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Best Namesake of All Time

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    1
    Columbia

    Columbia

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbia ( /kəˈlʌmbiə/) is the fifth-largest city in Missouri, and the largest city in Mid-Missouri. With a population of 110,438 as of the 2011 according to the United States Census, it is the principal municipality of the Columbia Metropolitan Area, a region of 175,831 residents. The city serves as the county seat of Boone County and as the location of the University of Missouri. The college town is politically liberal and is known by the nicknames "The Athens of Missouri," "College Town USA," and "CoMO." Over half of Columbians possess a bachelor's degree and over a quarter hold graduate degrees, making it the thirteenth most highly educated municipality in the United States. Columbia was settled in Pre-Columbian times by the mound-building Mississippian culture of Native Americans. In 1818, a group of settlers incorporated under the Smithton Land Company purchased over 2,000 acres (8.1 km) and established the village of Smithton near present-day downtown Columbia. In 1821, the settlers moved and renamed the settlement Columbia—a poetic name for the United States. The founding of the University of Missouri in 1839 established the city as a center of education and research. Two
    8.14
    7 votes
    2

    Jeffersonville

    • Named after: Thomas Jefferson
    Jeffersonville is a village in Sullivan County, New York, United States. The population was 359 at the 2000 census. The name is derived indirectly from Thomas Jefferson. The Village of Jeffersonville is in the southeast part of the Town of Callicoon on NY 52. The postal code is 12748. The Village of Jeffersonville is home to the Sullivan West Central School elementary. The original settlers arrived around 1830 and called the village Winkelried. The first hotel in the village was The Jefferson House, named after President Jefferson, and the village was subsequently renamed to Jeffersonville. The hotel is now known as the Abel Building and still stands on Main St. In 1897 and 1898, a total of bills from hotels and saloons in town showed that 3000 kegs of beer were consumed in a village with a population of 500. The village was incorporated on November 24, 1924. In June 1974, Patty Hearst was kept in a home in Jeffersonville that was rented by Nicki Scott, a Symbionese Liberation Army ally. Patty Hearst described Jeff as "remote and as near nowhere in particular." (Times Herald Record, June 1974). During her days in captivity in Jeffersonville, it was rumored that she trained in
    8.33
    6 votes
    3

    Columbia Township

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbia Township is a civil township of Tuscola County in the U.S. state of Michigan. The population was 1,419 at the 2000 census. According to the United States Census Bureau, the township has a total area of 36.0 square miles (93 km), all land. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,419 people, 528 households, and 399 families residing in the township. The population density was 39.4 per square mile (15.2/km²). There were 558 housing units at an average density of 15.5 per square mile (6.0/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 97.18% White, 0.28% Native American, 0.49% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 0.78% from other races, and 1.20% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.47% of the population. There were 528 households out of which 34.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 64.0% were married couples living together, 8.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.4% were non-families. 20.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.66 and the average family size was 3.11. In the township the population was spread out
    7.00
    7 votes
    4

    Columbia

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbia is a town in Washington County, Maine, United States. The population was 486 at the 2010 census. According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 36.3 square miles (94 km). 36.0 square miles (93 km) of it is land and 0.3 square miles (0.78 km) of it (0.74%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 459 people, 190 households, and 122 families residing in the town. The population density was 12.8 per square mile (4.9/km² ). There were 267 housing units at an average density of 7.4 per square mile (2.9/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 98.69% White, 0.22% Native American, and 1.09% from two or more races. There were 190 households out of which 32.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.7% were married couples living together, 14.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.3% were non-families. 26.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.42 and the average family size was 2.89. In the town the population was spread out with 24.6% under the age of 18, 8.3% from 18 to 24, 34.4% from 25 to 44, 23.1%
    9.00
    5 votes
    5
    The Gernsback Continuum

    The Gernsback Continuum

    • Named after: Hugo Gernsback
    "The Gernsback Continuum" is a short story by William Gibson about a photographer who has been given the assignment of photographing old, futuristic architecture. This architecture, although largely forgotten at the time of the story, embodied for the generation that built it their concept of the future. The titular "Gernsback" alludes to Hugo Gernsback, a Pulp magazine science fiction publisher during the early 20th century. By using this title Gibson contrasts the future envisaged during Gernsback's style of science fiction and the present, "cyberpunk" era that Gibson was establishing. The story was published in Gibson's Burning Chrome anthology. During his assignment to photograph 1930s era futuristic architecture, Parker begins to realize a "continuum," an alternative reality containing the possible future of the world represented by the architecture he is photographing – a future that could have been, but was not, thereby contrasting modernism to postmodern reality. Parker's glimpses of this fantastical utopian future, characterised by massive multi-lane highways, giant zeppelins and Aryan inhabitants become increasingly frequent and disturbing until, on the advice of a
    6.86
    7 votes
    6
    Archimedean spiral

    Archimedean spiral

    • Named after: Archimedes
    The Archimedean spiral (also known as the arithmetic spiral) is a spiral named after the 3rd century BC Greek mathematician Archimedes. It is the locus of points corresponding to the locations over time of a point moving away from a fixed point with a constant speed along a line which rotates with constant angular velocity. Equivalently, in polar coordinates (r, θ) it can be described by the equation with real numbers a and b. Changing the parameter a will turn the spiral, while b controls the distance between successive turnings. Archimedes described such a spiral in his book On Spirals. The Archimedean spiral has the property that any ray from the origin intersects successive turnings of the spiral in points with a constant separation distance (equal to 2πb if θ is measured in radians), hence the name "arithmetic spiral". In contrast to this, in a logarithmic spiral these distances, as well as the distances of the intersection points measured from the origin, form a geometric progression. The Archimedean spiral has two arms, one for θ > 0 and one for θ 
    7.67
    6 votes
    7

    Matthew Flinders Girls' Secondary College

    • Named after: Matthew Flinders
    Matthew Flinders Girls' Secondary College is an all-girls State high school located in Geelong, Victoria, Australia. It provides education for students years 7-12. The school opened as Flinders National Grammar School in January 1858. The foundation stone for the school was laid on 5 December 1856 by Lieutenant Governor Major General Edward Macarthur. The school was to be named the Geelong National Grammar School, but the Governor said that should be named after Captain Matthew Flinders, the first European explorer to visit the You Yangs. When the school opened in January 1858, 116 boys were enrolled, but there was no room for girls. Falling enrolments forced the school to become coeducational in 1864. The school was extended and remodelled in December 1879 due to increased student numbers. When the extensions were opened in April 1880, it was then known as Flinders State School no. 260. The school was unofficially known as 'Link's School', after fifth headmaster George Link who was in charge from 1879 to 1894. During this time enrolments had increased to 1000 students. By 1938 enrolments were still increasing but there was not enough space. As a result, the decision was made in
    7.67
    6 votes
    8
    Columbus

    Columbus

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbus is a science laboratory that is part of the International Space Station (ISS) and is the largest single contribution to the ISS made by the European Space Agency (ESA). Like the Harmony and Tranquility modules, the Columbus laboratory was constructed in Turin, Italy by Rome based Alcatel Alenia Space with respect to structures and thermal control. The functional architecture (including software) of the lab was designed by EADS in Germany where it was also integrated before being flown to the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida in an Airbus Beluga. It was launched aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis on February 7, 2008 on flight STS-122. It is designed for ten years of operation. The module is controlled by the Columbus Control Centre, located at the German Space Operations Centre, part of the German Aerospace Center in Oberpfaffenhofen near Munich, Germany. The European Space Agency has spent €1.4 billion (about US$2 billion) on building Columbus, including the experiments that will fly in it and the ground control infrastructure necessary to operate them. The laboratory is a cylindrical module with two end cones. It is 4,477 mm (15 ft) in external diameter and 6,871 mm
    6.57
    7 votes
    9
    Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historic Site

    Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historic Site

    • Named after: Martin Luther King, Jr.
    Martin Luther King, Jr., National Historic Site established on October 10, 1980, consists of several buildings surrounding Martin Luther King, Jr.'s boyhood home on Auburn Avenue in the Sweet Auburn historic district of Atlanta, Georgia. The original Ebenezer Baptist Church, the church where King and his father Martin Luther King, Sr. pastored, is also part of the national historic site. These places are critical components in the interpretation of the life of Martin Luther King Jr. and his legacy as a leader of the American civil rights movement. In total, the buildings included in the site make up 35 acres (0.14 km²). The visitor center contains a museum that chronicles the American civil rights movement which follows the parallel paths of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.. A firehouse (Fire Station No. 6), built in 1894, served the Sweet Auburn community until 1991, and now contains a gift shop and an exhibit on desegregation in the Atlanta Fire Department. The “I Have a Dream” International World Peace Rose Garden, and a memorial tribute to Mohandas K. Gandhi. Also of interest is the "International Civil Rights Walk of Fame" which gives recognition to those courageous pioneers who
    7.33
    6 votes
    10
    USS Thomas Jefferson

    USS Thomas Jefferson

    • Named after: Thomas Jefferson
    USS Thomas Jefferson (APA-30) was a President Jackson-class attack transport. She was ordered built by the U.S. Navy for use in World War II and was assigned the task of transporting troops to and from battle areas. For this dangerous work, she was awarded six battle stars for World War II service and four for the Korean War. She was laid down under Maritime Commission contract (MC hull 56) as President Garfield on 5 February 1940 at Newport News, Virginia, by the Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Company for the American President Lines; launched on 20 November 1940; sponsored by Miss Eugenia Merrill; acquired by the United States Navy on 1 May 1942 from the War Shipping Administration; converted into a troop transport (AP-60) by her builders; and commissioned on 31 August 1942, Commander Chauncey R. Crutcher in command. Following a brief shakedown, the new transport participated in amphibious exercises in the Hampton Roads-Virginia Capes area. On 23 October, the transport embarked elements of the 3rd Infantry Division and got underway the next day with Task Group (TG) 34.9, the Center Attack Group, for the invasion of North Africa. All units of Task Force (TF) 34, the Western
    7.33
    6 votes
    11
    Madison River

    Madison River

    • Named after: James Madison
    The Madison River is a headwater tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 183 miles (295 km) long, in Wyoming and Montana. Its confluence with the Jefferson and Gallatin rivers near Three Forks, Montana form the Missouri River. The Madison rises in Park County in northwestern Wyoming at the confluence of the Firehole and Gibbon rivers, a location known as Madison Junction in Yellowstone National Park. It flows west then north through the mountains of southwestern Montana to join the Jefferson and Gallatin rivers at Three Forks. The Missouri River Headwaters State Park is located on the Madison at Three Forks. In its upper reaches in Gallatin County, Montana, the Hebgen Dam forms Hebgen Lake. In its middle reaches in Madison County, Montana, the Madison Dam forms Ennis Lake and provides hydroelectric power. In 1959, the Hebgen Lake earthquake formed Quake Lake just downstream from Hebgen Dam. Downstream from Ennis, the Madison flows through Bear Trap Canyon, known for its class IV-V whitewater. The Bear Trap Canyon section is part of the Lee Metcalf Wilderness area. The river was named in July 1805 by Meriwether Lewis at Three Forks. The central fork of the three, it was named
    8.40
    5 votes
    12
    7.00
    6 votes
    13
    Rome

    Rome

    • Named after: Romulus and Remus
    Rome (/ˈroʊm/; Italian: Roma pronounced [ˈroːma] ( listen); Latin: Rōma) is a city and special comune ("Roma Capitale") in Italy. Rome is the capital of Italy and the capital of Lazio (Latin: Latium). With 2.8 million residents in 1,285.3 km (496.3 sq mi), it is also the country's largest and most populated comune and fourth-most populous city in the European Union by population within city limits. Between 3.2 and 3.8 million people live in the Rome urban and metropolitan area. The city is located in the central-western portion of the Italian Peninsula, on the Tiber River within the Lazio region of Italy. Rome is referred to as "The Eternal City", a notion expressed by ancient Roman poets and writers. Rome's history spans more than two and a half thousand years, since its founding in 753 BC, with the union of rural villages. It was the capital city of the Roman Kingdom, the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire, which was the dominant power in Western Europe and the lands bordering the Mediterranean for over seven hundred years from the 1st century BC until the 7th century AD and the city is regarded as one of the birthplaces of western civilization. Since the 1st century AD Rome has
    7.00
    6 votes
    14

    Theodore Roosevelt High School

    • Named after: Theodore Roosevelt
    Theodore Roosevelt High School, usually referred to simply as Roosevelt High School or TRHS, is a secondary school located on the west side of Des Moines, Iowa. It is one of five secondary schools under the district of the Des Moines Public Schools, and was named after the 26th President of the United States, Theodore Roosevelt. The construction of the building in which TRHS is housed was initiated in 1922 by Proudfoot, Bird, and Rawson and opened in 1924 with 1,282 students. The final cost to build was $1,331,600. The building's design has won many awards and is considered one of 50 most significant buildings in Iowa by PBS. The building is on both the State and National Register of Historic Places. As of the 2008-2009 school year, there are 1,654 students enrolled at Roosevelt High School. As of the 2010-2011 year, Roosevelt is set on a block schedule, there are eight blocks total and each day containing four of these blocks. These set of blocks alternate each day, meaning one week may contain three classes in four subjects, and only two classes in the other four. Students are required to have two semesters of Physical Education per year. They are also required to, as before,
    9.25
    4 votes
    15
    Simon Bolivar Buckner, Sr.

    Simon Bolivar Buckner, Sr.

    • Named after: Simón Bolívar
    Simon Bolivar Buckner (April 1, 1823 – January 8, 1914) was an American soldier and politician who fought in the United States Army in the Mexican–American War and in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. He later served as the 30th Governor of Kentucky. After graduating from the United States Military Academy at West Point, Buckner became an instructor there. He took a hiatus from teaching to serve in the Mexican–American War, participating in many of the major battles of that conflict. He resigned from the army in 1855 to manage his father-in-law's real estate in Chicago, Illinois. He returned to his native state in 1857 and was appointed adjutant general by Governor Beriah Magoffin in 1861. In this position, he tried to enforce Kentucky's neutrality policy in the early days of the Civil War. When the state's neutrality was breached, Buckner accepted a commission in the Confederate Army after declining a similar commission to the Union Army. In 1862, he accepted Ulysses S. Grant's demand for an "unconditional surrender" at the Battle of Fort Donelson. He was the first Confederate general to surrender an army in the war. He participated in Braxton Bragg's
    8.00
    5 votes
    16
    Roosevelt Institution

    Roosevelt Institution

    • Named after: Eleanor Roosevelt
    The Roosevelt Institute Campus Network, formerly the Roosevelt Institution, is the first student-run policy organization in the United States. It is a part of the Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt Institute, an organization with offices in New York, NY, Washington, DC, and Hyde Park, NY, focused on carrying forward through new leaders and ideas the values and spirit that Franklin and Eleanor brought to the last century. Roosevelt currently has 8,500 active members and over 80 established chapters both in the United States and abroad. Individual chapters on college campuses conduct research and write policy regarding various public issues. It is the first student-run policy research group or "think tank" in the United States. Roosevelt was founded at Stanford University and Yale University following the 2004 U.S. Presidential Election. Its name is a counterpoint to the conservative Hoover Institution at Stanford. The Roosevelt Institution, now The Roosevelt Institute Campus Network, was founded in 2004 by disillusioned young progressives seeking a stronger voice in American policymaking. Quinn Wilhelmi, one of the organization's founders, often told students that "the three pillars of
    6.83
    6 votes
    17
    Columbia County

    Columbia County

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbia County is a county located in the U.S. state of Arkansas. As of 2010, the population was 24,552. The county seat is Magnolia. Columbia County was formed on December 17, 1852, and was named for Christopher Columbus. It is an alcohol prohibition or dry county. The Magnolia Micropolitan Statistical Area includes all of Columbia County. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 766.86 square miles (1,986.2 km), of which 766.11 square miles (1,984.2 km) (or 99.90%) is land and 0.75 square miles (1.9 km) (or 0.10%) is water. Columbia County is in South Arkansas. Columbia County, along with Union County, is home to the largest Bromine reserve in the United States. Dorcheat Bayou flows through Columbia County from its origin in Nevada County southward into Webster Parish, Louisiana, before emptying into Lake Bistineau. Magnolia Municipal Airport is a public-use airport in Columbia County. It is owned by the city of Magnolia and located three nautical miles (6 km) southeast of its central business district. As of the census of 2000, there were 25,603 people, 9,981 households, and 6,747 families residing in the county. The population density was 33 people per
    7.80
    5 votes
    18
    USS Simon Bolivar

    USS Simon Bolivar

    • Named after: Simón Bolívar
    USS Simon Bolivar (SSBN-641), a Benjamin Franklin class fleet ballistic missile submarine, was the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for Simón Bolívar (1783–1830), a hero of the independence movements of the former Spanish colonies in South America. Simon Bolivar's keel was laid down on 17 April 1963 by the Newport News Shipbuilding of Newport News, Virginia. She was launched on 22 August 1964, sponsored by Mrs. Thomas C. Mann, and commissioned on 29 October 1965 with Commander Charles H. Griffiths commanding the Blue Crew and Commander Charles A. Orem commanding the Gold Crew. During late December 1965 and most of January 1966, Simon Bolivar underwent demonstration and shakedown operations. The Gold Crew successfully fired a Polaris A-3 ballistic missile off the coast of Cape Kennedy, Florida, on 17 January 1966, and the Blue Crew completed a successful Polaris missile firing on 31 January. In February 1966, the Gold Crew continued shakedown operations in the Caribbean Sea. In March 1966, Simon Bolivar's home port was changed to Charleston, South Carolina, where she was assigned to Submarine Squadron 18, and minor deficiencies were corrected during a shipyard
    7.80
    5 votes
    19
    Columbia

    Columbia

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbia is a town in Fluvanna County, Virginia, United States, at the confluence of the James and Rivanna Rivers. The population was 49 at the 2000 census, making it Virginia's smallest incorporated town. It was the site of a minor battle during the Revolutionary War, historical reenactments of which are held annually. Columbia is part of the Charlottesville Metropolitan Statistical Area. Columbia is located at 37°45′8″N 78°9′44″W / 37.75222°N 78.16222°W / 37.75222; -78.16222 (37.752206, -78.162291). According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 0.2 square mile (0.5 km²), of which 0.2 square mile (0.5 km²) is land and 4.76% is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 49 people, 18 households, and 12 families residing in the town. The population density was 246.1 people per square mile (94.6/km²). There were 22 housing units at an average density of 110.5 per square mile (42.5/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 63.27% White, 28.57% African American, and 8.16% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.08% of the population. There were 18 households out of which 27.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 66.7%
    7.60
    5 votes
    20

    Columbia

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbia is an unincorporated town in Columbia Township, Fayette County, Indiana. Columbia is located at 39°34′35″N 85°12′26″W / 39.57639°N 85.20722°W / 39.57639; -85.20722.
    7.60
    5 votes
    21

    Theodore and Franklin D. Roosevelt Prize in Naval History

    • Named after: Franklin D. Roosevelt
    The Theodore and Franklin D. Roosevelt Prize in Naval History is an annual prize established in 1986 and given by The New York Council of the Navy League of the United States, the Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt Institute, and the Theodore Roosevelt Association. It is given for the best book on American naval history published in the previous calendar year. The prize commemorates Theodore Roosevelt and Franklin D. Roosevelt, who both served as Assistant Secretary of the Navy, and who both supported the United States Navy as Presidents of the United States. The judges for the prize include specialists in naval history such as faculty members at the U.S. Naval Academy, U.S. Naval War College, U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, U.S. Coast Guard Academy, U.S. Military Academy, The Citadel, and Princeton University.
    7.60
    5 votes
    22
    Mission District

    Mission District

    • Named after: Mission Dolores (main building)
    The Mission District, also commonly called "The Mission", is a neighborhood in San Francisco, California, USA, originally known as "the Mission lands" meaning the lands belonging to the sixth Alta California mission, Mission San Francisco de Asis. This mission, San Francisco's oldest standing building, is located in the neighborhood. The principal thoroughfare of the Mission District of San Francisco is Mission Street. Its borders are U.S. Route 101 to the east which forms the boundary between the eastern portion of the district, known as "Inner Mission" and its eastern neighbor, Potrero Hill, while Sanchez Street separates the neighborhoods from Eureka Valley (also known as "The Castro") and Noe Valley to the west. The part of the neighborhood from Valencia Street to Sanchez Street, north of 20th, is known as Mission Dolores. South of 20th towards 22nd, and between Valencia and Dolores Streets is a distinct sub-neighborhood known as Liberty Hill. Cesar Chavez Street (formerly Army Street) is the southern border which lies next to Bernal Heights, while to the north the neighborhood is separated from South of Market roughly by Duboce Avenue and the elevated highway of the Central
    7.40
    5 votes
    23
    Amundsen Sea

    Amundsen Sea

    • Named after: Roald Amundsen
    The Amundsen Sea is an arm of the Southern Ocean off Marie Byrd Land in western Antarctica. It is bounded by Cape Flying Fish, the northwestern tip of Thurston Island to the east and Cape Dart on Siple Island to the west. East of Cape Flying Fish starts the Bellingshausen Sea. West of Cape Dart is no named marginal sea of the Southern Ocean between Amundsen Sea and Ross Sea. Named for the Norwegian polar explorer Roald Amundsen by the Norwegian expedition of 1928–29, under Captain Nils Larsen, while exploring this area in February, 1929. The sea is mostly ice-covered, and the Thwaites Ice Tongue protrudes into it. The ice sheet which drains into the Amundsen Sea averages about 3 km (1.9 mi) in thickness; is roughly the size of the state of Texas and the area is known as the Amundsen Sea Embayment (ASE); it forms one of the three major ice drainage basins of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. The ice sheet which drains into the Amundsen Sea averages about 3 km (1.9 mi) in thickness; is roughly the size of the state of Texas and the area is known as the Amundsen Sea Embayment (ASE); it forms one of the three major ice drainage basins of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, the others being the
    8.50
    4 votes
    24

    Columbus

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbus is a village in Adams County, Illinois, United States. The population was 112 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Quincy, IL–MO Micropolitan Statistical Area. Columbus is located at 39°59′17″N 91°8′51″W / 39.98806°N 91.1475°W / 39.98806; -91.1475 (39.988141, -91.147503). According to the 2010 census, the village has a total area of 0.25 square miles (0.65 km), all land. As of the census of 2000, there were 112 people, 42 households, and 34 families residing in the village. The population density was 444.5 people per square mile (173.0/km²). There were 51 housing units at an average density of 202.4 per square mile (78.8/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 94.64% White and 5.36% African American. There were 42 households out of which 35.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 78.6% were married couples living together, 4.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 16.7% were non-families. 14.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.67 and the average family size was 2.91. In the village the population was spread out with 24.1%
    8.50
    4 votes
    25
    Gandhi Memorial International Foundation

    Gandhi Memorial International Foundation

    • Named after: Mahatma Gandhi
    Gandhi Memorial International Foundation, also known as the Mahatma Gandhi International Foundation, was a controversial non-profit organization run by Yogesh K. Gandhi, born Yogesh Kothari, who claims to be related to Mahatma Gandhi. However, an immediate descendant of Mahatma Gandhi, publicly stated that Yogesh K. Gandhi was a "scam artist", and "interested primarily in enriching himself." Yogesh Gandhi described the organization as dedicated to "social betterment through nonviolence." The organization gave out the "Mahatma Gandhi Humanitarian Award". The organization's business dealings were investigated by the United States Senate, in March 1998. Mother Jones referred to the organization as: "a shadowy non-profit enterprise devoted in principle to 'promoting the philosophy of non-violence'." On March 8, 1999, Yogesh Gandhi was charged by the United States Department of Justice with "tax evasion, mail and wire fraud and perjury" for dealings related to the Gandhi Memorial International Foundation. He had previously been indicted by the Justice Department's Campaign Financing Task Force in August 1998. In 1999, Yogesh Gandhi entered a guilty plea to the charges of mail fraud, tax
    8.50
    4 votes
    26

    Narnia

    • Named after: Narnia
    Narnia was a Christian neo-classical progressive power metal band founded by guitarist Carl Johan Grimmark and singer Christian Liljegren. The band formed in Sweden in 1996, and disbanded in 2010. Their album themes heavily reference The Chronicles of Narnia by C. S. Lewis. Liljegren and Grimmark met for the first time in 1993 in Jönköping, a town in the south of Sweden. At this time Liljegren and his band Modest Attraction were just about to release their first album, The Truth in Your Face. Grimmark was a member of a band named Sentinel. They remained in contact over several years, during which both had trouble with their bands. Modest Attraction produced its second album Divine Luxury in 1996, at the same time as Grimmark decided to leave Sentinel. Liljegren phoned Grimmark and asked him whether he was interested in working together on a project. Liljegren had a passion for melodic hard rock, which he was not able to explore in the band Modest Attraction. Grimmark was instantly interested in a project along those lines. A few months later Liljegren called Grimmark again and told him that Modest Attraction would go on tour to Germany and the guitar player Stephan Mohlin could not
    8.50
    4 votes
    27

    T'Pau

    • Named after: T'Pau
    T'Pau is a British pop rock group led by singer Carol Decker. They had had a string of Top 40 hits in the UK in the late 1980s, most notably "China in Your Hand" and "Heart and Soul", and several hits in the United States and Europe, before disbanding in the early 1990s. Decker still performs under the name T'Pau at solo shows and 1980s nostalgia concerts. The band formed in 1986 in Shropshire, taking their name from a Vulcan priestess of the same name in the 1960s sci-fi series Star Trek. Prior to deciding on this name, they were called Talking America on early demos sent to record and publishing companies. Their first hit was the 1987 release "Heart and Soul". Initially a flop in the UK, it first became a hit in the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart, reaching No. 4 after being featured on a Pepe Jeans advertisement; it repeated the feat in the UK Singles Chart some months later. Their next single, "China in Your Hand", was their biggest UK hit, spending five weeks at number 1. It also reached the top spot in several European countries, but made little impact in the United States. Their debut album, Bridge of Spies (simply called T'Pau in the USA), also reached number 1 and went
    8.50
    4 votes
    28
    Roosevelt High School

    Roosevelt High School

    • Named after: Theodore Roosevelt
    Roosevelt High School is a high school located in Sioux Falls. The current enrollment is 2,055 students. . Theodore Roosevelt High School opened in September 1991 on a 40-acre (160,000 m) campus in southwest Sioux Falls. Roosevelt High School was selected as a pilot site for the South Dakota Modernization Project. Through the modernization project and continued efforts to improve student achievement, Roosevelt High School has embarked upon programs in Value-Added Instruction, Classroom Management That Works, 21st Century Skills, Curriculum Mapping and Differentiated Instruction. Roosevelt High School has been consistently ranked in the top twenty percent of all high schools in the United States. The school is serviced by Sioux Area Metro Route 25, which is open to all fare-paying passengers Monday to Friday during the school year.
    6.33
    6 votes
    29

    SS Amerigo Vespucci

    • Named after: Amerigo Vespucci
    SS Amerigo Vespucci (Hull Number 2767) was a Liberty ship built in the United States during World War II. She was named after Amerigo Vespucci, an Italian explorer for which North America and South America are named. The ship was laid down on 20 February 1944, then launched on 10 March 1944. The ship survived the war only to suffer the same fate as nearly all other Liberty ships that survived did; she was scrapped in 1962.
    8.25
    4 votes
    30
    Americas

    Americas

    • Named after: Amerigo Vespucci
    The Americas (or America) are lands in the Western Hemisphere that are also known as the New World. Comprising the continents of South America and North America, linked by the isthmus of Panama, along with their associated islands, they cover 8.3% of the Earth's total surface area (28.4% of its land area). The topography is dominated by the American Cordillera, a long chain of mountains that run the length of the west coast. The flatter eastern side of the Americas is dominated by large river basins, such as the Amazon, Mississippi, and La Plata. Extending 14,000 km (8,699 mi) in a north-south orientation, the climate and ecology varies strongly across the Americas, from arctic tundra of Canada, Greenland, and Alaska, to the tropical rain forests in Central America and South America. When the continents joined 3 million years ago, the Great American Interchange resulted in many species being spread across the Americas, such as the cougar, porcupine, and hummingbirds. Humans first settled the Americas from Asia between 40000 BCE and 15000 BCE. A second migration of Na-Dene speakers followed later from Asia. The subsequent migration of the Inuit into the neoarctic around 3500 BCE
    7.00
    5 votes
    31
    Columbia

    Columbia

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbia is a city in Marion County, Mississippi, which was formed six years before Mississippi was admitted to statehood. Columbia was named for Columbia, South Carolina, from which many of the early settlers had migrated. The population was 6,603 as of the 2000 census. It is the county seat of Marion County. Columbia is located at 31°15′24″N 89°49′44″W / 31.25667°N 89.82889°W / 31.25667; -89.82889 (31.256781, -89.828779). It is located on the east bank of the Pearl River and is 81 miles south of Jackson, Mississippi and 103 miles north of New Orleans, Louisiana. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 6.4 square miles (17 km), all land. As of the census of 2000, there were 6,603 people, 2,497 households, and 1,620 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,033.5 people per square mile (399.0/km²). There were 2,821 housing units at an average density of 441.6 per square mile (170.5/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 62.56% White, 35.64% African American, 0.39% Native American, 0.44% Asian, 0.18% from other races, and 0.79% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.77% of the population. There were
    7.00
    5 votes
    32

    William Matthew Flinders Petrie

    • Named after: Matthew Flinders
    William Matthew Flinders Petrie, FRS (3 June 1853 – 28 July 1942), commonly known as Flinders Petrie, was an English Egyptologist and a pioneer of systematic methodology in archaeology and preservation of artifacts. He held the first chair of Egyptology in the United Kingdom, and excavated many of the most important archaeological sites in Egypt. Some consider his most famous discovery to be that of the Merneptah Stele, an opinion with which Petrie himself concurred.Petrie developed the system of dating layers based on pottery and ceramic findings. William Matthew Flinders Petrie was born in Maryon Road, Charlton, Kent, England, the son of William Petrie (1821–1908) and Anne (née Flinders (1812–1892). Anne was the daughter of Captain Matthew Flinders, surveyor of the Australian coastline. He was raised in a devout Christian household (his father being Plymouth Brethren), and was educated at home. He had no formal education. His father taught his son how to survey accurately, laying the foundation for his archaeological career. At the age of eight he was tutored in French, Latin, and Greek, until he had a collapse and was taught at home. He also ventured his first archaeological
    7.00
    5 votes
    33
    Fort Wayne

    Fort Wayne

    • Named after: Anthony Wayne
    Fort Wayne is a city in the U.S. state of Indiana and the county seat of Allen County. The population was 255,824 as of the July 1, 2011 Census estimate making it the 74th largest city in the United States and the second-largest in Indiana after Indianapolis. The municipality is located in northeastern Indiana, approximately 18 miles (29 km) west of the Ohio border and 50 miles (80 km) south of the Michigan border. Fort Wayne is the principal city of the Fort Wayne metropolitan area, which for statistical purposes is defined as Allen, Wells, and Whitley counties, for an estimated population of 419,453, In addition to those three core counties, the combined statistical area, defined as including Adams, DeKalb, Huntington, and Noble counties, has a population of about 615,077. Under the direction of American Revolutionary War statesman General "Mad" Anthony Wayne, the United States Army built Fort Wayne last in a series of forts near the Miami Indian village of Kekionga in 1794. Named in Wayne's honor, Fort Wayne established itself at the confluence of the St. Joseph River, St. Marys River, and Maumee River as a trading post for European settlers. The village was platted in 1823 and
    8.00
    4 votes
    34
    Matmos

    Matmos

    • Named after: Matmos
    Matmos is an experimental electronic music duo originally from San Francisco but now residing in Baltimore signed to the Matador Records label. M. C. (Martin) Schmidt and Drew Daniel are the core members, but they frequently include other artists on their records and in their performances, including notably J Lesser. Much of their work could be classified as a pop version of the musique concrète genre. The name Matmos refers to the seething lake of evil slime beneath the city Sogo in the 1968 film Barbarella. The name might also originate from Swedish, literally meaning "mashed food". In 1998, Matmos remixed the Björk single Alarm Call. Subsequently, Matmos worked with Björk on her albums Vespertine (2001) and Medúlla (2004), as well as her Vespertine and Greatest Hits tours. In November 2004, Matmos spent 97 hours in the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts as artists in residence, performing music with friends, musical guests and onlookers. The live album Work, Work, Work, essentially a "best of" collection of the session, was released as a free download from their website. Matmos gained notoriety for their use of samples including "freshly cut hair" and "the amplified neural activity
    8.00
    4 votes
    35
    Columbia

    Columbia

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbia is a town in Tolland County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 4,971 at the 2000 census. Originally a part of Lebanon, known as the North Society or Lebanon's Crank , Columbia was incorporated in May, 1804. Columbia offers prekindergarten through 8th grade education in town at Horace W. Porter School, while high school students have a choice of attending four nearby high schools (Bolton High School, E. O. Smith High School, Windham High School and Windham Technical High School, part of the Connecticut Technical High School System). According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 22.0 square miles (57 km), of which, 21.4 square miles (55 km) of it is land and 0.6 square miles (1.6 km) of it (2.78%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 4,971 people, 1,864 households, and 1,463 families residing in the town. The population density was 232.8 people per square mile (89.9/km²). There were 1,988 housing units at an average density of 93.1 per square mile (35.9/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 97.43% White, 0.38% African American, 0.08% Native American, 0.70% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 0.56% from other races, and 0.78%
    6.80
    5 votes
    36
    Columbia City

    Columbia City

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbia City is a city in Columbia County, Oregon, United States. It was named for its location on the Columbia River. The population was 1,571 at the 2000 census. The 2007 estimate is 1,955 residents. Columbia City was founded in 1867 by Jacob and Joseph Caples. In 1870, the town had aspirations of becoming the terminus for Ben Holladay's Willamette Valley railroad. The same year, Portland, Oregon became the terminus of the west-side line, but the railroad never reached Columbia City. Columbia City post office was established in 1871. Currently, Columbia City serves as a suburb of St. Helens. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.1 square miles (2.8 km), of which 0.8 square miles (2.1 km) is land and 0.3 square miles (0.78 km) (31.82%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,571 people, 595 households, and 448 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,106.6 people per square mile (808.8/km²). There were 640 housing units at an average density of 858.2 per square mile (329.5/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 95.61% White, 0.38% African American, 1.34% Native American, 0.70% Asian, 0.51% from other races, and
    9.00
    3 votes
    37
    Columbus

    Columbus

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbus is the second largest city and county seat of Cherokee County, Kansas, United States, 15 miles south-southwest of Pittsburg, Kansas. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 3,312. Columbus was a railroad junction for the Saint Louis and San Francisco, and the Missouri, Kansas, and Texas railroads. It was named Columbus by A.L. Peters, one of the European-American founders, for his hometown of Columbus, Ohio; the name thus indirectly honors Christopher Columbus, the explorer. Coal, lead and zinc were mined in the region. Columbus had a considerable trade in agricultural products, and its businesses included machine shops, grain elevators, flour mills, a cigar factory, bottle works (soft drinks), a canning factory, and an extensive brick-making plant. In 1875, Robert A. Long and Victor Bell formed the Long-Bell Lumber Company in Columbus. From one lumberyard, Long-Bell expanded operations and holdings to become one of the largest vertically integrated lumber companies in the United States. In 1956 it was purchased by International Paper. Columbus is located at 37°10′17″N 94°50′27″W / 37.17139°N 94.84083°W / 37.17139; -94.84083 (37.171379, -94.840704). According to
    9.00
    3 votes
    38
    Theodore Roosevelt High School

    Theodore Roosevelt High School

    • Named after: Theodore Roosevelt
    for schools of the same name Theodore Roosevelt High School, also known as RHS or Roosevelt, or also Wyandotte High by alumni, is the secondary school in Wyandotte, Michigan. Established in 1923, RHS is the only public high school in the city of Wyandotte. Its mascot is the Bear, with athletic teams with similar names (the Bears for males and the Lady Bears for females). Enrollment as of the 2005-2006 school year is 1416 students attending grades 9-12. The mainstream curriculum is essentially university-preparatory, yet students do not have to enroll in all of these classes. Standard procedure for graduation is having obtained 22 of 24 possible credits, taking 4 terms of English and literature based classes, including Composition, 3 terms of Social Studies, including Economics and Government, 3 terms of Science, and 3 terms of Mathematics. Students must also include 2 terms of the Arts or Vocational training, or a Foreign Language, 1 term of Physical Education, and a half-term (semester) of Keyboarding or Computer Informatics. The school offers juniors and seniors several Advanced Placement courses, and all juniors must take the MME in the second semester. Class Courses such as
    9.00
    3 votes
    39
    Python

    Python

    • Named after: Monty Python
    Python is a general-purpose, interpreted high-level programming language whose design philosophy emphasizes code readability. Its syntax is said to be clear and expressive. Python has a large and comprehensive standard library. Python supports multiple programming paradigms, primarily but not limited to object-oriented, imperative and, to a lesser extent, functional programming styles. It features a fully dynamic type system and automatic memory management, similar to that of Scheme, Ruby, Perl, and Tcl. Like other dynamic languages, Python is often used as a scripting language, but is also used in a wide range of non-scripting contexts. Using third-party tools, Python code can be packaged into standalone executable programs. Python interpreters are available for many operating systems. CPython, the reference implementation of Python, is free and open source software and has a community-based development model, as do nearly all of its alternative implementations. CPython is managed by the non-profit Python Software Foundation. Python was conceived in the late 1980s and its implementation was started in December 1989 by Guido van Rossum at CWI in the Netherlands as a successor to
    7.75
    4 votes
    40
    Zonule of Zinn

    Zonule of Zinn

    • Named after: Johann Gottfried Zinn
    The zonule of Zinn (Zinn's membrane, ciliary zonule) (after Johann Gottfried Zinn) is a ring of fibrous strands connecting the ciliary body with the crystalline lens of the eye. The zonule of Zinn is split into two layers: a thin layer, which lines the hyaloid fossa, and a thicker layer, which is a collection of zonular fibers. Together, the fibers are known as the suspensory ligament of the lens. When colour granules are displaced from the Zonules of Zinn (by friction against the lens), the irises slowly fade. In some cases those colour granules clog the channels and lead to Glaucoma Pigmentosa. This article was originally based on an entry from a public domain edition of Gray's Anatomy. As such, some of the information contained within it may be outdated.
    7.75
    4 votes
    41
    Jefferson High School

    Jefferson High School

    • Named after: Thomas Jefferson
    For schools with a similar name, see Jefferson High School (disambiguation). Jefferson High School is an American public high school in Daly City, California, and is the first school in the Jefferson Union High School District (JUHSD). Jefferson serves Daly City, Brisbane, and the town of Colma. Daly City residents who formerly had to send their children to San Francisco high schools due to lack of a local alternative, voted into existence the JUHSD in 1922. This resulted in the formation of Jefferson High School. JHS opened its doors in 1922 to its first 50 students using the old Jefferson Hall (previously Jefferson Elementary School) near San Pedro Road and Hill Street. Recognizing the need for a more suitable campus to accommodate the rapidly expanding student body, JUHSD residents voted to build a new campus at the current location in 1923. The first building was finished in 1925. Subsequently, this building was demolished and replaced in 1963. In 2000, alum John Madden donated the lighting for the campus football field. They are named "Madden Lights" in his honor. In 2005, Jefferson undertook to renovate and remodel the campus. The following co-curricular clubs are hosted at
    7.50
    4 votes
    42

    Scrooge McDuck

    • Named after: Ebenezer Scrooge
    Scrooge McDuck is a cartoon character created in 1947 by Carl Barks and licensed by The Walt Disney Company. Scrooge is an elderly Scottish anthropomorphic white duck with a yellow-orange bill, legs, and feet. He typically wears a red or blue frock coat, top hat, pince-nez glasses, and spats and is portrayed in animations as speaking with a slight Scottish accent, also sometimes known as a Scottish burr. His dominant character trait is his thrift, and within the context of the fictional Disney universe, he is the Earth's richest person. Named after Ebenezer Scrooge from the 1843 novel A Christmas Carol, Scrooge is a wealthy Scottish business magnate and tycoon. He was in his first few appearances characterized as a greedy miser and antihero (as Charles Dickens' original Scrooge was), but in later comics and animated shorts and the modern day he is more often portrayed as a charitable and thrifty hero, adventurer, explorer and philanthropist. Scrooge was created by Barks as a comic book character originally as an antagonist for Donald Duck, first appearing in the 1947 Four Color story "Christmas on Bear Mountain" (#178). The character soon became so popular that McDuck became a
    7.50
    4 votes
    43
    Berkeley College

    Berkeley College

    • Named after: George Berkeley
    Berkeley College is a residential college at Yale University, constructed in 1934. The eighth of Yale's 12 residential colleges, it was named in honor of Reverend George Berkeley (1685–1753), dean of Derry and later bishop of Cloyne, in recognition of the assistance in land and books that he gave to Yale in the 18th century. The college was renovated in 1998. As of fall 2011, Berkeley freshmen are housed in Lanman-Wright Hall. Previously, freshmen were housed in Vanderbilt Hall, erected in memory of William Henry Vanderbilt, a member of the class of 1893, who died in 1892 and was the son of Cornelius Vanderbilt II and Alice Gwynne Vanderbilt. Vanderbilt Hall is home to the Vanderbilt Suite; amongst the Suite's former residents is Anderson Cooper, great-grandson of Cornelius Vanderbilt II, although Cooper was actually a member of Trumbull College, which housed its freshmen there at the time. Berkeley is similar to other residential colleges, with its own gym, television room, and other amenities. It also has unique features: Annual traditions include the snowball fight (which pits North Court against South Court), GLO (a blacklight party), and the Bishop Bash, which was founded in
    8.67
    3 votes
    44

    Fotheringay

    • Named after: Fotheringay Castle
    Fotheringay was a short-lived British folk rock group, formed in 1970 by singer Sandy Denny on her departure from Fairport Convention. The band drew its name from her 1968 composition "Fotheringay" about Fotheringhay Castle, in which Mary, Queen of Scots had been imprisoned. The song originally appeared on the 1969 Fairport Convention album, What We Did on Our Holidays, Denny's first album with that group. Two former members of Eclection, Trevor Lucas and Gerry Conway, and two former members of Poet and the One Man Band, Jerry Donahue and Pat Donaldson (bass), completed the line-up responsible for what was long assumed to be the quintet's only album. This folk-based set included several Denny originals, notably "Nothing More", "The Sea" and "The Pond and The Stream", as well as versions of Gordon Lightfoot's "The Way I Feel" and Bob Dylan's "Too Much of Nothing". Though, during the year of its original release, the album featured in the UK's two music papers' Top 20 (Melody Maker and NME), it did not meet commercial expectations, and pressures on Denny to undertake a solo career — she was voted Britain's number 1 singer (two years consecutively) in Melody Maker's readers poll —
    8.67
    3 votes
    45
    Franklin D. Roosevelt High School

    Franklin D. Roosevelt High School

    • Named after: Franklin D. Roosevelt
    Franklin D. Roosevelt High School is a public high school in the Oak Cliff area of Dallas, Texas (USA), serving grades 9 - 12. The school opened in 1963 and is part of the Dallas Independent School District. The school serves several communities, including Cadillac Heights. Construction of the school began in 1961 at 525 Bonnie View Road in the Oak Cliff area. Built before the school district integrated its high schools, the campus was the first new "Negro high school" built in Dallas since 1939 at the time it opened in January 1963. The school was built to serve a maximum capacity of 2000 students and at its opening was expected to draw about 1200 students from the Oak Cliff area, most previously attending Madison High School — which had itself been converted to a "Negro school" in 1956 to relieve overcrowding at Booker T. Washington and Lincoln high schools. The school is named for former U.S. president Franklin Delano Roosevelt. In 2005, after the closure of the Wilmer-Hutchins Independent School District. Roosevelt absorbed some WHISD high school students. In 2011 the district re-opened Wilmer Hutchins High School. Some former WHISD zones covered by Roosevelt were rezoned to
    8.67
    3 votes
    46
    Columbia Township

    Columbia Township

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbia Township is a civil township of Jackson County in the U.S. state of Michigan. As of the 2000 census, the township population was 7,234. According to the United States Census Bureau, the township has a total area of 39.3 square miles (102 km), of which, 36.6 square miles (95 km) of it is land and 2.7 square miles (7.0 km) of it (6.90%) is water. The township is the headwaters of the River Rasin which passes through Vineyard Lake, Goose Creek passes through the manmade lake Lake Columbia then into the Rasin River. The head waters of the Grand River pass through the west end of the township. US 127 bounds the western boundary and M50 passes through the Village of Brooklyn through the township north and south. The township contains the northern property of Michigan International Speedway. As of 2006: The township has a four member police department and a volunteer fire department with two stations, rescue service, four fire trucks. As of the census of 2000, there were 7,234 people, 2,894 households, and 2,115 families residing in the township. The population density was 197.8 per square mile (76.4/km²). There were 3,552 housing units at an average density of 97.1 per square
    6.40
    5 votes
    47

    Calvin

    • Named after: John Calvin
    Calvin is a fictional character, and one of the two principal characters in the comic strip Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson. Calvin demonstrates a level of wisdom, vocabulary and humor unusual for a six year-old boy. However, in many ways he is typical for his age: he absolutely hates baths, and fears and hates his babysitter, refuses to go to school, always disobeys his parents 24/7, and is lazy, very tired and selfish. Calvin is also a Creator Curator, and frequently loses himself in various fantastical worlds of his own imagining. On the rare occasions on which he applies himself, Calvin's projects in school are very well received, to his confusion or indifference. He shows relatively minor interest or success in interacting with any "real" characters, choosing instead to spend the majority of his time with Hobbes, with whom he frequently embarks on imaginary adventures, debates philosophical issues, plots various pranks against girls, and fights. Calvin appeared in almost every Calvin and Hobbes strip printed and published. Named after 16th century theologian John Calvin, the character of Calvin is presented as being intelligent and verbose, with an imagination that usually
    7.25
    4 votes
    48

    Columbia

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbia is a census-designated place within Knowlton Township in Warren County, New Jersey, United States. The area is served as United States Postal Service ZIP Code 07832. As of the United States 2010 Census, the population for Columbia was 229.
    7.25
    4 votes
    49
    Columbus

    Columbus

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbus is a city in Burke County, North Dakota in the United States. The population was 133 at the 2010 census. Columbus was founded in 1906. Both this town and nearby Larson were named for an early postmaster that served the area (Columbus Larson), making it possibly the only town so named that was NOT named for Christopher Columbus. Columbus is located at 48º54'N 102º47'W (48.9045, -102.7815). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.3 square miles (0.78 km), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 151 people, 83 households, and 44 families residing in the city. The population density was 548.5 people per square mile (208.2/km). There were 142 housing units at an average density of 515.8 per square mile (195.8/km). The racial makeup of the city was 98.68% White, 0.66% African American and 0.66% Asian. There were 83 households out of which 12.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.8% were married couples living together, 7.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 45.8% were non-families. 44.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 30.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age
    7.25
    4 votes
    50

    Roald Dahl Museum and Story Centre

    • Named after: Roald Dahl
    The Roald Dahl Museum and Story Centre is in the village of Great Missenden in Buckinghamshire, England, which was the home of the children's and short story writer Roald Dahl for 36 years until his death in 1990. The museum was officially opened on 10 June 2005 by Cherie Blair and open to the public on 11 June 2005. It is housed in an old coaching inn and yard, which has been converted into a museum at a cost of £4.5 million. Funding was provided by the Dahl family, Dahl's publishers, charitable foundations and corporate and private donors. The museum houses all of Dahl's main papers: his manuscripts, business and personal correspondence and is "Ideas Book". It also offers regular workshops and hosts events that help to enhance creativity and writing skills. It is run by an independent registered charity. In 2008 the museum won the "Best Small Visitor Attraction" award from Enjoy England, the website of the country's official tourist board.
    7.25
    4 votes
    51

    Columbus Township

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbus is a city in Anoka County, Minnesota, United States. The population was 3,914 at the 2010 census. The city was known as Columbus Township until September 21, 2006, when it was incorporated as the city of Columbus, in response to concerns that the adjacent city of Forest Lake was planning to annex portions of the township. Mel Mettler, the first Mayor of Columbus, was re-elected in November, 2008. Running Aces Harness Park opened in Columbus in April 2008. According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 47.8 square miles (124 km). 44.9 square miles (116 km) of it is land and 2.9 square miles (7.5 km) of it (6.13%) is water. County Roads 18, 19, and 23 are three of the main routes in the community. Interstate 35 splits into Interstates 35E and 35W within the southeast corner of the city. Rice Creek flows through the city. As of the census of 2000, there were 3,957 people, 1,328 households, and 1,120 families residing in the township. The population density was 88.2 people per square mile (34.0/km²). There were 1,358 housing units at an average density of 30.3 per square mile (11.7/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 97.60% White, 0.18%
    7.00
    4 votes
    52
    7.00
    4 votes
    53
    July

    July

    • Named after: Julius Caesar
    July (/dʒʊˈlaɪ/ juu-LY) is the seventh month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian Calendars and one of seven months with the length of 31 days. It is, on average, the warmest month in most of the Northern hemisphere (where it is the second month of summer) and the coldest month in much of the Southern hemisphere (where it is the second month of winter). The second half of the year commences in July. In the Southern hemisphere, July is the seasonal equivalent of January in the Northern hemisphere. July starts on the same day of the week as April in a common year, and January in leap years. In a common year no other month ends on the same day as July, while in a leap year July ends on the same day of the week as January. The birthstone for July is a ruby. In the Northern Hemisphere: Previously, it was called Quintilis in Latin, since it was the fifth month in the ancient Roman calendar, which traditionally set March as the beginning of the year before it was changed to January at the time of the decemvirs about 450 BC. The name was then changed by Augustus to honor Julius Caesar, who was born in July. In the ancient Roman calendar the ides of July fell on the 15th day of the
    7.00
    4 votes
    54
    Wayne

    Wayne

    • Named after: Anthony Wayne
    Wayne is an unincorporated community located on the Main Line, centered in Delaware County, Pennsylvania, United States. While the center of Wayne is in Radnor Township, Wayne extends into both Tredyffrin Township in Chester County and Upper Merion Township in Montgomery County. Considering the large area served by the Wayne post office, the community may extend slightly into Easttown Township, Chester County, as well. The center of the Wayne business district is the intersection of Lancaster Avenue and Wayne Avenue, its main street. The historic Wayne station is located one block north of this intersection. The Wayne business district also includes a post office, a cinema, a hotel, a library, the new Radnor Middle School, and several banks, stores, restaurants, cafes, bars and other commercial establishments. Other institutions and attractions in Wayne include the Wayne Hotel, Chanticleer Garden, the Valley Forge Military Academy (with a monument from the Battle of the Bulge located by the parade ground) and the headquarters of Traffic Pulse (NAVTEQ Traffic), a world wide traffic information provider. Wayne was originally named Louella, after founder J. Henry Askin's daughters
    7.00
    4 votes
    55
    Xiu Xiu

    Xiu Xiu

    • Named after: Xiu Xiu: The Sent Down Girl
    Xiu Xiu ( /ˈʃuːʃuː/) is an American avant-garde group originally from San Jose, California. The band is the brainchild of singer-songwriter Jamie Stewart, who has been its only constant member since its inception in 2002. As of 2009, his bandmate has been Angela Seo. The band's name is taken from the 1998 Chinese film Xiu Xiu: The Sent Down Girl. Having performed alongside one another in previous acts such as IBOPA (the Indestructible Beat of Palo Alto) and Ten in the Swear Jar, Jamie Stewart and Cory McCulloch formed their third collaborative effort, Xiu Xiu, in 2002. Aided by friends Lauren Andrews and Yvonne Chen – both of whom would contribute to the band's early recordings – Xiu Xiu would tour their first LP Knife Play, and its successor EP, Chapel of the Chimes, throughout the years 2001 and 2002, blending both melody and cacophony with a heavy reliance on percussive instrumentation and brass instrumentation. Following 2002, the group would shrink in membership as Yvonne Chen left in order to focus on her vegan boutique Otsu and self-published magazine Zum, while Cory McCulloch also stopped touring, focusing instead on producing the band's next two LPs. A personal loss would
    7.00
    4 votes
    56

    Columbia County

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbia County is a county located in the US state of Georgia along the Savannah River. As of the 2010 census the population was 124,053 a growth of 38.9% from the 2000 census figure of 89,288. The de jure county seat is Appling. Appling is an unincorporated area, making Columbia one of only three counties in Georgia to have an unincorporated county seat. The de facto county seat, the location of Columbia County's government and courts, is Evans, also an unincorporated area. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 307.78 square miles (797.1 km), of which 290.01 square miles (751.1 km) (or 94.23%) is land and 17.76 square miles (46.0 km) (or 5.77%) is water. Columbia County is also located just north of the Augusta-Richmond County. As of the census of 2000, there were 89,288 people, 31,120 households, and 25,362 families residing in the county. The population density was 308 people per square mile (119/km²). There were 33,321 housing units at an average density of 115 per square mile (44/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 82.67% White, 11.21% Black or African American, 0.32% Native American, 3.36% Asian (0.6% of the Asians are of South Asian descent),
    8.00
    3 votes
    57

    Florence Nightingale School of Nursing and Midwifery

    • Named after: Florence Nightingale
    The Florence Nightingale School of Nursing and Midwifery is a school within King's College London. It is primarily concerned with the education of people to become nurses and midwives. It also carries out nursing research, continuing professional development and postgraduate programmes. The School has a history which dates back to the first ever school of nursing opened by Florence Nightingale at St. Thomas' Hospital on 9 July 1860. The School forms part of the Waterloo campus on the South Bank of the River Thames and is now one of the largest schools in the university.
    8.00
    3 votes
    58

    Martin Luther King Middle School

    • Named after: Martin Luther King, Jr.
    Martin Luther King Middle School (commonly MLK or King) is a public middle school in Berkeley, California serving grades 6-8. King is one of three middle schools in the Berkeley Unified School District, which includes Willard Middle School, and Longfellow Middle School. Its address is 1781 Rose Street. MLK was originally named Garfield Junior High School after U.S. President James A. Garfield. It was renamed for the civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. a few years after his assassination in 1968. Garfield was established in the early 1900s at 1414 Walnut Street, just south of Rose Street. Garfield was moved into new buildings at the present site of MLK in 1922. The original site on Walnut Street was subsequently used for an elementary school (University Elementary School), and later, as the headquarters of the Berkeley Unified School District until the 1970s. The site and buildings are today occupied by the Berkeley Richmond Jewish Community Center. King was originally a junior high school serving grades 7-9. In the 1990s, following multiple school closures and relocations caused by damage from the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, the Berkeley Unified School District's grade
    8.00
    3 votes
    59
    Oxford County

    Oxford County

    • Named after: Oxford
    Oxford County is a county located in the U.S. state of Maine with a population of 57,833 as of the 2010 U.S. census. Its county seat is Paris. Part of Oxford County is included in the Lewiston-Auburn, Maine, metropolitan New England City and Town Area while a different part of Oxford County is included in the Portland-South Portland-Biddeford, Maine, metropolitan New England City and Town Area. Oxford County was formed on 4 March 1805 from northerly portions of York and Cumberland counties. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 2,175.26 square miles (5,633.9 km), of which 2,078.00 square miles (5,382.0 km) (or 95.53%) is land and 97.26 square miles (251.9 km) (or 4.47%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 54,755 people, 22,314 households, and 15,173 families residing in the county. The population density was 26 people per square mile (10/km²). There were 32,295 housing units at an average density of 16 per square mile (6/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 98.25% White, 0.17% Black or African American, 0.28% Native American, 0.37% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.11% from other races, and 0.80% from two or more races. 0.53% of the population
    8.00
    3 votes
    60
    Theodore Roosevelt Island

    Theodore Roosevelt Island

    • Named after: Theodore Roosevelt
    Theodore Roosevelt Island is a 88.5-acre (358,000 m) island and a national memorial located in the Potomac River in Washington, D.C. The island was given to the American people by the Theodore Roosevelt Association in memory of the 26th U.S. president, Theodore Roosevelt; before that, the island had been known as My Lord's Island, Barbadoes Island, Mason's Island, Analostan Island, and Anacostine Island. The island is maintained by the National Park Service as part of the nearby George Washington Memorial Parkway. The land is generally maintained as a natural park, with various trails and a memorial plaza featuring a statue of Roosevelt. No cars or bicycles are permitted on the island, which is reached by a footbridge from Arlington, Virginia, on the western bank of the Potomac. A small island named "Little Island" lies just off the southern tip; Georgetown and the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts are across the main channel of the Potomac to the north and east, respectively. The Nacotchtank Indians, formerly of what is now Anacostia (in Washington, D.C.), temporarily moved to the island in 1668, giving its first recorded name, "Anacostine." The island was patented in
    8.00
    3 votes
    61
    Jefferson High School

    Jefferson High School

    • Named after: Thomas Jefferson
    Jefferson High School is a public high school in Portland, Oregon, founded in 1908. Jefferson opened in September 1908, and received its name at some later date. The school wasn't ready in 1908, but was opened early due to overcrowding. It was finished on February 6, 1910. Hopkin Jenkins was principal at Jefferson from opening until June 1940. Due to the baby boom and passing of a $25 million building levy by the school district in 1947, a new high school was slated. In September 1991, "at least six fires" were set at the school by an arsonist. On January 7, 2008, Mayor Potter relocated City Hall to Jefferson for a week, held a City Council meeting, and delivered State of the City address. The aim was stated to be to "give students, parents and educators a first hand lesson in how government really works - and to showcase the opportunities, successes and challenges facing every school in Portland's six public school districts." In 2009-2010 the school was the only one in Oregon to have a majority of African American students. Only 30% of students live within the school boundaries. In 2009, 18% of students transferred into the school. In 2008, 67% of the school's seniors received
    6.75
    4 votes
    62

    Theodore Roosevelt High School

    • Named after: Theodore Roosevelt
    Theodore Roosevelt High School is a high school in San Antonio, Texas. A part of the North East Independent School District, the school serves portions of San Antonio and the City of Windcrest. It first opened for classes in 1966, funded by a 1960 school district bond that also established Churchill High School and the Blossom Athletic Center. Roosevelt is host to two magnet programs: Roosevelt was named a National Blue Ribbon School in 1999-2000.
    6.75
    4 votes
    63
    Columbia Falls

    Columbia Falls

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbia Falls is a city in Flathead County, Montana, United States. The population was 4,688 at the 2010 census. Columbia Falls is located at 48°22′13″N 114°11′20″W / 48.37028°N 114.18889°W / 48.37028; -114.18889 (48.370379, -114.188943). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.5 square miles (3.9 km), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 3,645 people, 1,400 households, and 966 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,402.9 people per square mile (925.9/km²). There were 1,470 housing units at an average density of 969.1 per square mile (373.4/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 96.27% White, 0.25% African American, 1.23% Native American, 0.49% Asian, 0.08% Pacific Islander, 0.41% from other races, and 1.26% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.84% of the population. There were 1,400 households out of which 36.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.0% were married couples living together, 12.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.0% were non-families. 25.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.0% had someone living alone who
    9.00
    2 votes
    64
    James Tiptree, Jr. Award

    James Tiptree, Jr. Award

    • Named after: James Tiptree, Jr
    The James Tiptree, Jr. Award is an annual literary prize for works of science fiction or fantasy that expand or explore one's understanding of gender. It was initiated in February 1991 by science fiction authors Pat Murphy and Karen Joy Fowler, subsequent to a discussion at WisCon. The award is named for Alice B. Sheldon, who wrote under the pseudonym James Tiptree, Jr. By choosing a masculine nom de plume, having her stories accepted under that name and winning awards with them, Sheldon helped demonstrate that the division between male and female science fiction writing was illusory. Years after "Tiptree" first published science fiction, Sheldon wrote some work under the female pen name "Raccoona Sheldon"; later, the science fiction world discovered that "Tiptree" had been female all along. This discovery led to widespread discussion over which aspects of writing, if any, have an intrinsic gender. To remind audiences of the role gender plays in both reading and writing, the award was named in Sheldon's honor at the suggestion of Karen Joy Fowler. Fundraising efforts for the Tiptree include publications (two cookbooks), "feminist bake sales", and auctions. (The Tiptree cookbook The
    9.00
    2 votes
    65
    Jeffersonia

    Jeffersonia

    • Named after: Thomas Jefferson
    Jeffersonia which is also known as twinleaf or rheumatism root, is a small genus of herbaceous perennial plants in the family Berberidaceae. The two species are native to eastern Asia and eastern North America. They are uncommon spring wildflowers, which grow in limestone soils of rich deciduous forests. Jeffersonia was named for United States President Thomas Jefferson, by his contemporary Benjamin Smith Barton. This genus was formerly, incorrectly grouped in genus Podophyllum. Twinleaf is protected by state laws as a threatened or endangered plant in Georgia, Iowa, New York, and New Jersey. The leaves and flowers of this plant are smooth and emerge directly from the rhizome at base of the plant. Jeffersonia has showy white flowers with eight petals; the flower resembles Bloodroot. The short-lived flower appears in April or May, before the forest canopy appears (see spring emphemeral). The fruit is a green pear-shaped capsule with a hinged top. The characteristic leaves are large and nearly divided in half, giving rise to its common name, twinleaf. Plants in this genus rarely grow taller than 12 inches (30 cm). As with many other deciduous forest plants, the seeds are dispersed by
    9.00
    2 votes
    66
    They Might Be Giants

    They Might Be Giants

    • Named after: They Might Be Giants
    They Might Be Giants (sometimes abbreviated as TMBG) is an American alternative band formed in 1982 by John Flansburgh and John Linnell. During TMBG's early years Flansburgh and Linnell were frequently accompanied by a drum machine. In the early 1990s, TMBG became a full band. Currently, the members of TMBG are Flansburgh, Linnell, Marty Beller, Dan Miller, and Danny Weinkauf. They are best known for an unconventional and experimental style of alternative music. Over their career, the group has found success on the modern rock and CMJ charts. More recently they have found success in children's music, and in theme music for several television programs and films. TMBG have released 15 studio albums. Flood has been certified platinum and their children's music album Here Come the ABCs has been certified gold. The band has won two Grammy Awards, one in 2002 for their song "Boss of Me", which served as the theme to Malcolm in the Middle. They won their second in 2009 for their album Here Come the 123s. The band has sold over 4 million records. Linnell and Flansburgh first met as teenagers growing up in Lincoln, Massachusetts. They began writing songs together while attending
    9.00
    2 votes
    67
    Bloomers

    Bloomers

    • Named after: Amelia Bloomer
    Bloomers is a word which has been applied to several types of divided women's garments for the lower body at various times. The original bloomers were an article of women's clothing invented by Elizabeth Smith Miller of Peterboro, New York an early pioneer of the vulcanized rubber girdle, but popularized by Amelia Bloomer in the early 1850s (hence the name, a shortening of "Bloomer suit"). They were long baggy pants narrowing to a cuff at the ankles (worn below a skirt), intended to preserve Victorian decency while being less of a hindrance to women's activities than the long full skirts of the period (see Victorian dress reform). They were worn by a few women in the 1850s, but were widely ridiculed in the press, and failed to become commonly accepted (see 1850s in fashion). Bloomer was an insult made up by the newspapers of the time. British explorer Richard Francis Burton, travelling across the United States in 1860 noted that he saw only one woman (whom he called a "hermaphrodite") wearing bloomers. The costume was called the "American Dress" or "Reform Costume" by the women's activists that wore it. Most of the women who wore the costume were deeply involved in dress reform,
    7.67
    3 votes
    68
    Colombia

    Colombia

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Colombia ( /kəˈlʌmbiə/ kə-LUM-biə, or /kəˈlɒmbiə/ kə-LOM-biə), officially the Republic of Colombia (Spanish: República de Colombia [reˈpuβlika ðe koˈlombja]), is a unitary constitutional republic comprising thirty-two departments. The country is located in northwestern South America, bordered to the northwest by Panama; to the north by the Caribbean Sea; to the east by Venezuela and Brazil; to the south by Ecuador and Peru; and to the west by the Pacific Ocean. Colombia is the 26th largest country by area and the fourth largest in South America after Brazil, Argentina and Peru. With over 46 million people, Colombia is the 27th largest country in the world by population and has the second largest population of any Spanish-speaking country in the world, after Mexico. Colombia is a middle power, and is now the fourth largest economy in Latin America, and the third largest in South America. Colombia produces coffee, flowers, emeralds, coal, and oil. These products comprise the primary sector of the economy. The territory of what is now Colombia was originally inhabited by indigenous peoples including the Muisca, Quimbaya, and Tairona. The Spanish arrived in 1499 and initiated a period
    7.67
    3 votes
    69

    Columbia County

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbia County is a county located in the U.S. state of Washington. As of the 2010 census, the population was 4,078. The county seat is at Dayton, which is also the county's largest city. It is named after the Columbia River. Columbia County was created out of Walla Walla County on November 11, 1875. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 874 square miles (2,263.6 km), of which 869 square miles (2,250.7 km) is land and 5 square miles (12.9 km) (0.54%) is water. It is part of the Palouse, a wide and rolling prairie-like region of the middle Columbia basin. As of the census of 2000, there were 4,064 people, 1,687 households, and 1,138 families residing in the county. The population density was 5 people per square mile (2/km²). There were 2,018 housing units at an average density of 2 per square mile (1/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 93.73% White, 0.22% Black or African American, 0.96% Native American, 0.42% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 2.73% from other races, and 1.89% from two or more races. 6.35% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 19.6% were of German, 18.2% United States or American, 14.3% English and 8.3% Irish
    7.67
    3 votes
    70
    Madison Avenue

    Madison Avenue

    • Named after: James Madison
    Madison Avenue is a north-south avenue in the borough of Manhattan in New York City, United States, that carries northbound one-way traffic. It runs from Madison Square (at 23rd Street) to the Madison Avenue Bridge at 138th Street. In doing so, it passes through Midtown, the Upper East Side (including Carnegie Hill), Spanish Harlem, and Harlem. It is named after and arises from Madison Square, which is itself named after James Madison, the fourth President of the United States. Since the 1920s, the street's name has been synonymous with the American advertising industry. Madison Avenue was not part of the original New York City street grid established in the Commissioners' Plan of 1811, and was carved between Park Avenue (formerly Fourth) and Fifth Avenue in 1836, due to the effort of lawyer and real estate developer Samuel B. Ruggles, a graduate of Yale University who had previously purchased and developed New York's Gramercy Park in 1831, who was in part responsible for the development of Union Square, and who also named Lexington Avenue. Madison Avenue carries one-way traffic uptown (northbound) from East 23rd Street to East 135th Street, with the changeover from two-way traffic
    7.67
    3 votes
    71

    Martin Luther King, Jr. High School

    • Named after: Martin Luther King, Jr.
    Martin Luther King, Jr. High School is a public high school located in Cleveland, Ohio. It is part of the Cleveland Metropolitan School District. The school nickname is the Crusaders. The school was built in 1972. Like many schools that opened in the 10 years after his 1968 assassination, the school was named after Martin Luther King, Jr.. This school is a big help for those students who are interested in the medical industry. The classes are hands on experiences which will prepare teens for college. The school has two "Small Schools" located in it:
    7.67
    3 votes
    72
    Alexandria

    Alexandria

    • Named after: Alexander the Great
    Alexandria is the second-largest city of Egypt, with a population of 4.1 million, extending about 32 km (20 mi) along the coast of the Mediterranean Sea in the north central part of the country. It is also the largest city lying directly on the Mediterranean coast. Alexandria is Egypt's largest seaport, serving approximately 80% of Egypt's imports and exports. Alexandria is also an important tourist resort. It is home to the Bibliotheca Alexandrina (the new Library of Alexandria). It is an important industrial center because of its natural gas and oil pipelines from Suez. Alexandria was founded around a small pharaonic town c. 331 BC by Alexander the Great. It remained Egypt's capital for nearly a thousand years, until the Muslim conquest of Egypt in AD 641, when a new capital was founded at Fustat (Fustat was later absorbed into Cairo). Ancient Alexandria was best known for its Lighthouse of Alexandria (Pharos), one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World; its library (the largest library in the ancient world); and the Catacombs of Kom el Shoqafa, one of the Seven Wonders of the Middle Ages. Ongoing maritime archaeology in the harbor of Alexandria, which began in 1994, is
    10.00
    1 votes
    73

    Cirith Ungol

    • Named after: Cirith Ungol
    Cirith Ungol was a Californian heavy metal band who formed in 1972 and split up in May 1992. They drew influences from other metal groups such as Black Sabbath and Thin Lizzy, as well as Iggy and the Stooges. Their first album, Frost and Fire, was closer to a hybrid between 1970s hard rock and metal with songs written by then bassist and guitarist Greg Lindstrom and drummer Robert Garven, but from King of the Dead and onwards they played a progressive rock influenced brand of doom metal with songs primarily written by vocalist Tim Baker. The band began with Greg Lindstrom, Robert Garven, Jerry Fogle and Pat Galligan (who would later go on to play guitar for Angry Samoans) playing in their first band "Titanic" in high school. With a desire to play heavier music, the rest of the band dumped Pat and reformed in 1972 as Cirith Ungol with Neal Beattie on vocals. It was not until 1980 that they were signed by Enigma and released their first record Frost and Fire with Tim Baker on vocals. After their fourth album Paradise Lost, they split up due to frustration caused by problems with their new record company. The year 2001 saw the light of a new Cirith Ungol album which contained old and
    10.00
    1 votes
    74
    Flinders Ranges

    Flinders Ranges

    • Named after: Matthew Flinders
    Flinders Ranges is the largest mountain range in South Australia, which starts approximately 200 km (120 mi) north-west of Adelaide. The discontinuous ranges stretch for over 430 km (270 mi) from Port Pirie to Lake Callabonna. Its most characteristic landmark is Wilpena Pound, a large, sickle-shaped, natural amphitheatre covering nearly 80 square kilometres (31 sq mi), containing the range's highest peak, St Mary Peak (1,170 m (3,840 ft)) and adjoining the Flinders Ranges National Park. The northern ranges host the Arkaroola wilderness sanctuary and the Vulkathunha-Gammon Ranges National Park. The southern part of the ranges are notable for the Pichi Richi scenic railway and Mount Remarkable National Park. Several small areas in the Flinders Ranges are protected as National Parks. These include the Flinders Ranges National Park near Wilpena Pound and the Mount Remarkable National Park in the southern part of the ranges near Melrose. The Arkaroola Wilderness Sanctuary is a scenic protected area at the northern end of the ranges. In addition, the Dutchman's Stern Conservation Park, west of Quorn and the Mount Brown Conservation Park, south of Quorn, are protected areas of the ranges.
    10.00
    1 votes
    75

    Jefferson High School

    • Named after: Thomas Jefferson
    For schools with a similar name, see Jefferson High School. Thomas Jefferson High School is a public high school in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. It is the eighth largest high school in Iowa. The school's mascot is Jeffy the J-Hawk and the official school colors are Columbia Blue and white. Jefferson currently has 170 staff members, and 1610 students. The student to teacher ratio is 16:1. Jefferson offers four years of French, German, Japanese, and Spanish. All four languages also offer an AP replacement for 4th year. Jefferson has 22 Varsity level sports and is one of 14 schools that participate in the Mississippi Valley Conference. Jefferson offers multiple instrumental programs, including marching band, three concert bands, one jazz band, and two pep bands. They also offer six choirs, and two show choirs. In addition, Jefferson has five orchestra programs. In addition to varsity sports, there are numerous other Extra-Curricular Activities for students, including math team, National Honor Society, theater, DECA, and a gay-straight alliance Jefferson's Academic Decathlon team is led by John Wojtowicz. The team has won the state championship fourteen of the past fifteen years and placed
    10.00
    1 votes
    76

    Roald Dahl Children's Gallery

    • Named after: Roald Dahl
    The Roald Dahl Children's Gallery is in Church Street, Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, England. A children's museum in honour of Roald Dahl, it was opened on 23 November 1996 by Terence Hardiman, an actor popular with children due to his role as the titular role in The Demon Headmaster. The building was previously a coach-house. Broadly speaking, it is a children's museum that uses characters and themes from Roald Dahl's books to stimulate children's interest in science, history and literature. The Roald Dahl theme is further emphasised by the use of Quentin Blake to provide the graphical elements of the museum. Blake, a celebrated children's author and illustrator, is strongly associated with Dahl through his covers and illustrations for almost all modern UK editions of Dahl's books. The museum has won two major awards for education. Aylesbury hosts the Roald Dahl Festival, a procession of giant puppets based on his characters, on July 2. Roald Dahl Children's Gallery
    10.00
    1 votes
    77
    Roosevelt Island

    Roosevelt Island

    • Named after: Franklin D. Roosevelt
    Roosevelt Island — known as Welfare Island from 1921 to 1973, and before that Blackwell's Island — is a narrow island in the East River of New York City. It lies between the island of Manhattan to its west and the borough of Queens to its east. Running from Manhattan's East 46th to East 85th Streets, it is about two miles (3 km) long, with a maximum width of 800 feet (240 m), and a total area of 147 acres (0.59 km). The island is part of the Borough of Manhattan (New York County). Together with Mill Rock, Roosevelt Island constitutes Manhattan's Census Tract 238, which has a land area of 0.279 sq mi (0.72 km). and had a population of 9,520 in 2000 according to the US Census. The Roosevelt Island Operating Corporation estimated its population was about 12,000 in 2007. Roosevelt Island is owned by the city, but was leased to the state of New York's Urban Development Corporation for 99 years in 1969. Most of the residential buildings on Roosevelt Island are rental buildings. There is also a cooperative (Rivercross) and a condominium building (Riverwalk). One rental building (Eastwood) has left New York State's Mitchell-Lama Housing Program, though current residents are still
    10.00
    1 votes
    78
    Roosevelt Island, Antarctica

    Roosevelt Island, Antarctica

    • Named after: Franklin D. Roosevelt
    Roosevelt Island is an ice-covered island, about 130 km (81 mi) long in a NW-SE direction, 65 km (40 mi) wide and about 7,500 km (2,896 sq mi) in area, lying in the eastern part of the Ross Ice Shelf of Antarctica. Its central ridge rises to about 550 m (1,804 ft) above sea level, but this and all other elevations of the island are completely covered by ice, so that the island is invisible at ground level. The existence and extent of the island is made clear by examination of how the ice flows above it. It was named by Rear Admiral Richard E. Byrd in 1934 for Franklin D. Roosevelt, then President of the United States. Byrd was the leader of the expedition that discovered the island. Roosevelt Island lies within the boundaries of the Ross Dependency, New Zealand's Antarctic claim.
    10.00
    1 votes
    79
    Washington, D.C.

    Washington, D.C.

    • Named after: George Washington
    Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as Washington, "the District", or simply D.C., is the capital of the United States. On July 16, 1790, the Residence Act approved the creation of a capital district located along the Potomac River on the country's East Coast. As permitted by the U.S. Constitution, the District is under the exclusive jurisdiction of the United States Congress and is therefore not a part of any U.S. state. The states of Maryland and Virginia each donated land to form the federal district, which included the preexisting settlements of Georgetown and Alexandria; however, Congress returned the Virginia portion in 1846. Named in honor of George Washington, the City of Washington was founded in 1791 to serve as the new national capital. Congress created a single municipal government for the whole District of Columbia after the American Civil War. Washington, D.C., had an estimated population of 617,996 in 2011, the 25th most populous place in the United States. Commuters from the surrounding Maryland and Virginia suburbs raise the city's population to over one million during the workweek. The Washington Metropolitan Area, of which
    10.00
    1 votes
    80
    Columbia City

    Columbia City

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbia City is a city in Columbia Township, Whitley County, Indiana, United States. The population was 8,750 at the 2010 census. The city is the county seat of Whitley County. Columbia City is located at 41°9′31″N 85°29′16″W / 41.15861°N 85.48778°W / 41.15861; -85.48778 (41.158569, -85.487784). According to the 2010 census, the city has a total area of 5.60 square miles (14.5 km), of which 5.58 square miles (14.5 km) (or 99.64%) is land and 0.02 square miles (0.052 km) (or 0.36%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 7,077 people, 3,018 households, and 1,874 residing in the city. The population density was 1,359.5 people per square mile (524.5/km²). There were 3,191 housing units at an average density of 613.0 per square mile (236.5/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 98.11% White, 0.32% African American, 0.44% Native American, 0.08% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.34% from other races, and 0.68% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.20% of the population. There were 3,018 households out of which 30.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.8% were married couples living together, 12.4% had a female householder with no
    6.50
    4 votes
    81

    Columbia County

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbia County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oregon. It was named for the Columbia River, which forms its eastern and northern borders. As of 2010, its population was 49,351. The county seat is St. Helens. The primary industries are wood products and paper manufacturing, trade, construction and horticulture. The extensive stands of old growth timber, which had attracted many of the early settlers to the area, were completely logged over by the 1950s. Second-growth timber provides the raw material for local lumber and paper mills. About half the county's workforce commutes out of the county to work, most to the nearby Portland, Oregon metro area. Columbia County's average nonfarm employment was 10,740 in 2007. The five largest private employers in Columbia County are Fred Meyer, Armstrong World Industries, Wal-Mart, Boise Paper, and USG. The county is governed by an elected board of three commissioners. Each commissioner is elected to a term of four years. Other elected officials include the Sheriff, County Clerk, District Attorney, Treasurer, Surveyor, Assessor and Justice of the Peace. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 688 square miles
    6.50
    4 votes
    82
    Ecuador

    Ecuador

    • Named after: Equator
    Ecuador (/ˈɛkwədɔr/ E-kwə-dawr), officially the Republic of Ecuador (Spanish: República del Ecuador [reˈpuβlika ðel ekwaˈðor], which literally translates as "Republic of the Equator") is a representative democratic republic in South America, bordered by Colombia on the north, Peru on the east and south, and by the Pacific Ocean to the west. It is one of only two countries in South America, along with Chile, that do not have a border with Brazil. The country also includes the Galápagos Islands in the Pacific, about 1,000 kilometres (620 mi) west of the mainland. The main spoken language in Ecuador is Spanish (94% of the population). Languages of official use in native communities include Quichua, Shuar, and 11 other languages. Ecuador has an area of 275,830 km (106,500 sq mi). Its capital city is Quito, which was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in the 1970s for having the best preserved and least altered historic center in Latin America. The country's largest city is Guayaquil. With its international port and tuna fishing industry, Manta is the third most important city in the country economically. The historic center of Cuenca, the third largest city in the country, was
    6.50
    4 votes
    83
    Columbia Heights

    Columbia Heights

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbia Heights is a neighborhood in central Washington, D.C. Located in the Northwest quadrant of Washington, D.C., Columbia Heights borders the neighborhoods of Shaw, Adams Morgan, Mount Pleasant, Park View, Pleasant Plains, and Petworth. On the eastern side is Howard University. The streets defining the neighborhood's boundaries are 16th Street to the west; Spring Road to the north; 11th Street to the east; and Florida Avenue to the south. It is served by a subway station stop on the Washington Metro Green and Yellow Lines. Once farmland on the estate of the Holmead family (called "Pleasant Plains"), Columbia Heights was part of Washington County, District of Columbia (within the District but outside the borders of the city of Washington; the southern edge of Columbia Heights is Florida Avenue, which was originally called "Boundary Street" because it formed the northern boundary of the Federal City). In 1815 an engraver from England, William J. Stone, purchased a 121-acre tract of the Holmead estate — east of Seventh Street Road (present-day Georgia Avenue), and north of Boundary Street — and established his own estate known as the Stone Farm. Nearby, construction of the first
    5.60
    5 votes
    84
    Columbia

    Columbia

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbia is a town in and the parish seat of Caldwell Parish, Louisiana, United States. The population was 477 at the 2000 census. Columbia is located at 32°6′15″N 92°4′37″W / 32.10417°N 92.07694°W / 32.10417; -92.07694 (32.104042, -92.076921). According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 0.8 square miles (2.1 km), of which, 0.8 square miles (2.1 km) of it is land and 1.30% is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 477 people, 184 households, and 101 families residing in the town. The population density was 629.9 people per square mile (242.3/km²). There were 237 housing units at an average density of 312.9 per square mile (120.4/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 70.02% White, 27.25% African American, 0.63% Native American, 1.47% Asian, 0.42% from other races, and 0.21% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.42% of the population. There were 184 households out of which 21.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 40.8% were married couples living together, 12.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 44.6% were non-families. 41.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 20.1%
    8.50
    2 votes
    85
    Division of Flinders

    Division of Flinders

    • Named after: Matthew Flinders
    The Division of Flinders is an Australian Electoral Division in Victoria. The division was one of the original 75 divisions contested at the first federal election. It is named for Matthew Flinders, the first man to circumnavigate Australia, and the person credited with giving Australia her name. Originally a country seat south and east of Melbourne, Flinders has been gradually cut back to the outer southern suburbs on the Mornington Peninsula, including Dromana, Hastings and Portsea. It has usually been a fairly safe seat for the Liberal Party and its predecessors, who have held it for all but six years since its creation. However, it has occasionally been won by the Australian Labor Party, notably in 1929 when Prime Minister Stanley Bruce was defeated. This was the first time an Australian Prime Minister has lost his own seat at a general election. (The only other such instance was the defeat of Liberal Prime Minister John Howard in his seat of Bennelong, also by Labor, in the 2007 federal election.) Other prominent members include former Deputy Liberal leaders Sir Phillip Lynch and Peter Reith.
    8.50
    2 votes
    86
    French ship Romulus

    French ship Romulus

    • Named after: Romulus and Remus
    The Romulus was a Téméraire class 74-gun ship of the line of the French Navy. In February 1814, under captain Rolland, she sailed from Toulon to Genoa, being part of a division under Julien Cosmao. On 13, she was engaged by three British ships of the line, notably HMS Boyne and HMS Caledonia, and managed to escape to Toulon by sailing close to the coast to avoid being surrounded. By 1821, she had been razéed into a frigate, and renamed Guerrière. She was captained by Commander Jean-Léon Émeric. She was eventually broken up in 1840.
    8.50
    2 votes
    87
    Jupiter

    Jupiter

    • Named after: Zeus
    Jupiter is the fifth planet from the Sun and the largest planet in the Solar System. It is a gas giant with mass one-thousandth that of the Sun but is two and a half times the mass of all the other planets in our Solar System combined. Jupiter is classified as a gas giant along with Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. Together, these four planets are sometimes referred to as the Jovian or outer planets. The planet was known by astronomers of ancient times, and was associated with the mythology and religious beliefs of many cultures. The Romans named the planet after the Roman god Jupiter. When viewed from Earth, Jupiter can reach an apparent magnitude of −2.94, making it on average the third-brightest object in the night sky after the Moon and Venus. (Mars can briefly match Jupiter's brightness at certain points in its orbit.) Jupiter is primarily composed of hydrogen with a quarter of its mass being helium, although helium only comprises about a tenth of the number of molecules. It may also have a rocky core of heavier elements, but like the other gas giants, Jupiter lacks a well-defined solid surface. Because of its rapid rotation, the planet's shape is that of an oblate spheroid (it
    8.50
    2 votes
    88

    Wayne

    • Named after: Anthony Wayne
    Wayne is a city in Wayne County in the U.S. state of Michigan, southwest of Detroit. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 17,593. Ford Motor Company has two plants here; Wayne Stamping & Assembly and the Michigan Assembly Plant, formerly known as Michigan Truck Plant. The Michigan Assembly Plant began manufacturing the third generation, North American Ford Focus on December 14, 2010. As of 2006, Downtown Wayne began to undergo a revitalization & growth program, with the assistance of Andrews University - Urban Design Studio. Completed projects have included the new fire station on Wayne Road, the new police station on Michigan Ave, and the new Department of Public Works on Forest. Plans in the program includes adding Wayne as a Transit Department train stop on Washington Street. In 2006, the Downtown Development Authority launched several beautification projects including streetscape and parking lot improvements and three City-operated hiking trails which border the city. Wayne was first settled in the 1820s. Soon a hamlet began to develop known as Derby’s Corners. In 1836 the name of the settlement was changed to Wayne in honor of General Anthony Wayne. In 1869 Wayne was
    8.50
    2 votes
    89
    Columbia Heights

    Columbia Heights

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbia Heights is a city in Anoka County, Minnesota, United States. The population was 19,496 at the 2010 census. Columbia Heights was formed as a village on March 14, 1898 when it separated from Fridley Township. On July 21, 1921 the Charter of the City of Columbia Heights was adopted and the city was formed. Minnesota State Highways 47 (University Avenue) and 65 (Central Avenue) are two of the main arterial routes in the city. Columbia Heights is a first-ring northern suburb of Minneapolis, which it borders on the south. Its downtown district is centered on the corner 40th Avenue NE and Central Avenue, and includes the Heights Theater, county offices, the Public Library, and a variety of businesses. Central Avenue forms a commercial district along its length. More businesses line University Avenue. Columbia Heights, the Heights Jamboree, Hylander, and many other references to the city and Minnesota appear in Pat Proft's 1998 film Wrongfully Accused. A Polish flag and white eagle are on the sign marking the border between Columbia Heights and Minneapolis, visible when entering Columbia Heights on Central Avenue, in celebration of the suburb's early roots as a Polish-American
    7.33
    3 votes
    90
    Columbus

    Columbus

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbus is a village in Luna County, New Mexico, United States. The population was 1,765 at the 2000 census. The town is named after 15th century explorer Christopher Columbus. On March 9, 1916, on the orders of Mexican revolutionary leader Francisco "Pancho" Villa, (Colonel) Francisco Beltrán, (Colonel) Candelario Cervantes, (General) Nicolás Fernández, (General) Pablo López and others led five hundred men in an attack against the town, which was garrisoned by a detachment of the U.S. 13th Cavalry Regiment. Villa's army burned a part of the town and killed seven or eight soldiers and 10 residents before retreating back into Mexico. United States President Woodrow Wilson responded to the Columbus raid by sending 10,000 troops under Brigadier General John J. Pershing to Mexico to pursue Villa. This was known as the Punitive Mexican Expedition or Pancho Villa Expedition. The expedition was eventually called off after failing to find Villa, who had successfully escaped. In July 2011, Columbus dissolved its police force, due to a gun smuggling scandal that involved its village officials and others. The Mayor, a village trustee, a former police chief, and nine other people were
    7.33
    3 votes
    91
    Columbus City

    Columbus City

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbus City is a city in Louisa County, Iowa, United States. The population was 391 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Muscatine Micropolitan Statistical Area. Columbus City is located at 41°15′30″N 91°22′33″W / 41.25833°N 91.37583°W / 41.25833; -91.37583 (41.258225, -91.375711). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.24 square miles (0.62 km), all of it land. As of the census of 2010, there were 391 people, 146 households, and 99 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,629.2 inhabitants per square mile (629.0 /km). There were 155 housing units at an average density of 645.8 per square mile (249.3 /km). The racial makeup of the city was 74.2% White, 3.1% Asian, 22.0% from other races, and 0.8% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 41.9% of the population. There were 146 households out of which 32.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.4% were married couples living together, 9.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.8% had a male householder with no wife present, and 32.2% were non-families. 24.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.4% had
    7.33
    3 votes
    92
    Eisley

    Eisley

    • Named after: Mos Eisley
    Eisley is a rock band from Tyler, Texas, consisting of four siblings (Chauntelle, Sherri, Stacy, and Weston) and their cousin (Garron), all of whom were born and live in Texas. Although the band's name translates to ice island in several Germanic languages, it was actually selected by the bandmates because of its link to the Star Wars saga (i.e. Mos Eisley). The band was formed in 1997 when Chauntelle and Sherri began creating music together after having been inspired by bands like the Beatles, Jeremy Enigk, and Radiohead. Younger sister Stacy (who was then 8 years old) became frustrated over their insistence that she was too young to be a part of the band and wrote her own song without their help before she was inducted. Their brother Weston (who was then 10 years old) soon joined the band as the drummer. Jonathan Wilson, a family friend, was brought on to play bass. Boyd and Kim Dupree, parents of the four DuPree siblings, ran a venue called Brewtones Coffee Galaxy by occupying the space of their church on days when it was not in use. Eisley, then known as the Towheads, began years of service as the house band, giving them their first exposure. At Brewtones, the band played with
    7.33
    3 votes
    93

    Eudora

    • Named after: Eudora Welty
    Eudora /juːˈdɔərə/ is an e-mail client used on the Apple Macintosh and Microsoft Windows operating systems. It also supports several palmtop computing platforms, including Newton and the Palm OS. The software was named after American author Eudora Welty, because of her short story Why I Live at the P.O. Eudora was developed in 1988 by Steve Dorner, who worked at the Computer Services Organization of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Eudora was acquired by Qualcomm in 1991. In 2006 Qualcomm stopped development of the commercial version, and sponsored the creation of a new open-source version based on Mozilla Thunderbird, code-named Penelope. Originally distributed for free, Eudora was commercialized and offered in a Light (freeware) and Pro (commercial) product. Between 2003 and 2006, the full-featured Pro version was also available as a "Sponsored mode" (adware) distribution. Eudora (6.0.1) added support for Bayesian filtering of spam with a feature called SpamWatch. Eudora (6.2) added a scam watch feature that flags suspicious links within e-mails in an attempt to thwart phishing. Eudora (7.0) added Ultra-Fast Search, which finds any emails using single or multiple
    7.33
    3 votes
    94
    Florence Nightingale

    Florence Nightingale

    • Named after: Florence
    Florence Nightingale OM, RRC ( /ˈflɒrəns ˈnaɪtɨŋɡeɪl/; 12 May 1820 – 13 August 1910) was a celebrated English nurse, writer and statistician. She came to prominence for her pioneering work in nursing during the Crimean War, where she tended to wounded soldiers. She was dubbed "The Lady with the Lamp" after her habit of making rounds at night. Nightingale laid the foundation of professional nursing with the establishment, in 1860, of her nursing school at St Thomas' Hospital in London, the first secular nursing school in the world, now part of King's College London. The Nightingale Pledge taken by new nurses was named in her honour, and the annual International Nurses Day is celebrated around the world on her birthday. Florence Nightingale was born into a rich, upper-class, well-connected British family at the Villa Colombaia, near the Porta Romana at Bellosguardo in Florence, Italy, and was named after the city of her birth. Florence's older sister Frances Parthenope had similarly been named after her place of birth, Parthenopolis, a Greek settlement now part of the city of Naples. Her parents were William Edward Nightingale, born William Edward Shore (1794–1874) and Frances
    7.33
    3 votes
    95
    Roosevelt

    Roosevelt

    • Named after: Theodore Roosevelt
    Roosevelt is a neighborhood in north Seattle, Washington. Its main thoroughfare, originally 10th Avenue, was renamed Roosevelt Way upon Theodore Roosevelt's death in 1919. The neighborhood received his name as the result of a Community Club contest held eight years later, in 1927. Roosevelt's principal and minor arterials are the one-way pair Roosevelt Way (southbound) and 12th Avenue NE (northbound), Lake City Way (SR 522) and 15th Avenue NE, and NE 65th and 75th Streets. City streets are laid out and designated in a pattern; see street layout of Seattle, directionals. The boundaries of the neighborhood are Interstate 5 to the west, beyond which lies Green Lake; NE Ravenna Boulevard and NE 60th Street to the south, beyond which is the University District; 15th Avenue NE to the east, beyond which is Ravenna; and Lake City Way (SR 522) to the north, beyond which lies Maple Leaf, (map). The Roosevelt district is also home to Roosevelt High School (RHS, opened 1922), one of the older schools in the Seattle School District. Like the street, it is named after Teddy, not Franklin D. Roosevelt. For many years, Roosevelt High School and Garfield High School juggled the lead in the school
    7.33
    3 votes
    96
    USS Florence Nightingale

    USS Florence Nightingale

    • Named after: Florence Nightingale
    USS Florence Nightingale (AP-70) was an Elizabeth C. Stanton-class transport ship of the United States Navy. She was named for Florence Nightingale (1820–1910), the nursing pioneer, and is one of the few United States Navy ships named after a woman. Florence Nightingale was launched on 28 August 1940 by Moore Shipbuilding and Drydock Company, Oakland, California, as Mormacsun; sponsored by Miss Carlotta S. Chapman. Delivered to Moore McCormack Lines in May 1941, she was acquired by the War Shipping Administration on 20 December 1941, and acquired by the US Navy on 13 September 1942, and commissioned on 17 September 1942, Captain E. D. Graves, Jr., in command. Florence Nightingale sailed from Norfolk on 23 October 1942 in the task force bound for the invasion of North Africa, and between 8–15 November lay off Port Lyautey, Morocco, landing troops and cargo. Returning to Norfolk on 30 November, she made two voyages to Algeria, carrying reinforcements and cargo out, and prisoners of war back, returning to New York from the second, on 11 March 1943. After brief overhaul and exercising in Chesapeake Bay, Florence Nightingale sailed from Norfolk on 8 June with troops for the invasion of
    7.33
    3 votes
    97
    Mathmos

    Mathmos

    • Named after: Matmos
    Mathmos is a British company that sells lighting products, most famously the lava lamp invented by its founder Edward Craven Walker. It is headquartered in its factory in Poole, Dorset. The Astro lamp or lava lamp as it is sometimes known, was invented around 1963 by Edward Craven Walker. He licensed the product to a number of overseas markets whilst continuing to manufacture for the European market himself under the original name of the company, Crestworth. The rights to produce and sell the lamp on the American market were sold to Lava Simplex International, in 1966, and the lamp became an icon of its decade; Haggerty Enterprises now has the rights, in America, but has closed the American factory and now has them made in China. In Europe Craven-Walker’s original lava lamp designs have been in continuous production since the early 1960s and are still made today by Mathmos in Poole, Dorset, UK. The Mathmos lava lamp formula developed initially by Craven-Walker in the 1960s and then improved with his help in the 1990s is still used. Mathmos’ lava lamp sales have been through a number of ups and downs. After selling millions of lamps worldwide in the 1960s and 70s they did not revive
    6.25
    4 votes
    98
    Amerigo Vespucci

    Amerigo Vespucci

    • Named after: Amerigo Vespucci
    The Amerigo Vespucci is a tall ship of the Marina Militare, named after the explorer Amerigo Vespucci. Its home port is Livorno, Italy, and it is in use as a school ship. In 1925, the Regia Marina ordered two school ships to a design by General Lieutenant Francesco Rotundi of the Italian Navy Engineering Corps, inspired by the style of large late 18th century 74-cannon ships of the line (like the neapolitan ship "Monarca"). The first, the Cristoforo Colombo, was put into service in 1928 and was used by the Italian Navy until 1943. After World War II, this ship was handed over to the USSR as part of the war reparations and was shortly afterwards decommissioned. The second ship was the Amerigo Vespucci, built in 1930 at the (formerly Royal) Naval Shipyard of Castellammare di Stabia (Naples). She was launched on February 22, 1931, and put into service in July of that year. The vessel is a full rigged three-masted steel hull 82.4 m (270.34 ft) long, with an overall length of 101 m (331 ft) including the bowsprit and a maximum width of 15.5 m (51 ft). She has a draught of about seven metres (23 ft) and a displacement at full load of 4146 tons. Under auxiliary diesel-electric propulsion
    7.00
    3 votes
    99
    Columbia

    Columbia

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbia is a town in Houston County, Alabama, United States. It is part of the Dothan, Alabama Metropolitan Statistical Area. At the 2000 census the population was 804. Founded in 1820, Columbia served as a major trading center for communities throughout the Wiregrass Region of Alabama between 1822-1833. Bordering the State of Georgia and the Chattahoochee River, Columbia was a major port-of-call for steamboats and was known to many as "Old Columbia". The town was incorporated in 1880 and was the center of education, culture, commerce, and trade. It was the county seat of Henry County which then comprised portions of present day Covington, Dale, Barbour, Coffee, Crenshaw, Bullock, Geneva, and Houston counties. Columbia was the largest town in the area during the 19th century and remains one of the area's oldest continuously operating municipalities. Columbia received its first cotton textile mill in 1891 and its first electric plant in 1892. A branch of the Henry County Courthouse was located here from 1889 until Columbia became part of Houston County in 1903. Columbia got electric street lights in 1900 and its first electric utility company in 1914. At the turn of the 19th to
    7.00
    3 votes
    100
    Columbia

    Columbia

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbia is a town in Tyrrell County, North Carolina, United States. The population was 819 at the 2000 census. It is the county seat of Tyrrell County. The Albemarle-Pamlico Peninsula is located in northeastern North Carolina, inshore of Nags Head and the Outer Banks in the Inner Banks region. The peninsula is framed by Albemarle Sound to the north, Alligator River to the east, and the Scuppernong River to the west. In addition to the Scuppernong River, Tyrrell County is bordered on the north by the Albemarle Sound, one of the East Coast's largest estuarine systems, and to the east by the Alligator River. According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 0.5 square miles (1.3 km), all land. Tyrrell County was formed in 1729 from Chowan, Bertie, Currituck and Pasquotank counties. Named for Sir John Tyrrell, one of the Lords Proprietors of the Carolina colony. Tyrrell County's original boundaries originally stretched westward from Roanoke Island to near present-day Tarboro. In 1870 the territory was divided and resulted in what is now known as Tyrrell, Martin, Washington, and Dare counties. Elizabethtown, later renamed Columbia, was established on the
    7.00
    3 votes
    101
    Columbia

    Columbia

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbia is an unincorporated community in Marion County, Iowa, United States.
    7.00
    3 votes
    102

    Columbia County

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbia County is a county located in the U.S. state of Florida. As of 2000, the population was 56,513. The U.S. Census Bureau 2005 estimate for the county is 64,040 . Its county seat is Lake City, Florida. The Lake City Micropolitan Statistical Area includes all of Columbia County. Columbia County was created in 1832. For the origin of its name, see Columbia. In 1958, the Columbia Amateur Radio Society was formed. This was a group of amateur radio operators that enjoyed the ability to communicate all over the world. This radio club still exists today. As of the census of 2000, there were 56,513 people, 20,925 households, and 14,919 families residing in the county. The population density was 71 people per square mile (27/km²). There were 23,579 housing units at an average density of 30 per square mile (11/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 79.72% White, 17.03% Black or African American, 0.53% Native American, 0.67% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.60% from other races, and 1.42% from two or more races. 2.74% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 20,925 households out of which 32.10% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.70% were
    7.00
    3 votes
    103

    Columbia Township

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbia Township is a civil township of Van Buren County in the U.S. state of Michigan. The population was 2,714 at the 2000 census. Columbia Township is a largely rural area with many farms. It is also home to several lakes with a significant percentage of the population living on them, frequently retirees from Chicago. Many summer lake cottages are owned by families with roots in the Chicago area. There are three settlements in the township, none of them large. The Kal-Haven Trail State Park goes through Columbia Township in an east-west direction, passing through both Berlamont and Grand Junction. According to the United States Census Bureau, the township has a total area of 35.5 square miles (92 km), of which, 34.1 square miles (88 km) of it is land and 1.4 square miles (3.6 km) of it (3.81%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 2,714 people, 981 households, and 722 families residing in the township. The population density was 79.6 per square mile (30.7/km²). There were 1,433 housing units at an average density of 42.0 per square mile (16.2/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 88.91% White, 3.06% African American, 1.03% Native American, 0.15% Asian, 4.64% from
    7.00
    3 votes
    104

    Eleanor Roosevelt Award for Human Rights

    • Named after: Eleanor Roosevelt
    The Eleanor Roosevelt Award for Human Rights was established in 1998 by the President of the United States Bill Clinton, honoring outstanding American promoters of rights in the United States. The award was first awarded on the 50th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, honoring Eleanor Roosevelt's role as the "driving force" in the development of the UN's Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The award was presented from 1998 to the end of the Clinton Administration in 2001. In 2005 the American Rights at Work organization, issued the Eleanor Roosevelt Human Rights Award. 1998 1999 2000 2001 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
    7.00
    3 votes
    105
    Flinders Island, Tasmania

    Flinders Island, Tasmania

    • Named after: Matthew Flinders
    Flinders Island is an island in Bass Strait. It is 20 kilometres (12 mi) from Cape Portland, the north-eastern tip of Tasmania, Australia and is the largest island in the Furneaux Group. Flinders Island was first colonised at least 35,000 years ago, when people made their way across the then-land bridge which is now Bass Strait. A population remained until about 4500 years ago, succumbing to thirst and hunger following an acute El Nino climate shift. Some of the south-eastern islands of the Furneaux Group where first recorded in 1773 by British navigator Tobias Furneaux, commander of HMS Adventure, the support vessel with James Cook on Cook’s second voyage. In February 1798 British navigator Matthew Flinders charted some of the southern islands, using one of the schooner Francis' open boats. Later that year, Flinders returned and finished charting the islands in the Norfolk, he then went on to complete the first circumnavigation of Tasmania [1798-99], accompanied by George Bass, proving Tasmania to be an island separated from the Australian mainland by Bass Strait, later named in honour of George Bass. James Cook named the islands, Furneaux’s Islands, after Tobias Furneaux.
    7.00
    3 votes
    106
    GNU/Linux

    GNU/Linux

    • Named after: Linus Torvalds
    Linux (/ˈlɪnəks/ LIN-əks or /ˈlɪnʊks/ LIN-uuks) is a Unix-like computer operating system assembled under the model of free and open source software development and distribution. The defining component of Linux is the Linux kernel, an operating system kernel first released 5 October 1991 by Linus Torvalds. Linux was originally developed as a free operating system for Intel x86-based personal computers. It has since been ported to more computer hardware platforms than any other operating system. It is a leading operating system on servers and other big iron systems such as mainframe computers and supercomputers: more than 90% of today's 500 fastest supercomputers run some variant of Linux, including the 10 fastest. Linux also runs on embedded systems (devices where the operating system is typically built into the firmware and highly tailored to the system) such as mobile phones, tablet computers, network routers, televisions and video game consoles; the Android system in wide use on mobile devices is built on the Linux kernel. The development of Linux is one of the most prominent examples of free and open source software collaboration: the underlying source code may be used,
    7.00
    3 votes
    107
    Hugo Awards

    Hugo Awards

    • Named after: Hugo Gernsback
    The Hugo Awards are a set of awards given annually for the best science fiction or fantasy works and achievements of the previous year. The awards are named after Hugo Gernsback, the founder of the pioneering science fiction magazine Amazing Stories, and were officially named the Science Fiction Achievement Awards until 1992. Organized and overseen by the World Science Fiction Society, the awards are given each year at the annual World Science Fiction Convention as the central focus of the event. They were first given in 1953, at the 11th World Science Fiction Convention, and have been awarded every year since 1955. Over the years that the award has been given, the categories presented have changed; currently Hugo Awards are given in more than a dozen categories, and include both written and dramatic works of various types. One of the most prestigious science fiction awards, the Hugo Awards have been termed as "among the highest honors bestowed in science fiction and fantasy writing". Works that have won have been published in special collections, and the official logo of the Hugo Awards is often placed on the winning books' cover as a promotional tool. The 2012 awards were
    7.00
    3 votes
    108
    USS Constitution

    USS Constitution

    • Named after: United States Constitution
    The keel of a Lexington-class battlecruiser, to have been named USS Constitution (CC-5), was laid down at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in September 1920. Her construction was suspended in February 1922 by the Washington Naval Treaty and she was formally canceled in August 1923, with her hull being scrapped on the building ways. Constitution was some 13.4 percent complete at the time of her cancellation. During this period the original Constitution was renamed Old Constitution to free the name for the new battle cruiser.
    7.00
    3 votes
    109
    Eleanor Roosevelt College

    Eleanor Roosevelt College

    • Named after: Eleanor Roosevelt
    Eleanor Roosevelt College (ERC or, less frequently, Roosevelt) is one of the six colleges located on the campus at the University of California, San Diego. The college was named after former American First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, who was a humanitarian as well as a champion of international cooperation and a major member of the early United Nations. Preparations to add a fifth college to UCSD began in 1985 when its Preliminary Planning Committee was formed. The Committee's report recommended a college focused on comparative culture studies and was approved by the Academic Senate in May 1986. In March 1987, James Lyon was appointed as Founding Provost of Fifth College (UCSD's colleges use a numeric name until a proper name is chosen). In 1988, Fifth College formally accepted its first class and opened using the "Camp Snoopy" residence halls in the Pepper Canyon area of campus. Many originally suggested that the college be named "International College" in light of its cross-cultural emphasis. Fifth College was officially named Eleanor Roosevelt College in a dedication ceremony on January 26, 1995, beating out over sixty other suggestions including Amelia Earhart, Cesar Chavez, and
    6.00
    4 votes
    110
    Simón Bolívar International Airport

    Simón Bolívar International Airport

    • Named after: Simón Bolívar
    Simón Bolívar International Airport of Maiquetia (IATA: CCS, ICAO: SVMI) (Spanish: Aeropuerto Internacional de Maiquetia Simón Bolívar) is an international airport located in Maiquetía, Venezuela, about 13 miles (21 kilometers) from downtown Caracas. Simply called 'Maiquetia' by the local population, it is the top international air passenger gateway to Venezuela among the twelve international airports in the country. From 1960 to 1997 it was the main hub for VIASA, Venezuela's former flag carrier till the air carrier went bankrupt. It handles flights to many important cities in the Americas, the Caribbean, Europe and the Middle East. Since 2000 the airport has been undergoing major changes in order to meet international standards and to improve passenger traffic, security, immigration areas and customs areas. Security measures have become top priority since the 9/11 events, and now departure areas and arrival areas are completely split into the lower and upper levels of the airport. As part of an expansion plan new international gates are currently in construction and a section of the parking area has been cleared to build an airport hotel. Maiquetia airport has two terminals:
    6.00
    4 votes
    111
    Theodore Roosevelt High School

    Theodore Roosevelt High School

    • Named after: Theodore Roosevelt
    Theodore Roosevelt High School was a public high school located in The Bronx, New York City, United States. It was first organized November 14, 1918. When Theodore Roosevelt died on January 6, 1919, the Board of Education decided to give the school his name. The school's sports teams are known as Rough Riders, in honor of the 1st United States Volunteer Cavalry, the unit organized by Colonel (later President) Roosevelt. The school mascot is the teddy bear. First opened in 1919, the school served for several years as a vocational school and academic courses in the mid-1920s. As the South Bronx suffered from decay in the 1970s, Roosevelt saw an increase in truancy and disorder and a decrease in academic achievement. During the 1990s, the school briefly enjoyed a renaissance under the leadership of Principal Thelma Baxter, who made efforts to get Roosevelt students to stay in school. In 1996, the school was removed from the state's list of failing schools, and the New York Daily News proclaimed, "Roosevelt HS turns corner." In 1999, Baxter was promoted to superintendent in Harlem's District 5, and in 2000, Roosevelt returned to the list of failing schools, with a four-year graduation
    6.00
    4 votes
    112

    Theodore Roosevelt High School

    • Named after: Theodore Roosevelt
    Theodore Roosevelt High School (RHS), is located in Fresno, California. It is a high school established within the Fresno Unified School District. The high school mascot is the Rough Rider (in physical form it is a horse) named after the 1st U.S. Volunteer Cavalry Regiment Theodore Roosevelt organized and helped command during the Spanish-American War. The high schools colors are green and gold. The school was opened in 1928, and was both a junior and senior high school. It now only serves grades 9-12. Every fall RHS holds the "Little Big Game" (a.k.a. "Pig Game"), a football game that is played between Roosevelt and longstanding rival and fellow historic high school Fresno High. RHS is located in south central Fresno, near Fresno's historic downtown district. Roughly 2700 students attended RHS in 2006. This number is down substantially from the 1990s when RHS often housed upwards of 4000 students. Many of its students are immigrants from Mexico and Southeast Asia. 36.59% of the student population are English learners. Below are rough figures of the student population. RHS has many programs to serve its students, including AVID tutoring, IRS Business Academy, Powerschool and
    6.00
    4 votes
    113
    Amon Amarth

    Amon Amarth

    • Named after: Orodruin
    Amon Amarth is a melodic death metal band from Tumba, Sweden founded in 1992. It takes its name from the Sindarin name of Mount Doom, a volcano in J. R. R. Tolkien′s Middle-earth. Their lyrics mostly deal with the Vikings, their mythology and their history. The band comprises vocalist Johan Hegg, guitarists Olavi Mikkonen and Johan Söderberg, bassist Ted Lundström and drummer Fredrik Andersson. Amon Amarth has released eight studio albums, one EP, one DVD, and seven music videos. Formed in 1988 as Scum by Paul "Themgoroth" Mäkitalo (Dark Funeral) on vocals, Olavi Mikkonen on guitar, Nico Mehra on drums and Vesa Meriläinen guitar, the band originally played grindcore based on "jagged riffs, dark atmospheres, untethered vitriol and copious amounts of mead". Scum made no impression upon the burgeoning Stockholm metal scene, but then Johan Hegg came in: it was his "imposing stature [and] [Thor]-like growl" that were beginning to shape the image and the sound of the band which now started to incorporate Viking-related themes. After a 1991 demo (credited to Scum) the band changed their name to Amon Amarth in 1992 and recorded their first demo Thor Arise (1993). Raw and uneven in sound
    8.00
    2 votes
    114
    Columbia

    Columbia

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbia is a planned community that consists of ten self-contained villages, located in Howard County, Maryland, United States. It began with the idea that a city could enhance its residents' quality of life. Creator and developer James W. Rouse saw the new community in terms of human values, rather than merely economics and engineering. Opened in 1967, Columbia was intended to not only eliminate the inconveniences of then-current subdivision design, but also eliminate racial, religious, and class segregation. Columbia proper consists only of that territory governed by the Columbia Association, but larger areas are included under its name by the U.S. Postal Service and the census. These include several other communities which predate Columbia, including Simpsonville, Atholton, and in the case of the census, Clarksville. The census-designated place had a population of 99,615 in 2010, making it the most populous community in Maryland after Baltimore. In 1962, Community Research and Development board member Melvin Berman took interest in a 1,032 acre parcel of land assembled by land developer Robert Moxley comprising four farm properties from the Carroll, Kahler, Wix, and his uncle
    8.00
    2 votes
    115

    Franklin Delano Roosevelt High School

    • Named after: Franklin D. Roosevelt
    Franklin Delano Roosevelt High School is a public high school located in Hyde Park, New York in Dutchess County. Named for a native son, the school serves about 1,550 students in grades 9 to 12 in the Hyde Park Central School District. The original high school building (now a middle school) was erected as a Depression-era public works project, and graduated its first class in 1941; the original FDR HS may be the only public high school in the United States built under the auspices of, and named for, a sitting president. The building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2011.
    8.00
    2 votes
    116
    Oxford

    Oxford

    • Named after: Oxford
    Oxford is a city in, and the county seat of, Lafayette County, Mississippi, United States. Founded in 1837, it was named after the British university city of Oxford in hopes of having the state university located there, which it did successfully attract. As of the 2010 US Census, the population is 18,916. Oxford is the home of the University of Mississippi, founded in 1848, also commonly known as "Ole Miss." Oxford has been named by USA Today as one of the top six college towns in the nation. It is included in The Best 100 Small Towns in America. Lafayette County consistently leads the state rankings in the lowest unemployment rate per quarter. Oxford City Schools are ranked as "Star" schools, the highest ranking available, and Lafayette County school systems are consistently ranked as "5-star" systems. Oxford and Lafayette County were formed from lands ceded by the Chickasaw in the treaty of Pontotoc Creek in 1832. The county was organized in 1836, and in 1837 three pioneers -- John Martin, John Chisom, and John Craig -- purchased land from Hoka, a female Chickasaw landowner, as a site for the town. They named it Oxford, intending to promote it as a center of learning in the Old
    8.00
    2 votes
    117
    Ponte Amerigo Vespucci

    Ponte Amerigo Vespucci

    • Named after: Amerigo Vespucci
    Ponte Amerigo Vespucci is a bridge over the Arno River in Florence, Italy and named after Florence-born explorer Amerigo Vespucci. It joins the Lungarno Amerigo Vespucci to the Lungarno Soderini. To the east is the Ponte alla Carraia. This bridge, like most of the other bridges over the Arno, is a reconstruction. Plans were made in 1908 to bridge this section of the Arno to service quartiere di San Frediano, but the plans were never realized. In 1949, a bridge, ponte di via Melegnano, was constructed from the recycled remains of other bridges that had been destroyed by the Nazi army as they withdrew before the advancing Allied forces during World War II. Between 1952 and 1954, a competition for the construction of a new bridge was held, and the plan of the architects George Giuseppe Gori, Enzo Gori and Ernesto Nelli and of engineer Riccardo Morandi was chosen. The plan called for three spans in a thin, flat arch over two piers which supports the roadway. The final effect gives the impression of a single, slightly curved span. Construction on the bridge was completed in 1957. It was designed to be reflective of the nearby historical structures but also to be an obviously modern
    8.00
    2 votes
    118

    Columbia

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbia is a city in Monroe and St. Clair County in the U.S. state of Illinois, about 12 miles (19 km) south of St. Louis, Missouri. The population was 7,922 at the 2000 census. The first white settlers to come to the area of Columbia, Illinois, were Frenchmen in the mid-17th century. They named the area in which Columbia was founded L'Aigle, which is French for "The Eagle." In the mid-18th century, the British took over the territory until the Revolutionary War forced them out of the area. The colonial American settlers soon arrived and established the first permanent settlements in the area of Columbia, Fort Whiteside and Fort Piggott. Both forts were made out of log cabins and were used to protect against Indian raids. In 1820, Columbia was plotted out as a town and built on bluffs 500 feet above sea level to protect against the flooding of the Mississippi River. Columbia is a poetic name for the United States. Germans began immigrating to the area around 1833, with the majority coming in the 1840s. United States land agents had traveled to Germany to sell land to emigrating Germans. When the immigrants arrived in the United States, they traveled immediately to their own
    9.00
    1 votes
    119

    Columbus Township

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbus Township is a civil township of Luce County in the U.S. state of Michigan. As of the 2000 census, the township population was 215. According to the United States Census Bureau, the township has a total area of 143.3 square miles (371.1 km²), of which, 140.8 square miles (364.6 km²) of it is land and 2.5 square miles (6.4 km²) of it (1.74%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 215 people, 99 households, and 63 families residing in the township. The population density was 1.5 per square mile (0.6/km²). There were 307 housing units at an average density of 2.2 per square mile (0.8/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 96.28% White, 1.40% Native American, and 2.33% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.47% of the population. There were 99 households out of which 21.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.5% were married couples living together, 2.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.4% were non-families. 31.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.17 and the average family size was 2.72. In
    9.00
    1 votes
    120
    Columbia

    Columbia

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbia is the state capital and largest city in the U.S. state of South Carolina. The population was 129,272 according to the 2010 census. The 2011 United States Census Estimates put the city at 130,591. Columbia is the county seat of Richland County, but a portion of the city extends into neighboring Lexington County. The city is the center of a metropolitan statistical area of 767,598, the largest within the state. The name Columbia was a poetic term for the Americas derived from Christopher Columbus. Located 13 miles (21 km) northwest of South Carolina's geographic center, Columbia is the primary city of the Midlands region of South Carolina, which comprises several counties in the central portion of the state. The city lies at the confluence of two rivers, the Saluda and the Broad, which merge at Columbia to form the Congaree River. CNNMoney.com named Columbia as one of America's 25 best places to retire, and U.S. News & World Report ranked the city sixth on its 2009 America's Best Affordable Places to Retire list. From the creation of Columbia by the South Carolina General Assembly in 1786, the site of Columbia was important to the overall development of the state. The
    6.67
    3 votes
    121
    Columbia Pictures

    Columbia Pictures

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc. (CPII) is an American film production and distribution company. Columbia Pictures now forms part of the Columbia TriStar Motion Picture Group, owned by Sony Pictures Entertainment, a subsidiary of the Japanese conglomerate Sony. It is one of the leading film companies in the world, a member of the so-called Big Six. It was one of the so-called Little Three among the eight major film studios of Hollywood's Golden Age. The studio, founded in 1919 as Cohn-Brandt-Cohn Film Sales by brothers Jack and Harry Cohn and Joe Brandt, released its first feature film in August 1922. It adopted the Columbia Pictures name in 1924 and went public two years later. The name is derived from "Columbia", a national personification of the United States, which is used as the company's logo. In its early years a minor player in Hollywood, Columbia began to grow in the late 1920s, spurred by a successful association with director Frank Capra. With Capra and others, Columbia became one of the primary homes of the screwball comedy. In the 1930s, Columbia's major contract stars were Jean Arthur and Cary Grant (who was shared with RKO Pictures). In the 1940s, Rita Hayworth
    6.67
    3 votes
    122

    Jefferson High School

    • Named after: Thomas Jefferson
    Delphos Jefferson High School is a public high school located in Allen County, Ohio for reporting purposes only. Jefferson High School is physically located in Van Wert County, Ohio. It also serves parts of Van Wert County, Ohio. Delphos City Schools has only one building (Franklin Elementary) located in Allen County, Ohio, and two (Jefferson Middle School and Jefferson High School) located in Van Wert County, Ohio. They are a charter member of the Northwest Conference.
    6.67
    3 votes
    123
    Roosevelt High School

    Roosevelt High School

    • Named after: Theodore Roosevelt
    Roosevelt High School (RHS) is a public school in the Seattle Public Schools district of Seattle, Washington, USA. Founded in the 1920s, Roosevelt continues to be one of the largest schools in the greater Seattle area. The school offers a wide variety of academic courses as well as extracurricular activities. In a yearlong series of reports on RHS, NPR described it as "an above-average school in a below-average school district." The school is named after Theodore Roosevelt; the school's team, the Rough Riders, is named after Roosevelt's famous military regiment. It subsequently gave its name to the Roosevelt neighborhood and nearby Roosevelt Way N.E. The school was designed by the Seattle School District's architect, Floyd Naramore, and constructed in 1921-22. From 2004 to 2006, the building was seismically retrofitted, modernized, and expanded while many of the school's original architectural elements were preserved. During this time classes were held in Lincoln High School. Architects for this work were Bassetti Architects. Roosevelt High School has the only full-time drama program in the Seattle School District . Eight periods of drama are offered per day including directing,
    6.67
    3 votes
    124
    Columbia River

    Columbia River

    • Named after: Columbia Rediviva
    The Columbia River is the largest river in the Pacific Northwest region of North America. The river rises in the Rocky Mountains of British Columbia, Canada. It flows northwest and then south into the U.S. state of Washington, then turns west to form most of the border between Washington and the state of Oregon before emptying into the Pacific Ocean. The river is 1,243 miles (2,000 km) long, and its largest tributary is the Snake River. Its drainage basin is roughly the size of France and extends into seven U.S. states and a Canadian province. By volume, the Columbia is the fourth-largest river in the United States; it has the greatest flow of any North American river draining into the Pacific. The river's heavy flow and its relatively steep gradient gives it tremendous potential for the generation of electricity. The 14 hydroelectric dams on the Columbia's main stem and many more on its tributaries produce more hydroelectric power than those of any other North American river. The Columbia and its tributaries have been central to the region's culture and economy for thousands of years. They have been used for transportation since ancient times, linking the many cultural groups of
    5.75
    4 votes
    125
    Columbus

    Columbus

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbus is a city in Colorado County, Texas, United States, 74 miles (119 km) west of Houston along Interstate 10, on the Colorado River. In 1890, 2,199 people lived in Columbus, Texas; in 1900, there were 1,824 residents. The population was 3,916 as of the 2000 census. It is the county seat of Colorado County. The town's motto is "City of Live Oaks and Live Folks." Columbus is located at 29°42′21″N 96°32′46″W / 29.70583°N 96.54611°W / 29.70583; -96.54611 (29.705822, -96.546223). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 3.9 square miles (10 km²), all land. Columbus was established in 1821, on the legendary site of Montezuma's Indian village by members of Stephen F. Austin's Old Three Hundred. By late December, colonist's Robert H. Kuykendall with his brother Joseph, and Daniel Gilleland had arrived in the area of Columbus. In 1822, settler Benjamin Beason began operating a ferry across the Colorado River known as Beason's Ferry. Columbus would become part of Austin's colony in 1822, when the colony was divided into two districts by Mexican governor José F. Trespalacios. The Mexican government granted the rights to establish a town and locals
    7.50
    2 votes
    126
    Columbus Township

    Columbus Township

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbus Township is a township in Warren County, Pennsylvania, United States. The population was 1,741 at the 2000 census. According to the United States Census Bureau, the township has a total area of 40.6 square miles (105 km), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,741 people, 663 households, and 489 families residing in the township. The population density was 42.9 people per square mile (16.5/km²). There were 733 housing units at an average density of 18.0/sq mi (7.0/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 98.39% White, 0.11% African American, 0.29% Native American, 0.17% from other races, and 1.03% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.34% of the population. There were 663 households out of which 33.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.4% were married couples living together, 8.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.1% were non-families. 20.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.63 and the average family size was 3.03. In the township the population was spread out with 25.4% under
    7.50
    2 votes
    127
    Madison Square

    Madison Square

    • Named after: James Madison
    Madison Square is formed by the intersection of Fifth Avenue and Broadway at 23rd Street in the New York City borough of Manhattan. The square was named for James Madison, fourth President of the United States and the principal author of the United States Constitution. The focus of the square is Madison Square Park, a 6.2 acre (2.5 hectare) public park, which is bounded on the east by Madison Avenue (which starts at the park's southeast corner at 23rd Street); on the south by 23rd Street; on the north by 26th Street; and on the west by Fifth Avenue and Broadway as they cross. The park and the square are at the northern (uptown) end of the Flatiron District neighborhood of Manhattan. The use of "Madison Square" as a name for the neighborhood has fallen off, and it is rarely heard. The neighborhood to the north and west of the park is NoMad ("NOrth of MADison Square Park") and to the north and east is Rose Hill. Madison Square is probably best known around the world for providing the name of Madison Square Garden, a sports arena and its successor which were located just northeast of the park for 47 years, until 1925. The current Madison Square Garden, the fourth such building, is not
    7.50
    2 votes
    128

    The Young Ones

    • Named after: The Young Ones
    The Young Ones is a British sitcom, first broadcast in 1982, which ran for two series on BBC2. Its anarchic, offbeat humour helped bring alternative comedy to television in the 1980s and made household names of its writers and performers. Soon afterwards, it was shown on MTV, one of the first non-music television shows on the fledgling channel. The main characters were four undergraduate students sharing a house: violent punk Vyvyan (Adrian Edmondson), pompous would-be anarchist Rick (Rik Mayall), long-suffering hippie Neil (Nigel Planer), and the suave and diminutive Mike (Christopher Ryan). It also featured Alexei Sayle, who played various members of the Balowski family—most often Jerzei Balowski, the quartet's landlord—and occasional independent characters, such as the train driver in "Bambi" and the Mussolini-lookalike Police Chief in "Cash". The show combined traditional sitcom style with violent slapstick, non sequitur plot turns, and surrealism. These older styles were mixed with the working and lower-middle class attitudes of the growing 1980s alternative comedy boom, in which all the principal performers except Ryan had been involved. Every episode except one featured a
    7.50
    2 votes
    129

    Tim Hortons

    • Named after: Tim Horton
    Tim Hortons Inc. (TSX: THI, NYSE: THI) is a Canadian fast casual restaurant known for its coffee and doughnuts. It is also Canada's largest fast food service with over 3000 stores nationwide. It was founded in 1964 in Hamilton, Ontario, by Canadian hockey player Tim Horton and Jim Charade, after an initial venture in hamburger restaurants. In 1967 Horton partnered with investor Ron Joyce, who assumed control over operations after Tim Horton died in 1974, and expanded the chain into a multi-million dollar franchise. Charade left the organization in 1966 and briefly returned in 1970 and 1993 through 1996. Tim Hortons franchises spread rapidly and eventually overtook McDonald's as Canada's largest food service operator. The company opened twice as many Canadian outlets as McDonald's and system-wide sales also surpassed those of McDonald's Canadian operations as of 2002. The chain accounted for 22.6% of all fast food industry revenues in Canada in 2005. Tim Hortons commands 76% of the Canadian market for baked goods (based on the number of customers served) and holds 62% of the Canadian coffee market (compared to Starbucks, in the number two position, at 7%). As of 1 July 2012, Tim
    7.50
    2 votes
    130
    Wayne

    Wayne

    • Named after: Anthony Wayne
    Wayne is an affluent village in DuPage and Kane County, Illinois. The eastern portion, in DuPage County, is in Wayne Township while the western portion, in Kane County, is in St. Charles Township. The population was 2,137 at the 2000 census. In the late 19th and early 20th century, Wayne was a prominent center of horse breeding and farming research. The community was known for breeding French Percheron horses, a draft horse similar to a Clydesdale. In May 1834, settlers began to move into Wayne Township (believed to be named after Maj. Gen. Anthony Wayne). The first railroad arrived in 1849, and Solomon Dunham arranged for an inn, a general store, and a house to be built east of the Chicago and Northwestern tracks at Army Trail Road, where he became station agent and postmaster for a settlement area named Wayne Station. By 1861, all the land in the township had been settled, with business districts at Wayne Center near present day Fair Oaks Road at Army Trail and Wayne Station, now known as the Village of Wayne. Three railroads etched their way through Wayne Township by 1888, followed by the electric interurban Chicago Aurora and Elgin Railroad in 1903, which also provided
    7.50
    2 votes
    131

    Bal-Sagoth

    • Named after: The Gods of Bal-Sagoth
    Bal-Sagoth is a symphonic black metal band from Sheffield, Yorkshire, England, formed in 1993. Originally formed as an epic/symphonic black metal band with strong death metal elements, vocalist/lyricist Byron Roberts took the name 'Bal-Sagoth' from the Robert E. Howard short story "The Gods of Bal-Sagoth". Their first demo was recorded in 1993, and Bal-Sagoth have since released three albums on Cacophonous Records, and three with Nuclear Blast. Bal-Sagoth was conceived in 1989 by Byron Roberts, in an attempt to form what he called "A sublimely symphonic black/death metal band swathed in a concept of dark fantasy/science fiction and ancient myths & legends." Inspired by such writers and artists as Robert E. Howard, H. P. Lovecraft, Clark Ashton Smith, Edgar Rice Burroughs, J.R.R Tolkien and Jack Kirby, Byron set out to create his own dark fantasy universe, with tales told through epic lyrics and music. After several unsuccessful attempts to launch the project, Byron was introduced to the brothers Chris and Jonny Maudling in 1993, who were also looking to form a serious band. This formed what would become the writing core of the outfit. After several months of rehearsing, and
    6.33
    3 votes
    132

    Bloomington Jefferson High School

    • Named after: Thomas Jefferson
    For schools with a similar name, see Jefferson High School. Thomas Jefferson Senior High School is one of the two high schools in Bloomington, Minnesota, USA Independent School District No. 271. It is located on at 102nd Street and France Avenue on the suburb's southwest side. About 1,600 students attend in grades 9 through 12. The mascot is a Jaguar. Jefferson was named a National Blue Ribbon School of Excellence by the US Department of Education in 2009, although the school has had a solid academic reputation among in the state for some time. After many years in the Lake Conference, in 2010 both Bloomington Jefferson and Bloomington Kennedy High schools became founding members of the South Suburban Conference sponsored by the Minnesota State High School League. League activities include athletics, academic teams, drama, and music. The other high school, John F. Kennedy located at 98th Street and Nicollet Avenue, and Jefferson are intense cross town rivals. Bloomington Jefferson was part of the Lake Conference in the Minnesota State High School League. The 2000-2001 boys hockey team is the subject of the 2003 book Blades of Glory by John Rosengren. The school had been a member of
    6.33
    3 votes
    133
    Columbus Grove

    Columbus Grove

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbus Grove is a village in Putnam County, Ohio, United States. The population was 2,200 at the 2000 census. Columbus Grove is located at 40°55′10″N 84°3′36″W / 40.91944°N 84.06°W / 40.91944; -84.06 (40.919437, -84.059999). According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 1.0 square mile (2.6 km), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 2,200 people, 880 households, and 616 families residing in the village. The population density was 2,144.9 people per square mile (824.7/km²). There were 927 housing units at an average density of 903.8 per square mile (347.5/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 97.50% White, 0.50% Native American, 0.05% Asian, 1.36% from other races, and 0.59% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.73% of the population. There were 880 households out of which 33.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.1% were married couples living together, 12.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.0% were non-families. 27.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or younger. The average household size
    6.33
    3 votes
    134
    Marie Byrd Land

    Marie Byrd Land

    • Named after: Marie Ames Byrd
    Marie Byrd Land is the portion of West Antarctica lying east of the Ross Ice Shelf and the Ross Sea and south of the Pacific Ocean, extending eastward approximately to a line between the head of the Ross Ice Shelf and Eights Coast. It stretches between 158°W and 103°24'W. The inclusion of the area between the Rockefeller Plateau and Eights Coast is based upon the leading role of Rear Admiral Richard E. Byrd in the exploration of this area. The name was originally applied by Admiral Byrd in 1929, in honor of his wife, to the northwestern part of the area, the part that was explored in that year. Because of its remoteness, even by Antarctic standards, most of Marie Byrd Land (the portion east of 150°W) has not been claimed by any sovereign nation. It is by far the largest single unclaimed territory on Earth, with an area of 1,610,000 km (620,000 sq mi) (including Eights Coast, immediately east of Marie Byrd Land). In 1939, United States President Franklin D. Roosevelt instructed members of the United States Antarctic Service Expedition to take steps to claim some of Antarctica as United States territory. Although this appears to have been done by members of this and subsequent
    6.33
    3 votes
    135
    Colombia

    Colombia

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbia is a neighborhood located in Downtown San Diego, California. The neighborhood is largely commercial, however there are a large number of highrise condominium buildings under construction. The Midway Aircraft Carrier Museum and the Maritime Museum are located in this neighborhood. Columbia is located south of Little Italy, north of the Marina District, and west of Core and the Horton District. This district is bordered by Ash Street to the north, F Street to the south, Union Street to the east and the Pacific Ocean to the west. The Santa Fe Depot is served by the Trolley, the Coaster and the Pacific Surfliner. Parts of Columbia are under re-development, including the North Embarcadero Visionary Plan, Navy Broadway Complex and the Embarcadero Circle cruise ship terminal expansion. As of March 16, 2007, there are seven high-rise buildings scheduled for or currently under construction: five of these buildings are condominiums, one is office, and one is a Federal court house; six buildings have more than 20 floors, four buildings have more than 30 floors, and one building has more than 40 floors.
    8.00
    1 votes
    136
    Columbus Junction

    Columbus Junction

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbus Junction is a city in Louisa County, Iowa, United States. The population was 1,899 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Muscatine Micropolitan Statistical Area. A large Tyson food plant is located in the city. Columbus Junction is also home of the historic 'Swinging Bridge'. Columbus Junction began as Clifton. The Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railroad built an east-west line through the area in 1858, with a station at Clifton. When the north-south Burlington, Cedar Rapids and Minnesota railroad was built, in 1870, it crossed the Rock Island at Clifton. The first BCR&M train arrived on Feb. 7, 1870, and the first local business opened the next day, a restaurant and boarding house, in a building moved by rail from Muscatine, Iowa. Just a month later, the town was platted. Columbus City, Iowa had already been established before the railroads came through, and both the Rock Island and the BCR&M had missed Columbus City by over a mile. As both Columbus City and Township had invested in the latter line, they were permitted to name the new town, so it became Columbus Junction. In the summer of 2008, downtown Columbus Junction was badly flooded when the Cedar and Iowa Rivers
    8.00
    1 votes
    137
    Flinders Street, Melbourne

    Flinders Street, Melbourne

    • Named after: Matthew Flinders
    Flinders Street is a notable street in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Running roughly parallel to the Yarra River, Flinders Street forms the southern edge of the Hoddle Grid. It is exactly one mile (1609.344 m) in length and one and half chains (30.1752 m) in width. It is named for the explorer Matthew Flinders, who was (erroneously) credited with discovering Port Phillip at the time of its naming. It extends eastwards as far as Spring Street and the Treasury Gardens, and westwards past Batman's Hill to the Melbourne Docklands. As the closest street to the river, Flinders Street serviced Melbourne's original river port. Customs House, now the site for Victoria's Immigration Museum, is situated on Flinders Street. An overpass was built over the intersection with King Street as part of the construction of Kings Way. It extended from Downie Street to just east of Custom House Lane. The overpass opened in stages with trams using it from early 1960 and other traffic from mid 1960. Many businesses and properties were overshadowed by the overpass which resulted in property values dropping and the closure of hotels, shops and showrooms. Plans to revitalise the area in the early 1960s
    8.00
    1 votes
    138

    Jefferson High School

    • Named after: Thomas Jefferson
    For schools with a similar name, see Jefferson High School. Jefferson High School (often referred to as "Lafayette Jefferson" or "Lafayette Jeff") is a high school located in Lafayette, Indiana, and administered by the Lafayette School Corporation. Its mascot is the Broncho and its school colors are red and black. In a meeting held February 10, 1910, Lafayette's school board decided to proceed with construction of a new school to replace the aging and inadequate Lafayette High School at Sixth and Columbia. The new school, a three-story brick building to be named Jefferson High School, was erected in the block between Ninth, Tenth, Elizabeth and Cincinnati Streets. Jefferson opened its doors to students in January 1912 and was formally dedicated April 2. The old high school building at Sixth and Columbia became a vocational school, with classes beginning July 1, 1913. By the early 1960s, Lafayette's growing population prompted the board to consider either expanding the current school building or constructing a new facility. In 1965 they settled on the latter, and in 1966 a 43-acre (170,000 m) section of land around the Pythian Home on South 18th Street was purchased to accommodate
    8.00
    1 votes
    139
    Jethro Tull

    Jethro Tull

    • Named after: Jethro Tull
    Jethro Tull are a British rock group formed in Luton, Bedfordshire, in December 1967. Their music is characterised by the vocals, acoustic guitar, and flute playing of Ian Anderson, who has led the band since its founding, and the guitar work of Martin Barre, who has been with the band since 1969, after he replaced original guitarist Mick Abrahams. Initially playing blues rock with an experimental flavour, they have also incorporated elements of classical music, folk music, jazz, hard rock and art rock into their music. One of the world's best-selling music artists, the band have sold more than 60 million albums worldwide in a career that has spanned more than forty years. Ian Anderson started his first band, The Blades, in Blackpool, England in 1962. The group featured Anderson on vocals and harmonica, Jeffrey Hammond on bass, John Evans on drums, and a guitarist named either Hipgrave or Michael Stephans. Drummer Barrie Barlow became a member in 1963 after Evans had switched from drums to piano. By 1964 the band had developed into a seven-piece Blue-eyed soul band called The John Evan Band (later The John Evan Smash). By this point Evans had shortened his surname to "Evan" at the
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    140

    Romulus

    • Named after: Romulus and Remus
    Romulus is the outer and larger moon of the main-belt asteroid 87 Sylvia, not to be confused with the directly Sun-orbiting asteroid 10386 Romulus. It follows an almost-circular close-to-equatorial orbit around the parent asteroid. In this respect it is similar to the other moon Remus. Romulus was discovered in February 2001 from the Keck II telescope by Michael E. Brown and Jean-Luc Margot. Its full designation is (87) Sylvia I Romulus; before receiving its name, it was known as S/2001 (87) 1. The moon is named after Romulus, the mythological founder of Rome, one of the twins of Rhea Silvia raised by a wolf. 87 Sylvia has a low density, which indicates that it is probably a rubble pile formed when debris from a collision between its parent body and another asteroid re-accreted gravitationally. Therefore it is likely that both Romulus and Remus, the second of Sylvia's moons, are smaller rubble piles which accreted in orbit around the main body from debris of the same collision. In this case their albedo and density are expected to be similar to Sylvia's. Romulus' orbit is expected to be quite stable − it lies far inside Sylvia's Hill sphere (about 1/50 of Sylvia's Hill radius), but
    8.00
    1 votes
    141
    Thomas Jefferson High School

    Thomas Jefferson High School

    • Named after: Thomas Jefferson
    Thomas Jefferson High School is a secondary school in Dallas, Texas that serves grades 9-12. The school is part of the Dallas Independent School District and is located at 4001 Walnut Hill Lane, Dallas, Texas 75229. The school is named after the third President of the United States, Thomas Jefferson, and locally is known simply as "TJ." The school's colors are Columbia blue and cardinal red and its mascot is the Patriot. Until 1972, the (Confederate) Rebel served as school mascot and the Confederate Battle Flag was a recognized school emblem. The negative associations of both symbols led to a change following desegregation of Dallas schools in the early 1970s. In the 2005-06 school year, the school celebrated its 50th anniversary. In 1987 John Kincaide, the athletic director of DISD, said that the district is prepared to allow Jefferson to be reclassified by the University Interscholastic League (UIL) from athletic class 5A to athletic class 4A; the UIL had the possibility of demoting the school to athletic class 4A as part of its biannual reclassification. Jefferson serves several sections of Dallas, including a portion of Walnut Hill, Walnut Hill Lane and the adjacent residential
    8.00
    1 votes
    142
    USS Theodore Roosevelt

    USS Theodore Roosevelt

    • Named after: Theodore Roosevelt
    USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) (also known by crewmembers as "the Big Stick" or within the navy simply as TR) is the fourth Nimitz-class supercarrier. Her radio call sign is Rough Rider, the name of President Theodore Roosevelt's volunteer cavalry unit during the Spanish-American War. She was launched in 1984, saw her first action during Operation Desert Storm in 1991, and is currently homeported at Newport News Shipyard, Virginia. Roosevelt and those Nimitz-class vessels completed after her have slight structural differences from the earlier carriers (Nimitz and Eisenhower), and improved protection for ordnance storage in her magazines. TR's history began on 30 September 1980, when a contract was awarded for "Hull 624D" to Newport News Shipbuilding. Her keel was laid down on 31 October 1981, with Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger initiating the first weld. On 3 November 1981, Secretary of the Navy John F. Lehman announced that the carrier would be named for the 26th President of the United States, Theodore Roosevelt. TR was the first aircraft carrier to be assembled using modular construction, wherein large modules are independently constructed in "lay-down" areas, prior to
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    1 votes
    143
    Columbia Station

    Columbia Station

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbia Township, also known as Columbia Station or just Columbia, is the easternmost of the eighteen townships of Lorain County, Ohio, United States. Columbia Township is the official government name, while Columbia Station is the post office name, and tends to be the town name used by residents. The post office name was chosen to differentiate the township from other Columbia Townships statewide, located in Hamilton and Meigs Counties. As of the 2000 census, the township had a total population of 6,912 in 2,452 residences. According to the United States Census Bureau, the township has a total area of 25.7 square miles (66.5 km²), of which, 25.3 square miles (65.6 km²) of it is land and 1.34% is water. The west branch of the Rocky River and Plum Creek flow through the township from south to north. Columbia Township is part of Greater Cleveland. Located in eastern Lorain County, it borders the following townships and cities: No municipalities are located in Columbia Township. The township is governed by a three-member board of trustees, who are elected in November of odd-numbered years to a four-year term beginning on the following January 1. Two are elected in the year after the
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    144
    Columbus

    Columbus

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbus is a city in Hickman County, Kentucky, United States. The population was 229 at the 2000 census. Columbus is located at 36°45′37″N 89°6′10″W / 36.76028°N 89.10278°W / 36.76028; -89.10278 (36.760176, -89.102840). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.4 square miles (1.0 km), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 229 people, 95 households, and 60 families residing in the city. The population density was 558.6 people per square mile (215.7/km²). There were 110 housing units at an average density of 268.3 per square mile (103.6/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 77.29% White, 17.90% Black or African American, 2.18% from other races, and 2.62% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.80% of the population. There were 95 households out of which 27.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.5% were married couples living together, 12.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.8% were non-families. 31.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.41 and the average
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    145
    Florence Nightingale Museum

    Florence Nightingale Museum

    • Named after: Florence Nightingale
    The Florence Nightingale Museum is located at St Thomas' Hospital, which faces the Palace of Westminster across the River Thames in South Bank, central London, England. It is open to the public seven days a week. It re-opened on May 12 2010 following an extensive £1.4m refurbishment. The museum tells the real story of the lady with the lamp from her Victorian childhood to her experiences in the Crimean, through to her years as an ardent campaigner for health reform. Florence Nightingale, is recognised as the founder of modern nursing in the United Kingdom. The new museum explains her legacy and also celebrates nursing today. In 1860, four years after her famous involvement in the Crimean War, Nightingale founded the Nightingale Training School for nurses at St. Thomas' Hospital and the museum is located on this site. The new museum is designed around three exciting pavilions which tell her story: Highlights from the Collection include: Audio tours are free with entry and accessed via your own set of stethoscopes. New interactive exhibits have been created to offer different ways of exploring Florence's story and influence. Free creative activities for children are offered during
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    2 votes
    146
    Jello Biafra

    Jello Biafra

    • Named after: Biafra
    Jello Biafra (born Eric Reed Boucher; June 17, 1958, Boulder, Colorado, United States) is the former lead singer and songwriter for San Francisco punk rock band Dead Kennedys, and is currently a musician and spoken word artist. After he left Dead Kennedys, he took over the influential independent record label Alternative Tentacles, which he had co-founded in 1979 with Dead Kennedys bandmate East Bay Ray. Although now focused primarily on spoken word, he has continued as a musician in numerous collaborations. Politically, Biafra is a member of the Green Party of the United States and actively supports various political causes. He ran for the party's Presidential nomination in 2000, finishing second to Ralph Nader. He is a staunch believer in a free society, who utilizes shock value and advocates direct action and pranksterism in the name of political causes. Biafra is known to use absurdist media tactics, in the leftist tradition of the Yippies, to highlight issues of civil rights and social justice. Eric Boucher was born in Boulder, Colorado, to parents Stanley Boucher, a psychiatric social worker and poet, and Virginia Boucher, a librarian. He also had a sister, Julie J. Boucher,
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    2 votes
    147
    Simon Bolívar Symphony Orchestra

    Simon Bolívar Symphony Orchestra

    • Named after: Simón Bolívar
    The Orquesta Sinfónica Simón Bolívar (Simón Bolívar Symphony Orchestra) is a Venezuelan orchestra. Named after the Venezuelan national hero Simón Bolívar, it is the apex of the nation's system of youth orchestras. The orchestras are run under the auspices of the Fundación Musical Simón Bolívar (FMSB), formerly known as the Fundacion del Estado para el Sistema Nacional de las Orquestas Juveniles e Infantiles de Venezuela, known colloquially as El Sistema. The economist José Antonio Abreu established the orchestra on 12 February 1975. Based in Caracas, the orchestra moved home in 2007 from the Teresa Carreño Cultural Complex to a new Center for Social Action Through Music nearby. The name of the center reflects that fact that El Sistema sees itself as a social agency. Gustavo Dudamel has been the orchestra's artistic director since 1999. The orchestra has worked with many famous conductors including Claudio Abbado. By 2011 the Simón Bolívar Symphony Orchestra was no longer officially a youth orchestra because the average age of the players had risen too high. As its country's national youth orchestra, it has been replaced by its younger sibling, the Teresa Carreño Youth Orchestra. In
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    148
    Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology

    Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology

    • Named after: Thomas Jefferson
    Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology (TJHSST, TJ, Jefferson) is a Virginia state-chartered magnet school located within Fairfax County, Virginia, United States. It is a regional high school operated by Fairfax County Public Schools (FCPS). As a publicly funded and administered high school with selective admissions, TJHSST is often compared with notable public magnet schools, although it did get rid of non-application based admission after the class of 1988. Attendance at TJ is open to students in six local jurisdictions based on an admissions test, prior academic achievement, recommendations and essays. The selective admissions program was initiated in 1985 through the cooperation of state and county governments, as well as corporate sponsorship from the defense and technology industries. TJHSST occupies the building of the previously FCPS non-selective Thomas Jefferson High School (constructed in 1965). TJHSST is one of 18 Virginia Governor's Schools, and a founding member of the National Consortium for Specialized Secondary Schools of Mathematics, Science and Technology. U.S. News & World Report ranked the school the best public high school in the nation from
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    149

    USS Theodore Roosevelt

    • Named after: Theodore Roosevelt
    The first USS Theodore Roosevelt (ID-1478) was a United States Navy troop transport in commission from 1918 to 1919. SS Theodore Roosevelt was a passenger steamer built in 1906 at Toledo, Ohio, by the Toledo Shipbuilding Company, and operated commercially on Lake Michigan. Ordered taken over by the U.S. Navy on 6 April 1918 for World War I service as a troop stransport, she was acquired by the United States Navy from the Roosevelt Steamship Company sometime in the spring of 1918, assigned Identification Number (Id. No.) 1478, and fitted out as a troop transport during the summer and fall of 1918. Though some sources suggest that Theodore Roosevelt served in a non-commissioned capacity in the Navy, the fact that the 1919 Navy Directory lists Lieutenant Harry D. Irwin, USNRF, as "...comdg U.S.S. Roosevelt..." is a strong indication that she was in fact commissioned as USS Theodore Roosevelt (ID-1478) during 1918. By 1 November 1918, Theodore Roosevelt was assigned to duty as a transport carrying troops back and forth across the English Channel between the United Kingdom and France. She continued that duty at least until 1 April 1919 and probably returned to the United States sometime
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    150
    Columbia

    Columbia

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbia is a city in Maury County, Tennessee, United States. The 2008 population was 34,402 according to U.S. Census Bureau estimates. It is the county seat of Maury County. The town is notable for being the self-proclaimed "Mule capital of the world" and honors this with Mule Day, a large celebration held annually in April. Columbia is also the home of the national headquarters for the Sons of Confederate Veterans. Columbia is located at 35°36′54″N 87°2′40″W / 35.615°N 87.04444°W / 35.615; -87.04444 (35.615022, -87.044464). It is nestled along the banks of the Duck River at the southern edge of the Nashville Basin with the higher elevated ridges of the Highland Rim located to the south and west of the city. The Duck River is the longest river located entirely within the state of Tennessee. Free flowing for most of its length, the Duck River is home to over 50 species of freshwater mussels and 151 species of fish, making it the most biologically diverse river in North America. It enters the city of Manchester and meets its confluence with a major tributary, The Little Duck River, at Old Stone Fort State Park, named after an ancient Native American structure between the two
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    151
    Columbus

    Columbus

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbus is a city in and the county seat of Muscogee County, Georgia, United States, with which it is consolidated. As of the 2010 census, the city had a population of 189,885. It is the principal city of the Columbus, Georgia metropolitan area, which had a 2011 estimated population of 301,439, according to the US Census. It joins with the Auburn, Alabama metropolitan area to form the Columbus, Georgia-Auburn, Alabama Combined Statistical Area, which had a 2011 estimated population of 466,089. It is the third largest city and fourth largest metropolitan area in the state, and also the 123rd largest city in the United States. Columbus lies 100 miles (160 km) south of Atlanta. Fort Benning, a major employer, is located south of the city in Chattahoochee County. The city is home to museums and other tourism sites. The area is served by the Columbus Airport. The current mayor is Teresa Tomlinson, who was elected in November 2010. The city was ranked number 4 on the 100 Best U.S. Cities to live by Best Life Magazine. Founded in 1828 by an act of the Georgia Legislature, Columbus was situated at the beginning of the navigable portion of the Chattahoochee River and on the last stretch of
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    152

    Columbia County

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbia County is a county located in the U.S. state of New York. As of the 2010 census, the population was 63,096. The county seat is Hudson. The name comes from the Latin feminine form of the name of Christopher Columbus, which was at the time of the formation of the county a popular proposal for the name of the United States of America. Columbia County is part of the Albany-Schenectady-Amsterdam, NY Combined Statistical Area. The first known European exploration of Columbia County was in 1609, when Henry Hudson, an explorer, sailed across the Atlantic, and up the Hudson River. An accident to his craft forced him to stop at what is now known as Columbia County, and search around for food and supplies. The Americans that had lived there were the Mohican Indians. In 1612, a trade was established to colonize regions of the land. This led to the creation of Fort Orange (today Albany) and New Amsterdam (today the New York City). This allowed traders to stop along the shores of the Hudson, which led to the growth of small settlements that were intended to supply the trader's ships with supplies. In 1649, the region of land near Claverack was purchased and in 1667, more land was
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    153

    Martin Luther King, Sr.

    • Named after: Martin Luther
    Martin Luther King, Sr. (born Michael King; December 19, 1899 – November 11, 1984) was a Baptist pastor, missionary, and an early leader in the American Civil Rights Movement. He was also the father of Martin Luther King, Jr. King, Sr. led the Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia and became a leader of the civil rights movement, as the head of the NAACP chapter in Atlanta and of the Civic and Political League. He encouraged his son to become active in the movement. King was a member of the Baptist Church and decided to become a preacher after being inspired by ministers who were prepared to stand up for racial equality. He left Stockbridge for Atlanta, where his sister Woodie was boarding with Reverend A.D. Williams, then pastor of the Ebenezer Baptist Church. He attented Dillard University for a two year degree. After King started courting Williams' daughter, Alberta, her family encouraged him to finish his education and to become a preacher. King completed his high school education at Bryant Preparatory School, and began to preach in several black churches in Atlanta. In 1926, King started his ministerial degree at the Morehouse School of Religion. On Thanksgiving Day in
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    3 votes
    154
    Oxford County

    Oxford County

    • Named after: Oxford
    Oxford County is a regional municipality and census division of the Canadian province of Ontario, located in the Southwestern portion of the province. The regional seat is in Woodstock. Oxford County has functioned as a regional municipality since 2001, despite still containing the word county in its official title. Oxford County comprises In 1788, the Hesse District was established within Upper Canada covering the territory of what is today southwestern Ontario. Four years later it became the Western District with the establishment of Norfolk County which included the territory of present-day Oxford County. In 1793, Abraham Canfield a United Empire Loyalist from Connecticut, settled in the "Township of Oxford on the Thames". In 1798, these lands were included into a new London District. The Brock District, containing the Oxford County territory, was then split off from the London District in 1840, after Upper Canada had been replaced by the Canada West portion of the Province of Canada governance. The boundaries of Oxford county for most of its existence were established in 1850 with the implementation of the Baldwin Act. In 1855, Norwich Township in the county's southeast was
    5.67
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    155
    Sandwich

    Sandwich

    • Named after: John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich
    A sandwich is a food item, consisting of two or more slices of bread with one or more fillings between them, Sandwiches are a widely popular type of lunch food, typically taken to work, school, or picnics to be eaten as part of a packed lunch. They generally contain a combination of salad vegetables, meat, cheese, and a variety of sauces or savoury spreads. The bread can be used as it is, or it can be coated with any condiments to enhance flavour and texture. They are widely sold in restaurants and cafes. The sandwich is the namesake of John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich. The ancient Jewish sage Hillel the Elder is said to have wrapped meat from the Paschal lamb and bitter herbs between two pieces of old-fashioned soft matzah, flat, unleavened bread, during Passover in the manner of a modern sandwich wrap made with flatbread. Flat breads of only slightly varying kinds have long been used to scoop or wrap small amounts of food en route from platter to mouth throughout Western Asia and northern Africa. From Morocco to Ethiopia to India, bread is baked in flat rounds, contrasting with the European loaf tradition. During the Middle Ages in Europe, thick slabs of coarse and usually
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    3 votes
    156

    James Madison University

    • Named after: James Madison
    James Madison University (also known as JMU, Madison, or James Madison) is a public coeducational research university located in Harrisonburg, Virginia, U.S. Founded in 1908 as the State Normal and Industrial School for Women at Harrisonburg, the university has undergone four name changes before settling with James Madison University. The university is situated in the Shenandoah Valley, with the campus quadrangle located on South Main Street in Harrisonburg. Founded in 1908 as a women's college, James Madison University was established by the Virginia General Assembly. It was originally called The State Normal and Industrial School for Women at Harrisonburg. In 1914, the name of the university was changed to the State Normal School for Women at Harrisonburg. At first, academic offerings included only today's equivalent of technical training or junior college courses; however authorization to award bachelor's degrees was granted in 1916. During this initial period of development, the campus plan was established and six buildings were constructed. The university became the State Teachers College at Harrisonburg in 1924 and continued under that name until 1938, when it was named
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    157
    Martin Luther King Bridge

    Martin Luther King Bridge

    • Named after: Martin Luther King, Jr.
    The Martin Luther King Bridge (formerly known as the Veterans Bridge) in St. Louis is a cantilever truss bridge of about 4,000 feet (1,200 m) in total length across the Mississippi River, connecting St. Louis with East St. Louis, Illinois. The bridge serves as traffic relief connecting the concurrent freeways of Interstate 55, Interstate 70, Interstate 64, and U.S. Route 40 with the downtown streets of St. Louis. The bridge was built in 1951 as the Veterans' Memorial Bridge to relieve congestion on the MacArthur Bridge to the south and was built as a toll bridge and was owned by the City of East St. Louis. At one time, it carried U.S. Route 40 and U.S. Route 66 across the river. In 1967, the bridge fell into disrepair when the (free) Poplar Street Bridge was constructed, and traffic began to use that route, leading to declining toll revenues. Eventually, ownership was transferred dually to the Missouri and Illinois Departments of Transportation and the bridge was renamed after Martin Luther King, Jr in 1968. In 1987, the toll was removed. A bi-state project for about 24,000,000 USD to renovate the bridge at the behest of local civic and government leaders was carried out in the
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    2 votes
    158
    Mount Madison

    Mount Madison

    • Named after: James Madison
    Mount Madison is a mountain in the Presidential Range of New Hampshire in the United States. It is named after the fourth U.S. President, James Madison. Mountains in the Presidential Range are named for U.S. presidents, with the tallest mountain (Mt. Washington) named for the first president, the second tallest (Mt. Adams) for the second president, and so on. However due to a surveying error, Mt. Monroe, named after the fifth President, James Monroe, is actually 22 feet (6.7 m) taller than Mt. Madison. There are many hiking trails on Mount Madison. A stretch of the Appalachian Trail traverses just below its summit on the Osgood Trail. The Madison Spring Hut, maintained by the Appalachian Mountain Club, is nestled between Mount Madison and Mount Adams and provides rustic lodging in the summer. Reservations generally need to be made far in advance. Mount Madison is the northernmost mountain in the Presidential Range. Like most of the mountains of the Presidential Range, the summit of Mount Madison is above treeline. Due to high winds and low temperatures, hypothermia is a danger even in the summer.
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    159
    Space Shuttle Columbia

    Space Shuttle Columbia

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Space Shuttle Columbia (NASA Orbiter Vehicle Designation: OV-102) was the first spaceworthy Space Shuttle in NASA's orbital fleet. First launched on the STS-1 mission, the first of the Space Shuttle program, it completed 27 missions before disintegrating during re-entry on February 1, 2003 near the end of its 28th, STS-107. The destruction of the orbiter killed all those on board. Construction began on Columbia in 1975 at Rockwell International's (formerly North American Aviation/North American Rockwell, now Boeing North America) principal assembly facility in Palmdale, California, a suburb of Los Angeles. Columbia was named after the historical poetic name for the United States of America, like the explorer ship of Captain Robert Gray and the Command Module of Apollo 11, the first manned landing on another celestial body. Also, Columbia was the female symbol of the U.S. After construction, the orbiter arrived at Kennedy Space Center on March 25, 1979, to prepare for its first launch. Columbia was originally scheduled to lift off in late 1979, however the launch date was delayed by problems with both the SSME components, as well as the thermal protection system (TPS). On March 19,
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    160
    Thomas Jefferson University

    Thomas Jefferson University

    • Named after: Thomas Jefferson
    Thomas Jefferson University is a private health sciences university in Center City, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in the United States. The university consists of six constituent colleges and schools, Jefferson Medical College, Jefferson College of Graduate Studies, Jefferson School of Health Professions, Jefferson School of Nursing, Jefferson School of Pharmacy, and Jefferson School of Population Health. In 2011, the medical college (JMC) was ranked #42 among the nation's medical schools by U.S. News & World Report. During the early 19th century, several attempts to create a second medical school in Philadelphia had been stymied, largely due to the efforts of University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine alumni In an attempt to circumvent that opposition, a group of Philadelphia physicians led by Dr. George McClellan sent a letter to the trustees of Jefferson College in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania (now Washington & Jefferson College) in 1824, asking the College to establish a medical department in Philadelphia. The trustees agreed, establishing the Medical Department of Jefferson College in Philadelphia. In spite of a vigorous challenge, the Pennsylvania General Assembly granted an
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    2 votes
    161
    Thursday

    Thursday

    • Named after: Thor
    Thursday (/ˈθɜrzdi/ or /ˈθɜrzdeɪ/) is the fourth or fifth day of the week. According to the ISO 8601 international standard adopted in most western countries, it is the fourth day of the week. In countries that use the Sunday-first convention Thursday is defined as the fifth day of the week. It is the fifth day of the week in the Judeo-Christian calendar as well, and was defined so in the ancient Mesopotamian and biblical calendars. It falls between Wednesday and Friday. The name is derived from Old English Þūnresdæg and Middle English Thuresday, which means "Thor's day". The contemporary name comes from the Old English Þunresdæg, "Thunor's Day" (with loss of -n-, first in northern dialects, from influence of Old Norse Þorsdagr, meaning "Thor's Day"). Thunor and Thor are derived from the Proto-Germanic god Thunraz, god of thunder, while German Donnerstag is derived from Donar (see Donar Oak). See Week-day names for more on naming conventions. In most Romance languages, the day is named after the Roman god, Jupiter who was the god of sky and thunder. In Latin, the day was known as Iovis Dies, "Jupiter's Day". In Latin the Genitive or possessive case of Jupiter was Iovis/Jovis and
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    162
    Universidad Simón Bolívar

    Universidad Simón Bolívar

    • Named after: Simón Bolívar
    Simón Bolívar University (Universidad Simón Bolívar in Spanish) or USB, is a public institution located in Miranda State, Venezuela with scientific and technological orientation. Both nationally and globally, Simón Bolívar University is a well-known school with a high reputation in scientific and engineering careers. Its graduates are known for achieving high professional standards. On May 1967 the government created a commission composed by Luis Manuel Peñalver, Luis Carbonell, Mercedes Fermín, Miguel Angel Pérez and Héctor Isava to study the possibility of creating a new university that would offer studies to directly promote the economic and social development of the country. On July 18, 1967 the President of Venezuela Raúl Leoni signed a decree which officially founded the University as an Instituto Experimental de Educación Superior focused mainly on scientific and technological research. The original name given to the university was Universidad de Caracas; however, the first name of the Central University of Venezuela was also "Universidad de Caracas" and it was still known by that name. Members of The National Academy of History, the Bolivarian Society of Venezuela and other
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    2 votes
    163

    Wayne County

    • Named after: Anthony Wayne
    Wayne County is a county located in the U.S. state of New York. It is part of the Rochester area and lies on the south shore of Lake Ontario, forming part of the northern border of the United States with Canada. The name honors General Anthony Wayne, an American Revolutionary War hero and American statesman. The county seat is Lyons. As of the 2010 Census, the estimated population was 93,772. Its location during the early westward expansion of the United States, on an international border and in a fertile farming region, has contributed to a rich cultural and economic history. Two world religions sprung from within its borders, and its inhabitants played important roles in Abolitionism in the years leading up to the Civil War. Nineteenth century War of 1812 skirmishes, Great Lakes sailing ship commerce and Erie Canal barge traffic have since yielded to contemporary recognition as one of the world's most productive fruit growing regions. Wayne County ranks as the top apple producing county in New York. Prior to the arrival of Europeans, the land Wayne County encompasses was originally part of the Iroquois Confederacy, which had existed from around August 31, 1142. When counties were
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    164

    Cartesian linguistics

    • Named after: René Descartes
    The term Cartesian linguistics was coined with the publication of Cartesian Linguistics: A Chapter in the History of Rationalist Thought (1966), a book on linguistics by Noam Chomsky, written with the purpose of deepening "our understanding of the nature of language and the mental processes and structures that underlie its use and acquisition" (ix). Chomsky wishes to shed light on these underlying structures of the human language, and subsequently whether one can infer the nature of an organism from its language (x). Cartesian linguistics refers to a form of linguistics developed during the time of René Descartes, a prominent 17th century philosopher whose ideas continue to influence modern philosophy. Chomsky's book, Cartesian Linguistics, manages to trace the development of linguistic theory from Descartes himself to Wilhelm von Humboldt, or in other words, directly from the period of the Enlightenment up to Romanticism (59). The central doctrine of Cartesian linguistics maintains that the general features of grammatical structure are common to all languages and reflect certain fundamental properties of the mind (59). Chomsky's book received mostly unfavorable reviews and critics
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    165
    Columbia

    Columbia

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbia is a town in Herkimer County, New York, United States. As of the 2010 census, the town population was 1,580. The Town of Columbia is at the south border of the county and is southeast of Utica. The area was called "Coonradstown" during the early settlement period. The original settlers, mainly of German extraction, abandoned their holdings during the American Revolution, and the next settlement period took place around 1791. The first school, opened in 1795, was taught in the German language. The town was organized in 1812 from part of the Town of Warren, which was itself made by a partition of the Town of German Flatts. The population of Columbia in 1865 was 1,732. According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 35.0 square miles (91 km), of which, 35.0 square miles (91 km) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.10 km) of it (0.06%) is water. The south town line is the border of Otsego County. The Unadilla River flows westward through the town. New York State Route 28 is a major north-south highway through Columbia. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,630 people, 581 households, and 457 families residing in the town. The population density
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    166
    Columbus

    Columbus

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbus is the capital of and the largest city in the U.S. state of Ohio. The broader metropolitan area encompasses several counties and is the third largest in Ohio behind those of Cleveland and Cincinnati. Columbus is the fifteenth largest city in the United States of America. It is the county seat of Franklin County, yet the city has expanded and annexed portions of adjoining Delaware County and Fairfield County. Named for explorer Christopher Columbus, the city was founded in 1812 at the confluence of the Scioto and Olentangy rivers, and assumed the functions of state capital in 1816. The city has a diverse economy based on education, government, insurance, banking, fashion, defense, aviation, food, clothes, logistics, steel, energy, medical research, health care, hospitality, retail, and technology. Modern Columbus has emerged as a technologically sophisticated city. It is home to the world's largest private research and development foundation, the Battelle Memorial Institute; CAS, or Chemical Abstracts Service, the world's largest clearinghouse of chemical information; NetJets, the world's largest fractional ownership jet aircraft fleet; and The Ohio State University, the
    7.00
    1 votes
    167
    Columbus

    Columbus

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbus is a city in Lowndes County, Mississippi that lies above the Tombigbee River. It is approximately 146 miles (235 km) northeast of Jackson, 92 miles (148 km) north of Meridian, 63 miles (101 km) south of Tupelo, 60 miles (97 km) northwest of Tuscaloosa, Alabama, and 120 miles (193 km) west of Birmingham, Alabama. The population was 25,944 at the 2000 census. It is the county seat of Lowndes County and the principal city of the Columbus Micropolitan Statistical Area, which is part of the larger Columbus-West Point Combined Statistical Area. Columbus is also part of the area of northeast Mississippi called The Golden Triangle, consisting of Columbus, West Point and Starkville, in the counties of Lowndes, Clay and Oktibbeha. The first record of the site of Columbus in Western history is found in the annals of the explorer Hernando de Soto, who is reputed to have crossed the nearby Tombigbee River on his search for El Dorado. However, the site does not enter the main continuity of American history until December 1810, when John Pitchlynn, the U.S. interpreter for the Choctaw Nation, had moved to Plymouth Bluff, where he built a home, established a farm and transacted Choctaw
    7.00
    1 votes
    168
    Doug Anthony All Stars

    Doug Anthony All Stars

    • Named after: Doug Anthony
    The Doug Anthony All Stars (or Doug Anthony Allstars, DAAS, D.A.A.S. or stylized as D⋆A†A☭S) were an Australian musical comedy group who performed together between 1984 and 1994. The band was an acoustic trio comprising Paul McDermott and Tim Ferguson on main vocals and Richard Fidler on guitar and backing vocals. They were known for their aggressive, provocative style; their habit of involving audience members and their tendency to attack topical and sometimes controversial issues in their comedy. DAAS began performing as buskers on the streets of Canberra in 1984, while they were attending university. After winning the Pick of the Fringe award at the 1986 Adelaide Fringe Festival, the group relocated from Canberra to Melbourne, but it was not until they travelled to the Edinburgh Festival Fringe in 1987 that they first achieved success. They quickly gained popularity in the United Kingdom, where they made numerous television appearances, but remained virtually unknown in Australia until 1989 when they were made regular performers on the Australian comedy show The Big Gig. These appearances gained them recognition, and they remained a popular feature of the show until 1991 when
    7.00
    1 votes
    169
    Duran Duran

    Duran Duran

    • Named after: Durand Durand
    Duran Duran are an English New Wave band, formed in Birmingham in 1978. They were one of the most successful bands of the 1980s and a leading band in the MTV-driven "Second British Invasion" of the United States. Since the 1980s, they have placed 14 singles in the Top 10 of the UK Singles Chart and 21 in the Billboard Hot 100 and have, according to the Sunday Mercury, sold more than 100 million records. While they were generally considered part of the New Romantic scene along with bands such as Spandau Ballet when they first emerged, they later shed this image. The band worked with fashion designers to build a sharp and elegant image that earned them the nickname "the prettiest boys in rock." The band's controversial videos, which included partial nudity and suggestions of sexuality, became popular in the early 1980s on the then-new music video channel MTV. Duran Duran were among the first bands to have their videos shot by professional directors with 35 mm film movie cameras, which gave their videos a much more polished look. In 1984, the band were early innovators with video technology in their live stadium shows. The group was formed by Nick Rhodes, John Taylor and Stephen
    7.00
    1 votes
    170

    Theodore Roosevelt High School

    • Named after: Theodore Roosevelt
    Theodore Roosevelt High School (abbreviated RHS or TRHS), often referred to as Kent Roosevelt or Roosevelt, is a public high school in Kent, Ohio, United States. It is the only high school in Kent and the Kent City School District and serves students in grades 9–12 living in Kent, Franklin Township, Brady Lake, and Sugar Bush Knolls as well as a small portion of southern Streetsboro. As of 2010, enrollment was 1,336 with around 115 teachers for a student–teacher ratio of 12:1. Recognition for academic performance over the years has come from the United States Department of Education, Ohio Department of Education, and U.S. News & World Report. The school was founded in 1868 as Kent High School and was first housed at the Franklin Township Hall until the completion of the K–12 (kindergarten through year 12) Union School building in March 1869. In 1922, the school was moved to a new facility named for U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt on a 10-acre (4.0 ha) campus, which would serve as the high school until 1959. Following completion of a new building on a larger 31-acre (13 ha) campus along North Mantua Street in northern Kent, Roosevelt was moved to this location. The building has
    7.00
    1 votes
    171

    Eleanor Roosevelt Legacy Committee

    • Named after: Eleanor Roosevelt
    The Eleanor Roosevelt Legacy Committee (Eleanor's Legacy) inspires and supports pro-choice Democratic women to run for local and state offices in New York State. Eleanor's Legacy sponsors campaign training schools, links candidates with volunteers and experts, collaborates with like-minded organizations and provides vital campaign grants to endorsed candidates. History: The Hon. Judith Hope founded Eleanor's Legacy in 2001 and served as its president until April 2008. Since 2001, Eleanor's Legacy has elected more than 285 women to state and local office and equipped over 900 women with the skills necessary to run for office and manage campaigns. Cathy Lasry served as Eleanor's Legacy second president, from April 2008 until March 2010. Nora Bredes was elected president April 8, 2010. 2010 Board of Directors Officers The Hon. Nora Bredes, President; The Hon. Harriet Cornell, Chair; Suzy Ballantine, Vice President; The Hon. Crystal Peoples, Vice President; The Hon. Catherine Abate, Treasurer; Karen Persichilli Keogh, Assistant Treasurer; Martha Baker, Secretary. Directors The Hon. Judith Hope, Founder; Margo Alexander; Dr. Allida Black; The Hon. Gale Brewer; Betsy Cohn; Rob Dyson;
    5.33
    3 votes
    172

    H. P. Lovecraft Historical Society

    • Named after: H. P. Lovecraft
    The H. P. Lovecraft Historical Society or HPLHS is the organization that hosts Cthulhu Lives!, a group of live-action roleplayers for the Cthulhu Live version of Call of Cthulhu. Founded in Colorado in 1984, it is now based in Glendale, California. Their motto is Ludo Fore Putavimus ("We thought it would be fun"). HPLHS produces a number of Cthulhu Mythos films and sound recordings, under its Mythoscope and Mythophone labels, respectively. They also offer props, both for sale and for free download. The H.P. Lovecraft Historical Society has created music based on the writings of HP Lovecraft.
    5.33
    3 votes
    173

    Columbia University

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbia University in the City of New York, commonly referred to as Columbia University, is an American private Ivy League research university located in New York City, New York, United States. Columbia is the oldest institution of higher learning in the state of New York, the fifth oldest in the United States, and one of the country's nine Colonial Colleges founded before the American Revolution. Today the university operates seven Columbia Global Centers overseas in Amman, Beijing, Istanbul, Paris, Mumbai, Santiago and Nairobi. The university was founded in 1754 as King's College by royal charter of George II of Great Britain. After the American Revolutionary War, King's College briefly became a state entity, and was renamed Columbia College in 1784. The University now operates under a 1787 charter that places the institution under a private board of trustees, and in 1896 it was further renamed Columbia University. That same year, the university's campus was moved from Madison Avenue to its location in the Morningside Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, where it occupies more than six city blocks, or 32 acres (0.13 km). The university encompasses twenty schools and is affiliated
    6.00
    2 votes
    174

    Florence Nightingale Effect

    • Named after: Florence Nightingale
    The Florence Nightingale effect is a situation where a caregiver develops romantic and/or sexual feelings for his/her patient, even if very little communication or contact takes place outside of basic care. Feelings may fade once the patient is no longer in need of care, either by recovery or death. The effect is named for Florence Nightingale, a pioneer in the field of nursing in the second half of the 19th century. Due to her dedication to patient care, she was dubbed "The Lady with the Lamp" because of her habit of making rounds at night, previously not done. Her care would forever change the way hospitals treated patients. Most consider Nightingale the founder of modern nursing. There is no record of Florence Nightingale having ever fallen in love with one of her patients. In fact, despite multiple suitors, she never married for fear it might interfere with her calling for nursing. As best as can be determined, the phrase originated in pop-culture. Florence Nightingale effect and Florence Nightingale syndrome are often considered to be the same thing. However, the latter typically refer to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, from which Nightingale was said to have suffered. During the
    6.00
    2 votes
    175
    Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt Institute

    Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt Institute

    • Named after: Franklin D. Roosevelt
    The Roosevelt Institute is a progressive non-profit organization devoted to carrying forward the legacy and values of Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt by developing progressive ideas and bold leadership in the service of restoring America's health and security. It has offices located in New York, New York, Hyde Park, New York, and Washington, D.C.. The Roosevelt Institute was initially created through the merger of three Roosevelt family organizations in 1987: The purpose of these organizations was not to memorialize Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt, but rather to promote the study of the momentous era in which they played such prominent roles and to inspire others to carry forward their public legacy. A series of organizational mergers followed the celebrations, programs, and events that took place around the centennials of Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt’s births in 1982 and 1984, respectively. In 1982, the Franklin D. Roosevelt Foundation merged with the Four Freedoms Foundation to strengthen their shared mission of bringing contemporary relevance to the history of the Roosevelt era. In 1987, the Eleanor Roosevelt Institute merged with the FDR Four Freedoms Foundation and the new
    6.00
    2 votes
    176

    Jefferson High School

    • Named after: Thomas Jefferson
    For schools with a similar name, see Jefferson High School. Jefferson High School is a public high school located in Alexandria, Minnesota. JHS (Jefferson High School) offers more than 180 required and elective courses including college course opportunities, online selections, individualized study, and career/service mentorships. Many of these opportunities are given through the Alexandria Technical and Community College. Jefferson offers more than 50 student activities including the full complement of Minnesota State High School League (MSHSL) offerings, featuring varsity sports, fine and performing arts, and numerous school clubs and organizations. Jefferson Senior High School also has a very good music program, where dedicated and talented directors teach the art of music.
    6.00
    2 votes
    177
    St Catherine's College, Oxford

    St Catherine's College, Oxford

    • Named after: Catherine of Alexandria
    St Catherine's College, often called Catz, is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England. Its motto is Nova et Vetera ("the new and the old"). As of 2006, the college had an estimated financial endowment of £53m. St Catherine's College was founded by the distinguished historian Alan Bullock, who went on to become the first Master of the College, and later Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University. The College traces its descent from the Delegacy of Non-Collegiate Students, founded in 1868 to offer university education at Oxford without the costs of college membership. Nonetheless, the social role of a college was re-established by the Delegacy's students, meeting as St Catherine's Club (originally St Catharine's Club), which was named after its meeting place in a hall on Catte Street. The Club was officially recognised by the University in 1931 as St Catherine's Society. It was thus developing the characteristics of a college, and in 1956 the Delegates decided to formalise this change in status. After acquiring 8 acres (32,000 m) from Merton College, Oxford on part of Holywell Great Meadow for £57,690, monies were sought from the University Grants Committee
    6.00
    2 votes
    178

    Archimedean property

    • Named after: Archimedes
    In abstract algebra and analysis, the Archimedean property, named after the ancient Greek mathematician Archimedes of Syracuse, is a property held by some ordered or normed groups, fields, and other algebraic structures. Roughly speaking, it is the property of having no infinitely large or infinitely small elements. It was Otto Stolz who gave the axiom of Archimedes its name because it appears as Axiom V of Archimedes’ On the Sphere and Cylinder. The notion arose from the theory of magnitudes of Ancient Greece; it still plays an important role in modern mathematics such as David Hilbert's axioms for geometry, and the theories of ordered groups, ordered fields, and local fields. An algebraic structure in which any two non-zero elements are comparable, in the sense that neither of them is infinitesimal with respect to the other, is said to be Archimedean. A structure which has a pair of non-zero elements, one of which is infinitesimal with respect to the other, is said to be non-Archimedean. For example, a linearly ordered group that is Archimedean is an Archimedean group. This can be made precise in various contexts with slightly different ways of formulation. For example, in the
    5.00
    3 votes
    179
    Cardigan

    Cardigan

    • Named after: James Brudenell, 7th Earl of Cardigan
    A cardigan is a type of knit shirt than has an open front. Often, cardigans can be tied, buttoned, or zipped. By contrast, a pullover does not open in front but must be "pulled over" the head to be worn. It may be machine- or hand-knitted. The cardigan was named after James Brudenell, 7th Earl of Cardigan, a British Army Major General who led the Charge of the Light Brigade at the Battle of Balaclava during the Crimean War. It is modelled after the knitted wool waistcoat that British officers supposedly wore during the war. The legend of the event and the fame that Brudenell achieved after the war led to the rise of the garment's popularity. The term originally referred only to a knitted sleeveless vest, but expanded to other types of garment over time. Cardigans were adopted by male fishermen to keep warm, but spread to academic circles, and are now popular with women as well. Plain cardigans are often worn over shirts and inside suit jackets as a less formal version of the waistcoat or vest that restrains the necktie when the jacket has been removed. Its versatility means it can be worn in casual or formal settings and in any season, but it is most popular during cool weather.
    5.00
    3 votes
    180
    Jeffersonville

    Jeffersonville

    • Named after: Thomas Jefferson
    Jeffersonville ( /ˈdʒɛfərsənvɪl/) is a city in Clark County, Indiana, along the Ohio River. Locally, the city is often referred to by the abbreviated name Jeff. It is directly across the Ohio River to the north of Louisville, Kentucky along I-65. The population was 44,953 at the 2010 census. The city is the county seat of Clark County. In 1786 Fort Finney was situated where the Kennedy Bridge is today to protect the area from Indians, and a settlement grew around the fort. The fort was renamed in 1791 to Fort Steuben in honor of Baron von Steuben. In 1793 the fort was abandoned. Precisely when the settlement became known as Jeffersonville is unclear, but it was probably around 1801, the year in which President Thomas Jefferson took office. In 1802 local residents used a grid pattern designed by Thomas Jefferson for the formation of a city. On September 13, 1803, a post office was established in the city. In 1808 Indiana's second federal land sale office was established in Jeffersonville, which initiated a growth in settling in Indiana that was further spurred by the end of the War of 1812. Shortly after formation, Jeffersonville was named to be the county seat of Clark County in
    5.00
    3 votes
    181
    Yarra River

    Yarra River

    • Named after: Yarra Yarra
    The Yarra River, originally Berrern, Birr-arrung, Bay-ray-rung, Birarang and Birrarung, is a river in east-central Victoria, Australia. The lower stretches of the river is where the city of Melbourne was established in 1835 and today Greater Melbourne dominates and influences the landscape of its lower reaches. From its source in the Yarra Ranges, it flows 242 km west through the Yarra Valley which opens out into plains as it winds its way through Greater Melbourne before emptying into Hobsons Bay in northernmost Port Phillip. The river was a major food source and meeting place for indigenous Australians from prehistoric times. Shortly after the arrival of European settlers land clearing forced the remaining Wurundjeri to neighbouring territories and away from the river. Originally called Birrarung by the Wurundjeri, the current name was mistranslated from another Wurundjeri term; Yarra Yarra. The river was utilised primarily for agriculture by early European settlers. The landscape of the river has changed dramatically since 1835. The course has been progressively disrupted and the river widened in places. The first of many Crossings of the Yarra River to facilitate transport was
    5.00
    3 votes
    182

    Alex Bayley

    • Named after: Kirrily Nolan
    Alex Bayley is a software developer and internet technologist from Melbourne, Australia.
    5.50
    2 votes
    183
    Columbia

    Columbia

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbia is a town in Coos County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 757 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Berlin, NH–VT micropolitan statistical area. The township was originally chartered in 1762 and named Preston, after Richard Graham, 1st Viscount Preston of Scotland. Settlers failed to meet the terms of the original grant, so the plantation was transferred in 1770 to grantees including Sir James Cockburn, 8th Baronet, after which it was named Cockburn Town, incorporated in 1797. In 1811, in the lead-up to the War of 1812, Governor John Langdon changed the name to Columbia. Although the surface is uneven and mountainous, the soil was of good quality. Maple sugar became an important product, and lumber was cut and transported on rafts down the Connecticut River to markets. By 1859, when the population was 762, Columbia had four sawmills, three gristmills, two clapboard machines, and a starch mill. According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 60.6 square miles (157 km), of which 60.3 square miles (156 km) is land and 0.3 square miles (0.78 km) is water, comprising 0.55% of the town. It is drained by the east and west branches of
    5.50
    2 votes
    184
    Columbia Records

    Columbia Records

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbia Records is an American record label, owned by Sony Music Entertainment, operating under the Columbia Music Group. It was founded in 1888, evolving from an earlier enterprise, the American Graphophone Company—successor to the Volta Graphophone Company. Columbia is the oldest brand name in pre-recorded sound, being the first record company to produce pre-recorded records as opposed to blank cylinders. Columbia Records went on to release records by an array of notable singers, instrumentalists, and bands. From 1961 to 1990, its recordings were released outside the U.S. and Canada on the CBS Records label (for Columbia Broadcasting System, its parent from 1938 to 1988) before adopting the Columbia name in most of the world. Until 1989, Columbia Records had no connection to Columbia Pictures, which used various other names for record labels they owned, including Colpix and later Arista; rather, it was connected to CBS, which stood for Columbia Broadcasting System, a broadcasting media company which purchased Columbia Records in the late 1930s, and which had been co-founded in 1927 by Columbia Records itself. Though Arista was later sold to BMG, it is now a sister label to
    5.50
    2 votes
    185

    Columbus

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbus is a town in Chenango County, New York, United States. The population was 975 at the 2010 census. The town of Columbus is in the northeast corner of the county and is northeast of Norwich. The Town of Columbus was first settled around 1791. The town was formed in 1805 from the Town of Brookfield (now in Madison County). Additional territory was obtained from the Town of Norwich in 1807. The Columbus Community Church was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1986. Columbus Quarter is a community on the Unadilla River in the Town of Columbus. According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 37.5 square miles (97 km), of which, 37.4 square miles (97 km) of it is land and 0.1 square miles (0.26 km) of it (0.21%) is water. The north town line is the border of Madison County, and the east town line is the border of Otsego County, marked by the West Branch of the Unadilla River. New York State Route 8 is a north-south highway by the east town line, and New York State Route 80 is an east-west highway. As of the census of 2000, there were 931 people, 342 households, and 243 families residing in the town. The population density was 24.9
    5.50
    2 votes
    186
    Eleanor Roosevelt High School

    Eleanor Roosevelt High School

    • Named after: Eleanor Roosevelt
    Eleanor Roosevelt High School (ERHS), is a Maryland public magnet high school specializing in science, mathematics, technology, and engineering. The school was established in 1976 at its current location in Greenbelt, Maryland and is part of the Prince George's County Public Schools system. It was the first high school named for former first lady Eleanor Roosevelt. Eleanor Roosevelt was the county's first academic specialized high school for science and technology from its founding until 1982. The program has since expanded to two other centers, located at Charles Herbert Flowers High School, which serves the central region, and Oxon Hill High School, which serves the southern region. Roosevelt serves the northern region of the county. Each school is a four-year comprehensive high school with the Science and Technology Center serving as an alternative/specialized program. The Science and Tech program is not officially considered a "true" magnet program, as its purpose wasn't intended to serve in the way that a traditional magnet does. The program is the only one within the system for which admission is through competitive examination only. Roosevelt has an enrollment of 2,764
    5.50
    2 votes
    187

    Flinders

    • Named after: Matthew Flinders
    Flinders is a historic town south of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, located on the Mornington Peninsula at the point where Western Port meets Bass Strait. Its Local Government Area is the Shire of Mornington Peninsula. At the 2006 census, Flinders had a population of 787. The town was named by George Bass after his friend, the explorer and British naval officer Captain Matthew Flinders. Settlement commenced in 1854 and many pioneers and settlers are buried at the Flinders cemetery. Flinders Post Office opened on 7 March 1863 as the population grew. The town has a picturesque golf course built on a cliff top on Bass Street operated by the Flinders Golf Club. , a recreation reserve, a small yacht club and a 250m long pier where sailing and fishing are almost always under way. Several accommodation options exist, including B&Bs and hotel-motel style accommodation. Shopping and a mobile library are also available to tourists and residents. Flinders was the original home of Flinders Bread, available throughout Melbourne and the Mornington Peninsula. The companies operations are now based in Dandenong but bread is still available locally. The Royal Australian Navy operate a weapons
    5.50
    2 votes
    188
    Gorgoroth

    Gorgoroth

    • Named after: Gorgoroth
    Gorgoroth is a Norwegian black metal band based in Bergen. Formed in 1992 by Infernus (who is also the only original member remaining), the band is named after the dead plateau of evil and darkness in the land of Mordor from J. R. R. Tolkien's fantasy novel The Lord of the Rings. The group is currently signed to Regain Records and have released eight full-length studio albums. A re-recording of their third album, Under the Sign of Hell, was released in 2011, and a new full-length album has been in the works since late 2009. Gorgoroth was founded in 1992 by guitarist Infernus after making a pact with the devil. In 1993, the band released their first demo, entitled A Sorcery Written in Blood. On January 7, 1994, Firda, the major newspaper in the county of Sogn og Fjordane where the band originated from, ran a cover story on the demo, with the headline "Local music with Satanic symbolism". According to the article, the release of the demo and flyers with Satanic symbols led to "concerned parents contacting the Sheriff's Office in Fjaler". After the demo was released, Gorgoroth signed a record deal with Embassy Productions and started work on their debut full-length Pentagram. When
    5.50
    2 votes
    189
    Madison

    Madison

    • Named after: James Madison
    Madison is the capital of the U.S. state of Wisconsin and the county seat of Dane County. As of July 1, 2011, Madison had a population of 236,901. making it the second largest city in Wisconsin, after Milwaukee, and the 81st largest in the United States. The city forms the core of the United States Census Bureau's Madison Metropolitan Statistical Area, which includes all of Dane County and neighboring Iowa and Columbia counties. The Madison Metropolitan Statistical Area had a 2010 population of 568,593. Madison's origins begin in 1829, when former federal judge James Duane Doty purchased over a thousand acres (4 km²) of swamp and forest land on the isthmus between Lakes Mendota and Monona, with the intention of building a city in the Four Lakes region. When the Wisconsin Territory was created in 1836 the territorial legislature convened in Belmont, Wisconsin. One of the legislature's tasks was to select a permanent location for the territory's capital. Doty lobbied aggressively for Madison as the new capital, offering buffalo robes to the freezing legislators and promising choice Madison lots at discount prices to undecided voters . He had James Slaughter plat two cities in the
    5.50
    2 votes
    190
    The Fall

    The Fall

    • Named after: The Fall
    The Fall are an English post-punk band, formed in Prestwich, Greater Manchester, in 1976. With an ever-changing line up, the group essentially consists of its founder and only constant member, Mark E. Smith, who has said "If it's me and your granny on bongos, then it's [the] Fall". First associated with the late 1970s punk movement, the band's music has evolved through numerous stylistic changes, often concurrently with changes in the group's membership. The Fall's music is characterised by repetition, an abrasive guitar-driven sound, and is always underpinned by Smith's often cryptic lyrics, described by critic Steve Huey as "abstract poetry filled with complicated wordplay, bone-dry wit, cutting social observations, and general misanthropy." The group's output is prolific—as of November 2011 they have released 29 studio albums, and more than triple that counting live albums and other releases. They have never achieved widespread public success beyond a handful of minor hit singles in the late 1980s, but have maintained a strong cult following. The band were long associated with BBC disc jockey John Peel, who championed them from early on in their career and cited the Fall as his
    5.50
    2 votes
    191
    Archimedes

    Archimedes

    • Named after: Archimedes
    Archimedes is a large lunar impact crater on the eastern edges of the Mare Imbrium. To the south of the crater extends the Montes Archimedes mountainous region. On the southeastern rim is the Palus Putredinis flooded plain, containing a system of rilles named the Rimae Archimedes that extend over 150 kilometers. North-northwest of Archimedes stand the Montes Spitzbergen, a string of peaks in the Mare Imbrium. East of Archimedes is the crater Autolycus, and the stretch of lunar surface between these two formations was the crash-landing site of Luna 2. This was the first craft to reach the surface of the Moon, landing September 13, 1959. Northeast of Archimedes is the prominent crater Aristillus. The lava plain between Archimedes, Aristillus, and Autolycus forms the Sinus Lunicus bay of Mare Imbrium. A wrinkle ridge leads away from Archimedes toward the north-northwest, crossing this mare. The diameter of Archimedes is the largest of any crater on the Mare Imbrium. The rim has a significant outer rampart brightened with ejecta and the upper portion of a terraced inner wall, but lacks the ray system associated with younger craters. A triangular promontory extends 30 kilometers from
    4.67
    3 votes
    192

    Archimedean solid

    • Named after: Archimedes
    In geometry an Archimedean solid is a highly symmetric, semi-regular convex polyhedron composed of two or more types of regular polygons meeting in identical vertices. They are distinct from the Platonic solids, which are composed of only one type of polygon meeting in identical vertices, and from the Johnson solids, whose regular polygonal faces do not meet in identical vertices. "Identical vertices" are usually taken to mean that for any two vertices, there must be an isometry of the entire solid that takes one vertex to the other. Sometimes it is instead only required that the faces that meet at one vertex are related isometrically to the faces that meet at the other. This difference in definitions controls whether the pseudorhombicuboctahedron is considered an Archimedean solid or a Johnson solid. Prisms and antiprisms, whose symmetry groups are the dihedral groups, are generally not considered to be Archimedean solids, despite meeting the above definition. With this restriction, there are only finitely many Archimedean solids. They can all be made via Wythoff constructions from the Platonic solids with tetrahedral, octahedral and icosahedral symmetry. The Archimedean solids
    6.00
    1 votes
    193
    Columbia

    Columbia

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbia is a city in Adair County, Kentucky, United States, just above Russell Creek. The area was settled around 1802 by Daniel Trabue. The post office was opened on April 1, 1806 by John Field, who also ran a local store. The population was 4,014 at the 2000 census. It is the county seat of Adair County. For the origin of the name see Columbia. The Louie B. Nunn Cumberland Parkway runs through Columbia as it extends from Bowling Green, KY to Somerset, KY. This Parkway is a future Corridor of Interstate 66. The addition of an interchange with a 2006 reconstruction of Highway 61 South, Columbia now has two exits on the Parkway. Exit 49, the original exit on the parkway, merges onto Highway 55 South (also known as Jamestown Street) bringing drivers through the middle of Columbia. Exit 47, the new exit, merges onto Highway 61 South (also known as Burkesville Street/Road) and drivers can choose to go north and visit the new Holladay Place Shopping Center, home of Columbia's Super Wal-Mart or go to Burkesville to the south. The Highway 55 Bypass was officially opened on October 7, 2008, for more information see below. Columbia is also the home of Lindsey Wilson College, a private four
    6.00
    1 votes
    194

    Columbus

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbus is a town in Columbia County, Wisconsin, United States. The population was 711 at the 2000 census. The City of Columbus lies mostly with the town boundaries. According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 31.9 square miles (82.6 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 711 people, 236 households, and 193 families residing in the town. The population density was 22.3 people per square mile (8.6/km²). There were 241 housing units at an average density of 7.6 per square mile (2.9/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 98.45% White, 0.14% Black or African American, 0.14% Native American, 0.28% Asian, 0.14% from other races, and 0.84% from two or more races. 0.98% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 236 households out of which 36.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 69.1% were married couples living together, 8.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 18.2% were non-families. 14.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.91 and the average family size was 3.21. In
    6.00
    1 votes
    195
    Diponegoro University

    Diponegoro University

    • Named after: Diponegoro
    Diponegoro University (Indonesian: Universitas Diponegoro) is a state university located in Semarang, Central Java, Indonesia and a member of IDGHE. Founded in 1956 as a private university by Semarang University Foundation, it is a pioneer of higher learning institutions in the Indonesia and the first and oldest corporation in Central Java. Initially called Semarang University, the institution was named Diponegoro University on October 5, 1960, after it was granted state university accreditation by the Indonesian Government. The "Diponegoro" name is taken from an Indonesian hero who waged war against the Dutch colonialism in the early 19th century. This institution better known as UNDIP. UNDIP is the best university in Central Java. It is renowned for being at the forefront of engineering and technological knowledge. During 2000 UNDIP expanded engineering faculty and research facility on its Tembalang campus, has 11 faculties and the number of research centres, in addition to academic departments to service technological, educational and research. An important result of UNDIP’s carefully managed modernisation is a steadily improving education system that has poured millions into
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    Ephel Duath

    • Named after: Ephel Dúath
    Ephel Duath is an Italian progressive metal band, formed in 1998 in Padova, Italy. They have had a constantly changing line-up with guitarist and songwriter Davide Tiso, being the only original member. To date, they have released one demo, four studio albums, and two remix albums. Their fourth studio album, Through My Dog's Eyes, was released on January 26, 2009. Ephel Duath was formed in 1998 as a two-man group and taking their name after the fictional location of the same name in J.R.R. Tolkien's book The Lord of the Rings. Their debut release was Phormula, on the Code666 record label. Following Phormula's release, they signed to Elitist Records (a sub-division of Earache), and repackaged the debut with demo tracks, releasing it in 2001 as Rephormula. Forming a new lineup, founder Davide Tiso recruited a diverse set of musicians for the band, hailing from backgrounds in hardcore punk, progressive rock, jazz, blues, funk and pop. The first album with this lineup was 2003's The Painter's Palette. The album showcases an unorthodox combination of hardcore punk and jazz fusion. Kerrang! magazine bizarrely compared the band at this point in a May 2003 interview as supermodels playing
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    Flinders Street Station

    Flinders Street Station

    • Named after: Matthew Flinders
    Flinders Street Station—colloquially shortened to simply Flinders Street or sometimes FSS—is a central commuter railway station at the corner of Flinders and Swanston streets in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. It services the entire metropolitan train newtork. Backing onto the city reach of the Yarra River in the heart of the city, the complex covers two whole city blocks and extends from Swanston Street to Queen Street. Each weekday, over 110,000 commuters and 1,500 trains pass through the station. It is the most used metropolitan railway station in Melbourne, in 2009 there was an average of 850,900 passenger boardings per day. Flinders Street is serviced by Metro's suburban services, and V/Line regional services to Gippsland. It was the first railway station in an Australian city and the terminus for first use of steam rail in Australia and the world's busiest passenger station in the late 1920s. The main station building, completed in 1909, is a cultural icon to Melbourne, with its prominent dome, arched entrance, tower and clocks it is one of the city's most recognisable landmarks. As such it is frequently used to symbolise the city and is listed on the Victorian Heritage
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    Gadjah Mada University

    • Named after: Gajah Mada
    Gadjah Mada University (Indonesian: Universitas Gadjah Mada or UGM) is one of the largest national universities in Indonesia . founded on December 19, 1949; although the first lecture was given on 13 March 1946. The name was taken from the name of Majapahit's Prime Minister, Gajah Mada. UGM is located in Yogyakarta, Daerah Istimewa Yogyakarta. It has 18 faculties, 73 undergraduate study programs, 28 diploma study programs, and a graduate program of 62 study programs ranging from Social Sciences to Engineering. It has approximately 55,000 students, 647 foreign students, 2,240 employees, and 2,273 lecturers. Gadjah Mada University has been considered to be the second most prestigious University in Indonesia (between University of Indonesia and Bandung Institute of Technology. When founded, UGM had 6 faculties: the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmacy, the Faculty of Law, Social and Political Sciences, the Faculty of Engineering, the Faculty of Letters, Pedagogy and Philosophy, the Faculty of Agriculture, and the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine. From 1952 until 1972 the Faculty of Medicine was split into two separate faculties, the Surabaya branch of the Faculty of Law, Social,
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    Gandhi Memorial International School

    • Named after: Mahatma Gandhi
    The Gandhi Memorial International School (GMIS) was founded along with the Gandhi School Ancol in 1950, and is an international school in Jakarta, Indonesia. The students of grades 1 to 12 moved to a new campus in 2004 located in Kemayoran (Central Jakarta), while the old campus houses the Pre-School. GMIS is a hub for over 2000 students from around the globe from more than 50 countries, including North Korea. A majority of the students come from India, Indonesia and South Korea. GMIS was one of the first schools in Indonesia to gain the status of an IB world school. The school offers its students learning options from Nursery, PYP, MYP, IGCSE, O Level Science and Commerce, and the Full International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma. The GMIS follows the IB curriculum. Mr. Ashok Pal Singh is the principal. The GMIS is accredited by the University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (IGCSE, O Level and A Level Examinations), and the Board of Secondary Education, Association of Indian Universities, Australian Music Examinations Board (Melbourne), University of Delhi and the University of Mumbai. GMIS is authorised to deliver the IB DIploma. According to the Jakarta Globe, the school
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    Martin Luther King III

    • Named after: Martin Luther King, Jr.
    Martin Luther King III (born October 23, 1957) is an American human rights advocate and community activist. He is the eldest son and oldest living child of civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Coretta Scott King. His siblings are Dexter Scott King, Rev. Bernice Albertine King, and the late Yolanda Denise King. King attended The Galloway School and went on to Morehouse College, which was the same school his father, his grandfather, and his great-grandfather attended. He received his B.A. in Political Science from Morehouse in 1979. Martin Luther King III was born on October 23, 1957 to civil rights advocate Martin Luther King, Jr. and Coretta Scott King. His mother had reservations about naming him after his famous father, "realizing the burdens it can create for the child," but King, Jr. always wanted to name his son Martin Luther III. He was raised in Vine City, an urban neighborhood in Atlanta, Georgia, and was ten years old when his father was assassinated. King lived with his mother in his childhood home until his adulthood. As an adult, King was a shy man who rarely socialized, and friends have claimed he tends to overwork, in part due to the pressure to live up
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    Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial

    Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial

    • Named after: Martin Luther King, Jr.
    The Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial is located in West Potomac Park in Washington, D.C., southwest of the National Mall (but within the larger area commonly referred to as the "National Mall"). The memorial is America's 395th national park. The monumental memorial is located at the northwest corner of the Tidal Basin near the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial, on a sightline linking the Lincoln Memorial to the northwest and the Jefferson Memorial to the southeast. The official address of the monument, 1964 Independence Avenue, S.W., commemorates the year that the Civil Rights Act of 1964 became law. Covering four acres, the memorial opened to the public on August 22, 2011, after more than two decades of planning, fund-raising and construction. A ceremony dedicating the Memorial was scheduled for Sunday, August 28, 2011, the 48th anniversary of the "I Have a Dream" speech that Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in 1963 but was postponed until October 16 (the 16th anniversary of the 1995 Million Man March on the National Mall) due to Hurricane Irene. Although this is not the first memorial to an African-American in Washington, D.C., Dr.
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    Oxford

    Oxford

    • Named after: Oxford
    Oxford is a city in northwestern Butler County, Ohio, United States, in the southwestern portion of the state. It lies in Oxford Township, originally called the College Township. The population was 21,943 at the 2000 census. This college town was founded as a home for Miami University. Oxford is served by U.S. Route 27, Ohio State Route 732, and Ohio State Route 73. Although Miami was chartered in 1809, Oxford was laid out by James Heaton on March 29, 1810, by the Ohio General Assembly's order of February 6, 1810. It was established in R1ET5N of the Congress Lands in the southeast quarter of Section 22, the southwest corner of Section 23, the northwest corner of Section 26, and the northeast corner of Section 27. The original village, consisting of 128 lots, was incorporated on February 23, 1830. Oxford was elevated to town status in 1962 and to city status in 1971. Freedom Summer started with orientations at Western College in June 1964. This event is commemorated near the Kumler Chapel, Western Campus Miami University. As of the census of 2000, there were 21,943 people, 5,870 households, and 2,066 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,734.4 people per square
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    Roald Dahl

    Roald Dahl

    • Named after: Roald Amundsen
    Roald Dahl ( /ˈroʊ.ɑːl ˈdɑːl/, Norwegian: [ˈɾuːɑl dɑl]; 13 September 1916 – 23 November 1990) was a British novelist, short story writer, poet, fighter pilot and screenwriter. Born in Wales to Norwegian parents, he served in the British Royal Air Force during World War II, in which he became a flying ace and intelligence officer, rising to the rank of Wing Commander. Dahl rose to prominence in the 1940s, with works for both children and adults, and became one of the world's best-selling authors. He has been referred to as "one of the greatest storytellers for children of the 20th century". In 2008 The Times placed Dahl 16th on its list of "The 50 greatest British writers since 1945". His short stories are known for their unexpected endings, and his children's books for their unsentimental, often very dark humour. Some of his notable works include James and the Giant Peach, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Matilda, The Witches, Fantastic Mr Fox, The Twits, George's Marvellous Medicine and The BFG. Roald Dahl was born at Villa Marie, Fairwater Road in Llandaff, Cardiff, Wales, in 1916, to Norwegian parents, Harald Dahl and Sofie Magdalene Dahl (née Hesselberg). Dahl's father had
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    Roald Dahl Plass

    Roald Dahl Plass

    • Named after: Roald Dahl
    Roald Dahl Plass (Welsh: Plas Roald Dahl) is a public plaza in Cardiff Bay, part of Cardiff, Wales. It is named after Cardiff-born author Roald Dahl, and is located on the coast along the south of the city centre. The square is home to the Senedd (Welsh Assembly Building) and the Wales Millennium Centre, a performing arts centre. The bowl-like shape of the plaza has made it a popular amphitheatre for hosting open-air concerts. Formerly named the Oval Basin, the area was one of the docks for a thriving coal port during the latter half the 19th century and much of the 20th century. Following World War II, the plaza entered a period of decay and dereliction until the 1980s, when the Cardiff Bay area was regenerated. "Plass" means plaza in Norwegian, a nod to the acclaimed writer's roots (both of Dahl's parents were from Norway) and to the Norwegian seafarers' church which stands nearby. The area was originally all wetlands owned by John Crichton-Stuart, 2nd Marquess of Bute. He was persuaded to finance construction of the dock on his land at a cost of over £ 350,000. The dock opened under the name "West Bute Dock" on 8 October 1839, and was over 1400 yards (1280 m) long and 200 feet
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    USS Constitution

    USS Constitution

    • Named after: United States Constitution
    USS Constitution is a wooden-hulled, three-masted heavy frigate of the United States Navy. Named by President George Washington after the Constitution of the United States of America, she is the world's oldest commissioned naval vessel afloat. Launched in 1797, Constitution was one of six original frigates authorized for construction by the Naval Act of 1794 and the third constructed. Joshua Humphreys designed the frigates to be the young Navy's capital ships, and so Constitution and her sisters were larger and more heavily armed and built than standard frigates of the period. Built in Boston, Massachusetts, at Edmund Hartt's shipyard, her first duties with the newly formed United States Navy were to provide protection for American merchant shipping during the Quasi-War with France and to defeat the Barbary pirates in the First Barbary War. Constitution is most famous for her actions during the War of 1812 against Great Britain, when she captured numerous merchant ships and defeated five British warships: HMS Guerriere, Java, Pictou, Cyane and Levant. The battle with Guerriere earned her the nickname of "Old Ironsides" and public adoration that has repeatedly saved her from
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    USS Franklin D. Roosevelt

    USS Franklin D. Roosevelt

    • Named after: Franklin D. Roosevelt
    USS Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVB/CVA/CV-42) was the second of three Midway class aircraft carriers. To her crew, she was known as the "Swanky Franky," "Foo-De-Roo," or "Rosie," with the last nickname probably the most popular. Roosevelt spent most of her active deployed career operating in the Mediterranean Sea as part of the United States Sixth Fleet. The ship was decommissioned in 1977 and was scrapped shortly afterward. Franklin D. Roosevelt was constructed at New York Naval Shipyard. Sponsor Mrs. John H. Towers, wife of the Deputy Commander-in-Chief, Pacific Fleet, christened the ship Coral Sea at the 29 April 1945 launching. On 8 May 1945, President Harry S. Truman approved the Secretary of the Navy's recommendation to rename the ship Franklin D. Roosevelt in honor of the late president; she was the first aircraft carrier to be named for an American statesman. Roosevelt was commissioned on Navy Day, 27 October 1945, at the New York Naval Shipyard. Capt. Apollo Soucek was the ship's first commanding officer. During her shakedown cruise, Roosevelt called at Rio de Janeiro from 1 February to 11 February 1946 to represent the United States at the inauguration of Brazilian president
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    USS Theodore Roosevelt

    USS Theodore Roosevelt

    • Named after: Theodore Roosevelt
    USS Theodore Roosevelt (SSBN-600), a George Washington class, was the second ship of the United States Navy to be named for President Theodore Roosevelt (1858–1919). Initially unnamed and assigned hull classification symbol SSGN-600 as a guided missile submarine, her keel was laid down on 20 May 1958 by the Mare Island Naval Shipyard using components initially assembled for the Skipjack class nuclear attack submarine USS Scamp (SSN-588). She was named Theodore Roosevelt and redesignated fleet ballistic missile submarine SSBN-600 on 6 November 1958, launched on 3 October 1959 sponsored by Mrs. Alice Roosevelt Longworth (1884–1980), daughter of the ship's namesake, and commissioned on 13 February 1961 with Commander William E. Sims commanding the Blue Crew and Commander Oliver H. Perry, Jr. commanding the Gold Crew. On 18 February 1961, Theodore Roosevelt departed Mare Island, California, bound for the United States East Coast. On 7 March, she became the first FBM submarine to transit the Panama Canal. On 11 March 1961, she arrived at Cape Canaveral, Florida. After successfully firing her first Polaris A1 missile on 20 March 1961 and completing her shakedown training, she arrived in
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    Amelia Bloomer Project

    • Named after: Amelia Bloomer
    The Amelia Bloomer Project is an annual book list published by the Feminist Task Force of the American Library Association's Social Responsibilities Round Table for the purpose of honoring children's books with feminist themes published during the award year. The project organizers state the criteria for a book's inclusion in the list as: The list has been published annually since 2002.
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    Bolivia

    Bolivia

    • Named after: Simón Bolívar
    Bolivia (/bəˈlɪviə/, Spanish: [boˈliβja]), officially known as the Plurinational State of Bolivia (Spanish: Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia, Quechua: Bulivya Mamallaqta, Aymara: Wuliwya Suyu), is a landlocked country in central South America. It is bordered by Brazil to the north and east, Paraguay and Argentina to the south, Chile to the southwest, and Peru to the west. Prior to European colonization, the Andean region of Bolivia was a part of the Inca Empire – the largest state in Pre-Columbian America. The conquistadors took control of the region in the 16th century. During most of the Spanish colonial period, this territory was known as Upper Peru and was under the administration of the Viceroyalty of Peru, which included most of Spain's South American colonies, although the area enjoyed substantial autonomy under the jurisdiction of the Royal Court of Charcas. After declaring independence in 1809, 16 years of war followed before the establishment of the Republic, named for Simón Bolívar, on 6 August 1825. Bolivia has struggled through periods of political instability, dictatorships and economic woes. Bolivia is a democratic republic that is divided into nine departments. Its
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    Martin Luther King Day

    Martin Luther King Day

    • Named after: Martin Luther King, Jr.
    Martin Luther King, Jr. Day is a United States federal holiday marking the birthday of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. It is observed on the third Monday of January each year, which is around the time of King's birthday, January 15. The floating holiday is similar to holidays set under the Uniform Monday Holiday Act, though the act predated the establishment of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day by 15 years. King was the chief spokesman for nonviolent activism in the civil rights movement, which successfully protested racial discrimination in federal and state law. The campaign for a federal holiday in King's honor began soon after his assassination in 1968. Ronald Reagan signed the holiday into law in 1983, and it was first observed on January 20, 1986. At first, some states resisted observing the holiday as such, giving it alternative names or combining it with other holidays. It was officially observed in all 50 states for the first time in 2000. Soon after, the King Center turned to support from the corporate community and the general public. The success of this strategy was cemented when musician Stevie Wonder released the single "Happy Birthday" to popularize the campaign in 1980
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    Hobbes

    • Named after: Thomas Hobbes
    Hobbes is a character in the comic strip Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson. He is Calvin's stuffed tiger and best friend, and is depicted with two distinct identities. Hobbes is seen in two differentiating perspectives. The creator, Bill Watterson, clearly states it's not Calvin's imagination that makes him come to life when he's around. Calvin views him as a live tiger; as best friend. To everybody else he's a stuffed tiger. When he was captured by Susie (because he took Binky Betsy) he was very willing, it seemed to Calvin's point of view. Hobbes is often shown to be smarter and wiser than Calvin when he is pictured as a real tiger. He is seen reading more often than his owner and tries to be the voice of reason when Calvin tries to perform a risky stunt or engage in a dubious scheme. Hobbes' advice mostly has no effect on Calvin, who usually ignores Hobbes's reasoning and winds up getting in trouble for his actions. Because of this, some fans say that Hobbes represents Calvin's conscience. Hobbes is named after Thomas Hobbes, a philosopher who at times had a poor outlook on life and human nature. When Hobbes is shown to be alive, he is proud of his species and glad not to be a
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    Pico Simón Bolívar

    • Named after: Simón Bolívar
    Pico Simᅢᄈn Bolᅢᆳvar is the one of the two highest mountains in Colombia, located in the north in the Magdalena Department, in the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta range. It is approximately 5,700 m high; it is not clear whether or not it is higher than its twin neighbour, Pico Cristᅢᄈbal Colᅢᄈn. Simon Bolivar
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    Roosevelt University

    Roosevelt University

    • Named after: Franklin D. Roosevelt
    Roosevelt University is a coeducational, private university with campuses in Chicago, Illinois and Schaumburg, Illinois. Founded in 1945, the university is named in honor of both former President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt. The university's curriculum is based on principles of social justice. Currently with an acceptance rate of 53 percent the university enrolls around 7,000 students between its undergraduate and graduate programs and is ranked #81 in US News and World Report Midwest Universities from 2012. Roosevelt is also home to the internationally renowned Chicago College of Performing Arts. The University's newest academic building Wabash, is located in the area of Downtown Chicago called The Loop and is the tallest educational building in Chicago, the second tallest educational building in the United States and the sixth largest academic complex in the world. The current president is Charles R. Middleton; he was inaugurated in 2002. The university was founded in 1945 after the president of Central YMCA College in Chicago, Edward J. Sparling, refused to provide his board with the demographic data of his student body, fearing that it would
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    The Velvet Underground

    • Named after: The Velvet Underground
    The Velvet Underground was an American rock band formed in New York City. First active from 1964 to 1973, their best-known members were Lou Reed and John Cale, who both went on to find success as solo artists. Although experiencing little commercial success while together, the band is often cited by many critics as one of the most important and influential groups of the 1960s. An often-repeated statement, usually attributed to Brian Eno or Peter Buck, is that "the first Velvet Underground album only sold 10,000 copies, but everyone who bought it formed a band." Andy Warhol managed the Velvet Underground and it was the house band at his studio, the Factory, and his Exploding Plastic Inevitable events. The provocative lyrics of some of the band's songs gave a nihilistic outlook to some of their music. Their 1967 debut album, The Velvet Underground & Nico (which featured German singer Nico, with whom the band collaborated), was named the 13th Greatest Album of All Time, and the "most prophetic rock album ever made" by Rolling Stone in 2003. In 2004, Rolling Stone ranked the band No. 19 on its list of the "100 Greatest Artists of All Time". The band was inducted into the Rock and Roll
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    August

    August

    • Named after: Augustus
    August (/ˈɔːɡʊst/ AW-guust) is the eighth month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian Calendars and one of seven months with a length of 31 days. In the Southern Hemisphere, August is the seasonal equivalent of February in the Northern Hemisphere. In common years no other month starts on the same day of the week as August, though in leap years February starts on the same day. August ends on the same day of the week as November every year. This month was originally named Sextilis in Latin, because it was the sixth month in the original ten-month Roman calendar under Romulus in 753 BC, when March was the first month of the year. About 700 BC it became the eighth month when January and February were added to the year before March by King Numa Pompilius, who also gave it 29 days. Julius Caesar added two days when he created the Julian calendar in 45 BC giving it its modern length of 31 days. In 8 BC it was renamed in honor of Augustus. (Despite common belief, he did not take a day from February; see the debunked theory on month lengths) According to a Senatus consultum quoted by Macrobius, he chose this month because it was the time of several of his great triumphs, including the
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    Florence Nightingale David

    • Named after: Florence Nightingale
    Florence Nightingale David, also known as F. N. David (August 23, 1909 – July 23, 1993) was an English statistician, born in Ivington, Herefordshire, England. She was named after Florence Nightingale, who was a friend of her parents. David read mathematics at Bedford College for Women in London. After graduation, she worked for the eminent statistician Karl Pearson at University College, London as his research student. She calculated the distribution of correlation coefficients, producing in 1938 her first book, Tables of the correlation coefficient. After Karl Pearson died in 1934, she returned to the Biometrics laboratory to work with Jerzy Neyman where she submitted her last four published papers as her PhD thesis. During World War II, David worked for the Ministry of Home Security. In late 1939 when war had started but England had not yet been attacked, she created statistical models to predict the possible consequences of bombs exploding in high density populations such as the big cities of England and especially London. From these models, she determined estimates of harm to humans and damage to non-humans This included the possible numbers living and dead, the reactions to
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    James Madison College

    James Madison College

    • Named after: James Madison
    This article is about the public-policy college at Michigan State University. For the similarly named institution in Virginia, see James Madison University. James Madison College is a college of public affairs and international relations within Michigan State University in East Lansing, Michigan. It was founded in 1967, "with a vision of creating a residential college merging the best attributes of a small college with an undergraduate education focusing on public affairs and firmly rooted in liberal arts"; the college was named after James Madison in honor of his role in writing the United States Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and the Federalist Papers (which form part of the College's core curriculum). Originally considered experimental, the college has since come to be recognized as among the best in the nation. The college was developed as part of MSU president John A. Hannah's attempts to increase the profile of the university and to capitalize off of the international and federal government contacts developed by the otherwise ignominious MSU Vietnam Project. The Lyman Briggs College was also founded in 1967 on the same general principle as James Madison College, though
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    Jefferson Park

    Jefferson Park

    • Named after: Thomas Jefferson
    Jefferson Park is one of Chicago's 77 well-defined community areas located on the city's Northwest Side. The neighborhood of Jefferson Park occupies a larger swath of territory than the community area by including within it land of adjacent community areas. Jefferson Park is bordered by the community areas of Norwood Park to the northwest, Forest Glen to the northeast, Portage Park to the south. and the suburb of Harwood Heights to the south. Although the official community area map draws the boundary between Jefferson Park and Portage Park at Gunnison and Lawrence, the Jefferson Park neighborhood extends to Montrose further south. Settlement in the vicinity of Jefferson Park began in the 1830s with John Kinzie Clark and Elijah Wentworth, whose claim was near what is now the Jefferson Park Metra Station, where he operated a tavern and inn. The tiny settlement of traders, hunters, and farmers consisted of simple one and two room log cabins until Abram Gale, for whom Gale Street is named, built the first frame house in Jefferson. Jefferson Park became the hub of an independent township that was incorporated at the nearby Dickinson Tavern as Jefferson Township in 1850 until annexed by
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    Theodore Roosevelt High School

    • Named after: Theodore Roosevelt
    See also Roosevelt High School for schools of the same name Theodore Roosevelt High School is a high school (grades 9-12) located in the Boyle Heights area of Los Angeles, California named for the 26th president of the United States. Roosevelt is a public school in the Los Angeles Unified School District with an enrollment of 5,047 in 2007, making it one of the largest in the country, and second largest behind Belmont High School. Its current principal is Dr. Friere and this school year, Roosevelt went from an all-year round school to traditional. Its school colors are red, gold and blue and the mascot is Teddy the Bear and their sport teams are known as the Rough Riders. The school's motto is "Don't flinch, don't foul, hit the line hard!", which is a Theodore Roosevelt quote. Students come from Boyle Heights, South Central, and City Terrace. Roosevelt was founded in 1922, but opened in 1923 in Boyle Heights to the East of the Los Angeles River. During World War II the Japanese were removed to internment camps. Many returned after the war. A Japanese Garden that had been destroyed was restored in 1996 with funds raised by alumni and students. As the population grew in the area,
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    Castle Douglas

    Castle Douglas

    • Named after: William Douglas, Castle Douglas
    Castle Douglas (Gd: Caisteal Dhùghlais), a town in the south of Scotland in Dumfries and Galloway, lies in the eastern part of Galloway known as the Stewartry, between the towns of Dalbeattie and Gatehouse of Fleet. Castle Douglas is built next to Carlingwark Loch in which traces of prehistoric crannogs can be found, evidence of early inhabitation of the area. To the North of the town Glenlochar is the site of two successive Roman forts, the first being erected during the invasion of Agricola and the second during the Antonine period, they appear to have been for cavalry units and evidence has been found that a "victus" grew up around them, they were abandoned completely about 160. Nearby Threave Castle was a seat of the powerful "Black" Earls of Douglas. A small collection of cottages developed by the shores of Carlingwark, which was a source of marl. These cottages can still be seen on the Western approach to Castle Douglas and are known as The Buchan. The development of a military road through Galloway, built by General Wade after Jacobite rising of 1745, passed through the Carlingwark area and improved transportation connections in the 18th century. Castle Douglas was founded
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    Ramon Magsaysay Award Foundation

    • Named after: Ramon Magsaysay
    The Ramon Magsaysay Award is an annual award established to perpetuate former Philippine President Ramon Magsaysay's example of integrity in government, courageous service to the people, and pragmatic idealism within a democratic society. The Ramon Magsaysay Award is often considered Asia's Nobel Prize. The prize was established in April 1957 by the trustees of the Rockefeller Brothers Fund based in New York City with the concurrence of the Philippine government. Magsaysay Award Foundation the prize to Asian individuals achieving excellence in their respective fields. The awards are given in six categories: In May 1957, seven prominent Filipinos were named to the founding board of trustees of the Ramon Magsaysay Award Foundation, the non-profit corporation tasked with implementing the awards program. The RMAF recognizes and honors individuals and organizations in Asia regardless of race, creed, sex, or nationality, who have achieved distinction in their respective fields and have helped others generously without anticipating public recognition. The awards have traditionally been given in five categories: government service; public service; community leadership; journalism,
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    Roosevelt High School

    Roosevelt High School

    • Named after: Theodore Roosevelt
    Roosevelt High School is a public school located in Minneapolis, Minnesota and is part of the Minneapolis Public Schools. The school is named after US President Theodore Roosevelt. Athletic and other competition teams from the school are nicknamed the Teddies.
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    Saudi Arabia

    Saudi Arabia

    • Named after: Muhammad bin Saud
    Saudi Arabia (/ˌsaʊdi əˈreɪbi.ə/ or /ˌsɔːdiː əˈreɪbi.ə/; Arabic: السعودية‎ as-Su‘ūdiyyah or as-Sa‘ūdiyyah), officially known as the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (Arabic: المملكة العربية السعودية‎ al-Mamlakah al-‘Arabiyyah as-Su‘ūdiyyah  Arabic pronunciation (help·info)), is the largest Arab state in Western Asia by land area, constituting the bulk of the Arabian Peninsula, and the second-largest in the Arab world (after Algeria). It is bordered by Jordan, and Iraq on the north and northeast, Kuwait, Qatar, Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates on the east, Oman on the southeast, and Yemen on the south. The Red Sea lies to its west, and the Persian Gulf lies to the east. Saudi Arabia has an area of approximately 2,250,000 km (870,000 sq mi), and it has an estimated population of 27 million, of which 9 million are registered foreign expatriates and an estimated 2 million are illegal immigrants. Saudi nationals comprise an estimated 16 million people. The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia was founded by Abdul-Aziz bin Saud (known for most of his career as Ibn Saud) in 1932, although the conquests which eventually led to the creation of the Kingdom began in 1902 when he captured Riyadh, the ancestral
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    Archimedes' screw

    Archimedes' screw

    • Named after: Archimedes
    The Archimedes' screw, also called the Archimedean screw or screwpump, is a machine historically used for transferring water from a low-lying body of water into irrigation ditches. The screw pump is commonly attributed to Archimedes on the occasion of his visit to Egypt, but this tradition may reflect only that the apparatus was unknown before Hellenistic times and introduced in his lifetime by unknown Greek engineers. Archimedes' screw consists of a screw (a helical surface surrounding a central cylindrical shaft) inside a hollow pipe. The screw is turned usually by a windmill or by manual labour. As the shaft turns, the bottom end scoops up a volume of water. This water will slide up in the spiral tube, until it finally pours out from the top of the tube and feeds the irrigation systems. The screw was used mostly for draining water out of mines or other areas of low lying water. The contact surface between the screw and the pipe does not need to be perfectly watertight, as long as the amount of water being scooped at each turn is large compared to the amount of water leaking out of each section of the screw per turn. Water leaking from one section leaks into the next lower one,
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    Cartesian coordinate system

    • Named after: René Descartes
    In mathematics, abscissa (plural abscissae or abscissæ) refers to that element of an ordered pair which is plotted on the horizontal axis of a two-dimensional Cartesian coordinate system, as opposed to the ordinate. It is the first of the two terms (often labelled x and y) which define the location of a point in such a coordinate system. The usage of the word abscissa is first recorded in 1659 by Stefano degli Angeli, a mathematics professor in Rome, according to Moritz Cantor. Soon thereafter, Leibniz used the term extensively in Latin in his Mathematische Schriften (1692), after which it became a standardized mathematical term. The first occurrence of the term in English is found in An Institution of Fluxions by the English mathematician Humphry Ditton (1706), where he spells the word abscisse, possibly denoting the plural. This article is based on material taken from the Free On-line Dictionary of Computing prior to 1 November 2008 and incorporated under the "relicensing" terms of the GFDL, version 1.3 or later.
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    Cartesian product

    • Named after: René Descartes
    In mathematics, a Cartesian product (or product set) is a construction to build a new set out of a number of given sets. Each member of the Cartesian product corresponds to the selection of one element each in every one of those sets. The Cartesian product is named after René Descartes, whose formulation of analytic geometry gave rise to this concept. The Cartesian product of two sets X (for example the points on an x-axis) and Y (for example the points on a y-axis), denoted X × Y, is the set of all possible ordered pairs whose first component is a member of X and whose second component is a member of Y (e.g., the whole of the x–y plane): For example, the Cartesian product of the 13-element set of standard playing card ranks {Ace, King, Queen, Jack, 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2} and the four-element set of card suits {♠, ♥, ♦, ♣} is the 52-element set of all possible playing cards: ranks × suits = {(Ace, ♠), (King, ♠), ..., (2, ♠), (Ace, ♥), ..., (3, ♣), (2, ♣)}. The corresponding Cartesian product has 52 = 13 × 4 elements. The Cartesian product of the suits × ranks would still be the 52 pairings, but in the opposite order {(♠, Ace), (♠, King), ...}. Ordered pairs (a kind of tuple)
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    Columbia

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbia, formerly Wright's Ferry, is a borough in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, 28 miles (45 km) southeast of Harrisburg on the left (east) bank of the Susquehanna River, across from Wrightsville and York County and just south of U.S. Route 30. The settlement was founded in 1726 by Colonial English Quakers from Chester County led by entrepreneur and evangelist John Wright. Establishment of the eponymous Wright's Ferry, the first commercial Susquehanna crossing in the region, inflamed territorial conflict with neighboring Maryland but brought growth and prosperity to the small town, which was briefly considered as a candidate for the new United States' capital. Though besieged for a short while by Civil War destruction, Columbia remained a lively center of transport and industry throughout the 19th century, once serving as a terminus of the Pennsylvania Canal. Later, however, the Great Depression and 20th-century changes in economy and technology sent the borough into decline. It is notable today as the site of one of the world's few museums devoted entirely to horology. The area around present-day Columbia was originally populated by Native American tribes, most notably the
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    Columbia

    Columbia

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbia is a former California Gold Rush boomtown located in the Sierra Nevada foothills. The central portion of the town is preserved as a California state historic park and a National Historic Landmark that preserves the original, gold-rush-town flavor of the town, once dubbed the "Gem of the Southern Mines." Founded in 1850 when gold was discovered, it is in Tuolumne County, California, United States. Although only about 2,000 people now live in this region near Sonora, California, at its height it was California's second-largest city. It was even considered briefly as a site for the state capitol of California. In 1854 the bulk of the town burned down and was re-built with brick and iron structures that survive to this day. Columbia's main street, part of the Columbia State Historic Park, is closed to automobile traffic but is open to horses, carriages, bicycles and pedestrians. The town, now technically a census-designated place (CDP), is located along State Route 49 just north of Sonora. Wired telephones in Columbia work out of the Sonora central office. Major points of interest in the area include Columbia Community College, a two-year, community college. Columbia Airport
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    Columbia County

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbia County is a county located in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. As of 2010, the population was 67,295. Columbia County was created on March 22, 1813, from part of Northumberland County and named for Columbia, a poetic name for the United States that alludes to Christopher Columbus. Its county seat is Bloomsburg. The county is part of the Bloomsburg–Berwick micropolitan statistical area. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 490 square miles (1,269.1 km), of which 486 square miles (1,258.7 km) is land and 4 square miles (10.4 km) (0.87%) is water. Part of Ricketts Glen State Park is in the northern portion of Columbia County. Knob Mountain, which peaks at approximately 1720 feet above sea level. Catawissa Mountain, which peaks at approximately 1760 feet above sea level. As of the census of 2000, there were 64,151 people, 24,915 households, and 16,568 families residing in the county. The population density was 132 people per square mile (51/km²). There were 27,733 housing units at an average density of 57 per square mile (22/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 97.59% White, 0.80% Black or African-American, 0.15% Native American, 0.52% Asian,
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    Columbus

    Columbus

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbus is a city in east central Nebraska, United States. Its population was 22,111 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Platte County. In the 18th century, the area around the confluence of the Platte and the Loup Rivers was used by a variety of Native American tribes, including Pawnee, Otoe, Ponca, and Omaha. The Pawnee are thought to have descended from the Protohistoric Lower Loup Culture; the Otoe had moved from central Iowa into the lower Platte Valley in the early 18th century; and the closely related Omaha and Ponca had moved from the vicinity of the Ohio River mouth, settling along the Missouri by the mid-18th century. In 1720, Pawnee and Otoe allied with the French massacred the Spanish force led by Pedro de Villasur just south of the present site of Columbus. In the 19th century, the "Great Platte River Road"—the valley of the Platte and North Platte rivers running from Fort Kearny to Fort Laramie— was the principal route of the westward expansion. For travellers following the north bank of the Platte, the Loup River, with its soft banks and quicksands, represented a major obstacle. In the absence of a ferry or a bridge, most of these followed the Loup for a
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    Columbus

    Columbus

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbus is an unincorporated area within Mansfield Township in Burlington County, New Jersey, United States. The area is served as United States Postal Service ZIP Code 08022. Notable current and former residents of Columbus include:
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    Columbus

    Columbus

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbus is a town in Polk County, North Carolina, United States. The population was 992 at the 2000 census. It is the county seat of Polk County. Columbus is located at 35°15′2″N 82°12′8″W / 35.25056°N 82.20222°W / 35.25056; -82.20222 (35.250669, -82.202115). According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 1.8 square miles (4.7 km), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 992 people, 414 households, and 238 families residing in the town. The population density was 559.1 people per square mile (216.4/km²). There were 442 housing units at an average density of 249.1 per square mile (96.4/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 90.32% White, 5.95% African American, 0.20% Native American, 3.12% from other races, and 0.40% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.56% of the population. There were 414 households out of which 19.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.7% were married couples living together, 10.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 42.5% were non-families. 38.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 26.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or
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    Columbus

    Columbus

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbus ( /kəˈlʌmbəs/) is a city in and the county seat of Bartholomew County, Indiana, United States. The population was 44,061 at the 2010 census. Located approximately forty miles (64 km) south of Indianapolis, on the east fork of the White River, it is the state's 20th largest city. It is also the principal city of the Columbus, Indiana, metropolitan statistical area which encompasses all of Bartholomew County. Columbus is currently ranked 11th in the US on the list of safest cities per population. National Geographic Traveler ranked Columbus 11th on its historic destinations list in late 2008, describing the city as "authentic, unique, and unspoiled." Columbus won the national contest "America in Bloom" in 2006, and in 2004 it was named one of "The Ten Most Playful Towns" by Nick Jr. Family Magazine. The July 2005 edition of GQ Magazine named Columbus one of the "62 Reasons to Love Your Country." Columbus is the headquarters of the engine company Cummins, Inc. The land which is now Columbus was bought by General John Tipton and Luke Bonesteel in 1820. General Tipton built a log cabin on Mt. Tipton, a small hill overlooking White River and the surrounding flat, heavily
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    Columbus

    Columbus

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbus is a city in Columbia and Dodge Counties in the south-central part of the U.S. state of Wisconsin. The population was 4,991 at the 2010 census. Columbus is located about 28 miles (45 km) northeast of Madison on the Crawfish River. It is part of the Madison Metropolitan Statistical Area. Nearly all of the city is located within the town of Columbus in Columbia County, though a small portion lies within the town of Elba in Dodge County. Columbus is located at 43°20′14″N 89°1′21″W / 43.33722°N 89.0225°W / 43.33722; -89.0225 (43.337366, -89.022753). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 4.0 square miles (10 km), of which 0.25% is water. In 1900, 2,349 people lived in Columbus, Wisconsin; in 1910, there were 2,523 residents. As of the census of 2000, there were 4,479 people, 1,843 households, and 1,194 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,122.7 people per square mile (433.4/km²). There were 1,927 housing units at an average density of 483.0 per square mile (186.5/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 98.28% White, 0.36% Black or African American, 0.22% Native American, 0.31% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.29%
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    Columbus

    Columbus

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbus is a town in and the county seat of Stillwater County, Montana, United States. The population was 1,893 at the 2010 census. The community originated as a stagecoach station on the Yellowstone River. The original name was Sheep Dip, then changed to Stillwater, but because of a Stillwater, Minnesota on the Northern Pacific RR, the mail presented a problem. Then came the name Columbus, Montana. Columbus is located at 45°38′18″N 109°15′08″W / 45.638445°N 109.252332°W / 45.638445; -109.252332 (45.638445, -109.252332). According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 1.2 square miles (3.1 km), of which, 1.2 square miles (3.1 km) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.10 km) of it (3.20%) is water. Columbus is located between the Yellowstone River, the old Yellowstone Trail, Highway 10, and now Interstate 90. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,748 people, 709 households, and 455 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,449.6 people per square mile (557.8/km). There were 762 housing units at an average density of 631.9 per square mile (243.1/km). The racial makeup of the town was 96.62% White, 0.23% African American, 1.26% Native
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    Columbus Township

    • Named after: Christopher Columbus
    Columbus Township is a civil township of St. Clair County in the U.S. state of Michigan. The population was 4,615 at the 2000 census. According to the United States Census Bureau, the township has a total area of 37.2 square miles (96 km), of which, 37.1 square miles (96 km) of it is land and 0.1 square miles (0.26 km) of it (0.38%) is water. The Belle River passes through the township and has two tributaries: Gillett Drain and Dawson Drain. The creation of the Fort Gratiot Turnpike, now known as Gratiot Road, in 1832 led to the settlement of Columbus Township. Columbus Township was organized as a township on March 11, 1837. The Township was named for the famous explorer Christopher Columbus, and Theodore Bethey served as the Township's first supervisor. In 1839 the Grand Trunk Western Railroad opened a small train station. In 1859, a 12 year-old Thomas A. Edison was given his first job as a newsboy on the Grand Trunk Western Railroad line between Port Huron and Detroit. In 1992, the Richmond Area Historical and Genealogical Society moved the 1900-era Grand Trunk Railroad Depot located in Hickey to the nearby community of Richmond, MI. In 1845 the population was 315. In 1880, the
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    Eleanor Roosevelt High School

    • Named after: Eleanor Roosevelt
    Eleanor Roosevelt High School is a public high school on the Upper East Side of Manhattan in New York City. Eleanor Roosevelt High School is a small school composed of about 33 teachers and 500 students representing over 40 different countries. Initially opened at a temporary location in Chelsea, with 105 ninth graders and a staff of eight, ERHS currently has over five hundred students and over forty-five staff members. Every year, the school selects 125 to 140 students out of over 6,000 applicants and is often selected over specialized high schools by students looking for a more liberal curriculum. In 2011 Eleanor Roosevelt High School was ranked in the top 1% of public high schools in the nation by Newsweek. Eleanor Roosevelt High School offers a comprehensive college preparatory program with Advanced Placement (AP) offerings, electives, and opportunities for college credit. Advanced Placement (AP) courses are college level courses where the student is admitted based on eligibility. The class schedule consists of seven 46-minute periods for the four core subjects, two elective/foreign language courses, and lunch. An advisory class occurs after the student's lunch period
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    Flinders University

    Flinders University

    • Named after: Matthew Flinders
    The Flinders University of South Australia, commonly referred to as Flinders University, is a public university in Adelaide, South Australia. Founded in 1966, it was named in honour of navigator Matthew Flinders, who explored and surveyed the South Australian coastline in the early 19th century. The university has established a reputation as a leading research institution with a devotion to innovation. It is a member of the Innovative Research Universities (IRU) Group and ranks 17 in Australia. Academically, the university pioneered a cross-disciplinary approach to education, and its faculties of medicine and the humanities are ranked among the nation's top 10. It is also ranked within the world's top 400 institutions in both Times Higher Education and the Academic Ranking of World Universities by Shanghai Jiao Tong University. In 2011, Flinder's registered the Australia's worst fall in the year's rankings, when it dropped 49 places from the 2010 position in the QS World University Rankings. In the late 1950s, with the growth of population in South Australia and the University of Adelaide's North Terrace campus reaching full capacity, the need for a second South Australian
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    Gorch Fock

    Gorch Fock

    • Named after: Johann Kinau
    The Gorch Fock is a tall ship of the German Navy (Deutsche Marine). She is the second ship of that name and a sister ship of the Gorch Fock built in 1933. Both ships are named in honour of the German writer Johann Kinau who wrote under the pseudonym "Gorch Fock" and died in the battle of Jutland/Skagerrak in 1916. The modern-day Gorch Fock was built in 1958 and has since then undertaken 146 cruises (as of October 2006), including one tour around the world in 1988. She is sometimes referred to (unofficially) as the Gorch Fock II to distinguish her from her older sister ship. Germany lost all of its school ships as war reparations after World War II to the Allies, so the (West) German Bundesmarine decided in 1957 to have a new training vessel built following the plans for the original Gorch Fock of 1933 which by that time was owned by the Soviets, and renamed to Tovarishch. The new ship was a modernized repeat of the Albert Leo Schlageter, a slightly modified sister ship of the previous Gorch Fock. The 1933 Gorch Fock had already been designed to be a very safe ship: she had a righting moment large enough to bring her back into the upright position even when heeling over to nearly
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    H. P. Lovecraft

    • Named after: H. P. Lovecraft
    H. P. Lovecraft was an American psychedelic rock band, formed in Chicago, Illinois, in 1967 and named after the horror writer H. P. Lovecraft. Much of the band's music was possessed of a haunting, eerie ambience, and consisted of material that was inspired by the macabre writings of the author whose name they had adopted. Combining elements of psychedelia and folk rock, the band's sound was marked by the striking vocal harmonies of ex-folk singer George Edwards and the classically-trained Dave Michaels. In addition, Michaels' multi-instrumentalist abilities on organ, piano, harpsichord, clarinet and recorder provided the band with a richer sonic palette than many of their contemporaries. The band was signed to Philips Records in 1967 and released its first single, "Anyway That You Want Me", in the early part of that year. Their first album, H. P. Lovecraft, followed in late 1967 and included what is arguably the band's best-known song, "The White Ship". The band then relocated to San Francisco, California, where they became a frequent attraction at various San Francisco Bay Area venues, including The Fillmore and the Winterland Ballroom. In 1968, a second album, H. P. Lovecraft II,
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    Martin Luther King, Jr.

    Martin Luther King, Jr.

    • Named after: Martin Luther King, Sr.
    Martin Luther King, Jr. (January 15, 1929 – April 4, 1968) was an American clergyman, activist, and prominent leader in the African-American Civil Rights Movement. He is best known for his role in the advancement of civil rights using nonviolent civil disobedience. King has become a national icon in the history of modern American liberalism. A Baptist minister, King became a civil rights activist early in his career. He led the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott and helped found the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) in 1957, serving as its first president. King's efforts led to the 1963 March on Washington, where King delivered his "I Have a Dream" speech. There, he established his reputation as one of the greatest orators in American history. He also established his reputation as a radical, and became an object of the FBI's COINTELPRO for the rest of his life. On October 14 1964, King received the Nobel Peace Prize for combating racial inequality through nonviolence. In the next few years leading up to his death, he expanded his focus to include poverty and the Vietnam War—alienating many of his liberal allies with a 1967 speech titled "Beyond Vietnam". King was planning a
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    Montes Archimedes

    • Named after: Archimedes
    Montes Archimedes is a mountain range on the Moon. It is named after the crater Archimedes that lies to the north, which in turn has an eponym of the Greek mathematician Archimedes. This group of mountains is located on a plateau in the eastern part of the Mare Imbrium, a lunar mare in the northwest quadrant of the Moon's near side. They are bounded on the eastern side by the Palus Putredinis, a small mare, and to the north by Archimedes. Farther to the south and east lies the impressive Montes Apenninus, a long mountain range. The selenographic coordinates of this range is 25.3° N, 4.6° W. The peaks of Montes Archimedes occupy an area with a maximum diameter of 163 km, although the most rugged portion of the terrain is concentrated within the central 70 km. The remainder of the peaks are scattered across the plateau, with no particular structure or pattern. Some of the peaks in this range achieve heights of up to 2.0 km, much less than those in the Montes Apenninus, for example, and none have received specific designations.
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    Perl

    • Named after: Parable of the Pearl
    Perl is a high-level, general-purpose, interpreted, dynamic programming language. Though Perl is not officially an acronym, there are various backronyms in usage, such as: Practical Extraction and Reporting Language. Perl was originally developed by Larry Wall in 1987 as a general-purpose Unix scripting language to make report processing easier. Since then, it has undergone many changes and revisions. The latest major stable revision is 5.16, released in May 2012. Perl 6 is a complete redesign of the language, announced in 2000 and still under active development as of 2012. Perl borrows features from other programming languages including C, shell scripting (sh), AWK, and sed. The language provides powerful text processing facilities without the arbitrary data length limits of many contemporary Unix tools, facilitating easy manipulation of text files. Perl gained widespread popularity in the late 1990s as a CGI scripting language, in part due to its parsing abilities. In addition to CGI, Perl is used for graphics programming, system administration, network programming, finance, bioinformatics, and other applications. Perl is nicknamed "the Swiss Army chainsaw of scripting languages"
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    President Theodore Roosevelt High School

    President Theodore Roosevelt High School

    • Named after: Theodore Roosevelt
    President Theodore Roosevelt High School is a public, co-educational college preparatory high school of the Hawaiʻi State Department of Education and serves grades nine through twelve. Roosevelt High School is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. President Theodore Roosevelt High School is one of the oldest public secondary schools in the state of Hawaii. It was one of the first schools in the state to have compulsory Reserve Officer Training Corps education, a standard from 1934 to 1966. Roosevelt High School is most famous for its buildings and landmark domed bell tower constructed in Spanish mission architectural style, currently being restored through grants of the Hawaiʻi State Legislature. Its buildings were used as backdrops in several movie and television productions. Adjacent to the historic bell-towered building is the 2001 Hawaiian basalt sculpture 'Hoʻokahi' (To Make as One), by Mark Watson. Roosevelt High School is located in urban Honolulu, Hawaiʻi. It is situated in Makiki's Kalāwahine Valley adjacent to the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific overlooking downtown Honolulu and Ala Moana. The campus boasts the Hawaiian basalt sculpture
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    The B-52's

    The B-52's

    • Named after: B-52 Stratofortress
    The B-52s are an American rock band, formed in Athens, Georgia in 1976. The original line-up consisted of Fred Schneider (vocals, cowbell), Kate Pierson (vocals, keyboards), Cindy Wilson (vocals, tambourine, bongos), Ricky Wilson (guitar), and Keith Strickland (drums). Following Ricky Wilson's death in 1985 Strickland switched to guitar. Rooted in New Wave and 1960s rock and roll, the group later covered many genres ranging from post-punk to pop rock. The "guy vs. gals" vocals of Schneider, Pierson, and Wilson, sometimes used in call and response style ("Strobe Light," "Private Idaho", and "Good Stuff"), are a trademark. Presenting themselves as a positive, enthusiastic, slightly oddball party band, the B-52s tell tall tales, glorify wild youth, and celebrate wild romance. The band name had long been "The B-52's", until 2008 when they dropped the apostrophe and are now "The B-52s". The B-52s were formed when vocalist Cindy Wilson, her older brother and guitarist Ricky, organist and vocalist Kate Pierson, original drummer and percussionist Keith Strickland and cowbell player and vocalist Fred Schneider played an impromptu musical jam session after sharing a tropical Flaming Volcano
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    Theodore Roosevelt High School

    • Named after: Theodore Roosevelt
    Theodore Roosevelt High School is a four year (9-12) public high school of the Gary Community School Corporation in Gary, Indiana, United States. It is located in the Midtown neighborhood. Theodore Roosevelt High School was named after Theodore Roosevelt, the twenty-sixth President of the United States. Roosevelt High School began with a very few students who attended school in a one-room frame structure erected in 1908 at Twelfth Avenue and Massachusetts Street. Mr. Everett D. Simpson was the first teacher employed. At that time there was another school at Fourteenth Avenue and Connecticut Street. In 1912, the pupils of these two centers were moved into the new Froebel School at Fifteenth and Madison Street. To meet the new demands of the growing Gary population, a school for primary children was opened at Twenty-first Avenue and Adams Street in 1915. To this center, Mrs. Elizabeth Lytle and a group of primary children were transferred from Froebel School. The next year three additional teachers were employed. In 1921, the school was moved to the present site on Twenty-fifth Avenue and Harrison Street. Mr. Z. D. Lenoir was appointed Principal. This school was called Roosevelt
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    Tristan Buckner

    Tristan Buckner

    { "code": "/api/status/error", "messages": [ { "code": "/api/status/error", "message": "All hosts have soft-failed" } ], "status": "500 Internal Error", "transaction_id": "cache;cache01.p01.sjc1:8101;2013-01-16T14:22:07Z;0083" }
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    249
    USS Thomas Jefferson

    USS Thomas Jefferson

    • Named after: Thomas Jefferson
    USS Thomas Jefferson (SSBN-618), an Ethan Allen class nuclear-powered submarine, was the second ship of the United States Navy to be named for Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826), the third President of the United States (1801–1809). She later was reclassified as an attack submarine and redesignated SSN-618. Thomas Jefferson's keel was laid down on 3 February 1961 at Newport News, Virginia, by the Newport News Shipbuilding sponsored by Mrs. Robert S. McNamara, wife of United States Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara; and commissioned on 4 January 1963, Commander Leon H. Rathbun commanding the Blue Crew and Commander Charles Priest, Jr., commanding the Gold Crew. Thomaas Jefferson was initially a fleet ballistic missile submarine and was later converted to an attack submarine. After shakedown training by both crews and a repair period, Thomas Jefferson was assigned to Submarine Squadron 14 in early October 1963. On 28 October 1963, the Blue Crew took the submarine on her first deterrent patrol which ended at Holy Loch, Scotland, in December 1963. Thomas Jefferson continued patrols from Holy Loch for the next four years and also acted as flagship for Submarine Squadron 14. In 1966, she
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    Wayne County

    Wayne County

    • Named after: Anthony Wayne
    Wayne County is a county in the U.S. state of Michigan. As of the 2010 census, its population was 1,820,584 making it the 15th most-populous county in the United States. The county seat is Detroit, the largest city in Michigan. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 672.20 square miles (1,741.0 km), of which 614.15 square miles (1,590.6 km) (or 91.36%) is land and 58.05 square miles (150.3 km) (or 8.64%) is water (including parts of the Detroit River and Lake St. Clair). Wayne County borders on Oakland County and Macomb County to the north, Washtenaw County to the west, and Monroe County to the south. The eastern (and sometimes southern) boundary is a water boundary in the Detroit River and Lake St. Clair with Essex County, Ontario, Canada. Automotive traffic crosses this boundary at the Detroit-Windsor Tunnel and the Ambassador Bridge. Due to the change in direction of the river, this portion of Ontario actually lies south of Wayne County. Due to the direction ambiguity, the southern communities of the county are usually referred to as "Downriver". Grosse Ile is the largest island in Wayne County and is connected to the mainland by the Wayne County Bridge and
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