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Best Military unit of All Time

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    1
    23d Space Operations Squadron

    23d Space Operations Squadron

    The 23rd Space Operations Squadron (23 SOPS) is a United States Air Force unit of the 50th Network Operations Group, itself a part of the 50th Space Wing, and is located at New Boston Air Force Station, New Hampshire.
    7.50
    8 votes
    2
    1st Combat Communications Squadron

    1st Combat Communications Squadron

    The United States Air Forces in Europe's 1st Combat Communications Squadron is a unit located at Ramstein Air Base, Germany. It is part of the 435th Air Ground Operations Wing. An alumni website of the USAF’s 1st MOB/Comm, compiled by members & alumni of the 1st MOB/Comm.
    6.71
    7 votes
    3
    No. 340 Squadron RAF

    No. 340 Squadron RAF

    340 (Free French) Squadron RAF was formed at RAF Turnhouse in Scotland on 7 November 1941 as part of Le Groupe de Chasse IV/2 (Fighter Group 4-2) "Ile de France". The squadron was first equipped with Spitfire Mk I fighters and consisted of two flights - A Flight ("Paris") and B Flight ("Versailles"). Becoming operational on 29 November with the operational code 'GW', the squadron flew defensive patrols until moving south in April 1942 to begin fighter sweeps over northern France. Between 1 April and 8 April 1942, the squadron based based at Redhill Aerodrome near Gatwick and between 27 July 1942 and 20 March 1943, at RAF Biggin Hill. In March 1943, the squadron was withdrawn for rest and returned to Scotland, moving to south-west England in November for fighter sweeps and anti-shipping operations off Brittany. Joining 145 Wing of the Second Tactical Air Force (2 TAF) in April 1944, 340 Squadron helped to provide fighter cover for the Normandy landings, then moved to France that August. After moving forward to Belgium in September 1944, the squadron returned to the UK to fly bomber escort missions and was based at Biggin Hill again between 3 November and 19 November 1944. In
    7.33
    6 votes
    4
    Polish 2nd Armoured Brigade

    Polish 2nd Armoured Brigade

    • Unit size designation: Brigade
    • Armed force: Polish Armed Forces in the West
    2nd (Warsaw) Armoured Brigade (Polish: 2 Warszawska Brygada Pancerna) was a unit of the Polish Armed Forces in the West that existed from 1942 to 1945. From 1945 to 1947 it was redesignated as the 2nd Warsaw Armoured Division. (Polish: 2 Warszawska Brygada Pancerna) The unit was the armoured wing of the 2nd (Polish) Corps. General officer commanding: Brig. General Gustaw Paszkiewicz then Brig. General Bronisław Rakowski. Following the upgrade to Division, Rakowski became GOC 2nd Warsaw Armoured Division. Colonel Ziemowit Grabowski became CO 2 Armoured Brigade. In 1945 the Brigade was upgraded to Division strength and it stood as follows: Tanks in the 2nd Armoured Brigade (and later Division) were all named, the names being painted in the squadron colours. The turret also had a diamond, triangle, square or circle painted to show squadron number. 2nd Armoured Brigade HQ Platoon Tank names: Quizil-Ribat Hill-69 Quassasin Rossario MTE-Cassino Taza-Khurmatli 4th “Scorpion” Armoured Regiment HQ Squadron Il-Vicinato Monte-Cassino Gustaw Gdynia Gdansk Grochow Gardziel Gryf Gron Grodna 1st Squadron Mass Albaneta Tobruk Taifun Turnia Trzyniec Tempo Tygrys Taran Tur Terror Tempo Ter Topor
    7.33
    6 votes
    5
    Royal Northumberland Fusiliers

    Royal Northumberland Fusiliers

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Royal Northumberland Fusiliers was an infantry regiment of the British Army. Originally raised in 1674, the regiment was amalgamated with three other fusilier regiments in 1968 to form the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers. The regiment was originally part of the Dutch service and known as the Irish Regiment, or Viscount Clare's Regiment. The regiment was transferred to the British Service on 5 June 1685, establishing its order of precedence as the 5th Regiment of the Line. Until 1751, like most other regiments, it was known successively by the names of the colonels who commanded them at the time. The regiment took part in the Irish campaign of 1690–1691, and was present at the Battle of the Boyne, the Second Siege of Athlone and the 1691 Siege of Limerick. In 1692 the unit sailed for Flanders where they were to remain for five years. In 1695 they were part of the allied forces that recaptured Namur. With the ending of the war by the Treaty of Ryswick they returned to England. The regiment spent the years 1707–1713 in Spain. They were one of four English regiments who fought a rearguard action with their Portuguese allies at Campo Maior in 1709, and fought an action on the River
    9.25
    4 votes
    6
    34th Bomb Squadron

    34th Bomb Squadron

    The 34th Bomb Squadron (34 BS) is part of the 28th Bomb Wing at Ellsworth Air Force Base, South Dakota. It operates B-1 Lancer aircraft providing strategic bombing capability. Provide combat-ready aircrews to project global power anytime in support of the Combatant Commander's objectives. The 34 BS is one of the oldest squadrons in the United States Air Force, activated June 11, 1917. Deployed to France during World War II, the 34th Aero Squadron was a ground training unit. The unit remained in France as part of the Army of Occupation after the 1918 Armistice with Germany, and returned to the United States in May 1919 and was demobilized. Reactivated by the Army Air Corps in 1931 as a Pursuit Squadron, being assigned to the 17th Pursuit Group at March Field, California and equipped with the Boeing P-12 Peashooter. Converted to an attack squadron on March 1, 1935, and a medium bomb group in November 1939. Received B-25 Mitchell bombers in the spring of 1941 and was assigned to the GHQ Air Force Northwest Air District; operated from airfields in Oregon performing patrols over the Pacific Northwest. In the immediate aftermath of the Pearl Harbor Attack, the 34th flew flew
    6.83
    6 votes
    7
    The Wiltshire Regiment

    The Wiltshire Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Wiltshire Regiment (Duke of Edinburgh's) was an infantry regiment of the line in the British Army, formed in 1881 by the amalgamation of the 62nd (Wiltshire) Regiment of Foot and the 99th Duke of Edinburgh's (Lanarkshire) Regiment of Foot. The regiment was originally formed as The Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire Regiment), taking the county affiliation from the 62nd Foot (which became the 1st Battalion) and the honorific from the 99th Foot (which became the 2nd Battalion). In 1921 the titles switched to become The Wiltshire Regiment (Duke of Edinburgh's) After service in the First and Second World Wars, it was amalgamated into The Duke of Edinburgh's Royal Regiment (Berkshire and Wiltshire) in 1959. Following further mergers, the regiment's lineage is today continued by The Rifles. The regiment's depot was at Devizes. The senior partner in the amalgamated Wiltshire Regiment was the 62nd Regiment of Foot. The 62nd was formed in 1756, originally as the second battalion of the 4th Regiment of Foot. In 1758, the battalion was redesignated as the 62nd Regiment of Foot. Although a regiment of the line, many of its companies were initially deployed as marines, serving with Admiral
    6.83
    6 votes
    8
    51st Highland Volunteers

    51st Highland Volunteers

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The 51st Highland Volunteers was a regiment and is now a battalion in the British Army's Territorial Army (TA) or reserve force in the Scottish Highlands, forming the 7th Battalion of the Royal Regiment of Scotland, also known as 7 SCOTS. In contrast with 52nd Lowland (6 SCOTS), a similar unit located in the Lowlands of Scotland, 51st Highland (7 SCOTS) consists of a number of infantry companies located throughout the various regions of the Highlands. Both 51st Highland Volunteers and 52nd Lowland Volunteers were unique in that each of their companies was officially the reserve element of a regular infantry regiment in the Scottish Division. The 51st Highland Volunteers were formed in 1967 from the amalgamation of territorial battalions of regiments in the Highland Brigade. In 1999, however, the regiment was re-organized and became the 51st Highland Regiment. The name commemorated that of the 51st Highland Division, which consisted of the Regiment's antecedent Territorial Battalions, and fought during the First and Second World Wars. The 51st Highland Volunteers were formed as a TAVRII (NATO reserve role) unit on 1 April 1967 with headquarters located at Perth, Scotland: In 1969,
    9.00
    4 votes
    9
    No. 627 Squadron RAF

    No. 627 Squadron RAF

    No. 627 Squadron was a Royal Air Force Mosquito aircraft pathfinder bomber squadron that operated during the Second World War. The squadron was formed on 12 November 1943 at RAF Oakington from part of 139 Squadron. It was equipped with the de Havilland Mosquito twin-engined fighter-bomber it flew operations as part of No. 8 Groups light bomber force. As well as normal bombing missions it also carried out Pathfinder duties and was involved in attacks on Berlin in early 1944. In April 1944 it was transferred to No. 5 Group as a specialised target marking squadron, although it also carried out amend reconnaissance and normal bombing duties. It was disbanded on 1 October 1945 at RAF Woodhall Spa when it was re-numbered 109 Squadron.
    7.60
    5 votes
    10
    The Devonshire Regiment

    The Devonshire Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Devonshire Regiment was an infantry regiment of the British Army which served under various titles from 1685 to 1958. Its lineage is continued today by The Rifles. In June, 1667, Henry Somerset, Marquess of Worcester, was granted a commission to raise a regiment of foot, The Marquess of Worcester's Regiment of Foot. The regiment remained in existence for only a few months and was disbanded in the same year. It was re-raised in January 1673 and again disbanded in 1674. In 1682, Henry Somerset was created Duke of Beaufort, and in 1685 he was again commissioned to raise a regiment, The Duke of Beaufort's Regiment of Foot, or Beaufort Musketeers, to defend Bristol against the Duke of Monmouth's rebellion. The Regiment served under the name of its various Colonels until it was numbered as the 11th Regiment of Foot when the numerical system of regimental designation was adopted in 1751. It was given the additional county title of 11th (North Devonshire) Regiment of Foot in 1782. In 1881, under the Childers Reforms it became the Devonshire Regiment, at the same time merging with the militia and rifle volunteer units of the county of Devon. The Regiment was not required to fight at the
    8.75
    4 votes
    11
    19th Fighter Squadron

    19th Fighter Squadron

    The 19th Fighter Squadron (19 FS) is part of the 15th Wing at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii. The 19th FS operates the F-22 Raptor aircraft conducting strategic attack, interdiction, offensive counterair (air-to-surface), suppression of enemy air defenses, as well as offensive and defensive counterair (air-to-air) missions. Originally established as an Army Flying School Squadron, the 19th was based in Texas, Ohio, and New York for short periods before ending up at Clermont-Ferrand, France, to observe the French company Michelin's airplane manufacture and assembly procedures. Renamed the 19th Pursuit Squadron, the squadron flew from various locations in the Hawaiian Islands beginning in 1923. The squadron suffered six casualties as a result of the attack on Oahu by the Japanese on 7 December 1941, but no fatalities. The squadron was then stationed aboard the USS Natoma Bay, off Saipan. Upon arriving, the 19th flew night and day missions, strafing and using general purpose bombs and rockets in support of advancing U.S. ground troops. Using homemade napalm bombs made out of napalm, gasoline, and oil placed inside fuel tanks, the 19th helped U.S. forces successfully invade and
    6.50
    6 votes
    12
    7.40
    5 votes
    13
    43d Fighter Squadron

    43d Fighter Squadron

    The 43d Fighter Squadron (43 FS) is part of the 325th Fighter Wing at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida. It conducts advanced fighter training for F-22 Raptor pilots. The 43d Fighter Squadron is responsible for providing air dominance training for the F-22 Raptor. The 43d Fighter Squadron traces its lineage to the 43d Aero Squadron, first activated 13 June 1917, at Camp Kelly, Texas. In March 1918, the squadron moved to England, where it trained until reassigned to France on 1 November 1918 - just 10 days before the Armistice that ended World War I was signed. Having never seen combat, the squadron was deactivated in April 1919. The 43d was reactivated on 22 July 1922, at Kelly Field, Texas, and was redesignated the 43d School Squadron in January 1923. The squadron flew various aircraft, including the DH-4, Spad XIII, SE-5, MB-7, AT-4, AT-5, PW-9, P-1, and P-12. The 43d became known as the "Hornets" as depicted by their emblem, a poised Vespa Maculata, or American "Yellow Jacket," the most formidable of the wasp family, surrounded by an ovate cloud. The emblem was approved in 1924 and the Hornet signifies the speed, agility and hard-hitting capabilities of the squadron while the
    8.50
    4 votes
    14
    459th Airlift Squadron

    459th Airlift Squadron

    The 459th Airlift Squadron (459 AS) is part of the 374th Airlift Wing at Yokota Air Base, Japan. It operates UH-1 Iroquois and C-12J Huron aircraft providing aeromedical evacuation and search and rescue missions. Established in mid-1942 under II Bomber Command as a B-17 Flying Fortress Replacement Training Unit (RTU). Operated until March 1944 with the end of Heavy Bomber training. Re-designated on 1 April 1944 as a B-29 Superfortress Very Heavy bombardment squadron. When training was completed moved to North Field Guam in the Mariana Islands of the Central Pacific Area in January 1945 and assigned to XXI Bomber Command, Twentieth Air Force. It's mission was the strategic bombardment of the Japanese Home Islands and the destruction of its war-making capability. Flew "shakedown" missions against Japanese targets on Moen Island, Truk, and other points in the Carolines and Marianas. The squadron began combat missions over Japan on 25 February 1945 with a firebombing mission over Northeast Tokyo. The squadron continued to participate in wide area firebombing attack, but the first ten day blitz resulting in the Army Air Forces running out of incendiary bombs. Until then the squadron
    8.50
    4 votes
    15
    Royal Sussex Regiment

    Royal Sussex Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Royal Sussex Regiment was an infantry regiment of the British Army from 1881 to 1966. The regiment was formed as part of the Childers reforms by the amalgamation of the 35th (Royal Sussex) Regiment of Foot and the 107th Regiment of Foot (Bengal Light Infantry). Its lineage is continued today by the Princess of Wales's Royal Regiment. Following its formation, the regiment was sent to Egypt in 1882 as part of General Wolseley's expedition to crush the Urabi Revolt and conquer Egypt in the name of the Khedive. The 2nd Battalion was stationed in Alexandria after its bombardment by the Royal Navy and the 1st Battalion was engaged in several of the decisive land battles in that short-lived conflict. Later, in 1884, the regiment was part of the Nile Expedition--the unsuccessful attempt to save General Gordon and his garrison at Khartoum during the Mahdist War. Twenty men of the regiment, led by Lt. Lionel Trafford, led the advanced party towards Khartoum. Being told that the enemy would flee at the sight of the British in their red coats, they traded their khaki for the scarlet of the Camel Guards. Nevertheless, the British relief force was two days too late, as Khartoum had fallen
    8.50
    4 votes
    16
    The Royal Rifle Volunteers

    The Royal Rifle Volunteers

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Royal Rifle Volunteers is a former regiment of the British Territorial Army. It was, for most of its existence, the TA infantry in the counties of Hampshire, Berkshire, Wiltshire, Oxfordshire, Buckinghamshire and the Isle of Wight. The regiment was formed on 1 July 1999 by the amalgamation of elements of the 6th/7th (Volunteer) Battalion, The Princess of Wales's Royal Regiment, 2nd (Volunteer) Battalion, The Royal Gloucestershire, Berkshire and Wiltshire Regiment and the 5th (Volunteer) Battalion, The Royal Green Jackets due to the reforms of the Territorial Army implemented following the Strategic Defence Review. It was the infantry component of 145 (Home Counties) Brigade. Its companies during its eight year existence were: In 2002 the Royal Rifle Volunteers took part in a major NATO "Partnership for Peace" exercise in the Ukraine codenamed Exercise COSSACK EXPRESS. In 2003 the Royal Rifle Volunteers took part in a major NATO exercise in the Eastern European country of Lithuania codenamed Exercise AMBER HOPE. A formed platoon was also deployed to Afghanistan as part of Op FINGAL. Some soldiers from E (RGJ) Coy also deployed to Bize, Albania in support of the Royal Welsh
    6.33
    6 votes
    17
    67th (South Hampshire) Regiment of Foot

    67th (South Hampshire) Regiment of Foot

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The 67th (South Hampshire) Regiment of Foot was an infantry regiment of the British Army, formed in 1758 and amalgamated into The Hampshire Regiment in 1881. The regiment was raised by the redesignation of the 2nd Battalion, 20th Regiment of Foot in April 1758, ranked as the 67th Regiment of Foot. In 1782 they took a county title as the 67th (South Hampshire) Regiment of Foot.
    9.67
    3 votes
    18
    Essex Regiment

    Essex Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Essex Regiment was an infantry regiment of the British Army that saw active service from 1881 to 1958. Members of the regiment were recruited from across Essex county. Its lineage is continued by the Royal Anglian Regiment. The Essex Regiment was formed in 1881 following the union of the 44th (East Essex) Regiment of Foot and the 56th (West Essex) Regiment of Foot. The merger was part of Childers Reforms of the British Army. The new regiment was designated The Essex Regiment. The Old 44th became the 1st Battalion of the new regiment and the Old 56th became the 2nd Battalion. For history of the regiment prior to 1881 see: The 1st Battalion and the 2nd Battalion both served in South Africa during the Second Anglo-Boer War. Notably, the regiment participated in the Relief of Kimberley and the Battle of Paardeberg. During the First World War the Essex Regiment provided 30 infantry battalions to the British Army (3 Regular Army, 18 Territorial Force, 6 Kitchener Army, 3 Garrison). The regiment's battle honors for the First World War include Le Cateau, Ypres, Loos, Somme, Cambrai, Gallipoli and Gaza. 1st Battalion took part in the first day of the Battle of the Somme on 1 July 1916.
    7.20
    5 votes
    19
    No. 222 Squadron RAF

    No. 222 Squadron RAF

    No. 222 Squadron was a Royal Air Force fighter unit. The Squadron was formally formed at Thasos on 1 April 1918 from A squadron of the former No. 2 Wing, RNAS when the Royal Air Force was formed. Later, 6 April 1918 former Z Squadron of No. 2 Wing, RNAS was added to the strength. Renumbered No. 62 Wing and consisting of Nos. 478, 479 and 480 Flights, the squadron was given the task of maintaining raids on Turkish targets in Macedonia and Thrace, operating from islands in the Northern Aegean, officially adopting the 222 sqn number plate on 14 September 1918. The squadron continued to carry out raids on Turkish targets in the Balkans until the end of the war, eventually disbanding on 27 February 1919. On 5 October 1939 No. 222 squadron was reformed at RAF Duxford flying Blenheim Mk.If's in the shipping protection role, but in March of the following year it re-equipped with Spitfires and became a day-fighter unit. It fought during the Battle of Britain, being based at RAF Hornchurch on 15 September 1940, under Squadron Leader "Johnnie" Hill. It later took part in Operation Jubilee, the 1942 Dieppe raid. In December 1944 the squadron converted to Tempests, which it flew till the
    8.25
    4 votes
    20
    No. 550 Squadron RAF

    No. 550 Squadron RAF

    No. 550 Squadron RAF was a heavy bomber squadron of the Royal Air Force during World War II. No. 550 squadron was formed at RAF Waltham (near Grimsby), Lincolnshire on 25 November 1943 from 'C' Flight of 100 Squadron. Equipped with Avro Lancasters, they began operating in the same month, as part of No. 1 Group RAF. On November 26/27, 8 of their Lancasters were dispatched to make bombing runs over Berlin; 7 succeeded, with the other failing to return after the mission. In early 1944, it was moved to RAF North Killingholme, Lincolnshire where it continued operations over German targets until May 1945, when it began dropping food over the Netherlands as a relieve effort as part of Operation Manna. The squadron completed 3,582 operational sorties with the Lancaster with a loss of 59 aircraft. It was disbanded at North Killingholme on 31 October 1945., the same day that North Killinghome closed. Before standing up as an operational bomber unit 550 Squadron was allocated to the Air Fighting Development Unit under 'Operation Banquet' anti-invasion plans. Three of the Lancasters that flew with 550 squadron managed to survive one hundred operations or more, and one nearly did so:
    8.25
    4 votes
    21
    52nd Lowland Regiment

    52nd Lowland Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The 52nd Lowland Regiment (52 LOWLAND) now forms the 6th Battalion of The Royal Regiment of Scotland, also known as 6 SCOTS. Due to its erstwhile association with the 1st Regiment of Foot, it is the senior Territorial line infantry battalion in the British Army. It is one of two Territorial battalions in the Royal Regiment of Scotland, along with 51st Highland (7 SCOTS), a similar unit located in the Scottish Highlands. Originally formed as the 52nd Lowland Volunteers in 1967, as a result of the amalgamation of Territorial Battalions within the infantry Regiments of the Lowland Brigade, the name commemorated the 52nd Lowland Division of the Territorial Force, within which many of the Regiment's antecedent Territorial Battalions served during the First and Second World Wars. The current Battalion traces its lineage back to the reserve Rifle Volunteer units that were originally raised in the Scottish Lowlands as part of the Victorian Volunteer Force by Lord Lieutenants in every county. These included: the Queens City of Edinburgh Rifle Volunteers, the Midlothian Rifle Volunteers, the Haddingtonshire Rifle Volunteers, the Linlithgowshire Rifle Volunteers, the Ayrshire Rifle
    7.00
    5 votes
    22
    700th Airlift Squadron

    700th Airlift Squadron

    The 700th Airlift Squadron (700 AS) is part of the 94th Airlift Wing at Dobbins Air Reserve Base, Georgia. It operates C-130 Hercules aircraft providing global airlfit. Maintain combat ready aircrews and aircraft capable of deploying in response to worldwide contingencies and emergencies. The 700th saw combat in the European Theater of Operations from 13 December 1943-25 April 1945. It trained for bombardment missions from 1947–1949, and for fighter-bomber missions from 1952-1957. Since 1957, the 700th has provided tactical airlift to include airdrop, airland, and air evacuation of personnel and equipment. It was called to active duty during the Cuban Missile Crisis. The squadron assisted with the redeployment of U.S. Army and Marine Corps personnel from Grenada following Operation Urgent Fury in 1983. In 1984 and 1985, the squadron helped deploy U.S. personnel throughout Central and South America from Howard Air Force Base, Panama in support of Operations Volant Oak and Coronet Oak. During the 1990s, the 700th helped deploy U.S. forces to Saudi Arabia in support of Operation Desert Shield. If flew in support of Operation Provide Promise and Operation Provide Comfort II.
    7.00
    5 votes
    23
    13th Fighter Squadron

    13th Fighter Squadron

    The 13th Fighter Squadron (13 FS) is part of the 35th Fighter Wing at Misawa Air Base, Japan. It operates the F-16 Fighting Falcon aircraft conducting air superiority missions. The 13th flew antisubmarine patrols in the Gulf of Mexico from, June–August 1942 and served as an operational and replacement training unit from, April 1942–October 1943. It flew combat missions in Southeast Asia from, 15 May 1966 – 30 June 1975. During the Vietnam War, while stationed at Udorn Royal Thai Air Force Base, the squadron's mascot was a full-grown black panther (Asian leopard), named Eldridge. The cat was given to the squadron in 1970, as the story went by an Air America (CIA) pilot who picked it up in Laos. Eldridge was kept in a large cage near the Squadron building and often taken for walks around the Base. Although tame, he was still a wild animal and after the war was given to the Phoenix Arizona zoo in 1973. The squadron adopted the nickname "The Panther Pack," and the image of the black panther appears on the unit emblem. The name Eldridge was chosen as a nod to Eldridge Cleaver (31 August 1935 – 1 May 1998) a radical and author, who served as the Minister of Information for the Black
    8.00
    4 votes
    24
    32d Combat Communications Squadron

    32d Combat Communications Squadron

    The 32d Combat Communications Squadron (32 CBCS) is a United States Air Force combat communications squadron, located at Tinker AFB. They deploy quality communications-computer systems and air traffic services for military operations and emergency missions under hostile and base conditions anytime, anywhere. Provide engineering team and expeditionary communications to support advon, initial reception of forces, and "reach forward" deployment of key personnel. Provide communications infrastructure to activate and robust two air expeditionary wings (AEW) with a maximum boots on ground of 3,000 persons each. Provide deployed base information infrastructure across the full spectrum of operations. Provide connectivity for base infrastructure and from base infrastructure to theatre information infrastructure. Provide power and environmental control where these services are not available from host or wing civil engineering. Provide theatre-level services including global broadcast system tactical receive suite, line of sight and intra-theatre information infrastructure. Provide air traffic control services to one AEW.
    8.00
    4 votes
    25
    36th (Herefordshire) Regiment of Foot

    36th (Herefordshire) Regiment of Foot

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The 36th (Herefordshire) Regiment of Foot was an infantry regiment of the British Army, formed in 1701 and amalgamated into The Worcestershire Regiment in 1881. Its lineage is continued today by the Mercian Regiment. The regiment was raised by General William Caulfeild, 2nd Viscount Charlemont in May 1701; it was the successor to a previous regiment raised by Charlemont in 1694 for Irish service. In 1751, they were numbered the 36th Regiment of Foot, and in 1782 took a county title as the 36th (Herefordshire) Regiment of Foot.
    8.00
    4 votes
    26
    47th Regiment of Foot

    47th Regiment of Foot

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The 47th (Lancashire) Regiment of Foot was an infantry regiment of the British Army. First raised in 1741 in Scotland, the regiment saw service over a period of 140 years, before it was amalgamated with another regiment to become The Loyal North Lancashire Regiment in 1881. During its existence it served in North America during the Seven Years' War and American War of Independence, fought during the Napoleonic and Crimean Wars and served as garrison troops in Ireland, Canada and Malta. The regiment was first raised in 1741 as Sir John Mordaunt's Regiment of Foot in Scotland. Initially, the regiment was ranked as the 58th of the line, but it was later renumbered as the 47th. The regiment first saw war service, paradoxically, at home during the 1745 Jacobite Rising against rebels who had risen in support of Bonnie Prince Charlie who claimed the thrones of the Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. The regiment under Sir John Cope marched north into the Scottish Highlands but, as he thought the rebel force to be stronger than it really was, avoided engaging the Jacobites then sailed from Aberdeen down to Dunbar to meet the Jacobite forces to the east of Edinburgh at the Battle of
    8.00
    4 votes
    27
    4th Space Operations Squadron

    4th Space Operations Squadron

    The United States Air Force's 4th Space Operations Squadron (4 SOPS) is a satellite operations unit located at Schriever AFB, Colorado. 4 SOPS controls the Milstar communication satellite constellation. The mission of 4th SOPS is to ensure the Milstar system provides survivable, enduring, critical essential command and control communications through all levels of conflict for the president, the Secretary of Defense, and war fighting combatant commanders worldwide. 4th SOPS operates the $31 billion Milstar system executing communications management, satellite command and control, and ground segment maintenance for the Milstar constellation. 4th SOPS' motto "Linking the Forces" reflects Milstar's responsibility to enhance the nation's secure communications capability for today's military forces. Established under the 1st Photographic Group in May 1941. Performed aerial mapping primarily over the southwestern United States prior to the Pearl Harbor Attack using P-39 Aircobra sub-variants (F-2) which were equipped for the ground-attack and reconnaissance roles. After the United States entry into World War II, flew aerial mapping missions over Western Canada and the Alaska Territory,
    6.00
    6 votes
    28
    The Suffolk Regiment

    The Suffolk Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Suffolk Regiment was an infantry regiment of the line in the British Army with a history dating back to 1685. It saw service for three centuries, before being amalgamated with the Royal Norfolk Regiment as the 1st East Anglian Regiment (Royal Norfolk and Suffolk) in 1959. Its lineage is continued today by the Royal Anglian Regiment. The "Duke of Norfolk's Regiment of Foot" raised in 1685 incorporated men from the East Anglian counties of Norfolk and Suffolk. Until 1751 it was named after ten different colonels and was ranked in 1747 as the 12th Foot regiment. In 1751 it was retitled the 12th Regiment of Foot and in 1782 given a county association as the 12th (the East Suffolk) Regiment of Foot. In 1758 the 2nd Battalion of the 12th Regiment of Foot was redesignated as the 65th (2nd Yorkshire, North Riding) Regiment of Foot. The 63rd Regiment of Foot (another regiment recruiting in Suffolk) became the 63rd (the West Suffolk) Regiment of Foot, which would later form the 1st Battalion, Manchester Regiment. The 1st Battalion served in the Second Boer War. By contrast between 1895 and 1914, the 2nd Battalion Suffolk Regiment was not involved in hostilities. It was stationed for the
    6.80
    5 votes
    29
    47th Fighter Squadron

    47th Fighter Squadron

    The 47th Fighter Squadron (47 FS) is part of the 917th Fighter Group at Barksdale Air Force Base, Louisiana, and falls under the operational control of the 442nd Fighter Wing, Whiteman Air Force Base, Missouri. The 47 FS conducts advanced A-10 Thunderbolt II training. The 47th Fighter Squadron was activated on 1 December 1940, as the 47th Pursuit Squadron, one of three squadrons assigned to the 15th Pursuit Group, Wheeler Field, territory of Hawaii. The squadron also flew missions from Hawaiian stations of Bellows, Haleiwa and Mokuleia Fields, as well as Barking Sands. The 47th Pursuit Squadron participated in numerous campaigns from 1940 to 1945, flying P-10, P-26, P-36, P-47, and P-51 aircraft. The squadron was credited with shooting down eight Japanese aircraft on 7 December 1941, before being inactivated on 15 October 1946, at Wheeler Field. On 1 December 1952, the 47th was re-designated the 47th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron and was activated at Niagara Falls Municipal Airport, New York. Assigned to the 4708th Defense Wing under Air Defense Command, the squadron flew F-47 aircraft. In February 1953 the 47th was reassigned to the 518th Air Defense Group, flying F-84F
    9.00
    3 votes
    30
    The Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire Regiment

    The Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire Regiment was the final title of an infantry regiment of the line in the British Army originally formed in 1688. The lineage of the regiment is today continued by the Royal Anglian Regiment. The origins of the regiment go back to 9 October 1688 when the raising of Archibald Douglas' Regiment of Foot was authorised by King James II in response to the threat posed to his throne by Prince William of Orange. The regiment was raised in the southern counties of England, and was embodied in Reading, Berkshire. The new regiment was ordered to London to oppose William's forces, but refused to fight. James fled the country allowing William to become king. Colonel Douglas, an adherent of the displaced monarch, was replaced by Robert Hodges and the regiment was allowed to continue in existence as part of William's army. Until 1751 the Regiment was titled according to its string of ten Colonels: The installation of William as king involved England in the wider Nine Years War. The regiment quickly embarked for service overseas in April 1689, forming part of the Anglo-Dutch forces in the Netherlands. They fought at the battles of Walcourt (1689), Steenkirk (1692)
    9.00
    3 votes
    31
    30th (Cambridgeshire) Regiment of Foot

    30th (Cambridgeshire) Regiment of Foot

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The 30th (Cambridgeshire) Regiment of Foot was an infantry regiment of the British Army, formed in 1702 and amalgamated into The East Lancashire Regiment in 1881. In 1689, during the Nine Years' War, Viscount Castleton was authorised to raise a regiment of foot in Lincolnshire. Lord Castleton's Regiment of Foot was duly formed, and in 1691 travelled to Flanders. In 1694 the colonelcy of the unit changed and it became Colonel Thomas Sanderson's Regiment of Foot. With the signing of the Treaty of Ryswick in 1697 the war came to an end. Sanderson's Regiment returned to England, where it was disbanded on 4 March 1698. By 1702 England was again involved in a European conflict which became known as the War of the Spanish Succession. Sanderson was commissioned to reform his regiment as marines. In February 1702 Thomas Sanderson's Regiment of Marines (or the 1st Regiment of Marines) was reraised in Lincolnshire. The unit took part in the capture and defence of Gibraltar in 1704–1705. It subsequently took part in the campaign led by the Earl of Peterborough and was involved in the taking of Barcelona. The regiment's title changed with the name of its colonel: Thomas Pownall (1704–1705) and
    7.75
    4 votes
    32
    65th (2nd Yorkshire, North Riding) Regiment of Foot

    65th (2nd Yorkshire, North Riding) Regiment of Foot

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The 65th (2nd Yorkshire, North Riding) Regiment of Foot was a British Army infantry regiment formed in 1758 from the redesignation of the 2nd Battalion, 12th Regiment of Foot. In 1881 it would become the 1st Battalion, York and Lancaster Regiment when amalgamated with the 84th (York and Lancaster) Regiment of Foot. After the regiment was formed in 1758 it was sent to the fever ridden West Indies to aid in the capturing of the French islands of Guadeloupe (1759) and Martinique (1762). They were also involved in the expedition to capture Havana, Cuba in 1762. In 1764 the 65th Foot returned to England, where the regiment refilled its ranks. In 1768 the 65th Foot was shipped to Boston, Massachusetts as part of the garrison. A few years later in 1775 the American War of Independence began. The regiment's first action in the war was at the Battle of Bunker Hill in 1775 where their Grenadier and Light Companies were involved in the attack. In 1776 the remnants of the 65th Foot were drafted into other regiments and the officers sent home to reform. In 1782 they received the title 2nd Yorkshire, North Riding Regiment. In 1789 war had broken out with France again and Spain and the 65th were
    7.75
    4 votes
    33
    90th Fighter Squadron

    90th Fighter Squadron

    The 90th Fighter Squadron (90 FS) is part of the 3d Wing at Elmendorf Air Force Base, Alaska. It operates the F-22 Raptor aircraft conducting air superiority missions. The 90th Fighter Squadron trains in the fighter missions of offensive counter-air (OCA), defensive counter-air (DCA) and suppression of enemy air defenses (SEAD), as well as strategic attack and interdiction. The 90th Fighter Squadron was initially activated on 20 August 1917, as the 90th Aero Squadron. Its first location was at Kelly Field, San Antonio, Texas. The first few months of its existence were consumed by the necessary training to prepare the men for operations in France during World War I. On 12 November 1917, the men of the 90th arrived at Le Havre, France. The initial cadre of officers and enlisted men began preparing the infrastructure necessary to support their flying mission. The air contingent arrived soon after this first group. The squadron's first aircraft were the Sopwith 1½ Strutter ground attack aircraft. The squadron upgraded to Salmson 2-A2s, SPAD Xis, and Breguet BR-14 observation aircraft. Pilots flew from Colombey-les-Belles and scored seven confirmed aerial victories (against aircraft)
    7.75
    4 votes
    34
    393d Bomb Squadron

    393d Bomb Squadron

    The 393d Bomb Squadron (393 BS) is part of the 509th Bomb Wing at Whiteman Air Force Base, Missouri. The 393d Bombardment Squadron is the only United States Air Force squadron to carry out a nuclear attack on an enemy in combat. During World War II, its aircraft attacked Hiroshima on 6 August 1945 and Nagasaki, Japan 9 August 1945 with atomic bombs. It operates B-2 Spirit aircraft providing strategic bombing capability. Activated as a B-29 Superfortress squadron in early 1944; trained under Second Air Force. Due to a shortage of B-29s, the squadron was initially equipped with former II Bomber Command B-17 Flying Fortresses previously used for training heavy bomber replacement personnel as engineering flaws were being worked out of the B-29.. The squadron was then reassigned for advanced training and received B-29s at Fairmont Army Airfield, Nebraska during the late spring and summer of 1944. In December 1944 reassigned as only operational B-29 squadron to 509th Composite Group at Wendover Field, Utah in December. Aircraft refitted to Silverplate configuration becoming atomic bomb capable under highly classified program. Deployed to North Field, Tinian in late May 1945, flying
    6.60
    5 votes
    35
    No. 161 Squadron RAF

    No. 161 Squadron RAF

    No. 161 (Special Duties) Squadron was a highly secretive unit of the Royal Air Force, which, together with 138 Squadron, was tasked with missions of the Special Operations Executive during the Second World War. Their primary role was to drop and collect secret agents and equipment into and from Nazi-occupied Europe. The squadron had a secondary role in acting as the King's Flight. A proposal was made on 9 May 1918 to create a Squadron flying the Airco DH.9A in a daylight bombing role. The scheduled formation date was postponed several times before the plans were entirely cancelled. The squadron was reformed at RAF Newmarket on 15 February 1942 when the King's Flight was combined with elements of 138 Squadron. In April, 161 Squadron moved to RAF Tempsford in Bedfordshire where it would remain until disbandment on 2 June 1945. Several types of aircraft were used by the squadron in the course of their duties. The Lysanders, Hudsons and Havocs were used for parachuting/landing and collection of agents whilst the Whitworths, Halifaxes and Stirlings were used for supply-dropping missions. This aircraft and the remains of the pilot were discovered 53 years, to the day, after it went
    6.60
    5 votes
    36
    84th Regiment of Foot

    84th Regiment of Foot

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The 84th Regiment of Foot was a British regiment raised for service in India with the British East India Company. Raised in England in 1758 during the Seven Years' War it was shipped to Madras, India in 1759 where it took part in the East Indies Campaign (1757–1763) under Robert Clive. The 84th foot was among the first British regiments to serve in India. The regiment was soon in action in the Battle of Wandiwash in January 1760. This battle was followed in September by the Siege of Pondicherry (1760) and the Siege of Arcot in the Second Carnatic War. In 1765 the 84th Foot sailed back to Britain and were disbanded. Sir Eyre Coote was a commander of the regiment during the war. He would later become one of the first Commanders in Chief of India and General of the British Army.
    5.67
    6 votes
    37
    86th (Royal County Down) Regiment of Foot

    86th (Royal County Down) Regiment of Foot

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The 86th (Royal County Down) Regiment of Foot was an infantry regiment of the British Army, formed in 1793 and amalgamated into The Royal Irish Rifles following the Childers Reforms in 1881. The regiment was raised in 1793 as a volunteer corps in Shropshire, and taken into the British Army the following year as the 86th (Shropshire Volunteers). In 1795, after the Battle of Groix it absorbed the remnants of the disbanded 118th Regiment of Foot (Fingall's Regiment), which had been raised in 1794 for service as marines. In 1806 it became the 86th (Leinster) Regiment of Foot, and then in 1812 it was renamed as the 86th (Royal County Down) Regiment of Foot.
    7.50
    4 votes
    38
    United States Navy Nurse Corps

    United States Navy Nurse Corps

    • Armed force: United States Navy
    The United States Navy Nurse Corps was officially established by Congress in 1908; however, unofficially, women had been working as nurses aboard Navy ships and in Navy hospitals for nearly 100 years. In 1811, Dr. William P.C. Barton became the first to officially recommend that female nurses be added to naval hospital staff. However, it wasn't until 19 June 1861 that a Navy Department circular order finally established the designation of Nurse, to be filled by junior enlisted men. Fifteen years later, the duties were transferred to the designation Bayman (US Navy Regulations, 1876). Although enlisted personnel were referred to as Nurses, their duties and responsibilities were more related to those of a Hospital Corpsman than to a nurse. During the American Civil War, several African American women are noted to have served as paid crew aboard the hospital ship Red Rover in the Mississippi River area in the position of nurse. The known names of four nurses are: Alice Kennedy, Sarah Kinno, Ellen Campbell and Betsy Young (Fowler). In addition volunteer nuns from the Catholic Sisters of the Holy Cross also served aboard as nurses. During the 1898 Spanish-American War, the Navy employed
    7.50
    4 votes
    39
    No. 845 Naval Air Squadron

    No. 845 Naval Air Squadron

    845 Naval Air Squadron is a squadron of the Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm. Part of the Commando Helicopter Force, it is a specialist amphibious unit operating the Westland Sea King HC4 helicopter and provides troop transport and load lifting support to 3 Commando Brigade Royal Marines. The squadron is based at HMS Heron, RNAS Yeovilton in Somerset. The primary role of the squadron is in supporting Royal Marine Commando troops in amphibious assaults. 845NAS formed on 1 January 1943 as a Torpedo Bomber Reconnaissance Squadron (TBRS) flying the new Grumman Avenger, designed as a much needed replacement for the ageing Fairy Swordfish. The squadron took part in its first active service by dive bombing an oil refinery at Syurabaya, Java, in May 1944. For the following year the squadron saw action over Malaya, Ceylon, and Sumatra before being disbanded in 1945. 845 reformed on 15 March 1955 at Gosport to be an Anti Submarine unit flying the newly proved Whirlwind HAS 22’s where it saw service on several ships in the Mediterranean and Indonesia. Its job was to prove the new sonar technology and the navigational reliability of the Whirlwind. After returning to the UK the squadron disbanded
    8.67
    3 votes
    40
    Worcestershire and Sherwood Foresters

    Worcestershire and Sherwood Foresters

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Worcestershire and Sherwood Foresters Regiment (29th/45th Foot) was an infantry regiment of the British Army, part of the Prince of Wales' Division. It was formed in 1970 through the amalgamation of two other regiments: The regiment served as the county regiment of the following counties: In 2004, as part of the restructuring of the infantry, it was announced that the Worcestershire and Sherwood Foresters would be amalgamated with the 22nd (Cheshire) Regiment and the Staffordshire Regiment to form the new Mercian Regiment. In July 2005, the 1st Battalion moved to Cavalry Barracks, Hounslow as a public duties battalion, where it, amongst other duties, provided the Queen's Guard. In August 2007, the regiment was renamed as the 2nd Battalion, Mercian Regiment (Worcesters and Foresters), before moving to Northern Ireland in the light infantry role in 2008. The 95th Derbyshire Regiment were, since 1858, famous for their Regimental Mascot, a Ram. He was and still is known as Private DERBY and has been held on the official strength of the regiment since that time. He has his own individual system of numbering (beginning with No1 to the present 28th) and documentation. In addition he
    10.00
    2 votes
    41
    67th Special Operations Squadron

    67th Special Operations Squadron

    The 67th Special Operation Squadron is an active unit within the 352d Special Operations Group (352 SOG), United States Air Force, United States European Command, and is currently based at Royal Air Force base RAF Mildenhall in Suffolk, eastern England. From their base at RAF Mildenhall, the 67th Special Operations Squadron's Combat Shadow flies single or multi-ship low-level air refueling missions for special operations helicopters, and infiltration, exfiltration, and resupply of special operations forces by airdrop or airland. The MC-130P primarily flies missions at night to reduce probability of visual acquisition and intercept by airborne threats. The squadron operates the Lockheed MC-130P Combat Shadow. The most notable addition to this aircraft is its compatibility with night vision goggles, and as such, it does most of the group's heavy night work. In theory the Combat Shadow also has the ability to refuel the group's helicopters in flight, making it a most valuable addition to the group, and to the Air Force in general. The unit was constituted as the 67th Air Rescue Squadron on 17 October 1952. It was activated on 14 November 1952 at RAF Sculthorpe, England, and
    6.40
    5 votes
    42
    Mercian Regiment

    Mercian Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Mercian Regiment is an infantry regiment of the British Army, formed by the amalgamation of three existing regiments on 1 September 2007. The regiment has three regular army battalions and one Territorial Army or reserve battalion, though this is set to decrease in the next decade to two battalions as the 3rd Battalion is disbanded. It is called the Mercian Regiment as it generally recruits from within the territory occupied by the former Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Mercia. The regiment's formation was announced on 16 December 2004 by the then Secretary of Defence Geoff Hoon and General Sir Mike Jackson as part of the restructuring of the British Army Infantry - it consists of three regular battalions, plus a territorial battalion, and was created through the merger of three single battalion regiments: The 1st Battalion, Cheshire Regiment became 1st Battalion, Mercian Regiment. The 1st Battalion, Worcestershire and Sherwood Foresters Regiment became the 2nd Battalion, Mercian Regiment and the 1st Battalion, Staffordshire Regiment became the 3rd Battalion, Mercian Regiment. The reserve West Midlands Regiment, with elements of the King's and Cheshire Regiment and the East of England
    6.40
    5 votes
    43
    No. 605 Squadron RAF

    No. 605 Squadron RAF

    No 605 Squadron was formed as an Auxiliary Air Force Squadron. Initially formed as a bomber unit, it was one of the most successful participants of the Battle of Britain. It also had the distinction of being active during World War II at two fronts at a time, when the squadron was split up between Malta and the Duch East Indies. In its last incarnation so far the squadron served as the first jet fighter unit in the post-war Royal Auxiliary Air Force, 616 already having flown Gloster Meteors during World War II). No. 605 Squadron was formed on 5 October 1926 at RAF Castle Bromwich as a day bomber unit of the Auxiliary Air Force, recruiting in the Birmingham area. Initially equipped with DH.9As, it received Westland Wapitis in April 1930 and Hawker Harts in October 1934. The latter were replaced by Hawker Hinds in August 1936. On 1 January 1939 No. 605 squadron was redesignated as a fighter squadron and re-equipped with Gloster Gladiators. Hawker Hurricanes began to arrive a few weeks before the outbreak of World War II and the squadron took up its war station at RAF Tangmere with a mixture of six Hurricanes and ten Gladiators, completing re-equipment during October 1939. In February
    6.40
    5 votes
    44
    West Yorkshire Regiment

    West Yorkshire Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The West Yorkshire Regiment (Prince of Wales's Own) (14th Foot) was an infantry regiment of the British Army. In 1958 it amalgamated with The East Yorkshire Regiment (15th Foot) to form The Prince of Wales's Own Regiment of Yorkshire. On 6 June 2006 The regiment was amalgamated with the Green Howards and the Duke of Wellington's Regiment (West Riding) to form the Yorkshire Regiment (14th/15th, 19th and 33rd/76th Foot). The regiment was raised by Sir Edward Hales in 1685 by order of King James II. One of the nine new regiments of foot, raised to meet the Monmouth rebellion it was termed Hales's Regiment. The regiment served in Flanders between 1693 and 1696 and gained its first battle honour at Namur in 1695. In 1694 the regiment took precedence as the 14th Regiment of Foot. 1715 saw the regiment moved to Scotland to fight the Jacobite Rebellion. In 1727 the regiment played a major part in defending Gibraltar against the Spanish, where it remained garrisoned for the next 15 years. 1745 saw the regiment in Flanders fighting at Fontenoy before being recalled to Scotland to fight '45 Rebellion. Fighting at Falkirk and Culloden, becoming the 14th of Foot in 1751. The regiment returned
    6.40
    5 votes
    45
    192 Squadron

    192 Squadron

    The 192 Squadron of the Israeli Air Force (IAF), also known as the Daya (Milvus) Squadron, was formed in July 1978 with several E-2 Hawkeye Airborne Early Warning aircraft. The squadron served in a reconnaissance role during the 1982 Lebanon War and in other operations since. The squadron was reportedly disbanded in 1994, although a flying E-2C appeared in a flight school air show in 1998. The IAF was the first operator to install in-flight refuelling equipment and also applied several avionics enhancements to Israeli E-2Cs. Three of the four Israeli Hawkeyes were sold to Mexico in 2002 after an upgrade package installation, while one was handed over to the Israeli Air Force Museum. The "Roll Out" Ceremony of the first E-2C Hawkeye Aircraft for the Mexican Navy took place on January 21, 2004, at the facilities of Israel Aerospace Industries's Bedek Aviation Group.
    7.25
    4 votes
    46
    34th Fighter Squadron

    34th Fighter Squadron

    The 34th Fighter Squadron (34 FS) was part of the 388th Fighter Wing at Hill Air Force Base, Utah. It operated the F-16 Fighting Falcon aircraft conducting air superiority missions. Conduct air-to-air and air-to-ground operations for daylight and nighttime missions. The 34th was activated at Seymour Johnson Field, North Carolina on 15 October 1944, flying the P-47 Thunderbolt. The squadron served in the final stages of World War II, seeing combat operations in the Western Pacific from May 1945 to August 1946, while it was stationed in the Ryukyu Islands, first on Ie Shima and later on Okinawa. The 34th FS was de-activated on 15 October 1946, following the war, and was redesignated the 34th Fighter-Day Squadron prior to its reactivation in November 1954, at George Air Force Base, California. It was part of the 413th Fighter-Day Wing and was equipped with the F-86 Sabre. The 34th transitioned into the F-100 Super Sabre in 1956, which it flew until 1959 when it was again de-activated. On 2 May 1966, the 34th FS was again activated and assigned to Pacific Air Forces. The squadron was part of the 41st Air Division at Yokota Air Base, Japan. One month later, the 34th deployed and was
    7.25
    4 votes
    47
    355th Fighter Squadron

    355th Fighter Squadron

    The 355th Fighter Squadron is an inactive United States Air Force unit. Its last assignment was that of a subordinate unit of the 354th Fighter Wing based at Eielson Air Force Base in Alaska, flying the Republic A/OA-10 Thunderbolt II aircraft. The squadron was inactivated on 15 August 2007 as a result of Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) 2005. Activated on 15 November 1942 at Hamilton Field, California, initially equipped with P-39 Aircobras and assigned to IV Fighter Command for training. Moved to several bases in California and Nevada then to Portland Army Air Base, Oregon in June 1943 and re-equipped with new P-51B Mustangs. Transitioned to the Mustang throughout the summer of 1943 the deployed to the European Theater of Operations (ETO), being assigned to IX Fighter Command in England. In late 1943, the strategic bombardment campaign over Occupied Europe and Nazi Germany being conducted by VIII Bomber Command was taking heavy losses in aircraft and flight crews as the VIII Fighter Command's P-38 Lightnings and P-47 Thunderbolts lacked the range to escort the heavy B-17 Flying Fortress and B-24 Liberator bombers deep into Germany to attack industrial and military targets. The
    7.25
    4 votes
    48
    71st Fighter Squadron

    71st Fighter Squadron

    The 71st Fighter Squadron (71st FS) was a squadron of the United States Air Force, currently part of the 1st Operations Group of the 1st Fighter Wing, and stationed at Langley Air Force Base in Virginia. The squadron is equipped with the F-15C Eagle, the last squadron of the 1st Fighter Wing to fly the F-15, with the 27th and 94th already flying the F-22 Raptor. The squadron is known as "The Ironmen", and also as "Cragmore". The 71st Fighter Squadron has a tradition of outstanding performance since its foundation in December 1940 as the 71st Pursuit Squadron (Interceptor). Initial activation to the 1st Pursuit Group at Selfridge Field, Michigan on 1 January 1941 was definite evidence of America's impending direct involvement in World War II. Initial activation training was accomplished in the P-35. This was changed to the YP-43 Lancer when the squadron was redesignated as the 71st Pursuit Squadron (Fighter) on 12 March 1941. The squadron gained proficiency in the aircraft and the anti-submarine mission while training on the Great Lakes. On 9 December 1941, just two days after the attack on Pearl Harbor, the squadron reported to NAS San Diego in defense of the important Southern
    7.25
    4 votes
    49
    No. CCVII Squadron RAF

    No. CCVII Squadron RAF

    No. 207 Squadron (sometimes written as No. CCVII Squadron) was a former bomber, communications and training squadron of the Royal Air Force, most recently based at RAF Linton-on-Ouse in Yorkshire, operating Short Tucano T.1 trainer aircraft. No. 7 Squadron RNAS was formed from "B" Squadron of No. 4 Wing RNAS on 31 December 1916 at Petite-Synthe, France. Note that another No. 7 Squadron RNAS had been sent to East Africa in May 1916, flying Voisins and BE.2cs for seven months on reconnaissance and bombing duties until disbanding there in January 1917, when the other 7 Squadron RNAS had already been formed in France. Thus, formed as a specialist night bomber squadron in France in December 1916, No. 7 RNAS flew its first mission there on 3 February 1917, with four Short Bombers setting out against the Brugge (Bruges) docks. In April that year it re-equipped with Handley Page O/100s, using them for night raids, including attacks against rail targets and ammunition dumps during the Second Battle of Ypres. The squadron split into two in July 1917, with eight O/100s forming the initial equipment of 7A Squadron, which later became 14 Squadron RNAS, while 7 Squadron continued with 10
    7.25
    4 votes
    50
    The Green Howards

    The Green Howards

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Green Howards (Alexandra, Princess of Wales's Own Yorkshire Regiment) was an infantry regiment of the British Army, in the King's Division. Originally raised in 1688, they served under various titles until they were amalgamated with The Prince of Wales's Own Regiment of Yorkshire and The Duke of Wellington's Regiment, all Yorkshire-based regiments in the King's Division, to form The Yorkshire Regiment on 6 June 2006. The regiment was formed in 1688 from independent companies of infantry in Devon. Until 1751 it was known by the names of its various colonels, when it became the 19th Regiment of Foot. In 1782 all regiments of foot without a special designation were given a county title "to cultivate a connection with the County which might at all times be useful towards recruiting". The regiment became the 19th (1st North Riding of Yorkshire) Regiment of Foot, and its main recruiting efforts continued in this area until 2006, particularly in Middlesbrough, Redcar, Northallerton and Scarborough. The regiment was known as the Green Howards from 1744. At that time, regiments were known by the name of their colonel. The 19th regiment's colonel was Hon. Sir Charles Howard. However, at
    7.25
    4 votes
    51
    87th (Royal Irish Fusiliers) Regiment of Foot

    87th (Royal Irish Fusiliers) Regiment of Foot

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The 87th (Royal Irish Fusiliers) Regiment of Foot was an infantry regiment of the British Army, formed in 1793 and amalgamated into the Princess Victoria's (Royal Irish Fusiliers) in 1881. The regiment was raised in 1793 as the 87th (The Prince of Wales's Irish) Regiment of Foot, taking its title from George IV, then Prince of Wales, later modifying its title to 87th (The Prince of Wales's Own Irish) Regiment of Foot, then to 87th (Royal Irish Fusiliers) Regiment of Foot following the Prince's accession to the throne. The 87th were famous for being the first British Regiment to capture a French Imperial Eagle during the Peninsular War. At the Battle of Barrosa on 5 March 1811, Ensign Edward Keogh and Sergeant Patrick Masterson captured the Eagle of the 8th Ligne. Keogh only managed to get a hand on the shaft when he was shot and bayoneted, he was killed instantly. Masterson had followed his officer and after killing several men he wrenched the Eagle from the dying hands of its bearer, Lieutenant Gazan. It was bugler Paddy Shannon of the 2nd Battalion of the 87th Regiment of Foot who "picked up" Marshal Jean-Baptiste Jourdan's baton after the battle of Vittoria . The baton was sent
    8.33
    3 votes
    52
    325th Air Control Squadron

    325th Air Control Squadron

    The 325th Air Control Squadron (325 ACS) is part of the 325th Fighter Wing, an Air Education and Training Command (AETC) unit, based at the United States Air Force's Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida. Originally constituted the 325th Fighter Control squadron in March 1943, the 325th served in the European Theater during WWII. The squadron's present mission was activated at Tyndall in 1947, making it the base's oldest surviving mission. During the past decades, radar operations and maintenance has been taught to tens of thousands of personnel of all ranks. The 325 ACS is primarily responsible for the initial training of all Active duty, Air National Guard, and Reserve Air Force Air Battle Manager officers in command and control mission execution. The squadron also provides training international officers in command and control operations, as well as providing command and control support for F-22A Raptor initial and transition training at Tyndall AFB. The "Screamin' Eagles" began as the 325th Fighter Control Squadron in April 1943. In December 1943, the unit moved to North Africa to support the operations of the American and other Allied flying units. Moving its radar with the front
    9.50
    2 votes
    53
    35th (Royal Sussex) Regiment of Foot

    35th (Royal Sussex) Regiment of Foot

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The 35th (Royal Sussex) Regiment of Foot was an infantry regiment in the British Army. The regiment became The Royal Sussex Regiment. The 35th Regiment changed its name many times during its history. Originally formed as the Earl of Donegal's Regiment of Foot in 1693 (raised by Arthur Chichester, 3rd Earl of Donegall in Belfast), which was disbanded in 1698 and raised again in 1701. The regiment was also known as the Belfast Regiment and by two other colonel's names before it was given the numerical title of 35th in 1747. It was given the title Prince of Orange's Own Regiment in 1751 and in 1782 became the 35th (The Dorsetshire) Regiment of Foot. In 1805 the regiment changed its county allegiance and recruiting ground becoming the 35th (Sussex) Regiment of Foot. In 1881 during the Childer's Reforms of the British Army the 35th Regiment was united with the 107th Regiment of Foot (Bengal Light Infantry) to form the The Royal Sussex Regiment. The Earl of Donegall, a wealthy land owner, raised the regiment and paid for it out of his own pocket. As a mark of respect to Chichester, William III granted permission for the regiment to wear orange facings on their uniforms. When the War of
    9.50
    2 votes
    54
    95th Fighter Squadron

    95th Fighter Squadron

    The 95th Fighter Squadron (95 FS) was part of the 325th Fighter Wing at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida. It conducted advanced fighter training for the F-15 Eagle aircraft. The squadron first saw service flying the original twin-tailed fighter, the P-38 Lightning, serving in both North Africa and Italy. The 95th participated in the attacks on the Ploesti oil refineries. Each aircraft carried a 1,000-pound bomb and a 300-gallon gas tank. In May 1943, the 95th was tasked with bombing Pantellaria, supporting the Allied invasion of Sicily. In part due to the squadron's efforts the garrison surrender just prior to the Allies landing on the island. The squadron also took part in some of the first shuttle missions to Russia. At the end of World War II, the 95th tallied more than 400 total victories including 199 air-to-air kills and seven aces. During the post-war period, the squadron was assigned to the Alaskan Air Command, flying the P-51 Mustang. In the fall of 1959, the 95th was tasked with defending Washington, D.C., and the surrounding area. With the initiation of North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) and the threat of manned bomber attacks, the 95th was assigned to
    9.50
    2 votes
    55
    625th Strategic Operations Squadron

    625th Strategic Operations Squadron

    The mission of the 625th Strategic Operations Squadron (625 STOS) is to find, analyze, and evaluate strategic nuclear targets for U.S. nuclear forces inside OPLAN 8044, formerly known as the SIOP. Three mission areas are encompassed by subordinate flights: The 625 STOS was previously designated 625th Missile Operations Flight (625 MOF). 625 MOF's mission was to verify missile targeting, trains airborne launch control system crews and ensures strategic communications networks between the launch control centers and national leadership are operating. The squadron will soon transfer to the new Air Force Global Strike Command. Ultramarine blue and Air Force yellow are the Air Force colors. Blue alludes to the sky, the primary theater of Air Force operations. Yellow refers to the sun and the excellence required of Air Force personnel. The mission element symbolizes three mission areas and flights (Airborne Launch Control System flight, Strategic Automated Command and Control Systems Flight). The world globe represents the unit's global spanning missions. The stars represent the unit's commitment to the ever vigilant forces at three missile wings located at, Malmstrom AFB, Minot AFB, and
    7.00
    4 votes
    56
    No. 658 Squadron RAF

    No. 658 Squadron RAF

    No. 658 Squadron was a Royal Air Force Air Observation Post squadron associated with the 21st Army Group during World War II. Numbers 651 to 663 Squadrons of the RAF were Air Observation Post units working closely with Army units in artillery spotting and liaison. A further three of these squadrons, 664-666, were manned with Canadian personnel. Their duties and squadron numbers were transferred to the Army with the formation of the Army Air Corps on 1 September 1957. No. 660 Squadron was formed at RAF Old Sarum on 30 April 1943 with the Auster III and from March 1944 the Auster IV. The squadron role was to support the 21st Army Group and in June 1944 it moved to France. Fighting in the break-out from Normandy it followed the army across the countries and into Germany. In October 1945 the squadron left for India, where it was disbanded on 15 October 1946. The squadron today is represented by 658 Squadron of 7 (Volunteer) Regiment, Army Air Corps.
    7.00
    4 votes
    57
    Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers

    Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers was an Irish infantry regiment of the British Army formed in 1881 by the amalgamation of the 27th (Inniskilling) Regiment of Foot and the 108th Regiment of Foot (Madras Infantry). It saw service in the South African War, the First World War and the Second World War, before being amalgamated into the Royal Irish Rangers in 1968. On 1 July 1881 the 27th and 108th were redesignated as the 1st and 2nd Battalions, The Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers respectively. In 1903 the Regiment was granted a grey hackle for their fusiler sealskin hats to commeorate the original grey uniforms of the Inniskilling Regiment. The regimental district comprised the counties of Donegal, Londonderry, Tyrone and Fermanagh in Ireland, with its garrison depot located at Omagh. The local militia regiments also became part of the new regiment, becoming the 3rd to 5th (Militia) Battalions. Militarily, the whole of Ireland was administered as a separate command within the United Kingdom with Command Headquarters at Parkgate (Phoenix Park) Dublin, directly under the War Office in London. Under the Childers system, one regular battalion of each regiment was to be at a "home" station,
    6.00
    5 votes
    58
    1st Battalion, The Parachute Regiment

    1st Battalion, The Parachute Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The First Battalion, The Parachute Regiment (1 PARA) is a battalion sized formation of the British Army's Parachute Regiment and subordinate unit within 16th Air Assault Brigade, but is permanently attached to the Special Forces Support Group. An airborne light infantry unit, the battalion has since 2006 been the main contributor of manpower to the Special Forces Support Group and is capable of a wide range of operations. Based at RAF St Athan, their barracks in South Wales, personnel regularly deploy outside of the United Kingdom on operations and training. All personnel will have completed the Pre Parachute Selection (P Company) course at the Infantry Training Centre Catterick Garrison, North Yorkshire (previously it was at Aldershot, Hampshire) entitling them to wear the Maroon beret. The 1st is based at St Athan, Wales, and is permanently attached to the Special Forces Support Group (SFSG). To be selected for the 1st Battalion, Paras first have to have served two years with the 2nd or 3rd Battalions. Once selected, they receive further training on additional weapons, communications equipment and specialist assault skills. All men within the Parachute Regiment can expect to
    8.00
    3 votes
    59
    27th Fighter Squadron

    27th Fighter Squadron

    The 27th Fighter Squadron (27 FS) is a United States Air Force unit. It is assigned to the 1st Operations Group and stationed at Langley Air Force Base, Virginia. The 27th Fighter Squadron is the oldest fighter squadron in the United States Air Force. Originally organized as the 21st Aero Squadron on 15 June 1917, the squadron was redesignated as the 27th Aero Squadron on 23 June 1917, and assigned to the 1st Pursuit Group in early 1918. The 27th entered World War I in the European theater where it served with distinction from March 1918 until the Armistice in November of that year. Known as the "Fighting Eagles" or "Black Falcons", the squadron is equipped with the F-22 Raptor, having transitioned from the F-15 in 2005 to become the world's first operational F-22 squadron. As one of three fighter squadrons of the 1st Fighter Wing, the 27th is tasked to provide air superiority for United States or allied forces by engaging and destroying enemy forces, equipment, defenses or installations for global deployment. During World War I, the squadron was based at Toul (5 May 1918), Touquin (28 June 1918), Saints (9 July 1918) and Rembercourt (1 September 1918). Lieutenant Frank Luke, Jr.,
    8.00
    3 votes
    60
    466th Fighter Squadron

    466th Fighter Squadron

    The 466th Fighter Squadron (466 FS) is the 419th Fighter Wing's designated flying squadron. They are located at Hill Air Force Base, Utah. The 419th uses 15 F-16C/D model aircraft, which are light, air to air daytime fighters. The 466th Fighter Squadron first saw action in 1998, participating for the first time in the exercise Cape Tiger. This is a drill which puts reserve pilots shoulder to shoulder with members of the Thailand and Singapore Air Forces. Later that year, the 466th was deployed to Kuwait in time for Operation Southern Watch. The 466th was part of a unit attempting to hold off Iraqi movements toward Kuwaiti and Saudi Arabia. Formed in late 1944 under Second Air Force as one of the last P-47 Thunderbolt Fighter Squadrons, programmed for deployment to Western Pacific theater with long-range P-47N for B-29 Superfortress escort missions. Arrived in Hawaii in early 1945, assigned to Seventh Air Force. Lack of a serious fighter defense over Japan at high altitudes and reprogramming of B-29 raids over Japan to night low-level fast attacks led to reassignment as a replacement training unit based in Hawaii; also performed air defense of the islands until inactivation in
    8.00
    3 votes
    61
    56th Regiment of Foot

    56th Regiment of Foot

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The 56th (West Essex) Regiment of Foot was an infantry regiment in the British Army, active from 1755 to 1881. It was originally raised in Northumbria as the 58th Regiment, and renumbered the 56th the following year when two senior regiments were disbanded. It saw service in Cuba at the capture of Havana in the Seven Years' War, and was later part of the garrison during the Great Siege of Gibraltar in the American Revolutionary War. During the French Revolutionary Wars it fought in the Caribbean and then in Holland. On the outbreak of the Napoleonic Wars the 56th raised a second battalion in 1804 as part of the anti-invasion preparations; both saw service in India and in the Indian Ocean, with the first capturing Réunion and Mauritius. A third battalion was formed in the later years of the war, but was disbanded after a brief period of service in the Netherlands. The regiment spent much of the following period on foreign garrison duties, and saw service in the later stages of the Crimean War, at the Siege of Sevastopol. It was despatched to India during the Indian Mutiny, but did not see active service. The regiment was amalgamated with the 44th (East Essex) Regiment of Foot to
    8.00
    3 votes
    62
    Highland Light Infantry

    Highland Light Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Highland Light Infantry was a regiment of the British Army from 1881 to 1959. In 1923 the regimental title was expanded to the Highland Light Infantry (City of Glasgow Regiment) The regiment was formed as part of the Childers reforms on 1 July 1881 by the amalgamation of the 71st (Highland) Light Infantry and the 74th (Highland) Regiment of Foot as the city regiment of Glasgow, absorbing the local Militia and Rifle Volunteer units. Its exact status was a somewhat ambiguous one - although the regiment insisted on being classified as a non-kilted Highland regiment, it recruited mainly from Glasgow in Lowland Scotland. The HLI (as it was popularly known) continued in service, actively taking part in the First and Second World Wars, until it was amalgamated with the Royal Scots Fusiliers in 1959 to form the Royal Highland Fusiliers (Princess Margaret's Own Glasgow and Ayrshire Regiment). The HLI was also affiliated with a Canadian militia regiment: The Highland Light Infantry of Canada. On July 1, 1881 the 71st and 74th Regiments of Foot were redesignated as the 1st and 2nd Battalions, Highland Light Infantry respectively. Following the independence of India, all infantry regiments
    8.00
    3 votes
    63
    No. 295 Squadron RAF

    No. 295 Squadron RAF

    No 295 Squadron RAF was an airborne forces and transport squadron of the Royal Air Force during World War II. It was the first unit to be equipped with the Armstrong Whitworth Albemarle transport and glider tug aircraft. No. 295 Squadron was formed on 3 August 1942 at RAF Station Netheravon as an airborne forces unit, equipped with Whitley Mk.Vs. These were from November 1942 used in leaflet dropping mission over France, supplemented in February 1943 with Halifax Mk.Vs, which they used in Operation Beggar. By October 1943 the squadron converted to the Albemarle Mk.I. With these aircraft the squadron shared - with 570 sqn.- the honour of being the first to drop troops over Normandy on the eve of D-Day, while other aircraft of the squadron towed gliders to the landing zones. The Albemarles gave way in July 1944 to the Stirling Mk.IV, the squadron used these aircraft during the Battle of Arnhem during Operation Market Garden, again towing gliders. In early October 1944, Short Stirlings of the RAF's No 295 Squadron took up residence at RAF Station Rivenhall, with most of its operations consisting of supply drops to Norwegian resistance forces and similar activities over Holland and
    8.00
    3 votes
    64
    No. 601 Squadron RAF

    No. 601 Squadron RAF

    No. 601 (County of London) Squadron was a squadron of the Royal Auxiliary Air Force, based in London. The squadron battle honours most notably include the Battle of Britain and the first Americans to fly in World War II were members of this squadron. 601 Squadron was formed at RAF Northolt on 14 October 1925 when a group of wealthy aristocratic young men, all of whom were amateur aviators, decided to form themselves into a Reserve Squadron of the RAF after a meeting in White's Club, London. The original officers were picked by the first commanding officer, Lord Edward Grosvenor, youngest son of Hugh Grosvenor, 1st Duke of Westminster. Grosvenor tested potential recruits by plying them with alcohol to see if they would behave inappropriately. Grosvenor wanted officers "of sufficient presence not to be overawed by him and of sufficient means not to be excluded from his favourite pastimes, eating, drinking and Whites". The Squadron was initially known as "the millionaires squadron", a nametag gained because of a reputation for filling their ranks with the very 'well-heeled'. Most of these affluent young pilots had little regard for the rigid discipline of the regular service; they
    8.00
    3 votes
    65
    The Somerset Light Infantry

    The Somerset Light Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Somerset Light Infantry (Prince Albert's) was an infantry regiment of the British Army, which served under various titles from 1685 to 1959. Its lineage is continued today by The Rifles. The regiment was one of nine regiments of foot raised by James II when he expanded the size of the army in response to the Monmouth Rebellion. On 20 June 1685 Theophilus Hastings, 7th Earl of Huntingdon was issued with a warrant authorising him to raise a regiment, and accordingly the Earl of Huntingdon's Regiment of Foot was formed, mainly recruiting in the county of Buckinghamshire. The regiment remained in existence when William III came to the throne in the Glorious Revolution of 1688. Fernando Hastings took over the colonecy of the regiment, which accordingly became Hastings's Regiment of Foot. Hastings's Regiment first saw action at the Battle of Killiecrankie, where they failed to halt the advance of Jacobite rebels, although they were later defeated at the Battle of Dunkeld. The regiment accompanied William to Ireland in the following year, fighting in the decisive Williamite victories at the Boyne and Cork. The Jacobite struggles in Scotland and Ireland were part of a wider European
    6.75
    4 votes
    66
    101st Regiment of Foot

    101st Regiment of Foot

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The 101st Regiment of Foot (Royal Bengal Fusiliers) was a regiment of the British Army from 1862 to 1881 but with a previous history in the Bengal Army going back to 1652. The regiment was formed as part of the Honourable East India Company's army firstly as a Guard of Honour in 1652. By 1756 it was the Bengal European Regiment - 'European' indicating it was composed of white soldiers, not Indian sepoys - and when this was split in 1765, it became the 1st Bengal European Regiment. In 1846 it became the 1st Bengal European Fusiliers, also referred to in contemporary official papers, with inverted word ordering, as 1st European Bengal Fusiliers. It retained this title until British India was transferred to the Crown after the Indian Mutiny of 1857. The "European" was then dropped and replaced by Royal, the title becoming in 1861 1st Royal Bengal Fusiliers. The regiment was then transferred to the British Army and renumbered as the 101st Regiment of Foot at the same time retaining the Royal Bengal name. In 1881 it was combined with the 104th Regiment of Foot (Bengal Fusiliers) to form part of the new Royal Munster Fusiliers. On the outbreak of the Indian Mutiny the order to march on
    9.00
    2 votes
    67
    44th Regiment of Foot

    44th Regiment of Foot

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The 44th Regiment of Foot was an infantry regiment in the British Army. After 1782 the regiment became known as the 44th (East Essex) Regiment of Foot. The lineage of the 44th transferred to the Essex Regiment in 1881. Through the process of amalgamation and restructuring of the Army, the lineage now rests with the 1st Battalion of the Royal Anglian Regiment. The regiment was raised in 1741 as James Long's Regiment of Foot (the tradition at the time to name regiments after their Commanding Officers, in this case Colonel James Long). Long's Regiment saw active service in the Jacobite Rising (1745), including the Battle of Prestonpans, and served in Flanders (1748). Originally ranked as the 55th Regiment of the Line, the regiment was re-ranked as the 44th in 1748 following the disbandment of other regiments - the removal of the 11 Marine regiments from the British Army's numbering system. The regiment was renamed the 44th Regiment of Foot in 1751 when British regiments ceased to be named for their Colonels. The regiment saw active service overseas in North America and participated in the French and Indian War and in the American Revolution. Notably, the regiment fought at Braddock's
    9.00
    2 votes
    68
    73rd Regiment of Foot

    73rd Regiment of Foot

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    Four regiments of the British Army have been numbered the 73rd Regiment of Foot:
    9.00
    2 votes
    69
    21st Fighter Squadron

    21st Fighter Squadron

    The 21st Fighter Squadron (21 FS) is part of the 56th Operations Group at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona. It operates the F-16 Fighting Falcon aircraft conducting advanced fighter training for the pilots of the Republic of China (Taiwan). The 21st Fighter Squadron, 'The Gamblers', operate the Block 20 F-16A/B for the Republic of China Air Force (ROCAF), under a three year pilot training programme called 'Peace Fenghuang'. This is the only squadron at Luke to operate the original F-16 variant, which are unusual in being 93 fiscal year serial new build Block 20 aircraft. The squadron is to: Prior to reforming at Luke in 1997, the 21st Tactical Fighter Training Squadron operated F-4E Phantom IIs at George AFB, California until 1993. The unit was activated in October 1944 as a Very Long Range P-47N Thunderbolt fighter-escort squadron for B-29 Superfortress units engaged in the strategic bombardment of the Japanese Home Islands. It trained under the Third Air Force in the southeast United States and deployed to the Pacific Theater, being assigned to Okinawa in May 1945. The squadron began operations from Ie Shima in June. It engaged in dive-bombing and strafing attacks on factories, radar
    7.67
    3 votes
    70
    93rd Regiment of Foot

    93rd Regiment of Foot

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The 93rd (Sutherland Highlanders) Regiment of Foot was a Line Infantry Regiment of the British Army . In 1881 during the Childers Reforms it was united with the 91st (Argyllshire Highlanders) Regiment of Foot to form the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders (Princess Louise's) . The 93rd Regiment was raised three times before it became the Sutherland Highlanders. The 1st Sutherland Fencibles were raised in Scotland from the area of Sutherland and Caithness in 1759 and disbanded in 1763 by Lord Reay. 1779: 2nd Sutherland Fencibles raised by Elizabeth, Countess of Sutherland (done in practice by Lt. Col. William Wemyss of Wemyss). 1793: 3rd Sutherland Fencibles raised by Wemyss. Served in 1798 Irish Rebellion. Disbanded April 1799 at Ft. George. Upon the disbandment of the two regiments in 1799, the new 93rd Regiment was recruited from the recently disbanded Sutherland Fencibles by their old colonel William Wemyss, at this time a Major General in the British Army, on behalf of his 16 year old cousin Elizabeth, Countess of Sutherland. Wemyss had the remaining volunteers from all over Sutherland lined up by Parish and selected those he thought most suitable and issued each of these a
    7.67
    3 votes
    71
    Dorset Regiment

    Dorset Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Dorset Regiment was an infantry regiment of the British Army from 1881 to 1958, the county regiment of Dorset. Until 1951 it was formally called The Dorsetshire Regiment, although usually known as "The Dorsets". The Dorsetshire Regiment was formed in 1881 under the Childers Reforms by the amalgamation of the 39th (Dorsetshire) Regiment of Foot and the 54th (West Norfolk) Regiment of Foot. The 1st Battalion took part in operations on the North West Frontier of India in 1897-98 and the 2nd Battalion fought in the Second Boer War, participating in the Relief of Ladysmith. During the Great War, nine hostilities-only battalions were formed, six battalions serving overseas. The 1st and 6th Battalions served on the Western Front throughout the war. The 2nd Battalion was in Poona, India, when war broke out and was shipped to Mesopotamia where it was trapped in the Siege of Kut and captured by the Turks. (Of the 350 men of the battalion captured, only 70 survived their captivity.) During the siege, returning sick and wounded, and the few replacements who were sent out, were unable to re-join their battalion, so they, and similar drafts of the 2nd Battalion, The Norfolk Regiment, were
    7.67
    3 votes
    72
    London Regiment

    London Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The London Regiment is a Territorial Army regiment in the British Army. It was first formed in 1908 in order to regiment the various Volunteer Force battalions in the newly formed County of London, each battalion having a distinctive uniform. The Volunteer Force was merged with the Yeomanry in 1908 to form the Territorial Force. This resulted from the impending insolvency of the Volunteer Force's voluntary civilian administration. The administration was taken over by the War Office, and most volunteer units lost their unique identities, becoming territorial battalions of their regular army county regiment. The London corps were a notable exception, being grouped to form their own regiment, each retaining a measure of its original identity, and independent of any regular army regiment. Following the First World War, the Territorial Force was reorganised and renamed the Territorial Army. The London Regiment ceased to exist in 1938 with the battalions transferring to regular infantry regiments, the Royal Artillery and the Royal Engineers. The London Regiment was reformed in 1992 through the regimentation of most of the remaining successors of the original regiment (except the Rifles
    7.67
    3 votes
    73
    261st Combat Communications Squadron

    261st Combat Communications Squadron

    The United States Air Force's 261st Combat Communications Squadron (261 CBCS) is a Air National Guard combat communications unit located in California. The 261st Combat Communications Squadron traces its beginnings to the 96th Signal Company, Service Group. Activated at Reno Army Air Base, Nevada on 1 Jan 1943. The unit moved shortly thereafter to the Army Air Base at Muroc, CA. Redesignated as the 1096th Signal Company, the unit moved to Great Falls Montana prior to being activated on 17 October 1943. The unit received battle credits during World War II for the New Guinea Campaign, the Southern Philippines Campaign and the Luzon Campaign. Additionally, the unit served in Machinato, Okinawa and Tachikawa Japan where it officially became the 611th Signal Light Company just prior to its inactivation on 25 March 1946. The 611th Signal Light Company was reorganized on 15 August 1948 at the National Guard Center, Alameda California and received federal recognition on 27 September 1948. At the time of recognition, the unit had two officers and ten enlisted members assigned. On 1 July 1952, the 611th Signal Light Company was redesignated the 261st Combat Communications Squadron,
    10.00
    1 votes
    74
    315th Network Warfare Squadron

    315th Network Warfare Squadron

    The United States Air Force's 315th Network Warfare Squadron (315 NWS) is a network warfare unit located at Fort George G. Meade, Maryland. Constituted 15th Radio Squadron, Mobile, on 2 February 1951. Activated on 9 February 1951. Inactivated on 8 May 1955. Disbanded on 15 June 1983. Reconstituted, and consolidated (1 October 1993), with the 6922d Security Group, which was established, and activated, on 1 April 1970. Redesignated 6922d Security Squadron on 1 July 1974; 6922d Electronic Security Squadron on 1 August 1979. Inactivated on 15 December 1991. Redesignated 315th Intelligence Squadron, and activated, on 1 October 1993. Inactivated on 1 July 2001. Redesignated 315th Information Operations Squadron on 10 May 2005. Activated on 16 May 2005. Redesignated 315th Network Warfare Squadron on 26 July 2007.
    10.00
    1 votes
    75
    334th Fighter Squadron

    334th Fighter Squadron

    The 334th Fighter Squadron (334 FS) is a United States Air Force unit. It is assigned to the 4th Operations Group and stationed at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina. The 334th was constituted on 22 August 1942 as an incorporation of the No. 71 Squadron RAF, an Eagle Squadron of American volunteers in Britain's Royal Air Force. After the United States entered the war, the squadron was transferred to the USAAF. It was officially constituted by War Department letter on 12 August 1942, and was activated at Bushey Hall, England on 12 September 1942. The "Eagles" fly the McDonnell-Douglas (now Boeing) F-15E Strike Eagle. Its aircraft are identified by the "SJ" tail code and blue fin flash. Currently the squadron provides worldwide deployable aircraft and personnel capable of executing combat missions in support of worldwide Aerospace Expeditionary Force deployments to combat areas as part of the Global War on Terrorism. The 334th, along with the 335th and 336th, were assigned to the VIII Fighter Command 4th Fighter Group, which was the first United States Army Air Force unit activated in the European Theater during World War II, which was located in Essex, England. The 334th
    10.00
    1 votes
    76
    10.00
    1 votes
    77
    4th Fighter Squadron

    4th Fighter Squadron

    The 4th Fighter Squadron (4 FS) "Fighting Fuujins" is part of the 388th Fighter Wing at Hill Air Force Base, Utah. It operates the F-16 Fighting Falcon aircraft conducting air superiority, strike, and close air support missions. Conduct air-to-air and air-to-ground operations for daylight and nighttime missions. The 4th was activated at Selfridge Field, Michigan on 15 January 1941 and trained under Third Air Force as a tactical fighter squadron. Moved to several U.S. bases before relocating to Northern Ireland and England in 1942. Equipped with the British Supermarine Spitfire, was assigned to Twelfth Air Force during the North African Campaign in late 1942. Moved across Algeria and Tunisia flying ground support missions for American ground forces; taking part in the invasion of Sicily and Italy in 1943. Participated in the liberation of Corsica in 1943; then returning to Italy and being re-equipped with P-51D Mustangs in May 1944. Participated in Northern Italian Campaign, returning to the United States in August 1945 and inactivating. Reactivated as part of Thirteenth Air Force in Okinawa, assuming personnel and P-61 Black Widows of the inactivated 418th Night Fighter Squadron.
    10.00
    1 votes
    78
    551st Special Operations Squadron

    551st Special Operations Squadron

    The 551st Special Operations Squadron (551 SOS) is a squadron of the United States Air Force. It is assigned to the 27th Special Operations Wing at Cannon AFB, New Mexico. The 551st had been based at Kirtland Air Force Base from 15 March 1976 until its deactivation on 10 May 2007. It was reactivated in 2009 and currently is assigned to the AFSOC and trains aircrews on the MC-130 and AC-130. The 551st was originally designated the 1551st Flying Training Squadron, and was assigned to the 1550th Aircrew Training and Test Wing, 1550th Combat Crew Training Wing. In 1994, it was redesignated the 551st Special Operations Squadron, and was reassigned to the 58th Special Operations Wing. The 551st conducted helicopter training until it was inactivated in 2007. It is also responsible for special operations contingencies, exercises, and humanitarian rescue missions. The Squadron conducted training on the Pave Low helicopter, but suspended these operations due to the looming retirement of the helicopter.
    10.00
    1 votes
    79
    No. 2622 Squadron RAF Regiment

    No. 2622 Squadron RAF Regiment

    2622 (Highland) Squadron, based at RAF Lossiemouth, is the northernmost RAuxAF Unit in the United Kingdom and was formed in 1979 to assist with the ground defence of that airfield. Initially, personnel were recruited solely from the local area but recruiting now extends as far south as Edinburgh and Glasgow and to the North, East and West Coasts of Scotland. The Squadron is established for 116 Auxiliary personnel plus a small contingent of regular RAF personnel. The badge of 2622 (Highland) Squadron, approved in 1985, depicts the Burghead Bull, derived from stone carvings found within the Pictish Fort of Burghead, seven miles west of Lossiemouth. The badge carries the Gaelic Motto "Seasaidh Sinn Ar Tir" which is translated as "We stand our ground". Auxiliary officers of the Squadron are entitled to wear the Grey Douglas tartan kilt as part of their mess uniform, a privilege granted to all Scottish RAuxAF officers by King Edward VIII. Initial recruiting was fairly rapid and the Squadron soon established a solid training regime. In addition to the Squadron's RAF personnel providing trade expertise and support, a small cadre of auxiliary NCOs worked full-time to ensure that the
    6.50
    4 votes
    80
    No. 664 Squadron RAF

    No. 664 Squadron RAF

    No. 664 Squadron was a Royal Air Force Air Observation Post squadron associated with the Canadian 1st Army and later part of the Royal Auxiliary Air Force. Numbers 651 to 663 Squadrons of the RAF were Air Observation Post units working closely with Army units in artillery spotting and liaison. A further three of these squadrons, 664-666, were manned with Canadian personnel. Their duties and squadron numbers were transferred to the Army with the formation of the Army Air Corps on 1 September 1957. No. 664 Squadron was formed on 9 December 1944 at RAF Andover as an air observation post (AOP) squadron associated with the Canadian 1st Army. The pilots were officers recruited from the Royal Canadian Artillery and trained to fly at 22 E.F.T.S. Cambridge, further developing advanced flying skills at 43 Operational Training Unit RAF (43 OTU), RAF Andover. The first Commanding Officer was Major Dave Ely, RCA; the operational Commanding Officer was Major D.W. Blyth, RCA. In England the squadron operated under the overall control of No. 70 Group, RAF Fighter Command; prior to deployment to the European continent, the squadron was transferred to No. 84 Group, Second Tactical Air Force (2 TAF).
    6.50
    4 votes
    81
    Lancashire Fusiliers

    Lancashire Fusiliers

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Lancashire Fusiliers was a British infantry regiment that was amalgamated with other Fusilier regiments in 1968 to form the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers. The regiment was formed in 1688 in Devon under Sir Richard Peyton as Peyton's Regiment of Foot. The regiment's name changed according to the name of the colonel commanding until 1751, when it became the 20th Regiment of Foot. The regiment served in the Glorious Revolution under King William III and at the Battle of the Boyne in July 1690 and Aughrim in 1691. During the War of Spanish Succession (1701–1714), it aided in the capture of Spanish galleons at Battle of Vigo Bay in 1702. The regiment distinguished itself at the Battle of Dettingen in June 1743, and at Fontenoy in May 1745, and served in the Battle of Culloden in April 1746. During the Seven Years' War the regiment earned honour at the Battle of Minden on 1 August 1759, when, as an infantry formation, they stood up to and broke a French cavalry charge. The regiment was sent to Quebec in April 1776 and assisted in the relief of Quebec in May 1776. Serving under General John Burgoyne for the remainder of the Canadian campaign, they later surrendered along with General
    5.60
    5 votes
    82
    16th Special Operations Squadron

    16th Special Operations Squadron

    The 16th Special Operations Squadron (16 SOS) is part of the 27th Special Operations Wing at Cannon AFB, New Mexico. It operates AC-130H Spectre aircraft in support of special operations. Train and maintain its combat-ready force to provide highly accurate firepower in support of both conventional and unconventional forces. The 16th ferried aircraft from factories to units in US and Canada and conducted pilot training from April 1942–April 1944. It flew combat aerial transportation missions from India into Burma and China from December 1944–October 1945. The 16th flew combat missions in Southeast Asia where it was charged with attacking convoys on the Ho Chi Minh Trail, the defense of hamlets and fire bases, providing close air support to troops in contact with the enemy, providing convoy escort, and battlefield illumination, November 1968–July 1974. As the war drew to a close the squadron supported Operation Eagle Pull, the evacuation of Phnom Penh, Operation Frequent Wind, the evacuation of Saigon and figured prominently in the rescue of the Mayagüez. In all 53 members of the 16 SOS were killed in action during the Vietnam War. In November 1979 the 16th set a flight endurance
    8.50
    2 votes
    83
    2d Space Operations Squadron

    2d Space Operations Squadron

    The 2d Space Operations Squadron (2 SOPS) is a unit of the United States Air Force at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado. Its mission is to manage the Navstar Global Positioning System satellite constellation for global navigation, time transfer, and nuclear detonation detection. 2 SOPS is augmented by Reserve personnel from the 19th Space Operations Squadron, part of the 310th Space Wing. The squadron performs the command and control mission for the Global Positioning System satellite constellation. GPS is the world's premiere space-based position, velocity and timing system, capable of providing precision navigation and timing capability simultaneously to an unlimited number of properly equipped users. Continuous GPS availability and unprecedented signal accuracy has resulted in widespread integration of the technology; numerous military, commercial and international users have embraced GPS. 2 SOPS was originally constituted as the 2d Surveillance Squadron (Sensor) and activated on 16 January 1962 under North American Air Defense Command (NORAD) at Ent Air Force Base. It was then organized on 1 February 1962 under the 9th Aerospace Defense Division, under which it operated
    8.50
    2 votes
    84
    2nd Systems Operations Squadron

    2nd Systems Operations Squadron

    The 2d Systems Operations Squadron (2 SYOS), based out of Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska, delivers reliable and timely global environmental intelligence products and services for the defense of the United States of America and its global interests through the 24 x 7 operation, sustainment and maintenance of Air Force Weather's strategic center computer complex, production network, and applications. "Uninterrupted products and services for the fight." "Deliver reliable and timely global environmental intelligence products and services for the defense of the United States of America and its global interests through the 24x7 operation, sustainment and maintenance of Air Force Weather’s strategic center computer complex, production network, and applications." The 2d Systems Operations Squadron's manning consists of more than 100 active duty, civilian and contract personnel based at Offutt Air Force Base, Neb., under the 2nd Weather Group. This team sustains a $277M computing complex and communications infrastructure and perform their functions around the clock to provide terrestrial and space environmental characterization and information exploitation ensuring battlespace dominance
    8.50
    2 votes
    85
    525th Fighter Squadron

    525th Fighter Squadron

    The 525th Fighter Squadron is a United States Air Force unit. It is assigned to the 3d Operations Group and stationed at Elmendorf Air Force Base, Alaska. The combat-ready fighter squadron is prepared for rapid worldwide deployment of a squadron of F-22A Raptor aircraft to accomplish precision engagement of surface targets using a wide variety of conventional air-to-surface munitions. The 525th FS trains in the fighter missions of strategic attack, interdiction, offensive counterair (air-to-surface), suppression of enemy air defenses, as well as offensive and defensive counterair (air-to-air). The 525th Fighter Squadron originally activated during World War II as the 309th Bombardment Squadron (Light) on 10 February 1942, to support Allied Forces in the European Theater of Operations. The squadron began training for operations at Will Rogers Field, Oklahoma, and was assigned to the 86th Bombardment Group. In August 1942, the squadron transferred to Key Field, Mississippi, to start flight training in the Douglas A-20 Havoc. A month later, the squadron was redesignated the 309th Bombardment Squadron (Dive). By year's end, the squadron started the transition to two new combat
    8.50
    2 votes
    86
    No. 208 Squadron RAF

    No. 208 Squadron RAF

    No 208 (Reserve) Squadron is at present a reserve unit of the Royal Air Force based at RAF Valley, Anglesey, Wales. It operates the BAe Hawk aircraft. The squadron was established as part of the Royal Naval Air Service on 25 October 1916 at Dunkirk as No. 8 (Naval) Squadron. In its earlier days, the unit flew Sopwith Pups, 1½ Strutters and Nieuport Scouts. Later in World War I it re-equipped with Sopwith Camels and was assigned to artillery spotting. The squadron returned to the UK briefly before being sent back to France to face the German offensive. While in France a significant number of Camels belonging to the squadron were destroyed by the RAF to prevent the Germans capturing them during their advance. When the Royal Air Force was formed on 1 April 1918, the unit was renumbered to No. 208 Squadron RAF. After the war ended 208 Squadron remained with the occupying forces until August 1919, when it again returned to the UK for disbandment on 7 November 1919 at Netheravon. During the war, the squadron claimed 298 victories. Twenty-five aces had served in the squadron. Notable among them were Anthony Arnold, Charles Dawson Booker, Robert J. O. Compston, Harold Day, Stanley Goble,
    8.50
    2 votes
    87
    Royal Irish Regiment

    Royal Irish Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Royal Irish Regiment, until 1881 the 18th Regiment of Foot, was an infantry regiment of the line in the British Army, first raised in 1684. Also known as the 18th (Royal Irish) Regiment of Foot and the 18th (The Royal Irish) Regiment of Foot, it was one of eight Irish regiments raised largely in Ireland, its home depot in Clonmel. It saw service for two and a half centuries before being disbanded with the Partition of Ireland following establishment of the independent Irish Free State in 1922 when the five regiments that had their traditional recruiting grounds in the counties of the new state were disbanded. The regiment was formed in 1684 by the Earl of Granard from independent companies in Ireland. In 1695, the regiment became known as the Royal Regiment of Ireland due to its performance at Namur under the direction of King William III. The regiment also won the right to display the King's arms on their colours along with the harp and crown. The regiment served throughout the turn of the 18th century in continental battles before being sent to Gibraltar. In 1751, the regiment was officially ranked as the 18th Regiment of Foot - although it was older than all but six other
    8.50
    2 votes
    88
    Seaforth Highlanders

    Seaforth Highlanders

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Seaforth Highlanders (Ross–shire Buffs, The Duke of Albany's) was a historic regiment of the British Army associated with large areas of the northern Highlands of Scotland. The Seaforth Highlanders have varied in size from two battalions to seventeen battalions during the Great War. After several mergers, the Seaforth Highlanders are now incorporated in the Highlanders (Seaforth, Gordons and Camerons) Battalion of the Royal Regiment of Scotland. The regiment was created through the amalgamation of the 72nd Highlanders (Duke of Albany's Own) and the 78th Highlanders (Ross-shire Buffs), as part of the Childers Reforms of the British Army in 1881. The regimental museum is located at Fort George near Inverness. Fort George served as Depot for the Seaforth Highlanders for most of the regiment's life. The Seaforth Highlanders were combined with the Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders to form the Queen's Own Highlanders in 1961. More recently, the Queens Own Highlanders and Gordon Highlanders were combined to form The Highlanders (Seaforth, Gordons and Camerons). In May 2006 all the Scottish Infantry Regiments merged to form the Royal Regiment of Scotland. The Highlanders became the 4th
    8.50
    2 votes
    89
    The Worcestershire Regiment

    The Worcestershire Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Worcestershire Regiment was an infantry regiment of the line in the British Army, formed in 1881 by the amalgamation of the 29th (Worcestershire) Regiment of Foot and the 36th (Herefordshire) Regiment of Foot. During 1903 to 1905 the 4th Battalion were stationed in the West Indies, being responsible for guarding prisoners from the Boer War. In 1906-1907 they were stationed in Malta. From 1908-1913 they were stationed at Bareilly, India. In August 1911 troops from the regiment shot dead 2 men during the Llanelli railway strike. In the First World War the Regiment saw action in the retreat from Mons, The Battle of the Marne and at Langemark, Aisne and Ypres in 1914. Gheluvelt, Nonne Bosschen, Festubert in 1915, and Loos the Somme in 1916. 1917 saw involvement in actions at Bagentin, Delville Wood, Le Transloy, Arras, Ypres Menin Road, Polygon Wood, and Passchendale. The regiment then fought at Cambrai, Lys, Bailleul, Kemmel, Hindenburg Line, St. Quentin Canal and Selle in 1918. Members of the Regiment won nine Victoria Crosses, 70 Distinguished Service Orders (and 12 bars), 288 Military Crosses ( and 36 bars), 227 Distinguished Conduct Medals (and 8 bars). In December 1918 they
    8.50
    2 votes
    90
    1st Fighter Squadron

    1st Fighter Squadron

    The 1st Fighter Squadron (1 FS) was most recently based at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida. It operated F-15C Eagle aircraft conducting advanced fighter training. The 1 FS provided fully qualified F-15 Eagle pilots for worldwide assignment by conducting formal ground, simulator, and flight training. The 1st flew P-47 Thunderbolt aircraft during World War II. While based on Ie Shima the 1 FS launched Thunderbolts against the Japanese, amassing almost 1,200 combat air patrol, bombing, strafing, and escort missions. During this era, the squadron emblem was "Miss Fury," the mythical Greek goddess of vengeance. The 1 FS was inactivated on 15 October 1946, after the war had ended. The 1 FS was activated as part of the 413th Fighter-Day Wing on 11 November 1954. The squadron trained pilots, in the F-86 Sabre from 1954 to 1956 and the F-100 Super Sabre from 1956 to 1959. The 1st operated out of George Air Force Base, California, until it was again inactivated on 15 March 1959, with Lieutenant Colonel Charles E. "Chuck" Yeager as commander. The squadron was reactivated 1 January 1984, as part of the 325th Tactical Training Wing, at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, to train pilots in the
    7.33
    3 votes
    91
    319th Special Operations Squadron

    319th Special Operations Squadron

    The 319th Special Operations Squadron was first formed on August 9, 1944 as the 319th Troop Carrier Squadron (Commando) and served in the China-Burma-India Theater during World War II. It provided airlift support and flew aerial resupply missions in support of various commando units such as Merrill's Marauders and the Chindits and conducted airborne drops and glider operations for Allied troops in Burma, central China, and French Indochina in the last year of World War II. Over the next quarter century it was deactivated, reactivated, and redesignated on a number of occasions until it was inactivated (as the 319th Special Operations Squadron) on January 15, 1972 as part of the post-Vietnam War demobilization. On October 1, 2005 it was reactivated again as part of an overall enlargement of the United States Special Operations Command. Its mission is to provide intra-theater support for special operations forces and it is currently equipped with the U-28A, a modified version of the Pilatus PC-12. The U-28A was selected for its versatile performance and ability to operate from short and unimproved runway surfaces. The 319th began as the 319th Troop Carrier Squadron (Commando) on 9 Aug
    7.33
    3 votes
    92
    3d Special Operations Squadron

    3d Special Operations Squadron

    The 3d Special Operations Squadron (3 SOS) flies MQ-1 Predator Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA) and is currently located at Cannon Air Force Base in Clovis, New Mexico. The 3d SOS is under the command of the Air Force Special Operations Command. Currently operates Predators engaged in Operation New Dawn and Enduring Freedom. Organized in France in Apr 1918, the Photographic Section No. 1 processed aerial photographs taken by flying units working with the I Army Corps (American) and French XXXVIII Army Corps, 5 Apr-Nov 1918. The 1 Photographic Section, from Sept 1919 until becoming the 3 Observation Squadron on 1 Jun 1937, processed aerial photography of associated observation squadrons in Texas. At Langley Field, VA, the squadron engaged in aerial observation work with the Coast Artillery School until Apr 1942. It supported ground forces on maneuvers during 1942, and served as a training and demonstration unit Jan 1943-Feb 1944. The squadron was not manned or equipped, 1 Mar-2 Jul 1944. Activated again in May 1952 under Strategic Air Command as part of its global reconnaissance mission. The squadron did not receive its first aircraft until 1 Jul 1953, when it immediately began
    7.33
    3 votes
    93
    52nd (Oxfordshire) Regiment of Foot

    52nd (Oxfordshire) Regiment of Foot

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The 52nd (Oxfordshire) Regiment of Foot was a light infantry regiment of the British Army throughout much of the 18th and 19th centuries. The regiment first saw active service during the American War of Independence, and were posted to India during the Anglo-Mysore Wars. During the Napoleonic Wars, the 52nd were part of the Light Division, and were present at most of the major battles of the Peninsula campaign, becoming one of the most celebrated regiments, described by Sir William Napier as "a regiment never surpassed in arms since arms were first borne by men". They had the largest British battalion at Waterloo, 1815, where they formed part of the final charge against Napoleon's Imperial Guard. They were also involved in various campaigns in India. The regiment was raised as a line regiment in 1755 and numbered as the "54th Foot"; they were renumbered as the "52nd Regiment of Foot" in 1757. In 1781, the regional designation "52nd (Oxfordshire) Regiment of Foot" was given, and in 1803 the regiment was the first regular British Army regiment to be designated "Light Infantry". In 1881 the regiment was merged with the 43rd (Monmouthshire) Regiment of Foot to become the regiment later
    7.33
    3 votes
    94
    550th Special Operations Squadron

    550th Special Operations Squadron

    The 550th Special Operations Squadron (550 SOS) "WOLFPACK" is part of the 58th Special Operations Wing at Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico. It operates Lockheed HC-130s and MC-130s, conducting special operations flying training. To provide United States Special Operations Command and theater commanders the finest special operations and combat search and rescue forces in the world. The 1550th developed, conducted, and monitored helicopter flying training from, 1971–1987, in addition to search and rescue missions from, 1976–1987. It has conducted special operations training since 1987.
    7.33
    3 votes
    95
    No. 106 Squadron RAF

    No. 106 Squadron RAF

    No. 106 Squadron RAF was a Royal Flying Corps and Royal Air Force squadron active from 1917 until 1919. It was also operative during World War II and in the post war period until 1963. Formed as No 106 Squadron, RFC, at Andover, Hampshire, on 30 September 1917. It was initially intended to be a corps reconnaissance squadron but after training in May 1918 it was not sent to the Western Front but to Ireland to help with the developing troubles there. It served in Army co-operation and policing roles for 18 months before being disbanded at Fermoy, on 8 October 1919. The squadron next appeared in June 1938, when it was re-formed as No 106 (Bomber) Squadron. The squadron reformed in 1 June 1938 at Abingdon from a nucleus provided by a flight from No. 15 Squadron. Initially equipped with Hinds, it began to receive Battles the following month but these actually left the squadron before the Hinds, in June 1939 due to the fact the squadron was to be a No 5 Group unit and this group was to be equipped with Hampdens, which began to arrive in May 1939 together with Ansons to assist in the conversion process. At the outbreak of the Second World War the squadron was flying Hampdens with No. 5
    7.33
    3 votes
    96
    The South Wales Borderers

    The South Wales Borderers

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The South Wales Borderers was an infantry regiment of the British Army. It first came into existence, as the 24th Regiment of Foot, in 1689, but was not called the South Wales Borderers until 1881. The regiment served in a great many conflicts, including the American Revolutionary War, various conflicts in India, the Zulu War, Boer War, and World War I and II. The regiment was absorbed into the Royal Regiment of Wales in 1969. The regiment was formed as Sir Edward Dering's Regiment of Foot in 1689, becoming known, like other regiments, by the names of its subsequent colonels. It became the 24th Regiment of Foot in 1751, having been deemed 24th in the infantry order of precedence since 1747. In 1782 it became the 24th (The 2nd Warwickshire) Regiment of Foot. The 1st Warwickshires were the 6th (1st Warwickshire) Regiment of Foot. In 1741, during the War of Jenkin's Ear, the regiment was part of the amphibious expedition to the Caribbean and participated in the disastrous British defeat at the battle of Cartagena de Indias. In 1756, during the Seven Years War, the regiment was part of the garrison on Minorca and surrendered to the French on June 28. In 1758, during the Seven Years
    7.33
    3 votes
    97
    No. 330 Squadron RAF

    No. 330 Squadron RAF

    No. 330 Squadron RNoAF is a helicopter squadron in the Royal Norwegian Air Force (RNoAF) which at all times has a helicopter stationed on each of five Norwegian air stations. The squadron's current missions are search and rescue (SAR), air ambulance, disaster relief as well as special operations support. The squadron was established as No. 330 (Norwegian) Squadron RAF during World War II as part of the British Royal Air Force (RAF) and the exiled Royal Norwegian Navy Air Service, with a mission of convoy protection in the North Atlantic Ocean. After the war the name was kept and although now using helicopters instead of planes, and having a different mission, 330 Squadron still flies over the North Atlantic. The squadron was established on 25 April 1941 from Norwegian naval personnel. It was the first Norwegian exile air unit and part of the Royal Air Force and the Royal Norwegian Navy Air Service. Its mission was to guard the North Atlantic Ocean and protect convoys from the USA and Canada to Great Britain or Murmansk from attacks by submarines and surface ships from the German Kriegsmarine. The squadron first operated Northrop N-3PB torpedo bomber sea planes from Reykjavík on
    6.25
    4 votes
    98
    No. 656 Squadron RAF

    No. 656 Squadron RAF

    No. 656 Squadron RAF was a Air Oberservation Post unit of the Royal Air Force in India and Burma during the Second World War and afterwards in British Malaya. Numbers 651 to 663 Squadron of the RAF were Air Observation Post units working closely with British Army units in artillery spotting and liaison. A further three of these squadrons, 664–666, were manned with Canadian personnel. Their duties and squadron numbers were transferred to the Army with the formation of the Army Air Corps on 1 September 1957 With this it became 656 Light Aircraft Squadron Army Air Corps No. 656 Squadron was formed at RAF Westley on 31 December 1942. It embarked for India in August 1943 and went into action during the Burma campaign with the Fourteenth Army. It was to take part in the Allied invasion of Malaya, but the Japanese surrendered before this took place and the squadron disbanded there on 15 January 1947. The squadron reformed from No. 1914 Flight RAF on 29 June 1948 at Sembawang in Malaya and served in British Malaya to support Army and Police against Communist guerillas before it went over to Army control in September 1957. 656 Squadron performed a total of 143,000 operations in Malaya
    6.25
    4 votes
    99
    307th Fighter Squadron

    307th Fighter Squadron

    The 307th Fighter Squadron (307 FS) is an F-15E Strike Eagle unit and is part of the Air Force Reserve Command's 414th Fighter Group (414 FG) stationed at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina. The mission of the 307 FS is to assist the 4th Fighter Wing at Seymour Johnson to produce qualified F-15E aircrew. The squadron becmae operational in September 2011. Initially established under Third Air Force in early 1942 as a fighter squadron at Baer Field, Indiana, flying some antisubmarine patrols in the Gulf of Mexico. Deployed to the European Theater of Operations (ETO) in June 1942 without aircraft as its P-40s and P-39s were deemed unsuitable for use against German aircraft in long range bomber escort duties. Was re-equipped with RAF Spitfire Vs and its pilots and technicians spent a two-month period undergoing intensive training in flying and fighting with RAF pilots in the British aircraft from airfields in southeast England. The squadron flew its first combat mission on 18 August 1942, when it attacked enemy positions in occupied France. Assigned to the new Twelfth Air Force and deployed to Gibraltar in November 1942 as part of the Operation Torch invasion forces,
    7.00
    3 votes
    100
    7.00
    3 votes
    101
    602d Special Operations Squadron

    602d Special Operations Squadron

    The 602d Special Operations Squadron was a United States Air Force squadron that operated in Southeast Asia during the Vietnam War. The 602d Fighter Squadron (Commando) was activated in May 1964, and along with the 1st Air Commando Squadron, was a part of the 34th Tactical Group. The squadron became operational at Bien Hoa on 15 October 1964. By 1966 the squadron had been renamed the 602d Air Commando Squadron and moved, first to Nha Trang AB in South Vietnam, and then to Udorn Royal Thai Air Force Base. In March 1968 it moved again to Nakhon Phanom Royal Thai Air Force Base. On 1 August 1968 it was redesignated the 602d Special Operations Squadron, and was disbanded on 31 December 1970 at Nakhon Phanom. Constituted 2d Fighter Reconnaissance Squadron on 11 Apr 1944. Activated on 20 Apr 1944. Redesignated 2d Fighter Squadron, Commando on 2 Jun 1944. Inactivated on 12 Nov 1945. Disbanded on 8 Oct 1948. Reconstituted, redesignated 602d Fighter Squadron, Commando, and activated, on 15 Apr 1963. Organized on 1 May 1963. Redesignated 602d Special Operations Squadron on 1 Aug 1968. Inactivated on 31 Dec 1970. The original Squadron patch was drawn by Walt Disney in 1944. The sky was blue
    7.00
    3 votes
    102
    Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry

    Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry was an infantry regiment of the British Army. The regiment was formed as a consequence of Childers reforms, a continuation of the Cardwell reforms, by the amalgamation of the 43rd (Monmouthshire) Regiment of Foot (Light Infantry) and the 52nd (Oxfordshire) Regiment of Foot (Light Infantry), forming the 1st and 2nd Battalions, The Oxfordshire Light Infantry on 1 July 1881. In 1908 the regiment's title was altered to become the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, commonly shortened to the 'Ox and Bucks'. 1st Battalion The 43rd Foot was based in Burma when it became the 1st Battalion. In 1882 it moved to Bangalore, India. In 1887 the battalion returned home, being based in Parkhurst, England. It moved to Kinsale, Ireland in 1893 and, having been based in other parts of Ireland, returned to England in 1898. In December 1899 the Second Boer War began and the 1st Battalion arrived in Southern Africa to take part in it. It saw extensive service in the conflict, including in the relief of the besieged British garrison at Kimberley and in the defeat of the Boers at Paardeberg in February. The war raged on for a further two years
    7.00
    3 votes
    103
    3rd Battalion, The Parachute Regiment

    3rd Battalion, The Parachute Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The 3rd Battalion, The Parachute Regiment (3 PARA) is a battalion sized formation of the British Army's Parachute Regiment and subordinate unit within 16 Air Assault Brigade. Roled as an Airborne light infantry unit and is capable of a wide range of operational tasking's. Based at Merville Barracks, Colchester Garrison, their barracks in England, personnel regularly deploy outside of the United Kingdom on operations and training. All personnel will have completed the Pre Parachute Selection (P Company) course at Depot PARA at Catterick, North Yorkshire (previously Aldershot, Hampshire) entitling them to wear the Maroon beret. A unique part of The 3rd Battalion is the inclusion of the Guards Parachute Platoon incorporated into B Company and also known as 6 Platoon. The Guards Parachute Platoon is made up of volunteers from the 5 Regiments of the Foot Guards who can be distinguished from other paratroopers by a "blue red blue" patch sewn to their beret beneath the Parachute Regiment cap badge. Impressed by the success of German airborne operations during the Battle of France, the British Prime Minister, Winston Churchill directed the War Office to investigate the possibility of
    5.20
    5 votes
    104
    77th Fighter Squadron

    77th Fighter Squadron

    The 77th Fighter Squadron (77 FS) is a squadron of the United States Air Force, and is one of the oldest fighter squadrons in the United States military. In August 1917 it had been only fourteen years since the Wright Brothers took flight and ten years since the Aeronautical Division of the U.S. Army Signal Corps (forerunner to the Air Force) had been formed. Air power was in its infancy and growing. The possibilities were endless. New innovations were occurring every where you looked, but the Great War raged in Europe and the US was gearing up for its part in that war. The Air Service was still developing, and there were many fits and starts as the service grew. The first 77th Aero Squadron was formed at Kelly Field, San Antonio Texas in August 1917, and commanded by Capt. H. L. Mumma. In September under the command of 1st Lt Kenneth M. Spence, the squadron’s designation was changed to Aero Construction Squadron. In November 1917 the 77th moved to Air Depot, Garden City, New York for deployment to the AEF. On 4 December 1917 the squadron moved to port of Embarkation Philadelphia and boarded the transport Northland. On the Northland were 9 Aero Squadrons with 70 officers and 1,339
    5.20
    5 votes
    105
    Royal Irish Rangers

    Royal Irish Rangers

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Royal Irish Rangers (27th (Inniskilling), 83rd and 87th) (abbreviated as "RANGERS") was a regular infantry regiment of the British Army. The Royal Irish Rangers came into being on 1 July 1968 through the amalgamation of the three remaining Irish infantry regiments of the British Army: The date was initially known as "Vesting Day" (and then "Rangers Day"), emphasising that the traditions of the old regiments were "vested" in the new large regiment. Soon after creation in December 1968, and as part of a general reduction in the Army, the 3rd Battalion (former Royal Irish Fusiliers) was disbanded. The three regiments had old and differing traditions (Rifle & Fusilier) and to avoid favouring one above another, a unique designation "Rangers" was adopted. The title had not existed in the British Army since 1922. The title is also used by the US Army, Canada, Ireland and Pakistan. With the creation of the "Divisions of Infantry", the Royal Irish Rangers became part of the King's Division, along with regiments from the north of England. This continued until 1992 and Options for Change. The Ulster Defence Regiment and The Royal Irish Rangers amalgamated to form The Royal Irish
    5.20
    5 votes
    106
    701st Airlift Squadron

    701st Airlift Squadron

    The 701st Airlift Squadron (701 AS) is part of the 315th Airlift Wing at Charleston Air Force Base, South Carolina. It operates C-17 Globemaster III aircraft providing global airlfit. To provide trained personnel to be a source of augmentation for the active forces in any emergency expansion of the Air Force strategic and aeromedical airlift capability. The 701st saw combat in the European Theater of Operations from 13 December 1943-25 April 1945. It trained for bombardment missions from 1947–1949, and for fighter-bomber missions from 1952-1957. The 701st has flown airlift missions from, 1957–1965 and since 1970. It patricipated in US Army troops and equipment movements to various parts of the nation during Cuban Missile Crisis, October–November 1962.
    6.00
    4 votes
    107
    88th Regiment of Foot

    88th Regiment of Foot

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The 88th Regiment of Foot (Connaught Rangers) ("the Devil's Own") was an Irish Regiment of the British Army, one of eight Irish regiments raised and garrisoned in Ireland. The regiment saw extensive service in the Peninsular War, Crimean War and Indian Mutiny. As part of the Cardwell-Childers reforms of the British Army, the regiment amalgamated with the 94th Regiment of Foot, to form the Connaught Rangers on 1 July 1881. The regiment was raised on 25 September 1793 from the men of Connaught by John Thomas de Burgh, 13th Earl of Clanricard. The 88th Foot embarked in late 1806 on ships to take part in the secret attack on Buenos Aires. They languished on board for a month in Falmouth Harbour, then sailed as part of the convoy to Cape Town. There the troops were not allowed to go ashore. After some time they sailed, via St. Helena, to the Plate estuary, and in July 1807 attacked Buenos Aires. Given they had been on board ships for more than a half year, they were likely in less than perfect physical condition - and also were fighting an "urban warfare" battle that favoured their Argentinian patriotic adversaries, they were not successful. Taking many casualties, the remainder of the
    6.00
    4 votes
    108
    18th Flight Test Squadron

    18th Flight Test Squadron

    The 18th Flight Test Squadron (FLTS) is an independent field test agency of the Air Force Special Operations Command located at Hurlburt Field, Florida with one detachment at Edwards Air Force Base, California. The 18th FLTS evaluates aircraft, equipment and tactics in realistic battlespace environments to provide decision makers accurate, timely and complete assessments of mission capability. From concept development to system fielding, the unit's mission improves the survivability and combat capability of special operations forces worldwide. The 18th FLTS is composed of approximately 96 people. The squadron consists of seven flights: fixed wing, vertical lift, operations analysis, combat applications, special missions, instrumentation and mission support. The one detachment at Edwards Air Force Base, which is responsible for operational test and evaluation and tactics development and evaluation of the MV/CV-22 Osprey and supports Headquarters Air Force Operational Test and Evaluation Center in conducting joint tests with the Navy and Marine Corps. SMOTEC filled a unique role by exploring new frontiers in special operations capabilities and developed better equipment and tactics
    8.00
    2 votes
    109
    21st Special Operations Squadron

    21st Special Operations Squadron

    The 21st Special Operations Squadron is a unit within the 352d Special Operations Group (352 SOG), United States Air Force, United States European Command, and was based at Royal Air Force base RAF Mildenhall in Suffolk, eastern England. 21st Special Operations Squadron is the rotary-wing portion of the 352 Special Operations Group. The squadron's mission includes; all-weather, low-level penetration of denied territory to provide infiltration, exfiltration, resupply, or fire support for air, ground, and naval forces. The unique capabilities of the MH-53 the squadron operates permit operations from unprepared landing zones. The squadron operates Sikorsky MH-53M "Pave Low IV" helicopter, specially adapted CH-53 "Sea Stallion" helicopters, with updated avionics. The MH-53M is capable of aerial refueling from the MC-130P Combat Shadow assigned to the 67th Special Operations Squadron. The Combat Shadow, in turn, can be refueled in air by the KC-135 Stratotanker. The 21st Special Operations Squadron traces its lineage to the 21st Pursuit Squadron (Interceptor) which was constituted on 22 December 1939. Activated on 1 February 1940 at Moffett Field, California, it was assigned to the 35th
    8.00
    2 votes
    110
    813 Naval Air Squadron

    813 Naval Air Squadron

    813 Naval Air Squadron was an aircraft squadron of the Royal Navy's Fleet Air Arm during World War II and again post-war. It initially operated Swordfish Mk Is from the aircraft carrier Illustrious and took part in the successful raid on Taranto in November 1940. In July 1943, the squadron was a component of RAF Gibraltar but a detachment of its Swordfish (torpedo spotter reconnaissance) was based at Tafaraoui, Algeria and assigned to the Northwest African Coastal Air Force (NACAF) for Operation Husky. From April 1944 the squadron, including a detachment of Wildcats, were deployed on the escort carrier HMS Campania operating in in the Arctic Ocean on convoy duty. On 13 December 1944 two of 813's Swordfish were responsible for the sinking of German submarine U-365 by depth charges. Postwar, the squadron was tasked as a torpedo fighter unit, initially equipped with Blackburn Firebrand aircraft. Between February 1953 and April 1958 the squadron was equipped with turboprop powered Westland Wyvern strike aircraft. 813 Squadron disbanded for the last time on 22 April 1958.
    8.00
    2 votes
    111
    East Lancashire Regiment

    East Lancashire Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The East Lancashire Regiment was, from 1881 to 1958, an infantry regiment of the British Army. The regiment was formed under the Childers Reforms by the amalgamation of two 30th and 59th Regiments of Foot with the militia and rifle volunteer units of eastern Lancashire. Following a series of mergers since 1958, its lineage is today continued by the Duke of Lancaster's Regiment. The 1st Battalion was formed from the 30th (Cambridgeshire) Regiment of Foot (raised in 1702) and the 2nd Battalion from the 59th (2nd Nottinghamshire) Regiment of Foot (raised 1755). Under the system introduced in 1881, one battalion of each infantry regiment was to serve at a home station while the other was in a foreign garrison or on active service. Due to the emergency caused by the outbreak of war in South Africa in 1899 most home service battalions were dispatched to the conflict. The 1881 reforms also linked the militia and rifle volunteer units of the area into the regimental structure: The militia was a reserve force that was only liable to service in the United Kingdom and in peace time assembled for period of annual training. In time of war it could be "embodied" or mobilised. When the war that
    8.00
    2 votes
    112
    King's Royal Rifle Corps

    King's Royal Rifle Corps

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The King's Royal Rifle Corps was a British Army infantry regiment, originally raised in colonial North America as the Royal Americans, and recruited from American colonists. Later ranked as the 60th Regiment of Foot, the regiment served for more than 200 years throughout the British Empire. In 1966 the regiment became part of the Royal Green Jackets. The King's Royal Rifle Corps was raised in the American colonies in 1756 as the 62nd (Royal American) Regiment to defend the thirteen colonies against attack by the French and their native American allies. After Braddock's defeat in 1755, royal approval for a new regiment, as well as funds, were granted by Parliament just before Christmas 1755 – hence the regiment's traditional birthday of Christmas Day. However parliamentary delays meant it was 4 March 1756 before a special act of parliament created four battalions of 1,000 men each to include foreigners for service in the Americas. According to a regimental history compiled in 1879 by a captain in the Kings Royal Rifle Corps, in November 1755 Parliament voted the sum of £81,000 for the purpose of raising a regiment of four battalions, each one thousand strong for service in British
    8.00
    2 votes
    113
    Royal Norfolk Regiment

    Royal Norfolk Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Royal Norfolk Regiment, originally formed as the Norfolk Regiment, was an infantry regiment of the British Army. The Norfolk Regiment was created on 1 July 1881 as the county regiment of Norfolk. It was formed from the 9th (the East Norfolk) Regiment of Foot (formerly the 9th Regiment of Foot) and covered the local militia and rifle volunteers. Battalions of the Norfolks fought in the First World War on the Western Front and in the Middle East. It became the Royal Norfolk Regiment on 3 June 1935. In the Second World War, the regiment's battalions were in action in the Battle of France, the Far East, and then in the invasion of, and subsequent operations in, north-west Europe. The Royal Norfolks were amalgamated in 1959 with their neighbours, the Suffolk Regiment, to become part of the 1st East Anglian Regiment; this in turn became part of the Royal Anglian Regiment, of which "A" company of the first battalion is known as the Royal Norfolk. The Norfolks entered the First World War with two regular, one reserve and three Territorial Force battalions (one of cyclists), but the regiment expanded to nineteen battalions. The total number of men raised during the war amounted to
    8.00
    2 votes
    114
    The Middlesex Regiment

    The Middlesex Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Middlesex Regiment (Duke of Cambridge's Own) was a regiment of the British Army. It was formed in 1881 as part of the Childers Reforms when the 57th (West Middlesex) and 77th (East Middlesex) Regiments of Foot were amalgamated with the county's militia and rifle volunteer units. On 31 December 1966 The Middlesex Regiment was amalgamated with three other regiments to form The Queen's Regiment. The latter regiment was itself subject to a merger in 1992 to form part of the Princess of Wales's Royal Regiment. The Middlesex was one of the principal home counties based regiments with a long tradition. They inherited their nickname, the “Die-hards”, from the 57th Regiment of Foot (West Middlesex), which later became the 1st Battalion of the Middlesex Regiment. The 57th gained the name during the Peninsular War when, at the Battle of Albuera on 16 May 1811 their commander Colonel Inglis had his horse shot from under him, severely wounded and outnumbered by the French he called to his men “Die hard, 57th. Die hard!” "Albuhera" was the principal battle honour on the Middlesex Regiment's colours. The regiment was formed on 1 July 1881 with two regular, two militia and four volunteer
    8.00
    2 votes
    115
    U.S. 25th Infantry Regiment

    U.S. 25th Infantry Regiment

    • Armed force: United States Army
    The Twenty-fifth United States Infantry Regiment was one of the racially segregated units of the United States Army known as Buffalo Soldiers. The 25th served from 1866 to 1946, seeing action in the American Indian Wars, Spanish-American War, Philippine-American War and World War II. There was a 25th Infantry Regiment, raised in 1812, that served on the Lake Champlain front and the Niagara Frontier in the War of 1812. In 1815, during a postwar reduction in force, it was consolidated with four other regiments to form the 6th Infantry Regiment. On 28 July 1866 the 2nd Battalion, 18th Infantry, raised in 1861 for service in the American Civil War, was separated and designated the 25th Infantry Regiment. In 1869, it was consolidated back into the 18th. After the Civil War, the regular army was expanded to 45 infantry regiments from its wartime strength of 19. The act of Congress that authorized this included the creation of four regiments of "Colored Troops", racially segregated units with white officers and African-American enlisted men. The army had raised a number of volunteer United States Colored Troops (USCT) regiments during the war. The new regiments were the 38th, 39th, 40th
    8.00
    2 votes
    116
    125th Weather Flight

    125th Weather Flight

    The United States Air Force's 125th Weather Flight (125th WF) is a combat weather team located at Tulsa International Airport in Tulsa, Oklahoma. The mission of the 125th WF is to provide strategical meteorological information within an adequate amount of time, after given appropriate notice of changing meteorological elements. Being a combat team, the teams mission also includes five additional primary missions: unconventional warfare, foreign internal defense, special reconnaissance, direct action, and counter-terrorism. Although not specifically a part of the Special Operations Force (SOF) of the United States Army, the 125th Weather Flight does directly support it. On August 19, 2007 the 125th WF was awarded the Presidential Unit Citation for extraordinary heroism in action against an armed enemy, by President George W. Bush, as well as the Outstanding Weather Unit Award, by the Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA). The combat weather team received the distinguished unit citations for incendiary raids on the industrial sections of Dhi Qar and Wasit and for a strike against the nuclear power center at Baghdad, Iraq. During these incendiary raids, only one combative team member, Sra.
    9.00
    1 votes
    117
    9.00
    1 votes
    118
    55th Regiment of Foot

    55th Regiment of Foot

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The 55th Regiment of Foot was a British Army infantry regiment which existed from 1755 to 1881. After 1782 it had a county designation added, becoming known as the 55th (Westmorland) Regiment of Foot. or simply the Westmorland Regiment. The 55th ceased to exist as a separate regiment when it was amalgamated into The Border Regiment in 1881 as part of widespread army reforms. The regiment was raised in Stirling, Scotland in 1755. George Perry, Esqr. was appointed Colonel, his commission being dated 25 December 1755. Originally ranked as the 57th Regiment of Foot, the regiment was re-ranked as the 55th in 1757 following the disbandment of the 50th and 51st Regiments. The regiment saw active service overseas in North America and participated in the French and Indian War, arriving in North America in 1757. The regiment arrived in Nova Scotia on 8 July 1757 to take part in the abandoned attack on the Fortress Louisbourg. During the voyage Colonel Perry died, in September Lord George Augustus Viscount Howe was appointed Colonel of the regiment. In November of that same year, the 55th arrived in Albany, New York. It was during this time that Lord Howe accompanied Major Robert Rogers,
    9.00
    1 votes
    119
    60th Fighter Squadron

    60th Fighter Squadron

    The 60th Fighter Squadron (60 FS) is an inactive United States Air Force squadron. It was last assigned to the 33d Fighter Wing at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida. It was inactivated on 1 January 2009. The squadron is programmed to be reactivated as an F-35 Lightning II training squadron. Activated in 1940 at Mitchel Field, New York as the 60th Pursuit Squadron, the unit was attached to the 33d Pursuit Group on 15 January 1941. Re-designated as the 60th Fighter Squadron "Fighting Crows" on 15 May 1942, the unit was responsible for the continual mission of air defense of the United States until October 1942. In late 1942, the 60th joined the United States' effort in World War II by participating in combat operations in the Mediterranean Theater and the China-Burma-India Theater. As a result of superior performance in central Tunisia, the 60th earned the Distinguished Unit Citation for combat operations on 15 January 1944. Following its service in World War II, the 60th was assigned to the 33d Fighter Group at Neubiberg Air Base, Germany in August 1946 and flew the P-51 Mustang. In 1947, the 60th transferred to Roswell, New Mexico and soon afterward, in June 1948, converted to the F-84
    9.00
    1 votes
    120
    7th Space Operations Squadron

    7th Space Operations Squadron

    The United States Air Force's 7th Space Operations Squadron (7 SOPS) is an Air Force Reserve space operations unit located at Schriever AFB, Colorado. The 7th Space Operations Squadron operates the Multi-Mission Space Operations Center, a one-of-a-kind satellite operations center focused on rapidly fielding cutting-edge space technologies for warfighters. The previous mission for 7 SOPS was to augment space operation squadrons of the 50th Space Wing, specifically the 1st Space Operations Squadron. These activities included satellite emergencies, launch and early orbit, and satellite disposal for the Global Positioning System and Defense Support Program satellites. Up until 2007, 7 SOPS operated the Midcourse Space Experiment satellite, AFSPC's only space-based space surveillance asset and also performed booster launch operations mission, providing telemetry collection/data relay for Delta II launches. The 7th Space Operations Squadron traces its lineage to the 7th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron which was activated 28 January 1942, at MacDill Field, Tampa, FL. 15 May of that same year, it transferred to Peterson Field, Colorado Springs, CO. The squadron’s primary mission was
    9.00
    1 votes
    121
    Grenadier Guards

    Grenadier Guards

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Grenadier Guards (GREN GDS) is an elite infantry regiment of the British Army. It is the most senior regiment of the Guards Division and, as such, is the most senior regiment of infantry. It is not, however, the most senior regiment of the Army, this position being attributed to the Life Guards. Although the Coldstream Guards was formed before the Grenadier Guards, the regiment is ranked after the Grenadiers in seniority as it was a regiment of the New Model Army. The grouping of buttons on the tunic is a common way to distinguish between the regiments of Foot Guards. Grenadier Guards' buttons are equally spaced and embossed with the Royal Cypher reversed and interlaced surrounded by the Royal Garter bearing Honi soit qui mal y pense (Evil be to him who evil thinks). Their "Buff Belt" brass clasps also carry the Royal Cypher. Modern Grenadier Guardsmen wear a cap badge of a "grenade fired proper" with seventeen flames. This cap badge has to be cleaned twice a day, once in the morning and once in the afternoon, as it is made from brass and a tarnished grenade is frowned upon by all in the regiment. The Grenadier Guards traces its lineage back to 1656, when Lord Wentworth's
    9.00
    1 votes
    122
    King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry

    King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry (KOYLI) was a regiment of the British Army. It officially existed from 1881 to 1968, but its predecessors go back to 1755. The regiment's traditions and history are now maintained by The Rifles. The 53rd Regiment of Foot was raised in Leeds in 1755 and renumbered the 51st in January 1757. In 1782, in common with other regiments of the line, the 51st was given a "county" designation, becoming the 51st (2nd Yorkshire, West Riding) Regiment of Foot. The title of Light Infantry was given in honour of its former commander General Sir John Moore in 1809, and in 1821 the regiment was given royal status when King's Own was added to its title, becoming the 51st (2nd Yorkshire, West Riding, The King's Own Light Infantry) Regiment. The 2nd Madras European Light Infantry was raised by the British East India Company in 1839. In 1861 East India Company forces were absorbed into the British Army, and the regiment became the 105th (Madras Light Infantry) Regiment. In 1878, the 105th was moved to Pontefract, where the KOLI already also had their depot. In 1881 after the Cardwell and Childers reforms, regimental numbers were abolished. The 51st King's Own
    9.00
    1 votes
    123
    Royal Scots Fusiliers

    Royal Scots Fusiliers

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Royal Scots Fusiliers was a Regiment of the British Army. The regiment was raised in Scotland in 1678 by Stuart loyalist Charles Erskine, de jure 5th Earl of Mar for service against the rebel covenanting forces during the Second Whig Revolt (1678-1679). They were used to keep the peace and put down brigands, mercenaries, and rebels. In the Glorious Revolution of 1689, the regiment was ordered south. Initially they stayed loyal to James II of England until he fled to Ireland, upon which they opted to serve Prince William of Orange. The regiment later ironically fought against the Jacobites during the Second Jacobite Rebellion (1745) at the Battle of Culloden in 1746. The regiment was converted to fusiliers in 1689, but didn't receive the title officially until 1695. It was nicknamed the "Duke of Marlborough's Own" for its excellent service in all of the Duke's campaigns in the War of the Spanish Succession and received the title of "Royal" in 1712. The regiment was renamed the Royal North British Fusilier Regiment of Foot in 1713. It was later numbered the 21st Regiment in 1751, when seniority numbers were introduced. The regiment finally saw the restoration of "Scots" in their
    9.00
    1 votes
    124
    The Border Regiment

    The Border Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Border Regiment was an infantry regiment of the line in the British Army, formed in 1881 by the amalgamation of the 34th (Cumberland) Regiment of Foot and the 55th (Westmorland) Regiment of Foot. After service in the First and Second World Wars, it was amalgamated into The King's Own Royal Border Regiment in 1959. Its lineage is continued today by the Duke of Lancaster's Regiment. The regiment was formed on 1 July 1881 as part of the Childers Reforms. Under the reforms, each line infantry regiment was to have a defined regimental district, with two regular battalions sharing a single permanent depot. At any one time one battalion was to be on foreign service and one on "home" service. In the case of the Border Regiment the regimental district comprised the counties of Cumberland and Westmorland, with the depot established at Carlisle Castle. The outbreak of the Second Anglo-Boer War in 1899 found the British Army overstretched, and the 1st Battalion was one of many "home service" dispatched to fight in the conflict. The Battalion saw action at Colenso and Spion Kop as part of the campaign to relieve Ladysmith. The two regular battalions were stationed as follows: 1st
    9.00
    1 votes
    125
    19th Special Operations Squadron

    19th Special Operations Squadron

    The 19th Special Operations Squadron (19 SOS) is part of the 1st Special Operations Wing at Hurlburt Field, Florida. It conducts crew training for AC-130 and MC-130 aircraft. The 19th was established as a GHQ Air Force medium bomber squadron in 1940 as a result of the buildup of the United States Army Air Corps after the outbreak of World War II in Europe. It trained with a mix of Douglas B-18 Bolos and Martin B-26 Marauders. After the attack on Pearl Harbor brought the USA into World War II, the squadron was transferred to the West Coast, flying anti-submarine patrols from Muroc AAF, California from December 1941 to the end of January 1942. It was then assigned to the new Fifth Air Force, originally based on the Philippines. Leaving the B-18s at Muroc, the squadron moved to the South Pacific where it flew its first combat missions from Garbutt Field, Townsville, Australia, against Rabaul, New Britain. In addition to frequent raids against Rabaul, the 19th flew against enemy shipping, facilities, and troop concentrations in New Guinea and provided close air support for Allied troops fighting there, until being withdrawn from combat in January 1943. With refurbished B-26s, the 19th
    6.67
    3 votes
    126
    Sayeret Matkal

    Sayeret Matkal

    • Armed force: Israel Defense Forces
    Sayeret Matkal (Hebrew: סיירת מטכ"ל‎, General Staff Reconnaissance Unit) is a special forces unit of the Israel Defense Forces (IDF), which is subordinated to the intelligence directorate Aman. First and foremost a field intelligence-gathering unit, conducting deep reconnaissance behind enemy lines to obtain strategic intelligence, Sayeret Matkal is also tasked with counter-terrorism and hostage rescue beyond Israel's borders. The unit is modeled after the British Army's Special Air Service, taking the unit's motto "Who Dares Wins". It is directly subordinate to the IDF's Directorate of Military Intelligence. It is known in the IDF as "the Unit". The unit is best known for Operation Thunderbolt, commonly known as Operation Entebbe, in which it rescued more than 100 Air France passengers hijacked and flown to Uganda by PFLP-EO militants, killing 52 enemy combatants while losing only the assault element commander, Yonatan Netanyahu, and three hostages. In 1954 Israel's first special operations unit—Unit 101—was disbanded following the outcry provoked by the Qibya massacre. This left the IDF without a dedicated special-forces unit other than the Navy's Shayetet 13, a naval commando
    6.67
    3 votes
    127
    The Highlanders

    The Highlanders

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Highlanders, 4th Battalion, Royal Regiment of Scotland (4 SCOTS) is an infantry battalion of the Royal Regiment of Scotland. Prior to 28 March 2006, the Highlanders was an infantry regiment in its own right; The Highlanders (Seaforth, Gordons and Camerons), part of the Scottish Division. The regiment was the only one in the British Army with a Gaelic motto - Cuidich 'n Righ which means "Help the King". The regiment was formed September 17, 1994, as part of the Options for Change defence review, by the amalgamation of the Queen's Own Highlanders (Seaforth and Camerons) and The Gordon Highlanders. In 2004, as part of the restructuring of the infantry, it was announced that The Highlanders would be amalgamated with the other Scottish infantry regiments into the single large Royal Regiment of Scotland. The amalgamation took place on 28 March 2006. As with the other Scottish regiments, the Highlanders were permitted to retain their former name as the new battalion's primary title, with the battalion number as a subtitle. The current battalion is based in Fallingbostel, British Forces Germany, part of 7 Armoured Brigade, the descendants of World War II's Desert Rats, equipped with
    6.67
    3 votes
    128
    31st (Huntingdonshire) Regiment of Foot

    31st (Huntingdonshire) Regiment of Foot

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The 31st (Huntingdonshire) Regiment of Foot was an infantry regiment of the British Army formed in 1702 and amalgamated into The East Surrey Regiment in 1881. In 1694, during the Nine Years' War, Sir Richard Atkins was authorised to raise a regiment of foot for service in Ireland. Sir Richard Atkins's Regiment of Foot was duly formed. In 1694 the colonelcy of the unit changed and it became Colonel George Villier's Regiment of Foot. With the signing of the Treaty of Ryswick in 1697 the war came to an end. Villier's Regiment was duly disbanded in 1698. By 1702 England was again involved in a European conflict which became known as the War of the Spanish Succession. Villiers was commissioned to reform his regiment as marines. In February 1702 George Villier's Regiment of Marines (or the 2nd Regiment of Marines) was reraised. The unit took part in the capture and defence of Gibraltar in 1704 – 1705. It subsequently took part in a number of actions in the Mediterreanean and Spain, including the capture of Barcelona and Majorca. The regiment's title changed with the name of its colonel: Alexander Luttrell in 1703, Joshua Churchill in 1706 and Sir Henry Goring in 1711. With the signing of
    5.75
    4 votes
    129
    33d Network Warfare Squadron

    33d Network Warfare Squadron

    The United States Air Force's 33d Network Warfare Squadron (33 NWS) is a network warfare unit located at Lackland AFB, Texas. The 33 NWS's mission, as the USAF’s lone Network Warfare Squadron dedicated to AF network defense (NetD), is to: Combat in ETO, 10 April 1944-7 May 1945; flew F-4, F-5, and F-6 reconnaissance aircraft supporting Allied buildup and invasion of Normandy. Furnished vitally important photographs of the beaches and defenses on the Continent for briefing and training of assault troops. Low-level missions under difficult weather and combat conditions led to awarding of the Distinguished Unit Citation for 6–20 May 1944. From 1 October 1985-30 June 1996, conducted electronic security and intelligence missions and supported Operation JUST CAUSE in 1989-1990. From 1 August 2000, conducted information operations. From 5 July 2005, conducted network defense operations.
    7.50
    2 votes
    130
    955th Air Expeditionary Squadron

    955th Air Expeditionary Squadron

    The 966th Air Expeditionary Squadron of the United States Air Force will perform administrative and operational control of joint expeditionary tasks in Afghanistan. The 966 AES is assigned to the 466th Air Expeditionary Group (AEG). The Air Force set up Air Expeditionary Squadrons (AES) to provide Administrative Control (ADCON) and Expeditionary Combat Support to its Airmen assigned to fight in battle with Joint and Army units. The 966 AES is headquartered at Bagram Airfield (BAF). BAF is a militarized airport and housing complex located next to the ancient mile-high city of Bagram in the Parwan Province of Afghanistan. The base is run by an Army division headed by a two-star general. All the Joint Expeditionary Tasked (JET) and Individual Augmenteer (IA) Airmen assigned to Northern and Eastern Afghanistan are ADCON to the 966 AES. This includes over 510 Airmen at BAF and 400 more at 70 combat outposts and bases. The "Air" in Airpower represents Airman, not just aircraft. Airmen are an important part of the Air Force’s contribution to the Joint mission in Afghanistan. The Air Force has delegated Tactical Control (TACON) over some of its Airmen in critical support billets to a
    7.50
    2 votes
    131
    Joint Task Force Guantanamo

    Joint Task Force Guantanamo

    Joint Task Force Guantanamo (JTF-GTMO) is a U.S. military joint task force based at Guantanamo Bay Naval Base, Guantánamo Bay, Cuba on the southeastern end of the island. JTF-GTMO falls under US Southern Command. Since around 2002 the unit has operated the Guantanamo Bay detention camps Camp X-Ray and its successors Camp Delta, Camp V, and Camp Echo where there are detained prisoners captured in the war in Afghanistan after the September 11, 2001 attacks. The unit is currently under the command of Rear Admiral David B. Woods, who replaced Rear Admiral Jeffrey Harbeson in August 2011. Previous commanders have included Army Major General Geoffrey D. Miller, who took command in November 2002. The status of these detainees is disputed. The United States government defines them as enemy combatants, claiming their status was not that of a prisoner of war as recognized under the Geneva Conventions (due to not being affiliated with any government, being alleged members of Al Qaida or groups affiliated with them). On June 29, 2006, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Hamdan v. Rumsfeld that they had the minimal protection of Article 3 of the Geneva Conventions in that detainees must be housed
    7.50
    2 votes
    132
    No. 576 Squadron RAF

    No. 576 Squadron RAF

    No. 576 Squadron RAF was a Royal Air Force Second World War heavy bomber squadron. No. 576 Squadron was formed on 25 November 1943 from 'C' Flight of 103 squadron at RAF Elsham Wolds in Lincolnshire. They started operations beginning in the night of 2 to 3 December 1943, when seven Avro Lancasters were send out to bomb Berlin. Eleven months later 576 Squadron moved to RAF Fiskerton, a little way outside Lincoln. During its brief period of existence 576 Squadron operated only one type of aircraft, the Avro Lancaster four-engined heavy bomber. It carried out 2,788 operation sorties with the Lancaster, with the loss of 66 aircraft. The last bombs of the squadron were dropped on 25 April 1945, when 23 of the squadrons aircraft bombed Berchtesgaden, their last operational mission was a food dropping to the starving Dutch people in Rotterdam on 7 May 1945. 576 Squadron was disbanded at Fiskerton on 13 September 1945. Four of the Lancasters that flew with 576 squadron managed to survive one hundred operations or more:
    7.50
    2 votes
    133
    No. 654 Squadron RAF

    No. 654 Squadron RAF

    No. 654 Squadron RAF was a unit of the Royal Air Force during the Second World War. Numbers 651 to 663 Squadrons of the RAF were Air Observation Post units working closely with Army units in artillery spotting and liaison. A further three of these squadrons, 664-666, were manned with Canadian personnel. Their duties and squadron numbers were transferred to the Army with the formation of the Army Air Corps on 1 September 1957. No. 654 Squadron was formed at RAF Old Sarum, Wiltshire, on 15 July 1942 and went into action on August 1943 in North Africa. From December 1943, it served in Italy, where it remained until disbanding at Campoformido on 24 June 1947. The original squadron is represented today by 654 Squadron of 4 Regiment, Army Air Corps.
    7.50
    2 votes
    134
    The Royal Fusiliers

    The Royal Fusiliers

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment) was an infantry regiment of the British Army until 1968 when it was amalgamated with other regiments to form the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers. It was known as the 7th Regiment of Foot until 1881. The Royal London Fusiliers Monument, a memorial dedicated to the Royal Fusiliers who died during World War I, stands on Holborn in the City of London. It was formed as a fusilier regiment in 1685 by Lord Dartmouth, George Legge, from two companies of the Tower of London guard, and was originally called the Ordnance Regiment. Most regiments were equipped with matchlock muskets at the time, but the Ordnance Regiment were armed with flintlock fusils. This was because their task was to be an escort for the artillery, for which matchlocks would have carried the risk of igniting the open-topped barrels of gunpowder. The regiment became the 7th Regiment of Foot (Royal Fusiliers) in 1751, although a variety of spellings of the word "fusilier" persisted until the 1780s, when the modern spelling was formalised. In 1881, under the Childers Reforms when regimental numbers were abolished the regiment became The Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). The
    7.50
    2 votes
    135
    U.S. 7th Cavalry Regiment

    U.S. 7th Cavalry Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: United States Army
    The 7th Cavalry Regiment is a United States Army Cavalry Regiment, whose lineage traces back to the mid-19th century. Its official nickname is "Garryowen," in honor of the Irish air Garryowen that was adopted as its march tune. Following its activation the Seventh Cavalry Regiment patrolled the Western plains for raiding native Americans and to protect the westward movement of pioneers. From 1866 to 1881, the regiment marched a total of 181,692 miles (292,342 km) across Kansas, Montana, and the Dakota Territories. The regiment was constituted on July 28, 1866 in the regular army as the 7th Cavalry. It was organized on September 21, 1866 at Fort Riley, Kansas as part of an expansion of the regular army following the demobilization of the wartime volunteer and draft forces. From 1866 through 1871, the regiment was posted to Fort Riley and fought in the American Indian Wars. Its most notorious action of the American Indian Wars was at the Battle of the Washita (also known as the Washita Massacre) in 1868, in which the regiment sustained 21 losses, while inflicting more that 150 deaths on a Cheyenne encampment composed largely of elderly men, as well as women and children. Typical of
    7.50
    2 votes
    136
    Yorkshire Regiment

    Yorkshire Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Yorkshire Regiment (14th/15th, 19th and 33rd/76th Foot) (abbreviated YORKS) is one of the largest infantry regiments of the British Army. The regiment is currently the only line infantry or rifles unit to represent a single geographical county in the new infantry structure, serving as the county regiment of Yorkshire. It is set to lose one Battalion as part of the Army 2020 defence review. The regiment's recruitment area today covers almost all the historic county (the three ridings of the county: East Riding of Yorkshire, North Riding of Yorkshire and West Riding of Yorkshire) except for the eastern half of South Yorkshire and the southeast of West Yorkshire, which is a recruitment area for The Rifles, and the part of the West Riding that is now in Greater Manchester. The recruitment area covers all of the present-day ceremonial counties of North Yorkshire (which extends to the northern border of historic Yorkshire — the River Tees) and East Riding of Yorkshire. Recruitment however is open to those from outside the formal recruitment area, with the regiment in particular recruiting from North East England and the Commonwealth. The regiment's antecedent units also recruited in
    7.50
    2 votes
    137
    614th Space Operations Squadron

    614th Space Operations Squadron

    The 614th Space Operations Squadron (614 SOPS) was a squadron of the United States Air Force (USAF) under Air Force Space Command (AFSPC). By AFSPC order the unit inactivated 24 May 2007. Its mission and members moved to the Combat Operations Division of the 614th Air and Space Operations Center (614 AOC). The inactivation was part of the larger USAF plan to implement the Numbered Air Force-Component structure. The unit's members became the plankholders of the 614th Air and Space Operations Center and the Joint Space Operations Center. The 614th Space Operations Squadron mission was to provide Air Force Space Command's Fourteenth Air Force Commander (14 AF/CC (AFSTRAT-SP)) and US Strategic Command’s Commander, Joint Functional Component Command for Space (CDR JFCC SPACE) with the space operations expertise to command and control space forces in continuous support of global and theater operations. Representing the 14 AF/CC (AFSTRAT-SP) and CDR JFCC SPACE, the 614 SOPS delivered Air Force space force capabilities to users around the globe, 24-hours a day. The 614 SOPS was first constituted as the 614th Space Operations Flight (SOPF) in April 1996 with thirty-seven assigned members.
    5.50
    4 votes
    138
    No. 114 Squadron RAF

    No. 114 Squadron RAF

    No. 114 Squadron Royal Flying Corps was formed In Lahore, India on 27 Sep 1917. It was equipped with the B.E.2 and Bristol F2B and operated on the North-West Frontier. The squadron became part of the Royal Air Force before it was disbanded on 1 April 1920. The squadron reformed in 1936 at Wyton, equipped first with Hawker Hinds and then Bristol Blenheims. In July 1940 the squadron was evacuated from Vraux, France due to the German advance and lost most of its aircraft. The squadron was transferred to RAF Coastal Command before returning to RAF Bomber Command in July 1941. It was moved to Algeria in November 1942 and took part in Operation Torch, it then operated from Sicily and Italy, having been re-equipped with Douglas Boston aircraft, which it retained until the end of the war when they were replaced with the De Havilland Mosquito. The squadron reformed in Egypt in 1947 with Dakota transport aircraft. It then operated Valettas, Chipmunks and the Argosy until it was finally disbanded in 1971.
    5.50
    4 votes
    139
    71st Regiment of Foot

    71st Regiment of Foot

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The 71st Regiment of Foot was a Highland regiment in the British Army, which in 1881 became the 1st Battalion, Highland Light Infantry . The 71st Regiment of Foot was first formed in 1758 from the 2nd Battalion, 32nd Regiment of Foot. Soon after formation the 71st Foot was part of a raid on the French coast at Cherbourg during the Seven Years' War. After taking the fort and destroying the docks the regiment reboarded and returned to England before it took part in a similar raid on Belleisle in 1761. In 1763 the 71st became a Regiment of Invalids before disbanding in 1768. Main article 78th Fraser's Highlanders Main article 71st Regiment of Foot, Fraser's Highlanders Fraser's Highlanders were formed from independent Highland companies in 1757 before becoming the 78th (Highland) Regiment of Foot in 1758. Later on that year the Fraser's Highlanders were shipped to Nova Scotia from where they took part in the French and Indian War . They fought at the Battles of Louisburg (1758), Quebec (1759) and Sainte Foy (1760). In 1763 the 78th disbanded at Quebec where most of its men transferred to the Royal Highland Emigrants . In 1775 Fraser's Highlanders were raised again in Inverness,
    6.33
    3 votes
    140
    78th Fraser Highlanders

    78th Fraser Highlanders

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The 78th Regiment, (Highland) Regiment of Foot otherwise known as the 78th Fraser Highlanders was a British infantry regiment of the line raised in Scotland in 1757, to fight in the French and Indian War. The regiment was formed as the "2nd Highland Battalion" having its roots in a Highland company of 1745. With the buildup of 2nd battalions of various regiments into separate regiments it was then numbered as the 62nd Regiment of Foot, the 63rd and then finally as the 78th in 1758. The regiment fought at the capture of Louisbourg in 1758, at the Battle of the Plains of Abraham in 1759, at the capture of Montreal in 1760 and at the Battle of Signal Hill in 1762. In 1763 at the end of the war, they were disbanded in what is now Canada. Many soldiers remained in the area of Quebec, others returned to Scotland and some joined the 84th Regiment of Foot (Royal Highland Emigrants). A new 78th (Highland) Regiment of Foot was created in 1793. The 78th Fraser Highlanders wore both the great kilt (feileadh mor) and the little kilt (feileadh beag). It is unknown whether they wore the government sett (Black Watch) or the modified Fraser sett, although several sources, including Benjamin West's
    6.33
    3 votes
    141
    Loyal Regiment

    Loyal Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Loyal Regiment (North Lancashire) (until 1921 known as The Loyal North Lancashire Regiment) was an infantry regiment of the line in the British Army from 1881 to 1970. Today, the regiment's lineage is continued by The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment. The regiment was formed as part of the Childers reforms of 1881 by the amalgamation of the 47th (Lancashire) Regiment of Foot, 81st (Loyal Lincoln Volunteers) Regiment of Foot, 3rd Duke of Lancaster's Own Royal Lancashire Militia and the 11th and 14th Lancashire Rifle Volunteer Corps. The Loyals were one of seven county regiments recruiting in Lancashire. The depot was at Preston, and the regimental district also included the towns of Bolton, Chorley, Farnworth, Hindley. The regiment also recruited in the Isle of Man. As part of the Cardwell Reforms, the 47th and 81st regiments were linked. The depot for the linked regiment was Fulwood Barracks at Preston. Beginning in 1873, the regiments which would eventually be re-designated as the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment began moving their depot units to Fulwood. However, it would not be until 1877 that the moves were completed when the required facilities were completed. The barracks
    6.33
    3 votes
    142
    28th Regiment of Foot

    28th Regiment of Foot

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The 28th (North Gloucestershire) Regiment of Foot was a British infantry regiment from 1782 to 1881. For their conduct at the Battle of Alexandria in 1801 the 28th were given the unique honour of wearing a badge on both the front and rear of their head dress. This commemorated a possibly unique feat, when, drawn up in two ranks to repel a French infantry attck, they were simultaneously attacked from the rear by French cavalry. The rear rank simply turned round and both attacks were repelled. They served throughout the Peninsula War including the battles of Talavera, Albuhera and Vittoria. They were one of the few Peninsula veteran regiments which was available for the Hundred Days campaign and fought in the battles of Quatre Bras and Waterloo as part of the 8th Brigade commanded by James Kempt. Because of their actions in this campaign, they earned distinguished mention in the dispatches of the Duke of Wellington. During the hundred days the 28th continued to wear the old style stovepipe shako, distinguishing them from most British regiments that had adopted the new Belgic shako. From 1751 to 1782 they were the 28th Regiment of Foot, and in 1881 they merged with the 61st (South
    8.00
    1 votes
    143
    2nd Battalion, The Parachute Regiment

    2nd Battalion, The Parachute Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Second Battalion, The Parachute Regiment (2 PARA) is a battalion-sized formation of the British Army's Parachute Regiment and subordinate unit within 16th Air Assault Brigade whose Commanding Officer as of July 2011 was Lieutenant Colonel Adam Dawson OBE, MC. 2 PARA is an airborne light infantry unit capable of a wide range of operational tasks, based at Merville Barracks, Colchester Garrison, England. Personnel regularly deploy outside the United Kingdom on operations and training. All personnel have completed the Pre Parachute Selection (P Company) course at Depot PARA at Catterick, North Yorkshire (previously Aldershot, Hampshire) entitling them to wear the Maroon beret. The 2nd Battalion was formed on 30 September 1941, as the 2nd Parachute Battalion, and later became part of the Army Air Corps. The battalion took part in their first active operation over the night of the 27–28 February 1942, Operation Biting, the raid on Bruneval in France. On 1 August of the same year the battalion was renamed the 2nd Battalion, The Parachute Regiment. The battalion was part of the 1st Parachute Brigade, 1st Airborne Division, and fought in the British airborne operations in North Africa,
    8.00
    1 votes
    144
    73d Special Operations Squadron

    73d Special Operations Squadron

    The 73d Special Operations Squadron (73 SOS) is part of the 27th Special Operations Wing at Cannon Air Force Base, New Mexico. It operates AC-130W Stinger II aircraft in support of special operations. The 73d Aero Squadron managed an airpark supporting the Air Service of the U.S. Second Army from, c. 15 November 1918-1919. Redesignated the 73d Pursuit Squadron in 1929, now part of the Air Corps, it trained for pursuit missions from 1931 to 1935, when it was redesignated the 73d Attack Squadron, and in 1939 the 73d Bombardment Squadron (Medium). The squadron conducted reconnaissance in support of flood-relief in southern California during March 1938. It flew combat missions in the Northern Pacific from, December 1941-August 1943, when it was disbanded. Reconstituted and consolidated with 3rd Strategic Support Squadron, which performed airlift support for Strategic Air Command bases from 1950 to 1961. The consolidated squadron then redesignated 73d Special Operations Squadron on the inactive list. It was activated in 2006 to operate the new MC-130W Combat Spear aircraft. The 73d was the first flying special operations squadron to move to Cannon Air Force Base after the fighter
    8.00
    1 votes
    145
    London Irish Rifles

    London Irish Rifles

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The London Irish Rifles (LIR) is a volunteer Rifle Regiment with a distinguished history, and now forms 'D' (London Irish) Company of the London Regiment. They are currently based at Connaught House, Flodden Road in Camberwell. The London Irish Rifles was originally formed in 1859 during the Victorian Volunteer Movement and named "28th Middlesex (London Irish) Rifle Volunteer Corps". During the Second Boer War, the Battalion sent eight officers and 200 private soldiers for active service. One officer won the Distinguished Service Order (DSO) and another member gained seven bars to his South Africa Medal. In recognition of their service, the London Irish was granted their first Battle Honour of "South Africa, 1900-1902". In 1908, the London Irish was transferred to the Territorial Force and renamed the "18th (County of London) Battalion, the London Regiment (London Irish Rifles)". During the First World War, the LIR raised three Battalions, one of which stayed in reserve in England. The 1st Battalion was sent to France in 1915 and saw its first action at Festubert in May, before taking part in many of the major battles on the western front during the next three years. The 2nd
    8.00
    1 votes
    146
    No. 640 Squadron RAF

    No. 640 Squadron RAF

    No. 640 Squadron RAF was a heavy bomber squadron of the Royal Air Force during the Second World War. No. 640 Squadron was first formed at RAF Leconfield, East Riding of Yorkshire on 7 January 1944, from 'C' Flight of No. 158 Squadron RAF. It was equipped with Halifax Mk.III bombers, and operated as part of No. 4 Group in Bomber Command. It re-equipped with Halifax VI bombers in March 1945, and was disbanded at RAF Leconfield on 7 May of that year.
    8.00
    1 votes
    147
    The Northamptonshire Regiment

    The Northamptonshire Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Northamptonshire Regiment was an infantry regiment of the British Army from 1881 to 1960. Its lineage is now continued by The Royal Anglian Regiment. The regiment was formed as part of the reorganisation of the infantry by the Childers reforms. The 48th (Northamptonshire) Regiment of Foot (raised in 1741) and the 58th (Rutlandshire) Regiment of Foot (raised in 1755) were redesignated as the 1st and 2nd battalions of the Northamptonshire Regiment, with the regimental depot at Northampton. As well as the two regular battalions, the Northamptonshire and Rutland Militia became the 3rd (Militia) Battalion, and the 1st Northamptonshire Rifle Volunteer Corps became the First Volunteer Battalion. With the enactment of the Territorial and Reserve Forces Act 1907, they became the 3rd (Special Reserve) and 4th (Territorial Force) Battalions respectively. In the years 1881-1914 the two regular battalions saw overseas service in Hong Kong, India, Singapore and South Africa, with the regiment receiving battle honours for actions in the North West Frontier Province and the Second Boer War. During the First World War the regiment was expanded to comprise 13 battalions which served on the
    8.00
    1 votes
    148
    The Royal Dublin Fusiliers

    The Royal Dublin Fusiliers

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Royal Dublin Fusiliers was an Irish infantry Regiment of the British Army created in 1881, one of eight Irish regiments raised and garrisoned in Ireland, with its home depot in Naas. The Regiment was created by the amalgamation of two British Army regiments in India - the Royal Bombay Fusiliers and Royal Madras Fusiliers - with Dublin and Kildare militia units as part of the Childers Reforms that created larger regiments and linked them with "Regimental Districts". Both regular battalions of the Regiment fought in the Second Boer War. In the First World War, a further six battalions were raised and the regiment saw action on the Western Front, the Mediterranean, and the Middle East. In the course of the war three Victoria Cross were awarded. Following the establishment of the independent Irish Free State in 1922, the five regiments that had their traditional recruiting grounds in the counties of the new state were disbanded. The regiment was created on 1 July 1881 as a result of Childers reforms by the amalgamation of the 102nd Regiment of Foot (Royal Madras Fusiliers) and the 103rd Regiment of Foot (Royal Bombay Fusiliers) whose predecessors had been in the service of the East
    8.00
    1 votes
    149
    The Royal Lincolnshire Regiment

    The Royal Lincolnshire Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Royal Lincolnshire Regiment was raised on June 20, 1685 as the Earl of Bath's Regiment for its first Colonel, John Granville, 1st Earl of Bath. In 1751 it was numbered like most other Army regiments and named the 10 Regiment of Foot. After the Childers Reforms of 1881 it became the Lincolnshire Regiment after the county where it had been recruiting since 1781. After the Second World War it was honoured with the name Royal Lincolnshire Regiment, before being amalgamated in 1960 with the Northamptonshire Regiment to form the 2nd East Anglian Regiment. The regiment would see action during the War of the Grand Alliance, the War of the League of Augsburg and the War of the Spanish Succession at the Battle of Blenheim, Battle of Ramillies and the Battle of Malplaquet. In 1751 the regiment was given the title of the 10th Regiment of Foot, as all British regiment were given numbers instead of Colonel's name for identification. The regiment would next see action during the American War of Independence at the Battle of Lexington and Concord, the Battle of Bunker Hill, the New York Campaign, the Battle of Germantown, the Battle of Monmouth and the Battle of Rhode Island. In 1778 the 10th
    8.00
    1 votes
    150
    7.00
    2 votes
    151
    356th Tactical Fighter Squadron

    356th Tactical Fighter Squadron

    The 356th Tactical Fighter Squadron is an inactive United States Air Force fighter squadron. Its last assignment was with the 354th Fighter Wing, being stationed at Myrtle Beach AFB, South Carolina. It was inactivated on June 12, 1992. Activated on November 15, 1942 at Hamilton Field, California, initially equipped with P-39 Aircobras and assigned to IV Fighter Command for training. Moved to several bases in California and Nevada then to Portland Army Air Base, Oregon in June 1943 and re-equipped with new P-51B Mustangs. Transitioned to the Mustang throughout the summer of 1943 the deployed to the European Theater of Operations (ETO), being assigned to IX Fighter Command in England. In late 1943, the strategic bombardment campaign over Occupied Europe and Nazi Germany being conducted by VIII Bomber Command was taking heavy losses in aircraft and flight crews as the VIII Fighter Command's P-38 Lightnings and P-47 Thunderbolts lacked the range to escort the heavy B-17 Flying Fortress and B-24 Liberator bombers deep into Germany to attack industrial and military targets. The P-51 had the range to perform the escort duties and the unit's operational control was transferred to
    7.00
    2 votes
    152
    609th Special Operations Squadron

    609th Special Operations Squadron

    The 609th Special Operations Squadron is an inactive United States Air Force unit. The squadron was constituted on 1 October 1942, and was originally designated the 349th Night Fighter Squadron. Its last assignment was with the 56th Special Operations Wing based at Nakhon Phanom RTAFB, Thailand. The squadron served notably for two and a half years combat duty during the Vietnam War. It was inactivated on 1 Dec 1969. The 609th Special Operations Squadron was activated as the 609th Air Commando Squadron at Nakhon Phanom RTAFB, Thailand on 22 Aug 1967 and officially organized on 15 Sept 1967. It was assigned to the 56th Air Commando Wing. The squadron flew the Douglas A-26 Invader, a twin engine attack bomber of WWII vintage. These aircraft were transferred from the 606th Air Commando Squadron which transitioned to other aircraft. The primary mission of the 609th was night interdiction of truck traffic along the Ho Chi Minh Trail. Its call sign for these missions was "Nimrod", inherited from the 606th and other squadrons that had flown that mission, and "The Nimrods" soon became the squadron's nickname. The squadron's A-26 aircraft carried tail letters "TA". On 1 August 1968, all Air
    7.00
    2 votes
    153
    Black Watch

    Black Watch

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Black Watch, 3rd Battalion, Royal Regiment of Scotland (3 SCOTS) is an infantry battalion of the Royal Regiment of Scotland. Prior to 28 March 2006, the Black Watch was an infantry regiment. The Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment) from 1931 to 2006, and The Black Watch (Royal Highlanders) from 1881 to 1931. Part of the Scottish Division, it was the senior regiment of Highlanders. The source of the regiment's name is uncertain but they were part of the Highland Watch originally raised on the orders of Charles II in 1667 but later disbanded. George II caused them to be recreated in 1725 following the rebellion of 1715 and used them to calm the troubled Highlands of Scotland. The government issue tartan they were required to wear was dark and may have contributed to the name they were given locally, which was Am Freiceadan Dubh (Gaelic m. The Black Watch), but it is also possible that the name was given by those who claimed its recruits had "black hearts" for siding with the "enemies of true Highland spirit", or that it derived from their original duty in policing the Highlands, namely preventing 'blackmail' (Highlanders demanding extortion payments to spare cattle herds). The
    7.00
    2 votes
    154
    Legio V Alaudae

    Legio V Alaudae

    • Unit size designation: Roman legion
    Legio quinta Alaudae (Fifth Larks Legion) sometimes known as Gallica, was levied by Julius Caesar in 52 BC from native Gauls. Their emblem was an elephant, and their cognomen Alaudae came from the high crest on their helmets, typical of the Gauls, which made them look like larks. The French word "Alouette" is a direct descendant of "Alauda", itself not a proper Latin noun, but a loan word from Gaulish, possibly the first reason for the legionary name. V Gallica was the first Roman legion composed of provincial soldiers, as opposed to Roman citizens. Caesar paid the soldiers with his own resources, but the legion was later recognized by the Roman Senate. V Alaudae fought in the Gallic Wars until 49 BC, as one of the bravest legions of Caesar, then they were moved to Spain. They served with Mark Antony between 41 BC and 31 BC and probably fought in Actium. After Antony committed suicide, they were merged into Augustus' army in 30 BC. Legio V was involved in a mutiny on the Rhine in AD 14. Their emblem depicted an elephant and was awarded in 46 BC for bravery against a charge of elephants in the Battle of Thapsus. Known locations for V Alaudae include: The legion suffered heavy
    7.00
    2 votes
    155
    The Connaught Rangers

    The Connaught Rangers

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Connaught Rangers ("the Devil's Own") was an Irish regiment of the British Army, formed by the amalgamation in 1881 of the 88th Regiment of Foot (Connaught Rangers) and the 94th Regiment of Foot. It was disbanded in 1922. The 88th Foot or Connaught Rangers were raised in 1793 by the Earl of Clanricarde to help counteract the threat from Napoleonic France. They formed part of the expeditions to Egypt in 1801, South America in 1806 and the short campaign in Holland against France. The 94th, formally known as the Scotch Brigade had fought in India (earning the Army of India Medal with three clasps) prior to joining the 88th in General Picton's, 3rd Light Division in the Peninsular Wars against France. Wellington used the 88th effectively as his Storm Troopers in the Iberian Peninsula where they were given the honour of providing the Forlorn Hope at Cuidad Rodrigo. The men of the 88th earned up to 12 battle clasps to the Military General Service Medal for services in Egypt and the Peninsula and the 94th, 10 clasps. After the Battle of Toulouse, the 88th departed to Canada while the 94th moved to Ireland and became over the next 50 years effectively an Irish Regiment. The 88th
    7.00
    2 votes
    156
    The Royal Irish Fusiliers

    The Royal Irish Fusiliers

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Royal Irish Fusiliers was an Irish infantry regiment of the British Army, formed by the amalgamation of the 87th (Prince of Wales's Irish) Regiment of Foot and the 89th (The Princess Victoria's) Regiment of Foot in 1881. The regiment's first title in 1881 was Princess Victoria's (Royal Irish Fusiliers), changed in 1920 to The Royal Irish Fusiliers (Princess Victoria's). Between the time of its formation and Irish independence, it was one of eight Irish regiments. In 1968 the regiment was amalgamated with the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers and the Royal Ulster Rifles to become the Royal Irish Rangers. The 87th and 89th Regiments of Foot both saw extensive service in the Napoleonic Wars. At the Battle of Barrosa in 1811 the 2nd battalion of the 87th became famous as the first British Army unit to capture a French Imperial eagle in battle. It was during the Peninsular War that the regiment got its nickname, the Faughs, from their Irish war cry "Faugh A Ballagh" (Fág a' Bealach, meaning Clear the Way). The 87th Regiment subsequently saw service in the Burmese War of 1824-26, where the battle honour "Ava" was gained. The 89th Regiment served in the Crimean War (1854) and the Indian
    7.00
    2 votes
    157
    The Royal Leicestershire Regiment

    The Royal Leicestershire Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Royal Leicestershire Regiment was an infantry regiment of the line in the British Army, with a history going back to 1688. It saw service for three centuries, before being amalgamated into The Royal Anglian Regiment in 1964. On 27 September 1688 a commission was issued to Colonel Solomon Richards to raise a regiment of foot. From 1688 to 1751 the regiment was known by the name of its various colonels. The regiment saw service in the Flanders from 1694 to 1697, before moving to Ireland. In 1701 the regiment moved to the continent of Europe, and took part in the War of the Spanish Succession. In 1709 the unit returned to England, moving to Minorca in 1725. In 1751 a royal warrant assigned numbers to the regiments of the line, and the unit became the 17th Regiment of Foot. It saw service during the French and Indian War at Louisbourg in 1758, Ticonderoga in 1759, and in Caribbean engagements in 1761 and 1762. Following that war it also saw duty during Pontiac's Rebellion before eventually returning to England in 1767. The 17th were again in service during the American War of Independence, landing in Boston on New Year's Day 1776. The regiment's performance at the Battle of
    7.00
    2 votes
    158
    21st Space Operations Squadron

    21st Space Operations Squadron

    The 21st Space Operations Squadron (21 SOPS) is a satellite control unit of the 50th Network Operations Group of the United States Air Force located at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. It formerly operated Onizuka Air Force Station. The mission of the 21st Space Operations Squadron is to plan and conduct specialized communications for a wide spectrum of DoD, allied, civil and commercial space systems. The squadron is rich in tradition. Every space shuttle mission in history has been supported from Onizuka AFS. It schedules, allocates and configures Air Force Satellite Control Network common user resources; monitors, maintains and updates the status of AFSCN resources; and provides status, configurations and readiness of controlled resources to multiple users and command centers. The squadron supports DoD-assigned space missions by operating, maintaining and providing logistical support for the common user resources of the AFSCN. The 21st SOPS Network Operations Center at Onizuka AFS is the prime AFSCN resource for fault isolation/detection for the primary and additional operational switch replacement communication links. It monitors, maintains and updates the status of AFSCN
    6.00
    3 votes
    159
    26th Regiment of Foot

    26th Regiment of Foot

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The 26th (Cameronian) Regiment of Foot was a Scottish infantry regiment of the British Army, active from 1688 to 1881. Although the regiment took the name of its first colonel as The Earl of Angus's Regiment, it became popularly known as The Cameronians until 1751, when it was ranked as the 26th Foot. In 1881, it merged with the 90th Regiment of Foot (Perthshire Volunteers) to form the Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). The Cameronians were themselves disbanded in 1968, meaning that no Army unit today perpetuates the lineage of the 26th Foot. It was originally raised as the Cameronian Guard by the Lords of the Convention, named after the followers of the Presbyterian leader Richard Cameron. In March 1689, three Scottish regiments in the service of William III arrived in Edinburgh, and the ad-hoc forces raised to protect the Convention were dismissed. However, the following month, a regiment was raised near Douglas by James, Earl of Angus, drawn from among the Cameronians, and placed under the service of William III. 1200 men are said to have been enlisted in a single day, without the need for "the beat of drum" (active recruiting) or any bounty money being paid. The regiment had a
    6.00
    3 votes
    160
    57th (West Middlesex) Regiment of Foot

    57th (West Middlesex) Regiment of Foot

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The 57th (West Middlesex) Regiment of Foot was a regiment of line infantry in the British Army. The regiment started out as the 59th Regiment of Foot raised in Gloucester in 1755. After the disbandment of the 50th Regiment of Foot and the 51st Regiment of Foot in 1756, it became the 57th Regiment of Foot. In 1782, it was given a county connection, becoming the "57th (the West Middlesex) Regiment of Foot". The 57th Regiment earned their nickname of "the Die Hards" after their participation in the Battle of Albuera, one of the bloodiest battles of the Peninsular War, fought on the 16 May 1811. The commanding officer of the 57th, Colonel Inglis, was struck down by a charge of canister shot which hit him in the neck and left breast. He refused to be carried to the rear for treatment, but lay in front of his men calling on them to hold their position and when the fight reached its fiercest cried, "Die hard the 57th, die hard!". The casualties of the 57th were 422 out of the 570 men in the ranks and 20 out of the 30 officers. The Allied commander of the Anglo-Portuguese force Field Marshal Beresford wrote in his dispatch, "our dead, particularly the 57th Regiment, were lying as they
    6.00
    3 votes
    161
    803 Naval Air Squadron

    803 Naval Air Squadron

    803 Naval Air Squadron was a Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm squadron. 803 NAS was formed on 3 April 1933 by promoting No 409 (Fleet Fighter) Flight to the status of a squadron, with nine Ospreys. In the same month it embarked on HMS Eagle for the Far East, where it remained (transferring to HMS Hermes in January 1935) until disbandment on 1 October 1937. 803 Squadron was re-formed on 21 November 1938 at RNAS Worthy Down out of 'B' Flight of No 800 Squadron. Equipped with six Ospreys and three Nimrods, then (from December 1938) six Skuas and three Nimrods, the squadron embarked on the HMS Ark Royal in April 1938 as an RAF squadron but was transferred to Admiralty control on 24 May 1939. At the outbreak of World War II, the Skuas and Rocs which formed 803 Squadron were embarked on HMS Ark Royal. Operating out of Scapa Flow, the squadron carried out anti-submarine patrols in the Northwestern Approaches (losing two Skuas in an attack on U-30 on 14 September 1939 and defending SS Fanad Head) and regular patrols off Norway (during which the squadron shot down the first German aircraft to be shot down by a British aircraft in the war, a Dornier 18, on 26 September 1939). The squadron's
    6.00
    3 votes
    162
    80th Fighter Squadron

    80th Fighter Squadron

    The 80th Fighter Squadron (traditionally nicknamed the "Headhunters", and since 1971 also the "Juvats") is an F-16 fighter squadron of the United States Air Force, currently part of the 8th Operations Group of the 8th Fighter Wing, and stationed at Kunsan Air Base, Republic of Korea. The 80th has served in combat operations in World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War. The Headhunters' history began only one month after Pearl Harbor, as the squadron shipped out to fight in the Pacific Theater. The Squadron was first activated on 10 January 1942 at Mitchel Field in New York. Originally designated as a pursuit squadron, they were redesignated in May 1942 as a fighter squadron. Attached to the 8th Fighter Group. One of the early squadron commanders, Edward "Porky" Cragg named the Squadron "The Headhunters" after the local New Guinean Headhunter tribes who hated the Japanese and helped to rescue downed pilots. He also commissioned a crew chief, M/Sgt. Yale Saffro, who was once offered a job to work for Walt Disney as a cartoonist but turned it down, to design the 80th's patch. (This original patch design can be seen "here".
    6.00
    3 votes
    163
    The Rifles

    The Rifles

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Rifles (RIFLES) is an elite light infantry regiment in the British Army. Formed in 2007, it consists of five regular and two territorial battalions, plus a number of companies in other TA battalions, Each battalion of the Rifles was formerly an individual battalion of one of the two large regiments of the Light Division (with the exception of the 1st Battalion, which is an amalgamation of two individual regiments). Since formation the regiment has been involved in combat operations, first in the later stages of the Iraq War and currently in the War in Afghanistan. The Rifles was created as a result of the Future Army Structure. Under the original announcement, the Light Division would have remained essentially unchanged, with the exception of the Light Infantry gaining a new battalion through the amalgamation of two other regiments, and both gaining a TA battalion. However, on 24 November 2005, the Ministry of Defence announced that the four regiments would amalgamate into a single five-battalion regiment. The Rifles was formed on 1 February 2007 by the amalgamation of the four Light Infantry and Rifle Regiments of the Light Division: The two existing battalions each of the
    6.00
    3 votes
    164
    53rd Regiment of Foot

    53rd Regiment of Foot

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The 53rd (Shropshire) Regiment of Foot was a British Army regiment founded in 1755. In 1881, as part of the Childers Reforms, it became The King's Shropshire Light Infantry Regiment. Its traditions are currently held by The Rifles. The 53rd was raised in 1755 as the 55th but was renumbered in 1757 to the 53rd. The regiment would see its first action when it arrived at Quebec City in May 1776 to help raise the siege of the city by Continental Army troops during the American Revolutionary War. The regiment served in the 1776 campaign under Guy Carleton, 1st Baron Dorchester at the Battle of Trois-Rivières and the Battle of Valcour Island. In 1777 its flank companies (Grenadier and Light infantry) were with Gen. John Burgoyne during the ill-fated Saratoga Campaign. Men from the other eight companies would serve under Maj. Christopher Carleton of the 29th Regiment of Foot during Carleton's Raid (1778) and in 1780 during the Burning of the Valleys campaign. Lieutenant Houghton of the 53rd would lead the Royalton Raid in 1780 burning three towns in eastern Vermont. In 1782 the regiment was linked to the county of Shropshire for recruiting. The Regiment returned to England in 1787. During
    5.67
    3 votes
    165
    29th Regiment of Foot

    29th Regiment of Foot

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The 29th (Worcestershire) Regiment of Foot was, from 1694 to 1881, an infantry regiment of the British Army. It now forms part of the Mercian Regiment. The regiment was raised in 1694 by Colonel Thomas Farrington, an officer of the Coldstream Guards during War of the Grand Alliance known in America as King William's War. It was disbanded in 1698 after the Peace of Ryswick and reformed in 1702 for the War of the Spanish Succession, also known as Queen Anne's War. The regiment served under John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough at the victorious Battle of Ramillies in 1706 against the French in what is now Belgium and in the siege of Ostend. In 1727 the regiment saw action at Gibraltar and were sent to Fortress Louisbourg on Cape Breton Island in 1745. In 1749, the regiment was at the site of Halifax, Nova Scotia, where the soldiers cleared the land for the new town. An altercation with some Native Americans led to an order that all officers in the regiment must always be armed, thus earning their first nickname as the Ever Sworded due to the swords the officers are required to wear even when off-duty a tradition still in effect today as the orderly officer is still armed even at
    6.50
    2 votes
    166
    6th Intelligence Squadron

    6th Intelligence Squadron

    The United States Air Force's 6th Intelligence Squadron (6 IS) is an intelligence unit located at Osan AB, Korea. The mission of the 6 IS is to execute 24/7 imagery and analytical operations, as part of the Distributed Ground System-Three (DGS-3), to support Seventh Air Force during armistice and war.
    6.50
    2 votes
    167
    72nd Regiment of Foot

    72nd Regiment of Foot

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The 72nd Highlanders (Formerly 78th Highlanders) was a British Army Highland Infantry Regiment of the Line raised in the late 18th Century in Scotland for service against the French. In 1881 the regiment was linked with the 78th (Highlanders) Regiment to form the 1st and 2nd Battalions of the Seaforth Highlanders. In 1771 the family title of "Earl of Seaforth" was restored to Kenneth Mackenzie after his family had forfeited it because of their involvement in the Jacobite Rebellion of 1715. As a gesture of gratitude, the Earl offered to raise a regiment on his estate for general use by the Crown. The offer was accepted and a corps of 1,130 men was raised. Of these, 900 were Highlanders and the remainder coming from the Lowlands and was located at Elgin, its first base, in May 1778. In August 1778 the Regiment marched to Leith for embarkation to the East Indies– but a dispute regarding their terms of service lead the men to march back to Edinburgh and they took up a position of protest in the vicinity of Arthurs Seat, remaining for several days. During this protest, the men were amply supplied with food and ammunition by the populace of the capital, who had taken side with them in
    6.50
    2 votes
    168
    75th Ranger Regiment

    75th Ranger Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: United States Army
    The 75th Ranger Regiment (Airborne), also known as Rangers, is a Special Operations light infantry unit of the United States Army. The Regiment is headquartered in Fort Benning, Georgia with battalions in Fort Benning, Hunter Army Airfield and Joint Base Lewis-McChord. It operates as a special operations force of the United States Army Special Operations Command (USASOC). The Regiment is composed of one Special Troops Battalion and three, organizationally identical, rapidly-deployable light infantry special operations battalions with specialized skills that enable them to perform a variety of special operations missions. These missions include airborne, air assault, and direct action operations, raids, infiltration and exfiltration by air, land or sea in addition to airfield seizure, recovery of personnel and special equipment, and support of general purpose forces (GPF). Each of the Regiment's three line battalions rotates as the "Ranger Ready Force". Every battalion of the Regiment is at a constant readiness to deploy and is expected to be able to respond anywhere in the world within 18 hours. American Ranger history predates the Revolutionary War with Ethan Allen and his
    6.50
    2 votes
    169
    808 Squadron RAN

    808 Squadron RAN

    808 Squadron was a Royal Australian Navy Fleet Air Arm squadron, initially a Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm squadron formed as 808 Naval Air Squadron during World War II as a naval fighter attack squadron. It was disbanded at then end of the war, only to be reformed as a carrier based attack squadron in 1950 and transferred to the Australian Fleet Air Arm. It served during the Korean War, and disbanded again in 1958. 808 Squadron was first formed as a Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm fighter squadron in June 1940, before being merged with 807 Naval Air Squadron, and was one of two Royal Navy Squadrons that took part in the Battle of Britain, the other being 804 Naval Air Squadron. 808 Squadron was also involved in the providing ground-attack support for the D-Day landings. Towards the end of the war the squadron was re-deployed to the East Indies, where they remained until the end of the war. The Squadron operated Supermarine Seafire in a strike attack combat role. 808 Squadron was reformed in 1950 in Cornwall, under the command of Lieutenant Commander John Appleby, RN,however this time as a Royal Australian Navy squadron, deployed to serve aboard the aircraft carrier HMAS Sydney. They were
    6.50
    2 votes
    170
    99th (Lanarkshire) Regiment of Foot

    99th (Lanarkshire) Regiment of Foot

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The 99th (Lanarkshire) Regiment of Foot was an infantry regiment of the British Army, formed in 1824 and amalgamated into The Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire Regiment) in 1881. The regiment was raised in 1824 as the 99th Regiment of Foot, taking a county title in 1836 as the 99th (Lanarkshire) Regiment of Foot. In 1874 it was renamed to the 99th Duke of Edinburgh's (Lanarkshire) Regiment of Foot, taking its title from Prince Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh. The 99th Regiment of Foot was raised in 1824 in Edinburgh by Major-General Gage John Hall. It was a distinct unit, unrelated to earlier units designated as the 99th Regiment of the British Army, including the 99th Regiment of Foot (Jamaica Regiment), 99th Foot which was re-designated as the 100th Regiment of Foot. In 1832, the new 99th Regiment received its county title, becoming the 99th (Lanarkshire) Regiment of Foot. During its early years, the 99th spent much of its time in the Pacific. The first detachments of the 99th Regiment arrived in Australia with transported convicts aboard the transport ship North Briton, destined for Tasmania, in 1842. The rest of the 99th arrived on with successive shipments of convicts. The 99th rotated
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    171
    No. 669 Squadron RAF

    No. 669 Squadron RAF

    No. 669 Squadron RAF was a glider squadron of the Royal Air Force active during the Second World War. No. 669 Squadron RAF was formed on 16 November 1944 at Bikram, Patna, India as a glider squadron, with the intention of being used for airborne operations by South East Asia Command. However, after a short period it was redesignated No. 671 Squadron RAF, due to an earlier mix-up of squadron designations and bases. The squadron was reformed anew the next day, with the same role and at the right base, and continued to train, as part of No. 343 Wing RAF, until the surrender of Japan, when it became surplus to requirements. The squadron was disbanded on 10 November 1945 at Fatehjang, British India. The squadron today is represented by 669 Squadron of 9 Regiment, Army Air Corps.
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    2 votes
    172
    Polish II Corps

    Polish II Corps

    • Armed force: Polish Armed Forces in the West
    Polish II Corps (Polish: Drugi Korpus Wojska Polskiego), 1943–1947, was a major tactical and operational unit of the Polish Armed Forces in the West during World War II. It was commanded by Lieutenant General Władysław Anders and by the end of 1945 it had grown to well over 100,000 soldiers. Victims of Soviet deportations of 1939-40 from occupied Poland had been processed by NKVD and sent to concentration camps, labour camps or penal exile in Siberia. The Nazi-Soviet pact of August 1939 effectively ended on 22 June 1941 when the Wehrmacht invaded the USSR. The consequent release of the many thousands of Poles from the Soviet Gulags allowed for the formation of a Polish Army on Soviet soil following the signing of the Polish-Russian Military Agreement on August 14, 1941. The first commander, General Michał Tokarzewski, began the task of forming this army in the Soviet town of Totskoye on August 17. The commander chosen by General Władysław Sikorski to ultimately lead the new army, General Władysław Anders, had been just released from the Lubyanka prison in Moscow, on August 4, and did not issue his first orders or announce his appointment as commander until August 22. This army
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    173
    Royal Guernsey Light Infantry

    Royal Guernsey Light Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    Royal Guernsey Light Infantry was a regiment in the British Army that was formed from the Royal Guernsey Militia in 1916 to serve in World War I. They fought as part of the British 29th Division. Of the 2280 Guernseymen who fought on the western front with the RGLI, 327 died and 667 were wounded. The regimental motto, Diex Aix, derives from the battle cry used by the Normans at the Battle of Hastings. The Regiment lives on in the Guernsey Army Cadet Force (Det.) Light Infantry, who, although they do not wear the RGLI Cap Badge, still keep alive the history of the Regiment within the Detachment. 17 December 1 June September 26 September 9–14 October 20 November – 3 December 18–26 January 8–29 March 3–7 April 10–14 April 30 April 22 May Order of St. Michael and St. George (Companion) T. L. de Havilland, Lieutenant Colonel Royal Victorian Order (5th Class) N. R. Ingrouille, Lieutenant Military Cross E. J. Stone, 2nd Lieutenant H. E. K. Stranger, 2nd Lieutenant H. A. Le Bas, Captain Ambrose Sherwill, Lieutenant F. de M. Laine, Lieutenant Distinguished Conduct Medal W. H. Budden, 569 Acting Sergeant W. J. Le Poidevin, 590 Sergeant H. L. James, 586 Sergeant Military Medal T. R. Robin,
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    174
    The Gordon Highlanders

    The Gordon Highlanders

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Gordon Highlanders was a British Army infantry regiment from 1794 until 1994. The regiment took its name from the Clan Gordon and recruited principally from Aberdeen and the North-East of Scotland. The regiment was formed on 1 July 1794 by the amalgamation of the 75th Stirlingshire Regiment - which became the 1st battalion of the new regiment - and the 92nd Gordon Highlanders, which became the 2nd. The 75th Highlanders were raised in 1787 by Colonel Robert Abercromby of Tullibody for service in India, where they saw a great deal of action. They went on to serve in South Africa, the Indian Mutiny, Egypt and on the North-West Frontier. The 92nd were raised as the 100th Highlanders by the Duke of Gordon in 1794 being renumbered 92nd in 1798. Their early service included the Low Countries and Egypt, followed by Corunna, the Peninsula, Waterloo, Afghanistan and South Africa. The Gordons raised 21 battalions in the First World War, serving on the Western Front and in Italy and winning 65 battle honours. The regiment lost 1,000 officers and 28,000 men during the war. The legendary folk singer and Scottish Traveller Jimmy MacBeath served with the regiment during this era. A further 27
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    175
    The Manchester Regiment

    The Manchester Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Manchester Regiment was a regiment of the British army, formed in 1881 by the amalgamation of the 63rd Regiment of Foot and the 96th Regiment of Foot. The regiment amalgamated with the King's Regiment (Liverpool) in 1958, to form the King's Regiment (Manchester and Liverpool). Between the 1860s and 1880s, the British Army underwent a period of reform implemented by Edward Cardwell and Hugh Childers. Single-battalion regiments amalgamated and were affiliated with a geographical area. The Manchester Regiment came into being on 1 July 1881 by the union of the 63rd (West Suffolk) and 96th Regiments of Foot. They had been linked in 1873 by their allocation to the 16th Sub-district Brigade Depot in Ashton-under-Lyne, near to Manchester. The 2nd Battalion, as the 96th Foot, had been raised in the town of Manchester in 1824. Eight additional battalions were gained through the incorporation of the 6th Royal Lancashire Militia and rifle corps units from Lancashire. India featured prominently in the early history of the regiment. The 1st Battalion had been based there for a decade before departing for Egypt and thence to Britain in 1883, while the 2nd Battailon arrived in 1882 after
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    176
    The Staffordshire Regiment

    The Staffordshire Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Staffordshire Regiment (Prince of Wales') (or simply "Staffords" for short) was an infantry regiment of the British Army, part of the Prince of Wales' Division. The regiment was formed in 1959 by the amalgamation of The South Staffordshire Regiment and The North Staffordshire Regiment (Prince of Wales's). The Staffords can trace their history back to 1705 when a regiment known as the 38th Foot was raised at Lichfield by Colonel Luke Lillingstone. After the creation of the regiment, its first overseas posting was a six month exercise in Kenya, followed by a year in Colchester and then a return to Kenya for a further two years. On the tour the regiment had to deal with a mutiny by the Ugandan Army. Returning home the regiment was the last unit of the British Army to serve in East Africa. A home tour in Dover followed, then came a two year posting to Berlin followed by tours in Bahrain and Sharjah in the Persian Gulf where the regiment again recorded a 'last unit' distinction being the last unit to serve in Sharjah. Five tours in Northern Ireland were undertaken between 1972 and 1984. For the rest of the 1980s the regiment served in the United Kingdom and Germany. In October 1990
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    177
    5th Space Operations Squadron

    5th Space Operations Squadron

    The United States Air Force's 5th Expeditionary Space Operations Squadron (5 ESOPS) is an expeditionary satellite operations unit administratively assigned to Schriever AFB, Colorado. The 5th Space Operations Squadron was a component of the 50th Operations Group, 50th Space Wing, before being deactivated in 1995. 5 SOPS was responsible for day-to-day command and control for the DSCS III satellites and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization communications satellite program. The squadron had prime launch responsibility for DSCS III, NATO IV/Skynet IV and the Inertial Upper Stage booster. 5th SOPS rose out of the rich history of the Air Force Satellite Control Facility. The squadron was provisionally activated as Operating Location-A, 750th Space Group, on October 1, 1992. This satellite control facility established one of the Air Force's major roles in space: satellite operations. AFSCF was later divided into the 2nd Space Test Group and the Consolidated Space Test Center on October 1, 1987 when AFSPC took over Onizuka Air Force Base, now Onizuka Air Station. OL-A encompassed the CSTC divisions of VOS, VOE, and VOD. 5th SOPS was officially activated November 22, 1993 under the 50th
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    1 votes
    178
    9th Regiment of Foot

    9th Regiment of Foot

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The 9th Regiment of Foot was a infantry line regiment of the British Army from 1751 to 1881. It became the Norfolk Regiment following the Army reforms of 1881. The title of 9th Foot was awarded in 1751, but the origins of the regiment are with Henry Cornewall's Regiment of Foot raised by James II in 1685 in response to the Monmouth Rebellion. The regiment fought in the Williamite war in Ireland, seeing action at the Battle of the Boyne and Battle of Aughrim, as well as the siege of Limerick (1690), and siege of Limerick (1691) and siege of Athlone. In the War of the Spanish Succession, the regiment fought in several engagements, including the Battle of Almansa. During the Seven Years' War the Regiment won its first formal Battle honour as part of the expedition that captured Belle Île from the French in 1761. In 1762 they sailed with George Keppel, 3rd Earl of Albemarle in the British expedition against Cuba and took part in the siege and subsequent capture of Havana. Following the signing of the Treaty of Paris in 1763 and the end of the war they moved to a posting at St. Augustine, Florida. At this stage their strength was reported as less than 300 out of the approximately 1,000
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    179
    No. 660 Squadron RAF

    No. 660 Squadron RAF

    No. 660 Squadron was a Royal Air Force Air Observation Post squadron associated with the 21st Army Group during World War II. Numbers 651 to 663 Squadrons of the RAF were Air Observation Post units working closely with Army units in artillery spotting and liaison. A further three of these squadrons, 664-666, were manned with Canadian personnel. Their duties and squadron numbers were transferred to the Army with the formation of the Army Air Corps on 1 September 1957. No. 660 Squadron was formed at RAF Old Sarum on 31 July 1943 with the Auster III and in February 1944 the Auster IV. From November 1943, it was based at Hammerwood Park, a country house in Sussex. However, as the squadron's role was to support the Second British Army, in July 1944 it moved to France. Fighting in the break-out from Normandy it followed the army across the low countries and into Germany. The squadron disbanded at Holtenau, Germany on 31 May 1946. The squadron today is represented by 660 Squadron (Defence Helicopter Flying School) of the Army Air Corps.
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    1 votes
    180
    York and Lancaster Regiment

    York and Lancaster Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The York and Lancaster Regiment was an infantry regiment of the British Army. It was formed on 1 July 1881 through the amalgamation of two regiments of foot and a militia regiment: Under the original scheme of amalgamation announced in March 1881 the title of the new regiment was to be The Hallamshire Regiment. This reflected the fact that the regimental district included an area of West Riding of Yorkshire known as Hallamshire. The proposed title was unpopular with the amalgamating units, who sought a more "suitable title... which at the same time would identify the Regiment with the county (Yorkshire), which the word 'Hallamshire' entirely fails to do." Four different titles were proposed, and following a vote of the officers of all four battalions, the title York and Lancaster Regiment was chosen. The regiment inherited the title "York and Lancaster" from the 84th Foot to which had been awarded in 1809. The 84th was one of the few Regiments of Foot lacking a county designation and the title was given in recognition of the fact that the unit had been raised in York in 1793, with a second battalion in Preston, Lancashire in 1808. The new regiment saw service in both Egypt and
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    1 votes
    181
    Danish Naval Air Squadron

    Danish Naval Air Squadron

    The Danish Navy Air Squadron (Danish: Søværnets Helikoptertjeneste), was the aerial component of the Danish navy, from 1977 to 2010-12-31. Operationally it was directly under command of the Danish Naval Command, but maintenance of the eight Westland Lynx helicopters and training of personnel was in cooperation with the air force. The helicopters were used primarily for fishery patrol, shipboard support and coastal Search & Rescue (SAR) missions. The tasks and hardware have now been transferred to the air force as Eskadrille 723 (Squadron 723). The squadron was originally a flight in the air force eskadrille 722 (722nd Squadron) when the first Alouette III helicopter was received in 1962. In 1977 the flight was made into a unit of its own and became a part of the navy, under the name Søværnets Flyvetjeneste (The Naval Air Service). In 1980-1982 the eight Alouette helicopters were replaced with the new Westland Lynx helicopters. In 2000 it was decided that Søværnets Flyvetjeneste should be transferred to the air force as a squadron (728th Squadron) and put under operational command of the air force command along with the Army Air Corps (Hærens Flyvetjeneste), but for a political
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    3 votes
    182
    No. 115 Squadron RAF

    No. 115 Squadron RAF

    No. 115 Squadron RAF was a Royal Air Force squadron during World War I. It was then equipped with Handley Page O/400 heavy bombers. During World War II the squadron served as a bomber squadron and after the war it flew in a similar role till 1958, when it was engaged as a radio calibration unit. The squadron disbanded for the last time as an operational unit in 1993, but reformed in 2008 at RAF Cranwell as 115(R) Squadron, part of 22 Group, operating the Grob Tutor. No. 115 Squadron, RFC, was formed at Catterick, Yorkshire, on 1 December 1917 from a nucleus provided by No. 52 Training Squadron. At the end of August 1918, after having been equipped with Handley Page O/400 twin-engined bombers, it joined the Independent Force in France. Its first raid was made in the night of 16/17 September when nearly 4 tons of bombs were dropped on Metz-Sablon. For this raid the squadron was congratulated by Major-General Sir Hugh Trenchard and the OC 83rd Wing described the raid as "the finest piece of work which has ever been done by a new squadron". Its most successful raid was made against Morhange airfield when five O/400s, making double trips, dropped 6½ tons of bombs on their objective.
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    3 votes
    183
    No. 332 Squadron RAF

    No. 332 Squadron RAF

    No 332 Squadron of the Royal Air Force was formed at RAF Catterick in the North Riding of Yorkshire on 16 January 1942, as a Spitfire-equipped fighter squadron manned by Norwegians. The squadron became operational on 21 March 1942, and moved on to RAF Station North Weald to operate alongside another Norwegian crewed squadron, 331 Squadron. With squadron code "AH" 332 squadron became part of No 132 Wing RAF alongside Norwegian 331 Squadron. It operated as air cover for the Dieppe Raid, and later flew fighter sweeps and escort operations over occupied France and the Low Countries. In late 1943/early 1944 both squadrons were transferred to the 2nd Tactical Air Force and participated in the Normandy Landings as fighter-bombers and tactical air superiority fighters. From September onwards 132 Wing participated in the Liberation of Holland. In April 1945, the squadron was transferred to Scotland, and the following month transferred to Norway after the German surrender. On 21 September 1945, the squadron was disbanded at Værnes as an RAF unit and passed to the control of the Royal Norwegian Air Force (RNoAF). During the war between them, No 331 and No 332 Squadrons scored many air
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    3 votes
    184
    26 Squadron SAAF

    26 Squadron SAAF

    • Unit size designation: Squadron
    • Armed force: South African Air Force
    26 Squadron SAAF is a disbanded squadron of the South African Air Force. The squadron was based at Takoradi, Gold Coast (now Ghana) on the West Coast of Africa during World war II. They flew Vickers Wellingtons on anti-submarine and convoy escort patrols over the Atlantic. The squadron was seconded to No. 298 Wing RAF.
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    185
    2d Fighter Squadron

    2d Fighter Squadron

    The 2d Fighter Squadron (2 FS) is an inactive United States Air Force Unit. It was last part of the 325th Fighter Wing at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida. It was inactivated on 11 May 2010. It operated the F-15C/D Eagle aircraft conducting advanced fighter training for reserve pilots in air dominance missions for worldwide application including training with night vision goggles and the Fighter Data Link. Originally constituted the 2d Pursuit Squadron on 20 November 1940, the squadron was activated on 15 January 1941. It served in World War II with the 52d Pursuit Group, and during that period flew the Curtis P-40 Warhawk and Bell P-39 Airacobra. The 2d also flew combat missions in the Supermarine Spitfire and P-51 Mustang in the European and Mediterranean Theaters, serving specifically in air campaigns in Europe, Algeria-French Morocco, Tunisia, Sicily, Naples-Foggia, Rome-Arno, Normandy, Northern France, Southern France, north Appennines, Rhineland, Central Europe, Po Valley, and performed air combat in the European-African-Middle Eastern Theater. The unit received two Distinguished Unit Citations for operations in Germany and Romania in 1944. Following World War II, the squadron
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    186
    3d Space Operations Squadron

    3d Space Operations Squadron

    The United States Air Force's 3d Space Operations Squadron (3 SOPS) is a satellite operations unit located at Schriever AFB, Colorado. The mission of 3 SOPS is to ensure reliable space-borne communications to the President, the Secretary of Defense and U.S. and Allied Forces. The mission is accomplished by conducting launch and on-orbit operations for the Defense Satellite Communications System Phase III satellites and Wideband Global Satellite. These satellites provide secure high-rate data communications links to the President, the Secretary of Defense, theater commanders, and strategic and tactical forces worldwide. Established under the 1st Photographic Group in May 1941. Performed aerial mapping primarily over the southeastern United States prior to the Pearl Harbor Attack using P-39 Aircobra sub-variants (F-2) which were equipped for the ground-attack and reconnaissance roles. After the United States entry into World War II, flew aerial mapping missions over the Caribbean and northern South America, mapping various islands for locations of airfields to support the South Atlantic Transport route and Antilles Air Command antisubmarine mission. In addition, flew aerial mapping
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    2 votes
    187
    42nd Regiment of Foot

    42nd Regiment of Foot

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The 42nd (Royal Highland) Regiment of Foot was a Scottish infantry regiment in the British Army. Originally the 43rd Highlanders they were renumbered the 42nd in 1748. After the 1715 Jacobite Rising the British government did not have the resources or manpower to keep a standing army in the Scottish Highlands. As a result, they were forced to keep order by recruiting men from local Highland clans that had been loyal to the Whigs. This proved to be unsuccessful in deterring crime, especially cattle rustling, so independent companies (of what would be known as the Black Watch) were raised as a militia in 1725 by General George Wade to keep "watch" for crime. He was commissioned to build a network of roads to help in the task. The militia was recruited from local clans, with one company coming from Clan Munro, one from Clan Fraser, one from Clan Grant and three from Clan Campbell. These companies were commonly known as Am Freiceadan Dubh, or the Black Watch, taking their name from their task and from the dark green government tartan they were issued, and eventually recruited many young gentlemen from both Jacobite and Whig clans. The Regiment of the Line was formed officially in 1739
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    188
    46th (South Devonshire) Regiment of Foot

    46th (South Devonshire) Regiment of Foot

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The 46th (South Devonshire) Regiment of Foot was an infantry regiment of the British Army, created in 1741 and amalgamated into the Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry in 1881. The regiment was raised at Newcastle in 1741 as the 57th Regiment of Foot, ranked as the 46th Regiment of Foot in 1751, and took a county title as the 46th (South Devonshire) Regiment of Foot in 1782. A red 'ball tuft' distinction was worn on the Shako (cap) by the Light company of the 46th from 1833, later by the whole regiment, until 1878. From this the 46th took their nickname 'The Red Feathers', which upheld a tradition allegedly dating from the Light company's role at Paoli's Tavern during the American War of Independence. In 1749 the Regiment was stationed in Ireland, where they remained for eight years. Whilst they were in Ireland, the Seven Years' War broke out, and the 46th were relocated to Nova Scotia. During their time in Canada, the 46th were involved in several battles, including: In 1762 they fought in the Caribbean, taking part in the following actions: In the American War of Independence the 46th Regiment of Foot fought at Capture of Long Island, August 28, 1776; Capture of New York, 1776;
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    189
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    190
    No. 44 Squadron RAF

    No. 44 Squadron RAF

    No. 44 (Rhodesia) Squadron was an aviation unit of the Royal Air Force. It was active between 1917 and 1982. For most of its history it served as a heavy bomber squadron. 44 Squadron was formed on 24 July 1917 as a Home Defence Corps. The squadron pioneered the use of the Sopwith Camel in night fighter operations. By the end of the First World War it was commanded by Arthur Harris, later known as Bomber Harris. Disbanded in 1919, the squadron was reformed as a bomber squadron in March 1937 and equipped with Hawker Hinds. Moving to RAF Waddington later that year, it was equipped with Bristol Blenheims before changing to Handley Page Hampdens. During the war the squadron was subsequently based at RAF Dunholme Lodge, near Dunholme, then RAF Spilsby at Great Steeping in Lincolnshire. At the outbreak of the Second World War, as part of Bomber Harris' No. 5 Group, the squadron was commanded by John Boothman, winner of the Schneider Trophy in September 1931. It was one of only two squadrons to operate continuously throughout the war. There were two squadron commanders who held the Victoria Cross - Wing Commanders Roderick Learoyd and John Nettleton. In 1941 the squadron was renamed No. 44
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    191
    No. 49 Squadron RAF

    No. 49 Squadron RAF

    No. 49 Squadron was a bomber squadron of the Royal Air Force from 1938 to 1965. They received their first Hampdens in September 1938. They were a famous Hampden squadron; with the only Victoria Cross awarded Rod Learoyd amongst the ones who served on the type. They carried out the attack of the Dortmund-Ems Canal in 12 August 1940. They made 2 tours of duty during the Kenyan Mau Mau Uprising from November 1953 to January 1954 and from November 1954 to July 1955. During both these tours it was commanded by Squadron Leader Alan E. Newitt DFC. During their second tour of operation Avro Lincoln SX984 was lost in an accident. They operated the Vickers Valiant from RAF Wittering and RAF Marham, from 1 May 1956 until 1 May 1965. The sole remaining Vickers Valiant (XD818) - the one that dropped the first British hydrogen bomb at Christmas Island with 49 Sqn as part of Operation Grapple - is preserved at the RAF Museum Cosford, near Wolverhampton. The SX984 was lost in a crash on February 19, 1955 while serving in Kenya during the Mau Mau Uprising. On returning from an operational bombing sortie at 1540 hours some 1hr 25mins flying time (total airborne time to the moment of the crash was
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    192
    No. 657 Squadron RAF

    No. 657 Squadron RAF

    No. 657 Squadron RAF was a unit of the Royal Air Force in North Africa, Italy and the Netherlands during the Second World War and afterwards in Germany. Numbers 651 to 663 Squadrons of the RAF were Air Observation Post units working closely with Army units in artillery spotting and liaison. A further three of these squadrons, 664-666, were manned with Canadian personnel. Their duties and squadron numbers were transferred to the Army with the formation of the Army Air Corps on 1 September 1957. No. 657 Squadron was formed at RAF Ouston on 31 January 1943. It went into action in August of that year, in North Africa. It later served in Italy, the Netherlands and Germany. In November 1945, the squadron returned to the UK and continued to support army units in the South of England until disbanded by being renumbered No. 651 Squadron RAF on 1 November 1955. The original squadron is represented today by No. 657 Squadron of the Joint Special Forces Aviation Wing.
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    2 votes
    193
    The Buffs

    The Buffs

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Buffs (Royal East Kent Regiment), formerly the 3rd Regiment of Foot was an infantry regiment of the British Army until 1961. It had a history dating back to 1572 and was one of the oldest regiments in the British Army being third in order of precedence (ranked as the 3rd Regiment of the line). It provided distinguished service over a period of almost four hundred years accumulating one hundred and sixteen battle honours. Following a series of amalgamations since 1961 its lineage is today continued by the Princess of Wales's Royal Regiment. The origins of the regiment lay in Thomas Morgan's Company of Foot, The London Trained Bands which was in existence from 1572 to 1648. In 1665 it was known as the 4th (The Holland Maritime) Regiment and by 1668 as the 4th (The Holland) Regiment. In 1688-1689 it was "4th The Lord High Admiral's Regiment" until 1751 it was named as other regiments after the Colonel Commanding being the 3rd (Howard's) Regiment of Foot from 1737-1743 at which point it became the 3rd Regiment of Foot, "Howard's Buffs". The 3rd Regiment received its nickname of "The Buffs" because it had been issued buff coats—made of soft leather—first when it served abroad in
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    2 votes
    194
    The East Yorkshire Regiment

    The East Yorkshire Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The East Yorkshire Regiment was an infantry regiment of the line in the British Army, first raised in 1685 as Sir William Clifton's Regiment of Foot. It saw service for three centuries, before being amalgamated with the West Yorkshire Regiment (The Prince of Wales's Own), becoming The Prince of Wales's Own Regiment of Yorkshire in 1958. Subsequently, the regiment was one of the Yorkshire infantry regiments which amalgamated to form the Yorkshire Regiment (14th/15th, 19th and 33rd/76th Foot) on 6 June 2006. Raised in 1685 in Nottingham by Sir William Clifton, 3rd Baronet, it was originally, like many British infantry regiments, known by the name of its current Colonel. In 1751, when the numerical system of designation of Regiments of Foot was adopted, it became the 15th Regiment of Foot and in 1782 the 15th (The Yorkshire East Riding) Regiment of Foot. With the Childers Reforms of 1881, it became The East Yorkshire Regiment, the County Regiment of the East Riding of Yorkshire, and in 1935 was renamed The East Yorkshire Regiment (The Duke of York's Own), after its Colonel-in-Chief. In 1958, it was amalgamated with The West Yorkshire Regiment (The Prince of Wales's Own), to form The
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    2 votes
    195
    The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers

    The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers (RRF) is an infantry regiment of the British Army, part of the Queen's Division. The regiment was formed on April 23, 1968, as part of the reforms of the army that saw the creation of the first 'large infantry regiments', by the amalgamation of the four English fusilier regiments. On 23 April 1968 the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers was formed from the four English fusilier regiments. Each of these regiments were steeped in history and traditions which have been retained by the regiment today. On formation, the regiment consisted of four Regular battalions, one Volunteer battalion covering the four Regimental areas and the Depot. Due to a series of Government Defence Reviews, 'Options for Change' and the recent 'Strategic Defence Review' the regiment now comprises two Regular battalions and a number of Territorial Army companies located in the four Regimental Areas. This, however, will again decrease to just one Battalion as the 2nd Battalion is scrapped as part of the Army 2020 defence review. The Regular battalions are: As one of the existing large infantry regiments, the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers is unaffected by the reforms of the infantry that
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    2 votes
    196
    No. 204 Squadron RAF

    No. 204 Squadron RAF

    No 204 Squadron was a Royal Air Force squadron formed in 1918 near Dunkerque, France, from No 4 Squadron Royal Naval Air Service, which had already been formed in 1915 and reformed once in 1916. The squadron served during World War I in the roles of bomber, scout and fighter unit. After that war the squadron was reformed as a flying boat unit, a role that it continued till the end of World War II. After World War II the squadron was reformed as a transport unit and as last role it performed duties as a maritime reconnaissance, shipping surveillance and search and rescue unit. No 204 Squadron RAF was originally formed from the Dover Defence Flight on 23 March 1915 at Dover as No 4 Squadron RNAS, flying a variety of aircraft. It moved to Eastchurch on 3 August 1915 and the unit was redesignated there as No 4 (Naval) Wing in October. The squadron was reformed on 31 December 1916 at Coudekerque from 'A' Squadron of No 5 (Naval) Wing and was originally equipped with Sopwith 1½ Strutters for the bomber role, but in March 1917 these were replaced with Sopwith Pups and the unit converted to the scout role. June 1917 saw a conversion to Sopwith Camels and the squadron began its role of
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    3 votes
    197
    458th Airlift Squadron

    458th Airlift Squadron

    The 458th Airlift Squadron (458 AS) is part of the 375th Airlift Wing at Scott Air Force Base, Illinois. It operates C-21 aircraft providing executive airlift and aeromedical evacuation. Established in mid-1942 under II Bomber Command as a B-17 Flying Fortress Replacement Training Unit (RTU). Operated until March 1944 with the end of Heavy Bomber training. Re-designated on 1 April 1944 as a B-29 Superfortress Very Heavy bombardment squadron. When training was completed moved to North Field Guam in the Mariana Islands of the Central Pacific Area in January 1945 and assigned to XXI Bomber Command, Twentieth Air Force. It's mission was the strategic bombardment of the Japanese Home Islands and the destruction of its war-making capability. Flew "shakedown" missions against Japanese targets on Moen Island, Truk, and other points in the Carolines and Marianas. The squadron began combat missions over Japan on 25 February 1945 with a firebombing mission over Northeast Tokyo. The squadron continued to participate in wide area firebombing attack, but the first ten day blitz resulting in the Army Air Forces running out of incendiary bombs. Until then the squadron flew conventional strategic
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    2 votes
    198
    The Sherwood Foresters

    The Sherwood Foresters

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment) was formed during the 1881 Childers Reforms of the army by the amalgamation of the 45th (Nottinghamshire) Regiment of Foot and the 95th (Derbyshire) Regiment of Foot. The new regiment also included the militia and rifle volunteer units of Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire. Following a series of mergers since 1970, its lineage is now continued by the 2nd battalion, the Mercian Regiment. The regiment was formed as part of the reorganisation of the infantry by the Childers reforms. The 45th (Nottinghamshire) Regiment of Foot (raised in 1741) and the 95th (Derbyshire) Regiment of Foot (raised in 1823) were redesignated as the 1st and 2nd battalions of The Sherwood Foresters (Derbyshire Regiment), while the Derbyshire and Royal Sherwood Foresters Militias became the 3rd and 4th Battalions respectively. These were joined by the 1st and 2nd (Derbyshire) and the 3rd and 4th (Nottinghamshire) Volunteer Battalions. In 1902, the Nottinghamshire association was made explicit, the name changing to The Sherwood Foresters (Nottingham and Derbyshire) Regiment. The Headquarters of the Regimental District was established at
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    199
    U.S. 10th Cavalry Regiment

    U.S. 10th Cavalry Regiment

    • Armed force: United States Army
    The 10th Cavalry Regiment is a unit of the United States Army. Formed as a segregated African-American unit, the 10th Cavalry was one of the original "Buffalo Soldier" regiments. It served in combat during the Indian Wars in the western United States, the Spanish-American War in Cuba and in the Philippine-American War. The regiment was trained as a combat unit but later relegated to non-combat duty and served in that capacity in World War II until its deactivation in 1944. The 10th Cavalry was reactivated as an integrated combat unit in 1958. Portions of the regiment have served in conflicts ranging from the Vietnam War to Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom. The current structure is by squadron, with the 1st, 4th, and 7th Squadrons assigned to three brigades of the U.S. 4th Infantry Division at Ft Carson, Colorado. The following story is one of many how the Buffalo Soldiers got their name. In September 1867, Private John Randall of Troop G of the 10th Cavalry Regiment was assigned to escort two civilians on a hunting trip. The hunters suddenly became the hunted when a band of 70 Cheyenne warriors swept down on them. The two civilians quickly fell in the initial
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    200
    No. 659 Squadron RAF

    No. 659 Squadron RAF

    No. 659 Squadron was a Royal Air Force Air Observation Post squadron associated with the 21st Army Group during World War II. Numbers 651 to 663 Squadrons of the RAF were Air Observation Post units working closely with Army units in artillery spotting and liaison. A further three of these squadrons, 664-666, were manned with Canadian personnel. Their duties and squadron numbers were transferred to the Army with the formation of the Army Air Corps on 1 September 1957. No. 659 Squadron was formed at RAF Firbeck on 30 April 1943 with the Auster III and from March 1944 the Auster IV. The squadron role was to support the Army and in June 1944 it moved to France. Fighting in the break-out from Normandy it followed the army across the low countries and into Germany. In October 1945 the squadron left for India, where it was eventually disbanded at Lahore on 14 August 1947. The squadron today is represented by 659 Squadron of 9 Regiment, Army Air Corps.
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    201
    22d Space Operations Squadron

    22d Space Operations Squadron

    The 22d Space Operations Squadron (22 SOPS) is a United States Air Force unit of the 50th Network Operations Group, itself a part of the 50th Space Wing, and is located at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado. 22 SOPS develops, publishes, executes, and enforces the network operations tasking order, as well as operating and maintaining worldwide remote tracking stations and associated communications systems comprising the Air Force Satellite Control Network (AFSCN). It additionally coordinates launch and on-orbit operations of Department of Defense and other national agencies' satellites in support of warfighters, the President, and the Secretary of Defense. Lastly, the squadron supports NASA's space mission. Constituted 22d Space Operations Squadron on 10 July 1991, it was activated on 1 Oct 1991. It operated as part of the 2d Satellite Tracking (later, 750th Space) Group. In 2004 it changed from being under the 50th Operations Group to the 50th Network Operations Group. As part of 22 SOPS, the Colorado Tracking Station (CTS) enjoys a unique status as the only on-base satellite tracking facility. Originally built in the late 1980s, the station has undergone a number of upgrades that
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    202
    No. 846 Naval Air Squadron

    No. 846 Naval Air Squadron

    846 Naval Air Squadron is a squadron of the Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm. It operates the Westland Sea King HC4 helicopter and provides troop transport and load lifting support to 3 Commando Brigade Royal Marines. The squadron is based at RNAS Yeovilton in Somerset. 846 Naval Air Squadron was established in April 1943 at the Naval Air Station Quonset Point, Rhode Island, USA. It was equipped with 12 Grumman Avenger I torpedo bombers. Two months later the squadron embarked on the escort carrier HMS Ravager (D70) and was transferred to the UK. Before being assigned to HMS Tracker (D24) in January 1944, four Grumman Wildcat V fighters were added to 846 NAS. HMS Tracker was first assigned to convoys going to Gibraltar, then to Murmansk. On the latter voyage, aircraft from 846 NAS attacked eight German U-Boats. HMS Tracker was damaged in June 1944 in a collision with the Canadian frigate HMCS Teme (K458) while forming part of the naval screen for the D-Day landings, and the squadron disembarked to RAF Limavady airfield, Northern Ireland, joining 15 Group RAF Coastal Command. A month later 846 NAS was assigned to HMS Trumpeter (D09), mainly laying mines off Norway until September 1944. In
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    203
    Submarine Squadron 14

    Submarine Squadron 14

    Submarine Squadron 14, or SUBRON 14, was a United States Navy squadron of Polaris and later Poseidon Fleet Ballistic Missile (FBM) submarines based at Holy Loch, Scotland. The squadron was part of Submarine Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet. The squadron also included several submarine tenders anchored out in the Loch, initially USS Proteus, tugs, barges, small boats, and the floating drydock Los Alamos. The site was a deep, sheltered anchorage which had been a British submarine base during the Second World War with the Submarine Depot Ship HMS Forth serving as a support unit for submarines training in the Clyde. Commissioned 1 July 1958, the Squadron arrived at FBM Refit Site 1, Holy Loch 3 March 1961 and departed in June 1992. From the latter half of 1978 until November 1991 USS Will Rogers was forward deployed at Site One in Holy Loch, Scotland. On 9 November 1991, Will Rogers departed Site One, the last submarine to leave Holy Loch before Submarine Squadron 14 was deactivated. There was also a large number of small boats used to transport personnel and supplies from the shore to the ship. Among these small boats were 40 and 50 ft (12 and 15 m) Utility Boats, LCM Mk6 and Mk8 landing
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    204
    The Black Watch

    The Black Watch

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment) was a Scottish infantry regiment of the British Army from 1881 (as the Royal Highland Regiment (The Black Watch)) to 2006. In 2006 the regiment was restructured to be a battalion The Black Watch, 3rd Battalion of the Royal Regiment of Scotland As part of the Scottish Division, it was the senior regiment of the Highland Brigade. The regiment's name came from the dark tartan that they wore and from its role to "watch" the Highlands. 'Black Watch' was originally just a nickname for the 42nd (Royal Highland) Regiment of Foot, but was used more and more so that, in 1881, when the 42nd amalgamated with the 73rd Regiment of Foot, the new regiment was named 'The Black Watch (Royal Highlanders)'. The uniform changed over time, but the nickname has been more enduring. The regimental motto was Nemo me impune lacessit (no one attacks me with impunity). The Royal Stewart Tartan was worn by the regimental pipers to reflect the status of 'Royal' regiment. The Black Watch was formed as part of the Childers Reforms in 1881 when the Royal Highland Regiment (The Black Watch) was amalgamated with the 73rd (Perthshire) Foot to form two battalions of the newly
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    205
    Tuskegee Airmen

    Tuskegee Airmen

    • Unit size designation: Wing
    • Armed force: United States Army Air Corps
    The Tuskegee Airmen ( /tʌsˈkiːɡiː/) is the popular name of a group of African American pilots who fought in World War II. Formally, they formed the 332nd Fighter Group and the 477th Bombardment Group of the United States Army Air Corps (United States Army Air Forces after 20 June 1941). The Tuskegee Airmen were the first African-American military aviators in the United States armed forces. During World War II, African Americans in many U.S. states were still subject to the Jim Crow laws. The American military was racially segregated, as was much of the federal government. The Tuskegee Airmen were subjected to racial discrimination, both within and outside the army. Despite these adversities, they trained and flew with distinction. All black military pilots who trained in the United States trained at Tuskegee, including five Haitians. Although the 477th Bombardment Group "worked up" on North American B-25 Mitchell bombers, they never served in combat; the Tuskegee 332nd Fighter Group was the only operational unit, first sent overseas as part of Operation Torch, then seeing action in Sicily and Italy, before being deployed as bomber escorts in Europe, where they were very
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    206
    1st Space Operations Squadron

    1st Space Operations Squadron

    The United States Air Force's 1st Space Operations Squadron (1 SOPS) is a space operations unit located at Schriever AFB, Colorado. The squadron is also responsible for performance launch, on-orbit, emergency, end-of-life testing and disposal operations providing warning, navigation, R&D, surveillance and weather to the president and the Secretary of Defense, Joint Chiefs of Staff and nine combatant commanders worldwide. 1 SOPS conducts command and control (C2) for four distinct constellations: Defense Support Program (DSP), Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) and a NASA research and development (NASA R&D) program, in low earth to deep space orbits, and is Air Force Space Command's only multi-mission Satellite Operations Control Center. 1 SOPS is supported by the Air Force Reserves unit, the 7th Space Operations Squadron. The squadron operates and maintains 24-hour Air Force Satellite Control Network command and control capability for Defense Support Program and Midcourse Space Experiment constellations. 1st SOPS also operates and maintains a research and development space system providing vital space weather data worldwide. 1st SOPS performs launch and early-orbit operations for GPS
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    207
    352d Tactical Fighter Squadron

    352d Tactical Fighter Squadron

    The 352d Tactical Fighter Squadron is an inactive United States Air Force fighter squadron. Its last assignment was with the 35th Tactical Fighter Wing, being stationed at Phan Rang Air Base, South Vietnam. It was inactivated on 31 July 1971. The squadron was formed in 1942 and served in the European Theater of World War II. During the Cold War, the squadron was attached to NATO, and stood on alert during the Cuban Missile Crisis. Deployed to South Vietnam during the Vietnam War, the squadron fought with distinction. The Squadron was deactivated in 1971. The 352d Tactical Fighter Squadron was formed in Mitchel Field, New York, on 28 September 1942, flying the P-47 Thunderbolt. The squadron operated against the enemy in combat over Europe from August 1943 to April 1945, using P-47's until conversion to P-51 Mustangs in October 1944. The unit regularly escorted bombers that attacked industrial establishments, marshalling yards, submarine installations, V-weapon sites, and other targets. They frequently strafed and dive-bombed buildings, troops, flak batteries, barges and tug boats, locomotives and rail lines, vehicles, bridges, and airfields while also flying numerous counter-air
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    208
    London Scottish

    London Scottish

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The London Scottish is a unit of the British Army. Formerly a regiment, the unit is now a company of The London Regiment. Founded in 1859 as part of the Volunteer Force sponsored by The Highland Society of London and The Caledonian Society of London, a group of individual Scots raised The London Scottish Rifle Volunteers under the command of Lt Col Lord Elcho, later The Earl of Wemyss and March. Over many years the London Scottish have changed titles and lineage, today they are A (London Scottish) Company of The London Regiment. The regimental tartan is Elcho tartan and Hodden Grey in colour. Lt Col Lord Elcho clothed the regiment in Hodden Grey, the homespun cloth known throughout Scotland. This avoided all interclan feeling on the subject of tartan and, as Lord Elcho said "A soldier is a man hunter. As a deer stalker chooses the least visible of colours, so ought a soldier to be clad." A detailed history of the London Scottish Cadets can be found in the Regimental Gazette, written month to month over the years, but there follows some useful facts about all three Army Cadet Units that are badged London Scottish. The earliest record of The London Scottish Cadet Corps ("LSCC") was
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    209
    No. 159 Squadron RAF

    No. 159 Squadron RAF

    No. 159 Squadron RAF was a Royal Air Force Squadron that was active as a Bomber, Mine-laying, Reconnaissance and Transport unit in World War II. The original 159 Squadron was to be formed during the First World War, but the idea was disbanded so that reinforcements could be sent to France. No. 159 Squadron was reformed at RAF Molesworth on 2 July 1942 during the Second World War and its ground crew personnel were posted, without aircraft, to the Middle East on 12 February 1942 and then to India on 18 May 1942. Flying B-24 Liberators, the squadron was posted to Palestine in July 1942 and carried out bombing raids in North Africa, Italy and Greece. No. 159 then flew to India on 30 September 1942. The first operation against the Japanese was on 17 November 1942, and during the rest of the war, the squadron flew mine-laying, bombing, and reconnaissance missions over Burma, Siam, Malaya, Indo-China and the Dutch East Indies. After the war, No.159 converted to transport and survey duties before disbanding on 1 June 1946. Flight Sergeant Stanley James Woodbridge, a wireless operator who served with 159 squadron, was awarded the George Cross posthumously in 1948. Woodbridge had steadfastly
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    210
    The Royal Scots

    The Royal Scots

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Royal Scots (The Royal Regiment), once known as the Royal Regiment of Foot, was the oldest, and therefore most senior, infantry regiment of the line in the British Army, having been raised in 1633 during the reign of Charles I of Scotland. The regiment existed until 2006, when it amalgamated with the King's Own Scottish Borderers to become the Royal Scots Borderers, 1st Battalion of the newly formed Royal Regiment of Scotland. The regiment was first raised in 1633 as the Royal Regiment of Foot by Sir John Hepburn, under a royal warrant from Charles I, on the Scottish establishment for service in France. It was formed from a nucleus of Hepburn's previous regiment, formerly in Swedish service, which had been in existence since 1625. When in France it absorbed the remnants of a number of other Scottish mercenary units which had fought in Swedish service, and by 1635 had swelled to some 8,000 men. Sir John Hepburn, was killed at the siege of Saverne in 1636; it was then taken over by his nephew, Sir John Hepburn who was killed in action the following year. Lord James Douglas was appointed the new colonel, and the name of the corps was altered to the Régiment de Douglas, numbering
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    211
    48th (Northamptonshire) Regiment of Foot

    48th (Northamptonshire) Regiment of Foot

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The 48th (Northamptonshire) Regiment of Foot was a regiment of the British Army. The regiment was first raised in 1741 as James Cholmondeley's Regiment of Foot in Norwich, England during the War of Austrian Succession. The regiment first saw action at the Battles of Falkirk and Culloden in 1745-1746, campaigning against the Young Pretender. In 1748, it was renumbered as the 48th Regiment of Foot. The 48th took part in the French and Indian War and they received their first battle honour in the Americas at the Battle of Louisburg, although the Regiment did not receive their due honour for this until 1882. The 48th was part of General James Wolfe's capture of Quebec in 1759. The 48th was present at the capture Martinique and Havana in the West Indies before returning to serve in Ireland in 1763. In 1773, the 48th was stationed in the West Indies prior to the start of the American Revolution. They were later captured by the French during the war. Suffering from loss of men in battle, captivity and disease, the 48th was repatriated back to England in 1780. The Regiment was relocated to Northampton District and then became known as the Northamptonshire Regiment. It too was part of the
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    212
    6th Vermont Infantry

    6th Vermont Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: Union Army
    • Place of origin: Vermont
    The 6th Regiment, Vermont Volunteer Infantry (or 6th VVI) was a three years' infantry regiment in the Union Army during the American Civil War. It served in the Eastern Theater, predominantly in the VI Corps, Army of the Potomac, from October 1861 to June 1865. It was a member of the Vermont Brigade. The regiment was mustered into Federal service on October 15, 1861 at St. Albans, Vermont. It was engaged in, or present at, Warwick Creek, Lee's Mill, Williamsburg, Golding's Farm, Savage's Station and White Oak Swamp during the Peninsula Campaign; Crampton's Gap and Antietam during the 1862 Maryland Campaign; Battle of Fredericksburg, Marye's Heights, Salem Church, and Banks' Ford; Gettysburg and Funkstown during the Gettysburg Campaign; Gainesville and Rappahannock Station; the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Wilmington and Weldon Railroad, and Reams' Station during the Overland Campaign; Fort Stevens; Charlestown, Opequon, Winchester, Fisher's Hill, and Cedar Creek during the Shenandoah Valley campaign; the Siege of Petersburg, and Sayler's Creek. Throughout the 6th Vermont's service, 189 men were killed and mortally wounded in combat, 2 died from non-combat
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    213
    23d Bomb Squadron

    23d Bomb Squadron

    The 23d Bomb Squadron (23 BS) is a United States Air Force unit, assigned to the 5th Bomb Wing. It is stationed at Minot AFB, North Dakota. The mission of the 23BS is to fly the Boeing B-52H Stratofortress long range bomber. The squadron stands ready to deploy and fly its B-52Hs to enforce national security policy by being ready to deliver overwhelming nuclear or conventional firepower to destroy targets, worldwide, at any time. The insignia is a blue disk with a black volcano with red lava flowing from the crater, extending upward as red and yellow rays intermingling with clouds. On the front are five black bombs signifying the 23 BS with three on the dexter (right) side, and two on the sinister (left) side. The patch was approved on 30 September 1931. On 27 December 1935 fate stepped in, and the unit was actually tasked to drop twenty 600-pound bombs in the path of the flow of lava from Mauna Loa volcano, thus saving the city of Hilo, Hawaii, from destruction. It is worn proudly by all members and is a constant reminder of their heritage. Originally organized on 16 June 1917 as the 18th Aero Squadron but redesignated 23d six days later, the 23d supported World War I air combat
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    214
    31st Special Operations Squadron

    31st Special Operations Squadron

    The 31st Rescue Squadron (31 RQS) is part of the 18th Wing at Kadena Air Base, Japan. It trains, equips and employs combat-ready pararescue specialists. 31st Special Operations Squadron was constituted as the 31st Air Rescue Squadron on 17 October 1952. They made combat rescues in Southeast Asia, 1965–1966 and also operated the Joint Rescue Coordination Center (JRCC) for Thirteenth Air Force, Apr 1967-July 1975. They took part in Disaster relief missions in the Philippines between 16–31 July 1990. In May 1993 the squadron was redesignated the 31st Rescue Squadron under the 18th Wing at Kadena Air Base, Japan.
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    215
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    216
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    217
    84th Regiment of Foot

    84th Regiment of Foot

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The 84th Regiment of Foot (Royal Highland Emigrants) was a British regiment in the American Revolutionary War that was raised to defend present day Ontario, Quebec and Atlantic Canada from the constant land and sea attacks by American Revolutionaries. The 84th Regiment was also involved in offensive action in the Thirteen Colonies; including North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Virginia and what is now Maine, as well as raids upon Lake Champlain and the Mohawk Valley. The regiment consisted of 2,000 men in twenty companies. The 84th Regiment was raised from Scottish soldiers who had served in the Seven Years' War and stayed in North America. As a result, the 84th Regiment had one of the oldest and most experienced officer corps of any regiment in North America. The Scottish Highland regiments were a key element of the British Army in the American Revolution. The 84th Regiment was clothed, armed and accoutred the same as the Black Watch, with Lieutenant Colonel Allan Maclean commanding the first battalion and Major General John Small of Strathardle commanding the second. The two Battalions operated independently of each other and saw little action together. The British Province
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    218
    No. 331 Squadron RAF

    No. 331 Squadron RAF

    No. 331 Squadron RAF was a Second World War squadron of the Royal Air Force. It was formed as a fighter squadron at RAF Catterick in Yorkshire on 21 July 1941. The squadron personnel were Norwegian, except for the ground crew and the commanding officer. It was given the RAF aircraft code prefix "FN", which was often said to be an abbreviation for "First Norwegian" or "For Norway", the latter being the squadron's official motto, in Norwegian (For Norge). The squadron badge was a Norwegian Viking sword and a British sword in saltire, bound together with a ring — symbolising the friendship between Norway and Great Britain. The squadron was initially equipped with run-down Hawker Hurricane Mk 1s, inherited from a Polish RAF unit. These had to be rebuilt, before 331 Sqn could become operational, on 15 September. It provided defence for northern Scotland, moving to Castletown on 21 August and later to RAF Skeabrae. In May 1942, the squadron moved south to RAF North Weald, having re-equipped with Spitfires in November 1941. 331 Sqn was joined by a second Norwegian Squadron 332 Squadron, also flying Spitfires. Together they were known as North Weald Wing and were part of the Allied air
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    219
    No. 608 Squadron RAF

    No. 608 Squadron RAF

    No. 608 (North Riding) Squadron was an Auxiliary Air Force squadron of the Royal Air Force during World War II. It flew during its existence as a bomber, fighter and reconnaissance unit and was the only RAF squadron to be equipped with the unsuccessful Blackburn Botha torpedo bomber. No. 608 Squadron was formed at Thornaby-on-Tees, North Yorkshire as No. 608 County of York (North Riding) Squadron, on 17 March 1930 as a day bomber squadron within the Auxiliary Air Force. Its initial equipment was the Avro 504 N and Westland Wapiti, which the squadron flew until they were replaced with Hawker Demon fighters in January 1937, when the squadrons role was changed to that of a fighter squadron. In May 1937 the name of the squadron was changed to No. 608 (North Riding) Squadron. Shortly before the second world war broke out, on 20 March 1939, the squadrons role was changed yet again, now into that of a general reconnaissance unit flying under RAF Coastal Command and they were re-equipped for that role with Avro Ansons. So the squadron started its role in World War II flying the Anson and in June 1940 began to re-equip with the Blackburn Botha torpedo bomber. These were found to be
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    220
    The Parachute Regiment

    The Parachute Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Parachute Regiment, colloquially known as the Paras is the Airborne Infantry of the British Army. One battalion is permanently under the command of the Director Special Forces in the Special Forces Support Group. The other battalions are the parachute infantry component of the British Army's rapid response formation 16 Air Assault Brigade. It is the only line infantry regiment that has not been amalgamated with another unit since the end of the Second World War. Members of the Parachute Regiment are known to the rest of the army and the British public by the nickname the Paras. The Parachute Regiment was formed during the Second World War and eventually raised 17 battalions. In Europe, these battalions formed part of the 1st Airborne Division, the 6th Airborne Division and the 2nd Independent Parachute Brigade. Another three battalions served with the British Indian Army in India and Burma. The regiment took part in five major parachute assault operations, often landing ahead of all other troops, during which they fought in North Africa, Italy, Greece, France, the Netherlands and Germany. At the end of the Second World War, the regiment was reduced to three regular army
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    221
    182nd Fighter Squadron

    182nd Fighter Squadron

    The 182nd Fighter Squadron flies the F-16C/D Fighting Falcon. It is a unit of the Texas Air National Guard. Its parent unit is the 149th Fighter Wing. The 182nd Fighter Squadron was originally activated in June 1943 as the 396th Fighter Squadron, and served in the European Theater during World War II. The 396th was inactivated on 20 August 1946 and the next day redesignated the 182nd Fighter Squadron. On 6 October 1947, several World War II veterans petitioned for and won federal recognition for the squadron as an Air National Guard unit. The 182nd began flying the F-51 "Mustang" in 1947 and accepted its first jet, the F-84E "Thunderjet" when the squadron was called to active duty during the Korean War. The squadron, as an element of the 136th Fighter-Bomber Group, was the first Air National Guard squadron to see combat during that war; the first Air National Guard unit to shoot down a MiG-15; and the first to successfully demonstrate the applicability of aerial refueling during combat. The squadron's "Lonestar Gunfighters" converted in 1996 to the newer F-16 "C/D model", a multi-role fighter manufactured in Texas. The squadron's main role is in training active duty, Air National
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    222
    22d Fighter Squadron

    22d Fighter Squadron

    The 22d Fighter Squadron is an inactive United States Air Force unit. It was last assigned to the 52d Operations Group and stationed at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany. It was inactivated on 13 August 2010. The 22d Pursuit Squadron (Interceptor) was constituted on 22 December 1939, at Langley Field, Virginia. Flying the P-36 Hawk, The squadron was one of several deployed to the Caribbean (later Antilles Air Command) and being stationed on bases established as part of the 1940 Destroyers for Bases Agreement with Great Britain. The squadron left from Norfolk, Virginia on 1 February 1940 with several others bound for Puerto Rico aboard the USAT Chateau Thierry from Norfolk for what turned into 29 months of overseas service, taking station at Ponce (later Losey Field) on 6 January 1941. After its arrival at Ponce, the Squadron converted from the P-36A to P-40 Warhawk. After the Pearl Harbor Attack on 7 December 1941, the Squadron was placed on 24 hour alert status and, the Squadron's P-40E's were flown to Howard Field, in the Panama Canal Zone to reinforce the defense units of the Panama Canal. The squadron returned back to Ponce without aircraft, and upon their return, the squadron
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    223
    23rd Fighter Squadron

    23rd Fighter Squadron

    The 23d Fighter Squadron is an inactive United States Air Force unit. It was last assigned to the 52d Operations Group and stationed at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany. It was inactivated on 13 August 2010 The 23d Fighter Squadron, the "Fighting Hawks," was constituted on 22 December 1939, at Langley Field, Virginia, as the 23d Pursuit Squadron (Interceptor) flying P-36 Hawk aircraft. The unit moved to Kelly Field, Texas, in January 1940, and was equipped with the YP-37. The squadron was one of several deployed to the Caribbean (later Antilles Air Command) and being stationed on bases established as part of the 1940 Destroyers for Bases Agreement with Great Britain. The squadron left from Norfolk, Virginia on 1 February 1940 with several others bound for Puerto Rico aboard the USAT Chateau Thierry from Norfolk for what turned into 29 months of overseas service, taking station at Ponce (later Losey Field) on 6 January 1941. A detachment was also established at Benedict Field, St. Croix, US Virgin Islands. In both locations, the mission of the squadron was air defense. After the Pearl Harbor Attack, the 23d engaged in antisubmarine warfare against German U-boats. The unit P-39s and
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    224
    555th Fighter Squadron

    555th Fighter Squadron

    The 555th Fighter Squadron (555 FS) is part of the 31st Operations Group at Aviano Air Base, Italy. It operates F-16 Fighting Falcon aircraft conducting an air superiority mission. The 555th Fighter Squadron provides combat airpower on demand to U.S. and NATO Combatant Commanders as well as the National Command Authority in order to meet National Security objectives. It also performs air and space control and force application roles of counterair, strategic attack and counterland, including interdiction and close-air support, with 21 F-16CMs employing state of the art munitions in support of the joint, NATO, and combined operations. The squadron's heritage began on 25 November 1942 when the 555th Bombardment Squadron, Medium, was constituted flying the B-26 Marauder. During World War II, the 555th led offensive actions against Axis forces from bases in England, France, and Belgium. For gallantry in action, the squadron was awarded the first of its four Presidential Unit Citations. The squadron was deactivated shortly after WWII ended. On 8 January 1964, the 555th re-emerged at MacDill Air Force Base, Florida, operating the F-4 Phantom II. The squadron was organized from elements of
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    225
    561st Fighter Squadron

    561st Fighter Squadron

    The 561st Fighter Squadron is an inactive United States Air Force squadron, being last assigned to the 57th Operations Group at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada. It was inactivated on 1 October 1996. The 561st FS was the last United States Air Force unit to fly the F-4 Phantom II on operational missions. The last F-105 shot down in the Vietnam War was from the 561st. Activated in 1942 as a B-17 Flying Fortress heavy bomber squadron. Trained under II Bomber Command in Idaho, Utah and in Iowa. Deployed to Eighth Air Force in England, June 1943 at RAF Knettishall (AAF-136), England. Entered combat in June 1943 by attacking an aircraft factory in Amsterdam. The squadron functioned primarily as a strategic bombardment Organization in the European Theater of Operations (ETO) until the war ended. Targets included industries, naval installations, oil storage plants, refineries, and communications centers in Germany, France, Poland, Belgium, Norway, Romania, and Holland. The squadron attacked many significant enemy targets, including aircraft factories in Kassel, Reims, and Brunswick; airfields in Bordeaux, Paris, and Berlin; naval works at La Pallice, Emden, and Kiel; chemical industries in
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    226
    76th Regiment of Foot

    76th Regiment of Foot

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The 76th Regiment of Foot was originally raised as Lord Harcourt's Regiment on 17 November 1745 and disbanded in June 1746. Following the loss of Minorca to the French, it was raised again in November 1756 as the 61st Regiment, but renumbered to 76th, by General Order in 1758, and again disbanded in 1763. A second battalion raised by that regiment in October 1758, for service in Africa, was renumbered as the 86th Regiment and also disbanded in 1763. On 25 December 1777 the 76th was again re-raised as the 76th Regiment of Foot (Macdonald's Highlanders) by Colonel John MacDonell of Lochgarry, in the West of Scotland and Western Isles, as a Scottish Light Infantry regiment. It was disbanded at Stirling Castle in March 1784. The regiment was again raised for service in India by the Honorable East India Company in 1787. In 1881 the 76th Regiment, which shared the same Depot in Halifax as the 33rd (Duke of Wellington's) Regiment, was linked to the 33rd, under the Childers Reforms, to become the regiment's 2nd Battalion. Although retitled as the Halifax Regiment (Duke of Wellington's) this title only lasted six months until it was changed on 30 June 1881, in a revised appendix to General
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    227
    81st Regiment of Foot

    81st Regiment of Foot

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The 81st Regiment of Foot (Loyal Lincoln Volunteers) was an infantry regiment of the British Army, raised in 1793 and amalgamated into The Loyal North Lancashire Regiment in 1881. The 81st was raised in 1793 in response to the French Revolution. The British Army was in the process of being expanded to meet the French Republican threat. On 23 September 1793, Major General Albermarle Bertie, formerly of the 1st Foot Guards, was directed to raise a regiment. However, no levy money would be provided. The original compliment was composed of the Militia of Lincoln volunteering to serve in the new regiment. Originally known as the Loyal Lincoln Volunteers, the regiment was embodied in January 1794. On 25 January 1794, the Loyal Lincoln Volunteers were redesignated as the 81st Regiment of Foot. The regiment was quartered in Lincoln and Gainsborough. The first commander was Lieutenant Colonel Lewis. After a year's service in Ireland, the regiment was detailed to serve under Major-General Ralph Abercromby in the West Indies. The regiment sailed from Southampton and arrived in the West Indies in March 1794. The 81st was sent as reinforce British operations on Saint-Domingue in what is now the
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    94th Fighter Squadron

    94th Fighter Squadron

    The 94th Fighter Squadron (94 FS) is a United States Air Force unit. It is assigned to the 1st Operations Group and stationed at Langley Air Force Base, Virginia. The 94th Fighter Squadron is the second oldest currently active fighter squadron in the United States military. During World War I, the flight echelon of the 103d Aero Squadron, a predecessor United States Army Air Service squadron, was largely composed of former members of the French Air Service Lafayette Escadrille (from the French Escadrille de Lafayette). This was a squadron of American volunteer pilots who had joined the French Air Service prior to the United States entry into the war on 6 April 1917. The 94 Fighter Squadron is tasked to provide air superiority for the United States and allied forces by engaging and destroying enemy forces, equipment, defenses or installations for global deployment as part of the 1st Fighter Wing. The squadron flies one of today's most advanced air dominance fighters, the F-22A Raptor, being the USAF's second operational F-22 squadron in 2006. 94 FS aircraft, like other aircraft from the 1st Fighter Wing, have the tail code "FF". The 94th Fighter Squadron has a long history and
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    Helicopter Interdiction Tactical Squadron

    Helicopter Interdiction Tactical Squadron

    The Helicopter Interdiction Tactical Squadron (HITRON) is an armed U.S. Coast Guard helicopter squadron specializing in Airborne Use of Force (AUF) and drug-interdiction missions. It is based at Cecil Field in Jacksonville, Florida. HITRON flew armed Agusta MH-68A Stingray helicopters from December 2000 until February 2008. At that time, HITRON took on the mantle of the Atlantic Area Deployment Center, and began flying the MH-65C Dolphin. The unit was formally commissioned in 1998 and as of December 2011 it had interdicted 209 vessels resulting in seizures totalling over $10 billion USD. When conducting counter drug operations, HITRON aircrews will deploy aboard Coast Guard cutters for thirty to sixty day deployments. While on deployment, go-fast boats are searched for not only by the HITRON helicopter but also by shore based maritime patrol aircraft (MPA) such as the Coast Guard HC-130J Hercules. If an MPA locates a go-fast, the HITRON crew will launch from the cutter to intercept it. The crew will approach the suspect vessel with weapons trained on the vessel for self-protection. The helicopter crew will confirm the nationality or lack of nation status and whether the vessel is
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    Honourable Artillery Company

    Honourable Artillery Company

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Honourable Artillery Company was incorporated by Royal Charter in 1537 by King Henry VIII and is the second oldest military organisation in the world (behind the Vatican’s Pontifical Swiss Guard). Today it is a Registered Charity whose purpose is to attend to the "better defence of the realm". This purpose is primarily achieved by the support of the HAC Regiment and a detachment of Special Constabulary to the City of London Police. Regiments, battalions and batteries of the Company have fought with distinction in both World Wars and its current Regiment, which forms part of the Territorial Army, is the oldest surviving regiment in the British Army, and the second most senior in the Territorial Army. Members of the Regiment and Specials are drawn, for the most part, from young men and women working in and around the City and Greater London. Those leaving the active units may become Veteran Members and remain within the fraternity of the Company, which they then serve in a variety of ways. The HAC can trace its history as far back as 1087, but it received a Royal Charter from Henry VIII on 25 August 1537, when Letters Patent were received by the Overseers of the Fraternity or
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    No. 351 Squadron RAF

    No. 351 Squadron RAF

    No. 351 Squadron RAF was a Yugoslav-manned fighter-bomber squadron of the Royal Air Force during the Second World War. The squadron was also known as Second NOVJ Squadron. Formed on 1 July 1944 at Benina in Libya from Yugoslav personnel, it was equipped with Hawker Hurricane IICs in the fighter-bomber role. In September the squadron re-equipped with Hawker Hurricane IVs and moved to Canne, Italy, where it joined No. 281 Wing RAF. 281 Wing was part of the Balkan Air Force and the squadron was involved in supporting the Yugoslav partisans. The squadron used an advanced operating base on the island of Vis and from February 1945, was also able to make use of an advance base on the Yugoslav coast. The squadron was organized according to the war formation prescribed for mobile fighter squadron RAF, with two flights, each of eight Hawker Hurricanes. The flying and technical staff were composed of personnel who came from the Royal Yugoslav Air Force moved to NOVJ, and staff from the First Air Base NOVJ. The first squadron commander was Captain Aleksandar Cenić, the commander of "A" flight was Lieutenant Stanislav Vouk, and the commander of "B" flight was Captain Francis Jež. The first
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    Royal Ulster Rifles

    Royal Ulster Rifles

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The Royal Ulster Rifles (formerly Royal Irish Rifles) was a British Army infantry regiment. It saw service in the Second Boer War, Great War, the Second World War and the Korean War, before being amalgamated into the Royal Irish Rangers in 1968. The regiment's history dates backs to the reign of King George III. In 1793 the British army expanded to meet the commitments of the war with the French First Republic. As part of that expansion it raised two new Regiments of Foot, the 83rd and the 86th. At the same time the counties Antrim, Down and Louth Regiments of Militia were raised. In 1881, under the Childers Reforms, the 83rd and 86th were amalgamated into a single regiment, named the Royal Irish Rifles. It was one of eight regiments raised and garrisoned in Ireland and was the county regiment of Antrim, Down and Louth, with its garrison depot located at Belfast. Militarily, the whole of Ireland was administered as a separate command within the United Kingdom with Command Headquarters at Parkgate (Phoenix Park) Dublin, directly under the War Office in London. Also known as the Second Boer War. In October 1905, a memorial was erected in the grounds of Belfast City Hall in memory of
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    1/2 fighter squadron Storks

    1/2 fighter squadron Storks

    The 1/2 fighter squadron "Storks" (French language: escadron de chasse 01.002 "Cigognes" or l'EC 1/2) is a French Air Force fighter squadron, currently stationed in 102 Dijon-Longvic Airbase (BA 102, (IATA: DIJ, ICAO: LFSD)). It inherits the traditions of three notable World War I units: SPA 3 of the famous ace Georges Guynemer, SPA 103 of René Fonck, and SPA 12. Following a decision taken by the French Army General Council, in June 1912, the first flights of the French air arm were formed. One of these was established at the army camp of Avord, in Cher. Its designation, B.L. 3, arose from the aircraft type with which it was equipped, the Blériot XI. Once established, the flight moved eastward, towards Alsace. The sight of this 'migration' led to comparison with the storks which are harbingers spring in Alsace. So the name 'Cigogne' came to be associated in people's minds with B.L. 3. Alsace had been part of France until 1871 but in 1912 was part of Germany. The association therefore touched French pride. It was not until 1916, under the pressure of the Great War in which aircraft numbers grew rapidly, that the association between the emblem and the unit became official. So that
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    23d Information Operations Squadron

    23d Information Operations Squadron

    The United States Air Force's 23d Information Operations Squadron (23 IOS) is an information operations unit located at Lackland AFB, Texas. The mission of the 23 IOS is to deliver proven full spectrum information operations tactics to the warfighter
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    27th (Inniskilling) Regiment of Foot

    27th (Inniskilling) Regiment of Foot

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The 27th (Inniskilling) Regiment of Foot was an Irish infantry regiment of the British Army, formed in 1689 and amalgamated with the 108th (Madras Infantry) Regiment of Foot into The Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers during the Childers Reforms in 1881. The regiment was raised as local militia at Enniskillen by Colonel Zachariah Tiffin in June 1689, to fight against James II in the Williamite war in Ireland. They served successfully, most notably at the Battle of Newtownbutler, and their performance gained them a place on the English establishment in 1690 as a regular infantry regiment, as such they then fought at the Battle of the Boyne. After peace returned to Ireland, the regiment was stationed around the world over the next half a century; from the Low Countries, West Indies, Minorca and to Spain. It formed part of the Government army sent to defeat the Jacobite Rising of 1745, participating in the Battle of Falkirk and in the Battle of Culloden. At this period they were commonly known as Blakeney's Regiment after the colonel-in-chief. In 1751, they were formally titled the 27th (Enniskillen) Regiment of Foot. During the Seven Years' War (1756–63) the Regiment fought against the
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    332d Fighter Group

    332d Fighter Group

    The 332d Expeditionary Operations Group (332 EOG) is a Provisional Air Expeditionary Group of Air Combat Command, currently inactive. It was inactivated on 8 May 2012. The 322d EOG holds the lineage, history and honors of the World War II 332d Fighter Group, the Tuskegee Airmen. The title Tuskegee Airmen refers to all who trained in the groundbreaking Army Air Forces African-American pilot training program at Moton Field and Tuskegee Army Airfield, Alabama between 1941 and 1945. It includes pilots, navigators, bombardiers, maintenance and support staff, instructors and all the personnel who kept the planes in the air. Constituted as the 332d Fighter Group on 4 July 1942, then activated on 13 October. Consisted of the 100th, 301st and 302d Fighter Squadrons at Tuskeegee Army Airfield, Alabama. Trained with P-39 Aircobra and P-40 Warhawk aircraft for an extended period of time as the Army Air Forces was reluctant to deploy African-American fighter pilots to an overseas combat theater. The 100th Fighter Squadron pre-dates the 332d Fighter Group, being formed on 19 February 1942. The 100th carried out advanced fighter training of graduates of the Tuskegee Institute primary and basic
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    335th Fighter Squadron

    335th Fighter Squadron

    The 335th Fighter Squadron (335 FS) is a United States Air Force unit. It is assigned to the 4th Operations Group and stationed at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina. The 335th was constituted on 22 August 1942 as an incorporation of the No. 121 (Eagle) Squadron of the Royal Air Force, formed on 14 May 1941 as the second of three Eagle Squadrons of the Royal Air Force. These squadrons were composed of American volunteers, recruited by the RAF as a result of the heavy loss of pilots during the Battle of Britain in 1940; the volunteers were ineligible to join the USAAF. In this capacity, the squadron operated Supermarine Spitfires and Hawker Hurricanes. Its current emblem contains the head of an American Indian chief, which dates back to the original emblem of 121 Squadron RAF. The "Chiefs" fly the McDonnell-Douglas (now Boeing) F-15E Strike Eagle. The squadron has an authorized strength of 24 aircraft and around 65 personnel. Its aircraft are identified by the "SJ" tail code and green fin flash. Currently the squadron provides worldwide deployable aircraft and personnel capable of executing combat missions in support of worldwide Aerospace Expeditionary Force deployments
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    35th Fighter Squadron

    35th Fighter Squadron

    The 35th Fighter Squadron (35 FS) is part of the 8th Fighter Wing at Kunsan Air Base, South Korea. It operates the F-16 Fighting Falcon aircraft conducting air superiority missions. The 35th Fighter Squadron heritage dates back to 12 June 1917, when the unit activated as the 35th Aero Squadron. Originally an aircraft maintenance squadron, the unit served in France from September 1917 to February 1919. Upon the unit's return to the United States after the armistice, it demobilized during the American disarmament. Recognizing the need for a strong air arm, American defense officials reconstituted the squadron in June 1932 and redesignated it the 35th Pursuit Squadron. For the next few years, the 35th flew P-12, PB-2, A-17, and P-36 aircraft out of Langley Field, Virginia. In 1939, the unit was redesignated the 35th Pursuit Squadron (Fighter) and moved to Mitchel Field, New York, to fly the P-40 Warhawk. In March 1942, the newly named 35th Fighter Squadron entered combat in the Pacific. During World War II, its members flew a variety of aircraft, including the P-40 and the P-38 Lightning and accounted for 124 kills. During this time, the unit was based in Australia, New Guinea, Leyte
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    370th Flight Test Squadron

    370th Flight Test Squadron

    The 370th Flight Test Squadron is a United States Air Force unit assigned to the 452d Operations Group, stationed at Edwards AFB, California. The squadron is assigned to the United States Air Force Reserve 452d OG and performs flight testing. Formed as a heavy bombardment group in January 1942, trained in the Pacific Northwest under Second Air Force, with B-17 Flying Fortresses. Reassigned to Seventh Air Force in Hawaii, November 1942 and performed performing search and rescue and antisubmarine patrols until January 1943 while transitioning to long-range B-24 Liberator heavy bombers. Deployed to Central Pacific from Hawaii throughout 1943 for long-range combat bombardment operations against Japanese forces in the Central Pacific; New Guinea; Northern Solomon Islands and Eastern Mandates campaigns. Deployed to the New Hebrides in the South Pacific and operated from numerous temporary jungle airfields, engaging in long-range bombardment operations during the Bismarck Archipelago; Western Pacific; Leyte; Luzon and Southern Philippines campaigns until the end of the war in August 1945. Assigned to Clark Field, Philippines after the war ended, demobilized with personnel returning to the
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    39th Information Operations Squadron

    39th Information Operations Squadron

    The 39th Information Operations Squadron (39th IOS) is the U.S. Air Force's premier Information Operations and Cyber Formal Training Unit, part of the 318th Information Operations Group, assigned to the 688th Information Operations Wing, headquartered at Lackland AFB, Texas, under the Twenty-Fourth Air Force and Air Force Space Command. The 39th IOS is located on Hurlburt Field, Florida. The schoolhouse is a state of the art 17,000-square-foot (1,600 m) facility housing several classrooms, multiple small group mission planning rooms and a 60-person auditorium. All classrooms are equipped with cutting edge communication and computer systems, to include secure video teleconferencing and fiber optic infrastructures. This allows real-time war gaming and improved instruction at multiple security levels. Provide initial and advanced Information Operations and Cyber training for the United States Air Force. The 39th Intelligence Squadron was assigned to the 67th Intelligence Group, Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, until 1 October 1988 when it was relocated to Hurlburt Field, Florida under the direction of The Air Intelligence Agency. The squadron assumed the mission of the deactivated
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    3rd Carpathian Rifle Division

    3rd Carpathian Rifle Division

    • Unit size designation: Division
    The Polish 3rd Carpathian Rifle Division (Polish: 3 Dywizja Strzelców Karpackich, sometimes translated as 3rd Carpathian Infantry Division), also commonly known as Christmas Tree Division due to the characteristic emblem, was an Allied unit fighting during World War II on the Italian Front. It was formed in 1942 of the Polish Independent Carpathian Brigade and the forces of General Władysław Anders' 2nd Polish Corps evacuated from the USSR. The division participated in the North African and the Italian Campaigns (1941–1945) as part of the British Eighth Army. Notable actions include the victories in the Battle of Monte Cassino, Ancona and Bologna. Disbanded after the war, most soldiers chose not to return to the new, Communist Poland. After the war, the division was housed at Hodgemoor Camp in Hodgemoor Woods, Chalfont St Giles, Buckinghamshire, England. They maintained a presence there until 1962. There were, and may still be, many Polish families in the area. The division's order of battle between 1943 and 1946 was as follows:
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    457th Fighter Squadron

    457th Fighter Squadron

    The 457th Fighter Squadron is a United States Air Force Reserve Command (AFRC) unit, assigned to the 301st Operations Group. Stationed at Carswell Field, Texas, the squadron flies the F-16 Fighting Falcon. The 457th FS is part of the only Air Force Reserve unit in the state of Texas. Since 11 September 2001, 301st Fighter Wing units and individual personnel in various career fields have supported a number of missions related to Operation Enduring Freedom, Operation Noble Eagle's homeland defense, and Operation Iraqi Freedom. The 457th FS ended a two month deployment to Balad AB in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom in December 2005. The aircraft of the 457th FS carry the base tail code TX on their F-16s. The tail code carried by 457th TFS aircraft when the NAS JRB Fort Worth was known as Carswell AFB was TH. Trained in the continental United States, Oct 1944-Feb 1945. Moved to western Pacific Ocean in spring of 1945. Escorted B-29 bombers in raids against Japan, and attacked targets such as enemy airfields, May-Aug 1945. Between 1953 and 1959, and again since July 1972, trained for a variety of tactical air missions. Frequently deployed for training exercises, some of them
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    510th Fighter Squadron

    510th Fighter Squadron

    The 510th Fighter Squadron (510 FS) is part of the 31st Operations Group at Aviano Air Base, Italy. It is a combat-ready F-16CM fighter squadron prepared to deploy and fly combat sorties as tasked by NATO and US combatant commanders. The squadron employs a full range of the latest state-of-the-art precision ordnance. The 510 FS performs air and space control and force application roles including counterair, strategic attack, interdiction, combat search and rescue (CSAR), close air support (CAS), and forward air control-airborne (FAC-A) missions. The 510th Fighter Squadron was originally formed as the 625th Bombardment Squadron (Dive), part of the 405th Bombardment Group, at Drew Field, Florida, in 1943, flying the Douglas A-24 Banshee. On 15 August 1943, the 625th was renamed the 510th Fighter-Bomber Squadron. In late 1943, the squadron moved to Walterboro Army Air Field, South Carolina, and began flying the Bell P-39 Airacobra, and then the Republic P-47 Thunderbolt. In March 1944, the 510th moved to RAF Christchurch, England, and began combat operations. During World War II, the 510th moved to mainland Europe with the advance of Allied troops, flying from Picauville and
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    566th Information Operations Squadron

    566th Information Operations Squadron

    The 566th Information Operations Squadron is a support unit to the Aerospace Data Facility in conjunction with the 460th Space Wing, Buckley Air Force Base, Aurora, Colorado. The 566th is a member of the 544th Information Operations Group headquartered at Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado. To provide the Aerospace Data Facility-Colorado with leading-edge information superiority and technical support in the performance of joint national system missions. The 566th Information Operations Squadron (IOS) began during World War II, when the 16th Photographic Technical Unit was activated on November 5, 1944, at Charleroi, Belgium. The 16th was a squadron to the 67th Tactical Reconnaissance Group and the 16th was assigned to several bases in Europe: Vogelsang, Limburg, and Eschwege, Germany, and France. After World War II, the unit moved to MacDill Field, Florida, where it was decommissioned on December 21, 1945. The 66th Reconnaissance Technical Squadron was Constituded on 15 November 1952 and Activated on 1 January 1953 at Shaw AFB. SC relocated to Shaw AFB, SC: 01 Jan–25 June 1953; Sembach AB, West Germany on 7 July 1953 and moved to Kaiserslautern, West Germany on 13 August 1953 till
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    685th Aircraft Control and Warning Squadron

    685th Aircraft Control and Warning Squadron

    The 685th Aircraft Control and Warning Squadron is an inactive United States Air Force unit. It was last assigned to the Oklahoma City Air Defense Sector, Aerospace Defense Command, stationed at Las Cruces Air Force Station, New Mexico. It was inactivated on 1 August 1963. The unit was a General Surveillance Radar squadron providing for the air defense of the United States. Assignments Stations  This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Air Force Historical Research Agency.
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    78th Regiment of Foot

    78th Regiment of Foot

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Armed force: British Army
    The 78th Regiment of Foot (after 1796 sub-titled the Ross-shire Buffs) was a Highland Infantry Regiment of the Line raised in late 18th Century Scotland for service against the French during the French Revolutionary Wars. The Regiment later led to involvement in worldwide military activities in countries such as India, Egypt and South Africa. The regiment is most well known for its involvement in the Siege of Lucknow. Their deeds were commemorated by poets such as John Greenleaf Whittier and Alfred, Lord Tennyson. Today there is a re-enactment Regiment and the 78th Highlanders (Halifax Citadel) Pipe Band stationed at Halifax Citadel National Historic Site of Canada, Halifax, Nova Scotia, where the original 78 Regiment were stationed for three years (1869-1871). On 7 March 1793, Francis Humberstone MacKenzie raised the "78th (Highland) Regiment of Foot". Francis Humberston Mackenzie was chief of the clan Mackenzie and a descendent of the earls of Seaforth. (Its associations were all with the clan Mackenzie and it bore no relationship to the earlier 78th Fraser Highlanders that fought at Louisbourg and Quebec under Wolfe in the French and Indian War.) During the French Revolutionary
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    8th Special Operations Squadron

    8th Special Operations Squadron

    The 8th Special Operations Squadron (8 SOS) is part of the 1st Special Operations Wing at Hurlburt Field, Florida. It operates CV-22 Osprey in support of special operations. The primary mission of the 8 SOS is insertion, extraction, and re-supply of unconventional warfare forces and equipment into hostile or enemy-controlled territory using airland or airdrop procedures. The 8th saw combat as observation unit with IV and VI Army Corps from, c. 25 August 1918 – 11 November 1918. It flew Mexican border patrol from, August 1919-June 1921. The squadron went on to train in attack aviation and participated in field exercises and army maneuvers from, 1921-1941. It flew Antisubmarine patrols from, December 1941-January 1942 before going into combat in Southwest and Western Pacific from, 1 April 1942 – 29 July 1942 and 24 May 1943-12 August 1945. It again flew combat missions in Korea, 27 June 1950-27 July 1953 and in Southeast Asia, April 1964-September 1972. The 8th became the U.S.-based operator of the MC-130 Combat Talon in 1974, and provided five of the eight Talon crews participating in Operation Eagle Claw. Its members crewed the lead Talon and all three of the EC-130E refuelers on
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    9th Space Operations Squadron

    9th Space Operations Squadron

    The United States Air Force's 9th Space Operations Squadron (9 SOPS) is a space operations unit located at Vandenberg AFB, California. 9 SOPS operates the Joint Space Operations Center, or JSpOC, performing combat operations, plans, strategy and intelligence assessments enabling the commander, Joint Functional Component Command for Space to command and control space forces by providing worldwide space effects to combatant commanders. 9th SOPS is an associate unit to the 614th Air and Space Operations Center, and augment the active duty in day-to-day operations of the 14th Air Force. The AOC is a 24-hour operation center designed to provide commanders with up-to-date information on the status of Air Force satellites. The satellites provide weather, intelligence, communication and navigational data necessary for strategic planning of U.S. military operations. The AOC provides the means for tracking and monitoring the status of 141 space units worldwide, said Lt. Col. Patrick Phelps, 9th SOPS commander. These units provide the data for surveillance, space warning, satellite command and control, and space launch capabilities. "We don't operate any particular systems; it's our job to
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    Gestapo

    Gestapo

    • Armed force: German Secret Police
    The Gestapo (German pronunciation: [ɡeˈstaːpo, ɡəˈʃtaːpo] ( listen); abbreviation of Geheime Staatspolizei, "Secret State Police") was the official secret police of Nazi Germany and German-occupied Europe. Beginning on 20 April 1934, it was under the administration of SS national leader, Heinrich Himmler who in 1936 was appointed Chief of German Police (Chef der Deutschen Polizei) by Hitler. In 1936, Himmler made it a suboffice of the Sicherheitspolizei (SiPo) ("Security Police"). Then from 27 September 1939 forward, it was administered by the Reichssicherheitshauptamt (RSHA) ("Reich Main Security Office") and was considered a sister organization of the Sicherheitsdienst (SD) ("Security Service"). As part of the deal in which Adolf Hitler became Chancellor of Germany, Hermann Göring—future commander of the Luftwaffe and an influential Nazi Party official—was named Interior Minister of Prussia. This gave him command of the largest police force in Germany. Soon afterward, Göring detached the political and intelligence sections from the police and filled their ranks with Nazis. On 26 April 1933, Göring merged the two units as the Gestapo. He originally wanted to name it the Secret
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    No. 2 Squadron RAF Regiment

    No. 2 Squadron RAF Regiment

    No. 2 Squadron RAF Regiment is based at RAF Honington in Suffolk. It is a parachute-trained Field Squadron in the RAF Regiment which is capable of inserting by parachute and securing forward airfields, although this capability has never been put to use in combat operations. The unit was formed as Number 2 Armoured Car Company RAF at Hellopolis, Egypt on 7 April 1922 and placed under the command of Squadron Leader M Copenan. The Company was equipped with Rolls Royce Armoured Cars and Morris Tenders, which it retained until 1944. In 1924 the unit were engaged in active operations against the Wahabl tribe who were causing unrest in Transjordan, then a British Protectorate. The actions took the form of a series of ground and air attacks against the fanatical tribesmen near the city of Amman. During the course of the battle II ACC captured one of Wahabi Tribe's coveted Banners. The Company's second battle honour was won during the Palestine troubles in 1936-1939, assisting the Palestine Police Force in search operations, convoy escorts, recovering downed aircrew, strike breaking and road patrols. When employed for convoy escort and road patrol, members of the Company found they were
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