Top List Curated by Listnerd
  • Public list
  • Nov 27th 2012
  • 352 views
  • 130 votes
  • 130 voters
  • 7%
Best New York City Newspapers of All Time

More about Best New York City Newspapers of All Time:

Best New York City Newspapers of All Time is a public top list created by Listnerd on rankly.com on November 27th 2012. Items on the Best New York City Newspapers of All Time top list are added by the rankly.com community and ranked using our secret ranking sauce. Best New York City Newspapers of All Time has gotten 352 views and has gathered 130 votes from 130 voters. O O

Best New York City Newspapers of All Time is a top list in the General category on rankly.com. Are you a fan of General or Best New York City Newspapers of All Time? Explore more top 100 lists about General on rankly.com or participate in ranking the stuff already on the all time Best New York City Newspapers of All Time top list below.

If you're not a member of rankly.com, you should consider becoming one. Registration is fast, free and easy. At rankly.com, we aim to give you the best of everything - including stuff like the Best New York City Newspapers of All Time list.

Get your friends to vote! Spread this URL or share:

Items just added

    1

    TWICE

    TWICE (ISSN-0892-7278) is a trade publication and web site owned by NewBay Media serving the information needs of retailers, distributors and manufacturing representatives in the consumer electronics and major appliance industries. TWICE is an acronym for This Week In Consumer Electronics. The editor-in-chief is Stephen Smith, with the editorial offices located in New York, New York, USA. Established in 1986, TWICE magazine is published twice monthly with an extra issue in January and September. Common topics covered include consumer electronics and major appliance retailing and distribution, custom home installation and networking, home and portable audio and video equipment, digital imaging, portable digital communication devices, small office and home office products and technology, computer technology and accessories. TWICE.com offers live, continually updated daily breaking news and product coverage, "TWICE on the Scene Video" interviews with industry executives, industry blogs, photo galleries and "By The Numbers" statistical stories and research. Readers can register to receive a daily eNewsletter and Breaking News alerts as they occur. TWICE produces the Official Show Daily
    8.00
    6 votes
    2

    New York Dispatch

    The New York Dispatch also called the New York Weekly Dispatch and the Weekly Dispatch, was a newspaper published in New York City. The paper previously owned by Amor J. Williamson was purchased by Francis Shubael Smith and Francis Scott Street in 1858. Smith an editor at the Dispatch and Street a bookkeeper paid $40,000 for the ownership of the paper and were given 5 years to pay.
    7.33
    6 votes
    3

    Daily Racing Form

    The Daily Racing Form (DRF) is a tabloid newspaper founded in 1894 in Chicago, Illinois by Frank Brunell. The paper publishes the past performances of race horses as a statistical service for bettors on horse racing in the United States. In cooperation with the National Thoroughbred Racing Association and the National Turf Writers Association, the Daily Racing Form selects the winners of the annual Eclipse Awards. In 1922, the DRF publishing company was sold to Moses Annenberg's Triangle Publications, which would eventually be owned by Walter Annenberg. The Daily Racing Form currently is owned by Arlington Capital Partners (since late 2007), and is based at 708 3rd Avenue in New York City. The DRF's publisher is Steven Crist, a former editor of the Harvard Lampoon and a reporter and columnist for the New York Times. Several DRF employees have included cartoonist Pierre Bellocq (aka: Peb), columnist Joe Hirsch, and longtime business manager Louis Iverson. Iverson reported to Annenberg for most of his tenure and was described as a manager who "threw nickels around like they were manhole covers". The Daily Racing Form currently publishes 30 editions daily.
    6.83
    6 votes
    4

    New York Herald Tribune

    The New York Herald Tribune was a daily newspaper created in 1924 when the New York Tribune acquired the New York Herald. Other predecessors, which had earlier merged into the New York Tribune, included the original The New Yorker newsweekly (unrelated to the magazine of that name), and the Whig Party's Log Cabin. The paper was home to such writers as Dorothy Thompson, Red Smith, Richard Watts, Jr. and Walter Kerr and begat the International Herald Tribune and New York magazine. The New York Herald Tribune ceased publication in August 1966. The New York Herald and the New York Tribune were established in 1835 and 1841, respectively. The papers were very different: the Herald was a penny press newspaper whose editor, James Gordon Bennett was a firm Democrat and a pioneer in reporting crime. The Tribune, founded by Horace Greeley, was a Whig (and later Republican) newspaper sold as a sober alternative to some of the excesses of the penny press. The Herald was the largest circulation newspaper in New York City until the 1880s (when Joseph Pulitzer's World overtook it), while the Tribune's weekly publication was circulated throughout the United States. The Tribune went into decline in
    9.50
    4 votes
    5

    The Chief-Leader

    The Chief-Leader is a long-established newspaper aimed at civil service workers in New York City. Privately owned, it was established in 1897 by Joseph J. O'Reilly; and it was first aimed at firefighters. A weekly broadsheet, the newspaper is known for in-depth coverage of the unions representing civil servants. Its most popular features are the listing of job certifications and articles on job openings in the city government. Its current editor, Richard Steier, writes a weekly column called "Razzle Dazzle" and has also written about sports, especially horse racing. The newspaper is owned by the Prial family and it prides itself on its traditional style. It did not go from an eight-column to a six-column format until 2008 and its reporters used typewriters well into the 1990s. The Chief has now expanded its web presence with an online version of each issue, opinion polls and other interactive elements. In 2011, the newspaper began actively posting links to its Facebook page and using the social media tool, Twitter. It's available via paper or online subscription. Some stories have raised the ire of several union leaders, including Patrolmen's Benevolent Association President
    8.25
    4 votes
    6

    New York Blade

    The New York Blade was a weekly lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) newspaper in New York City, New York. The Blade was a member of the National Gay Newspaper Guild, and contains news, entertainment, classified ads, and free personals for men and women. The New York Blade was started in 1997 as a New York edition of the Washington Blade. The original founding came under fire from gay rights advocates because of indications that Wilbur Ross would be involved with the paper. The paper, along with the Washington Blade, was acquired by Window Media, LLC in 2001, and then sold to HX Media in 2007. Kat Long succeeded Trenton Straube as editor-in-chief in February 2009. The paper ceased publication in July 2009.
    8.00
    4 votes
    7

    Crawdaddy!

    Crawdaddy! was the first U.S. magazine of rock and roll music criticism. Created in 1966 by college student Paul Williams in response to the increasing sophistication and cultural influence of popular music, Crawdaddy! was self-described as "the first magazine to take rock and roll seriously." Preceding both Rolling Stone and Creem, Crawdaddy! is regarded as the U.S. pioneer of rock journalism and was the training ground for many rock writers just finding the language to describe rock and roll, which was only then beginning to be written about as studiously as folk music and jazz. The magazine spawned the career of numerous rock and other writers. Early contributing writers included Jon Landau, Sandy Pearlman, Richard Meltzer and Peter Knobler. Williams left the magazine in 1968, going on to write over 25 books. From 1993 to 2003 he self-published a Crawdaddy! reincarnation. In 2006 it was sold to Wolfgang's Vault and later resurrected as a daily webzine. Effective August 5, 2011, visits began redirecting to PasteMagazine.com, which announced that Crawdaddy "relaunches as a blog on Paste, where we’ll share stories from the Crawdaddy archives and publish new content on legacy
    7.75
    4 votes
    8

    The New York Times Book Review

    The New York Times Book Review is a weekly paper-magazine supplement to The New York Times in which current non-fiction and fiction books are reviewed. It is one of the most influential and widely read book review publications in the industry. The offices are located near Times Square in New York City. Sam Tanenhaus has been the Senior Editor since the spring of 2004. The New York Times has published a book review section since October 10, 1896, announcing: The target audience is an intelligent, general-interest adult reader. The Times publishes two versions each week, one with a cover price sold via subscription, bookstores and newsstands; the other with no cover price included as an insert in each Sunday edition of the Times (the copies are otherwise identical). Each week the NYTBR receives 750 to 1000 books from authors and publishers in the mail, of which 20 to 30 are chosen for review. Books are selected by the "preview editors" who read over 1,500 advance galleys a year. The selection process is based on finding books that are important and notable, as well as discovering new authors whose books stand above the crowd. Self-published books are generally not reviewed as a
    7.75
    4 votes
    9

    El Diario La Prensa

    El Diario la Prensa is the largest and oldest Spanish-language daily newspaper in New York City, and the oldest Spanish-language daily in the United States. Published by ImpreMedia, the paper covers local, national and international news with an emphasis on Latin America, as well as human-interest stories, politics, business and technology, health, entertainment, and sports. El Diario La Prensa currently has 294,769 daily readers and 676,570 unique readers each week. The paper's offices are located on the 18th floor of 1 MetroTech Center in Downtown Brooklyn, New York City. The newspaper was created in 1963 through the merger of El Diario de Nueva York (established 1947) and La Prensa (established 1913 by Rafael Viera) when both were purchased by O. Roy Chalk. In 1981, Chalk sold the newspaper to Gannett Company, in a deal valued at $10 million. The paper's publisher, Carlos D. Ramirez, and his investment group El Diario Associates, purchased the paper in 1989 from Gannett for a price just over $20 million. The paper had been unprofitable for as three years and circulation had declined from a peak of 80,000 to under 70,000. With the addition of new technology and improved
    6.20
    5 votes
    10
    New York Tribune

    New York Tribune

    The New-York Tribune was an American newspaper, first established by Horace Greeley in 1841. From the 1840s through the 1860s it was the dominant Whig Party and then Republican newspaper in the U.S. Its editorials were widely read and helped shape national opinion. In 1924 it was merged with the New York Herald to form the New York Herald Tribune, which in turn ceased publication in 1966. Greeley had previously published a weekly newspaper, The New Yorker (unrelated to the modern magazine), in 1833, and was also publisher of the Whig Party's political organ, Log Cabin. In 1841, he merged operations of the two into a new newspaper, the New-York Tribune. The Tribune was created by Greeley with the goal of providing a straightforward, trustworthy media source in an era when newspapers such as the New York Sun and New York Herald thrived on sensationalism. The Tribune did reflect some of Horace Greeley's idealist views. His journal retained Karl Marx as European correspondent in 1852; although Marx viewed the Tribune as a 'filthy rag', the arrangement, whereby his collaborator Engels also submitted articles under the by-line, lasted ten years, the final Marx column being published in
    7.00
    4 votes
    11

    New York Daily News

    The Daily News of New York City is the fourth most widely circulated daily newspaper in the United States. The first U.S. daily printed in tabloid form, it was founded in 1919, and as of 2012 is owned and run by Mortimer Zuckerman. It has won ten Pulitzer Prizes. The Daily News was founded by Joseph Medill Patterson in 1919. It was not connected to an earlier New York Daily News, which had been founded in the 1850s, flourished under the stewardship of Benjamin Wood, and faltered after his death in 1900, going through three owners (including his widow) before suspending publication in mid-December 1906. Patterson and his cousin, Robert R. McCormick were co-publishers of the Chicago Tribune and grandsons of Tribune founder Joseph Medill. When Patterson and McCormick could not agree on the editorial content of the Chicago paper, the two cousins decided at a meeting in Paris that Patterson set on the project of launching a Tribune-owned newspaper in New York. On his way back, Patterson met with Alfred Harmsworth, who was the Viscount Northcliffe and publisher of the Daily Mirror, London's tabloid newspaper. Impressed with the advantages of a tabloid, Patterson launched the Daily News
    8.67
    3 votes
    12
    New Yorker Staatszeitung

    New Yorker Staatszeitung

    The New Yorker Staats-Zeitung, nicknamed "The Staats", claims to be the leading German-language weekly newspaper in the United States. It is certainly one of the oldest, having been published since the mid-1830s. In the late 1800s it was one of New York City's major daily newspapers, exceeded in circulation only by the New York World and the New York Tribune. Among other achievements, as of its sesquicentennial anniversary in 1984 it had never missed a publication date, thereby laying claim to the title of being continuously published longer than any other newspaper (of any language) in America. The Staats-Zeitung was founded in New York City in 1834 by a society of German-American businessmen. The partners included George Zahm, Stepan Molitor, Conrad Braeker, and Gustav Adolph Neumann, with Neumann serving as editor-in-chief (as well as reporter and production foreman). Neumann subsequently purchased shares of the enterprise until, in the late 1830s, he obtained a majority, after which the society was dissolved and he became sole owner. The first issue was published on December 24, 1834. The nascent newspaper consisted of four pages and was printed weekly using a Washington
    8.33
    3 votes
    13

    The Wall Street Journal

    The Wall Street Journal. is an American English-language international daily newspaper. It is published in New York City by Dow Jones & Company, a division of News Corporation, along with the Asian and European editions of the Journal. The Journal is the largest newspaper in the United States, by circulation. According to the Audit Bureau of Circulations, it has a circulation of 2.1 million copies (including 400,000 online paid subscriptions), as of March 2010, compared to USA Today's 1.8 million. Its main rival, in the business newspaper sector, is the London-based Financial Times, which also publishes several international editions. The Journal primarily covers American economic and international business topics, and financial news and issues. Its name derives from Wall Street, located in New York City, which is the heart of the financial district; it has been printed continuously since its inception on July 8, 1889, by Charles Dow, Edward Jones, and Charles Bergstresser. The newspaper version has won the Pulitzer Prize thirty-three times, including 2007 prizes for its reporting on backdated stock options and the adverse effects of China's booming economy. Dow Jones & Company,
    8.00
    3 votes
    14

    Il Progresso Italo-Americano

    Il Progresso Italo-Americano was an Italian-language daily newspaper in the United States, published in New York City from 1880 to 1988, when it was shut down due to a union dispute. In 1989, most journalists of "Il Progresso" reunited to create a new daily, America Oggi. In the early 20th century "Il Progresso" was the most popular of New York's Italian newspapers, selling anywhere from 90,000 to 100,000 copies every day. Founded in 1879 by Carlo Barsotti, who was also the first director, Il Progresso Italo-Americano was a bully pulpit for raising funds for monuments by public subscription in the city of New York. From 1888 to 1921 it promoted monuments to Giuseppe Garibaldi, Christopher Columbus, Giuseppe Verdi, Giovanni da Verrazano and Dante. Generoso Pope assumed the direction of the newspaper in 1928, after buying it for $2,052,000 and retained control until he died in 1950. He doubled its circulation to 200,000 in New York City, making it the largest Italian daily newspaper in the country.
    10.00
    2 votes
    15

    New York Sports Express

    The New York Sports Express, sometimes abbreviated NYSX, was a free publication distributed from April 2003 to July 2004 as a sister paper to the New York Press. The New York City, USA publication was designed to take an entertaining look at topical sports stories, in contrast to most sports publications at that time, whose sportswriters took themselves more seriously. However, its existence was short-lived; the paper was shut down in July 2004. In December 2002, the Avalon Equity Partners investment group purchased the New York Press and were looking to launch new publications to take their purchase in additional directions. In April 2003, 60,000 copies of the New York Sports Express were placed in bright orange newsstand boxes as the initial circulation of this free sports weekly. The bright orange newsstand boxes created a conflict between the New York Sports Express and The L Magazine, a new free bimonthly guide to events. Hoping to distinguish themselves on corners crowded with other news boxes, both bought bright orange ones and placed about 400 of them on the streets just weeks apart in April. The coincidence became a running joke between the publications. However, the
    7.67
    3 votes
    16

    New York World-Telegram

    The New York World-Telegram, later known as the New York World-Telegram and Sun, was a New York City newspaper from 1931 to 1966. The World-Telegram was formed in 1931, following the sale of the New York World by the heirs of Joseph Pulitzer to Scripps Howard, owners of the Evening Telegram since 1927. (The Telegram was originally founded in 1867 by James Gordon Bennett, Jr., publisher of the morning New York Herald.) More than 2,000 employees of the morning, evening and Sunday editions of the World lost their jobs in the merger, although some star writers, like Heywood Broun and Westbrook Pegler, were kept on the new paper. The World-Telegram enjoyed a reputation as a liberal paper for some years after the merger, based on memories of the Pulitzer-owned World. However, under Scripps Howard the paper moved steadily to the right, eventually becoming a conservative bastion. In 1950, the World-Telegram acquired the remnants of another afternoon paper, the New York Sun, to become the New York World-Telegram and Sun. (The writer A.J. Liebling once described the "and Sun" portion of the combined publication's masthead as resembling the tail feathers of a canary on the chin of a
    6.00
    4 votes
    18
    7.33
    3 votes
    20

    Columbia Daily Spectator

    Columbia Daily Spectator is the daily student newspaper of Columbia University. It is published at 112th and Broadway in New York, New York. Founded in 1877, it is the oldest continuously operating college news daily in the nation after The Harvard Crimson, and has been legally independent of the university since 1962. It is printed weekdays during the academic term. In addition to serving as a campus newspaper, the Spec, as it is commonly known, also reports the latest news of the surrounding Morningside Heights community. The paper is delivered each day to over 150 locations throughout the Morningside Heights neighborhood and has a circulation of 8,000. Spectator is published by the Spectator Publishing Company, an independent non-profit organization. The president of the Spectator Publishing Company also serves as the publisher of the Columbia Daily Spectator. Spectator's writing departments, each headed by one or two editors, include campus news, city news, sports, arts and entertainment, and opinion. The other non-writing departments, also headed by their own respective editors, include photography, design, online, production, copy, and business. The business departments,
    8.50
    2 votes
    21
    Long Island Press

    Long Island Press

    The Long Island Press is a free newsweekly serving Long Island with extensive coverage of local news, arts and entertainment, sports, and alternative political viewpoints. The newspaper started in 2003 after its parent company, Morey Publishing, bought The Island Ear, which was a free bi-monthly entertainment-oriented newspaper. Morey Publishing renamed the paper, using the same name of a daily newspaper that was forced out of business in 1977. The staff of the Press has included former Newsday columnist Ed Lowe, television columnist Todd Hyman, technology columnist Lazlow and relationship columnist Holly Marie Busacca. Long Island Press is the largest free-distribution newsweekly on Long Island. The paper reports an average weekly circulation of 85,000, distributed each week to more than 2,000 locations including supermarkets, delis, diners, schools, libraries, office buildings and more. The Press reports an average pass around rate of 2.3, reaching an approximate 195,500 readers each week. The Press reports that on average, 850,000 to 1,000,000 visitors come to their flagship website per month. The website contains a mix of content from the weekly edition, as well as daily local,
    8.50
    2 votes
    22

    New York Mirror

    The New-York Mirror was a weekly newspaper published in New York City from 1823 to 1842, and again as a daily newspaper renamed The Evening Mirror from 1844 to 1898. The Mirror was founded by George Pope Morris and Samuel Woodworth in August 1823. The journal was a weekly publication, and it included coverage of arts and literature in addition to local news. Circulation flagged in the 1840s and at the end of 1842, the paper was closed. In 1843, Morris partnered with popular writer Nathaniel Parker Willis to revamp the business, and together they relaunched the newspaper as The Evening Mirror. In both incarnations, the paper employed many well known literary figures of the day. Edgar Allan Poe worked for the newspaper as a critic until February 1845. In the January 29, 1845, issue, the Mirror was the first to publish Poe's poem "The Raven" with the author's name. In his introduction to the poem, Willis called it "unsurpassed in English poetry for subtle conception, masterly ingenuity of versification, and consistent, sustaining of imaginative lift... It will stick to the memory of everybody who reads it." Willis and Morris left the publication in 1846. After Willis, the newspaper
    8.50
    2 votes
    23
    Brooklyn Eagle

    Brooklyn Eagle

    The Brooklyn Eagle, originally the Brooklyn Daily Eagle, was a daily newspaper published in Brooklyn, New York, for 114 years from 1841 to 1955. At one point it was the most popular afternoon paper in the United States. Walt Whitman was its editor for two years. Other notable editors of the paper included Thomas Kinsella, St. Clair McKelway, Cleveland Rogers, Frank D. Schroth, and Charles Montgomery Skinner. The paper ceased publication in 1955 due to a prolonged strike and was briefly revived between 1960 and 1963. A new version of the Brooklyn Eagle began publishing in 1996. It has no relation to the original Eagle, although it publishes a daily feature called "On This Day in History," made up of much material from the original Eagle. The Brooklyn Public Library maintains an online archive of the original Brooklyn Daily Eagle encompassing the years 1841 through 1902. The Brooklyn Daily Eagle was first published on October 26, 1841. Its address at this time, and for many years afterwards, was 28 Old Fulton Street, Brooklyn (today the site of a landmark building known as the Eagle Warehouse). From 1846 to 1848, the newspaper's editor was Walt Whitman. During the American Civil War,
    6.33
    3 votes
    24

    Newsday

    Newsday is an American daily newspaper that primarily serves Nassau and Suffolk counties and the New York City borough of Queens on Long Island, although it is sold throughout the New York metropolitan area. As of 2009, its weekday circulation of 377,500 was the 11th-highest in the United States, and the highest among suburban newspapers. The newspaper's headquarters are in Melville, New York, in Suffolk County. Founded by Alicia Patterson, with backing from her husband, Harry Guggenheim, the paper was first published on September 3, 1940 from Hempstead. After Patterson's death in 1963, Guggenheim became publisher and editor. In 1967, Guggenheim turned over the publisher position to Bill Moyers and continued as president and editor-in-chief. But Guggenheim was disappointed by the liberal drift of the newspaper under Moyers, criticizing what he called the "left-wing" coverage of Vietnam War protests. The two split over the 1968 presidential election, with Guggenheim signing an editorial supporting Richard Nixon, when Moyers supported Hubert Humphrey. Guggenheim sold his majority share to the then-conservative Times-Mirror Company over the attempt of newspaper employees to block the
    8.00
    2 votes
    25

    The Villager

    The Villager is a weekly newspaper serving Downtown Manhattan. It was founded in 1933 by Walter and Isabel Bryan. In 2001, 2004 and 2005, The Villager won the Stuart Dorman Award, honoring New York State's best weekly newspaper, in the New York Press Association's Better Newspaper Contest. The Villager has also been called better than The New York Times by New York magazine. In 2005, in its "123 Reasons Why We Love New York Right Now," New York dubbed The New York Times Reason #51, "because our hometown paper is still the greatest in the world," the magazine said...before adding, #52, on the facing page: "...next to The Villager." The Villager is part of the NYC Community Media newspaper group. Other papers in the group include the Downtown Express, Gay City News (formerly LGNY), Chelsea Now, and the East Villager/Lower East Sider. http://www.thevillager.com/?p=6689
    8.00
    2 votes
    27

    New York Observer

    The New York Observer is a weekly newspaper first published in New York City on September 22, 1987, by Arthur L. Carter, a former investment banker with publishing interests. The Observer focuses on the city's culture, real estate, media, politics and the entertainment and publishing industries. Since July 2006 the paper has been owned and published by the American real-estate mogul Jared Kushner. The paper has its headquarters on West 44th Street, in the building next to Birdland jazz club. Published every Wednesday, the newspaper's editorial team is led by Aaron Gell with other writers and editors including Rex Reed, Kara Bloomgarden-Smoke, Colin Campbell, Matt Chaban, Dan Duray, Drew Grant, Patrick Clark, Jessica Roy, Kelly Faircloth, George Gurley, Andrew Russeth, Sarah Douglas, Rozalia Jovanovic, Michael Miller, Nitasha Tiku, Kim Velsey, Daniel Rosen, Hunter Walker. Previous writers include Joe Conason, Alexandra Jacobs, Tom McGeveran, Peter M. Stevenson, Doree Shafrir, Hilton Kramer, Andrew Sarris, Richard Brookhiser, Michael Thomas, Michael Tomasky, John Heilpern, Robert Gottlieb, Nicole Brydson, Foster Kamer, Nicholas von Hoffman and Steve Kornacki. The paper is perhaps
    10.00
    1 votes
    28

    The National

    The National Sports Daily, simply referred to as The National, was a sports-centered newspaper published in the United States beginning on January 31, 1990. The newspaper was published as a tabloid and appeared seven days a week. The National was an American attempt to emulate the model of several international all-sports publications, such as La Gazzetta dello Sport (Italy), L'Equipe (France), and others. The paper was founded by Mexican-American media mogul Emilio Azcárraga Milmo, who had owned Mexican television conglomerate Televisa and whose family had founded Univision. Azcárraga was also the chief financier for the paper and used the success of the international sports papers as his inspiration for founding The National. Frank Deford, who at the time was writing for Sports Illustrated and a contributor at National Public Radio, was hired by Azcárraga to be editor in chief despite his inexperience in running a newspaper of any kind. When The National was launched, it featured National Basketball Association superstars Michael Jordan, Magic Johnson, and Patrick Ewing on the first cover to represent the Chicago, Los Angeles, and New York media markets (where the paper was
    10.00
    1 votes
    29

    New York Law Journal

    The New York Law Journal, founded in 1888, is a legal periodical covering the legal profession in New York, United States. The newspaper covers legal news, decisions, court calendars, and legislation, and provides analysis and insight in columns written by leading professionals. The newspaper publishes a number of special issues, including its "NYLJ 100" rankings of New York's 100 largest law firms. The Law Journal is published by ALM. The Law Journal is published Monday through Friday, with a circulation of 11,450, which it says makes it the highest circulation legal daily newspaper in the United States. The paper's website has 3,500 paid subscribers. Its primary audience is litigators. Because the full decisions of many New York City court cases, particularly the New York City Civil Court, are reported only in the Law Journal, it is common for lawyers practicing in these courts to cite to the newspaper for case law authority. The Law Journal is also one of the accepted newspapers regularly used to serve process by publication of legal notices. The full text of most Law Journal articles on its website are available to subscribers only, however a selection of articles from NYLJ and
    6.00
    3 votes
    30

    New York World Journal Tribune

    The New York World Journal Tribune, also known as the World-Journal-Tribune, was a newspaper published in New York City from September 1966 until May 1967. The World Journal Tribune represented an attempt to save the heritages of several historic New York City newspapers by merging them together into a consolidated newspaper. The late 1940s and the 1950s were a troubled time for newspapers throughout North America. Newspapers had acquired a new competitor for the eyes and ears of the nation, television. Competition from radio and magazines for the news audience also continued unabated. The market for evening papers in particular was affected by television and by the suburban lifestyle, but all papers were affected by it. The New York media market was by far the nation's largest at the time (by an even larger margin than it is currently) and had by far the most daily newspapers. Mergers had been ongoing for several years. In the 1960s the market got even more competitive, forcing the closure of the Hearst Corporation-owned New York Daily Mirror in 1963. The newspaper industry was struggling with financial troubles by the mid-1960s and had warned their unions – some of the more
    6.00
    3 votes
    31
    New York Call

    New York Call

    The New York Call was a socialist daily newspaper published in New York City from 1908 through 1923. The Call was the second of three English-language dailies affiliated with the Socialist Party of America to be established, following the Chicago Daily Socialist (1906-1912) while preceding the long running Milwaukee Leader (1911-1938). In 1899 a bitter factional war swept the Socialist Labor Party of America (SLP), pitting loyalists to the party's English-language newspaper, The People, and its intense and autocratic editor, Daniel DeLeon, against a dissident faction organized around the party's German-language paper, the New Yorker Volkszeitung. In addition to personal antipathy, the two sides differed on the fundamental question of trade union policy, with the DeLeon faction favoring a continuation of the party's policy of establishing an explicitly socialist union organization and the dissidents seeking to abandon the course of dual unionism so that closer relations to the established unions of the American Federation of Labor could be forged. A bitter split had ensued, with the dissident wing — pejoratively called "Kangaroos" by the DeLeonist SLP Regulars — attempting to
    7.50
    2 votes
    32
    The New York Times

    The New York Times

    The New York Times (NYT) is an American daily newspaper founded and continuously published in New York City since 1851. The New York Times has won 108 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other news organization. Its website is the most popular American newspaper website, receiving more than 30 million unique visitors per month. Although the print version of the paper remains the largest local metropolitan newspaper in the United States, it is the third largest newspaper overall, behind The Wall Street Journal and USA Today, and its weekday circulation has fallen since 1990 (as have other newspapers) to fewer than one million copies daily. Nicknamed "the Old Gray Lady", and long regarded within the industry as a national "newspaper of record", The New York Times is owned by The New York Times Company, which also publishes 18 other newspapers including the International Herald Tribune and The Boston Globe. The company's chairman is Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr., whose family has controlled the paper since 1896. The paper's motto, printed in the upper left-hand corner of the front page, is "All the News That's Fit to Print." The New York Times website (NYTimes.com) has the motto "All the News
    7.50
    2 votes
    33
    New York Herald

    New York Herald

    The New York Herald was a large distribution newspaper based in New York City that existed between May 6, 1835, and 1924. The first issue of the paper was published by James Gordon Bennett, Sr., on May 6, 1835. By 1845 it was the most popular and profitable daily newspaper in the United States. In 1861, it circulated 84,000 copies and called itself "the most largely circulated journal in the world." He stated that the function of a newspaper "is not to instruct but to startle." Bennett's politics tended to be anti-Catholic and he had tended to favor the Know-Nothing faction though he was not particularly anti-immigrant as they were. During the American Civil War, it was a staunch supporter of the Democratic Party. Frederic Hudson served as managing editor of the paper from 1846–1866. Under Bennett's son, James Gordon Bennett, Jr., the paper financed Henry Morton Stanley's expeditions into Africa to find David Livingstone, where they met on November 10, 1871. The paper also supported Stanley's trans-Africa exploration, and in 1879 supported the ill-fated expedition of George W. DeLong to the arctic region. On October 4, 1887, Bennett Jr. sent Julius Chambers to Paris, France to
    5.67
    3 votes
    34

    The New York Times Magazine

    The New York Times Magazine is a Sunday magazine supplement included with the Sunday edition of The New York Times. It is host to feature articles longer than those typically in the newspaper and has attracted many notable contributors. The magazine is also noted for its photography, especially relating to fashion and style. Its first issue was published on September 6, 1896, and contained the first photographs ever printed in the newspaper. In the early decades it was a section of the broadsheet paper and not an insert as it is today. The creation of a "serious" Sunday magazine was part of a massive overhaul to the newspaper instigated that year by its new owner, Adolph Ochs, who also banned fiction, comic strips and gossip columns from the paper, and is generally credited with saving The New York Times from financial ruin. In 1897, the magazine published a 16-page spread of photographs documenting Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee, a "costly feat" that resulted in a wildly popular issue and helped boost the magazine to success. In its early years, The New York Times Magazine began a tradition of publishing the writing of well-known contributors, from W. E. B. Du Bois and Albert
    5.67
    3 votes
    35
    The Onion

    The Onion

    The Onion is an American news satire organization. It is an entertainment newspaper and a website featuring satirical articles reporting on international, national, and local news, in addition to a non-satirical entertainment section known as The A.V. Club. It claims a national print circulation of 400,000 and says 61 percent of its web site readers are between 18 and 44 years old. Since 2007, the organization has been publishing satirical news audios and videos online, as the "Onion News Network". Web traffic on theonion.com amounts to some 7.5 million unique visitors per month. The Onion's articles comment on current events, both real and fictional. It parodies such traditional newspaper features as editorials, man-on-the-street interviews, and stock quotes on a traditional newspaper layout with an AP-style editorial voice. Much of its humor depends on presenting everyday events as newsworthy and by playing on commonly used phrases, as in the headline "Drugs Win Drug War." A second part of the newspaper is a non-satirical entertainment section called The A.V. Club that features interviews and reviews of various newly released media, as well as other weekly features. The print
    5.67
    3 votes
    36

    Diario de América

    Diario de América is a Spanish-language opinion journal about politics, economics, culture and social issues. Published in the United States, the publication's name means 'America's Daily' which is also its alternate name. Its contents are updated daily with opinion pieces from some of the most renowned columnists from Latin America, Europe and the United States. It was originally founded under the name 'El Iberoamericano' on Columbus Day 2004 and in its relatively short lifetime it has become an influential vehicle of opinion in several Spanish-speaking countries and among the U.S. Hispanic community. Diario de América's "Declaration of Purpose" cites as its main objective "the dissemination of opinions whose essential purpose is the defense of the cause of human freedom." Its editorial line can be described as Libertarian, Conservative and strongly influenced by Western thought, upholding the values of individual autonomy, private property and a laissez-faire economic policy. Its Founder and Editor-in-Chief is Pablo Kleinman.
    9.00
    1 votes
    37

    New York Press

    New York Press was a free alternative weekly in New York City, which was published from 1988 to 2011. During its lifetime, it was the main competitor to The Village Voice. It was originally conceived and published by founder Russ Smith as a conservative voice in a traditionally liberal New York; later it became less political. The Press strove to create a rivalry with the Village Voice, and took credit for forcing the Voice into becoming a free paper in 1996, although almost all other alternative weekly newspapers had long since gone that route. Emulating New York Press's own popular "Best of Manhattan" annual feature, the Village Voice later began publishing its own annual "Best of New York" issue. Press editors wrote about their unfruitful attempt to hire away writer Nat Hentoff from the Voice. Liz Trotta of The Washington Post compared the rivalry to a similar sniping between certain publications in the eighteenth-century British press, such as the Analytical Review and its self-styled nemesis the Anti-Jacobin Review. The paper's weekly circulation in 2006 topped 100,000, compared to about 250,000 for the Village Voice, but this total fell to 20,000 by the end of the paper's
    7.00
    2 votes
    38

    PM

    PM was a leftist New York City daily newspaper published by Ralph Ingersoll from June 1940 to June 1948 and bankrolled by the eccentric Chicago millionaire Marshall Field III. There were accusations that the paper was Communist-dominated, but a thesis by Anya Schiffrin concluded that the paper frequently opposed the policies of the Communist Party and got into editorial fights with the CP's paper, the Daily Worker. The name stood for Picture Magazine; it borrowed many elements from weekly newsmagazines, such as many large photos and, at first, being bound with staples. It accepted no advertising in an attempt to be free of pressure from business interests. These departures from the norms of newspapering created excitement in the industry; 11,000 people applied for the 150 jobs available when the paper began. Circulation averaged at 165,000, but the paper never managed to sell the 225,000 copies a day it would need to break even. According to a June 21, 1966 memo from Ingersoll to Mrs. Leighner [found in the Boston University Gottlieb Archives]: The paper was sold in 1948 and published its final issue on June 22. The next day it was replaced by the New York Star, which folded
    7.00
    2 votes
    39
    New York World

    New York World

    The New York World was a newspaper published in New York City from 1860 until 1931. The paper played a major role in the history of American newspapers. It was a leading national voice of the Democratic Party, and from 1883 to 1911 under publisher Joseph Pulitzer it became a pioneer in Yellow Journalism as it pushed its daily circulation to the one-million mark. The World was formed in 1860. From 1862 to 1876, it was edited by Manton Marble, who was also its proprietor at the time. After Marble ran into financial trouble, he was forced to sell the unsuccessful newspaper. In 1864, the World was shut down for three days after it published forged documents from Abraham Lincoln. The World was a relatively unsuccessful New York newspaper from 1860 to 1883. It was purchased by Joseph Pulitzer in 1883 and a new, aggressive era of circulation building began. Reporter Nellie Bly became one of America's first investigative journalists, often working undercover. As a publicity stunt for the paper inspired by the Jules Verne novel Around the World in Eighty Days, she traveled around the planet in 72 days in 1889-1890. In 1890, Pulitzer built the New York World Building, the tallest office
    6.50
    2 votes
    40

    The Jewish Week

    The Jewish Week is an independent weekly newspaper serving the Jewish community of the metropolitan New York City area. The Jewish Week covers news relating to the Jewish community in NYC and has world-wide distribution. Gary Rosenblatt has been the editor and publisher since 1993. The Jewish Week covers the latest Jewish news from New York, the United States and Israel. Major sections include: The Jewish Week publishes five regional editions serving Manhattan, Long Island, Queens, Westchester County/The Bronx and Brooklyn/Staten Island and has a circulation of more than 70,000 households weekly. each week, giving it the largest circulation of any North American Jewish newspaper. In 2000, Rosenblatt and the newspaper won the Casey Medal for Meritorious Journalism from the Journalism Center on Children & Families for the story "Stolen Innocence", an investigative report that uncovered allegations of decades of child abuse by a youth movement leader and high school principal, Baruch Lanner. The story was initially criticized for being "malicious gossip". The revelations were seen as a "watershed in the way the Orthodox community addresses sexual abuse" and led to Lanner's resignation
    6.50
    2 votes
    42

    New York Post

    The New York Post is the 13th-oldest newspaper published in the United States and is generally acknowledged as the oldest to have been published continuously as a daily, although—as is the case with most other papers—its publication has been periodically interrupted by labor actions. Since 1993, it has been owned by media mogul Rupert Murdoch's News Corporation, which had owned it previously from 1976 to 1988. It is the seventh-largest newspaper in the U.S. by circulation. Its editorial offices are located at 1211 Avenue of the Americas, in New York City, New York. The Post is known for its conservative editorial policy and sensationalist headlines. The New York Post, established on November 16, 1801 as the New-York Evening Post, describes itself as the nation's oldest continuously published daily newspaper. (The only known original copy of the New York Evening Post 11/16/1801 is owned by Dominick Speziale of Hewlett, NY.) The Hartford Courant, believed to be the oldest continuously published newspaper, was founded in 1764 as a semi-weekly paper; it did not begin publishing daily until 1836. The New Hampshire Gazette, which has trademarked its claim of being The Nation's Oldest
    8.00
    1 votes
    43
    New York Journal American

    New York Journal American

    The New York Journal-American was a newspaper published from 1937 to 1966. The Journal-American was the product of a merger between two New York newspapers owned by William Randolph Hearst: The New York American (originally the New York Journal, renamed American in 1901), a morning paper, and the New York Evening Journal, an afternoon paper. Both were published by Hearst from 1895 to 1937. The Journal-American was an afternoon publication. Joseph Pulitzer's younger brother Albert founded the New York Morning Journal in 1882. John R. McLean briefly acquired the paper in 1895, but quickly sold it to Hearst. Hearst founded the Evening Journal about a year later. Hearst entered into a circulation war with the New York World, the newspaper run by his former mentor Joseph Pulitzer and from whom he stole the cartoonists George McManus and Richard F. Outcault. In October 1896, Outcault defected to Hearst's New York Journal. The result of a lawsuit awarded the title Hogan's Alley to the World and The Yellow Kid to the Journal. The Yellow Kid was one of the first comic strips to be printed in color and gave rise to the phrase yellow journalism, used to describe the sensationalist and often
    4.33
    3 votes
    44

    New York Graphic

    The New York Evening Graphic (not to be confused with the earlier Daily Graphic) was a tabloid newspaper published from 1924 to 1932 by Bernarr "Bodylove" Macfadden. Exploitative and mendacious in its short life, the "pornoGraphic" defined tabloid journalism, launching the careers of Walter Winchell, Louis Sobol, and sportswriter-turned-television host Ed Sullivan. The New York Evening Graphic's founding editor was investigative reporter Emile Gauvreau, a classic outsider who grew up in Connecticut and in Montreal, Quebec, the eldest son of an itinerant French Canadian war hero. Gauvreau, a high school drop-out, began his journalism career as a cub reporter on the New Haven Journal-Courrier, - alongside part-time Yalies such as Sinclair Lewis - during World War I, and by 1919, had moved on to become the youngest managing editor in the history of the Hartford Courant, after only three years on the job. He was fired when an investigative project hit too close to the mark, embarrassing Boss Roraback - Connecticut's state Republican boss, utilities tycoon J. Henry Roraback. In 1924, Gauvreau made his way to New York to seek his fortune on The New York Times under Carr Van Anda, when,
    6.00
    1 votes
    45

    Vanguard Journal

    Vanguard: A Libertarian Communist Journal was a monthly anarchist political and theoretical journal, based in New York City, published between April 1932 and July 1939, and edited by Samuel Weiner, among others. Vanguard began as a project of the Vanguard Group, composed of members of the editorial collective of the Road to Freedom newspaper, as well as members of the Friends of Freedom group. Its initial subtitle was "An Anarchist Youth Publication", but changed to "A Libertarian Communist Journal " after issue 1. Within several issues Vanguard would become a central sounding board for the international anarchist movement, including reports of developments during the Spanish Revolution as well as movement reports by Augustin Souchy and Emma Goldman. The following is a partial list of contributors whose essays were published in Vanguard:
    6.00
    1 votes
    47
    The Village Voice

    The Village Voice

    The Village Voice is a free weekly newspaper and news and features website in New York City that features investigative articles, analysis of current affairs and culture, arts and music coverage, and events listings for New York City. It is also distributed throughout the United States on a pay basis. It was the first of the big-city tabloids that came to be known as alternative weeklies. The Voice was launched by Ed Fancher, Dan Wolf, John Wilcock, and Norman Mailer on October 26, 1955 from a two-bedroom apartment in Greenwich Village, which was its initial coverage area, expanding to other parts of the city by the 1960s. The offices in the 1960s were located at Sheridan Square; they are now at Cooper Square in the East Village. The Voice has published groundbreaking investigations of New York City politics, as well as reporting on local and national politics, with arts, culture, music, dance, film, and theater reviews. The Voice has received three Pulitzer Prizes, in 1981 (Teresa Carpenter), 1986 (Jules Feiffer) and 2000 (Mark Schoofs). Almost since its inception the paper has recognized alternative theater in New York through its Obie Awards. The paper's "Pazz & Jop" music poll,
    5.00
    1 votes
    48
    Washington Square News

    Washington Square News

    The Washington Square News is the daily student newspaper of New York University and serves the NYU, Greenwich Village, and East Village communities. The paper, better known as WSN, has a circulation of 10,000 and an estimated 65,000 readers online. It is published Monday through Thursday during the fall and spring semesters and online on Friday, with additional issues published in the summer. WSN is run solely by NYU students, with the paper's senior staff composed of undergraduates. Its offices are located at 838 Broadway. The paper is editorially independent from the university and is solely responsible in selling advertisements to fund its production. The term for the position of editor-in-chief is one calendar year, beginning in the spring semester and ending in the fall semester. The term for all other editorial positions is one semester. The editor-in-chief for the 2012 calendar year is Amanda Randone. The newspaper was born in 1973 as the result of NYU's merging of their two campuses: the University Heights campus in the Bronx had published the Heights Daily News, while the Washington Square campus in Lower Manhattan originally published the Washington Square Bulletin. In
    5.00
    1 votes
    49

    Financial Times

    The Financial Times (FT) is one of the world's leading business news and information organisations. The FT is owned by Pearson PLC, the global media company who also own Pearson, the world's largest education publishing and technology group and Penguin Books, the book publishing group. The FT has an average daily readership of 2.2 million people worldwide (PwC audited figures, November 2011). FT.com has 4.5 million registered users and over 285,000 digital subscribers, as well as 600,000 paying users. FT Chinese has more than 1.7 million registered users. The world editions of the Financial Times newspaper have a combined average daily circulation of 280 thousand copies (59 thousand for the British version of the newspaper), as of August 2012. Founded in 1888 by James Sheridan and Horatio Bottomley, the Financial Times competed with four other finance-oriented newspapers, in 1945 absorbing the last, the Financial News, which had been founded in 1884. The FT specialises in UK and international business and financial news, and is printed as a broadsheet on light salmon paper. The FT was launched as the London Financial Guide on 9 January 1888, renaming itself the Financial Times on
    4.00
    1 votes
    50

    T: The New York Times Style Magazine

    T: The New York Times Style Magazine is a perfect-bound magazine dedicated to fashion, living, beauty, holiday, travel and design coverage. The magazine was launched in August 2004. It is published 15 times a year and distributed within the Sunday edition of The New York Times newspaper. Since December 2007, an international edition has been distributed with the weekend edition of the International Herald Tribune. Stefano Tonchi was editor until 2010; his replacement was Sally Singer. T is not a supplement of The New York Times Magazine, but a distinct publication with its own staff. In 2010, it launched its first country specific edition with T Qatar, other edition in Middle East are to follow. Oryx Qatar's premier media house led by highly experienced and well known media baron Ravi Raman, has acquired the license to publish these editions.
    4.00
    1 votes
    51

    The Irish Echo

    The Irish Echo is a weekly newspaper based in New York City. Founded in 1928, it bills itself as "the USA's most widely read Irish-American newspaper" with a readership of 100,000 on circulation of about 60,000. According to the Irish Echo's media kit, the newspaper is printed in both the United States and Ireland and has "newsstand presence in all major American and Irish cities." Irish writers John B Keane, Brian Friel and Tom Caulfield have all contributed to the paper in the past. 44% of the newspaper's readers are first-generation Irish immigrants to the United States. The Irish Echo is also known within the New York community as a popular medium for advertising private childcare services.
    4.00
    1 votes
    52

    New York Evening Mail

    The New York Evening Mail was an American daily newspaper published in New York City. The paper origins began with the New York Express, which was founded by James and Erastus Brooks as a Whig paper in June 1836, and the Daily Advertiser, with which it merged in November 1836. It was eventually merged with the Evening Telegram upon being acquired by Frank Munsey from Henry L. Stoddard in January 1924. This later became the New York World-Telegram in 1927. The New York Times of July 9, 1918, reported that Edward Rumely ". . . vice president, secretary and publisher of the New York Evening Mail, was arrested late yesterday afternoon by agents of the Government, charged with perjury. The charge grew out of a statement filed with A. Mitchell Palmer, the Alien Property Custodian, in which Rumely asserted that The Evening Mail was an American-owned newspaper. The Government is in possession of evidence which, it is held, shows that instead of being owned by Americans, the paper is in fact owned by the Imperial German Government, which on June 1, 1915, paid to Rumely, through Walter Lyon, of the former Wall Street house of Renskorf. Lyon & Co., the sum of $735,000, which transferred the
    0.00
    0 votes
    53
    Staten Island Advance

    Staten Island Advance

    The Staten Island Advance is a daily newspaper published in the borough of Staten Island in New York City. The only daily newspaper published in the borough, and the only borough to have its own major daily paper, it covers news of local and community interest, including borough politics. As of April 25, 2007, Monday-Friday circulation was down 3.9% from the previous year, to 59,461. Sunday dropped 4.6% to 73,203. It is currently owned by the Advance/Newhouse Group, which derives its name from this newspaper. The Advance was created in 1886 by printer John J. Crawford and businessman James C. Kennedy as the Richmond County Advance. The name was changed to the Daily Advance before the current name. When the Advance began there were nine competing daily newspapers in Staten Island. The circulation of the Advance surpassed its early competitors, and the circulation grew from 4,500 in 1910, to over 80,000 by the mid 1990s. In 1908, Samuel Irving Newhouse, Sr. started working for New Jersey Democratic machine politician, Bayonne Times newspaper owner, and Judge Hyman Lazarus's law office as an office-boy, bookkeeper and rent-collector. By the time Samuel Newhouse Sr. was twenty-one in
    0.00
    0 votes
    54
    0.00
    0 votes
    Get your friends to vote! Spread this URL or share:

    Discuss Best New York City Newspapers of All Time

    Top List Voters