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Best Musical genre of All Time

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    1
    Classic rock

    Classic rock

    • Artists: Steve Miller Band
    • Albums: Live at the Fillmore East
    • Parent genres: Rock music
    Classic rock is a radio format which developed from the album-oriented rock (AOR) format in the early 1980s. In the United States, the classic rock format features music ranging generally from the late 1960s to the late 1980s, primarily focusing on the hard rock genre that peaked in popularity in the 1970s. Classic rock stations re-create, in part, the sound of album-oriented rock stations of the 1970s and 1980s (although usually with a much more limited playlist) and appeal mainly to adults rather than teenagers. Despite this, many classic rock acts consistently attract new generations of fans. Some classic rock stations also play a limited number of current releases which are stylistically consistent with the station's sound, or from established classic rock artists who still produce new albums. The classic rock format evolved from AOR radio stations that were attempting to appeal to an older audience by including familiar songs of the past with current hits. In 1980, AOR radio station M105 in Cleveland, Ohio began billing itself as "Cleveland's Classic Rock", playing a mix of rock music from the mid-1960s to the present. In 1982, radio consultant Lee Abrams developed the
    7.43
    7 votes
    2

    Electronica

    • Artists: Orbital
    • Albums: Ghost Boobs
    • Parent genres: Techno
    Electronica includes a wide range of contemporary electronic music designed for a wide range of uses, including foreground listening, some forms of dancing, and background music for other activities. Unlike electronic dance music not all examples of electronica are necessarily made for dancing. In the United States genres such as techno, downtempo, and ambient are among those encompassed by the umbrella term, entering the American mainstream from "alternative" or "underground" venues during the late 1990s. Allmusic categorises electronica as a top-level genre on their main page, where they state that electronica includes danceable grooves to music for headphones and chillout areas. Electronica has grown to influence mainstream crossover recordings. Electronic sounds began to form the basis of a wide array of popular music in the late 1970s, and became key to the mainstream pop and rock sounds of the 1980s. Since the adoption of "electronica" in the 1990s to describe more underground music with an electronic aesthetic, elements of modern electronica have been adopted by many popular artists in mainstream music. Electronica took benefit from advancements in music technology,
    9.40
    5 votes
    3
    Electronic art music

    Electronic art music

    • Artists: Enore Zaffiri
    • Albums: Klangfelder
    • Parent genres: 20th century classical music
    Electronic art music refers to those forms of electronic music that fall within the general category of art music. The term encompasses a range of experimental music forms, both historical and contemporary, created by means of electronic instrument and differentiated from electronic forms of popular music, such as technopop, electronica or electronic dance music. Although electronic art music has not penetrated the popular music marketplace directly, it has influenced the course of popular music, from the early days of space rock and progressive rock, through the later developments of electronica, electronic dance music, ambient music, space music, and cinema soundtracks. Some of the most prominent musicians and most highly acclaimed institutions have been involved in the progress of electronic art music, including celebrities such as Stokowski, Boulez, and Stockhausen, and institutions such as Columbia University, Princeton University, the University of Wisconsin, and Stanford University in the US, as well as broadcasting institutions in Canada, Europe, and Japan. At the earliest performances of true electronic music in the United States, "public and professionals alike were
    8.17
    6 votes
    4
    Garage rock

    Garage rock

    • Artists: The Troggs
    • Albums: Ear-Piercing Punk
    • Parent genres: Mod
    Garage rock is a raw form of rock and roll that was first popular in the United States and Canada from about 1963 to 1967. During the 1960s, it was not recognized as a separate music genre and had no specific name. In the late 1970s, some rock critics retroactively identified it as an early incarnation of punk rock, and it is sometimes called garage punk, protopunk, or 1960s punk; however, the music style has predominantly been referred to as garage rock. The term "garage rock" comes from the perception that many such performers were young and amateurish, and often rehearsed in a family garage. Some bands were made up of middle-class teenagers from the suburbs, but some were from rural or urban areas, while others were composed of professional musicians in their twenties. The performances were often amateurish or naïve, with typical themes revolving around the traumas of high school life and songs about "lying girls" being particularly common. The lyrics and delivery were notably more aggressive than was common at the time, often with growled or shouted vocals that dissolved into incoherent screaming. Instrumentation was often characterised by the use of guitars distorted through a
    8.17
    6 votes
    5

    Goa trance

    • Artists: Kode IV
    • Albums: Twisted
    • Parent genres: Trance music
    Goa trance is a form of electronic music that originated during the late 1980s in Goa, India. The music has its roots in the popularity of Goa in the late 1960s and early 1970s as a hippie capital, and although musical developments were incorporating elements of industrial music and EBM (electronic body music) with the spiritual culture in India throughout the 1980s, the actual Goa trance style did not officially appear until the early 1990s. As the hippie tourist influx tapered off in the 1970s and 1980s, a core group remained in Goa, concentrating on developments in music along with other pursuits such as yoga and recreational drug use. The music that would eventually be known as Goa trance did not evolve from one single genre, but was inspired mainly by EBM-groups like Front Line Assembly, Meat Beat Manifesto, Front 242 and A Split-Second, acid house (The KLF's "What Time Is Love?" in particular), techno, Orbital, and psychedelic rock like Ozric Tentacles, Steve Hillage and Ash Ra Tempel. In addition to those, oriental tribal music/ethnic music also became a source of inspiration. A very early example (1974) of the relation between psychedelic rock and the music that would
    8.17
    6 votes
    6
    Tango music

    Tango music

    • Artists: Katona Twins
    • Albums: Lunático
    • Parent genres: Candombe
    Tango is a style of ballroom dance music in 2/4 or 4/4 time that originated among European immigrant populations of Argentina and Uruguay (collectively, the "Rioplatenses"). It is traditionally played by a sextet, known as the orquesta típica, which includes two violins, piano, double bass, and two bandoneóns. Earlier forms of this ensemble sometimes included flute, clarinet and guitar. Tango may be purely instrumental or may include a vocalist. Tango music and dance have become popular throughout the world. Even though the present forms developed in Argentina and Uruguay from the mid 19th century, there are records of 18th and early 19th century Tango styles in Cuba and Spain, while there is a flamenco Tangos dance that may share a common ancestor in a minuet-style European dance. All sources stress the influence of the African communities and their rhythms, while the instruments and techniques brought in by European immigrants in the 20th century played a major role in its final definition, relating it to the Salon music styles to which Tango would contribute back at a later stage. The first Tango ever recorded was made by Angel Villoldo and played by the French national guard in
    8.00
    6 votes
    7
    Industrial metal

    Industrial metal

    • Artists: Deadstar Assembly
    • Albums: Revolution
    • Parent genres: Alternative metal
    Industrial metal is a musical genre that draws from industrial dance music, thrash metal and hardcore punk, using repeating metal and punk guitar riffs, sampling, synthesizer or sequencer lines, and distorted vocals. Founding industrial metal acts include Ministry, Godflesh, and KMFDM. Industrial metal's popularity led to some criticism from other artists associated with the industrial scene. Subsequently, it is most well known in various European permutations. Industrial metal groups have produced many acclaimed music videos. Though electric guitars had been used by industrial artists since the early days of the genre, archetypal industrial groups such as Throbbing Gristle displayed a strong anti-rock stance. British post-punk band Killing Joke pioneered the crossing over between styles, and was an influence on major industrial metal bands such as Ministry, Godflesh, and Nine Inch Nails. Another pioneer industrial rock group, Big Black, also impacted some later groups. By the late 1980s industrial and heavy metal began to fuse into a common genre, with Godflesh's self-titled EP and Ministry's The Land of Rape and Honey at the forefront. Godflesh was founded by former Napalm Death
    7.67
    6 votes
    8

    Indian classical music

    • Artists: Asha Bhosle
    • Albums: Rich Ala Rahka
    • Parent genres: Classical music
    The origins of Indian classical music can be found in the Vedas, which are the oldest scriptures in the Hindu tradition. Indian classical music has also been significantly influenced by, or syncretised with, Indian folk music and Persian music. The Samaveda, one of the four Vedas, describes music at length. The Samaveda was derived from the Rigveda so that its hymns could be sung as Samagana. These hymns were sung by Udgatar priests at sacrifices in which the Soma ritual drink, clarified and mixed with milk and other ingredients, was offered in libation to various deities. This style evolved into jatis and eventually into ragas. Bharat's Natyashastra was the first treatise laying down fundamental principles of dance, music, and drama. Indian classical music is both elaborate and expressive. Like Western classical music, it divides the octave into 12 semitones of which the 7 basic notes are, in ascending tonal order, Sa Re Ga Ma Pa Dha Ni Sa for Hindustani music and Sa Ri Ga Ma Pa Dha Ni Sa for Carnatic music, similar to Western music's Do Re Mi Fa Sol La Ti Do. However, Indian music uses just-intonation tuning, unlike most modern Western classical music, which uses the
    8.80
    5 votes
    9
    Drum and bass

    Drum and bass

    • Artists: Aphex Twin
    • Albums: Damage
    • Parent genres: Ambient music
    Drum and bass (/ˈdrʌm ənd ˈbeɪs/) (also written as drum 'n' bass and commonly abbreviated to D&B, D+B or DnB) is a type of electronic music which emerged in the mid 1990s. The genre is characterized by fast breakbeats (typically between 160–180 bpm, occasional variation is noted in older compositions), with heavy bass and sub-bass lines. Drum and bass began as an offshoot of the United Kingdom rave scene of the very early 1990s. Over the first decade of its existence, the incorporation of elements from various musical genres led to many permutations in its overall style. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, a growing nightclub and overnight outdoor event culture gave birth to a new electronic music style called rave music, which, much like hip-hop, combined sampled syncopated beats or breakbeats, other samples from a wide range of different musical genres and, occasionally, samples of music, dialogue and effects from films and television programmes. But rave music tended to feature stronger bass sounds and a faster tempo (127 to over 140) beats per minute (BPM) than that of early house music. This subgenre was known as "hardcore" rave but from as early as 1992, some musical tracks
    7.50
    6 votes
    10
    Folk music of Ireland

    Folk music of Ireland

    • Artists: Pádraig Duggan
    • Albums: Maighréad Ní Dhomhnaill
    • Parent genres: Music of Ireland
    The folk music of Ireland (also known as Irish traditional music, Irish trad, Irish folk music, and other variants) is the generic term for music that has been created in various genres in Ireland. In Topographia Hibernica (1188), Gerald de Barri conceded that the Irish were more skilled at playing music than any other nation he had seen. He claimed that the two main instruments used at this time were the "harp" and "tabor" (see bodhrán), that their music was fast and lively, and that their songs always began and ended with B-flat. In A History of Irish Music (1905), W. H. Grattan Flood wrote that, in Gaelic Ireland, there were at least ten instruments in general use. These were the cruit (a small harp) and clairseach (a bigger harp with typically 30 strings), the timpan (a small string instrument played with a bow or plectrum), the feadan (a fife), the buinne (an oboe or flute), the guthbuinne (a bassoon-type horn), the bennbuabhal and corn (hornpipes), the cuislenna (bagpipes - see Great Irish Warpipes), the stoc and sturgan (clarions or trumpets), and the cnamha (castanets). There is also evidence of the fiddle being used in the 8th century. There are several collections of
    8.20
    5 votes
    11
    Beat music

    Beat music

    • Artists: The Pretty Things
    • Albums: The Kinks
    • Parent genres: Rock music
    Beat music, British beat, or Merseybeat (for bands from Liverpool beside the River Mersey) is a pop and rock music genre that developed in the United Kingdom in the early 1960s. Beat music is a fusion of rock and roll, doo-wop, skiffle and R&B. The beat movement provided most of the bands responsible for the British invasion of the American pop charts in the period after 1964, and provided the model for many important developments in pop and rock music, including the format of the rock group around lead, rhythm and bass guitars with drums. The exact origins of the terms Beat music and Merseybeat are uncertain. Beat music seems to have had little to do with the Beat Generation literary movement of the 1950s, and more to do with driving rhythms, which the bands had adopted from their rock and roll, rhythm and blues and soul music influences. As the initial wave of rock and roll declined in the later 1950s "big beat" music, later shortened to "beat", became a live dance alternative to the balladeers like Tommy Steele, Marty Wilde and Cliff Richard who were dominating the charts. The term Mersey Beat was used for a Liverpool magazine of that name found in 1961 by Bill Harry. Harry
    9.25
    4 votes
    12
    Big band

    Big band

    • Artists: Bobby Darin
    • Albums: Call Me Irresponsible
    • Parent genres: Jazz
    A big band is a type of musical ensemble that originated in the United States and is associated with jazz and the Swing Era typically consisting of rhythm, brass, and woodwind instruments totaling approximately 12 to 25 musicians. The terms jazz band, jazz ensemble, jazz orchestra, stage band, society band, and dance band may describe this type of ensemble in particular contexts. A standard 17-piece instrumentation evolved in the big-bands, for which many commercial arrangements are available. This instrumentation consists of five saxophones (most often two altos, two tenors, and one baritone), four trumpets, four trombones (often including one bass trombone) and a four-piece rhythm section (composed of drums, acoustic bass or electric bass, piano and guitar). However, variants to this instrumentation are common. Composers, arrangers, and bandleaders have used sections with more or fewer players, and additional instruments, such as valve trombone, baritone horn/euphonium (both of which are usually used in place of or with trombones), vibes, bass clarinet, French horn, tuba, banjo, accordion and strings (violin, viola, cello). Male and female vocalists have also joined big bands to
    9.25
    4 votes
    13
    Queercore

    Queercore

    • Artists: Pansy Division
    • Albums: Personal Best
    • Parent genres: Punk rock
    Queercore (or Homocore) is a cultural and social movement that began in the mid-1980s as an offshoot of punk. It is distinguished by being discontent with society in general and its rejection of the disapproval of the gay, bisexual, and lesbian communities. Queercore expresses itself in a DIY style through zines, music, writing, art and film. As a musical genre, it may be distinguished by lyrics exploring themes of prejudice and dealing with issues such as sexual identity, gender identity and the rights of the individual; more generally bands offer a critique of society endemic to their position within it, sometimes in a light-hearted way, sometimes seriously. Musically, many queercore bands originated in the punk scene but the industrial music culture has been influential as well. Queercore groups encompass many genres such as hardcore punk, synthpunk, indie rock, power pop, No Wave, noise, experimental, industrial and others. The zine J.D.s, created by G.B. Jones and Bruce LaBruce, is widely acknowledged as being the zine which launched the movement. "J.D.s is seen by many to be the catalyst that pushed the queercore scene into existence", writes Amy Spencer in DIY: The Rise Of
    6.00
    7 votes
    14

    Italo disco

    • Artists: Mirage
    • Albums: 28 Golden Hits
    • Parent genres: Electronic dance music
    Italo disco (sometimes hyphenated, such as Italo-disco, subjected to varying capitalization, or abbreviated as Italo) is a genre of music which originated in Italy and was mainly produced in the mid-1980s. The origin of the genre's name is strongly tied to marketing efforts of the ZYX record label, which began licensing and marketing the music outside of Italy in 1982. An early form of electronic dance music, Italo disco faded in the late 1980s as Italian dance music producers and consumers increasingly embraced pop, Hi-NRG and Italo house aesthetics. Italo disco borrowed elements from traditional disco music, yet was more electronic. The genre employed drum machines and synthesizers and was usually sung in English. The genre was successful in Europe during the 1980s, except the United Kingdom where it was never particularly successful, although several Italo disco songs did become hits there, such as Ryan Paris's "Dolce Vita", Clubhouse's "Do It Again Medley", Laura Branigan's "Self Control" (a cover of the original by Raf), Baltimora's "Tarzan Boy", Taffy's "I Love My Radio", Spagna's "Call Me" and Sabrina's "Boys". Nonetheless, several British electronic acts such as the Pet
    6.83
    6 votes
    15

    Neotraditional country

    • Artists: Randy Travis
    • Albums: Risin' Outlaw
    • Parent genres: Country
    Neotraditional country, also known as "new traditional" country, is a country music style that emphasizes the instrumental background and a "traditional" country vocal style. Neotraditional country artists often dress in the fashions of the country music scene of the 1940s, 1950s and early 1960s. Some neotraditional artists are sometimes associated with the alternative country movement. Neotraditional country was born as a reaction to the perceived blandness of mainstream country music. New (or "neo-") traditionalism looked to the elders of country music like Ernest Tubb, Hank Williams and Kitty Wells for inspiration, and was a precursor to the more general categorization known as New country. The creation of neotraditionalism was also done in contrast to the more pop-oriented acts of the 1970s and 1980s, such as Ronnie Milsap and Anne Murray. In the mid-1980s Ricky Skaggs, a picking prodigy who took his inspiration from Bill Monroe and Ralph Stanley (Skaggs was a Clinch Mountain Boy as a teen), began making music that he believed brought country back to its roots. Another Neotraditional Country artist was one of Skaggs' friend and former band-mate, Keith Whitley. After his success
    6.83
    6 votes
    16
    Dub

    Dub

    • Artists: King Tubby
    • Albums: King Tubby Meets Rockers Uptown
    • Parent genres: Reggae
    Dub is a genre of music which grew out of reggae music in the 1960s, and is commonly considered a subgenre, though it has developed to extend beyond the scope of reggae. Music in this genre consists predominantly of instrumental remixes of existing recordings and is achieved by significantly manipulating and reshaping the recordings, usually by removing the vocals from an existing music piece, emphasizing the drum and bass parts (this stripped down track is sometimes referred to as a 'riddim'). Other techniques include dynamically adding extensive echo, reverb, panoramic delay, and occasional dubbing of vocal or instrumental snippets from the original version or other works. Dub was pioneered by Osbourne "King Tubby" Ruddock, Lee "Scratch" Perry, Errol Thompson and others in the late 1960s. Similar experiments with recordings at the mixing desk outside of the dancehall environment were also done by producers Clive Chin and Herman Chin Loy. These producers, especially Ruddock and Perry, looked upon the mixing desk as an instrument, manipulating tracks to come up with something new and different. Dub has influenced many genres of music, including rock (most significantly the
    7.80
    5 votes
    17
    Melodic death metal

    Melodic death metal

    • Artists: Nightfall
    • Albums: Tales from Sadness
    • Parent genres: Death metal
    Melodic death metal (also referred to as melodeath or MDM) is a heavy metal music style that combines elements from the New Wave of British Heavy Metal (NWOBHM) with elements of death metal. The style was developed during the early and mid-1990s, primarily in England and Scandinavia. The Swedish death metal scene in particular did much to popularize the style, which soon centered in the "Gothenburg metal" scene in Gothenburg, Sweden. Melodic death metal uses components of NWOBHM, in particular the fast riffing and harmonic guitar lines, but also is influenced by the characteristics of death metal like heavily distorted guitars, fast double-bass drum patterns and sometimes blast beats. The vocal style of the genre may be a combination of harsh screaming, clean vocals, and death growls, if not emphasizing one of these styles over the rest. Credit for the popularity of melodic death metal can be attributed to the mid-90s releases of In Flames, At the Gates, and Dark Tranquillity, which laid the foundation for the Gothenburg metal scene. Another key band in the definition of melodic death metal was the British band Carcass, who started out playing grindcore but morphed into a death
    7.60
    5 votes
    18

    New Beat

    • Artists: Technotronic
    • Albums: Ex:el
    • Parent genres: Electronic body music
    New Beat is a term that was used in the 1980s to refer to two different genres of electronic dance music. It also refers to an underground 1980s Belgian music style. The term New Beat was first used in the USA during the early '80s. At the time, this New Beat music was a contemporary genre to techno from Detroit and house from Chicago, although not intrinsically linked. The Americans at the time used the term to describe those music styles that they never heard before. It was the new beat of the time, the new sound, very different from Hi-NRG disco, New Wave, synthpop, and rap. The term was soon replaced by other terms, so virtually any U.S. hits once described as "New Beat" are today considered a part of another music style, most of the time simply house or techno. The second time that the term New Beat was used, was in Europe. It first appeared in Belgium around 1987, to describe a local music style that mainly developed out of 'Bodybeat' heralded by the early formation of Front 242 and other such acts as Praga Khan and Lords of Acid. When MTV Europe began in the summer of 1987, it brought the term to the UK. In the UK, the term New Beat was used in 1987–1988 for various local
    7.60
    5 votes
    19
    Salsa music

    Salsa music

    • Artists: Brenda K. Starr
    • Albums: Te Sigo Esperando
    • Parent genres: Rumba
    Salsa music is a general term referring to what is essentially Cuban popular dance music which was internationalized outside Cuba. The term "Salsa" was initially recorded, promoted and marketed in New York City during the 1970s. The various musical genres comprising salsa include the Cuban son montuno, guaracha, chachachá, mambo, bolero and, to a lesser degree, non-Cuban genres such as the Puerto Rican bomba and plena, the Dominican merengue, and the Colombian cumbia. Latin jazz, which was also developed in New York City, has had a significant influence on salsa arrangers, piano guajeos, and instrumental soloists. Salsa occasionally incorporates elements from North American rock, R&B, and funk. All of these non-Cuban elements are grafted onto the basic Cuban son montuno template when performed within the context of salsa. The first salsa bands were predominantly "Nuyorican" (New Yorkers of Puerto Rican descent). The music eventually spread throughout the Western Hemisphere. Ultimately, salsa's popularity spread globally. Some of the founding salsa artists include Johnny Pacheco (the creator of the Fania All-Stars), Ray Barretto, Willie Colón, Larry Harlow, Roberto Roena, Bobby
    7.60
    5 votes
    20

    Kwaito

    • Artists: Lebo Mathosa
    • Albums: Zabalaza
    • Parent genres: African popular music
    Kwaito is a music genre that emerged in Johannesburg, South Africa, during the 1990s. It is a variant of house music featuring the use of African sounds and samples. Typically at a slower tempo range than other styles of house music, Kwaito often contains catchy melodic and percussive loop samples, deep bass lines, and vocals. Although bearing similarities to hip hop music, a distinctive feature of Kwaito is the manner in which the lyrics are sung, rapped and shouted. American producer Diplo has described Kwaito as "slowed-down garage music," most popular among the black youth of South Africa. The word kwaito is an Isicamtho term from the Gauteng townships and encompasses styles that range from guz, d'gong, and isgubhu to swaito. The word originates from the Afrikaans kwaai, which traditionally means strict or angry, although in more common and contemporary use the word is a loose translation of the English term cool. Kwaito led a post-Apartheid township subculture into the mainstream. Despite the fact that the Afrikaans language is associated with the apartheid regime and racial oppression, Afrikaans words are often drawn into the Isicamtho vocabulary, reshaped and used in a
    8.75
    4 votes
    21
    Metalcore

    Metalcore

    • Artists: Vision of Disorder
    • Albums: The Awakening
    • Parent genres: Heavy metal
    Metalcore is a broad fusion genre of extreme metal and hardcore punk. The name is an amalgam of the names of the two genres, distinguished by its emphasis on breakdowns, which are slow, intense passages that are conducive to moshing. Pioneering bands, such as Hogan's Heroes, Earth Crisis, Deadguy, and Integrity, lean more toward punk, whereas latter bands - Killswitch Engage, Underoath, All That Remains, Trivium, As I Lay Dying, Bullet for My Valentine and The Devil Wears Prada - lean toward metal. Sepultura, who has been credited to "laying the foundation" for the genre, and Pantera, who influenced Trivium, Atreyu, Bleeding Through and Unearth, have been influential in the development of metalcore. Black Flag and Bad Brains, among the originators of hardcore, admired and emulated Black Sabbath. British street punk groups such as Discharge and The Exploited also took inspiration from heavy metal. The Misfits put out the Earth A.D. album, becoming a crucial influence on thrash. Nonetheless, punk and metal cultures and music remained separate through the first half of the 1980s. Cross-pollination between metal and hardcore eventually birthed the crossover thrash scene, which gestated
    6.50
    6 votes
    22

    Alternative hip hop

    • Artists: Mattafix
    • Albums: S.T.I.L.L.B.O.R.N.
    • Parent genres: East Coast hip hop
    Alternative hip hop (also known as alternative rap) is a sub-genre of hip hop music that revolves around varieties of rap and hip hop genres. Allmusic defines it as follows: Originating in the late-80s, in midst of the Golden age of hip hop, alternative hip hop was headed primarily by East Coast rappers such as De La Soul, Pete Rock & C.L. Smooth, Jungle Brothers, A Tribe Called Quest, Brand Nubian, and Digable Planets in subsidiary conjunction by West Coast acts such as The Pharcyde, Del Tha Funkee Homosapien, Digital Underground, Freestyle Fellowship and Jurassic 5 as well as certain Southern acts such as Arrested Development, Goodie Mob, and OutKast. Similar to the alternative rock movement, alternative hip hop segued into the mainstream at the dawn of the 1990s. Arrested Development along with The Fugees, stand as the some of the first few alternative rap to be recognized by mainstream audiences. The classic debut albums 3 Feet High and Rising, People's Instinctive Travels and the Paths of Rhythm, and Bizarre Ride II the Pharcyde achieved minor commercial success as they garnered immense acclaim from music critics, who described the records as managing to be both ambitiously
    8.50
    4 votes
    23

    Middle Eastern music

    • Artists: Munir Bashir
    • Albums: Youm Aleek
    • Parent genres: Arabesque music
    The music of Western Asia and North Africa spans across a vast region, from Egypt to Iran, and its influences can be felt even further afield. Middle Eastern music influenced by the music of Greece and India, as well as Central Asia, Spain, Southern Italy, the Caucasus and the Balkans, as in Byzantine music and Chalga. The various nations of the region include the Arabic-speaking countries of the Middle East and North Africa, the Iraqi traditions of Mesopotamia, Iranian traditions of Persia, the varied traditions of Cypriot music, the music of Turkey, traditional Assyrian music, various Jewish traditions, Kurdish music, Berbers of North Africa, and Coptic Christians in Egypt all maintain their own traditions. Throughout the region, religion has been a common factor in uniting peoples of different languages, cultures and nations. The predominance of Islam allowed a great deal of Arabic and Byzantine influence to spread through the region rapidly from the 7th century onward. The Arabic scale is strongly melodic, based around various maqamat (sing. maqam) or modes (also known as makam in Turkish music). Arabs translated and developed Greek texts and works of music and mastered the
    6.33
    6 votes
    24
    Fado

    Fado

    • Artists: Madredeus
    • Albums: Ulisses
    • Parent genres: Modinha
    Fado (Portuguese pronunciation: [ˈfaðu], "destiny, fate") is a music genre which can be traced to the 1820s in Portugal, but probably with much earlier origins. Fado historian and scholar Rui Vieira Nery states that "the only reliable information on the history of Fado was orally transmitted and goes back to the 1820s and 1830s at best. But even that information was frequently modified within the generational transmission process that made it reach us today." In popular belief, fado is a form of music characterized by mournful tunes and lyrics, often about the sea or the life of the poor, and infused with a characteristic sentiment of resignation, fatefulness and melancholia (loosely captured by the word "saudade", or longing). However, although the origins are difficult to trace, today fado is by many regarded as a simply a form of song which can be about anything, but must follow a certain structure. The music is usually linked to the Portuguese word saudade which symbolizes the feeling of loss (a permanent, irreparable loss and its consequent life lasting damage). Amália Rodrigues, Carlos do Carmo, Mariza, Mafalda Arnauth, and Cristina Branco are amongst the most famous
    8.25
    4 votes
    25

    Happy hardcore

    • Artists: Scooter
    • Albums: Dune
    • Parent genres: Bouncy techno
    Happy hardcore, also known as happycore, is a genre of music typified by a very fast tempo (usually around 160–180 BPM), often coupled with solo vocals and sentimental lyrics. Its characteristically 4/4 beat "happy" sound distinguishes it from most other forms of hardcore techno, which tend to be "darker". It is typically in a major mode, like Ionian or Lydian. In its original incarnation, it was often characterized by piano riffs, synthetic stabs and spacey effects. This genre of music is closely related to the typically Dutch genre of Gabber. Happy hardcore evolved from Breakbeat Hardcore around 1991–1993, as the original house music-based rave became faster and began to include breakbeats, evolving into Oldschool Jungle which evolved into Drum and Bass. Some of the most famous artists of this genre include, Scott Brown, Darren Styles, Hixxy, DJ Paul Elstak, Dune, Scooter, Party Animals and Charly Lownoise and Mental Theo.
    8.25
    4 votes
    26
    Rock and roll

    Rock and roll

    • Artists: Cliff Williams
    • Albums: 50,000,000 Elvis Fans Can't Be Wrong
    • Parent genres: Richard Watters
    Rock and roll (often written as rock & roll or rock 'n' roll) is a genre of popular music that originated and evolved in the United States during the late 1940s and early 1950s, primarily from a combination of African American blues, country, jazz, and gospel music. Though elements of rock and roll can be heard in country records of the 1930s, and in blues records from the 1920s, rock and roll did not acquire its name until the 1950s. The term "rock and roll" now has at least two different meanings, both in common usage: as synonymous with rock music and as music that originated in the mid-1950s and later developed "into the more encompassing international style known as rock music". For the purpose of differentiation, this article uses the second definition. In the earliest rock and roll styles of the late 1940s and early 1950s, either the piano or saxophone was often the lead instrument, but these were generally replaced or supplemented by guitar in the middle to late 1950s. The beat is essentially a blues rhythm with an accentuated backbeat, the latter almost always provided by a snare drum. Classic rock and roll is usually played with one or two electric guitars (one lead, one
    8.25
    4 votes
    27
    Bebop

    Bebop

    • Artists: Miles Davis
    • Albums: I Remember Clifford
    • Parent genres: Jazz
    Bebop or bop is a style of jazz characterized by fast tempo, instrumental virtuosity and improvisation based on the combination of harmonic structure and melody. It was developed in the early and mid-1940s. It first surfaced in musicians' argot some time during the first two years of American involvement in the Second World War. This style of jazz ultimately became synonymous with modern jazz, as either category reached a certain final maturity in the 1960s. The word "bebop" is usually stated to be nonsense syllables (vocables) which were made in scat singing, and is supposed to have been first attested in 1928. Some researchers speculate that it was a term used by Charlie Christian, because it sounded like something he hummed along with his playing. Dizzy Gillespie tells that the audiences coined the name after hearing him scat the then-nameless tunes to his players and the press ultimately picked it up, using it as an official term: "People, when they'd wanna ask for those numbers and didn't know the name, would ask for bebop." However, the most plausible theory is that it derives from the cry of "Arriba! Arriba!" used by Latin American bandleaders of the period to encourage
    9.33
    3 votes
    28
    Bluegrass

    Bluegrass

    • Artists: Sweet Sunny South
    • Albums: It's just the night
    • Parent genres: Progressive Southern Gospel
    Bluegrass music is a form of American roots music, and a sub-genre of country music. Bluegrass, also known as "hillbilly music," was inspired by the music of Appalachia. It has mixed roots in Scottish, Irish and English traditional music, and also later influenced by the music of African-Americans through incorporation of jazz elements. Immigrants from Great Britain and Ireland arrived in Appalachia in the 18th century, and brought with them the musical traditions of their homelands. These traditions consisted primarily of English and Scottish ballads— which were essentially unaccompanied narratives— and dance music, such as Irish reels, which were accompanied by a fiddle. Many older Bluegrass songs come directly from the British Isles. Several Appalachian Bluegrass ballads, such as Pretty Saro, Barbara Allen, Cuckoo Bird and House Carpenter, come from England and preserve the English ballad tradition both melodically and lyrically. Others such as The Twa Sisters also come from England, however the lyrics are about Ireland. Some Bluegrass fiddle songs popular in Appalachia, such as "Leather Britches", and Pretty Polly, have Scottish roots. The dance tune Cumberland Gap may be
    8.00
    4 votes
    29
    Computer and video game music

    Computer and video game music

    • Artists: Visa Röster
    • Albums: Rockman Theme Song Collection
    • Parent genres: Electronic music
    Video game music is any of the musical pieces or soundtracks and background musics found in video games. It can range from a simple synthesizer tune to an orchestral piece, usually such that the older the game, the simpler the music. In recent times, many games have had complex soundtracks similar to those of movies, and sometimes even interactive soundtracks which change in order to create an appropriate atmosphere, based on what the player does. It is also common for video game soundtracks to be commercially sold or performed in concerts that focus on video game music. Music can also be an important gameplay element in certain types of video games (like rhythm games). At the time video games emerged as a popular form of entertainment in the late 1970s (the golden age of arcade video games and second-generation consoles), music was stored on physical medium in analog waveforms such as compact cassettes and phonograph records. Such components were expensive and prone to breakage under heavy use making them less than ideal for use in an arcade cabinet, though in rare cases, they were used (Journey). A more affordable method of having music in a video game was to use digital means,
    6.80
    5 votes
    30

    Country blues

    • Artists: Reverend Gary Davis
    • Albums: Odetta and The Blues
    • Parent genres: Blues
    Country blues otherwise known as acoustic blues (also folk blues, rural blues, backwoods blues, or downhome blues) is a general term that refers to all the acoustic, mainly guitar-driven forms of the blues. It often incorporated elements of rural gospel, ragtime, hillbilly, and dixieland jazz. After blues' birth in the southern United States, it quickly spread throughout the country (and elsewhere), giving birth to a host of regional styles. These include Memphis, Detroit, Chicago, Texas, Piedmont, Louisiana, West Coast, Atlanta, St. Louis, East Coast, Swamp, New Orleans, Delta, Hill country and Kansas City blues. When African-American musical tastes began to change in the early 1960s, moving toward soul and rhythm and blues music, country blues found renewed popularity as "folk blues" and was sold to a primarily white, college-age audience. Traditional artists like Big Bill Broonzy and Sonny Boy Williamson II reinvented themselves as folk blues artists, while Piedmont bluesmen like Sonny Terry and Brownie McGhee found great success on the folk festival circuit. The title "country blues" does not mean blending country music with blues music. Acoustic blues last.fm
    6.80
    5 votes
    31

    Folk metal

    • Artists: Elvenking
    • Albums: Solens Rötter
    • Parent genres: Black metal
    Folk metal is a sub-genre of heavy metal music that developed in Europe during the 1990s, a fusion of heavy metal and traditional folk music. This includes the widespread use of folk instruments and, to a lesser extent, traditional singing styles (for example, Dutch Heidevolk, Danish Sylvatica and Spanish Stone of Erech). The earliest example of folk metal was the English band Golgotha, whose 1984 EP Dangerous Games contained a mixture of New Wave of British Heavy Metal and folk styles. The genre was not further developed, however, until the emergence of another English band, Skyclad. Their debut album The Wayward Sons of Mother Earth was released in 1990. It was not until 1994 and 1995 that other early contributors in the genre began to emerge from different regions of Europe as well as in Israel. Among these early groups, the Irish band Cruachan and the German band Subway to Sally each spearheaded a different regional variation that over time became known as Celtic metal and medieval metal respectively. Despite their contributions, folk metal remained little known with few representatives during the 1990s. It was not until the early 2000s when the genre exploded into prominence,
    6.80
    5 votes
    32
    Rocksteady

    Rocksteady

    • Artists: The 86 List
    • Albums: Chasing The Sun
    • Parent genres: Ska
    Rocksteady is a music genre that originated in Jamaica around 1966. A successor to ska and a precursor to reggae, rocksteady was performed by Jamaican vocal harmony groups such as The Gaylads, The Maytals and The Paragons. The term rocksteady comes from a dance style that was mentioned in the Alton Ellis song "Rock Steady". Dances performed to rocksteady were less energetic than the earlier ska dances. The first international rocksteady hit was "Hold Me Tight" (1968) by the American soul singer Johnny Nash; it reached number one in Canada. Rocksteady uses some of the musical elements of rhythm and blues (R&B), jazz, ska, African and Latin American drumming, and other genres. One of the most easily recognizable elements, as in ska, are offbeat rhythms; staccato chords played by a guitar and piano on the offbeats of the measure. This offbeat can be counted so that it falls between each count as an "and". Example: 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and etc. The perceived tempo became slower with the development of rocksteady than it had been in ska and this led to a number of changes in the music. The guitar and piano players began to experiment with occasional accents around the basic offbeat
    6.80
    5 votes
    33
    Rumba

    Rumba

    • Artists: Los Niños de Sara
    • Albums: Pasajero
    • Parent genres: Son montuno
    Rumba is a family of percussive rhythms, song and dance that originated in Cuba as a combination of the musical traditions of Africans brought to Cuba as slaves and Spanish colonizers. The name derives from the Cuban Spanish word rumbo which means "party" or "spree". It is secular, with no religious connections. Rhythmically, Afro-Cuban folkloric rumba is based on the five-stroke pattern called clave and the inherent structure it conveys. Carlos Vidal Bolado (better known simply as Carlos Vidal) was the first to commercially record authentic folkloric rumba (Ritmo Afro-Cubano SMC 2519-A and 2520-B, circa 1948). The term spread in the 1930s and 1940s to the faster popular music of Cuba (the Peanut Vendor was a classic), where it was used as a catch-all term, rather like salsa today. Also, the term is used in the international Latin-American dance syllabus, where it is a misnomer: the music used for this slower dance is the bolero-son. Ballroom rumba, or rhumba, is basically son and not based on the authentic folkloric rumba. Similarly, the African style of pop music called African Rumba or soukous is also son-based. The term is also used today for various styles of popular music
    6.80
    5 votes
    34

    Oldschool jungle

    • Artists: Black Sun Empire
    • Albums: Earthling
    • Parent genres: Breakbeat
    Jungle is a genre of electronic music that incorporates influences from other genres, including breakbeat hardcore and reggae/dub/dancehall. The fast tempos (150 to 170 bpm) breakbeats, other heavily syncopated percussive loops, samples and synthesized effects makes up the easily recognizable form of jungle. Producers create the drum patterns featured; sometimes completely off-beat, by cutting apart breakbeats (most notably the Amen break). Long pitch-shifted snare rolls are also common in oldschool jungle. Jungle producers incorporated classic Jamaican/Caribbean sound-system culture production-methods. The slow, deep basslines and simple melodies (reminiscent of those found in dub, reggae and dancehall) accentuated the overall production, giving jungle its "rolling" quality. While the use of the word to describe what is now known as jungle is debatable, the emergence of the term in relation to electronic music circles can be roughly traced to lyrics used in Jamaican toasting (a pre-cursor to modern MCs), circa 1970. References to 'jungle', 'junglists' and 'jungle music' can be found throughout dub, reggae and dancehall genres from that era up until today. Interestingly, and
    9.00
    3 votes
    35

    Glitch

    • Artists: Lismore
    • Albums: Life Is Full of Possibilities
    • Parent genres: Electronica
    Glitch is a style of electronic music that emerged in the mid to late 1990s. It has been described as a genre that adheres to an "aesthetic of failure," where the deliberate use of glitch based audio media, and other sonic artifacts, is a central concern. Sources of glitch sound material are usually malfunctioning or abused audio recording devices or digital technology, such as CD skipping, electric hum, digital or analog distortion, bit rate reduction, hardware noise, computer bugs, crashes, vinyl record hiss or scratches and system errors. In a Computer Music Journal article published in 2000, composer and writer Kim Cascone classifies glitch as a sub-genre of electronica, and used the term post-digital to describe the glitch aesthetic. The origins of the glitch aesthetic can be traced to the early 20th century, with Luigi Russolo's Futurist manifesto The Art of Noises, the basis of noise music. He also constructed noise generators, which he named intonarumori. Later musicians and composers made use of malfunctioning technology, such as Christian Marclay who used mutilated vinyl records to create sound collages beginning in 1979. Yasunao Tone used damaged CDs in his Techno Eden
    7.75
    4 votes
    36

    Southern rap

    • Artists: Dirty South Rydaz
    • Albums: Tradimento
    • Parent genres: Hip hop music
    Southern hip hop, also known as Southern rap, is a blanket term for a subgenre of American hip hop music that emerged in the Southern United States, including New Orleans, Louisiana; Houston, Texas; Nashville, Tennessee; Atlanta, Georgia; Memphis, Tennessee; Charlotte, North Carolina and Miami, Florida. The music was a reaction to the 1980s flow of hip hop culture from New York City and California, and can be considered a third major American hip hop genre, after East Coast hip hop and West Coast hip hop. Many early Southern rap artists released their music independently or on mixtapes after encountering difficulty securing record-label contracts in the 1990s. Atlanta, Georgia, is a prominent city in the region's hip hop scene. Throughout the 1980s and 1990s, the American hip hop music market was primarily dominated by artists from the east seaboard and the west coast. Los Angeles, California and New York City were the two main cities where hip hop was receiving widespread attention. In the 1980s, cities throughout the Southern United States began to catch on to the hip hop music movement. The Geto Boys, a hip hop group from Houston, were among the first hip hop artists from the
    7.75
    4 votes
    37
    Funk Carioca

    Funk Carioca

    • Artists: Fernanda Abreu
    • Albums: The Spirit of Apollo
    • Parent genres: Freestyle music
    Funk carioca (English: Rio Funk), favela funk and, elsewhere in the world, baile funk, is a type of dance music from Rio de Janeiro, derived from Miami bass. "Baile funk", in Brazil, refers not to the music, but to the actual parties or discothèques in which the music is played. Although originated in Rio, funk carioca has become increasingly popular amongst (mainly) low classes in other parts of Brazil. In the whole country, funk carioca is most often simply known as funk, although it is very different musically from what funk means in most other places. Funk is a direct derivative of Miami Bass and freestyle (another Miami-based genre) music from the United States. The reason why these genres, very localized in the USA, became popular and influential in Rio de Janeiro is due to proximity. Miami is a popular plane stop for Rio DJs to buy the latest American records. The funk popularized in the 1980s in Rio de Janeiro shanty neighborhoods called favelas. From mid-1990s it was a mainstream phenomenon in Brazil. Funk songs discuss topics as varying as poverty, human dignity, racial pride of black people, sex (breaking its moral values), violence and social injustice. Social analysts
    7.50
    4 votes
    38

    No Wave

    • Artists: Create
    • Albums: Public Castration Is a Good Idea
    • Parent genres: Post-punk
    No Wave was a short-lived but influential underground music, film, performance art, video, and contemporary art scene that had its beginnings during the mid-1970s in New York City. The term No Wave is in part satirical word play rejecting the commercial elements of the then-popular New Wave genre. The term originates from a 1981 show, "New York/New Wave", curated by artist Diego Cortez. No Wave is not a clearly definable musical genre with consistent features. Various groups drew on such disparate styles as funk, jazz, blues, punk rock, avant garde, and experimental. There are, however, some elements common to most No Wave music, such as abrasive atonal sounds, repetitive driving rhythms, and a tendency to emphasize musical texture over melody—typical of La Monte Young's early downtown music. In 1978 a punk-influenced noise series was held at New York’s Artists Space that led to the Brian Eno-produced recording No New York, documenting James Chance and the Contortions, Teenage Jesus and the Jerks, Mars, and DNA. Sonic Youth made their first live appearance at Noise Fest, a noise music festival curated by Thurston Moore at the art space White Columns in June 1981. Each night three
    7.50
    4 votes
    39

    Jewish music

    • Artists: Charming Hostess
    • Albums: Songs of The Vilna Ghetto
    • Parent genres: Sacred music
    Jewish music is the music and melodies of the Jewish people which have evolved over time throughout the long course of Jewish history. In some instances Jewish music is of a religious nature, spiritual songs and refrains are common in Jewish Services throughout the world, while other times, it is of a secular nature. The rhythm and sound of Jewish music varies greatly depending on the origins of the Jewish composer and the time period in which the piece was composed. As Velvel Pasternak writes, "The importance of music in the life of the Jewish people is found almost at the beginning of Genesis... [musicians are] mentioned among the three fundamental professions.... Music was viewed as a necessity in everyday life, as a beautifying and enriching complement of human existence." The history of religious Jewish music spans the evolution of cantorial, synagogal, and Temple melodies from Biblical to Modern times. The earliest synagogal music was based on the same system used in the Temple in Jerusalem. According to the Mishnah, the regular Temple orchestra consisted of twelve instruments, and a choir of twelve male singers. A number of additional instruments were known to the ancient
    8.67
    3 votes
    40

    Soul jazz

    • Artists: Duke Pearson
    • Albums: The Champ
    • Parent genres: Rhythm and blues
    Soul jazz is a development of jazz incorporating strong influences from blues, soul, gospel and rhythm and blues in music for small groups, often an organ trio featuring a Hammond organ. Soul jazz is often associated with hard bop. Mark C. Gridley, writing for the All Music Guide to Jazz, explains that soul jazz more specifically refers to music with "an earthy, bluesy melodic concept" and "repetitive, dance-like rhythms…. Note that some listeners make no distinction between 'soul-jazz" and 'funky hard bop,' and many musicians don't consider 'soul-jazz' to be continuous with 'hard bop.'" Roy Carr describes soul jazz as an outgrowth of hard bop, with the terms "funk" and "soul" appearing in a jazz context as early as the mid-1950s to describe "gospel-informed, down-home, call-and-response blues." Carr also notes the acknowledged influence of Ray Charles' small group recordings (which included saxophonists David "Fathead" Newman and Hank Crawford) on Horace Silver, Art Blakey, and Cannonball Adderley. Soul jazz developed in the late 1950s, reaching public awareness with the release of The Cannonball Adderley Quintet in San Francisco. Cannonball Adderley noted: "We were pressured
    8.67
    3 votes
    41

    Oi!

    • Artists: The GC5
    • Albums: Oi! Młodzież/Mechaniczna Pomarańcza
    • Parent genres: Punk rock
    Oi! is a working class subgenre of punk rock that originated in the United Kingdom in the late 1970s. The music and its associated subculture had the goal of bringing together punks, skinheads and other working-class youths (sometimes called herberts). The Oi! movement was partly a response to the perception that many participants in the early punk rock scene were, in the words of The Business guitarist Steve Kent, “trendy university people using long words, trying to be artistic...and losing touch”. André Schlesinger, singer of The Press, said, “Oi shares many similarities with folk music, besides its often simple musical structure; quaint in some respects and crude in others, not to mention brutally honest, it usually tells a story based in truth.” Oi! became a recognized genre in the latter part of the 1970s, emerging after the perceived commercialization of punk rock, and before the soon-to-dominate hardcore punk sound. It fused the sounds of early punk bands such as the Sex Pistols, the Ramones, The Clash, and The Jam with influences from 1960s British rock bands such as The Rolling Stones, the Small Faces, and The Who; football chants; pub rock bands such as Dr. Feelgood,
    6.40
    5 votes
    42
    Techno

    Techno

    • Artists: Aphex Twin
    • Albums: Back to the Heavyweight Jam
    • Parent genres: Synthpop
    Techno is a form of electronic dance music (EDM) that emerged in Detroit, Michigan in the United States during the mid to late 1980s. The first recorded use of the word techno in reference to a genre of music was in 1988. Many styles of techno now exist, but Detroit techno is seen as the foundation upon which a number of subgenres have been built. The initial take on techno arose from the melding of electronic music, in the style of artists such as Kraftwerk, Giorgio Moroder and Yellow Magic Orchestra, with African American music styles, including funk, electro, Chicago house and electric jazz. Added to this is the influence of futuristic and fictional themes relevant to life in American late capitalist society, with Alvin Toffler's book The Third Wave being a notable point of reference. Pioneering producer Juan Atkins cites Toffler's phrase "techno rebels" as inspiring him to use the word techno to describe the musical style he helped to create. This unique blend of influences aligns techno with the aesthetic referred to as afrofuturism. To producers such as Derrick May, the transference of spirit from the body to the machine is often a central preoccupation; essentially an
    7.25
    4 votes
    43
    Trance music

    Trance music

    • Artists: Orbital
    • Albums: Elements of Life
    • Parent genres: Techno
    Trance is a genre of electronic dance music that developed in the 1990s. It is characterized by a tempo of between 110 and 150 beats per minute, repeating melodic phrases, and a musical form that builds up and down throughout a track. It is a combination of many styles of electronic music such as techno, house, pop, chill-out, classical music, and film music. Trance employs aural dynamics to a great degree: A characteristic of virtually all trance songs is the soft mid-song breakdown, beginning with and occurring after the orchestration is broken down and the rhythm tracks fade out rapidly, leaving the melody and/or atmospherics to stand alone for anywhere from seconds to a few minutes. When vocals are present in trance, they are generally sung by a female with a soaring, operatic voice ranging from mezzo-soprano to soprano, best described as "ethereal female leads floating amongst the synths". Germany is regarded as the birthplace of trance music, with the original melodic trance sound first appearing around 1993 in Frankfurt. The origin of the term is uncertain; one theory suggests that the term is derived from the Klaus Schulze album Trancefer (1981) or the early trance act
    7.25
    4 votes
    44
    Bubblegum pop

    Bubblegum pop

    • Artists: Play
    • Albums: ABC
    • Parent genres: Pop music
    Bubblegum pop (also known as bubblegum rock, bubblegum music, or simply bubblegum) is a genre of pop music with an upbeat sound contrived and marketed to appeal to pre-teens and teenagers, produced in an assembly-line process, driven by producers, often using unknown singers. Bubblegum's classic period ran from 1967 to 1972. A second wave of bubblegum started two years later and ran until 1977 when disco took over and punk rock emerged; Britney Spears has since then been credited with influencing the revival of the genre in the late 1990s. The genre was predominantly a singles phenomenon rather than an album-oriented one, the presumption being that teenagers and pre-teens had less money to spend on records and were thus more likely to buy singles than albums. Also, because many acts were manufactured in the studio using session musicians, a large number of bubblegum songs were by one-hit wonders. Among the best-known acts of bubblegum's golden era are 1910 Fruitgum Company, The Ohio Express and The Archies, an animated group which had the most successful bubblegum song with "Sugar, Sugar", Billboard Magazine's No. 1 single for 1969. Singer Tommy Roe, arguably, had the most
    8.33
    3 votes
    45

    Roots reggae

    • Artists: The Congos
    • Albums: Live At Bats
    • Parent genres: Ska
    Roots reggae is a subgenre of reggae that deals with the everyday lives and aspirations of the artists concerned, including the spiritual side of Rastafari and with the honoring of God, called Jah by rastafarians. It also is identified with the life of the ghetto sufferer, and the rural poor. Lyrical themes include spirituality and religion, poverty, Black pride, social issues, resistance to government and racial oppression, and repatriation to Africa. The increasing influence of the Rastafari movement after the visit of Haile Selassie to Jamaica in 1966 played a major part in the development of roots reggae, with spiritual themes becoming more common in reggae lyrics in the late 1960s. Important early roots reggae releases included Winston Holness's "Blood & Fire" (1970) and Yabby You's "Conquering Lion" (1972). Political unrest also played its part, with the 1972 election campaign of Michael Manley targeting the support of Jamaica's ghetto communities. Increasing violence associated with the opposing political parties was also a common lyrical theme, with tracks such as Junior Murvin's "Police & Thieves" and Culture's "Two Sevens Clash". The heyday of roots reggae is usually
    8.33
    3 votes
    46
    UK hardcore

    UK hardcore

    • Artists: Digi
    • Albums: Bonkers 2: Now We're Totally Bonkers
    • Parent genres: Bouncy techno
    UK Hardcore is a broad term to describe the evolved sound of happy hardcore rave music which emerged around the end of the 1990s and grew in strength during the 21st century. The music is typically harder and less break-beat led than happy hardcore back in the 1990s. Early hardcore producers such as SL2, Prodigy, Hyper-On Experience, DJ Jonny L and Sonz of a Loop da Loop Era, along with record labels such as Moving Shadow, Reinforced, XL and Formation evolved in a period where Techno was developing a harder edge, exploring the complex breakbeats that would later manifest themselves as jungle and the subsequent development of drum and bass. The stylistic influence of techno including the movie, cartoon and media samples, and powerful synthesizer-based breakdowns characterised this earlier form of UK hardcore, which some believed to have hit its first peak in 1992. For example, some fan websites go so far as to hyperbolically proclaim "1992 was the best year for music, EVER!" With the diversity in sound available to producers rising with the onset of progressively more advanced computer and music production systems, electronic music was evolving at a rapid pace during this period.
    8.33
    3 votes
    47
    Rock music

    Rock music

    • Artists: The Police
    • Albums: Sweet Oblivion
    • Parent genres: Rockabilly
    Rock music is a genre of popular music that originated as "rock and roll" in 1950s America and developed into a range of different styles in the 1960s and later, particularly in the United Kingdom and the United States. It has its roots in 1940s' and 1950s' rock and roll, itself heavily influenced by rhythm and blues and country music. Rock music also drew strongly on a number of other genres such as blues and folk, and incorporated influences from jazz, classical and other musical sources. Musically, rock has centered around the electric guitar, usually as part of a rock group with bass guitar and drums. Typically, rock is song-based music usually with a 4/4 time signature utilizing a verse-chorus form, but the genre has become extremely diverse and common musical characteristics are difficult to define. Like pop music, lyrics often stress romantic love but also address a wide variety of other themes that are frequently social or political in emphasis. The dominance of rock by white, male musicians has been seen as one of the key factors shaping the themes explored in rock music. Rock places a higher degree of emphasis on musicianship, live performance, and an ideology of
    9.50
    2 votes
    48

    Techstep

    • Artists: Kemal and Rob Data
    • Albums: St rotfest and the death monastic
    • Parent genres: Techno
    Techstep is a subgenre of drum and bass that was popular in the late 1990s. It is characterized by a dark, sci-fi mood, near-exclusive use of synthesised or sampled sound sources, influences from industrial and techno music, and what some writers have described as a "clinical" sound. Although described as having a "techy" feel, techstep's relationship with techno should not be overstated. It shares the technique of creating a high-energy collage from abstract, synthetic noises, including samples, bleeps and squelches: it rarely uses instruments that have not been processed by effects. Similarly, quantized drum-machine kit and percussion sounds are favored over naturalistic human breakbeats. However, it usually adheres to drum and bass norms in other regards, especially in terms of musical structure, with the emphasis on the "drop". Techstep saw jungle music's obsession with bass change from aiming for low and deep to exploring timbre, artists aiming to outdo each other with ever more distorted and "twisted" bass sounds. Techstep developed from jungle music and hardstep around 1995. The name of the genre was coined by Ed Rush and Trace, who were both instrumental in shaping the
    9.50
    2 votes
    49
    Chamber music

    Chamber music

    • Artists: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
    • Albums: Plays Metallica by Four Cellos
    • Parent genres: Classical music
    Chamber music is a form of classical music, written for a small group of instruments which traditionally could be accommodated in a palace chamber. Most broadly, it includes any art music that is performed by a small number of performers with one performer to a part. The word "chamber" signifies that the music can be performed in a small room, often in a private salon with an intimate atmosphere. However, it usually does not include, by definition, solo instrument performances. Because of its intimate nature, chamber music has been described as "the music of friends." For more than 200 years, chamber music was played primarily by amateur musicians in their homes, and even today, when most chamber music performance has migrated from the home to the concert hall, there are still many musicians, amateur and professional, who continue to play chamber music for their own pleasure. Playing chamber music requires special skills, both musical and social, which are different from the skills required for playing solo or symphonic works. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe described chamber music (specifically, string quartet music) as "four rational people conversing." This conversational paradigm
    7.00
    4 votes
    50
    Dancehall

    Dancehall

    • Artists: Yellowman
    • Albums: Arular
    • Parent genres: Dub
    Dancehall is a genre of Jamaican popular music that originated in the late 1970s. Initially dancehall was a more sparse version of reggae than the roots style, which had dominated much of the 1970s. In the mid-1980s, digital instrumentation became more prevalent, changing the sound considerably, with digital dancehall (or "ragga") becoming increasingly characterized by faster rhythms. Dancehall music has come under criticism from international organizations and individuals for its violent and sometimes homophobic lyrics, although the lyrical themes are more varied than simply dealing with slackness and violence. Dancehall owes its moniker to the Jamaican dance halls in which popular Jamaicans recordings were played by local sound systems. These began in the late 1940s among people from the inner city of Kingston, Jamaica who were not able to participate in dances uptown. Social and political changes in late-1970s Jamaica were reflected in the shift away from the more internationally oriented roots reggae towards a style geared more towards local consumption, and in tune with the music that Jamaicans had experienced when sound systems performed live. Michael Manley's socialist
    7.00
    4 votes
    51
    Doo-wop

    Doo-wop

    • Artists: The Flamingos
    • Albums: For Real!
    • Parent genres: Rhythm and blues
    The name Doo-wop is given to a style of vocal-based rhythm and blues music that developed in African American communities in the 1940s and achieved mainstream popularity in the 1950s and early 1960s. It emerged from New York, Philadelphia, Chicago, Baltimore, Newark, Pittsburgh, Cincinnati and areas of greater Los Angeles including El Monte and Compton. Built upon vocal harmony, doo-wop was one of the most mainstream, pop-oriented R&B styles of the time. As a musical genre, Doo-wop is a type of vocal group harmony with the musical qualities of many vocal parts, nonsense syllables, a simple beat, little or no instrumentation, and simple music and lyrics. It is ensemble singing with single artists appearing with a backing group. Solo billing usually implies that the individual is more prominent in the musical arrangement. African-American vocal groups such as The Ink Spots and The Mills Brothers, both from Cincinnati, Ohio, had record hits during the years of the second world war that set important precedents for the genre. The Ink Spots had a string of record successes in 1939-40, both in the USA and in Britain, with "My Prayer", "Bless You" and "Whispering Grass" and The Mills
    7.00
    4 votes
    52

    Frat rock

    • Artists: The Sonics
    • Albums: Midnight Ride
    • Parent genres: Garage rock
    Frat rock was an early influential American subgenre of rock and roll / roots rock. Frat rock was generally characterized as very energetic and upbeat yet raw "party" rock. The genre is named after the fact that many of these bands played gigs at fraternity houses during the genre's heyday in the late 1950s to 1960s. The movie Animal House played numerous selections of this style of music during the film. Frat rock is considered an important influence and precursor to garage rock and punk rock, and many of the bands associated with the genre are also considered proto-punk or early garage rock. The frat rock genre itself also had numerous outside influences, including soul music, blues, surf rock, and Latin rock. Examples of this style of music include the song "Louie Louie", done most famously by The Kingsmen, "Shout" by The Isley Brothers, "Farmer John" by The Premiers, and "Double Shot of my Baby's Love" by The Swingin' Medallions. Other frat rock standards include "Hang on Sloopy", "Twist and Shout" and "Wild Thing". Frat rock was mentioned by Bruce Springsteen at his August 4, 1978 concert. Sherry Darling was an attempt by him at frat rock. Note that these bands are not
    7.00
    4 votes
    53
    Raï

    Raï

    • Artists: Khaled
    • Albums: Tékitoi
    • Parent genres: African popular music
    Raï (/ˈraɪ/; Arabic: راي‎) is a form of folk music that originated in Oran, Algeria from Bedouin shepherds, mixed with Spanish, French, African and Arabic musical forms, which dates back to the 1930s. Singers of raï are called cheb (shabab, young) as opposed to sheikh (shaykh, old), the name given to Chaabi singers. The tradition arose in cities like Oran, Relizane, Oujda, Mostaganem, Chlef and Sidi-Bel-Abbès, primarily among the poor. Traditionally sung by men, by the end of the 20th century, female singers had become common. The lyrics of raï have concerned social issues, such as disease and the policing of European colonies, that affected native populations. Raï is a music style that originated in Algeria in the 1930s. It appealed to young people who sought to modernize the traditional Islamic values and attitudes. Regional, secular, and religious drum patterns, melodies, and instruments were blended with Western electric instrumentation. Oran, a seaport in Western Algeria, was invaded by the Spanish in the 16th century; Spanish troops kept women there to entertain the troops, and the city has retained a reputation for hedonism ever since. In the early 20th century, Oran was
    7.00
    4 votes
    54
    Alternative rock

    Alternative rock

    • Artists: Wilco
    • Albums: Taking Tiger Mountain (by Strategy)
    • Parent genres: Post-punk
    Alternative rock (also called alternative music, alt rock or simply alternative) is a genre of rock music that emerged from the independent music underground of the 1980s and became widely popular by the 1990s. Although the term was most commonly associated in its commercial heyday with a loud, distorted guitar sound, its original meaning was broader, referring to a generation of musicians unified by their collective debt to either the musical style, or simply the independent, D.I.Y. ethos of punk rock, which in the late 1970s laid the groundwork for alternative music. At times, "alternative" has been used as a catch-all description for music from underground rock artists that receives mainstream recognition, or for any music, whether rock or not, that is seen to be descended from punk rock (including some examples of punk itself, as well as New Wave, and post-punk). Alternative rock is a broad umbrella term consisting of music that differs greatly in terms of its sound, its social context, and its regional roots. By the end of the 1980s magazines and zines, college radio airplay, and word of mouth had increased the prominence and highlighted the diversity of alternative rock,
    8.00
    3 votes
    55
    Breakbeat

    Breakbeat

    • Artists: Mental escape
    • Albums: The Matrix: Music from the Motion Picture
    • Parent genres: Rave music
    Breakbeat (sometimes breakbeats or breaks) is a collection of sub-genres of electronic music, usually characterized by the use of a non-straightened 4/4 drum pattern (as opposed to the steady beat of house). These rhythms may be characterised by their intensive use of syncopation and polyrhythms. Traditionally, a 'break' is considered to be the part of a funk or jazz song during which the melody "breaks" to let the rhythm section, or soloist, play unaccompanied. Breakbeat (or funky breakbeat or broken beat) may also refer to the music of bands who play funk and soul music with an emphasis on the elements that became popular in hip-hop and later breaks-based music. This sound is characterized by slower tempos (80-110 bpm) and organic, "human" rhythms. It is sometimes differentiated by the term "broken beat". Breakbeats were used in the 1920s by Jass, Jazz and Swing bands, a popular breakbeat song of the 1920s was the Charleston. Fast forward to the late 1970s and early 1980s, hip-hop turntablists, such as Kool DJ Herc, began using several Funk breaks in a row, using irregular drum patterns from songs such as James Brown Funky Drummer and The Winstons Amen Brother, to form the
    8.00
    3 votes
    56

    Country gospel

    • Artists: Marty Raybon
    • Albums: Precious Memories
    • Parent genres: Country
    Christian country music (sometimes marketed as Country Gospel or Inspirational Country) is music that is written to express either personal or a communal belief regarding Christian life, as well as (in terms of the varying music styles) to give a Christian alternative to mainstream secular music. Christian country music is a form of Christian music and a subgenre of both Gospel music and Country music. Like other forms of music the creation, performance, significance, and even the definition of Christian country music varies according to culture and social context. It is composed and performed for many purposes, ranging from aesthetic pleasure, religious or ceremonial purposes, or as an entertainment product for the marketplace. However, a common theme as with most Christian music is praise, worship or thanks to God and/or Christ. Christian country music has been around for generations. It originated as a blend of early mountain music, cowboy music and the music from the plantations of the Deep South. It was out of this blend of music that Southern Gospel music was birthed and was found primarily in the southern states. Today, Christian country music has blended with a new brand of
    8.00
    3 votes
    57
    Ranchera

    Ranchera

    • Artists: Los Temerarios
    • Albums: Alejandro Fernandez
    • Parent genres: Mariachi
    Ranchera (pronounced: [ranˈtʃeɾa]) is a genre of the traditional music of Mexico originally sung by only one performer with a guitar. It dates to the years of the Mexican Revolution in the early 20th century. It later became closely associated with the mariachi groups which evolved in Jalisco. Ranchera today is also played by norteño (or Conjunto) or banda. Drawing on rural traditional folk music, ranchera developed as a symbol of a new national consciousness in reaction to the aristocratic tastes of the period. The greatest exponents of ranchera are Antonio Aguilar, Flor Silvestre, Amalia Mendoza, Lucha Villa, Cuco Sanchez, Rocío Dúrcal, José Alfredo Jiménez, Lola Beltrán, Vicente Fernández, Pedro Infante, Jorge Negrete, and Javier Solís. Traditional rancheras are about love, patriotism or nature. Rhythms can be in 3/4, 2/4 or 4/4, reflecting the tempo of, respectively, the waltz, the polka, and the bolero. Songs are usually in a major key, and consist of an instrumental introduction, verse and refrain, instrumental section repeating the verse, and another verse and refrain, with a tag ending. Instrumentation may include guitars, strings, trumpets, and/or accordions, depending on
    8.00
    3 votes
    58
    Symphonic metal

    Symphonic metal

    • Artists: Adastreia
    • Albums: A Night at the Opera
    • Parent genres: Black metal
    Symphonic metal is heavy metal music that has symphonic elements; that is, elements that are borrowed from other music genres (i.e. classical music, progressive rock) but usually with more keyboards or acoustic guitars and typically an operatic female lead vocalist. When referring to bands from other genres, it refers to bands who use minor classical and operatic themes in their music similar to what one finds in the symphonic metal genre, to show they are more "symphonic" than other bands within their genre. Although many symphonic metal bands base their style solidly on classical music, few follow a theatrical, more epic approach to this genre by including or basing their style in Film Music or movie soundtracks. A popular example of this type of approach would be the works of the successful Finnish symphonic metal band Nightwish. The main musical influences on symphonic metal are early gothic metal, power metal, and classical music. Keyboards are normally the focal point of the music. While other instruments typically play relatively simple parts, the keyboard parts can be very complex and technically challenging, often played in a wide variety of classical styles and emulating
    8.00
    3 votes
    59
    Glam rock

    Glam rock

    • Artists: Sigue Sigue Sputnik
    • Albums: Diamond Dogs
    • Parent genres: Garage rock
    Glam rock (also known as glitter rock) is a style of rock and pop music that developed in the United Kingdom in the early 1970s, which was performed by singers and musicians who wore outrageous clothes, makeup and hairstyles, particularly platform-soled boots and glitter. The flamboyant costumes and visual styles of glam performers were often camp or androgynous, and have been connected with new views of gender roles. Glam rock visuals peaked during the mid 1970s with artists including T. Rex, David Bowie, Sweet, Roxy Music and Gary Glitter in the UK and New York Dolls, Lou Reed and Jobriath in the US. It declined after 1976, but had a major influence on genres including punk, glam metal, New Romantics and gothic rock and has sporadically revived since the 1990s. Musically glam rock was very diverse, varying between the simple rock and roll revivalism of figures like Alvin Stardust to the complex art rock of Roxy Music, and can be seen as much as a fashion as a musical sub-genre. Visually it was a mesh of various styles, ranging from 1930s Hollywood glamour, through 1950s pin-up sex appeal, pre-war Cabaret theatrics, Victorian literary and symbolist styles, science fiction, to
    6.75
    4 votes
    60
    Salsa

    Salsa

    • Artists: Roberto Roena
    • Albums: Todo A Su Tiempo
    • Parent genres: Boogaloo
    Salsa is a syncretic dance form with origins from the Cuban Son (circa 1920s) and Afro-Cuban dance (specifically Afro-Cuban rumba).. It is generally associated with the salsa music style, although it may be danced under other types of tropical music. Salsa is normally a partner dance, although there are forms such as a line dance form "Salsa suelta", where the dancers dance individually and a round dance form "Rueda de Casino" where multiple couples exchange partners in a circle. Salsa can be improvised or performed with a set routine. Salsa is a popular social dance throughout South America as well as in North America, Europe, Australia, and some countries in Asia and the Middle East. Famous salsa dancers include the serbian Jovan Tojagic, winner of the 2012 individual salsa world meet, held in Sheffield. Also he is renowned for his signiture move, the reverse thrust. There are a few basic steps of Salsa. The most common is the three weight changes (or steps) in each four-beat measure. The beat on which one does not step might contain a tap or kick, or weight transfer may simply continue with the actual step not occurring until the next beat. The option chosen depends upon
    6.75
    4 votes
    61
    Thrash metal

    Thrash metal

    • Artists: Suicidal Tendencies
    • Albums: Christ Illusion
    • Parent genres: Classic metal
    Thrash metal is a subgenre of heavy metal that is characterized most typically by its fast tempo and aggression. Thrash metal songs typically use fast percussive beats and fast, low-register guitar riffs, overlaid with shredding-style lead work. Lyrically, thrash metal songs often deal with social issues and reproach for The Establishment, often using direct and denunciatory language, an approach which partially overlaps with the hardcore genre. Thrash metal's "Big Four", the four bands widely regarded as the genre's most successful and influential acts, are Metallica, Megadeth, Slayer and Anthrax due to their status as pioneers of the genre in the 1980s. Some common characteristics of thrash metal are fast guitar riffs with aggressive picking styles and lightning fast solos, and extensive use of double bass drumming. The origins of thrash metal are generally traced to the late 1970s and early 1980s, when a number of predominantly American bands began fusing elements of the New Wave of British Heavy Metal with the speed and aggression of hardcore punk. Thrash metal is more aggressive compared to its relative, speed metal, and is thought to have emerged at least in part as a
    6.75
    4 votes
    62
    Christian rock

    Christian rock

    • Artists: The Benjamin Gate
    • Albums: Subseven: the EP
    • Parent genres: Rock music
    Christian rock is a form of rock music played by individuals and bands whose members are Christians and who often focus the lyrics on matters concerned with the Christian faith. The extent to which their lyrics are explicitly Christian varies between bands. Many bands who perform Christian rock have ties to the contemporary Christian music labels, media outlets, and festivals, while other bands are independent. Rock and roll music was not viewed favorably by most traditional and fundamentalist Christians when it became popular with young people from the 1950s, although early rock music was often influenced by country and gospel music. Religious people in many regions of the United States did not want their children exposed to music with unruly, impassioned vocals, loud guitar riffs and jarring, hypnotic rhythms. Rock and roll differed from the norm, and thus it was seen as a threat. Often the music was overtly sexual in nature, as in the case of Elvis Presley, who became controversial and massively popular partly for his suggestive stage antics and dancing. However, Elvis was a religious person who even released a gospel album: Peace in the Valley. Individual Christians may have
    9.00
    2 votes
    63

    Deathgrind

    • Artists: Brodequin
    • Albums: Cristo Satánico
    • Parent genres: Death metal
    Deathgrind (sometimes written as death-grind or death/grind) is a musical genre that fuses death metal and grindcore. The genre, along with pornogrind, is related to the goregrind subgenre. Zero Tolerance described deathgrind as "grindcore and brutal death metal colliding head on." Danny Lilker described deathgrind as "combining the technicality of death metal with the intensity of grindcore." Paul Schwarz, writing for Terrorizer, claimed that,
    9.00
    2 votes
    64

    Mambo

    • Artists: Lou Bega
    • Albums: A Little Bit of Mambo
    • Parent genres: Son montuno
    Mambo is a musical form and dance style that developed originally in Cuba, with further significant developments by Cuban musicians in Mexico and the USA. The word "mambo" means "conversation with the gods" in Kikongo, the language spoken by Central African slaves taken to Cuba. Modern mambo began with a song called "Mambo" written in 1938 by brothers Orestes and Cachao López. The song was a danzón, a dance form descended from European social dances like the English country dance, French contredanse, and Spanish contradanza. It was backed by rhythms derived from African folk music. Contradanza arrived in Cuba in the 18th century, where it became known as danza and grew very popular. The arrival of black Haitians later that century changed the face of contradanza, adding a syncopation called cinquillo (which is also found in another contradanza-derivative, Argentine tango). By the end of the 19th century, contradanza had grown lively and energetic, unlike its European counterpart, and was then known as danzón. The 1877 song "Las alturas de Simpson" was one of many tunes that created a wave of popularity for danzón. One part of the danzón was a coda which became improvised overtime.
    9.00
    2 votes
    65
    D-beat

    D-beat

    • Artists: Discharge
    • Albums: Hear Nothing See Nothing Say Nothing
    • Parent genres: Hardcore punk
    D-beat (also known as discrust, discore, or kängpunk) is a style of hardcore punk developed in the early 1980s by imitators of Discharge, after whom the genre is named, as well as a drum beat characteristic of this subgenre. Discharge may have themselves inherited the beat from Motörhead. The first such group was The Varukers. D-beat is closely associated with crust punk, which is a heavier, more complex variation. The style was particularly popular in Sweden, and developed there by groups such as Anti Cimex, Mob 47, Driller Killer, and No Security. Other D-beat groups include Doom, from the UK; Disclose, from Japan; Crucifix and Final Conflict, from the U.S.; Ratos de Porão, from Brazil; and MG15, from Spain. While the style initially developed in the early 1980s, a number of new groups working within the subgenre emerged in the mid-1990s. These include the Swedish groups Wolfpack, Totalitär, Avskum, Skitsystem and Disfear. D-beat began in the United Kingdom as a subgenre of street punk or hardcore punk inspired by Discharge. Discharge formed in 1977 in Stoke-on-Trent, England, initially played a basic variety of street punk inspired by the Sex Pistols and The Clash. In 1979, the
    7.67
    3 votes
    66
    Electro

    Electro

    • Artists: Daiquiri
    • Albums: Sagan om konungens årsinkomst
    • Parent genres: West Coast hip hop
    Electro (short for either electro-funk or electro-boogie) is a genre of electronic dance music directly influenced by the use of TR-808 drum machines, and funk sampling. Records in the genre typically feature drum machines and heavy electronic sounds, usually without vocals, although if vocals are present they are delivered in a deadpan manner, often through electronic distortion such as vocoding. This is the main distinction of electro from previously prominent genres such as disco, in which electronic sound was only part of the instrumentation rather than basis of the whole song. From its origins, the definition of the electro sound is the use of drum machines as the rhythmic base of a track; however as the style has evolved, and with the advent of computer usage in electronic music, the use of drum machines has become less and less practical and widespread. Electro drum patterns tend to be electronic emulations of breakbeats, with a syncopated kick drum, and usually a snare or clap accenting the downbeat. The difference between electro drumbeats and breakbeats (or breaks) is that electro tends to be more mechanical, while breakbeats tend to have more of a human-like feel, like
    7.67
    3 votes
    67

    Hard bop

    • Artists: Herbie Hancock
    • Albums: California Hard
    • Parent genres: Rhythm and blues
    Hard bop is a style of jazz that is an extension of bebop (or "bop") music. Journalists and record companies began using the term in the mid-1950s to describe a new current within jazz which incorporated influences from rhythm and blues, gospel music, and blues, especially in saxophone and piano playing. David H. Rosenthal contends in his book Hard Bop that the genre is to a large degree the natural creation of a generation of African-American musicians who grew up at a time when bop and rhythm and blues were the dominant forms of black American music. Prominent jazz musicians included Horace Silver, Art Blakey, Cannonball Adderley, Miles Davis and Tadd Dameron. Hard bop is sometimes referred to as "funky hard bop." The "funky" label refers to the rollicking, rhythmic feeling associated with the style. The descriptor is also used to describe soul jazz, which is commonly associated with hard bop. According to Mark C. Gridley, soul jazz more specifically refers to music with "an earthy, bluesy melodic concept and... repetitive, dance-like rhythms.... Note that some listeners make no distinction between 'soul-jazz' and 'funky hard bop,' and many musicians don't consider 'soul-jazz' to
    7.67
    3 votes
    68

    Microhouse

    • Artists: Swayzak
    • Albums: Total 1
    • Parent genres: Techno
    Microhouse, buftech or sometimes just minimal, is a subgenre of house and glitch music. Microhouse has its roots in the minimal techno, glitch (both developed in the early 90's), and house (developed in the mid-80's) genres of music. Its first echoes appeared in a glitch album by German experimental artist Oval, in 1993. Like many contemporary electronic genres, Microhouse has many influences, most notably techno and the "click and pop" garage house that has emerged from Yorkshire Bleeps and Bass (or "Bleep"), glitch and minimal techno. Contrasting with tech house, which is often thought of as 'house with techno melodic elements', microhouse is more aptly described as 'housey minimal techno' – a marriage of the funky and groovy backroom house elements with glitch and the driving, repetitive sound of techno. The first microhouse track to gain mainstream popularity by a non-glitch artist was Isolée's 1999 anthem, 'Beau Mot Plage'. However, microhouse did not begin to rapidly build in popularity until the early 2000s with the advent of record labels such as Kompakt, Perlon, Spectral Sound, Fabric, Telegraph and Force Inc. The term microhouse is usually credited to music journalist and
    7.67
    3 votes
    69
    Post-hardcore

    Post-hardcore

    • Artists: The Sleeping
    • Albums: Acrobatic Tenement
    • Parent genres: Hardcore punk
    Post-hardcore is a genre of music that developed from hardcore punk, itself an offshoot of the broader punk rock movement. Like post-punk, post-hardcore is a term for a broad constellation of groups. Many emerged from the hardcore punk scene, or took inspiration from hardcore, while concerning themselves with a wider degree of expression. The genre took shape in the mid- to late-1980s with releases from bands from cities that had established hardcore punk scenes, in particular from the scenes in Washington, D.C. such as Fugazi as well as slightly different sounding groups such as Big Black and Jawbox that stuck closer to the noise rock roots of post-hardcore. The style became commercially prominent in the first decade of the 21st century. Hardcore punk typically features very fast tempos, loud volume, and heavy bass levels, as well as a "do-it-yourself" ethic. Music database Allmusic stated "these newer bands, termed post-hardcore, often found complex and dynamic ways of blowing off steam that generally went outside the strict hardcore realm of 'loud fast rules'. Additionally, many of these bands' vocalists were just as likely to deliver their lyrics with a whispered croon as they
    7.67
    3 votes
    70
    Progressive metal

    Progressive metal

    • Artists: Negură Bunget
    • Albums: Undertow
    • Parent genres: Progressive rock
    Progressive metal (sometimes known as prog metal or prog-metal) is a subgenre of heavy metal originating in the United Kingdom and North America in the late 1980s. Progressive metal blended elements of heavy metal and progressive rock music, taking the loud "aggression", amplified electric guitar-driven sound of the former, with the more experimental, complex and "pseudo-classical" compositions of the latter. Progressive metal often utilises the conceptual themes associated with progressive rock. Throughout the years, progressive metal has borrowed influences from several other genres, including classical and jazz fusion music. Whilst the genre emerged towards the late-1980s, it was not until the 1990s that progressive metal achieved commercial success. Dream Theater, Queensrÿche, Tool, and Fates Warning are a few examples of progressive metal bands who achieved commercial success; additionally, heavy metal bands such as Metallica incorporated elements of progressive music in their work. Progressive metal's popularity started to decline towards the end of the 1990s, but it remains a largely underground genre with a committed fan base. The mixing of the progressive rock and heavy
    7.67
    3 votes
    71
    Psychedelic rock

    Psychedelic rock

    • Artists: Steve Miller Band
    • Albums: Disraeli Gears
    • Parent genres: British rock
    Psychedelic rock is a style of rock music that is inspired or influenced by psychedelic culture and attempts to replicate and enhance the mind-altering experiences of psychedelic drugs. It often uses new recording techniques and effects and draws on non-Western sources such as the ragas and drones of Indian music. It was pioneered by musicians including The Beatles, The Byrds, and The Yardbirds, emerging as a genre during the mid 1960s among folk rock and blues rock bands in the United Kingdom and United States, such as Grateful Dead, Jefferson Airplane, The Jimi Hendrix Experience, Cream, The Doors and Pink Floyd. It reached a peak in between 1967 and 1969 with the Summer of Love and Woodstock Rock Festival, becoming an international musical movement and associated with a widespread counter-culture, before beginning a decline as changing attitudes, the loss of some key individuals and a back-to-basics movement, led surviving performers to move into new musical areas. Psychedelic rock influenced the creation of psychedelic pop and psychedelic soul. It also bridged the transition from early blues- and folk music-based rock to progressive rock, glam rock, hard rock and as a result
    7.67
    3 votes
    72
    Soul music

    Soul music

    • Artists: Rosie Gaines
    • Albums: Komm doch mal rüber
    • Parent genres: Black gospel
    Soul music is a popular music genre that originated in the United States in the 1950s and early 1960s, combining elements of African American gospel music and rhythm and blues. According to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, soul is "music that arose out of the black experience in America through the transmutation of gospel and rhythm & blues into a form of funky, secular testifying." Catchy rhythms, stressed by handclaps and extemporaneous body moves, are an important feature of soul music. Other characteristics are a call and response between the soloist and the chorus, and an especially tense vocal sound. The style also occasionally uses improvisational additions, twirls and auxiliary sounds. Soul music has its roots in gospel music and rhythm and blues. The term 'soul' in black American parlance has connotations of black pride and culture. Gospel groups in the 1940s and 1950s occasionally used the term as part of their name. The jazz that self-consciously derived from gospel came to be called soul jazz. As singers and arrangers began using techniques from gospel and soul jazz in black popular music during the 1960s, soul music gradually functioned as an umbrella term for the black
    7.67
    3 votes
    73
    Zydeco

    Zydeco

    • Artists: Chris Ardoin
    • Albums: Running with Scissors
    • Parent genres: Cajun music
    Zydeco is a musical genre of American folk music roots. It evolved in southwest Louisiana in the early 19th century from forms of "la la" Creole music. As of 2012, the rural Creoles of southwest Louisiana and southeast Texas continue to sing in Louisiana Creole French. Zydeco combines elements of an older American musical style that began in the late 1700s, Cajun music, a style that consists of French fiddle tunes, Irish Celtic fiddle tunes, German button accordion, Latin rhythms, and Appalachian styles. Zydeco music was born as a blend of Cajun music and two other "new" American music styles, blues and rhythm and blues. Zydeco derives from the French phrase Les haricots ne sont pas salés, which, when spoken in the regional French, sounds as "leh-zy-dee-co sohn pah salay". This literally translates as "the snap beans aren't salty" but idiomatically as "I have no spicy news for you." Alternatively the term has been given the meaning "I'm so poor, I can't afford any salt meat for the beans." The first recorded use of the term was in 1949. Usually fast tempo and dominated by the button or piano accordion and a form of a washboard known as a "rub-board," "scrub-board," "wash-board," or
    7.67
    3 votes
    74

    Ambient industrial

    • Artists: Ah Cama-Sotz
    • Albums: Planetary Dust
    • Parent genres: Ambient music
    Ambient industrial is a post-industrial music genre that makes use of industrial principles such as noise and shock tactics, but wields these elements with more subtlety. Additionally, ambient industrial often has strong occultist tendencies, with a particular leaning toward Chaos Magick (the image of the Black Sun is one that comes up repeatedly in post-industrial music), often giving the music a highly ritualistic flavor. Ambient industrial is one of several directions that post-Industrial music took on after the breakup of Throbbing Gristle (the founders of industrial as an art movement) in 1981 ended the industrial period proper. Indeed, the last material that TG recorded, at least in the studio, Journey Through a Body and In the Shadow of the Sun, was ambient industrial work and pointed to the direction that several of TG's offshoots (most notably Coil and CTI) would take. Among the many artists who work in this area are Coil, CTI, Lab Report, Lustmord, Hafler Trio, Nocturnal Emissions, Zoviet France, PGR, Akira Yamaoka, Thomas Köner, Controlled Bleeding, Nine Inch Nails (Ghosts I-IV), early Techno Animal, Robin Rimbaud, Final and Deutsch Nepal. It is important to note,
    10.00
    1 votes
    75
    Chicago house

    Chicago house

    • Artists: Fingers Inc.
    • Albums: My Destiny
    • Parent genres: Tribal house
    Chicago house is geographical reference that generally applies to house music, a genre of electronic dance music, that was produced in Chicago in the mid-1980s and late-1980s. Stylistically, Chicago house is not a sub-genre in itself, but generally includes the first house music productions by Chicago-based artists throughout the 1980s. Following Chicago's Disco Demolition Night in mid-1979, disco music's mainstream popularity fell into decline. In the early 1980s, fewer and fewer disco records were being released, but the genre remained popular in some Chicago nightclubs and on at least one radio station, WBMX-FM. In this era, Chicago radio jocks The Hot Mix 5 and club DJs like Ron Hardy, Frankie Knuckles, and Marshall Jefferson played various styles of dance music, including older disco records, newer Italo Disco, hip hop and electro funk tracks, as well as electronic pop music by Kraftwerk and Yellow Magic Orchestra, and recent danceable R&B productions in the genre now known as boogie. Some of these DJs also made and played their own edits of their favorite songs on reel-to-reel tape, focusing on the portions of songs which worked well on the dancefloor. Some even mixed in
    10.00
    1 votes
    76
    Jazz

    Jazz

    • Artists: John Coltrane
    • Albums: Giant Steps
    • Parent genres: Popular music
    Jazz is a musical style that originated at the beginning of the 20th century in black communities in the Southern United States. It was born out of a mix of African and European music traditions. Its African pedigree is evident in its use of blue notes, improvisation, polyrhythms, syncopation and the swung note. From its early development until the present day jazz has also incorporated elements from American popular music. As the music has developed and spread around the world it has drawn on many different national, regional and local musical cultures giving rise, since its early 20th century American beginnings, to many distinctive styles: New Orleans jazz dating from the early 1910s, big band swing, Kansas City jazz and Gypsy jazz from the 1930s and 1940s, bebop from the mid-1940s and on down through West Coast jazz, cool jazz, avant-garde jazz, Afro-Cuban jazz, modal jazz, free jazz, Latin jazz in various forms, soul jazz, jazz fusion and jazz rock, smooth jazz, jazz-funk, punk jazz, acid jazz, ethno jazz, jazz rap, cyber jazz, Indo jazz, M-Base, nu jazz, urban jazz and other ways of playing the music. In a 1988 interview, trombonist J. J. Johnson said, "Jazz is restless. It
    10.00
    1 votes
    77

    Mobb Music

    • Artists: JT the Bigga Figga
    • Albums: Me Against the World
    • Parent genres: West Coast hip hop
    Mobb Music is a style of West Coast rap music that began in the San Francisco Bay Area in the late 1980s to mid 1990s. The basic instrumental style is derived primarily from funk music, with a heavy focus on synthesizers, ultra low bass lines and Roland TR-808 drums.
    10.00
    1 votes
    78

    New Romantic

    • Artists: Theatre of Ice
    • Albums: Stick Figure Neighbourhood
    • Parent genres: Synthpop
    New Romanticism (also called blitz kids and a variety of other names) was a pop culture movement in the United Kingdom that began around 1979 and peaked around 1981. Developing in London nightclubs such as Billy's and The Blitz and spreading to other major cities in the UK, it was based around flamboyant, eccentric fashion and New Wave music. Several music acts from the era adopted the style of the movement and became known to epitomise it within the music and mainstream press, including Ultravox, Visage, Duran Duran, Spandau Ballet, ABC and Boy George (of Culture Club). Japan and Adam and the Ants were also labelled as New Romantic artists by the press, although they had no direct connection to the original scene. A number of these bands adopted synthesizers and helped to develop synthpop in the early 1980s, which, combined with the distinctive New Romantic visuals, helped them first to national success in the UK and, with help of MTV to play a major part in the Second British Invasion of the U.S. charts. By the mid-1980s, the original movement had largely dissipated and, although some of the artists associated with the scene continued their careers, they had largely abandoned the
    10.00
    1 votes
    79

    Psychedelic pop

    • Artists: The Fiery Furnaces
    • Albums: Look To The Merry-Go-Sun
    • Parent genres: Psychedelic rock
    Psychedelic pop is a psychedelic musical style inspired by the sounds of psychedelic folk and psychedelic rock, but applied to a pop music setting. It reached its peak during the late 1960s, declining rapidly in the early 1970s. The origins of psychedelic music were in folk and rock music of the mid-1960s, particularly the work of The Beatles, The Byrds and bands like The Yardbirds and The Grateful Dead. As psychedelia emerged as a mainstream and commercial force it began to influence pop music, which incorporated hippie fashions, drug references, as well as the sounds of sitars, fuzz guitars, and tape effects, but often using the close harmonies of the California sound and applying these elements to concise and catchy pop songs. With The Beatles being the mainstream and commercial force during the psychedelic era; with albums such as Revolver (1966), The Beach Boys under the leadership of Brian Wilson also began to herald psychedelia into the mainstream with records such as Pet Sounds (1966) and the single "Good Vibrations", which made use of a Tannerin (an easier to manipulate version of a Theremin). American vocal group The Mamas & the Papas were also influenced by psychedelic
    10.00
    1 votes
    80

    Soukous

    • Artists: Oliver N'Goma
    • Albums: World Psychedelic Classics, Vol. 3: Love's a Real Thing
    • Parent genres: Rumba
    Soukous (also known as Lingala and Congo) is a dance music musical genre that originated in the two neighbouring countries of Belgian Congo and French Congo during the 1930s and early 1940s, and which has gained popularity throughout Africa. "Soukous" (a derivative of the French word secousse, "shake") was originally the name of a dance popular in the Congos in the late 1960s, an African version of rumba. Although the genre was initially known as rumba (sometimes termed specifically as African rumba), the term "soukous" has come to refer to African rumba and its subsequent developments. Soukous is called Congo music in West Africa, and Lingala in Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania – referring to the Lingala language of the region from where it originated. In Zambia and Zimbabwe, where Congolese music is also influential, it is usually referred to as Rumba. In the 1980s and early 1990s, a fast-paced style of soukous known as kwassa kwassa – named after a popular dance, was popular. A style called ndombolo, also named after a dance, is currently popular. Soukous also mixes styles from zouk music. Cuban music has been popular in sub-Saharan Africa since the mid twentieth century. To the
    10.00
    1 votes
    81
    Indie rock

    Indie rock

    • Artists: The Shins
    • Albums: Use Your Appetite for Spaghetti
    • Parent genres: Psychobilly
    Indie rock is a genre of alternative rock that originated in the United Kingdom and the United States in the 1980s. Indie rock is extremely diverse, with sub-genres that include indie pop, jangle pop, C86, and lo-fi, among others. Originally used to describe record labels, the term became associated with the music they produced and was initially used interchangeably with alternative rock. As grunge and punk revival bands in the US, and then Britpop bands in the UK, broke into the mainstream in the 1990s, it came to be used to identify those acts that retained an outsider and underground and less testosterone-driven perspective. In the 2000s, as a result of changes in the music industry and the growing importance of the Internet, a number of indie rock acts began to enjoy commercial success, leading to questions about its meaningfulness as a term. Indie rock, derived from "independent", describes the small and relatively low-budget labels on which it is released and the do-it-yourself attitude of the bands and artists involved. Although distribution deals are often struck with major corporate companies, these labels and the bands they host have attempted to retain their autonomy,
    6.50
    4 votes
    82

    Balkan Pop

    • Artists: Lepa Brena
    • Albums: Fisherman's Woman
    • Parent genres: Pop music
    Balkan Pop, is a mixture of traditional South and east European (Greek, Boulgarian, Serbian etc) folk music and western dance music.
    8.50
    2 votes
    83

    Britpop

    • Artists: Jarvis Cocker
    • Albums: Laid
    • Parent genres: Mod
    Britpop is a subgenre of alternative rock that originated in the United Kingdom. Britpop emerged from the British independent music scene of the early 1990s and was characterised by bands influenced by British guitar pop music of the 1960s and 1970s. The movement developed as a reaction against various musical and cultural trends in the late 1980s and early 1990s, particularly the grunge phenomenon from the United States. In the wake of the musical invasion into the United Kingdom of American grunge bands, new British groups such as Suede and Blur launched the movement by positioning themselves as opposing musical forces, referencing British guitar music of the past and writing about uniquely British topics and concerns. These bands were soon joined by others including Oasis, Pulp, Supergrass, Sleeper and Elastica. Britpop groups brought British alternative rock into the mainstream and formed the backbone of a larger British cultural movement called Cool Britannia. Although its more popular bands were able to spread their commercial success overseas, especially to the United States, the movement largely fell apart by the end of the decade. Britpop bands were influenced by British
    8.50
    2 votes
    84
    Flamenco

    Flamenco

    • Artists: Sabicas
    • Albums: La Leyenda del Tiempo
    • Parent genres: Sephardic music
    Flamenco (Spanish pronunciation: [flaˈmeŋko]) is a genre of Spanish music, song, and dance from Andalusia, in southern Spain, that includes cante (singing), toque (guitar playing), baile (dance) and palmas (handclaps). First mentioned in literature in 1774, the genre grew out of Andalusian and Romani music and dance styles. In recent years flamenco has become popular all over the world and is taught in many countries: in Japan there are more academies than there are in Spain. On November 16, 2010 UNESCO declared flamenco one of the Masterpieces of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity. There are many assertions as to the use of the name flamenco as a musical term (summarized below) but no solid evidence for any of them. The word was not recorded as a musical and dance term until the late 18th century. The word flamenco is the Spanish name for the Greater Flamingo, a bird native to southern Spain. The Flamenco dance style derives much from Romani dances that have elements that can be traced all the way back to northern India, from where the Romani originated, and can still be seen there in the present day Kathak dance. It has been suggested that the term flamenco may have
    8.50
    2 votes
    85
    Industrial music

    Industrial music

    • Artists: Soar
    • Albums: Soliloquy For Lilith
    • Parent genres: Noise music
    Industrial music is a style of experimental music that draws on transgressive and provocative themes. The term was coined in the mid-1970s with the founding of Industrial Records by the band Throbbing Gristle, and the creation of the slogan "industrial music for industrial people". In general, the style is harsh and challenging. Allmusic defines industrial as the "most abrasive and aggressive fusion of rock and electronic music"; "initially a blend of avant-garde electronics experiments (tape music, musique concrète, white noise, synthesizers, sequencers, etc.) and punk provocation". The first industrial artists experimented with noise and aesthetically controversial topics, musically and visually, such as fascism, serial killers and the occult. Their production was not limited to music, but included mail art, performance art, installation pieces and other art forms. Prominent industrial musicians include Throbbing Gristle, SPK, Boyd Rice, Cabaret Voltaire, and Z'EV. The precursors that influenced the development of the genre included acts such as electronic group Kraftwerk, experimental rock The Velvet Underground and Frank Zappa, psychedelic rock artists such as Jimi Hendrix, and
    8.50
    2 votes
    86
    Neofolk

    Neofolk

    • Artists: Von Thronstahl
    • Albums: Nada!
    • Parent genres: Industrial music
    Neofolk is a form of folk music-inspired experimental music that emerged from post-industrial music circles. Neofolk can either be solely acoustic folk music or a blend of acoustic folk instrumentation aided by varieties of accompanying sounds such as pianos, strings and elements of industrial music and experimental music. The genre encompasses a wide assortment of themes. Neofolk musicians often have ties to other genres such as neoclassical and martial industrial. The term "neofolk" originates from esoteric music circles who started using the term in the late 20th century to describe music influenced by musicians such as Douglas Pearce (Death In June), Tony Wakeford (Sol Invictus) and David Tibet (Current 93) who had collaborated heavily for a period of time. These musicians were part of a post-industrial music circle who later on incorporated folk music based upon traditional and European elements into their sound. Anglo-American folk music with similar sounds and themes to neofolk existed as far back as the 1960s. Folk musicians such as Vulcan's Hammer, Changes, Leonard Cohen, and Comus could be considered harbingers of the sound that later influenced the neofolk artists. Also
    8.50
    2 votes
    87
    Old-time music

    Old-time music

    • Artists: The Monroe Brothers
    • Albums: Good for What Ails You: Music of the Medicine Shows 1926-1937
    • Parent genres: Folk music
    Old-time music is a genre of North American folk music, with roots in the folk music of many countries, including England, Scotland, Ireland and countries in Africa. It developed along with various North American folk dances, such as square dance, buck dance, and clogging. The genre also encompasses ballads and other types of folk songs. It is played on acoustic instruments, generally centering on a combination of fiddle and plucked string instruments (most often the guitar and banjo). Reflecting the cultures that settled North America, the roots of old-time music are in the traditional musics of the British Isles (primarily English and Scottish) and Ireland. In some regions French and German sources are also prominent. While many dance tunes and ballads can be traced to European sources, many others are of purely North American origin. With its origins in traditional music of Europe and Africa, old-time music represents perhaps the oldest form of North American traditional music other than Native American music, and thus the term "old-time" is an appropriate one. As a label, however, it dates back only to 1923. Fiddlin' John Carson made some of the first commercial recordings of
    8.50
    2 votes
    88

    Psybient

    • Artists: Shpongle
    • Albums: Are You Shpongled?
    • Parent genres: Goa trance
    Psybient, also known as ambient psy, psychedelic chillout, psychedelic ambient, ambient goa, ambient psytrance and more commonly within the Goa/psytrance scene as psychill and psydub, is a genre of electronic music that combines elements of psychedelic trance, ambient, world music, new age and even ethereal wave. It often has many dub influences and can also sound somewhat like glitch. Psybient pieces are often structured around the concept of creating a "sonic voyage" or "musical journey". Although similar to psytrance's emphasis on maintaining non-stop rhythm throughout the night, psybient is far more focused on creating a vast soundscape that can be experienced over the length of an album, focusing less on beatmatching and allowing for a myriad of tempo changes. Some of the most popular and genre leading psybient artists include Shpongle, Entheogenic, Shulman, Ott, Prometheus (musician), Hoopy Frood, Carbon Based Lifeforms, Third Ear Audio, Doof, Warp Technique, Yestegan chaY, Younger Brother, The Infinity Project, Asura, Pitch Black, The Mystery Of The Yeti, Celtic Cross, Astropilot, Androcell, Technical Pillow, Tor.Ma and Evan Bluetech. Because of the heat, humidity, and dust
    8.50
    2 votes
    89
    Russian pop

    Russian pop

    • Artists: Alla Pugacheva
    • Albums: Gorodskaya Shumasshedskaya
    • Parent genres: Disco
    Russian pop music is Russian-language pop music produced either in Russia or other countries. This is the successor to popular "variety" Soviet music with its pop idols such as Alla Pugachova or Valery Leontiev. Modern-day mainstream Russian-language pop music is extremely diverse and has many ways to spread through the audience. The most famous pop stars can be seen on general television in music or talk shows, and also on music TV channels such as MTV Russia and Muz-TV. There are also Russian Pop radio stations, and there's been lots of one-hit-wonders in recent years.
    8.50
    2 votes
    90
    Christian music

    Christian music

    • Artists: Kids in the Way
    • Albums: Escape From the Fallen Planet
    • Parent genres: Sacred music
    Christian music is music that has been written to express either personal or a communal belief regarding Christian life and faith. Common themes of Christian music include praise, worship, penitence, and lament, and its forms vary widely across the world. Like other forms of music the creation, performance, significance, and even the definition of Christian music varies according to culture and social context. Christian music is composed and performed for many purposes, ranging from aesthetic pleasure, religious or ceremonial purposes, or as an entertainment product for the marketplace. Among the most prevalent uses of Christian music are in church worship or other gatherings. Most Christian music involves singing, whether by the whole congregation (assembly), or by a specialized subgroup—such as a soloist, duet, trio, quartet, madrigal, choir, or worship band—, or both. It is frequently accompanied by instruments, but some denominations (such as some Exclusive Brethren, the Churches of Christ, the Primitive Baptists and the Free Church of Scotland) or congregations still prefer unaccompanied or a cappella singing. One of the earliest forms of worship music in the church was the
    7.33
    3 votes
    91
    Electric folk

    Electric folk

    • Artists: Steeleye Span
    • Albums: Live at Last
    • Parent genres: Folk rock
    Electric folk is the name given to the form of folk rock pioneered in England from the late 1960s, and most significant in the 1970s, which then was taken up and developed in the surrounding Celtic cultures of Brittany, Ireland, Scotland, Wales and the Isle of Man, to produce Celtic rock and its derivatives. It has also been influential in those parts of the world with close cultural connections to Britain and gave rise to the genre of folk punk. By the 1980s the genre was in steep decline in popularity, but has survived and revived in significance, partly merging with the rock music and folk music cultures from which it originated. Although in Britain the term folk rock is often used synonymously with electric folk, commentators have returned to this term as a means of distinguishing this as a clear and distinct category within the wider folk rock genre. When English bands of the late 1960s and early 1970s defined themselves as 'electric folk' they were making a distinction with the already existing 'folk rock'. Folk rock was (to them) what they had already been producing: American or American style singer-songwriter material played on rock instruments, as undertaken by Dylan and
    7.33
    3 votes
    92

    French house

    • Artists: Cassius
    • Albums: Ed Rec Vol. 2
    • Parent genres: Tribal house
    French house is a catch-all term for house music by many French artists, a popular strand of the late 1990s and 2000s (decade) European dance music scene and a form of Euro disco. The genre has also been referred to as "neu-disco" (new disco, distinct from the non-house "nu-disco" revival), "French touch", "filter house" and "tekfunk" over the years. The defining characteristics of the sound are heavy reliance on filter and phaser effects both on and alongside samples of late 1970s and early 1980s American or European disco tracks. Celebrated and successful purveyors of this music include Daft Punk, Cassius and Etienne de Crécy. Most tracks in this vein feature steady 4/4 beats with a tempo range of 110–130 beats per minute. French house is greatly influenced by the lineage of American dance music from the emergence of disco onwards, maintaining a distinct connection to Euro disco and the short lived space disco music style. Space disco was very popular in France, with artists like Cerrone, Space and Sheila B. Devotion during the late 1970s and early 1980s. Additional influences came from P-Funk, especially the George Clinton and Bootsy Collins hits of that era. Due to originating
    7.33
    3 votes
    93
    Funk

    Funk

    • Artists: Rosie Gaines
    • Albums: Sign 'O' the Times
    • Parent genres: Brown-eyed soul
    Funk is a music genre that originated in the mid-late 1960s when African American musicians blended soul music, jazz and R&B into a rhythmic, danceable new form of music. Funk de-emphasizes melody and harmony and brings a strong rhythmic groove of electric bass and drums to the foreground. Funk songs are often based on an extended vamp on a single chord, distinguishing it from R&B and soul songs, which are centered on chord progressions. Like much African-inspired music, funk typically consists of a complex groove with rhythm instruments such as electric guitar, electric bass, Hammond organ, and drums playing interlocking rhythms. Funk bands sometimes have a horn section of several saxophones, trumpets, and in some cases, a trombone, which plays rhythmic "hits". Many of the most famous bands in the genre also played disco and soul extensively. Funk samples have been used extensively in genres including hip hop, house music and drum and bass. It is also the main influence of go-go, a subgenre associated with funk. The word funk as applied in the music world initially referred to a strong odor. The anthropologist/art historian Robert Farris Thompson, in his work Flash Of The Spirit:
    7.33
    3 votes
    94
    Intelligent dance music

    Intelligent dance music

    • Artists: Hood
    • Albums: In a Beautiful Place Out in the Country
    • Parent genres: Electronica
    Intelligent dance music (commonly IDM) is an electronic music genre that emerged in the early 1990s. The genre was originally influenced by developments in electronic dance music (EDM) such as Detroit Techno and various breakbeat styles that were emerging in the UK at that time. Stylistically, IDM tended to rely upon individualistic experimentation rather than adhering to musical characteristics associated with specific styles of EDM. The range of post-techno styles to emerge in the early 1990s were described variously as art techno, ambient techno, intelligent techno, and electronica. In the United States, the latter term is now used by the music industry as a catchall to describe EDM and its many derivatives. The term IDM is said to have originated in the United States in 1993 with the formation of the IDM list, an electronic mailing list originally chartered for the discussion of music by (but not limited to) a number of prominent English artists, especially those appearing on a 1992 Warp Records compilation called Artificial Intelligence. Usage of the term "Intelligent Dance Music" has been criticised by electronic musicians such as Aphex Twin and is seen by artists such as
    7.33
    3 votes
    95

    Islamic music

    • Artists: Nazeel Azami
    • Albums: Jalwa e Janan
    • Parent genres: Sacred music
    Islamic music is Muslim religious music, as sung or played in public services or private devotions. The classic heartland of Islam is the Middle East, North Africa, Iran, Central Asia, Horn of Africa and South Asia. Due to Islam being a multi-ethnic religion, the musical expression of its adherents is vastly diverse. The indigenous musical styles of these areas have shaped the devotional music enjoyed by contemporary Muslims: The Seljuk Turks, a nomadic tribe that converted to Islam, conquered Anatolia (now Turkey), and held the Caliphate as the Ottoman Empire, also had a strong influence on Islamic music. See: All of these regions were connected by trade long before the Islamic conquests of the 7th century, and it is likely that musical styles traveled the same routes as trade goods. However, lacking recordings, we can only speculate as to the pre-Islamic music of these areas. Islam must have had a great influence on music, as it united vast areas under the first caliphs, and facilitated trade between distant lands. Certainly the Sufis, brotherhoods of Muslim mystics, spread their music far and wide. The Berber and Arabic speaking countries of North Africa, such as Morocco,
    7.33
    3 votes
    96
    Crunk

    Crunk

    • Artists: Crime Mob
    • Albums: Tradimento
    • Parent genres: Southern rap
    Crunk, or Krunk, is a music style that originated in Memphis, Tennessee in the mid-to-late 1990s and gained mainstream success around 2003–04. Performers of crunk music are sometimes referred to as crunksters. An archetypal crunk track most frequently uses a drum machine rhythm, heavy bassline, and shouting vocals, often in call and response manner. The term crunk is also used as a blanket term to denote any style of southern hip hop, a side effect of the genre's breakthrough to the mainstream. The term "Crunk" has been attributed mainly to African American slang which holds various meanings. It is theorized that the use of the term came from the past tense form of "crank", which was sometimes conjugated as "crunk" in the South. Thus, if a person, event or party was hyped or "cranked"- it was said to be "crunk". In publications, the term crunk can be traced back to 1972 in the Dr. Seuss book Marvin K. Mooney Will You Please Go Now!. He uses the term "Crunk-Car" without any given definition. The term has also been traced to usage in the 1980s coming out of Atlanta, Georgia night clubs and meaning being "full of energy" or "hyped". In the mid 1990s, crunk was variously defined either
    6.25
    4 votes
    97

    Funk metal

    • Artists: Infectious Grooves
    • Albums: Colma
    • Parent genres: Punk rock
    Funk metal is a subgenre of funk rock that fuses elements of heavy metal and funk. Allmusic has claimed that "funk metal evolved in the mid-'80s when alternative bands like the Red Hot Chili Peppers and Fishbone began playing the hybrid with a stronger funk underpinning than metal." Faith No More have been described as a funk metal that dabbled in rap-metal. Rage Against the Machine's mix of funk and metal not only included rap, but also elements of punk rock. Primus, a band that has never had a clear genre, have been called things such as "thrash metal-funk meets Don Knotts, Jr." Living Colour have been cited by Rolling Stone as "black-funk-metal pioneers." Certain bands not from an alternative background, such as Bang Tango and Extreme, have also frequently incorporated funk into their musical style.
    6.25
    4 votes
    98

    Alternative metal

    • Artists: Skrape
    • Albums: Undertow
    • Parent genres: Free jazz
    Alternative metal (or alt-metal) is a style of heavy metal and alternative rock that gained popularity in the early 1990s. Alternative metal bands are often characterized by heavy guitar riffs, unconventional sounds within other heavy metal genres, unconventional song structures and sometimes experimental approaches to heavy music. Faith No More and Soundgarden are recognized as two of the earliest, most influential alternative metal band's, with both band's emerging during the early 80s, and mixing heavy metal with a variety of different genres. Initially alternative metal appealed mainly to alternative rock fans, since virtually all 1980s alt-metal bands had their roots in the American rock underground scene. Alternative metal bands emerged from hardcore punk (Biohazard, Corrosion of Conformity), noise rock (Helmet, The Jesus Lizard), grunge (Alice in Chains, Soundgarden), and industrial (Ministry, Nine Inch Nails). These bands never formed a distinct movement or scene; rather they were bound by their incorporation of traditional metal influences and openness to experimentation. Jane's Addiction borrowed from progressive rock and Living Colour injected funk into their sound, for
    7.00
    3 votes
    99

    Experimental classical music

    • Artists: Kill the Scientist
    • Albums: Delusion of the Fury: A Ritual of Dream and Delusion
    • Parent genres: Guitar Mashing
    Experimental music is a term introduced by composer John Cage in 1955. Cage defined "an experimental action is one the outcome of which is unforeseen" and he was specifically interested in completed works that performed an unpredictable action (Cage 1973, 39, quoted and so interpreted in Mauceri 1997, 197). There is an overlap with avant-garde music. David Cope describes experimental music as that, "which represents a refusal to accept the status quo" (Cope, 1997, p. 222) "Experimental music" is therefore by definition completely outside all established genres and classifications. Michael Nyman (1974) uses the term "experimental" (without reference to "classical" or any other qualification) to describe the work of American modernist composers (John Cage, Christian Wolff, Earle Brown, Meredith Monk, Malcolm Goldstein, Morton Feldman, Terry Riley, La Monte Young, Philip Glass, Steve Reich, etc.) as opposed to the European avant-garde at the time (Karlheinz Stockhausen, Pierre Boulez, Iannis Xenakis). The "experiment" in this case is not whether a piece succeeds or fails, but is in the fact that the outcome of the piece is uncertain or unforeseeable (Cage 1961, 13).
    7.00
    3 votes
    100
    Gabber

    Gabber

    • Artists: EC8OR
    • Albums: The Gabber Mixes
    • Parent genres: Hardcore techno
    Gabber ( /ˈɡæbər/; Dutch: [ˈxɑbər]), is a style of electronic music and a subgenre of hardcore techno. "Gabber" is an Amsterdam slang word of Bargoens and Yiddish origin (cf. chaver) that means "mate", "buddy", "pal" or "friend". The music got its name from an article in which the Amsterdam DJ K.C. the Funkaholic was asked how he felt about the harder Rotterdam house scene. He answered "They're just a bunch of gabbers having fun". DJ Paul Elstak from Rotterdam read this article and on the first Euromasters record (released through Rotterdam Records), he engraved in the vinyl "Gabber zijn is geen schande!" translating as "it's not a disgrace to be a gabber!". The word gained popularity in the Rotterdam house scene and people started to call themselves 'gabbers'. Although a house variant from Detroit reached Amsterdam in the late 1980s, it was the producers and DJs from Rotterdam who evolved it into a harder house variant which is today known as "Gabber". The specific sound of Rotterdam was also created as a reaction to the house scene of Amsterdam which was seen as "snobby and pretentious". Though house tracks from Frankfurt's Marc Acardipane were quite similar to the Rotterdam
    7.00
    3 votes
    101

    Jump blues

    • Artists: Louis Prima
    • Albums: Colin James and the Little Big Band II
    • Parent genres: Blues
    Jump blues is an up-tempo blues usually played by small groups and featuring horns. It was very popular in the 1940s, and the movement was a precursor to the arrival of rhythm and blues and rock and roll. More recently, there was renewed interest in jump blues in the 1990s as part of the swing revival. Jump evolved from big bands such as those of Lionel Hampton and Lucky Millinder. These early 1940s bands produced musicians such as Louis Jordan, Jack McVea, Earl Bostic, and Arnett Cobb. Blues and jazz were part of the same musical world, with many accomplished musicians straddling both genres. Jump blues, or simply "jump," was an extension of the boogie-woogie craze. Jump bands such as the Tympany Five, which came into being at the same time as the boogie-woogie revival, achieved maximum effect with an eight-to-the-bar boogie-woogie style. Lionel Hampton recorded a stomping big band blues, "Flying Home," in 1942. Featuring a choked, screaming tenor sax performance, the song was a hit in the "race" category. When released, however, Billboard described the tune as "an unusually swingy side" "with a bright bounce in the medium tempo and a steady drive maintained, it's a jumper that
    7.00
    3 votes
    102
    Latin American music

    Latin American music

    • Artists: Vallejo
    • Albums: Hang on Little Tomato
    • Parent genres: World music
    Latin American music (sometimes abbreviated as Latin music) is a music genre encompassing rhythms and styles originated or related to Latin America, as well as derived music genres from the United States and Europe. Some critics have defined Latin music as an incorporation of four elements: music style, geography, cultural background of the artist and language. The first of those encapsulates all music styles generated from Latin countries, such as salsa, merengue, tango and bachata; as well as other styles derived from a more mainstream genre, such as Latin pop, rock, jazz and hip-hop. It also includes recently developed genres, such as reggaeton. The tango is perhaps Argentina's best-known musical genre, famous worldwide. Others styles include the Chacarera, Milonga, Zamba and Chamamé. Modern rhythms include Cuarteto (music from the Cordoba Province) and Electrotango. Argentine rock (known locally as rock nacional) was most popular during the 1980s, and remains Argentina's most popular music. Rock en Español was first popular in Argentina, then swept through other Latin American countries and Spain. The movement was known as the "Argentine Wave." The music of Belize has a
    7.00
    3 votes
    103
    Post-rock

    Post-rock

    • Artists: Shalabi Effect
    • Albums: 37:29:24
    • Parent genres: Electronica
    Post-rock is a subgenre of rock music characterized by the influence and use of instruments commonly associated with rock, but using rhythms and "guitars as facilitators of timbre and textures" not traditionally found in rock. Post-rock musicians often produce instrumental music. Don Caballero and Tortoise were among the more prominent bands described as post-rock in the 1990s, but their styles are very different, despite being instrumental bands centered on guitars and drums. As such, the term has been the subject of backlash from listeners and artists alike. Although firmly rooted in the indie or underground scene of the 1980s and early '90s, post-rock's style often bears little resemblance musically to that of contemporary indie rock. The term "post-rock" is believed to have been coined by critic Simon Reynolds in his review of Bark Psychosis' album Hex, published in the March 1994 issue of Mojo magazine. Reynolds expanded upon the idea later in the May 1994 issue of The Wire. He used the term to describe music "using rock instrumentation for non-rock purposes, using guitars as facilitators of timbre and textures rather than riffs and power chords". He further expounded on the
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    3 votes
    104
    Protopunk

    Protopunk

    • Artists: Suicide
    • Albums: The Stooges
    • Parent genres: Punk rock
    Protopunk is a term used retrospectively to describe a number of musicians who were important precursors of punk rock in the mid-1960s to mid-1970s, or who have been cited by early punk musicians as influential. Typically, these artists were not themselves considered punk; furthermore, the typification is not widely regarded to have been the result of a distinct musical genre as these precursors came from a wide array of backgrounds, styles, and influences. American acts like The Seeds, Paul Revere & the Raiders, The Monks, Shadows of Knight, The Velvet Underground, MC5, The Stooges, The Modern Lovers, The Sonics, New York Dolls, Lou Reed, Big Star, The Fugs, Television, Death, Captain Beefheart, Patti Smith, Richard Hell, Rocket from the Tombs, and Love, German acts such as Ton Steine Scherben, Neu! and Can, and acts from Britain including The Kinks, The Troggs, The Who, David Bowie, T.Rex, Faces, Brian Eno, Mott The Hoople, Roxy Music, Doctors of Madness and Hawkwind are commonly cited as the most noteworthy artists that would ultimately influence punk. In the early and mid-1960s, garage rock bands that came to be recognized as punk rock's progenitors began springing up in many
    7.00
    3 votes
    105

    Surf rock

    • Artists: Dick Dale
    • Albums: Drop Out with The Barracudas
    • Parent genres: Psychobilly
    Surf rock, also known as "Surf Guitar" is a style of music that originated in the USA that mixes elements of surf music and rock music, and partially due to the number of Mexican immigrants in southern California, added elements of Spanish rooted melodies, as well as popular titles like "Mexico", "Baja", and "Esperanza". The most influential styles on surf rock were general rock 'n' roll, pop rock and surf music. While in the 1960s surf music and rock 'n' roll were distinct styles, associated with competing dance styles and representing distinct and competing youth cultures, the development of rock music since then has built upon both styles. Many authorities now retrospectively classify all surf bands as rock bands, and surf music therefore as a subgenre of rock music. Dick Dale has stated in an interview that he first performed surf music somewhere between 1955-57 (he claimed to be unsure): given the nature of his pre-"Let's Go Trippin'" recordings and his propensity (intentional or otherwise) for making incorrect, self-aggrandizing statements, this seems doubtful. Duane Eddy's instrumental "Movin' and Groovin'" is thought by many to be the first popular surf rock record, while
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    3 votes
    106

    Trip hop

    • Artists: Moonlight
    • Albums: Sorry I Make You Lush
    • Parent genres: Electronica
    Trip hop (or trip-hop) is a genre consisting of downtempo electronic music, originating in the early 1990s in the United Kingdom, especially Bristol. Deriving from "post"-acid house, the term was first used by the British music media and press as a way to describe the more experimental variant of breakbeat which contained influences of soul, funk and jazz. It has been described as "Europe's alternative choice in the second half of the '90s", and "a fusion of hip hop and electronica until neither genre is recognisable." Trip hop music fuses several styles and has much in common with other genres; it has several qualities similar to ambient music, its drum-based breakdowns share characteristics with hip hop, and it also contains elements of house, dance, R&B and dub reggae. Trip hop can be highly experimental in nature. Trip hop may have originated in the mid-1980s in Bristol, UK, during a time when American hip hop started to gain increasing popularity there along with the then exploding popularity of the house music and dance scene. According to Merriam-Webster's Dictionary, the term was first used in 1989, though the use is not attributed to anyone. The term 'trip hop' was first
    7.00
    3 votes
    107
    Ska punk

    Ska punk

    • Artists: The Clash
    • Albums: On the Eve of Destruction: 1991-1995
    • Parent genres: Punk rock
    Ska punk is a fusion music genre that combines ska and punk rock. It achieved its highest level of commercial success in the United States in the late 1990s. Ska-core (sometimes spelled skacore) is a subgenre of ska punk, blending ska with hardcore punk. The characteristics of ska punk vary, due to the fusion of contrasting genres. The more punk-influenced style often features faster tempos, guitar distortion, onbeat punk rock-style interludes (usually the chorus), and punk-style vocals. The more ska-influenced style of ska punk features a more developed instrumentation and a cleaner vocal and musical sound. The common instrumentation includes electric guitar, bass guitar, drums, brass instruments (such as trombones or trumpets), saxophones, and sometimes an organ. Ska and punk rock were first combined during the 2 Tone movement of the late 1970s, by bands such as The Specials, The Selecter, The Beat, and Madness. The fusion of the two genres became most prevalent in the 1980s, during the third wave of ska, and this is what most people associate with ska punk. Fishbone formed in 1979 in Los Angeles and is widely considered a pioneer of the genre, followed by Operation Ivy formed in
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    4 votes
    108
    Acid house

    Acid house

    • Artists: Innovaders
    • Albums: Analord
    • Parent genres: Tribal house
    Acid house is a sub-genre of house music that emphasizes a repetitive, hypnotic and trance-like style, often with samples or spoken lines instead of lyrics. Acid house's core electronic "squelch" sounds were developed around the mid-1980s, particularly by DJs from Chicago who experimented with the Roland TB-303 electronic synthesizer-sequencer. Acid house spread to the United Kingdom and continental Europe, where it was played by DJs in the acid house and later rave scenes. By the late 1980s, copycat tracks and acid house remixes brought the style into the mainstream, where it had some influence on pop and dance styles. Nicknamed "the sound of acid", the influence of acid house can be heard in subsequent styles of music that include trance, Goa trance, psychedelic trance, breakbeat, big beat, techno. Acid house emphasizes a repetitive, hypnotic and trance-like style, often with samples or spoken lines instead of lyrics. Acid house's core electronic "squelch" sounds were developed around the mid-1980s, particularly by DJs from Chicago who experimented with the Roland TB-303 electronic synthesizer-sequencer. There are conflicting accounts about how the term acid came to be used to
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    2 votes
    109
    Christian punk

    Christian punk

    • Artists: Kids in the Way
    • Albums: GO EP
    • Parent genres: Punk rock
    Christian punk is a form of Christian music and a subgenre of punk rock with some degree of Christian lyrical content. Much disagreement persists about the boundaries of the subgenre, and the extent that their lyrics are explicitly Christian varies among bands. For example, The Crucified explicitly rejected the classification of "Christian punk" while staying within the Christian music industry. Given the nature of punk and some of its subgenres, such as hardcore punk, many bands have been rejected by the Christian and CCM music industry. Some bands generally avoid specific mention of God or Jesus; likewise some bands may specifically reject the CCM label or express disdain for that niche of the music industry. For example, Ninety Pound Wuss vocalist Jeff Suffering said about the breakup of the band in 2000, "...[N]obody wanted to continue playing in [the] "Christian" music industry." Christian punk's origins during the wider 1980s punk rock scene are somewhat obscure. The rise of the Jesus Movement and its cultural institutions, such as Jesus People USA (JPUSA), served as an incubator for various Christian subcultures including punk, in part through JPUSA's label Grrr Records.
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    2 votes
    110
    Disco

    Disco

    • Artists: McFadden & Whitehead
    • Albums: Bee Gees Greatest
    • Parent genres: Soul music
    Disco is a genre of dance music. Disco acts charted high during the mid-1970s, and the genre's popularity peaked during the late 1970s. Its initial audiences were club-goers from the African American, Latino, gay, and psychedelic communities in New York City and Philadelphia during the late 1960s and early 1970s. Disco also was a reaction against both the domination of rock music and the stigmatization of dance music by the counterculture during this period. Women embraced disco as well, and the music eventually expanded to several other popular groups of the time. In what is considered a forerunner to disco style clubs, New York City DJ David Mancuso opened The Loft, a members-only private dance club set in his own home, in February 1970. Allmusic claims some have argued that Isaac Hayes and Barry White were playing what would be called disco music as early as 1971. According to the music guide, there is disagreement as to what the first disco song was. Claims have been made for Manu Dibango's "Soul Makossa" (1972), Jerry Butler's "One Night Affair" (1972), the Hues Corporation's "Rock the Boat" (1973), George McCrae's "Rock Your Baby" (1974), and "Kung Fu Fighting" (1974) by
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    2 votes
    111

    Folk rock

    • Artists: Dan Zanes
    • Albums: The Divine Comedy
    • Parent genres: Rock music
    Folk rock is a musical genre combining elements of folk music and rock music. In its earliest and narrowest sense, the term referred to a genre that arose in the United States and the UK around the mid-1960s. The genre was pioneered by the Los Angeles band The Byrds, who began playing traditional folk music and Bob Dylan-penned material with rock instrumentation, in a style heavily influenced by The Beatles and other British bands. The term "folk rock" was itself first coined by the U.S. music press to describe The Byrds' music in June 1965, the same month that the band's debut album was issued. The release of The Byrds' cover version of Dylan's "Mr. Tambourine Man" and its subsequent commercial success initiated the folk rock explosion of the mid-1960s. Dylan himself was also influential on the genre, particularly his recordings with an electric rock band on the Bringing It All Back Home, Highway 61 Revisited, and Blonde on Blonde albums. Dylan's July 25, 1965 appearance at the Newport Folk Festival with an electric backing band is also considered a pivotal moment in the development of folk rock. The genre had its antecedents in the American folk music revival, the beat music of
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    2 votes
    112
    House music

    House music

    • Artists: Real McCoy
    • Albums: Love Mysterious
    • Parent genres: Soul music
    House music is a genre of electronic dance music that originated in the American city of Chicago in the early 1980s. It was initially popularized circa 1984 in discothèques catering to gay and mixed, primarily African-American and Latino audiences in Chicago, but beginning in 1985, fanned out to other major cities such as Detroit, Toronto, New York City, Boston, Montreal, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Manchester, Miami, London, and Paris. It then began to influence popular music in Europe, with songs such as "House Nation" by House Master Boyz and the Rude Boy Of House (1987) and "Doctorin' The House" by Coldcut (1988) in the pop charts. Since the early to mid-1990s, house music has been infused in mainstream pop and dance music worldwide. Early house music was generally dance-based music characterized by repetitive 4/4 beats and rhythms centered around drum machines, off-beat hi-hat cymbals and synthesized basslines. While house displayed several characteristics similar to disco music, it was more electronic and minimalistic, and the structured music's focus around a repetitive rhythm was more important than the song itself. House music today, while keeping several of these core
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    2 votes
    113

    Krautrock

    • Artists: Mythos
    • Albums: Station to Station
    • Parent genres: Progressive rock
    Krautrock is a generic name for the experimental music scenes that appeared in Germany in the late 1960s and gained popularity throughout the 1970s, especially in Britain. The term is a result of the English-speaking world's reception of the music at the time and not a reference to any one particular scene, style, or movement, as many krautrock artists were not familiar with one another. BBC DJ John Peel in particular is largely credited with spreading the reputation of krautrock outside of the German-speaking world. Largely divorced from the traditional blues and rock & roll influences of English and American rock music up to that time, the period contributed to the birth and evolution of electronic music, ambient music, post-punk, alternative rock and New Age music. Key artists associated with the tag include Can, Amon Düül II, Ash Ra Tempel, Faust, Popol Vuh, Cluster, Tangerine Dream, Klaus Schulze, Neu!, and Kraftwerk. The moniker "krautrock" was applied to the experimental German rock movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s by the British music press, and ironically retained by its practitioners. The term krautrock was originally a humorous one coined by the UK music press
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    2 votes
    114
    Post-punk

    Post-punk

    • Artists: Sigue Sigue Sputnik
    • Albums: Luxury
    • Parent genres: Glam rock
    Post-punk is a rock music genre that paralleled and emerged from the initial punk rock explosion of the late 1970s. The genre retains a strong association with punk, especially art punk, but is more complex and experimental. Post-punk laid the groundwork for alternative rock by broadening the range of punk and underground music, incorporating elements of Krautrock (particularly the use of synthesizers and extensive repetition), dub music (specifically in regard to the use of bass guitars), American funk and studio experimentation into the genre. It was the focus of the 1980s alternative music/independent scene, and led to the development of genres such as gothic rock and industrial music. The term "post punk" was used in 1977 by Sounds regarding Siouxsie and the Banshees. The term came to signify artists with sounds, lyrics and aesthetics that differed significantly from their punk contemporaries and soon became applied to other British musicians, including The Pop Group, This Heat, Subway Sect, Wire, The Fall, Public Image Ltd and Magazine. This occurred as a scene emerged in the United States around protopunk/art punk survivors like Devo, Suicide, Television and Talking Heads, as
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    2 votes
    115
    Psychobilly

    Psychobilly

    • Artists: The Cramps
    • Albums: Bring It On!
    • Parent genres: Country
    Psychobilly is a fusion genre of rock music that mixes elements of punk rock, rockabilly, and other genres. It is one of several subgenres of rockabilly which also include thrashabilly, trashabilly, punkabilly, surfabilly and gothabilly. Psychobilly is often characterized by lyrical references to science fiction, horror and exploitation films, violence, lurid sexuality, and other topics generally considered taboo, though often presented in a comedic or tongue-in-cheek fashion. It is often played with an upright double bass instead of the electric bass more common in modern rock music. Psychobilly gained underground popularity in Europe beginning in the early 1980s, but remained largely unknown in the United States until the late 1990s. Since then the advent of several notable psychobilly bands has led to its mainstream popularity and attracted international attention to the genre. The evolution of psychobilly as a genre is often described as having occurred in waves. The first wave occurred in Britain in the early 1980s, the second wave took place at the end of that decade and spread through the rest of Europe, and the third crested in the late 1990s with the genre finding
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    2 votes
    116

    Son

    • Artists: Jóvenes Clásicos del Son
    • Albums: Buena Vista Social Club
    • Parent genres: Changui
    The Son cubano is a style of music that originated in Cuba and gained worldwide popularity in the 1930s. Son combines the structure and elements of Spanish canción and the Spanish guitar with African rhythms and percussion instruments of Bantu and Arará origin. The Cuban son is one of the most influential and widespread forms of Latin American music: its derivatives and fusions, especially salsa, have spread across the world. The word son (literally meaning 'sound' in Spanish) has also come to be used for other traditional rural musical styles of Spanish-speaking countries. For example, in Mexico the Son Jarocho of Veracruz and the Son Huasteco of the Sierra Huasteca constitute distinct popular musical genre. They are not derived from the Cuban son. The evidence is that son is a relatively recent musical invention, probably no earlier than the end of the 19th century. Son arose in the Cuban province of Oriente and reached Havana around 1910. It was at this time that the son most likely adopted the clave rhythm from the Havana-based rumba. Cuban historians and musicologists no longer believe that son is related to the story of Ma Teodora. The newer view is that son really originated
    8.00
    2 votes
    117
    Alternative country

    Alternative country

    • Artists: Wilco
    • Albums: Every Day is Better than the Next
    • Parent genres: Country
    Alternative country (sometimes alt-country, insurgent country, or Americana) is a loosely defined sub-genre of country music, which includes acts that differ significantly in style from mainstream or pop country music. It has been used to describe country music bands and artists that have incorporated influences ranging from roots rock, bluegrass, rockabilly, honky-tonk, alternative rock, folk rock, and sometimes punk. In the 1990s the term alternative country, paralleling alternative rock, began to be used to describe a diverse group of musicians and singers operating outside the traditions and industry of mainstream country music. Many eschewed the increasingly polished production values and pop sensibilities of the Nashville-dominated industry for a more lo-fi sound, frequently infused with a strong punk and rock & roll aesthetic. Lyrics may be bleak or socially aware, but also more heartfelt and less-often follow the clichés sometimes used by mainstream country musicians. In other respects, the musical styles of artists that fall within this genre often have little in common, ranging from traditional American folk music and bluegrass, through rockabilly and honky-tonk, to music
    9.00
    1 votes
    118
    Bossa nova

    Bossa nova

    • Artists: Nouvelle Vague
    • Albums: The Shadow of Your Smile
    • Parent genres: Samba
    Bossa nova is a well-known style of Brazilian music developed and popularized in the 1950s and 1960s. The phrase bossa nova means literally "new trend" (Portuguese pronunciation: [ˈbɔsɐ ˈnɔvɐ] ( listen)). A lyrical fusion of samba and jazz, bossa nova acquired a large following in the 1960s initially among young musicians and college students. Since its birth, it has remained a vital part of the standard jazz repertoire. In Brazil, the word "bossa" is slang for doing something with particular charm, natural flair or innate ability. As early as 1932, Noel Rosa used the word in a samba: "O samba, a prontidão e outras bossas são nossas coisas, são coisas nossas" ("The samba, the readiness and other bossas are our things, are things from us"). The exact origin of the term "bossa nova" still remains uncertain. Within the artistic beach culture of the late 1950s in Rio de Janeiro, the term "bossa" was used to refer to any new "trend" or "fashionable wave". In his book Bossa Nova, Brazilian author Ruy Castro asserts that "bossa" was already in use in the 1950s by musicians as a word to characterize someone's knack for playing or singing idiosyncratically. Castro claims that the term
    9.00
    1 votes
    119

    Celtic music

    • Artists: Four to the Bar
    • Albums: Wild Ocean
    • Parent genres: Ancient Celtic music
    Celtic music is a broad grouping of musical genres that evolved out of the folk musical traditions of the Celtic people of Western Europe. It refers to both orally-transmitted traditional music and recorded music and the styles vary considerably to include everything from "trad" (traditional) music to a wide range of hybrids. Celtic music means two things mainly. First, it is the music of the peoples identifying themselves as Celts. Secondly, it refers to whatever qualities may be unique to the musics of the Celtic Nations. Many notable Celtic musicians such as Alan Stivell and Paddy Moloney claim that the different Celtic musics have much in common. These common melodic practices may be used: These two latter usage patterns may simply be remnants of formerly widespread melodic practices. Often, the term Celtic music is applied to the music of Ireland and Scotland because both lands have produced well-known distinctive styles which actually have genuine commonality and clear mutual influences. The definition is further complicated by the fact that Irish independence has allowed Ireland to promote 'Celtic' music as a specifically Irish product. In reality, the terms 'Scots/Scottish'
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    1 votes
    120
    Electronic rock

    Electronic rock

    • Artists: Depeche Mode
    • Albums: Frankenstein Girls Will Seem Strangely Sexy
    • Parent genres: Rock music
    Electronic rock, also commonly referred to as synthrock, electrorock or digital rock, is rock music generated with electronic instruments. It has been highly dependent on technological developments, particularly the invention and refinement of the synthesizer, the development of the MIDI digital format and computer technology. In the late 1960s rock musicians began to use electronic instruments, like the theremin and Mellotron, to supplement and define their sound, by the end of the decade the Moog synthesizer took a leading place in the sound of emerging progressive rock bands who would dominate rock in the early 1970s. After the arrival of punk rock a form of basic synth rock emerged, increasingly using new digital technology to replace other instruments. In the 1980s more commercially oriented synth pop dominated electronic rock. In the 1990s big beat and industrial rock were among the most important new trends and in the new millennium the spread of recording software led to the development of new distinct genres including indie electronic, electroclash, dance-punk and new rave. Experiments in tape manipulation or musique concrète, early computer music and early sampling and
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    1 votes
    121

    Free jazz

    • Artists: Create
    • Albums: New Thing at Newport
    • Parent genres: Jazz
    Free jazz is an approach to jazz music that was first developed in the 1950s and 1960s. Though the music produced by free jazz composers varied widely, the common feature was a dissatisfaction with the limitations of bebop, hard bop, and modal jazz, which had developed in the 1940s and 1950s. Each in their own way, free jazz musicians attempted to alter, extend, or break down the conventions of jazz, often by discarding hitherto invariable features of jazz, such as fixed chord changes or tempos. While usually considered experimental and avant-garde, free jazz has also oppositely been conceived as an attempt to return jazz to its "primitive", often religious roots, and emphasis on collective improvisation. Free jazz is most strongly associated with the 1950s innovations of Ornette Coleman and Cecil Taylor and the later works of saxophonist John Coltrane. Other important pioneers included Charles Mingus, Eric Dolphy, Albert Ayler, Archie Shepp, Joe Maneri and Sun Ra. Although today "free jazz" is the generally-used term, many other terms were used to describe the loosely-defined movement, including "avant-garde", "energy music" and "The New Thing". During its early- and mid-60s
    9.00
    1 votes
    122

    G-funk

    • Artists: Boo-Yaa T.R.I.B.E.
    • Albums: Regulate... G Funk Era
    • Parent genres: West Coast hip hop
    G-funk, or gangsta-funk, is a sub-genre of hip hop music that emerged from West Coast gangsta rap in the late 1980s - early 1990s. G-funk (which uses funk with an artificially altered tempo) incorporates multi-layered and melodic synthesizers, slow hypnotic grooves, a deep bass, background female vocals, the extensive sampling of P-Funk tunes, and a high-pitched portamento sine wave synthesizer lead. The lyrical content depended on the artist and could consist of sex, drugs, violence, and women, but also of love for a city, love for friends and relaxing words. There was also a slurred “lazy” way of rapping in order to clarify words and stay in rhythmic cadence. Unlike other earlier rap acts that also utilized funk samples (such as EPMD and The Bomb Squad), G-funk often utilized fewer, unaltered samples per song. Music theorist Adam Krims has described G-funk as "a style of generally West Coast rap whose musical tracks tend to deploy live instrumentation, heavy on bass and keyboards, with minimal (sometimes no) sampling and often highly conventional harmonic progressions and harmonies". Dr. Dre, a pioneer for the G-funk genre, normally uses live musicians to replay the original
    9.00
    1 votes
    123
    Jazz fusion

    Jazz fusion

    • Artists: Return to Forever
    • Albums: Where Have I Known You Before
    • Parent genres: Jazz
    Jazz fusion, fusion, or jazz-rock is a musical fusion genre that developed from mixing funk and R&B rhythms and the amplification and electronic effects of rock music, complex time signatures derived from non-Western music and extended, typically instrumental compositions with a jazz approach to lengthy group improvisations, often using wind and brass and displaying a high level of instrumental technique. The term "jazz rock" is often used as a synonym for "jazz fusion" as well as for music performed by late 1960s and 1970s-era rock bands that added jazz elements to their music. Some progressive rock is also labelled "fusion". After a decade of popularity during the 1970s, fusion expanded its improvisatory and experimental approaches through the 1980s and 1990s. Fusion albums, even those that are made by the same group or artist, may include a variety of styles. Rather than being a codified musical style, fusion can be viewed as a musical tradition or approach. Allmusic Guide states that "until around 1967, the worlds of jazz and rock were nearly completely separate". While in the USA modern jazz and electric R&B may have represented opposite poles of blues-based Afro-American
    9.00
    1 votes
    124

    New Age music

    • Artists: Deep Forest
    • Albums: Dawn of a New Century
    • Parent genres: Ambient music
    New Age music is an umbrella term for various downtempo music intended to create artistic inspiration, relaxation, and optimism. It is used by listeners for yoga, massage, meditation, and reading as a method of stress management or to create a peaceful atmosphere in their home or other environments, and is often associated with environmentalism and New Age spirituality. The harmonies in New Age music are generally modal, consonant, or include a drone bass. The melodies are often repetitive, to create a hypnotic feeling, and sometimes recordings of nature sounds are used as an introduction to a track or throughout the piece. Pieces of up to thirty minutes are common. New Age music includes both electronic forms, frequently relying on sustained synth pads or long sequencer-based runs, and acoustic forms, featuring instruments such as flutes, piano, acoustic guitar and a wide variety of non-western acoustic instruments. Vocal arrangements were initially rare in New Age music but as it has evolved vocals have become more common, especially vocals featuring Native American, Sanskrit, or Tibetan influenced chants, or lyrics based on mythology such as Celtic legends or the realm of
    9.00
    1 votes
    125
    Celtic punk

    Celtic punk

    • Artists: The Go Set
    • Albums: Long Dim Road
    • Parent genres: Punk rock
    Celtic punk is punk rock mixed with traditional Celtic music. The genre was founded in the 1980s by The Pogues, a band of punk musicians in London who celebrated their Irish heritage. Celtic punk bands often play covers of traditional Irish folk and political songs, as well as original compositions. Although the plight of the Irish people is often a topic of their songs, it's not considered an overtly political genre. Prevalent themes in Celtic punk songs include Ireland, Scotland, Irish Republicanism, Scottish Independence, Scottish diaspora and Irish diaspora, drinking and working class pride. The typical Celtic punk band includes a rock instrumentation as well as traditional instruments such as bagpipes, fiddle, tin whistle, accordion, mandolin, and banjo. Like Celtic rock, Celtic punk is a form of Celtic fusion. The term Celtic punk is usually used to describe bands who base their music in Irish or Scottish traditional music. It is considered part of the broader folk punk genre, but that term tends to be used for bands that use English, American and other forms of folk music as inspiration. Celtic punk's origin is in the 1960s and 1970s folk rock musicians who played electric
    6.67
    3 votes
    126

    Country rock

    • Artists: Blue Mountain
    • Albums: Tambourine
    • Parent genres: Country
    Country rock is a subgenre of country music, formed from the fusion of rock with country. The term is generally used to refer to the wave of rock musicians who began to record country-flavored records in the late 1960s and early 1970s, beginning with Bob Dylan and The Byrds; reaching its greatest popularity in the 1970s with artists like Emmylou Harris and the Eagles. Rock and roll has often been seen as a combination of rhythm and blues with country music, a fusion particularly evident in 1950s rockabilly, and there has been cross-pollination throughout the history of both genres, however, the term country-rock is generally used to refer to the wave of rock musicians of the late 1960s and early 1970s who began to record rock records using country themes, vocal styles and additional instrumentation, most characteristically pedal steel guitar. Country influences can be heard on rock records through the 1960s, including tracks on the Beatles for Sale album (1964) (including "I'll Cry Instead", "Baby's in Black" and "I Don't Want to Spoil the Party"), on the Rolling Stones "High and Dry" (1966), as well as Buffalo Springfield's "Go and Say Goodbye" (1966) and "Kind Woman" (1968). In
    6.67
    3 votes
    127
    Deathrock

    Deathrock

    • Artists: Theatre of Ice
    • Albums: A Deeper Kind of Slumber
    • Parent genres: Punk rock
    Deathrock is a term used to identify a sub-genre of punk rock incorporating horror elements and spooky atmospherics, that emerged on the West Coast of the United States in the early 1980s. Deathrock songs use simple chords, echoing guitars, a prominent bass, and drumming which emphasizes repetitive, post-punk beats within a 4/4 time signature. To create atmosphere, scratchy guitars are sometimes used. Lyrics can vary, but are typically introspective and surreal, and deal with the dark themes of isolation, gloom, disillusionment, loss, life, death, etc.; as can the style, varying from harsh and dark to upbeat, melodic and tongue-in-cheek. Deathrock lyrics and other musical stylistic elements often incorporate the themes of campy horror and sci-fi films, which in turn leads some bands to adopt elements of rockabilly and surf rock. The frequently simplistic song structures, heavy atmosphere and rhythmic music place a great demand on lead vocalists to convey complex emotions, so deathrock singers typically have distinctive voices and strong stage presences. Despite the similar sounding name, deathrock has no connection to the similarly named death metal, which is an extreme subgenre of
    6.67
    3 votes
    128
    Grunge music

    Grunge music

    • Artists: Line Lokr
    • Albums: Sweet Oblivion
    • Parent genres: Punk rock
    Grunge (sometimes referred to as the Seattle sound) is a subgenre of alternative rock that emerged during the mid-1980s in the American state of Washington, particularly in the Seattle area. Inspired by hardcore punk, heavy metal, and indie rock, grunge is generally characterized by heavily distorted electric guitars, contrasting song dynamics, and apathetic or angst-filled lyrics. The grunge aesthetic is stripped-down compared to other forms of rock music, and many grunge musicians were noted for their unkempt appearances and rejection of theatrics. The early grunge movement coalesced around Seattle independent record label Sub Pop in the late 1980s. Grunge became commercially successful in the first half of the 1990s, due mainly to the release of Nirvana's Nevermind and Pearl Jam's Ten. The success of these bands boosted the popularity of alternative rock and made grunge the most popular form of hard rock music at the time. However, many grunge bands were uncomfortable with this popularity. Although most grunge bands had disbanded or faded from view by the late 1990s, their influence continues to affect modern rock music. Mark Arm, the vocalist for the Seattle band Green
    6.67
    3 votes
    129
    Merengue music

    Merengue music

    • Artists: Olga Tañón
    • Albums: Mudanza y Acarreo
    • Parent genres: Décima
    Merengue is a type of music and dance originated in Dominican Republic, which has become popular all over Latin America - even in those countries which formerly had their own type of music traditions. The etymology of its name is much disputed. It may derived from the French meringue, a dessert made from whipped egg whites and sugar, but is equally likely to be related to similar West African words related to dance and music. Merengue is first mentioned in the Dominican Republic in 1854. In the Dominican Republic it was promoted by Rafael Trujillo, the dictator from the 1930 to 1961, who turned it into the country's national music and dance style. In the United States it was first popularized by New York-based groups and bandleaders like Rafael Petiton Guzman, beginning in the 1930s, and Angel Viloria y su Conjunto Típico Cibaeño in the 1950s. It was during the Trujillo era that the merengue "Compadre Pedro Juan", by Luis Alberti, became an international hit and standardized the 2-part form of the merengue. Internationally known merengue singers and groups include Fernando Villalona, Juan Luis Guerra, Eddy Herrera, Toño Rosario & Los Hermanos Rosario, Los Toros Band, Sergio Vargas,
    6.67
    3 votes
    130
    Reggae

    Reggae

    • Artists: The Police
    • Albums: Love Is My Religion
    • Parent genres: Rocksteady
    Reggae is a music genre first developed in Jamaica in the late 1960s. While sometimes used in a broader sense to refer to most types of Jamaican music, the term reggae more properly denotes a particular music style that originated following on the development of ska and rocksteady. Reggae is most easily recognized by the rhythmic accents on the off-beat, usually played by guitar or piano (or both), known as the skank. This pattern accents the second and fourth beat in each bar (or the "and"s of each beat depending on how the music is counted) and combines with the drums emphasis on beat three to create a unique feel and sense of phrasing in contrast to most other popular genres focus on beat one, the "downbeat". The tempo of reggae is usually felt as slower than the popular Jamaican forms, ska and rocksteady, which preceded it. It is this slower tempo, the guitar/piano offbeats, the emphasis on the third beat, and the use of syncopated, melodic bass lines that differentiates reggae from other music, although other musical styles have incorporated some of these innovations separately. The 1967 edition of the Dictionary of Jamaican English lists reggae as "a recently estab. sp. for
    6.67
    3 votes
    131

    Space rock

    • Artists: Flotation Toy Warning
    • Albums: You
    • Parent genres: Psychedelic rock
    Space rock is a subgenre of rock music; the term originally referred to a group of early, mostly British, 1970s progressive and psychedelic rock bands such as Hawkwind and Pink Floyd, characterised by slow, lengthy instrumental passages dominated by electronic organs, synthesizers, experimental guitar work and science fiction or astronomical lyrical themes, though it was later repurposed to refer to a series of late 1980s British alternative rock bands that drew from earlier influences to create a more ambient but still melodic form of pop music. The term was revived in the 21st century to refer to a new crop of bands including The Flowers of Hell, Comets on Fire, and Flotation Toy Warning who diversely draw upon the ideas and sounds of both waves of the genre’s founders. Man's entry into outer space provided ample subject matter for rock and roll and R&B songs from the mid-1950s through the early 1960s. It also inspired new sounds and sound effects to be used in the music itself. A prominent early example of space rock is the 1959 concept album I Hear a New World by British producer and song writer Joe Meek. The album was inspired by the space race and concerned man's first close
    6.67
    3 votes
    132
    Crust punk

    Crust punk

    • Artists: Municipal Waste
    • Albums: They Brought Death
    • Parent genres: Heavy metal
    Crust punk (often simply crust) is a form of music influenced by anarcho-punk, hardcore punk and extreme metal. The style, which evolved in the mid-1980s in England, often has songs with dark and pessimistic lyrics that linger on political and social ills. The term "crust" was coined by Hellbastard on their 1986 Ripper Crust demo. Crust is partly defined by its "bassy" and "dirty" sound. It is often played at a fast tempo with occasional slow sections. Vocals are usually guttural and may be growled or screamed. Crust punk takes cues from the anarcho-punk of Crass and Discharge and the extreme metal of bands like Venom and Celtic Frost. While the term was first associated with Hellbastard, Amebix have been described as the originators of the style. Crust punk is a derivative form of hardcore punk and anarcho-punk, mixed with metal riffs. The tempos are often fast, but just short of thrashcore or grindcore, though many groups confine themselves to a crawling, sludgy pace. The overall musical sound has been described as being "stripped down". Drumming is typically done at high speed, with D-beats sometimes being used. Vocals in crust punk are often shrieked or shouted, and may be
    5.75
    4 votes
    133

    Detroit hip hop

    • Artists: Royce da 5'9"
    • Albums: Devil's Night
    • Parent genres: Hip hop music
    Detroit hip hop refers to hip hop music that originates in Detroit, Michigan. Many rap groups in Detroit often "beef" or fall out, really starting back in 2000. When the Street Lord'z vs. Rock Bottom, then in 2002 with Eminem & D12 vs. Royce Da 5'9", and in 2004 with the Eastside Chedda Boyz vs. Street Lord'z, and then again in 2007 with Killa Kaunn of Iron Fist Records vs. Famous & Flame. Since the 1990s the Detroit rap scene has been devastated by the many murders and deaths of prominent artists, starting in 1991 with the murder of Charles Edward Bridgeman(Poncho)of B-def and Poncho and then in 1996 with AWOL member DJ Homicide, who was killed by Detroit Police during an alleged burglary. This continued with D12 member Bugz in 1999 who was killed at Belle Isle Park, CEO of the Eastside Chedda Boyz "Wipeout" in 2004, Blade Icewood who was murdered at Scotty B's car wash in spring of 2005, J. Dilla who died in 2006 from an illness, and Proof who was killed in the CCC Club (AKA Club 3C) on E. 8 Mile less than 2 months later.
    5.75
    4 votes
    134
    Hip hop music

    Hip hop music

    • Artists: The 7A3
    • Albums: The Ultimate Master P
    • Parent genres: East Coast hip hop
    Hip hop music, also called hip-hop, rap music or hip-hop music, is a music genre consisting of a stylized rhythmic music that commonly accompanies rapping, a rhythmic and rhyming speech that is chanted. It developed as part of hip hop culture, a subculture defined by four key stylistic elements: MCing/rapping, DJing/scratching, break dancing, and graffiti writing. Other elements include sampling (or synthesis), and beatboxing. While often used to refer to rapping, "hip hop" more properly denotes the practice of the entire subculture. The term hip hop music is sometimes used synonymously with the term rap music, though rapping is not a required component of hip hop music; the genre may also incorporate other elements of hip hop culture, including DJing and scratching, beatboxing, and instrumental tracks. Creation of the term hip hop is often credited to Keith Cowboy, rapper with Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five. However, Lovebug Starski, Keith Cowboy, and DJ Hollywood used the term when the music was still known as disco rap. It is believed that Cowboy created the term while teasing a friend who had just joined the U.S. Army, by scat singing the words "hip/hop/hip/hop" in a
    5.75
    4 votes
    135

    Industrial rock

    • Artists: Trent Reznor
    • Albums: Year Zero
    • Parent genres: Industrial music
    Industrial rock is a musical genre that fuses industrial music and specific rock subgenres. Industrial rock spawned industrial metal, with which it is often confused. The early fusions of industrial music and rock were practiced by a handful of post-punk groups, including Chrome, Killing Joke, Swans, Foetus and Big Black. Industrial rock artists generally employ the basic rock instrumentation of electric guitars, drums and bass and pair it with white noise blasts and electronic music gear (synthesizers, sequencers, samplers and drum machines). Guitars are commonly heavily distorted or otherwise treated. Bass guitars and drums may be played live, or be replaced by electronic musical instruments or computers in general. Industrial rock frequently incorporates the sounds of machinery and industry. This sound palette was pioneered by early 1980s artists (SPK, Einstürzende Neubauten, Die Krupps and Test Dept), who relied heavily on metal percussion, generally made with pipes, tubes and other products of industrial waste. Experimental '60s group, Cromagnon are said to have been one of the bands that helped foresee the birth of industrial rock. Specifically, their song "Caledonia" has
    5.75
    4 votes
    136
    Arabesque music

    Arabesque music

    • Artists: Hisham Abbas
    • Albums: Youm Aleek
    • Parent genres: Balkan Pop
    Arabesque or Arabesk (Turkish: Arabesk) is a term created by Turkish musicologists for an Arabic style of music created in Turkey. The genre was particularly popular in Turkey in the decades from the 1960s through the 1990s. As with Arabic music itself, its aesthetics have evolved over the decades. Although melodies and rhythms are predominantly Byzantine and Arabic influenced, it also draws ideas from other aspects of Middle Eastern music including bağlama music and Ottoman forms of oriental music. A very small percentage of Arabesk is exclusively instrumental. For the great majority of it, a singer lies at the center of the music. Male singers dominated the genre in its early years, but female singers probably predominated during its peak years of popularity. Simultaneously with the influx of female singers, the sound grew more dancey and upbeat. Orhan Gencebay is generally considered the founder of the genre (though he disagrees with the usage of the term). Other well known older singers are Müslüm Gürses and Ferdi Tayfur. One of the most prolific and commercially successful is İbrahim Tatlıses, who broke all sales records in Turkey in 1978 and continues to turn out popular
    7.50
    2 votes
    137

    Breakcore

    • Artists: Famine
    • Albums: The Chocolate Wheelchair Album
    • Parent genres: Hardcore techno
    Breakcore is a style of electronic dance music largely influenced by hardcore techno, drum and bass and industrial music that is characterized by its use of heavy kick drums, breaks and a wide palette of sampling sources, played at high tempos. Breakcore is hard to accurately describe as musicians and djs like Electric Kettle, Drop the Lime, Christoph Fringeli and Dj Balli have argued that breakcore is a catch-all term that encompasses various related, though different styles of electronic music that are related through mindset or aesthetics rather than sound. Regardless, there is a common element of aggression or chaos, unconventional song structures and sudden shifts of rhythm in breakcore music. Perhaps the most defining characteristic of breakcore is the drum work which more often than not is based on the manipulation of the Amen break and other classic jungle and hip-hop breaks in high BPM. The techniques applied to achieve this differ from musician to musician, some preferring to cut up and rearrange the breaks, while others merely distort and loop breaks or apply various effects such as delay and chorus to alter the break's timbre. Distorted Roland TR-909 bass drum sounds
    7.50
    2 votes
    138
    Celtic Fusion

    Celtic Fusion

    • Artists: Four to the Bar
    • Albums: Grit
    • Parent genres: Celtic music
    Celtic fusion is an umbrella term for modern music which incorporates influences considered "Celtic," or Celtic music which incorporates modern music. It is a syncretic musical tradition which borrows freely from the perceived "Celtic" musical traditions of all the Celtic nations, as well as from all styles of popular music; it is thus sometimes associated with the Pan-Celtic movement. Celtic fusion may or may not include authentic traditional music from any one tradition under the Celtic umbrella, but its common characteristic is the inspiration by Celtic identity. The oldest musical tradition which fits under the label of Celtic fusion originated in the rural American south in the early colonial period and incorporated Scottish, Scots-Irish, Irish, and African American influences. Variously referred to as roots music, American folk music, or old-time music, this tradition has exerted a strong influence on all forms of American music, including country, blues, and rock and roll. The connections between traditional Scottish and Irish music and Rock music are deep and go back to the origins of American music. As Elvis Costello put it: "I started with rock n' roll and...then you
    7.50
    2 votes
    139
    Hard rock

    Hard rock

    • Artists: AC/DC
    • Albums: Wolfmother
    • Parent genres: Rock music
    Hard rock (or heavy rock) is a loosely defined subgenre of rock music which has its earliest roots in mid-1960s garage rock, blues rock and psychedelic rock. It is typified by a heavy use of distorted electric guitars, bass guitar, drums, and often accompanied with pianos and keyboards. Hard rock developed into a major form of popular music in the 1970s, with bands such as Led Zeppelin, The Who, Deep Purple, Aerosmith, AC/DC, and Van Halen, and reached a commercial peak in the mid to late 1980s. The glam metal of bands like Bon Jovi and Def Leppard and the rawer sounds of Guns N' Roses followed up with great success in the later part of that decade, before losing popularity with the commercial success of grunge and later Britpop in the 1990s. Despite this, many post-grunge bands adopted a hard rock sound and in the 2000s there came a renewed interest in established bands, attempts at a revival, and new hard rock bands that emerged from the garage rock and post-punk revival scenes. Hard rock is a form of loud, aggressive rock music. The electric guitar is often emphasised, used with distortion and other effects, both as a rhythm instrument using repetitive riffs with a varying
    7.50
    2 votes
    140

    Hip house

    • Artists: E-Rotic
    • Albums: Pump Up the Jam: The Album
    • Parent genres: House music
    Hip house, also known as house rap, is a musical genre that mixes elements of house music and hip-hop. The style rose to prominence during the 1980s in New York and Chicago. However, in the UK, the first officially credited hip house track was 1987's Rok Da House by UK producers the Beatmasters featuring British female emcees the Cookie Crew. Minor controversy ensued in 1989 when a U.S. record called "Turn Up The Bass" by Tyree Cooper featuring Kool Rock Steady claimed it was the "first hip house record on vinyl." The Beatmasters disputed this, pointing out that "Rok da House" had originally been written and pressed to vinyl in 1986. The outfit responded by releasing "Who’s in the House?" featuring British emcee Merlin, containing the disc "Watch Out, Tyree—we come faster, this is the sound of the true Beatmasters". More claims to the hip-house crown were subsequently laid down in tracks by Fast Eddie, Rob Base and DJ E-Z Rock, and Toni Scott. After successful releases by the Beatmasters, Deskee, Tyree, Doug Lazy, and Mr. Lee, hip-house became popular in nightclubs and garnered substantial chart success. The style complemented sample-based records of the period, produced by artists
    7.50
    2 votes
    141

    Minimal techno

    • Artists: Basic Channel
    • Albums: Total 1
    • Parent genres: Techno
    Minimal techno is a minimalist sub-genre of techno. It is characterized by a stripped-down aesthetic that exploits the use of repetition, and understated development. Minimal techno is thought to have been originally developed in the early 1990s by Detroit based producers Robert Hood and Daniel Bell, although what is currently referred to as 'minimal' largely developed in Germany during the 2000s, and was popularised by labels such as Kompakt and M-nus. In an essay published in the book Audio Culture: Readings in Modern Music (2004), music journalist Philip Sherburne argues that minimal techno uses two specific stylistic approaches; skeletalism and massification. According to Sherburne, in skeletal minimal techno, only the core elements are included with embellishments used only for the sake of variation within the song. In contrast, massification is a style of minimalism in which many sounds are layered over time, but with little variation in sonic elements. Today the influence of minimal styles of house music and techno are not only found in club music, but becoming more commonly heard in popular music. Regardless of the style, "minimal Techno corkscrews into the very heart of
    7.50
    2 votes
    142

    Neoclassicism

    • Artists: Blood Axis
    • Albums: Winds Devouring Men
    • Parent genres: 20th century classical music
    Neoclassicism in music was a twentieth-century trend, particularly current in the period between the two World Wars, in which composers sought to return to aesthetic precepts associated with the broadly defined concept of "classicism", namely order, balance, clarity, economy, and emotional restraint. As such, neoclassicism was a reaction against the unrestrained emotionalism and perceived formlessness of late Romanticism, as well as a "call to order" after the experimental ferment of the first two decades of the twentieth century. The neoclassical impulse found its expression in such features as the use of pared-down performing forces, an emphasis on rhythm and on contrapuntal texture, an updated or expanded tonal harmony, and a concentration on absolute music as opposed to Romantic program music. In form and thematic technique, neoclassical music often drew inspiration from music of the 18th century, though the inspiring canon belonged as frequently to the Baroque and even earlier periods as to the Classical period—for this reason, music which draws inspiration specifically from the Baroque is sometimes termed Neo-Baroque music. Neoclassicism had two distinct national lines of
    7.50
    2 votes
    143
    Electronic dance music

    Electronic dance music

    • Artists: Kraftwerk
    • Albums: She's in Control
    • Parent genres: Electronic music
    Electronic dance music (EDM) is electronic music produced primarily for the purposes of use within a nightclub setting, or in an environment that is centered in dance-based entertainment. The music is largely created for use by disc jockeys and is produced with the intention of it being heard in the context of a continuous DJ set; wherein the DJ progresses from one record to the next via a synchronized segue or "mix". The term emerged in America in the late 1990s and describes a set of percussive music genres that largely stem from the production methods of disco music, techno music, house music, and trance music. Such music was popularized via regional nightclub scenes in the 1980s, the warehouse party scene of the late 1980s, and the early rave scene of the acid house movement in the late 1980s. However, even in the later half of the 1970s the Disco music dance scene began to shift away from its traditional orchestration (acoustic orchestras) on its recordings. By 1977 producer Giorgio Moroder worked with Donna Summer to release I Feel Love. The song was a dance/discothèque hit, that was made using synthesizers and drum machines. They would later collaborate and release the Donna
    5.50
    4 votes
    144
    Grime

    Grime

    • Artists: Roll Deep
    • Albums: Arular
    • Parent genres: Breakbeat
    Grime is a style of music that emerged from Bow, East London, England in the early 2000s, primarily as a development of UK garage, British hip hop and dancehall. Pioneers of the style include Dizzee Rascal, Wiley, and Roll Deep. Grime emerged from Bow, East London with its origins on UK pirate radio stations, such as Rinse FM, Deja Vu Fm, Freeze 92.7 & MajorFm.com were essential to the evolution of the genre. At this point the style was known by number of names, including "8-bar" (meaning 8 bar verse patterns), "Nu Shape" (which encouraged more complexed 16 bar and 32 bar verse patterns), "Sublow" (a reference to the very low bassline frequencies, often around 40 Hz), as well as "Eskibeat", a term applied specifically to a style initially developed by Wiley and his collaborators, incorporating dance and electro elements. This indicated the movement of UK Garage away from its House influences towards darker themes and sounds. Among the first tracks to be labelled "Grime" as a genre in itself were 'Eskimo' by Wiley and "Pulse X" by Musical Mob. Dizzee Rascal and Wiley were among the first to bring the genre to the attention of the mainstream media in 2003-4, with their albums Boy in
    5.50
    4 votes
    145

    Hi-NRG

    • Artists: Culture Beat
    • Albums: Youthquake
    • Parent genres: Electronic dance music
    Hi-NRG ("high energy") is a style of uptempo disco or electronic dance music that originated in the United States and United Kingdom during the late 1970s. The genre is characterized by such elements as a four-on-the-floor rhythm and reverberated vocals. Hi-NRG and electro-funk have influenced the evolution of house music since the late 1980s. In 1977, Donna Summer was interviewed about her single "I Feel Love", which was a mostly electronic, relatively high-tempo disco song without a strong funk component. In the interview, she said "this song became a hit because it has a high-energy vibe". Following that interview, the description "high-energy" was increasingly applied to high-tempo disco music, especially songs dominated by electronic timbres. The tempo threshold for high-energy disco was around 130 to 140 BPM. In the 1980s, the term "high-energy" was stylized as "Hi-NRG". Eurobeat, dance-pop, and freestyle artists like Shannon, Stock Aitken Waterman, Taylor Dayne, Freeez or Michael Sembello were also labeled as "Hi-NRG" when sold in the United States. In the 1980s "Hi-NRG" referred not just to any high-tempo disco/dance music, but to a specific genre, only somewhat disco-like.
    5.50
    4 votes
    146
    Neue Deutsche Härte

    Neue Deutsche Härte

    • Artists: Silber
    • Albums: Aus der Tiefe
    • Parent genres: Industrial metal
    Neue Deutsche Härte ("New German Hardness", German pronunciation: [nɔʏ.ə dɔʏtʃə hɛʁtə], abbrev: NDH), also known as Die Neue Härte, German electronic metal or dance metal (tanzmetall), is a subgenre of rock music. The term was invented by the German music press after the release of the debut album Herzeleid (1995) by Rammstein. It describes a Crossover style that is influenced by German rock, groove metal, alternative metal and hard rock combining it with elements from electronica and techno. The lyrics are generally in German, sometimes with Latin words or terms. It uses the basic setup of instruments for metal, electric guitar, bass guitar, drums and vocals, with keyboard, synthesizers and samples. Emphasis is on a demonstration of predominance, by over-pronouncing certain syllables and letters (such as the uvular trill). The vocals are thus dominantly presenting in deep, male, and clean voice. Some bands use screaming and death growls, which is also common, being heard in certain songs by Oomph!, Rammstein, Stahlhammer (literally "Steel Hammer"), Samsas Traum and Megaherz. NDH imagery is often strongly masculine, and at times satanic and/or military-like, depending on the group
    5.50
    4 votes
    147
    Blues

    Blues

    • Artists: Steve Miller Band
    • Albums: Bahamut
    • Parent genres: Folk music
    Blues is the name given to both a musical form and a music genre that originated in African-American communities of primarily the "Deep South" of the United States around the end of the 19th century from spirituals, work songs, field hollers, shouts and chants, and rhymed simple narrative ballads. The blues form, ubiquitous in jazz, rhythm and blues, and rock and roll is characterized by specific chord progressions, of which the twelve-bar blues chord progression is the most common. The blue notes that, for expressive purposes are sung or played flattened or gradually bent (minor 3rd to major 3rd) in relation to the pitch of the major scale, are also an important part of the sound. The blues genre is based on the blues form but possesses other characteristics such as specific lyrics, bass lines and instruments. Blues can be subdivided into several subgenres ranging from country to urban blues that were more or less popular during different periods of the 20th century. Best known are the Delta, Piedmont, Jump and Chicago blues styles. World War II marked the transition from acoustic to electric blues and the progressive opening of blues music to a wider audience, especially white
    6.33
    3 votes
    148
    Blues-rock

    Blues-rock

    • Artists: Badlands
    • Albums: Disraeli Gears
    • Parent genres: Jam band
    Blues rock is a musical genre combining bluesy improvisations over the twelve-bar blues and extended boogie jams with rock and roll styles. The core of the blues rock sound is created by the electric guitar, piano, bass guitar and drum kit, with the electric guitar usually amplified through a tube guitar amplifier, giving it an overdriven character. The style began to develop in the mid-1960s in Britain and the United States. UK Bands, such as The Rolling Stones and The Animals and American bands such as the Butterfield Blues Band and the Siegel–Schwall Band, experimented with music from the older American bluesmen, like Albert Kingand Howlin' Wolf andRobert Johnsonand Jimmy Reedand Muddy Waters, and B.B. King. While the early blues rock bands "attempted to play long, involved improvisations which were commonplace on jazz records", by the 1970s, blues rock got heavier and more riff-based. By the "early '70s, the lines between blues rock and hard rock were barely visible", as bands began recording rock-style albums. In the 1980s and 1990s, blues rock acts returned to their bluesy roots, and some of these, such as the Fabulous Thunderbirds and Stevie Ray Vaughan, flirted with rock
    6.33
    3 votes
    149
    Doom metal

    Doom metal

    • Artists: Void of Silence
    • Albums: King of the Grey Islands
    • Parent genres: Drone music
    Doom metal is an extreme form of heavy metal music that typically uses slower tempos, low-tuned guitars and a much "thicker" or "heavier" sound than other metal genres. Both the music and the lyrics intend to evoke a sense of despair, dread, and impending doom. The genre is strongly influenced by the early work of Black Sabbath, who formed a prototype for doom metal with songs such as "Black Sabbath", "Electric Funeral" and "Into the Void". During the first half of the 1980s, a number of bands from England (Pagan Altar, Witchfinder General), the United States (Pentagram, Saint Vitus, Trouble) and Sweden (Candlemass, Count Raven) defined doom metal as a distinct genre. The electric guitar, bass guitar and drum kit are the most common instruments used to play doom metal, although keyboards are sometimes used. Guitarists and bassists often downtune their instruments to very low notes and make use of large amounts of distortion. This produces a very "thick" or "heavy" guitar tone, which is one of the defining characteristics of the genre. Along with the usual heavy metal compositional technique of guitars and bass playing the same riff in unison, this creates an impressively loud and
    6.33
    3 votes
    150
    Vallenato

    Vallenato

    • Artists: Fonseca
    • Albums: Herencia Vallenata
    • Parent genres: Music of Africa
    Vallenato, along with cumbia, is currently a popular folk music of Colombia. It primarily comes from the Colombia's Caribbean region. Vallenato literally means "born in the valley". The valley influencing this name is located between the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta and the Serranía de Perijá in northeast Colombia. The name also applies to the people from the city where this genre originated: Valledupar (from the place named Valle de Upar - "Valley of Upar"). In 2006 Vallenato and cumbia were added as a category in the Latin Grammy Awards. This form of music originated from farmers who, keeping a tradition of Spanish minstrels (Juglares in Spanish), mixed also with the West African-inherited tradition of griots (African version of juglar), who used to travel through the region with their cattle in search of pastures or to sell them in cattle fairs. Because they traveled from town to town and the region lacked rapid communications, these farmers served as bearers of news for families living in other towns or villages. Their only form of entertainment during these trips was singing and playing guitars or indigenous gaita flutes, known as kuisis in the Kogi language, and their form of
    6.33
    3 votes
    151
    Art rock

    Art rock

    • Artists: Moonlight
    • Albums: Hasten Down the Wind
    • Parent genres: Psychedelic rock
    Art rock is a subgenre of rock music that originated in the United Kingdom in the 1960s, with influences from art, avant-garde, and classical music. The first usage of the term, according to Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary, was in 1968. Influenced by the work of The Beatles, most notably their album Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, art rock was a form of music which wanted to "extend the limits of rock & roll", and opted for a more experimental and conceptual outlook on music. Art rock took influences from several genres, notably classical music, yet also jazz in later compositions. Art rock, due to its classical influences and experimental nature, has often been used synonymously with progressive rock; nevertheless, there are differences between the genres, with progressive putting a greater emphasis on symphony and melody, whilst the former tends to focus on avant-garde and "novel sonic structure". Art rock, as a term, can also be used to refer to either classically-driven rock, or a progressive rock-folk fusion, making it an eclectic genre. Common characteristics of art rock include album-oriented music divided into compositions rather than songs, with usually
    8.00
    1 votes
    152
    Bolero

    Bolero

    • Artists: Javier Solís
    • Albums: Rhythms del Mundo Classics
    • Parent genres: Ranchera
    Bolero is a genre of slow-tempo Latin music and its associated dance. There are Spanish and Cuban forms which are both significant and which have separate origins. The term is also used for some art music. In all its forms, the bolero has been popular for over a century. The bolero is a 3/4 dance that originated in Spain in the late 18th century, a combination of the contradanza and the sevillana. Dancer Sebastiano Carezo is credited with inventing the dance in 1780. It is danced by either a soloist or a couple. It is in a moderately slow tempo and is performed to music which is sung and accompanied by castanets and guitars with lyrics of five to seven syllables in each of four lines per verse. It is in triple time and usually has a triplet on the second beat of each bar. In Cuba, the bolero is perhaps the first great Cuban musical and vocal synthesis to win universal recognition. In 2/4 time, this dance music spread to other countries, leaving behind what Ed Morales has called the "most popular lyric tradition in Latin America". The Cuban bolero tradition originated in Santiago de Cuba in the last quarter of the 19th century; it does not owe its origin to the Spanish music and
    8.00
    1 votes
    153
    Cajun music

    Cajun music

    • Artists: Amanda Shaw
    • Albums: Le Chat Bleu
    • Parent genres: Ballad
    Cajun music, an emblematic music of Louisiana, is rooted in the ballads of the French-speaking Acadians of Canada. Cajun music is often mentioned in tandem with the Creole-based, Cajun-influenced zydeco form, both of Acadiana origin. These French Louisiana sounds have influenced American popular music for many decades, especially country music, and have influenced pop culture through mass media, such as television commercials. Cajun music is relatively harsh with an infectious beat and a lot of forward drive, placing the accordion at the center. Besides the voices, only two melodic instruments are heard, the accordion and fiddle, but usually in the background can also be heard the high, clear tones of a metal triangle. The harmonies of Cajun music are simple, basically I, IV, and V, tonic, sub-dominant, and dominant with many tunes just using I and V. The melodic range is just one octave, rising a fifth above the tonic and descending a fourth below. Because the Cajun accordion is a diatonic instrument, i.e., do-re-mi or natural major scale, it can only play tunes in a few keys. For example, a "C" accordion is tuned such that the entire C scale is available on the ten buttons (over
    8.00
    1 votes
    154
    Experimental music

    Experimental music

    • Artists: Hylic
    • Albums: Boys for Pele
    • Parent genres: Drum and bass
    Experimental music refers, in the English-language literature, to a compositional tradition which arose in the mid-20th century, applied particularly in North America to music composed in such a way that its outcome is unforeseeable. Its most famous and influential exponent was John Cage (Grant 2003, 174). More loosely, the term "experimental" is used in conjunction with genre names to describe music within specific genres that pushes against their boundaries or definitions, or else whose approach is a hybrid of disparate styles, or incorporates unorthodox, new, distinctly unique ingredients (Anon. [n.d.]a). Similarly, it has sometimes been used to describe "transethnic" music: the mixture of recognizable music genres. A quite distinct sense was current in the late 1950s to describe computer-controlled composition, and the term at that time also was sometimes used for electronic music and musique concrète. "Experimental music" has also been used in music journalism as a general term of disapprobation for music departing from traditional norms. The Groupe de Recherches de Musique Concrète (GRMC), under the leadership of Pierre Schaeffer, organized the First International Decade of
    8.00
    1 votes
    155
    Girl group

    Girl group

    • Artists: Phil Spector
    • Albums: Presenting the Fabulous Ronettes featuring Veronica
    • Parent genres: Rock music
    A girl group is a popular music act featuring several young female singers who generally harmonise together. Girl groups emerged in the late 1950s as groups of young singers teamed up with behind-the-scenes songwriters and music producers to create hit singles, often featuring glossy production values and backing by top studio musicians. Some acts had certain members taking the lead vocalist position with the other members as supporting vocalists. In later eras the girl group template would be applied to disco, contemporary R&B, and country-based formats as well as pop. A distinction is made here with all-female bands, in which members also play instruments, though this terminology is not universally followed. Spice Girls and TLC are considered the best-selling girl groups of all time. Both of their sales records have surpassed any other girl group in the world and their albums (Spice Girls's Spice and TLC's CrazySexyCool) are the best-selling albums of all time by a girl group. During the Music Hall/Vaudeville era, all-girl singing groups were mainly novelty acts singing nonsense songs in silly voices. One of the first major exceptions was the Hamilton Sisters and Fordyce, an
    8.00
    1 votes
    156

    Hardcore techno

    • Artists: Scooter
    • Albums: Music for the Jilted Generation
    • Parent genres: Techno
    Hardcore or hardcore techno is a type of electronic dance music typified by the rhythmic use of distorted and atonal industrial-like beats and samples. The tempo of various kinds of hardcore ranges from about 95 beats per minute (Belgian "New Beat" and rave/techno), to over 300 bpm ("speedcore"), with the more popular styles ranging from about 150 bpm to 200 bpm. The origins of hardcore emerged in the late 1980s. It largely derived from the combining of techno with EBM and New Beat sounds coming from the Belgian club scene at the time. A number of artists such as à;GRUMH... and later Leather Strip began to call their music hardcore techno. The origins of the name are largely rooted in this scene, although hardcore also regularly incorporated elements of house into its sound. Hardcore is usually composed using music sequencers, and many earlier tracks were produced on home computers with module tracker software. Some examples of the software used are FL Studio, Ableton Live, Cubase, Logic, Nuendo and Reason. The wide availability of computers, combined with the absence of financial remuneration, means that many hardcore musicians write for their own enjoyment and the pleasure of
    8.00
    1 votes
    157

    UK Hard house

    • Artists: Eskimo
    • Albums: Frantic Euphoria
    • Parent genres: Tribal house
    UK hard house or simply hard house is a style of hard dance music that emerged in the 1990s. Proper hard house is typified by a set formula of up-tempo house music compressed kick drums, signature style off-beat basslines (often referred to as a 'donk') and the use of 'hoover' type sounds. In contempt of the name it shares some parts in style with house music, but borrows elements heavily from trance music (synths and sometimes breakdown formula) plus oldskool/hardcore/rave music (hoover sounds, rap samples). Generally, hard house is part of a wider group of styles called Hard Dance and has little in common with the modern trance or house scenes going for a stronger storm sound. Hard Dance also encompasses NRG or Hard NRG, which UK Hard House is often confused for. However, the two have some variance from each other, and are considered two separate genres by Hard Dance enthusiasts. Ishkur's Guide to Electronic Music does not have an entry for Hard House, it lists only NRG which a sub-genre of hard house, sometimes referred to as "filth" for its darker, menacing, harder and more twisted sound Hard House is similar to, but distinct from Hardstyle. Confusion can sometimes arise as
    8.00
    1 votes
    158

    West Coast hip hop

    • Artists: Yukmouth
    • Albums: Snoop Dogg Presents The Big Squeeze
    • Parent genres: Reggae
    West Coast hip hop is a hip hop music subgenre that encompasses any artists or music that originates in the westernmost region of the United States, as opposed to East Coast hip hop, based originally in New York alone. The gangsta rap subgenre of West Coast hip hop began to dominate from a radio play and sales standpoint during the early 1990s. Some believe that the five elements of hip hop culture, which include B-Boying, beatboxing, DJing, graffiti art, and MCing, existed on the East and West Coasts of the United States simultaneously during the mid-seventies. This theory runs in opposition to the more universally accepted belief that the fundamental elements of hip hop were all born and cultivated exclusively on the East Coast, New York City in particular, in the most early stages of the culture. Although it is agreed that hip hop was given its name in New York, some say a culture that closely mirrored the East Coast hip hop culture had emerged in the West existing from Los Angeles to the San Francisco Bay Area during the same period. The culture itself is believed to have been a mutual creation which probably evolved from interaction between people who identified with elements
    8.00
    1 votes
    159

    Brown-eyed soul

    • Artists: War
    • Albums: Pies Descalzos
    • Parent genres: Soul music
    Brown-eyed soul is a subgenre of soul music or rhythm and blues created and performed in the United States mainly by Latinos in Southern California during the 1960s, continuing through to the early 1980s. The genre of soul music occasionally draws from Latin, and often contains rock music influences. This contrasts with blue-eyed soul, soul music performed by non-Hispanic white artists. Brown-eyed soul emerged from the 1950s simultaneously on the East Coast United States, in the Hispanic communities, and on the West Coast, in the much larger Hispanic communities. Chicago soul and Motown hits were crowd favorites at dances and clubs during the late 1950s and early 1960s. Latino artists began to draw inspiration from the Motown hits, and as a result, brown-eyed soul began sounding very similar to African American soul. Early brown-eyed soul artists owed little to traditional Latin and rarely performed in Spanish. Ritchie Valens, one of the original pioneers of brown-eyed soul music, also became one of the first brown-eyed soul artists to bring traditional Latin music and rock and roll influences into the genre. Latino groups on the East and West Coast also drew from the
    7.00
    2 votes
    160

    Drone music

    • Artists: Wizard Master
    • Albums: Stars of the Lid and Their Refinement of the Decline
    • Parent genres: Experimental classical music
    Drone music is a minimalist musical style that emphasizes the use of sustained or repeated sounds, notes, or tone-clusters – called drones. It is typically characterized by lengthy audio programs with relatively slight harmonic variations throughout each piece compared to other musics. La Monte Young, one of its 1960s originators, defined it in 2000 as "the sustained tone branch of minimalism". Drone music is also known as drone-based music, drone ambient or ambient drone, dronescape or the modern alias dronology, and often simply as drone. Explorers of drone music since the 1960s have included Theater of Eternal Music (aka The Dream Syndicate: La Monte Young, Marian Zazeela, Tony Conrad, Angus Maclise, John Cale, et al.), Charlemagne Palestine, Eliane Radigue, Philip Glass, Kraftwerk, Klaus Schulze, Tangerine Dream, Sonic Youth, Band of Susans, The Velvet Underground, The Godz, Robert Fripp & Brian Eno, Steven Wilson, Ghola, Phill Niblock, Michael Waller, David First, Kyle Bobby Dunn, Robert Rich, Steve Roach, Earth, Rhys Chatham, Coil, If Thousands, John Cage, Labradford, Lawrence Chandler, Stars of the Lid, Lattice, Sonic Boom, Sheila Chandra, Hwyl Nofio, Janek Schaefer, This
    7.00
    2 votes
    161
    Emo

    Emo

    • Artists: Texas Is the Reason
    • Albums: Where You Want to Be
    • Parent genres: Post-hardcore
    Emo ( /ˈiːmoʊ/) is a style of rock music characterized by melodic musicianship and expressive, often confessional lyrics. It originated in the mid-1980s hardcore punk movement of Washington, D.C., where it was known as "emotional hardcore" or "emocore" and pioneered by bands such as Rites of Spring and Embrace. As the style was echoed by contemporary American punk rock bands, its sound and meaning shifted and changed, blending with pop punk and indie rock and encapsulated in the early 1990s by groups such as Jawbreaker and Sunny Day Real Estate. By the mid 1990s numerous emo acts emerged from the Midwestern and Central United States, and several independent record labels began to specialize in the style. Emo broke into mainstream culture in the early 2000s with the platinum-selling success of Jimmy Eat World and Dashboard Confessional and the emergence of the subgenre "screamo". In recent years the term "emo" has been applied by critics and journalists to a variety of artists, including multiplatinum acts and groups with disparate styles and sounds. In addition to music, "emo" is often used more generally to signify a particular relationship between fans and artists, and to
    7.00
    2 votes
    162
    Math rock

    Math rock

    • Artists: Shake Ray Turbine
    • Albums: Split with Akarso
    • Parent genres: Progressive rock
    Math rock is a rhythmically complex, often guitar-based, style of experimental rock and indie rock acts that emerged in the late 1990s, influenced by progressive rock bands like King Crimson and Rush, as well as 20th century minimalist composers such as Steve Reich. It is characterized by complex, atypical rhythmic structures (including irregular stopping and starting), counterpoint, odd time signatures, angular melodies, and extended, often dissonant, chords. Whereas most rock music uses a basic 4/4 meter (however accented or syncopated), math rock frequently uses asymmetrical time signatures such as 7/8, 11/8, or 13/8, or features constantly changing meters based on various groupings of 2 and 3. This rhythmic complexity, seen as "mathematical" in character by many listeners and critics, is what gives the genre its name. The sound is usually dominated by guitars and drums as in traditional rock, and because of the complex rhythms, drummers of math rock groups have a tendency to stick out more often than in other groups. It is commonplace to find guitarists in math rock groups using the "tapping" method of guitar playing, and loop pedals are occasionally incorporated, such as in
    7.00
    2 votes
    163
    Nazi punk

    Nazi punk

    • Artists: Skrewdriver
    • Albums: White Rider
    • Parent genres: Punk rock
    A Nazi punk is a neo-Nazi who is part of the punk subculture. The term also describes the related type of music. Nazi punk music sounds similar to most forms of punk rock, but it differs by having lyrics that express hatred of Jews, homosexuals, communists, anarchists, anti-racists and people who are not considered white. It is a fringe minority faction that contrasts sharply with the anti-authoritarian, anti-racist, left-wing ideas prevalent in much of the punk subculture. Nazi punks are different from early punks such as Sid Vicious and Siouxsie Sioux, who are believed to have incorporated Nazi imagery such as Swastikas for shock or comedy value. In 1978 in Britain, the white nationalist National Front had a punk-oriented youth organization called the Punk Front. Although the Punk Front only lasted one year, it recruited several English punks, as well as forming a number of white power punk bands such as The Dentists, The Ventz, Tragic Minds and White Boss. In the early 1980s, the white power skinhead band Brutal Attack temporarily transformed into a Nazi punk band. They said they did that in the hopes of getting public concerts booked easier, but this tactic did not work, and
    7.00
    2 votes
    164

    Urban contemporary gospel

    • Artists: The Clark Sisters
    • Albums: This Is Me
    • Parent genres: Gospel music
    Urban/contemporary gospel is a modern form of Christian music that expresses either personal or a communal belief regarding Christian life, as well as to give a Christian alternative to mainstream secular music. Musically, it follows the trends in secular urban contemporary music. Urban/contemporary gospel is a recent subgenre of gospel music. Christian hip hop is a subtype of urban/contemporary gospel music. Although the style developed gradually, early forms are generally dated to the 1970s, and the genre was well established by the end of the 1980s. The radio format is marketed primarily to young African-American adults. Protestant hymns and African-American spirituals make up the basic source material for traditional black gospel music, which in turn is the most significant source of urban/contemporary gospel. Urban/contemporary gospel has kept the spiritual focus of the traditional black gospel music, but uses modern musical forms. Urban/contemporary gospel derives primarily from traditional black gospel music, with strong influence from, and strong influence on, many forms of secular pop music. Due to strong racial divisions in 20th century American culture,
    7.00
    2 votes
    165
    British Invasion

    British Invasion

    • Artists: Chad Stuart
    • Albums: Face to Face
    • Parent genres: Rock music
    The British Invasion was a phenomenon that occurred in the mid 1960s when a group of rock and pop music acts from the United Kingdom, as well as other aspects of British culture, became popular in the United States. Bands such as The Beatles and The Rolling Stones would get their start during this time and go on to make a lasting impact on the American music scene. The rebellious tone and image of American rock and roll and blues musicians became popular with British youth in the late 1950s. While early commercial attempts to replicate American rock and roll mostly failed, the trad jazz-inspired skiffle craze, with its "do it yourself" attitude, was the starting point of several British acts that would later be part of the "invasion". Lonnie Donegan, who is credited with singlehandedly popularizing skiffle in Britain, had two top 20 US pre-Invasion hits. Young British groups started to combine various British and American styles, coalescing in Liverpool during 1962 in what became known as Merseybeat, hence the "beat boom". That same year featured the first three acts with British roots to reach the Hot 100's summit. Also that same year, the James Bond film series began, giving an
    6.00
    3 votes
    166
    Contemporary R&B

    Contemporary R&B

    • Artists: Aaliyah
    • Albums: Rhythm Nation 1814
    • Parent genres: Rhythm and blues
    Contemporary R&B (also known as simply R&B) is a music genre that combines elements of rhythm and blues, pop, soul, funk and hip hop. Although the abbreviation "R&B" originates from traditional rhythm and blues music, today the term R&B is most often used to describe a style of African-American music originating after the demise of disco in the 1980s. Some sources refer to the style as urban contemporary (the name of the radio format that plays hip hop and contemporary R&B). Contemporary R&B has a polished record production style, drum machine-backed rhythms, an occasional saxophone-laced beat to give a jazz feel (mostly common in contemporary R&B songs prior to the year 1993), and a smooth, lush style of vocal arrangement. Electronic influences are becoming an increasing trend, and the use of hip hop or dance-inspired beats are typical, although the roughness and grit inherent in hip hop may be reduced and smoothed out. Contemporary R&B vocalists are often known for their use of melisma, popularized by vocalists such as Michael Jackson, Stevie Wonder, Whitney Houston and Mariah Carey. As the disco era came to a close, a new generation of producers began adding synthesizers and
    6.00
    3 votes
    167
    Heavy metal

    Heavy metal

    • Artists: Led Zeppelin
    • Albums: Smell the Glove
    • Parent genres: Blues-rock
    Heavy metal (often referred to simply as metal) is a genre of rock music that developed in the late 1960s and early 1970s, largely in the United Kingdom and in the United States. With roots in blues rock and psychedelic rock, the bands that created heavy metal developed a thick, massive sound, characterized by highly amplified distortion, extended guitar solos, emphatic beats, and overall loudness. Heavy metal lyrics and performance styles are generally associated with masculinity and machismo. The first heavy metal bands such as Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath and Deep Purple attracted large audiences, though they were often critically reviled, a status common throughout the history of the genre. In the mid-1970s Judas Priest helped spur the genre's evolution by discarding much of its blues influence; Motörhead introduced a punk rock sensibility and an increasing emphasis on speed. Bands in the New Wave of British Heavy Metal such as Iron Maiden followed in a similar vein. Before the end of the decade, heavy metal fans became known as "metalheads" or "headbangers". During the 1980s, glam metal became a commercial force with groups like Mötley Crüe and Poison. Underground scenes
    6.00
    3 votes
    168

    Groove metal

    • Artists: Cock and Ball Torture
    • Albums: As the Palaces Burn
    • Parent genres: Heavy metal
    Groove metal (sometimes called post-thrash metal, post-thrash or simply groove) is a subgenre of heavy metal. It is often used to describe Pantera and Exhorder. At its core, groove metal takes the intensity and sonic qualities of thrash metal and plays it at a mid-tempo, with most bands making only occasional forays into fast tempo. Pantera's Cowboys from Hell album from 1990 was described as "groundbreaking" and "blueprint-defining" for the groove metal genre. Ian Christe credits Sepultura's Chaos A.D. and Pantera for creating the death metal-derived music of groove metal influencing later groups in the genre during the 1990s. Groove metal bands have incorporated thrash metal, hardcore punk, and industrial music. Tommy Victor of Prong claims that the attitude of groove metal came from Bad Brains. The style has been associated with bands such as Pantera, Lamb of God, Sepultura, Soulfly, Gojira, Throwdown, Machine Head, Byzantine, Trivium, Anthrax, and Spiritual Beggars. Some bands have gone to some lengths to avoid being labelled a groove metal band. Veteran thrash metal band Annihilator left Roadrunner Records in 1993 specifically to avoid being caught up in the groove metal trend
    5.00
    4 votes
    169
    Classic metal

    Classic metal

    • Artists: Warlock
    • Albums: Thunderlip CD
    • Parent genres: Classic rock
    Traditional heavy metal, also known as classic metal or simply heavy metal, is the seminal genre of heavy metal music before the genre "evolved and splintered into many different styles and subgenres." The short, original, and proper term for this genre is "heavy metal", but as Michka Assayas notes in his Dictionary of Rock, the term "heavy metal" may sometimes be used in different senses. While the term can refer to the seminal style, it also can be used as a large umbrella term for any derivative subgenres. Hence the term "traditional heavy metal" or "classic heavy metal" may be employed to avoid confusion with the larger sense. In order to avoid the potential ambiguity others, like Sharpe Young, use the term "heavy metal" exclusively to refer to original genre and use the term "metal" instead to refer to the global genre including subgenres. Similarly, Paul Du Noyer also uses the term heavy metal to refer to the original style exclusively. Assayas points out another ambiguity of the term "heavy metal" and notes that in certain context some may consider it synonymous with hard rock (most particularly in the USA) while others consider these to be distinct genres. The former view
    5.67
    3 votes
    170
    Country

    Country

    • Artists: Cowboy Slim Rinehart
    • Albums: Cannonball
    • Parent genres: Old-time music
    Country music is a genre of American popular music that originated in the rural regions of the Southern United States in the 1920s. It takes its roots from southeastern American folk music, Western cowboy. Blues mode has been used extensively throughout its recorded history. Country music often consists of ballads and dance tunes with generally simple forms and harmonies accompanied by mostly string instruments such as banjoes, electric and acoustic guitars, fiddles, and harmonicas. The term country music gained popularity in the 1940s in preference to the earlier term hillbilly music; it came to encompass Western music, which evolved parallel to hillbilly music from similar roots, in the mid-20th century. The term country music is used today to describe many styles and subgenres. In 2009 country music was the most listened to rush hour radio genre during the evening commute, and second most popular in the morning commute in the United States. Immigrants to the Maritime Provinces and Southern Appalachian Mountains of North America brought the music and instruments of the Old World along with them for nearly 300 years. They brought some of their most important valuables with them,
    5.67
    3 votes
    171

    Garage punk

    • Artists: The Horrors
    • Albums: Soul Food
    • Parent genres: Psychobilly
    Garage punk is a fusion of garage rock and punk rock. It is fast-paced lo-fi music characterized by a dirty, choppy guitar sound—usually played by bands who are on independent record labels or who are unsigned. Garage punk bands often distance themselves from hardcore and political punk bands. According to the Allmusic guide, "Before the punk-pop wing of America's '90s punk revival hit the mainstream, a different breed of revivalist punk had been taking shape in the indie-rock underground. In general, garage punk wasn't nearly as melodic as punk-pop; instead, garage punk drew its inspiration chiefly from the Detroit protopunk of The Stooges and The MC5." Other important precedents are the early 1970s Detroit band Death and the Boston band The Modern Lovers. The latter were an influence on punk while using an organ similar to 1960s garage bands. The genre originated from the 1970s and 1980s punk bands, as well as 1960s American garage bands who (influenced by the sound and attitude of British rhythm and blues groups) created a cruder, more urgent sound. Early UK punk bands such as The Clash often originally characterized themselves as 'garage bands' with The Clash even featuring a
    5.67
    3 votes
    172

    Breakbeat hardcore

    • Artists: Brown Brigade
    • Albums: Appetizer for Destruction
    • Parent genres: Breakbeat
    Breakbeat hardcore (aka oldskool rave hardcore) is a derivative of acid house and techno music, of the late 1980s and early 1990s, that combines four-on-the-floor rhythms with breakbeats, and is associated with the UK rave scene. The scene was driven around the M25 motorway (London's orbital motorway), and its audience was mainly urban teenagers and lower middle-class suburban teenagers with cars. The audience was very much multicultural, with black, white and Asian influences resulting in a unique sound. The scene expanded rapidly in 1991, with large raves of 30–50,000 people attending in open air venues around England, put on by Spiral Tribe and other free party sound systems held at locations up and down the length of England. The late 1980s House music raves such as Sunrise UK, spawned the idea of holding huge parties rather than hosting more intimate parties at small clubs. The Breakbeat Hardcore raves modeled their events after these early raves. In the early years, the underground sound became more mainstream. Even without radio play, many hybrid and regional styles made their way into Top 20 charts. However, during the early 1990s, the two main subdivisions of this
    6.50
    2 votes
    173
    Darkwave

    Darkwave

    • Artists: Collection d'Arnell~Andréa
    • Albums: Spleen and Ideal
    • Parent genres: New Wave
    Dark wave or darkwave is a music genre that began in the late 1970s, coinciding with the popularity of New Wave and post-punk. Building on those basic principles, dark wave added dark, introspective lyrics and a dark undertone for some bands. In the 1980s, a subculture developed alongside dark wave music, whose members were called "wavers" or "dark wavers". The term was coined in Europe in the 1980s to describe a dark and melancholy variant of New Wave and post-punk music, such as gothic rock and dark synthpop, and was first applied to musicians such as Bauhaus, Joy Division, The Cure, Siouxsie and the Banshees, and The Chameleons. The movement spread internationally, spawning such developments as French coldwave. Coldwave described groups such as KaS Product, Martin Dupont, Asylum Party, Norma Loy, Pavillon 7B, Résistance, Clair Obscur, Opera Multi Steel, The Breath of Life, and Trisomie 21. Subsequently, different dark wave genres merged and influenced each other, e.g. electronic New Wave music (also called Electro Wave in Germany) with gothic rock, or used elements of ambient and post-industrial music. Attrition, In The Nursery and Pink Industry (UK), Clan of Xymox
    6.50
    2 votes
    174
    Death metal

    Death metal

    • Artists: Lull
    • Albums: Breath of the Demiurg
    • Parent genres: Heavy metal
    Death metal is an extreme subgenre of heavy metal music. It typically employs heavily distorted guitars, tremolo picking, deep growling vocals, blast beat drumming, minor keys or atonality, and complex song structures with multiple tempo changes. Building from the musical structure of thrash metal and early black metal, death metal emerged during the mid 1980s. Metal acts such as Slayer, Kreator, Celtic Frost, and Venom were very important influences to the crafting of the genre. Possessed and Death, along with bands such as Obituary, Carcass, Deicide and Morbid Angel are often considered pioneers of the genre. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, death metal gained more media attention as popular genre niche record labels like Combat, Earache and Roadrunner began to sign death metal bands at a rapid rate. Since then, death metal has diversified, spawning a variety of subgenres. English heavy metal band Venom, from Newcastle, crystallized the elements of what later became known as thrash metal, death metal and black metal, with their 1981 album Welcome to Hell. Their dark, blistering sound, harsh vocals, and macabre, proudly Satanic imagery proved a major inspiration for extreme
    6.50
    2 votes
    175

    Electroacoustic music

    • Artists: Szkieve
    • Albums: Minidisc
    • Parent genres: Electronic art music
    Electroacoustic music originated in Western art music during the modern era following the incorporation of electric sound production into compositional practice. The initial developments in electroacoustic music composition during the 20th century are associated with the activities of the Groupe de Recherches Musicales at the ORTF in Paris, the home of musique concrete, the Nordwestdeutscher Rundfunk (NWDR) studio in Cologne, where the focus was on the composition of elektronische Musik, and the Columbia-Princeton Electronic Music Center in New York, where tape music, electronic music, and computer music were all explored. The work of Halim El-Dabh is perhaps the earliest example of tape music. El-Dabh's The Expression of Zaar, first presented in Cairo, Egypt, in 1944, was an early work using musique concrète–like techniques similar to those developed in Paris during the same period. El-Dabh would later become more famous for his work at the Columbia-Princeton Electronic Music Center, where in 1959 he composed the influential piece Leiyla and the Poet (Holmes 2008, 153–54 & 157). US composer John Cage's assembly of the Williams Mix serves as an example of the rigors of tape music.
    6.50
    2 votes
    176
    Gothic metal

    Gothic metal

    • Artists: D
    • Albums: Revolution
    • Parent genres: Black metal
    Gothic metal or goth metal is a subgenre of heavy metal music that combines the heaviness of death/doom with the dark imagery of gothic rock. The music of gothic metal is diverse with bands known to adopt the gothic approach to different styles of heavy metal music. The genre originated during the early 1990s in Europe originally as an outgrowth of death/doom, a fusion of death metal and doom metal. Lyrics are generally dark and introspective with inspiration from gothic fiction as well as personal experiences. Pioneers of gothic metal (although the bands themselves never claim the title of gothic-metal) include Paradise Lost, My Dying Bride and Anathema, all from the north of England. Other pioneers from the first half of the 1990s include Type O Negative from the United States, Tiamat from Sweden, and The Gathering from the Netherlands. Norwegian band Theatre of Tragedy developed the "beauty and the beast" aesthetic of combining aggressive male vocals with clean female vocals, a contrast that has since been adopted by many gothic metal groups. During the mid-1990s, Moonspell, Theatres des Vampires and Cradle of Filth brought the gothic approach to black metal. By the end of the
    6.50
    2 votes
    177
    Grindcore

    Grindcore

    • Artists: Painkiller
    • Albums: I
    • Parent genres: Heavy metal
    Grindcore is an extreme genre of music that started in the early- to mid-1980s. It draws inspiration from some of the most abrasive music genres – including extreme metal, industrial music, noise music and the more extreme varieties of hardcore punk. Grindcore is characterized by heavily distorted, down-tuned guitars, high speed tempo, blast beats, and vocals which consist of incomprehensible growls, or high-pitched shrieks. Early groups like Napalm Death are credited with laying the groundwork for the style. It is most prevalent today in North America and Europe, with popular contributors such as Brutal Truth and Nasum. Lyrical themes range from a primary focus on social and political concerns, to gory subject matter and black humor. An infamous trait of grindcore is the "microsong". Several bands have produced songs that are only seconds in length. British band Napalm Death holds the Guinness World Record for shortest song ever recorded with the one-second "You Suffer" (1987). Many bands record simple phrases that may be rhythmically sprawled out across an instrumental lasting only a couple of bars in length. A variety of "microgenres" have subsequently emerged, often labeling
    6.50
    2 votes
    178

    Indie pop

    • Artists: Lava
    • Albums: Ghost
    • Parent genres: Pop music
    Indie pop is a genre of alternative rock music that originated in the United Kingdom in the mid-1980s, with its roots in Scottish post-punk bands on the Postcard Records label in the early '80s (Josef K and Orange Juice) and the dominant UK independent band of the mid-'80s, The Smiths. Indie pop was inspired by punk's DIY ethic and related ideologies, and it generated a thriving fanzine, label, and club and gig circuit. Indie pop differs from indie rock to the extent that it is more melodic, less abrasive, and relatively angst-free. The term "indie" had been used for some time to describe artists on independent labels (and the labels themselves), but the key moment in the naming of "indie pop" as a genre was the release of NME's C86 tape in 1986. The compilation featured, among other artists, Primal Scream, The Pastels, and The Wedding Present, and "indie" quickly became shorthand for a genre whose defining conventions were identified as jangling guitars, a love of '60s pop, and melodic power pop song structures (the genre was initially dubbed "C86" after the tape itself). In the mid to late '80s, indie pop was criticized for its associations with so-called "shambling" (a John
    6.50
    2 votes
    179

    Nu jazz

    • Artists: Fila Brazillia
    • Albums: J.A.C.
    • Parent genres: Electronica
    Nu jazz is an umbrella term coined in the late 1990s to refer to music that blends jazz elements with other musical styles, such as funk, soul, electronic dance music, and free improvisation. Also written nü-jazz or NuJazz, it is sometimes called electronic jazz, electro-jazz, e-jazz, jazztronica, jazz house, phusion, neo-jazz, future jazz or jazz-hop. According to critic Tony Brewer, Nu jazz ranges from combining live instrumentation with beats of jazz house (exemplified by the French St Germain, the German Jazzanova and the British Fila Brazillia) to more band-based improvised jazz with electronic elements (such as that of The Cinematic Orchestra from the UK, the Belgian PhusionCulture, Mexican duo Kobol, and the Norwegian "future jazz" style pioneered by Bugge Wesseltoft, Jaga Jazzist, Nils Petter Molvær, and others). Nu jazz typically ventures farther into the electronic territory than does its close cousin, acid jazz (or groove jazz), which is generally closer to earthier funk, soul, and rhythm and blues, although releases from noted groove & smooth jazz artists such as the Groove Collective, and Pamela Williams blur the distinction between the styles. Nu jazz can be very
    6.50
    2 votes
    180
    Pop music

    Pop music

    • Artists: Steve Miller Band
    • Albums: Audience Of Zero
    • Parent genres: Dance music
    Pop music (a term that originally derives from an abbreviation of "popular") is a genre of popular music which originated in its modern form in the 1950s, deriving from rock and roll. The terms popular music and pop music are often used interchangeably, even though the former is a description of music which is popular (and can include any style), whilst the latter is a specific genre containing qualities of mass appeal. As a genre, pop music is very eclectic, often borrowing elements from other styles including urban, dance, rock, Latin and country; nonetheless, there are core elements which define pop. Such include generally short-to-medium length songs, written in a basic format (often the verse-chorus structure), as well as the common employment of repeated choruses, melodic tunes, and catchy hooks. So-called "pure pop" music, such as power pop, features all these elements, utilising electric guitars, drums and bass for instrumentation; in the case of such music, the main goal is usually that of being pleasurable to listen to, rather than having much artistic depth. Pop music is generally thought of as a genre which is commercially recorded and desires to have a mass audience
    6.50
    2 votes
    181
    Pub rock

    Pub rock

    • Artists: Brinsley Schwarz
    • Albums: Silver Pistol
    • Parent genres: Glam rock
    Pub rock was a rock music genre that developed in the early to mid-1970s in the United Kingdom. A back-to-basics movement, pub rock was a reaction against progressive and glam rock. Although short-lived, pub rock was notable for rejecting stadium venues and for returning live rock to the small pubs and clubs of its early years. It was the catalyst for the British punk rock scene. Pub rock was deliberately nasty, dirty and post-glam. Dress style was based around denim and plaid shirts, tatty jeans and droopy hair. The figureheads of the movement, Dr Feelgood, were noted for their frontman’s filthy white suit. Bands looked menacing and threatening, "like villains on The Sweeney". Pub rock groups disdained any form of flash. Scene leaders like Dr. Feelgood, Kilburn & The High Roads and Ducks Deluxe played simple, “back to mono” rhythm and blues in the tradition of white British groups like the Stones and the Yardbirds, with fuzzy guitars and whiny vocals. Lesser acts played funky soul (Kokomo, Clancy, Cado Belle) or country rock (Kursaal Flyers, Chilli Willi and the Red Hot Peppers). The scene was primarily a live phenomenon. During the peak years of 1972 to 1975, there was just one
    6.50
    2 votes
    182
    Shoegazing

    Shoegazing

    • Artists: Hood
    • Albums: Radio Sessions
    • Parent genres: Alternative rock
    Shoegazing (also known as shoegaze) is a subgenre of alternative rock that emerged from the United Kingdom in the late 1980s. It lasted there until the mid 1990s, with a critical zenith reached in 1990 and 1991. The British music press—particularly NME and Melody Maker—named this style shoegazing because the musicians in these bands stood relatively still during live performances in a detached, introspective, non-confrontational state, hence the idea that they were gazing at their shoes. The heavy use of effects pedals also contributed to the image of performers looking down at their feet during concerts. The shoegazing sound is typified by significant use of guitar effects, and indistinguishable vocal melodies that blend into the creative noise of the guitars. A general description given to shoegazing and other affiliated bands in London in the early 1990s was The Scene That Celebrates Itself. In the early 1990s, shoegazing groups were pushed aside by the American grunge movement and early Britpop acts such as Suede, forcing the relatively unknown bands to break up or reinvent their style altogether. Recent times have seen a renewed interest in the genre among "nu-gaze"
    6.50
    2 votes
    183
    Ballad

    Ballad

    • Artists: Chihiro Onitsuka
    • Albums: Aries
    • Parent genres: Folk music
    A ballad is a form of verse, often a narrative set to music. Ballads were particularly characteristic of the popular poetry and song of the British Isles from the later medieval period until the 19th century and used extensively across Europe and later the Americas, Australia and North Africa. Many ballads were written and sold as single sheet broadsides. The form was often used by poets and composers from the 18th century onwards to produce lyrical ballads. In the later 19th century it took on the meaning of a slow form of popular love song and the term is now often used as synonymous with any love song, particularly the pop or rock power ballad. The ballad probably derives its name from medieval French dance songs or "ballares" (from which we also get ballet), as did the alternative rival form that became the French Ballade. In theme and function they may originate from Scandinavian and Germanic traditions of storytelling that can be seen in poems such as Beowulf. The earliest example we have of a recognisable ballad in form in England is ‘Judas’ in a 13th-century manuscript. Ballads were originally composed to accompany dances, and so were composed in couplets with refrains in
    7.00
    1 votes
    184

    Baroque pop

    • Artists: Flotation Toy Warning
    • Albums: Fold Your Hands Child, You Walk Like a Peasant
    • Parent genres: Indie rock
    Baroque pop, baroque rock, or English baroque, often used interchangeably with chamber pop/rock, is a pop rock music subgenre which originated in the United Kingdom and United States. It emerged in the mid-1960s as a fusion of pop rock and classical music, in particular that of the baroque and classical eras. Baroque pop reached its height of success in the mid-to-late 1960s, with several prominent groups and artists both emerging or incorporating the genre within their repertoire; these include the The Beach Boys, The Moody Blues, The Beatles, Left Banke, The Rolling Stones, Love and Procol Harum, amongst others. Baroque pop's mainstream popularity faded by the 1970s, partially because punk rock, disco and hard rock took over; nonetheless, music was still produced within the genre's tradition, and it exerted an influence on several subgenres. Such includes the arrival of chamber pop in the 1990s, which contained ornate productions and classical influences, while contesting much of the time's low fidelity musical aesthetic. Furthermore, since the 1990s, baroque pop has seen a revival; several prominent artists, such as Belle and Sebastian, Regina Spektor and The Divine Comedy, have
    7.00
    1 votes
    185

    Crossover thrash

    • Artists: Prong
    • Albums: Undisputed Attitude
    • Parent genres: Alternative metal
    Crossover thrash (often abbreviated to crossover, sometimes called also punk metal) is a form of thrash metal that contains more hardcore punk elements than standard thrash. The genre lies on a continuum between heavy metal and punk rock. Other genres on the same continuum have significant overlap with crossover thrash, and besides tradition hardcore punk and thrash metal, include such related genres as thrashcore, grindcore and skate punk. The genre is often confused with thrashcore, which is essentially a faster hardcore punk rather than a more punk-oriented form of metal. Throughout the early and mid 1980s, the term "thrash" was often used as a synonym for hardcore punk (as in the New York Thrash compilation of 1982). The term "thrashcore" to distinguish acts of the genre from others was not coined until at least 1993. Many crossover bands, such as D.R.I., began as influential thrashcore bands. The "-core" suffix of "thrashcore" is sometimes used to distinguish it from crossover thrash and thrash metal, the latter of which is often referred to simply as "thrash", which in turn is rarely used to refer to crossover thrash or thrashcore. Thrashcore is occasionally used by the music
    7.00
    1 votes
    186
    Hardcore punk

    Hardcore punk

    • Artists: Mikoto
    • Albums: Insomniac Doze
    • Parent genres: Punk rock
    Hardcore punk (usually referred to simply as hardcore) is a punk rock music genre that originated in the late 1970s. Hardcore is generally faster, thicker, and heavier than earlier punk rock. The origin of the term "hardcore punk" is uncertain. The Vancouver-based band D.O.A. may have helped to popularize the term with the title of their 1981 album, Hardcore '81. Hardcore has spawned the straight edge movement and its associated submovements, hardline and youth crew. Hardcore was heavily involved with the rise of the independent record labels in the 1980s, and with the DIY ethics in underground music scenes. It has influenced a number of music genres which have experienced mainstream success, such as alternative rock, metalcore, grunge, nu metal, thrash metal, emo and post-hardcore. Hardcore sprouted underground scenes across the United States in the early 1980s particularly in Washington, D.C., California, New York/New Jersey, and Boston—as well as in Canada and the United Kingdom. While traditional hardcore has never experienced mainstream commercial success, some of its early pioneers have garnered appreciation over time. Black Flag's album Damaged was included in Rolling
    7.00
    1 votes
    187
    Native American music

    Native American music

    • Artists: Jan Michael Looking Wolf
    • Albums: Music for the Native Americans
    • Parent genres: Prehistoric music
    Native American music is the music that is used, created or performed by Native North Americans, specifically traditional tribal music. In addition to the traditional music of the Native American groups, there now exist pan-tribal and inter-tribal genres as well as distinct Native American subgenres of popular music including: rock, blues, hip hop, classical, film music and reggae, as well as unique popular styles like waila ("chicken scratch"). Vocalization and percussion are the most important aspects of traditional Native American music. Vocalization takes many forms, ranging from solo and choral song to responsorial, unison and multipart singing. Percussion, especially drums and rattles, are common accompaniment to keep the rhythm steady for the singers, who generally use their native language or non-lexical vocables (nonsense syllables). Traditional music usually begins with slow and steady beats that grow gradually faster and more emphatic, while various flourishes like drum and rattle tremolos, shouts and accented patterns add variety and signal changes in performance for singers and dancers. Native American song texts include both public pieces and secret songs, said to be
    7.00
    1 votes
    188
    Power pop

    Power pop

    • Artists: The New Pornographers
    • Albums: Weezer
    • Parent genres: Pop music
    Power pop is a popular musical genre that draws its inspiration from 1960s British and American pop and rock music. It typically incorporates a combination of musical devices such as strong melodies, crisp vocal harmonies, economical arrangements and prominent guitar riffs. Instrumental solos are usually kept to a minimum, and blues elements are largely downplayed. Recordings tend to display production values that lean toward compression and a forceful drum beat. Instruments usually include one or more electric guitars, an electric bass guitar, a drum kit and sometimes electric keyboards or synthesizers. While its cultural impact has waxed and waned over the decades, power pop is among rock's most enduring subgenres. Writing for Allmusic, John Dougan described the genre's origins: The musical sourcepoint for nearly all power pop is The Beatles. Virtually all stylistic appropriations begin with them: distinctive harmony singing, strong melodic lines, unforgettable guitar riffs, lyrics about boys and girls in love; they created the model that other power poppers copied for the next couple of decades. Other profound influences include The Who, The Kinks and The Move, bands whose
    7.00
    1 votes
    189
    Psychedelic trance

    Psychedelic trance

    • Artists: Mindelight
    • Albums: Pog-O-Matic Pogómen 3000000
    • Parent genres: Goa trance
    Psychedelic trance, psytrance or just psy (derived from the Ancient Greek word ψυχή "psyche", mind; soul; breath; spirit) is a form of electronic music characterized by hypnotic arrangements of synthetic rhythms and complex layered melodies created by high tempo riffs. It appeared in the mainstream in 1995 as with reporting of the trend of Goa trance. The genre offers variety in terms of mood, tempo, and style. Some examples include full on, dark, progressive, suomi, psybreaks and psybient. Goa Trance continues to develop alongside the sub genres. The first hippies who arrived in Goa, India in the mid 1960s were drawn there for many reasons, including the beaches, the low cost of living, the friendly locals, the Indian religious and spiritual practices and the readily available Indian hashish, which until the mid-1970s was legal. During the 1970s the first Goa DJs were generally playing psychedelic rock bands such as the Grateful Dead, Pink Floyd and The Doors. In 1979 the beginnings of electronic dance music could occasionally be heard in Goa in the form of tracks by artists such as Kraftwerk but it wasn’t until 1983 that DJs Laurent and Fred Disko, closely followed by Goa Gil,
    7.00
    1 votes
    190

    Ragga

    • Artists: Yellowman
    • Albums: Minesweeper Suite
    • Parent genres: Dancehall
    Raggamuffin music, usually abbreviated as ragga, is a sub-genre of dancehall music or reggae, in which the instrumentation primarily consists of electronic music. Similar to hip hop, sampling often serves a prominent role in raggamuffin music. In the mid-80s French Antilles Kassav, the first in the Caribbean to use MIDI technology, took Caribbean music to another level by recording in a digital format. Wayne Smith's "Under Me Sleng Teng" was produced by King Jammy in 1985 on a Casio MT-40 synthesizer, and is generally recognized as the seminal ragga song. "Sleng Teng" boosted Jammy's popularity immensely, and other producers quickly released their own versions of the riddim, accompanied by dozens of different vocalists. Ragga is now mainly used as a synonym for dancehall reggae or for describing dancehall with a deejay chatting rather than singjaying or singing on top of the riddim. Ragga originated in Jamaica during the 1980s, at the same time that electronic dance music's popularity was increasing globally. One of the reasons for ragga's swift propagation is that it is generally easier and less expensive to produce than reggae performed on traditional musical instruments. Ragga
    7.00
    1 votes
    191

    Reggaeton

    • Artists: Criollo
    • Albums: Mundo Frío
    • Parent genres: Merengue music
    Reggaeton ( /ˌrɛɡeɪˈtoʊn/ or UK /rɛɡeɪˈtɒn/) is an urban form of music which has its roots in Latin and Caribbean music. Its sound derives from the Reggae en Español from Panama. The genre was shaped and made known in Puerto Rico where it got its name; most of its current artists are also from Puerto Rico. After its mainstream exposure in 2004, it spread to North American, European, Asian and African audiences. Reggaeton blends Jamaican musical influences of dancehall, with those of Latin America, such as salsa, Latin hip hop, and electronica. Vocals include rapping and singing, typically in Spanish. Lyrics tend to be derived from hip hop rather than from dancehall. Like hip hop, reggaeton has caused some controversy, albeit less, due to alleged exploitation of women, and to a lesser extent, explicit and violent lyrics. While it takes influences from hip hop and Jamaican dancehall, reggaeton is not precisely the Hispanic or Latin American version of either of these genres; reggaeton has its own specific beat and rhythm, whereas Latin hip hop is simply hip hop recorded by artists of Latino descent. The specific "riddim" that characterizes reggaeton is referred to as "Dem Bow". The
    7.00
    1 votes
    192
    Rockabilly

    Rockabilly

    • Artists: Lollipop Lust Kill
    • Albums: Bring It On!
    • Parent genres: Country
    Rockabilly is one of the earliest styles of rock and roll music, dating to the early 1950s. The term "rockabilly" is a portmanteau of "rock" (from "rock 'n' roll") and "hillbilly", the latter a reference to the country music (often called "hillbilly music" in the 1940s and 1950s) that contributed strongly to the style's development. Other important influences on rockabilly include western swing, boogie woogie, and rhythm and blues. While there are notable exceptions, its origins lie primarily in the Southern United States. The influence and popularity of the style waned in the 1960s, but during the late 1970s and early 1980s, rockabilly enjoyed a major revival of popularity that has endured to the present, often within a rockabilly subculture. There was a close relationship between blues and country music from the very earliest country recordings in the 1920s. The first nationwide country hit was "Wreck of the Old '97", backed with "Lonesome Road Blues", which also became very popular. Jimmie Rodgers, the "first true country star", was known as the "Blue Yodeler", and most of his songs used blues-based chord progressions, although with very different instrumentation and sound from
    7.00
    1 votes
    193
    Ska

    Ska

    • Artists: The Police
    • Albums: Specials
    • Parent genres: ska-core
    Ska ( /ˈskɑː/, Jamaican [skjæ]) is a music genre that originated in Jamaica in the late 1950s, and was the precursor to rocksteady and reggae. Ska combined elements of Caribbean mento and calypso with American jazz and rhythm and blues. It is characterized by a walking bass line accented with rhythms on the upbeat. In the early 1960s, ska was the dominant music genre of Jamaica and was popular with British mods. Later it became popular with many skinheads. Music historians typically divide the history of ska into three periods: the original Jamaican scene of the 1960s (First Wave), the English 2 Tone ska revival of the late 1970s (Second Wave) and the third wave ska movement, which started in the 1980s (Third Wave) and rose to popularity in the US in the 1990s. There are different theories about the origins of the word ska. Ernest Ranglin claimed that the term was coined by musicians to refer to the "skat! skat! skat!" scratching guitar strum. Another explanation is that at a recording session in 1959 produced by Coxsone Dodd, double bassist Cluett Johnson instructed guitarist Ranglin to "play like ska, ska, ska", although Ranglin has denied this, stating "Clue couldn't tell me
    7.00
    1 votes
    194

    Speed metal

    • Artists: Gama Bomb
    • Albums: Imaginations from the Other Side
    • Parent genres: Heavy metal
    Speed metal is a sub-genre of heavy metal music that originated in the late 1970s from NWOBHM and hardcore punk roots. It is described by Allmusic as "extremely fast, abrasive, and technically demanding" music. Motörhead is often credited as the first band to invent/play speed metal. Some of speed metal's earlier influences include Black Sabbath's "Children of the Grave", Deep Purple's "Fireball" and Queen's "Stone Cold Crazy" (which was eventually covered by the thrash metal band Metallica), from their 1974 album Sheer Heart Attack, and Deep Purple's song "Highway Star", from their album Machine Head. The latter was called 'early speed metal' by Robb Reiner of speed metal band Anvil. Speed metal eventually evolved into thrash metal. Although many tend to equate the two subgenres, others argue that there is a distinct difference between them. In his book Sound of the Beast: The Complete Headbanging History of Heavy Metal, Ian Christe states that "...thrash metal relies more on long, wrenching rhythmic breaks, while speed metal... is a cleaner and more musically intricate subcategory, still loyal to the dueling melodies of classic metal." Speed metal's sound varied between various
    7.00
    1 votes
    195
    Progressive rock

    Progressive rock

    • Artists: The Raspberries
    • Albums: 2112
    • Parent genres: Psychedelic rock
    Progressive rock, also known as prog rock, prog-rock or simply prog, is a rock music subgenre which originated in the United Kingdom, with further developments in Germany, Italy and France, throughout the mid to late 1960s and 1970s. Developing from psychedelic rock, progressive rock originated, similarly to art rock, as a "British attempt" to give greater artistic weight and credibility to rock music. Progressive rock intended to break the boundaries of traditional rock music by bringing in a greater and more eclectic range of influences, including free-form and experimental compositional methods, as well as new technological innovations. Progressive rock saw a high level of popularity throughout the 1970s, especially in the middle of the decade, with bands such as Pink Floyd, Gentle Giant, Van der Graaf Generator, The Moody Blues, Genesis, King Crimson, Yes, Camel, Jethro Tull and Emerson, Lake & Palmer. It started to fade in popularity by the latter part of the decade, with the rawer and more minimalistic punk rock growing in popularity, and also with the rise of genres such as disco, funk, hard rock/roots rock, and the gradual emergence of hip-hop. Nevertheless, progressive
    5.33
    3 votes
    196
    Anarcho-punk

    Anarcho-punk

    • Artists: Avskum
    • Albums: Omnicide
    • Parent genres: Punk rock
    Anarcho-punk is punk rock that promotes anarchism. The term anarcho-punk is sometimes applied exclusively to bands that were part of the original anarcho-punk movement in the United Kingdom in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Some use the term more broadly to refer to any punk music with anarchist lyrical content, including crust punk, d-beat, folk punk, hardcore punk, garage punk or ska punk. Some protopunk bands of the late 1960s had anarchist members, such as the German blues rock band Ton Steine Scherben and English bands connected to the UK underground, such as Hawkwind, Pink Fairies, The Deviants and the Edgar Broughton Band. These bands, along with Detroit's MC5, set a precedent for mixing radical politics with rock music, and established the idea of rock as agent of social and political change in the public consciousness. Other precursors to anarcho-punk include avant-garde art and political movements such as Fluxus, Dada, the Beat generation, England's angry young men (such as Joe Orton), the surrealism-inspired Situationist International, the May 1968 uprising in Paris, and the CND. Jello Biafra of the Dead Kennedys has cited the Yippies as an influence on his activism and
    6.00
    2 votes
    197
    Electro house

    Electro house

    • Artists: Djnikkei
    • Albums:
    • Parent genres: House music
    Complextro (a portmanteau of the words "complex" and "electro") is a subgenre of electro house. The term was coined by Porter Robinson to describe his sound and then became then eventually became the genre's name. It is typified by the use of complex basslines which are split between multiple electronic instruments. Complextro, as a derivative of electro house, is often very similar stylistically and typically features the four on the floor rhythmic patterns and prominent basslines commonly found in electro house. Artists who have produced complextro include:
    6.00
    2 votes
    198
    Experimental rock

    Experimental rock

    • Artists: No Doctors
    • Albums: Exhaust
    • Parent genres: Rock music
    Experimental rock or avant-garde rock is a type of music based on rock which experiments with the basic elements of the genre, or which pushes the boundaries of common composition and performance technique. Performers may also attempt to individualize their music with unconventional time signatures, instrumental tunings, unusual harmony and key signatures, compositional styles, lyrical techniques, elements of other musical genres, singing styles, instrumental effects or custom-made experimental musical instruments. According to Allmusic, "experimental rock is the diametric opposite of standard 'verse-chorus-verse' music." The late 1960s was an era of explosive growth and experimentation in rock music. Bands drew influences from free jazz artists such as John Coltrane and Sun Ra and avant-garde composers like John Cage and Karlheinz Stockhausen. The Velvet Underground, which at one point counted Lou Reed, John Cale, and Angus Maclise among its members and was associated with Andy Warhol and LaMonte Young, fused elements of minimalism and avant-garde music with standard rock song structures. The sounds of Indian and Arabic music were also widely admired and adapted. Even such
    6.00
    2 votes
    199
    Glam metal

    Glam metal

    • Artists: White Lion
    • Albums: Pornograffitti
    • Parent genres: Classic metal
    Glam metal (also known as hair metal and often used synonymously with pop metal) is a subgenre of hard rock and heavy metal. It combines elements of these genres with punk rock, adding catchy hooks and guitar riffs, while borrowing from the aesthetic of 1970s glam rock. It arose in the late 1970s and early 1980s in the United States, particularly on the Los Angeles Sunset Strip music scene, pioneered by bands such as Kix, Night Ranger, Mötley Crüe and Quiet Riot. It was popular throughout the 1980s and the beginning of the 1990s, bringing to prominence bands including Poison, Cinderella and Bon Jovi. The genre rapidly lost mainstream interest from 1991 to 1994 with the rise of grunge and the release of albums such as Nirvana's Nevermind, but it has enjoyed revivals since the beginning of the new millennium with the Swedish sleaze metal movement and the retro styling of bands including The Darkness and Steel Panther. Musically, glam metal uses traditional hard rock and heavy metal songs, incorporating elements of punk rock, while adding pop-influenced catchy hooks and guitar riffs. Like other heavy metal songs of the 1980s, they often feature shred guitar solos. They also include
    6.00
    2 votes
    200
    New Orleans blues

    New Orleans blues

    • Artists: Guitar Slim, Jr.
    • Albums: Crawfish Fiesta
    • Parent genres: Louisiana blues
    New Orleans blues, is a sub-genre of blues music and a variation of Louisiana blues that developed in the 1940s and 1950s in and around the city of New Orleans. Strongly influenced by jazz and incorporated Caribbean influences, it is dominated by piano and saxophone but has also produced major guitar bluesmen. Major figures in the genre include Professor Longhair and Guitar Slim, who both produced major regional, R&B chart and even mainstream hits. As a style New Orleans blues is primarily driven by piano and horn, enlivened by Caribbean rhythms and Dixieland music. It is generally cheerful in delivery regardless of the subject matter, with a laid back tempo and complex rhythms falling just behind the beat. Vocals range from laid-back crooning to full-throated gospel shouting. New Orleans is generally credited as the birthplace of jazz music, but has attracted less attention as a centre of the blues. Although it has drawn to it and produced fewer blues musicians than other major US urban centres with large African-American populations, it has been the center of a distinctive form of blues music, which has been pursued by some notable musicians and produced important recordings. In
    6.00
    2 votes
    201
    New Wave

    New Wave

    • Artists: Terry Bozzio
    • Albums: Escape From the Fallen Planet
    • Parent genres: Glam rock
    New Wave is a subgenre of rock music that emerged in the mid to late 1970s alongside punk rock. The term at first generally was synonymous with punk rock before being considered a genre in its own right that incorporated aspects of electronic and experimental music, mod subculture, disco and 1960s pop music. New Wave, as a term, has been used to describe all post-punk rock music, yet, it distances itself from other post-punk movements as it displays characteristics common to pop music, rather than the more "arty" post-punk. As a genre, it incorporates much of the original punk rock sound and ethos yet it is characterized by greater complexity in both music and lyrics. Common characteristics of New Wave music, aside from its punk influences, include the use of synthesizers and electronic productions, the importance of styling and the arts, as well as a great amount of diversity. As a term, New Wave is often used to describe music which was quirky and eccentric, yet also catchy and pop at heart, incorporating clear melodious hooks. In such a way, its style varies greatly, ranging from 1950s and 60s rock revivalism, ska and reggae-styled music, to synthpop-oriented dance. New Wave is
    6.00
    2 votes
    202
    Samba

    Samba

    • Artists: SambaDá
    • Albums: Stereo * Type A
    • Parent genres: Maxixe
    Samba (Portuguese pronunciation: [ˈsɐ̃bɐ] ( listen)) is a Brazilian dance and musical genre originating in Bahia and with its roots in Brazil (Rio de Janeiro) and Africa via the West African slave trade and African religious traditions. It is recognized around the world as a symbol of Brazil and the Brazilian Carnival. Considered one of the most popular Brazilian cultural expressions, samba has become an icon of Brazilian national identity. The Bahian Samba de Roda (dance circle), which became a UNESCO Heritage of Humanity in 2005, is the main root of the samba carioca, the samba that is played and danced in Rio de Janeiro. The modern samba that emerged at the beginning of the 20th century is basically 2/4 tempo varied with the conscious use of chorus sung to the sound of palms and batucada rhythm, adding one or more parts or stanzas of declaratory verses. Traditionally, the samba is played by strings (cavaquinho and various types of guitar) and various percussion instruments such as tamborim. Influenced by American orchestras in vogue since the Second World War and the cultural impact of US music post-war, samba began to use trombones, trumpets, choros, flutes, and clarinets. In
    6.00
    2 votes
    203

    Tribal house

    • Artists: Thunderpuss
    • Albums: Blue Notes in the Basement
    • Parent genres: House music
    Tribal house is a subgenre of house music similar in structure to deep house, but providing elements of ethnic or indigenous musical percussions (typically conga drums or its synthesized derivative). The genre remains one of the most minimalist in the history of electronic dance music since the appearance of house in the mid-1980s and up to the recent days. In many tribal house tracks, it is rare to find a core melody or prolonged synth sound, such as those found in house music and similar electronic music styles. Instead, tribal house tracks rely on sophisticated drum patterns for their rhythm. A track can consist of several different drum sounds. Tribal house rose to prominence during the early 1990s, notably off the releases of New York labels Tribal America Records and, to a lesser extent, Strictly Rhythm Records. The music was staple in New York's most prominent clubs such as the Sound Factory and Roxy NYC. Tribal America Records' infamy within this sub-genre stemmed from their globally popular releases by Danny Tenaglia, Junior Vasquez, Deep Dish, Eric Kupper (aka K-Scope) and MURK amongst others. This popularity led to the formation of a UK sub-label, Tribal United Kingdom.
    6.00
    2 votes
    204
    New Wave of British Heavy Metal

    New Wave of British Heavy Metal

    • Artists: Elixir band
    • Albums: To Heaven From Hell
    • Parent genres: Heavy metal
    Italic text The New Wave of British Heavy Metal, or NWOBHM /nˈwɒbm/, was a heavy metal movement that started in the late 1970s, in Britain, and achieved international attention by the early 1980s. After Sounds editor Alan Lewis coined the term, journalist Geoff Barton first used it in the May 1979 issue of Sounds magazine as a way of describing a second wave of heavy metal bands that emerged in the late 1970s during the period of punk rock's decline and the dominance of New Wave music. The movement developed as a reaction in part to the decline of early heavy metal bands such as Deep Purple, Led Zeppelin and Black Sabbath. NWOBHM bands toned down the blues influences of earlier acts, incorporated elements of punk, increased the tempo, and adopted a "tougher" sound, taking a harder approach to its music. It was a scene directed almost exclusively at heavy metal fans. The era is considered to be a major foundation stone for the extreme metal genres; acts such as the American metal band Metallica cite NWOBHM bands like Saxon, Motörhead, Diamond Head, and Iron Maiden as a major influence on their musical style. The NWOBHM came to dominate the heavy metal scene of the early-mid 1980s.
    5.00
    3 votes
    205

    Bouncy techno

    • Artists: Ultrabeat
    • Albums: Best of Bonkers
    • Parent genres: Techno
    Bouncy techno is a hardcore dance music rave style that developed in the early 1990s from Scotland and North England. Described as an accessible gabber-like form, it was popularised by Scott Brown under numerous aliases. The sound became prominent in the northern United Kingdom rave scene before it broke into the hardcore homeland of the Netherlands through Paul Elstak, where it became known there as happy hardcore (i.e.: happy gabber). A subsequent mainstream-aimed euro dance tangent appeared in Germany and itself back into the Netherlands. The music of Brown also changed the Southern England happy breakbeat style away from its breakbeat foundation and into a bouncy derivative. These different country entrails created a single pan European hardcore briefly in the mid 1990s. Bouncy techno rapidly declined from this point for a variety of reasons. The breakbeat hardcore style that dominated raves across England was generally not popular in Scotland. The few Scottish-based DJs who supported this music found it difficult to be booked locally, amidst increased discontent. DJ Kid told the crowd to "fuck off" before he stormed off stage when ravers turned hostile towards him playing
    5.50
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    206

    Calypso music

    • Artists: Mighty Sparrow
    • Albums: Odetta Sings Ballads and Blues
    • Parent genres: Kaiso
    Calypso is a style of Afro-Caribbean music that originated in Trinidad and Tobago from African and European roots. The roots of the genre lay in the arrival of enslaved Africans, who, not being allowed to speak to each other, communicated through song. This forged a sense of community among the Africans, who saw their colonial masters change rapidly, bringing French, Spanish and British music styles to the island of Trinidad. The French brought Carnival to Trinidad, and calypso competitions at Carnival grew in popularity, especially after the abolition of slavery in 1834. While most authorities stress the African roots of calypso, in his 1986 book, Calypso from France to Trinidad: 800 Years of History, that veteran calypsonian, The Roaring Lion (Rafael de Leon) asserted that calypso descends from the music of the medieval French troubadours. The modern music history of Trinidad and Tobago reflects the ethnic groups which form the current culture—French, Spanish, British, the African and New World nations from which the African population derives, and subsequent immigration from Asia and India in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. A creole culture was formed, combining
    5.50
    2 votes
    207
    Classical music

    Classical music

    • Artists: Wendy Carlos
    • Albums: Goldberg Variations (feat. piano: Glenn Gould) (1955 recording)
    • Parent genres: Art music
    Classical music is the art music produced in, or rooted in, the traditions of Western liturgical and secular music, encompassing a broad period from roughly the 11th century to present times. The central norms of this tradition became codified between 1550 and 1900, which is known as the common practice period. It should not be confused with the Classical Era. European music is largely distinguished from many other non-European and popular musical forms by its system of staff notation, in use since about the 16th century. Western staff notation is used by composers to prescribe to the performer the pitch, speed, meter, individual rhythms and exact execution of a piece of music. This leaves less room for practices such as improvisation and ad libitum ornamentation, that are frequently heard in non-European art music and popular music. The term "classical music" did not appear until the early 19th century, in an attempt to "canonize" the period from Johann Sebastian Bach to Beethoven as a golden age. The earliest reference to "classical music" recorded by the Oxford English Dictionary is from about 1836. Given the extremely broad variety of forms, styles, genres, and historical
    5.50
    2 votes
    208
    Klezmer

    Klezmer

    • Artists: Afenginn
    • Albums: Masada Guitars
    • Parent genres: Roma music
    Klezmer (Yiddish כליזמר or קלעזמער, pl כליזמר,כליזמרים, from Hebrew כלי זמר — instruments of music) is a musical tradition of the Ashkenazic Jews of Eastern Europe. Played by professional musicians called klezmorim, the genre originally consisted largely of dance tunes and instrumental display pieces for weddings and other celebrations. The genre has its origins in Eastern Europe. In the United States the genre morphed considerably as Yiddish-speaking Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe, who arrived between 1880 and 1924, met and assimilated American jazz. During the initial decades after the "Klezmer Revival," this was what most people knew as klezmer, although in the current century musicians have begun paying attention to the "original" pre-jazz traditions as some original revivialists (e.g., Josh Horowitz, Yale Strom, Bob Cohen) spent years doing field research in Eastern/Central Europe. Additionally, late immigrants from the Soviet Union such as German Goldenshtayn brought their surviving repertoires to the United States and Israel in the 1980s. Compared to most other European folk music styles, very little is known about the history of klezmer music, and much of what is
    5.50
    2 votes
    209

    Southern Gospel

    • Artists: The Perry Sisters
    • Albums: Third Day
    • Parent genres: Gospel music
    Southern Gospel music—at one time also known as "quartet music"—is music whose lyrics are written to express either personal or a communal faith regarding biblical teachings and Christian life, as well as (in terms of the varying music styles) to give a Christian alternative to mainstream secular music. Southern Gospel is a genre of Christian music, and its name comes from its origins in the Southeastern United States. Like other forms of music the creation, performance, significance, and even the definition of Southern Gospel varies according to culture and social context. It is composed and performed for many purposes, ranging from aesthetic pleasure, religious or ceremonial purposes, or as an entertainment product for the marketplace. The date of Southern Gospel's establishment as a distinct genre is generally considered to be 1910, the year the first professional quartet was formed for the purpose of selling songbooks for the James D. Vaughan Music Publishing Company. Nonetheless the style of the music itself had existed for at least 35 years prior although the traditional wisdom that Southern Gospel music was "invented" in the 1870s by circuit preacher Everett Beverly is
    5.50
    2 votes
    210

    Ambient music

    • Artists: Aphex Twin
    • Albums: Cast from the Platform
    • Parent genres: Psychedelic rock
    Ambient is a music genre which originated in the United Kingdom. Developing in the 1970s, ambient stemmed from the experimental and synthesizer-oriented styles of the period, while being influenced by Kraftwerk and Klaus Schulze; nevertheless, the dance and techno music of the 1980s also played an important role in the genre. Basil Kirchin and Brian Eno are regarded as ambient's main founders. The concept of background or furniture music had already existed some time before, yet both Kirchin and Eno created ambient by fusing elements of environmental music with electronica. Ambient's sound was additionally influenced in part by space rock and Krautrock. As a genre, ambient focuses on creating a mood or atmosphere through synthesizers and timbral qualities. It often lacks the presence of any net composition, beat, or structured melody. Due to its relatively open style, ambient music often takes influences from many other genres, ranging from house, dub, industrial and new age, amongst several others. Since it is a relatively ambiguous term, ambient has no distinct characteristics, and its style can vary a lot. In essence, it is a term to describe any form of electronic music which
    6.00
    1 votes
    211

    Dark ambient

    • Artists: The Moon lay hidden beneath a Cloud
    • Albums: Gregorian - The Dark Side
    • Parent genres: Ambient music
    Dark ambient is a subgenre of ambient music that features foreboding, ominous, or discordant overtones. Dark ambient has its roots in the 1970s, with the introduction of newer, smaller, and more affordable effects units, synthesizer and sampling technology. Dark ambient is an unusually diverse genre, related to ambient music and noise, yet generally free from derivatives and connections to other genres or styles. Dark ambient evolved partially based on several of Brian Eno's early solo albums (Another Green World -> In Dark Trees, Music For Films) and collaboration that had a distinctly dark or discordant edge, notably "An Index of Metals" (from Evening Star, 1975), a collaboration with Robert Fripp that incorporated harsh guitar feedback, the ambient pieces on the second half of David Bowie's Low (1977) and "Heroes", Fourth World, Vol. 1: Possible Musics (1980), a collaboration with Jon Hassell, and particularly the fourth installment of his ambient series, On Land (1982), which had many deeply spatial elements, often utilizing field recordings to foreboding effect. An important early precursor of the genre was Tangerine Dream's early double-album Zeit, which was unlike most of
    6.00
    1 votes
    212

    East Coast hip hop

    • Artists: Erick Sermon
    • Albums: The Infamous Archives
    • Parent genres: Soul music
    East Coast hip hop is a regional subgenre of hip hop music that originated in New York City, USA during the 1970s. Hip hop is recognized to have originated and evolved first in the East Coast. The style in the East Coast emerged as a definitive subgenre after artists from other regions of the United States emerged with different styles. In contrast to the simplistic rhyme pattern and scheme utilized in old school hip hop, East Coast hip hop has been noted for its emphasis on lyrical dexterity. It has also been characterized by multi-syllabic rhymes, complex wordplay, a continuous free-flowing delivery and intricate metaphors. While East Coast hip hop does not have a uniform sound or standard style, it tends to gravitate to aggressive beats and sample collages. The aggressive and hard-hitting beats of the form were emphasized by such acts as EPMD and Public Enemy, while artists such as Eric B. & Rakim, Boogie Down Productions, Big Daddy Kane and Slick Rick were noted for their lyrical skill. Lyrical themes throughout the history of East Coast hip hop have ranged from lyrical consciousness by such artists as Public Enemy and A Tribe Called Quest to mafioso rap themes by rappers such
    6.00
    1 votes
    213
    Gothic rock

    Gothic rock

    • Artists: Carfax Abbey
    • Albums: The Serpent's Egg
    • Parent genres: Punk rock
    Gothic rock (also referred to as goth rock or simply goth) is a musical subgenre of post-punk that formed during the late 1970s. Gothic rock bands grew from the strong ties they had to the English punk rock and emerging post-punk scenes. According to both Pitchfork and NME, protogoth bands are Joy Division, Siouxsie and the Banshees, Bauhaus and The Cure. The genre itself was defined as a separate movement from punk rock during the early 1980s largely due to the significant stylistic divergences of the movement; gothic rock, as opposed to punk, combines dark, often keyboard-heavy music with introspective and dark lyrics. Gothic rock then gave rise to a broader subculture that included clubs, fashion and numerous publications that grew in popularity in the 1980s. According to music journalist Simon Reynolds, standard musical fixtures of the Gothic rock include "scything guitar patterns, high-pitched Joy Division basslines that often usurped the melodic role; [and] beats that were either hypnotically dirgelike or 'tribal'". Reynolds described the vocal style as consisting of "deep, droning alloys of Jim Morrison and Leonard Cohen". Siouxsie and the Banshees tended to play the
    6.00
    1 votes
    214

    Post-industrial

    • Artists: Von Thronstahl
    • Albums: All the Pretty Little Horses
    • Parent genres: Industrial music
    Post-industrial is a term used to refer to a grouping of music genres which developed in the 1980s, and which are related to the original usage of the term Industrial music by Industrial Records through either influence or direct involvement, such as power electronics, death industrial, neofolk, martial industrial, dark ambient, and types of experimental music. Where industrial music was largely defined by the group Throbbing Gristle and the Industrial Records label, a considerable strain of post-industrial arguably begins with the post-Throbbing Gristle project Psychic TV in the early 1980s, and ideas hatched at that time. A number of key post-industrial music projects directly spun off early Psychic TV, or were closely connected or influenced, by PTV and/or by its associated religious network Thee Temple ov Psychick Youth.
    6.00
    1 votes
    215
    Rhythm and blues

    Rhythm and blues

    • Artists: The Troggs
    • Albums: Nuts to You
    • Parent genres: Black gospel
    Rhythm and blues, often abbreviated to R&B and RnB, is a genre of popular African-American music that originated in the 1940s. The term was originally used by record companies to describe recordings marketed predominantly to urban African Americans, at a time when "urbane, rocking, jazz based music with a heavy, insistent beat" was becoming more popular. The term has subsequently had a number of shifts in meaning. In the early 1950s, the term rhythm and blues was frequently applied to blues records. Starting in the mid-1950s, after this style of music contributed to the development of rock and roll, the term "R&B" became used to refer to music styles that developed from and incorporated electric blues, as well as gospel and soul music. By the 1970s, rhythm and blues was used as a blanket term for soul and funk. In the 1980s, a newer style of R&B developed, becoming known as "Contemporary R&B". Jerry Wexler of Billboard magazine coined the term "rhythm and blues" in 1948 as a musical marketing term in the United States. It replaced the term "race music", which originally came from within the black community, but was deemed offensive in the postwar world. The term "rhythm and blues"
    6.00
    1 votes
    216
    UK Garage

    UK Garage

    • Artists: The Underdog Project
    • Albums: Original Pirate Material
    • Parent genres: Hip house
    UK garage (also known as UKG) is a genre of electronic dance music originating from England in the early 1990s. UK garage is a descendant of house music which originated in Chicago and New York. The genre usually features a distinctive syncopated 4/4 percussive rhythm with 'shuffling' hi-hats and beat-skipping kick drums. Garage tracks also commonly feature 'chopped up' and time-shifted or pitch-shifted vocal samples complementing the underlying rhythmic structure. UK garage was largely subsumed into other styles of music and production in the mid-2000s, including dubstep, bassline, grime and UK funky. The evolution of house music in the UK in the mid 1990s led to the term, as previously coined by the Paradise Garage DJs, being applied to a new form of music also known as speed garage. Its originator is widely recognised to be Todd Edwards, the American house and garage producer, also known as Todd "The God" Edwards. In the early nineties he began to start remixing more soulful house records and incorporating more time-shifts and vocal samples than normal house records, whilst still living in the US. However it was not until DJ EZ, the North London DJ, got ahold of one of Todd's
    6.00
    1 votes
    217
    Neo-Psychedelia

    Neo-Psychedelia

    • Artists: Flotation Toy Warning
    • Albums: Roots and Echoes
    • Parent genres: Heavy metal
    Neo-psychedelia is music that emulates or is heavily influenced by the psychedelic music of the 1960s. It began to be revived among British post-punk bands of the later 1970s and early 1980s and was taken up by groups including bands of the Paisley Underground and Madchester scenes, as well as occasional interest from mainstream artists and bands into the new millennium. Neo-psychedelic acts borrowed a variety of elements from 1960s psychedelic music. Some emulated the psychedelic pop of bands like The Beatles and early Pink Floyd, others adopted the jangly guitars of folk rock bands like the Byrds-influenced guitar rock, or distorted free-form jams and sonic experimentalism of late 1960s acid rock. Some neo-psychedelia has been explicitly focused on drug use and experiences, while other bands have used it to accompany surreal or political lyrics. As a distinct genre psychedelic rock declined towards the end of the 1960s, as bands broke up or moved into new forms of music, including heavy metal music and progressive rock. In the 1980s and 1990s there were occasional mainstream acts that dabbled in neo-psychedelia, including Prince's mid-1980s work and some of Lenny Kravitz's 1990s
    5.00
    2 votes
    218

    Rapcore

    • Artists: SEV
    • Albums: Insomnia
    • Parent genres: Heavy metal
    Rapcore (sometimes referred to as punk rap or rap punk) is a subgenre of rap rock fusing vocal and instrumental elements of hip hop with punk rock and hardcore punk. Rapcore originated from rap rock, a genre fusing vocal and instrumental elements of hip hop with rock. Beastie Boys, formerly a hardcore punk group, began working in the hip hop genre. Their debut album, Licensed to Ill, largely featured a rock-based sound. Biohazard is considered to be a strong influence on the genre's development. Huntington Beach-based punk band Hed PE performs a fusion of styles ranging from hip hop and reggae to punk rock, hardcore punk and heavy metal. Although they are considered to be performers in the rapcore genre, they refer to their musical style as "G-punk". Kottonmouth Kings perform a style which they refer to as "psychedelic hip-hop punk rock". Among the first wave of bands to gain mainstream success were 311, Bloodhound Gang, Limp Bizkit, Steriogram and Suicidal Tendencies. In 2008, the rapcore band Hollywood Undead achieved success with their debut album Swan Songs. Although the popularity of rap rock genres is believed to be declining, some believe that rapcore may regain popularity,
    5.00
    2 votes
    219

    Rave music

    • Artists: Scooter
    • Albums: Music for the Jilted Generation
    • Parent genres: House music
    Rave music may either refer to the late 1980s genre of house music, the first genre of music in the world to be played at raves, or any genre of electronic dance music that may be played at a rave, such as house, trance, techno, drum & bass, happy hardcore, breakbeat hardcore and gabber. Very rarely, the term is used to refer to less electronic related genres such as glam, powerpop, psychedelic rock and dub music parties. The genre "rave", also known as 1980s hardcore by ravers, first appeared amongst the acid house movement in Scotland during the mid-1980s as a reaction to New Beat. While New Beat usually borrowed an aggressive industrial sound, rave tended to borrow New Beat's elements that were harder than acid house, while retaining the neutral mooded sound of acid house. Rave tended to be a happy genre that favoured synthesized melodies over the duller sound of the TB-303 in order to attract a wider audience. The genre was later reestablished as oldskool hardcore, which lead onto newer forms of rave music such as drum and bass and jazzstep, as well as other hardcore techno genres, such as gabber, hardstyle and happy hardcore. The different genres of electronic dance music
    5.00
    2 votes
    220

    Funk-rock

    • Artists: Rosie Gaines
    • Albums: Make Yourself
    • Parent genres: Rock music
    Funk rock is a music genre that fuses funk and rock elements. Its earliest incarnation was heard in the late 1960s through the mid-1970s by acts such as the Jimi Hendrix Experience (last two albums), Eric Burdon and War, Ike and Tina Turner, Trapeze, Parliament-Funkadelic, Betty Davis and Mother's Finest. The 1990s were known for acts such as Red Hot Chili Peppers and Rage Against the Machine. After a period of time where the genre had died down in popularity, Audioslave brought the genre back into the spotlight with the release of their 2006 album Revelations. Funk rock is a fusion of funk and rock. Many instruments may be incorporated into the music, but the overall sound is defined by a definitive bass or drum beat and electric guitars. The bass and drum rhythms are influenced by funk music but with more intensity, while the guitar can be funk- or rock-influenced, usually with distortion, which is similar to overdrive or fuzz. Jimi Hendrix was the first well-known recording artist to combine the rhythms and riffs of early funk to his rock sound. Perhaps the earliest example is his song "Little Miss Lover" (1967). His live album Band of Gypsys features funky riffs and rhythms
    4.50
    2 votes
    221

    Jazz-funk

    • Artists: Gil Scott-Heron
    • Albums: Journey to Love
    • Parent genres: Soul music
    Jazz-funk is a sub-genre of jazz music characterized by a strong back beat (groove), electrified sounds, and often, the presence of the first electronic analog synthesizers. The integration of funk, soul, and R&B music and styles into jazz resulted in the creation of a genre whose spectrum is indeed quite wide and ranges from strong jazz improvisation to soul, funk or disco with jazz arrangements, jazz riffs, and jazz solos, and sometimes soul vocals. Jazz-funk is primarily an American genre, where it was popular throughout the 1970s and the early 1980s, but it also achieved noted appeal on the club-circuit in England during the mid 1970s. Similar genres include soul jazz and jazz fusion, but neither entirely overlap with jazz-funk. Notably jazz-funk is less vocal, more arranged and featured more improv than soul jazz, and retains a strong feel of groove and R&B versus some of the jazz fusion production. At the jazz end of the spectrum, jazz-funk characteristics include a departure from ternary rhythm (near-triplet), i.e. the "swing" (see swing rhythm), to the more danceable and unfamiliar binary rhythm, known as the "groove". It is therefore no surprise that this type of jazz saw
    4.50
    2 votes
    222
    Synthpop

    Synthpop

    • Artists: De/Vision
    • Albums: Folk of the 80s
    • Parent genres: New Wave
    Synthpop (also known as electropop, or technopop) is a genre of popular music that first became prominent in the 1980s, in which the synthesizer is the dominant musical instrument. It was prefigured in the 1960s and early 1970s by the use of synthesizers in progressive rock, electronic art rock, disco and particularly the "Krautrock" of bands like Kraftwerk. It arose as a distinct genre in Japan and the United Kingdom in the post-punk era as part of the New Wave movement of the late-1970s to the mid-1980s. Early synthpop pioneers included Japanese group Yellow Magic Orchestra and British bands Ultravox and the Human League; the latter largely used monophonic synthesizers to produce music with a simple and austere sound. After the breakthrough of Tubeway Army and Gary Numan in the British Singles Chart, large numbers of artists began to enjoy success with a synthesizer-based sound in the early 1980s, including Soft Cell, Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark, Japan and Depeche Mode in the United Kingdom, while in Japan, Yellow Magic Orchestra's success opened the way for synthpop bands such as P-Model, Plastics, and Hikashu. The development of inexpensive polyphonic synthesizers, the
    4.50
    2 votes
    223

    Zouk

    • Artists: Kaoma
    • Albums: Best Of
    • Parent genres: Reggae
    Zouk, or Zouk beton is a fast style of rhythmic music originating from the French Caribbean islands of Guadeloupe and Martinique popularized by the group Kassav' in the 1980s. Actually as featured and danced, zouk is The French Antillean konpa. In Africa, it is popular in Franco- and lusophone countries. In Europe, it is particularly popular in France. The word zouk means "party" or "festival" in the local Antillean Creole of French, although the word originally referred to, and is still used to refer to the mazurka, that was introduced to the French Caribbean in the 19th century. The Creole word "soukwe", "souke", "zouke" from the French verb "secouer", meaning "to shake" was introduced by Haitian meringue-compas musicians who toured these Islands in the 50s-80s. Zouk's origins can be traced back to the West Indies, having come out of the French islands of Guadeloupe and Martinique in the early to mid-1980s. In Jocelyn Guilbault’s seminal book on the subject, Zouk: World Music in the West Indies, she states that “Zouk is the creation of black, Creole-speaking Antillean artists,” and puts forth the theory that it is the product of the struggle to form some kind of national identity
    4.50
    2 votes
    224

    Detroit techno

    • Artists: Richie Hawtin
    • Albums: Anxiety Always
    • Parent genres: Techno
    Detroit techno is a type of techno music that generally includes the first techno productions by Detroit-based artists during the late 1980s and early 1990s. Detroit has been cited as the birthplace of techno. Prominent Detroit techno artists include Juan Atkins, Derrick May, and Kevin Saunderson. A distinguishing trait of Detroit techno is the use of analog synthesizers and early drum machines, particularly the Roland TR-909, or, in later releases, the use of digital emulation to create the characteristic sounds of those machines. Detroit techno music was originally thought of as a subset to Chicago's early style of house. Many of the early techno tracks had futuristic or robotic themes, although a notable exception to this trend was a single by Derrick May under his pseudonym Rhythim Is Rhythim, called "Strings of Life" (1987). This vibrant dancefloor anthem was filled with rich synthetic string arrangements and took the underground music scene by storm in May 1987. It "hit Britain in an especially big way during the country's 1987-1988 house explosion." It became May's best known track, which, according to Frankie Knuckles, "just exploded. It was like something you can't
    5.00
    1 votes
    225

    Instrumental rock

    • Artists: From Monument to Masses
    • Albums: No Boundaries
    • Parent genres: Rock music
    Instrumental rock is a type of rock music which emphasizes musical instruments, and which features very little or no singing. Examples of instrumental rock can be found in practically every subgenre of rock, often from musicians who specialize in the style. Instrumental rock was most popular during rock and roll's first decade (mid-1950s to mid-1960s), before the British Invasion. One notable early instrumental was "Honky Tonk" by the Bill Doggett Combo, with its slinky beat and sinuous saxophone-organ lead. And bluesman Jimmy Reed charted with "Boogie in the Dark" and "Roll and Rhumba". Jazz saxophonist Earl Bostic revived his career with instrumentals like "Harlem Nocturne" and "Earl's Rhumboogie". (Other jazz musicians who scored pop hits include Tab Smith and Arnett Cobb). Several rhythm and blues sax players had hit instrumental songs, including Big Jay McNeeley, Red Prysock, and Lee Allen, whose "Walking with Mr. Lee" was quite popular. There were several notable blues instrumental songs during the 1950s; Little Walter's rollicking "Juke" was a major hit. Instrumental hit songs could emphasize electronic organ (The Tornados' "Telstar", Dave "Baby" Cortez's "The Happy Organ",
    5.00
    1 votes
    226

    Intelligent drum and bass

    • Artists: 808 State
    • Albums: The Seduction of Claude Debussy
    • Parent genres: Oldschool jungle
    Intelligent drum and bass (also known as IDB, jazzstep, atmospheric drum and bass, ambient jungle and artcore), is the widespread term for the subgenre of drum and bass emphasising influences from lounge, jazz, and ambient music. The music typically has a very atmospheric or ambient quality, with washes of synthesised pads, and deep sub-bass. The Rhodes piano is heavily featured, along with samples of other jazz fusion instruments like guitar, flute, and vocals. LTJ Bukem, owner of Good Looking and arguably the most influential figure behind the style, stated he disliked the term as it implied that other forms of drum and bass are not intelligent. In 2010, Chris Marigold of Blu Mar Ten blogged, "yes, I dislike the term ‘intelligent’ as much as you probably do but I never really figured out what we were supposed to call this stuff, even though we were in the thick of it at the time." In addition to Good Looking Records, Rob Playford's label Moving Shadow Records was a popular distributor of 12" Records for this genre in the 90's till the label wound down and closed in 2007. Jazzstep, also known as "jazzy jungle" and "jazz and bass" is a drum and bass subgenre which emerged in 1995.
    5.00
    1 votes
    227
    Medieval folk rock

    Medieval folk rock

    • Artists: Schandmaul
    • Albums: Giles Farnaby's Dream Band
    • Parent genres: Medieval music
    Medieval folk rock, medieval rock or medieval folk is a musical sub-genre that emerged in the early 1970s in England and Germany which combined elements of early music with rock music. It grew out of the electric folk and progressive folk movements of the later 1960s. Despite the name, the term was used indiscriminately to categorise performers who incorporated elements of medieval, renaissance and baroque music into their work and sometimes to describe groups who used few, or no electric instruments. This sub-genre reached its height towards the middle of the 1970s when it achieved some mainstream success in Britain, but within a few years most groups had either disbanded, or were absorbed into the wider movements of progressive folk and progressive rock. Nevertheless, the genre had a considerable impact within progressive rock where early music and medievalism in general, was a major influence and through that in the development of heavy metal. More recently medieval folk rock has revived in popularity along with other forms of medieval inspired music such as dark wave orientated neo-medieval music and medieval metal. Medieval folk rock is characterised by three major elements
    5.00
    1 votes
    228
    Mod

    Mod

    • Artists: Simon Townshend
    • Albums: Small Faces
    • Parent genres: Soul music
    Mod (from modernist) is a subculture that originated in London, England, in the late 1950s and peaked in the early-to-mid 1960s. Significant elements of the mod subculture include fashion (often tailor-made suits); music, including African American soul, Jamaican ska, British beat music, and R&B; and motor scooters. The original mod scene was also associated with amphetamine-fuelled all-night dancing at clubs. From the mid-to-late 1960s and onwards, the mass media often used the term mod in a wider sense to describe anything that was believed to be popular, fashionable, or modern. There was a mod revival in the United Kingdom in the late 1970s, which was followed by a mod revival in North America in the early 1980s, particularly in Southern California. The term mod derives from modernist, which was a term used in the 1950s to describe modern jazz musicians and fans. This usage contrasted with the term trad, which described traditional jazz players and fans. The 1959 novel Absolute Beginners by Colin MacInnes describes as a modernist, a young modern jazz fan who dresses in sharp modern Italian clothes. Absolute Beginners may be one of the earliest written examples of the term
    5.00
    1 votes
    229
    Swing

    Swing

    • Artists: The Boilermaker Jazz Band
    • Albums: Around the World in 80 Years
    • Parent genres: Kansas City Jazz
    Swing music, or simply Swing, is a form of American music that developed in the early 1930s and became a distinctive style by 1940. Swing uses a strong rhythm section of double bass and drums as the anchor for a lead section of brass instruments such as trumpets and trombones, woodwinds including saxophones and clarinets, and sometimes stringed instruments such as violin and guitar, medium to fast tempos, and a "lilting" swing time rhythm.The name swing came from the phrase ‘swing feel’ where the emphasis is on the off–beat or weaker pulse in the music (unlike classical music). Swing bands usually featured soloists who would improvise on the melody over the arrangement. The danceable swing style of big bands and bandleaders such as Benny Goodman and Count Basie was the dominant form of American popular music from 1935 to 1945, a period known as the Swing Era. The verb "to swing" is also used as a term of praise for playing that has a strong rhythmic "groove" or drive. The styles of jazz that were popular from the late teens through the late 1920s were usually played with rhythms with a two beat feel, and often attempted to reproduce the style of contrapuntal improvisation developed
    5.00
    1 votes
    230
    Minimalist music

    Minimalist music

    • Artists: Philip Glass
    • Albums: Satyagraha
    • Parent genres: 20th century classical music
    Minimal music is a style of music associated with the work of American composers La Monte Young, Terry Riley, Steve Reich, and Philip Glass. It originated in the New York Downtown scene of the 1960s and was initially viewed as a form of experimental music called the New York Hypnotic School. Prominent features of the style include consonant harmony, steady pulse (if not immobile drones), stasis or gradual transformation, and often reiteration of musical phrases or smaller units such as figures, motifs, and cells. It may include features such as additive process and phase shifting. Minimal compositions that rely heavily on process techniques that follow strict rules are usually described using the term process music. Starting in the early 1960s as a scruffy underground scene in San Francisco alternative spaces and New York lofts, minimalism spread to become the most popular experimental music style of the late 20th century. The movement originally involved dozens of composers, although only five (Young, Riley, Reich, Glass, and later John Adams) emerged to become publicly associated with American minimal music. In Europe, the music of Louis Andriessen, Karel Goeyvaerts, Michael
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    231

    20th century classical music

    • Artists: John Cage
    • Albums: Delusion of the Fury: A Ritual of Dream and Delusion
    • Parent genres: Classical music
    20th century classical music was without a dominant style and highly diverse. At the turn of the century, music was characteristically late Romantic in style. Composers such as Gustav Mahler and Jean Sibelius were pushing the bounds of Post-Romantic Symphonic writing. At the same time, the Impressionist movement, spearheaded by Claude Debussy, was being developed in France. The term was actually loathed by Debussy: "I am trying to do 'something different—in a way realities—what the imbeciles call 'impressionism' is a term which is as poorly used as possible, particularly by art critics" (Politoske 1988, 419)—and Maurice Ravel's music, also often labelled with this term, explores music in many styles not always related to it (see the discussion on Neoclassicism, below). Many composers reacted to the Post-Romantic and Impressionist styles and moved in quite different directions. The single most important moment in defining the course of music throughout the century was the widespread break with traditional tonality, effected in diverse ways by different composers in the first decade of the century. From this sprang an unprecedented "linguistic plurality" of styles, techniques, and
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    232

    Nederpop

    • Artists: Golden Earring
    • Albums: Pebbles, Volume 15
    • Parent genres: Pop music
    Nederpop is a Dutch term that was invented by the mid-1970s to describe the Dutch pop music scene of the 1960s and 1970s that was gaining worldwide attention, exemplified by bands such as Shocking Blue, Golden Earring and Focus. The name is a play on the country's name in Dutch (Nederland). Most of the Nederpop bands of this period had English-language songs or played only instrumentals, but some of the bands performed exclusively in the Dutch language. Many such were popular thanks to airplay over the offshore pirate radio stations targeting the Netherlands such as Mi Amigo, Veronica, Atlantis and Northsea International. During the early 1980s, the Nederpop term was revived to name the sudden growth of Dutch language pop music from the Netherlands. The revived meaning came about because of the huge success of Doe Maar. This success helped other bands to sing in Dutch and/or get the spot light. Aside from Doe Maar, the early eighties were good for, amongst others, the Frank Boeijen Groep, Het Goede Doel, The Amazing Stroopwafels, Toontje Lager and Noodweer. Female Nederpop bands of the time included the Dolly Dots and Mai Tai
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    233

    Progressive electronic music

    • Artists: The Forth
    • Albums: Scores
    • Parent genres: Progressive rock
    Progressive house is a style (subgenre) of house music. House music is a type of electronic dance music (EDM). The progressive house style emerged in the early 1990s. It developed initially in the United Kingdom as a natural progression of American and European house music of the late 1980s. In the context of popular music the word "progressive" was first used widely in the 1970s to differentiate experimental forms of rock music from mainstream styles. Such music attempted to explore alternate approaches to rock music production. Some acts also attempted to elevate the aesthetic values of rock music by incorporating features associated with classical instrumental music. This led to a style of music called progressive rock, which has been described as "the most self-consciously arty branch of rock." In disco music, and later house, a similar desire to separate more exploratory styles from standard approaches saw DJs and producers adopting the word progressive to make a distinction. According to the DJ and producer Carl Craig, the term "progressive" was used in Detroit in the early 80s in reference to Italo Disco. The music was dubbed "progressive" because it drew upon the influence
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    234

    Southern rock

    • Artists: He Is Legend
    • Albums: Wire
    • Parent genres: Rock music
    Southern rock is a subgenre of rock music, and genre of Americana. It developed in the Southern United States from rock and roll, country music, and blues, and is focused generally on electric guitar and vocals. Although it is unknown from where the term southern rock came, "many people feel that these important contributors to the development of rock and roll have been minimized in rock's history." Rock music's origins lie mostly in the music of the American South, and many stars from the first wave of 1950s rock and roll such as Bo Diddley, Elvis Presley, Little Richard, Buddy Holly, Fats Domino, and Jerry Lee Lewis hailed from the Deep South. However, the British Invasion and the rise of folk rock and psychedelic rock in the middle 1960s shifted the focus of new rock music away from the rural south and to large cities like Liverpool, London, Los Angeles, New York City, and San Francisco. In the late 1960s, traditionalists such as Canned Heat (from Los Angeles), Creedence Clearwater Revival (from El Cerrito, California), and The Band (Canadian, though drummer Levon Helm was a native Arkansan) revived interest to the roots of rock and to Southern themes in Americana music. See
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    235

    Swamp rock

    • Artists: Deadboy & The Elephantmen
    • Albums: Bayou Country
    • Parent genres: Southern rock
    Swamp rock is a distinct form of Roots rock that includes influences from such diverse genres as Zydeco, Cajun music, Swamp blues and Swamp pop. It first became prominent in American rock and pop in the late 1960s. Creedence Clearwater Revival defined much of the early "choogling" sound and subject matter associated with swamp rock, but it is also strongly associated with Tony Joe White and his hit "Polk Salad Annie." Other musicians such as Screamin' Jay Hawkins, Dr. John, Larry Jon Wilson, Jim Dickinson, Travis Wammack, J. J. Cale, Bobbie Gentry, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Roy Head, and more recently Deadboy and the Elephantmen have contributed to the swamp rock sound. The music is characterized by funky, soulful bass, twangy reverb guitar and songs that typically concerned themselves with matters of Southern American States folklore. There's a literary, Southern Gothic feel to most swamp rock. The lyrics of swamp rock songs often describe life in such locales as along the Mississippi River, in New Orleans or such rural areas as the bayou. In 1998, producer Phil Ramone produced Swamp Boogie Queen. This effort suggested an expansive approach to the genre of swamp rock and pop, and brought
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    236
    Black metal

    Black metal

    • Artists: Negură Bunget
    • Albums: Dahmer
    • Parent genres: Heavy metal
    Black metal is an extreme subgenre of heavy metal music. Common traits include fast tempos, shrieked vocals, highly distorted guitars played with tremolo picking, blast beat drumming, raw recording and unconventional song structures. During the 1980s, several thrash metal bands formed a prototype for black metal. This so-called "first wave" included bands such as Venom, Bathory, Hellhammer and Celtic Frost. A "second wave" arose in the early 1990s, spearheaded by Norwegian bands such as Mayhem, Burzum, Darkthrone, Immortal and Emperor. The early Norwegian black metal scene developed the style of their forebears into a distinct genre. Norwegian-inspired black metal scenes emerged throughout Europe and North America, although some other scenes developed their own styles with no connection to the Norwegian one. Initially a synonym for "Satanic metal", black metal has often been met with hostility from mainstream culture, mainly due to the misanthropic and anti-Christian views of many artists. Moreover, several of the genre's pioneers have been linked with church burnings and murder. Some artists have also been linked to neo-Nazism, although most black metal fans and most prominent
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    237
    Dixieland

    Dixieland

    • Artists: Johnny Dodds
    • Albums: Half Past Autumn Suite
    • Parent genres: Jazz
    Dixieland music, sometimes referred to as Hot jazz or Early Jazz, is a style of jazz music which developed in New Orleans at the start of the 20th century, and was spread to Chicago and New York City by New Orleans bands in the 1910s. Well-known jazz standard songs from the Dixieland era, such as "Basin Street Blues" and "When the Saints Go Marching In", are known even to non-jazz fans. Dixieland is a name given to the style of jazz performed by early New Orleans Jazz Musicians. The name is a reference to the "Old South". Dixieland which was developed in New Orleans, is one of the earliest styles of Jazz music. The style combined earlier brass band marches, French Quadrilles, ragtime and blues with collective, polyphonic improvisation. While instrumentation and size of bands can be very flexible, the "standard" band consists of a "front line" of trumpet (or cornet), trombone, and clarinet, with a "rhythm section" of at least two of the following instruments: guitar or banjo, string bass or tuba, piano, and drums. The term Dixieland became widely used after the advent of the first million-selling hit records of the Original Dixieland Jass Band in 1917. The music has been played
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    238

    Downtempo

    • Artists: Richard Dorfmeister
    • Albums: Winter Chill 2
    • Parent genres: Electronica
    Downtempo (sometimes referred to as "chill out", "chill" or "downbeat") is a type of electronic music style similar to ambient music, but usually with a beat or groove. The tempo, as well as the drum patterns of each track can vary. Sometimes the beat can be restrained and/or simple. Sometimes the beats are more complicated and more featured instead of being in the background, but even then they are usually less intense than other kinds of electronic music like trance and house. The tempo is often slower than that of traditional electronic dance music. Often the name chill-out music is used to refer to songs demonstrative of the genre, but those names also refer to other styles of music, and downtempo encompasses a wider variety of styles than those terms alone would indicate. Due to the relaxing and often sensual or romantic feel of most downtempo music, it is a popular form of background music in 'chill out rooms' of dance parties, and many alternative cafes. The 1990s brought on a wave of slower paced music which was played throughout chillout rooms—the relaxation sections of the clubs or dedicated sections at electronic music events. Downtempo music started to surface around
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    239

    Electronic body music

    • Artists: Front 242
    • Albums: Dreams of a Cryotank
    • Parent genres: Electropunk
    Electronic body music (EBM) or industrial dance is a music genre that combines elements of industrial music and electronic dance music. It first came to prominence in Belgium. Pure electronic body music is referred to as old-school EBM and should not be confused with aggrotech, dark electro or industrial music. Emerging in the early 1980s, the genre's early influences range from industrial music (Throbbing Gristle, Cabaret Voltaire), European synthpunk (DAF, Liaisons Dangereuses, Portion Control), and electronic music (Kraftwerk). From its inception, the style has been characterized by hard and often sparse danceable electronic beats, clear undistorted vocals, shouts or growls with reverberation and echo effects, and repetitive sequencer lines. At the time the genre arose, important synthesizers were the Korg MS-20, Emulator II, Oberheim Matrix and Yamaha DX7. Typical EBM rhythms are based on 4/4 beats, mainly with some minor syncopation to suggest a rock music rhythm structure. Electro-industrial is an outgrowth of the EBM and industrial music that developed in the mid-1980s. While EBM has a minimal structure and clean production, electro-industrial has a deep, complex and layered
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    240
    Eurodance

    Eurodance

    • Artists: Groove Coverage
    • Albums: Encore Une Fois - The Greatest Hits
    • Parent genres: Electronic dance music
    Eurodance (also known as Eurohouse, Eurotechno, Euro-NRG and simply Euro) is a genre of electronic dance music that originated in the late 1980s primarily in Europe. It combines many elements from house, techno, Hi-NRG (especially Eurobeat) as well as Eurodisco. Eurodance production continues to evolve with a more modernized style that incorporates elements from trance and techno music. This genre of music is heavily influenced by the utilization of rich melodic vocals, either exclusively by itself or inclusively with rapped verses. This, combined with cutting-edge synthesizer, strong bass rhythm and melodic hooks establishes the core foundation of Eurodance music. The term "Eurodance" gradually became associated with a specific style of European dance music over time. During its golden years in the mid 1990s it was referred as "Euro-House" or "Euro-NRG"; in Europe it was often called "Dancefloor" or simply "Dance". While some use a much broader definition of what is considered "Eurodance", over time, the term particularly came to refer to an NRG-based genre from the 1990s which included a solo vocalist or a rapper/vocalist duet and is also used to describe later European dance
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    241
    Jam band

    Jam band

    • Artists: Brute.
    • Albums: Live at the Warfield
    • Parent genres: Bluegrass
    Jam bands are musical groups whose albums and live performances relate to a fan culture that originated with the 1960s groups such as the Grateful Dead and The Allman Brothers Band. This jam band environment continued in the 1990s with bands like Phish. The performances of these bands often feature extended musical improvisation ("jams") over rhythmic grooves and chord patterns and long sets of music that cross genre boundaries. While the seminal group Grateful Dead were originally categorized as psychedelic rock, by the 1990s the term "jam band" was used for groups playing a variety of genres, including those outside of rock such as funk, progressive bluegrass, and jazz fusion. The term is also used for some groups playing blues, country music, folk music, world music, and electronic music. In the 1980s the Grateful Dead's fan base included a large core group which followed their tours from show to show. From following the Dead, fans developed a sense of community and loyalty. In the 1990s bands such as Phish began to attract this fan base. The term "jam band" was first used regarding Grateful Dead and Phish culture in the 1990s. Rolling Stone magazine asserted in a 2004 biography
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    242
    Madchester

    Madchester

    • Artists: The Farm
    • Albums: Greatest Hits
    • Parent genres: Rave music
    Madchester was a music scene that developed in Manchester, England, towards the end of the 1980s and into the early 1990s. The music that emerged from the scene mixed alternative rock, psychedelic rock and dance music. Artists associated with the scene included New Order, The Stone Roses, Happy Mondays, Inspiral Carpets, Northside, 808 State, James, The Charlatans, The Fall, A Guy Called Gerald, and other bands. At that time, the Haçienda nightclub was a major catalyst for the distinctive musical ethos in the city that was called the Second Summer of Love. The music scene in Manchester immediately before the Madchester era had been dominated by bands such as The Smiths, New Order, The Fall and James. These bands were to become a significant influence on the Madchester scene. The opening of the Haçienda nightclub, an initiative of Factory Records, in May 1982 was also influential in the development of popular culture in Manchester. For the first few years of its life, the club played predominantly club oriented pop music and hosted gigs from artists including New Order, Culture Club, The Thompson Twins, and the Smiths. It had DJs such as Hewan Clarke and Greg Wilson and switched
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    243
    Mod Revival

    Mod Revival

    • Artists: The Adored
    • Albums: All Mod Cons
    • Parent genres: New Wave
    The mod revival was a music genre and subculture that started in England in 1978 and later spread to other countries (to a lesser degree). The mod revival's mainstream popularity was relatively short, although its influence has lasted for decades. The mod revival post-dated a Teddy Boy revival, and mod revivalists sometimes clashed with Teddy Boy revivalists, skinhead revivalists, casuals, punks and rival gang members. The late 1970s mod revival combined musical and cultural elements of the 1970s pub rock, punk rock and New Wave music genres with influences from 1960s mod and beat music bands such as The Who, Small Faces and The Kinks. The revival was largely spurred on by the band The Jam, who had adopted a stark mod look and mixed the energy of punk with the sound of 1960s mod bands. Their debut album In the City (1977), mixed R&B standards with originals modelled on The Who's early singles. They confirmed their status as the leading mod revival band with their third album All Mod Cons (1978), on which Paul Weller's song-writing drew heavily on the British-focused narratives of the Kinks. The revival was also spurred on by small concerts at venues such as the Cambridge and Hop
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    244
    Noise music

    Noise music

    • Artists: The Martini Henry Rifles
    • Albums: Miss Black America
    • Parent genres: Industrial music
    Noise music is a category consisting of multiple discrete genres of music that have employed noise as a musical resource. It includes a wide range of musical styles, and sound based creative practices, that feature noise as a primary aspect. It can feature acoustically or electronically generated noise, and both traditional and unconventional musical instruments. It may incorporate live machine sounds, non-musical vocal techniques, physically manipulated audio media, processed sound recordings, field recordings, computer generated noise, stochastic processes and other randomly produced electronic signals such as distortion, feedback, static, hiss and hum. There may also be emphasis on high volume levels and lengthy, continuous pieces. More generally noise music may contain aspects such as improvisation, extended technique, cacophony and indeterminacy, and in many instances conventional use of melody, harmony, rhythm and pulse is often dispensed with. The Futurist art movement was important for the development of the noise aesthetic, as was the Dada art movement (a prime example being the Antisymphony concert performed on April 30, 1919 in Berlin), and later the Surrealist and
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    245

    Pop rock

    • Artists: Butch Walker
    • Albums: On Fire
    • Parent genres: Rock music
    Pop rock is a music genre which mixes a catchy pop style and light lyrics in its (typically) guitar-based rock songs. There are varying definitions of the term, ranging from a slower and mellower form of rock music to a subgenre of pop music. Scholars have noted that pop and rock are usually depicted as opposites; the detractors of pop often deride it as a slick, commercial product, less authentic than rock music. Pop rock has been described as an "upbeat variety of rock music represented by artists such as Elton John, Paul McCartney, Rod Stewart, Chicago, and Peter Frampton." In contrast, music reviewer George Starostin defines it as a subgenre of pop music that uses catchy pop songs that are mostly guitar-based. Starostin argues that most of what is traditionally called 'power pop' falls into the pop rock subgenre. He claims that the lyrical content of pop rock is "normally secondary to the music." Critic Philip Auslander argues that the distinction between pop and rock is more pronounced in the US than in the UK. He claims in the US, pop has roots in white crooners such as Perry Como, whereas rock is rooted in African-American-influenced forms such as rock and roll. Auslander
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    246
    Power metal

    Power metal

    • Artists: Meliah Rage
    • Albums: A Night at the Opera
    • Parent genres: Classic metal
    Power metal is a style of heavy metal combining characteristics of traditional metal with speed metal, often within symphonic context. Generally, power metal is characterized by a more uplifting sound, in contrast to the heaviness and dissonance prevalent in styles such as doom metal and death metal. The term was first used in the middle of the 80s and refers to two different but related styles: the first pioneered and largely practiced in North America with a harder sound similar to speed metal, and a later more widespread and popular style based in Europe (especially Germany, Finland, Italy, Scandinavia), Latin America (Argentina, Brazil) and Japan, with a lighter, more melodic sound and frequent use of keyboards. The origins of power metal could be traced back to the late '70s, when the groundwork for power metal lyrical style was laid down by Ronnie James Dio. The fantasy oriented lyrics he wrote for Rainbow, concentrated around medieval, renaissance, folk and science fiction themes, directly influenced modern power metal bands. Rob Halford of Judas Priest created a blueprint for power metal vocal delivery. His almost constant high-pitched singing became one of the main
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    247
    Punk rock

    Punk rock

    • Artists: GG Allin
    • Albums: Life Won't Wait
    • Parent genres: Glam rock
    Punk rock is a rock music genre that developed between 1974 and 1976 in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Australia. Rooted in garage rock and other forms of what is now known as protopunk music, punk rock bands eschewed perceived excesses of mainstream 1970s rock. Punk bands created fast, hard-edged music, typically with short songs, stripped-down instrumentation, and often political, anti-establishment lyrics. Punk embraces a DIY ethic; many bands self-produced recordings and distributed them through informal channels. By late 1976, bands such as the Ramones, in New York City, and the Sex Pistols and The Clash, in London, were recognized as the vanguard of a new musical movement. The following year saw punk rock spreading around the world, and it became a major cultural phenomenon in the United Kingdom. For the most part, punk took root in local scenes that tended to reject association with the mainstream. An associated punk subculture emerged, expressing youthful rebellion and characterized by distinctive styles of clothing and adornment and a variety of anti-authoritarian ideologies. By the beginning of the 1980s, faster, more aggressive styles such as hardcore and Oi!
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    248

    Reggae fusion

    • Artists: UB40
    • Albums: Hot Shot
    • Parent genres: Dancehall
    Reggae fusion is a fusion genre of reggae that mixes reggae or dancehall with other genres, such as pop, rock, R&B, Eurohouse, jazz & drum and bass. In addition to characterizing fusions of reggae music with other genres, the term is used to describe artists who frequently switch between reggae and other genres, mainly hip hop, such as Kardinal Offishall, Sean Kingston, Chux Starr and Heavy D. The term is also used to describe artists who are known to deejay over instrumentals which are neither reggae nor dancehall, such as Elephant Man, Shaggy, Beenie Man, Natasja Saad, Diana King, Delly Ranx and Dionne Bromfield. Although artists have been mixing reggae with other genres from as early as the early 1970s, no official term had been used to describe this practice. Artists such as UB40 were described using terms that joined the various genres they performed (e.g. reggae funk, reggae pop). It was not until the late 1990s when the term was coined. The sub genre predominantly evolved from late 1980s and early 1990s dancehall music which instrumentals or riddims contained elements from the R&B and hip hop genres. Due to this, some consider dancehall artists such as Mad Cobra, Shabba
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    249

    Sludge metal

    • Artists: Pelican
    • Albums: For the Sick
    • Parent genres: Doom metal
    Sludge metal is a subgenre of heavy metal that melds elements of doom metal and hardcore punk, and sometimes incorporates influences from Southern rock, grunge and noise rock. Sludge metal is typically harsh and abrasive; often featuring shouted or screamed vocals, heavily distorted instruments and sharply contrasting tempos. While the style was anticipated by the Melvins from Washington, many of its earliest pioneers were from the city of New Orleans. Sludge metal generally combines the slow tempos, heavy rhythms and dark, pessimistic atmosphere of doom metal with the aggression, shouted vocals and occasional fast tempos of hardcore punk. As The New York Times put it, "The shorthand term for the kind of rock descending from early Black Sabbath and late Black Flag is sludge, because it's so slow and dense." Many sludge bands compose slow-paced songs that contain brief hardcore passages (for example, Eyehategod's "Depress" and "My Name Is God"). Mike Williams, a founder of the sludge style and member of Eyehategod, suggests that "the moniker of sludge apparently has to do with the slowness, the dirtiness, the filth and general feel of decadence the tunes convey". However, some bands
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    250

    Thrashcore

    • Artists: Doom
    • Albums: All We Need Is Cheez
    • Parent genres: Punk rock
    Thrashcore (also known as fastcore) is a fast tempo sub-genre of hardcore punk that emerged in the early 1980s. Thrashcore is essentially sped-up hardcore punk, with bands often using blast beats. Songs can be very brief, and thrashcore is in many ways a less dissonant, less metallic forerunner of grindcore. Like hardcore groups, thrashcore lyrics typically emphasize youthful rebellion or antimilitarism. In some ways, the genre is aligned with skateboarder subculture. Thrashcore is often confused with crossover thrash and sometimes thrash metal. Further confusion is added by the fact that many crossover bands, such as D.R.I., began as influential thrashcore bands. The term thrashcore is of recent vintage but dates from at least 1993. Throughout the '80s, the term "thrash" was in use as a synonym for hardcore punk (as in the New York Thrash compilation of 1982). It eventually came to be used for the faster, more intense style pioneered by D.R.I., just before their crossover period. The "-core" suffix is necessary to distinguish it from the thrash metal scene, which is also referred to as "thrash" by fans. Still more confusingly, the term "thrashcore" is occasionally used by the
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