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Best Noble title of All Time

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    1
    Earl of Onslow

    Earl of Onslow

    • Noble rank: Earl
    Earl of Onslow, of Onslow in the County of Shropshire, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1801 for George Onslow, 4th Baron Onslow. The Onslow family descends from Arthur Onslow, who represented Bramber, Sussex and Guildford in the House of Commons. He was the husband of Mary, daughter of Thomas Foote, Lord Mayor of London in 1649, who had been created a Baronet in 1660 (a title which became extinct on his death in 1687). In 1674 Onslow was himself created a Baronet in the Baronetage of England, with the precedence of 1660. Onslow was succeeded by his son, the second Baronet. He was a prominent politician and served as Speaker of the House of Commons from 1708 to 1710 and as Chancellor of the Exchequer from 1713 to 1714. In 1716 he was raised to the Peerage of Great Britain as Baron Onslow, of Onslow in the County of Shropshire and of Clandon in the County of Surrey, with remainder, failing male issue of his own, to his uncle Denzil Onslow, and afterwards, to the male heirs of his father. Lord Onslow was succeeded by his son, the second Baron. He sat as Member of Parliament for Gatton, Chichester, Bletchingley and Surrey and served as Lord Lieutenant
    8.63
    8 votes
    2
    Baron Churston

    Baron Churston

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Churston, of Churston Ferrers and Lupton in the County of Devon, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1858 for the former Conservative Member of Parliament, Sir John Yarde, 3rd Baronet. He had earlier represented South Devon in the House of Commons. Two years later, in 1860, he assumed by Royal license the additional surname of Buller. As of 2010 the titles are held by his great-great-great-grandson, the fifth Baron, who succeeded his father in 1991. The Baronetcy, of Churston Court in the County of Devon, was created in the Baronetage of Great Britain in 1790 for the lawyer Sir Francis Buller. He was the son of James Buller. The first Baronet's son, the second Baronet, represented Totnes in the House of Commons. In 1800, he assumed by Royal license the surname of Yarde. He was succeeded by his eldest son, the aforementioned third Baronet, who was elevated to the peerage in 1858. The Barons Churston are related to the Viscounts Dilhorne. Sir Edward Manningham-Buller, 1st Baronet, of Dilhorne, third son of Sir Francis Yarde, 2nd Baronet, of Churston Court, was the great-grandfather of Reginald Manningham-Buller, 1st Viscount Dilhorne. Also, Hon.
    7.25
    8 votes
    3
    Baron Abinger

    Baron Abinger

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Abinger, of Abinger in the County of Surrey and of the City of Norwich, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created on 12 January 1835 for the prominent lawyer and politician Sir James Scarlett, the Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer. Lord Abinger was succeeded by his eldest son, the second Baron. He represented Norwich and Horsham in the House of Commons. He was succeeded by his son, the third Baron. He was a lieutenant-general in the army and fought in the Crimean War. On the death of his son, the fourth Baron, the line of the eldest son of the first Baron failed. The late Baron was succeeded by his second cousin, the fifth Baron. He was the grandson of Hon. Peter Campbell Scarlett, third son of the first Baron. When he died the title passed to his younger brother, the sixth Baron, and then to another brother, the seventh Baron. As of 2010 the title is held by the latter's grandson, the ninth Baron, who succeeded his father in 2002. The Hon. Sir James Yorke Scarlett, second son of the first Baron, was a general in the army and fought in the Crimean War. The Hon. Mary Elizabeth, daughter of the first Baron, was created Baroness Stratheden in 1836. She was
    8.33
    6 votes
    4
    Earl of Macclesfield

    Earl of Macclesfield

    • Noble rank: Earl
    Earl of Macclesfield is a title that has been created twice. The first creation came in the Peerage of England in 1679 in favour of the soldier and politician Charles Gerard, 1st Baron Gerard. He had already been created Baron Gerard, of Brandon in the County of Suffolk, in 1645, and was made Viscount Brandon, of Brandon in the County of Suffolk, at the same time as he was given the earldom. These titles are also in the Peerage of England. Lord Macclesfield was the great-grandson of the distinguished judge Sir Gilbert Gerard, Master of the Rolls from 1581 to 1594. He was succeeded by his eldest son, the second Earl. He was involved in the Rye House Plot of 1683, was sentenced to death but later pardoned by the King. On his death without legitimate issue in 1701 the titles passed to his younger brother, the third Earl. He had earlier represented Yarmouth, Lancaster and Lancashire in the House of Commons. When he died in 1702 the titles became extinct. The second creation came in the Peerage of Great Britain in 1721 when the noted lawyer Thomas Parker, 1st Baron Parker, was made Viscount Parker, of Ewelm in the County of Oxford, and Earl of Macclesfield, in the County Palatine of
    8.17
    6 votes
    5
    Baron Carrington

    Baron Carrington

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Carrington is a title that has been created three times, once in the Peerage of England, once in the Peerage of Ireland and once in the Peerage of Great Britain. The first creation came in the Peerage of England in 1643 in favour of Sir Charles Smyth. Only a few days later he was created Viscount Carrington in the Peerage of Ireland. For more information, see this title. The second creation came in 1796 when Robert Smith was created Baron Carrington, of Bulcot Lodge, in the Peerage of Ireland. He had earlier represented Nottingham in the House of Commons. Only one year later, in 1797, he was made Baron Carrington, of Upton in the County of Nottingham, in the Peerage of Great Britain. His son, the second Baron, sat as a Member of Parliament for Wendover, Buckinghamshire and High Wycombe and served as Lord Lieutenant of Buckinghamshire. In 1880 he owned 25,809 acres (104.45 km) of land in Buckinghamshire, Lincolnshire and Bedfordshire, giving an annual rental income of £42,254 (John Bateman: "The Great Landowners of Great Britain and Ireland"). His son, the third Baron, was a prominent Liberal politician. He was created Viscount Wendover, of Chepping Wycombe in the County of
    6.13
    8 votes
    6
    Baron Lyttelton

    Baron Lyttelton

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Lord Lyttelton, Baron of Frankley, in the County of Worcester, is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain, created in 1794. Since 1889 it is a subsidiary title of the viscountcy of Cobham. The Lyttelton family descends from Thomas Lyttelton, who in 1618 he was created a Baronet, of Frankley in the County of Worcester, in the Baronetage of England. He later represented Worcestershire in the House of Commons. His son, the second Baronet, sat as Member of Parliament for Lichfield. On his death the titles passed to his younger brother, the third Baronet, He represented Bewdley in Parliament. He was succeeded by his son, the fourth Baronet. He was Member of Parliament for Worcester and Camelford. Lyttelton married Christian, daughter of Sir Richard Temple, 3rd Baronet, and sister of Richard Temple, 1st Viscount Cobham, and Hester Grenville, 1st Countess Temple. The viscountcy of Cobham and its junior title the barony of Cobham were created with remainder, failing male issue, to (1) Lord Cobham's eldest sister Hester Grenville (who succeeded as second Viscountess in 1749 and was created Earl Temple in 1750) and the heirs male of her body and (2) to his third sister Christian, with
    7.33
    6 votes
    7
    Marquess of Winchester

    Marquess of Winchester

    • Noble rank: Marquess
    Marquess of Winchester is a title in the Peerage of England. It was created in 1551 for the prominent statesman William Paulet, 1st Earl of Wiltshire. He had already been created Baron St John in 1539 and Earl of Wiltshire in 1550, also in the Peerage of England. The first Marquess was one of the most noted statesmen of his time, serving in high positions under Henry VIII and all his children, and served as Lord High Treasurer of England from 1550 to 1572. He was succeeded by his son, the second Marquess, who had been summoned to the House of Lords in his father's lifetime through a writ of acceleration in his father's junior title of Baron St John. His son, the third Marquess, was summoned to the House of Lords through a writ of acceleration as Lord St John in 1572. His grandson, the fifth Marquess, represented St Ives in the House of Commons. During the Civil War he was a strong supporter of King Charles I and became known as "the loyal Marquess". The family seat of Basing House was burnt to the ground by the Parliamentarians during the conflict. During this period, the courtesy title for the heirs apparent of the Marquesses was Baron St John; that of Earl of Wiltshire does not
    7.17
    6 votes
    8
    Baron Bolton

    Baron Bolton

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Bolton, of Bolton Castle in the County of York, is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1797 for the Tory politician Thomas Orde-Powlett, who had previously served as Chief Secretary for Ireland. Born Thomas Orde, he was the husband of Jean Mary Browne-Powlett, illegitimate daughter of Charles Powlett, 5th Duke of Bolton, who had entailed the greater part of his extensive estates to her in default of male issue of his younger brother Harry Powlett, 6th Duke of Bolton. The sixth Duke died without male heirs in 1794 when the dukedom became extinct and the Bolton estates passed to Thomas Orde in right of his wife. In 1795 he assumed the additional surname of Powlett. He was succeeded by his eldest son, the second Baron. He briefly represented Yarmouth in the House of Commons. On his death the title passed to his nephew, the third Baron. His grandson, the fifth Baron, sat as a Conservative Member of Parliament for Richmond and served as Lord Lieutenant of the North Riding of Yorkshire. As of 2010 the title is held by the latter's great-grandson, the eighth Baron, who succeeded his father in 2001. John Orde, younger brother of the first Baron Bolton, was an
    9.25
    4 votes
    9
    Baron Shuttleworth

    Baron Shuttleworth

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Shuttleworth, of Gawthorpe in the County Palatine of Lancaster, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created on 16 July 1902 for the Liberal politician Sir Ughtred Kay-Shuttleworth, 2nd Baronet. Both his sons were killed in the First World War and he was therefore succeeded by his grandson, the second Baron (eldest son of Hon. Lawrence Ughtred Kay-Shuttleworth, eldest son of the first Baron). However, both he and his brother, the third Baron, were killed in action during the Second World War. On the death of the third Baron in 1942 the titles passed to his first cousin, the fourth Baron (eldest son of the Hon. Edward Kay-Shuttleworth, second son of the first Baron), who survived the Second World War although he was badly wounded. As of 2010 the titles are held by the latter's son, the fifth Baron, who succeeded in 1975. He is Lord Lieutenant of Lancashire since 1997. The Kay-Shuttleworth Baronetcy, of Gawthorpe in the County Palatine of Lancaster, was created in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom in 1849 for the first Baronet, the physician, social reformer and educationalist James Kay-Shuttleworth. Born James Kay, he assumed by Royal license the
    9.25
    4 votes
    10
    Earl of Mansfield and Mansfield

    Earl of Mansfield and Mansfield

    • Noble rank: Earl
    Earl of Mansfield, in the County of Nottingham, and Earl of Mansfield, of Caen Wood in the County of Middlesex, are two titles in the Peerage of Great Britain that have been united under a single holder since 1843. They were created in 1776 and 1792 respectively for the Scottish lawyer and judge William Murray, 1st Baron Mansfield, fourth son of David Murray, 5th Viscount of Stormont (see the Viscount Stormont for earlier history of the family). He was Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench from 1756 to 1788. Murray had already been created Baron Mansfield, in the County of Nottingham, in the Peerage of Great Britain in 1756, with normal remainder to the heirs male of his body. The two earldoms were created with different remainders. The 1776 earldom was created with remainder to Lord Mansfield's niece Louisa Murray (née Cathcart), Viscountess Stormont (daughter of Charles Schaw Cathcart, 9th Lord Cathcart), second wife of his nephew David Murray, 7th Viscount Stormont, while the 1792 earldom was created with remainder to his nephew the Viscount Stormont. Lord Mansfield was childless and on his death in 1793 the barony became extinct. He was succeeded in the 1776 earldom according
    9.00
    4 votes
    11
    Earl Cadogan

    Earl Cadogan

    • Noble rank: Earl
    Earl Cadogan (pronounced /kəˈdʌɡən/) is a title that has been created twice in the Peerage of Great Britain. The Cadogan family descends from Major William Cadogan, a cavalry officer in Oliver Cromwell's army. His son Henry Cadogan was a barrister in Dublin. His eldest son William Cadogan was a noted soldier, politician and diplomat. He was a General in the Army and fought in the War of the Spanish Succession and also served as Ambassador to the Netherlands and as Master-General of the Ordnance. In 1716 he was raised to the Peerage of Great Britain as Baron Cadogan, of Reading in the County of Berkshire, with normal remainder to the heirs male of his body. In 1718 he was further honoured when he was made Baron Cadogan, of Oakley in the County of Buckingham, with remainder, failing heirs male of his own, to his younger brother Charles Cadogan and the heirs male of his body, and Viscount Caversham, in the County of Oxford, and Earl Cadogan, in the County of Denbigh, with remainder to the heirs male of his body. These titles were also in the Peerage of Great Britain. Lord Cadogan had two daughters but no sons and on his death in 1726 the barony of 1716, the viscountcy and earldom
    7.60
    5 votes
    12
    Marquess of Salisbury

    Marquess of Salisbury

    • Noble rank: Marquess
    Marquess of Salisbury is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1789 for the 7th Earl of Salisbury. Most of the holders of the title have been prominent in British political life over the last two centuries, particularly the 3rd Marquess, who served three times as Prime Minister in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This branch of the Cecil family descends from Sir Robert Cecil, the son of the prominent statesman the 1st Baron Burghley, from his second marriage, to Mildred Cooke. His elder half-brother the 2nd Baron Burghley, was created Earl of Exeter in 1605 and is the ancestor of the Marquesses of Exeter. Cecil notably served under Queen Elizabeth I and later King James I as Secretary of State, Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, Lord Privy Seal and Lord High Treasurer. In 1603 he was raised to the Peerage of England as Baron Cecil, of Essendon in the County of Rutland, and the following year he was created Viscount Cranborne. In 1605 he was further created Earl of Salisbury. The last two titles were also in the Peerage of England. The Earl of Salisbury was succeeded by his son, the second Earl. He represented Weymouth in the House of Commons and also
    6.50
    6 votes
    13
    Marquess of Waterford

    Marquess of Waterford

    • Noble rank: Marquess
    Marquess of Waterford is a title in the Peerage of Ireland and the premier marquessate in that peerage. It was created in 1789 for George Beresford, 2nd Earl of Tyrone. The Beresford family descends from Tristram Beresford, who originated from Kent but settled in Ireland in the 17th century. His eldest son Tristram Beresford sat as a member of the Irish House of Commons. On 5 May 1665 he was created a baronet, of Coleraine in the County of Londonderry, in the Baronetage of Ireland. His great-grandson (the title having descended from father to son), the fourth Baronet, married Lady Catherine, oldest daughter of James de la Poer, 3rd Earl of Tyrone (see Earl of Tyrone). In 1720 he was raised in the Peerage of Ireland as Baron Beresford, of Beresford, in the County of Cavan, and Viscount Tyrone. He was further honoured when he was made Earl of Tyrone in the Peerage of Ireland in 1746. In 1767, four years after his death, the Dowager Countess of Tyrone was confirmed with the hereditary peerage title Baroness La Poer in the Peerage of Ireland (created by writ ca. 1650). Lord Tyrone was succeeded by his fourth but eldest surviving son, the second Earl, who also inherited the title Baron
    6.50
    6 votes
    14
    Baron Rothschild

    Baron Rothschild

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Rothschild, of Tring in the County of Hertford, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1885 for Sir Nathan Rothschild, 2nd Baronet, a member of the Rothschild banking family. He was the first person of the Jewish faith to be raised to the peerage. (Benjamin Disraeli, though born into a Jewish family, was a member of the Church of England.) The Rothschild Baronetcy, of Tring Park, was created in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom in 1847 for Anthony de Rothschild, a banker and politician, with remainder to the male issue of his elder brother, Lionel de Rothschild, the first ever Member of Parliament of the Jewish faith. Both Anthony and Lionel were the sons of the influential financier Nathan Mayer Rothschild (1777–1836) founder of the English branch of the family. The first Baronet was succeeded according to the special remainder by his nephew, the aforementioned second Baronet, who was elevated to the peerage in 1885. The latter was succeeded by his eldest son, Walter, the second Baron. He was a banker and politician but is best remembered for his interest in zoology. He died without issue, and his brother had predeceased him, so on his death
    9.67
    3 votes
    15
    Baron Teignmouth

    Baron Teignmouth

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Teignmouth was a title in the Peerage of Ireland. It was created in 1798 for Sir John Shore, 1st Baronet, previously Governor-General of India. He had already been created a Baronet in the Baronetage of Great Britain in 1794. The titles became extinct in 1981 on the death of the seventh Baron.
    8.25
    4 votes
    16
    Baron Wrenbury

    Baron Wrenbury

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Wrenbury, of Old Castle, Dallington in the County of Sussex, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1915 for the barrister and judge Sir Henry Buckley. He served as a Judge of the High Court of Justice and as a Lord Justice of Appeal. As of 2010 the title is held by his grandson, the third Baron, who succeeded his father in 1940. The Hon. Sir Denys Buckley, younger son of the first Baron, was also a Judge of the High Court of Justice and Lord Justice of Appeal.
    8.25
    4 votes
    17
    Marquess of Exeter

    Marquess of Exeter

    • Noble rank: Marquess
    Marquess of Exeter is a title that has been created twice, once in the Peerage of England and once in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. The first creation came in the Peerage of England in 1525 for Henry Courtenay, 2nd Earl of Devon. For more information on this creation, which was forfeited in 1538, see the Earl of Devon. The title is chiefly associated with the Cecil family, descended from the courtier Richard Cecil of the parish of Stamford Baron St Martin in Northamptonshire. His only son, Sir William Cecil, was a prominent statesman and served as Secretary of State, Lord High Treasurer and Lord Privy Seal. In 1571 he was created Baron Burghley, in the County of Northampton, in the Peerage of England. His son from his second marriage to Mildred Cooke, Sir Robert Cecil, was created Earl of Salisbury in 1605 and is the ancestor of the Marquesses of Salisbury. Lord Burghley was succeeded by his son from his first marriage to Mary Cheke, Thomas, the second Baron. He represented Stamford, Lincolnshire and Northamptonshire in the House of Commons, served as Lord Lieutenant of Yorkshire and as President of the Council of the North and was also a distinguished soldier. In 1605 he was
    8.25
    4 votes
    18
    Baron Farnham

    Baron Farnham

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Farnham, of Farnham in the County of Cavan, is a title in the Peerage of Ireland. It was created in 1756 for John Maxwell, who had previously represented Cavan Borough in the Irish House of Commons. John Maxwell's son, the second Baron, was created Viscount Farnham in 1760 and Earl of Farnham in 1763. Both titles were in the Peerage of Ireland but became extinct when he died childless in 1779. His brother and successor, the third Baron, was again created Viscount Farnham in 1781 and Earl of Farnham in 1785. These titles were also in the Peerage of Ireland. His son, the second Earl, sat in the House of Lords as an Irish Representative Peer from 1816 to 1823. However, he had no children and on his death in 1823 the viscountcy and earldom became extinct. He was succeeded in the barony by his first cousin, the fifth Baron. He was the eldest son of The Most Rev. The Hon. Henry Maxwell, Lord Bishop of Meath, third son of the first Baron. Lord Farnham sat as a Member of Parliament for County Cavan and was an Irish Representative Peer in the House of Lords from 1825 to 1838. His nephew, the seventh Baron (who succeeded his father in 1838), also represented County Cavan in the House
    6.17
    6 votes
    19
    Baron Merthyr

    Baron Merthyr

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Merthyr, of Senghenydd in the County of Glamorgan, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1911 for the Welsh coal mining magnate Sir William Lewis, 1st Baronet. He had already been created a baronet, of Nantgwyne in the County of Glamorgan, in 1896. The barony is named after the town of Merthyr Tydfil, where Lewis was born. Lord Merthyr's grandson, the third Baron, was Chairman of Committees in the House of Lords from 1957 to 1965 and a Deputy Speaker from 1957 to 1974. The latter was succeeded by his son, the fourth Baron. He disclaimed the peerage for life on 26 April 1977, three weeks after succeeding his father. He does not use his title of baronet either. The Hon. Robin Lewis, fourth son of the third Baron, was appointed Lord Lieutenant of Dyfed in December 2006, although this was not officially reported in the London Gazette until September 2007. The heir apparent is the present holder's son, David Trevor Lewis (born 1977)
    7.00
    5 votes
    20
    Baron Wynford

    Baron Wynford

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Wynford, of Wynford Eagle in the County of Dorset, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1829 for the politician and lawyer Sir William Best. He served as Chief Justice of the Common Pleas from 1824 to 1829. His eldest son, the second Baron, represented Mitchell (also known as St Michael's) in the House of Commons from 1831 to 1832, when the constituency was abolished. On the death of his younger son, the fourth Baron, this line of the family failed. The late Baron was succeeded by his first cousin, the fifth Baron. He was the son of Reverend the Hon. Samuel Best, third son of the first Baron. As of 2010 the title is held by his great-grandson, the ninth Baron, who succeeded his father in 2002. The heir apparent is the present holder's only son the Hon. Harry Robert Francis Best (b. 1987)
    6.00
    6 votes
    21
    Earl of Guilford

    Earl of Guilford

    • Noble rank: Earl
    Earl of Guilford is a title that has been created three times in British history. The title was created for the first time in the Peerage of England in 1660 (as Countess of Guilford) for Elizabeth Boyle. She was the daughter of William Feilding, 1st Earl of Denbigh, and the widow of Lewis Boyle, 1st Viscount Boyle of Kinalmeaky. The title was for life only and became extinct on her death in 1667. The title was created for a second time in the Peerage of England in 1674 for John Maitland, 1st Duke of Lauderdale. For more information on this creation, see the article on him as well as the Earl of Lauderdale. Despite these earlier creations the title of Earl of Guilford is chiefly associated with one branch of the North family. This branch of the family descends from the prominent lawyer and politician the Hon. Sir Francis North, second son of Dudley North, 4th Baron North (see the Baron North for earlier history of the family). He was Chief Justice of the Common Pleas from 1675 to 1682 and Lord Keeper of the Great Seal from 1682 to 1685. In 1683 he was created Baron Guilford, of Guilford (now spelled Guildford) in the County of Surrey, in the Peerage of England. He died at an early
    6.80
    5 votes
    22
    Baron Gifford

    Baron Gifford

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Gifford, of St Leonard's in the County of Devon, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1824 for the lawyer Sir Robert Gifford, who later served as Master of the Rolls. His grandson, the third Baron, was a soldier and colonial administrator and was awarded the Victoria Cross in 1874. On his death the title passed to his younger brother, the fourth Baron, and then to their nephew, the fifth Baron. As of 2010 the title is held by the latter's son, the sixth Baron, who succeeded in 1961. He is a barrister. The Hon. Maurice Gifford, fourth son of the second Baron, was a soldier. The family surname and the title of the barony are pronounced "Jifford". The heir apparent is the present holder's son the Hon. Thomas Adam Gifford (b. 1967)
    9.00
    3 votes
    23
    Baron Southampton

    Baron Southampton

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Southampton, of Southampton in the County of Southampton, is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1780 for the soldier and politician Charles FitzRoy. He was the third son of Lord Augustus FitzRoy, second son of Charles FitzRoy, 2nd Duke of Grafton, while Prime Minister Augustus FitzRoy, 3rd Duke of Grafton was his elder brother. Lord Southampton was also the great-great-grandson (through an illegitimate line) of King Charles II by his mistress Barbara Palmer, 1st Duchess of Cleveland. The Southampton title had previously been created for Charles FitzRoy, eldest natural son of Charles II and the Duchess of Cleveland and the elder brother of Henry FitzRoy, 1st Duke of Grafton, but had become extinct in 1774 on the death of his son William FitzRoy, 3rd Duke of Cleveland and 2nd Duke of Southampton, six years before the creation of the barony of Southampton. The first Baron Southampton's grandson, the third Baron, notably served as Lord-Lieutenant of Northamptonshire from 1867 to 1872. Lord Southampton was succeeded by his eldest son, the fourth Baron. He held the title for 86 years and 144 days, the second longest time anyone has held a peerage (the only
    9.00
    3 votes
    24
    Count of Flanders

    Count of Flanders

    • Noble rank: Count
    The Count of Flanders was the ruler or sub-ruler of the county of Flanders from the 9th century until the abolition of the position by the French revolutionaries in 1790. Although the early rulers, from Arnulf I onwards, were sometime referred to as margraves or marquesses, this alternate title largely fell out of use by the 12th century. Since then the rulers of Flanders have only been referred to as counts. The Counts of Flanders enlarged their estate through a series of diplomatic manoeuvres. The counties of Hainaut, Namur, Béthune, Nevers, Auxerre, Rethel, Burgundy, and Artois were acquired via marriage with the respective heiresses. The County of Flanders itself suffered the same fate. By the marriage of Countess Margaret III with Philip II, Duke of Burgundy, the county and the subsidiary counties entered a personal union with the Duchy of Burgundy in 1405. The county itself ceased to exist in 1795. Charles V proclaimed the Pragmatic Sanction of 1549 eternally uniting Flanders with the other lordships of the Low Countries in a personal union. When the Habsburg empire was divided among the heirs of Charles V, the Low Countries, including Flanders, went to Philip II of Spain, of
    9.00
    3 votes
    25
    Baron Coleridge

    Baron Coleridge

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Coleridge, of Ottery St Mary in the County of Devon, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1874 for the prominent lawyer, judge and Liberal politician Sir John Coleridge. He served as Lord Chief Justice of England from 1880 to 1894. His son, the second Baron, represented Attercliffe in the House of Commons and served as a Judge of the High Court of Justice. As of 2010 the title is held by the latter's great-grandson, the fifth Baron, who succeeded in 1984. The first Baron was the son of Sir John Taylor Coleridge and the great-nephew of the poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge. The ancestral home of the Coleridge family is The Chanter's House in Ottery St Mary. In October 2006 the increasing costs of maintaining the property caused the family trust to put the property up for sale and auction the contents. The heir apparent is the present holder's only son The Hon. James Duke Coleridge (b. 1967)
    7.75
    4 votes
    26
    Baron Henniker

    Baron Henniker

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Henniker, of Stratford-upon-Slaney in the County of Wicklow, is a title in the Peerage of Ireland. It was created in 1800 for Sir John Henniker, 2nd Baronet, who had previously represented Sudbury and Dover in the House of Commons. His son, the second Baron, also sat as a Member of Parliament. In 1792 he assumed by Royal license the additional surname of Major (which was that of his maternal grandfather; see below). He was childless and was succeeded by his nephew, the third Baron. He assumed the additional surname of Major by Royal license in 1822. His son, the fourth Baron, represented Suffolk East in Parliament. In 1866 he was created Baron Hartismere, of Hartismere in the County of Suffolk, in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. This title gave him and his descendants an automatic seat in the House of Lords. He was succeeded by his son, the fifth Baron. He also sat as Member of Parliament for Suffolk East and later held minor office in the Conservative administrations of Benjamin Disraeli and Lord Salisbury. His grandson, the eighth Baron, was a prominent diplomat and notably served as British Ambassador to Jordan and to Denmark. As of 2010 the titles are held by his son,
    7.75
    4 votes
    27
    Sultan of Perak

    Sultan of Perak

    • Noble rank: Sultan
    Sultan of Perak is one of the oldest hereditary seats among the Malay states. When the Sultanate of Malacca empire fell to Portugal in 1511, Sultan Mahmud Syah I retreated to Kampar, Sumatra and died there in 1528. He left behind two princes named Sultan Alauddin Riayat Shah II and Sultan Muzaffar Syah. The former later went to establish the Sultanate of Johor. Meanwhile Muzaffar Syah was invited to rule Perak and hence, he became the first sultan of Perak. The current sultan of Perak is the descendant of Siak Sultanate of Sumatra. Malacca Dynasty Siak Dynasty
    7.75
    4 votes
    28
    Baron Acton

    Baron Acton

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Acton, of Aldenham in the County of Shropshire, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created on 11 December 1869 for the prominent historian and Liberal Member of Parliament Sir John Dalberg-Acton, 8th Baronet. His son, the second Baron, was a diplomat and also held minor office in the Liberal administrations of Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman and H. H. Asquith. In 1919 he assumed by Royal license the additional surname of Lyon, which was that of his father-in-law. His son, the third Baron, sold the family home in 1947 and settled in Rhodesia. The fourth Baron, who succeeded his father in 1989, lost his seat in the House of Lords after the passing of the House of Lords Act 1999. However, on 17 April 2000 he was created a life peer as Baron Acton of Bridgnorth, of Aldenham in the County of Shropshire. Consequently, Lord Acton was able to return to the House of Lords where he sat on the Labour benches. He died in 2010 and was succeeded by his son. The Acton Baronetcy, of Aldenham in the County of Shropshire, was created in the Baronetage of England on 17 January 1644 for Edward Acton. He represented Bridgnorth in both the Short Parliament and the Long Parliament
    6.60
    5 votes
    29
    Baron Herschell

    Baron Herschell

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Herschell, of the City of Durham, was a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1886 for the lawyer and Liberal politician Sir Farrer Herschell. He served as Lord Chancellor in 1886 and from 1892 to 1895. The title became extinct on the death of his grandson, the third Baron, in 2008. Ridley Haim Herschell was the father of the first Baron.
    6.60
    5 votes
    30
    Baron Ravensdale

    Baron Ravensdale

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Ravensdale, of Ravensdale in the County of Derby, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created on 2 November 1911 for the Conservative politician George Curzon, 1st Baron Curzon, with remainder, in default of issue male, to his eldest daughter and the heirs male of her body, failing whom to his other daughters in like manner in order of primogeniture. Curzon was created Viscount Scarsdale and Earl Curzon of Kedleston at the same time. The viscounty was created with special remainder to the heirs male of his father while the earldom was created with normal remainder to heirs male. Curzon had already in 1898 been created Baron Curzon of Kedleston in the Peerage of Ireland (the last Irish peerage to be created), with remainder to heirs male. In 1916 he succeeded his father as fifth Baron Scarsdale and in 1921 he was further honoured when he was made Earl of Kedleston and Marquess Curzon of Kedleston, with remainder to heirs male. Lord Curzon died without male issue in 1925 and the barony of Curzon of Kedleston, the two earldoms and the marquessate thus became extinct. He was succeeded in the viscountcy of Scarsdale according to the special remainder by his
    6.60
    5 votes
    31
    Baron Birdwood

    Baron Birdwood

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Birdwood, of Anzac and of Totnes in the County of Devon, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created on 25 January 1938 for Sir William Birdwood, 1st Baronet. He is chiefly remembered as the commander of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) during the Battle of Gallipoli in 1915. Birdwood had already been created a Baronet, of Anzac and Totnes, on 6 October 1919. As of 2010 the titles are held by his grandson, the third Baron, who succeeded his father in 1962. The politician Jane Birdwood, Baroness Birdwood, was the second wife of the second Baron. Come With Kashmir Travel The heraldic blazon for the coat of arms of the barony is: Azure, five martlets, two, two and one, within an inescutcheon voided a representation of the Southern Cross, all argent. There is no heir to the barony and baronetcy.
    7.50
    4 votes
    32
    Baron Braybrooke

    Baron Braybrooke

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Lord Braybrooke, Baron of Braybrooke, in the County of Northampton, is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1788 for John Whitwell, 4th Baron Howard de Walden, with remainder to his kinsman Richard Neville-Aldworth. Lord Howard de Walden was the son of William Whitwell and Anne Griffin, daughter of James Griffin, 2nd Baron Griffin of Braybrooke, who was the son of Edward Griffin, 1st Baron Griffin of Braybrooke, and his wife Lady Essex Howard, eldest daughter of James Howard, 3rd Earl of Suffolk and 3rd Baron Howard de Walden. In 1749 Whitwell assumed the surname of Griffin, and the same year he was elected to Parliament for Andover, a seat he held until 1784. The latter year the barony of Howard de Walden, which had been in abeyance since the death of his great-great-grandfather the third Earl of Suffolk in 1689, was called out of abeyance in favour of him, and he was summoned to the House of Lords as the fourth Baron Howard de Walden. Moreover, the barony of Griffin of Braybrooke held by his maternal ancestors had become extinct on the death of his uncle, the third Baron, in 1743. In 1788 the Braybrooke title was revived when Griffin was created Baron
    7.50
    4 votes
    33
    Baron Dufferin and Claneboye

    Baron Dufferin and Claneboye

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Dufferin and Claneboye, of Ballyleidy and Killyleagh in County Down, is a title in the Peerage of Ireland. It was created 31 July 1800 for Dame Dorcas Blackwood, widow of Sir John Blackwood, 2nd Baronet, Member of the Irish Parliament for Killyleagh and Bangor. The peerage had been intended for Sir John in return for his support for the Union with the Kingdom of Great Britain. The Baronetcy, of Killyleagh in the County of Down, was created in the Baronetage of Ireland in 1763 for Robert Blackwood, the father of Sir John Blackwood. He was the son of John Blackwood and Ursula Hamilton, the daughter and co-heir of Robert Hamilton of Killyleagh, County Down. The Blackwood family, originally of Scottish descent, were prominent landowners in County Down and controlled the borough constituency of Killyleagh in the Irish Parliament. Lady Dufferin and Claneboye was the daughter of James Stevenson, son of Colonel Hans Stevenson and Anne Hamilton, daughter of James Hamilton, son of Archibald Hamilton, of Halcraig, Lanarkshire, brother of James Hamilton, 1st Viscount Claneboye. Her great-grandfather James Hamilton had become the sole heir of Lord Claneboye when the first Viscount's
    7.50
    4 votes
    34
    Baron Hampton

    Baron Hampton

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Hampton, of Hampton Lovett and of Westwood in the County of Worcester, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1874 for the Conservative politician Sir John Pakington, 1st Baronet. He had previously represented Droitwich in the House of Commons served as Secretary of State for War and as First Lord of the Admiralty. Pakington had already been created a Baronet in 1846. Born John Somerset Russell, he had assumed by Royal license the surname of Pakington in lieu of Russell in 1830 on inherited the estates of his maternal uncle Sir John Pakington, 8th and last Baronet, of Ailesbury. He was succeeded by his eldest son, the second Baronet. On his death in 1893 the title passed to his half-brother, the third Baron. The title then descended to his second but eldest surviving son, the fourth Baron, and then to the latter's younger brother, the fifth Baron. The fifth Baron's son, the sixth Baron, sat as a Liberal member of the House of Lords and was the party's Spokesman on Northern Ireland in the House of Lords from 1977 to 1987. As of 2010 the titles are held by his son, the seventh Baron, who succeeded in 2003. As of 30 June 2006, the present holder of
    7.50
    4 votes
    35
    Baron Morris

    Baron Morris

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Morris, of St John’s in the Dominion of Newfoundland and of the City of Waterford, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1918 for the lawyer and politician Sir Edward Morris upon his retirement as Premier of Newfoundland. As of 2012 the title is held by his great-grandson, the fourth Baron, who succeeded his father in 2011. The heir presumptive is the present holder's brother, Hon. James Morris (b. 1983).
    8.67
    3 votes
    36
    Earl of Bristol

    Earl of Bristol

    • Noble rank: Earl
    Earl of Bristol is a title that has been created twice in British history. The first creation came in the Peerage of England in 1622 in favour of the politician and diplomat John Digby who served for many years as Ambassador to Spain, and had already been created Baron Digby of Sherborne, in the County of Dorset, in 1618, also in the Peerage of England. Digby was the brother of Sir Robert Digby of Coleshill, Warwickshire, whose son also Robert Digby became 1st Baron Digby of Geashill in the Peerage of Ireland in 1620. (See the article Baron Digby for more information on this other branch of the family). He was succeeded by his son, the second Earl. He was a prominent statesman and served as Secretary of State for King Charles I. In 1641 he was summoned to the House of Lords through a writ of acceleration in his father's junior title of Baron Digby of Sherborne. When he died the titles passed to his son, the third Earl. He sat as Member of Parliament for Dorset and served as Lord-Lieutenant of Dorset. He was childless and the titles became extinct on his death in 1698. The second creation of the earldom came in the Peerage of Great Britain in 1714. For more information on this
    8.67
    3 votes
    37
    Earl of Romney

    Earl of Romney

    • Noble rank: Earl
    Earl of Romney (pronounced "Rumney") is a title that has been created twice. It was first created in the Peerage of England in 1694 in favour of the soldier and politician Henry Sydney. He had been made Baron Milton and Viscount Sidney at the same time in 1689. Sydney was the younger son of Robert Sidney, 2nd Earl of Leicester. He never married and the titles became extinct on his death in 1704. It was created for the second time in the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1801 in favour of Charles Marsham, 3rd Baron Romney. The Marsham family descends from Sir John Marsham, one of the six Clerks of the Court of Chancery from 1638 to 1644 and from 1660 to 1680. In 1663 he was created a Baronet, of Cuckston in the County of Kent, in the Baronetage of England. His grandson, the fourth Baronet (who succeeded his nephew), was also a Clerk of the Court of Chancery and represented Maidstone in the House of Commons. His son, the fifth Baronet, also sat as Member of Parliament for Maidstone and served as Governor of Dover Castle. In 1716 he was raised to the Peerage of Great Britain as Baron of Romney, of Romney in the County of Kent. His grandson, the aforementioned third Baron, represented
    8.67
    3 votes
    38
    Marquess of Donegall

    Marquess of Donegall

    • Noble rank: Marquess
    Marquess of Donegall is a title in the Peerage of Ireland held by the head of the Chichester family, originally from Devon, England. Sir John Chichester sat as a Member of Parliament and was High Sheriff of Devon in 1557. One of his sons, Sir Arthur Chichester, was Lord Deputy of Ireland from 1604 to 1615. In 1613 he was raised to the Peerage of Ireland as Baron Chichester, of Belfast in the County of Antrim. He died childless in 1625 when the barony became extinct. However, already the same year the Chichester title was revived in favour of his younger brother, Edward Chichester, who was made Baron Chichester, of Belfast in the County of Antrim, and Viscount Chichester, of Carrickfergus in the County of Antrim. Both titles are in the Peerage of Ireland. He was succeeded by his eldest son, the second Viscount. A distinguished soldier, he was created Earl of Donegall in the Peerage of Ireland in 1647 (one year before he succeeded his father), with remainder to the heirs male of his father. He died without male issue and was succeeded (in the earldom according to the special remainder) by his nephew Arthur Chichester, the second Earl. He was the eldest son of Lieutenant-Colonel John
    8.67
    3 votes
    39
    Baron Wilson

    Baron Wilson

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Wilson, of Libya and of Stowlangtoft in the County of Suffolk, was a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1946 for the prominent military commander Field Marshal Sir Henry Maitland Wilson. The title became extinct on the death of only son, the second Baron, in 2009.
    10.00
    2 votes
    40
    Viscount Bolingbroke

    Viscount Bolingbroke

    • Noble rank: Viscount
    Viscount Bolingbroke is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain and is currently held by Nick St John who lives in Sydney, Australia and grew up in New Zealand. It was created in 1712 for the Hon. Henry St John. He was made Baron St John, of Lydiard Tregoze in the County of Wilts, at the same time, also in the Peerage of Great Britain. Since 1751 the titles are merged with the titles of Viscount St John and Baron of Battersea, in the County of Surrey, both also in the Peerage of Great Britain. John St John (d. 1648) was the great-great-great-grandson of Oliver St John (d. 1497) (whose elder brother Sir John St John (d. c. 1488) was the ancestor of the Barons St John of Bletsoe and Earls of Bolingbroke), second son of Sir Oliver St John (d. 1437), the husband of Margaret, great-great-granddaughter of Roger de Beauchamp, 1st Baron Beauchamp of Bletshoe (d. 1380). His uncle was Oliver St John, 1st Viscount Grandison (a title now held by the Earl of Jersey). On 22 May 1611 he was created a Baronet, of Lydiard Tregoze in the County of Wilts, in the Baronetage of England. St John later represented Wiltshire in Parliament and was a strong supporter of King Charles I during the Civil War.
    6.40
    5 votes
    41
    Baron Chetwode

    Baron Chetwode

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Chetwode, of Chetwode in the County of Buckingham, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1945 for the noted military commander Field Marshal Sir Philip Chetwode, 7th Baronet. As of 2010 the titles are held by his grandson, the second Baron, who succeeded in 1950. He is the eldest son of Captain Roger Charles George Chetwode, who was killed in the Second World War. The Baronetcy, of Oakley in the County of Stafford, was created in the Baronetage of England on 6 April 1700 for the first Baron's great-great-great-great-grandfather John Chetwode, of Oakley Hall, Staffordshire. His great-grandson, the fourth Baronet, represented Newcastle-under-Lyme and Buckingham in the House of Commons. His son, the fifth Baronet, married Elizabeth Juliana Newdigate-Ludford, daughter of John Newdigate-Ludford, and in 1826 he assumed by Royal license the additional surnames of Newdigate-Ludford. He was succeeded by his nephew, the sixth Baronet. He was a Colonel in the Army. On the latter's death in 1905 the title passed to his son, the aforementioned seventh Baronet, who was elevated to the peerage in 1945 The heir apparent is the present holder's son the Hon. Roger
    7.25
    4 votes
    42
    Duke of Manchester

    Duke of Manchester

    • Noble rank: Duke
    Duke of Manchester is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1719 for the politician Charles Montagu, 4th Earl of Manchester. The Royal and Ducal House of Montagu is descended from Drogo de Montaigu, who was a companion of William, Duke of Normandy alias William the Conqueror. Montaigu participated in the Norman conquest of England in 1066, which subsequently would remove the native ruling class, replacing it with a foreign, French-speaking aristocracy, to which the Montagus themselves belonged. In 1333 William I de Montacute became Sovereign King of Mann, establishing the Royal House of Montagu. The judge Sir Edward Montagu's (c. 1485–1557) grandson, Sir Henry Montagu (c. 1563–1642), who served as Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench as well as Lord High Treasurer of England and Lord Privy Seal, was in 1620 raised to the Peerage of England as Baron Montagu of Kimbolton, of Kimbolton in the County of Huntingdon, and as Viscount Mandeville. In 1626 he was further honoured when he was created Earl of Manchester, also this in the Peerage of England. His son, the 2nd Earl, was a prominent Parliamentary General during the Civil War, but later supported the
    7.25
    4 votes
    43
    Duke of Windsor

    Duke of Windsor

    • Noble rank: Duke
    Duke of Windsor was a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1937, for Prince Edward, the former King Edward VIII, following his abdication in December 1936. The dukedom takes its name from the town where Windsor Castle, a residence of English monarchs since the Norman Conquest, is situated. Windsor had been the house name of the Royal Family since 1917. Edward had abdicated on 11 December 1936, so that he could marry the American divorcée Wallis Simpson, whom upon their marriage became The Duchess of Windsor. At the time of the abdication, there was controversy as to how the ex-King should be titled – other possibilities were the Dukedoms of Cambridge or Connaught, though neither was likely because the Marquessate of Cambridge and the Dukedom of Connaught were both extant at the time. One of George III's younger sons had borne the title Duke of Sussex, but for unknown reasons that specific title has never been resurrected and, so far as is known, no consideration was given to conferring it upon the abdicated king in 1936. Although the Duke of Connaught was also Earl of Sussex, that title was not in active use as his heir Prince Arthur of Connaught was known
    7.25
    4 votes
    44
    Baron Boston

    Baron Boston

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Boston, of Boston in the County of Lincoln, is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1761 for the court official and former Member of Parliament, Sir William Irby, 2nd Baronet. He had earlier represented Launceston and Bodmin in the House of Commons. He was the son of Edward Irby, Member of Parliament for Boston, who was created a baronet, of Whapload and Boston in the County of Lincoln, in the Baronetage of Great Britain in 1704. Lord Boston's son, the second Baron, was a Lord of the Bedchamber to both George III and George IV. The title followed the line of his eldest son, the third Baron, until the death of the latter's great-great-grandson, the eighth Baron, in 1972. The late Baron was succeeded by his third cousin once removed, the ninth Baron. He was the great-grandson of Rear-Admiral the Hon. Frederick Paul Irby, second son of the second Baron. As of 2010 the title is held by his grandson, the eleventh Baron, who succeeded his father in 2007. The family seat was Hedsor House, Hedsor, Buckinghamshire. The family also owned Llanidan Hall and land at Lligwy in Moelfre, Anglesey, Wales. The heir apparent is the present holder's son the Hon. Tom Irby
    8.33
    3 votes
    45
    Marquess of Downshire

    Marquess of Downshire

    • Noble rank: Marquess
    Marquess of Downshire is a title in the Peerage of Ireland. It was created in 1789 for Wills Hill, 1st Earl of Hillsborough, a former Secretary of State. Hill had already been created Earl of Hillsborough and Viscount Kilwarlin of County Down in the Peerage of Ireland in 1751 with remainder, in default of male issue of his own, to his uncle Arthur Hill, 1st Viscount Dungannon. He was further created Lord Harwich, Baron of Harwich, in the County of Essex, in the Peerage of Great Britain in 1756 with a seat in the House of Lords. In 1772 he was further ennobled as Earl of Hillsborough and Viscount Fairford in the County of Gloucester in the Peerage of Great Britain. Downshire was the eldest son of Trevor Hill, who had been created Viscount Hillsborough and Baron Hill of Kilwarlin of County Down, in the Peerage of Ireland in 1717, with remainder, in default of male issue of his own, to the male issue of his father, Michael Hill. Trevor Hill was the brother of the aforementioned Arthur Hill, 1st Viscount Dungannon. Among many other estates, the Marquess owned Hillsborough Castle, the Blessington Estate in Co. Wicklow and Easthampstead Park near Bracknell. The Marquesses are also
    8.33
    3 votes
    46
    Baron Burton

    Baron Burton

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Burton, of Burton-on-Trent and of Rangemore in the County of Stafford, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1897 for the prominent brewer, philanthropist and Liberal politician Michael Bass, 1st Baron Burton. He had already been created a baronet in 1882 and Baron Burton in 1886. However, the three titles had different remainders. The Bass family descended from William Bass, who founded the brewery business of Bass & Co in Burton upon Trent in 1777. His grandson Michael Thomas Bass transformed the company into one of the largest breweries in the United Kingdom. He also represented Derby in Parliament as a Liberal for thirty-five years and was a great benefactor to the town of Burton. However, Bass declined every honour offered to him, including a baronetcy and a peerage. His son, Michael Arthur Bass, was also involved with the family business (which now had become Bass, Ratcliff, Gretton and Co), and sat as Liberal Member of Parliament for Stafford, East Staffordshire and Burton. Like his father he was also a benefactor of Burton. In 1882 Bass was created a baronet, of Stafford in the County of Stafford, in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom.
    6.20
    5 votes
    47
    Baron Clinton

    Baron Clinton

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Clinton is a title in the Peerage of England. It was created in 1298 for John de Clinton. The peerage was created by writ, which means that it can descend through both male and female lines. It is thus one of the most ancient English titles still in existence. The first Baron's great-great-great-grandson, the fifth Baron, fought on the Yorkist side in the Wars of the Roses. He was attainted in 1461 but late restored to his title. His great-great-grandson, the ninth Baron, was created Earl of Lincoln in 1572. The titles remained united until 1692 upon the death of his great-great-great-grandson, Edward de Clinton, fifth Earl of Lincoln and 13th Baron Clinton. The earldom was inherited by the late Earl's cousin, the sixth Earl (see the Earl of Lincoln for later history of this title) while the barony fell into abeyance between the issue of his two aunts, Lady Margaret Clinton (d.1688) and Lady Arabella Clinton, the daughters of Theophilus de Clinton, 4th Earl of Lincoln and 12th Baron Clinton. The abeyance of 1692 was terminated in 1721 in favour of Hugh Fortescue (d.1751), fourteenth Baron Clinton, the grandson of Lady Margaret Clinton (d.1688), the eldest daughter of
    9.50
    2 votes
    48
    Baron de Clifford

    Baron de Clifford

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron de Clifford is a title in the Peerage of England. It was created in 1299 for Robert de Clifford. The title was created by writ, which means that it can descend through both male and female lines. The de Clifford family settled in England after the Norman conquest and were a notable family in late medieval England. The first Baron notably served as Earl Marshal of England but was killed at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314. His great-great-great-great-great-great-grandson, the eleventh Baron, was created Earl of Cumberland in 1525. His grandson, the third Earl, was a noted naval commander. On his death in 1605 the earldom passed to his younger brother, the fourth Earl (see the Earl of Cumberland for later history of this title). The barony of de Clifford was claimed in 1628 by his daughter and only child, Anne, but the House of Lords postponed the hearing. The barony remained dormant until 1678, when Nicholas Tufton, 3rd Earl of Thanet, was allowed to claim the peerage and became the fifteenth Baron de Clifford. He was the son of Lady Margaret Sackville, daughter of the aforementioned Anne. On the death in 1721 of the Earl's younger brother, the sixth Earl, the earldom and
    9.50
    2 votes
    49
    Baron Faringdon

    Baron Faringdon

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Faringdon, of Buscot Park in the County of Berkshire, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1916 for Sir Alexander Henderson, 1st Baronet, who had previously represented Stafford West and St George's, Hanover Square in the House of Commons as a Liberal Unionist. He had already been created a baronet in 1902. He was succeeded by his grandson, the second Baron. He was the son of the Hon. Harold Henderson, eldest son of the first Baron, who predeceased his father. Lord Faringdon was a member of the London County Council. As of 2010 the titles are held by his nephew, the third Baron, who succeeded in 1977. He is the son of the Hon. Michael Thomas Handerson, second son of the Hon. Harold Henderson. The family seat is Buscot Park, near Faringdon in Oxfordshire. The heir apparent is the present holder's son the Hon. James Harold Henderson (born 1961)
    9.50
    2 votes
    50
    Baron St Oswald

    Baron St Oswald

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron St Oswald, of Nostell in the County of York, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1885 for the industrialist and Conservative politician Rowland Winn, a former Member of Parliament for North Lincolnshire. His son, the second Baron, represented Pontefract in the House of Commons. His grandson, the fourth Baron, held junior ministerial positions in the Conservative administrations of Harold Macmillan and Alec Douglas-Home and also sat as a Member of the European Parliament. As of 2010 the title is held by the latter's nephew, the sixth Baron, who succeeded his father in 1999. The family seat is Nostell Priory in Yorkshire. The house was handed over to the National Trust in 1953 but is still the home of the Barons St Oswald.
    9.50
    2 votes
    51
    Duke of St Albans

    Duke of St Albans

    • Noble rank: Duke
    Duke of St Albans is a title in the Peerage of England. It was created in 1684 for Charles Beauclerk, 1st Earl of Burford, then fourteen years old. King Charles II had accepted that Burford was his illegitimate son by Eleanor Gwynn (commonly known as 'Nell') an actress, and awarded him the Dukedom just as he had awarded the Dukedoms of Monmouth, Richmond, Lennox, Southampton and Grafton on his other illegitimate sons. The subsidiary titles of the Duke are: Earl of Burford, in the County of Oxford (1676), Baron Heddington, in the County of Oxford (1676) and Baron Vere, of Hanworth in the County of Middlesex (1750). The Earldom and the Barony of Heddington are in the Peerage of England, and the Barony of Vere is in the Peerage of Great Britain. The Dukes of St Albans also bear the hereditary title of Grand Falconer of England, and Hereditary Registrar of the Court of Chancery. The eldest son and heir of the Duke of St Albans is known by the courtesy title Earl of Burford, and Lord Burford's eldest son and heir is known as Lord Vere. Recent Dukes of St Albans have not held a landed estate. Former seats of the Dukes of St Albans were Bestwood in Nottinghamshire and Upper Gatton in
    9.50
    2 votes
    52
    Duke of Sutherland

    Duke of Sutherland

    • Noble rank: Duke
    Duke of Sutherland is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom held by the head of the Leveson-Gower family. It was created by William IV in 1833 for George Leveson-Gower, 2nd Marquess of Stafford. A series of marriages to heiresses by members of the Leveson-Gower family made the Dukes of Sutherland one of the richest landowning families in the United Kingdom. The subsidiary titles of the Duke of Sutherland are: Marquess of Stafford (created 1786), Earl Gower (1746), Earl of Ellesmere, of Ellesmere in the County of Shropshire (1846), Viscount Trentham, of Trentham in the County of Stafford (1746), Viscount Brackley, of Brackley in the County of Northampton (1846), and Baron Gower, of Sittenham in the County of York (1703). The marquessate of Stafford, the earldom of Gower and the viscounty of Trentham are in the Peerage of Great Britain, the dukedom, the earldom of Ellesmere and the viscounty of Brackley in the Peerage of the United Kingdom, and the barony of Gower in the Peerage of England. The Duke is also a Baronet, of Sittenham in the County of York, a title created in the Baronetage of England in 1620. Between 1839 and 1963 the Dukes also held the titles of Lord
    9.50
    2 votes
    53
    Baron Rossmore

    Baron Rossmore

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Rossmore, of Monaghan in the County of Monaghan, is a title in the Peerage of Ireland. It was created in 1796 for the soldier Robert Cuninghame, with remainder to his wife Elizabeth's nephews Henry Alexander Jones (the son of Theophilus Jones and Anne Murray, eldest sister of Elizabeth; Henry Alexander Jones died childless before his uncle Lord Rossmore) and Warner William Westenra and Henry Westenra, sons of Henry Westenra and Harriet Murray, youngest sister of Elizabeth. Cuninghame was a General in the Army and served as Commander-in-Chief of Ireland. From January to August 1801 he also sat in the House of Lords as an Irish Representative Peer. Lord Rossmore died childless and was succeeded according to the special remainder by his nephew Warner William Westenra, the second Baron. He represented Monaghan in the British House of Commons and also served as Lord Lieutenant of Monaghan from 1831 to 1842. In 1838 he was created Baron Rossmore, of the County of Monaghan, in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. This gave the barons an automatic seat in the House of Lords. His eldest son, the third Baron, represented Monaghan in Parliament as a Whig and was Lord Lieutenant of
    7.00
    4 votes
    54
    Earl of Carnarvon

    Earl of Carnarvon

    • Noble rank: Earl
    Earl of Carnarvon is a title that has been created three times in British history. The first creation came in the Peerage of England in 1628 in favour of Robert Dormer, 2nd Baron Dormer. For more information on this creation, which became extinct in 1709, see the Baron Dormer. The title was created again in 1714 in the Peerage of Great Britain for James Brydges, 9th Baron Chandos. In 1719 he was further honoured when he was made Marquess of Carnarvon and Duke of Chandos. For more information on this creation, which became extinct in 1789, see the Duke of Chandos. The title was created for a third time in the Peerage of Great Britain in 1793 for Henry Herbert, 1st Baron Porchester. The precise form of this creation was Earl of the Town and County of Carnarvon, in the Principality of Wales, although in practice only the style of Earl of Carnarvon is used. He had previously represented Wilton in the House of Commons and had already in 1780 been created Baron Porchester, of High Clere in the County of Southampton (also in the Peerage of Great Britain). Herbert was the son of Major-General the Hon. William Herbert, fifth son of Thomas Herbert, 8th Earl of Pembroke. He was succeeded by
    6.00
    5 votes
    55
    Baron Hankey

    Baron Hankey

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Hankey, of The Chart in the County of Surrey, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1939 for the civil servant Sir Maurice Hankey, Cabinet Secretary from 1920 to 1938. His eldest son, the second Baron, was a diplomat and served as British Ambassador to Sweden between 1954 to 1960. As of 2010 the title is held by the latter's eldest son, the third Baron, who succeeded in 1996. He is an architect. Donald Hankey, brother of the first Baron, was a soldier best known for two volumes of essays about the British volunteer army in the First World War. The Hon. Henry Hankey, third son of the first Baron, was British Ambassador to Panama between 1966 and 1969.
    8.00
    3 votes
    56
    Baron Brownlow

    Baron Brownlow

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Brownlow, of Belton in the County of Lincoln, is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1776 for Sir Brownlow Cust, 4th Baronet. The Cust family descends from Richard Cust who represented Lincolnshire and Stamford in Parliament. In 1677 he was created a baronet, of Stamford in the County of Lincoln. He was succeeded by his grandson, the second Baronet. He married Anne Brownlow, daughter of Sir William Brownlow, 4th Baronet, of Humby and sister and sole heiress of John Brownlow, 1st Viscount Tyrconnel (and 5th Baronet, of Humby). The second Baronet's son, the third Baronet, sat as a Member of Parliament for Grantham and served as Speaker of the House of Commons from 1761 to 1770. In 1754 Cust inherited the Brownlow estates on the death of his maternal uncle Lord Tyrconnel. His son, the fourth Baronet, represented Ilchester and Grantham in Parliament. In 1776 he was raised to the peerage as Baron Brownlow, of Belton in the County of Lincoln, chiefly in recognition of his father's services, and chose the title of the barony from the surname held by his grandmother's ancestors. He was succeeded by his son, the second Baron. He sat as Member of Parliament for
    6.75
    4 votes
    57
    Baron Hotham

    Baron Hotham

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Hotham, of South Dalton in the County of York, is a title in the Peerage of Ireland. It was created in 1797 for the naval commander Admiral William Hotham, with remainder to the heirs male of his father. Hotham was the third son of Sir Beaumont Hotham, 7th Baronet, of Scorborough (see below), and in 1811 he also succeeded his nephew as eleventh Baronet. Lord Hotham never married and on his death in 1813 he was succeeded in both titles by his younger brother Beaumont, the second Baron and twelfth Baronet. He had previously represented Wigan in the House of Commons. Beaumont Hotham, 3rd Baron Hotham, grandson of the first Baron, fought at the Battle of Waterloo and was later a General in the Army and sat as a Member of Parliament. He died unmarried and was succeeded by his nephew, the fourth Baron, the son of Rear-Admiral George Frederick Hotham, brother of the third Baron. He, like his successor and younger brother, the fifth Baron, died unmarried. The latter was succeeded by his first cousin once removed, the sixth Baron. He was the son of Reverend William Francis Hotham, second son of the second Baron. On the death of the sixth Baron, that line of the family also failed and
    6.75
    4 votes
    58
    Baron Shaughnessy

    Baron Shaughnessy

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Shaughnessy, of the City of Montreal in the Dominion of Canada and of Ashford in the County of Limerick, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1916 for the businessman and public servant Thomas Shaughnessy, president of the Canadian Pacific Railway Company. He was succeeded by his eldest son, the second Baron, a Director of the CPR and of the Canadian Bank of Commerce. His son, the third Baron, was a businessman and was also active in the House of Lords. However, he lost his hereditary seat in parliament after the House of Lords Act 1999. The line of the eldest son of the first Baron failed on the death of the third Baron's son, the fourth Baron, in 2007. The late Baron was succeeded by his second cousin, the fifth Baron, who is better known as the actor Charles Shaughnessy, star of the American TV comedy The Nanny and the soap opera Days of Our Lives. The fifth Baron's late father was Alfred Shaughnessy, a scriptwriter and producer, and son of the Hon. Alfred Shaughnessy, younger son of the first Baron. The heir presumptive to the title is David Shaughnessy, younger brother of the fifth Baron, an actor and producer. The heir presumptive is the
    6.75
    4 votes
    59
    Baron Decies

    Baron Decies

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Decies, of Decies in the County of Waterford, is a title in the Peerage of Ireland. It was created in 1812 for the Right Reverend William Beresford, Archbishop of Tuam from 1794 to 1819. He was the third son of the Marcus Beresford, 1st Earl of Tyrone, and the younger brother of the George Beresford, 1st Marquess of Waterford. His son, the second Baron, married Charlotta Philadelphia Horsley, only daughter and heiress of Robert Horsley, and assumed the additional surname of Horsley in 1810. However, none of the subsequent barons have held this surname. His grandson, the fifth Baron, was a Major in the Army and also sat in the House of Lords as an Irish Representative Peer from 1912 to 1944. As of 2010 the title is held by his grandson, the seventh Baron, who succeeded his father in 1992. As a descendant of the first Earl of Tyrone he is also in remainder to this peerage and its subsidiary titles, which are now held by his kinsman the Marquess of Waterford. The heir apparent is the present holder's eldest son, the Hon. Robert Marcus Duncan de la Poer Beresford (b. 1988)
    9.00
    2 votes
    60
    Baron Rodney

    Baron Rodney

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Rodney, of Rodney Stoke in the County of Somerset, is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1782 for the naval commander Sir George Brydges Rodney, 1st Baronet. He had previously been created a Baronet, of Alresford in the County of Southampton, in the Baronetage of Great Britain on 22 January, 1764. His son, the second Baron, represented Northampton in Parliament. He was succeeded by his eldest son, the third Baron. He served as Lord Lieutenant of Radnorshire. His younger brother, the fourth Baron, assumed by Royal license the additional surname of Harley in 1804. On his death the titles passed to his younger brother, the fifth Baron. He was Rector of Elmley in Kent. He was succeeded by his nephew, the sixth Baron. He was the son of Captain the Hon. Robert Rodney, fourth son of the second Baron. The sixth Baron's great-grandson, the ninth Baron, was an active member of the House of Lords and served as a Delegate to the Council of Europe and the Western European Union. As of 2011 the titles are held by the latter's grandson, the eleventh Baron, who succeeded in 2011.
    9.00
    2 votes
    61
    Baron St Leonards

    Baron St Leonards

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron St Leonards, of Slaugham in the County of Sussex, was a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1852 for Sir Edward Sugden, Lord Chancellor in Lord Derby's 1852 administration. He was succeeded by his grandson, the second Baron. He was the son of the Honourable Henry Sugden, eldest son of the first Baron. He was succeeded by his nephew, the third Baron. He was the son of the Hon. Henry Frank Sugden, next brother of the second Baron. The title became extinct on the early death of the fourth Baron in 1985.
    9.00
    2 votes
    62
    Baron Ashburton

    Baron Ashburton

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Ashburton, of Ashburton in the County of Devon, is a title that has been created twice, once in the Peerage of Great Britain and once in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. Since 1835, the title has been held by members of the Baring family. The first creation came in the Peerage of Great Britain 1782 in favour of the barrister and Whig politician, Sir John Dunning. This creation became extinct in 1823 on the death of his son, the second Baron. The title was revived in the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1835 for the financier and Tory politician Alexander Baring. He was the first cousin of the last holder of the 1782 creation. A member of the distinguished Baring family, Lord Ashburton was the second son of Sir Francis Baring, 1st Baronet, the uncle of Francis Baring, 1st Baron Northbrook, Evelyn Baring, 1st Earl of Cromer and Edward Baring, 1st Baron Revelstoke, and the great-uncle of Thomas Baring, 1st Earl of Northbrook and Evelyn Baring, 1st Baron Howick of Glendale. Lord Ashburton was succeeded by his eldest son, the second Baron. He held office in the second Tory administration of Sir Robert Peel. His younger brother, the third Baron, represented Thetford in the House
    5.80
    5 votes
    63
    Baron Westbury

    Baron Westbury

    • Noble rank: Baron
    The Baron Westbury, of Westbury in the County of Wiltshire, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1861 for the lawyer and Liberal politician Richard Bethell on his appointment as Lord Chancellor, a post he held until 1865. The title descended in the direct line until the death of his great-great-grandson, the fourth baron (who succeeded his grandfather), in 1961. The fourth baron was succeeded by his younger brother, the fifth baron. He was equerry to His Royal Highness Prince Henry, Duke of Gloucester from 1947 to 1949 and also served as Deputy Lieutenant of North Yorkshire in 1973. As of 2010 the title is held by his son, the sixth baron, who succeeded in 2001.
    5.80
    5 votes
    64
    Viscount Gage

    Viscount Gage

    • Noble rank: Viscount
    Viscount Gage, of Castle Island in the County of Kerry of the Kingdom of Ireland, is a title in the Peerage of Ireland. It was created in 1720 for Thomas Gage, along with the subsidiary title of Baron Gage, of Castlebar in the County of Mayo, also in the Peerage of Ireland. In 1744 he also succeeded his cousin as eighth Baronet, of Firle Place. The titles remain united. The Gage family descends from John Gage, who was created a baronet, of Firle Place in the County of Sussex, in the Baronetage of England on 26 March 1622. His great-grandson, the seventh Baronet, represented Seaford in Parliament. He was succeeded by his first cousin, Thomas Gage, 1st Viscount Gage, the eighth Baronet. He sat as a Member of Parliament for Minehead and Tewkesbury and also served as Governor of Barbados. In 1720, 24 years before succeeding in the baronetcy, he was raised to the Peerage of Ireland as Baron Gage and Viscount Gage. His second son was the military commander the Hon. Sir Thomas Gage. Lord Gage was succeeded by his eldest son, the second Viscount. He represented Seaford in the House of Commons and served as for many years as Paymaster of Pensions. In 1780 he was created Baron Gage, of Firle
    5.80
    5 votes
    65
    Baron Glentoran

    Baron Glentoran

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Glentoran, of Ballyalloly in the County of Down, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created on July 8, 1939 for the Unionist politician Herbert Dixon. In 1950 he also succeeded his elder brother as third Baronet, of Ballymenock (see below). His son, the second Baron, was also a politician and served as the last Speaker of the Senate of Northern Ireland. As of 2010 the titles are held by the latter's son, Robin Dixon, the third Baron, who succeeded in 1995. He is a former Olympic Bobsleigh gold medallist as well as a soldier, businessman and politician. Lord Glentoran is one of the ninety elected hereditary peers that remain in the House of Lords after the passing of the House of Lords Act of 1999, and sits on the Conservative benches. The Dixon Baronetcy, of Ballymenock in the County of Antrim, was created in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom in 1903 for Daniel Dixon. He served as Lord Mayor of Belfast and also represented Belfast North in the House of Commons. His eldest son, the second Baronet, was a member of the Senate of Northern Ireland and also served as Lord Lieutenant of Belfast. On his death in 1950 the title passed to his younger brother,
    7.67
    3 votes
    66
    Baron Keyes

    Baron Keyes

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Keyes, of Zeebrugge, and Dover in the County of Kent, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1943 for the prominent naval commander Admiral of the Fleet Sir Roger Keyes, 1st Baronet. He is chiefly remembered for his role in the Zeebrugge Raid in 1918, an attempt by the Royal Navy to neutralize the Belgian port of Zeebrugge which was used as a base for German submarine attacks on Allied shipping. Keyes had already been created a Baronet, of Zeebrugge, and of Dover in the County of Kent, in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom in 1919. As of 2010 the titles are held by his grandson, the third Baron, who succeeded his father in 2005. He does not use his title. Geoffrey Charles Tasker Keyes, eldest son of the first Baron, was killed in 1941 during an attempt to capture General Erwin Rommel in Libya. For his actions, Keyes was posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross. The heir presumptive is the present holder's brother the Hon. Leopold Roger John Keyes (b. 1956)
    7.67
    3 votes
    67
    Baron Methuen

    Baron Methuen

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Methuen, of Corsham in the County of Wiltshire, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1838 for the former Member of Parliament for Wiltshire and Wiltshire North, Paul Methuen. His grandson, the third Baron (who succeeded his father), was a distinguished soldier. His son, the fourth Baron, was a professional artist and Royal Academician. On his death the title passed to his younger brother, the fifth Baron. As of 2010 the title is held by the latter's younger son, the seventh Baron, who succeeded his elder brother in 1994. Lord Methuen is one of the ninety hereditary peers elected to the House of Lords after the passage of the House of Lords Act 1999, and sits on the Liberal Democrat benches. The first Baron's grandfather, Paul Methuen, was the cousin and heir of the wealthy Sir Paul Methuen, a well-known politician, courtier, diplomat and patron of art and literature, who was the son of John Methuen (c. 1650–1706), Lord Chancellor of Ireland between 1697 and 1703 and ambassador to Portugal. It was the last-named who in 1703 negotiated the famous Methuen Treaty, which, in return for the admission of English woollens into Portugal, granted
    7.67
    3 votes
    68
    Baron Stafford

    Baron Stafford

    • Noble rank: Baron
    The title Baron Stafford, referring to Stafford, has been created several times in the Peerage of England. In the 14th century, the barons of the 1st creation were made earls. Those of the fifth creation, in the century became first viscounts and then earls. The first creation was by writ in 1299 for Edmond de Stafford. His successor, the second baron, was made an earl, and the sixth earl was made Duke of Buckingham. The second Duke of Buckingham was executed for treason and his titles were declared forfeit. His son was restored as third Duke, but he, too, was executed for treason, forfeiting his titles. A second creation, again by writ, was for Richard Stafford, who was created Baron Stafford of Clifton. At the death of the fourth baron, that title fell into abeyance. The next creation was for Sir Hugh Stafford, son of Hugh Stafford, 2nd Earl of Stafford in 1411; he had married Elizabeth Bouchier, who succeeded to the Barony of Bouchier. Hugh was summoned to parliament in lieu of his wife, as Baron Stafford. At his death, this title became extinct since he left no heirs. The fourth creation was in 1547 for Henry Stafford. In 1558, his title was recognized as carrying precedence
    7.67
    3 votes
    69
    Earl of Clarendon

    Earl of Clarendon

    • Noble rank: Earl
    Earl of Clarendon is a title that has been created twice in British history, in 1661 and 1776. The title was created for the first time in the Peerage of England in 1661 for the statesman Edward Hyde, 1st Baron Hyde. He was Chancellor of the Exchequer from 1643 to 1646 and Lord Chancellor from 1658 to 1667 and a close political adviser to Charles II, although he later fell out of favour and was forced into exile. Hyde had already been created Baron Hyde, of Hindon in the County of Wiltshire, in 1660, and was made Viscount Cornbury, in the County of Oxford, at the same time he was given the earldom. These titles were also in the Peerage of England. His second son the Hon. Laurence Hyde was also a politician and was created Earl of Rochester in 1682. Lord Clarendon's daughter Lady Anne Hyde married the future King James II and was the mother of Queen Mary II and Queen Anne. Lord Clarendon was succeeded by his eldest son Henry, the second Earl. He was also a politician and served as Lord Privy Seal and Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. His son, the third Earl, represented Wiltshire and Christchurch in the House of Commons and served as Governor of New York, before succeeding to the earldom;
    7.67
    3 votes
    70
    Earl of Hardwicke

    Earl of Hardwicke

    • Noble rank: Earl
    Earl of Hardwicke is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1754 for Philip Yorke, 1st Baron Hardwicke, Lord Chancellor of Great Britain from 1737 to 1756. He had already been created Baron Hardwicke, of Hardwicke in the County of Gloucester, in 1733, and was made Viscount Royston at the same time as he was given the earldom. These titles were also in the Peerage of Great Britain. He was succeeded by his eldest son, the second Earl. He represented Reigate and Cambridgeshire in the House of Commons and served as Lord Lieutenant of Cambridgeshire. Lord Hardwicke married Lady Jemima Campbell, only daughter of John Campbell, 3rd Earl of Breadalbane, and granddaughter and heiress of Henry Grey, 1st Duke of Kent, who succeeded her grandfather as Marchioness Grey in 1722 (a title which became extinct on her death). They had two daughters of whom the eldest, Lady Amabel, was created Countess De Grey in her own right in 1816. Lord Hardwicke was succeeded by his nephew, the third Earl. He was the son of the Hon. Charles Yorke, second son of the first Earl. He was a prominent politician and served as Lord Lieutenant of Ireland between 1801 and 1805. Lord Hardwicke died
    7.67
    3 votes
    71
    Marquess of Linlithgow

    Marquess of Linlithgow

    • Noble rank: Marquess
    Marquess of Linlithgow, in the County of Linlithgow or West Lothian, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1902 for John Hope, 7th Earl of Hopetoun. This branch of the Hope family descends from Sir Charles Hope, grandson of Sir James Hope, sixth son of Sir Thomas Hope, 1st Baronet, of Craighall (see Hope baronets). In 1703 he was created Lord Hope, Viscount of Aithrie and Earl of Hopetoun in the Peerage of Scotland, with remainder to the heirs male and female of his body. He later served as Lord Lieutenant of Linlithgowshire and as Governor of the Bank of Scotland. Lord Hopetoun married Lady Henrietta, only surviving daughter of William Johnstone, 1st Marquess of Annandale (died 1721). He was succeeded by his eldest son, the second Earl. In 1763 he succeeded his kinsman as fourth Baronet, of Kirkliston (see Hope baronets for earlier history of this title). His son from his first marriage, the third Earl, served as Lord Lieutenant of Linlithgowshire from 1794 to 1816 and sat in the House of Lords as a Scottish Representative Peer from 1784 to 1794. In 1792 Lord Hopetoun succeeded his great-uncle as de jure fifth Earl of Annandale and Hartfell, although
    7.67
    3 votes
    72
    Marquess of Zetland

    Marquess of Zetland

    • Noble rank: Marquess
    Marquess of Zetland is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created on 22 August 1892 for the former Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, Lawrence Dundas, 3rd Earl of Zetland. Zetland is an archaic spelling of Shetland. The Dundas family descends from the wealthy Scottish businessman and Member of Parliament, Lawrence Dundas. In 1762 he was created a Baronet, of Kerse in the County of Linlithgow, in the Baronetage of Great Britain. The title was created with remainder, failing heirs male of his own, to his brother Thomas Dundas and the heirs male of his body. He was succeeded by his son, the second Baronet. He represented Richmond and Stirling in the House of Commons and also served as Lord Lieutenant of Orkney and Shetland. In 1794 he was created Baron Dundas, of Aske in the County of York, in the Peerage of Great Britain. Lord Dundas notably purchased the right to the earldom of Orkney and lordship of Zetland from James Douglas, 14th Earl of Morton. His son, the second Baron, was a Member of Parliament for Richmond and also served as Lord Lieutenant of Orkney and Shetland. In 1838 he was created Earl of Zetland in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. He was succeeded by his
    7.67
    3 votes
    73
    Ban of Croatia

    Ban of Croatia

    • Noble rank: Ban
    Ban of Croatia (Croatian: Hrvatski ban) was the title of local rulers and after 1102 viceroys of Croatia. From earliest periods of Croatian state, some provinces were ruled by Bans as a rulers representative (viceroy) and supreme military commander. In the 18th century, Croatian bans eventually become chief government officials in Croatia. They were at the head of Ban's Government, effectively the first prime ministers of Croatia. The institution of ban in Croatia persisted until the 20th century. South Slavic ban (Croatian pronunciation: [bâːn], with a long [a]) is a result of the contraction from the earlier form bojan. The long form is directly attested in 10th-century Constantine Porphyrogenitus' book De Administrando Imperio as βο(ε)άνος, in a chapter dedicated to Croats and the organisation of their state, describing how their ban "has under his rule Krbava, Lika and Gacka". References from the earliest periods are scarce, but history recalls that the first known Croatian ban is Pribina in the 10th century (in 949 and in 969). Ban on his territory was pursuing administrative, judicial and military authority. The meaning of the title was elevated to that of provincial governor
    10.00
    1 votes
    74
    Baron Dowding

    Baron Dowding

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Dowding, of Bentley Priory in the County of Middlesex, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1943 for the noted air commander Air Chief Marshal Sir Hugh Dowding. He was commander of the RAF Fighter Command during the Battle of Britain in 1940. As of 2010 the title is held by his grandson, the third Baron, who succeeded his father in 1992. The heir presumptive is the present holder's only brother the Honourable Mark Dennis James Dowding (b. 1949) The heir presumptive's heir apparent is his only son Alexander Dowding (b. 1983)
    10.00
    1 votes
    75
    Baron Fisher

    Baron Fisher

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Fisher of Kilverstone, in the County of Norfolk, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1909 for the noted naval reformer Admiral of the Fleet Sir Jackie Fisher. His son, the second Baron, assumed in 1909 by Royal license the additional surname of Vavasseur. As of 2010 the title is held by the latter's son, the third Baron, who succeeded in 1955. The heir apparent is the present holder's son the Hon. Patrick Vavasseur Fisher (b. 1953)
    10.00
    1 votes
    76
    Baron Walpole

    Baron Walpole

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Walpole, of Walpole in the County of Norfolk, is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. The holders of the peerage also held the titles of Baron Walpole, of Houghton in the County of Norfolk, Viscount Walpole and Earl of Orford (second creation) from 1745 to 1797, the title of Earl of Orford (third creation) from 1806 to 1931 and the title of Baron Clinton from 1781 to 1791. Additionally, since 1797 the title is merged with the title of Baron Walpole of Wolterton. The title of Baron Walpole, of Walpole in the County of Norfolk, was created in the Peerage of Great Britain in 1723 for Robert Walpole, in honour of his father, Sir Robert Walpole, known as the first Prime Minister of Great Britain. The peerage was created with remainder, failing male issue of his own, to his brothers Edward Walpole and Horace Walpole, in default thereof to the heirs male of his father, and in default thereof to the heirs male of his grandfather Sir Thomas Walpole. On Sir Robert Walpole's retirement from the House of Commons in 1742, he was himself raised to the Peerage of Great Britain as Baron Walpole, of Houghton in the County of Norfolk, Viscount Walpole and Earl of Orford, with remainder to
    10.00
    1 votes
    77
    Baron Zouche

    Baron Zouche

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Zouche is a title that has been created three times in the Peerage of England. The de la Zouche family descended from Alan de la Zouche, sometimes called Alan de Porhoët and Alan la Coche (c. 1136–1190), a Breton who settled in England during the reign of Henry II. He was the son of Vicomte Geoffrey I de Porhoët and Hawisa of Brittany. He married Adeline (Alice) de Belmeis, daughter of Phillip de Belmeis and Maud la Meschine and died at North Molton in North Devon. He obtained Ashby in Leicestershire (called after him Ashby-de-la-Zouch) by his marriage. His son was Roger la Zouche (c. 1175 – bef. 14 May 1238). Roger La Zouche became the father of Alan la Zouche (1205–1270) and Eudo La Zouche. Alan was justice of Chester and justice of Ireland under Henry III of England. He was loyal to the king during the struggle with the barons, fought at the Battle of Lewes and helped to arrange the peace of Kenilworth. As the result of a quarrel over some lands with John de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey, he was seriously injured in Westminster Hall by the earl and his retainers, and died on August 10, 1270. Eudo La Zouche married Millicent de Cantilupe. Alan's grandson, Alan la Zouche, was
    10.00
    1 votes
    78
    Duke of Hamilton

    Duke of Hamilton

    • Noble rank: Duke
    Duke of Hamilton is a title in the Peerage of Scotland, created in 1643. It is the senior dukedom in that Peerage (except for the Dukedom of Rothesay held by the Sovereign's eldest son), and as such its holder is the Premier Peer of Scotland, as well as being head of both the House of Hamilton and the House of Douglas. The title, the town of Hamilton in Lanarkshire, and many places around the world are named for members of the Hamilton family. The Ducal family's surname, originally "Hamilton", is now "Douglas-Hamilton". Since 1711, the Dukedom has been held together with the Dukedom of Brandon in the Peerage of Great Britain, and the Dukes since that time have been styled Duke of Hamilton and Brandon. The titles held by the current Duke of Hamilton and Brandon are: The Duke of Hamilton and Brandon is Hereditary Keeper of the Palace of Holyroodhouse, the official royal residence in Scotland, where he maintains large private quarters. He is also, as Lord Abernethy, and in this respect successor to the Gaelic Earls of Fife, the Hereditary Bearer of the Crown of Scotland, a role which the 15th Duke performed at the inauguration of the Scottish Parliament in 1999, as did the 16th Duke
    10.00
    1 votes
    79
    Baron Manners

    Baron Manners

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Manners, of Foston in the County of Lincoln, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1807 for the lawyer and politician Sir Thomas Manners-Sutton. He served as Solicitor-General from 1802 to 1805 and as Lord Chancellor of Ireland from 1807 to 1827. Manners-Sutton was the fifth son of Lord George Manners-Sutton, third son of John Manners, 3rd Duke of Rutland. His elder brother Charles Manners-Sutton was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1805 to 1828 and the father of Charles Manners-Sutton, 1st Viscount Canterbury, Speaker of the House of Commons from 1817 to 1834. The first Baron's great-grandson, the fourth Baron, assumed the surname of Manners only. As of 2010 the title is held by the latter's grandson, the sixth Baron, who succeeded his father in 2008. As a descendant of the third Duke of Rutland he is also in remainder to this peerage and its subsidiary titles. The heir apparent is the present holder's son, Hon. John Alexander David Manners (b. 2011). Categroy:Living people
    6.50
    4 votes
    80
    Earl of Winchilsea

    Earl of Winchilsea

    • Noble rank: Earl
    Earl of Winchilsea and Earl of Nottingham are two titles in the Peerage of England held by the Finch family that have been united under a single holder since 1729. The Finch family is believed to be descended from Henry FitzHerbert, Lord Chamberlain to King Henry I (r. 1100–1135). The name change came in the 1350s after marriage to an heiress member of the Finch family. A later member of the family, Sir William Finch, was knighted in 1513. His son Sir Thomas Finch (died 1563), was also knighted for his share in suppressing Sir Thomas Wyatt's insurrection against Queen Mary I, and was the son-in-law of Sir Thomas Moyle, some of whose lands Finch's wife inherited. Thomas's eldest son Moyle Finch represented Weymouth, Kent and Winchilsea in the House of Commons. In 1611 he was created a baronet, of Eastwell in the County of Kent. Finch married Elizabeth Heneage, only daughter of Sir Thomas Heneage (1533–1595), Vice-Chamberlain of the Household to Queen Elizabeth I. After Sir Moyle's death in 1614 Elizabeth and her sons made considerable efforts to have the family's status elevated. On 8 July 1623 Elizabeth was raised to the Peerage of England as Viscountess Maidstone, and on 12 July
    6.50
    4 votes
    81
    Baron Braye

    Baron Braye

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Braye, of Eaton Bray in the County of Bedford, is a title in the Peerage of England. It was created in 1529 for Sir Edmund Braye. The barony was created by writ, which means that it can descend through both male and female lines. He was succeeded by his son, the second Baron. He died from wounds received at the Battle of St Quentin in 1557. Lord Braye was childless and on his death the title fell into abeyance between his sisters. It remained in abeyance for 282 years until the abeyance was terminated in 1839 in favour of Sarah Otway-Cave, who became the third Baroness Braye. She was the wife of Henry Otway and only daughter of Sir Thomas Cave, 6th Baronet, of Stanford, grandson of Sir Thomas Cave, 3rd Baronet, of Stanford, and his wife the Hon. Margaret Verney, daughter of John Verney, 1st Viscount Fermanagh, great-great-grandson of Hon. Elizabeth Verney, second daughter of the first Baron Braye, and her husband Sir Ralph Verney. In 1819 she assumed by Royal license the additional surname of Cave. When she died in 1862 the barony fell into abeyance between her four daughters. In 1879 the abeyance was terminated in favour of the last surviving daughter, Henrietta, the fourth
    8.50
    2 votes
    82
    Baron Cawley

    Baron Cawley

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Cawley, of Prestwich in the County Palatine of Lancaster, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1918 for the Liberal politician Sir Frederick Cawley, 1st Baronet. He had previously represented Prestwich in the House of Commons and served as Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster from 1916 to 1918. Before his elevation to the peerage, Cawley had been created a Baronet, of Prestwich in the County Palatine of Lancaster, in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom, in 1906. His grandson, the third Baron, notably served as Deputy Chairman of Committees in the House of Lords from 1958 to 1967. As of 2011 the titles are held by the latter's eldest son, the fourth Baron, who succeeded in 2001. The Honourable Harold Thomas Cawley, second son of the first Baron, and the Honourable Oswald Cawley, fourth son of the first Baron, were both Liberal politicians. The former seat of the Cawley family was Berrington Hall near Leominster in Herefordshire.
    8.50
    2 votes
    83
    Baron Digby

    Baron Digby

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Digby, of Geashill in the King's County, is a title in the Peerage of Ireland. It was created in 1620 for Robert Digby, Governor of King's County. He was the nephew of John Digby, 1st Earl of Bristol. Lord Digby's grandson, the third Baron, and the latter's younger brothers the fourth and fifth Barons, all represented Warwick in Parliament. The fifth Baron's grandson, the sixth Baron, sat as a Member of Parliament for Malmesbury and for Wells. His younger brother, the seventh Baron, represented Ludgershall and Wells in the House of Commons. In 1765 he was created Baron Digby, of Sherborne in the County of Dorset, in the Peerage of Great Britain, with remainder to the issue male of his father. In 1790 Lord Digby was further honoured when he was made Viscount Coleshill and Earl Digby in the Peerage of Great Britain, with remainder to the issue male of his body. His son, the second Earl, was Lord Lieutenant of Dorset from 1808 to 1856. He never married and on his death in 1856 the viscountcy and earldom became extinct. However, he was succeeded in the two baronies by his first cousin twice removed, the ninth Baron. He was the son of Admiral Sir Henry Digby, son of the Very
    8.50
    2 votes
    84
    Duke of Normandy

    Duke of Normandy

    • Noble rank: Duke
    The Duke of Normandy is the title of the reigning monarch of the crown dependencies of the Bailiwick of Guernsey and the Bailiwick of Jersey. The title traces its roots to the Duchy of Normandy (of which the Channel Islands are remnants). Whether the reigning sovereign is male or female, the title remains "Duke of Normandy". The fiefdom of Normandy was created in 911 for the Viking leader Rollo (also known as Rolf). After participating in many Viking incursions along the Seine, culminating in the siege of Paris in 886, Rollo was finally defeated by King Charles the Simple. With the Treaty of St.-Claire-sur-Epte, Rollo accepted to become a vassal to Charles III of France, converted to Christianity and was baptized with the name Robert. Charles then granted Rollo territories around Rouen, which came to be called Normandy after the Northmen (Latin Normanni). Rollo and his immediate successors were styled as "counts" of Normandy. Some later medieval sources refer to them by the title dux, the Latin word from which the English word "duke" is derived; however, Rollo's great-grandson Richard II was the first to assuredly be styled "Duke of Normandy". Although certain titles were used
    8.50
    2 votes
    85
    Baron Ashcombe

    Baron Ashcombe

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Ashcombe, of Dorking in the County of Surrey and of Bodiam Castle in the County of Sussex, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1892 for the Conservative politician George Cubitt. He was the son of the architect Thomas Cubitt. Lord Ashcombe was succeeded by his son, the second Baron. He was a Conservative Member of Parliament and also served as Lord Lieutenant of Surrey. As of 2010, the title is held by his grandson, the fourth Baron, who succeeded his father in 1962. The Hon. Rosalind Maud Cubitt, daughter of the third Baron, was the mother of Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall. Bodiam Castle in East Sussex was purchased by the first Baron in 1874. However, it was sold in 1916. The family seat was then at Denbies House until its demolition in the 1950s. The current Lord Ashcombe resides at Sudeley Castle. The heraldic blazon for the coat of arms of the barony is: Checky or and gules on a pile argent a lion's head erased sable. This can be translated as: a chequered shield with alternating golden and red squares, a white triangle pointing downwards from the top with a black lion's head on top. The heir presumptive is the present holder's first cousin
    7.33
    3 votes
    86
    Baron Melchett

    Baron Melchett

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Melchett, of Landford in the County of Southampton, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created on 5 June 1928 for Sir Alfred Mond, 1st Baronet, Chairman of Imperial Chemical Industries and a former First Commissioner of Works and Minister of Health. He had already been created a Baronet, of Hartford Hill in Great Budworth in the County of Chester, on 8 July 1910. He was succeeded by his only son, the second Baron. He was also a politician and businessman. His second but only surviving son, the third Baron, was a businessman. As of 2010 the titles are held by the latter's son, the fourth Baron, who succeeded in 1973. He held political office under James Callaghan in the late 1970s and was later Executive Director of Greenpeace UK. Ludwig Mond, father of the first Baron, was an industrialist. There is no heir to the titles.
    7.33
    3 votes
    87
    Duke of Abercorn

    Duke of Abercorn

    • Noble rank: Duke
    The title Duke of Abercorn was created in the Peerage of Ireland in 1868 and bestowed upon James Hamilton, 2nd Marquess of Abercorn. This article also covers the Earls and Marquesses of Abercorn, all named after Abercorn, West Lothian, in Scotland. In acknowledgement of his loyalty, James VI of Scotland (James I of England), conferred on Hon. Claud Hamilton, third son of James Hamilton, 2nd Earl of Arran, the title Lord Paisley. His son James Hamilton was created Lord Abercorn on 5 April 1603, then on 10 July 1606 he was made Earl of Abercorn and Lord of Paisley, Hamilton, Mountcastell and Kilpatrick, all in the Peerage of Scotland. His successor, the 2nd Earl of Abercorn, was additionally created Lord Hamilton, Baron of Strabane, in the Peerage of Ireland, on 8 May 1617. He resigned this dignity to his younger brother in 1633; the brother's heirs inherited the Earldom and other titles in 1680, in the person of Claud Hamilton, 4th Earl of Abercorn. He was attainted in Ireland in 1691, and the Barony of Strabane forfeited, but his brother Charles Hamilton, 5th Earl of Abercorn, obtained a reversal of the attainder and recovered in 1692. The 6th earl was at his accession an Irish
    7.33
    3 votes
    88
    Earl of Warwick

    Earl of Warwick

    • Noble rank: Earl
    Earl of Warwick (/ˈwɒrɪk/ WORR-ik) is a title that has been created four times in British history and is one of the most prestigious titles in the peerages of the British Isles. The medieval earldom created in 1088 was held to be inheritable through a female line of descent, and thus was held by members of several families. It was traditionally associated with possession of Warwick Castle. The heraldic device of the Earls of Warwick, the bear and ragged staff, is believed to derive from two legendary Earls, Arthal and Morvidus. Arthal is to mean "bear", while Morvidus was to have slain a giant "with a young ash tree torn up by the roots." The first Earl of Warwick was Henry de Beaumont, younger son of Roger de Beaumont, Count of Meulan and brother to Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester. The family name of Beaumont was Latinised to de Bello Monte ("from the beautiful mountain"); the family was also known as de Newburgh, Latinised to de Novo Burgo ("from the new borough/town"). Henry changed his named to de Newburgh, after the Castle de Neubourg, his home in Normandy. Henry became constable of Warwick castle in 1068 and Earl in 1088 as reward for his support for the king
    7.33
    3 votes
    89
    Marquess of Bath

    Marquess of Bath

    • Noble rank: Marquess
    Marquess of Bath is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1789 for Thomas Thynne, 3rd Viscount Weymouth. The Thynne family descends from the soldier and courtier Sir John Thynne (died 1580), who constructed Longleat House between 1567 and 1579. In 1641 his great-grandson Henry Frederick Thynne was created a Baronet, of Cause Castle, in the Baronetage of England (some sources claim that the territorial designation is "Kempsford in the County of Gloucester"). He was succeeded by his son, the second Baronet. He represented Oxford University and Tamworth in the House of Commons and also served as Envoy to Sweden. In 1682 he was raised to the Peerage of England as Baron Thynne, of Warminster in the County of Wiltshire, and Viscount Weymouth, in the County of Dorset, with remainder to his younger brothers James Thynne (who died unmarried) and Henry Frederick Thynne and the heirs male of their bodies. Lord Weymouth died without surviving male issue in 1714 (one of his three sons, the Hon. Henry Thynne, represented Weymouth and Melcombe Regis and Tamworth in Parliament but had died in 1708, leaving only daughters) and was succeeded in the peerages (according to the
    7.33
    3 votes
    90
    Baron Aberdare

    Baron Aberdare

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Aberdare, of Duffryn in the County of Glamorgan, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created on 23 August 1873 for the Liberal politician Henry Bruce. He served as Home Secretary from 1868 to 1873. His grandson, the third Baron, was a soldier, cricketer and tennis player and a member of the International Olympic Committee. His son, the fourth Baron, held office in the Conservative administration of Edward Heath and was later a Deputy Speaker of the House of Lords. Lord Aberdare was one of the ninety-two elected hereditary peers that were allowed to remain in the House of Lords after the passing of the House of Lords Act 1999. As of 2010 the title is held by his son, the fifth Baron, who succeeded in 2005 and was elected to the House of Lords in 2009. The heraldic blazon for the coat of arms of the barony is: Or, a saltire gules, on a chief of the last a martlet of the field. The heir apparent is the present holder's son the Hon. Hector Morys Napier Bruce (b. 1974)
    6.25
    4 votes
    91
    Baron Tiptoft

    Baron Tiptoft

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Earl of Worcester is a title that has been created five times in the Peerage of England. The first creation came in 1138 in favour of the Norman noble Waleran de Beaumont. He was the son of Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester, by Elizabeth of Vermandois, and the twin brother of Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester. Like his father and brother he also held the title Count of Meulan in the French nobility. The earldom of Worcester apparently became extinct on his death in 1166. The second creation came in 1397 in favour of the military commander and governor Thomas Percy. He was a younger son of Henry de Percy, 3rd Baron Percy, and Mary of Lancaster, and the brother of Henry Percy, 1st Earl of Northumberland. He fought in the Hundred Years' War for Richard II, against whom he later rebelled. After the Battle of Shrewsbury, he was hanged for treason and his honours forfeit, although he was without issue anyway. The third creation came in 1420 in favour of Richard Beauchamp, 2nd Baron Bergavenny. He was the son of William de Beauchamp, younger son of Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick and Katherine Mortimer. William de Beauchamp was summoned to Parliament as "Willilmo
    6.25
    4 votes
    92
    Earl of Kinnoull

    Earl of Kinnoull

    • Noble rank: Earl
    Earl of Kinnoull (sometimes spelled Earl of Kinnoul) is a title in the Peerage of Scotland. It was created in 1633 for George Hay, 1st Viscount of Dupplin. Other associated titles are: Viscount Dupplin (created 1627), Lord Hay of Kinfauns (1627) and Baron Hay of Pedwardine (1711). The former two are in the Peerage of Scotland, while the last is in the Peerage of Great Britain. The title of Viscount Dupplin is the courtesy title for the Earl's eldest son and heir. The family seat is Dupplin Castle, just outside of Perth, in Scotland. The heir apparent is the present holder's son Charles William Harley Hay, Viscount Dupplin (b. 1962). Lord Dupplin is a barrister; director of Hiscox Underwriting, Ltd, since 1995; was Associate, Credit Suisse First Boston Ltd, 1985-88; Underwriter, Roberts & Hiscox, then Hiscox Syndicates Ltd, 1990-95. Lieutenant, Atholl Highlanders, since 1993; Chairman of the Royal Caledonian Ball, since 1996. The heir apparent's heir apparent is his son Hon. William Hay (b. 2011).
    6.25
    4 votes
    93
    Baron Castlemaine

    Baron Castlemaine

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Castlemaine, of Moydrum in the County of Westmeath, is a title in the Peerage of Ireland. It was created in 1812 for William Handcock, with remainder to his younger brother Richard Handcock. Handcock represented Athlone in Parliament and also served as Governor of County Westmeath. In 1822 he was further honoured when he was made Viscount Castlemaine in the Peerage of Ireland, with remainder to the heirs male of his body. On Lord Castlemaine's death the viscountcy became extinct as he died childless, but he was succeeded in the barony according to the special remainder by his brother Richard, the second Baron. He also represented Athlone in Parliament. His son, the third Baron, was also Member of Parliament for Athlone and sat in the House of Lords as an Irish Representative Peer from 1841 to 1869. He was succeeded by his eldest son, the fourth Baron. He served as an Irish Representative Peer from 1874 to 1892 and was Lord Lieutenant of County Westmeath from 1888 to 1892. On his death the title passed to his son, the fifth Baron. He was an Irish Representative Peer from 1898 to 1937 and served as Lord Lieutenant of County Westmeath from 1899 to 1937. On the death of his
    7.00
    3 votes
    94
    Baron Desborough

    Baron Desborough

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Desborough, of Taplow in the County of Buckingham, was a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1905 for the sportsman and politician William Grenfell of Taplow Court in Buckinghamshire. He had three sons and two daughters. The eldest son, Hon. Julian Grenfell, and the second son, Hon. William Grenfell, were both killed in action in 1915 during the First World War. The third son, Hon. Ivo George Winifred Grenfell, died as the result of a motoring accident in 1926. None of the sons had children and consequently the title became extinct on Lord Desborough's death in 1945. Lord Desborough was the first cousin of the banker Edward Grenfell, 1st Baron St Just.
    7.00
    3 votes
    95
    Baron Plunket

    Baron Plunket

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Plunket, of Newtown in the County of Cork, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1827 for the prominent Irish lawyer and Whig politician William Plunket. He served as Lord Chancellor of Ireland from 1830 and 1834 and again from 1835 to 1841. His eldest son, the second Baron, was Bishop of Tuam, Killala and Achonry between 1839 and 1866. He was succeeded by his younger brother, the third Baron. He was a barrister. His eldest son, the fourth Baron, served as Archbishop of Dublin between 1884 and 1897. He was succeeded by his eldest son, the fifth Baron. He was a diplomat and held office as Governor of New Zealand between 1904 and 1910. His grandson, the seventh Baron, was Equerry to both King George VI and Queen Elizabeth II. He was succeeded by his younger brother, the eighth and (as of 2012) present holder of the title. Two other members of the family have also gained distinction. The Hon. David Plunket, second son of the third Baron, was a Conservative politician and was created Baron Rathmore in 1895. The Most Reverend the Hon. Benjamin Plunket, second son of the fourth Baron, was Bishop of Meath from 1919 to 1925. The seventh and eighth barons
    7.00
    3 votes
    96
    Baron Swinfen

    Baron Swinfen

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Swinfen, of Chertsey in the County of Surrey, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1919 for the lawyer and judge Sir Charles Swinfen Eady upon his retirement as Master of the Rolls. He died only two weeks after his elevation to the peerage and was succeeded by his only son, the second Baron. As of 2010 the title is held by the latter's eldest son, the third Baron, who succeeded in 1977. He is one of the ninety elected hereditary peers that remain in the House of Lords after the passing of the House of Lords Act 1999, and sits on the Conservative benches. The author Mary Wesley was the first wife of the second Baron Swinfen and the mother of the third Baron.
    7.00
    3 votes
    97
    Rashidun

    Rashidun

    • Noble rank: Caliph
    The Rightly Guided Caliphs or The Righteous Caliphs (الخلفاء الراشدون al-Khulafā’u r-Rāshidūn) is a term used in Sunni Islam to refer to the first four caliphs after the Prophet Muhammad who established the Rashidun Caliphate: Abu Bakr, Umar, Uthman and Ali. The concept of "Rightly Guided Caliphs" originated with the later Abbasid Dynasty, which was based in Baghdad. It is a reference to the Sunni tradition, "Hold firmly to my example (sunnah) and that of the Rightly Guided Caliphs" (Ibn Majah, Abu Dawood). The implication of the term is that later caliphs were less "righteous" and perhaps lesser examples of Muslim piety. The first four Caliphs who ruled after the death of Muhammad are often quoted as the Khulafah Rashidun. The Rashidun were either elected by a council (see The election of Uthman and Islamic democracy) or chosen based on the wishes of their predecessor. In the order of succession, the rashidun were: In addition to this, there are several views regarding additional rashidun. Umar ibn Abdul Aziz (Umar ІІ), who was one of the Umayyad caliphs, is sometimes regarded as one of the Rashidun and is quoted by Taftazani. In the Ibadhi tradition, only Abu Bakr and Umar are
    7.00
    3 votes
    98
    Baron Glanusk

    Baron Glanusk

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Glanusk, of Glanusk Park in the County of Brecknock, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1899 for Sir Joseph Russell Bailey, 2nd Baronet, who had earlier represented Herefordshire and Hereford in the House of Commons as a Conservative. Both his son, the second Baron, and grandson, the third Baron, served as Lord Lieutenant of Brecknockshire. The latter was succeeded by his first cousin, the fourth Baron. He was the son of the Hon. Herbert Crawshay Bailey, fourth son of the first Baron. As of 2010 the titles are held by his son, the fifth Baron, who succeeded in 1997. The Bailey Baronetcy, of Glanusk Park in the County of Brecon, was created in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom in 1852 for Joseph Bailey, a Welsh ironmaster and Member of Parliament for Worcester and Breconshire. He was succeeded by his grandson, the aforementioned second Baronet, who was elevated to the peerage in 1899.
    6.00
    4 votes
    99
    Baron St Levan

    Baron St Levan

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron St Levan, of St Michael's Mount in the County of Cornwall, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created on 4 July 1887 for the former Member of Parliament Sir John St Aubyn, 2nd Baronet. He had previously represented Cornwall West in House of Commons as a Liberal and St Ives as a Liberal Unionist. He was succeeded by his eldest son, the second Baron. He was a Colonel and Honorary Brigadier-General in the Grenadier Guards. On his death the titles passed to his nephew, the third Baron. He was the son of the Hon. Sir Arthur James Dudley Stuart St Aubyn (1867–1897), second son of the first Baron. As of 2010 the titles are held by the third Baron's son, the fourth Baron, who succeeded in 1978. The St Aubyn Baronetcy, of St Michael's Mount in the County of Cornwall, was created in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom in 1866 for the first Baron's father, Edward St Aubyn. He was the illegitimate son of Sir John St Aubyn, 5th Baronet, of Clowance, on whose death in 1839 the baronetcy of Clowance had become extinct (see St Aubyn Baronets). The ancestral seat of the St Aubyn family is the castle on St Michael's Mount, Cornwall. The majority of the island and castle
    6.00
    4 votes
    100
    Marquess of Anglesey

    Marquess of Anglesey

    • Noble rank: Marquess
    Marquess of Anglesey is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1815 for Henry Paget, 2nd Earl of Uxbridge, a hero of the Battle of Waterloo. The Marquess holds the subsidiary titles of Earl of Uxbridge, in the County of Middlesex, in the Peerage of Great Britain (1784), Baron Paget, de Beaudesert, in the Peerage of England (1553), and is also an Irish Baronet, of Plas Newydd in the County of Anglesey and of Mount Bagenall in the County of Louth. The Paget family descends from Sir William Paget, a close adviser to Henry VIII, who in 1553 was summoned to Parliament as Lord Paget de Beaudesert. His younger son, the third Baron, was a Catholic opponent of Elizabeth I. In 1589 he was attainted and his title forfeited. However, his son, the fourth Baron, was restored to the title in 1604. In contrast to his father he was a prominent Protestant. He was succeeded by his son, the fifth Baron. He was Lord Lieutenant of Buckinghamshire for the parliamentarians between 1641 and 1642, when he joined the Royalists and was dismissed. His son, the sixth Baron, was Ambassador to both Austria and the Ottoman Empire. On his death the title passed to his son, the seventh
    6.00
    4 votes
    101
    Viscount Hood

    Viscount Hood

    • Noble rank: Viscount
    Viscount Hood, of Whitley in the County of Warwick, is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1796 for the famous naval commander Admiral Samuel Hood, 1st Baron Hood. He had already been created a Baronet, of Catherington, in the Baronetage of Great Britain on 20 May 1778, and Baron Hood, of Catherington in the County of Southampton, in the Peerage of Ireland in 1782. In 1795 his wife Susannah was created Baroness Hood, of Catherington in the County of Southampton, in her own right, in the Peerage of Great Britain. They were both succeeded by their son Henry, the second Viscount. His grandson, the third Viscount, assumed in 1840 by Royal license the additional surname of Tibbits, which was that of his father-in-law. His great-grandson, the sixth Viscount, was a Diplomat and notably served as Minister at the British Embassy in Washington from 1958 to 1962 and as Deputy Under-Secretary of State at the Foreign Office between 1962 and 1969. As of 2012 the titles are held by the latter's nephew, the eighth Viscount, who succeeded his father in 1999. Alexander Hood, 1st Viscount Bridport, was the younger brother of the first Viscount Hood. In 1794 he had been created
    6.00
    4 votes
    102
    Baron Aylmer

    Baron Aylmer

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Lord Aylmer, Baron of Balrath, in the County of Meath, is a title in the Peerage of Ireland. It was created in 1718 for the naval commander Matthew Aylmer. He was the second son of Sir Christopher Aylmer, 1st Baronet, of Balrath (see below). Lord Aylmer's son, the second Baron, represented Rye in the House of Commons. The latter's grandson, the fourth Baron, succeeded his kinsman as seventh Baronet, of Balrath, in 1776. The titles remain united. He was succeeded in both titles by his son, the fifth Baron. He was a General in the Army and served as Governor General of Canada from 1830 to 1835. Lord Aylmer assumed by Royal license the additional surname of Whitworth in 1825 on the death of his uncle Charles Whitworth, 1st Earl Whitworth. On his death the titles passed to his younger brother, the sixth Baron. He was an Admiral in the Royal Navy. He was succeeded by his second cousin, the seventh Baron. He was the son of John Athalmer Aylmer, eldest son of Admiral John Aylmer, son of Reverend the Hon. John Aylmer, fourth son of the second Baron. His claim to the titles was not allowed until 1860, however. His son, the eighth Baron, was a Major-General in the Canadian Army. His third
    8.00
    2 votes
    103
    Baron Baltimore

    Baron Baltimore

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Baltimore, of Baltimore Manor in County Longford, was a title in the Peerage of Ireland. It was created in 1624 for George Calvert and became extinct on the death of the sixth Baron in 1771. The title was held by several members of the Calvert family who were proprietors of the palatinates Province of Avalon in Newfoundland and Province of Maryland, later the U.S. state of Maryland. In the context of United States history, the name Lord Baltimore usually refers to Cæcilius Calvert, 2nd Baron Baltimore after whom the city of Baltimore, Maryland is named. His younger brother Leonard Calvert was the first Governor of Maryland. As members of the Irish peerage, the Lords Baltimore were able to sit in the House of Commons. Irish peerages were often used as a way of creating peerages which did not grant a seat in the English House of Lords and so allowed the grantee to sit in the House of Commons in London. As a consequence, many Irish peers had little or no connection to Ireland. Though the barony is extinct, The Barons Baltimore left a number of descendants, including: There are several locations in Maryland named after the Barons Baltimore, including Baltimore County, Baltimore
    8.00
    2 votes
    104
    Baron Darling

    Baron Darling

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Darling, of Langham in the County of Essex, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1924 for Sir Charles Darling, a former Conservative Member of Parliament for Deptford and Judge of the High Court of Justice. As of 2010 the title is held by his great-grandson, the third Baron, who succeeded his father in 2003.
    8.00
    2 votes
    105
    Baron Dynevor

    Baron Dynevor

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Dinevor, of Dinevor in the County of Carmarthen (usually spelt Dynevor), is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1780 for William Talbot, 1st Earl Talbot, with remainder to his daughter, Lady Cecil, wife of George Rice, a member of a prominent Welsh family. On Lord Talbot's death the earldom became extinct because he left no sons to succeed to it, while the barony of Talbot also held by him was inherited by his nephew. The barony of Dynevor passed according to the special remainder to his daughter, the second holder of the title. In 1787 Lady Dynevor assumed by Royal license the surname of de Cardonnel in lieu of Rice. Her son, the third Baron, represented Carmarthen in the House of Commons and served as Lord Lieutenant of Carmarthenshire. In 1793 he assumed by Royal license the surname of de Cardonnel, but in 1817 he resumed by Royal license the surname of Rice. He was succeeded by his son, the fourth Baron. He also sat as Member of Parliament for Carmarthen. In 1824, on inheriting the estates of the Trevor family of Glynde in Sussex, he assumed by Royal license the additional surname of Trevor. He was succeeded by his first cousin, the fifth Baron. He
    8.00
    2 votes
    106
    Baron Ellenborough

    Baron Ellenborough

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Ellenborough, of Ellenborough in the County of Cumberland, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1802 for the lawyer, judge and politician Sir Edward Law, Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench from 1802 to 1818. His son, the second Baron, notably served as Governor-General of India. In 1844 he was created Viscount Southam, of Southam in the County of Gloucester, and Earl of Ellenborough, in the County of Cumberland. These title were also in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. His only son predeceased him and on his death in 1871 the viscountcy and earldom became extinct. However, he was succeeded in the barony by his nephew, the third Baron. He was the son of the Hon. Charles Law, Member of Parliament for Cambridge University, second son of the first Baron. In 1885 he assumed by Royal license the additional surname of Towry (which was that of his father's mother). On the death of his son, the fourth Baron, this line of the family failed. He was succeeded by his cousin, the fifth Baron. When he died the title passed to his younger brother, the sixth Baron. As of 2010 the title is held by the latter's grandson, the eighth Baron, who succeeded his
    8.00
    2 votes
    107
    Baron FitzWalter

    Baron FitzWalter

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron FitzWalter is an ancient title in the Peerage of England. It was created in 1295 for Robert FitzWalter. The title was created by writ, which means that it can descend through both male and female lines. His great-grandson, the fourth Baron, was an Admiral of the Fleet. His grandson, the seventh Baron, was succeeded by his daughter and only child, Elizabeth. She was the wife of John Radcliffe. Their son, the ninth Baron, was attainted for treason in 1495 with his title forfeited. However, his son Robert Radcliffe obtained a reversal of the attainder by Act of Parliament in 1509 and later served as Lord Lieutenant of Lancashire. He was created Viscount FitzWalter in 1525 and Earl of Sussex in 1529. His grandson, the third Earl, was summoned to the House of Lords through a writ of acceleration in 1553 in his father's junior title of Baron FitzWalter. Lord Sussex later served as Lord Deputy of Ireland. He was succeeded by his younger brother, the fourth Earl. He had earlier represented Maldon, Hampshire and Portsmouth in the House of Commons and also served as Lord Lieutenant of Hampshire. When he died the titles passed to his only child, the fifth Earl. He was Lord Lieutenant of
    8.00
    2 votes
    108
    Baron Glenconner

    Baron Glenconner

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Glenconner, of The Glen in the County of Peebles, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1911 for Sir Edward Tennant, 2nd Baronet, who had earlier represented Salisbury in the House of Commons as a Liberal and also served as Lord Lieutenant of Peeblesshire. Lord Glenconner was succeeded by his second son, the second Baron. He was succeeded in 1983 by his eldest son, the third Baron, who bought the island of Mustique. As of 2010 the titles are held by the third Baron's grandson, the fourth Baron, who, when he succeeded in August 2010 became the next to youngest peer in the Realm. The Tennant Baronetcy, of The Glen and St Rolux, was created in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom in 1885 for Charles Tennant, a businessman and Liberal Member of Parliament and the grandson of the chemist and industrialist Charles Tennant. Tennant was succeeded by fourth son, the aforementioned second Baronet, who was elevated to the peerage in 1911. Several other members of the Tennant family have also gained distinction. The Liberal politician Harold Tennant was a younger son of the first Baronet. Margot Tennant, wife of Prime Minister H. H. Asquith, was the daughter
    8.00
    2 votes
    109
    Baron Carleton

    Baron Carleton

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Carleton is a title that has been created three times in British history, once in the Peerage of Ireland and twice in the Peerage of Great Britain. The first creation came in the Peerage of England in 1626 when Sir Dudley Carleton was made Baron Carleton, of Imbercourt in the County of Surrey. He was made Viscount Dorchester two years later. See the article on him for more information on this creation. Dudley Carleton was the first cousin of Sir John Carleton, 1st Baronet (see Carleton baronets). The second creation came in the Peerage of Great Britain in 1714 when Henry Boyle was made Baron Carleton, of Carleton in the County of York. He was the son of Charles Boyle, 3rd Viscount Dungarvan and the brother of Charles Boyle, 2nd Earl of Burlington (see Earl of Cork for earlier history of the family). The title became extinct upon his death in 1725. The third creation came in the Peerage of Great Britain in 1786 when Richard Boyle, 2nd Earl of Shannon was made Baron Carleton, of Carleton in the County of York, which entitled him to a seat in the House of Lords. Lord Shannon was the first cousin of the first holder of the 1714 creation (through his mother Lady Henrietta Boyle,
    9.00
    1 votes
    110
    Baron Tennyson

    Baron Tennyson

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Tennyson, of Aldworth in the County of Sussex and of Freshwater in the Isle of Wight, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1884 for the poet Alfred Tennyson. His son, the second Baron, served as Governor-General of Australia, and his grandson, the third Baron, as a captain for the English national cricket squad. On the death in 2006 of the latter's younger son, the fifth Baron, the line of the eldest son of the first Baron failed. The title was inherited by the late Baron's second cousin once removed, the sixth and (As of 2010) present holder of the peerage. He is the great-grandson of Hon. Lionel Tennyson, second son of the first Baron. Another member of the Tennyson family was the naval architect Sir Eustace Tennyson-d'Eyncourt, 1st Baronet. He was the grandson of Charles Tennyson-d'Eyncourt, uncle of the first Baron Tennyson. The heir presumptive is the present holder's brother Alan James Drummond Tennyson (b. 1965)
    9.00
    1 votes
    111
    Earl of Buckinghamshire

    Earl of Buckinghamshire

    • Noble rank: Earl
    Earl of Buckinghamshire is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1746 for John Hobart, 1st Baron Hobart. The Hobart family descends from Henry Hobart, who served as Attorney General and Lord Chief Justice of the Common Pleas. In 1611 he was created a Baronet, of Intwood in the County of Norfolk, in the Baronetage of England. He was succeeded by his son, the second Baronet. He represented Cambridge, Lostwithiel, Brackley and Norfolk in the House of Commons. He died without surviving male issue and was succeeded by his nephew, the third Baronet. He was the son of Sir Miles Hobart, younger son of the first Baronet. Hobart sat as Member of Parliament for Norfolk. In 1656 he married Mary, daughter of the prominent politician John Hampden. He was succeeded by his elder son, the fourth Baronet. He was a General of the Horse and was equerry to King William III at the Battle of the Boyne in 1690. He also represented Norfolk, King's Lynn and Bere Alston in Parliament. Hobart was killed in a duel in 1698. His son, the fifth Baronet, served as Treasurer of the Chamber, as Captain of the Honourable Band of Gentlemen Pensioners and as Lord Lieutenant of Norfolk. In 1728 he
    9.00
    1 votes
    112
    Earl of Lonsdale

    Earl of Lonsdale

    • Noble rank: Earl
    Earl of Lonsdale is a title that has been created twice in British history, firstly in the Peerage of Great Britain in 1784 (becoming extinct in 1802), and then in the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1807, both times for members of the Lowther family. This family descends from Sir Richard Lowther (1529–1607), of Lowther Hall, Westmorland, who served as Lord Warden of the West Marches. His great-grandson, John Lowther, was created a baronet, of Lowther in the County of Westmorland, in the Baronetage of Nova Scotia in circa 1638. He was succeeded by his grandson, the second Baronet (the son of John Lowther, eldest son of the first Baronet). He was an influential politician and held several ministerial posts during the reign of William III. In 1696 he was raised to the Peerage of England as Baron Lowther and Viscount Lonsdale. His eldest son, the second Viscount, died unmarried at an early age and was succeeded by his younger brother, the third Viscount. He was also a prominent politician. On his death in 1751 the barony and viscountcy became extinct. The late Viscount was succeeded in the baronetcy by his second cousin, James Lowther, the fifth Baronet. He was the son of Robert
    9.00
    1 votes
    113
    Viscount Torrington

    Viscount Torrington

    • Noble rank: Viscount
    Viscount Torrington is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1721 for the statesman Sir George Byng, 1st Baronet, along with the subsidiary title Baron Byng, of Southill in the County of Bedford, also in the Peerage of Great Britain. He had already been created a baronet, of Wrotham in the County of Kent, in the Baronetage of Great Britain in 1715. His eldest son, the second Viscount, represented Plymouth and Bedfordshire in the House of Commons and later served as Captain of the Yeomen of the Guard from 1746 to 1747. His younger brother, the third Viscount, was a Major-General in the Army. His grandson, the sixth Viscount, was a Vice-Admiral in the Royal Navy. His son, the seventh Viscount, served as Governor of Ceylon between 1847 and 1850. On his death the titles passed to his nephew, the eighth Viscount, the son of Hon. Robert Barlow Palmer Byng, third son of the sixth Viscount. He was succeeded by his son, the ninth Viscount. However, this line of the family failed on his death in 1944 and the titles passed to the late Viscount's first cousin, the tenth Viscount. As of 2009 the titles are held by the latter's grandson, the eleventh Viscount, who succeeded
    9.00
    1 votes
    114
    Baron Abercromby

    Baron Abercromby

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Abercromby, of Aboukir and of Tullibody in the County of Clackmannan, was a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created on 28 May 1801 for Mary, Lady Abercromby, in honour of her late husband, the noted military commander Lieutenant-General Sir Ralph Abercromby, who died from wounds received in the Battle of Aboukir in 1801. The latter was the grandson of Alexander Abercromby, Member of The Scottish Parliament for Clackmannanshire from 1703 to 1707, younger son of Sir Alexander Abercromby, 1st Baronet, of Birkenbog (see Abercromby baronets). Lady Abercromby was succeeded by her eldest son George, the second Baron. He represented Edinburgh and Clackmannan in the House of Commons. On his death the title passed to his son George, the third Baron. He sat as Member of Parliament for Clackmannanshire, Stirling and Clackmannan and Kinross. He was succeeded by his eldest son, the fourth Baron. He was Deputy Lieutenant of Stirlingshire in 1860. He was childless and was succeeded by his younger brother John, the fifth Baron. He was President of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland. On his death in 1924 without male issue the barony became extinct. The Hon. James
    6.67
    3 votes
    115
    Baron Baden-Powell

    Baron Baden-Powell

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Baden-Powell, of Gilwell in the County of Essex, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1929 for the military commander Lieutenant-General Sir Robert Baden-Powell, 1st Baronet, hero of the Siege of Mafeking and founder of the international Scouting movement. He had already been created a baronet, of Bentley, in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom on 4 December 1922. As of 2011, the titles are held by his grandson, the third Baron, who succeeded his father in 1962. Baden Powell, father of the first Baron, was a mathematician. Warington Baden-Powell, Sir George Baden-Powell, Agnes Baden-Powell and Baden Baden-Powell, siblings of the first Baron, all gained prominence in their own right. The heir presumptive is the present holder's brother the Hon. David Michael Baden-Powell (born 1940)
    6.67
    3 votes
    116
    Baron Cranworth

    Baron Cranworth

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Cranworth is a title that has been created twice, both times in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. The first creation came in 1850 when the lawyer and Liberal politician Sir Robert Rolfe was made Baron Cranworth, of Cranworth in the County of Norfolk. He later served as Lord Chancellor of the United Kingdom. This creation became extinct on his death in 1868. The second creation came in 1899 when Robert Gurdon was created Baron Cranworth, of Letton and Cranworth in the County of Norfolk. He had earlier represented South Norfolk and Mid Norfolk in the House of Commons. As of 2010 the title is held by his great-grandson, the third Baron, who succeeded his grandfather in 1964. He is the son of the Hon. Robert Brampton Gurdon, who was killed in action in Libya in July 1942. The heir apparent is the present holder's son the Hon. Sacha William Robin Gurdon (b. 1970)
    6.67
    3 votes
    117
    Baron Dormer

    Baron Dormer

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Dormer, of Wyng or Wenge in the County of Buckingham, is a title in the Peerage of England. It was created on 30 June 1615 for Sir Robert Dormer, 1st Baronet. He had, only twenty days earlier on 10 June 1615, been created a baronet, of Wenge in the County of Buckingham, in the Baronetage of England. His grandson, the second Baron, was made Viscount Ascot, in the County of Hertford, and Earl of Carnarvon, in 1628, and later became a prominent Royalist commander in the Civil War. On the death of his son, the second Earl, in 1707, the viscountcy and earldom became extinct. However, the late Earl was succeeded in the baronetcy and barony by his second cousin, the fourth Baron. He was the grandson of the Hon. Anthony Dormer, second son of the first Baron. On his death this line of the family also failed and the titles passed to his second cousin, the fifth Baron. He was the grandson of the Hon. Robert Dormer, third son of the first Baron. He was succeeded by his son, the sixth Baron. He was a Roman Catholic priest and did not assume the title. On his death the title passed to his younger brother, the seventh Baron. His grandson, the tenth Baron, who succeeded his half-brother in
    6.67
    3 votes
    118
    Baron Llangattock

    Baron Llangattock

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Llangattock, of the Hendre in the County of Monmouth, was a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1892 for John Rolls, Member of Parliament for Monmouthshire from 1880 to 1892. He was succeeded by his eldest son, John Maclean, the second Baron, who was killed in action at the Battle of the Somme in 1916. As John MacLean was unmarried and his two younger brothers had already died before him, the title became extinct up on his death. The family estates, including The Hendre in Monmouthshire, passed to Lord Llangatock's only sister, Eleanor Rolls. She was the wife of Sir John Shelley, 6th Baronet, of Castle Goring, who assumed by Royal license the additional surname of Rolls in 1917 (see Shelley Baronets). They had no children and The Hendre estate passed to the Harding-Rolls family, descended from Patricia Rolls, sister of the first Baron. This branch of the family lived at the estate until 1987. The Honourable Charles Rolls, third and youngest son of the first Baron, was the co-founder of the Rolls-Royce car manufacturing firm.
    6.67
    3 votes
    119
    Baron Raglan

    Baron Raglan

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Raglan, of Raglan in the County of Monmouth, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1852 for the military commander Lord FitzRoy Somerset, chiefly remembered as commander of the British troops during the Crimean War. Somerset was the youngest son of Henry Somerset, 5th Duke of Beaufort (see Duke of Beaufort for earlier history of the family). His second but eldest surviving son, the second Baron, served as a Lord-in-Waiting (government whip in the House of Lords) from 1866 to 1868 in the Conservative administrations of the Earl of Derby and Benjamin Disraeli. He was succeeded by his son, the third Baron. He held office as Under-Secretary of State for War between 1900 and 1902 in the Conservative government of Lord Salisbury. His eldest son, the fourth Baron, was a soldier and also served as Lord Lieutenant of Monmouthshire. The fifth Baron was active in the House of Lords but lost his seat in the upper chamber of parliament after the passing of the House of Lords Act 1999. As of 2010 the title is held by the fourth Baron's third but second surviving son, the sixth Baron, who succeeded in 2010. As a descendant of the fifth Duke of Beaufort Lord
    6.67
    3 votes
    120
    Baron Sackville

    Baron Sackville

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Sackville, of Knole in the County of Kent, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1876 for the Honourable Mortimer Sackville-West, with remainder, failing heirs male of his body, to his younger brothers the Hon. Lionel and the Hon. William Edward. Sackville-West was the fourth son of George Sackville-West, 5th Earl De La Warr and Elizabeth Sackville-West, Countess De La Warr and 1st Baroness Buckhurst, younger daughter and co-heir of John Sackville, 3rd Duke of Dorset. On the death of the latter's cousin, Charles Sackville-Germain, 5th Duke of Dorset, in 1845, the dukedom and its subsidiary titles became extinct and the Sackville estates passed through Elizabeth to the West family who assumed the additional surname of Sackville by Royal license. By arrangement, Mortimer Sackville-West succeeded to a substantial part of the estates, including Knole in Kent, which is still the seat of the Barons Sackville. He was succeeded in the barony according to the special remainder by his brother Lionel, who became the second Baron. He had no legitimate male issue and, on his death, the title passed to his nephew, the third Baron. He was the son of the
    6.67
    3 votes
    121
    Count of Boulogne

    Count of Boulogne

    • Noble rank: Count
    The county of Boulogne is a historical region of France centered on Boulogne-sur-Mer. In Roman times, Boulogne was situated in the Roman provinces of Belgica and inhabited by Celtic tribes, until Germanic peoples replaced them and made an end to roman imperial rule. This area belonged to the province of Artois, and had been detached from Artois in the 15th century when it became part of the province of Picardy. It consist now of a part of the present-day French département of the Pas-de-Calais. The city of Boulogne-sur-Mer became the centre of the county of Boulogne in the 9th century. The founder of the dynasty of the counts of Boulogne seems to have been Hernequin of Boulogne, the son of Ragnhart. Hernequin married Bertha of Ponthieu around 850. Later that century it was frequently raided by the Vikings. There is some uncertainly about the early counts. There are number of people called count but the first definite count does not appear until the 11th century. Boulogne later became influential in the history of England, when Eustace II of Boulogne accompanied William the Conqueror's invasion in 1066. Boulogne was also a major participant in the First Crusade; Eustace III of
    6.67
    3 votes
    122
    Baron Arlington

    Baron Arlington

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Arlington is a title in the Peerage of England. In 1664, it was created for Sir Henry Bennet, younger brother of John Bennet, 1st Baron Ossulston, with a special remainder allowing it to descend to male and female heirs, rather than only male heirs, as was customary with most peerages. In 1672, he was made Earl of Arlington and Viscount Thetford, and was regranted the title of Baron Arlington, with the same special remainder. The first Earl died without male heirs, so the titles went to his daughter Isabella, Duchess of Grafton. At age four, Isabella was married off to the nine-year old Duke of Grafton, an illegitimate son of King Charles II. After the death of the couple, Charles FitzRoy, their son, came to hold both the Arlington and Grafton titles. The two sets of titles continued united until the death of the ninth Duke in a racecar accident in 1936. The dukedom passed to a cousin, while all of the Arlington titles fell into abeyance between his two sisters, neither of whom petitioned the Sovereign to terminate the abeyance. After the death of the elder sister, her elder daughter Jennifer did petition the Crown, and the abeyance of the barony of Arlington was terminated
    7.50
    2 votes
    123
    Baron Carnock

    Baron Carnock

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Carnock, of Carnock in the County of Stirling, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1916 for the former Permanent Under-Secretary in the Foreign Office, Sir Arthur Nicolson, 11th Baronet. The Nicolson family descends from Thomas Nicolson. In 1636 he was created a Baronet, of Carnock in the County of Stirling, in the Baronetage of Nova Scotia. His great-grandson, the fourth Baron, succeeded as 4th Lord Napier of Merchistoun in 1683. However, on his death three years later the lordship passed to his maternal aunt Margaret Brisbane, while he was succeeded in the baronetcy by his cousin and heir-male, the fifth Baronet. He was succeeded by his son, the sixth Baronet. On the death of his younger son, the eighth Baronet, this line of the family failed. The latter was succeeded by his cousin, the ninth Baronet. He was a Major-General in the Army, while his son, the tenth Baronet, was an Admiral in the Royal Navy. The latter was succeeded by his son, the eleventh Baronet. In 1916 he was raised to the peerage as Baron Carnock, of Carnock in the County of Stirling. His two eldest sons succeeded as second and third Baron, in 1928 and 1952; the fourth Baron
    7.50
    2 votes
    124
    Baron Feversham

    Baron Feversham

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Feversham is a title that has been created twice, once in the Peerage of Great Britain and once in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. The first creation, in the Peerage of Great Britain, came in 1747 when Anthony Duncombe, who had earlier represented Salisbury and Downton in the House of Commons, was made Lord Feversham, Baron of Downton, in the County of Wilts. He had previously inherited half of the enormous fortune of his uncle Sir Charles Duncombe. However, Lord Feversham had no sons and the barony became extinct on his death in 1763. The peerage was revived in the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1826 in favour of his kinsman Charles Duncombe, who was created Baron Feversham, of Duncombe Park in the County of York. He was a former Member of Parliament for Shaftesbury, Aldborough, Heytesbury and Newport. Duncombe was the grandson of Thomas Duncombe, son of John Brown (who assumed the surname Duncombe) by his wife Ursula Duncombe, aunt of the first Baron of the 1747 creation. Ursula had inherited the other half of her brother Sir Charles Duncombe's fortune. Lord Feversham son, the second Baron, sat as a Conservative Member of Parliament for Yorkshire and the North Riding
    7.50
    2 votes
    125
    Baron Hesketh

    Baron Hesketh

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Hesketh, of Hesketh in the County Palatine of Lancaster, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1935 for Sir Thomas Fermor-Hesketh, 8th Baronet, who had previously briefly represented Enfield in the House of Commons as a Conservative. As of 2010 the titles are held by his grandson, the third Baron, who succeeded his father in 1955. Lord Hesketh held junior ministerial positions in the Conservative administrations of Margaret Thatcher and John Major. However, he lost his seat in the House of Lords after the House of Lords Act 1999 removed the automatic right of hereditary peers to sit in the upper chamber of Parliament. The Hesketh Baronetcy, of Rufford in the County Palatine of Lancaster, was created in the Baronetage of Great Britain in 1761 for Thomas Hesketh, with special remainder to his brother Robert, who succeeded him as second Baronet. The latter's great-great-grandson, the fifth Baronet, sat as a Conservative Member of Parliament for Preston. His grandson, the eighth Baronet, was elevated to the peerage as Baron Hesketh in 1935. The former seat of the Barons Hesketh was Easton Neston in Northamptonshire. The house was previously the seat
    7.50
    2 votes
    126
    Baron Newton

    Baron Newton

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Newton, of Newton-in-Makerfield in the County of Lancaster, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1892 for the Conservative politician William Legh, who had earlier represented Lancashire South and Cheshire East in the House of Commons. Both his son, the second Baron, and his great-grandson, the fourth Baron, were Conservative government ministers. As of 2010 the title is held by the latter's eldest son, the fifth Baron, who succeeded in 1992. The seat of the Legh (pronounced "Lee") family was Lyme Park near Disley in Cheshire. It was given to the National Trust in 1946 by the third Baron Newton. The heir apparent is the present holder's son the Hon. Piers Richard Legh (b. 1979)
    7.50
    2 votes
    127
    Baron Phillimore

    Baron Phillimore

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Phillimore, of Shiplake in the County of Oxford, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1918 for the former Judge of the High Court of Justice and Lord Justice of Appeal, Sir Walter Phillimore, 2nd Baronet. The Phillimore Baronetcy, of The Coppice, had been created in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom on 28 December 1881 for his father Sir Robert Phillimore, who was also a noted lawyer and judge. The first Baron was succeeded by his son, the second Baron. On his death the titles passed to his grandson, the third Baron, his eldest son Captain the Hon. Anthony Francis Phillimore (d. 1940) having been killed in action during the Second World War. The third Baron was childless and was succeeded by his uncle, the fourth Baron. He was an architect. As of 2010 the titles are held by his son, the fifth Baron, who succeeded in 1994. The fifth baron is a barrister who lives at Coppid Hall, Shiplake, Oxfordshire. The Phillimore family were formerly owners, and now trustees, of the Phillimore estate in Kensington, west London, covering the prosperous 19th century houses around Holland Park and Campden Hill. The heir apparent is the present holder's son,
    7.50
    2 votes
    128
    Baron Tweedsmuir

    Baron Tweedsmuir

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Tweedsmuir, of Elsfield in the County of Oxford, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1935 for the author and Conservative politician John Buchan. He served as Governor-General of Canada from 1935 to his death in 1940. His eldest son, the second Baron, was the husband of the Conservative politician Lady Tweedsmuir. As of 2010 the title is held by the second Baron's nephew, the fourth Baron, who succeeded his father in 2008. The Honourable James Buchan, younger son of the third Baron, is an author. The first Baron was brought up in the Tweed Valley in the Scottish Borders at Broughton close to the village of Tweedsmuir. The heir apparent is the present holder's son the Hon. John Alasdair Gawain Buchan (b. 1986).
    7.50
    2 votes
    129
    Baron Vernon

    Baron Vernon

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Lord Vernon, Baron of Kinderton in the County of Chester, is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1762 for the former Member of Parliament George Venables-Vernon. He had previously represented Lichfield and Derby in the House of Commons. Born George Vernon, he was the son of Henry Vernon, of Sudbury in Derbyshire, and Anne Pigott, daughter and heiress of Thomas Pigott by his wife Mary Venables, sister and heiress of Sir Peter Venables, Baron of Kinderton in Cheshire. In 1728 he assumed by Royal license the additional surname of Venables. Lord Vernon was married three times. He married, thirdly, Martha Harcourt, granddaughter of the Simon Harcourt, 1st Viscount Harcourt. Their second son was Edward Harcourt, Archbishop of York. He succeeded to the Harcourt family estates on the death of his cousin the William Harcourt, 3rd Earl Harcourt, and assumed by Royal license the surname of Harcourt. Edward Harcourt was the father of William Vernon Harcourt, the grandfather of Sir William Vernon Harcourt and the great-grandfather of the Lewis Harcourt, 1st Viscount Harcourt (see the Viscount Harcourt for more information on this branch of the family). Lord Vernon was
    7.50
    2 votes
    130
    Duke of Cornwall

    Duke of Cornwall

    • Noble rank: Duke
    Duke of Cornwall is a title in the Peerage of England, traditionally held by the heir to the reigning British monarch. The Duchy of Cornwall was the first duchy created in England and was established by royal charter in 1337. The present duke is the Prince of Wales, the eldest son of Queen Elizabeth II. In some folkloric histories of the British Isles, the first leader of Cornwall is Corineus, a Trojan warrior and ally of Brutus of Troy, the original settler of the British Isles. From this earliest period through the Arthurian period, the Duke of Cornwall is semi-autonomous if not independent from the Hi-King or ruler of Britain, while also serving as his closest ally and, at times, as his protector. According to legend, Gorlois, Duke of Cornwall under King Uther Pendragon, rebelled against the latter's rule when the king became obsessed with Gorlois' wife Igraine. Uther killed Gorlois and took Igraine: the result of their union was the future King Arthur. According to history, during the Dark Ages there existed an independent Kingdom of Cornwall but by c.900 AD this had become an English dependency with its final native rulers using the title Earl of Cornwall. After the Norman
    7.50
    2 votes
    131
    Earl of St Germans

    Earl of St Germans

    • Noble rank: Earl
    Earl of St Germans, in the County of Cornwall, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1815 for John Eliot, 2nd Baron Eliot, with remainder to his younger brother the Hon. William Eliot and the heirs male of his body. He had earlier represented Liskeard in Parliament. John and William were the second and third sons respectively of Edward Eliot, who represented St Germans, Liskeard and Cornwall in the House of Commons and served as a commissioner of the Board of Trade and Plantations. Eliot was the son of Richard Eliot and his wife Harriot, illegitimate daughter of James Craggs the Younger by his mistress, the noted actress Hester Santlow. In 1784 he was created Baron Eliot, of St Germans in the County of Cornwall, in the Peerage of Great Britain. In 1789 he assumed by Royal license the additional surname of Craggs. However, this surname has not been used by any of his descendants. Lord Eliot's second but eldest surviving son, Edward James Eliot, predeceased him, and he was succeeded by his third son, the aforementioned first Earl of St Germans. He was succeeded according to the special remainder by his younger brother William, the second Earl. He was a
    7.50
    2 votes
    132
    Baron Armstrong

    Baron Armstrong

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Armstrong is a title that has been created twice in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. The first creation came on 6 July 1887 when the industrialist Sir William Armstrong was made Baron Armstrong, of Cragside in the County of Northumberland. The title became extinct on his death in 1900. However, the title was revived three years later, on 4 August 1903, for his great-nephew William Watson-Armstrong, who was created Baron Armstrong, of Bamburgh and of Cragside in the County of Northumberland. Born William Watson, he had assumed the additional surname of Armstrong by Royal license in 1889. Lord Armstrong was the grandson of Sir William Henry Watson, Baron of the Exchequer, by his wife Anne, sister of the first Baron of the first creation. He was succeeded by his son, the second Baron. He unsuccessfully contested Berwick-on-Tweed as an independent candidate in the 1918 general election. The title became extinct in 1987 on the death of his son, the third Baron.
    6.33
    3 votes
    133
    Baron Burnham

    Baron Burnham

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Burnham, of Hall Barn in the Parish of Beaconsfield in the County of Buckingham, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1903 for the influential newspaper magnate Sir Edward Levy-Lawson, 1st Baronet, owner of the Daily Telegraph. He had already been created a Baronet, of Hall Barn in The Parish of Beaconsfield in the County of Buckingham, in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom in 1892. Levy-Lawson was the son of Joseph Moses Levy, who acquired the Daily Telegraph only months after its founding. Lord Burnham was succeeded by his eldest son, the second Baron. He followed his father in the management and ownership of the newspaper, but sold it in 1928 to Lord Camrose and partners. Lord Burnham also sat as a Member of Parliament. In 1919 he was created Viscount Burnham, of Hall Barn in the County of Buckingham, in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. However, he had no surviving male issue and the viscountcy became extinct on his death while he was succeeded in the baronetcy and barony by his younger brother, the third Baron. He was succeeded by his son, the fourth Baron. He was a Major-General in the Territorial Army. His younger son, the sixth Baron
    6.33
    3 votes
    134
    Baron Monson

    Baron Monson

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Monson, of Burton in the County of Lincolnshire, is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1728 for Sir John Monson, 5th Baronet. The Monson family descends from Thomas Monson, of Carleton, Lincolnshire. He sat as Member of Parliament for Lincolnshire, Castle Rising and Cricklade. On 29 June 1611 he was created a Baronet, of Carleton in the County of Lincoln, in the Baronetage of England. His eldest son, the second Baronet, fought as a Royalist during the Civil War and also represented Lincoln in the House of Commons. He married Ursula Oxenbridge, daughter of Sir Robert Oxenbridge of Hurstbourne in Hampshire, through which marriage the manor of Broxbourne came into the Monson family. This was to be the seat of the family for many years. His eldest son, the third Baronet, also represented Lincoln in Parliament. He died childless and was succeeded by his younger brother, the fourth Baronet. He sat as a Member of Parliament for Lincoln, Heytesbury, Hertford and for Aldborough. His son, the fifth Baronet, represented Lincoln in Parliament. In 1728 he was raised to the Peerage of Great Britain as Baron Monson, of Burton in the County of Lincoln. He later served
    6.33
    3 votes
    135
    Baron Petre

    Baron Petre

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Petre (pronounced Peter), of Writtle, in the County of Essex, is a title in the Peerage of England. It was created in 1603 for Sir John Petre. He represented Essex in parliament and served as Lord Lieutenant of Essex. Lord Petre was the son of Sir William Petre, Secretary of State to Henry VIII, Mary I, Edward VI and Elizabeth I. Sir William acquired Ingatestone Hall and the surrounding manor from Henry for the full market value after it had been surrendered to the King by Barking Abbey during the Suppression of the Monasteries. The first Baron was succeeded by his son, William Petre, 2nd Baron Petre. He sat as Member of Parliament for Essex. His grandson, William Petre, 4th Baron Petre, was one of the accused in the Titus Oates plot and died in the Tower of London in 1684. His younger brother, Thomas Petre, 6th Baron Petre, was Lord Lieutenant of Essex. His great-grandson, Robert Petre, 9th Baron Petre, who succeeded his father the year of his birth, married Anne Howard, daughter of Philip Howard, younger brother of Edward Howard, 9th Duke of Norfolk. On her uncle's death in 1777 Anne became co-heiress to the baronies of Howard, Furnivall, Strange of Blackmere, Talbot,
    6.33
    3 votes
    136
    Marquess of Bute

    Marquess of Bute

    • Noble rank: Marquess
    Marquess of the County of Bute, shortened in general usage to Marquess of Bute, is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1796 for John Stuart, 4th Earl of Bute. John Stuart was the member of a family that descended from John Stewart (born 1360), Sheriff of Bute, married to Janet Sympil and in 1407 to Elizabeth Graham, the natural son of Robert II of Scotland and his mistress Moira Leitch. This John Stewart was granted the lands of Bute, Arran and Cumbrae by his father. He was known as the 'Black Stewart' because of his dark complexion, his brother was John Stewart of Dundonald, known as the 'Red Stewart'. The grant of lands was confirmed in 1400 by a charter of Robert III. About 1385, John Stewart of Bute was granted the hereditary office of Sheriff of Bute by his father Robert II. He died in 1449, aged 89. At about the time of Mary, Queen of Scots, the family adopted the spelling of 'Stuart', which she had used while living in France. James Stuart, seventh in descent from the Black Stewart, was created a Baronet, of Bute, in the Baronetage of Nova Scotia on 28 March 1627. His grandson, the third Baronet, represented Bute in the Parliament of Scotland and was
    6.33
    3 votes
    137
    Baron Inverforth

    Baron Inverforth

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Inverforth, of Southgate in the County of Middlesex, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1919 for the Scottish shipping magnate Andrew Weir. He was head of the firm of Andrew Weir & Co, shipowners, and also served as Minister of Munitions from 1919 to 1921. As of 2010 the title is held by his great-grandson, the fourth Baron, who succeeded his father in 1982.
    8.00
    1 votes
    138
    Baron Killanin

    Baron Killanin

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Killanin, of Galway in the County of Galway, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1900 for the Irish lawyer and politician Michael Morris, Baron Morris, Lord Chief Justice of Ireland from 1887 to 1889 and a Lord of Appeal in Ordinary from 1889 to 1900. He had already been created a Baronet in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom in 1885, and a life peer under the Appellate Jurisdiction Act 1876 as Baron Morris, of Spiddal in the County of Galway, in 1889. On his death in 1901 the life peerage became extinct while he was succeeded in the baronetcy and hereditary barony by his eldest son, the second Baron. He briefly represented Galway Borough in the House of Commons as a Conservative and also served as Lord Lieutenant of County Galway from 1918 to 1922. He was succeeded by his nephew, the third Baron, the son of George Henry Morris. He was a prominent author, journalist and sports official and served as President of the International Olympic Committee from between 1972 and 1980. As of 2010 the titles are held by his eldest son, the fourth Baron, who succeeded in 1999. He is a film producer. The heir apparent is the present holder's son the Hon.
    8.00
    1 votes
    139
    Baron Lilford

    Baron Lilford

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Lilford, of Lilford in the County of Northampton, is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1797 for Thomas Powys, who had previously represented Northamptonshire in the House of Commons. His grandson, the third Baron, served as a Lord-in-Waiting (government whip) from 1837 to 1841 in the Whig administration of Lord Melbourne. He was succeeded by his son, the fourth Baron. He was an ornithologist. On the death of his younger son, the sixth Baron (who succeeded his elder brother), in 1949, the line of the eldest son of the second Baron failed. The late Baron was succeeded by his second cousin once removed, the seventh Baron. He was the great-great-grandson of the Hon. Robert Vernon Powys, second son of the second Baron. As of 2010 the title is held by his only son, the eighth Baron, who succeeded in 2005. The family seat until the 1990s was Lilford Hall in Northamptonshire. The current Baron Lilford retains ownership of land in Jersey, South Africa and West Lancashire including the Bank Hall Estate, which were inherited in 1860 by Thomas Atherton Powys, 3rd Baron Lilford upon the death of his wife's cousin George Anthony Legh Keck.
    8.00
    1 votes
    140
    Baron Milford

    Baron Milford

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Milford is a title that has been created three times, once in the Peerage of Ireland and twice in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. All three creations have been for members of the same family. The first creation came in the Peerage of Ireland in 1776 when Sir Richard Philipps, 7th Baronet, of Picton Castle was made Baron Milford (there was no territorial designation). However, this title became extinct on his death in 1823, while the baronetcy was passed on to a distant relative (see the Viscount St Davids). The title was revived in the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1847 when Sir Richard Philipps, 1st Baronet, of Picton Castle was created Baron Milford, of Picton Castle in the County of Pembroke. Born Richard Bulkeley Philipps Grant, he was the son of John Grant and Mary Philippa Artemisia, daughter of James Child and Mary Philippa Artemisia, daughter of Bulkeley Philipps, uncle of the first Baron of the first creation. He succeeded to the Philipps estates in 1823 and assumed the surname of Philipps the same year. In 1828 he was created a Baronet, of Picton Castle in the County of Pembroke, in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom. However, Lord Milford was childless and
    8.00
    1 votes
    141
    Duke of Leinster

    Duke of Leinster

    • Noble rank: Duke
    Duke of Leinster is a title in the Peerage of Ireland and the premier dukedom in that peerage. The title refers to Leinster, but unlike the province the title is pronounced "Lin-ster". The subsidiary titles of the Duke of Leinster are: Marquess of Kildare (1761), Earl of Kildare (1316), Earl of Offaly (1761), Viscount Leinster, of Taplow in the County of Buckingham (1747), Baron Offaly (1620) and Baron Kildare, of Kildare in the County of Kildare (1870). The viscounty of Leinster is in the Peerage of Great Britain, the barony of Kildare in the Peerage of the United Kingdom, and all other titles in the Peerage of Ireland. The courtesy title of the eldest son and heir of the Duke of Leinster is Marquess of Kildare. This branch of the Welsh-Norman FitzGerald dynasty, which came to Ireland in 1169, were initially created Earls of Kildare. The earldom was created in 1316 for John FitzGerald. Two senior FitzGeralds, Garret Mór FitzGerald and his son, Garret Óg FitzGerald served as Lords Deputy of Ireland (the representative of the Lord of Ireland (the King of England) in Ireland). The tenth Earl, Thomas FitzGerald, known as Silken Thomas, was attainted and his honours were forfeit in
    8.00
    1 votes
    142
    Earl of Egmont

    Earl of Egmont

    • Noble rank: Earl
    Earl of Egmont was a title in the Peerage of Ireland. It was created in 1733 for John Perceval, 1st Viscount Perceval. This Perceval descends from John Perceval, who on 9 September 1661 was created a Baronet, of Kanturk in the County of Cork, in the Baronetage of Ireland. He was succeeded by his eldest son, the second Baronet. He died unmarried at an early age and was succeeded by his younger brother, the third Baronet. He also died at an early age and was succeeded by his eldest son, the fourth Baronet. He died at the age of only nine when the titles were inherited by his younger brother, the fifth Baronet. He represented Cork in the Irish House of Commons and Harwich in the British House of Commons and also served as the first President of Georgia. Perceval was created Baron Perceval, of Burton in the County of Cork, in 1715, with remainder to the heirs male of his father, and Viscount Perceval, of Kanturk in the County of Cork, in 1722, and Earl of Egmont in 1733, with remainder to the heirs male of his body. All three titles were in the Peerage of Ireland. Perceval claimed descent from the Egmonts of Holland but the title of the earldom was taken from a place in County Cork
    8.00
    1 votes
    143
    Lord of the Isles

    Lord of the Isles

    • Noble rank: Lord
    The designation Lord of the Isles (Scottish Gaelic: Triath nan Eilean or Rìgh Innse Gall) is today a title of Scottish nobility with historical roots that go back beyond the Kingdom of Scotland. It emerged from a series of hybrid Viking/Gaelic rulers of the west coast and islands of Scotland in the Middle Ages, who wielded sea-power with fleets of galleys. Although they were, at times, nominal vassals of the King of Norway, High King of Ireland, or the King of Scotland, the island chiefs remained functionally independent for many centuries. Their territory included the Hebrides, (Skye and Ross from 1438), Knoydart, Ardnamurchan, and the Kintyre peninsula. At their height they were the greatest landowners and most powerful Lords in Britain and its Isles (excluding Ireland) following the Kings of England and Scotland. The end of the Lordship came in 1493 when John Macdonald II forfeited his estates and titles to James IV of Scotland. Since that time, the eldest male child of the reigning Scottish (and later, British) monarch has been styled "Lord of the Isles", though the office itself has been extinct since the 15th century. Today Charles, Prince of Wales is styled Lord of the
    8.00
    1 votes
    144
    Baron Hazlerigg

    Baron Hazlerigg

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Hazlerigg, of Noseley in the County of Leicester, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1945 for Sir Arthur Hazlerigg, 13th Baronet. He had previously served as Lord Lieutenant of Leicestershire. As of 2010 the titles are held by his grandson, the third Baron, who succeeded his father in 2002. The Hazlerigg Baronetcy, of Noseley Hall in the County of Leicester, was created in the Baronetage of England in 1622 for Thomas Hesilrige. He notably represented Leicestershire in the House of Commons. He was succeeded by his son, the second Baronet, the most famous member of the family. He was one of the five members of Parliament whom King Charles I tried to have arrested in 1642. His grandson, the fourth Baronet, also represented Leicestershire in Parliament. He was succeeded by his uncle, the fifth Baronet. The latter's great–great-grandson, the eleventh Baronet, assumed by Royal license the surname of Hazlerigg in lieu of Hesilrige in 1818. His great-grandson was the thirteenth Baronet, who was elevated to the peerage in 1945. As of 30 June 2006, the present holder of the barony has not successfully proven his succession to the baronetcy and is
    5.25
    4 votes
    145
    Baron Geddes

    Baron Geddes

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Geddes, of Rolvenden in the County of Kent, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1942 for the prominent Conservative politician and former Ambassador to the United States, Sir Auckland Geddes. As of 2010 the title is held by his grandson, the third Baron, who succeeded his father in 1975. He is one of the ninety elected hereditary peers that remain in the House of Lords after the passing of the House of Lords Act 1999, and sits on the Conservative benches. Sir Eric Geddes, British Minister of Munitions and First Lord of the Admiralty during the First World War, was the elder brother of the first Baron. The Hon. Margaret Geddes, who married Prince Louis of Hesse and by Rhine, son of Ernest Louis, Grand Duke of Hesse, was the daughter of the first Baron. The heir apparent is the present holder's son the Hon. James George Neil Geddes (b. 1969)
    7.00
    2 votes
    146
    Baron Hylton

    Baron Hylton

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Hylton is a title that has been created twice, once in the Peerage of England and once in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. The first creation came in the Peerage of England 1295 when Robert Hylton was summoned to the Model Parliament as Lord Hylton by writ. His son, Alexander, was called to Parliament in 1332 and 1335, but no further summons were sent for his descendants. Therefore, the title has only been held de jure after the death of the second baron. Indeed, the last baron was Member of Parliament for Carlisle after "inheriting" the title, due to this anomaly. Despite this, the creation is deemed to have fallen into abeyance on the death of the eighteenth baron with male heirs in 1746. The second creation came in the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1866 when the soldier and Conservative politician, Sir William Jolliffe, 1st Baronet, was made Baron Hylton of Hylton in the County Palatine of Durham and of Petersfield in the County of Southampton. He had already been created a Baronet, of Merstham in the County of Surrey, in 1821. He was the grandson of William Jolliffe (for many years Member of Parliament for Petersfield), and a co-heir of the original barony of Hylton
    7.00
    2 votes
    147
    Duke of Westminster

    Duke of Westminster

    • Noble rank: Duke
    The title Duke of Westminster was created by Queen Victoria in 1874 and bestowed upon Hugh Grosvenor, 3rd Marquess of Westminster. The current holder of the title is Gerald Grosvenor, 6th Duke of Westminster. The Duke of Westminster's seat is at Eaton Hall, Cheshire. The traditional burial place of the Dukes is St Mary's Church, Eccleston. Richard Grosvenor was created Baronet of Eaton in January 1622. Sir Richard Grosvenor, the 7th Baronet, was created Baron Grosvenor in 1761 and in 1784 became both Viscount Belgrave and Earl Grosvenor under George III. The title Marquess of Westminster was bestowed upon Robert Grosvenor the 2nd Earl Grosvenor at the coronation of William IV in 1831. The subsidiary titles are: Marquess of Westminster (created 1831), Earl Grosvenor (1784), Viscount Belgrave, of Belgrave in the County of Chester (1784), and Baron Grosvenor, of Eaton in the County of Chester (1761). The Dukedom and Marquessate are in the Peerage of the United Kingdom; the rest are in the Peerage of Great Britain. The courtesy title of the eldest son and heir to the Duke is Earl Grosvenor. The heir apparent is the present holder's only son, Hugh Grosvenor, Earl Grosvenor (b. 29
    7.00
    2 votes
    148
    Earl of Yarborough

    Earl of Yarborough

    • Noble rank: Earl
    Earl of Yarborough is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1837 for Charles Anderson-Pelham, 2nd Baron Yarborough. The Anderson-Pelham family descends from Francis Anderson of Manby, Lincolnshire. He married Mary, daughter of Charles Pelham of Brocklesby, Lincolnshire. Their grandson Charles Anderson assumed the additional surname of Pelham and represented Beverley and Lincolnshire in the House of Commons. In 1794 he was created Baron Yarborough, of Yarborough in the County of Lincoln, in the Peerage of Great Britain. He was succeeded by his son, the second Baron. He sat as Member of Parliament for Great Grimsby and for Lincolnshire. Lord Yarborough married Henrietta Anne Maria Charlotte Bridgeman (d. 1813), daughter of the Hon. John Simpson and Henrietta Francis, daughter of Sir Thomas Worsley, 6th Baronet, of Appuldurcombe (a title which became extinct in 1825; see Worsley baronets). Through this marriage Appuldurcombe House on the Isle of Wight, which had previously been in the Worsley family, came into the Anderson-Pelham family (however, it was sold already in 1855). In 1837 Yarborough was created Baron Worsley, of Appuldurcombe on the Isle of Wight,
    7.00
    2 votes
    149
    Earl Talbot

    Earl Talbot

    • Noble rank: Earl
    Earl Talbot is a title that has been created twice in the Peerage of Great Britain. This branch of the Talbot family descends from the Hon. Sir Gilbert Talbot (died 1518), third son of John Talbot, 2nd Earl of Shrewsbury. His great-great-great-grandson the Right Reverend William Talbot was Bishop of Oxford, of Salisbury and of Durham. His eldest son Charles Talbot was a prominent lawyer and politician. In 1733 he was raised to the Peerage of Great Britain as Lord Talbot, Baron of Hensol, in the County of Glamorgan, and then served as Lord Chancellor of Great Britain from 1733 to 1737. He was succeeded by his eldest son, the second Baron. He served as Lord Steward of the Household from 1761 to 1782. In 1761 he was created Earl Talbot and in 1780 Baron Dynevor, of Dynevor in the County of Carmarthen, in the Peerage of Great Britain. The earldom was created with normal remainder to the heirs male of his body while the barony was created with remainder to his daughter Cecil, wife of George Rice, and her issue male. On his death in 1782 the earldom became extinct while he was succeeded in the barony of Dynevor according to the special remainder by his daughter Cecil (see the Baron
    7.00
    2 votes
    150
    Marquess of Ailsa

    Marquess of Ailsa

    • Noble rank: Marquess
    Marquess of Ailsa, of the Isle of Ailsa in the County of Ayr, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created on 10 September 1831 for Archibald Kennedy, 12th Earl of Cassillis. The title Earl of Cassillis (pronounced "Cassels") had been created in 1509 for the 3rd Lord Kennedy. This title had been created in the Peerage of Scotland in 1457. The 1st Marquess had been created Baron Ailsa in the Peerage of the United Kingdom on 12 November 1806. The name of the title was taken from the Island of Ailsa Craig in the Firth of Clyde. The island is still owned by the family but it is currently up for sale for £1,500,000. James Kennedy, Archbishop of St Andrews, was the younger brother of the first Lord Kennedy. The Marquess of Ailsa is the hereditary Clan Chief of Clan Kennedy. The family seat is Cassillis House, Maybole, Ayrshire. The heir presumptive is the present holder's younger brother Lord David Thomas Kennedy (b. 1958) married with a son.
    7.00
    2 votes
    151
    Sultan of Selangor

    Sultan of Selangor

    • Noble rank: Sultan
    Sultan of Selangor is the title of the constitutional ruler of Selangor, Malaysia. The Sultans of Selangor are descended from a Bugis dynasty that claim descent from the rulers of Luwu in the southern part of Celebes (today known as Sulawesi). Nobles from this bloodline were involved in the dispute over the Johor-Riau Sultanate in the early 18th century, eventually placing their full support in the cause of Sultan Abdul Jalil of the Bendahara dynasty against the claimant to the Malaccan lineage, Raja Kechil. For this reason, the Bendahara rulers of Johor-Riau established close relations with the Bugis nobles, providing them with titles and control over many areas within the empire, including Selangor. Daeng Chelak's prince, Raja Lumu arrived in Selangor and founded a new government at Kuala Selangor in 1766. He was installed by the Sultan of Perak as Sultan Salehuddin Shah and became the first Sultan of Selangor.
    7.00
    2 votes
    152
    Baron Grimthorpe

    Baron Grimthorpe

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Grimthorpe, of Grimthorpe in the East Riding of the County of York, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1886 for the lawyer and architect Sir Edmund Beckett, 5th Baronet, with remainder to the heirs male of his father. He was succeeded according to the special remainder by his nephew, the second Baron. He had earlier represented Grimsby in Parliament. As of 2010 the titles are held by the latter's great-grandson, the fifth Baron, who succeeded his father in 2003. The Beckett Baronetcy, of Leeds in the County of York, was created in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom in 1813 for John Beckett. His eldest son, the second Baronet, was a Tory politician. On his death the title passed to his younger brother, the third Baronet, and then to another brother, the fourth Baronet. The latter represented the West Riding of Yorkshire in Parliament. He was succeeded by his eldest son, the fifth Baronet, who was raised to the peerage as Baron Grimthorpe in 1886. Another member of the Beckett family was the Conservative politician Gervase Beckett. He was the younger brother of the second Baron Grimthorpe. The heir apparent is the present holder's son the Hon.
    6.00
    3 votes
    153
    Baron Strathcona and Mount Royal

    Baron Strathcona and Mount Royal

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Strathcona and Mount Royal, of Mount Royal in the Province of Quebec and Dominion of Canada and of Glencoe in the County of Argyll, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1900 for the Scottish-born Canadian financier and politician Donald Smith, 1st Baron Strathcona and Mount Royal, with remainder in default of male issue to his only daughter Margaret Charlotte. Smith had already been created Baron Strathcona and Mount Royal, of Glencoe in the County of Argyll and of Mount Royal in the Province of Quebec and Dominion of Canada, in 1897, with remainder to the issue male of his body. This title was also in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. On his death in 1914 the barony of 1897 became extinct while he was succeeded according to the special remainder in the barony of 1900 by his daughter. She was the wife of Robert Jared Bliss Howard, a surgeon. Their eldest son, the third Baron, represented North Cumberland in the British House of Commons as a Unionist from 1922 to 1926 and served in the National Government as Captain of the Yeomen of the Guard from 1931 to 1934 and as Under-Secretary of State for War from 1934 to 1939. As of 2010 the title is held
    6.00
    3 votes
    154
    Count of Blois

    Count of Blois

    • Noble rank: Count
    The County of Blois was originally centred on Blois, south of Paris, France. One of the chief cities, along with Blois itself, was Chartres. Blois was associated with Champagne, Châtillon (the lords of which tended to reside in Blois), and later with the French royal family, to whom the county passed in 1391. Blois was later important during the Hundred Years' War; Joan of Arc based herself there. The extent of the county varied over time. The northern portion, bordering on Normandy, was sometimes alienated as the County of Chartres, but the Counts of Blois who possessed it did not use a separate title for it. These lands were finally sold to the crown by Joanne of Châtillon in 1291. In 1439, the area around Châteaudun was separated as the County of Dunois for Jean Dunois.
    6.00
    3 votes
    155
    Earl of Dartmouth

    Earl of Dartmouth

    • Noble rank: Earl
    Earl of Dartmouth is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1711 for William Legge, 2nd Baron Dartmouth. The Legge family descended from Edward Legge, Vice-President of Munster. His eldest son William Legge was a Royalist army officer and close associate of Prince Rupert of the Rhine. On the Restoration Charles II offered to create him an earl, but Legge declined. His son George Legge was a prominent naval commander. In 1682 he was raised to the Peerage of England as Baron Dartmouth, of Dartmouth in the County of Devon. His son was the aforementioned second Baron, who notably served as Secretary of State for the Southern Department between 1710 and 1713. In 1711 he was created Viscount Lewisham, in the County of Kent, and Earl of Dartmouth, in the Peerage of Great Britain. He was succeeded by his grandson, the second Earl. He was the only son of George Legge, Viscount Lewisham (d. 1732), eldest son of the first Earl, who had died before his father. He was also an influential politician and served as Secretary of State for the Colonies and First Lord of Trade between 1772 and 1775. The American Ivy League school Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, was
    6.00
    3 votes
    156
    Earl of Ilchester

    Earl of Ilchester

    • Noble rank: Earl
    Earl of Ilchester, is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1756 for Stephen Fox, 1st Baron Ilchester, who had previously represented Shaftesbury in Parliament. He had already been created Baron Ilchester, of Ilchester in the County of Somerset in 1741, and Baron Ilchester and Stavordale, of Redlynch, in the County of Somerset, in 1747. These titles were also in the Peerage of Great Britain. All three peerages were created with remainder, failing heirs male of his own, to his younger brother Henry Fox, who was himself created Baron Holland in 1763. The brothers were the only sons from the second marriage of the politician Sir Stephen Fox. In 1758 the first Earl assumed by Royal license the additional surname of Strangways, which was the maiden name of his wife's maternal grandmother. He was succeeded by his eldest son, the second Earl. He represented Midhurst in Parliament. His eldest son, the third Earl, served as Captain of the Yeomen of the Guard from 1835 to 1841 in the Whig administration of Lord Melbourne and was also Lord Lieutenant of Somerset from 1837 to 1839. Lord Ilchester survived both his sons and was succeeded by his half-brother, the fourth
    6.00
    3 votes
    157
    Baron de Saumarez

    Baron de Saumarez

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron de Saumarez, in the Island of Guernsey, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created on 15 September 1831 for the prominent naval commander Admiral Sir James Saumarez, 1st Baronet. He had already been created a Baronet, of Guernsey, on 13 June 1801. Lord de Saumarez was succeeded by his eldest son James, the second Baron, a clergyman. James was succeeded by his younger brother, John, the third Baron. As of 2009 the titles are held by his great-great-grandson, the seventh Baron, who succeeded his father in 1991. Although born and brought up in Suffolk, in 2006 Lord de Saumarez returned to Guernsey. The Saumarez Manor estate in Guernsey belongs to a very distant branch of the Barons de Saumarez. The ancestral family seat was the Shrubland Park estate, near Ipswich, in Suffolk. It was put on the market by the present Lord de Saumarez in April 2006 following the demise of the Dowager Lady de Saumarez. The heir presumptive is the present holder's twin brother the Hon. Victor Thomas Saumarez (b. 1956)
    5.67
    3 votes
    158
    Baron Bingley

    Baron Bingley

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Bingley is a title that has been created three times, twice in the Peerage of Great Britain and once in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. The first creation came in 1713 in the Peerage of Great Britain, when the former Chancellor of the Exchequer, Robert Benson, was made Baron Bingley, of Bingley in the County of York. He had no sons and the title became extinct on his death in 1731. However, the title was revived in 1762 for his son-in-law, George Fox-Lane, who was also created Baron Bingley, of Bingley in the County of York, with remainder only to his heirs male with his wife, Harriet (daughter of the first Baron of the 1713 creation). Born George Fox, he was the son of Henry Fox and the Hon. Frances, daughter of George Lane, 1st Viscount Lanesborough (see Viscount Lanesborough), and assumed in 1751 by Act of Parliament the additional surname of Lane. Before his elevation to the peerage he had represented Hedon and York in the House of Commons. His son and heir, the Honourable Robert Fox-Lane, Member of Parliament for York, predeceased him in 1768 and the barony consequently became extinct on Lord Bingley's death in 1773. The most recent creation came in the Peerage of the
    6.50
    2 votes
    159
    Baron Grenfell

    Baron Grenfell

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Grenfell, of Kilvey in the County of Glamorgan, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1902 for the military commander [Sir[Francis Grenfell, 1st Baron Grenfell,]Field Marshal]. His eldest son, the second Baron, was Deputy Speaker of the House of Lords and Chairman of Committees from 1963 to 1976. As of 2010 the title is held by the latter's son, the third Baron, who succeeded in 1976. He previously worked for the [[World Bank]1965-95]. Lord Grenfell lost his seat in the House of Lords after the passing of the House of Lords Act of 1999. However, in 2000 he was made a life peer]] as Baron Grenfell of Kilvey, of Kilvey in the County of Swansea, and was able to return to the House of Lords where he sits as a Labour peer. He served as Principal Deputy Chairman of Committees, a Deputy Speaker and Chairman of the Select Committee on the European Union from 2002 to 2006. The heir presumptive to the baroney is Richard Arthur St. Leger Grenfell (b. 1966).
    6.50
    2 votes
    160
    Baron Holand

    Baron Holand

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Holand is a title in the Peerage of England. It was created twice, in 1314 and 1353. The first creation was extinguished by attainder and the second is in abeyance. See Earl of Kent, 1360 creation
    6.50
    2 votes
    161
    Baron Kilbracken

    Baron Kilbracken

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Kilbracken, of Killegar in the County of Leitrim, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1909 for the senior civil servant Sir Arthur Godley. He was Permanent Under-Secretary of State for India between 1883 and 1909. As of 2010 the title is held by his great-grandson, the fourth Baron, who succeeded his father in 2006. John Robert Godley was the father of the first Baron. Another member of the Godley family was General Sir Alexander Godley. He was the first cousin of the first Baron. The heir apparent is the present holder's son The Hon. James John Godley (b. 1972)
    6.50
    2 votes
    162
    Baron Monk Bretton

    Baron Monk Bretton

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Monk Bretton, of Conyboro and Hurstpierpoint in the County of Sussex, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1884 for the Liberal politician John George Dodson. He was succeeded by his son, the second Baron. He was notably chairman of the London County Council from 1929 to 1930. As of 2010 the title is held by the latter's son, the third Baron, who succeeded in 1933. The judge Sir John Dodson was the father of the first Baron. The heir apparent is the present holder's son the Hon. Christopher Mark Dodson (b. 1958)
    6.50
    2 votes
    163
    Baron O'Hagan

    Baron O'Hagan

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron O'Hagan, of Tullahogue in the County of Tyrone, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created on 14 June 1870 for Sir Thomas O'Hagan, then Lord Chancellor of Ireland. His younger son, the third Baron, served as a Lord-in-Waiting (government whip in the House of Lords) from 1907 to 1910 in the Liberal administrations of Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman and H. H. Asquith and was later a Deputy Speaker of the House of Lords. In 1909 Lord O'Hagan assumed by Royal license the additional surname of Towneley, which was that of his maternal grandfather. As of 2010 the title is held by his grandson, the fourth Baron, who succeeded in 1961. He is the son of the Hon. Thomas Anthony Edward Towneley Strachey (d. 1955). Lord O'Hagan was a Member of the European Parliament for Devon from 1973 to 1975 and again from 1979 to 1994, first as an independent and later as a Conservative. He assumed in 1938 by deed poll the additional Christian name of Towneley and the surname of Strachey in lieu of his patronymic. Strachey was the surname of his maternal grandfather Edward Strachey, 1st Baron Strachie.
    6.50
    2 votes
    164
    Baron Saye and Sele

    Baron Saye and Sele

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Saye and Sele is a title in the Peerage of England. It is thought to have been created by letters patent in 1447 for James Fiennes for his services in the Hundred Years' War. The patent creating the original barony was lost, so it was assumed that the barony was created by writ, meaning that it could descend to heirs-general, and not only heirs-male. However, several authorities, including Burke's Peerage, agree that the assumption was erroneous, and that the original creation was by patent. His son, the second baron, was summoned to Parliament but killed at the Battle of Barnet in 1471. His son, the de jure third Baron, was known as Lord Saye and Sele but was never summoned to Parliament. The peerage is therefore considered to have become dormant (unclaimed) on the death of the second Baron. His great-great-great-grandson, Richard Fiennes, the de jure seventh baron, claimed the title in 1573. For years, he remained unsuccessful, but in 1603 James I granted him letters patent confirming his right to the title. The patent confirmed that the barony created in 1447 belonged to Richard Fiennes, but on the condition that, for the purposes of precedence or seniority, it would be
    6.50
    2 votes
    165
    Baron Tollemache

    Baron Tollemache

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Tollemache, of Helmingham Hall near Ipswich in the County of Suffolk, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1876 for John Tollemache, who had earlier represented Cheshire South and Cheshire West in the House of Commons as a Conservative. He was the son of Admiral of the Fleet John Halliday (who in 1821 assumed by Royal license the surname and arms of Tollemache in lieu of Halliday), eldest son of Lady Jane Halliday, youngest daughter and co-heir of Lionel Tollemache, 4th Earl of Dysart. The first Baron was succeeded by his eldest son, the second Baron. He also sat as Conservative Member of Parliament for Cheshire West. On the death of his grandson, the third Baron, this line of the family failed, and the title passed to the late Baron's second cousin, the fourth Baron. He was the son of Major-General Edward Tollemache, son of the Hon. Hamilton James Tollemache, fourth son of the first Baron. As of 2010 the title is held by the fourth Baron's son, the fifth Baron, who succeeded in 1975. He is Lord Lieutenant of Suffolk since 2003. As a descendant of the fourth Earl of Dysart Lord Tollemache is also in remainder to this peerage and its subsidiary
    6.50
    2 votes
    166
    Earl Ferrers

    Earl Ferrers

    • Noble rank: Earl
    Earl Ferrers is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1711 for Robert Shirley, 13th Baron Ferrers of Chartley. The Shirley family descends from George Shirley (died 1622) of Astwell Castle, Northamptonshire. In 1611 he was created a Baronet, of Staunton Harold in the County of Leicester, in the Baronetage of England. He was succeeded by his son, the second Baronet. He married Lady Dorothy Devereux, daughter of Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex. On the death of her brother Robert Devereux, 3rd Earl of Essex, she became the youngest co-heir to the baronies of Ferrers of Chartley and the barony of Bourchier, which had fallen into abeyance on the death of the third Earl. Shirley was succeeded by his eldest son, the third Baronet. He died unmarried and was succeeded by his younger brother, the fourth Baronet. He was imprisoned in the Tower of London by Cromwell and died there in 1656. On his death the title passed to his eldest son, the fifth Baronet. He died at an early age and was succeeded at birth by his posthumous son, the sixth Baronet. He died as an infant and was succeeded by his uncle, the seventh Baronet. In 1677 King Charles II terminated the abeyance of
    6.50
    2 votes
    167
    Earl of Stradbroke

    Earl of Stradbroke

    • Noble rank: Earl
    Earl of Stradbroke, in the County of Suffolk, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1821 for John Rous, 1st Baron Rous, who had earlier represented Suffolk in the House of Commons. He had already succeeded his father as sixth Baronet of Henham in 1771 and been created Baron Rous, of Dennington in the County of Suffolk, in the Peerage of Great Britain in 1796, and was made Viscount Dunwich, in the County of Suffolk, at the same time he was given the earldom. He was succeeded by his eldest son, the second Earl who notably served as Lord Lieutenant of Suffolk. His son, the third Earl, was Governor of Victoria from 1920 to 1926 as well as Lord Lieutenant of Suffolk. He was succeeded by his eldest son, the fourth Earl, who also served as Lord Lieutenant of Suffolk. As of 2010 the titles are held by the latter's nephew, the sixth Earl, who succeeded his father in 1983. Lord Stradbroke lives at Mount Fyans, Victoria, Australia. The Baronetcy, of Henham in the County of Suffolk, was created in the Baronetage of England in 1660 for John Rous. He sat as Member of Parliament for Dunwich and Eye. His son, the second Baronet, represented Dunwich and Suffolk in
    6.50
    2 votes
    168
    Marquess of Abergavenny

    Marquess of Abergavenny

    • Noble rank: Marquess
    Marquess of Abergavenny (pronounced Abergavenny), in the County of Monmouth, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom that was created on 14 January 1876, along with the title Earl of Lewes (pronounced "Lewis"), in the County of Sussex, for the 5th Earl of Abergavenny, a member of the Nevill family. The 1st Marquess's ancestor, the de facto 17th (de jure 2nd) Baron Bergavenny, was created Earl of Abergavenny, in the County of Monmouth, and Viscount Nevill, of Birling in the County of Kent, in the Peerage of Great Britain on 17 May 1784. The Barony of Bergavenny was held by his successors, the Earls and Marquesses of Abergavenny, until 1938, when it passed into abeyance between the two daughters of the 3rd Marquess. The 6th and present Marquess is Christopher George Charles Nevill (b. 23 April 1955), the son of the late Lord Rupert Charles Montecute Nevill and Lady Ann Camilla Evelyn Wallop. He succeeded to the title in 2000 on the death of his uncle the 5th Marquess who had no surviving sons. Eridge Castle is the seat of the Marquesses of Abergavenny. Eridge is 38 miles south of London. The heraldic blazon for the coat of arms of the Marquesses of Abergavenny is: Gules, a
    6.50
    2 votes
    169
    Prince of Wales

    Prince of Wales

    • Noble rank: Crown Prince
    Prince of Wales (Welsh: Tywysog Cymru) is a title traditionally granted to the heir apparent to the reigning monarch of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and the 15 other independent Commonwealth realms (and formerly of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, before that the Kingdom of Great Britain and before that the Kingdom of England). The current Prince of Wales is Prince Charles, the eldest son of Queen Elizabeth II. The Prince of Wales currently has no formal public role or responsibility that has been legislated by Parliament or otherwise delegated by the Monarchy. Charles, like most previous Princes of Wales, is also Duke of Cornwall and therefore responsible for the duchy of Cornwall. For most of the post-Roman period, the nation of Wales was divided into several smaller states. Before the Norman conquest of England, the most powerful Welsh ruler at any given time was generally known as King of the Britons. In the 12th century and the 13th century, this title evolved into Prince of Wales (see Brut y Tywysogion). In Latin, the new title was "Princeps Walliae", and in Welsh it was "Tywysog Cymru". The literal translation of "Tywysog" is
    6.50
    2 votes
    170
    Viscount Scarsdale

    Viscount Scarsdale

    • Noble rank: Viscount
    Viscount Scarsdale, of Scarsdale in the County of Derby, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1911 for the prominent Conservative politician and former Viceroy of India George Curzon, 1st Baron Curzon of Kedleston, who was created Earl Curzon of Kedleston at the same time and was later made Marquess Curzon of Kedleston. The first member of the Curzon family to hold a hereditary title was John Curzon, who created a baronet, of Kedleston in the County of Derby, in both the Baronetage of Nova Scotia (18 June 1636) and the Baronetage of England (11 August 1641). His grandson, the third Baronet, sat as a Member of Parliament for Derbyshire. His younger brother, the fourth Baronet, represented Derby, Clitheroe and Derbyshire in the House of Commons. His eldest son, the fifth Baronet, also sat as a Member of Parliament for Clitheroe and Derbyshire. In 1761 he was created Baron Scarsdale, of Scarsdale in the County of Derby, in the Peerage of Great Britain. Lord Scarsdale later served as Chairman of Committees in the House of Lords. His son, the second Baron, represented Derbyshire in the House of Commons. His grandson, the fourth Baron, was Rector of
    6.50
    2 votes
    171
    Earl of Bradford

    Earl of Bradford

    • Noble rank: Earl
    Earl of Bradford is a title that has been created twice, once in the Peerage of England and once in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was first created in 1694 for Francis Newport, 2nd Baron Newport. However, all the Newport titles became extinct on the death of the fourth Earl in 1762. The Earldom was revived in 1815 for Orlando Bridgeman, 2nd Baron Bradford. The Bridgeman family had previously succeeded to the Newport estates. The title of the peerage refers to the ancient hundred of Bradford in Shropshire, and not, as might be assumed, to the city of Bradford, Yorkshire. The Newports were an ancient Shropshire family. One member of the family, Richard Newport, represented Shropshire and Shrewsbury in Parliament and was a supporter of King Charles I during the Civil War. In 1642 he was raised to the Peerage of England as Baron Newport, of High Ercall in the County of Shropshire. His son, the second Baron, represented Shrewsbury in the Long Parliament and fought as a Royalist in the Civil War. After the Restoration he served as Lord Lieutenant of Shropshire, as Comptroller of the Household and as Treasurer of the Household. In 1676 Newport was created Viscount Newport, of
    4.75
    4 votes
    172
    Earl of Lindsey

    Earl of Lindsey

    • Noble rank: Earl
    Earl of Lindsey is a title in the Peerage of England. It was created in 1626 for the 14th Baron Willoughby de Eresby (see Baron Willoughby de Eresby for earlier history of the family). He was First Lord of the Admiralty from 1635 to 1636 and also established his claim in right of his mother to the hereditary office of Lord Great Chamberlain of England. Lord Lindsey fought on the Royalist side in the Civil War and was killed at the Battle of Edgehill on 23 October 1642. He was succeeded by his son, the second Earl. He also fought at Edgehill and surrendered to the Parliamentarians in order to attend his mortally wounded father. Lord Lindsey later fought at both Battles of Newbury and at Naseby. His son from his second marriage, James, was created Earl of Abingdon in 1682. He was succeeded by his son from his first marriage to Martha Cockayne, the third Earl. He represented Boston in the House of Commons and served as Lord Lieutenant of Lincolnshire. His son, the fourth Earl, was summoned to the House of Lords in 1690 through a writ of acceleration in his father's junior title of Baron Willoughby de Eresby. He later served as Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and as Lord
    4.75
    4 votes
    173
    Baron Stuart de Rothesay

    Baron Stuart de Rothesay

    • Noble rank: Baron
    The title of Baron Stuart de Rothesay was created in the Peerage of the United Kingdom for the British diplomat, Sir Charles Stuart on 22 January 1828. The title became extinct upon his death on 6 November 1845.
    5.33
    3 votes
    174
    Earl of Harrowby

    Earl of Harrowby

    • Noble rank: Earl
    Earl of Harrowby, in the County of Lincoln, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1809 for the prominent politician and former Foreign Secretary, Dudley Ryder, 2nd Baron Harrowby. He was made Viscount Sandon, of Sandon in the County of Stafford, at the same time, which title is used as a courtesy title by the heir apparent to the earldom. His son, the second Earl, held office under Lord Palmerston as Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Lord Privy Seal. He was succeeded by his eldest son, the third Earl. He was a Conservative politician and notably served as President of the Board of Trade from 1878 to 1880. His nephew, the fifth Earl (who succeeded his father in 1900), briefly represented Gravesend in the House of Commons as a Conservative and was also Lord Lieutenant of Staffordshire. His son, the sixth Earl, sat as Conservative Member of Parliament for Shrewsbury. As of 2010 the titles are held by the latter's grandson, the eighth Earl, who succeeded his father in 2007. The title of Baron Harrowby, of Harrowby in the County of Lincoln, was created in the Peerage of Great Britain in 1776 for Nathaniel Ryder, who had previously represented Tiverton
    5.33
    3 votes
    175
    Sultan of Egypt

    Sultan of Egypt

    • Noble rank: Sultan
    Sultan of Egypt was the status held by the rulers of Egypt after the establishment of the Ayyubid Dynasty of Saladin in 1174 until the Ottoman conquest of Egypt in 1517. Though the extent of the Egyptian Sultanate ebbed and flowed, it generally included Sham and Hejaz, with the consequence that the Ayyubid and later Mameluke sultans were also regarded as the Sultans of Syria. From 1914 the title was once again used by the heads of the Muhammad Ali Dynasty of Egypt and Sudan, later being replaced by the title of King of Egypt and Sudan in 1922. Prior to the rise of Saladin, Egypt was the center of the Shia Fatimid Caliphate, the only period in Islamic history when a caliphate was ruled by members of the Shia branch of Islam. The Fatimids had long sought to completely supplant the Sunni Abbasid Caliphate based in Iraq, and like their Abbasid rivals they also took the title Caliph, representing their claim to the highest status within the Islamic hierarchy. However, with Saladin's rise to power in 1169, Egypt returned to the Sunni fold and the Abbasid Caliphate. Recognizing the Abbasid Caliph as his theoretical superior, Saladin took the title of Sultan in 1174, though from this point
    5.33
    3 votes
    176
    Baron Playfair

    Baron Playfair

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Playfair, of St Andrews in the County of Fife, was a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created on 3 September 1892 for the scientist and Liberal politician Sir Lyon Playfair. He was succeeded by his only son, the second Baron. He was a Brigadier-General in the British Army. His only son, the Hon. Lyon Playfair (1888-1915), was a Captain in the Royal Field Artillery and was killed in action in the First World War, unmarried. Consequently, the title became extinct on the death of the second Baron in 1939.
    7.00
    1 votes
    177
    Baron Sheffield

    Baron Sheffield

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Sheffield is a title that has been created four times: once in the Peerage of England, twice in the Peerage of Ireland, and once in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. The first creation, as Baron Sheffield of Butterwick, was in the Peerage of England in 1547 for Edmund Sheffield (1521–1549), second cousin of Henry VIII, who was murdered in Norwich during Kett's Rebellion. His grandson, the 3rd Baron Sheffield, was created Earl of Mulgrave in 1626, and the 3rd Earl of Mulgrave was finally advanced to the dukedom of Buckingham and Normanby. At the death of the 2nd Duke of Buckingham and Normanby, however, all of the titles became extinct since no heirs to them remained. The next three creations were all in favour of one person, John Baker-Holroyd (1735–1821). In 1781, on the second creation of the title, he was made Baron Sheffield, of Dunnamore in the County of Meath in the Peerage of Ireland. This peerage was created with normal remainder to the heirs male of his body. Two years later, in 1783, John Baker-Holroyd obtained the third creation of the title when he was made Baron Sheffield, of Roscommon in the County of Roscommon, also in the Peerage of Ireland, with remainder,
    7.00
    1 votes
    178
    Baron Strathspey

    Baron Strathspey

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Strathspey, of Strathspey in the Counties of Inverness and Moray, is a title that has been created twice, both times in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created for the first time in 1858 for John Ogilvy-Grant, 7th Earl of Seafield (see the Earl of Seafield for earlier history of this title). This creation became extinct on the death of his son, the eighth Earl and second Baron, in 1884. However, it was revived only a few months later in favour of the late Earl's uncle, James Ogilvy-Grant, 9th Earl of Seafield (who had also succeeded him in the baronetcy of Colquhoun; see Colquhoun baronets for earlier history of this title). The barony and baronetcy remained subsidiary titles of the earldom until the death of the ninth Earl's grandson, the eleventh Earl, in 1915. The earldom, which could be passed on to female heirs, was inherited by the Earl's daughter and only child, the twelfth Countess (see the Earl of Seafield for later history of the earldom). The baronetcy and barony of Strathspey, which could only be inherited by males, were passed on to the Earl's brother, the fourth Baron. His son, the fifth Baron, was confirmed in the surname of Grant of Grant by decree
    7.00
    1 votes
    179
    Baron Walsingham

    Baron Walsingham

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Walsingham, of Walsingham in the County of Norfolk, is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1780 for Sir William de Grey on his retirement as Lord Chief Justice of the Common Pleas. He had also previously served as Solicitor General and as Attorney General. His son, the second Baron, represented Wareham, Tamworth and Lostwithiel in the House of Commons and served as Joint Postmaster General from 1787 to 1794. Lord Walsingham was also Chairman of Committees in the House of Lords for many years. His eldest son, the third Baron, was a Lieutenant-General in the Army. The latter was succeeded by his younger brother, the fourth Baron. He was Archdeacon of Surrey. His grandson, the sixth Baron, was a Conservative Member of Parliament for Norfolk West and served as a government whip from 1874 to 1875 in Benjamin Disraeli's second administration. On his death the title passed to his half-brother, the seventh Baron. As of 2010 the title is held by the latter's grandson, the ninth Baron, who succeeded his father in 1965. The heir apparent is the present holder's son the Hon. Robert de Grey (b. 1969)
    7.00
    1 votes
    180
    Baron Wenlock

    Baron Wenlock

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Wenlock is a title that has been created three times, once in the Peerage of England and twice in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. The first creation came in 1461 when the soldier Sir John Wenlock was summoned to Parliament as Lord Wenlock. However, he was childless and on his death in 1471 the title became extinct. The second creation came in the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1831 when Sir Robert Lawley, 6th Baronet, was created Baron Wenlock, of Wenlock in the County of Shropshire. He had earlier represented Newcastle-under-Lyme in the House of Commons. However, he was childless and on his death in 1834 the barony became extinct. He was succeeded in the baronetcy by his younger brother, the seventh Baronet. He was a former Member of Parliament for Warwickshire. On his death the title passed to his younger brother, the eighth Baronet. In 1820 he had inherited the Escrick estate in Yorkshire from his uncle Richard Thompson and had assumed by Royal license the surname of Thompson in lieu of Lawley. He also represented Wenlock and the East Riding of Yorkshire. In 1839, twelve years before he succeeded in the baronetcy, the barony created for his elder brother was revived
    7.00
    1 votes
    181
    Earl of Ducie

    Earl of Ducie

    • Noble rank: Earl
    Earl of Ducie is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1837 for Thomas Reynolds Moreton, 4th Baron Ducie. The family descends from Edward Moreton (17th century), who married Elizabeth, daughter of Robert Ducie. Their son Matthew Ducie Moreton represented Gloucestershire in the House of Commons. In 1720 he was raised to the Peerage of Great Britain as Lord Ducie, Baron of Moreton, in the County of Stafford. He was succeeded by his son, the second Baron. He was also a Member of Parliament and served as Lord-Lieutenant of Gloucestershire. In 1763 he was created Baron Ducie, of Tortworth in the County of Gloucester, with remainder to the sons of his sister Elizabeth Reynolds. This title was also in the Peerage of Great Britain. On his death in 1770 the barony of 1720 became extinct. He was succeeded in the barony of 1763 according to the special remainder by his nephew, the second Baron. He assumed the surname of Moreton by Act of Parliament in 1771. He died childless and was succeeded by his younger brother, the third Baron. He had earlier represented Lancaster in Parliament. Lord Ducie assumed the surname of Moreton by Act of Parliament in 1786. Remote Ducie
    7.00
    1 votes
    182
    Marquess of Huntly

    Marquess of Huntly

    • Noble rank: Marquess
    Marquess of Huntly (also spelt Marquis) (Scottish Gaelic: Coileach Strath Bhalgaidh) is a title in the Peerage of Scotland created on 17 April 1599 for George Gordon, 6th Earl of Huntly. It is the oldest existing marquessate in Scotland, and the second-oldest in the British Isles, only the English marquessate of Winchester being older. The Marquess holds the following subsidiary titles: Lord Gordon of Strathaven and Glenlivet and Earl of Aboyne (1660; Peerage of Scotland), and Baron Meldrum, of Morven in the County of Aberdeen (1815; Peerage of the United Kingdom) The Gordon family descends from Sir Adam Gordon of Huntly, killed at the Battle of Humbleton Hill in 1402 and succeeded in his estates by his daughter Elizabeth, wife of Alexander Seton whose son Alexander assumed the surname of Gordon in lieu of Seton. He was created Earl of Huntly in the Peerage of Scotland in 1445 and succeeded by his son, the second Earl, who served as Lord Chancellor of Scotland from 1498 to 1501. His younger son the Hon. Adam Gordon married Elizabeth, suo jure Countess of Sutherland. Their grandson John Gordon succeeded his grandmother in the earldom in 1535 (see the Earl of Sutherland for further
    7.00
    1 votes
    183
    Baron Somerleyton

    Baron Somerleyton

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Somerleyton, of Somerleyton in the County of Suffolk, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1916 for the Liberal Unionist politician and former Paymaster-General Sir Savile Crossley, 2nd Baronet. As of 2012 the titles are held by his great-grandson, the fourth Baron, who succeeded his father in 2012. The third Baron notably served as Master of the Horse from 1991 to 1998 and was made a Knight Grand Cross of the Royal Victorian Order in 1998. The Crossley Baronetcy, of Halifax in the County of York, was created in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom in 1863 for the first Baron's father, the carpet manufacturer, philanthropist and Liberal Member of Parliament, Francis Crossley. The family seat is Somerleyton Hall in Somerleyton, Suffolk. The heir apparent is the current holder's son, Hon. John Crossley (b. 2010).
    4.50
    4 votes
    184
    Baron Penrhyn

    Baron Penrhyn

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Penrhyn is a title that has been created twice. The first creation came in the Peerage of Ireland in 1783 in favour of Richard Pennant, who had previously served as a Member of Parliament for Petersfield and Liverpool. This creation became extinct on his death in 1808. The next creation came in 1866 in the Peerage of the United Kingdom when the Conservative politician Edward Douglas-Pennant was created Baron Penrhyn, of Llandegai in the County of Carnarvon. He had previously represented Carnarvon in the House of Commons and also served as Lord Lieutenant of Caernarvonshire. He was granted the estate of his father-in-law (a cousin and heir of the first Baron of the 1783 creation) on the condition that he accepted his wife's maiden name, Pennant. Lord Penrhyn was the younger brother of George Douglas, 17th Earl of Morton. In 1833 he had married Juliana Isabella Mary Pennant (d. 1842), eldest daughter and co-heiress of George Hay Dawkins-Pennant of Penrhyn Castle and in 1841 he assumed by Royal license the additional surname of Pennant. Lord Penrhyn was succeeded by his eldest son George Sholto, the second Baron. He also represented Carnarvon in Parliament as a Conservative. On
    6.00
    2 votes
    185
    Earl of Eldon

    Earl of Eldon

    • Noble rank: Earl
    Earl of Eldon, in the County Palatine of Durham, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1821 for the lawyer and politician John Scott, 1st Baron Scott, Lord Chancellor from 1801 to 1806 and from 1807 to 1827. He had already been created Baron Eldon, of Eldon in the County Palatine of Durham, in the Peerage of Great Britain in 1799, and was made Viscount Encombe, of Encombe in the County of Dorset, at the same time was given the earldom. His grandson, the second Earl, briefly represented Truro in the House of Commons. As of 2010 the titles are held by the latter's great-great-grandson, the fifth Earl, who succeeded his father in 1976. William Scott, 1st Baron Stowell, was the elder brother of the first Earl of Eldon. The Hon. Sir Ernest Scott, second son of the third Earl, was Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to Hungary. The heir apparent is the present holder's son John Francis Scott, Viscount Encombe (b. 1962)
    6.00
    2 votes
    186
    Lord of Mann

    Lord of Mann

    • Noble rank: Lord
    The title Lord of Mann (Manx: Çhiarn Vannin) is used on the Isle of Man to refer to Queen Elizabeth II, who is the island's Lord Proprietor and head of state. The title is not correctly used on its own. Since 1399, the Kings and Lords of Mann existed in a position of feudality as vassals of the reigning King of England, and subsequently of Great Britain and the United Kingdom, who was the ultimate sovereign of the island. This right of 'Lord Proprietor' was revested into the Crown by the Isle of Man Purchase Act 1765 and hence ceased to exist separately. King George III became the first British monarch to rule the Isle of Man as 'Lord of Mann' in 1769. However, for reasons of culture and tradition, the title Lord of Mann continues to be used. For these reasons, the correct formal usage, as used on the Isle of Man for the Loyal Toast, is The Queen, Lord of Mann. The title is now Lord of Mann regardless of gender. However, during her reign Queen Victoria was styled as Lady of Mann. The formal Latin style is Dominus Manniae. Analogously, the British monarch (whether male or female) is "Duke of Lancaster." In 1598, a succession dispute between the daughters of Ferdinando Stanley, 5th
    6.00
    2 votes
    187
    Viscount Cobham

    Viscount Cobham

    • Noble rank: Viscount
    Viscount Cobham is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1718 for Field Marshal Richard Temple, 1st Baron Cobham and 4th Baronet, of Stowe. The Viscount holds the subsidiary titles of Baron Cobham, of Cobham in the County of Kent, (1718), Baron Westcote, of Ballymore in the County of Longford (1776), and Baron Lyttelton, of Frankley in the County of Worcester (1794). All the titles are in the Peerage of Great Britain, except the barony of Westcote, which is in the Peerage of Ireland. The Viscount is also a Baronet, of Frankley in the County of Worcester (1618). The barony and viscountcy of Cobham were subsidiary titles of the earldom of Temple from 1750 to 1784, of the Marquessate of Buckingham from 1784 to 1822 and of the Dukedom of Buckingham and Chandos from 1822 to 1889. Since the latter year the titles are merged with the barony of Lyttelton and barony of Westcote. The Temple family descended from Peter Temple of Burton Dassett. His younger son Anthony Temple founded the Irish branch of the family from whom the Viscounts Palmerston descended. Peter Temple's eldest son, John Temple, acquired the Stowe estate in Buckinghamshire. The latter's son Thomas
    6.00
    2 votes
    188
    Earl of Morley

    Earl of Morley

    • Noble rank: Earl
    Earl of Morley, in the County of Devon, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1815 for the politician John Parker, 2nd Baron Boringdon. He was made Viscount Boringdon, of North Molton in the County of Devon, at the same time, which title is used as a courtesy title by the heir apparent to the earldom. No manor of the name "Morley" appears to exist in Devon, and the name appears rather to refer to Morley Saint Botolph in Norfolk, which was the origin of the ancient Barony of Morley held by the Lovel family and inherited in the 15th.c. by a member of a Parker family through marriage to the Lovel heiress. Whether the ancient Parker family of North Molton were related to this other Parker family of Barons Morley has not apparently formed the subject of any enquiry, but some connection would seem to exist from the choice of Morley as the name of the Parker earldom. The title of Baron Boringdon, of Boringdon in the County of Devon, was created in the Peerage of Great Britain in 1784 for his father John Parker, who had previously represented Bodmin and Devon in the House of Commons. Lord Morley was succeeded by his only son, the second Earl. He held minor
    5.00
    3 votes
    189
    Baron Noel-Buxton

    Baron Noel-Buxton

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Noel-Buxton, of Aylsham in the County of Norfolk, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1930 for the politician Noel Noel-Buxton, who was the second son of Sir Thomas Buxton, 3rd Baronet, of Belfield, and a great-grandson of the philanthropist Sir Thomas Fowell Buxton, 1st Baronet, of Belfield, as well as a great-nephew of Charles Buxton, the father of Sydney Buxton, 1st Earl Buxton. As of 2010 the title is held by his grandson, the third Baron, who succeeded his father in 1980. As a descendant of the third Baronet of Belfield, he is also in remainder to this title. Another member of the Buxton family is Aubrey Buxton who was created a life peer as Baron Buxton of Alsa in 1978. He is the son of Leland William Wilberforce Buxton, youngest son of the third Baronet.
    5.50
    2 votes
    190
    Baron Stanmore

    Baron Stanmore

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Stanmore, of Great Stanmore in the County of Middlesex, was a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1893 for the colonial administrator the Hon. Sir Arthur Hamilton-Gordon. He was the youngest son of the former Prime Minister George Hamilton-Gordon, 4th Earl of Aberdeen (see Marquess of Aberdeen and Temair for earlier history of the family). His only son, the second Baron, served as a Government Whip from 1914 to 1922 and as Chief Liberal Whip in the House of Lords from 1923 to 1944. However, Lord Stanmore never married and the title became extinct on his death in 1957.
    5.50
    2 votes
    191
    Duke of Montrose

    Duke of Montrose

    • Noble rank: Duke
    The title of Duke of Montrose (named after Montrose, Angus) was created twice in the peerage of Scotland, firstly in 1488 for David Lindsay, 5th Earl of Crawford. It was forfeited and then returned, but only for the period of the holder's lifetime. Thus, it was not inherited. The title was bestowed anew in 1707, again in the peerage of Scotland, on the fourth Marquess of Montrose, and has since been in the Graham family. The title is also tied as the chieftainship of Clan Graham. The Duke's subsidiary titles are: Marquess of Montrose (created 1644), Marquess of Graham and Buchanan (1707), Earl of Montrose (1503), Earl of Kincardine (1644 & 1707), Earl Graham of Belford (1722), Viscount Dundaff (1707), Lord Graham (1445), Lord Aberruthven, Mugdock and Fintrie (1707) and Baron Graham of Belford (1722). The titles Earl and Baron Graham of Belford are in the peerage of Great Britain; the rest are in the peerage of Scotland. The eldest son of the Duke uses the courtesy title Marquess of Graham and Buchanan. The family seat is Auchmar, near Loch Lomond. The heir apparent is James Graham, Marquess of Graham (b. 1973), elder son of the 8th Duke
    5.50
    2 votes
    192
    Earl of Cork

    Earl of Cork

    • Noble rank: Earl
    Earl of the County of Cork, usually shortened to Earl of Cork, is a title in the Peerage of Ireland. It was created in 1620 for the Anglo-Irish politician Richard Boyle, 1st Baron Boyle. He had already been created Lord Boyle, Baron of Youghal, in the County of Cork, in 1616, and was made Viscount of Dungarvan, in the County of Waterford, at the same time he was given the earldom. These titles are also in the Peerage of Ireland. Known as the "Great Earl", he was born in Canterbury, England, but settled in Ireland in 1588, where he married an Irish heiress and bought large estates in County Cork. From 1631 to 1643 he served as Lord Treasurer of Ireland. His third son the Hon. Sir Roger Boyle was created Earl of Orrery in 1660. The first Earl of Cork was remarkable for having four of his sons created peers; his remaining son was Robert Boyle, the physicist, discoverer of Boyle's Law, whose fame may outlast all his brothers' together. Lord Cork was succeeded by his second son, another Richard Boyle, the second Earl; his eldest son died young. This Richard Boyle had already succeeded his younger brother as second Viscount Boyle of Kinalmeaky according to a special remainder in the
    5.50
    2 votes
    193
    Earl of Radnor

    Earl of Radnor

    • Noble rank: Earl
    Earl of Radnor is a title which has been created two times. It was first created in the Peerage of England in 1679 for John Robartes, 2nd Baron Robartes, a notable political figure of the reign of Charles II. He was made Viscount Bodmin at the same time. Robartes was the son of Richard Robartes, who had been created Baronet in July 1621 and Baron Robartes, of Truro, in the Peerage of England in 1626. All three titles became extinct on the death of the fourth Earl in 1757. Anna Maria Hunt, great-niece of the fourth Earl, married the Hon. Charles Bagenal-Agar, youngest son of James Agar, 1st Viscount Clifden. Their son Thomas James Agar-Robartes was created Baron Robartes in 1869. For more information on this title, see the Viscount Clifden. The earldom was created for a second time in the Peerage of Great Britain in 1765 when William Bouverie, 2nd Viscount Folkestone, was made Earl of Radnor. The Bouverie family descends from William des Bouveries, a prominent London merchant. He was created a Baronet, of St. Catherine Cree Church, London, in the Baronetage of Great Britain in 1714. His eldest son, the second Baronet, represented Shaftesbury in the House of Commons. He was succeeded
    5.50
    2 votes
    194
    Marquess Townshend

    Marquess Townshend

    • Noble rank: Marquess
    Marquess Townshend /ˈtaʊnzənd/ is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain held by the Townshend family of Raynham Hall in Norfolk. This family descends from Roger Townshend, who in 1617 was created a baronet, of Raynham in the County of Norfolk, in the Baronetage of England. He later represented Orford and Norfolk in the House of Commons. His younger son, the third Baronet (who succeeded his elder brother), played an important role in the restoration of the monarchy after the Civil War and was also Member of Parliament for Norfolk. In 1661 he was created Baron Townshend, of Lynn Regis in the County of Norfolk, and in 1682 he was further honoured when he was made Viscount Townshend, of Raynham in the County of Norfolk. Both titles were in the Peerage of England. He was succeeded by his son, the second Viscount. He was a prominent statesman and served as Secretary of State for the Northern Department from 1714 to 1716 and from 1721 to 1730. Lord Townshend is also remembered for the agricultural reforms he undertook at his Norfolk estate and gained the nickname "Turnip Townshend". His eldest son, the third Viscount, briefly represented Great Yarmouth in the House of Commons. However,
    5.50
    2 votes
    195
    Baron Auckland

    Baron Auckland

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Auckland is a title in both the Peerage of Ireland and the Peerage of Great Britain. The first creation came in 1789 when the prominent politician and financial expert William Eden was made Baron Auckland in the Peerage of Ireland. In 1793, he was created Baron Auckland, of West Auckland in the County of Durham, in the Peerage of Great Britain. Eden notably served as Chief Secretary for Ireland, Ambassador to Spain and President of the Board of Trade. His second son, the second Baron, was also a politician and served as Governor-General of India. In 1839 he was created Baron Eden, of Norwood in the County of Surrey, and Earl of Auckland, in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. However, he never married and the barony of Eden and earldom became extinct on his death while he was succeeded in the baronies of Auckland by his younger brother, the third Baron. He was Bishop of both Sodor and Man and Bath and Wells. The titles descended from father to son until the death of the sixth Baron in 1941. He was succeeded by his cousin, the seventh Baron. He was the son of the Hon. George Eden, third son of the fourth Baron. He was succeeded by his younger brother, the eighth Baron. As of
    4.67
    3 votes
    196
    Baron Parmoor

    Baron Parmoor

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Parmoor, of Frieth in the County of Buckingham, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1914 for the lawyer and politician Sir Charles Cripps. Two of his sons, the second and third Baron, both succeeded in the title. The third Baron was succeeded by his son, the fourth Baron. As of 2010 the title is held by the latter's first cousin, the fifth Baron, who succeeded in 2008. He is the grandson of Major the Hon. Leonard Harrison Cripps, third son of the first Baron. The Labour politician the Hon. Sir Stafford Cripps was the youngest son of the first Baron. Parmoor House in Parmoor hamlet near Frieth, Buckinghamshire, was the home of the first Baron Parmoor.
    4.67
    3 votes
    197
    Baron Adrian

    Baron Adrian

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Adrian, of Cambridge in the County of Cambridge, was a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created on 27 January 1955 for the electrophysiologist and Nobel Prize recipient Edgar Adrian. He was succeeded by his only son, the second Baron. He was Professor of cell physiology at the University of Cambridge. He was childless and the title became extinct on his death in 1995.
    6.00
    1 votes
    198
    Baron Berkeley

    Baron Berkeley

    • Noble rank: Baron
    The title Baron Berkeley originated as a feudal title and was subsequently created twice in the Peerage of England by writ. It was first granted by writ to Thomas II de Berkeley, 1st Baron Berkeley(1245–1321), 6th feudal Baron Berkeley, in 1295, but the title of that creation became extinct at the death of his great-great-grandson, the fifth Baron by writ, when no male heirs to the barony by writ remained, although the feudal barony continued. The next creation by writ was in 1421, for the last baron's nephew and heir James Berkeley. His son and successor William was created Viscount Berkeley in 1481, Earl of Nottingham in 1483, and Marquess of Berkeley in 1488. He had no surviving male issue, so the Marquesate and his other non-inherited titles became extinct on his death in 1491, whilst the barony passed de jure to his younger brother Maurice. However William had disinherited Maurice because he considered him to have brought shame on the noble House of Berkeley by marrying beneath his status to Isabel, daughter of Philip Mead of Wraxhall, an Alderman and Mayor of Bristol. Instead he bequeathed the castle, lands and lordships comprising the Barony of Berkeley to King Henry VII and
    6.00
    1 votes
    199
    Baron Brougham and Vaux

    Baron Brougham and Vaux

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Brougham and Vaux ( /ˈbrʊm ən ˈvɔːks/), of Brougham in the County of Westmorland and of High Head Castle in the County of Cumberland, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1860 for the lawyer, Whig politician and former Lord Chancellor Henry Brougham, 1st Baron Brougham and Vaux, with remainder to his younger brother William Brougham. He had already been created Baron Brougham and Vaux, of Brougham in the County of Westmorland, in 1830, also in the Peerage of the United Kingdom, with normal remainder to the heirs male of his body. On his death in 1868 the barony of 1830 became extinct as he had no sons while he was succeeded in the barony of 1860 according to the special remainder by his brother William, the second Baron. He had earlier represented Southwark in the House of Commons. As of 2010 the title is held by his great-great-grandson, the fifth Baron, who succeeded his father in 1967. He is one of the ninety elected hereditary peers that were allowed to remain in the House of Lords after the passing of the House of Lords Act 1999, and sits as a Conservative. The heir apparent is the present holder's son the Hon. Charles William Brougham (b.
    6.00
    1 votes
    200
    Baron Hastings

    Baron Hastings

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Hastings is a title that has been created three times. The first creation was in the Peerage of England in 1295, and is extant. The second creation was in the Peerage of England in 1299, and became extinct on the death of the first holder in c. 1314. The third creation was in the Peerage of England in 1461, and has been in abeyance since 1960. John Hastings was summoned to the Model Parliament as Lord Hastings on 23 June 1295. He was the son of Henry de Hastings, who had been created Baron Hastings by Simon de Montfort in 1263. This title does not appear to have been recognised by the King, although his son John Hastings is sometimes referred to as the second Baron Hastings. John Hastings's grandson, the third Baron, was created Earl of Pembroke in 1339. The latter’s son, the second Earl, married as his second wife Anne Hastings, 2nd Baroness Manny. Their son, the third Earl and fifth Baron Hastings, succeeded his mother as third Baron Manny. On his death in 1389 the earldom and barony of Manny became extinct, while the barony of Hastings became dormant. It then became the subject of a bitter-fought law suit, nominally over the right to the Hastings arms but including the
    6.00
    1 votes
    201
    Baron Kilmarnock

    Baron Kilmarnock

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Kilmarnock, of Kilmarnock in the County of Ayr, Scotland, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1831 for William Hay, 18th Earl of Erroll. This was a revival of the Kilmarnock title held by his great-grandfather William Boyd, 4th Earl of Kilmarnock, who was attainted in 1746 (with his titles forfeited). The barony of Kilmarnock remained a subsidiary title of the earldom of Erroll until the death in 1941 of the eighteenth Earl's great-great-grandson, the twenty-second Earl. The earldom, which could be passed on through female lines, was inherited by the late Earl's daughter and only child, the twenty-third Countess. The barony of Kilmarnock, which could only be passed on to male heirs, was inherited by the Earl's younger brother, the sixth Baron. He assumed the surname of Boyd in lieu of Hay the same year he succeeded to the title. As of 2010 the title is held by his younger son, the eighth Baron, who succeeded his elder brother in 2009. The current Barons Kilmarnock are the hereditary Clan Chiefs of Clan Boyd. The heir apparent is the present holder's eldest son, Simon John Boyd (b. 1978) The heir apparent's heir apparent is his son Lucian Michael
    6.00
    1 votes
    202
    Baron Seaton

    Baron Seaton

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Seaton, of Seaton in the County of Devon, was a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created on 14 December 1839 for the soldier and colonial administrator Sir John Colborne. He fought at the Battle of Waterloo and was Lieutenant Governor of Upper Canada from 1828 to 1836, acting Governor General of British North America from 1837 to 1838 and Commander-in-Chief of North America from 1838 to 1839. He later served as Commander-in-Chief of Ireland between 1855 and 1860 and was promoted to Field Marshal in 1860. Lord Seaton was succeeded by his eldest son, the second Baron. He was Military Secretary to his father when Commander-in-Chief of the Forces in Ireland. On his death the titles passed to his eldest son, the third Baron. He was a Major in the Royal 1st Devon Yeomanry and fought in the Second Boer War and in the First World War. Lord Seaton married Elizabeth Beatrice (d. 1937), daughter of Sir Francis Fuller-Eliott-Drake, 2nd Baronet, of Nutwell Court and Buckland Abbey (a title which became extinct on his death in 1916), in 1887. In 1917 he assumed by Royal Licence the additional surnames of Eliott-Drake. Lord Seaton was childless and on his death in 1933 the
    6.00
    1 votes
    203
    Earl of Galloway

    Earl of Galloway

    • Noble rank: Earl
    Earl of Galloway is a title in the Peerage of Scotland. It was created in 1623 for Alexander Stewart, 1st Lord Garlies, with remainder to his heirs male bearing the name and arms of Stewart. He had already been created Lord Garlies in the Peerage of Scotland in 1607, with remainder to the heirs male of his body succeeding to the estates of Garlies. This branch of the Stewart family were distant relatives of the Stewart King of Scotland. Lord Galloway was succeeded by his second but eldest surviving son, the second Earl. He had already been created a Baronet, of Corsewell, Corswell Castle, north Kirkcolm Parish, Wigtownshire, Scotland in 1627. This title is in the Baronetage of Nova Scotia or New Scotland baronetage. John Ainslie's AD1782 map in the National Library of Scotland, shows Lady Galloway at "Fine View", Kircolme, in the Parish of Kirkcolm, Wigtownshire. His grandson, the fifth Earl (who had succeeded his elder brother, who in his turn had succeeded his father), was a politician. He was succeeded by his son, the sixth Earl. He was a Lord of Police. In 1704 Lord Galloway succeeded his kinsman Sir Archibald Stewart, 2nd Baronet, of Burray, as third Baronet of Burray (see
    6.00
    1 votes
    204
    Earl of Malmesbury

    Earl of Malmesbury

    • Noble rank: Earl
    Earl of Malmesbury is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1800 for the diplomat James Harris, 1st Baron Malmesbury. The son of the grammarian and politician James Harris, he served as Ambassador to Spain, Prussia, Russia and France and also represented Christchurch in the House of Commons. Harris had already been created Baron Malmesbury, of Malmesbury in the County of Wiltshire, in 1788, and was made Viscount FitzHarris, of Hurn Court in the County of Southampton, at the same time he was given the earldom. He was succeeded by his eldest son, the second Earl. He sat as Member of Parliament for Helston, Horsham, Heytesbury and Wilton. His eldest son, the third Earl, was a prominent Conservative politician. He served as Foreign Secretary in 1852 and from 1858 to 1859 and was also Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords. Lord Malmesbury died childless and was succeeded by his nephew, the fourth Earl. He was the son of Admiral the Hon. Sir Edward Harris, second son of the second Earl. His eldest son, the fifth Earl, served as a Lord-in-Waiting (government whip in the House of Lords) from 1922 to 1924 in the Conservative administrations of Andrew Bonar
    6.00
    1 votes
    205
    Earl Waldegrave

    Earl Waldegrave

    • Noble rank: Earl
    Earl Waldegrave is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1729 for James Waldegrave, 2nd Baron Waldegrave. The Waldegrave family descends from Sir Richard Waldegrave, Speaker of the House of Commons from 1381 to 1382. His son and namesake, Sir Richard Waldegrave, was a soldier and fought in the Hundred Years' War. His descendant Sir Edward Waldegrave was a politician and courtier. A prominent Catholic, he held office under Queen Mary I, who granted him the Chewton estate in Somerset. However, Waldegrave was imprisoned in the Tower of London after the accession of Queen Elizabeth I, where he died in 1561. His grandson Edward Waldegrave fought as a Royalist in the Civil War despite his old age. In 1643 he was created a baronet, of Hever Castle in the County of Kent, in the Baronetage of England. His great-grandson, the fourth Baronet (the title having descended from father to son), married Henrietta FitzJames, illegitimate daughter of King James II and his mistress Arabella Churchill. Mainly thanks to this marriage Waldegrave was raised to the Peerage of England as Baron Waldegrave, of Chewton in the County of Somerset. He was succeeded by his son, the second
    6.00
    1 votes
    206
    Baron Aberconway

    Baron Aberconway

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Aberconway, of Bodnant in the County of Denbigh, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created on 21 June 1911 for the industrialist and Liberal politician Sir Charles McLaren, 1st Baronet. He had already been created a baronet, of Bodnant, Gwylgre and Hilders, on 8 August 1902. His eldest son, the second Baron, was a businessman and also sat as a Member of Parliament. He was succeeded by his son, the third Baron. In August 1939, the future third Baron was part of a secret delegation sent to Germany by Lord Halifax to offer Adolf Hitler concessions on the assurance that he would not invade Poland. The third baron died on 4 February 2003 and the title passed to his eldest son, Henry McLaren, the fourth and (As of 2010) present holder of the titles. As of 30 June 2006, the present holder of the barony has not successfully proven his succession to the baronetcy and is therefore not on the Official Roll of the Baronetage. However, the case is under review by the Registrar of the Baronetage. For more information, follow this link. The family seat is Bodnant Hall, near the town of Conwy. Aberconway is the anglicised form of the Welsh place name Aberconwy, the
    5.00
    2 votes
    207
    Baron Kenyon

    Baron Kenyon

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Lord Kenyon, Baron of Gredington, in the County of Flint, is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1788 for the lawyer and judge Sir Lloyd Kenyon, 1st Baronet. He served as Master of the Rolls and as Lord Chief Justice of England. Kenyon had already been created a Baronet, of Gredington in the County of Flint, in 1784. His grandson, the third Baron, briefly represented St Michael's in the House of Commons. His grandson, the fourth Baron, held minor office in the governments of Lord Salisbury, Arthur Balfour and David Lloyd George and also served as Lord Lieutenant of Denbighshire. In 1912 Lord Kenyon assumed by Royal license the additional surname of Tyrell. As of 2010 the titles are held by his grandson, the sixth Baron, who succeeded his father in 1993.
    5.00
    2 votes
    208
    Baron Sudeley

    Baron Sudeley

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Sudeley is a title that has been created thrice in British history, twice in the Peerage of England and once in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. The first creation came in the Peerage of England in 1299 when John de Sudeley was summoned to Parliament as Lord Sudeley. On the death of the third Baron in 1367 the title fell into abeyance. The abeyance was terminated in 1380 when Thomas Boteler, the fourth Baron, became sole heir. The sixth Baron was created Baron Sudeley by letters patent in 1441. He served as Lord High Treasurer from 1444 to 1447. On his death in 1473 the 1441 creation became extinct while the 1299 creation once again fell into abeyance. The third creation came in the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1838 when Charles Hanbury-Tracy was created Baron Sudeley, of Toddington in the County of Gloucester. He had previously represented Tewkesbury in the House of Commons as a Whig and served as Lord Lieutenant of Montgomeryshire. He was also as Chairman of the Royal Commission appointed to judge designs for the new Houses of Parliament. He married his cousin Hon. Henrietta Susanna, daughter and heiress of Henry Leigh Tracy, 8th and last Viscount Tracy, through which
    5.00
    2 votes
    209
    Baron Teynham

    Baron Teynham

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Teynham, of Teynham in the County of Kent, is a title in the Peerage of England. It was created in 1616 for Sir John Roper. His great-great-grandson, the fifth Baron, served as Lord Lieutenant of Kent. The latter's third son, the eighth Baron, married, as his second wife, Anne Barrett-Lennard, 16th Baroness Dacre. His eldest son from this marriage, the Hon. Charles Roper, was the father of Trevor Charles Roper, 18th Baron Dacre, and Gertrude Trevor Roper, 19th Baroness Dacre (see the Baron Dacre for more information). His youngest son from this marriage, Reverend Hon. Richard Henry Roper, was the great-great-great-grandfather of the historian Hugh Trevor-Roper, Baron Dacre of Glanton. The eighth Baron was succeeded by his eldest son from his first marriage to the Hon. Catherine Smythe, the ninth Baron. He died unmarried and was succeeded by his younger brother, the tenth Baron. The latter's grandson, the fourteenth Baron, assumed in 1788 by Royal license the surname of Curzon in lieu of his patronymic but in 1813 he resumed by Royal license his original surname of Roper in addition to that of Curzon. His great-great-grandson, the nineteenth Baron, served as Deputy Chairman of
    5.00
    2 votes
    210
    Baron Willoughby de Broke

    Baron Willoughby de Broke

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Willoughby de Broke is a title in the Peerage of England. It was created by writ in 1491 for Sir Robert Willoughby, of the manor of Broke, part of Westbury, Wiltshire, who according to modern doctrine was de jure 9th Baron Latimer. On the death of his son, the two baronies (the recognised barony of Willoughby de Broke and the de jure barony of Latimer) fell into abeyance. Around 1535, the abeyance was naturally terminated when the second Baron's grand-daughter Elizabeth, who had married Sir Fulke Greville, became the only surviving co-heir, passing her claim to her son Sir Fulke Greville, father of the poet of the same name. The title stayed in the Greville family until after the death of the 5th Baron, when it passed to his sister, Margaret Greville, the wife of a Verney. Thereafter it remained in the Verney family. The Barons Willoughby de Broke remain heirs to the ancient Barony of Latimer (a title which predates their recognised Barony by almost two hundred years). The heir apparent is the present holder's son the Hon. Rupert Greville Verney (b. 1966).
    5.00
    2 votes
    211
    Baron FitzHardinge

    Baron FitzHardinge

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron FitzHardinge, of the City and County of the City of Bristol, was a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created on 5 August 1861 for the naval commander and politician Admiral Sir Maurice Berkeley. He was illegitimate son of Frederick Berkeley, 5th Earl of Berkeley and the brother of Thomas Berkeley, 6th Earl of Berkeley and William Berkeley, 1st Earl FitzHardinge (a title which became extinct on his death 1857). He was succeeded by his eldest son, the second Baron. He was a Liberal politician. He was succeeded by his younger brother, the third Baron. He briefly represented Gloucester in Parliament. The title became extinct on his death in 1916.
    4.50
    2 votes
    212
    Baron Foley

    Baron Foley

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Foley is a title that has been created twice in the Peerage of Great Britain, both times for members of the same family. The first creation came in 1712 in favour of Thomas Foley, who had earlier represented Stafford in the House of Commons. He was the grandson of the prominent ironmaster Thomas Foley and the nephew of Paul Foley, Speaker of the House of Commons, and Philip Foley. However, this creation became extinct in 1766 on the death of his son, the second Baron. It was revived in 1776 for Thomas Foley, the cousin, heir and namesake of the last holder of the 1712 creation, who was created Baron Foley, of Kidderminster in the County of Worcester. He was a former Member of Parliament for Droitwich and Herefordshire. He was succeeded by his son, the second Baron. He also represented Droitwich and Herefordshire in Parliament and served as Postmaster General. On his death the title passed to his son, the third Baron. He notably held office as Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (Government Chief Whip in the House of Lords) in the Whig administration of Lord Grey. He was succeeded by his son, the fourth Baron. He was also a Whig politician and succeeded his
    4.50
    2 votes
    213
    Duke of Argyll

    Duke of Argyll

    • Noble rank: Duke
    Duke of Argyll (Scottish Gaelic: Diùc Earra-Ghàidheil) is a title, created in the Peerage of Scotland in 1701 and in the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1892. The Earls, Marquesses, and Dukes of Argyll were for several centuries among the most powerful, if not the most powerful, noble family in Scotland. As such, they played a major role in Scottish history throughout the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries. The Duke holds several subsidiary titles, including: Marquess of Kintyre and Lorne (created 1701), Earl of Argyll (created 1457), Earl Campbell and Cowall and Viscount Lochow and Glenyla (created 1701), Lord Campbell (created 1445), Lord Lorne (created 1470), Lord Kintyre (created 1626), Lord Inveraray, Mull, Mover and Tiry' (created 1701), Baron Hamilton of Hameldon (created 1776) and Baron Sundridge (created 1766). They are in the Peerage of Scotland, except the last two, which are in the Peerage of Great Britain. The Duke is also a Baronet of Lundie (created 1627) in the Baronetage of Nova Scotia. The courtesy title for the Duke's eldest son and heir is Marquess of Kintyre and Lorne. The Duke of Argyll is also the chief of the Scottish clan of Campbell and in this capacity is
    4.50
    2 votes
    214
    Marquess of Queensberry

    Marquess of Queensberry

    • Noble rank: Marquess
    Marquess of Queensberry is a title in the Peerage of Scotland. The title has been held since its creation in 1682 by a member of the Douglas family. The Marquesses also held the title of Duke of Queensberry from 1684 to 1810, when it was inherited by the Duke of Buccleuch. The feudal title Baron Drumlanrig was created for William Douglas, illegitimate son of James Douglas, 2nd Earl of Douglas, some time before 1427, when he died. His descendant, the 9th Baron Drumlanrig, was created the 1st Earl of Queensberry in 1633. The subsidiary titles of Lord Queensberry are: Earl of Queensberry (created 1633), Viscount Drumlanrig (1628) and Lord Douglas of Hawick and Tibbers (1628), all in the peerage of Scotland. He is also a Scottish baronet, styled "of Kelhead", created 26 February 1668, so the 6th Marquess was the 5th Baronet. The courtesy title used by Lord Queensberry's eldest son and heir is Viscount Drumlanrig. There is no special courtesy title for Lord Drumlanrig's eldest son and heir. The 9th Marquess is particularly well-known because of the rules of boxing that were named after him (the Marquess of Queensberry rules), and for his litigious interaction with Oscar Wilde. In 22
    4.50
    2 votes
    215
    Baron Rayleigh

    Baron Rayleigh

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Rayleigh, of Terling Place in the County of Essex, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1821 for Lady Charlotte Strutt, wife of Colonel Joseph Strutt, Member of Parliament for Maldon and a member of an Essex family that had made its fortune in the milling business. Joseph Strutt had earlier declined the offer of a peerage, and instead proposed that the honour be given to his wife. Lady Rayleigh was the daughter of James FitzGerald, 1st Duke of Leinster, and his wife Lady Emily Lennox, the second of the famous Lennox sisters. Her elder brother was Charles FitzGerald, 1st Baron Lecale and her younger brother was Lord Edward FitzGerald. Lady Rayleigh's grandson, the third Baron, was a noted physicist and Nobel Prize recipient. The latter's son, the fourth Baron, was also a well-known physicist. As of 2010 the title is held by the fourth Baron's grandson, the sixth Baron, who succeeded his uncle in 1988. The family seat is Terling Place in Terling, Essex. The heir apparent is the present holder's son the Hon. John Frederick Strutt (b. 1993)
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    216
    Earl Cawdor

    Earl Cawdor

    • Noble rank: Earl
    Earl Cawdor, of Castlemartin in the County of Pembroke, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1827 for John Campbell, 2nd Baron Cawdor. This branch of Clan Campbell descends from Sir John Campbell (died 1546), third son of Archibald Campbell, 2nd Earl of Argyll (whose eldest son Colin was the ancestor of the Dukes of Argyll; see the latter title for earlier history of the family). His great-great-great-great-great-great-grandson Pryse Campbell represented Nairnshire in the House of Commons. His son John Campbell was Member of Parliament for Nairnshire and Cardigan. In 1796 he was raised to the Peerage of Great Britain as Baron Cawdor, of Castlemartin in the County of Pembroke. He was succeeded by his eldest son, the second Baron. He represented Carmarthenshire in Parliament and served as Lord Lieutenant of Carmarthenshire. In 1827 he was created Viscount Emlyn, of Emlyn in the County of Carmarthen, and Earl Cawdor, of Castlemartin in the County of Pembroke. These titles were in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. His son, the second Earl, was Member of Parliament for Pembrokeshire and Lord Lieutenant of Carmarthenshire. He was succeeded by his eldest
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    217
    Princess of Wales

    Princess of Wales

    • Noble rank: Crown Princess
    Princess of Wales (Welsh: Tywysoges Cymru) is a British courtesy title held by the wife of the Prince of Wales since the first post-conquest Prince of Wales in 1301. Although there have been considerably more than ten male heirs to the throne, there have been only ten Princesses of Wales. The majority of Princes of Wales married after acceding to the throne as King. A number of other Princes of Wales died too young to marry. The second wife of the present Prince of Wales, Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, is the Princess of Wales by right, but does not use the title, out of respect for her husband's first wife, the late Diana, Princess of Wales. The ten Princesses of Wales (and the dates the individuals held that title) are as follows: Several Princesses of Wales became queens consort. Those who did not generally took the title of "Dowager Princess of Wales" after the deaths of their husbands. (Following the annulment of Henry VIII's marriage to Catherine of Aragon, Catherine officially reverted to her earlier title of Dowager Princess of Wales, as the widow of Henry's older brother, Arthur, Prince of Wales, because Henry did not wish to acknowledge that he had ever been legally
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    218
    Viscount Clifden

    Viscount Clifden

    • Noble rank: Viscount
    Viscount Clifden, of Gowran in the County of Kilkenny, was a title in the Peerage of Ireland. It was created on 12 January 1781 for James Agar, 1st Baron Clifden. He had already been created Baron Clifden, of Gowran in the County of Kilkenny, in 1776, also in the Peerage of Ireland. The Viscounts also held the titles of Baron Mendip in the Peerage of Great Britain from 1802 to 1974 (a title which is still extant and now held by the Earl of Normanton) and Baron Dover from 1836 to 1899, when this title became extinct, and Baron Robartes from 1899 to 1974, when this title became extinct, the two latter titles which were in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. The interrelated histories of the peerages follows below. James Agar, 1st Viscount Clifden was the son of Henry Agar and the elder brother of Charles Agar, 1st Earl of Normanton. His mother was Anne Ellis, daughter of Welbore Ellis, Bishop of Meath, and sister of the politician Welbore Ellis, who in 1794 was created Baron Mendip in the Peerage of Great Britain with remainder to his three nephews Lord Clifden, the future Lord Normanton and another brother of theirs. Lord Clifden was succeeded by his son, the second Viscount. He
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    219
    Baron Merrivale

    Baron Merrivale

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Merrivale, of Walkhampton in the County of Devon, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1925 for the Conservative politician and judge of the High Court of Justice, Sir Henry Duke. As of 2010 the title is held by his great-grandson, the fourth Baron, who succeeded his father in 2007.
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    220
    Baron St Helens

    Baron St Helens

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron St Helens is a title that has been created three times, once in the Peerage of Ireland and twice in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. The first two creations were both in favour of the same person, but are now extinct. The first creation came in the Peerage of Ireland in 1791 when the Chief Secretary for Ireland Alleyne Fitzherbert was made Baron St Helens. In 1801 he was further honoured when he was made Baron St Helens, of St Helens on the Isle of Wight in the County of Southampton, in the Peerage of the United Kingdom, allowing him to sit in the House of Lords.On his death in 1839, both baronies became extinct. Lord St Helens was the son of William Fitzherbert, Member of Parliament for Derby, and a younger brother of Sir William Fitzherbert, 1st Baronet. The third creation came in 1964 when the Conservative politician Michael Hughes-Young was made Baron St Helens, of St Helens in the County Palatine of Lancaster. He had earlier represented Wandsworth Central in the House of Commons. It was one of the last hereditary baronies ever created in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. As of 2010 the title is held by his son, the second Baron, who succeeded in 1980. Henry George
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    221
    Baron Camoys

    Baron Camoys

    • Noble rank: Baron
    The barony of Camoys was twice created. From 26 November 1313 to 1 April 1335 Ralph de Camoys (d.1336) was summoned to Parliament by writ, and is thereby held to have become 1st Baron Camoys of the first creation. Ralph de Camoys (d.1336) married firstly, Margaret de Brewes, daughter of William de Brewes, 1st Lord Brewes (d.1291), and secondly, Elizabeth le Despenser, daughter of Hugh le Despenser, 1st Earl of Winchester (executed 27 October 1326). By his first wife, Margaret de Brewes, Ralph de Camoys (d.1336) had a son, Thomas de Camoys, 2nd Baron Camoys, (d.1372) who married a wife named Margaret, and by her had a son, Ralph Camoys. This first creation of the barony expired with the death on 11 April 1372 without male heirs of Thomas de Camoys, 2nd Baron Camoys, his son, Ralph having predeceased him. The heir of Thomas de Camoys (d.1372) was his nephew, another Thomas de Camoys (d.1421), who was the grandson of Ralph de Camoys (d.1336) by his second wife, Elizabeth le Despenser, and the son of Sir John Camoys by his second wife, Elizabeth le Latimer, daughter of William le Latimer, 3rd Lord Latimer. From 20 August 1383 to 26 February 1421 Thomas de Camoys (d.1421) was summoned
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    222
    Baron de Blaquiere

    Baron de Blaquiere

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron de Blaquiere, of Ardkill in the County of Londonderry, was a title in the Peerage of Ireland. It was created in 1800 for the politician John Blaquiere, 1st Baron de Blaquiere, Chief Secretary for Ireland between 1772 and 1777. He had already been created a Baronet, of Ardkill in the County of Londonderry, in the Baronetage of Ireland in 1784. He was the son of Jean de Blaquiere, a merchant who emigrated to England from France in 1685. Lord de Blaquiere was succeeded by his eldest son, the second Baron. He died unmarried and was succeeded by his younger brother, the third Baron. He was a general in the British Army. His two sons, the fourth and fifth Barons, both succeeded in the title. The latter was a Captain in the Royal Navy. He was succeeded by his first cousin once removed, the sixth Baron. He was the grandson of the Hon. Peter de Blaquière, fourth son of the first Baron. Lord de Blaquiere's two sons were both killed in the First World War and on his death in 1920 the titles became extinct. The aforementioned the Honourable Peter de Blaquière, fourth son of the first Baron, emigrated to Canada in 1837 and was a member of the Legislative Council of the Province of Canada
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    223
    Baron Dudley

    Baron Dudley

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Dudley is a title in the Peerage of England. It was created in circa 1440 for John Sutton, a soldier who served as Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. According to Debrett's Peerage and Baronetage he was actually summoned to Parliament as "Johanni de Sutton de Duddeley militi", whereby he is held to have become Baron Dudley. The title is sometime referred to as Baron Sutton of Dudley. The peerage was created by writ, which means that it can descend through both male and female lines. It is in fact arguable that the title arose even earlier, as his ancestor John Sutton (died 1359) had a writ of summons to the Council on 25 February 1342, but neither he nor his son (died c.1370), grandson (died 10 March 1396) or great grandson (all called John Sutton of Dudley) were summoned, so that they can probably not be regarded as peers. Lord Dudley's great grandson, the third Baron, managed to get himself severely into debt and lost the family seat of Dudley Castle to his cousin John Dudley, 1st Duke of Northumberland. He became known as "Lord Quondam" ("Lord Has-been" or "Lord Formerly"). However, Dudley Castle and the other family estates were restored to his son, the fourth Baron. He was
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    224
    Baron Gainford

    Baron Gainford

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Gainford, of Headlam in the County of Durham, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1917 for the Liberal politician Jack Pease. He notably served as President of the Board of Education from 1911 to 1915. Pease was the second son of Sir Joseph W. Pease, 1st Baronet, and the grandson of Joseph Pease, while Arthur Pease was his uncle and Sir Arthur Francis Pease, 1st Baronet, and Herbert Pike Pease, 1st Baron Daryngton, his first cousins. As of 2010 the title is held by the first Baron's grandson, the third Baron, who succeeded his father in 1971. He is a former member of the London County Council and of the Greater London Council. As a descendant of Sir Joseph W. Pease, 1st Baronet, he is also in remainder to this title. The heir presumptive is the present holder's younger brother the Hon. George Pease (b. 1926)
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    225
    Baron Leigh

    Baron Leigh

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Leigh is a title that has been created twice, once in the Peerage of England and once in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. The first creation came in the Peerage of England 1643 when Sir Thomas Leigh, 2nd Baronet, was created Baron Leigh, of Stoneleigh in the County of Warwick. The Leigh Baronetcy, of Stoneleigh in the County of Warwick, had been created in 1611 for his grandfather and namesake Thomas Leigh. The latter was the second son of Sir Thomas Leigh (d. 1571), Lord Mayor of London in 1558, whose third son Sir William Leigh was the grandfather of Francis Leigh, 1st Earl of Chichester. The titles became extinct on the death of the fifth Baron Leigh in 1786. The barony was revived in 1839 when the poet Chandos Leigh was created Baron Leigh, of Stoneleigh in the County of Warwick, in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. He was a descendant of Rowland Leigh, eldest son of the aforementioned Sir Thomas Leigh (d. 1571), himself of a cadet branch of the Leighs of West Hall, High Legh. Both Lord Leigh's son, the second Baron, and grandson, the third Baron, served as Lord Lieutenant of Warwickshire. The third Baron was succeeded by his nephew, the fourth Baron. As of 2010 the
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    226
    Baron Middleton

    Baron Middleton

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Middleton, of Middleton in the County of Warwick, is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1711 for Sir Thomas Willoughby, 2nd Baronet, who had previously represented Nottinghamshire and Newark in Parliament. The Middleton Baronetcy, of Wollaton in the County of Nottingham, had been created in the Baronetage of England in 1677 for his elder brother Francis Willoughby, with special remainder to the latter's only brother Thomas, who succeeded him in 1688. Lord Middleton was succeeded by his eldest son, the second Baron. He sat as Member of Parliament for Nottinghamshire and Tamworth. On the death of his younger son, the fourth Baron (who had succeeded his elder brother), the line of the eldest son of the first Baron failed. He was succeeded by his cousin Henry Middleton, the fifth Baron. He was the son of the Hon. Thomas Willoughby (c. 1694–1742), second son of the first Baron. On the death of his son, the sixth Baron, this line of the family also failed. The late Baron was succeeded by his cousin Digby Willoughby, the seventh Baron. He was the son of a younger son of the aforementioned the Hon. Thomas Willoughby, second son of the first Baron. He was a
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    227
    Baron Sandys

    Baron Sandys

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Sandys is a title that has been created three times, once in the Peerage of England, once in the Peerage of Great Britain and once in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. The title of Baron Sandys, of The Vyne, was created in the Peerage of England in 1523 for William Sandys, the favourite of King Henry VIII. It descended through several generations of his descendants until it fell into abeyance in circa 1683 at the death of the eighth Baron, where it has remained since. The title was created for a second time in the Peerage of Great Britain in 1743 when the former Chancellor of the Exchequer Samuel Sandys was made Lord Sandys, Baron of Ombersley, in the County of Worcester. This title became extinct on the death of his son Edwin, the second Baron, in 1797. The family estates were inherited by Edwin's niece Mary Hill, Marchioness of Downshire, wife of Arthur Hill, 2nd Marquess of Downshire. In 1802 the barony of Sandys was revived in favour of her when she was created Baroness Sandys, of Ombersley in the County of Worcester, in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. The title was created with remainder to her younger sons Lord Arthur Moyses William Hill, Lord Marcus Hill, Lord
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    228
    Earl of Kimberley

    Earl of Kimberley

    • Noble rank: Earl
    Earl of Kimberley, of Kimberley in the County of Norfolk, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1866 for the prominent Liberal politician John Wodehouse, 3rd Baron Wodehouse. During his long political career he notably held office as Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, Secretary of State for the Colonies, Secretary of State for India and Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs. He was succeeded by his son, the second Earl. At first a Liberal like his father, he later joined the Labour Party, becoming the first Labour member of the House of Lords. His eldest son, the third Earl, represented Norfolk Mid in the House of Commons as a Liberal. As of 2010 the titles are held by the latter's grandson, the fifth Earl, who succeeded his father in 2002. The title of Baron Wodehouse, of Kimberley in the County of Norfolk, was created in the Peerage of Great Britain in 1797 for Sir John Wodehouse, 6th Baronet, of Wilberhall. He had previously represented Norfolk in Parliament. His son, the second Baron, sat as Member of Parliament for Great Bedwyn and Marlborough. He was succeeded by his grandson, the aforementioned third Baron (the son of the Hon. Henry Wodehouse), who was
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    229
    Baron Alvanley

    Baron Alvanley

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Alvanley, of Alvanley in the County of Chester, was a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created on 22 May 1801 for Sir Richard Arden, the Chief Justice of the Common Pleas and former Master of the Rolls. The title became extinct on the death of his second son, the third Baron (who had succeeded his elder brother), in 1857.
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    230
    Baron Avebury

    Baron Avebury

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Avebury, of Avebury in the County of Wiltshire, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1900 for the banker, politician and archaeologist Sir John Lubbock, 4th Baronet. He was succeeded by his eldest son, the second Baron. On his death the titles passed to his nephew, the third Baron. He was the son of Hon. Harold Fox Pitt Lubbock, fourth son of the first Baron. As of 2010 the titles are held by his first cousin, the fourth Baron, who succeeded in 1971. He is the son of Hon. Maurice Fox Pitt Lubbock, sixth son of the first Baron. Lord Avebury is a Liberal Democrat politician and one of the ninety excepted hereditary peers who remain in the House of Lords after the passing of the House of Lords Act 1999. The Lubbock Baronetcy, of Lammas, was created in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom on 9 April 1806 for John Lubbock, with remainder to his nephew John William, the son of William Lubbock. Lubbock was a successful merchant and banker in London. He was succeeded according to the special remainder by his nephew William, the second Baronet. He was also a banker. His grandson, the aforementioned fourth Baronet, was elevated to the peerage as Baron
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    231
    Baron Barnard

    Baron Barnard

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Barnard, of Barnard Castle in the Bishopric of Durham, is a title in the Peerage of England. It was created in 1698 for Sir Christopher Vane, who had previously served as a Member of Parliament for County Durham and Boroughbridge. Vane was the son of Sir Henry Vane the Younger and grandson of Sir Henry Vane the Elder. His grandson, the third Baron, notably served as Paymaster of the Forces and as Lord Lieutenant of County Durham. In 1754 he was created Viscount Barnard, of Barnard Castle in the County of Durham, and Earl of Darlington, in the County of Durham. Lord Darlington was the husband of Lady Grace FitzRoy, daughter of Charles FitzRoy, 2nd Duke of Cleveland, the illegitimate son of King Charles II by his mistress Barbara Villiers, 1st Duchess of Cleveland. He was succeeded by his son, the second Earl. He sat as a Member of Parliament for Downton and County Durham and served as Lord Lieutenant of County Durham. On his death the titles passed to his son, the third Earl. He represented Totnes and Winchelsea in Parliament and served as Lord Lieutenant of County Durham. In 1827 the Cleveland title held by his great-grandmother was recreated when he was made Marquess of
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    232
    Baron Cottesloe

    Baron Cottesloe

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Cottesloe, of Swanbourne and Hardwick in the County of Buckingham, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1874 for the Conservative politician and former Chief Secretary for Ireland, Sir Thomas Fremantle, 1st Baronet. He was the son of Admiral Sir Thomas Fremantle. Lord Cottesloe had already been created a Baronet, of Swanbourne in the County of Berkshire, in 1821, chiefly in recognition of his father's services, and with remainder to the latter's heirs. Moreover, Thomas Fremantle was already created Baron Fremantle, of the Austrian Empire, in 1816. Subsequently, in 1822 he was given a Royal license, which authorized him and his successors to use the title in Britain. However, a warrant issued on 27 April 1932 withdrew all the royal licences, only allowing the use of the title to the then current holders, their heir (if any was born) and their heir's heir (if any was born). Nowerdays, John Fremantle, 5th Baron Cottesloe is the current holder of this title, and his son Hon. Thomas Henry Fremantle, heir to the Cottesloe Barony, will be the last future holder being allowed to use the austrian title in the United Kingdom. The 1st Baron Cottesloe was
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    233
    Baron Delamere

    Baron Delamere

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Delamere, of Vale Royal in the County of Chester, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1821 for Thomas Cholmondeley, a former Member of Parliament for Cheshire. This Vale Royal branch of the Cholmondeley family descends from Thomas Cholmondeley (died 1653), younger brother of Robert Cholmondeley, 1st Earl of Leinster and Hugh Cholmondeley (1591–1665), ancestor of the Marquesses of Cholmondeley. The first Baron was succeeded by his son. Before acceding to the title in 1855, the second Baron represented Denbighshire and Montgomery in the House of Commons as a Tory. His eldest son, also named Hugh, acceded to the title in 1887 and in the same year, he emigrated to Kenya, where he acquired a major estate. The third Baron's eldest son inherited his father's title in 1931. In 1934, he attempted to re-establish his family at Vale Royal, the family's country home and baronial seat from the 17th century; however, the great house was requisitioned as a sanatorium during the war years. When it was sold in 1947, the fourth Baron returned to Kenya. As of 2010 the title is held by the fifth Baron, who succeeded his father in 1979. He also lives in Kenya. The
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    234
    Baron Fermoy

    Baron Fermoy

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Fermoy is a title in the Peerage of Ireland. It was created in 1856 for Edmond Roche, who represented County Cork and Marylebone in the House of Commons and also served as Lord Lieutenant of County Cork. His younger son, the third Baron, sat as Member of Parliament for Kerry East. He was succeeded by his son, the fourth Baron. He notably represented King's Lynn in Parliament. As of 2010 the title is held by his grandson, the sixth Baron, who succeeded his father in 1984. Diana, Princess of Wales, was a great-great-granddaughter of the first Baron Fermoy through her mother, Frances Shand Kydd. She was the daughter of the fourth Baron Fermoy, a friend of King George VI and the elder of the twin sons of the American heiress Frances Work and her first husband, Hon. James Boothby Burke Roche, who, after their divorce, became third Baron Fermoy. Her maternal grandmother Ruth Roche, Baroness Fermoy (née Ruth Sylvia Gill), was a confidante and lady-in-waiting to Queen Elizabeth (later the Queen Mother), and founder of the annual King's Lynn Festival (of classical music) in Norfolk, England. The heir presumptive is the present holder's younger brother, the Hon. Edmund Hugh Burke Roche
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    235
    Baron Heathfield

    Baron Heathfield

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Lord Heathfield, Baron Heathfield of Gibraltar, was a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1787 for General Sir George Augustus Eliott in in recognition of his defence of Gibraltar during the Franco-Spanish Siege of 1779 to 1783. He was the tenth but eighth surviving son of Sir Gilbert Eliott, 3rd Baronet, of Stobs (see Eliott baronets). The title became extinct on the death of his only son, the childless second Baron, in 1813.
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    236
    Baron Heytesbury

    Baron Heytesbury

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Heytesbury, of Heytesbury in the County of Wiltshire, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1828 for the prominent politician and diplomat Sir William à Court, 2nd Baronet, who later served as Ambassador to Russia and as Viceroy of Ireland. His son, the second Baron, sat as Member of Parliament for the Isle of Wight. On his marriage in 1837 to Elizabeth Holmes, daughter of Sir Leonard Worsley Holmes, Lord Heytesbury assumed the additional surname of Holmes. As of 2010 the titles are held by his great-great-great-grandson, the seventh Baron, who succeeded his father in 2004. The Baronetcy, of Heytesbury House in the County of Wiltshire, was created in the Baronetage of Great Britain on 4 July 1795 for the first Baron father, William à Court. He was a colonel in the army and represented Heytesbury in the House of Commons. His father, William Ashe-à Court, was a general in the army and also sat as a Member of Parliament for Heytesbury. A junior line of the family has attained fortune and fame in Australia, thanks to the business empire of Robert Holmes à Court, who was of South African birth, and his Western Australian wife Janet Holmes à Court, now
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    237
    Baron Hindlip

    Baron Hindlip

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Hindlip, of Hindlip in the County of Worcester and of Alsop-en-le-Dale in the County of Derby, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1886 for the businessman and Conservative politician Sir Henry Allsopp, 1st Baronet. He was head of the brewing firm of Samuel Allsopp & Sons of Burton upon Trent and also represented East Worcestershire in Parliament. Allsopp had already been created a baronet, of Hindlip Hall in the Parish of Hindlip in the County of Worcester, in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom on 7 May 1880. His son, the second Baron, was also head of the family firm and sat as Conservative Member of Parliament for Staffordshire East and Taunton. His son, the third Baron, was a junior Unionist whip in the House of Lords from 1907 to 1914. The third Baron's younger son, the fifth Baron (who succeeded his elder brother), was a Deputy Lieutenant of Wiltshire. As of 2012, the titles are held by the latter's son, the sixth Baron, who succeeded in 1993. Television presenters the Honourable Kirstie Allsopp and the Honourable Sofie Allsopp are the daughters of the sixth Baron. The heir apparent is the present holder's only son, the Honourable Henry
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    238
    Baron Trevethin

    Baron Trevethin

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Trevethin, of Blaengawney in the County of Monmouth, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1921 for the prominent judge Sir Alfred Lawrence, Lord Chief Justice of England from 1921 to 1922. His third son the Hon. Geoffrey Lawrence was also a noted jurist and served as the main British judge at the Nuremberg trials. In 1947 he was himself raised to the peerage as Baron Oaksey, of Oaksey in the County of Wilts. In 1959 he succeeded his elder brother as third Baron Trevethin, although he continued to be known as Lord Oaksey. As of 2012 the titles are held by his grandson, the fifth Baron Trevethin and third Baron Oaksey, who succeeded in 2012. He is a QC. The heir apparent is the present holder's son, Oliver John Tristram Lawrence (b. 1990) see above for further holders
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    239
    Baron Tryon

    Baron Tryon

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Tryon, of Durnford in the County of Wiltshire, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1940 for the Conservative politician George Tryon. He was the son of the naval commander Vice-Admiral Sir George Tryon. As of 2010 the title is held by the first Baron's grandson, the third Baron, who succeeded his father in 1976. The heir apparent is the present holder's son the Hon. Charles George Barrington Tryon (b. 1976)
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    240
    Baron Tweedmouth

    Baron Tweedmouth

    • Noble rank: Baron
    Baron Tweedmouth, of Edington in the County of Berwick, was a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1881 for the businessman and Liberal politician Sir Dudley Marjoribanks, 1st Baronet. He had already been created a baronet, of Guisachan in Beaulieu in the County of Inverness, in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom 1866. He was succeeded by his son, the second Baron. He was also a Liberal politician and notably served as First Lord of the Admiralty between 1905 and 1908. The title became extinct on the death of his son, the third Baron, in 1935. Ishbel Hamilton-Gordon, Marchioness of Aberdeen and Temair, was the daughter of the first Baron.
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    241
    Duke of York

    Duke of York

    • Noble rank: Duke
    The Duke of York is a title of nobility in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. Since the 15th century, it has, when granted, usually been given to the second son of the English monarch. The equivalent title in the Scottish peerage is Duke of Albany. The title has been created eleven times, eight as "Duke of York", before the Act of Union and three times in the United Kingdom as the "Duke of York and Albany". Since 1461, when the great-grandson of the first duke became King Edward IV, not one of the ten subsequent holders of the title has ever passed it on: they either died without male heirs or became King themselves. The current Duke of York is The Prince Andrew, second son of Queen Elizabeth II. Andrew currently has no male heirs and (since his 1996 divorce) is unmarried. The wife of the Duke of York is known as the Duchess of York. In medieval times, York was the main town of the North of England and the see of the Archbishop of York from AD 735. Yorkshire was England's largest shire in area. In the interval between the fall of Jorvik under Eirik Bloodaxe, last King of Jorvik (d. 954), and the first creation of the Dukedom of York, there were a few Earls of York. The title Duke
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    242
    Earl Bathurst

    Earl Bathurst

    • Noble rank: Earl
    Earl Bathurst, of Bathurst in the County of Sussex, is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1772 for Allen Bathurst, 1st Baron Bathurst. He was a politician and an opponent of Sir Robert Walpole. He was also known for his wit and learning, for his connections with poets and scholars of his time, and the famous landscape garden he created at his seat, Cirencester House, in Gloucestershire. Sixty years before being created an Earl, in 1712, he had been elevated to the Peerage of Great Britain as Baron Bathurst, of Battlesden in the County of Bedford. Bathurst was the son of Sir Benjamin Bathurst, Cofferer of the Household and Governor of the British East India Company, by his wife Frances, daughter of Sir Allen Apsley. He married his cousin Catherine Apsley, daughter of his maternal uncle Sir Peter Apsley, in 1704. He was succeeded by his second but eldest surviving son Henry, the second Earl. He was a prominent lawyer and politician. In 1771, four years before the death of his father, he was raised to the Peerage of Great Britain in his own right as Baron Apsley, in the County of Sussex. He then served as Lord High Chancellor until 1778 and later held office as
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    243
    Earl of Chichester

    Earl of Chichester

    • Noble rank: Earl
    Earl of Chichester is a title that has been created three times in British history. It was created for the first time in the Peerage of England in 1644 when Francis Leigh, 1st Baron Dunsmore, was made Earl of Chichester, in the County of Sussex, with remainder to his son-in-law Thomas Wriothesley, 4th Earl of Southampton (the husband of his daughter Elizabeth). He had already been created a baronet, of Newnham in the County of Warwick, in 1618 (in the Baronetage of England), with remainder to the male heirs of his body, and Baron Dunsmore, in the County of Warwick, in 1628 (in the Peerage of England), with remainder to his stepson John Anderson (the son of his second wife the Hon. Audrey Boteler by her first husband Sir Francis Anderson). Lord Chichester had no sons and on his death in 1653 the baronetcy became extinct. The barony of Dunsmore also became extinct as his stepson John (who had been created a baronet in 1629) had died childless in 1630. The earldom was passed on according to the special remainder to his son-in-law Lord Southampton (see the Earl of Southampton for earlier history of this title). However, he had no male issue and on his death in 1667 both earldoms became
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    Earl of Minto

    Earl of Minto

    • Noble rank: Earl
    Earl of Minto, in the County of Roxburgh, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1813 for Gilbert Elliot-Murray-Kynynmound, 1st Baron Minto. The current earl is Gilbert Timothy George Lariston Elliot-Murray-Kynynmound, 7th Earl of Minto (born 1953). The family descends from the politician and judge Gilbert Elliot, who served as a Lord of Session under the judicial title of Lord Minto. In 1700 he was created a baronet, of Minto in the County of Roxburgh, in the Baronetage of Nova Scotia. He was succeeded by his son, the second Baronet. He was also a prominent judge and politician and served as a Lord of Session (under the judicial title of Lord Minto) from 1726 to 1733, as a Lord of the Justiciary from 1733 to 1765 and as Lord Justice Clerk from 1763 to 1766. His eldest son, the third Baronet, was a politician and held ministerial office as a Lord of the Admiralty from 1756 to 1762 and as Treasurer of the Navy from 1767 to 1770. He was succeeded by his eldest son, the fourth Baronet. He was a noted diplomat, politician and colonial administrator and served as Governor-General of India from 1807 to 1813. In 1797 he was raised to the Peerage of Great
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    Earl of Mount Edgcumbe

    Earl of Mount Edgcumbe

    • Noble rank: Earl
    Earl of Mount Edgcumbe is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1789 for George Edgcumbe, 3rd Baron Edgcumbe. The Edgcumbe family descends from Sir Piers Edgcumbe of Cotehele in Cornwall, who acquired the Mount Edgcumbe estate near Plymouth through marriage in the early 16th century. His descendant Richard Edgcumbe was a prominent politician and served as Paymaster-General of Ireland and as Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster. In 1742 he was created Baron Edgcumbe, of Mount Edgcumbe in the County of Devon, in the Peerage of Great Britain. He was succeeded by his eldest son, the second Baron. He represented Plympton Erle, Lostwithiel and Penrhyn in the House of Commons and served as Lord-Lieutenant of Cornwall. On his death the title passed to his younger brother, the third Baron. He was an Admiral of the Blue and also held political office as Treasurer of the Household and as Captain of the Honourable Band of Gentlemen Pensioners. In 1781 he was created Viscount Mount Edgcumbe and Valletort and in 1789 he was further honoured when he was made Earl of Mount Edgcumbe. Both titles are in the Peerage of Great Britain. He was succeeded by his son, the second Earl.
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    Earl of Portsmouth

    Earl of Portsmouth

    • Noble rank: Earl
    Earl of Portsmouth is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1743 for John Wallop, 1st Viscount Lymington, who had previously represented Hampshire in the House of Commons. He had already been created Baron Wallop, of Farleigh Wallop in Hampshire in the County of Southampton, and Viscount Lymington, in 1720, also in the Peerage of Great Britain. His great-grandson, the fourth Earl (who succeeded his elder brother in 1853, who in his turn had succeeded his father in 1797, who in his turn had succeeded his grandfather the first Earl), represented Andover and Devonshire North in Parliament. In 1794 he assumed by Royal license for himself and his issue the surname and arms of Fellowes only. He was succeeded by his son, the fifth Earl. He resumed, without Royal license, the family surname and arms of Wallop. His son, the sixth Earl, represented Barnstaple in Parliament as a Liberal. Oliver Henry Wallop, the 8th Earl, had moved from England to the United States, and had been living the life of a rancher in Sheridan, Wyoming, at the time of the death of his older brother, the 7th Earl. Known as O.H. Wallop, he had served two terms a state representative in the Wyoming
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    Earl of Rosslyn

    Earl of Rosslyn

    • Noble rank: Earl
    Earl of Rosslyn is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1801 for Alexander Wedderburn, 1st Baron Loughborough, Lord Chancellor from 1793 to 1801, with special remainder to his nephew Sir James St Clair-Erskine, 6th Baronet. Wedderburn had already been created Baron Loughborough, of Loughborough in the County Leicester, in the Peerage of Great Britain in 1780, with normal remainder to the heirs male of his body, and Baron Loughborough, of Loughborough in the County Surrey, in the Peerage of Great Britain in 1795, with similar remainder as for the earldom. Lord Rosslyn was childless and on his death in 1805 the barony of 1780 became extinct. He was succeeded in the barony of 1795 and in the earldom according to the special remainders by his aforementioned nephew, the second Earl. He was a Lieutenant-General in the Army and also held political office as Lord Privy Seal and Lord President of the Council. His son, the third Earl, was a General in the Army and held political office as Master of the Buckhounds and Under-Secretary of State for War. He was succeeded by his son, the fourth Earl. He served as Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms
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    Marquess of Cholmondeley

    Marquess of Cholmondeley

    • Noble rank: Marquess
    Marquess of Cholmondeley ( /ˈtʃʌmli/ CHUM-lee) is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1815 for George Cholmondeley, 4th Earl of Cholmondeley. Each Marquess of Cholmondeley is a descendant of Sir Robert Walpole, the first Prime Minister of Great Britain. The Cholmondeley family descends from Sir Hugh Cholmondeley. His eldest son was Robert Cholmondeley, 1st Earl of Leinster, while his youngest son Thomas was the ancestor of the Barons Delamere. Another son, his namesake Hugh, was the father of Robert Cholmondeley. He succeeded to the estates of his uncle Lord Leinster and was created Viscount Cholmondeley, of Kells in the County of Meath, in the Peerage of Ireland in 1661. He was succeeded by his eldest son, the second Viscount. He was a supporter of King William III and Queen Mary II and also served as Comptroller of the Household and as Treasurer of the Household. In 1689 he was created Baron Cholmondeley, of Nantwich in the County of Chester, in the Peerage of England, with remainder to his younger brother George Cholmondeley. In 1706 he was further honoured when he was made Viscount Malpas, in the County of Chester, and Earl of Cholmondeley, in the
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    Marquess of Normanby

    Marquess of Normanby

    • Noble rank: Marquess
    Marquess of Normanby is a title that has been created twice, once in the Peerage of England and once in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. The first creation came in 1694 in the Peerage of England in favour of John Sheffield, 3rd Earl of Mulgrave. He was a notable Tory politician of the late Stuart period, who served under Queen Anne as Lord Privy Seal and Lord President of the Council. In 1703 this first Marquess of Normanby was further honoured when he was made Duke of Buckingham and Normanby. These titles became extinct on the death of the 2nd Duke in 1735. The second creation came in the Peerage of the United Kingdom on 25 June 1838, in favour of Constantine Phipps, 2nd Earl of Mulgrave. He was a noted politician and served as Lord Lieutenant of Ireland and as Home Secretary. His great-grandfather William Phipps had married Lady Catherine Annesley, who was the daughter and heiress of James Annesley, 3rd Earl of Anglesey and his wife Lady Catherine Darnley (an illegitimate daughter of King James II by his mistress Catherine Sedley, Countess of Dorchester). Lady Catherine Darnley had later married John Sheffield, 1st Duke of Buckingham and Normanby, and hence Constantine Phipps,
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    Viscount Falmouth

    Viscount Falmouth

    • Noble rank: Viscount
    Viscount Falmouth is a title that has been created twice, first in the Peerage of England, and then in the Peerage of Great Britain. The first creation came in the Peerage of England in 1674 for George FitzRoy, illegitimate son of King Charles II by Barbara Villiers. He was created Earl of Northumberland at the same time and in 1683 he was made Duke of Northumberland. However, he left no heirs, so the titles became extinct at his death in 1716. The second creation came in the Peerage of Great Britain in 1720 for Hugh Boscawen (c.1680-1734). He was made Baron Boscawen-Rose at the same time, also in the Peerage of Great Britain. Boscawen had earlier represented Tregony, Cornwall, Truro and Penryn in Parliament and notably served as Comptroller of the Household and Vice-Treasurer of Ireland. His son, the second Viscount, was a General in the Army and also sat as a Member of Parliament for Truro. He later served as Captain of the Yeomen of the Guard. His nephew, the third Viscount, held office as Captain of the Honourable Band of Gentlemen Pensioners from 1797 to 1799. His son, the fourth Viscount, represented Truro in the House of Commons. In 1821 he was created Earl of Falmouth, in
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