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  • Nov 27th 2012
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Best Military Person of All Time

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    1
    Hamilton S. Hawkins

    Hamilton S. Hawkins

    Hamilton Smith Hawkins (1834–1910) was a United States Army Major General during the Spanish-American War. Hawkins attended the United States Military Academy between 1852 and 1855, but did not graduate with the class of 1856 due to deficient academics. Despite being a South Carolinian, Hawkins served in the Union Army during the American Civil War. He fought at several battles, including the Battle of Gettysburg. He remained in the army after the Civil War and participated in campaigns against the Plains Indians. He became the only commandant of West Point to have attended the academy and failed to graduate. He served in this position between 1888 and 1892. Hawkins was Commandant of the United States Army Command and General Staff College, then known as the United States Infantry and Cavalry School, at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas between October 1894 and April 1898. On May 4, 1898, Hawkins was appointed brigadier general in the volunteer army and was in command of the 1st Brigade, 1st Division, VII Corps stationed in Tampa, Florida when the Spanish-American War began. He was transferred to command the 1st Brigade, 1st Division, V Corps and sailed to Cuba. His brigade landed at
    7.63
    8 votes
    2
    Kevin Byrnes

    Kevin Byrnes

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    Kevin P. Byrnes (born March 12, 1950) is a retired United States Army General, who was officially relieved of command in August 2005, after 36 years of military service, for disobeying a lawful order from Army Chief of Staff Peter Schoomaker. General Byrnes assumed the duties of Commander, Army Training and Doctrine Command, on November 7, 2002, after serving as the Director, Army Staff. General Byrnes, a native of New York City, New York, was commissioned through the Officer Candidate School program in 1969. He was awarded a Bachelor of Arts in Economics from Park College in 1975, and a Master of Arts in Management from Webster University in 1985. Prior to assuming his current duties, he served as Director, Army Staff, the Deputy Chief of Staff for Programs and as the Assistant Vice Chief of Staff. General Byrnes’ other key assignments include: Commanding General, 1st Cavalry Division, Fort Hood, Texas; while deployed in that capacity, he simultaneously served as the Commanding General of the Multinational Division (North) in Tuzla, Bosnia, from October 1998 to August 1999; Director, Force Programs, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations and Plans, Washington, D.C.;
    7.86
    7 votes
    3
    Dale Meyerrose

    Dale Meyerrose

    Major General (Retired) Dale W. Meyerrose is the Harris Corporation lead for the National Cyber Initiative, as of January 2009. Before January he was the Associate Director of National Intelligence/Chief Information Officer (CIO) and Information Sharing Executive for the Director of National Intelligence (DNI). Previously he was the Director of Command Control Systems, Headquarters North American Aerospace Defense Command, and Director of Architectures and Integration, Headquarters U.S. Northern Command, Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado. He also served as the Chief Information Officer for both commands. General Meyerrose ensured the Commander of NORAD had the command and control systems to safeguard the air sovereignty of North America. For U.S. Northern Command, he created architectures and integrated solutions to support the command's mission to deter, prevent and defeat threats to the United States. He facilitated communications and information sharing for military assistance to civil authorities for incident response responsibilities assigned to Northern Command. Born in Indianapolis, Indiana, General Meyerrose entered the Air Force in 1975 after graduating from the United
    8.67
    6 votes
    4
    James D. Thurman

    James D. Thurman

    James David Thurman (born September 19, 1953) is a United States Army general who serves as the current Commander, United Nations Command which he concurrently serves as Commander, R.O.K.-U.S. Combined Forces Command and as Commander, U.S. Forces Korea. He previously served as the 18th Commanding General, U.S. Army Forces Command from June 3, 2010 to July 8, 2011. Prior to that, he served as Deputy Chief of Staff, G-3/5/7. He was the former commanding general of United States V Corps in Heidelberg, Germany from January 19, 2007 to August 8, 2007. He assumed his current assignment on July 14, 2011. Thurman is a native of Marietta, Oklahoma, United States. He received a Bachelor of Arts in History from East Central University and a Master of Arts in Management from Webster University. Thurman received a Regular Army Commission from the United States Army as a Second Lieutenant in 1975. Thurman began his career in the 4th Infantry Division serving as Platoon Leader, Executive Officer, and Motor Officer for 6th Battalion, 32d Armor. He has commanded at all levels from Company to Division. After attending the Officer Rotary Wing Aviator Course, he commanded the Aero-Scout Platoon and
    7.29
    7 votes
    5
    Laurence Cardee Craigie

    Laurence Cardee Craigie

    • Participated in conflicts: World War II
    Laurence Cardee Craigie (January 26, 1902 – February 27, 1994), middle name sometimes Carby or Carbee, was a United States aviator and United States Air Force general. He became the first U.S. military jet pilot in 1942 when he piloted the Bell XP-59. With Orval R. Cook he is also known as one half of the Cook-Craigie plan, a method of producing aircraft. Born in Concord, New Hampshire on January 26, 1902, he grew up in Concord, Somerville, Massachusetts, Keene, New Hampshire and graduated from Stoneham, Massachusetts High School in 1919 and the U.S. Military Academy in June 1923, being commissioned a second lieutenant in the Air Service. He took flying training at Brooks Field and Kelly Field, Texas, and was a flying instructor at both places. He was promoted to first lieutenant in December 1927. In February 1929 he went to France Field, Panama Canal Zone, where he was an Engineering Officer with the 7th Observation Squadron. He returned to Brooks in May 1931 and went to Randolph Field, Texas the following October for varied assignments. In 1935 Craigie graduated as a captain from the Air Corps Engineering School at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base Ohio, Training and Transport
    7.83
    6 votes
    6
    Charles L. Gilliland

    Charles L. Gilliland

    Charles Leon Gilliland (May 24, 1933 – April 25, 1951) was a United States Army soldier who posthumously received the United States military's highest award, the Medal of Honor, for his actions in the Korean War. Born in the community of Colfax near Mountain Home, Arkansas, Gilliland was the second of nine children of Leon Carl and Evangeline Margarite Martin Gilliland. His father was a farmer and construction worker and his mother worked as a nurse's aide. His family moved to nearby Marion County when he was a teenager. Throughout his childhood, Gilliland showed a strong interest in the military and law enforcement, enjoyed hunting and fishing, and in his teenage years was a fitness enthusiast. He attempted to enlist in the Marine Corps at sixteen, but was turned away and advised to continue his education. After much convincing, his parents agreed to let him enlist in the U.S. Army on his 17th birthday, May 24, 1950. After joining the Army in Yellville, he attended basic training at Fort Riley, Kansas. The Korean War began one month after his enlistment, and by the end of the year he had been sent to east Asia. During his deployment in Korea, he was wounded and, in one instance,
    7.50
    6 votes
    7
    Frederick J. Finch

    Frederick J. Finch

    Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force Frederick J. "Jim" Finch (born July 29, 1956) was the thirteenth Chief Master Sergeant appointed to the highest noncommissioned officer position in the United States Air Force. Chief Finch grew up in East Hampton, New York. He entered the Air Force in July 1974. His background was in missile maintenance and professional military education and he served in a number of operational, maintenance, and support units at every level of command, from squadron through Major Command (MAJCOM). His assignments included bases in Colorado, Florida, Alabama, Texas, Virginia, and Washington, D.C.. He served overseas in the United Kingdom and Alaska. Chief Finch served as the Command Chief Master Sergeant for 11th Air Force and Air Combat Command (ACC). While at ACC, the command was involved in operations such as Operation Provide Promise, Operation Northern Watch, Operation Southern Watch, Operation Deliberate Force, Operation Joint Endeavor, Operation Desert Fox, and Operation Allied Force.  This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Government document "http://www.af.mil/information/bios/bio.asp?bioID=5412".
    8.60
    5 votes
    8
    Gustav Hasford

    Gustav Hasford

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    Gustav Hasford (November 28, 1947 - January 29, 1993) was an American journalist, novelist, and poet. His semi-autobiographical novel The Short-Timers was the basis of the film Full Metal Jacket. He was also a United States Marine Corps veteran, who served during the Vietnam War. Born in Russellville, Alabama, Hasford joined the United States Marine Corps in 1967 and served as a combat correspondent during the Vietnam War. As a military journalist, he wrote stories for Sea Tiger, Pacific Stars and Stripes, and Leatherneck Magazine. Hasford associated with various science fiction writers of the 1970s (including Arthur Byron Cover and David J. Skal), had works published in magazines and anthologies such as Space and Time and Damon Knight's Orbit series, and briefly shared an apartment with author Harlan Ellison. He also published the poem, "Bedtime Story", in a 1972 edition of Winning Hearts and Minds published by 1st Casualty Press, the first anthology of writing about the war by the veterans themselves. (The poem was reprinted in Carrying the Darkness in 1985.) In 1978, Hasford attended the Milford Writer's Workshop and met veteran science fiction author Frederik Pohl, who was then
    8.60
    5 votes
    9
    Greg Kelly

    Greg Kelly

    Gregory Raymond "Greg" Kelly (born December 17, 1968) is an American broadcast journalist. He was the co-host of Good Day New York; before being promoted to the 6 pm and 10 pm news. Previously, he was the co-host of Fox and Friends and a White House correspondent for Fox News. Kelly is also a Lieutenant Colonel in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserves. In 2003, he provided extensive coverage of Operation Iraqi Freedom as an embedded journalist with the United States Army's 3rd Infantry Division, 2nd Brigade. He received a minor shrapnel wound to the face when a mortar round exploded near him while crossing the Euphrates River with the 3rd Infantry Division on March 31, 2003. Kelly was the first television journalist to broadcast live pictures of U.S. military forces reaching Baghdad on April 5, 2003. Information Minister Muhammad Said al-Sahhaf, a.k.a. Baghdad Bob, was shown at one of his press conferences saying that Coalition forces were not in Baghdad, Fox News was showing, in split screen, reporter Kelly riding a tank through the city. Two days later, Kelly captured another exclusive during the storming of Saddam Hussein's presidential palace. His reporting assignments have brought
    8.40
    5 votes
    10
    Edward Hill

    Edward Hill

    Edward Hill (April 13, 1835 – October 23, 1900) was an officer in the United States Army during the American Civil War. He received the Medal of Honor. Hill was born on April 13, 1835 in Liberty, New York. On June 1, 1864, as the Captain of Company K, 16th Michigan Infantry during the Battle of Cold Harbor, Hill "led the brigade skirmish line in a desperate charge on the enemy's masked batteries to the muzzles of the guns, where he was severely wounded." Hill survived and rose to the rank of lieutenant colonel. He was awarded the Medal of Honor on December 4, 1893. Hill died on October 23, 1900, and was buried in Fredericksburg National Cemetery, in Fredericksburg, Virginia. His grave can be located in Section OS, Grave 2. Rank and organization: Captain, Company K, 1 6th Michigan Infantry. Place and date: At Cold Harbor, Va., June 1, 1864. Entered service at: Detroit, Mich. Birth: Liberty, N.Y. Date of issue: December 4, 1893. Citation: Led the brigade skirmish line in a desperate charge on the enemy's masked batteries to the muzzles of the guns, where he was severely wounded.
    6.29
    7 votes
    11
    Fred Zabitosky

    Fred Zabitosky

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    Fred William Zabitosky (October 27, 1942 – January 18, 1996) was a United States Army soldier and a recipient of the United States military's highest decoration — the Medal of Honor — for his actions in the Vietnam War. Zabitosky joined the Army from his birth city of Trenton, New Jersey in 1959, and by February 19, 1968 was serving as a Staff Sergeant with the 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne). On that day, while on reconnaissance patrol in Laos, his small team came under intense enemy fire. Zabitosky directed the defense until rescue helicopters arrived, and when the helicopter that was to extract him from the battlefield crashed, he ignored his own injuries to save the downed craft's pilot. Zabitosky was later promoted to Sergeant First Class and, in 1969, was presented with the Medal of Honor by President Richard Nixon. He retired from the Army after 30 years of service with the rank of Master Sergeant. Zabitosky, aged 53 at his death, was buried in Lumbee Memorial Park, Lumberton, North Carolina. A street, the former Community Access Road, on nearby Fort Bragg was named in his honor. Sergeant First Class Zabitosky's official Medal of Honor citation reads: For conspicuous
    8.20
    5 votes
    12
    Montgomery Meigs

    Montgomery Meigs

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    Montgomery Cunningham Meigs (b. January 11, 1945 in Annapolis, Maryland) is a retired United States Army General. He is the great-great-great grandnephew of Montgomery C. Meigs He graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York in 1967. He served as a cavalry troop commander in the Vietnam War. After study at the University of Wisconsin–Madison and a year at the Army's Command and General Staff College, he taught in the History Department at West Point and spent the 1981–82 academic year at Massachusetts Institute of Technology as an International Affairs Fellow of the Council on Foreign Relations. He received his PhD in history from Wisconsin in 1982 before reporting to 2nd Armored Cavalry Regiment as its executive officer. In 1984, General Meigs commanded the 1st Squadron, 1st Armored Cavalry Regiment. Following a stint at the National War College as an Army Fellow, he worked as a strategic planner on the Joint Staff in Washington, D.C. for three years. Returning to Germany, he assumed command of the 2nd Brigade, 1st Armored Division on September 26, 1990 and commanded it through Desert Storm. He subsequently commanded the 7th Army Training Command in
    8.20
    5 votes
    13
    Dominic Salvatore Gentile

    Dominic Salvatore Gentile

    • Participated in conflicts: World War II
    Major Dominic Salvatore "Don" Gentile (December 6, 1920 - January 28, 1951) was a World War II USAAF pilot who surpassed Eddie Rickenbacker's World War I record of 26 downed aircraft. Gentile was born in Piqua, Ohio. After a fascination with flying as a child, his father provided him with his own plane, an Aerosport Biplane. He managed to log over 300 hours flying time by July 1941, when he attempted to join the Army Air Force. The U.S. military required two years of college for its pilots, which Gentile did not have, so he enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force and was posted to the UK in 1941. Gentile flew the Supermarine Spitfire Mark V with No. 133 Squadron, one of the famed "Eagle Squadron" during 1942. His first kills (a Ju 88 and Fw 190) were on August 1, 1942, during Operation Jubilee. In September 1942, the Eagle squadrons transferred to the USAAF, becoming the 4th Fighter Group. Gentile became a flight commander in September 1943, now flying the P-47 Thunderbolt. Having been Spitfire pilots, Gentile and the other pilots of the 4th were displeased when they transitioned to the heavy P-47. By late 1943, Group Commander Col. Don Blakeslee pushed for re-equipment with the
    9.25
    4 votes
    14
    Edward B. Cole

    Edward B. Cole

    Edward Ball Cole (September 23, 1879 - June 18, 1918) was an officer in the United States Marine Corps during World War I. He was a leading expert on machine guns; he was killed in action during the Battle of Belleau Wood. Cole was born in on September 23, 1879 in Boston, Massachusetts. He graduated from Harvard University in 1902, where he was a member of the Owl Club. Cole was one of the United States' leading experts on machine guns and had published several articles and a book on the subject — Field Book for Machine Gunners (1917). He received a direct commission in the Marine Corps in World War I. Cole received the Navy Cross and the Distinguished Service Cross for heroism during the Battle of Belleau Wood in which he was mortally wounded on June 10, 1918. On that day, while he was leading an attack on enemy machine guns a German hand grenade wounded him in the foot. When a second grenade landed in front of him, he grabbed it to throw it back and protect his men — it exploded in his hand. He crawled back to his men under rifle fire. He died from his wounds on June 18, 1918, in a field hospital near Coulommiers, France, with his brother, U.S. Army Brigadier General Charles H.
    8.00
    5 votes
    15
    Julius W. Gates

    Julius W. Gates

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    Julius William Gates was the eighth Sergeant Major of the Army. In July 1987, he was sworn in and he served until his term ended four years later in June 1991. He was born in North Carolina on June 14, 1941. Sergeant Major of the Army Gates entered the United States Army on August 12, 1958 and attended initial training at Fort Jackson, South Carolina. He served three tours in Germany, two combat tours in Vietnam, and a tour in the Republic of Korea. His stateside assignments include duty with the 101st Airborne Division at Fort Campbell, Kentucky, the United States Army Infantry School at Fort Benning, Georgia, the 1st Ranger Battalion at Fort Stewart, Georgia, the Virginia Military Institute of Lexington, Virginia and Fort Bliss, Texas. Sergeant Major Gates has served in numerous non commissioned officer leadership positions, including as first Commandant of the 24th Infantry Division NCO Academy at Fort Stewart, GA. Before being appointed as the SMA he served as Command Sergeant Major of the 2d Armored Division (Forward), the Command Sergeant Major of the 3d Infantry Division (Mechanized), Command Sergeant Major of the U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy, and the Command Sergeant
    9.00
    4 votes
    16
    Daniel D. Schoonover

    Daniel D. Schoonover

    Daniel Dwain Schoonover (October 8, 1933 – July 10, 1953) was an enlisted soldier of the United States Army during the Korean War and a posthumous recipient of the Medal of Honor at the Second Battle of Pork Chop Hill. He was killed in action July 10, 1953 and is buried in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, Honolulu, Hawaii. Although his body is buried in Hawaii there is a cenotaph at Morris Hill Cemetery in Boise, Idaho. Rank and organization: Corporal, U.S. Army, Company A, 13th Engineer Combat Battalion, 7th Infantry Division Place and date: Near Sokkogae, Korea, 8 to July 10, 1953 Entered service at: Boise, Idaho. Born: October 8, 1933, Boise, Idaho G.O. No.: 5, January 14, 1955 Citation:
    6.67
    6 votes
    17
    Gary E. Luck

    Gary E. Luck

    Gary Edward Luck (born August 5, 1937) is a retired four-star General in the U.S. Army, and currently a senior advisor to the U.S. Joint Forces Command. Receiving a bachelor's degree in engineering from Kansas State University in 1959, GEN Luck also holds a master's degree from Florida State University and a doctorate in business administration (Operations Research and Systems Analysis, a/k/a ORSA) from George Washington University. In addition, GEN Luck has attended numerous military schools and courses, to include the Armor Basic and Advanced Officer courses, Army Aviator training, the Armed Forces Staff College, and the United States Army War College. GEN Luck is a combat veteran of both the Vietnam War and the Gulf War and has held a variety of command and staff positions throughout his Army career, to include: Chief of Staff, 8th Infantry Division, U.S. Army, Europe; Director, Force Programs, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations and Plans, HQ Department of the Army; Assistant Division Commander, 101st Airborne Division; Commanding General, 2nd Infantry Division, Korea; Commanding General, Joint Special Operations Command (1989–1990); Commanding General, U.S. Army
    7.60
    5 votes
    18
    Leon J. LaPorte

    Leon J. LaPorte

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    Leon J. LaPorte (born May 5, 1946) is a retired United States Army General who served as Commander, United States Forces Korea until 2006. LaPorte graduated from the University of Rhode Island in 1968 and was commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the U.S. Army as an Armor Officer. From 1969 until 1970 he served with the 3rd Infantry Division, in 1971 he transferred to the 238th Aerial Weapons Company in the Republic of Vietnam. In 1977 he received his Master's Degree in Administration from the University of California, Irvine. From 1977 until 1980 he was an assistant Professor at the United States Military Academy. In October 1990 as the Chief of Staff, 1st Cavalry Division he deployed as part of Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm. From February 2003 until February 2006 he was commander of United States Forces Korea (USFK) and United Nations Forces, Korea. In February he retired from the Army after 38 years of service, handing command to U.S. Army General Burwell B. Bell III. Laporte also played a major part in an investigation of the involvement U.S. military personnel in hiring prostitutes and facilitating human trafficking in South Korea. Laporte gave an apology to the
    7.60
    5 votes
    19
    Charles Phillips

    Charles Phillips

    Charles E. Phillips (born 1959 in Little Rock, Arkansas) is the CEO of Infor, an ERP Software provider headquartered in New York City, and serves on the company's Board of Directors. Prior to joining Infor, Phillips was, until September 6, 2010, President of Oracle Corporation and a member of the company's Board of Directors. His responsibilities encompassed global field operations. Prior to joining Oracle, Phillips was a Managing Director with Morgan Stanley where he currently serves as a director. He is also a director at Viacom Corporation, the American Museum of Natural History, and Jazz at Lincoln Center. Prior to his career on Wall Street, Phillips was a Captain in the United States Marine Corps. Phillips holds a BS in Computer Science from the United States Air Force Academy, an MBA from Hampton University, and a JD from New York Law School. In February 2009, Phillips was appointed as a member to the President's Economic Recovery Advisory Board to provide President Barack Obama and his administration with advice and counsel in addressing the Late-2000s recession. Phillips is known for his philanthropic work and for the millions of dollars he has contributed to non-profits,
    7.40
    5 votes
    20
    Pamela Melroy

    Pamela Melroy

    Pamela Anne Melroy (born 17 September 1961) is a retired United States Air Force officer and a former NASA astronaut. She served as pilot on Space Shuttle missions STS-92 and STS-112 and commanded mission STS-120. Melroy left the agency in August 2009 and currently serves as Deputy Program Manager, Space Exploration Initiatives, Lockheed Martin. Melroy graduated from Bishop Kearney High School in 1979. Melroy received a bachelor's degree in physics and astronomy from Wellesley College in 1983. She then earned a master's degree in earth and planetary sciences from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1984. On May 18, 2008 Melroy received an honorary degree from Iona College in New Rochelle, NY. Melroy was commissioned through the Air Force ROTC program in 1983. After completing a master’s degree, she attended Undergraduate Pilot Training at Reese Air Force Base in Lubbock, Texas and was graduated in 1985. She flew the KC-10 for six years at Barksdale Air Force Base in Bossier City, Louisiana, as a copilot, aircraft commander and instructor pilot. Melroy is a veteran of Operation Just Cause and Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm, with over 200 combat and combat support
    7.40
    5 votes
    21
    Eugene Asa Carr

    Eugene Asa Carr

    • Participated in conflicts: American Civil War
    Eugene Asa Carr (March 20, 1830 – December 2, 1910) was a soldier in the United States Army and a general in the Union Army during the American Civil War. Carr was born in Hamburg, New York. He graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York, in 1850, 19th in a class of 44 cadets. He was appointed a brevet second lieutenant in the Regiment of Mounted Riflemen, and served in the Indian Wars until 1861, seeing his first bit of combat on October 3, 1854 against Apaches near the Sierra Diablo Mountains. By 1861 he had been promoted to captain (June 11, 1858) in the old 1st U.S. Cavalry (later designated the 4th U.S.) and command of Fort Washita in the Indian Territory. During the Civil War, Carr's first combat was at the Battle of Wilson's Creek on August 10, 1861. He was appointed colonel of the 3rd Illinois Cavalry six days later and received a brevet promotion to lieutenant colonel in the regular army. At the Battle of Pea Ridge in Arkansas, on March 7, 1862, Carr led the 4th Division of the Army of the Southwest in the fighting around Elkhorn Tavern. He was wounded in the neck, arm and ankle and was later awarded a Medal of Honor for his actions. According
    7.20
    5 votes
    22
    Hamilton H. Howze

    Hamilton H. Howze

    • Participated in conflicts: World War II
    Hamilton Hawkins Howze (December 21, 1908–December 8, 1998) was born in West Point, New York, while his father, Major General Robert Lee Howze, an 1888 West Point graduate, was serving as Commandant of the West Point. Howze attended West Point, graduating in the Class of 1930. He was commissioned into the 6th Cavalry. In WWII he served as the commanders of: 2nd Battalion, 13th Armor Regiment (1943); 13th Armor Regiment (1943–44); 1st Armored Division, Italy (1944–45). After the war Howze served as the G-3 of the 1st Armored Division in 1946. Three years later he attended the National War College, which was followed by an assignment in the office of the G-2 from 1949 to 1952. After promotion to Brigadier General in 1952 he became Assistant Commanding General, 2nd Armored Division, European Command, until 1954. Howze is recognized as the intellectual force behind the concept of air-mobility and current US Army Aviation doctrine. While serving as the first Director of Army Aviation, Department of the Army, from 1955 to 1958, he developed new tactical principles for the employment of Army Aviation, and was instrumental in helping the Aviation Center and School become fully established
    7.20
    5 votes
    23
    Isaiah Stillman

    Isaiah Stillman

    Cavalry Major Isaiah Stillman (1793–15 April 1861) led Illinois militia in the first armed confrontation of the Black Hawk War against Black Hawk’s Sauk Indian Band. The first armed confrontation would be named Battle of Old Man's Creek, but would later be named Stillman's Run. Isaiah Stillman was born and raised in the state of Massachusetts, but he left the east and traveled to Illinois to become a trader of pots, pans, and other items. For a time, he lived in Coopers Creek Landing in Fulton County, before deciding to join the Illinois militia as a captain at the age of 35 in 1827. By the early part of 1832, Isaiah had attained the rank of brigadier general elect. With this new position, he gained the responsibility of defending everything west of the Illinois River. This land was mostly an empty place, with few First Nation's tribes and settlements. In April 1832, Governor Reynolds Governor of Illinois John Reynolds ordered Stillman to raise a battalion for the Illinois militia. He was unable to recruit a full battalion, so he was made a major rather than a general. The next year after Black Hawk War, he was promoted to general. He died in Kingston, Peoria County, on April 15,
    8.25
    4 votes
    24
    Richard D. Kisling

    Richard D. Kisling

    • Participated in conflicts: World War II
    Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force Richard D. Kisling (October 11, 1923 – November 3, 1985) was the third Chief Master Sergeant appointed to the highest non-commissioned officer position in the United States Air Force. Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force Richard D. Kisling was adviser to Secretary of the Air Force Robert C. Seamans Jr. and Chief of Staff of the Air Force Gen. John D. Ryan on matters concerning welfare, effective utilization and progress of the enlisted members of the Air Force. He was the third chief master sergeant appointed to this top noncommissioned officer position. Chief Kisling was born in Mapleton, Iowa, and graduated from Castana High School, Castana, Iowa in May 1941. He entered the U.S. Army in July 1944 and served overseas in the European area with the 3rd Infantry Division and 88th Infantry Division. In April 1947, he re-enlisted in the Army Air Corps and was assigned to the Mobile Training Unit, Chanute Field, Illinois. When the Air Force became a separate military service in 1947, he transferred to the Air Force and was in the personnel field during most of his subsequent career. In May 1948, he transferred to Hamilton Air Force Base,
    8.25
    4 votes
    25
    Russell C. Davis

    Russell C. Davis

    Lieutenant General Russell C. Davis (born November 22, 1938) was Chief, National Guard Bureau in Arlington, Virginia. Davis began his military career in the U.S. Air Force in 1958 as an aviation cadet. Following pilot training, he was assigned at Lincoln Air Force Base, Nebraska. He was released from active duty in April 1965, when he joined the Iowa Air National Guard in Des Moines. He has served in numerous command and staff positions, from squadron pilot to director of operations. Davis commanded the 113th Tactical Fighter Wing prior to being appointed the Commanding General of the District of Columbia National Guard. He was appointed Vice Chief of the NGB in December 1995. He retired November 1, 2002, the last aviation cadet to do so. He was also on the board of directors of the Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America.  This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Government document "http://www.af.mil/information/bios/bio.asp?bioID=5179".
    8.25
    4 votes
    26
    Edward Soriano

    Edward Soriano

    Lieutenant General Edward Soriano (born in November 1946) was the highest-ranking Filipino American officer to have served in the United States military. He retired in March 2005. Born in Pangasinan to Ilocos Sur natives, he came to the United States in the early 1950s when his father, Major Fred Soriano, USA, was assigned to Ft. Benning, Georgia. His father was a Corporal in the 57th Infantry (PS) during World War II and, after the surrender of USAFFE to the Japanese, was subjected to the Bataan Death March; in the Korean War, the elder Soriano again became a prisoner of war ("POW"). During this time, young Edward and the rest of his family moved from Guam back to the Philippines. His father later retired as a Major. It was his father's service that inspired Edward Soriano to join the military after graduation from Salinas High School. Soriano was graduated from San Jose State University and later earned a Master's degree from the University of Missouri. He was commissioned through Army ROTC in 1970. His commands include Company A, 3d Battalion, 47th Infantry of the 3d Brigade of the U.S. 9th Infantry Division, 1973–1975; 2nd Battalion of the 41st Infantry, 2nd Armored Division at
    6.17
    6 votes
    27
    Sylvester Antolak

    Sylvester Antolak

    • Participated in conflicts: World War II
    Sylvester Antolak (September 10, 1916 St. Clairsville, Ohio – May 24, 1944 Cisterna di Littoria, Italy) was a United States Army Sergeant who posthumously received the Medal of Honor for actions on May 24, 1944. Sergeant Antolak was a Polish-American. He joined the army from his hometown in July 1941. Near Cisterna di Littoria, Italy, he charged 200 yards over flat, coverless terrain to destroy an enemy machinegun nest during the second day of the offensive which broke through the German cordon of steel around the Anzio beachhead. Fully 30 yards in advance of his squad, he ran into withering enemy machinegun, machine-pistol and rifle fire. Three times he was struck by bullets and knocked to the ground, but each time he struggled to his feet to continue his relentless advance. With one shoulder deeply gashed and his right arm shattered, he continued to rush directly into the enemy fire concentration with his submachinegun wedged under his uninjured arm until within 15 yards of the enemy strong point, where he opened fire at deadly close range, killing 2 Germans and forcing the remaining 10 to surrender. He reorganized his men and, refusing to seek the medical attention which was so
    7.00
    5 votes
    28
    George Dashiell Bayard

    George Dashiell Bayard

    • Participated in conflicts: American Civil War
    George Dashiell Bayard (December 18, 1835 – December 14, 1862) was a career soldier in the United States Army and a general in the Union Army in the American Civil War. He was wounded in the Battle of Fredericksburg and died the next day. He was born in Seneca Falls, New York on December 18, 1835 to Samuel John Bayard and Jane Ann Dashiell. His family moved as homesteaders to the Iowa Territory. He attended the United States Military Academy at West Point, graduating in 1856 as a second lieutenant in the U.S. cavalry. Bayard fought in the Indian Wars in Kansas and Colorado from 1856 to 1861. At the start of the Civil War in 1861, Bayard was promoted to colonel in the 1st Pennsylvania Cavalry, based in Tenallytown (now Tenleytown, Washington, D.C.). Late in November 1861, he was involved in a confrontation with rebel soldiers near Dranesville, Virginia, in which his horse and two of his fellow soldiers were killed. He escaped with only minor wounds and was subsequently commissioned Chief of Cavalry of the III Corps and brigadier general of volunteers on April 28, 1862. He fought under John C. Frémont at the Battle of Port Republic. In August 1862, at the Battle of Cedar Mountain, he
    9.33
    3 votes
    29
    William C. Lambert

    William C. Lambert

    William C. (Bill) Lambert (August 18, 1894 – March 19, 1982) was an American fighter pilot who flew in World War I. He was probably the second-ranking American ace of World War I. He claimed 18 air-to-air victories, eight fewer than "Ace of Aces" Eddie Rickenbacker and was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. He was born William Carpenter Lambert in Ironton, Ohio. He was the son of Mary and William G. Lambert. Lambert had his first airplane flight in a Wright biplane on 4 July 1910. In 1914, Lambert quit his job as a chemist in Buffalo, New York, to go enlist in the Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery. Finding no openings, he took a chemist's job with Canadian Explosives Limited until 1916. He joined the Royal Flying Corps in early 1917, and sailed for England after completion of his training, on 19 November 1917. He joined No. 24 Squadron RFC on 20 March 1918 flying the Royal Aircraft Factory SE.5a, and, between April and August, scored 18 victories–one observation balloon and 11 aircraft destroyed (with two victories shared), and six driven down out of control (one of which was a shared victory). He was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. Suffering from combat fatigue
    9.33
    3 votes
    30
    Ralph E. Pomeroy

    Ralph E. Pomeroy

    Ralph Eugene Pomeroy (March 26, 1930 – October 15, 1952) was a soldier in the United States Army during the Korean War. He received the Medal of Honor for his actions on October 15, 1952. Rank and organization: Private First Class, U.S. Army, Company E, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division Place and date: Near Kumhwa, Korea, October 15, 1952 Entered service at: Quinwood, West Virginia Born: March 26, 1930, Quinwood, West Virginia G.O. No.: 97, December 30, 1953 Citation: Pfc. Pomeroy, a machine gunner with Company E, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and indomitable courage above and beyond the call of duty in action against the enemy. While his comrades were consolidating on a key terrain feature, he manned a machine gun at the end of a communication trench on the forward slope to protect the platoon flank and prevent a surprise attack. When the enemy attacked through a ravine leading directly to his firing position, he immediately opened fire on the advancing troops inflicting a heavy toll in casualties and blunting the assault. At this juncture the enemy directed intense concentrations of artillery and mortar fire on his position in an attempt to neutralize
    8.00
    4 votes
    31
    Terry de la Mesa Allen, Jr.

    Terry de la Mesa Allen, Jr.

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    Terry de la Mesa Allen, Jr. (1929–1967), son of Terry de la Mesa Allen, Sr., was a fourth generation soldier. He achieved the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. He served with the 1st Infantry Division, which his father had commanded in World War II. He was killed in an ambush in South Vietnam on 17 October 1967, while leading a battalion against the Viet Cong near Lai Khe, northwest of Saigon at the Battle of Ong Thanh. An account of that battle is detailed in They Marched Into Sunlight, a book by David Maraniss. Allen was married to Jean Ponder of El Paso and had 3 children; Mary, Consuelo, and Alice. Under steady pressure from higher-ups to forcefully engage the enemy, Allen, in what has been called an "ill-advised action", took two rifle companies, "A" and "D" on an attempt to contact hostle Viet Cong forces. These two rifle companies ran into an ambush by two much larger Viet Cong battalions that lay in wait along the trail. The Viet Cong forces allowed the lead company, Bravo to walk past the second of two battalions lying along side the road as close as 10 meters away. Bravo Company continued up the trail and walked along the 1st of the two battalions which opened fire on the Bravo
    8.00
    4 votes
    32
    Barbara Fast

    Barbara Fast

    Barbara Fast was a general officer in the United States Army and was the senior military intelligence officer serving in Iraq during the period of time when the Abu Ghraib torture and prisoner abuse occurred. Fast retired from the Army as a Major General with over thirty of years of service. She currently is employed by Boeing as Vice President of Cyber Solutions. Fast graduated from Belleville Township High School East in Belleville, Illinois in 1971 and earned a Master of Science degree in Business Administration from Boston University and a Bachelor of Science degree in Education from the University of Missouri in Columbia, Missouri. She also is a graduate of the Army War College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. Fast was the most senior military intelligence officer serving in Iraq during the period of time when the Abu Ghraib torture and prisoner abuse occurred. Critics believed she should have been held partly accountable for the abuses committed at Abu Ghraib by military intelligence personnel, but she was never officially implicated, charged, or reprimanded. She was previously assigned as the commanding general of the United States Army Intelligence Center at Fort Huachuca,
    6.80
    5 votes
    33
    Brod Veillon

    Brod Veillon

    Brigadier General Joseph "Brod" Veillon (born c. 1950) is the assistant adjutant general-air for Louisiana. He has served on active duty in the United States Air Force since 1978. He joined the Louisiana Air National Guard in 1992. In 2005, Veillon coordinated the Louisiana National Guard's support of Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries search and rescue efforts in response to Hurricane Katrina. Veillon formulates policy pertaining to administration and training of over 1,500 Louisiana Air National guardsmen. He serves as principal advisor to the adjutant general on matters pertaining to the Louisiana Air National Guard. He also is the director of Louisiana’s Pelican State STARBASE. He graduated from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, then called the University of Southwestern Louisiana, in 1974, receiving a bachelor of arts degree. He is a graduate of the United States Air War College. Veillon attended undergraduate pilot training at Laughlin Air Force Base, Texas. He is a command pilot with over 2,800 hours in the F-4, F-15, and F-16. At the national level he serves as the Air National Guard Area IV representative to the National Guard Association in Washington, D.C. Veillon
    9.00
    3 votes
    34
    Charles C. Davis

    Charles C. Davis

    Charles C. Davis (August 15, 1830 – January 20, 1909) was an United States Army Medal of Honor recipient, honored for his actions in command of the 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry during the Battle of Hoover's Gap of the American Civil War. He was born in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania in August 1830. He later entered service as an officer with the 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry, United States Army at Harrisburg. He is one of two recipients of the Civil War Medal of Honor from Dauphin County, Pennsylvania. He is interned at Harrisburg Cemetery. Davis attained the rank of major in command of the 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry. He was present at the Battle of Hoover's Gap, the principal battle fought in the Tullahoma Campaign (also known as the Middle Tennessee Campaign), of the American Civil War. He received the Medal of Honor for his actions at Shelbyville, Tennessee on June 27, 1863. The citation read: Led one of the most desperate and successful charges of the war. Date of issue: June 1894. Rank and organization: Major, 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry. Place and date: At Shelbyville, Tenn., June 27, 1863. Entered service at: Harrisburg, Pa. Born: August 15, 1830, Harrisburg, Pa. Date of issue: June 14,
    9.00
    3 votes
    35
    Everton Conger

    Everton Conger

    Everton Judson Conger (April 25, 1834 – July 12, 1918) was an American Civil War officer who was instrumental in the capture of John Wilkes Booth, the assassin of President Abraham Lincoln, in a Virginia barn twelve days after Lincoln was shot. Everton Conger was born in Huron County, Ohio, in 1834. He was the son of Rev. Enoch Conger, a Presbyterian minister. In 1856, he moved to Fremont, Ohio, where he established a dental practice. Conger enlisted in the Union army during the Civil War, initially as a private in the three-months 8th Ohio Infantry. He returned to Fremont with the expiration of his term of enlistment and married Emma "Kate" Boren on October 16, 1861, with whom he had five children. He later became a captain in the 3rd West Virginia Cavalry and eventually rose to the rank of lieutenant colonel of the 1st District of Columbia Cavalry. He suffered three severe wounds during combat and was assigned to detached duty in Washington, D.C., joining General Lafayette Baker's intelligence service as a detective. Following the assassination of President Lincoln on April 14, 1865, Conger was ordered to accompany a detachment of 25 Union soldiers from the 16th New York Cavalry
    9.00
    3 votes
    36
    Francis T. Evans

    Francis T. Evans

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    Francis Thomas Evans, Sr. (3 June 1886 - 14 March 1974) was a pioneer aviator. He was one of the earliest United States Marine Corps aviators, the first person to perform a loop in seaplane, and a pioneer of stall and spin recovery techniques. Evans was born in Delaware, Ohio, on 3 June 1886. He became one of the earliest United States Marine Corps aviators, being designated Marine Aviator Number 4. By early 1917, Evans was the most experienced Curtiss N-9 floatplane pilot in the world. Although the consensus among aviators and even the N-9's manufacturer was that the N-9 could not be looped, Evans believed it was possible. On February 13, 1917, he flew an N-9 over the Gulf of Mexico off Pensacola, Florida, and began attempts to loop it. He succeeded on his fourth try, becoming the first person ever to loop a seaplane. Lacking witnesses, he flew over Naval Air Station Pensacola and repeated the feat. In 1936, he received the Distinguished Flying Cross for this achievement. More important, however, were the stall and spin recovery techniques he discovered that day. During his first three loop attempts, the N-9 stalled before he reached the apex of the loop and fell into a spin. He
    9.00
    3 votes
    37
    Ola L. Mize

    Ola L. Mize

    • Participated in conflicts: Korean War
    Ola Lee Mize (born August 28, 1931) is a retired United States Army officer and a recipient of the Medal of Honor for his actions in the Korean War. Mize was born in Marshall County, Alabama, the son of a sharecropper. He left school after 9th grade to help support his family. After several years of working for low pay, he attempted to enlist in the Army but was rejected for being too light, at 120 pounds (54 kg). He tried repeatedly to enlist and was eventually accepted, joining the Army from Gadsden, Alabama. Assigned to the 82nd Airborne Division, Mize planned to finish his term of service and return to school. When the Korean War began, he changed his plans and reenlisted in hopes of seeing combat. He volunteered for a front-line unit and ended up as a sergeant in Company K of the 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division. On June 10, 1953, his unit was manning Outpost Harry near Surang-ni, Korea, when the post came under heavy enemy attack. Mize organized defensive positions, rescued wounded soldiers, and engaged the enemy until reinforcements arrived about noon the next day. He was subsequently promoted to master sergeant and, on September 24, 1954, awarded the Medal of
    9.00
    3 votes
    38
    Dan Lauria

    Dan Lauria

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    Daniel Joseph "Dan" Lauria (born April 12, 1947) is an American television and film actor. Lauria, an Italian-American, was born in Brooklyn, New York, the son of Carmela (née Luongo) and Joseph J. Lauria. He also lived in Lindenhurst, New York. He graduated from Lindenhurst High School in 1965 as a varsity football player, and he briefly taught physical education at Lindenhurst High School. A Vietnam War veteran, Lauria served as an officer in the US Marine Corps in the early 1970s, at the same point in his life that Jack Arnold, his character in The Wonder Years did during the Korean War. He got his start in acting while attending Southern Connecticut State University in New Haven, Connecticut, on a football scholarship. Lauria is best known for his portrayal of Jack Arnold, the money-conscious father on the TV series The Wonder Years, that ran from 1988 to 1993. He also played James Webb in the 1998 TV miniseries From the Earth to the Moon and Commanding Officer, USA in 1996's Independence Day. More recently he has appeared in a War Veterans public service announcement and as Police Commissioner Eustace Dolan in The Spirit. He appeared as Coach Hamstrung in The Three Stooges
    7.75
    4 votes
    39
    Hugh A. Drum

    Hugh A. Drum

    • Participated in conflicts: World War I
    Hugh Aloysius Drum September 19, 1879 – October 3, 1951 was a U.S. general. Born in Fort Brady, Chippewa County, Michigan, he graduated from Boston College in 1898. Drum, an 1894 graduate of Xavier High School, first entered Boston College intending to join the Jesuit priesthood. He was admitted to the Xavier High School Hall of Fame in 1931. Joining the United States Army with the outbreak of the Spanish-American War, he was made a second lieutenant in the 12th Infantry Regiment. Regarded by some as one of the most adroit players of intra-service politics, Drum climbed quickly up the ranks in the Army; he became assistant Chief of Staff to General John J. Pershing in France during World War I. In 1918, he was promoted to colonel, and became Chief of Staff of the First United States Army, AEF. After the war, Drum served as the director of training for the School of the Line at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, where he taught the doctrine of open warfare that he and General Pershing had practiced in France. From there he went to the War Department in Washington, D.C. where he publicly clashed with Colonel Billy Mitchell about the disposition of the U.S. Army Air Corps. General Drum
    7.75
    4 votes
    40
    Richard G. Wilson

    Richard G. Wilson

    Richard Gene Wilson (August 19, 1931 – October 21, 1950) was a United States Army soldier and a posthumous recipient of the U.S. military's highest decoration, the Medal of Honor, for his actions in the Korean War. A combat medic, Wilson was awarded the medal for attempting to rescue a wounded soldier at the Battle of Yongju. Wilson was born in Marion, Illinois, on August 19, 1931, to Bert and Alice Wilson. He had three brothers, Norman, Norris Dean, and Ronald, and three sisters, Rosemary, Shirley, and Jo Anne. The family moved to Cape Girardeau, Missouri, in 1939 where he attended May Greene School followed by Central High School. He was an avid sportsman and played right guard on Central's football team. After his junior year, Wilson left high school to join the Army; he enlisted on his seventeenth birthday, August 19, 1948. Just before leaving for Korea, on August 29, 1950, Wilson married Yvonna Lea Fowler, a Central High School classmate. After completing basic training at Fort Knox, Kentucky, Wilson reported to Fort Sam Houston, Texas, where he was trained as a combat medic. He next attended Airborne School at Fort Benning, Georgia, graduating in May 1949. He was assigned to
    5.83
    6 votes
    41
    Rodney J. Evans

    Rodney J. Evans

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    Rodney John Evans (July 17, 1948 – July 18, 1969) was a Sergeant in the United States Army's 1st battalion of the 12th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division. Evans was killed in action during the Vietnam War in Tay Ninh province. He died protecting other members of his unit from a concealed land mine using his own body, for which he received the Medal of Honor. Rodney Evans was the adopted son of the Evans family of Florala, Alabama. His parents owned a dry cleaning business. After joining the US Army, he married his High School sweetheart, Barbara Geohagan. Evans was then sent to Vietnam and successfully completed a full tour of duty. Upon his return to the United States, he was stationed at Fort Rucker, Alabama, not far from where he grew up. Due to financial constraints his wife lived with her parents and would drive up to Fort Rucker on weekends to pick him up and take him home. On Thursday, September 5, 1968, Barbara was killed in a car accident after going to Ft Rucker to take care of some business. She lost control of her car. Evans became very depressed, re-enlisted and volunteered for another tour in Vietnam. It took over a year for his papers to be processed and for
    6.60
    5 votes
    42
    Boris Pash

    Boris Pash

    Boris Theodore Pash (20 June 1900–11 May 1995) was a United States Army officer. He was born in San Francisco, California, on June 20, 1900. His father was Rev. Theodore Pashkovsky (would become Most Reverend Metropolitan Theophilus from 1934–1950), a Russian Orthodox priest who had been sent to California by the Church in 1894. Because his father had been recalled to Russia, the entire family returned to Russia in 1912. Boris attended Seminary school and graduated in 1917. During the Russian Revolution, he served in the White movement navy. In 1920, he married Lydia Ivanov, and chose to return to the United States when the Bolshevik consolidation of power became apparent. He was able to secure employment with the YMCA in Berlin [Germany] where his son (Edgar Constantine Boris Pashkovsky; aka Edgar C.B. Pash) was born on June 14, 1921. Upon returning to the United States with his family, he attended Springfield College, in Springfield, Massachusetts, where he graduated with a B.A. in physical education. It was during this time that he changed the family name from Pashkovsky to Pash. Before World War II, Pash taught at Hollywood High School in Los Angeles. He continued his
    7.50
    4 votes
    43
    Carl H. Dodd

    Carl H. Dodd

    • Participated in conflicts: Korean War
    Carl Henry Dodd (April 21, 1925 – October 13, 1996) was a United States Army soldier and a recipient of the U.S. military's highest decoration, the Medal of Honor, for his actions in the Korean War. He was awarded the medal for conspicuous leadership during the taking of a strongly defended hill as part of Operation Thunderbolt. Dodd was born to Edward and Ruby Eagle Dodd on April 21, 1925, in the community of Cotes near Evarts, Kentucky. He enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1943 and developed a foot problem while helping train other soldiers. Discharged in March 1946 as a sergeant, Dodd re-enlisted only months later in September. Dodd married Libbie Rose and had three children, sons Carl Jr. and David and daughter Lorana. Upon the outbreak of the Korean War in 1950, Dodd was sent to Korea with Company E of the 5th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. During the Battle of Masan on August 7, 1950, Dodd (then a master sergeant) earned the U.S. military's third-highest decoration, the Silver Star. When his platoon was overrun near Chindong-ni, he took over for the missing platoon leader and led the twelve remaining soldiers in reestablishing their position. A North Korean attack from
    8.67
    3 votes
    44
    Louis R. Lowery

    Louis R. Lowery

    • Participated in conflicts: Battle of Peleliu
    Louis R. "Lou" Lowery (July 24, 1916 – April 15, 1987) was a United States Marine Corps photographer best known for taking the first flag-raising photograph on Iwo Jima on February 23, 1945. The first flag raised was too small to be seen easily from the nearby landing beaches, so a second, larger flag was raised, resulting in the famous photograph taken by Joe Rosenthal that was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Photography in 1945. A founder and former president of the United States Marine Corps Combat Correspondents Association (USMCCCA), Lowery was a photographic director of Leatherneck Magazine, a publication of the Marine Corps. Lowery died on April 15, 1987 at age 70 from aplastic anemia. He is buried in Quantico National Cemetery in Prince William County, Virginia. He was portrayed by actor David Hornsby in the 2006 film Flags of Our Fathers.
    8.67
    3 votes
    45
    Gordon M. Craig

    Gordon M. Craig

    Gordon Maynard Craig (August 1, 1929 – September 10, 1950) was a soldier in the United States Army during the Korean War. He posthumously received the Medal of Honor for his actions on September 10, 1950. Rank and organization: Corporal, U.S. Army, 16th Reconnaissance Company, 1st Cavalry Division Place and date: Near Kasan, Korea September 10, 1950 Entered service at. Brockton, Mass. Born: August 1, 1929, Brockton, Mass. G.O. No.: 23, April 25, 1951. Citation: Cpl. Craig, 16th Reconnaissance Company, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty in action against the enemy. During the attack on a strategic enemy-held hill his company's advance was subjected to intense hostile grenade, mortar and small-arms fire. Cpl. Craig and 4 comrades moved forward to eliminate an enemy machine gun nest that was hampering the company's advance. At that instance an enemy machine gunner hurled a hand grenade at the advancing men. Without hesitating or attempting to seek cover for himself, Cpl. Craig threw himself on the grenade and smothered its burst with his body. His intrepid and selfless act, in which he unhesitantly gave his life for his
    10.00
    2 votes
    46
    Robert E. Hall

    Robert E. Hall

    Robert E. Hall was sworn in as the eleventh Sergeant Major of the Army on October 21, 1997 and served until June 23, 2000. Hall was born in Gaffney, South Carolina, on May 31, 1947. He entered the Army in February 1968 and attended Basic Training at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, and Advanced Individual Training at Fort Bliss, Texas. He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in management from Park College in Parkville, Missouri. He held a variety of senior NCO positions culminating in his assignment as the Sergeant Major of the Army. He previously held the senior enlisted position as Command Sergeant Major of the United States Central Command, MacDill Air Force Base, Florida. Other assignments he held as Command Sergeant Major were: the 1st Battalion, 5th Air Defense Artillery, Fort Stewart, Georgia; Commandant, 24th Infantry Division Noncommissioned Officer Academy, Fort Stewart; and the 24th Division Artillery, Saudi Arabia and Iraq; the 2nd Infantry Division, Korea; and First U.S. Army, Fort Meade, Maryland. Throughout his 32-year career, SMA Hall has held every key leadership position including: squad leader, 2nd Infantry Division, Korea; platoon sergeant, battalion operations sergeant
    6.40
    5 votes
    47
    Edward F. Rector

    Edward F. Rector

    • Participated in conflicts: World War II
    Edward "Ed" F. Rector (September 28, 1916 – April 26, 2001) was a Colonel in the United States Air Force, a fighter ace, and a member of the Flying Tigers. Rector, a native of Marshall, North Carolina, graduated from Catawba College in 1938 and began his military career as a naval aviator. He was a carrier pilot on the Ranger, based in Norfolk, when he was recruited for the American Volunteer Group, the official name of the Flying Tigers. The unit was formed with the financial backing of the Chinese government to help defend the Burma Road and Chinese cities from Japanese attack before the United States entered the war. On December 10, 1941 Rector was part of a 3 plane photo reconnaissance mission from Rangoon to Bangkok. On December 20 when the Flying Tigers engaged in combat for the first time during a raid by Hanoi-based Japanese aircraft on the Chinese city of Kunming. Ed provided the AVG with its first aerial victory and would later record the last in a long list of 23rd Fighter Group air-to-air kills. In May 1942, he played a critical role in locating and attacking Japanese military columns attempting a push into China at the Salween River Gorge. This allowed the Chinese time
    7.25
    4 votes
    48
    Gary R. Pfingston

    Gary R. Pfingston

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force Gary R. Pfingston was the tenth Chief Master Sergeant appointed to the highest Non-commissioned officer position in the United States Air Force. Chief Pfingston was born in Evansville, Indiana on January 2, 1940. In California, he graduated from Torrance High School in 1958 and attended El Camino College from 1958 through 1961. He entered the Air Force in February 1962. Chief Pfingston spent his early years as a B-52 Crew Chief at Castle AFB, California from 1962 to 1968 and then worked on B-52s and KC-135s at Plattsburgh AFB, N.Y. from 1968 to 1972. After serving in Thailand at U-Tapao Royal Thai Air Base for a year between 1972 and 1973, he became a military Training Instructor at Lackland AFB in 1973. In 1979 he became Commandant of the Military Training Instructor School. He became a First Sergeant in 1982 and then between 1984 and 1990 he was a Senior Enlisted Advisor at George AFB, California; Bergstrom AFB, Texas; and Pacific Air Forces Headquarters, Hickam AFB, Hawaii. On August 1, 1990 he became CMSAF. Chief Pfingston’s focus during his tenure was tackling the Air Force’s draw-down and budget. After Basic Allowance for Subsistence
    7.25
    4 votes
    49
    Jack L. Tilley

    Jack L. Tilley

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    Jack L. Tilley was sworn in as the 12th Sergeant Major of the Army on June 23, 2000 and served until January 15, 2004. Tilley was born in Vancouver, Washington, on December 3, 1948. He entered the U.S. Army in November 1966 and attended basic training at Fort Lewis, Washington, and advanced individual training at Fort Knox, Kentucky. Following tours in Vietnam and Fort Benning, Georgia, SMA Tilley left the Army for two years before enlisting again in September 1971. He held a variety of important positions culminating in his assignment as the Sergeant Major of the Army. He previously held the senior enlisted position as Senior Enlisted Leader of the United States Central Command, MacDill Air Force Base, Florida. Other assignments he held as Command Sergeant Major were 1st Battalion, 10th Cavalry, Fort Knox, 194th Armored Brigade, 1st Armored Division, Bad Kreuznach, Germany and United States Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Arlington, Virginia. Throughout his 36-year career, SMA Tilley held every key leadership position including tank commander, section leader, drill sergeant, platoon sergeant, senior instructor, operations sergeant and first sergeant. His military education
    7.25
    4 votes
    50
    Charles F. Wald

    Charles F. Wald

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    General Charles "Chuck" F. Wald (born 1948) is the former Deputy Commander of United States European Command. He retired on July 1, 2006, and was succeeded by General William E. Ward. General Wald earned his commission through the Air Force ROTC program in 1971. He has combat time as an O-2A forward air controller in Vietnam and as an F-16 pilot flying over Bosnia. The general has served as a T-37 instructor pilot and F-15 flight commander. Other duties include Chief of the U.S. Air Force Combat Terrorism Center, support group commander, operations group commander, and special assistant to the Chief of Staff for National Defense Review. He was also the Director of Strategic Planning and Policy at Headquarters U.S. Air Force, and served on the Joint Staff as the Vice Director for Strategic Plans and Policy. General Wald commanded the 31st Fighter Wing at Aviano Air Base, Italy, where on August 30, 1995, he led one of the wing’s initial strike packages against the ammunition depot at Pale, Bosnia-Herzegovina, in one of the first NATO combat operations. He also commanded the 9th Air Force and U.S. Central Command Air Forces, Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina, where he led the
    8.33
    3 votes
    51
    H. Steven Blum

    H. Steven Blum

    H Steven Blum (born on October 13, 1946) is a retired United States Army lieutenant general. He last served as Deputy Commander, U.S. Northern Command, where he concurrently served as Vice Commander, U.S. Element, North American Aerospace Defense Command from January 16, 2009 to May 21, 2010. Prior to that, Blum served as the 25th Chief of the National Guard Bureau from April 11, 2003 to November 17, 2008. He retired from the Army and the National Guard on May 21, 2010. As Deputy Commander, U.S. Northern Command, Blum helped lead the command to anticipate, prepare, and respond to threats and aggression aimed at the United States, its territories, and interests within the assigned area of responsibility and, as directed by the President or Secretary of Defense, provided defense support of civil authorities including consequence management operations. As Chief, National Guard Bureau, Blum was the senior uniformed National Guard of the United States officer responsible for formulating, developing, and coordinating all policies, programs, and plans affecting more than half a million federalized and nonfederalized Army National Guard and Air National Guard personnel. Appointed by the
    8.33
    3 votes
    52
    Michael J. Bloomfield

    Michael J. Bloomfield

    Michael John "Bloomer" Bloomfield (born 16 March 1959) is a former American astronaut and a veteran of three Space Shuttle missions. Born in Flint and raised in Lake Fenton, Michigan, Bloomfield received his bachelor's degree in Engineering Mechanics from the United States Air Force Academy, where he played Falcons football for coach Bill Parcells and was the team's captain. He became an F-15 fighter pilot with the rare combination of having graduated the Fighter Weapons Instructor Course (FWIC, pronounced 'Fwick') and then selected as a test pilot (assigned to the F-16 test squadron at Edwards AFB). He earned his master's degree in Engineering Management from Old Dominion University in 1993. Selected by NASA in December 1994, Bloomfield reported to the Johnson Space Center in March 1995. He worked as Chief of Safety for the Astronaut Office, Chief Instructor Astronaut, Director of Shuttle Operations, and Chief of the Shuttle Branch, which oversees all Shuttle technical issues for the Astronaut Office. He first flew as a pilot aboard STS-86 in 1997, where he docked with the space station Mir. Bloomfield also piloted STS-97 in 2000 and commanded STS-110 in 2002, both missions to the
    8.33
    3 votes
    53
    John Galvin

    John Galvin

    John Rogers Galvin (born May 13, 1929) is a retired American general who was Dean of the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University and a member of the U.S. Commission on National Security/21st Century. General Galvin's career included the rare opportunity to command 2 different Department of Defense Unified Commands. He served as Commander in Chief, United States Southern Command in Panama from 1985 to 1987 and Commander in Chief, United States European Command from June 26, 1987, to June 23, 1992. During his stint as commander US European Command he also served as NATO's Supreme Allied Commander, Europe. Prior to his command at US Southern Command, General Galvin served as commander of VII Corps from July 1983- February 1985. The Galvin Middle School in Wakefield, Massachusetts, is named after him. General Galvin began his service as an enlisted man in the Massachusetts National Guard in 1947. He served his country in uniform for over 45 years. Wife Ginny and twin daughters. The United States Military Academy awarded Galvin (Class of '54) the 1997 Distinguished Graduate Award.
    6.20
    5 votes
    54
    Dale Mabry

    Dale Mabry

    Dale Mabry (March 22, 1891–February 21, 1922) was an American World War I aviator. Mabry, a native of Tallahassee, Florida, was the son of former Florida Supreme Court Justice Milton H. Mabry and Ella Dale Bramlett. He went on to become an airship pilot and captain in the United States Army. Captain Mabry died piloting the Army airship Roma, a dirigible he was testing, when it crashed in Norfolk, Virginia on February 21, 1922. The event marked the greatest disaster in American aeronautics up to that time, resulting in 34 deaths. Mabry was laid to rest at Arlington National Cemetery. He was survived by a brother, G. E. Mabry, of Tampa, Florida. Dale Mabry Highway in Tampa, Florida is named for him. It was initially constructed to connect MacDill Air Force Base with Drew Field Municipal Airport. It is a major, highly commercialized roadway through Hillsborough County. Landmarks on this road include Hillsborough Community College, Raymond James Stadium, and George M. Steinbrenner Field. Also in Tampa, Dale Mabry Elementary school is named in his honor. Dale Mabry Municipal Airport in Tallahassee, Florida, that city's first airport, also bears his name. The original Tallahassee Airport
    9.50
    2 votes
    55
    Albert William Stevens

    Albert William Stevens

    Albert William Stevens (March 13, 1886 - March 26, 1949 in Redwood City, California) was an officer in the United States Army Air Corps, balloonist and aerial photographer. He was born on 13 March 1886 in Belfast, Maine. While flying over South America in 1930, Stevens took the first photograph of the Earth in a way that the horizon's curvature is visible. To cut through haze, Stevens often employed infrared-sensitive film for long-distance aerial shots whose subjects were visually obscured. Accompanied by Lt. Charles D. McAllister of the Army Air Corps, Stevens took the first photograph of the Moon's shadow projected onto the Earth during a solar eclipse in August, 1932. On 29 July 1934 Stevens and two other US Army officers, Major William Kepner and Captain Orvil Arson Anderson, ascended in a specially-constructed balloon and gondola named Explorer I over north-western Nebraska in an attempt to break the current altitude record for manned flight. However, nearing the current record height, the balloon envelope ruptured, sending the gondola plunging to earth. Fortunately, all three crew were able to eventually exit and parachute to earth before the gondola crashed into a farm
    7.00
    4 votes
    56
    Arthur L. Andrews

    Arthur L. Andrews

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force Arthur L. "Bud" Andrews (March 9, 1934 – October 26, 1996) was the seventh Chief Master Sergeant appointed to the highest Non-commissioned officer position in the United States Air Force. Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force Arthur "Bud" L. Andrews was adviser to United States Secretary of the Air Force Verne Orr and Chief of Staff of the Air Force General Charles A. Gabriel on matters concerning welfare, effective utilization and progress of the enlisted members of the Air Force. He was the seventh chief master sergeant appointed to this ultimate noncommissioned officer position. Chief Andrews was born in Boston where he attended Cathedral of Holy Cross, Bancroft and Rice Public Schools, and the English High School. He enlisted in the Air Force in January 1953 and completed basic training at Sampson Air Force Base, N.Y. His first assignment was to Keesler Air Force Base, Miss., in April 1953, where he began 12 years as an air policeman, including eight years as an investigator. After a short tour at Keesler, he was sent to Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, and then to French Morocco, North Africa. Returning to the United States 12 months
    7.00
    4 votes
    57
    Paul D. Harkins

    Paul D. Harkins

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    Paul Donal Harkins (May 15, 1904 – August 21, 1984) was Deputy Chief of Staff during World War II to George S. Patton Jr. and later became a U.S. Army General and the first Military Assistance Command, Vietnam (MACV) commander from 1962 to 1964. Harkins was born in Boston, Massachusetts. He was a West Point graduate, class of 1929. Harkins was deputy Chief of Staff, Third Army, under General Hobart R. Gay. While in that capacity he earned the nickname "Ramrod" for his determination to fulfill Patton's desire to always keep moving. When asked by a fellow officer who asked him "how the devil our G.I.s can remain so cheerful at the front under these frightful conditions?" Harkins is said to have replied, "Well the Old Man knows that as long as they are winning and moving forward they will remain happy and their morale will be high". Harkins, in his capacity as deputy of operations, for the Third Army, was present with Patton at the famous staff meeting called by General Dwight D. Eisenhower to discuss the Allied response to the German attack in the Ardennes, in which Patton promised Eisenhower that Third Army would be ready to disengage his troops from their current eastward attack
    7.00
    4 votes
    58
    Peter H. Quinn

    Peter H. Quinn

    Peter H. Quinn (May 1873 - April 19, 1934) was a United States Army soldier received the Medal of Honor for actions on May 13, 1899 during the Philippine-American War. Private Quinn is buried in Arlington National Cemetery. Rank and organization: Private, Company L, 4th U.S. Cavalry. Place and date: At San Miguel de Mayumo, Luzon, Philippine Islands, May 13, 1899. Entered service at: San Francisco, California. Birth: San Francisco, California. Date of issue: June 6, 1906. Citation: With 11 other scouts without waiting for the supporting battalion to aid them or to get into a position to do so, charged over a distance of about 150 yards and completely routed about 300 of the enemy who were in line and in a position that could only be carried by a frontal attack.
    7.00
    4 votes
    59
    William R. Peers

    William R. Peers

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    William R. Peers (June 14, 1914 – April 6, 1984) was a United States Army General, who is most notable for presiding over the Peers Commission investigation into the My Lai massacre and other similar war crimes during the Vietnam War. Peers, often referred to by his middle name "Ray" by close associates, was born in Stuart, Iowa in 1914. He attended the University of California, Los Angeles where he was a member of the Sigma Pi Fraternity. He graduated with a degree from the College of Education in 1937, and received a regular Army commission in 1938. When the United States entered World War II, Peers was recruited into the Office of Strategic Services (OSS). He joined Detachment 101, which carried out guerrilla operations against the Japanese in the China India Burma Theater. At first the unit's operations and training officer, he eventually became the unit's commander. He held that position until 1945, when he became commander of all OSS operations in China south of the Yangtze River. In this capacity he led a Nationalist Chinese parachute-commando unit into Nanking, securing the former Chinese capital from the Japanese and Communist Chinese before the armistice. After WWII,
    7.00
    4 votes
    60
    Bennie L. Davis

    Bennie L. Davis

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    Bennie Luke Davis (May 12, 1928 - September 23, 2012) was commander in chief, Strategic Air Command and director Joint Strategic Target Planning Staff, with headquarters at Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska. The command is the nation's major nuclear deterrent force with bombers, tankers, reconnaissance aircraft and intercontinental ballistic missiles. The Joint Strategic Target Planning Staff coordinated United States nuclear war plans and develops the Single Integrated Operational Plan. General Davis was born in McAlester, Oklahoma, in 1928. He graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1950 with a commission as a second lieutenant and a bachelor of science degree. He earned a master of science degree from The George Washington University, Washington, D.C., in 1967; and graduated from the Armed Forces Staff College, Norfolk, Virginia, in 1964; and the National War College, Fort Lesley J. McNair, Washington, D.C., in 1967. After graduation from West Point, he entered the Air Force and attended pilot training at Vance Air Force Base, Oklahoma, earning his pilot wings in August 1951. He then was assigned as a twin-engine pilot at James Connally Air Force Base,
    6.00
    5 votes
    61
    Silas L. Copeland

    Silas L. Copeland

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    Silas L. Copeland (April 2, 1920 – December 4, 2001) was the third Sergeant Major of the Army. He was sworn in on October 1, 1970 and served until June, 1973. He was born in Embryfield, Texas (now Staley, Texas), on April 2, 1920, and died December 4, 2001. After serving at various posts in CONUS, he was sent overseas in January 1945 and assigned to Company E, 66th Armored Regiment, 2nd Armored Division, as a tank commander and later a tank platoon sergeant. In late 1945, he returned from Germany and was stationed at Fort Hood, Texas, where he became Operations and Intelligence Sergeant of the 67th Tank Battalion and 82d Reconnaissance Battalion. In 1950 he joined the 2d Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, then located in Japan. From there, his unit was moved into Korea on July 18, 1950, making the landing by assault boats. He served as the Reconnaissance and Intelligence Platoon Sergeant and Battalion Operations Sergeant. From 1951-1953, he was assigned to Senior ROTC duty at Texas A&M University. In 1953 was assigned to the 2d Battalion, 22d Infantry Regiment, Germany, as a first sergeant. He remained with that unit until November 1954 when he was reassigned to
    8.00
    3 votes
    62
    Bobby Muller

    Bobby Muller

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    Robert O. "Bobby" Muller (born 1946) is an American peace advocate. He was born on Long Island, and grew up in Great Neck, New York and attended Hofstra University. He enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps in 1967, during the Vietnam War. His commission with the Marines began the same day he received his bachelor's degree in business administration from Hofstra University in 1968, and by September of that year he was a combat lieutenant leading a Marine infantry platoon. In April 1969, while leading an assault in Vietnam, a bullet entered his chest and severed his spinal cord, leaving him paralyzed from the chest down. After returning from Vietnam, Muller became a staunch advocate for veterans' rights and Peace activist. In 1974 he earned his law degree from the Hofstra University School of Law. In the same year, he appeared in the anti-war documentary film Hearts and Minds, speaking about his life before, during, and after the Vietnam War. He founded Vietnam Veterans of America (VVA) in 1978 and Vietnam Veterans of America Foundation (VVAF) in 1980. The VVAF co-founded the International Campaign to Ban Landmines, which won a 1997 Nobel Peace Prize. In 2004, Muller founded Alliance for
    6.75
    4 votes
    63
    Sam E. Parish

    Sam E. Parish

    Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force Sam E. Parish (born October 2, 1937) was the eighth Chief Master Sergeant appointed to the highest Non-commissioned officer position in the United States Air Force. Chief Parish was born in Marianna, Florida, and attended Malone High School. He joined the US Air Force in December 1954. Following basic military training, he was assigned to Chanute Air Force Base, Illinois, for training as a ground weather equipment operator where earned distinction as an honor graduate. His early assignments include Germany, Massachusetts, and Illinois. In March 1973, Chief Parish graduated from the first class of the Senior Noncommissioned Officer Academy at Gunter Air Force Station, Alabama. One of his classmates was James M. McCoy, who in August 1979 would be appointed as one of Chief Parish's predecessors, the sixth Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force. In August 1976, he began his third tour of duty in West Germany as Sergeant Major for the 36th Combat Support Group consolidated base personnel office at Bitburg Air Base, Germany. His career includes tours as Senior Enlisted Advisor for 40th Air Division, US Air Forces in Europe, and Strategic Air
    6.75
    4 votes
    64
    Alexander Oswald Brodie

    Alexander Oswald Brodie

    Alexander Oswald Brodie (November 13, 1849 – May 10, 1918) was an American military officer and engineer. Earning his initial reputation during the Indian wars, he came to prominence for his service with the Rough Riders during the Spanish–American War. His friendship with Theodore Roosevelt then lead to Brodie being appointed Governor of Arizona Territory from 1902 to 1905. Brodie was born to Joseph and Margaret (Brown) Brodie near Edwards, New York, in late 1849, the second of four children. By age 13 he was a student in a boarding school in Canton, New York operated by St. Lawrence University. Brodie received an appointment to the United States Military Academy in 1866 and upon graduation was commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the First Cavalry on June 15, 1870. As a newly commissioned officer, Brodie was assigned to Camp Apache where he participated in General George Crook's campaign in Arizona Territory. During this assignment there were several events of note. On June 21, 1871, Brodie and a group of five troopers were ambushed by a numerically superior band of Apaches. The young lieutenant managed his groups ammunition supply over the course of an eight hour fight, and
    9.00
    2 votes
    65
    Henry Doctor Jr.

    Henry Doctor Jr.

    Lieutenant General Henry Doctor, Jr. was the Commanding General, 2nd Infantry Division, Eighth United States Army, based in the Republic of Korea (South Korea). His last assignment was as an Inspector General of the U.S. Army. In 1954, he graduated from South Carolina State University with a Bachelor of Science in Agriculture and is a member of Omega Psi Phi. He earned his Master of Arts from Georgia State University. He is a graduate of United States Army War College and U. S. Army Command and General Staff College. On December 7, 2007, Henry Doctor died and was buried at Arlington National Cemetery. On July 9, 2008, the South Carolina Department of Transportation announced that a five mile stretch of Highway 52 would be named the "Lieutenant General Henry Doctor Jr. Memorial Highway".
    9.00
    2 votes
    66
    Jimmy G. Stewart

    Jimmy G. Stewart

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    Jimmy Goethel Stewart (December 25, 1942 – May 18, 1966) was a United States Army soldier and a posthumous recipient of the U.S. military's highest decoration, the Medal of Honor, for his actions in the Vietnam War. Born on December 25, 1942, in West Columbia, West Virginia, Stewart joined the Army from Ashland, Kentucky. He served in Vietnam as a staff sergeant with Company B of the 2nd Battalion, 12th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). On the morning of May 18, 1966, Company B was manning a defensive position when they were attacked by a reinforced North Vietnamese company, with the main thrust of the assault pitting Stewart's 6-man squad against a platoon-sized hostile force. Although his five squadmates fell wounded, Stewart ignored an opportunity to withdraw and instead held his position alone for four hours, tossing back enemy-thrown grenades and crawling through heavy fire to retrieve ammunition from the wounded. When a friendly platoon arrived and counterattacked the North Vietnamese, he moved forward and was killed while assisting their effort. For these actions, he was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor. Stewart, aged 23 at his death, is buried in
    9.00
    2 votes
    67
    Kelly George

    Kelly George

    Kelly George (born September 10, 1982) is an officer in the United States Air Force and a beauty queen from Mission Viejo, California who competed for the Miss USA title in 2007. George who currently lives in Sherwood, Arkansas, is a second lieutenant in the U.S. Air Force. She won the Miss Arkansas USA 2007 title in the state pageant held in Conway, Arkansas on 23 September 2006 and was crowned by outgoing titleholder Kimberly Forsyth of Cabot. Her "sister" 2007 titleholder is Tiffany Greenstreet, Miss Arkansas Teen USA 2007. George competed in the Miss USA 2007 pageant which was broadcast live from the Kodak Theatre in Los Angeles, California on March 23, 2007. She will be the first active-duty military member to compete in the pageant in its 56 year history. Although this was her first Miss USA state pageant, George had placed second runner-up in the Miss Maryland 2005 pageant and third runner-up in the 2004 event. In 2004 she represented Maryland in the annual Miss National Sweetheart competition, competing alongside other runners-up from various Miss America state pageants. George grew up in Mission Viejo, California and attended Trabuco Hills High School. She later gained a
    9.00
    2 votes
    68
    Robert C. Kingston

    Robert C. Kingston

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    Robert Charles Kingston (July 16, 1928 – February 28, 2007) was an American General who served as the commander of United States Central Command. Kingston graduated from Brookline High School in 1947. He entered the Army as an enlisted soldier in November 1948. The following year he attended Officer Candidate School at Fort Riley, Kansas and was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the Infantry on December 20, 1949. As a 2LT, he commanded Task Force Kingston in the early phase of the Korean War, driving his unit all the way to the Yalu River. He has commanded troops at each level from platoon to brigade. In 1970 he was assigned as the Deputy Secretary of the General Staff, Office of the Chief of Staff, U.S. Army. In June 1972 General Kingston returned to Vietnam where he was promoted to Brigadier General in December and served as Deputy Commanding General, Second Regional Assistance Command and as Deputy Senior Advisor, II Corps and Military Region 2. In January 1973, General Kingston assumed command of the Joint Casualty Resolution Center in Nakhon Phanom, Thailand. Upon his return to the United States in 1974, he assumed duties as Assistant Division Commander of the First
    9.00
    2 votes
    69
    Rodney J. McKinley

    Rodney J. McKinley

    Rodney J. McKinley (born January 17, 1956) was the 15th Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force who served a total of 30 combined years in the United States Air Force. McKinley represented the highest enlisted level of leadership, and as such, provided direction for the enlisted corps and represents their interests, as appropriate, to the American public, and to those in all levels of government. He served as the personal adviser to the Chief of Staff and the Secretary of the Air Force on all issues regarding the welfare, readiness, morale, and proper utilization and progress of the enlisted force. McKinley was the 15th Chief Master Sergeant appointed to the highest non-commissioned officer position. McKinley grew up in Mt. Orab, Ohio. He originally entered the Air Force in 1974, took a break in service in 1977 to attend college, and re-entered the Air Force in 1982. His background includes various duties in medical and aircraft maintenance, and as a first sergeant and Command Chief Master Sergeant at wing, numbered air force and major command levels. His assignments include bases in North Carolina, South Carolina, Oklahoma, Virginia, Alaska and Hawaii. He also served overseas in
    9.00
    2 votes
    70
    Ulric Dahlgren

    Ulric Dahlgren

    Ulric Dahlgren (April 3, 1842 – March 2, 1864) served as a Union Army colonel. He was in command of an unsuccessful 1864 raid on the Confederate capital of Richmond, Virginia, and was killed in the raid. The major consequence of the failed raid was the Dahlgren Affair after incriminating documents were discovered on Dahlgren's corpse. Dahlgren was born, in 1842, to Rear Admiral John A. Dahlgren and Madeleine (Mary) Vinton. Papers found on the body of Dahlgren shortly after his death contained orders for an assassination plot against Confederate President Jefferson Davis. The discovery and publication of the Dahlgren Papers sparked an international controversy, and may have contributed to John Wilkes Booth's decision to assassinate U.S. President Abraham Lincoln a year later.
    5.80
    5 votes
    71
    Henry "Gunfighter" Emerson

    Henry "Gunfighter" Emerson

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    Lieutenant General Henry Everett "Hank" Emerson, United States Army (Ret.), known as "The Gunfighter," was an American military leader. He is primarily remembered as the commanding officer of the 2nd Infantry Division in South Korea in the mid-1970s, in which Colin Powell served as a battalion commander. He is a graduate of the United States Military Academy, class of 1947. Where he gained notice was in his controversial methods in fighting in Vietnam. He gained recognition in the Vietnam war for his tactical ability on the battlefield. He conceived aerial reconnaissance and combat methods employed effectively against the Viet Cong, which included "checkerboard tactics," "Jitterbug strikes" and Eagle Flights. He demonstrated that American soldiers could effectively "out-guerrilla" the Viet Cong. Emerson also developed the "seal-and-pile-on technique" (the rapid build-up of combat power to surround and destroy an enemy force). These highly complex tactics shattered many large enemy units. Emerson was known for his somewhat eccentric personality, from his training methods to carrying a cowboy-style six-shooter in place of a regulation M1911 pistol semi-automatic pistol. For example,
    7.67
    3 votes
    72
    Theodore Freeman

    Theodore Freeman

    Theodore Cordy Freeman (February 18, 1930, in Haverford, Pennsylvania – October 31, 1964 at Ellington Air Force Base, Houston, Texas) was a NASA astronaut and a captain in the United States Air Force. He was killed in the crash of a T-38 jet, marking the first fatality among the American astronaut corps. He was survived by his wife Faith Clark Freeman and one daughter, Faith Huntington. Freeman completed his secondary education in 1948. He attended the University of Delaware at Newark for one year, then entered the United States Naval Academy and graduated in 1953 with a Bachelor of Science degree. In 1960, he received a Master of Science degree in aeronautical engineering from the University of Michigan. Freeman was also a member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and the Society of Experimental Test Pilots. Freeman graduated from both the Air Force's Experimental Test Pilot and Aerospace Research Pilot Courses. He elected to serve with the Air Force. His last Air Force assignment was as a flight test aeronautical engineer and experimental flight test instructor at the Aerospace Research Pilot School at Edwards Air Force Base in the Mojave Desert. He served
    7.67
    3 votes
    73
    Alexander Brydie Dyer

    Alexander Brydie Dyer

    • Participated in conflicts: American Civil War
    Alexander Brydie Dyer (January 10, 1815 – May 20, 1874) was an American soldier in a variety of 19th century wars, serving most notably as a general and chief of ordnance for the Union Army during the American Civil War. Dyer was born at Richmond, Virginia, and graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1837. He served in the Seminole Wars in 1837–38 and as lieutenant of ordnance in the Mexican-American War in 1846–48, being brevetted captain for gallant conduct at the Battle of Santa Cruz de Rosales. He served throughout the Civil War. From 1861 to 1864, he commanded the Federal armory in Springfield, Massachusetts. On September 13, 1864, he was appointed chief of ordnance at Washington, D.C., with the rank of brigadier general, U.S. Army, to rank from September 12, 1864. President Lincoln submitted the nomination to the U.S. Senate on December 12, 1864 and the Senate confirmed the appointment on February 23, 1865. Dyer held the position on May 30, 1864. Dyer is known as being the commander first committed to the purchasing of the Gatling gun,the first design of machine a gun, first designed by John Gatling. On March 8, 1866, President Andrew
    10.00
    1 votes
    74
    Bryant E. Womack

    Bryant E. Womack

    Bryant Homer Womack (May 12, 1931–March 12, 1952) was a soldier in the United States Army during the Korean War. He posthumously received the Medal of Honor for his actions on March 12, 1952. Womack Army Medical Center, Fort Bragg, North Carolina, is named for him. Womack was born and raised in Mill Spring, Polk County, North Carolina. He was the son of George and Julie Womack and had three brothers and one sister. He grew up working as a farm laborer and picked peaches during the summer. He enjoyed hunting, fishing, and riding bicycles. Womack was drafted into the U.S. Army in 1950 and sent to Korea as a private first class with the Medical Company of the 14th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. During a firefight on March 12, 1952, near Sokso-ri, his unit began taking heavy casualties. Womack exposed himself to enemy fire in order to treat wounded soldiers. When he was himself wounded, he refused medical treatment and continued to give aid to others. He was the last soldier to withdraw from the engagement and died of his injuries soon after. He was officially issued the Medal of Honor the next year, on January 12, 1953. Aged 20 at his death, Womack was buried at Lebanon
    10.00
    1 votes
    75
    Darleen Druyun

    Darleen Druyun

    Darleen A. Druyun (born November 7, 1947) is a former United States Air Force civilian official (Principal Deputy Undersecretary of the Air Force for Acquisition) and Boeing executive. Druyun graduated from Chaminade University of Honolulu and the executive education program at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University In 1993 Darleen Druyun was investigated for her involvement in a plan to speed up payments by the Air Force to McDonnell Douglas. Although several other people involved were discharged, Druyun kept her position. In 2000 Druyun sent the resumes of her daughter, a recent college graduate, and her daughter's fiancé, a published PhD Aeronautical Engineer, to Boeing and both were hired. Although this was a conflict of interest, it was not illegal. After leaving the Air Force in 2003 she took a job with Boeing at an annual salary of $250,000 She also received a $50,000 signing bonus. In May 2003, the United States Air Force announced it would lease 100 KC-767 tankers to replace the oldest 136 of its KC-135s. The 10 year lease would give the USAF the option to purchase the aircraft at the end of the contract. In September 2003, responding to critics who argued
    10.00
    1 votes
    76
    George W. Morell

    George W. Morell

    George Webb Morell (January 8, 1815 – February 11, 1883) was a civil engineer, lawyer, farmer, and a Union general in the American Civil War. Morell was born in Cooperstown, New York. His father was George Morell. the chief justice of the Michigan Supreme Court. He graduated from the United States Military Academy, first in his class of 56 cadets, in 1835 and was commissioned a brevet second lieutenant in the Corps of Engineers. He resigned from the Army on June 30, 1837, and became a civil engineer for the Charleston and Cincinnati Railroad and later for the Michigan Central Railroad. He moved to New York in 1839 and worked as a lawyer. He was a United States court commissioner from 1859 to 1861. At the start of the Civil War, Morell was appointed colonel and quartermaster of the New York Militia. He was promoted to brigadier general of volunteers on August 9, 1861, and served in brigade and division command in the Army of the Potomac during the Peninsula Campaign. Morell led the 1st Division, V Corps, during most of this period. His close association with Brig. Gen. Fitz John Porter, his corps commander, negatively affected his career prospects, as Porter was court-martialed for
    10.00
    1 votes
    77
    Harry E. Soyster

    Harry E. Soyster

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    Harry Edward Soyster (6 June 1935 in Altoona, Pennsylvania) is a retired United States Army Lieutenant General. He served as the Commanding General of the United States Army Intelligence and Security Command (INSCOM). Upon promotion to the rank of Lieutenant General, Soyster served as the Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency at Bolling Air Force Base, Washington D.C. Soyster served in this role from December 1988 to September 1991. Upon retirement he was the VP for International Operations for the private military firm Military Professional Resources Inc. He later served as Special Assistant to the SEC ARMY for WWII 60th Anniversary Commemorations. Soyster is a member of the Military Intelligence Hall of Fame and currently serves on numerous boards of directors and participates in studies on current issues. Lieutenant General Soyster has three daughters and six grandchildren. Harry Edward Soyster was born on 6 June 1935 in Altoona, Pennsylvania and was raised in Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania. He attended school there and was subsequently appointed to the United States Military Academy at West Point, NY. General Soyster was an Eagle Scout, Class President, member of the first
    10.00
    1 votes
    78
    James 'Jamie' Smith

    James 'Jamie' Smith

    Cpl. James "Jamie" Edgar Smith Jr. (1972 – October 3, 1993) was a U.S. Army Ranger who served in Mogadishu, Somalia. He was one of the 19 American soldiers killed during the The Battle of Mogadishu, bleeding to death after being shot in the thigh. Smith was the eldest of three sons of James H. Smith, a Vietnam War veteran. Jamie Smith was born in 1972 to James and Carol Smith. He was from Long Valley, New Jersey. Smith graduated from West Morris Central High School in 1990, where he played both varsity lacrosse and football. After graduation, Smith went on to enlist in the US Army, his goal from the beginning to become an Army Ranger. Smith became a machine gunner, and was one of the top gunners in his regiment. He was quickly promoted to corporal. Smith was one of 19 US military personnel killed in action in Somalia between October 3 and 4, 1993. He had been part of a Ranger unit fast roping from a helicopter to provide security for a mission to capture Somali clan leaders. He was among the first Rangers to arrive at the scene of one of the downed helicopters. The Rangers did not want to leave dead bodies in the helicopter; Somalis were known for mutilating American bodies. He was
    10.00
    1 votes
    79
    Matthew Arlington Batson

    Matthew Arlington Batson

    Matthew Arlington Batson (24 April 1866 – 13 January 1917) was a United States Army Officer who received the Medal of Honor for actions during the Philippine-American War. 1st Lieutenant Batson was awarded the medal for swimming the San Juan River under enemy fire. He later obtained the rank of Captain. He was awarded his medal alongside Captain Hugh J. McGarth who performed the same feat. Batson joined the 2nd United States Cavalry on 9 April 1888 and was commissioned as an officer in August 1891. He retired as a Brevet Major (United States) of volunteers and a Regular Army Captain in February 1902. He died on 13 January 1917 and is buried in Arlington National Cemetery Section 2, Lot 3604-WS. Batson's Medal of Honor citation reads: Swam the San Juan River in the face of the enemy's fire and drove him from his entrenchments.
    10.00
    1 votes
    80
    Robert H. Dunlap

    Robert H. Dunlap

    Robert Henry Dunlap (December 22, 1879 – May 19, 1931) was a general in the United States Marine Corps. Born in Washington, D.C., Dunlap was appointed a second lieutenant in the Marine Corps August 8, 1898. He served with distinction in the Spanish-American War; in the Philippine-American War and China during 1900, including the Battle of Tientsin of the Boxer Rebellion; and in the U.S. occupation of Veracruz, Mexico, in 1914. For his distinguished service as regimental commander during the Meuse-Argonne campaign in World War I, he was awarded a Citation Certificate by Commander-in-Chief, A.E.F.; the French Fourragère; and the Navy Cross. In 1917-18 he analyzed a proposed Allied landing in the Adriatic for Admiral William Sims and concluded that amphibious operations could be successful and there was no absolute advantage for the defender. In 1928 he served in Nicaragua and was awarded the Navy Distinguished Service Medal and the Medal of Merit of Nicaragua. Brigadier General Dunlap sacrificed his life attempting to rescue a woman imprisoned in a landslide in France on May 19, 1931. USS Dunlap (DD-384) was named for him. His widow, Katherine Wood Dunlap (1884–1970), christened the
    10.00
    1 votes
    81
    William S. Sitman

    William S. Sitman

    William Samuel Sitman (August 9, 1923 – February 14, 1951) was a soldier in the United States Army during the Korean War. He posthumously received the Medal of Honor for his actions on February 14, 1951, during the Battle of Chipyong-ni. Sitman joined the Army from his birthplace of Bellwood, Pennsylvania in February 1943. Rank and organization: Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, Company M, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division Place and date: Near Chipyong-ni, Korea, February 14, 1951 Entered service at: Bellwood, Pennsylvania, Birth: Bellwood, Pennsylvania G.O. No.: 20, February 1, 1952 Citation: Sfc. Sitman distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty in action against an armed enemy of the United Nations. Sfc. Sitman, a machine gun section leader of Company M, was attached to Company I, under attack by a numerically superior hostile force. During the encounter when an enemy grenade knocked out his machine gun, a squad from Company I, immediately emplaced a light machine gun and Sfc. Sitman and his men remained to provide security for the crew. In the ensuing action, the enemy lobbed a grenade into the position and Sfc.
    10.00
    1 votes
    82
    David J. Campanale

    David J. Campanale

    Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force David J. Campanale (born October 7, 1952) was the eleventh person appointed to the highest noncommissioned officer position in the United States Air Force. Chief Campanale was born in Worcester, Massachusetts. He graduated from North High School and entered the Air Force in October 1970. He completed technical training as an aircraft maintenance specialist at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas. In February 1971, he was assigned as a B-52 Stratofortress crew chief in the 2nd Organization Maintenance Squadron, Barksdale Air Force Base, Louisiana. While there, he completed three successive tours at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, in support of B-52 Operation Arc Light missions in Southeast Asia. His career includes tours at bases in Indiana, Hawaii, New Hampshire, and Nebraska. He served as Senior Enlisted Advisor to the 93rd Bomb Wing, Castle Air Force Base, California; and Air Mobility Command, Scott Air Force Base, Illinois. CMSAF Campanale served as the Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force from October 1994 to November 1996. He retired from active duty effective January 1, 1997. He now resides in southern Arizona, and frequently speaks at USAF
    6.50
    4 votes
    83
    George K. Broomhall

    George K. Broomhall

    George K. Broomhall was a brevet general in the Union Army during the American Civil War. Originally from the town of Wayne, Maine, Broomhall is widely credited with the invention of cream soda. Broomhall is generally considered to be Wayne's most famous resident. Broomhall never set foot in the "State of Maine," having enlisted in the military in 1817, training at Annapolis, Maryland, and eventually settling in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, after hostilities ended. He never returned to Wayne. (Maine became a state on March 15, 1820, after he moved away. It was part of Massachusetts when Broomhall lived there.) He is buried at Gott Cemetery on Gott Road in Wayne next to his wife Amelia, daughter Josephine, and son Augustus. The four were originally buried in Mount Joy, Pennsylvania, but the bodies were exhumed in 1889 for Wayne's centennial festivities and brought to their current resting place. A small memorial was also erected there.
    6.50
    4 votes
    84
    Manton S. Eddy

    Manton S. Eddy

    • Participated in conflicts: World War II
    Manton Sprague Eddy (May 16, 1892 – April 10, 1962) was a Lieutenant General of the United States Army. Eddy graduated from Shattuck Military School in Faribault, Minnesota in 1913. He enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1916. Thoroughly the infantryman, Manton Eddy served in France in World War I in rifle and machine gun units. Promoted to major, he served in the army of occupation in Germany until 1919 when he returned to the USA. Relegated to captain's rank in 1920, Eddy married Mamie Peabody Buttolph a year later. During the interwar period, he was a member of the Infantry Board and an instructor of tactics at the Command and General Staff College. The years of preparation and training returned great dividends to the Army. In 1941 Eddy became commanding officer of the 114th Infantry Regiment. one year later he was promoted to brigadier general and given command of the 9th Infantry Division in campaigns in Tunisia, Sicily, and Normandy. As Commander of XII Corps, his units successfully held the southern shoulder of the German salient in the Battle of the Bulge. In April 1945, he returned to the USA because of illness. For his role in the capture of Cherbourg, Eddy was awarded the
    6.50
    4 votes
    85
    Oliver R Crawford

    Oliver R Crawford

    Oliver "Ollie" Ray Crawford (born July 19, 1925) is one of America’s foremost advocates for a strong and modern United States Air Force. Crawford’s desire to fly was whetted by Army Air Corps aircraft flying over his hometown early in World War II. At age 17, he volunteered to become an aviation student and began military training at Buckley Field, Colorado after turning 18. Crawford completed fighter pilot training at Luke Field, Arizona, and on 15 April 1945 earned his wings and commission. He next transitioned to the Curtiss P-40 Warhawk four months before WWII ended. In 1946, Crawford was released from active duty, but remained in the reserves for 13 years. His duties included flight instructor at Tinker Field, Oklahoma. He attended South Texas University of Law and later became associated with Time, Inc. Crawford was an officer and director of several companies owned by the corporation. He flew many company aircraft from the Douglas DC-3 to the Fokker F-27 and F-28. In 1974, he started TECOM, Inc. a Department of Defense contractor. In 1981, he founded two new companies, Crawford Technical Services and CTS Nevada. A charter member of the Air Force Association (AFA), the Air
    6.50
    4 votes
    86
    Edward Albert Ostermann

    Edward Albert Ostermann

    • Participated in conflicts: World War II
    Edward Albert Ostermann (November 23, 1882 – May 18, 1969) was a United States Marine Corps major general who received the Medal of Honor for his actions during the U.S. occupation of Haiti. Osterman began his military career in the United States Army in 1899, was commissioned an officer in the U.S. Marine Corps in 1907, and retired as a major general in 1943. Ostermann was born in Columbus, Ohio, on November 23, 1882. He attended the public schools of Milo, Columbus, and Dayton, Ohio. After attending Ohio Northern University at Ada for two and a half years, he enlisted in the U.S. Army on October 21, 1899, and served as a musician. Discharged as chief trumpeter at the expiration of a three-year enlistment, he remained a civilian for about one and a half years and then reenlisted in the Army on April 28, 1904. He was honorably discharged by purchase on November 12, 1905, as a chief trumpeter with the First Band, Artillery Corps. Ostermann accepted a second lieutenant's commission in the Marine Corps on March 20, 1907, and served continuously until his retirement as a major general on January 1, 1943. His long career took him to Cuba, Panama, China, Nicaragua, Mexico, Haiti, Hawaii,
    8.50
    2 votes
    87
    Stanley T. Adams

    Stanley T. Adams

    • Participated in conflicts: Korean War
    Stanley "Stan" Taylor Adams (May 9, 1922 – April 19, 1999) was a United States Army officer who received the U.S. military's highest decoration, the Medal of Honor, for his actions in the Korean War. A native of Kansas, Adams fought in World War II as an enlisted solder. He was sent to Korea as a sergeant soon after the outbreak of war there, and was awarded the Medal of Honor for leading a bayonet charge against a numerically superior force in early 1951. Commissioned as an officer shortly after receiving the medal, Adams continued to serve into the Vietnam War, eventually retiring as a lieutenant colonel. Born in De Soto, Kansas, on May 9, 1922, Adams joined the Army from nearby Olathe in 1942. During World War II, he was wounded in action while fighting in North Africa and Italy. After World War II, he served in Japan as part of the Allied occupation force. In July 1950, shortly after the onset of the Korean War, he was sent to South Korea as a sergeant first class with Company A of the 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Division. In late January 1951, the Eighth Army, of which Adams' unit was a part, launched a counteroffensive against Chinese troops which had begun pushing the
    8.50
    2 votes
    88
    Alexander Schimmelfennig

    Alexander Schimmelfennig

    Alexander Schimmelfennig (July 20, 1824 – September 5, 1865) was a German soldier and political revolutionary, and then an American Civil War general in the Union Army. Schimmelfennig was born in Bromberg (Now Bydgoszcz in Poland) in the Prussian Province of Posen. He enrolled in the military and served in both the 29th Infantry Regiment (von Horn) and the 16th Infantry Regiment (Freiherr von Sparr), which was stationed in Cologne, Germany. There, he became acquainted with some of the more radical German political sources. He was very supportive of the 1848 revolution, but came disillusioned with the outcome of the peace treaty that ended the Schleswig-Holstein War of 1848. He supported the opposition to Prussian attempts to put down unification efforts and was part of the Palatinate military commission that led the defense against the subsequent Prussian invasion. He was twice wounded in the Battle of Rinnthal, rescued, and eventually fled to Switzerland. For his involvement, he was tried in absentia and sentenced to death by the Prussian authorities. He remained in exile in Switzerland, where he met fellow expatriate Carl Schurz, and ultimately these two fled to London via Paris.
    7.33
    3 votes
    89
    Allen Lawrence Pope

    Allen Lawrence Pope

    • Participated in conflicts: Korean War
    Allen Lawrence Pope (born 1928 or '29) is a retired US military and paramilitary aviator. Pope is a native of Miami, Florida and graduate of the University of Florida. Pope's early career was with the United States Air Force, in which he served with distinction flying bombing missions in the Korean War. In 1954 he transferred to the CIA, in which he served with distinction flying transport missions in the First Indochina War. In the Permesta rebellion in Indonesia in 1958, Pope flew bombing missions for the CIA. Indonesian government forces shot down his plane, captured Pope and held him under house arrest for just over four years. In 1960 an Indonesian court condemned him to death but in 1962 President Sukarno released him. Pope returned to the USA and subsequently flew CIA covert missions in other theaters. Pope is now retired and lives in the USA. In 2005 France made him a Chevalier de la Légion d'honneur for his service in Indochina. After university, Pope entered the USAF and served as a first lieutenant in the Korean War. He flew a Douglas B-26 Invader in combat, winning three Air Medals and a Distinguished Flying Cross. After the war the USAF returned Pope to the USA as an
    7.33
    3 votes
    90
    Charles Bonesteel

    Charles Bonesteel

    • Participated in conflicts: World War II
    General Charles Hartwell Bonesteel III (September 26, 1909 – October 13, 1977) was an American military commander, the son and grandson of American military officers. He served in the United States Army during World War II and the Korean War. In the 1960s, he served for a time as commander United States Forces Korea during the Korean DMZ Conflict (1966-1969). Bonesteel was born on September 26, 1909 in New York City. He was the son of Charles Hartwell Bonesteel, Jr, who served in the United States Army, eventually reaching the rank of major general. As a teenager, he was an Eagle Scout. He was later awarded the Distinguished Eagle Scout Award by the Boy Scouts of America. Bonesteel was a Rhodes Scholar at the University of Oxford. A 1931 graduate of the United States Military Academy, Bonesteel received the lifelong nickname of "Tick." He served in the United States and Europe during World War II in a number of senior staff assignments. With the surrender of Japan imminent, Bonesteel, General George A Lincoln and Colonel Dean Rusk of the Strategy Policy Committee at the Pentagon were tasked with drawing up General Order No. 1 to define the areas of responsibility for US, Soviet and
    7.33
    3 votes
    91
    Gilbert G. Collier

    Gilbert G. Collier

    Gilbert Georgie Collier (December 30, 1930 – July 20, 1953) was a soldier in the United States Army during the Korean War. He posthumously received the Medal of Honor for his actions on July 19, and July 20, 1953. Collier joined the Army from Tichnor, Arkansas in 1951. Rank and organization: Sergeant (then Cpl.), U.S. Army, Company F, 223d Infantry Regiment, 40th Infantry Division Place and date: Near Tutayon, Korea, 19-July 20, 1953 Entered service at: Tichnor Ark. Born: December 30, 1930, Hunter, Ark. G.O. No.: 3, January 12, 1955 Citation: Sgt. Collier, a member of Company F, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and indomitable courage above and beyond the call of duty in action against the enemy. Sgt. Collier was pointman and assistant leader of a combat patrol committed to make contact with the enemy. As the patrol moved forward through the darkness, he and his commanding officer slipped and fell from a steep, 60-foot cliff and were injured. Incapacitated by a badly sprained ankle which prevented immediate movement, the officer ordered the patrol to return to the safety of friendly lines. Although suffering from a painful back injury, Sgt. Collier elected to remain
    7.33
    3 votes
    92
    Sheila E. Widnall

    Sheila E. Widnall

    Sheila Marie Evans Widnall (born July 13, 1938) is an American aerospace researcher and Institute Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She served as United States Secretary of the Air Force between 1993 and 1997, making her the first female Secretary of the Air Force and first woman to lead an entire branch of the U.S. military in the Department of Defense. Widnall graduated from MIT with an S.B. in 1960, S.M. in 1961, and Sc.D. in 1964, all in Aeronautics. She was appointed as the Abby Rockefeller Mauzé Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics in 1986 and joined the Engineering Systems Division, was Chair of the Faculty 1979–1981, and has served as MIT's Associate Provost from 1992–1993. In 1988 she was the President of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. President of the United States Bill Clinton announced her nomination to be Secretary of the Air Force on the Fourth of July, 1993. The Senate received her nomination July 22, 1993, and confirmed her two weeks later on August 5, 1993, 183 days after inauguration and 197 after the office became vacant. During her tenure she handled the Kelly Flinn scandal. She was elected to the National
    7.33
    3 votes
    93
    Thomas N. Barnes

    Thomas N. Barnes

    • Participated in conflicts: Korean War
    Thomas N. Barnes, CMSgt USAF (ret.) (November 16, 1930 – March 17, 2003) was the fourth Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force and the first and to date only African-American in that position. He was also the first African-American Senior Enlisted Advisor in any of the Armed Forces of the United States. CMSAF Barnes served as Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force from October 1973 to July 1977. He was key in bringing many African-American related issues to the attention of senior military leaders. In April 1949 Barnes enlisted the U.S. Air Force and received his basic training at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas. He later attended Aircraft and Engine School and Hydraulic Specialist School at Chanute Technical Training Center, Ill. In October 1950 he was assigned to the 4th Troop Carrier Squadron of the 62nd Troop Carrier Group at McChord Air Force Base, Wash. In November 1950, aged 20, Barnes transferred with the 4th Troop Carrier Squadron to Ashiya, Japan, in support of the Korean War. Shortly after arrival in Japan, he completed on-the-job training for flight engineer duties. Then, due to low unit manning, he performed both flight engineer and hydraulic specialist duties. In
    7.33
    3 votes
    94
    Carl E. Vuono

    Carl E. Vuono

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    Carl Edward Vuono (born October 18, 1934) is a retired United States Army General who served as the Chief of Staff of the United States Army from 1987 to 1991. He was born on 18 October 1934 in Monongahela, Pennsylvania. He is of Italian and Finnish ancestry. He began his career as a field artillery officer after graduating from the United States Military Academy, in West Point, New York. After graduating with the class of 1957, he served three tours in Vietnam as an artillery battalion executive officer with the 1st Infantry Division in 1966-67; executive officer of Division Artillery, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile) in 1970; and as commander, 1st Battalion, 77th Artillery in 1970-1971. Vuono rose through the ranks quickly, serving several times in the Army's Training and Doctrine Command, in which he eventually became its commander in 1986. During his military career, he received many military awards and honors including the Army Distinguished Service Medal (with two oak leaf clusters), the Defense Distinguished Service Medal, the Navy Distinguished Service Medal, the Air Force Distinguished Service Medal, the Legion of Merit, and the Bronze Star (with Valor device and six oak
    6.25
    4 votes
    95
    Edward Needles Hallowell

    Edward Needles Hallowell

    Edward "Ned" Needles Hallowell (November 3, 1836–July 26, 1871) was an officer in the Union Army during the American Civil War, commanding the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry following the death of Colonel Robert Gould Shaw at the Second Battle of Fort Wagner in 1863. Edward grew up in a well-to-do Quaker family in Philadelphia. His father Morris was part owner and operator of Hallowell & Company of 33 South Third Street, Philadelphia. The firm predominantly imported and sold silk from India and China. Edward's father was also a passioante abolitionist. The family was far more than passive meeting attenders. The family's summer home was employed as a stop on the Underground Railroad. Edward and the other children of Morris and Hannah shared the abolitionist views of their parents. His brother Richard Price Hallowell was one of the members of the "Black Committee" that Governor Andrew of Massachusetts selected to inquire of the willingness of prospective candidates to serve in officer positions in the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. He had two children, Charlott and Emily Hallowell, with his wife, Charlotte Bartlett Wilhelmina Swett. Hallowell was a stock broker before
    6.25
    4 votes
    96
    John A. Pittman

    John A. Pittman

    • Participated in conflicts: Korean War
    John Albert Pittman (October 15, 1928 – April 8, 1995) was a soldier in the United States Army during the Korean War. He received the Medal of Honor for his actions on November 26, 1950. He is buried in New Hope Church Cemetery, Blackhawk, Caroll County, Mississippi. Rank and organization: Sergeant, U.S. Army, Company C, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division Place and date: Near Kujangdong, Korea, November 26, 1950 Entered service at: Carrollton, Mississippi Born: October 15, 1928, Carrollton, Mississippi G.O. No.: 39, June 4, 1951 Citation: Sgt. Pittman, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty in action against the enemy. He volunteered to lead his squad in a counterattack to regain commanding terrain lost in an earlier engagement. Moving aggressively forward in the face of intense artillery, mortar, and small-arms fire he was wounded by mortar fragments. Disregarding his wounds he continued to lead and direct his men in a bold advance against the hostile standpoint. During this daring action, an enemy grenade was thrown in the midst of his squad endangering the lives of his comrades. Without hesitation, Sgt. Pittman
    6.25
    4 votes
    97
    Mike Mangold

    Mike Mangold

    Mike Mangold (born October 10, 1955) is a Boeing 767 commercial pilot for American Airlines and an aerobatics pilot. Mangold competed in the Red Bull Air Race World Series from 2004 through 2009, where he repeatedly placed first and won the World Championship in the 2005 World Series, as well as the 2007 World Series. His nickname is "Mongo". Mangold was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, and is the oldest of three children (Robert and Frank). He moved to California at 3 years old and then to Pennsylvania for his high school years. Mangold began his aviation career in 1974 as a skydiver while attending the United States Air Force Academy. He went on to USAF pilot training, learned to fly fighters, eventually attending the United States Air Force Fighter Weapons School. Mangold graduated first in his class earned the "Outstanding Graduate" award. During his military career Mike served in the Pacific and Conus theaters, flying nuclear, conventional, smart weapons, and air intercept missions in the F-4 Phantom, including the F-4G "Wild Weasel". After leaving active duty he became a commercial airline pilot, starting his competitive aerobatic and air show career in 1990. In 2004 Mike got into
    6.25
    4 votes
    98
    Morris Davis

    Morris Davis

    Colonel Morris D. Davis (born July 31, 1958) is a United States Air Force officer and lawyer, was appointed to serve as the third Chief Prosecutor in the Guantanamo military commissions. He resigned from the position and retired from active duty in October 2008. Davis has received the following awards and recognition. Unlike his predecessors, Fred Borch and Robert L. Swann, Davis has been a visible public figure. His statements have triggered controversy. A National Post article published January 10, 2006 contained extensive quotes from Davis's arguments before the commission, including at one in which Davis said: "Thanks to the American medics who stepped over their dead friend and tended to Mr. Khadr, he's alive today," SFC Christopher Speer, a Special Forces medic, was fatally wounded along with two coalition forces, and multiple U.S. forces were wounded and evacuated as a result of the firefight (U.S. v Omar Khadr, Nov 2005). Though medics did not specifically step over Speer's body to tend to Omar Khadr's wounds, two other dead coalition forces were on the ground as Khadr was receiving treatment and evacuation. SFC Speer was also evacuated from the scene and died in a hospital
    7.00
    3 votes
    99
    Scott J. Horowitz

    Scott J. Horowitz

    Scott Jay "Doc" Horowitz (born March 24, 1957) is a retired American astronaut and a veteran of four space shuttle missions. After earning his undergraduate degree in engineering from California State University, Northridge in 1974-1978, Horowitz earned a doctorate in aerospace engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology (1982) and worked as a scientist for Lockheed Company. He joined the United States Air Force and flew as a T-38 and F-15 pilot while also teaching courses in aircraft design and propulsion at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and later California State University, Fresno. He graduated from the United States Air Force Test Pilot School in Dec, 1990 as a member of class 90-A. Horowitz was selected as an astronaut candidate by NASA in 1992, and piloted missions STS-75 (1996), STS-82 (1997) and STS-101 (2000). He commanded mission STS-105, a visit to the International Space Station for equipment and crew transfer. Horowitz retired from the United States Air Force and NASA in October, 2004. He returned to NASA in September, 2005 to become the Associate Administrator for the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate, in charge of the return of America to the
    7.00
    3 votes
    100
    Daniel P. Leaf

    Daniel P. Leaf

    Dan “Fig” Leaf became the Director, Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies (APCSS) in January 2012. Prior to that, he worked in the defense industry as vice president of full spectrum initiatives at Northrop Grumman Information Systems. Formerly the Deputy Commander of U.S. Pacific Command (PACOM), Lt. Gen. Leaf retired from the U.S. Air Force in 2008 after more than 33 years of service. Other assignments during his Air Force career included Vice Commander of Air Force Space Command, Air Force Director of Operational Requirements, and multiple commands at squadron, group and wing levels. He was a member of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board from 2009 through 2011. Lt. Gen. (Ret.) Leaf was a command pilot with more than 3,600 flight hours, including F-15 and F-16 combat missions. His decorations include the Defense Distinguished Service Medal, the Air Force Distinguished Service Medal, the Legion of Merit, the Bronze Star and the Air Medal. A native of Shawano, Wisconsin, Lt. Gen. Leaf earned a bachelor’s degree in political science from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and earned his commission as a distinguished graduate of the university’s Air Force ROTC program in
    6.00
    4 votes
    101
    Emerson Opdycke

    Emerson Opdycke

    Samuel Emerson Opdycke (January 7, 1830 – April 25, 1884) was a businessman and Union brigadier general during the American Civil War. Opdycke was born on a farm in Hubbard, Ohio, to a military family. His father fought in the War of 1812 and his grandfather was a captain in New Jersey militia in the American Revolution. His older brother Henry would serve in the Kansas cavalry during the Civil War. Opdycke was educated in the Hubbard schools. He engaged in various business pursuits in Ohio and California. Opdycke enlisted immediately following the First Battle of Bull Run and was commissioned a first lieutenant in the 41st Ohio Infantry on August 26, 1861. As a captain, he fought in the Battle of Shiloh. He resigned in September 1862 to help recruit the 125th Ohio, in which he became the lieutenant colonel on October 1, 1862, and the colonel on January 14, 1863. His regiment earned fame in the defense of Horseshoe Ridge at the Battle of Chickamauga. In command of a demi-brigade, Opdycke's men were some of the first to reach the summit of Missionary Ridge during the Battles for Chattanooga. He fought throughout the Atlanta Campaign with the Army of the Cumberland and was badly
    6.00
    4 votes
    102
    James M. McCoy

    James M. McCoy

    Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force James M. McCoy (born July 30, 1930) was the sixth Chief Master Sergeant appointed to the highest Non-commissioned officer position in the United States Air Force. Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force James M. McCoy was adviser to Secretary of the Air Force Hans Mark and Chief of Staff of the Air Force Gen. Lew Allen Jr. on matters concerning welfare, effective utilization and progress of the enlisted members of the Air Force. He was the sixth chief master sergeant appointed to this ultimate noncommissioned officer position. McCoy was born in Creston, Iowa, and he graduated from Maur Hill High School, Atchison, Kansas, in 1948. He entered the U.S. Air Force in January 1951 after attending St. Benedict's College in Atchison and St. Ambrose College in Davenport, Iowa. He received a bachelor of science degree in business administration from Centenary College of Louisiana in 1966. He is an honor graduate of the Second Air Force Noncommissioned Officer Academy and graduated with the first class of the U.S. Air Force Senior Noncommissioned Officer Academy at Gunter Air Force Station, Alabama, in March 1973. After basic training at Lackland Air
    6.00
    4 votes
    103
    Pearce Bailey

    Pearce Bailey

    • Participated in conflicts: World War I
    Pierce Bailey (1865–1922) was an American neurologist and psychiatrist, educated at Princeton and Columbia Universities. He became a consultant in several New York hospitals and with Collins and Frankel founded the Neurological Institute. He was also appointed an associate professor of neurology in Columbia. On the entry of the United States into World War I, he was appointed chief of the division of neurology and psychiatry in the United States army with the rank of colonel. He perfected a system for weeding out defectives which is said to have been used as a model by the Allies. His major literary efforts comprised a translation of Golobievski's Atlas and Epitome of Diseases Caused by Accident (1900) and a monograph Accident and Injury; Relation to the Nervous System (1906), which was later expanded into Diseases of the Nervous System Resulting from Accident and Injury, a valuable work for the medical world. At the time of his death, Bailey was chairman of the New York State Committee for Mental Defectives.
    6.00
    4 votes
    104
    Charles B. Eichelberger

    Charles B. Eichelberger

    Charles B. Eichelberger was an officer in the United States Army. From November 22, 1989 to September 30, 1991, Eichelberger, then a Lieutenant General, served as the Deputy Chief of Staff for Intelligence, Headquarters, Department of the Army. General Eichelberger is a member of the Military Intelligence Hall of Fame and a graduate of Georgia Military College.
    8.00
    2 votes
    105
    Charles McCawley

    Charles McCawley

    • Participated in conflicts: Mexican–American War
    Charles Grymes McCawley (January 29, 1827 – October 13, 1891) was the eighth Commandant of the Marine Corps and served as an officer in the United States Marine Corps during the Mexican-American War and the American Civil War. Born at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, McCawley was appointed a second lieutenant in the Marine Corps on March 3, 1847. He took part in the Battle of Chapultepec and the capture of Mexico City during the Mexican-American War. (It is this battle which is commemorated in the Marine Hymn's words, "From the Halls of Montezuma....") He was brevetted first lieutenant September 13, 1847, for gallantry in those actions. In the Civil War, he aided in the capture of Port Royal, South Carolina, November 7, 1861 and led a detachment of 200 Marines to reoccupy the Norfolk Navy Yard, May 1862. He subsequently commanded Marine detachments during operations in Charleston Harbor against Forts Wagner, Gregg, and Sumter. For gallant and meritorious conduct during the boat attack on Fort Sumter, September 8, 1863, he was brevetted major. In 1876, he was appointed colonel commandant, the highest post in the Marine Corps, and served in that position until he retired in 1891. In 1883,
    8.00
    2 votes
    106
    Charles W. Brooks

    Charles W. Brooks

    Charles Wayland Brooks (March 8, 1897 – January 14, 1957) was a Republican U.S. Senator from Illinois from 1940 to 1949. He was born in West Bureau, Illinois and during World War I Brooks served as a first lieutenant in the United States Marines from 1917 to 1919; while in combat he was wounded several times. Wayland Brooks ran for Governor of Illinois in 1936 but was defeated by incumbent Democrat Henry Horner. In 1940 Brooks was elected to fill the senate vacancy caused by the death of J. Hamilton Lewis by a very narrow margin. Brooks was reelected in 1942 and ran for reelection in 1948 but was defeated by Democrat Paul Douglas. He died in Chicago, Illinois. Brooks married Mary Elizabeth Thomas Peavey, a widow and daughter of U.S. Senate colleague John W. Thomas of Idaho, in 1945. They remained married to his death. Mary Brooks later became a member of the Idaho Senate and for eight years was Director of the United States Mint during the Nixon and Ford administrations. His step-son, John Peavey, is a Democratic politician in Idaho.
    8.00
    2 votes
    107
    Christopher Loria

    Christopher Loria

    Christopher Joseph "Gus" Loria (b. July 9, 1960 in Newton, Massachusetts) is a retired United States Marine Corps Colonel and a medically retired NASA astronaut. He was originally scheduled to fly on STS-113 as pilot, however he was grounded from spaceflight due to a severe back injury. Born July 9, 1960 in Belmont, Massachusetts. He considers Munford, Tennessee, his hometown. He has three children. His mother, Joan Loria, resides in Belmont, Massachusetts. His father, Robert L. Loria, is deceased. On November 10, 2007 he married U.S. Navy Lieutenant Commander Jamie Ann Fraser. Loria graduated from Belmont High School in 1978 and the U.S. Naval Academy Preparatory School in 1979. He entered the U.S. Naval Academy shortly after and graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in general engineering in 1983. He later completed 30 credits of coursework toward a Master of Science degree in aeronautical engineering at the Florida Institute of Technology, earned a Master in Public Administration from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University in 2004 and an Executive Certificate in Business Management and Leadership from the MIT Sloan School of Management. Loria
    8.00
    2 votes
    108
    Christopher Speer

    Christopher Speer

    Sergeant First Class (SFC) Christopher James Speer (September 9, 1973 – August 6, 2002) was a U.S. Army combat medic and an armed member of a special operations team who was fatally wounded during a skirmish in Afghanistan on July 27, 2002. Speer, who was not wearing a helmet at the time because the mission called for indigenous clothing, suffered a head wound from a grenade and succumbed to his injuries approximately two weeks later. Speer enlisted in the U.S. Army in July 1992 and, after initial training as a combat medic, was assigned to the Army Hospital at Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania until 1994. He received 18 Delta combat medic training at the Joint Special Operations University at Hurlburt Field, Florida. Speer was assigned to the Third Special Forces Group upon completing training as a Special Forces medic in 1997. As part of the 1st SFOD-D known as Delta Force which is based at Fort Bragg, North Carolina he deployed to Afghanistan in Spring 2002 as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. On July 27, 2002, Christopher Speer and a group of four other soldiers on reconnaissance patrol were injured during a firefight upon attacking and forcibly entering a building in Khost
    8.00
    2 votes
    109
    Donald Cook

    Donald Cook

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    Donald Gilbert Cook (August 9, 1934 – December 8, 1967) was a United States Marine Corps officer and a Medal of Honor recipient. Donald Cook was born in Brooklyn, New York. He attended Xavier High School in New York City and St. Michael's College in Vermont. In 1956 he enlisted in the Marine Corps as a private but was quickly sent for officer training in Quantico, Virginia. He was commissioned a second lieutenant in 1957. He held a series of assignments in the Marine Corps and was sent to Vietnam in 1964, where he was wounded and captured by the Viet Cong several weeks later. He was held as a prisoner of war by the Viet Cong in the Republic of Vietnam from December 31, 1964 until his death at age 33. He was posthumously promoted from Captain to Colonel. Although his body was never recovered, his grave can be found in the Memorial Section MI Lot 110. The United States Navy Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS Donald Cook (DDG-75) is named in his honor. Colonel Donald G. Cook Chapter 5 Disabled American Veterans (DAV) of Burlington, Vermont is named in his honor. Col. Donald G. Cook Chapter 5 DAV assists veterans in obtaining compensation for their service-connected
    8.00
    2 votes
    110
    Frank Ross McCoy

    Frank Ross McCoy

    Frank Ross McCoy (October 29, 1874–June 4, 1954) was an American soldier, born in Lewistown, Pennsylvania. He graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1897, was commissioned a 2nd Lieutenant and appointed to the 8th Cavalry. He served on the western front in Cuba, in the Philippines, and in the Santiago campaign. In Cuba and in the Philippines he acted as aide to General Wood and was for several years aide to President Roosevelt after his promotion to Major General. In 1911 he was appointed a member of the General Staff, and in 1917 became a member of the General Staff of the American Expeditionary Force in Europe, where he commanded the 165th Infantry Brigade in 1918. While serving in France, he wrote: Principles of Military Training (1918). From 1918 to 1919 he was Director of Transportation in the American Expeditionary Force. In 1919 he served as chief of staff in the American military mission to Armenia. From 1926 to 1929 he commanded the 3rd Infantry Brigade and the 1st Field Artillery Brigade. From 1932 to 1933, he served on the Lytton Commission investigating the Japanese military invasion and occupation of Manchuria. He retired from the army in 1938, but
    8.00
    2 votes
    111
    Robert H. Young

    Robert H. Young

    Robert Harley Young (March 4, 1929 – November 5, 1950) was a soldier in the United States Army during the Korean War. He posthumously received the Medal of Honor for his actions on October 9, 1950, and was promoted to the rank of Corporal. Young is buried at Golden Gate National Cemetery in San Bruno, California. Rank and organization: Private First Class, U.S. Army, Company E, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division Place and date: North of Kaesong, Korea, October 9, 1950 Entered service at: Vallejo, Calif. Born: March 4, 1929, Oroville, California G.O. No.: 65, August 2, 1951 Citation: Pfc. Young distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty in action. His company, spearheading a battalion drive deep in enemy territory, suddenly came under a devastating barrage of enemy mortar and automatic weapons crossfire which inflicted heavy casualties among his comrades and wounded him in the face and shoulder. Refusing to be evacuated, Pfc. Young remained in position and continued to fire at the enemy until wounded a second time. As he awaited first aid near the company command post the enemy attempted an enveloping movement.
    8.00
    2 votes
    112
    Alexander R. Skinker

    Alexander R. Skinker

    Captain Alexander Rives Skinker (October 13, 1883 – September 26, 1918) was a Medal of Honor recipient during World War I. He graduated from Washington University in St. Louis in 1905. He served in the Missouri National Guard from 1903 to 1908, and entered the Army as a commissioned officer in 1916. He was awarded the medal for leading an attack on German pillboxes in the Hindenburg Line during the Battle of the Argonne. Skinker was killed in the attack. Rank and organization: Captain, U.S. Army, 138th Infantry, 35th Division. Place and date: At Cheppy, France, September 26, 1918. Entered service at: St. Louis, Mo. Birth: St. Louis, Mo. G.O. No.: 13, W.D., 1919. Citation: Unwilling to sacrifice his men when his company was held up by terrific machinegun fire from iron pill boxes in the Hindenburg Line, Capt. Skinker personally led an automatic rifleman and a carrier in an attack on the machine-guns. The carrier was killed instantly, but Capt. Skinker seized the ammunition and continued through an opening in the barbed wire, feeding the automatic rifle until he, too, was killed.
    9.00
    1 votes
    113
    Donald R. Gardner

    Donald R. Gardner

    Major General Donald R. Gardner is a retired United States Marine Corps officer and former president of the Marine Corps University. Major General Gardner graduated from Memphis State University in 1960 with a Bachelor of Science degree in History. He also holds a Master of Arts degree in History from Memphis State University. He is a graduate of the Marine Corps Command and Staff College and a distinguished graduate of the Naval War College. Gardner enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve in 1955, reaching the rank of sergeant. He was commissioned a second lieutenant in Reserves in 1960 after earning his Bachelor's Degree. Major General Gardner’s command assignments include: Platoon Commander, 2nd Battalion, 6th Marines (1961); Company Commander, 2nd Reconnaissance Battalion(1963); Company Commander, 3rd Reconnaissance Battalion (1966–67); Commanding Officer, 3rd Battalion, 2nd Marines (1977); Commanding General, Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, North Carolina (1988); Commanding General, III Marine Expeditionary Force and Commanding General, Marine Corps Bases, Japan (1992–94); Commanding General, 3rd Marine Division (Rein) (1993). Major General Gardner’s staff assignments
    9.00
    1 votes
    114
    George Van Horn Moseley

    George Van Horn Moseley

    George Van Horn Moseley (September 28, 1874 – November 7, 1960) was a United States Army general. Following his retirement in 1938, he became controversial for his anti-immigrant and anti-Semitic views. Moseley was born in Evanston, Illinois, on September 28, 1874. He graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1899 and was commissioned second lieutenant in the cavalry. He served in the Philippines twice, from 1900 to 1903 and 1906 to 1907, where his assignments included commanding a troop of the 1st Cavalry and serving as Aide-de-Camp to Generals J. M. Bell and J. M. Lee. In 1901 Moseley, accompanied by only one other officer, without escort and under conditions of great danger, penetrated a major Philippine insurgent stronghold. 2nd Lt. Moseby and st Lt. George Curry convinced Brigadier General Ludovico Arejola to sign the peace agreement in Taban, Minalabac (Philippines) on 25 March 1901. The honor graduate of the Army School of the Line in 1908, he also graduated from the Army Staff College in 1909 and the Army War College in 1911. Moseley married Mrs. Florence DuBois in July 1930. He held camp and Washington assignments from 1920-1929. He was the executive for the
    9.00
    1 votes
    115
    Hugh L. Scott

    Hugh L. Scott

    Hugh Lenox Scott (September 22, 1853 – April 30, 1934) was a post-Civil War West Point graduate who served as superintendent of West Point from 1906 to 1910, and Chief of Staff of the United States Army from 1914 to 1917, including the first few months of American involvement in World War I. Born September 22, 1853 in Danville, Kentucky, he grew up there and in Princeton, New Jersey where he attended The Lawrenceville School. He graduated from West Point in 1876 (His Cullum Number was 2628), and was commissioned in the Cavalry. For some twenty years thereafter he served on the Western frontier, chiefly with the 7th United States Cavalry. He was assigned to the quarters only recently vacated by the widow of George Armstrong Custer. In fact, Scott was sent out to the Little Big Horn battle site to mark gravesites for Custer's men killed in the battle. He also had the opportunity to interview many of the Native Americans who fought on both sides on that hot June 25, 1876 day. He saw action in campaigns against the Sioux, Nez Perce, Cheyenne and other Indians of the Plains and became an expert in their languages and ways of life. He was promoted to First Lieutenant in June 1878. In
    9.00
    1 votes
    116
    James C. Binnicker

    James C. Binnicker

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    Chief Master Sergeant James C. Binnicker (born July 23, 1938) was the ninth appointed Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force (CMSAF) — the highest non-commissioned officer position in the United States Air Force. James Binnicker was born in Orangeburg, South Carolina, where he graduated from Aiken High School in 1956. He entered the Air Force in August 1957. His first assignment was to the 96th Air Refueling Squadron, Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma, as a life support specialist. His early years include tours in base and wing operations in Hawaii, North Dakota, Georgia, North Carolina, Vietnam, and Taiwan. He served as the Senior Enlisted Advisor for 12th Air Force, Headquarters Pacific Air Forces (PACAF), and Headquarters Tactical Air Command (TAC). He also represented the Air Force as Senior Enlisted Advisor on the President's Commission on Military Compensation. In February 1985, Chief Binnicker was selected for the 33-year extended tenure program. Binnicker served as the Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force from July 1, 1986 to July 1990. Since March 2000, Binnicker has been the president and CEO of the Air Force Enlisted Village (AFEV), a non-profit charity located in Fort
    9.00
    1 votes
    117
    Leroy A. Mendonca

    Leroy A. Mendonca

    Leroy A. Mendonca was a soldier in the United States Army during the Korean War. He posthumously received the Medal of Honor for his actions on July 4, 1951. Leroy was born in Honolulu, Territory of Hawaii, on 2 August 1932, and is of Portuguese ancestry. While attending President William McKinley High School, he was a AJROTC cadet, and graduated in 1950. Rank and organization: Sergeant, U.S. Army, Company B, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division Place and date: Near Chich-on, Korea, July 4, 1951 Entered service at: Honolulu, T.H. Birth: Honolulu, T.H. G.O. No.: 83, September 3, 1952 Citation: Sgt. LeRoy A. Mendonca, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry above and beyond the call of duty in action against the enemy. After his platoon, in an exhaustive fight, had captured Hill 586, the newly won positions were assaulted during the night by a numerically superior enemy force. When the 1st Platoon positions were outflanked and under great pressure and the platoon was ordered to withdraw to a secondary line of defense, Sgt. Mendonca voluntarily remained in an exposed position and covered the platoon's withdrawal. Although under murderous enemy fire, he fired his weapon
    9.00
    1 votes
    118
    Robert Alexander

    Robert Alexander

    • Participated in conflicts: World War I
    Robert Alexander (October 17, 1863 – August 20, 1941) was a soldier in the United States Army, originally from Baltimore, Maryland. As Major General he commanded the United States Army U.S. Army's 77th Infantry Division in France during World War I. He is buried in Arlington National Cemetery in northern Virginia. He joined the Army after rejecting a career in law, and became a Private in 1886 in the 4th Infantry. In 1887, he became the First Sergeant of his Company, and soon after received a promotion to second lieutenant in 1889.
    5.00
    5 votes
    119
    Charles L. Thomas

    Charles L. Thomas

    • Participated in conflicts: World War II
    Major Charles Leroy Thomas (April 17, 1920-February 15, 1980) was a United States Army officer who was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross for his actions while a company commander during the capture of Climbach, France in 1944 — the second African American to be awarded one during World War II. This award was upgraded to the Medal of Honor awarded posthumously in 1997. Prior to the war he had worked as a molder for the Ford Motor Company, and was a student at Wayne State University when he joined the Army in January 1942. He was assigned to the 614th Tank Destroyer Battalion, and sent to Officer Candidate School; he was commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in March 1943 and returned to his battalion, deploying with it to England and then to North-Western Europe. On December 14, 1944, Thomas led a task force storming Climbach, consisting of a platoon from the 756th Tank Battalion and a reinforced company of the 411th Infantry Regiment, 103rd Infantry Division, led by a platoon of his tank destroyers. Approaching Climbach, Thomas' armored scout car was knocked out by enemy fire and he was wounded. The lieutenant helped his crew out of the vehicle, but as he left the car's
    6.67
    3 votes
    120
    Clarence R. Huebner

    Clarence R. Huebner

    • Participated in conflicts: World War II
    Clarence Ralph Huebner (November 24, 1888–September 23, 1972) was a Lieutenant General of the United States Army. A farm boy from Bushton, Kansas who spent almost seven years serving from private to sergeant in the 18th Infantry, Huebner received a regular commission in November 1916. During World War I, he led a company, battalion, and regiment of the 1st Infantry Division—the "Big Red One"—from the first American regimental assault at Cantigny through Soissons, Saint-Mihiel, and the Meuse-Argonne. For his service in this war, he received two Distinguished Service Crosses, a Distinguished Service Medal, and a Silver Star. In 1924, he attended the Command and General Staff School at Fort Leavenworth and served on its faculty from 1929 to 1933. In 1943, General Huebner relieved the popular commander of the 1st Infantry Division, General Terry Allen, in a move engineered by General Omar N. Bradley. While the 1st ID, aka The Big Red One had enjoyed considerable combat success under Allen's leadership, Bradley was highly critical of both Allen and Roosevelt's wartime leadership style, which favored fighting ability over drill and discipline: "While the Allies were parading decorously
    6.67
    3 votes
    121
    Harrison Jeffords

    Harrison Jeffords

    Harrison Jeffords (August 21, 1834 – July 3, 1863) was the colonel of the 4th Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment in the Union Army of the Potomac during the American Civil War. He was noted for his heroism on July 2, 1863 during the Battle of Gettysburg, in which he gave his life while protecting the United States flag. Jeffords was born in Michigan and educated in the common schools. A practicing lawyer during the outbreak of the Civil War, he enlisted in the 4th Michigan Volunteer Infantry and became captain of Company C. He later rose to the command of the regiment as its colonel. He saw action in several of the major battles in the Eastern Theater while serving in the Army of the Potomac. While Colonel Jeffords was back in Michigan on a recruiting trip, the ladies of Monroe, Michigan, presented him with a new national flag to replace the regiment's original flag, which had been badly damaged in recent battles. Jeffords stated that he would defend the flag with his life. During the second day at Gettysburg, the color-bearer of the regiment dropped this flag, and Jeffords advanced to retrieve it. He is said to have shot a Confederate soldier who had seized the flag and grasped
    6.67
    3 votes
    122
    Joseph R. Ouellette

    Joseph R. Ouellette

    Joseph R. Ouellette (May 9, 1930 – September 3, 1950) was a soldier in the United States Army during the Korean War. He posthumously received the Medal of Honor for his actions on August 31, and September 1–3, 1950. Rank and organization: Private First Class, U.S. Army, Company H, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division Place and date: Near Yongsan, Korea, from August 31, to September 3, 1950. Entered service at: Lowell, Mass. Birth: Lowell, Mass. G.O. No.: 25, April 25, 1951. Citation: Pfc. Ouellette distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy in the Makioug-Chang River salient. When an enemy assault cut off and surrounded his unit he voluntarily made a reconnaissance of a nearby hill under intense enemy fire to locate friendly troop positions and obtain information of the enemy's strength and location. Finding that friendly troops were not on the hill, he worked his way back to his unit under heavy fire. Later, when an airdrop of water was made outside the perimeter, he again braved enemy fire in an attempt to retrieve water for his unit. Finding the dropped cans broken and devoid of water, he returned to his unit. His heroic
    6.67
    3 votes
    123
    James D. Halsell

    James D. Halsell

    James Donald Halsell, Jr. (born 29 September 1956) is a retired United States Air Force officer and a former NASA astronaut. He is a veteran of five Space Shuttle missions. He has been quoted as saying he loves floating in zero gravity and watching the earth from space. "It's amazing to hold a handful of Skittles and watch them float away from you," Halsell has said. Halsell was born and raised in West Monroe, Louisiana and attended the United States Air Force Academy. After training as a test pilot, he worked on F-4, F-16 and SR-71 aircraft. Halsell was selected as an astronaut candidate in 1990 and was trained as a Space Shuttle pilot. He piloted missions STS-65 (1994) and STS-74 (1995), and commanded missions STS-83, STS-94 (1997) and STS-101 (2000). Halsell was Space Shuttle Program manager for launch integration at the Kennedy Space Center from 2000–2002, responsible for giving the "go for launch" on 13 Shuttle missions. After the Columbia accident, he led the NASA Return to Flight Planning Team, responsible for converting the recommendations of the accident investigation board into Shuttle Program actions that resulted in resumption of missions in 2005. Halsell earned a
    5.75
    4 votes
    124
    Troy H. Middleton

    Troy H. Middleton

    • Participated in conflicts: World War II
    Lieutenant General Troy Houston Middleton (12 October 1889 – 9 October 1976) was a distinguished soldier-educator who served as a corps commander in Europe during World War II and later as President of Louisiana State University (LSU). He is best known for his decision to hold Bastogne during the Battle of the Bulge, contrary to the recommendation of General George Patton. Enlisting in the United States Army in 1910, Middleton was first assigned to the 29th Infantry Regiment where he worked as a clerk. Here he did not become an infantryman as he had hoped, but he was pressed into service playing football, a sport strongly endorsed by the Army. Following two years of enlisted service, Middleton was transferred to Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, where he was given the opportunity to compete for an officer's commission. Of the 300 individuals who were vying for a commission, 56 were selected, and four of them, including Middleton, would become general officers. As a new second lieutenant, Middleton was assigned to the 7th Infantry Regiment in Galveston, Texas, which was soon pressed into service, responding to events created by the Mexican Revolution. Middleton spent seven months doing
    5.75
    4 votes
    125
    Charles Robert Francis

    Charles Robert Francis

    Charles Robert Francis (b: May 19, 1875 Doylestown, Pennsylvania–July 15, 1946) was a Marine Private who received the Medal of Honor for actions on June 21, 1900, near Tientsin, China during the Boxer Rebellion. He later obtained the rank of Sergeant Major. Sergeant Major Francis is buried in Hollywood Cemetery, California Sec 5, Lot 737, Grave 5. Francis, Charles Robert, Private, U.S. Marine Corps, G.O. Navy Department, No.55, July 19, 1901 Citation: In the presence of the enemy during the battle near Tientsin, China, 21 June 1900, Francis distinguished himself by meritorious conduct.
    7.50
    2 votes
    126
    Denver Randleman

    Denver Randleman

    • Participated in conflicts: World War II
    Staff Sergeant Denver "Bull" Randleman (November 20, 1920 – June 26, 2003) was a non-commissioned officer with Easy Company, 2nd Battalion, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, in the 101st Airborne Division of the United States Army during World War II. Randleman, who was commonly known by his nickname "Bull" Randleman, was portrayed in the HBO miniseries Band of Brothers by Michael Cudlitz. Randleman was born in Rector, Arkansas. Dropping out of high school during his junior year, he left Rector during the Great Depression looking for work and ended up in a foundry in Michigan. He enlisted in the United States Army on August 19, 1942 in Kalamazoo, Michigan shortly after the United States' entry into World War II. He was a member of the famed Band of Brothers of Easy Company, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne. Bull's training originated at Camp Toccoa, Georgia in August 1942 under Captain Herbert Sobel. On June 6, 1944, Randleman, along with the rest of the 101st, 82nd, and British 6th Airborne Divisions, dropped into France, eventually regrouping with Easy Company after missing his landing zone, a fate suffered by many men that night. During the failed Operation
    7.50
    2 votes
    127
    Forrest L. Vosler

    Forrest L. Vosler

    • Participated in conflicts: World War II
    Forrest Lee Vosler, (July 29, 1923 - February 17, 1992) a Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress radio operator, was the second enlisted airman to ever receive a Medal of Honor. Vosler joined the Army Air Forces from Rochester, New York in October 1942. On a mission to Bremen, Germany, radio operator Technical Sergeant Forrest Vosler was hit twice by 20 mm shrapnel after taking the place of one of the gunners. Despite his injuries, he managed to tend to the wounded tail gunner, repair the damaged radio equipment and send off distress signals before the aircraft ditched into the sea. Vosler was awarded the Medal of Honor for his heroism during the mission. Sergeant Vosler was assigned to the 358th Bomb Squadron, 303rd Bomb Group, based at RAF Molesworth, England. At about 8:30 a.m. on December 20, 1943, Sergeant Vosler left on his fourth combat mission. His plane, on its 28th combat flight, was a B-17F named the "Jersey Bounce Jr.," S/N 42-29664. The plane and crew reached the target area of Bremen, Germany, just before noon. The bombers encountered concentrated, accurate and intense flak over Axis territory. In addition to the anti-aircraft fire, about 125 German fighters repeatedly attacked
    7.50
    2 votes
    128
    Glen E. Morrell

    Glen E. Morrell

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    Glen E. Morrell was the seventh Sergeant Major of the Army. He was sworn in on July 1, 1983 and served until July, 1987. He was born in Wick, West Virginia, on May 26, 1936. He served in the United States Army for over 31 years. After his entry on active duty in November 1954 he served in virtually every noncommissioned officer leadership position. His career took him through many CONUS assignments, two tours in Europe, three tours in the Republic of Vietnam and two tours in Panama. Morrell attended Ranger School at Fort Benning, Ga., at the age of forty-one and was selected as the Distinguished Honor Graduate for his class. His units of assignment include the 6th Infantry in Berlin; 14th Armored Cavalry Regiment, Germany; 82d Airborne Division, Fort Bragg, North Carolina; 5th Special Forces Group at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, and three tours in the Republic of Vietnam; two tours with the 7th and 8th Special Forces Group, Panama; 1st Infantry Division, Fort Riley, Kansas; Reserve Officer Training Corps instructor duty with St. John University, Minnesota; 1st Ranger Battalion, 75th Infantry, Fort Stewart, Georgia, Special Forces Detachment (Airborne) Europe; United States Army
    7.50
    2 votes
    129
    John A. Logan

    John A. Logan

    John Alexander Logan, Jr, born Manning Alexander Logan (July 24, 1865–November 11, 1899) was a United States Army officer who posthumously received the Medal of Honor for actions during the Philippine–American War. Logan was the son of Major General, statesman and politician John A. Logan from the American Civil War. A former cadet at West Point as a member of the class of 1887, Major Logan was killed in action while leading his troops in an attack on a much larger force. He is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Youngstown, Ohio. Rank and Organization: Major, 33d Infantry, U.S. Volunteers. Place and Date: At San Jacinto, Philippine Islands, November 11, 1899. Entered Service At: Youngstown, Ohio. Born: July 24, 1865, Carbondale, Ill. Date of Issue: May 3, 1902. Citation: For most distinguished gallantry in leading his battalion upon the entrenchments of the enemy, on which occasion he fell mortally wounded.
    7.50
    2 votes
    130
    Robert D. Gaylor

    Robert D. Gaylor

    Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force Robert D. Gaylor (born May 8, 1930) was the fifth Chief Master Sergeant appointed to the highest enlisted position in the United States Air Force. Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force Robert D. Gaylor was adviser to Secretary of the Air Force John C. Stetson and Chiefs of Staff of the Air Force Gen. David C. Jones and Gen. Lew Allen Jr. on matters concerning welfare, effective utilization and progress of the enlisted members of the Air Force. He was the fifth chief master sergeant appointed to this ultimate noncommissioned officer position. Chief Gaylor was born in Bellevue, Iowa; however, most of his youth was spent in Indiana. He entered the Air Force in September 1948 and was assigned to the security police career field, in which he served until 1957. In September 1957 he served as a military training instructor at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas, until February 1962. He then returned to the security police field until July 1965. During Chief Gaylor's security police years, his early assignments were at James Connally Air Force Base, Texas; Laredo Air Force Base, Texas; Kunsan Air Base, Korea; Tachikawa Air Base, Japan; Columbus Air Force
    5.50
    4 votes
    131
    Jeffrey Feinstein

    Jeffrey Feinstein

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    Lieutenant Colonel (USAF Retired) Jeffrey S. Feinstein was a career officer in the United States Air Force. In 1972 during the Vietnam War, while flying as a weapon systems officer (WSO) aboard F-4 Phantom IIs, Feinstein downed five enemy aircraft, thereby becoming a flying ace, the last ace produced by the USAF. Born in Chicago, Illinois on January 29, 1945, Feinstein enlisted in the Air Force in 1963 to attend the United States Air Force Academy Preparatory School. He subsequently entered the United States Air Force Academy in 1964 and graduated in 1968. His actions, for which he received multiple awards of the Distinguished Flying Cross and Silver Star for his first four kills and the Air Force Cross for his fifth kill, took place prior to and during Operation Linebacker in 1972 while Feinstein, assigned to the 80th TFS, was detached to the 13th Tactical Fighter Squadron, part of the 432d Tactical Reconnaissance Wing, based at Udorn Royal Thai Air Force Base, Thailand. His nickname/tactical callsign was "Fang." Having originally been designated as an Air Force Navigator, he was given a vision waiver after Vietnam (Feinstein wore glasses to correct mild nearsightedness to 20/20),
    6.33
    3 votes
    132
    John A. Powers

    John A. Powers

    • Participated in conflicts: Korean War
    John Anthony Powers (August 22, 1922–December 31, 1979), better known as Shorty Powers, was an American public affairs officer for NASA from 1959 to 1963 during Project Mercury. A US Air Force lieutenant colonel and war veteran, he was known as the "voice of the astronauts," the "voice of Mercury Control," and the "eighth astronaut." He received his nickname for his 5-foot, 6-inch (1.68 m) height. Powers was born in Toledo, Ohio; but when he was an infant his family moved to Downers Grove, Illinois where he was a cheerleader at Downers Grove North High School. After graduation, he enlisted in the Army Air Corps in 1942 and became a C-46 and C-47 pilot with the 349th Troop Carrier Group. He was one of six pilots who volunteered to learn the technique of snatching fully loaded troop gliders off the ground, and spent the end of World War II ferrying gasoline in cargo planes to Gen. George Patton's command in Germany. Powers left the service in January 1947; but was recalled to active duty in December 1948 and flew as part of the Berlin Airlift, making 185 round-trip flights. He later volunteered for the Korean War. He flew 55 night missions in B-26 bombers with the 13th Bombardment
    6.33
    3 votes
    133
    Oscar Koch

    Oscar Koch

    • Participated in conflicts: World War II
    Oscar W. Koch (January 10, 1897, Milwaukee, Wisconsin - May 16, 1970, Carbondale, Illinois) was a brigadier general in the U.S. Army and the Third Army intelligence officer (G-2) while the army was commanded by General George S. Patton in World War II. Koch began his military career in 1915 with Troop A, First Wisconsin Cavalry and thereafter served on the Mexican border with General John J. Pershing. Koch subsequently served in World War I in France, and, in 1920, was commissioned an officer in the regular army cavalry. Having made the acquaintance of General Patton while serving in the army, Koch was called by Patton to be his chief of staff during the invasion of French Morocco in November 1942. Subsequently, Koch served as the senior intelligence officer for Patton as he successively commanded the II Corps, I Armored Corps, Seventh Army, and finally Third Army. Early in December 1944, Koch famously warned Patton that intelligence indicators pointed to an imminent large-scale German offensive against the U.S. VIII Corps in the Ardennes. This warning was accepted by Patton and resulted in Third Army devising contingency plans to swiftly change the axis of their operations—plans
    6.33
    3 votes
    134
    Turney W. Leonard

    Turney W. Leonard

    • Participated in conflicts: World War II
    Turney White Leonard (June 18, 1921 - November 6, 1944) was a United States Army officer who received the U.S. military's highest award, the Medal of Honor, for his actions in World War II. A native of Dallas, Texas, Leonard graduated from Dallas Technical High formerly Dallas High School, then Texas A&M University in 1942 with a bachelor's degree in agriculture. Commissioned in 1942 via the ROTC program at Texas A&M, Leonard was serving as a platoon leader in Company C, 893rd Tank Destroyer Battalion, which was attached in October 1944 to support the 112th Infantry Regiment of the 28th Infantry Division during that unit's assault on the Siegfried Line through the Hürtgen Forest area along the German-Belgian border. Between 4–6 November 1944, Leonard's company was heavily engaged in the fighting in and around the village of Kommerscheidt west of Schmidt. Throughout the three days, he repeatedly exposed himself to hostile fire. When all officers of the infantry unit his platoon was supporting became incapacitated, Leonard assumed command. Already seriously wounded in the arm on the first day, he refused medical evacuation to remain with his troops. On 6 November, a mortar round
    6.33
    3 votes
    135
    David Dixon Porter

    David Dixon Porter

    Major General David Dixon Porter (April 29, 1877 – February 25, 1944), a Medal of Honor recipient, was a United States Marine Corps officer who served in the Philippine-American War and in World War I. He was the son of Lieutenant Colonel Carlile Patterson Porter (1846–1914), USMC, grandson of Admiral David Dixon Porter (1813–1891), and great-grandson of Commodore David Porter (1780–1843). Captain Porter received the Medal of Honor during the Philippine-American War for efforts in battle at the junction of the Cadacan and Sohoton Rivers, Samar on November 17, 1901. He was also one of the Officers who participated in Waller's march across Samar. Porter retired from the Marine Corps after World War I and was promoted to Major General on the retired list. He is buried in Arlington National Cemetery Arlington, Virginia. His grave can be found in section 2, lot 3479. For extraordinary heroism and eminent and conspicuous conduct in battle at the junction of the Cadacan and Sohoton Rivers, Samar, P. I., November 17, 1901. Citation: In command of the columns upon their uniting ashore in the Sohoton Region, Col. Porter (then Capt.) made a surprise attack on the fortified cliffs and
    8.00
    1 votes
    136
    George William Casey

    George William Casey

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    George William Casey, Sr. (March 9, 1922 – July 7, 1970) was a United States Army Major General, who commanded the 1st Cavalry Division (United States), in South Vietnam during the Vietnam War. His son, George William Casey, Jr. served as the 36th Chief of Staff of the United States Army from April 2007 to April 2011. George William Casey was born on March 9, 1922. He attended Harvard College for a year before transferring to the United States Military Academy at West Point, graduating with a Bachelor of Science degree in 1945. He later earned a Master of Arts degree in international relations from Georgetown University in 1958 and a Master of Business Administration degree from George Washington University in 1965. He went on to conduct postgraduate study at the Center for International Affairs at Harvard University. He served at the end of World War II. He also served in combat during the Korean War and the Vietnam War. On July 7, 1970, he was killed in a helicopter crash in South Vietnam when his UH-1H hit a mountain near Bao Luc as he was enroute to Cam Ranh to visit wounded troops. General Casey was survived by his wife, three daughters and two sons. He is buried in Arlington
    8.00
    1 votes
    137
    Peter Julien Ortiz

    Peter Julien Ortiz

    Colonel Pierre (Peter) Julien Ortiz OBE (July 5, 1913 - May 16, 1988) was one of the most decorated Marine officers of World War II. He served in both Africa and Europe throughout the war, as a member of the Office of Strategic Services (OSS). Although born in New York City from a Spanish-American mother and French-American father, Ortiz was educated at the University of Grenoble in France. He spoke ten languages including French, German and Arabic. On February 1, 1932, at the age of 19, he joined the French Foreign Legion for five years service in North Africa. He was sent first to the Legion's training camp at Sidi Bel-Abbes, Algeria. He later served in Morocco, where he was promoted to corporal in 1933 and sergeant in 1935. He was awarded the Croix de Guerre twice during a campaign against the Rif. When his contract expired, he went to Hollywood to serve as a technical adviser for war films. With the outbreak of World War II and the United States still neutral, he re-enlisted in the Legion in 1939 as a sergeant. He was wounded in action and imprisoned by the Germans during the 1940 Battle of France. He escaped the following year and made his way to the United States. He joined
    8.00
    1 votes
    138
    William F. Dean

    William F. Dean

    • Participated in conflicts: Korean War
    William Frishe Dean, Sr. (August 1, 1899 – August 24, 1981) was a major general in the United States Army during World War II and the Korean War. He received the Medal of Honor for his actions on July 20 and 21, 1950, during the Battle of Taejon in South Korea. Dean was also the highest ranking American officer captured by the North Koreans during the Korean War. Born in Illinois, Dean attended the University of California at Berkeley before graduating with a commission in the US Army through the Reserve Officer's Training Corps (ROTC) in 1921. Slowly rising up the ranks in the inter-war years, Dean worked a desk job in Washington D.C. for much of World War II before being transferred to the 44th Infantry Division which he later commanded during the final days of the war, and was awarded a Distinguished Service Cross. He is best known for commanding the 24th Infantry Division at the outbreak of the Korean War. Dean led the division for several weeks in unsuccessful delaying battles against the North Koreans, before he led his division in making a last stand at Taejon. During the confused retreat from that city, Dean was separated from his soldiers and badly injured, and was
    8.00
    1 votes
    139
    William Robert Button

    William Robert Button

    William Robert Button (December 3, 1895 – April 15, 1921) was a United States Marine Corps Corporal who received the Medal of Honor for his actions in killing Charlemagne Peralte on October 31,–November 1, 1919. Second Lieutenant Herman H. Hanneken was also awarded the Medal of Honor on that date. Button later obtained the rank of Sergeant before dying at age 25 from malaria. Button was born December 3, 1895 in St. Louis, Missouri and after joining the Marine Corps was sent to fight in Haiti. He was in command of a group of Gendarmerie near Grande Riviere, Republic of Haiti, on October 31-November 1, 1919 when they engaged a group of Haitians opposed to the U.S. occupation. By the end of fighting Charlemagne Peralte, alleged in Button's citation to be "the supreme bandit chief in the Republic of Haiti", had been killed and about 1200 of his followers had been killed, captured or dispursed. For risking his life in battle he, along with Sergeant Herman H. Hanneken, were cited for bravery, and recommended for the United States militaries highest decoration for bravery, the Medal of Honor, for their actions. The medal was approved by the Secretary of the Navy on June 10, 1920, and
    8.00
    1 votes
    140
    Bernard E. Trainor

    Bernard E. Trainor

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    Bernard E. Trainor (born September 2, 1928) is journalist and a retired United States Marine Corps lieutenant general. He served in the Marine Corps for 39 years in both staff and command capacities. After retiring from the Marine Corps, he began working as the chief military correspondent for the New York Times. He is currently a military analyst for NBC and has also written two books. The actress Saxon Trainor is his daughter. Bernard E. Trainor was born on September 2, 1928 in New York City. In 1946, Trainor enlisted in the United States Marine Corps after high school and served until his selection as a midshipman in the Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps (NROTC) in 1947. He then attended the College of the Holy Cross, where he earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in history and was commissioned a Marine second lieutenant upon graduation in June 1951. He then went to The Basic School in Marine Corps Base Quantico, Virginia, and after completion in December 1951, he was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 1st Marines, 1st Marine Division in Korea where he served as an infantry platoon commander. Returning to the United States in September 1952, he served with the 8th Marines, 2nd
    7.00
    2 votes
    141
    Charles Bassett

    Charles Bassett

    Charles Arthur "Charlie" Bassett II (December 30, 1931 – February 28, 1966) was a United States Air Force test pilot. He was selected as a NASA astronaut in 1963 and assigned to Gemini 9, but died in an airplane crash during training for his first spaceflight. Bassett was born in Dayton, Ohio, on December 30, 1931. He was active in the Boy Scouts of America, where he achieved its second highest rank, Life Scout. After graduating from Berea High School in Berea in 1950, he attended Ohio State University from 1950 to 1952, and Texas Technological College, now Texas Tech University, from 1958 to 1960. He received a bachelor of science degree in electrical engineering with honors from Texas Tech; he did graduate work at University of Southern California. He graduated from the Aerospace Research Pilot School and the Air Force Experimental Pilot School and became a Captain in the U.S. Air Force. He served as an experimental test pilot and engineering test pilot in the Fighter Projects Office at Edwards Air Force Base, California. He logged over 3,600 hours-flying time, including over 2,900 hours in a jet aircraft. Bassett was one of the third group of astronauts named by NASA in October
    7.00
    2 votes
    142
    Eric W. Benken

    Eric W. Benken

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force Eric W. Benken (born August 20, 1951) was the twelfth Chief Master Sergeant appointed to the highest noncommissioned officer (NCO) position in the United States Air Force. Chief Benken was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, and entered the Air Force in March 1970. His background was in information management. He served in operational, maintenance and support units at every level of command from squadron through Major Command (MAJCOM). Chief Benken served in Taiwan, Korea, and South Vietnam, and in a joint service (NATO) assignment at Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe (SHAPE). He served as Senior Enlisted Advisor to 12th Air Force and United States Air Forces in Europe (USAFE). While at USAFE, the command was involved in operations such as Provide Promise, Provide Comfort, Deliberate Force, and Joint Endeavor in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Of interesting note, when Chief Benken entered the Air Force the Chief of Staff was General John D. Ryan. While serving as the CMSAF, he was the advisor to his son, General Michael E. Ryan. As CMSAF, Chief Benken's many initiatives included the development of the Command Chief Master Sergeant title (previously
    7.00
    2 votes
    143
    Francis Barretto Spinola

    Francis Barretto Spinola

    Francis Barretto Spinola (March 19, 1821 – April 14, 1891) was the first Portuguese American to be elected to the United States House of Representatives, serving as a representative from New York from 1887 to 1891. He also served as a general in the Union Army during the American Civil War. Spinola was born in Oil Field, near Stony Brook, Suffolk County, Long Island, New York. He attended Quaker Hill Academy in Dutchess County and then passed the bar exam before establishing a law practice in Brooklyn. He was elected alderman of the Second Ward in Brooklyn in 1846 and 1847, and was reelected in 1849 and served for four years. By 1854, when he joined a special force known as "Special Police" to keep order in the streets of New York, he was already one of the "most respected and influential citizens" of the city. Politically a Democrat, he was a member of the New York State Assembly (Kings Co., 2nd D.) in 1856. He was a member of the New York State Senate (3rd D.) from 1858 to 1861, sitting in the 81st, 82nd, 83rd and 84th New York State Legislatures. He was a delegate to the 1860 Democratic National Convention. He was commissioner of New York Harbor when the Civil War erupted.
    7.00
    2 votes
    144
    Frank S. Besson, Jr.

    Frank S. Besson, Jr.

    • Participated in conflicts: World War II
    Frank Schaffer Besson, Jr., CBE (May 30, 1910–July 15, 1985) was born on May 30, 1910 in Detroit, Michigan. His father was a West Point graduate and an officer in the Corps of Engineers . Frank S. Besson, Jr. graduated seventh in his class from the United States Military Academy in 1932. In 1935, he received a master's degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His early career was noted for the role he played in the development of portable military pipelines, steel landing mats for airplanes, and steel treadway bridges. He is credited with the studies leading to the Army 's adoption of the Bailey Bridge, used extensively in all theaters in World War II. He became Assistant Director of the Third Military Railway Service (with rank of Lieutenant Colonel) in 1943, and was promoted to Director (with rank of Colonel) the following year. As Director of the Third Military Railway Service in Iran from 1944 to 1945, Besson ensured the flow of war materials to the Russian forces through the Persian Corridor. He was promoted to brigadier general, becoming, at 34, the youngest general officer in the Army Ground Forces and Chief of the Railway Division. Toward the end of World War
    7.00
    2 votes
    145
    Paul F. McHale, Jr.

    Paul F. McHale, Jr.

    Paul F. McHale, Jr. (born July 26, 1950) is an American politician. From 2003 to 2009, he served as the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Homeland Defense. Additionally, from 1993 to 1999, he represented Pennsylvania's 15th congressional district in the United States House of Representatives. Currently, McHale is the President of Civil Support International LLC, which is a consulting firm that advises private contractors and government agencies in matters related to disaster preparedness, crisis response, and homeland defense and security. McHale was born in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, where he graduated from Liberty High School. McHale received a Bachelor of Arts from Lehigh University in 1972 and a J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center in 1977. He served in the United States Marine Corps from 1972 to 1974. He has been a member of the Marine Corps Reserve since 1974, and retired with the rank of colonel in 2007. He served in Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm during the Gulf War. McHale also served combat tours in Saudi Arabia (1990), Kuwait (1991), and Afghanistan (2007). His personal military decorations include the Baryal Medal for his service in Afghanistan, the
    7.00
    2 votes
    146
    Robert L. Howard

    Robert L. Howard

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    Robert Lewis Howard (July 11, 1939 – December 23, 2009) was a highly decorated United States Army soldier and Medal of Honor recipient of the Vietnam War. He was wounded 14 times over 54 months of combat, was awarded 8 Purple Hearts, 4 Bronze Stars, and was nominated for the Medal of Honor three separate times. He was laid to rest at Arlington National Cemetery on February 22, 2010. Howard enlisted in the Army at Montgomery, Alabama and retired as Colonel. As a staff sergeant of the highly-classified Military Assistance Command, Vietnam – Studies and Observations Group (MACV-SOG), Howard was recommended for the Medal of Honor on three separate occasions for three individual actions during thirteen months spanning 1967–1968. The first two nominations were downgraded to a Silver Star and the Distinguished Service Cross due to the covert nature of the operations in which Howard participated. As a Sergeant First Class of the same organization, he risked his life during a rescue mission in Cambodia on December 30, 1968, while second in command of a platoon-sized Hornet Force that was searching for missing American soldier Robert Scherdin, and was finally awarded the Medal of Honor. He
    7.00
    2 votes
    147
    Adolphus Greely

    Adolphus Greely

    Adolphus Washington Greely (March 27, 1844 – October 20, 1935), was an American Polar explorer, a United States Army officer and a recipient of the Medal of Honor. Greely was born March 27, 1844 in Newburyport, Massachusetts. He entered the United States Army at the age of 17, after having been rejected twice before. He had achieved the rank of brevet Major by the end of the Civil War. Greely joined the regular Army in 1866 as a Second Lieutenant of Infantry; in 1873, Greely was promoted to First Lieutenant. In 1881, First Lieutenant Greely was given command of the Lady Franklin Bay Expedition on the ship Proteus. Promoted by Henry W. Howgate, its purpose was to establish one of a chain of meteorological-observation stations as part of the First International Polar Year. The expedition also was commissioned by the US government to collect astronomical and polar magnetic data, which was carried out by the astronomer Edward Israel, who was part of Greely's crew. Another goal of the expedition was to search for any clues of the USS Jeannette, lost north of Ellesmere Island. Greely was without previous Arctic experience, but he and his party were able to discover many hitherto unknown
    6.00
    3 votes
    148
    Alfred Valenzuela

    Alfred Valenzuela

    Alfred A. Valenzuela is a retired United States Army major general who commanded United States Army South (USARSO) at Fort Buchanan, Puerto Rico. He comes from a Mexican-American family from San Antonio, Texas. He frequently discusses how he overcame his childhood as a gang member. His decorations include the Defense Distinguished Service Medal, Army Distinguished Service Medal, Defense Superior Service Medal, Legion of Merit (with three Oak Leaf Clusters), Soldier's Medal, Bronze Star with "V" device, Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Meritorious Service Medal (with two Oak Leaf Clusters), Joint Service Commendation Medal, Army Commendation Medal (with Oak Leaf Cluster), Joint Service Achievement Medal, Army Achievement Medal, Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal, Humanitarian Service Medal and the Joint Meritorious Unit Award (3rd award). Valenzuela is married to Esther Valenzuela and they have two children.
    6.00
    3 votes
    149
    Charles Ellet, Jr.

    Charles Ellet, Jr.

    • Participated in conflicts: Battle of Memphis
    Charles Ellet, Jr. (1 January 1810 – 21 June 1862) was a civil engineer and a colonel during the American Civil War, mortally wounded at the Battle of Memphis. Ellet was born in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, brother of Alfred W. Ellet, also a civil engineer and a brigadier general in the Union Army during the war. Charles studied civil engineering at École nationale des Ponts et Chaussées in Paris, France, and in 1832 submitted proposals for a suspension bridge across the Potomac River. In 1842, he designed and built the first major wire-cable suspension bridge in the United States, spanning 358 feet over the Schuylkill River at Fairmount, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He designed the record-breaking Wheeling suspension bridge over the Ohio River at Wheeling, West Virginia in 1848, and a 770-foot suspension footbridge at Niagara Falls at the same time. His other civil engineering accomplishments include supervising both the James River & Kanawha Canal in Virginia and the Schuylkill Navigation improvements in Pennsylvania, and also constructing railroads in those states. Ellet developed theories for improving flood control and navigation of mid-western rivers. In 1849 he had advocated
    6.00
    3 votes
    150
    Dennis E. Nolan

    Dennis E. Nolan

    Dennis E. Nolan (April 22, 1872 – February 24, 1956) was a career officer with the United States Army through three wars. He distinguished himself by heading the first modern American military combat intelligence function during World War I. Nolan served as the head football coach at the United States Military Academy in 1902, compiling a record of 6–1–1. Born in Akron, New York, outside of Buffalo, New York, Nolan was the son of an Irish immigrant. He graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1896. In 1902, Nolan coached the Army football team to a record of 6 wins, 1 loss and 1 draw. The New York Times of 1930s noted that many contemporary U. S. Generals (Nolan, Leon Kromer, Malin Craig, Paul Bunker) were connected by past football experience at West Point. Starting in August 1920, Nolan, then a brigadier general, served for a year as the War Department Chief of Military Intelligence Division. From 1927 to 1931, Nolan was commander of Fifth Corps Area, headquartered at Fort Hayes at Columbus, Ohio, one of and geographically the largest of nine corps areas established in the continental United States for the administration of the regular army and reserves by the
    6.00
    3 votes
    151
    Drew Dennis Dix

    Drew Dennis Dix

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    Drew Dennis Dix (born December 14, 1944) is a decorated United States military veteran and retired major in the United States Army. He received the Medal of Honor for his actions in the Vietnam War; he was the first enlisted Special Forces soldier to receive the medal. Dix was born in West Point, New York, and raised in Pueblo, Colorado. He enlisted in the Army at age 18 in 1962, hoping to join the Special Forces. Initially turned down because of his young age, he spent three years serving with the 82nd Airborne Division before being accepted into the Special Forces at the age of 21. During this time he served in Operation Power Pack, the US military intervention in the Dominican Republic. By 1968 he had reached the rank of staff sergeant and was assigned as a military adviser to the Army of the Republic of Vietnam (ARVN) in Chau Phu, South Vietnam, near the Cambodian border. On January 31, 1968, Viet Cong forces attacked Chau Phu in the first days of the Tet Offensive. Throughout that day and the next, Dix led groups of local fighters in rescuing endangered civilians and driving Viet Cong forces out of buildings in the city. For these actions, Dix was awarded the Medal of Honor by
    6.00
    3 votes
    152
    Hugh Joseph Gaffey

    Hugh Joseph Gaffey

    • Participated in conflicts: World War II
    Hugh Joseph Gaffey (18 November 1895 – 16 June 1946) was Chief of Staff for General George Patton's Third Army during World War II. Born in Hartford, Connecticut, he graduated from Worcester Academy in 1916 and later attended Officers Training School at Fort Niagara, New York State, and was commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in the Field Artillery Reserve on 15 August 1917. Assigned to the 312th Field Artillery at Fort Meade, Maryland, he went to Europe in August 1918 and served in France and Germany before returning to the United States in August 1919. During the next two decades he served at various posts in the United States and served with the 15th and 18th Field Artillery and the 7th Cavalry Brigade. Assigned to the I Armored Corps in July 1940, he served with them until July 1942 when he was assigned to the 2nd Armored Division. Appointed Brigadier General 5 August 1942, he was sent to the European Theater in November; and, in April 1944, he was designated Chief of Staff for General Patton's 3d Army fighting in France. He then assumed command of the 4th Armored Division in December. Major General Gaffey was killed in a B-25 Mitchell crash at Godman Field, Kentucky. The U.S.
    6.00
    3 votes
    153
    Richard A. Kidd

    Richard A. Kidd

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    Richard A. Kidd (b. June 24, 1943, Morehead, Kentucky) was the ninth Sergeant Major of the Army. He was sworn in on July 2, 1991 and served until his term expired in June 1995. His assignments include two combat tours in Vietnam (1966-67 & 1970-71) and multiple tours in Korea (including 1st Sgt of B Company 1/32nd Infantry Regiment (Buccaneers) Camp Howze Korea, which was the only front line military unit approved by the US Congress at the time) and Europe. Before becoming the Sergeant Major of the Army, he was Command Sergeant Major (CSM) of I Corps & Fort Lewis, Fort Lewis, Washington. Among his other assignments, he has been Command Sergeant Major for numerous organizations,. These included CSM of the 9th Aviation Battalion; 2d Battalion, 2d Infantry; Commandant, 1st Armored Division, NCO Academy, Katterbach, Germany. He returned to Fort Lewis after his tour in Germany and served consecutively as CSM of the 4th Battalion, 23rd Infantry Regiment; 3d Brigade, 9th Infantry Division (Motorized); and 9th Infantry Division (Motorized). Since military retirement, Kidd continues to serve the military community and has received numerous awards including the Outstanding Civilian Service
    6.00
    3 votes
    154
    Ronald T. Kadish

    Ronald T. Kadish

    Lt. Gen. Ronald T. Kadish, Ret. (born April 6, 1948) is a United States Air Force officer who rose to head the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization and the Missile Defense Agency within the United States Department of Defense. Born in Kingston, Pennsylvania, Kadish attended the Cardinal O'Hara High School and earned a bachelor's degree in chemistry in 1970 from St. Joseph's University in Philadelphia and joined the Air Force through the OTS program. He trained as a pilot on the C-130E aircraft and, as a pilot and instructor, logged over 2,500 flight hours. By the early 1990s, Kadish had risen through the ranks to the posts of Program Director of the F-15, F-16, and C-17 programs at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. From 1996 to 1999, he commanded the Electronic Systems Center at Hanscom Air Force Base, and in 1999 was named director of the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization in The Pentagon. From January 2002 until his retirement in September 2004, Kadish headed the Missile Defense Agency. His name was circulated as a possible NASA administrator following the 2004 resignation of Sean O'Keefe. He now works at Booz Allen Hamilton.
    6.00
    3 votes
    155
    Marcus W. Robertson

    Marcus W. Robertson

    Marcus William Robertson (February 12, 1870 – May 24, 1948) was a United States Army soldier and a recipient of America's highest military decoration - the Medal of Honor - for his actions on the Philippine-American War. Marcus Robertson enlisted in the United States Army from Hood River, Oregon, and by May 16, 1899 was serving as a private in Company B of the 2nd Oregon Volunteer Infantry Regiment. On that day, near San Isidro in the Philippines, Private Robertson helped to rout a large enemy force despite being greatly outnumbered. For his actions, he was presented with the Medal of Honor on April 28, 1906. He later rose to the rank of stable Sergeant and served in France during World War I. He died at age 78 and was buried in Pine Grove Cemetery, Hood River, Oregon. Rank and organization: Private, Company B, 2d Oregon Volunteer Infantry. Place and date: Near San Isidro, Philippine Islands, May 16, 1899. Entered service at: Hood River, Oreg. Birth: Flintville, Wisconsin Date of issue: April 28, 1906. Media related to Marcus W. Robertson at Wikimedia Commons
    5.67
    3 votes
    156
    Thomas Hemingway

    Thomas Hemingway

    Brigadier General Thomas Hemingway is an American military lawyer who has served as a legal advisor to the Office of Military Commissions. Thomas Hemingway was a distinguished graduate of the Air Force ROTC program, was commissioned as a second lieutenant in November 1962 after earning his undergraduate degree at Willamette University. Upon graduation, he took an educational delay and earned his doctor of jurisprudence in 1965 at Willamette University College of Law. Hemingway entered active service in November 1965. He has also been an associate professor of law at the United States Air Force Academy and a senior judge on the Air Force Court of Military Review. He is a current member of the state bar in Oregon and the District of Columbia, and has been admitted to practice before the U.S. Court of Federal Claims, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit and the Supreme Court of the United States. He retired from active service in October 1996. General Hemingway was recalled to active service in August 2003 to fill the position as Legal Adviser to the Convening Authority in the Department of Defense Office of Military Commissions, Washington, D.C. He was replaced by Thomas
    5.67
    3 votes
    157
    Dan McNeill

    Dan McNeill

    Dan Kelly McNeill (born July 23, 1946) is a retired four-star general in the United States Army. He served Commander, Coalition Forces, Afghanistan from 2002 to 2003 and as Commanding General, U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) from 2004 to 2007. He then served as Commander, International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) in Afghanistan from February 1, 2007 to June 3, 2008. According to Eurasianet, McNeill opposed the local ceasefires and economic development programs that had been favored by the outgoing NATO commander, British General David Richards. The attempted targeting of Taliban commander Abdul Ghafour, through aerial bombardment, on February 4, 2007, was seen as a sign of the policy changes McNeill wanted to introduce. Officials in several European countries have quietly expressed concern about placing an American general in charge of the NATO force. Richards tried to create a less harsh, more economic-development-oriented identity for NATO in Afghanistan, as compared to the "kicking-down-doors" image that US forces have. Many local analysts expect NATO forces to embrace a more aggressive stance under McNeill, who is believed to oppose the type of local peace arrangements
    6.50
    2 votes
    158
    Edmund R. Thompson

    Edmund R. Thompson

    Edmund R. Thompson was a United States Army general officer. From 1 July 1975 to 29 August 1977, Thompson, then a Brigadier General, was commanding general in the U.S. Army Intelligence Agency. From 29 August 1977 to 1 November 1981, Thompson, then a Major General, served as the Assistant Chief of Staff for Intelligence at the Department of the Army headquarters. Between 1982 and 1984 he was the Deputy Director for Management and Operations of the Defense Intelligence Agency. General Thompson is a member of the Military Intelligence Hall of Fame.
    6.50
    2 votes
    159
    Felix Longoria

    Felix Longoria

    • Participated in conflicts: World War II
    Private Felix Z. Longoria (1920 – June 1945), was a Mexican-American soldier, who served in the United States Army during World War II and was buried at Arlington National Cemetery. When he was killed at war (1945), he wasn't returned to his family for a long time (1947). Finally his body was returned but the local funeral home denied him wake services at the home because he was Mexican American. G.I. Forum fought for the injustice and eventually he was buried near Washington D.C. Born and raised in Three Rivers, Texas, Longoria later moved to Corpus Christi, TX with his wife in search of work. There his wife bore them a daughter who was only a young child when Felix enlisted. Prior to the war, he worked as a truck driver. In November 1944, Longoria enlisted in the army and, in late April 1945, shipped out from Fort Ord, CA to the 27th Infantry Regiment of the 25th Infantry Division, then located in Luzon in the Philippines, leaving behind his wife and four-year-old daughter. He arrived on Luzon, Philippines, about June 1, 1945. Less than fifteen days after landing on the Island of Luzon, Pacific Theatre, a platoon to which Longoria was assigned was ambushed by a hidden Japanese
    6.50
    2 votes
    160
    George Henry Gordon

    George Henry Gordon

    • Participated in conflicts: American Civil War
    George Henry Gordon (July 19, 1823 – August 30, 1886) was an American lawyer and a Union general in the American Civil War. Gordon was born in Charlestown, Massachusetts. He moved to Framingham, Massachusetts, at the age of five with his widowed mother. He graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1846, 43rd in a class of 59 cadets. He served under Lt. Gen. Winfield Scott in the Mexican-American War, earning the brevet of first lieutenant for gallantry at Cerro Gordo. He resigned from the army in 1854. After taking a course in the Harvard Law School, he practiced law in Boston. When the Civil War erupted in 1861, Gordon organized and became colonel of the 2nd Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. The regiment served guarding the upper Potomac River and Frederick, Maryland, and in the spring of 1862, Gordon served under Maj. Gen. Nathaniel P. Banks, unsuccessfully opposing Maj. Gen. Stonewall Jackson in the Shenandoah Valley. Gordon was appointed a brigadier general of volunteers on June 12, 1862, to rank from June 9, 1862. Gordon commanded a brigade in XII Corps, Army of the Potomac, at the Battle of Antietam, becoming acting division commander when Brig. Gen.
    6.50
    2 votes
    161
    Ira C. Owens

    Ira C. Owens

    Ira C. Owens was an officer in the United States Army. Owens was born on July 31, 1936, in Cortez, Colorado. In the early 1990s, Owens, then a Lieutenant General, served as the Deputy Chief of Staff for Intelligence, Headquarters, Department of the Army. General Owens is a member of the Military Intelligence Hall of Fame.
    6.50
    2 votes
    162
    John T. Corley

    John T. Corley

    • Participated in conflicts: World War II
    Brigadier General John T. Corley (August 4, 1914 - April 16, 1977) was a career Army officer noted for his contributions to Army training. Born to Irish immigrant parents in Brooklyn, New York. He attended high school at St. Francis Preparatory High School, in Brooklyn and graduated from the class of 1932 and he is also a member of that High School's Hall of Fame. He graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1938, where he also was an accomplished boxer prior to his active duty service. One story states that after his graduation from West Point he was assigned to the Army Air Corps; where he then flew an airplane under the Brooklyn Bridge and was then reassigned to the infantry. He fought in World War II with the 1st Infantry Division. As a major, he landed with the Big Red One in North Africa and two days later earned a Silver Star, America's third highest award for valor, for action in Oran, Algeria. In March 1943, during fighting at El Guettar, Tunisia, he destroyed an enemy machine gun nest, allowing his troops to take the hilltop. This action earned Corley the Distinguished Service Cross, America's second highest award for valor. In May 1943 Corley was
    6.50
    2 votes
    163
    Opha Mae Johnson

    Opha Mae Johnson

    Opha May Johnson (February 13, 1900 – January 1976) was the first woman to enlist in the United States Marine Corps. She joined the Marine Corps Reserve in 1918. Johnson was a United States Marine in the late 1910s. She became the first woman to enlist in the Marine Corps on August 13, 1918, when she joined the Marine Corps Reserve during World War I. Johnson was the first of 305 women to enlist in the United States Marine Corps Women's Reserve that day. Enlistment came half a century after Susan B. Anthony championed women's rights and some twenty years after Alice Paul fought for the same cause. Johnson was seen as another combatant in the nations recent women's rights movement. When she became a Marine, she was given a category of "F" (for female). In those days women were allowed to enlist but were not allowed to serve in war zones. Opha May Johnson may have worked as a secretary, a cook, or another job which the first women Marines were allowed to perform, but she would not have been a military nurse (the Marine Corps does not employ a medic specialty; that position is carried out by the Navy) while her male counterparts were being sent to fight in France. It would not be
    6.50
    2 votes
    164
    Ronald A. Burdo

    Ronald A. Burdo

    • Participated in conflicts: World War II
    Ronald Allen Burdo was born on July 24, 1920 in Cheboygan, Michigan and enlisted in the United States Marine Corps on September 20, 1940, aged 20. He was killed in action, aged 22, on August 7, 1942 at Gavutu, Solomon Islands, during the Battle of Guadalcanal. In 1944, the high speed transport USS Burdo (APD-133) was named in his honor.
    6.50
    2 votes
    165
    Vincent Brooks

    Vincent Brooks

    Vincent Keith Brooks (born October 24, 1958) is an American Lieutenant General, who is commanding general of the Third Army. Brooks was the United States Army's Deputy Director of Operations during the War in Iraq. This position again made him visible in the media. He also served as the Chief of Army Public Affairs in The Pentagon. He later was commanding general of the 1st Infantry Division. Brooks was born in Anchorage, Alaska. Brooks grew up in an Army family in California, and his father Leo A. Brooks Sr. and brother Leo A. Brooks Jr. were both Major Generals in the United States Army. He attended Thomas Jefferson High School in Alexandria, Virginia, for two years and then Jesuit High School in Carmichael, California, and graduated in 1976. He attended the United States Military Academy where he rose to the rank of Cadet First Captain, the highest position (Cadet Brigade Commander), a cadet can hold. He was the first African-American cadet to hold this prestigious position. He graduated from West Point in 1980. He was a basketball player and he decided to follow his brother to West Point to study to become an officer. At West Point, Brooks was the academy's first
    6.50
    2 votes
    166
    William Trent Rossell

    William Trent Rossell

    William Trent Rossell was the Engineer Commissioner of the District of Columbia. He was born in Alabama on October 11, 1849, the son and grandson of Army officers, and he graduated third in the United States Military Academy class of 1873. Commissioned in the Corps of Engineers, he served until 1880 at Willets Point and as Assistant Professor of Engineering at the Military Academy. He then engaged in river, harbor, and fortification work in regions around Portland, Maine; Jacksonville, Florida; and Vicksburg, Mississippi. Rossell served in 1891-93 as the Engineer Commissioner on the three-member governing board of the District of Columbia. After briefly commanding the Battalion of Engineers, he led Mobile District for six years. He then supervised lighthouse construction and repair in the New York area and, later, Ohio River improvements. He was a member of the Mississippi River Commission from 1906 to 1913, as well as Central Division Engineer in 1908-09 and Eastern Division Engineer in 1909-13. He retired October 11, 1913, but was recalled to active service in 1917. He led the Third New York and Puerto Rico districts and was Northeast Division Engineer. He again retired in 1918.
    6.50
    2 votes
    167
    Albert E. Baesel

    Albert E. Baesel

    Albert Edward Baesel (March 21, 1890 – September 27, 1918) was an American Army officer who posthumously received the Medal of Honor for actions near Ivoiry, France which led to his death during World War I. Baesel was born in Berea, Ohio. He joined the 5th Infantry Regiment of the Ohio National Guard in 1912 as a private and later promoted to Corporal in the Ohio National Guard. In 1918, he resigned from the 5th Infantry and was commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in the 148th Infantry Regiment of the Ohio National Guard. That same year, the 148th was federalized to serve in France. Upon hearing that a squad leader of his platoon had been severely wounded while attempting to capture an enemy machinegun nest about 200 yards in advance of the assault line and somewhat to the right, 2d Lt. Baesel requested permission to go to the rescue of the wounded Corporal. After thrice repeating his request and permission having been reluctantly given, due to the heavy artillery, rifle, and machinegun fire, and heavy deluge of gas in which the company was at the time, accompanied by a volunteer, he worked his way forward, and reaching the wounded man, placed him upon his shoulders and was
    7.00
    1 votes
    168
    Bryan D. Brown

    Bryan D. Brown

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    General Bryan Douglas "Doug" Brown (born October 20, 1948) is a former Commander, U.S. Special Operations Command (USSOCOM). As USSOCOM's combatant commander, he was responsible for all unified special operations forces, both active duty and reserve. Brown has a B.A. in history from Cameron University and a Master of Business Administration degree from Webster University. He entered the Army in 1967 as a private in the infantry. Upon completion of Airborne School and the Special Forces Qualification Course, he served on a Special Forces "A Team" at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. He later went on to earn his pilot’s wings shortly after that. His notable commands include 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment, Joint Special Operations Command and U.S. Army Special Operations Command. Gen. Bryan D. "Doug" Brown was the first member of the Aviation branch to attain the rank of four-star general. As a general officer, he served as Assistant Division Commander (Maneuver), 1st Infantry Division (Mechanized), Fort Riley, Kansas. He also served as director of Plans, Policy and Strategic Assessments (J5/J7) at the U.S. Special Operations Command MacDill AFB, Commanding General, Joint
    7.00
    1 votes
    169
    Charles F. Pendleton

    Charles F. Pendleton

    Charles Frank Pendleton (September 26, 1931 - July 17, 1953) was a soldier in the United States Army during the Korean War. He posthumously received the Medal of Honor for his actions on July 16, and July 17, 1953. Pendleton joined the Army from Fort Worth, Texas in 1951. He is buried at Laurel Land Memorial Park in Fort Worth. His grave can be found in Section C, Lot 31, Space 11. The GPS location of his grave is (lat/lon): 32.38753, -97.20918. Rank and organization: Corporal, U.S. Army, Company D, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division Place and date: Near Choo Gung-Dong, Korea, 16 and July 17, 1953 Entered service at: Fort Worth, Texas Born: September 26, 1931, Camden, Tennessee Citation: Cpl. Pendleton, a machine gunner with Company D, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and indomitable courage above and beyond the call of duty in action against the enemy. After consolidating and establishing a defensive perimeter on a key terrain feature, friendly elements were attacked by a large hostile force. Cpl. Pendleton delivered deadly accurate fire into the approaching troops, killing approximately 15 and disorganizing the remainder with grenades. Unable to protect
    7.00
    1 votes
    170
    Craig Thomas

    Craig Thomas

    Craig Lyle Thomas (February 17, 1933 – June 4, 2007) was an American politician who served more than twelve years as a Republican United States senator from Wyoming. In the Senate, Thomas was considered an expert on agriculture and rural development. He had served in key positions in several state agencies, including a long tenure as Vice President of the Wyoming Farm Bureau from 1965-74. Thomas resided in Casper for twenty-eight years. In 1984, he was elected from Casper to the Wyoming House of Representatives, in which he served until 1989. In 1989, Dick Cheney, who occupied Wyoming's only seat in the House of Representatives, resigned to become Secretary of Defense. Thomas became the Republican candidate to succeed Cheney and won the April 1989 special election. He was re-elected in 1990 and 1992, and in 1994 he ran for and won the Senate seat being vacated by fellow conservative Republican Malcolm Wallop of Sheridan in northeastern Wyoming. He was re-elected in 2000 and 2006, having easily beaten Democratic candidates in both elections with margins of 70 percent or more. Thomas was married to the former Susan Roberts, a public school teacher for special-needs students in
    7.00
    1 votes
    171
    John H. Quick

    John H. Quick

    • Participated in conflicts: Battle of Belleau Wood
    John Henry Quick (June 20, 1870 – September 9, 1922) was a United States Marine who received the Medal of Honor for his actions at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba in 1898 during the Spanish-American War. He was also received the Distinguished Service Cross and the Navy Cross during World War I. Quick was born June 20, 1870 in Charles Town, Jefferson County, West Virginia. He enlisted in the United States Marine Corps on August 10, 1892 from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He received the Medal of Honor "for gallantry in action" in signalling the gunfire support vessel Dolphin while exposed to heavy enemy fire at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba on June 14, 1898. Throughout his 26 year career as a Marine, Quick participating in every campaign the Marines were involved in during his enlistment and he was the holder of several awards for valor. The campaigns he participated in includes The West Indies Campaign, The Spanish-American War, the Philippine-American War, Cuban Campaign, Battle of Vera Cruz (1914) and, World War I. During the morning of June 14, 1898, Companies "C" and "D" of Lt. Col Robert W. Huntington's Marine Battalion and approximately fifty Cubans moved through the hills to seize Cuzco Well, the
    7.00
    1 votes
    172
    Virgil A. Richard

    Virgil A. Richard

    Brigadier General Virgil A. Richard (born September 4, 1937) is a retired US Army General who served 32 years of active military service of which 30 were devoted to Financial Management. Richard has become an outspoken critic of the "Don't ask, don't tell" policy of the U.S. Armed Forces and has gained national media attention as a part of a small group of high-ranking military officers who have come out as gay after retirement. Richard was born in Anthony, Kansas, and grew up in rural Wakita, Oklahoma. He received his BS in accounting from Oklahoma State University, his Master of Business Administration (Managerial Economics) from George Washington University and is a graduate of the Advanced Management Program of Columbia University, the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College and the U.S. Army War College. He is also an ROTC Distinguished Military Graduate. Richard was an Officer of the Association of the United States Army chapters in Alaska and Indiana, Commander of the Harker Heights, Texas American Legion Post and Assistant State Treasurer of the Texas Department of the American Legion. He is also a Board Member of the Austin Exchange Club, The Texas District Exchange
    7.00
    1 votes
    173
    Charles H. Barker

    Charles H. Barker

    Charles Heyward Barker (April 12, 1935 – June 4, 1953) was a United States Army soldier in the Korean War who received the U.S. military's highest decoration, the Medal of Honor. Born on April 12, 1935, in Pickens County, South Carolina, Barker joined the Army from that county in 1952. He served in Korea as a private with Company K of the 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. During the Battle of Pork Chop Hill on June 4, 1953, near Sokkogae, his platoon was on patrol outside the Pork Chop outpost when they surprised a group of Chinese soldiers digging entrenchments. Barker and another soldier provided covering fire with their rifles and grenades while the rest of the platoon moved to a better position on higher ground. As the fight intensified and ammunition ran low, the platoon was ordered to withdraw to the outpost. Barker volunteered to stay behind and cover the retreat; he was last seen engaging Chinese soldiers in hand-to-hand combat. Barker was initially classified as missing in action, then declared dead one year after the battle. He was posthumously promoted to private first class and, on June 7, 1955, awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions on Pork Chop Hill.
    5.33
    3 votes
    174
    Lewis G. Lee

    Lewis G. Lee

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    Sergeant Major Lewis G. Lee served as the 13th Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps (1995–1999). He retired from active duty in 1999 after over 31 years of service. Lewis Lee was born on 19 January 1950 in North Carolina, and enlisted in the Marine Corps on 28 March 1968. He graduated from the Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island in May 1968, and completed Infantry Training at Camp Lejeune in July 1968. The following August, Lee was assigned to A Company, 1st Battalion 4th Marines and deployed to South Vietnam, eventually becoming a squad leader and platoon sergeant. In June 1969, he was sent to Sub Unit #1 U.S. Naval Hospital Camp Lejeune, and remained there for seven months. In March 1970 until December 1971, he served at Weapons and Tactics Instructor with the Infantry Training Regiment at Camp Lejeune. He then served as a Drill Instructor and Instructor at DI School Staff at Parris Island. In August 1975, Lee was sent to the 3rd Marine Division to become the Operations Chief for the division's Headquarters Battalion. The next year, he was Assistant Marine Officer Instructor in the Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps Unit at The Citadel. he became the platoon sergeant for the
    5.33
    3 votes
    175
    Donald Ryder

    Donald Ryder

    Donald Ryder was a United States Army officer (Military Police branch). Ryder was commissioned in 1971. He was promoted to Major General in 2001 He served as the most senior officer in the Criminal Investigation Division, and was also the top Army Law Enforcement officer as the US Army Provost Marshal General. In 2003 Ryder conducted an inquiry into abuse of prisoners in Iraq, cited in the Taguba Report. Some of the key recommendations of Ryder's report were directly contrary to the recommendations of Major General Geoffrey Miller, formerly the commander of Camp Delta. Ryder recommended that the duties of the military police who guarded detainees should be strictly separated from the duties of the Military Intelligence officers who interrogated them. General Miller had urged closer cooperation between guards and interrogators. Miller had recommended that guards "set the conditions" for successful interrogation—a vague term that some critics believe was the trigger for some of the abuse some guards later committed. Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld's response to the public release of the news of the Abu Ghraib torture and prisoner abuse was to ignore Ryder and Taguba's
    4.50
    4 votes
    176
    Clarence Sasser

    Clarence Sasser

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    Clarence Eugene Sasser (born September 12, 1947) is a former United States Army soldier and a recipient of the U.S. military's highest decoration, the Medal of Honor, for his actions in the Vietnam War. Born in Chenango, Texas, Sasser was a combat medic in the United States Army during the Vietnam war. He received the medal from President Richard Nixon in 1969 for his actions on January 10, 1968, in Dinh Tuong Province, Republic of Vietnam. A member of Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3rd Battalion, 60th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division, he was a private first class attached to the 3rd Battalion's Company A when he earned the medal and eventually was promoted to specialist five. Drafted into the Army after giving up his college deferment, Sasser's Vietnam tour lasted just 51 days. When his military commitment was finished he returned to college as a chemistry student. He then worked at an oil refinery for more than five years before being employed by the United States Department of Veterans Affairs. A statue depicting Sasser in Vietnam was created in 2010 and will be placed in front of the Brazoria County Courthouse. Sasser's official Medal of Honor citation
    6.00
    2 votes
    177
    Einar H. Ingman, Jr.

    Einar H. Ingman, Jr.

    • Participated in conflicts: Korean War
    Einar Harold Ingman, Jr. (born October 6, 1929) was a United States Army soldier who received the Medal of Honor for his actions during the Korean War. Ingman was born on October 6, 1929, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and grew up on a farm. He joined the Army from Kewaskum, Wisconsin in November 1948, hoping to work with heavy machinery, but instead served as an infantryman. By February 26, 1951, he was a corporal serving with Company E, 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, in Korea. On that day, near the town of Malta-ri, he was among two squads of men tasked with assaulting a fortified ridge-top position. When both squad leaders were wounded, Ingman combined the squads and took command. After making a radio call for artillery and tank support, he led his soldiers against the position, encouraging them and directing their fire. He single-handedly attacked a machine gun which was firing on his group, tossing a hand grenade into the emplacement and killing the crew with his rifle. While approaching a second machine gun, he was knocked to the ground and lost part of his left ear when a grenade exploded near his head. As he got to his feet, he was shot in the face by a Chinese
    6.00
    2 votes
    178
    Ernest E. West

    Ernest E. West

    • Participated in conflicts: Korean War
    Ernest Edison "Ernie" West (born September 2, 1931) is a former United States Army soldier and a recipient of the U.S. military's highest decoration, the Medal of Honor, for his actions in the Korean War. West was raised in an orphanage at the Methodist Children's Home in Versailles, Kentucky. He returned to visit the home a few years after receiving the Medal of Honor. Born on September 2, 1931, in Russell, Kentucky, West was drafted from Wurtland in 1950. By October 12, 1952, he was serving in Korea as a private first class with Company L, 14th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. After his unit was ambushed near Sataeri on that day, he ran through heavy fire to rescue his wounded commander. As he was pulling the man to safety, three hostile soldiers attacked. West shielded the commander with his body and killed the attackers with his rifle, suffering a wound which resulted in the loss of his eye in the process. Despite this injury, he remained on the field and assisted in the evacuation of other wounded men, at one point killing three more hostile soldiers. For these actions, he was awarded the Medal of Honor just over a year later, on January 29, 1954. West currently
    6.00
    2 votes
    179
    Jake DeShazer

    Jake DeShazer

    Jacob Daniel DeShazer (15 November 1912 – 15 March 2008) participated in the Doolittle Raid as a staff sergeant and later became a missionary in Japan. DeShazer was born on 15 November 1912 in West Stayton, Oregon and graduated from Madras High School in Madras, Oregon in 1931. He enlisted in the United States Army in 1940, and rose to the rank of sergeant in 1941. On 7 December 1941, while on KP duty at a U.S. Army base in Oregon, DeShazer heard news of the attack on Pearl Harbor over the radio. He became enraged, shouting: "The Japs are going to have to pay for this!" Following the attack on Pearl Harbor, Staff Sergeant DeShazer, along with other members of the 17th Bomb Group, volunteered to join a special unit that was formed to attack Japan. The 24 crews selected from the 17th BG received intensive training at Eglin Field, Florida, for three weeks beginning 1 March 1942. The crews undertook practice carrier deck takeoffs along with extensive flying exercises involving low-level and night flying, low altitude bombing and over water navigation. Their mission would be to fly modified B-25 Mitchell bombers launched from an aircraft carrier to attack Japan. The unit formed to carry
    6.00
    2 votes
    180
    James G. Jones

    James G. Jones

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    Major General James G. Jones (born 1934) is a retired United States Air Force general and former commander of the Keesler Technical Training Center, Keesler Air Force Base, Mississippi. Jones earned a bachelor of arts degree (cum laude) in mathematics from Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, in 1956 where he was a member of Phi Kappa Tau. He received a master's degree in public administration from Auburn University in 1975. General Jones was a distinguished graduate of Air Command and Staff College in 1968, and the Air War College in 1975. Both schools are located at Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama. He was commissioned through the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps program in 1956 and received his navigator wings at Harlingen Air Force Base, Texas, in September 1957. General Jones is a master navigator with 3,000 flying hours. His military decorations and awards include the Air Force Distinguished Service Medal, Legion of Merit, Distinguished Flying Cross, Meritorious Service Medal with oak leaf cluster, Air Medal with eight oak leaf clusters, Joint Service Commendation Medal, Air Force Commendation Medal with two oak leaf clusters, Combat Readiness Medal and Armed Forces
    6.00
    2 votes
    181
    Lt. General Charles Campbell

    Lt. General Charles Campbell

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    General Charles C. Campbell, United States Army (born 1948) was the 17th Commanding General, United States Army Forces Command (FORSCOM). He previously served as FORSCOM’s Deputy Commanding General and Chief of Staff from April 26, 2006 to January 8, 2007. He assumed his Commanding General assignment January 9, 2007, and completed it June 3, 2010. Campbell earned his commission through ROTC at Louisiana State University. His initial assignment was as an instructor at the Infantry Training Command (Provisional), United States Army Training Center Infantry, Fort Ord, California. After Special Forces training, Campbell went on to teach tactics at Forces Armeé National Khmere Training Command, Army Advisory Group, Phouc Tuy Training Battalion, United States Army, Vietnam. He subsequently served as an A-Detachment Executive Officer and Commander in Vietnam. His succeeding commands include a Combat Support Company in the 2d Armored Division, Fort Hood, Texas; an armor battalion in the 3d Armored Division, United States Army Europe and a heavy brigade in the 2d Infantry Division, Eighth Army, Korea. He was also the Commanding General of the 7th Infantry Division at Fort Carson, Colorado
    6.00
    2 votes
    182
    Randolph B. Marcy

    Randolph B. Marcy

    Randolph Barnes Marcy (April 9, 1812 – November 22, 1887) was a career officer in the United States Army, achieving the rank of Brigadier General before retiring in 1881. Although beginning in 1861 his responsibilities were those of a brigadier general, the U.S. Senate failed to confirm President Lincoln's September 28, 1861 appointment of Marcy as a brigadier general and it expired by law on March 4, 1863. The U.S. Senate finally confirmed Marcy's appointment as a brigadier general when he was also appointed inspector general of the U.S. Army on December 12, 1878. Marcy was awarded the honorary grade of brevet major general to rank from March 13, 1865 by nomination by President Johnson on December 3, 1867 and confirmation on February 14, 1868. In 1852 Capt. Marcy was in charge of the expedition that first reached the headwaters of both forks of the Red River, which official parties had tried to find since 1806. He was assisted by Brevet Capt. George B. McClellan, later to achieve notability as a general in the American Civil War. Marcy’s 1859 book, The Prairie Traveler: A Handbook for Overland Expeditions, with Maps, Illustrations, and Itineraries of the Principal Routes between
    6.00
    2 votes
    183
    Travis E. Watkins

    Travis E. Watkins

    • Participated in conflicts: World War II
    Travis Earl Watkins (September 5, 1920 – September 3, 1950) was a United States Army soldier and a posthumous recipient of the Medal of Honor for his actions in the Korean War. A veteran of World War II, Watkins was awarded the medal for his conspicuous leadership during the Second Battle of Naktong Bulge. Watkins was born in Waldo, Arkansas, on September 5, 1920. His family moved to East Texas when he was a young child and he attended school in the city of Troup. Enlisting in the U.S. Army in June 1939, Watkins served in World War II and was awarded the Bronze Star for his actions during the Guadalcanal Campaign. He returned to Texas after the war and in 1948 married Madie Sue Barnett. In the Korean War, Watkins served as a master sergeant with Company H of the 9th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division. Near Yongsan, Korea, on August 31, 1950, he was among a group of 30 soldiers who were cut off and surrounded by a numerically superior North Korean force. Watkins took command and directed the group's defense, exposing himself to hostile fire in order to lead and encourage his men. When ammunition became scarce, he crossed the defensive perimeter to collect weapons from the
    6.00
    2 votes
    184
    Wayne Fisk

    Wayne Fisk

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    CMSgt Wayne Fisk was directly involved in the famed Son Tay POW camp raid and the rescue of the crew of the SS Mayagüez. When the Mayagüez was hijacked by Cambodian Communist forces in May 1975, Fisk was a member of the assault force that successfully recovered the ship and the entrapped United States Marines. For his actions, he was presented with his second Silver Star. Concluding the Mayagüez mission, he was recognized as the last American serviceman to engage Communist forces in ground combat in Southeast Asia. In 1979, he was the first Air Force enlisted recipient of the US Jaycees Ten Outstanding Young Men of America. In 1986, he became the first director of the Air Force Enlisted Heritage Hall on Maxwell AFB-Gunter Annex. Chief Master Sergeant Wayne Fisk was born in Waldport, Oregon, on April 6, 1945, and raised on the Oregon Coast. In high school, Wayne was a member of the honor society, an award-winning cadet in the Alaska Civil Air Patrol, and he even turned down an appointment to the United States Air Force Academy to care for his terminally ill mother. In March 1966, Fisk enlisted in the Air Force and was accepted for pararescue training. In 1967, he served at Eglin
    6.00
    2 votes
    185
    Willard Warren Scott, Jr.

    Willard Warren Scott, Jr.

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    Willard Warren Scott Jr. (February 18, 1926 – January 1, 2009) was a Lieutenant General in the United States Army. He graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1948. He was commissioned upon his graduation from West Point and assigned to the artillery. He later went on to serve as superintendent of the United States Military Academy from 1981 through 1986. Born February 18, 1926 at Fort Monroe, Virginia. Willard Scott was the son of an Army Coastal Artillery officer Willard Warren Scott Sr. and Bernice Peck Scott [both buried at the Military Cemetery at The Presidio in San Francisco]. General Scott spent the early part of his life in San Francisco and, in fact, crossed the Golden Gate Bridge on the day it opened in 1937, leading a contingent of student crossing guards. He had 2 brothers Richard and Peter Scott. Before graduating from the military academy he met Justine Dorney of New Rochelle, New York. They were married in June 1948 and had 7 children. General Scott continued to be an ardent supporter of Army football and had the honor of having one of the mascot Army mules (General Scott or Scotty) named in his honor by a vote of the Association of
    6.00
    2 votes
    186
    William Thompson

    William Thompson

    William Henry Thompson (16 August 1927 – 6 August 1950) was a United States Army soldier and a recipient of the United States military's highest decoration, the Medal of Honor, for his actions in the Korean War. Born to a single mother in an impoverished neighborhood in New York City, Thompson entered the Army in 1945 and served tours in Alaska and Japan. At the outbreak of the Korean War, Thompson was a machine gunner of the U.S. 24th Infantry Regiment, a de facto segregated unit. During the Battle of Masan in August 1950, Thompson was part of a unit conducting an offensive along the Pusan Perimeter. When North Korean troops attacked his company and caused many men to panic and scatter, Thompson stood his ground, refusing orders to evacuate despite being wounded, and covering the retreat of his platoon until he was killed by a grenade. For his actions, Thompson was awarded the Medal of Honor, one of only two African Americans to be so honored in the war. William Thompson was born on 16 August 1927 in Brooklyn, New York to an unmarried mother. Little is known of Thompson's early life, but he grew up in an impoverished tenement house neighborhood. He dropped out of school at a young
    6.00
    2 votes
    187
    Leon L. Van Autreve

    Leon L. Van Autreve

    • Participated in conflicts: World War II
    Leon L. Van Autreve was the fourth Sergeant Major of the Army. He was sworn in on July 1, 1973 and served until June, 1975. He was born in Eeklo, Belgium, on January 29, 1920 and died March 14, 2002, in San Antonio, Texas. He entered the U.S. Army in August 1941 from Delphos, Ohio. After basic training at Fort Belvoir, he served overseas with the 9th Infantry Division and participated in the invasion of Port Lyautey, Africa. He was discharged in August 1945 and enlisted again in March 1948. After a tour in Germany from 1950 to 1954, he served as an instructor with the Reserve Officer Training Corps at the University of Toledo until 1958. From ROTC duty he was assigned to Continental Army Command (CONARC) Armor Board at Fort Knox, Kentucky, remaining there until reassignment to Korea in 1960. Upon completion of his tour in Korea, Sergeant Major Van Autreve returned to Fort Belvoir and was promoted to Sergeant Major in 1962. He served as Sergeant Major of the 91st Engineer Battalion from 1962 until 1963. From 1963 to 1964, Sergeant Major Van Autreve was stationed in Indonesia, 1964 to 1967 in Germany as Sergeant Major, 317th Engineer Battalion, and 1967 to 1969 in Vietnam as Sergeant
    5.00
    3 votes
    188
    William M. Hoge

    William M. Hoge

    • Participated in conflicts: World War II
    William Morris Hoge (January 13, 1894–29 October 1979) was a General of the United States Army. William M. Hoge grew up in Lexington, Missouri, where his father, William McGuffey Hoge, served as principal and superintendent at Wentworth Military Academy. After graduating from Wentworth in 1912, he received an appointment to West Point. He graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1916, then was commissioned into the Corps of Engineers and commanded a company of the 7th Engineers at Fort Leavenworth from 1917 to 1918. During World War I, Hoge received the Distinguished Service Cross personally from General John J. Pershing for heroic action under fire as a battalion commander in the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. During the interwar years, he graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and from the Command and General Staff School. Hoge directed one of the great engineering feats of World War II, the construction of the 1,519-mile (2,450 km) ALCAN Highway in nine months. Later, in Europe, he commanded the Provisional Engineer Special Brigade Group in the assault on Omaha Beach. He then directed Combat Command B, 9th Armored Division, in its heroic actions in the
    5.00
    3 votes
    189
    William Wallace Wotherspoon

    William Wallace Wotherspoon

    William Wallace Wotherspoon (November 16, 1850 – October 21, 1921) was a United States Army general who served as Army Chief of Staff in 1914. William Wotherspoon was born in Washington, D.C., on November 16, 1850. He was educated in private schools and served aboard ship as a mate in the United States Navy from 1870–1873. Wotherspoon was commissioned a second lieutenant and assigned to the 12th Infantry in October 1873. From 1874 to 1881, he served in the West during the Indian wars as a troop officer and quartermaster. In 1887, while stationed in northern New York, he married Mary C. Adams. After a year of absence from the Army for being sick, he became the superintendent and did much needed work to expand the Soldiers' Home in Washington, D.C. He then served at Fort Sully and at Mount Vernon Barracks, where he trained a company of Apache prisoners from 1890 to 1894. In 1894, he became aide to General Oliver O. Howard, commander of the Department of the East, and was the University of Rhode Island's first Professor Military Science and Tactics from 1894 to 1898. In 1898, while on recruiting duty at Fort McPherson, he organized the 3rd Battalion, 12th Infantry. He served in the
    5.00
    3 votes
    190
    Alfred Sully

    Alfred Sully

    Alfred Sully (22 May 1821 - 27 April 1879), was a military officer during the American Civil War and during the Indian Wars on the frontier. He was also a noted painter. Sully was the son of the portrait painter, Thomas Sully, of Pennsylvania. Alfred Sully graduated from West Point in 1841. During and after the American Civil War, Sully served in the Plains States and was widely regarded as an Indian fighter. Sully, like his father, was a watercolorist and oil painter. Between 1849 to 1853, he became chief quartermaster of the U.S. troops at Monterey, California, after California came under American jurisdiction. Then, Sully created a number of watercolor and some oil paintings reflecting the social life of Monterey during that period. Sully headed US troops out of Ft. Leavenworth, Kansas, in June 1861 as captain and occupied the city of St Joseph, Missouri, declaring martial law. Violent secessionist uprisings in the city during the early Civil War prompted Sully's occupation. Sully was commissioned colonel of the 1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry on February 3, 1862 and served in that rank until promoted to brigadier general on September 26, 1862. Also during the Civil War years,
    4.67
    3 votes
    191
    Paul Howe

    Paul Howe

    Master Sergeant (MSG) Paul R. Howe was a U.S. Army Delta operator who served in Somalia in 1993. He served with the United States Army for approximately twenty years, ten of which were spent within the special operations community. He entered training for Delta in the mid-1980s and was a member of the Delta squadron that was deployed to Somalia as part of Task Force Ranger in August 1993. Howe obtained a B.S. in general studies from Liberty University in 1995, and received a Master's from Stephen F. Austin State University in 2000. Probably most known for operations in Somalia on Oct.3-4, 1993 (Battle of Mogadishu); Howe was part of an assault element that was to apprehend a pair of lieutenants under the command of tyrant warlord, Mohamed Farrah Aidid in the infamous "Black Hawk Down" incident. He was one of the Delta fireteam leaders whose primary objective was the raid and takedown of a multi-story building inside Somalia's capital of Mogadishu. The building contained Aidid's two lieutenants, who were seen by U.S. sponsored informants on Oct. 3rd. Several hours after the spotting, U.S. Special Operations Forces belonging to the designation of "Task Force Ranger", launched an
    4.67
    3 votes
    192
    Albion P. Howe

    Albion P. Howe

    • Participated in conflicts: Mexican–American War
    Albion Parris Howe (March 13, 1818 – January 25, 1897) was a Union Army general in the American Civil War. Howe's contentious relationships with superior officers in the Army of the Potomac eventually led to his being deprived of division command. Howe was born in Standish, Maine. He graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1841. After serving in the 4th U.S. Artillery for two years, he taught mathematics at the U.S. Military Academy for three years. Howe served in the Mexican War and was awarded a brevet promotion in 1847 to the rank of captain for gallantry during Winfield Scott's advance upon Mexico City, especially for his actions at the Battle of Contreras and the Battle of Churubusco. He was promoted to the rank of captain on March 2, 1855. Howe served under Robert E. Lee during the suppression of John Brown at Harpers Ferry. At the beginning of the Civil War, Howe served under Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan in western Virginia. He took command of John J. Peck's 3rd Brigade, (55th New York, 62nd New York, and the 93rd, 98th, and 102nd Pennsylvania regiments) Couch's 1st Division, Keyes's IV Corps during the Seven Days Battles, after Peck was promoted to command of
    6.00
    1 votes
    193
    Coral Wong Pietch

    Coral Wong Pietch

    Coral Wong Pietsch (Chinese: 珊瑚黄皮茨奇; Pinyin: Shānhú Huáng Pí Cí Qí) was a Brigadier General in the United States Army Reserve. She was also the first Asian American woman to reach the rank of Brigadier General in the United States Army. Born in Waterloo, Iowa, to a Chinese immigrant father from Canton, China who had come to the United States to start a Chinese restaurant, and a Czech American mother, she grew up feeling different than her peers during the height of the Cold War, often being mocked for her Asian half of her ethnicity. Initially earning a bachelor's degree in theatre, and later a master's degree in drama, she went on to attend The Catholic University of America to attend law school. There she would meet her future husband, an army officer who was also attending to become a lawyer. Commissioned into the Judge Advocate General Corps in 1974, she was assigned to Eighth Army in Korea then to Fort Shafter, Hawaii, completing her active duty requirement, and transferring to the Army Reserves. After active duty, she settled down and began to reside in Hawaii with her husband and became a civilian attorney for U.S. Army Pacific. While a reservist she had been deployed to
    6.00
    1 votes
    194
    Duane Graveline

    Duane Graveline

    Duane Edgar Graveline (MD, MPH) (born on March 2, 1931 in Newport, Vermont) is an American physician and was a NASA astronaut. He was one of the six scientists selected in 1965, in NASA's fourth group of astronauts, for the Apollo program. He is best known for being immersed in water for seven days as part of his zero gravity deconditioning research while a United States Air Force (USAF) research scientist. He was consultant to magician David Blaine for Blaine's week of water immersion in 2006, correctly predicting Blaine's profound weakness from deconditioning. Graveline was born on March 2, 1931 in Newport, Vermont. He retired from family practice after twenty-three years and is now a writer of medical and science fiction. His current hobbies include medical consulting in zero gravity deconditioning and galactic cosmic radiation and personal health maintenance. Graveline graduated from Newport High School in 1948. He received his Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Vermont in June 1951 and his Doctor of Medicine degree from the University of Vermont College of Medicine in June 1955. Following his internship at Walter Reed, he specialized in Aerospace Medicine,
    6.00
    1 votes
    195
    Eli Beeding

    Eli Beeding

    Eli Lackland Beeding Jr. (born December 17, 1928) was a U.S. Air Force captain and rocket test subject. In 1958, a series experiments using a miniature rocket sled began at Holloman AFB under the supervision of Colonel John Paul Stapp and Captain Beeding. Participants rode the "Daisy Sled" (so-called because it was originally designed to be air, and not rocket, powered) at various speeds and in many different positions — even head first — in an attempt to learn more about the g-force force limits of the human body. On May 16, Capt. Eli Beeding prepared to make a 40 g run. The Daisy shot down the track, reached a top speed around 35 mph, and came to a screeching halt in less than a tenth of a second. "When I hit the water brake," Beeding recalled in a recent interview, "It felt like Ted Williams had hit me on the back, about lumbar five, with a baseball bat." Beeding had barely informed flight surgeon Capt. Les Eason of his troubles when he began to experience tunnel vision and passed out. It was a scary moment, since the standard protocol for shock would be to elevate Beeding’s feet. Yet there was a chance his back was broken, in which case he shouldn’t be touched. Taking a
    6.00
    1 votes
    196
    Emily Perez

    Emily Perez

    Emily Jazmin Tatum Perez (19 February 1983 – 12 September 2006) was the first female minority Cadet Command Sergeant Major in the history of the United States Military Academy at West Point. Born in Heidelberg, West Germany, of African American and Hispanic parents in a U.S. military family, she graduated from Oxon Hill High School in Maryland, where she was wing commander of Junior ROTC. While in high school, working with the District's Peace Baptist Church, Perez helped begin an HIV-AIDS ministry after family members contracted the virus. In July 2001, after graduation from high school, Perez entered the United States Military Academy at West Point. There she was an exemplary student and talented track athlete. Following graduation from West Point in 2005, she was commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the 204th Support Battalion, 2nd Brigade, 4th Infantry Division of the United States Army. Perez was deployed to Iraq in December as a Medical Service Corps officer. She was killed when a makeshift bomb exploded near her Humvee during combat operations in Al Kifl, near Najaf. Aged 23, she was the first female graduate of West Point to die in the Iraq War, the first West Point graduate
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    197
    George W. Dunaway

    George W. Dunaway

    • Participated in conflicts: World War II
    George W. Dunaway (July 24, 1922 – February 6, 2008) was the second Sergeant Major of the Army. He was sworn in on September 1, 1968 and served until his term ended in September 1970. He was born in Richmond, Virginia, on July 24, 1922 and died on February 6, 2008 in Las Vegas, Nevada. After attending the Airborne Course in August 1943, Sergeant Major Dunaway remained at Fort Benning, Georgia as an Airborne School Instructor until January 1945 when he joined the 517th Parachute Regimental Combat Team in France as a platoon sergeant. He returned to Fort Benning in December 1945 with assignment to the 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment where he served as first sergeant of Company "A". In March 1948, Sergeant Major Dunaway was reassigned to the 82d Airborne Division at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. There he became a member of the 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment as Operations Sergeant, ascending to the Regimental Sergeant Major position in 1952. In early 1954 he transferred to the 187th Regimental Combat Team as the Combat Team Sergeant Major. He continued in that position for seven years during which he saw the Airborne Regimental Combat Team renamed as the 187th Infantry, when the
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    198
    Hiram George Berry

    Hiram George Berry

    • Participated in conflicts: American Civil War
    Hiram Gregory Berry (August 27, 1824 – May 2, 1863) was an American politician and general in the Army of the Potomac during the American Civil War. Hiram G. Berry was born in Rockland. He worked as a carpenter and a navigator. He served several terms in the State Legislature and subsequently became the mayor of Rockland. He originated and commanded the "Rockland Guard," a volunteer militia company, which held a reputation for drill and discipline. At the beginning of the Civil War, he went to Augusta and offered his services to the Governor and was given orders to recruit a regiment.". He participated in the First Battle of Manassas under the command of O.O. Howard. For his gallant service at Bull Run he was promoted to brigadier general in March 1862. Berry was reassigned to the command of the 3rd Brigade of Hamilton's Division (later Kearny's), 3rd Corps. The 3rd Brigade consisted of four regiments: the 2nd Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment; 3rd Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment, 5th Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment and the 37th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment. Berry's decisive action at the Battle of Williamsburg benefited General Hooker. His brigade fought in
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    199
    Julian Smith

    Julian Smith

    • Participated in conflicts: United States occupation of Veracruz, 1914
    Julian Constable Smith (September 11, 1885 – November 5, 1975) was a United States Marine Corps general who served for 37 years, including service in Nicaragua (Navy Cross) and during World War II's Battle of Tarawa (Distinguished Service Medal). Smith was born in Elkton, Maryland, on 11 September 1885, and graduated from the University of Delaware. He received his appointment as a Second Lieutenant in January 1909, and underwent his basic training as a Marine officer at the Marine Barracks, Port Royal, South Carolina. Following his promotion to First Lieutenant in September 1912, he was ordered to the Marine Barracks at the Philadelphia Navy Yard, and in December of the following year, he was transferred to Panama, remaining there until January 1914. As a member of an expeditionary force, he departed from Panama to take part in the occupation of Vera Cruz, Mexico, from April to December 1914. Upon returning to the United States, he again was ordered to Philadelphia, this time as a member of the 1st Brigade of Marines. In August 1915, he began a tour of expeditionary duty in Haiti, and in April 1916, was transferred to Santo Domingo with the 2nd Battalion, 1st Regiment, 1st
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    200
    Kenneth Minihan

    Kenneth Minihan

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    Lieutenant General Kenneth A. Minihan (born December 31, 1943) is a former director of the National Security Agency and the Defense Intelligence Agency (retired 1 May 1999). Minihan entered the United States Air Force in 1966 as a distinguished graduate of the Reserve Officer Training Corps program at Florida State University, where he was also a member of Phi Kappa Psi. He served as senior intelligence officer for the Air Force and in other senior staff officer positions in the Pentagon; Headquarters Tactical Air Command, Langley Air Force Base, Virginia.; Electronic Security Command, Kelly Air Force Base, Texas; the Defense Intelligence Agency, Washington, D.C.; and the National Security Agency, Fort George G. Meade, Maryland. He has commanded squadrons, groups and a major Air Command, both in the United States and overseas. He has been the assistant chief of staff, intelligence, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Washington, D.C., and most recently, director of the Defense Intelligence Agency. After retiring from the Air Force, Minihan served as president of the Security Affairs Support Association from 1999 until 2002. He currently serves as a Managing Director in the Paladin Capital
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    201
    Wilbur J. Peterkin

    Wilbur J. Peterkin

    Colonel Wilbur J. Peterkin was a Lieutenant Colonel in the United States Army during the Second World War in the China Burma India Theater, and an executive and commanding officer of the United States Army Observer Group, commonly known as the Dixie Mission. Prior to the war, Peterkin was a high school teacher in Sumner, Washington. Before commanding Dixie, Peterkin had spent almost two years in China. Peterkin went to school in Polson, Montana, and Portland, Oregon. He received a B.S. in military science and education from the University of Oregon where he was drum major of the university band (he played the baritone and tuba, later directing the high school band in Sumner, Washington). He was an infantry instructor in Fort Benning, Georgia, from 1941-1943. From 1943-44 he trained Kuomintang officers in South China. After World War II he served with the 415th Infantry Regiment, 104th Infantry Division (Reserve) from 1946–1964, and was the commanding officer 1948-1957.
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    202
    Charles Justin Bailey

    Charles Justin Bailey

    • Participated in conflicts: World War I
    Charles Justin Bailey (June 21, 1859 – September 21, 1946) was an American soldier, born in Tamaqua, Pa. He graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1880 and in the same year was appointed third lieutenant. He was promoted through the various grades and became colonel in 1911 and brigadier general in 1913. On August 5, 1917, he was appointed major general of the National Army. He commanded the Philippine Department in 1918 and in the same year was made commander of the 81st Division of the National Army, which he commanded in France in 1918-19. In the latter year he was appointed commander of the Middle Atlantic Coast, Artillery District, and in 1921, commander of the Third Corps area. His university tutor remarked once "Damn this boy, damn him to hell". He was awarded the D.S.M., the Order of Leopold (Belgium), the Croix de Guerre with palm, and was an officer of the Legion of Honor.
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    203
    Donald L. Harlow

    Donald L. Harlow

    Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force Donald L. Harlow (November 20, 1920 – October 1, 1997) was the second Chief Master Sergeant, appointed to the highest non-commissioned officer position in the United States Air Force. Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force Donald L. Harlow was adviser to Secretary of the Air Force Robert C. Seamans Jr. and Chief of Staff of the Air Force Gen. John D. Ryan on matters concerning welfare, effective utilization and progress of the enlisted members of the Air Force. He was the second chief master sergeant appointed to this ultimate noncommissioned officer position. The chief was born in Waterville, Maine, on September 22, 1920. He graduated from Lawrence Academy, Groton, Mass., in 1942, and he attended California College of Commerce, Long Beach, Calif., during 1946 to 1948. He was awarded a bachelor of science degree in business administration by the college in 1956, when he completed requirements while assigned to the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps program at Southern Methodist University. Chief Harlow entered military service in August 1942 during World War II and was assigned to the Army Air Corps. He attended Armament School and upon
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    204
    Jerry K. Crump

    Jerry K. Crump

    • Participated in conflicts: Korean War
    Jerry Kirt Crump (February 18, 1933 – January 10, 1977) was a soldier in the United States Army during the Korean War. He received the Medal of Honor for his actions on September 6, and September 7, 1951. Rank and organization: Corporal, U.S. Army, Company L, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division Place and date: Near Chorwon, Korea, 6 and September 7, 1951 Entered service at: Forest City, N.C. Born: February 18, 1933, Charlotte, N.C. G.O. No.: 68, July 11, 1952 Citation: Cpl. Crump, a member of Company L, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and outstanding courage above and beyond the call of duty in action against the enemy. During the night a numerically superior hostile force launched an assault against his platoon on Hill 284, overrunning friendly positions and swarming into the sector. Cpl. Crump repeatedly exposed himself to deliver effective fire into the ranks of the assailants, inflicting numerous casualties. Observing 2 enemy soldiers endeavoring to capture a friendly machine gun, he charged and killed both with his bayonet, regaining control of the weapon. Returning to his position, now occupied by 4 of his wounded comrades, he continued his accurate
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    2 votes
    205
    Melvin L. Brown

    Melvin L. Brown

    Melvin Louis Brown (February 2, 1931 – September 5, 1950) was a United States Army soldier during the Korean War. He posthumously received the Medal of Honor for his actions on September 4, 1950. He was 19 years old. Born and raised in Mahaffey, Pennsylvania, Brown was one of ten children of Edward D. and Rhoda V. Jones Brown. He enjoyed skiing, ice skating, swimming, and fishing. He worked as a mechanic before dropping out of high school and enlisting in the Army at age seventeen in October 1948. He was inspired by his older brother Donald, who had joined the military earlier and was stationed in Japan; two other Brown brothers would also serve in the military. Melvin Brown was sent to Japan, where he stayed for eighteen months until late July 1950 when he was deployed to Korea in the first weeks of the war there. While in Korea, Brown served as a private first class in Company D of the 8th Engineer Combat Battalion. On September 4, 1950 near Kasan, his platoon was taking a hill when they came under enemy attack. Brown took up a position near a wall and, although he was wounded and eventually ran out of ammunition, maintained his position throughout the battle. The attack was
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    206
    Paul X. Kelley

    Paul X. Kelley

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    General Paul Xavier Kelley (born November 11, 1928) was the twenty-eighth Commandant of the United States Marine Corps, from July 1, 1983 to June 30, 1987. Kelley served 37 years active duty in the Marine Corps. After his commission in 1950, he served as an infantry officer in a wide variety of billets. His first assignment after receiving his commission through Villanova College's Naval ROTC program was with Aircraft Engineering Squadron 12 (AES-12) at Marine Corps Air Station Quantico, Virginia. He then served as an exchange officer with the Royal Marines. He then joined the Marine Force Reconnaissance community and served with distinction during the Vietnam War. His final assignments were as Assistant Commandant of the Marine Corps and then Commandant of the Marine Corps until his retirement in 1987. Following his retirement from the Marine Corps, Kelley has served on a number of corporate boards. Paul Kelley was born on November 11, 1928 in Boston, Massachusetts. He earned his Bachelor of Science degree in Economics from Villanova University in 1950. Kelley was commissioned a second lieutenant in the U.S. Marine Corps in June 1950. After The Basic School in March 1951, he
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    207
    Thomas J. Callan

    Thomas J. Callan

    Thomas Joseph Callan (July 12, 1853 – May 5, 1908) was a United States Army soldier who received the Medal of Honor for his bravery during the Battle of Little Big Horn in 1876. He was born on July 12, 1853. He served during the Indian Wars as a Private in Company B, 7th United States Cavalry. He received the Medal of Honor for his bravery at the Battle of Little Big Horn, Montana Territory, on June 25, and June 26, 1876. His medal was issued on October 24, 1896. He died on May 5, 1908 and was buried in Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, East Orange in New Jersey. Rank and organization: Private, Company B, 7th U.S. Cavalry. Place and date. At Little Big Horn, Mont., 25-June 26, 1876. Entered service at: Boston, Mass. Birth: Ireland. Date of issue: October 24, 1896. Citation: Volunteered and succeeded in obtaining water for the wounded of the command; also displayed conspicuously good conduct in assistlng to drive away the Indians.
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    208
    Benjamin S. Griffin

    Benjamin S. Griffin

    Benjamin S. Griffin, (born August 11, 1946) was a four-star general in the United States Army. He served as the Commanding General, United States Army Materiel Command from November 5, 2004 to November 13, 2008. Prior to this assignment, he served as the Department of the Army Deputy Chief of Staff, G-8. He retired from the Army after over 38 years of service. General Griffin began his career when he was commissioned as an Infantry officer in July 1970 following graduation from Officer Candidate School, Fort Benning, Georgia. He served two tours at Fort Bragg, North Carolina in the 82nd Airborne Division: in the 1st Battalion, 508th Infantry Regiment as a rifle platoon leader and company executive officer, and in the 3rd Battalion (Airborne), 325th Infantry Regiment as a commander of Company C and a S-3 Air (Operations) officer. General Griffin also worked as a G3 operations officer, Headquarters, 82nd Airborne Division. General Griffin's overseas assignments included a tour in Korea as a Company Commander and Brigade S-2 in the 2nd Infantry Division. He served two tours in Germany in the 8th Infantry Division as Secretary of the General Staff and Mechanized Infantry Battalion
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    209
    David Hicks

    David Hicks

    Chaplain (Major General) David Harlan Hicks, USA (born 1942) is a retired American Army officer who served as the 21 Chief of Chaplains of the United States Army from 2003 to 2007. Hicks began his career in 1958 and was stationed as a patrolman in the Korean Demilitarized Zone in 1965. An ordained Presbyterian, he served as a command chaplain at the United States Army Special Forces Command (USASOC) at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. He has over 30 years of experience as an army chaplain. As the Army's Chief of Chaplains, he oversaw over 2,200 chaplains serving in United States Army, National Guard, and Army Reserve capacities. He retired in 2007, and was succeeded by Brig. Gen. Douglas L. Carver.
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    210
    Decatur Dorsey

    Decatur Dorsey

    Decatur Dorsey (1836–July 11, 1891) was a Union Army soldier in the American Civil War and a recipient of the U.S. military's highest decoration, the Medal of Honor, for his actions at the Battle of the Crater. Born into slavery, Dorsey enlisted in the United States Colored Troops and served through the last year of the war. Dorsey was born a slave in 1836 in Howard County, Maryland. He worked as a laborer before enlisting in the Union Army from Baltimore on March 22, 1864, at age twenty-five. He joined Company B of the 39th United States Colored Infantry Regiment as a private, but was promoted to corporal less than two months later, on May 17. On July 30, 1864, Dorsey took part in the Battle of the Crater in Petersburg, Virginia. With the Siege of Petersburg at a stalemate, Union forces hoped to break the city's defenses by detonating explosives in a tunnel dug beneath the Confederate lines and charging the enemy positions in the aftermath of the explosion. The blast blew a huge crater in the Confederate defenses, and white Union soldiers rushed in to attack. Men who entered the crater became trapped as the Confederates regrouped and began firing down at them. Dorsey's division,
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    2 votes
    211
    Benjamin Foulois

    Benjamin Foulois

    Benjamin Delahauf Foulois (December 9, 1879 – April 25, 1967) was a United States Army general who learned to fly the first military planes purchased from the Wright Brothers. He became the first military aviator as an airship pilot, and achieved numerous other military aviation "firsts". He led strategic development of the Air Force in the United States. Benjamin "Benny" Delahauf Foulois was born on December 9, 1879, in Washington, Connecticut, to the son of a French veteran of the Franco-Prussian War (1870–1871), and a Boston-born nurse. At age 18 he used his older brother’s birth certificate to enlist in the Army to support the Spanish-American War, but arrived in Puerto Rico just weeks before the armistice was signed. As an engineer, he fought off the rampant tropical diseases, and after five months, was shipped home and mustered out. On June 17, 1899, Foulois enlisted again, as a private in the Regular Army and was assigned to the 19th Infantry, where he achieved the grade of first sergeant. After service in the Philippines at Luzon, Panay and Cebu, he was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant on July 9, 1901. Foulois was transferred to the 17th Infantry, and served in Manila,
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    1 votes
    212
    David E. Twiggs

    David E. Twiggs

    • Participated in conflicts: Mexican–American War
    David Emanuel Twiggs (1790 – July 15, 1862) was a United States soldier during the War of 1812 and Mexican-American War and a general of the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. He was the oldest Confederate general in the Civil War. Twiggs was born on the "Good Hope" estate in Richmond County, Georgia, son of John Twiggs, a general in the Georgia militia during the American Revolution and a nephew of David Emanuel, Governor of Georgia and the first Jewish Governor in the US, making him ethnically Jewish. Twiggs volunteered for service in the War of 1812 and subsequently served in the Seminole Wars and the Black Hawk War. He became Colonel of the 2nd U.S. Dragoons in 1836. During the Mexican-American War, he led a brigade in the Army of Occupation at the battles of Palo Alto and Resaca de la Palma. He was promoted to brigadier general in 1846 and commanded a division at the Battle of Monterrey. He joined Winfield Scott's expedition, commanding its 2nd Division of Regulars and led the division in all the battles from Veracruz through Mexico City. He was wounded during the assault on Chapultepec. After the fall of Mexico City, he was appointed military governor of
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    213
    Hubert L. Lee

    Hubert L. Lee

    • Participated in conflicts: Korean War
    Hubert Louis Lee (February 2, 1915 – November 5, 1982) was a soldier in the United States Army during the Korean War. He received the Medal of Honor for his actions on February 1, 1951. Rank and organization: Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, Company I, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division Place and date: Near Ip-ori, Korea, February 1, 1951 Entered service at: Leland, Miss. Born: February 2, 1915, Arburg, Mo. G.O. No.: 21, February 5, 1952. Citation: 'M/Sgt. Lee, a member of Company I, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty in action against the enemy. When his platoon was forced from its position by a numerically superior enemy force, and his platoon leader wounded, M/Sgt. Lee assumed command, regrouped the remnants of his unit, and led them in repeated assaults to regain the position. Within 25 yards of his objective he received a leg wound from grenade fragments, but refused assistance and continued the attack. Although forced to withdraw 5 times, each time he regrouped his remaining men and renewed the assault. Moving forward at the head of his small group in the fifth attempt, he was struck by an exploding grenade,
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    214
    Minnie Spotted-Wolf

    Minnie Spotted-Wolf

    Private Minnie Spotted-Wolf (1923 – 1988) was the first Native American woman to enlist in the United States Marine Corps. She enlisted in the Marine Corps Women's Reserve in July 1943. Minnie, from Heart Butte, Montana, is a member of the Blackfoot tribe, Prior to joining the Marines, she had worked on her father's ranch doing such chores as cutting fence posts, driving a two-ton truck, and breaking horses. Her comment on Marine boot camp: "It was hard but when it was over, I was proud of myself and all that I accomplished."
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    215
    Samuel Ringgold

    Samuel Ringgold

    Samuel B. Ringgold (1796 – May 11, 1846) was an artillery officer in the United States Army who was noted for several military innovations which caused him to be called the "Father of Modern Artillery." He was also, according to some records, the first U.S. officer to fall in the Mexican-American War, perishing from wounds received at the Battle of Palo Alto. Ringgold was the son of Samuel Ringgold, a U.S. Congressman from Maryland. A younger brother, Cadwallader Ringgold, also served in the military, becoming a rear admiral. On July 24, 1818, Samuel Ringgold graduated 5th in a class of 23 from the United States Military Academy at West Point. He was commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the Artillery. In the early 1820s, Ringgold was on the staff of General Winfield Scott. At about that time, (roughly 1825) John Vanderlyn, then working in New York City, painted Ringgold's portrait. Ringgold's significant military innovations included the Ringgold military saddle and artillery techniques. Based on his research in Europe, he rewrote the Army's manual for artillery, which included the tactical concept of flying artillery—employing artillery pieces that could be moved quickly from place
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    216
    Leonard F. Mason

    Leonard F. Mason

    • Participated in conflicts: World War II
    Leonard Foster Mason (February 22, 1920 – July 22, 1944) served in the United States Marine Corps during World War II. He was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for heroism during the Battle of Guam where he was mortally wounded. Leonard Foster Mason was born on February 22, 1920 in Middlesboro, Kentucky. He enlisted in the Marine Corps in April 1943 and was promoted to private first class in March 1944. During the landing on Guam, on July 22, 1944, two enemy machine guns opened fire on Mason’s platoon. Although mortally wounded, Mason cleared out the hostile position, acting on his own initiative. His heroic act in the face of almost certain death enabled his platoon to accomplish its mission. He posthumously received the Medal of Honor. Mason died the following day of his wounds. Rank and organization: Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps. Born: February 2, 1920, Middlesboro, Ky. Accredited to: Ohio. Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as an automatic rifleman serving with the 2d Battalion, 3d Marines, 3d Marine Division, in action against enemy Japanese forces on the Asan-Adelup Beachhead, Guam,
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    2 votes
    217
    A. Peter Dewey

    A. Peter Dewey

    • Participated in conflicts: World War II
    Albert Peter Dewey (October 8, 1916-September 26, 1945), shot by accident by Viet Minh troops on September 26, 1945. Dewey was the first American fatality in French Indochina, killed in the early aftermath of World War II. (This is often confused with the Vietnam War). The younger son of Congressman Charles S. Dewey and his wife, Marie Suzette de Marigny Hall Dewey, and also a distant relative of New York Governor Thomas E. Dewey, Dewey was born in Chicago. He was educated in Switzerland at Institut Le Rosey, before receiving further teaching at St. Paul's School (Concord, New Hampshire). He attended Yale University (where he studied French history and was a member of the Berzelius Secret Society along with friends such as William Warren Scranton, later Governor of Pennsylvania), and the University of Virginia School of Law. After his graduation from Yale in 1939, Dewey worked as a journalist for the Chicago Daily News in its Paris bureau. Dewey later worked for family friend Nelson Rockefeller and his Office of Inter-American Affairs, part of the Office of War Information. Rockefeller once sent him to France to meet secretly with General Charles de Gaulle. While reporting on the
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    1 votes
    218
    Arthur Trudeau

    Arthur Trudeau

    • Participated in conflicts: World War II
    Arthur Gilbert Trudeau (July 5, 1902 in Middlebury, Vermont – June 5, 1991, Chevy Chase, Maryland) was a Lieutenant General in the United States Army best known for his command of the 7th Infantry Division during the battle of Battle of Pork Chop Hill during the Korean War Arthur Trudeau entered West Point in 1920 and graduated in the Class of 1924 later serving in the 104th Engineers of the New Jersey National Guard. In 1944, he was promoted to Brigadier General. Considered a specialist on amphibious warfare he assumed command of a secret base in the Philippines in 1945, assisting in the preparation for an invasion of Japan which never came. After the war, he served in Germany before becoming deputy commander of the Army War College in 1950. During the Korean war, Trudeau commanded the 7th Infantry Division and would earn the Silver Star by personally leading a reconnaissance team to scout the strategic position, Pork Chop Hill, while it was under heavy enemy fire. He was named Chief of Army intelligence in October 1953 but was relieved of his command 20 months later when Allen W. Dulles, Director of Central Intelligence Agency sent a scathing memorandum of complaints to the
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    219
    Frank McIntyre

    Frank McIntyre

    For the 19th-century baseball player, see Frank McIntyre (baseball) Frank McIntyre (January 5, 1865 - February 16, 1944) was an American military officer who served for many years as Chief of the Bureau of Insular Affairs, responsible for federal administration of the Philippines and Puerto Rico. General McIntyre was born the son of Irish immigrants Dennis and Mary Gaughan McIntyre in Montgomery, Alabama. Dennis McIntyre came to America in the 1850s and was a railroad car inspector for the West Point and Alabama Railroad. He is listed on the roster of the Montgomery County Home Guard, CSA in 1864. His wife Mary was from County Mayo. The surname McIntyre is a Scottish Highland name also spelt MacIntyre and means son of the carpenter or wright which is explicit in the Gaelic original Mac an-T Saoir, McIntyres were originally to be found in Lorne where they possessed the lands of Glenoe from the 13th century until the early 19th century. According to family tradition the MacIntyres/McIntyres came originally from the Hebrides. In the 13th century, they sailed from their ancestral home carrying a white cow, and settled on the mainland at Glen Noe by Ben Cruachan. On the mainland the
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    220
    George D. Libby

    George D. Libby

    George Dalton Libby (4 December 1919 – 20 July 1950) was a soldier in the United States Army during the Korean War. He posthumously received the Medal of Honor for his actions on July 20, 1950. Part of the U.S. 24th Infantry Division, sergeant Libby was attempting to withdraw from Taejon after the battle of Taejon when the truck he was riding in was disabled by North Korean fire. Libby exposed himself to North Korean fire multiple times to help wounded soldiers, before using himself as a human shield to protect the driver of another truck as they broke through the North Korean forces. Shot multiple times, Libby died from blood loss but was able to protect a truck full of wounded men until they escaped to allied lines. For this action, Libby was awarded the Medal of Honor. George Dalton Libby was born on 4 December 1919. In Bridgton, Maine. He enlisted in the United States Army in Waterbury, Connecticut. Libby was known to have fought in World War II in the European Theatre of Operations. By the time of the outbreak of the Korean War, however, Libby was a sergeant and had been assigned to C Company of the 3rd Engineer Battalion, 24th Infantry Division. On 20 July 1950, the 24th
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    221
    John Green

    John Green

    • Participated in conflicts: Mexican–American War
    John Green (November 20, 1825 – November 22, 1908) was a United States cavalry officer, who was awarded a Medal of Honor for his bravery and leadership at the First Battle of the Stronghold during the Modoc War. Green, of German birth came to the U.S. at age 6 in 1831. He grew up to become apprenticed to a carpenter on one occasion and to a cabinetmaker, but he did not feel his life was in those lines of work and instead enlisted in the army aged 21. Green entered the army in 1846, he fought in the Mexican-American War under General Winfield Scott as a Sergeant. He later served as an officer in the American Civil War and rose through the ranks to become Colonel. At the First Battle of the Stronghold during the Modoc War Green's men displayed a reluctance to fight Modoc warriors, who had been inflicting casualties on their unit. Green left cover, and, standing in full view of the Modoc warriors, proceeded to pace in front of his men, slapping his gloves in his palm for emphasis. Although exposed to enemy fire, Green survived, although he was injured, and remained in command. Rank and Organization: Major, 1st U.S. Cavalry. Place and Date: At the Lava Beds, Calif., January 17, 1873.
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    222
    Raymond S. McLain

    Raymond S. McLain

    • Participated in conflicts: World War II
    Raymond Stallings McLain (April 4, 1890 – December 14, 1954) was a general of the United States Army, rising to the rank of Lieutenant General. In the words of George C. Marshall, Raymond S. McLain "gave great distinction to the term 'citizen soldier'". His service to his state and nation spanned more than forty years. Raymond McLain was born in Washington County, Kentucky as a son of Thomas A. and Lucetta (Stallings) McLain. He graduated from Hill’s Business College in Oklahoma City in 1909 and subsequently worked as a Clerk in real estate office and then worked as an abstractor. Simultaneously entered in the Oklahoma National Guard in 1912, where he reached the rank of Sergeant. In December 1914, he was commissioned to the rank of Second Lieutenant in Oklahoma National Guard after he attended a school of musketry at Fort Sill. He was promoted again next year to the rank of First lieutenant. Following a Pancho Villa Expedition, he served as a machine gun company commander with 36th Infantry Division on the Mexican Border. During World War I, he was with the American Expeditionary Forces under General John J. Pershing in France until 1919. After return home, he continued service
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    223
    Wayne A. Downing

    Wayne A. Downing

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    Wayne Allan Downing (May 10, 1940 – July 18, 2007) was a retired four-star United States Army general born in Peoria, Illinois. He graduated from the United States Military Academy with a Bachelor of Science degree in 1962 and held a Master of Business Administration degree from Tulane University. In 2001, Downing came out of retirement to coordinate the national campaign "to detect, disrupt and destroy global terrorist organizations and those who support them.". He held the title of National Director and Deputy National Security Advisor for combating terrorism. He reported to then-National Security Advisor Condoleezza Rice and Homeland Security director Tom Ridge. From 2003 until his death he held the Distinguished Chair at the Combating Terrorism Center at West Point. Downing was formerly a director of Metal Storm and a senior executive with Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). He also performed various speaking engagements. Besides working for the US government in his retiree years, he also worked for NBC News as a military analyst. In 2006 he received the United States Military Academy's 2006 Distinguished Graduate Award. Downing died on July 18, 2007, of
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    224
    William Wells

    William Wells

    William Wells (c. 1770 – 15 August 1812), also known as Apekonit ("Carrot top"), was the son-in-law of Chief Little Turtle of the Miami. He fought for the Miami in the Northwest Indian War. During the course of that war, he became an United States Army officer, and also served in the War of 1812. Wells was born at Jacob's Creek, Pennsylvania, the youngest son of Samuel Wells, a captain in the Virginia militia during the American Revolutionary War. The family moved to Kentucky when William was a small child, and his mother died soon after. Wells' father was killed in an Indian raid near Louisville, and the young boy was sent to live with a family friend. Three years later in 1782, he was taken captive by Miami while on a hunting trip. Wells was 12 years old. Wells was adopted by a chief named Gaviahate ("Porcupine"), and raised in the village of Kenapakomoko, on the Eel River. His Miami name was "Apekonit" (carrot), perhaps in reference to his red hair. He seems to have adapted to Miami life quite well, and accompanied war parties- sometimes as the decoy. Wells was located and visited by his brothers around 1788 or 1789. He visited Louisville but remained with the Miami, perhaps
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    Albert H. Wilkening

    Albert H. Wilkening

    Major General Albert H. Wilkening is the adjutant general of Wisconsin. He is responsible for both the federal and state missions of the Wisconsin Army and Air National Guard and the Wisconsin Division of Emergency Management. In March 2003 he was appointed by Governor Jim Doyle to head a new Homeland Security Council in Wisconsin and to be the governor's homeland security advisor. Wilkening enlisted in the United States Air Force in 1968 and was commissioned a Second Lieutenant on March 28 of that year. Following pilot training at Webb Air Force Base, Texas, he served as a flight training instructor at Columbus Air Force Base, Mississippi until May, 1973. In August, 1973, he joined the Wisconsin Air National Guard. He has served in a variety of command and staff positions, including as Commander of the 176th Tactical Fighter Squadron and Deputy Commander for Operations, 128th Tactical Fighter Wing. From December, 1990 to August, 2002, he served as Deputy Adjutant General for Air, and Commander of the Wisconsin Air National Guard. He was named Adjutant General by Governor Scott McCallum and assumed office on September 1, 2002. Wilkening is a command pilot with more than 3,300
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    Bertram Tracy Clayton

    Bertram Tracy Clayton

    • Participated in conflicts: World War I
    Bertram Tracy Clayton (October 19, 1862 – May 30, 1918) was an American soldier and politician. Born in Clayton, Alabama, he went on to attend the United States Military Academy, graduating in 1886 with John J. Pershing. He resigned in 1888, intending to work as a civil engineer, but went on to serve with Troop C, New York Volunteer Cavalry (Brooklyn's Own) during the Spanish-American War in Puerto Rico, winning distinction. After the war, Clayton served in the House of Representatives from 1899 until 1901, representing New York's fourth district. After an unsuccessful reelection bid, he was appointed as a captain in the Regular Army. He stayed on active duty and was promoted several times up to the rank of colonel and served in a variety of posts until World War I. While serving in France with the 1st Infantry Division, Clayton was killed during a German air raid on American trenches. He was the highest ranking West Point graduate killed in action during the war. Clayton is buried at Arlington National Cemetery with his wife, Mary Elizabeth D'Aubert Clayton. His brother, Henry De Lamar Clayton, Jr., also served as a Member of Congress from their home state, Alabama. Their father,
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    227
    Clifton Williams

    Clifton Williams

    This article is about the American astronaut. For the composer, see Clifton Williams (composer). Clifton Curtis 'C.C.' Williams (September 26, 1932 - October 5, 1967) was a NASA astronaut, a Naval Aviator, and a Major in the United States Marine Corps who was killed in a plane crash; he had never been to space. The crash was caused by a mechanical failure in a NASA T-38 jet trainer, which he was piloting to visit his parents in Mobile, Alabama. The failure caused the flight controls to stop responding, and although he activated the ejection seat, it did not save him. He was the fourth astronaut from NASA's Astronaut Group 3 to have died, the first two (Bassett and Freeman) having been killed in separate T-38 flights and (Chaffee) in the Apollo 1 fire earlier that year. The aircraft crashed in Florida near Tallahassee within an hour of departing Patrick AFB. Although he was never on a spaceflight, he served as backup pilot for the mission Gemini 10, which took place in July 1966. Following this mission he was selected to be the lunar module pilot for an Apollo mission to the moon commanded by Pete Conrad. Following Williams' death, Alan Bean became lunar module pilot for Conrad's
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    David D. McKiernan

    David D. McKiernan

    David D. McKiernan (born December 11, 1950) is a retired United States Army four-star general who served in Afghanistan as Commander, International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) from June 3, 2008 to June 15, 2009. He served concurrently as Commander, U.S. Forces Afghanistan (USFOR-A) from October 6, 2008 to June 15, 2009. Prior to Afghanistan, McKiernan was Commanding General, U.S. Army, Europe and Seventh U.S. Army from December 14, 2005 to May 2, 2008. Before promotion to four-star rank, he served as Commanding General, Third U.S. Army and Coalition Forces Land Component Command (CFLCC) from 2002 to 2004, where he commanded all allied ground forces during the 2003 invasion of Iraq, and as Deputy Commanding General, U.S. Army Forces Command, the Army's largest major command, from 2004 to 2005. On May 11, 2009, Defense Secretary Robert Gates asked for McKiernan's resignation from ISAF and USFOR-A. Gates said new leadership was needed as the administration of President Barack Obama launched a new strategy in the seven-year-old Afghanistan war. McKiernan was replaced by two generals, General Stanley A. McChrystal (Commander) and Lieutenant General David Rodriguez (Deputy
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    Edward E. Lyon

    Edward E. Lyon

    Edward Eugene Lyon (August 8, 1871 – November 18, 1931) was a United States Army private received the Medal of Honor for actions on May 13, 1899 during the Philippine–American War. Private Lyon was part of the Young's Scouts, 2nd Oregon Volunteer Regiment. He later became a police sergeant. Private Lyon is buried in Hollywood Cemetery, Hollywood, California. Rank and Organization: Private, Company B, 2d Oregon Volunteer Infantry. Place and Date: At San Miguel de Mayumo, Luzon, Philippine Islands, May 13, 1899. Entered Service At: Amboy, Wash. Birth: Hixton, Wis. Date of Issue: January 24, 1906. Citation: With 11 other scouts, without waiting for the supporting battalion to aid them or to get into position to do so, charged over a distance of about 150 yards and completely routed about 300 of the enemy, who were in line and in a position that could only be carried by a frontal attack.
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    230
    Elisha Hunt Rhodes

    Elisha Hunt Rhodes

    Elisha Hunt Rhodes (March 21, 1842 – January 14, 1917) served in the Union Army of the Potomac during the American Civil War. Rhodes' illustrative diary of his war service was quoted prominently in Ken Burns' PBS documentary The Civil War. Rhodes was born in Providence, Rhode Island, to Captain Elisha H. and Eliza A. Chase. He had several sisters and two brothers. At age 14, Rhodes went to a business academy. His father drowned when his schooner Worcester was sunk by a hurricane on December 10, 1858 and was buried on Linyards Cay, Abaco in the Bahamas. Rhodes enlisted in the war with his mother's permission. At first he believed war to be an adventure. During the Civil War, he advanced from private in Company D of the 2nd Rhode Island Volunteer Infantry to colonel of the regiment. After the war, he became a successful businessman and became active in veterans' affairs. He never missed a regimental reunion. From 1879 until 1893 he served as Brigadier General in command of the Rhode Island State Militia. Elisha Hunt Rhodes is most remembered for the wartime journal and letters published as All For the Union by a great-grandson, Robert H. Rhodes. This diary reflects the change in
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    231
    Frank Merrill

    Frank Merrill

    • Participated in conflicts: World War II
    Frank Dow Merrill (December 4, 1903 in New Hampshire – December 11, 1955 in Fernandina Beach, Florida) is best remembered for his command of Merrill's Marauders, officially the 5307th Composite Unit (provisional), in the Burma Campaign of World War II. Merrill's Marauders came under General Joseph Stilwell's Northern Combat Area Command. It was a special forces unit modelled on the Chindits' long range penetration groups trained to operate from bases deep behind Japanese lines. Merrill lived with his family in Amesbury, Massachusetts and graduated from Amesbury High School. He enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1922 and earned the rank of sergeant before attending West Point where he graduated in 1929. Merrill also earned a B.S. in military engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1932. In 1938, Merrill became the Military Attaché in Tokyo where he studied the Japanese language. He joined General Douglas MacArthur's staff in the Philippines in 1941 as a military intelligence officer. Merrill was on a mission in Rangoon, Burma at the time of the Pearl Harbor attack and remained in Burma after the Japanese invasion. In 1942, Col. Merrill was promoted to Brigadier
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    Frank Tejeda

    Frank Tejeda

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    Frank Mariano Tejeda (October 2, 1945 – January 30, 1997) was a decorated United States Marine and an American Democratic politician from Texas. He served in the Texas House of Representatives (1976–1987), the Texas Senate (1987–1993), and in the United States House of Representatives (1993–1997). Frank M. Tejeda was born in San Antonio, Texas. He attended St. Leo's Catholic School and graduated from Harlandale High School. He served in the United States Marine Corps and was wounded in action during the Vietnam War (1963–1967). He was decorated for valor with the Silver Star, the Bronze Star, and the Purple Heart. Tejeda reached the rank of Major in the Marine Corps Reserves. After his Marine Corps service, he earned his bachelor's degree in 1970 from St. Mary's University in San Antonio, and his J.D. in 1974 from University of California, Berkeley Law School. Tejeda began his political career in the Texas Legislature. He served in the Texas House from 1976 to 1987, and then in the Texas Senate from 1987 to 1993. While serving in the legislature, he earned two Masters degrees — in 1980, he received an M.A. from Harvard University, and in 1989, an LL.M. from Yale Law School. Tejeda
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    233
    George Patton IV

    George Patton IV

    • Participated in conflicts: Korean War
    George Smith Patton, IV (December 24, 1923 – June 27, 2004) was a Major General in the United States Army and the son of World War II General George Patton. A 1946 graduate of West Point Patton was initially trained as an infantry officer. His first assignment was to Regensburg, West Germany where he participated in the 1948 Berlin Airlift. The troops under his command were used to load supplies onto Air Force transport aircraft bound for Berlin. In 1952, a year after he returned from Germany, he married Joanne Holbrook. Patton served in Korea starting in February 1953, commanding "A" Company of the 140th Tank Battalion, 40th Infantry Division. Patton received his first Silver Star and the Purple Heart in Korea. Returning to the United States in 1954, Patton, now a captain, was initially assigned to West Point but was quickly picked up as part of an exchange program and was sent to teach at the United States Naval Academy. Patton served a total of three tours of duty in Vietnam, the first from April 1962 to April 1963 at Military Assistance Command, Vietnam-Special Operations, during which he was promoted to lieutenant colonel. He then took command of the 2nd Medium Tank Battalion,
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    James Barnet Fry

    James Barnet Fry

    • Participated in conflicts: American Civil War
    James Barnet Fry ( February 22, 1827 - July 11, 1894 ) was an American soldier and prolific author of historical books. He was born in Carrollton, Illinois. He graduated from West Point in 1847 and served for a time as assistant instructor of artillery there, in the fall going to Mexico to serve under General Scott in the Mexican-American War. He was stationed successively in Oregon, Louisiana, and Texas, and at West Point in 1853–54. He was adjutant of the Academy from 1854 to 1859. In 1861 he acted as chief of staff to General Irvin McDowell in the American Civil War, and in 1862 held a similar position under Don Carlos Buell. He served as the last provost marshal general of the United States from 1863 to 1866, when this office was abolished at the close of the war. Subsequently, he served as adjutant general and was successively brevetted colonel, brigadier general, and major general in the Regular Army. He retired in 1881 to devote his time to writing military histories.
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    Jesse Brown

    Jesse Brown

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    Jesse Brown (March 27, 1944 – August 15, 2002) was the United States Secretary of Veterans Affairs under President Bill Clinton from 1993 to 1997. Jesse Brown was born on March 27, 1944, in Detroit, Michigan, to Lucille Marsh Brown and David Brown but grew up in Chicago. He attended The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C. and Roosevelt University in Chicago, and graduated from the City Colleges of Chicago. He enlisted in the United States Marine Corps in 1963, and served as a Marine in the Vietnam War, reaching the rank of Corporal. He was seriously injured in 1965 near Da Nang — his right arm shattered and partially paralyzed. In 1967, Brown joined the staff of Disabled American Veterans (DAV), a service and advocacy organization. He served in various supervisory roles with the DAV in the 1970s and 1980s: In 1989, Brown became the DAV's first African-American director, serving until 1993. In January 1993, Brown was selected by President Bill Clinton to the post of Secretary of Veterans Affairs, serving until 1997. He was the first African American to hold that post. During his tenure, Brown expanded the services offered to female veterans, homeless veterans and
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    236
    John H. Pruitt

    John H. Pruitt

    John Henry Pruitt (October 4, 1896–October 4, 1918) was a United States Marine during World War I and is one of only 19 people who received two Medals of Honor. The Medals of Honor were presented posthumously for his actions during World War I. John Henry Pruitt was born on October 4, 1896 in Fayetteville, Arkansas and he entered military service from Phoenix, Arizona in May 1917. Pruitt was a corporal in the Marine Corps, he attacked and captured two enemy machine guns, and later captured forty of the enemy. Killed by shell-fire, he was awarded the Medal of Honor for his bravery on October 4, 1918 at the Battle of Blanc Mont Ridge, France by both the United States Marine Corps and the US Army (for the same action). After his remains were returned to the United States he was buried at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Virginia. His grave can be found in section 18, lot #245-3, map grid P 10. Rank and organization: Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, 78th Company, 6th Regiment, 2d Division. Place and date: At Blanc Mont Ridge, France, October 3, 1918. Entered service at: Phoenix, Ariz. Born: October 4, 1896, Fayettesville, Ark. G.O. No.: 62, W.D., 1919. (Also received Navy Medal of
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    237
    John Levitow

    John Levitow

    • Participated in conflicts: Vietnam War
    John Lee Levitow (November 1, 1945 – November 8, 2000), was an AC-47 gunship loadmaster for the 3d Special Operations Squadron who received the Medal of Honor for exceptional heroism during wartime. Born in Hartford, Connecticut, He originally intended to join the United States Navy, but changed his mind and joined the US Air Force in June 1966. His first job was civil engineering, then he cross-trained into the loadmaster career field. On February 24, 1969, Levitow was asked to fill in for the regular loadmaster on an armed AC-47 named "Spooky 71". They were flying night missions near the Tan Son Nhut Air base area when Long Binh came under attack. It was Airman Levitow's job to set the ejection and ignition controls on Mark 24 magnesium flares and pass to the gunner. These flares were 27-pound (12 kg) metal tubes 3 feet (0.91 m) long that would burn at 4000 degrees, illuminate with intensity of two million candela and burn for more than a minute. As they were patrolling the area the pilot, Kenneth Carpenter of "Spooky 71" had seen muzzle flashes outside Long Binh Army Base. The pilot threw the AC-47 and its eight-man crew into a turn to engage the Viet Cong in the Tan Son Nhut
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    John M. Gamble

    John M. Gamble

    Lieutenant Colonel John Marshall Gamble (1791 – 11 September 1836) was an officer in the United States Marine Corps during the early 19th century. He was the first, and remains the only, U.S. Marine to command a U.S. Navy ship, commanding the Greenwich and the Sir Andrew Hammond during the War of 1812. Born in Brooklyn, New York, Gamble was appointed Second Lieutenant on 16 January 1809. He held the rank of captain and was stationed in the South Sea during the War of 1812. He distinguished himself in many enterprises, including encounters with people of the Marquesas Islands during the absence of frigate Essex in 1813, and sailing a prize of Essex, with only a four-man crew and without benefit of a chart in a 17-day voyage to the Hawaiian Islands. Captain Gamble is remembered in history as one of the two U.S. Marines to command U.S. Navy ships. He was the only U.S. Marine to engage in a naval duel with another ship of equal size and prevail. His capture of the British armed whaler Seringapatam was noted as a triumph by American newspapers and thus earned him considerable fame upon his return. The Seringapatam was deemed as the biggest British threat to American whalers in the S.
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    John R. Hodge

    John R. Hodge

    • Participated in conflicts: World War II
    General John Reed Hodge (June 12, 1893 – November 12, 1963) was a general in the United States Army. Being born in Golconda, Illinois, Hodge attended Southern Illinois Teachers College and the University of Illinois. After completing U.S. Army Officer Candidate School at Fort Sheridan, he entered military service as a Second Lieutenant of Infantry in 1917. He served in World War I in France and Luxembourg. Remaining in the Army following the end of the war, he taught military science at Mississippi State University from 1921–1925 and graduated from the Infantry School in 1926. After a posting to Hawaii, he graduated from the Command and General Staff School, the Army War College, and the Air Corps Tactical School. At the beginning of World War II, Hodge was part of the staff of VII Corps. Being appointed Brigadier General, He started his combat career as part of the staff of general Joseph Lawton Collins in the Guadalcanal campaign. He then participated in the Bougainville campaign in 1943–1944. He was promoted to Major General during the Philippines Campaign in 1944. In 1945 he served on Okinawa, and he was promoted to Lieutenant General in August, becoming the commander of the
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    John U. D. Page

    John U. D. Page

    John Upshur Dennis Page (February 8, 1904 – December 11, 1950) was an United States Army officer from Saint Paul, Minnesota. Lieutenant Colonel Page received the Medal of Honor for his actions in the Battle of Chosin Reservoir during the Korean War. John U.D. Page was born in the Philippines and studied engineering at Princeton University. Princeton was Page’s second choice, when his dream of attending West Point was thwarted by weak eyesight. He graduated from Princeton in 1926 with a varsity letter in pistol and an Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) commission, and was called to duty in World War II as a reservist. Trained in artillery, Page was considered an expert teacher, and he spent much of World War II training troops at Fort Sill, Okla., much to his chagrin. He finally got to command an artillery battery in Germany, and remained in the military after World War II. Assigned to the prestigious Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth, Kans., he pulled strings to go to Korea rather than to the classroom. During the long withdrawal of US and UN forces out of the Chosin Reservoir area as they marched to the port of Hungnam for evacuation, in the early morning
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    241
    Lewis L. Millett

    Lewis L. Millett

    • Participated in conflicts: World War II
    Lewis Lee Millett, Sr. (December 15, 1920 – November 14, 2009) was a United States Army officer who received the Medal of Honor during the Korean War for leading the last major American bayonet charge. He enlisted into the National Guard while still in high school and then in 1940 joined the United States Army Air Corps. When he thought that the United States would not participate in World War II he deserted and went to Canada with a friend where they joined the military and were sent to London. The U.S. did enter the war and by the time he made it to Europe they were in the fight so he transferred to the U.S. Army. While serving with the Army in World War II, he received a Silver Star for driving a burning ammunition truck away from a group of soldiers, before it exploded. During the Korean War, he was awarded the United States military's highest decoration, the Medal of Honor. The citation explains that he lead a bayonet charge against the enemy. He later served in the Vietnam War as well. He retired from the Army in 1973 and died of congestive heart failure in 2009. Millett was born on December 15, 1920, in Mechanic Falls, Maine. He grew up in South Dartmouth, Massachusetts,
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    242
    Lloyd Williams

    Lloyd Williams

    Lloyd W. Williams (June 5, 1887 – June 12, 1918) was an officer in the United States Marine Corps who served and died in World War I. A famous saying is attributed to Captain Williams, who was serving as a company commander in the 5th Marines. When advised to withdraw by a French officer at the defensive line just north of the village of Lucy-le-Bocage on June 1, 1918, he is said to have replied: "Retreat? Hell, we just got here!" Captain Williams would not survive the ensuing battle, and was posthumously promoted to major and awarded the Distinguished Service Cross. A member of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute class of 1907, he was a member of Alpha Company in the Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets. Major Williams Hall was named in his memory in 1957. He is also considered to be the first known person from Virginia to die in the First World War.
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    Mark Kimmitt

    Mark Kimmitt

    Mark Traecey Patrick Kimmitt (born 21 June 1954) was the 16th Assistant Secretary of State for Political-Military Affairs, serving under George W. Bush from August 2008 to January 2009. Prior to joining the State Department, he was a Brigadier General in the United States Army, and served as the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Middle East. Kimmitt has also served as Deputy Director for Strategy and Plans for the United States Central Command, and Deputy Director for Operations/Chief Military Spokesman for Coalition Forces in Iraq, and served at NATO's SHAPE headquarters in Belgium. Currently he is Executive Vice President of Advanced Technology Systems Company. Kimmitt was born in Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and is married to Catherine Kimmitt. Kimmitt's father, Joseph Stanley Kimmitt was the Secretary of the United States Senate and Secretary for the Majority from 1977 to 1981. Kimmitt graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point as a part of the class of 1976, and earned a Masters in Business Administration degree, graduating with distinction, from Harvard University as part of the class of 1984. He also received master's degrees from the United States Army
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    Michael Bartelle

    Michael Bartelle

    Command Sergeant Major Michael Bartelle, US Army (Retired) previously served as the Senior Non-Commissioned Officer at Allied Command Operations from 2006 to 2009. A native of the Bronx, New York, he entered the Army on June 29, 1979, attending Basic Training and Signal Advanced Individual Training at Fort Gordon, Georgia. CSM Bartelle completed six tours overseas. He served as the Senior Enlisted Leader for the United States European Command, February 2005 to September 2006, North Atlantic Treaty Organization, Command Sergeant Major of the 125th Signal Battalion, 25th Infantry Division (Light) in Hawaii, completed two tours with the 1st Signal Brigade in the Republic of Korea as First Sergeant, a tour with the 32nd Army Air Defense Command, and a tour with V (US) Corps in Germany as Platoon Sergeant. He has been involved in various contingency operations, serving as Command Sergeant Major of the USEUCOM Forward/Joint Task Force North during Operation Iraqi Freedom, as well as participating in Operations Blazing Skies, Southern Watch, Bright Star, and Provide Hope. His stateside duty assignments include Battery Communication Chief of the 1st Battalion 65th Air Defense Artillery at
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    Paul E. Menoher

    Paul E. Menoher

    Paul E. Menoher, Jr. was a U.S. Army officer. From 15 September 1989 to 27 July 1993, Menoher, then a Major General, served as Chief of the Military Intelligence Corps. On 12 August 1993, Menoher became the Commanding General, U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command. Later as a Lieutenant General, Menoher became Deputy Chief of Staff for Intelligence, Headquarters, Department of the Army. General Menoher is a member of the Military Intelligence Hall of Fame.
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    Reginald B. Desiderio

    Reginald B. Desiderio

    Reginald Benjamin Desiderio (September 12, 1918 – November 27, 1950) was a soldier in the United States Army during the Korean War. He posthumously received the Medal of Honor for his actions on November 27, 1950. Desiderio joined the Army from Gilroy, California in March 1941. He is buried in San Francisco National Cemetery San Francisco, California. The United States Army Reserve Center on Westminster Drive in Pasadena, California is named in his honor. The airfield at USAG Humphreys (ICAO: RKSG) in Pyongtaek, South Korea, is named in his honor. Rank and organization: Captain, U.S. Army, commanding officer, Company E, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division Place and date: Near Ipsok, Korea, November 27, 1950 Entered service at: Gilroy, Calif. Born: September 12, 1918, Clairton, Pa G.O. No.: 58, August 2, 1951 Citation: Capt. Desiderio distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the repeated risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. His company was given the mission of defending the command post of a task force against an enemy breakthrough. After personal reconnaissance during darkness and under intense enemy fire, he placed his men in
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    Ronald E. Rosser

    Ronald E. Rosser

    • Participated in conflicts: Korean War
    Ronald Eugene Rosser (born October 24, 1929) is a former United States Army soldier who received the United States military's highest decoration, the Medal of Honor, for his actions in the Korean War. Born on October 24, 1929, in Columbus, Ohio, Rosser was the second oldest of seventeen children. He joined the Army in 1946 at age 17 for a three year term of service. After one of his brothers was killed in the early stages of the Korean War, he re-enlisted from Crooksville, Ohio, in 1951 as a way of getting revenge. Initially stationed in Japan, Rosser requested to be sent into combat and was then deployed to Korea with the heavy mortar company of the 38th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division. On January 12, 1952, Rosser, by then a corporal, was acting as a forward observer with Company L's lead platoon during an assault on a heavily fortified hill near Ponggilli. When the unit came under heavy fire, Rosser went forward three times and attacked the hostile positions alone, each time returning to friendly lines to gather more ammunition before charging the hill again. Although wounded himself, he helped carry injured soldiers to safety once withdrawal became necessary. For these
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    248
    Sarah Deal

    Sarah Deal

    LtCol Sarah Deal Burrow, United States Marine Corps, became the first female Marine selected for Naval aviation training, and subsequently the Marine Corps' first female aviator in 1993. Deal earned a Bachelor of Science degree in aerospace flight technology from Kent State University in 1992. She was commissioned a second lieutenant in the Marine Corps in May 1992. Though she had already earned her pilot's license while in college, the Marine Corps did not yet have any female aviators. After Basic School at Quantico, she attended air traffic control school. When U.S. military policy was changed to allow women to fly combat aircraft in 1993, Deal requested to become an aviator. She was selected for training in July 1993. She began her flight training at Naval Air Station Pensacola in the T-34C Turbo Mentor aircraft. She went on to helicopter training in the TH-57 Sea Ranger helicopter and earned her aviator's wings on April 21, 1995. Deal was assigned to Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron 466 as a CH-53E pilot. Deal completed her active duty service in 2004 and transferred to the Marine Corps Reserve. In May 2006, Deal was assigned to HMH-769 where she serves as a reserve CH-53E
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    Scott Sather

    Scott Sather

    Staff sergeant Scott Sather was born on 21 June 1973 in Clio, Michigan. Sather joined the United States Air Force in 1992. Sather served in Afghanistan as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. On 8 April 2003, while in southern Iraq, SSgt Scott Sather, a combat controller, assigned to the 24th Special Tactics Squadron stationed at Pope Air Force Base in North Carolina, became the first airman killed in Operation Iraqi Freedom. Sather earned seven medals, including the Bronze Star, the Air Medal and the Purple Heart during his Air Force career. Currently there is a US air base named after him in Baghdad, Iraq. Sather Air Base is home of the 447th Air Expeditionary Group at Baghdad International Airport. It is home to over 1,000 airmen, army, British Royal Air Force, and contracted civilians. The citation accompanying his Bronze Star Medal with Valor reads,
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    Walker 'Bud' Melville Mahurin

    Walker 'Bud' Melville Mahurin

    • Participated in conflicts: World War II
    Colonel Walker Melville "Bud" Mahurin (December 5, 1918 – May 11, 2010) was a retired officer of the United States Air Force (USAF). During World War II, while serving in the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF), he was a noted flying ace. Mahurin was the first American pilot to become a double ace in the European Theater. He was the only United States Air Force pilot to shoot down enemy planes in both the European and Pacific Theaters and the Korean War. During World War II he was credited with 20.75 aerial victories, making him the sixth-highest American P-47 ace. He was credited with shooting down 3.5 MiG-15s in Korea, giving him a total of 24.25 aircraft destroyed in aerial combat. Born in Benton Harbor, Michigan, Mahurin joined the U.S. Army Air Forces as an aviation cadet on September 29, 1941 after several years as an engineering student at Purdue University. Graduating from pilot training on April 29, 1942, he was assigned to the 63d Fighter Squadron, 56th Fighter Group and deployed to England with them in January 1943. Based at Halesworth, England, then Captain Mahurin became a flight leader in the 63rd FS and began flying missions in May. On August 17, 1943, he scored
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