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  • Nov 27th 2012
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Best Musical Game of All Time

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Best Musical Game of All Time is a public top list created by Listnerd on Rankly.com on November 27th 2012. Items on the Best Musical Game of All Time top list are added by the Rankly.com community and ranked using our secret ranking sauce. Best Musical Game of All Time has gotten 2.690 views and has gathered 564 votes from 564 voters. Only owner can add items. Just members can vote.

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    1

    Disney Sing It! - High School Musical 3: Senior Year

    Disney Sing It! – High School Musical 3: Senior Year is a karaoke video game and sequel to High School Musical: Sing It!. It was released on November 28, 2008 across multiple platforms, within Europe and on February 17, 2009 in North America. Unlike High School Musical: Sing It! which contained animations for the musical numbers, this game is set out exactly like a SingStar game however instead of music videos, they used the actual musical sequence from the film. It was released in North America on February 17, 2009, coinciding with the DVD and Blu-ray Disc releases of the film. The North American version included an additional 2 songs from High School Musical 2, and 3 songs from High School Musical 3, giving the entire High School Musical 3 songlist. Disney Sing It: High School Musical 3: Senior Year for the Xbox 360 allows use of the wireless Microsoft Lips microphones. Similarly the PlayStation 3 version allows the use of the SingStar wireless microphones. High School Musical 2 High School Musical
    7.88
    8 votes
    3

    Guitar Hero: On Tour

    Guitar Hero: On Tour is a music video game for the Nintendo DS system, based on the Guitar Hero series of video games. The game is developed by Vicarious Visions and published by RedOctane and Activision. The game was initially released as part of a "Guitar Grip" bundle in North America and Australia in June 2008, and in Europe in July 2008. Two versions were released in Europe, one for primarily English-speaking countries, and one for the rest of Europe, with some changes in the song list. A stand-alone version of the game was released alongside the game's sequel Guitar Hero On Tour: Decades in November 2008 in all regions. As with other Guitar Hero games, the player attempts to follow the lead guitar portion of a rock song as note patterns scroll by on the game's screens. Instead of the normal guitar peripheral used in other game console versions, On Tour is packaged with the "Guitar Grip", a unique four-fret controller that fits into the Game Boy Advance slot on either the Nintendo DS or DS Lite hardware, although not compatible with the Nintendo DSi due to the removal of the Game Boy Advance cartridge slot. The player strums each note by dragging the stylus across the
    6.88
    8 votes
    5

    Tranquility

    tranquility is a nonviolent musical platform game created in 1991 for Macintosh and Windows computers by musician William A. Romanowski. The game features generative algorithms that determine music and level layout based on the player's actions. For this reason, and due to its use of generated ambient music, the game's philosophy has been compared to that of Transcendentalism and the New Age Movement. According to the game's publishers, some players have reported immersion in the game to produce a dream-like experience during and after play. The game notably appeared first as a demo included with Silicon Graphics computers. It was updated and re-released by its designer as a commercial game 10 years later in 2001. This version of the game was supported for 10 years but a notice that the game was to be retired appeared on the website in 2010. As of now, the site is inaccessible. In tranquility, the player (from an abstract, first-person viewpoint) floats in a sea of starlit geometric structures called "platforms" in order to pass through targets called "spinners" (camouflaged star-shaped objects scattered at a density of one per room). The game's challenge is derived from the
    7.00
    7 votes
    6

    Toy's March

    Toy's March is a drum simulation game developed by Konami in 2005. Players take on the role of toy soldiers in a military band performing in a parade. Each player has one snare and one cymbal. The cartoon-style graphics are targeted towards a younger audience. The soundtrack features many themes from teenage Anime, as well as popular J-Pop anthems. A sequel, Toy's March 2, was released later in the same year.
    8.00
    6 votes
    7

    DJ Hero

    DJ Hero is a music video game, developed by FreeStyleGames and published by Activision as a rhythm game spin-off of the Guitar Hero franchise. It was released on October 27, 2009 in North America and on October 29, 2009 in Europe. The game is based on turntablism, the act of creating a new musical work from one or more previously recorded songs using record players and sound effect generators, and features 94 remixes of two different songs from a selection of over 100 different songs across numerous genres. To score points, the player must press buttons to activate accented beats, adjust their crossfade between the two songs, and "scratch" the turntable on the game's custom controller in time to marks that scroll on the screen to score points and perform well for the virtual crowd. The game features both a single player Career mode and cooperative and competitive multiplayer modes. The game also features a mode for selected songs for a DJ player to play alongside another player using a Guitar Hero guitar controller. Many DJ and mix artists have contributed to the game both in the game's development, the creation of mixes, and in lending their images for playable avatars in the
    7.83
    6 votes
    9

    Quest for Fame

    Quest for Fame is a music video game developed by Virtual Music and distributed by IBM. They were eventually acquired by Namco (who then made the arcade version in 1999) to create karaoke machines. In 2001, they resurfaced with a web-based subscription product named Music Playground, allowing the user to purchase the instrument tracks for already-owned audio CDs and play along with them. The service failed to attract a sufficient number of users and was finally shut down in August 2003. Quest for Fame is a simulation adventure game where the player becomes a rock guitarist, working his way up from lonesome bedroom rehearsals to becoming a garage band member, playing clubs and ultimately becoming a rock legend. The game is based on tunes by Aerosmith and is played by a special device called "V-Pick" that's included in the box. The device is connected to the PC via the parallel port. It contains simple vibration sensing electronics so that the player can simulate playing a guitar by strumming it along a tennis racket, a baseball bat or just the thigh. Virtual Music also sold a more realistic virtual guitar device that could be connected to the computer's serial port. Additional
    9.00
    5 votes
    10

    Vib-Ribbon

    Vib-Ribbon (ビブリボン, Vibu Ribon) is a video game for Sony PlayStation. Developed by Masaya Matsuura (the former leader of the Japanese "Hyper Pop Unit" PSY S) and his NanaOn-Sha company, and released in Japan in 1999. The game was released in Europe the following year and was additionally re-released in Japan under the PlayStation the Best and PSone Books greatest hits lines in 2000 and 2001 respectively. Vib-Ribbon is a rhythm video game in the style of PaRappa the Rapper and Amplitude. The game was unique in that the software loaded into RAM, letting the player use any music CD to play against; the game could generate a unique level from any track. The graphics for Vib-Ribbon are simple, consisting of straight, white vector lines forming crude, angular drawings of the level and the character, a female rabbit named Vibri. The objective of the game is to guide Vibri along a ribbon filled with obstacles corresponding to the song being played. Pressing the correct buttons at the right time will let Vibri pass unscathed. Failing to do so multiple times will eventually result in Vibri degenerating from a rabbit into a frog, then a worm, and finally perishing for good. If 18 obstacles are
    8.80
    5 votes
    11

    3DDX

    Dance Station 3DDX, usually abbreviated to 3DDX, is a rhythm video game developed by NGG (Next Generation Games) Entertainment, a Korean game producer company established in May 2000. Players of this game use their feet to step on arrows as well as their hands, arms or legs to activate infrared sensors around the stage. This title has only been released in arcade so far. The 3DDX dance machine is composed by a two side pad connected to the computer hardware and a screen above the main cabinet. Each side of the dance pad has 4 buttons on the corners of the pad and 4 sensors, located to the left, right, front, and back sides of each pad. In contrast with other dancing rhythm games for arcade such as Dance Dance Revolution and Pump It Up, the 3DDX arcade doesn't have support bars to allow more movement in freestyle dancing. On the screen of the machine, arrows corresponding to each one of the buttons and sensors scroll upwards on the background until they reach a stationary set of arrows (often called "receptors") on top of the screen, which indicate the moment when the player must step on the corresponding arrow and/or activate the corresponding sensor. There are 3 main screens in
    9.75
    4 votes
    13

    Singstar: Next Gen

    SingStar is a competitive karaoke game for the PlayStation 3, and is a follow-up to the PlayStation 2 SingStar series. SingStar is developed by SCE London Studio and published by Sony Computer Entertainment. This is the first singstar game for the PS3. Unlike most previous SingStar games, SingStar for the PlayStation 3 features the ability to remove vocals. The songs feature the original music artist, and can be adapted from a single track master as with previous versions. SingStar then attempts to digitally remove the vocals from the track. The game will also allow users to fade out the vocal track once it detects the user singing, and return it if the user stops. The technology is unable to work on some songs due to the way they were mixed during recording. The game shipped with 30 songs on disc, with the ability to download more songs from the online SingStore. The SingStore initially launched with 41 songs, including selected songs from the PS2 back catalogue, with more songs to be added regularly. The downloads feature the entire music video, and are in high definition where available. My SingStar Online is the online component of SingStar. The idea for My SingStar Online was
    6.83
    6 votes
    14
    7.80
    5 votes
    15

    EJay

    eJay is a series of musical arrangement software and games, primarily for Microsoft Windows. The first edition, Dance eJay, was released in 1997, supports eight tracks of audio and, as with its successors, permits the arrangement of sound bites by a drag-and-drop interface. Since the original Dance eJay, there have been many releases catering to different music genres and users, including techno and hip-hop as well as a PlayStation 2 edition. In May 2009, a note posted to eJay's official Facebook page stated that Empire Interactive Europe Limited, the company that owned and developed the eJay products, was in Administration. "The intellectual property, or the 'rights' to sell eJay products are now owned by a different company. Only this new owner can legally produce eJay products or licence other people to do so. They do not have to provide support, and they would probably not be in a position to do so in any case.". On 15 October 2010, three eJay products were reissued in editions: Hip Hop 5, Dance 6 and DJ Mixstation 4, with Hip Hop 5 and Dance 6 now having twice the number of sound samples than they had originally (10,000 instead of 5,000). Also on the same date, a new software
    9.00
    4 votes
    16
    Dance Dance Immolation

    Dance Dance Immolation

    Dance Dance Immolation is an interactive performance piece by fire art group Interpretive Arson based out of the artist work space known as NIMBY in East Oakland. It is a modified version of Dance Dance Revolution where players are shot with fire if they perform poorly. Participants are not harmed since they wear a fire proximity suit with forced-air respirators. Numerous other safeguards are built into the system to ensure the players are not subject to direct flame exposure or inhalation of superheated air. The piece was premiered in 2005 and has since run at various festivals and private events internationally. Members of Interpretive Arson began the project in 2005, when they received a grant from BORG2, an offshoot of artists associated with the West Coast art festival Burning Man. The game first premiered at the The Crucible's Fire Arts Festival in Oakland, California, before the current version, a full two-player game, was completed and installed at Burning Man in 2005. The game reappeared at Burning Man, and occasionally in Interpretive Arson's warehouse in Oakland, until 2007. In 2010, Guinness World Records 2010 Gamer's Edition listed Dance Dance Immolation as the
    6.67
    6 votes
    17

    Guitar Hero

    • Input Method: Guitar Hero Guitar
    Guitar Hero is a music video game developed by Harmonix Music Systems and published by RedOctane for the PlayStation 2 video game console. It is the first entry in the Guitar Hero series. Guitar Hero was released on November 8, 2005 in North America, April 7, 2006 in Europe and June 15, 2006 in Australia. The game's development was a result of collaboration between RedOctane and Harmonix to bring a GuitarFreaks-like game to America. The game features a guitar-shaped controller (resembling a miniature Gibson SG) that the player uses to simulate playing rock music. The gameplay is similar to GuitarFreaks, in that the player presses buttons on the guitar controller in time with musical notes that scroll on the game screen. The game features covers of 30 popular rock songs spanning five decades of rock, from the 1960s up through 2005, in addition to bonus tracks. Guitar Hero became a surprise hit, earning critical acclaim and winning many awards from major video game publications, and was considered one of the most influential games of the first decade of the 21st century. The game's success launched the Guitar Hero franchise, which has earned more than $2 billion in sales, spawning
    7.60
    5 votes
    18

    Donkey Konga 3

    • Input Method: DK Bongos
    Donkey Konga 3 (ドンキーコンガ3 食べ放題!春もぎたて50曲♪, Donkī Konga Surī - Tabe-houdai! Haru Mogitate 50 Kyoku, Donkey Konga 3: All You Can Eat! Spring 50 Song Mix) is a music video game in the Donkey Kong series by Nintendo and Namco. Before the second installment was released in North America, Nintendo and Namco had already started plans for the third game in the series, which was eventually released in Japan in early 2005. It features all new songs and mini-games. Donkey Konga 3 features a total of 57 songs, over 20 songs more than the first two games. 35 of these tunes are the usual classical, pop, and game selections, but an extra 21 tunes from Nintendo Famicom games are included. Unlike the previous Donkey Konga games, Donkey Konga 3 was only released in Japan.
    8.75
    4 votes
    19

    Music Catch

    Music Catch is a music game available for the iOS, Mac OS X, and Windows platforms by Reflexive Entertainment. The fairly simple gameplay is centered around catching, with the cursor, different colored falling shapes that appear on screen in sync with the music playing in the background; shapes of some colors grant extra points while touching red notes incurs penalties. Music Catch has attained great popularity among flash gaming sites such as Kongregate. The song featured in the online version is titled "Before Dawn" and was written by Music Catch's developer, Isaac Shepard. In addition to being playable for free on the web, Reflexive Entertainment has also released a downloadable version that is available for purchase. The downloadable version of Music Catch includes the ability to play along to any MP3 in the user's library. Shepard has stated that this was his original intent all along, but the online version could not accommodate this feature, hence work began on the downloadable version. In May 2009, a version of Music Catch was released for the iOS. A sequel to the game, Music Catch 2, has also been released online.
    6.50
    6 votes
    20

    Cool Cool Jam

    Cool Cool Jam is a rhythm video game which appeared on the Neo Geo Pocket Color in 2000. Cool Cool Jam is comparable in gameplay to other rhythm games such as: PaRappa the Rapper, Donkey Konga or Beatmania. The storyline involves a boy and a girl who are transported 1,000 years into the future. To return home they must form a successful and popular music band. The game can be played by one or two players. In two player mode the game plays like a duet; the players take it in turn to play tune and receive a message after completion. The game also features a single player storymode which has adventure game elements. Various instruments can be played in the game. Each instrument has a different playing style. The instruments include: Clapping to a beat - a bar moves across the screen the player taps a button when they see a red dot. If successful the dot glows. Violin - The player taps either the A or B when a red light (button A) or a green light (button B) appears. The power can be altered by moving the joystick up and down. Bluesharp - The player moves the joystick to coincide with the position of the lights. The player then pushes A or B depending whether a red or green light
    7.40
    5 votes
    21

    IS - internal section

    iS: internal section (イズ ~インターナル・セクション~) is a video game developed by Positron and published by Square and released in 1999. In the same vein of gameplay as Tempest 2000, iS: internal section is a tube shooter, a type of shoot 'em up where the player controls a ship "looking down" a long tunnel or tube, and the player can move around inside the cylinder, shooting enemies that it runs into while moving. It is an experimental project that responds to its 16 built-in tracks, or even your own music from a CD.
    7.40
    5 votes
    22

    Lego Rock Band

    Lego Rock Band is a music video game and part of the Rock Band series developed by Harmonix Music Systems, but also incorporates elements from other Lego video games as developed by Traveller's Tales. The game is published by Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment and MTV Games. The game was released on November 3, 2009 for Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, and Wii home consoles in the United States. A Nintendo DS version was also developed in conjunction with Backbone Entertainment. The game, as with other games in the Rock Band series, allows up to four players to use instrument controllers to play lead and bass guitar, drums, and vocals on a number of rock music songs. In addition, aspects of building with Lego bricks are incorporated into the game, allowing players to customize their avatars and other band assistants, and include additional Lego-themed gameplay modes. The gameplay and the game's 45-song soundtrack has been selected to create a "family-friendly" game. Players are able to export the songs from the game into other Rock Band titles, while existing and future downloadable content that passes family-friendly filters can be incorporated into the game; however, songs released
    7.40
    5 votes
    23

    Guitar Hero

    The Guitar Hero series (sometimes referred to as the Hero series) is a series of music video games first published in 2005 by RedOctane and Harmonix Music Systems, and distributed by Activision, in which players use a guitar-shaped game controller to simulate playing lead, bass guitar, and rhythm guitar across numerous rock music songs. Players match notes that scroll on-screen to colored fret buttons on the controller, strumming the controller in time to the music in order to score points, and keep the virtual audience excited. The games attempt to mimic many features of playing a real guitar, including the use of fast-fingering hammer-ons and pull-offs and the use of the whammy bar to alter the pitch of notes. Most games support single player modes, typically a Career mode to play through all the songs in the game, and both competitive and cooperative multiplayer modes. With the introduction of Guitar Hero World Tour in 2008, the game includes support for a four-player band including vocals and drums. The series initially used mostly cover version of songs created by WaveGroup Sound, but most recent titles feature soundtracks that are fully master recordings, and in some cases,
    8.50
    4 votes
    24

    PopStar Guitar

    PopStar Guitar is a music game for the Wii and PlayStation 2. In PopStar Guitar, players embark on a journey as a budding guitarist with aspirations of becoming the ultimate pop music sensation. Throughout the game, players develop skills to help them achieve their goal of success on the main stage of a worldwide Battle of the Bands competition, which will bring them international stardom. The career mode will see the player starting as a member of a garage band before touring across the 25 different in game venues before performing at the Battle Of The Bands. The game features 12 playable characters (6 male/6 female) to choose from, and players are able to customize their look and the instruments they play. The game is played similar to other music games with players trying to press buttons as they follow scrolling notes onscreen. The PlayStation 2 version supports guitar controllers for play, while the Wii version will come packaged with one AirG controller shell allowing players to play air guitar-style using only the Wii Remote and Nunchuk. The game features a line-up of 60 songs, which includes original mastered tracks from pop and rock artists. These songs include: IGN called
    7.20
    5 votes
    25

    Stepping Selection

    Stepping Selection is a rhythm game published on March 4, 2000 by Jaleco for the PlayStation 2. It is only available in Japan. The game features popular songs, but uses shortened cover versions of them instead of the original recording. A video loosely related to the song accompanies each of them. On release, Famitsu magazine scored the PlayStation 2 version of the game a 32 out of 40.
    8.25
    4 votes
    26

    Lips

    Lips is a video game for the Xbox 360. Lips was developed by iNiS and published by Microsoft Game Studios. The game features the use of motion sensitive wireless microphones and supports the use of songs already owned through a Zune or iPod. The game was released on November 18, 2008 in North America and on November 21, 2008 in Europe and has received generally average reviews. Localized versions of the game have been released in several countries, each with a different soundtrack. On April 3, it was announced that the Lips' microphones will be compatible with Rock Band 2 and Guitar Hero: Metallica due to a patch that was released in summer 2009. The gameplay in Lips is similar to the gameplay of SingStar and Karaoke Revolution. In addition to supporting single-player, the game allows two players to sing duets or play competitively in various multiplayer modes including "Time Bomb", "Kiss", and "Vocal Fighters". Unlike most other music games, players cannot fail out of a song if they sing badly (or even if they don't sing at all). The game does not have a difficulty setting but rewards players for their singing in six categories including rhythm, pitch, and vibrato. Players can
    9.33
    3 votes
    27

    Traxxpad

    Traxxpad is a music application for Sony's PlayStation Portable developed by Definitive Studios and published by Eidos Interactive. It was released June 26, 2007. Traxxpad is a portable music studio featuring a sequencer, drum machine, and keyboard for the creation of music tracks. It features a library of over 1000 sound samples for use, and allows users to record their own samples using a microphone for the PSP. Traxxpad uses Real Time Interactive Sequencing Technology (or RTIST) to create patterns from samples either in real-time or a step at a time. The MELOD mode allows users to modify the pitch of samples using a keyboard-like interface. The Studio Through a Console (or STAC) mode allows users to use patterns made in RTIST and put them together. When finished, you are able to export it to a memory stick or share it with others through an ad hoc network.
    9.33
    3 votes
    28

    Vib-Ripple

    Vib-Ripple (ビブリップル, Viburippuru) is a video game for the PlayStation 2 created by Masaya Matsuura and his studio NanaOn-Sha. It is the sequel to the 1999 PlayStation game Vib-Ribbon. It was released in Japan in 2004, but never published in any other markets. Vib-Ripple is notable for allowing the player to import photographs to be used as the game's playing field. The player takes control of Vibri, the simple, vector-shaped rabbit from the game's predecessor Vib-Ribbon. The game puts the player on top of various photographs, using each one as trampoline. Jumping on a photograph loosens up 2D items called "Peta Characters," which Vibri must collect before a time limit expires. An icon on the left side of the screen gives the player a hint as to what part of the photograph to jump on to find the item; the icon's color, shape, and size corresponds to a certain combination of the three on the photograph. When Vibri is close enough to the item, a drumming sound is made and the controller vibrates. Other than the time limit, Vibri must avoid creatures called "Boonchies" that inhabit the surface of the picture. Coming in contact with a Boonchie will cause Vibri to de-evolve from a rabbit,
    9.33
    3 votes
    29

    Doogi doogi

    Doogi doogi is a drumming arcade game that uses an actual drumset. It is a rhythm game where the player must play the actual drums to different songs. It is produced by a Korean company named Doogi Doogi Co. Ltd.
    8.00
    4 votes
    30

    StepMania

    StepMania is a cross-platform rhythm video game and engine. It was originally developed as a simulator of Konami's arcade game series Dance Dance Revolution, and has since evolved into an extensible rhythm game engine capable of supporting a variety of rhythm-based game types. Released under the MIT License, StepMania is open source free software. Several video game series, including In the Groove and Pump It Up Pro use StepMania as their game engine. StepMania was included in a video game exhibition at New York's Museum of the Moving Image in 2005. StepMania was originally developed as an open source port of Konami's arcade game series Dance Dance Revolution (DDR), and was able to import DDR PC's file format. During the first three major versions, the Interface was based heavily on DDR's. Development of StepMania branched out in Version 4.0, with two versions being developed concurrently. The CVS version is based on a 2006 build of StepMania, better known as 3.95. StepMania creator Chris Danford later forked the CVS build and called it StepMania 4 beta. Beginning with the announcement of this beta, StepMania's CVS/SVN fork was unofficially branded by the StepMania community as
    5.83
    6 votes
    31

    BBBeat

    BBBeat is an audio game designed for the visually impaired. As such it has no video display. The player wears a pair of headphones and must use sound to locate a bee and then swat it. Sensors attached to the wrist indicate whether or not the "bee" was swatted. The game was developed by Makato Ohuchi at Tohoku Fukushi University in Japan.
    7.75
    4 votes
    32

    JamLegend

    JamLegend was an online, browser-based music video game, similar to Guitar Hero. As of April 29, 2011, JamLegend ceased all of its activity and closed the site. A list of the artists that contributed has been kept on the front page of the website. JamLegend was created by Andrew Lee, Arjun Lall, and Ryan Wilson in 2008. The company participated in the LaunchBox Digital 2008 summer cycle. The game was in private beta from August 2008 to December 2008 when the players needed invitations to access the game. On December 4, 2008, JamLegend became open-beta so players no longer needed invitations to register. In March 2009, JamLegend reached 5 million plays. In July 2009, JamLegend reached Version 1, releasing new features. On 29 April 2011, FooBrew announced that JamLegend will be closing to "move on to new ventures". From the 18th April 2011, VIP memberships could no longer be purchased, and on April 28 all user data was deleted. Users with leftover JamCash or months of VIP membership past May 27, 2011 may be eligible for a refund due to the closure. To find out more and to see if they qualify for a refund, gamers could go to the refund section of the website, which however currently
    7.75
    4 votes
    33

    Raycatcher

    Raycatcher is a music video game that is distributed via Valve's Steam service. Gameplay in Raycatcher is determined by music that the player inputs in MP3 format. An in-game algorithm determines level-structure by synchronizing with the music. The objective of the game is to rotate various clustered shapes to match beams of light that form the target pattern. Correctly matched patterns will allow the clusters of shapes to grow and the cluster will evolve. This is the fundamental basis of the game.
    7.75
    4 votes
    34

    Aero Guitar

    Aero Guitar is a WiiWare game developed by Yudo. It was released only in Japan on September 30, 2008 for 800 Wii Points. Similar to other music games, the player shakes their Wii Remote in time to onscreen symbols.
    9.00
    3 votes
    35
    Lumines Live!

    Lumines Live!

    Lumines Live! is a puzzle game based on the original PlayStation Portable game for the Xbox 360. It was released on October 18, 2006 as an Xbox Live Arcade title. The gameplay in Lumines Live! is very similar to the gameplay in Lumines, Lumines II, and Lumines Plus. As a block-dropping game, its look and basic gameplay is similar to Columns and Tetris, although the music and visuals are far more important to this game. A 2 x 2 square (an O tetromino) made of four smaller block pieces is dropped into the playing field. The small blocks that comprise the larger blocks will be one of two different colors. The player makes the blocks disappear by rotating their component block orientation and using the D-Pad to form four matching colored blocks into a square. A vertical "timeline" periodically sweeps horizontally across the field and removes such squares. Unmatched blocks pile up, and the game ends when the pile gets too tall. When part of a falling block hits an obstruction, the unobstructed portion of the block will split off and continue to fall. Lumines Live! is played in different "skins". Like software interface skins, these change the visual appearance of the board, but they
    9.00
    3 votes
    36

    Space Channel 5: Part 2

    Space Channel 5: Part 2 (スペースチャンネル5 パート2, Supēsu Chaneru Faibu Pāto Tsū) is the sequel to the rhythm action game Space Channel 5, developed by United Game Artists and published by Sega. It was released on the Dreamcast (Japan only) and the PlayStation 2. It was released in Japan on February 14, 2002, Europe in February 12, 2003 (although it was not released in the United Kingdom) and in North America as part of special edition package with the first game on November 18, 2003. With its improved graphics, greater variety, and longer campaign, Part 2 is generally regarded as superior to its predecessor. However, it is much less well known than the original Space Channel 5 due to its belated and limited release outside of Japan. An HD version of Part 2 was included in Dreamcast Collection, which was released for Xbox 360 and PC on February 22, 2011 in North America and February 25, 2011 in Europe. It was released on Steam on March 5, 2011, for PlayStation Network on October 4, 2011, and for Xbox Live Arcade October 5, 2011. The story follows Ulala as she faces off against a new group of enemies called the Rhythm Rogues (known as the Odori-dan in Japanese), led by the mysterious Purge
    9.00
    3 votes
    37

    Gunpey

    Gunpey and Gunpey DS are a pair of puzzle games for the Nintendo DS and Sony PlayStation Portable handheld video game console. It is based on a video game of the same name that appeared on the Wonderswan handheld. The game was named as a tribute to the developer of the game, Gunpei Yokoi. He is also the designer of the Wonderswan and Nintendo's Game Boy system. The DS and the PSP versions are essentially the same, but each of them have something unique about them. Lines of four various angles, namely a caret, inverted caret, left slash, and right slash, scroll towards the top of the screen in a five column wide playing field. The player may slide the line fragments only vertically, either to move them or switch them with another segment. The objective is to assemble an unbroken line from the left side of the screen to the right. After doing so, the line will glow and there will be a few seconds for the player to augment the line with additional branching segments to achieve a combo bonus. A large bonus is awarded when all of the line segments are cleared from the playing field. The rate at which the new pieces scroll up from the bottom increases as the levels go on, and the game
    6.60
    5 votes
    38

    Wacky Worlds

    Wacky Worlds Creativity Studio is a children's video game for the Mega Drive/Genesis, released in the mid-1990s. In it, the player has a choice of six different Wacky Worlds in which they can place animated "stickers", creating a diorama using two-dimensional computer graphics. Among the Worlds are an underwater scene, a scene inside a house, a jungle, and the Moon. The user is also able to alter the music played in each world by selecting from a bank of different music stickers. It is considered the sequel to Sega's Art Alive. The stickers are available in certain sticker books assigned for the Wacky Worlds. Each World has its own default book, but each of the other sticker books are available for use anytime as well. The same applies for the music stickers, as music from other worlds can be chosen to be played anywhere. Many of the stickers are people or characters that can move around in each world. Their movements are preprogrammed and do not stray very far from their original placement. When a sticker is first placed, it moves very little, if at all. When clicked on, it will perform its action until clicked again, at which time it reverts to its more dormant state. The player
    6.60
    5 votes
    39

    O2Jam

    O2Jam (Korean: 오투잼) is an online casual rhythm video game developed in South Korea by O2Media. There were agencies in many countries and regions, but as of 2012 it was only available in South Korea and was published by Nowcom. On 30 May 2012, Nowcom shut down the O2JAM server. Playing the game is divided between finding a room to play in, selecting a song, and playing a song. There are music-halls, technically servers, on which a user can play in. Some music-halls are named after the muses in Greek mythology. There are 3 servers in the Korean version of O2Jam: Melpomin (Melpomin), Kalliope and Kleo (Clio). There are also three servers: Kalliope, Kleo and Thalia. All three are free to use, although about half of the songs cost money to play. Each server works under song level restrictions. Before Thalia was introduced, in Kalliope, only songs level 15 and below could be played, while Kleo allowed all songs above level 13. As of 09/08/06, O2Jam has all three servers: Kalliope, which is now a level 1-13 song restriction, Thalia, a level 7-19 restriction, and Kleo, which remains the same. There were six servers in O2Jam, all of which were free-to-play. These were Euta, Thalo, Kalliope,
    7.50
    4 votes
    40

    The Jungle Book Groove Party

    The Jungle Book Groove Party, known in North America as The Jungle Book Rhythm N'Groove is a music video game produced by Ubisoft for the PlayStation and PlayStation 2. Featuring similar gameplay to the Dance Dance Revolution series, the game features characters and songs from Disney's The Jungle Book. The game was packaged with a dance pad and released in Europe on November 17, 2000 and in North America on December 8, 2000. The Jungle Book Groove Party loosely follows the story of The Jungle Book film, going through Mowgli's journey to the Man Village and the creatures he encounters along the way. The game is played in the style of Dance Dance Revolution with some differences, and can played with either a standard controller or a dance pad. Arrows come down the top of the screen and the player must step on the corresponding arrow in time to the music. Missing arrows cause the fruit at the top of the screen to turn yellow and disappear, with the game ending if all pieces of fruit are lost. Power-ups can be activated by entering input commands in between arrows. These range from beneficial bonuses, such as point multipliers or automatically clearing arrows, to offensive items that
    7.50
    4 votes
    41
    GuitarFreaks

    GuitarFreaks

    GuitarFreaks (ギターフリークス) is a music video game series produced by Konami. It is a rhythm game where the player uses a controller to simulate the playing of an electric guitar. The game consists of music predominantly from the rock music, rock and roll and J-pop genres. It is considered one of the most influential video games of all time, for having laid the foundations for popular guitar-based rhythm games, such as the Guitar Hero series. The game is now in its nineteenth version, GuitarFreaks V8, which was released in March 28, 2011. It was speculated to be the final release of GuitarFreaks V. A spin-off series, GuitarFreaks XG was released in Japanese arcades on March 10, 2010 , which added two more buttons to the fret bar. A sequel, GuitarFreaks XG2, was released on March 9, 2011. Another sequel, GuitarFreaks XG3, was released on Feb. 23, 2012 GuitarFreaks is played using a controller designed to imitate the shape of an electric guitar, most like the Fender Jazzmaster or Fender Mustang. The neck houses three buttons, colored red, green, and blue. On the main face of the guitar, a pick lever is used to simulate the picking and strumming of an actual guitar. A small metal knob near
    8.67
    3 votes
    42

    The Beatles: Rock Band

    The Beatles: Rock Band is a 2009 music video game developed by Harmonix Music Systems, published by MTV Games, and distributed by Electronic Arts. It is the third major console release in the Rock Band music video game series, in which players can simulate the playing of rock music by using controllers shaped like musical instruments. The Beatles: Rock Band is the first band-centric game in the series, and it is centered on the popular English rock group The Beatles. The game had proved to be a huge sales success with multi millions of units sold in its first year. The game features virtual portrayals of the four band members performing the songs throughout the band's history, including depictions of some of their famous live performances, as well as a number of "dreamscape" sequences for songs from the Abbey Road Studios recording sessions during the group's studio years. The game's soundtrack consists of 45 Beatles songs; additional songs and albums by The Beatles were made available for the game as downloadable content. The game was released internationally on 9 September 2009, coinciding with the release of new, remastered compact disc versions of The Beatles albums. It
    8.67
    3 votes
    43

    Tuneland

    Tuneland is a musical children's computer game, produced in 1993 by a division of 7th Level, Kids' World Entertainment. The cartoon video game follows the character Little Howie, who is voiced by the television personality Howie Mandel on an adventure around Old McDonald's Farm. Tuneland was followed by the Lil' Howie series: Lil' Howie's Great Word Adventure, Lil' Howie's Great Math Adventure, and Lil' Howie's Great Reading Adventure. The series has won 36 awards. The eight locations in the game are the barnyard, the farmhouse, the barn, the pond, grandma's house, the train station, the mountain, and the valley. The game contains around 40 songs, which are primarily nursery rhymes. These include "Old MacDonald", "Turkey in the Straw, "Three Blind Mice", "I'm a Little Teapot", "Itsy Bitsy Spider" and "Bingo". The CD can also be used as an audio disk or with the built in Jukebox to listen to the songs featured in the game. Tuneland's cast features a large number of musicians including the Doobie Brothers' Jeff "Skunk" Baxter and Pink Floyd's David Gilmour on guitars. Jon Anderson from Yes provides some vocals and Scott Page of Supertramp performs on the soundtrack for the
    8.67
    3 votes
    44

    Kaikan Phrase: Datenshi Kourin

    Kaikan Phrase: Datenshi Kourin is a music videogame for Sony PlayStation, released in Japan only. The game was developed by Produce and published by Enix in 2000. The plot is based on Kaikan Phrase anime series, which tell us about the japanese rock group reaching the fame and popularity. Gameplay is similar to such games as Bust a Groove or PaRappa the Rapper. The main characters are five members of Λucifer:
    10.00
    2 votes
    45

    All-Star Cheer Squad

    All Star Cheer Squad is a rhythm video game developed by Gorilla Systems Corp for the Wii and Nintendo DS. It was released on October 27, 2008. The Wii version is one of several Wii games to use the Wii Balance Board. The game is THQ’s "first original property created specifically for girls". The game follows a year in the life of a cheerleader as they learn new cheers, participate in practices and create their own routines to make the squad and eventually become captain. On the Wii, the Wii Remote and Nunchuk, along with the Balance Board can be used to perform cheer and dance moves. Cheerleading choreographer Tony G of Bring It On fame acted as chief consultant to the game.
    7.25
    4 votes
    46
    Lumines

    Lumines

    Lumines (ルミネス, Ruminesu) is a puzzle video game based on sound and light patterns. Created by game designer Tetsuya Mizuguchi and his company, Q Entertainment, it was first released as a launch title for the PlayStation Portable in Japan on December 12, 2004 and released in North America on March 23, 2005 and released in Europe on September 1, 2005. As of October 11, 2005, Lumines has sold over half a million units since its original release in Japan. Europe has sold 180,000 units since its release in September 2005, and North America has sold around 300,000 since March while selling 70,000 units In Japan. In September 2005, mobile gamemaker Gameloft announced that they would be bringing both Meteos and Lumines to cell phones. Lumines Mobile was released on March 1, 2006. A port for the PlayStation 2 was released on February 27, 2007 as Lumines Plus. It was also released for PC on the WildGames platform in December 2007 and later on Steam in 2008. In 2009, Lumines Touch was released on the iTunes App Store for iOS devices. The game was followed up by four sequels: Lumines Live! and Lumines II were released in 2006, Lumines Supernova in 2009, and Lumines Electronic Symphony in
    7.25
    4 votes
    47

    Mad Maestro

    Mad Maestro!, known in Japan as Bravo Music (ブラボーミュージック, Burabō Myūjikku), is a classical music rhythm game for the PlayStation 2 (PS2). It was developed by Desert Productions and released in Japan by Sony Computer Entertainment (SCEI) and abroad by Eidos Interactive under their "Fresh Games" label. The game features classical songs, such as Swan Lake, Hungarian Dance No. 5 & 6, and Night on Bald Mountain. Typically rhythm games rely on timed input according to on screen cues and tempo. Mad Maestro features this style of gameplay, with the additional layer of pressure sensitivity. Utilizing the pressure sensitivity with the DualShock 2, the player must conduct an orchestra by tapping correlating buttons with varying degrees of pressure. There are three levels of pressure; light, medium and hard. The Japanese release featured an optional Baton peripheral. On release, Famitsu magazine scored the game a 30 out of 40. The use of pressure sensitivity in addition to standard rhythm game play mechanics was considered by some to be overly complicated. According to Dengeki Online, the Japanese edition of Mad Maestro was the 195th best-selling video game of 2001 at 54,794 copies. Mad
    7.25
    4 votes
    48
    Major Minor's Majestic March

    Major Minor's Majestic March

    Major Minor's Majestic March (メジャマジ・マーチ, Mejamaji Māchi) is a music video game for the Wii. It was created by Parappa the Rapper designer Masaya Matsuura and famous artist Rodney Greenblat. Major Minor’s Majestic March uses the Wii Remote as a mace (a form of baton used exclusively by drum majors) that the drum major, Major Minor, uses to keep tempo, recruit new band members and pick up valuable items. While marching through eight whimsical locations that contain various hair-raising events, Major Minor strives to create the most impressive parade ever. Players can add up to 15 different instruments to their dynamic procession—including brass, woodwinds, and percussion—to alter its composition and resulting performance. Players are then scored on how well their band maintains its rhythm and manages obstacles that could otherwise throw the procession into disarray. The band keeps tempo to more than 25 popular marching band songs from around the world, composed into original medleys for each stage. John Merchant, marketing manager of Majesco Europe has been quoted saying about this game, “There’s something magical about marching bands that truly captures the imagination. The concept
    7.25
    4 votes
    49

    MTV Drumscape

    MTV Drumscape (or Drumscape) is an arcade drum simulation made by Devecka Enterprises. First introduced in 1997, it was designed with the intention of introducing players to music in a fun and interesting way. Drumscape resembles Karaoke for drums and has been set up as a top earning "attraction" in the US and other countries by hundreds of amusement locations such as the Santa Cruz Boardwalk and several Las Vegas Casino game rooms. Production of Drumscape stopped in 2001. A number of celebrity drummers and musicians are pictured on the drumscape website either playing the game or posing with its creators. The player sits in a booth before an array of electronic drum simulation pads. After selecting a song, the player hits the pads with a pair of drumsticks while a time meter counts down. The manufacturers recommend that arcade machines be set to a 2 minute and 15 second play-period costing $1. Unlike other music games, the player's actions are not dictated by a set rhythm displayed onscreen, but rather the player plays as he sees fit. Additionally, Drumscape lacks a scoring system to indicate success or failure of a player. As the player drums, stage lights and crowd cheers are
    7.25
    4 votes
    50
    MusicVR

    MusicVR

    MusicVR is a virtual reality project created and developed by the musician Mike Oldfield. To date it has produced two standalone simulation games and inspired content for some of Oldfield's albums. As of January 2010 Tubular.net hosts the free downloads of the two games. MusicVR set out to be a real-time virtual reality experience combining imagery and music, as a non-violent and essentially a non-goal driven game. In the early 1990s when Oldfield first wanted to create this world, the computers required to render the quality of images he wanted were large and vastly expensive. This prevented the early versions of the game from being released to the public, and although Oldfield had toyed with the idea of touring the game with his own powerful computer, this never happened. It was not just the graphical demands that were restrictive, but also the idea that the game should have 'freedom' and not be restricted to one path. In 1994, Oldfield's album The Songs of Distant Earth, one of the first enhanced CDs, featured a 3D interactive segment, with some ideas similar to MusicVR. This content only works on Apple Mac OS 9 and earlier. Music Virtual Reality (MusicVR) was previously called
    8.33
    3 votes
    51

    Fluid

    Fluid, known in Japan as Depth, is a music video game developed by Sony Computer Entertainment and Opus Corp. for the PlayStation. The game's concept is an interactive sound lab which allows the player to create dance and electronic music. The player uses a dolphin character in 'Cruise Stage' to collect samples for mixing in the 'Groove Editor'. The player goes through many stages in order to unlock more sounds some of which being Abyss Lair and Jungle Reef. Levels can be replayed and selected from the Silent Space, which contains twelve geometric shapes representing the levels "passed". The player starts in the first stage "Peace" and continues through to "Abyss", and ten other levels. Each level contains its own sound set, which can be imported into other levels on completion of the level. The "Groove Editor" allows for in depth manipulation of samples collected. Several tracks can be mixed at once, controlling speed, pitch, frequency and modulation with a series of coloured crystals. Mixes can be saved to memory card, and then played during levels. Controlling the dolphin allowed the player to add improvisations during the playback sessions, frequency being mapped to the up/
    9.50
    2 votes
    52

    Guitar Hero III: Legends of Rock

    • Input Method: Guitar Hero Guitar
    Guitar Hero III: Legends of Rock is a music video game, the third main installment in the Guitar Hero series, and the fourth title overall. The game was published by Activision and RedOctane, and is the first game in the series to be developed by Neversoft, after Activision's acquisition of RedOctane and MTV Games' purchase of Harmonix Music Systems, the previous development studio for the series. The game was released worldwide for the PlayStation 2, PlayStation 3, Wii, and Xbox 360 in October 2007, with Budcat Creations and Vicarious Visions assisting in the PlayStation 2 and Wii ports, respectively. Aspyr Media developed the PC and Mac versions of the game, releasing them later in 2007. Guitar Hero III: Legends of Rock retains the basic gameplay from previous games in the Guitar Hero series, where the player uses a guitar-shaped controller to simulate the playing of lead, bass, and rhythm guitar parts in rock songs by playing in time to scrolling notes on-screen. The game, in addition to existing single-player Career modes, includes a new Co-Op Career mode and competitive challenges that pit the player against in-game characters and other players. Guitar Hero III: Legends of
    9.50
    2 votes
    53

    SingStar

    SingStar is a karaoke video game for the PlayStation 2, published by Sony Computer Entertainment Europe and developed by SCEE and London Studio. SingStar is distributed either as the software alone, or bundled with a pair of USB microphones - one red, one blue. SingStar is compatible with the EyeToy camera, allowing players to see themselves singing. In 2005, SingStar and SingStar Party jointly received the award for originality at the BAFTA Games Awards. SingStar is a karaoke game in which players sing to music videos in order to score points. Players interface with their PS2 via SingStar-brand USB microphones (not compatible with any other game) while a music video plays on screen. Lyrics are shown at the bottom of the screen. SingStar matches a player's song voice to the original track, with players scoring points according to how accurate their singing is. Until the release of the PS3 edition, the game series could only detect pitch. Usually, two players compete simultaneously. Certain modes of SingStar may vary this basic pattern, but the principle is similar throughout. Thus, SingStar is a competitive singing game akin to Karaoke Revolution. Later editions of
    9.50
    2 votes
    54

    The Idolmaster

    The Idolmaster (アイドルマスター, Aidorumasutā, officially romanized as THE iDOLM@STER) is an arcade and console raising simulation game released exclusively in Japan by Namco (now Namco Bandai Games) on July 26, 2005. It was released on the Xbox 360 on January 25, 2007. The game follows the career of a producer who works for the fictional 765 Production studio and has to work with a group of prospective pop idols. An anime adaptation by A-1 Pictures aired from July 7, 2011 to December 23, 2011. At the beginning of a game, the producer types in his or her producer name. This name always ends in "-P". They then select an idol to produce. The producer decide on an idols schedule. They can train their idol, communicate with them, or send them to auditions and events. The Idolm@ster has been credited with making Japan's ratio of sign-ups for Xbox Live compared to the number of consoles sold as the world's highest. Over four times as many Microsoft points were sold on the date of The Idolm@ster 360 release as on the date before it. The Xbox 360 version contains new songs and an additional idol, Miki Hoshii, for the player to work with along with the original idols from the arcade version. On
    9.50
    2 votes
    56

    Daigasso! Band Brothers DX

    Jam with the Band, known in Japan as Daigasso! Band Brothers DX (大合奏!バンドブラザーズDX, Daigassō! Bando Burazāzu DX, lit. Grand Ensemble! Band Brothers DX), is a music video game developed and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo DS handheld game console. It is the sequel to the Japan-exclusive Daigasso! Band Brothers, which was released at the DS' launch. Jam with the Band was released in Japan in June 2008 and in Europe in May 2010. It uses the largest save capacity for a Nintendo DS game at eight megabytes. Its release was accompanied by a Wii Channel for the Wii console called the Live Channel, known in Japan as the Speaker Channel, that allows players to hear the game's sound through their television. It features the character Barbara Bat, who was also in the predecessor. It has been very well received commercially. It sold more than 120,000 copies in Japan in its first four days of release. selling well enough to become the 24th best-selling game of 2008 in Japan, selling approximately 424,477 units. It has also received positive reception. Jam with the Band features more than 60 instruments that can be played. Its gameplay focuses on button input similar to its predecessor, which
    7.00
    4 votes
    57
    Donkey Konga 2

    Donkey Konga 2

    • Input Method: DK Bongos
    Donkey Konga 2 (ドンキーコンガ2, Donkī Konga Tsū) is the 2004 sequel to Donkey Konga for the Nintendo GameCube, a video game where the player must pound on a special, barrel-like controller called the DK Bongos along with a selected song. The main selling point of Donkey Konga 2 is over 30 new songs to play with the Bongos. Other features include slightly improved graphics, the inclusion of some classic Donkey Kong characters and a variety of new minigames.
    7.00
    4 votes
    58

    Frets on Fire

    • Input Method: Guitar Hero Guitar
    Frets on Fire (FoF) is a free, open-source Finnish music video game created by Unreal Voodoo. Players use the keyboard to play along with markers which appear on screen, with the aim to score points, achieve a high point multiplier, and complete a song. Frets on Fire was the winner of the Assembly 2006 game development competition. The game is written in the Python programming language, and is licensed under the GNU General Public License, although the game incorporates other free and open-source code under other licenses. The game's included song files and some internal fonts are proprietary, and their redistribution is not permitted outside of the Frets On Fire executable. Frets on Fire is a video game that imitates the commercial game Guitar Hero. It is playable on Windows, Linux and Mac OS X. The player presses buttons in time to coloured markers, which appear on-screen, the markers are matched with the rhythm of the music. Frets on Fire can be played by using a keyboard by pressing the fret buttons and pick buttons, although there is support for joysticks, meaning that with the appropriate adapter and/or software, various guitar-type controllers can be used as well. Coloured
    7.00
    4 votes
    59

    High School Musical: Makin' the Cut!

    High School Musical: Makin' the Cut! is a video game based on the 2006 television movie High School Musical available for the Nintendo DS. It was featured on Disney 365, airing on Disney Channel, hosted by Chester at the time. The main game's gameplay is a takeoff of the Japanese rhythm game Osu! Tatakae! Ouendan, localized internationally as Elite Beat Agents. Songs are sung by cover artists, and not the original artists. It starts with the gang auditioning for a national music competition. They have problems in between (i.e.: Taylor thinking Chad is cheating on her with Gabriella, while Chad was just scared of heights since the other part of the competition would be held at a high altitude.) There are three different types of Gameplay. Dance, music, and video making showdowns.
    7.00
    4 votes
    60

    Helix

    Helix is a music video game for WiiWare by Ghostfire Games for 1000 Wii Points (and, now that DSiWare has been created, Nintendo Points). The objective of the game is to accurately copy gestures with the Wii Remote to the beat of the music. The game encourages players to use two Wii Remotes to play, and features 26 music tracks from independent musicians. Helix was released on August 25, 2008 in North America and on September 26, 2008 in Europe. The player is required to copy the arm motions of a robot that dances on screen using their Wii Remotes. The player is first shown the motion, and then must perform it afterward, similar to the game simon says. A "Rhythm Track" scrolls across the top of the screen, indicating to the player when it is time for to do the motion. When the robot does a move, a "Move Bar" appears on the Rhythm Track. The Move Bar starts traveling left on the Rhythm Track after it appears. The player must then time their motion so that it is halfway completed by the time the center of the Move Bar passes by the halfway mark of the Rhythm Track. Once completing the motion, if the Move Bar turns green, the player has performed the gesture correctly, if it turns
    8.00
    3 votes
    61
    Keyboardmania

    Keyboardmania

    Keyboardmania (alternately KEYBOARD MANIA, and abbreviated KBM) is a rhythm video game created by the Bemani division of Konami. In this game up to two players use 24-key keyboards to play the piano or keyboard part of a selected song. Notes are represented on-screen by small bars that scroll downward above an image of the keyboard itself. The goal is to play the matching key when a note bar descends to the red play point line. The arcade cabinet has two screens - one for each player. There is also a simulator called DoReMi Mania , which uses *.pms files. However, players can use a midi-to-pms converter to simplify editing. Keyboardmania has three Japanese arcade releases. Keyboardmania 3rdMIX has a linking feature with Drummania 4thMIX/GUITARFREAKS 5thMIX and Drummania 5thMIX/GUITARFREAKS 6thMIX with a dozen songs. Keyboardmania has 2 home versions for PlayStation 2. The Home Version of keyboardmania has Modified controller similar to the Arcade keys. One other notable version is for Windows PCs and it is shipped with the Yamaha EZ-250i Keyboard, which is used to play [Released Q2 2003] .
    8.00
    3 votes
    62

    Ontamarama

    Ontamarama (おんたま♪おんぷ島へん aka Ontama Onputouhen) is a rhythm game published by Atlus for the Nintendo DS. The game uses both of the DS's screens, touch functionality, and the microphone during gameplay. The story revolves around spirits called Ontama, who live on a tropical island and can create music. Ontamarama's gameplay is a combination of games like Dance Dance Revolution and Elite Beat Agents. The player must hit a D-pad direction as it passes through a circle, similar to DDR, but with the stylus. Each arrow has a color and will only register if enough colored energy is stored. To store energy, the player must touch colored Ontama that move across the touch screen. Black Ontama's may appear and block the colored ones, and some Ontama need to be touched twice. Blowing into the microphone allows the player to clear the screen of all Ontama, but this can only be used a limited amount of times. Taking place on a tropical island, the focus of the story are the Ontama spirits. Someone steals the Ontama by hypnotizing the island's people. Beat and Rest, the main characters, are both "Ontamaestros" and they attempt to free the Ontama by battling the islanders in musical
    8.00
    3 votes
    63

    SingStar Queen

    SingStar Queen is a competitive karaoke video game for the PlayStation 3 and PlayStation 2, developed by London Studio and published by Sony Computer Entertainment Europe. The game features the music of rock band Queen. It was released on March 20, 2009 in United Kingdom and on August 4, 2009 in North America. SingStar games require players to sing along with music in order to score points. Players interface with their console via SingStar USB microphones while a music video plays in the background. The pitch players are required to sing is displayed as horizontal grey bars, which function similar to a musical stave, with corresponding lyrics displayed at the bottom of the screen. The game analyses a player's pitch and compares it to the original track, with players scoring points based on how accurate their singing is. Different modes of SingStar may vary this basic pattern, but the principle is similar throughout. SingStar includes a variety of game modes. The standard singing mode allows one or two people to sing simultaneously, either competitively or in a duet. The PlayStation 3 version of the game supports trophies, however older versions of the game will need to go online to
    8.00
    3 votes
    64

    Synthesia

    Synthesia is a video game and piano keyboard trainer for Microsoft Windows and Mac OS X, as well as Linux using Wine, which allows users to play a MIDI keyboard or use a computer keyboard in time to a MIDI file by following on-screen directions, much in the style of Keyboard Mania or Guitar Hero. It was originally named Piano Hero due to the similarity of gameplay with Guitar Hero; however, Activision (the owners of the rights to Guitar Hero) sent a cease and desist to the program's creator, Nicholas Piegdon. The program was originally Windows-only, but after a donation-drive in early 2007, the game was ported to Mac OS X. Synthesia was originally an open source project, but seeing the potential commercial value of the program, Piegdon decided to stop releasing the source code (version 0.6.2), however leaving the most recent open-source release available for download. While the basic functionality is still currently free, a "Learning Pack" key can be purchased to unlock additional features, such as a sheet music display mode. Free Version: MIDI Support:You can play any MIDI file with Synthesia. Online Scoreboard:You can submit your scores online at any pace you play. With Learning
    8.00
    3 votes
    65

    Unity

    Unity was a video game being developed by Jeff Minter and Lionhead Studios for the Nintendo GameCube video game system. It was in development from the beginning of 2003 until its cancellation at the end of 2004. It was to feature Jeff Minter's trademark psychedelic graphical style, meshed with an interactive music component. The music was to be provided by someone who was well known and appropriate for the game's style, but the participant was never revealed. Unity was so highly anticipated that the UK games magazine Edge featured it on its front cover, with a full 8 page preview in the same issue. However, the project slipped off the release schedules soon after.
    8.00
    3 votes
    66

    Moondust

    Moondust is a 1983 generative music video game created for the Commodore 64 by virtual reality pioneer, Jaron Lanier. Moondust was programmed in 6502 assembly in 1982, and is widely considered the first art video game. Moondust is also considered to be the first interactive music publication, and it sold quite successfully. With the profits from Moondust and additional funding from Marvin Minsky, Lanier formed VPL which would later go on to create the DataGlove and the DataSuit and to become one of the primary innovators of virtual-reality research and development throughout the 1980s. Moondust's gameplay is characterized by graphical complexity, and the game features an abstract ambient score. The goal of the game is to guide a spaceman around the screen creating strange patterns and getting bullet-shaped spaceships to pass through the trails that the spaceman creates. The in-game scoring system assigns point-values according to an algorithm. The game has been compared to the works of Jeff Minter. Additionally, Moondust has frequently been used as an art installation piece in museums, and by Lanier and others in papers and lectures as an example to demonstrate the unexpected
    6.75
    4 votes
    67

    Moero! Nekketsu Rhythm Damashii Osu! Tatakae! Ouendan 2

    Moero! Nekketsu Rhythm Damashii: Osu! Tatakae! Ouendan 2 (燃えろ!熱血リズム魂 押忍!闘え!応援団2, Moero! Nekketsu Rizumu-damashii Osu! Tatakae! Ōendan Tsū, lit. "Burn! Hot-Blooded Rhythm Spirit: Hey! Fight! Cheer Squad 2") is a rhythm video game developed by iNiS and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo DS handheld video game console. It is the third game to use its gameplay, and is the sequel to Osu! Tatakae! Ouendan while incorporating many of the improvements in gameplay made in Elite Beat Agents. The game has 4-player wireless play, supports the Nintendo DS Rumble Pak accessory, and was released in Japan on May 17, 2007. Moero! Nekketsu Rhythm Damashii follows more or less the storyline from the original Osu! Tatakae! Ouendan, and is set roughly six years after the original game based on the game manual and the age differences of returning characters. Players act as the leader of a three-person cheerleading squad. Whenever someone is stressed out or backed into a corner, all they need to do is shout "Ouendan!" (Japanese for "Cheer Squad"). Then, the Ouendan appear (usually out of a place like a closet or waiting there while eating ramen) and use cheering and dance to help that someone through
    9.00
    2 votes
    68

    UmJammer Lammy

    UmJammer Lammy (ウンジャマ・ラミー, Un Jama Ramī) is a rhythm video game developed by NanaOn-Sha and published by Sony for the PlayStation video game console in 1999. It is a follow up to 1996's PaRappa the Rapper. On September 1, 2009, the ESRB rated the game for release on the PlayStation Network for PlayStation 3 and PSP; the game was released on the PlayStation Network on September 30, 2009. Like the original PaRappa game, Um Jammer Lammy features the hand-drawn, paper-thin characters of Rodney Alan Greenblat. Improvements include multiplayer mode, higher-quality cutscenes, and character lip-sync. In a joint creation with Namco, Sony of Japan released an arcade version of UmJammer Lammy which features updated visuals and a differing song list. Furthermore, similar to Konami's Guitar Freaks series, the game boasts a guitar-shaped specialty controller which gives the player a better sensation of playing a real guitar. The game revolves around a shy lamb named Lammy, a southpaw guitarist of a rock band named MilkCan, alongside bassist and vocalist Katy Kat and drummer Ma-san. Although normally a nervous wreck, Lammy becomes much more confident once she has a guitar in hand. On the night
    9.00
    2 votes
    69
    Beatmania

    Beatmania

    Beatmania (ビートマニア) (styled as beatmania) is a rhythm video game developed and distributed by Japanese game developer Konami and first released in December 1997. It contributed largely to the boom of music games in 1998, and the series expanded not only with arcade sequels, but also moved to home consoles and other portable devices, achieving a million unit sales. The Bemani line of music games from Konami is named after the series, and was first adopted in the arcade release of Beatmania 3rdMix and kept ever since. The series came to an end with the last game being Beatmania The Final, released in 2002. Beatmania gave birth to several spinoffs, such as the Beatmania IIDX series (a more advanced version featuring 7-keys and higher difficulty levels) and the other being Beatmania III, a remake of the 5-key series which featured a more modern hardware platform, a pedal for optional effects and a 3.5" floppy disk drive to save play records. While the series was never ported to the computer, there have been unlicensed hard-drive copies which made it playable on a computer's keyboard, or even with a modded PlayStation controller. Its popularity led to non-official simulators, with one of
    7.67
    3 votes
    70

    Guitar Praise

    Guitar Praise is a Christian rhythm video game for PC. Published by Digital Praise, it uses contemporary Christian music with gameplay akin to that of the Guitar Hero and Rock Band games, although it is only compatible with its own wired and cordless USB guitar controllers. A second guitar can be connected for two-player mode. The games can be played on a computer running Microsoft Windows or Mac OS X. While the game does not contain a mode for vocals, it does display the song's lyrics on-screen during the song. It also supports online leaderboards but the website is currently down. Guitar Praise was developed in response to the popularity of the Guitar Hero and Rock Band franchises, popular demand directly received by CEO Tom Bean via emails, and as a follow-up to Dance Praise—a dance game focused on Contemporary Christian music which proved successful within its market. As with Dance Praise, Guitar Praise was designed to be a family-oriented game and provide a "positive experience" for all players. As a result of this mandate, its soundtrack consists of primarily Christian rock music with no offensive content, and the game additionally does not feature any animated avatars for
    7.67
    3 votes
    71

    Rhyme Rider Kerorican

    Rhyme Rider Kerorican (ライムライダー・ケロリカン) is a music video game in the style of Vib-Ribbon, an earlier game developed by the same studio. The game's plot is quite simple involving the adventures of Kerorican, a female astronaut wearing kemonomimi-style frog-helmet, as she walks along accompanied by jazzy techno music. As Kerorican continues her walk, she encounters more and more enemies and obstacles. Kerorican must jump, duck, kick aside, or otherwise dodge these obstacles to progress and as she does so, the actions she takes add notes to the song such that the player's actions results in a generative melody. By successfully clearing strings of obstacles, Kerorican's combo count increases and this can result in a reward to the player of a crown that acts to skip the player over obstacles. The game has been criticized for difficulty of gameplay as timing and tricky button combinations often result in the player's death. The game also only contains 4 levels so replayability-value has also been considered a negative factor.
    7.67
    3 votes
    72

    Traxion

    Traxion was a rhythm game for the PlayStation Portable by British developer Kuju Entertainment. It was scheduled to be released in Q4 2006 by LucasArts, but was cancelled in January 2007. The game was to feature a number of minigames, and would support imported songs from the player's own library as well as the game's bundled collection. The game was received well at E3 2006, with Wired calling it "the best thing they had on the show floor". The game combined music and puzzles by allowing players to user their own MP3s, stored on a memory stick, as the basis for more than 20 puzzles. From your music collection, the game created 24 minigames around the audio. The style and pace of each game would vary depending on the rhythm of the song and the genre of the song. The background and objects in the game were changed by the game engine to match the songs. The game would have also come with a couple of tracks. One of the minigames developed before cancellation was one where the player had to hit notes in time with the music. In another, a cooking minigame, food flies at a chef in time to the music, and the player must control the chef to prepare the food, also in time with the
    7.67
    3 votes
    73
    Bust a Groove

    Bust a Groove

    Bust a Groove is a hybrid music/fighting game for the Sony PlayStation released in 1998. The game was published by the Japanese video game developer Enix (now Square Enix) in Japan and brought to the U.S. by now-defunct 989 Studios. The original Japanese game was titled Bust a Move: Dance & Rhythm Action (バスト ア ムーブ Dance & Rhythm Action, Basuto a Mūbu Dance & Rhythm Action); in the U.S., it became Bust-A-Groove because the Japanese puzzle series Puzzle Bobble was already going under the name Bust-A-Move for its American incarnation. The game combined PaRappa the Rapper-like rhythm-based gameplay with fighting game elements, including special moves designed to damage the opponent and a focus on head-to-head competitive play. The sequel, Bust a Groove 2, unlike its predecessor, was never released in Europe. A third game in the series, Dance Summit 2001 was only released in Japan on the PlayStation 2. The game mechanics are quite simple and focuses on beats. The player needs to press a series of arrows that appears on the interaction bar using the D-Pad and be able to press the corresponding face button (Circle or X) every fourth beat of the music to execute a dance move otherwise, it
    6.50
    4 votes
    74
    Taiko no Tatsujin

    Taiko no Tatsujin

    Taiko no Tatsujin (太鼓の達人) is a series of rhythm games created by Namco. The series has seen releases for the arcade, Nintendo DS, Nintendo 3DS, PlayStation 2, PlayStation Portable, Wii, iOS, Advanced Pico Beena, and mobile phones. There have been many releases of the game in Japan, and one North American release under the name Taiko: Drum Master. Due to the nature of the series, there were no other releases outside of Japan. The player uses a simulated taiko drum controller to play the notes of a chosen song's drum part as they are displayed on the screen. The PlayStation 2 and Wii versions can be played with a TaTaCon (stands for Taiko Tapping Controller), a special controller which looks like a small taiko drum. The Nintendo DS and iPhone OS versions uses the touch screen as an interactive taiko drum, with the DS games including two styluses in their packages. The Nintendo DS and PlayStation Portable versions also have the ability to engage in 4 player wireless multiplayer. Symbols moving horizontally along a timeline show the player what to hit and when. Blue symbols indicate that the drum should be hit on the rim. Red symbols indicate that the face of the drum should be hit.
    6.50
    4 votes
    75

    Ultimate Band

    Ultimate Band is a music video game for the Nintendo DS & Wii. It is developed by Fall Line Studios, and published by Disney Interactive Studios. Ultimate Band allows players to play guitar, drums, bass or be the front man or woman in a band (though vocals are not supported). The Wii version follows the fortunes of an upstart rock band, with the player building the career of their customizable character, unlocking bonus songs, venues and accessories. Ultimate Band forgoes the use of specialized peripherals such as guitar and drum controllers, relying mainly on the Wii Remote and Nunchuk for the Wii version, and the touch screen and stylus for the DS version. For example, to play notes on guitar in the Wii version the player must press a button combination on the Nunchuk while strumming the Wii Remote up and down. The DS version, based on Hannah Montana: Music Jam's code base, will also allow players to create and record their own songs, and have greater song customization options. Ultimate Band features support for Disney Interactive's DGamer community network. The game will also feature connectivity between the Wii and DS versions, with DS players being able to control stage
    6.50
    4 votes
    76

    Beats

    Beats is a rhythm-based video game for the Sony PlayStation Portable handheld gaming system. It was released in 2007 at the PlayStation Store. In addition to downloading music from the Internet, users may also use their own music to play along to in the My Music Challenge mode. Beats automatically loads the track titles and artist names of the songs it finds on the user's PSP. However, the game will only read up to 127 tracks for the user to choose from. There is as yet no explanation from Sony for this limitation, nor is it obvious how the game determines which 127 tracks are loaded from the library. (What is known is that the game loads the same set of tracks from the user's /MUSIC directory each time.) During the game, three stationary targets, or landing points, (just one in Novice mode) are spaced evenly at the center of the screen. Symbols appear from off the screen and glide towards these targets in rhythm with the music. The symbols represent notes that players are meant to synchronize their button presses to and are identified by the four PlayStation face buttons: circle, "x", square, and triangle. These notes are generated based on the rhythm of the music using a beat
    5.60
    5 votes
    77

    DJMAX

    DJMax (Korean: 디제이맥스, dijeimaegseu) (often stylised as DJMAX and also known as DJ Max in North America) is an action-rhythm video game series created by the South Korean studio Pentavision Studio Division under Neowiz Mobile company. Games feature mostly experimental music and visual art from Korean DJs, artists and composers. Known South Korean experimental group Clazziquai Project has also made songs for the game series. There are also few Japanese composers who have given significant contributions to game series. The first game in the series, DJMax Online, started in June 13, 2004 (closed alpha test) as a web based service for the Windows platform. It was only accessible from Korea, Japan and China. Since then Pentavision has developed and published seven DJMax games mostly for the PSP under the title DJMax Portable. Pentavision released an offline DJMax game for Windows under the title DJMax Trilogy on December 25, 2008. Trilogy is a compilation of songs from three earlier games (DJMax Online, DJMax Portable and DJMax Portable 2) and it was created to replace DJMax Online which was taken offline on March 21, 2008. Pentavision worked together with a Korean company Gammac to
    10.00
    1 votes
    78

    FreQuency

    Frequency is a music video game developed by Harmonix Music Systems and published by SCEI. It is the first major release from Harmonix. It was released in November 2001. A sequel titled Amplitude was released in 2003. In the game, a player portrays a virtual avatar called a "FreQ", and travels down an octagonal tunnel, with each wall containing a musical track. These tracks contain sequences of notes. As the player hits buttons corresponding to the note placement on the track, the "sonic energy" from within is released and the music plays. If the player plays two measures of the track without any errors, the track is "captured" and the music plays automatically until the next pre-determined section of the song. All songs on the frequency game are edited from its original version. Some tracks are bonus tracks and only open up when all notes are played, allowing the user to pick up "freestyle" points. Powerups are available which allow the immediate capturing of the track or the doubling of points. If a player continually misses notes, their energy meter reduces until the game is over. High scores are achieved in the game by quickly moving from track to track, as they are completed,
    10.00
    1 votes
    79

    Miracle Piano Teaching System

    The Miracle Piano Teaching System is a MIDI keyboard/teaching tool created in 1990 by The Software Toolworks for the NES and SNES, Apple Macintosh, Amiga, Sega Genesis and PC. It consisted of a keyboard, connecting cables, power supply, soft foot pedals, and software either on 3.5" floppies or standard, licensed NES/SNES/Genesis cartridges. When connected to the console or computer, a user followed the on-screen notes. Its marketed value was as a tool to teach kids and to play the piano. It provided hundreds of lessons, and was advertised as the perfect adjunct to formal lessons. Due to its high price ($500) and low sales, the keyboard with all of the original cables together are a rare find. The Sega Genesis version can be worth up to $412. Aside from being released in the United States, the Miracle Keyboard was also released in multiple regions within Europe. The European versions are, however, much harder to find. Some of the NES Miracle keyboards were also later converted for PC use - the Nintendo Seal of Quality on these boards was covered up with a piece of plastic. Students can learn to play classic piano, rock piano or show tunes. Fun exercises make learning the piano seem
    10.00
    1 votes
    80

    PaRappa the Rapper

    PaRappa the Rapper (パラッパラッパー, Parappa Rappā) is a rhythm video game for the Sony PlayStation created by Masaya Matsuura (the former leader of the Japanese "Hyper Pop Unit" PSY S) and his NanaOn-Sha company. While the gameplay is not challenging for experienced gamers, the game is remembered for its unique graphic design, its quirky soundtrack and its bizarre plot. Despite being made in Japan, all of the game's songs and dialogue are spoken in English in all versions. The game is named after its protagonist, Parappa, a rapping dog with the motto, "I gotta believe!". The game spawned a merchandising campaign in Japan, a spinoff in 1999, an anime series in 2001, and a direct sequel for PlayStation 2 in 2002. A PlayStation Portable port of the original game was released in Japan in December 2006 in North America and Europe in July 2007. PaRappa the Rapper is a music game in which the eponymous character, Parappa, must make his way through each of the game's six stages by rapping. Each stage constantly alternates between the stage's teacher and Parappa. As the teacher raps, a bar at the top of the screen will appear, showing symbols that match up to the teacher's lyrics. The player must
    10.00
    1 votes
    81

    Rez

    Rez, developed under the codenames K-Project, Project Eden, and Vibes, is a rail shooter video game released by Sega in Japan in 2001 for the Dreamcast and PlayStation 2, with a European Dreamcast release and United States PlayStation 2 release in 2002. The game was developed by Sega's United Game Artists division, which contained several former members of the disbanded Team Andromeda, the Sega development team behind the Panzer Dragoon series. It was conceptualized and produced by Tetsuya Mizuguchi. His company, Q Entertainment released a high definition version, Rez HD to the Xbox Live Arcade in 2008. The game is notable for replacing the typical sound effects found in most rail shooter games with electronic music, with sounds and melodies created by the player as they target and destroy foes in the game, leading to a form of synesthesia, enhanced by an optional Trance Vibrator peripheral. A prequel, Child of Eden, has been released for Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3, published by Ubisoft. It is compatible with the Xbox 360 Kinect and the PlayStation Move motion controller. The game is set in futuristic computer "supernetwork" called the K-project where much of the data flow is
    10.00
    1 votes
    82

    SingStar

    SingStar is a competitive music video game series for PlayStation consoles, developed by London Studio and published by Sony Computer Entertainment. 23 English-language instalments of the series have been released for the PlayStation 2, and six versions for the PlayStation 3 have been released since December 2007. The games have also undergone a number of non-English releases in various European countries. SingStar games are distributed either as the software alone, or bundled with a pair of USB microphones – one red, one blue; wireless microphones are also available. The games are compatible with the EyeToy and PlayStation Eye cameras, allowing players to see themselves singing. SingStar games require players to sing along with music in order to score points. Players interface with their console via SingStar microphones while a music video plays in the background. The pitch players are required to sing is displayed as horizontal grey bars, which function similar to a musical stave, with corresponding lyrics displayed at the bottom of the screen. The game analyses a player's pitch and compares it to the original track, with players scoring points based on how accurate their singing
    10.00
    1 votes
    83
    UltraStar

    UltraStar

    UltraStar is a clone of SingStar, a music video game. UltraStar lets one or several players score points by singing along to a song or music video and match the pitch of the original song well. UltraStar displays lyrics as well as the correct notes similar to a piano roll. On top of the correct notes UltraStar displays the pitch recorded from the players. UltraStar allows several people to play simultaneously by connecting several microphones possibly to several sound cards. To add a song to UltraStar, a file with notes and lyrics is required, together with an audio file. Optionally a cover image, a backdrop image and a video may be added to each song. UltraStar comes preloaded with a short sample from Nine Inch Nails hit Discipline from The Slip album. The UltraStar is released under Freeware License. Very old versions were available under GNU General Public License and all game forks are based on the old code. This change was made to protect and secure users private data sent to the game server. New version of the game introduces Song Shop, where users after free registration can download free songs and buy points. Free songs includes: The original UltraStar is programmed in
    10.00
    1 votes
    84

    We Cheer

    We Cheer is a dance video game developed by Namco Bandai Games. The game sees the player leading a squad of cheerleaders through a routine by following lines and swirls that appear on screen by motioning the Wii Remote. For single player and two player games, two Remotes for each player (one per hand) are required, but in four player games each player can use a single Remote only. The game has the player performing physical motions ranging from single motion thrusts, to elaborate zig-zagging actions and windmilling whole arm motions. We Cheer also allows players to customize their cheer squad including their hair color and uniforms (though only female cheerleaders will be available), and additional outfits and squad members can be unlocked by collecting gold pompoms earned after a successful routine. The game also features a workout mode that keeps track of the number of calories burned by the player during play. The game features 30 licensed music tracks. The list of songs includes:
    10.00
    1 votes
    85

    Band Hero

    Band Hero is a spinoff video game as part of the Guitar Hero series of music video games, released by Activision on November 3, 2009, for the PlayStation 2, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, Wii and Nintendo DS consoles. The game is structurally similar to Guitar Hero 5, and supports full band play (lead and bass guitar, drums, and vocals) including the drop-in/drop-out and in-song instrument and difficulty change menus, and additional multiplayer modes as Guitar Hero 5. The console versions use instrument-shaped game controllers, while the DS version uses either the "Guitar Grip" introduced with the Guitar Hero: On Tour series or a new Drum Skin that come with the game. Like previous games, virtual avatars of Taylor Swift, Adam Levine, and the band No Doubt are presented in the game. Band Hero received mixed reviews from journalists. Some considered the game to be an appropriately flavored version of Guitar Hero 5 for the "Top 40" pop rock hits, while others felt the game was strictly aimed at teenagers. They also contested the cost of the full game, featuring only 65 songs compared with 85 songs in Guitar Hero 5, and considered if the content would have been better in downloadable form. A
    7.33
    3 votes
    86

    Dance Aerobics

    Dance Aerobics (known as Aerobics Studio in Japan, and third game in Bandai's Family Trainer series) is a 1987 Nintendo game that uses the Power Pad. It features eight classes in the exercise studio. The player must follow the motions of the instructor. The score begins at 100 and decreases with each mistake. However, it goes up for each routine completed correctly.
    7.33
    3 votes
    87

    Guitar Hero: Smash Hits

    Guitar Hero Smash Hits (titled Guitar Hero Greatest Hits in Europe and Australia) is a music video game and the fourth expansion game to the Guitar Hero series. The game features 48 songs originally featured in five previous games in the series—Guitar Hero, Guitar Hero II, Guitar Hero Encore: Rocks the 80s, Guitar Hero III: Legends of Rock and Guitar Hero: Aerosmith—redesigning the songs to be based on master recordings and to include support for full band play first introduced to the series in Guitar Hero World Tour. The game was developed by Beenox and published by Activision for release on the PlayStation 2, PlayStation 3, Wii, and Xbox 360 systems and was released around the world in the second half of June 2009. The game reuses many elements from previous titles in the series, including Guitar Hero World Tour and Guitar Hero: Metallica. Beenox designed the game around playing the greatest songs of the series at venues located in the greatest places on Earth, and created venues based on various Wonders of the World for the game. While the game's soundtrack and expansion into a four-player band were well received by reviewers, the game was highly criticized for being a full-cost
    7.33
    3 votes
    88
    INXS: Make My Video

    INXS: Make My Video

    INXS: Make My Video was created as a video game by Digital Pictures in 1992. The game was part of a series of games made of the same concept for various artists of this era. The game puts the player in control of editing the music videos for the band INXS on 3 different songs, Heaven Sent, Baby Don’t Cry and Not Enough Time. Players are given instructions of what they should include in the video, and then the song is played while you edit the video live. Players can change between video clips available by pressing the buttons on the controller, and have the option between clips from the videos of the group, stock footage, movie clips and special effects. Like other games in the Make My Video series that starred Kris Kross, Marky Mark and C+C Music Factory, the games in the series were a critical and commercial failures.
    7.33
    3 votes
    89

    SingStar ABBA

    SingStar ABBA is a singing/voice simulation video game released in 2008 for the PlayStation 2 and PlayStation 3. It was the first band specific SingStar game, followed by SingStar Queen in 2009. David Reeves, President, Sony Computer Entertainment Europe, said of the release: "We are thrilled to be collaborating with ABBA to bring their tracks to SingStar this Christmas... The popularity of this iconic band continues year after year, and we know SingStar fans will be delighted to add this selection of classics tracks to their SingStar collection.” Patrick Foster reports that "Bocu, the British music publisher that acquired the British rights to ABBA’s songs more than 30 years ago... collaborated with Sony to release Singstar Abba." Arnold Katayev explains that the game "uses a very clean user interface, one than even a five year old can navigate. You can either play a practice session, or play for points and attempt to score the best record." He adds, "The object is to fill the bars on screen with accuracy by singing as accurately as possible. If you go flat, you'll get color below the bar; likewise, if you go sharp, you'll get color above the bar. It's a very intuitive system, and
    7.33
    3 votes
    90

    We Cheer 2

    We Cheer 2 is a dance video game developed by Namco Bandai Games. It is the sequel to We Cheer. The gameplay is the same as the original We Cheer using the Wii Remote as a virtual pom-poms. In the single player mode, players can use either two Wii Remotes (one in each hand) or one Wii Remote (in either the left or right hand) to follow the on-screen motions. The game also offers cooperative and competitive modes for up to 4 players. New to the game are further customization of characters and the ability to play as a male or female cheerleader. The game features a brand-new lineup of 30 licensed music tracks. The list of songs includes:
    7.33
    3 votes
    91

    Bust a Groove 2

    Bust a Groove 2 is a hybrid music/fighting game released in 2000 for the Sony PlayStation and is the sequel to Bust a Groove. The game was originally released in Japan as Bust a Move 2: Dance Tengoku Mix (バスト ア ムーブ2 ダンス天国MIX, Basuto a Mūbu 2: Dansu Tengoku Mix), and was never released in Europe. A third game in the series, Dance Summit 2001 was only released in Japan on the PlayStation 2. The game takes place one year after the previous installment and shares the same overall gameplay. It combines dance moves and special abilities designed to damage the opponent. It also features new songs, new characters and updated costumes for the returning characters retained from the previous game. Bust a Groove 2''s gameplay is still the same from the previous title. However, backgrounds have become crazier; if a player attains high scores, background stages will sport crazy effects and changes (see Fever Time). "The single-player game has changed - it now features branching paths in the single-player game that move you up to more difficult opponents depending on how well you're dancing. The popularity meter has been axed; now your character has a small border around his or her name that
    8.50
    2 votes
    92

    Dancing Stage

    Dancing Stage is a series of music video game developed and published by Konami. It is the Europe variant of Dance Dance Revolution. Several versions have been produced for the Sony PlayStation and PlayStation 2, and a number of arcade versions exist as well. Like other dancing video games, Dancing Stage is best played with a special dance pad instead of a regular control pad. Each game features a number of different songs, and each song can be played on different difficulty levels; some games also include other modes such as workout mode, training mode, etc. As a song is running, arrow icons scroll up the screen, towards a set of arrow markers; the objective of the game is to step on the matching arrows on the mat exactly when the arrow icons meet the markers. Each arrow will be awarded a score ranging from "PERFECT!!" to "Miss.." (missed). By getting hits right, the players increase their respective "dance gauge"; missing arrows will decrease the dance gauge, and if the gauge ever reaches zero, the song will end prematurely and the player will fail. At the end of a song, the game will display a breakdown of how well the players performed, and will also rate their
    8.50
    2 votes
    93

    Draglade

    Draglade ( カスタムビートバトル ドラグレイド, Kasutamu Bīto Batoru Doragureido, Custom Beat Battle Draglade) is a fighting video game with music video game and role-playing game elements for the Nintendo DS developed by Dimps and published in Japan by Banpresto and Bandai Namco Games. It was then later published in the US by Atlus. The fighting system is different from other fighting games in that there are not a lot of directional inputs needed for moves. Instead, special moves are set by collecting "Bullets" and then activating them with the DS's touch screen. The story of Draglade takes place in a post-modern setting where the world's primary source of power is a form of energy called "Matter." A piece of technology called a G-Con is capable of absorbing Matter and transforming it into a physical object. A weapon conjured by this means is called a Glade, which can emit a distinct sound when colliding with other objects. During the era that the events of Draglade take place, fighting using Glades is the world's most popular sport, called "Grapping." The story follows four characters on their own individual quests become professional Grappers. Element: Fire Glade Type: Sword Glade Color:
    8.50
    2 votes
    94

    Leaf Trombone: World Stage

    Leaf Trombone: World Stage is a massively multiplayer online music game for the Apple iOS, developed by Smule and released on April 15 2009 through the App Store. The game simulates a trombone based on a traditional Chinese leaf instrument, similar to a slide whistle. In the game players can play the Leaf trombone along to a variety of tunes, as well as compose and publish songs of their own for anyone to play. Along with a "Free Play" mode, the "World Stage" feature provides a venue where players can perform their songs live for a global audience and receive ratings on a 1 to 10 scale from three separate judges. Following each performance, a player's rating is added to their previous ratings creating a comprehensive score reflecting the player's skill within the online community. The creators at Smule claim that Leaf Trombone: World Stage is “an instrument, a game, and a huge global social experience.” The game simulates a trombone based on a traditional Chinese leaf instrument, similar to a slide whistle. The Leaf trombone can be played in two ways. The user must first decide between blowing into the iPhone microphone (or a peripheral microphone if using iPod Touch), or the user
    8.50
    2 votes
    95

    Taiko no Tatsujin DS

    Taiko no Tatsujin DS (太鼓の達人DS タッチでドコドン!, Taiko no Tatsujin DS Touch de Dokodon, lit. "Taiko Drum Master DS Touch and Play!") is a rhythm video game developed and published by Namco for the Nintendo DS handheld game console in 2007, and it was released only in Japan. Like other Taiko games, the player plays the notes of a chosen song's drum part as they are displayed on the screen. The taiko drums can be played using the touch screen or the buttons. Like the PlayStation Portable versions, Taiko no Tatsujin DS Touch de Dokodon has the ability to engage in 4 player wireless multiplayer. Players can also dress up and add decoration to anthropomporphic taiko character Don. Up to 4 people can play together using link play or download play. Special items are available in multiplayer mode. Attack items include water ballons, takoyaki, bombs and music jammer. Other items include autoplay and score multipliers. There is also a daily challenge mode. It is used to unlock things but not always. It is used to master at this game. Occasionally, challenges will be issued to the player. If the player succeeds in completing the challenge, additional decorating items will be unlocked. Also, in normal
    6.25
    4 votes
    96

    Buzz! The Music Quiz

    Buzz!: The Music Quiz is the first in the Buzz! series of video games created by Sleepydog and Relentless Software for the Sony PlayStation 2. In the game, players answer questions asked by the quizmaster (also called Buzz) using the four Buzz! remote controls. The game was part of Sony's "Fire It Up" campaign, which also includes the EyeToy and SingStar systems. Hosted by the computer animated, ever-smiling Buzz and his assistant Rose, the game creates the illusion that the players are in an actual quiz show, complete with buzzers, theme songs and canned audience clapping/laughter. Jason Donovan is the voice of Buzz in the UK and Australia. Different voice-actors are used across Europe for Buzz and Rose. Players can choose from 16 different contestants to suit that persons personal music taste. These include a pop diva (Gina), a rocker (Phil), a punk, an Elvis (Pelvis) and a disco dude (Stevie). These characters resemble famous pop musicians such as Gwen Stefani, Liam Gallagher and Geri Halliwell and Bob Marley. There are over 1,000 music clips, all of which are international chart-toppers from the 1950s through to 2005 and over 5,000 questions to test a players knowledge, either
    5.20
    5 votes
    97

    Buzzamp

    Buzzamp is a free software program which enables users to play a music style quiz on their own computer using media files including mp3, wav and wmv but also video files including avi, mpeg and more. Programming is currently done solely by inventor and creator Frederick De Block of the small Belgian software company Revolve. The program is developed using Microsoft Visual Basic. Buzzamp is made with an interface that is very clear and comfortable, even for first time users. Using colourcodes and other visual extras, the game has a simple but strong interface. No songs are packed with Buzzamp. The revolutionary idea behind the game is that people use their own music in the form of an M3U playlist to play the game. That way, the user can choose himself how many songs to add to the game. This also gives the game a high repeatability factor. Buzzamp can be played alone or with up to four other friends. The current version of Buzzamp supports 2 players using one keyboard and up to 3 joysticks connected to a single computer. Future versions may have features of streaming using the internet. After the installation of the game, start up the game and use the "wizard" to load up
    7.00
    3 votes
    98

    Dancing with the Stars

    Dancing with the Stars is a video game based on the show Dancing with the Stars. It was released on October 23, 2007 in the United States. The game is also being developed for mobile phones, and for the PC. In the game you have option of playing as selected celebrities and professionals from the show. On the mobile phone version, the only characters listed are the celebrities. There are no mentions of their professional partners. For the PC game, the player can choose any of the following characters and he or she will automatically be partnered with either a professional dancer or a celebrity depending on the character the player chooses. The dances included in the game are taken from the ABC TV show of the same name. A sequel, Dancing with the Stars: We Dance!, was released October 21, 2008 for Wii and Nintendo DS. The game is much improved on the previous ones, with score multipliers, options for new costumes and switching partners, and new songs such as Push It by Salt n' Pepa, Black Horse and the Cherry Tree by KT Tunstall and Lady Marmalade.
    7.00
    3 votes
    99
    Guitar Hero: Aerosmith

    Guitar Hero: Aerosmith

    Guitar Hero: Aerosmith is a music video game developed by Neversoft and distributed by Activision. It was released on the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 consoles, with a Wii version developed by Vicarious Visions, a PlayStation 2 version by Budcat Creations and with a PC and Mac version by Aspyr Media. The game was released on June 26, 2008 in Europe, on June 29, 2008 in North America, and on August 6, 2008 in Australia. Guitar Hero: Aerosmith sold as both a bundle with a specially designed guitar controller as well as a game-only package. The game is considered an expansion in the Guitar Hero series, extending upon the general features of Guitar Hero III: Legends of Rock. As with other games in the series, the player uses a guitar-shaped controller to simulate the playing of rock music by playing in-time to scrolling notes on-screen. It is the first game in the series to primarily focus on the work of one rock band, with Aerosmith songs comprising approximately 60% of the soundtrack, while the remaining songs are from bands that have been influenced by or opened for Aerosmith. The single player Career mode allows the player to follow the history of the band through several
    7.00
    3 votes
    100
    Happy Feet

    Happy Feet

    Happy Feet is an action-adventure video game based on the movie of the same name. Released in 2006 by A2M for the Wii, PlayStation 2, Nintendo GameCube, Nintendo DS, Game Boy Advance and PC, Elijah Wood, Brittany Murphy, Nicole Kidman, Dee Bradley Baker, Carlos Alazraqui, Jeff Garcia, Johnny A. Sanchez, Hugh Jackman and Hugo Weaving all reprise their voice roles from the film. The console versions (for PS2, Wii, GameCube and PC) feature 3 different modes: a dancing mode which simulates Dance Dance Revolution with the player pushing the button in response to arrows on the screen, a fishing mode in which the player collects pebbles and shrimp as well as air bubbles in order to breathe, and a belly-sledding mode where the player sleds and collects the number of fish needed, sleds to beat a given time or races another character down the hill. In the Nintendo DS version of the game, the rhythm sequences use gameplay mechanics similar to those in Elite Beat Agents, though greatly simplified. The game also features each of these modes for two players. In the dancing and swimming games, the players compete with each other, while cooperating with each other in the multi-player
    7.00
    3 votes
    101

    Music Construction Set

    Music Construction Set (MCS) is a music composition notation program. It was originally developed in 1984 for the Apple II, and quickly ported to other systems of the era. It was designed and developed by Will Harvey and published by Electronic Arts. Harvey designed and programmed the original Apple II version of the game in assembly language when he was 15 and in high school. Though it is entertainment software, strictly speaking it is not a game, though it is often lumped together with them. It is also considered edutainment since users could learn a bit about music notation by using it. Music Construction Set was a prototype for much of today's scorewriting software. With MCS, the user can create musical composition using a graphical user interface, a novel concept for the era of its release. Users could drag and drop notes right onto the staff, play back their creations and print them out. The program came with a few popular songs as samples. Most versions of this program required the users to use a joystick to create their songs, note by note. Though novel, the music creation process was cumbersome due to the fairly primitive input mechanisms of early home computers. Also, the
    7.00
    3 votes
    102

    Osu! Tatakae! Ouendan

    Osu! Tatakae! Ouendan (押忍!闘え!応援団, Osu! Tatakae! Ōendan, lit. "Hey! Fight! Cheer Squad"), sometimes referred to as simply Ouendan, is a rhythm video game developed by iNiS and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo DS handheld game console in 2005, for release only in Japan. Ouendan stars a cheer squad rhythmically cheering for various troubled people. At the 2007 Game Developers Conference in San Francisco, iNiS Vice President Keiichi Yano described the process which eventually resulted in Osu! Tatakae! Ouendan. His first inspirations for the game came when he first tried a Nintendo DS handheld, and development on the game began after successfully pitching the concept to Nintendo. At the conference, he also displayed early concept art for lead Ouendan character Ryūta Ippongi, who originally wore the shirt of his gaku-ran uniform unbuttoned and had a significantly shorter hairstyle. Yano noted that Nintendo was fond of the characters due to their manga-style aesthetic. Yano also displayed an unused Ouendan stage from a prototype build that featured a puppy in danger. The stage concept was ultimately dropped from the final version of the game because the puppy died if the player
    7.00
    3 votes
    103

    SingStar Take That

    SingStar Take That is a competitive karaoke video game for the PlayStation 2 and PlayStation 3. It is the third band-specific SingStar game released in the UK, following up on SingStar ABBA and SingStar Queen. It was released on 6 November 2009. SingStar games require players to sing along with music in order to score points. Players interface with their console via SingStar USB microphones while a music video plays in the background. The pitch players are required to sing is displayed as horizontal grey bars, which function similar to a musical stave, with corresponding lyrics displayed at the bottom of the screen. The game analyses a player's pitch and compares it to the original track, with players scoring points based on how accurate their singing is. Different modes of SingStar may vary this basic pattern, but the principle is similar throughout. SingStar includes a variety of game modes. The standard singing mode allows one or two people to sing simultaneously, either competitively or in a duet. The PlayStation 3 version of the game supports trophies. SingStar Take That was spectacularly launched at the SingStar Take That Extravaganza charity party on Wednesday 25th November
    7.00
    3 votes
    104

    Song Summoner: The Unsung Heroes

    Song Summoner: The Unsung Heroes (ソングサマナー 歌われぬ戦士の旋律, Songu Samanā Utawa Renu Senshi no Senritsu) is an iPod tactical role-playing game developed and published by Square Enix worldwide. A new version entitled Song Summoner: The Unsung Heroes - Encore was announced for the iOS at the 2009 Tokyo Game Show. This game expands on the original game with new Tune Troopers and a reworked storyline twice the size of the first. The game was released on App Store on December 2. Song Summoner is similar to other Square Enix tactical games, but unique in that troops, called Tune Troopers, are generated from songs on the user's iPod. There are 50 characters that can be generated, each of which falls into one of five job classes: Soldier, Mage, Archer, Knight, and Monk. Most of the Troopers and their skills are named or modeled after songs, albums and musicians from both Japanese and Western music. Each Trooper is given a rank of bronze, silver, gold or platinum as well as a secondary letter ranking based on its statistics in relation to its rank. The higher a Trooper's rank, the fewer times it can be deployed; however, further deployments, called rewinds, can be bought. When the player plays a
    7.00
    3 votes
    105

    Tap Tap Revenge 2

    Tap Tap Revenge 2 is an installment in the Tap Tap Series. It is a game developed and published by Tapulous for iOS. It is the sequel to Tap Tap Revenge. The game features a series of notes falling down the screen of the iPhone or iPod Touch. It is similar in gameplay to Guitar Hero and Rock Band, and is controlled via touching the notes, or shaking the device left, right, or back when an arrow is displayed. There are five difficulty levels: Kids, Easy, Medium, Hard, and Extreme. In Kids mode, players can tap anywhere on the screen while the note is in the strike zone to score, and can never lose a note streak. This feature was introduced with Tap Tap Christmas with Weezer. In 2010, Tapulous shut down its servers for online mode, in an effort to migrate users to Tap Tap Revenge 3. Stars that were previously available in online mode with achievement of scores consist of the following: In Tap Tap Revenge 2, a variety of new features were introduced. In the song select screen, there is now album artwork. Also, players can import songs from premium games in the Tap Tap series. However, players can not import boss songs from Lady Gaga Revenge and Tap Tap Coldplay. Also, there are more
    7.00
    3 votes
    106

    Boom Boom Rocket

    Boom Boom Rocket is a downloadable video game for Xbox 360's Xbox Live Arcade service. Boom Boom Rocket marks the first rhythm game for the Live Arcade service and was developed by Geometry Wars creators Bizarre Creations and published by the Pogo division of Electronic Arts. It is not currently available in Japan, Korea, Singapore or Taiwan. The object of Boom Boom Rocket is to trigger fireworks explosions in time with music, in a gameplay style very similar to that of Dance Dance Revolution and Guitar Hero. Each rocket is color-mapped to one of the colored buttons on the Xbox 360 controller. A life gauge, which also serves as a score multiplier meter, fills with each successful shot and drains with each missed shot, and players are graded on overall hit accuracy. If the life meter drains completely, the player fails the song and the game is over. Each song has three unlockable firework types, one for each difficulty level. If the player successfully triggers a prescribed number of fireworks a rocket with a wavy tail appears. If this special rocket is triggered, the firework is unlocked and it will randomly replace other firework types on subsequent songs. If the rocket with the
    6.00
    4 votes
    107
    TechnoMotion

    TechnoMotion

    TechnoMotion is a Korean music video game. As in other games that use dance pads, such as Dance Dance Revolution, a player must press panels in response to scrolling arrows on the game's monitor. TechnoMotion has three distinct gameplay modes: It is possible to change the panel mode between and during songs in the game with switches on the cabinet. A player has the option to play in Single mode (one player, one pad) or Versus mode (two players, two pads). There are four difficulty levels: Easy, Normal, Hard, and Double(one player, both pads). Each difficulty has a separate songlist, and each pattern is rated with 1 to 12 small diamond icons. All but one of the TechnoMotion songs are of the K-Pop music genre. TechnoMotion's songlist is mostly composed of new licenses, but there are a few veteran songs which were found in Pump It Up and Dance Dance Revolution's 3rd Mix Korean before appearing in TechnoMotion. TechnoMotion has four different songlists: one for each mode of play. Easy Mode with 18 songs Normal Mode with 16 songs Hard Mode with 16 songs Double Mode with 20 songs TechnoMotion Song Lists (including the 2nd Dance Floor version): A Man Tales - Honey Family Another Truth -
    6.00
    4 votes
    108

    Dance Praise

    Dance Praise (marketed as Original Dance Praise after the release of its sequel) is a Christian dance video game developed and published by Digital Praise. Dance Praise was conceived by Peter Fokos, the Chief technical officer for Digital Praise, wishing to use Konami's Dance Dance Revolution video games as part of his daughter's home school exercise program. Due to objections over the game's content, Foko's daughter suggested that he develop a dance game utilizing Christian music. Gameplay is similar to other four-panel dance games such as the Dance Dance Revolution series, with one key difference: whereas most four-panel dance games have the target arrows on the top portion of the screen, Dance Praise places the targets on the bottom of the screen. When the arrows approach a target zone on the bottom of the screen, the player must step on the corresponding arrow on the dance pad when arrows reach the target zone. Players are judged on their accuracy and timing. The game also features multiplayer modes, such as "Shadow Dance" mode, where players "record" steps to be played by the other player. The "arcade" mode adds additional hazards and multipliers to gameplay. Lyrics to the
    8.00
    2 votes
    109

    Dancing with the Stars: We Dance!

    Dancing with the Stars: We Dance! (Also called Dancing with the Stars: Get Your Dance On!) is a video game based on Dancing with the Stars. It is the sequel to the original Dancing with the Stars game. It is on Activision's "Wee 1st" label. The game's subtitle, We Dance, was derived from the Namco-Bandai games; We Ski and We Cheer, also for the Wii. The game features stars including Mel B, Apolo Anton Ohno, Joey Fatone and Jennie Garth and new professional dancers including Derek Hough and his sister Julianne Hough. The Wii version improves on the original with refined Wii Remote and Nunchuk controls. Other additions include new special "flair" moves. The Nintendo DS version features changeable outfits and swappable partners. Note: Sabrina Bryan's original partner was Mark Ballas. However, in the all-star season, her partner is Louis Van Amstel.
    8.00
    2 votes
    110

    Kawasaki Synthesizer

    The Kawasaki Synthesizer is a musical software tool for the Commodore 64 created in 1983 by Japanese jazz musician, Ryo Kawasaki. The first of four music programs created by Kawasaki, Kawasaki Synthesizer was followed by Kawasaki Rhythm Rocker in 1985, and then Kawasaki Magical Musicquill in 1985. Following this Kawasaki created Kawasaki MIDI Workstation his only software title intended for professional use instead of personal or educational use. As soon as the Commodore 64 was released in 1982, Kawasaki immediately bought one, paying $600 for it at an electronics store on 45th street in Manhattan. Kawasaki was fascinated by the possibilities the system afforded him and in two years he taught himself to program and wrote four programs in machine code using SuperMon (a tool created by Jim Butterfield) that he released commercially on 5¼-inch floppy for $49.95 each as well as an unpublished 8-track real-time MIDI recorder called Midi-Workstation. The Kawasaki Synthesizer was sold as a 2-disk package that according to its own in-game demonstration "will transform [a] Commodore 64 into an incredible synthesizer and more." The game came with a software version of a techno track by
    8.00
    2 votes
    111

    Otocky

    Otocky is a videogame released in 1987 for the Family Computer Disk System in Japan. Developed by SEDIC and published by ASCII Corporation, the game was conceived and designed by Toshio Iwai. Otocky can be described as a musical side-scrolling shoot 'em up. The player's spaceship has a ball for a weapon, which can be fired in eight directions; each direction corresponds to a different musical note. The note plays when the player presses the fire button, and is also quantized in time so that it matches the beat playing in the background. By using the weapon selectively the player can improvise music while playing. The ball is used to destroy enemies by touching them, and also to catch various types of objects: The ball gets smaller when the player is touched by an enemy, until the player loses a life. Completing a certain number of levels unlocks a music editor which makes it possible for the player to freely compose their own melodies. Otocky is notable for being the first game to include creative/procedural generative music. Otocky is a precursor of Rez, Tetsuya Mizuguchi's 2002 Dreamcast and PlayStation 2 game exploring similar themes of player action and musical evolution. Jake
    8.00
    2 votes
    112

    Phase

    Phase is a music-themed iPod game created by Harmonix exclusively for the iPod click wheel interface. It is similar to other Harmonix games Amplitude and FreQuency. "Phase" as in phase modulation is one of three ways information is carried, the others being amplitude modulation and frequency modulation. Phase is played in a forced single-point perspective view of a three line track. Down each line come colored circles, and the player must click the corresponding button on the click wheel when the circle reaches the bottom of the screen. The circles are arranged on the track in relation to the beat of the music track being played. Additionally, there are occasional series of smaller, more closely spaced dots that will sweep across the track. These require the player to swipe their finger across the click wheel at the correct pace, instead of clicking the wheel buttons. The game comes with Easy, Medium, and Hard settings available for immediate play. After completing a marathon with the Hard difficulty setting, Expert mode is made available. In the same way, completing a marathon on Expert unlocks Insane mode. The difficulty settings control the speed of the track and the number of
    8.00
    2 votes
    113

    Rayman Raving Rabbids

    Rayman Raving Rabbids, known in French as Rayman contre les Lapins Crétins (literally meaning "Rayman against the Moronic Rabbits"), is a spinoff in the Rayman series released by the French company Ubisoft as a Wii launch title. The game consists of 75 minigames. The game is primarily designed with the Wii Remote in mind, but is also available on Game Boy Advance, PlayStation 2, Microsoft Windows, Nintendo DS, and Xbox 360. Ubisoft released a sequel to the game, Rayman Raving Rabbids 2, in November 2007, and released the third game in the series, Rayman Raving Rabbids TV Party in November 2008. The fourth game in the series, Rabbids Go Home was released in 2009, though only on the Wii and DS systems. A fifth game, Raving Rabbids: Travel in Time, was released in 2010. A sixth game, Raving Rabbids: Alive & Kicking was released in 2011 only for Xbox 360 (which requires the Kinect for Xbox 360.) The game features two different modes of play - 'Story mode' (or adventure mode) and 'Score mode'. In story mode the game follows fifteen days of Rayman's imprisonment by the Rabbids. Each day, Rayman ((Raymondo)) must complete at least three trials, followed by one special “boss trial”, such
    8.00
    2 votes
    114

    Burst a fever

    Bust a Fever (BAF) is a rhythm-matching game similar to O2Jam and Beatmania. It is created and distributed by 9You in China. BAF currently has no plans to have an English version. There are six keys used to play. One hand uses s,d,f, one uses j,k,l, and the thumbs use the space bar. When the colored block reaches the bottom, you press the key corresponding to that block.
    9.00
    1 votes
    115
    DrumMania

    DrumMania

    DrumMania (ドラムマニア, Doramumania) is a drumming music video game series produced by Bemani, the musical division of Konami Digital Entertainment, Inc.. Drummania was first released in 2000 as an arcade game, then subsequently ported to PlayStation 2. Subsequent mixes have been released approximately once a year. In 2010, a series XG was introduced, adding a floor tom, left cymbal and left pedal to the cabinet setup. To focus on the new game, development ceased for the original version, with the last mix V8 released in 2011. The most recent arcade version is DrumMania XG2, which was released on March 9, 2011. The game can be linked to its guitar-version sibling Guitarfreaks, allowing for cooperative play as long as they are from the same release. Earlier versions of the game could also be linked with Keyboardmania. From 7th mix onwards, the game has been linked to Konami's e-Amusement system, allowing for online competitive play. DrumMania simulates real life drumming. It is played using a controller designed to imitate a drum set. Five pads are arrayed from left to right for the hi-hat, snare drum, high tom, low tom, cymbal and bass drum. On XG series, a left cymbal, left pedal and a
    9.00
    1 votes
    116
    Go! Go! Break Steady

    Go! Go! Break Steady

    Go! Go! Break Steady is a breakdancing-themed puzzle game developed by Little Boy Games. The game was released on July 23, 2008. The game is a timed-button rhythm game similar to Boom Boom Rocket with elements of Zuma. A sequence of button icons rolls from various angles towards a target circle, and the player must hit those buttons when they enter the circle to earn "Beatniks"; the better the timing, the more Beatniks earned to shoot. Missing a beat or making the wrong button press fills the penalty bar. The player then uses the Beatniks to eliminate the string of Beatniks arranged in an arc. The player must shoot each colored Beatnik into a string of like-colored Beatniks to eliminate them for points; the arc collapses in the same way as Zuma. An especially long combination "saves" the player by wiping the penalty bar. The round ends when the song ends. If the penalty bar fills before the song is over, the song ends before the player eliminates the Beatniks, or the Beatnik arc gets too long, the player fails the round. The game features 20 licensed songs which fall into the hip-hop, disco, funk and electro categories. The game features two player off- and online co-op and versus
    9.00
    1 votes
    117

    Jam Sessions

    Jam Sessions is a guitar simulation software title and music game for the Nintendo DS based on the Japan-only title Sing & Play DS Guitar M-06 (Hiite Utaeru DS Guitar M-06) originally developed by Plato. It was brought to North America and Europe, courtesy of Ubisoft. The game is infamous for its ad campaign, which features a child swearing at his mother loudly, despite the game being E for Everyone. Jam Sessions makes use of the DS touch screen to simulate strumming on a real guitar, while the D-pad is used for selecting chords. The game allows players to play through a list of songs in order to unlock other features such as upgraded strings and new backgrounds, while Free Play allows the player to simply strum away, playing out songs or practicing without being judged. Tutorial and Warm Up modes teach players how to play the game and get accustomed to the controls and the concepts behind playing guitar. What makes Jam Sessions different from other rhythm games, such as Guitar Hero, is that it is considered to be a tool instead of a game. In addition, the player (while using headphones or an external speaker) can also use the DS microphone to sing along. Andy Myers of Nintendo
    9.00
    1 votes
    118

    Musician

    Musician is cartridge number 31 in the official Magnavox/Philips line of games for the Philips Videopac. It came in a cardboard box roughly double the size of a standard Videopac game box, containing a keyboard overlay in the style of a piano keyboard; the cartridge, in a standard Videopac box with a single sheet where the manual would usually be; and a landscape-format manual, over double the size of a standard game manual. The purpose of the set is to turn your Videopac into a music keyboard, it supports recording and editing sequences of up to 81 notes, although there is no way to save apart from writing a composition down on music manuscript. In the manual there are the following pieces of sheet music:
    9.00
    1 votes
    120

    Ongaku Tsukuru: Kanadeeru

    Ongaku Tsukūru: Kanadeeru (音楽ツクール かなでーる, Music Maker: Plaay!) is a music sequencer software released only in Japan for Super Famicom. Tsukūru is a pun mixing the Japanese word tsukuru (作る), which means "make" or "create", with tsūru (ツール), the Japanese transcription of the English word "tool". The 'game' can be used as-is for composing songs and saving them on the cartridge, but it also has a built-in support for saving on ASCII Turbo File device and Satellaview Memory Cassettes (SHVC-031) which you can use to transfer your music to be used in Sound Novel Tsukūru and RPG Tsukūru 2. The engine of the game is similar to the "music making" mode on Mario Paint but has a more professional touch to it. Songs can be up to 128 measures long and written on eight monophonic channels. A complete selection of 28 musical instruments plus four sine waves, four saw waves, eight square waves and a drumkit are available for use. The duration and the volume can be set individually for any note and it is even possible to write lyrics in Japanese for the express purpose of bringing the song to life for singers. However, the options are all in Japanese with only the numbers and musical notes being
    9.00
    1 votes
    121
    Pump It Up

    Pump It Up

    Pump It Up, commonly abbreviated as PIU or shortened to just Pump, is a music video game series currently developed by Nexcade and published by Andamiro, a Korean arcade game producer. The game is typically played on a dance pad with five arrow panels: up-left, up-right, bottom-left, bottom-right, and a center panel. Additional gameplay modes may utilize two five-panel pads side-by-side. These panels are pressed using the player's feet, in response to arrows that appear on the screen in front of the player. The arrows are synchronized to the general rhythm or beat of a chosen song, and success is dependent on the player's ability to time and position his or her steps accordingly. The original version of the game was originally released in South Korea in August 1999. The game has also been released in other markets, such as North America and South America and in Europe. there is set to be 2 new versions of the game. Pump It Up Infinity 2012 , will be released on October, 2012, alongside the newest international version Pump it up 2013: FIESTA 2 , which is the direct sequel to the main series, FIESTA and FIESTA EX. FIESTA 2 will be released in November. Pump it Up has tried to cater
    9.00
    1 votes
    122
    9.00
    1 votes
    123

    SimTunes

    SimTunes is a children's software toy designed by Toshio Iwai and released by Maxis in 1996. It involves painting a picture with dots (large pixels), where each color (unless it was part of the backdrop, which was black or a bitmap) represents a musical note. The player places up to four different-coloured Bugz, which represent instruments or vocal syllables, on this picture, and can change their starting directions and relative speeds. The Bugz crawl over the picture, playing notes corresponding with the colours, and turning, moving randomly or jumping in response to function symbols that can be added to the dots. SimTunes was originally developed by Iwai as a game for the Super NES/Super Famicom, known as Sound Fantasy, in the early 1990s. It is believed that Nintendo chose not to release the completed game because of its musical mechanics, which were unproven in home game consoles. Many of the ideas and elements in Sound Fantasy are present in SimTunes. Electroplankton, for the Nintendo DS, was also designed by Iwai and is considered a spiritual sequel to SimTunes.
    9.00
    1 votes
    124
    The Idolmaster: Live For You!

    The Idolmaster: Live For You!

    The Idolm@ster: Live For You! (アイドルマスター Live for You!, Aidorumasutā Raibu fō Yū) is an Xbox 360 game only released in Japan by Namco Bandai Games on February 28, 2008. The game is the sequel to the arcade game The Idolm@ster (which was later ported to the Xbox 360) which followed the career of a producer who works for the fictional 765 Production studio and has to work with a selection of ten prospective pop idols. In this game, due to the sudden absence of the original producer, the player is given the role of 'Special Producer' and is charged with coordinating the idols' concerts. After the success of the Xbox 360 version of the game, Namco revealed the production of Live for You! in October 2007. The game focuses more on the concert event section from the original, with higher customization of the stage, costumes and songs. The game was sold in two versions, a Limited and a Regular Edition. The limited edition includes a custom slipcase and a special DVD containing an OVA and previews of remixed versions of the songs, available on the Xbox Live Marketplace. Pre-reservations contained a download card that would allow users to download a new song, 'Shiny Smile' (3/27 release) for
    9.00
    1 votes
    125

    Amplitude

    Amplitude is a 2003 PlayStation 2 musical video game. It was developed by Harmonix and is the sequel to the game Frequency. In Amplitude, the player controls a ship (referred to as a "Beat Blaster") moving down a path of varying shapes and lengths, containing up to six tracks. Each color-coded track corresponds to a different aspect of the song, such as percussion, synth, bass, or vocals, and contains a sequence of notes. As the player hits buttons corresponding to the note placement on the track, the notes activate a small portion of the track. If the player successfully activates enough notes in sequence, the track is "captured" and the section will play automatically for a number of bars, freeing the player to capture another section. The object of the game is to capture a sufficient amount of sections to reach the end of the song. If the player continually misses notes, an energy meter empties until the game is over. There are several different powerups available to the player to make gameplay easier. Powerups are gained by activating a series of specially shaped and colored notes. Such powerups allow immediate capturing of tracks, doubling of points scored, slowing down the
    5.75
    4 votes
    126

    Rock Band Unplugged

    Rock Band Unplugged is an expansion of the Rock Band series of music video games released for the PlayStation Portable. The game is developed by Backbone Entertainment in conjunction with Harmonix Music Systems and is distributed by MTV Games and Electronic Arts. The game was released in North America and Europe on June 9, 2009. The core game is functionally similar to the note-matching gameplay of Harmonix' previous titles, Frequency and Amplitude, with the player responsible for playing all four instruments—lead and bass guitar, drums, and vocals—using the Portable's controls. Game modes are similar to Rock Band's, and the soundtrack includes a number of songs that have already been a part of the Rock Band series. Additional tracks will be a time-limited exclusive to Unplugged before they are released as downloadable content for the console games. The game supports the addition of new songs that can be purchased through the PlayStation Store. Rock Band Unplugged, in addition to being released separately, was also released as part of a "Limited Edition Entertainment Pack" that also includes a Rock Band Unplugged-branded PSP, a 4GB memory card, and a voucher to download the movie
    5.75
    4 votes
    127

    Lips: Number One Hits

    Lips: Number One Hits is a karaoke video game for the Xbox 360 console, and the follow-up to the 2008 title Lips. Like its predecessor, the game was developed by iNiS and published by Microsoft Game Studios. It was released on October 20, 2009 in North America and October 23 in Europe and received generally average reviews. Spin-offs of the game have also been released, including Lips: Deutsche Partyknaller and Lips: Canta en Español. Lips: Number One Hits features the use of motion-sensitive microphones, which is also compatible with other music video games such as The Beatles: Rock Band. The game is sold separately, and in packages including one and two microphones. Each copy of Lips: Number One Hits includes a redemption code for downloading one of three 5-song track packs for free. Number One Hits remains with the core of its patched predecessor, while offering some new features: The Lips: Number One Hits song list consists solely of songs that have reached the number one position on major global charts. In addition to this, players with a Lips save data on their hard drive will be able to select songs from the first game via a hot swap feature. 40 master tracks are included on
    6.67
    3 votes
    128

    Musika

    Musika is a music video game created for the iPod by Masaya Matsuura (of Parappa the Rapper and Vib-Ribbon fame). Originally called Rhythmica, Musika was created exclusively for the iPod click wheel interface and is considered similar in format to the rhythm game, Phase, also for iPod. Matsuura has said in interviews that his decision to make the game for the iPod was a simple decision because "[m]any years ago Apple's tools first opened [his] eyes to the power of music and multimedia, so it's exciting [for him] to release [his] first game for this device." Musika is a music-generated game and as such it is played using the songs already on the iPod it is played on. To player the player selects a song from the list of all songs available and plays it. As the music plays, the player is challenged to press the Select button (the only button used to play the game) as soon as a character (letter or number) from the song's title appears in the field. The faster this is done, the more points are earned. For every 5 letters selected correctly and for every completed song, score multipliers build up the more correct letters you get in a row. High scores can lead to development of bonus
    6.67
    3 votes
    129

    Samba de Amigo

    Samba de Amigo is a rhythm game originally developed by Sonic Team and released in 1999 by Sega in arcades, 2000 for the Dreamcast video game console, and developed by Gearbox Software and Escalation Studios in 2008 for the Wii. The player uses controllers shaped like maracas with the goal of matching a series of patterns displayed on-screen. It can be played by one or two players simultaneously. The music in Samba de Amigo is made of primarily popular Latin music songs rather than common or traditional samba. The game also features non-Latin pop songs. Samba de Amigo is played with a pair of maracas. As a song plays, the player, guided by on-screen graphics, must shake the maracas at high, middle, or low heights with the beat of the music, or occasionally must strike poses with the maracas held in various positions. The player is represented on-screen by Amigo, a monkey. If the player does well, the scene around the monkey (usually a concert or a dance) will attract more people and become more vividly animated; if the player does poorly, characters leave and eventually all that's left is the monkey alone, looking sad. In the primary game mode, each player has six spots arranged in
    6.67
    3 votes
    130
    Audiosurf

    Audiosurf

    Audiosurf is a puzzle/rhythm hybrid game created by Invisible Handlebar, a personal company created by Dylan Fitterer. Its track-like stages visually mimic the music the player chooses, while the player races across several lanes collecting colored blocks that appear in sync with the music. The game was released on February 15, 2008 over Steam, few days after winning the Independent Games Festival 2008 Excellence in Audio Award, heavily influenced by the hit soundtrack composed by Pedro Macedo Camacho; the full version was for a long time only available for purchase through Steam, but was later released as a retail product in Europe, by Ascaron. Audiosurf was the first third party game to use Valve's Steamworks technology. The Zune HD version was also released as Audiosurf: Tilt. On March 22nd, 2012, a sequel, Audiosurf Air, was announced via Dylan Fitterer's Twitter account and the Audiosurf launch screen. In Audiosurf, the player controls a levitating vehicle similar to those found in Wipeout or F-Zero. The player then maneuvers it down a colorful multi-lane highway, collecting blocks in a manner similar to Klax. The ship is controlled either by a mouse, the arrow keys, the
    7.50
    2 votes
    131

    Guitar Rising

    Guitar Rising is an unpublished educational music video game developed by GameTank to teach the guitar. It is to be similar to Rock Band and the Guitar Hero franchise, but use an actual guitar, which can be of any model, by plugging a guitar-USB adapter or jack plug into a microphone port or directly to the sound card. The on-screen fretboard scrolls from right to left, reading much like a tablature, with the notes lying on the corresponding string showing the number of the fret on which the note is to be played. A playable demo was given at Independent Game Conference West on November 5, 2009. Release for Microsoft Windows and Mac OS X was scheduled for late 2009, but the game was not released in 2009, and as of September 2011 no release date has been given. The Guitar Rising homepage no longer exists. A similar free release, LittleBigStar, was in beta testing but failed as a product. LittleBigStar has been succeeded by a product called Jam Origin that is in beta. A commercial version of Guitar Rising, called Rocksmith, was released on October 18, 2011. The game features a similar USB to 1/4" interface, allowing any guitar to be used with the game. GameTank CEO Jake Parks has told
    7.50
    2 votes
    132

    Karaoke Revolution

    Karaoke Revolution and its many sequels are video games for the PlayStation 2, PlayStation 3, Nintendo GameCube, Wii, Xbox, and Xbox 360, developed by Harmonix Music Systems and Blitz Games and published by Konami in its Bemani line of music games. The Original Concept for Karaoke Revolution was created by Scott Hawkins and Sneaky Rabbit Studios. Technology and concepts from the game were subsequently incorporated into Harmonix's game Rock Band. The Japanese versions of the game are developed by Konami themselves. The gameplay also differs significantly. Rather than a game per se, it is merely a karaoke system for the PlayStation 2, with no judgments. The game does not attempt to understand the singer's words, but instead detects their pitch. As such, singers can hum to a song or sing different lyrics without penalty. The game adapts to the player singing in a different octave than the song, to accommodate players whose vocal ranges do not fit the song. The songs in the game are covers of pop hits frequently sung in karaoke bars. This contrasts with the SingStar series from Sony Computer Entertainment Europe, which features only original artist recordings along with the music
    7.50
    2 votes
    134

    Let's Tap

    Let's Tap is a video game developed by Yuji Naka's studio Prope and published by Sega for the Wii console. Along with Let's Catch, Let's Tap was the first game from Prope to be announced. Owners of Let's Tap will be able to unlock content in Let's Catch. The game was later released as five individual applications for the iOS. Let's Tap consists of a number of minigames that requires the player to tap a flat surface with their hands to play. The game requires the player to set the Wii Remote face-side down on a flat, stable surface, with the accelerometer picking up their vibrations as they tap the surface to move an on screen character in a race, inflate a balloon, create ripples in a pool of water or paint swirls on a canvas. In a video released by Sega the player is shown resting the Wii Remote on an empty box originally used to package the Wii console. In Japan and Europe Sega has released the game with two foldout cardboard boxes that players are able to use as a tapping surface. However these are not included in the North American package. The game features the following minigames: Let's Tap has received generally favorable reviews from critics, garnering a Metascore of 70 at
    7.50
    2 votes
    135

    Martial Beat

    Martial Beat was a game created by Konami for the arcade and PlayStation in Japan in 2002. This game tests skill in martial arts, and it is not really considered part of Konami's Bemani series, even though it contains music from the series. This game was shipped in a modified Dance Dance Revolution cabinet, with the sensors and the game's art on it. Even though there is the presence of two sets of selection buttons (as Dance Dance Revolution supported two players), this game is one player only. To play the game, one needs to follow the on-screen instructor, and when a red light turns on located on top of the screen, the player must perform the move by repeating the instructor. Songs from this game are a compilation of Dancemania licensed tracks from DDR 4thMix and DDR 5thMix. Every song has only one difficulty level. Footnotes:
    7.50
    2 votes
    136
    Rock Band 2

    Rock Band 2

    Rock Band 2 is a music video game developed by Harmonix Music Systems. It is the sequel to Rock Band and is the second title in the series. The game allows up to four players to simulate the performance of popular songs by playing with controllers modeled after musical instruments. Players can play the lead guitar, bass guitar, and drums parts to songs with "instrument controllers", as well as sing through a USB microphone. Players are scored on their ability to match scrolling musical "notes" while playing instruments, or by their ability to match the singer's pitch on vocals. Rock Band 2 features improved drum and guitar controllers, while supporting older controllers, as well. New features include a "Drum Trainer" mode, a "Battle of the Bands" mode, online capabilities for "World Tour" mode, and merchandising opportunities for the players' virtual bands. In addition to the 84 songs included on the game disc and 20 free downloadable songs, over 1400 additional downloadable songs have been released for the Xbox 360, Wii, and PlayStation 3 versions, with more added each week. All of these songs, existing and future, are compatible with all Rock Band titles. Rock Band 2 software was
    7.50
    2 votes
    137

    Rock Revolution

    Rock Revolution is a music video game developed by Zoë Mode and HB Studios and published by Konami. It was first revealed on May 15, 2008, and released on October 15, 2008 for the Nintendo DS, PlayStation 3, Wii and Xbox 360. As with similar titles, the game uses various controllers to simulate the performance of rock music, primarily using guitar and drum controllers on its Xbox 360 and PS3 versions. Rock Revolution received generally negative reviews from critics, who felt that the game was merely an inferior clone of the Guitar Hero and Rock Band franchises with no distinguishing characteristics to set it apart from its competition; particularly the design of its drum kit controller, the game's interface, and its soundtrack of mostly cover versions as its worst aspects. The game also experienced low sales numbers in its first month, selling only around 3,000 copies. Gameplay in Rock Revolution revolves around players attempting to simulate the playing of rock music using special instrument shaped controllers. Scrolling notes onscreen indicate the pattern and timing of buttons that must be pushed on the guitar or pads hit on the drumkit. Songs can feature "fill boxes" and "roll
    7.50
    2 votes
    138

    Superstar Dance Club

    Superstar Dance Club: #1 Hits is a game created by XS Games. It was released for the PlayStation console in 2001. It was released for the PlayStation Network on March 11, 2010 in Europe.
    7.50
    2 votes
    139

    Synaesthete

    Synaesthete is a freeware game developed by four students at the DigiPen Institute of Technology under the team name Rolling Without Slipping. Synaesthete is a marriage of arcade-style music games such as Dance Dance Revolution and PC role-playing games such as Diablo II. At first glance, the feel of the game will be similar to an action RPG, but with several key differences. First, there is no inventory management, so players do not collect or equip items. Second, player actions such as attacking monsters and casting spells must occur synchronously with the music in order to be effective. Third, the game is not story-driven, and there are no friendly NPCs. The focus of the player is to explore a music-driven environment, where the music that is playing changes the world, and reaching different parts of the world changes the music, as well as character advancement, which is accomplished by killing enemies and reacting synchronously to the music. You control an avatar named the Zaikman, named after the team's producer Zach Aikman. The Zaikman is referred to as a defense mechanism for the collective unconscious, and you use him to destroy enemies and progress through various levels.
    7.50
    2 votes
    140
    7.50
    2 votes
    141

    Technic Beat

    Technicbeat is an arcade music video game developed by Arika. It is a sequel to the PlayStation 2 game Technictix. The PlayStation 2 version of Technicbeat was published in North America by Mastiff. It was released in Japan in 2002 and the United States in 2004. In this game, players select a song from a preset list and then “play” their chosen song using their on-screen character. Most of Technicbeat’s gameplay takes place on a square-shaped area called a “stage”. During gameplay, circle-shaped “markers” appear on the stage. When these markers first appear, a small circle appears in the center of each marker and then expands like a ripple toward the marker’s outer edge. The player’s goal is to “activate” all the markers that appear by placing their on screen character on top of the marker and pressing a button when the marker’s inner circle overlaps its outer edge. Each marker that appears on the stage corresponds to a note or set of notes in the player’s selected song. If the player successfully activates a marker, it will play its corresponding note(s) and then disappear. If the player does not activate a marker before the marker’s inner circle has expanded past its outer edge,
    7.50
    2 votes
    142

    Spice World

    Spice World is a music video game created by SCE London Studio for Sony PlayStation released in July 1998. With tracks like "Wannabe,", "Who Do You Think You Are", "Move Over", "Spice Up Your Life," and "Say You'll Be There," each animated Spice Girl will offer a few comments as they tour the game's stages, experiencing a DJ and dance instructor that speak in stereotypical fashions. There are eleven dance moves, each one a different combination of four buttons, two of which are always the "X" button. The game also contains a dozen interviews along with other entertaining moments, such as Geri Halliwell pinching Prince Charles' bottom, and the girls wreaking havoc on a Japanese talk-show. In the game, players have to prepare the Spice Girls for a live television concert by doing such things as teaching them the dance steps they must do for the performance, choosing the song they will perform, and the sequence in which the song's lyrics will be sung. When it's time for the show to happen, the player gets to be a camera-person, deciding which camera shots will go and the angle from which the girls will be seen. The player gets to watch the girls "sing" and dance as the player has
    5.50
    4 votes
    143
    UBeat

    UBeat

    Jubeat (ユビート, Yubīto) is a series of arcade music video games developed by Konami Computer Entertainment Japan, and is a part of Konami's Bemani line of music video games. The series uses an arrangement of 16 buttons in a 4x4 grid for gameplay, a grid also used for the displaying of cues and part of the user interface. The game went on several location tests in Asia since December 2007, and was released on July 24, 2008. in Japan, and December in Hong Kong and Macau (Mainland China didn't officially get the game until early 2010). Two attempts to localize the game for the United States market have been made since August 2008, including UBeat, a variant of the first version, and Jukebeat in 2009, a variant based on Jubeat Ripples. A port of the game for the iOS, "Jubeat Plus", was released on Apple's Japanese App Store in 2010, with a release in the USA store titled "Jukebeat" in 2011. The basic gameplay of the series is similar to Nintendo DS music games such as Osu! Tatakae! Ouendan and Elite Beat Agents and can be considered to be similar to Whac-A-Mole. Animated explosions or other animations, called "markers", that can be chosen at the song select screen are shown within the
    6.33
    3 votes
    144

    Audition Online

    Audition Online (Korean: 오디션 온라인), also known as X-BEAT in Japan, is a downloadable multiplayer online casual rhythm game produced by T3 Entertainment. It was originally released in South Korea in 2004, but it has been localized by various publishers around the world. Audition Online is free to play but it earns its revenue by selling virtual items such as clothes for the player's avatar. It currently has over 300 million players worldwide. In South Korea, PSP (called Audition Portable) and cellphone versions were released on June 1, 2007 and June 4, 2007 respectively. On June 12, 2008, Season 2 was first officially released in Korea. Currently, Korean Audition, China Audition, Thailand Audition, Indonesian Audition, AuditionSEA, AuditionEu, Vietnam Audition, Philippines Audition, North American Audition, Brazil Audition, X-BEAT have updated to Season 2. Audition Season 2 features a new interface, sound system, expressions, and many new features. During Fall 2008, Audition 2, the sequel, was discovered to be in the making. On April 28, 2010, closed beta has officially begin. Audition's popularity began in South Korean and global versions of the game. Due to hacking in the global
    8.00
    1 votes
    145
    Bemani Pocket

    Bemani Pocket

    The Bemani Pocket (ビーマニポケット) series was a short-lived attempt by Konami to capitalize on the market of portable entertainment in the late 1990s. They were introduced on the Japanese market in 1998 and they featured versions of most Bemani games, from Beatmania to ParaParaParadise. Beginning in 1998, Bemani Pocket games were used by Nintendo in collaboration with St.GIGA as prizes for national Satellaview competitions and events. Partial platform release list:
    8.00
    1 votes
    146

    Boogie

    Boogie is a music video game developed by Electronic Arts for the Wii, PlayStation 2 and Nintendo DS. Being touted as a party-game, it enables players to create their character, then use the Wii Remote and a microphone to sing and dance through it. Each song within the game can be performed either as a karaoke or as a dancing game. The game is based around an alien theme. It was one of the first games released in Brazil for the Wii. Although anticipation was high for the game, it received negative reviews. The game was followed by a sequel, Boogie Superstar, in 2008. The karaoke gameplay is similar to other singing games such as SingStar and Karaoke Revolution. The game comes packaged with a USB microphone. To score, the player must sing in time and in tune with the lyrics as they scroll at the bottom of the screen, with a musical staff to indicate the correct pitch and where the player's current pitch is. Rather than using phonetic detection, the game bases the score on how well the player matches the rhythm and pitch. The dancing portion uses the Wii Remote and optionally the Nunchuk attachment. As the song plays, the player must move the remote left, right, down or up in time
    8.00
    1 votes
    147

    Brain Strainers

    Brain Strainers is an early music video game designed for the ColecoVision. It is one of the first video game clones of the popular 1970s audio game, Simon, which became a large hit in the early 1980s. The game was recognized by magazines such as the Atari-centric Antic for excellence in educational software and it is notable for being one of the earliest music video games to employ pitch-based gameplay in the Clef Climber portion of the game. Brain Strainers consisted of two musically-themed sub-games: "Follow The Leader," and "Clef Climber." The intention of the game was to provide an educational video game experience. Skills that were targeted were eidetic musical memory and tonal accuracy. The "Follow The Leader" sub-game is an eidetic music game designed to test the player's memory. Here, a pattern of musical notes are played and four colored panels light up correspondingly. The player then has a few seconds to repeat the sequence back to the computer. If the sequence is repeated correctly then the computer generates a longer string of notes to perform. As the game progresses, the speeds at which the tune is performed and at which the response by the player must be given are
    8.00
    1 votes
    148

    Daigasso! Band Brothers

    Daigasso! Band Brothers (大合奏!バンドブラザーズ, lit. "Grand Ensemble! Band Brothers") is a music video game published and developed by Nintendo for the Nintendo DS handheld game console. It was released in Japan on December 2, 2004 as a launch game for the Nintendo DS. The game features multiple songs, which include classical music, television themes, and video game music. The game is controlled using both the buttons on the DS as well as its touch screen in certain portions. It uses a variety of different instruments, which are combined selectively in order to compose a song. Besides the primary mode, players may play together, each one playing a different instrument in the song. Players may also compose their own songs. It was to be released in the United States as Jam with the Band, but was never released nor formally cancelled. It has a sequel titled Jam with the Band, which was released in Japan in 2008 and in Europe in 2010. The single-player game of Band Brothers includes 35 normal songs, plus three unlockable songs. These are divided into the categories J-Pop, World, TV (anime/live-action), Classic, and Game (includes a variety of medleys from Nintendo titles such as Mario, Fire
    8.00
    1 votes
    149

    Guitar Rock Tour

    Guitar Rock Tour is a music video game developed and published by Gameloft for the Nintendo DS and iOS. It was released on November 4, 2008 and released on Nintendo's DSiWare in Europe on July 31, 2009 and in North America on August 17, 2009. The game is played similarly to other music games such as Guitar Hero and Rock Band, with the player using either their finger or the stylus to tap along to incoming notes which move down the screen in time to the music. Two different instruments are available; guitar and drums. There are three difficulties: Easy, Medium and Hard. 17 songs are included in the game, all of which are covers. These include: Songs marked with an asterisk are featured in the mobile version. Also, exclusive to the mobile version are Iron Maiden's "Run to the Hills" and David Bowie's "Heroes".
    8.00
    1 votes
    150

    KORG DS-10

    KORG DS-10 is a music creation program for the Nintendo DS that emulates the Korg MS range of synthesizers. Frequently people refer to the Korg MS-10 but this is a single oscillator monosynth. The DS-10 adds sync which the MS-20 is lacking. It was released on July 24, 2008 in Japan, October 10, 2008 in Europe, and November 4, 2008 in the United States. A newer, DSi compatible version, entitled KORG DS-10 Plus, was released in Japan on September 17, 2009 and in the United States on February 16, 2010. It doubles the number of synth and drum machines. It also adds some minor new features for the standard DS. The DS-10 creates sound with two analogue synthesizer emulators, each with two Voltage-Controlled Oscillators (the Korg MS-10 had only one VCO). The VCOs feature a sawtooth, a pulse (with a non-modifiable pulse width), a triangle and a noise waveform. There is also a four part drum machine that uses the same sound creation techniques as the synthesizers. The sounds made by each of the synthesizer emulators are modified using virtual knobs to change the value of standard synthesizer parameters such as cutoff frequency and waveform shape. Additionally there is a screen where users
    8.00
    1 votes
    151

    Blues Brothers 2000

    Blues Brothers 2000 is a platform game for the Nintendo 64 console, released by Virgin Interactive in October 2000 in Europe, and by Titus Software in November 2000 in North America. The game is a platformer, loosely based on the band and the film. Due to major delays it was released two years after the film it was supposed to help promote was in theaters. The game player starts out as Elwood in prison who needs to get the band together for the battle of the bands, which is in less than two days. After saving the guitarist, Cab, then defeating the warden, the player progresses through Chicago, in hopes of finding Mac and Buster. After going about the rooftops, the player enters Willie's Club, where Mac is being held captive. After defeating Willie, Mac says that Buster has escaped to the old graveyard. Arriving there, the player finds that an evil tree has put Buster in a cage. The final battle takes place in a swamp.
    7.00
    2 votes
    152

    Rhythm Tengoku

    Rhythm Tengoku (リズム天国, Rizumu Tengoku, lit. Rhythm Heaven) is a music video game (rhythm action game) developed by Nintendo SPD. It was released in Japan on August 3, 2006, and was the last game developed by Nintendo for the Game Boy Advance. An arcade version of the game was reprogrammed and published by Sega exclusively in Japan in September 2007. The game received an Excellence Prize for Entertainment at the 10th annual Japan Media Arts Festival in 2006. Although this game was never released outside of Japan, a sequel entitled Rhythm Tengoku Gold was released for the Nintendo DS on July 31, 2008, and was later released internationally as Rhythm Heaven in North America, Australasia, and as Rhythm Paradise in Europe. Another sequel for the Wii, Rhythm Heaven Fever, was released in Japan on 21 July 2011, in North America on 13 February 2012 and in Europe on 6 July 2012. Rhythm Tengoku's quirky visual style and gameplay bears similarities to the WarioWare series (which was also designed by Yoshio Sakamoto and his WarioWare development team). Each level is a minigame which requires the player to perform certain actions in sync with the rhythm to create a beat to go along with the
    7.00
    2 votes
    153

    Space Channel 5

    Space Channel 5 (スペースチャンネル5, Supēsu Chaneru Faibu) is a music video game developed by United Game Artists under the direction of Tetsuya Mizuguchi and published by Sega. The gameplay features a system where the player must copy sequences of dance steps performed by the computer, as synchronized to the rhythm of the music. The game's theme song, Mexican Flyer, was composed by Ken Woodman in the 1960's. Space Channel 5 was first released in Japan in 1999 and North America and Europe in 2000 for the Dreamcast and was later released for the PlayStation 2 in Japan and Europe in 2002 and ported by THQ to the Game Boy Advance in 2003. A sequel, Space Channel 5: Part 2, was released for Dreamcast (Japan only), PlayStation 2 (Japan and Europe) in 2002 and on Steam on March 4, 2011. The games revolve around players controlling the funky space reporter, Ulala, as she grooves to rescue hostages and stop the enemy. Each level is split up into several parts, revolving around dance-offs or shoot-outs, during which the player must repeat commands spoken by the opponent (Up, Down, Left, Right and Chu) in time to the rhythm. Dance-offs involve dancing against an opponent, with some routines
    7.00
    2 votes
    154

    Tap Tap Revenge

    Tap Tap Revenge, also known as Tap Tap Revenge Classic is a music game created by Nate True, and developed and published by Tapulous for the iOS in July 2008. It is the first game in Tapulous' Tap Tap series. Development for the game began prior to the release of the iPhone SDK, and was originally entitled Tap Tap Revolution. The goal of the game is to tap each of the colored balls when they reach a line at the bottom of the screen. If the ball is hit on the beat, the player gains points, but if not, it counts as a miss. There are also "shakes", which require the player to move the iPhone, iPod Touch or iPad (although the game was designed for the formet two) to the right, left, or middle. The game's reception was generally positive, and it became the most downloaded free game of the App Store for 2008. The game was followed by Tap Tap Revenge 2, Tap Tap Revenge 3 and Tap Tap Revenge 4. The game was modeled after Konami's popular Dance Dance Revolution series gameplay. Players use their fingers to tap colored balls when they reach the bottom of the screen. The goal is to hit the balls at the correct time (as dictated by the beat of the song), and thus gain points. "Shakes",
    7.00
    2 votes
    155
    Betty Boop's Double Shift

    Betty Boop's Double Shift

    Betty Boop's Double Shift is a puzzle game, developed and published by DSI Games. The game is based on the popular Betty Boop cartoon series. The gameplay is similar to the Diner Dash formula. Betty must move from table to table in order to serve her customers in a timely manner, but if she takes too much time, customers will get angry and leave. After a while, however, Betty Boop's Double Shift changes gears, and becomes a game more akin to Elite Beat Agents. Betty gets called to the front of the diner to sing a song, and the player must tap the stylus on the buttons that correspond to the note she sings. Critical reaction has been overwhelmingly negative. Nintendojo, which gave it a 3.0 out of 10, criticized the unresponsive touch controls, and the game's lack of originality. IGN came down on the game for being a clone of Diner Dash and Cake Mania, and gave the game a 4.5 out of 10.
    6.00
    3 votes
    156

    Dance Dance Revolution: Hottest Party

    Dance Dance Revolution Hottest Party, known as Dancing Stage Hottest Party in the European and Oceanic regions, is a video game released by Konami in 2007 and 2008 to several countries for the Wii console. Konami took the game beyond the traditional setup of Dance Dance Revolution by incorporating the Wii Remote and the standard dance pad into a full body motion game. It has two sequels, Dance Dance Revolution Hottest Party 2 and Dance Dance Revolution Hottest Party 3. Unlike the previous release of Dance Revolution on a Nintendo console, Dance Dance Revolution Mario Mix, Hottest Party was not a collaboration between Konami and Nintendo. It is not a sequel, but the Nintendo GameCube accessories for Mario Mix are compatible with Hottest Party. Gameplay is largely unchanged from other Dance Revolution games. However, the game features additional modes taking advantage of the hardware of the Wii. The game allows the integration of the Wii Remote into gameplay, where steps can be replaced by markers requiring a hand motion with the remote. Other step types include steps which must be hit twice. Hottest Party also includes several other modes, including a Free Mode, multi player modes,
    6.00
    3 votes
    157

    Total distortion

    Total Distortion is a 1995 full motion video adventure game for Mac and Windows, developed by Pop Rocket. It was critically acclaimed for being innovative and creative. Originally slated for Q4 1993, the game was delayed until November 1995. The gameplay has the player as a music video entrepreneur in the "Distortion Dimension", a place where you fight "Guitar Warriors" which you face in guitar battles. The ultimate goal of the game is to get fame points, make lots of money, and to film successful music videos. The game was also known for its sense of humor (the game over screen featured the enemy singing a song known as "You Are Dead" featuring lyrics such as, "You heart has stopped and your brain is cold... You are so so dead"). One of the most distinctive features of the game was the sleep mode. When player went to sleep, a dream appeared which consisted of a minigame. If the player failed the dream sequence it would result in a nightmare, which decreased mental energy (an important stat in the game). The programming of this game was headed up mostly by Joe Sparks, creator of Radiskull and Devil Doll and Spaceship Warlock. Six years before the producer's journey began into the
    6.00
    3 votes
    158

    UNiSON

    Unison: Rebels of Rhythm & Dance (sometimes known as simply Unison) is a rhythm video game released for the PlayStation 2 in 2001 which featured unique controls and, at the time, beautiful graphics for its genre of game. It is heavily inspired by J-pop, anime and the formation of musical girl groups. World is Waiting for Unison; 3 Girls and an afro goes save the world!; Bring Back Smile By Soul Dancing! The game's plot, taking place in the futuristic city of Twin Ships, centers around the exploits of three girls - Trill, Cela and Chilly - and mascot Friday as they struggle against the dictatorship of a man known only as Ducker, who can use his voice to exert a hypnotic influence over people and only allow them to experience his peculiar brands of fun, which has outlawed anything creative aside from his own music; dancing, in particular, is especially prohibited. Gathered together by a man known as Doctor Dance - who happens to dress in what passes as stereotypical 1960s attire and possesses a large afro - the three girls form the musical dance group Unison, and set about putting on a series of performances over Twin Ships' airwaves to rally the public to their cause and bring
    6.00
    3 votes
    159

    GuitarFreaks V6

    GuitarFreaks V6: Blazing!!! is the 17th game in the GuitarFreaks series of music video games. It was released in arcades by Konami on April 15, 2009. The game features over 20 new songs, some of which are unlocked over Konami's e-Amusement platform. The overall motif of Blazing!!! is a fresh orange, yellow background, departing from its construction beams design from GuitarFreaks V5: Rock to Infinity. Core gameplay remains the same on GuitarFreaks V5. A new hidden modifier allows the highest prefect hit rate of the individual songs to be displayed simultaneously while playing the song. Skill percentile of the each individual songs is now displayed when playing as a guest, which was exclusively only for players using the e-Amusement card. If the player gets three S's, two S's and an A, the player gets to play the Extra Stage, Over the Limit!, Rock to Infinity or 風神雲龍伝 by 98. If the stage is cleared with a perfect percentage of more than 93% and the player is playing without using the auto accompaniment, the player gets to play Encore Stage, Driven Shooter by 猫叉Master+.
    5.67
    3 votes
    160

    Boogie Superstar

    Boogie Superstar is a rhythm video game by Electronic Arts. It is the sequel to the game Boogie. NGamer magazine initially reported that the title would support the Wii Balance Board, writing that it was to be a "board-based dance-a-thon"; however, Electronic Arts confirmed that while the title would include a microphone to sing along to, it will not support the Wii Balance Board. Like the original game, Boogie Superstar features both singing and dancing. The game is based around the premise of a talent contest. The karaoke gameplay is similar to other singing games such as SingStar and Karaoke Revolution. To score, the player must sing in time and in tune with the lyrics as they scroll at the bottom of the screen, with a musical staff to indicate the correct pitch and where the player's current pitch is. Rather than using phonetic detection, the game bases the score on how well the player matches the rhythm and pitch. In contrast to the freestyle dancing in the last game, the game mechanic in Boogie Superstar involves players waggling the Wii Remote to simple two-beat prompts, such as swinging the Remote side-to side or up and down in time to on screen directions. Boogie Superstar
    6.50
    2 votes
    161

    EyeToy: Groove

    EyeToy: Groove is a dancing game developed by SCE London Studio and published by Sony Computer Entertainment. It was released November 14, 2003 in Europe and April 20, 2004 in The United States. In EyeToy: Groove the player must hit targets with their arms on the edges of the screen to the beat of the music. The game also includes a built-in calorie counter which estimates calories burned based on the player's weight. Players can usually burn around 5-20 calories per song. There are rewards available for high amounts of calories burned. There is also a mode that allows players to design their own moves for the songs. Building on from the 'Beat Freak' mode from EyeToy: Play, players must hit targets on the edges of the screen with their arms in time to the music. There will sometimes be stars that require players to follow it from one position to the other. There are also freestyle segments in which players earn points by freely moving about on screen. There are 28 songs from several different artists including The Cheeky Girls, Daniel Bedingfield, Mis-Teeq, Earth, Wind & Fire, Elvis Presley, Fatboy Slim, Groove Armada, Good Charlotte, The Jackson 5, Jessica Simpson, Las Ketchup,
    6.50
    2 votes
    162

    Kris Kross: Make My Video

    Kris Kross: Make My Video was created as a video game by Digital Pictures in 1992, due to the popularity of the rap group Kris Kross. The game puts the player in control of editing the music videos for the group on 3 different songs, Jump, I Missed the Bus and Warm It Up. Players are given instructions of what they should include in the video, and then the song is played while you edit the video live. Players can change between video clips available by pressing the buttons on the controller, and have the option between clips from the videos of the group, stock footage, movie clips and special effects. The game turned out to be a huge failure, both financially and critically. It is on Seanbaby's Crapstravaganza list of the 20 worst games of all time at #18.
    6.50
    2 votes
    163

    Mambo A Go Go

    Mambo a Go Go, is a music video game produced by Konami where players must rhythmically beat conga drums as colored notes fall from the top of the screen. There are 3 drums, each one divided into three sections, giving players a maximum of nine places to hit. The game predominantly features Latin music including "Mambo No. 5", "La Bamba" and "El Bimbo" the song that served as the basis for "El Ritmo Tropical" used in the Dance Dance Revolution series. Mambo a Go Go is probably the most obscure music video game by Konami, as it was overshadowed by another music game produced by Sega; Samba de Amigo. Despite this, some songs such as "Gamelan de Couple" and "La Bamba" were popular enough to make appearances in other Bemani series such as beatmania as Dance Dance Revolution. A release of Mambo a Go Go in the United States under the title Mambo King was planned, but never materialized.
    6.50
    2 votes
    164

    MC Groovz Dance Craze

    MC Groovz Dance Craze is a rhythm game for the Nintendo GameCube, developed and published by Mad Catz, Inc. The game is a Dance Dance Revolution clone which came bundled with Mad Catz' Beat Pad accessory. The game was originally announced via a press release on November 2, 2004. There are two main gameplay modes: Scroll and Spin. In Scroll mode, you play by stepping on four different directions on the game pad (right, up, down and left) as the arrows scroll towards four icons at the top of the screen. Spin mode, however, allows you to step on eight directions. The arrows gravitate towards the icons in the screen from the center. In Easy mode, you only step on four arrows. Moderate and Expert increase the number of arrows to eight. The songs are also longer than other dance games, often lasting around seven minutes. The game also includes three extra modes of play: Dance Workout mode, which lets you see how many calories you've burned while playing the game; Dance Together, a two player co-op dance mode; and Dance Faceoff, a two-player versus mode. The game features a total of 28 songs, including several licensed songs from original artists such as KC and the Sunshine Band, Earth,
    6.50
    2 votes
    165
    Pump It Up Pro

    Pump It Up Pro

    Pump It Up Pro (abbreviated as PIUPRO or Pump Pro, and marketed as Pump It Up PRO) is a series of Rhythm games produced by Fun in Motion and published by Andamiro. The product is a spin-off of Pump It Up, and is developed separately from the main series. Pump It Up Pro was designed with the intent of getting players who normally play 4-panel dance games into 5-panel dancing. The game utilizes a build of StepMania 4 for its engine. The game can be purchased inside a FX cabinet, or as an upgrade kit for SX and GX cabinets running MK6 or MK7 hardware (which includes the button panel for the front of the machine, USB ports, the hard drive, the marquee graphics, and optionally the MK6 hardware). Notable contributors include Kyle Ward, who also contributed many songs and step charts. A sequel was confirmed on a blog post on his website. Pump It Up PRO 2 was released in Summer 2010 as both an upgrade kit and dedicated cabinet. Gameplay in Pump It Up Pro is similar to other Pump games, but with slight differences. A new judgment, "Superb", is slotted in above Perfect on the ranking scale. Holds function differently as well. In addition to requiring that they be hit at their heads in order
    6.50
    2 votes
    166
    Dance Factory

    Dance Factory

    Dance Factory is a PlayStation 2 game developed by Broadsword Interactive and published by Codemasters. It has been compared with Dance Dance Revolution, but unlike the Dance Dance Revolution series Dance Factory can generate dance moves from any music CD. It can be played with any PlayStation controller and allows input from the EyeToy camera, but the majority of gameplay is done with a foot-operated Dance pad and is available with or without a pad in the package. Dance Factory has a variety of modes: Players can enter their own moves for any CD tracks and then use those instead of the automatically generated ones. These custom dances can be shared with other users who own the same CDs. Dance Factory has been widely reviewed. Without duplicating exhaustive lists and summaries elsewhere, the extracts here show the range of responses. Reviews have been polarized, generally positively by those who appreciate the key USP - the way that it can work with any CD, rather than just a few bundled tracks, and who found it suited their taste in music - but more critically by those who compared Dance Factory with Konami's Dance Dance Revolution series. The differences stem from the gamut of
    5.33
    3 votes
    167
    EZ2DJ

    EZ2DJ

    EZ2DJ is a series of music video games created by the South Korean company Amuseworld. The basic manner of gameplay is similar as in the Konami's Beatmania series; however, as the franchise continues, it differs in style of music and gameplay. The first edition of EZ2DJ was introduced in 1999 and the most recent version, 'Azure Expression' was released in March 2012. EZ2DJ cabinet features a total of 10 speakers. There are four mid-range speakers stacked vertically on either side of the screen, and two subwoofers located on the front of the machine. The cabinet also features a pair of headphone jacks, so that both players may use their own headphones to enjoy the game's audio. Using headphones does not disable the external speakers. EZ2DJ cabinet features four red effector buttons, located at the top of the controller part. However, unlike the Beatmania series (including III and IIDX), depending on the gamemode, effector button are treated as a gameplay button, especially in the gamemode "Radio Mix", where each player need to control 2 effector buttons. Essentially this is very similar to the 7 key mode of beatmania IIDX, but due to the location of these effector button—located in
    5.33
    3 votes
    168

    PaRappa the Rapper 2

    PaRappa the Rapper 2 (パラッパラッパー2, Parappa Rappā Tsu) is a PlayStation 2 rhythm video game and the sequel to PaRappa the Rapper, although it is actually the third game in the series following UmJammer Lammy. Though the game boasts a number of new gameplay elements, it was not as well-received critically and failed to garner similar sales as its predecessor. The story line of PaRappa the Rapper 2 centers on Parappa, who has recently won a hundred years supply of noodles and has grown tired of eating them. When his girlfriend, Sunny Funny, serves him noodles one day, Parappa throws a tantrum, prompting Sunny to call him a baby and leading him to question his maturity. As Parappa tries to find an alternative meal at Beard Burger, he learns that someone is mysteriously turning all the food in Parappatown into noodles. After taking a brief lesson in 'Romantic Karate' from Chop Chop Master Onion, Parappa and his friends get shrunk by his father's invention, so he helps coach them back to normal size with the help of Guru Ant. Parappa gets drafted into the army and must complete a military boot camp training course with Instructor Moosesha. He then becomes an amateur barber after customers
    5.33
    3 votes
    169

    Dance 86.4 Funky Radio Station

    Dance 86.4 (pronounced "Dance Yaroyo", which loosely translates to "Let's Dance") Funky Radio Station is a music video game produced by Konami in 2005. It is part of the Bemani collection of music games. Dance 86.4 has a simple dance pad with three panels laid out side-by-side. The player must step on these three panels to the beat or rhythm of the music. The interface is similar to beatmania and other Bemani games. Three columns are displayed on-screen, one for each panel. Colorful footprints, representing musical notes, scroll downwards from the top of the screen. The player must step on the corresponding panel when the notes reach the bottom, using the music to properly time each step. The gameplay includes bombs, notes that you must avoid stepping on. This functionality is commonly seen in Roxor Games' In the Groove series of dancing games. Unlike Dance Dance Revolution, the game does not offer step judgements after you complete a song, but rather a percentage. Minigames can be played if you obtain a sufficient percentage. The game's music consists of anime, television, and J-pop licensed songs, designed to appeal towards the younger Japanese audience. Konami has not made any
    7.00
    1 votes
    170

    Everyday Shooter

    Everyday Shooter, known as Riff: Everyday Shooter in Europe, is an independent video game developed by Canadian programmer and artist Jonathan Mak. It was released on the U.S. PlayStation Store on October 11, 2007; the European PlayStation Store on February 14, 2008; and for Windows PC via Steam on May 8, 2008. Everyday Shooter is notable because it was created completely by a single person. The game was developed in the span of a few months by Jonathan Mak using Visual C++. In addition to programming and graphic design, Mak recorded and implemented an all-guitar soundtrack in the game. Mak collaborated with Shaw-Han Liem of I Am Robot and Proud on the soundtrack for Everyday Shooter. Sony Computer Entertainment took notice of the game at the 2007 Independent Gaming Festival and published it for the PlayStation 3 on October 11 as a downloadable game on the PlayStation Network. Everyday Shooter is a dual-stick, multidirectional shooter. In the game's "Normal Play", the player maneuvers a small dot through eight different levels. The gameplay dynamics (enemy types, chaining systems, etc.) change with each level, encouraging the player to observe their surroundings closely to best
    7.00
    1 votes
    171
    EZ2Dancer

    EZ2Dancer

    EZ2Dancer is a series of dance video games developed by the Korean video game company Amuseworld. The gameplay of the series is similar to other dance simulation games, but unlike most games of their genre, EZ2Dancer incorporates both hand sensors and foot sensors into gameplay. The core gameplay involves staying in sync to a dance routine presented to the selected song, these routines involve stepping on three directional panels arranged in a circle in up-left, up-right, and down positions, and breaking beams between a set of two infrared hand sensors directly in front of the player. Players receive a judgement on each command, and some versions incorporate notes that must be held for their duration. After the song is completed, a score and rank are generated. The series uses 4 common difficulty levels; "Easy" mode, "Hard" mode, "Club" mode (which uses both pads and sensor sets), and "Real" mode (which adds the need to use the lower hand sensors for actions alongside just the top ones). Released September 2000 in Korea and early 2001 in England. Notable songs include "Rule of Game" by Goofy, "Wah" by Lee Jung Hyun, "First Love" by Clon, "Pierrot" by Lee Hyun Do and D.Bace, "Make
    7.00
    1 votes
    172
    Gitaroo Man

    Gitaroo Man

    Gitaroo Man (ギタルマン, Gitaru Man) is a rhythm video game developed by iNiS and published by Koei for PlayStation 2. The game features visual production by Mitsuru Nakamura AKA 326 and an original soundtrack by Japanese band COIL. The game was released in Japan on June 21, 2001, in North America on February 18, 2002 and in Europe on June 21, 2002. A port of the game for PlayStation Portable, titled Gitaroo Man Lives! (known as Gitaroo Man Live! (ギタルマンライブ!, Gitaru Man Raibu!) in Japan), was released in 2006. The player character is U-1, a young boy who is frequently ridiculed by classmates and passed over by Little Pico, the girl of his dreams. The story proper begins when Puma, a dog with the ability to speak, teaches U-1 to play the guitar, simultaneously teaching the controls of the game to the player, and subsequently revealing to him that he is the last legendary hero of Planet Gitaroo, and the possessor of the Last Gitaroo. When they are then attacked, Puma transforms into Puma AC-30 and gives U-1 the Gitaroo, transforming him into Gitaroo Man. Each battle comprises a separate level, divided into five types of sections: The exceptions to this format are "Void", which is purely
    7.00
    1 votes
    173

    Guitar Hero Encore: Rocks the 80s

    • Input Method: Guitar Hero Guitar
    Guitar Hero Encore: Rocks the 80s (titled Guitar Hero: Rocks the 80s in Europe) is a music video game and the third installment in the popular Guitar Hero series. It was released in July 2007 in North America and Europe, and in August 2007 in Australia. Players use a guitar-shaped controller (purchased separately) to simulate playing rock music by hitting notes as they scroll towards the player. Rocks the 80s is an incremental title in the Guitar Hero series, rather than a full sequel. No changes in gameplay from Guitar Hero II have been introduced to this game. As implied by the game's title, the game features a 1980s theme, consisting of songs from the decade and playable characters, fashions, and artwork that reflect the time period. The game was not as well-received as the prior two Guitar Hero games, due to the lack of new gameplay features and reduced soundtrack. Rocks the 80s is the third and final title in the Guitar Hero series to be developed by Harmonix before they moved on to create Rock Band. The next major installment of the series, Guitar Hero III: Legends of Rock, was developed by Activision's Neversoft division. After the successful release of Guitar Hero II,
    7.00
    1 votes
    174
    ParaParaParadise

    ParaParaParadise

    ParaParaParadise (パラパラパラダイス, Para Para Paradaisu), often abbreviated PPP, is an arcade and PlayStation 2 dance game made by the Japanese company Konami and released under the Bemani moniker following the booming Para Para fad. Konami would later release Dance Evolution for the XBOX 360, game that shares many similarities with "Para Para Paradise". In fact, the game includes several songs with Para Para routines (on specific difficulties). The gameplay of PPP is very similar to other Konami music games. The cabinet utilizes an octagonal platform with motion detecting sensors above it. Players must trigger the sensors by moving their arms (or other body parts) under the sensors when a corresponding arrow reaches. There are 2 modes, ParaPara Mode, which guides the arrows through an actual routine for the song, and Freestyle Mode, which utilizes more DDR-like patterns with 3 difficulty options, "Normal", "Hard", and "Expert". The home Playstation 2 version features a USB peripheral, which has five pink "pods" each with three infrared sensors. Each pod can be individually calibrated to accommodate the height of the players arms. In the arcade versions, there are colorful backgrounds
    7.00
    1 votes
    175
    7.00
    1 votes
    177
    Def Jam Rapstar

    Def Jam Rapstar

    Def Jam Rapstar is a rapping game produced by 4mm Games and developed by Terminal Reality. The game was released on October 5, 2010 in the United States of America (U.S.), and released on November 26, 2010 in Europe. An official launch event was held at New York's Hudson hotel on October 6, 2010 to celebrate the game's U.S. release. As of October 5, 2011, the community site has been shut down with no official word on when or if it will be reopened, causing major features of the game to be inaccessible. Rapstar is essentially a rap themed karaoke game. The game uses radio versions of all its tracks to secure a T rating by the ESRB. Players are not penalized for cursing, but it is not a required part of the game. There are two modes, either Career or Party modes. The Career mode is in five stages. Each stage has eight tracks for the player to master, including a New Song Challenge which is unlocked as the player progresses through the stage. The Party mode allows players to simply pick an individual song and perform it. The Xbox 360 version is compatible with the Kinect sensor if you live in North America, specifically with the sensor being used as an alternative to the Xbox Live
    6.00
    2 votes
    178

    Electroplankton

    Electroplankton is an interactive music video game developed by Toshio Iwai and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo DS handheld video game console. It was first released in Japan, and was later released in North America and Europe. This game allows the player to interact with animated plankton and create music through one of ten different plankton themed interfaces. The first-run edition of Electroplankton in Japan came bundled with a set of blue colored ear bud headphones. The game offers two game modes — Performance and Audience. The Performance mode is considered to be the more significant portion of Electroplankton, allowing the user to interact with the plankton through use of the stylus, touchscreen, and microphone. Audience mode simply allows the user to put down the system and enjoy a continuous musical show put on by all of the plankton, although the user can interact with the plankton just like in Performance mode. Audience mode is like a demo mode in some other games. The developers considered including a save function, but opted not to because they wanted for the players to enjoy the game both extemporarily and viscerally. They felt that if a save function were
    6.00
    2 votes
    179

    Elite Beat Agents

    • Input Method: Stylus
    Elite Beat Agents is a music video game developed by iNiS and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo DS handheld game console. It was first released in North America, and has since been released in Europe and South Korea . It is the spiritual sequel to Osu! Tatakae! Ouendan, a Japanese rhythm game released in 2005, sharing many common elements with it. Similar to Ouendan, the player taps and drags on indicated locations on the touch screen of the DS in time to the rhythm of the music to score points, while the upper screen shows comic-style scenes of the fictional "Elite Beat Agents" cheering on others in tough situations through their dance moves. The improvements made in this game were implemented in the Japanese game's sequel, Moero! Nekketsu Rhythm Damashii Osu! Tatakae! Ouendan 2. Elite Beat Agents was released under Nintendo's Touch! Generations label in North America, which markets games to audiences outside of the traditional gaming community. Though sales were not as high as expected, the game was well received by critics and merited several 2006 gaming awards. The main characters of Elite Beat Agents are members of a fictional government agency responsible for helping
    6.00
    2 votes
    180

    Karaoke Joysound Wii

    Karaoke Joysound Wii (カラオケJOYSOUND Wii) is a karaoke video game by Hudson Soft for Wii. It licenses the Joysound online song library from Japanese karaoke service provider Xing, who also helped co-develop the game with Hudson. The game was originally released in a retail package with an included USB microphone on December 18, 2008 in Japan, and was later released there as a downloadable WiiWare game on July 28, 2009. Karaoke Joysound Wii is a game "designed to provide a karaoke-club experience at home". The game requires an internet connection for players to access new songs to download. Buying tickets for songs with Nintendo Points, players rent the songs they want to sing for a limited period (from 24 hours to up to 90 days) from Xing's song library. Choosing a stage to perform on, players are able to select from a previously created avatar or use their own Miis to represent themselves. Players are also able to adjust options such as echo, key and speed of the song, and other players can use their Wii Remotes to accompany the singer by playing instruments such as cymbals and maracas. In addition to the included microphone, the retail version includes 70 songs on disc as well as a
    6.00
    2 votes
    181

    Master of the Lamps

    Master of the Lamps is 1985 video game by Activision. The game is an Arabian Nights-style adventure. The hero, a prince, must reclaim pieces of his crown from an evil genie. The gameplay consists of two parts. The first is a flying carpet game in which the player must maneuver through a psychedelic tunnel of colors. The second is a matching game in which the player must hit various colored gongs to match a tune played by the genie. The game's music was created by Russell Lieblich. This game is notable as one of the earliest music games created.
    6.00
    2 votes
    182

    Xbox Music Mixer

    The Xbox Music Mixer is a multimedia accessory/utility developed by Wild Tangent and published by Microsoft Game Studios for the Xbox. The Xbox Music Mixer was released on December 1, 2003. The Xbox Music Mixer allows one to transfer certain types of music and pictures directly from a PC to the Xbox, though this requires a separate install on the computer. The Xbox Music Mixer also allows one to view photos on a TV set and create customized soundtracks to go with the photo slideshow. The Xbox Music Mixer has several different and unique features that turn your Xbox from a gaming console to your home entertainment system. The Xbox Music Mixer comes with a few accessories like the microphone that can be used with the Xbox Music Mixer. Template:Orignal The Xbox Music Mixer is currently no longer sold at retail stores. It is now considered rare and can only be bought online from auction websites such as www.eBay.com. Even when sold on-line, it is still very difficult to find one that still comes with the microphone and even more rare to find someone that is selling a brand new Xbox Music Mixer still in its original packaging. Also, its developer (Microsoft) no longer produces 'Xbox
    6.00
    2 votes
    183
    Dance Maniax

    Dance Maniax

    Dance Maniax is a game from the Bemani series of rhythm games, published by Konami, with songs mostly from the Dancemania series of music, and shares many songs with Dance Dance Revolution. Instead of using physical contact to activate sensors, it uses optical switches to allow hands, feet and legs to be used in gameplay by passing them above or below the sensor. Dance Maniax is a dance game that uses four optical sensors to determine player movements. Sensors are positioned such that there are two top and two bottom sensors on each side. In addition, special options (such as center play, doubles, speed modifiers, etc.) are accessible by holding the left arrow button, the right arrow button and the start button after credits have been inserted but before the game has begun. Center play is where one player controls the middle two pairs of sensors. Also, doubles play is where one player controls all eight sensors at once. By default, players are presented with a set of predefined courses, and are able to select one per game, or should they have started the game into the "options" menu (by pressing both select buttons and the start button), they may also choose to define their own
    5.50
    2 votes
    184

    Guitar Hero II

    • Input Method: Guitar Hero Guitar
    Guitar Hero II is a music video game developed by Harmonix Music Systems and published by RedOctane. It is the second installment in the Guitar Hero series and is the sequel to Guitar Hero. It was first released for the PlayStation 2 in November 2006 and then for the Xbox 360 in April 2007, with additional content not originally in the PlayStation 2 version. Like in the original Guitar Hero, the player uses a guitar-shaped peripheral to simulate playing rock music as notes scroll towards the player. Most of the gameplay from the original game remains intact., provides new modes and note combinations. The game features more than 40 popular licensed songs, many of them cover versions recorded for the game, spanning five decades (from the 1960s to the 2000s). The PlayStation 2 version of Guitar Hero II can be purchased individually or in a bundle that packages the game with a cherry red Gibson SG guitar controller. The Xbox 360 version of the game is offered in a bundle that packages the game with a white Gibson X-Plorer guitar controller. Both of these controllers are wired, but RedOctane also sells a wireless controller for the PlayStation 2. Since its release, Guitar Hero II has
    5.50
    2 votes
    185
    Donkey Konga

    Donkey Konga

    • Input Method: DK Bongos
    Donkey Konga (ドンキーコンガ, Donkī Konga) is a GameCube rhythm video game starring the ape Donkey Kong, developed by Namco and published by Nintendo. Instead of the standard GameCube controllers, the game is intended to be played with a special controller called the DK Bongos that resemble two small bongo drums. Donkey Konga was developed by the same team of people who made the Taiko: Drum Master series for the PlayStation 2. The songs include hits such as "Louie Louie", "We Will Rock You", "Shining Star", "Rock Lobster" and "Losing my Religion". There are songs from the Mario series, the The Legend of Zelda series and other Nintendo related music. The Japanese, PAL, and US versions have different track lists. The different versions have between 31 and 33 songs. Donkey Kong and Diddy Kong are hanging out at the beach one day when they come across some mysterious objects that resemble barrels. Fearing they had something to do with King K. Rool, they take them to Cranky Kong. Cranky explains that they are bongos, so Donkey tries playing them. Diddy tries to do so as well. Then, when Donkey claps, the bongos started glowing. Cranky explained that the bongos had some kind of power inside
    6.00
    1 votes
    186

    High School Musical: Sing it!

    High School Musical: Sing It! is a video game for the Wii and PlayStation 2, based on the popular 2006 television movie High School Musical and its 2007 sequel High School Musical 2. The characters of Troy, Gabriella, Chad, Taylor, Ryan, and Sharpay are available to the player, alongside an option to create their own character. The visuals of the game are animated and based on motion capture. The game was followed by a prequel without the High School Musical characters, titled Disney Sing It, and a sequel, Disney Sing It!: High School Musical 3. * The second verse of this song is changed, as to not advertise the brands Jimmy Choo, Prada and Tiffany. **While the rest of the songs are cover versions, this is the original version sung by Zac Efron and Vanessa Hudgens
    6.00
    1 votes
    187

    Karaoke Studio

    Karaoke Studio is a music video game designed for Nintendo's Family Computer. Physically the game acts as a subsystem designed to be inserted into the Family Computer cartridge slot. Several levels of the game can be played on the subsystem alone, and additionally, smaller expansion cartridges (originally available for separate purchase) providing additional levels and other new content can be plugged directly into the Karaoke Studio subsystem. The game comes with a microphone peripheral capable of detecting a human voice. Gameplay consists of singing along in a karaoke-manner to a series of Japanese pop songs. The player is scored on accuracy of singing. The songs have been converted into 8-bit format for use with the Famicom and as the music plays and the song's lyrics are shown, on-screen depictions of the song's themes are displayed in the background simultaneously. Several expansion cartridges were released providing new songs not contained on the original subsystem. These expansion cartridges are smaller in size and plug directly into the Karaoke Studio subsystem.
    6.00
    1 votes
    188

    Music Wizard

    Music Wizard is a software development firm that develops and publishes kits to teach students to play various musical instruments through MIDI software and a Guitar Hero-like interface. Unlike Guitar Hero, it uses real instruments and teaches to read sheet music as well. Released in 2005, this educational software teaches users to play the piano. A $200 kit includes an M-Audio Keystation 49e keyboard. The $500 Piano Wizard Academy version is more popular, as it includes video lessons for parents and non-music educators to show them how to move children, adults or themselves through the levels of the game, and then to transition off the game to reading sheet music (sheet music also included in the Academy version). Both the Premier and Academy version allow unlimited import of MIDI song files, so virtually any song written in Western notation could be imported into the game and learned. Guitar Wizard is intended to teach guitar skills. The software version is under development, but there is a toy version called Mattel's I Can Play Guitar, aimed at young children. A package in development by the manufacturer will bundle the software with either a Washburn Guitars-branded instrument
    6.00
    1 votes
    189

    Cyber Groove

    Cyber Groove (known as 熱舞2000 or Dance 2000 in Chinese) in is a Taiwanese dancing game, by Front Fareast Industrial Corporation, played on a Microsoft Windows computer. It was released in January of 2000, and can be played on either the keyboard or a dance pad. Gameplay is similar to Dance Dance Revolution. Arrows (up, down, left and right) scroll from bottom to top. The player must step on the corresponding arrow when it reaches the top of the screen, where stationary arrows (referred to as the Step Zone in DDR terminology) are located. In the background of the game play region, a random, non-selectable dancing character can be seen. In addition to Dance mode, there exist four gameplay styles which utilize different elements of the pad (or pads), two of which must be unlocked through gameplay. Together mode, where two players play on the same pad, utilizes all eight directional arrows to make the players move in a synchronized pattern. Double mode uses two pads for a single player, with the four main directionals for a total of eight panels. Extra mode (a secret mode) uses the four main directionals, plus the up-right and up-left arrows, similar to Dance Dance Revolution Solo.
    5.00
    2 votes
    190
    Pop'n Music

    Pop'n Music

    Pop'n Music (ポップンミュージック), commonly abbreviated as Pop'n, PM or PNM, is a music video game series in the Bemani series made by the Konami Corporation. The games are known for their bright colors, upbeat songs, and cartoon character graphics. Originally released in 1998, the series has had fifteen home releases in Japan as well as many arcade versions. Pop'n Music Mickey Tunes contain Disney music. The PlayStation port is known as Pop'n Music Disney Tunes. Pop'n Music Animelo 2 is the most expensive Pop'n Music version to date, due to its song list consisting completely of anime as well as television show licensed songs. This version is also the only one with the infamous "double" and "triple" modes. These options were originally provided with the intention of allowing multiple people to play along by adding one or two more notes for every note in the chart, sometimes resulting in a chord of all nine buttons. However, it became a popular challenge for a single player to play a song in "double" or "triple" mode. The following games have only been released in Asia. Pop'n Music 1, Pop'n Music 2, Pop'n Music 3 Pop'n Music 4 were released on the PlayStation and the Dreamcast, with 9
    5.00
    2 votes
    191

    Beaterator

    Beaterator is a music mixer released in September 2009 by Rockstar Games for the PlayStation Portable, PlayStation 3 (via the PlayStation Network), Windows, and the iOS released in December 2009. Beaterator was developed by Rockstar Leeds. The game was co-produced by Timbaland. The game is based on an Adobe Flash music mixing tool released on the Internet in 2005 by Rockstar and contains original all-new loops and sounds produced by Timbaland for Beaterator. The game also allows the user to produce his or her own loops. A teaser trailer has been released confirming the following game modes: Live play, Studio Session and Song Crafter. On August 27 the official website for Beaterator received an overhaul, revealing that the game will have Social Club integration for sharing your music with the community. Also revealed was the first video in a series of videos focusing on Timbaland and others making beats with the game. Users can upload their songs to the Internet. In PlayStation Home, Rockstar Games has begun to have "Beaterator Parties" at the Listen@Home station in North America's Central Plaza. Rockstar Games will be playing users uploaded Beaterator tracks at Listen@Home during
    4.50
    2 votes
    192

    Guitar Hero World Tour

    Guitar Hero World Tour (initially referred to as Guitar Hero IV or Guitar Hero IV: World Tour) is a music video game developed by Neversoft and published by RedOctane and Activision. It is the fourth main entry in the Guitar Hero series. The game was launched in North America in October 2008 for the PlayStation 2, PlayStation 3, Wii, and Xbox 360 consoles, and a month later for Europe and Australia. A version of World Tour for Microsoft Windows and Apple Macintosh was later released. While the game continues to feature the use of a guitar-shaped controller to simulate the playing of rock music, Guitar Hero World Tour is the first game in the Guitar Hero series to feature drum and microphone controllers for percussion and vocal parts, similar in manner to the competing Rock Band series of games. The game allows users to create new songs through the "Music Studio" mode, which can then be uploaded and shared through a service known as "GHTunes". World Tour received generally positive reviews with critics responding positively to the quality of the instrument controllers, the customization abilities, and improvements in the game's difficulty compared with the previous Guitar Hero III:
    4.50
    2 votes
    193
    In the Groove

    In the Groove

    • Input Method: Dance pad
    In the Groove (abbreviated ITG) is the first game in the In the Groove franchise, published and developed by Roxor Games, and first released in video arcades around August 30, 2004. In the Groove utilizes similar mechanics to Konami's Dance Dance Revolution series. The core gameplay involves the player moving his or her feet to a set pattern, stepping in time to the general rhythm or beat of a song. Like DDR, there are 4 arrows. During normal gameplay, arrows scroll upwards from the bottom of the screen and pass over flashing stationary arrows (referred to as the "guide arrows" or "receptors"). When the scrolling arrows overlap the stationary ones, the player must step on the corresponding arrows on the dance platform. Longer arrows referred to as "holds" must be held down for their entire length for them to count. Successfully hitting the arrows in time with the music fills the life bar, while failure to do so drains it. If the life bar is fully depleted during gameplay, the player fails the song (unless the fail at end of song setting is on), usually resulting in a game over. Otherwise, the player is taken to the Results Screen, which rates the player's performance with a letter
    4.50
    2 votes
    194

    Beat'n Groovy

    Beat'n Groovy is a music video game distributed over Xbox Live Arcade. It was released on October 8, 2008 for 800 MSP ($10 USD). The game is based on Pop'n Music, a similarly styled arcade/PlayStation 2 game series that has not been released officially outside of Japan. As scrolling notes scroll down the screen, the player is to press the corresponding button on the controller, which plays a keysound which fills in part of the selected song. Players are judged on the accuracy of their hits, and a life bar on the side of the screen increases or decreases depending on their performance. The life bar must be at or over 60% at the end of the song in order to pass. The game features nine songs (ranked on a difficulty level of 1 to 9, although the hardest song is only a 3), and seven playable characters. 3-key and 5-key modes are available, with online multiplayer modes using 3-key only. An additional play mode using the Xbox Live Vision camera is also available. IGN's Hilary Goldstien gave Beat'n Groovy a 2.0/10, critiquing the game as "poorly designed and poorly executed", and dubbing the song list as being "horrendous".
    5.00
    1 votes
    195

    Guitar Hero 5

    Guitar Hero 5 (initially referred to as Guitar Hero V) is a music video game and the fifth main entry in the Guitar Hero series. The game was developed by Neversoft and published by Activision, and released internationally in September 2009 for the Xbox 360, PlayStation 2, 3 and Wii consoles. Similar to the preceding title, Guitar Hero World Tour, Guitar Hero 5 is geared towards playing in a four-person band experience, including lead and bass guitar, drums, and vocals. The game is available as a standalone title, allowing players to use existing compatible instrument controllers, and as a bundle that provides these controllers. Guitar Hero 5 adds several new features, such as drop-in/drop-out play, bands composed of any combination of available instruments, a Rockfest competitive mode consisting of several various scoring mechanisms, and both song-specific and general Challenges to unlock new avatars, clothing, and other extras in the game. Many of these changes were added to make the game a more social experience, allowing players across a range of skill levels to be able to play cooperatively and competitively against each other both locally and online. Guitar Hero 5's track
    5.00
    1 votes
    196

    Guitar Hero: Van Halen

    Guitar Hero: Van Halen is the third and final band-specific rhythm video game in the Guitar Hero series. As with the previous games Guitar Hero: Aerosmith and Guitar Hero: Metallica, the game features 25 songs from Van Halen along with 19 additional songs from selected artists that have been inspired by the group. The game was released in retail for the PlayStation 2, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, and Wii systems on December 22, 2009, in North America, and in February 2010 for PAL regions. However, as part of a promotion with Guitar Hero 5, the game was shipped to Guitar Hero 5 purchasers in North America prior to its retail release. The game content was developed by Underground Development, with the primary engine code developed by Neversoft and Budcat Creations. The game was published by Activision Blizzard. The game has received mostly negative reviews from critics, most of which consider the game's quality to be greatly inferior to its predecessor, Guitar Hero: Metallica and other games of the series. The reviewers criticized the lack of former Van Halen members, Sammy Hagar, Michael Anthony and Gary Cherone, the limited tracks selected from Van Halen's discography, the selection of
    5.00
    1 votes
    197

    Marky Mark: Make My Video

    Marky Mark: Make My Video was created as a video game by Digital Pictures in 1992. The game was part of a series of games made of the same concept for various artists of this era. The game puts the player in control of editing the music videos for hip-hop artist Marky Mark (Mark Wahlberg) and his group The Funky Bunch on 3 different songs: "Good Vibrations", "I Need Money" and "You Gotta Believe". Players are given instructions of what they should include in the video, and then the song is played while you edit the video live. Players can change between video clips available by pressing the buttons on the controller, and have the option between clips from the videos of the group, stock footage, movie clips and special effects. The magazine Game Informer gave this game a 0 out of 10, the lowest score a game has ever received. A 2007 PC World article rated the game as number 8 on their list of the 10 worst games of all time.
    5.00
    1 votes
    198

    Patapon

    Patapon (パタポン) is a video game published for the PlayStation Portable handheld game console combining gameplay features of a rhythm game and a god game. The title is created from two Japanese onomatopoeia, pata (marching) and pon (drumming). The game is presented in a cartoonish, silhouetted two-dimensional environment, and features the player acting as a deity who commands an army of caricatured miniature tribal creatures by beating traditional talking drums. The game was developed by Pyramid and produced by Japan Studios. Patapon is a video game that the player controls in a manner similar to rhythm games. The player is put in in direct control of a tribe of Patapon warriors; to command the warriors, the player inputs specific sequences using the face buttons on the PSP, each representing a "talking drum", in time to a drum rhythm. These sequences order the tribe to move forward on the linear battlefield, attack, defend, and other actions. If the player inputs an unknown sequence or enters them off the main rhythm, the tribe will become confused and stop whatever they are doing. However, repeatedly entering a proper sequence in sync with the rhythm will lead the tribe into a
    5.00
    1 votes
    199

    Flash Flash Revolution

    Flash Flash Revolution is a web-based simulation of Dance Dance Revolution, a video game made by Konami. FFR runs on a website driven by a custom content management system written by the FFR coding team. Flash Flash Revolution allows those who cannot afford the large pads of Dance Dance Revolution or other rhythm games like Guitar Hero to enjoy a rhythm game. Because it runs on Flash, it can be quickly picked up and played, as it does not need to be install. Flash Flash Revolution (or FFR) is similar to Dance Dance Revolution (or DDR) in its basic gameplay mechanics, yet there are many differences in functionality and control, most notably the fact that DDR is played with a large, stage-like dance pad, while FFR is played with a keyboard. FFR derives its name from the fact that it is coded entirely in Adobe Flash. It is coded almost entirely by a man named James Webb who calls himself Synthlight. The goal of FFR is to attain the highest score possible by tapping out a rhythm using the arrow keys on the keyboard. The player begins by selecting a song - each song has its own unique pattern of arrows. There are five ways that you can have the arrows set to move in (from left
    4.00
    2 votes
    200
    Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Game

    Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Game

    Alvin and the Chipmunks is a video game based on the film of the same name. The game was released on December 4, 2007 and was the first release by short-lived video game company Brash Entertainment. It follows The Chipmunks as they play their way from small venues (such as a high school prom or a civic center) to massive crowds at Burning Munk and ultimately Rockathonapalooza. The soundtrack features 40 popular songs, including "All the Small Things" by Blink-182, "It's Tricky" by Run-D.M.C., and "Heartbreak Hotel" by Elvis Presley. The gameplay itself is similar to other rhythm games such as Rock Band and Guitar Hero. Jason Lee reprise his role as David Seville in the story cutscenes while Ross Bagdasarian Jr. and Janice Karman reprise their roles from the 1980s-2000's cartoons. A second installment video game Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Squeakquel was released on December 1, 2009 to coincide with the release of Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Squeakquel. It is played in a similar way, playing at various venues around the world. Now some venues allow you to play as The Chipettes (female Chipmunks who appear in The Squeakquel). The Chipmunks play various venues. Each venue is
    4.00
    1 votes
    201
    Ez2on

    Ez2on

    EZ2ON is an online music game created by the South Korean company Retro Games. The game is currently played online at Uplay – a game portal by Dreamline.
    4.00
    1 votes
    202

    Karaoke Revolution

    Karaoke Revolution is a video game for the Xbox 360, Wii and PlayStation 3. It is developed by Blitz Games and published by Konami. Konami recently announced that Karaoke Revolution Glee was released exclusively for the Wii and is based on the popular musical TV sitcom by 20th Century Fox. The player is depicted as a character on-screen performing at a public venue. The words to the song scroll right-to-left at the bottom of the screen, above a piano roll representation of the relative pitches at which they are to be sung (the game calls these "note tubes"). At the left end of this area, a "pitch arrow" shows the pitch which the player is singing and provides feedback on whether s/he's hitting the notes. A "crowd meter" shows the mood of the crowd as the player sings; if s/he does a good job of hitting notes on-pitch then the crowd will cheer more loudly and clap in rhythm with the song, and the scene will become more vividly animated. If the crowd meter falls all the way to the lowest rating, the audience will boo the character off-stage and the game is over. New to this iteration of the series is a deep character customization mode, in which players can change facial features,
    4.00
    1 votes
    203

    Mojib-Ribbon

    Mojib-Ribbon (モジブリボン, Mojiburibon) is a music video game created by Masaya Matsuura as a pseudo-sequel to his earlier music game, Vib-Ribbon (1999, PS1). A direct sequel called Vib-Ripple was released in 2004. The releases are comparable to the releases of the earlier PaRappa series (also a Matsuura series) where the original was followed by a pseudo-sequel and then a direct sequel a few years later. Whereas in Vib-Ribbon the gameplay centered around the player's interaction with the melody of the song being played, in Mojib-Ribbon the gameplay centers on the player's interaction with the lyrics. As such, the music employed in the game is heavily lyrics-oriented rap music. The game's art-style is centered on traditional sumi-e and Japanese kana calligraphy. This has led to claims that the game is incomprehensible to non-Japanese audiences, however the simplicity of gameplay have allowed numerous import gamers (typically also fans of Masaya Matsuura's oeuvre) to enjoy the game as well, and guides exist online regarding menu navigation instructions for non-Japanese speakers. In Mojib-Ribbon, the player plays the part of Mojibri (モジブリ, Mojiburi) (a name similar to that of Vibri from
    4.00
    1 votes
    204

    Rhythm 'n Notes: Improve Your Music Skills

    Rhythm 'n Notes: Improve Your Music Skills (Tenohira Gakushuu: Zettai Onkan Training DS in Japan) is a music game created by Agetec. It was released for the Nintendo DS on October 23, 2007. Its focus is on rhythm for drums and tonal patterns for piano.
    4.00
    1 votes
    205

    Amadeus Revenge

    Amadeus Revenge is a music-based shoot 'em up created by System Editoriale s.r.l. in 1988 for the Commodore 64. The game was developed using the SEUCK (Shoot'Em-Up Construction Kit). In this game the player plays the part of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart or Amadeus as he is known in the game. The goal of the game is to complete Mozart's famous Piano Concerto No. 25, (K. 503), referred to in-game as simply Concerto in C. To do this the player must navigate Amadeus across reams of sheet music while eliminating the conflicting notes produced by rival musicians. As a rival musician produces a conflictory note it is reproduced within the game score at the appropriate tone. Amadeus Revenge at MobyGames
    0.00
    0 votes
    206
    American Idol

    American Idol

    American Idol (known as Pop Idol in Europe) is a music video game. It is based on the Fox Network show American Idol developed by former name of Rockstar Leeds, Mobius Entertainment and published by Codemasters. X-Play gave the game a 1 out of 5, complaining about the gameplay consisting of pressing buttons in time to judge the character's singing and not on the player's actual singing. In addition to the release of Karaoke Revolution Presents: American Idol for the PlayStation 2 on January 2, 2007, a sequel Karaoke Revolution Presents: American Idol Encore was released during the 1st quarter of 2008 following its direct sequel Karaoke Revolution Presents: American Idol Encore 2 which was released on November 18, 2008. An iPhone application entitled "American Idol: The Game" was released on the App Store. It was released by Electronic Arts on July 3, 2009. Omaha Sternberg of Macworld rated the game 4.5 out of 5 stars. The application has received mixed to positive reviews from its users.
    0.00
    0 votes
    207

    Band Mashups

    Battle of the Bands (formerly titled "Band Mashups") is a video game published by THQ and developed by Planet Moon Studios for the Wii console. It is a rhythm game in a similarstyle to the Guitar Hero series, PaRappa the Rapper, twisted metal, and Bust a Groove, however does not use any peripherals outside of the standard Wii Remote. The game features 30 licensed songs with 5 cover versions done in completely different styles. The five main genres of music are Rock/Metal, Funk/Hip-Hop, Country Western, Latin, and Marching Band. There will also be three tracks performed with an orchestra. The game features two of the eleven bands in the game playing the song head-to-head against one another. Notes will roll up from the bottom of the screen (as opposed to from the top like similar games) and the player must move the remote in sync. The game also features various power-ups including electrifying the other player's board, shrinking notes or flipping the notes around. However, certain instances allow the other player to block the effects from taking place with synced button presses. The music of the player playing the best will have their music playing dominantly, with the others being
    0.00
    0 votes
    208

    BIT.TRIP BEAT

    Bit.Trip Beat, marketed as BIT.TRIP BEAT, is an arcade-style music video game developed by Gaijin Games and published by Aksys for the Wii's WiiWare download service. It was released in 2009 in North America, and released in Japan and PAL regions in the same year. It was later released for the Windows and Mac OS X through the download service Steam in 2010, while Namco Bandai published it for iOS on iPod Touch, iPhone, and iPad in both Bit.Trip Beat and Bit.Trip Beat HD versions. Android and Linux versions debuted in the Humble Android Bundle 3. The WiiWare version is controlled by tilting the Wii Remote while holding it on its side. Players are placed in control of a paddle on the left side of the screen which, much like Pong, is tasked with deflecting squares that are coming from the right side. Each successful hit creates a sound effect that contributes to the background music, which was composed by an anonymous composer at Petrified Productions. A soundtrack was eventually released for the game's music, including some songs by micromusican Bit Shifter who composed the Title Screen and Credits music. Since its release, Bit.Trip Beat received generally positive reception, holding
    0.00
    0 votes
    209
    Dance Dance Revolution

    Dance Dance Revolution

    Dance Dance Revolution, abbreviated DDR, and previously known as Dancing Stage in Europe and Australasia, is a music video game series produced by Konami. Introduced in Japan in 1998 as part of the Bemani series, and released in North America and Europe in 1999, Dance Dance Revolution is the pioneering series of the rhythm and dance genre in video games. Players stand on a "dance platform" or stage and hit colored arrows laid out in a cross with their feet to musical and visual cues. Players are judged by how well they time their dance to the patterns presented to them and are allowed to choose more music to play to if they receive a passing score. Dance Dance Revolution has been given much critical acclaim for its originality and stamina in the video game market. There have been dozens of arcade-based releases across several countries and hundreds of home video game console releases, promoting a music library of original songs produced by Konami's in-house artists and an eclectic set of licensed music from many different genres. The DDR series was followed by games such as Pump It Up by Andamiro and In the Groove by Roxor. DDR celebrated its 10th anniversary on November 21, 2008.
    0.00
    0 votes
    210

    DANCE! Online

    DANCE! Online was a downloadable massively multiplayer online music video game produced by David Perry and published by Acclaim in North America. It is a free-to-download PC title that largely resembles a combination of Audition Online and Dance Dance Revolution series. It is based on the Chinese game Super Dancer Online created by 9you. Its open beta period began in March 2007. DANCE! Online was a downloadable massively multiplayer online music video game produced by David Perry and published by Acclaim in North America. It is a free-to-download PC title that largely resembles a combination of Audition Online and Dance Dance Revolution series. It is based on the Chinese game Super Dancer Online created by 9you. Its open beta period began in March 2007. As of August 26, 2010 Dance! Online and all other free to play Acclaim games (an exception seems to be 2moons (aka dekaron) and 9Dragons have been closed and no longer functioning. Players must dance against other players with songs by pressing each of the four available directional buttons when prompted. By default, players use either the Directional Arrows or WASD keys (or a combination of both) to do this, but dance mats are also
    0.00
    0 votes
    211

    Disney Sing It

    Disney Sing It is a karaoke video game and sequel to High School Musical: Sing It!. It was released on October 28, 2008 across multiple platforms. The game's product description refers to additional downloadable song packs being available. However, as of 28 April 2009, Disney Interactive Support has replied (to a query): "Thank you for contacting us.In some circumstances we need to make some business decisions and drop certain projects that might have been planned or even announced previously. This case falls in one of those situations and currently we don't have any plans on adding any downloadable contents for either Disney Sing It title." The game has received mixed reviews, with both 1UP.com and IGN praising its accessibility towards kids but finding serious fault with the gameplay, with Official Xbox Magazine ultimately calling it a "gateway game" at best.
    0.00
    0 votes
    212

    DrumMania V6

    DrumMania V6: Blazing!!! is the 16th game in the DrumMania series of music video games. It was released in arcades by Konami on April 15, 2009. The game features over 20 new songs, some of which are unlocked over Konami's e-Amusement platform. The overall motif of Blazing!!! is a fresh orange, yellow background, departing from its construction beams design from DrumMania V5: Rock to Infinity. Core gameplay remains the same on DrumMania V5. A new hidden modifier allows the highest prefect hit rate of the individual songs to be displayed simultaneously while playing the song. Skill percentile of the each individual songs is now displayed when playing as a guest, which was exclusively only for players using the e-Amusement card. As with previous versions of the game, performing very well on the first stages, allows the player to play an Extra Stage with new songs unlocked, available only for this stage. These songs include Walnuts!, Driven Shooter and Chronos. Depending on the song chosen and the player's performance on this stage, the player may receive an additional Encore Stage with a preset song, or a Premium Encore Stage (the song is Sonne by Asaki) and then a Blazing Stage, both
    0.00
    0 votes
    213

    Get On Da Mic

    Get On Da Mic is a video game for the PlayStation 2 published by Eidos and co-developed by A2M and Highway 1 Productions. Unlike the many other singing games available for the PlayStation 2, this game focuses exclusively on Hip-Hop songs. The game is based on karaoke singing in which an amateur singer sings a popular song while it plays with the vocals. The games are able to detect the pitch of the singer's voice and award points based on how well the singer matches the pitches they are supposed to be singing. Get On Da Mic requires the use of the same kinds of microphones also used with the Karaoke Revolution games. A hand-held karaoke microphone made by Logitech is available in a bundle with the game and is also sold separately; Logitech also sells a microphone headset.
    0.00
    0 votes
    214

    Guitar Hero III Mobile

    Guitar Hero Mobile is a series of rhythm video games in the Guitar Hero series, adapting the normal console-based gameplay which uses a guitar-shaped controller to match notes of popular rock music songs to work with the face buttons on advanced mobile phones, including BlackBerry devices and those supporting the Windows Mobile platform. The first three games in the series—Guitar Hero III Mobile, Guitar Hero III Backstage Pass, and Guitar Hero World Tour Mobile—were developed by MachineWorks Northwest LLC and published by Hands-On Mobile, while a mobile version of Guitar Hero 5 was developed by Glu Mobile. The series has proven to be popular; the Guitar Hero III Mobile game has been downloaded more than 2 million times, and over 250,000 songs are played each day across the series. Originally, the Guitar Hero Mobile series was published by Hands-On Mobile and developed by MachineWorks Northwest LLC. For the first game, Guitar Hero III Mobile, Hands-On Mobile received licensing from Activision to port 51 songs, two characters, three venues, and four guitars to the mobile version. The game was originally released on Verizon Wireless, but made available on other cellphone carriers in
    0.00
    0 votes
    215

    Guitar Hero On Tour: Decades

    Guitar Hero On Tour: Decades is a music video game for the Nintendo DS based on the Guitar Hero series and a follow-up to Guitar Hero: On Tour. The game is developed by Vicarious Visions and published by RedOctane and Activision. It was announced at Nintendo's 2008 E3 Conference and was released in November 2008 in Europe and North America. The game shares the same gameplay as with On Tour, and uses a "Guitar Grip", either bundled with the game or from the first game, to provide a similar guitar controller interface as with the console-based versions of Guitar Hero. Reflecting on its name, the game's region-specific soundtrack contains 28 songs arranged in "decades" (such as "1970s" or "Modern"). Decades uses the DS's local wireless capabilities to let users share songs between On Tour and On Tour: Decades in competitive modes. Decades received a lukewarm reception, with critics citing many of the same issues in relation to the Guitar Grip and sound quality from the first game. Reviewers felt the game was more an expansion pack than a full title on its own. The gameplay in Decades remains primarily unchanged from On Tour. The core game is a score attack music game, in which the
    0.00
    0 votes
    216

    Guitar Hero: Metallica

    Guitar Hero: Metallica is a music video game developed by Neversoft and distributed by Activision. The game was released in North America on the PlayStation 3, Wii, and Xbox 360 on March 29, 2009 and on PlayStation 2 on April 14, 2009, with a European release in May 2009. Guitar Hero: Metallica is the second game of the Guitar Hero series to focus on the career and songs of one band following Guitar Hero: Aerosmith. The game is based on Guitar Hero World Tour, with support for lead and bass guitar, drums, and vocals. The game has many of the same features from World Tour, including single-player and band Career modes, online competitive modes, and the ability to create and share songs through "GHTunes". In addition to the normal difficulty levels presented in Guitar Hero World Tour, Guitar Hero: Metallica provides an "Expert+" difficulty for drums that allows the use of a second bass drum pedal to match the drumming style of Metallica's Lars Ulrich. The game features 28 master recordings spanning Metallica's career and an additional 21 songs selected by members of Metallica. The band performed extensive motion capture for the game for their in-game avatars and performances. The
    0.00
    0 votes
    217

    Hatsune Miku: Project DIVA

    Hatsune Miku: Project DIVA (初音ミク -Project DIVA-) is a series of rhythm game created by Sega and Crypton Future Media. The games have appeared on the PlayStation Portable, PlayStation 3, Nintendo 3DS, iOS, Sega RingEdge, PlayStation Vita platforms. The series currently consists of 5 main titles and 3 spin-offs. The series primarily makes use of Vocaloids, a series of singing synthesizer software, and the songs created using these vocaloids most notably the virtual-diva Vocaloid Hatsune Miku. The game is the first video game to utilize the Vocaloid software developed by the Yamaha Corporation. As the game is a rhythm game, players are allowed to choose from a wide variety of Vocaloid songs, original songs sung by vocaloids, including songs sung by Hatsune Miku, Kagamine Rin and Len. Players also can choose which character they wish to play in the game. Known as modules, these modules can be completely different characters or simply different costumes for the same characters. These modules, though not directly controlled by the player, will be the ones appearing in the music videos throughout the game including their specific costumes. For example, if the player chooses Kagamine Rin
    0.00
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    218
    In the Groove 2

    In the Groove 2

    In the Groove 2 is the sequel to Roxor Games' 2004 arcade game In the Groove. It was released to arcades officially on June 18, 2005. It is available as an upgrade kit and as a dedicated cabinet developed by Andamiro. The price for a dedicated cabinet is $9,999 USD and the upgrade kit (sometimes referred to as a "Boxor") is $2,999 USD. There is a total of 137 songs available in the arcade version. This includes all 72 from the original arcade game, the three new songs in the home version, and 65 brand new songs, four of which are hidden and unlockable. A lawsuit filed by Konami on May 9, 2005, asked for an injunction against the sale of the upgrade kit version. October 23, 2006 Konami and Roxor reached an out-of-court settlement which resulted in Konami acquiring the intellectual property rights to the In The Groove franchise and thus effectively terminated the distribution of the game in North America. In development, it was known solely as In the Groove 2. On June 18, 2005, Roxor Games officially announced the release of the game, and announced that it would add the name of Andamiro's Pump It Up line, becoming Pump It Up: In the Groove 2. However, "Pump It Up" only appears on
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    220

    Lumines II

    Lumines II is a sequel to the puzzle game Lumines. The game was released in November, 2006 in Europe and North America, and in February 15, 2007 in Japan. The gameplay in Lumines II is very similar to its predecessor, Lumines. The object is still to move blocks of four different colored squares across the board; while trying to create a single square of the same color. This all must be done before a "timeline" crosses the screen deleting the squares that you make. Deleting four or more squares will add a bonus multiplier to your score. (Refer to the Gameplay section of Lumines for more details). There is no Infrastructure gameplay in Lumines II. The game is visually similar to Lumines Live! and the PC port of Lumines during both gameplay and in the menus. A soundtrack of music from Lumines II by series composer Takayuki Nakamura was released on January 23, 2008, called L.II remixes. The album was released by Nakamura's sound design company Brainstorm and included eleven tracks appearing in the game. The mastering engineer on the project was Kenzi Nagashima and the package design was by Katsumi Yokota. Nakamura used his experience as a sound effects designer to make such noises as
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    221

    Princess Debut

    Princess Debut (お姫さまデビュー) is a rhythm otome game published by Natsume and developed by Cave for the Nintendo DS. The illustration and package design was done by Kotori Momoyuki, a manga artist serialized in Kodansha's Nakayoshi. Princess Debut opens with the player character speaking to a friend of hers. The former laments her boredom and wishes to be whisked away by a prince. After the two finish their dialogue and the player character arrives home, a strange girl and an even stranger creature burst forth from her closet. When asked about her identity, this girl responds that she is the same person as the player character, but from another world, known as the Flower Kingdom. Further, she explains that she is a princess there and that she will soon be required to dance at the prestigious Ball of Saint-Lyon. However, because the Princess lacks both talent and taste for dancing, she wants the player character to go in her stead. The player character accepts, and from that point forth the player has 30 days to practice dancing and find a prince to be their partner for the ball. Depending on where you go in the day and what you say to people, many different things can happen up until
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    222

    Ragnarawk

    Ragnarawk is an musical role-playing video game created for the 2007 Dare to be Digital video games development competition. The self-proclaimed 'GuitaRPG' combines RPG-style gameplay with a Guitar Hero-style input system. The player character explores a musically themed world fighting enemies using an enchanted guitar. The demo version that was released consisted of a Victorian-styled level featuring enemies loosely themed around classical music. Basic enemies consisted of monsters playing harps, flutes and violins, as well as a hidden mid-boss that rewarded the player with a new guitar after its defeat. The final battle in the demo takes place in a church, against a monster called Morgan, who battles you using a corrupted church organ. Ragnarawk was developed by Voodoo Boogy, a team of 5 students from Abertay University, 2 from the Computer Games Technology course, and 3 from Computer Arts. In the 2007 Dare to be Digital competition, the game was judged to have the most commercial potential, as well as winning the Audience Award. Ragnarawk was singled out as 'one to watch' by the 2007 British Academy Video Games Awards, and also won the Interactive category at the Scottish
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    223

    SingStar The Dome

    SingStar The Dome is a variant of the game SingStar Pop and was only released in the German speaking countries Germany and Austria.
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    224

    Sound Fantasy

    Sound Fantasy also titled Sound Factory during production, is an unreleased video game for the Super NES/Super Famicom. Interactive media artist Toshio Iwai designed the game in the early 1990s using concepts from the installation art piece Music Insects, which he created during his time as an Artist in Residence at the San Francisco Exploratorium. However, the finished product was never brought to market by Nintendo for unknown reasons. Its eccentric concepts and untested game mechanics may have been the main factor in its cancellation; music games, especially on home consoles, were not popular in the early 1990s, and it wouldn't be until much later in the decade that they gained mainstream attention. Sound Fantasy was to come packed-in with the SNES Mouse and mouse pad, and it would arrive in a larger game box to hold its contents similar to Super Nintendo games like Mario Paint and EarthBound. It is speculated that Nintendo chose to use Mario Paint to launch its mouse peripheral in 1992 instead, as that game was endorsed by Mario, one of gaming's most recognizable mascots. Toshio Iwai eventually went on to convert his work into the PC game SimTunes in 1996, and many of Sound
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    225

    Space Invaders: Galaxy Beat

    Space Invaders Evolution, or Space Invaders Galaxy beat (スペースインベーダー ギャラクシービート) is a PSP game based on the Space Invaders series.
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    226
    Taiko: Drum Master

    Taiko: Drum Master

    "Taiko: Drum Master" (English title), also known as "Taiko no Tatsujin" (太鼓の達人) is a drumming game for the Sony PlayStation 2 based on the popular Japanese arcade game. A drum simulating the taiko is played in time with music. It is made by Namco. The home version can be played with a TaTaCon, a special controller which looks like the face of a Taiko drum. Players control one of the two main characters - WadaDon, a red-faced and blue body taiko, and WadaKatsu, a blue-faced and red body taiko. The graphics are 2-D, with cartoon-like feel. Cut scenes show the adventures of the animated taikos and their friends. Symbols moving horizontally along a timeline show what to hit and when. Home versions distinguish single and double strikes, arcade versions hard and soft strikes. Successful play builds up a life meter. If the meter is past a certain point by the end of the song, the song is passed. In the Japanese version, subtitles under the symbols give the pronunciation of the sounds (for example, "do don do don") using a traditional system called kuchi shoga (口唱歌). Despite the game's cute and childish appearance, many players find the game quite difficult to master. Players need to
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    TotemBall

    Totemball is an Xbox Live Arcade musical action game developed by Freeverse Software/Strange Flavour and published by Microsoft Game Studios. It takes advantage of the Xbox Live Vision Camera with the camera tracking the players hand movements. It was released on October 4, 2006 as a free download. It does require the camera to play. Unlike other Xbox Live Vision titles, Totemball is not compatible with the Kinect and can only be played with the original Xbox Live Vision camera.
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    We Rock: Drum King

    We Rock: Drum King is a music video game developed by Arc System Works and published by 505 Games for the Wii. In the United States, the game will be co-branded by rock music magazine Rolling Stone, and be known as Rolling Stone: Drum King, considered a "natural next step for the Rolling Stone brand." The game simulates the playing of drums with players either using the Wii Remote and Nunchuk or two Wii Remotes for control. Following a scrolling runway similar to music games such as Guitar Hero, players gesture their appropriate controller in time to the music and prompts that appear on screen. All songs in the game are cover versions.
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    Wii Music

    Wii Music

    Wii Music (Wiiミュージック) is a free form music game developed and published by Nintendo for the Wii video game console. The game was released in Japan and North America in October 2008, and in Europe and Australia in the following month. Wii Music is part of both Nintendo's Touch! Generations brand and the Wii series. Wii Music focuses on creating arrangements of existing songs by controlling the members of an on-screen band. In order to do so, players choose from a wide selection of musical instruments that are played by mimicking the required actions using the Wii Remote and Nunchuk. Unlike other music games such as Rock Band and Guitar Hero, players are not scored on their performance and are encouraged to experiment with different ways to play various songs. The game has been advertised by Nintendo as a means of "bring[ing] the joy and creativity of musicianship to [one's] home without expensive music lessons." Wii Music was one of the original titles announced for the Wii console, first publicly playable at E3 2006, and then later re-introduced in greater detail at E3 2008. Upon release, Wii Music received mixed reviews, gaining aggregate scores of 64.07% and 63% on GameRankings
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