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Best National Anthem of All Time

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    1
    God Save the Tsar!

    God Save the Tsar!

    "God Save the Tsar!" (Russian: Боже, Царя храни!; transliteration: Bozhe, Tsarya khrani!) was the national anthem of the late Russian Empire. The song was chosen from a competition held in 1833. The composer was violinist Alexei Lvov, and the lyrics were by the court poet Vasily Zhukovsky. It was the anthem until the Russian Revolution of 1917, after which "Worker's Marseillaise" was adopted as the new national anthem until the overthrow of the Russian Provisional Government. Many composers made use of the theme in their compositions, most notably Tchaikovsky, who quoted it in the 1812 Overture, the Marche Slave, his overture on the Danish national anthem, and the Festival Coronation March. During the Soviet era, authorities altered Tchaikovsky's music (such as the 1812 Overture and Marche Slave), substituting other patriotic melodies for "God Save the Tsar." Charles Gounod uses the theme in his Fantaisie sur l'Hymne National Russe (Fantasy on the Russian National Hymn). William Walton's score for the 1970 film Three Sisters, based on Chekhov's play, is dominated by the theme. In 1842, English author Henry F. Chorley wrote God, the Omnipotent! set to Lvov's tune and published in
    8.67
    6 votes
    2

    For The Gambia Our Homeland

    For The Gambia Our Homeland is the national anthem of The Gambia, written by Virginia Julia Howe and composed by Jeremy Frederic Howe (based on the traditional Mandinka song Foday Kaba Dumbuya). It was adopted after an international competition to produce an anthem (and flag) before independence in 1965. The English lyrics are as follows:
    7.83
    6 votes
    3

    Salut à toi, pays de nos aïeux

    "Terre de nos aïeux" (Land of our forefathers) is the national anthem of Togo. The words and music were written by Alex Casimir-Dosseh, and was the national anthem from independence in 1960 until 1979. From 1979 to 1992 it was replaced by a different anthem composed by the party of the Rally of the Togolese People. It was readopted from 1992 onwards. This was the anthem, written by the party of Rally of the Togolese People, that, between 1979 and 1992, replaced Terre de nos aïeux :
    6.43
    7 votes
    4

    Teirake Kaini Kiribati

    Teirake Kaini Kiribati or Stand up, Kiribati is the national anthem of Kiribati. It was written and composed by Tamuera Ioteba, Uriam, and adopted in 1979. Gilbertese: Teirake kaini Kiribati, Anene ma te kakatonga, Tauraoi nakon te mwioko, Ma ni buokia aomata. Tauaninne n te raoiroi, Tangiria aomata nako. Tauaninne n te raoiroi, Tangiria aomata. Reken te kabaia ma te rau Ibuakoia kaain abara, Bon reken te nano ae banin Ma te i-tangitangiri naba. Ma ni wakina te kab'aia, Ma n neboa i eta abara. Ma ni wakina te kab'aia, Ma n neboa abara. Ti butiko ngkoe Atuara Kawakinira ao kairira Nakon taai aika i maira. Buokira ni baim ae akoi. Kakabaia ara Tautaeka Ma ake a makuri iai. Kakabaia ara Tautaeka Ma aomata ni bane. English: Stand up, People of Kiribati! Sing with jubilation! Prepare to accept responsibility And to help each other! Be steadfastly righteous! Love all our people! Be steadfastly righteous! Love all our people! The attainment of contentment And peace by our people Will be achieved when all our hearts beat as one, Love one another! Promote happiness and unity! Love one another! Promote happiness and unity! We beseech You, O God, To protect and lead us In the days to
    8.40
    5 votes
    5

    Gong Jin'ou

    Gong Jin'ou (Chinese: 鞏金甌; pinyin: gǒng jīn'ōu, lit. "Cup of Solid Gold") was the first official national anthem of China, created during the late Qing Dynasty; though it was used only for a short time due to the Republic of China overthrowing the Qing Dynasty. The song was composed by Bo Tong (溥侗), a high-ranking officer of the Imperial Guard. The lyrics, in Classical Chinese, were penned by Yan Fu, commander of the Qing Navy. Guo Cengxin (郭曾炘), Master of Ceremonies, made some minor adjustments and arranged the music. Gong Jin'ou was adopted by the Qing government on the 13th Day and 8th Month of the 3rd Year of the Xuantong Emperor's reign (October 4, 1911). However, only six days later was the Wuchang Uprising, which effectively led to the end of the Qing Dynasty with the declaration of the Republic of China on January 1, 1912 and the abdication of the emperor on February 12, 1912. As a result, the anthem never gained any notability. Since it praises the Qing dynasty specifically, it is also a Royal anthem.
    6.83
    6 votes
    6

    Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau

    Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau (Welsh pronunciation: [heːn wlɑːd və ˈn̥adai]) is the national anthem of Wales. The title – taken from the first words of the song – means "Old Land of My Fathers", usually rendered in English as simply "Land of My Fathers". The words were written by Evan James and the tune composed by his son, James James, both residents of Pontypridd, Glamorgan, in January 1856. The earliest written copy survives and is part of the collections of the National Library of Wales. Glan Rhondda (Banks of the Rhondda), as it was known when it was composed, was first performed in the vestry of the original Capel Tabor, Maesteg, (which later became a working men's club), in either January or February 1856, by Elizabeth John from Pontypridd, and it soon became popular in the locality. James James, the composer, was a harpist who played his instrument in the public house he ran, for the purpose of dancing. The song was originally intended to be performed in 6/8 time, but had to be slowed down to its present rhythm when it began to be sung by large crowds. The popularity of the song increased after the Llangollen Eisteddfod of 1858. Thomas Llewelyn of Aberdare won a competition for an
    7.80
    5 votes
    7

    La Bayamesa

    El Himno de Bayamo (The Bayamo Anthem) is the national anthem of Cuba. It was first performed during the Battle of Bayamo in 1868. Perucho Figueredo, who took part in the battle, wrote and composed the song. The melody, also called La Bayamesa, was composed by Figueredo in 1867. On October 20, 1868 the Cuban forces obtained the capitulation of the Spaniard authorities in Bayamo, the jubilant people surrounded Figueredo and asked him to write an anthem with the melody they were humming. Right on the saddle of his horse, Figueredo wrote the lyrics of the anthem, which was longer than the current official version. Figueredo was captured and executed by the Spaniards two years later. Just before the firing squad received the Fire command, Figueredo shouted the line from his anthem: Morir por la Patria es vivir. Officially adopted in 1902, the anthem was retained after the revolution of 1959. The arrangement commonly used, without credit in Cuba, is believed to be that of José Norman, author of Cuban Pete . The Cuban composer Antonio Rodriguez-Ferrer, was the author of the musical introductory notes to the Cuban national anthem. In addition to the Himno de Bayamo, there are two other
    7.80
    5 votes
    8
    Samo ku waar

    Samo ku waar

    Samo ku waar ("Long Life with Peace") is the national anthem of Somaliland, a self-declared republic that is internationally recognized as an autonomous region of Somalia. It was written and composed in 1997 by Hassan Sheikh Mumin. It is sung in Somali. Samo ku waar Long Life with Peace
    7.80
    5 votes
    9

    Somalia, Wake Up

    Soomaaliyeey toosoo, or Somalia, Wake Up, is the national anthem of Somalia. Soomaaliyeey toosoo is a well-known Somali song that dates from the early 1940s. According to the Somali government, it was written by Ali Mire Awale in 1947. However, some sources suggest that it was written by Ali Mire Awale and Yusuf Haji Adan sometime in the 1940s. It was sung to mark independence day on July 1, 1960, and was regularly performed by children in the mornings at schools. Soomaaliyeey toosoo was officially adopted in 2000. The Somali Republic was formed on 1 July 1960 following the union of the newly-independent Trust Territory of Somalia (the former Italian Somaliland) and the State of Somaliland (the former British Somaliland). At this time a wordless and untitled piece by Italian composer Giuseppe Blanc was adopted as the national anthem. This anthem remained in use during the Somali Democratic Republic period between 1969–1991.
    7.80
    5 votes
    10

    Bože pravde

    "Bože pravde" (Serbian Cyrillic: „Боже правде”, meaning "God of Justice" or "Lord, Give Us Justice") is the official anthem of Serbia, as defined by the Article 7 of the Constitution of Serbia. "Bože pravde" was the anthem of the Principality of Serbia and Kingdom of Serbia until 1918 when Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes was formed. It was recommended by the Parliament of Serbia on August 17, 2004 and constitutionally adopted on November 8, 2006. The recommended text was made Law on May 11, 2009. The original song was written in 1872 with music by Davorin Jenko and lyrics by Jovan Đorđević. It was then a piece for the theater play "Marko kazuje na kome je carstvo" (Marko names the Emperor), and its immense popularity with audiences prompted its adoption as the Serbian national anthem. While being the anthem of the Kingdom of Serbia, it occasionally was referred to as 'Serbian National Prayer' and the original lyrics contained a petition for the Serbian king. Various rulers of Serbia changed the words of the anthem to suit them. During the rule of Prince Milan I of Serbia, the words were "God, save Prince Milan" (knez Milana Bože spasi), which changed to King Milan when Serbia
    6.67
    6 votes
    11

    Al-Nasheed Al-Watani

    Al-Nasheed Al-Watani (Arabic: النشيد الوطني‎, an-našid al-waṭanī, meaning "National Anthem"). The Kuwaiti national anthem is by poet Ahmad Meshari Al-Adwani, Ibrahim Al-Soula composed the music and Ahmad Ali arranged the composition. It was first broadcast on 25 February 1978. Before 1978 Amiri Salute was used. It was composed by Yusuf Adees in 1951. Now the salute is the first six bars of the national anthem. The anthem is seldom used in Kuwait and is used primarily for special occasions. As such, many Kuwaitis do not use the national anthem.
    8.75
    4 votes
    12

    Ey Reqîb

    Ey Reqîb (in Kurdish: ئه‌ی رەقیب) is the Kurdish national anthem. It was written by the Kurdish poet and political activist, Dildar in 1938, while in jail. "Ey Reqîb" means "Oh, Enemy" or "Hey Enemy", in reference to the jail guards in the prison where Dildar was held and tortured and who also symbolized the occupying countries of Turkey, Iraq and Syria. The song was originally written in Soranî-Kurdish but nowadays it is sung in both the Sorani and the Kurmancî-dialects. In 1946, the song was adopted as the official anthem of the Kurdistan Republic of Mahabad, a short-lived Kurdish republic of the 20th century in Iran that lasted for a year. "Ey Reqîb" has been adopted by the Kurdistan Regional Government as the official national anthem of the federal south Kurdistan.
    8.75
    4 votes
    13
    Kde domov můj?

    Kde domov můj?

    Kde domov můj? (Czech pronunciation: [ˈɡdɛ ˈdomof ˈmuːj]; in English: Where is my home?) is a piece of music written by the composer František Škroup and the playwright Josef Kajetán Tyl. The piece was written as a part of the incidental music to the comedy Fidlovačka aneb Žádný hněv a žádná rvačka (Fidlovačka, or No Anger and No Brawl). It was first performed by Karel Strakatý at the Estates Theatre in Prague on December 21, 1834. The original song consists of two verses (see below). Although J. K. Tyl is said to have considered leaving the song out of the play, not convinced of its quality, it soon became very popular among Czechs and was accepted as an informal anthem of a nation seeking to revive its identity within the Habsburg Empire. Soon after Czechoslovakia was formed in 1918, the first verse of the song became the Czech part of the national anthem, followed by the first verse of the Slovak song Nad Tatrou sa blýska. Because of the linguistic and ethnic diversity of the First Republic, official translations were made into Hungarian and German as well. With the split of Czechoslovakia in 1993, the Czechoslovak anthem was divided as well. While Slovakia extended its anthem
    7.40
    5 votes
    14

    The Banner of Freedom

    The Banner of Freedom (Samoan: O Le Fu'a o Le Sa'olotoga o Samoa) is the national anthem of Samoa. Both the words (which honour the country's flag) and the music were composed by Sauni Iiga Kuresa. Samoa adopted The Banner of Freedom as its national anthem upon gaining its independence from New Zealand in 1962. Samoan version: English translation:
    7.40
    5 votes
    15

    National anthem of South Africa

    Since 1997, the South African national anthem has been a hybrid song combining new English lyrics with extracts of the hymn Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrika (God Bless Africa) and the former anthem Die Stem van Suid-Afrika (The Call of South Africa). The fact that it shifts (modulates) and ends in a different key, a feature it shares with the Italian national anthem, makes it compositionally unusual. The lyrics employ the five most widely spoken of South Africa's eleven official languages - Xhosa (first stanza, first two lines), Zulu (first stanza, last two lines), Sesotho (second stanza), Afrikaans (third stanza) and English (final stanza). Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrika was composed in 1897 by Enoch Sontonga, a Methodist school teacher. It was originally sung as a church hymn but later became an act of political defiance against the apartheid government. Die Stem van Suid-Afrika is a poem written by C.J. Langenhoven in 1918 and was set to music by the Reverend Marthinus Lourens de Villiers in 1921. Die Stem was the co-national anthem with God Save the King/Queen from 1936 to 1957, when it became the sole national anthem until 1995. The South African government adopted both songs as national
    8.50
    4 votes
    16

    Hymni i Flamurit

    Himni i Flamurit (in English: Hymn to the Flag) is the national anthem of Albania. The words were written by the Albanian poet Asdreni (Aleksandër Stavre Drenova) but are merely different from the original Romanian lyrics which Andrei Barseanu wrote for Porumbescu's piece. The hymn was first published as a poem in Liri e Shqipërisë (in English: Freedom of Albania), an Albanian newspaper in Sofia, Bulgaria, on April 21, 1912. It was later printed in a volume of poems by Drenova titled Ëndra e lotë (in English: Dreams and tears), which was published in Bucharest. The music of the anthem was composed by the Romanian composer Ciprian Porumbescu, originally for the song "Pe-al nostru steag e scris Unire" (or "E scris pe tricolor unire"). There are two versions of the anthem: a long and a short one. Below is the text for the long version. The second stanza is considered as refrain and is repeated at the end. The short version makes use of the first two stanzas only and repeats the last two verses of the 2nd stanza. Usually, in sportive events among national teams, the short version is the one officially used. (The original poem has three more stanzas that are not part of the anthem –
    6.33
    6 votes
    17
    Mer Hayrenik

    Mer Hayrenik

    "Mer Hayrenik" (Armenian: Մեր Հայրենիք, Armenian pronunciation: [mɛɾ hɑjɾɛnikʰ]; "Our Fatherland") is the national anthem of the Republic of Armenia. Adopted on July 1, 1991, it was also the national anthem of the Democratic Republic of Armenia (1918–1920), the first modern Armenian state. The lyrics of the anthem are adapted from a version of Song of an Italian girl (Armenian: Իտալացի աղջկա երգը, written in 1859) by Mikael Nalbandian (1829–1866). Later set to music by composer Barsegh Kanachyan (1885–1967). Mer Hayrenik is based on the first, third, fourth and sixth stanzas of the original poem The Song of an Italian Girl. Refers to the Wars of Italian Independence against the Austrian Empire.
    7.20
    5 votes
    18

    Ardulfurataini Watan

    "Ardulfurataini Watan" (The Land of The Two Rivers) (Arabic: أرض الفراتين‎) is the old national anthem of Iraq. The anthem was adopted in 1981, written by Shafiq Alkamali with music by Walid Georges Gholmieh. After the ousting of the Saddam Hussein government in 2004, the Iraqi government selected a new national anthem, Mawtini.
    7.00
    5 votes
    19
    National anthem of South Vietnam

    National anthem of South Vietnam

    The National Anthem of the Republic of Vietnam (Tiếng Gọi Công Dân) originally the "Thanh Niên Hành Khúc" (English: March of the Youths), was the national anthem of South Vietnam, from 1948 to 1975. The anthem was written and composed by Lưu Hữu Phước (1921-1989). Phước was a well-known Vietnamese musician and songwriter. The song was later modified with the name changed to "Tiếng Gọi Công Dân" (English: "Call to the Citizens"), and became the official national anthem of the Republic of Vietnam. The Song is still sung by the Vietnamese people living in the United States (and other countries where Vietnamese refugees consequently resided after the war) as the Anthem of Free Vietnam. "Thanh niên Hành Khúc" was first adopted as the national anthem by the Provisional Central Government of Vietnam (Pre-government of the State of Vietnam. 1948 - 1949) on 14 June 1948, and it was inherited as a national anthem by the State of Vietnam (1949–1955) and the Republic of Vietnam (1955–1975). The words of "Thanh Niên Hành Khúc" were revised by former President Ngo Dinh Diem in 1956. "Tiếng Gọi Công Dân" was an official national anthem of the Republic of Vietnam. “Giải phóng miền Nam” ("To
    8.00
    4 votes
    20
    Fair Antigua, We Salute Thee

    Fair Antigua, We Salute Thee

    "Fair Antigua, We Salute Thee" is the national anthem of Antigua and Barbuda. Written by Novelle Hamilton Richards and composed by Walter Garnet Picart Chambers, it was adopted upon independence in 1981. God Save the Queen is still the Royal anthem.
    6.00
    6 votes
    21

    Hymn to Liberty

    The Hymn to Liberty or Hymn to Freedom (Greek: Ὕμνος εἰς τὴν Ἐλευθερίαν, Ýmnos is tin Eleftherían) is a poem written by Dionýsios Solomós in 1823 that consists of 158 stanzas, which is used as the national anthem of Greece. It was set to music by Nikolaos Mantzaros, and is the longest national anthem in the world by length of text. In 1865, the first three stanzas and later the first two officially became the national anthem of Greece and later also that of the Republic of Cyprus. The hymn was set to music in 1865 by the Corfiot operatic composer Nikolaos Mantzaros, who composed two choral versions, a long one for the whole poem and a short one for the first two stanzas; the latter is the one adopted as the National Anthem of Greece. The Constitution of Cyprus of 1960 does not mention anything about an anthem. After an agreement made between the two communities, in official circumstances, a piece of classical music should be played as the anthem. However, after rejecting the amendments of the Constitution proposed by Makarios, in 1963, the Turkish representation broke away from the Government. This resulted to the decision by the Council of Ministers to adopt as the official anthem
    6.80
    5 votes
    22

    Nashid as-Salaam as-Sultani

    Nashīd as-Salām as-Sultānī (Arabic: نشيد السلام السلطاني‎) is the Sultanate of Oman's national anthem. It was adopted in 1970 and amended on November 6, 1996. The transliteration of the anthem follows.
    6.80
    5 votes
    23
    Shumi Maritsa

    Shumi Maritsa

    Shumi Maritsa (Bulgarian: Шуми Марица [ʃoˈmi mɐˈritsɐ]) was the Bulgarian national anthem from 1886 until 1944. The original text was written by Nikola Zhivkov, a head teacher in Veles (now in the Republic of Macedonia). The lyrics were edited many times, most notably in 1912 by the poet Ivan Vazov who also composed the music.
    9.00
    3 votes
    24

    Djibouti

    Djibouti (Somali: Jabuuti) is the national anthem of the country of the same name. The Djibouti national anthem was adopted upon independence in 1977. The words are in Somali, and were written by Aden Elmi. The melody was composed by Abdi Robleh.
    7.75
    4 votes
    25

    March of the Volunteers

    March of the Volunteers (simplified Chinese: 义勇军进行曲; traditional Chinese: 義勇軍進行曲; pinyin: Yìyǒngjūn Jìnxíngqǔ) is the national anthem of the People's Republic of China (including the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region since 1 July 1997, and the Macau Special Administrative Region since 20 December 1999), written by the poet and playwright Tian Han with music composed by Nie Er. This composition is a musical march. The piece was first performed as part of a 1934 Shanghai play and its original lyrics are the official lyrics of the national anthem. In 2004, a provision that the March of the Volunteers be the national anthem was added to the Constitution of the People's Republic of China as Article 136. March of the Volunteers was composed by Nie Er to a text by Tian Han in 1934. Popular stories suggest, however, that Tian wrote it on a tobacco paper after being arrested in Shanghai and thrown into a Kuomintang (KMT) jail in 1935. The song was featured as the theme song of the 1935 patriotic film Sons and Daughters in a Time of Storm, also known as "Children of the Storm," a story about an intellectual who leaves to fight in the Second Sino-Japanese War. The song was later used in
    7.75
    4 votes
    26

    Salve, Oh Patria

    "¡Salve, Oh Patria!" ("We Salute You, Our Homeland") is the national anthem of Ecuador. The lyrics were written in 1865 by the poet Juan León Mera, under request of the Ecuadorian Senate; the music was composed by Antonio Neumane. However, the anthem was not officially adopted by the Congress until September 29, 1948.. The anthem consists of a chorus and six verses, of which only the second verse and the chorus (before and after the verse) are sung. In 1830-1832, José Joaquín de Olmedo wrote a national anthem (chorus and four verses) as an homage to the infant Ecuadorian state. This composition, suggested by General Juan José Flores, was not set to music and did not gain popularity. In 1833, a hymn entitled Canción Ecuatoriana (Ecuadorian Song), of six verses, was published in the Gaceta del Gobierno del Ecuador No. 125 of December 28. A composition date of 1830 was given, but most historians do not consider this definitive, because it was by an anonymous author. In 1838, a Canción Nacional (National Song), of a chorus and six verses, appeared included in the pamphlet Poesías by General Flores, which was published by the Government Press. In a later editions, there were changes to
    7.75
    4 votes
    27

    The Patriotic Song

    "The Patriotic Song" (Russian: Патриотическая Песня, tr. Patrioticheskaya Pesnya; also translatable as "A Patriotic Song") was the national anthem of the Russian SFSR and of the Russian Federation from 1990 to 2000. The song originally was not a song but a composition for piano without lyrics, written by Mikhail Glinka and entitled in French, "Motif de chant national." The song has been confused with the closing chorus of Glinka's opera A Life for the Tsar, probably because both begin with the same word ("Slav'sya"), but the two compositions are unrelated (though the operatic music, too, has been suggested as a candidate for the Russian national anthem). The tune of this instrumental anthem, which was chosen by Boris Yeltsin in the early 1990s and favored by the Russian Orthodox church, went without lyrics for several years. In 1999, a contest to provide suitable words for the anthem was won by Viktor Radugin with his poem "Славься, Россия!" ("Slav'sya, Rossiya!"; "Be glorious, Russia!"). Glinka's anthem was replaced soon after Yeltsin's successor, Vladimir Putin took office. The National Anthem of the Soviet Union music with modified lyrics was established and approved by federal
    7.75
    4 votes
    28
    Het Wilhelmus

    Het Wilhelmus

    Wilhelmus van Nassouwe, usually known just as the Wilhelmus (Dutch: het Wilhelmus  pronunciation (help·info); English translation: the William), is the national anthem of the Netherlands and is the oldest national anthem in the world though the words of the Japanese national anthem (not the music) date back to the ninth century. Although it was not recognized as the official national anthem until 1932, it has always been popular with parts of the Dutch population and resurfaced on several occasions in the course of Dutch history before gaining its present status. Like many anthems, the Wilhelmus originated in the nation's struggle to achieve independence. It tells of Willem van Oranje (William of Orange), his life and why he is fighting against the King of Spain. As a result, the anthem is written in a first person perspective, as if it were sung by William himself. William of Orange being the I-figure (Early Modern Dutch "ick") in the 1st stanza "Den Coninck van Hispaengien heb ick altijt gheeert" ("I have always honoured the King of Spain"). It was also the anthem of the Netherlands Antilles from 1954-1964. This refers to the initial loyalty of the leading figures of the Dutch
    6.60
    5 votes
    29

    Hey, Slavs

    Hey, Slavs is an anthemic song dedicated to Slavic peoples. Its first lyrics were written in 1834 under the title Hey, Slovaks (Hej, Slováci) by Samuel Tomášik and it has since served as the anthem of the Pan-Slavic movement, the anthem of the Sokol physical education and political movement, the anthem of the SFR Yugoslavia and the transitional anthem of the State Union of Serbia and Montenegro. The song is also considered to be the second, unofficial anthem of the Slovaks. Its melody is based on Mazurek Dąbrowskiego, which has been also the anthem of Poland since 1926, but the Yugoslav variation is much slower and more accentuated. In the Serbo-Croatian language, which deployed both the Latinic and the Cyrillic alphabets, the title Hej, Slaveni was presented: In Macedonian the song is called Ej, Sloveni (Еј, Словени), and in Slovene Hej, Slovani. The original title in Slovak is Hej, Slováci. The song was written by the Slovak Lutheran pastor, poet and historian Samuel Tomášik while he was visiting Prague in 1834. He was appalled that German was more commonly heard in the streets of Prague than Czech. He wrote in his diary: He soon altered the lyrics to include all Slavs and Hey,
    7.50
    4 votes
    30

    La Renaissance

    "La Renaissance" is the national anthem of the Central African Republic, adopted upon independence in 1960. The words were written by the then Prime Minister, Barthélémy Boganda. The music was composed by Herbert Pepper, who also composed the national anthem of Senegal, Pincez Tous vos Koras, Frappez les Balafons. There is also a version in the Sango language entitled E Zingo.
    7.50
    4 votes
    31

    Aegukga

    Aegukga is the national anthem of South Korea. The title literally means "The Patriotic Song", or "The Song of Love for the Country". It is believed that the lyrics were written for the cornerstone-laying ceremony of the Independence Gate in Seoul in 1896 by Yun Chiho, a politician, or by An Chang-ho, a pro-independence leader and educator. Initially, Aegukga was sung to the tune of the Scottish folk song "Auld Lang Syne", introduced to Korea by Western missionaries. The Provisional Government of the Republic of Korea (1919–1945) in Shanghai, China, adopted it as their national anthem. At a ceremony celebrating the founding of South Korea on 15 August 1948, the Scottish tune was finally replaced by the Finale of Korea Fantasia that Ahn Eak-tai had composed in 1935. The new "Aegukga" was later adopted by the Presidential Decree of 1948 by then-President Syngman Rhee (or Lee Seungman). Since the composer Ahn Eak-tai died in 1965, the copyright for the music will not expire at least until 2015. Two Korean professional soccer teams were sued by a copyrightholders' group for public playing of this song in December 2003. The composer's widow Lolita Ahn and her family then relinquished
    8.67
    3 votes
    32

    Burundi Bwacu

    Burundi Bwacu (Our Burundi) is the national anthem of Burundi. Written by a group of writers led by Jean-Baptiste Ntahokaja, a Catholic priest, and composed by Marc Barengayabo, it was adopted upon independence in 1962. Burundi bwacu, Burundi buhire, Shinga icumu mu mashinga, Gaba intahe y'ubugabo ku bugingo. Warapfunywe ntiwapfuye, Warahabishijwe ntiwahababuka, Uhagurukana, uhagurukana, uhagurukana, ubugabo urikukira. Komerwamashyi n'amakungu, Habwa impundu nabawe, Isamirane mu mashinga, isamirane mu mashinga, Burundi bwacu, ragi ry'abasokuru, Ramutswa intahe n'ibihugu, Ufatanije ishaka n'ubuhizi; Vuza impundu wiganzuye uwakuganza uwakuganza. Burundi bwacu, nkoramutima kuri twese, Tugutuye amaboko, umitima n'ubuzima, Imana yakuduhaye ikudutungire. Horana ubumwe n'abagabo n'itekane. Sagwa n'urweze, sagwa n'amahoro meza. Burŭndi Bwâcu, Burŭndi buhĭre, Shīnga icúmu mu mashīnga, Gaba intăhe y'úbugabo ku bugīngo. Warápfunywe ntiwapfûye, Waráhabīshijwe ntiwahababuka, Uhagurukana, uhagurukana, uhagurukana, ubugabo urîkukira. Komerwa amáshi n'ámakūngu, Hābwa impŭndu n'âbâwe, Isāmírane mu mashīnga, isāmírane mu mashīnga. Burŭndi bwâcu, rági ry'ábasôkúru, Ramutswa intăhe
    8.67
    3 votes
    33

    Liberté

    "Liberté" (Liberty) has been the national anthem of Guinea since independence in 1958. It was arranged by Fodéba Keïta and was based on the melody of "Alfa yaya". The author of the lyrics is unknown.
    6.40
    5 votes
    34
    Flower of Scotland

    Flower of Scotland

    Flower of Scotland (Scottish Gaelic: Flùr na h-Alba, Scots: Flouer o Scotland) is a Scottish song, used frequently at special occasions and sporting events. Although there is no official national anthem of Scotland, Flower of Scotland is one of a number of songs which unofficially fulfil this role, along with the older Scots Wha Hae, Scotland the Brave and Highland Cathedral. It was written by Roy Williamson of the folk group The Corries, and presented in 1967, and refers to the victory of the Scots, led by Robert the Bruce, over England's Edward II at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314. The song has been used by as a National Anthem by the Scotland national rugby union team, ever since the winger, Billy Steele, encouraged his team-mates to sing it on the victorious Lions tour of South Africa in 1974. The song was adopted as the pre-game anthem during the deciding match of the 1990 Five Nations Championship between Scotland and England, which Scotland won 13–7 to win the Grand Slam. The Scottish Football Association adopted "Flower of Scotland" as its pre-game national anthem in 1997 although it was first used by them in 1993,. Usually only the first and third verses are sung. The
    7.25
    4 votes
    35
    Kimigayo

    Kimigayo

    "Kimigayo" (君が代) is the national anthem of Japan. From 1868 to 1945, it served as the national anthem of the Empire of Japan. With a length of 11 measures and 32 characters, "Kimigayo" is also one of the world's shortest national anthems currently in use. Its lyrics are based on a Waka poem written in the Heian period (794-1185), sung to a melody written in the imperial period (1868–1945). The current melody was chosen in 1880, replacing an unpopular melody composed eleven years earlier. While the title "Kimigayo" is usually translated as His Majesty's Reign, no official translation of the title nor lyrics has ever been established by law. Prior to 1945, "Kimigayo" served as the national anthem of the Empire of Japan, however, when the Empire of Japan was dissolved following its surrender at the end of World War II, its parliamentary democracy successor state, the State of Japan, replaced it in 1945, the polity therefore changed from an absolute monarchy to a parliamentary democracy. However, Emperor Hirohito was not dethroned, and "Kimigayo" was retained as the de facto national anthem, only becoming legally recognized as the official national anthem in 1999, with the passage of
    7.25
    4 votes
    36

    National Anthem of Uruguay

    The "National Anthem of Uruguay", also known by its first line "Orientales, la Patria o la Tumba", is the longest national anthem in terms of duration with 105 bars of music (about six minutes). The anthem's lyrics are by Francisco Acuña de Figueroa, who was also author of the lyrics to Paraguay's national anthem; "Paraguayos, República o Muerte". The lyrics were officially declared the national anthem on July 8, 1833. The music was composed by Francisco José Debali with the collaboration of Fernando Quijano. It was first performed on July 19, 1845. The music was officially declared the national anthem on July 25, 1848. Ninety years later (May 20, 1938) a new decree incorporated modifications by Gerardo Grasso and Benone Calcavecchia. Only the first two verses are sung. The theme of the anthem is supposedly taken from a Donizetti opera, while the elaboration of this theme is truly Debali's merit.
    7.25
    4 votes
    37
    Virgin Islands March

    Virgin Islands March

    The "Virgin Islands March" is a patriotic song which is considered to be the national anthem of the United States Virgin Islands. The song was composed by Sam Williams and U.S. Virgin Island native Alton Adams in the 1920s. It served as the unofficial anthem of the U.S. Virgin Islands until 1963 when it was officially recognized by Legislative Act. The song itself consists of a very cheerful melody. Since the U.S. Virgin Islands is an American insular territory, the national anthem is still The Star-Spangled Banner. The Guardian reporter Alex Marshall compared this anthem favourably to other national anthems, suggesting that it was reminiscent of the music of the Disney film Mary Poppins.
    7.25
    4 votes
    38

    La Dessalinienne

    La Dessalinienne (The Dessalines Song) is the national anthem of Haiti, honoring Jean-Jacques Dessalines. It was written by Justin Lhérisson and composed by Nicolas Geffrard and adopted in 1904.
    8.33
    3 votes
    39
    Majulah Singapura

    Majulah Singapura

    Majulah Singapura (Onward Singapore) is the national anthem of Singapore. Composed by Zubir Said in 1958 as a theme song for official functions of the City Council of Singapore, the song was selected in 1959 as the island's anthem when it attained self-government. Upon full independence in 1965, Majulah Singapura was formally adopted as Singapore's national anthem. By law the anthem may only be sung with its original Malay lyrics, although there exist authorized translations of the lyrics of the anthem in Singapore's three other official languages: English, Mandarin and Tamil. Originally composed in the key of G major, in 2001 the national anthem was officially relaunched in the lower key of F major as this was said to allow for a "grander and more inspiring arrangement". The national anthem is regularly performed or sung in schools and armed forces camps at ceremonies held at the beginning and/or the end of each day, during which the national flag is also raised and lowered and the national pledge is taken. Singaporeans are especially encouraged to sing the national anthem on occasions of national celebration or national significance such as at the National Day Parade, at National
    8.33
    3 votes
    40

    Oh Uganda, Land of Beauty

    "Oh Uganda, Land of Beauty" is the Ugandan national anthem. It was adopted in 1962, with words and music by George Wilberforce Kakoma. The anthem is one of the shortest in the world, and is occasionally performed twice in a row to lengthen it.
    8.33
    3 votes
    41

    Surudi Milli

    "Surudi Milli" is the national anthem of Tajikistan, officially adopted in 1991. The lyrics were written by Gulnazar Keldi and the music by Suleiman Yudakov, the same melody from the Anthem of the Tajik Soviet Socialist Republic. Note the Cyrillic script is the only official script of the country and the Perso-Arabic script is not well known in the country itself and is just provided as a comparison to the Tajik language since it is a dialect of Persian.
    8.33
    3 votes
    42

    Tahiat Alalam

    The National Anthem of the United Arab Emirates, (Arabic: النشيد الوطني الإماراتي‎), also popularly known as Ishy Bilady (عيشي بلادي; ‘īšiy bilādī; literally, Long Live my Nation), was officially accepted as the United Arab Emirates' national anthem after the formation of the country in 1971. The anthem was composed by Sa'ad Abdel Wahab, who also composed the national anthems of other Arab states, including that of Libya. The lyrics to the anthem, officially adopted in 1996, were written by Arif Al Sheikh Abdullah Al Hassan.
    8.33
    3 votes
    43

    Pheng Xat Lao

    "Pheng Xat Lao" (Lao: ເພງຊາດລາວ) is the national anthem of the Lao People's Democratic Republic. It was composed by Dr. Thongdy Sounthonevichit (1905-1968) in 1941 and adopted as the national anthem of the Kingdom of Laos in 1947. The original lyrics were replaced when the Lao People's Democratic Republic was established in 1975 by new lyrics written by Sisana Sisane.
    6.20
    5 votes
    44

    Mu isamaa, mu õnn ja rõõm

    Mu isamaa, mu õnn ja rõõm ("My Fatherland, My Happiness and Joy") was adopted as the national anthem (Estonian: (riigi)hümn) of the Republic of Estonia in 1920, and again in 1990. The lyrics were written by Johann Voldemar Jannsen and are set to a melody composed in 1848 by Fredrik (Friedrich) Pacius which is also that of the national anthem of Finland: Maamme ("Vårt Land" in Swedish). It is also considered to be national anthem for Livonian people with text Min izāmō, min sindimō, My Fatherland, my native land. The song was first presented to the public as a choral work in the Grand Song Festival of Estonia in 1869 and quickly became a symbol of the Estonian National Awakening. Mu isamaa, mu õnn ja rõõm was officially adopted as the national anthem of Estonia in 1920, after the Estonian War of Independence. During the Soviet occupation since 1944, Mu isamaa, mu õnn ja rõõm was banned. Between 1945 and 1990 the Estonian Soviet Socialist Republic had a different anthem. Yet, the people of Estonia could often hear the melody, as Finland's state broadcaster Yleisradio, whose radio and television broadcasts were received in Northern Estonia, played an instrumental version of the
    9.50
    2 votes
    45

    Rwanda Nziza

    "Rwanda Nziza" (Kinyarwanda for "Beautiful Rwanda") has been the national anthem of Rwanda since January 1, 2001. It replaces Rwanda Rwacu, which had been the national anthem since 1962. The lyrics are as follows:
    9.50
    2 votes
    46

    Angola Avante

    Angola Avante! (Forward Angola!) is the national anthem of Angola. It was written by Manuel Rui Alves Monteiro (1941) and composed by Rui Alberto Vieira Dias Mingas (1939). It was adopted in 1975 upon independence from Portugal.
    7.00
    4 votes
    47
    God Save the Queen

    God Save the Queen

    "God Save the Queen" (alternatively "God Save the King") is an anthem used in a number of Commonwealth realms, their territories, and the British Crown Dependencies. The words and title are adapted to the gender of the current monarch, e.g., replacing "Queen" with "King", "she" with "he", and so forth, when a king reigns. The author of the tune is unknown, and it may originate in plainchant, but a 1619 attribution to John Bull is sometimes made. God Save the Queen is the de facto British national anthem and has this role in some British territories. It is one of two national anthems for New Zealand (since 1977) and for several of Britain's territories that have their own additional local anthem. It is the royal anthem of Australia (since 1984), Canada (since 1980), Barbados, Jamaica, and Tuvalu. In countries not previously part of the British Empire, the tune of "God Save the Queen" has provided the basis for various patriotic songs, though still generally connected with royal ceremony. In the United States, the tune is used for the patriotic "My Country, 'Tis of Thee." Beyond its first verse, which is consistent, it has many historic and extant versions: Since its first
    7.00
    4 votes
    48
    Maamme

    Maamme

    Maamme (Finnish) or Vårt land (Swedish) (“our land”) is the title of Finland's national anthem. There is no law on an official national anthem in Finland, but Maamme is firmly established by convention. The music was composed by the German immigrant Fredrik Pacius, with (original Swedish) words by Johan Ludvig Runeberg, and was performed for the first time on 13 May 1848. The original poem, written in 1846 but not printed until 1848, had 11 stanzas and formed the prologue to the great verse cycle The Tales of Ensign Stål ("Fänrik Ståhls Sägner"), a masterpiece of Romantic nationalism. The current Finnish text is usually attributed to the 1889 translation of Ensign Stål by Paavo Cajander, but in fact originates from the 1867 translation by Julius Krohn. The Tales of Ensign Stål were much appreciated throughout all of Scandinavia. Up until the time of Finland's independence in 1917–18, when the song began to be recognized as specifically applying to Finland, Pacius's tune and Runeberg's text were often also sung in Denmark, Norway, and Sweden. Note that in the original Swedish text there is no reference to Finland (except for in verses 4 and 10, which are rarely sung), only to a
    7.00
    4 votes
    49
    Nad Tatrou sa blýska

    Nad Tatrou sa blýska

    Nad Tatrou sa blýska (English: Lightning over the Tatras) is the national anthem of Slovakia. The origins of the anthem are in the Central European activism of the 19th century. Its main themes are a storm over the Tatra mountains that symbolized danger to the Slovaks, and a desire for a resolution of the threat. It used to be particularly popular during the 1848 - 1849 insurgencies. During the days of Czechoslovakia, the anthem was played in many Slovak towns at noon. This tradition ceased to exist after the two nations split. Nad Tatrou sa blýska is now performed mainly at special events, including sporting events. 23-year-old Janko Matúška wrote the lyrics of this anthem in January - February 1844. The tune came from the folk song Kopala studienku (She Dug A Well) suggested to him by his fellow student Jozef Podhradský (1823 – 1915), a future religious and Pan-Slavic activist and gymnasial teacher. Shortly afterwards, Matúška and about two dozen other students left their prestigious Bratislava Lutheran lyceum (preparatory high school and college) in protest over the removal of Ľudovít Štúr from his teaching position by the Lutheran Church under pressure from the authorities.
    7.00
    4 votes
    50
    National Anthem of the Republic of China

    National Anthem of the Republic of China

    "Zhōnghuá Míngúo gúogē" is the national anthem of the Republic of China (ROC). It discusses how the vision and hopes of a new nation and its people can and should be achieved and maintained using the Three Principles of the People. The text of "National Anthem of the Republic of China" was the collaboration between several Kuomintang (KMT) members, The text debuted on July 16, 1924 as the opening of a speech by Sun Yat-sen at the opening ceremony of the Whampoa Military Academy. After the success of the Northern Expedition, the Kuomintang chose the text to be its party anthem and publicly solicited for accompanying music. Ch'eng Mao-yün (程懋筠; Chéng Màoyún) won in a contest of 139 participants. On March 24, 1930, numerous Kuomintang members proposed to use the speech by Sun as the lyrics to the national anthem. Due to opposition over using a symbol of a political party to represent the entire nation, the National Anthem Editing and Research Committee (國歌編製研究委員會) was set up, which endorsed the KMT party song. On June 3, 1937, the Central Standing Committee (中央常務委員會) approved the proposal, and in 1943, the song officially became the national anthem of the Republic of China. Simplified
    7.00
    4 votes
    51

    Du gamla, Du fria

    "Du gamla, Du fria" ("Thou ancient, Thou free") is the de facto national anthem of Sweden. It was originally named "Sång till Norden" ("Song to the North"), and the first words of its lyrics have become adopted as the title in the interim. Although the Swedish constitution makes no mention of a national anthem, Du gamla, Du fria enjoys universal recognition and is used, for example, at government ceremonies as well as sporting events. It first began to win recognition as a patriotic song in the 1890s, and the issue of its status was debated back and forth up until the 1930s. In 1938, the Swedish public service radio company Sveriges Radio started playing it at the end of transmitting in the evenings, which marked the beginning of the de facto status as national anthem the song has had since. Despite a widespread belief that it was adopted as the national anthem in 1866, no such recognition has ever been officially accorded. A kind of official recognition was when the King Oscar II rose in honour when the song was played, the first time in 1893. In 2000 a Riksdag committee rejected, as "unnecessary", a proposal to give the song legally official status. However, there have since been
    6.00
    5 votes
    52
    Kassaman

    Kassaman

    Kassaman or Qassaman (We Pledge) (Arabic: قَسَمًا‎) is the national anthem of Algeria. It was adopted in 1963, shortly after the Independence. The lyrics were written by Mufdi Zakariah in 1956 while imprisoned by the French colonial forces. He wrote the verses using his blood on the 69th cell walls. The composer of the music is Mohamed Fawzi, from Egypt. The lyrics to Kassaman are unusual for a national anthem in that they make direct reference to another state – France.
    6.00
    5 votes
    53
    Denes nad Makedonija

    Denes nad Makedonija

    Denes nad Makedonija (Macedonian: Денес Над Македонија, English translation: "Today Over Macedonia") is the national anthem of the Republic of Macedonia. It was composed by Todor Skalovski and the lyrics were written by Vlado Maleski in 1941. It was performed as a popular song of the Macedonians during the time of Socialist Republic of Macedonia, a part of Yugoslavia. Later the song was officially adopted to be the anthem of the independent Macedonia.
    8.00
    3 votes
    54
    He Mele Lahui Hawaii

    He Mele Lahui Hawaii

    "He Mele Lāhui Hawaiʻi" ("The Song of the Hawaiian Nation") was composed by Liliuokalani in November 1866 at the request of Kamehameha V, who wanted a national anthem to replace the British anthem "God Save the King". It replaced Lunalilo's composition "E Ola Ke Aliʻi Ke Akua" as the national anthem. Liliʻuokalani wrote: "The king was present for the purpose of Criticising my new composition of both words and music, and was liberal in his commendations to me on my success. He admired not only the beauty of music, but spoke enthusiastically of the appropriate words, so well adapted to the air and to the purpose for which they were written. This remained in use as our national anthem for some twenty years or more when my brother composed the words Hawaiʻi Ponoʻī." Liliʻuokalani's memoir, Hawaii's Story by Hawaii's Queen, stated: "In the early years of the reign of Kamehameha V. he brought to my notice the fact that the Hawaiian people had no national air. Each nation, he said, but ours had its statement of patriotism and love of country in its own music; but we were using for that purpose on state occasions the time-honored British anthem, "God save the Queen." By July 1867, the
    8.00
    3 votes
    55
    Jana Gana Mana

    Jana Gana Mana

    "Jana Gana Mana " (Bengali: জন গণ মন, Sanskrit: जन गण मन) is the national anthem of India. Written in highly Sanskritised (Tatsama) Bengali, it is the first of five stanzas of a Brahmo hymn composed and scored by Nobel laureate Rabindranath Tagore. It was first sung in Calcutta Session of the Indian National Congress on 27 December 1911. "Jana Gana Mana" was officially adopted by the Constituent Assembly as the Indian national anthem on 24 January 1950. 27 December 2011 marked the completion of 100 years of Jana Gana Mana since it was sung for the first time. As there is enormous diversity in Indian languages, it is interesting to know how the National Anthem that is written in Bengali can be understood by other Indians who do not know Bengali. The song has a lot of Sanskrit words that also are found in the majority of Indian languages with the same meaning. This makes the song understandable to non-Bengali speaking Indians. The original poem written by Rabindranath Tagore was translated into Hindi by Abid Ali. The original Hindi version of the song Jana Gana Mana, translated by Ali and based on the poem by Tagore, was a little different. It was "Sukh Chain Ki Barkha Barase,
    8.00
    3 votes
    56

    Nahnu Jund Allah Jund Al-watan

    As-salam Al-jamhuri: Nahnu Jund Allah Jund Al-watan (Arabic: السلام الجمهوري: نحن جند الله جند الوطن‎), The Republican Anthem: We are the soldiers of God and of our home-land, is the national anthem of Sudan. نحن جند الله جند الوطن إن دعا داعي الفداء لن نخــن نتحدى الموت عند المحن نشتري المجد بأغلى ثمن هذه الأرض لنا فليعش سوداننا علماً بين الأمم يابني السودان هذا رمزكم يحمل العبء ويحمى أرضكم Nahnu Jund Allāh Jund Al-watan. In daʿa dāʿī l-fidā′ lam nachun. Natahaddal maut ʿind il-mihan. Naschtarī l-madschd bi-aghlā thaman. Hadhihi l-ard lanā! Falayaʿīsch Sūdānunā, ālaman bain al-umam. Yā banī s-Sudān, hadhā ramzukum; Yahmil ulaʿba′, wa yahmī ardakum. We are the soldiers of God, the soldiers of our homeland, We never betray the call for sacrifice. Death we defy at adversity. Glory we buy with the highest price. This land is ours. So let our Sudan, live long, higher, showing the way among the nations, like a banner. the weird and the burden and shields ye land. The current national anthem of the Republic of the Sudan was originally the anthem of the Sudan Defence Force prior to independence.
    8.00
    3 votes
    57
    Der er et yndigt land

    Der er et yndigt land

    Der er et yndigt land (Danish pronunciation: [dæɐ̯ ˈæɐ̯ et ˈønd̥id̥ ˈlanˀ]) ("There is a lovely country") is the (civil) national anthem of Denmark. On royal occasions, the royal anthem Kong Christian stod ved højen mast is performed together with Der er et yndigt land. In common use, only the first verse (or stanza) and the last three lines of the fourth verse are sung. The first half of the last verse is rarely heard. The last line of each verse is repeated once. The lyrics were written in 1819 by Adam Oehlenschläger and bore the motto in Latin: Ille terrarum mihi praeter omnes angulus ridet (Horace: "This corner of the earth smiles for me more than any other"). When first published, the anthem had 12 verses, but this was shortened to the first, third, fifth, and last verse in later editions. The music was composed in 1835 by Hans Ernst Krøyer. Later, Thomas Laub and Carl Nielsen each composed alternative melodies, but neither of them has gained widespread adoption, and today they are mostly unknown to the general population. The version today is significantly shortened. The original published version had twelve verses:
    6.75
    4 votes
    58

    Dio vi Salvi Regina

    Diu vi Salvi Regina is a religious song in the folklore of Corsica. The local nationalists also consider it the national anthem of Corsica. It is customary to sing it at the end of any concert of Corsican folk music. The anthem was written as a hymn in Italy by Francis de Geronimo (later canonized) about 1675. It was adopted as the national anthem of an independent Corsica when its people proclaimed their independence from the Republic of Genoa at Orezza, on 30 January 1735. Traditionally, a shepherd, Sauveur Costa, is credited with converting the hymn not only to a Corsican anthem, but to a rallying symbol for Corsican independence. It was first performed at the Chapel of St. Mark (San Marco) on 25 April 1720. The anthem requests the protection of the Virgin Mary, heartily concurred in by the independence leaders. There were a few changes, such as in the second stanza from "disperati" (desperate) to "tribolati" (troubled). The commonly used version's last stanza was an original addition, written in the Corsican language, which makes reference to victory against enemies of Corsica, as to highlight the adopted lyrics' intended use.
    6.75
    4 votes
    59
    La Borinqueña

    La Borinqueña

    La Borinqueña is the official anthem of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. After Puerto Rico became the "The Commonwealth of Puerto Rico" in 1952, the first elected governor, Luis Muñoz Marín, signed law #2 of July 24, 1952 that stated that the musical composition known as "La Borinqueña" was to become the official anthem of Puerto Rico. The words that go with the composition were approved by governor Carlos Romero Barceló on July 27, 1977, law #123. The title refers to the aboriginal Taíno name for the island of Puerto Rico, Borinkén or Borinquén The music was originally credited to Félix Astol Artés in 1867 as an habanera danza, with romantic lyrics, but there is some evidence that Francisco Ramírez, a native of San Germán, wrote the music in 1860, and named it "La Almojábana". In 1868, Lola Rodríguez de Tió wrote a poem in support of the Puerto Rican revolution, which was set to the Ramirez/Astol Artés music. In fear of investigation by the Spanish insular government, Ramirez, asked Astól to claim authorship of the music since he was a native of Catalonia and would therefore raise no suspicion. After the cession of the island to the United States, the popular revolutionary lyrics
    6.75
    4 votes
    60

    Belau rekid

    Belau rekid (Our Palau) is the national anthem of Palau. It was officially adopted in 1980. The music was written by Ymesei O. Ezekiel, to which the combined words of several authors were set.
    9.00
    2 votes
    61

    Land of the Free

    Land of the Free is the national anthem of Belize. The words were written by Samuel Alfred Haynes and the music by Selwyn Walford Young in 1963. It was officially adopted in 1981. Refrain: Haynes participated in World War I as part of the colonial effort for Great Britain and encountered much abuse and ridicule along with his fellow workers. On his return to Belize he became a part of workers' movements in Belize and is readily identified with the 1919 Ex-Servicemen's Riot that began on July 22. After that riot was suppressed, Haynes began organizing Belize's branch of the Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA) and facilitated the visit of its head Marcus Garvey of Jamaica. Garvey recruited Haynes to work with him in the U.S., a move that rendered the UNIA in Belize leaderless for much of the 1920s and that indirectly contributed to the Isaiah Morter controversy. Haynes most likely wrote the anthem as an answer to colonialism's stifling of Belizeans' identity. The lofty language and uplifting lyrics referenced Belize's former status as a slave society indebted to profits from forestry, cleverly linking it to the end of Belize's colonial period, a process that culminated on
    9.00
    2 votes
    62

    El Gran Carlemany

    El Gran Carlemany (Catalan pronunciation: [əɫ ˈɣɾaŋ kərləˈmaɲ], Western Catalan: [eɫ ˈɣɾaŋ kaɾleˈmaɲ]; "The Great Charlemagne") is the national anthem of Andorra. Written by Enric Marfany Bons (1871–1942) and composed by Joan Benlloch i Vivó (1864–1926), it was adopted in 1921.
    7.67
    3 votes
    63

    Hail Grenada

    Hail Grenada has been the national anthem of Grenada since independence in 1974. The words are by Irva Merle Baptiste and the music is by Louis Arnold Masanto.
    7.67
    3 votes
    64

    Hatikvah

    "Hatikvah" (Hebrew: הַתִּקְוָה‎, HaTiqvah, lit. The Hope) is the national anthem of Israel. Its lyrics are adapted from a poem written by Naphtali Herz Imber, a Jewish poet from Złoczów, province of Galicia, Austro-Hungarian Empire, (today, Zolochiv, Ukraine). Imber wrote the first version of his poem in 1877 while being hosted as a guest by a Jewish scholar in the city of Iasi, Romania. The romantic anthem's theme reflects the nearly 2000-year-old hope of the Jewish people to return to the Land of Israel—their ancient homeland—and to restore it and reclaim it as a sovereign nation. The text of Hatikvah was written in 1878 by Naphtali Herz Imber, a Jewish poet from Złoczów, a city often referred to by its nickname, "The City of Poets" in the province of Galicia, Austro-Hungary, (today Zolochiv, Ukraine). N.H.Imber emigrated to Eretz Israel in the early 1880s and lived in two or more of the first Jewish colonies . The foundation of Hatikvah is Imber's nine-stanza poem named Tikvatenu (lit: "Our Hope"). In this poem Imber puts into words his thoughts and feelings in the wake of the establishment of Petah Tikva, one of the first Jewish settlements in Ottoman Palestine. Published in
    7.67
    3 votes
    65

    Ishe Komborera Africa

    This was Zimbabwe's first anthem after gaining independence in 1980. It is a translation of 19th century South African schoolteacher Enoch Sontonga's popular African hymn Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrika (God Bless Africa) into Zimbabwe's native Shona and Ndebele languages. It was replaced as the national anthem of Zimbabwe in 1994 by Kalibusiswe Ilizwe leZimbabwe (Blessed be the land of Zimbabwe), but remains very popular in the country.
    7.67
    3 votes
    66
    Kaba Ma Kyei

    Kaba Ma Kyei

    "Kaba Ma Kyei" (Burmese: ကမ္ဘာမကျေ [ɡəbà mə tɕè]; Till the End of the World) is the national anthem of Burma (Myanmar). The preamble of the anthem is in the traditional Burmese style, before transitioning into a Western-style orchestra. The melody and lyrics were written by Saya Tin, and adopted as the Burmese national anthem in 1947. According to the Constitution of Myanmar (2008), the complete version of Kaba Ma Kyei includes both the anthem in traditional Burmese style and Western-style. The complete version is usually used on domestic occasions. A long standing tradition at the end of the anthem is that singers who sing this bow at the end, full of respect for the nation and its national anthem.
    7.67
    3 votes
    67

    Ma Normandie

    "Ma Normandie" is the semi-official anthem of the Bailiwick of Jersey, a British Crown dependency in the Channel Islands, and was written and composed by Frédéric Bérat. Jersey is historically part of the Duchy of Normandy, and French has been for centuries an official administrative language of Jersey, whose inhabitants have traditionally spoken a variety of Norman language. Although "Ma Normandie" is used by Jersey at Commonwealth Games, Island Games and other international events where it is necessary for territories that otherwise use "God Save the Queen" to be distinguished, the fact that the song refers to France rather than to Jersey means that a body of opinion has campaigned for a change of anthem. In 2007 the States of Jersey undertook to find a new, official, Anthem by means of an open competition. The final judging of the competition took place with a public performance of the short-listed pieces on 30 April 2008. The short-listed composers were: Derek Lawrence, Gerard Le Feuvre, James Taberner and a joint composition by Kevin Porée and Matheson Bayley; the traditional song "Beautiful Jersey"/"Man Bieau P'tit Jèrri" was also included in the shortlist. The winner of the
    7.67
    3 votes
    68

    Mungu ibariki Afrika

    Mungu ibariki Afrika is the national anthem of Tanzania. The anthem is the Swahili language version of Enoch Sontonga's popular hymn Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrika that is also used as Zambia's anthem (with different words) and part of South Africa's. It was formerly also used as Zimbabwe's anthem. The word Mungu in Swahili means God and the title of the anthem therefore translates as God bless Africa. In Finland the same melody is used as the children's psalm Kuule Isä Taivaan (Hear, Heavenly Father). In this form the song has found its way to the common book of psalms used by the major church of Finland.
    7.67
    3 votes
    69
    O Canada

    O Canada

    "O Canada" is the national anthem of Canada. The song was originally commissioned by Lieutenant Governor of Quebec Théodore Robitaille for the 1880 Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day ceremony; Calixa Lavallée wrote the music as a setting of a French Canadian patriotic poem composed by poet and judge Sir Adolphe-Basile Routhier. The lyrics were originally in French and translated into English in 1906. Robert Stanley Weir wrote in 1908 another English version, which is the official and most popular version, one that is not a literal translation of the French. Weir's lyrics have been revised twice, taking their present form in 1980, but the French lyrics remain unaltered. "O Canada" had served as a de facto national anthem since 1939, officially becoming Canada's national anthem in 1980 when the Act of Parliament making it so received Royal Assent and became effective on July 1 as part of that year's Dominion Day celebrations. The Crown-in-Council established set lyrics for "O Canada" in Canada's two official languages, as well as in Inuktitut. There is also a commonly sung bilingual version which combines the English and French lyrics. The lyrics are as follows: It has been noted that the
    7.67
    3 votes
    70

    Aruba Dushi Tera

    Aruba Dushi Tera (Aruba Dear Country) is the national anthem of Aruba. It is a waltz written by Juan Chabaya Lampe and composed by Rufo Wever. It was accepted as the anthem on March 18, 1976. It is written in Papiamento. Aruba patria aprecia nos cuna venera Chikito y simpel bo por ta pero si respeta. Chorus: O, Aruba, dushi tera nos baranca tan stima Nos amor p’abo t’asina grandi cu n’tin nada pa kibr'e, cu'n tin nada pa kibr'e. Bo playanan tan admira cu palma tur dorna Bo escudo y bandera ta orguyo di nos tur! Chorus Grandeza di bo pueblo ta su gran cordialidad Cu Dios por guia y conserva su amor pa libertad! Chorus Aruba appreciated native land our venerated cradle you may be small and simple but yet you are respected. Chorus: Oh Aruba dear country our rock so beloved our love for you is so strong that nothing can destroy it. (repeat) Your beaches so much admired with palm trees all adorned your coat of arms and flag is the proudness of us all! Chorus The greatness of our people is their great cordiality that God may guide and preserve his love for liberty! Chorus Aruba patria apreciada nuestra cuna venerada aunque pequeña y simple eres respetada. Chorus Oh Aruba tierra
    10.00
    1 votes
    71
    Dąbrowski's Mazurka

    Dąbrowski's Mazurka

    Mazurek Dąbrowskiego (Polish pronunciation: [maˈzurɛɡ dɔmbrɔfˈskʲɛɡɔ], "Dąbrowski's Mazurka") is the national anthem of Poland. It is also known by its original title, Pieśń Legionów Polskich we Włoszech ([pʲɛɕɲ lɛˈɡʲɔnuf ˈpɔlskiɣ vɛˈvwɔʂɛx], "Song of the Polish Legions in Italy"), or by its incipit, Jeszcze Polska nie zginęła ([ˈjɛʂt͡ʂɛ ˈpɔlska ɲɛzɡiˈnɛwa], "Poland is not yet lost" or "Poland has not yet perished"). The song is a lively mazurka with lyrics penned by Józef Wybicki in Reggio nell'Emilia, Cisalpine Republic (now in Italy), around 16 July 1797, two years after the Third Partition of Poland erased the once vast country from the map. It was originally meant to boost the morale of Polish soldiers serving under General Jan Henryk Dąbrowski in the Polish Legions, which were part of the French Revolutionary Army led by General Napoléon Bonaparte in its conquest of Italy. The mazurka, expressing the idea that the nation of Poland, despite lack of political independence, had not disappeared as long as the Polish people were still alive and fighting in its name, soon became one of the most popular patriotic songs in Poland. The song's popularity led to a plethora of
    10.00
    1 votes
    72

    Forged From The Love of Liberty

    Forged from the Love of Liberty is the national anthem of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago. Originally composed as the national anthem for the short-lived West Indies Federation (1958-1962), this song was adopted by Trinidad and Tobago when it became independent in 1962. Words and music by Patrick Castagne (1916-2000).
    10.00
    1 votes
    73

    God Bless Our Homeland Ghana

    God Bless Our Homeland Ghana is the national anthem of Ghana. The anthem was originally written and composed by Philip Gbeho and adopted upon independence in 1957. The current text was chosen some time after the 1966 coup in Ghana. Mr. Philip Gbeho’s text which was discarded at that time started with: The current lyric which has been in use since the 1970s was written by a student Michael Kwame Gbordzoe within the framework of a national competition, and is accompanied by Ghana's National Pledge. Thus, the lyric of Ghana’s National Anthem is as follows: Thus, although Mr. Philip Gbeho’s composition is still being used, the current lyric "God Bless our Homeland Ghana", etc. does not originate from him. Michael Kwame Gbordzoe, who became a scientist by profession, has drawn the attention of the Ghana Government to the fact that although his lyric has been adopted for the country’s national anthem since the 1970s, there has so far been no official Ghana Government recognition for his work, this may be attributed to the abrupt changes in regimes in Ghana in the past. Messages were sent to various Ghanaian government agencies, and was also discussed on air at the Ghana Broadcasting
    10.00
    1 votes
    74
    Heil dir im Siegerkranz

    Heil dir im Siegerkranz

    "Heil dir im Siegerkranz" (German for "Hail to Thee in Victor's Crown") was from 1871 to 1918 the unofficial national anthem of the German Empire. Previously, it had been the anthem of Prussia, the melody of the hymn derived from the British anthem "God Save the Queen". For these reasons, the song failed to become popular within all of Germany. Not only did it fail to win the support of most German nationalists, it was never recognized by the southern German states, such as Bavaria or Württemberg. After World War I, the German Empire came to an end and "Das Lied der Deutschen" became the national anthem of the Weimar Republic. "Die Wacht am Rhein" ("The Watch on the Rhine") was a second hymn used during the German Empire that could also be denoted as a national anthem in that period. Heinrich Harries wrote the lyrics in 1790 in honour of King Christian VII of Denmark. The original text was later adapted for use by the German Empire, e.g. the line "Heil, Kaiser, dir" originally read "Heil, Christian, dir". These lyrics were used for the reign of Kaiser Wilhelm II, German Emperor and King of Prussia. One of the jokes at the time was that the song's title be changed to "Heil Dir im
    10.00
    1 votes
    75

    Independência total

    "Independência total is the national anthem of São Tomé and Príncipe. The anthem, adopted in 1975, was written by Alda Neves da Graça do Espírito Santo and composed by Manuel dos Santos Barreto de Sousa e Almeida.
    10.00
    1 votes
    76
    Ko e fasi 'o e tu'i 'o e 'Otu Tonga

    Ko e fasi 'o e tu'i 'o e 'Otu Tonga

    "Ko e fasi ʻo e tuʻi ʻo e ʻOtu Tonga" is the national anthem of Tonga. The title literally means "song of the king of the Tonga Islands" in the Tongan language but is in daily life better known as fasi fakafonua, which translates to "national song". The lyrics of the anthem were written by Prince Uelingatoni Ngū Tupoumalohi, with the music by Karl Gustavus Schmitt. It was first used in 1874. media:Fasi fakafonua.mid (midi with karaoke) The music written down in the tuʻungafasi or Tongan music notation: Tongan music of the Tongan anthem Law of Tonga: http://legislation.to/Tonga/DATA/PRIN/1988-060/NationalAnthemofTongaAct.pdf
    10.00
    1 votes
    77

    La Nigérienne

    "La Nigérienne" is the national anthem of Niger. The lyrics are by Maurice Albert Thiriet. Robert Jacquet and Nicolas Abel François Frionnet wrote the music. It was adopted as Niger's anthem in 1961.
    10.00
    1 votes
    78

    My Belarusy

    "My Belarusy" (Belarusian: Мы, беларусы (My, Bielarusy); "We Belarusians") is the unofficial title of the national anthem of Belarus and the first line of its lyrics. Officially, "My Belarusy" is titled "the State Anthem of the Republic of Belarus" (Belarusian: Дзяржаўны гімн Рэспублікі Беларусь, Russian: Государственный гимн Республики Беларусь). The anthem was originally written and adopted in 1955 for use in the Byelorussian Soviet Socialist Republic. The music of the Byelorussian SSR anthem was composed by Niescier Sakałoŭski and the lyrics were written by Mikhas Klimkovich. After the dissolution of the Soviet Union, the music composed by Sakałoŭski was kept and the lyrics were discarded. New lyrics, which were written by Klimkovich and Uladzimir Karyzny, were adopted by a presidential decree issued on July 2, 2002. The lyrics of the anthem now sing of a friendly Belarus, honoring past military battles and looking forward to the future. The music was kept due to the historical connections it has to Belarus. "My Belarusy" was originally used as the anthem of the Byelorussian Soviet Socialist Republic (Belarusian: гімн Беларускай Савецкай Сацыялістычнай Рэспублікі, Russian: гимн
    10.00
    1 votes
    79

    National Anthem of Mauritania

    The words of the National Anthem of Mauritania (Arabic: نشيد وطني موريتاني‎) are taken from an 18th-century poem by Baba Ould Cheikh; the melody was written by Tolia Nikiprowetzky. The anthem was adopted upon independence in 1960. The unusual and highly complex rhythm of the anthem makes it extremely difficult to sing; for this reason, the anthem is often erroneously listed as wordless.
    10.00
    1 votes
    80

    Salve a ti, Nicaragua

    Salve a ti, Nicaragua (Hail to thee, Nicaragua) is the Nicaraguan national anthem. It was approved October 20, 1939, and officially adopted August 25, 1971. The lyrics were written by Salomón Ibarra Mayorga, and the musical arrangement is by Luis A. Delgadillo. The music dates back to the 18th century, when it was used as a liturgical anthem by a Spanish monk, Fr. Castinove, when the country was a province of Spain. During the initial years of independence, it was used to salute the justices of the Supreme Court of the State of Nicaragua, then a member of the Central American Federation. The anthem was eventually replaced by three other anthems during periods of political upheaval or revolution, but it was restored on April 23, 1918 at the fall of the last liberal revolution. A contest was opened to the public, for new lyrics for the national anthem. The lyrics could only mention peace and work, as the country had just ended a civil war. As a result, the Nicaraguan anthem is one of the only anthems in Latin America that speaks of peace instead of war. The new conservative, pro-Spanish government quickly awarded the first prize to Salomon Ibarra Mayorga, a Nicaraguan teacher and
    10.00
    1 votes
    81

    Tautiška giesmė

    Tautiška giesmė (The National Hymn) is the national anthem of Lithuania, also known by its opening words "Lietuva, Tėvyne mūsų" (official translation of the lyrics: "Lithuania, Our Homeland", literally: "Lithuania, Our Fatherland") and as "Lietuvos himnas" (Hymn of Lithuania). The music and lyrics were written in 1898 by Vincas Kudirka, when Lithuania was still a part of the Russian Empire. The fifty-word poem was a condensation of Kudirka's conceptions of the Lithuanian state, the Lithuanian people, and their past. Shortly before his death in 1899, the anthem was performed for Lithuanians living in Saint Petersburg, Russia. The first public Lithuanian performance of the anthem took place in Vilnius in 1905, and it became the official national anthem in 1919, a year after Lithuania declared its independence. Following the occupation and annexation of Lithuania by the Soviet Union in 1940, the anthem was forbidden to be played or sung in public. "Tautiška giesmė" was reinstated 1989 short before reestablishing Lithuanian independence and conffirmed in National Anthem act (1991.10.21). It was automatically included as the national anthem in 1992, when the new Constitution was
    10.00
    1 votes
    82

    Amhrán na bhFiann

    "Amhrán na bhFiann" (Irish pronunciation: [ˈəuɾˠaːn̪ˠ n̪ˠə ˈvʲiːən̪ˠ]; "The Soldiers' Song") is the Irish national anthem. The music was composed by Peadar Kearney and Patrick Heeney, the original English lyrics (as "A Soldiers' Song") by Kearney, and the Irish language translation by Liam Ó Rinn. The song has three verses, but the national anthem consists of the chorus only. The Presidential Salute, played when the President of Ireland arrives at an official engagement, consists of the first four bars of the national anthem immediately followed by the last five. "A Soldiers' Song" was composed in 1907, with words by Peadar Kearney and music by Kearney and Patrick Heeney. The first draft, handwritten on copybook paper, sold at auction in Dublin in 2006 for €760,000. The text was first published in Irish Freedom by Bulmer Hobson in 1912. It was used as marching song by the Irish Volunteers and was sung by rebels in the General Post Office (GPO) during the Easter Rising of 1916. Its popularity increased among rebels held in Frongoch internment camp after the Rising, and the Irish Republican Army (IRA) in the Irish War of Independence (1919–21). After the establishment of the Irish
    6.50
    4 votes
    83

    Debout Congolais

    Debout Congolais (Arise Congolese) is the national anthem of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It was first adopted in 1960 upon independence but replaced in 1971 when the country became Zaire. Then it was replaced by La Zaïroise. It was reinstated when Laurent Kabila came to power in 1997. The words are by Joseph Lutumba and the music is by Simon-Pierre Boka di Mpasi Londi. CHOIR Debout Congolais, Unis par le sort, Unis dans l'effort pour l'indépendance, Dressons nos fronts, longtemps courbés Et pour de bon prenons le plus bel élan, dans la paix, O peuple ardent, par le labeur, nous bâtirons un pays plus beau qu'avant, dans la paix. VERSE Citoyens, entonnez, l'hymne sacré de votre solidarité, Fièrement, saluez, l'emblème d'or de votre souveraineté, Congo. REFRAIN Don béni (Congo) des aïeux (Congo), O pays (Congo) bien aimé (Congo), Nous peuplerons ton sol et nous assurerons ta grandeur. (Trente juin) O doux soleil (trente juin) du trente juin, (Jour sacré) Sois le témoin (jour sacré) de l'immortel, serment de liberté Que nous léguons, à notre postérité, pour toujours. CHOIR Arise, Congolese, United by fate, United in the struggle for independence, Let us hold up our heads, so
    6.50
    4 votes
    84
    Inno Nazionale della Repubblica

    Inno Nazionale della Repubblica

    The Inno Nazionale is the national anthem of the Republic of San Marino. It was written by Federico Consolo, a Sammarinese violinist and composer, and adopted as the national anthem in 1894. This national anthem is one of the few without official lyrics, and is therefore called simply Inno Nazionale (Italian: National anthem). Although it is little known and scarcely heard within the wider European Community, the Inno Nazionale is regularly played in the streets of San Marino City by the musicians of the Military Ensemble during national and religious festivals.
    6.50
    4 votes
    85

    Terang Bulan

    Terang Bulan ia a song adopted from a famous song during the late 19th century in the French occupied territories in the Indian Ocean. The title translate from Malay to "Bright Moon" The song was composed by Pierre-Jean de Béranger (1780–1857), a French lyricist. It became a popular French melody, and was prominent on the island of Mahé in Seychelles. The song's popularity spread across the Indian Ocean and reached as far as Maritime Southeast Asia early in the 20th century. In 1901, it was presented as the Perak State Anthem during the installation ceremony of King Edward VII. In the 1920s, an Indonesian, Bangsawan, made the debuted the song in Singapore. The melody became popular among the people and was given the name Terang Bulan (Bright Moon), becoming a Malay evergreen, played at parties and cabarets in the 1920s and 1930s. Since Malaysia independence, it was prohibited from being played as a popular melody, as any such use is proscribed by statute. The Sultan of Perak, during his exile in Seychelles, was aware of the song's popularity. When Sultan Idris Murshidul’adzam Shah, the Ruler of the State of Perak, represented the Malay Rulers of the Federated Malay States at the
    6.50
    4 votes
    86
    Amar Shonar Bangla

    Amar Shonar Bangla

    Amar Shonar Bangla (Bengali: আমার সোনার বাংলা, "My Golden Bengal") is a 1905 song written and composed by the Bengali poet Rabindranath Tagore (defender of an undivided India), the first ten lines of which were adopted in 1972 as the Bangladeshi national anthem. The word shonar literally means 'made of gold', but in the song shonar Bangla may be interpreted to either express the preciousness of Bengal or a reference to the colour of paddy fields before harvest. The song was written in 1905 during the period of Bongobhanga (Bôngobhôngo - 1905 Partition of Bengal) - when the ruling British empire had the province of Bengal (of undivided India) split into two parts; the decision on the Partition of Bengal was announced on 19 July 1905 by then Viceroy of India, Lord Curzon. The partition took effect on 16 October 1905. This divide of Bengal was along communal lines — East Bengal had a majority of Muslims, while West Bengal had a majority of Hindus. This partition is claimed to have undermined India's national movement against British imperialism, and is said to have been politically motivated. This song, along with a host of others, was written by Tagore, a pioneer of the cultural and
    5.60
    5 votes
    87

    Allahu Akbar

    "Allahu Akbar" (Arabic: الله أكبر‎; meaning "God is [the] Greatest," or "God is Great") was the national anthem of the Great Socialist People's Libyan Arab Jamahiriya from 2 March 1977 to 20 October 2011. Originally an Egyptian military marching song during the Suez Canal War of 1956, it was previously the national anthem of the Libyan Arab Republic beforehand, in use from 1 September 1969 to 2 March 1977. "Allahu Akbar" was originally an Egyptian military marching song which became popular in Egypt and Syria during the Suez Canal War of 1956. The lyrics were written by Mahmoud El-Sherif, and the music was composed by Abdalla Shams El-Din. "Allahu Akbar" was adopted as the official national anthem of the Libyan Arab Republic on 1 September 1969, by Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi, showing his hopes of uniting the Arab world. "Allahu Akbar" replaced the previous national anthem "Libya, Libya, Libya", which had been used by the Kingdom of Libya since its independence in 1951. When the Libyan Arab Republic became the Socialist People's Libyan Arab Jamahiriya on 2 March 1977, "Allahu Akbar" remained the national anthem of Libya. However, when Libya and Egypt broke off diplomatic
    8.50
    2 votes
    88

    Bro Gozh ma Zadoù

    Bro Gozh ma Zadoù (Breton for Old Land of My Fathers) is the national anthem of Brittany. It is sung to the same tune as that of the national anthem of Wales, Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau, and has similar words. The Cornish anthem, Bro Goth Agan Tasow, is also sung to the same tune. The Breton lyrics are the creation of François Jaffrennou in 1897, and the music was that composed by the Welsh James James for Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau. The new song was first published in 1898, and circulated as Henvelidigez ("Adaptation"). It was chosen as national anthem (and a song to celebrate friendship between the Welsh and Bretons) in 1903, at a Congress of the Union Régionaliste Bretonne held in Lesneven. Maurice Duhamel adapted it for the piano, and it was first recorded by Pathé in 1910.
    8.50
    2 votes
    89

    Državna himna Bosne i Hercegovine

    Državna himna Bosne i Hercegovine (Serbian Cyrillic: Државна химна Босне и Херцеговине, National Anthem of Bosnia and Herzegovina) is the national anthem of Bosnia and Herzegovina. The anthem was adopted on 25 June 1999, by the promulgation of the Law on the National Anthem of Bosnia and Herzegovina, replacing the previous anthem, "Jedna si jedina", which apparently excluded the country's Serb and Croat communities, though, was in use from February 10, 1998, as the flag and coat of arms. Bosnian Serb from Banja Luka, Dušan Šestić composed the melody, to which initially there were no lyrics under the working title Intermeco, which is commonly referred to as the title of the anthem. Lyrics written by Dušan Šestić, the original composer, and Benjamin Isović were accepted by a parliamentary commission in February 2009. The decision still requires approval of the Council of Ministers of Bosnia and Herzegovina and the Parliamentary Assembly of Bosnia and Herzegovina and the House of Peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina. The lyrics do not mention the two administrative entities or the constitutional nations that make up the state, and end with the line "We are going into the future,
    8.50
    2 votes
    90

    God Save Our Solomon Islands

    God Save Our Solomon Islands is the national anthem of the Solomon Islands. It was adopted in 1978 following the independence of the country. The text was written by Panapasa Balekana and Matila Balekana, the music was written by Panapasa Balekana.
    8.50
    2 votes
    91

    Motherland

    "Motherland" is the national anthem of the island country of Mauritius. The music was composed by Philippe Gentil M.B.E. and the lyrics were written by Jean Georges Prosper (Mauritian poet born in 1933). The anthem is short and briefly describes the lucious landscape of Mauritius. It also mentions the qualities of its people: peace, justice, and liberty.
    8.50
    2 votes
    92

    Namibia, Land of the Brave

    "Namibia, Land of the Brave" is the national anthem of Namibia. The anthem was written by Axali Doëseb, who was the director of a traditional music group from the Kalahari desert. Doëseb was chosen to write the anthem during a contest held after Namibia became independent in 1990.
    8.50
    2 votes
    93
    Phleng Chat

    Phleng Chat

    The national anthem of Thailand was adopted on 10 December 1939. The melody was composed by Phra Jenduriyang (Peter Feit) and the words are by Luang Saranuprapan. Phleng Chat (Thai: เพลงชาติ), literally meaning "national anthem", is a general word for national anthem. Phleng Chat Thai (Thai: เพลงชาติไทย), Thailand's national anthem, is also used to refer to this specific song. The anthem was composed a few days after the 1932 coup in the tune vaguely similar to the national anthem of Poland, Poland Is Not Yet Lost, and was first broadcast in July 1932. The original lyrics were by Khun Wichitmatra. Before 1932, Phleng Sansoen Phra Barami (the Royal Anthem) was used as the national anthem of Siam. In 1934, Thai Government launched the competitions for the official national anthem, both with music and lyrics. For the music, Jangwang Tua Patayakosol composed another tune in a more traditional style called "Phleng Maha Nimit" for making the decision to the government but they still selected Phra Jenduriyang's melody because it sounded more modern. After that, in the competition for the lyrics with Phra Jenduriyang's music, the original words by Khun Wichitmatra won the first prize and
    8.50
    2 votes
    94

    Valiant Quisqueyans

    Quisqueyanos valientes ("Valiant Quisqueyans") is the national anthem of the Dominican Republic. Its music was composed by José Rufino Reyes Siancas (1835-1905), and its lyrics were written by Emilio Prud'Homme (1856-1932). The first public performance of Himno Nacional (English: "National Anthem") took place on August 17, 1883 at the Masonic Lodge "Esperanza No.9" ("Esperanza" means "Hope" in Spanish). The music was an instant success, but the original lyrics were questioned by several Dominican scholars, due to factual errors in the words. In 1897 Prud'homme submitted a corrected version, which stands today. With the new lyrics approved by mostly everybody, the Dominican Congress adopted Himno Nacional as the official national anthem, after heated debates, on June 7, 1897. President Ulises Heureaux (1846-1899) vetoed the act, however, because Prud'homme was an opponent of his government. Heureaux was assassinated in 1899 and the political disorders of the following years prevented the officialization of the anthem. Himno Nacional was finally adopted as the national anthem of the Dominican Republic on May 30, 1934. The term 'Dominican' never appears in the anthem. Prud'homme
    8.50
    2 votes
    95
    Himno Nacional Mexicano

    Himno Nacional Mexicano

    The "Mexican National Anthem" (Spanish: Himno Nacional Mexicano), also known as "Mexicans, at the cry of war" (Spanish: Mexicanos, al grito de guerra), is the national anthem of the United Mexican States. The anthem first started being used in 1854, although it was not officially adopted de jure until 1943. The lyrics of the national anthem, which allude to historical Mexican military victories in the heat of battle and including cries of defending the homeland, were composed by poet Francisco González Bocanegra in 1853. In 1854, Jaime Nunó composed the music which now accompanies González's poem. The anthem, consisting of ten stanzas and a chorus, effecitvely entered into use on September 16, 1854. On November 12, 1853, President Antonio López de Santa Anna announced a competition to write a national anthem for Mexico. The competition offered a prize for the best poetic composition representing patriotic ideals. Francisco González Bocanegra, a talented poet, was not interested in participating in the competition. He argued that writing love poems involved very different skills from the ones required to write a national anthem. His fiancée, Guadalupe González del Pino (or Pili),
    7.33
    3 votes
    96

    L'Aube Nouvelle

    L'Aube Nouvelle (The Dawn of a New Day) is the national anthem of Benin. Written and composed by Gilbert Jean Dagnon, it was adopted upon independence in 1960.
    7.33
    3 votes
    97

    National Anthem of the Republic of Uzbekistan

    The National Anthem of the Republic of Uzbekistan (Uzbek: O‘zbekiston Respublikasining Davlat Madhiyasi) came into being when Uzbekistan was a republic of the Soviet Union. Upon independence in 1991, lacking any other suitable candidate, the tune of the old Soviet anthem, composed by Mutal Burhanov, was retained with new lyrics written by Abdulla Oripov.
    7.33
    3 votes
    98

    Udzima wa ya Masiwa

    "Udzima wa ya Masiwa" (Comorian for "The Union of the Great Islands") is the national anthem of Comoros. Adopted upon independence in 1978, it was written by Said Hachim Sidi Abderemane who also composed the music, along with Kamildine Abdallah. Mayotte (claimed by the Comoros, but under French administration) is also mentioned in the song.
    7.33
    3 votes
    99
    Anthem of Europe

    Anthem of Europe

    "Ode to Joy" (German original title: "Ode an die Freude") is the anthem of the European Union and the Council of Europe; both of which refer to it as the European Anthem due to the Council's intention that it represents Europe as a whole, rather than any organisation. It is based on the final movement of Beethoven's 9th Symphony composed in 1823, and is played on official occasions by both organisations. Friedrich Schiller wrote the poem An die Freude (To Joy) in 1785 as a "celebration of the brotherhood of man". In later life, the poet was contemptuous of this popularity and dismissed the poem as typical of "the bad taste of the age" in which it had been written. After Schiller's death, the poem provided the words for the choral movement of Ludwig van Beethoven's 9th Symphony. In 1971 the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe decided to propose adopting the prelude to the Ode To Joy from Beethoven's 9th Symphony as the European anthem, taking up a suggestion made by Count Richard Nikolaus von Coudenhove-Kalergi in 1955. Beethoven, "the spearhead of early Romanticism's universalist pretentions", was generally seen as the natural choice for a European anthem. The Committee
    6.25
    4 votes
    100

    Chant de Ralliement

    "Chant de Ralliement" or "The Rallying Song" is the national anthem of Cameroon. It was used on an unofficial basis beginning in 1948 before independence, and officially adopted in 1957. The music was composed by René Djam Afame, who also wrote the lyrics along with Samuel Minkio Bamba and Moïse Nyatte Nko'o. The lyrics were changed in 1978.
    6.25
    4 votes
    101
    Die Stem van Suid-Afrika

    Die Stem van Suid-Afrika

    Die Stem van Suid-Afrika (English: The Call of South Africa) was the national anthem of South Africa from 1957 to 1994, and shared national anthem status with Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrika until 1997, when a new hybrid anthem was adopted. It was also the anthem for South-West Africa (modern Namibia) under South African mandate until 1990. In May 1918, C.J. Langenhoven wrote an Afrikaans poem called Die Stem, for which music was composed by the Reverend Marthinus Lourens de Villiers in 1921. It was widely used by the South African Broadcasting Corporation in the 1920s, which played it at the close of daily broadcasts, along with God Save the King. It was sung publicly for the first time on 31 May 1928. It was not translated into English until 1952, while God Save the Queen did not cease to have official status until 1957. The poem originally had only three verses, but the government asked the author to add a fourth verse with a religious theme. The anthem speaks throughout of commitment to the Vaderland (father land) and to God. However, the anthem was generally disliked by black South Africans, who saw it as triumphalist and associated it with the apartheid regime where one verse shows
    6.25
    4 votes
    102

    All Hail, Liberia, Hail!

    "All Hail, Liberia, Hail!" is the national anthem of Liberia, lyrics written by President Daniel Bashiel Warner (1815-1880, 3rd president of Liberia) in English, and music by Olmstead Luca (1826-1869). It became the official national anthem in 1847.
    7.00
    3 votes
    103

    Arise O Compatriots, Nigeria's Call Obey

    "Arise, O Compatriots" is the national anthem of Nigeria. It was adopted in 1978, and replaced Nigeria, We Hail Thee. The lyrics are a combination of words and phrases taken from five of the best entries in a national contest. The words were put to music by the Nigerian Police Band under the directorship of Benedict Elis. "Arise, O Compatriots" (1978–present) The Nigerian National Anthem is usually performed at major events having to do with national pride, such as the President's address, major sporting events and at school where it is usually accompanied by Nigeria's National Pledge. Nigeria's National Pledge The National Pledge of Nigeria is recited immediately after the Anthem
    7.00
    3 votes
    104

    Fatshe leno la rona

    "Fatshe leno la rona" (Blessed Be This Noble Land) is the national anthem of Botswana. Written and composed by Kgalemang Tumedisco Motsete, it was adopted upon independence in 1966.
    7.00
    3 votes
    105

    National Anthem of Colombia

    Himno Nacional de la República de Colombia (National Anthem of the Republic of Colombia) is the official name of the national anthem of Colombia. The anthem, commonly known as ¡Oh gloria inmarcesible! (O Unfading Glory), was largely the creation of José Domingo Torres, an actor from Bogotá, who took a poem written by former Colombian president Rafael Núñez and asked a friend, opera singer Oreste Sindici, to set it to music. The official announcement came in the form of Act 33 of October 28 of 1920. The law 198 of 1995, which legislates national symbols, its broadcast became mandatory for all radio and television in the country both at 6:00 am and at 6:00 pm (the latter half, at various times for private open signal and not applicable to national TV channels by cable), and public addresses of the President of the Republic and other official events. During the border conflict with Peru (1932-1934), the soldiers who defended Colombia's national sovereignty added a new verse after the trumpet fanfare. Written specifically for that time of war, it soon fell into disuse. The words are: According to José Antonio Amaya, elementary school students in the 1930s were taught this stanza. The
    7.00
    3 votes
    106

    Pátria

    "Pátria" ("Fatherland" in Portuguese) is the national anthem of the Democratic Republic of East Timor. It was first used on November 28, 1975, when East Timor unilaterally declared independence from Portugal, shortly before the Indonesian invasion on December 7. Following Indonesia's withdrawal and the transition to independence under UN administration, it was adopted as the national anthem on independence on May 20, 2002. The music was composed by Afonso de Araujo, and the words were written by the poet Francisco Borja da Costa, who was killed on the day of the invasion. It is only sung in Portuguese, there is as yet no version in Tetum, the country's national and co-official language.
    7.00
    3 votes
    107

    Trei culori

    Trei culori ("Three colours") was the national anthem of Romania from 1977 until 1990. Since 1990, after the anti-communist Romanian Revolution of 1989, it has been replaced by Deşteaptă-te, române!. Before 1977 the national anthem had been Te slăvim, Românie, introduced in 1953. Trei culori is based on a Romanian patriotic song with the same title (music and lyrics by Ciprian Porumbescu). The original text twice underwent non-credited adaptation in order to match currently prevailing Communist Party ideology. The title refers to the national flag of Romania, which is a tricolor: red, yellow and blue. It has not undergone many or major changes in the course of history. Only the distribution of the colors (in point of proportion and position) changed to a certain extent, being made equal after the abortive Romanian revolution of 1848 when, under the spur of the French revolutionary spirit, many states in Europe adopted as their national flag the tricolour, or dimensionally standardized three-color banner.
    7.00
    3 votes
    108
    Tú alfagra land mítt

    Tú alfagra land mítt

    Tú alfagra land mítt ("Thou fairest land of mine"), officially entitled Mítt alfagra land, is the national anthem of the Faroe Islands. The anthem's lyrics, composed in 1906, are by Símun av Skarði (1872-1942) and the melody by Peter Alberg (1885-1940).
    7.00
    3 votes
    109

    Tuvalu mo te Atua

    Tuvalu for the Almighty (Tuvalu mo te Atua) is the national anthem of Tuvalu. The lyrics and music are by Afaese Manoa. It was adopted in 1978, when the country became independent.
    7.00
    3 votes
    110
    Wodefit Gesgeshi, Widd Innat Ityopp'ya

    Wodefit Gesgeshi, Widd Innat Ityopp'ya

    Wodefit Gesgeshi, Widd Innat Ityopp'ya (Amharic: ወደፊት ገስግሺ ውድ እናት ኢትዮጵያ,  ; "March Forward, Dear Mother Ethiopia") is the national anthem of Ethiopia. The anthem's lyrics were written by Dereje Melaku Mengesha, and the music was composed by Solomon Lulu Mitiku. It was adopted in 1992, as part of reforms that followed the fall of the Derg regime.
    7.00
    3 votes
    111

    Gaumii salaam

    Qaumii Salaam (Dhivehi: ޤައުމީ ސަލާމް, National Salute) is the current national anthem of the Maldives. The lyrics were written by Muhammad Jameel Didi in 1948, and the melody was composed by Sri Lankan maestro Pandit Wannakuwattawaduge Don Amaradeva in 1972. Qaumii Salaam is a proud declaration of national unity, the country's Islamic faith, the victory of historic battles and an homage to the heroes who fell defending the nation. It also wishes further development on the country, while paying respect to the leaders who had served her. Until 1948, a melody without lyrics called the 'Salaamathi' was performed by a royal band on state occasions at the 'Etherekoilu', the residence of the Sultan. Soon after it was decided that the Salaamathi needed lyrics accompanied by a new melody. The lyrics were written by a young poet and later chief justice, Mohamed Jameel Didi. Jameel Didi wrote the words for the new Salaamathi bearing in mind the influence of Urdu poetry during the time, closely imitating its style and also furnishing his work with words borrowed from Arabic. Afterwards, Jameel Didi began looking for a tune to accompany his poem when he heard the noon chime (Auld Lang Syne) of
    6.00
    4 votes
    112

    Koullouna Lilouataan Lil Oula Lil Alam

    The Lebanese National Anthem (Arabic: النشيد الوطني اللبناني‎) was written by Rashid Nakhle and composed by Wadih Sabra. It was adopted on 12 July 1927, seven years after the proclamation of the state of Greater Lebanon during the French mandate. The Lebanese national anthem was chosen following an open nationwide competition. The music of the national anthem is influenced by Beirut's exposure to western culture by the end of the 19th century, it was composed by French trained artist Wadih Sabra in 1925. Al-Jadeed TV station showed a mini documentary on the Lebanese National Anthem, claiming the music to have been plagiarized from a song dedicated to Muhammad Ibn 'Abd al-Karim al-Khattabi, the leader of the Rif Republic, which was composed by Lebanese Mohammed Flayfel. it later showed another documentary containing documents that disprove the claim. Vocal versions of the anthem can be heard at
    8.00
    2 votes
    113

    Nauru Bwiema

    "Nauru Bwiema" ("Nauru, our homeland") is the national anthem of Nauru. The words of the anthem were written by Margaret Hendrie. The music was composed by Laurence Henry Hicks. Nauru adopted the anthem in 1968, the year of independence. Nauru bwiema, ngabena ma auwe. Ma dedaro bwe dogum, mo otata bet egom. Atsin ngago bwien okor, ama bagadugu Epoa ngabuna ri nan orre bet imur. Ama memag ma nan epodan eredu won engiden, Miyan aema ngeiyin ouge: Nauru eko dogin! Nauru our homeland, the land we dearly love, We all pray for you and we also praise your name. Since long ago you have been the home of our great forefathers And will be for generations yet to come. We all join in together to honour your flag, And we shall rejoice together and say: Nauru for evermore!
    8.00
    2 votes
    114

    O Arise, All You Sons

    "O Arise, All You Sons" is the national anthem of Papua New Guinea. The song was promoted to national anthem when Papua New Guinea became independent on 16 September 1975. The anthem was composed by a former Royal Marine and Australian soldier, Thomas Shacklady.
    8.00
    2 votes
    115

    Aash Al Maleek

    The National Anthem of Saudi Arabia (النشيد الوطني السعودي) was first officially adopted in 1950 with no lyrics and then again in 1984 with new lyrics. The original composition was by Abdul-Rahman al-Khateeb (عبد الرحمن الخطيب) in 1947 and the brass instrumental version was later arranged by Seraj Omar (سراج عمر). The new lyrics (1984) were written by Ibrahim Khafaji (إبراهيم خفاجي). It is referred to simply as The National Anthem (النشيد الوطني an-Našīd al-Waṭaniyy), although Sārʿī (سارعي) is a common name for the lyrics, taken from the first verse (سارعي للمجد والعلياء Sārʿī lil-maǧdi wal-ʿalyāʾ) "Hasten to glory and supremacy!" The instrumental version is called the Royal Salute (السلام الملكي as-Salām al-Malakiyy) which is also the name of the ceremony in which it is played to salute senior members of the royal family as well as diplomatic figures. The lyrics call upon the country to hasten to greatness and raise the flag, glorifies God and asks Him to grant the King of Saudi Arabia long life.
    9.00
    1 votes
    116

    Cântico da Liberdade

    "Cântico da Liberdade (in English: Song of Freedom) is the national anthem of Cape Verde. It was made official in 1996, before that the national anthem was the same as that of Guinea-Bissau. The music was composed by Adalberto Higino Tavares Silva, and the lyrics written by Amílcar Spencer Lopes.
    9.00
    1 votes
    117

    God Bless Fiji

    Meda Dau Doka or God Bless Fiji is the national anthem of Fiji. The melody was adapted from a 1911 hymn by Charles Austin Miles entitled Dwelling in Beulah Land. The lyrics and music were composed by Michael Francis Alexander Prescott and adopted upon independence in 1970. The English and Fijian lyrics are not translations of each other, and in fact have very little in common. Blessing grant oh God of nations on the isles of Fiji As we stand united under noble banner blue And we honour and defend the cause of freedom ever Onward march together God bless Fiji CHORUS: For Fiji, ever Fiji, let our voices ring with pride For Fiji, ever Fiji, her name hail far and wide, A land of freedom, hope and glory, to endure what ever befall May God bless Fiji Forever more! Blessing grant, oh God of nations, on the isles of Fiji Shores of golden sand and sunshine, happiness and song Stand united, we of Fiji, fame and glory ever Onward march together God bless Fiji. Meda dau doka ka vinakata na vanua E ra sa dau tiko kina na savasava Rawa tu na gauna ni sautu na veilomani Biu na i tovo tawa savasava CHORUS: Me bula ga ko Viti Ka me toro ga ki liu Me ra turaga vinaka ko ira na i liuliu Me ra liutaki
    9.00
    1 votes
    118

    National Anthem of El Salvador

    "Himno Nacional de El Salvador" (Spanish Language National Anthem of El Salvador) is the national anthem of El Salvador. Written by General Juan José Cañas with music composed by the Italian Juan Aberle in 1856, the anthem was adopted as the national song on September 15, 1879, and officially recognized by the government on December 11, 1953. Commonly, only the chorus (which is repeated) is played and sung at sporting events and official diplomatic ceremonies, the anthem is ended before the first verse (the slow music) due to the chorus being the strongest musical part of the anthem. It is officially considered the second longest national anthem in the world (the longest being Uruguay's, at five minutes). Although there are three verses, only the chorus and first verse are commonly sung.
    9.00
    1 votes
    119

    Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrika

    "Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrika" ("Lord Bless Africa" in Xhosa), was originally composed as a hymn in 1897 by Enoch Sontonga, a teacher at a Methodist mission school in Johannesburg, to the tune 'Aberystwyth' by Joseph Parry. The song became a pan-African liberation anthem and was later adopted as the national anthem of five countries in Africa including Zambia, Tanzania, Namibia and Zimbabwe after independence. Zimbabwe and Namibia have since adopted new national anthems. The song is currently the national anthem of Tanzania, Zambia and since 1994, a part of the joint national anthem of South Africa along with Die Stem van Suid-Afrika. Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrika was originally composed as a hymn in 1897 by Enoch Sontonga, a teacher at a Methodist mission school in Johannesburg, using the tune 'Aberystwyth' originally composed by Joseph Parry in 1879. The words of the first stanza were originally written in Xhosa as a hymn. In 1927 seven additional Xhosa stanzas were added by the poet Samuel Mqhayi. Original hymn as composed by Enoch Sontonga, but not as used in the National anthem of South Africa, in which the first two of the stanza are sung in Xhosa and the last two in Zulu. Second stanza
    9.00
    1 votes
    120
    Nokoreach

    Nokoreach

    "Nokor Reach" (Khmer: បទនគររាជ; Royal Kingdom or Majestic Kingdom) is the national anthem of the Kingdom of Cambodia. It was based on a Cambodian folk tune and written by Chuon Nath, the anthem was originally adopted in 1941 and reconfirmed in 1947, around the time of independence from France. In 1970, the monarchy was abolished, thereby replacing the anthem as well. After the communist victory in 1975, former royalist symbols, including "Nokor Reach", were reinstated for a short while. The Khmer Rouge then replaced it with Dap Prampi Mesa Chokchey ("Glorious Seventeenth of April"). After the royalist party FUNCINPEC defeated the former communists (Cambodian People's Party) in the 1993 elections, the royalist anthem was restored. The anthem also has an unofficial French version.
    9.00
    1 votes
    121

    Pincez Tous vos Koras, Frappez les Balafons

    "Pincez tous vos koras, frappez les balafons" is the national anthem of Senegal, adopted in 1960. The lyrics were written by Léopold Sédar Senghor, who became Senegal's first president, and the music by Herbert Pepper, who also wrote the national anthem of the Central African Republic, "La Renaissance". The kora (a type of harp) and balafon (wooden xylophone) are Senegalese musical instruments.
    9.00
    1 votes
    122

    Anthem Without a Title

    The anthem without a title was the untitled national anthem of the Netherlands Antilles. The anthem was written in English by Zahira Hiliman from Sint Maarten and translated into the native Papiamento language by Lucille Berry-Haseth from Curaçao. The anthem was written in two of the three official languages of the Netherlands Antilles, English and Papiamento; Dutch was the third official language. It was adopted in 2000. In addition to this anthem, many of the islands in the Netherlands Antilles had their own anthems. On 10 October 2010, the Netherlands Antilles was dissolved into Curaçao, Sint Maarten and the three public bodies of the Caribbean Netherlands. 1. Sinku prenda den laman, e islanan di nos, dòrnando e korona di un aliansa ideal. Ounke hende i kultura tur koló nan tin , nos mes a forma ùn famia den tur libertad. Bridge Pesei nos tur ta alsa bos ku amor i den union Chorus Antia Neerlandes, bunitesa sin igual. Ku orguyo mi ta defendé mi patria tan stimá. Antia Neerlandes, p’abo tur mi lealtat. Pa semper lo mi keda fiel, pais bendishoná 2. Un shelu semper kla, laman ta invitá, e islanan ta wowo dje kadena di unidat Idiomanan distinto, papiá Ku komprenshon, mes ternura:
    6.67
    3 votes
    123

    Fida'i

    The Palestinian national anthem ("My Redemption"; Arabic: فدائي‎ Fidāʼī ), is the national anthem of the Palestinian National Authority. It was adopted by the Palestinian Liberation Organization in 1996, in accordance with Article 31 of the Palestinian Declaration of Independence from 1988. It was written by Said Al Mozayen (aka Fata Al Thawra, "boy of the revolution"), and its music was composed by Egyptian maestro Ali Ismael, and it was known as the "anthem of the Palestinian redemption".
    6.67
    3 votes
    124

    Hymne Monégasque

    "Hymne Monégasque" (in English: Monégasque Anthem) is Monaco's national anthem. Théophile Bellando de Castro wrote the lyrics and composed the music of the 1st edition of Hymne Monégasque in 1841, later Castil-Blaze modified the melody and made several other minor changes. In 1848 the National Guard, created by Prince Charles III, adopted Bellando's song and it became the March of the National Loyalists. In 1896 Charles Albrecht composed a new arrangement for piano, published by Tihebaux in Paris and called Air National de Monaco; in 1897 Decourcelle of Nice, printed an edition called 429 Hymne National de Monaco for piano. Years later, François Bellini orchestrated the song by Albrecht; this new arrangement for a trio was judged to be too long for people in 1900 and ceased being played. The modern version was created by Léon Jehin in 1914 and was played for the first time during the 25th anniversary of the beginning Prince Albert's reign. Finally in 1931 Louis Notari wrote the lyrics in the Monegasque language. Only the Monegasque lyrics are official, reportedly dating back to a request from the Prince. The official lyrics contain only one verse. (The anthem is not usually even
    6.67
    3 votes
    125
    National Anthem of Russia

    National Anthem of Russia

    The National Anthem of the Russian Federation (Russian: Государственный гимн Российской Федерации, tr. Gosudarstvenny Gimn Rossiyskoy Federatsii) is the name of the official national anthem of Russia. Its musical composition and lyrics were adopted from the National Anthem of the Soviet Union, composed by Alexander Alexandrov, and lyricists Sergey Mikhalkov and Gabriel El-Registan. The Soviet anthem was used from 1944, replacing "The Internationale" with a more Russian-centric song. The anthem was amended in 1956 to remove lyrics that had references to former Soviet leader Joseph Stalin. The anthem was amended again in 1977 to introduce new lyrics written by Mikhalkov. Russia sought a new anthem in 1990 to start anew after the collapse of the Soviet Union. The lyric-free "Patrioticheskaya Pesnya", composed by Mikhail Glinka, was officially adopted in 1990 by the Supreme Soviet of Russia and confirmed in 1993 by President of Russia, Boris Yeltsin. The government sponsored contests to create lyrics for the unpopular anthem because of its inability to inspire Russian athletes during international competitions. None of the entries were adopted, resulting in the restoration of the
    6.67
    3 votes
    126
    Rjana Łužica

    Rjana Łužica

    Rjana Łužica (Lower Sorbian: Rědna Łužyca)—“Beautiful Lusatia”) is the Sorbian national anthem. It was written by poet Handrij Zejler. The lyrics were firstly published on August 24, 1827, in the Leipzig magazine Serbska Nowina. Its music was composed in the beginning of 1845 by Korla Awgust Kocor (German: Karl August Katzer). The anthem was publicly performed for the first time on October 17, 1845, in Budyšin/Bautzen (Upper Sorbian Budyšin, Lower Sorbian: Budyšyn), German Bautzen, formerly Budissin). Handrij Zejler’s two additional verses have been excluded from the official version.
    6.67
    3 votes
    127

    Scotland the Brave

    "Scotland the Brave" (Scottish Gaelic: Alba an Aigh) is a Scottish patriotic song. It was one of several songs considered an unofficial national anthem of Scotland. Scotland the Brave is also the authorised pipe band march of The British Columbia Dragoons of the Canadian Forces, and is played during the Pass in Review at Friday parades at The Citadel and Virginia Military Institute. In 2006, it was adopted as the regimental quick march of the Royal Regiment of Scotland. In the 1982, 1986, and in the 1990 FIFA World Cup, the Scottish national team used it as its anthem prior to using "Flower of Scotland". Scotland the Brave is a popular song for pipe bands to play in American parades. The tune probably first appeared around the turn of the 20th century, and at that time was sometimes known as Scotland the Brave. The lyrics commonly sung today were written in around 1950 by the Scottish journalist Cliff Hanley for the singer Robert Wilson in an arrangement by Marion McClurg. There is another set of lyrics known as My Bonnie Lassie There is also an alternate set of lyrics by John McDermott Scotland Forever, sung to the same tune: In June 2006, the song came in second in an online
    6.67
    3 votes
    128

    Forever Marshall Islands

    Forever Marshall Islands is the national anthem of the Marshall Islands. The music and lyrics were created by former President Amata Kabua. It was adopted in 1991. It replaced the previous national anthem, Ij Io̧kwe Ļo̧k Aelōn̄ Eo Aō. Note: The brackets indicate substitute words that may or have been sung instead of the word in front of them. Lyrics in the Marshallese language
    5.75
    4 votes
    129

    Paraguayos, República o Muerte

    Paraguayos, República o Muerte is the national anthem of Paraguay. The lyrics were written by Francisco Acuña de Figueroa (who also wrote Orientales, la Patria o la tumba, the national anthem of Uruguay) under the presidency of Carlos Antonio López, who at the time delegated Bernardo Jovellanos and Anastasio González to ask Figueroa to write the anthem (Jovellanos and González were commissioners of the Paraguayan government in Uruguay). The anthem was officially finished by Figueroa on May 20, 1846. It still remains unclear who was responsible for the music. Some sources claim that Frenchman Francisco de Dupuis was the composer, while others cite Francisco Acuña de Figueroa as the composer. Other sources claim that the music was composed by Francisco José Debali, repeating the team of the Uruguayan national anthem. What it is known for sure is that in 1933, the Paraguayan composer Remberto Giménez re-arranged and developed the final version of the anthem.
    5.75
    4 votes
    130
    Tibetan National Anthem

    Tibetan National Anthem

    The current Tibetan National Anthem, known as Gyallu was written by Trijang Rinpoche and came into use around 1950. The first national anthem of Tibet was created in the 18th century by Pholanas. Tibet's first national anthem was, according to Tashi Tsering, written by a famous Tibetan scholar, during the epoch of the seventh Dalai Lama and under the reign of the Pholanas in between 1745-1746. Gyallu is the current national anthem of Tibet. The anthem focuses on the radiance of Buddha. The words were written by Trijang Rinpoche around 1950 but it is unclear exactly when Tibet's anthem was first used, either while the country was still under the control of the Dalai Lama's administration or first adopted by the government in exile after the entrance of The People's Liberation Army into the country.. The earliest report of an anthem (presumably this one) is from the period of 1949 to 1950 (when the country was already facing the threat of a Chinese invasion), introduced under reforms set in place to strengthen patriotic feelings of the Tibetan people. Another report states that the anthem was presented to the 14th Dalai Lama in 1960, after he went into exile. Regardless of the
    5.75
    4 votes
    131

    Allah Peliharakan Sultan

    Allah Peliharakan Sultan (Jawi: الله فليهاراكن سلطن ) (English: God Bless the Sultan) is the national anthem of Brunei Darussalam. The anthem is sung in Malay, the national language of the country. It was written by Pengiran Haji Mohamed Yusuf bin Pengiran Abdul Rahim (later bestowed with the title Yang Amat Mulia Pengiran Setia Negara Pengiran Haji Mohamed Yusuf bin Pengiran Abdul Rahim) and composed by Haji Awang Besar bin Sagap in 1947. It was adopted in 1951 as the national anthem of the British protectorate of Brunei. It was adapted as the national anthem of Brunei Darussalam upon independence from the United Kingdom, and was sung as the national anthem of the independent state at the stroke of midnight 1 January 1984. The national anthem is sung by schoolchildren in Brunei at the beginning of school during the raising of the national flag and national emblem on school assemblies. The national anthem is played each morning early breakfast on radio and television by Radio Televisyen Brunei (RTB) and at the sign-on and sign-off (replay rerun recorded sign-on) of its transmission for the day.
    7.50
    2 votes
    132

    Ons Hémécht

    "Ons Heemecht" is the national anthem of Luxembourg. The title in Luxembourgish translates as Our Homeland. Michel Lentz wrote the words in 1859, and they were set to music by Jean Antoine Zinnen in 1864. The song was first performed in public in Ettelbruck, a town at the confluence of the Alzette and Sauer rivers (both of which are mentioned in the song), on 5 June 1864. The first and the last stanza of Ons Heemecht were adopted as Luxembourg's national anthem in 1895. It was added as one of the official 'national emblems' (French: emblèmes nationaux), alongside the national flag, national coat of arms, and the Grand Duke's Official Birthday, on 17 June 1993. Whilst Ons Heemecht is the national anthem, the royal anthem, or more accurately the Grand Ducal anthem, is De Wilhelmus. The music of De Wilhelmus has its origin in Het Wilhelmus, the national anthem of the Netherlands. (1) Wou d'Uelzécht durech d'Wisen zéit, Duerch d'Fielsen d'Sauer brécht, Wou d'Rief laanscht d'Musel dofteg bléit, Den Himmel Wäin ons mécht: Dat ass onst Land, fir dat mer géif Hei nidden alles won, Ons Heemechtsland dat mir so déif An onsen Hierzer dron. Ons Heemechtsland dat mir so déif An onsen Hierzer
    7.50
    2 votes
    133

    Pour l'Afrique et pour toi, Mali

    Le Mali (popularly known as Pour l'Afrique et pour toi, Mali – French: For Africa and for you, Mali or A ton appel Mali – French: At your call, Mali) is the national anthem of Mali. The words were written by Seydou Badian Kouyaté and the music was by Banzumana Sissoko. Adopted as the national anthem in 1962, its themes are patriotism, national, and African unity. It states the willingness of the people of Mali to lay down their lives for their nation and for liberty. A common theme throughout the song is the desire to strive for a united Africa. Its music is a traditional European style military march. It was officially adopted less than a year after independence, by loi n° 62-72 du 9 août 1962. It is traditionally played at state ceremonies by the band of the Garde Républicaine of the Armed Forces of Mali. The Malian Young Pioneer movement of the 1960s translated the anthem in the Bambara language for its rallies. The first verse begins: Translated as: The chorus is as follows: Translated as: THE SINGING OF NATIONAL PIONEERS OF MALI
    7.50
    2 votes
    134
    Dievs, svētī Latviju!

    Dievs, svētī Latviju!

    Dievs, svētī Latviju! (God, Bless Latvia!) is the national anthem of Latvia. Words and music by Kārlis Baumanis (Baumaņu Kārlis, 1834–1904). The music and lyrics were written in 1873 by Kārlis Baumanis, a teacher, who was part of the Young Latvian nationalist movement. It has been speculated that Baumanis may have borrowed part of the lyrics from a popular song which was sung to tune of God Save the Queen, modified them and set them to music of his own. Baumanis's lyrics were different from the modern ones: he used the term "Baltics" synonymously and interchangeably with "Latvia" and "Latvians", so "Latvia" was actually mentioned only at the beginning of the first verse. Later the term "Latvia" was removed and replaced with "Baltics" to avoid a ban on the song. This has led to the misapprehension that the term "Latvia" was not part of the song until 1920, when it was chosen as national anthem and the word "Baltics" was replaced with "Latvia".
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    135

    Ertra, Ertra, Ertra

    Ertra, Ertra, Ertra (Tigrinya: ኤርትራ ኤርትራ ኤርትራ) is the national anthem of Eritrea. It was adopted in 1993, soon after the country became independent, and is entitled Eritrea, Eritrea, Eritrea in English. The song was written by Solomon Tsehaye Beraki, and composed by Isaac Abraham Meharezghi and Aron Tekle Tesfatsion. Eritrea, Eritrea, Eritrea, Her arch-enemy destroyed wailingly, her sacrifices vindicated by freedom. She holds firmly her goal, her name has come to mean perseverance and steadfastness, Eritrea, the pride of the oppressed people, is a testament that truth prevails. Eritrea, Eritrea, has taken her rightful place in the world. The supreme dedication that brought her liberation, will serve to rebuild her and make her green, We shall honour her with progress, It is our legacy to embellish her. Eritrea, Eritrea, has taken her rightful place in the world.
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    3 votes
    136

    La Concorde

    "La Concorde" is the national anthem of Gabon. Written and composed by Georges Aleka Damas, it was adopted upon independence in 1960.
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    3 votes
    137

    Land der Berge, Land am Strome

    Land der Berge, Land am Strome (Land of the mountains, land on the river) is the national anthem of Austria. Nineteen days before his death on December 5, 1791, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart composed his last complete work, the Freimaurerkantate, K. 623. In parts of the printed edition of this cantata there appeared the song K. 623a "Lasst uns mit geschlungnen Händen" ("Let us with joined hands"). To this melody the Austrian national anthem is sung. Today, Mozart's authorship is regarded as dubious and the song is attributed to Johann Holzer (1753–1818). The lyrics were written by Paula von Preradović, one of the few women to have written lyrics for a national anthem. On October 22, 1946, it was declared Austria's official national anthem. On January 1, 2012, parts of the lyrics were changed to make the anthem gender-neutral. Original (pre-2012) lyrics had the line Heimat bist du großer Söhne (You are home to great sons) instead of Heimat großer Töchter und Söhne on first verse and Brüderchören (fraternal choirs) instead of Jubelchören on third verse. It is said that, the same evening after von Preradović learned that her lyrics were chosen for the national anthem, her sons, Otto and
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    3 votes
    138

    Vajacki marš

    Vajacki marš (pronounced [vaˈjatsci ˈmarʂ], "Come, We Shall March in Joint Endeavour") is the National anthem for the short-lived Belarusian People's Republic (BNR) that existed in 1918. Currently the government of BNR exists in exile. The anthem was written by Makar Kraŭcoŭ and music by Uladzimier Teraŭski. It was first published in Minsk, in the newspaper, Belarus.
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    139
    Argentine National Anthem

    Argentine National Anthem

    The Argentine National Anthem (Spanish: Himno Nacional Argentino) is the national anthem of Argentina. The name of the song originally was Marcha Patriótica (Patriotic March), and was later renamed Canción Patriótica Nacional (National Patriotic Song) and finally Canción Patriótica (Patriotic Song). A copy published in 1847 called it Himno Nacional Argentino and the name has remained ever since. Its lyrics were written by the Buenos Aires-born politician Vicente López y Planes and the music was composed by the Spanish musician Blas Parera. The work was adopted as the sole official song on May 11, 1813, three years after the May Revolution; May 11 is therefore Anthem Day in Argentina. The first anthem was the Patriotic March, published on November 15, 1810 in the Gazeta de Buenos Ayres. It had lyrics by Esteban de Luca and music by Blas Parera. This original anthem made no reference to the name of Argentina or an independentist will, and talked instead about Spain being conquered by France in the Peninsular War, the absolutist restauration began by the Council of Regency, and the need to keep the republican freedoms achieved so far in the Americas: "Spain was victim / of the
    8.00
    1 votes
    140

    Die Wacht am Rhein

    "Die Wacht am Rhein" (English: The Watch/Guard on the Rhine) is a German patriotic anthem. The song's origins are rooted in the historical French–German enmity, and it was particularly popular in Germany during the Franco-Prussian War and the First World War. In the Rhine Crisis of 1840, French prime minister Adolphe Thiers advanced the claim that the Upper and Middle Rhine River should serve as his country's "natural eastern border". The member states of the German Confederation feared that France was planning to annex the left bank of the Rhine, as it had sought to do under King Louis XIV, and had temporarily accomplished during the Napoleonic Wars and the implementation of the Confederation of the Rhine in 1806–1813. In the two centuries from the Thirty Years' War to the final defeat of Napoleon, the German inhabitants of these lands suffered from repeated major and minor French invasions. Nikolaus Becker answered to these events by writing a poem called "Rheinlied", in which he swore to defend the Rhine. The Swabian merchant Max Schneckenburger, inspired by the German praise and French opposition this received, then wrote the poem "Die Wacht am Rhein". In the poem, with five
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    1 votes
    141

    Horst-Wessel-Lied

    The Horst-Wessel-Lied (Horst Wessel Song), also known as Die Fahne hoch ("The Flag On High") from its opening line, was the anthem of the Nazi Party from 1930 to 1945. From 1933 to 1945 the Nazis made it a co-national anthem of Germany, along with the first stanza of the Deutschlandlied. The lyrics were written in 1929 by Horst Wessel, commander of the Storm Division (SA) in the Friedrichshain district of Berlin. Wessel was murdered by Albrecht Höhler, a Communist party member, in February 1930, and Joseph Goebbels made him a martyr of the Nazi movement. The song was first performed at Wessel's funeral, and was thereafter extensively used at party functions as well as being sung by the SA during street parades. When Adolf Hitler became chancellor three years later, the Horst-Wessel-Lied was recognised as a national symbol by a law on May 19, 1933. The following year a regulation required the right arm raised in a "Hitler salute" when the (identical) first and fourth verses were sung. Nazi leaders can be seen singing the Horst-Wessel-Lied at the finale of Leni Riefenstahl's 1935 film Triumph of the Will. With the end of the Nazi regime in May 1945, the Horst-Wessel-Lied was banned,
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    142

    Limba noastră

    "Limba noastră" (Romanian pronunciation: [ˈlimba ˈno̯astrə], meaning "Our Language") is the national anthem of the Republic of Moldova since 1994. For a short period before that, the official anthem of the country was Deşteaptă-te, române!, which is also the national anthem of Romania. The lyrics were written by Alexei Mateevici (1888-1917) a month before his death. Mateevici contributed significantly to the national emancipation of Bessarabia. The music for the anthem was composed by Alexandru Cristea (1890-1942). The focus of "Limba noastră", written in a romantic style, is the national language. It calls for the people to revive the usage of their native language. The poem does not make a named reference to the language; it is only called poetically "our language". "Limba noastră", like "Deşteaptă-te, române!", makes reference to the awakening from the sleep of death: "a people suddenly awaken from the sleep of death" and "awaken, Romanian, from the sleep of death", respectively. The original poem contains four stanzas of twelve verses each. For the anthem, the verses were selected and reorganized in five stanzas of four verses each. Limba noastră is based on a twelve-verse
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    143

    Song of the Ålander

    Ålänningens sång (English: "Song of the Ålander"; Finnish: "Ahvenanmaalaisten laulu), is the official anthem of the Åland Islands, an autonomous Swedish-speaking province of Finland. Adopted in 1922, the anthem's words are by John Grandell and the music was composed by Johan Fridolf Hagfors. The song was first performed during the song festival in Mariehamn 1922. In Åland the song is mostly sung on Midsummer's Eve and on the National day of Åland in June 9th. The song originally had four verses, but the third verse is omitted for a long time when the song is sung and often when it appears in print.
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    144

    Stand and Sing of Zambia, Proud and Free

    Stand and Sing of Zambia, Proud and Free or Lumbanyeni Zambia is the national anthem of Zambia. The tune is taken from the hymn Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrika (God Bless Africa), which was composed by a South African, Enoch Sontonga, in 1897, the lyrics were composed at or near Zambian independence to specifically reflect Zambia, as opposed to Sontonga's lyrics which refer to Africa as a whole. Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrika also forms the first verse of South Africa's national anthem.
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    1 votes
    145

    Aegukka

    "Aegukka" (English: "The Patriotic Song") is the national anthem of North Korea. "Aegukka" is a Romanized transliteration of "The Patriotic Song". Is also known by the first phrase of the song Ach'imŭn pinnara or "Let Morning Shine". The Provisional Government of the Republic of Korea (1919-1945) in Shanghai, China adopted as their national anthem "Aegukga" (which has the same name with a different Romanization). After World War II, South Korea kept the words, put to a new tune (changed from Auld Lang Syne), while North Korea adopted this newly-written piece in 1947. The words were written by Pak Seyŏng (박세영; 朴世永; 1902–1989) and the music was composed by Kim Wŏn'gyun (김원균; 金元均; 1917–2002). "Aegukka", almost unique among most North Korean patriotic songs, as it praises neither the Workers' Party of Korea, nor Kim Il-sung or Kim Jong-il's cult of personality.
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    146
    Indonesia Raya

    Indonesia Raya

    "Indonesia Raya" is the national anthem of the Republic of Indonesia. The song was introduced by its composer, Wage Rudolf Supratman, on 28 October 1928 during the Second Indonesian Youth Congress in Batavia. The song marked the birth of the all-archipelago nationalist movement in Indonesia that supported the idea of one single "Indonesia" as successor to the Dutch East Indies, rather than split into several colonies. The first newspaper to openly publish the musical notation and lyric of "Indonesia Raya" — an act of defiance towards the Dutch authorities — was the Chinese Indonesian weekly Sin Po. The first stanza of "Indonesia Raya" was chosen as the national anthem when Indonesia proclaimed its independence at 17 August 1945. Jozef Cleber, a Dutch composer, created Indonesia Raya arrangement for philharmonic orchestra in 1950. This arrangement is widely been used currently for formal and some informal purposes. "Indonesia Raya" is played in flag raising ceremonies. The flag is raised in a solemn and timed motion so that it reaches the top of the flagpole as the anthem ends. The main flag raising ceremony is held annually on 17 August to commemorate Independence day. The ceremony
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    2 votes
    147
    L-Innu Malti

    L-Innu Malti

    "L-Innu Malti" (in English: The Maltese Hymn) is the national anthem of Malta. It is written in the form of a prayer to God; It was composed by Robert Samut and the lyrics were written by Dun Karm Psaila. From the mid nineteenth century up to the early 1930s, Malta was passing through a national awakening. With the increased national awareness, it was felt by many thinkers that Malta should have its own National Anthem. In 1850 Ġan Anton Vassallo composed Innu Lil Malta, which used to be played during many Maltese political manifestations and meetings. In 1922, Professor Mro. Robert Samut composed a short melody. A year later, Dr A.V. Laferla, Director of Primary Schools in Malta, obtained possession of this composition, as he wanted to have an anthem which could be sung by students in Malta's schools. Laferla asked Dun Karm to write lyrics that would fit with Samut's short and dignified melody. The poems of Dun Karm Psaila are well known for their religious and patriotic currents, and so are the verses written for Samut's anthem. The hymn was already being sung in December 1922, mostly in governmental schools. The first time it was heard in public was on 27 December 1922 and again
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    148
    National Anthem of Chile

    National Anthem of Chile

    The National Anthem of Chile (Spanish: Himno Nacional de Chile) is also known as Canción Nacional (National Song). It has a history of two lyrics and two melodies that made up three different versions. The current version was composed by Ramón Carnicer, with words by Eusebio Lillo, and has six parts plus the chorus. The first Chilean National Anthem dates back to 1819, when the government called for, on the 19th of July, the creation of music and lyrics for this purpose. The composer Manuel Robles and the poet Bernardo de Vera y Pintado fulfilled this mandate and their "National Song" debuted on 20 August 1820 in the Domingo Arteaga theater, although other historians claim that it was played and sung during the festivities of September 1819. In the beginning, everyone would stand for the song. O'Higgins and Freire listened to it with respect and full of emotion, for they had marched to victory to its tune more than once. The custom of always singing it at the theater slowly disappeared, until it was ordered that it only be sung at the anniversary of the country. The doctor Bernardo Vera, known in the history of the independence, was the author of the verses that were sung to
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    2 votes
    149
    National Anthem of the Soviet Union

    National Anthem of the Soviet Union

    The National Anthem of the Soviet Union, the State Anthem of the USSR (Russian: Государственный гимн СССР, Gosudarstvenny Gimn SSSR) was introduced during World War II on March 15, 1944, replacing The Internationale as the official national anthem of the Soviet Union as well as the national anthem of the Russian SFSR. The lyrics were written by Sergey Mikhalkov (1913–2009) in collaboration with Gabriel El-Registan (1899–1945) and the music was composed by Alexander Alexandrov (1883–1946). It was believed that Soviet soldiers would respond more to an anthem that was dedicated only to the Soviet Union rather than to a worldwide movement. The song was originally written as the Anthem of the Bolshevik Party with lyrics in the Alexandrine meter by Vasily Lebedev-Kumach in 1939. The Anthem of the Soviet Union was played for the first time on the Soviet radio at midnight of the 1 January 1944. The 1944 lyrics had three different refrains following three different stanzas; in each refrain, the second line was consequently modified with references to friendship, then happiness and finally to glory. Later on, in 1977, these refrains were replaced by a uniform refrain following all stanzas.
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    150

    Oben am jungen Rhein

    Oben am jungen Rhein (Up above the young Rhine), sung to the same tune as God Save the Queen, has been the national anthem of Liechtenstein since 1963, when the lyrics were altered (the first line had been Oben am deutschen Rhein). The original lyrics had been written in 1850 by Swiss pastor Jakob Josef Jauch (1802–1859), in a time when the Principality of Liechtenstein, which is considered the last remnant of the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation, was a member of the German Confederation. About a decade earlier, French claims to the left bank of the Rhine (Rhine Crisis of 1840) had triggered a series of German Rhine songs of which Die Wacht am Rhein is the most famous. Jauch's lyrics were adopted in 1920 as national anthem. In 1963, the anthem was shortened, and references to German and Germany were removed: am deutschen Rhein (on the German Rhine) became am jungen Rhein (on the young Rhine), and im deutschen Vaterland (in the German fatherland) became das teure Vaterland (the precious fatherland). The second original stanza, containing Auf Deutschlands Wacht (on guard for Germany) was, like the third and fourth, discontinued altogether. Until 1963 the anthem's text was:
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    151

    Scots Wha Hae

    Scots Wha Hae (English: Scots, Who Have; Scottish Gaelic: Brosnachadh Bhruis) is a patriotic song of Scotland which served for centuries as an unofficial national anthem of the country, but has lately been largely supplanted by Scotland the Brave and Flower of Scotland. The lyrics were written by Robert Burns in 1793, in the form of a speech given by Robert the Bruce before the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314, where Scotland maintained its sovereignty from the Kingdom of England. Although the lyrics are by Burns, he wrote them to the traditional Scottish tune 'Hey Tuttie Tatie' which, according to tradition, was played by Bruce's army at the Battle of Bannockburn, and by the Franco-Scots army at the Siege of Orleans. The tune tends to be played as a slow air, but certain arrangements put it at a faster tempo, as in the Scottish Fantasy by Max Bruch, the concert overture Rob Roy by Hector Berlioz, and the Real McKenzies' punk rock rendition on their 1998 album Clash of the Tartans. The song was sent by Burns to his publisher George Thomson, at the end of August 1793, with the title Robert Bruce's March To Bannockburn, and a postscript saying that he had been inspired by Bruce's
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    2 votes
    152
    The Internationale

    The Internationale

    "The Internationale" ("L'Internationale" in French) is a widely sung left-wing anthem. It has been one of the most recognizable and popular songs of the socialist movement since the late 19th century, when the Second International (now the Socialist International) adopted it as its official anthem. The original French refrain of the song is C'est la lutte finale / Groupons-nous et demain / L'Internationale / Sera le genre humain. (English: "This is the final struggle / Let us group together and tomorrow / The Internationale / Will be the human race.") "The Internationale" has been translated into many languages. It is often sung with the hand raised in a clenched fist salute and is sometimes followed (in English-speaking places) with a chant of "The workers united will never be defeated". "The Internationale" has been celebrated by socialists, communists, and anarchists. The original French words were written in June 1871 by Eugène Pottier (1816–1887, previously a member of the Paris Commune) and were originally intended to be sung to the tune of "La Marseillaise". Pierre De Geyter (1848–1932) set the poem to music in 1888. His melody was first publicly performed in July 1888 and
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    2 votes
    153

    Tiến Quân Ca

    The "Marching Song" (Vietnamese: Tiến Quân Ca, pronounced [tjə̌n kwən kaː]), also known as the "Army March", and the "Song of Advancing Soldiers", is the national anthem of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam, both written and composed by Văn Cao in 1944. The "Marching Song" was adopted as the national anthem of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam in 1945, and was adopted as the national anthem of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam in 1976, following the reunification of both North Vietnam and South Vietnam, at the end of the Vietnam War. The "Marching Song" was both written and composed by Văn Cao in 1944, and was adopted as the national anthem of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam in 1945, and throughout the Vietnam War. When Vietnam was unified following the end of the Vietnam War, the "Marching Song" became the national anthem of the unified Socialist Republic of Vietnam in 1976. During the wars there was a movement to replace the national anthem of Vietnam as the "Marching Song" was deemed outdated, but no reasonable alternative ever materialized. Although the "Song of Advancing Soldiers" consists of two verses, only the first is recognized and used as the official anthem within
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    2 votes
    154
    China Heroically Stands in the Universe

    China Heroically Stands in the Universe

    "China Heroically Stands in the Universe" (simplified Chinese: 中国雄立宇宙间; traditional Chinese: 中國雄立宇宙間; pinyin: Zhōngguó xióng lì yǔzhòujiān) was the imperial anthem of the Empire of China (1915–1916). It was issued by the Ritual Regulations Office (禮制館) in June 1915 after Yuan Shikai was declared Emperor of China. Its lyrics were written by Yin Chang (廕昌) and music by Wang Lu (王露). 中國雄立宇宙間, 廓八埏, 華冑來從崑崙巔, 江湖浩蕩山綿連, 共和五族開堯天, 億萬年。
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    3 votes
    155
    Dideba

    Dideba

    "Dideba" ("Praise", დიდება in Georgian) was the national anthem of Georgia from 1918 to 1920, and from 14 November 1990 to 23 April 2004. It was written and composed by Kote Potskhverashvili (1889–1959). It was replaced by Tavisupleba.
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    3 votes
    156
    Il Canto degli Italiani

    Il Canto degli Italiani

    Il Canto degli Italiani (The Song of the Italians) is the Italian national anthem. It is best known among Italians as Inno di Mameli (Mameli's Hymn), after the author of the lyrics, or Fratelli d'Italia (Brothers of Italy), from its opening line. The words were written in the autumn of 1847 in Genoa, by the then 20-year-old student and patriot Goffredo Mameli, in a climate of popular struggle for unification and independence of Italy which foreshadowed the war against Austria. Two months later, they were set to music in Turin by another Genoese, Michele Novaro. The hymn enjoyed widespread popularity throughout the period of the Risorgimento and in the following decades. After unification (1861) the adopted national anthem was the Marcia Reale, the Royal March (or Fanfara Reale), official hymn of the royal house of Savoy composed in 1831 to order of Carlo Alberto di Savoia. The Marcia Reale remained the Italian national anthem until Italy became a republic in 1946. Giuseppe Verdi, in his Inno delle Nazioni (Hymn of the Nations), composed for the London International Exhibition of 1862, chose Il Canto degli Italiani – and not the Marcia Reale – to represent Italy, putting it beside
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    3 votes
    157

    Isle of Man National Anthem

    The National Anthem (Manx: Arrane Ashoonagh) of the Isle of Man, known in Manx as Arrane Ashoonagh dy Vannin, was written and composed by William Henry Gill (1839-1923), with the Manx translation by John J. Kneen (1873-1939). The anthem is sung to an adaptation of the traditional Manx melody of Mylecharaine's March and its English title is normally O Land of Our Birth. First performed at the Manx Music Festival on Thursday 21 March 1907, there are eight verses in total, but the first verse is usually sung. The anthem was given official status by the Isle of Man's legislature Tynwald at a sitting on 22 January 2003, with God Save the Queen, being designated as the Royal Anthem. The National Anthem is used on official and ceremonial occasions and in schools, the Royal Anthem is normally reserved for use additionally on those occasions when the Sovereign, members of the Royal Family or the Lieutenant Governor are present. The song Ellan Vannin had up to this point vied to be an equal unofficial national anthem.
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    3 votes
    158
    The Prayer of Russians

    The Prayer of Russians

    The Prayer of Russians (Russian: Молитва русских, Molitva russkikh) was a song used as the national anthem of Imperial Russia from 1816 to 1833. After defeating the First French Empire, Tsar Alexander I of Russia recommended a national anthem for Russia. The lyrics were written by Vasily Zhukovsky, and the music of the British anthem God Save the King was used. In 1833, "The Prayer of Russians" was replaced with "God Save the Tsar" (Bozhe, tsarya khrani). The two songs both start with the same words Bozhe, tsarya khrani but differ after that. Some consider God Save the Tsar Russia's first true national anthem, as both its words and music were Russian. Others say the title belongs to Grom pobedy, razdavaysya!, another popular song of the time, although it never had official status. Боже, Царя храни! Славному долги дни Дай на земли! Гордыхъ смирителю, Слабыхъ хранителю, Всѣхъ утѣшителю— Всё ниспошли! Перводержавную Русь Православную Боже, храни! Царство ей стройное, Въ силѣ спокойное! Всё-жъ недостойное Прочь отжени! О, Провидѣніе! Благословеніе Намъ ниспошли! Къ благу стремленіе, Въ счастьѣ смиреніе, Въ скорби терпѣніе Дай на земли! Bozhe, tsarya khrani! Slavnomu dolgi dni Day na
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    3 votes
    159

    Une Seule Nuit

    Une Seule Nuit (also known as L'Hymne de la victoire or Ditanyè) is the national anthem of Burkina Faso. It was written by the former president Thomas Sankara and adopted in 1984, when the country adopted its present name, and replaced the Hymne Nationale Voltaïque, or national anthem of Upper Volta.
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    3 votes
    160

    United Republic

    "United Republic" is the national anthem of Yemen. Written by Abdallah "al-Fadhool" Abdulwahab Noman and composed by Ayoob Tarish, it was formerly the anthem of the People's Democratic Republic of Yemen (South Yemen) and became the anthem of all of Yemen when the two Yemens merged in 1990. رددي أيتها الدنيا نشيدي ردديـه وأعـيدي وأعـيـدي واذكـري في فـرحتي كل شهيد وامنحيه حللاً من ضوء عيدي 1 يـا بلادي نحن أبنـاء وأحفاد رجالك سوف نحمي كل ما بين يدينا من جلالـك وسيبقى خالد الضوء على كل المسالك كل صخرة في جبالك .. كل ذرة في رمالك 2 كـل أنداءفي ضـلالـك .. مـلـكنا إنـها ملك أمـانينا الـكبيرة.. حقنا جاء من أمجاد ماضيك المثيرة Chorus 3 وحدتي .. وحدتي .. يا نشيدا رائـعاً يملأ نـفسي أنتِ عـهد عالق في كل ذمة رايتي .. رايتي .. يا نسيجاً حكته من كل شـمس اخـلدي خافقة في كل قمة أمتي .. أمتي .. امنحيني البأس يا مصدر بأسي واذخريني لك يا أكرم أمة 4 عشت إيماني وحبي امميا ومسيري فوق دربي عربيا وسيبقى نبـض قلبي يمنيا لن ترى الدنيا على أرضي وصيا رددي أيتها الدنيا نشيدي رددي أيتها الدنيا نشيدي Raddidi Ayyatuha 'D-dunya Nashidi Raddidihi Wa a'idi Wa aidi Wa 'Dhkuri Fi Farhati Kulla Shahidi Wa 'Mnahihi Hullalan Min Daw'i Idi Raddidi Ayyatuha 'D-dunya Nashidi Raddidi Ayyatuha 'D-dunya Nashidi Ya Biladi,
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    3 votes
    161
    Deșteaptă-te, române!

    Deșteaptă-te, române!

    "Deșteaptă-te, române" [deʃˈte̯aptəte roˈmɨne] ( listen) (variously translated as "Awaken thee, Romanian!", "Awaken, Romanian!", or "Wake Up, Romanian!") is Romania's national anthem. The lyrics were composed by Andrei Mureșanu (1816–1863) and the music was popular (it was chosen for the poem by Gheorghe Ucenescu, as most sources say). It was written and published during the 1848 revolution, initially with the name "Un răsunet" ("An echo"). It was first sung in late June in the same year in the city of Brașov, on the streets of Șchei quarter. It was immediately accepted as the revolutionary anthem and renamed "Deșteaptă-te, române". Since then, this song, which contains a message of liberty and patriotism, has been sung during all major Romanian conflicts, including during the 1989 anti-Ceauşist revolution. After that revolution, it became the national anthem, replacing the communist-era national anthem "Trei culori" ("Three colors"). July 29 is now "National Anthem Day" (Ziua Imnului național), an annual observance in Romania. The song was also used on various solemn occasions in the Moldavian Democratic Republic, during its brief existence, between 1917 and 1918. Between 1991 and
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    3 votes
    162
    God Save the South

    God Save the South

    "God Save the South" is considered to be the unofficial national anthem of the Confederate States of America. It was written by George Henry Miles (as Ernest Halphin). The commonly-heard version was composed by Charles W. A. Ellerbrock, while C. T. De Cœniél composed a different tune for the song. It was written in 1861.
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    3 votes
    163
    Lofsöngur

    Lofsöngur

    "Lofsöngur" ("Hymn"), also known as "Ó Guð vors lands" ("O, God of Our Land"), is the national anthem of Iceland. The lyrics are by Matthías Jochumsson and the music by Sveinbjörn Sveinbjörnsson. The anthem contains three stanzas, but only the first one is commonly sung. The melody is by many considered difficult to sing, and requires a vocal range of a minor fourteenth. Many Icelandic people claim to be unable to sing it. That the anthem is essentially a hymn has been the subject of controversy in recent times, but proponents point to the fact that Iceland has a state church and that Christianity is by far the most popular religion. Many other patriotic and nationalistic songs are sung to show allegiance to Iceland, on various occasions as people often know them better when it comes to singing them, like "Ísland er land þitt" ("Iceland is your country"), "Ísland ögrum skorið" ("Iceland cut with bays"), "Öxar við ána" ("By the Öxará (Axe River)"), "Ó fögur er vor fósturjörð" ("Oh how beautiful is our motherland"), "Hver á sér fegra föðurland?" ("Who has a more beautiful motherland?"), "Eldgamla Ísafold" ("Ancient Ice-land"), "Ég vil elska mitt land" ("I want to love my country")
    5.67
    3 votes
    164

    As Salam al Amiri

    As Salam al Amiri (Arabic: السلام الأميري‎, As-salām al-amīrī, meaning "Peace to the Amir") is the national anthem of the state of Qatar. It was written by Sheikh Mubarak bin Saïf al Thani.
    6.50
    2 votes
    165

    Ee Mungu Nguvu Yetu

    Ee Mungu Nguvu Yetu (O God, you are our strength) is the national anthem of Kenya. It was originally composed in Swahili, the national language. Kenya's National Anthem was prepared by local people. The commission included five members and was headed by the Kenya Music Adviser. It was based on a traditional tune sung by Pokomo mothers to their children. The anthem is notable for being one of the first national anthems to be specifically commissioned. It was written by the Kenyan Anthem Commission in 1963 to serve as the anthem after independence from the United Kingdom.
    6.50
    2 votes
    166
    God Defend New Zealand

    God Defend New Zealand

    "God Defend New Zealand" is one of two national anthems of New Zealand, the other being "God Save the Queen". Legally they have equal status, but "God Defend New Zealand" is more commonly used, and is popularly referred to as "the national anthem". The anthem has English and Māori lyrics, with slightly different meanings. "God Defend New Zealand" was written as a poem in the 1870s by Irish-born, Victorian-raised immigrant Thomas Bracken of Dunedin. A competition to compose music for the poem was held in 1876 by The Saturday Advertiser and judged by three prominent Melbourne musicians, with a prize of ten guineas. The winner of the competition was the Tasmanian-born John Joseph Woods of Lawrence, New Zealand who composed the melody in a single sitting the evening after finding out about the competition. The song was first performed at the Queen's Theatre, Princes Street, Dunedin, on Christmas Day, 1876. The song became increasingly popular during the 19th century and early 20th century, and in 1940 the New Zealand government bought the copyright and made it New Zealand's national hymn in time for that year's centennial celebrations. While being used as New Zealand's national anthem
    6.50
    2 votes
    167

    Isle of Beauty, Isle of Splendour

    Isle of Beauty, Isle of Splendour is the national anthem of the Commonwealth of Dominica. It was adopted upon gaining statehood in 1967 and again with independence in 1978. The lyrics are by Wilfred Oscar Morgan Pond and the music is composed by Lemuel McPherson Christian.
    6.50
    2 votes
    168

    Jedna Si Jedina

    "Jedna si jedina" was the national anthem of Bosnia and Herzegovina between 1992 and 1998. The music was taken from the old Bosnian folk song "S one strane Plive" ("On the far bank of the Pliva river" or "On the other side of the Pliva river"), and the lyrics were written by music star Edin Dervišhalidović. It was adopted in November 1992, several months after independence in March 1992. A new anthem - "The National Anthem of Bosnia and Herzegovina" - was adopted in 1999. "Jedna si jedina" is still considered by some people to be the real anthem of Bosnia and Herzegovina.
    6.50
    2 votes
    169
    My Kazakhstan

    My Kazakhstan

    My Kazakhstan (Kazakh: Менің Қазақстаным, Meniñ Qazaqstanım) is the national anthem of Kazakhstan, adopted on January 7, 2006. It is based on a homonymous song written in 1956, with music by Shamshi Kaldayakov and lyrics by Jumeken Najimedenov. This replaced the anthem of the Republic of Kazakhstan as the state anthem, which was used after independence. The original lyrics were modified by Nursultan Nazarbayev, the President of Kazakhstan, before the decree was issued.
    6.50
    2 votes
    170

    Ode to Newfoundland

    "Ode to Newfoundland" is the official provincial anthem of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. It was composed by Governor Sir Cavendish Boyle in 1902 as a four-verse poem entitled Newfoundland. On December 22, 1902 it was sung by Frances Daisy Foster at the Casino Theatre of St. John's during the closing of the play Mamzelle. The original score was set to the music of E.R. Krippner, a German bandmaster living in St. John's but Boyle desired a more dignified score. It was then set to the music of British composer Sir Hubert Parry, a personal friend of Boyle, who composed two settings. On May 20, 1904 it was chosen as Newfoundland's official national anthem (national being understood as a self-governing Dominion of the British Empire on par with Canada, South Africa, Australia and other former British colonies) . This distinction was dropped when Newfoundland joined the Canadian Confederation in 1949. Three decades later, in 1980, the province re-adopted the song as an official provincial anthem.
    6.50
    2 votes
    171
    Sorood-e Shahanshahi Iran

    Sorood-e Shahanshahi Iran

    "Sorood-e Shahanshahi Iran" or "Imperial Salute of Iran" (in Persian: Sorude Şähanşähiye Irän) was the national anthem of Iran from 1933 until the Islamic Revolution of 1979, when the monarchy was abolished. The anthem is a chronicle of the exploits of the Shah and his dynasty (the Pahlavi dynasty).
    6.50
    2 votes
    172
    The Internationale in Chinese

    The Internationale in Chinese

    The Internationale in Chinese (simplified Chinese: 国际歌; traditional Chinese: 國際歌; pinyin: Guójìgē) is literally the International Song. It has several different sets of lyrics. The most common and official Chinese version is the de facto anthem of the Communist Party of China. It was translated on 15 June 1923 from the Russian version by Qu Qiubai (Chinese: 瞿秋白), a leader of the Communist Party of China in the late 1920s. His translation has transliterated the Internationale as Yīngtènàxióngnài'ěr (simplified Chinese: 英特纳雄耐尔; traditional Chinese: 英特納雄耐爾) when singing the phrase in Standard Chinese. When the Chinese Soviet Republic was established in 1931, it was decided to be its national anthem. As he was executed by the Kuomintang in 1935, his Chinese translation is in the public domain wherever the duration of copyright is an author's lifetime plus up to 70 years, including Chinese-speaking Mainland China, Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan (lifetime plus 50 years in these places), and Singapore (lifetime plus 70 years). The three Chinese lyrics roughly correspond to the three Russian lyrics by Arkady Yakovlevich Kots and the first, second, and sixth French lyrics by Eugène Pottier. The
    6.50
    2 votes
    173

    God zij met ons Suriname

    God zij met ons Suriname or Opo kondreman is the national anthem of Suriname. It has 2 verses: the first in Dutch and the second in Sranan Tongo.
    4.75
    4 votes
    174

    Jamaica, Land We Love

    "Jamaica, Land We Love" is the national anthem of Jamaica. The words were written by Hugh Sherlock and the music was composed by Robert Lightbourne and arranged by Mapletoft Poulle.
    4.75
    4 votes
    175

    A Portuguesa

    A Portuguesa (English: The Portuguese), Portuguese pronunciation: [ɐ puɾtuˈɣezɐ], is the national anthem of Portugal. It was composed by Alfredo Keil and written by Henrique Lopes de Mendonça during the resurgent nationalist movement ignited by the 1890 British ultimatum to Portugal concerning its African colonies. Used as the marching song of the failed republican rebellion of January 1891, in Porto, it was adopted as the national anthem of the newborn Portuguese Republic in 1911, replacing O Hino da Carta (English: The Charter Anthem), the anthem of the deposed constitutional monarchy. On 11 January 1890, the United Kingdom issued an ultimatum demanding that Portugal refrain from occupying land lying between the Portuguese colonies of Angola, on the west coast of Africa, and Mozambique, on the east coast, thereby forming one contiguous polity (as proposed on the Pink Map). Despite a popular uproar, the Portuguese government was forced to accept Britain's demands. This contributed to the unpopularity of King Carlos I and the monarchy, and it garnered support for the increasingly popular republican movement in Portugal. The night after the ultimatum was accepted, the composer,
    7.00
    1 votes
    176

    Brazilian national anthem

    The Brazilian national anthem (Portuguese: Hino Nacional Brasileiro) was composed by Francisco Manuel da Silva in 1831 and had been given at least two sets of unofficial lyrics before a 1922 decree by President Epitácio Pessoa gave the anthem its definitive, official lyrics, by Joaquim Osório Duque-Estrada, after several changes were made to his proposal, written in 1909. The anthem's lyrics have been described as Parnassian in style and Romantic in content. The melody of the Brazilian national anthem was composed by Francisco Manuel da Silva and was presented to the public for the first time in April 1831. On 7 April 1831 the first Brazilian Emperor, Pedro I abdicated the Crown and days later left for Europe, leaving behind the then five year old Emperor Pedro II. From the Proclamation of the Independence of Brazil in 1822 until the 1831 abdication, an anthem that had been composed by Pedro I himself, celebrating the country's independence (and that now continues to be an official patriotic song, the Independence Anthem), was used as the National Anthem. In the immediate aftermath of the abdication of Pedro I, the Anthem composed by him fell in popularity. Francisco Manoel da
    7.00
    1 votes
    177
    Das Lied der Deutschen

    Das Lied der Deutschen

    The "Deutschlandlied" ("Song of Germany", German pronunciation: [ˈdɔʏtʃlantˌliːt]; also known as "Das Lied der Deutschen" or "The Song of the Germans"), has been used wholly or partially as the national anthem of Germany since 1922. Since World War II and the fall of Nazi Germany, only the third stanza has been used as the national anthem. The music was written by Joseph Haydn in 1797 as an anthem for the birthday of the Austrian Emperor Francis II of the Holy Roman Empire. In 1841, the German linguist and poet August Heinrich Hoffmann von Fallersleben wrote the lyrics of "Das Lied der Deutschen" to Haydn's melody, lyrics that were considered revolutionary at the time. The song is also well known by the opening words and refrain of the first stanza, "Deutschland, Deutschland über alles" (literally, "Germany, Germany above all"), but this has never been its title. The line "Germany, Germany above all" meant that the most important goal of the Vormärz revolutionaries should be a unified Germany overcoming the perceived anti-liberal Kleinstaaterei. Alongside the Flag of Germany it was one of the symbols of the March Revolution of 1848. In order to endorse its republican and liberal
    7.00
    1 votes
    178
    Druk tsendhen

    Druk tsendhen

    Druk tsendhen ("The Thunder Dragon Kingdom") is the national anthem of Bhutan. Adopted in 1953, the music is by Aku Tongmi and the words are by Dasho Gyaldun Thinley. Tongmi was educated in India and had recently been appointed leader of the military brass band when the need for an anthem rose at the occasion of a state visit from prime minister Nehru of India. His original score was inspired by the Bhutanese folk tune "The Unchanging Lotus Throne" (Thri nyampa med pa pemai thri). The melody has twice undergone changes by Tongmi's successors as band leaders. The original lyrics were 12 lines, but was shortened to the present 6 lines version in 1964 by a secretary to the king. As the anthem is inspired by a folk tune, there is a choreography to it as well, originally directed by Tongmi. འབྲུག་ཙན་དན་བཀོད་པའི་རྒྱལ་ཁབ་ནང་།། དཔལ་ལུགས་གཉིས་བསྟན་སྲིད་སྐྱོང་བའི་མགོན་།། འབྲུག་རྒྱལ་པོ་མངའ་བདག་རིན་པོ་ཆེ་།། སྐུ་འགྱུར་མེད་བརྟན་ཅིང་ཆབ་སྲིད་འཕེལ་།། ཆོས་སངས་རྒྱས་བསྟན་པ་དར་ཞིང་རྒྱས་།། འབངས་བདེ་སྐྱིད་ཉི་མ་ཤར་བར་ཤོག་།། Druk tsenden keipi gyelkhap na Pyel loog nig tyensi chongwei gyen Druk gyelpo ngadak rinpoche Koo jurmey tyentsing chap tsid pyel Che sangye tyenpa darshing gyel Bang deykyed nyima
    7.00
    1 votes
    179

    Hawaii Pono'i

    Hawaiʻi Ponoʻī is the state song and former national anthem of Hawaiʻi. The words were written in 1874 by King David Kalākaua with music composed by Captain Henri Berger, then the king's royal bandmaster. Hawaiʻi Ponoʻī was one of the national anthems of the Republic of Hawaiʻi and the Kingdom of Hawaiʻi, having replaced Liliuokalani's compostition He Mele Lahui Hawaii. It was the adopted song of the Territory of Hawaiʻi before becoming the state symbol by an act of the Hawaiʻi State Legislature in 1967. The melody is reminiscent of God Save the Queen and the Prussian Hymne, Heil dir im Siegerkranz. Hawaiʻi Ponoʻī' is commonly sung at sporting events, immediately after the national anthem. In the Hawaiian language, Hawaiʻi ponoʻī means "Hawaiʻi's own". Hawaiʻi Ponoʻī==
    7.00
    1 votes
    180

    Himat Al Hima

    Ḥumāt al-Ḥimá (Arabic: حماة الحمى‎ Defenders of the Homeland) is the national anthem of Tunisia. The text was written by Mostafa Saadeq Al-Rafe'ie and Aboul-Qacem Echebbi. The lyrics of this anthem come from a poem written in the 1930s by Egyptian-born Syrian poet Mostafa Saadeq Al-Rafe'ie. Although some say the melody was composed by Mohammed Abdel Wahab, Tunisian musicologist Salah El Mahdi claims the melody for the anthem was composed by the poet Ahmed Kheireddine while the original music for the poem was composed by Zakariyya Ahmad. The last verses of the anthem were written by Aboul-Qacem Echebbi. According to El Mahdi, these verses were appended to the anthem in June 1955 by nationalist Mongi Slim. Known as the Hymn of the Revolution, it was sung during the meetings of the ruling party, the Neo Destour which later changed its name to Socialist Destourian Party. Humat al-Hima was temporarily used as a national anthem between the end of the monarchy on 25 July 1957 and the adoption of Ala Khallidi as the official national anthem on 20 March 1958. Humat al-Hima replaced Ala Khallidi following the coup which brought Zine El Abidine Ben Ali to power on 7 November 1987. Kesang
    7.00
    1 votes
    181

    L'Abidjanaise

    "L'Abidjanaise" (Song of Abidjan) is the national anthem of Côte d'Ivoire. It was adopted in 1960 and remains the national anthem, even though the capital city is now Yamoussoukro. The words are by Mathieu Ekra, Joachim Bony, and Pierre Marie Coty. Coty also composed the music along with Pierre Michel Pango.
    7.00
    1 votes
    182

    Lesotho Fatse La Bontata Rona

    "Lesōthō Fatše La Bo Ntat'a Rōna" is the national anthem of Lesotho. The lyrics were written by François Coillard, a French missionary, and the music was composed by Ferdinand-Samuel Laur. It has been used as the national anthem since 1967.
    7.00
    1 votes
    183
    Lupang Hinirang

    Lupang Hinirang

    Lupang Hinirang is the national anthem of the Philippines. Its music was composed in 1898 by Julián Felipe, with lyrics in Spanish adapted from the poem Filipinas, written by José Palma in 1899. Originally written as incidental music, it did not have words when it was adopted as the national anthem of the Philippines and subsequently played during the proclamation of Philippine independence on June 12, 1898. During the American occupation of the Philippines, the colonial government banned the song from being played with the passage of the Flag Law. The law was repealed in 1919 and the song was translated into English and would be legalized as the "Philippine Hymn". The anthem was translated into Tagalog beginning in the 1940s. A 1956 Pilipino version, revised in the 1960s, serves as the present anthem. Lupang Hinirang in Filipino or Tagalog means "Chosen Land" in English. Some English sources erroneously translate Lupang Hinirang as "Beloved Land" or "Beloved Country"; the first term is actually a translation of the incipit of the original poem Filipinas (Tiérra adorada), while "Beloved Country" is a translation of Bayang Magiliw, the current version's incipit (and colloquial
    7.00
    1 votes
    184

    Nunarput utoqqarsuanngoravit

    "Nunarput utoqqarsuanngoravit" (You Our Ancient Land; Danish: Vort ældgamle land under isblinkens bavn) is the national anthem of Greenland, an autonomous province of Denmark. With lyrics by Henrik Lund and music composed by Jonathan Petersen, the anthem was officially adopted in 1916. Since 1979, "Nuna asiilasooq" (The Land of Great Length), an anthem used by the self-governing Kalaallit people, has also been officially recognised by the government.
    7.00
    1 votes
    185

    Oj, svijetla majska zoro

    "Oj, svijetla majska zoro" (Montenegrin Cyrillic: „Ој, свијетла мајска зоро”, trans. "Oh, Bright Dawn of May") is the official National anthem of Montenegro adopted in 2004. Before becoming the anthem, it was a popular folk song of the Montenegrins, with many variations of its text. The oldest one is dated to the 2nd half of the 19th century, known as "Oh, Bright Dawn of Heroism, oh!", a popular Montenegrin and Serb folk song. Its music (composer unknown, as with all folklore) was written down to notes for the first time by a Serb musician from Croatia by the name of Nikola Hercigonja shortly after World War II, who falsely assumed that Montenegrin WWII Nazi-fascist collaborator Sekula Drljević was the song's original author. It has had many variations and changes to find verses which were more suitable for both melodic and political purposes. Drljevic is the author of 3rd and 4th stanzas of the modern official anthem. The current text of the official anthem is derived from the text written by Drljević to be the Montenegrin national anthem in the early 1930s, but slightly amended, namely removing the references celebrating a slaughter of Muslims. It was proclaimed an anthem by the
    7.00
    1 votes
    186
    Rastriya Gaan

    Rastriya Gaan

    Rastriya Gaan (Nepali:राष्ट्रिय गान्) was the national anthem of the Kingdom of Nepal until May 19, 2006, being replaced by Sayaun Thunga Phool Ka in August 2007 when the century-old national anthem was suspended by the House of Representatives. It was adopted in 1962, as a homage to the ruler of Nepal and the country's national anthem. In English it may be called "May Glory Crown You, Courageous Sovereign" or "May Glory Crown Our Illustrious Sovereign." The music was composed by Bakhat Bahadur Budhapirthi in 1899 (Grandfather of musician Louis Banks or Dambar Bahadur Budaprithi), and the lyrics were written by Chakra Pani Chalise in 1924. The song originally had two stanzas, but the government of Nepal dropped the second stanza when it was officially adopted as the national anthem. The remaining stanza honoured the king. After the April movement for democracy, the anthem was abolished as it was widely accused of being just a tune for monarchical glorification instead of representing the Nation as a whole. When officially adopted, the government of Nepal dropped the second stanza of the song.
    7.00
    1 votes
    187
    Rise O Voices of Rhodesia

    Rise O Voices of Rhodesia

    "Rise, O Voices of Rhodesia" (or "Voices of Rhodesia") was the national anthem of the unrecognised state of Rhodesia (renamed Zimbabwe in 1980) between 1974 and 1979. The tune was that of "Ode to Joy", the Fourth Movement from Ludwig van Beethoven's Ninth Symphony, which had been adopted as the official European Anthem by the Council of Europe in 1972 (it remains Europe's anthem today). The music used in Rhodesia was an original sixteen-bar arrangement by Captain Ken MacDonald, the bandmaster of the Rhodesian African Rifles. A national competition was organised by the government to find an appropriate set of lyrics to match the chosen tune, and won by Mary Bloom, a South African-born woman living in Gwelo. In the fallout from Salisbury's Unilateral Declaration of Independence from Britain on 11 November 1965, Rhodesia still claimed loyalty to Queen Elizabeth II as its professed head of state, and so retained "God Save the Queen" as its national anthem. With Rhodesia's reconstitution in 1970 as a republic, however, the royal anthem was dropped along with many other references to the monarchy. The Republic of Rhodesia lacked a national anthem until it adopted "Rise, O Voices of
    7.00
    1 votes
    188

    Advance Australia Fair

    "Advance Australia Fair" is the official national anthem of Australia. Created by the Scottish-born composer, Peter Dodds McCormick, the song was first performed in 1878, but did not gain its status as the official anthem until 1984. Until then, the song was sung in Australia as a patriotic song. In order for the song to become the anthem, it had to face a vote between the Royal anthem God Save the Queen, the "unofficial anthem" Waltzing Matilda and Song of Australia. Other songs and marches have been influenced by Advance Australia Fair, such as the Australian Vice-Regal salute. The earliest known sound recording of Advance Australia Fair appears in "The Landing of the Australian Troops in Egypt", circa 1916, a short commercial recording dramatising arrival of the Australian troops in Egypt en route to Gallipoli. The original song Advance Australia Fair was composed by Peter Dodds McCormick under the pen-name 'Amicus' (which means 'friend' in Latin), in the late 19th century, and first performed by Andrew Fairfax at a Highland Society function in Sydney on 30 November 1878. The song quickly gained popularity and an amended version was sung by a choir of 10,000 at the inauguration
    5.33
    3 votes
    189

    National Anthem of Mongolia

    The national anthem of Mongolia was created in 1950. The music is a composition by Bilegiin Damdinsüren (1919 - 1991) and Luvsanjambyn Mördorj (1919 - 1996), the lyrics were written by Tsendiin Damdinsüren (1908 - 1988). Over the twentieth century, Mongolia had several national anthems. The first one was used between 1924 and 1950. The second between 1950 and 1962, and a third one between 1961 and 1991. Since 1991, most of the anthem of 1950 is used again, but the second verse (praising Lenin, Stalin, Sükhbaatar, and Choibalsan) has been removed. On July 6, 2006, the lyrics were revised by the Mongolian Parliament to commemorate Genghis Khan.
    5.33
    3 votes
    190

    The East Is Red

    "The East Is Red" (simplified Chinese: 东方红; traditional Chinese: 東方紅; pinyin: Dōngfāng Hóng) is a song that was the de facto anthem of the People's Republic of China during the Cultural Revolution in the 1960s. The lyrics of the song were attributed to Li Youyuan, a farmer from northern Shaanxi, and the melody was derived from a local folk song. He allegedly got his inspiration upon seeing the rising sun in the morning of a sunny day. The lyrics of "The East is Red" idealize Mao Zedong, and Mao's popularization of "The East is Red" was one of his earliest efforts to promote his image as a perfect hero in Chinese popular culture after the Korean War. In 1956, a political commissar suggested to China's defense minister, Peng Dehuai, that the song be taught to Chinese troops, but Peng opposed Mao's propaganda, saying "That is a personality cult! That is idealism!" Peng's opposition to "The East is Red", and to Mao's incipient personality cult in general, contributed to Mao purging Peng in 1959. After Peng was purged, Mao accelerated his efforts to build his personality cult, and by 1966 succeeded in having "The East is Red" sung in place of China's national anthem. The song was played
    5.33
    3 votes
    191

    Anthem of the Republic of Kazakhstan

    The National Anthem of the Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakh: Қазақстан Республикасының Мемлекеттік Әнұраны, Qazaqstan Respwblïkasınıñ memlekettik änuranı) was the title of the old national anthem of Kazakhstan, when it was adopted as the anthem from 1992 to early 2006. Upon independence in December 1991, the melody of the Kazakh SSR anthem, composed by Mukan Tulebayev, Eugeny Brusilovsky and Latif Khamidi, was retained; and new lyrics were adopted in 1992, written by Muzafar Alimbayev, Kadyr Myrzaliyev, Tumanbai Moldagaliyev and Zhadyra Daribayeva. On January 7, 2006, "My Kazakhstan" (Kazakh: Менің Қазақстаным, Meniñ Qazaqstanım), written in 1956, was adopted as the new anthem, with modified lyrics. In March 2012, during medal ceremony of the International Shooting Tournament in Kuwait City, a mocked version of the Kazakhstan national anthem from the film Borat was played, much to the embarrassment of the medal winner Maria Dmitrienko.
    6.00
    2 votes
    192

    Bahrainona

    Bahrainona (Arabic: نشيد البحرين الوطني‎, literally: Our Bahrain), is the national anthem of Bahrain. Two different versions were made with the same melody but with different words. The first was used from the Bahrain's independence in 1971 until 2002. The second has been in use since the constitutional amendments referendum that declared the country's ruler Hamad ibn Isa Al Khalifah as king, and the country a kingdom. The original words were written by Mohamed Sudqi Ayyash (born 1925). The composer of the melody is unknown, but it was later re-arranged by singer and composer Ahmed Al-Jumairi, where it became the current, widely-used anthem.
    6.00
    2 votes
    193

    Inno e Marcia Pontificale

    The Pontifical Anthem or Papal Anthem is the official anthem of the Pope, which serves also as the anthem of the Holy See and the Vatican City State. It is played at solemn occasions of the State and ceremonies in which the Pope or one of his representatives, such as a nuncio, is present. When the Vatican's flag is ceremonially raised, only the first eight bars are played. The music was composed in 1869 by Charles Gounod, for the celebration on April 11, 1869 of Pope Pius IX's silver jubilee of priestly ordination. The purely instrumental piece in three parts, originally called Marche pontificale (French for "Pontifical March"), became extremely popular from its first performance. On October 16, 1949, Pope Pius XII decided that it would become the papal anthem, replacing Viktorin Hallmayer's Marcia trionfale (1857), which, being still the papal anthem when the Vatican City State was founded in 1929, had been treated also as the new state's anthem. Gounod's Marche Pontificale was first performed in this new role during a ceremony on Christmas Eve of 1949, one day before the opening of the Holy Year 1950. The old anthem too was played for a last time, almost as a token of respect. At
    6.00
    2 votes
    194

    National Anthem of the Kyrgyz Republic

    The National Anthem of the Kyrgyz Republic (Kyrgyz: Кыргыз Республикасынын Мамлекеттик Гимни, transliteration: Kyrgyz Respublikasynyn Mamlekettik Gimni; Russian: Государственный гимн Киргизской Республики, transliteration: Gosudarstvennyy gimn Kirgizskoy Respubliki) was adopted on 18 December 1992 by a resolution of the Supreme Council of Kyrgyzstan (Jogorku Kenesh). The music was composed by Nasyr Davlesov and Kalyi Moldobasanov, and the words were written by Djamil Sadykov and Eshmambet Kuluev.
    6.00
    2 votes
    195
    Tavisupleba

    Tavisupleba

    "Tavisupleba" (Georgian: თავისუფლება) is the current national anthem of Georgia. The anthem, whose title means "Freedom", was adopted in 2004, along with the new national flag and coat of arms. The symbols' change was brought about upon the successful overthrow of the previous government in the bloodless Rose Revolution. The music, taken from the Georgian operas Abesalom da Eteri ("Abesalom and Eteri") and Daisi ("The Nightfall"), by the Georgian composer Zachary (Zakaria) Paliashvili (ზაქარია ფალიაშვილი, 1871–1933), was adapted to form the anthem by Ioseb Kechakmadze (იოსებ კეჭაყმაძე). The lyrics were composed by David Magradze (დავით მაღრაძე). The new Georgian anthem was adopted by the Parliament of Georgia on 20 May 2004, exactly 5 months after the resignation of President Eduard Shevardnadze in the Rose Revolution. A bill was introduced in the first plenary meeting of the 6th convocation of the Georgian Parliament on April 22, 2004. The bill to adopt Tavisupleba as the anthem was presented by the Minister of Culture Giorgi Gabashvili; in which the music was played for the deputies soon afterwards. The law does not give any regulations, but refers to the corresponding
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    İstiklâl Marşı

    İstiklâl Marşı

    The İstiklâl Marşı (Independence March) is the National Anthem of Turkey and Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus, officially adopted on 12 March 1921 - two and a half years before the 29 October 1923 establishment of the Republic of Turkey, both as a motivational musical saga for the troops fighting in the Turkish War of Independence, and as an anthem for a Republic that was yet to be established. Penned by Mehmet Âkif Ersoy, ultimately composed by Osman Zeki Üngör, the theme is one of affection for the Turkish homeland, freedom, and faith, of sacrifice for liberty, and of hope and devotion, explored through visual, tactile and kinesthetic imagery as they relate to the flag, the human spirit and the soil of the homeland. The manuscript by Ersoy, between the title line İstiklal Marşı and the first text line, carries the dedication Kahraman Ordumuza – "To our Heroic Army", the army that won the Independence War. The lyrics reflect on the sacrifice of the soldiers during the War. The Anthem is regularly heard during state and military events, as well as during national festivals, bayrams, sporting events, and school ceremonies. Of the ten-stanza anthem, only the first two quatrains
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    The Brabançonne

    The Brabançonne

    The Brabançonne is the national anthem of Belgium. In the originally French language, the term normally refers to Brabant, literally Brabantian in English. The untranslated initial name is maintained for the Dutch and the German lyrics, that at a later stage ensured reflecting all three official languages of the country. According to legend, the Belgian national anthem was written in September 1830, during the Belgian Revolution, by a young revolutionary called "Jenneval", who read the lyrics during a meeting at the Aigle d'Or café. Jenneval, a Frenchman whose real name was Alexandre Dechet (sometimes known as Louis-Alexandre Dechet), did in fact write the Brabançonne. At the time, he was an actor at the theatre where, in August 1830, the revolution started which led to independence from the Netherlands. Jenneval died in the war of independence. François Van Campenhout composed the accompanying score and it was first performed in September 1830. In 1860, Belgium formally adopted the song and music as its national anthem, although the then prime minister, Charles Rogier edited out lyrics attacking the Dutch Prince of Orange. The ending, pledging loyalty to "Le Roi, la Loi, la
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    Mawtini

    Mawtini (Arabic: موطني‎ “My Homeland”) is a popular poem written by famous Palestinian poet Ibrahim Touqan (Arabic: إبراهيم طوقان‎) circa 1934 in Palestine and became the de facto national anthem of Palestine and Iraq. It is also recognized in Syria and Algeria as an anthem as to show their support for the Palestinian cause. The original music was composed by Muhammad Fuliefil (Arabic: محمد فليفل‎). During the years it became very popular through the Arab world. In 2004 it was re-adopted, on the order of Coalition Provisional Authority chief Paul Bremer as the national anthem of Iraq after it was replaced by the old anthem Ardh Alforatain (1981-2004) associated with Saddam Hussein's Baath regime.
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    Sorood-e Melli-e Jomhoori-e Eslami-e Iran

    The national anthem of the Islamic Republic of Iran (Persian: سرود ملی جمهوری اسلامی ایران‎ [ˈsoɾude melije dʒomhuɾije ʔeslɒmije ʔiɾɒn]) was composed by Hassan Riyahi, with words written collectively. This anthem was adopted in 1990, replacing the anthem used during the time of Ayatollah Khomeini.
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    Marche Henri IV

    Marche Henri IV

    "Marche Henri IV," alternatively "Vive Henri IV" or "Vive le roi Henri" is a popular French song celebrating King Henri IV of France. Marche Henri IV was composed around 1590 and refers to the first Bourbon King of France, Henry IV (Henry III of Navarre), who had ended the wars of religion and restored peace to France. Vive Henri quatre Vive ce Roi vaillant Ce diable à quatre A le triple talent chorus De boire et de battre Et d'être un vers galant De boire et de battre Et d'être un vers galant Au diable guerres Rancunes et partis Commes nos pères Chantons en vrais amis chorus Au choc des verres Les roses et les lys Au choc des verres Les roses et les lys Chantons l'antienne Qu'on chant'ra dans mille ans Que Dieu maintienne En paix ses descendants chorus Jusqu'à c'e qu'on prenne La lune avec les dents Jusqu'à c'e qu'on prenne La lune avec les dents Vive la France Vive le roi Henri Qu'à Reims on danse En disant comme Paris chorus Vive la France Vive le roi Henri Vive la France Vive le roi Henri Roughly translated into English, this becomes: Long live Henry IV Long live this valiant king This fourfold devil With the three talents Of drinking, fighting And womanising To hell with
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    Auferstanden aus Ruinen

    Auferstanden aus Ruinen (German for "Risen from Ruins") was the national anthem of the German Democratic Republic (GDR), commonly known as East Germany, during its existence from 1949 to 1990. In 1949, the Soviet Zone of Allied-occupied Germany became a socialist state called the German Democratic Republic (GDR). For an anthem, lyrics were written by the poet Johannes R. Becher (who later became Minister of Culture) . Two musicians proposed music to Becher's lyrics, and the version of Hanns Eisler was selected. He had been in exile in the 1930s and might not have noticed that his music was very similar to the 1930s hit song Goodbye Johnny sung by Hans Albers. Written in 1949, the anthem reflects the early stages of German separation, in which continuing progress towards reunification of the occupation zones was seen by most Germans as appropriate and natural. Consequently, Becher's lyrics develop several connotations of "unity" and combine them with "fatherland" (einig Vaterland), meaning Germany as a whole. However, this concept soon would not conform to an increasingly icy Cold War context, especially after the Berlin Wall had been erected in 1961 by the East German
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    Gibraltar Anthem

    The Gibraltar Anthem is the national song of the British overseas territory of Gibraltar. In common with the United Kingdom, crown dependencies and other British territories, the official national anthem of Gibraltar is God Save the Queen. The Gibraltar anthem is the national song, and was chosen in a competition in 1994. Both the lyrics and music were composed by Peter Emberley, who is not a Gibraltarian. The anthem is sung every 10 September by a school choir, accompanied by the general public, at the annual release of 30,000 red and white balloons on Gibraltar National Day.
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    National anthem of Honduras

    The "National Anthem of Honduras" (Spanish Himno Nacional de Honduras) was adopted under presidential decree 42 in 1915. The lyrics were written by Augusto Constancio Coello and the music composed by Carlos Hartling. In its entirety, the anthem is a brief chronology of Honduran history. The anthem consists of the chorus and seven verses. But, for official acts, only the chorus and the seventh are sung. The chorus, which is sung before and after the seventh verse, is a description of Honduras' chief national symbols, the flag and the coat of arms. The eighth verse, is a patriotic call to duty to Hondurans to defend the flag and the nation. By the time Hondurans complete their sixth year of elementary education, they will have memorized and been taught the meaning of all eight verses. Unofficially, the anthem is sometimes called "Tu bandera es un lampo de cielo" (Spanish for "Your flag is a splendor of sky") which is also the first line of the chorus.
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    Noble patria, tu hermosa bandera

    "Himno Nacional de Costa Rica" (Spanish language, Costa Rican National Anthem) is the national anthem of Costa Rica. It was originally adopted in 1853, with the music composed by Manuel María Gutiérrez. Words by José María Zeledón Brenes: were added in 1900. In the original wording Zeledon, the first stanza read: Costa Rica tu hermosa bandera Expresión de tu vida nos da: Bajo el manto azul de tu cielo Blanca y pura descansa la paz. And the final say: '¡Salve, oh patria!, tu pródigo suelo dulce abrigo y sustento nos da; bajo el límpido azul de tu cielo, ¡Vivan siempre el trabajo y la paz! This is not a direct translation but an adaption of the original text, the goal was to convey the message, the essence of the anthem, not to give a literal translation.
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    Qaumi Tarana

    Qaumi Tarana

    The Qaumī Tarāna (Urdu/Persian: قومی ترانہ), also known as Pāk Sarzamīn (lit. "The Pure Land"), is the national anthem of Pakistan. The words "Qaumi Tarana" in Urdu literally translate to "National Anthem". Its music, composed by Ahmad G. Chagla in 1950, preceded its lyrics, which were written by Hafeez Jullundhri in 1952. Another feature of the anthem is that no verse in the three stanza lyrics is repeated. In early 1948, A. R. Ghani from Transvaal, South Africa, offered two prizes of five thousand rupees each for the poet and composer of a new national anthem for the newly independent state of Pakistan. The prizes were announced through a government press advertisement published in June 1948. In December 1948, the Government of Pakistan established the National Anthem Committee (NAC), which was initially chaired by the Information Secretary, Sheikh Muhammad Ikram. The Committee members included several politicians, poets and musicians such as Abdur Rab Nishtar, Ahmad G. Chagla and Hafeez Jullundhri. The committee had some difficulty at first in finding suitable music and lyrics. In 1950, the impending state visit of the Shah of Iran resulted in the Pakistani Government asking the
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    Sarnia Cherie

    Sarnia Cherie is used as the anthem of the Bailiwick of Guernsey, one of the Channel Islands. 'Sarnia' is a traditional Latin name for the island, hence, the title translates as 'Dear Guernsey'. George Deighton wrote Sarnia Cherie in 1911, with Domenico Santangelo subsequently composing the tune later that year. The song was first performed at St. Julian’s Theatre - which is now the Gaumont Cinema - in November 1911. Sarnia Cherie was G.B. Edwards's title for The Book of Ebenezer le Page on the original typescript he gave to Edward Chaney in 1974 but Hamish Hamilton decided to use his subtitle when they published it in 1981, chosing, however, to add Deighton's song as an epigraph instead. In 2005, the then Chief Minister, Laurie Morgan, called for an updated version, which seems to have been abandoned after it met with near-universal opposition. The sheet music has been republished (c)2009 Ray Lowe, Sark. A CD of 13 renditions of the song has been released. Included on the CD is a recording from May 9, 1945, when British Troops landed in St. Peter Port to Liberate the Island after 5 years of German Occupation during WWII. CD available from the Guernsey Visitor Centre, St. Peter
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    Swiss Psalm

    Swiss Psalm

    The Swiss Psalm (German: Schweizerpsalm, French: Cantique suisse, Italian: Salmo svizzero, Romansh: Psalm svizzer) is the national anthem of Switzerland. It was composed in 1841, by Alberich Zwyssig (1808–1854). Since then, it has been frequently sung at patriotic events. The Federal Council declined however on numerous occasions to accept the psalm as the official anthem. This was because the council wanted the people to express their say on what they wanted as a national anthem. From 1961 to 1981 it provisionally replaced Rufst Du, mein Vaterland ("When You Call, My Country", French Ô monts indépendants; Italian Ci chiami o patria, Romansh E clomas, tger paeis) the anthem by Johann Rudolf Wyss (1743–1818) which was set to the melody of God Save the Queen. On April 1, 1981, the Swiss Psalm was declared the official Swiss national anthem. Until the end of the 19th century, there was no Swiss national anthem. The German-language patriotic song Rufst du, mein Vaterland (French Ô monts indépendants, Italian Ci chiami o patria, Romansh E clomas, tger paeis), composed in 1811 by Johann Rudolf Wyss (1743–1818), was the first national anthem, used until 1961. The Swiss Psalm was composed
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    Ukraine's glory has not perished

    Ukraine's glory has not perished

    "Shche ne vmerla Ukraina" (Ukrainian: Ще не вмерла Українa, or "Ukraine has not yet perished") is the national anthem of Ukraine again since 1992 ( instrumental performance (help·info); pre-2003  choral performance (help·info)). Before its re-adaptation a concourse for a national anthem among three patriotic songs was taken place with one of the other songs being Za Ukrainu by Mykola Voronyi. The lyrics constitute a slightly modified original first stanza of the patriotic poem written in 1862 by Pavlo Chubynsky, a prominent ethnographer from the region of Ukraine's capital, Kiev, and were influenced by the words and themes of Poland's national anthem, Poland Is Not Yet Lost. In 1863, Mykhailo Verbytsky, a western Ukrainian composer and a Greek-Catholic priest composed music to accompany Chubynsky's text. The first choral performance of the piece was at the Ukraine Theatre in Lviv, in 1864. The song was first the national anthem of the Ukrainian People's Republic, Carpatho-Ukraine and later the independent post-Soviet Ukraine. In 1917, Shche ne vmerla Ukraina (Ukraine has not yet perished) became the anthem of the short-lived Ukrainian People's Republic. However, in 1920, it was
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    Amerika Samoa

    Amerika Samoa is the territorial anthem of American Samoa. Composed by Napoleon Andrew Tuiteleleapaga and written by Mariota Tiumalu Tuiasosopo, it was officially adopted in 1950. English Translation
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    E Ola Ke Alii Ke Akua

    E Ola Ke Alii Ke Akua

    E Ola Ke Aliʻi Ke Akua, translated as God Save the King, was one of Hawaii's four national anthems. It was composed in 1860 by Prince William Charles Lunalilo, who later became King Lunalilo. Prior to 1860, the Kingdom of Hawaii lacked its own national anthem and had used the British royal anthem God Save The King. A contest was sponsored in 1860 by Kamehameha IV, who wanted a song with Hawaiian lyrics set to the tune of the British anthem. The winning entry was written by the 25-year-old Lunalilo and was reputed to have been written in 20 minutes. Lunalilo was awarded 10 dollars and his composition became Hawaii's first national anthem. It remained Hawaii's national anthem until 1866, when it was replaced by Queen Liliʻuokalani's composition He Mele Lahui Hawaii.
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    Himno Istmeño

    Himno Istmeño (in English: Hymn of the Isthmus) is the national anthem of Panama (Spanish: Himno Nacional de Panama). The music was written by Santos Jorge, and the lyrics by Dr. Jeronimo de la Ossa. The song is directed to the average, working-class Panamanian with such lyrics as "Ahead the shovel and pick; At work without any more dilation". CHORUS Alcanzamos por fin la victoria En el campo feliz de la unión; Con ardientes fulgores de gloria Se ilumina la nueva nación At last we reached victory In the joyous field of the union; With ardent fires of glory A new nation is alight. Es preciso cubrir con un velo Del pasado el calvario y la cruz; Y que adorne el azul de tu cielo De concordia la espléndida luz. It is necessary to cover with a veil The past times of Calvary and cross; Let now the blue skies be adorned with The splendid light of the concord. El progreso acaricia tus lares. Al compás de sublime canción, Ves rugir a tus pies ambos mares Que dan rumbo a tu noble misión. Progress caresses your path. To the rhythm of a sublime song, You see both your seas roar at your feet Giving you a path to your noble mission. (Chorus) En tu suelo cubierto de flores A los besos del tibio
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    Ja, vi elsker dette landet

    Ja, vi elsker dette landet

    "Ja, vi elsker dette landet" (help·info) (In English: "Yes, we love this country") is a patriotic anthem, which has been commonly regarded as the de facto national anthem of Norway since early 20th century, after being used alongside Sønner av Norge since the 1860s. The lyrics were written by Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson between 1859 and 1868, and the melody was written by his cousin Rikard Nordraak sometime during the winter of 1863-1864. It was first performed publicly on 17 May 1864 in connection with the 50th anniversary of the constitution. Usually only the first and the last two verses are sung. Until the mid 1860s, the older anthems Sønner av Norge and Norges Skaal were commonly regarded as the Norwegian national anthems, with Sønner av Norge being most recognised. Ja, vi elsker dette landet gradually came to be recognised as a national anthem from the mid 1860s. Until the early 20th century, however, both Sønner av Norge and Ja, vi elsker were used alongside, with Sønner av Norge being preferred in official situations. A new development took place in 2011, when the song Mitt lille land featured most prominently in all the memorial ceremonies following the 2011 Norway attacks and
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    La Congolaise

    "La Congolaise" (The Congolese) is the national anthem of the Republic of the Congo. The anthem was adopted upon independence in 1959, replaced in 1969 by Les Trois Glorieuses, but reinstated in 1991. The lyrics were written by Jacques Tondra and Georges Kibanghi, and the music was composed by Jean Royer and Joseph Spadilière.
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    La Tchadienne

    La Tchadienne is the national anthem of Chad. Written by Louis Gidrol and his student group and composed by Paul Villard, it has been the official anthem since independence in 1960. Peuple Tchadien, debout et à l'ouvrage ! Tu as conquis la terre et ton droit ; Ta liberté naîtra de ton courage. Lève les yeux, l'avenir est à Toi. Ô mon Pays, que Dieu te prenne en garde, Que tes voisins admirent tes enfants. Joyeux, pacifique, avance en chantant, Fidèle à tes anciens qui te regardent. Peuple Tchadien, debout et à l'ouvrage ! Tu as conquis la terre et ton droit ; Ta liberté naîtra de ton courage. Lève les yeux, l'avenir est à Toi. شعب تشاد قم إلي العمل إسترديت أرضاك وحقاك وحرياتك تولودك من شجاعتك إرفع عينيك فالمستقبل لك يابلادي فليحفظك الله فليحفظ جيرانك وأبنائك أيه المحيط الساري تقدم وأنت تنشد وافيا لأسلافك الذين ينظرون إليك شعب تشاد قم إلي العمل إسترديت أرضاك وحقاك وحرياتك تولودك من شجاعتك إرفع عينيك فالمستقبل لك Transliteration `shyb tshad qm i'li alyml i'strdit a'rdak uxhqak uxhriatk tuludk mn shgaytk i'rfy yinik falmstqbl lk ya bilaadi flixhfz'k Allah flixhfz' girank ua'bnaj'k a'ix' almxhit' alsari tqdm ua'nt tnshd wafia la'slafk aldhin inz'run i'lik `shyb tshad qm i'li
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    As-salam al-malaki al-urdoni

    The royal anthem of Jordan is known as as-Salām al-Malakī al-ʾUrdunnī (Arabic: السلام الملكي الأردني‎, literally Jordanian Royal Anthem). It was adopted in 1946. The lyrics were written by Abdul Monem Al-Refai. The music was composed by Abdul Qader al-Taneer. The first version of the lyrics was extremely short (the first stanza is the first version), it has then been expanded and elongated. The Jordanian Royal Anthem
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    La Marseillaise

    La Marseillaise

    "La Marseillaise" (English: "The Song of Marseille"; French pronunciation: [la maʁsɛjɛz]) is the national anthem of France. The song, originally titled "Chant de guerre pour l'Armée du Rhin" (English: "War Song for the Army of the Rhine") was written and composed by Claude Joseph Rouget de Lisle in 1792. The French National Convention adopted it as the Republic's anthem in 1795. The name of the song is due to first being sung on the streets by volunteers from Marseille. The song is the first example of the "European march" anthemic style. The anthem's evocative melody and lyrics have led to its widespread use as a song of revolution and its incorporation into many pieces of classical and popular music (see below: Musical quotations). On 25 April 1792, the mayor of Strasbourg requested his guest Rouget de Lisle compose a song "that will rally our soldiers from all over to defend their homeland that is under threat". That evening, Rouget de Lisle wrote Chant de guerre pour l'Armée du Rhin and dedicated the song to Marshal Nicolas Luckner, a Bavarian in French service from Cham. The melody soon became the rallying call to the French Revolution and was adopted as La Marseillaise after
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    Mila Rodino

    Mila Rodino ("Мила Родино" [miɫɐ rɔdino], translated as "Dear Motherland" or "Dear native land") is the current national anthem of Bulgaria. It is based on the music and text of the song "Gorda Stara Planina" by Tsvetan Radoslavov, written and composed as he left to fight in the Serbo-Bulgarian War in 1885. The anthem was adopted in 1964. The text has been changed many times, most recently in 1990. Between 1886 and 1944, the Bulgarian national anthem was Shumi Maritsa ("Шуми Марица"); from 1950 to 1964, it was Balgariyo mila, zemya na geroi ("Българийо мила, земя на герои"); in the brief period between these two, the march "Republiko nasha, zdravey" ("Републико наша, здравей!")
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    Anthem of the Georgian SSR

    Anthem of the Georgian SSR

    The State Anthem of the Georgian SSR was the national anthem of Georgia when it was a republic of the Soviet Union and known as the Georgian SSR. The anthem was used from 1946 to 1991. The music was composed by Otar Taktakishvili, and the words were written by Grigol Abashidze and Alexander Abasheli. All three stanzas (not including the refrain) in the original lyrics have references to Joseph Stalin, a native Georgian and leader of the Soviet Union at that time. These words were completely removed after Stalin's death as part of Nikita Khrushchev's De-Stalinization program.
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    Dixie

    Dixie

    "Dixie", also known as "I Wish I Was in Dixie", "Dixie's Land", and other titles, is a popular American song. It is one of the most distinctively American musical products of the 19th century, and probably the best-known song to have come out of blackface minstrelsy. Although not a folk song at its creation, "Dixie" has since entered the American folk vernacular. The song likely cemented the word "Dixie" in the American vocabulary as a synonym for the Southern United States. Most sources credit Ohio-born Daniel Decatur Emmett with the song's composition; however many other people have claimed to have composed "Dixie", even during Emmett's lifetime. Compounding the problem of definitively establishing the song's authorship are Emmett's own confused accounts of its writing, and his tardiness in registering the song's copyright. The latest challenge has come on behalf of the Snowden Family of Knox County, Ohio, who may have collaborated with Emmett to write "Dixie". The song originated in the blackface minstrel shows of the 1850s and quickly grew famous across the United States. Its lyrics, written in a comic, exaggerated version of African American Vernacular English, tell the story
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    Gloria al Bravo Pueblo

    Gloria al Bravo Pueblo (Glory to the Brave People) was adopted as Venezuela's national anthem by President Antonio Guzmán Blanco on May 25, 1885. The lyrics were written by the physician and journalist Vicente Salias in 1810. The music was later composed by musician Juan José Landaeta. It is said, however, that the melody has been known since 1840 as La Marsellesa Venezolana (Venezuelan Marseillaise), in reference to its subtle similarity to the French national anthem. Some recent investigations have suggested that the real author of the anthem was Andrés Bello, and not Salias, to whom it was originally credited, and the music was composed by another musician called Lino Gallardo. However, this theory has yet to be proven, and lacks any real recognition among the general Venezuelan population, historians, or otherwise.
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    Gott erhalte Franz den Kaiser

    Gott erhalte Franz den Kaiser

    Gott erhalte Franz den Kaiser (God Save Emperor Francis) was originally written as an anthem to Francis II, Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire and later of Austria. The lyrics were by Lorenz Leopold Haschka (1749–1827), and the melody by Joseph Haydn. It is sometimes called the "Kaiserhymne" (Emperor's Hymn). Haydn's tune has since been widely employed in other contexts: in works of classical music, in Christian hymns, in alma maters, and as the tune of Das Lied der Deutschen, the national anthem of Germany. The sound file given below (played on a piano) uses the harmony Haydn employed for the string quartet version of his song, which he prepared later in 1797. The English translation of the above verse is: God save Francis the Emperor, our good Emperor Francis! Long live Francis the Emperor in the brightest splendor of bliss! May laurel branches bloom for him, wherever he goes, as a wreath of honor. God save Francis the Emperor, our good Emperor Francis! The song was written when Austria was seriously threatened by France and patriotic sentiments ran high. The story of the song's genesis was narrated in 1847 by Anton Schmid, who was Custodian of the Austrian National Library in
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    Himnusz

    Himnusz

    "Himnusz" (in English: Hymn) is a song beginning with the words Isten, áldd meg a magyart  listen (help·info) (God, bless the Hungarians) that's a musical poetic prayer that serves as the official national anthem of Hungary. True to its title, Himnusz presents a more solemn and dignified tone than many other lively national anthems. It was adopted in 1844 and the first stanza is sung at official ceremonies. The words were written by Ferenc Kölcsey, a nationally renowned poet in 1823, and its currently official musical setting was composed by the romantic composer Ferenc Erkel, although other less-known musical versions exist. The poem bore the subtitle "A magyar nép zivataros századaiból" ("From the stormy centuries of the Hungarian people"); it is often argued that this subtitle – by emphasizing past rather than contemporary national troubles – was added expressly to enable the poem to pass Habsburg censorship. The full meaning of the poem's text is evident only to those well acquainted with Hungarian history. The poem and song titled "Szózat", which starts with the words Hazádnak rendületlenül légy híve, óh magyar (To your homeland be faithful steadfastly, O Hungarian) enjoys a
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    Marcha Real

    The Marcha Real (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈmartʃa reˈal], "Royal March") is the national anthem of Spain. It is one of the two national anthems (along with that of Kosovo) in the world to have no official lyrics. The anthem, one of the oldest in the world, was first printed in a document dated 1761 and entitled Libro de Ordenanza de los toques militares de la Infantería Española (The Spanish Infantry's Book of Military Bugle and Fife Calls), by Manuel de Espinosa. Here it is entitled La Marcha Granadera ("March of the Grenadiers"), although no composer's name is given. In 1770, King Charles III declared the Marcha Granadera to be the official "Honour March" for the Sovereigns and the Royal Family, as it was played at public and ceremonial events, and because it was always played at public events attended by the royal family, Spaniards soon came to regard the Marcha Granadera as their national anthem and called it the Marcha Real, or "Royal March". Under the Second Spanish Republic (1931–1939) and the Trienio Liberal (1820-1823), El Himno de Riego replaced La Marcha Real as the national anthem of Spain. At the conclusion of the Civil War, however, Francisco Franco restored La Marcha
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    National Anthem of Bolivia

    National Anthem of Bolivia

    The national anthem of Bolivia (Himno Nacional de Bolivia), also known as Bolivianos, el Hado Propicio (Bolivians, a most Favorable Destiny) was adopted in 1851. José Ignacio de Sanjinés, a signer of both the Bolivian Declaration of Independence and the first Bolivian Constitution, wrote the lyrics. The music was composed by an Italian, Leopoldo Benedetto Vincenti. The words of the Bolivian National Anthem are as follows (with parallel translation into English):
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    National Anthem of Peru

    The Peruvian National Anthem is the national anthem of Peru. This anthem was adopted in 1821. After Peru declared its independence, the general José de San Martín began a public contest to select the National March, which was published on 7 August 1821 in the Gaceta Ministerial (Ministerial Gazette). The contest called upon professors of poetry, composers and general aficionados, to send their signed productions to the Ministry of the State before 18 September, the day in which a designated commission would decide which of them would be adopted as the "National March". The author of the selected composition would be compensated with the government's and the public's gratitude. Seven compositions were entered, and on the prefixed day, they were reviewed and played in the following order: After hearing the last production of master José Bernardo Alcedo, General José de San Martín stood up and exclaimed, "Without a doubt, this is the National Anthem of Peru". The following day, a signed decree confirmed this opinion expressed in the midst of great enthusiasm and jubilation. The anthem was first performed publicly in the night of 23 September 1821 in the Theater of Lima, in the
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    227
    Trăiască Regele

    Trăiască Regele

    Trăiască Regele (Long live the King) was the national anthem of the Principality of Romania and later Kingdom of Romania between 1866 and 1947. The music was composed in 1862 by Eduard Hübsch, an army captain who later became the chief of the music department of the Minister of War. The lyrics were written by the Romanian poet Vasile Alecsandri in 1881, when Romania became a Kingdom.
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    Wien Neêrlands Bloed

    Wien Neêrlands bloed (Those in whom Dutch blood) was the national anthem of the Netherlands between 1815 and 1932. At the foundation of the Kingdom of the Netherlands in 1815, it was decided that a national anthem was needed. The hymn Het Wilhelmus – which is the national anthem today – was already well known in the time of the Dutch Republic. At that time, however, it was more of a party or faction hymn than a national one, being associated with and glorifying the House of Orange – which in the politics of the 17th and 18th Netherlands had enthusiastic supporters but also bitter foes. In particular, the Wilhelmus was unpopular with the anti-Orangist Patriot party, which dominated the country (under French tutelage) for a considerable time. Following the fall of Napoleon, with the House of Orange attaining the status of Monarchs which they lacked before, they desired to make a fresh start and adopt a politically neutral hymn rather than what had been their factional song. Moreover, a new song might also be acceptable to the Catholic inhabitants of the Southern Netherlands with which the Dutch were united in 1815 to form the United Kingdom of the Netherlands; the Wilhelmus might be
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    Yumi, Yumi, Yumi

    "Yumi, Yumi, Yumi" (Bislama: "We, We, We") is the national anthem of Vanuatu. It was written and composed by François Vincent Ayssav (born 1955) and adopted in 1980. CHORUS: Yumi, Yumi, yumi i glat long talem se Yumi, yumi, yumi ol man blong Vanuatu God i givim ples ia long yumi, Yumi glat tumas long hem, Yumi strong mo yumi fri long hem, Yumi brata evriwan! CHORUS Plante fasin blong bifo i stap, Plante fasin blong tedei, Be yumi i olsem wan nomo, Hemia fasin blong yumi! CHORUS Yumi save plante wok i stap, Long ol aelan blong yumi, God i helpem yumi evriwan, Hem i papa blong yumi! CHORUS CHORUS: We, we, we are happy to proclaim We, we, we are the people of Vanuatu God has given us this land, We have great cause for rejoicing We are strong and we are free in this land We are all brothers CHORUS There were many ways before There are many ways today But we are all one Despite our many ways CHORUS We know there is plenty of work to be done We work hard on our many islands God helps us in our work He is Our Father! CHORUS Refrain : Nous nous nous sommes fiers de dire que Nous nous nous sommes des Hommes du Vanuatu ! Dieu nous a donné cet endroit, Nous y sommes très heureux, Nous y
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    Otrechemsya ot starogo mira

    The Worker's Marseillaise (Russian: Рабочая Марсельеза, Rabochaya Marselyeza) was a Russian revolutionary song set to the tune of the Marseillaise. The lyrics were authored by Pyotr Lavrov, first published on July 1, 1875. The lyrics are not a direct translation of the French ones and are very radical-socialist in spirit. This anthem was popular during the Russian Revolution of 1905 and was used as a national anthem by Russia's Provisional Government until its overthrow in the October Revolution. It remained in use by the Soviets for a short time alongside The Internationale.
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    The Star-Spangled Banner

    The Star-Spangled Banner

    "The Star-Spangled Banner" is the national anthem of the United States of America. The lyrics come from "Defence of Fort McHenry", a poem written in 1814 by the 35-year-old lawyer and amateur poet, Francis Scott Key, after witnessing the bombardment of Fort McHenry by the British Royal Navy ships in Chesapeake Bay during the Battle of Fort McHenry in the War of 1812. The poem was set to the tune of a popular British song written by John Stafford Smith for the Anacreontic Society, a men's social club in London. "The Anacreontic Song" (or "To Anacreon in Heaven"), with various lyrics, was already popular in the United States. Set to Key's poem and renamed "The Star-Spangled Banner", it would soon become a well-known American patriotic song. With a range of one and a half octaves, it is known for being difficult to sing. Although the poem has four stanzas, only the first is commonly sung today. "The Star-Spangled Banner" was recognized for official use by the Navy in 1889, and by President Woodrow Wilson in 1916, and was made the national anthem by a congressional resolution on March 3, 1931 (46 Stat. 1508, codified at 36 U.S.C. § 301), which was signed by President Herbert
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    Azərbaycan marşı

    Azərbaycan Marşı is the national anthem of Azerbaijan, the original title of which is March of Azerbaijan (Azərbaycan marşı). The words were written by the poet Ahmad Javad, and the music was composed by Azeri composer Uzeyir Hajibeyov. The anthem was adopted in 1919 with the passage of "On the State Hymn of the Republic of Azerbaijan." This anthem is both current national anthem Azerbaijan Republic (got independence in 18 October 1991) and anthem of Azerbaijan Democratic Republic (28 May 1918 – 28 April 1920). A fragment from national anthem is depicted on the obverse of the Azerbaijani 5 manat banknote issued since 2006. Note that, in accordance with Azerbaijani law, there are no official translations of the anthem.
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    Bro Goth Agan Tasow

    Bro Goth agan Tasow ("Old Land of our Fathers") is one of the anthems of Cornwall. It is sung to the same tune as the Welsh national anthem, Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau. The Breton anthem Bro Gozh ma Zadoù also uses the same tune. The Song of the Western Men, more commonly known as Trelawny, is often considered to be the Cornish anthem as well, and as in Scotland, opinion is divided on the matter, and there is no official position. Trelawny's words are certainly more widely known amongst Cornish people. Bro goth agan tasow, dha flehes a'th car, Gwlas ker an howlsedhes, pan vro yw dha bar? War oll an norvys 'th on ni scollys a-les, Mes agan kerensa yw dhis. Chorus Gwlascor Myghtern Arthur, an Sens kens, ha'n Gral Moy kerys genen nyns yw tiredh aral, Ynnos sy pub carn, nans, menydh ha chi A gews yn Kernowek dhyn ni. Chorus Yn tewlder an bal ha war donnow an mor, Pan esen ow qwandra dre diryow tramor Yn pub le pynag, hag yn keniver bro Y treylyn colonnow dhiso. Chorus Old land of our fathers, your children love you! Dear land of the west, what country is your equal? Across the whole world, we are spread far and wide, But our love is for you. Chorus Kingdom of King Arthur, ancient saints and
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    234

    Esta é a Nossa Pátria Bem Amada

    "Esta É a Nossa Pátria Bem Amada" ("This Is Our Beloved Country") is the national anthem of Guinea-Bissau. Written by Amílcar Cabral and composed by Xiao He, it was adopted upon independence in 1974. It was also the national anthem of Cape Verde until 1996, when a new anthem (Cântico da Liberdade) was chosen by the latter country.
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    High We Exalt Thee, Realm of the Free

    "High We Exalt Thee, Realm of the Free" is the national anthem of Sierra Leone. It was written by Clifford Nelson Fyle and composed by John Akar. It was adopted as the national anthem in 1961 when the country became independent replacing God Save The Queen. The Constitution of Sierra Leone, 1991, makes it the responsibility of every citizen of Sierra Leone to "respect its ideals and its institutions" including the national anthem. High we exalt thee, realm of the free; Great is the love we have for thee; Firmly united ever we stand, Singing thy praise, O native land. We raise up our hearts and our voices on high, The hills and the valleys re-echo our cry; Blessing and peace be ever thine own, Land that we love, our Sierra Leone. One with a faith that wisdom inspires, One with a zeal that never tires; Ever we seek to honour thy name, Ours is the labour, thine the fame. We pray that no harm on thy children may fall, That blessing and peace may descend on us all; So may we serve thee ever alone, Land that we love, our Sierra Leone. Knowledge and truth our forefathers spread, Mighty the nations whom they led; Mighty they made thee, so too may we Show forth the good that is ever in
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    Himno Nacional de Guatemala

    The National Anthem of Guatemala was written by José Joaquín Palma (1844–1911) and composed by Rafael Álvarez Ovalle. The anthem was adopted in 1896 as the winning entry in a competition held by the government. The lyrics were modified slightly in 1934 by Professor Jose Maria Bonilla Ruano, a Spanish grammar scholar. Some verses were softened in their bloody context while others were enhanced in their poetic beauty. The anthem is often erroneously titled "Guatemala Feliz!" from its opening lyrics, but the anthem has no official name and is only referred to in the country as "Himno Nacional". Transcription in F, original key. Transcription in C for children and female voices, and for easy piano.
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    Hymn of the Republic of Tatarstan

    The National Anthem of the Republic of Tatarstan (Russian: Государственный гимн Республики Татарстан; Tatar: Татарстан Республикасы Дәүләт гимны), composed by Röstäm Yäxin, and has no lyrics. It was adopted on 14 July 1993. Attempts to write lyrics in the Tatar language were proposed. Ramazan Baytimerov's version was titled Tuğan yağım (My native country): However since both Russian and Tatar are official languages of Tatarstan, and it is difficult to have corresponding Russian words to a Tatar text, due to the different structures of the two languages, the lyrics are not official.
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    Independent, Neutral, Turkmenistan State Anthem

    The national anthem of Turkmenistan is called the National Anthem of Independent Neutral Turkmenistan (sometimes also Independent, Neutral, Turkmenistan State Anthem, a literal translation from Turkic: Garassyz, Bitarap, Türkmenistanyn Döwlet Gimni). The lyrics were written by the first president of Turkmenistan, Saparmurat Niyazov (also known as Turkmenbashi, Turkic: Türkmenbaşy). Niyazov died on 21 December 2006, and two years after his death the reference to Turkmenbashi in the chorus was replaced with the people. The text of the anthem is given here in its present form, followed by the original text from the Niyazov period.
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    Lijepa naša domovino

    Lijepa naša domovino

    "Lijepa naša domovino" ("Our Beautiful Homeland") is the national anthem of Croatia. It is often referred to as just "Lijepa naša" ("Our Beautiful") in Croatia, which is also a phrase widely used as a metonym for the country. The original lyrics were written by Antun Mihanović and first published under the title "Horvatska domovina" ("Croatian homeland") in 1835. The author of music has not been indisputably determined although the late 19th century tradition suggests that it might have been the music amateur Josip Runjanin (1821–1878). It has not been known what was the original form of the melody because the first copy has not been recovered to this day. The complete song was reportedly scored and harmonized by Vatroslav Lichtenegger in 1861 and based on the singing of his students, trainee teachers. It was first performed as the Croatian anthem in the same year, under the title "Lijepa naša". The original anthem has 15 verses. Since then it has come to be known under the slightly longer present title and a few minor adjustments have been made to the lyrics. Between 1918 and 1941, segments of the Croatian national anthem were part of the national anthem of the Kingdom of
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    National Banner Song

    National Banner Song

    The "National Flag Anthem" (official name, also known as the National Banner Song unofficially) (Chinese: 國旗歌; pinyin: gúoqí gē) of the Republic of China (Taiwan) is played during the raising and lowering of the Flag of the Republic of China. This song is also played at international sporting events such as the Olympic Games, where the ROC team plays as "Chinese Taipei." After the Kuomintang Anthem became the de facto National Anthem of the Republic of China in 1930, the Ministry of Education had invited submissions for a new official national anthem. The music composed by Huang Tzu was eventually chosen in 1936, but the Nationalist Government refused to adopt it as the national anthem. As a compromise, the National Anthem remained unchanged, while Huang Tzu's music was adopted as the National Flag Anthem, with lyrics written in Classical Chinese by Tai Chi-tao, who had also contributed to the lyrics of the National Anthem. Since 1983, the song was used at Olympic competitions instead of the National Anthem due to pressure from the Chinese Olympic Committee and the International Olympic Committee. This also changed the symbols used by Taiwan during the Olympics and their name
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    The Bonnie Blue Flag

    "The Bonnie Blue Flag", also known as "We Are a Band of Brothers", is an 1861 marching song associated with the Confederate States of America. The words were written by the Ulster-Scots entertainer Harry McCarthy, with the melody taken from the song "The Irish Jaunting Car". The song's title refers to the unofficial first Flag of the Confederacy, the Bonnie Blue Flag. The song was premiered by lyricist Harry McCarthy during a concert in Jackson, Mississippi, in the spring of 1861 and performed again in September of that same year at the New Orleans Academy of Music for the First Texas Volunteer Infantry regiment mustering in celebration. The New Orleans music publishing house of A.E. Blackmar issued six editions of "The Bonnie Blue Flag" between 1861 and 1864 along with three additional arrangements. The "band of brothers" mentioned in the first line of the song recalls the well known St. Crispin's Day Speech in William Shakespeare's play Henry V (Act IV, scene ii)i. The first verse of the song goes: The second line is sometimes given as "fighting for our liberty with treasure, blood, and toil". A copy of the 1861 song sheet posted on a website by University of San Diego professor
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    Dear Land of Guyana, of Rivers and Plains

    Green Land of Guyana is the national anthem of Guyana. Selected a month before independence in 1966, the lyrics were written by Archibald Leonard Luker and the music was composed by Robert Cyril Gladstone Potter.
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    Homat el Diyar

    “Ħumāt ad-Diyār” (Arabic: حُمَاةَ الدِّيَار‎, translated Guardians of the Homeland) is the national anthem of Syria, with lyrics written by Khalil Mardam Bey and the music by Mohammed Flayfel, who also composed the national anthem of the Palestinian National Authority, as well as many other Arab folk songs. It was adopted in 1938 after a national competition was held by Hashim al-Atassi's nationalist government to choose an anthem for the new republic 2 years after the Franco–Syrian Treaty of Independence was signed which gave Syria limited autonomy and future independence. The anthem was initially set to lose the competition, but it later won the competition after the anthem gained rapid popularity amongst the Syrian populace which put pressure on the competition's committee to reconsider it's decisions, and eventually the anthem won and was adopted by the government as Syria's national anthem. The anthem temporarily fell from use when Syria joined the United Arab Republic with Egypt in 1958. It was decided that the national anthem of the UAR would be a combination of the then-Egyptian anthem and Ħumāt ad-Diyār. When Syria seceded from the union in 1961, the anthem was completely
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    Negaraku

    Negaraku

    "Negaraku" (English: My Country) is the national anthem of Malaysia. "Negaraku" was selected as a national anthem at the time of the Federation of Malaya's independence from Britain in 1957. The tune was originally used as the state anthem of Perak, which was adopted from a popular French melody titled "La Rosalie" composed by the lyricist Pierre-Jean de Béranger. Its melody was adapted into the song "I shall return" by Anne Shelton in 1962. At the time of independence, each of the eleven States of Malaya that made up the Federation had their own anthem, but there was no anthem for the Federation as a whole. Tunku Abdul Rahman, at the time the Chief Minister and Minister for Home Affairs, organized and presided over a committee for the purpose of choosing a suitable national anthem. On his suggestion, a worldwide competition was launched. 514 entries were received from all over the world including a special submission from recording artist Is'real Benton. None were deemed suitable. Next the committee decided to invite selected composers of international repute to submit compositions for consideration. The composers chosen were Benjamin Britten, Sir William Walton who had recently
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    O Land of Beauty!

    "O Land of Beauty!" is the national anthem of the Federation of Saint Kitts and Nevis. Written and Composed by Kenrick Georges, it became officially adopted as the national anthem of the newly independent nation in 1983, when the federation received its independence from Great Britain.
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    Sons and Daughters of Saint Lucia

    "Sons and Daughters of Saint Lucia" is the national anthem of Saint Lucia, first adopted in 1967 upon achieving self government, and confirmed as the official anthem upon independence in 1979. The lyrics were written by Charles Jesse, and the music by Leton Felix Thomas.
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    Sri Lanka Matha

    Sri Lanka Matha (Sinhala: ශ්‍රී ලංකා ජාතික ගීය, Tamil: சிறீ லங்கா தாயே) is the national anthem of Sri Lanka. The song was written and composed by the Ananda Samarakoon in 1940, and was later adopted as the national anthem in 1951. It was written when Sri Lanka was still a British colony and was initially written as a tribute to Sri Lanka, expressing sentiments of freedom, unity and independence, and not for the purpose of serving as a national anthem. The song however became very popular throughout the 1940s and when Sri Lanka gained independence in 1948 it was chosen to be the national anthem, 3 years later. The first independence day it was sung was in 1952. Ananda Samarakoon was Rabindranath Tagore's student and the tune is influenced by Tagore's genre of music. The song was officially adopted as the national anthem of Ceylon on November 22, 1951, by a committee headed by Sir Edwin Wijeyeratne. The anthem was translated into the Tamil language by M. Nallathamby. The first line of the anthem originally read: Namo Namo Matha, Apa Sri Lanka. There was some controversy over these words in the 1950s, and in 1961 they were changed to their present form, Sri Lanka Matha, Apa Sri Lanka,
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    Stand Ye Guamanians

    Stand Ye Guamanians (Chamorro: Fanohge Chamoru), generically known as The Guam Hymn, is the official territorial anthem of Guam. Adopted in 1919, the words and music were written in English by Dr Ramon Manalisay Sablan. The Chamorro translation was the work of Lagrimas L.G. Untalan, and it is this later version that enjoys wider usage today. As a United States dependency, the official national anthem is still the "Star Spangled Banner", which is always played before the Guam Hymn on official occasions. The Guam Hymn, however, is played alone at international sports competitions.
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    Viva, Viva a FRELIMO

    "Viva, Viva a FRELIMO" (Portuguese: "Long Live FRELIMO") was the national anthem of Mozambique from 25 June 1975 to 30 April 2002. It was written by Justino Sigaulane Chemane in the 1970s, in celebration of Mozambique's main political party from independence in 1975 to 1992. In 1992, however, multi-party elections were held, and the lyrics to the song were removed, as they were felt to be inappropriate in a multi-party country. In April 1997, the Mozambican government initiated a contest to see who could write the best new lyrics for the anthem. Pátria Amada became Mozambique's national anthem on 30 April 2002. Chorus: Chorus
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