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  • Nov 27th 2012
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Best New York City of All Time

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    1
    Laurelton

    Laurelton

    Laurelton is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Queens. It is now a largely middle class neighborhood. In the 1930s through 1970s and beyond, the neighborhood was populated by many Jewish Americans, but succeeding generations have been made up of people of diverse backgrounds, including African-Americans who moved up from the South. The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 13. Laurelton is part of the former town of Jamaica. It is better known today as part of the larger community of Jamaica, Queens. Merrick Boulevard, which bisects the community in a generally east-west direction, forms its commercial spine. Laurelton was modeled after an English village, with stately Tudor-style homes, both attached and detached. There are co-ops in converted garden apartment complexes and some new construction with more modern designs, but no high-rise buildings, which has enabled Laurelton to keep its small town feel. The area of Laurelton closest to Rosedale and Cambria Heights is mostly made up of single-family homes. The area abutting Springfield Gardens contains many two-family homes. The area south of Merrick Boulevard contains many large, individually designed houses
    9.00
    5 votes
    2
    Broad Channel

    Broad Channel

    Broad Channel is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Queens. It occupies the southern portion of Rulers Bar Hassock (known colloquially as "Broad Channel Island"), which is the only inhabited island (pop. about 3,000) in Jamaica Bay. The neighborhood stands on Big Egg Marsh, an area of fill approximately 20 blocks long and 4 blocks wide. The community is an inholding within the Gateway National Recreation Area, a unit of the U.S National Park Service Lying between Howard Beach and the Rockaway Peninsula, it is connected to those communities by bridges at either end of the island—the Cross Bay Veterans Memorial Bridge and the Joseph P. Addabbo Memorial Bridge—which carry vehicular, bicycle and pedestrian traffic. Cross Bay Boulevard is the only through road. The area consists of artificial canals separating dead-end residential blocks. The IND Rockaway Line of the New York City Subway (A S trains) serves the Broad Channel station. During the 1960s and 1970s, some mapmakers have shown the streets of Broad Channel numbered along the same continuum found in the rest of Queens besides the Rockaways, with the numbers of "Streets" increasing from west to east, the numbers of
    7.67
    6 votes
    3
    Country Club

    Country Club

    Country Club is a neighborhood located in the East Bronx in New York City. It shares the 10465 ZIP code with Throggs Neck, although it is part of Pelham Bay. The neighborhood's boundaries are Pelham Bay Park to the north, Eastchester Bay to the east, Randall Avenue to the south, and the New England Thruway to the west. This area is policed by the 45th Precinct. According to Yahoo! Neighborhood Profiles, Property values in Country Club exceed the national average. Alongside Riverdale, Pelham and Schuylerville, the nearby Country Club is one of the most expensive neighborhoods in the Bronx. It is often ranked as the best neighborhood in the Bronx and among the best and safest places in New York City. The town is located across Pelham Bay Park, which has several sports fields, tennis courts, golf courses and trails for biking/running. At the end of the park to the northeast is Orchard Beach. The film Summer of Sam was partially filmed in Country Club. One of the largest public parks in New York City, Pelham Bay Park, is located nearby, as well as Orchard Beach. Residents are also five minutes away from City Island in Eastchester Bay. The Country Club section of the Bronx contains a
    6.71
    7 votes
    4
    Inwood

    Inwood

    Inwood is the northernmost neighborhood on Manhattan Island in the New York City borough of Manhattan. Inwood is physically bounded by the Harlem River to the north and east, and the Hudson River to the west. It extends southward to Fort Tryon Park and alternatively Dyckman Street or Fairview Avenue farther south, depending on the source. Inwood is mostly covered by the 10034 postal ZIP code. Notably, while Inwood is the northernmost neighborhood on the island of Manhattan, it is not the northernmost neighborhood of the entire borough of Manhattan. That distinction is held by Marble Hill, a Manhattan neighborhood situated just north of Inwood, on what is properly the North American mainland bordering the Bronx. (Marble Hill was isolated from Inwood and the rest of Manhattan in 1895 when the route of the Harlem River was altered by the construction of the Harlem River Ship Canal.) Because of its water boundary on three sides, the hilly geography, and the limited local street connections (only Broadway and Fort George Hill connect to the rest of the Manhattan street grid), the neighborhood can feel somewhat physically detached from the rest of the borough. The W.P.A. Guide to New
    7.50
    6 votes
    5
    DUMBO

    DUMBO

    Dumbo, an acronym for Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass, is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Brooklyn. It encompasses two sections: one located between the Manhattan and Brooklyn Bridges, which connect Brooklyn to Manhattan across the East River, and another that continues east from the Manhattan Bridge to the Vinegar Hill area. The neighborhood is part of Brooklyn Community Board 2. Until the 1890s, the western portion of the neighborhood was known as Fulton Landing, after the ferry stop that connected it to Manhattan before the Brooklyn Bridge opened. Then, it was primarily a manufacturing district, housing warehouses and factories that made machinery, paper boxes and Brillo soap pads. With deindustrialization it began becoming primarily residential, when artists and other young homesteaders seeking relatively large and inexpensive loft apartment spaces for studios and homes began moving there in the late 1970s. The acronym Dumbo arose in 1978, when new residents coined it in the belief such an unattractive name would help deter developers. Near the end of the 20th century, as property became more and more expensive in Manhattan, Dumbo became increasingly
    6.57
    7 votes
    6
    East Williamsburg

    East Williamsburg

    East Williamsburg is a name for the area in the northwestern portion of the borough of Brooklyn in New York City, United States, which lies between Williamsburg, Greenpoint, and Bushwick. Much of this area has been and still is referred to as either Bushwick, Williamsburg, or Greenpoint with the term East Williamsburg falling out of use until the 1990s. East Williamsburg consists roughly of what was the 3rd District of the Village of Williamsburg and what is now called the East Williamsburg In-Place Industrial Park (EWIPIP), bounded by the neighborhoods of Northside and Southside Williamsburg to the west, Greenpoint to the north, Bushwick to the south and southeast, and both Maspeth and Ridgewood in Queens to the east. Although the City of New York recognizes East Williamsburg as a neighborhood, there are no official boundaries to East Williamsburg since the City only officially delineates Community Districts and Boroughs, not neighborhoods. In the 18th century, Bushwick was already an established town, and the waterfront area that provided ferry service to the island of Manhattan was simply known as Bushwick Shore. The land of scrub bush that stood between Bushwick Shore and the
    7.33
    6 votes
    7
    Manhattan Valley

    Manhattan Valley

    Manhattan Valley is a neighborhood on the Upper West Side of Manhattan in New York City, bounded by West 110th Street to the north, Central Park West to the east, West 96th Street to the south, and Broadway to the west. It was formerly known as the Bloomingdale District, a name still in occasional use. Manhattan Valley occupies a natural depression running east-west across Manhattan, declining rapidly from high rocky bluffs at the western border of modern Central Park, and following west the valley created by what was once a minor stream draining from roughly the area of the Harlem Meer into the Hudson River. Some sources consider the southern boundary of Manhattan Valley to be West 100th Street, but a more natural division preferred by community groups extends the area south to West 96th Street, a major thoroughfare which runs in its own natural valley and stretches across town through Central Park. Broadway and Central Park West are busy north/south thoroughfares through the neighborhood. Others include, west to east, Amsterdam Avenue, Columbus Avenue, and Manhattan Avenue. The former two extend through the entirety of the Upper West Side (and beyond). The last originates at
    9.50
    4 votes
    8
    Pleasant Plains

    Pleasant Plains

    Pleasant Plains is a neighborhood located on Staten Island, one of the five boroughs of New York City, New York, the most populous city in the United States. Situated on the island's South Shore, Pleasant Plains has a population of 5,000 according to the 2000 census. It was named by officials of the Staten Island Railroad Corporation, the original owners of what is now known as the MTA Staten Island Railway. When the railroad line was extended to Tottenville in 1860, a station crossing Amboy Road approximately two miles north of Tottenville was named Pleasant Plains. Eventually, the name "Pleasant Plains" was applied to the community which soon sprung up around the station. In 1882, a 120-acre (0.49 km) farm southeast of the railroad station was purchased from the Bennett family by the Reverend John Christopher Drumgoole founder of the Mission of the Immaculate Virgin. He started the mission in Manhattan in 1871 originally to aid homeless newsboys. Subsequent parcels were added for a combined area of 400 acres (1.6 km). The formal name became The Mission of The Immaculate Virgin at Mount Loretto but was and still is referred to solely as "Mt. Loretto". An orphanage for boys and a
    9.50
    4 votes
    9
    Baychester

    Baychester

    Baychester is a working-class neighborhood geographically located in the northeast Bronx borough of New York City in the United States. The neighborhood is part of Bronx Community Board 12. Its boundaries, starting from the north and moving clockwise are: East 222nd Street to the north, the New England Thruway to the east, Pelham Parkway to the south, and Bronxwood Avenue to the west. Eastchester Road is the primary thoroughfare through Baychester. The local subway is the 5 line. Many homes are located on streets in the teen 200's and advancing to the 220's. While 10469 is the primary ZIP code of Baychester, it also covers the adjacent neighborhood of Pelham Gardens, Bronx. The area is patrolled by the 47th Precinct located at 4111 Laconia Avenue in the Williamsbridge section of the Bronx. Baychester is dominated by one and two family homes of various styles. The total land area is 2.61 square miles. The area is low laying and flat; some parts of the East Bronx are built on marshland and valleys. As of the census of 2000, there were 63,345 people and 23,144 housing units in the neighborhood. The population density was 24,249.08 people per square mile. The racial makeup of the
    8.20
    5 votes
    10
    South Beach

    South Beach

    South Beach is the name of a neighborhood located on the East Shore of Staten Island, one of the five boroughs of New York City, USA. It is situated immediately to the south of the Staten Island side of the Verrazano Narrows Bridge. Directly east of the beach is Hoffman Island, and Swinburne Island. In the early 20th Century, many summer homes dotted the neighborhood, including an organized development consisting of such structures known as Bungalowtown. South Beach was the terminus of a branch of the Staten Island Railway to which service was halted in 1953; by the 1980s the tracks of this line had been uprooted, and tract homes now stand on the original right-of-way in many places. Today, Railroad Avenue and the Robin Road Trestle are among the only evidence left behind. Many small amusement parks and arcades once flourished there, but virtually all had disappeared by the 1970s; the last one closed in 2006. The City of New York built a public housing project in the neighborhood in 1949; it is one of only three such projects found on the island south of the Staten Island Expressway. The neighborhood's principal thoroughfare was originally named Seaside Boulevard, and, as its name
    9.25
    4 votes
    11
    Rego Park

    Rego Park

    Rego Park is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Queens. Rego Park is bordered to the north by Elmhurst and Corona, the east and south by Forest Hills and the west by Middle Village. A swath of farmland until the early 20th century, the area that came to be called Rego Park was once populated by Dutch & German farmers who sold their produce in Manhattan. Later, the farmers were Chinese, and sold their goods exclusively to Chinatown. Rego Park was named after the Real Good Construction Company, which began development of the area in the mid-1920s. "Rego" comes from the first two letters of the first two words of the Real Good Construction Company. The company built 525 eight-room houses costing $8,000 each, stores were built in 1926 on Queens Boulevard and 63rd Drive, and apartment buildings were built in 1927–28. Like its neighbor, Forest Hills, Rego Park has long had a significant Jewish population, most of which have Bukharan, Georgian and Russian Jewish ancestors, with a number of synagogues and kosher restaurants. Cartoonist Art Spiegelman grew up in Rego Park and made it the setting for significant scenes involving his aged father in Maus, his graphic novel about
    8.00
    5 votes
    12
    RAMBO

    RAMBO

    RAMBO (an acronym for "Right After the Manhattan Bridge Overpass") refers to a small neighborhood in the downtown area of the New York City borough of Brooklyn. Its borders are Flatbush Avenue Extension on the west, Tillary Street on the south, and the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway (BQE) on the north and east. The area is also known historically and in city planning as "Bridge Plaza". RAMBO used to be part of Vinegar Hill until the 1950s, when the construction of the BQE effectively isolated it from surrounding areas.
    6.67
    6 votes
    13
    Herald Square

    Herald Square

    Herald Square is formed by the intersection of Broadway, Sixth Avenue (officially named Avenue of the Americas) and 34th Street in the borough of Manhattan in New York City. Named for the New York Herald, a now-defunct newspaper formerly headquartered there, it also gives its name to the surrounding area. The intersection is a typical Manhattan bow-tie square that consists of two named sections: Herald Square to the north (uptown) and Greeley Square to the south (downtown). Most non-New Yorkers know of it from the song Give My Regards to Broadway where the singer asks "remember me to Herald Square", or from the fact that Herald Square is the terminus for the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, broadcast nationally each year by NBC-TV. Greeley Square lies between West 32nd Street and West 33rd Street and between Broadway and Sixth Avenue, and is taken up almost entirely by a triangular park. It is named after Horace Greeley, who was the publisher of the New York Tribune, the Herald's rival newspaper. (The two papers later merged to form the New York Herald Tribune.) There is a statue of Greeley inside the park, created in 1890 by Alexander Doyle The small park has great deal of charm,
    7.60
    5 votes
    14
    Loisaida

    Loisaida

    Loisaida ( /ˌloʊ.iːˈsaɪdə/) is a term derived from the Latino (and especially Nuyorican) pronunciation of "Lower East Side", a neighborhood in Manhattan, New York City. The term was originally coined by poet/activist Bittman "Bimbo" Rivas in his 1974 poem "Loisaida". Loisaida Avenue is now an alternative name for Avenue C in the Alphabet City neighborhood of New York City, whose population has largely been Hispanic (mainly Nuyorican) since the 1960s. Today, there is much dispute over the borders of the Lower East Side, Alphabet City, and the East Village. Historically, Manhattan's Lower East Side was 14th Street at the northern end, bound on the east by East River and on the west by First Avenue. It originally comprised German, Jewish, Irish, and Italian working-class residents who lived in tenements, without running water; the German presence, already in decline, virtually ended after the General Slocum Disaster in 1904. Note: Loíza (or Loíza Aldea) is a town in Puerto Rico; some people believe that "Loisaida" comes from "Loíza Aldea". Since the 1940s the demographic has changed markedly several times: the addition of the large labor-backed Stuyvesant Town / Peter Cooper Village
    8.75
    4 votes
    15
    Riverdale

    Riverdale

    Riverdale (population: 47,850, according to the 2000 U.S. Census) is an affluent residential neighborhood in the northwest portion of the Bronx in New York City. Riverdale contains the northernmost point in New York City. Early in its residential development, Riverdale was a 19th-century estate district where many of Manhattan's moguls built their country estates. At the turn of the century, the new popularity of railroad commute enabled wealthy businessmen to make Riverdale their year-round residence. The Fieldston neighborhood, owned by a private association, is a particularly intact example of a turn-of-the century upper class suburb. The Hudson Hill neighborhood retains many of its historic mansions. Riverdale's elite private schools and historic churches also reflect this past. As the 20th century progressed, upscale apartment buildings and smaller houses were added to the neighborhood. To this day, Riverdale continues to maintain its character as an affluent enclave in the city of New York. The rich history of Riverdale has led to the creation of the Riverdale Historic District. Leland Weintraub, the commissioner who moved for the district's creation, noted that "most of the
    8.50
    4 votes
    16
    Rockaway Beach

    Rockaway Beach

    Rockaway Beach is a neighborhood on the Rockaway Peninsula in the New York City borough of Queens. It is located on the South Shore of Long Island. The neighborhood is bounded by Arverne to the east and Rockaway Park to the west. It is named for Rockaway Beach, which is the largest urban beach in the United States, stretching for miles along the Rockaway Peninsula facing the Atlantic Ocean. The beach is run and operated by the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation. Rockaway Beach was once known as the "Irish Riviera" because of the large Irish American population in the area. As of the United States Census, 2000, 25.4% of residents in ZIP code 11693 identified themselves as having Irish ancestry. According to the 2010 United States Census, the community's total population has reached to over 13,000 people making it the third most populated neighborhood on the peninsula. What is now Rockaway Beach was formerly two different villages, Holland and Hammels. In 1857, Michael P. Holland had purchased land and named the area after himself. Soon after, Louis Hammel, an immigrant from Germany, bought a tract of land just east of Holland. In 1878 he decided to give portions of his
    8.50
    4 votes
    17
    Sugar Hill

    Sugar Hill

    Sugar Hill is a neighborhood in the northern part of Hamilton Heights, which itself is a sub-neighborhood of Harlem, a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan. The neighborhood is defined by 155th Street to the north, 145th Street to the south, Edgecombe Avenue to the east, and Amsterdam Avenue to the west. The name originated in the 1920s, when the area became a popular place to live for wealthy African Americans. Named to identify the "sweet life" in Harlem, it was a popular residential area of rowhouses for wealthy African Americans during the Harlem Renaissance, including W. E. B. Du Bois, Thurgood Marshall, Adam Clayton Powell Jr., and Duke Ellington. Langston Hughes wrote about its relative affluence in relation to Harlem in his essay "Down and Under in Harlem" published in The New Republic in 1944. Sugar Hill was made a municipal historic district by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 2000. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2002. The Sugar Hill Historic District has 414 contributing buildings, two contributing sites, three contributing structures, and one contributing object. Rap group The Sugarhill Gang and rap
    7.20
    5 votes
    18
    Chelsea

    Chelsea

    Chelsea is a neighborhood on the West Side of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. The district's boundaries are roughly 14th Street to the south, 30th Street to the north, the western boundary of the Ladies' Mile Historic District – which lies between the Avenue of the Americas (Sixth Avenue) and Seventh Avenue – to the east, and the Hudson River and West Street to the west. To the north of Chelsea is the neighborhood of Hell's Kitchen, also known as "Clinton," to the northeast is the Garment District, to the east are NoMad and the Flatiron District, to the southwest is the Meatpacking District and to the southeast is the West Village. Chelsea is divided between Manhattan Community Board 4 and Manhattan Community Board 5. It contains the Chelsea Historic District and its extension, which were designated by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1970 and 1981, respectively, and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1977, expanded in 1982 to include contiguous blocks containing particularly significant examples of period architecture. The neighborhood is primarily residential, with a mix of tenements, apartment blocks, city housing projects,
    8.25
    4 votes
    19
    Huguenot

    Huguenot

    Huguenot is the name of a neighborhood located on the South Shore of Staten Island, one of the five boroughs of New York City, USA. In recent years it has become increasingly customary to refer to the western part of Huguenot as a separate neighborhood called Woodrow. Originally named "Bloomingview", its present name is derived from the Huguenots, led by Daniel Perrin, who settled in the area during the late 17th century and early 18th centuries to escape religious persecution. The community gained a station along the Staten Island Railway soon after the line was extended to Tottenville in 1860. This station was given the name "Huguenot Park", even though no park was actually located nearby; by the 1970s the word "Park" had been dropped, but later a branch of the New York Public Library was opened one block west of the station, replacing what was once the smallest New York Public Library building just east of the station (still standing), and named the Huguenot Park Branch, perhaps in honor of the station's former name. Long noted for the beauty of its woodlands, Huguenot had a transformation that led to a significant rise in the population of the neighborhood. The first visible
    8.25
    4 votes
    20
    Longwood

    Longwood

    Longwood is a low income residential neighborhood geographically located in the southwest Bronx, New York City. The neighborhood is part of Bronx Community Board 2. Its boundaries, starting from the north and moving clockwise are: East 167th Street to the north, the Bronx River & the Bruckner Expressway to east, East 149th Street to the south, and Prospect Avenue to the west. Southern Blvd is the primary thoroughfare through Longwood. The local subway is the 6 line, operating along Southern Blvd. Zip codes include 10455 and 10459. The neighborhood is served by the NYPD's 41st Precinct. NYCHA property in the area is patrolled by P.S.A. 7 at 737 Melrose Avenue in the Melrose section of the Bronx. Longwood has a population over 35,000 people. For decades Longwood has been one of the poorest communities in America. Over half the population lives below the poverty line and receives public assistance (AFDC, Home Relief, Supplemental Security Income, and Medicaid). Longwood has one of the highest concentrations of Puerto Ricans in all of New York City. The vast majority of households are renter occupied. Longwood is dominated by tenement buildings, older multi-unit homes, vacant lots,
    8.25
    4 votes
    21
    Fort Hamilton

    Fort Hamilton

    Fort Hamilton is a neighborhood in the far southwestern corner of the New York City borough of Brooklyn. It is located south of, and often considered part of, Bay Ridge. The area stretches from 86th Street as its northern border to 101st Street/the Narrows at the south; it is bounded by New York Bay on the west, and 7th Avenue on the east. The neighborhood is named for the United States Army installation of the same name. Fort Hamilton is patrolled by the NYPD's 68th Precinct. Notable locations include the St. John's Episcopal Church on Fort Hamilton Parkway, St. Patrick's Church on 4th Avenue, and Fort Hamilton Memorial Park at 4th Avenue and 101st Street. There are also a handful of houses dating from the 19th Century. Educational institutions include P.S. 104K (called the Fort Hamilton School) and Fort Hamilton High School (on 83rd Street). Fort Hamilton is served by the Brooklyn Public Library (BPL) Fort Hamilton branch. The current branch's predecessor was founded over 100 years ago. It became a part of the BPL system in 1901 and moved to its current location in 1905. Since then it has gone through numerous renovations. The most recent renovation was completed in March 2011,
    6.17
    6 votes
    22
    Midtown Manhattan

    Midtown Manhattan

    Midtown Manhattan, or simply Midtown, is a geographic area of Manhattan, New York City. It is home to some of the city's tallest and most famous buildings, such as the Empire State Building and Chrysler Building. It also contains world-famous commercial zones such as Rockefeller Center, Broadway, and Times Square. Geographically, Midtown is commonly defined as the area south of 59th Street, east of the Hudson River, and west of the East River. While its border with Lower Manhattan is less clear, the City of New York refers to 14th Street as the divider between the two districts. Overall, Manhattan can be divided into three geographic regions: "Uptown", Midtown, and "Downtown". As New York's largest central business district, Midtown Manhattan is the busiest single commercial district in the United States, and among the most intensely used pieces of real estate in the world. The majority of New York City's skyscrapers, including its tallest hotels and apartment towers, lie within Midtown. More than 700,000 commuters work in its offices, hotels, and retail establishments; the area also hosts many tourists, visiting residents, and students. Some areas, such as Times Square and Fifth
    7.00
    5 votes
    23
    Prospect-Lefferts Gardens

    Prospect-Lefferts Gardens

    Prospect Lefferts Gardens is a residential neighborhood in Flatbush in the New York City borough of Brooklyn. The area is bounded by Empire Boulevard (formerly Malbone Street) to the north, Clarkson Avenue to the south, New York Avenue to the east, and Ocean Avenue/Prospect Park to the west. Prospect Lefferts Gardens is part of Brooklyn Community Board 9 and is serviced by the NYPD 71st Precinct. The area was originally settled by a Dutch family in 1660. In 1893 the Lefferts estate was divided by James Lefferts into 600 building lots, now known as Lefferts Manor, and sold to developers. Lefferts observed construction from the Lefferts homestead, then located on Flatbush Avenue between Maple and Midwood Streets (now a historic museum located in Prospect Park). In order to ensure that the neighborhood would contain homes of a substantial nature, Lefferts attached land-use deed restrictions, dictating that each lot contain a single family residence built of brick or stone at least two stories in height, among other restrictions. The land-use covenant still exists in Lefferts Manor. Houses in Lefferts Manor were mostly constructed during the late 19th Century, the last of which were
    7.00
    5 votes
    24
    Brighton Beach

    Brighton Beach

    Brighton Beach is an oceanside neighborhood in the New York City borough of Brooklyn. As of 2007, it has a population of 75,692 with a total of 31,228 households. It is known for its high population of Russian-speaking immigrants and as a summer destination for New York City residents due to its beaches along the Atlantic Ocean and its proximity to the amusement parks in Coney Island. The neighborhood served as the setting for the 1983 Neil Simon play Brighton Beach Memoirs, a coming of age story about a family living there during the great depression. More recently, it has been used as a setting for New York television shows such as Law & Order, Blue Bloods, and Person of Interest. In August 2011, a reality TV series, Russian Dolls, followed the lives of eight women living in the community. Brighton Beach is bounded by Coney Island at Ocean Parkway to the west, Manhattan Beach at Corbin Place to the east, Gravesend at the Belt Parkway to the north, and the Atlantic Ocean to the south (at the Riegelmann Boardwalk/beachfront). It is patrolled by the NYPD's 60th Precinct. Brighton Beach was developed by William A. Engeman as a beach resort in 1868, and was named by Henry C. Murphy
    9.33
    3 votes
    25
    Bushwick

    Bushwick

    Bushwick is a neighborhood in the northern part of the New York City borough of Brooklyn. The neighborhood, formerly Brooklyn's 18th Ward, is now part of Brooklyn Community Board 4. It is served by the NYPD's 83rd Precinct and is represented in the New York City Council as part of Districts 34 and 37. Bushwick is bound by Williamsburg to the west, East New York to the east, Bedford-Stuyvesant and Brownsville to the south, and Ridgewood, Queens to the north. It is served by Postal Service zip codes 11207, 11221 and 11237. Bushwick was once an independent town and has undergone various territorial changes throughout its history. Brooklyn neighbhorhoods are unofficially designated and as such do not have official boundaries. In the popular understanding Bushwick is roughly continuous with Brooklyn Community Board 4, and as such is delimited by Broadway on the west, Johnson and Cypress Avenues on the north, the Queens Borough line and Vermont Avenue on the east, and Highland Blvd. on the south. Bushwick's population in 2007 was 129,980. 38.9% of that population was foreign born. Though an ethnic neighborhood, Bushwick's population is, for a New York City neighborhood, relatively
    9.33
    3 votes
    26
    Canarsie

    Canarsie

    Canarsie (/kəˈnɑrsi/kə-NAR-see) is a neighborhood in the southeastern portion of the borough of Brooklyn, in New York City, United States. The area is part of Brooklyn Community Board 18. Canarsie, which includes the entire 11236 ZIP code, is bordered on the east by Fresh Creek Basin, East 108th Street, and the BMT Canarsie Line (L train) to Linden Boulevard; on the north by Linden Boulevard; on the west by Remsen Avenue to Ralph Avenue and the Paerdegat Basin; and on the south by Jamaica Bay. Canarsie also neighbors East Flatbush, Flatlands, Mill Basin, Bergen Beach, and East New York. Canarsie is patrolled by the NYPD's 69th Precinct. "Canarsie" is a phonetic interpretation of a word in the Lenape language for "fenced land" or "fort". The Native Americans who made the infamous sale of the island of Manhattan for 60 guilders were Lenape. Europeans would often refer to the indigenous people living in an area by the local place-name, and so reference may be found in contemporary documents to "Canarsee Indians". The current neighborhood lies within the former town of Flatlands, one of the five original Dutch towns on Long Island. Canarsie was built on swamps near Jamaica Bay. It was
    9.33
    3 votes
    27
    Washington Heights

    Washington Heights

    Washington Heights is a New York City neighborhood in the northern reaches of the borough of Manhattan. It is named for Fort Washington, a fortification constructed at the highest point on Manhattan island by Continental Army troops during the American Revolutionary War, to defend the area from the British forces. Washington Heights borders Harlem to the South, along 155th street, Inwood to the North along Dyckman Street, the Hudson River to the West and Harlem River to the East. Washington Heights is on the high ridge in Upper Manhattan that rises steeply north of the narrow valley that carries 125th Street to the former ferry landing on the Hudson River that served the village of Manhattanville. Though the neighborhood was once considered to run as far south as 125th Street, modern usage defines the neighborhood as running north from Hamilton Heights at 155th Street to Inwood, topping out just below Dyckman Street. The wooded slopes of Washington Heights seen from a sandy cove on the Hudson as they were about 1845 are illustrated in a canvas by John James Audubon's son, Victor Clifford Audubon, conserved by the Museum of the City of New York. Fifteen blocks from the northern end
    9.33
    3 votes
    28
    University Heights

    University Heights

    University Heights is a low-income neighborhood of the West Bronx in New York City. The neighborhood is part of Bronx Community Board 5 and Bronx Community Board 7. Its boundaries, starting from the north and moving clockwise, are: West 190th Street to the north, Jerome Avenue to the east, West Burnside Avenue to the south, and the Harlem River to the west. University Avenue is the primary thoroughfare in University Heights. The local subway is the IRT Jerome Avenue Line, operating along the Jerome Avenue. ZIP codes include 10453 and 10468. University Heights has a population of over 40,000. There is a mix of renter-occupied as well as owner-occupied households. The demographics are 23.0% African American, 2.0% White, 3.4% Asian or Pacific Islander, and 72.6% Hispanic or Latino, the majority of which are of Dominican and Puerto Rican descent. University Heights consists of 5- and 6-story buildings, older multi-unit homes, newly constructed multi-unit townhouses and apartment buildings, and co-ops. The total land area is roughly one square mile. The terrain is elevated and hilly. The neighborhood takes it name from the hill on which New York University's Bronx campus was built in
    8.00
    4 votes
    29
    Upper West Side

    Upper West Side

    The Upper West Side is a neighborhood in the borough of Manhattan, New York City, that lies between Central Park and the Hudson River and between West 59th Street and West 110th Street. The Upper West Side is sometimes also considered to include the neighborhood of Morningside Heights. Like the Upper East Side, the Upper West Side is an upscale, primarily residential area with many of its residents working in more commercial areas in Midtown and Lower Manhattan. While these distinctions were never hard-and-fast rules and now mean little, it has the reputation of being home to New York City's cultural and artistic workers, while the Upper East Side is traditionally perceived to be home to commercial and business types. The Upper West Side is bounded on the south by 58th Street, Central Park to the east, and the Hudson River to the west. Its northern boundary is somewhat less obvious. Although it has historically been cited as 110th Street, which fixes the neighborhood alongside Central Park, it is now sometimes considered to be 125th Street, encompassing Morningside Heights. This reflects demographic shifts in Morningside Heights, as well as the tendency of real estate brokers to
    8.00
    4 votes
    30
    Greenpoint

    Greenpoint

    Greenpoint is the northernmost neighborhood in the New York City borough of Brooklyn. It is bordered on the southwest by Williamsburg at the Bushwick inlet, on the southeast by the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway and East Williamsburg, on the north by Newtown Creek and Long Island City, Queens at the Kosciuszko Bridge, and on the west by the East River. Originally farmland (many of the farm owners' family names, e.g., Meserole and Calyer, still name the streets), the residential core of Greenpoint was built on parcels divided during the 19th century, with rope factories and lumber yards lining the East River to the west, while the northeastern section along the Newtown Creek through East Williamsburg became an industrial maritime reach. There has been an effort to reclaim not only the rezoned Greenpoint/Williamsburg East River waterfront for recreational use, but to extend that effort to include a continuous promenade into the Newtown Creek area. The neighborhood is part of New York's 12th congressional district, State Senate Districts 17 and 25, State Assembly District 50, City Council District 33, and Brooklyn Community Board 1. The neighborhood is served by the NYPD's 94th Precinct.
    6.00
    6 votes
    31
    Hollis

    Hollis

    Hollis is a neighborhood within the southeastern section of the New York City borough of Queens. A predominantly African American community, the boundaries are considered to be the Far Rockaway Branch of the Long Island Rail Road to the west, Hillside Avenue to the north, Francis Lewis Boulevard to the east (although parts of Queens Village are addressed as Hollis on Jamaica water bills) and Murdock Avenue to the south. Much of this area is considered to be within the St. Albans postal district. Hollis is close to Jamaica and Queens Village, Queens. The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 12. Hollis is patrolled by the NYPD's 113th Precinct. The first European settlers were Dutch homesteaders in the 17th century. A century later, early in the American Revolutionary War, it was the site of part of the Battle of Long Island, a battle in which the rebel Brigadier General Nathaniel Woodhull was captured at a tavern on what is now Jamaica Avenue. Woodhull Avenue in Hollis is named after him. The area remained rural until 1885, when developers turned 136 acres (55 ha) into houses, and the area is still developed primarily with single family houses. In 1898, it became a part of
    6.80
    5 votes
    32
    Little Germany

    Little Germany

    Little Germany, known in German as Kleindeutschland and Deutschländle and called Dutchtown by contemporary non-Germans, was a German immigrant neighborhood on the Lower East Side of Manhattan in New York City. The neighborhood's ethnic cohesion began to decline in the late 19th century from the population dynamics of non-German immigrants settling in the area, and the loss of second-generation families to other German-American communities. The decline was exacerbated in 1904, when the General Slocum disaster wiped out the social core of the neighborhood. Beginning in the 1840s, large numbers of German immigrants entering the United States provided a constant population influx for Little Germany. In the 1850s alone, 800,000 Germans passed through New York. By 1855 New York had the third largest German population of any city in the world, outranked only by Berlin and Vienna. The German immigrants differed from others in that they usually were educated and had marketable skills in crafts. More than half of the era's bakers and cabinet makers were Germans or of German origin, and many Germans also worked in the construction business. Educated Germans such as Joseph Wedemeyer, Oswald
    6.80
    5 votes
    33
    Cypress Hills

    Cypress Hills

    Cypress Hills is a sub-section of the East New York neighborhood in Brooklyn, New York City, lying north of City Line and south of Cypress Hills Cemetery, in the far northeastern corner of Brooklyn. It is abutted on the west by Bushwick and on the east, across the Brooklyn–Queens border, by Woodhaven and Ozone Park.It lies within the 37th City Council District of New York City. The southern border of the neighborhood is Atlantic Avenue. The northern part, north of Atlantic Avenue, is mixed, with Hispanic-Americans, South Asian-Americans, Caribbean Americans and African Americans. The southern part is composed of African-Americans and Hispanic-Americans, and a scattered presence of South Asian-Americans. It is served by the Cleveland Street, Norwood Avenue, Crescent Street, Cypress Hills and 75th Street – Elderts Lane subway stations (J Z trains) on the BMT Jamaica Line of the New York City Subway. Conduit Boulevard passes through the neighborhood. In the south, on Sutter Avenue, facing the Cypress Hills Houses, is a branch of the Brooklyn Public Library. There is also a branch on Arlington Avenue between Warwick Street and Ashford Street. Northeastward, in the Woodhaven
    9.00
    3 votes
    34
    Starrett City

    Starrett City

    Starrett City is a housing development in Brooklyn, New York City. Starrett City opened in 1974, and in 2002, changed its name to the Spring Creek Towers. The neighborhood is part of Brooklyn Community Board 5. Starrett City is patrolled by the NYPD's 75th Precinct. The Starrett City site spanned over 153 acres (0.62 km) before being subdivided in 2009 as part of a refinancing. The housing development contains 5,881 apartment units in 46 buildings, and is said to be the largest federally assisted rental property in the United States. The residential site also includes eight parking garages, a community center, and a number of parcels of undeveloped land were separated out from the residential site as part of the refinancing. The residential portion of the property has eight "sections" each including several buildings, its own field, recreational area (jungle gym, park, handball court, basketball court) and a parking garage for residents in that section. These sections are Ardsley, Bethel, Croton, Delmar, Elmira, Freeport, Geneva, and Hornell; each named after municipalities in Westchester County and upstate New York (except for Freeport, which is on Long Island). Each building has
    9.00
    3 votes
    35
    Arthur Avenue

    Arthur Avenue

    Arthur Avenue is a street in the Fordham section of New York City's northernmost borough, The Bronx. It was once the heart of the Bronx's "Little Italy". "Little Italy" generally refers to Arthur Avenue and East 187th Street. Although the historical and commercial center of Little Italy is Arthur Avenue itself, the area stretches across East 187th Street from Arthur Avenue to Prospect Avenue, and is similarly lined with delis, bakeries, cafes and various Italian merchants. Arthur Avenue and Morris Park are viewed as the Bronx's primary Italian-American communities. Other Italian-American communities in the Bronx are the middle and upper-class neighborhoods of Schuylerville and Country Club. The avenue itself is named in honor of President Chester A. Arthur. Robert De Niro's directing debut A Bronx Tale, takes place in the vicinity of Belmont. However, it was largely filmed in Astoria, Queens. The series Third Watch was based on Arthur Avenue initially, with the first episode referring to the firehouse as "Camelot," based on its location at the intersection of King Street and Arthur Avenue. The 1973 film "The Seven-Ups" starring Roy Scheider was filmed on Arthur Avenue and Hoffman
    7.75
    4 votes
    36
    Bay Ridge

    Bay Ridge

    Bay Ridge is a neighborhood in the southwest corner of the New York City borough of Brooklyn, USA. It is bounded by Sunset Park on the north, Seventh Avenue and Dyker Heights on the east, The Narrows Strait, which partially houses the Belt Parkway, on the west and the Verrazano bridge on the south. While Fort Hamilton is often considered a separate neighborhood, it is part of Bay Ridge. Bay Ridge and Fort Hamilton both share the ZIP code of 11209. Bay Ridge is patrolled by the NYPD's 68th Precinct. It is served by Engine 241, Engine 242, and Ladder 109 of the New York City Fire Department. Bay Ridge is a largely middle-class neighborhood. With its strong family presence, it is not uncommon to see third or fourth generation families living in the region. Until the early 1990s Bay Ridge was a primarily Irish, Italian, and Norwegian neighborhood. Today, Bay Ridge maintains a sizable Irish, Italian, and Greek population, but like other areas in South/Southwest Brooklyn, late in the 20th century it saw an influx of Russian, Polish, and Arabians, and lesser numbers of Chinese. In recent decades many Syrian/Lebanese Americans have moved to Bay Ridge. Bay Ridge has many international
    7.75
    4 votes
    37
    Cooperative Village

    Cooperative Village

    Cooperative Village is a community of housing cooperatives on the Lower East Side of Manhattan, New York City. The cooperatives are centered around Grand Street in an area south of the entrance ramp to the Williamsburg Bridge and west of FDR Drive. Combined, the four cooperatives have 4,500 apartments in twelve buildings. The cooperatives were sponsored, organized and built by trade unions, the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America and International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union, as well as the United Housing Foundation, a development organization set up by the unions in 1951. The cooperatives followed strict Rochdale Principles, with one vote per member, irrespective of the nominal value of his shares. Resale of shares was restricted; members moving out of the apartments had to sell their shares back to the cooperative at the buying price, minus a flip tax. After the original financing structures governing the apartments were phased out, beginning in 1986, the shareholders of each cooperative decided in separate votes in 1997 and 2000, to abandon the limited equity rules and free the resale of shares, in some cases increasing the value of apartments fivefold. To keep the
    7.75
    4 votes
    38
    Glendale

    Glendale

    Glendale is a neighborhood in the west-central portion of the New York City borough of Queens. It is bounded on the north by Cooper Avenue in the eastern portion (Upper Glendale) and by a section of the Montauk Branch of the LIRR in the western portion (Middle and Lower Glendale), Woodhaven Boulevard to the east, a number of contiguous cemeteries and part of Forest Park to the south and the Bushwick Branch of the LIRR to the west. The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 5. Glendale is characterized as an upper-middle-class and middle-class residential community, with other upper and middle-class neighborhoods directly surrounding it such as Forest Hills, Ridgewood, Woodhaven, Middle Village, and Kew Gardens. Because of its relative isolation from the New York City Subway system, its abundance of trees, proximity to Forest Park, its bordering by over a dozen cemeteries, and slightly cooler microclimate, Glendale has a bucolic, sleepy quality unlike nearby Ridgewood. Within Glendale are several smaller sections with their own unique attributes. The easternmost portion near the Shops at Atlas Park is known as Upper Glendale and in general has more expensive homes and
    7.75
    4 votes
    39
    Great Kills

    Great Kills

    Great Kills is a neighborhood within New York City's borough of Staten Island. It is located on the island's South Shore, and according to many local geographers, it is the South Shore's northernmost community. Kill is an archaic Dutch word with various popular translations, including "creek" and "channel;" indeed, many small streams dot the neighborhood, and the name can be interpreted as meaning that a great number of such streams can be found there. The ZIP Code for Great Kills is 10308. This neighborhood is home to Great Kills Little League, one of the 8 little leagues on Staten Island. Actor Rick Schroder lived in the community as a child, as did actress Alyssa Milano, comedian Bob Levy and new ESPN anchor Joe Engle. At the southeastern corner of the neighborhood is Great Kills Park, a national park site that is part of Gateway National Recreation Area. The park includes a beach, marina, trails, fishing and bird-watching areas and sports fields. FDNY Engine Company 162/Ladder Company 82 and Battalion 23, serve Great Kills from quarters on Nelson Ave and Myra S. Barnes I.S.24 one of Staten Island's middle schools. Firefighter Scott Davidson, lost in the 9-11 attacks, attended
    7.75
    4 votes
    40
    Mariners Harbor

    Mariners Harbor

    Mariners Harbor is a neighborhood located in the northwestern part of New York City, USA's borough of Staten Island. It is bordered by Lake Avenue to the east, Forest Avenue to the south, Richmond Terrace to the north, and Holland Avenue to the west. The northwestern section of Mariners Harbor is often known as Arlington. The neighborhood is named for its 19th-century harvesting of oysters and other seafood products from the Kill Van Kull, which forms the neighborhood's northern border (Elm Park and Port Ivory lie to the east and west, respectively, while Graniteville is to the south). Later developments included shipbuilding, repair and marine salvage work. Fishing activity declined due to pollution during the 20th century. The Mariners Harbor Yacht Club remains as a reminder of the community's maritime past. Erastina was the first rail station built here in 1886 and named for Erastus Wiman, the promoter who helped the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad to enter New York via Staten Island. Vacant land nearby was used for staging Buffalo Bill’s “Wild West Show”, generating over 10,000 additional passengers from the St. George Ferry Terminal over the new rail line. Erastina became Mariners'
    7.75
    4 votes
    41
    New Lots

    New Lots

    New Lots is a sub-section of the East New York neighborhood in the eastern part of the New York City borough of Brooklyn. It was known as the Town of New Lots from 1852 when the area seceded from the Town of Flatbush until it was annexed in 1886 as the 26th Ward of Brooklyn. The population is largely African-American and Hispanic-American. The neighborhood is part of Brooklyn Community Board 5. It is served by the IRT New Lots Line. Nearby neighborhoods include Canarsie to the south, Brownsville to the west and City Line to the east.
    7.75
    4 votes
    42
    Rosedale

    Rosedale

    Rosedale is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Queens. The neighborhood is on the border of Queens and Nassau County, Long Island. The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 13. Rosedale was originally conceived in the consolidation of the borough of Queens as a part of what is now Springfield Gardens. At the time, the Laurelton Land Company was in charge of the new Borough of Queens. It was dotted with farmland that was isolated from each other, so construction on an acceptable mode of transportation was started immediately. The Southern Railroad of Long Island (now Long Island Rail Road) was built and the whole area (today Laurelton, Rosedale, and Springfield Gardens) was served by Laurelton Station. The area was also connected to the Brooklyn waterworks. In the 20th century, the water system was less needed, and its use dwindled. Today the ruins of the aqueduct system can still be seen. After the Long Island Rail Road's construction, many new roads such as Francis Lewis and Sunrise Boulevard (today Sunrise Highway) were constructed. The area that is now Rosedale remained farmland until the mid 1930s. After the former period of relatively slow growth,
    7.75
    4 votes
    43
    Castle Hill

    Castle Hill

    Castle Hill is primarily a residential neighborhood geographically located in the South Central section of the borough of The Bronx in New York City. The neighborhood is part of Bronx Community Board 9. Its boundaries, starting from the North and moving clockwise are: Waterbury-Westchester Avenues to the North, Westchester Creek to the east, the East River to the South, and White Plains Road to the West. Castle Hill Avenue is the primary thoroughfare through Melrose. ZIP codes include 10473, 10472, and 10462. The area is patrolled by the 43rd Precinct located at 900 Fteley Avenue. New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) property in the area is patrolled by P.S.A. 8 at 2794 Randall Avenue. Castle Hill is a high density neighborhood. The neighborhood has a relatively diverse population consisting primarily of Latin Americans, predominantly Puerto Ricans (Castle Hill has one of the highest concentrations of Puerto Ricans in all of New York City). Like most neighborhoods in New York City the vast majority of households are renter occupied. There is significant income diversity on a block by block basis. Castle Hill is dominated by multi-unit homes and apartment buildings. In the last
    6.60
    5 votes
    44
    Brooklyn Heights

    Brooklyn Heights

    Brooklyn Heights is a culturally diverse neighborhood within the New York City borough of Brooklyn. Originally referred to as 'Brooklyn Village', it has been a prominent area of Brooklyn since 1834. As of 2000, Brooklyn Heights sustained a population of 22,594 people. The neighborhood is part of Brooklyn Community Board 2. The neighborhood is served by the NYPD's 84th Precinct. Brooklyn Heights stretches from Old Fulton Street near the Brooklyn Bridge south to Atlantic Avenue and from the East River east to Court Street and Cadman Plaza. Adjacent neighborhoods are: Dumbo, Downtown Brooklyn, Cobble Hill and Boerum Hill. It is directly across the East River from Manhattan, and easily accessible to Downtown and multiple subway lines. The neighborhood is largely composed of block after block of picturesque rowhouses and a few mansions. A great range of architectural styles is represented, including a few Federal-style houses from the early 19th century in the northern part of the neighborhood, brick Greek Revival and Gothic Revival houses, and Italianate brownstones. A number of houses, particularly along Pierrepont Street and Pierrepont Place are authentic mansions. Brooklyn Heights
    7.50
    4 votes
    45
    Hunters Point

    Hunters Point

    Hunters Point is a neighborhood on the south side of Long Island City, in the New York City borough of Queens. The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 2. On May 4, 1870, Hunters Point was incorporated with the villages of Astoria, Blissville, Ravenswood, Dutch Kills, Middletown, Sunnyside and Bowery Bay into Long Island City. As a peninsula bounded by the commercial waterways of Newtown Creek and the East River, Hunters Point became a highly industrialized area in the 19th century. Deindustrialization in the 1970s and 80s left many abandoned warehouses and factories in the community. Gantry Plaza State Park was built in this neighborhood in the 1990s, with restored car float docks and an excellent view of Manhattan. There are new schools, businesses, playgrounds and high rise apartments. LaGuardia Community College is a short distance away. In 1998, the Queens Historical Society recognized Hunters Point's historical architecture with a "Queensmark" award to encourage landmark preservation. The neighborhood is currently undergoing substantial gentrification, with co-ops and condominiums being built along the East River waterfront. The Hunters Point Historic District is a
    7.50
    4 votes
    46
    Alphabet City

    Alphabet City

    Alphabet City is a neighborhood located within the Lower East Side in the New York City borough of Manhattan. Its name comes from Avenues A, B, C, and D, the only avenues in Manhattan to have single-letter names. It is bordered by Houston Street to the south and by 14th Street to the north, along the traditional northern border of the East Village and south of Stuyvesant Town and Peter Cooper Village. Some famous landmarks include Tompkins Square Park and the Nuyorican Poets Cafe. The neighborhood has a long history, serving as a cultural centre and ethnic enclave for Manhattan's German, Polish, Hispanic, and Jewish populations. Alphabet City is located in New York's 12th and 14th congressional districts, the New York State Assembly's 64th and 74th districts, the New York State Senate's 25th district, and New York City Council's 2nd district. It is represented by Congresswomen Carolyn Maloney and Nydia Velázquez, State Senator Dan Squadron, Assemblymen Sheldon Silver and Brian Kavanagh, and Councilwoman Rosie Mendez. The neighborhood is regulated by Manhattan Community Board 3. The neighborhood lies within the New York Police Department's 9th precinct, and its schools fall within
    8.67
    3 votes
    47
    Melrose

    Melrose

    Melrose is primarily a residential neighborhood geographically located in the southwestern section of the borough of The Bronx in New York City. Predominantly German-American in the 19th century it is home to the Haffen Building and was home to Haffen Brewing Company. The German population waned especially post WWII. The neighborhood until the 60s was mostly Irish and Italian. It is now primarily Latino. It adjoins the business and one-time theater area known as the Hub. Melrose is bordered by the intersection of Brook and Park Avenues on the north, Brook Avenue on the east, 149th Street on the south and Park Avenue on the west. Melrose Avenue is the primary thoroughfare through Melrose. ZIP codes include 10451 and 10455. The area is patrolled by the 42nd Precinct located at 830 Washington Ave., the 40th Precinct located at 257 Alexander Ave. and the 44th Precinct located at 2 E. 169th St. New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) property in the area is patrolled by P.S.A. 7 at 737 Melrose Avenue. Melrose is a high density neighborhood with a population over 30,000. The neighborhood has a relatively diverse population consisting primarily of Latin Americans, predominantly Puerto
    8.67
    3 votes
    48
    Tudor City

    Tudor City

    Tudor City is an apartment complex located on the East Side of Manhattan in New York City. It is the first residential skyscraper complex in the world. It is bordered by East 40th Street to the south, First Avenue to the east, Second Avenue to the west, and East 43rd Street to the north. Tudor City takes its name from England's Tudor dynasty, which ruled from 1485 to 1603 and included King Henry VIII and Queen Elizabeth I Before Tudor City, tenements and slums dominated the area, which bordered a power plant and slaughterhouses, along First Avenue on the East River. It was known as "Goat Hill" (goats and squatters ruled the area) and later "Prospect Hill". The area eventually developed into a shanty Irish community known as "Corcoran's Roost", founded by Jimmy Corcoran, in the 1850s and later became known as a community with a high rate of violent crime and a haven for waterfront thieves, most notably the Rag Gang, during the late 19th century. In the 1920s, the real estate developer Fred F. French sought to lure tenants to Tudor City, his vision of an urban Utopia — a "human residential enclave" that boasted "tulip gardens, small golf courses, and private parks." The complex was
    8.67
    3 votes
    49
    Annadale

    Annadale

    Annadale is a neighborhood or section of New York City in the borough of Staten Island, New York, USA, situated on the island's South Shore. The community received its present name circa 1860, and is named after Anna Seguine, a descendant of French Huguenots who were among the South Shore's earliest settlers; this settlement is also responsible for the neighborhood immediately to the southwest of Annadale being named Huguenot, and the Seguine family also lends its name to Seguine Avenue, the principal north-south thoroughfare on the east side of Prince's Bay, the next neighborhood southwest of Huguenot. In 1929, immigrants from Spain purchased land along the Annadale shoreline, and founded a settlement that became known as the Spanish Camp, or Spanish Colony. First tents, and later bungalows, were built at the site. The site was purchased and buildings demolished at the end of the 20th century so that several large, upscale homes could be constructed. Annadale once had abundant woodland, but much of it was cleared in the last three decades of the 20th Century to make room for new homes. However, a city park in the heart of the neighborhood was converted into a wildlife preserve;
    10.00
    2 votes
    50
    Willets Point

    Willets Point

    Willets Point, also known locally as the Iron Triangle, is the name currently applied to a neighborhood within Corona, in the New York City borough of Queens. It is bounded by Northern Boulevard to the north, 126th Street and Citi Field to the west, Roosevelt Avenue and Flushing Meadows-Corona Park to the south and the Flushing River to the east. The IRT 7 Train stops at the Mets–Willets Point station near the southwest corner of the "Triangle", at Roosevelt Avenue at 126 Street. The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 7. Willets Point currently has no sidewalks or sewers. In times of heavy rain, flooding is common. The area is very industrial and is filled with auto repair shops, scrap yards, waste processing sites, and similar small businesses. A Hunter College study found that Willets Point was a "unique regional destination" for auto parts and repairs. The area was named after that portion of Willets Point Boulevard lying west of Flushing Creek, which flows northward past the area. Willets Point Boulevard once crossed a bridge (no longer in existence) over Flushing Creek and continued to the cape of the same name at the confluence of the East River and Long Island
    10.00
    2 votes
    51
    Far Rockaway

    Far Rockaway

    Far Rockaway is a neighborhood on the Rockaway Peninsula in the New York City borough of Queens in the United States. It is the easternmost section of the Rockaways. The neighborhood starts at the Nassau County line and extends west to Beach 32nd Street. The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 14. The name "Rockaway" may have meant "place of sands" in the Munsee language of the Native American Lenape. Other spellings include Requarkie, Rechouwakie, Rechaweygh, Rechquaakie and Reckowacky (see: Toponymy of New Netherland). Access to Manhattan is available via the IND Rockaway Line (A train) subway service, which has a terminal at Mott Avenue. This subway stretch is completely elevated throughout the Rockaway Peninsula. The Far Rockaway station is the terminus for the Long Island Rail Road's Far Rockaway Branch, providing full service to Penn Station in Midtown Manhattan and Atlantic Terminal in Brooklyn. The line is unique in that trains leave New York City and make local stops in Nassau County before crossing back into Queens and terminating at Far Rockaway. Passengers can "change at Jamaica" between the various destinations and other LIRR lines. During rush hour, express
    7.25
    4 votes
    52
    Hammels

    Hammels

    Hammels is an area within Rockaway Beach on the Rockaway Peninsula in the New York City borough of Queens. It is located west of Arverne and east of Seaside, and is centered on Beach 84th Street. Its main thoroughfare is Beach Channel Drive. The A train passes through the neighborhood. The Hammel Houses, a public housing project built in 1954, is located in the neighborhood. Hammels was named for a local landowner, Louis Hammel (1836-1904). It originated as a summer community based on a series of boardwalks that ran between the Bay and Ocean shores. This was followed by a hotel — the Eldert House — that was kept by Garret Eldert, and faced the bay on the east side of what today is Beach 85th Street. In August 1869, Louis Hammel leased the hotel. The New York, Woodhaven & Rockaway Railroad ran within a few feet of the hotel as a trestle was erected across the bay in 1880. The hotel gave an easement for construction of the "Hammels" station, which was used as the name for the entire community. A dock in front of the hotel on the Bay side, known as Fifth Landing, was a regular stop for boats of the Iron Steamboat Company. As the Rockaway resorts declined, residency changed to
    7.25
    4 votes
    53
    Soundview

    Soundview

    Soundview is primarily a residential neighborhood geographically located in the South Central section of the Borough of The Bronx in New York City. The neighborhood is part of Bronx Community Board 9. Its boundaries, starting from the North and moving clockwise are the Cross-Bronx Expressway to the North, White Plains Road to the East, Lacombe Avenue to the South, and the Bronx River to the West. The Bruckner Expressway bisects the neighborhood along the center and the Bronx River Parkway runs North to South. Soundview Avenue is the primary thoroughfare through Soundview. The local subway is the 6 line, operating along Westchester Avenue. Zip codes include 10472 and 10473. The area is patrolled by the 43rd Precinct located at 900 Fteley Avenue. New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) property in the area is patrolled by P.S.A. 8 at 2794 Randall Avenue in the Throggs Neck section of The Bronx. Soundview is a high density neighborhood with a population over 75,000 within two square miles. The neighborhood has a population consisting primarily of Latin Americans. Like most neighborhoods in New York City the vast majority of households are renter occupied. Almost half the population
    7.25
    4 votes
    54
    Jamaica Estates

    Jamaica Estates

    Jamaica Estates is a neighborhood located in the New York City borough of Queens. Within Queens Community District 8, Jamaica Estates is served by Queens Community Board 8 It is bounded by Union Turnpike to the north, Hillside Avenue to the south, Utopia Parkway and Homelawn Street to the west and 188th Street to the east. Jamaica Estates was created at the turn of the century by the Jamaica Estates Company, which developed the hilly terminal moraine's 503 acres (2.04 km), while preserving many of the trees that had occupied the site. Jamaica Estates now has significant Modern Orthodox Jewish American and South Asian American populations. The latter has been particularly affected by the wave of mortgage foreclosures that began in 2008. The only apartments and multi-family housing lie near the southern border within a few blocks from and along Hillside Avenue. The shopping corridors are along Hillside Avenue and Union Turnpike. In 2007, following the damage of the roof of the Historic Gatehouse in Hurricane Isabel, the restoration and beautification of the Gatehouse and Malls was completed. The Jamaica Estates Association, founded in 1929, continues as an active, vital civic
    8.33
    3 votes
    55
    Manhattanville

    Manhattanville

    Manhattanville is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan bordered on the south by Morningside Heights on the west by the Hudson River, on the east by Harlem and on the north by Hamilton Heights. Its borders straddle West 125th Street, roughly from 122nd Street to 135th Street and from the Hudson River to St. Nicholas Park. Throughout the 19th century, Manhattanville was a town that bustled around a wharf active with ferry and daily river conveyances. It was the first station on the Hudson River Railroad running north from the city, and the hub of daily stage coach, omnibus and streetcar lines. Situated near the famous Bloomingdale Road, its hotels, houses of entertainment and post office made it an alluring destination of suburban retreat from the city, yet its direct proximity to the Hudson River also made it an invaluable industrial entry point for construction materials and other freight bound for upper Manhattan. With the construction of road and railway viaducts over the valley in which the town sat, Manhattanville, increasingly absorbed into the growing city, became a marginalized industrial area. The neighborhood is now the site of a major planned expansion
    8.33
    3 votes
    56
    Upper Manhattan

    Upper Manhattan

    Upper Manhattan denotes the more northerly region of the New York City Borough of Manhattan. Its southern boundary may be defined anywhere between 59th Street and 155th Street. Between these two extremes lies the most common definitions of Upper Manhattan as Manhattan above 96th Street (the southern boundary of Manhattan Valley in the west and Spanish Harlem in the east) . This definition of Upper Manhattan takes in the neighborhoods of Marble Hill, Inwood, Washington Heights (including Fort George, Sherman Creek and Hudson Heights), Harlem (including Sugar Hill and Hamilton Heights), and parts of the Upper West Side (Morningside Heights and Manhattan Valley). In the late 19th century, the IRT Ninth Avenue Line and other elevated railroads brought urban sprawl to the previously rustic Upper Manhattan. Until the late 20th century it was less influenced by the gentrification that had taken place in other parts of New York over the previous 30 years. Like other residential areas, Upper Manhattan is not a major center of tourism in New York City, although some tourist attractions, such as The Cloisters lie within it. Tourist maps similarly pay scant attention to the boroughs of the
    6.20
    5 votes
    57
    Flatiron District

    Flatiron District

    The Flatiron District is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan, named after the Flatiron Building at 23rd Street, Broadway and Fifth Avenue. Generally the Flatiron District can be said to be bounded by 20th Street, Union Square and Greenwich Village to the south; the Avenue of the Americas (Sixth Avenue) or Seventh Avenue and Chelsea to the west; 25th Street and NoMad to the north; Rose Hill to the northeast, and Lexington Avenue/Irving Place, Gramercy Park to the east. Broadway cuts through the middle of the district, and Madison Avenue begins at 23rd Street and runs north. At the north (uptown) end of the district is Madison Square Park, which was completely renovated in 2001. The Flatiron District encompasses within its boundaries the Ladies' Mile Historic District and the birthplace of Theodore Roosevelt, a National Historic Site. The Flatiron District is part of New York City's Manhattan Community Board 5. The designation "Flatiron District" for this area is of relatively recent vintage, dating from around 1985, and came about because of its increasingly residential character, and the influx of many restaurants into the area – real estate agents needed an
    9.50
    2 votes
    58
    Hillcrest

    Hillcrest

    Hillcrest is a small residential neighborhood in the New York City borough of Queens. The neighborhood is located between Flushing and Jamaica. Its name derives from its location on the hills between Jamaica and Flushing. The neighborhood runs from Union Turnpike to the LIE, between Utopia Parkway and 164th Street. Union Turnpike is its main commercial strip. It is part of Queens Community Board 8. The ZIP Codes for this neighborhood are, 11365 and 11366. It neighbors Jamaica Hills to the south, Briarwood and Kew Gardens Hills to the west, Pomonok and Utopia to the north, and Utopia and Jamaica Estates to the east. Hillcrest is home to a very large Orthodox Jewish Community.
    9.50
    2 votes
    59
    Homecrest

    Homecrest

    Homecrest is a neighborhood situated in the New York City borough of Brooklyn. It borders Kings Highway to the north, Avenue X to the south, Coney Island Avenue to the west, and Ocean Avenue to the east. Homecrest uses the ZIP Code, 11229. The area is served by Brooklyn Community Board 15. Homecrest is served by the NYPD's 61st Precinct. The community has traditionally been home to a large Italian population and has also experienced an influx of people from Latin America, China, Israel, Syria, Russia,other former Eastern-bloc nations and from South Asia From the turn of the century Avenue U (Ocean Pkwy. to Ocean Ave.) became New York City's newest Chinatown, as evidenced by the growing number of Chinese-run food markets, bakeries, restaurants, beauty and nail salons, and computer and general electronics dealers. It is in a way a 2nd extension of Manhattan's Chinatown since the Q trains are directly connected from Canal Street in Manhattan's Chinatown to Brooklyn's Avenue U Chinatown. It is the second Chinatown of Brooklyn after the older and larger Sunset Park Chinatown. Congestion and increasing property values in Brooklyn's first established Chinatown in Sunset Park has sent the
    9.50
    2 votes
    60
    Theatre District

    Theatre District

    The Theatre District is an area in Midtown Manhattan where most Broadway theatres are located, as well as many other theatres, movie theatres, restaurants, hotels and other places of entertainment. It extends from 40th Street to 54th Street, and from west of Sixth Avenue to east of Eighth Avenue, and includes Times Square. The City of New York defines the "Theater Subdistrict" for zoning purposes to extend from 40th Street to 57th Street and from Sixth Avenue to Eighth Avenue, with an additional area west of Eighth Avenue from 42nd Street to 45th Street. The Times Square Alliance, a Business Improvement District organization dedicated to improving the Theater District, defines the district is an irregular area from 40th Street to 54th Street from east of Sixth Avenue to west of Eighth Avenue. The Great White Way is the name given to the section of Broadway which runs through the Theater District. Theatre Row, an area on 42nd Street from Ninth Avenue to Eleventh Avenue, which contains many Off-Broadway and Off-Off-Broadway theaters, may be considered to be an extension of the Theatre District, although it is not officially a part of it.
    9.50
    2 votes
    61
    East Morrisania

    East Morrisania

    Crotona Park East, also known as Crotona (not to be confused with Crotona Avenue in nearby East Tremont), is a low income residential neighborhood geographically located in the southwest Bronx in New York City. The neighborhood is part of Bronx Community Board 3. Its boundaries, starting from the north and moving clockwise are: the Cross-Bronx Expressway to the north, the Bronx River to the east, East 167th Street to the south, and Crotona–Prospect Avenue to the west. Southern Boulevard is the primary thoroughfare through East Morrisania. Zip codes include 10459 and 10460. The area is patrolled by the 42nd Precinct located at 830 Washington Ave in Morrisania. NYCHA property in the area is patrolled by P.S.A. 7 at 737 Melrose Avenue in the Melrose section of the Bronx. Crotona Park East has a population of 75,656. The demographics are 14.2% White, 51.5% African American, 1.2% Native American, 0.8% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 26.3% other, 6.0% two or more races and 50.4% Hispanic or Latino.The majority of residents in the area are of Puerto Rican or African American descent. The vast majority of households are renter occupied, 93.5% of all housing. Crotona Park East is dominated by
    7.00
    4 votes
    62
    Pelham Bay

    Pelham Bay

    Pelham Bay is a neighborhood in the borough of the Bronx, in New York City. It is named for Pelham Bay Park, New York City's largest park which lies on the neighborhood's northeastern border. Most of the neighborhood is land that was purchased by Thomas Pell in 1654, part of an original grant to the Dutch West India Company. Despite the name, the area that is now the Pelham Bay neighborhood was not part of the historical Town of Pelham, which consisted of the modern-day town of Pelham in Westchester County as well as Pelham Bay Park and City Island in the Bronx. The latter two areas were annexed by the City of New York in 1895. Pelham Bay's boundaries, starting from the north and moving clockwise, are as follows: Pelham Bay includes the residential enclave of Country Club, which occupies the portion of the neighborhood east of Interstate 95 (I-95). The core of Pelham Bay is the portion west of I-95 and north of Middletown Road. Pelham Bay is part of Bronx Community Board 10, which also covers Throgs Neck and Co-op City. Pelham Bay is home to a large Italian and Hispanic population. Alongside Riverdale and Country Club, Pelham Bay is one of the top and safest neighborhoods in the
    7.00
    4 votes
    63
    NoLIta

    NoLIta

    Nolita, sometimes written as NoLIta, and deriving from "NOrth of Little ITAly" is a neighborhood in the borough of Manhattan in New York City. Nolita is bounded on the north by Houston Street, on the east by the Bowery, on the south roughly by Broome Street, and on the west by Lafayette Street. It lies east of SoHo, south of NoHo, west of the Lower East Side, and north of Little Italy and Chinatown. The neighborhood was long regarded as part of Little Italy, but has lost much of its recognizable Italian character in recent decades because of the migration of Italian-Americans out of Manhattan. Many elderly descendants of Italian immigrants continue to live in the neighborhood. Moreover, the Feast of San Gennaro, dedicated to Saint Januarius ("pope of Naples"), is held in the neighborhood every year following Labor Day, on Mulberry Street between Houston and Grand Streets. The feast, as recreated on Elizabeth Street between Prince and Houston, was featured in the film The Godfather Part III. In the second half of the 1990s, the neighborhood saw an influx of yuppies and an explosion of expensive retail boutiques and trendy restaurants and bars. After previous unsuccessful tries to
    6.00
    5 votes
    64
    Flushing

    Flushing

    Flushing, founded in 1645, is a neighborhood in the north central part of the New York City borough of Queens. Flushing was one of the first Dutch settlements on Long Island. Today, it is one of the largest and most diverse neighborhoods in New York City. Flushing's diversity is reflected by the numerous ethnic groups that reside there, including people of Asian, Hispanic, Middle Eastern, European, African American ancestry and Jewish peoples. It is part of the Fifth Congressional District, which encompasses the entire northeastern shore of Queens County, and extends into neighboring Nassau County. Flushing is served by five railroad stations on the Long Island Rail Road Port Washington Branch, and the New York City Subway Number 7 subway line has its terminus at Main Street. The intersection of Main Street and Roosevelt Avenue is the third busiest intersection in New York City, behind only Times Square and Herald Square. Flushing is part of Queens Community Board 7 and is bounded by Flushing Meadows-Corona Park to the West, Francis Lewis Boulevard to the East, Long Island Expressway (LIE) to the South and Willets Point Boulevard to the North. ZIP Codes beginning with 113- are
    8.00
    3 votes
    65
    Long Island City

    Long Island City

    Long Island City (L.I.C.) is the westernmost neighborhood of the New York City borough of Queens. L.I.C. is notable for its rapid and ongoing gentrification, its waterfront parks, and its thriving arts community. L.I.C. has among the highest concentration of art galleries, art institutions, and studio space of any neighborhood in New York City. The neighborhood is bounded on the north by the Queens neighborhood of Astoria; on the west by the East River; on the east by Hazen Street, 31st Street, and New Calvary Cemetery; and on the south by Newtown Creek, which separates Queens from Greenpoint, Brooklyn. It originally was the seat of government of Newtown Township, and remains the largest neighborhood in Queens. The area is part of Queens Community Board 1 north of the Queensboro (59th Street) Bridge and Queens Community Board 2 south of the Bridge. In 2007, the neighborhood is home to 25,595 people. The racial makeup is 51.1% Hispanic, 21.3% Asian, 16.1% Black, and 11.2% white. Long Island City, as its name suggests, was formerly a city, created in 1870 from the merger of the Village of Astoria and the hamlets of Ravenswood, Hunters Point, Blissville, Sunnyside, Dutch Kills,
    8.00
    3 votes
    66
    Mill Basin

    Mill Basin

    Mill Basin is a neighborhood in New York City in the southern portion of the borough of Brooklyn lying along Jamaica Bay and bounded to the north by Avenue U, and to the east, south, and west by the Mill Basin/Mill Island Inlet. The area is part of Brooklyn Community Board 18. The area was called Equandito (Broken Lands) by the local Lenape Native Americans, who sold it in 1664 to John Tilton, Jr. and Samuel Spicer. During the seventeenth century it became part of Flatlands, and tide mills were built on it; the land was owned from 1675 by Jan Martense Schenck and between 1818 and 1870 by the wife of General Philip S. Crooke. The Crooke-Schenck House, which stood at East 63rd Street, was dismantled in 1952 and later reassembled as a museum exhibit at the Brooklyn Museum. The area retained its rural character until Robert L. Crooke built a lead-smelting plant in 1890. The Crooke Smelting Company was bought out by the National Lead Company, and Crooke sold the remainder of the land to the firm of McNulty and Fitzgerald, which erected bulkheads and filled in the marshes. Until the early twentieth century, the chief resources were the abundant crabs, oysters, and clams in Jamaica Bay.
    8.00
    3 votes
    67
    Windsor Terrace

    Windsor Terrace

    Windsor Terrace is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Brooklyn. It is bounded by Prospect Park to the northeast and Green-Wood Cemetery, a National Historic Landmark, to the southwest. Its southeastern boundary is Caton Avenue, while to the northwest it is bordered by 8 Avenue. It is between the neighborhoods of Park Slope to the northwest and Kensington to the southeast. The subway arrived in 1933 with the building of the IND South Brooklyn Line, now known as the IND Culver Line (F G trains), which includes the 15th Street – Prospect Park and Fort Hamilton Parkway stations. Largely residential, Windsor Terrace is home to mainly Irish, German-American, Polish-American and Italian-American families, many having settled in its brick rowhouses and small woodframe homes when the neighborhood was first developed at the turn of the Twentieth Century. Over time, Windsor Terrace has become increasingly diverse, including Greek and Hispanic people, in addition to a small minority of Syrians, Maronite Lebanese and Jewish-Americans. More recently, an influx of Park Slope and Manhattan refugees as a result of "gentrification" has pushed house prices well above average. The
    8.00
    3 votes
    68
    Neponsit

    Neponsit

    Neponsit is a small affluent neighborhood located on the western half of the Rockaway Peninsula, the southernmost area of the New York City borough of Queens. The area starts at 142nd Street and ends at 149th Street. It borders the neighborhood of Belle Harbor to the east and Jacob Riis Park on the west. Jamaica Bay and the Atlantic Ocean are the northern and southern borders. The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 14. As of January 1, 2007, the neighborhood's population reached just over 2,000, making it one of the smallest communities on the peninsula, as well in the entire borough of Queens. Neponsit's zoning is residential, R-1, a rarity in New York City.This category of zoning prohibits any commercial structures and only allows single family homes to be built. Due to this, and its secluded beach location, homes may be mansion-like, and the average market price for properties has exceeded $3.1 million since 2006, according to the Neponsit Property Owners Association. Neponsit is a Native American name meaning "the place between waters", the waters of the Atlantic Ocean and of Jamaica Bay or Rockaway Inlet. The present community's character has persisted since it was
    6.75
    4 votes
    69
    TriBeCa

    TriBeCa

    Tribeca (sometimes stylized as TriBeCa, pronounced /traɪˈbɛkə/) is a neighborhood in Lower Manhattan, New York City, USA. Its name is an acronym based on the words "Triangle below Canal Street": the triangle is properly bounded by Canal Street, West Street, Broadway, and Vesey Street. The neighborhood is home to the Tribeca Film Festival. The Tribeca name came to be applied to the area south of Canal Street, between Broadway and West Street, extending south to Chambers Street. The area was among the first residential neighborhoods developed in New York beyond the boundaries of the city during colonial times, with residential development beginning in the late 18th century. By the mid-19th century the area transformed into a commercial center, with large numbers of store and loft buildings constructed along Broadway in the 1850s and 1860s. Development in the area was spurred by the extension of the IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line, which opened for service in 1918, and the accompanying extension of Seventh Avenue and the widening of Varick Street during subway construction in 1914. That resulted in better access to the area both for vehicles and for travelers using public
    6.75
    4 votes
    70
    Wakefield

    Wakefield

    Wakefield is a working-class section of the northern borough of the Bronx in New York City, bounded by the New York city line with Westchester County or 243rd street to the north,and 222nd Street to the south, and the Bronx River, Bronx River Parkway and Metro-North Railroad tracks to the west. Wakefield is the northernmost neighborhood in New York City (although the city's northernmost point is actually in Riverdale, at the College of Mount Saint Vincent). The neighborhood is part of Bronx Community Board 12. The 2000 United States Census reported a total of 68,787 residents. Wakefield was named after the Virginia plantation where George Washington was born, just as neighboring Mount Vernon was named after the plantation where he lived and died. Wakefield, like the rest of the Bronx, was once woods and farmland. That started to change in 1840 when the New York and Harlem Railroad arrived. The current Wakefield station of the Metro-North Harlem Line was on the site of a village called Washingtonville, which was incorporated into Wakefield. Formerly, Wakefield was home to large Irish American and Italian-American populations. During the 1980s, these communities were replaced with
    6.75
    4 votes
    71
    Liberty Island

    Liberty Island

    Liberty Island is a small uninhabited island in New York Harbor in the United States, best known as the location of the Statue of Liberty. Though so called since the turn of the 19th to 20th century, the name did not become official until 1956. In 1937, by proclamation 2250, President Franklin D. Roosevelt expanded the Statue of Liberty National Monument to include all of Bedloe's Island, and in 1956, an act of Congress officially renamed it. It became part of the National Register of Historic Places site Statue of Liberty National Monument, Ellis Island and Liberty Island in 1966. According to the United States Census Bureau, the island has a land area of 59,558 square meters, or 14.717 acres, which is the property of the federal government. Liberty Island is located in the Upper New York Bay surrounded by the waters of Jersey City, New Jersey, but its built portions and docks fall under the jurisdiction of the City of New York. . The historical developments which led to this construction created the rare situation of an exclave of one state, New York, being situated in another, New Jersey. The island is operated by the National Park Service, and since September 11, 2001, guarded
    9.00
    2 votes
    72
    Todt Hill

    Todt Hill

    Todt Hill (pronounced Tote Hill) [elevation 410 ft (125 m)] is a hill formed of serpentine rock on Staten Island, New York. It is the highest natural point in the five boroughs of New York City and the highest elevation on the entire Eastern Seaboard from Florida to Cape Cod., The summit of the ridge is largely covered in woodlands as part of the Staten Island Greenbelt, although much of the surrounding area is developed and residential. The name Todt comes from the German language word for "dead" and may refer to the cemetery (the present Moravian Cemetery) on the southwestern foot of the ridge near the town of New Dorp that has been in use since colonial days. An alternate explanation is that the name was given by early Dutch settlers because of treeless rocky exposures on the hilltop. The term Todt Hill is now often used to include the upscale developments in the hills along the eastern side of the ridge, which most island geographers classify as part of the neighborhood of Dongan Hills. Two small, natural ponds are found on Todt Hill, and a Roman Catholic priory is located near the summit. Staten Island Academy, a private school, moved its campus to Todt Hill in the 1960s.
    9.00
    2 votes
    73
    Two Bridges

    Two Bridges

    Two Bridges is a neighborhood in the southeastern part of Manhattan in New York City, United States. Although the exact boundaries of the neighborhood are not clearly defined, it is the East River waterfront area, roughly between the Brooklyn Bridge and Manhattan Bridge at the southern end of the Lower East Side. Two Bridges, with its tenements and a high concentration of public housing projects, including the LaGuardia Houses, has traditionally been an immigrant neighborhood, previously populated by immigrants from Europe, more recently from Latin America, and now from China. The Two Bridges Historic District was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in September 2003. Although Two Bridges has no exact borders, the neighborhood is roughly bounded by East River to the south, East Broadway to the north, Montgomery Street to the east, St. James Place and Brooklyn Bridge to the west. However, the Two Bridges Urban Renewal district lies between Manhattan Bridge and Williamsburg Bridge to the north. Nearby neighborhoods include: Two Bridges has historically been an Irish and Italian neighborhood, but after the war and the building of public housing high rises in the 1950s,
    9.00
    2 votes
    74
    Williamsburg

    Williamsburg

    Williamsburg is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Brooklyn, bordering Greenpoint to the north, Bedford–Stuyvesant to the south, Bushwick and Ridgewood, Queens to the east and the East River to the west. The neighborhood is part of Brooklyn Community Board 1. The neighborhood is served by the New York Police Department (NYPD)'s 90th Precinct. In the City Council the western and southern part of the neighborhood is represented by the 33rd District; and the eastern part of the neighborhood is represented by the 34th District. Many ethnic groups have enclaves within Williamsburg, including Italians, Puerto Ricans, and Dominicans. There is also a number of Hasidic Jews. It is also an influential hub for indie rock, hipster culture, and the local art community. The neighborhood is being redefined by a growing population and the rapid development of housing and retail space particularly catered to a wealthy population that has been historically foreign to the neighborhood. In 1638 the Dutch West India Company first purchased the area's land from the local Native Americans. In 1661, the company chartered the Town of Boswijck, including land that would later become
    9.00
    2 votes
    75
    Castleton Corners

    Castleton Corners

    Castleton Corners (or Four Corners) is an upscale neighborhood of Staten Island, one of the five boroughs of New York City. It is in a region of the island often referred as the North Shore, Staten Island. The word "corners" in the neighborhood's name refers to the intersection of Victory Boulevard and Manor Road, which forms its core. It was once called Centerville, but became more popularly known as Castleton Corners when a post office by that name was opened there in 1872. "Castleton" refers to Cassiltowne, County Kildare, Ireland, the birthplace of Thomas Dongan, the colonial governor of the Province of New York after it was obtained from the Dutch—who had called it New Amsterdam—in 1682. The post office later closed, but reopened in 1949, and today it is the general, or main, post office for Staten Island as a whole, its ZIP Code being 10314. Castleton Corners is separated from its eastern neighbor Sunnyside by Castleton Hill, noted for the two churches that stand across from one another on its western ridge—a Moravian church (Castleton Hill Moravian Church) on one side of Victory Boulevard and a Roman Catholic church (St. Teresa's) on the other. To the north lies West
    5.80
    5 votes
    76
    Jamaica

    Jamaica

    Jamaica is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Queens. It was settled under Dutch rule in 1656 in New Netherland as Rustdorp. Under British rule, the Village of Jamaica became the center of the "Town of Jamaica". Jamaica was the county seat of Queens County from the formation of the county in 1683 until March 7, 1788, when the town was reorganized by the state government and the county seat was moved to Mineola (now part of Nassau County). When Queens was incorporated into the City of Greater New York in 1898, both the Town of Jamaica and the Village of Jamaica were dissolved, but the neighborhood of Jamaica regained its role as county seat. The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 12, which also includes Hollis, St. Albans, Springfield Gardens, Baisley Park, Rochdale Village, and South Jamaica. Jamaica is patrolled by the NYPD's 103rd Precinct. Previously known as one of the predominantly African American neighborhoods in the borough of Queens, Jamaica in recent years has been undergoing a sharp influx of other ethnicities. It has a substantial concentration of West Indian immigrants, Indians, Arabs, Russians, Puerto Ricans, Dominicans, Filipinos as well as
    7.67
    3 votes
    77
    Fort Wadsworth

    Fort Wadsworth

    Fort Wadsworth is a former United States military installation on Staten Island in New York City, situated on The Narrows which divide New York Bay into Upper and Lower halves, a natural point for defense of the Upper Bay and Manhattan beyond. Prior to closing in 1994 it claimed to be the longest continually-manned military installation in the United States. Fort Wadsworth is part of the Staten Island Unit of the Gateway National Recreation Area that is maintained by the National Park Service. The first use of the land for military purposes was as the site of a blockhouse in 1663. During the American Revolution it became known as Flagstaff Fort; captured by the British in 1776, it remained in British hands until the war's end in 1783. It became the responsibility of New York State in 1806, and reverted to federal control during the War of 1812. Divided into several smaller units, including Fort Tompkins and Fort Richmond, its present name was adopted in 1864 to honor Brigadier General James Wadsworth, who had been killed in the Battle of the Wilderness during the Civil War. In 1910, the fort fired a 21-gun salute to former President Theodore Roosevelt as his ship passed through
    10.00
    1 votes
    78
    Kew Gardens Hills

    Kew Gardens Hills

    Kew Gardens Hills, also sometimes incorrectly referred to as Kew Garden Hills, is a neighborhood of the New York City borough of Queens. Kew Gardens Hills is situated in the southwestern corner of the area historically known as the Town of Flushing, in its 6th district. As neighborhoods in the City of New York are not designated by the city, there are multiple means to determine the geographical boundaries of the area. The western boundary of the neighborhood is considered to be Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, which is separated from the neighborhood by the Van Wyck Expressway. The southern playground of the park however is east of the Van Wyck Expressway, and is only accessible via an entrance along Park Drive East. Though part of the park, the playground is considered within Kew Gardens Hills. Prior to the building of the Van Wyck Expressway, the IND World's Fair Line ran along this route during the 1939 New York World's Fair. Since 2003, when the United States Postal Services renamed the post office in ZIP code 11367 to the "Kew Gardens Hills Post Office", the borders of the area for ZIP Code purposes extend from the south at Union Turnpike, to the north at the Horace Harding
    10.00
    1 votes
    79
    Lighthouse Hill

    Lighthouse Hill

    Lighthouse Hill is the name of a hill, and the neighborhood situated thereon, in the New York City borough of Staten Island. Formerly known as Richmond Hill (and not to be confused with the neighborhood of the same name in the borough of Queens), Lighthouse Hill acquired its present name when the Staten Island Range Light, towering 141 feet (43 m) above the Lower New York Bay, was built there in 1912. Its original light could be seen as far as 21 miles (34 km) away. The former name of Richmond Hill survives in Richmond Hill Road, located at the southern edge of the hill. Lighthouse Hill is the southernmost of the chain of hills that radiate from the northeast corner of Staten Island and separate its East Shore from the region behind the hills, usually referred to as Mid-Island by island residents. Richmond Creek flows near the bottom of the hill's eastern ridge, and it is surrounded on all sides by parks belonging to the Staten Island Greenbelt, with the LaTourette Golf Course at the hill's southern margin. Like the other hilltop neighborhoods of Staten Island, Lighthouse Hill is noted for having some of the most opulent homes on Staten Island, rivaled only in grandeur by the Todt
    10.00
    1 votes
    80
    Little Neck

    Little Neck

    Little Neck is a neighborhood of Queens, New York City, bordered on the north by Little Neck Bay and on the east by Great Neck in Nassau County. Due to this proximity to Nassau, Little Neck remains one of the most suburban-looking areas in New York City. The southern border is the Grand Central Parkway, and to the west is Douglaston. The Little Neck station is the easternmost New York City station on the Port Washington Branch of the Long Island Rail Road (LIRR). The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 11. Little Neck is home to the busiest of approximately a dozen remaining railway grade crossings in New York City. From the 1860s through the 1890s, small hard clams (quahogs) from Little Neck Bay were served in the best restaurants of New York and several European capitals. Eventually, the term "littleneck" or "littleneck clam" came to be used as a size category for all hard clams, regardless of origin. Prior to the mid-1600s, the Matinecock lived in what is today considered Little Neck, sustained by the seafood in Little Neck Bay. In the 1600s, European settlers began arriving in the area for its conveniently located harbor. Soon after, the British and Dutch gained
    10.00
    1 votes
    81
    New Utrecht

    New Utrecht

    New Utrecht was the last of six towns to be founded in what is today the borough of Brooklyn in New York City. It was named after the city of Utrecht, Netherlands. In 1652 Cornelius Van Deventer, a surveyor born in Utrecht and a principal investor in the Dutch West India Company, began purchasing land from the Canarsee and Nyack tribes. Upon his death in 1655 Jacques Cortelyou received permission to sell lots of the land to create a town. Twenty lots were laid out; Nicasius di Sille, an attorney from Arnhem in the Netherlands, was one of the first to purchase a lot and build a house using locally available stone and red roof tiles imported from Holland. He moved to New Utrecht from his former residence in Nieuw Amsterdam (now New York) located near the current intersection of Broad St. and Exchange Pl. Nicasius di Sille was employed as an advisor to Petrus Stuyvesant and as a "schout fiscal", a combination of sheriff and district attorney. In 1660 di Sille's List of the Inhabitants of Nieuw Amsterdam was completed at the behest of Stuyvesant. The names and addresses on the list correspond to the houses drawn on the Castello Plan. During the American Revolution his house would be
    10.00
    1 votes
    82
    Ozone Park

    Ozone Park

    Ozone Park is a neighborhood located in the southwestern section of the New York City borough of Queens bordering Woodhaven, Richmond Hill, South Ozone Park, Howard Beach, and City Line, Brooklyn. Different parts of the neighborhood are covered by Queens Community Board 9 and 10. The northern border is Atlantic Avenue; the southern border is South Conduit Avenue, and the eastern border is 108th Street. The western border is the county line with Brooklyn (mostly along Ruby and Drew Streets). It is the home of the Aqueduct Racetrack, a popular spot for thoroughbred racing. An area now part of Ozone Park that pre-dated that community was an area called "Centreville". It was founded in the 1840s and was centered around Centreville St and the Centreville Community Church. The church merged with the United Methodist Church of Ozone Park in 1957 and a new church, the Community Methodist Church of Ozone Park, was built at the South East corner of Sutter Ave and Cross Bay Blvd. It was completed for Christmas 1958. The old church and the property that surrounded it were sold to Aqueduct Racetrack and the old, historic church was torn down in mid-1959. The lot is still vacant as of
    10.00
    1 votes
    83
    Prospect Park South

    Prospect Park South

    Prospect Park South is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Brooklyn, within the community of Flatbush. It is bordered by Church Avenue to the north, the Brighton Line (B & Q trains at present) of the New York City Subway to the east, Beverley Road (originally spelled Beverly) to the south, and between Stratford Road and Coney Island Avenue to the west. Prospect Park South is patrolled by the NYPD's 70th Precinct. In 1899 visionary developer Dean Alvord created Prospect Park South as a community of substantial homes. The motto he chose for the development was rus in urbe (country in the city). Its location was selected to take advantage of the train service on the Brooklyn and Brighton Beach Railroad of the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company (BRT). The line, now known as the BMT Brighton Line, offered express and local train service that remains to this day. The trains emerged at Fulton Street as an elevated line and continued across the Brooklyn Bridge to Manhattan. The houses in Prospect Park South were required to be substantial, freestanding homes exceeding 3,500 sq/ft and costing over $ 5,000. Several other "restrictions" were placed upon builders wishing to develop the
    10.00
    1 votes
    84
    Waterside Plaza

    Waterside Plaza

    Waterside Plaza, formerly a Mitchell-Lama Housing Program-funded rental apartment complex, is located on the East River in the Kips Bay section of Manhattan, New York City. The apartment buildings that make up Waterside (as well as the neighboring United Nations International School) were constructed on top of platforms supported by over 2,000 concrete piles sunk into the East River. Developed by Richard Ravitch, the first apartment buildings opened in 1973 and the complex was completed the following year. The housing development received the Construction Achievement Project of the Year Award from the Metropolitan Section of the American Society of Civil Engineers in 1974. The complex is made up of four residential towers as well as a row of duplex townhouses, clad in red brickwork, that encompass a large plaza overlooking the East River. There are 1,470 residential units along with a health club (open to non-residents) and a parking garage. Waterside Plaza's small retail space is occupied by Citibank, cleaners, a stationery store, Creative Dream Parties, a Gristedes, and Robbins Nest Cafe. The British International School of New York is also located within the base of one of the
    10.00
    1 votes
    85
    Breezy Point

    Breezy Point

    Breezy Point is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Queens, located on the western end of the Rockaway peninsula, between Rockaway Inlet and Jamaica Bay on the landward side, and the Atlantic Ocean. The neighborhood is governed by Queens Community Board 14. The community is run by the Breezy Point Cooperative, in which all residents pay the maintenance, security, and community-oriented costs involved with keeping the community private. The cooperative owns the entire 500-acre (2 km) community; residents own their homes and hold shares in the cooperative. Breezy Point and the Rockaway Peninsula in general are unlike the rest of the city of New York; while the latter is very urbanized, developed and noisy, Breezy Point is a quiet beach community, having more in common with nearby Long Island and even the Hamptons. According to the United States Census Bureau, the community's ZIP code (11697) is 99.2% white and has the nation's 2nd highest concentration of Irish-Americans, at 60.3% as of the United States Census, 2000 (Squantum, in Quincy, Massachusetts, is #1, at 65%). It functions mainly as a summer get-away for many residents of New York. Estimates put summer residency
    6.50
    4 votes
    86
    Park Slope

    Park Slope

    Park Slope is a neighborhood in western Brooklyn, New York City's most populous borough. Park Slope is roughly bounded by Prospect Park West to the east, Fourth Avenue to the west, Flatbush Avenue to the north, and Prospect Expressway to the south, though other definitions are sometimes offered. Generally the section from Flatbush Ave. to Garfield Place (the "named streets") are considered the North Slope, 1st St. through 9th Street is considered the "Center Slope" and 10th St. through the Prospect Expressway is the "South Slope." The neighborhood takes its name from its location on the western slope of neighboring Prospect Park. Fifth Avenue and Seventh Avenue are its primary commercial streets, while its east-west side streets are populated by many historic brownstones. Park Slope features historic buildings, top-rated restaurants, bars, and shops, as well as proximity to Prospect Park, the Brooklyn Academy of Music, the Brooklyn Botanic Garden, the Brooklyn Museum, the Brooklyn Conservatory of Music, and the Central Library (as well as the Park Slope branch) of the Brooklyn Public Library system. The neighborhood had a population of about 62,200 as of the 2000 census, resulting
    6.50
    4 votes
    87
    Richmondtown

    Richmondtown

    Richmondtown, is a neighborhood on Staten Island in New York City, New York, in the United States. Originally known as Coccles Town (sometimes misreckoned as Cuckolds Town) because of the abundance of oyster and clam shells found in the waters of the nearby Fresh Kills, Richmondtown gained its present name in 1728 when the village now preserved as Historic Richmond Town was founded. The village became the county seat of Richmond County, as Staten Island is alternatively known, and remained as such until the emergence of St. George soon after the ferries to Manhattan and Brooklyn began to proliferate at the latter site near the end of the 19th century. Located at the base of Lighthouse Hill with New Dorp and Oakwood to the east, Richmondtown has seen much new home construction since the mid-1960s, and ranks as one of the most popular destinations for families seeking to relocate to Staten Island from New York City's other boroughs, especially Brooklyn. The town is also home to one of the ten remaining Volunteer Fire Departments in New York City, Richmond Engine Company 1, which operates a 2005 American LaFrance Engine purchased through a federal home security grant. New York Public
    6.50
    4 votes
    88
    Rose Hill

    Rose Hill

    Rose Hill is a recently-revived name for a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan. It is bounded by 25th Street and 30th Street on the south and north, and by Third Avenue and Madison or Fifth Avenue on the east and west. The neighborhoods surrounding Rose Hill are Murray Hill to the north, Kips Bay to the east, the Flatiron District and Gramercy Park to the south, and NoMad to the west. It straddles Manhattan Community Boards 5 and 6. The designation "Rose Hill" has been until recently more prominent in The Bronx, where Rose Hill Park is a vestige of a far larger estate once called "Rose Hill" by its owner, Robert Watts, and Rose Hill Campus is part of the site of Fordham University. According to the New York City Department of Parks, in 1775 Robert's brother John married his cousin Jane DeLancey, whose family lived on the adjacent property, which is now Bronx Park. Prior to his marriage, John Watt had lived on his Manhattan properties. He purchased the Bronx property in 1787 from the estate of Andrew Corsa. Shortly afterward, John transferred the property to his brother Robert, who named it "Rose Hill". Archival research by Roger Wines, professor of history at
    6.50
    4 votes
    89
    Tremont

    Tremont

    Tremont is a low income residential neighborhood geographically located in the west Bronx, New York City. The neighborhood is part of Bronx Community Board 5. Its boundaries, starting from the north and moving clockwise are: East 183rd Street to the north, Webster Avenue to the east, the Cross-Bronx Expressway to the south, and the Jerome Avenue to the west. The Grand Concourse is the primary thoroughfare through Tremont. The local subway is the IND Concourse Line (B D), operating along the Grand Concourse. Zip codes include 10453 and 10457. The area is patrolled by the 46th Precinct located at 2120 Ryer Avenue within Tremont. Tremont has a population under 45,000. For decades, Tremont has been one of the poorest communities in America. Over half the population lives below the poverty line and receives public assistance (AFDC, Home Relief, Supplemental Security Income, and Medicaid). The neighborhood is now predominantly Dominican with a significant longstanding Puerto Rican, and African American population. The vast majority of households are renter occupied. Based God avenue is a new extension to the Tremont section. Tremont is dominated by 5 and 6-story tenements. The apartments
    6.50
    4 votes
    90
    Downtown Brooklyn

    Downtown Brooklyn

    Downtown Brooklyn is the third largest central business district in New York City, USA (following Midtown Manhattan and Lower Manhattan), and is located in the northwestern section of the borough of Brooklyn. The neighborhood is known for its office and residential buildings, such as the Williamsburgh Savings Bank Tower and the MetroTech Center office complex, that give the area its own unique skyline. Since the rezoning of Downtown Brooklyn in 2004, the area is undergoing a transformation, with $9 billion of private investment and $300 million in public improvements underway. This area was originally inhabited by Lenape Native Americans, until the 17th century. At that time the Dutch arrived, gained control of the land, and called it Breuckelen. Until 1814, Downtown Brooklyn and Brooklyn Heights remained sparsely populated. Robert Fulton’s new steam ferry then began to offer an easy commuting option to and from downtown Manhattan. It made Brooklyn Heights Manhattan’s first suburb, and put Downtown Brooklyn on its way to becoming a commercial center, and the heart of the City of Brooklyn. The city was home to many prominent Abolitionists at a time when most of New York was
    5.60
    5 votes
    91
    Marcus Garvey Park

    Marcus Garvey Park

    Marcus Garvey Park, or Mount Morris Park as it was originally called and still referred to by some people in the neighborhood, is located in Harlem in the New York City borough of Manhattan. The 20.17-acre (81,600 m) park, centered on a massive and steep outcropping of schist and surrounded by flat lawns and playing fields, interrupts the flow of Fifth Avenue traffic, which is routed around the park via Mount Morris Park West. The park is bounded by 120th Street and 124th Street and by Madison Avenue on its east side. The park is operated and maintained by the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation. Opened to the public in 1840 and originally named Mount Morris Park, Marcus Garvey Park is still part of the Mount Morris Park Historic District). In 1973 the park was renamed for Marcus Garvey. The name change did not arise from a grass-roots movement in the community, but rather, it was political maneuvering by Mayor John Lindsay to ingratiate himself with the communities of upper Manhattan. The name has changed on maps, but some of the people in the neighborhood still call it Mount Morris Park. The new name for the park honored Garvey, a publisher, journalist, entrepreneur,
    5.60
    5 votes
    92
    Briarwood

    Briarwood

    Briarwood is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Queens. It is located northwest of Jamaica and roughly bounded by Queens Boulevard, Parsons Boulevard, Union Turnpike, and Hillside Avenue. The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 8. It is serviced by the IND Queens Boulevard Line of the New York City Subway at the Briarwood–Van Wyck Boulevard station (E F). It lies in the northern half of the 11435 zip code. Briarwood is today a very diverse community, with lead fractions of the population being African-Americans (36.6%) and European-Americans (30.2%). It has many Bukharian Jewish, Greek, Hispanic, African American, Albanian, and South American residents. It now has a distinguishable and fast-growing Asian American (14.4%) community as well. Economic activity is mostly confined to small restaurants, delis, markets, and other small businesses. The neighborhood is named for the Briarwood Land Company, headed by Herbert O'Brien, which built housing there beginning in 1905. However, the company quickly went bankrupt and the area was largely empty until the 1920s. The New York Life Insurance Company and the United Nations constructed housing in the 1940s; United
    8.50
    2 votes
    93
    Richmond Hill

    Richmond Hill

    Richmond Hill is a neighborhood located in the central-southern area of the New York City borough of Queens. It is bordered by Kew Gardens to the north, Woodhaven and Ozone Park to the west, South Ozone Park to the south and South Jamaica to the east. The neighborhood is split between Queens Community Board 9 and 10. Main commercial streets in the neighborhood include Jamaica Avenue, Atlantic Avenue and Liberty Avenue. The main zip code of Richmond Hill is 11418; the zip code for the southern part of the neighborhood is 11419. The hill referred to as Richmond Hill is a moraine created by debris and rocks collected while glaciers advanced down North America. Richmond Hill is rich in history. The Battle of Long Island, one of the bloodiest battles of the Revolutionary War, was fought in 1776 along the ridge now in Forest Park, near what is now the golf course clubhouse. Protected by its thickly wooded area, American riflemen used guerrilla warfare tactics to attack and defeat the Hessians. Richmond Hill's name was inspired either by a suburban town near London, England, or because of Edward Richmond, a landscape architect in the mid-19th century who designed much of the neighborhood.
    8.50
    2 votes
    94
    West Village

    West Village

    The West Village is the western portion of the Greenwich Village neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan. The area is usually defined as bounded by the Hudson River on the west and either Sixth Avenue or Seventh Avenue on the east, extending from 14th Street down to Houston Street. The Far West Village extends from the Hudson River to Hudson Street. Bordering neighborhoods include Chelsea to the north, the South Village, and the newly invented (2009) area called Hudson Square to the south, and Central Village to the east. The neighborhood is primarily residential, with a multitude of small restaurants, shops and services. The area is part of Manhattan Community Board 2. Known as "Little Bohemia" starting in 1916, West Village is the center of the bohemian lifestyle on the West Side, with classic artist's lofts (Westbeth Artists Community), Julian Schnabel's Palazzo Chupi, and new residential towers designed by American architect Richard Meier facing the Hudson River at 173/176 Perry Street. The High Line connects the historic district to the art galleries in Chelsea and points north. The elevated train tracks running parallel to Tenth Avenue have been converted to an
    8.50
    2 votes
    95
    Clifton

    Clifton

    'Clifton is a neighborhood in northeastern Staten Island in New York City in the United States. It is an older waterfront neighborhood, facing Upper New York Bay on the east. It is bordered on the north by Stapleton, on the south by Rosebank, on the southwest by Concord, and on the west by Van Duzer Street. The name "Clifton" for the area dates to 1817, when a town by the name, larger in area than the present neighborhood, was laid out along the waterfront. In its early history, much of the surrounding land was owned by the Vanderbilt family. As a young man, Cornelius Vanderbilt established ferry service from the waterfront to Manhattan at the foot of present Vanderbilt Avenue. Bayley Seton Hospital, north of Vanderbilt Avenue, was formerly the United States Public Health Service Hospital and housed the original headquarters of the National Institutes of Health (now located in Bethesda, Maryland). In the 1840s the Townsend family built a huge home that had turrets so it was called the Townsend Castle. It was located at what is now Townsend Avenue and Tomkins Avenue. In the 1870s many roads were built near the water and many large homes were built in the area near the water. The
    7.33
    3 votes
    96
    Coney Island

    Coney Island

    Coney Island is a peninsula and beach on the Atlantic Ocean in southern Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States. The site was formerly an outer barrier island, but became partially connected to the mainland by land fill. Coney Island is possibly best known as the site of amusement parks and a major resort. The attractions reached their peak during the first half of the 20th century, declining in popularity after World War II and years of neglect. In recent years, the area has seen the opening of MCU Park and has become home to the minor league baseball team the Brooklyn Cyclones. The neighborhood of the same name is a community of 60,000 people in the western part of the peninsula, with Sea Gate to its west, Brighton Beach and Manhattan Beach to its east, and Gravesend to the north. Coney Island is the westernmost part of the barrier islands of Long Island, about 4 miles (6.4 km) long and 0.5 miles (0.80 km) wide. Formerly it was an island, separated from the main part of Brooklyn by Coney Island Creek, which was partially tidal mudflats, but it has since been developed into a peninsula. There were plans early in the 20th century to dredge and straighten the creek as a
    7.33
    3 votes
    97
    Morrisania

    Morrisania

    Morrisania ( /mɒrɨˈseɪniə/ morr-ə-SAY-nee-ə) is the historical name for the South Bronx and derives from the powerful and aristocratic Morris family, who at one time owned all of the Manor of Morrisania. Today the name is most commonly associated with the village of Morrisania, which is only a small corner of the original Morrisania. It is mostly a low income residential neighborhood geographically located in the southwestern Bronx, New York City. The neighborhood is part of Bronx Community Board 3. Its boundaries, starting from the north and moving clockwise are: the Cross-Bronx Expressway to the north, Crotona-Prospect Avenue to the east, East 161st Street to the south, and Webster Avenue to the west. Third Avenue is the primary thoroughfare through Morrisania. ZIP codes include 10456, 10457, and 10459. The area is patrolled by the 42nd Precinct located at 830 Washington Avenue. NYCHA property in the area is patrolled by P.S.A. 7 at 737 Melrose Avenue in the Melrose section of the Bronx. Morrisania has a population over 35,000. The majority of residents in the area are of African American, Puerto Rican, and a growing Dominican population. The vast majority of households are in
    7.33
    3 votes
    98
    Roosevelt Island

    Roosevelt Island

    Roosevelt Island — known as Welfare Island from 1921 to 1973, and before that Blackwell's Island — is a narrow island in the East River of New York City. It lies between the island of Manhattan to its west and the borough of Queens to its east. Running from Manhattan's East 46th to East 85th Streets, it is about two miles (3 km) long, with a maximum width of 800 feet (240 m), and a total area of 147 acres (0.59 km). The island is part of the Borough of Manhattan (New York County). Together with Mill Rock, Roosevelt Island constitutes Manhattan's Census Tract 238, which has a land area of 0.279 sq mi (0.72 km). and had a population of 9,520 in 2000 according to the US Census. The Roosevelt Island Operating Corporation estimated its population was about 12,000 in 2007. Roosevelt Island is owned by the city, but was leased to the state of New York's Urban Development Corporation for 99 years in 1969. Most of the residential buildings on Roosevelt Island are rental buildings. There is also a cooperative (Rivercross) and a condominium building (Riverwalk). One rental building (Eastwood) has left New York State's Mitchell-Lama Housing Program, though current residents are still
    7.33
    3 votes
    99
    South Ozone Park

    South Ozone Park

    South Ozone Park is a neighborhood in the southwestern section of the New York City borough of Queens. It was originally developed as low-cost housing in the early 1900s. Adjacently north of JFK Airport, its boundaries extend from the Aqueduct Racetrack eastward to the Van Wyck Expressway. Its main thoroughfare is Rockaway Boulevard. The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 10. Despite its name, South Ozone Park is mostly east of the neighborhood of Ozone Park. Richmond Hill lies to the north. Jamaica, South Jamaica, and Springfield Gardens are to the east. To the southwest are Howard Beach and Old Howard Beach. Generally seen as less upscale than Ozone Park, South Ozone Park is home to a more diverse population, with many African Americans, Trinidadians, Bangladeshis, Guyanese, and Hispanics living in the area, in addition to the area's longtime Italian-American population. The African-American and Afro-Caribbean community of South Ozone Park is largely concentrated in the easternmost districts of the neighborhood, while Hispanics and Indo Caribbeans are scattered throughout the neighborhood. Italian-Americans are most prevalent in the southern and western areas in the
    7.33
    3 votes
    100
    Stuyvesant Town

    Stuyvesant Town

    Stuyvesant Town—Peter Cooper Village is a large private residential development on the East Side of the borough of Manhattan in New York City, and one of the most iconic and successful post-World War II private housing communities. Stuyvesant Town, known to its residents as "Stuy Town", was named after Peter Stuyvesant, the last Director-General of the Dutch colony of New Amsterdam, whose farm occupied the site in the 17th century. Peter Cooper Village is named after the 19th century industrialist, inventor and philanthropist Peter Cooper, who founded Cooper Union. The complex, which was planned beginning in 1942 and opened its first building in 1947, replaced the Gas House district of gas storage tanks. The complex is a sprawling collection of red brick apartment buildings stretching from First Avenue to Avenue C, between 14th and 23rd Streets. It covers about 80 acres (320,000 m) of land, a portion of which is utilized for playgrounds and parkland. The development located between 14th and 20th Streets, Stuyvesant Town, has 8,757 apartments in 35 residential buildings and with its sister development, Peter Cooper Village – located between 20th and 23rd Streets – the complex has a
    7.33
    3 votes
    101
    Columbus Circle

    Columbus Circle

    Columbus Circle, named for Christopher Columbus, is a major landmark and point of attraction in the New York City borough of Manhattan, located at the intersection of Eighth Avenue, Broadway, Central Park South (West 59th Street), and Central Park West, at the southwest corner of Central Park. It is the point from which all official distances from New York City are measured. The name is also used for the neighborhood a few blocks around the circle in each direction. To the south of the circle lies Hell's Kitchen, also known as "Clinton", and the Theatre District, and to the north is the Upper West Side. Completed in 1905 and renovated a century later, the circle was designed by William P. Eno – a businessman who pioneered many early innovations in road safety and traffic control – as part of Frederick Law Olmsted's vision for Central Park, which included a "Grand Circle" at the Merchants' Gate, its most important Eighth Avenue entrance. The monument at the center of Columbus Circle, created by Italian sculptor Gaetano Russo, was erected as part of New York's 1892 commemoration of the 400th anniversary of Columbus' landing in the Americas. Constructed with funds raised by Il
    6.25
    4 votes
    102
    Kingsbridge

    Kingsbridge

    Kingsbridge is a working class residential neighborhood geographically located in the northwest Bronx in New York City. The neighborhood is part of Bronx Community Board 8. Its boundaries are Van Cortlandt Park to the north, Goulden Avenue to the east, West 225th Street to the south, and Irwin Avenue to the west. Broadway is the primary thoroughfare through Kingsbridge. Kingsbridge Heights, Bronx, a separate but similarly named neighborhood, lies across the Major Deegan Expressway, east of Kingsbridge proper. The neighborhood is named for The King's Bridge, erected in 1693 by Frederick Philipse, a local Lord loyal to the British Monarch. The bridge spanned the now-filled-in Spuyten Duyvil Creek, roughly south-parallel with today's 230th Street. The King's Bridge was part of Boston Post Road, connecting southern Westchester County (which became The Bronx) with Marble Hill, once part of the Manhattan island, but still today part of the Manhattan borough. The bridge is said to still be in place, having been buried when the creek bed was filled in. The creek water flow was redirected to the new and deeper shipping canal, south of Marble Hill. (A depiction of King's Bridge can be seen
    6.25
    4 votes
    103
    Korea Way

    Korea Way

    Korea Way, the segment of 32nd Street between Fifth Avenue and Broadway in Manhattan's Koreatown, is a center for Korean cuisine, shopping, and culture. Located in Midtown Manhattan in New York City, Korea Way is adjacent to Herald Square, a large shopping district that features department stores and various large chain stores, pharmacies and clothing shops. The street features a Korean bank, various styles of restaurants that serve both traditional and/or regional Korean fare and fusion cuisine, bookstores, video rental shops, tchotchke and stationery shops, cell phone service providers, a Han Ah Reum supermarket, karaoke bars, nightclubs, doctor's offices, and hair salons. Though only one city block long, Korea Way features stores and restaurants on multiple stories, with small, independently-run establishments reaching up to the third or fourth floors. This set-up differs from most of commercial Manhattan, where stores usually occupy only the ground floor, with a small frequency of second-floor walk-ups. There are other Korean establishments scattered in the area as well, though of course at a lesser concentration than on Korea Way proper. The street is also casually referred to
    7.00
    3 votes
    104
    Roxbury

    Roxbury

    Roxbury is a community on the Rockaway Peninsula in the New York City borough of Queens. The neighborhood is just west of the Marine Parkway Bridge and adjoins Fort Tilden. It is an inholding within the borders of the Breezy Point Unit of Gateway National Recreation Area, of the US National Park System. Roxbury is part of the Breezy Point Cooperative, a private property owning corporation of residents.
    7.00
    3 votes
    105
    Woodrow

    Woodrow

    Woodrow is a name increasingly applied to the western part of Huguenot, a neighborhood located on the South Shore of Staten Island, New York, United States. The first Methodist church in the immediate New York City area opened in the neighborhood in 1771. Known today as the Woodrow United Methodist Church, its original congregants included some of the island's earliest well-known families. Long regarded as the western part of Huguenot pursuant to the custom of old-time Staten Islanders of naming a particular East Shore or South Shore neighborhood after the nearest station on the Staten Island Railway. The Prince's Bay post office is actually located in Woodrow, as well as I.S. 75. Highways/Major Roads in Woodrow: Roads accessed in Woodrow could be the Korean War Veterans Pkwy corner of Arden Ave or the West Shore Expwy (NY 440) New York Public Library operates the Huguenot Park Branch, which serves Woodrow and other neighborhoods, at 830 Huguenot Avenue at Drumgoole Road East. The branch opened in January 1985. Woodrow is served by the S56 local bus on Woodrow Road during weekdays only. It is also served by the X23 and X24 express buses along Woodrow Road, during rush hours only.
    7.00
    3 votes
    106
    Manhattan Beach

    Manhattan Beach

    Manhattan Beach is a residential neighborhood in the New York City borough of Brooklyn. It is bounded by the Atlantic Ocean to the south and east, by Sheepshead Bay on the north, and Brighton Beach to the west. Traditionally known as an Italian and Ashkenazi Jewish neighborhood, it is also home to a sizable community of Sephardi Jews and a large Russian Jewish immigrant presence. The area is part of Brooklyn Community Board 15, which is represented by the Manhattan Beach Community Group, established 67 years ago, and the Manhattan Beach Neighborhood Association, established in 2008. The community's street names, derived from England, are in alphabetical order from A to P (Amherst, Beaumont, Coleridge, Dover, Exeter, Falmouth, through to Pembroke, with Quentin and Reynolds on old maps). The area was named for the beach on the Atlantic Ocean situated on the eastern end of Coney Island. It was developed in the last quarter of the 19th century as a resort by Austin Corbin, later president of the Long Island Rail Road, for whom a street ("Corbin Place") was named. Manhattan Beach is patrolled by the NYPD's 61st Precinct. Kingsborough Community College, which is the part of the City
    6.00
    4 votes
    107
    Bedford-Stuyvesant

    Bedford-Stuyvesant

    Bedford-Stuyvesant ( /ˈstaɪvəsənt/; also shortened as Bed-Stuy) is a neighborhood in the central portion of the New York City borough of Brooklyn. Formed in 1930, the neighborhood is part of Brooklyn Community Board 3, Brooklyn Community Board 8, and Brooklyn Community Board 16. The neighborhood is patrolled by the NYPD's 79th and 81st precincts. In the City Council, the district is represented by Albert Vann of the 36th Council District. Bedford-Stuyvesant is bordered by Flushing Avenue to the north (bordering Williamsburg); Classon Avenue to the west (bordering Clinton Hill); Broadway and Saratoga to the east (bordering Bushwick and East New York); and Atlantic Avenue to the south (bordering Crown Heights). It is served by Postal Service zip codes 11205, 11206, 11216, 11221, 11233 and 11238. For decades, it has been a cultural center for Brooklyn's black population. Following the construction of the subway line between Harlem and Bedford in 1936, African Americans left an overcrowded Harlem for more housing availability in Bedford-Stuyvesant. From Bedford-Stuyvesant, African Americans have since moved into the surrounding areas of Brooklyn, such as East New York, Crown Heights,
    8.00
    2 votes
    108
    Belle Harbor

    Belle Harbor

    Belle Harbor is an upscale neighborhood in the New York City borough of Queens. It is a tightly-knit, upper class community located on the western half of the Rockaway Peninsula, the southernmost area of the borough. While there are no formal boundaries for the area, Belle Harbor is often used to refer to the area between Beach 126th and Beach 142nd Streets. According to a map from 1909, Belle Harbor is located in the area between Beach 125th (west side) and Beach 141st Streets. The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 14. According to the 2010 United States Census, the neighborhood, coupled with nearby Neponsit, had a population just over 5,400. Belle Harbor is the site of the fatal 2001 crash of American Airlines Flight 587. The opening of passenger railroad service in 1880 to Rockaway Park from Long Island City and from Flatbush Terminal (now Atlantic Terminal) in downtown Brooklyn, via the Long Island Railroad's Rockaway Beach Branch, facilitated population growth on the Rockaways Peninsula. The makings of Belle Harbor began in 1900, when a New York State judge ordered that the land west of Rockaway Park be put up for auction. The area that makes up Belle Harbor and
    8.00
    2 votes
    109
    Chinatown

    Chinatown

    Manhattan's Chinatown (simplified Chinese: 纽约华埠; traditional Chinese: 紐約華埠; pinyin: Niŭyuē Huá Bù), home to the largest enclave of Chinese people in the Western hemisphere, is located in the borough of Manhattan in New York City, bordering Lower East Side to the east and Little Italy to the north. With an estimated population of 90,000 to 100,000 people, Manhattan's Chinatown is also one of the oldest ethnic Chinese enclaves outside of Asia, with many of its residents Cantonese-speaking and originating from various regions of China, mainly from Guangdong and Fujian,FJ provinces, and Hong Kong. It is one of three Chinatown neighborhoods in New York City, with the two others located in the boroughs of Queens and Brooklyn. The borders of Chinatown are currently approximated as: Although Quimbo Appo is claimed to have arrived in the area during the 1840s, the first Chinese person credited as having permanently immigrated to Chinatown was Ah Ken, a Cantonese businessman, who eventually founded a successful cigar store on Park Row. He first arrived around 1858 in New York City, where he was "probably one of those Chinese mentioned in gossip of the sixties [1860s] as peddling 'awful'
    8.00
    2 votes
    110
    Civic Center

    Civic Center

    The Civic Center or Five Points as it has always been called, is the swath of downtown Manhattan that encompasses City Hall, police headquarters and the courts. The area is roughly 10 blocks long and 5 blocks wide, but is far less dense than most of Manhattan, where the average number of residents for an area that size is 35,000, and the Civic Center has approximately 20,000. The district is bound on the west by Broadway, on the north by Chinatown, on the east by the East River and the Brooklyn Bridge, and on the south by the Financial District. Originally, the Lenape American Indians occupied the Civic Center due to its rich pastoral fields and its proximity to the East River and Hudson River. There was a series of marshes in the area and a big pond in what is now Foley Square that the early settlers called “The Collect” or “Collect Pond.” In fact, the area was so low lying that during the spring floods, the Indians could paddle from the East River to the Hudson River through the Collect Pond Then in 1609, Henry Hudson, an English explorer working for the Dutch, came and claimed the land for the Dutch. The colony there grew and farms began to expand, so the demand for workers
    8.00
    2 votes
    111
    Ocean Hill

    Ocean Hill

    Ocean Hill is a subsection of Bedford-Stuyvesant in the New York City borough of Brooklyn. Founded in 1890, the neighborhood is part of Brooklyn Community Board 16. The ZIP code for the neighborhood is 11233. The neighborhood has a diverse community with a large number of African Americans, and a small number of Caribbean and Latin Americans. Ocean Hill's boundaries start from Broadway (Bushwick) in the north, Ralph Avenue (Bed-Stuy proper) to the west, East New York Avenue (Brownsville) in the south, and Van Sinderen Avenue (East New York) to the east. Ocean Hill received its name in 1890 for being slightly hilly. Hence it was subdivided from the larger community of Stuyvesant Heights. From the beginning of the 20th century to the 1960s Ocean Hill was an Italian enclave. By the late 1960s Ocean Hill and Bedford-Stuyvesant proper together formed the largest African American community in the United States. In 1968, the Ocean Hill-Brownsville school district experienced the worst teacher strike in history. At that time, the New York City Board of Education controlled the entire school system. In response to complaints from parents in poor minority neighborhoods that schools were
    8.00
    2 votes
    112
    Rochdale

    Rochdale

    Rochdale is a neighborhood in the southeastern corner of the New York City borough of Queens. Located in Community Board 12, Rochdale, along with other neighborhood areas are grouped as part of Greater Jamaica, corresponding to the former Town of Jamaica. It is adjacent to three other Queens neighborhoods: South Jamaica to the west, Locust Manor to the north and Springfield Gardens to the south. Rochdale is west of the Queens/Nassau border and directly north of the John F. Kennedy International Airport. Rochdale Village was named after the English town of Rochdale, Greater Manchester, where the Rochdale Pioneers developed the Rochdale Principles of cooperation. The architect's concept of Rochdale Village was an attractive community covering 122 blocks that would provide the residents with a park-like setting and facilities of suburbia, within the limits of the Urban Jamaica Area. Rochdale was designed to be a "city within a city". The property is the former site of Jamaica Racetrack, which was operated by the Metropolitan Jockey Club and its successor, the Greater New York Association (now the New York Racing Association.) When the NYRA decided to renovate Greater Jamaica's other
    8.00
    2 votes
    113
    Sunnyside

    Sunnyside

    Sunnyside is a neighborhood in the western portion of the New York City borough of Queens. It shares borders with Hunters Point and Long Island City to the west, Astoria to the north, Woodside to the east and Maspeth to the south. The neighborhood is part of Queens Community District 2, served by Queens Community Board 2. The land was originally owned by French settlers in the 1800s. The name "Sunnyside" is derived from Sunnyside Hill Farms, so named by the Bragraws family who owned the land. Sunnyside was a rural hamlet mostly consisting of small farms and marshland. It was incorporated into Long Island City in 1870, and developed into a bedroom community after the Queensboro Bridge was completed in 1909. A large portion of the neighborhood is six-story apartment buildings constructed during the 1920s and '30s. The area is known for one of America's first planned communities, Sunnyside Gardens. This model allowed for denser residential development, while also providing ample open/green-space amenities. Clarence Stein and Henry Wright served as the architects and planners for this development, and the landscape architect was Marjorie Sewell Cautley. These well-planned garden homes
    8.00
    2 votes
    114
    Fresh Meadows

    Fresh Meadows

    Fresh Meadows is a residential neighborhood in the northeastern section of the New York City borough of Queens. Fresh Meadows is located on the northeast side of Hillcrest, bordered to the east by Cunningham Park, to the south by Union Turnpike and St. John's University, and to the west by South Flushing. The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 8 and is served by the United States Postal Service as ZIP codes 11365 and 11366. During the American Revolution General Benedict Arnold drilled his troops in the area, on the current location of M.S. 216. During the 19th century, Fresh Meadows was a farming community known as Black Stump. The name derives from the convention of defining property lines by placing blackened tree stumps at the edges of properties. A few such boundary markers are still visible in the undeveloped areas of Cunningham Park along 73rd Avenue. Black Stump School was located at present-day Utopia Playground, at 73rd Avenue and Utopia Parkway. For several years, the woods of Black Stump were rumored to be haunted because people heard strange sounds coming from the woods. In 1908, the mysterious sounds were discovered to be coming from a recluse who lived in
    9.00
    1 votes
    115
    Harlem

    Harlem

    Harlem is a large neighborhood within the northern section of the New York City borough of Manhattan, which since the 1920s has been known as a major African-American residential, cultural and business center. Originally a Dutch village, formally organized in 1658, it is named after the city of Haarlem in the Netherlands. Harlem was annexed to New York City in 1873. Harlem can be separated into three separate yet cohesive main sections: Central Harlem, West Harlem, and East Harlem. Harlem has been defined by a series of boom-and-bust cycles, with significant population shifts accompanying each cycle. Black residents began to arrive en masse in 1904, with numbers fed by the Great Migration. In the 1920s and 1930s, Central and West Harlem was the focus of the "Harlem Renaissance", an outpouring of artistic and professional works without precedent in the American black community. However, with job losses in the time of the Great Depression and the deindustrialization of New York City after World War II, rates of crime and poverty increased significantly. Today, Central Harlem has an African-American community at 81% of the population, creating the largest African-American community by
    9.00
    1 votes
    116
    Middle Village

    Middle Village

    Middle Village is a neighborhood in the central section of the New York City borough of Queens. The neighborhood is located in the western central section of Queens, bounded to the north by Eliot Avenue, to the east by Woodhaven Boulevard, to the south by Cooper Avenue, and to the west by Fresh Pond Road. Middle Village borders Elmhurst to the North, Maspeth and Ridgewood to the West, Glendale to the South, and Rego Park to the East. In 2003, "South Elmhurst", an area between Eliot Avenue and the Long Island Expressway, was added to Middle Village's ZIP code (11379). The neighborhood is part of Queens Community District 5, served by Queens Community Board 5. Housing in the neighborhood is largely single-family homes with many attached homes, and small apartment buildings. The neighborhood is served by the M train of the New York City Subway which terminates at Metropolitan Avenue. Five bus lines serve Middle Village: the Q29, the Q38, the Q47, the Q54, and the Q67. The area was settled around 1816 by people of English descent and was named in the early nineteenth-century for its location as the midpoint between the then towns of Williamsburg, Brooklyn and Jamaica, Queens on the
    9.00
    1 votes
    117
    Union Square

    Union Square

    Union Square is an important and historic intersection in Manhattan in New York City, located where Broadway and the former Bowery Road – now Fourth Avenue – came together in the early 19th century; its name celebrates neither the Federal union of the United States nor labor unions but rather denotes that "here was the union of the two principal thoroughfares of the island". Today, Union Square Park is bounded by 14th Street on the south, Union Square West on the west side, 17th Street on the north, and on the east Union Square East, which links together Broadway and Park Avenue South to Fourth Avenue and the continuation of Broadway. The park is under the aegis of the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation. The neighborhoods around the square are the Flatiron District to the north, Chelsea to the west, Greenwich Village to the south, and Gramercy to the east. Many buildings of The New School are near the square, as are several dormitories of New York University. The eastern side of the square is dominated by the four Zeckendorf Towers, on the former site of the bargain-priced department store, S. Klein, and the south side by the full-square block mixed-use One Union
    9.00
    1 votes
    118
    Woodhaven

    Woodhaven

    Woodhaven is a neighborhood located in the New York City borough of Queens. Woodhaven is bordered on the north by a public park, Forest Park, and Park Lane South. Woodhaven also borders Richmond Hill to the east, and Ozone Park to the south at Atlantic Avenue. Its western border is the borough of Brooklyn. Woodhaven, once known as Woodville, has one of the greatest tree populations in the borough, and thus it has retained its suburban look. Schools, transportation, and park recreation are convenient. The ethnically diverse neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 9. Woodhaven's Zip Code is 11421. Commerce is centered on Jamaica Avenue which effectively bisects Woodhaven. On this avenue, are a large number of stores, most being small and locally owned. One of the oldest and best known was Lewis of Woodhaven, which had two locations and closed its doors in 2004. The Wisconsin Glacier retreated from Long Island some 20,000 years ago, leaving behind the hills to the north of Woodhaven that now are part of Forest Park, the third largest park in Queens. Southern Woodhaven is mostly flat (the lowest elevation is just under 30 feet (9.1 m) ), while northern Woodhaven gradually rises
    9.00
    1 votes
    119
    Crown Heights

    Crown Heights

    Crown Heights is a neighborhood in the central portion of the New York City borough of Brooklyn. The main thoroughfare through this neighborhood is Eastern Parkway, a tree-lined boulevard designed by Frederick Law Olmsted extending two miles (3 km) east-west. Originally, the area was known as Crow Hill. It was a succession of hills running east and west from Utica Avenue to Classon Avenue, and south to Empire Boulevard and New York Avenue. The name was changed when Crown Street was cut through in 1916. Crown Heights is bounded by Washington Avenue (to the west), Atlantic Avenue (to the north), Howard Avenue (to the east) and Empire Boulevard (to the south). It is about one mile wide and two miles long. Neighborhoods bordering Crown Heights include Prospect Heights to the west, Flatbush to the south, Brownsville to the southeast, and Bedford-Stuyvesant to the north. The neighborhood extends through much of Brooklyn Community Board 8 and 9. It is under the jurisdiction of two precincts of the New York City Police Department. The 77th precinct is part of Brooklyn North, which covers Crown Heights, Prospect Heights and Weeksville. The 71st precinct is part of Brooklyn South and covers
    6.67
    3 votes
    120
    Madison Square

    Madison Square

    Madison Square is formed by the intersection of Fifth Avenue and Broadway at 23rd Street in the New York City borough of Manhattan. The square was named for James Madison, fourth President of the United States and the principal author of the United States Constitution. The focus of the square is Madison Square Park, a 6.2 acre (2.5 hectare) public park, which is bounded on the east by Madison Avenue (which starts at the park's southeast corner at 23rd Street); on the south by 23rd Street; on the north by 26th Street; and on the west by Fifth Avenue and Broadway as they cross. The park and the square are at the northern (uptown) end of the Flatiron District neighborhood of Manhattan. The use of "Madison Square" as a name for the neighborhood has fallen off, and it is rarely heard. The neighborhood to the north and west of the park is NoMad ("NOrth of MADison Square Park") and to the north and east is Rose Hill. Madison Square is probably best known around the world for providing the name of Madison Square Garden, a sports arena and its successor which were located just northeast of the park for 47 years, until 1925. The current Madison Square Garden, the fourth such building, is not
    6.67
    3 votes
    121
    Norwood

    Norwood

    Norwood is a working class residential neighborhood in the northwest Bronx, New York City. As of the census of 2000, the seven census tracts that make up the neighborhood have a population of 40,748. The area is dominated topographically by what was once known as Valentine's Hill, the highest point being near the intersection of 210th Street and Bainbridge Ave., where Gun Hill Road intersects, and around the Montefiore Medical Center, the largest landowner and employer of the neighborhood. It borders Van Cortlandt Park and Woodlawn Cemetery to the north, the Bronx River to the east, and Mosholu Parkway to the south and west. Norwood's main commercial arteries are Gun Hill Road, Jerome Avenue, Webster Avenue, and Bainbridge Avenue. Due to its use in city publications, subway maps, and local media, Norwood is the neighborhood's more common name, but the entirety is also known as Bainbridge, most consistently within the neighborhood's Irish American community—centered around the commercial zone of Bainbridge Avenue and East 204th Street. However, as this Irish community largely left the country during the 1990s, the name Bainbridge has accordingly lost a great deal of currency. Even
    6.67
    3 votes
    122
    Seagate

    Seagate

    Sea Gate is a private, gated community at the far western end of Coney Island at the southwestern tip of the New York City borough of Brooklyn. It contains mostly single-family homes, some directly on Gravesend Bay. It is regularly patrolled by the Sea Gate Police Department which was established in 1899, though the New York City Police Department has joint jurisdiction over it. The area that is now Sea Gate was once known as Norton's Point. The name came from the owner of a casino where the Coney Island Light now stands. The neighborhood held a reputation for gambling before it was developed into a neighborhood. Sea Gate was developed into a full neighborhood in 1892 by developer Alrick Man. By 1899 Sea Gate home and land owners included; The Morgan, Dodge and Vanderbilt families. Governor Al Smith and others could be found enjoying the amenities at the then famous Atlantic Yachet Club.Many today still stop to look at and point out the houses built by the famous Architect Stamford White. At present Sea Gate is still surrounded on three sides by water with private beaches. In 1995 the Army Corps of Engineers completed its work of replenishing Coney beaches and building new jetties,
    6.67
    3 votes
    123
    SoHo

    SoHo

    SoHo is a neighborhood in Lower Manhattan, New York City, notable for being the location of many artists' lofts and art galleries, and also, more recently, for the wide variety of stores and shops ranging from trendy boutiques to outlets of upscale national and international chain stores. The area's history is an archetypal example of inner-city regeneration and gentrification, encompassing socio-economic, cultural, political and architectural developments. Almost all of SoHo is included in the SoHo-Cast Iron Historic District, which was designated by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1973, extended in 2010, and was listed on the National Register of Historic Places and declared a National Historic Landmark in 1978. It consists of 26 blocks and approximately 500 buildings, many of them incorporating cast iron architectural elements. The side streets in the district are notable for being paved with Belgian blocks. The name SoHo refers to the area being "SOuth of HOuston (Street)", and was also a reference to the London district of Soho. The name was first designated in the 1970s. This naming convention has become a model for the names of new, emerging and
    6.67
    3 votes
    124
    South Street Seaport

    South Street Seaport

    The South Street Seaport is a historic area in the New York City borough of Manhattan, located where Fulton Street meets the East River, and adjacent to the Financial District. The Seaport is a designated historic district, distinct from the neighboring Financial District. It features some of the oldest architecture in downtown Manhattan, and includes the largest concentration of restored early 19th-century commercial buildings in the city. This includes renovated original mercantile buildings, renovated sailing ships, the former Fulton Fish Market, and modern tourist malls featuring food, shopping and nightlife, with a view of the Brooklyn Bridge. At the entrance to the Seaport is the Titanic Memorial lighthouse. South Street Seaport Museum was founded in 1967 by Peter and Norma Stanford. When originally opened as a museum, the focus of the Seaport Museum conservation was to be an educational historic site, with "shops" mostly operating as reproductions of working environments found during the Seaport's heyday, 1820 to 1860. Designated by Congress in 1998 as one of several museums, which together make up "America's National Maritime Museum", South Street Seaport Museum sits in a
    6.67
    3 votes
    125
    Springfield Gardens

    Springfield Gardens

    Springfield Gardens is a neighborhood in the southeastern area of the New York City borough of Queens, bounded to the north by St. Albans, to the east by Laurelton & Rosedale, to the south by John F. Kennedy International Airport, and to the west by Farmers Boulevard. The neighborhood is served by Queens Community Board 12. The area was first settled by Europeans in 1660, and was subsequently farmed until the mid nineteenth-century. Major residential development came in the 1920s as Long Island Rail Road service was expanded to the area at the Springfield Gardens station (closed in 1979). Farmers Boulevard, Merrick Boulevard, Springfield Boulevard, Rockaway Boulevard, and Guy R. Brewer Boulevard all are major streets in the area. Today the area maintains its low-rise suburban nature, and is home to many Caribbean immigrants including Jamaicans, Haitians, and Guyanese. It also is home to a minority African-American population. Many homes have been torn down and remade for more families as more people move into the neighborhood. Part is a Registered historic District. Springfield Gardens is located within zip codes 11434 (western part) and 11413 (eastern part).
    6.67
    3 votes
    126
    Bath Beach

    Bath Beach

    Bath Beach is a neighborhood in the New York City Borough of Brooklyn in the United States. It is located at the southwestern edge of the borough on Gravesend Bay. Sometimes erroneously thought to be part of Bensonhurst, Bath Beach is actually separated from that neighborhood by 86th Street to the northeast. To the north, also across 86th Street, lies New Utrecht. To the northwest across 14th Avenue is Dyker Beach Park and Golf Course, and to the southeast across Stillwell Avenue is the neighborhood of Gravesend. To the south, across Gravesend Bay and Coney Island Creek, are Seagate and Coney Island. Bath Beach is served by the D elevated subway line of the New York City Subway system, also called the BMT West End Line. Stations along the line serving the community are 18th Avenue, 20th Avenue, Bay Parkway, 25th Avenue, and Bay 50th Street. Streets of the neighborhood have a unique nomenclature. Four two-way thoroughfares traverse the neighborhood, running southeast/northwest, parallel to Shore Parkway: these are Cropsey Avenue, Bath Avenue, Benson Avenue, and 86th Street. Another, Harway Avenue, runs from Stillwell only as far as Twenty-Fourth Avenue. The one-way
    5.75
    4 votes
    127
    Borough Park

    Borough Park

    Borough Park (usually spelled Boro Park by its residents), is a neighborhood in the southwestern part of the borough of Brooklyn, in New York City in the United States. Borough Park is home to one of the largest Orthodox Jewish communities outside of Israel, with one of the largest concentrations of Jews in the United States and Orthodox traditions, rivaling many insular communities. Since the average number of children in Hasidic and Hareidi families is 6.72, Borough Park is experiencing sharp growth. It is an economically diverse area, with rich, working class and poor people living side-by-side and going to the same schools and synagogues. Its heart lies between 11th and 18th Avenues and 40th and 60th Streets. Borough Park is patrolled by the NYPD's 66th Precinct. The neighborhood underwent many transformations in in the late 20th century. Demographically, it changed from a neighborhood of Italian, Irish, and Modern Orthodox Jewish families to one of mostly Hasidic Jewish families. In a 2000 Census study, it was reported that an estimated 76,600 Jews lived in Borough Park. Since that time, Borough Park has grown significantly, and has earned the title of "baby boom capital" of
    5.75
    4 votes
    128
    Hunts Point

    Hunts Point

    Hunts Point is a neighborhood located on a peninsula in the South Bronx in New York City. It is the location of one of the largest food distribution facilities in the world. The neighborhood is part of Bronx Community Board 2. Its boundaries are the Bruckner Expressway to the west and north, the Bronx River to the east, and the East River to the south. Hunts Point Avenue is the primary street through Hunts Point. The neighborhood is considered to be a "Red Light District" in many cases for its crime and prostitution. The neighborhood is served by NYPD's 41st Precinct. As of the United States 2000 Census, Hunts Point has a population of 46,824, up from 39,433 in 1990 and 34,397 in 1980. Of them, 35,507 (75.8%) are of Hispanic origin, 10,021 (21.4%) are Black, non-Hispanic, 582 (1.2%) are White, non-Hispanic, 207 (0.4%) are Asian or Pacific Islander, 101 (0.2%) American Indian or Alaska Native, 90 (0.2%) are some other race (non-Hispanic), and 316 (0.7%) of two or more races (non-Hispanic). Hunts Point is a low-income residential neighborhood. Over half the population lives below the poverty line and receives public assistance (AFDC, Home Relief, Supplemental Security Income, and
    5.75
    4 votes
    129
    Astor Row

    Astor Row

    Astor Row is the name given to 130th Street between Fifth Avenue and Lenox Avenue in Harlem, in the New York City borough of Manhattan. More specifically, it refers to the semi-attached row houses on the south side of the street. These were among the first speculative townhouses built in Harlem, and their design is very unusual. The houses are set back from the street and all have front yards, an oddity in Manhattan, and all have wooden porches. The effect is southern, and has been compared to the appearance of parts of Savannah, Georgia. The houses were built on land that had been purchased by John Jacob Astor in 1844 for $10,000, but the development was driven by his grandson, William Backhouse Astor, who hired architect and builder Charles Buek to oversee the project. The houses were all built between 1880 and 1883. Upon the death of William Backhouse Astor, the houses were divided among his grandchildren, Mary, James and Sarah Van Alen. Ownership stayed in the Astor family until 1911, when the westernmost ten of the houses were sold to real estate investor Max Marx, who traded them in part for an apartment building in Washington Heights. The new owners, the Brown Realty
    7.50
    2 votes
    130
    Financial District

    Financial District

    The Financial District of New York City (sometimes called FiDi) is a neighborhood on the southernmost section of the borough of Manhattan which comprises the offices and headquarters of many of the city's major financial institutions, including the New York Stock Exchange and the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. The World Trade Center existed in the neighborhood until the September 11 attacks and is currently being rebuilt. The neighborhood roughly overlaps the boundaries of the New Amsterdam settlement in the late 17th century and has a residential population of about 56,000. During the day, the population swells to about 300,000. As a district, it encompasses roughly the area south of City Hall Park but excluding Battery Park and Battery Park City. The heart of the Financial District is often considered to be the corner of Wall Street and Broad Street, both of which are contained entirely within the district. The northeastern part of the financial district (along Fulton Street and John Street) was known in the early 20th century as the Insurance District, due to the large number of insurance companies who were either headquartered there, or maintained their New York offices
    7.50
    2 votes
    131
    Garment District

    Garment District

    The Garment District, also known as the Garment Center, the Fashion District, or the Fashion Center, is a neighborhood located in the Manhattan borough of New York City. The dense concentration of fashion-related uses give the neighborhood – which is generally considered to lie between Fifth Avenue and Ninth Avenue, from 34th to 42nd Street – its name. The Garment District has been known since the early 20th century as the center for fashion manufacturing and fashion design in the United States, and even the world. Less than one square mile in area, the neighborhood is home to the majority of New York’s showrooms and to numerous major fashion labels, and caters to all aspects of the fashion process–from design and production to wholesale selling. No other city has a comparable concentration of fashion businesses and talent in a single district. New York City is arguably the fashion capital of the United States and the entire world because the industry based there generates over $14 billion in annual sales and sets design trends which are mirrored worldwide. The core of the industry is Manhattan's Garment District, where the majority of the city's major fashion labels operate
    7.50
    2 votes
    132
    Greenwich Village

    Greenwich Village

    Greenwich Village, often referred to in New York as simply "the Village", is a largely residential neighborhood on the west side of Lower Manhattan in New York City. A large majority of the district is home to upper middle class families. Greenwich Village, however, was known in the late 19th to mid 20th centuries as an artists' haven, the bohemian capital, and the East Coast birthplace of the Beat movement. What provided the initial attractive character of the community eventually contributed to its gentrification and commercialization. The name of the village is Anglicized from the Dutch name Greenwijck, meaning "Pine District", into Greenwich, a borough of London. The neighborhood is bordered by Broadway to the east, the Hudson River to the west, Houston Street to the south, and 14th Street to the north, and roughly centered around Washington Square and New York University. The neighborhoods surrounding it are the East Village and NoHo to the east, SoHo to the south, and Chelsea to the north. The East Village was formerly considered part of the Lower East Side and never associated with Greenwich Village. The West Village is the area of Greenwich Village west of 7th Avenue,
    7.50
    2 votes
    133
    Throgs Neck

    Throgs Neck

    Throggs Neck (also known as Throgs Neck) is a narrow spit of land in the southeastern portion of the borough of the Bronx in New York City. It demarcates the passage between the East River (an estuary), and Long Island Sound. "Throggs Neck" is also the name of the neighborhood of the peninsula, bounded on the north by East Tremont Avenue and Baisley Avenue, on the west by Westchester Creek, and on the other sides by the River and the Sound. Throggs Neck was largely exempt from the severe urban decay that affected much of the Bronx in the 1970s. Throggs Neck is at the northern approach to the Throgs Neck Bridge, which connects the Bronx with the neighborhood of Bay Terrace in the borough of Queens on Long Island. The Throgs Neck Lighthouse formerly stood at its southern tip. Historically, the correct spelling is with two "g's," and while NYC Parks Commissioner and Triborough Bridge and Tunnel Authority Chairman Robert Moses officially shortened it to one "g" after deciding that two would not fit on many of the street signs. However, original residents do not prefer the shortened version and continue to recognize the traditional spelling. On September 17, 2012, News12 (Bronx)
    7.50
    2 votes
    134
    Vinegar Hill

    Vinegar Hill

    Vinegar Hill is a neighborhood in the borough of Brooklyn in New York City on the East River waterfront between Dumbo and the Brooklyn Navy Yard. The neighborhood is served by Brooklyn Community Board 2. The neighborhood is served by the NYPD's 84th Precinct. Vinegar Hill gets its name from the Battle of Vinegar Hill, an engagement near Enniscorthy during the Irish Rebellion of 1798. Originally settled by the Irish, this community has maintained its 19th-century look while facing modernization and development from all sides. Vinegar Hill stretches from the East River waterfront to Front St and from the Brooklyn Navy Yard to Bridge St, roughly comprising a six block area, although, before the construction of the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway in the 1950s, Vinegar Hill's area was significantly larger, extending south to Tillary St, including what is now known as RAMBO. Most of Vinegar Hill consists of 19th century Federal Style and Greek Revival style homes mixed with industrial buildings. The streets on Hudson Avenue, Plymouth, Water and Front are made of cobblestones. The Vinegar Hill area includes the Vinegar Hill Historic District and is home to the Con Edison Hudson Avenue
    7.50
    2 votes
    135
    Arverne

    Arverne

    Arverne is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Queens, on the Rockaway Peninsula. It was initially developed by Remington Vernam, whose signature "R. Vernam" inspired the name of the neighborhood. Arverne extends from Beach 56th Street to Beach 73rd Street, along its main thoroughfare Beach Channel Drive, alternatively known as Rev. Joseph H. May Drive. The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 14. Vernam's original plan was to name the neighborhood Arverne-by-the-Sea, and one grandiose plan, influenced by his wife, Florence, included a canal running through the neighborhood, reminiscent of the Amstel canal in Amsterdam, Holland. When this plan fell through, the canal right-of-way was converted into a thoroughfare, Amstel Boulevard, which, except for a stub west of Beach 71st Street, was later incorporated into Beach Channel Drive. While Arverne became well known as a beachfront community with inexpensive summer bungalows, and hotels of varying levels of expense and luxury as well as amusements and boardwalk concessions, it also attracted a year-round residential community. On January 3, 1914, a violent storm devastated the neighborhood as well as other
    5.50
    4 votes
    136
    Sunset Park

    Sunset Park

    Sunset Park is a neighborhood in the western section of the New York City borough of Brooklyn, USA. It is bounded by Greenwood Heights to the north, Borough Park to the east, Bay Ridge to the south, and Upper New York Bay to the west. Sunset Park is served by the NYPD's 72nd Precinct. There is a namesake city park within the neighborhood, located between 41st and 44th Streets and 5th and 7th Avenues, which is the second highest point in Brooklyn (the highest being on the northeastern edge of Green-Wood Cemetery). The "main drag" of the neighborhood is 5th Avenue. The area is also home to the Jackie Gleason Bus Depot. In the heyday of the New York Harbor's dominance of North American shipping during the 19th Century, Sunset Park grew rapidly, largely as a result of Irish, Polish, Finnish and Norwegian immigrant families moving to the area. The neighborhood grew up around the Bush Terminal of Irving T. Bush, a model industrial park completed in 1895 between 39th and 53d Streets, and continued to grow through World War II, when the Brooklyn Army Terminal between 53d and 66th Streets employed more than 10,000 civilians to ship 80% of all American supplies and troops. Sunset Park's
    5.50
    4 votes
    137
    Kew Gardens

    Kew Gardens

    Kew Gardens is a triangular-shaped neighborhood in the central area of the New York City borough of Queens, bounded to the north by the Jackie Robinson Parkway (formerly Interborough Parkway), to the east by Van Wyck Expressway and 131st Street, to the south by Hillside Avenue, and to the west by Park Lane, Abingdon Road and 118th Street. Forest Park and the neighborhood of Forest Hills and Forest Hills Gardens lie west of the neighborhood. The neighborhood is accessible thanks to its surrounding expressways and the Union Turnpike-Kew Gardens subway station. The commute on the E or F train to Midtown Manhattan is about thirty minutes. Kew Gardens was one of seven planned garden communities built in Queens from the late 19th Century to 1950. Much of the area was acquired in 1868 by Englishman Albon P. Man, who developed the neighborhood of Hollis Hill to the south, chiefly along Jamaica Avenue, while leaving the hilly land to the north undeveloped. Maple Grove Cemetery on Kew Gardens Road opened in 1875. A Long Island Rail Road station was built for mourners in October and trains stopped there from mid-November. The station was named Hopedale, after Hopedale Hall, a hotel located at
    6.33
    3 votes
    138
    Little Italy

    Little Italy

    Little Italy is a neighborhood in lower Manhattan, New York City, once known for its large population of Italians. Today the neighborhood of Little Italy consists of Italian stores and restaurants. Little Italy on Mulberry Street, extends as far south as Canal Street, as far north as Bleecker, as far west as Lafayette and as far east as the Bowery. It borders Chinatown at Bowery. The Feast of San Gennaro originally was once only a one-day religious commemoration. It began in September, 1926 with the new arrival of immigrants from Naples. The Italian immigrants congregated along Mulberry Street in Manhattan's Little Italy to celebrate San Gennaro as the Patron Saint of Naples. The Feast of San Gennaro is a large street fair, lasting 11 days, that takes place every September along Mulberry Street between Houston and Canal Streets. The festival is an annual celebration of Italian culture and the Italian-American community. Much of the neighborhood has been absorbed and engulfed by Chinatown, as immigrants from China moved to the area. What was once Little Italy has essentially shrunk into a single street which serves as a restaurant area but which has few Italian residents. The
    6.33
    3 votes
    139
    Ravenswood

    Ravenswood

    Ravenswood is the name for the strip of land bordering the East River in Long Island City, in the New York City borough of Queens. The area is part of Queens Community Board 1. The land was acquired in 1814 by Col. George Gibbs, a businessman from New York City who developed it. Gibbs died in 1833, and the land was divided into nine parcels by three developers. From 1848, there were several mansions built on this land, but the high class housing did not survive. The spring of 1853 brought the opening of a post office of its own and country store "run by Messrs. Moore & Luyster, and Mr. Samuel H. Moore of that firm received the appointment of postmaster, handling the mails in a corner of the store." Ravenswood, unlike Astoria, Queens, never became a village; there was no disposition at any time to become independent as there was insufficient population or commercial activity to justify such a move. Ravenswood remained an exclusive hamlet within the Town of Newtown until its absorption with the Village of Astoria, and the hamlets of Hunters Point, Blissville, Sunnyside, Dutch Kills, Steinway, Bowery Bay and Middleton in Newtown Township into Long Island City in 1870. "Ravenswood
    6.33
    3 votes
    140
    Brownsville

    Brownsville

    Brownsville is a residential neighborhood located in eastern Brooklyn, New York City. The total land area is 2.19 square miles, and the ZIP code for the neighborhood is 11212. Brownsville is bordered by East New York Avenue to the north (on the Bedford-Stuyvesant border), East 98th Street to the west (East Flatbush) and the freight rail Bay Ridge Branch of the Long Island Rail Road to the south (adjacent to the neighborhood of Canarsie) and to the east (East New York). The area is patrolled by the 73rd Precinct located at 1470 East New York Avenue. New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) property in the area is patrolled by P.S.A. 2. It is part of Brooklyn Community Board 16. Brownsville is notable for having some of the highest rates of violent crime in New York City. In 2010, Brownsville's population was 116,579 and the demographics were 70.8% Non-Hispanic Black or African American, 19.1% Hispanic/Latino, 2.9% Non-Hispanic White, 1.8% Asian/Pacific Islander and 5.4% described themselves as other. 29.9% of the population were High School graduates and 8.4% had a Bachelor's degree or higher. As of 2008, the median household income was $15,978. There were a total of 28,298 housing
    8.00
    1 votes
    141
    Marble Hill

    Marble Hill

    Marble Hill is the neighborhood which makes up the northernmost part of the Borough of Manhattan in New York City, United States. Although it is politically part of Manhattan and New York County, because of the re-routing of the Harlem River, it is located on the North American mainland contiguous to The Bronx, not on Manhattan Island. Because of its geography, Marble Hill is often associated with the Bronx; for instance, it is part of two of the Bronx's Community Board Districts. Broadway is the area’s primary thoroughfare. The United States Census Bureau defines Marble Hill as Census Tract 309 of New York County. As of the 2010 census, it had a population of 8,463 on a land area of 0.3065 km² (0.1183 sq mi, 75.7 acres). After an increase in ship traffic in the 1890s, the Army Corps of Engineers determined that a canal was needed for a shipping route between the Hudson and Harlem rivers. In 1895, the construction of the Harlem River Ship Channel rendered Marble Hill an island bounded by the canal to the south and the original course of the Harlem River to the north. The Greater New York Charter of 1897 designated Marble Hill as part of the Borough of Manhattan. Effective January
    8.00
    1 votes
    142
    Morris Heights

    Morris Heights

    Morris Heights is a low income residential neighborhood located in the west Bronx. The neighborhood is part of Bronx Community Board 5. Its boundaries, starting from the north and moving clockwise are: West Burnside Avenue to the north, Jerome Avenue to the east, the Cross-Bronx Expressway to the south, and the Harlem River to the west. University Avenue is the primary thoroughfare through Morris Heights. The local subway is the IRT Jerome Avenue Line, operating along Jerome Avenue. ZIP codes include 10453 and 10452. The area is patrolled by the 46th Precinct located at 2120 Ryer Avenue in Fordham. New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) property in the area is patrolled by P.S.A. 7 at 737 Melrose Avenue in the Melrose section of the Bronx. Morris Heights has a population over 45,000. For decades Morris Heights has been one of the poorest communities in America. Over half the population lives below the poverty line and receives public assistance (TANF, Home Relief, Supplemental Security Income, and Medicaid). The vast majority of residents in the area are of Puerto Rican, Dominican, or African American descent. The vast majority of households are renter occupied. Morris Heights is
    8.00
    1 votes
    143
    Parkchester

    Parkchester

    Parkchester is a residential neighborhood geographically located in the south central Bronx, New York City. The neighborhood is part of Bronx Community Board 9. Its boundaries, starting from the north and moving clockwise are: East Tremont Avenue to the north, Castle Hill Avenue to the east, the Cross-Bronx Expressway-Westchester Avenue to the south (Westchester Avenue is the southern border east of Metropolitan Avenue), and the Bronx River Parkway to the west. White Plains Road is the primary thoroughfare through Parkchester. The local subway is the 6 line, operating along Westchester Avenue. The local ZIP code is 10462. The area is patrolled by the 43rd Precinct located at 900 Fteley Avenue in Soundview. New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) property in the area is patrolled by PSA 8 at 2794 Randall Avenue in Throgs Neck. The housing development has the same origins as Stuyvesant Town, Peter Cooper Village and Riverton Houses in Manhattan, all of which were originally developed and owned by the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company. The name was later unofficially applied to the entire neighborhood surrounding the apartment complex. The name "Parkchester" itself was derived from
    8.00
    1 votes
    144
    Silver Beach

    Silver Beach

    Silver Beach is a neighborhood in the Throggs Neck section of the new York City borough of the Bronx. Silver Beach is a predominantly Irish, German, and Italian neighborhood in the southeastern Bronx, lying on a bluff on the southern shore of Throggs Neck. The land was used as a lockout during the American Revolution. A farm in the area owned by the Stephenson family was sold in 1795 to Abijah Hammond, who built a large mansion (later the offices of the Silver Beach Garden Corporation). In the 1920s the Peters and Sorgenfrel families formed Silver Beach Garden (named for the color of the beach at low tide), a summer colony of bungalows that were later adapted for year-round usemost of the streets were named for flowers and trees found on the Hammond estate. Residents owned their houses but rented the land when they joined together to buy it. In the mid 1990s there were 350 small houses lying along narrow lanes. The landscape is a long breezy bluff about 50 to 60 ft above the water. There are two beaches below and along Indian Trail, the latter, a popular place to live that is right on the river. From the southern end of Indian trail, Ft Schuyler is visible at the tip of Throggs
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    1 votes
    145
    Times Square

    Times Square

    Times Square is a major commercial intersection in Midtown Manhattan, New York City, at the junction of Broadway and Seventh Avenue and stretching from West 42nd to West 47th Streets. Times Square – iconified as "The Crossroads of the World" and the "The Great White Way" – is the brightly illuminated hub of the Broadway theater district, one of the world's busiest pedestrian intersections, and a major center of the world's entertainment industry. According to Travel + Leisure magazine's October 2011 survey, Times Square is the world's most visited tourist attraction, bringing in over 39 million visitors annually. Formerly Longacre Square, Times Square was renamed in April 1904 after The New York Times moved its headquarters to the newly erected Times Building – now called One Times Square – site of the annual ball drop on New Year's Eve. The northern triangle of Times Square is technically Duffy Square, dedicated in 1937 to Chaplain Francis P. Duffy of New York City's "Fighting 69th" Infantry Regiment; a memorial to Duffy is located there, along with a statue of George M. Cohan, and the TKTS discount theatre tickets booth. The stepped red roof of the TKTS booth also provides
    8.00
    1 votes
    146
    Tottenville

    Tottenville

    Tottenville with an area of approximately 1.7 square miles (4.4 km), is the southernmost neighborhood of Staten Island, New York City and New York State. Originally named Bentley Manor by one of its first settlers, Captain Christopher Billop (1638–1726), after a small ship he owned named the Bentley, the district was renamed Tottenville in 1869, apparently in honor of the locally prominent Totten family, whose name can be seen on tombstones in one of the earliest churches, Bethel Methodist Church, on Amboy Road. The Raritan band of the Unami Indians, a branch of the Lenape or Delaware nation, were the original inhabitants of all Staten Island, including Tottenville. The largest pre-European burial ground known as Burial Ridge, is located in Conference House Park. During the colonial period and for a significant time thereafter, Tottenville was an important way-station for travelers between New York City (of which Staten Island did not formally become a part until 1898) and Philadelphia, as it was the site of a ferry that crossed the Arthur Kill to the Ferry Slip in Perth Amboy, New Jersey. This ferry became less important when the Outerbridge Crossing opened in 1928, but continued
    8.00
    1 votes
    147
    Bayside

    Bayside

    Bayside is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Queens. Bayside is an upper-middle-class neighborhood with many wealthy residents. When analyzing comparable detached homes throughout the United States, CNN Money ranked Bayside as one of the most expensive housing markets nationally. Despite its large housing stock of free-standing homes, it nationally ranks high to very high in population density. These homes give the neighborhood a similar feel to other Queens neighborhoods such as Douglaston and Little Neck. The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 11. Bayside's history dates back to 2000 B.C., when the Matinecock Native American tribe first settled there. In the late 17th century, the area was settled by English colonists. By the middle of the 18th century, early settlers left their homes in Flushing and developed a farming community, Bay Side. During the Revolutionary War, the Bayside-Little Neck area suffered from raids by whaleboatmen from the Connecticut shores. In the 19th century Bayside was still mostly farmland. Middle 20th century urban sprawl in New York City, with the help of more convenient and accessible transportation, led to its
    7.00
    2 votes
    148
    City Line

    City Line

    City Line is a sub-section of the East New York neighborhood in Brooklyn, New York City, bordering the neighborhoods of Cypress Hills to the north and Ozone Park, Queens to the east, and the Shore Parkway to the south. The neighborhood is named "City Line" for its location in the former City of Brooklyn near the border with Queens County before Brooklyn and parts of Queens County were consolidated into New York City in 1898. City Line is one of the most ethnically diverse neighborhoods in Brooklyn. Many Italians, Germans and Irish originally lived in the area, which today is home to immigrants from Bangladesh, the Dominican Republic, Guyana, and Puerto Rico. City Line is served by the New York City Subway with the A train and the C train of the IND lines. The main commercial district is located along Liberty Avenue. The neighborhood is served by Brooklyn Community Board 5. The Cypress Hills Houses contains 15 seven-story buildings with 1,442 apartments on a site between Linden Boulevard, Sutter Avenue, Euclid Avenue, and Fountain Avenue that is 29 acres (12 ha) in size. The housing complex was completed in 1955 and is run by the New York City Housing Authority. The East New York
    7.00
    2 votes
    149
    East Village

    East Village

    The East Village is a neighborhood in the borough of Manhattan in New York City, lying east of Greenwich Village, south of Gramercy and Stuyvesant Town, and north of the Lower East Side. Within the East Village are several smaller neighborhoods, including Alphabet City and the Bowery. The area was once generally considered to be part of the Lower East Side, but began to develop its own identity and culture in the late 1960s, when many artists, musicians, students and hippies began to move into the area, attracted by cheap rents and the base of Beatniks who had lived there since the 1950s. The neighborhood has become a center of the counterculture in New York, and is known as the birthplace and historical home of many artistic movements, including punk rock and the Nuyorican literary movement. It has also been the site of protests and riots. The East Village is still known for its diverse community, vibrant nightlife and artistic sensibility, although in recent decades gentrification has changed the character of the neighborhood somewhat. Definitions vary, but generally the East Village is considered to be the area east of Broadway and the Bowery to the East River, between 14th
    7.00
    2 votes
    150
    Ellis Island

    Ellis Island

    Ellis Island, in Upper New York Bay, was the gateway for millions of immigrants to the United States as the nation's busiest immigrant inspection station from 1892 until 1954. The island was greatly expanded with land reclamation between 1892 and 1934. Before that, the much smaller original island was the site of Fort Gibson and later a naval magazine. The island was made part of the Statue of Liberty National Monument in 1965, and has hosted a museum of immigration since 1990. A 1998 United States Supreme Court decision found most of the island to be part of New Jersey. The south side of the island, home to the Ellis Island Immigrant Hospital, is closed to the general public and the object of restoration efforts spearheaded by Save Ellis Island. Ellis Island is located in Jersey City, New Jersey and is situated in the Upper New York Bay east of Liberty State Park and north of Liberty Island. The island has a land area of 27.5 acres (11.1 ha), most of which was created through land reclamation. The original portion of the island is 3.3 acres (1.3 ha) and is an exclave of New York City, while reclaimed areas are part of Jersey City. The entire island has been owned and administered
    7.00
    2 votes
    151
    Gerritsen Beach

    Gerritsen Beach

    Gerritsen Beach is a small town/community in the New York City borough of Brooklyn, located near Marine Park and Sheepshead Bay. The area is served by Brooklyn Community Board 15. Gerritsen Beach lies on a peninsula in the southeastern part of Brooklyn, near Marine Park; it is bounded on the north by Avenue U, to the east by Gerritsen Avenue, to the south by the Plumb Beach Channel, and on the west by Shell Bank Creek and Knapp Street. It is bisected, from west to east, by the Gotham Avenue Canal. The area north of the canal, known as the "new section" by local residents, has traditional city streets lined with stores, brick houses, and wide sidewalks. The area south of the canal (the "old section") is a popular spot for party boats and chartered fishing boats to be berthed. The streets in Gerritsen Beach are in alphabetical order (that is, Aster, Bevy, Celeste, Dictum, etc.), and they are patrolled by officers of the New York Police Department's 61st Precinct. The neighborhood is named for Wolphert Gerretse, a Dutch settler, who, in the early seventeenth century, built a house and mill on Gerritsen Creek (which is now part of the nearby Marine Park neighborhood). The
    7.00
    2 votes
    152
    Hudson Heights

    Hudson Heights

    Hudson Heights is a neighborhood in Upper Manhattan, New York City in the United States. Hudson Heights is a sub-neighborhood of Washington Heights. Its name is the combination of its proximity to the Hudson River, and its geographical altitude, which includes the highest natural point in Manhattan. Hudson Heights is bounded by the Hudson River to the West, Broadway to the East, 173rd Street to the South, and Fort Tryon Park to the North. The name Hudson Heights, and the boundaries associated with the neighborhood, were first established by the Hudson Heights Owners Coalition, which was founded in 1993. Before European explorers and settlers, the Lenape Indians lived on the island they called Manhatta. Just to the north of Hudson Heights, in what is now Inwood Hill Park, the Lenape tribe exchanged the island for 60 Dutch Gilders in a deal with Peter Minuit in 1626. He named the island New Amsterdam. The area north of central Manhattan was called Niew Haarlem until the British gained control of the area during the Revolutionary War. They renamed the area Lancaster, and gave it a northern border near what is now 129th Street The ridge that overlooks the Hudson River was once
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    2 votes
    153
    Meatpacking District

    Meatpacking District

    The Meatpacking District is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan which runs roughly from West 14th Street south to Gansevoort Street, and from the Hudson River east to Hudson Street, although recently it is sometimes considered to have extended north to West 16th Street and east beyond Hudson Street. The earliest development of the area now known as the Meatpacking District came in the mid-19th century. Before that it was the location of Fort Gansevoort, and the upper extension of Greenwich Village, which had been a vacation spot until overtaken by the northward movement of New York City. The irregular street patterns in the area resulted from the clash of the Greenwich Village street system with that of the Commissioners' Plan of 1811, which sought to impose a regular grid on the undeveloped part of Manhattan island. Construction of residences in the neighborhood – primarily rowhouses and town houses, some of which were later converted into tenements – had began around 1840, primarily in the Greek Revival style which was prominent at the time. By mid-century, with Fort Gansevoort replaced by freight yards of the Hudson River Railroad, a neighborhood developed
    7.00
    2 votes
    154
    New Dorp

    New Dorp

    New Dorp – an anglicization of Nieuw Dorp, Dutch for New Village – is a neighborhood in Staten Island, one of the five boroughs of New York City, United States. The community lies near the foot of Todt Hill, with Grant City immediately to its north, Oakwood bordering to the south, and New Dorp Beach bordering on the east. Formerly one of the most important towns on the island before suburbanization, it was the center of much activity during the American Revolution. Despite surrounding development, the neighborhood has retained its distinct character as a town, and is one of the most thriving commercial centers on the Island. Like all of Staten Island, the area of New Dorp was populated by American Indians going back over 10,000 years. At the time of the arrival of the Europeans in the 17th Century, it was inhabited primary by the Raritans and other subgroups of the Lenape tribe. The first recorded European settlement of the area was in 1671. The English, after having taken over the New Netherland colony from the Dutch, expanded the previous Dutch settlements along the South Shore at Oude Dorp ("Old Village") which had been established ten years earlier. In the late 19th century, it
    7.00
    2 votes
    155
    Sheepshead Bay

    Sheepshead Bay

    Sheepshead Bay is a bay separating the mainland of Brooklyn, New York City from the eastern portion of Coney Island, the latter originally a barrier island but now effectively an extension of the mainland with peninsulas both east (the neighborhood of Manhattan Beach) and west (the neighborhoods of Coney Island and Sea Gate). Its mouth is about a mile (1.6 km) southwest of Marine Park, Brooklyn. The area is part of Brooklyn Community Board 15. The bay itself was originally the easterly entrance to Coney Island Creek, but filling of the central part of this waterway during the 1930s in conjunction with construction of the Shore Parkway portion of the Belt Parkway eliminated access to the creek. At the same time the bay was widened at its western end, deepened and bulkheaded. It is now the home of recreational fishing fleets. The fishing fleet has been shrinking every year and is being replaced by dinner boats. At the western end of the bay, there is Holocaust Memorial Park, which is used throughout the year for commemorative events. In the last decade of the 20th century, a real estate boom brought the reopening of the landmark Lundy Brothers seafood restaurant, which closed again
    7.00
    2 votes
    156
    Tenderloin

    Tenderloin

    The Tenderloin was an entertainment and red-light district in the heart of the New York City borough of Manhattan during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The area originally ran from 23rd Street to 42nd Street and from Fifth Avenue to Seventh Avenue, but by the turn of the century, it had expanded northward to 57th or 62nd Street and west to Eighth Avenue, encompassing parts of what is now the Flatiron District, NoMad, Chelsea, Clinton, the Garment District and the Theatre District. Police Captain Andrew S. "Clubber" Williams gave the area its name in 1876, when he was transferred to a police precinct in the heart of the district. Referring to the increased payoffs he would get for police protection of both legitimate and illegitimate businesses there, especially the many brothels, Williams said "I've been having chuck steak ever since I've been on the force, and now I'm going to have a bit of tenderloin." Early in the 19th century, the major vice district had been located in what is now SoHo, called at the time "Hells' Hundred Acres", but as the city grew steadily northward, the theatre district along Broadway and the Bowery moved uptown as well, as did the legitimate and
    7.00
    2 votes
    157
    Woodside

    Woodside

    Woodside is a neighborhood in the western portion of the New York City borough of Queens. It is bordered on the south by Maspeth, on the north by Astoria, on the west by Sunnyside and on the east by Elmhurst and Jackson Heights. Some areas are widely residential and very quiet, while others (especially closer to Roosevelt Avenue) are more urban. The neighborhood is located in Queens Community Board 1 and Queens Community Board 2. In the 19th century the area was part of the Town of Newtown (now Elmhurst). The adjacent area of Winfield was largely incorporated into the post office serving Woodside and as a consequence Winfield lost much of its identity distinct from Woodside. With large scale residential development in the 1860s, Woodside became the largest Irish American community in Queens. In the early 1930s, the area was approximately 80% Irish. Even as the neighborhood has seen growth in ethnic diversity today, the area still retains a strong Irish American presence. There are a number of Irish pubs and restaurants scattered across Woodside. In the early 1990s, many Asian American families moved into the area, particularly east of the 61st Street – Woodside. In 2000, Woodside's
    7.00
    2 votes
    158
    Gramercy

    Gramercy

    Gramercy Park is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan focused around Gramercy Park, a private park of the same name between East 20th and 21st Streets at the foot of Lexington Avenue. "Gramercy" is an Anglicization of "Crommessie", itself derived from the Dutch Krom Mesje, or "Little Crooked Knife," the name of a small brook, Crommessie Vly that flowed in a deep gully along what is now 21st Street into the East River at 18th Street. Gramercy Park's boundaries are roughly 14th Street to the south, First Avenue to the east, 23rd Street to the north, and Park Avenue South to the west. Recently, real estate agents and developers have expanded the use of the name to extend its northern boundary into the less prestigious Murray Hill section of Midtown at around 30th Street. To the west of Gramercy Park is the Flatiron District and Union Square, to the south the East Village, to the east are Stuyvesant Town and Peter Cooper Village, two large red-brick middle-class residential tower projects located between First Avenue and the FDR Drive, and to the northeast is Kips Bay. Gramercy Park is generally perceived to be a quiet area, safer than many other parts of the city.
    6.00
    3 votes
    159
    Tompkinsville

    Tompkinsville

    Tompkinsville is a neighborhood in northeastern Staten Island in New York City in the United States. Though the neighborhood sits on the island's eastern shore, along the waterfront facing Upper New York Bay — between St. George on the north and Stapleton on the south — it is reckoned as being part of the North Shore by the island's residents. Tompkinsville was the site where early explorers replenished their fresh water supplies and was known in colonial times as the "Watering Place". In 1815, a settlement was established in the neighborhood next to the existing quarantine station by Daniel D. Tompkins, who was elected Vice President the following year. In 1817 Tompkins built a dock at the foot of present-day Victory Boulevard and began offering steam ferry service to Manhattan. In the early 1900s, the telephone exchange that served Staten Island's eastern North Shore was named after the neighborhood; the name of this exchange became "Saint George" in the mid-1920s, and "SAint George 7" when New York Telephone upgraded telephone service throughout New York City in December 1930. Converted for All-Number Calling, the prefix "727" still exists on the island today, and is the sole
    6.00
    3 votes
    160
    Woodlawn

    Woodlawn

    Woodlawn (population 7,741) is a neighborhood at the very north end of the borough of the Bronx in New York City. Unlike some neighborhoods in New York, its boundaries are well-defined, as it is bounded by McLean Avenue to the north, which is approximately the New York City / Westchester County line, the Bronx River to the east, Woodlawn Cemetery to the south and Van Cortlandt Park to the west. Woodlawn is home to a large Irish-American community, and is also the site of the famous Woodlawn Cemetery. The neighborhood is part of Bronx Community Board 12. Katonah Avenue, which runs north-south through the heart of Woodlawn, is a popular destination for its many Irish pubs and restaurants, The Emerald Isle Immigration Center, an Italian bakery, an Irish Butcher Shop, an Irish Barber Shop, and many other types of specialty shops. McLean Avenue, which runs east-west, is the main shopping strip for the neighborhood. Its pubs and shops are considered to be some of the neighborhood's most notable fixtures, although technically it is not part of Woodlawn at all but within the City of Yonkers, New York. McLean Ave. has many Irish pubs, a large variety of Irish and non-Irish restaurants and
    5.00
    4 votes
    161
    Astoria

    Astoria

    Astoria is a neighborhood in the northwestern corner of the New York City borough of Queens. Located in Community Board 1, Astoria is bounded by the East River and is adjacent to three other Queens neighborhoods: Long Island City, Sunnyside (bordering at Northern Boulevard), and Woodside (bordering at 50th Street). Astoria is patrolled by the New York City Police Department's 114th Precinct. The area now known as Astoria was originally called Hallett's Cove, after its first landowner William Hallett, who settled there in 1659 with his wife Elizabeth Fones. Beginning in the early 19th century, affluent New Yorkers constructed large residences around 12th and 14th streets, an area that later became known as Astoria Village (now Old Astoria). Hallett's Cove, founded in 1839 by fur merchant Steven Halsey, was a noted recreational destination and resort for Manhattan's wealthy. The area was renamed after John Jacob Astor, then the wealthiest man in America, with a net worth of over $40 million, in order to persuade him to invest just $2,000 in the neighborhood. He only invested $500, but the name stayed nonetheless, as a bitter battle over naming the village was finally won by Astor's
    5.67
    3 votes
    162
    Blissvile

    Blissvile

    Blissville is a neighborhood within Long Island City, in the New York City borough of Queens. It is bordered by Calvary Cemetery to the east; the Long Island Expressway to the north; Newtown Creek to the south; and Dutch Kills, a tributary of Newtown Creek, to the west. Blissville was named after Neziah Bliss, who owned most of the land in the 1830s and 1840s. Bliss built the first version of what was known for many years as the Blissville Bridge, a drawbridge over Newtown Creek, connecting Greenpoint, Brooklyn and Blissville. It was replaced in the 20th century by the Greenpoint Avenue Bridge, also called the J. J. Byrne Memorial Bridge, located slightly upstream. Blissville existed as a small village until 1870 when it was incorporated with the villages of Astoria, Ravenswood, Hunters Point, Dutch Kills, Middletown, Sunnyside and Bowery Bay into Long Island City.
    5.67
    3 votes
    163
    Sunnyside Gardens

    Sunnyside Gardens

    Sunnyside Gardens is a community within Sunnyside, a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Queens. The area was one of the first developments to incorporate the "superblock" model in the United States. The complex was constructed from 1924 to 1929 by the New York City Housing Corporation, founded by developer Alexander Bing. The residential area has brick row houses of two and a half stories, with front and rear gardens and a landscaped central court shared by all. This model allowed for denser residential development, while also providing ample open/green-space amenities. Clarence Stein and Henry Wright served as the architects and planners for this development, and the landscape architect was Marjorie Sewell Cautley. These well-planned garden homes are listed as a historical district in the National Register of Historic Places, and are also home to one of two private parks in New York City, the other being Gramercy Park. The Sunnyside Gardens Historic District is a national historic district that includes 66 contributing buildings and 12 contributing sites. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984. In 2003, a grassroots movement started to request
    5.67
    3 votes
    164
    Bensonhurst

    Bensonhurst

    Bensonhurst is a neighborhood located in the southwestern part of the New York City borough of Brooklyn. Sometimes erroneously thought to include all or parts of such neighborhoods as Bath Beach, Dyker Heights, and Borough Park, or to be defined by the streets where the concentration of Italian residents is most dense, Bensonhurst actually has clearly defined borders, with Gravesend to the southeast, Midwood to the east, Borough Park to the north, Dyker Heights to the west, and Bath Beach to the southwest. Starting at the neighborhood's southern tip at the corner of Stillwell Avenue and 86th Street, the border runs north along Stillwell Avenue to Avenue P, east to McDonald Avenue, north to 60th Street, northwest to Fort Hamilton Parkway, southwest to Bay Ridge Avenue, southeast to 14th avenue, south to 86th Street, and southeast back to Stillwell Avenue. Bensonhurst is served by two branches of the New York City Subway system: the D elevated subway line, also called the BMT West End Line, at 62nd Street, 71st Street, 79th Street, 18th Avenue, 20th Avenue, Bay Parkway, and 25th Avenue Stations; and the N open-cut line, (also called the BMT Sea Beach Line), at Fort Hamilton Parkway,
    6.50
    2 votes
    165
    Cobble Hill

    Cobble Hill

    Cobble Hill is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Brooklyn, USA. Bordered by Atlantic Avenue on the north, Hicks Street to the west, Smith Street on the east and Degraw Street to the south, Cobble Hill sits adjacent to Boerum Hill and Brooklyn Heights with Carroll Gardens to the south. The Cobble Hill Historic District covers the majority of the neighborhood. This historic district does not include portions of the Cobble Hill neighborhood such as the part between Court Street and Smith Street. The neighborhood is part of Brooklyn Community Board 6. Its historic district, first designated on December 20, 1969 and extended on June 7, 1988, is roughly bordered by Atlantic Avenue to the north, Degraw Street to the South, Court Street to the east and Hicks Street (with the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway on the lower level) to the west. Its area measures approximately twenty-two city blocks. With the establishment of the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1965, charming and historically important neighborhoods like Cobble Hill got a chance to be safeguarded from developers, and stabilized property values and economic strength for property owners. According to the
    6.50
    2 votes
    166
    Concord

    Concord

    Concord is a neighborhood located in the Borough of Staten Island in New York City, New York, United States. Located in northeastern Staten Island, and bordered by the neighborhoods of Grasmere, Clifton, Dongan Hills, Emerson Hill, and Old Town, Concord was named Dutch Farms originally, but was renamed in 1845 after Concord, Massachusetts as a consequence of that town's historical significance. Early residents of Concord included Judge William Emerson (brother of Ralph Waldo Emerson and for whom nearby Emerson Hill is named) and Henry David Thoreau. In the early 19th Century, Concord had a significant German immigrant population that was dominant. Today, it is ethnically diverse Concord currently consists of one-family homes, small apartment buildings, and condominiums. The neighborhood’s center is traversed by some of the most heavily traveled roads on Staten Island, including Clove Road; Richmond Road; Targee Street; and the Staten Island Expressway. Much property in Concord was condemned to make way for the Staten Island Expressway in the early 1960s; one of its principal east-west thoroughfares, Price Street, is now a service road of the expressway and is known as Narrows Road
    6.50
    2 votes
    167
    Gowanus

    Gowanus

    Gowanus is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Brooklyn. The neighborhood is part of Brooklyn Community Board 6. The Gowanus area has been an active center of industrial and shipping activity since the 1860s. It is zoned for light to mid-level manufacturing (M1, M2, and M3). Recently, residential developers have been hindered by the industrial zoning and the problems of the sewage overflow through the canal water, but there have been rumors of rezoning by the New York City Department of City Planning. In 1636, Gowanus Bay was the site of the first settlement by Dutch farmers in what is now Brooklyn. The water and much of the land along the banks of the Gowanus Canal have been severely polluted from a combination of CSO's (combined sewer outflows) along the canal designed to relieve sewage and storm water when the sewer treatment plant is overwhelmed as well as from decades of industrial use and extensive coal gas manufacturing during the late 19th century. The Gowanus Canal was also an alleged Mafia dumping ground. The F, G, and R trains run through Gowanus. Bike routes cross the canal on the Union Street and 3rd Street bridges. The Carroll Street bridge is the oldest of
    6.50
    2 votes
    168
    Grant City

    Grant City

    Grant City is the name of a neighborhood located on the East Shore of Staten Island, New York, USA. The island comprises one of the five boroughs of New York City. Originally known as Frenchtown, the community was renamed in honor of Civil War General Ulysses S. Grant soon after the conflict began, despite the fact that the war itself was so unpopular on Staten Island that the island was the scene of anti-draft riots in July 1863. Many of the streets are named after historical figures such as Lincoln Ave (after President Abraham Lincoln), Fremont Ave (after General John C. Fremont who was the first Republican candidate for President, as well as a Staten Island resident, in 1856), Adams Avenue (after President John Adams), Colfax Ave (after Abraham Lincoln's first Vice President)and Greeley Ave (after newspaper editor Horace Greeley). Many other streets were originally named after historical figures but those streets have been renamed. The Grant City station on the Staten Island Railway serves the community, and the station immediately to the north is located at and named Jefferson Avenue, this street generally regarded as the boundary between Grant City and neighboring Dongan
    6.50
    2 votes
    169
    Flatlands

    Flatlands

    Flatlands is a neighborhood in the south east part of the New York City borough of Brooklyn. The area is part of Brooklyn Community Board 18. Originally inhabited by the Lenape Native Americans and settled in 1623 by French Waloons in an attempt to escape puritan oppression, Flatlands was given right to local rule in 1661 by Peter Stuyvesant as one of the five Dutch Towns on Long Island. Prior to British rule, Flatlands was known as Nieuw Amersfoort (named after the Dutch city of Amersfoort) and was established as a farming community when, in 1636, Andreas Hudde and Wolfert Gerritsen bought 15,000 acres of land centered around what is now the intersection of Kings Highway and Flatbush Avenue. Crops typically grown in the area were beans, corn, marsh hay, squash, potato bean and tobacco. Oysters and clams were also farmed and harvested from Jamaica Bay, surrounding marshes and basins. The amount of farming done in the area also made Niew Amersfoort a slave town by necessity until the state declared emancipation of all slaves in 1827, after which black laborers took up farming jobs, many times on the farms they worked on as slaves . Historic homes dated to the 18th century include
    4.75
    4 votes
    170
    Port Richmond

    Port Richmond

    Port Richmond is a neighborhood situated on the North Shore of Staten Island, one of the five boroughs of New York City, United States. It is along the waterfront of the Kill Van Kull, with the southern terminus of the Bayonne Bridge serving as the boundary between it and Mariners Harbor, the neighborhood which borders it on the west. Formerly an independent village, it is one of the oldest neighborhoods on the island. In the 19th century it was an important transportation and industrial center of the island, but this role has vanished nearly completely, leaving a largely blue collar residential area bypassed by the shift of development of the island to its interior after the 1960s. The formerly bustling commercial center along Richmond Avenue (now Port Richmond Avenue) had been largely abandoned at the time, But in recent years many small businesses have opened in the area with the commercial activity shifting inland to Forest Avenue (or leaving the neighborhood altogether and relocating to the Staten Island Mall when the latter opened in the summer of 1973). The first white European contact with Staten Island was recorded in 1524 by Giovanni da Verrazzano. In 1609 Henry Hudson
    4.75
    4 votes
    171
    Arden Heights

    Arden Heights

    Arden Heights is a name increasingly applied to the western part of Annadale, a neighborhood located on the South Shore of Staten Island, New York, USA. The name "Arden Heights" is found on most maps of New York City, including Hagstrom's. Erastus Wiman, a noted Staten Island real estate developer, coined the name "Arden Heights" in 1886; the neighborhood's name probably refers to the hill that currently looms above the Village Greens shopping center and housing development. (The moniker does not refer to the now-shuttered Fresh Kills Landfill, at the western end of Arden Avenue. The landfill did not exist until the mid-20th Century.) Long noted for being the site of St. Michael's Home For Children, a Roman Catholic orphanage, Arden Heights underwent a serious transformation when the aforementioned Village Greens, New York City's first planned urban development, opened there in 1971. Ground was broken for the project by Mayor John V. Lindsay, who in the late 1960s proudly announced that travel time from the Greens to Lower Manhattan would average one hour 15 minutes – just about the same when taking a bus in 2007. In 1982, the Saint Michael's orphanage, situated off Arthur Kill
    7.00
    1 votes
    172
    Battery Park City

    Battery Park City

    Battery Park City is a 92-acre (0.37 km) planned community at the southwestern tip of lower Manhattan in New York City, United States. The land upon which it stands was created by land reclamation on the Hudson River using 1.2 million cubic yards (917,000 m) of soil and rocks excavated during the construction of the World Trade Center and certain other construction projects, as well as from sand dredged from New York Harbor off Staten Island. The neighborhood, which is the site of the World Financial Center along with numerous housing, commercial and retail buildings, is named for adjacent Battery Park. Battery Park City is owned and managed by the Battery Park City Authority (BPCA), a public-benefit corporation created by New York State under the authority of the Urban Development Corporation. Excess revenue from the area was to be contributed to other housing efforts, typically low-income projects in the Bronx and Harlem. Under the 1989 agreement between the BPCA and the City of New York, $600 million was transferred by the BPCA to the city. Charles J. Urstadt, the first Chairman and CEO of the BPCA, noted in an August 19, 2007 op-ed piece in the New York Post that the aggregate
    7.00
    1 votes
    173
    Elmhurst

    Elmhurst

    Elmhurst is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Queens. It is bounded by Roosevelt Avenue (Jackson Heights) on the north; Corona to the northeast; Junction Boulevard on the east; Rego Park to the southeast; the Long Island Expressway on the south; Middle Village to the south and southwest; and Maspeth and the New York Connecting Railroad on the west; and Woodside on the northwest. The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 4. The village was established in 1652 by the Dutch as Middenburgh (Middleburgh), and was a suburb of New Amsterdam (Nieuw Amsterdam) in New Netherland (Nieuw Nederland). The original settlers of Elmhurst were from the nearby colony of Maspat (now called Maspeth), following threats and attacks by local Indians. When the British took over New Netherland in 1664, they renamed Middleburgh as New Town (Nieuwe Stad) to maintain the Dutch heritage. This was eventually simplified to Newtown. Among the English settlers in the present Elmhurst section of Newtown was Gershom Moore, in whose orchard a chance seedling produced the Newtown Pippin, Colonial America's most famous apple. Newtown was established as the Town Seat for the Township of the same
    7.00
    1 votes
    174
    Fieldston

    Fieldston

    Fieldston is a section of the Riverdale section of the Bronx, New York City. It is bounded by Manhattan College Parkway to the south, Henry Hudson Parkway to the west, 250th Street to the north and Broadway to the east. The area is home to two private schools: the Horace Mann School, and the Ethical Culture Fieldston School. The Riverdale Country School, the third of the three prestigious "Hill Schools" is just outside Fieldston to the north. Manhattan College is located on Manhattan College Parkway, the neighborhood's southern boundary. Fieldston is one of few areas in New York City to be completely privately owned. The streets and common areas are owned by the Fieldston Property Owners' Association, Inc. which plows the streets, does sewer repair, cares for the trees—of which there are about 1000, and runs a security patrol as well as other municipal functions. Annual dues are paid by the approximately 250 homeowners who make up the Association (who nevertheless have to pay the same real estate taxes as their neighbors) to maintain the area. Once-a-year the streets are closed to non-residents to maintain private ownership. Parking is restricted to residents and their guests. The
    7.00
    1 votes
    175
    Jackson Heights

    Jackson Heights

    Jackson Heights is a neighborhood in the northwestern portion of the New York City borough of Queens. The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 3. The main zip code of Jackson Heights is 11372. Jackson Heights is the location of the Roosevelt Avenue / 74th Street transportation hub, where the IRT Flushing Line (7 trains), the IND Queens Boulevard Line (E F M R trains), and numerous bus routes converge. A major renovation of this facility, completed in 2005 by the MTA, cost over $100 million. It includes one of the first green buildings by the MTA, the Victor A. Moore Bus Terminal, which is partially powered by solar panels built into the roof. These are located along the length of the sheds above the Flushing line platforms.It is the largest subway stop in Queens with six subway services and five bus lines (Q32, Q33, Q47, Q49 and Q53). The Q33 bus goes to LaGuardia Airport's main terminals and operates 24 hours a day. The Q47 bus goes to the Marine Air Terminal. The Q53 bus goes to Rockaway Beach, Queens. The community is bounded by Northern Boulevard to the north, the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway to the west, Roosevelt Avenue to the south, and Junction Boulevard to the
    7.00
    1 votes
    176
    Meiers Corners

    Meiers Corners

    Meiers Corners is a neighborhood on Staten Island, one of the five boroughs of New York City, USA. Meiers Corners is sometimes confused with the adjacent neighborhood of Westerleigh; however, Westerleigh is generally understood to mean the area immediately west of Castleton Corners that is also north of Victory Boulevard east of Jewett Avenue and Watchogue Road west of the latter, while Meiers Corners is west of the aforementioned community but south of that line. The name "Meiers Corners" is also applied to the commercial district where Watchogue Road, Jewett Avenue, Victory Boulevard and Bradley Avenue all meet — and was formerly the point where three different city bus routes terminated (and a fourth one passed by) until two of the three were combined and the third was extended to the St. George ferry terminal on a full-time basis in the early 1980s. The area is named for a prominent 18th-Century Dutch resident named Joachim Meier, who lived at the Martling-Cozine House — one of the oldest private homes still standing on Staten Island until it was demolished in 1981. The house stood near the corner of Watchogue Road and Bradley Avenue. South of Victory Boulevard, the altitude
    7.00
    1 votes
    177
    Douglaston

    Douglaston

    Douglaston, population 14,168 (2000 Census), is a community in the New York City borough of Queens. Douglaston comprises six distinct neighborhoods: Doug Bay, Douglas Manor, and Douglaston Hill, all located north of Northern Boulevard on the peninsula abutting Little Neck Bay; Douglaston Park, located between Northern Boulevard and the Long Island Expressway; and two areas south of the Expressway, Winchester Estates and an area simply known as Douglaston. The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 11 and New York City school district 26. Douglaston is located on the North Shore of Long Island, bordered to the east by Little Neck, and to the west by Bayside. Douglaston's two ZIP Codes are 11362 and 11363. Douglaston represents one of the least traditionally urban communities in New York City, with many areas (particularly those north of Northern Boulevard) having a distinctly upscale suburban feel, similar to that of wealthy Nassau County towns located nearby (such as Great Neck). The area is also known for its historical society and other civic groups, notably the Douglaston Civic Association and the Douglas Manor Association. The earliest known residents of the area that
    5.33
    3 votes
    178
    Howard Beach

    Howard Beach

    Howard Beach is a neighborhood in the southwestern portion of the New York City borough of Queens. It is bordered in the north by the Belt Parkway and South Conduit Avenue in Ozone Park, the south by Jamaica Bay in Broad Channel, the east by 102nd-104th streets, and the west by 78th Street. The areas houses are similar to Bayside and Hollis The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 10. and home to a large Italian population. The ZIP code of Howard Beach is 11414. Howard Beach was established in the 1890s by William J. Howard, a Brooklyn glove manufacturer who operated a 150 acre (0.61 km²) goat farm on meadow land near Aqueduct Racetrack as a source of skin for kids' gloves. In 1897, he bought more land and filled it in and the following year, built 18 cottages and opened a hotel near the water, which he operated until it was destroyed by fire in October 1907. He gradually bought more land and formed the Howard Estates Development Company in 1909. He dredged and filled the land until he was able to accumulate 500 acres (2 km²) by 1914. He laid out several streets, water mains and gas mains, and built 35 houses that were priced in the $2,500-$5,000 range. The Long Island
    5.33
    3 votes
    179
    Maspeth

    Maspeth

    Maspeth is a small community in the New York City borough of Queens. Neighborhoods sharing borders with Maspeth are Woodside and Sunnyside to the north, Long Island City to the northwest, Greenpoint, Brooklyn to the west, East Williamsburg, Brooklyn to the southwest, Fresh Pond and Ridgewood to the south, and Middle Village and Elmhurst to the east. The area known today as Maspeth was chartered by Dutch and English settlers in the mid-17th century. The Dutch had purchased land in the area known today as Queens in 1635, and within a few years began chartering towns. In 1642 they settled Maspat, under a charter granted to Rev. Francis Doughty. Maspat became the first European settlement in Queens. The settlement was leveled the following year in an attack by Native Indians, and the surviving settlers returned to Manhattan. It wasn't until nine years later, in 1652, that settlers ventured back to the area, settling an area slightly inland from the previous Maspat location. This new area was called Middleburg, and eventually developed into what is now the town of Elmhurst, bordering Maspeth. Following the immigration waves of the 19th century, Maspeth was home to a shanty town of
    5.33
    3 votes
    180
    Ocean Parkway

    Ocean Parkway

    Ocean Parkway is a broad boulevard in the west central portion of the borough of Brooklyn in New York City. Ocean Parkway extends over a distance of about five miles (8 km), running almost north to south from the vicinity of Prospect Park to Brighton Beach. The parkway runs roughly parallel to Coney Island Avenue, an important commercial avenue several blocks to the east. It consists of a central bidirectional avenue of seven lanes, the middle lane being for left turns or a painted median, two small parallel side streets, and two medians with trees, benches, and pedestrian paths. The west median also has a bike path, part of the Brooklyn-Queens Greenway. The parkway is designated New York State Route 908H, an unsigned reference route. Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux (who were also responsible for Central Park, Prospect Park, and Eastern Parkway) suggested Ocean Parkway to Brooklyn park commissioners in reports prepared during the 1860s. They drew up a plan for the parkway, inspired by boulevards in Berlin and Paris (such as the present Avenue Foch). In 1868 the land was acquired by the City of Brooklyn; work began in 1874 and was completed in 1880. The resulting parkway is
    5.33
    3 votes
    181
    Sutton Place

    Sutton Place

    Sutton Place is a street and surrounding neighborhood in the borough of Manhattan in New York City, New York. Sutton Place itself – one of the most affluent streets in the city – is the wide north/south avenue that runs only two blocks, from 57th Street to 59th Street, along the East River and south of the Queensboro Bridge. The stretch that continues below 57th Street down to 53rd Street is called Sutton Place South, while north of 59th Street, the street continues as York Avenue. The greater Sutton Place neighborhood is situated between the neighborhoods of Turtle Bay on the south and the Yorkville on the north, is bounded on the east by the East River, on the west by Second Avenue, and runs from 53rd Street to 59th Street. Sutton Square is the cul-de-sac at the end of East 58th Street, just east of Sutton Place; and Riverview Terrace is a row of townhouses on a short private driveway that runs north from Sutton Square. Sutton Place was originally one of several disconnected stretches of Avenue A, where space allowed, east of First Avenue. Effingham B. Sutton constructed a group of brownstones in 1875 between 57th and 58th Streets, and is said to have lent the street his name,
    5.33
    3 votes
    182
    Barren Island

    Barren Island

    Barren Island was originally an island east of the southern end of the New York City borough of Brooklyn, in Jamaica Bay. The area is separated from the Rockaway Peninsula in Queens by the Rockaway Inlet. It once maintained a somewhat diverse community for its time, supported mainly by a fish rendering plant and other industries related to offal products. The island housed a plant that rendered horse bones (supplied from the streets of New York City and elsewhere) into glue. This activity inspired the name Dead Horse Bay for the still extant water body on the western shore. Today it is connected to the Brooklyn mainland, owing to reclamation ground in 1926 that united a series of marsh islands (Barren Island being the largest) to create Floyd Bennett Field. All of what was once was Barren Island is now part of the Jamaica Bay Unit of Gateway National Recreation Area, managed by the National Park Service.
    6.00
    2 votes
    183
    Broadway

    Broadway

    Broadway is a road in the U.S. state of New York. Perhaps best known for the portion that runs through the borough of Manhattan in New York City, it actually runs 15 mi (24 km) through Manhattan and The Bronx, exiting north from the city to run an additional 18 mi (29 km) through the municipalities of Yonkers, Hastings-On-Hudson, Dobbs Ferry, Irvington, Tarrytown and terminating north of Sleepy Hollow in Westchester County. It is the oldest north–south main thoroughfare in New York City, dating to the first New Amsterdam settlement. The name Broadway is the English literal translation of the Dutch name, Breede weg. Broadway is known worldwide as the heart of the American theatre industry. Broadway was originally the Wickquasgeck Trail, carved into the brush destination of Manhattan by its Native American inhabitants. This trail originally snaked through swamps and rocks along the length of Manhattan Island. Upon the arrival of the Dutch, the trail soon became the main road through the island from Nieuw Amsterdam at the southern tip. The Dutch explorer and entrepreneur David de Vries gives the first mention of it in his journal for the year 1642 ("the Wickquasgeck Road over which
    6.00
    2 votes
    184
    Clinton Hill

    Clinton Hill

    Clinton Hill is a neighborhood in the north-central portion of the borough of Brooklyn in New York City. It is bordered by Boerum Hill, Bedford-Stuyvesant, Prospect Heights, Williamsburg, and Fort Greene. The neighborhood is served by the NYPD's 88th Precinct. 275 Park Avenue in Clinton Hill, a brick building that now houses "Body by Brooklyn," was once a chocolate factory that produced and distributed Tootsie Rolls throughout the United States. In 1996, real estate developer Alex Goldin purchased the chocolate factory and converted it into the first luxury loft apartment rentals in the area. By the 1840s, Clinton Hill, and its sister neighborhood Fort Greene had become fashionable neighborhoods for the wealthy of Brooklyn, who could commute to Manhattan by way of stagecoach to the Fulton Ferry in nearby Brooklyn Heights. By the 1880s and '90s, Clinton Avenue was lined with mansions of millionaires, many of which have survived to the present day. The most prominent of these are linked to Charles Pratt, who built a mansion for himself and one each as wedding presents for three of his four sons (pictured, right). These four mansions can be seen on Clinton Avenue between DeKalb and
    5.00
    3 votes
    185
    Forest Hills

    Forest Hills

    Forest Hills is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Queens. The neighborhood is disproportionately home to the upper-middle class, of whom the wealthiest often live in the Forest Hills Gardens section. Historically, Forest Hills has had many Jewish residents, with more than ten thousand still located in the area. Originally, the area was called Whitepot. The development of adjacent Forest Park, supposedly named to honor the regional Walloon Huguenot pioneer family named de Forest, began in 1895. In 1906, Brooklyn attorney Cord Meyer bought abutting land made up of six farms (those of Ascan Bakus, Casper Joost-Springsteen, Horatio N. Squire, Abram V.S. Lott, Sarah V. Bolmer and James van Siclen) and then renamed the aggregated 600 acres Forest Hills. In 1909, Margaret Olivia Slocum Sage, who founded the Russell Sage Foundation, bought 142 acres (0.57 km) of land from the Cord Meyer Development Company. The stated plan was to build good low-income housing and improve living conditions of the working poor, but the resulting huge property values made this claim totally impractical. Grosvenor Atterbury, a renowned architect, was given the commission to design Forest Hills
    5.00
    3 votes
    186
    Lower Manhattan

    Lower Manhattan

    Lower Manhattan is the southernmost part of the island of Manhattan, the main island and center of business and government of the City of New York. Lower Manhattan or "downtown" is defined most commonly as the area delineated on the north by 14th Street, on the west by the Hudson River, on the east by the East River, and on the south by New York Harbor (also known as Upper New York Bay). When referring specifically to the lower Manhattan business district and its immediate environs, the northern border is commonly designated by thoroughfares approximately a mile-and-a-half south of 14th Street and a mile north of the island's southern tip: Chambers Street from near the Hudson east to the Brooklyn Bridge entrances and overpass. Two other major arteries are also sometimes identified as the northern border of "lower" or "downtown Manhattan": Canal Street, roughly half a mile north of Chambers Street, and 23rd Street, roughly half a mile north of 14th Street. Anchored by Wall Street, in Lower Manhattan, New York City functions as the financial capital of the world and is home to the New York Stock Exchange, the world's largest stock exchange by market capitalization of its listed
    5.00
    3 votes
    187
    Midland Beach

    Midland Beach

    Midland Beach (formerly known as Woodland Beach) is a Staten Island neighborhood. It lies along the east-central coast of the island, in the area known locally as the "Mid-Island, Staten Island," or, according to some, the "East Shore." To its immediate west is Grant City, south lies New Dorp Beach with Graham Beach and South Beach bordering it on the north. The Miller Field border & Prescott Ave is the West border (formerly, a lane called Maplewood Terrace paralleled New Dorp Lane), Poultney Street/Laconia Ave to the North, the Lower New York Bay, to the South, & Seaview Ave to the East. Father Capodanno Boulevard and Midland Avenue are Midland Beach's two main arteries. During the late 19th and early 20th century, Midland Beach was a popular beach resort. In 1896, Midland Beach began attracting residents and tourists who came by trolley or excursion boats from Manhattan and Newark, NJ. Resorts, complete with hotels and amusement attractions, drew thousands daily. Besides its hotels and amusement park, it offered concerts, a fishing pier, vaudeville entertainment and gambling. However, all of this is no longer in existence except for the new Ocean Breeze Fishing Pier which opened
    5.00
    3 votes
    188
    Flatbush

    Flatbush

    Flatbush is a community in the New York City borough of Brooklyn, consisting of several neighborhoods. The name Flatbush is an Anglicization of the Dutch language Vlacke bos (vlacke = vlak = flat; "flat woodland" or "wooded plain"). The Flatbush Post Office is assigned postal zone (ZIP Code) 11226, but the area understood as included in Flatbush extends into other postal zones. The Flatbush community has been receiving an influx of immigrants from the Caribbean (West Indies), mostly from Haiti, Trinidad and Tobago, Jamaica, Grenada, Guyana, Barbados, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Dominica, Antigua and Barbuda, Saint Kitts and Nevis and Belize, since the 1980s, as well as immigrants from South Asia, primarily India, Pakistan and Bangladesh and African countries like Ghana, Zimbabwe, Nigeria, and Kenya. Haitians are the largest ethnic group in Flatbush. Prior to the arrival of these groups, the Flatbush community had already been diverse, with many Italians, African-Americans and Jews. Flatbush is patrolled by the NYPD's 67th and 70th Precincts. Flatbush was originally chartered as the Dutch Nieuw Nederland colony town of Midwout in 1651. Both names were used in the
    5.50
    2 votes
    189
    Gravesend

    Gravesend

    Gravesend is a neighborhood in the south-central section of the New York City borough of Brooklyn, USA. The derivation of the name is unclear. Some speculate that it was named after the English seaport of Gravesend, Kent. An alternative explanation suggests that it was named by Willem Kieft for the Dutch settlement of "'s- Gravesande", which means "Count's Beach" or "Count's Sand". There is also a town in the Netherlands called 's-Gravenzande. Gravesend was one of the original towns in the Dutch colony of New Netherland and became one of the six original towns of Kings County in colonial New York. It was the only English chartered town in what became Kings County and was designated the "Shire Town" when the English assumed control, as it was the only one where records could be kept in English. Courts were removed to Flatbush in 1685. The former name survives, and is now associated with a neighborhood in Brooklyn. Gravesend is notable for being founded by a woman, Lady Deborah Moody; a land patent was granted to the English settlers by Governor Willem Kieft, December 19, 1645. A prominent early settler was Anthony Janszoon van Salee. Gravesend Town encompassed 7,000 acres (28 km²)
    5.50
    2 votes
    190
    Kensington

    Kensington

    Kensington is a neighborhood in the center of the New York City borough of Brooklyn. It is the area south of Prospect Park and the Green-Wood Cemetery. It is bordered by Coney Island Avenue to the east, Fort Hamilton Parkway and Caton Avenue to the north, McDonald Avenue and 37th Street to the west, and Foster Avenue and 47th Street to the south. The neighborhoods that border it are Ditmas Park and Prospect Park South to the east (both of which are parts of Flatbush), Windsor Terrace to the north, Borough Park to the west, and Midwood to the south. Kensington is a predominantly residential area that consists of housing types that run the gamut from brick rowhouses to detached one-family Victorians to apartment buildings. Pre-war brick apartment buildings dominate the Ocean Parkway and Coney Island Avenue frontage, including many that operate as co-ops. The main commercial streets are Coney Island Avenue, Church Avenue, and Ditmas Avenue. Ocean Parkway bisects the neighborhood north-south. Kensington is served by the NYPD's 66th Precinct. Kensington is a very diverse neighborhood, containing Ukrainian, South Asian (Bangladeshi and Pakistani), Chinese, Orthodox Jewish, Hasidic,
    5.50
    2 votes
    191
    Lincoln Square

    Lincoln Square

    Lincoln Square is the name of both a square and the surrounding neighborhood within the Upper West Side of the New York City borough of Manhattan. Lincoln Square is centered around the intersection of Broadway and Columbus Avenue, between West 65th and West 66th streets The area is served by the 66th Street – Lincoln Center subway station (1 2 trains) and is anchored by Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts. Tourist information, sidewalk trash removal, and security patrol services are provided by the Lincoln Square BID. The reason for naming the area "Lincoln Square" is unknown. West of Columbus Avenue and Broadway, the area shares much of the same gritty past (as depicted in West Side Story) as Hell's Kitchen, to the south. The development of Lincoln Center, and more recently Trump Place and other upscale high-rise apartment buildings have brought a measure of gentrification to the western end of Lincoln Square.
    5.50
    2 votes
    192
    NoHo

    NoHo

    NoHo, for North of Houston Street (as contrasted with SoHo, South of Houston) is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan, roughly bounded by Houston Street on the south, The Bowery on the east, Astor Place on the north, and Broadway on the west. NoHo is wedged between Greenwich Village, west of Broadway, and the East Village. NoHo is primarily made up of loft apartments, which in turn makes it one of the most expensive and desirable neighborhoods in Manhattan. Its small size and central location also contributes to a high demand, again keeping prices high. When Lafayette Street was opened in the 1820s, it was one of the most fashionable streets in New York: the only survivor of that era is half of the original Colonnade Row, 1833, perhaps designed by Alexander Jackson Davis for speculative builder Seth Geer. Across from it is The Public Theater. When it was a light manufacturing and warehouse district, Robert Mapplethorpe's loft was in NoHo. From the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission designation report: The NoHo Historic District, which comprises approximately 125 buildings, represents the period of New York City's commercial history from the early
    5.50
    2 votes
    193
    Port Morris

    Port Morris

    Port Morris is a neighborhood in the southwest Bronx, New York City. It is a heavily industrial neighborhood. Its boundaries are the Major Deegan Expressway and Bruckner Expressway to the north, East 149th Street to the east, the East River to the southeast, the Bronx Kill south, and the Harlem River to the west. Bruckner Blvd, which runs under the Expressway, is the primary thoroughfare through Port Morris. Most of the neighborhood is within walking distance from the IRT #6 train's stops at Cypress Avenue and E. 149th St. Zip codes include 10454. The neighborhood is served by the NYPD's 40th Precinct. Though almost entirely industrial, Port Morris does contain two small residential pockets where about 1,500 people live. Most live in poverty. Over half the population receives public assistance (AFDC, Home Relief, Supplemental Security Income, and Medicaid). The vast majority of residents in the area are of Puerto Rican descent. There is some evidence that a British paymaster ship went down off its coast, during the Revolutionary war with millions of dollars in gold aboard. No recovery was ever made. The name comes from a deep water port established along the neighborhood's East
    5.50
    2 votes
    194
    West Farms

    West Farms

    West Farms is a residential neighborhood in a west central part of The Bronx, New York City, also known as the northeast corner of the South Bronx. The neighborhood is part of Bronx Community Board 6. Its boundaries, starting from the north and moving clockwise are: Bronx Park to the north, the Bronx River Parkway to the east, the Cross-Bronx Expressway to the south, and Crotona Avenue to the west. East Tremont Avenue is the primary thoroughfare through West Farms. The local subway is the IRT White Plains Road Line (2 5) at West Farms Square–East Tremont Avenue (IRT White Plains Road Line), operating along Boston Road and E 180 St (IRT White Plains Road Line) on Morris Park Avenue. Zip codes include 10460. The area is patrolled by the 48th Precinct located at 450 Cross Bronx Expressway in East Tremont. NYCHA property in the area is patrolled by P.S.A. 8 at 2794 Randall Avenue in the Throggs Neck section of the Bronx. West Farms was separated from the town of Westchester, New York, by an act of the legislature in 1846, formed from the settlements of West Farms, Morrisania, and Fordham, which survive as recognizable neighborhoods of The Bronx to this day. The patent of the "West
    5.50
    2 votes
    195
    Whitestone

    Whitestone

    Whitestone is a residential neighborhood in the northernmost part of the New York City borough of Queens. Located between the East River to the north and 25th Avenue to the south. Whitestone is surrounded by College Point, Flushing, Bayside, Auburndale, Linden Hill, and Murray Hill. Dutch settlers derived the name of the town from limestone that used to lie on the shore of the river according to a popular tradition. This tradition is supported by 17th century wills and deeds, which may be found in The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, that refer to "the white stone" as a local landmark and survey reference point. Whitestone got its name because the settlers discovered that Whitestone was built on white limestone. The neighborhood is patrolled by the NYPD's 109th Precinct, and part of Queens Community Board 7. It is traditionally bounded by the Bronx-Whitestone Bridge (opened 1939) on the west and the Throgs Neck Bridge (opened 1961) on the east. The zip code of Whitestone is 11357. The area was, in large part, the estate of Francis Lewis, a delegate to the Continental Congress and a signer of the Declaration of Independence. The estate was the site of an English raid
    5.50
    2 votes
    196
    Boerum Hill

    Boerum Hill

    Boerum Hill is a small neighborhood in the northwestern portion of the New York City borough of Brooklyn that occupies 36 blocks bounded by Schermerhorn Street to the north, 4th Avenue to the east, Court Street to the west, and Warren Street to the south. Commercial strips line Smith Street and Atlantic Avenue. The neighborhood is part of Brooklyn Community District 2, served by Brooklyn Community Board 2. The Brooklyn High School of the Arts is located in the neighborhood on Dean Street and 3rd Avenue. The neighborhood is served by the NYPD's 84th Precinct. Boerum Hill is named for the colonial farm of the Dutch Boerum family, which occupied most of the area during early European-American settlement. Most of the housing consists of three-story row houses built between 1840 and 1870. In the early twentieth century, many of the buildings were run as boarding houses. Nearby was the union hall for ironworkers, who came to the city to work on bridges and skyscrapers. The population today is middle and upper-middle class. Despite the "hill" in the name, this area, formerly "North Gowanus" and built on landfill in the former Gowanus Swamp, is of lower elevation than most nearby land. In
    4.67
    3 votes
    197
    Elm Park

    Elm Park

    Elm Park is the name of a small park in the Port Richmond section of Staten Island, one of the five boroughs of New York City, USA. The park is located across Innis Street from Port Richmond High School. The name "Elm Park" is also — and perhaps more commonly — used to denote the area from its namesake westward for several blocks, lending its name to the former Elm Park Station on the North Shore Branch of the Staten Island Railway. The station was situated directly beneath Morningstar Road. Passenger service on this branch of the railway was halted in 1953; a dilapidated remnant of the station's platform still exists, but the stairways leading to the street have been removed. At various times, the neighborhood was known as Jacksonville (circa 1830) and Lowville (circa 1850). Its present name was given to it by a local physician, Dr. John T. Harrison, and refers to the elm trees that could be found on the doctor's estate. In the early 20th Century a large number of Polish-American families settled in Elm Park, and they still constitute a percentage of its population; many of these families are parishioners of St. Adalbert's Church, a Roman Catholic church located in the community,
    6.00
    1 votes
    198
    Co-op City

    Co-op City

    Co-op City (Cooperative City), located in the Baychester section of the borough of the Bronx in northeast New York City, is one of the largest cooperative housing developments in the world. Situated at the intersection of Interstate 95 and the Hutchinson River Parkway, the community is part of Bronx Community Board 10. If it were a distinct municipality, it would be the 10th largest "city" in New York State. Nearby attractions include Pelham Bay Park, Orchard Beach and City Island. The community's Zip code is 10475. Originally a swamp, the site was formerly the home of a 205-acre amusement park named Freedomland that operated from July 1960 to September 1964. Construction on Co-op City began in May 1966. Residents began moving in during December 1968, and construction was completed in 1973. Its 15,372 residential units, in 35 high rise buildings and seven clusters of townhouses, make it the largest single residential development in the United States. It sits on 320 acres (1.3 km) but only 20% of the land was developed, leaving many green spaces. The apartment buildings, referred to by number, range from 24 floors to as high as 33. There are four types of buildings; Triple Core,
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    199
    Fort Greene

    Fort Greene

    Fort Greene is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Brooklyn. Part of Brooklyn Community Board 2, Fort Greene is listed on the New York State Registry and on the National Register of Historic Places, and is a New York City-designated Historic District. It is located in northwest Brooklyn, above Prospect Park. The neighborhood is named after an American Revolutionary War era fort that was built in 1776 under the supervision of General Nathanael Greene of Rhode Island. General Greene aided General George Washington during the Battle of Long Island in 1776. Fort Greene Park, originally called Washington Park and Brooklyn's first, is also derived from General Greene's name and the neighborhood. In 1864, Fort Greene Park was redesigned by Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux. The park notably includes the Prison Ship Martyrs' Monument and crypt, which honors some 11,500 patriots who died aboard British prison ships during the American Revolution. Fort Greene contains many examples of mid-19th century Italianate and Eastlake architecture, most of which is well preserved. It is known for its many tree-lined streets and elegant low-rise housing. Fort Greene is also home to the
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    200
    Yorkville

    Yorkville

    Yorkville is a neighborhood in the greater Upper East Side, in the Borough of Manhattan in New York City. Yorkville's boundaries include: the East River on the east, 96th Street (where East Harlem begins) on the north, Third Avenue on the west and 72nd Street to the south. However, its southern boundary is a subject of debate. Some sources and natives consider 59th Street (the southern boundary of the greater Upper East Side, bounded by Central Park and the East River) to be the southern boundary, while others consider it being 86th Street. What is certain is that Yorkville's boundaries have changed over time. Its western half was referred to as "Irishtown." The neighborhood's main artery, East 86th Street, was sometimes called the "German Broadway." Yorkville is part of Manhattan Community Board 8. For much of the 19th and 20th centuries, Yorkville was a middle- to working-class neighborhood, inhabited by many people of Czech, German, Hungarian, Irish, Jewish, Lebanese, Polish, and Slovak descent. While most of the neighborhood's ethnic establishments have closed, a number remain. Many of the area's long-time residents still live in Yorkville. Many of Yorkville's original German
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    201
    Bowery

    Bowery

    Bowery ( /ˈbaʊ.əri/ or local /ˈbaʊ.ri/), commonly called "the Bowery", is a street and a small neighborhood in the southern portion of the New York City borough of Manhattan. The neighborhood's boundaries are East 4th Street and the East Village to the north, Canal Street and Chinatown to the South, Allen Street and the Lower East Side to the east and Little Italy to the west. Bowery is an anglicisation of the Dutch bouwerij, derived from an antiquated Dutch word for "farm." In the 17th century the road branched off Broadway north of Fort Amsterdam at the tip of Manhattan to the homestead of Peter Stuyvesant, Director-General of New Netherland. As a street, the Bowery was known as Bowery Lane prior to 1807. Today it runs from Chatham Square in the south to Cooper Square at 4th Street in the north. After Cooper Square, the street runs north as Third Avenue and to the northwest as Fourth Avenue. Major streets that intersect the Bowery include Canal Street, Delancey Street, Houston Street, and Bleecker Street. A New York City Subway station named Bowery on the BMT Nassau Street Line (J and Z services) is located at the Bowery's intersection with Delancey Street. The Bowery is the
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    202
    Brooklyn Navy Yard

    Brooklyn Navy Yard

    The United States Navy Yard, New York, also known as the Brooklyn Navy Yard and the New York Naval Shipyard (NYNSY), is a shipyard located in Brooklyn, New York, 1.7 miles (2.7 km) northeast of the Battery on the East River in Wallabout Basin, a semicircular bend of the river across from Corlear's Hook in Manhattan. It was bounded by Navy Street, Flushing and Kent Avenues, and at the height of its production of warships for the United States Navy, it covered over 200 acres (0.81 km). Following the American Revolution, the waterfront site was used to build merchant vessels. Federal authorities purchased the old docks and 40 acres (160,000 m) of land for forty thousand dollars in 1801, and the property became an active U.S. Navy shipyard five years later, in 1806. The offices, store-houses and barracks were constructed of handmade bricks, and the yard's oldest structure (located in Vinegar Hill), the 1807 federal style commandant's house, was designed by Charles Bulfinch, architect of the United States Capitol in Washington, D.C.. Many officers were housed in Admiral's Row. Military chain of command was strictly observed. During the yard's construction of Robert Fulton's steam
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    203
    East Elmhurst

    East Elmhurst

    East Elmhurst is a culturally diverse area in the northwest section of the New York City borough of Queens. It is located north of Jackson Heights and Corona and is bounded on the east and north by Flushing Bay. Residents are mostly moderate-income families, but there are also low-income areas. It includes Trainsmeadow, which is its western section. It is patrolled by the New York Police Department's 115th Precinct. The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 3. The zip codes of East Elmhurst are 11369 and 11370. East Elmhurst and its southern neighbor Corona are often referred to jointly as “Corona/East Elmhurst”. During the ‘50’s and '60's the area was home to legendary African American musicians, civil rights leaders, professionals and athletes including Malcolm X, Dizzy Gillespie, Nat Adderley, Louis Armstrong, Jimmy Heath, Frankie Lymon, Charlie Shavers, Ella Fitzgerald, and Willie Mays. During the late 60' and early 70's numerous New York Mets such as Ed Charles and Tommie Agee called East Elmhurst home. The Corona East Elmhurst News, first published in 1959 by Kenneth and Corien Drew was located on Astoria Boulevard. It ultimately became the Queens Voice and was
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    204
    Ridgewood

    Ridgewood

    Ridgewood is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Queens. It borders the neighborhoods of Maspeth, Middle Village and Glendale, as well as the Brooklyn neighborhoods of Bushwick and East Williamsburg. Historically, the neighborhood straddled the Queens-Brooklyn boundary. The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 5. Originally, Ridgewood was part of the Dutch settlement Boswijk (Bushwick) and was later incorporated into the village of Breuckelen (Brooklyn). A legacy of this past stands today; Onderdonk House, which was erected in 1709. The house is the oldest Dutch Colonial stone house in New York City. Also located at the Onderdonk House site is Arbitration Rock, which was a marker for the disputed boundary between Bushwick and Newtown and essentially Brooklyn and Queens. Although the area was originally farmed and settled by the Dutch during the 18th and 19th centuries, it was the secondary wave of English settlers who named it Ridgewood after the area's green and hilly terrain. The development of public transportation, from horse-drawn cars in the mid-19th century and later trolleys and elevated trains, helped to spur residential and retail development. Most of
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    205
    Spanish Harlem

    Spanish Harlem

    East Harlem, also known as Spanish Harlem and El Barrio, is a section of Harlem located in the northeastern extremity of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. East Harlem is one of the largest predominantly Latino communities in New York City, mostly made up of Puerto Ricans, as well as a rising number of Dominican and Mexican immigrants. It includes the area formerly known as Italian Harlem, in which the remnants of a once predominantly Italian community remain. East Harlem has the highest violent crime rate in Manhattan. The area is patrolled by both the 23rd Precinct and the 25th Precinct of New York City. The neighborhood suffers from many social issues, such as the highest jobless rate in New York City, teenage pregnancy, AIDS, drug abuse, homelessness, and an asthma rate 5 times the national average. It has the second highest concentration of public housing in the United States, closely following Brownsville, Brooklyn. The neighborhood, all of which lies within Manhattan Community District 11, is bounded by East 142nd Street along the Harlem River to the north, the East River to the east, East 96th Street to the south, and Fifth Avenue to the west. El Barrio is notable
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    Upper East Side

    Upper East Side

    The Upper East Side is a neighborhood in the borough of Manhattan in New York City, between Central Park and the East River. The Upper East Side lies within an area bounded by 59th Street to 96th Street, and the East River to Fifth Avenue-Central Park. The ZIP codes included in this neighborhood are 10021, 10022, 10028, 10075, 10128, 10029 and 10065. Once known as the 'Silk Stocking District', it retains its position as one of the most affluent neighborhoods of New York City. Before the arrival of Europeans, the mouths of streams that eroded gullies in the East River bluffs are conjectured to have been the sites of fishing camps used by the Lenape, whose controlled burns once a generation or so kept the dense canopy of oak-hickory forest open at ground level. In the 19th century the farmland and market garden district of what was to be the Upper East Side was still traversed by the Boston Post Road and, from 1837, the New York and Harlem Railroad, which brought straggling commercial development around its one station in the neighborhood, at 86th Street, which became the heart of German Yorkville. The area was defined by the attractions of the bluff overlooking the East River, which
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    Bay Terrace

    Bay Terrace

    Bay Terrace is an affluent neighborhood in the northeastern section of the New York City borough of Queens. It is often considered part of the larger area of Bayside. The construction of the Bay Terrace Cooperative apartment buildings and garden apartments in the 1950s, as well as the development of the Bay Terrace Shopping Center, lent the area its own identity. The area encompasses gated cooperative/condominium developments such as the Bay Club, the Towers at Waters Edge, the Kennedy Street Quad, the Bayside Townhouse Condominiums and others. The gated estate community of the "Bayside Gables" is also located within the Bay Terrace neighborhood, being the site of some of the only single family homes in the area. Bay Terrace overlooks the East River and the approaches to the Throgs Neck Bridge from the Clearview Expressway and Cross Island Parkway. The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 7, and is located within ZIP Code 11360, bounded on the west by the Clearview Expressway, on the south by 26th Avenue and 28th Avenue, and to the east and north by the Little Neck Bay and Little Bay, Queens (which is a cove of the East River), respectively. The civic organization serving
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    208
    College Point

    College Point

    College Point is a working-middle-class neighborhood in the New York City borough of Queens. It is located north of Flushing on Flushing Bay and the East River and is part of the Queens Community Board 7. Willets Point Boulevard and the Whitestone Expressway are often the neighborhood's approximate boundaries with Flushing and Whitestone. The 109th precinct NYPD serves College Point. College Point is a diverse community, mostly residential with some industrial areas. College Point was named for St. Paul's College, a seminary founded in 1835 by the Rev. William Augustus Muhlenberg. The college closed around 1850. Former names include Lawrence's Neck, Tew's Neck, Flammersberg, and Strattonsport. The original European settler of this area was Captain William Lawrence. He was also the largest land holder of the original incorporators of the Town of Flushing, now in Queens. He arrived in America on the ship Planter in the 1630s. He married the oldest daughter of Richard "Bull Rider" Smith who founded Smithtown L.I. With his first wife he had a son, William Jr., who married the Smiths' youngest daughter. In 1854 the German-American industrialist, Conrad Poppenhusen arrived, already a
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    209
    Forest Hills Gardens

    Forest Hills Gardens

    Forest Hills Gardens is a planned community located in Forest Hills, in the New York City borough of Queens. Its streets are privately owned but open to traffic. The northern border runs along the Long Island Rail Road tracks, the eastern along Union Turnpike, and the remaining borders form an irregular line from the stadium at the West Side Tennis Club to near the intersection of Union Turnpike and Kessel Street. The area consists of a 142-acre (0.57 km) development, fashioned after a traditional English village, that is one of America's oldest planned communities and the most prominent American example of Ebenezer Howard's Garden city movement. The community, founded in 1908, consists of about 800 homes, townhouses, and apartment buildings, mostly in Tudor, Brick Tudor or Georgian style, in a parklike setting designed by Frederick Law Olmsted, Jr., son of noted landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted and partner in the Olmsted Brothers firm. Designed with transportation access in mind, the community's central square is adjacent to the Forest Hills Long Island Rail Road station. The largest apartment buildings stand closest to the station, while more distant buildings are
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    210
    Glen Oaks

    Glen Oaks

    Glen Oaks is a neighborhood in the easternmost portion of the New York City Borough of Queens. The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 13. Glen Oaks lies between Grand Central Parkway to the north, Union Turnpike to the south, the Queens/Nassau county border (Lakeville Road) to the east, and the Cross Island Parkway to the west. In this area, the Queens/Nassau border separates New York City from the Village of Lake Success. The Queens/Nassau border is referred to locally as "the city line" and is so designated on New York City buses. Union Turnpike is the main commercial road in the area. The northern edge of Glen Oaks is a line of hills which are part of the terminal moraine of the last glacial period. These hills include the highest point in Queens: 258.2 feet (78.7 m) above sea level. The southern part of Glen Oaks is a glacial outwash plain. The postal ZIP code zones for this area do not follow political boundaries, even crossing the city line. The easternmost part of the neighborhood is in the 11040 zip code, addressed as New Hyde Park. The northernmost part of the neighborhood—the North Shore Towers complex—is in the 11005 zip code, addressed as Floral Park. The
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    211
    Highbridge

    Highbridge

    Highbridge is a residential neighborhood geographically located in the Southwestern section of The Bronx, New York City. The neighborhood is part of Bronx Community Board 4. Its boundaries, starting from the north and moving clockwise are: the Cross-Bronx Expressway to the north, Jerome Avenue to the east, East 161st Street to the south, and the Harlem River to the west. Ogden Avenue is the primary thoroughfare through Highbridge. The local subway is the 4 line; operating along Jerome Avenue. ZIP codes include 10452. The area is patrolled by the 44th Precinct located at 2 E 169th Street in Concourse. NYCHA property in the area is patrolled by P.S.A. 7 at 737 Melrose Avenue in the Melrose section of the Bronx. Highbridge has a population under 35,000. For decades Highbridge has been one of the poorest communities in America. Over half the population lives below the poverty line and receives public assistance (AFDC, Home Relief, Supplemental Security Income, and Medicaid). The majority of residents in the area are of Puerto Rican, or African American descent. A small but growing Dominican community exists in this area. The vast majority of households are renter occupied. Highbridge
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    212
    Lower East Side

    Lower East Side

    The Lower East Side, (often abbreviated as LES), is a neighborhood in the southeastern part of the New York City borough of Manhattan. It is roughly bounded by Allen Street, East Houston Street, Essex Street, Canal Street, Eldridge Street, East Broadway, and Grand Street. It was traditionally an immigrant, working-class neighborhood. But it has undergone rapid gentrification starting in the mid-2000s, prompting The National Trust for Historic Preservation to place the neighborhood on their list of America's Most Endangered Places. It has become a home to upscale boutiques and trendy dining establishments along Clinton Street's restaurant row. The Lower East Side is bordered in the south and west by Chinatown (which extends north to roughly Grand Street), in the west by NoLIta and in the north by East Village. Politically it is located in New York's 8th, 12th and 14th congressional districts, the New York State Assembly's 64th district, the New York State Senate's 25th district, and New York City Council's 1st and 2nd district. Originally, the "Lower East Side" referred to the area alongside the East River from about the Manhattan Bridge and Canal Street up to 14th Street, and
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    St. George

    St. George

    St. George is a neighborhood on the northeastern tip of Staten Island in New York City, where the Kill Van Kull enters Upper New York Bay. It is the most densely developed neighborhood on Staten Island, and the location of the administrative center for the borough and for the coterminous Richmond County. The Staten Island terminal of the Staten Island Ferry is located here, as well as the northern terminus of the Staten Island Railway. St. George is bordered on the south by the neighborhood of Tompkinsville and on the west by the neighborhood of New Brighton. Fort Hill , one of the hills overlooking the harbor, was the location on Duxbury's Point or Ducksberry Point fortified by the British during the American Revolutionary War. The area was primarily rural through the early 19th century. The name was derived not from the dragon-slaying saint, but from George Law, a developer who acquired rights to the waterfront at bargain prices. According to island historians Charles Leng and William T. Davis, it was only after another prominent businessman, Erastus Wiman, promised to "canonize" him in the town's name that Law agreed to relinquish the land rights for a ferry terminal. In the
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    214
    Mott Haven

    Mott Haven

    Mott Haven is a primarily residential neighborhood in the Southwestern section of The Bronx in New York City. Zip codes include 10451, 10454, and 10455. The neighborhood is part of Bronx Community Board 1. Its boundaries, starting from the north and moving clockwise are: East 149th Street to the north, the Bruckner Expressway to the east, the Bronx Kill waterway to the south, and the Harlem River to the west. East 138th Street is the primary east-west thoroughfare through Mott Haven. The local subway is the IRT Pelham Line (6 trains), operating along East 138th Street. The local buses are the Bx1, Bx2, Bx15, Bx17, Bx21, Bx32, Bx33. Mott Haven is served by the Triborough Bridge, the Third Avenue Bridge, the Madison Avenue Bridge and the Willis Avenue Bridge. The closest Metro-North Railroad stops are Yankees – East 153rd Street and Harlem – 125th Street. Mott Haven is a high density neighborhood with a population roughly 50,000 within a square mile. The neighborhood consists primarily of Latin Americans, predominantly Puerto Ricans. Like most neighborhoods in New York City, the vast majority of households are renter occupied. However, there is significant income diversity on a
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    215
    Allerton

    Allerton

    Allerton is a working-class neighborhood geographically located in the east Bronx borough of New York City in the United States. It is named in honor of Isaac Allerton, a passenger on the Mayflower, who is listed at the memorial at Plymouth Rock. It consists of both the Bronxwood and Laconia neighborhoods. The neighborhood is part of Bronx Community Board 11. Its boundaries, starting from the north and moving clockwise, are: East Gun Hill Road to the north, IRT Dyre Avenue Line to the east, Pelham Parkway south, and Bronx River Parkway to the west. White Plains Road is the primary thoroughfare through Allerton. The local subway is the IRT White Plains Road Line. ZIP codes include 10467. The area is patrolled by the 49th Precinct located at 2121 Eastchester Avenue in the Morris Park section of the Bronx. Allerton Avenue was ethnically divided in the 1950s through the 1980s by a distinct separation of Jewish and Italian residents. Primarily a commercial avenue west of Laconia Avenue, the geographic boundary between the Jewish and Italians was Bronxwood Avenue and Boston Post Road. Bordering the largely Jewish Pelham Parkway to the southern extreme of Williamsbridge, the area east of
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    216
    Diamond District

    Diamond District

    The Diamond District is an area of New York City located on West 47th Street between Fifth Avenue and Sixth Avenue (Avenue of the Americas) in midtown Manhattan, within walking distance of many New York attractions. It is located one block south of Rockefeller Center, three blocks south of Radio City Music Hall (along the Avenue of the Americas), three blocks south of St Patrick's Cathedral (along Fifth Avenue), and one block east of the Broadway Theater District. The Plaza Arcade, lined with shops, connects the street to Rockefeller Center. The district was created when dealers moved north from an earlier district near Canal Street and the Bowery that was created in the 1920s, and from a second district located in the Financial District, near the intersection of Fulton and Nassau Streets, which started in 1931. The move uptown started in 1941. The district grew in importance when the German Nazis invaded the Netherlands and Belgium, forcing thousands of Orthodox Jews in the diamond business to flee Antwerp and Amsterdam and settle in New York City. Most of them remained after World War II, and remain a dominant influence in the Diamond District. A notable, long-time anomaly of the
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    217
    Dyker Heights

    Dyker Heights

    Dyker Heights is a residential neighborhood in the southwest corner of the Borough of Brooklyn in New York City, USA. It is sandwiched among Bay Ridge, Bensonhurst, and Gravesend Bay. According to the Post Office, Dyker Heights is bounded to the west by Interstate 278, to the north by Bay Ridge Avenue, to the east by Fourteenth Avenue, and to the south by Fort Hamilton. The Dyker Beach Golf Course extends to the Belt Parkway. Dyker Heights originated as a speculative luxury housing development in October 1895 when Walter Loveridge Johnson developed a portion of woodland into a suburban community. During the height of his development, the boundaries were primarily between Tenth Avenue and Thirteenth Avenue and from 79th Street to 86th Street. The finest homes of the development were situated along the top of the 110-foot (34 m) hill, at about Eleventh Avenue and 82nd Street. Dyker Heights is patrolled by the 68th Precinct of the NYPD. The neighborhood of Dyker Heights lies within the boundaries of the original Dutch town of New Utrecht settled in 1657. The area that is now known as Dyker Heights was not developed in the 17th or 18th centuries because the land was too sloped for
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    218
    East Tremont

    East Tremont

    East Tremont is a low income residential neighborhood located in west Bronx, New York City. It is part of Bronx Community Board 6. It borders, from the north and moving clockwise, East 183rd Street, Crotona Avenue, the Cross-Bronx Expressway and the Webster Avenue. East Tremont Avenue is the primary thoroughfare through the neighborhood. ZIP codes include 10457, 10458, and 10460. The area is patrolled by the 48th Precinct located at 450 Cross Bronx Expressway. New York City Housing Authority property in the area is patrolled by P.S.A. 8 at 2794 Randall Avenue in the Throggs Neck section of the Bronx. East Tremont has a population over 30,000. For decades East Tremont has been one of the poorest communities in America. Its steady decline began in the 1950s largely as a result of the displacement of working and lower middle class, largely of Jewish descent, residents by the construction of the Cross-Bronx Expressway. Over half the population lives below the poverty line and receives public assistance (AFDC, Home Relief, Supplemental Security Income, and Medicaid). East Tremont has one of the highest concentrations of Puerto Ricans in New York City. There is a small but growing
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    219
    Hamilton Heights

    Hamilton Heights

    Hamilton Heights is a neighborhood in West Harlem, in the New York City borough of Manhattan. It lies between Manhattanville to the south and Washington Heights to the north. It contains the neighborhood of Sugar Hill. Hamilton Heights is bounded by 135th Street to the south, the Hudson River to the west, 155th Street to the north, and Edgecombe Avenue to the east. The community derives its name from Founding Father Alexander Hamilton, who lived the last two years of his life in the area when it was still largely farmland; specifically, he lived in what is now known as Hamilton Grange National Monument. It is located within Manhattan Community Board 9. Most of the housing dates from the extension of the elevated and subway lines at the end of the 19th and the start of the 20th Century. This fairly elegant housing became less desirable to white residents in the 1930s and 1940s as the population changed from white to black, even though the black residents were just as affluent as the white residents. There are spacious apartment buildings, brownstones and other row houses prominently lining the leafy eastern streets of Hamilton Heights, an area traditionally home to a substantial
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    Morningside Heights

    Morningside Heights

    Morningside Heights is a neighborhood of the Borough of Manhattan in New York City and is chiefly known as the home of institutions such as Columbia University, Teachers College, Barnard College, the Manhattan School of Music, Bank Street College of Education, "Grant's Tomb", the Cathedral of Saint John the Divine, the Riverside Church, the Broadway Presbyterian Church, Union Theological Seminary in the City of New York, Jewish Theological Seminary of America, Interchurch Center and St. Luke's Hospital. Many consider Morningside Heights to be part of the Upper West Side. However, it has been described as part of "Greater Harlem". Many sources have the Upper West Side going no farther north than 110th Street. Morningside Heights is bounded by Morningside Park to the east, Harlem to the north, and Riverside Park to the west. The streets that form its boundaries are 110th Street on the south, Riverside Drive on the west, 125th Street on the north, and Morningside Drive to the east. The main thoroughfare is Broadway. With the recent gentrification of Bloomingdale, the neighborhood immediately to the south of Morningside Heights, the southern boundary of this region is sometimes
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    221
    Murray Hill

    Murray Hill

    Murray Hill is a Midtown Manhattan neighborhood in New York City, United States. Around 1987 many real estate promoters of the neighborhood and newer residents described the boundaries as within East 34th Street, East 42nd Street, Madison Avenue, and the East River; in 1999, Frank P. Vardy, the demographer for the City Planning Commission, said that the traditional boundary is within East 34th Street, East 40th Street, Madison Avenue, and Third Avenue. The neighborhood is part of Manhattan Community Board 6. Murray Hill derives its name from the Murray family, 18th-century Quaker merchants mainly concerned with shipping and overseas trade. Robert Murray (1721–1786), the family patriarch, was born in County Armagh, Ireland, immigrated to Pennsylvania in 1732, and came to New York in 1753 after a short residence in North Carolina. He quickly established himself as a merchant and eventually owned more shipping tonnage than any other New Yorker. About 1762 Murray rented land from the city for a great house and farm. His great house, which he named Inclenberg (or Belmont), but which was popularly termed Murray Hill, was built on a since-leveled hill at what is today Park Avenue and 36th
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    222
    Stapleton

    Stapleton

    Stapleton is a neighborhood in northeastern Staten Island in New York City in the United States. It is located along the waterfront of Upper New York Bay, bounded on the north by Tompkinsville at Grant Street, on the south by Clifton at Vanderbilt Avenue, and on the west by St. Paul's Avenue and Van Duzer Street, which form the border with the community of Grymes Hill. Stapleton is one of the older waterfront neighborhoods of the borough, built in the 1830s on land once owned by the Vanderbilt family. It was a long-time commercial center of the island, but has struggled to revive after several decades of neglect following the building in 1964 of the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge, which shifted the commercial development of the island to its interior. The neighborhood was the site of the farm where Cornelius Vanderbilt grew up, at the location of the present-day Paramount Theater building on Bay Street (the theater itself having closed in the early 1980s). In the early 19th century it became the commercial center of Southfield Township. In 1832 William J. Staples, a merchant from Manhattan for whom the neighborhood is named, as well as Minthorne Tompkins, the son of Vice President Daniel
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    Belmont

    Belmont

    Belmont is a residential neighborhood geographically located in the west Bronx. The neighborhood is part of Bronx Community Board 6. Its boundaries, starting from the north and moving clockwise are: Fordham Road to the north, Bronx Park to the east, East 183rd Street to the south, and the Third Avenue (which formerly was served by the IRT Third Avenue Line) to the west. These boundaries give the neighborhood a crescent like shape. Arthur Avenue is the primary thoroughfare through Belmont. Zip codes include 10458. The area is patrolled by the NYPD 48th Precinct located at 450 Cross-Bronx Expressway in East Tremont. Belmont has a population over 15,000. For decades Belmont has been one of the poorest communities in America. Over half the population lives below the poverty line and receives public assistance (AFDC, Home Relief, Supplemental Security Income, and Medicaid). The vast majority of residents in the area are of Puerto Rican or African American descent. There is also a small population of Albanian immigrants and longstanding Italians along East 187th Street near Arthur Avenue. Belmont is dominated by 5 and 6-story tenement buildings, older multi-unit homes, vacant lots, and
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    Brighton Heights

    Brighton Heights

    Brighton Heights is a neighborhood in New York City's borough of Staten Island. Silver Lake borders Brighton Heights on the south; however the name "Silver Lake" is applied to the community on the other side of the lake, which is actually a reservoir created in 1917. The word "Heights" denotes the steep hill that rises from Tompkinsville to the east. Victory Boulevard climbs this hill, and as a result the hill itself is often called Victory Hill. Stapleton Heights is on the other side of Victory Hill from Brighton Heights, and north of Brighton Heights is St. George, the island's "downtown" section. The northern section of Brighton Heights is sometimes referred to as Fort Hill, after a street located therein named Fort Hill Circle. Brighton Heights has many large, older homes, and its points of interest include a Jewish Community Center and the Brighton Heights Reformed Church (NRHP).
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    Carnegie Hill

    Carnegie Hill

    Carnegie Hill is a neighborhood within the Upper East Side, in the borough of Manhattan in New York City. Its boundaries extend from 86th Street on the south to 96th Street to the north, between Fifth Avenue (Central Park) on the west and Third Avenue on the east, and up to 98th Street from Fifth to Park avenues. The neighborhood is part of Manhattan Community Board 8. Carnegie Hill is widely considered one of the most prestigious residential areas of New York City. The neighborhood is named for the mansion that Andrew Carnegie built at Fifth Avenue and 91st Street in 1901. Today the mansion houses the Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum, a branch of the Smithsonian Institution. Facing it on 91st Street is the Otto Kahn House (illustration below), a Florentine palazzo, now housing the Convent of the Sacred Heart. A number of other townhouses in the area have been converted to schools, including the recent purchase of the William Goadby and Florence Baker Loew House on 93rd Street by the Spence School. The Lycée Français, housed in the former Virginia Graham Fair Vanderbilt House, held an additional townhouse space on 93rd between Fifth and Madison Avenue until 2005, when the
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    226
    Carroll Gardens

    Carroll Gardens

    Carroll Gardens is a neighborhood in the Brooklyn borough of New York City, USA. The area is named for Charles Carroll, a revolutionary war veteran who was also the only Roman Catholic signer of the Declaration of Independence. Carroll Park is a block-long area of playgrounds, walkways and sitting areas between Court and Smith Streets, with Carroll Street as its southern boundary and President Street on the northern side. It was constructed in the late 19th century and is also named for Carroll. The neighborhood is part of Brooklyn Community Board 6. A long-standing Italian-American neighborhood of family-run stores, Carroll Gardens is now sprinkled with cafes, boutiques and antique shops. It shares its northern boundary with Cobble Hill at Degraw Street and Boerum Hill at Warren Street, while extending south to Hamilton Avenue and Red Hook. Prior to the gentrification movement in the mid-1960s, this part of South Brooklyn was considered by residents to be part of Red Hook. In the late 1940s, however, the southern tip of Red Hook was cut off from the rest of the neighborhood by the building of the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway and Gowanus Expressway, and the area now known as Carroll
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    City Island

    City Island

    City Island is a small island approximately 1.5 mi (2.4 km) long by .5 mi (1 km) wide. At one time incorporated within the boundaries of Pelham, Westchester County, it is now part of the New York City borough of the Bronx. As of the 2010 census the island had a population of 4,362. Its land area is 1.023 km² (0.395 sq mi, or 252.835 acres). The island is part of Bronx Community Board 10. City Island is located at the extreme western end of Long Island Sound, south of Pelham Bay and east of Eastchester Bay. The body of water between City Island and the even smaller (and uninhabited) Hart Island to the east is known as City Island Harbor. The small island adjacent to the northeast is High Island. Stepping Stones Lighthouse, marking the main shipping channel into New York, is off the southern tip of the island, near the Long Island shore. It is part of the Pelham Islands, a group of islands originally belonging to Thomas Pell. City Island was created by glacial deposits at the end of the last ice age. There is a layer of bedrock and then a thick layer of red clay topped with sand, with topsoil above that. The southern end has deposits of rare blue clay. The area is strewn with glacial
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    Ditmas Park

    Ditmas Park

    Ditmas Park is a neighborhood in western Flatbush in the New York City borough of Brooklyn, east of Kensington, and is one of three Flatbush neighborhoods which have been officially designated Historic Districts. Located on land formerly owned by the Ditmas family that remained rural until the early 20th century, the neighborhood consists of many large, free-standing Victorian homes built in the 1900s (decade). The traditional boundary of Ditmas Park is from Ocean Avenue to East 16th Street and from Dorchester Road to Newkirk Avenue. However due to the popularity of the Ditmas Park Blog and confusion over what to call the larger neighborhood, all of Victorian Flatbush is now generally referred to as "Ditmas Park". The current borders of what is now considered to be Ditmas Park are from Coney Island Avenue on the west to Ocean Avenue on the east and from Foster Avenue in the south to Caton Avenue in the north. Ditmas Park is patrolled by the NYPD's 70th Precinct. Newkirk Avenue, Coney Island Avenue, Church Avenue, and Cortelyou Road are the neighborhood's commercial strips while many of their north-south streets are lined with historic Victorian style homes. Since much of Ditmas
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    229
    Dutch Kills

    Dutch Kills

    Dutch Kills is an area within Long Island City, in the New York City borough of Queens. It was a hamlet, named for its navigable tributary of Newtown Creek, that occupied what today is centrally Queensboro Plaza. Dutch Kills was an important road hub during the American Revolutionary War, and the site of a British Army garrison from 1776 to 1783. The area supported farms during the 19th Century, and was finally consolidated in 1870 with the villages of Astoria, Ravenswood, Hunters Point and Blissville to form Long Island City. The canalization of Newtown Creek and the Kills at the end of the 19th century intensified industrial development of the area, which prospered until the middle of the 20th century. The neighborhood is currently undergoing a massive rezoning of mixed residential and commercial properties.
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    230
    East New York

    East New York

    East New York is a residential neighborhood located in the Eastern section of the borough of Brooklyn in New York City, United States. The neighborhood is part of Brooklyn Community Board 5. Its boundaries, starting from the north and moving clockwise are: Cypress Hills Cemetery to the north, the Borough of Queens to the east, Jamaica Bay to the south, and the Bay Ridge Branch railway tracks next to Van Sinderen Avenue to the west. Linden Boulevard and Atlantic Avenue are the primary thoroughfares through East New York. ZIP codes include 11207, 11208, and 11239. The area is patrolled by the 75th Precinct located at 1000 Sutter Avenue. New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) property in the area is patrolled by P.S.A. 2. During the latter part of the twentieth century East New York came to be a commuter town predominantly inhabited by African Americans and Hispanics. East New York has a population around 90,000. Over half the population lives below the poverty line and receives public assistance (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families [TANF], Home Relief, Supplemental Security Income, and Medicaid). East New York is predominantly African American with a significant Puerto Rican and
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    231
    Eltingville

    Eltingville

    Eltingville is the name of a neighborhood on Staten Island, one of the five boroughs of New York City, USA. It is on the island's South Shore, immediately to the south of Great Kills and north of Annadale. The main commercial area of Eltingville extends down Richmond Avenue, with offshoots heading north on Amboy Road and Hylan Boulevard. Originally called South Side, and later Seaside, the neighborhood owes its present name to a prominent family by the name of Elting which settled there in the late 19th century. It was the southern terminus of the Staten Island Railway until 1860, when the line was extended to Tottenville. The community's main business district sprang up around the railroad station, which is located a short distance west of the intersection of Amboy Road and Richmond Avenue. It is probably with the neighborhoods of Eltingville and Great Kills in mind that New York Telephone named a telephone exchange "Honeywood" in the 1920s; this exchange, which also served Annadale and Huguenot, was retired from service in 1959, but a local business establishment — Honeywood Liquors on Hylan Boulevard — remained for decades as a reminder of the exchange's existence. When
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    232
    Emerson Hill

    Emerson Hill

    Emerson Hill is the name of a hilly area, and the neighborhood upon which the hill is situated, in Staten Island, New York, one of the five boroughs of New York City, USA. A highly affluent community, the roads on Emerson Hill are technically private, and several gates are found at approaches to the enclave; since the gates are seldom closed and are not manned by security personnel, however, it does not officially qualify as a gated community. Emerson Hill is separated from its northern neighbor Grymes Hill by the Staten Island Expressway. The equally exclusive neighborhood of Todt Hill — where private roads also exist — borders Emerson Hill on the south. The hill is named for Judge William Emerson--oldest brother of Ralph Waldo Emerson--who lived with his wife, Susan, and children William, Haven and Charles in a long brown shingle house known as The Snuggery. Willie and Haven were tutored in 1843 by Henry David Thoreau, who lived with the Emersons from May through October. It was the only time in his adult life that Thoreau lived anywhere but Concord, Massachusetts. In 1971, two large mock Tudor homes at the end of Longfellow Avenue served as Casa Corleone for the filming of
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    233
    Five Points

    Five Points

    Five Points (or The Five Points) was a neighborhood in central lower Manhattan in New York City. The neighborhood was generally defined as being bound by Centre Street in the west, The Bowery in the east, Canal Street in the north and Park Row in the south. The former neighborhood known as Five Points is now split between the Civic Center on the west and south and Chinatown on the east and north. The name Five Points was derived from the five-pointed intersection created by Orange Street (now Baxter) and Cross Street (now Mosco); from this intersection Anthony Street (now Worth) began and ran in a northwest direction, creating a triangular-shaped block thus the fifth "point". To the west of this "point" ran Little Water Street (which no longer exists) north to south, creating a triangular plot which would become known as Paradise Square or Paradise Park. Five Points gained international notoriety as a disease-ridden, crime-infested slum that existed for well over 70 years. The topography of the area that would become Five Points was a major factor in the progression of the neighborhood from middle class homes built upon reclaimed land to a sprawling, disease-ridden slum in a
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    234
    Governors Island

    Governors Island

    Governors Island is a 172 acres (70 ha) island in Upper New York Bay, approximately one-half mile (1 km) from the southern tip of Manhattan Island and separated from Brooklyn by Buttermilk Channel. It is legally part of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. Governors Island is recognized as the birthplace, in 1624, of the state of New York by the New York State Senate and Assembly. Physically, the island changed greatly during the early 20th century. Using material excavated from the Lexington Avenue subway, the Army Corps of Engineers supervised the deposit of 4,787,000 cubic yards of fill on the south side of Governors Island, adding 103 acres (42 ha) of flat, treeless land by 1912 and bringing the total acreage of the island to 172. The Dutch explorer Adriaen Block named the uninhabited island "Noten Eylant", meaning 'nut island', in 1611, doubtless after the island's plentiful hickory, oak, and chestnut trees; This became "Nutten Island" in pidgin English. Upon arrival of the first Dutch colonists to New Netherland, a fortification was erected on the island in 1624. After construction of Fort Amsterdam on Manhattan Island in 1625, Native Americans of the New York Tri-State
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    235
    Kips Bay

    Kips Bay

    Kips Bay is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan. Because there are no official boundaries for New York City neighborhoods, the limits of Kip's Bay are somewhat vague, but it is often considered to be the area between East 23rd Street and East 34th Street extending from Lexington Avenue to the East River. Some definitions put its western boundary significantly farther east, at Second Avenue, and recently the northern boundary has been extended to 38th Street rather than 34th Street. Kips Bay is neighbored on the north by Murray Hill, on the west by Midtown East or Rose Hill, and on the south by the Gramercy Park neighborhood and the Peter Cooper Village apartment complex. It is part of Manhattan Community Board 6. Kips Bay was an inlet of the East River running from what is now 32nd Street to 37th Street. The bay extended into Manhattan island to just west of what is now First Avenue and had two streams that ran from it. The bay was named after New Netherland Dutch settler Jacobus Hendrickson Kip (1631-1690), whose farm ran north of present day 30th Street along the East River. The bay became reclaimed land, yet "Kips Bay" remains the name of the area. Kip built
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    236
    Koreatown

    Koreatown

    Koreatown, Manhattan, or Manhattan's Koreatown, a neighborhood in the Manhattan borough of New York City, USA, is an ethnic Korean enclave generally bordered by 31st and 36th Streets, Fifth Avenue, and the Avenue of the Americas. The Koreatown area of Manhattan is primarily a Korean business district. However, in recent years, the district has seen an increase in Korean and European traffic as well, and the resident Korean population in the area has grown concomitantly. There was never a formal plan or agreement to create a Korean commercial district in Manhattan. However, given the high tourist traffic stemming from its proximity to the Empire State Building, Macy's Herald Square, Penn Station, Madison Square Garden, the Garment District, and the Flower District, amongst other Midtown Manhattan landmarks, it was an ideal location for Korean immigrants to settle. Initiated by the opening of a Korean bookstore and a handful of restaurants, Koreatown sprang into being. With their success, an additional stream of Korean-owned businesses took root in the neighborhood, coinciding with increased immigration from Korea. Per the 2010 United States Census, the rapidly growing Korean
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    237
    Malba

    Malba

    Malba is an upper-middle-class neighborhood in the New York City borough of Queens. A small area on the waterfront home to some of the largest and most expensive private houses in New York City, Malba is bounded to the north by the East River, to the east by the Whitestone Expressway, to the south by 14th Avenue, and to the west by 138th Street. Its name is derived from the first letters of the surnames of its five founders of the Malba Land Company: Maycock, Alling, Lewis, Bishop, and Avis. Malba is considered part of Whitestone, one of the most affluent communities in Queens. Demographically, the population is mostly white and of European descent (Greek, Irish, Italian, and Jewish), with a small minority of Asian Americans. Most of the residential properties in Malba are large homes. The neighborhood is part of Queens Community District 7, served by Queens Community Board 7. The first known resident of the area known as present-day Malba was David Roe, who arrived from England in the 1640s. According to Clarence Almon Torrey's book, David Roe Of Flushing And Some Of His Descendants, Roe became a resident of Flushing circa 1666. In 1683, Roe was taxed upon owning 35 acres (140,000
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    238
    Marine Park

    Marine Park

    Marine Park is a neighborhood located in the New York City borough of Brooklyn, that lies between Mill Basin and Gerritsen Beach. The neighborhood is mostly squared off in area by Gerritsen Avenue, Flatbush Avenue, Avenue U and Kings Highway. It partly surrounds the eponymous park. The neighborhood is largely made up of ethnic groups such as Italian, Irish, Greek, and Jewish. The area is part of Brooklyn Community Board 18. As of 2007, Marine Park had a population of 86,253. The neighborhood is situated around Gerritsen Inlet, the westernmost inlet of Jamaica Bay. During the last 5,000 years strips of sand were deposited by ocean currents. These beach strips form a surf-barrier and allow salt marshes to "...grow in the calm water on their protected bay side..." Native Americans living in the nearby Keshawchqueten village favored the creek for hunting and fishing. Food preparation pits dating from 800 to 1400 A.D. were revealed by archaeological excavations in Marine Park. The pits contained deer and turtle bones, oyster shells, and sturgeon scales. The area was originally a Dutch settlement which had the first tide mill in North America. Dutch settlers found the salt marshes and
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    Midwood

    Midwood

    Midwood is a neighborhood in the south central part of the New York City borough of Brooklyn. It is within Community District 14, and is patrolled by the 61st, 66th and 70th precincts of the New York City Police Department. It is bounded on the north by the Bay Ridge Branch freight line tracks just above Avenue I and Brooklyn College campus of the City University of New York, and on the south by Avenue P and Kings Highway. The eastern border is Nostrand Avenue or Flatbush Avenue and Coney Island Avenue, McDonald Avenue or Ocean Parkway to the west is the other boundary. The name, Midwood, derives from the Dutch word, "Midwout" (middle woods), the name the settlers of New Netherland called the area of dense woodland midway between the towns of Boswyck (Bushwick) and Breuckelen (Brooklyn). Later, it became part of old Flatbush, situated between the towns of Gravesend and Flatlands. Settlement was begun by the Dutch in 1652, and they later gave way to the English (who conquered it in 1664), but the area remained rural and undeveloped for the most part until its annexation to the City of Brooklyn. It became more developed in the 1920s when large middle-class housing tracts and
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    240
    New Brighton

    New Brighton

    New Brighton, formerly an independent village, is today a neighborhood located on the North Shore of Staten Island in New York City, USA. The neighborhood comprises an older industrial and residential harbor front area along the Kill Van Kull west of St. George. The village of New Brighton was incorporated in 1866 out of six wards of the town of Castleton. It originally stretched for four miles (6.4 km) long and was two miles (3.2 km) wide, encompassing the entire northeast tip of the island from Tompkinsville to Snug Harbor. The current neighborhood includes Hamilton Park, an enclave of Victorian homes built before the American Civil War. The neighborhood includes several older churches, including St. Peter's Church, the oldest Roman Catholic church on Staten Island. The original Village Hall, constructed in 1871 on present Fillmore Street, was demolished in 2004. New Brighton public housing includes the Cassidy-Laffayette Houses and the Richmond Terrace Houses on Jersey Street. Built in 1871, it was one of the few Village Halls to remain from the old village system the existed before it was considered to be a part of New York City. In 1898, the villages were incorporated into New
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    241
    Oakwood

    Oakwood

    Oakwood is the name of a neighborhood located in east central Staten Island, one of the five boroughs of New York City, USA. It lies near the southern shore, and is bordered by Ebbitts Street (north); the Atlantic Ocean (east); Great Kills Park (south); and the Staten Island Railway (west). The community's station on the Staten Island Railway bears the name Oakwood Heights, because of the fact that the neighborhood is divided into two sections: Oakwood Heights, to the west, and Oakwood Beach, to the east. The area's bus service is provided by the S57 (along Amboy Road), and the S78, and S79 buses (along Hylan Boulevard). Dominated by farmland in the heights area, and an ocean resort in the beach area until the mid-20th Century, Oakwood started suburbanization when a subway line was proposed between Brooklyn and Staten Island, and it underwent rapid suburbanization after the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge opened in November 1964. Today, Oakwood is a middle-class neighborhood of one- and two-family homes and garden apartments, with important commercial establishments along Hylan Boulevard. Points of interest located in Oakwood include Monsignor Farrell High School and a string of
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    242
    Pelham Parkway

    Pelham Parkway

    Pelham Parkway is primarily a residential neighborhood geographically located in the center of the Bronx borough of New York City in the United States. The neighborhood is part of Bronx Community Board 11. Its boundaries, starting from the north and moving clockwise are: Waring Avenue to the north, the 5 line tracks to the east, Neill Avenue to the South, and Bronx River Parkway to the west. White Plains Road is the primary commercial thoroughfare through Pelham Parkway. The local subway is the 2 line operating along White Plains Road. Zip codes include 10462 and 10467. The area is patrolled by the NYPD 49th Precinct located at 2121 Eastchester Road in the Morris Park section of the Bronx. Pelham Parkway is a high density neighborhood with a population over 50,000. The neighborhood has a significantly diverse population including Albanians (The largest concentration in New York City), Arabs, African Americans, Christians, Dominicans, Filipino, Germans, Guyanese, Indians, Irish, Italians, Jamaicans, Jews, Muslims, Pakistanis, Puerto Ricans, and Russians. Hispanics of various races account for 45% of the community; 38% of the community are non-Hispanic White and 20% non-Hispanic
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    Peter Cooper Village

    Peter Cooper Village

    Peter Cooper Village is a residential development in the New York City borough of Manhattan, which is located east of Gramercy Park, between First Avenue and Avenue C, stretching between 20th and 23rd Streets. It sits directly north of its sister community, Stuyvesant Town, which extends from Peter Cooper's southern border down to 14th Street. Peter Cooper was a venerated figure in the cultural history of New York. Among his many achievements were the invention of Jell-O. He also established the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Art and Science in 1859. As reported in the March 6, 2006, issue of New York Magazine, the current rent increase for Peter Cooper Village apartments is about 25% that year. MetLife sold the entire complex to Tishman Speyer for $5.4 billion. The sale of Stuyvesant Town and Peter Cooper Village was the most expensive deal for a single American property. New York City Council member Daniel Garodnick, a lifelong resident of Peter Cooper Village, attempted to organize tenants and investors to place a buyout bid on Peter Cooper Village and Stuyvesant Town. Initially, MetLife deemed the tenants group an unqualified bidder, but, after being pressured by elected
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    Prospect Heights

    Prospect Heights

    Prospect Heights is a neighborhood in the northwest of the New York City borough of Brooklyn. The traditional boundaries are Flatbush Avenue to the west, Atlantic Avenue to the north, Eastern Parkway – beginning at Grand Army Plaza – to the south, and Washington Avenue to the east. In the northern section of Prospect Heights, are the Vanderbilt Railyards, which could become part of the massive and controversial Atlantic Yards project. The Barclays Center, home to the NBA's Brooklyn Nets basketball team, is located in the northwestern corner of the neighborhood at Flatbush and Atlantic Avenues. Compared to other Brooklyn neighborhoods, Prospect Heights is relatively small and is notable for its cultural diversity as well as its tree-lined streets. Prospect Heights has seen rapid demographic changes over the last decade, and its shifts are exemplified by a mixture of older buildings under reconstruction, rows of classic 1890s brownstones, and newly built luxury condominiums. The neighborhood is served by the New York Police Department's 77th Precinct. Along the southern boundary, Eastern Parkway, from Grand Army Plaza to Washington Avenue is reminiscent of Manhattan's Fifth
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    Queensbridge

    Queensbridge

    Queensbridge Houses is the largest public housing development in North America. It is located in Long Island City in Queens, and opened in 1939. The 3,142-unit complex is owned by the New York City Housing Authority. The complex is located in Community Board 1. Although the Queensbridge Houses accommodate approximately 6,907 people it is technically two separate complexes (North and South Houses) consisting of roughly 3,450 each. It is an initial location of KEYWIFI, a scheme for sharing wireless Internet access. Long Island City is located in the western part of the New York City borough of Queens, with Newtown Creek and East River waterfronts. It is the largest housing project in North America. The Queensbridge Housing Projects, the largest of Queens' twenty-six developments, is located between Vernon Boulevard (which runs along the East River) and 21st Street, immediately south of Ravenswood power plant. Queensbridge gets its name from the Queensboro (59th Street) Bridge, which is just south of the complex. The development is separated into two complexes, the North Houses on 40th Avenue and the South Houses on 41st Avenue. Subway commuters will recognize the complex's name from
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    Red Hook

    Red Hook

    Red Hook is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Brooklyn, U.S.A. The neighborhood is part of Brooklyn Community Board 6. It is also the location where the transatlantic liner RMS Queen Mary 2 docks in New York City. Red Hook has been part of the Town of Brooklyn since it was organized in the 1600s. It is named for the red clay soil and the point of land projecting into the Upper New York Bay. The village was settled by Dutch colonists of New Amsterdam in 1636, and named Roode Hoek. In Dutch "Hoek" means "point" or "corner" and not the English hook (i.e., not something curved or bent). The actual "hoek" of Red Hook was a point on an island that stuck out into Upper New York Bay at today's Dikeman Street west of Ferris Street. From the 1880s to the present time, people who live in the eastern area of Red Hook have referred to their neighborhood as "The Point". Today, the area is home to about 11,000 people. During the Battle of Brooklyn (also known as the Battle of Long Island), a fort was constructed on the "hoek" called "Fort Defiance". It is shown on a map called "a Map of the Environs of Brooklyn" drawn in 1780 by a loyalist engineer named George S. Sproule. General
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    Richmond Valley

    Richmond Valley

    Richmond Valley is the name of a neighborhood located on the South Shore of Staten Island, one of the five boroughs of New York City, the largest city in the United States. Once considered part of Tottenville, Richmond Valley gained a separate identity when the Richmond Valley (Staten Island Railway station) was opened soon after the railroad was extended to Tottenville in 1860. Today the neighborhood is noted chiefly for being the site of the terminus, on the Staten Island side, of the Outerbridge Crossing, which connects the island to Perth Amboy, New Jersey, across the Arthur Kill, and its most identifiable point of interest besides the bridge is Church at the Gateway, an independent, non-denominational Christian church, built in 1993.
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    248
    Rockefeller Center

    Rockefeller Center

    Rockefeller Center is a complex of 19 commercial buildings covering 22 acres (89,000 m) between 48th and 51st streets in New York City, United States. Built by the Rockefeller family, it is located in the center of Midtown Manhattan, spanning the area between Fifth Avenue and Sixth Avenue. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1987. Rockefeller Center was named after John D. Rockefeller, Jr., who leased the space from Columbia University in 1928 and developed it from 1930. Rockefeller initially planned a syndicate to build an opera house for the Metropolitan Opera on the site, but changed his mind after the stock market crash of 1929 and the Metropolitan's continual delays to hold out for a more favorable lease, causing Rockefeller to move forward without them. Rockefeller stated "It was clear that there were only two courses open to me. One was to abandon the entire development. The other to go forward with it in the definite knowledge that I myself would have to build it and finance it alone." He took on the enormous project as the sole financier, on a 27-year lease (with the option for three 21-year renewals for a total of 87 years) for the site from Columbia;
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    249
    Turtle Bay

    Turtle Bay

    Turtle Bay is a neighborhood in New York City, on the east side of Midtown Manhattan. It extends between 43rd and 53rd Streets, and eastward from Lexington Avenue to the East River, across from Roosevelt Island. It is the site of the United Nations Headquarters and the Chrysler Building. Turtle Bay, which received its name in the 17th century, was a valuable shelter from the often harsh weather of the East River, and it also became a thriving site for shipbuilding. The Turtle Bay neighborhood was originally a 40 acres (16 ha) grant given to two Englishmen by the Dutch colonial governor of New Amsterdam in 1639, and named "Turtle Bay Farm". On a knoll overlooking the cove, near 41st Street, the farmhouse was purchased as a summer retreat by Francis Bayard, and in the early 19th century remained the summer villa of Francis Bayard Winthrop. Turtle Creek, or DeVoor's Mill Creek emptied into the cove at what is now 47th Street. To the south lay Kip's Bay farm; to the north, on a bluff, stood James Beekman's "Mount Pleasant", the first of a series of houses and villas with water views stretching away up the shoreline. After the street grid system was initiated in Manhattan, the hilly
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    250
    Weeksville

    Weeksville

    Weeksville is a neighborhood founded by African American freedmen in what is now Brooklyn, New York, United States, part of the present-day neighborhood of Crown Heights. Weeksville was named after James Weeks, an African-American stevedore from Virginia, who in 1838 bought a plot of land from Henry C. Thompson (another free African-American) in the Ninth Ward of central Brooklyn (just 11 years after the abolition of slavery in New York State). The village itself was established by a group of African American land investors and political activists, and covered an area bounded by present-day Fulton Street, East New York Avenue, Ralph Avenue and Troy Avenue. A 1906 article in the New York Age recalling the earlier period noted that James Weeks "owned a handsome dwelling at Schenectady and Atlantic Avenues." By the 1850s, Weeksville had more than 500 residents from all over the East Coast (as well as two people born in Africa). Almost 40 percent of residents were southern-born, and nearly one-third of the men over 21 owned land. The village had its own churches (including Bethel Tabernacle African Methodist Episcopal Church and the Berean Missionary Baptist Church), a school ("Colored
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