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Best Newspaper circulation area of All Time

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    1
    Île-de-France

    Île-de-France

    • Newspapers: Le Petit Journal
    Île-de-France (French pronunciation: [ildəfʁɑ̃s] ( listen)) (literally Island of France; see the Etymology section) is the wealthiest and most populated of the twenty-seven administrative regions of France. It consists mostly of the Paris metropolitan area. With 11.7 million inhabitants, Île-de-France is not only the most populated region of France, but also has more residents than Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Benin, Finland, Greece, Portugal, or Sweden, and has a population comparable to that of the U.S. state of Ohio or to that of the Canadian province of Ontario. It is the fourth most populous country subdivision in the European Union, after England, North Rhine-Westphalia and Bavaria. Economically, Île-de-France is the world's fourth-largest and Europe's wealthiest and largest regions. It is the wealthiest metropolitan area in the European Union, and if it were a country, it would rank as the 15th wealthiest in the world. Île-de-France is also the world's second most important location for Fortune Global 500 companies' headquarters (after the Kantō region). Created as district de la région de Paris ("the District of the Paris Region") in 1961, it was renamed after the historic
    7.63
    8 votes
    2
    Perth

    Perth

    • Newspapers: Pelican
    Perth (/pɜrθ/) is the capital and largest city of the Australian state of Western Australia. It is the fourth most populous city in Australia, with an estimated population of 1.74 million living in the Perth metropolitan area. Part of the South West Land Division of Western Australia, the majority of the metropolitan area of Perth is located on the Swan Coastal Plain, a narrow strip between the Indian Ocean and the Darling Scarp, a low coastal escarpment. The first areas settled were on the Swan River, with the city's central business district and port (Fremantle) both still located on the river. Perth's metropolitan area is formally divided into a number of local government areas, which themselves consist of a large number of suburbs, extending from Two Rocks in the north to Rockingham in the south, and east inland to The Lakes. Perth was originally founded by Captain James Stirling in 1829 as the administrative centre of the Swan River Colony, and gained city status in 1856 (currently vested in the smaller City of Perth). The city's population increased substantially as a result of the Western Australian gold rushes in the late 19th century, largely as a result of emigration from
    8.14
    7 votes
    3
    Alexandria

    Alexandria

    • Newspapers: Alexandria Gazette Packet
    Alexandria is an independent city in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of 2010, the city had a total population of 139,966. Located along the Western bank of the Potomac River, Alexandria is approximately six miles (9.6 kilometers) south of downtown Washington, D.C. Like the rest of Northern Virginia, as well as central Maryland, modern Alexandria has been shaped by its proximity to the nation's capital. It is largely populated by professionals working in the federal civil service, the U.S. military, or for one of the many private companies which contract to provide services to the federal government. The latter are known locally as beltway bandits, after the Capital Beltway, an interstate highway that circles Washington, D.C. One of Alexandria's largest employers is the U.S. Department of Defense. Others include the Institute for Defense Analyses and the Center for Naval Analyses. In 2005, the United States Patent and Trademark Office moved 7,100 employees from 18 separate buildings in nearby Crystal City into a new headquarters complex in the city. The historic center of Alexandria is known as Old Town. With its concentration of boutiques, restaurants, antique shops and theaters,
    7.71
    7 votes
    4
    England

    England

    • Newspapers: The Post Boy
    England /ˈɪŋɡlənd/ is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Scotland to the north and Wales to the west; the Irish Sea is to the north west, the Celtic Sea to the south west, while the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south separate it from continental Europe. Most of England comprises the central and southern part of the island of Great Britain in the North Atlantic. The country also includes over 100 smaller islands such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight. The area now called England was first inhabited by modern humans during the Upper Palaeolithic period, but it takes its name from the Angles, one of the Germanic tribes who settled during the 5th and 6th centuries. England became a unified state in AD 927, and since the Age of Discovery, which began during the 15th century, has had a significant cultural and legal impact on the wider world. The English language, the Anglican Church, and English law—the basis for the common law legal systems of many other countries around the world—developed in England, and the country's parliamentary system of government has been widely adopted by other nations. The Industrial
    6.75
    8 votes
    5
    Brooks

    Brooks

    • Newspapers: Medicine Hat News
    Brooks is a city in southeast Alberta, Canada surrounded by the County of Newell. It is located on Highway 1 (Trans-Canada Highway) and the Canadian Pacific Railway, approximately 186 km (116 mi) southeast of Calgary, and 110 km (68 mi) northwest of Medicine Hat. The city has an elevation of 760 m (2,490 ft). The area that is now Brooks was originally used as a bison hunting ground for the Blackfoot and Crow. After Treaty 7 was signed in 1877, homesteaders moved into the area to begin farming. Before 1904, the area still did not have a name. Through a Postmaster General-sponsored contest, the area was named after Noel Edgell Brooks, a Canadian Pacific Railway Divisional Engineer from Calgary. Brooks incorporated as a village on July 14, 1910, and then as a town on September 8, 1911. Its population in the 1911 Census of Canada was 486. In the 1996 Census, the population of Brooks reached 10,093 making it eligible for city status. Brooks incorporated as a city on September 1, 2005 when its official population was 11,604. In 2010, Brooks celebrated its centennial as a municipality since originally incorporating as a village in 1910. Brooks is located in the Grassland Natural Region of
    8.33
    6 votes
    6
    Duval County

    Duval County

    • Newspapers: The Florida Times-Union
    Duval County is a county located in the U.S. state of Florida. As of 2010, the population was 864,263. Its county seat is Jacksonville, with which the Duval County government has been consolidated since 1968. Duval County was established in 1822, and is named for William Pope DuVal, Governor of Florida Territory from 1822 to 1834. This area had been settled by varying cultures of indigenous peoples for thousands of years before European contact. Within the Timucuan Ecological and Historic Preserve in Jacksonville, archeologists have excavated remains of some of the oldest pottery in the United States, dating to 2500 BCE. Prior to European contact, the area was inhabited by the Mocama, a Timucuan-speaking group who lived throughout the coastal areas of northern Florida. At the time Europeans arrived, much of what is now Duval County was controlled by the Saturiwa, one of the most powerful tribes in the region. The area that became Duval County was home to the 16th-century French colony of Fort Caroline, and saw increased European settlement in the 18th century with the establishment of Cowford, later renamed Jacksonville. Duval County was created in 1822 from St. Johns County. It
    8.00
    6 votes
    7
    Troms

    Troms

    • Newspapers: Dagens Nyheter
    Troms (help·info), Romsa (Sami language) or Tromssa (Finnish language) is a county in Northern Norway. It borders Finnmark county to the northeast and Nordland county in the southwest. Norrbotten Län in Sweden is located to the south and further southeast is a shorter border with Lapland Province in Finland. To the west is the Norwegian Sea (Atlantic ocean). The entire county, which was established in 1866, is located north of the Arctic circle. The Troms County Municipality is the governing body for the county, elected by the people of Troms, while the Troms county governor is a representative of the King and Government of Norway. Until 1919 the county was formerly known as Tromsø amt. On 1 July 2006, the Northern Sami name for the county, Romsa, was granted official status along with Troms. The county (and the city of Tromsø) is named after the island Tromsøya on which it is located (Old Norse Trums). Several theories exist as to the etymology of Troms. One theory holds "Troms-" to derive from the old (uncompounded) name of the island (Old Norse: Trums). Several islands and rivers in Norway have the name Tromsa, and the names of these are probably derived from the word straumr
    8.40
    5 votes
    8
    DeKalb County

    DeKalb County

    • Newspapers: Times-Journal
    DeKalb County is a county of the U.S. state of Alabama. Its name is in honor of Major General Baron Johan DeKalb. As of the 2010 census, the population was 71,109. Its county seat is Fort Payne. DeKalb County was created by the Alabama legislature on January 9, 1836, from land ceded to the Federal government by the Cherokee Nation. It was named for Major General Baron Johann de Kalb, a hero of the American Revolution. DeKalb County was the one time home of the famous Cherokee Sequoyah. The county's eastern edge, along the state line, was also the epicenter of a strong earthquake on April 29, 2003, measuring 4.6 on the Richter scale. Power was knocked out in the area, mirrors and pictures thrown to the floor, foundations cracked, and one chimney fell to the ground. It was felt over a significant portion of the southeastern states, including quite strongly in northeastern Alabama and neighboring northwestern Georgia, and nearby eastern Tennessee (especially near Chattanooga). It was also felt slightly in western upstate South Carolina, far west-southwestern North Carolina, south and southeastern Kentucky, and east-northeastern Mississippi. (See: 2003 Alabama earthquake) On the
    7.17
    6 votes
    9
    Williamson County

    Williamson County

    • Newspapers: Williamson Herald
    Williamson County is a county in the U.S. state of Tennessee. As of the 2010 census, the population was 183,182. The County's seat is Franklin, and it is part of the Nashville-Davidson–Murfreesboro–Franklin Metropolitan Statistical Area. The county is named after Hugh Williamson, a North Carolina politician who signed the U.S. Constitution. According to the census bureau, the county has a total area of 584 square miles (1,513 km), of which 583 square miles (1,510 km) is land and 1 square mile (2.6 km) is water. Williamson County was originally inhabited by at least five prehistoric cultures, including tribes of Cherokees, Chickasaws, Choctaws, Creeks, and Shawnees. White settlers had settled here by 1798, and on October 26, 1799, the Tennessee General Assembly created Franklin and Williamson County. In 1800 Abram Maury laid out Franklin, the county seat, which was carved out of part of a land grant he purchased from Major Anthony Sharp. "The county was named in honor of Dr. Hugh Williamson of North Carolina who was a colonel in the North Carolina militia and served three terms in the Continental Congress." Many of the early inhabitants of the county were recipients of Revolutionary
    8.20
    5 votes
    10
    Rutland

    Rutland

    • Newspapers: Seven Days
    Rutland is a town in Rutland County, Vermont, United States. The population was 4,054 at the 2010 census. Rutland completely surrounds the city of Rutland, which is incorporated separately from the town of Rutland. The town was originally granted in 1761 by Governor Benning Wentworth as one of the New Hampshire Grants. He named it after John Manners, 3rd Duke of Rutland. It was one of the most successful of those grants because of the excellent farmland and gentle topography. In the early 19th century, small high-quality marble deposits were discovered in Rutland, and in the 1830s a large deposit of nearly solid marble of high quality was found in what is now West Rutland. By the 1840s small firms had begun operations, but marble quarries only became profitable when the railroad came to Rutland in 1851. As fate would have it, the famous quarries of Carrara in Tuscany, Italy, became largely unworkable because of their extreme depth at the same time, and Rutland quickly became one of the leading producers of marble in the world. This fueled enough growth and investment that in 1886 the marble companies saw to it that the present Rutland City was incorporated as a village, and most of
    6.83
    6 votes
    11
    Toledo

    Toledo

    • Newspapers: The Blade
    Toledo is the fourth most populous city in the U.S. state of Ohio and is the county seat of Lucas County. Toledo is in northwest Ohio, on the western end of Lake Erie, and borders the State of Michigan. The city was founded in 1833 on the west bank of the Maumee River, originally incorporated as part of Monroe County, Michigan Territory, then re-founded in 1837, after conclusion of the Toledo War, when it was incorporated in Ohio. Toledo grew quickly as a result of the Miami and Erie Canal and its position on the railway line between New York and Chicago. It has since become a city well known for its industry, particularly in glass and auto assembly, as well as for its art community, education, and local sports teams. The population of Toledo as of the 2010 Census was 287,208, while the Toledo metropolitan area had a population of 651,409. French trading posts operated in the area as far back as 1680. The area was first settled by Americans in 1845, after the Battle of Fallen Timbers, with the founding of Fort Industry. However, many settlers fled the area during the War of 1812. Resettlement began around 1868 when a Cincinnati syndicate purchased a 974-acre (3.9 km) tract at the
    6.83
    6 votes
    12
    Metro Detroit

    Metro Detroit

    • Newspapers: Detroit Free Press
    The Detroit metropolitan area, often referred to as Metro Detroit, is the metropolitan area located in Southeast Michigan centered on the city of Detroit which shares an international border with Windsor, Ontario. The Detroit metropolitan area is the second largest U.S. metropolitan area connecting the Great Lakes system to the Saint Lawrence Seaway. As a major metropolitan area, it is known for its automotive heritage, arts, entertainment, and popular music and sports legacies. The area includes a variety of natural landscapes, parks, and beaches with a recreational coastline linking the Great Lakes. The Detroit Urban Area, which serves as the core of the Metropolitan Statistical Area, ranks as the 12th most populous of the United States, with a population of 3,734,090 as of the 2010 census, and an area of 1,337.16 square miles (3,463.2 km). This urbanized area covers parts of the counties of Wayne, Oakland, and Macomb. These counties are sometimes referred to informally as the Detroit Tri-County Area, and had a population of 3,863,888 as of the 2010 census with an area of 1,967.1 square miles (5,095 km). The United States Office of Management and Budget defines the
    7.80
    5 votes
    13
    Colorado Springs

    Colorado Springs

    • Newspapers: The Gazette
    Colorado Springs is a Home Rule Municipality that is the county seat and most populous city of El Paso County, Colorado, United States. Colorado Springs is located in the southern portion of the state. It is situated on Fountain Creek and is located 65 miles (105 km) south of the Colorado State Capitol in Denver. At 6,035 feet (1839 m) the city stands over one mile (1.6 km) above sea level, though some areas of the city are significantly higher and lower. Colorado Springs is situated near the base of one of the most famous American mountains, Pikes Peak, in the eastern edge of the Southern Rocky Mountains. With a population of 416,427 as of the 2010 Census, it is the second most populous city in the state of Colorado, behind Denver, and the 41st most populous city in the United States, while the Colorado Springs Metropolitan Statistical Area had an estimated population of 645,613 in 2010. The city covers 194.7 square miles (504 km), making it Colorado's largest city in area. Colorado Springs was selected as the No. 1 Best Big City in "Best Places to Live" by Money magazine in 2006, and placed number one in Outside's 2009 list of America's Best Cities. William Jackson Palmer, a
    7.60
    5 votes
    14
    Ghana

    Ghana

    • Newspapers: The Ghanaian Chronicle
    Ghana /ˈɡɑːnə/, officially the Republic of Ghana, is a country in West Africa. It is bordered by Côte d'Ivoire (Ivory Coast) to the west, Burkina Faso to the north, Togo to the east, and the Gulf of Guinea to the south. The word Ghana means "Warrior King" and is derived from the ancient Ghana Empire. Ghana was inhabited in pre-colonial times by a number of ancient predominantly Akan kingdoms, including the inland Ashanti Empire, the Akwamu, the Akyem, the Bonoman, the Denkyira, and the Fante among others. Non-Akan states created by the Ga also existed as did states by the Dagomba. Prior to contact with Europeans trade between the Akan and various African states flourished due to Akan gold wealth. Trade with European states began after contact with the Portuguese in the 15th century, and the British established the Gold Coast Crown colony in 1874 over parts but not all of the country. The Gold Coast achieved independence from the United Kingdom in 1957, becoming the first sub-Saharan African nation to do so, from European colonialism. The name Ghana was chosen for the new nation to reflect the ancient Empire of Ghana, which once extended throughout much of west Africa. Ghana is a
    7.40
    5 votes
    15
    Binghamton

    Binghamton

    • Newspapers: Press & Sun-Bulletin
    Binghamton is a city in the Southern Tier of New York in the United States. It is near the Pennsylvania border, in a bowl-shaped valley at the confluence of the Susquehanna and Chenango Rivers. Binghamton is the county seat of Broome County and is the principal city and cultural center of the Greater Binghamton metropolitan area (also known as the Triple Cities), home to a quarter million people. The population of the city itself, according to the 2010 census, is 47,376. From the days of the railroad, Binghamton was a transportation crossroads and a manufacturing center, and has been known at different times for the production of cigars, shoes, and high-tech products. IBM was founded nearby, and Edwin Link invented the flight simulator in the city, leading to a notable concentration of electronics- and defense-oriented firms that continue to exist to this day. The population of the city has declined significantly in the second half of the 20th century, from a high of 85,000 in 1950, as a result of suburbanization and economic stagnation. The region lost a significant portion of its manufacturing industry, following cuts made by defense firms after the end of the Cold War. Some, but
    8.50
    4 votes
    16
    Alameda County

    Alameda County

    • Newspapers: Alameda Times-Star
    Alameda County is a county in the U.S. state of California. It occupies most of the East Bay region of the San Francisco Bay Area. As of the 2010 census it had a population of 1,510,271, making it the 7th most populous county in the state. The county's major cities include Oakland, which is its seat, Fremont, Berkeley and Hayward. The county was formed on March 25, 1853 from a large portion of Contra Costa County and a smaller portion of Santa Clara County. The Spanish word alameda means "a place where poplar trees grow", a name which originally was given to the Arroyo de la Alameda (Poplar Grove Creek). The willow and sycamore trees along the banks of the river reminded the early explorers of a road lined with trees, also known as an alameda. The county seat at the time it was formed was located at Alvarado; it was moved to San Leandro in 1856 where the county courthouse was destroyed by the devastating 1868 quake on the Hayward Fault. The county seat was then re-established in the town of Brooklyn from 1872-1875. Brooklyn is now part of Oakland, which has been the county seat since 1873. Much of what is now considered an intensively urban region, with major cities, was developed
    6.33
    6 votes
    17
    North East England

    North East England

    • Newspapers: Darlington & Stockton Times
    North East England is one of the nine regions of England that are classified at the first level of NUTS for statistical purposes. It covers Northumberland, County Durham, Tyne and Wear, and Teesside, which is partly in North Yorkshire. The only cities in the region are Durham, Newcastle upon Tyne and Sunderland. Other large settlements in the region include Darlington, Gateshead, Hartlepool, Middlesbrough, Redcar, South Shields and Stockton-on-Tees. The region is home to three large conurbations: Teesside, Wearside, and Tyneside, which is the largest of the three and the sixth most populous conurbation in the United Kingdom. The region is generally hilly and sparsely populated in the North and West, and urban and arable in the East and South. The highest point in the region is The Cheviot, in the Cheviot Hills, at 815 metres (2,674 ft). The region contains the urban centres of Tyneside, Wearside and Teesside, and is noted for the rich natural beauty of its coastline, Northumberland National Park, and the section of the Pennines that includes Teesdale and Weardale. Its historic importance is evidenced by Northumberland's castles, the two World Heritage Sites of Durham Cathedral and
    8.25
    4 votes
    18
    Bucks County

    Bucks County

    • Newspapers: The Intelligencer
    Bucks County is a county located in the U.S. state (commonwealth) of Pennsylvania. The county seat is Doylestown. This county is part of the Delaware Valley area. Bucks County is named after the English county of Buckinghamshire. As of 2010, the population was 625,249. This makes Bucks the fourth most populous county in Pennsylvania (after Philadelphia, Allegheny, and Montgomery counties), and the 95th most populous county in the United States. As of 2000, it is the 76th wealthiest county in the nation as measured by median family income. Bucks County was one of the three original counties in Pennsylvania. It was named by William Penn in 1682 after Buckinghamshire, England, the county where he lived and from which his family originated. Bucks is the abbreviation for Buckinghamshire, and both names are used interchangeably in England. Penn's home, Pennsbury Manor, is located within Bucks County. Place names in Bucks County derived from places in Buckinghamshire include Buckingham, Chalfont (named after Chalfont St Giles), Wycombe and Solebury (spelled Soulbury in England). Buckingham was the former county town of Buckinghamshire; Buckingham, PA, (now known as Bristol, not to be
    7.00
    5 votes
    19
    Ancaster, Ontario

    Ancaster, Ontario

    • Newspapers: Ancaster news
    Ancaster is a picturesque and historic community located on the Niagara escarpment, within the greater area of the city of Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. This former town was founded officially in 1793 and was one of the oldest European communities established in present day Ontario along with Windsor (1749), Kingston (1780), St. Catharines (1787–89), Grimsby (1790), Niagara-on-the-Lake (1792) and Toronto (1793). By 1823, due in large part to its easily accessible water power located nearby already existing historical trading routes, Ancaster had become Upper Canada's largest industrial and commercial center. At that time it also had the largest population in Upper Canada with 1,681 townspeople surpassing both Toronto's 1,376 and Hamilton's 1,000 residents. After this initial period of prosperity beginning in the late 18th century, sudden significant water and rail transportation advancements of the early 19th century would soon better benefit Ancaster's neighbouring towns situated closer to the Lake Ontario waterfront. Stationary steam engines for industries were also being rapidly developed in the 19th century that would eventually make Ancaster's water powered industries less vital.
    8.00
    4 votes
    20
    Lake County

    Lake County

    • Newspapers: Lake County Tribune
    Lake County is a county located in the U.S. state of Ohio. According to the 2010 census, it has a population of 230,041, which is an increase of 1.1% from 227,511 in 2000. The county seat is Painesville, and the county name comes from its location on the southern shore of Lake Erie. Lake County is part of the Cleveland–Elyria–Mentor Metropolitan Statistical Area. According to the 2010 census, the county has a total area of 979.20 square miles (2,536.1 km), of which 227.49 square miles (589.2 km) (or 23.23%) is land and 751.70 square miles (1,946.9 km) (or 76.77%) is water. Lake County is Ohio's smallest county by land area. As of the census of 2000, there were 227,511 people, 89,700 households, and 62,520 families residing in the county. The population density was 997 people per square mile (385/km²). There were 93,487 housing units at an average density of 410 per square mile (158/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 95.40% White, 1.99% Black or African American, 0.11% Native American, 0.90% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.66% from other races, and 0.92% from two or more races. 1.70% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 18.5% were of German, 14.6% Italian,
    8.00
    4 votes
    21
    Melbourne

    Melbourne

    • Newspapers: Florida Today
    Melbourne  /ˈmɛlbərn/ is a city in Brevard County, Florida, United States. As of the 2010 census, the population was 76,068. The municipal area is the second largest by size and by population in the county. Melbourne is a principal city of the Palm Bay – Melbourne – Titusville, Florida Metropolitan Statistical Area. In 1969 the city was expanded by merging with nearby Eau Gallie. The city was named Melbourne in honor of its first postmaster, Cornthwaite John Hector, an Englishman who had spent much of his life in Melbourne, Australia. Evidence for the presence of Paleo-Indians in the Melbourne area during the late Pleistocene epoch was uncovered during the 1920s. C. P. Singleton, a Harvard University zoologist, discovered the bones of a mammoth (Mammuthus columbi) on his property along Crane Creek, 1.5 miles (2.4 km) from Melbourne, and brought in Amherst College paleontologist Frederick B. Loomis to excavate the skeleton. Loomis found a second elephant, with a "large rough flint instrument" among fragments of the elephant's ribs. Loomis found in the same stratum mammoth, mastodon, horse, ground sloth, tapir, peccary, camel and saber-tooth cat bones, all extinct in Florida since
    8.00
    4 votes
    22
    Pensacola

    Pensacola

    • Newspapers: Pensacola News Journal
    Pensacola is the westernmost city in the Florida Panhandle and the county seat of Escambia County, Florida, United States of America. As of the 2010 census, the city had a total population of 51,923. Pensacola is the principal city of the Pensacola-Ferry Pass-Brent Metropolitan Statistical Area, an area with about 455,102 residents in 2009. Pensacola was founded in 1559 by a Spanish explorer named Tristán de Luna y Arellano. It was officially America's first settlement. After about 116 years of Spanish rule the French took control over Pensacola from 1719 to 1722. The colony was then passed to the British who seized control of Pensacola temporarily through the Peace of Paris. Pensacola was also named the capital of the new British Colony. During the Civil War Pensacola was apart of the Confederacy. The United States later regained control and Pensacola was once again a part of the union on May 1862. Pensacola is a sea port on Pensacola Bay, which connects to the Gulf of Mexico. A large United States Naval Air Station, the first in the United States, is located southwest of Pensacola (near the community of Warrington) and is home to the Blue Angels flight demonstration team and the
    6.80
    5 votes
    23
    Surry County

    Surry County

    • Newspapers: Mount Airy News
    Surry County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. As of 2010, the population was 73,673. Its county seat is Dobson, and its largest city is Mount Airy. The county was formed in 1771 from Rowan County. It was named for the county of Surrey in England, birthplace of William Tryon, Governor of North Carolina from 1765 to 1771. In 1777 parts of Surry County and Washington District (now Washington County, Tennessee) were combined to form Wilkes County. The first permanent courthouse was established at Richmond in 1779, what is now the modern-day Old Richmond Township in Forsyth County near Donnaha. However, in 1789 the eastern half of Surry County became Stokes County, thus making the Richmond site unusable for either county. In 1790, the county seat was moved to Rockford where it remained for over half a century. In 1850 the half of the county's remaining territory south of the Yadkin River became Yadkin County. The town of Dobson was established in 1853 to be the new county seat. Surry County is a member of the regional Northwest Piedmont Council of Governments. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 538 square miles (1,400 km), of
    6.80
    5 votes
    24
    Hong Kong

    Hong Kong

    • Newspapers: Ta Kung Pao
    Hong Kong (Chinese: 香港) is one of two special administrative regions (SARs) of the People's Republic of China (PRC), the other being Macau. It is situated on China's south coast and, enclosed by the Pearl River Delta and South China Sea, it is known for its expansive skyline and deep natural harbour. With a land mass of 1,104 km (426 sq mi) and a population of seven million people, Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated areas in the world. Hong Kong's population is 95 percent ethnic Chinese and 5 percent from other groups. Hong Kong's Han Chinese majority originate mainly from the cities of Guangzhou and Taishan in the neighbouring Guangdong province. Hong Kong became a colony of the British Empire after the First Opium War (1839–42). Originally confined to Hong Kong Island, the colony's boundaries were extended in stages to the Kowloon Peninsula in 1860 and then the New Territories in 1898. It was occupied by Japan during the Pacific War, after which the British resumed control until 1997, when China resumed sovereignty. The region espoused minimum government intervention under the ethos of positive non-interventionism during the colonial era. The time period greatly
    9.00
    3 votes
    25
    Atlanta

    Atlanta

    • Newspapers: Creative Loafing Atlanta
    Atlanta ( /ətˈlæntə/, stressed /ætˈlæntə/, locally  /ætˈlænə/) is the capital of and the most populous city in the U.S. state of Georgia, with a 2010 population of 420,003. Atlanta is the cultural and economic center of the Atlanta metropolitan area, home to 5,268,860 people and the ninth largest metropolitan area in the country. Atlanta is the county seat of Fulton County, and a small portion of the city extends eastward into DeKalb County. Atlanta was established in 1847 at the intersection of two railroad lines, and the city rose from the ashes of the Civil War to become a national center of commerce. In the decades following the Civil Rights Movement, during which the city earned a reputation as "too busy to hate" for the progressive views of its citizens and leaders, Atlanta attained international prominence. Atlanta is the primary transportation hub of the Southeastern United States via highway, railroad, and air, with Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport being the world's busiest airport since 1998. Atlanta is considered an "alpha(-) world city," and, with a gross domestic product of US$270 billion, Atlanta’s economy ranks 15th among world cities and sixth in the
    7.75
    4 votes
    26
    Lake County

    Lake County

    • Newspapers: Daily Herald
    Lake County is a county in the northeastern corner of the U.S. state of Illinois, on the shore of Lake Michigan. According to the 2010 census, it has a population of 703,462, which is an increase of 9.2% from 644,356 in 2000. Its county seat is Waukegan. The county is part of the Chicago metropolitan area. According to the 2000 Census, Lake County is the 31st richest county by per capita income. The lakefront communities of Lake Forest and Highland Park are part of the affluent North Shore area. Originally part of McHenry County, the townships composing Lake County were carved out into a separate county in 1839. Naval Station Great Lakes is located in the city of North Chicago in Lake County. It is the United States Navy's Headquarters Command for training, and the Navy's only recruit training center. The county, which was primarily unsettled prairie and was still home to its native Potawatomi Indians, was created by the Illinois State Legislature in 1839. At that time, Libertyville, then known as Independence Grove, was the first county seat. In 1841, however, the county's residents voted to move the county government to Little Fort, now Waukegan, where the commissioners had
    6.60
    5 votes
    27
    Urbana

    Urbana

    • Newspapers: Daily Illini
    Urbana ( /ɜrˈbænə/) is a city in and the county seat of Champaign County, Illinois, United States. The population was 41,250 at the 2010 census. Urbana is the tenth-most populous city in Illinois outside of the Chicago metropolitan area. Most of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign campus is located here. Urbana is located at 40°6′35″N 88°12′15″W / 40.10972°N 88.20417°W / 40.10972; -88.20417 (40.109665, -88.204247). According to the 2000 United States Census Bureau, the city had a total area of 10.5 square miles (27 km), of which 0.10% is water body. City planning maps from January 2010 indicate that the total area is now 11.7 square miles (30 km). Urbana borders the city of Champaign. The main campus of the University of Illinois is situated on this border. Together, these two cities are often referred to as Urbana-Champaign (the designation used by the University), Champaign-Urbana (the more common usage, due to the larger size of Champaign), and the nearby village of Savoy form the Champaign-Urbana Metropolitan Area. As of the census of 2000, there were 36,395 people, 14,327 households, and 6,217 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,468.3
    6.60
    5 votes
    28
    Boston

    Boston

    • Newspapers: Irish echo (Boston, Mass.)
    Boston (pronounced /ˈbɒstən/ or locally /ˈbɔstən/ ( listen)) is the capital of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and its largest city, and is one of the oldest cities in the United States. The largest city in New England, Boston is regarded as the unofficial "Capital of New England" for its economic and cultural impact on the entire New England region. The city proper, covering 48.43 square miles (125.43 square km), had an estimated population of 625,087 in 2011 according to the U.S. Census, making it the 21st largest in the country. Boston is also the anchor of a substantially larger metropolitan area called Greater Boston, home to 4.5 million people and the tenth-largest metropolitan area in the country. Greater Boston as a commuting region is home to 7.6 million people, making it the fifth-largest Combined Statistical Area in the United States. In 1630, Puritan colonists from England founded the city on the Shawmut Peninsula. During the late 18th century, Boston was the location of several major events during the American Revolution, including the Boston Massacre and the Boston Tea Party. Several early battles of the American Revolution, such as the Battle of Bunker Hill and the
    7.50
    4 votes
    29
    Covington

    Covington

    • Newspapers: The Covington News
    Covington is a city in Newton County, Georgia. As of the 2010 census, the city had a population of 13,118. The city is the county seat of Newton County. Incorporated in 1822, Covington was named for United States Army Brigadier General and United States Congressman Leonard Covington, a hero of the War of 1812. The city grew with the advent of the railroad in 1845. In 1864, General Sherman's troops marched through during their March to the Sea. Although the city was looted, several antebellum homes were spared. Georgia militiamen and forces under Sherman's command skirmished November 17-18 on the banks of the Alcovy River, just east of Covington, in the Battle of Alcovy Ford. The city of Covington encompasses two historic districts known as the Covington Historic District and the North Covington Historic District. These two districts are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The maps and materials describing these two districts are available for review through City Hall. The Covington Historic District contains Floyd Street and the downtown square. The North Covington Historic District contains, North Emory Street and Odum Street as its hub. Both the Covington Historic
    7.50
    4 votes
    30
    Germany

    Germany

    • Newspapers: Bild-Zeitung
    Germany (/ˈdʒɜrməni/; German: Deutschland), officially the Federal Republic of Germany (German: Bundesrepublik Deutschland, pronounced [ˈbʊndəsʁepuˌbliːk ˈdɔʏtʃlant] ( listen)), is a federal parliamentary republic in west-central Europe. The country consists of 16 states, and its capital and largest city is Berlin. Germany covers an area of 357,021 square kilometres (137,847 sq mi) and has a largely temperate seasonal climate. With 81.8 million inhabitants, it is the most populous member state in the European Union. Germany is one of the major political and economic powers of the European continent and a historic leader in many theoretical and technical fields. A region named Germania, inhabited by several Germanic peoples, was documented before AD 100. During the Migration Period, the Germanic tribes expanded southward and established successor kingdoms throughout much of Europe. Beginning in the 10th century, German territories formed a central part of the Holy Roman Empire. During the 16th century, northern German regions became the centre of the Protestant Reformation while southern and western parts remained dominated by Roman Catholic denominations, with the two factions
    7.50
    4 votes
    31
    Vancouver

    Vancouver

    • Newspapers: The Vancouver Sun
    Vancouver (/væŋˈkuːvər/) is a coastal seaport city on the mainland of British Columbia, Canada. The 2011 census recorded more than 603,000 people in the city, making it the eighth largest among Canadian cities. The metropolitan area, with more than 2.3 million residents, is the third most populous metropolitan area in the country and the most populous in Western Canada. With 5,249 people per square kilometre (13,590 per square mile), the City of Vancouver is the most densely populated Canadian municipality among those with 5,000 residents or more. Vancouver is one of the most ethnically and linguistically diverse cities in Canada, with 52% for whom English is not their first language. The original settlement, named Gastown, grew around the Hastings Mill logging sawmill and a nearby tavern, both established in 1867. Enlarging to become the townsite of Granville, with the announcement that the railhead would reach the site it was renamed "Vancouver" and incorporated as a city in 1886. By 1887, the transcontinental railway was extended to the city to take advantage of its large natural seaport, which soon became a vital link in a trade route between the Orient, Eastern Canada, and
    7.50
    4 votes
    32
    Vermont

    Vermont

    • Newspapers: Burlington Free Press
    Vermont /vɜrˈmɒnt/ is a state in the New England region of the northeastern United States. Vermont is the 6th least extensive and the 2nd least populous of the 50 United States. It is the only New England state not bordering the Atlantic Ocean. Lake Champlain forms half of Vermont's western border, which it shares with the state of New York. The Green Mountains are within the state. Vermont is bordered by Massachusetts to the south, New Hampshire to the east, New York to the west, and the Canadian province of Quebec to the north. Originally inhabited by two major Native American tribes (the Algonquian-speaking Abenaki and the Iroquois), much of the territory that is now Vermont was claimed by France during its early colonial period. France ceded the territory to the Kingdom of Great Britain after being defeated in 1763 in the Seven Years' War (also called the French and Indian War). For many years, the nearby colonies, especially New Hampshire and New York, disputed control of the area (then called the New Hampshire Grants). Settlers who held land titles granted by these colonies were opposed by the Green Mountain Boys militia, which eventually prevailed in creating an independent
    7.50
    4 votes
    33
    Bonney Lake

    Bonney Lake

    • Newspapers: Bonney Lake & Sumner Courier-Herald
    Bonney Lake is a city in Pierce County, Washington, United States. The population was 17,374 at the 2010 census. Bonney Lake is located at 47°11′13″N 122°10′12″W / 47.187019°N 122.170035°W / 47.187019; -122.170035 (47.187019, -122.170035). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 5.5 square miles (14.3 km), of which, 5.4 square miles (14.1 km) of it is land and 0.1 square miles (0.2 km) of it (1.27%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 9,687 people, 3,266 households, and 2,583 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,780.9 people per square mile (687.5/km). There were 3,404 housing units at an average density of 625.8 per square mile (241.6/km). The racial makeup of the city was 94.08% White, 0.60% African American, 1.02% Native American, 1.27% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 0.62% from other races, and 2.33% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.08% of the population. There were 3,266 households out of which 47.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.7% were married couples living together, 9.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 20.9% were non-families.
    8.67
    3 votes
    34
    Cape Cod

    Cape Cod

    • Newspapers: Cape Cod Times
    Cape Cod, often referred to locally as simply the Cape, is a cape in the easternmost portion of the state of Massachusetts, in the Northeastern United States. Today it is co-extensive with Barnstable County, and is defined by the towns along the Cape Cod Canal, and those to the east on the peninsula all the way to Provincetown. Several small islands right off Cape Cod, including Monomoy Island, Monomoscoy Island, Popponesset Island, and Seconsett Island, are also in Barnstable County, being part of municipalities with land on the Cape. The Cape's historic and maritime character and ample beaches attract heavy tourism during the summer months. Cape Cod was formed as the recessional moraine of a glacier, resulting in a peninsula in the Atlantic Ocean. In 1914, the Cape Cod Canal was cut through the base or isthmus of the peninsula, forming what may be loosely described as an island. The Cape Cod Commission refers to the resultant landmass as an island; as does the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) in regards to disaster preparedness. Cape Cod is one of the biggest barrier islands in the world, shielding much of the Massachusetts coastline from North Atlantic storm waves.
    7.25
    4 votes
    35
    Colombia

    Colombia

    • Newspapers: El Tiempo
    Colombia ( /kəˈlʌmbiə/ kə-LUM-biə, or /kəˈlɒmbiə/ kə-LOM-biə), officially the Republic of Colombia (Spanish: República de Colombia [reˈpuβlika ðe koˈlombja]), is a unitary constitutional republic comprising thirty-two departments. The country is located in northwestern South America, bordered to the northwest by Panama; to the north by the Caribbean Sea; to the east by Venezuela and Brazil; to the south by Ecuador and Peru; and to the west by the Pacific Ocean. Colombia is the 26th largest country by area and the fourth largest in South America after Brazil, Argentina and Peru. With over 46 million people, Colombia is the 27th largest country in the world by population and has the second largest population of any Spanish-speaking country in the world, after Mexico. Colombia is a middle power, and is now the fourth largest economy in Latin America, and the third largest in South America. Colombia produces coffee, flowers, emeralds, coal, and oil. These products comprise the primary sector of the economy. The territory of what is now Colombia was originally inhabited by indigenous peoples including the Muisca, Quimbaya, and Tairona. The Spanish arrived in 1499 and initiated a period
    7.25
    4 votes
    36
    Denver

    Denver

    • Newspapers: The Denver Post
    The City and County of Denver ( /ˈdɛnvər/; Arapaho: Niinéniiniicíihéhe') is the largest city and the capital of the U.S. state of Colorado. Denver is also the second most populous county in Colorado after El Paso County. Denver is a consolidated city and county located in the South Platte River Valley on the western edge of the High Plains just east of the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains. The Denver downtown district is located immediately east of the confluence of Cherry Creek with the South Platte River, approximately 12 miles (19 km) east of the foothills of the Rocky Mountains. Denver is nicknamed the Mile-High City because its official elevation is exactly one mile or 5,280 feet (1,609.344 m) above sea level, making it one of the highest major cities in the United States. The 105th meridian west of Greenwich passes through Union Station and is the temporal reference for the Mountain Time Zone. The 2011 estimated population of Denver was 619,968 which ranks it as the 23rd most populous U.S. city. The 10-county Denver-Aurora-Broomfield, CO Metropolitan Statistical Area had an estimated 2011 population of 2,599,504 and ranked as the 21st most populous U.S. metropolitan
    7.25
    4 votes
    37
    Effingham

    Effingham

    • Newspapers: Effingham Daily News
    Effingham is a city in Effingham County, Illinois, United States. The population was 12,384 at the 2000 census. It is the county seat of Effingham County. The city bills itself as "The Crossroads of Opportunity" because of its location at the intersection of two major Interstate highways: I-57 running from Chicago to Miner, Missouri, and I-70 running from Utah to Maryland. It also is the path of U.S. Route 45, which runs from Michigan to Alabama. Illinois Route 33 and Illinois Route 32 also run through the city. Thus, Effingham has a broad range of restaurants, lodging, and shopping facilities. Effingham is also located on U.S. Highway 40, the historic National Road, which stretches from Cumberland, Maryland to East St. Louis, Illinois. Effingham is located at 39°7′15″N 88°32′45″W / 39.12083°N 88.54583°W / 39.12083; -88.54583 (39.120903, −88.545909). According to the 2010 census, the city has a total area of 9.92 square miles (25.7 km), of which 9.86 square miles (25.5 km) (or 99.40%) is land and 0.06 square miles (0.16 km) (or 0.60%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 12,384 people, 5,330 households, and 3,187 families residing in the city. The population density
    7.25
    4 votes
    38
    Decatur

    Decatur

    • Newspapers: The Decatur Daily
    Decatur is a city in Limestone and Morgan Counties in the U.S. state of Alabama. The city, affectionately known as "The River City", is located in Northern Alabama on the banks of Wheeler Lake, along the Tennessee River. It is the largest city and county seat of Morgan County. The population in 2010 census was 55,683. Decatur is also the core city of the two-county large Decatur Metropolitan Area which had 150,125 in 2006. Combined with the Huntsville Metropolitan Area, the two create the Huntsville-Decatur Combined Statistical Area, of which, Decatur is the second largest city. Like many southern cities in the early 19th century, Decatur's early success was based upon its location along a river. Railroad routes and boating traffic pushed the city to the front of North Alabama's economic atmosphere. The city rapidly grew into a large economic center within the Tennessee Valley and was a hub for travelers and cargo between Nashville/Chattanooga and Mobile/New Orleans. Throughout the 20th century, the city experienced steady growth, but was eclipsed as the regional economic center by a fast growing Huntsville during the space race. The city now finds its economy heavily based on
    6.20
    5 votes
    39
    Gadsden

    Gadsden

    • Newspapers: The Gadsden Times
    The city of Gadsden is the county seat of Etowah County in the U.S. state of Alabama, and it is located about 65 miles northeast of Birmingham, Alabama. It is the primary city of the Gadsden Metropolitan Statistical Area, which has a population of 103,459. Gadsden is closely associated with the neighboring town of Attalla, Alabama. As of the U.S. Census Bureau estimate in 2006, the population of the city was about 37,300. Gadsden and Rome, Georgia are the largest cities in the triangular area defined by the Interstate highways between Atlanta, Birmingham and Chattanooga. Gadsden was at one time in the 19th century Alabama's second most important center of commerce and industry, trailing only the seaport of Mobile. The two cities were important shipping centers: Gadsden for riverboats and Mobile for international trade. Through the 1980s, Gadsden was a center on heavy industry, including the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company and the Republic Steel Corporation. More than a decade after the sharp decline in industry, in 1991 Gadsden was awarded the honor of All-America City by the National Civic League, an award that honored the way Gadsden's citizens, government, businesses, and
    6.20
    5 votes
    40
    Bethel

    Bethel

    • Newspapers: Delta Discovery
    Bethel (Mamterilleq in Central Alaskan Yup'ik) is a city located near the west coast of the U.S. state of Alaska, 340 miles (550 km) west of Anchorage. Accessible only by air and river, Bethel is the main port on the Kuskokwim River and is an administrative and transportation hub for the 56 villages in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta. Bethel is the largest community in western Alaska and in the Unorganized Borough, as well as the 9th largest in the state, with a population estimated to be 6,080 as of the 2010 Census. Bethel is home to the lone detention center in southwestern Alaska, the Yukon Kuskokwim Correction Center. In 2009, Bethel opted out of status as a "Local Option" community, theoretically opening the door to allowing alcohol sales in the city; residents and city officials maintain that all liquor license requests will be actively opposed. Annual events in Bethel include a noted dogsled race, the Kuskokwim 300, Camai, a traditional Yupik dance festival held each spring, and the Bethel Fair held in August. Southwestern Alaska was for thousands of years the traditional place of Yup'ik people and their ancestors. They called their village Mamterillermiut, meaning "Smokehouse
    9.50
    2 votes
    41
    Carrboro

    Carrboro

    • Newspapers: The Daily Tar Heel
    Carrboro is a town in Orange County in the U.S. state of North Carolina. The population was 19,582 at the 2010 census. The town, which is part of the Durham-Chapel Hill metropolitan statistical area, was named after North Carolina industrialist Julian Shakespeare Carr. Located next to Chapel Hill and the University of North Carolina, Carrboro has a reputation as one of the most liberal communities in the Southern United States. It was the first municipality in North Carolina to elect an openly gay mayor, Mike Nelson, in 1995 and the first municipality in the state to grant domestic-partner benefits to same-sex couples. In October 2002, Carrboro was among the first municipalities in the South to adopt resolutions opposing the Iraq War and the USA PATRIOT Act. Known originally as West End because of its location west of Chapel Hill, Carrboro was settled in 1882 around the State University Railroad. The local merchants stipulated that the railroad station had to be at least two miles (3 km) outside of town in order to discourage students from leaving on the weekends and spending their money elsewhere. Settlement in West End increased after Thomas F. Lloyd of Chapel Hill built the
    9.50
    2 votes
    42
    Dorsten

    Dorsten

    • Newspapers: Dorstener Zeitung
    Dorsten (German pronunciation: [ˈdɔʁstən]) is a town in the district of Recklinghausen in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany and has a population of just below 80,000. Dorsten is situated on the western rim of Westphalia bordering the Rhineland. Its historical old town lies on the south bank of the river Lippe and the Wesel–Datteln Canal and was granted city rights in 1251. During the twentieth century, the town was enlarged in its north by the villages of the former Herrlichkeit Lembeck. While Dorsten's northern districts are thus shaped by the rural Münsterland with its many historical castles, just south of the town the Ruhr region begins, Germany's largest urban agglomeration with more than seven million inhabitants. The exact linguistic derivation of the word “Dorsten” is unknown, leaving the meaning of the town’s name unclear. Archaeological findings show that the area was already populated during the Neolithic and Bronze Ages, from about 4000 BC onwards. The Romans established a military camp in Dorsten-Holsterhausen in 11 BC and Varus passed through it in 9BC on his way to the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest. From around 700 AD onwards, the Archbishopric of Cologne began to
    9.50
    2 votes
    43
    Flanders

    Flanders

    • Newspapers: Het Nieuwsblad
    Flanders (Dutch:  Vlaanderen (help·info), French: Flandre) is one of the regions and communities of Belgium and also a historical geographical region located in parts of present-day Belgium, France and the Netherlands. The demonym for Flanders is Flemish, while someone from Flanders is a Fleming. Brussels is the capital of Flanders. Over the course of history, the geographical territory that was called "Flanders" has varied. From around 1000 AD, Flanders historically meant to English-speaking peoples the land situated along the North Sea from the Strait of Dover to the Scheldt estuary with ill-defined southern borders. It came to refer specifically to the County of Flanders, lasting from 862 to 1795, whose territory was situated in the northwestern part of what is now Belgium (the Belgian provinces of West Flanders and East Flanders), with extensive portions in what is now northern France (French Flanders), and a small area that is now part of the Netherlands (Zeelandic Flanders). Through marriage, the County of Flanders was joined with most of the rest of the Low Countries around 1400 AD, and it lost its independence. Most of the county's territory became part of an independent
    7.00
    4 votes
    44
    Stockholm

    Stockholm

    • Newspapers: Metro
    Stockholm (Swedish pronunciation: [ˈstɔkːˈhɔlm, ˈstɔkːˈɔlm, ˈstɔkːɔlm] ( listen to the second one)) is the capital and the largest city of Sweden and constitutes the most populated urban area in Scandinavia. Stockholm is the most populous city in Sweden, with a population of 871,952 in the municipality (2010), 1.4 million in the urban area (2010), and over 2.1 million in the 6,519 km (2,517.00 sq mi) metropolitan area (2010). As of 2010, the Stockholm metropolitan area is home to approximately 22% of Sweden's population. Founded no later than c. 1250, possibly as early as 1187, Stockholm has long been one of Sweden's cultural, media, political, and economic centres. Its strategic location on 14 islands on the coast in the south-east of Sweden at the mouth of Lake Mälaren, by the Stockholm archipelago, has been historically important. Stockholm has been nominated by GaWC as a global city, with a ranking of Beta+. In The 2008 Global Cities Index, Stockholm ranked 24th in the world, 10th in Europe, and first in Scandinavia. Stockholm is known for its beauty, its buildings and architecture, its abundant clean and open water, and its many parks. It is sometimes referred to as Venice of
    7.00
    4 votes
    45
    DeLand

    DeLand

    • Newspapers: West Volusia Beacon
    DeLand is a city in the U.S. state of Florida. It is the county seat of Volusia County. As of the 2010 U.S. Census, the city had a population of 27,031. It is a part of the Deltona–Daytona Beach–Ormond Beach, FL Metropolitan Statistical Area, which was home to 494,804 people as of the 2011 U.S. Census estimates. The city was founded in 1876, and was named for its founder, Henry Addison DeLand. DeLand is home to Stetson University, Florida's oldest private college, as well as the Museum of Florida Art. The DeLand Municipal Airport serves as an uncontrolled general aviation reliever airport to commercial operations at Daytona Beach International Airport (DAB), Orlando Sanford International Airport (SFB) and Orlando International Airport (MCO). On February 2, 2007, DeLand and the surrounding area was the site of a major tornado outbreak. The city sits approximately 34 miles (55 km) north of the central business district of Orlando, and approximately 23 miles (37 km) west of the central business district of Daytona Beach. Known as Persimmon Hollow for the wild persimmon trees that grow around the natural springs, the area was originally accessible only by steamboat up the St. Johns
    6.00
    5 votes
    46
    Bradford County

    Bradford County

    • Newspapers: The Daily Review
    Bradford County is a county located in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. As of 2010, the population was 62,622. The county was created on February 21, 1810, from parts of Lycoming and Luzerne Counties. Originally called Ontario County, it was reorganized and separated from Lycoming County on October 13, 1812, and renamed Bradford County for William Bradford, who had been a chief justice of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court and United States Attorney General. Its county seat is Towanda. The county is not to be confused with the city of Bradford, which is in McKean County, 141 miles to the west via U.S. Route 6. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,161 square miles (3,007.0 km), of which 1,151 square miles (2,981.1 km) is land and 10 square miles (25.9 km) (0.89%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 62,761 people, 24,453 households, and 17,312 families residing in the county. The population density was 54 people per square mile (21/km²). There were 28,664 housing units at an average density of 25 per square mile (10/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 97.94% White, 0.40% Black or African American, 0.31% Native American, 0.45% Asian, 0.01%
    8.00
    3 votes
    47
    Regional Municipality of Niagara

    Regional Municipality of Niagara

    • Newspapers: Pulse Niagara
    The Regional Municipality of Niagara, also known as the Niagara Region, or colloquially "Regional Niagara", is a regional municipality comprising twelve municipalities of Southern Ontario, Canada. The region occupies most of the Niagara Peninsula. Its eastern boundary is the Niagara River, which is also the border with the United States. It is bounded on the north by Lake Ontario and on the south by Lake Erie. Unique natural landscapes make the Niagara Region an important centre for agriculture and tourism in Canada. The most important agricultural enterprise in Niagara is viticulture, or winemaking. The Niagara Wine Route, which connects visitors to dozens of wineries, is a growing tourism draw while the internationally-renowned Niagara Falls is one of Canada's major tourist attractions. Along with Shaw Festival, held annually in Niagara-on-the-Lake, and the Welland Canal, the Regional Municipality of Niagara receives up to 12 million visitors each year. Cities Towns Townships Historic populations: Racial groups Religious profile Top ten largest ethnicities West Niagara East Niagara 400-Series expressways: Other highways:
    8.00
    3 votes
    48
    Washington

    Washington

    • Newspapers: Soy Source
    Washington (/ˈwɒʃɪŋtən/) is a state in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States located north of Oregon, west of Idaho and south of the Canadian province of British Columbia, on the coast of the Pacific Ocean. Washington was carved out of the western part of Washington Territory which had been ceded by Britain in 1846 by the Oregon Treaty as settlement of the Oregon Boundary Dispute. It was admitted to the Union as the 42nd state in 1889. Washington is the 18th most extensive and the 13th most populous of the 50 United States. Approximately 60 percent of Washington's residents live in the Seattle metropolitan area, the center of transportation, business, and industry along the Puget Sound region of the Salish Sea, an inlet of the Pacific consisting of numerous islands, deep fjords, and bays carved out by glaciers. The remainder of the state consists of deep rainforests in the west, mountain ranges in the west, center, northeast and far southeast, and a semi-arid eastern basin given over to intensive agriculture. Washington is the second most populous state on the west coast and in the western United States after California. Washington was named after George Washington, the
    8.00
    3 votes
    49
    Anderson

    Anderson

    • Newspapers: The Herald Bulletin
    Anderson is a city in and the county seat of Madison County, Indiana, United States. It is the principal city of the Anderson, Indiana Metropolitan Statistical Area which encompasses Madison County. Anderson is the headquarters of the Church of God (Anderson) and home of Anderson University, which is affiliated with that denomination. Highlights of the city include the historic Paramount Theatre and the Gruenewald Historic House. The population was 56,129 at the 2010 census. Prior to the organization of Madison County, William Conner entered the land upon which Anderson is located. Conner later sold the ground to John and Sarah Berry, who donated 32 acres (129,000 m²) of their land to Madison County on the condition that the county seat be moved from Pendleton to Anderson. John Berry laid out the first plat of Anderson on November 7, 1827. In 1828 the seat of justice was moved from Pendleton to Anderson. The city is named for Chief William Anderson, whose mother was a Delaware Indian (Lenape) and whose father was of Swedish descent. Chief Anderson's Indian name was Kikthawenund (spelled in a variety of ways) meaning "making a noise" or "causing to crack." The Delaware village was
    6.75
    4 votes
    50
    Brentwood

    Brentwood

    • Newspapers: Brentwood Journal
    Brentwood is a suburb of Nashville located in Williamson County, Tennessee. The population was 37,163 at the 2010 census. As of the 2000 Census, Brentwood had a land area of 35.4 square miles (92 km), but an annexation in 2001 increased the area to 40.8 square miles (106 km). As of the census of 2010, there were 37,060 people, comprising 11,791 households residing in the city. The population density was 676.7 inhabitants per square mile (261.3 /km). There were 12,577 housing units at an average density of 227.7 per square mile (87.9 /km). The racial makeup of the city was 90.0% European American, 3.0% African American, 0.2% Native American, 5.0% Asian, and 1.6% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.1% of the population. Brentwood is Tennessee's best educated city, proportionately, with 98.4% of adult residents (25 and older) holding a high school diploma, and 68.4% of adults possessing a bachelor's degree or higher (2010 Census). There were 11,791 households out of which 48.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 82.2% were married couples living together, 4.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 11.5% were non-families. 10.0%
    6.75
    4 votes
    51
    Greensburg

    Greensburg

    • Newspapers: Greensburg Daily News
    Greensburg is a city in Decatur County, Indiana, United States. The population was counted at 11,492 at the 2010 census. The city is the county seat of Decatur County. According to the 2010 census, the city has a total area of 9.32 square miles (24.1 km), of which 9.27 square miles (24.0 km) (or 99.46%) is land and 0.04 square miles (0.10 km) (or 0.43%) is water. The Decatur County Courthouse in Greensburg, Indiana, is known for a tree which grows from the top of the Courthouse Tower, giving Greensburg its nickname of the "Tree City.” There have been one or more trees growing continually since the first tree was noticed in the early 1870s. Later, other small trees appeared on the clock tower. County officials were initially concerned that the trees would cause damage to the roof, and a steeplejack was hired in the 1880s to remove some of them. Two trees were left, with one ultimately growing to a height of nearly 15 feet (4.6 m). By the time it died, another tree had appeared. Today, there are two trees on the tower. They are believed to be of the Large Tooth Aspen variety. As of the census of 2000, there were 10,260 people, 4,178 households, and 2,778 families residing in the
    6.75
    4 votes
    52
    Norrbotten County

    Norrbotten County

    • Newspapers: Norrländska Socialdemokraten
    Norrbotten County (Norrbottens län) is the northernmost county or län of Sweden. It borders Västerbotten County to the southwest, the Gulf of Bothnia to the southeast. It also borders the counties of Nordland and Troms in Norway to the northwest, and Lapland Province in Finland to the northeast. The name "Norrbotten" is also used for a province of the same name. Norrbotten province covers only the eastern part of Norrbotten County—the inland mostly belongs to the Swedish Lapland (Lappland) province. Norrbotten County exists on provinces of Norrbotten and about ⅔ of Swedish Lapland. Norrbotten County covers almost ¼ of Sweden's surface, but is sparsely inhabited. This is especially true for inland part of Lapland. The climate is generally harsh, which is not surprising considering its northern location. However, the long summer days allow crops to ripen within 2–3 months, and various grains are commonly grown and make up an important part of the industry. Besides grains, potatoes and turnips are also grown. The most important plant is however grass, used as hay for the livestock. Major rivers in Norrbotten County (north–south) include the Torne River, Lule River, Kalix River, and
    6.75
    4 votes
    53
    Santa Cruz County

    Santa Cruz County

    • Newspapers: Santa Cruz Weekly
    Santa Cruz County is a county located on the Pacific coast of the U.S. state of California, on the California Central Coast. The county forms the northern coast of the Monterey Bay. (Monterey County forms the southern coast). As of the 2010 U.S. Census, its population was 262,382. The county seat is Santa Cruz. Santa Cruz County is a member of the regional governmental agency Association of Monterey Bay Area Governments and is one of 11 counties in the U.S. Census Bureau's definition of the San Francisco Bay Area Combined Statistical Area. Santa Cruz County was one of the original counties of California, created in 1850 at the time of statehood. In the original act, the county was given the name of "Branciforte" after the Spanish pueblo founded there in 1797; a major watercourse in the county, Branciforte Creek, bears this name. Less than two months later on April 5, 1850, the name was changed to "Santa Cruz" ("Holy Cross"). Mission Santa Cruz, established in 1791 and completed in 1794, was destroyed by an earthquake in 1857, but a smaller-scale replica was erected in 1931. According to the 2011 census, the county has a total area of 445.17 miles. Of California's counties, only San
    6.75
    4 votes
    54
    Wailuku

    Wailuku

    Wailuku is a census-designated place (CDP) in Maui County, Hawaiʻi, United States. The population was 15,313 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Maui County. Wailuku is located just west of Kahului, at the mouth of the ʻĪao Valley. In the early 20th century Wailuku was the main tourist destination on Maui, though it has since been eclipsed with the rise of the resort towns such as Kaʻanapali, so much that there are no hotels to speak of in Wailuku. Historic sites in the town include Kaʻahumanu Church (named after one of Hawaiʻi's great monarchs, Queen Kaʻahumanu) which dates to 1876, the Wailuku Civic Center Historic District, the site of the Chee Kung Tong Society Building, and the Bailey House, a 19th-century former seminary and home that houses a history museum and the Maui Historical Society. There are two ancient temples near Wailuku, called heiau — the Halekiʻi Heiau and the Pihanakalani Heiau. Both date back hundreds of years and were used for religious purposes by the native Hawaiians. Wailuku is served by Kahului Airport. Wailuku is located at 20°53′31″N 156°30′8″W / 20.89194°N 156.50222°W / 20.89194; -156.50222 (20.891923, -156.502177) The town is situated at
    6.75
    4 votes
    55
    Littleton

    Littleton

    • Newspapers: Columbine Community Courier
    Littleton is a Home Rule Municipality contained in Arapahoe, Douglas, and Jefferson counties in the U.S. state of Colorado. Littleton is a suburb of the Denver-Aurora Metropolitan Statistical Area. Littleton is the county seat of Arapahoe County and the 20th most populous city in the state of Colorado. The population was 41,737 at the 2010 census. The city of Littleton's history dates back to the 1859 Pike's Peak Gold Rush, which brought not only gold seekers, but merchants and farmers to the community. Richard Sullivan Little was an engineer from New Hampshire that made his way out west to work on irrigation systems. Little quickly fell in love with the area that is present day Littleton and brought his wife Angeline out from the East in 1862. The Littles, along with many neighbors, built the Rough and Ready Flour Mill in 1867, which provided a solid economic base in the community. By 1890, the community had grown to 245 people and the residents voted to incorporate the Town of Littleton. The Colorado Center for the Blind, a skills training program for blind teenagers and adults operated by the National Federation of the Blind, is located in Littleton. Denver Seminary is also in
    9.00
    2 votes
    56
    Maple Creek

    Maple Creek

    • Newspapers: Medicine Hat News
    Maple Creek (Assiniboine: Cąšúška wakpá, Wazíȟe wakpá, Wazíȟe wakpa ) is a town in Maple Creek Rural Municipality No. 111, Saskatchewan, Canada. The population was 2,198 at the 2006 Census. Located 52 miles southeast of Medicine Hat, Alberta, and 20 miles north of the Cypress Hills Interprovincial Park on Highway 21 8 km south of the Trans Canada Highway. After the North-West Mounted Police had been established at Fort Walsh, settlers began to explore the Cypress Hills area, living along the creeks and doing small-scale ranching. The Department of the Interior was operating a First Nations farm on the Maple Creek, a few miles south from the present town site. In 1882-1883 the First Nations (mainly Cree, Saulteaux, and Assiniboine) were moved to Qu'Appelle, and the farm was then operated by Major Shircliff, an ex-Mounted Policeman. In the winter of 1882, a Canadian Pacific Railway construction crew of 12 decided to winter where the town of Maple Creek now stands. This marked the establishment of Maple Creek. In June 2010, a flood submerged most of the town. The same flood hit much of southwest Saskatchewan and southern Alberta and even destroyed a portion of the Trans-Canada
    9.00
    2 votes
    57
    Nantucket

    Nantucket

    • Newspapers: The Inquirer and Mirror
    Nantucket /ˌnænˈtʌkɨt/ is an island 30 miles (48 km) south of Cape Cod, Massachusetts, in the United States. Together with the small islands of Tuckernuck and Muskeget, it constitutes the town of Nantucket, Massachusetts, and the coterminous Nantucket County, which are consolidated. Part of the town is designated the Nantucket CDP, or census designated place. The region of Surfside on Nantucket is the southernmost settlement in Massachusetts. The name, Nantucket, is adapted from among similar Algonquian names for the island. Nantucket is a tourist destination and summer colony. The population of the island soars from about 10,000 to 50,000 during the summer months, due to tourists and summer residents. According to Forbes Magazine, in 2006, Nantucket had the highest median property value of any Massachusetts ZIP code. The Nantucket Historic District, comprising all of Nantucket Island, was added to the National Register of Historic Places on December 13, 1966. In doing so the National Park Service paid particular note to the settlements of Nantucket and Siasconset which is known as "Sconset". The island features one of the highest concentrations of pre-Civil War structures in the
    9.00
    2 votes
    58
    Polk County

    Polk County

    • Newspapers: Des Moines Register
    Polk County is a county located in the U.S. state of Minnesota. The population was at 31,600 at the 2010 census. Its county seat is Crookston, and the largest community is East Grand Forks. Polk County and Grand Forks County, North Dakota, make up the "Grand Forks, ND-MN Metropolitan Statistical Area" or "Greater Grand Forks". According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 1,997.81 square miles (5,174.3 km), of which 1,970.37 square miles (5,103.2 km) (or 98.63%) is land and 27.44 square miles (71.1 km) (or 1.37%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 31,369 people, 12,070 households, and 8,050 families residing in the county. The population density was 16 people per square mile (6/km²). There were 14,008 housing units at an average density of 7 per square mile (3/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 94.18% White, 0.33% Black or African American, 1.30% Native American, 0.30% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 2.57% from other races, and 1.30% from two or more races. 4.79% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 41.7% were of Norwegian, 19.7% German and 5.8% French ancestry according to Census 2000. There were 12,070 households out of which
    9.00
    2 votes
    59
    Saint Petersburg

    Saint Petersburg

    • Newspapers: Journal de St.-Pétersbourg
    Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербург, tr. Sankt-Peterburg; IPA: [sankt pʲɪtʲɪrˈburk] ( listen)) is a city and a federal subject (a federal city) of Russia located on the Neva River at the head of the Gulf of Finland on the Baltic Sea. In 1914 the name of the city was changed to Petrograd (Russian: Петроград; IPA: [pʲɪtrɐˈgrat]), in 1924 to Leningrad (Russian: Ленинград; IPA: [lʲɪnʲɪnˈgrat]) and in 1991 back to Saint Petersburg. In Russian literature, informal documents, and discourse, the "Saint" (Санкт-) is usually omitted, leaving Petersburg (Петербург, Peterburg). In common parlance Russians may drop "-burg" (-бург) as well, leaving only Peter (Питер, Russian: [ˈpʲitʲɪr]). Saint Petersburg was founded by Tsar Peter the Great on May 27 [O.S. 16] 1703. From 1713 to 1728 and from 1732 to 1918, Saint Petersburg was the Imperial capital of Russia. In 1918 the central government bodies moved from Saint Petersburg (then named Petrograd) to Moscow. It is Russia's second largest city after Moscow with almost 5 million inhabitants. Saint Petersburg is a major European cultural center, and also an important Russian port on the Baltic Sea. Saint Petersburg is often described as the
    9.00
    2 votes
    60
    Sweden

    Sweden

    • Newspapers: Offensiv
    Sweden (/ˈswiːdən/ SWEE-dən; Swedish: Sverige [ˈsværjɛ] ( listen)), officially the Kingdom of Sweden (Swedish:  Konungariket Sverige (help·info)), is a Nordic country on the Scandinavian Peninsula in Northern Europe. Sweden borders Norway and Finland, and is connected to Denmark by a bridge-tunnel across the Øresund. At 450,295 square kilometres (173,860 sq mi), Sweden is the third largest country in the European Union by area, with a total population of about 9.5 million. Sweden has a low population density of 21 inhabitants per square kilometre (54 /sq mi) with the population mostly concentrated to the southern half of the country. About 85% of the population live in urban areas. Sweden's capital city is Stockholm, which is also the largest city. Sweden emerged as an independent and unified country during the Middle Ages. In the 17th century, the country expanded its territories to form the Swedish Empire. The empire grew to be one of the great powers of Europe in the 17th and early 18th century. Most of the conquered territories outside the Scandinavian Peninsula were lost during the 18th and 19th centuries. The eastern half of Sweden, present-day Finland, was lost to Russia in
    5.80
    5 votes
    61
    Downtown Los Angeles

    Downtown Los Angeles

    • Newspapers: Los Angeles Downtown News
    Downtown Los Angeles is the central business district of Los Angeles, California, United States, located close to the geographic center of the metropolitan area. The area features many of the city's major arts institutions and sports facilities, sightseeing opportunities, a variety of skyscrapers and associated large multinational corporations and an array of public art and unique shopping opportunities. Downtown Los Angeles is the hub of the city's freeway network and Metro rapid transit system. Though downtown is generally thought to be bounded by the Los Angeles River on the east in Lincoln Heights, the Hollywood (101) Freeway to the north, the Santa Monica (10) Freeway on the south and the Harbor (110) Freeway on the west, some sources, including the Los Angeles Downtown News and Los Angeles Times, extend the area past the traditional boundary to include University Park and Exposition Park, encompassing the University of Southern California (USC) and Central City West neighborhoods. The earliest known settlements in the area of what is now Downtown Los Angeles was by the Tongva, a Native American people. Later European settlement arrived after Father Juan Crespí, a Spanish
    7.67
    3 votes
    62
    Fairview

    Fairview

    • Newspapers: Fairview Observer
    Fairview is a city located in Williamson County, Tennessee. It is part of the Nashville metropolitan area. The population was 7,720 at the 2010 census, which was a 33.1% increase in population from the 2000 census. In the communities just outside Fairview, there are an additional 4,100 people, so there are over 11,000 people living within the Fairview area. There is also an unincorporated community of the same name in Scott County. Fairview was incorporated on July 28, 1959, under the Uniform City Manager-Commission Charter as set out in Tennessee Code Annotated. Fairview was originally known as "Jingo." Fairview is home to Bowie Park which is one of the largest city managed parks in the state of Tennessee. Bowie Commons has a Publix supermarket. Fairview has two Elementary Schools, Fairview, and Westwood serving over 1000 students with grades K-5. Fairview Middle has an enrollment of 800 plus and is home to grades 6th-8th. Fairview High School serves over 1000 students and is home of the Yellow Jackets. Fairview High School was listed as one of the top 1000 High Schools in the US according to Newsweek Magazine. Fairview has a recreation center that is part of Williamson County
    7.67
    3 votes
    63
    Indianapolis

    Indianapolis

    • Newspapers: Nuvo Newsweekly
    Indianapolis  /ˌɪndiəˈnæpɵlɨs/ (abbreviated Indy /ˈɪndi/) is a city located in the Midwestern United States. Indianapolis is the capital of the US state of Indiana, and also the county seat of Marion County, Indiana. As of the 2010 census, the city's population is 829,718. It is the twelfth largest city in the United States, and one of the fastest growing metropolitan areas in the United States. Historically, Indianapolis has oriented itself around government and industry, particularly manufacturing. Over the late decades of the 20th century, the city's Unigov began a long process to revitalize the downtown area. Today, Indianapolis has a much more diversified economy, contributing to the fields of education, health care, and finance. Tourism is also a vital part of the economy of Indianapolis, and the city plays host to numerous conventions and sporting events. Of these, perhaps the most well known are the annual Indianapolis 500, Brickyard 400, and NHRA U.S. Nationals. Other major sporting events include the Men's and Women's NCAA Basketball Tournaments. Indianapolis also hosted the 2012 Super Bowl, a game that featured the New York Giants defeating the New England Patriots. Both
    7.67
    3 votes
    64
    Montpelier

    Montpelier

    • Newspapers: Seven Days
    Montpelier /mɒntˈpiːliər/ is a city in the U.S. state of Vermont that serves as the state capital and the shire town (county seat) of Washington County. As the capital of Vermont, Montpelier is the site of the Vermont State House, seat of the legislative branch of Vermont government. The population was 7,855 at the 2010 census. By population, it is the smallest state capital in the United States. The Vermont History Museum and Vermont College of Fine Arts are located in Montpelier. Chartered by the Vermont General Assembly on August 14, 1781, the town was granted to Timothy Bigelow and 58 others. The first permanent settlement began in May 1787, when Colonel Jacob Davis and General Parley Davis arrived from Charlton, Massachusetts. General Davis surveyed the land, while Colonel Davis cleared forest and erected a large log house on the west side of the North Branch of the Winooski River. His family moved in the following winter. It was Colonel Davis who selected the name Montpelier after the French city Montpellier. There was a general enthusiasm for things French as a result of the country's aid during the American Revolution. The settlement grew quickly, and by 1791 the population
    7.67
    3 votes
    65
    San Francisco Bay Area

    San Francisco Bay Area

    • Newspapers: San Francisco Chronicle
    The San Francisco Bay Area, commonly known as the Bay Area, is a populated region that surrounds the San Francisco and San Pablo estuaries in Northern California, United States. The region encompasses the major cities and metropolitan areas of San Francisco, Oakland, and San Jose, along with smaller urban and rural areas. The Bay Area's nine counties are Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, and Sonoma. Home to approximately 7.15 million people, the nine-county Bay Area contains many cities, towns, airports, and associated regional, state, and national parks, connected by a network of roads, highways, railroads, bridges, tunnels and commuter rail. The combined urban area of San Jose and San Francisco is the 53rd largest urban area in the world. The nine-county definition of the San Francisco Bay Area is not recognized by the United States Census Bureau; rather, they define a larger 11-county Combined Statistical Area (CSA) designated the San Jose-San Francisco-Oakland, CA CSA, including Santa Cruz and San Benito counties to the south; counties that do not have a border on the San Francisco Bay. As of the 2010 U.S. Census, this larger CSA
    7.67
    3 votes
    66
    Stowe

    Stowe

    • Newspapers: Seven Days
    Stowe is a town in Lamoille County, Vermont, United States. The population was 4,339 at the 2000 census. Tourism is a significant industry. Stowe was founded in March 1763 by Oliver Luce and his family. According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 72.7 square miles (188.4 km), of which 72.7 square miles (188.2 km) is land and 0.1 square mile (0.2 km) (0.10%) is water. By area, it is the second-largest town in the state of Vermont (after Chittenden in Rutland County). Stowe lies in a broad, fertile valley between Mount Mansfield and other peaks of the Green Mountains to the west, and the Worcester Range or "Hogback" Mountains to the east. The Waterbury River (or Little River, as it is presently known) with its main east and west branches and various tributaries, flows southward and, above Waterbury Center, empties into the large reservoir created by the flood control dam. From there the "Little River" flows southward and eventually empties into the westward flowing Winooski River west of the Village of Waterbury. As of the census of 2000, there were 4,339 people, 1,905 households, and 1,129 families residing in the town. The population density was 59.7
    7.67
    3 votes
    67
    Warren County

    Warren County

    • Newspapers: Review Republican
    Warren County lies in western Indiana between the Illinois state line and the Wabash River in the United States. Before the arrival of non-indigenous settlers in the early 19th century, the area was inhabited by several Native American tribes. The county was officially established in 1827 and was the 55th county to be formed in Indiana. The county seat is Williamsport. According to the 2000 census, the county was home to 8,419 people in 3,219 households; the 2010 population was 8,508. It is one of the most rural counties in the state, with the third-smallest population and the lowest population density at about 23 inhabitants per square mile (8.9/km). The county has four incorporated towns with a total population of about 3,100, as well as many small unincorporated communities. The county is divided into 12 townships which provide local services. Much of the land in the county is given over to agriculture, especially on the open prairie in the northern and western parts; the county's farmland is among the most productive in the state. Nearer the river along the southeastern border, the land has many hills, valleys, and tributary streams and is more heavily wooded. Agriculture,
    7.67
    3 votes
    68
    Edson

    Edson

    • Newspapers: Edson Leader
    Edson is a town in west-central Alberta, Canada. It is located in Yellowhead County, 192 kilometres (119 mi) west of Edmonton along the Yellowhead Highway and 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) east of the intersection with Highway 47. Residents of Edson are referred to as Edsonites. The town was originally named Heatherwood, but the name was changed around 1911 in honour of Edson Joseph Chamberlin, vice-president of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway. Local history maintains that Edson (Heatherwood) was built in its current location because it was the first level spot after Wolf Creek. (The land at Wolf Creek was quickly bought up after the announcement of plans to develop a town there, which rendered it uneconomical for the railway.) When Edson was declared the local rail centre, smaller communities such as Rosevear (abandoned), Wolf Creek, Carrot Creek and Niton Junction fell into a decline that continues today. In the 1950s, upgrading of Highway 16 caused a dramatic increase in private, commercial and industrial traffic. Today, the Yellowhead Highway carries some of the heaviest traffic flow in Alberta and has been officially declared the second Trans-Canada Highway. In the 1970s, a
    10.00
    1 votes
    69
    Leader

    Leader

    • Newspapers: Medicine Hat News
    Leader is a town in southwestern Saskatchewan, Canada, located approximately 350 km directly east of Calgary, Alberta and is near the border between Saskatchewan and Alberta. It has a population of 881 as of 2006. Before settlement, the Leader area was a hunting ground of prehistoric humans. A Midland Folsom point was discovered that the University of Saskatchewan dated back 8,000 to 9,000 years before present. Homesteaders began arriving in large numbers in 1907; most were German immigrants from southern Russia. An RCMP detachment opened in 1909, and ensured all the settlers had adequate supplies to last the winter. By 1911, the Canadian Pacific Railway purchased a quarter section of land as the prospective site for a settlement. The railway arrived in 1913 and the village of Prussia was incorporated in September of that year. By 1917, anti-German sentiment surrounding the events of World War I prompted the community to change its name, as well as its German street names to numbers. The new name was chosen after a contest won by two local girls, Bertha Keller and Muriel Legault. They were inspired by the arrival of the Regina Morning Leader newspaper on the passenger train. The
    10.00
    1 votes
    70
    Mauritania

    Mauritania

    • Newspapers: Chaab
    Mauritania /mɔrɪˈteɪniə/ (Arabic: موريتانيا‎ Mōrītānyā; Berber: Muritanya / Agawej; Wolof: Gànnaar; Soninke: Murutaane; Pulaar: Moritani; French: Mauritanie), officially the Islamic Republic of Mauritania, is an Arab Maghreb country in West Africa. It is bordered by the Atlantic Ocean in the west, by Western Sahara (controlled by Morocco) in the north, by Algeria in the northeast, by Mali in the east and southeast, and by Senegal in the southwest. It is named after the ancient Berber Kingdom of Mauretania, which later became a province of the Roman Empire, even though the modern Mauritania covers a territory far to the south of the old Berber kingdom that had no relation with it. The capital and largest city is Nouakchott, located on the Atlantic coast. The government of Mauritania was overthrown on 6 August 2008, in a military coup d'état led by General Mohamed Ould Abdel Aziz. On 16 April 2009, General Aziz resigned from the military to run for president in the 19 July elections, which he won. In Mauritania about 20% of the population live on less than US$1.25 per day. Slavery in Mauritania has been called a major human rights issue as well as female genital mutilation, child
    10.00
    1 votes
    71
    Mississauga

    Mississauga

    • Newspapers: The Mississauga News
    Mississauga (/ˌmɪsɪˈsɒɡə/) is a Canadian city in Southern Ontario on the shores of Lake Ontario, located in the Regional Municipality of Peel, in the western part of the Greater Toronto Area. The city has a population of 713,443 as of the Canada 2011 Census, and is Canada's sixth-most populous municipality. Developed as a suburb of Toronto, Mississauga's growth is attributed to its proximity to that city. It is the 37th largest suburb in the world by population, and the 4th largest in North America. The city is debt-free and has not borrowed money since 1978. Mississauga has been the beneficiary of federal infrastructure funding but may have to borrow money to build new capital projects in 2012. Residents of the city are called Mississaugans. The city is placed fourth in 'large cities of the future' by fDi Magazine for North and South American cities. Mississauga was also rated as Canada's 11th best city to live in terms of prosperity according to MoneySense magazine. Toronto Pearson International Airport, Canada's busiest airport is located in the city, and it is the location of several major corporate headquarters for Canada such as Walmart Canada and Target Canada. At the time
    10.00
    1 votes
    72
    Novato

    Novato

    • Newspapers: Novato Advance
    Novato ( /nəˈvɑːtoʊ/ nə-VAH-toh) is a city located in the North Bay region of the San Francisco Bay Area, in northern Marin County. Novato is located about 10 miles (16 km) north-northwest of San Rafael, at an elevation of 30 feet above sea level (nine meters). The 2010 U.S. Census estimated the city population to be about 51,904. Novato is about 30 miles (48 km) north of San Francisco on U.S. 101. What is now Novato was originally the site of several Coast Miwok villages: Chokeche, near downtown Novato, Puyuku, near Ignacio, and Olompali, at the present Olompali State Historic Park. In 1839 the Mexican government granted the 8,876-acre (35.92 km) Rancho Novato to Fernando Feliz. The rancho was named after a local Miwok leader who had probably been given the name of Saint Novatus at his baptism. Subsequently four additional land grants were made in the area; Rancho Corte Madera de Novato to John Martin in 1839, Rancho San Jose to Ignacio Pacheco in 1840, Rancho Olompali awarded in 1843 to Camilo Ynitia, son of a Coast Miwok chief, and Rancho Nicasio, by far the largest at 56,621 acres (229.1 km), awarded to Pablo de la Guerra and John B.R. Cooper in 1844. Novato, along with the
    10.00
    1 votes
    73
    United Kingdom

    United Kingdom

    • Newspapers: The Guardian
    The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom (UK) or Britain, is a sovereign state located off the north-western coast of continental Europe. The country includes the island of Great Britain, the north-eastern part of the island of Ireland, and many smaller islands. Northern Ireland is the only part of the UK that shares a land border with another sovereign state—the Republic of Ireland. Apart from this land border the UK is surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, the North Sea, the English Channel and the Irish Sea. The United Kingdom is a unitary state governed under a constitutional monarchy and a parliamentary system, with its seat of government in the capital city of London. It is a country in its own right and consists of four administrative divisions (or countries): England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales. The latter three of these are devolved administrations, each with varying powers, based in their capital cities Belfast, Edinburgh and Cardiff respectively. Associated with the UK, but not constitutionally part of it, are the three Crown dependencies: Guernsey, Jersey and the Isle of Man. The United Kingdom has fourteen
    10.00
    1 votes
    74
    Canada

    Canada

    • Newspapers: The Globe and Mail
    Canada (/ˈkænədə/) is a North American country consisting of ten provinces and three territories. Located in the northern part of the continent, it extends from the Atlantic to the Pacific and northward into the Arctic Ocean. Canada is the world's second-largest country by total area, and its common border with the United States is the world's longest land border. The land that is now Canada has been inhabited for millennia by various Aboriginal peoples. Beginning in the late 15th century, British and French colonial expeditions explored, and later settled, the region's Atlantic coast. France ceded nearly all of its colonies in North America to Britain in 1763 after the Seven Years' War. In 1867, with the union of three British North American colonies through Confederation, Canada was formed as a federal dominion of four provinces. This began an accretion of provinces and territories and a process of increasing autonomy, culminating in the Canada Act 1982. Canada is a federal state governed as a parliamentary democracy and a constitutional monarchy, with Queen Elizabeth II as its head of state. The country is officially bilingual and multicultural at the federal level, with a
    6.50
    4 votes
    75
    Plattsburgh

    Plattsburgh

    • Newspapers: Seven Days
    Plattsburgh is a city in and county seat of Clinton County, New York, United States. The population was 19,989 at the 2010 census. The population of the unincorporated areas within the Town of Plattsburgh was 11,870 as of the 2010 census; making the population for the immediate Plattsburgh, New York Region 31,859. The city of Plattsburgh is located entirely within the original boundaries of the town of Plattsburgh and is in the North Country region of the northeastern part of the state. The City of Plattsburgh is the population center and county seat at the heart of the Plattsburgh Micropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) - population 82,128 as of the 2010 Census. A statistical area representing the greater Plattsburgh region (as defined by the U.S. government), the Plattsburgh MSA includes all communities in the immediate Clinton County, New York area. As early as Samuel de Champlain's 1609 expedition into the Lake Champlain valley, this region began to fall under the influence of the French - and later under American and English colonial power. Early French contact and the proximity of Plattsburgh to Quebec, make this a historically French region. Situated within and intimately
    6.50
    4 votes
    76
    Seattle

    Seattle

    • Newspapers: The Seattle Times
    Seattle (pronounced [siːˈætɫ̩] ( listen) see-AT-əl or [siːˈæɾɫ̩]) is a major coastal seaport and the seat of King County, in the U.S. state of Washington. With 608,660 residents as of the 2010 Census, Seattle is the largest city in the Pacific Northwest region of North America and the largest city on the West Coast north of San Francisco. The Seattle metropolitan area of about 3.4 million inhabitants is the 15th largest metropolitan area in the United States. The city is situated on a narrow isthmus between Puget Sound (an arm of the Pacific Ocean) and Lake Washington, about 114 miles (183 km) south of the Canada–United States border, yet further north than Toronto. In 2010, the container ports in the Seattle metropolitan area (Seattle-Tacoma) were the third busiest in the United States, after Los Angeles–Long Beach and New York–New Jersey, serving as a major gateway for trade with Asia. The Seattle area had been inhabited by Native Americans for at least 4,000 years before the first permanent white settlers. Arthur A. Denny and his group of travelers, subsequently known as the Denny Party, arrived at Alki Point on November 13, 1851. The settlement was moved to its current site and
    6.50
    4 votes
    77
    Napa County

    Napa County

    • Newspapers: American Canyon Eagle
    Napa County is a county located north of San Pablo Bay in the U.S. state of California. It is officially one of the nine San Francisco Bay Area counties, and one of four North Bay counties. The county is coterminous with the Napa, California, Metropolitan Statistical Area. As of the 2010 census the population is 136,484. The county seat is Napa. Napa County was one of the original counties of California, created in 1850 at the time of statehood. Parts of the county's territory were given to Lake County in 1861. The word napa is of Native American origin and has been variously translated as "grizzly bear", "house", "motherland", and "fish". Of the many explanations of the name's origin, the most plausible seems to be that it is derived from the Patwin word napo meaning house, although local residents will often cite an urban legend that gives the translation as "you will always return". Napa County, once the producer of many different crops, is known today for its wine industry, rising in the 1960s to the first rank of wine regions with France, Italy, Portugal and Spain. In prehistoric times, the valley was inhabited by the Patwin Native Americans, with possible habitation by Wappo
    5.60
    5 votes
    78
    Dothan

    Dothan

    • Newspapers: Dothan Eagle
    Dothan ( /ˈdoʊθən/) is a city located in the southeastern corner of the US state of Alabama, situated approximately 20 miles (32 km) west of the Georgia state line and 18 miles (29 km) north of Florida. It is the seat of Houston County, with portions extending into nearby Dale County and Henry County. Its name derives from Genesis 37:17: "let us go to Dothan." According to the 2010 census the city's population was 65,496, making it the largest town in this part of the state. Dothan is the principal city of the Dothan Metropolitan Statistical Area which encompasses all of Geneva, Henry, and Houston counties; the small portion that lies in Dale County is part of the Enterprise–Ozark Micropolitan Statistical Area. The combined population for the entire Dothan metropolitan area in 2000 was 137,916. The city serves as the main transportation and commercial hub for a significant part of southeastern Alabama, southwest Georgia, and nearby portions of the Florida Panhandle. Since approximately one-fourth of the U.S. peanut crop is produced nearby, with much of it being processed in the city, Dothan is called "The Peanut Capital of the World." The area that is now Dothan was originally
    8.50
    2 votes
    79
    Fairfax County

    Fairfax County

    • Newspapers: Fairfax County Times
    Fairfax County is a county in Virginia, in the United States. As of the 2010 census, the population of the county is 1,081,726, making it the most populous jurisdiction in the Commonwealth of Virginia, with 13.5% of Virginia's population. The county is also the most populous jurisdiction in the Washington Metropolitan Area, with 19.8% of the MSA population, as well as the larger Baltimore–Washington Metropolitan Area, with 13.1% of the CSA population. Fairfax was the first county in the United States to reach a six-figure median household income, and has the second-highest median household income of any local jurisdiction in the United States after neighbor Loudoun County. The county is home to the headquarters of intelligence agencies such as the Central Intelligence Agency, National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, and National Reconnaissance Office, as well as the National Counterterrorism Center and Office of the Director of National Intelligence. The county is also home to ten of the metropolitan area's Fortune 500 companies. Fairfax County was formed in 1742 from the northern part of Prince William County. It was named for Thomas Fairfax, 6th Lord Fairfax of Cameron
    8.50
    2 votes
    80
    Florida

    Florida

    • Newspapers: Cleveland Scene
    Florida (/ˈflɒrɪdə/) is a state in the southeastern region of the United States, bordered to the west by the Gulf of Mexico, to the north by Alabama and Georgia and to the east by the Atlantic Ocean. Florida is the 22nd most extensive, the 4th most populous, and the 8th most densely populated of the 50 United States. The state capital is Tallahassee, its largest city is Jacksonville, and the Miami metropolitan area is the largest metropolitan area in the southeastern United States. Much of Florida is situated on a peninsula between the Gulf of Mexico, the Atlantic Ocean, and the Straits of Florida. Its geography is marked by a coastline, by the omnipresence of water and the threat of hurricanes. Florida has the longest coastline in the contiguous United States, encompassing approximately 1,350 miles (2,170 km), and is the only state to border both the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean. Much of the state is at or near sea level and its terrain is characterized by sedimentary soils. The climate varies from subtropical in the north to tropical in the south. Its symbolic animals like the American alligator, crocodile, Florida panther and the manatee, can be found in the Everglades,
    8.50
    2 votes
    81
    Knoxville

    Knoxville

    • Newspapers: Knoxville News Sentinel
    Knoxville is a city in the U.S. state of Tennessee, and the county seat of Knox County. As of 2010, the city had a population of 178,874 residents, making it the state's third largest city. Knoxville is the principal city of the Knoxville Metropolitan Statistical Area, which in 2000 had a population of 655,400. The KMSA is in turn the central component of the Knoxville-Sevierville-La Follette Combined Statistical Area, which in 2000 had a population of 1,029,155. First settled in 1786, Knoxville was the first capital of Tennessee. The city struggled with geographic isolation throughout the early 19th century, though the arrival of the railroad in 1855 led to an economic boom. During the Civil War, the city was bitterly divided over the secession issue, and was occupied alternately by both Confederate and Union armies. Following the war, Knoxville grew rapidly as a major wholesaling and manufacturing center. The city's economy stagnated after the 1920s as the manufacturing sector collapsed, the Downtown area declined, and city leaders became entrenched in highly partisan political fights. Hosting the 1982 World's Fair helped reinvigorate the city, and revitalization initiatives by
    8.50
    2 votes
    82
    Lafayette

    Lafayette

    • Newspapers: Journal and Courier
    Lafayette ( /ˌlɑːfiːˈɛt/ or lah-fee-YET) is a city in and the county seat of Tippecanoe County, Indiana, United States, 63 miles (101 km) northwest of Indianapolis. West Lafayette, on the other side of the Wabash River, is home to Purdue University, which contributes significantly to both communities. Together, Lafayette and West Lafayette form the core of the Lafayette, Indiana Metropolitan Statistical Area. According to the 2010 census, its population was 67,140, an increase of 19% from 56,397 in 2000. When European explorers first reached the area around what is now Tippecanoe County, it was inhabited by a tribe of Miami Indians known as the Ouiatenon or Weas. In 1717 the French government established Fort Ouiatenon across the Wabash River and three miles (5 km) south of present-day Lafayette. The fort became the center of trade for fur trappers, merchants and Indians. An annual reenactment and festival known as Feast of the Hunters' Moon takes place there each autumn. The town of Lafayette was platted in May 1825 by William Digby, a trader. It was designated as the county seat of the newly formed Tippecanoe County the following year. Like many frontier towns, Lafayette was
    8.50
    2 votes
    83
    Portland

    Portland

    • Newspapers: Portland Press Herald
    Portland is the largest city in Maine and is the county seat of Cumberland County. The 2010 city population was 66,194, growing 3 percent since the census of 2000. With a metro population of over 500,000, the Greater Portland area is home to more than one-third of Maine's total population. Tourists visit Portland's historic Old Port district along Portland Harbor, at the mouth of the Fore River and part of Casco Bay, and the Arts District, which runs along Congress Street in the center of the city. Portland Head Light is located in nearby Cape Elizabeth and marks the entrance to Portland Harbor. The city seal depicts a phoenix rising from ashes, which aligns with the city's motto, Resurgam, Latin for "I will rise again." The motto refers to Portland's recoveries from four devastating fires. The city of Portland, Oregon was named for Portland, Maine. Portland Public Schools is the largest school system in Maine, serving approximately 7,000 students. Native Americans originally named Portland Machigonne. The first European settler was Capt. Christopher Levett, an English naval captain granted 6,000 acres (2,400 ha) by King Charles I of England in 1623 to found a settlement in Casco
    8.50
    2 votes
    84
    Tallahassee

    Tallahassee

    • Newspapers: Tallahassee Democrat
    Tallahassee ( /ˌtæləˈhæsi/) is the capital of the U.S. state of Florida. It is the county seat and only incorporated municipality in Leon County, and is the 128th largest city in the United States. Tallahassee became the capital of Florida, then the Florida Territory, in 1824. In 2010, the population recorded by the U.S. Census Bureau was 181,376, and the Tallahassee metropolitan area is 367,413. Tallahassee is one of Florida's most prominent college cities, and is home to several colleges and universities, most notably Florida State University and Florida A&M University. Other schools in Tallahassee include Tallahassee Community College and branches of Saint Leo University, Thomas University, Keiser University, Barry University, Flagler College, and Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. Tallahassee is a regional center for trade and agriculture in the Florida Panhandle, and is served by Tallahassee Regional Airport. With one of the fastest growing manufacturing and high tech economies in Florida, its major private employers include a General Dynamics Land Systems manufacturing facility (military and combat applications), the Municipal Code Corporation, which specializes in the
    8.50
    2 votes
    85
    Middlebury

    Middlebury

    • Newspapers: Seven Days
    Middlebury is a town in and the shire town (county seat) of Addison County, Vermont, United States. The population was 8,496 at the 2010 census. Middlebury is home to both Middlebury College and the Henry Sheldon Museum of Vermont History. One of the New Hampshire grants, Middlebury was chartered by Colonial Governor Benning Wentworth on November 2, 1761. The name Middlebury came from its location in the middle of Salisbury and New Haven. It was awarded to John Evarts and 62 others. The French and Indian Wars ended in 1763, and the first settlers arrived in 1766. John Chipman cleared his lot seven, it was the first clearing. During the Revolutionary War, much of the town was burned in Carleton's Raid on November 6, 1778. After the war concluded in 1783, settlers returned to rebuild homes, clear forests and establish farms. Principal crops were grains and hay. Landowners vied for the lucrative honor of having the village center grow on their properties. A survey dispute with Salisbury led to the forfeiture of Gamaliel Painter's farm to that town, and his transition from farming to developing Middlebury Village near his and Abisha Washburn's mill, together with other mills that
    7.33
    3 votes
    86
    North Dakota

    North Dakota

    • Newspapers: Bismarck Tribune
    North Dakota (/ˌnɔrθ dəˈkoʊtə/) is a state located in the Midwestern region of the United States, along the Canadian border. The state is bordered by Manitoba and Saskatchewan to the north, Minnesota to the east, South Dakota to the south and Montana to the west. North Dakota is the 19th most extensive, but the 3rd least populous and the 4th least densely populated of the 50 United States. North Dakota was created from the northern portion of the Dakota Territory and admitted to the Union on November 2, 1889, simultaneously with South Dakota. The state capitol is located in Bismarck and the largest city is Fargo. The primary public universities are located in Grand Forks and Fargo. The U.S. Air Force operates air bases at Minot AFB and Grand Forks AFB. For more than a decade, the state has had a strong economy, with unemployment lower than the national average and strong job and population growth. Much of the growth has been based on development of the Bakken oil shale fields in the western part of the state. The state has also seen strong economic growth in the technology and service sectors. North Dakota is considered to be in the U.S. region known as the Great Plains. The state
    7.33
    3 votes
    87
    Oakland

    Oakland

    • Newspapers: The Oakland Tribune
    Oakland ( /ˈoʊklənd/), located in the U.S. state of California, is a major West Coast port city and the busiest port for San Francisco Bay and all of Northern California. It is the third largest city in the San Francisco Bay Area, the eighth-largest city in the state, and the 47th-largest city in the U.S. with a population of 395,817. Incorporated in 1852, Oakland is the county seat of Alameda County. It serves as a major transportation hub and trade center for the entire region and is also the principal city of the Bay Area Region known as the East Bay. The city is situated directly across the bay six miles east from San Francisco. Oakland's territory covers what was once a mosaic of coastal terrace prairie, oak woodland, and north coastal scrub. Its land served as a rich resource when its hillside oak and redwood timber were logged to build San Francisco, and Oakland's fertile flatland soils helped it become a prolific agricultural region. In the late 1860s, Oakland was selected as the western terminal of the Transcontinental Railroad. It continued to grow into the 20th century with its busy port, shipyards, and a thriving automobile industry. Following the 1906 San Francisco
    7.33
    3 votes
    88
    San Anselmo

    San Anselmo

    • Newspapers: Ross Valley Reporter
    San Anselmo is an incorporated town in Marin County, California, in the western United States. San Anselmo is located 1.5 miles (2.4 km) west of San Rafael, at an elevation of 46 feet (14 m). It is located about 20 miles (32 km) north of San Francisco. Neighboring towns include San Rafael to the east, Fairfax to the west, and Ross to the south. Mount Tamalpais dominates the view to the south. The population was 12,336 at the 2010 census. The land in and around San Anselmo was mostly pastoral until 1874, when the North Pacific Coast Railroad (NPC) added to its line a spur track from San Anselmo to San Rafael. In 1875, the railroad completed a line from Sausalito to Tomales and north to Cazadero via San Anselmo. For a few years, the town was referred to on railroad maps as "Junction", but in 1883 the name San Anselmo came back into use. The San Anselmo post office opened in 1892. Two postal substations were operated: Lansdale, from 1924 to 1962, and Yolanda, from 1924 to 1954. From 1902 until the early 1940s, San Anselmo was part of Marin's Northwestern Pacific (in 1907, investors formed the NWP) Electric Train system. The Miracle Mile's and Center Boulevard's current "raised
    7.33
    3 votes
    89
    Syria

    Syria

    • Newspapers: Tishreen
    Syria (/ˈsɪriə/ ( listen) SIRR-ee-ə ; Arabic: سوريا‎ Sūryā or سورية Sūrīyah ; Syriac: ܣܘܪܝܐ), officially the Syrian Arab Republic (Arabic: الجمهورية العربية السورية‎ al-Jumhūrīyah al-ʻArabīyah As-Sūrīyah  Arabic pronunciation (help·info)), is a country in Western Asia, bordering Lebanon and the Mediterranean Sea to the West, Turkey to the north, Iraq to the east, Jordan to the south, and Israel to the southwest. In English, the name Syria was formerly synonymous with the Levant, known in Arabic as Sham, while the modern state encompasses the sites of several ancient kingdoms and empires, including the Eblan civilization of the third millennium BC. In the Islamic era, its capital city, Damascus, the oldest continuously inhabited city in the world, was the seat of the Umayyad Caliphate, and a provincial capital of the Mamluk Sultanate of Egypt. The modern Syrian state was established after the First World War as a French mandate, and represented the largest Arab state to emerge from the formerly Ottoman-ruled Arab Levant. It gained independence in April 1946, as a parliamentary republic. The post-independence period was tumultuous, and a large number of military coups and coup
    7.33
    3 votes
    90
    Timaru

    Timaru

    • Newspapers: The Timaru Herald
    Timaru (Maori: Te Tihi-o-Maru) is a major port in the southern Canterbury region of New Zealand, located 160 kilometres southwest of Christchurch and about 200 kilometres northeast of Dunedin on the eastern Pacific coast of the South Island. The Timaru District, a territorial authority of 42,867 people (2006 census) in and around the former Timaru City (27,200), includes a prosperous agricultural hinterland with links to smaller rural communities such as Pleasant Point (1,170), Temuka (4,044), and Geraldine (2,244). The town of Waimate is about 40 kilometres to the south just off the main highway to Oamaru and Dunedin. The Timaru urban area is the second largest city in the Canterbury Region, after Christchurch. Caroline Bay beach is a popular recreational area located close to Timaru's town centre, just to the north of the substantial port facilities. Beyond Caroline Bay, the industrial suburb of Washdyke is at a major junction with State Highway 8, the main route into the Mackenzie Country. This provides a road link to Fairlie, Twizel, Lake Tekapo, Aoraki/Mount Cook and Queenstown. Timaru has been constructed on rolling hills created from the lava flows of the extinct Mt Horrible
    7.33
    3 votes
    91
    Emsdetten

    Emsdetten

    • Newspapers: Emsdettener Volkszeitung
    Emsdetten is a town in the district of Steinfurt, in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. Emsdetten is situated on the river Ems, approx. 13 km south-east of Rheine and 25 km north-west of Münster. Emsdetten consists of 8 districts: On 20 November 2006, 18-year-old former student Bastian Bosse entered the Geschwister Scholl School, fired several shots and set off smoke grenades. He injured 8 people before killing himself by a shot into the mouth.
    6.25
    4 votes
    92
    Lexington

    Lexington

    • Newspapers: Lexington Minuteman
    Lexington is a town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States. The population was 31,394 at the 2010 census. This town is famous for being the site of the first shot of the American Revolutionary War, in the Battle of Lexington on April 19, 1775. Lexington was first settled circa 1642 as part of Cambridge, Massachusetts. What is now Lexington was then incorporated as a parish, called Cambridge Farms, in 1691. This allowed them to have a separate church and minister, but were still under jurisdiction of the Town of Cambridge. Lexington was incorporated as a separate town in 1713. It was then that it got the name Lexington. How it received its name is the subject of some controversy. Some people believe that it was named in honor of Lord Lexington, an English peer. Some, on the other hand, believe that it was named after Lexington (which was pronounced and today spelled Laxton) in Nottinghamshire, England. In the early colonial days, Vine Brook, which runs through Lexington, Burlington, and Bedford, and then empties into the Shawsheen River, was a focal point of the farming and industry of the town. It provided for many types of mills, and later, in the 20th Century for farm
    6.25
    4 votes
    93
    Bakersfield

    Bakersfield

    • Newspapers: The Bakersfield Californian
    Bakersfield is a major city near the southern end of the San Joaquin Valley in Kern County, California. It is roughly equidistant between Fresno and Los Angeles 110 miles (180 km) to the north and south respectively. In the 2010 census, the city’s population was 347,483, making it the 9th largest city in California and the 51st largest city in the United States. It is also the third largest inland city in California, behind Fresno and Sacramento. The city is currently in a state of rapid growth. Over the 40-year period between 1970 and 2010, it has grown 400% (from 70,000 to 347,000), making it one of the fastest growing cities in California. Bakersfield is the focal point of the larger Bakersfield-Delano Metropolitan Statistic Area (MSA). In 2010, it had a population of 839,631, making it the 62nd largest metropolitan area in United States. The city is also the county seat for Kern County, the third largest county in California by landmass (which encompasses the entire MSA). Bakersfield was founded by Colonel Thomas Baker in 1869. It was located near (part of it "in") one of the forks of the Kern River, in reclaimed swampland. At one time called Kern Island, the city became known
    7.00
    3 votes
    94
    Berkeley

    Berkeley

    • Newspapers: Berkeley Daily Planet
    Berkeley ( /ˈbɜrkliː/ BURK-lee) is a city on the east shore of the San Francisco Bay in Northern California, United States. Its neighbors to the south are the cities of Oakland and Emeryville. To the north is the city of Albany and the unincorporated community of Kensington. The eastern city limits coincide with the county line (bordering Contra Costa County), which generally follows the ridge line of the Berkeley Hills. Berkeley is located in northern Alameda County. The population was 112,580 at the 2010 census. The city is named after Bishop George Berkeley. Berkeley is the site of the University of California, Berkeley, the oldest of the University of California system, and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It is also home to the Graduate Theological Union. The city is noted as one of the most politically liberal in the nation, with one study placing it as the third most liberal city in the United States. The site of today's City of Berkeley was the territory of the Chochenyo/Huchiun band of the Ohlone people when the first Europeans arrived. Evidence of their existence in the area include pits in rock formations, which they used to grind acorns, and a shellmound, now
    7.00
    3 votes
    95
    Chicago

    Chicago

    • Newspapers: Chicago Flame
    Chicago (/ʃɪˈkɑːɡoʊ/ or /ʃɪˈkɔːɡoʊ/) is a world-class city, and is the third most populous city in the United States. Located in the State of Illinois, the city has approximately 2.7 million residents. Its metropolitan area, sometimes called "Chicagoland", is the third-largest in the United States, after New York City and Los Angeles, with an estimated 9.8 million people. Chicago is the county seat of Cook County, though a small portion of the city limits also extend into DuPage County. Chicago was incorporated as a city in 1837, near a portage between the Great Lakes and the Mississippi River watershed. Today, Chicago is listed as an alpha+ global city by the Globalization and World Cities Research Network, and ranks seventh in the world in the 2012 Global Cities Index. The city is an international hub for finance, commerce, industry, telecommunications, and transportation, with O'Hare International Airport being the second-busiest airport in the world in terms of traffic movements. In 2008, the city hosted 45.6 million domestic and overseas visitors. Among metropolitan areas, Chicago has the fourth-largest gross domestic product (GDP) in the world, just behind Tokyo, New York
    7.00
    3 votes
    96
    Montgomery County

    Montgomery County

    • Newspapers: Northwest Houston Leader
    Montgomery County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas within the Houston–Sugar Land–Baytown metropolitan area. The county was created by an act of the Congress of the Republic of Texas on December 14, 1837. The county was named for the town of Montgomery, Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 455,746. A 55.14% growth rate in the ten years from the last U.S. Census—making the county the 24th fastest-growing county in the United States. The seat of the county is Conroe. Montgomery county is officially the birthplace of the Texas flag. The actual design of the Lone Star Flag remained a mystery until the Texas House of Representatives passed House Resolution 1123 in 1997 commemorating Montgomery County as the flag's official birthplace. Dr. Charles B. Stewart is credited with creating the inspirational banner of the State of Texas. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,077 square miles (2,790 km), of which 1,044 square miles (2,700 km) is land and 33 square miles (85 km) (3.04%) is water. See List of Highways in Montgomery County for more roadways in Montgomery County. As of the census of 2000, there were 293,768 people, 103,296
    7.00
    3 votes
    97
    Winnipeg

    Winnipeg

    • Newspapers: Winnipeg Tribune
    Winnipeg /ˈwɪnɪpɛɡ/ is the capital and largest city of Manitoba, Canada, with a census area population of 730,018 in the Canada 2011 Census. It is located near the longitudinal centre of North America, at the confluence of the Red and Assiniboine Rivers. The city is found on the eastern edge of the Canadian Prairies. The name "Winnipeg" comes from the Cree for "muddy waters." The Winnipeg area was a trading centre for Aboriginal peoples prior to the arrival of Europeans. The first fort was built there in 1738 by French traders. A settlement was later founded by the Selkirk settlers in 1812, the nucleus of which was incorporated as the City of Winnipeg in 1873 with a population of 1,869. Winnipeg is the seventh-largest municipality in Canada, and is the primary municipality of the Winnipeg Capital Region (population of 730,305), with more than half of Manitoba's population. The economy of Winnipeg includes finance, manufacturing, food and beverage production, culture, retail and tourism sectors. Winnipeg is a transportation hub, served by Richardson International Airport. The city has railway connections to the United States and Eastern and Western Canada through three Class I rail
    7.00
    3 votes
    98
    Medicine Hat

    Medicine Hat

    • Newspapers: Medicine Hat News
    Medicine Hat (Assiniboine: pežúda wápa ) is a city of 61,180 people located in the southeastern part of the province of Alberta, Canada. It and the adjacent Town of Redcliff to the northwest are surrounded by Cypress County. It is situated on the Trans-Canada Highway, the eastern terminus of the Crowsnest Highway, and the South Saskatchewan River. Nearby communities considered part of the Medicine Hat area include the Town of Redcliff (located immediately adjacent to the city's northwest boundary) and the hamlets of Desert Blume, Dunmore, Irvine, Seven Persons, and Veinerville. The Cypress Hills (including Cypress Hills Interprovincial Park) is a relatively short distance (by car) to the southeast of the city. Historically, Medicine Hat has been known for its large natural gas fields, being immortalised by Rudyard Kipling as having "all hell for a basement". Because of these reserves, the city is known as The Gas City. It is Alberta's sixth largest city. In October 2008, Medicine Hat was named one of Alberta's Top Employers by Mediacorp Canada Inc., which was announced by the Calgary Herald and the Edmonton Journal. The name "Medicine Hat" is the English translation of 'Saamis'
    6.00
    4 votes
    99
    MetroWest

    MetroWest

    • Newspapers: MetroWest Daily News
    MetroWest is a cluster of cities and towns lying west of Boston and east of Worcester, in the U.S. state of Massachusetts. The name was coined in the 1980s by a local newspaper. While regional definitions vary, the MetroWest Economic Research Center at Framingham State University defines MetroWest as the nine towns of Ashland, Framingham, Holliston, Hopkinton, Natick, Sherborn, Southborough, Sudbury, and Wayland, representing a total population of approximately 184,000. With the exception of Southborough, in Worcester County, these towns are part of Middlesex County. The 495/MetroWest Corridor Partnership calls the region the "Arc of Innovation" because it is home to many of Massachusetts' largest and fastest growing companies. In addition to the nine towns mentioned above, 23 other municipalities in Middlesex, Norfolk and Worcester counties are included in the 495/MetroWest Corridor as defined by the 495/MetroWest Corridor Partnership: Yellow Book's MetroWest edition defines MetroWest as all cities and towns completely or partially enclosed by Interstate 93 on the northeast, Interstate 495 on the north and west, and Interstate 95 on the east and south, stretching as far north as
    6.00
    4 votes
    100
    Rutgers-Newark

    Rutgers-Newark

    • Newspapers: The Daily Targum
    Rutgers University in Newark is one of three campuses of Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, the eighth oldest college in the United States and a member of the Association of American Universities. It is located in Newark, New Jersey. Rutgers University, Newark, officially came into existence in 1946, when the New Jersey State Legislature voted to make the University of Newark part of Rutgers University. The roots of Rutgers University, Newark, however, date back to 1908 when the New Jersey Law School first opened its doors. That law school, along with four other educational institutions in Newark — Dana College, the Newark Institute of Arts & Sciences, the Seth Boyden School of Business, and the Mercer Beasley School of Law — formed a series of alliances over the years. A final merger in 1936 resulted in the establishment of the University of Newark. A decade later, Rutgers University in Newark was founded. Today, the 38-acre campus, located in Newark's University Heights neighborhood, consists of the following degree-granting divisions: Rutgers University in Newark awards approximately 80 doctoral degrees, 250 juris doctor degrees, 1,050 master degrees, and 1,500
    6.00
    4 votes
    101
    Basse-Normandie

    Basse-Normandie

    • Newspapers: Ouest-France
    Lower Normandy (French: Basse-Normandie, IPA: [bas nɔr.mɑ̃.di]; Norman: Basse-Normaundie) is an administrative region of France. It was created in 1956, when the Normandy region was divided into Lower Normandy and Upper Normandy. The region includes three departments, Calvados, Manche and Orne, that cover the part of Normandy traditionally termed "Lower Normandy" lying west of the Dives River, the Pays d'Auge (except a small part remaining in Upper Normandy), a small part of the Pays d'Ouche (the main part remaining in Upper Normandy), the Norman Perche and part of the "French" Perche. It covers 10,857 km, 3.2 percent of the surface area of France. The traditional districts of Lower Normandy include the Cotentin Peninsula and La Hague, the Campagne de Caen, the Norman Bocage, the Bessin and the Avranchin. The traditional province of Normandy, with an integral history reaching back to the 10th century, was divided in 1957 into two regions: Lower Normandy and Upper Normandy. During the Roman era, the region was divided into several different city-states. That of Vieux was excavated in the 17th century, revealing numerous structures and vestiges bearing testimony to the prosperity of
    8.00
    2 votes
    102
    Goshen

    Goshen

    • Newspapers: The Goshen News
    Goshen ( /ˈɡoʊʃən/) is a city in and the county seat of Elkhart County, Indiana, United States. It is the smaller of the two principal cities of the Elkhart-Goshen Metropolitan Statistical Area, which in turn is part of the South Bend-Elkhart-Mishawaka Combined Statistical Area. It is located in the northern part of Indiana near the Michigan border, in a region known as Michiana. Goshen is located 10 miles south of Elkhart, 25 miles southeast of South Bend, 120 miles east of Chicago, and 150 miles north of Indianapolis. The population was 31,719 at the 2010 census. The city is known as a center of manufacturing for recreational vehicles and accessories, the home of Goshen College, a small Mennonite liberal arts college, and home to the Elkhart County 4-H Fair, the second largest county fair in the United States. Goshen is located at 41°34′55″N 85°50′12″W / 41.58194°N 85.83667°W / 41.58194; -85.83667. The Elkhart River winds its way through the city and through a dam on the south side making the Goshen Dam Pond. Rock Run Creek also runs through town. The city is divided east/west by Main Street and north/south by Lincoln Avenue. According to the 2010 census, the city has a total
    8.00
    2 votes
    103
    Knox County

    Knox County

    • Newspapers: Knoxville Journal
    Knox County is a county in the U.S. state of Tennessee. As of the 2010 census, the population is 432,226. Its county seat is Knoxville, as it has been since the creation of the county. The county is at the geographical center of the Great Valley of East Tennessee. Near the heart of the county is the origin of the Tennessee River at the union of the Holston and French Broad Rivers. The county is included in the Knoxville Metropolitan Area. Knox County was created on June 11, 1792 by Governor William Blount from parts of Greene and Hawkins counties, and has the distinction of being one of only eight counties created during territorial administration. It is one of nine United States counties named for American Revolutionary War general and first United States Secretary of War Henry Knox. Parts of Knox County later became Blount (1795), Anderson (1801), Roane (1801), and Union (1850) counties. In 1786 James White built a fort five miles (8 km) below the junction of the French Broad and Holston Rivers on the southernmost edge of frontier settlement in present-day East Tennessee. William Blount, governor of the Territory of the United States South of the River Ohio, selected the site of
    8.00
    2 votes
    104
    London

    London

    • Newspapers: Reporter - The Newspaper of Imperial College
    London /ˈlʌndən/ is the capital city of England and the United Kingdom, the largest metropolitan area in the United Kingdom, and the largest urban zone in the European Union by most measures. Located on the River Thames, London has been a major settlement for two millennia, its history going back to its founding by the Romans, who named it Londinium. London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its square-mile mediaeval boundaries. Since at least the 19th century, the name London has also referred to the metropolis developed around this core. The bulk of this conurbation forms the London region and the Greater London administrative area, governed by the elected Mayor of London and the London Assembly. London is a leading global city, with strengths in the arts, commerce, education, entertainment, fashion, finance, healthcare, media, professional services, research and development, tourism and transport all contributing to its prominence. It is the world's leading financial centre alongside New York City and has the fifth- or sixth-largest metropolitan area GDP in the world depending on measurement. London has been described as a world cultural capital. It is the
    8.00
    2 votes
    105
    Marin County

    Marin County

    • Newspapers: Marin Independent Journal
    Marin County ( /məˈrɪn/) is a county located in the North San Francisco Bay Area of the US state of California, across the Golden Gate Bridge from San Francisco. As of 2010, the population was 252,409. The county seat is San Rafael and the largest employer is the county government. Marin County is well known for its natural beauty, liberal politics, and affluence. In May 2009, the county had the fifth highest income per capita in the United States at $91,483. The county is governed by local cities and the Marin County Board of Supervisors. San Quentin Prison is located in the county, as is Skywalker Ranch. Autodesk, the publisher of AutoCAD, is also located there, as well as numerous other high-tech companies. The headquarters of film and media company Lucasfilm Ltd., previously based in San Rafael, have moved to the Presidio of San Francisco. The Marin County Civic Center was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and draws thousands of visitors a year to guided tours of its arch and atrium design. In 1994, a new county jail facility was embedded into the hillside nearby. America's oldest cross country running event, the Dipsea Race, takes place annually in Marin County, attracting
    8.00
    2 votes
    106
    Nottingham

    Nottingham

    • Newspapers: Nottingham Mercury
    Nottingham (/ˈnɒtɪŋəm/ NOT-ing-əm) is a city and unitary authority in the East Midlands of England in the ceremonial county of Nottinghamshire. Nottingham is famed for its links with the legend of Robin Hood and, during the Industrial Revolution, obtained worldwide recognition for its lace-making, bicycle and tobacco industries. With origins traceable back to 600 AD, Nottingham was granted its city charter as part of the Diamond Jubilee celebrations of Queen Victoria in 1897 and has since been officially titled the City of Nottingham. Nottingham is home to the BBC East Midlands offices and formerly to the Government Office for the East Midlands. It is one of eight members of the English Core Cities Group. Whilst Nottingham has always had a tightly-drawn city boundary, accounting for its relatively small population of 305,700, making it the second largest city in the East Midlands behind its local neighbour Leicester with a population of 330,000, and the fifteenth largest city in the UK, the Nottingham Urban Area has a population of approximately 640,900; in the 2011 census, it was the eighth largest urban area in the United Kingdom. Eurostat's concept of the Larger Urban Zone
    8.00
    2 votes
    107
    Pottsville

    Pottsville

    • Newspapers: The Republican & Herald
    Pottsville is a city in, and the county seat of Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, United States. The population was 14,324 at the 2010 census. The city lies along the west bank of the Schuylkill River, 97 miles (156 km) north-west of Philadelphia. It is located in Pennsylvania's Coal Region, named for the abundance of anthracite coal. Pottsville is not to be confused with Pottstown, a borough in Montgomery County approximately 40 miles (64 km) northwest of Philadelphia. By the Charter of Charles II, by the grace of God, King of England, Scotland, Ireland, and France, Defender of the Faith, to his trustie and well beloved subject, William Penn, Esq., sonne and heire of Sir William Penn, for the Colony of Pennsylvania, the grantee, William Penn, was given power and authority to erect counties, in the following words: "And we do further for us, our heires and successors, give and grant unto the said William Penn, his heirs and assignees, free and absolute power to divide the said countrey and islands into townes, into boroughes and counties, etc.," whereupon William Penn did divide the Province into three counties, Philadelphia, Bucks and Chester. The last comprised all lands west and
    8.00
    2 votes
    108
    Sarasota

    Sarasota

    • Newspapers: Sarasota Herald-Tribune
    Sarasota is a city located in Sarasota County on the southwestern coast of the U.S. state of Florida. It is south of the Tampa Bay Area and north of Fort Myers. Its current official limits include Sarasota Bay and several barrier islands between the bay and the Gulf of Mexico. These islands separating Sarasota Bay from the gulf near the city, known as keys, include Lido Key and Siesta Key, which are famous worldwide for the quality of their sandy beaches. Today the keys that are included in the boundary of Sarasota are Lido Key, St. Armands Key, Otter Key, Coon Key, Bird Key, and portions of Siesta Key. Previously, Siesta Key was named Sarasota Key. At one time, it and all of Longboat Key were considered part of Sarasota and confusing contemporaneous references may be found discussing them. Longboat Key is the largest key separating the bay from the gulf, but it is now evenly divided by the new county line of 1921. The portion of the key that parallels the Sarasota city boundary that extends to that new county line along the bay front of the mainland was removed from the city boundaries at the request of John Ringling in the mid-1920s, who sought to avoid city taxation of his
    8.00
    2 votes
    109
    Tuscaloosa

    Tuscaloosa

    • Newspapers: The Tuscaloosa News
    Tuscaloosa (/tʌskəˈluːsə/ TUSK-ə-LOO-sə) is a city in and the seat of Tuscaloosa County in west central Alabama (in the southeastern United States). Located on the Black Warrior River, it is the fifth-largest city in Alabama, with a population of 91,605 in 2011. It is the principal city of the Tuscaloosa Metropolitan Statistical Area, which includes Tuscaloosa, Greene, and Hale counties, and whose estimated metro population in 2012 was 221,553. A former capital of Alabama, Tuscaloosa is named after Tuskaloosa, the chieftain of a Muskogean-speaking people, who battled and was defeated by Hernando de Soto in 1540 in the Battle of Mabila. Tuscaloosa is the regional center of industry, commerce, healthcare, and education for the area of west-central Alabama known as West Alabama. Tuscaloosa is also the home of the University of Alabama, Stillman College and Shelton State Community College. While the city attracted international attention when Mercedes-Benz announced it would build its first automotive assembly plant in North America in Tuscaloosa County, the University of Alabama remains the dominant economic and cultural engine in the city. The city has received many quality-of-life
    8.00
    2 votes
    110
    Chester County

    Chester County

    • Newspapers: The Daily Local News
    Chester County is a county located in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. As of the 2010 census, the population was 498,886, with an estimated population of 500,182 in 2011. The county seat is West Chester. It is the highest-income county in Pennsylvania and 24th highest in the nation as measured by median household income (as of 2010). Eastern Chester County is home to many communities that comprise the Main Line western suburbs of Philadelphia, while part of its southernmost portion is considered suburban Wilmington, Delaware, along with southwest Delaware County. Chester County was one of the three original Pennsylvania counties created by William Penn in 1682. It was named for Chester, England. It is part of the Delaware Valley region and is the only Delaware Valley county in Pennsylvania that does not actually border Philadelphia. Philadelphia, Bucks, and Chester were the three Pennsylvania counties initially created by William Penn on August 24, 1682. At that time, Chester County's borders were Philadelphia County to the north, the western edge of the colony (approximately the Susquehanna River) to the west, the Delaware River to the east, and Delaware and Maryland to the south.
    9.00
    1 votes
    111
    Cincinnati

    Cincinnati

    • Newspapers: The Cincinnati Post
    Cincinnati (pronounced /sɪnsɨˈnæti/) is a city in and the county seat of Hamilton County, Ohio, United States. Settled in 1788, the city is located on the north bank of the Ohio River at the Ohio-Kentucky border, near Indiana. The population within city limits was 296,943 according to the 2010 census, making it Ohio's third-largest city. According to the 2011 Census Bureau estimate, the Cincinnati metropolitan area had a population of 2,138,038, the 27th most populous Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) in the United States and largest in Ohio. Residents of Cincinnati are called Cincinnatians. In the early 19th century, Cincinnati was the first American boomtown in the heart of the country to rival the larger coastal cities in size and wealth. As the first major inland city in the country, it is sometimes thought of as the first purely American city. It developed initially without as much recent European immigration or influence as took place in eastern cities. However, by the end of the 19th century, with the shift from steamboats to railroads, Cincinnati's growth had slowed considerably and the city became surpassed in population and prominence by another inland city,
    9.00
    1 votes
    112
    Pittsburgh, PA Metropolitan Statistical Area

    Pittsburgh, PA Metropolitan Statistical Area

    • Newspapers: Pittsburgh Tribune-Review
    The Pittsburgh Metropolitan Area is the metropolitan area surrounding the city of Pittsburgh in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. It is renowned for its industries including steel, glass and oil; its economy also thrives on healthcare, education, technology, robotics, financial services and the film industry. The region is an emergent area for oil and natural gas companies' Marcellus shale production. The city is headquarters to major global financial institutions including PNC Financial Services (the nation's fifth-largest bank), Federated Investors and the regional headquarters of BNY Mellon. Population The Pittsburgh Metropolitan Statistical Area (also called Greater Pittsburgh), as defined by the United States Census Bureau, is an area consisting of seven counties in Western Pennsylvania, anchored by the city of Pittsburgh. As of the 2010 census, the MSA had a population of 2,356,285 and has a land area of 5,343 sq. miles (5,706 with Lawrence County included in the Combined Statistical Area). A 2011 census estimate placed the MSA at 2,359,746, which was the first time in nearly 50 years of a positive change. Pittsburgh is part of the Great Lakes Megalopolis containing an
    9.00
    1 votes
    113
    Portugal

    Portugal

    • Newspapers: Público
    Portugal /ˈpɔrtʃʉɡəl/ (Portuguese: Portugal, IPA: [puɾtuˈɣaɫ]; Mirandese: Pertual), officially the Portuguese Republic (Portuguese: República Portuguesa, Mirandese: República Pertuesa) is a country located in Southwestern Europe, on the Iberian Peninsula. It is the westernmost country of mainland Europe, and is bordered by the Atlantic Ocean to the west and south and by Spain to the north and east. The Atlantic archipelagos of the Azores and Madeira are Portuguese territory as well. The country is named after its second largest city, Porto, whose Latin name was Portus Cale. The land within the borders of the current Portuguese Republic has been continuously settled since prehistoric times. In the 8th century most of the Iberian Peninsula was conquered by Moorish invaders professing Islam, which were later expelled by the Knights Templar. During the Christian Reconquista, Portugal established itself as an independent kingdom from León in 1139, claiming to be the oldest European nation-state. In the 15th and 16th centuries, as the result of pioneering the Age of Discovery, Portugal expanded western influence and established the first global empire, becoming one of the world's major
    9.00
    1 votes
    114
    Tanzania

    Tanzania

    • Newspapers: Daily News
    Tanzania, officially the United Republic of Tanzania ( /ˌtænzəˈniːə/ Swahili: Jamhuri ya Muungano wa Tanzania), is a country in East Africa bordered by Kenya and Uganda to the north, Rwanda, Burundi, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo to the west, and Zambia, Malawi, and Mozambique to the south. The country's eastern border lies on the Indian Ocean. The country is divided into 26 regions, 5 on the semi-autonomous islands of Zanzibar, and 21 on the mainland in the former Tanganyika. The head of state is President Jakaya Mrisho Kikwete, elected in 2005. Since 1996, the official capital of Tanzania has been Dodoma, where Parliament and some government offices are located. Between independence and 1996, the main coastal city of Dar es Salaam served as the country's political capital. Today, Dar es Salaam remains the principal commercial city of Tanzania and the de facto seat of most government institutions. It is the major seaport for the country and its landlocked neighbours. The name Tanzania derives from the names of the two states, Tanganyika and Zanzibar, that united in 1964 to form the United Republic of Tanganyika and Zanzibar, which later the same year was renamed the
    9.00
    1 votes
    115
    Charlotte

    Charlotte

    • Newspapers: The Charlotte Observer
    Charlotte ( /ˈʃɑrlət/) is the largest city in the U.S. state of North Carolina and the seat of Mecklenburg County. In 2011 the estimated population of Charlotte according to the U.S. Census Bureau was 751,087, making it the 17th largest city in the United States based on population. The Charlotte metropolitan area had a 2010 population of 1,758,038. The Charlotte metropolitan area is part of a wider thirteen-county labor market region or combined statistical area with a 2010 U.S. Census population of 2,402,623. Residents of Charlotte are referred to as "Charlotteans". The city is a major U.S. financial center, the second largest financial center by assets following New York City. Bank of America and the East Coast operations of Wells Fargo are headquartered in the city. Charlotte is also home of the Carolina Panthers of the National Football League, the Charlotte Bobcats of the National Basketball Association, the NASCAR Hall of Fame, Carowinds amusement park and the U.S. National Whitewater Center. Nicknamed the Queen City, Charlotte and its resident county are named in honor of Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, who had become queen consort of British King George III the year
    6.67
    3 votes
    116
    Denton County

    Denton County

    • Newspapers: Denton Record-Chronicle
    Denton County is a county in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 662,614. Part of the Dallas–Fort Worth metroplex, it is one of the fastest-growing counties in the United States. The county seat is Denton. The county, which is named for John B. Denton, was established in 1846. Before the arrival of white settlers, various Native American peoples, including the Kichai and the Lenape, infrequently populated the area. The area was settled by Peters Colony landowners in the early 1840s. Until the annexation of Texas, the area was considered part of Fannin County. On April 11, 1846, the First Texas Legislature established Denton County. The county was named for John B. Denton, who was killed while raiding a Native American village in Tarrant County in 1841. Originally, the county seat was set at Pickneyville. This was later changed to Alton, where the Old Alton Bridge currently stands, and then moved finally to Denton. By 1860, the population of the county had increased to 5,031. On March 4, 1861, residents of the county narrowly voted for secession from the Union, with 331 votes cast for and 264 against. The Missouri–Kansas–Texas Railroad reached
    6.67
    3 votes
    117
    Des Moines

    Des Moines

    • Newspapers: Des Moines Register
    Des Moines /dɨˈmɔɪn/ is the capital and the most populous city in the U.S. state of Iowa. It is also the county seat of Polk County. A small portion of the city extends into Warren County. It was incorporated on September 22, 1851, as Fort Des Moines which was shortened to "Des Moines" in 1857. It is named after the Des Moines River, which may have been adapted from the French Rivière des Moines, literally meaning "River of the Monks." The five-county metropolitan area is ranked 88th in terms of population in the United States with 580,255 residents according to the 2011 estimate by the United States Census Bureau. The city proper population was 203,433 at the 2010 census. Des Moines is a major center for the insurance industry and also has a sizable financial services and publishing business base. In fact, Des Moines was credited with the "number one spot for U.S. insurance companies" in a Business Wire article. The city is the headquarters for the Principal Financial Group, Aviva insurance, the Meredith Corporation, Ruan Transportation, EMC Insurance Companies, and Wellmark Blue Cross Blue Shield. Other major corporations such as Wells Fargo, ING Group, Nationwide Mutual
    6.67
    3 votes
    118
    Ibbenbüren

    Ibbenbüren

    • Newspapers: Ibbenbürener Volkszeitung
    Ibbenbüren or Ibbenbueren is a medium-sized town in the district of Steinfurt, in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. It is on position 185 of the largest cities in Germany and the largest city in Tecklenburger Land. Ibbenbüren (Ibbenbueren) is situated on the Ibbenbürener Aa river, at the northwest end of the Teutoburger forest and rather exactly in the center of the two cities Rheine in the west and Osnabrück in the east, both approximately 20 km away. Ibbenbüren is mentioned in documentary evidence for the first time in 1146, when the bishop of Osnabrück at that time, Philipp of Katzenelnbogen, donated a tenth of his possessions in Ibbenbüren to the Getrudenkloster of Osnabrück. Although Ibbenbüren is already much older and a document of the year 1348 already occupies the establishment of a church in the year 799, the year 1146 is officially considered as the year of the foundation of Ibbenbüren. In the years 1219 and/or 1234 it appears as church village. In this transition of the High Middle Ages to the Late Middle Ages the noble gentlemen of Ibbenbüren, that is the abbot of Herford and the counts of Tecklenburg, possessed basic rule in the place. To this time Ibbenbüren belonged
    6.67
    3 votes
    119
    Long Island

    Long Island

    • Newspapers: Long Island Press
    Long Island is an island in the southeast of the U.S. state of New York, just east of Manhattan. Stretching northeast into the Atlantic Ocean, Long Island contains four counties, two of which are boroughs of New York City (Queens and Brooklyn), and two of which are mainly suburban (Nassau and Suffolk). The term "Long Island" often refers only to Nassau and Suffolk counties in order to differentiate them from New York City, though all four counties are on the island and part of the New York metropolitan area. As of the 2010 census, Long Island had a population of 7,568,304, making it the most populated island in any U.S. state or territory. It is also the 17th most populous island in the world, ahead of Ireland, Jamaica and the Japanese island of Hokkaidō. Its population density is 5,402 inhabitants per square mile (2,086 /km). If it were a state, Long Island would rank 13th in population (after Virginia) and first in population density. Both the longest and the largest island in the contiguous United States, Long Island extends 118 miles (190 km) eastward from New York Harbor to Montauk Point, and has a maximum north-to-south expanse of 23 miles (37 km) between the northern Long
    6.67
    3 votes
    120
    Mendocino County

    Mendocino County

    • Newspapers: Mendocino County Observer
    Mendocino County is a county located on the north coast of the U.S. state of California, north of the greater San Francisco Bay Area and west of the Central Valley. As of the 2010 census, the population was 87,841, up from 86,265 at the 2000 census. The county seat is Ukiah. The county is noted for its distinctive Pacific Ocean coastline, Redwood forests, wine production, microbrews, and liberal views about the use of cannabis and support for its legalization. It is estimated that roughly two-thirds of the economy is based on the cultivation of marijuana. The notable historic and recreational attraction of the "Skunk Train" connects Fort Bragg with Willits in Mendocino County via steam-locomotive trains and other vehicles. Mendocino County was one of the original counties of California, created in 1850 at the time of statehood. Due to an initially low population, it did not have a separate government until 1859 and was under the administration of Sonoma County prior to that. The county derives its name from Cape Mendocino, which was probably named in honor of either Antonio de Mendoza, Viceroy of New Spain, 1535–1542 (who sent the Juan Cabrillo Expedition to this coast in 1542), or
    6.67
    3 votes
    121
    Pinellas County

    Pinellas County

    • Newspapers: St. Petersburg Times
    Pinellas County is a county located in the U.S. state of Florida. Its 2010 population was 916,542. Its county seat is Clearwater and its largest city is St. Petersburg. Pinellas, together with Hillsborough, Hernando, and Pasco counties form the Tampa-St.Petersburg-Clearwater Metropolitan Statistical Area, and along with various combinations of Manatee and Sarasota counties to the south, Citrus County to the north, and Polk County to the east is often referred to as the Tampa Bay Area. Prior to European exploration and settlement the Pinellas peninsula was inhabited by the Tocobaga, who built a town and large temple mound overlooking the bay in what is now Safety Harbor. The modern site is protected by the county and can be visited as a part of Philippe Park. During the 16th century Spanish explorers discovered and slowly began venturing into Florida, including Tampa Bay. In 1528 Panfilo de Narvaez landed in Pinellas, and 10 years later Hernando de Soto is thought to have explored the Bay. By the early 18th century the Tocobaga had been virtually annihilated, having fallen victim to European diseases from which they had no immunity, as well as European conflicts. Later Spanish
    6.67
    3 votes
    122
    Pittsburgh

    Pittsburgh

    • Newspapers: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
    Pittsburgh ( /ˈpɪtsbərɡ/, PITS-burg) is the second-largest city in the U.S. Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, after only Philadelphia, and the county seat of Allegheny County. Regionally, it anchors the largest urban area of both Appalachia and the Ohio River Valley. Nationally, it is the 22nd-largest urban area in the United States. The population of the city in 2010 was 305,704, while that of the seven-county metropolitan area stood at 2,356,285. Downtown Pittsburgh retains substantial economic influence, ranking at 25th in the nation for jobs within the urban core and 6th in job density. The characteristic shape of Pittsburgh's central business district is a triangular tract carved by the confluence of the Allegheny and Monongahela rivers, which form the Ohio River. The city features 151 high-rise buildings, 446 bridges, two inclined railways, and a pre-revolutionary fortification. Pittsburgh is known colloquially as "the City of Bridges" and "the Steel City" for its many bridges and former steel manufacturing base. While the city is historically known for its steel industry, today its economy is largely based on healthcare, education, technology, robotics, and financial services.
    6.67
    3 votes
    123
    Boise

    Boise

    • Newspapers: Idaho Statesman
    Boise ( /ˈbɔɪsiː/) is the capital and most populous city of the U.S. state of Idaho, as well as the county seat of Ada County. Located on the Boise River, it anchors the Boise City-Nampa metropolitan area and is the largest city between Salt Lake City, Utah and Portland, Oregon. As of the 2010 Census, Boise's city population was 205,671. The Boise metropolitan area is home to about 616,500 people and is the most populous metropolitan area in Idaho, and the third most populous metropolitan area in the U.S. Pacific Northwest region (behind only the Seattle and Portland metropolitan areas). It is also the 104th largest U.S. city by population. The area was called Boise long before the establishment of Fort Boise. The original Fort Boise was 40 miles (64 km) west, near Parma, down the Boise River near its confluence with the Snake River at the Oregon border. This defense was erected by the Hudson's Bay Company in the 1830s. It was abandoned in the 1850s, however massacres along the Oregon Trail prompted the U.S. Army to re-establish a fort in the area in 1863 during the U.S. Civil War. The new location was selected because it was near the intersection of the Oregon Trail with a major
    5.75
    4 votes
    124
    Fort Worth

    Fort Worth

    • Newspapers: Fort Worth Star-Telegram
    Fort Worth is the sixteenth most populous city in the United States of America and the fifth most populous city in the state of Texas. Located in North Central Texas, the city is a cultural gateway into the American West and covers nearly 300 square miles (780 km) in Tarrant, Denton, and Wise counties, serving as the seat for Tarrant County. According to the 2010 Census, Fort Worth had a population of 741,206. It has been estimated that by 2030 it will have 1,211,665 residents. The city is the second most populous in the Dallas–Fort Worth metropolitan area. The city was established in 1849 as an Army outpost on a bluff overlooking the Trinity River. Today Fort Worth still embraces its Western heritage and traditional architecture and design. USS Fort Worth (LCS-3) is the first ship of the United States Navy named after the city. Fort Worth is home to the Kimbell Art Museum, considered to have one of the best collections in the world, and housed in what is widely regarded as the most beautiful work of modern architecture in the world. Also of note are the Museum of Modern Art and the Amon Carter Museum, the latter of which houses one of the most extensive collections of American art
    7.50
    2 votes
    125
    Fountain County

    Fountain County

    • Newspapers: The Neighbor
    Fountain County lies in the western part of the U.S. state of Indiana on the east side of the Wabash River. The county was officially established in 1826 and was the 53rd in Indiana. The county seat is Covington. According to the 2000 census, its population was 17,954; the 2010 population was 17,240. The county has eight incorporated towns with a total population of about 9,700, as well as many small unincorporated communities; it is also divided into eleven townships which provide local services. An interstate highway, two U.S. Routes and five Indiana state roads cross the county, as does a major railroad line. The state of Indiana was established in 1816. The first non-indigenous settler in the area that became Fountain County is thought to have been a Mr. Forbes, who arrived here in early 1823 and was soon followed by others. Fountain County was officially created on December 30, 1825, the act taking effect on April 1, 1826; the boundaries of the county have not changed since that time. It was named for Major James Fontaine of Kentucky who was killed at Harmar's Defeat (near modern Fort Wayne, Indiana) on October 22, 1790, during the Northwest Indian War. The first Fountain
    7.50
    2 votes
    126
    Hampstead

    Hampstead

    • Newspapers: Ham&High
    Hampstead (/ˈhæmpstɪd/ or /-stɛd/), commonly known as Hampstead Village, is an affluent area of London, England, 4 miles (6.4 km) north-west of Charing Cross. Part of the London Borough of Camden in Inner London, it is known for its intellectual, liberal, artistic, musical and literary associations and for Hampstead Heath, a large, hilly expanse of parkland. It has some of the most expensive housing in the London area. The village of Hampstead has more millionaires within its boundaries than any other area of the United Kingdom. The name comes from the Anglo-Saxon words ham and stede, which means, and is a cognate of, the Modern English "homestead". Although early records of Hampstead can be found in a grant by King Ethelred the Unready to the monastery of St. Peter’s at Westminster (AD 986) and it is referred to in the Domesday Book (1086), the history of Hampstead is generally traced back to the 17th century. Trustees of the Well started advertising the medicinal qualities of the chalybeate waters (water impregnated with iron) in 1700. Although Hampstead Wells was initially most successful and fashionable, its popularity declined in the 1800s due to competition with other
    7.50
    2 votes
    127
    Israel

    Israel

    • Newspapers: Davar
    Israel, officially the State of Israel ( /ˈɪzriːəl/ or  /ˈɪzreɪəl/; Hebrew: מְדִינַת יִשְׂרָאֵל‎, Medīnat Yisrā'el, IPA: [me̞diˈnät jisʁäˈʔe̞l] ( listen); Arabic: دَوْلَة إِسْرَائِيل‎, Dawlat Isrāʼīl, IPA: [dawlat ʔisraːˈʔiːl]), is a parliamentary republic in the Middle East, along the eastern shore of the Mediterranean Sea. It borders Lebanon in the north, Syria in the northeast, Jordan and the West Bank in the east, Egypt and the Gaza Strip on the southwest, and the Gulf of Aqaba in the Red Sea to the south, and it contains geographically diverse features within its relatively small area. Israel is defined as a Jewish and Democratic State in its Basic Laws and is the world's only Jewish-majority state. Following the adoption of a resolution by the United Nations General Assembly on 29 November 1947, recommending the adoption and implementation of the United Nations partition plan of Mandatory Palestine, on 14 May 1948 David Ben-Gurion, the Executive Head of the World Zionist Organization and president of the Jewish Agency for Palestine, declared "the establishment of a Jewish state in Eretz Israel, to be known as the State of Israel", a state independent upon the termination of
    7.50
    2 votes
    128
    Macomb County

    Macomb County

    • Newspapers: Macomb County Advisor & Source
    Macomb County is a county in the U.S. state of Michigan. The 2010 census recorded its population to be 840,978, making it the third most populous county in the state. Of Michigan's five largest counties, Macomb experienced the most population growth (6.7%) between 2000 and 2010. The county seat is Mt. Clemens. Macomb County is part of the Detroit metropolitan area; the city of Detroit is located south of 8 Mile Road, the county's southern border. Macomb County contains 28 cities, townships and villages, including three of the top ten most populous municipalities in Michigan as of the 2010 census: Warren (#3), Sterling Heights (#4) and Clinton Township (#10). Most of this population is concentrated south of Hall Road (M-59), one of the county's main thoroughfares. The county is named for Alexander Macomb, Jr., an early U.S. Army commander. The Ojibwa lived in the area centuries before European contact. The first European explorers arrived in the area during the 17th century. A Moravian colony was established in the county in the late 18th century. They included French fur trappers and missionaries. In addition to the original French and English, later settlers included Germans,
    7.50
    2 votes
    129
    Sonoma County

    Sonoma County

    • Newspapers: Sonoma Valley Sun
    Sonoma County, located on the northern coast of the U.S. state of California, is the largest (in area) and northernmost of the nine San Francisco Bay Area counties. Its population at the 2010 census was 483,878. Its largest city and county seat is Santa Rosa. Sonoma is the southwestern county and largest producer of California's Wine Country region, which also includes Napa, Mendocino, and Lake counties. It has 13 approved American Viticultural Areas and over 250 wineries. In 2002, Sonoma County ranked as the 32nd county in the United States in agricultural production. As early as 1920, Sonoma County was ranked as the eighth most agriculturally productive U.S county and a leading producer of poultry products, hops, grapes, prunes, apples and dairy products, largely due to the extent of available, fertile agricultural land, in addition to the abundance of high quality irrigation water. More than 7.4 million tourists visit each year, spending more than $1 billion in 2006. Sonoma County is the home of Sonoma State University and Santa Rosa Junior College. Sonoma County is home to several Native American tribes. By the 1830s, European settlement had set a new direction that would prove
    7.50
    2 votes
    130
    South Dakota

    South Dakota

    • Newspapers: Watertown Public Opinion
    South Dakota (/ˌsaʊθ dəˈkoʊtə/) is a state located in the Midwestern region of the United States. It is named after the Lakota and Dakota Sioux American Indian tribes. South Dakota is the 17th most extensive, but the 5th least populous and the 5th least densely populated of the 50 United States. Once the southern portion of the Dakota Territory, South Dakota became a state on November 2, 1889. Pierre is the state capital and Sioux Falls, with a population of 153,000, is South Dakota's largest city. South Dakota is bordered by the states of North Dakota, Minnesota, Iowa, Nebraska, Wyoming, and Montana. The state is bisected by the Missouri River, dividing South Dakota into two geographically and socially distinct halves, known to residents as "East River" and "West River". Eastern South Dakota is home to most of the state's population, and fertile soil in this area is used to grow a variety of crops. West of the Missouri, ranching is the predominant agricultural activity, and the economy is more dependent on tourism and defense spending. The Black Hills, a group of low pine-covered mountains, is located in the southwest part of the state. The Black Hills are sacred to the Sioux.
    7.50
    2 votes
    131
    Leesburg

    Leesburg

    • Newspapers: Leesburg Today
    Leesburg is a historic town within and the county seat of Loudoun County, Virginia, United States of America. Leesburg is located 33 miles (53 km) west-northwest of Washington, D.C. along the base of Catoctin Mountain and adjacent to the Potomac River. Its population according the 2010 Census is 42,616. The town is also the northwestern terminus of the Dulles Greenway, a private toll road that connects to the Dulles Toll Road at Washington Dulles International Airport. Leesburg, like the rest of Loudoun, has undergone considerable growth and development over the last 30 years, transforming from a small, rural, piedmont town to a suburban bedroom community for commuters to the national capital. Current growth in the town and its immediate area to the east (Lansdowne/Ashburn) concentrates along the Dulles Greenway and State Route 7, which roughly parallels the Potomac River between Winchester to the west and Alexandria to the east. The Federal Aviation Administration's Washington Air Route Traffic Control Center is located in Leesburg. Prior to European settlement, the area around Leesburg was occupied by various Native American tribes. John Lederer (1670) testified that the entire
    5.50
    4 votes
    132
    City of Sunderland

    City of Sunderland

    • Newspapers: Sunderland Echo
    The City of Sunderland  /ˈsʌndərlənd/ is a local government district of Tyne and Wear, in North East England, with the status of a city and metropolitan borough. It is named after its largest settlement, Sunderland, but covers a far larger area which includes the towns of Hetton-le-Hole, Houghton-le-Spring, Washington, and a range of suburban villages. The district was formed in 1974 as the Metropolitan Borough of Sunderland as part of the provisions of the Local Government Act 1972 and is an amalgamation of four former local government districts of County Durham. It was granted city status in 1992, the 40th anniversary of the Queen Elizabeth II's accession. The city had a population of 280,807 at the time of the 2001 census, with the majority of the population (177,739) residing in Sunderland. The 'Sunderland Urban Area' (including Whitburn in South Tyneside) is quoted alternatively as having a population of around 200,000. The metropolitan borough was formed in 1974 under the Local Government Act 1972 by the merger of several districts of County Durham - Washington Urban District, Houghton-le-Spring Urban District and Hetton Urban District - with the County Borough of
    6.33
    3 votes
    133
    Barren County

    Barren County

    • Newspapers: Barren County Progress
    Barren County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was founded on December 20, 1798, from parts of Warren and Green Counties. It was named for the Barrens, the meadowlands that cover the northern third. As of 2010 the population was 42,173. Its county seat is Glasgow, Kentucky. The county is part of the Glasgow Micropolitan Statistical Area. In 2007 Barren County was named the "Best Place to Live in Rural America" by Progressive Farmer Magazine. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 499.93 square miles (1,294.8 km), of which 490.97 square miles (1,271.6 km) (or 98.21%) is land and 8.96 square miles (23.2 km) (or 1.79%) is water. Barren River Lake is located in the southern part of the county, forming part of its boundary with Allen County. Barren River Lake State Resort Park is located primarily within Barren County, along the lake's shoreline. As of the census of 2000, there were 38,033 people, 15,346 households, and 10,941 families residing in the county. The population density was 78 per square mile (30 /km). There were 17,095 housing units at an average density of 35 per square mile (14 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 94.30%
    8.00
    1 votes
    134
    Dubai

    Dubai

    • Newspapers: 7 Days
    Dubai (/duːˈbaɪ/ doo-BY; Arabic: دبيّ‎ Dubayy, IPA: [dʊ'bæj]) is an emirate within the United Arab Emirates (UAE). A city within the emirate is also named Dubai. The emirate is located south east of the Persian Gulf on the Arabian Peninsula and has the largest population with the second-largest land territory by area of all the emirates, after Abu Dhabi. Dubai and Abu Dhabi are the only two emirates to have veto power over critical matters of national importance in the country's legislature. Dubai City is located on the emirate's northern coastline. Dubai is often misperceived as a country and in some cases, the whole UAE has been described as 'Dubai.' The earliest mention of Dubai is in 1095, and the earliest settlement known as Dubai town dates from 1799. Dubai was formally established in 1833 by Sheikh Maktoum bin Buti al Maktoum when he persuaded 800 members of the Bani Yas tribe, living in what is now part of Saudi Arabia, to follow him to the Dubai Creek by the Al Abu Falasa clan of Bani Yas. It remained under clan control when the United Kingdom assumed the protection of Dubai in 1892. Its geographical location made it an important trading hub and by the beginning of the
    8.00
    1 votes
    135
    Fairfax

    Fairfax

    • Newspapers: Ross Valley Reporter
    Fairfax is an incorporated town in Marin County, California, United States. Fairfax is located 3.25 miles (5.2 km) west-northwest of San Rafael, at an elevation of 115 feet (35 m). The population is 7,520 at the 2011 census. Fairfax is the only town that holds a Green Party majority in the town council in America. According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 2.2 square miles (5.7 km), all of it land. The 2010 United States Census reported that Fairfax had a population of 7,441. The population density was 3,376.9 people per square mile (1,303.8/km²). The racial makeup of Fairfax was 6,617 (88.9%) White, 110 (1.5%) African American, 36 (0.5%) Native American, 204 (2.7%) Asian, 4 (0.1%) Pacific Islander, 174 (2.3%) from other races, and 296 (4.0%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 504 persons (6.8%). The Census reported that 7,419 people (99.7% of the population) lived in households, 12 (0.2%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 10 (0.1%) were institutionalized. There were 3,379 households, out of which 939 (27.8%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 1,422 (42.1%) were opposite-sex married couples
    8.00
    1 votes
    136
    France

    France

    • Newspapers: Présent
    France (English /ˈfræns/ FRANSS or /ˈfrɑːns/ FRAHNSS; French: [fʁɑ̃s] ( listen)), officially the French Republic (French: République française French pronunciation: [ʁepyblik fʁɑ̃sɛz]), is a unitary semi-presidential republic in Western Europe with several overseas territories and islands. Metropolitan France extends from the Mediterranean Sea to the English Channel and the North Sea, and from the Rhine to the Atlantic Ocean. It is often referred to as l’Hexagone ("The Hexagon") because of the geometric shape of its territory. France is the largest country in Western Europe and the third-largest in Europe as a whole, and it possesses the second-largest exclusive economic zone in the world. France has its main ideals expressed in the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen. Over the past 500 years, France has been a major power with strong cultural, economic, military and political influence in Europe and around the world. From the 17th to the early 20th century, France built the second largest colonial empire of the time, including large portions of North, West and Central Africa, Southeast Asia, and many Caribbean and Pacific Islands. France is a developed country, it
    8.00
    1 votes
    137
    Gothenburg

    Gothenburg

    • Newspapers: Metro
    Gothenburg (Swedish: Göteborg; pronounced [jœtəˈbɔrj] ( listen)) is the second largest city in Sweden by population and the fifth-largest in the Nordic countries. Situated on the west coast of Sweden, the city proper has a population of 522,259, with 549,839 in the urban area and total of 938,580 inhabitants in the metropolitan area. Gothenburg is classified as a global city by GaWC, with a ranking of Gamma−. The City of Gothenburg was founded in 1621 by King Gustavus Adolphus. It lies by the sea at the mouth of Göta Älv—the river running through the city—and is the largest seaport in the Nordic countries. Gothenburg is home to many students, as the city includes both the University of Gothenburg and Chalmers University of Technology. Volvo was founded in Gothenburg in 1927. The city is a major centre in Sweden for sports and home to the IFK Göteborg, BK Häcken, GAIS and Örgryte IS association football teams as well as the Frölunda HC ice hockey team. Gothenburg is served by Gothenburg-Landvetter Airport, located 30 km (18.64 mi) southeast of the city centre. It is the second largest airport in Sweden. The city is also served by Gothenburg City Airport, located 15 km (9.32 mi) from
    8.00
    1 votes
    138
    Harrisburg

    Harrisburg

    • Newspapers: The Patriot-News
    Harrisburg is the capital city of Pennsylvania. As of 2011, the city had a population of 49,673, making it the ninth-largest city in Pennsylvania. Harrisburg is also the county seat of Dauphin County and lies on the east bank of the Susquehanna River, 105 miles (169 km) west-northwest of Philadelphia. The Harrisburg-Carlisle Metropolitan Statistical Area, which includes Dauphin, Cumberland, and Perry counties, had a population of 509,074 in 2000. A July 1, 2007 estimate placed the population at 528,892, making it the fifth largest Metropolitan Statistical Area in Pennsylvania after Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Allentown–Bethlehem–Easton (the Lehigh Valley), and Scranton–Wilkes Barre. The Harrisburg-Carlisle-Lebanon Combined Statistical Area, including both the Harrisburg-Carlisle and Lebanon Metropolitan Statistical Areas, had an estimated population of 656,781 in 2007 and was the fourth-most populous metropolitan area in the state. Harrisburg played a notable role in American history during the Westward Migration, the American Civil War, and the Industrial Revolution. During part of the 19th century, the building of the Pennsylvania Canal and later the Pennsylvania Railroad allowed
    8.00
    1 votes
    139
    Highgate

    Highgate

    • Newspapers: Ham&High
    Highgate ( /ˈhaɪɡeɪt/ or /ˈhaɪɡɨt/) is an area of North London on the north-eastern corner of Hampstead Heath. Highgate is one of the most expensive London suburbs in which to live. It has an active conservation body, the Highgate Society, to protect its character. Until late Victorian times it was a distinct village outside London, sitting astride the main road to the north. The area retains many green expanses including the eastern part of Hampstead Heath, three ancient woods, Waterlow Park and the eastern-facing slopes known as Highgate bowl. At its centre is Highgate village, a collection of largely Georgian shops, pubs, restaurants and residential streets, interspersed with diverse landmarks such as St Michael's Church and steeple, Highgate School (1565), Jacksons Lane arts centre housed in a Grade II listed former church, the Gatehouse inn dating from 1670 and Berthold Lubetkin's 1930s Highpoint buildings. Highgate is also famous for its atmospheric Victorian cemetery in which the communist philosopher Karl Marx is buried. The village sits atop a hill which provides views across London, climbing 446 feet (136 m) above sea level at its highest point. The area is divided
    8.00
    1 votes
    140
    Idaho Falls

    Idaho Falls

    • Newspapers: The Post Register
    Idaho Falls is a city in and the county seat of Bonneville County, Idaho, United States, and the largest city in Eastern Idaho. As of the 2010 census, the population of Idaho Falls was 56,813, with a metro population of 130,374. Idaho Falls is the principal city of the Idaho Falls, Idaho Metropolitan Statistical Area and the Idaho Falls-Blackfoot, Idaho Combined Statistical Area. It is the state's largest city outside the Boise metropolitan area and the third-largest metro area behind Boise City-Nampa and Coeur d'Alene, which is connected to the larger Spokane, Washington. The city serves as a hub to all of eastern Idaho and much of western Wyoming. Due to its relative economic vitality, high quality of life, and proximity to world-class outdoor recreation, it is often featured in various publications' lists of "best places to live." The area is served by the Idaho Falls Regional Airport and is home to the Idaho Falls Chukars minor league baseball team. What became Idaho Falls was the site of Taylor’s Crossing on the Montana Trail, a timber frame bridge built across the Snake River. The 1865 bridge was built by Matt Taylor, a Montana Trail freighter, who built a toll bridge across
    8.00
    1 votes
    141
    Malmö

    Malmö

    • Newspapers: Metro
    Malmö (Swedish pronunciation: [ˈmalːˈmøː] ( listen)), in the southernmost province of Scania, is Sweden's third largest city by population after Stockholm and Gothenburg, and is one of the largest cities in Scandinavia. Malmö is the seat of Malmö Municipality and the capital of Skåne County. The administrative entity for most of the city is Malmö Municipality which, as of January 2012, has 302,835 inhabitants in eight different localities. Malmö is also a bimunicipal locality, as part of it is formally situated in Burlöv Municipality. The total population of the urban area was 280,415 in December 2010. Greater Malmö is one of Sweden's three officially recognized Metropolitan areas (storstadsområden) and since 2005 is defined as the municipality of Malmö and 11 other municipalities in the southwestern corner of Scania. On 31 March 2012, its population was recorded to be 664,428. The region covers an area of 2,521.92 square kilometres (973.72 sq mi). The municipalities included, apart from Malmö, are Burlöv, Eslöv, Höör, Kävlinge, Lomma, Lund, Skurup, Staffanstorp, Svedala, Trelleborg and Vellinge. Lund, with a municipal population of over 100,000 and home to one of Scandinavia's
    8.00
    1 votes
    142
    Rushville

    Rushville

    • Newspapers: Rushville Republican
    Rushville is a city in Rushville Township, Rush County, Indiana, United States. The population was 6,341 at the 2010 census. The city is the county seat of Rush County. It was the campaign headquarters for Wendell Willkie's 1940 presidential campaign against Franklin D. Roosevelt. Willkie is buried in the city's East Hill Cemetery. It, like the county, was named in honor of Dr. Benjamin Rush, who signed the Declaration of Independence. Rushville is located at 39°36′52″N 85°26′55″W / 39.61444°N 85.44861°W / 39.61444; -85.44861 (39.614482, -85.448657), along the Flatrock River. According to the 2010 census, the city has a total area of 3.09 square miles (8.0 km), all land. As of the census of 2000, there were 5,995 people, 2,434 households, and 1,552 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,668.8 people per square mile (1,028.7/km²). There were 2,597 housing units at an average density of 1,156.1 per square mile (445.6/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 96.45% White, 1.58% African American, 0.20% Native American, 0.85% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 0.13% from other races, and 0.73% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.40% of the
    8.00
    1 votes
    143
    San Joaquin County

    San Joaquin County

    • Newspapers: The Record
    San Joaquin County ( /ˈsæn wɑːˈkiːn/) is a county located in Central Valley of the U.S. state of California, just east of the San Francisco Bay Area. As of the 2010 census, the population was 685,306. The county seat is Stockton. San Joaquin County was one of the original counties of California, created in 1850 at the time of statehood. The county takes its name from the San Joaquin River. In the early 19th century Lieutenant Gabriel Moraga, commanding an expedition in the lower great California Central Valley, gave the name of San Joaquin (meaning Joachim) to the San Joaquin River that springs from the southern Sierra Nevada. San Joaquin County is also home to the site of the San Joaquin Valley's first permanent residence. Between 1843 and 1846, during the era when California was a province of independent Mexico, five Mexican land grants were made in what became San Joaquin County: Campo de los Franceses, Pescadero (Grimes), Pescadero (Pico), Sanjon de los Moquelumnes and Thompson. On August 7, 1998, a tire fire ignited at S.F. Royster's Tire Disposal just south of Tracy on South MacArthur Drive, near Linne Rd. The tire dump held over 7 million illegally stored tires and was
    8.00
    1 votes
    144
    Syracuse

    Syracuse

    • Newspapers: Eagle Newspapers
    Syracuse ( /ˈsɪrəkjuːs/ or local /ˈsɛrəkjuːs/) is a city in and the county seat of Onondaga County, New York, United States. It is the largest U.S. city with the name "Syracuse", and is the fifth most populous city in the state of New York. At the 2010 census, the city population was 145,170, (making it the 167th largest city in the country) and its metropolitan area had a population of 662,577. It is the economic and educational hub of Central New York, a region with over a million inhabitants. Syracuse is also well-provided with convention sites, with a downtown convention complex and, directly west of the city, the Empire Expo Center, which hosts the annual Great New York State Fair. The city derives its name from Siracusa, a city on the eastern coast of the Italian island of Sicily. The city has functioned as a major crossroads over the last two centuries, first between the Erie Canal and its branch canals, then of the railway network. Today, Syracuse is located at the intersection of Interstates 81 and 90, and its airport is the largest in the region. Syracuse is a home to Syracuse University, a major research university; the Upstate Medical University and Hospital, the
    8.00
    1 votes
    145
    Taber

    Taber

    • Newspapers: Medicine Hat News
    Taber ( /ˈteɪbər/) is a town in southern Alberta, Canada within the Municipal District of Taber. It is located approximately 51 km (32 mi) east of the City of Lethbridge at the intersection of Highway 3 and Highway 36. Taber is famous for its corn due to the large amounts of sunshine the area receives. It is therefore known as the Corn Capital of Canada and holds an annual "Cornfest" in the last week of August. The Taber Police Service is the only town municipal police service in Alberta. Taber was established in the late 1890s by European settlers on the banks of the lower Oldman River. Originally, Taber was known as "Tank No. 77," and was used by the railway to fill up on water. In 1903, it is said that the first Mormon settlers from the U.S.A. were the ones to establish a hamlet at the Tank. After the town's post office was built in 1907, the CPR decided to call the town "Tabor," probably after Mount Tabor in the Holy Land. However, various letters and station heads came out printed "Taber," so the CPR changed the name to make it match the records. An alternate version of the towns name origin is that the first part of the word tabernacle was used by Mormon settlers in the
    8.00
    1 votes
    146
    Tucson

    Tucson

    • Newspapers: Aztec Press
    Tucson ( /ˈtuːsɒn/ TOO-son) is the county seat of Pima County, Arizona, United States, and home to the University of Arizona. The 2010 United States Census puts the city's population at 520,116, while the 2011 estimated population of the entire Tucson metropolitan area was 989,569. Tucson is the second-largest populated city in Arizona behind Phoenix, which both anchor the Arizona Sun Corridor. The city is located 108 miles (172 km) southeast of Phoenix and 60 miles (98 km) north of the U.S.-Mexico border. Tucson is the 32nd largest city and the 52nd largest metropolitan area in the United States. Roughly 150 Tucson companies are involved in the design and manufacture of optics and optoelectronics systems, earning Tucson the nickname Optics Valley. Major incorporated suburbs of Tucson include Oro Valley and Marana northwest of the city, Sahuarita south of the city, and South Tucson in an enclave south of downtown. Communities in the vicinity of Tucson (some within or overlapping the city limits) include Casas Adobes, Catalina Foothills, Flowing Wells, Tanque Verde, Tortilita, New Pascua, Sahuarita and Vail. Towns outside the Tucson metro area include Benson to the southeast,
    8.00
    1 votes
    147
    Wake County

    Wake County

    • Newspapers: Fuquay-Varina Independent
    Wake County is a county in the US state of North Carolina. As of the 2010 census, the population was 900,993, making it North Carolina's second most populated county. Its county seat is Raleigh, which is also the state capital. Wake County is part of the Research Triangle metropolitan region, which encompasses the cities of Raleigh and Durham, the towns of Cary and Chapel Hill, and their surrounding suburban areas. The regional name originated after the 1959 creation of the Research Triangle Park, located midway between Raleigh and Durham. The Research Triangle region encompasses the U.S. Census Bureau's Combined Statistical Area (CSA) of Raleigh-Durham-Cary. The estimated population of the Raleigh-Durham-Cary CSA was 1,749,525 at the 2010 census, with the Raleigh-Cary Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) portion at 1,130,490 residents as of April 1, 2010. Wake County is the 9th fastest growing county in the United States, with the town of Cary and the city of Raleigh being the 8th and 15th fastest growing cities, respectively. It is governed by the Wake County Board of Commissioners. The earliest known inhabitants of present-day Wake County were the Tuscarora Native Americans. They
    8.00
    1 votes
    148
    Cook County

    Cook County

    • Newspapers: Daily Herald
    Cook County is a county in the US state of Illinois, with its county seat in Chicago. It is the second most populous county in the US after Los Angeles County. The county has 5,217,080 residents, which is 40.5 percent of all Illinois residents. Cook County's population is larger than that of 29 individual US states and the combined populations of the seven smallest states. There are over 130 incorporated municipalities in Cook County, the largest of which is Chicago, which makes up approximately 54% of the population of the county. That part of the county which lies outside of the Chicago city limits is divided into 30 townships. Geographically the county is the fifth largest in Illinois by land area and shares the state's Lake Michigan shoreline with Lake County. Cook County is mainly urban and very densely populated, containing the city of Chicago and many suburbs. Cook County was created on January 15, 1831, out of Putnam County by an act of the Illinois General Assembly. It was the 54th county established in Illinois and was named after Daniel Cook, one of the earliest and youngest statesmen in Illinois history, who served as the second U.S. Representative from Illinois and the
    7.00
    2 votes
    149
    Emporia

    Emporia

    • Newspapers: Emporia Gazette
    Emporia is a city in and the county seat of Lyon County, Kansas, United States. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 24,916. Emporia lies between Topeka and Wichita at the intersection of U.S. Route 50 with Interstates 335 and 35 on the Kansas Turnpike. Emporia is the principal city of the Emporia Micropolitan Statistical Area, which includes all of Lyon and Chase counties. Located on upland prairie, Emporia was founded on February 20, 1857, drawing its name from ancient Carthaginian Africa. Emporia is particularly known for its newspaper, the Emporia Gazette, published in the first half of the 20th century by the legendary newspaperman William Allen White. The paper became the widely perceived model of excellence in small-town journalism. In 1953, Emporia was the site of the first Veterans Day observance in the United States. At the urging of local shoe cobbler Alvin J. King, U.S. Representative Edward Rees introduced legislation in The United States Congress to rename Armistice Day as Veterans Day. President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed the bill into law on October 8, 1954. On June 8, 1974, an F4 tornado struck Emporia, killing six people, injuring 200 people, and
    7.00
    2 votes
    150
    Gainesville

    Gainesville

    • Newspapers: The Independent Florida Alligator
    Gainesville is the county seat and largest city in Alachua County in the U.S. state of Florida, and the principal city of the Gainesville, Florida Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). The population of Gainesville in the 2010 Census was 124,354. Gainesville is also the largest city in the region of North Central Florida. Gainesville is home to the University of Florida, the nation's seventh largest university campus by enrollment, as well as to Santa Fe College. The Gainesville MSA was ranked as the #1 place to live in the 2007 edition of Cities Ranked and Rated. Gainesville was also ranked as one of the "best places to live and play" in 2007 by National Geographic Adventure. Conversely, Gainesville was ranked as the 5th meanest city in the USA by the National Coalition for the Homeless twice, first in 2004 for its criminalization of homelessness and then in 2009 for its ordinance restricting soup kitchens to 130-meals a day. 12,000 years ago Paleo Indians lived in Florida, but fewer than 100 sites have been found and although it is not known for certain whether any permanent settlements from that period were in the present city limits of Gainesville, archeological evidence of
    7.00
    2 votes
    151
    Greater Boston

    Greater Boston

    • Newspapers: The Jewish Advocate
    Greater Boston is the area of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts surrounding the city of Boston. Due to ambiguity in usage, the size of the area referred to can be anywhere between that of the metropolitan statistical area (MSA) of Boston and that of the city's combined statistical area (CSA), which includes the metro areas of Providence, Rhode Island and Worcester, Massachusetts. By contrast, Metro Boston is usually reserved to signify the "inner core" surrounding the City of Boston, while "Greater Boston" usually at least overlaps the North and South Shores, as well as MetroWest and the Merrimack Valley. Greater Boston is tenth in population among U.S. metropolitan statistical areas in the United States, home to over 4.6 million people as of the 2010 U.S. Census and is ranked fifth among CSAs, having over 7.6 million people. Greater Boston has many sites and people significant to American history and culture, particularly the American Revolution, civil rights, literature, and politics, and is one of the nation's centers of education, finance, industry, and tourism, with the sixth-largest Gross metropolitan product in the country and twelveth-largest in the world. The most
    7.00
    2 votes
    152
    Jacksonville

    Jacksonville

    • Newspapers: Jacksonville Daily Record
    Jacksonville is the largest city in the U.S. state of Florida in terms of both population and land area, and the largest city by area in the contiguous United States. It is the county seat of Duval County, with which the city government consolidated in 1968. Consolidation gave Jacksonville its great size and placed most of its metropolitan population within the city limits; with a population of 827,908, it is the most populous city proper in Florida and the Southeast, and the eleventh most populous in the United States. Jacksonville is the principal city in the Greater Jacksonville Metropolitan Area, with a population of 1,345,596 in 2010. Jacksonville is in the First Coast region of northeast Florida and is centered on the banks of the St. Johns River, about 25 miles (40 km) south of the Georgia state line and about 340 miles (547 km) north of Miami. The Jacksonville Beaches communities are along the adjacent Atlantic coast. The area was originally inhabited by the Timucua people, and in 1564 was the site of the French colony of Fort Caroline, one of the earliest European settlements in what is now the continental United States. Under British rule, settlement grew at the narrow
    7.00
    2 votes
    153
    Jeffersonville

    Jeffersonville

    • Newspapers: The Evening News
    Jeffersonville ( /ˈdʒɛfərsənvɪl/) is a city in Clark County, Indiana, along the Ohio River. Locally, the city is often referred to by the abbreviated name Jeff. It is directly across the Ohio River to the north of Louisville, Kentucky along I-65. The population was 44,953 at the 2010 census. The city is the county seat of Clark County. In 1786 Fort Finney was situated where the Kennedy Bridge is today to protect the area from Indians, and a settlement grew around the fort. The fort was renamed in 1791 to Fort Steuben in honor of Baron von Steuben. In 1793 the fort was abandoned. Precisely when the settlement became known as Jeffersonville is unclear, but it was probably around 1801, the year in which President Thomas Jefferson took office. In 1802 local residents used a grid pattern designed by Thomas Jefferson for the formation of a city. On September 13, 1803, a post office was established in the city. In 1808 Indiana's second federal land sale office was established in Jeffersonville, which initiated a growth in settling in Indiana that was further spurred by the end of the War of 1812. Shortly after formation, Jeffersonville was named to be the county seat of Clark County in
    7.00
    2 votes
    154
    Kitchener

    Kitchener

    • Newspapers: Echo Weekly
    The City of Kitchener ( /ˈkɪtʃɨnər/) is a city in Southern Ontario, Canada. Located approximately 100 km west of Toronto, Kitchener is the seat of the Regional Municipality of Waterloo. It was the Town of Berlin from 1854 until 1912 and the City of Berlin from 1912 until 1916. The city had a population of 219,153 in the 2011 Census. The metropolitan area, which includes the neighbouring cities of Waterloo and Cambridge, has 477,160 people, making it the tenth largest Census Metropolitan Area (CMA) in Canada and the fourth largest CMA in Ontario. The city is adjacent to the smaller cities of Cambridge to the south, and Waterloo to the north. Kitchener and Waterloo are often referred to jointly as "Kitchener-Waterloo" (K-W), although they have separate municipal governments. Including Cambridge, the three cities are known as "the tri-cities". The City of Kitchener covers an area of 136.86 square kilometres. On June 10, 2012, the city of Kitchener celebrated 100 years of cityhood. Activities are planned to take place throughout 2012 in honour of this milestone. Kitchener is located in Southwestern Ontario, in the Saint Lawrence Lowlands. This geological and climatic region has
    7.00
    2 votes
    155
    Lee County

    Lee County

    • Newspapers: Naples Daily News
    Lee County is a county in the U.S. state of Florida. Located in southwest Florida, the principal cities in the county are Fort Myers (the county seat) and Cape Coral (the county's most populous municipality). In 2003 the population of the county was 586,908. The county is coextensive with the Cape Coral-Fort Myers, Florida Metropolitan Statistical Area, a metropolitan statistical area (MSA) designated by the Office of Management and Budget and used for statistical purposes by the United States Census Bureau and other agencies. The MSA was first defined as the Fort Myers, Florida Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area in 1973. In 1981 Cape Coral was added as a principal city, and the MSA was renamed the Fort Myers-Cape Coral, Florida Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. In 1983, the name was changed to Fort Myers, Florida Metropolitan Statistical Area. In 1990 it became the Fort Myers-Cape Coral, Florida Metropolitan Statistical Area. In 2003 the name was changed to its present form. The area has been represented in the United States House of Representatives by Connie Mack IV since January 2005. Lee County was created in 1887 from Monroe County. It was named for Robert E. Lee,
    7.00
    2 votes
    156
    Pocatello

    Pocatello

    • Newspapers: Idaho State Journal
    Pocatello ( /ˌpoʊkəˈtɛloʊ/) is the county seat and largest city of Bannock County, with a small portion on the Fort Hall Indian Reservation in neighboring Power County, in the southeastern part of the US state of Idaho. It is the principal city of the Pocatello metropolitan area, which encompasses all of Bannock and Power counties. As of the 2010 census the population of Pocatello was 54,255. Pocatello is the fifth largest city in the state, just behind Idaho Falls (population of 56,813). In 2007, Pocatello was ranked twentieth on Forbes list of Best Small Places for Business and Careers. Pocatello is the home of Idaho State University and the manufacturing facility of ON Semiconductor. The city is at an elevation of 4,462 feet (1,360 m) above sea level and is served by the Pocatello Regional Airport. Founded as an important stop on the first railroad in Idaho during the gold rush, the city later became an important center for agriculture. It is located along the Portneuf River where it emerges from the mountains onto the Snake River Plain, along the route of the Oregon Trail. The city is named after Chief Pocatello of the Shoshoni tribe, who granted the right-of-way for the
    7.00
    2 votes
    157
    Anniston

    Anniston

    • Newspapers: The Anniston Star
    Anniston is a city in Calhoun County in the state of Alabama. As of the 2000 census, the population of the city is 24,276. According to the 2005 U.S. Census estimates, the city had a population of 23,741. The city is the county seat of Calhoun County and one of two urban centers/principal cities of and included in the Anniston-Oxford Metropolitan Statistical Area. Named The Model City by Atlanta newspaperman Henry W. Grady for its careful planning in the late 19th century, the city is situated on the slope of Blue Mountain. Though the surrounding area was settled long before, the mineral resources in the area of Anniston weren't exploited until the Civil War. During that time, the Confederate States of America established and operated an iron furnace near present day downtown Anniston, until the furnace was destroyed by Union troops in 1865. Later, cast iron for sewer systems became the focus of Anniston's industrial output. Cast iron pipe, also called soil pipe, was popular until the advent of plastic pipe in the 1960s. In 1865, at the end of the Civil War, Union troops near the furnace wrongfully hanged one of the few residents. Charley Lloyd, a farmer working the land in what is
    6.00
    3 votes
    158
    Beach Cities

    Beach Cities

    • Newspapers: Beach Reporter
    The three Beach Cities are Manhattan Beach, Hermosa Beach and Redondo Beach, which lie on the south end of the Santa Monica Bay west and south of downtown Los Angeles on the Pacific Ocean in Southern California. All three are renowned for their beaches and all three have municipal piers. They are popular with swimmers, surfers, bodyboarders and other beachgoers. The strand runs along the beaches and is used for cycling, running and rollerblading. The three cities share the Beach Cities Transit district.
    6.00
    3 votes
    159
    Bexar County

    Bexar County

    • Newspapers: San Antonio Lightning News
    Bexar County ( /ˈbɛər/) is a county in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, the population is 1,714,773, making it the 19th most populous county in the nation. Its county seat is San Antonio. In old Spanish, "Béxar" is pronounced [ˈbeʃar]. Bexar County is the central county of the San Antonio-New Braunfels Metropolitan Statistical Area. Despite being situated in the reliably Republican state of Texas, Bexar County is a major bellwether in presidential elections. The county has a perfect record of voting for the winning candidate in every presidential election since 1972. Bexar County was created on December 20, 1836, and encompassed almost the entire western portion of the Republic of Texas, including the disputed areas of western New Mexico northward to Wyoming. After statehood, 128 counties were carved out of its area. The county gets its name from San Antonio de Béxar, one of the 23 municipalities (administrative divisions) of Texas at the time of its independence. San Antonio de Béxar—originally Villa of San Fernando de Béxar—was the first civil government established in the Spanish province of Texas. Specifically, the municipality was created in 1731 when 55 Canary
    6.00
    3 votes
    160
    Shenzhen

    Shenzhen

    • Newspapers: Cicada
    Shēnzhèn (Chinese: 深圳 Mandarin pronunciation: [ʂə́ntʂə̂n]) is a major city in the south of Southern China's Guangdong Province, situated immediately north of Hong Kong. The area became China's first—and one of the most successful—Special Economic Zones (SEZs). It currently also holds sub-provincial administrative status, with powers slightly less than a province. Shenzhen's modern cityscape is the result of the vibrant economy made possible by rapid foreign investment since the institution of the policy of "reform and opening" establishment of the SEZ in the late 1979, before which it was only a small village. Both Chinese and foreign nationals have invested enormous amounts of money in the Shenzhen SEZ. More than US$30 billion in foreign investment has gone into both foreign-owned and joint ventures, at first mainly in manufacturing but more recently in the service industries as well. Shenzhen is now considered one of the fastest-growing cities in the world. Being southern mainland China's major financial centre, Shenzhen is home to the Shenzhen Stock Exchange as well as the headquarters of numerous high-tech companies. Shenzhen is also one of the busiest container ports in
    6.00
    3 votes
    161
    Benton County

    Benton County

    • Newspapers: The Benton Review
    Benton County is located along in the northwest part of the U.S. state of Indiana, along the border with Illinois. As of 2010, the county's population was 8,854. It contains six incorporated towns as well as several small unincorporated settlements; it is also divided into 11 townships which provide local services. The county seat is Fowler. Benton County is part of the Lafayette, Indiana, Metropolitan Statistical Area. Benton County was formed February 18, 1840. It is named for Thomas H. Benton (D), U.S. Senator from Missouri. The original county seat selected in 1843 was Oxford, but after a long struggle between contending factions it was moved to Fowler in 1874. The current Benton County courthouse, located in Fowler, was designed by Gordon P. Randall of Chicago and built in 1874 by Levi L. Leach at a cost of $62,257. The new courthouse was an impressive building from an architectural standpoint, but also provided much-needed improvements in security, including large fire-proof vaults. Randall had designed the Marshall County courthouse a few years earlier. In 2008 the Benton County Wind Farm began operating with 87 1.5 MW wind turbines. Duke Energy purchases electricity from
    5.67
    3 votes
    162
    Lakeland

    Lakeland

    • Newspapers: The Ledger
    Lakeland is a city in Polk County, Florida, United States, is located between Tampa and Orlando along Interstate 4. According to the 2010 U.S. Census Bureau estimate, the city had a population of 97,422. Lakeland is a principal city of the Lakeland-Winter Haven, Florida Metropolitan Statistical Area, which had an estimated population of 584,383 in July, 2009 based on data from the University of Florida Bureau of Economic and Business Research. It is twinned with Richmond Hill, Ontario; Imabari, Japan; Balti, Moldova; Portmore, Jamaica; and Chongming County, Shanghai, China as part of the Sister Cities program. The first Paleo-indians reached the central Florida area near the end of the last ice age, as they followed big game south. As the ice melted and sea levels rose, these Native Americans ended up staying and thrived on the peninsula for thousands of years. By the time the first Spanish conquistadors arrived, there were over 250,000 Native Americans living on the peninsula. Some of these first early tribes were the Tocobago, Timucua, and the Calusa. In 1527, a Spanish map showed a settlement near the Rio de la Paz. The arrival of the Spanish turned out to be disastrous to these
    5.67
    3 votes
    163
    Ottawa

    Ottawa

    • Newspapers: Ottawa Citizen
    Ottawa (/ˈɒtəwɑː/ or /ˈɒtəwə/) is the capital of Canada. It is the second largest city in Ontario and the fourth largest city in the country. The city is located on the south bank of the Ottawa River in the eastern portion of Southern Ontario. Ottawa borders Gatineau, Quebec, located on the north bank of the Ottawa River; together they form the National Capital Region (NCR). Founded in 1826 as Bytown and incorporated as "Ottawa" in 1855, the city has evolved into a political and technological centre of Canada. Its original boundaries were expanded through numerous minor annexations and ultimately replaced by a new city incorporation and major amalgamation in 2001 which significantly increased its land area. The name "Ottawa" is derived from the Algonquin word adawe, meaning "to trade". Initially an Irish and French Christian settlement, Ottawa has become a multicultural city with a diverse population. The 2011 census had the city's population as 883,391, and the metropolitan population as 1,236,324. Mercer ranks Ottawa with the second highest quality of living of any large city in the Americas, and 14th highest in the world. It is also rated the second cleanest city in Canada, and
    5.67
    3 votes
    164
    Bolton

    Bolton

    • Newspapers: The Caledon Underground
    Bolton (2011 population 25,954) is the most populous community in the town of Caledon, located in the Region of Peel, approximately 50 kilometres northwest of Toronto, in Ontario, Canada. In regional documents, it is referred to as a 'Rural Service Centre'. It has 26,478 residents in 8,721 households. The downtown and area that historically defined the village is in a valley, through which flows the Humber River. The current village expands on either side of the valley to the north and south. The conservation lands' forests dominate a large part of the northwest, the north, the east including along the Humber valley. These conservation lands have created several recreational areas; including parts of the Humber Valley Heritage Trail. Farmland and the protected Oak Ridges Moraine dominate the landscape surrounding the village. There are two 400-Series highways nearby, including Highway 427, about 15 km southeast (by Highway 7), and Highway 400, about 14 km east (exit at King Road). Bolton is located about 50 km northwest of downtown Toronto via Highway 427, about 20 km northeast of downtown Brampton, Ontario, about 80 km northeast of Hamilton, about 100 km northeast of Kitchener,
    6.50
    2 votes
    165
    Bretagne

    Bretagne

    • Newspapers: Ouest-France
    Brittany (Breton: Breizh, French: Bretagne, IPA: [bʁətaɲ] ( listen)); is one of the 27 regions of France. It occupies a large peninsula in the northwest of the country, lying between the English Channel to the north and the Bay of Biscay to the south. Its capital is Rennes. The region of Brittany is made up of 80% of the former Duchy and Province of Brittany. The remaining 20% of the province is the Loire-Atlantique department which now lies inside the Pays de la Loire region, whose capital, Nantes, was the historical capital of the Duchy of Brittany. Part of the reason why Brittany was split between two present-day regions was to avoid the rivalry between Rennes and Nantes. Although Nantes was the principal capital of the Duchy of Brittany until the sixteenth century, Rennes had been the seat of the Duchy's supreme court of justice between 1560 and 1789. Rennes had also been the administrative capital of the Intendant of Brittany between 1689 and 1789, and Intendances were the most important administrative units of the kingdom of France in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. As for the provincial States of Brittany, a legislative body which had originally met every two years
    6.50
    2 votes
    166
    Broward County

    Broward County

    • Newspapers: New Times Broward-Palm Beach
    Broward County is a county located in the U.S. state of Florida. As of 2010, the population was 1,748,066; making it the second most populated county in the state. Its county seat is Fort Lauderdale. It is also the eighteenth most populous county in the United States and one of three counties that comprise the South Florida metropolitan area. Broward County was created in 1915. It was named for Napoleon Bonaparte Broward, Governor of Florida from 1905 to 1909. It was originally intended to be named Everglades County, but then-Speaker of the Florida House of Representatives Ion Farris amended the bill that established the county to be named after Broward. In 1915, Palm Beach County and Dade County contributed nearly equal portions of land to create Broward County. At its inception, Broward County was considered a leader in agriculture products and services within the State of Florida. The massive post-World War II buildup of the South Florida region transformed the region. It was one of the counties at the center of the 2000 U.S. Presidential election recount controversy. In 2002, it began an aggressive campaign of placing surveillance cameras along highways and traffic lights.
    6.50
    2 votes
    167
    DuPage County

    DuPage County

    • Newspapers: Daily Herald
    DuPage County is a county located in the U.S. state of Illinois. Its county seat is the city of Wheaton. This county is part of the Chicago metropolitan area. According to the 2010 census, it has a population of 916,924, which is an increase of 1.4% from 904,161 in 2000. It is the second most populous county in Illinois after Cook County, which borders it to the north and east; the two counties account for half of the state's population. The county is divided into nine different townships: Addison, Bloomingdale, Downers Grove, Lisle, Milton, Naperville, Wayne, Winfield and York. The majority of DuPage County is in the 630 and 331 area codes. However, the areas of the county that are in the city of Chicago are in area code 773, primarily part of O'Hare International Airport. Long known as one of the nation's wealthiest counties, DuPage County has transformed itself from a primarily agricultural economy to one rich in many different types of commerce. Today, DuPage County has the highest per capita income in the state. DuPage County's per capita income is also the highest in the Midwest. Nineteen of the county's towns have average household incomes of over $100,000. The most populous
    6.50
    2 votes
    168
    Inverclyde

    Inverclyde

    • Newspapers: Greenock Telegraph
    Inverclyde (Scottish Gaelic: Inbhir Chluaidh, pronounced [iɲiɾʲˈxlˠ̪uəj]) is one of 32 council areas used for local government in Scotland. Together with the Renfrewshire and East Renfrewshire council areas, Inverclyde forms part of the historic county of Renfrewshire - which currently exists as a registration county and lieutenancy area - located in the west central Lowlands. It borders on to the Renfrewshire and North Ayrshire council areas, and is otherwise surrounded by the Firth of Clyde. Inverclyde District was one of nineteen districts within Strathclyde Region, from 1975 until 1996. Prior to 1975, Inverclyde was governed as part of the local government county of Renfrewshire, comprising the burghs of Greenock, Port Glasgow and Gourock, and the former fifth district of the county. Its landward area is bordered by the Kelly, North and South Routen burns to the south west (separating Wemyss Bay and Skelmorlie, North Ayrshire), part of the River Gryfe and the Finlaystone Burn to the south-east. It is one of the smallest in terms of area (29th) and population (27th) out of the 32 Scottish unitary authorities. Along with the council areas clustered around Glasgow City it is
    6.50
    2 votes
    169
    Scranton

    Scranton

    • Newspapers: The Times-Tribune
    Scranton is a city in the northeastern part of Pennsylvania, United States. It is the county seat of Lackawanna County and the largest principal city in the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre metropolitan area. Scranton had a population of 76,089 in 2010, according to the U.S. Census, making it Pennsylvania's sixth-most-populous city after Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Allentown, Erie, and Reading. Scranton is the geographic and cultural center of the Lackawanna River valley, and the largest of the former anthracite coal mining communities in a contiguous quilt-work that also includes Wilkes-Barre, Pittston, and Carbondale. Scranton was incorporated as a borough on February 14, 1856, and as a city on April 23, 1866. Scranton became known as the Electric City when electric lights were introduced at Dickson Locomotive Works in 1880. Scranton is also home to Dunder Mifflin, the fictional paper company featured in the television series The Office.. Present-day Scranton and its surrounding area had been inhabited by the native Lenape tribe, from whose language "Lackawanna" (or "le-can-hanna", meaning "stream that forks") is derived. In 1778, Isaac Tripp, known as the area's first white settler, built
    6.50
    2 votes
    170
    St. Albans

    St. Albans

    • Newspapers: Seven Days
    St. Albans is a town in Franklin County, Vermont. The population was 6,392 at the 2010 census. The town completely surrounds the city of St. Albans, which was separated from the town and incorporated in 1902. References to "St. Albans" prior to this date generally refer to the town center, which now belongs to the city. Located on the shore of Lake Champlain, St. Albans features events honoring maple syrup; the Vermont Maple Festival is held in St. Albans each year. The lake monster "Champ" was allegedly sighted and photographed near there also. The creature in Lake Champlain was ostensibly given in 1609 by French explorer Samuel de Champlain, the founder of Québec and the lake's namesake, who is supposed to have been the first white man to record spotting "Champ" as he was fighting the Iroquois on the bank of the lake. However, in actuality no such sighting was recorded, and it has since been traced back to a 1970 article. On October 19, 1864, St. Albans was the site of the St. Albans Raid, the northernmost Confederate land action of the American Civil War, which was basically, an enemy cavalry raid and bank robbery across the border from Quebec, Canada. Amelia Earhart was said
    6.50
    2 votes
    171
    Washington

    Washington

    • Newspapers: Washington Times-Herald
    Washington is a city in Daviess County, Indiana, United States. The population was 11,509 at the 2010 census. The city is the county seat of Daviess County. Washington developed as a railroad town in 1857. By 1889, it was a major depot and repair yard for the Ohio and Mississippi Railroad. The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad took over the line in 1893. During this time, the railroad employed over 1,000 workers. Washington is located at 38°39′30″N 87°10′30″W / 38.65833°N 87.175°W / 38.65833; -87.175 (38.658207, -87.175111). According to the 2010 census, the city has a total area of 4.77 square miles (12.4 km), of which 4.73 square miles (12.3 km) (or 99.16%) is land and 0.04 square miles (0.10 km) (or 0.84%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 11,380 people, 4,658 households, and 2,897 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,404.0 people per square mile (928.9/km). There were 5,077 housing units at an average density of 1,072.5 per square mile (414.4/km). The racial makeup of the city was 95.30% White, 0.91% African American, 0.30% Native American, 0.39% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 2.20% from other races, and 0.85% from two or more races. Hispanic or
    6.50
    2 votes
    172
    Seychelles

    Seychelles

    • Newspapers: Seychelles Nation
    Seychelles (/seɪˈʃɛlz/ say-SHELZ; French: [sɛʃɛl]), officially the Republic of Seychelles (French: République des Seychelles; Creole: Repiblik Sesel), is an island country spanning an archipelago of 115 islands in the Indian Ocean, some 1,500 kilometres (932 mi) east of mainland Africa, northeast of the island of Madagascar. Other nearby island countries and territories include Zanzibar to the west, Mauritius, Rodrigues, Agalega and Réunion to the south, and Comoros and Mayotte to the southwest. Seychelles, with an estimated population of 86,525, has the smallest population of any African state. It also has the highest Human Development Index in Africa. Scholars assume that Austronesian seafarers, and later Maldivian and Arab traders were the first to visit the uninhabited Seychelles. Remains of Maldivian mariner presence from the 12th century were found in Silhouette Island. The earliest recorded sighting by Europeans took place in 1502 by the Portuguese Admiral Vasco da Gama, who passed through the Amirantes and named them after himself (islands of the Admiral). A transit point for trade between Africa and Asia, the islands were occasionally used by pirates until the French began
    4.75
    4 votes
    173
    Champaign

    Champaign

    • Newspapers: Daily Illini
    Champaign (English /ˌʃæmˈpeɪn/) is a city in Champaign County, Illinois, in the United States. The city is located 135 miles (217 km) south of Chicago, 124 miles (200 km) west of Indianapolis, Indiana, and 178 miles (286 km) northeast of St. Louis, Missouri. Though surrounded by farm communities, Champaign is notable for sharing the campus of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign with its sister city of Urbana. Thanks to the university and a number of well known technology startup companies, it is often referred to as the hub, or at least a significant landmark, of the Silicon Prairie. Champaign is also the home of Parkland College. Champaign houses offices for seven Fortune 500 companies, and two more are planned to arrive soon. As reported in the 2010 U.S. Census, the city was home to 81,055 people. Champaign is the 11th-most populous city in Illinois, and the fourth-most populous city in the state outside of the Chicago Metropolitan Area. Champaign was founded in 1855, when the Illinois Central Railroad laid its rail track two miles (3 km) west of downtown Urbana. Originally called "West Urbana", it was renamed Champaign when it acquired a city charter in 1860. Both the
    7.00
    1 votes
    174
    Hampton Roads

    Hampton Roads

    • Newspapers: The Virginian-Pilot
    Hampton Roads is the name for both a body of water and the Norfolk–Virginia Beach metropolitan area which surrounds it in southeastern Virginia, United States. Hampton Roads is notable for its year-round ice-free harbor, for United States Navy, Coast Guard, Air Force, NASA, Marine Corps, and Army facilities, shipyards, coal piers, and hundreds of miles of waterfront property and beaches, all of which contribute to the diversity and stability of the region's economy. The water area known as Hampton Roads is one of the world's largest natural harbors (more accurately a roadstead or "roads"), and incorporates the mouths of the Elizabeth River and James River with several smaller rivers and itself empties into the Chesapeake Bay near its mouth leading to the Atlantic Ocean. The land area (also known as "Tidewater") includes dozens of cities, counties and towns on the Virginia Peninsula and in South Hampton Roads. Some of the more outlying areas from the harbor may or may not be included as part of "Hampton Roads", depending upon the organization or purpose. For a commonly used example, as defined for federal economic purposes, the Hampton Roads metropolitan statistical area (MSA)
    7.00
    1 votes
    175
    Luxembourg

    Luxembourg

    • Newspapers: Journal de la ville et du Grand-Duché de Luxembourg
    The city of Luxembourg (Luxembourgish: Lëtzebuerg, German: Luxemburg), also known as Luxembourg City (Luxembourgish: Stad Lëtzebuerg, French: Ville de Luxembourg, German: Stadt Luxemburg), is a commune with city status, and the capital of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. It is located at the confluence of the Alzette and Pétrusse Rivers in southern Luxembourg. The city contains the historic Luxembourg Castle, established by the Franks in the Early Middle Ages, around which a settlement developed. Luxembourg City lies at the heart of Western Europe, situated 213 km (132 mi) by road from Brussels, 372 km (231 mi) from Paris, 209 km (130 mi) from Cologne, and 65 km (40 mi) from Metz in northeast France. As of 2011, the commune of Luxembourg City had a population of 94,034, which was almost three times the population of the country's second most populous commune. The city's metropolitan population, including that of surrounding communes of Hesperange, Sandweiler, Strassen, and Walferdange, is 103,973. In 2011, Luxembourg was ranked as having the second highest GDP in the world, with a per capita GDP (PPP) of $80,119 (US Dollars), with the city having developed into a banking and
    7.00
    1 votes
    176
    Lebanon

    Lebanon

    • Newspapers: The Lebanon Reporter
    Lebanon (commonly pronounced "Leba-nen") is a city in and the county seat of Boone County, Indiana, United States. The population was 15,792 at the 2010 census. The city was named Lebanon because a stand of hickory trees on the site reminded one of the town's commissioners of the Biblical cedars of Lebanon. Lebanon is located in central Indiana, northwest of Indianapolis. Lebanon is located at 40°3′8″N 86°28′18″W / 40.05222°N 86.47167°W / 40.05222; -86.47167 (40.052137, -86.471570). According to the 2010 census, the city has a total area of 15.57 square miles (40.3 km), of which 15.56 square miles (40.3 km) (or 99.94%) is land and 0.02 square miles (0.052 km) (or 0.13%) is water. The county courthouse of Lebanon is notable for its single-piece vertical Ionic order limestone columns. They were at one time the largest single-piece limestone columns in the world. As of the census of 2000, there were 14,222 people, 5,834 households, and 3,780 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,952.9 people per square mile (754.3/km²). There were 6,202 housing units at an average density of 851.6 per square mile (328.9/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 97.67% White,
    5.33
    3 votes
    177
    Austin

    Austin

    • Newspapers: Austin Chronicle
    Austin (/ˈɒstɨn/ or /ˈɔːstɨn/) is the capital of the U.S. state of Texas and the seat of Travis County. Located in Central Texas on the eastern edge of the American Southwest, Austin is the thirteenth most populous city in the United States of America and the fourth most populous city in the state of Texas. It was the third-fastest-growing large city in the nation from 2000 to 2006. Austin has a population of 820,611 (2011 U.S. Census). The city is the cultural and economic center of the Austin–Round Rock–San Marcos metropolitan area, which had an estimated population 1,783,519 (2011 U.S. Census), making it the 34th-largest metropolitan statistical area in the United States and the fourth-largest in Texas. In the 1830s, pioneers began to settle the area in central Austin along the Colorado River. After Republic of Texas Vice President Mirabeau B. Lamar visited the area during a buffalo-hunting expedition between 1837 and 1838, he proposed that the republic's capital then located in Houston, Texas, be relocated to the area situated on the north bank of the Colorado River near the present-day Ann W. Richards Congress Avenue Bridge. In 1839, the site was officially chosen as the
    6.00
    2 votes
    178
    Ballard

    Ballard

    • Newspapers: Ballard News-Tribune
    Ballard is a neighborhood located in the northwestern part of Seattle, Washington. To the north it is bounded by Crown Hill, (N.W. 85th Street); to the east by Greenwood, Phinney Ridge and Fremont (along 8th Avenue N.W.); to the south by the Lake Washington Ship Canal; and to the west by Puget Sound’s Shilshole Bay. The neighborhood’s landmarks include the Hiram M. Chittenden Locks (known locally as the "Ballard Locks"), the Nordic Heritage Museum, the Shilshole Bay Marina, and Golden Gardens Park. The neighborhood's main thoroughfares running north-south are Seaview, 32nd, 24th, Leary, 15th, and 8th Avenues N.W.; East-west traffic is carried by N.W. Leary Way and N.W. 85th, 80th, 65th, and Market Streets (east- and westbound). The Ballard Bridge carries 15th Avenue over Salmon Bay to the Interbay neighborhood, and the Salmon Bay Bridge carries the BNSF Railway tracks across the bay, west of the Ballard Locks. Before the settling of Seattle, the land surrounding Shilshole Bay was inhabited by the Shilshole Tribe who lived off the plentiful salmon and clams in the region. The first European resident, homesteader Ira Wilcox Utter, moved to his claim in 1853. Utter hoped to see a
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    2 votes
    179
    Crosby

    Crosby

    • Newspapers: The Lake Houston Sentinel
    Crosby is a census-designated place in Harris County, Texas, United States. The population was 2,299 at the 2010 census. Crosby is located at 29°54′38″N 95°03′39″W / 29.910577°N 95.060882°W / 29.910577; -95.060882 (29.910577, -95.060882). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 2.3 square miles (6.0 km), all of it land. The site north of U.S. Route 90 (according to some) was an encampment nicknamed Lick Skillet in 1823 by Humphrey Jackson, one of the 300 original colonists to settle Texas. The name "Lick Skillet" came from the phrase, "The East Texas oxen team drivers sipped the spring sweet water and licked their skillets clean." Humphrey Jackson (1784-1833) moved to Texas from Louisiana in September 1823 and built a log cabin outside Austin's colony on the San Jacinto River, 0.5 miles (800 m) west of the site of present-day Crosby. On August 16, 1824, the Baron de Bastrop granted him title to a league and a labor of land, including the place where he had settled, in what is now Harris County. Jackson next petitioned the Mexican government to form the San Jacinto District under control of the Austin colony; he was elected alcalde of the new
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    2 votes
    180
    Franklin

    Franklin

    • Newspapers: Williamson Herald
    Franklin is a city in, and county seat of, Williamson County, Tennessee, United States. It is a southern suburb of Nashville. As of the 2010 Census, the city had a total population of 62,487. The City of Franklin was founded October 26, 1799 by Abram Maury, Jr. (1766–1825), who was also a State Senator and is buried with his family in Founders Pointe. Maury named the town after Benjamin Franklin, a close friend of Dr. Hugh Williamson, a member of the Continental Congress after whom Williamson County was named. Ewen Cameron built the first house in the town of Franklin. Cameron was born February 23, 1768 in Balgalkan, Ferintosh, Scotland. He emigrated to Virginia in 1785 and from there came to Tennessee. Cameron died February 28, 1846, having lived forty-eight years in the same log house. He and his second wife, Mary, are buried in the old City Cemetery. His descendants have lived in Franklin continuously since 1798 when his son Duncan was born. The Battle of Franklin was fought in the city on November 30, 1864, resulting in almost 10,000 casualties (killed, wounded, captured and missing) and turning forty-four buildings into field hospitals. As of the census of 2010, there were
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    2 votes
    181
    Fresno

    Fresno

    • Newspapers: The Fresno Bee
    Fresno ( /ˈfrɛznoʊ/ FREZ-noh) is a city in central California, United States, the county seat of Fresno County. As of 2012, the city's population was 510,365, making it the fifth largest city in California, the largest inland city in California and the 34th largest in the nation. Fresno is in the center of the San Joaquin Valley of Central California, approximately 200 miles (320 km) north of Los Angeles, and 170 miles (270 km) south of the state capital, Sacramento. Metropolitan Fresno has a population of 1,107,416. The name Fresno is the Spanish language word for the ash tree, and an ash leaf is featured on the city's flag. The original inhabitants of the San Joaquin Valley region were the Yokut people, who engaged in trading with other California tribes of Native Americans including coastal peoples such as the Chumash of the Central California coast, with whom they are thought to have traded plant and animal products. The County of Fresno was formed in 1856 after the California Gold Rush. It was named for the abundant ash trees lining the San Joaquin River. Fresno is the Spanish word for ash trees. The county was much larger than it is today as part of Tulare County, comprising
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    2 votes
    182
    Hamilton

    Hamilton

    • Newspapers: View Magazine
    Hamilton ( /ˈhæməltən/; 2011 population 519,949; UA population 670,580; CMA population 721,053) is a port city in the Canadian province of Ontario. Conceived by George Hamilton when he purchased the Durand farm shortly after the War of 1812, Hamilton has become the centre of a densely populated and industrialized region at the west end of Lake Ontario known as the Golden Horseshoe. On January 1, 2001, the new City of Hamilton was formed through the amalgamation of the former city and the other constituent lower-tier municipalities of the Regional Municipality of Hamilton-Wentworth with the upper-tier regional government. Residents of the old city are known as Hamiltonians. Since 1981, the metropolitan area has been listed as the ninth largest in Canada and the third largest in Ontario. Hamilton is home to the shared Royal Botanical Gardens, the Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum, the Bruce Trail, McMaster University and Mohawk College. The Canadian Football Hall of Fame can be found downtown right beside Hamilton City Hall and across town to the east, the Canadian Football League's Hamilton Tiger-Cats play at Ivor Wynne Stadium. Partly because of its diverse environment, numerous TV
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    2 votes
    183
    Hammonton

    Hammonton

    • Newspapers: Hammonton Gazette
    Hammonton is a town in Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the town population was 14,791. The population increased by 2,187 (+17.4%) from the 12,604 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 396 (+3.2%) from the 12,208 counted in the 1990 Census. Hammonton was settled in 1812 and was named for John Hammond Coffin, a son of one of the community's earliest settlers, William Coffin, with the "d" in what was originally Hammondton disappearing over time. It was incorporated as a town by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 5, 1866, from portions of Hamilton Township and Mullica Township. It is located directly between Philadelphia and the resort town of Atlantic City, along a former route of the Pennsylvania Railroad currently used by New Jersey Transit's Atlantic City Line. Hammonton is located at 39°39′39″N 74°46′01″W / 39.66078°N 74.767021°W / 39.66078; -74.767021 (39.66078,-74.767021). According to the United States Census Bureau, the town had a total area of 41.419 square miles (107.274 km), of which, 40.887 square miles (105.897 km) of it is land and 0.532 square miles (1.377 km) of it (1.28%) is
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    2 votes
    184
    Hastings

    Hastings

    • Newspapers: Hastings Star Gazette
    Hastings is a city in Dakota and Washington counties in the U.S. state of Minnesota, near the confluence of the Mississippi and St. Croix Rivers. The population was 22,172 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Dakota County. The bulk of Hastings is in Dakota County; only a small part of the city extends into Washington County. The city is named for the first elected governor of the state of Minnesota, Henry Hastings Sibley. The advantages of the location that led to Hastings' original growth are that it is well-drained, provides a good riverboat port, and is close to a hydropower resource at the falls of the Vermillion River. Sites closer to the river confluence are either too swampy (Dakota County) or too hilly (Washington County and Pierce County, Wisconsin). U.S. Route 61 and Minnesota State Highways 55 and 316 are three of the main arterial routes in the city. The area around Hastings was first settled by a military detachment sent from Fort Snelling to guard a blocked shipment of supplies in the winter of 1820. A Lieutenant William. G. Oliver camped in an area that would come to be known as Oliver's Grove and in 1833 a trading post was opened at the same location. After
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    2 votes
    185
    Southern Maine Coast

    Southern Maine Coast

    • Newspapers: Portland Press Herald
    The Southern Maine Coast is a region of the U.S. state of Maine. It commonly includes York County, Cumberland County. Some notable towns are Kittery, York, Wells, Ogunquit, Kennebunkport, Saco, and Scarborough. The seaside communities of the Southern Maine Coast have popular beaches at York Beach, Goose Rocks, and Old Orchard Beach, and offer a large number of outlet malls, the most famous of which is the L. L. Bean flagship store (just up the coast in Freeport). The area also has several fine museums such as the Seashore Trolley Museum and the Portland Museum of Art. Area restaurants emphasize a wide variety of local seafood, especially lobster, in settings ranging from shacks to fine dining at its highest. The Southern Maine Coast has the highest population growth of any region in the state due to large numbers of people from Massachusetts and New Hampshire who vacation or own second homes there deciding to permanently relocate.
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    2 votes
    186
    Swift Current

    Swift Current

    • Newspapers: Medicine Hat News
    Swift Current (Assiniboine: Miníȟaȟa ) is a small city in southwest Saskatchewan. It is situated along the Trans Canada Highway 170 kilometres (110 mi) west from Moose Jaw, and 218 kilometres (135 mi) east from Medicine Hat, Alberta. Swift Current grew 0.8% between 2001 and 2006 ending up at 14,946 residents. The city is surrounded by the Rural Municipality of Swift Current No. 137. Swift Current's history began with Swift Current Creek which originates at Cypress Hills and traverses 100 miles (160 km) of prairie and empties into the South Saskatchewan River. The creek was a camp for First Nations for centuries. The name of the creek comes from the Cree, who called the South Saskatchewan River kisiskâciwan, meaning "it flows swiftly." Fur traders found the creek on their westward treks in the 1800s, and called it "Rivière au Courant" (lit: "river of the current"). Henri Julien, an artist traveling with the North-West Mounted Police expedition in 1874, referred to it as "Du Courant", and Commissioner French used "Strong Current Creek" in his diary. While it took another decade before being officially recorded, the area has always been known as "Swift Current.". The settlement of
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    2 votes
    187
    Winona

    Winona

    • Newspapers: Winona Daily News
    Winona is a city in and the county seat of Winona County, in the U.S. State of Minnesota. Located in picturesque bluff country on the Mississippi River, its most noticeable physical landmark is Sugar Loaf. The city is named after Princess We-Noh-Nah, daughter of Chief Wapasha (Wabasha) III. The population was 27,592 at the 2010 census. Its annual celebration, Steamboat Days, is held in the summer. It is also known as the stained glass capital of the United States. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 23.6 square miles (61 km), of which, 18.2 square miles (47 km) of it is land and 5.3 square miles (14 km) of it (22.62%) is water. Winona's primary suburbs are Goodview, Stockton, Minnesota City and Rollingstone to the west, Homer to the southeast and Fountain City to the north. Rochester is 44 miles to the west of Winona, La Crescent is 21 miles to the south, and La Crosse is 30 miles to the southeast. Winona's weather station, as well as neighboring city, La Crescent's station, records the warmest climate of any in Minnesota, with a normal year-round average (1971–2000) temperature of 48.9°F,"Temperature Summary Station: 219067 WINONA,
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    2 votes
    188
    Kokomo

    Kokomo

    • Newspapers: Kokomo Perspective
    Kokomo ( /ˈkoʊkəmoʊ/) is the county seat of Howard County, Indiana, United States. Kokomo is Indiana's 12th largest city. It is the principal city of the Kokomo, Indiana Metropolitan Statistical Area, which includes all of Howard and Tipton counties. Kokomo's population was 46,113 at the 2000 census, and 45,468 at the 2010 census. On January 1, 2012, Kokomo successfully annexed more than 7 square miles (18 km) on the south and west sides of the city, including Alto and Indian Heights, increasing the city's population to nearly 57,000 people. Kokomo was named after a Miami Indian referred to as a chief, but later found to be local legend Ma-Ko-Ko-Mo, which is sometimes spelled as "Koh-Koh-Mah" or "Kokomoko". His name translates to Black Walnut. There was a trading post for commerce between Native Americans and European-Americans here in the early 19th century. David Foster founded the first trading post in Howard County. In 1844, Foster donated 40 acres (160,000 m) of his land to create a county seat in Kokomo, which was a log courthouse, for use in the community. It was incorporated as a city in 1865. On October 6, 1886, natural gas was discovered in Kokomo, leading to a "boom" in
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    3 votes
    189
    Shelby County

    Shelby County

    • Newspapers: The Daily News
    Shelby County is a county located in the U.S. state of Tennessee. It is the state's largest both in terms of population and geographic area, with a population of 927,644 at the 2010 census. Its county seat is Memphis. Shelby County is part of the Memphis Metropolitan Statistical Area, which comprises eight counties in the three states of Tennessee, Mississippi, and Arkansas. Shelby County was named for Governor Isaac Shelby (1750–1826) of Kentucky. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 784 square miles (2,030 km), of which 755 square miles (1,960 km) is land and 29 square miles (75 km) (3.71%) is water. The lowest point in the state of Tennessee is located on the Mississippi River in Shelby County (just outside the Memphis city limits), where it flows out of Tennessee and into Mississippi. County government is headed by an elected county mayor and a thirteen-member county commission that is elected from five districts. The members of the county commission serve four-year terms. Other elected officials in Shelby County include the sheriff, the chief law enforcement officer, trustee, chief tax collector, and assessor, the chief property appraiser. The
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    3 votes
    190
    Collin County

    Collin County

    • Newspapers: McKinney Courier-Gazette
    Collin County is a suburban county located in the U.S. state of Texas. The county has been experiencing extensive growth in recent years. As of the 2010 census, its population was 782,341. Its seat is McKinney. Both the county and the county seat were named after Collin McKinney (1766 - 1861), one of the five men who drafted the Texas Declaration of Independence and the oldest of the 59 men who signed it. Collin County is part of the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex. A small portion of the city of Dallas is located in the county. Other important cities in the county include Allen, Frisco, McKinney, Plano, Richardson, Wylie, and Murphy. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 886 square miles (2,294.7 km), of which 848 square miles (2,196.3 km) is land and 38 square miles (98.4 km) (4.32%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 491,675 people, 181,970 households, and 132,292 families residing in the county. The population density was 580 people per square mile (224/km²). There were 194,892 housing units at an average density of 230 per square mile (89/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 81.39% White, 4.79% Black or African American, 0.47% Native
    5.50
    2 votes
    191
    Durham

    Durham

    • Newspapers: The Daily Tar Heel
    Durham is a city in the U.S. state of North Carolina. It is the county seat of Durham County and portions also extend into Wake and Orange Counties. It is the fourth-largest city in the state, and the 84th-largest in the United States by population, with 229,330 residents as of the 2010 United States census (though a 2011 estimate of Census Bureau estimate of 233,252 makes Durham fourth in North Carolina). It is the home of Duke University and North Carolina Central University, and is also one of the vertices of the Research Triangle area (home of the Research Triangle Park). Durham is the core of the four-county Durham-Chapel Hill Metropolitan Area. which has a population of 504,357 as of Census 2010. The US Office of Management and Budget also includes Durham as a part of the Raleigh-Durham-Cary Combined Statistical Area, which has a population of 1,749,525 as of Census 2010. Effective June 6, 2003 the Office of Management and Budget redefined the Federal Statistical Areas and dismantled what had been for decades the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill, MSA and split them into two separate MSAs even though the region still functions as a single metropolitan area. The Eno and the
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    2 votes
    192
    Haltern

    Haltern

    • Newspapers: Halterner Zeitung
    Haltern (also: Haltern am See, Haltern at the lake) is a town and a municipality in the district of Recklinghausen, in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. It is situated on the Lippe and the Wesel–Datteln Canal, approx. 15 km north of Recklinghausen. Benedikt Höwedes, footballer for Schalke 04 and Germany, was born in the city. Christoph Metzelder, footballer for Schalke 04, was born in the city. Haltern is twinned with:
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    2 votes
    193
    Lake County

    Lake County

    • Newspapers: Triangle News Leader
    Lake County is a county located in the state of Florida, United States. As of the 2000 Census, the population was 210,528. The Census Bureau estimated the population in 2008 to be 307,243. Its county seat is Tavares. Lake County is part of the Orlando-Kissimmee, Florida, Metropolitan Statistical Area. Lake County was created in 1887 from portions of Sumter County and Orange County. It was named for the numerous lakes in the area. There are approximately 1,400 named lakes. Lake County is also home to Sugarloaf Mountain, the highest point in peninsular Florida, at 312 feet (95 m) above sea level. Britton Hill is higher, but is in the Florida Panhandle. On New Year's Day of 1888, Flora Call and Elias Disney were married in the Lake County town of Kismet, and they lived for a short time in the adjoining town of Acron, Florida. They were the parents of Walt Disney. On February 2, 2007, Lake County was devastated by a series of early morning tornadoes, which killed at least 20 people in the area. Gov. Charlie Crist declared a state of emergency. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 1,156.40 square miles (2,995.1 km), of which 953.15 square miles (2,468.6 km) (or
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    2 votes
    194
    Londonderry

    Londonderry

    • Newspapers: Derry Journal
    County Londonderry or County Derry (named after the city of Londonderry or Derry) is one of the six counties of Northern Ireland and one of the nine counties of the Irish province of Ulster. Adjoined to the north-west shore of Lough Neagh, the county covers an area of 2,074 km², with a population of approximately 233,550. Since 1981, it has become one of four counties in Northern Ireland that has a Catholic majority (55.56% according to the 2001 Census), with 57% of the Catholic population residing within Derry City Council. The highest point in the county is the summit of Sawel Mountain (678 m) on the border with County Tyrone. Sawel is part of the Sperrin Mountains, which dominate the southern part of the county. To the east and west, the land falls into the valleys of the Bann and Foyle rivers respectively; in the south-east, the county touches the shore of Lough Neagh, which is the largest lake in Ireland; the north of the county is distinguished by the steep cliffs, dune systems, and remarkable beaches of the Atlantic coast. The county is home to a number of important buildings and landscapes, including the well-preserved 17th-century city walls of Derry; the National
    5.50
    2 votes
    195
    Palm Springs

    Palm Springs

    • Newspapers: The Desert Sun
    Palm Springs is a desert resort city in Riverside County, California, within the Coachella Valley. It is located approximately 37 miles (60 kilometres) east of San Bernardino, 111 miles (179 kilometres) east of Los Angeles, 136 miles (219 kilometres) northeast of San Diego, and 269 miles (433 kilometres) west of Phoenix, Arizona. The population was 44,552 at the 2010 census. Golf, swimming, tennis, horseback riding, biking, and hiking in the nearby desert and mountain areas are major forms of recreation in Palm Springs. Archaeological research has shown that the Cahuilla people have lived in the area for the past 350–500 years. The Cahuilla name for the area was "Se-Khi" (boiling water). When the Agua Caliente Reservation was established by the United States Government in 1896, the reservation land was composed of alternating sections (640 acres) of land laid out across the desert in a checkerboard pattern. The alternating, non-reservation sections, were granted to the Southern Pacific Railroad as an incentive to bring rail lines through the open desert. Presently the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians is composed of several smaller bands who live in the modern day Coachella
    5.50
    2 votes
    196
    Tacoma

    Tacoma

    • Newspapers: Tacoma News Tribune
    Tacoma ( /təˈkoʊmə/, US dict: tə·kō′·mə) is a mid-sized urban port city and the county seat of Pierce County, Washington, United States. The city is on Washington's Puget Sound, 32 miles (51 km) southwest of Seattle, 31 miles (50 km) northeast of the state capital, Olympia, and 58 miles (93 km) northwest of Mount Rainier National Park. The population was 198,397, according to the 2010 census. Tacoma is the second-largest city in the Puget Sound area and the third largest in the state. Tacoma also serves as the center of business activity for the South Sound region that has a population of around 1 million people. Tacoma adopted its name after the nearby Mount Rainier, originally called Mount Tahoma. It is known as the "City of Destiny" because the area was chosen to be the western terminus of the Northern Pacific Railroad in the late 19th century. The decision of the railroad was influenced by Tacoma's neighboring deep-water harbor, Commencement Bay. By connecting the bay with the railroad Tacoma's motto became "When rails meet sails." Today Commencement Bay serves the Port of Tacoma, a center of international trade on the Pacific Coast and Washington state's largest port. Like
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    2 votes
    197
    Brooklyn

    Brooklyn

    • Newspapers: Brooklyn Eagle
    Brooklyn (/ˈbrʊklɪn/) is the most populous of New York City's five boroughs, with approximately 2.5 million residents, and the second-largest in area. Since 1896, Brooklyn has had the same boundaries as Kings County, which is now the most populous county in New York State and the second-most densely populated county in the United States, after New York County (Manhattan). It is also the westernmost county on Long Island. Today, if it were an independent city, Brooklyn would rank as the fourth most populous city in the U.S., behind only the other boroughs of New York City combined, Los Angeles, and Chicago. Brooklyn was an independent city until it was annexed by New York City in 1898. It continues to maintain a distinct culture. Many Brooklyn neighborhoods are ethnic enclaves where particular ethnic groups and cultures predominate. Brooklyn's official motto is Eendraght Maeckt Maght. Written in the (early modern spelling of the) Dutch language, it is inspired by the motto of the United Dutch Provinces and translated "Unity makes strength". The motto is displayed on the borough seal and flag, which also feature a young robed woman bearing fasces, a traditional emblem of
    4.67
    3 votes
    198
    Fargo

    Fargo

    • Newspapers: The Forum of Fargo-Moorhead
    Fargo is the largest city in the U.S. state of North Dakota, accounting for nearly 16% of the state population. Fargo is also the county seat of Cass County. According to the 2010 census, its population was 105,549. Fargo, along with its twin city of Moorhead, Minnesota, as well as adjacent West Fargo, North Dakota and Dilworth, Minnesota, form the core of the Fargo-Moorhead, ND-MN Metropolitan Statistical Area, which in 2010 contained a population of 208,777. Founded in 1871, Fargo is the economic center of southeastern North Dakota. Fargo is a cultural, retail, health care, educational, and industrial hub for the region. Fargo is also the home to North Dakota State University. The area that is present-day Fargo was an early stopping point for steamboats floating down the Red River during the 1870s and 1880s. The city was originally named "Centralia," but was later renamed "Fargo" after Northern Pacific Railway director and Wells Fargo Express Company founder William Fargo (1818 - 1881). The area started to flourish after the arrival of the Northern Pacific Railroad and the city became known as the "Gateway to the West". During the 1880s, Fargo became the "divorce capital" of the
    4.67
    3 votes
    199
    Chilkat River

    Chilkat River

    • Newspapers: Chilkat Valley News
    The Chilkat River is a river in British Columbia and southeastern Alaska that flows southward from the Coast Range to the Chilkat Inlet and ultimately Lynn Canal. It is about 80 kilometres (50 mi) long. It begins at Chilkat Glacier, in Alaska, flows west and south in British Columbia for 27 kilometres (17 mi), enters Alaska and continues southwest for another 60 kilometres (37 mi). It reaches the ocean at the abandoned area of Wells, Alaska and deposits into a long delta area. The river was named by the Russians for the Chilkat group of Tlingit, called /Ǯiɬqut/ in their own language, who lived in the region. The name means "salmon storehouse". Near the Chilkat River is the Alaska Chilkat Bald Eagle Preserve, where thousands of bald eagles appear between October and February, to take advantage of late salmon runs. Nearby Haines, the nearest town, is the most common organization spot for birdwatchers.
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    1 votes
    200
    Cuba

    Cuba

    • Newspapers: Granma
    Cuba, officially the Republic of Cuba, (/ˈkjuːbə/; Spanish: República de Cuba, pronounced: [reˈpuβlika ðe ˈkuβa] ( listen)) is an island country in the Caribbean. The nation of Cuba consists of the main island of Cuba, the Isla de la Juventud, and several archipelagos. Havana is the largest city in Cuba and the country's capital. Santiago de Cuba is the second largest city. To the north of Cuba lies the United States (140 km or 90 mi away) and the Bahamas, Mexico is to the west, the Cayman Islands and Jamaica are to the south, and Haiti and the Dominican Republic are to the southeast. In 1492, Christopher Columbus landed on and claimed the island now occupied by Cuba, for the Kingdom of Spain. Cuba remained a territory of Spain until the Spanish–American War ended in 1898, and gained formal independence from the U.S. in 1902. A fragile democracy, increasingly dominated by radical politics eventually evolved, solidified by the Cuban Constitution of 1940, but was quashed in 1952 by former president Fulgencio Batista, and an authoritarian regime was set up, intensifying and catalyzing already rampant corruption, political repression and crippling economic regulations. Batista was
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    1 votes
    201
    Danville

    Danville

    • Newspapers: The Cento
    Danville is a city in and the county seat of Boyle County, Kentucky, United States. The population was 16,218 at the 2010 census. Danville is the principal city of the Danville Micropolitan Statistical Area, which includes all of Boyle and Lincoln counties. In 2001, Danville received a Great American Main Street Award from the National Trust for Historic Preservation. In 2011, Money Magazine placed Danville as the fourth best place to retire in the United States. Danville was twice chosen to host U.S. Vice-Presidential debates. Danville is called the "City of Firsts". Danville was part of the Great Settlement Area around Harrod's Fort (now Harrodsburg), which was first settled in 1774. Walker Daniel, Kentucky's first District Attorney, bought 76 acres (31 ha) from settler John Crow on the Wilderness Road and had it surveyed for a town in 1783-1784. The city was probably named for Daniel. The Virginia legislature officially established Danville on December 4, 1787. Between 1784 and 1792, ten conventions were held in Danville to petition for better governance and ultimately to secure independence from Virginia. In 1786 the Danville Political Club was organized. It met each Saturday
    6.00
    1 votes
    202
    Osceola County

    Osceola County

    • Newspapers: The Osceola News-Gazette
    Osceola County ( /ɒsiˈoʊlə/, o-si-OH-lə) is a county located in the U.S. state of Florida. As of 2000, the population was 172,493. The U.S. Census Bureau 2006 estimate for the county is 244,045, making it the 17th fastest-growing county in the United States. Its county seat is Kissimmee. Osceola County was created in 1887. It was named for the Indian leader Osceola, whose name means "Black Drink Cry [Asi Yaholo]." On July 21, 1821, Florida was divided into two counties, named Escambia County to the west and St. John's County to the east. In 1824, the southern part of St. John's County became Mosquito County, with Enterprise as the county seat. When Florida became a state in 1845, Mosquito County was renamed Orange County. In 1844, Brevard County was carved out from Mosquito County. On May 12, 1887, Osceola was named a county, having been created from both Orange and Brevard Counties. Osceola County reached all the way down to Lake Okeechobee until 1917 when Okeechobee County was formed. Since the late 20th century, Osceola County has experienced a significant influx of immigrants from Puerto Rico, and in the 2000 U.S. Census Puerto Rican was the largest self-reported ancestry
    6.00
    1 votes
    203
    Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater

    Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater

    • Newspapers: St. Petersburg Times
    The Tampa Bay Area is the region of west central Florida adjacent to Tampa Bay. Definitions of the region vary. It is often considered equivalent to the Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater Metropolitan Statistical Area (or MSA) defined by the United States Census Bureau. The Census Bureau currently estimates the population for the CMSA at 4,228,855 as of 2010 during consolidation. as of July 1, 2008, making it the second most populous metropolitan area in Florida and fourth in the Southeast. A wider definition is adopted by other entities, including state agencies like Enterprise Florida and the Florida Department of Transportation, and the Tampa Bay Partnership, a not-for-profit organization created to promote economic growth in the region. These entities include additional nearby counties. According to the Tampa Bay Partnership the Greater Tampa Bay Region contains 4 million residents. The Tampa Bay Partnership and U.S. Census data showed an average annual growth of 2.47 percent, or a gain of approximately 97,000 residents per year between 2000 and 2006. The combined Greater Tampa Bay region experienced a combined growth rate of 14.8 percent, growing from 3.4 million to 3.9 million
    6.00
    1 votes
    204
    University of Waterloo

    University of Waterloo

    • Newspapers: Imprint
    University of Waterloo (commonly referred as Waterloo or UW) is a public research university whose main campus is located in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. The main campus is located on 400 hectares (990 acres) of land in Uptown Waterloo, adjacent to Waterloo Park. The university offers a wide variety of academic programs, which is administered by six faculties, and four affiliated university colleges. Waterloo is a member of the U15, a group of research-intensive universities in Canada. The university traces its origins to 1 July 1957 as the Waterloo College Associate Faculties, a semi-autonomous entity of Waterloo College (which later evolved into the present-day Wilfrid Laurier University). The entity had formally separated from Waterloo College in 1959, and was incorporated as a university. The university was established in order to fill the need of a program to train engineers and technicians for Canada’s growing postwar economy. Since then, the university had greatly expanded, adding a faculty of arts in 1960, and the College of Optometry of Ontario moving from Toronto in 1967. The university is co-educational, and has nearly 26,000 undergraduate and over 4,000 post-graduate
    6.00
    1 votes
    205
    Dallas

    Dallas

    • Newspapers: The Dallas Morning News
    Dallas ( /ˈdæləs/) is the ninth most populous city in the United States of America and the third most populous city in the state of Texas. The Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex is the largest metropolitan area in the South and fourth-largest metropolitan area in the United States. Divided between Collin, Dallas, Denton, Kaufman, and Rockwall counties, the city had a population of 1,197,816 in 2010, according to the United States Census Bureau. The city is the largest economic center of the 12-county Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington metropolitan area (the DFW MSA) that according to the March 2010 U.S. Census Bureau release, had a population of 6,371,773. The metroplex economy is the sixth largest in the United States, with a 2010 gross metropolitan product of $374 billion. Its 2010 Real GDP amounted to $325 billion according to ‘Urban America: US cities in the global economy,’ which was published by the McKinsey Global Institute in April 2012. Dallas was founded in 1841 and was formally incorporated as a city in February 1856. The city's economy is primarily based on banking, commerce, telecommunications, computer technology, energy, healthcare and medical research, transportation and
    4.33
    3 votes
    206
    Münster

    Münster

    • Newspapers: Münstersche Zeitung
    Münster is one of the five Regierungsbezirks of North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, located in the north of the state, and named after the capital city of Münster. It includes the area which in medieval times was known as the Dreingau. Regierungsbezirk Münster mostly covers rural lands of the Münsterland which is famous for its castles, e.g. Castle Nordkirchen and Castle Ahaus. The region offers more the 100 castles, all linked up by the bike path 100 Schlösser Route. The three southern municipalities are part of the Ruhrgebiet, densely populated and still offer a wide range of industry. Besides that this area is mostly as green as the rest of the Münsterland and historically a part of the landscape. The history of the Regierungsbezirk dates back to 1815, when it was one of the original 25 Regierungsbezirke created as a subdivision of the provinces of Prussia. The last reorganization of the districts was done in 1975, when the number of districts was reduced from 10 to 5, and the number of district-free cities from six to three. The climate is mainly maritime, influenced by the recently deteriorating gulf stream. Temperatures above 30 °C during the summer were rare till the 80s of the
    4.33
    3 votes
    207
    Chapel Hill

    Chapel Hill

    • Newspapers: The Daily Tar Heel
    Chapel Hill is a town in Orange County, North Carolina (with some eastern portions in Durham County), and the home of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and UNC Health Care. The population was 57,233 at the 2010 census; Chapel Hill is the 16th largest municipality in North Carolina. Chapel Hill, Durham and Raleigh make up the three corners of the Research Triangle, so named in 1959 with the creation of Research Triangle Park, a research park between Durham and Raleigh. Chapel Hill is part of the Durham, NC MSA. Chapel Hill and its surrounding area have historically been politically liberal. Orange County voted for Barack Obama 72%-27% over John McCain in the 2008 presidential election. The Chapel Hill-Carrboro school district, which covers most of the towns of Chapel Hill and Carrboro, along with portions of unincorporated Orange County, is recognized for its academic strengths. East Chapel Hill High School and Chapel Hill High School have received national recognition for excellence, with Newsweek currently ranking East Chapel Hill High as the 88th best high school in the nation, and the highest ranked standard public high school in North Carolina. A third high
    5.00
    2 votes
    208
    Memphis

    Memphis

    • Newspapers: The Commercial Appeal
    Memphis is a city in the southwestern corner of the U.S. state of Tennessee, and the county seat of Shelby County. The city is located on the 4th Chickasaw Bluff, south of the confluence of the Wolf and Mississippi rivers. Memphis had a population of 646,889 at the 2010 census, making it the largest city in the state of Tennessee, the third largest in the Southeastern United States, and the 20th largest in the United States. The greater Memphis metropolitan area, including adjacent counties in Mississippi and Arkansas, had a 2010 population of 1,316,100. This makes Memphis the second largest metropolitan area in Tennessee, surpassed only by metropolitan Nashville, which has overtaken Memphis in recent years. Memphis is the youngest of Tennessee's major cities. A resident of Memphis is referred to as a Memphian, and the Memphis region is known, particularly to media outlets, as "Memphis & The Mid-South". Because it occupies a substantial bluff rising from the Mississippi River, the site of Memphis is a natural location for settlement. The area was first settled by the Mississippian Culture and then by the Chickasaw Indian tribe. For 10,000 years they occupied the bluffs along the
    5.00
    2 votes
    209
    Santa Ana

    Santa Ana

    • Newspapers: The Orange County Register
    Santa Ana /ˌsæntə ˈænə/ is the county seat and second most populous city in Orange County, California, and with a population of 324,528 at the 2010 census, Santa Ana is the 57th-most populous city in the United States. Founded in 1869, Santa Ana is located in Southern California adjacent to the Santa Ana River, 10 miles (16 km) away from the California coast. The city is part of the Los Angeles–Long Beach–Santa Ana metropolitan area which, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, is the second largest metropolitan area in the U.S., with almost thirteen million people. According to the 2000 U.S. Census, of U.S. cities with more than 300,000 people, Santa Ana is the 4th-most densely populated behind only New York City, San Francisco, and Chicago, and slightly denser than Boston. Santa Ana lends its name to the Santa Ana Freeway (I-5), which runs through the city. It also shares its name with the nearby Santa Ana Mountains, and the Santa Ana winds, which have historically fueled seasonal wildfires throughout Southern California. The current Office of Management and Budget (OMB) metropolitan designation for the Orange County Area is "Santa Ana-Anaheim-Irvine, CA". Members of the Tongva and
    5.00
    2 votes
    210
    Lawrenceburg

    Lawrenceburg

    • Newspapers: The Anderson News
    Lawrenceburg is a city in Anderson County, Kentucky, United States. The population was 10,505 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Anderson County. Lawrenceburg is part of the Frankfort, Kentucky micropolitan statistical area. Lawrenceburg is located at 38°02′14″N 84°53′48″W / 38.03722°N 84.89667°W / 38.03722; -84.89667 (38.0372967, -84.8966171). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 3.7 square miles (9.6 km), all land. The site of Lawrenceburg was settled in the early 1780s by a German immigrant named Jacob Kaufman and was first called Kaufman's (or Coffman's) Station. The post office was established January 22, 1817 with Jeremiah A. Matthews as first postmaster and named Lawrenceburgh, for William Lawrence, a local tavern owner. The community was incorporated as Lawrence in 1820 by the Court of Franklin County (of which it was then a part) but renamed Lawrenceburg in 1827. William Lawrence, with his father-in-law, Samuel Arbuckle, was one of the principal developers of the new community. As of the census of 2000, there were 9,014 people, 3,545 households, and 2,524 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,427.0
    4.50
    2 votes
    211
    Mountain Home

    Mountain Home

    Mountain Home is a city in and the county seat of Baxter County, Arkansas, United States, in the southern Ozark Mountains. It was recently listed in the top 20 cities in the U.S. for sportsmen in the current edition of Outdoor Life magazine, was recently ranked #2 for Field and Stream's Best Fishing Towns in America and today it is primarily known as a retirement and resort destination. Big Creek Golf Course has consistently earned 5 star ratings in Golf Digest magazine and ranked in the top 10 places to play. It has also been rated the number 1 public course in Arkansas for four years in a row. However, Big Creek is now a private club. Mountain Home was incorporated in 1888. The city sprang up around the Male and Female Academy which Professor J.S. Howard founded during the 1850s. The community's first name was "Rapp’s Barren". Director/producer Roger Corman directed. Bloody Mama (1970), Starring Shelley Winters as Ma Barker, and twenty-six-year-old Robert De Niro in one of his earliest film roles. Bloody Mama was shot in and around Mountain Home (Baxter County) and Little Rock (Pulaski County). More than 150 Baxter County residents were hired as extras, including the county judge
    4.50
    2 votes
    212
    New Albany

    New Albany

    • Newspapers: The Tribune
    New Albany ( /ˈɑːlbəni/) is a city in Floyd County, Indiana, United States, situated along the Ohio River opposite Louisville, Kentucky. The population was 36,372 at the 2010 census. The city is the county seat of Floyd County. It is bounded by I-265 to the north and the Ohio River to the south, and is considered part of the Louisville, Kentucky Metropolitan Statistical Area. The mayor of New Albany is Jeff Gahan, a Democrat; he was elected in 2011. The land of New Albany was officially granted to the United States after the American Revolutionary War. The territory had been captured by George Rogers Clark in 1779. For his services Clark was awarded large tracts of land in Southern Indiana including most of Floyd County. After the war Clark sold and distributed some of his land to his fellow soldiers. The area of New Albany ended up in the possession of Col. John Paul. New Albany was founded in July 1813 when three brothers from Albany, New York—Joel, Abner, and Nathaniel Scribner—arrived at the Falls of the Ohio and named the site after their home. They purchased the land from Col. John Paul. New Albany was platted by John Graham on the land owned by the Scribner brothers. In 1814
    4.50
    2 votes
    213
    Oslo

    Oslo

    • Newspapers: Aftenposten
    Oslo (English pronunciation: /ˈɒzloʊ/, OZ-loh, Norwegian pronunciation: [²uʃlu] ( listen) or, rarer [²uslu] or [uʃlu]) is the capital of and most populous city in Norway. Founded around 1048 by King Harald III, the city was elevated to a bishopric in 1070 and a capital under Haakon V around 1300. Personal unions with Denmark from 1397 to 1523 and again from 1536 to 1814 and with Sweden from 1814 to 1905 reduced its influence. After being destroyed by a fire in 1624, the city was moved closer to Akershus Castle during the reign of King Christian IV and renamed Christiania in his honour. It was established as a municipality (formannskapsdistrikt) on 1 January 1838. Following a spelling reform, it was known as Kristiania from 1877 to 1925, when its original Norwegian name was restored. Oslo is the economic and governmental centre of Norway. The city is also a hub of Norwegian trade, banking, industry and shipping. It is an important centre for maritime industries and maritime trade in Europe. The city is home to many companies within the maritime sector, some of which are amongst the world's largest shipping companies, shipbrokers and maritime insurance brokers. Oslo is a pilot city
    4.50
    2 votes
    214
    Puyallup

    Puyallup

    • Newspapers: Puyallup Herald
    Puyallup, Washington (/pjuːˈæləp/ pew-AL-əp or /pjuːˈɔːləp/ pew-AWL-əp) is a city in Pierce County, Washington about five miles (8 km) east of Tacoma. The population was 37,022 at the 2010 Census and the Washington State Office of Financial Management estimated the 2012 population at 37,620. Named after the Puyallup Tribe of Native Americans, Puyallup means "the generous people". Native Americans numbered about 2,000 in what is now the Puyallup Valley in the 1830s and 1840s. The first European settlers arrived in the 1850s. In 1877, Ezra Meeker platted a townsite and named it Puyallup after the local Puyallup Indian tribes. By the 1880s Puyallup had become a major hop growing region and more people flocked to the area. The town grew rapidly throughout the 1880s and the town was incorporated in 1890, the first mayor being Ezra Meeker. The turn of the 20th century brought change to the valley with the growth of nearby Tacoma and the interurban rail lines. The Western Washington Fairgrounds were developed giving local farmers a place to exhibit their crops and livestock. During the early part of World War II, the fairgrounds were part of Camp Harmony, a temporary Japanese American
    4.50
    2 votes
    215
    Spain

    Spain

    • Newspapers: El País
    Spain (/ˈspeɪn/ SPAYN; Spanish: España, pronounced: [esˈpaɲa] ( listen)), officially the Kingdom of Spain (Spanish: Reino de España), is a sovereign state and a member of the European Union located in southwestern Europe on the Iberian Peninsula. Its mainland is bordered to the south and east by the Mediterranean Sea except for a small land boundary with the British Overseas Territory of Gibraltar, to which Spain lays claim; to the north and north east by France, Andorra, and the Bay of Biscay; and to the northwest and west by the Atlantic Ocean and Portugal. Spanish territory also includes the Balearic Islands in the Mediterranean, the Canary Islands in the Atlantic Ocean off the African coast, and two autonomous cities in North Africa, Ceuta and Melilla, that border Morocco plus Alborán island, the Chafarinas islands (Islas Chafarinas), Alhucemas island and Perejil (Parsley island). Furthermore, the town of Llívia is a Spanish exclave situated inside French territory. With an area of 505,992 square kilometres (195,365 sq mi), it is the fourth largest country in Europe. Because of its location, the territory of Spain was subject to many external influences since prehistoric times
    4.50
    2 votes
    216
    West Virginia

    West Virginia

    • Newspapers: The Inter-Mountain
    West Virginia (/ˌwɛst vərˈdʒɪnjə/) is a state in the Appalachian region of the Southern United States. It is bordered by Virginia to the southeast, Kentucky to the southwest, Ohio to the northwest, Pennsylvania to the northeast and Maryland to the east. West Virginia is the 41st most extensive and the 37th most populous of the 50 United States. The capital and largest city is Charleston. West Virginia became a state following the Wheeling Conventions and broke away from Virginia during the American Civil War. The new state was admitted to the Union on June 20, 1863, and was a key Civil War border state. West Virginia was the only state to form by seceding from a Confederate state, and was one of two states formed during the American Civil War (the other one being Nevada, which separated from Utah Territory). The Census Bureau and the Association of American Geographers classify West Virginia as part of the South. The northern panhandle extends adjacent to Pennsylvania and Ohio, with the West Virginia cities of Wheeling and Weirton just across the border from the Pittsburgh metropolitan area, while Bluefield is less than 70 miles (110 km) from North Carolina. Huntington in the
    4.50
    2 votes
    217
    Clark County

    Clark County

    • Newspapers: The Vancouver Voice
    Clark County is a county located in the southwestern part of the U.S. state of Washington, across the Columbia River from Portland, Oregon. Clark County was the first county of Washington, named after William Clark of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. It was created by the provisional government of Oregon Territory on August 20, 1845, and at that time covered the entire present-day state. On July 1, 2011 Estimate, Clark County's population was to be 433,418. Its county seat is at Vancouver, which is also its largest city. Clark County began as the District of Vancouver on July 27, 1844. It included all the land north of the Columbia River, west of the Rocky Mountains, and south of Alaska. In 1845 the provisional government changed its name to Vancouver County. At that time it stretched from the Columbia River to 54 degrees 40 minutes North Latitude in British Columbia. On June 15, 1846 the United States Senate approved the present boundary between the U.S. and Canada at the 49th Parallel. On August 13, 1848, President James K. Polk signed an act creating the entire region as the Oregon Territory. On September 3, 1849, the Oregon Territorial Legislature modified the borders again and
    5.00
    1 votes
    218
    Greater Manchester

    Greater Manchester

    • Newspapers: Manchester Evening News
    Greater Manchester is a metropolitan county in North West England, with a population of 2.68 million. It encompasses one of the largest metropolitan areas in the United Kingdom and comprises ten metropolitan boroughs: Bolton, Bury, Oldham, Rochdale, Stockport, Tameside, Trafford, Wigan, and the cities of Manchester and Salford. Greater Manchester was created on 1 April 1974 as a result of the Local Government Act 1972. Greater Manchester spans 493 square miles (1,277 km). It is landlocked and borders Cheshire (to the south-west and south), Derbyshire (to the south-east), West Yorkshire (to the north-east), Lancashire (to the north) and Merseyside (to the west). There is a mix of high-density urban areas, suburbs, semi-rural and rural locations in Greater Manchester, but overwhelmingly the land use is urban. It has a focused central business district, formed by Manchester city centre and the adjoining parts of Salford and Trafford, but Greater Manchester is also a polycentric county with ten metropolitan districts, each of which has at least one major town centre and outlying suburbs. The Greater Manchester Urban Area is the third most populous conurbation in the UK, and spans
    5.00
    1 votes
    219
    Italy

    Italy

    • Newspapers: La Repubblica
    Italy /ˈɪtəli/ (Italian: Italia [iˈtaːlja]), officially the Italian Republic (Italian: Repubblica italiana), is a unitary parliamentary republic in Southern Europe. To the north, it borders France, Switzerland, Austria, and Slovenia along the Alps. To the south, it consists of the entirety of the Italian Peninsula, Sicily, Sardinia–the two largest islands in the Mediterranean Sea–and many other smaller islands. The independent states of San Marino and the Vatican City are enclaves within Italy, while Campione d'Italia is an Italian exclave in Switzerland. The territory of Italy covers some 301,338 km (116,347 sq mi) and is influenced by a temperate seasonal climate. With 60.8 million inhabitants, it is the fifth most populous country in Europe, and the 23rd most populous in the world. Rome, the capital of Italy, has for centuries been a political and religious centre of Western civilisation as the capital of the Roman Empire and site of the Holy See. After the decline of the Roman Empire, Italy endured numerous invasions by foreign peoples, from Germanic tribes such as the Lombards and Ostrogoths, to the Byzantines and later, the Normans, among others. Centuries later, Italy became
    5.00
    1 votes
    220
    Kern County

    Kern County

    • Newspapers: Ridgecrest Daily Independent
    Kern County is a county spanning across the southern end of the California Central Valley. Covering 8,161.42 square miles (21,138.0 km), it ranges west to the southern slope of the Coast Ranges, and east beyond the southern slope of the eastern Sierra Nevada into the Mojave Desert. The population of Kern County was 839,631 in 2010, making it the eleventh most populous county in the state. Its county seat is Bakersfield. The county's economy is heavily linked to agriculture and to petroleum extraction. There is also strong aviation, space, and military presence, such as Edwards Air Force Base and China Lake Naval Air Weapons Station. The area was claimed by the Spanish in 1769, and in 1772 Commander Don Pedro Fages became the first European to enter it, from the south by way of the Grapevine Canyon. Kern County was the site of the Battle of San Emigdio, in March 1824, between the Chumash Indians of the Santa Barbara Mission who rebelled against the Mexican government's taking over mission property and ejecting the natives. This battle with Mexican forces from Monterey under the command of Cárlos Carrillo took place at the canyon where San Emigdio Creek flows down San Emigdio
    5.00
    1 votes
    221
    Pays de la Loire

    Pays de la Loire

    • Newspapers: Ouest-France
    Pays de la Loire (French pronunciation: [pɛ.i də la lwaʁ]; Breton: Broioù al Liger) is one of the 27 regions of France. It is one of the regions created in the late 20th century to serve as a zone of influence for its capital, Nantes, one of a handful so-called "balancing metropolises" (métropoles d'équilibre)¹. Other examples of "artificially created" regions include Rhône-Alpes, which was created as the region for Lyon, and Midi-Pyrénées, which was created as the region for Toulouse. Pays de la Loire is made up of the following historical provinces: Consequently, the name of the region, chosen by the French central government, was not based on history, but purely on geographical references: Pays (i.e. "lands") de la Loire (i.e. "of the Loire River"). However, the majority of the famous châteaux of the Loire Valley are located in the Centre region, and not inside Pays de la Loire, despite the confusing name. The Pays de la Loire present many great monuments as the castles of Angers, Laval, Mayenne and the Nantes "Château des Ducs de Bretagne", the Royal Fontevraud Abbey (the widest monastic ensemble in Europe), the old city of Le Mans, and also many natural parks such as the
    5.00
    1 votes
    222
    Puskás Tivadar Távközlési Technikum

    Puskás Tivadar Távközlési Technikum

    • Newspapers: Chipogó
    The school's name's variations
    Magyar Királyi Posta Mûszerész Tanonciskola (The Hungarian Royal Post's Operator Apprentice School) /Oct 24, 1912/ Magyar Posta Műszerész Tanonciskola / Iparostanuló Iskola / (The Post's Operator Apprentice /Trade/ School) /1945-1950./ MTH 30.sz. Iparitanuló-Iskola (Labor-power standby's Office's 30th Trade School)  /Jan 1, 1950/ Villamosipari Technikum (Electricity Polytechnic) /Sept 1, 1951/ Puskás Tivadar Távközlési Technikum (Tivadar Puskás Telecommunication Polytechnic) /Jan 1, 1953/ Puskás Tivadar Távközlési Technikum és Szakközépiskola (Tivadar Puskás Telecommunication Polytechnic and Trade Shool) /1969-1972./ Puskás Tivadar Távközléstechnikai Szakközépiskola (Tivadar Puskás Telecommunication Trade School) /1972-1973./ Puskás Tivadar Híradástechnikai Szakközépiskola (Tivadar Puskás Communication Engineering Trade School) /1973-1985./ Puskás Tivadar Híradástechnikai Szakközépiskola és Technikum (Tivadar Puskás Communication Engineering Trade School And Polytechnicl) /1985-1994./ Puskás Tivadar Távközlési Technikum (Tivadar Puskás Telecommunication Polytechnic)  /July 1, 1994 - /The history of the schoolThe PTTT founded by the Hungarian Royal Post in 1912. It's name was Műszerész Tanonciskola (Operator Apprentice School). It is Hungary's most important intermediate telecommunication institution.

    The school's eras:I. A Posta Műszerész Tanonciskolája (The Post's Operator Apprentice School) /1912-1950/The first telegraph connection in Austria-Hungary built between Vienna and Bratislava. Tivadar and Ferenc Puskás built the first telephone exchange in Budapest. Foreign people worked on the exchange yet, and there wasn't telecommunication operator education in Hungary at that time. Then the telecommunication network was flaring, hence Endre Kolossváry, one of the first telecommunication engineers launch the Post's trade school's organization. It recovered in two years in the Ferencváros (Francis' Town), on the Gyáli út. It was a three-decker neo-Baroque buliding. It's architect was Fleischl Róbert.

    II. A Munkaerõ-tartalékok Hivatalának Iparitanuló Iskolája (Labor-power standby's Office's Trade School) /1950-1951/The high school reform of 1949 wasn't concerned with the trade schools. A new office, the Labor-power standby's Office got the governing of the trade schools. it started an elementary vocational training . The office got the school on Jan 1, 1950.The student after the primary school got a two-year training here.
     III. A Posta technikuma (The Post's Polytechnic) /1951-1969/In the summer of 1951 the Post get the school. It reopen the Operator Apprentice School, but its name was Electricity Polytechnic.

    The PTTT became  a  modern  communication  engineering school  for the  beginnig of the 60s.IV.A Magyar Posta, majd a Fõvárosi Tanács Szakközépiskolája (The Hungarian Post's, then the Council of Budapest's Polytechnic) /1969-1994/
    V. A Távközlési Oktatási Alapítvány technikuma (The Telecommunication Education Foundation's Polytechnic) /1994-/
    Charles Simonyi in the schoolWhen Charles Simonyi was in the space, he contacted former and current students of the school on April 13.On April 30, when he was in Hungary, he visited the school.
     PresentNow the headmaster of the school is Dr. László Horváth.
    The student learn about the Telecommunication and the Media.

    The school is more modern than other hungarian schools. It has got some computer room, lots of lab, a radio and a TV studio, a gym and a library.

    In the afternoon the student can do some sports (soccer, basketball, table tennis, chess and billiards), can made programme for the school radio (CoolFM), can make films.

    The compulsory language is the English, but the student can learn German and Russian.
    5.00
    1 votes
    223
    Waco

    Waco

    • Newspapers: Waco Tribune-Herald
    Waco (/ˈweɪkoʊ/) is a city in and the county seat of McLennan County, Texas, United States. It is situated along the Brazos River and on the I-35 corridor, halfway between Dallas and Austin. The city had a 2010 population of 124,805, an increase of almost 10 percent since the 2000 census, making it the twenty-second most populous city in the state. The Waco Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of just McLennan County, which had a 2010 population of 234,906. Prior to the founding of Waco in 1849, a Wichita Native American group known as the "Waco" (Spanish: Hueco or Huaco) lived on the land of present-day downtown Waco. In 1824 Thomas M. Duke explored the area and reported to Stephen F. Austin describing the village: "This town is situated on the West Bank of the River. They have a spring almost as cold as ice itself. All we want is some Brandy and Sugar to have Ice Toddy. They have about 400 acres (1.6 km) planted in corn, beans, pumpkins, and melons and that tended in good order. I think they cannot raise more than One Hundred Warriors." After Austin aborted the first attempt to destroy their village in 1825, he made a treaty with them. The Waco eventually moved out of the
    5.00
    1 votes
    224
    Huntington

    Huntington

    • Newspapers: The Herald-Dispatch
    Huntington is a city in Cabell and Wayne counties in the U.S. state of West Virginia, along the Ohio River. Most of the city is in Cabell County, for which it is the county seat. A small portion of the city, mainly the neighborhood of Westmoreland, is in Wayne County. Its population was 49,138 at the 2010 census. Huntington is a part of the Huntington–Ashland, WV–KY–OH, Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). As of the 2010 census, the MSA's population was 287,702. Huntington is the largest city within the MSA and the second largest city in West Virginia, behind Charleston. The first permanent settlement, Holderby's Landing, was founded in 1775 in what was then the Colony of Virginia. The city is the home of Marshall University. The first permanent settlement in modern-day Huntington was founded in 1775 as "Holderby's Landing." The city of Huntington was named for Collis P. Huntington, who built it as the western terminus for the Chesapeake and Ohio Railway (C&O) on the land west of the mouth of the Guyandotte River at the Ohio River. It was created as a railroad town for the C&O, when it initially stretched from Richmond, Virginia to the Ohio River. The C&O Railroad expanded East to
    4.00
    2 votes
    225
    Abu Dhabi

    Abu Dhabi

    • Newspapers: 7 Days
    Abu Dhabi (Arabic: أبو ظبي‎ Abu Dhabi, Father of Deer) is the capital and the second largest city of the United Arab Emirates in terms of population and the largest of the seven member emirates of the United Arab Emirates. Abu Dhabi lies on a T-shaped island jutting into the Persian Gulf from the central western coast. The city proper had a population of 621,000 in 2012. Abu Dhabi houses important offices of the federal government, and is the seat for the United Arab Emirates Government and the home for the Abu Dhabi Emiri Family and the President of the UAE from this family. Abu Dhabi has grown to be a cosmopolitan metropolis. Its rapid development and urbanisation, coupled with the relatively high average income of its population, has transformed Abu Dhabi to a larger and advanced metropolis. Today the city is the country's center of political, industrial activities, and a major cultural, and commercial centre due to its position as the capital. Abu Dhabi alone generated 56.7% of the GDP of the United Arab Emirates in 2008. Abu Dhabi is home to important financial institutions such as the Abu Dhabi Securities Exchange, the Central Bank of the United Arab Emirates and the
    4.00
    1 votes
    226
    Cumberland

    Cumberland

    • Newspapers: Cumberland Times-News
    Cumberland is a city in the far western, Appalachian portion of Maryland, United States. It is the county seat of Allegany County, and the primary city of the Cumberland, MD-WV Metropolitan Statistical Area. The Cumberland, MD-WV Metropolitan Statistical Area is one of the poorest in the United States, ranking 305th out of 318 metropolitan areas in per capita income. At the 2010 census, the city had a population of 20,859, and the metropolitan area had a population of 103,299. Cumberland is a regional business and commercial center for Western Maryland and the Potomac Highlands of West Virginia. Historically Cumberland was known as the "Queen City," as it was once Maryland's second largest city. At the 2000 census, there were 21,518 people, 9,538 households and 5,436 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,372.7 per square mile (916.0/km). There were 11,143 housing units at an average density of 1,228.7 per square mile (474.3/km). The racial makeup of the city was 92.54% White, 5.06% African American, 0.26% Native American, 0.61% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.26% from other races, and 1.24% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.70% of
    4.00
    1 votes
    227
    DeKalb County

    DeKalb County

    • Newspapers: The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    DeKalb County (/dɨˈkæb/ dee-KAB) is a county located in the U.S. state of Georgia. The population of the county was 691,893 at the 2010 census. Its county seat is the city of Decatur. It is bordered to the west by Fulton County and contains roughly 10% of the city of Atlanta. (The other 90% lies in Fulton County). DeKalb County is included in the five-county core of the Atlanta metropolitan statistical area. It is the third-most-populated county in Metro Atlanta and the state, just behind Gwinnett County. Prior to the 2010 Census, DeKalb County historically ranked second behind Fulton County for many years. It is the most diverse county in Georgia. DeKalb is primarily a suburban county, and is the second-most-affluent county with an African-American majority in the United States, behind Prince George's County, Maryland, in suburban Washington D.C. However, unlike in Prince George's County, DeKalb County's communities with a majority African-American population tend to fall below the county's median income, while communities with a majority White population tend to have incomes above the county's median. In 2009, DeKalb earned the Atlanta Regional Commission's "Green Communities"
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    228
    Drayton Valley

    Drayton Valley

    • Newspapers: Drayton Valley Western Review
    Drayton Valley is a town in central Alberta, Canada. It is located on Highway 22 (Cowboy Trail), approximately 133 kilometres (83 mi) southwest of Edmonton. It is surrounded by Brazeau County, which is known for its vast oil fields. Prior to the 1953 oil boom, the community of Drayton Valley was sparsely-populated. The main economic activities were farming and logging. Drayton Valley was incorporated as a village in 1956 and become officially a town in 1957. In the 2011 Census, the Town of Drayton Valley had a population of 7,049 living in 2,740 of its 2,899 total dwellings, a 2.3% change from its 2006 population of 6,893. With a land area of 12.27 km (4.74 sq mi), it had a population density of 574.49/km (1,487.9/sq mi) in 2011. In 2006, Drayton Valley had a population of 6,893 living in 2,619 dwellings, a 13.2% increase from 2001. The town has a land area of 12.27 km (4.74 sq mi) and a population density of 561.6 /km (1,455 /sq mi). Oil and gas is the primary driver of Drayton Valley's economy. Agriculture and forestry also play roles in the local economy. Weyerhauser operated a mill within the town until 2007. Drayton Valley's main attraction is the Omniplex, a community sports
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    229
    Falkirk

    Falkirk

    • Newspapers: Falkirk Herald
    Falkirk (pronounced/ˈfɔːlkʌrk/; Scottish Gaelic:  An Eaglais Bhreac (help·info)) is a town in the Central Lowlands of Scotland. It lies in the Forth Valley, almost midway between the two most populous cities of Scotland; 23.3 miles (37.5 km) north-west of Edinburgh and 20.5 miles (33.0 km) north-east of Glasgow. Falkirk had a resident population of 32,422 at the 2001 census. The population of the town had risen to 34,570 according to a 2008 estimate, making it the 20th most populous settlement in Scotland. Falkirk is the main town and administrative centre of the Falkirk council area, which has an overall population of 145,191 and inholds the nearby towns of Grangemouth, Bo'ness, Denny, Larbert and Stenhousemuir. The town lies at the junction of the Forth and Clyde Canal and the Union Canal, a location which proved key to the growth of Falkirk as a centre of heavy industry during the Industrial Revolution. In the 18th and 19th centuries Falkirk was at the centre of the iron and steel industry, underpinned by the Carron Company in the nearby village of Carron. The company was responsible for making Carronades for the Royal Navy and also later many UK pillar boxes. In the last 50
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    230
    Hungary

    Hungary

    • Newspapers: Fordulat
    Hungary /ˈhʌŋɡəri/ (Hungarian: Magyarország [ˈmɒɟɒrorsaːɡ] ( listen)) is a landlocked country in Central Europe. It is situated in the Carpathian Basin and is bordered by Slovakia to the north, Ukraine, and Romania to the east, Serbia, and Croatia to the south, Slovenia to the southwest and Austria to the west. The country's capital, and largest city, is Budapest. Hungary is a member of the European Union, NATO, the OECD, the Visegrád Group, and is a Schengen state. The official language is Hungarian, also known as Magyar, which is part of the Finno-Ugric group and is the most widely spoken non-Indo-European language in the European Union. Following a Celtic (after c. 450 BC) and a Roman (AD 9 – c. 430) period, the foundation of Hungary was laid in the late 9th century by the Hungarian prince Árpád, whose great-grandson Saint Stephen I was crowned with a crown sent by the pope from Rome in 1000 AD. The Kingdom of Hungary existed for 946 years, and at various points was regarded as one of the cultural centres of the Western world. After about 150 years of partial Ottoman occupation (1541–1699), Hungary was integrated into the Habsburg Monarchy, and later constituted half of the
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    231
    Minnetonka

    Minnetonka

    • Newspapers: Minnetonka Sun Sailor
    Minnetonka /ˌmɪnɨˈtɒŋkə/ MIN-i-TONG-kə is a suburban city in Hennepin County, Minnesota, United States, eight miles (13 km) west of Minneapolis. The population was 49,734 at the 2010 census. The word "Minnetonka" comes from the Dakota Indian mni tanka meaning "great water". The city is home to Cargill, the country's largest privately owned company and United Healthcare, the state's largest publicly owned company. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 28.2 square miles (73 km)—27.1 square miles (70.3 km²) of it is land and 1.1 square miles (2.8 km) of it (3.83%) is water. Part of the city includes the Eastern tip of Lake Minnetonka, one of the largest lakes in Minnesota. The outlet of Lake Minnetonka is Minnehaha Creek, which winds through South Minneapolis before ending at Minnehaha Falls and flowing into the Mississippi River. Minnetonka is located 8 miles (13 km) west of Minneapolis in Hennepin County. As of the census of 2000, there were 51,301 people, 21,393 households, and 14,097 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,893.0 persons per square mile (729.7/km²). There were 22,228 housing units at an average density of
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    232
    Newton

    Newton

    • Newspapers: The New Jersey Herald
    Newton is a town in Sussex County, New Jersey, United States. It is the county seat of Sussex County. As of the United States 2000 Census, the town population was 7,997. The population declined by 247 (-3.0%) from the 8,244 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 723 (+9.6%) from the 7,521 counted in the 1990 Census. Newton was incorporated by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 11, 1864 from portions of Newton Township, which was also partitioned to create Andover Township and Hampton Township, and was then dissolved. Additional land was acquired from Andover Township in 1869 and 1927, and from Fredon Township in 1920. Newton is located at 41°03′10″N 74°45′17″W / 41.052742°N 74.754787°W / 41.052742; -74.754787 (41.052742,-74.754787). According to the United States Census Bureau, the town had a total area of 3.169 square miles (8.207 km), of which, 3.146 square miles (8.147 km) of it is land and 0.023 square miles (0.060 km) of it (0.73%) is water. As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 7,997 people, 3,170 households, and 1,842 families residing in the town. The population density was 2,542.2 inhabitants per square mile (981.5 /km). There
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    233
    Pacific Northwest

    Pacific Northwest

    • Newspapers: The Rocket
    The Pacific Northwest is a region in western North America, bounded by the Pacific Ocean to the west and, loosely, by the Rocky Mountains on the east. Though no universally agreed upon boundary exists, a common definition includes the U.S. states of Oregon and Washington and the Canadian province of British Columbia. Broader conceptions reach north into Alaska and Yukon, south into the coastal and mountainous regions of Northern California, and east into Idaho, western Montana, and western Wyoming to the Continental Divide. Narrower conceptions may be limited to the Northwestern U.S. or to the coastal areas west of the Cascade and Coast mountains. The variety of definitions can be attributed to partially overlapping commonalities of the region's history, geography, society, and other factors. The term Northwest Coast is often used when referring only to the coastal regions. The term Northwest Plateau has been used to describe the inland regions, although they are commonly referred to as "the Interior" in British Columbia and the Inland Empire in the United States. The term "Pacific Northwest" should not be confused with the Northwest Territory (also known as the Great Northwest, a
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    234
    Banbury

    Banbury

    • Newspapers: Banbury Guardian newspaper
    Banbury ( /ˈbænbri/) is a market town and civil parish on the River Cherwell in the Cherwell District of Oxfordshire. It is 64 miles (103 km) northwest of London, 38 miles (61 km) southeast of Birmingham, 27 miles (43 km) south of Coventry and 21 miles (34 km) north northwest of the county town of Oxford. The urban area, including surrounding parishes, had a population of 43,867 at the 2001 census, though this figure has increased in recent years to approximately 45,000. The Member of Parliament for Banbury is Tony Baldry. Banbury is a significant commercial and retail centre for the surrounding area, which is predominantly rural. Banbury's main industries are car components, electrical goods, plastics, food processing, and printing. Banbury is home to the world's largest coffee-processing facility (Kraft Foods), built in 1964. The town is famed for Banbury cakes – similar to Eccles cakes but oval in shape. Since July 2000 Banbury has hosted a unique gathering of traditional mock animals, from around the UK, at the annual Banbury Hobby Horse Festival. The surrounding area is known informally as Banburyshire and covers the north half of the Cherwell district and neighbouring areas.
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    235
    Bobcaygeon

    Bobcaygeon

    • Newspapers: Bobcaygeon Independent
    Bobcaygeon is a community on the Trent-Severn Waterway in the City of Kawartha Lakes, east-central Ontario, Canada. Bobcaygeon was incorporated as village in 1876, and became known as the "Hub of the Kawarthas". Its recorded name bob-ca-je-wan-unk comes either from the Mississauga Ojibwa word baabaagwaajiwanaang "at the very shallow currents", giishkaabikojiwanaang "at the cliffed cascades" or obaabikojiwanaang "at currented rocky narrows", or from the French beau bocage "beautiful hedged farmland". The first lock in the Trent-Severn Waterway was built in Bobcaygeon in 1833. By the early 1830s, the government of Upper Canada had completed its survey of the Township of Verulam and the area began to attract settlers. Thomas Need, who arrived in 1832 is recognized as one of the earliest settlers of the Township of Verulam and is the founder of Bobcaygeon. With his purchase of 3000 acres (12 km²) of land, Need built a sawmill, gristmill, and the first store. In 1833, the provincial government began construction of a lock and canal at the narrows between Sturgeon and Pigeon Lakes. Soon a community began to develop around the lock and the Thomas Need's sawmill and gristmill. In the
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    236
    Chatham County

    Chatham County

    • Newspapers: Chatham Record
    Chatham County (local pronunciation:  /ˌtʃætəm/CHA-təm) is a county located in the Piedmont area of the U.S. state of North Carolina. As of 2010, the population was 63,505. Its county seat is Pittsboro. It is part of the Durham-Chapel Hill Metropolitan Area. Some of the first settlers of what would become the county were English Quakers, who settled along the Haw and Eno Rivers. The county was formed in 1771 from Orange County. It was named, like Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in 1758, for William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham, who served as British Prime Minister from 1766 to 1768 and opposed harsh colonial policies. In 1907, parts of Chatham County and Moore County were combined to form Lee County. The award-winning PBS documentary Family Name notes Chatham County as the place the relationship between the African-American and European-American branches of the Alston family originated. George Moses Horton, Historic Poet Laureate of Chatham County, (1797?-1883) lived most of his life in Chatham County and is among the few slaves to have published material while still a slave. Moncure once served as the western-most inland port in the state, linked all the way to the coast by steamships. On
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    237
    Greven

    Greven

    • Newspapers: Grevener Zeitung
    Greven (German pronunciation: [ˈɡʁeːvən]) is a medium-sized town in the district of Steinfurt, in Germany's most populous state of North Rhine-Westphalia and close to the city of Münster. Greven is situated on the river Ems, approx. 25 km south-east of Rheine and 15 km north of Münster. Greven consists of the following districts Greven is home to North Rhine-Westphalia's fourth-largest airport Münster Osnabrück International Airport (IATA code: FMO) transporting approx. 1.6 mil. passengers per year to destinations in Europe, Asia Minor, and North Africa.
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    238
    Gwinnett County

    Gwinnett County

    • Newspapers: Braselton News
    Gwinnett County is a county in the U.S. state of Georgia, named for Button Gwinnett, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. The county is the Atlanta metropolitan area's north-eastern link to Interstate 85, and is the second most populous county in the state, after Fulton County., with an estimated population of 805,321. Its county seat is Lawrenceville. Located along the Eastern Continental Divide; according to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 436.72 square miles (1,131.1 square kilometers), of which 432.73 square miles (1,120.8 square kilometers) (or 99.09%) is land and 3.99 square miles (10.3 square kilometers) (or 0.91%) is water. A portion of the county to the northwest is a part of the Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area chain. The regional reservoir, Lake Lanier, at the extreme north of the county, is the central cause to the Tri-state water dispute. The county maintains a regional airport under the name Gwinnett County Airport, formerly, Briscoe Field. (Main Article: Ronald Reagan Parkway) The county is part of the Atlanta Metropolitan Area (Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, Georgia Metropolitan Statistical Area). As of 2010, Gwinnett
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    239
    Kenya

    Kenya

    • Newspapers: Daily Nation
    Kenya ( /ˈkɛnjə/ or /ˈkiːnjə/), officially the Republic of Kenya, is a country in East Africa that lies on the equator. With the Indian Ocean to its south-east, it is bordered by Tanzania to the south, Uganda to the west, South Sudan to the north-west, Ethiopia to the north and Somalia to the north-east. Kenya has a land area of 580,000 km and a population of a little over 43 million residents. The country is named after Mount Kenya, a significant landmark and second among Africa's highest mountain peaks. Its capital and largest city is Nairobi. Kenya has a warm and humid climate along its coastline on the Indian Ocean, which changes to wildlife-rich savannah grasslands moving inland towards the capital. Nairobi has a cool climate that gets colder approaching Mount Kenya, which has three permanently snow-capped peaks. The warm and humid tropical climate reappears further inland towards lake Victoria, before giving way to temperate forested and hilly areas in the western region. The North Eastern regions along the border with Somalia and Ethiopia are arid and semi-arid areas with near-desert landscapes. Lake Victoria, the world's second largest fresh-water lake (after Lake Superior
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    240
    Lake County

    Lake County

    • Newspapers: Lake County Times
    Lake County is a county located in the U.S. state of Indiana. In 2011, its population was 496,314, making it Indiana's second-most populous county. The county seat is Crown Point. This county is part of Northwest Indiana and the Chicago metropolitan area. The county contains a mix of urban, suburban, and rural areas. It is the home of part of the Indiana Dunes. It is also the home of Marktown, Clayton Mark's planned worker community in East Chicago. Lake County was formed in 1837. From 1832 to 1836 the area that was to become Lake County was part of La Porte County. From 1836 to 1837 it was part of Porter County. It was named for its location on Lake Michigan. According to the 2010 census, the county has a total area of 626.56 square miles (1,622.8 km), of which 498.96 square miles (1,292.3 km) (or 79.63%) is land and 127.60 square miles (330.5 km) (or 20.37%) is water. The northern and southern portions of the county are mainly flat, except for a few sand ridges in the north. However, the central part of the county is very rolling and hilly. There are many remnants of the ancient shorelines of Lake Michigan. Hoosier Prairie, a portion of what once existed, has been preserved and
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    241
    Mandatory Palestine

    Mandatory Palestine

    • Newspapers: Davar
    Mandatory Palestine (in its official languages: English: Palestine, Arabic: فلسطين‎, Filasţīn; Hebrew: פָּלֶשְׂתִּינָה (א"י)‎‎, Palestína (EY), EY standing for Eretz Yisrael) was a geopolitic entity under British administration, carved out of Ottoman Southern Syria after World War I. British civil administration in Palestine operated from 1920 until 1948. This administration was formalised with the League of Nations' consent in 1923 under the British Mandate for Palestine which covered two administrative areas. The land west of the Jordan River, known as Palestine, was under direct British administration until 1948, while the land east of the Jordan was a semi-autonomous region known as Transjordan, under the rule of the Hashemite family from the Hijaz, and gained independence in 1946. In 1917, during the First World War, Britain defeated the Ottoman forces and occupied and set up a military administration across the former Ottoman Syria. The land remained under British military administration for the remainder of the war, and beyond. The British sought to set up legitimacy for their continued control of the region and this was achieved by obtaining a mandate from the League of
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    242
    North Carolina

    North Carolina

    • Newspapers: Q-Notes
    North Carolina (/ˌnɔrθ kærəˈlaɪnə/) is a state in the Southeastern United States. The state borders South Carolina and Georgia to the south, Tennessee to the west and Virginia to the north. North Carolina is the 28th most extensive and the 10th most populous of the 50 United States. North Carolina is known as the Tar Heel State and the Old North State. North Carolina is composed of 100 counties. Its capital is Raleigh, and its largest city is Charlotte. In the past five decades, North Carolina's economy has undergone a transition from heavy reliance upon tobacco and furniture making to a more diversified economy with engineering, biotechnology, and finance sectors. North Carolina has a wide range of elevations, from sea level on the coast to 6,684 feet (2,037 m) at Mount Mitchell, the highest point in the Eastern US. The climate of the coastal plains is strongly influenced by the Atlantic Ocean. Most of the state falls in the humid subtropical climate zone. More than 300 miles (500 km) from the coast, the western, mountainous part of the state has a subtropical highland climate. North Carolina borders South Carolina on the south, Georgia on the southwest, Tennessee on the west,
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    243
    Philadelphia

    Philadelphia

    • Newspapers: Political and Commercial Register
    Philadelphia ( /ˌfɪləˈdɛlfiə/) is the largest city in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the fifth-most-populous city in the United States. It is located in the Northeastern United States along the Delaware and Schuylkill rivers, and it is the only consolidated city-county in Pennsylvania. As of the 2010 Census, the city had a population of 1,526,006. Philadelphia is the economic and cultural center of the Delaware Valley, home to 6 million people and the country's fifth-largest metropolitan area. Popular nicknames for Philadelphia are Philly and The City of Brotherly Love, the latter of which comes from the literal meaning of the city's name in Greek (Greek: Φιλαδέλφεια ([pʰilaˈdelpʰeːa], Modern Greek: [filaˈðelfia]) "brotherly love", compounded from philos (φίλος) "loving", and adelphos (ἀδελφός) "brother"). In 1682, William Penn founded the city to serve as capital of Pennsylvania Colony. By the 1750s it was the largest city and busiest port in British America. During the American Revolution, Philadelphia played an instrumental role as a meeting place for the Founding Fathers of the United States, who signed the Declaration of Independence in 1776 and the Constitution in 1787.
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    244
    Pictou County

    Pictou County

    • Newspapers: The News
    Pictou County is a county in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia. It was established in 1835, and was formerly a part of Halifax County from 1759 to 1835. It had a population of 46,513 people in 2006, which represents a decline of 6.3 percent from 1991. It is the sixth most populous county in Nova Scotia. The origin of the name "Pictou" is obscure. Possible Mi'kmaq derivations include "Piktook" meaning an explosion of gas, and "Bucto" meaning fire, possibly related to the coal fields in the area. It might also be a corruption of Poictou, an old province in France. Nicolas Denys named the harbour La rivière de Pictou in the 1660s. Pictou was a receiving point for many Scottish immigrants moving to a new home in northern Nova Scotia and Cape Breton Island following the Highland Clearances of the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Consequently, the town's slogan is "The Birthplace of New Scotland"; the first wave of immigrants is acknowledged to have arrived on September 15, 1773, on the Hector. Pictou County includes the towns of New Glasgow, Stellarton, Pictou, Westville and Trenton. Pictou County is wholly within the federal electoral district of Central Nova. The county has been
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    245
    Poland

    Poland

    • Newspapers: Gazeta Wyborcza
    Poland /ˈpoʊlənd/ (Polish: Polska), officially the Republic of Poland (Polish: Rzeczpospolita Polska; Kashubian: Pòlskô Repùblika), is a country in Central Europe, bordered by Germany to the west; the Czech Republic and Slovakia to the south; Ukraine, Belarus and Lithuania to the east; and the Baltic Sea and Kaliningrad Oblast, a Russian exclave, to the north. The total area of Poland is 312,679 square kilometres (120,726 sq mi), making it the 69th largest country in the world and the 9th largest in Europe. Poland has a population of over 38.5 million people, which makes it the 34th most populous country in the world and the sixth most populous member of the European Union, being its most populous post-communist member. Poland is a unitary state made up of 16 voivodeships. Poland is a member of the European Union, NATO, the United Nations, the World Trade Organization, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), European Economic Area, International Energy Agency, Council of Europe, Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe, International Atomic Energy Agency, European Space Agency, G6, Council of the Baltic Sea States, Visegrád Group, Weimar
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    246
    San Francisco

    San Francisco

    • Newspapers: California Star
    San Francisco (/ˌsæn frənˈsɪskoʊ/), officially the City and County of San Francisco, is the leading financial and cultural center of Northern California and the San Francisco Bay Area. The only consolidated city-county in California, it encompasses a land area of about 46.9 square miles (121 km) on the northern end of the San Francisco Peninsula, giving it a density of about 17,179 people per square mile (6,632 people per km). It is the most densely settled large city (population greater than 200,000) in the state of California and the second-most densely populated major city in the United States after New York City. San Francisco is the fourth most populous city in California and the 14th most populous city in the United States, with a population of 805,235 as of the 2010 Census. The city is also the financial and cultural hub of the larger San Jose-San Francisco-Oakland metropolitan area, with a population of 7.6 million. San Francisco (Spanish for "Saint Francis") was founded on June 29, 1776, when colonists from Spain established a fort at the Golden Gate and a mission named for St. Francis of Assisi a few miles away. The California Gold Rush of 1849 propelled the city into a
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    Seminole County

    Seminole County

    Seminole County ( /ˈsɛmɨnoʊl/, SEM-i-nohl) is a county in the U.S. state of Florida. Located between Orange County to the south and Volusia County to the north, it is part of the Greater Orlando metropolitan area. Its county seat and largest city is Sanford. As of the 2010 Census, Seminole County's population was 422,718, a 15.75% increase from 2000. On July 21, 1821, there were two counties that formed Florida: Escambia to the west and St. Johns to the east. In 1824, the area to the south of St. Johns County was designated Mosquito County, with its seat at Enterprise. The county's name was changed to Orange County in 1845 when Florida became a state, and over the next 70 years several other counties were created. Seminole County was one of the last to split. Seminole County was created on April 25, 1913 out of part of the northern portion of Orange County by the Florida Legislature. It was named for the Seminole people who historically lived throughout the area. The name "Seminole" is thought to be derived from the Spanish word cimarron, meaning "wild" or "runaway." According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 344.87 square miles (893.2 km), of which 308.20 square
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    Staunton city

    Staunton city

    • Newspapers: The News Virginian
    Staunton (/ˈstæntən/ STAN-tən) is an independent city within the confines of Augusta County in the commonwealth of Virginia. The population was 23,746 as of 2010. It is the county seat of Augusta County. It is known for being the birthplace of Woodrow Wilson, the 28th U.S. president, and the home of Mary Baldwin College, a women's college. The city is also home to Stuart Hall, a private co-ed preparatory school, as well as the Virginia School for the Deaf and Blind. Staunton is the larger of the two principal cities of the Staunton-Waynesboro micropolitan statistical area, which covers Augusta County and the cities of Staunton and Waynesboro. The micropolitan area had a combined population of 116,299 in 2009. The area was first settled in 1732 by John Lewis and family. In 1736, William Beverley, a wealthy planter and merchant from Essex County, was granted by the Crown over 118,000 acres (478 km²) in what would become Augusta County. Surveyor Thomas Lewis in 1746 laid out the first town plat for Beverley of what was originally called Beverley's Mill Place. Founded in 1747, it was renamed in honor of Lady Rebecca Staunton, wife to Royal Lieutenant-Governor Sir William Gooch. Because
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    249
    Waterloo

    Waterloo

    • Newspapers: Imprint
    Waterloo is a city in Southern Ontario, Canada. It is the smallest of the three cities in the Regional Municipality of Waterloo, and is adjacent to the city of Kitchener. Kitchener and Waterloo are often jointly referred to as "Kitchener-Waterloo" (K-W), or "the Twin Cities", although they have separate city governments. There have been several attempts to amalgamate the two cities (sometimes with the city of Cambridge as well), but none have been successful. At the time of the 2011 census, Waterloo had a population of 98,780. Waterloo was built on land that was part of a parcel of 675,000 acres (2,730 km) assigned in 1784 to the Iroquois alliance that made up the League of Six Nations. Almost immediately—and with much controversy—the native groups began to sell some of the land. Between 1796 and 1798, 93,000 acres (380 km) were sold through a Crown Grant to Richard Beasley, with the Six Nations Indians continuing to hold the mortgage on the lands. The first wave of immigrants to the area was Mennonites from Pennsylvania. They bought deeds to land parcels from Beasley and began moving into the area in 1804. The following year, a group of 26 Mennonites pooled resources to purchase
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    250
    White Rock

    White Rock

    • Newspapers: Peace Arch News
    White Rock is a city in British Columbia, Canada, that lies within the Metro Vancouver regional district. It borders Semiahmoo Bay and is surrounded on three sides by South Surrey. To the south lies the Semiahmoo First Nation, which is within the city limits of Surrey. Semiahmoo Bay and the Southern Gulf Islands in the Strait of Georgia are also to the south. The boundaries between White Rock and Surrey are Bergstrom Road (136 Street) to the west, North Bluff Road (16th Avenue) to the north, Stayte Road (160 Street) to the east, and 8th Avenue to the south. The area south of 8 Avenue from Stayte Road westward to where 8 Avenue meets the water is the Semiahmoo Indian Reserve and lies within the bounds of the City of Surrey (though it is governed separately). The Surrey neighbourhoods of Ocean Park and Crescent Beach lie immediately to the northwest. White Rock has a moderate climate, with average daily high temperatures of 23 degrees Celsius in summer and 6 degrees Celsius in winter. Pilots accustomed to flying around the area often refer to it as 'the hole in the sky', referring to the fact that White Rock is often bright and sunny while the rest of the Lower Mainland is covered by
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