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  • Nov 27th 2012
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Best Newspaper of All Time

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    1
    The Catholic Telegraph

    The Catholic Telegraph

    • Circulation Areas: Cincinnati
    The Catholic Telegraph is a newspaper published by the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Cincinnati, which covers the Cincinnati metropolitan area, the greater Dayton area and other communities in the southwest region of Ohio, with a total diocesan population of approximately 500,000. The Telegraph is described on its official website as the oldest continuously-published Catholic diocesan newspaper in the United States. The Telegraph was established in October 1831 by Bishop Edward Fenwick, O.P., the Archdiocese's first bishop. The paper's use of the word "telegraph" predated the invention of the communication device by over a decade. As one of the first Catholic newspapers in the nation, the Telegraph was sold in cities throughout the country's middle section, including Louisville, Kentucky, Baltimore, Maryland, Washington, D.C., St. Louis, Missouri, and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Early in the episcopal reign of John Baptist Purcell, the Telegraph fell into significant financial difficulties. As its closure appeared imminent, large numbers of common Catholics formed the Roman Catholic Society for the Diffusion of Knowledge, with its primary purpose being the rescue of the Telegraph.
    8.57
    7 votes
    2
    The Courier

    The Courier

    • Circulation Areas: Houma
    • Owner: The New York Times Company
    The Houma Courier is a newspaper published daily in Houma, Louisiana, United States, covering Terrebonne Parish. It is owned by Halifax Media Group It is sometimes simply referred to as "The Courier". The paper is published by Miles Forrest and the paper's Executive Editor is Keith Magill. The paper was founded in 1878 as Le Courrier de Houma by French-born Lafayette Bernard Filhucan Bazet. It first published in four-page, half-French half-English editions. The Courier has a daily circulation of 19,700 and a Sunday circulation of 22,100. Its online edition, Houma Today was launched in May 1999. The Courier won the Louisiana Press Association's Newspaper of the Year award four times in the 2000s (decade).
    8.43
    7 votes
    3
    The Independent

    The Independent

    • Circulation Areas: Boyd County
    • Owner: Community Newspaper Holdings
    The Independent (formerly known as The Daily Independent and The Sunday Independent) is a seven-day morning daily newspaper covering the city of Ashland and surrounding areas of Boyd County, Kentucky. It is owned by Community Newspaper Holdings Inc. Launched December 17, 1896 as the Tri-State Independent Col. G. F. Friel of nearby Catlettsburg, Kentucky , the newspaper moved to 12th Street and Greenup Avenue in Ashland in 1900 as the Ashland Daily Independent; it absorbed the Ashland Commercial in the move. The first publication after the move was on December 17 . The offices later relocated to 17th Street two years later, when it purchased the Ashland Daily News and discontinued it in that year. In 1920, it founded the Sunday Independent, and five years later, it doubled the size of its headquarters on 17th Street. After years of publishing in the afternoon on weekdays (and morning on weekends), The Independent switched to all-morning publication in May 2003, and dropped the "Daily" and "Sunday" from its nameplate. The newspaper's Website, however, retains the old name as part of its URL, dailyindependent.com. Colonel B.F. Forgey, an Ohio native who bought half an interest in the
    7.86
    7 votes
    4
    Washington Examiner

    Washington Examiner

    • Circulation Areas: Washington, D.C.
    • Owner: Philip Anschutz
    The Washington Examiner is a free daily newspaper published in Springfield, Virginia, and distributed in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. The newspaper was formerly distributed only in the suburbs of Washington, under the titles of Montgomery Journal, Prince George's Journal, and Northern Virginia Journal. The Examiner is owned by Denver billionaire Philip Anschutz, who purchased their parent company, Journal Newspapers Inc., in October 2004. On February 1, 2005, the paper's name changed to the Washington Examiner, and it adopted a logo and format similar to that of another newspaper owned by Anschutz, the San Francisco Examiner. Politico described the paper as "a megaphone for [Anschutz's] right-wing views on taxes, national security and President Barack Obama." The Examiner's parent company, Clarity Media Group, also owns the conservative opinion magazine The Weekly Standard. The Examiner co-sponsored the Republican presidential debate in Ames, Iowa on August 11, 2011. The newspaper is supported entirely by advertisements and is distributed in the Washington, DC, area. The paper is available at most Washington Metro subway stations. It is delivered to 300,000 houses on
    7.29
    7 votes
    5
    The Emory Wheel

    The Emory Wheel

    • Circulation Areas: Atlanta
    • Owner: Emory University
    The Emory Wheel is the student-run newspaper of Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. The Wheel is published twice a week, on Tuesday and Friday, during the regular school year, and is updated regularly at its website. The sections of the Wheel include News, Editorials, Sports, Entertainment, Arts & Living and, formerly, The Hub, an award-winning quarterly magazine founded in 2005. Serving the Emory community since 1919, the Wheel is editorially and financially independent from the University. The staff is composed entirely of students, with the exception of the general manager, who oversees advertising and whose salary is paid by the newspaper. The Wheel offices are currently located in the Dobbs University Center. The Wheel's editor-in-chief is Evan Mah. The Emory Wheel began in 1919 as a weekly newspaper with its offices located in the journalism department. The name is wordplay on an emery wheel, a sharpening device. An editorial published in the first issue of The Wheel explains that the newspaper will strive to sharpen the intellect of the University community. The newspaper, initially chartered by the Student Government Association, was originally meant to promote Emory's
    6.86
    7 votes
    6
    Al Akhbar

    Al Akhbar

    • Circulation Areas: Beirut
    Al Akhbar (Arabic: الأخبار‎, literally "The News") is a daily Arabic language newspaper published in Beirut. Recently, it also started an English version published on the Internet. The newspaper started printing and distribution in July 2006. It was established by Joseph Samaha and Ibrahim El Ameen. In December 2010, Al Akhbar received and published an advance copy of the US State Department cables by Wikileaks, after which the newspaper's website was hacked. Al-Akhbar defines its political orientation to be affiliated to the general popular political stream working for independence, freedom, anti-war, anti-occupation and social justice in Lebanon and around the world. The paper is partisan, allying itself with the March 8 Alliance, made up of Hezbollah, the Free Patriotic Movement, and others. The paper has published articles involving women's rights and gay rights. Ibrahim al Amine, editorial chairman of Al Akhbar, says the paper is intended for “the U.S. ambassador to wake up in the morning, read it and get upset.” The Western media variously classifies the paper from "Hezbollah’s newspaper" to "left-wing". However, the paper is commonly known to be close to Hezbollah.
    8.40
    5 votes
    7
    Atlanta Georgian

    Atlanta Georgian

    • Circulation Areas: Atlanta
    • Owner: James M. Cox
    The Atlanta Georgian was a daily afternoon newspaper in Atlanta, Georgia. Founded by New Jersey native, Fred Loring Seely, the first issue was April 25, 1906, with editor John Temple Graves. They mainly criticized saloons and the convict lease system. In February 1907, Seely expanded the paper by buying out the Atlanta News. The paper was struggling when William Randolph Hearst purchased it in the spring of 1912 (his ninth newspaper property); he transformed it into a yellow press, making it much more successful, if less respected. Noted journalist James B. Nevin became editor (continuing until his death in 1931) and started the Empty Stocking Fund in 1927. That year the paper was awarded the Sutlive Trophy, given by the Georgia Press Association. By the 1930s it was the third largest paper in Atlanta with a circulation of 75,000: far behind the Journal (98,000) and the Constitution (91,000). In 1939, James M. Cox purchased it at the same time as the Atlanta Journal (now The Atlanta Journal-Constitution). He closed down the Georgian, with its last issue being December 18, 1939. By this time the Hearst empire had decreased to fewer than 20 newspapers.
    8.40
    5 votes
    8
    Ålandstidningen

    Ålandstidningen

    • Circulation Areas: Åland Islands
    Ålandstidningen or Tidningen Åland is a Swedish language newspaper on the Åland Islands, an autonomous region in Finland. It's published six times a week, and is the largest local newspaper on Åland, of the two published (the other being Nya Åland). Tidningen Åland was founded in 1891 by Julius Sundblom, who would later play an instrumental part in the Åland Crisis.
    7.17
    6 votes
    9
    Florida Keys Keynoter

    Florida Keys Keynoter

    • Circulation Areas: Marathon
    • Owner: The McClatchy Company
    The Florida Keys Keynoter is a twice-weekly tabloid format newspaper owned by The McClatchy Company and is a sister newspaper to the Miami Herald. It primarily serves Monroe county in the U.S. state of Florida. In addition to publishing regular issues on Wednesday and Saturday, the Keynoter also publishes the weekend magazine L'Attitudes and the bi-monthly Fishing the Florida Keys magazine. The Keynoter is also a partner of the Upper Keys Reporter, which specializes in coverage of the Upper Florida Keys, including Key Largo. The newspaper employs approximately three dozen people in three bureaux across Monroe County. The bureaus, located in Key West, Marathon, and Tavernier, also work with the Miami Herald and Upper Keys Reporter to provide complete coverage of the Florida Keys and southern Florida. The newspaper has been continually among the best in the state, repeatedly earning awards from the Florida Press Association for design and newswriting. The newspaper's coverage of fishing in the Florida Keys and surrounding waters has been repeatedly praised, and special fishing sections regularly feature columns and tips from local fishermen. The Keynoter was founded by Edgar Seney
    7.17
    6 votes
    10
    Gazeta Wyborcza

    Gazeta Wyborcza

    • Circulation Areas: Poland
    Gazeta Wyborcza (Polish pronunciation: [ɡaˈzɛta vɨˈbɔrtʂa] "Electoral Gazette") is a leading Polish newspaper. It covers the gamut of political, international and general news. Like all the Polish newspapers, it is printed on compact-sized paper, and is published by the multimedia corporation Agora SA. The average circulation of the newspaper was once 672,000, but by 2010 had dropped to 319,000, with a commensurate decrease in advertising revenue. Gazeta Wyborcza began publication on May 8, 1989, under the rhyming masthead motto, "Nie ma wolności bez Solidarności" ("There's no freedom without Solidarity"). Its founding was an outcome of the Polish Round Table Agreement between the communist government of the People's Republic of Poland and political opponents centered around the Solidarity movement. The paper was to serve as the voice of Solidarity during the run-up to semi-free elections to be held June 4, 1989 (hence its title). As such, it was the first legal newspaper published outside the communist government's control since its founding in the late 1940s. The paper's editor-in-chief, since its founding, has been Adam Michnik. According to the editors, the first edition was
    7.17
    6 votes
    11
    Trinity News

    Trinity News

    • Circulation Areas: Dublin
    • Owner: Dublin University Publications Committee
    Trinity News is the student newspaper of Trinity College, and the oldest student newspaper in Ireland. It is an independent newspaper which reports on the news and views of the students and staff of Dublin University. The newspaper was first published in 1953; it is using this date as the first volume that the volume numbers are currently derived. Over the years, Trinity News has appeared in many formats including broadsheet and tabloid; as of 2008 it is a broadsheet which publishes on a fortnightly basis during term time. The newspaper is produced exclusively by students of the University under the direction of a student Editor; due to the increased number of issues and workload, it has become common practice for the editor to take a sabbatical from studies for the year. In addition to advertising revenue, Trinity News is funded in part by a grant from the Dublin University Publications Committee, but the newspaper claims full editorial independence. It is printed by NWN Media. The print run is 6,000 copies for each issue, which are distributed around Trinity College, various other city centre locations, Froebel College, Blackrock and Marino College. A small number of copies are
    7.17
    6 votes
    12
    SF Weekly

    SF Weekly

    • Circulation Areas: San Francisco Bay Area
    • Owner: Village Voice Media
    SF Weekly is a free alternative weekly newspaper in San Francisco, California. The newspaper, distributed throughout the San Francisco Bay Area every Wednesday, is published by Village Voice Media, a 16-paper alt weekly newspaper chain that also includes the New York City Village Voice and the Los Angeles, California LA Weekly. Founded locally in the mid 1980s and bought by Village Voice Media (then New Times Media) in 1995, SF Weekly has garnered notable national journalism awards and enjoys mixed reviews by the Bay Area community. The paper sponsors the annual SF Weekly Music Awards, also known as the "Wammies". SF Weekly is politically independent, and encourages its writers to form and support educated opinions about the topics upon which they report. Contrarianism and questioning of political dogma is openly encouraged. The paper combines columns critical of both the left and right, emphasizing investigative reportage, long-form, narrative feature writing, and comprehensive arts and entertainment coverage. The paper trains anywhere from 1-5 up and coming reporters per academic quarter, but interns must receive academic credit for their work. With an October 30, 2007 Op-Ed blog
    6.83
    6 votes
    13
    Maariv

    Maariv

    • Circulation Areas: Israel
    Maariv (Hebrew: מַעֲרִיב‎, lit. Evening) is a mainstream Hebrew language daily newspaper published in Israel. It is second in sales after Yedioth Ahronoth and third in readership after Yedioth Ahronoth and Israel HaYom. In a TGI survey for the first half of 2012, Maariv's market share was 11.9 percent. Ma'ariv was established in 1948 by former Yediot Aharonot journalists. It was the most widely read newspaper in Israel in its first twenty years. Since August 2011, Maariv's editor in chief is Nir Hefetz. Apart from the daily newspaper and its supplements, the Maariv media group (Ma'ariv Holdings Ltd) has a chain of local newspapers with a national scale distribution, a magazines division, and a semi-independent website called NRG, which includes much of the print content. The company's shares are listed on the Tel Aviv Stock Exchange since 1990 (TASE: MARV). For many years, the Nimrodi family held a controlling stake in Maariv and Yaakov Nimrodi served as its chairman. In March 2010, Zaki Rakib bought a 50% share from Israel Land Development Company and Ofer Nimrodi, bringing new energy and much needed cash infusion to the newspaper which has been losing millions of NIS a year since
    7.80
    5 votes
    14
    Neue Zürcher Zeitung

    Neue Zürcher Zeitung

    • Circulation Areas: Zürich
    The Neue Zürcher Zeitung (NZZ, English: New Zurich Times/News) is a Swiss German-language daily newspaper, published by the NZZ-Gruppe in Zurich. It has a reputation as a quality newspaper and as the Swiss newspaper of record, the newspaper is known for its detailed reports on international affairs, stock exchange, and the intellectual, in-depth style of its articles. One of the oldest newspapers still published, it originally appeared as Zürcher Zeitung, edited by Salomon Gessner, from 12 January 1780, and was renamed to Neue Zürcher Zeitung in 1821. Aside from the switch from its Blackletter typeface in 1946, the newspaper has changed little since the 1930s. It has, for example, only in the last three years or so added color pictures, much later than most mainstream papers. The emphasis is on international news, business, finance, and high culture. Features and lifestyle stories are kept to a minimum. Politically, the newspaper is positioned close to the liberal Free Democratic Party of Switzerland. It has a circulation of 330,000. As its average reader is now over age 50, its circulation is slowly declining. In 2002, the newspaper launched a weekend edition, NZZ am Sonntag (NZZ
    7.60
    5 votes
    15
    Sacramento Union

    Sacramento Union

    • Circulation Areas: Sacramento
    The Sacramento Union was a daily newspaper founded in 1851 in Sacramento, California. It was the oldest daily newspaper west of the Mississippi River before it closed its doors after 143 years in January 1994, no longer able to compete with The Sacramento Bee, which was founded in 1857, just six years after the Union. The birth of this storied newspaper institution began 156 years ago, when the city of Sacramento was in its infancy. Under the direction of its first editor, Dr. John F. Morse, who had attracted proprietors through letters to the New Orleans Delta and well-known literary attainments, The Union was initially printed as The Daily Union on Wednesday, March 19, 1851. Upon the front page of this 23-inch by 34-inch paper, Morse addressed the readers of The Union, committing to “publish the first news in the best style and at the lowest prices” and “to have an efficient correspondent in every important town and mining region in the state.” The paper had evolved through the efforts of four Sacramento Transcript printers. The printers had introduced the idea of The Union’s creation a year earlier, due to their frustrations with a labor dispute between the Transcript and the
    7.40
    5 votes
    16
    Apple Daily

    Apple Daily

    • Circulation Areas: Hong Kong
    • Owner: Next Media
    Apple Daily is a Hong-Kong-based tabloid-style newspaper founded in 1995 by Jimmy Lai Chee Ying and is published by its company, Next Media. A sister publication carrying the same name is published in Taiwan, Republic of China under a joint venture between Next Media and other Taiwanese companies. Apple Daily tends to favor the pan-democracy camp in its editorials and commentaries. Apple Daily's main sections include "Local News", "Foreign News", "Finance", "Entertainment", "Sports" and "Others"—including technology, travel, eating, cooking, fashion and more provocative material generating much of its popularity and controversy. Apple Daily's popularity as Hong Kong's second best selling newspaper, according to AC Nielsen, is derived from its concentration on celebrity coverage, brash news style, sensationalist news reportage and its anti-government political positions. Its founder brainstormed the name of this newspaper, stating that "if Adam and Eve didn't eat the apple, there would be no evil or wrongdoings in this world, which made news a non-existing term". Apple Daily was founded by Jimmy Lai Chee Ying on June 20, 1995. Unlike newspapers at that time, it used colour printing
    8.50
    4 votes
    17
    La Capital

    La Capital

    • Circulation Areas: Rosario
    La Capital is a daily Spanish-language newspaper edited and published in Rosario, province of Santa Fe, Argentina. It was founded on November 15, 1867, and it is the oldest Argentine newspaper still in circulation, which has gained it the title of Decano de la Prensa Argentina ("Dean of the Argentine Press"). The name was chosen by its founder, Ovidio Lagos, as a political statement on the part of those, including him, who were lobbying to move the capital of the federal government to Rosario. Rosario was in fact declared the capital three times by Congress, only to face presidential vetoes each time. At the time of its foundation, La Capital was an afternoon newspaper. Newspapers were just forums of political debate with classified ads. Since the beginning, the heading of La Capital included a motto showing a commitment to public opinion: Las columnas de La Capital pertenecen al pueblo, "La Capital's columns belong to the people". On 19 August 1868 the editorial building was at 104 Santa Fe St. After that, La Capital turned into a morning newspaper, and in 1870 it moved to Port St. (now Buenos Aires St.). In 1874 and again in 1887 new printing machinery was acquired. In 1889 the
    8.50
    4 votes
    18
    La Gaceta

    La Gaceta

    • Circulation Areas: Tampa
    La Gaceta (ISSN 0016-3724) is a weekly newspaper in Tampa, Florida, founded in 1922. Published in English, Spanish, and Italian, it is the only trilingual newspaper in the United States. The paper was founded by Victoriano Manteiga, a former lector in the cigar factories of West Tampa and Ybor City, to serve the needs of the immigrant population of Tampa. Later, his son Roland Manteiga took over as editor and publisher. Roland was very well connected, and his column "As We Heard It", became the local mid-20th century version of today's political blogs, often breaking stories and predicting events before the area's "major" newspapers. Today, La Gaceta is still published weekly under the direction of Roland's son (and Victoriano's grandson) Patrick Manteiga, who has assumed authorship of the "As We Heard It" column. Additional editors are Manuela Ball (Spanish Section) and Giuseppe Maniscalco (Italian Section). Other columnists include Arturo Rivera, Joe O'Neill, Richard Muga, Emily Carney, Paul Guzzo, Leonardo Venta, Harvey Grajales, Gene Siudut, Kyle Dion and Travis Puterbaugh.
    8.50
    4 votes
    19
    Buffalo Courier-Express

    Buffalo Courier-Express

    • Circulation Areas: Buffalo
    The Buffalo Courier-Express was a morning newspaper in Buffalo, New York. It ceased publication on September 1982. The Courier-Express was created in 1926 by a merger of the Buffalo Daily Courier and the Buffalo Morning Express. William James Conners, owner of the Buffalo Courier, brought the two papers together. The combined newspapers claimed a heritage dating to 1828. One notable part-owner and editor of the Buffalo Express was Samuel Langhorne Clemens, the writer also known as Mark Twain, whose tenure at the newspaper lasted from 1869 to 1871. In August 1979, The Courier-Express was purchased by the Cowles Media Company, a publishing company based in Minneapolis, MN. After a change in corporate leadership, Cowles Media decided to close the paper in September, 1982. After the local Newspaper Guild members voted to oppose a deal to sell the Courier Express to Rupert Murdoch's News Corporation, the September 19, 1982 issue was the last issue published. This left Buffalo with only one daily newspaper, the Buffalo Evening News, now known as the Buffalo News. Cowles Media donated the library to the Buffalo and Erie County Historical Society and Buffalo State College. The library is
    6.33
    6 votes
    20
    Houston Chronicle

    Houston Chronicle

    • Circulation Areas: Montgomery County
    • Owner: Hearst Corporation
    The Houston Chronicle is the largest daily newspaper in Texas, USA, headquartered in the Houston Chronicle Building located at 801 Texas Avenue, Houston, TX. As of March 2008, it is the ninth-largest newspaper by circulation in the United States. With its 1995 buy-out of long-time rival the Houston Post, the Chronicle became Houston's primary newspaper. The Houston Chronicle is the largest daily paper owned and operated by the Hearst Corporation, a multinational corporate media conglomerate with $4 billion in revenues. The paper employs nearly 2,000 people, including approximately 300 journalists, editors, and photographers. The Chronicle has bureaus in Washington, D.C. and Austin. Its web site averages more than 75 million page views per month. From its inception, the practices and policies of the Houston Chronicle were shaped by strong-willed personalities who were the publishers. The history of the newspaper can be best understood when divided into the eras of these individuals. The Houston Chronicle was founded in 1901 by a former reporter for the now-defunct Houston Post, Marcellus E. Foster. Foster, who had been covering the Spindletop oil boom for the Post, invested in
    6.33
    6 votes
    21
    The Dallas Morning News

    The Dallas Morning News

    • Circulation Areas: Dallas
    • Owner: Belo Corporation
    The Dallas Morning News is the major daily newspaper serving the Dallas, Texas (USA) area, with a circulation of 264,459 subscribers, the Audit Bureau of Circulations reported in September 2010. It was founded on October 1, 1885, by Alfred Horatio Belo as a satellite publication of the Galveston Daily News, of Galveston, Texas. Today it has one of the 20 largest paid circulations in the United States. Throughout the 1990s and as recently as 2010, the DMN has won numerous Pulitzers for both reporting and photography, George Polk Awards for education reporting and regional reporting, and an Overseas Press Club award for photography. The company has its headquarters in Downtown Dallas. In late 1991, the DMN became the lone major newspaper in the Dallas market, when its rival the Dallas Times Herald was closed after several years of hard-fought circulation wars between the two papers, especially over the then-burgeoning classified advertising market. In July 1986, the Times Herald was purchased by a fledgling newspaper impresario, the controversial William Dean Singleton, owner of MediaNews Group. After 18 months of tepid efforts to turn the paper around, Singleton sold it to an
    9.67
    3 votes
    22
    L'Équipe

    L'Équipe

    • Circulation Areas: France
    L'Équipe (French pronunciation: [le'kip] ; French for "the team") is a French nationwide daily newspaper devoted to sports, owned by Éditions Philippe Amaury. The paper is noted for coverage of football (soccer), rugby, motorsports and cycling. Its ancestor was L'Auto, a general sports paper, whose name reflected not any narrow interest but the excitement of the time in car racing. L'Auto originated the Tour de France cycling stage race in 1903 as a circulation booster. The race leader's yellow jersey (maillot jaune) was instituted in 1919, probably to reflect the distinctive yellow newsprint on which L'Auto was published. The competition that would eventually become the UEFA Champions League was also the brainchild of a l'Equipe journalist, Gabriel Hanot. L'Auto and therefore L'Équipe owed its life to a 19th-century French scandal involving soldier Alfred Dreyfus - the Dreyfus affair. With overtones of anti-semitism and post-war paranoia, Dreyfus was accused of selling secrets to France's old enemy, the Germans. As different sides of society insisted he was guilty or innocent - he was eventually cleared but only after rigged trials had banished him to an island prison camp - the
    7.20
    5 votes
    23
    The New Haven Register

    The New Haven Register

    • Circulation Areas: New Haven County
    • Owner: Journal Register Company
    The New Haven Register is a daily newspaper published in New Haven, Connecticut. It is owned by Journal Register Company of Yardley, Pennsylvania. The Register's main office is located at 40 Sargent Drive in New Haven. The Register covers 19 towns and cities within New Haven and Middlesex counties, including New Haven. The newspaper also had one reporter in Hartford, the state capital, who covered state politics, but as of March 2008 removed that reporter, leaving New Haven's major daily without day-to-day coverage of state offices and the General Assembly. The editor of the New Haven Register and other Journal Register Co. publications in Connecticut, is Matt DeRienzo, and its publisher is Tom Wiley. Mark Brackenbury is the managing editor and Helen Bennett Harvey is the state and city editor. The Register was established about 1812 and is one of the oldest continuously published newspapers in the U.S. In the early 20th century it was bought by John Day Jackson. The Jackson family owned the Register, published weekday evenings and Saturday and Sunday mornings, and The Journal-Courier, a morning weekday paper, until they were combined in 1987 into a seven-day morning Register. John
    7.20
    5 votes
    24
    Timmins Daily Press

    Timmins Daily Press

    • Circulation Areas: Timmins
    The Timmins Daily Press is a newspaper in Timmins, Ontario, which publishes six days a week. It is notable as the first paper bought by press baron Roy Thomson, who would eventually own more than 200 newspapers including The Times (London). In something of a strange twist of fate, the paper was later sold to Hollinger, a company founded by Noah Timmins, after whom the city of Timmins is named. The Daily Press is now owned by Quebecor through its Osprey Media division. Osprey bought the Daily Press from Hollinger in 2001. The Daily Press had an average daily circulation of 6,001 in the six-month period ending in March 2008, down from 9,522 in September 2005. In January 2007 the Daily Press dropped Chapleau and Hearst from its circulation routes. The paper's move to axe those towns from its regular circulation was a response to its dropping distribution levels. Those towns now receive the paper one day after its publication date.
    7.20
    5 votes
    25
    Taunton Daily Gazette

    Taunton Daily Gazette

    • Circulation Areas: Bristol County
    • Owner: GateHouse Media
    The Taunton Daily Gazette (and Taunton Sunday Gazette) is a daily newspaper founded in 1848. Based in Taunton, Massachusetts, its coverage area also includes Berkley, Rehoboth, Dighton, Lakeville, Norton, and Raynham. On December 1, 2006, Journal Register Company announced it would sell the Gazette, along with the Fall River Herald News, to GateHouse Media. Since early 2007, the Gazette has been published as part of GateHouse Media New England.
    8.25
    4 votes
    26
    Long Island Press

    Long Island Press

    • Circulation Areas: Long Island
    The Long Island Press is a free newsweekly serving Long Island with extensive coverage of local news, arts and entertainment, sports, and alternative political viewpoints. The newspaper started in 2003 after its parent company, Morey Publishing, bought The Island Ear, which was a free bi-monthly entertainment-oriented newspaper. Morey Publishing renamed the paper, using the same name of a daily newspaper that was forced out of business in 1977. The staff of the Press has included former Newsday columnist Ed Lowe, television columnist Todd Hyman, technology columnist Lazlow and relationship columnist Holly Marie Busacca. Long Island Press is the largest free-distribution newsweekly on Long Island. The paper reports an average weekly circulation of 85,000, distributed each week to more than 2,000 locations including supermarkets, delis, diners, schools, libraries, office buildings and more. The Press reports an average pass around rate of 2.3, reaching an approximate 195,500 readers each week. The Press reports that on average, 850,000 to 1,000,000 visitors come to their flagship website per month. The website contains a mix of content from the weekly edition, as well as daily local,
    7.00
    5 votes
    27
    The Herald-Sun

    The Herald-Sun

    • Circulation Areas: Durham
    • Owner: Paxton Media Group
    The Herald-Sun is a daily newspaper in Durham, North Carolina, published by the Paxton Media Group of Paducah, Kentucky. The Herald-Sun began publication on 1 January 1991 as the result of a merger of The Durham Morning Herald and The Durham Sun. The Herald-Sun and The Durham Morning Herald before they were owned and operated by the Rollins Family, which had been in management positions since 1895. Edward Tyler Rollins Jr., former owner, board chairman and publisher of The Herald-Sun, died 5 November 2006, just shy of two years after selling to Paxton Media Group. The Durham Morning Herald began publication in 1893, as a result of the reorganization of The Durham Globe from a daily to a weekly paper. Four former employees of the downsized Globe, itself an outgrowth of the merger of Durham's first daily, The Tobacco Plant and The Durham Daily Recorder, organized a competitor newspaper, The Globe Herald, which would soon be renamed The Morning Herald. In 1929, the Durham Morning Herald Company acquired The Durham Sun, an evening daily that had been in publication in one form or another since 1889. The late Rick Kaspar was the first person outside of the Rollins Family to run the
    7.00
    5 votes
    28
    Klassekampen

    Klassekampen

    • Circulation Areas: Oslo
    Klassekampen (English: The Class Struggle) is a Norwegian daily newspaper, which styles itself as "the daily left-wing newspaper". Klassekampen was founded in 1969 with a Marxist-Leninist-Maoist platform. Until recently, it was owned by The Workers' Communist Party. Today it is owned by Rødt, Fagforbundet, OktoPax and Industri Energi among others. Bjørgulv Braanen has been the editor of Klassekampen since 2002, succeeding Jon Michelet. Weekly columnists include Paul Bjerke, Arild Rønsen and Dag Seierstad, and cartoonist Hallvard Skauge contributes on Saturdays. On Saturdays the newspaper features a book magazine. Editors of this section have been Bendik Wold (2006–2008) and Karin Haugen (2008–present). Klassekampen has a readership of more than 50,000 on week days and 90,000 on Saturdays.
    9.33
    3 votes
    29
    Stochos

    Stochos

    Stochos (Greek: Στόχος, English: Target) is a nationalist Greek weekly newspaper, first published in 1985. It was founded by Georgios Kapsalis (d. 1999). Until the death of its founder, the newspaper was strictly national conservative, rejecting all political parties.
    9.33
    3 votes
    30
    Turun Sanomat

    Turun Sanomat

    • Circulation Areas: Finland Proper
    Turun Sanomat is the leading regional newspaper of the region of Finland Proper. It is published in the region's capital, Turku, and is read daily by about 280 000 people, or 70% of the inhabitants, in the city and its surrounding municipalities, making it the third most widely read morning newspaper in Finland (after Helsingin Sanomat and Aamulehti). The paper has been published since 1904, and is officially politically independent and non-aligned since 1961. Turun Sanomat was founded as supporter of the liberal Young Finnish Party and is still active in the Young Finn Newspaper Association. The newspaper publishes two weekly supplements, Treffi (on entertainment, and containing the following week's TV programmes) and Extra, the monthly TS Talous (with in-depth economic coverage), and 24 different TS Teema -supplements (lifestyle). It also operates its own printing press and the local television channel Turku TV. The current executive editor of Turun Sanomat is Kari Vainio.
    6.00
    6 votes
    31
    The Detroit News

    The Detroit News

    • Circulation Areas: Detroit
    • Owner: MediaNews Group
    The Detroit News is one of the two major newspapers in the U.S. city of Detroit, Michigan. The paper began in 1873, when it rented space in the rival Free Press's building. The News absorbed the Detroit Tribune on February 1, 1919, the Detroit Journal on July 21, 1922, and on November 7, 1960, it bought and closed the faltering Detroit Times. However, it retained the Times' building which it used as a printing plant until 1967 when a new facility opened in Sterling Heights and it was demolished. The street in downtown Detroit where the Times building once stood is still called "Times Square." The Evening News Association, owner of The News, merged with Gannett in 1985. The News claims to have been the first newspaper in the world to operate a radio station, station 8MK, which went on the air August 20, 1920. 8MK is now CBS-owned WWJ. In 1947, it established Michigan's first television station, WWJ-TV, now WDIV-TV. In 1989, the paper entered into a 100-year joint operating agreement with the rival Free Press, combining business operations while keeping separate editorial staffs. The combined company is called the Detroit Newspaper Partnership. The Free Press moved into The News
    6.80
    5 votes
    32
    The Evening News

    The Evening News

    • Circulation Areas: Jeffersonville
    • Owner: Community Newspaper Holdings
    The Evening News is a six-day (Tuesday through Sunday) daily newspaper serving Jeffersonville, Indiana, and Clark County, Indiana. It is owned by Community Newspaper Holdings Inc. On weekends, the paper publishes in the morning; on weekdays except Monday, in the afternoon. There is no Monday edition. The newspaper shares a publisher, editor, staff and other resources, notably its Website, with the The Tribune of New Albany in neighboring Floyd County, Indiana. The headquarters are located on Spring Street within the Old Jeffersonville Historic District.
    6.80
    5 votes
    33
    Fyens Stiftstidende

    Fyens Stiftstidende

    • Circulation Areas: Odense
    Fyens Stiftstidende is a daily newspaper in Denmark and has a circulation, primarily on Funen, of approximately 60,000 on weekdays and 80,000 on weekends. Until 1841 it was known as "Kongelig Priviligerede Odense Adresse-Contoirs Efterretninger" On 13 April 1993 the newspaper changed its 221-year-old tradition as a midday newspaper, to a morning paper. Since November 2007, "Stig's Stribe" (Stig's Strip in English) has appeared in the newspaper Monday through Friday all year round. The cartoon strip is of the gag strip variety and was created by Danish cartoonist/illustrator Stig Kristensen. Originally, it was placed above the other "regulars" Fyens Stiftstidende ran, Pearls Before Swine and Up and Running, but starting from February 2009 they moved those inside the newspaper featuring only "Stig's Stribe" on the back page. The editor in chief Per Westergård chairs the board of the Centre for Journalism at the University of Southern Denmark in Odense, one of the two university journalism departments in Denmark.
    9.00
    3 votes
    34
    Predvestnik

    Predvestnik

    • Circulation Areas: Western Massachusetts
    Predvestnik (Forerunner) was a Russian language newspaper published in the Pioneer Valley, Massachusetts. Founded in 2004, it ceased publication in 2008. Predvestnik covered a wide variety of local and world news, and published articles on Christianity. It appeared monthly with a circulation of about 4,000 and was printed in a full color broadsheet format. The newspaper was delivered free to the public. The newspaper served immigrants from the former Soviet Union republics that had been immigrating to Western Massachusetts since 1989. The majority of these immigrants belong to the Evangelical Christian faith, which includes Pentecostals and Baptists. These immigrants were granted refugee status by the United States Department of State because of religious persecution. Russian Jewish immigrants who moved to Western Massachusetts during the same period represent a significantly smaller number of the population. Other religious faiths represented in the area include the Armenian and Orthodox faiths. The population also includes a small number of Muslim Turkish people, who began arriving from Russia in 2006. For more than 15 years the Russian speaking community has drastically grown in
    9.00
    3 votes
    35
    Proletären

    Proletären

    • Circulation Areas: Gothenburg
    Proletären (meaning "the proletarian"; in full Marxist-leninist Proletären) is a Swedish Marxist-Leninist weekly newspaper published by the Communist Party. It was founded in 1970. Circulation is about 3 000 every week, of which about a third is sold in the streets. A lot of famous Swedes, as Jan Myrdal, Peter Birro and Sven Wollter, who is a member of the Communist Party, have been published in Proletären.
    7.75
    4 votes
    36
    Miami New Times

    Miami New Times

    • Circulation Areas: Miami
    • Owner: Village Voice Media
    The Miami New Times is a free weekly newspaper published in Miami and distributed every Thursday. It primarily serves the Miami area and is headquartered near Miami's Design District. It was acquired by Village Voice Media, then known as New Times Media, in 1987, when it was fortnightly newspaper called the Wave. As of 2010 it is edited by Chuck Strouse, a former Miami Herald reporter. The paper has won numerous awards including a first place in 2008 among weekly papers from the Investigative Reporters and Editors for stories about the Julia Tuttle Causeway sex offender colony In 2010, the paper garnered international attention when it published a story by Brandon K. Thorp and Penn Bullock which revealed that anti-gay activist George Alan Rekers had hired a male prostitute to accompany him on a trip to Europe. Former writers for the Miami New Times include authors Steve Almond, Sean Rowe, Robert Andrew Powell, Jim DeFede, and Kirk Semple.
    6.60
    5 votes
    37
    Le Canadien

    Le Canadien

    • Circulation Areas: Lower Canada
    Le Canadien (French pronunciation: [lə kanadjɛ̃]) was a French language newspaper published in Lower Canada from November 22, 1806 to March 14, 1810. Its motto was: "Nos institutions, notre langue et nos droits" (Our institutions, our language, our rights). It was released every Saturday and the yearly subscription was of 10 chelins or shillings. The newspaper was founded in Quebec City by lawyer Pierre-Stanislas Bédard and associates François Blanchet, Jean-Antoine Panet, Jean-Thomas Taschereau and Joseph Le Vasseur Borgia. All were members of the Parliament of Lower Canada at the time. The editor was Jean-Antoine Bouthillier. The newspaper quickly became the voice of the Parti canadien in their battle against the English party and the government of governor James Craig. On March 17, 1810, the press and the papers of the editorial office on rue Saint-François were seized by the government. The printer Charles Lefrançois was imprisoned and a patrol searched the city for conspirators. The Quebec Mercury had previously insinuated that the French Canadians and the Americans were plotting against England. Two days later, no conspirators had been found. Bédard, Blanchet and Taschereau
    8.67
    3 votes
    38
    The Capital

    The Capital

    • Circulation Areas: Anne Arundel County
    • Owner: Landmark Media Enterprises
    The Capital is a daily newspaper published in Annapolis, Maryland. It serves the city, much of Anne Arundel County, and neighboring Kent Island in Queen Anne's County. It is an evening newspaper during the week and offers morning delivery on the weekend. The Capital, the Maryland Gazette and their sister publications have been composed and printed in numerous locations, all in the Annapolis area, for more than 270 years. The company has moved headquarters seven times, including from 3 Church Circle to 213 West St. in 1948, and then to 2000 Capital Drive in 1987. One of the Capital's sister papers is the Gazette, originally the Maryland Gazette, one of the oldest newspapers in the United States. William Parks founded The Maryland Gazette in Annapolis in the early 18th century. Eventually, Parks moved to Virginia, and the paper was later published by Anne Catherine Hoof Green. Today, the Gazette, published twice weekly, is a sister newspaper of the Capital that covers northern Anne Arundel County. The first paper to feature the word "Capital" rolled off the presses in 1884 as the Evening Capital. It was a weekly until 1955. The word "Evening" was dropped in 1981. John Peter Zenger,
    8.67
    3 votes
    39
    UCSD Guardian

    UCSD Guardian

    • Circulation Areas: San Diego
    The UCSD Guardian is a student-operated newspaper at the University of California, San Diego. Originally named the Triton Times, it is published twice a week during the regular academic year, usually Mondays and Thursdays. Although the Guardian is officially a university department, it is funded solely by advertising. Unlike many college newspapers, the Guardian has no faculty advisor and is not formally tied to any academic program. The Guardian's editorial staff consists of UCSD undergraduates. The Editor in Chief is elected in the late spring by a vote of the current year's staff; the Editor in Chief-elect then selects new senior editors, who make up the paper's Executive Board, which is ratified by the outgoing editors. In contrast, the paper's business side is operated by several longtime university employees. A Business Oversight Board, which includes the paper's general manager, Editor in Chief, and managing editors is responsible for setting long-term policies for the business and overseeing their implementation. Though the Guardian is technically a self-supporting enterprise under the university's Student Affairs department, it operates with relative independence and
    6.40
    5 votes
    40
    Daily Intelligencer

    Daily Intelligencer

    • Circulation Areas: Atlanta
    The Daily Intelligencer was first published on June 1, 1849 as the young city of Atlanta's first successful daily newspaper (although the town had previously had weekly papers such as The Luminary). The founders were Benjamin Bomar, Z.A. Rice, Jonathan Norcross and Ira O. McDaniel. During the American Civil War, it had great trouble acquiring paper from its supplier, the paper mill at Sope Creek. In 1864, it was purchased by Jared Whitaker who briefly moved it to Macon then moved back after the war, making it the only Atlanta paper to survive. John H. Steele was its editor from 1860 until his death in January 1871 and Captain Evan Howell was its city editor starting in 1868. The paper closed in April, soon after Steele's death and after intense competition from the new Atlanta Constitution which ended up buying at auction the mechanical equipment of the Intelligencer. At that same auction, Whitaker purchased the archives and other paperwork.
    7.25
    4 votes
    41
    Mansfield News Journal

    Mansfield News Journal

    • Circulation Areas: Richland County
    • Owner: Gannett Company
    The Mansfield News Journal is a daily newspaper based in Mansfield, Ohio that serves Richland, Ashland and Crawford counties, as well as parts of Morrow, Knox and Huron counties in the north central part of the state. The News Journal was formed by the merger of the Mansfield News and the Mansfield Journal in 1932. The paper celebrated its 75th anniversary in December 2007. The paper's daily sections include the Front Page, Region and State, Nation, Sports, and Lifestyle. The business section is in the A section daily and in the D section on Sundays. Tom Brennan is the publisher and David Kennard is the editor. The newspaper's Web site was chosen the state's best among newspapers in its circulation category in 2007 in the annual AP contest.
    7.25
    4 votes
    42
    The Forward

    The Forward

    • Circulation Areas: New York City
    The Forward (Yiddish: פֿאָרווערטס; Forverts), commonly known as The Jewish Daily Forward, is a Jewish-American newspaper published in New York City. The publication began in 1897 as a Yiddish-language daily issued by dissidents from the Socialist Labor Party of Daniel DeLeon. As a privately owned publication loosely affiliated with the Socialist Party of America, Forverts achieved massive circulation and considerable political influence during the first three decades of the 20th Century. The publication still exists as a weekly news magazine in parallel Yiddish (Yiddish Forward) and English editions (The Jewish Daily Forward). The first issue of Forverts, appeared on April 22, 1897 in New York City. The paper was founded by a group of about 50 Yiddish-speaking socialists who organized themselves approximately three months earlier as the Forward Publishing Association. The paper's name, as well as its political orientation, was borrowed from the German Social Democratic Party and its organ Vorwärts. Forverts was a successor to New York's first Yiddish-language socialist newspaper, Di Arbeter Tsaytung (The Workman's Paper), a weekly established in 1890 by the fledgling Jewish trade
    7.25
    4 votes
    43
    La Opinión

    La Opinión

    • Circulation Areas: Los Angeles
    La Opinión is a Spanish-language daily newspaper published in Los Angeles, California, USA and distributed throughout the six counties of Southern California. It is the largest Spanish-language newspaper in the United States and second-most read newspaper in Los Angeles (after The Los Angeles Times). It is published by Impremedia LLC. Its Impremedia shares are held by Lozano Enterprises, the private equity company of the Lozano family. The newspaper headquartered in Suites 3000 and 3100 in the MCI Center in Downtown Los Angeles. The paper was first founded and published on September 16, 1926 by Ignacio E. Lozano, Sr.. He emigrated from Mexico to San Antonio, Texas in 1908 where Lozano first founded a Spanish language daily newspaper known as La Prensa in 1913. With the increase in the Mexican population Los Angeles experienced during the 1920s, Lozano believed he had a strong base for a Spanish newspaper in the growing city and founded La Opinión on September 16 to coincide with Mexico's Independence Day. The Lozano family retained control over both La Prensa and La Opinion until 1959 when La Prensa was sold. In its early existence La Opinión consisted primarily of news from Mexico
    8.33
    3 votes
    44
    Robotnik

    Robotnik

    • Circulation Areas: Poland
    Robotnik (Polish pronunciation: [rɔˈbɔtɲik]; The Worker) was the bibuła (underground) newspaper published by the Polish Socialist Party (PPS), and distributed in most major cities and towns in Poland under Partitions. Robotnik was first published on 12 July 1894 in Lipniszki near Wilno in the amount of 1,200 copies, by the local branch of the then-illegal PPS, led by the future naczelnik of the Second Polish Republic, Józef Piłsudski. Among its other editors was Stanisław Wojciechowski, future president of Poland. In order to throw the ochrana secret police and regular Russian police off track, the newspaper was first distributed in Warsaw. Piłdsudski would become one of the chief editors and writers for the newspaper, and he often spent most of the day at the printing press. In 1900 the police managed to find the printing press, leading to the arrest, sentencing, and imprisonment of Józef Piłsudski and several other members of PPS (including his wife, Maria Piłsudska), although Piłsudski would soon escape by feigning mental illness. In the following years Robotnik would be printed in various places by several groups of PPS, or related to it. From 1915 Robotnik was legalized; the
    8.33
    3 votes
    45
    The Daily Telegraph

    The Daily Telegraph

    • Circulation Areas: United Kingdom
    • Owner: David and Frederick Barclay
    The Daily Telegraph is a daily morning broadsheet conservative-leaning newspaper distributed throughout the United Kingdom and internationally. The newspaper was founded by Arthur B. Sleigh in June 1855 as The Daily Telegraph and Courier, and since 2004 has been owned by David and Frederick Barclay. According to a MORI survey conducted in 2005, 64% of Telegraph readers intended to support the Conservative Party in the coming elections. It had an average daily circulation of 634,113 in July 2011 (compared to 441,205 for The Times). It is the sister paper of The Sunday Telegraph. It is run separately with a different editorial staff, but there is some cross-usage of stories, and the two titles share a website. The Daily Telegraph and Courier was founded by Colonel Arthur B. Sleigh in June 1855 to air a personal grievance against the future Commander-in-chief of the British Army, Prince George, Duke of Cambridge. Joseph Moses Levy, the owner of The Sunday Times, agreed to print the newspaper, and the first edition was published on 29 June 1855. The paper cost 2d and was four pages long. It was not a success, however, and Sleigh was unable to pay Levy the printing bill. Levy took over
    6.20
    5 votes
    46
    Tygodnik Solidarność

    Tygodnik Solidarność

    • Circulation Areas: Poland
    Tygodnik Solidarność was a Polish weekly magazine. Started and published by the Solidarity movement on 3 April 1981, it was banned by the People's Republic of Poland following the martial law declaration from 13 December 1981 and the thaw of 1989. It was legalized in June 1989 after the Polish legislative elections, 1989.
    6.20
    5 votes
    47
    The Galveston County Daily News

    The Galveston County Daily News

    • Circulation Areas: Galveston County
    The Daily News, formerly the Galveston County Daily News and Galveston Daily News, is a newspaper published in Galveston, Texas, United States. It was first published April 11, 1842, making it the oldest newspaper in the U.S. state of Texas. The newspaper founded The Dallas Morning News on October 1, 1885 as a sister publication. It currently serves as the newspaper of record for the City of Galveston as well as Galveston County. On April 11, 1842, George H. French began publication of the "Daily News", as a single broadsheet paper. At the time, Texas was an independent Republic, with Sam Houston serving as president, and Galveston was its largest port and primary city. By 1843, Willard Richardson was named editor of the paper and in 1845 decided to purchase the growing publication. The News continued to grow and became a "major voice in the Republic of Texas", and was one of the first papers in the US with a dedicated train to manage its circulation in cities across the Republic and later the U.S. State of Texas. During the Civil War, the Daily News was briefly published in Houston, after Galveston was occupied by Union forces, but by 1866, it had returned to the Island
    9.50
    2 votes
    48
    Chicago Sun-Times

    Chicago Sun-Times

    • Circulation Areas: McHenry County
    • Owner: Sun-Times Media Group
    The Chicago Sun-Times is an American daily newspaper published in Chicago, Illinois. It is the flagship paper of Wrapports LLC and its Sun-Times Media Group subsidiary. The Chicago Sun-Times is the oldest continuously published daily newspaper in the city. It began in 1844 as the Chicago Evening Journal (which was the first newspaper to publish the rumor, now believed false, that a cow owned by Catherine O'Leary was responsible for the Chicago fire). The Evening Journal, whose West Side building at 17–19 S. Canal was undamaged, gave the Chicago Tribune a temporary home until it could rebuild. In 1929, the newspaper was relaunched as the Chicago Daily Illustrated Times. The modern paper grew out of the 1948 merger of the Chicago Sun, founded in 1941 by Marshall Field III, and the Chicago Daily Times. The newspaper was owned by Field Enterprises, controlled by the Marshall Field family, which would acquire the afternoon Chicago Daily News in 1959 and launch WFLD television in 1966. When the Daily News ended its run in 1978, much of its staff, including Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist Mike Royko, were moved to the Sun-Times. During the Field period, the newspaper had a populist,
    7.00
    4 votes
    49
    Chunichi Shimbun

    Chunichi Shimbun

    • Circulation Areas: Aichi Prefecture
    The Chunichi Shimbun (中日新聞, Chūnichi Shinbun) is a Japanese daily "broadsheet" newspaper published in mostly Aichi Prefecture and neighboring regions by Chunichi Shimbun Co., Ltd (株式会社中日新聞社, Kabushiki-gaisha Chūnichi Shinbunsha). It is the owner of the Chunichi Dragons baseball team, and is also known as the main organizer of a famous international gymnastics event, the Chunichi Cup. The newspaper is dominant in its region, with a market penetration approaching 60 percent of the population of Aichi Prefecture. The Chunichi Shimbun group also publishes the Tokyo Shimbun, the Chunichi Sports, and the Tokyo Chunichi Sports newspapers. The group’s combined circulation is more than 4 million, meaning it ranks fourth in Japan behind the Yomiuri Shimbun, the Asahi Shimbun, and the Mainichi Shimbun. The group has thirteen foreign bureaus. They are in New York City, Washington, D.C., London, Paris, Berlin, Moscow, Cairo, Beijing, Shanghai, Taipei, Seoul, Manila, and Bangkok.
    7.00
    4 votes
    50
    Ouest-France

    Ouest-France

    • Circulation Areas: Bretagne
    Ouest-France (French pronunciation: [wɛst.fʁɑ̃s] ; French for "West-France") is a provincial daily French newspaper known for its emphasis on local news and events. The paper is produced in 47 different editions covering events in different French départments within the régions of Brittany, Lower Normandy and Pays de la Loire. Its readership has been unaffected by the decline of newspaper reading in France, unlike most other dailies. With 2.5 million daily readers (and a circulation of almost 800 000 units), it is the most read Francophone newspaper in the world. Ouest-France was founded in 1944, by Adolphe Le Goaziou and others following the closure of Ouest-Éclair, which was banned by Liberation forces for collaborationism during the war. It is based in Rennes and Nantes and has a circulation about 792,400 (greater than any French national daily newspaper), mostly in Brittany. Its editorial line has been strongly pro-European integration from the beginning, influenced by Christian democracy (Popular Republican Movement), now MoDem, Nouveau Centre or Union for a Popular Movement (UMP). The 47 different editions are divided among twelve départements :
    7.00
    4 votes
    51
    The Daily Mining Gazette

    The Daily Mining Gazette

    • Circulation Areas: Houghton
    The Daily Mining Gazette is a newspaper published in Houghton, Michigan. The paper is also distributed over most of the Upper Peninsula and some northern parts of the Lower Peninsula of Michigan. It is a daily Monday through Friday, with an expanded, combined Saturday-Sunday edition. The Mining Gazette was founded in Ontonagon, Michigan in July 1858 by George Emerson. In 1860, the paper was purchased by James R. Devereau and moved to Houghton, where it was published weekly as The Portage Lake Mining Gazette. The paper began daily publication on 14 September 1899.
    7.00
    4 votes
    52
    Tidens Krav

    Tidens Krav

    • Circulation Areas: Kristiansund
    Tidens Krav (TK) is a local newspaper published in Kristiansund, Norway. It was founded in 1906, is published Monday through Saturday, and reports news from Nordmøre. Circulation numbers verified by the Norwegian Media Businesses' Association:
    7.00
    4 votes
    53
    Grand Forks Herald

    Grand Forks Herald

    • Circulation Areas: Minnesota
    • Owner: Forum Communications
    The Grand Forks Herald is a daily broadsheet newspaper, begun in 1879, published in Grand Forks, North Dakota. It is the primary daily paper for northeast North Dakota and northwest Minnesota. Its average daily circulation is 34,763 on Sundays and 31,524 on weekdays. It has the second largest circulation in the state of North Dakota. The paper won a Pulitzer Prize for Public Service for its coverage of the 1997 flood but the prize was bittersweet, as the Herald building had not only been inundated but, ironically, burned to the ground in the midst of the floodwaters. Despite losing its offices during the flood, the Herald never missed a day of publication. Temporary offices were set up at the University of North Dakota and at a nearby elementary school. Papers were distributed free of charge to flood "refugees" in neighboring towns. Following the flood, the newspaper rebuilt its office building in downtown Grand Forks. Its distinctive features are a tall clock tower and the symbolism built into the structure, as well as parts of the old building that survived the fire. A new printing facility was also built in an industrial park in the western part of Grand Forks. Knight Ridder
    6.00
    5 votes
    54
    Daily Record

    Daily Record

    • Circulation Areas: Scotland
    • Owner: Trinity Mirror
    The Daily Record is a Scottish tabloid newspaper based in Glasgow. It had been the best-selling daily paper in Scotland for many years with a paid circulation in August 2011 of 307,794 (ABC). It is now outsold by its arch-rival the Scottish Sun which in September 2010 had a circulation of 339,586 in Scotland (ABC). Current circulation is less than half the all-time high of 743,000 achieved in 1983 when it enjoyed the second highest market saturation in the world. The Daily Record was founded in 1895. The North British Daily Mail ceased publication in 1901 and was then incorporated into the Daily Record, which was renamed the Daily Record and Mail. Lord Kemsley bought the paper for £1 million in 1922, forming a controlling company known as Associated Scottish Newspapers Limited. Production was transferred from Renfield Lane to 67 Hope Street in 1926. In 1971 the Daily Record became the first European newspaper to be printed with run-of-paper colour, and was the first British national to introduce computer page make-up technology. It was purchased by Trinity Mirror in 1999, from the estate of Robert Maxwell. In August 2006, the paper launched afternoon editions in Glasgow and
    8.00
    3 votes
    55
    Die Rote Fahne

    Die Rote Fahne

    The German newspaper Die Rote Fahne ("The Red Flag") was created on 9 November 1918 by Karl Liebknecht and Rosa Luxemburg in Berlin, first as organ of the left wing revolutionary Spartakusbund. After the founding of the Communist Party of Germany (KPD) on 1 January 1919, it became the central publication of the party, until 1945. Outlawed after the end of the Weimar Republic and the Reichstag fire in 1933, it was illegally distributed during the Nazi dictatorship by underground groups close to the Communist Party until 1942. Since the 1970s, a number of projects by different left-wing socialist groupings or small parties tried to publish Die Rote Fahne again. At present, at least two internet publications use the name, each claiming to be the successor of the historical newspaper.
    8.00
    3 votes
    56
    The Florida Times-Union

    The Florida Times-Union

    • Circulation Areas: Jacksonville
    • Owner: Morris Communications
    The Florida Times-Union is a major daily newspaper in Jacksonville, Florida, USA. Widely known as the oldest newspaper in the state, it began publication as the Florida Union in 1864. Its current incarnation started in 1883, when the Florida Union merged with another Jacksonville paper, the Florida Daily Times and the Florida Union. A Southeast Georgia edition, called The Georgia Times-Union, serves the Brunswick area. For much of its history, the Times-Union was owned by the then St. Augustine-based Florida East Coast Railway, along with the St. Augustine Record. Under this ownership, the paper was notorious for relegating news of any railroad mishap to its back pages while giving front page coverage to trucking accidents. In fact, an oft repeated joke around Jacksonville was that "In North Florida, trains don't hit cars. Cars hit trains." In 1959, Florida Publishing Company (its parent company) purchased the evening newspaper the Jacksonville Journal. The two newspapers remained sister publications until October 28, 1988 when the Journal ceased publication. During the 1960s, The Florida Times-Union and Jacksonville Journal played different roles in two major events in city
    8.00
    3 votes
    57
    The Guardian

    The Guardian

    • Circulation Areas: United Kingdom
    • Owner: Guardian Media Group
    • Issues: The Guardian, 14 Feb 2004
    The Guardian, until 1959 known as The Manchester Guardian (founded 1821), is a British national daily newspaper in the Berliner format. Currently edited by Alan Rusbridger, it has grown from a 19th-century local paper to a national paper associated with a complex organisational structure and international multimedia presence with sister papers The Observer (British Sunday paper) and The Guardian Weekly, as well as a web presence. The Guardian in paper form had a certified average daily circulation of 215,998, behind The Daily Telegraph and The Times. The newspaper's online offering is the second most popular British newspaper website behind the Daily Mail's Mail Online. Founded in 1821 by John Edward Taylor in Manchester, with backing from the non-conformist Little Circle group of local businessmen, The Manchester Guardian replaced the radical Manchester Observer which championed the Peterloo protesters. The paper currently identifies with social liberalism. In the last United Kingdom elections, the paper supported the Liberal Democrats, who went on to form a coalition government with the Conservatives. The paper is also influential in the design and publishing arena, sponsoring
    8.00
    3 votes
    58
    Vaartha Bhaarathi

    Vaartha Bhaarathi

    • Circulation Areas: Mangalore
    Vaartha Bhaarathi (¢ᄇᄉ¢ᄇᄒ¢ᄇᄂ¢ᄇᄒ¢ᄈᆵ ¢ᄇᆳ¢ᄇᄒ¢ᄇᄚ¢ᄇᄂ¢ᄇ﾿) is the fastest growing Kannada daily (¢ᄇユ¢ᄇᄄ¢ᄈヘ¢ᄇᄄ¢ᄇᄀ ¢ᄇᆭ¢ᄇ﾿¢ᄇᄄ¢ᄇᆰ¢ᄇᄂ¢ᄈヘ¢ᄇᄚ¢ᄇ﾿¢ᄇユ¢ᄈニ) in the Indian southern state, Karnataka, with a prominent presence in the coastal region. Vaartha Bhaarathi (also known as Vaartha Bharathi) is a very popular Kannada newspaper amongst the Indian expatriates living in the Persian Gulf States. Vaartha Bharathi has a formidable readership in the entire coastal region of the state and its adjacent districts. It has already emerged as the largest circulated Kannada daily newspaper in the gulf region. This newspaper has won widespread admiration from various quarters for its fearless stand on several critical issues and also for the role it has played in carrying the true version of the events in many cases. In its process of expanding, Vaartha Bhaarathi has launched its Bangalore edition on 29.08.2006 while commemorating its 3rd anniversary at N.G.O. Hall, Bangalore. With the commencement of the Bangalore edition the daily reached the capital of Karnataka, to cover Mysore, Mandya, Kolar, Chamarajpet, Chitradurga, Davangere districts. The Bangalore edition is brought out with a plan to cover at
    8.00
    3 votes
    59
    El Sur

    El Sur

    • Circulation Areas: Concepción
    El Sur is a Chilean newspaper published in Concepción and it circulates in almost all the Biobío Region. El Sur is owned by El Sur S.A., which manages two dailies in Concepción: El Sur and Crónica.
    6.75
    4 votes
    60
    L'Aurore

    L'Aurore

    • Circulation Areas: Paris
    L’Aurore (French for “The Dawn”) was a literary, liberal, and socialist newspaper published in Paris, France, from 1897 to 1916. Its most famous headline was Émile Zola’s “J'Accuse”, leading into his article on the Dreyfus Affair. The newspaper was published by Georges Clemenceau, who later became the Prime Minister of France. Georges Mandel as a young man worked for the paper in its early years, and later was recruited by Clemenceau to serve as his aide in government.
    6.75
    4 votes
    61
    Nürnberger Nachrichten

    Nürnberger Nachrichten

    • Circulation Areas: Fürth
    The Nürnberger Nachrichten (NN) was originally a local daily in the Nuremberg-Erlangen-Fürth area. With its regional editions it now covers the whole of Middle Franconia and parts of Upper Franconia and the Upper Palatinate. With a total circulation of, currently, about 300,000, it is one of Germany's larger regional newspapers. The Nürnberger Zeitung belongs to the same group but is editorially independent. The Nürnberger Nachrichten (NN) was first published on October 11, 1945. Its founder, Joseph E. Drexel, was granted licence No. 3 for newspaper publication by the occupying power, the American Military Government in Bavaria. At first, the NN was printed in Zirndorf because it was not possible to find an intact printing plant in Nuremberg, owing to the war damage. In 1945/46 the paper only came out twice a week; from Autumn 1946 to 1949 that increased to three times a week, and after that four times a week. In Autumn 1949, the publishers moved to Nuremberg. It was not until 16 November 1962 that the paper came out six times a week.
    6.75
    4 votes
    62
    The Canberra Times

    The Canberra Times

    • Circulation Areas: Canberra
    • Owner: Rural Press
    The Canberra Times newspaper was founded in 1926 in Canberra, Australia by Arthur Shakespeare. It was the second paper to be printed in the city, the first being The Federal Capital Pioneer. The paper was sold to the Fairfax group in the 1960s by Arthur Shakespeare on the condition that it continue to advocate for Canberra. It was later sold to Publishing and Broadcasting Limited, which in turn sold it to Kerry Stokes in 1989 for $110 million. Rural Press Limited bought the paper from Stokes in 1998 for $160 million. The Times rejoined the Fairfax banner in 2007 when Rural Press merged with Fairfax. The paper first went online on 31 March 1997. Its current editor-at-large is Jack Waterford. A recent editor in chief, Peter Fray, left in January 2009 to edit The Sydney Morning Herald. His successor is Rod Quinn. Previous editors include Michelle Grattan (1993–95), the first female editor of a metropolitan daily newspaper in Australia. In 2008, The Canberra Times printed a formal apology after the paper published an essay in which Irfan Yusuf falsely accused American historian Daniel Pipes of suggesting that Muslims deserved to be slaughtered as Jews were during the Holocaust. On 17
    6.75
    4 votes
    63
    Tribune de Genève

    Tribune de Genève

    • Circulation Areas: Geneva
    • Owner: Edipresse
    The Tribune de Genève (English: Geneva Tribune), commonly nicknamed La Julie, is a Swiss French-language, regional daily newspaper, published in the Berliner format by Edipresse in Geneva. Founded on 1 February 1879 by James T. Bates, the newspaper had a circulation of 67,151 and a readership of 175,000 as of 2007. It shares some of its content with 24 heures (English: 24 Hours), Edipresse's regional newspaper for the Canton of Vaud. The newspaper's online edition features some news in English.
    6.75
    4 votes
    64
    Borås Tidning

    Borås Tidning

    • Circulation Areas: Borås
    Borås Tidning is the daily newspaper of Borås, Sweden. It was founded in 1826, has a circulation of about 50,000 copies and is politically conservative ("moderat"). It is owned by Gota Media AB and has Stefan Eklund as chief editor. It had two predecessors, Borås Weckoblad (1826–1833) and Borås Nya Tidning (1834–1838). It was first published as Borås Tidning in 1838.
    9.00
    2 votes
    65
    Faro de Vigo

    Faro de Vigo

    • Circulation Areas: Vigo
    Faro de Vigo is a Galician newspaper from Vigo. It is the oldest Spanish newspaper still in circulation. Its headquarters are located in Chapela, Redondela. It was printed for the first time on November 3, 1853 on a small machine by its founder, Angel de Lema y Marina, at the Olive Street in Vigo, with the idea of "helping to the interests of Galicia". Since 1986, it belongs to Prensa Ibérica publishing home, communication group that nowadays consists of 14 journalistic mastheads, with common criteria of independence, rigor and pluralism, plus maximum commitment to the different regions where they are edited. In 2002, its circulation reached the 42,245 copies of daily average, as is certified by the Oficine of Spreading Justification (OJD). The numbers of the General Study of Media (EGM, May 2004), give it 304,000 readers a day, putting it among the 13 most important Spanish newspapers, and turns it the undisputed leader of the south of Galicia. The staff of Faro de Vigo is integrated by around 150 workers, divided between the areas of Editorial, Administration and delivery. Faro de Vigo has six editions each day. The one which more difufsion is the one that covers the area of Vigo
    9.00
    2 votes
    66
    L'Osservatore Romano

    L'Osservatore Romano

    • Circulation Areas: Vatican City
    L'Osservatore Romano (English: The Roman Observer) is the "semi-official" newspaper of the Holy See. It covers all the Pope's public activities, publishes editorials by important churchmen, and runs official documents after being released. The publication prints two Latin mottoes under the masthead of each edition: Unicuique suum ("To each his own") and Non praevalebunt ("The gates of Hell shall not prevail"). The current editor-in-chief is Giovanni Maria Vian. Today, the paper takes a more objective and subdued stance than at the time of its foundation, priding itself in "presenting the genuine face of the church and the ideals of freedom," following the statement by Cardinal Tarcisio Bertone in an October 2006 speech inaugurating a new exhibit dedicated to the founding and history of the newspaper. He further described the publication as "an instrument for spreading the teachings of the successor of Peter and for information about church events". L'Osservatore Romano is published in nine different languages (listed by date of first publication): The daily Italian edition of L'Osservatore Romano is published in the afternoon, but with a cover date of the following day, a
    9.00
    2 votes
    67
    Montreal Star

    Montreal Star

    • Circulation Areas: Montreal
    The Montreal Star was an English-language Canadian newspaper published in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. It folded in 1979 in the wake of an eight-month pressmen's strike. It was Canada's largest newspaper until the 1950s and remained the dominant English-language newspaper in Montreal until shortly before its closure. The paper was founded on January 16, 1869 by Hugh Graham, 1st Baron Atholstan and George T. Lanigan as the Montreal Evening Star. He would run the newspaper for nearly 70 years. In 1877, The Evening Star became known as The Montreal Daily Star. By 1915, the Montreal Star dominated the English-language evening newspaper market in Montreal. Hugh Graham was able to run his newspaper's competitors out of business, thus assuring control of the English-language market. In 1925, Graham sold the Montreal Star to John Wilson McConnell, but continued to be in charge of the newspaper until his death in 1938. Two other newspapers, the Montreal Standard and Family Herald, were under the same ownership. Beginning in the 1940s, the Montreal Star became very successful, its circulation was nearly 180,000 copies and it remained around that level for approximately thirty years. In 1951,
    9.00
    2 votes
    68
    The Meridian Star

    The Meridian Star

    • Circulation Areas: Lauderdale County
    • Owner: Community Newspaper Holdings
    The Meridian Star is a daily newspaper published each morning in Meridian, Mississippi, USA, covering Lauderdale County and adjoining portions of West Alabama and East Mississippi. It is owned by Community Newspaper Holding, Inc. Founded as The Evening Star in 1898 by Charles Pinckney Dement and his son James Washington Dement, the paper was published each afternoon until early 2005, when morning delivery was implemented. The paper was renamed The Meridian Star in 1915 and has been Meridian's only daily newspaper since 1921.
    9.00
    2 votes
    69
    SX News

    SX News

    • Circulation Areas: East Sydney
    SX News is a weekly gay and lesbian newspaper based in Sydney, Australia. One of several titles published by Evolution Publishing under the Gay News Network banner. SX News (commonly referred to simply as SX) is distributed throughout Sydney and New South Wales. The publication covers local, national and international news of interest to the gay and lesbian community, and has a strong focus on the arts and entertainment. SX features interviews with high profile people of interest to the gay and lesbian community. Interviews have included Kylie Minogue, Scissor Sisters, Michael Donald Kirby, Louie Spence, Sydney Lord Mayor Clover Moore MP, NSW Premier Nathan Rees, and celebrities such as Rupert Everett, Perez Hilton, Janet Jackson, k.d. lang, Liza Minnelli, Pam Ann, and the Pet Shop Boys. The SX editor is Reg Domingo. Brendan Bolger is the news editor, while Garrett Bithell is the sub-editor. The publication draws on a stable of regular contributors, including political commentators Rodney Croome and Sam Butler, theatre critic Veronica Hannon, Gay media identity Trevor Ashley, Sydney drag identity Joyce Mange and many more. SX is the official media sponsor of the Sydney Gay and
    5.80
    5 votes
    70
    De Tijd

    De Tijd

    • Circulation Areas: Flanders
    • Owner: Mediafin
    De Tijd (English: The Times), formerly De Financieel-Economische Tijd (The Financial Economical Times), is a Belgian berliner newspaper that mainly focuses on business and economics. It is printed on salmon pink paper since May 2009, following the example of its colleagues Financial Times, Het Financieele Dagblad, FT Deutschland and many more. De Tijd is a typical financial daily, covering economy and business, financial markets and national and international politics. It is the main information source for Belgian managers (CIM-survey 2009). It is published from Tuesday to Saturday with no Sunday or Monday edition. The weekend edition is enriched with two magazines: Netto, on personal finance, and Sabato on lifestyle. According to the Centrum voor Informatie over de Media, (CIM) De Tijd had a total paid for distribution of 37.031 copies at the end of 2011. It reaches 123.300 readers every day. De Tijd has an average market share of 6,4% in Flanders. The newspaper has been investing in multimedia projects since 2007. The website of De Tijd now reaches about 150.000 unique visitors a day. The website has a (frequency based) paid for model since May of 2010. The newspaper is also
    7.67
    3 votes
    71
    Hindustan Times

    Hindustan Times

    • Circulation Areas: New Delhi
    Hindustan Times (HT) is an Indian English-language daily newspaper founded in 1924 with roots in the Indian independence movement of the period ("Hindustan" being a historical name for India). It is the flagship publication of HT Media Ltd. Hindustan Times is one of the largest newspapers in India, by circulation. According to the Audit Bureau of Circulations, it has a circulation of 1.4 million copies as of 2010. The Indian Readership Survey (IRS) 2012 revealed that HT has a readership of (37.67 lakhs), placing it as the second most widely read English newspaper in India after The Times of India. It has a wide reach in northern India, with simultaneous editions from New Delhi, Mumbai, Kolkata, Lucknow, Patna, Ranchi, Bhopal and Chandigarh. The print location of Jaipur was discontinued from June 2006. HT launched a youth daily, HT Next, in 2004. The Mumbai edition was launched on 14 July 2005 and the Kolkata edition was launched on early 2000. Other sister publications of Hindustan Times are Mint (English business daily), Hindustan (Hindi Daily), Nandan (monthly children's magazine) and Kadambani (monthly literary magazine). The media group owns a radio channel, Fever, and
    7.67
    3 votes
    72
    Marca

    Marca

    • Circulation Areas: Spain
    MARCA is a Spanish national daily sports newspaper owned by Unidad Editorial. The newspaper focuses primarily on football, in particular the day-to-day activities of Real Madrid. It has a daily readership of over 3,000,000, the highest in Spain for a daily newspaper, and more than half of sports readership. Since February 2001 there has also been an associated 24-hour/day sports radio station, Radio Marca. In 2010 appeared the TV channel MARCA TV. MARCA was founded on 21 December 1938, at the height of the Spanish Civil War, in nationalist-held San Sebastián. Its first editor was Manuel Fernández Cuesta. On 25 November 1942 it ceased being published as a weekly publication and has been published as a daily ever since. On December 21, 2007 MARCA hosted a gala event, featuring the leading Spanish sportsmen of the 20th century, to celebrate the newspaper's 70th anniversary. The paper has been involved in an ongoing dispute with Sir Alex Ferguson since the summer of 2008 when he accused MARCA of being "...a vehicle to unsettle players" on behalf of Real Madrid - in reference to the alleged tapping-up of Cristiano Ronaldo. The following awards are awarded by MARCA at the end of each
    7.67
    3 votes
    73
    Cornwall Standard Freeholder

    Cornwall Standard Freeholder

    • Circulation Areas: Cornwall
    • Owner: Osprey Media
    The Cornwall Standard Freeholder is a daily newspaper based in Cornwall, Ontario. It has been in circulation for many years, and continues to be the newspaper with the largest circulation inside the Montreal - Ottawa - Kingston triangle. The newspaper is owned by Quebecor through its Sun Media division. The Standard-Freeholder has been the newspaper of record for Cornwall and the counties of Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry since 1846. The Cornwall Standard Freeholder is one of the oldest newspapers in Canada. The current newspaper began as two publications, the Freeholder, which was founded by the first premier of Ontario, John Sandfield Macdonald, and the Standard. The two newspapers were amalgamated in 1932 and the first issue was published on April 30 of that year. The Standard-Freeholder became a daily newspaper on April 1, 1941. The Standard-Freeholder remains the only daily newspaper in the triangle between Brockville, Ottawa and Montreal to this day. In 2006, the Standard-Freeholder was nominated for the first time for a National Newspaper Award for a series of articles published the day after an announcement the city's oldest and most prominent employer, Domtar Fine Papers
    10.00
    1 votes
    74
    De Morgen

    De Morgen

    • Circulation Areas: Flanders
    • Owner: De Persgroep Publishing
    De Morgen (Dutch for The Morning) is a Flemish newspaper with a circulation of 53,860. It originates from a merger in 1978 of two socialist newspapers Vooruit ("Onwards") and Volksgazet ("People's Newspaper"). De Morgen presents itself as an independent and progressive newspaper and a more dynamic alternative to its two competitors in the Flemish market De Standaard and De Tijd. According to the (former) editor-in-chief Yves Desmet, "the Flemish press was secularized" under the influence of De Morgen. It has also won several prizes for its revolutionary lay-out. It has applied advanced printing technology to be able to print with greener, water-based ink and higher quality paper. The Vooruit was founded in Ghent by Edward Anseele and appeared the first time on 31 August 1884, just before the foundation of the Belgian Labour Party (Dutch: Belgische Werklieden Partij) in 1885. Today De Morgen is published by De Persgroep (which also publishes Het Laatste Nieuws).
    10.00
    1 votes
    75
    Felix

    Felix

    • Circulation Areas: London
    • Owner: Imperial College Union
    Felix is the award-winning student newspaper of Imperial College London. It won the Guardian Student Newspaper of the Year award in 2008. The newspaper is published weekly during term time, approximately 30 issues per year, and is distributed around the various Imperial College campuses. The FELIX motto, "Keep The Cat Free" (first adopted in 1974), refers to the policy of distributing the newspaper free of charge but more importantly to the tradition of free speech: unlike many students' newspapers Felix is free to criticise union policy whenever the editor sees fit, although during Spring Term 2008 Imperial College Union constitution controversially prevented some news articles from being published. In addition to news, Felix also carries comic strips, features, opinions, puzzles and reviews, plus reports of trips and Imperial College sporting events. As a student newspaper, it is read by a large proportion of the student body, as well as other members of the Imperial College community. Consequently, it provides an opportunity for advertising to both students and staff. The editorial offices are located at the Imperial College Union Media Centre in Beit Quad. The editor is elected
    10.00
    1 votes
    76
    Hallandsposten

    Hallandsposten

    • Circulation Areas: Halmstad
    Hallandsposten is a newspaper printed in Halmstad, Sweden, that was founded 1850. It is the major newspaper of Halmstad, Hylte and Laholm municipalities. It is printed daily since 1900, before that it was printed two times a week. It has a distribution of 32,000.
    10.00
    1 votes
    77
    Nishinippon Shimbun

    Nishinippon Shimbun

    • Circulation Areas: Fukuoka
    The Nishinippon Shimbun (西日本新聞, Nishinippon Shinbun, lit. West-Japan newspaper) is a Japanese language daily newspaper published by The Nishinippon Shimbun Co., Ltd (株式会社西日本新聞社, Kabushiki-gaisha Nishinippon Shinbunsha). As of May 2006, it has the circulation of a million as a total of morning and evening editions. Headquartered in Fukuoka, Fukuoka, the newspaper cover reader is Kyūshū. The Nishinippon Shimbun sponsors the Prince Takamatsu Cup Nishinippon Round-Kyūshū Ekiden, the world's longest relay race.
    10.00
    1 votes
    78
    Regina Leader-Post

    Regina Leader-Post

    • Circulation Areas: Regina
    • Owner: CanWest Global Communications
    The Leader-Post is the daily newspaper of Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada, and now a member of the Postmedia Network. The newspaper was first published as The Leader in 1883, by Nicholas Flood Davin. Published weekly by the mercurial Davin, it almost immediately achieved national prominence during the Northwest Rebellion and the subsequent trial of Louis Riel. Davin had immediate access to the developing story, and his scoops were picked up by the national press. Davin's greatest coup was sending Mary McFadyen Maclean his reporter to conduct a jailhouse interview with Riel. Mary obtained this by masquerading as a francophone priest and interviewing Riel in French under the nose of uncomprehending anglophone watch-house guards. Having begun with a small wooden shack before Regina had full streets, or electricity and plumbing outside Government House, The Leader soon moved to a substantial office building on the southwest corner of Hamilton Street and 11th Avenue, one block south of what was then the post office; southwest across street from City Hall. It then moved to a multi-story building across Hamilton Street immediately to the south. It ultimately relocated in the 1960s to
    10.00
    1 votes
    79
    Salt Lake City Weekly

    Salt Lake City Weekly

    • Circulation Areas: Salt Lake City
    Salt Lake City Weekly (usually shortened to City Weekly) is a free alternative weekly tabloid-paged newspaper published in Salt Lake City, Utah. It began its life as the Private Eye. City Weekly is published and dated for every Thursday by Copperfield Publishing Inc. of which John Saltas is majority owner and president. John Saltas founded what would become Salt Lake City Weekly in June, 1984. He called his monthly publication the Private Eye because it contained news and promotions for bars and dance clubs, which due to Utah State liquor laws were all private clubs. Saltas originally mailed the Private Eye as a newsletter to private club members. State law forbade private clubs from advertising at the time, so Saltas' newsletter was the only way for clubs to get promotional information out. In 1988, the Private Eye became a bi-weekly newspaper although it was available mostly in clubs. Distribution of the paper broadened as new liquor rule interpretations at the Utah Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control (DABC) allowed mainstream media to carry club advertisements as long as they weren't "soliciting" members. The "Private Eye" thus ended its mailed period and was available for
    10.00
    1 votes
    80
    The Daily Progress

    The Daily Progress

    • Circulation Areas: Charlottesville
    • Owner: Media General
    The Daily Progress is the sole daily newspaper in the vicinity of Charlottesville, Virginia. It has been published continuously since 1892. According to the newspaper history published in the 75th anniversary edition in September, 1967, the paper was founded by James Lindsay. Lindsay's family owned it for 79 years, until the sale to the Worrell Newspaper group which took over on January 1, 1971. Worrell, of Bristol, Virginia, owned about two dozen rural weekly newspapers and a few dailies, all with less circulation than the Daily Progress. The DP immediately became the group's flagship paper, and T. Eugene Worrell moved his newspaper group headquarters to Charlottesville. He led his family, especially his son, Tom, into becoming an important source of local philanthropy. Among their contributions was Tom's multi-million dollar nest egg from which The Thomas Jefferson Center for the Protection of Free Expression was created. Worrell and his wife, Anne, were also major contributors to his North Carolina alma mater, Wake Forest University, which Worrell had attended in 1936 as recipient of a debating scholarship, according to a Wake Forest news release at the time of Worrell's death
    10.00
    1 votes
    81
    The Observator

    The Observator

    • Circulation Areas: London
    • Owner: Roger L'Estrange
    The Observator was a newspaper written by Roger L'Estrange, and published from April 13, 1681 to January 15, 1704. L'Estrange was a defender of the Monarchy, and promoted his anti-whig agenda through The Observator. Most issues were printed by the Brome family in London, England, at the "Gun in S. Pauls Church-yard".
    10.00
    1 votes
    82
    Santa Barbara News-Press

    Santa Barbara News-Press

    • Circulation Areas: Santa Barbara County
    The Santa Barbara News-Press is a broadsheet newspaper based in Santa Barbara, California. The News-Press asserts it is the oldest daily newspaper in Southern California, publishing since 1855. The oldest predecessor (the weekly Santa Barbara Post) of the News-Press started publishing on May 30, 1868, and so the News-Press is actually younger than the Bakersfield Californian. The Santa Barbara Post became the Santa Barbara Press, which eventually became the Morning Press which was acquired in 1932 by Thomas M. Storke and merged with his paper, the Santa Barbara News, to make the Santa Barbara News-Press. Storke, a prominent local rancher and booster descended from the Spanish founders of Santa Barbara, brought the paper to prominence. For many years his father, Charles A. Storke, ran the editorial page; his son, Charles A. Storke II, oversaw operations between 1932 and 1960. In 1962, T.M. Storke won the Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Writing "for his forceful editorials calling public attention to the activities of a semi-secret organization known as the John Birch Society". His children did not express interest in continuing to run the paper, however. Storke then sold the paper in
    6.50
    4 votes
    83
    The Paisano

    The Paisano

    The Paisano is the independent student-run newspaper of the University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA). It was established in 1981 and publishes 7,000 copies weekly. "Paisano" is a Spanish and Italian word for "fellow countryman." The newspaper is published once a week except during exam and holiday periods. Because it is student-run and independent from University administration, The Paisano is written completely by unpaid volunteers, with advertisements helping to support the costs associated with printing and distributing. The Paisano won a gold medal in 2000 from the Columbia Scholastic Press Association. The office for the newspaper is located at 14545 Roadrunner Way, across the street from the Main UTSA campus.
    6.50
    4 votes
    84
    Derry People/Donegal News

    Derry People/Donegal News

    • Circulation Areas: Letterkenny
    The Donegal News (also known as Derry People/Donegal News and formerly Derry People) is a twice-weekly local newspaper in the northwest of the island of Ireland, first published in 1902. Originally covering Derry, Northern Ireland, it moved across the border to Letterkenny, County Donegal, at the beginning of World War II and took on more of a Donegal focus. It is owned by the North West of Ireland Printing and Publishing Company, which was established in 1901 by the Lynch family, who also own several other papers in the region including the Ulster Herald, Fermanagh Herald, Strabane Chronicle, Tyrone Herald and Gaelic Life. Its two editions had a circulation of 15,467 for the first half of 2010, with the Friday edition accounting for most of the figure. Its main competitors are the Donegal Democrat and Derry Journal. The paper, despite a 'rebranding' several years ago, continues to be known, for short, locally across the northern half of County Donegal as The Derry People. The paper was first published in Derry in 1902, but at the start of the second world war, the paper’s owners decided to move production across the border to Letterkenny, County Donegal, in an aim to avoid
    8.50
    2 votes
    85
    La Vanguardia

    La Vanguardia

    • Circulation Areas: Catalonia
    La Vanguardia (Catalan: [ɫə βəŋˈɡwarðiə]; Spanish: [la βaŋˈɡwarðja], Spanish for "The Vanguard") is Catalonia's leading daily newspaper, printed in Spanish and in Catalan. It has its headquarters in Barcelona, Catalonia's largest city. La Vanguardia, despite being mostly distributed in Catalonia only, has Spain's fourth-highest circulation among general-interest newspapers, trailing only the three main Madrid dailies -- El País, El Mundo and ABC, all of which are national newspapers with bureaux and local editions throughout the country. Its editorial line leans to the centre of politics and moderate in its opinions. It promotes secessionism from Spain Catalanist stances and is considered close to the pro-business policies represented by Convergence and Union. La Vanguardia's newspaper history began on 1 February 1881, when two businessmen from Igualada, Carlos and Bartolomé Godó, first published the paper. It was defined as a Diario de los políticos de avisos y notícias (Political Newspaper of Announcements and News), intended as a means of communication for a faction of the Liberal Party that wanted to gain control over the Barcelona city council. On 31 December 1887, the paper
    8.50
    2 votes
    86
    The Epoch Times

    The Epoch Times

    • Circulation Areas: Ottawa
    The Epoch Times is a multi-language, international media organisation. As a newspaper, the Times has been publishing in Chinese since May 2000. It was founded in 1999 by supporters and practitioners of the Falun Gong spiritual discipline. The paper covers general interest issues, China, and human rights. The newspaper is heavily critical of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) and the policies of Chinese government. In 2004, the newspaper published the "Nine Commentaries on the Communist Party", an in-depth critique of China's ruling regime. The newspaper covers causes and groups opposed to the CCP, including Falun Gong, dissidents, activists, and supporters of the Tibetan government-in-exile. The Epoch Times website also hosts a "CCP Renunciations" service, encouraging Chinese to quit the CCP and related organizations. The PRC government blocks mainland Chinese from accessing the Epoch Times website. Headquartered in New York City, the newspaper has local bureaus and a network of local reporters throughout the world. It is either sold or distributed free-of-charge in roughly 30 countries worldwide, and maintains editions in English, Chinese, nine other languages in print, and 17 on
    8.50
    2 votes
    87
    The Star-Ledger

    The Star-Ledger

    • Circulation Areas: Newark
    • Owner: Advance Publications
    The Star-Ledger is the largest circulated newspaper in the U.S. state of New Jersey and is based in Newark. It is a sister paper to The Jersey Journal of Jersey City, The Times of Trenton and the Staten Island Advance, all of which are owned by Advance Publications. The Newark Star-Ledger's daily circulation is larger than the next two largest New Jersey newspapers combined and its Sunday circulation is larger than the next three papers combined. The Star-Ledger's main competitor in New Jersey is The Record, which is based in Bergen County. The Newark Daily Advertiser, founded in 1832, was Newark's first daily newspaper. It subsequently evolved into the Newark Star-Eagle. S. I. Newhouse bought the Newark Ledger in 1935, and merged the paper with the Star-Eagle in 1939 to become the Newark Star-Ledger, later changed to simply The Star-Ledger. (It is still popularly called the Newark Star-Ledger by many New York-area residents because of its heritage and its editorial location. During the 1960s The Star-Ledger’s chief competitor was the Newark Evening News, once the most popular newspaper in New Jersey. In March 1971, the Star-Ledger surpassed the Evening News in daily circulation,
    8.50
    2 votes
    88
    Gainesville Daily Register

    Gainesville Daily Register

    • Circulation Areas: Cooke County
    • Owner: Community Newspaper Holdings
    The Gainesville Daily Register is six-day daily newspaper published in Gainesville, Texas, weekday (Monday through Friday) afternoons and Sunday mornings. It has been published continuously since 1890. The newspaper covers primarily Cooke County, Texas, and parts of Love County, Oklahoma to the north, Montague County, Texas to the west, and Grayson County, Texas to the east. It is owned by Community Newspaper Holdings Inc (CNHI), and is the only daily newspaper operating in Cooke County. The newspaper, formerly known as Gainesville Daily Register and Messenger, was founded by the Leonard family of Gainesville in 1890. The newspaper was sold to Donrey Media in 1973. Shortly thereafter the newspaper converted to offset printing and a new six-unit Goss printing press was set up. CNHI acquired the paper in 1998. The publication continues to be printed on-site.
    7.33
    3 votes
    89
    Haaretz

    Haaretz

    • Circulation Areas: Israel
    Haaretz (Hebrew: הארץ‎) (lit. "The Land [of Israel]", originally Ḥadashot Ha'aretz – Hebrew: חדשות הארץ‎, IPA: [χadaˈʃot haˈʔaʁets] – "News of the Land") is Israel's oldest daily newspaper. It was founded in 1918 and is now published in both Hebrew and English in Berliner format. The English edition is published and sold together with the International Herald Tribune. Both Hebrew and English editions can be read on the Internet. In North America, it comes out as a weekly newspaper, combining articles from the Friday edition with a roundup from the rest of the week. It is known for its staunch left-liberal stance on domestic and foreign issues. Compared to other mass circulation papers in Israel, Haaretz uses smaller headlines and print. Less space is devoted to pictures, and more to political analysis. Its editorial pages are considered influential among government leaders. Apart from the news, Haaretz publishes feature articles on social and environmental issues, as well as book reviews, investigative reporting and political commentary. In 2008, the newspaper itself reported a paid subscribership of 65,000, daily sales of 72,000 copies, and 100,000 on weekends. The English edition
    7.33
    3 votes
    90
    Omaha World-Herald

    Omaha World-Herald

    • Circulation Areas: Douglas County
    The Omaha World-Herald, based in Omaha, Nebraska, is the primary daily newspaper of Nebraska, as well as portions of southwest Iowa. For decades it circulated daily throughout Nebraska, and in parts of Kansas, South Dakota, Missouri, Colorado and Wyoming. In 2008, distribution was reduced to the eastern third of Nebraska and western Iowa. The World-Herald was the largest employee-owned newspaper in the United States. On November 30, 2011, Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway announced plans to buy the newspaper. It is the only remaining major metropolitan newspaper in the United States to publish both morning and afternoon editions. The newspaper publishes four daily editions, with three morning editions (regional; Lincoln, Neb.; and metropolitan) and one afternoon edition (metropolitan). Its market area spans two time zones and is more than 500 miles across. The World-Herald had for many years been the newspaper with the highest penetration rate – the percentage of people who subscribe to the publication within the paper's home circulation area – in the United States. The Omaha World-Herald Company also operates the website Omaha.com, the region's most popular website by all
    7.33
    3 votes
    91
    Riverfront Times

    Riverfront Times

    • Circulation Areas: St. Louis
    • Owner: Village Voice Media
    The Riverfront Times (also known as the RFT) is a weekly newspaper in St. Louis, Missouri that consists of local politics, music, arts and dining news in the print edition and daily updates to blogs and photo galleries on its website. As of June 2008, Riverfront Times has an ABC-audited weekly circulation of 81,276 copies. The paper was founded in 1977 by Ray Hartmann who, along with co-owner Mark Vittert, sold the newspaper in 1998 to New Times Media (now known, following a 2006 merger, as Village Voice Media). The paper has received considerable recognition and claims more than three dozen awards from the Missouri Press Association, along with the group's Gold Cup. The paper and website also currently feature a weekly syndicated column by relationship and sex advice writer Dan Savage. In the past the paper carried Chuck Sheppard's News of the Weird column. The RFT is widely distributed at various locations around the St. Louis area.
    7.33
    3 votes
    92
    Bayane Al Yaoume

    Bayane Al Yaoume

    Bayane Al Yaoume (Arabic: بيان اليوم‎) is a daily Arabic language Moroccan newspaper of the Party of Progress and Socialism. It is the sister publication of Al Bayane.
    6.25
    4 votes
    93
    Iskra

    Iskra

    • Circulation Areas: Stuttgart
    Iskra (Russian: Искра, IPA: [ˈiskrə], Spark) was a political newspaper of Russian socialist emigrants established as the official organ of the Russian Social Democratic Labour Party (RSDLP). Initially, it was managed by Vladimir Lenin, moving as he moved. The first edition was published in Stuttgart, Germany, on December 1, 1900. Other editions were published in Munich (1900–1902) and Geneva from 1903. When Lenin was in London (1902–1903) the newspaper was edited from a small office at 37a Clerkenwell Green, EC1, with Henry Quelch arranging the necessary printworks. In 1903, following the split of the RSDLP, Lenin left the staff (after his initial proposal to reduce the editorial board to three - himself, Julius Martov and Georgi Plekhanov - was vehemently opposed), the newspaper fell under the control of the Mensheviks and was published by Plekhanov until 1905. The average circulation was 8,000. Iskra's motto was "Из искры возгорится пламя" ("From a spark a fire will flare up") — a line from the reply Alexander Odoevsky wrote to the poem by Alexander Pushkin addressed to the anti-tsar Dekabrists imprisoned in Siberia. Some of the staff were later involved in the Bolshevik
    6.25
    4 votes
    94
    Star Tribune

    Star Tribune

    • Circulation Areas: Minneapolis-St. Paul
    The Star Tribune (often abbreviated Star Trib or Strib) is the largest newspaper in the U.S. state of Minnesota and is published seven days each week in an edition for the Minneapolis-Saint Paul metropolitan area. A statewide version is also available across Minnesota and parts of Wisconsin, Iowa, South Dakota, and North Dakota. The paper's largest competitor is the St. Paul-based Pioneer Press, though it competes with a number of other papers in its wide circulation area. Today's Star Tribune is the product of the merger in 1982 between the Minneapolis Star, an evening newspaper, and the Minneapolis Tribune, a morning newspaper published by the same company. Several earlier mergers preceded that one by many years, as outlined below. The Minneapolis Tribune was founded in 1867, and operated by the Murphy family between 1891 and 1941. The Minneapolis Journal was founded in 1878 as an evening paper. The Minneapolis Times was a morning paper starting in 1889; it was purchased by the Tribune in 1905 and its name was used in various forms until 1948. Finally the Minnesota Daily Star began printing in 1920, and later became the Minneapolis Star, distributed in the evening. The Cowles
    6.25
    4 votes
    95
    Draugas

    Draugas

    • Circulation Areas: Lithuania
    Draugas (English: Friend) is the only Lithuanian daily newspaper published abroad. Until 2011, the newspaper was published five days a week, except Sundays and Mondays. It is currently published three days a week, Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday. It is read not only in the United States, but in Canada, South America, Australia, and Europe as well. Draugas is the oldest continuously published Lithuanian language newspaper anywhere in the world. Founded as a weekly Roman Catholic paper, Draugas published its first edition on July 25, 1909, in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. On March 31, 1916, it was relocated to Chicago, Illinois, and since then has been published daily, except Mondays and Sundays. During the Soviet occupation of Lithuania, the newspaper served as a voice of the Lithuanian independent media. Currently, Draugas is published by the Lithuanian Catholic Press Society in Chicago, Illinois. It contains twelve pages of political, religious, scientific, economic, sports, public interest articles, announcements, and paid advertising. The Saturday issue is twenty-four pages, including a weekly supplement Kultūra meaning Culture and subtitled Menas Literatūra Mokslas meaning Art
    7.00
    3 votes
    96
    El Comercio

    El Comercio

    • Circulation Areas: Peru
    El Comercio is a Peruvian newspaper based in Lima. It has a circulation of more than 120,000 copies. It was founded in 1839, making it the oldest newspaper of Peru and one of the oldest in the Spanish language. The government of Juan Velasco Alvarado expropriated the newspaper in the mid-1970s. The company was returned to their original owners by President Fernando Belaúnde Terry on July 28, 1980, the same day he assumed office. It was his first official act upon assuming his presidency. Currently, the newspaper is owned by shareholders of the Miró Quesada family, whose ownership of the company dates to 1875. Despite this, management of the company is under control of an individual who is not a member of the family The company also has ownership over its subsidiaries, the newspapers Peru 21, Trome, and the magazine, Somos. The corporation, Empresa Editora El Comercio S.A., is the product of the merging of many different companies in 1996. The company also manages the editing, publication, and distribution of the newspaper, El Comercio, as well as the publication and distribution of Trome, Peru 21, and Gestion. In addition to this, they also manage the advertising aspects of
    7.00
    3 votes
    97
    Le Temps

    Le Temps

    • Circulation Areas: Geneva
    Le Temps (English: The Times) is a Swiss French-language daily newspaper, published in the Berliner format in Geneva by Le Temps SA. Founded in 1998, it is the result of the merger of the newspapers Journal de Genève-Gazette de Lausanne with Le Nouveau Quotidien. Published Monday through Saturday, the newspaper has several supplements (Thursday: "Sortir" cultural diary; Friday: "Carrières" job and management; Saturday" "Samedi Culturel"; and special features for the week-end), thematic special editions, a website and digital applications. Its publisher, Le Temps SA, is held by ER Publishing at eighty-two percent, which, in turn, is fifty-percent owned by Edipresse Group and fifty-percent owned by Ringier Group. The remaining eighteen-percent ownership is held by Claude Demole (seven percent), employees (six perent) and Le Monde newspaper (five percent). Le Temps has an advertising agency, Le Temps Media (Publicitas). The newspaper's editor-in-chief, since May 2010, has been Pierre Veya. Previous editors were Eric Hoesli, from 1998 to 2002; and Jean-Jacques Roth, from 2002 to 2010. As of 2010, it had 130 correspondents, including in Bern, Fribourg, Geneva, Lausanne, Neuchâtel, Sion
    7.00
    3 votes
    98
    Los Angeles Herald-Examiner

    Los Angeles Herald-Examiner

    • Circulation Areas: Los Angeles
    The Los Angeles Herald Examiner was a major Los Angeles daily newspaper, published Monday through Friday in the afternoon, and in the morning on Saturdays and Sundays. It was part of the Hearst syndicate. The afternoon Herald-Express and the morning Examiner, both of which had been publishing in the city since the turn of the 20th century, merged in 1962. For a few years after this merger, the Herald Examiner claimed the largest afternoon-newspaper circulation in the country. It published its last edition on November 2, 1989. William Randolph Hearst founded the Los Angeles Examiner in 1903, in order to assist his campaign for the presidential nomination on the Democratic ticket and to complement his San Francisco Examiner. The Los Angeles Herald Examiner Mission Revival and Spanish Colonial Revival style building, located at the southwest corner of Broadway and 11th Streets, was largely designed by San Francisco architect Julia Morgan then associated with Los Angeles architects J. Martyn Haenke and William J. Dodd whose contribution to the design is not yet determined by scholars. The newspaper was descended from the Los Angeles Examiner, founded in 1903 by William Randolph Hearst
    7.00
    3 votes
    99
    Novi list

    Novi list

    • Circulation Areas: Primorje-Gorski Kotar County
    Novi list (trans. "new paper") is the oldest Croatian daily newspaper published in Rijeka. It is most read in Primorje-Gorski Kotar County of Croatia, but it is distributed throughout the country. Novi list had the distinction of being the only Croatian daily newspaper to keep critical distance towards the government of Franjo Tuđman during 1990s. Today it is considered a centre-left newspaper.
    7.00
    3 votes
    100
    Seattle Post-Intelligencer

    Seattle Post-Intelligencer

    • Circulation Areas: Washington
    • Owner: Hearst Corporation
    The Seattle Post-Intelligencer (popularly known as the Seattle P-I, the Post-Intelligencer, or simply the P-I) is an online newspaper and former print newspaper covering Seattle, Washington, United States, and the surrounding metropolitan area. The newspaper was founded in 1863 as the weekly Seattle Gazette, and was later published daily in broadsheet format. It was long one of the city's two daily newspapers, along with the The Seattle Times, until it became an online-only publication on March 17, 2009. J.R. Watson founded the P-I, Seattle's first newspaper, on December 10, 1863, as the Seattle Gazette. The paper failed after a few years and was renamed the Weekly Intelligencer in 1867 by the new owner, Sam Maxwell. 1878, after publishing the Intelligencer as a morning daily, Thaddeus Hanford bought the Daily Intelligencer for $8,000. Hanford also acquired the daily Puget Sound Dispatch and the weekly Pacific Tribune and folded both papers into the Intelligencer. In 1881, the Intelligencer merged with the Seattle Post. The names were combined to form the present-day name. Circulation stood at 31,000 in 1911. In 1912, editor Eric W. Allen left the paper to found the University of
    7.00
    3 votes
    101
    The Record

    The Record

    • Circulation Areas: Cambridge
    • Owner: Torstar
    The Waterloo Region Record is the daily newspaper covering Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada, including the cities of Kitchener, Waterloo and Cambridge, as well as the surrounding area. Since December 1998, the Record has been published by Metroland Media Group, a subsidiary of Torstar Corporation. The Record traces its history back to the founding of Daily News, first published on February 9, 1878, by former Methodist preacher Peter Moyer at a printing press located at King and Ontario streets in Berlin (now Kitchener). This would be the city's first daily newspaper, and Canada's first bilingual daily as it was supplemented with a full page of German news for the first eight months of its life. In 1896, at the time of Moyer's death, three newspapers existed in the city of Berlin (now Kitchener): the Berlin Daily Telegraph, the Berlin Daily Record and Moyer's Daily News. Due to financial pressures, by 1897 the latter two had merged to become the Berlin News Record, run by William (Ben) Uttley, publisher of the Berlin Daily Record and local historian. Retiring in October 1919, Uttley sold the newspaper to W.J. Motz and William Daum Euler, who renamed it The Kitchener Daily Record. In
    7.00
    3 votes
    102
    The Columbian

    The Columbian

    • Circulation Areas: Clark County
    The Columbian is a daily newspaper for Vancouver, Washington and Clark County in Washington State in the United States. The paper was published for its first decade (1890-1900) as a four page daily that was meant as a counterweight to the local Republican newspaper The Independent. Printer Tom Carolan began publication of The Vancouver Columbian on October 10, 1890. It successfully hedged out daily competition, such as the former Independent, to become the sole daily in the city today. A former weekly The Sun which published for 39 years prior to going daily, was absorbed by the Columbian and for a time the paper was published as The Vancouver Columbian and the Sun. Today the paper is published by Scott Campbell, and is the newspaper of record for the Cities of Vancouver and Washougal. Members of The Columbian's editorial board are Scott Campbell, Lou Brancaccio, John Laird, Douglas E. Ness and Jody Campbell. The Vancouver Columbian was first published as a weekly on October 10, 1890, before becoming a weekday paper on October 19, 1908. Owned by the Campbell family since 1921, it occupied a series of offices in downtown Vancouver before building its own offices at what is now the
    6.00
    4 votes
    103
    The Scotsman

    The Scotsman

    • Circulation Areas: Scotland
    • Owner: Johnston Press
    The Scotsman is a British newspaper, published in Edinburgh. As of August 2011 it had an audited circulation of 38,423, down from about 100,000 in the 1980s. Since 16 August 2004 it has been printed in compact format. Its sister Sunday publication, which remains broadsheet, is titled Scotland on Sunday. The Scotsman Publications Ltd also issues the Edinburgh Evening News and the Herald & Post series of free newspapers in Edinburgh, Fife, and West Lothian. The Scotsman was launched in 1817 as a liberal weekly newspaper by lawyer William Ritchie and customs official Charles Maclaren in response to the "unblushing subservience" of competing newspapers to the Edinburgh establishment. The paper was pledged to "impartiality, firmness and independence". After the abolition of newspaper stamp tax in Scotland in 1850, The Scotsman was relaunched as a daily newspaper priced at 1d and a circulation of 6,000 copies. In 1953 the newspaper was bought by Canadian millionaire Roy Thomson who was in the process of building a large media group. The paper was bought in 1995 by David and Frederick Barclay for £85 million. They moved the newspaper from its Edinburgh office on North Bridge, which is now
    6.00
    4 votes
    104
    Aamulehti

    Aamulehti

    • Circulation Areas: Tampere
    • Owner: Alma Media
    Aamulehti (Finnish for "morning newspaper") is a Finnish newspaper published in Tampere. It has the second largest circulation of Finnish dailies with an average circulation of 136,726 per day and 140,802 on Sundays (2004). Today Aamulehti is part of Alma Media, a large media corporation in Finland. Until 1992 it was aligned to the National Coalition Party, but no longer has official connections to any Finnish political party. It was founded in 1881 to "improve the position of the Finnish people and the Finnish language" during Russia's rule over Finland. The paper also publishes four weekly supplements: the entertainment-centered Valo ("Light"), which is published on Fridays, and Moro ("Hi" in the dialect of the Tampere region), which explores the culture of Tampere on Thursdays. In 2006 the two Sunday supplements were added: Asiat ("Matters") and Ihmiset ("People").
    8.00
    2 votes
    105
    Egunkaria

    Egunkaria

    • Circulation Areas: Basque Country
    Egunkaria ("The daily") was for thirteen years the only fully Basque language newspaper in circulation, until it was closed down on February 20, 2003 by the Spanish authorities, due to allegations of an illegal association with ETA, the armed Basque separatist group. After 7 years, on 15 April 2010 the defendants were acquitted on all charges related to ties to ETA. It remains open the issue of the damages for the shut down newspaper (not operative any more) and alleged tortures on detention to the members of the newspaper's executive board. Egunkaria was established in 1990 as the only Basque-language daily newspaper in the Basque Country (there had already been bilingual newspaper and monolingual weeklies). The promoters expected at the moment of first coming out in 1990 was to reach a circulation of 8,000 to 15,000 copies and 40,000 potential readers, a goal later achieved when being released, growing a widely respected publication as well as a meeting point for the Basque speaking community; the newspaper was also known for its nationalistic leanings. It was sold in both the French and Spanish parts of the Basque Country and its revenue from sales and advertising was
    8.00
    2 votes
    106
    Evening Standard

    Evening Standard

    • Circulation Areas: London
    • Owner: Daily Mail and General Trust
    The Evening Standard, since May 2009 styled the London Evening Standard, is a local, free daily newspaper, published Monday to Friday in tabloid format in London, United Kingdom. It is the dominant regional evening paper for London and the surrounding area, with coverage of national and international news and City of London finance. In October 2009, the paper ended a 180-year history of paid circulation and became a free newspaper, doubling its circulation as part of a change in its business plan. The newspaper was founded by barrister Stanley Lees Giffard on 21 May 1827, as the Standard. The early owner of the paper was Charles Baldwin. Under the ownership of James Johnstone The Standard became a morning paper from 29 June 1857, with The Evening Standard being published from 11 June 1859. The Standard gained eminence for its detailed foreign news, with its reporting events of the American Civil War (1861–1865), of the Austro-Prussian War of 1866, and of the Franco-Prussian War of 1870, all contributing to a rise in circulation. The newspaper has sponsored the annual Evening Standard Theatre Awards since the 1950s. The newspaper has also awarded the annual Evening Standard Pub of
    8.00
    2 votes
    107
    Hokkaido Shimbun

    Hokkaido Shimbun

    • Circulation Areas: Sapporo
    The Hokkaido Shimbun (北海道新聞, Hokkaidō Shinbun), which is often abbreviated as Doshin (道新, Dōshin), is a Japanese language daily newspaper published mainly in Hokkaidō, Japan by The Hokkaido Shimbun Press (株式会社北海道新聞社, Kabushiki-gaisha Hokkaidō Shinbunsha). As of November 2006, its morning edition has a circulation of 1,208,175. It was first published in Sapporo in 1887.
    8.00
    2 votes
    108
    Imprint

    Imprint

    • Circulation Areas: University of Waterloo
    • Owner: Imprint Publications, Waterloo
    Imprint is a publication created by Imprint Publications, Waterloo and is the official student newspaper of the University of Waterloo. Imprint prints weekly during the fall and winter semesters, and bi-weekly during the spring semester. Imprint publishes 30 issues a year and is paid for mostly by advertising, but is also supplemented with a $3.30 refundable fee paid per semester by students enrolled at the university. A student-run newspaper at the campus of Waterloo began in the late 1950s when the campus was still called the Waterloo College Associate Faculties and was affiliated with Waterloo College, which is now known as Wilfrid Laurier University. The Engineering students of the Associated Faculties started their own newsletter in early 1959, shortly after the formation of the Engineering society. The newsletter was called Enginews and was published as a mimeographed sheet of foolscap. By late 1959, Enginews had joined The Cord Weekly and was its own special section with its own masthead in the newspaper. The federation of Waterloo College and the Associated Faculties (which had now been renamed the University of Waterloo) failed in the spring of 1960. The Cord Weekly and
    8.00
    2 votes
    109
    Lance!

    Lance!

    • Circulation Areas: Brazil
    Lance! is one of the most important daily sports newspapers in Brazil, and its first edition was published in 1997. Its headquarters are located in Rio de Janeiro, and they print regional versions for the some of the other Brazilian States. Its tabloid format as well as its news design quickly became a success, and Lance! is also popular among Brazilian TV and Radio sports journalists and reporters. Its 3000th edition was published on January 29, 2006. Nowadays, there are Lance! offices in Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo and Belo Horizonte and they also publish regional versions in Curitiba and Manaus. Lance! also issues a weekly magazine called Lance! A+, its first edition was published in 2000. The newspaper awards the winner of the first turn of the Série A with the Troféu Osmar Santos, while the second turn winner is awarded with the Troféu João Saldanha.
    8.00
    2 votes
    110
    Mainichi Shimbun

    Mainichi Shimbun

    • Circulation Areas: Japan
    The Mainichi Shimbun (毎日新聞, lit. "Daily News") is one of the major newspapers in Japan, published by The Mainichi Newspapers Co., Ltd (株式会社毎日新聞社, Kabushiki-gaisha Mainichi Shinbunsha). The history of the Mainichi Shimbun begins with founding of two papers during the Meiji period. The Tokyo Nichi Nichi Shimbun was founded first, in 1872. The Mainichi claims that it is the oldest existing Japanese daily newspaper with its 136-year-long history. The Osaka Mainichi Shimbun was founded four years later, in 1876. The two papers merged in 1911, but the two companies continued to print their newspapers independently until 1943, when both editions were placed under a Mainichi Shimbun masthead. In 1966, the Tokyo office was moved from Yurakucho to Takebashi, and in 1992, the Osaka office was moved from Dojima to Nishi-Umeda. The Mainichi has 3,200 employees working in 364 offices in Japan and 26 bureaus overseas. It is one of Japan's three largest newspapers in terms of circulation and number of employees, and has 79 associated companies, including Tokyo Broadcasting System (TBS), Mainichi Broadcasting System (MBS) and the Sports Nippon Newspaper. Two former Mainichi Newspapers chief
    8.00
    2 votes
    111
    Rizospastis

    Rizospastis

    • Circulation Areas: Kryoneri
    Rizospastis (Greek: Ριζοσπάστης, "The Radical") is the official newspaper of the Communist Party of Greece. It is published daily. It was first published in 1916. Some of the more prominent editors in it are Nikos Boyiopoulos and Liana Kanelli. "Organ of the Communist Party's Central Committee" and "Proletarians of all countries unite!"
    8.00
    2 votes
    112
    Sydney Star Observer

    Sydney Star Observer

    • Circulation Areas: Sydney
    The Sydney Star Observer is a free weekly tabloid and online newspaper that caters to the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. The paper is owned and published by Gay & Lesbian Community Publishing Limited, a community-owned and oriented business. It has a sister publication in Melbourne, Victoria, called The Southern Star. The newspaper first went to print as a tabloid in 1979 under the name The Sydney Star and is the oldest and the largest publication in circulation of its kind in Australia. The typical profile of the audience is aged between 23 years and 50 years, with a higher than average income level. With a 2007 audited circulation in excess of 20,000 per week, the publishers claim a weekly readership exceeding 57,000 readers. In May 2007, Scott Abrahams was appointed publishing editor. In October 2007, SSO joined several other publications in every mainland state to form the Gay and Lesbian Australian Media Alliance (GLAMA), to improve support for the gay and lesbian community organisations that rely on community publishers. In hardcopy tabloid format, The Star (as it is commonly known) is published on a Wednesday morning
    8.00
    2 votes
    113
    The Stranger

    The Stranger

    • Circulation Areas: Seattle
    The Stranger is an alternative weekly newspaper in Seattle, Washington, USA. It runs a blog known as Slog. The Stranger was founded by Tim Keck, who had previously co-founded the satirical newspaper The Onion, and cartoonist James Sturm. Its first issue came out on September 23, 1991. The paper is distributed to local businesses, newsstands, and newspaper boxes free of charge every Thursday. It calls itself "Seattle's Only Newspaper," an expression of its disdain for Seattle's two dailies (the Seattle Times and the now-defunct print edition of the Seattle Post-Intelligencer) and The Stranger's main rival, the Seattle Weekly. The paper regularly covers Seattle City Council politics. In its early days, The Stranger had a print run of 20,000, and was focused in Seattle's University District. The paper was a single sheet wrapped around a wad of coupons for local businesses. On April 16, 2012, The Stranger won its first Pulitzer Prize. Eli Sanders won in the Feature Writing category for "The Bravest Woman In Seattle," which the citation describes as "a haunting story of a woman who survived a brutal attack that took the life of her partner, using the woman’s brave courtroom testimony
    8.00
    2 votes
    114
    The Times of India

    The Times of India

    • Circulation Areas: India
    • Owner: Bennett, Coleman & Co. Ltd.
    The Times of India (TOI) is an Indian English-language daily newspaper. According to Audit Bureau of Circulations, it has the largest circulation among all English-language newspapers in the world, across all formats (broadsheet, tabloid, compact, Berliner and online). In 2008, the newspaper reported that (with a circulation of over 3.14 million) it was certified by the Audit Bureau of Circulations (India) as the world's largest selling English-language daily, ranking it as the 8th largest selling newspaper in any language in the world. According to the Indian Readership Survey (IRS) 2012, the Times of India is the most widely read English newspaper in India with a readership of 76.43 lakhs (7.643 million). This ranks the Times of India as the top English daily in India by readership. It is owned and published by Bennett, Coleman & Co. Ltd. which is owned by the Sahu Jain family. The Times Of India was founded on 3 November 1838 as The Bombay Times and Journal of Commerce In Bombay, during the British Raj. Published every Saturday and Wednesday, The Bombay Times and Journal of Commerce was launched as a semi-weekly edition by Raobahadur Narayan Dinanath Velkar, a Maharashtrian
    8.00
    2 votes
    115
    Večernje novosti

    Večernje novosti

    • Circulation Areas: Belgrade
    Večernje novosti (Serbian: Вечерње новости; English: Evening News) is a Belgrade-based daily newspaper. Founded in 1953, it quickly grew into a high-circulation daily. It first appeared on stands on October 16, 1953 edited by Slobodan Glumac who set the newspaper's tone for years to come. Housing an extensive network of journalists and contributors, the paper reported and commented on various issues and events according to its mantra: fast, brief and clear. Novosti (as most people call it for short) also employs foreign correspondents spread around 23 national capitals around the globe. On February 4, 2006, retired basketball ace Vlade Divac expressed his desire to invest in Novosti, perhaps even buy the majority stake, but decided to lie low until the paper's complex ownership structure disputes are resolved. There was also a initial interest from two media conglomerates, WAZ-Mediengruppe and Northcliffe Media, a division of Daily Mail and General Trust in buying a stake in Večernje novosti. In mid 1980s Novosti got a big scoop by publishing the old files of the State Commission for War Crimes, which shed new light on Austrian president Kurt Waldheim's involvement in war crimes
    8.00
    2 votes
    116
    El Mercurio

    El Mercurio

    • Circulation Areas: Santiago
    El Mercurio is a conservative Chilean newspaper with editions in Valparaíso and Santiago. Its Santiago edition is considered the country's paper-of-record and its Valparaíso edition is the oldest daily in the Spanish language currently in circulation. El Mercurio is owned by El Mercurio S.A.P. (Sociedad Anónima Periodística, "joint stock news company"), which operates a network of 19 regional dailies and 32 radio stations across the country. (See List of newspapers in Chile.) The Valparaíso edition of El Mercurio was founded by Pedro Félix Vicuña (Benjamín Vicuña Mackenna's father) on September 12, 1827, and was later acquired by Agustín Edwards Ross in 1880. The Santiago edition was founded by Agustín Edwards Mac Clure, son of Edwards Ross, on June 1, 1900. In 1942 Edwards Mac Clure died and his son Agustín Edwards Budge took over as president. When Edwards Budge died in 1956, his son, Agustín Edwards Eastman, took control of the company. El Mercurio received funds from the CIA in the early 1970s to undermine the Socialist government of Salvador Allende, acting as a mouthpiece for anti-Allende propaganda. The paper played "a significant role in setting the stage for the military
    9.00
    1 votes
    117
    Houston Press

    Houston Press

    • Circulation Areas: Houston
    • Owner: Village Voice Media
    The Houston Press is an alternative weekly newspaper published in Houston, Texas, United States. It is headquartered in Downtown Houston. The paper, a part of the Village Voice Media group, is supported entirely by advertising revenue and is free to readers. The newspaper draws a weekly readership of more than 300,000, verified by an independent media audit and referenced on its website. The Press can be found in restaurants, coffee houses, and local retail stores. New weekly editions are distributed on Thursdays. The Houston Press is not to be confused with the newspaper of the same name that closed in 1964. The weekly Houston Press was founded locally in 1989. For the newspaper's first five years, Niel Morgan served as the investor. It was bought out by New Times Media in 1996. The paper includes sections devoted to The Houston Press headquarters is located in Downtown Houston, in the former Gillman Pontiac dealership building. It is in close proximity to the ExxonMobil Building. 2007 2005 2004 2003 2001 2000 1999 1998 Other recent awards of note include Todd Spivak's 2006 first place win in the Investigative Reporters and Editors Association under 100,000 circulation weekly
    9.00
    1 votes
    118
    Portland Tribune

    Portland Tribune

    • Circulation Areas: Multnomah County
    The Portland Tribune is a free weekly newspaper published each Thursday in Portland, Oregon, United States. The Tribune is part of the Pamplin Media Group, which publishes a number of community newspapers in the Portland metropolitan area, and also owns and operates the talk radio station KPAM, and several other radio stations throughout the Pacific Northwest. Portland businessman Robert B. Pamplin, Jr. announced his intention to found the paper in the summer of 2000. The first issue of what started as a twice-weekly (Tuesdays and Fridays) paper was published February 9, 2001, joining The Oregonian, the city's only daily general interest newspaper, and the alternative weeklies Willamette Week and The Portland Mercury. At the time, it was a rare example of the expansion of print news, in a time when many cities were seeing newspapers merge or go out of business. But its launch preceded a significant national downturn in advertising sales, which posed difficulties for a startup newspaper. Eleven months after its launch, the Tribune cut back on home deliveries. The newspaper was reportedly losing money faster than anticipated after its first year. By late 2006, its newsroom staff had
    9.00
    1 votes
    119
    Redwood City Daily News

    Redwood City Daily News

    • Circulation Areas: San Mateo County
    • Owner: MediaNews Group
    The Redwood City Daily News was a free daily newspaper in Redwood City, California published 6 days a week with an average daily circulation of 8,000. The newspaper was founded August 9, 2000 by Dave Price (journalist) and Jim Pavelich, who also published the Palo Alto Daily News. The Redwood City Daily News was adjudicated as a newspaper of general circulation by the San Mateo County Superior Court in 2001, enabling it to publish legal notices. Both the Palo Alto and Redwood City Daily News editions were distributed in large red newspaper racks and in stores, coffee shops, restaurants, schools and major workplaces. The Redwood City Daily News, along with five other Daily News editions, was sold to Knight Ridder on Feb. 15, 2005. After McClatchy's acquisition of Knight Ridder in early 2006, all six Daily News editions, including the Redwood City Daily News, were bundled with the San Jose Mercury News and sold to MediaNews Group of Denver, Colorado. On November 12, 2004, the Redwood City Daily News became one of the first print media outlets in the United States to report late-breaking news of national interest. The trial of Scott Peterson for the murder of his wife Laci and their
    9.00
    1 votes
    120
    Sydsvenskan

    Sydsvenskan

    • Circulation Areas: Malmö
    Sydsvenska Dagbladet Snällposten, usually known simply as Sydsvenskan, is a daily newspaper in Sweden, founded in 1848. It is published in Malmö and chiefly distributed in southern Scania. Its coverage is characterized by local news from south west Scania in addition to a full coverage of national, EU, and international news. Ultimately owned by Bonnier AB, the stated editorial position is "independent liberal". Sydsvenska Dagbladet changed its format from broadsheet to tabloid on 5 October 2004.
    9.00
    1 votes
    121
    The Arizona Republic

    The Arizona Republic

    • Circulation Areas: Maricopa County
    • Owner: Gannett Company
    The Arizona Republic is an American daily newspaper published in Phoenix. Circulated throughout Arizona, it is the state's largest newspaper. Since 2000, it has been owned by the Gannett newspaper chain. It is ranked sixteenth in US daily newspapers by circulation in 2012. The newspaper was founded May 19, 1890, under the name The Arizona Republican. Dwight B. Heard, a Phoenix land and cattle baron, ran the newspaper from 1912 until his death in 1929. The paper was then run by two of its top executives, Charles Stauffer and W. Wesley Knorpp, until it was bought by Midwestern newspaper magnate Eugene C. Pulliam in 1946. Stauffer and Knorpp had changed the newspaper's name to The Arizona Republic in 1930, and also had bought the rival Phoenix Evening Gazette and Phoenix Weekly Gazette, later known, respectively, as The Phoenix Gazette and the Arizona Business Gazette. Pulliam, who bought the two Gazettes as well as the Republic, ran all three newspapers until his death in 1975 at the age of 86. A strong period of growth came under Pulliam, who imprinted the newspaper with his conservative brand of politics and his drive for civic leadership. Pulliam was considered one of the
    9.00
    1 votes
    122
    The Daily Collegian

    The Daily Collegian

    • Circulation Areas: University Park
    The Daily Collegian is an award-winning, student-operated newspaper that is published independently at the Pennsylvania State University. The newspaper is printed on weekdays during the Fall, Spring, and second Summer semesters. It is distributed for free at the University Park campus. As of 2010, the off-campus cost for a copy of the newspaper is 30 cents. A compilation edition of the week's top stories, known as the Weekly Collegian is also distributed free of charge at the University's Commonwealth campuses. Subscriptions to the Weekly Collegian and The Daily Collegian, as well as back issues, can be purchased here. Collegian Inc., which publishes The Daily Collegian, the Weekly Collegian, Collegian Magazine, Venues, and The Daily Collegian Online, is an independent, non-profit corporation and has a board of directors that is composed of faculty, students, and professionals The mission statement of Collegian Inc. is "to publish a quality campus newspaper and to provide a rewarding educational experience for the student staff members." The student editing and reporting staff annually receives notable journalism awards. In 2010, the Collegian won the Best Newspaper Silver Crown
    9.00
    1 votes
    123
    The Dartmouth

    The Dartmouth

    • Circulation Areas: Hanover
    The Dartmouth is the daily student newspaper at Dartmouth College. Founded in 1799, it is America's oldest college newspaper. It is published by The Dartmouth, Inc., an independent, nonprofit corporation chartered in the state of New Hampshire. Many alumni of The Dartmouth have gone on to careers in journalism, and several have won Pulitzer Prizes. The Dartmouth was first published in Hanover, New Hampshire on August 27, 1799, by Moses Davis “on College Plain” under the name the Dartmouth Gazette. “Here range the world – explore the dense and rare; And view all nature in your elbow chair,” Davis wrote in the first issue of the Dartmouth Gazette. In his first column, Davis stressed the necessity of avoiding “personal reflections” while maintaining “impartiality in view.” The first articles of the Dartmouth Gazette focused on local news, but also printed two pages of foreign and national news. The Gazette’s aim was to print news articles that were of practical use to readers, often covering information about local events, laws that would affect local residents, and imminently dangerous sicknesses. The first issue of the Dartmouth Gazette contains a poem and short story signed by
    9.00
    1 votes
    124
    The Kansas City Star

    The Kansas City Star

    • Circulation Areas: Kansas City
    • Owner: The McClatchy Company
    The Kansas City Star is a McClatchy newspaper based in Kansas City, Missouri, in the United States. Published since 1880, the paper is the recipient of eight Pulitzer Prizes. The Star is most notable for its influence on the career of President Harry Truman and as the newspaper where a young Ernest Hemingway honed his writing style and for being central to government-mandated divestiture of radio and television outlets by newspaper concerns in the late 1950s. The paper, originally called The Kansas City Evening Star, was founded September 18, 1880 by William Rockhill Nelson and Samuel E. Morss. The two moved to Missouri after selling the newspaper that became the Fort Wayne News Sentinel (and earlier owned by Nelson's father) in Nelson's Indiana hometown, where Nelson was campaign manager in the unsuccessful Presidential run of Samuel Tilden. Morss quit the newspaper business within a year and a half because of ill health. At the time there were three daily competitors – the Evening Mail, The Kansas City Times and the Kansas City Journal. Competitor Times editor Eugene Field wrote this about the new newspaper: Nelson's business strategy called for cheap advance subscriptions and an
    9.00
    1 votes
    125
    Austin American-Statesman

    Austin American-Statesman

    • Circulation Areas: Austin
    • Owner: Cox Enterprises
    The Austin American-Statesman is the major daily newspaper for Austin, the capital city of Texas. It is owned by Cox Enterprises. The newspaper places focus on issues affecting Austin and the Central Texas region. The Austin American-Statesman competes with the Austin Chronicle, an alternative weekly. The paper tends to print Associated Press, New York Times, The Washington Post and Los Angeles Times international and national news, but has strong Central Texas coverage, especially in political reporting. The Statesman benefits from the culture and writing heritage of Austin. It extensively covers the music scene, especially the annual South by Southwest Music Festival. The newspaper co-sponsors various events around Austin such as the Capital 10K foot race and the Season for Caring charity campaign. The Statesman's news website is Statesman.com and its entertainment site is Austin360.com. It also publishes a weekly Spanish-language newspaper, ¡ahora sí! (ahorasi.com). Additionally, the Statesman partners with the St. Petersburg Times with PolitiFact Texas, a site that uncovers the truth in issues that are relevant to Texas and the Austin area. In 2009, the Austin
    6.67
    3 votes
    126
    Capital Times

    Capital Times

    • Circulation Areas: Madison
    The Capital Times (or Cap Times) is a newspaper published in Madison, Wisconsin by The Capital Times Company. The newspaper is primarily distributed in a 19-county region in south-central Wisconsin. The Capital Times formerly published paper editions Mondays through Saturdays, with a weekday circulation of 19,355 and a Saturday circulation of 21,065. The paper ceased daily (Monday-Saturday) paper publication with its April 26, 2008 edition. It became a primarily Internet-based daily news operation while continuing to publish twice-weekly free paper supplements. The Capital Times began publishing as an afternoon daily on December 13, 1917, competing directly with the Wisconsin State Journal. The Cap Times' founder, William T. Evjue, previously served as managing editor and business manager of the State Journal, a paper that had been a supporter of the progressive Robert La Follette, whom Evjue considered a hero. When La Follette began publicly opposing World War I, the pro-war State Journal abandoned La Follette. In response, Evjue abandoned the State Journal and formed his own newspaper, The Capital Times, one that would reflect the progressive views he espoused. The newspaper's
    6.67
    3 votes
    127
    Conway Daily Sun

    Conway Daily Sun

    • Circulation Areas: Moultonborough
    • Owner: Country News Club
    The Conway Daily Sun is a five-day (Tuesday through Saturday) free daily newspaper published in the town of Conway, New Hampshire, U.S., covering the Mount Washington Valley. It has been published since 1989 by Country News Club, and was the forerunner of three other Daily Sun newspapers in New Hampshire and Maine. The Conway Daily Sun was the first United States daily to publish the popular numbers puzzle Sudoku. Mark Guerringue and Adam Hirshan, two of the three founders of Country News Club, were still serving as publisher and editor, respectively, of The Conway Daily Sun as of early 2012. The Daily Sun circulates in several towns of Carroll County, New Hampshire, including Albany, Bartlett (including Glen), Conway (including Intervale and North Conway), Eaton, Freedom, Jackson, Madison (including Silver Lake), Moultonborough, Tamworth (including Chocorua), Ossipee and Wolfeboro; and two towns in Oxford County, Maine: Fryeburg and Lovell. A complete PDF of the newspaper is also available for free online; for an extra subscription fee, readers can even access the online version the night before the print edition is distributed. Online subscribers also have access to newspaper's
    6.67
    3 votes
    128
    Detroit Free Press

    Detroit Free Press

    • Circulation Areas: Metro Detroit
    • Owner: Gannett Company
    The Detroit Free Press is the largest daily newspaper in Detroit, Michigan, USA. The Sunday edition is entitled the Sunday Free Press. It is sometimes informally referred to as the "Freep" (reflected in the paper's web address, www.freep.com). It primarily serves Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, Livingston, Washtenaw, and Monroe counties. The Free Press is also the largest city newspaper owned by Gannett, which also publishes national newspaper USA Today. The Free Press has received nine Pulitzer Prizes and four Emmy Awards. The newspaper's motto is "On Guard for 181 Years." The newspaper was first published as the Democratic Free Press and Michigan Intelligencer on May 5, 1831. The first issues were printed on a Washington press purchased from the discontinued Oakland Chronicle of Pontiac, Michigan. It was hauled from Pontiac in a wagon over rough roads to a building at Bates and Woodbridge streets in Detroit. The press could produce 250 pages an hour, hand operated by two men. The first issues were 14 by 20 inches (360 mm × 510 mm) in size, with five columns of type. Sheldon McKnight became the first publisher with John Pitts Sheldon as editor. In the 1850s, the paper was developed into a
    6.67
    3 votes
    129
    The Australian

    The Australian

    • Circulation Areas: Australia
    • Owner: News Corporation
    The Australian is a broadsheet newspaper published in Australia from Monday to Saturday each week since 14 July 1964. The editor in chief is Chris Mitchell, the editor is Clive Mathieson and the editor-at-large is Paul Kelly. Available nationally (in each state and territory), The Australian is the biggest-selling national newspaper in the country, with weekday sales of 135,000 and Saturday sales of 305,000, figures substantially below those of top-selling papers in Sydney (The Daily Telegraph), Melbourne (The Herald Sun), and Brisbane (The Courier-Mail). Its chief rival is the business-focused Australian Financial Review. In May 2010, the newspaper launched the first Australian newspaper iPad app. The Australian is published by News Limited, an asset of News Corporation, which also owns the sole dailies in Brisbane, Adelaide, Hobart and Darwin and the most popular metropolitan dailies in Sydney and Melbourne. News Corporation's Chairman, Chief Executive Officer and Founder is Rupert Murdoch. The Australian integrates content from overseas newspapers owned by News Limited's parent, News Corporation, including the Wall Street Journal and The Times. The first edition of The
    6.67
    3 votes
    130
    The Cincinnati Post

    The Cincinnati Post

    • Circulation Areas: Cincinnati
    • Owner: E. W. Scripps Company
    The Cincinnati Post is a discontinued afternoon daily newspaper that was published in Cincinnati, Ohio. Distributed in Northern Kentucky as The Kentucky Post, it was owned by the E. W. Scripps Company. Since the 1980s, its editorial stance was usually conservative. The Post published its final edition on December 31, 2007. The Kentucky Post maintains a web edition, KYPost.com. The Post was first published by Frank and Walter Wellman on January 3, 1881. It was originally called the Penny Paper (http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85035986/), its name being changed to The Penny Post in 1883. The Kentucky Post was created as an edition of the paper in 1885 to serve Cincinnati's suburbs across the Ohio River. The Wellman brothers enlisted James E. Scripps and half-brother Edward Wyllis Scripps, to take over the paper later that year. In 1958, it absorbed The Cincinnati Times-Star, another afternoon paper. It first published on June 15, 1880, when the Spirit of the Times (founded in 1840) and the Cincinnati Daily Star (founded in 1872) merged. The combined papers would be published under the name The Cincinnati Post and Times-Star until December 31, 1974; afterward it was simply
    6.67
    3 votes
    131
    The New York Times

    The New York Times

    • Circulation Areas: New York City
    • Owner: The New York Times Company
    • Issues: The New York Times Oct 12, 1986
    The New York Times (NYT) is an American daily newspaper founded and continuously published in New York City since 1851. The New York Times has won 108 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other news organization. Its website is the most popular American newspaper website, receiving more than 30 million unique visitors per month. Although the print version of the paper remains the largest local metropolitan newspaper in the United States, it is the third largest newspaper overall, behind The Wall Street Journal and USA Today, and its weekday circulation has fallen since 1990 (as have other newspapers) to fewer than one million copies daily. Nicknamed "the Old Gray Lady", and long regarded within the industry as a national "newspaper of record", The New York Times is owned by The New York Times Company, which also publishes 18 other newspapers including the International Herald Tribune and The Boston Globe. The company's chairman is Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr., whose family has controlled the paper since 1896. The paper's motto, printed in the upper left-hand corner of the front page, is "All the News That's Fit to Print." The New York Times website (NYTimes.com) has the motto "All the News
    6.67
    3 votes
    132
    The Sunday Times

    The Sunday Times

    • Circulation Areas: England
    • Owner: News International
    The Sunday Times is the best-selling national Sunday broadsheet newspaper in the United Kingdom. It is published by Times Newspapers Ltd, a subsidiary of News International, which is in turn owned by News Corporation. Times Newspapers also owns The Times. The two papers were founded independently and have been under common ownership only since 1966. They were bought by Rupert Murdoch's News International in 1981. The Sunday Times occupies a dominant position in the quality Sunday market; its circulation of just under one million equals that of its main rivals, the The Sunday Telegraph, The Observer and The Independent on Sunday combined. While some other national newspapers moved to a tabloid format in the early 2000s, The Sunday Times has retained the larger broadsheet format and has said that it will continue to do so. It sells more than twice as many copies as its sister paper, The Times, which is published Monday to Saturday. The Sunday Times has acquired a reputation for the strength of its investigative reporting – much of it by its award-winning Insight team – and also for its wide-ranging foreign coverage. It has a number of popular writers, columnists and commentators
    6.67
    3 votes
    133
    Winston-Salem Journal

    Winston-Salem Journal

    • Circulation Areas: Winston-Salem
    • Owner: Media General
    The Winston-Salem Journal is a daily newspaper primarily serving the city of Winston-Salem, North Carolina and its county, Forsyth County, North Carolina. It also features coverage of Northwestern North Carolina and circulates as far west as Tennessee and north to Virginia. The paper is owned by Berkshire Hathaway. The Journal was founded in 1897. The Journal is primarily distributed through Forsyth County and the county seat of Winston-Salem. However, the paper also is distributed in Alleghany County, Ashe County, Davidson County, Davie County, Stokes County, Surry County, Wilkes County, Watauga County, and Yadkin County. The newspaper has an online presence called JournalNow. The Journal's television partner is WGHP of High Point, North Carolina. The paper also produces a weekly entertainment and social tabloid called Relish. Its editorial-page slant is considered moderate, although its conservative readership often decries its liberal bias and its liberal readers point out that the Journal hasn't endorsed a Democratic Party presidential candidate since Lyndon Johnson in 1964. In 2004, the paper refused to endorse a presidential candidate. The Winston-Salem Journal, started by
    6.67
    3 votes
    134
    Jornal de Notícias

    Jornal de Notícias

    • Circulation Areas: Portugal
    Jornal de Notícias (JN) is a Portuguese daily national newspaper. JN was founded in Porto on 2 June 1888, and has since become one of the most popular newspapers, especially after the Carnation Revolution. Since the late 1990s, JN has provided several gifts as a way to retain and attract new readers. The newspaper could offer various gifts, such as collectible fascicles and cutlery. After the Carnation revolution, JN was nationalized and later privatized in the early 1990s to the Lusomundo group. JN, along with Diário de Notícias, is nowadays owned by Controlinveste. It is currently published in four editions: National, Centre, Minho, and South. Its current editor-in-chief is Manuel Tavares. The newspaper released in April a collection of erotic films in DVD, which included highly controversial films In the Realm of the Senses and 9 Songs, which include unsimulated sex. Though, it was a success, and sold out in most stores.
    5.75
    4 votes
    135
    Le Journal de Montréal

    Le Journal de Montréal

    • Circulation Areas: Montreal
    • Owner: Quebecor
    Le Journal de Montréal is a daily tabloid newspaper published in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, and is the largest-circulation French-language newspaper in North America. Established by Pierre Péladeau in 1964, it is owned by the Sun Media division of Quebecor Media. It is also Canada's largest tabloid newspaper. Its head office is located on 4545 Frontenac Street in Montreal. Le Journal de Montréal covers mostly local and provincial news, as well as sports, arts and justice. While it prints no editorials, it is famous for its sensationalism and populist Quebec-nationalist perspective. It is the only Montreal newspaper that prints on Sundays, ever since La Presse and The Gazette dropped the Sunday editions most recently. Le Journal de Montréal is the newspaper with the highest circulation in Quebec. In 2004, it attained 320,658 Saturday-edition copies sold, exceeding its nearest competitor, La Presse, by 40,000 copies. Taking advantage of a labor dispute in La Presse, the leading daily newspaper in Montreal at the time, businessman Pierre Péladeau launched new tabloid newspaper. The first issue was launched on newsstands June 15, 1964. Although Péladeau's newspaper would evolve for
    5.75
    4 votes
    136
    Cincinnati Volksfreund

    Cincinnati Volksfreund

    • Circulation Areas: Cincinnati
    • Owner: Joseph A. Hemann
    The Cincinnati Volksfreund was a daily and weekly German-language newspaper based in Cincinnati, Ohio, and published between 1850 and 1908. The paper was founded in October 1850 by Joseph A. Hemann and his editorials began appearing in March 1853 in the weekly edition called the Cincinnati Wöchentlicher Volksfreund. Originally neutral in politics, it later became the leading German Democratic newspaper of Ohio.
    7.50
    2 votes
    137
    El País

    El País

    • Circulation Areas: Spain
    • Owner: PRISA
    El País ( listen (help·info); literally The Country) is the highest-circulation daily newspaper in Spain, and one of three Madrid dailies considered to be national newspapers of record for Spain (along with El Mundo and ABC). El País, based in Madrid, is owned by the Spanish media conglomerate PRISA. Its headquarters and central editorial staff are located in Madrid, although there are regional offices in the principal Spanish cities (Barcelona, Seville, Valencia, Bilbao, Santiago de Compostela) where regional editions are produced. El País also produces a world edition that is printed and distributed in Latin America. El País was founded by a team at PRISA which included José Ortega Spottorno and Carlos Mendo. The paper was designed by Reinhard Gade and Julio Alonso. It was first published on 4 May 1976, six months after the death of dictator Francisco Franco, and at the beginning of the Spanish transition to democracy. It was the first pro-democracy newspaper within a context where all the other Spanish newspapers were influenced by Franco's ideology. El País filled a gap in the market and became the newspaper of Spanish democracy, for which role El País was awarded the Prince of
    7.50
    2 votes
    138
    Merkuriusz Polski Ordynaryjny

    Merkuriusz Polski Ordynaryjny

    • Circulation Areas: Warsaw
    Merkuriusz Polski Ordynaryjny (in the original 17th-century Polish spelling, Merkuryusz Polski Ordynaryiny; full title: Merkuriusz Polski dzieje wszystkiego świata w sobie zamykający, dla informacji pospolitej; "The Polish Mercury Ordinary") was the first Polish newspaper, published in 1661, first in Kraków, then in Warsaw. Though short-lived, it gave name to several later newspapers, notably the Merkuriusz Polski published in London, 1955–58. Merkuryusz Polski Ordynaryiny first came out in Kraków on 3 January 1661. Sponsored by the court of King John Casimir of Poland and his consort Queen Ludwika Maria Gonzaga, the newspaper was a weekly devoted chiefly to contemporary politics, European dynastic affairs, and monarchs' military campaigns. With regard to internal affairs, it promoted political reforms and the strengthening of monarchical power. Its demise was associated with the failure of the king's political plans. Merkuryusz was edited in a 17th–century Polish heavily influenced by Latin; some parts of issues were written purely in Latin. Initially published by the Kraków printing house of J.A. Gorczyn (issues of 3 January – 4 May 1661), in May 1661 its editorial offices moved
    7.50
    2 votes
    139
    Metro Santa Cruz

    Metro Santa Cruz

    • Circulation Areas: Santa Cruz County
    • Owner: Metro Newspapers
    Metro Santa Cruz, a free-circulation weekly newspaper published in Santa Cruz, California from 1994 to 2009, was renamed the Santa Cruz Weekly on May 6, 2009. The weekly continues, under its new name, to cover news, arts and entertainment in Santa Cruz County, a coastal area that includes Capitola, Aptos, Boulder Creek, Scotts Valley and Watsonville. Popular features of Metro Santa Cruz included Nuz, a free-wheeling un-bylined political column, the "ClubGrid" music calendar and Muz, a music column. The Nuz name was retired upon the publication's renaming. Locally based in Santa Cruz, the alternative weekly is owned by Metro Newspapers, a company started by UC Santa Cruz graduate and former Santa Cruz publisher Dan Pulcrano. The company also publishes Metro in the adjacent Santa Clara Valley, a.k.a. Silicon Valley and the North Bay Bohemian in the Sonoma/Napa/Marin area. The newspaper commemorated its 15th anniversary in April 2009 with a photographic tribute to prominent Santa Cruzans, including wet suit inventor Jack O'Neill, musicians Greg Camp and Dale Ockerman, former California secretary of state Bruce McPherson and others. The essay was photographed by Santa Cruz native Dina
    7.50
    2 votes
    140
    Politiken

    Politiken

    • Circulation Areas: Copenhagen
    Politiken (Danish for "the politic", Danish pronunciation: [poliˈtiɡən]) is a Danish daily broadsheet newspaper, published by JP/Politikens Hus. The paper is one of Denmark's leading newspapers in terms of both circulated copies and number of readers. The number of copies are 97.820 Monday through Saturday and 120.411 on Sundays (first half of 2012). The number of readers are 375.000 on weekdays and 479.000 readers on Sundays (first half of 2012) . The daily also runs an online newspaper politiken.dk. The site has around 800.000 monthly users and is the tenth most viewed page among the members of The Association of Danish Interactive Media. The newspaper also publishes an international edition named Politiken Weekly which compiles the most important stories of a week for Danes living abroad. Internationally, Politiken is widely respected for its design for which it has won several awards. In 2012 Politiken was declared 'World's Best' along with four other newspapers in a competition carried out by Society for News Design. The paper's design, format and brand was given as the reason, when a jury made up of journalists, scientists and experts in 2010 awarded Politiken with the
    7.50
    2 votes
    141
    Pravda

    Pravda

    • Circulation Areas: Vienna
    • Owner: Communist Party of the Soviet Union
    Pravda (Russian: Правда; IPA: [ˈpravdə] ( listen), "Truth") is a Russian political newspaper associated with the Communist Party of the Russian Federation. The newspaper was started by the Russian Revolutionaries during pre-World War I days and emerged as a leading newspaper of the Soviet Union after the Russian Revolution. The newspaper also served as a central organ of the Central Committee of the RSDLP and the CPSU between 1912 and 1991. After the dissolution of the USSR, Pravda was closed down by the then Russian President Boris Yeltsin. As was the fate of many of the Soviet-era enterprises Pravda too suffered a huge economic downfall and after that the paper was sold to a Greek business family. Finally the Communist Party of Russian Federation acquired the newspaper in 1997 and established it as its principal mouthpiece. Pravda is still functioning from the same headquarters on Pravda Street in Moscow where it was published in the Soviet days. During its heyday Pravda was selling millions of copies per day compared to the current print run of just one hundred thousand copies. During the Cold War, Pravda was well known in the West for its pronouncements as the official voice of
    7.50
    2 votes
    142
    San Francisco Examiner

    San Francisco Examiner

    • Circulation Areas: San Francisco
    • Owner: Philip Anschutz
    The San Francisco Examiner is an independent free daily newspaper distributed in and around San Francisco, California, United States. Traditionally one of the city's leading newspapers, the Examiner has been published continuously since the late 19th century. The longtime "Monarch of the Dailies" and flagship of the Hearst Corporation chain, the Examiner converted to free distribution early in the 21st century and is now independently owned by the San Francisco Newspaper Company LLC. The Examiner was founded in 1863 as the Democratic Press, a pro-Confederacy, pro-slavery paper opposed to Abraham Lincoln, but after his assassination in 1865 the paper's offices were destroyed by a mob, and starting on June 12, 1865 it was called the Daily Examiner. In 1880, mining engineer and entrepreneur George Hearst bought the Examiner. Seven years later, after being elected to the U.S. Senate, he gave it to his son, William Randolph Hearst, who was then 23 years old. The elder Hearst "was said to have received the failing paper as partial payment of a poker debt." William Randolph Hearst hired S.S. (Sam) Chamberlain, who had started the first American newspaper in Paris, as managing editor and
    7.50
    2 votes
    143
    The Baltimore Sun

    The Baltimore Sun

    • Circulation Areas: Baltimore County
    • Owner: Tribune Company
    The Baltimore Sun is the U.S. state of Maryland’s largest general-circulation daily newspaper and provides coverage of local and regional news, events, issues, people, and industries. The Sun was founded on May 17, 1837, by printer Arunah Shepherdson Abell and two associates. The Abell family owned the paper through to 1910, when the Black family gained a controlling interest. The paper was sold in 1986 to the Times-Mirror Company of Los Angeles. The same week, the rival Baltimore News American, owned by the Hearst Corporation, announced it would fold. The Sun, like most legacy newspapers in the United States, has suffered a number of setbacks of late, including a decline in readership, a shrinking newsroom, and competition from a new free daily, The Baltimore Examiner, which has ceased publication. In 2000, the Times-Mirror company was purchased by the Tribune Company of Chicago. On September 19, 2005, and again on August 24, 2008, The Baltimore Sun introduced new layout designs. Its circulation as of 2010 was 195,561 for the daily edition and 343,552 on Sundays. On April 29, 2009, the Tribune Company announced that it would lay off 61 of the 205 staff members in the Sun newsroom.
    7.50
    2 votes
    144
    The Hartford Courant

    The Hartford Courant

    • Circulation Areas: Hartford
    • Owner: Tribune Company
    The Hartford Courant is the largest daily newspaper in the U.S. state of Connecticut, and is often recognized as the oldest continuously-published newspaper in the United States. A morning newspaper serving most of the state north of New Haven and east of Waterbury, its headquarters on Broad Street are a short walk from the state capitol. It reports regional news with a chain of bureaus in smaller cities and a series of local editions. Since 2000, it has been owned by Tribune Company, which later combined the paper's management and facilities with those of Tribune-owned WTIC-TV in Hartford. The Connecticut Courant began as a weekly on October 29, 1764, started by Thomas Green. The word "courant," borrowed from the Dutch, was a popular name for English-language newspapers. The daily Hartford Courant traces its existence back to the weekly, thereby claiming the title "America's oldest continuously published newspaper" and adopting as its slogan, "Older than the nation." (The New Hampshire Gazette, which started publication in 1756 and all but disappeared into other publications for most of a century, trademarked the title of oldest paper in the nation after being revived as a small
    7.50
    2 votes
    145
    The Times

    The Times

    • Circulation Areas: United Kingdom
    • Owner: News International
    The Times is a British daily national newspaper, first published in London in 1785 under the title The Daily Universal Register (it became The Times on 1 January 1788). The Times and its sister paper The Sunday Times (founded in 1821) are published by Times Newspapers, since 1981 a subsidiary of News International, itself wholly owned by the News Corporation group headed by Rupert Murdoch. The Times and The Sunday Times do not share editorial staff, were founded independently and have only had common ownership since 1967. The Times is the first newspaper to have borne that name, lending it to numerous other papers around the world, including The Times of India (1838), The Straits Times (1845), The New York Times (1851), The Irish Times (1859), the Los Angeles Times (1881), The Seattle Times (1891), The Daily Times (Malawi) (1900), The Canberra Times (1926), The Times (Malta) (1935) and The Times of Israel (Israel) (2012). Outside the UK it is often referred to as the "London Times" or "The Times of London" for distinguishing purposes. The Times is the originator of the ubiquitous Times Roman typeface, originally developed by Stanley Morison of The Times in collaboration with the
    7.50
    2 votes
    146
    Vjesnik

    Vjesnik

    • Circulation Areas: Croatia
    Vjesnik was a Croatian state-owned daily newspaper, published in Zagreb. Established in 1940 as a communist publication, it built and maintained a reputation as the Croatian newspaper of record during most of its post-war history. Its heyday was between 1952 and 1977 when its Wednesday edition ('Vjesnik u srijedu' or VUS) regularly achieved circulation of 100,000 and was widely read across Yugoslavia. Following Croatia's independence and the political turmoil in the early 1990s its once large circulation steadily dwindled, before it eventually ceased publication in April 2012. The paper was originally printed as a monthly publication by the League of Communists of Croatia starting in 1940. During World War II, while Croatia was under occupation of Nazi Germany, the paper served as the primary media publication of the Partisan resistance movement. The August 1941 edition of the paper featured the statement "Smrt fašizmu, sloboda narodu" (transl. "Death to fascism, freedom to the people") which was afterwards accepted as the official slogan of the entire resistance movement and was often quoted in post-war Yugoslavia. In 1990, after Croatia declared its independence from Yugoslavia,
    7.50
    2 votes
    147
    Dawn

    Dawn

    • Circulation Areas: Islamabad
    • Owner: Dawn Group of Newspapers
    Dawn is Pakistan's oldest and most widely read English-language newspaper. One of the country's two largest English-language dailies, it is the flagship of the Dawn Group of Newspapers, published by Pakistan Herald Publications, which also owns the Herald, a magazine, the evening paper The Star and Spider, an information technology magazine. It was founded by Quaid-i-Azam Mohammad Ali Jinnah in Delhi, India and the first issue was printed at Latifi Press on 12 October 1942. The newspaper has offices in Karachi (Sindh), Lahore (Punjab), and the federal capital Islamabad, as well as representatives abroad. As of 2004, it has a weekday circulation of over 138,000. The CEO of Dawn group is Hameed Haroon, and the current editor of Dawn is Zaffar Abbas. Founded by Mohammad Ali Jinnah on October 26, 1941 as a mouthpiece for the Muslim League, Dawn was originally a weekly publication, published in New Delhi. Jinnah summed up the paper's purpose when he stated: "The Dawn will mirror faithfully the views of Hindustan's Muslims and the All Hindustan Muslim League in all its activities: economic, educational and social and more particularly political, throughout the country fearlessly and
    6.33
    3 votes
    148
    New York Sun

    New York Sun

    • Circulation Areas: New York City
    The New York Sun was a weekday daily newspaper published in New York City from 2002 to 2008. When it debuted on April 16, 2002, adopting the name, motto, and masthead of an otherwise unrelated earlier New York paper, The Sun (1833-1950), it became the first general-interest broadsheet newspaper to be started in New York in several decades. The Sun was founded by a group of investors including publishing magnate Conrad Black, with the intent of providing an alternative to The New York Times, featuring front page news pertaining to local and state events, in contrast to the Times' emphasis on national and international news. It began business operations, prior to first publication, in October 2001. The newspaper's president and editor-in-chief was Seth Lipsky, former editor of The Forward. Its managing editor was Ira Stoll, who also served as a company vice-president. The paper's motto, displayed on its masthead and website, was "It Shines For All", also the name of a blog that was part of the Sun's online presence. Stoll had been a longtime critic of the Times in his media watchdog blog smartertimes.com. When smartertimes.com became defunct, its Web traffic was redirected to the Sun
    6.33
    3 votes
    149
    News-Times

    News-Times

    • Circulation Areas: Brookfield
    • Owner: MediaNews Group
    The News-Times is a 30,000-circulation daily newspaper in Danbury, Connecticut, United States. It is owned and operated by the Hearst Corporation, a multinational corporate media conglomerate with $4 billion in revenues. The paper covers greater Danbury, a city in Fairfield County in southwestern Connecticut. Other towns covered include Brookfield, New Fairfield, Newtown, Bethel, Ridgefield, Redding, Roxbury, New Milford, Sherman and Kent, Connecticut; and Brewster, New York. In addition to its Danbury headquarters, The News-Times maintains a news bureau in New Milford. The News-Times also owns and operates The Greater New Milford Spectrum, a weekly newspaper that covers Roxbury, New Milford, Sherman, Kent, Washington and Bridgewater, Connecticut. The Ottaway Community Newspapers chain purchased the paper in 1955. Ottaway, which later became a division of Dow Jones & Company, owned the newspaper until November 2006, when its sale to Community Newspaper Holdings was announced. Five months later, on April 1, 2007, the newspaper, along with the weekly Spectrum, was sold for US$75 million to Hearst Corporation of New York. Hearst also owns the Connecticut Post in Bridgeport and the
    6.33
    3 votes
    150
    The Gazette

    The Gazette

    • Circulation Areas: Montreal
    • Owner: CanWest Global Communications
    The Gazette, often called the Montreal Gazette to avoid ambiguity, is the only English-language daily newspaper published in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, with three other daily English newspapers all having shut down at different times during the second half of the 20th century. Founded in 1778 by Fleury Mesplet, The Gazette is Quebec's oldest daily newspaper. The oldest newspaper overall is the Quebec Chronicle-Telegraph, which was established in 1764 and is published weekly. Fleury Mesplet founded a French-language newspaper called La Gazette du commerce et littéraire, pour la ville et district de Montréal on June 3, 1778. This paper was shut down in 1779, with Mesplet and the editor, Valentin Jautard, having been imprisoned for their participation in the American Revolutionary War. Mesplet began a second weekly, La Gazette de Montréal, on August 25, 1785, which had a dual French-English bilingual format. It is the direct ancestor of the current newspaper. It was later purchased by an anglophone businessman and converted into an English-only paper in 1822. On April 25, 1849, The Gazette published a special edition in which its editor-in-chief, James Moir Ferres, called the
    6.33
    3 votes
    151
    Charleston Daily Mail

    Charleston Daily Mail

    • Circulation Areas: Charleston
    The Charleston Daily Mail is a Pulitzer Prize winning Monday-Friday morning newspaper in Charleston, West Virginia. The Daily Mail was founded in 1914 by former Alaska Gov. Walter Eli Clark and remained the property of his heirs until 1987. Governor Clark described the newspaper as an "independent Republican" publication. The newspaper published in the afternoons, Monday-Saturday, with a Sunday morning edition, until 1961, when the paper entered into a Joint Operating Agreement with the morning Charleston Gazette and the new Sunday Charleston Gazette-Mail was substituted and the Daily Mail began a six day publishing schedule. In 1987, the Clark heirs sold the paper to the Toronto based Thomson Newspapers. The new owners moderated the political views of the paper to some degree. In 1998, Thomson sold the Daily Mail to the Denver-based MediaNews Group. In May 2004, MediaNews sold the paper to the Daily Gazette Company, the owners of the morning newspaper. The new owner reduced the staff and canceled its Saturday edition, publishing Monday-Friday afternoons from 2004-2009. It also began to market the paper in an uncompetitive manner in an attempt to drive its circulation down to the
    8.00
    1 votes
    152
    Daily Mail

    Daily Mail

    • Circulation Areas: United Kingdom
    • Owner: Daily Mail and General Trust
    The Daily Mail is a conservative, British daily middle-market tabloid newspaper owned by the Daily Mail and General Trust. First published in 1896 by Lord Northcliffe, it is the United Kingdom's second biggest-selling daily newspaper after The Sun. Its sister paper The Mail on Sunday was launched in 1982. Scottish and Irish editions of the daily paper were launched in 1947 and 2006 respectively. The Daily Mail was Britain's first daily newspaper aimed at the newly literate "lower-middle class market resulting from mass education, combining a low retail price with plenty of competitions, prizes and promotional gimmicks", and the first British paper to sell a million copies a day. It was, from the outset, a newspaper for women, being the first to provide features especially for them, and is the only British newspaper whose readership is more than 50 percent female, at 53 percent. It had an average daily circulation of 1,991,275 copies in April 2012. Between June and December 2011 it had an average daily readership of approximately 4.371 million, of whom approximately 2.803 million were in the ABC1 demographic and 1.596 million in the C2DE demographic. The Daily Mail has had
    8.00
    1 votes
    153
    Folha de S. Paulo

    Folha de S. Paulo

    • Circulation Areas: São Paulo
    Folha de S. Paulo, known simply as Folha (Portuguese pronunciation: [ˈfoʎɐ], Sheet), is a Brazilian daily newspaper founded and continuously published in São Paulo since 19 February 1921. Owned by the Frias de Oliveira family since 1962, it has Brazil's largest circulation since 1986. Alongside O Globo and O Estado de S. Paulo, Folha is considered one of the most influential newspapers in the country. The newspaper is considered to have played a major role during the military dictatorship. With the return of press freedom, it became an important channel for public expression. Folha also had an important role during the impeachment of President Fernando Collor de Mello in 1992. It has a partnership with Wikileaks to publish the United States diplomatic cables in the country, alongside O Globo. Nevertheless, Folha's circulation has been on a sharp decline since the past decade. In December 1998, it led the circulation of Brazilian newspapers with an estimated 513,000 copies printed daily. Ten years later, its circulation was estimated at 299,000 copies, which represents a decrease of 41%, although it stills leads the newspaper market, which has been facing a decline as a
    8.00
    1 votes
    154
    Foster's Daily Democrat

    Foster's Daily Democrat

    • Circulation Areas: Dover
    • Owner: Geo. J. Foster Company
    Foster's Daily Democrat is a six-day (Monday-Saturday) morning broadsheet newspaper published in Dover, New Hampshire, USA, covering southeast New Hampshire and southwest Maine. A sister paper, Foster's Sunday Citizen, publishes on Sunday. In addition to its Dover headquarters, Foster's maintains news bureaus in Rochester and Portsmouth, New Hampshire. Founded by Joshua L. Foster on June 18, 1873, the paper was named after the U.S. Democratic Party, which then was the conservative and less-popular party in New England. Foster was already known, by then, as a political firebrand; one of his previous publishing ventures had been the States and Union, a pro-slavery paper in nearby Portsmouth, New Hampshire, during the American Civil War. Foster's Daily Democrat still takes a conservative line in its editorial pages, and its editorials tends to back Republicans. Foster's endorsed George W. Bush in the 2000 New Hampshire primary, although the paper backed no one in the general election. It also endorsed District 1 Congressman Jeb Bradley on a number of occasions and it is considered rare for a Democratic candidate to get an endorsement from Foster's. Foster's is in favor of the death
    8.00
    1 votes
    155
    Green Bay Press-Gazette

    Green Bay Press-Gazette

    • Circulation Areas: Brown County
    • Owner: Gannett Company
    The Green Bay Press-Gazette is a newspaper whose primary coverage is of northeastern Wisconsin, including Green Bay. It was founded as the Green Bay Gazette in 1866 as a weekly paper, becoming a daily newspaper in 1871. The Green Bay Gazette merged with its major competitor, the Green Bay Free Press in 1915, assuming its current title. The newspaper was purchased by Gannett in March, 1980. Its circulation is 57,675 for the daily morning paper, and 83,166 for the Sunday edition. In 1972, an internal labor dispute led to the creation of the Green Bay News-Chronicle by striking workers. In 2004, the News-Chronicle was taken over by Press-Gazette publisher Gannett, who closed it in 2005. Its sports section includes extensive coverage of the local NFL franchise, the Green Bay Packers.
    8.00
    1 votes
    156
    Metro, Silicon Valley's Weekly Newspaper

    Metro, Silicon Valley's Weekly Newspaper

    • Circulation Areas: Sunnyvale
    • Owner: Metro Newspapers
    Metro is a free weekly newspaper published by the San Jose, California, based Metro Newspapers. Also known as Metro Silicon Valley, the paper serves the greater Silicon Valley area. In addition to print form, Metro can be downloaded, in PDF format, for free from the publisher's website. Metro also keeps tabs on local politics and the "chattering" class of San Jose through its weekly column, The Fly. The newspaper has been published since 1985 and is one of the remaining owner-operated publications in the alternative press. Its principal distribution area encompasses the cities of San Jose, Los Gatos, Campbell, Saratoga, Santa Clara, Sunnyvale, Cupertino, Milpitas, Mountain View, Los Altos and Palo Alto. Metro is largely read for its coverage of the San Jose region's culture and entertainment scene. It publishes an exhaustive arts section, which has been edited by Michael S. Gant since 1990. The arts and entertainment section includes calendar listings, music reviews, critical coverage of the performing and visual arts, as well as movie reviews and information. The newspaper has employed well-regarded film critic Richard von Busack since 1985. Food critic Stett Holbrook edits the
    8.00
    1 votes
    157
    The Badger Herald

    The Badger Herald

    • Circulation Areas: Madison
    The Badger Herald is a newspaper serving the University of Wisconsin–Madison community. Founded in 1969, it is one of America's first independent daily student newspapers. The paper is published Monday through Friday during the academic year and once during the summer. Available at newsstands across campus and Downtown Madison, Wisconsin and published on the Web, it has a print circulation of 15,000. The Badger Herald, Inc. is a nonprofit corporation run entirely by University of Wisconsin–Madison students and funded solely by advertising revenue. The Board of Directors, which operates the company, is composed of nine UW students and three non-voting advisers, including noted First Amendment expert Donald Downs and former Republican congressional candidate John Sharpless. The staff consists of more than 100, about half of whom are salaried employees. The office is located off-campus at 326 W. Gorham St., less than one block from State Street. The paper is printed by Capital Newspapers, Inc., home of the Wisconsin State Journal and The Capital Times. The Badger Herald was founded in 1969 by a group of four students seeking a conservative alternative to the UW–Madison's primary
    8.00
    1 votes
    158
    The Examiner

    The Examiner

    • Circulation Areas: Jackson County
    • Owner: Morris Communications
    The Examiner is the daily newspaper of eastern Jackson County, Missouri, including Independence, Blue Springs and Grain Valley. The Examiner was first published as a weekly newspaper in 1898 by Col. William Southern. The daily edition began publication as The Independence Examiner May 16, 1905. The official Examiner website was launched in 1998 and is updated daily. The newspaper significantly expanded its audience in 2001 when it launched two monthly publications, SportsMonthly and The X/Entertainment Magazine. The monthly publications were run by Brendel and John Beaudoin, the newspaper's Specialty Publications Director. Beaudoin left in July 2006 after 10 years at the newspaper to become the publisher of the Logan Herald-Observer and Woodbine Twiner in Harrison County, Iowa. The Examiner launched Welcome Home - a real estate guide - in 2007 and redesigned the newspaper that year. On October 23, 2007, Morris Communications announced it was selling The Examiner and several other publications to GateHouse Media. Audrey Stubbart, an American centenarian, worked for The Examiner until the age of 105, becoming the oldest verified full-time employee ever in the United States. Examiner
    8.00
    1 votes
    159
    The Herald

    The Herald

    • Circulation Areas: Scotland
    • Owner: Newsquest
    The Herald is a broadsheet newspaper published Monday to Saturday in Glasgow, and available throughout Scotland. As of August 2011 it had an audited circulation of 47,226, giving it a lead over Scotland's other 'quality' national daily, The Scotsman, published in Edinburgh. The 1889 to 1906 editions are only available to view on micro-film. From then on printed copies have been retained. The paper is one of the world's oldest continuously-published English-language newspapers, first published on 27 January 1783 as the Glasgow Advertiser, from Duncan's Land, Gibson's Wynd, Glasgow. Its first editor was John Mennons. The Herald is owned by Newsquest (a division of Gannett), which acquired it with the purchase of the publishing arm of the Scottish Media Group in 2003 in a highly controversial £216m sale. Prominent columnists writing on the paper include Alison Rowat, Collete Douglas-Home, Ruth Wishart, Anne Johnstone, Ian Bell and Iain Macwhirter. It publishes the quarterly Scottish Review of Books as a supplement in the Saturday Herald. First published on Wednesday 1 January 1783. In 1803 it became 'The Herald and Advertiser and Commercial Chronicle changing to 'The Glasgow Herald'
    8.00
    1 votes
    160
    B.T.

    B.T.

    • Circulation Areas: Copenhagen
    • Owner: Det Berlingske Officin
    B.T. (Danish pronunciation: [ˈbeːˀ ˈteːˀ]) is a Danish tabloid newspaper which offers general news about various subjects such as sports, politics and current affairs. A large, red neon sign displays the B.T. logo at the square Trianglen in Østerbro, a part of Copenhagen.
    5.25
    4 votes
    161
    The Columbus Dispatch

    The Columbus Dispatch

    • Circulation Areas: Columbus
    • Owner: Dispatch Printing Company
    The Columbus Dispatch is a daily newspaper based in Columbus, Ohio. Its first issue was published on July 1, 1871, and has been the only mainstream daily newspaper in the city since The Columbus Citizen-Journal stopped printing in 1985. The Dispatch and the various WBNS stations (WBNS (AM), WBNS-FM, and WBNS-TV) as part of the Dispatch Broadcast Group are privately owned by the Wolfe family. Although this concentration of media ownership might seem to run afoul of the Federal Communications Commission's cross-ownership rules, the family was granted an exemption because their ownership pre-dated the regulations. The Dispatch Broadcast Group also includes WTHR Channel 13 in Indianapolis, Indiana, an affiliate of NBC, and the "Ohio News Network" cable news channel. As of 2010, John F. Wolfe is the newspaper's publisher. Michael F. Curtin is the associate publisher emeritus, Michael J. Fiorile is the president and chief operating officer, and Benjamin Marrison is the editor. The paper was founded in June 1871 by a group of 10 printers with US$900 in financial capital. The paper published its first issue as The Daily Dispatch on July 1, 1871, as a four page paper which cost US$0.04 per
    5.25
    4 votes
    162
    Monitor

    Monitor

    • Circulation Areas: Poland
    The Monitor was one of the first newspapers in Poland, printed from 1765 to 1785, during the Polish Enlightenment. It was founded in March 1765 by Ignacy Krasicki and Franciszek Bohomolec, with active support from King Stanisław August Poniatowski. It came out weekly, later semi-weekly. Its title was a tribute to the "small" Monitor published by Prince Adam Kazimierz Czartoryski. Inspired by the English Spectator and the spirit of rationalism and religious tolerance, Monitor has contributed to a negative view of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth under the Wettin dynasty. The Monitor advocated reforms and criticized a degenerate Sarmatian culture and the abuses of "Golden Liberty." Editors:
    7.00
    2 votes
    163
    Norrländska Socialdemokraten

    Norrländska Socialdemokraten

    • Circulation Areas: Norrbotten County
    • Owner: Orkla Group
    Norrländska Socialdemokraten (NSD) (Swedish: The Norrland Social Democrat) is a daily regional newspaper published in Norrbotten, Sweden. It is the largest morning newspaper in the region, as well as the largest newspaper published north of Uppsala, with a daily circulation of 35,600 (as of 2010). As of the division of the Swedish Social Democratic Workers' Party in May 1917, NSD was founded in 1918 due to that the original regional organ for the party, Norrskensflamman, went with the vast majority of the social democratic district to join the newly founded Swedish Social Democratic Left Party. The newspaper was first published on 4 January 1919, and the stated position of the editorial page is "social democratic".
    7.00
    2 votes
    164
    The Charleston Gazette

    The Charleston Gazette

    • Circulation Areas: Charleston
    The Charleston Gazette is a five-day morning newspaper in Charleston, West Virginia. It is published Monday through Friday mornings. On Saturday and Sunday mornings the combined Charleston Gazette-Mail is published, which is, more or less, similar to the Gazette. The Gazette was established in 1873. At the time, it was a weekly newspaper known as the Kanawha Chronicle. It had a couple of other owners and names—The Kanawha Gazette and the Daily Gazette—before its name was officially changed to The Charleston Gazette in 1907. The Chilton family acquired formal interest in the paper in 1912. William E. Chilton, a U.S. senator, was publisher of The Gazette, as were his son, William E. Chilton II, and grandson, W. E. "Ned" Chilton III, Yale graduate and classmate/protégé of conservative columnist William F. Buckley, Jr.. The paper carried Buckley's column, which was 180 degrees politically different from all other material in the paper, until Buckley's death. In 1918 a fire destroyed the Gazette building at 909 Virginia St. The newspaper was moved to 227 Hale St., where it remained for 42 years. Under a consolidation agreement, which eventually became a Joint Operating Agreement with
    7.00
    2 votes
    165
    The Shreveport Times

    The Shreveport Times

    • Circulation Areas: Shreveport
    • Owner: Gannett Company
    The Times is a Gannett daily newspaper based in Shreveport, Louisiana. The Times distribution area includes twelve parishes in Northwest Louisiana and three counties in east Texas. Coverage focuses on issues affecting the Shreveport-Bossier market and includes investigative reporting, community news, arts & entertainment, government, education, sports, business, and religion, along with local opinion/commentary. The Times website shreveporttimes.com provides news updates, videos, photo galleries, forums, blogs, event calendars, entertainment, classifieds, contests, databases and a regional search engine. Local news content produced by The Times is available on the website at no charge for seven days. From 1895 to 1991, The Times had competition from the afternoon Monday-Saturday daily, the since defunct Shreveport Journal. The papers were later printed at the same 222 Lake Street address and shared opposite sides of the building but were entirely separate and independent of the other. Publisher Charles T. Beaird effective March 30, 1991, closed the Shreveport Journal for financial reasons stemming from sharply reduced circulation. Threafter, the page opposite the editorial page of
    7.00
    2 votes
    166
    The Vancouver Sun

    The Vancouver Sun

    • Circulation Areas: Vancouver
    • Owner: CanWest Global Communications
    The Vancouver Sun is a daily newspaper first published in the Canadian province of British Columbia on February 12, 1912. The paper is currently published by the Pacific Newspaper Group, a division of Postmedia Network. It is published six days a week, Monday to Saturday. Although its staff of reporters has shrunken considerably in recent years, the Sun still has the largest newsroom in Vancouver. The Sun is a broadsheet newspaper and is not part of the Sun Media chain that operates tabloid papers in Toronto, Ottawa, Winnipeg, Calgary and Edmonton. When the Sun began operation, it was published at 125 West Pender Street, just around the corner from The Province, its rival newspaper at the time. In 1924, the Sun bought the Vancouver World newspaper, which had been in financial difficulty for some time. In March 1937, a fire destroyed the Sun's business and editorial offices. The only casualty was the janitor, who suffered minor burns and smoke inhalation. The Sun promptly moved across the street into the World Building, where the World had previously been published. The building was accordingly renamed the Sun Tower. In 1958, the Sun and the Province joined to create the Pacific
    7.00
    2 votes
    167
    Borba

    Borba

    • Circulation Areas: Zagreb
    Borba (Борба in Serbian Cyrillic) was a Serbian newspaper, formerly the official newspaper of the League of Communists of Yugoslavia (during the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia). The name is the Serbian and Croatian word for struggle or combat. the newspaper was started in 1922 in Zagreb as the official gazette of the Yugoslav Communist Party, which operated in the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes. During World War II Borba was published in the Republic of Užice. After the World War II liberation by the Partisans, its publication moved to Belgrade. After 1948, the newspaper was also published simultaneously in Zagreb. For a long time, Borba alternated pages in Serbian Cyrillic alphabet and Croatian Latin alphabet in the same edition. Borba briefly reappeared in Belgrade in 2008-2009. It was published by "Izdavačko preduzeće Novine Borba" using the Latin alphabet but due to poor sales (less than 3,000 copies per day) it ceased publication after less than a year.
    6.00
    3 votes
    168
    The Cincinnati Enquirer

    The Cincinnati Enquirer

    • Circulation Areas: Hamilton County
    • Owner: Gannett Company
    The Cincinnati Enquirer, a daily morning newspaper, is the highest-circulation print publication in Greater Cincinnati (Ohio) and Northern Kentucky. (The Enquirer publishes a Northern Kentucky edition under the title The Kentucky Enquirer with a front section and remade Local section. The front page is remade from the Ohio edition, although it may contain similar elements.) The Enquirer is a Gannett Co. Inc. newspaper and publishes a variety of print and electronic media, including separate editions for Ohio and Kentucky, 16 Community Press weekly newspapers, 10 Community Recorder weekly newspapers, OurTown magazine, the cincinnati.com network of Web sites, and free-distribution advertising publications in the employment, automotive, real estate, rental, health care and shopping segments. Cincinnati.Com is The Enquirer's flagship electronic product, and encompasses 50 local and national information and advertising Web products. The first known reference to Chicago as "The Windy City" appeared in the Enquirer May 9, 1876. The Enquirer was first published April 10, 1841. The Enquirer became one of the first newspapers in the United States to publish a Sunday edition beginning on
    6.00
    3 votes
    169
    The Heckler

    The Heckler

    • Circulation Areas: Chicago
    The Heckler is a satirical sports newspaper created in 2003 by Brad Zibung (born 1976) and George Ellis (born 1977). It is based in Chicago and chronicles the pratfalls of the fabled Chicago Cubs baseball club as well as other major Chicago sports teams and athletes. The Heckler has received acclaim from the Chicago Reader, The Chicago Sun-Times, Chicago Tribune, Chicago Tonight on WTTW, WFLD's Fox News in the AM, WGN-TV, ESPN Radio Chicago, WSCR-AM, Time Out Chicago and the Sporting News. It has subscribers in 40 states. In 2006 The Heckler branched beyond the Chicago Cubs and began covering all major Chicago sports. In March 2007, The Heckler published its first book, The Cubs Fan's Guide to Happiness.
    6.00
    3 votes
    170
    The Sheboygan Press

    The Sheboygan Press

    • Circulation Areas: Sheboygan County
    • Owner: Gannett Company
    The Sheboygan Press is a daily newspaper based in Sheboygan, Wisconsin. It is part of the Gannett Company chain of newspapers. The Sheboygan Press is primarily distributed in Sheboygan County. The Sheboygan Press also publishes the Shoreline Chronicle, a free shopper paper, Moxie, which features articles and news about senior citizens, and the Today's Real Estate realty listings magazine. All Press publications were printed at Gannett's printing facility in Fond du Lac from 1998 until its closing in 2009, when Gannett contracted with the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel to print all Press publications in Milwaukee.
    6.00
    3 votes
    171
    El Nuevo Herald

    El Nuevo Herald

    • Circulation Areas: Miami-Dade County
    • Owner: The McClatchy Company
    El Nuevo Herald is a McClatchy newspaper published daily in Spanish in Miami, Florida, in the United States. El Nuevo Herald's sister paper is The Miami Herald, also produced by the McClatchy Company. Founded: First published in 1975 as El Miami Herald; expanded and relaunched in 1987 as El Nuevo Herald; available as a standalone newspaper in 1998. Key Executives: David Landsberg, President and Publisher, Miami Herald Media Co. Manny Garcia, Executive Editor Gloria Leal, Associate Editor Andres Reynaldo, City Editor Distinction: Award-winning, Spanish-language daily newspaper in the nation's third-largest Hispanic market. Circulation Area: Miami-Dade, Broward and Monroe counties. Market: The South Florida market is the primary market in the state of Florida with nearly 4.3 million residents and ranks as the 15th largest in the United States. It is the third-largest Hispanic market in the nation. Strength: For daily newspapers, El Nuevo Herald is the United States' biggest Spanish-language Sunday paper and the second-largest daily. El Nuevo Herald carries an extraordinary sphere of influence in Latin America and the Caribbean for its groundbreaking news. Customers: Hispanic readers
    5.67
    3 votes
    172
    O Estado de S. Paulo

    O Estado de S. Paulo

    • Circulation Areas: São Paulo
    O Estado de S. Paulo (Portuguese pronunciation: [u isˈtadu dʒi sɐ̃w̃ ˈpawlu], The State of São Paulo) is a daily newspaper published in the Metropolitan region of São Paulo, Brazil, and distributed mainly nationally. It is owned by Grupo Estado, a holding company which publishes the Jornal da Tarde and owns the radios Rádio Eldorado AM and FM and the Agência Estado, largest news agency in Brazil. It has the second largest circulation in the City of São Paulo, only behind Folha de São Paulo, and the fifth largest overall in Brazil. It is nicknamed the Estadão (lit. "Big Estado"). The journal was founded relying on the ideals of republicans and social democracy on January 4 of 1875, and was firstly called A Província de São Paulo ("The Province of São Paulo"). The motto of the newspaper is Estadão, o jornal que pensa ÃO ("Estadão, the newspaper that thinks ÃO"). -ão is a Portuguese augmentative suffix. The current publisher is "O Estado de S. Paulo S.A." The term Província ("Province") was preserved until January 1890, one month after the fall of the monarchy and the regime change to the republican institution in Brazil. Although the newspaper supported the change, it showed that it
    5.67
    3 votes
    173
    Tulane Hullabaloo

    Tulane Hullabaloo

    • Circulation Areas: New Orleans
    The Tulane Hullabaloo is the weekly student-run newspaper of Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana. It is published every Friday of the academic year, except holidays, and has received multiple Pacemaker Awards, the highest award in college journalism. The Tulane Weekly began in 1905 to rival The Olive and Blue, another Tulane newspaper that dates back to 1896. (There were more Tulane newsletters and newspapers before The Olive and Blue named College Spirit, Collegian, Topics and The Rat.) The first issue of The Tulane Weekly was published on November 8, 1905 and stated that “the organization of this paper is the result of a dispute between the student body and a few individuals at The Olive and Blue. If a few students have a right to publish a periodical under the name of the University, and represent it as a student publication when the students have no voice in its management; then this paper has no right to an existence.” There is no record of The Olive and Blue after 1906. The Tulane Weekly changed its name to The Hullabaloo on January 16, 1920. A staff editorial titled “Note: Please Send Your Dollars to The Hullabaloo” appeared in the first issue and stated “The staff
    5.67
    3 votes
    174
    Bristol Evening Post

    Bristol Evening Post

    • Circulation Areas: Bristol
    • Owner: Daily Mail and General Trust
    The Bristol Post is a newspaper covering news in the city of Bristol, including stories from the whole of Greater Bristol, Northern Somerset and South Gloucestershire. The Evening Post was founded in 1932 by local interests, in response to an agreement between the two national press groups which owned the then two Bristol evening newspapers, Lord Rothermere, owner of the Bristol Evening World, and Baron Camrose, owner of the Bristol Times and Echo. Camrose had agreed to close his Bristol title in return for Rothermere's agreement to close his title in Newcastle, leaving Bristol with just one paper. Readers of the Times and Echo were instrumental in founding the Evening Post, which carried the rubric The paper all Bristol asked for and helped to create. The Evening Post and Evening World competed strongly until 1935, when both titles were acquired by a new company, Bristol United Press (BUP), 40% owned by Lord Rothermere's interests and 60% owned by the Bristol Evening Post. In 1960 BUP acquired the Bristol morning paper, the Western Daily Press, and the weekly Bristol Observer. In 1962 the Evening World ceased publication, leaving the Evening Post as Bristol's only evening paper.
    6.50
    2 votes
    175
    Indianapolis News

    Indianapolis News

    • Circulation Areas: Indianapolis
    The Indianapolis News was an evening newspaper published for 130 years, beginning December 7, 1869, and ending on October 1, 1999. At one time it had the largest circulation in the state of Indiana, and was the oldest Indianapolis newspaper in existence. The Indianapolis News was an evening paper, and its decline matched a growing circulation of the morning newspaper, the Indianapolis Star. Prior to the closing, there had been a partial merging of the newspaper staff with the Star.
    6.50
    2 votes
    176
    Justice

    Justice

    Justice was the weekly newspaper of the Social Democratic Federation (SDF) in the United Kingdom. The SDF was originally called the Democratic Federation until January 1884. With the name change, the organisation launched the newspaper. Many issues appeared with the by-line "Organ of the Social Democracy". The paper was initially edited by C. L. Fitzgerald, and later by H. M. Hyndman, Henry Hyde Champion, Ernest Belfort Bax, then Harry Quelch for many years, and finally Henry W. Lee. It attempted to present scientific ideas in a serious fashion, featuring work by Peter Kropotkin, Edward Aveling and Alfred Russel Wallace. When the SDF formed the British Socialist Party, it became the official journal of that organisation, but in 1916, the group around Justice split away to form the National Socialist Party. The paper then became the organ of that party, which soon joined the Labour Party and renamed itself as the "Social Democratic Federation" again. In 1925, Justice was renamed the Social Democrat and became a monthly publication, edited by William Sampson Cluse until its demise in 1933.
    6.50
    2 votes
    177
    Reforma

    Reforma

    • Circulation Areas: Mexico City
    • Owner: Grupo Reforma
    Reforma is a Mexican newspaper based in Mexico City. It has 276,700 readers in Mexico City. The paper shares content with other papers in parent newsgroup Grupo Reforma. The cumulative readership of the newsgroup is above 400,000. Reforma is named after the Mexico City avenue of the same name, Paseo de la Reforma, which is in turn named after "La Reforma": a series of liberal reforms undertaken by the country in the mid 19th century. The newspaper emphasizes its design, variety of columnists, and editorials that denounce political corruption. Reforma, along with the other newspapers of its parent, have an interest in color printing. The paper features weekly translations from selected articles of local interest from U.S. newspapers. These include The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal. The Sunday edition of Reforma includes a supplemental magazine, titled Top Magazzine, which covers celebrity gossip, Hollywood previews and interviews. Reforma was founded in 1993, as an offshoot of El Norte, the noted Monterrey-based daily. Reforma was the first newsgroup in Mexico to separate its commercial division from its journalism division. This allowed for a greater independence in
    6.50
    2 votes
    178
    Sankei Shimbun

    Sankei Shimbun

    • Circulation Areas: Tokyo
    Sankei Shimbun (産経新聞), lit. "Industrial and Economic Newspaper, is a daily newspaper in Japan published by the Sankei Shimbun Co., Ltd. (株式会社産業経済新聞社, Kabushiki-gaisha Sangyō Keizai Shinbunsha). It has the sixth highest circulation for a newspaper in Japan, and is considered as one of the five "national" newspapers. On 1 October 2007, Sankei Shimbun's website and MSN Japan started a content partnership, MSN Sankei News. The Sankei Shimbun is part of the Fujisankei Communications Group and is 40% owned by Fuji Media Holdings. The company is also the owner of Osaka Broadcasting Corporation (OBC, Radio Osaka).
    6.50
    2 votes
    179
    St. Petersburg Times

    St. Petersburg Times

    • Circulation Areas: Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater
    • Owner: Times Publishing Company
    The Tampa Bay Times, previously named the St. Petersburg Times, is an American newspaper published in St. Petersburg, Florida. It is one of two major publications serving the Tampa Bay Area, the other being The Tampa Tribune, which the Times tops in both circulation and readership. The Times has won eight Pulitzer Prizes since 1964, and in 2009, won two in a single year for the first time in the paper's history. It is published by the Times Publishing Company, which is owned by The Poynter Institute for Media Studies, a nonprofit journalism school directly adjacent to the University of South Florida St. Petersburg campus. Many issues are available through Google News Archive. A daily electronic version is also available for the Amazon Kindle and iPad. The paper traces its origins to the West Hillsborough Times, a weekly newspaper established in Dunedin, Florida on the Pinellas peninsula in 1884. At the time, neither St. Petersburg nor Pinellas County existed; the peninsula was part of Hillsborough County. The paper was published weekly in the back of a pharmacy and had a circulation of 480. It subsequently changed ownership six times in seventeen years. In December 1884 it was
    6.50
    2 votes
    180
    Kidderminster Shuttle

    Kidderminster Shuttle

    • Circulation Areas: Kidderminster
    • Owner: Newsquest
    The Shuttle, formerly known as the Kidderminster Shuttle, is a free weekly newspaper distributed to households in the Wyre Forest area of Worcestershire, England on a Thursday. In the Stourport area it was known as the Stourport News, and there was also a paid-for edition, the Kidderminster Times; all three papers have had identical editorial content since 2005 although each had its own masthead front page until April 2006. Since then all three papers have been renamed as The Shuttle incorporating the Kidderminster Shuttle, the Kidderminster Times and the Stourport News. The local office in Stourport was closed at the same time. The paper remains a local institution in the Kidderminster area, notably with its in-depth coverage of local politics and Kidderminster Harriers F.C.. The Shuttle was first published in the 19th century, and takes its name from the carpet industry for which Kidderminster is famous. The current editor of the Shuttle is Clive Joyce. The newspaper is owned by Newsquest Media Group which was acquired by the Gannett corporation in 1999. The Newsquest head office is based in Weybridge, Surrey and employs a total of more than 9,100 people across the UK. In 2009
    4.75
    4 votes
    181
    Anandabazar Patrika

    Anandabazar Patrika

    • Circulation Areas: Mumbai
    Anandabazar Patrika (Bengali: আনন্দবাজার পত্রিকা Aːnond̪obaːdʒaːr Pot̪riːkaː) is an Indian Bengali language daily newspaper published in Kolkata, New Delhi and Mumbai by the ABP Group. According to the Audit Bureau of Circulations, it has a circulation of 1.28 million copies making it the largest circulation for a single-edition, regional language newspaper in India. According to Indian Readership Survey (IRS) 2012, it is the most widely read Bengali newspaper in India with a readership of 58.59 lakhs. Thus making Anandabazar Patrika as the top Bengali newspaper in India by readership. The newspaper's principal rival is Bartaman Patrika, which ranks second by circulation and readership. Other than Kolkata, it is also printed from various other towns in West Bengal. The paper was founded in 1922 by its inaugural editor Prafulla Chandra Sarkar. Presently, the newspaper is edited by Aveek Sarkar. Anandabazar Patrika was first published as an evening daily on 13 March 1922 on the auspicious day of Holi or also known as Dol in Bengali. It was initially printed in red ink and consisted of four pages, which was increased to six. In 1923, the newspaper was transformed to a morning daily,
    7.00
    1 votes
    182
    Knoxville Whig

    Knoxville Whig

    • Circulation Areas: Tennessee
    The Whig was a polemical American newspaper published and edited by William G. "Parson" Brownlow (1805–1877) in the mid-nineteenth century. As its name implies, the paper's primary purpose was the promotion and defense of Whig Party political figures and ideals. In the years leading up to the Civil War, the Whig became the mouthpiece for East Tennessee's anti-secessionist movement. The Whig was published under several names throughout its existence, namely the Tennessee Whig, the Jonesborough Whig, the Knoxville Whig, and similar variations. The Whig was one of the most influential newspapers in nineteenth-century Tennessee, due mainly to Brownlow's editorials, which often included vindictive personal attacks and fierce diatribes. A Methodist circuit rider by trade, Brownlow launched the Whig in 1839 to counter rising Democratic sentiment in the region. He quickly made many enemies across the majority Democratic antebellum South. During his career, Brownlow survived several assassination attempts, numerous libel lawsuits, and arrest and imprisonment by Confederate authorities during the American Civil War. Brownlow's Whig editorials attacked Democrats and Methodism's two main
    7.00
    1 votes
    183
    La Prensa de Curicó

    La Prensa de Curicó

    • Circulation Areas: Curicó
    La Prensa de Curicó (Spanish: "The Press"), is a daily newspaper published in Curicó and owned by Empresa Periodística Curicó LTDA. This headquarters are located in Merced 373 Curicó, Chile. The newspaper was founded on November 13, 1898.
    7.00
    1 votes
    184
    North Star

    North Star

    • Circulation Areas: United States of America
    The North Star was a nineteenth-century anti-slavery newspaper in the USA. Abolitionist Frederick Douglass published the North Star until June 1851, when Douglass and Gerrit Smith agreed to merge the North Star with the Liberty Party Paper (based in Syracuse, New York) to form Frederick Douglass's Paper. In 1838, Frederick Douglass was first introduced to the ideology that inspired the North Star after subscribing to The Liberator, a weekly newspaper published by William Lloyd Garrison. The Liberator was a newspaper established by Garrison and his supporters based on core views of morality. The leading perspective of the Garrisonians focused on the Constitution as a pro-slavery document, the non-violent approach of emancipation of slaves by moral suasion, and the dissolution of the Union. Under the guidance of the abolitionist society, Douglass became well acquainted with the pursuit of the emancipation of slaves through a New England religious perspective. Douglass’s thoughts toward political inaction changed when he attended the National Convention of Colored Citizens, an antislavery convention in Buffalo, New York, in August 1843. One of the many speakers present at the
    7.00
    1 votes
    185
    Oslobođenje

    Oslobođenje

    • Circulation Areas: Bosnia and Herzegovina
    • Owner: Sarajevska Pivara
    Oslobođenje (English: Liberation) is a popular newspaper in Bosnia and Herzegovina based in the capital city Sarajevo. Oslobođenje was founded on August 30, 1943 in Donja Trnova near Ugljevik, as an anti-Nazi newspaper. During the Bosnian war and the Siege of Sarajevo, the Oslobođenje staff operated out of a makeshift newsroom in a bomb shelter after its 10-story office building had been destroyed. The war left five staff members dead and 25 wounded. In 1993, it was awarded the Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought. The editors of Oslobođenje, Kemal Kurspahić and Gordana Knezević, were named International Editors of the Year for 1993 by the World Press Review for their "bravery, tenacity, and dedication to the principles of journalism." Immediately after the war ended in 1995, editor-in-chief, Mehmed Halilovic accepted the University of Missouri [Mizzou] Honor Medal from the School of Journalism in Columbia, Missouri for continuous publication of the daily newspaper throughout the 1992-1995 siege of Sarajevo. During the war, its staff, consisting of Bosniaks, Bosnian Serbs, and Bosnian Croats, managed to print the paper every day except for one. In 2006, the company was bought by
    7.00
    1 votes
    186
    The Independent Florida Alligator

    The Independent Florida Alligator

    • Circulation Areas: Gainesville
    The Independent Florida Alligator is the daily student newspaper of the University of Florida. The Alligator is the largest student-run newspaper in the United States, with a daily circulation of 35,000 and readership of over 52,000. It is an affiliate of UWIRE, which distributes and promotes its content to their network. The paper prints every weekday during the spring and fall semesters (mid-August to early May) and on Tuesdays and Thursdays during the summer semesters. The Alligator has been financially and editorially independent from the university since 1973. The Alligator has been owned by non-profit, student-controlled 501(c)(3) Campus Communications Inc. since its independence. Students from both UF and Santa Fe College, also located in the city of Gainesville, Florida, are allowed to work at the paper. Only college students are allowed to work in the editorial department or be advertising representatives or interns. The Alligator is distributed free on campus and around the city of Gainesville, Florida, and contains a mix of campus and local news coverage, as well as national and international stories from wire services. It also contains a sports section that begins from
    7.00
    1 votes
    187
    The New Bedford Standard-Times

    The New Bedford Standard-Times

    • Circulation Areas: Bristol County
    • Owner: Ottaway Community Newspapers
    The Standard-Times (and Sunday Standard-Times), based in New Bedford, Massachusetts, is the larger of two daily newspapers covering the South Coast of Massachusetts, along with The Herald News of Fall River. Like the Cape Cod Times, which is the only larger newspaper in Southeastern Massachusetts, The Standard-Times is owned by Dow Jones Local Media Group, a subsidiary of News Corporation. Together with the weekly newspapers of Hathaway Publishing, which also cover Fall River and several other suburban towns, The Standard-Times is part of Dow Jones Local Media Group's South Coast Media Group. News Corporation acquired The Standard-Times when it bought Dow Jones & Company, Dow Jones Local Media Group Inc.'s parent, for US$5 billion in late 2007. Rupert Murdoch, the head of News Corp., reportedly told investors before the deal that he would be "selling the local newspapers fairly quickly" after the Dow Jones purchase. The Standard-Times' coverage area includes Acushnet, Dartmouth, Fairhaven, Fall River, Freetown, Lakeville, Marion, Mattapoisett, New Bedford, Rochester, Wareham, and Westport, Massachusetts. The Standard-Times' main daily competitor is The Herald News of Fall River.
    7.00
    1 votes
    188
    Valley News

    Valley News

    • Circulation Areas: New Hampshire
    • Owner: Newspapers of New England
    The Valley News (and Sunday Valley News) is a seven-day morning daily newspaper based in Lebanon, New Hampshire, covering the Upper Valley region of New Hampshire and Vermont. Although the newspaper's offices and presses are in Lebanon, its mailing address is a post office box in nearby White River Junction, Vermont. The newspaper covers communities on both sides of the Connecticut River, which forms the state line. The paper was founded in 1952 by Allan Churchill Butler. Shortly thereafter he sold the paper to James D. Ewing and Walter Paine. Paine would serve as editor and publisher of the paper for twenty-four years. Newspapers of New England, a private company based in Concord, New Hampshire, bought the Valley News in 1981 and has owned it since. The Valley News has editorialized in support of same-sex marriage.
    7.00
    1 votes
    189
    Varthabharathi

    Varthabharathi

    • Circulation Areas: Mangalore
    Varathabharathi Also spelled as Vartha Baharathi or Vaartha Bhaarathi, is a daily is a Kannada daily News paper (ಕನ್ನಡ ದಿನಪತ್ರಿಕೆ) fromMangalore andBangalore. Varathabharathi (Kannada: ವಾತಾ೯ ಭಾರತಿ)in the Indian southern state, Karnataka, with a presence in the coastal region.
    7.00
    1 votes
    190
    Houston Post

    Houston Post

    • Circulation Areas: Houston
    The Houston Post was a newspaper that had its headquarters in Houston, Texas, United States. In 1995, the newspaper was absorbed into the Houston Chronicle. The newspaper was established on February 19, 1880, by Gail Borden Johnson. Though that original publication ceased in October 1884, the Houston Post was re-established with the merger of the Houston Morning Chronicle and the Houston Evening Journal on April 5, 1885. J. L. Watson was the business manager and Rienzi M. Johnston was the editor. Short story writer O. Henry worked briefly for the Post in 1895 and 1896. He had to leave his position at the Post when he was indicted for embezzlement from previous employment at a bank in Austin. For many years, the Post was owned by the Hobby family, who also began Houston's first radio station, KPRC (AM) in 1925. Amid declining sales, the Post was sold in 1983 to the Toronto Sun. Four years later, MediaNews Group, led by William Dean Singleton, bought the paper. The Houston Post building, in the 1970s, had contemporary artwork, slate floors, and wood-grain concrete walls. Tours of the building and its facilities were given at the time. The Houston Post later closed down permanently,
    5.33
    3 votes
    191
    Trinity Tripod

    Trinity Tripod

    • Circulation Areas: Hartford
    • Owner: Trinity College
    The Trinity Tripod is the primary student newspaper of Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. Since 2006, the Tripod has been arranged with six sections, in order, News, Opinions, Features, Arts, Announcements, and Sports. Each of those sections has two co-editors save Announcements which has one editor. A typical issue of the Tripod has 24 pages, and is published weekly on Tuesdays, when classes are in session. The Trinity Tripod was first published by the students of Trinity College in 1904. The newspaper is an affiliate of UWIRE, which distributes and promotes its content to their network. Famous alumni include syndicated columnist George F. Will 1962, Jim Murray (sportswriter) 1943, and reporter William K. Marimow 1969 – all Pulitzer Prize winners.
    5.33
    3 votes
    192
    Bild-Zeitung

    Bild-Zeitung

    • Circulation Areas: Germany
    • Owner: Axel Springer AG
    The Bild newspaper (or Bild-Zeitung, lit. Picture Newspaper; pronounced [ˈbɪld]) is a German tabloid published by Axel Springer AG. The paper is published from Monday to Saturday, while on Sundays, Bild am Sonntag (lit. Picture on Sunday) is published instead, which has a different style and its own editors. Bild is tabloid in style, although actually broadsheet in size. It is the best-selling newspaper outside Japan and has the sixth-largest circulation worldwide. Its motto, prominently displayed below the logo, is unabhängig, überparteilich (independent, nonpartisan). Another slogan used prominently in advertising is Bild dir deine Meinung!, which translates as "Form your own opinion!" (i. e., by reading Bild), a pun based on the fact that in German, Bild is a homophone of the imperative form of the verb German: bilden (English: to form) and the noun German: Bild, (English: picture, image). Bild has been described as "notorious for its mix of gossip, inflammatory language, and sensationalism", and as having a huge influence on German politicians. Its nearest English-language stylistic and journalistic equivalent is often considered to be the British national newspaper The Sun—the
    6.00
    2 votes
    193
    Correio do Povo

    Correio do Povo

    • Circulation Areas: Porto Alegre
    • Owner: Rede Record
    Correio do Povo (The People's Mail) is a Brazilian daily newspaper printed in the city of Porto Alegre, located in the state of Rio Grande do Sul. The newspaper is owned by Grupo Record. Founded by Francisco Antônio Vieira Caldas Junior, it arose as a politically independent but democracy defending newspaper. In its first issue it was defined as Independent, noble and strong. The newspaper occupied all subjects of interest to society and was open to all thought chains. To the death of its founder, (him being just 45 years old), position was made of newspaper his life. Dolores Alcaraz Caldas assumed the periodical, and counted with the collaboration of journalists like Alcides Maia and Alcides Gonzaga. In 1935, Breno Alcaraz Caldas (1910–1986), Francisco Antônio's grandson, assumed control of the paper, and remained for more than half a century in that position. After his presidency, however, the group fell into a crisis. In 1984, after long periods of agony, Correio do Povo stopped its rotary presses due to financial difficulties derived from the great investments made by Correio do Povo in order to complete the creation of a new TV Station, TV Guaíba, in the late1970s. Two years
    6.00
    2 votes
    194
    Decorah Posten

    Decorah Posten

    • Circulation Areas: Decorah
    Decorah-Posten was a notable Norwegian language newspaper published in Decorah, Iowa. It was founded in 1874 by Brynild Anundsen, a native of Skien, Norway, and widely read by Scandinavian immigrants in several states. Its origin may be traced to the appearance at La Crosse, Wisconsin, in 1866, of the first Norwegian-American literary magazine, Ved Arnen ("By the Fireside"), which would later become a feulleton supplement thereto. Amundsen relocated his printing operation to Decorah, Iowa the following year. On September 18, 1874, Anundsen launched Decorah-Posten. It was a well-edited newspaper, its size and familiar format developed gradually. The publisher avoided areas of political and religious controversy, which had destroyed so many earlier papers. Considerable credit has been given to Anundsen for his sound judgment and business sense. He kept abreast of the times in printing and distribution, and expanded the physical plant to meet growing needs. A popular feature of the Decorah-Posten was news contributed by Norwegian immigrants and their descendants from many localities in the upper Midwest. The newspaper frequently featured, usually in the Ved Arnen section, Norwegian
    6.00
    2 votes
    195
    Kronen Zeitung

    Kronen Zeitung

    • Circulation Areas: Vienna
    • Owner: Westdeutsche Allgemeine Zeitung
    The Kronen Zeitung, commonly known as the Krone, is Austria's largest newspaper. According to a Österreichische Media-Analyse study, the average daily readership is 2,970,000 (14 years or older), which corresponds to 43.7% of all newspaper readers in Austria. The number of daily copies printed was 1,006,134 in the first half of 2004, according to the Österreichische Auflagenkontrolle (ÖAK). Its political positioning is social right wing and economic left wing. The Kronen Zeitung has often been accused of abusing its near monopoly to manipulate public opinion in Austria. Its many critics blame its populist style and emphasis on the topic of immigration for allegedly spreading fear and hatred among its readers. The paper is also known for being very Eurosceptic. The first issue of the Kronen Zeitung appeared on 2 January 1900. Gustav Davis, a former army officer, was the founder. The name was not an homage to the monarchy (Krone means crown), but refers to the monthly purchase price of one crown. This affordable price was possible because bureaucratic duties on newspapers (Zeitungsstempelgebühr) were abolished on 31 December 1899. The newspaper struggled in its first three years
    6.00
    2 votes
    196
    Berlingske Tidende

    Berlingske Tidende

    • Circulation Areas: Denmark
    • Owner: Det Berlingske Officin
    Berlingske, previously known as Berlingske Tidende (English: Berling's Times), is a Danish national daily newspaper based in Copenhagen. First published on 3 January 1749, it is the oldest Danish newspaper still published and among the oldest newspapers in the world. Berlingske was founded in 1749 by Denmark's Royal Book Printer Ernst Henrich Berling and originally titled Kjøbenhavnske Danske Post-Tidender, then the Berlingskes Politiske- og Avertissements Tidende. In 1936, the newspaper's title was shortened to Berlingske Tidende. With a circulation of about 103,000 copies on weekdays, it is also one of the "big three" broadsheet-quality newspapers in Denmark along with Jyllands-Posten and Politiken. Traditionally itself a broadsheet, Berlingske has been also published in the tabloid/compact format since August 28, 2006. Berlingske has won many awards in recent years. It is the only newspaper in the world to have won the World Press Photo Award four times. It has also won the most prestigious journalistic award in Denmark, the Cavling prize, in 2009. Following a long period of ownership by the Berling family, the whole Berlingske-group was acquired in 1982 by a group of investors
    5.50
    2 votes
    197
    Chicago Tribune

    Chicago Tribune

    • Circulation Areas: McHenry County
    • Owner: Tribune Company
    The Chicago Tribune is a major daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois, United States, and the flagship publication of the Tribune Company. Formerly self-styled as the "World's Greatest Newspaper" (for which WGN radio and television are named), it remains the most read daily newspaper of the Chicago metropolitan area and the Great Lakes region and is currently the eighth largest newspaper in the United States by circulation (and became the second largest under Tribune's ownership after the Chicago Tribune's parent company purchased the Los Angeles Times). Traditionally published as a broadsheet, on January 13, 2009, the Tribune announced it would continue publishing as a broadsheet for home delivery, but would publish in tabloid format for newsstand, news box and commuter station sales. On April 2, 2007, the Tribune Company announced a buy-out plan led by Chicago real estate magnate Sam Zell worth $8.2 billion, associated with a stock buyback at $34 per share, and an Employee Stock Ownership Plan. The deal closed on December 20, 2007, with Zell as the company's new chairman. As part of the deal, the company sold the Chicago Cubs and its properties, including Wrigley Field and a
    5.50
    2 votes
    198
    Louisville Eccentric Observer

    Louisville Eccentric Observer

    • Circulation Areas: Louisville
    The Louisville Eccentric Observer (also called LEO Weekly but widely known as just LEO) is a free weekly newspaper (urban alternative weekly), distributed every Wednesday in over 800 locations throughout the Louisville, Kentucky area, including areas of southern Indiana. The newspaper was founded in 1990 by John Yarmuth, Robert Schulman, Denny Crum (then the coach of the University of Louisville men's basketball team), and two other investors. LEO claims a readership of 153,000. The paper was initially devoted to opinion and commentary, with columns by Crum, Schulman, Yarmuth and former Louisville Courier-Journal writers Mary Cauldwell, and Dudley Saunders. The first issue was distributed in July 1990, began bi-weekly publication on November 1 of that year, and regular weekly publication in April 1993. A free paper, it has always been wholly supported by advertising revenue. Following its conversion to a weekly format in 1993, LEO began publishing a more diverse variety of news and reviews. The paper carries various nationally syndicated columns and features such as Real Astrology, News of the Weird and The New York Times crossword puzzle. However, the reviews of music,
    5.50
    2 votes
    199
    Nerikes Allehanda

    Nerikes Allehanda

    • Circulation Areas: Örebro County
    Nerikes Allehanda (shortened NA) is a daily newspaper based in Örebro, Sweden, and distributed across Örebro County. It was founded in 1843 as a weekly paper and became a daily in 1894. As of 2007, the newspaper has a circulation of 67,600 copies, making it the tenth largest in Sweden. It is owned by the media group LT Liberala Tidningar AB and the stated position of the editorial is "independently liberal". The name Nerikes Allehanda is roughly translated "All of Närke" (allehanda is an older Swedish word meaning "of all sorts/kinds", and Nerike is an older Swedish spelling of Närke). Nerikes Allehanda was founed in 1843 by Otto-Joel Gumaelius and Svante Falk. Falk was the owner of the printing house and Gumaelius, a devoted liberal, became its first editor. The first edition was published on 4 March 1843 and consisted of four pages. The newspaper was only published one day per week in 120 copies. Nerikes Allehanda was transferred into a corporation (Swedish: aktiebolag) in 1888. In 1894, the newspaper started to get published six days per week. It still consisted of four pages but now had a circulation of about 6,000 copies. In 1933, the lawyer Claes Ljung bought a majority of
    5.50
    2 votes
    200
    The Bellingham Herald

    The Bellingham Herald

    • Circulation Areas: Whatcom County
    • Owner: The McClatchy Company
    The Bellingham Herald is the only daily newspaper published in Bellingham, Washington, in the United States. It is currently owned by The McClatchy Company. The Bellingham Herald began publication on March 10, 1890 as the tri-weekly Fairhaven Herald. The newspaper went through several changes in its early years, including temporary suspension and a merger with a competing weekly. In 1900 the newspaper purchased the first linotype on the West Coast. When neighboring communities of Sehome, Whatcom and Fairhaven consolidated into the city of Bellingham in 1903, the paper was first printed as The Bellingham Herald. There were many who filled the roles of publisher and editor over the years but perhaps the most notable was the Sefrit-Carver team under the ownership of Sidney Albert "Sam" Perkins, which began in 1911 and lasted into the 1950s. Federated Publications bought The Herald in 1967. In 1971 Federated Publications merged with Gannett Corporation. The Herald switched to morning delivery in May 1997. Knight Ridder acquired The Bellingham Herald in 2005. Knight Ridder was purchased by McClatchy in 2006. On September 23, 2010 Mark Owings became the Publisher of the Herald; he had
    5.50
    2 votes
    201
    Edmonton Sun

    Edmonton Sun

    • Circulation Areas: Edmonton
    • Owner: Quebecor
    The Edmonton Sun is a daily newspaper published in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. It is a division of Sun Media, a Quebecor company. It began publishing in 1978 and shares many characteristics typical of Sun Media tabloids, including an emphasis on local news stories, its conservative editorial stance, extensive sports coverage, and a daily Sunshine Girl. Once each year, the Edmonton Sun prints a special swimsuit edition. Around Christmas time, they print a holiday lingerie edition.
    4.67
    3 votes
    202
    Avaz

    Avaz

    • Circulation Areas: Sarajevo
    Dnevni Avaz (English: Daily Voice) is a daily newspaper in Bosnia and Herzegovina. It is published in Sarajevo. Dnevni avaz evolved from a monthly publication Bošnjački Avaz which was first published in September 1993. In 1994 it became known simply as Avaz and was published weekly in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Germany. Starting in 1995 it has been published as a daily newspaper competing with Oslobođenje and SAN Daily News. Today, the Dnevni Avaz newspaper is part of the Avaz publishing house, the biggest news house in Bosnia and Herzegovina. As of 2006, the Avaz publishing house was expanded with the start of the construction of the Avaz Twist Tower a 172 m skyscraper in Sarajevo’s Marindvor Business District. The company's former headquarters, the Avaz Business Center (Former Oslobođenje Building), was converted into a highrise hotel, Radon Plaza Hotel (based on the owner's last name Radončić). Dnevni Avaz has published The New York Times International Weekly on Thursdays since 2009. This 8-page supplement features a selection of English language articles from The New York Times.
    6.00
    1 votes
    203
    Black Flag

    Black Flag

    Black Flag is the name of a number of anarchist periodicals, most notably the British anarchist bi-annual magazine Black Flag, mainly known for its coverage of international anarchist politics as well as supporting "class war" prisoners. Black Flag was founded by Albert Meltzer and Stuart Christie in 1970, with the name of the periodical being drawn from the traditional anarchist symbol dating back to the 1880s. It has gone through several format changes between magazine and newspaper, including a period in which it concentrated on investigative journalism. In more recent times, it has evolved into an analytical periodical for the anarchist movement in the UK. The magazine was temporarily suspended as a going operation in 2006 while its future, then in an annual format, was discussed. A new edition came out in time for the London Anarchist Bookfair for 2007, featuring a new look, and a range of new and classic articles. Since 2008, Black Flag has remained a bi-annual 40 page magazine, publishing a May Day edition and one timed for the London Anarchist Bookfair. Alongside regular features from Anarchist FAQ author Iain McKay, Freedom international editor Rob Ray and reviewer Ade
    6.00
    1 votes
    204
    College Tribune

    College Tribune

    • Circulation Areas: Dublin
    The College Tribune is a student newspaper based in University College Dublin. Established in 1989 by one of Ireland's best known print journalists, Vincent Browne, it is UCD's oldest surviving newspaper. It is currently co-edited by Cathal O' Gara and James Granell. The various sections throughout the paper include news, sport, features, opinion, music, books, film, health and fashion. Volume 20 saw the introduction of a full colour entertainment supplement, The Siren. In contrast to the majority of student newspapers, The College Tribune operates independently of college authorities and the students' union, supporting itself through advertising revenue. It is one of the four media outlets in UCD, the others being The University Observer, Belfield FM and the Campus Television Network. It has produced a number of high-profile journalists that can be seen in the national media today. Previous editors include Conor Lally, crime correspondent for The Irish Times, The Sunday Times journalist Richard Oakley, Irish Independent soccer correspondent Daniel McDonnell, Roddy O'Sullivan deputy news editor of The Irish Times, Paul Lynch, film critic of the Sunday Tribune, Emmet Oliver, Deputy
    6.00
    1 votes
    205
    The Coast

    The Coast

    • Circulation Areas: Halifax Regional Municipality
    The Coast is a free weekly newspaper in Halifax Regional Municipality, Canada. The paper distributes 24,000 copies per week throughout the Halifax Regional Municipality. The paper is owned by Coast Publishing Limited. Founded in 1993, The Coast has a generally left wing editorial policy. It focuses on local issues, especially "people working for change" within the community. The Coast is available in Bedford, Lower Sackville, Tantallon, and the Stanfield International Airport, but 75 percent of its readership lives in downtown Halifax and Dartmouth. The paper claims a readership of 61,263. According to a January 2007 Corporate Research Associates metro quarterly survey, 55 percent of The Coast's readers are between 18 and 34 years of age (34.701 readers).
    6.00
    1 votes
    206
    La Nación

    La Nación

    • Circulation Areas: Buenos Aires
    La Nación (Spanish: The Nation) is an Argentine daily newspaper. The country's leading conservative paper, the centrist Clarín is its main competitor. The paper was founded as La Nación Argentina on January 4, 1870, by former Argentine President Bartolomé Mitre and associates; until 1914, the managing editor was José Luis Murature, Foreign Minister of Argentina from 1914-1916. The daily was renamed La Nación on August 28, 1945. Enjoying Latin America's largest readership until the 1930s, its daily circulation averaged around 350,000, and exceeded only by Crítica, a Buenos Aires tabloid. The 1945 launch of Clarín created a new rival, and following the 1962 closure of Crítica, and the 1975 suspension of Crónica, La Nación secured its position as the chief market rival of Clarín. La Nación's daily circulation averaged 160,000 in 2008, and still represented nearly 20% of the daily newspaper circulation in Buenos Aires; the paper is also distributed nationwide and around the world. Some of the most famous writers in the Spanish-speaking world: José Martí, Miguel de Unamuno, Eduardo Mallea, José Ortega y Gasset, Rubén Darío, Alfonso Reyes, Jorge Luis Borges, Mario Vargas Llosa and Manuel
    4.33
    3 votes
    207
    Birmingham Mail

    Birmingham Mail

    • Circulation Areas: Black Country
    • Owner: Trinity Mirror
    The Birmingham Mail is a tabloid newspaper based in Birmingham, UK but distributed around Birmingham, The Black Country, Solihull, Warwickshire and parts of Worcestershire and Staffordshire. The newspaper, which was re-branded from the Birmingham Evening Mail in October 2005, is one of the biggest selling local newspapers in the UK, and the largest in Birmingham. The Mail is published Monday to Saturday in the following editions:- The Sunday Mercury is a sister paper published on a Sunday. The newspaper is currently owned by the Trinity Mirror Group who also owns the Daily Mirror and the Birmingham Post, the weekly business tabloid sold in the Birmingham area. The current Birmingham Mail editor is David Brookes, who is also Editor-in-Chief of the Birmingham Post and Sunday Mercury. The former Editor of the newspaper was Steve Dyson, who held the role from 2005 until 2010. The paper hits the streets at 06:00 and is on sale until the end of the day. The advertising deadlines are up until 17:00 to get into the next day's edition.
    5.00
    2 votes
    208
    Deseret Morning News

    Deseret Morning News

    • Circulation Areas: Salt Lake City
    • Owner: Deseret Management Corporation
    The Deseret News is a newspaper published in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States, and is Utah's oldest continuously published daily newspaper. It has the second largest daily circulation in the state behind The Salt Lake Tribune. The Deseret News is owned by Deseret News Publishing Company, a subsidiary of Deseret Management Corporation, which is a for-profit business holdings company owned by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The newspaper is printed by Newspaper Agency Corporation, which it co-owns with the MediaNews Group-owned newspaper The Salt Lake Tribune under a joint operating agreement. As of 2006, combined circulation of the two papers was 151,422. The Deseret News also publishes a weekly tabloid-sized insert, the Church News, and the Mormon Times insert, both of which are included in the newspaper (in the Saturday and the Thursday editions, respectively); the two inserts are also distributed as a separate publication outside of Utah. Church News includes news of the LDS Church and has been published since 1931, while the Mormon Times is about "the people, faith and culture associated with the church". Since 1974 the Deseret News has also published the
    5.00
    2 votes
    209
    Skagway News

    Skagway News

    • Circulation Areas: Skagway
    The Skagway News is a newspaper published once a month in January, then twice a month for the rest of the year in Skagway, Alaska. The paper was established in 1897 and published until 1904, then revived in 1978. The paper is usually available on the second and fourth Friday of the month.
    5.00
    2 votes
    210
    The Age

    The Age

    • Circulation Areas: South Australia
    • Owner: John Fairfax Holdings
    The Age is a daily broadsheet newspaper which has been published in Melbourne, Australia, since 1854. Owned and published by Fairfax Media, The Age primarily serves Victoria but is also available for purchase in Tasmania, the Australian Capital Territory and border regions of South Australia and southern New South Wales. It is delivered in both hardcopy and online formats. The newspaper shares many articles with other Fairfax Media metropolitan daily newspapers, such as The Sydney Morning Herald. The Age was founded by three Melbourne businessmen, the brothers John Cooke and Henry Cooke, who had arrived from New Zealand in the 1840s, and Walter Powell. The first edition appeared on 17 October 1854. As of June 2011, The Age had an average weekday circulation of 190,600, increasing to 275,000 on Saturdays (in a city of 4 million). The Sunday Age had a circulation of 225,400. The paper advertised that its Monday-to-Friday readership averaged 668,000, increasing to 857,000 on Saturdays and 695,000 for the The Sunday Age. The management board announced on 18 June 2012 that during the following three years 1,900 positions were expected to be terminated from Fairfax Media, including many
    4.50
    2 votes
    211
    Commonweal

    Commonweal

    • Circulation Areas: United Kingdom
    Commonweal was a British socialist newspaper founded in 1885 by the newborn Socialist League. Its aims were to spread socialistic views and to win over new recruits. William Morris, founder of the League, was its chief writer, money finder and "responsible head". John Turner, Ernest Belfort Bax and Eleanor Marx also regularly contributed articles. Its publishing office was at Great Queen Street, London. In 1890, Morris resigned as editor and was replaced by the anarchist David Nicholl. Nicholl published an article on the Walsall Anarchists, and in May 1892 was sentenced to eighteen months hard labour. H. B. Samuels then became acting editor. On Nicholl's release, the paper was closed and replaced by The Anarchist. Historian Alex Butterworth believes that the staff of Commonweal "may have consisted entirely of informants, unbeknownst to each other," although "[e]ven today, with unprecedented access to police files, Butterworth is often unsure who was reporting back to the cops."
    5.00
    1 votes
    212
    Hallands Nyheter

    Hallands Nyheter

    • Circulation Areas: Falkenberg
    Hallands Nyheter is a Swedish newspaper, founded by Artur Lagerihn in 1905. The newspaper is published in Falkenberg. It has a daily circulation of 31,600 and is owned by Stampen. The editorial page supports Centerpartiet. It is printed six days a week, daily except Sunday. The paper employs about 150 people and has annual revenue of 130 million Swedish kronor. Bengt Wendle is the CEO, while AnnaKarin Lith is chief editor. It is mainly distributed in the municipalities of Falkenberg and Varberg, where over 70% of the households subscribe. The paper has editorial offices in Falkenberg, Varberg, Kungsbacka and Halmstad. It is distributed as a talking magazine as well. Stampen bought it from Centertidningar AB in 2005. Originally published under the label Falkenbergs-Posten, it changed its name to Hallands Nyheter in 1919. The newspaper started as Falkenbergs-Posten and was initially an advertising brochure. It was set up by a printer, Artur Lagerihn, who published the first number on 2 October 1905. Before that, he had printed three specimen copies, starting on 13 September. The paper changed form to become a usual newspaper after just a few copies. It was then printed three times a
    5.00
    1 votes
    213
    Jewish Herald-Voice

    Jewish Herald-Voice

    • Circulation Areas: Houston
    The Jewish Herald-Voice is a weekly community newspaper serving the Jewish community of Texas' Gulf Coast. Established in 1908, it bills itself as the longest-running Jewish paper in the Southwest. Known as the Herald, it is subscribed to by approximately 7,000 households, and claims a readership of more than 30,000. The paper is owned by the Samuels family, also publishers, and is edited by Michael Duke. In 2001, a group of volunteers from the Greater Houston Jewish Genealogical Society began indexing all "life-cycle information" — announcements of births, engagements, marriages, deaths, and burials — for use in historical and genealogical projects. As of August, 2011, the index database included all events from the beginning of the paper's publication through June 2011.
    5.00
    1 votes
    214
    La Crosse Tribune

    La Crosse Tribune

    • Circulation Areas: La Crosse County
    • Owner: Lee Enterprises
    The La Crosse Tribune is a newspaper published in La Crosse, Wisconsin, covering the tri-state area of Wisconsin, Iowa, and Minnesota in the USA. The La Crosse Tribune was founded in 1904 as a result of public dissatisfaction and distrust created by a light and power monopoly in La Crosse. The Tribune has been at 401 N. Third St. in downtown La Crosse since moving into a new building in 1973. The building was in the mid-1990s to accommodate a regional distribution center. It is part of the River Valley Newspaper Group which includes:
    5.00
    1 votes
    215
    McGill Daily

    McGill Daily

    • Circulation Areas: Montreal
    The McGill Daily is a campus newspaper created and run by students of McGill University in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. The paper was first published in 1911. The paper was originally published daily, but is now issued twice a week. It began as a broadsheet that covered mainly sports and it retained the broadsheet format for many years, but it now publishes in the tabloid format and covers a range of topics and genres in its pages. The paper's main sections are News, Culture, Commentary, Health & Education, Features, Compendium!, Science & Technology, and Sports. The paper is generally considered a farther left voice on the McGill campus, compared to the more centrist McGill Tribune, and the other faculty-produced papers such as the The Bull & Bear. The Daily generally endorses left-wing student candidates, and backs grassroots student activism and direct action. Much of its features coverage is devoted to issues of social justice, accessibility, and inequality. However, the paper's longstanding policy of publishing almost all letters means that dissenting points of view and lively debate occur within the newspaper's pages. The McGill Daily is one of Canada's oldest university
    5.00
    1 votes
    216
    Palo Alto Daily News

    Palo Alto Daily News

    • Circulation Areas: Menlo Park
    • Owner: MediaNews Group
    The Daily News, originally the Palo Alto Daily News, is a free daily newspaper owned by MediaNews Group and located in Menlo Park. It was formerly published seven days a week and at one point had a circulation of 67,000 (a figure that included five zoned editions which no longer exist). The Daily News is distributed in red newspaper racks and in stores, coffee shops, restaurants, schools and major workplaces. As of April 7, 2009 the paper ceased to be published as The Palo Alto Daily News and was consolidated with other San Francisco Peninsula Daily News titles. They publish five days a week, Tuesday through Saturday. Weekday editions are delivered to selected homes. Originally, the Daily News had a distinctive format with pages that were 16 inches long and 10.75 inches wide, dimensions which were thought to make the Daily News easier to hold than traditional broadsheet papers, but allow more stories to be published per page than a typical tabloid. On May 5, 2009, the paper went to a smaller page size (11-1/4 by 11-3/8 inches) to save money. "The change also brands our newspaper as different than the local competition, and makes it easier for our on-the-go readers to carry around,"
    5.00
    1 votes
    217
    San Angelo Standard-Times

    San Angelo Standard-Times

    • Circulation Areas: Tom Green County
    • Owner: E. W. Scripps Company
    San Angelo Standard-Times is a daily newspaper based in San Angelo, Texas, USA, since 1884. It is owned by the newspaper group, The E.W. Scripps Company. The newspaper was established in 1884 by J. G. Murphy, the city's second mayor. Mr. Murphy sold the paper in the 1920s to Houston H. Harte. In 1924 it became one of the two original flagships of the Harte-Hanks newspaper chain. Scripps began operating the newspaper in 1997 after purchasing it from Harte-Hanks. The Western novelist Elmer Kelton began his career in 1948 as the farm-and-ranch editor at the Standard-Times.
    5.00
    1 votes
    218
    The Chicago Reader

    The Chicago Reader

    • Circulation Areas: Chicago
    • Owner: Creative Loafing
    The Chicago Reader is an American alternative weekly newspaper in Chicago, Illinois, noted for its literary style of journalism and coverage of the arts, particularly film and theater. It was founded by a group of friends from Carleton College. The Reader is recognized as a pioneer among alternative weeklies for both its creative nonfiction and its commercial scheme. Richard Karpel, then-executive director of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, wrote: [T]he most significant historical event in the creation of the modern alt-weekly occurred in Chicago in 1971, when the Chicago Reader pioneered the practice of free circulation, a cornerstone of today's alternative papers. The Reader also developed a new kind of journalism, ignoring the news and focusing on everyday life and ordinary people. The Reader, as it is commonly known, is dated every Thursday and distributed free on Wednesday and Thursday via street boxes and cooperating retail outlets. As of March 2009, the paper claimed more than 1,900 locations in the Chicago metropolitan area and an audited circulation of 100,000. In July 2007, the paper and its sibling, Washington City Paper, were sold to Creative Loafing,
    5.00
    1 votes
    219
    The Dominion Post

    The Dominion Post

    • Circulation Areas: Wellington
    • Owner: John Fairfax Holdings
    The Dominion Post is a metropolitan broadsheet newspaper published in Wellington, New Zealand, owned by the Australian Fairfax group, owners of The Age, Melbourne, and The Sydney Morning Herald. The Dominion Post was created by the previous owners, Independent Newspapers Limited (INL, 49% owned by Rupert Murdoch's News Limited), from an amalgamation of two Wellington broadsheet newspapers, The Dominion (morning, commenced Dominion Day, 26 September 1907) and its better selling evening sibling The Evening Post (commenced 8 February 1865), in July 2002. INL sold the paper and all other New Zealand newspapers and most magazines in its stable to Fairfax in 2003. With the amalgamation, The Dominion Post became the only pay-and-read newspaper in Wellington. Wellington has many free community newspapers (for example The Wellingtonian), albeit these may be owned by Dominion Post or affiliated/owning companies.
    5.00
    1 votes
    220
    The News & Observer

    The News & Observer

    • Circulation Areas: Raleigh
    • Owner: The McClatchy Company
    The News & Observer is the regional daily newspaper of the Research Triangle area of the U.S. State of North Carolina. The N&O, as it is popularly called, is based in Raleigh and also covers Durham, Cary, and Chapel Hill. The paper also has substantial readership in most of the state east of Winston-Salem. It is the state's second-largest newspaper, after The Charlotte Observer. The paper has won three Pulitzer Prizes, most recently in 1996 for a computer-assisted investigation of the North Carolina hog industry. The News & Observer Publishing Co. also publishes several non-daily local newspapers,including The Cary News, The Chapel Hill News, the Southwest Wake News, and The Herald in Johnston County. The newspaper became an online service provider and offered one of the first World Wide Web news sites with Nando.net in 1994. In 1995, the paper was bought by McClatchy Co. of Sacramento, California. The publisher is Orage Quarles, who was named the nation's outstanding publisher by Editor and Publisher magazine in 2002. In 2007, John Drescher was named executive editor, succeeding Melanie Sill. The paper has a daily circulation of approximately 176,000, and a Sunday circulation of
    5.00
    1 votes
    221
    The Phoenix Press

    The Phoenix Press

    • Circulation Areas: Bell Gardens
    The Phoenix Press is an independent newspaper in Bell Gardens, California. It is the brainchild of current and former reporters and editors of the Lancer Scroll in Bell Gardens High School. Currently, the paper runs bi-weekly in a 1 page (front and back) newsletter format. While the majority of the circulation and articles are directed towards students and teachers of Bell Gardens High School, the Phoenix Press claims no affiliation with the school, instead aligning itself with the city of Bell Gardens and its neighboring area. Because of this, the Phoenix Press does not receive any sanctioned school funds. Instead it is funded by those who work on it and by private donations and advertisement. The name Phoenix Press finds its roots in the mythology of the Phoenix. When Huerta and Rodriguez were still a part of the Lancer Scroll, upon working on the first 2006-2007 issue, they discovered that the new direction of the Lancer Scroll totally disregarded the teachings and the standards that Lancer Scroll had become known for in years past. This "new" Lancer Scroll that was being imposed by the new Editors-in-Chief did not sit well Huerta, Rodriguez and various staff members. In
    5.00
    1 votes
    222
    Cumberland Times-News

    Cumberland Times-News

    • Circulation Areas: Cumberland
    • Owner: Community Newspaper Holdings
    The Cumberland Times-News is a seven-day morning daily newspaper serving Cumberland, Maryland, USA, and the surrounding areas of Allegany and Garrett counties in Maryland, and Mineral County in West Virginia. In addition to its Cumberland headquarters, the newspaper maintained satellite bureaus in Frostburg and McHenry, Maryland, and in Keyser, West Virginia. The last of these, the Keyser bureau, closed in March 2009 in order to cut costs for the newspaper. Times-News staff also put out a subscription-based weekend edition covering business and politics throughout the region and state. Thomson Newspapers bought the Times-News in 1986 from the McMullen family. Community Newspaper Holdings acquired the Times-News in 2000.
    4.00
    1 votes
    223
    Golden Era

    Golden Era

    • Circulation Areas: San Francisco
    The Golden Era was a 19th century San Francisco newspaper that featured the writing of Mark Twain, Bret Harte, Charles Warren Stoddard (writing at first as "Pip Pepperpod"), Fitz Hugh Ludlow, Adah Isaacs Menken and Ada Clare. The Golden Era began in 1852 as a weekly founded by Rollin Daggett and J. Macdonough Foard. In 1860 it was sold to James Brooks and Joseph E. Lawrence, and became more literary. Harr Wagner bought the weekly in 1882. In January 1886, Wagner changed to monthly publication, and hired Joaquin Miller as editor. Wagner married poet Madge Morris who was already a contributor, and her contributions became more numerous. In 1887, Wagner moved the periodical to San Diego, California—city officials enticed him with a $5,000 subsidy.
    4.00
    1 votes
    224
    JoongAng Ilbo

    JoongAng Ilbo

    • Circulation Areas: South Korea
    JoongAng Ilbo is a newspaper published in Seoul, South Korea. It is one of the "big three newspapers" in South Korea. It has a circulation of 1.96 million copies in South Korea (as of 2004). Its average page count per copy is around 52. The paper also publishes an English edition, Korea JoongAng Daily, in alliance with the International Herald Tribune. First published on September 22, 1965 by Lee Byung-chul, the founder of Samsung Group. Once it owned Tongyang Broadcasting Company (TBC), which was also one of Samsung company. In 1980, JoongAng Ilbo gave up TBC and TBC merged with KBS. JoongAng Ilbo pioneered the use in South Korea of horizontal copy layout, topical sections, and specialist reporters with investigative reporting teams. Since April 15, 1995, JoongAng Ilbo has been laid out horizontally. At that time it also became a morning newspaper. The Korea JoongAng Daily is the English language version of the newspaper, and it is one of three English-language daily newspapers in South Korea, along with The Korea Times and The Korea Herald. It runs mainly news and feature stories by staff reporters, and some stories translated from the Korean language newspaper. The Korea
    4.00
    1 votes
    225
    Las Últimas Noticias

    Las Últimas Noticias

    • Circulation Areas: Santiago
    Las Últimas Noticias (Spanish: "The Latest News") is a Chilean, daily middle market tabloid newspaper owned by El Mercurio SAP; This company publishes various newspapers for a different audience: El Mercurio people look up to and ability to view, mainly close to the reading, La Segunda mainly a diary of "synthesis" news and evening edition, and Las Últimas Noticias is made profile tabloid, focused mainly on entertainment and gossip, so it is one of the best-selling newspapers in the country. The newspaper was founded on November 15, 1902 by the owner of El Mercurio, Agustín Edwards Mac Clure, after having made a trip to the United States as to the progress of the press. From that trip, Edwards would implement a series of reforms in his company, starting with the transformation of El Mercurio in morning newspaper, and creating Las Últimas Noticias de El Mercurio (The Latest News of El Mercurio) Posted afternoon. The first director of Las Últimas Noticias was the writer Joaquín Diaz Garcés. In 1928, Las Últimas Noticias went from broadsheet to tabloid format. In 1931, the overabundance of information generated during the fall of President Carlos Ibáñez del Campo, necessitated the
    4.00
    1 votes
    226
    Leeds Student

    Leeds Student

    • Circulation Areas: Leeds
    • Owner: Leeds University Union
    Leeds Student is a British weekly student newspaper, published free every Friday during term-time and distributed around the University of Leeds, Leeds, England. The only paid position is that of the editor, who is elected yearly by members of Leeds University Union. The articles are written by students, and are largely about local and student based issues. It is one of the country's most active university newspapers and regularly wins national student media awards. Leeds Student was formed in 1970 by the merger of the Leeds University Union newspaper (Union News) and the then Leeds Polytechnic Students Union newspaper ("Pact"), but in November 2005 Leeds Metropolitan University students voted to disaffiliate from Leeds Student, citing under-representation. Once known as an LUU 'Incorporated Body' along with RAG, Action, Nightline and LSRfm.com it now falls in the 'media' section of the student activities department along with LSRfm.com, LS:TV, Photography Society, Lippy Magazine, Leeds Review and Film Making Society. The editorship became a full-time, paid sabbatical position in 1972 after a campaign led by the then editor, Paul Vallely CMG, who went on to become the first
    4.00
    1 votes
    227
    Malayala Manorama

    Malayala Manorama

    • Circulation Areas: Kerala
    Malayala Manorama (Malayalam: മലയാള മനോരമ) is a daily newspaper, in Malayalam language, published in the state of Kerala, India. According to World Association of Newspapers, as of 2008, it holds a position as top 26 most circulating newspaper in the world (third largest circulating newspapers in India behind The Times of India and Dainik Jagran and most widely read daily in Kerala). It was first published as a weekly on 14 March 1890, and currently has a readership of over 20 million (with a circulation base of over 1.9 million copies). The Malayalam word "manorama" roughly translates to "entertainer". The Week (India), an Indian weekly, is also brought out by the Manorama Group. Manorama Yearbook is another yearly publication by the Kottayam–Kozhikode-based Manorama Group. It has 32 publications all over India in five languages (English, Hindi, Malayalam, Tamil and Bengali). A joint stock publishing company, destined to acquire the status of the first joint stock publishing company of Republic of India, was incorporated by in 1888 by Kandathil Varghese Mappillai at Kottayam, then a small town in the Kingdom of Travancore, currently, a part of Kerala state, India. The first issue
    4.00
    1 votes
    228
    The Boston Globe

    The Boston Globe

    • Circulation Areas: Boston
    • Owner: The New York Times Company
    • Issues: The Boston Globe, Nov 30, 2000
    The Boston Globe (and the Boston Sunday Globe) is an American daily newspaper based in Boston, Massachusetts. The Boston Globe has been owned by The New York Times Company since 1993. Its chief print rival is the Boston Herald. The Boston Globe has won 21 Pulitzer Prizes. The Boston Globe was founded in 1872 by six Boston businessmen, led by Eben Jordan, who jointly invested $150,000. The first issue was published on March 4, 1872 and cost four cents. Originally a morning daily, it began Sunday publication in 1877. In 1878, The Boston Globe started an afternoon edition called The Boston Evening Globe, which ceased publication in 1979. The Boston Globe was a private company until 1973 when it went public under the name Affiliated Publications. It continued to be managed by the descendants of Charles H. Taylor. In 1993, The New York Times Company purchased Affiliated Publications for US$1.1 billion, making The Boston Globe a wholly owned subsidiary of The New York Times' parent. The Jordan and Taylor families received substantial New York Times Company stock, but the last Taylor family members left management in 2000–2001. Boston.com, the online edition of Boston Globe was launched
    4.00
    1 votes
    229
    The Hindu

    The Hindu

    • Circulation Areas: India
    The Hindu is an English-language Indian daily newspaper founded and continuously published from Chennai since 1878. According to the Indian Readership Survey in 2012 it is the third most widely read English newspaper in India (after the Times of India and Hindustan Times) with a readership of 2.2 million people. The Hindu has its largest base of circulation in southern India, especially in the states of Tamil Nadu and Kerala and it is also the most widely read English daily in Tamil Nadu and Kerala. Headquartered at Chennai (formerly called Madras), The Hindu was published weekly when it was launched in 1878, and started publishing daily in 1889. According to the Audit Bureau of Circulations, it has a circulation of 1.46 million copies as of December 2009. The enterprise employed over 1,600 workers and annual turnover reached almost $200 million in 2010. Subscription and advertisement are major sources of income. The Hindu became, in 1995, the first Indian newspaper to offer an online edition. It is printed at 17 locations— Chennai, Coimbatore, Bangalore, Hyderabad, Madurai, Noida, Visakhapatnam, Thiruvananthapuram, Kochi, Vijayawada, Mangaluru, Tiruchirapalli, Kolkata, Hubli,
    4.00
    1 votes
    230
    The Observer

    The Observer

    • Circulation Areas: United Kingdom
    • Owner: Guardian Media Group
    • Issues: The Observer, 18 Jan 2004
    The Observer is a British newspaper, published on Sundays. In the same place on the political spectrum as its daily sister paper The Guardian, which acquired it in 1993, it takes a social liberal or social democratic line on most issues. First published in 1791, it is the world's oldest Sunday newspaper. The first issue, published on 4 December 1791 by W.S. Bourne, was the world's first Sunday newspaper. Believing that the paper would be a means of wealth, Bourne instead soon found himself facing debts of nearly £1,600. Though early editions purported editorial independence, Bourne attempted to cut his losses and sell the title to the government. When this failed, Bourne's brother (a wealthy businessman) made an offer to the government, which also refused to buy the paper but agreed to subsidise it in return for influence over its editorial content. As a result, the paper soon took a strong line against radicals such as Thomas Paine, Francis Burdett and Joseph Priestley. In 1807, the brothers decided to relinquish editorial control, naming Lewis Doxat as the new editor. Seven years later, the brothers sold The Observer to William Innell Clement, a newspaper proprietor who owned a
    4.00
    1 votes
    231
    A Semana

    A Semana

    • Circulation Areas: Cape Verde
    A Semana (Portuguese meaning The Week) is a weekly Cape Verdean daily that covers its top stories in the archipelago and local stories ranging from each island. A Semana is located in the Cape Verdean capital city of Praia and is one of the most circulated newspapers and dailies in Cape Verde. It was founded in 1991 and is published. A Semana also features sports, weather, businesses and entertainment. A Semana features a special section called Kriolidadi or Kriolidade, it is dedicated to Cape Verdean entertainment and culture, Kriolidadi is circulated weekly. The front page is displayed on the top-left of its homepage. A Semana also features since 2006 online at asemana.publ.cv news stories, newspaper pictures and sports from 2005 as well as Kriolidadi in pdf form with information and stories. The left section of the homepage features news from Cape Verde and its inhabited islands and the world, sports and weather from cities around the world.
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    0 votes
    232
    Cherwell

    Cherwell

    • Circulation Areas: Oxford
    • Owner: Oxford Student Publications Limited
    Cherwell (/ˈtʃɑrwɛl/ CHAR-well) is an independent newspaper, largely published for students of Oxford University. First published in 1920, it has had an online edition since 1996. Named after the local river, Cherwell is published by OSPL (Oxford Student Publications Ltd.), who also publish the sister publication ISIS along with the Etcetera Supplement and Bang! Science magazine. One of the oldest student publications in the UK, it is editorially independent and has been the launching pad for many well known journalistic and business careers. The newspaper has a commercial business team, receives no university funding and is independent of the student union. The current editors are Grace Goddard and Barbara Speed. Cherwell was conceived by two Balliol College students, Cecil Binney and George Edinger, on a ferry from Dover to Ostend during the summer vacation of 1920 while the students were travelling to Vienna to do relief work for the Save the Children charity. Edinger recalls the early newspaper having a radical voice: "We were feeling for a new Oxford… We were anti-convention, anti-Pre War values, Pro-Feminist. We did not mind shocking and we often did." Nonetheless, early
    0.00
    0 votes
    233
    Chugoku Shimbun

    Chugoku Shimbun

    • Circulation Areas: Yamaguchi Prefecture
    The Chugoku Shimbun (中国新聞, Chūgoku Shinbun) is a Japanese local daily newspaper based in Hiroshima. It serves the Chūgoku region of Japan with a market share in Hiroshima, Yamaguchi, Shimane, Okayama and Tottori Prefectures. The newspaper publishes morning paper and evening editions. The morning paper has a daily circulation of 646,908. And the evening paper has a daily circulation of 40,648. "The Daily Chugoku" was established on May 5, 1892 in Hiroshima and was founded by its editor, Saburo Yamamoto. In 1908, the newspaper changed its name to "The Chugoku Shimbun", which translates to "Middle Country Newspaper" (geographically, Hiroshima is near the middle of the Japanese archipelago). The Chugoku Shimbun lost 113 employees and the building and equipment were completely destroyed by the A-Bomb on August 6, 1945. They had restarted publishing on August 9 by asking other newspapers help.
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    0 votes
    234
    Dagens Nyheter

    Dagens Nyheter

    • Circulation Areas: Sweden
    • Owner: Bonnier
    Dagens Nyheter (help·info) (DN) (Swedish: lit. "today's news") is a daily newspaper in Sweden. It has the largest circulation of Swedish morning newspapers, followed by Göteborgs-Posten and Svenska Dagbladet, and is the only morning newspaper that is distributed to subscribers across the whole country. In 2009 DN had a circulation of 316,000, reaching 881 000 people every day. Opinion leaders often choose "DN" as the venue for publishing major opinion editorials. The stated position of the editorial page is "independently liberal". It is published in Stockholm and aspires to full national and international coverage. DN was founded by Rudolf Wall. The first issue was published on 23 December 1864. The format was completely changed from the classic broadsheet to tabloid on 5 October 2004. Dagens Nyheter operated from the so-called 'DN-skrapan' (the DN-skyscraper) in Sweden. This was completed in 1964 and was designed by architect Paul Hedqvist. It is 84 metres (276 ft.) tall and has 27 floors, none of which are underground. In 1996 the entire enterprise moved to its current location on Gjörwellsgatan, which is adjacent to the old ‘DN-skrapan’. The newspaper Expressen is also located
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    235
    Deccan Herald

    Deccan Herald

    • Circulation Areas: Mangalore
    Deccan Herald is a leading English-language daily newspaper in the Indian state of Karnataka. It is published by the Printers (Mysore) Private Limited and has a number of editions in Bangalore, Hubli, Mysore, Mangalore, Gulbarga and Delhi. Deccan Herald was started in 1948, with the famous journalist Pothan Joseph as its founding editor. Its sister publications are the Prajavani daily newspaper, the weekly magazine Sudha and the monthly magazine Mayura, all of which are published in Kannada. The head office of the Deccan Herald is on MG Road, Bangalore. For the first quarter (Q1) of 2011, according to the Indian Readership Survey, Deccan Herald recorded an average daily readership of 423,000 (based on whether the respondent had read the newspaper the previous day). The ABC certified figures for the first half of 2009 put the daily paid circulation (number of bought copies as opposed to number of copies read) at 214,797. The launch of its Delhi edition in December 2011 marked Deccan Herald's first venture outside of Karnataka, though the paper admits that it will find it very hard to compete in what is India's most competitive newspaper market with 15 newspapers on the market
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    236
    El Acil

    El Acil

    • Circulation Areas: Constantine
    El Acil: in (Arabic: الأصيل‎) means The Authentic is an Algerian daily newspaper in French language published in Constantine, the capital of the North east of Algeria. It was established on the 1993 by young journalist it belong to EURL Inter-Med-Info group which own Al Acil in Arabic and L'Authentic another French newspaper. El Acil manager is Nacer TAFRAOUT, and the Editor is Abdelkrim Zerzouri.
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    0 votes
    237
    Eleftherotypia

    Eleftherotypia

    • Circulation Areas: Greece
    Eleftherotypia (Greek: Ελευθεροτυπία meaning "freedom of the press") was a daily newspaper published in Athens (Greece). It was one of the most widely circulated newspapers in the country. Eleftherotypia also publishes a Sunday edition Kyriakatiki Eleftherotypia (Greek: Κυριακάτικη Ελευθεροτυπία). It was first published in 1975. Breaking the trend of Greek press, it was originally owned by its journalists. It was eventually taken over by the Tegopoulos brothers, and was published by businessman Thanasis Tegopoulos, retaining its traditional socialist domestic and international stance. Eleftherotypia editors often adopted a social-democratic stance on a number of issues, but more radical viewpoints are also frequently represented in the paper, to a notably greater extent than in centre-left daily To Vima. The newspaper was often supportive of the Panhellenic Socialist Movement (PASOK) party, however it had also criticized the party during its time in office. The Saturday and Sunday editions of Eleftherotypia, usually featured articles by a group of journalists, who collectively use the name the "Ios" (Greek "Ιος" meaning "virus"). The Ios were known for targeting and heavily
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    238
    Homer Tribune

    Homer Tribune

    • Circulation Areas: Homer
    The Homer Tribune is a weekly newspaper published every Wednesday in Homer, Alaska. It has been independently owned and operated since 1991 .
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    239
    MX

    MX

    • Circulation Areas: Brisbane
    • Owner: News Corporation
    mX is an Australian free afternoon daily newspaper in the cities of Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane, owned and produced by News Limited. Targeted at commuters, its main channels of distribution are inner-city railway stations, tram and bus stops, and major CBD intersections. The first mX was published in Melbourne on Tuesday 6 February 2001, hoping to capitalise on the Metro format, popular in Europe. The paper contains lighter news and sports articles, often containing strange stories and facts from around the world (under the headings "Nice One" and, "What The?"). The newspaper's approach is a much greater focus on entertainment than news than broadsheet newspapers, or even other tabloids. Melbourne Express, published by rival Fairfax Media, was this paper's competitor. Initially it used the same format, although it was released in the mornings rather than the afternoon. It began publication the day before mX, but was soon overtaken due to mX's much broader use of colour, its greater availability, and its lighter tone. In addition, mX had no explanation at its launch, allowing readers to assume that it stood for "Melbourne Express" and that it was the paper known by that name.
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    240
    Östgöta Correspondenten

    Östgöta Correspondenten

    • Circulation Areas: Linköping
    Östgöta Correspondenten (Corren) is a daily newspaper in Sweden. It is published in Linköping and has a circulation of about 60 000 copies every day. The stated position of the editorial page is liberal conservative. Östgöta Correspondenten was first published in 1838. Corren was controlled by the Ridderstad family for 168 years, but was sold to NT (Norrköpings Tidningar) in 2008 for SEK 700 million.
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    241
    Pleasanton Weekly

    Pleasanton Weekly

    • Circulation Areas: Pleasanton
    The Pleasanton Weekly is a weekly newspaper published in Pleasanton, California, established in 2000. It is published by Embarcadero Publishing Company, and the editor is Jeb Bing. The newspaper also maintains an online version on its web site, including a classified advertising section (fogster.com) shared among Embarcadero's other publications. The Pleasanton Weekly is distributed free to all households and businesses in Pleasanton, as well as via pickup boxes in the downtown area and shopping centers. Circulation is approximately 18,000. The newspaper won awards for best lifestyle coverage in 2001-2003 from the California Newspaper Publishers Association. Official site
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    242
    San Francisco Daily

    San Francisco Daily

    • Circulation Areas: San Francisco
    The Daily Post (Formerly known as the San Francisco Daily) is a free newspaper based in the San Francisco, California area. The Daily Post is owned by Dave Price and Jim Pavelich, who were the publishers of the Palo Alto Daily News and its sister papers in San Mateo, Burlingame, Los Gatos, Redwood City and Berkeley. They sold that chain of newspapers to Knight Ridder on Feb. 15, 2005. Joining Price and Pavelich as owners is Amando Mendoza, former circulation director of the Palo Alto Daily News.
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    243
    Street Sheet

    Street Sheet

    • Circulation Areas: San Francisco
    • Owner: Coalition on Homelessness
    The Street Sheet is a street newspaper published and sold in San Francisco, California which focuses on the problems of homeless people in the city, and on issues of poverty and housing. Founded in 1989, the Street Sheet is second only to the Street News as the oldest extant street newspaper in the United States and currently has the largest circulation of a street newspaper with 32,000 papers distributed monthly. The Coalition on Homelessness publishes the newspaper, and vendors distribute the paper on the streets of San Francisco, usually in exchange for a one-dollar donation. The one millionth copy was sold in 1993.
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    244
    Sunderland Echo

    Sunderland Echo

    • Circulation Areas: City of Sunderland
    • Owner: Johnston Press
    The Sunderland Echo is an evening newspaper serving the Sunderland, South Tyneside and East Durham areas of North East England. The newspaper was founded by Samuel Storey, Edward Backhouse, Edward Temperley Gourley, Charles Palmer, Richard Ruddock, Thomas Glaholm and Thomas Scott Turnbull in 1873, as the Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette. Designed to provide a platform for the Radical views held by Storey and his partners, it was also Sunderland's first local daily paper. The inaugural edition of the Echo was printed in Press Lane, Sunderland on 22 December 1873; 1,000 copies were produced and sold for a halfpenny each. The Echo survived intense competition in its early years, as well as the depression of the 1930s and two World Wars. Sunderland was heavily bombed in the Second World War and, although the Echo building was undamaged, it was forced to print its competitor's paper under wartime rules. It was during this time that the paper's format changed, from a broadsheet to its current tabloid layout, because of national newsprint shortages. The Echo is published Monday–Saturday by Northeast Press and is part of the Johnston Press group—one of the United Kingdom's
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    245
    The Berry

    The Berry

    • Circulation Areas: Cambridge
    The Berry is the only political newspaper at Cambridge University, England. In its print form, like The Cambridge Student and Varsity it had a distribution of 10,000. In 2009-10 it was relaunched as an online newspaper, 'The Berry Online', providing Cambridge students with their only regular forum for political debate. Just as berries can be red, blue, yellow, black and almost any other colour, this paper was created to address the concerns of students of all political beliefs. Originally a joint project between CULC and CUCA, the paper has expanded to include contributors from all political persuasions. It aims to remain unbiased while removing the anti-political slant of so much modern media. In the past, the Cambridge Union was seen as being relatively right wing (see Cambridge Mafia) and the Cambridge University Students' Union seen as left wing. In this context, the Berry's pan-political project is one which self-consciously attempts to broaden political debate outside any one traditional constituency. The paper was launched in October, 2005, by Laurie Fitzjohn-Sykes, then chairman of CUCA, to challenge the political apathy then prevalent among the university's students. While
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    246
    The Clinic

    The Clinic

    • Circulation Areas: Santiago
    The Clinic is a Chilean satirical/investigative newspaper founded by Patricio Fernández Chadwick in November 1998. The paper includes a wide mix of cultural criticism, jokes, in-depth interviews, and investigative work. The name was inspired by Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet's October 1998 arrest in Britain at The London Clinic, which bears the name The Clinic on its façade. In its first incarnation, it was only a few pages long, distributed only within Santiago, and costing 100 pesos (US¢22 at the time). Over the years, it has changed drastically, and now costs 900 pesos (US$1.80 in 2012) and averages forty pages. Today, it is published every Thursday during normal operation times (it usually takes February off) and published its 262nd edition on October 2, 2008. One of its humor features is done in a style reminiscent of Sergio Aragones' marginal cartoons in Mad Magazine: at the bottom of each page (except the covers), the statement Sabía usted que...( Did you know that...?) is printed and followed by a remark which can be obscene, witty, snarky, or impenetrable, but is always very short. Another hallmark of the people is its "shocking" covers, which often contain near-nudity
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    247
    The Village Voice

    The Village Voice

    • Circulation Areas: New York City
    • Owner: Village Voice Media
    The Village Voice is a free weekly newspaper and news and features website in New York City that features investigative articles, analysis of current affairs and culture, arts and music coverage, and events listings for New York City. It is also distributed throughout the United States on a pay basis. It was the first of the big-city tabloids that came to be known as alternative weeklies. The Voice was launched by Ed Fancher, Dan Wolf, John Wilcock, and Norman Mailer on October 26, 1955 from a two-bedroom apartment in Greenwich Village, which was its initial coverage area, expanding to other parts of the city by the 1960s. The offices in the 1960s were located at Sheridan Square; they are now at Cooper Square in the East Village. The Voice has published groundbreaking investigations of New York City politics, as well as reporting on local and national politics, with arts, culture, music, dance, film, and theater reviews. The Voice has received three Pulitzer Prizes, in 1981 (Teresa Carpenter), 1986 (Jules Feiffer) and 2000 (Mark Schoofs). Almost since its inception the paper has recognized alternative theater in New York through its Obie Awards. The paper's "Pazz & Jop" music poll,
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    248
    Tulsa World

    Tulsa World

    • Circulation Areas: Tulsa County
    Tulsa World is the daily newspaper for the city of Tulsa, Oklahoma, is the primary newspaper for the northeastern and eastern portions of Oklahoma, and is the second-most widely circulated newspaper in the state, after The Oklahoman. It was founded in 1905 and remains an independent newspaper, owned and operated for four generations by the Lorton family of Tulsa. The newspaper's circulation has dropped in recent years and the staff reduced. The newspaper shares some editorial content with The Oklahoman. In the early 1900s, Tulsa World fought an editorial battle in favor of building a reservoir on Spavinaw Creek, in addition to opposing the Ku Klux Klan in the 1920s. The paper was jointly operated with the Tulsa Tribune from 1941 to 1992. Tulsa World was not originally owned by the Lorton family when it was first published on September 14, 1905. It was not until 1911 that Eugene Lorton bought into the newspapers, becoming its editor, and then the sole owner in 1917. Beginning in 1915, Tulsa World fought an editorial battle advocating a proposal to build a reservoir on Spavinaw Creek and pipe the water 55 miles to Tulsa. Charles Page was among those who opposed the Spavinaw plan; he
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    249
    Woroni

    Woroni

    • Circulation Areas: Canberra
    Woroni is the student newspaper of the Australian National University, based in Canberra, ACT, Australia. The name ‘Woroni’ derives from an Indigenous Australian word meaning ‘mouthpiece’. Woroni is published fortnightly in full colour tabloid format, and features broad coverage of university & local news, opinion, features, arts & culture, sports, and leisure. Woroni was first published in 1948. Traditionally, the editorial tone has been lighthearted and satirical. However, in recent years Woroni has increased its coverage of serious issues such as VSU, "Wadgate", and changes to the ANU School of Humanities. From 1948 to 2010 Woroni was published by ANUSA; its editors were officers of the Association, and responsible to the ANUSA Board of Trustees. In 2010/2011, Woroni became ANU Student Media Inc, a financially and editorially independent student-run publishing house - the first of its kind in Australia. As of 2011, the Woroni Editorial Board is composed of 8 Editors, elected in alternating groups of 4, to terms of 12 months. Elections employ OPV, and are conducted online at the ANU website. Any ANU Student who has submitted 3 substantive articles to Woroni is eligible to run for
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    250
    Yedioth Ahronoth

    Yedioth Ahronoth

    • Circulation Areas: Long Beach
    Yedioth Ahronoth (Hebrew: ידיעות אחרונות‎,  Yedi'ot Aharonot (help·info), lit. Latest News) is a daily newspaper published in Tel Aviv, Israel. Since the 1970s, it has been the most widely circulated paper in Israel. In a TGI survey comparing the last half of 2009 with the same period in 2008, Yedioth Ahronoth retained the title of most widely read newspaper in Israel but saw its market share fall only slightly from 35.9 to 33.9 percent. In July 2010, though a TGI survey of the media reported that Israel HaYom overtook Yedioth Aharonoth as the most read newspaper in terms of exposure with a rate of 35.2% compared with Yedioth's 34.9%. After only a few months of publication of a weekend edition, it scored it 25.7% of exposure compared with Yedioth's 43.7% rate. Yedioth Ahronoth was established in the late 1930s by an investor named Nachum Kumarov. It was the first evening paper in the British Mandate of Palestine, and attempted to emulate the format of the London Evening Standard. Running into financial difficulties, Kumarov sold the paper to Yehuda Mozes, a wealthy land dealer who regarded the paper as an interesting hobby and a long-term financial investment. His sons, Reuben and
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