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Best Magazine of All Time

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    1
    Strand Magazine

    Strand Magazine

    • Genre: Literary magazine
    The Strand Magazine was a monthly magazine composed of fictional stories and factual articles founded by George Newnes. It was first published in the United Kingdom from January 1891 to March 1950 running to 711 issues, though the first issue was on sale well before Christmas 1890. Its immediate popularity is evidenced by an initial sale of nearly 300,000. Sales increased in the early months, before settling down to a circulation of almost 500,000 copies a month which lasted well into the 1930s. It was edited by Herbert Greenhough Smith from 1891 to 1930. The Sherlock Holmes short stories by Arthur Conan Doyle were first published in The Strand with illustrations by Sidney Paget. With the serialization of Doyle's The Hound of the Baskervilles, sales reached their peak. Readers lined up outside the magazine's offices, waiting to get the next installment. The A. J. Raffles, a "gentleman thief", stories of Ernest William Hornung first appeared in The Strand in the 1890s. Other contributors included Grant Allen, Margery Allingham, J. E. Preston Muddock, H.G. Wells, E.C. Bentley, Agatha Christie, C.B. Fry, Walter Goodman, E. Nesbit, W.W. Jacobs, Rudyard Kipling, Arthur Morrison, Dorothy
    7.00
    7 votes
    2
    Imagination

    Imagination

    • Issues: Imagination, October 1950
    • Genre: Science fiction magazine
    Imagination was an American fantasy and science fiction magazine first published in October 1950 by Raymond Palmer's Clark Publishing Company. The magazine was sold almost immediately to Greenleaf Publishing Company, owned by William Hamling, who published and edited it from the third issue, February 1951, for the rest of the magazine's life. Hamling launched a sister magazine, Imaginative Tales, in 1954; both ceased publication at the end of 1958 in the aftermath of major changes in US magazine distribution due to the liquidation of American News Company. The magazine was more successful than most of the numerous science fiction titles launched in the late 1940s and early 1950s, lasting a total of 63 issues. Despite this success, the magazine had a reputation for low-quality space opera and adventure fiction, and modern literary historians refer to it in dismissive terms. Hamling consciously adopted an editorial policy oriented toward entertainment, asserting in an early issue that "science fiction was never meant to be an educational tour de force". Few of the stories from Imagination have received recognition, but it did publish Robert Sheckley's first professional sale, "Final
    9.00
    5 votes
    3
    The Economist

    The Economist

    • Genre: News magazine
    The Economist is an English-language weekly news and international affairs publication owned by The Economist Newspaper Ltd. and edited in offices in London. Continuous publication began under founder James Wilson in September 1843. For historical reasons The Economist refers to itself as a newspaper, but each print edition appears on small glossy paper like a news magazine, and its YouTube channel is called EconomistMagazine. In 2006, its average weekly circulation was reported to be 1.5 million, about half of which were sold in the United States. The Economist claims that it "is not a chronicle of economics." Rather, it aims "to take part in a severe contest between intelligence, which presses forward, and an unworthy, timid ignorance obstructing our progress." It takes an editorial stance which is supportive of free trade, globalisation, free immigration and some socially liberal causes. It targets highly educated readers and claims an audience containing many influential executives and policy-makers. The publication belongs to The Economist Group, half of which is owned by the Financial Times, a subsidiary of Pearson PLC. A group of independent shareholders, including many
    9.50
    4 votes
    4
    Maayan

    Maayan

    • Genre: Literary magazine
    Maayan (in Hebrew: מעין) is an Israeli magazine for poetry, literature, art, and ideas. Its first issue appeared in 2005. Maayan is edited by Roy Arad and Joshua Simon. The magazine is a forum for poetry and art from Israel (Jewish and Arab) and beyond. From the opening statement of issue #1: In its journey to the shelves, Maayan's poetic proposal entails a risk: according to preconceived standards, it is not clear if it qualifies as poetry at all. Maayan's poets write, like a child riding a tricycle through heavy traffic..." The second issue of Maayan was released in December 2005, and was twice as big. It included a film magazine called Maarvon. Maayan's fourth issue came out in March 2008. It featured over 300 pages and 40 new writers, making it 70 plus contributors all together with the visual artists. From vol.3 opening arguments: ".. In Maayan we apply the politics of first name. Maayan, bottom line, is a name of a girl. The state of the Israeli language and discourse today demands first name politics as opposed to metaphorical and hollow trademarks such not calling the summer "feud" between Israel and Lebanon what it was - a war, and calling Israel's ruling party Kadima and
    8.20
    5 votes
    5
    The Germ

    The Germ

    The Germ was a periodical established by the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood to disseminate their ideas. It was not a success, only existing for four issues between January and April 1850. The Germ published poetry by William Michael Rossetti (who also edited the magazine) and other members of the Brotherhood, including his brother Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Thomas Woolner and James Collinson. It also printed contributions of verse and essays on art and literature by associates of the Brotherhood, including Ford Madox Brown and Coventry Patmore, as well as occasional book reviews. The title The Germ refers to the Pre-Raphaelite belief in the importance of nature (a germ is a seed) and of the human imagination, as implied by the phrase "the germ of an idea". They hoped that the magazine would be a seed from which new creative ideas would grow. It was subtitled thoughts towards nature in art and literature to emphasise the editors' belief that poetry and art should be closely intertwined. The magazine was renamed Art and Poetry for its final two issues. 40. A special limited edition (only 450 copies) of all four volumes of The Germ was published in 1898 on Van Gelder handmade paper, by
    8.00
    5 votes
    6
    International Times

    International Times

    International Times (it or IT) is an underground newspaper founded in London in 1966 and relaunched as a web journal in 2011. Editors included Hoppy, David Mairowitz, Pete Stansill, Barry Miles, Jim Haynes and playwright Tom McGrath. Jack Moore, avant-garde writer William Levy and Mick Farren, singer of The Deviants, also edited at various periods. The current editorial team include Mike Lesser, Niall McDevitt, Robert Tascher and others. Within a short time of the first issue, the name International Times was changed to IT after litigation threats from the London Times. The paper's logo was a black-and-white image of Theda Bara, vampish star of silent films. The founders' intention had been to use an image of actress Clara Bow, 1920s It girl, but a picture of Theda Bara was used by accident and, once deployed, not changed. Paul McCartney donated to the paper. International Times was launched on 14 October 1966 at The Roundhouse at a gig featuring Pink Floyd. The event promised a 'Pop/Op/Costume/Masque/Fantasy-Loon/Blowout/Drag Ball and featured Soft Machine, steel bands, strips, trips, happenings, movies. The launch was described as "one of the two most revolutionary events in the
    6.83
    6 votes
    7
    Marvel Tales

    Marvel Tales

    • Genre: Science fiction magazine
    Marvel Tales is the title of three American comic-book series published by Marvel Comics, the first of them from the company's 1950s predecessor, Atlas Comics. It is additionally the title of two unrelated, short-lived fantasy/science fiction magazines. The first publication using the title was the amateur magazine Marvel Tales, also known as Marvel Tales of Science and Fantasy, published by Fantasy Publications in Everett, Pennsylvania. The magazine ran five issues cover-dated May 1934 - Summer 1935. Despite its reportedly non-professional status, the magazine, which appeared in at least two sizes during its run, published a story by the already established Robert E. Howard, "The Garden of Fear", in issue #2 (July-Aug. 1934), and "The Creator", an early example of religious-themed science fiction by the noted Clifford D. Simak, in #4 (March-April 1935). The next was a pulp magazine from future Marvel Comics publisher Martin Goodman. Goodman, who published under a variety of corporate names, released five issues of the science-fiction anthology Marvel Science Stories (Aug. 1938 - Aug. 1939), which then changed its name to Marvel Tales for two issues (Dec. 1939 & May 1940) under the
    7.80
    5 votes
    8
    Kalkitos

    Kalkitos

    Action Transfers, of which Kalkitos were a subset, were a type of art-based children's pastime that was extremely popular in Europe, South East Asia and Central America in the 1960s to 1980s. They consisted of a printed cardboard background image and a transparent sheet of coloured dry-transferables containing such things as people, vehicles, weapons, explosions, animals and so on. These figures were to be applied on to the background scene through a process called chromolithography, accomplished by rubbing the back of the transparent sheet with a soft pencil. Clever part application of transfers could result in such imaginative compositions as a character with an arrow sticking out of his head, or people dismembered by explosions. A number of different sets were produced by several companies between the late 1970s and the 1980s; these included sets based on popular comics and cartoons (e.g., DC Comics, Marvel Comics, Scooby Doo, and Disney cartoons), television series and movies (e.g., Star Wars and Battlestar Galactica), as well as original content sets. Letraset, the company that developed Instant Lettering transfer sheets that dominated design and publishing before the advent
    6.50
    6 votes
    9
    MacCompanion

    MacCompanion

    • Genre: Computer magazine
    macCompanion was a monthly online computer magazine from the United States. macCompanion was the media that was officially created in September 2001. The magazine morphed from the earlier MacNut magazine and used an all-volunteer staff. It ended in August 2010.
    6.50
    6 votes
    10
    Boys' Life

    Boys' Life

    Boys' Life is the monthly magazine of the Boy Scouts of America (BSA). Its targeted readership is young American males between the ages of 6 and 18. Boys' Life is published in two demographic editions. Both editions often have the same cover, but are tuned to the target audience through the inclusion of 16-20 pages of unique content per edition. The first edition is suitable for the youngest members of Cub Scouting, the 6-10 year-old Tiger Cubs, Cub Scouts and 1st-year Webelos Scouts. The second edition is appropriate for 11-18 year old boys, which includes 2nd-year Webelos through 18-year old Boy Scouts, Varsity Scouts and Venturers. If the subscription is obtained through registration in the Boy Scouts of America program, the publisher will select the appropriate edition based on the boy's age. In June 2007, Boys' Life garnered four Distinguished Achievement Awards conferred by the Association of Educational Publishers (AEP), including Periodical of the Year. The magazine's mascot is Pedro the Mailburro, who signs his letters with the signature "UU", meant to represent the hoofprints of a burro. In 1911, George S. Barton, of Somerville, Massachusetts, founded, and published the
    7.40
    5 votes
    11
    Sapna magazine

    Sapna magazine

    Sapna is a magazine for South Asian women in the United States. In 2003, South Asian American culture was reaching critical mass in the United States. Sapna Magazine's objective was to create a platform for expression and development of issues and lifestyle for the South Asian American culture. University of Pittsburgh senior, Natasha Khan, believed the climate was ready for a publication for South Asian women. The boom in social networking websites such as Friendster and MySpace had brought the second generation of South Asians in America together online. Envisioning a publication that was by and for the community, she open sourced the name of the publication in a national poll. The winner with 70% of the votes was "SAPNA", which in Hindi and Urdu means dream. With the name and mission conceptualized, founding team extended to include, Saira Doja, Mariam Kamal, and Vaishali Rao. In 2004 the first online edition of Sapna Magazine was released to the public and the magazine was incorporated under Sapna Media LLC. In 2005, Sapna Magazine changed its home base to Washington, D.C. To be a platform for South Asian American women: A place where South Asians can discuss their issues,
    7.40
    5 votes
    12
    The Orbital

    The Orbital

    • Genre: Student newspaper
    The Orbital is the official student publication of SURHUL. It contains a range of subjects covering student life, culture, entertainment and current affairs. It attempts to strike a balance between serious topics and light-hearted features. Published by the Students' Union, the publication is produced entirely by students with any student being able to contribute. Like media counterpart Insanity Radio, The Orbital is constitutionally supervised by the Students' Union, through the Sabbatical Officer for Communications & Campaigns. The Orbital board is led by an Editor and a Deputy Editor. These positions are elected annually via a campus-wide election in which all 8000+ students are allowed to vote. A Sabbatical Officer of the Students' Union, the Vice President (Communications & Campaigns), is ultimately responsible for the strategic direction and financial regularity of the publication, as well as checking the publication for libel. The editorial board comprises four section Editors (News, Comment, Reviews, Lifestyle and Sports & Societies), the Art Director and the Online Editor, as well as sub-boards for each editorial and administrative section. Originally launched as a
    8.50
    4 votes
    13
    FHM

    FHM

    • Genre: Mens Lifestyle
    FHM (magazine), originally published as For Him Magazine, is an international monthly men's lifestyle magazine. It contains popular features such as the FHM 100 Sexiest Women in the World and the High Street Honeys. The magazine began publication in 1985 in the United Kingdom under the name For Him and changed its title to FHM in 1994 when Emap Consumer Media bought the magazine, although the full For Him Magazine continues to be printed on the spine of each issue. Circulation expanded to newsagents as a quarterly by the spring of 1987. It then went monthly and changed its name to FHM in 1994. It subsequently dominated the men's market and began to expand internationally. FHM was sold as part of the publishing company sale, from EMAP to German company Bauer Media Group in February 2008. Each of FHM's international editions publish yearly rankings for the sexiest women alive based on public voting through the magazine's website. Dates of magazine issues, winners, ages of winners at the time of selection, and pertinent comments are listed below for the UK edition.
    7.20
    5 votes
    14
    The Railway Magazine

    The Railway Magazine

    The Railway Magazine is a monthly British railway magazine, aimed at the railway enthusiast market, that has been published in London since July 1897. As of 2010 it has been, for three years running, the railway magazine with the largest circulation in the U.K., having a monthly average sale during 2009 of 34,715 (the figure for 2007 being 34,661). It was published by IPC Media until October 2010, with ISSN 0033-8923, and in 2007 won IPC's 'Magazine of the Year' award. From November 2010, The Railway Magazine is now published by Mortons Media Group Ltd. (Mortons of Horncastle). The Railway Magazine was launched by Joseph Lawrence and ex-railwayman Frank E. Cornwall of Railway Publishing Ltd, who thought there would be an amateur enthusiast market for some of the material they were then publishing in a railway staff magazine, the Railway Herald. They appointed as its first editor a former auctioneer, George Augustus Nokes (1867-1948), who wrote under the pseudonym "G.A. Sekon". He quickly built the magazine circulation to around 25,000. From the start it was produced in Linotype on good-quality paper and well illustrated with photographic halftone and occasional colour lithographic
    8.00
    4 votes
    15
    TV Quick

    TV Quick

    • Genre: Listings magazine
    TV Choice is a British weekly TV listings magazine published by H. Bauer Publishing, the UK subsidiary of family-run German company Bauer Media Group. It features weekly TV broadcast programming listings, running from Saturday to Friday, and goes on sale every Tuesday. Launched in 1999, the magazine also has its own annual awards ceremony, the "TV Choice Awards", awarded on the basis of a public vote by readers of TV Choice. It costs 42p and includes features on the most watched UK TV shows, the very popular British soaps, as well as films, puzzles, crosswords, a letters page and prize competitions. From February 29, 2012, the price increased to 45p. The Editor is Jon Peake. In February 2008, according to the Audit Bureau of Circulations, TV Choice became the biggest selling magazine in the UK, a position it has held ever since. It sells over 1.3 million copies a week.
    8.00
    4 votes
    16
    The Liberator

    The Liberator

    The Liberator was a monthly socialist magazine established by Max Eastman and his sister Crystal Eastman in 1918 to continue the work of The Masses, which was shut down by the wartime mailing regulations of the U.S. government. Intensely political, the magazine included copious quantities of art, poetry, and fiction along with political reporting and commentary. The publication was an organ of the Communist Party of America from late 1922 and was merged with two other publications to form The Workers Monthly in 1924. The Liberator’s international news coverage was first-rate. Legendary war correspondent and Communist Labor Party founder John Reed reported the ongoing situation in Soviet Russia; major reports were filed from across tumultuous post-war Europe by Robert Minor, Hiram K. Moderwell, Frederick Kuh, and Crystal Eastman. Pivotal conventions of political parties and labor unions were covered in depth by intelligent participants. The great political trials of the day were reported in detail with perception. Speeches and articles by sundry revolutionary leaders of the world found space on its pages. As with The Masses, The Liberator relied heavily upon political art, including
    6.00
    6 votes
    17
    Nature

    Nature

    Nature, first published on 4 November 1869, is ranked the world's most cited interdisciplinary scientific journal by the Science Edition of the 2010 Journal Citation Reports. Most scientific journals are now highly specialized, and Nature is among the few journals (the other weekly journals Science and Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences are also prominent examples) that still publish original research articles across a wide range of scientific fields. There are many fields of scientific research in which important new advances and original research are published as either articles or letters in Nature. Research scientists are the primary audience for the journal, but summaries and accompanying articles are intended to make many of the most important papers understandable to scientists in other fields and the educated general public. Towards the front of each issue are editorials, news and feature articles on issues of general interest to scientists, including current affairs, science funding, business, scientific ethics and research breakthroughs. There are also sections on books and arts. The remainder of the journal consists mostly of research articles, which are
    9.00
    3 votes
    18
    The Crisis

    The Crisis

    • Issues: The Crisis, June 1921
    • Genre: Literary magazine
    The Crisis is the official magazine of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), and was founded in 1910 by W. E. B. Du Bois (editor), Oswald Garrison Villard, J. Max Barber, Charles Edward Russell, Kelly Miller, W.S. Braithwaite, M. D. Maclean. The original title of the journal was The Crisis: A Record of The Darker Races. From 1997 to 2003, it appeared as The New Crisis: The Magazine of Opportunities and Ideas, but the title has since reverted to The Crisis. The title derives from the poem "The Present Crisis" by James Russell Lowell. Published monthly, by 1920 its circulation had reached 100,000 copies. Du Bois proclaimed his intentions in his first editorial: Predominantly a current-affairs journal, The Crisis also included poems, reviews, and essays on culture and history. Du Bois' initial position as editor was in line with the NAACP's liberal programme of social reform and racial equality, but by the 1930s Du Bois was advocating a form of black separatism. This led to disputes between Du Bois and the NAACP resulting in his resignation as editor in 1934. He was replaced by Roy Wilkins. Although The Crisis was officially an organ of the NAACP, Du
    9.00
    3 votes
    19
    Vellinakshatram

    Vellinakshatram

    Vellinakshatram is a film weekly news magazine published in Malayalam Language from Kerala, India. It is printed at Thiruvananthapuram and distributed throughout Kerala by Kalakaumudi publications private limited. Even though the magazine has leniages with Kerala Kaumudi news paper, its an independent company. It highlights the doings and happenings of the Mollywood film scene. It is one of the most popular entertainment magazine in Malayalam, it is read by the overseas Indian community worldwide. In fact the same group discontinued the much acclaimed Film magazine and launched Vellinakshatram. It also organizes and sponsors the Vellinakshatram Film Awards.
    9.00
    3 votes
    20
    Cosmopolitan

    Cosmopolitan

    • Issues: Cosmopolitan, October 1948
    • Genre: Women's magazine
    Cosmopolitan is an international magazine for women. It was first published in 1886 in the United States as a family magazine, was later transformed into a literary magazine and eventually became a women's magazine in the late 1960s. Also known as Cosmo, its content as of 2011 included articles on relationships, sex, health, careers, self-improvement, celebrities, as well as fashion and beauty. Published by Hearst Magazines, Cosmopolitan has 63 international editions, is printed in 32 languages and is distributed in more than 100 countries. Cosmopolitan began as a family magazine, launched in 1886 by Schlicht & Field of New York as The Cosmopolitan. Paul Schlicht told his first-issue readers that his publication was a "first-class family magazine", adding, "There will be a department devoted exclusively to the interests of women, with articles on fashions, on household decoration, on cooking, and the care and management of children, etc.There was also a department for the younger members of the family." Cosmopolitan's circulation reached 25,000 that year, but by March 1888, Schlicht & Field were no longer in business. John Brisben Walker acquired the magazine in 1889. That same
    7.75
    4 votes
    21
    L'Action nationale

    L'Action nationale

    L'Action nationale (ISSN 0001-7469) is a French-language monthly published in Quebec, Canada. The magazine publishes critical analysis of Quebec's linguistic, social, cultural and economic realities. Since 1917, some 17,000 authors have appeared in it, including such Quebec intellectuals such as André Laurendeau, Pierre Vadeboncoeur, Pierre Trudeau, Lionel Groulx, Marcel Rioux, Richard Ares, Fernand Dumont and Esdras Minville. The current director of the magazine is Robert Laplante.
    7.75
    4 votes
    22
    Tokyo Journal

    Tokyo Journal

    • Genre: Listings magazine
    Tokyo Journal is an international English-language quarterly magazine about Tokyo and Japan, which was started in 1981. As of the December 2012 issue, Tokyo Journal is published quarterly, and retails for 800 yen / US$10/ €8. Initially selling for 200 yen, Tokyo Journal was owned and operated by Yohan, a major English book distributor with 120 employees and $80 million in revenue. Its first editor-in-chief was Don Morton, who served in that position for four years prior to stepping down and becoming a movie reviewer for Tokyo Journal and then Metropolis magazine. Subsequent editors included Glenn Davis and Greg Starr. The magazine was later sold to Tokyo-based publishing and translation company Nexxus Communications K.K. in 1997. In 2001, the magazine went from being a monthly to a quarterly. Nexxus owned and operated the magazine for 15 years. Ownership was officially transferred from Nexxus Communications K.K. to the current owner Tokyo Journal International, Inc. in late 2012, with the magazine's first publication under the new ownership being December 2012 Issue 270. Its sections include Trends & Society, Travel & Food, Fashion & Design, Business & Technology, Movies, Music &
    7.75
    4 votes
    23
    Side-line

    Side-line

    Side-Line is an online music magazine specialising in electronic music, and electro-goth/ industrial in particular. It was founded in 1989 as a print publication, and had a circulation of 6,000 in Europe and America. It became a web-only publication in 2008. Side-line was started in 1989 by two university students David Noiret and Seba Dolimont, who noticed that there was a distinctive lack of media interest in the independent music scene, and especially a lack of coverage in the darkwave, dark electro, endzeit, gothic, gothic metal and electro industrial genres. Initially, Side-Line was written in French, but, aware of the lack of information and communication in the independent music scene, Dolimont decided to change the magazine's language format to being published entirely in English. In 1990, the German label Celtic Circle Productions offered to become the magazine’s publisher. The magazine also took on the added feature of moving to a glossy format with an attached CD compilation. After weeks of negotiations, Side-Line N°17 was released with a circulation of 7,000 copies. Side-Line was immediately recognised as the leading English-written magazine on the underground genre and
    5.83
    6 votes
    24
    Europa Magazine

    Europa Magazine

    • Genre: News magazine
    Europa Magazine is the only monthly magazine in Serbo-Croatian language in the United States. The first edition of the Europa Magazine was published in Atlanta on 1 August 2005
    7.50
    4 votes
    25
    Legends Magazine

    Legends Magazine

    • Genre: Literary magazine
    Legends Magazine is a literary and music magazine founded by writer Marcus Pan in October, 1990. It covers themes of dark horror, fantasy and science fiction and surrealism in its literary scope and reviews and discusses music in the gothic, punk, heavy metal, electronica and similar darker genres. It also includes book reviews, DVD reviews and issues related to the goth and punk subcultures. The magazine has released over 150 issues and ran for 15 years, with the full text of all articles available at their online website in full. Legends tries to stick to a monthly publishing schedule as much as it can. Legends magazine began in October, 1990 under the direction of Marcus Pan who continues as editor-in-chief. Originally started as a self-serving fanzine that covered science fiction, fantasy and gaming, it was intended to be a short lived project of three issues in length. It nonetheless continued and evolved, adding more work from other writers and artists as time drew on. Around 1996 the Legends Online site was born on the World Wide Web and eventually the text of all articles and scans of all imaging was available online. The magazine added such notable writers as Dan Century,
    7.50
    4 votes
    26
    Overland Monthly

    Overland Monthly

    Overland Monthly was a monthly magazine based in California, United States, and published in the 19th and 20th century. The magazine's first issue was in July 1868, published by Bret Harte, and continued until the late 1875. The original publishers, in 1880, started The Californian, which became The Californian and Overland Monthly in October 1882. In January 1883, the effort reverted to The Overland Monthly (starting again with Volume I, number 1). In 1923 the magazine merged with Out West to become Overland Monthly and the Out West magazine, and ended publication in July 1935. Famous writers, editors, and artists included: Editors include:
    7.50
    4 votes
    27
    Rail Business Intelligence

    Rail Business Intelligence

    Rail Business Intelligence is a fortnightly subscription newsletter for senior managers, investors, lawyers, contractors, consultants, local authorities, trade unionists, manufacturers and service providers working in the United Kingdom's rail industry. It is published every second Thursday as a printed magazine and also in PDF electronic format. Rail Business Intelligence was launched in March 1995 as Rail Privatisation News, with Roger Ford as Founding Editor. Initially conceived as a short-term project to provide inside information for financial, legal and commercial organisations taking part in the privatisation of British Rail, the Railway Gazette International newsletter saw circulation continuing to expand after the 1997 general election, and in 1998 the title was changed to Rail Business Intelligence to reflect its on-going role in the UK's privatised rail market. The newsletter is part of the Railway Gazette Group, which includes publications such as Railway Gazette International, Railway Directory and RailwayGazette.com, and is based at Sutton, London.
    7.50
    4 votes
    28
    The Gardeners' Chronicle

    The Gardeners' Chronicle

    The Gardeners' Chronicle was a British horticulture periodical. It lasted as a title in its own right for nearly 150 years and is still extant as part of the magazine Horticulture Week. Founded in 1841 by the horticulturalists Joseph Paxton, Charles Wentworth Dilke, John Lindley and William Bradbury it originally took the form of a traditional newspaper, with both national and foreign news, but also with vast amounts of material sent in by gardeners and scientists, covering every conceivable aspect of gardening. Its first editor, John Lindley, was one of the founders. Another founder, Paxton, later also became editor. Prominent contributors included Charles Darwin and Joseph Hooker. By 1851, the circulation of The Gardeners' Chronicle was given as 6500. Compared with that of the far more eminent Observer at 6230, and The Economist at 3826, the The Gardeners' Chronicle did astonishingly well. Possibly these figures include the Chronicle's large international readership. It was noted for its large advertising section and when the glass tax was abolished in 1845 and the huge interest generated by the Great Exhibition made personal, small-scale greenhouses possible, it became full of
    7.50
    4 votes
    29
    All the Year Round

    All the Year Round

    • Genre: Literary magazine
    All the Year Round was a Victorian periodical, being a British weekly literary magazine founded and owned by Charles Dickens, published between 1859 and 1895 throughout the United Kingdom. Edited by Dickens, it was the direct successor to his previous publication Household Words, abandoned due to differences with his former publisher. It hosted the serialization of many prominent novels, including Dickens' own A Tale of Two Cities. After Dickens's death in 1870, it was owned and edited by his eldest son Charles Dickens, Jr. In 1858, Charles Dickens was the editor of his then magazine Household Words, published by Bradbury and Evans; a petty dispute with them led Dickens to realize that he was at the whim of his publisher, and to decide that he would create a new weekly magazine that he would own and control entirely. In 1859, Dickens founded All the Year Round. Similarly to his previous magazine, the author searched a title that could be derived from a Shakespeare quote. He eventually found it on 28 January 1859 (in Othello, act one, scene three, lines 128-129), to be displayed before the title: The new weekly magazine had its debut issue on Saturday 30 April 1859, featuring the
    8.67
    3 votes
    30
    First Things

    First Things

    First Things is an ecumenical journal focused on creating a "religiously informed public philosophy for the ordering of society". The journal is inter-denominational and inter-religious, representing a broad intellectual tradition of Christian and Jewish critique of contemporary society. Published by the New York-based Institute on Religion and Public Life, it is published monthly, except for bi-monthly issues covering June/July and August/September. Newsweek called First Things "the most important vehicle for exploring the tangled web of religion and society in the English-speaking world." First Things was founded in 1990 by Richard John Neuhaus, a prominent Lutheran minister and writer, who converted to Catholicism and entered the priesthood shortly after the journal's founding. Fr. Neuhaus served as the journal's editor-in-chief until his death in 2009 and wrote a regular column called, "The Public Square." He started the journal after his connection with the Rockford Institute was severed. With a circulation of approximately 30,000 subscribers, First Things is considered to be influential in its articulation of a broadly ecumenical and erudite social and political conservatism.
    8.67
    3 votes
    31
    Make

    Make

    • Issues: Make #13
    Make (or MAKE) is an American quarterly magazine published by O'Reilly Media which focuses on do it yourself (DIY) and/or DIWO (Do It With Others) projects involving computers, electronics, robotics, metalworking, woodworking and other disciplines. The magazine is marketed to people who enjoy making things and features complex projects which can often be completed with cheap materials, including household items. Make magazine is considered "a central organ of the maker movement." Its first issue was released in January 2005, and, as of April 2012, 30 issues have been published. The magazine is subtitled "technology on your time." It is also available as an e-zine and Texterity digital edition on the Web, on subscription or free of charge to existing magazine subscribers. The HTML-based e-zine allows for searching and includes additional content such as videos, with freely accessible blogs, podcasts and forums also available in the website. The e-zine also allows limited sharing of articles with friends. The magazine has photo essays on projects as well as regular columns on the world of technology and reviews of books and tools. Most volumes have a theme to which the main articles
    8.67
    3 votes
    32
    San Francisco

    San Francisco

    San Francisco is an American monthly magazine devoted to San Francisco Bay Area culture, including arts, food, and entertainment. It is published monthly by Modern Luxury publications. There have been two separate San Francisco magazines published in San Francisco. The first was started in the 1970s and published for many years, under a series of different publishers, until it went out of business around 1985. The second magazine has its roots starting in 1955, when San Francisco public broadcasting station KQED-TV began publishing a programming guide called KQED in Focus. The program guide began to add more articles and took on the character of a regular magazine. The name was later changed to Focus Magazine and then to San Francisco Focus. In 1984, a new programming guide, Fine Tuning was separated off from Focus, with Focus carrying on as a self-contained magazine. In the early 1990s, San Francisco Focus was the recipient of number of journalism and publishing awards, including a National Headliner Award for feature writing in 1993. In 1996, KQED sold San Francisco Focus to Diablo Publications in order to pay off debts. The magazine was spun off into an independent entity in
    8.67
    3 votes
    33
    Perigee: Publication for the Arts

    Perigee: Publication for the Arts

    • Genre: Literary magazine
    Perigee: Publication for the Arts is a quarterly literary journal, founded in 2003, that publishes poetry, prose, and artwork. It is based in San Diego, California, and St. Louis, Missouri. The founding editor is Robert Judge Woerheide. In 2009 Web Del Sol named Perigee as one of the top 50 literary publications in the world. Notable past contributors include Tom Sheehan, Gladys Swan and Norman Mailer. Submissions are allowed directly through Perigee's web site. Approximately 95% of Perigee's submissions come from authors without a literary agent. About 40% of the work published is from first-time authors, making it a popular venue for new voices in literature. Perigee receives about 1,500 submissions each year. Approximately 70% of these submissions are poetry. Perigee holds annual contests in fiction and poetry. The poetry contest is held each year beginning September 1 and ending December 31. Past judges have included Judy Jordan, Steve Kowit, Marvin Bell and Joseph Millar. The fiction contest runs from January 1 to May 31. Past judges have included Thomas E. Kennedy and James Brown. The all volunteer staff consists of writers and educators from the Southern California area. At
    10.00
    2 votes
    34
    12oz Prophet

    12oz Prophet

    12ozProphet, created in 1993, is an online magazine featuring articles, pictures, and interviews related to graffiti. In the past it was a print magazine; however, today it exists in the form of an online magazine with an online forum and store. 12ozProphet Magazine was conceived in early 1993 by Allen Benedikt, while he attended the Rhode Island School of Design. The first issue of 12ozProphet was created as a design project for school credit and with the intentions of sparking competition among the graffiti zines of the time. Midway through development of the third issue, Caleb Neelon, a comparative classic literature major attending nearby Brown University joined the team as copy editor. Cody Hudson also joined as a chief collaborator. By the time it was published, the magazine had come into its own. The issue was among the earliest interviews with Barry McGee (also known as Twist), who was largely unknown outside of San Francisco at the time. Benedikt, Hudson, and Neelon continued their work with the magazine for another several issues, until releasing the sixth issue in 1998. The main feature of this issue was a feature on twin brothers from São Paulo, Brazil, calling
    5.50
    6 votes
    35
    McCall's

    McCall's

    McCall's was a monthly American women's magazine that enjoyed great popularity through much of the 20th century, peaking at a readership of 8.4 million in the early 1960s. It was established as a small-format magazine called The Queen in 1873. In 1897 it was renamed McCall's Magazine—The Queen of Fashion (later shortened to McCall's) and subsequently grew in size to become a large-format glossy. It was one of the "Seven Sisters" group of women's service magazines. McCall's published fiction by such well-known authors as Ray Bradbury, Gelett Burgess, Willa Cather, Jack Finney, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Barbara Garson, John Steinbeck, Tim O'Brien, Anne Tyler and Kurt Vonnegut. From June 1949 until her death in November 1962, Eleanor Roosevelt wrote a McCall's column, "If You Ask Me". The former First Lady gave brief answers to questions sent in to the magazine. Starting in May 1951, and lasting until at least 1995, Betsy McCall paper dolls were printed in most issues. Children could cut out the printed dolls and clothing, or for a small fee (10¢ in 1957, 25¢ in 1967) paper dolls printed on cardboard could be ordered. Betsy McCall became so popular that various sized vinyl dolls were
    7.25
    4 votes
    36
    Saudi Aramco World

    Saudi Aramco World

    Saudi Aramco World is a bi-monthly magazine published by Saudi Aramco, the national oil company of Saudi Arabia. In 2004, the magazine's website was awarded "Best Magazine Website" by the Web Marketing Association. The bimonthly magazine is published in Houston, Texas. While Saudi Arabia is still frequently the main feature of articles, the magazine also covers the wider Arabic and Muslim world, and is aimed at both company employees and other interested readers. The website also allows free access to back issues going back to the early 1960s, including photography.
    7.25
    4 votes
    37
    21st Century Science and Technology

    21st Century Science and Technology

    21st Century Science and Technology is a quarterly magazine covering scientific topics from the perspective of Lyndon LaRouche and his movement. The magazine was established in 1988 following the federal government's closing down of its predecessor Fusion Magazine (1977 to 1987). Statement of purpose: 21st Century Science & Technology magazine challenges the assumptions of modern scientific dogma, including quantum mechanics, relativity theory, biological reductionism, and the formalization and separation of mathematics from physics. We demand a science based on constructible (intelligible) representation of concepts, but shun the simple empiricist or sense-certainty methods associated with the Newton-Galileo paradigm. 21st Century Science and Technology deals with a variety of issues, including criticism of claims of anthropogenic global warming, promotion of the use of DDT and support for an alternative to the standard atomic theory, based on the "Moon model" of Robert J. Moon. The last hard copy issue of the magazine published was the Winter 2005-2006 issue. Subsequent issues are available in electronic PDF format only.
    8.33
    3 votes
    38
    Blunt Magazine

    Blunt Magazine

    Blunt Magazine is a monthly Canadian online magazine published by Blunt Magazine Inc.. Volume collections are printed quarterly and available at newsstands in Toronto, Canada or through the BluntMagazine.ca website. Blunt is a theme-based magazine, written by award winning international bloggers. The images found in Blunt Magazine are used with permission from the various photographers and artists that Blunt Magazine talent scouts find while browsing the internet. Avik Basu is the current managing editor of Blunt Magazine; Andrew Miller is the current deputy managing editor. Organized by Blunt Magazine Inc., Under the Mistletoe is a holiday charitable event held each year (for the past four years) to help raise money for the Toronto Daily Bread Food Bank. “It is always impressive to see young people getting involved in the community. These guys have been supporters of Daily Bread since their days at Albert Campbell High School. It’s great to see youth moved to action in school, and when they continue their commitment as adults it’s amazing, says Gail Nyberg, executive director at the Daily Bread Food Bank. Blunt Magazine Inc. (formerly known as Tha Playground) “brought 60 local
    8.33
    3 votes
    39
    Parameter Magazine

    Parameter Magazine

    • Genre: Literary magazine
    Parameter Magazine is a biannual literary magazine based in Manchester, with issues appearing in spring and autumn. The magazine publishes poetry, prose and reviews and also features artworks in its online incarnation. Writers featured in previous issues include Forward Prize nominees Carola Luther and Mario Susko. Issue 5 was launched in Autumn 2007.
    8.33
    3 votes
    40
    Sybil's Garage

    Sybil's Garage

    • Genre: Science fiction magazine
    Sybil's Garage is a speculative fiction, poetry, and art journal, published by Senses Five Press. Issues one through six were released as a small press magazine, or zine. Issue seven was released in trade paperback format. The publication combines artwork with fiction and poetry for a unique aesthetic. The majority of the stories have tended toward slipstream fiction (see interstitial art), but some stories fall into traditional genres such as science fiction, fantasy, and horror fiction. Above each story is the author's suggested musical accompaniment, thus adding to the magazine's intended effect of engaging multiple senses. Sybil's Garage was founded in 2003 by Matthew Kressel and Devin Poore of Hoboken, New Jersey as an experiment in creating their own zine. In May 2007 issues one through four were entered into the permanent collection of the Hoboken Historical Museum. Issue No. 7 was pre-released at Readercon, the conference on imaginative literature, on July 9th, 2010. The issue was released officially on July 21st, 2010. Richard Larson's "The Noise," from Sybil's Garage No. 7, will be published in Wilde Stories 2011: The Year's Best Gay Speculative Fiction. In April 2010,
    8.33
    3 votes
    41
    Wine Spectator

    Wine Spectator

    • Genre: Wine
    Wine Spectator is a lifestyle magazine that focuses on wine and wine culture. It publishes 15 issues per year with content that includes news, articles, profiles, and general entertainment pieces. Each issue also includes from 400 to more than 1,000 wine reviews, which consist of wine ratings and tasting notes. Among the critics in the magazine's tasting panel are James Molesworth, Kim Marcus, Bruce Sanderson, Harvey Steiman, James Laube and from 1981 to 2010, James Suckling. Like most other major wine publications, the magazine rates wine on a 50-100 scale. Thomas Matthews is the executive editor. Founded as a San Diego-based tabloid newspaper by Bob Morrisey in 1976, Wine Spectator was purchased three years later by current publisher and editor Marvin R. Shanken. That year, its panel of experts blind tasted and reviewed over 12,400 wines. In 1981 the magazine introduced its Restaurant Awards program, which reviews restaurant wine lists on three levels: the Award of Excellence (basic), Best of Award of Excellence (second-tier), and the Grand Award (highest). As of 2009 over 3,500 restaurants held one of these awards. The magazine organized and sponsored the Wine Spectator Wine
    8.33
    3 votes
    42
    Destroyer Magazine

    Destroyer Magazine

    Destroyer – Journal of Apollonian Beauty and Dionysian Sexuality was a Swedish-based gay magazine published by Karl Andersson, with the objective "to bring back the adolescent boy as one of the ideals of gay culture". The magazine contained features, essays, interviews, reviews, columns, culture articles, fiction and sexually suggestive shots of boys as young as 13. Destroyer was subjected to massive criticism by the gay establishment in Sweden, because of its young male models. In a live radio debate, the chairman of the Swedish Federation for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Rights accused Destroyer editor Karl Andersson of "giving gay people a bad name", an accusation they stood by when questioned by international LGBT media. The magazine also received criticism from child-protection professionals for allegedly "sexualising" children. Destroyer's final issue (#10), published in January 2010, was limited to 1,000 copies. Karl Andersson's book "Gay Man's Worst Friend - the Story of Destroyer Magazine" covers all media reactions to the magazine.
    6.20
    5 votes
    43
    Timothy McSweeney's Quarterly Concern

    Timothy McSweeney's Quarterly Concern

    • Genre: Literary magazine
    Timothy McSweeney's Quarterly Concern is a literary journal, first published in 1998, edited by Dave Eggers. The first issue featured only works rejected by other magazines, but thereafter the journal began to include pieces written with McSweeney's in mind. McSweeney’s has since published works by many notable writers, including Denis Johnson, William T. Vollmann, Joyce Carol Oates, Jonathan Lethem, Michael Chabon, Susan Straight, Roddy Doyle, T. Coraghessan Boyle, Steven Millhauser, Robert Coover, Stephen King, and Ann Beattie. In 2007, McSweeney's received the National Magazine Award for Fiction for three stories published in 2006: "Wild Child" by T.C. Boyle (Issue 19); "To Sit, Unmoving" by Susan Steinberg (Issue 20); and "The Strange Career of Dr. Raju Gopalarajan" by Rajesh Parameswaran (Issue 21). In Issue 10, it was claimed that exactly 56 issues of the journal would be published. In Issue 20, this claim was repeated in an advertisement that stated, "There will be roughly thirty-six [issues] to come; then, a five-year retrenchment." ^ Contributors: A few of the purported contributors—especially in the Letters sections—are pseudonyms used by Eggers and others associated with
    6.20
    5 votes
    44
    The Etude

    The Etude

    The Etude was a U.S. magazine dedicated to music, which was founded by Theodore Presser (1848–1925) at Lynchburg, Virginia, and first published in October 1883. In 1884, Presser moved his publishing headquarters to Philadelphia, and his Theodore Presser Company continued the magazine until 1957. Targeted as much as possible to all musicians, from the novice to the serious student to the professional, The Etude printed articles about both basic/popular and more involved musical subjects (including history, literature, gossip, and politics), write-in advice columns about musical pedagogy, and graded piano sheet music. Long-time editor James Francis Cooke (editor-in-chief from 1909 through 1949) added to its masthead the phrase "Music Exalts Life!", and the magazine became a platform for Cooke's somewhat polemical and militantly optimistic editorials. The Etude's sometimes conservative outlook and contents may have contributed to its circulation decline during the 1930s and 40s, but in many respects it moved with the times, unequivocally supporting the phonograph, radio, and eventually television, and embracing jazz by the late thirties. By the end, George Rochberg was an editor of
    9.50
    2 votes
    45
    Urania

    Urania

    • Genre: Science fiction magazine
    Urania is an Italian science fiction magazine published by Arnoldo Mondadori Editore since October 10, 1952. The first issue featured the novel The Sands of Mars by Arthur C. Clarke (as Le sabbie di Marte). The original name of the series was I Romanzi di Urania ("Urania's novels"), to differentiate it from another magazine with the same name (but popularly known as Urania Rivista, "Urania Magazine"), which featured only short stories. The latter, however, lasted only 14 issues, and Romanzi di Urania soon took the simpler name, which still holds today. Short story collections were thenceforth published in the main series, which at its height had a weekly periodicity with a circulation of 160,000 copies a month. Since the very beginning Urania has been indeed the best selling SF magazine of Italy, also introducing to Italian readers some famed authors like Isaac Asimov, Alfred Elton van Vogt, Robert A. Heinlein, J. G. Ballard, Philip K. Dick and many others. The first editor was Giorgio Monicelli (brother of movie director Mario Monicelli): Monicelli is credited with the invention of the word fantascienza, meaning science-fiction in Italian. From 1964 to 1985 novels and short
    9.50
    2 votes
    46
    Modern Railways

    Modern Railways

    Modern Railways is a British monthly magazine covering the rail transport industry published by Ian Allan. It has been published since 1962. It has always been targeted at both railway professionals and serious amateurs, an aim which derives from its origins as an amalgamation of the enthusiast magazine Trains Illustrated and the industry journal The Locomotive in the hands of its first editor Geoffrey Freeman Allen. It is currently edited by James Abbott. Regular contributors include Roger Ford, Alan Williams and Tony Miles. The first edition of Modern Railways was published in January 1962 as Volume XV, no. 160 in a sequence continuing from Trains Illustrated. It featured a preface letter from Dr Richard Beeching, then Chairman of the British Transport Commission, who wrote presciently: "The thousands who read your journal every month derive from it a great deal of pleasure and useful information about the activities of British Railways. I feel that we share common ground, for your readers are our friends as well as yours, and we are helped by your success in holding and enlarging their interest. In particular we have come to expect from you, and to value, the kind of
    7.00
    4 votes
    47
    Vokrug sveta

    Vokrug sveta

    Vokrug sveta (Russian: Вокруг света, literally: "Around the World") is the oldest magazine in the Russian language, still being published (and one of the biggest magazines in modern Russia). The first issue was printed in Saint Petersburg, in December 1861, almost thirty years before the establishment of the National Geographic Magazine. Thus, it is one of the oldest popular science magazines in the world. The magazine was conceived by a Warsaw-born entrepreneur, Boleslaw Wolf, who defined Vokrug Sveta as a lavishly illustrated yearly publication, dedicated to "physical geography, natural sciences, the most recent discoveries, inventions and observations". Its roster of authors included: Alfred Brehm, Camille Flammarion, Nikolai Przhevalsky and Nicholai Miklukho-Maklai. The Wolf edition was discontinued after 1868 for unclear reasons, but the project of a popular geographical journal was revived in 1885 by Ivan Sytin, a printer who directed his periodicals toward a wider audience. Sytin's Vokrug sveta was issued monthly and featured original translations of popular adventure fiction from such authors as Jules Verne, Rudyard Kipling and Arthur Conan Doyle. The Russian Revolution
    7.00
    4 votes
    48
    Liberty

    Liberty

    Liberty is a leading libertarian journal founded in 1987 by R. W. Bradford (who was the magazine's publisher and editor until his death from cancer in 2005) in Port Townsend, Washington, and currently edited from San Diego, by Stephen Cox. Unlike Reason, which is printed on glossy paper and has full-color photographs, Liberty is printed on uncoated paper stock and has line drawing cartoons by S. H. (Scott) Chambers and Rex F. "Baloo" May, no photographs except for advertisements, and only one extra color (blue), which is limited to the cover and occasionally a few ads. Bradford had planned the launch of Liberty for several years during the 1980s, waiting, in part, for the development of desktop publishing software to make the endeavor cost-effective for a short-run periodical. The magazine achieved Bradford's target circulation by the end of the first year of publication. Starting it as an arm of his private publishing business, he turned the magazine over to a 501(c)(3) non-profit corporation (under his control) in 1993. In 1999, it moved from a bimonthly to a monthly publication schedule. With 2008, it will be published eleven times a year, with one issue being a "double issue."
    6.00
    5 votes
    49
    Vienac

    Vienac

    • Genre: Literary magazine
    Vijenac (English: The Wreath) is a biweekly magazine for literature, art and science, established in December 1993 and published by Matica hrvatska, the central national cultural institution in Croatia. The magazine is seen as the direct descendant of the Vienac literary magazine. Vienac was published by Matica hrvatska, the central national cultural institution of Croatia. It gathered the best Croatian writers and poets of the second half of the 19th century. It was published from 1869 to 1903 and from 1993 till today. It was created in 1869 to "delight and educate" (zabavi i pouci). Prominent cultural figures were editors-in-chief. In the first year, the magazine was managed by Đuro Deželić, then by Ivan Perkovac, Milivoj Dežman, Franjo Marković and Vjekoslav Klaić. Vienac soon became the main Croatian literary magazine of the second half of the 19th century, especially when it was managed by the greatest Croatian writer of the time, August Šenoa, from 1874 until his death in 1881. It is a showcase of the big literary names of the period. For example, Ksaver Šandor Gjalski published his first short story there in 1884. Vijenac also published translations of works by Zola, Daudet
    6.00
    5 votes
    50
    Anything But Monday

    Anything But Monday

    • Genre: Humor magazine
    Anything But Monday was a nationally-distributed humor magazine published in the late-1980’s. The semi-monthly publication featured satirical social commentary, sarcastic criticism of public sensibilities, and comic strips that parodied many elements of American society and popular culture. Anything But Monday (ABM) began in 1985 on the campus of Drew University as a college radio show created and hosted by students Mike Masters and Frank Edward Nora. The pair’s weekly radio show on station WMNJ became immediately popular with listeners on and off the Drew University campus who appreciated the show’s stream of consciousness/improvisational humor format at a time when most other college radio was limited to classic rock and alternative music mixed with campus news and announcements. The ABM radio show also gained notice for its bold irreverence, as Masters and Nora regularly violated station policy with their provocative language and criticism of the WMNJ station manager and other members of the university’s staff and faculty. Though popular among students, ABM quickly drew the administration’s ire thanks to Masters' and Nora’s on-air jokes, some of which were deemed sexist or
    8.00
    3 votes
    51
    Bystander

    Bystander

    Bystander, a British weekly tabloid magazine, featured reviews, topical sketches, and short stories. Published from Fleet Street, it was established in 1903 by George Holt Thomas. Its first editor, William Comyns Beaumont, later edited from 1928-1932. It was notably popular in World War I for its publication of the "Old Bill" cartoons by Bruce Bairnsfather. The magazine also employed many notable artists including H M Bateman, W. Heath Robinson, Howard Elcock, Helen McKie, Will Owen, Edmund Blampied and L R Brightwell. It also published some of the earliest stories of Daphne du Maurier (Beaumont's niece), as well as short stories by Saki, including "Filboid Studge, the Story of a Mouse that Helped." The magazine ran until 1940, when it merged with the Tatler (titled Tatler & Bystander until 1968).
    8.00
    3 votes
    52
    COMPUTE!

    COMPUTE!

    • Genre: Computer magazine
    Compute! (ISSN 0194-357X) was an American computer magazine that was published from 1979 to 1994, though it can trace its origin to 1978 in Len Lindsay's PET Gazette, one of the first magazines for the Commodore PET computer. In its 1980s heyday Compute! covered all major platforms, and several single-platform spinoffs of the magazine were launched. The most successful of these was Compute!'s Gazette, catering to Commodore computer users. The magazine's original goal was to write about and publish programs for all of the computers that used some version of the MOS Technology 6502 CPU. It started out with the Commodore PET, Commodore VIC-20, the Atari 8-bit series, the Apple II plus, and some 6502-based computers one could build from kits, such as the Rockwell AIM 65, the KIM-1 by MOS Technology, and others from companies such as Ohio Scientific. Support for the kit computers and the Commodore PET were eventually dropped. The platforms that became mainstays at the magazine were the Commodore VIC-20, Commodore 64, Atari 8-bit series, TI-99/4A, and the Apple II series. Later on the 6502 platform focus was dropped and IBM PC, Atari ST series, and the Commodore Amiga series computers
    8.00
    3 votes
    53
    Kagenna Magazine

    Kagenna Magazine

    An alternative magazine from South Africa. Started life as an underground zine published shortly after the fall of the Berlin Wall, and grew into an irregular, irreverent and entertaining read at the newsstand. Published in Cape Town, the magazine carried articles by activists, anarchists, ecologists and hackers and was considered subversive and revolutionary for its time. The last issue was published electronically in 1993. Kagenna - from Gehenna, the Jewish Hell, and !Cagn, the mantis god of the !kung San People The project started out as a collective experiment in Cape Town after the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989. The first issue had a silk-screened cover and was photocopied. Subsequent issues became more sophisticated and the magazine developed a life of its own, spawning other experiments and in particular a thriving small press. Kagenna #1 (silk-screened cover) 101 Green things to do; Beyond Environmental Conflict; Women as practical Utopists; Hyperdelic Exploration; Artvark Interview; Garbage Ecology; Ten Key Values of the Green Movement; Jim Jute and the Night People; Tristam and Them comic.(24pp) out of print Kagenna #2 (silk-screened cover) Reclaiming Celebration;
    8.00
    3 votes
    54
    Mother Jones

    Mother Jones

    • Issues: Mother Jones, January-February, 1997
    • Genre: News magazine
    Mother Jones (abbreviated MoJo) is an American magazine, featuring investigative and breaking news reporting on politics, the environment, human rights, and culture. Mother Jones has been nominated for 23 National Magazine Awards and has won six times, including for General Excellence in 2001, 2008, and 2010. In addition, Mother Jones also won the Online News Association Award for Online Topical Reporting in 2010 and the Utne Reader Independent Press Award for General Excellence in 2011. Monika Bauerlein and Clara Jeffery serve as co-editors. Madeleine Buckingham has served as Chief Executive Officer and Steve Katz as Publisher since 2010. The magazine was named after Mary Harris Jones, called Mother Jones, an Irish-American trade union activist, opponent of child labor, and self-described "hellraiser." She was a part of the Knights of Labor, the Industrial Workers of the World, the Social Democratic Party, the Socialist Party of America, the United Mine Workers of America, and the Western Federation of Miners. The stated mission of Mother Jones is to produce revelatory journalism that in its power and reach informs and inspires a more just and democratic world. Mother Jones is
    8.00
    3 votes
    55
    Official UK PlayStation Magazine

    Official UK PlayStation Magazine

    PlayStation Official Magazine - UK, generally abbreviated as OPM, is a magazine based in the United Kingdom that covers PlayStation news, originally created in Winter 2006. Although the first issue was distributed in three-month intervals, from Issue 2 onward, it became a monthly segment. As of Issue 7 (June 2007), the magazine comes with a playable Blu-ray Disc; it primarily covers PlayStation 3 games and material. However, it additionally also covers PlayStation Portable material. The magazine covers PlayStation lifestyle, as well all aspects of High Definition media in lesser detail. The Official UK PlayStation Magazine is a now-defunct magazine, launched in November 1995 to coincide with the launch of the PlayStation console. It ran for 108 issues, with the last hitting news stands in March 2004. The first issue sold 37,000 copies. Roughly midway through its run the abbreviations in the magazine changed from PSM to OPM (this was mainly because another magazine by the name of PSM2 was launched in the 4th quarter of 2000, and so as not to cause confusion, the abbreviations of the official mag were changed to OPM). It had 3 design changes in its lifetime: 1 to 51, 52 to 72, and
    8.00
    3 votes
    56
    Oriental Stories/The Magic Carpet

    Oriental Stories/The Magic Carpet

    • Genre: Pulp magazine
    Oriental Stories, later retitled The Magic Carpet Magazine, was a pulp magazine of 1930-34, an offshoot of the famous Weird Tales. Like its parent, it was published by J.C. Henneberger's Rural Publications and edited by Farnsworth Wright. As its titles indicate, the magazine specialized in adventure and fantasy stories with Oriental settings and elements. Its stories were largely written by the same distinctive group of authors that filled the pages of Weird Tales, including Robert E. Howard, Otis Adelbert Kline, E. Hoffmann Price, Clark Ashton Smith, and Frank Owen, among others. The magazine struggled financially for the entirety of its existence (as indeed did Weird Tales); it was published first bi-monthly, then quarterly, during the grimmest years of the Great Depression. Volume 1 of Oriental Stories consisted of 6 issues that appeared on newsstands from October 1930 through Autumn 1931; Volume 2 comprised only 3 issues in the first half of 1932 (Winter, Spring, Summer). After a six-month hiatus, the first of four quarterly issues of Volume 3 appeared in January 1933, but with the new title The Magic Carpet. ("Oriental Stories combined with The Magic Carpet Magazine," read the
    8.00
    3 votes
    57
    The Hollywood Reporter

    The Hollywood Reporter

    • Genre: Trade journal
    Formerly a daily trade magazine, The Hollywood Reporter re-launched in late 2010 as a publication serving the entertainment industry and a consumer audience. Indie Wire noted in July 2011 that the magazine is "the right combo of sizzling entertainment and hard breaking news." The multi-platform brand currently consists of an oversized weekly magazine, seasonal special reports, glossies, a high-traffic website, a mobile-optimized site, a digital daily, iPad app and events. During the last century, it was one of the two major publications focused on Hollywood—the other being Variety. Both publications later expanded to cover what is more broadly called the entertainment industry. The Hollywood Reporter was Hollywood's first daily entertainment industry trade paper. It began as a daily film publication, then added television coverage in the 1950s and began in the late 1980s to cover intellectual-property industries. William R. Wilkerson published the first issue of The Hollywood Reporter on September 3, 1930. This daily magazine reported on movies, studios and personalities in an outrageously candid style. Through its outspoken pages, Wilkerson became one of the town's most colorful
    8.00
    3 votes
    58
    VOGUE

    VOGUE

    • Issues: Vogue September 2007
    • Genre: Women's magazine
    Vogue is an American fashion and lifestyle magazine that is published monthly in 19 national and one regional edition by Condé Nast. In 1892 Arthur Turnure founded Vogue as a weekly publication in the United States sponsored by Kristoffer Wright. When he died in 1909, Condé Montrose Nast picked up the magazine and slowly began growing its publication. He changed it to a bi-weekly magazine and also started Vogue overseas starting in the 1910s. He first went to Britain in 1916, and started a Vogue there, then to Spain, and then to Italy and France in 1920, where it was a huge success. The magazine's number of publications and profit increased dramatically under his management. The magazine's number of subscriptions surged during the Depression, and again during World War II. During this time, noted critic and former Vanity Fair editor Frank Crowninshield served as its editor, having been moved over from Vanity Fair by publisher Condé Nast. In the 1960s, with Diana Vreeland as editor-in-chief and personality, the magazine began to appeal to the youth of the sexual revolution by focusing more on contemporary fashion and editorial features openly discussing sexuality. Toward this end,
    8.00
    3 votes
    59
    Battle Games in Middle-earth

    Battle Games in Middle-earth

    Battle Games in Middle-earth (BGiME) was a fortnightly magazine published by De Agostini in conjunction with British games manufacturer Games Workshop. Unlike White Dwarf, which is dedicated to the three core systems of miniature wargaming produced by Games Workshop, BGiME was exclusively about The Lord of the Rings Strategy Battle Game. According to the magazine itself, as well as it was sold in Ireland, the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, Malta and South Africa. It also became available, through their sponsors, in the Netherlands, Belgium, France, Germany, Spain, Austria, and Poland. The magazine became more popular than the publishers had anticipated, and the deadline was extended several times. Having completed the series of magazines relating to the films, it then went on to explore the rest of the Lord of the Rings universe, includes miniatures that were featured in the The Lord of the Rings book but not the films. The last issue was Pack 91, featuring Sharkey from the Scouring of the Shire. Each pack came with a free Lord of the Rings Strategy Battle Game miniature, including some exclusive to the publication at the time. Exclusive miniatures were much sought after
    6.75
    4 votes
    60
    Moment

    Moment

    Moment is an American Jewish magazine. It publishes articles related to Jewish culture, lifestyle, politics, and religion. Moment is not affiliated with any Jewish organization or religious movement, and its articles and columnists represent a diverse range of political views. Nobel Peace Prize-winner Elie Wiesel co-founded Moment with Leonard Fein in 1975, naming it for Der Moment, an independent Yiddish-language newspaper founded in Warsaw in 1910. Der Moment, one of the two most important Yiddish newspapers published in the city, appeared regularly until the eve of Yom Kippur, 1939, when the building housing the newspaper was destroyed by a German bomb. Upon founding Moment, Wiesel and Fein dubbed it "The New Magazine for America's Jew." In its premier issue Fein proudly declared that Moment would include diverse opinions "of no single ideological position, save of course, for a commitment to Jewish life." Moment's editors have included Leonard Fein (1975–1987), Hershel Shanks (1987–2004) and its current editor and executive publisher Nadine Epstein, a journalist and entrepreneur who relaunched Moment in 2004. The magazine is an independent non-profit 501(c)(3), funded by the
    6.75
    4 votes
    61
    Mother Earth

    Mother Earth

    Mother Earth was an anarchist journal that described itself as "A Monthly Magazine Devoted to Social Science and Literature," edited by Emma Goldman. Alexander Berkman, another well-known anarchist, was the magazine's editor from 1907 to 1915. It published longer articles on a variety of anarchist topics including the labor movement, education, literature and the arts, state and government control, and women's emancipation, sexual freedom, and was an early supporter of birth control. Its subscribers and supporters formed a virtual "who's who" of the radical left in the United States in the years prior to 1920. In 1917, Mother Earth began to openly call for opposition to US entry into World War I and specifically to disobey government laws on conscription and registration for the military draft. On June 15, 1917, Congress passed the Espionage Act. The law set punishments for acts of interference in US foreign policy and espionage. The Act authorized stiff fines and prison terms of up to 20 years for anyone who obstructed the military draft or encouraged "disloyalty" to the U.S. government. After Goldman and Berkman continued to advocate against conscription, Goldman's offices at
    6.75
    4 votes
    62
    National Journal

    National Journal

    National Journal is an American weekly magazine that reports on the current political environment and emerging political and policy trends. National Journal was first published in 1969. Times Mirror owned the magazine from 1986 to 1997, when it was purchased by David G. Bradley. It is now - alongside The Hotline - a part of National Journal Group, a division of Atlantic Media Company. The magazine was established in 1969 by Thomas N. Schroth, who formed the publication after being fired from his post as editor of Congressional Quarterly, with many CQ staff defecting to the new publication. National Journal is aimed at Washington insiders. It is mostly read by members of Congress, Capitol Hill staffers, the White House, Executive Branch agencies, the media, think tanks, corporations, associations and lobbyists. Most of the journal's content can be accessed only by subscribers. The yearly subscription rate is $1,160, or $525 for just the weekly hardcopy magazine. The magazine has received three National Magazine Awards. Some of its best known current and former contributors have been: As of 2006, National Journal has an agreement with Washington Week which ensures that at least one
    6.75
    4 votes
    63
    Radio-Electronics

    Radio-Electronics

    • Genre: Science magazine
    Radio-Electronics was an American electronics magazine that was published under various titles from 1929 to 2003. Hugo Gernsback, sometimes called The Father of Science Fiction, started it as Radio-Craft in July 1929. The title was changed to Radio-Electronics in October 1948 and again to Electronics Now in July 1992. In January 2000 it was merged with Gernsback's Popular Electronics to become Poptronics. Gernsback Publications ceased operations in December 2002 and the January 2003 issue was the last. Over the years, Radio-Electronics featured audio, radio, television and computer technology. The most notable articles were the TV Typewriter (September 1973) and the Mark-8 computer (July 1974). These two issues are considered milestones in the home computer revolution. In 1905 Hugo Gernsback established Electro Importing Company to sell radio components and electrical supplies by mail order. The catalogs had detailed instructions on projects like a wireless telegraph outfit and were the predecessor of his first magazine, Modern Electrics (April 1908). Gernsback sold Modern Electrics in March 1913 and it became Electrician and Mechanic. In May 1913 he started another magazine, The
    6.75
    4 votes
    64
    The NoZe Brotherhood

    The NoZe Brotherhood

    • Genre: Humor magazine
    The NoZe Brotherhood is a collegiate secret society at Baylor University. Founded in Brooks Hall in 1924, the society was originally formed as a joke regarding Leonard Shoaf, a freshman with a large nose. Shoaf's nose was of "such great length and breadth of nostril" that his friends proclaimed they could "form a club around it". The society became a popular, irreverent campus fixture in the years that followed, poking fun at its rivals, the Baylor University Chamber of Commerce, appearing in Baylor's yearbook, the Round-Up, and writing the occasional humorous piece for the yearbook or Baylor's newspaper, The Lariat. Targets of the NoZe Brothers' mirth included Baylor's faculty, administration, the Southern Baptist Convention, various student organizations, and themselves. From the society's inception in the 1920s through to the early 1960s, members were open about their participation, but they now keep their identities secret. The society has always venerated its history and traditions through the observance of several key festivals and holidays. The oldest, the Pink Tea, has been held annually since 1929. Held in the spring, the event affords members the opportunity to hear the
    6.75
    4 votes
    65
    2512

    2512

    • Genre: News magazine
    2512 is a monthly news magazine published in Réunion. Its name refers to the size in square kilometres of this French overseas department, which is located in the Indian Ocean. Besides the daily press, 2512 is the only generalist publication in Réunion since a competitor, founded several months earlier than 2512, went bankrupt in December 2006. Its content varies greatly, even if certain columns do appear on a regular basis, such as those on the media or the environment. Although the editorial staff is only small, it prepares a dossier on a particular theme each month. Subjects that have already been treated include: the mobility of the inhabitants of Réunion beyond their island, their relationships to their bodies, and their driving habits. In general, a lot of space in the dossier and in the rest of the magazine is dedicated to interviews with local, national and international personalities. The journalists of 2512 have thus already conducted interviews with Xavier Bertrand, Ibrahim Dindar, Nassimah Dindar, Joëlle Écormier, Maud Fontenoy, Meddy Gerville, Johnny Griffin, Olivier Ker Ourio, Patricia Machado, Émilie Minatchy, Nathalie Natiembé, Monique Orphé, Patrick Poivre d'Arvor,
    9.00
    2 votes
    66
    Ladies' Home Journal

    Ladies' Home Journal

    Ladies' Home Journal is an American magazine published by the Meredith Corporation. It first appeared on February 16, 1883, and eventually became one of the leading women's magazines of the 20th century in the United States. It was the first American magazine to reach 1 million subscribers in 1907. Ladies' Home Journal is one of the Seven Sisters, a group of women's service magazines. The Ladies' Home Journal arose from a popular single-page supplement in the American magazine Tribune and Farmer titled Women at Home. Women at Home was written by Louisa Knapp Curtis, wife of the magazine's publisher Cyrus H. K. Curtis. After a year it became an independent publication with Knapp as editor for the first six years. Its original name was The Ladies Home Journal and Practical Housekeeper, but she dropped the last three words in 1886. It rapidly became the leading American magazine of its type, reaching a circulation of more than one million copies in ten years. At the turn of the 20th century, the magazine published the work of muckrakers and social reformers such as Jane Addams. In 1901 it published two articles highlighting the early architectural designs of Frank Lloyd Wright. During
    9.00
    2 votes
    67
    Sir John

    Sir John

    • Genre: Men's magazine
    Sir John Magazine was a monthly online magazine with articles that focused on Canadian politics, current world events, fashion, beauty, health, entertainment, technology, and culture. It was portrayed as an upscale and sophisticated type of magazine. Sir John Magazine was created by Anthony Santelli who is also the founder of Premiere Media Group, Inc. Since 2002 Santelli had a magazine idea to present a publication for Canadians' interest in politics. His own interest in political issues inspired him to develop a mainstream magazine that would make politics entertaining, motivating, and compelling to its readers. After making the decision to put teaching aside, he embarked full time on developing this new magazine. The magazine was named after Sir John Alexander Macdonald, GCB, KCMG, PC, QC, DCL, LL.D who was born on January 11, 1815 in Glasgow, Scotland, and who became the first Prime Minister of Canada, in 1867. The subscription-based online magazine, Sir John, was mixing cover girls with Canadian and international political coverage to target men and women 25-55. The magazine’s motto was "Politics with Flair" and was comparable to the defunct US publication George that was
    9.00
    2 votes
    68
    The Gadfly

    The Gadfly

    The Gadfly is a quarterly magazine written and edited by Columbia University undergraduates - including students of Columbia College, the Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and the Columbia University School of General Studies - that focuses on accessible philosophy to provoke thought among the general student body. It was founded in 2007 by undergraduates of Columbia University (citation). The first issue was published in January of 2007 (citation). It can be found online here.
    9.00
    2 votes
    69
    Vanity Fair

    Vanity Fair

    • Issues: Vanity Fair, March 1983
    Vanity Fair is a magazine of pop culture, fashion, and current affairs published by Condé Nast. The present Vanity Fair has been published since 1983 and there have been editions for four European countries as well as the U.S. edition. This revived the title which had ceased publication in 1935 after a run from 1913. The current editor is Graydon Carter. Condé Montrose Nast began his empire by purchasing the men's fashion magazine Dress in 1913. He renamed the magazine Dress and Vanity Fair and published four issues in 1913. It continued to thrive into the twenties. However, it became a casualty of the Great Depression and declining advertising revenues, although its circulation, at 90,000 copies, was at its peak. Condé Nast announced in December 1935 that Vanity Fair would be folded into Vogue (circulation 156,000) as of the March 1936 issue. Condé Nast Publications, under the ownership of S.I. Newhouse, announced in June 1981 that it was reviving the magazine. The first issue was published in February 1983 (cover date March), edited by Richard Locke, formerly of The New York Times Book Review. After three issues, Locke was replaced by Leo Lerman, veteran features editor of Vogue.
    9.00
    2 votes
    70
    Ranger Rick

    Ranger Rick

    Ranger Rick was originally titled Ranger Rick's Nature Magazine. Ranger Rick is a children’s nature magazine that is published by the National Wildlife Federation.The magazine offers activities for children, ages 7 and up, in order to spark their interest in the outdoors and become more actively involved in the environment. The magazine's primary intention is to instill a passion for nature and promote activity outdoors. Children are growing increasingly distant from their environment, which raises a concern that conservational efforts in the future will diminish. However, Ranger Rick has taken this disinterest into account and has made some changes in its content to attract children and therefore promote environmental activism.NWF also publishes two companion magazines, Big Backyard, which is aimed at ages 3–7, and Wild Animal Baby, which is aimed at kids 12 months old to 4 years old.) Ranger Rick is the oldest and biggest children’s nature magazine. The National Wildlife Federation first published the magazine as, Ranger Rick’s Nature Magazine, in January 1967 and instantly gained many devoted readers who have since passed on their interest to their own children. Ranger Rick has
    5.80
    5 votes
    71
    Bannawag

    Bannawag

    • Genre: Literary magazine
    Bannawag (Iloko word meaning "dawn") is a Philippine weekly magazine published in the Philippines by Liwayway Publications Inc. It contains serialized novels/comics, short stories, poetry, essays, news features, entertainment news and articles, among others, that are written in Ilokano, a language common in the northern regions of the Philippines. Bannawag has been acknowledged as one foundation of the existence of contemporary Iloko literature. It is through the Bannawag that every Ilokano writer has proved his mettle by publishing his first Iloko short story, poetry, or essay, and thereafter his succeeding works, in its pages. The magazine is also instrumental in the establishment of GUMIL Filipinas, the umbrella organization of Ilokano writers in the Philippines and in other countries. Bannawag magazine was conceived in 1934 when Magdaleno A. Abaya of Candon, Ilocos Sur, who was then a member of the editorial staff of the Graphic magazine, an English weekly published by the Roces Publications. Don Ramos Roces, the owner-publisher of Graphic magazine and other vernacular magazines which included Liwayway, Bisaya and Hiligaynon, scoffed at the idea when Abaya presented a proposal
    7.67
    3 votes
    72
    Harper's Weekly

    Harper's Weekly

    Harper's Weekly (A Journal of Civilization) was an American political magazine based in New York. Published by Harper & Brothers from 1857 until 1916, it featured foreign and domestic news, fiction, essays on many subjects, and humor, alongside illustrations. During its most influential period it was the forum of the political cartoonist Thomas Nast. Along with his brothers James, John, and Wesley, Fletcher Harper began the publishing company Harper & Brothers in 1825. Following the successful example of the Illustrated London News, Harper began publishing Harper’s Monthly in 1850. The publication was primarily intent on publishing established authors such as Charles Dickens and William Makepeace Thackeray, but within several years its circulation and interest grew enough to sustain a weekly edition. In 1857, Harper’s Weekly began publication in New York. By 1860 the Weekly’s circulation had reached 200,000. Illustrations were an important part of the Weekly’s content, and it developed a reputation for employing some of the most renowned illustrators, notably Winslow Homer, Granville Perkins and Livingston Hopkins. Among its recurring features were the political cartoons of Thomas
    7.67
    3 votes
    73
    Jabberwock

    Jabberwock

    Jabberwock: a Monthly Magazine for Boys and Girls was published in London by Chapman & Hall and edited by Brenda Girvin. Price 6d 1905 - 1907 Vol 1 No 3 (October 1905) contained The Princess and the Cat by E. Nesbitt.
    7.67
    3 votes
    74
    Mi Gente Hispana Magazine

    Mi Gente Hispana Magazine

    Mi Gente Hispana, Inc. is a media company based in Washington, D.C., in the United States of America. Founded in 2006, Mi Gente Hispana, Inc. publishes information for and about Hispanic empowerment in the United States. Mi Gente Hispana features the best thinkers, trendsetters, and next-generation leaders in the Hispanic American community. Mi Gente Hispana ignites conversation, promotes empowerment and celebrates aspiration. In a 2006 article in Hispanic Business magazine, Mi Gente Hispana Magazine is quoted as "La voz y alma de la cultura hispana." Mi Gente Hispana runs the gamut with issues that reflects highly upon Hispanic men, women, teens, children, and family. It also serves as a medium to not only inform but also entertain its audience through the use of positive images and messages. The magazine is mainly marketed towards Hispanic professionals, entrepreneurs, opinion leaders, members of Hispanic organizations, and students. Mi Gente Hispana also promotes local artists by providing them a venue to showcase their talent (dance, music, fashion) via the website as well as Mi Gente Hispana's annual MGH Fest, which is held in numerous cities every August. The company's
    7.67
    3 votes
    75
    Mountain Discoveries

    Mountain Discoveries

    Mountain Discoveries is a free publication that focuses on the region of Western Maryland and neighboring Pennsylvania and West Virginia. The magazine is written and produced by professional and freelance writers from the area and features articles about the people, activities, places and articles of interest related to the region. Mountain Discoveries is printed on locally produced paper from the NewPage paper mill. NewPage has a major paper plant in Allegany County, Maryland.
    7.67
    3 votes
    76
    The War Illustrated

    The War Illustrated

    The War Illustrated was a British war magazine published in London by William Berry (later Viscount Camrose and owner of The Daily Telegraph). It was first released on 22 August 1914, eighteen days after the United Kingdom declared war on Germany, and regular issues continued throughout World War I. The magazine was discontinued after the 8 February 1919 issue, but returned 16 September 1939 following the start of World War II. 255 issues were published over the course of the Second World War before the magazine permanently ceased production on 11 April 1947. Subtitled "A Pictorial Record of the Conflict of the Nation", The War Illustrated was at first sensationalistic and patriotic. Although it contained articles, the main focus was on photographs and illustrations, most notably those of Stanley Wood dramatising (or in some cases fabricating) events involving German troops. The magazine became more diligent in properly verifying its reports from 1916 onwards. Both versions of The War Illustrated were edited by John Hammerton, who also contributed articles throughout the magazine's run. The magazine contained personal accounts of the war by war correspondents such as Hamilton Fyfe
    7.67
    3 votes
    77
    Youth's Companion

    Youth's Companion

    The Youth's Companion (1827–1929), known in later years as simply The Companion—For All the Family, was an American children's magazine that existed for over one hundred years until it finally merged with The American Boy in 1929. The Companion was published in Boston, Massachusetts by the Perry Mason Company (later renamed "Perry Mason & Co." after the founder died). From 1892 to 1915 it was based in the Youth's Companion Building, which is now on the National Register of Historic Places. Early issues of the Companion were centered around religion, having been created, in the words of its first publishers Nathaniel Willis (father of Nathaniel Parker Willis) and Asa Rand, to encourage "virtue and piety, and ... warn against the ways of transgression". In its early years its circulation did not reach 5,000. Through the years, publishers included Willis & Rand (Washington St., ca.1831); Olmstead & Co., (School St., ca.1857); and Perry Mason & Co. (Washington St., ca.1868; Temple Place, ca.1873-1888; and Columbus Ave.; ca.1894). In the 1890s its content was recentered around entertainment, and it began to target adults as well as children with pieces contributed by writers such as
    7.67
    3 votes
    78
    10.00
    1 votes
    79
    Argosy

    Argosy

    • Issues: Argosy, September 1965
    • Genre: Pulp magazine
    Argosy, later titled The Argosy and Argosy All-Story Weekly,, was an American pulp magazine from 1882 through 1978, published by Frank Munsey. It is generally considered to be the first American pulp magazine. In late September 1882, Frank Munsey had moved to New York City to start Argosy, having arranged a partnership with a friend already in New York and working in the publishing industry, and with a stockbroker from Augusta, Maine, Munsey's previous home. Munsey put most of his money, around $500, into purchasing stories for the magazine. Once he was in New York, the stockbroker backed out, and Munsey decided to release his New York friend from involvement, since they were now hopelessly underfunded. Munsey then pitched the magazine to a New York publisher, and managed to convince him to publish the magazine and hire Munsey as editor. The first issue was published on December 2, 1882, (dated December 9, 1882, a common practice at the time) and came out weekly. The first issue was eight pages, cost five cents, and included the first installments of serialized stories by Horatio Alger, Jr. and Edward S. Ellis. Other authors associated with Argosy's early days include Annie
    10.00
    1 votes
    80
    Electronic Gaming Monthly

    Electronic Gaming Monthly

    Electronic Gaming Monthly (often abbreviated to EGM) is a bimonthly American video game magazine. It has been published by EGM Media, LLC. since relaunching in April 2010. Its previous run, which ended in January 2009, was published by Ziff Davis. It offers video game news, coverage of industry events, interviews with gaming figureheads, editorial content, and product reviews. Prior to the 2010 relaunch it only covered console hardware and software but has since widened its coverage to the PC and mobile gaming markets. In 1994, EGM spawned EGM², which focused on expanded cheats and tricks (i.e. with maps and guides). It eventually became Expert Gamer and finally the defunct GameNOW. Staff writers for the magazine have included founder Steve Harris, Martin Alessi, Ken Williams (as Sushi-X), "Trickman" Terry Minnich, Andrew "Cyber-Boy" Baran, Danyon Carpenter, Marc Camron (later Director of Operations), Mark "Candyman" LeFebvre, Todd Rogers, Mike Weigand a.k.a. Major Mike (now Managing Editor at GamePro), Al Manuel, Howard Grossman, Mark "Mo" Hain, Mike Vallas, Jason Streetz, Ken Badziak, Scott Augustyn, Chris Johnston, Che Chou, Dave Ruchala, Crispin Boyer, artist Jeremy "Norm"
    10.00
    1 votes
    81
    Kerrang!

    Kerrang!

    • Genre: Music magazine
    Kerrang! is a UK-based magazine devoted to rock music published by Bauer Media Group. It was first published on 6 June 1981 as a one-off supplement in the Sounds newspaper. Named after the onomatopoeic word that derives from the sound made when playing a power chord on an electric guitar, Kerrang! was initially devoted to the New Wave of British Heavy Metal and the rise of hard rock acts. In the early 2000s it became the best-selling British music newspaper. Kerrang! commenced publication on 6 June 1981 and was edited by Geoff Barton, initially as a one-time supplement in the Sounds newspaper, which focused on the New Wave of British Heavy Metal phenomenon and on the rise of other hard rock acts. Angus Young of AC/DC appeared on Kerrang!'s first cover. Launched as a monthly magazine, Kerrang! began to appear on a fortnightly basis later, and in 1987 it went weekly. The original owner was United Newspapers who then sold it to EMAP in 1991. During the 1980s and early 1990s the magazine placed many thrash and glam metal acts on the cover (like Mötley Crüe, Slayer, Bon Jovi, Metallica, Poison, and Venom) but later discarded them when grunge acts such as Nirvana rose to fame. Readers
    10.00
    1 votes
    82
    Novi Plamen

    Novi Plamen

    • Genre: Political magazine
    Novi Plamen (English: New Flame) is a left-wing magazine for political, social and cultural issues primarily aimed at intellectual audiences on the territory of the former Yugoslavia and the related diaspora. It is a leading publication of its kind in the region, published by the Demokratska misao (English: Democratic Thought) publishing company based in Zagreb and largely sold on kiosks. Its editors-in-chief are Filip Erceg, Mladen Jakopović (pseudonym Daniel Jakopovich), Ivica Mladenović and Professor Goran Marković. The magazine centres on peace and social justice issues, and on the obstacles and potentials for political, economic and social democratisation. The magazine has an Advisory Board consisting of well-known international left-wing figures such as Noam Chomsky, Slavoj Žižek, Ken Coates, John McDonnell MP, Michael Löwy and Jean Ziegler, as well as leading intellectuals and public figures from South East Europe, including the Deputy Prime Minister of the Croatian government Slobodan Uzelac, former Croatian Minister of Economy Ljubo Jurčić MP, former Croatian Minister of Culture Antun Vujić MP, Croatian MP Milorad Pupovac, president of the Croatian Writers' Association
    10.00
    1 votes
    83
    Redbook

    Redbook

    • Genre: Women's magazine
    Redbook is an American women's magazine published by the Hearst Corporation. It is one of the "Seven Sisters", a group of women's service magazines. The magazine was first published in May 1903 as The Red Book Illustrated by Stumer, Rosenthal and Eckstein, a firm of Chicago retail merchants. The name was changed to The Red Book Magazine shortly thereafter. Its first editor, from 1903 to 1906, was Trumbull White, who wrote that the name was appropriate because, "Red is the color of cheerfulness, of brightness, of gayety." In its early years, the magazine published short fiction by well-known authors, including many women writers, along with photographs of popular actresses and other women of note. Within two years the magazine was a success, climbing to a circulation of 300,000. When White left to edit Appleton's Magazine, he was replaced by Karl Edwin Harriman, who edited The Red Book Magazine and its sister publications The Blue Book and The Green Book until 1912. Under Harriman the magazine was promoted as "the largest illustrated fiction magazine in the world" and increased its price from 10 cents to 15 cents. According to Endres and Lueck (p. 299), "Red Book was trying to
    10.00
    1 votes
    84
    Sommelier India

    Sommelier India

    Sommelier India - The Wine Magazine is an Indian wine magazine dedicated to wine and the culture surrounding wine. International and Indian wine writers contribute to Sommelier India. This includes two Master of Wine one of whom is wine writer and critic Jancis Robinson. The magazine also organises Sommelier India Wine Competition (SIWC) every year for wines imported and sold in India. The competition used to be judged by a panel of judges led by Steven Spurrier. Sommelier India is owned by Consolidated Media Int.
    10.00
    1 votes
    85
    Palisade

    Palisade

    Palisade is a lifestyle magazine serving Hudson and Bergen counties in New Jersey. It is named for the New Jersey Palisades, which runs through those counties. The magazine, which is published six times a year, is a publication of The Hudson Reporter Assoc., L.P. The company's main office is located in Hoboken. The magazine was founded in 2007. The first issue was published in February of that year.
    6.50
    4 votes
    86
    Punchinello

    Punchinello

    Punchinello was a short-lived American satirical magazine. Inspired by the English publication Punch, it ran in weekly editions from 2 April 1870 to 24 December 1870. The magazine was founded by former editors of Vanity Fair, which went out of business in 1863. They found four investors willing to provide $5000 each--though they did not disclose that those four were robber baron Jay Gould, financial buccaneer Jim Fisk, and corrupt politicians Boss Tweed and Peter B. Sweeny. It ceased publication within a year. The magazine's main illustrator was Henry Louis Stephens, who produced a full-page cartoon every week. Other sections included theater reviews, correspondence (real or fictional) from Philadelphia, Boston, and Chicago, and essays on foreign affairs. "In format as in name", it was an imitator of the London Punch, according to Frank Luther Mott, though "Punchinello was not very funny."
    6.50
    4 votes
    87
    Scribner's Magazine

    Scribner's Magazine

    • Genre: Literary magazine
    Scribner's Magazine was an American periodical published by the publishing house of Charles Scribner's Sons from January 1887 to May 1939. Scribner's Magazine was the second magazine out of the "Scribner's" firm, after the publication of Scribner's Monthly. Charles Scribner's Sons spent over $500,000 setting up the magazine, to compete with the already successful Harper's Monthly and Atlantic Monthly. Scribner's Magazine was launched in 1887, and was the first of any magazine to introduce color illustrations. The magazine ceased publication in 1939. The magazine contained many engravings by famous artists of the 19th and early 20th centuries, as well as many famous authors of that time, including John Thomason, Elisabeth Woodbridge Morris and Clarence Cook, as well as 26th United States president Theodore Roosevelt. The magazine had high sales when president Roosevelt started contributing, reaching over 200,000. The magazine had strong sales until the first World War was over, and the magazine ceased publication. Scribner's Magazine was the second periodical publication of the "Scribner's" firm, after Scribner's Monthly was published from 1870 to 1881. Scribner's Monthly was later
    6.50
    4 votes
    88
    Hustler

    Hustler

    • Genre: Men's magazine
    Hustler is a monthly pornographic magazine published in the United States. It was first published in 1974 by Larry Flynt. It was a step forward from the Hustler Newsletter, which was cheap advertising for his strip club businesses at the time. The magazine grew from a shaky start to a peak circulation of around 3 million; it has since dropped to approximately 500,000. It showed explicit views of the female genitalia, becoming one of the first major US-based magazines to do so, in contrast with relatively modest publications like Playboy. Today, Hustler is still considered more explicit (and more self-consciously lowbrow) than such well known competitors as Playboy and Penthouse. It frequently depicts hardcore themes, such as the use of sex toys, penetration and group sex. Larry Flynt Publications also owns the Hustler Casino in Gardena, California, the Hustler Club chain of bars and clubs, and Hustler store chain that sells adult-oriented videos, cIothing, magazines and sex toys. The chain's flagship store is on Sunset Boulevard in West Hollywood. Of particular infamy are Hustler's cartoons, which have often featured blatantly violent and misogynistic themes. Gang rape, botched
    5.60
    5 votes
    89
    Dirt Rag

    Dirt Rag

    Dirt Rag is a mountain bike magazine based out of Pittsburgh, PA. The magazine covers many aspects of mountain-bike culture. Founded in 1989, Dirt Rag is an independently-owned mountain bike magazine that enjoys worldwide distribution. The magazine focuses on mountain bikes and their riders, but it also embraces all aspects of bicycle culture. The magazine is known for thorough and honest product reviews, a unique perspective on cycling, and original bicycle-related literature and art. Each year, Dirt Rag holds a reader submitted fiction contest. Readers are petitioned to submit an original work of fiction. The best are selected and published in the magazine and the winners receive prizes. Dirt Rag celebrates a grassroots connection to its readers and coverage of neglected niches of the bicycle world. Dirt Rag is published seven times per year. In 2012, Dirt Rag founded a new parent company, Rotating Mass Media, to oversea the Dirt Rag brand, its sister magazine Bicycle Times, and the Dirt Fest mountain bike festival.
    8.50
    2 votes
    90
    Frank Leslie's Weekly

    Frank Leslie's Weekly

    • Genre: News magazine
    Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, later renamed Leslie's Weekly, was an American illustrated literary and news magazine founded in 1852 and published until 1922. It was one of several magazines started by publisher and illustrator Frank Leslie. Throughout its decades of existence, the weekly provided illustrations and reports - first with woodcuts and Daguerreotypes, later with more advanced forms of photography - of wars from John Brown's raid at Harpers Ferry and the Civil War until the Spanish-American War and the First World War. The Illustrated Newspaper was founded in 1852. John Y. Foster was the first editor of the weekly, which came out on Tuesdays. There were 30 copies of the first edition printed. By 1897, its circulation had grown to an estimated 65,000 copies. After Leslie's death in 1880, the magazine was continued by his widow, the women's suffrage campaigner Miriam Florence Leslie. The name, by then a well-established trademark, remained also after 1902, when it no longer had a connection with the Leslie family. It continued until 1922. It often took a strongly patriotic stance and frequently featured cover pictures of soldiers and heroic battle stories. It also
    8.50
    2 votes
    91
    Match magazine

    Match magazine

    • Genre: Sports magazine
    Match! is a weekly British football magazine aimed at the teenage and pre-teenage market. First published in 1979, the magazine has a circulation of 57,108 as of December 2010. The magazine includes interviews, a skills school, quizzes and a weekly round-up of results, tables and player ratings from the four main English divisions and the Scottish Premier League in MatchFacts. It mostly covers teams and players in the English Premier League, but also has a limited coverage of La Liga, Serie A and international football. Match magazine was launched on 6 September 1979, at a cover price of 25p. The original editor was Mel Bagnall. Kevin Keegan was the first cover star of Match and supported the magazine with his column, Learn To Play The Keegan Way. The first issue came with an 80-page sticker album and included columns by Tottenham star Ossie Ardiles, Manchester United's Steve Coppell and Nottingham Forest manager, Brian Clough. Later columnists included David Platt, Mark Bright and Ryan Giggs. In March 1980, Match launched its first Matchman Of The Month contest. The award, based on a player's match rating, was won by Ossie Ardiles. He pipped Trevor Francis to the title and won
    8.50
    2 votes
    92
    The Blast

    The Blast

    The Blast was an anarchist newspaper published by Alexander Berkman from 1916 through 1917. When Berkman left his position as editor of Mother Earth, he moved to San Francisco and began work on The Blast. Named for the signature effect caused by the explosion of a revolutionist's dynamite bomb, the journal was originally conceived by Berkman as a "revolutionary labor paper" than a strictly anarchist newspaper. The Blast focused on the California labor situation and provided news about national labor events and leaders of radical political movements. Berkman published 29 issues of The Blast. In it he covered subjects such as Emma Goldman and Margaret Sanger's arrests for birth-control advocacy, the Mexican revolutionary Pancho Villa, and the trial of labor agitators Tom Mooney and Warren Billings for the Preparedness Day bombing. The magazine was shut down in June 1917 when Berkman was arrested for encouraging resistance to the draft. In 2005, all 29 issues of The Blast were re-published in book form by AK Press.
    8.50
    2 votes
    93
    Albina Românească

    Albina Românească

    • Genre: Literary magazine
    Albina Românească ("The Romanian Bee") was a Romanian-language bi-weekly political and literary magazine, printed in Iaşi, Moldavia, at two intervals during the Regulamentul Organic period (between June 1, 1829 and January 3, 1835 and again between January 3, 1837 and January 2, 1850). The owner and editor was Gheorghe Asachi. It published the literary supplement Alăuta Românească. Albina Românească was the second journal to be published in its country, after the French-language Courrier de Moldavie, and the first Romanian-language one in Moldavia. Alongside Curierul Românesc, edited by Ion Heliade Rădulescu in Wallachia, and George Bariţiu's Gazeta de Transilvania, it was one of the main Romanian periodical press of the time.
    7.33
    3 votes
    94
    Exclaim!

    Exclaim!

    Exclaim! (also known as exclaim!) is a monthly Canadian music magazine that features in-depth coverage of new music across all genres with special focus on Canadian and cutting-edge artists. Content is based on the monthly print publication, publishes 11 issues per year, distributing over 100,000 copies to over 2,600 locations across Canada. Exclaim! began as a discussion among college radio programmers at Ryerson's CKLN-FM in 1991. The goal of the publication was to support the great Canadian music that was otherwise going unheralded. Started by Ian Danzig along with fellow programmers and local Toronto musicians, the group worked through 1991 to produce their first issue at the beginning of 1992, with monthly issues being produced ever since. The magazine is distributed as a free publication in bars, record stores, libraries, and coffee shops, in a manner similar to an alternative weekly newspaper, although it also offers mail delivery subscriptions. With Chart's decision to cease publication of its newsstand edition in January 2009, Exclaim! is now Canada's only nationally-distributed general interest music magazine operating as a print publication. The magazine's website,
    7.33
    3 votes
    95
    Men's Health

    Men's Health

    • Genre: Men's magazine
    Men's Health (MH), published by Rodale Inc. in Emmaus, Pennsylvania, United States, is the world’s largest men’s magazine brand, with 39 editions in 46 countries. It is also the best-selling men's magazine on U.S. newsstands. It covers fitness, nutrition, sexuality, lifestyle and other aspects of men's life and health. The magazine's website, MensHealth.com, averages 38 million page views a month. Launched by Mark Bricklin in 1987 as a health-oriented service magazine, Men’s Health has evolved into a lifestyle magazine for men, covering areas such as health, fitness, nutrition, relationships, travel, technology, fashion and finance. Bricklin, along with Rodale editors Larry Stains and Stefan Bechtel, initially produced three newsstand test issues. The results led Rodale to launch Men's Health as a quarterly magazine in 1988 and begin to sell subscriptions. Bricklin, who was editor-in-chief of Prevention magazine, appointed Mike Lafavore as editor of Men's Health that year. In his subsequent 12 years as editor-in-chief, Lafavore grew the circulation from 100,000 to more than 1.5 million, took the publishing frequency to 10 times a year, and expanded the magazine's brand to a number
    7.33
    3 votes
    96
    Money

    Money

    Money is published by Time Inc. Its first issue was published in October 1972. Its articles cover the gamut of personal finance topics ranging from investing, saving, retirement and taxes to family finance issues like paying for college, credit, career and home improvement. It is well known for its annual list of "America's Best Places to Live." During the 1990s, WCBS-TV afternoon newscasts held segments for the magazine, along with Parents.
    7.33
    3 votes
    97
    Tertangala

    Tertangala

    Tertangala is the magazine of the University of Wollongong Undergraduate Students' Association (WUSA) The magazine features student investigative and feature articles, news, artwork, opinion, film and music reviews, as well as interviews and editorials. Submissions from staff and students (including student association representatives) makes up the bulk of the magazines content, however submissions from other members of the community are also accepted. From time to time, the Tertangala has been known to use themes as a way to source content and spark interest amongst the student population. However, themes are not at all restrictive and content is accepted even if it does not conform to the set theme. 2010 saw the Tertangala change format, printers and even add some long awaited color, from issue two onwards. The year did away with themes apart from the ever needed 'survival guide' and a special issue focusing on mental health and welfare, which was compiled with the help of the WUSA welfare collective. Tertangala has a 48 year history. It was first published in September 1962, when the school was still an external campus of the University of New South Wales, making it older than
    7.33
    3 votes
    98
    The Popular Magazine

    The Popular Magazine

    • Genre: Literary magazine
    The Popular Magazine was an early American literary magazine that ran for 612 issues from November 1903 to October 1931. It featured short fiction, novellas, serialized larger works, and even entire short novels. The magazine's subject matter ranged over a number of genres, although it tended somewhat towards men's adventure stories, particularly in the waning years of the publication, when the vogue for hardboiled fiction was strong. The Popular Magazine touted itself as "a magazine for men and women who like to read about men." Initially started as a boy's magazine, the editorial focus was shifted after only three issues to one of adult mainstream fiction, a program the magazine would retain for the rest of its publication run. The magazine can be considered a forerunner of the pulp fiction magazines that were prominent from the 1920s to 1950s, as it avoided more highbrow fare in favor of fiction "for the common man." Several issues of the Popular Magazine featured illustrations by N.C. Wyeth. One of the Popular Magazine's earliest successes came with the publication of H. Rider Haggard's novel Ayesha in 1905. Other notable writers published by the Popular Magazine include Morgan
    7.33
    3 votes
    99
    The Saturday Evening Post

    The Saturday Evening Post

    • Issues: Saturday Evening Post, Dec 17 1938
    • Genre: Literary magazine
    The Saturday Evening Post is a bimonthly American magazine. It was published weekly under this title from 1897 until 1969, and quarterly and then bimonthly from 1971. While the publication traces its historical roots to Benjamin Franklin, The Pennsylvania Gazette was first published in 1728 by Samuel Keimer. The following year (1729), Franklin acquired the Gazette from Keimer for a small sum and turned it into the largest circulation newspaper in all the colonies. It continued publication until 1800. The Saturday Evening Post was founded in 1821 and grew to become the most widely circulated weekly magazine in America. The magazine gained prominent status under the leadership of its longtime editor George Horace Lorimer (1899–1937). The Saturday Evening Post published current event articles, editorials, human interest pieces, humor, illustrations, a letter column, poetry (with contributions submitted by readers), single-panel gag cartoons (including Hazel by Ted Key) and stories by the leading writers of the time. It was known for commissioning lavish illustrations and original works of fiction. Illustrations were featured on the cover and embedded in stories and advertising. Some
    7.33
    3 votes
    100
    Super Play

    Super Play

    Super Play (スーパープレィ) was a British Super Nintendo Entertainment System (SNES) magazine which ran from November 1992 to September 1996. Super Play covered in great detail the role-playing video game genre. Many of these games were never released officially in the UK or European games market, and therefore the magazine concentrated much effort in covering aspects of the American, and moreover the Japanese games markets. It also featured in-depth, intelligent and passionate coverage of all aspects of gaming. Given the close ties between the world of Japanese console RPGs and animation, the magazine also heavily featured information about manga and anime by noted UK based writer, Helen McCarthy. It can be said that Super Play was one of the magazines that helped to push forward what was at the time a nascent market for anime in the UK. In this vein, the magazine itself was also notable as its cover illustrations (and many illustrations between the covers) were done in manga-influenced style by artist Wil Overton. Overton also caricatured many of the staff in chibi form, wearing various types of anime-related costumes - sci-fi armour, flying gear, RPG-style armour etc. The cover even
    5.40
    5 votes
    101
    BBC History

    BBC History

    BBC History Magazine is a British publication devoted to history articles on both British and world history and are aimed at all levels of knowledge and interest. The publication releases thirteen editions a year, one per month and a Christmas special edition, and is owned by BBC Worldwide but is published under license by the Immediate Media Company. BBC History is the biggest selling history magazine in the UK and is growing in circulation by nearly 7% every year. The magazine consists of topical features, often aligning with programming currently showing on BBC Radio and Television and written by academic historians, historical analysis of news events and comparison with similar previous events, reviews of new books and media and features into significant locations in history. The BBC History Magazine was launched in May 2000 by BBC Magazines with Greg Neale, an experienced journalist and history graduate, appointed as editor. In February 2004, parent company BBC Worldwide acquired publishing company Origin Publishing, who published rival magazine Living History Magazine since April 2003. Upon this aquisition, Living History Magazine was incorporated into BBC History Magazine
    7.00
    3 votes
    102
    Boy's Own Paper

    Boy's Own Paper

    The Boy's Own Paper was a British story paper aimed at young and teenage boys, published from 1879 to 1967. The idea for the publication was first raised in 1878 by the Religious Tract Society as a means to encourage younger children to read and also instil Christian morals during their formative years. The first issue went on sale on January 19, 1879. In 1939 it was taken over by Lutterworth Press, and in 1963 by Purnell and Sons Ltd. It was published at the end of its life in 1967 by BPC Publishing Ltd, who are believed to have started publishing the paper in 1965. The paper was published weekly following the school year (Autumn through to Summer) until November 1913, when it became a monthly. In total, 2511 issues of the paper were published. From 1879 onwards each year's issues were bound together and sold as the Boy's Own Annual. In the initial few years, one could purchase the covers at the end of the publishing year and have the weekly issues bound. This produced some interesting minor variations in order and contents. The Annuals ceased publication after the 1940-41 edition due to wartime paper rationing. The Annuals included all of the text of the weekly (and later
    7.00
    3 votes
    103
    Dacia Literară

    Dacia Literară

    Dacia Literară was the first Romanian literary and political journal. Founded by Mihail Kogălniceanu and printed in Iaşi, it was short-lived—having lasted only from January to June 1840. Dacia Literară was a Romantic nationalist and liberal magazine, engendering a literary society.
    7.00
    3 votes
    104
    Eye

    Eye

    Eye Magazine, The International Review of Graphic Design is a quarterly print magazine on graphic design and visual culture. First published in London in 1990, Eye was founded by Rick Poynor, a prolific writer on graphic design and visual communication. Poynor edited the first twenty-four issues (1990-1997). Max Bruinsma was the second editor, editing issues 25–32 (1997–1999), before its current editor John L. Walters took over in 1999. Stephen Coates was art director for issues 1-26, Nick Bell was art director from issues 27-57, and Simon Esterson has been art director since issue 58. Frequent contributors include Phil Baines, Steven Heller, Steve Hare, Richard Hollis, Robin Kinross, Jan Middendorp, J. Abbott Miller, John O’Reilly, Rick Poynor, Alice Twemlow, Kerry William Purcell, Steve Rigley, Adrian Shaughnessy, David Thompson, Christopher Wilson and many others. Other contributors have included Nick Bell (creative director from issues 27-57), Gavin Bryars, Anne Burdick, Brendan Dawes, Simon Esterson (art director since issue 58), Malcolm Garrett, Anna Gerber, Jonathan Jones, Emily King, Ellen Lupton, Russell Mills, Quentin Newark, Tom Phillips, Robin Rimbaud, Stefan
    7.00
    3 votes
    105
    Ma'am Magazine

    Ma'am Magazine

    Ma'Am Magazine, or Marc and Andrea Media, is an independent photojournalistic publication founded in Dublin, Ohio. It is printed and edited seasonally by Marc Jones and Andrea Rissing. The publication's aim is to evoke artistic and cultural awareness with a noticeable literary gonzo journalist slant. The idea for Ma'am Magazine began in June 2004 when Jones published a collection of anecdotes on his now defunct blog. He asked friends to help him with editing, including Rissing. Rissing read a paragraph where Jones imagined traveling and publishing a photographic magazine with her, she insisted that it was a good idea and to pursue this dream as a side-career. Topics within Ma’am typically include community politics, interviews with emerging artists, analytical research, and idiosyncratic suggestions as to how one should live life. Ma’am attempts to abstain from articles on popular culture and news coverage dominated by the mass media. This has helped Ma'am acquire a cult following. The cover story is almost always an anomaly to the rest of the publication. The expositive cover is allegedly rigid and objectively neutral, whereas everything else reads much more lax and narrated. In
    7.00
    3 votes
    106
    Playboy magazine

    Playboy magazine

    The Brazilian edition of Playboy is a local franchise of Playboy magazine published by Editora Abril in Brazil. The original edition of the magazine was created by Hugh Hefner in the 1950s in the United States. Editora Abril licenses the Playboy trademark and manages all associated brands of Playboy Enterprises in Brazil. The first issue was published in August 1975, under the name A Revista do Homem (Men's Magazine), since the official censorship of the Military dictatorship in place in the country vetoed the original name. The magazine was allowed to use its trademark name only as of 1980. The Brazilian edition follows the general guidelines of the original magazine in the United States, featuring the trademark sections of the magazine, such as the monthly interview, the 20 Questions interview and the centerfold pictorial featuring the "Miss of the month", which most of the time, but not always, coincides with the month's "star" (cover). But the Brazilian installment has some sections of its own, such as Coelhinhas (Bunnies), which features unknown models photographed by freelance photographers (not affiliated with the magazine), and Click, which features candid pictures of
    7.00
    3 votes
    107
    Popular Mechanics

    Popular Mechanics

    • Genre: Science magazine
    Popular Mechanics is an American magazine, which was first published January 11, 1902 by H. H. Windsor, and has been owned since 1958 by the Hearst Corporation. There are nine international editions, including a now-defunct Latin American version that had been published for decades and a newer South African edition. Popular Mechanics features regular sections on automotive, home, outdoors, science, and technology topics. A recurring column is "Jay Leno's Garage" featuring observations by the famed late-night talk show host and vehicle enthusiast. Popular Mechanics was originally self-published by the Popular Mechanics Company but in 1958 became a subsidiary of the Hearst Corporation. A near-complete archive of Popular Mechanics issues going back to 1905 is available through Google Books. Popular Mechanics Show is the official weekly podcast of Popular Mechanics magazine.
    7.00
    3 votes
    108
    Monkey magazine

    Monkey magazine

    Monkey is a free weekly men's magazine which is published by Dennis Publishing exclusively online and on mobile platforms. Monkey is a digital magazine. It replicates a magazine format, but with video and audio content embedded within both editorial and advertising. Each 48-page issue features a covergirl shoot and editorial covering cars, sport, humour, entertainment, gadgets, clothes and user-generated content aimed at 16 to 30-year-olds.
    5.20
    5 votes
    109
    Caretas

    Caretas

    • Genre: News magazine
    Caretas is a weekly newsmagazine published in Lima, Peru, renowned for its investigative journalism. It was founded in October 1950 by Doris Gibson and Francisco Igartua. In the mid 1950s, Gibson's son, Enrique Zileri, returned from Europe (from where he had been making contributions for the magazine) to join Caretas. Not long after, Igartua departed from the magazine and Zileri joined Gibson as co-director. After several years of monthly publication, Caretas began to be published semi-monthly, and, since 1979, weekly. A new edition currently appears every Thursday. Caretas focuses on Peruvian-related topics, ranging from historic coups (it was founded during Odría's regime), corruption scandals, presidential elections, crimes of passion, sports, to wars and terrorism. Since the mid-1980s, Caretas has imitated Time Magazine by naming a Man of the Year in the year-end issue of the magazine, called Premio a la Resistencia (Prize to the Resistance). The publication's first all-color cover featured Peruvian model Gladys Zender, who became Latin America's first beauty pageant contestant to win the Miss Universe title in 1957. In the first years of the 1990s, due to her advanced age,
    6.00
    4 votes
    110
    Der Spiegel

    Der Spiegel

    • Genre: News magazine
    Der Spiegel (German pronunciation: [deːɐ ˈʃpiːɡəl], lit. "The Mirror") is a German weekly news magazine published in Hamburg. It is one of Europe's largest publications of its kind, with a weekly circulation of more than one million. The first edition of Der Spiegel was published in Hanover on Saturday, 4 January 1947. Its release was initiated and sponsored by the British occupational administration and preceded by a magazine titled, Diese Woche (This Week), which had first been published in November 1946. After disagreements with the British, the magazine was handed over to Rudolf Augstein as chief editor, and was renamed Der Spiegel. From the first edition in January 1947, Augstein held the position of editor-in-chief, which he retained until his death on 7 November 2002. After 1950, the magazine was owned by Rudolf Augstein and John Jahr; Jahr's share merged with Richard Gruner in 1965 to form the publishing company Gruner + Jahr. In 1969, Augstein bought out Gruner + Jahr for DM 42 million and became the sole owner of Der Spiegel. In 1971, Gruner + Jahr bought back a 25% share in the magazine. In 1974, Augstein restructured the company to make the employees shareholders. All
    6.00
    4 votes
    111
    The Gentleman's Magazine

    The Gentleman's Magazine

    The Gentleman's Magazine was founded in London, England, by Edward Cave in January 1731. It ran uninterrupted for almost 200 years, until 1922. It was the first to use the term "magazine" (from the French magazine, meaning "storehouse") for a periodical. Samuel Johnson's first regular employment as a writer was with The Gentleman's Magazine. The original complete title was The Gentleman's Magazine: or, Trader's monthly intelligencer. Cave's innovation was to create a monthly digest of news and commentary on any topic the educated public might be interested in, from commodity prices to Latin poetry. It carried original content from a stable of regular contributors, as well as extensive quotes and extracts from other periodicals and books. Cave, who edited The Gentleman's Magazine under the pen name "Sylvanus Urban", was the first to use the term "magazine" (meaning "storehouse") for a periodical. Contributions to the magazine frequently took the form of letters, addressed to "Mr. Urban". The iconic illustration of St John's Gate on the front of each issue (occasionally updated over the years) depicted Cave's home, in effect, the magazine's "office". Before the founding of The
    6.00
    4 votes
    112
    Wired

    Wired

    • Genre: Science magazine
    Wired is a full-color monthly American magazine and on-line periodical, published since January 1993, that reports on how new and developing technology affects culture, the economy, and politics. Owned by Condé Nast, it is headquartered in San Francisco, California. It now has four international editions: Wired UK, Wired Italia, Wired Japan and Wired Germany (since September 2011). In its earliest colophons Wired credited Canadian media theorist Marshall McLuhan as its "patron saint." From the beginning, the strongest immediate influence on the magazine's editorial outlook came from the techno-utopian agenda of co-founder Stewart Brand and his long-time associate Kevin Kelly. From 1998 to 2006, Wired magazine and Wired News (which publishes at Wired.com) had separate owners. However, throughout that time, Wired News remained responsible for reprinting Wired magazine's content online, due to a business agreement made when Condé Nast purchased the magazine (but not the website). In July 2006, Condé Nast announced an agreement to buy Wired News for $25 million, reuniting the magazine with its website. Wired is known for coining new terms, such as "the Long Tail" and "crowdsourcing".
    6.00
    4 votes
    113
    Bandbaja

    Bandbaja

    Bandbaja was Pakistan's first online music magazine. Formed in 2003 by several college students, it was headed by Pakistani artist and graphic designer, Safwat Saleem. Other founding members of Bandbaja include Pakistani journalists Huma Imtiaz and Saba Imtiaz. The magazine received immediate recognition because of its relentless critique of the Pakistani music scene. By the third issue, the magazine was regularly featuring writings by prominent music writers like Nadeem F. Paracha and The Bug. Bandbaja was known for its blunt views and the promotion of modern popular music as a social and even political tool. Although Bandbaja was hailed by many as Pakistani music journalism's finest moment, die-hard fans of bands that have been on the receiving end of Bandbaja 's harsh criticism seem less than impressed by the effort. The popularity of Bandbaja gave rise to several similar online music websites and portals throughout Pakistan. As of 2006, the website has been offline.
    8.00
    2 votes
    114
    Case magazine

    Case magazine

    CASE is a seasonal magazine devoted to urban and street culture, including music, art, design, graffiti, etc. Based out of Houston, Texas, the magazine's first issue was released June 15, 2007. The magazine was created and emerged as a simplistic and low brow magazine to help spotlight underground artist and musicians. CASE is a free, independent publication, releasing a limited number of copies each issue. Music interviews by: Bushwick Bill, Chromeo, Z-Trip, Plastic Little, as well as other. Art by: Blaine Fontana (cover artist), Greg Simkins, Kathie Olivas, Give Up, plus many more. Music interviews by: Aesop Rock, Henry Rollins, GZA, Girl Talk, plus other. Art by: Damon Soule (cover artist), Failure, Blu, Reverend Butter, and much more. Music interviews by: Atmosphere, The Faint, Cut Copy, Sage Francis, Del the Funky Homosapien, B. Dolan Art by: Gary Baseman (cover artist), Matt Sharp, Bask, Jason Limon, Dual, The Death Head. Case Magazine official page Case Magazine myspace page
    8.00
    2 votes
    115
    Libertarian Forum

    Libertarian Forum

    The Libertarian Forum was a market anarchist journal published about twice a month from 1969 to 1984. Its editor and chief author was Murray Rothbard; initially, Karl Hess also served as Washington editor. Currently all the issues are available in the recopilatory book The Complete Libertarian Forum 1969–1984. The Libertarian Forum was created in 1969 after the demise of Left and Right: A Journal of Libertarian Thought to support anarcho-capitalism. The focus of the journal was on "substantive theoretical contributions, commentaries on politics, details of disputes and arguments within the libertarian movement, and forecasts on the future of liberty." The original publisher was Joseph R. Peden. The Libertarian Forum published several early incarnations of essays that would later be included as chapters in Walter Block's Defending the Undefendable. Originally titled The Libertarian, it was renamed The Libertarian Forum with the sixth issue. According to the journal, After we had launched The Libertarian, we discovered that a monthly mimeographed periodical with the same name emanating from New Jersey had been publishing for several years. To avoid confusion with this publication, we
    8.00
    2 votes
    116
    PC Magazine

    PC Magazine

    • Genre: Computer magazine
    PC Magazine (sometimes referred to as PC Mag) is a computer magazine published by Ziff Davis Publishing Holdings Inc. A print edition was published from 1982 to January 2009. Publication of online editions started in late 1994 and continue to present. The first issue of the magazine, dated February-March 1982, appeared as PC and described itself as "The Independent Guide to IBM Personal Computers". (The word Magazine was not added to the logo until the first major redesign in January 1986). PC Magazine was created by David Bunnell, Eddie Currie and Tony Gold, a co-founder of Lifeboat Associates who financed the magazine. The magazine grew beyond the capital required to publish it, and to solve this problem, Gold sold the magazine to Ziff-Davis who moved it to New York City, New York. Bunnell and his staff left to form PC World magazine. PC Magazine moved to biweekly publication in 1983 after a single monthly issue swelled to more than 800 pages. In January 2008 the magazine dropped back to monthly issues. Print circulation peaked at 1.2 million in the late 1990s. In November 2008 it was announced that the print edition would be discontinued as of the January 2009 issue, but the
    8.00
    2 votes
    117
    Simplicissimus

    Simplicissimus

    Simplicissimus was a satirical German weekly magazine started by Albert Langen in April 1896 and published until 1967, with a hiatus from 1944-1954. It became a biweekly in 1964. It took its name from the protagonist of Grimmelshausen's 1668 novel Der Abenteuerliche Simplicissimus Teutsch. Combining brash and politically daring content, with a bright, immediate, and surprisingly modern graphic style, Simplicissimus published the work of writers such as Thomas Mann and Rainer Maria Rilke. Its most reliable targets for caricature were stiff Prussian military figures, and rigid German social and class distinctions as seen from the more relaxed, liberal atmosphere of Munich. Contributors included Hermann Hesse, Gustav Meyrink, Fanny zu Reventlow, Jakob Wassermann, Frank Wedekind, Heinrich Kley, Alfred Kubin, Otto Nückel, Robert Walser, Heinrich Zille, Hugo von Hofmannsthal, Heinrich Mann and Erich Kästner. In 1898 Kaiser Wilhelm's objections to being ridiculed on the cover resulted in the magazine being suppressed. Langen, the publisher, spent five years' exile in Switzerland and was fined 30,000 German gold marks. A six-month prison sentence was given to the cartoonist Heine, and
    8.00
    2 votes
    118
    Computerra

    Computerra

    • Genre: Computer magazine
    Computerra (Russian: Компьюте́рра) was a Russian computer weekly publication. The first edition was released on December 21, 1992 and was published by C&C Computer Publishing Limited (Computerra Publishing House). Later, it received the online counterpart at [www.computerra.ru], which supplements the contents of the publication; due to the financial problems and lack of advertisement material, the issue 811-812 on December 15, 2009 was announced as the last issue to be published offline, with only the online version remaining active. The last issue cover lacks a usual cover image, with only the black rectangle instead and the words roughly translatable as "now you can shut down your computerra", as a pun on the shutdown image of Windows 95. Founder was Dmitriy Mendrelyuk. There are some other magazines founded by him like Business-Journal (Russian: Би́знес-Журна́л). The typical audience of Computerra magazine includes the working men 25–34 years old, who have high social status, high or medium income level, and use computers. The difference of "Computerra" from the most of other computer magazines is that this magazine not only writes about computer hardware and software, but
    9.00
    1 votes
    119
    Diplo magazine

    Diplo magazine

    Diplo was an international affairs magazine. It used graphic design as a medium to explore international affairs. It is inactive as of March 2007. Diplo was founded in 2004. Based in a warehouse in central London, the mag was launched in June of that year. The aim was to offer a politics magazine for the Wallpaper* generation - one that would unite people interested in both graphic design and international affairs.
    9.00
    1 votes
    120
    Le Rire

    Le Rire

    • Genre: Humor magazine
    Le Rire ("Laughter") was a successful French humor magazine published from October 1894 through the 1950s. Founded in Paris during the Belle Époque by Felix Juven, Le Rire appeared as typical Parisians began to achieve more education, income and leisure time. Interest in the arts, culture and politics intensified during the Gay Nineties. Publications like this helped satisfy such curiosity. It was the most successful of all the "Journaux Humoristiques." The Dreyfus Affair occurred in 1894 and Le Rire was one of many publications to tap anti-Republican sentiment in wake of that scandal. It was a time in which French governance was frequently characterized by corruption and mismanagement. Government ministers and military officials became frequent targets. The satirical journal was filled with excellent drawings by prominent artists. It featured full-page chromotypographs on both covers and in the centerfold. Many of these pieces are now highly desirable collectibles. The most prominent contributor was Théophile Steinlen. His illustrations were biting caricatures of the political "jackasses" of the day. Illustrations were contributed by well-known artists such as Henri de
    9.00
    1 votes
    121
    Literary Digest

    Literary Digest

    The Literary Digest was an influential general interest weekly magazine published by Funk & Wagnalls. Founded by Isaac Kaufmann Funk in 1890, it eventually merged with two similar weekly magazines, Public Opinion and Current Opinion. Beginning with early issues, the emphasis was on opinion articles and an analysis of news events. Established as a weekly newsmagazine, it offered condensations of articles from American, Canadian and European publications. Type-only covers gave way to illustrated covers during the early 1900s. After Isaac Funk's death in 1912, Robert Joseph Cuddihy became the editor. In the 1920s, the covers carried full-color reproductions of famous paintings. By 1927, The Literary Digest climbed to a circulation of over one million. Covers of the final issues displayed various photographic and photo-montage techniques. In 1938, it merged with the Review of Reviews, only to fail soon after. Its subscriber list was bought by Time. A column in the Digest, known as "The Lexicographer's Easy Chair", was produced by Frank Horace Vizetelly. The Literary Digest is best-remembered today for the circumstances surrounding its demise. As it had done in 1920, 1924, 1928 and
    9.00
    1 votes
    122
    New York

    New York

    New York is a weekly magazine principally concerned with the life, culture, politics, and style of New York City. Founded by Milton Glaser and Clay Felker in 1968 as a competitor to The New Yorker, it was brasher and less polite than that magazine, and established itself as a cradle of New Journalism. The magazine has, as a rule, published fewer national and more urban-tabloid stories than its sometime rival, but has also freely veered outside the city's borders, publishing many noteworthy articles on American culture by writers such as Tom Wolfe, Jimmy Breslin, Nora Ephron, Kurt Andersen and John Heilemann. In its current incarnation under editor-in-chief Adam Moss, "The nation's best and most-imitated city magazine is often not about the city—at least not in the overcrowded, traffic-clogged, five-boroughs sense," wrote Washington Post media critic Howard Kurtz, as the magazine has increasingly published political and cultural stories of national significance. Since its 2004 redesign and relaunch the magazine has won more National Magazine Awards than any other publication. It was one of the first city magazines, and one of the first dual-audience "lifestyle magazines," and its
    9.00
    1 votes
    123
    Spacing

    Spacing

    Spacing is a three-times-yearly magazine published in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Focusing on issues affecting Toronto's public realm, Spacing was originally published by the Toronto Public Space Committee in house until it was spun off as a wholly independent magazine after the first issue. Launched in December 2003, the magazine has been critically acclaimed by Toronto Star, The Globe and Mail, the National Post and Utne Reader magazine, the latter of which nominated Spacing the best new title at its annual independent magazine awards in 2004, and nominated the magazine again in 2006 for Best Local Coverage and Best Design. In 2006, Spacing won a Canadian National Magazine Award for "Best Editorial Package" for the 'History of our Future' issue. Noteworthy Toronto photographers, Matt O'Sullivan, Rannie Turingan, Miles Storey and Sam Javanrouh, are known for the street-scene photos featured in Spacing issues. Past Spacing issues have focused on pedestrians in public space, street postering, public art, and public transit, the future plans for the city that were never developed, the top 10 public space issues for the 2006 municipal elections, and profiles of Toronto's intersections.
    9.00
    1 votes
    124
    The Adventist Review

    The Adventist Review

    The Adventist Review is the semi-official newsmagazine of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. Commonly known as the Review, it is published weekly by the Review and Herald Publishing Association. The Review and Herald also publishes a sister magazine, Adventist World. The current editor of the Adventist Review is Bill Knott. The magazine currently has nearly 30,000 paying subscribers. Its library reference number is OCLC 9572173. The Adventist Review was founded by James and Ellen White in July 1849 as The Present Truth, but the name was changed to The Advent Review and then Second Advent Review and Sabbath Herald (with variations) after being combined with the Sabbath Herald publication. The name was changed to Adventist Review in 1978. Throughout its history it has been commonly referred to as the Review. It is known that for certain copies of the earliest issues, 1000 or 2000 copies were printed. In the 1940s paid circulation passed 40,000; and exceeded 50,000 in the 1950s. In 1963 the circulation reached 96,000, but has since diminished. In January 1994 circulation was 250,000 for the first issue of each month, and 40,000 for other issues. During the 1990s the magazine rotated
    9.00
    1 votes
    125
    Yukthivadi

    Yukthivadi

    Yukthivadi (The Rationalist) was the first rationalist/atheist journal published in Malayalam. The contribution made by Yukthivadi to the renaissance of Kerala, India is phenomenal. Yukthivadi started its publication in August 1929 from Ernakulam under the editorial board of M. Ramavarma Thampan, C. Krishnan, C. V. Kunhiraman, Sahodaran Ayyappan and M.C. Joseph. In a statement published in the first issue of Yukthivadi, Sahodaran K. Ayyappan wrote: In spite of the fact that all of the editorial board members were well known social activists, the conservative Kerala welcomed its publication with the expected derision. Even such a well known personality as Moorkoth Kumaran did not hesitate to pen a poem denigrating the publishers. Not surprisingly, a meeting of a religious sect passed a resolution cursing the publishers of Yukthivadi'! In August 1931 M.C.Joseph became its sole editor-publisher and shifted the publication to Irinjalakkuda. For the next forty five years until June 1974 M.C.Joseph brought out the magazine without any interruption. In July 1974, because of his failing health (he was 87 then), he handed over the magazine to Unni Kakkanad, who published it for yet another
    9.00
    1 votes
    126
    Aesthetica magazine

    Aesthetica magazine

    • Genre: Literary magazine
    Aesthetica is a British arts and culture magazine. Founded in 2002, Aesthetica Magazine covers literature, visual arts, music, film and theatre. It has 60,000 readers and national and international distribution. Cherie Federico, managing editor of Aesthetica was appointed a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts. Aesthetica was founded by Cherie Federico and Dale Donley, when they were students at York St John: A College of the University of Leeds (now York St John University) in 2002.
    6.67
    3 votes
    127
    In These Times

    In These Times

    • Genre: News magazine
    In These Times is a politically progressive/social democratic monthly magazine of news and opinion published by the Institute for Public Affairs in Chicago. In These Times was established as a broadsheet format fortnightly newspaper in 1976 by James Weinstein, a lifelong socialist, with the aid of prominent intellectuals such as Noam Chomsky, Herbert Marcuse, and Julian Bond. It investigates alleged corporate and government wrongdoing, covers international affairs, and has a cultural section. It regularly reports on environmental issues, feminism, grassroots democracy, minority communities, progressive ideals and the media. In These Times founding editor and publisher was James Weinstein; its current editor and publisher is Joel Bleifuss. It has a circulation of over 18,000 (2011). As a nonprofit organization, the magazine is financed through subscriptions and donations. In 1976 historian and former editor of Studies on the Left, James Weinstein (1926–2005) launched the politically progressive journal In These Times. He sought to model the newsweekly on the early 20th century socialist paper the Appeal to Reason. "We intend to speak to corporate capitalism as the great issue of our
    6.67
    3 votes
    128
    Life Magazine

    Life Magazine

    • Genre: News magazine
    Life is the title of a number of American magazines: The Life founded in 1883 was similar to Puck and was published for 53 years as a general-interest light entertainment magazine, heavy on illustrations, jokes and social commentary. It featured some of the greatest writers, editors and cartoonists of its era, including Charles Dana Gibson, Norman Rockwell, and Harry Oliver. During its later years, this magazine offered brief capsule reviews (similar to those in The New Yorker) of plays and movies currently running in New York City, but with the innovative touch of a colored typographic bullet appended to each review, resembling a traffic light: green for a positive review, red for a negative one, amber for mixed notices. The Luce Life was the first all-photographic American news magazine, and it dominated the market for more than 40 years. The magazine sold more than 13.5 million copies a week at one point and was so popular that President Harry S. Truman, Sir Winston Churchill and General Douglas MacArthur all serialized their memoirs in its pages. Luce purchased the rights to the name from the publishers of the first Life but sold its subscription list and features to another
    6.67
    3 votes
    129
    The American Jewess

    The American Jewess

    The American Jewess (1895–1899) described itself as "the only magazine in the world devoted to the interests of Jewish women." It was the first English-language periodical targeted to American Jewish women, covering an evocative range of topics that ranged from women's place in the synagogue to whether women should ride bicycles. Founded and edited by Rosa Sonneschein (1847–1932), it offered the first sustained critique, by Jewish women, of gender inequities in Jewish worship and communal life. Assembled and digitized for online access by the Jewish Women's Archive, 8 volumes of The American Jewess were assembled from the collections of Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion Klau Library, Brandeis University Libraries, the Library of Congress, and the Jewish Women's Archive.
    6.67
    3 votes
    130
    The Century Magazine

    The Century Magazine

    • Genre: Literary magazine
    The Century Magazine was first published in the United States in 1881 by The Century Company of New York City as a successor to Scribner's Monthly Magazine. It ceased publication in 1930. In 1921, The Cambridge History of English and American Literature summarized the early history of the magazine: The magazine was very successful during the 19th century, most notably for the aforementioned series of articles about the American Civil War, which ran for three years during the 1880s. It included reminiscences of 230 participants from all ranks of the service on both sides of the conflict. It was also a notable publisher of fiction, presenting three excerpts of Mark Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn in 1884 and 1885. Due to competition from cheaper magazines and newspapers, the magazine's circulation gradually declined. In 1929, The Century became a quarterly, and in 1930 it was merged with The Forum. However, its reprieve was short-lived; The Forum ceased publication at the end of that same year. The noted critic and editor Frank Crowninshield briefly served as its art editor. Pulp magazine author Ellis Parker Butler contributed 30 stories, articles and poems to The Century
    6.67
    3 votes
    131
    The Occult Review

    The Occult Review

    The Occult Review was a British illustrated monthly magazine published between 1905 and 1951 containing articles and correspondence by many notable occultists and authors of the day, including Aleister Crowley, Meredith Starr, Walter Leslie Wilmshurst, Arthur Edward Waite, Franz Hartmann, Florence Farr, and Paul Brunton. Edited by Ralph Shirley and published in London by William Rider and Son, LTD. (later Rider & Company), it is said to have been devoted to the investigation of supernormal phenomena and the study of psychological problems. It was published under different names from 1905 to 1951. From September 1933 to April 1938 it was published as The London Forum. In January 1936 it semi-reverted back to The Occult Review (incorporating the "London Forum") as a quarterly, but then reassumed its original title in its July 1938 issue.
    6.67
    3 votes
    132
    Auto Atlantic

    Auto Atlantic

    • Genre: Automobile magazine
    Auto Atlantic is an Atlantic Canada-based automotive industry magazine. Auto Atlantic magazine is based in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. Published six times per year, and distributed to 8000 subscribers mainly in the four Atlantic provinces (with additional distribution to the rest of Canada and the United States. Auto Atlantic is owned and published by Robert Alfers, who founded the magazine in 2002. The magazine's editorial serves all the segments of the automotive industries audience in Atlantic Canada - from installers to jobbers, garages, retailers, auto recyclers, car and truck dealers, etc. Contributing writers are experienced and very well respected in their field. Auto Atlantic publishes a wide variety of subjects that cover popular interests from local, regional, national and international stages. However the main focus of the publication has always been to inform, and assist, the business owner, manager or mechanic.
    5.75
    4 votes
    133
    BBC Gardeners' World

    BBC Gardeners' World

    BBC Gardeners' World is a British gardening magazine owned by BBC Worldwide containing tips for gardening from past and current presenters of the television series Gardeners' World. The magazine often has offers on plants, free supplements and giveaways. Copies are sold at newsagents and by subscription. Contributors have included: 265,328 A trade show and floral exhibition, Gardeners' World Live, promoted by the magazine, is held every June at the National Exhibition Centre near Birmingham. Presenters from the show usually make guest appearances.
    5.75
    4 votes
    134
    Garden Railways

    Garden Railways

    Garden Railways is a bi-monthly American magazine about the hobby of running large-scale trains outdoors, also called garden railroading. Published since 1984, it is the world's largest-circulation magazine on that subject. Each issue features hobby news, product reviews, how-to articles, featured railroads, and much more. Garden Railways magazine began publication in 1984 by Sidestreet Bannerworks. The magazine evolved from the company's newsletter, the Sidestreet Banner, which dealt primarily with the small scale live-steam locomotives that the company was importing at that time. Marc Horovitz was the Editor and Barbara Horovitz the Horticultural Editor. The first issues of Garden Railways (GR) were published in black-and-white. Text was generated on a typewriter. In 1985, a primitive IBM computer and a daisy-wheel printer were acquired, which allowed text to be printed out in justified columns. These columns, printed out in strips, were then pasted up by hand in the old-fashion way. Petria MacDonnell joined GR's staff at the beginning of 1986 as the magazine's first gardening editor, later succeeded by Chip Rosenblum, Barbara Abler, and Don Parker. Among the regular contributors
    5.75
    4 votes
    135
    Acta Eruditorum

    Acta Eruditorum

    • Genre: Science magazine
    Acta Eruditorum (Latin for "reports/acts of the scholars") was the first scientific journal of the German lands, published from 1682 to 1782. It was founded in 1682 in Leipzig by Otto Mencke, who became its first editor, and Gottfried Leibniz. It was published by Johann Friedrich Gleditsch, and patterned after the French Journal des savants and Italian Giornale de'letterati. Acta Eruditorum was a monthly edited in Latin language and contained excerpts from new writings, reviews, small essays and notes. Most of them were devoted to the natural sciences and mathematics. Since its inception many eminent scientists published there – apart from Leibniz, e.g., Isaac Newton, Jakob Bernoulli, Humphry Ditton, Leonhard Euler, Ehrenfried Walther von Tschirnhaus, Pierre-Simon Laplace and Jérôme Lalande but also humanists and philosophers as Veit Ludwig von Seckendorff, Stephan Bergler, Christian Thomasius and Christian Wolff. After Otto Mencke's death Acta Eruditorum were directed by his son, Johann Burckhardt Mencke, who died in 1732. The magazine changed its name by then and was called Nova Acta Eruditorum. Since 1754 it was led by Karl Andreas Bel.
    7.50
    2 votes
    136
    Computeractive

    Computeractive

    • Genre: Computer magazine
    Computeractive (sometimes written as Computeract!ve, to reflect the logo) is a fortnightly computer magazine published by Incisive Media in the United Kingdom. It was first published in February 1998 by VNU Business Publications, which was bought by Incisive Media in 2007. Its sister magazine is The Ultimate Guide series. Based on fortnightly sales, confirmed by the UK's Audit Bureau of Circulation, Computeractive is the UK's best-selling computer magazine. The iPad app version of the magazine was launched in January 2012. An ebook version of Computeractive is provided by Zmags, although purchasers cannot read the magazine offline. The magazine is split into three main sections:
    7.50
    2 votes
    137
    Cornhill Magazine

    Cornhill Magazine

    • Genre: Literary magazine
    The Cornhill Magazine was a Victorian magazine and literary journal named after Cornhill Street in London. Cornhill was founded by George Murray Smith in 1859 and was published until 1975. It was a literary journal with a selection of articles on diverse subjects and serialisations of new novels. Smith hoped to gain some of the same readership enjoyed by All the Year Round, a similar magazine owned by Charles Dickens, and he employed as editor William Thackeray, Dickens' great literary rival at the time. The magazine was phenomenally successful, selling many more issues than anyone had thought likely, but within a few years circulation dropped rapidly. It also gained a reputation for rather safe, inoffensive content in the late Victorian era. A mark of the high regard in which it was held was its publication of Leaves from the Journal of our Life in the Highlands by Queen Victoria. The stories were often illustrated and it contained works from some of the foremost artists of the time including: George du Maurier, Edwin Landseer, Frederic Leighton, and John Everett Millais. Some of its subsequent editors included G. H. Lewes, Leslie Stephen, Ronald Gorell Barnes, James Payn, Peter
    7.50
    2 votes
    138
    Loaded

    Loaded

    • Genre: Men's magazine
    Loaded, first published in 1994, is a British magazine for men that is considered to be the "original lads' mag". Its motto is "For men who should know better". At its peak in the late 1990s it sold over 450,000 copies each month, but by 2012 had collapsed to below 35,000. Loaded was founded in 1994 by Mick Bunnage, Tim Southwell and James Brown, a former deputy editor of the music weekly New Musical Express. It was first published by IPC. The title of the magazine is believed to be named after the Primal Scream song of the same name. In its early days, the magazine's readership was once memorably described as "50% Sun readers and 50% Guardian readers". Brown has described the irreverent comic Viz as an inspiration for Loaded (and he later bought the comic when he founded the company I Feel Good). Brown's fanzine Attack On Bzag can be seen as a precursor for Loaded, as can music journalist John Robb's Rox fanzine, which heavily influenced Brown and Loaded with its frenetic style and humorous use of captioned photos. Commenting on the magazine's creation, Brown said, "I was told you need 99 straight guys and one weirdo to make a magazine. I did it the other way, I chose 99 weirdos."
    7.50
    2 votes
    139
    Mean Machines

    Mean Machines

    Mean Machines was a market-leading multi-format gaming magazine released between 1990 and 1992 in the United Kingdom. Its style was popular with gamers of the time for its humor, editorial tone and style, and its sometimes outspoken reviews. In the late 1980s Computer and Video Games (CVG) was largely covering the outgoing generation of 8-bit computers like the Commodore 64, ZX Spectrum, Amstrad CPC and newly-emerging 16-bit computers (the Atari ST and Commodore Amiga). However, the popularity of 8-bit computers was fading, the new generation of computers were expensive, and it quickly became apparent that CVG needed a new angle to help maintain its appeal to gamers. Julian Rignall built upon an idea first conceived by C+VG contributor Tony Takoushi and launched a consoles-oriented section of the magazine called Mean Machines. The inaugural section was featured in the October 1987 issue of the magazine and largely covered games on 8-bit games systems like the Nintendo Entertainment System and Sega's Master System. More importantly, however, it included features on newly-emerging Japanese-only videogame systems such as the NEC and PC Engine. These new machines piqued the interest of
    7.50
    2 votes
    140
    Mojo

    Mojo

    • Genre: Music magazine
    MOJO is a popular music magazine published initially by Emap, and since January 2008 by Bauer, monthly in the United Kingdom. Following the success of the magazine Q, publishers Emap were looking for a title which would cater for the burgeoning interest in classic rock music. MOJO was first published on 15 October 1993; in keeping with its classic rock aesthetic, the first issue had Bob Dylan and John Lennon as its first cover stars. Noted for its in-depth coverage of both popular and cult acts it acted as the inspiration for Blender and Uncut. Many noted music critics have written for it including Charles Shaar Murray, Greil Marcus, Nick Kent and Jon Savage. The launch editor of MOJO was Paul Du Noyer and his successors have included Mat Snow, Paul Trynka and Pat Gilbert. While some criticise it for its frequent coverage of classic rock acts such as The Beatles and Bob Dylan, it has nevertheless featured many newer and "left-field" acts. It was the first mainstream magazine in the UK to focus on The White Stripes, whom it has covered as zealously as many older acts. MOJO regularly includes a covermount CD which ties in with a current magazine article or theme. In 2004 it
    7.50
    2 votes
    141
    Nyugat

    Nyugat

    • Genre: Literary magazine
    Nyugat (lit. "West" in English, pronounced similar to New-Got), was the most influential Hungarian literary journal in the first half of the 20th century. Writers and poets from that era are referred to as "1st/2nd/3rd generation of the NYUGAT". It was founded in 1908 and initially edited by Ignotus (Hugo Veigelsberg), Ernő Osvát, and Miksa Fenyő. It was receptive and inspired by the styles and philosophies then current in Western Europe, including naturalism, Symbolism, and impressionism. Nyugat published both poetry and prose writing. The first generation included the poets Endre Ady, Árpád Tóth, Mihály Babits, Dezső Kosztolányi, Gyula Juhász, Géza Gyóni and the novelists Gyula Krúdy and Zsigmond Móricz. During World War I, Nyugat, challenged by leftist literary circles, became frustrated and depressed about the war. The second generation of NYUGAT writers in the twenties - such as Lőrinc Szabó, József Fodor and György Sárközi - displayed post-expressionist tendencies. Poets of this generation included Attila József, Gyula Illyés, Miklós Radnóti and József Erdélyi. Prose writer Sándor Márai wrote family sagas and about social change. László Németh and Tibor Déry were also
    7.50
    2 votes
    142
    Quarterly Review

    Quarterly Review

    The Quarterly Review was a literary and political periodical founded in March 1809 by the well known London publishing house John Murray. It ceased publication in 1967. Initially, the Quarterly was set up primarily to counter the influence on public opinion of the Edinburgh Review. Its first editor, William Gifford, was appointed by George Canning, at the time Foreign Secretary, later Prime Minister. Early contributors included the Secretaries of the Admiralty John Wilson Croker and Sir John Barrow, the Poet Laureate Robert Southey, the poet-novelist Sir Walter Scott, the Italian exile Ugo Foscolo, the Gothic novelist Charles Robert Maturin, and the essayist Charles Lamb. Under Gifford, the journal took the Canningite liberal-conservative position on matters of domestic and foreign policy, if only inconsistently. It opposed major political reforms, but it supported the gradual abolition of slavery, moderate law reform, humanitarian treatment of criminals and the insane, and the liberalizing of trade. In a series of brilliant articles, in its pages Southey advocated a progressive philosophy of social reform. Because two of his key writers, Scott and Southey, were opposed to Catholic
    7.50
    2 votes
    143
    The Fader

    The Fader

    The FADER, or FADER, is a United States-based music-culture-fashion publication that covers hip hop, reggae, independent rock, pop and dance music from around the world. Founded by Rob Stone and Jon Cohen in 1998, The FADER is an independent Manhattan-based magazine which the New York Times dubbed "the new music-and-fashion bible". The magazine's editorial content focuses on music, style, art and culture. Led by president and publisher Andy Cohn, The Fader has won multiple awards for its arts coverage and online presence and within the genre of consumer entertainment. Among them was the FOLIO magazine Gold Eddie award for "Best Consumer Entertainment Magazine" in 2008. It was also the first print publication to be released on iTunes. FADER TV won Clicker awards in 2009 and 2010, and the magazine won two OMMA awards for integrated marketing campaigns in 2010 with Nike and Levi's. Stone and Cohen also founded the ad agency Cornerstone. The FADER Media Network includes The FADER magazine, thefader.com, FADER films, FADER label, FADER TV, which has been called one of the definitive voices on both mainstream and fringe music, rcrdlbl.com, XLR8R, XLR8R.com, thetripwire.com,
    7.50
    2 votes
    144
    The Skinny

    The Skinny

    • Genre: Listings magazine
    The Skinny is a 72 page, monthly publication distributed in approximately 600 establishments throughout the cities of Aberdeen, Dundee, Edinburgh, Glasgow and the region of Fife in Scotland. Founded in 2005, the magazine features interviews and articles on music, art, film, comedy and other aspects of Scottish culture. The Skinny was founded and launched in 2005 as a free Edinburgh and Glasgow listings magazine. From the outset, the magazine secured interviews with high-profile music acts, including Mogwai, Pearl Jam, GZA and Muse. In August 2006, The Skinny formed a partnership with established Edinburgh Festival magazine Fest. The first year of this partnership saw the publication renamed "SkinnyFest", before it reverted back to the title "Fest" in 2007. In May 2007, The Skinny started to distribute in Dundee in a move that was presented as the first step in a plan to distribute Scotland-wide. The Skinny was originally set up as a social enterprise and sustained this way of working until July 2007, when it became a private company limited by shares in order to take on new investment. In September 2007, The Skinny printed a Student Guide. The guide was distributed through a number
    7.50
    2 votes
    145
    Nintendo Power

    Nintendo Power

    • Genre: Computer magazine
    Nintendo Power magazine is a monthly news and strategy magazine formerly published in-house by Nintendo of America, but now runs independently. As of issue #222 (December 2007), Nintendo contracted publishing duties to Future US, the U.S. subsidiary of British publisher Future. The first issue published was July/August 1988 spotlighting the NES game Super Mario Bros. 2. It remains one of the longest-running video game magazines in the United States and Canada, and was Nintendo's official magazine in North America. On August 21, 2012, Nintendo announced that they would not be renewing their licensing agreement with Future Publishing, and that Nintendo Power would cease publication after 24 years. From the beginning, Nintendo Power has focused heavily on providing game strategy, tips and tricks, reviews, and previews of upcoming games. Seeing as the magazine enjoyed twenty years of Nintendo-directed publication, NP was the ultimate source for detailed mapping and insider knowledge delivered directly from the programming teams. As a result, the magazine has enjoyed the reputation of being the definitive source for all things Nintendo, separating itself from a more traditionally
    5.50
    4 votes
    146
    $pread magazine

    $pread magazine

    • Genre: Trade journal
    $pread Magazine was an independent magazine by and for sex workers and those who support their rights. Articles were written by readers as well as by figures from academic, cultural, and literary backgrounds, most of whom are current or former sex workers. The magazine was launched on March 15, 2005 by Rachel Aimee, Rebecca Lynn, and Raven Strega. By the end of its first year, the quarterly magazine had received the Utne Independent Press Award for "Best New Title". As of August 30, 2010, $pread has ceased printed publication due to both financial issues and not having enough people to keep the operation running, even if "there was $100k made available." A co-editor has said, "We want the general public to become aware of issues such as the physical working conditions of sex workers and their health care and housing needs, and to start considering sex workers as real people rather than mythical beasts who only come to life when someone drops a quarter into a slot." $pread had a focus on personal experiences and political insights and contains practical information such as news, features, health columns, and resources related to the sex industry. $pread supports the sex work
    6.33
    3 votes
    147
    Alternative Ulster

    Alternative Ulster

    AU (formerly Alternative Ulster) is a magazine written, designed and published in Belfast, Northern Ireland. Although predominantly a music magazine, AU covers other aspects of popular culture, such as movies, comics, games and the arts. The magazine was launched in June 2003. Alternative Ulster (named after a song by Stiff Little Fingers) started life in March 2002 as a radio show on Belfast community station Northern Visions, as well as a website. Early the following year, a prototype 'Issue Zero' was launched, promising to provide "the best reportage from the local world and beyond." Local band Therapy?, headlined the official launch party in the Mandela Hall on the 6th of June 2003. In 2004, the magazine won Magazine of the Year. The magazine underwent a massive redesign and relaunch in February 2007, when the name officially changed from Alternative Ulster to AU. Though it continues to cover the best in Northern Irish music, the name change reflects the wider scope that the magazine now has. The very best Irish acts sit side-by-side with the best in alternative music from around the world. During 2007, cover stars included Bright Eyes, The Gossip, Biffy Clyro, LCD Soundsystem,
    6.33
    3 votes
    148
    Beyond Fantasy Fiction

    Beyond Fantasy Fiction

    • Issues: Beyond Fantasy Fiction, July 1953
    • Genre: Fantasy fiction magazines
    Beyond Fantasy Fiction was a US fantasy fiction magazine edited by H. L. Gold, with only ten issues published from 1953 to 1955. The last two issues carried the cover title of Beyond Fiction, but the publication's name for copyright purposes remained as before. Although not a commercial success, it included several significant short stories by distinguished authors, such as Isaac Asimov, Ray Bradbury and Philip K. Dick. The publication has been described by critics as a successor to the tradition of Unknown, a fantasy magazine that ceased publication in 1943. It was noted for printing fantasy with a rational basis such as werewolf stories that included scientific explanations. A selection of stories from Beyond was published in paperback form in 1963, also under the title Beyond. James Gunn, a historian of science fiction, regarded the magazine as the best of the fantasy magazines launched in the early 1950s, and science fiction encyclopedist Donald H. Tuck contended it printed very good material. Not every critic viewed Beyond as completely successful, however; P. Schuyler Miller, in a 1963 review, commented that the stories were most successful when they did not try to emulate
    6.33
    3 votes
    149
    British Chess Magazine

    British Chess Magazine

    British Chess Magazine is the world's oldest chess journal in continuous publication. First published in January 1881, it has appeared at monthly intervals ever since. It is frequently known in the chess world as BCM. The founder and first general editor of the magazine was John Watkinson (1833–1923). He had previously edited the Huddersfield College Magazine, which was the British Chess Magazine's forerunner. From the beginning, the magazine was devoted to the coverage of chess worldwide, and not just in Great Britain. BCM is an independent and privately owned magazine; it is not owned or run by the former British Chess Federation (now the English Chess Federation), with which its name was occasionally confused, apart from the period August 1981–July 1992.
    6.33
    3 votes
    150
    Sentimentalist Magazine

    Sentimentalist Magazine

    Sentimentalist Magazine is an American magazine of indie rock music and culture, published quarterly. Launched in New York City in 2001 as The Sentimentalist, it changed its title to The Sentimentalist Magazine with Issue 14, and then dropped the definite article from Issue 16. As of January 2008, the magazine has been relaunched as an online only publication. It continues to publish "magazine covers" with each monthly online issue. Sentimentalist Magazine was started as an indie music and culture print magazine to scratch deep beneath the surface and seek out the best in emerging music, culture and media entertainment. Voted as PLUG Awards nominee in the Media (obsessive) category "Zine of the Year" in 2007 and again in 2008, subjects range from undiscovered bands and talent to the brightest and best. As of Jan. 2008, Sentimentalist Magazine was relaunched as an online-only magazine, giving its readers an expanded, constantly updated version of the original magazine, in a fresh web format. Sentimentalist Magazine continues to be a compelling option to the more corporate music magazines, blogs and sites in the market, constantly discovering and investigating the freshest new bands
    6.33
    3 votes
    151
    Southern Literary Messenger

    Southern Literary Messenger

    • Genre: Literary magazine
    The Southern Literary Messenger was a periodical published in Richmond, Virginia, from 1834 until June 1864. Each issue carried a subtitle of "Devoted to Every Department of Literature and the Fine Arts" or some variation and included poetry, fiction, non-fiction, reviews, and historical notes. It was founded by Thomas Willis White who served as publisher and occasional editor until his death in 1843. White hired Edgar Allan Poe in 1835 as a staff writer and critic. Others involved with the periodical included Matthew Fontaine Maury and Maury's kinsman Benjamin Blake Minor. It ended in June 1864 in part due to Richmond's involvement in the American Civil War. The Southern Literary Messenger first appeared in August 1834 with Thomas Willis White as publisher. In the inaugural issue Willis stated that his aim was "to stimulate the pride and genius of the south, and awaken from its long slumber the literary exertion of this portion of our country." This was in reference to the fact that at the time most magazines were published in Boston, New York and Philadelphia. Edgar Allan Poe served as an editor for a time (see below). After his departure, White resumed editorial duties before
    6.33
    3 votes
    152
    Tinkle

    Tinkle

    Tinkle is an Indian monthly magazine, published mainly in India. Originally owned by the India Book House, the Tinkle brand was acquired by ACK Media in 2007. The Magazine contains comics, stories, puzzles, quizzes, contests and other features targeted at school children, although its readership includes many adults as well. It is published in English and syndicated in many Indian languages like Malayalam. Anant Pai, the founding editor of the magazine, is known to his readers as Uncle Pai. He has also launched the popular Amar Chitra Katha series. The first issue was launched in April 1980. More than 500 issues have been printed so far. The magazine carries comic stories and regular columns of interest to school children. Tinkle enjoys great popularity, and has been an integral part of growing up in India in the last two decades. Characters like Suppandi and Shikari Shambu that appeared first in the pages of the magazine have nationwide recognition. Readers send more than 200 letters with stories and other features to be considered for printing in the magazine. The wholesome combination of educational and entertainment that defines Tinkle has many celebrity fans in India,
    6.33
    3 votes
    153
    Pen Pusher

    Pen Pusher

    • Genre: Literary magazine
    Pen Pusher is a London-based literary magazine, published three times a year, that features original short fiction, poetry, reviews, columns, literary facts and curiosities. Founded in January 2006 by Anna Goodall, Felicity Cloake and Hape Mueller, the first issue was published in April 2006. The magazine can currently be obtained at selected retailers in London and via the magazine's website. The magazine's office is in the Mildmay area of London. The Kaiser Chiefs' front man, Ricky Wilson, designed the magazine's emblem and was rewarded for his pains with the gift of an antique whistle as Pen Pusher's usual gift of thanks—a wheel of cheese—was unsuitable due to his dairy aversion. Pen Pusher provides a platform for new writing talent and welcomes submissions of reviews, features, short fiction and poetry. As well as championing new writing, the magazine features more well-known literary names. Recent contributors to the magazine include Simon Callow, Hugo Williams, Simon Munnery, Josie Long and John Hegley.
    8.00
    1 votes
    154
    Sovremennik

    Sovremennik

    • Genre: Literary magazine
    Sovremennik ("Современник", literally: The Contemporary) was a Russian literary, social and political magazine, published in St. Petersburg in 1836-1866. It came out four times a year in 1836-1843 and once a month after that. The magazine published poetry, prose, critical, historical, ethnographic, and other material. Sovremennik originated as a private enterprise of Alexander Pushkin who was running out of money to support his growing family. To assist him with the magazine, the poet asked Nikolai Gogol, Pyotr Vyazemsky and Vladimir Odoyevsky to contribute their works to the journal. It was there that the first substantial assortment of Fyodor Tyutchev's poems was published. Soon it became clear that Pushkin's establishment could not compete with Faddey Bulgarin's journal, which published more popular and less demanding literature. Sovremennik was out of date and could not command a paying audience. When Pushkin died, his friend Pyotr Pletnyov took over the editorship in 1838. A few years later the magazine fell into decline, and Pletnyov handed it over to Nikolay Nekrasov and Ivan Panaev in 1847. It was Nekrasov who really made the magazine profitable. He enlisted the services of
    8.00
    1 votes
    155
    The Ayn Rand Letter

    The Ayn Rand Letter

    The Ayn Rand Letter was an Objectivist magazine published by author Ayn Rand from October 1971 to February 1976. It took the place of The Objectivist, which Rand had published previously. The Letter was produced in the style of a typewritten letter. It was usually four or six pages long with a single major article per issue. It was originally published fortnightly, and Rand wrote most of the articles herself, in addition to acting as editor and publisher. Leonard Peikoff served as a contributing editor and wrote the articles for six of the magazine's eighty-one issues. Beginning in 1973, outside circumstances began to cause delays in the magazine's production. In March 1973, Rand discovered that a sister she believed to have died was in fact still alive and in the Soviet Union. Rand worked hard to arrange a visit to the United States for her sister. When her sister finally arrived, their reunion turned into fighting over political and philosophical differences. As historian Robert Hessen described it, "This incident, stretching across eight months, took a heavy toll on her writing and publication schedule, which allocated no time for unexpected interruptions." Several issues of the
    8.00
    1 votes
    156
    Yale Literary Magazine

    Yale Literary Magazine

    • Genre: Literary magazine
    The Yale Literary Magazine, founded in 1836, is the oldest literary magazine in the United States and publishes poetry and fiction by Yale undergraduates twice per academic year. The magazine is published biannually. In recent years, it has conducted and published interviews with high-profile 20th and 21st-century literary figures such as Junot Diaz, who won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, Art Spiegelman, who won a Pulitzer Prize for his graphic novel memoir Maus, and Paul Muldoon, the poetry editor for The New Yorker, who won a Pulitzer Prize for Poetry.
    8.00
    1 votes
    157
    Star Trek Magazine

    Star Trek Magazine

    Star Trek Magazine is an authorized periodical published bi-monthly by Titan UK in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia and New Zealand, devoted to the Star Trek franchise. The magazine has limited distribution in Europe. In August 2006 the magazine began to be published in North America with issue 128 being issue 1 in the US version. Star Trek Magazine was the first regular magazine to be published by Titan Magazines and is its longest-running title. It was launched in March 1995 as Star Trek Monthly, soon after the first broadcast of Star Trek: Voyager. It dropped to bi-monthly release (but larger format) in 2004. With issue 143 (Mar/Apr 2009), the magazine will increase its output to eight issues a year. The contents listed below are intended as a general reference and are not exhaustive. Recent issues include columns by Star Trek insiders Dave Rossi and Larry Nemecek.
    5.25
    4 votes
    158
    African American Review

    African American Review

    • Genre: Literary magazine
    The African American Review is a quarterly academic journal and the official publication of the Division on Black American Literature and Culture of the Modern Language Association. The journal covers African-American literature and culture, including theatre, film, the visual arts, interviews, poetry, and fiction. Between 1967 and 1976, the journal appeared under the title Negro American Literature Forum and until 1992 as Black American Literature Forum before obtaining its current title.
    7.00
    2 votes
    159
    Azerbaijan International

    Azerbaijan International

    • Genre: World magazine
    Azerbaijan International is an independent magazine that discusses issues related to Azerbaijanis around the world. It was established in 1993 shortly after the dissolution of the Soviet Union when Azerbaijan gained its independence. Since then, it has been published quarterly in English with occasional articles in the Azerbaijani language in Latin and Arabic scripts. The magazine has offices in Los Angeles and Baku. Each issue includes about 100-colored pages and relates to a specific theme. Past themes have included art, music, literature, folklore, architecture, archeology, health, environment, international relations, business, trends and transitions.Its target audience is international readers in the business, diplomatic and academic communities. Several editions have been particularly noteworthy in the history of the magazine. These include research about the discovery and decipherment of the Caucasian Albanian (Old Udi alphabet) in Mount Sinai, Egypt, by Dr. Zaza Aleksidze, Folklore of the Sufi Hamid Cemetery, and the relationship of Maiden Tower to the Winter Solstice. Also the 2006 Tangaroa Pacific Voyage: "Testing Thor Heyerdahl's Theories about Kon-Tiki 60 Years Later."
    7.00
    2 votes
    160
    Cabinet

    Cabinet

    Cabinet is a quarterly, Brooklyn, NY-based, non-profit art & culture periodical launched in 2000. Cabinet also operates an event and exhibition space in Brooklyn. Cabinet issues are divided into three sections. Each issue begins with four of Cabinet's recurring columns. Some columns have (or have had) recurring writers. Some columns appear more frequently than others: The Main section features miscellaneous essays, interviews, and artist projects. The third, themed section features essays, interviews, and artist projects related to a specific theme. A theme-based CD is included in issues 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, and 13. Though Cabinet is commonly called "Cabinet magazine" and is distributed to newsstands as a magazine (with ISSN), individual Cabinet issues are also distributed as books (with ISBN). Each issue is printed in two editions: one with a magazine barcode on the front cover and the other with a book barcode on the back cover. The logo was designed by Richard Massey, and is derived from the fragmented elements and ligatures of an early twentieth century stencil often used in Le Corbusier’s architectural drawings and manifestos. In addition to publishing the quarterly, Cabinet
    7.00
    2 votes
    161
    National Geographic

    National Geographic

    National Geographic, formerly the National Geographic Magazine, is the official journal of the National Geographic Society. It published its first issue in 1888, just nine months after the Society itself was founded.There are 12 monthly issues of the National Geographic per year, plus additional map supplements. The Magazine is available in its traditional printed edition on paper, or through an interactive digital edition, available online. On occasion, special editions of the Magazine are issued. It contains articles about geography, popular science, history, culture, current events, and photography. In a National Geographic Press Release, it was announced that in late-2011 that the magazine was circulated worldwide in thirty-four language editions and had a global circulation of 8.2 million. In the United States, the circulation is around 5 million every month. In May 2007, 2008, and 2010 National Geographic magazine won the American Society of Magazine Editors' General Excellence Award in the over two million circulation category. In 2010, National Geographic Magazine received the top ASME awards for photojournalism and essay. In 2011, National Geographic Magazine received the
    7.00
    2 votes
    162
    Oz

    Oz

    • Genre: Political magazine
    Oz was first published as a satirical humour magazine between 1963 and 1969 in Sydney, Australia and, in its second and better known incarnation, became a "psychedelic hippy" magazine from 1967 to 1973 in London. Strongly identified as part of the underground press, it was the subject of two celebrated obscenity trials, one in Australia in 1964 and the other in the United Kingdom in 1971. On both occasions the magazine's editors were acquitted on appeal after initially being found guilty and sentenced to harsh jail terms. The central editor throughout the magazine's life was Richard Neville. Co-editors of the Sydney version were Richard Walsh and Martin Sharp. Co-editors of the London version were Jim Anderson and, later, Felix Dennis. Oz was parodied in the short-lived 1999 UK television series Hippies. Hippie Hippie Shake, a film based on Neville's memoir with Cillian Murphy in the lead role, will be released in 2011. The original Australian editorial team included university students Neville, Walsh and Sharp and Daily Mirror cadet journalist Peter Grose. Other early contributors included future Time magazine critic and art historian Robert Hughes, student and future author Bob
    7.00
    2 votes
    163
    Planet Stories

    Planet Stories

    • Issues: Planet Stories, Winter 1939
    • Genre: Science fiction magazine
    Planet Stories was an American pulp science fiction magazine, published by Fiction House between 1939 and 1955. It featured interplanetary adventures, both in space and on other planets, and was initially focused on a young readership. Malcolm Reiss was editor or editor-in-chief for all of its 71 issues. Planet Stories was launched at the same time as Planet Comics, the success of which probably helped to fund the early issues of Planet Stories. Planet did not pay well enough to regularly attract the leading science fiction writers of the day, but did manage to obtain work from well-known names on occasion, including Isaac Asimov and Clifford Simak. In 1952 Planet published Philip K. Dick's first sale, and went on to print four more of his stories over the next three years. The two writers most identified with Planet Stories are Leigh Brackett and Ray Bradbury, both of whom set many of their stories on a romanticized version of Mars that owed much to the depiction of Barsoom in the works of Edgar Rice Burroughs. Bradbury's work for Planet included an early story in his Martian Chronicles sequence. Brackett's best-known work for the magazine was a series of adventures featuring Eric
    7.00
    2 votes
    164
    Rail Magazine

    Rail Magazine

    RAIL is a UK magazine on the subject of current rail transport in Great Britain. It is published every two weeks by Bauer and is available in the transport sections of most British newsagents. It is targeted primarily at the enthusiast market (those whose hobby is railways, rather than their occupation), but also covers business issues, sometimes in depth. RAIL is more than three decades old, and was known as Rail Enthusiast from its launch in 1981 until 1988. In spite of falling circulation, it is still a widely-read title for enthusiasts and, to a lesser extent, those who work in the industry. It has had roughly the same cover design for at least a decade, with a capitalised italic red RAIL along the top of the front cover. RAIL is customarily critical of railway institutions, including the Health and Safety Executive, the former Strategic Rail Authority and the Office of Rail Regulation, as well as, since it assumed greater railway powers, the Department for Transport. The magazine's readership peaked in the late 1980s at around 45,000. Since then the market for rail magazines has declined, although more titles (e.g. Rail Express, Traction, Heritage Railways, Today's Railways
    7.00
    2 votes
    165
    Revue de Paris

    Revue de Paris

    • Genre: Literary magazine
    Revue de Paris was a French literary magazine founded in 1829 by Louis Desiré Veron.
    7.00
    2 votes
    166
    Road & Track

    Road & Track

    • Genre: Automobile magazine
    Road & Track is an American automotive enthusiast magazine. It is owned by Hearst Magazines, and is published monthly. The editorial offices are located in Newport Beach, California. Road & Track (often abbreviated R&T) was founded by two friends, Wilfred H. Brehaut, Jr. and Joseph S. Fennessy, in 1947, in Hempstead, New York. Published only six times from 1947 to 1949, it struggled in its early years. By 1952, regular contributor and editor John Bond had become the owner of the magazine, which then grew until its sale to CBS Publications in 1972. In 1988, Hachette Filipacchi Media took ownership of the magazine. In October 2008, Matt DeLorenzo became Editor-in-Chief, succeeding Thos L. Bryant, who had been in place for 20 years. Hearst Magazines purchased the magazine in 2011. In June 2012, Larry Webster assumed the role of Editor-in-Chief, and DeLorenzo became an adviser to the publication. Road & Track focuses on both production and race cars. Former race car drivers have often contributed material, including Paul Frère and Formula One champion Phil Hill. Gordon Murray, the designer of the McLaren F1, is one of many contributing writers to be featured in the publication. Like
    7.00
    2 votes
    167
    Shōnen Big Comic

    Shōnen Big Comic

    Weekly Shōnen Big Comic (週刊少年ビッグコミック, Shūkan Shōnen Biggu Komikku) was a bi-weekly manga magazine published by Shogakukan in Japan from 1979 to 1987. From 1976 to 1979, the magazine was titled Manga-kun (マンガくん) before being renamed Shōnen Big Comics in 1979. In 1987, the magazine changed format and was renamed Weekly Young Sunday. The magazine is aimed at teens and a generally older audience than another of Shogakukan's manga magazines, Weekly Shōnen Sunday. Several of the manga series appearing in Weekly Shōnen Big Comic have been adapted into one or more anime TV or OVA series, including Esper Mami, Area 88, and Miyuki. Series marked with a ♣ appeared in the first issue. The magazine also featured a non-manga column titled Moving Toys Craft (ムービング・トイズ・クラフト, Mūbingu Toizu Kurafuto) which discussed construction of motorized toys such as radio controlled cars. The column was sponsored by Mabuchi Motor and Tamiya Corporation.
    7.00
    2 votes
    168
    Tiger Beat

    Tiger Beat

    • Genre: Teen magazine
    Tiger Beat is an American fan magazine marketed primarily to adolescent girls. It is currently published by Laufer Media, Inc. of Los Angeles, California, which also produces its sister publication, Bop. Founded in September 1965 by Charles "Chuck" Laufer and his brother, Ira, Tiger Beat has as its forte teen idol gossip, movies, music and fashion. It is known for its covers with 'cut and paste' collaged photos of teen idols. Its publisher, originally named The Laufer Co., also founded and published the teen magazines FaVE (now defunct) and Right On! (now owned by another publisher). Lloyd Thaxton's face appeared at the top of the newly launched Tiger Beat magazine (then known as Lloyd Thaxton's Tiger Beat) for which he did a column. Thaxton was a co-founder of Tiger Beat magazine. Tiger Beat was sold to Primedia late in 1998 by former publisher Sterling/MacFadden. It was purchased in 2003 by Scott Laufer, the son of Chuck Laufer.
    7.00
    2 votes
    169
    Xclusive Magazine

    Xclusive Magazine

    Xclusive Magazine is Ireland's first and only multicultural celebrity magazine. It is published in the first week of every month. Xclusive Magazine...Ireland's African only lifestyle monthly and the first and only African magazine to break into the mainstream Irish media market. It is a 70-page full colour monthly, glossy, entertaining, newsworthy, thought-provoking and contemporary in look and appeal, with a highly experienced editorial team. It celebrates African people and affirms Ireland's multicultural life. It captures the world of entertainment and engages the readership with regular coverage, in pictures and titbits, of social, professional, fashion, religious, musical events and general lifestyle. The main readers of Xclusive Magazine are Africans and ethnic minority people in Ireland, but it is creatively packaged to appeal to everyone. Xclusive Magazine is sold in Eason's, African shops and most Newsagents all over Ireland, plus Belfast and London.
    7.00
    2 votes
    170
    Blender

    Blender

    Blender was an American music magazine that billed itself as "the ultimate guide to music and more". It was also known for sometimes steamy pictorials of celebrities. It compiled lists of albums, artists, and songs, including both "best of" lists and "worst of" lists. In each issue, there was a review of an artist's entire discography, with each album being analyzed in turn. Blender was published by Dennis Publishing. The magazine began in 1994 as the first digital CD-ROM magazine by Jason Pearson, David Cherry & Regina Joseph, acquired by Felix Dennis/Dennis Publishing, UK it published 15 digital CD issues, and launched on the web in 1997. It started publishing a print edition again in 1999 in its most recent form. Blender CD-ROM showcased the earliest digital editorial formats, as well as the first forms of digital advertising. The first digital advertisers included: Calvin Klein, Apple Computer, Stephen Colbert, Toyota and Nike. Owner Alpha Media Group closed Blender magazine March 26, 2009, going to an online-only format in a move that eliminated 30 jobs and reduced the company's portfolio of titles to Maxim alone. Blender's final print issue was the April 2009 issue.
    6.00
    3 votes
    171
    Clarion

    Clarion

    • Genre: Literary magazine
    Clarion is a literary magazine published at Boston University since 1998. The first issue, titled The Staff Issue of ?, was published by the group "Student for Literary Awareness" in association with Bostonia, a university magazine. Subsequent issues, although produced by the same group of students, were released under the name Clarion. From issue No. 2 on, the student group began using the name Boston University Literary Society. In the fall of 2009, the editors began accepting submissions from all writers, regardless of their affiliation with Boston University. Since 2011, the magazine has been published by The Pen & Anvil Press, a Boston-based independent imprint associated with the Boston Poetry Union.
    6.00
    3 votes
    172
    Punch

    Punch

    • Genre: Humor magazine
    Punch, or the London Charivari was a British weekly magazine of humour and satire established in 1841 by Henry Mayhew and engraver Ebenezer Landells. Historically, it was most influential in the 1840s and 50s, when it helped to coin the term "cartoon" in its modern sense as a humorous illustration. It became a British institution, but after the 1940s, when its circulation peaked, it went into a long decline, finally closing in 1992. It was revived in 1996, but closed again in 2002. Punch was founded on 17 July 1841 by Henry Mayhew and engraver Ebenezer Landells, on an initial investment of £25. It was jointly edited by Mayhew and Mark Lemon. Initially it was subtitled The London Charivari, this being a reference to a satirical humour magazine published in France as Le Charivari. Reflecting their satiric and humorous intent, the two editors took for their name and masthead the anarchic glove puppet, Mr. Punch, of Punch and Judy; the name also referred to a joke made early on about one of the magazine's first editors, Lemon, that "punch is nothing without lemon". Mayhew ceased to be joint editor in 1842 and became "suggestor in chief" until he severed his connection in 1845. The
    6.00
    3 votes
    173
    Call-A.P.P.L.E.

    Call-A.P.P.L.E.

    Call-A.P.P.L.E. Magazine is the monthly journal publication of the Apple Pugetsound Program Library Exchange (or A.P.P.L.E.). The magazine was published from 1978 until 1990 when it was discontinued; after a 12 year lapse publication was restarted in 2002. The magazine has covered most aspects of Apple personal computers; from the Apple I to the latest Macintosh computers with Mac OS X. During its first period (1978 - 1990), the magazine was focused primarily on the Apple II series of computers and related programming content. Currently magazine continues to have Apple II programming content but also contains reviews and program information for the other Apple computers including the latest hardware and software releases. Call-A.P.P.L.E. Magazine also covers emulation of older platforms on the newer machines.
    6.50
    2 votes
    174
    Die Aktion

    Die Aktion

    • Genre: Literary magazine
    Die Aktion ("The Action") was a German literary and political magazine, edited by Franz Pfemfert and published between 1911 and 1932 in Berlin-Wilmersdorf; it promoted literary Expressionism and stood for left-wing politics. To begin with, Die Aktion was published weekly, after 1919 every two weeks, and only sporadically beginning from 1926. In 1981, Die Aktion was resumed by the Edition Nautilus publishing house. Issues appear irregularly. Before starting Die Aktion, Pfemfert, beginning in 1904, had been editor of the anarchist magazine Der Kampf, edited by Senna Hoy. While there, he came into contact with many modern writers and artists, as well as with political opposition groups. One of his early collaborators was Herwarth Walden, future editor of Der Sturm. After leaving his position at Der Kampf, Pfemfert worked for the magazines Das Blaubuch and Demokrat (becoming the latter's co-editor in 1910). In the radical left-wing Demokrat magazine, which he co-edited with Georg Zepler (1859–1925), he published texts by numerous writers who would later become contributors to Die Aktion. In early 1911, the partnership with Zepler came to an end when the latter, without consulting
    6.50
    2 votes
    175
    Flaunt

    Flaunt

    Flaunt is a monthly American fashion culture magazine founded by the current editor-in-chief, Luis Barajas, and creative director, Jim Turner, also the founders of Detour magazine. Long Nguyen, a third founder and style director, also was working on Detour for four years. Flaunt was established in September 1998. Since the publication of its first issue, Flaunt has continued to be an ongoing metamorphosis of new ideas and territories. Under the direction of its founding editors, what began as a luxury fashion title has progressed into a full-fledged lifestyle publication interested in both the serious and fanciful examinations of issues relevant to the realms of fashion, art, film, music, media, and literature, and always keeping the original intent of preserving the core value of constructive inquiry and artistic freedom. Flaunt is a wholly independent magazine published 10 times a year and distributed in over 32 countries. The publication was recently named one of three finalists, chosen out of 2,800 entries, for a prestigious FOLIO Award in the categories of Best Full Issue of a General Interest Magazine and Best Single Article in a Consumer Entertainment Magazine. The magazine
    6.50
    2 votes
    176
    La Gazette du bon ton

    La Gazette du bon ton

    • Genre: Women's magazine
    La Gazette du Bon Ton was a leading fashion magazine that was published in France from November 1912 to 1925. Founded in 1912 by Lucien Vogel, the magazine covered the latest developments in fashion, lifestyle, and beauty, and was distributed by Condé Nast. In the USA, the magazine was issued as the Gazette du Bon Genre. Both titles roughly translate as "Journal of Good Taste" or "Journal of Good Style." The magazine strove to present an elitist image to distinguish itself from its many competitors. It was available only to subscribers and was priced at a steep 100 francs per year, or $425.61 in today's money. The magazine was published on fine paper. The magazine signed exclusive contracts with seven of Paris's top couture houses – Madeleine Chéruit, Georges Doeuillet, Jacques Doucet, Jeanne Paquin, Paul Poiret, Redfern & Sons, and Charles Worth – so that the designers' fashions were shown only in the pages of the Gazette. After World War I, a select group of designers were added – Étienne Drian, Gustav Beer, Kriegck, Larsen, and Martial & Armand. The magazine's title was derived from the French concept of bon ton, or timeless good taste and refinement. The magazine also aimed to
    6.50
    2 votes
    177
    Photoplay

    Photoplay

    Photoplay was one of the first American film fan magazines. It was founded in 1911 in Chicago, the same year that J. Stuart Blackton founded a similar magazine entitled Motion Picture Story. For most of its life, it was published by Macfadden Publications. Photoplay began as a short-fiction magazine concerned mostly with the plots and characters of films at the time and was used as a promotional tool for those films. In 1915, Julian Johnson and James R. Quirk became the editors (though Quirk had been vice-president of the magazine since its inception), and together they created a format which would set a precedent for almost all celebrity magazines that followed. By 1918 the editors could boast a circulation figure of 204,434, the popularity of the magazine fueled by the public's ever increasing interest in the private lives of celebrities. It is because of this that the magazine is credited with inventing celebrity media. Photoplay reached its apex in the 1920s and 1930s and was considered quite influential within the motion picture industry. The magazine was renowned for its artwork portraits of film stars on the cover by such artists as Earl Christy and Charles Sheldon.
    6.50
    2 votes
    178
    The Bulletin

    The Bulletin

    The Bulletin was an Australian weekly magazine that was published in Sydney from 1880 until January 2008. It was influential in Australian culture and politics from about 1890 until World War I, the period when it was identified with the "Bulletin school" of Australian literature. Its influence thereafter declined steadily. In the 1960s it was revived as a modern newsmagazine. The final issue was published on 23 January 2008. The Bulletin was founded by two Sydney journalists, J.F. Archibald and John Haynes, and the first edition appeared on 31 January 1880. It was intended to be a journal of political and business commentary, with some literary content. Its politics were nationalist, anti-imperialist, protectionist, insular, racist, republican, anti-clerical and masculist - but not socialist. It mercilessly ridiculed colonial governors, capitalists, snobs and social climbers, the clergy, feminists and prohibitionists. It upheld trade unionism, Australian independence, advanced democracy and White Australia. It ran savagely racist cartoons attacking Chinese, Indians, Japanese and Jews, and mocking Indigenous Australians. The paper's masthead slogan, "Australia for the White Man,"
    6.50
    2 votes
    179
    Chinese National Geography

    Chinese National Geography

    Chinese National Geography (Chinese: 中国国家地理) is a Chinese monthly magazine similar to the National Geographic Magazine. Founded in 1949 in China, the magazine has revamped itself several times, and is now a popular magazine in mainland China. There is also an edition in traditional Chinese for readers in Hong Kong and Taiwan. In April 2009, it launched its first bi-monthly international edition, Chinese National Geography English edition. Founded by a group of teachers with a keen interest in geography, the original Chinese edition was first published in January 1950 under the name Di Li Zhi Shi ("Knowledge of Geography"; Chinese: 地理知识). The magazine focused on delivering scientific and geographical concepts. At first only 600 copies were printed, but the publication quickly became popular, and soon 2,000 copies of each volume were being printed. From August–December 1960, Di Li Zhi Shi temporarily stopped publication. It reformed itself and resumed publication in January 1961 under a new name, Di Li ("Geography"; Chinese: 地理). However, this new version was not successful with its readers, and the title was changed back to Di Li Zhi Shi in 1966. However, the magazine was forced to
    7.00
    1 votes
    180
    Christianity Magazine

    Christianity Magazine

    Christianity Magazine (formerly Christianity and Renewal) is an evangelical Christian magazine published monthly in the United Kingdom by Christian Communications Partnership (CCP) Ltd. The magazine contains news, features, reviews and comment for Christians and those interested in Christianity from across the denominational spectrum. The magazine adheres to the Evangelical Alliance statement of faith. Most of its readers are from the evangelical and/or charismatic traditions. It is seen as the UK's primary non-denominational evangelical magazine. It is currently edited by Ruth Dickinson. CCP Ltd is owned by Premier Media Group. In addition to Christianity Magazine, CCP Ltd publishes two other monthly titles – Youthwork Magazine and Christian Marketplace and Christian Holiday Guide.
    7.00
    1 votes
    181
    Juiced.GS

    Juiced.GS

    Juiced.GS is a print magazine/newsletter for Apple II computer users. Although the name implies a focus on the Apple IIGS, its coverage encompasses all Apple II systems. It is the longest-running Apple II publication and, since 1999, the only Apple II publication still in print as of 2012. The 20-page magazine/newsletter (with the occasional 24-page special edition) is published quarterly and is mailed to subscribers around the world. Each issue covers the latest Apple II news including new products and event coverage. There are also frequent product reviews, how-to articles, and technical articles covering programming and even hardware design. Each year's third issue features a cover photo of the staff, taken at KansasFest, and includes extensive coverage of the premiere annual Apple II event. The publication is available as subscription-only, delivered to subscribers via postal mail, though free sample issues are available on the magazine's web site. Juiced.GS subscriptions are annual, currently costing USD $19 per calendar year in the United States and USD $27 elsewhere in the world. Its 18th annual volume, announced at KansasFest, will be published in 2013. The Juiced.GS domain
    7.00
    1 votes
    182
    Lady's Magazine

    Lady's Magazine

    • Genre: Women's magazine
    The Lady's Magazine or Entertaining Companion for the Fair Sex, Appropriated Solely to Their Use and Amusement, was a British fashion magazine produced every month from 1770 until 1837 and cost six pence per copy. It was started in August 1770 by London bookseller John Coote and publisher John Wheble. This was by no means the first women's magazine, as The Ladies' Mercury had been published in 1693. It is sometimes confused with the Ladies' Magazine published in Boston, Massachusetts.
    7.00
    1 votes
    183
    Linux For You

    Linux For You

    • Genre: Computer magazine
    LINUX For You (LFY) is Asia's first publication about Linux and Open Source Software. This monthly magazine from India was launched in February 2003 by the EFY Enterprises Pvt. Ltd, which also publishes other magazines, such as Electronics For You. The magazine is also distributed in Singapore and Malaysia. LFY has been identified as an important part of the FLOSS culture in India. Linux for You's content ranges from introductory tutorials for new Linux users to programming for more advanced users. It includes reviews of utility tools, games and Linux distributions and as well as industry news. The magazine features colour content, lists of major Linux user groups in India and has featured interviews with prominent local and international open source developers. For example, Klaus Knopper, Paul W. Frields (Fedora project leader) and Greg Kroah-Hartman have all been interviewed in the magazine in the past. Like some other Linux magazines, LFY includes at least one DVD or CD containing free software. The magazine is usually priced at Indian rupees 100. A month after publication, all articles in the magazine are placed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported
    7.00
    1 votes
    184
    Nature Materials

    Nature Materials

    Nature Materials, is a peer-reviewed scientific journal published by Nature Publishing Group. It was launched in September 2002. Vincent Dusastre is the launching and current chief editor. Nature Materials is focused on all topics within the combined disciplines of materials science and engineering. Topics published in the journal are presented from the view of the impact that materials research has on other scientific disciplines such as (for example) physics, chemistry, and biology. Coverage in this journal encompasses fundamental research and applications from synthesis to processing, and from structure to composition. Coverage also includes basic research and applications of properties and performance of materials. Materials are specifically described as "substances in the condensed states (liquid, solid, colloidal)", and which are "designed or manipulated for technological ends." Furthermore, Nature Materials functions as a forum for the materials scientist community. Interdisciplinary research results are published, obtained from across all areas of materials research, and between scientists involved in the different disciplines. The readership for this journal are
    7.00
    1 votes
    185
    People Magazine

    People Magazine

    • Genre: Men's magazine
    People is a monthly Australian lad's mag published by ACP Publishing, a division of PBL Media. It has been published since the 1950s. It is not to be confused with the gossip magazine known by that name in the United States; that magazine is published under the name Who in Australia. People focuses on celebrity interviews and scandal, glamour photography, sex stories sent in by readers, puzzles, crosswords, and a jokes page. People was the first weekly magazine in Australia to feature topless models. The current editor of People is Shane Cubis. People magazine started a "Covergirl of the Year" quest in the early 80s with Samantha Fox an early winner. The 1985 winner was Carolyn Kent. People had a deliberate policy of searching for "average Aussie birds" from 1985 onwards, trying to veer away from a reliance on U.K. Page 3 girl pictorials (though Page 3 girls still appeared, and indeed, Tracey Coleman was named Covergirl of the year in 1992 and 1994). Mostly scouted by and photographed by Walter Glover, many popular "average" girls became very popular and frequent cover girls. These include Lynda Lewis, Lisa Russell, Narelle Nixon, Melinda Smith, Raquel Samuels, Tanja Adams (real
    7.00
    1 votes
    186
    Sports Afield

    Sports Afield

    Sports Afield (SA) was founded in 1887 as a hunting and fishing magazine by Claude King and is the oldest continuously published outdoor magazine in North America. The first issue, in January 1888, was eight pages long; it was printed on newspaper stock and published in Denver, Colorado. Together with Outdoor Life and Field & Stream it is one of the Big Three in American outdoor magazines. The “Journal for Gentlemen” promised, in King’s words, “To be devoted to hunting, fishing, rifle and trap shooting, the breeding of thorough-bred dogs, cycling, and kindred sports…” The subscription price was $1.50 per year, with single copies selling for fifteen cents. A few years later, King expounded on his philosophy: “Sports Afield has an ambition above that of simply entertaining and amusing the public; it wants to help propagate the true spirit of gentle sportsmanship, to encourage indulgence in outdoor recreations, and to assist in the dissemination of knowledge regarding natural history, photography, firearms, and kindred subjects.” Before the decade was out, Sports Afield had expanded and moved its operations to Chicago. The magazine grew, with some issues running ninety-six pages. It
    7.00
    1 votes
    187
    T3 Magazine

    T3 Magazine

    • Genre: Science magazine
    T3 magazine is a UK-based technology magazine, which specialises in gadgets, gizmos, and other technology. Originally, T3 stood for Tomorrow's Technology Today, but this isn't used anywhere in the magazine or on the website anymore. It's exclusively referred to as T3 or T3.com. The magazine is popular but in terms of sales is ranked second among UK gadget magazines ABC UK. T3 magazine is available in most countries, and has syndicated/localised versions in over 20 countries. The first issue of T3 magazine went on sale around September 1996. The magazine was a spin off of a science magazine eventually launched as Frontiers, but the publishers decided to have a look at future technology. The reasoning was that there wasn't really an all-round consumer technology magazine in the UK market and that people love reading about technology and gadgets. The magazine started off as a celebration of the best new technologies that were appearing, to explain how it all works, and how the technologies and products would impact the readers' lives, but evolved into a glossy entertainment magazine as well. Many of the readers started buying the magazine specifically to read about items that were
    7.00
    1 votes
    188
    Tatler

    Tatler

    Tatler has been the name of several British journals and magazines, each of which has viewed itself as the successor of the original literary and society journal founded by Richard Steele in 1709. The current incarnation, founded in 1901, is a glossy magazine published by Condé Nast Publications focusing on the glamorous lives and lifestyles of the upper class. A 300th anniversary party for the magazine was held in October 2009. The original Tatler was founded in 1709 by Richard Steele, who used the nom de plume "Isaac Bickerstaff, Esquire", the first such consistently adopted journalistic persona, which adapted to the first person, as it were, the 17th-century genre of "characters", as first established in English by Sir Thomas Overbury and soon to be expanded by Lord Shaftesbury's Characteristics (1711). Steele's idea was to publish the news and gossip heard in London coffeehouses, hence the title, and seemingly, from the opening paragraph, to leave the subject of politics to the newspapers, while presenting Whiggish views and correcting middle-class manners, while instructing "these Gentlemen, for the most part being Persons of strong Zeal, and weak Intellects...what to think."
    7.00
    1 votes
    189
    The Atlantic Monthly

    The Atlantic Monthly

    • Issues: The Atlantic Monthly, November 1945
    • Genre: Literary magazine
    The Atlantic is an American magazine (founded as The Atlantic Monthly) in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1857. It was created as a literary and cultural commentary magazine. It quickly achieved a national reputation, which it has held for more than 150 years. It was important for recognizing and publishing new writers and poets, and encouraging major careers. It published leading writers' commentary on abolition, education, and other major issues in contemporary political affairs. After financial hardship and a series of ownership changes, the format changed to a general editorial magazine. Focusing on "foreign affairs, politics, and the economy [as well as] cultural trends," it is primarily aimed at a target audience of "thought leaders." The magazine's founders were a group of prominent writers of national reputation, who included Harriet Beecher Stowe, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr., John Greenleaf Whittier and James Russell Lowell. Lowell was its first editor. James Bennet was named the fourteenth editor-in-chief in 2006. Jay Lauf joined the organization as publisher and vice-president in 2008. In 2010, The Atlantic posted its first
    7.00
    1 votes
    190
    Fun

    Fun

    Fun was a Victorian weekly magazine, first published on 21 September 1861. The magazine was founded by the actor and playwright H. J. Byron in competition with Punch magazine. Like Punch, the journal published satiric verse and parodies, as well as political and literary criticism, sports and travel information. These were often illustrated or accompanied by topical cartoons (often of a political nature). The Punch mascot, Mr. Punch and his dog Toby were lampooned by Fun's jester, Mr. Fun, and his cat. The magazine was aimed at a well educated readership interested in politics, literature, and theatre. Fun was sold for a penny and was sometimes characterised as a 'poor man's Punch'. Thackeray called it "Funch". Fun silenced its critics by publishing lively fare, whereas Punch was criticised as dull and tired. One area in which Fun clearly bested its rival was in its close connection to popular theatre. Byron and his successor as editor, Tom Hood, the son of the first Punch contributor, assembled a vivacious, bohemian and progressive staff. Notable contributors included playwrights Tom Robertson, Hood, Clement Scott, F. C. Burnand (who defected to Punch in 1862), satirist Ambrose
    5.33
    3 votes
    191
    Billboard

    Billboard

    • Genre: Music magazine
    Billboard is an international newsweekly magazine devoted to the music industry, and is one of the oldest trade magazines in the world. It maintains several internationally recognized music charts that track the most popular songs and albums in various categories on a weekly basis. The two most notable charts are the Billboard Hot 100, which ranks the top 100 songs regardless of genre and is based on digital sales, radio airplay, and internet streaming data; and the Billboard 200, the corresponding chart for album sales. Billboard was founded in Cincinnati on November 1, 1894, by William h. Donaldson and James Hennegan. Originally titled Billboard Advertising it was a trade paper for the bill posting industry, hence the magazine's name. Within a few years of its founding, it began to carry news of outdoor amusements, a major consumer of billboard space. Eventually Billboard became the paper of record for circuses, carnivals, amusement parks, fairs, vaudeville, minstrels, whale shows and other live entertainment. The magazine began coverage of motion pictures in 1909 and of radio in the 1920s. With the development of the jukebox industry during the 1930s, The Billboard began
    6.00
    2 votes
    192
    Geospatial Solutions Magazine

    Geospatial Solutions Magazine

    The magazine's self-described mission is as follows: Geospatial Solutions is the objective and authoritative forum for emerging intelligence about GIS and related spatial technologies. In this venue, industry leaders and peers define issues and share solutions critical to forging a community among professionals from diverse application environments.
    6.00
    2 votes
    193
    National Review

    National Review

    • Issues: National Review, 15 Sep 1997
    • Genre: News magazine
    National Review (NR) is a fortnightly magazine founded by the late author William F. Buckley, Jr., in 1955 and based in New York City. It describes itself as "America's most widely read and influential magazine and web site for conservative news, commentary, and opinion." Although the print version of the magazine is available online to subscribers, the free content on the website is essentially a separate publication under different editorial direction. Prior to National Review's founding in 1955, some conservatives believed that the American right was a largely unorganized collection of individuals who shared intertwining philosophies but had little opportunity for a united public voice. They also wanted to marginalize what they saw as the antiwar, noninterventionist views of the Old Right. In 1953 moderate Republican Dwight D. Eisenhower was president, and many major magazines such as the Saturday Evening Post, Time, and Reader's Digest were strongly conservative and anti-communist, as were many newspapers including the Chicago Tribune and St Louis Globe-Democrat. A few small-circulation conservative magazines, Human Events and The Freeman preceded National Review in developing
    6.00
    2 votes
    194
    The Masses

    The Masses

    The Masses was a graphically innovative magazine of socialist politics published monthly in the United States from 1911 until 1917, when federal prosecutors brought charges against its editors for conspiring to obstruct conscription. It was succeeded by The Liberator and then later The New Masses. It published reportage, fiction, poetry and art by the leading radicals of the time such as Max Eastman, John Reed, Dorothy Day, and Floyd Dell. Piet Vlag, an eccentric socialist immigrant from the Netherlands, founded the magazine in 1911. Vlag’s dream of a co-operatively operated magazine never worked well, and after just a few issues, he left for Florida. His vision of an illustrated socialist monthly had, however, attracted a circle of young activists in Greenwich Village to The Masses that included visual artists from the Ashcan school like John French Sloan. These Greenwich Village artists and writers asked one of their own, Max Eastman (who was then studying for a doctorate under John Dewey at Columbia University), to edit their magazine. John Sloan, Art Young, Louis Untermeyer, and Inez Haynes Gillmore (among others) mailed a terse letter to Eastman in August 1912: “You are
    6.00
    2 votes
    195
    The Sentinel

    The Sentinel

    The Sentinel is Melbourne High School's student magazine. It has been recognised numerous times on the front pages of Melbourne's The Age, Herald Sun, and The Australian The entire student body has the opportunity to submit writing to The Sentinel, and the student editorial committee produces each of the four to five editions per year, which are distributed to students free of charge. Social commentary articles are often critical of events outside the school. In the first edition under a new editor in 2004, a front-page article entitled "Influx of Anglo-Saxons Threatens Schools" was published, in response to an article in The Age a few weeks prior reporting on an increase in Asian students at the school. The Sentinel has been the source of much controversy in the community as the magazine undergoes no internal school censorship. A 2002 article entitled "Chick school analysis" ranked female students from Melbourne schools out of ten for "looks" and "personality". One comment about the students from an independent Melbourne girls' school was that, "You can look and you can touch." The magazine received numerous condemnatory letters in response to the publication, and the
    6.00
    2 votes
    196
    Isis magazine

    Isis magazine

    • Genre: Student newspaper
    The Isis Magazine was established at Oxford University in 1892. Traditionally a rival to the student newspaper Cherwell, it was finally acquired by the latter's publishing house, OSPL, in the late 1990s. It now operates as a termly magazine and website, providing an outlet for features journalism. In its long history, Isis has benefited from the participation of individuals with significant literary flair. Alumni include Hilaire Belloc, Evelyn Waugh, Harold Acton, Graham Greene, John Betjeman, Michael Foot, Sylvia Plath, Dennis Potter, Adrian Mitchell, Richard Ingrams, David Dimbleby, Terry Jones, George Osborne and Nigella Lawson. The Isis was founded by Mostyn Turtle Piggott, the first of the student editors, in April 1892. His first editorial is quoted below: In its early days, The Isis was owned and published by the Holywell Press. Students were given complete independence, as long as the paper they produced was profitable and within good taste. Oxford welcomed the addition to its scene wholeheartedly, and was more than prepared to pay the weekly sixpence. The Isis was an accurate recorder of proceedings in the Oxford Union - enough of a function to maintain sales. One of the
    5.00
    3 votes
    197
    The Pastel Journal

    The Pastel Journal

    The Pastel Journal is a bi-monthly magazine focused on pastel artists and pastel art. It is headquartered in the Cincinnati area and published by F+W Media As of 2006, its circulation was approximately 26,000.
    5.00
    3 votes
    198
    Writer's Digest

    Writer's Digest

    • Genre: Literary magazine
    Writer's Digest is an American magazine devoted to both beginning and established writers, offering interviews, market listings, calls for manuscripts, and how-to articles. Writer's Digest is owned by F+W Media, which also publishes the annual edition of Writer's Market, a guide similar in size to a telephone directory containing a comprehensive list of all paying markets — magazines, publishing houses, and contests — as well as an index and many tips for the beginning writer on how to compose query letters and proper manuscript format. The magazine is published 8 times per year by Editor Jessica Strawser, Managing Editor Zachary Petit, and Online Managing Editor Brian A. Klems. Writer's Digest also sponsors several in-house contests annually. Of particular interest are the Writer's Digest International Self-Published Book Awards and their Annual Writing Competition for short stories. Both are contests with fees and cash prizes for the Grand Prize Winner and Runners-Up. Certificates of participation and personal letters from the contest judges are given to all entrants in the Self-Published Book competition. Writer's Digest was established in 1920 under the name Successful Writing,
    5.00
    3 votes
    199
    BBC Focus

    BBC Focus

    • Genre: Science magazine
    BBC Focus is a British monthly magazine about science and technology published in Bristol, UK by Bristol Magazines Ltd, a BBC Worldwide company. Edited by Graham Southorn it covers all aspects of science and technology and is written for general readers as well as people with a knowledge of science. The magazine was taken over by the BBC in mid-2005 which has led to most issues featuring an article which corresponds with a BBC television series. There are also regular science celebrity features and interviews. As of issue #173, The Guide section of the magazine had a small redesign with increased focus on interactive media, with newly separate sections for Games reviews and the web including a new column on web issues such as collaborative video editing with the header 'Happening'. The Update section of the magazine now contains:
    5.50
    2 votes
    200
    Bearded

    Bearded

    • Genre: Music magazine
    Bearded is a bi-monthly music magazine that distributes nationwide through WHSmith, Borders, independent record shops and newsagents. The magazine covers the independent music industry and only reviews artists who are either unsigned or signed to independent record labels. Bearded is known for its high quality print which uses 100% recycled paper stock and its very high standard of art direction - commissioning illustrations from artists such as David Shrigley and Paul Davis. Starting from issue FFP. E in January 2009, Bearded have published a mission statement to reassert the reasons for the magazine's existence. This statement also appears on the magazine's website under the 'About Us' heading. The statement, in full, is: Bearded exists to generate coverage for independent labels and artists regardless of genre, background or how fashionable they are. Bearded aims to do this in a publication that has top quality art direction and design at its heart, with writing that allows the reader to form their own opinions rather than being told what to think and what to like. Bearded’s editorial direction is not dictated by advertisers, distributors or anybody else that might generate
    5.50
    2 votes
    201
    Gândirea

    Gândirea

    • Genre: Literary magazine
    Gândirea ("The Thinking"), known during its early years as Gândirea Literară - Artistică - Socială ("The Literary - Artistic - Social Thinking"), was a Romanian literary, political and art magazine. Founded by Cezar Petrescu and D. I. Cucu in the city of Cluj, and first issued on May 1, 1921 as a literary supplement for the Cluj-based Voinţa, it was originally a modernist and expressionist-influenced journal. During its early existence, it attracted criticism from the traditional cultural establishment for allegedly allowing influences from Germanic Europe to permeate Romanian culture. Gândirea moved to Bucharest in October 1922, and, in 1926, its leadership was joined by the nationalist thinker Nichifor Crainic; he became its director and ideological guide in 1928, gradually moving it toward a mystical Orthodox focus — itself occasionally referred to as Gândirism. With just two interruptions in publication (1925 and 1933–34), Gândirea became one of the most important cultural magazines of the Romanian interwar period. A proponent of home-grown traditionalist ideas, it eventually found itself in opposition to Sburătorul, the modernist magazine headed by literary critic Eugen
    5.50
    2 votes
    202
    Good Housekeeping

    Good Housekeeping

    Good Housekeeping is a women's magazine owned by the Hearst Corporation, featuring articles about women's interests, product testing by The Good Housekeeping Institute, recipes, diet, health as well as literary articles. It is well known for the "Good Housekeeping Seal," popularly known as the "Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval." The magazine was founded May 2, 1885 by Clark W. Bryan in Holyoke, Massachusetts. The magazine achieved a circulation of 300,000 by 1911, at which time it was bought by the Hearst Corporation. In 1966 it reached 5,500,000 readers. Good Housekeeping is one of the "Seven Sisters", a group of women's service magazines. The Hearst Corporation created a British edition along the same lines in 1922. Famous writers who have contributed to the magazine include Somerset Maugham, Edwin Markham, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Frances Parkinson Keyes, A. J. Cronin, Virginia Woolf, and Evelyn Waugh. In 1900, the "Experiment Station", the predecessor to the Good Housekeeping Research Institute (GHRI), was founded. The formal opening of the headquarters of GHRI - the Model Kitchen, Testing Station for Household Devices, and Domestic Science Laboratory - occurred in January
    5.50
    2 votes
    203
    Jane's Defence Weekly

    Jane's Defence Weekly

    Jane's Defence Weekly (abbreviated as JDW) is a weekly magazine reporting on military and corporate affairs, edited by Peter Felstead. It is one of a number of military-related publications named after John F. T. Jane, an Englishman who first published Jane's All the World's Fighting Ships in 1898. It is a unit of Jane's Information Group, which is now owned by IHS.
    5.50
    2 votes
    204
    Liberty

    Liberty

    Liberty was a nineteenth century anarchist periodical published in the United States by Benjamin Tucker, from August 1881 to April 1908. The periodical was instrumental in developing and formalizing the individualist anarchist philosophy through publishing essays and serving as a format for debate. Contributors included Benjamin Tucker, Lysander Spooner, Auberon Herbert, Dyer Lum, Joshua K. Ingalls, John Henry Mackay, Victor Yarros, Wordsworth Donisthorpe, James L. Walker, J. William Lloyd, Florence Finch Kelly, Voltairine de Cleyre, Steven T. Byington, John Beverley Robinson, Jo Labadie, Lillian Harman, and Henry Appleton. Included in its masthead is a quote from Pierre Proudhon saying that liberty is "Not the Daughter But the Mother of Order." Benjamin Tucker was an individualist anarchist and made it clear that the purpose of the journal was to further his point of view, saying in the first issue that the However, the journal did become a forum for argumentation about diverse views, and Tucker credited both Josiah Warren and the social anarchist Proudhon as influences for Liberty. He says of Proudhon: "Liberty is…a journal brought into existence almost as a direct consequences
    5.50
    2 votes
    205
    Maxim

    Maxim

    • Genre: Men's magazine
    Maxim is an international men's magazine targeted at heterosexual adult males and based in the United Kingdom, and known for its pictorials featuring popular actresses, singers, and female models often pictured scantily dressed but not fully nude, sometimes clothed. In the United States, Maxim is an industry leader, reporting a circulation of 2.5 million readers which they claim is enough to outsell leading competitors GQ, Esquire, and Details combined. The magazine is now using the brand name to market a myriad other magazines and projects. Due to its success in its primary markets, Maxim has expanded into many other countries, including Argentina, Canada , India, Indonesia, Israel, Belgium, Romania, the Czech Republic, France (marketed under "Maximal"), Germany, Bulgaria, Brazil, Chile, Greece, Italy, Korea, Mexico, Netherlands, Poland, Russia (where it stands now as the most popular men's magazine), Serbia, the Philippines, Singapore, Spain, Thailand, Ukraine and Portugal. A wireless version of the magazine was launched in 2005 across cellular carriers in twenty European and Asian countries. In 1999, MaximOnline.com was created. It contains content not included in the print
    5.50
    2 votes
    206
    Modern Electrics

    Modern Electrics

    • Genre: Science magazine
    Modern Electrics was a technical magazine for the amateur radio experimenter. It was created by Hugo Gernsback and began publication in April 1908. The magazine was initially intended to provide mail-order information for radio parts and to promote the amateur radio hobby, but it later became a vehicle for technology-based fiction stories. The first fiction appeared in the April, 1911 issue, and the series of 12 installments by Hugo Gernsback would later be published as the science fiction novel Ralph 124C 41+. The circulation for this magazine increased rapidly, starting at 2,000 and increasing to 52,000 in 1911. In 1908, the magazine announced the "wireless registry", a listing of radio owners, their call letters, and the type of equipment they owned and how it was operated. The magazine was sold in 1913, and ceased publication with the December 1913 issue. It then merged with Electrician and Mechanic to become Modern Electrics and Mechanics. The experience Gernsback gained with Modern Electrics led him to introduce Electrical Experimenter magazine in 1913 and pulp science fiction magazine Amazing Stories in 1926.
    5.50
    2 votes
    207
    College Humor

    College Humor

    • Genre: Humor magazine
    College Humor was a popular American humor magazine from the 1920s to the 1940s. Published monthly by Collegiate World Publishing, it began in 1920 with reprints from college publications and soon introduced new material, including fiction. Contributors included Robert Benchley, Heywood Broun, Groucho Marx, Ellis Parker Butler, Katherine Brush, F. Scott Fitzgerald and Zelda Fitzgerald. Editor H.N. Swanson later became Fitzgerald's Hollywood agent. The magazine featured cartoons by Sam Berman, Ralph Fuller, John Held Jr., Otto Soglow and others. The cover price in 1930 was 35 cents (for 130 pages of content). Dell Publishing acquired the title for a run that began in November, 1934. In the late 1930s, it was purchased by Ned Pines and turned into a girlie magazine. Collegian Press, Inc. was the publisher in the early 1940s. A competing magazine in 1933 was titled College Humor & Sense. That same year Paramount released the college campus musical, College Humor, with Bing Crosby, Jack Oakie, George Burns and Gracie Allen.
    4.67
    3 votes
    208
    The Cheese Grater

    The Cheese Grater

    • Genre: Student newspaper
    The Cheese Grater is an award-winning magazine produced at the University College London by a society of UCL Union, a students' union. It was first published in March 2004. The contents are a mix of (student) political news stories, exclusive investigations and humorous items, particularly cartoons. It most often concerns itself with activities of UCL Union, of which its writers are generally strongly critical. The Cheese Grater' was formed when René Lavanchy, then a first-year student at UCL, decided to found a new magazine to plug what he saw as a gap in the provision of student media at the college, specifically as UCL Union regulations prevented the publication of most serious criticism of the Union at that time. Dissatisfied with the tone, content and production values of Pi Magazine, the only significant student publication at the time, he resolved to edit a new magazine himself and publish it on the cheap. Having approached a fellow halls resident, he secured him as treasurer and applied for the magazine to be affiliated as a society of UCL Union, so that it could publicise through the Union and use a UCL e-mail address. The society was affiliated on 12 February 2004. The
    4.67
    3 votes
    209
    Filmjournalen

    Filmjournalen

    Filmjournalen, Sweden's largest (in edition) and most influential film magazine in the years 1919-1953. Printed and based in Stockholm. Filmjournalen featured the latest news on Swedish and international films, such as interviews with stars, directors, articles on film genres, reviews, premiere night photos of the stars, on-set reports from studios during filming (both in Sweden and internationally; as well as on great Hollywood films where Swedish Filmjournalen had their own reporters and photographers present). There were in every number glossy photographs of stars featured on full pages inside the magazine and—of course—on the cover. In 1953 Filmjournalen became part of the more "broad culture" magazine Bildjournalen, which not only featured news on films, but also on what was going on in the world of art, culture, theatre and society in general as well, with interviews with politicians and other famous personalities.
    6.00
    1 votes
    210
    Mir iskusstva

    Mir iskusstva

    Mir iskusstva (Russian: «Мир иску́сства», World of Art) was a Russian magazine and the artistic movement it inspired and embodied, which was a major influence on the Russians who helped revolutionize European art during the first decade of the 20th century. From 1909, many of the miriskusniki (i.e., members of the movement) also contributed to the Ballets Russes company operating in Paris. Few Western Europeans actually saw issues of the magazine itself. The artistic group was founded in November 1898 by a group of students that included Alexandre Benois, Konstantin Somov, Dmitry Filosofov, Léon Bakst, and Eugene Lansere. The starting moments for the new artistic group was organization of the Exhibition of Russian and Finnish Artists in the Stieglitz Museum of Applied Arts in Saint-Petersburg. The magazine was co-founded in 1899 in St. Petersburg by Alexandre Benois, Léon Bakst, and Sergei Diaghilev (the Chief Editor). They aimed at assailing low artistic standards of the obsolescent Peredvizhniki school and promoting artistic individualism and other principles of Art Nouveau. The theoretical declarations of the art movements were stated in the Diaghilev's articles "Difficult
    6.00
    1 votes
    211
    East Week

    East Week

    East Week (Chinese: 東周刊, Jyutping: dung1 zau1 hon1) is a Hong Kong-based weekly Chinese language magazine which was established by Oriental Group on October 29, 1992 and sold to the Emperor Group in September 2001. It is now owned by Global China Group Holdings Limited, and published by China Touch Media Solutions & Services Limited. Upon its establishment, East Week has been viewed as the direct competitor against Next Magazine of Next Media Limited. However, East Week could not beat Next Magazine throughout the years as Next Magazine still remained as the top-sold magazine with around 150 thousand publications for each issue. So, Ma Ching Fat, Chairman of Oriental Group finally decided to sell the magazine to Emperor Entertainment Group, owned by Albert Yeung. After Yeung had taken over East Week, a revolution of the magazine took place. There was a significant change in the type of news story and the reporting method. Since it took advantage of the "freedom of democracy", it always used very sensational and controversial topics to attract customers. It reported stories like the sex life of the businessman Law Siu Fai (羅兆輝) and the extramarital affairs of David Li Kwok-po. Such
    4.33
    3 votes
    212
    Fortune

    Fortune

    Fortune is a global business magazine published by Time Inc. Founded by Henry Luce in 1930, the publishing business, consisting of Time, Life, Fortune, and Sports Illustrated, grew to become Time Warner. In turn, AOL grew as it acquired Time Warner in 2000 when Time Warner was the world's largest media conglomerate. Fortune's primary competitors in the national business magazine category are Forbes, which is also published bi-weekly, and Bloomberg Businessweek. The magazine is especially known for its annual features ranking companies by revenue. CNNMoney.com is the online home of Fortune, in addition to Money. Fortune was founded by Time co-founder Henry Luce in February 1930, four months after the Wall Street Crash of 1929 that marked the onset of the Great Depression. Briton Hadden, Luce's partner, wasn't enthusiastic about the idea—which Luce originally thought to title Power—but Luce went forward with it after Hadden's February 27, 1929 death (probably of septicemia). Luce wrote a memo to the Time, Inc. board in November 1929, "We will not be over-optimistic. We will recognize that this business slump may last as long as an entire year." Single copies of that first issue cost
    5.00
    2 votes
    213
    Rock & Folk

    Rock & Folk

    • Genre: Music magazine
    Rock & Folk is a prominent French popular music magazine founded in 1966, and published in the Paris suburb of Clichy. Its current editor in chief in Philippe Manœuvre. Though the magazine's title includes the word "folk," it is in fact oriented strongly toward rock and roll, especially championing groups like the Rolling Stones and the Stooges. After a lag during the 1980s, the magazine overhauled itself in the 1990s, broadening its scope to cover newer electronic music as well as hip hop.
    5.00
    2 votes
    214
    Experimenter Publishing bankruptcy

    Experimenter Publishing bankruptcy

    • Genre: Science magazine
    Experimenter Publishing was an American media company founded by Hugo Gernsback in 1915. The first magazine was The Electrical Experimenter (1913–1931) and the most notable magazines were Radio News (1919–1985) and Amazing Stories (1926–2005). Their radio station, WRNY, began broadcasting experimental television in 1928. In early 1929 the company was forced into bankruptcy and the Gernsback brothers lost control of Experimenter Publishing. The magazines did not miss an issue and were quickly sold to another publisher. The Gernsbacks promptly started new magazines to compete with their former ones. Radio News became Popular Electronics and the January 1975 issue featured the Altair 8800 computer on the cover; this launched the personal computer revolution. Hugo Gernsback's Amazing Stories is regarded as the first dedicated science fiction magazine and every year World Science Fiction Society gives the Hugo Awards for the best science fiction and fantasy works. Hugo Gernsback was born in Luxembourg in 1884 and he became fascinated with electricity as a boy. While studying electrical engineering at a Technikum University in Bingen, Germany; he built a simple radio transmitter and
    4.50
    2 votes
    215
    Paris Review

    Paris Review

    • Genre: Literary magazine
    The Paris Review is a quarterly literary magazine established in 1953 by Harold L. Humes, Peter Matthiessen, and George Plimpton. Plimpton edited the Review from its founding until his death in 2003. In its first five years, The Paris Review published works by Jack Kerouac, Philip Larkin, V. S. Naipaul, Philip Roth, Adrienne Rich, Italo Calvino, Samuel Beckett, Nadine Gordimer, Jean Genet and Robert Bly. It has since become one of the world's leading outlets for emerging and established writers. Lorin Stein is the current editor. The Review's highly regarded "Writers at Work" series includes interviews with Ernest Hemingway, Truman Capote, Joan Didion, T. S. Eliot, Ralph Ellison, William Faulkner, Irwin Shaw, Elizabeth Bishop, and Vladimir Nabokov. The series has been called "one of the single most persistent acts of cultural conservation in the history of the world." A simple editorial statement, penned in the inaugural issue by William Styron, stated the magazine's aim: The Review's founding editors include Humes, Matthiessen, Plimpton, William Pène du Bois, Thomas Guinzburg and John P. C. Train. The first publisher was Prince Sadruddin Aga Khan. Du Bois, the magazine’s first art
    4.50
    2 votes
    216
    Reader's Digest

    Reader's Digest

    Reader's Digest is a general interest family magazine, published ten times annually. Formerly based in Chappaqua, New York, its headquarters is now in New York City. It was founded in 1922, by DeWitt Wallace and Lila Bell Wallace. For many years, Reader's Digest was the best-selling consumer magazine in the United States, losing the distinction in 2009 to Better Homes and Gardens. According to Mediamark Research, it reaches more readers with household incomes of $100,000+ than Fortune, The Wall Street Journal, Business Week and Inc. combined. Global editions of Reader's Digest reach an additional 40 million people in more than 70 countries, with 49 editions in 21 languages. It has a global circulation of 10.5 million, making it the largest paid circulation magazine in the world. It is also published in Braille, digital, audio, and a version in large type called Reader's Digest Large Print. The magazine is compact, with its pages roughly half the size of most American magazines'. Hence, in the summer of 2005, the U.S. edition adopted the slogan, "America in your pocket." In January 2008, it was changed to "Life well shared." The magazine was started by DeWitt Wallace, while
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    217
    Allegany Magazine

    Allegany Magazine

    Allegany Magazine is an independently operated sister publication of the Cumberland Times-News that publishes the works of writers, artists and photographers from Allegany County, Maryland. Each issue comprises at least a half dozen feature articles, as well as regular columns by area experts on topics including cooking, decorating, investing and living. Allegany Magazine is both a creative outlet for local talent and a lifestyle magazine for people interested in Western Maryland. The staff of the magazine consists of professional journalists and freelancers. The magazine can be purchased at newsstands and bookstores through the area or by subscription.
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    218
    DUB Magazine

    DUB Magazine

    • Genre: Automobile magazine
    DUB, founded in January 2000, is a North American magazine covering urban custom car culture and also features celebrities and their vehicles. The magazine also launched the DUB Magazine Custom Auto Show & Concert, a nationwide car show and concert tour that spans 16 United States cities. DUB now has many licensed goods that include Jada Toys' DUB City die-cast and radio controlled vehicles, DUB Edition car accessories, and Rockstar Games' Midnight Club 3: DUB Edition video game. The term "DUB" is street slang for custom wheels 20" or larger in diameter and was popularized through hip hop music. DUB was founded by Myles Kovacs, Haythem Haddad, and Herman Flores, who continue to head the company located in Industry, California.
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    219
    Electronics Illustrated

    Electronics Illustrated

    • Genre: Science magazine
    Electronics Illustrated was an American magazine started in May 1958 by Fawcett Publications, the publishers of Mechanix Illustrated. The magazine was published monthly from 1959 to 1961 then bi-monthly until November 1972. Charles Tepfer was the first editor and Robert Beason was the editor for rest of the magazine's run (1961 -1972). Ziff-Davis success with Popular Electronics magazine showed there was a market for electronics hobbyist magazines and the launch of the Sputnik satellite in 1957 had increased the public's interest in science and technology. Electronics Illustrated (EI) was targeted for this hobbyist and do-it-yourself audience. The cover of the second issue had a 6-foot-tall (1.8 m) rocket built in a basement workshop. To promote amateur rocketry the U.S. Army began a series titled "Build a Safe Model Missile." Model rockets appeared on the covers and in articles for several years. The space race between the United States and the Soviet Union lead many hobbyists into amateur rocketry. In the late 1960s Micro Instrumentation and Telemetry Systems (MITS) was formed to sell instrumentation to rocket hobbyist. They were unsuccessful at that venture but later created the
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    220
    Saturday Night Magazine

    Saturday Night Magazine

    • Genre: News magazine
    Saturday Night Magazine is a lifestyle and entertainment magazine created in 2004 at the University of Southern California by publisher and founder Michael Ritter. Saturday Night Magazine targets a readership of 18- to 29-year-olds through editorial coverage that includes: celebrities, fashion, sports, politics, music, technology, travel, careers, movies, video games, and comedy. The median age of its readers is 23. Past covers have featured celebrities and public figures such as: Katy Perry, Shenae Grimes, DJ AM, Emma Stone, Amber Heard, Sophia Bush, Rachel Bilson, Scarlett Johansson, Kristen Bell, Katie Couric, Audrina Patridge, Heidi Montag and Malin Åkerman. It can be found on college campuses in Los Angeles, San Francisco, San Diego, Phoenix and Tucson, as well as at many off-campus retail locations. In November 2008, Saturday Night Magazine celebrated its 40th issue. Saturday Night Magazine has a weekly section which outlines news and factoids as well as a "so over it" and "so into it" list. The career section of Saturday Night Magazine. It focuses on the varying career paths and successes of up and coming talent, entrepreneurs, and trendsetters. Past issues have highlighted:
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    221
    Science Fantasy

    Science Fantasy

    • Genre: Science fiction magazine
    Science Fantasy, which also appeared under the titles Impulse and SF Impulse, was a British fantasy and science fiction magazine, launched in 1950 by Nova Publications as a companion to Nova's New Worlds. Walter Gillings was editor for the first two issues, and was then replaced by John Carnell, the editor of New Worlds, as a cost-saving measure. Carnell edited both magazines until Nova went out of business in early 1964. The titles were acquired by Roberts & Vinter, who hired Kyril Bonfiglioli to edit Science Fantasy; Bonfiglioli changed the title to Impulse in early 1966, but the new title led to confusion with the distributors and sales fell, though the magazine remained profitable. The title was changed again to SF Impulse for the last few issues. Science Fantasy ceased publication the following year, when Roberts & Vinter came under financial pressure after their printer went bankrupt. Gillings had an inventory of material that he had acquired while editing Fantasy, and he drew on this for Science Fantasy, as well as incorporating his own fanzine, Science Fantasy Review, into the new magazine. Once Carnell took over, Science Fantasy typically ran a long lead novelette along
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    1 votes
    222
    The Monthly

    The Monthly

    • Genre: Literary magazine
    The Monthly is an Australian national magazine of politics, society and the arts, which is published eleven times per year on a monthly basis except the December/January issue. Founded in 2005, it is published by Melbourne property developer Morry Schwartz. The publisher is also director of Black Inc., which publishes non-fiction books and the political journal Quarterly Essay. Contributors have included Mark Aarons, Waleed Aly, John Birmingham, Peter Conrad, Annabel Crabb, Richard Flanagan, Robert Forster, Anna Funder, Helen Garner, Kerryn Goldsworthy, Ramachandra Guha, Gideon Haigh, M. J. Hyland, Clive James, Kate Jennings, Paul Kelly, Amanda Lohrey, Mungo MacCallum, Shane Maloney, Robert Manne, David Marr, Maxine McKew, Drusilla Modjeska, Peter Robb, Kevin Rudd, Margaret Simons, Tim Soutphommasane, Lindsay Tanner, Malcolm Turnbull and Don Watson. The magazine generally publishes essays 3,000 to 6,000 words long. The cover stories "Being There", Mark McKenna's investigation of key Australian historian Manning Clark, and "Wendi Deng Murdoch", Eric Ellis's profile of the wife of media mogul Rupert Murdoch were around 10,000 words long. Early in 2006, The Monthly published
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    223
    The Oxford Forum

    The Oxford Forum

    • Genre: Student newspaper
    The Oxford Forum is a termly student magazine distributed to members of Oxford University, and available to others free of charge on request. First released in 2005, the magazine is produced and published independently by Oxford students. The Forum's former contributors include the following: The Forum was founded in early 2005 by Zoe Flood with an aim to debate international affairs, British politics, media and culture. Each issue of the magazine comprises six sections. In its early days, the Forum focused on international development, British politics and new media, although the magazine has since expanded its scope to look at a diverse range of issues such as homelessness, devolution, mental health, globalisation, gender, ethics and higher education.
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    224
    If

    If

    • Issues: If, March 1967
    • Genre: Science fiction magazine
    If was an American science fiction magazine launched in March 1952 by Quinn Publications, owned by James L. Quinn. Quinn hired Paul W. Fairman to be the first editor, but early circulation figures were disappointing, and Quinn fired Fairman after only three issues. Quinn then took over the editorial position himself. He stayed in that role until late 1958, though Larry T. Shaw took over most editorial duties for a year from mid-1953. In 1958 Damon Knight was hired as editor, but within three issues Quinn sold the magazine to Robert Guinn at Galaxy Publishing. The new editor at Galaxy Publishing was Horace L. Gold, who was also editing Galaxy Science Fiction. After two years Frederik Pohl took over as editor, and it was under Pohl that If achieved its greatest success, winning the Hugo Award for best professional magazine three years running from 1966 to 1968. In 1969 Guinn sold all his magazines to Universal Publishing and Distribution (UPD). Pohl decided not to continue as editor as he wanted to return to his writing career. Ejler Jakobsson became editor; the magazine was not successful under his management and circulation plummeted. In early 1974 Jim Baen took over from Jakobsson
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    225
    Pacific Monthly

    Pacific Monthly

    • Genre: Literary magazine
    Pacific Monthly was a magazine of politics, culture, literature, and opinion, published in Portland, Oregon, United States from 1898 to 1911, when it was purchased by Southern Pacific Railroad and merged with its magazine, Sunset. Sunset still carries the subtitle "The Pacific Monthly." During its years as an independent publication, Pacific Monthly's most frequent contributor was Charles Erskine Scott Wood. Other contributors included Leo Tolstoy, George Sterling, Joaquin Miller, Sinclair Lewis, and Jack London, whose novel Martin Eden first appeared in serialized form in the magazine.
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    226
    PC Mania

    PC Mania

    • Genre: Computer magazine
    PC Mania is Bulgarian computer games media originally started as a computer magazine and transformed into on-line game media in the beginning of 2009. It is a prime Bulgarian on-line media source for gaming, Internet, and technology. It was established in 1998 and was the third Bulgarian computer games magazine after the brochure Top Games and the magazines Master Games and Gamers' Workshop. It is the oldest computer games media in the country and is indisputably the most popular media for computer entertainment in Bulgaria, having the biggest circulation and biggest readers span when it was distributed in paper version. The articles concern topics such as personal computer hardware, Internet technologies, computer and console games, news, etc. PC Mania Magazine celebrated its 10th anniversary in 2008 and shortly after a major overhaul was carried out. In the spring of 2009 the magazine moved entirely on-line. The existing web page had been completely redesigned and expanded in order to serve the growing gaming community in Bulgaria. The feedback has been greatly improved with readers now being able to comment directly under the news and articles posted, as well as to discuss
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    227
    The Burlington Magazine

    The Burlington Magazine

    The Burlington Magazine is a monthly academic journal that covers the fine and decorative arts. It is the longest running art journal in the English language and it is a charitable organisation since 1986. It was established in 1903 by a group of art historians and connoisseurs which included Roger Fry, Herbert Horne, Bernard Berenson, and Charles Holmes. Its most esteemed editors have been Fry (1909-1919), Herbert Read (1933-1939), and Benedict Nicolson (1948-1978). The journal's structure was loosely based on its contemporary British publication The Connoisseur, which was mainly aimed at collectors and had firm connections with the art trade. The Burlington Magazine, however, added to this late Victorian tradition of market-based criticism new elements of historical research inspired by the leading academic German periodicals and thus created a formula that has remained almost intact to date: a combination of archival and formalist object-based art historical research juxtaposed to articles on collectors’ items and private collections, enlivened with notes on current art news, exhibitions and sales. The lavishness of this publication almost immediately created financial troubles
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    228
    The Smart Set

    The Smart Set

    • Genre: Literary magazine
    The Smart Set was a literary magazine founded in America in March 1900 by Colonel William d'Alton Mann. During its heyday under the editorship of H.L. Mencken and George Jean Nathan, The Smart Set offered many up-and-coming authors their start and gave them access to a relatively large audience. In creating The Smart Set, Mann initially sought to offer a cultural counterpart to his Town Topics, a preceding gossip rag which he used for political and social gain among New York City's elite, which would include works “by, for and about ‘The Four Hundred’” (Dolmetsch 4). With The Smart Set, Mann wanted to provide sophisticated content that would reinforce the social values of New York’s social elite and gave it the subtitle: “The Magazine of Cleverness.” He published the first issue of The Smart Set on March 10, 1900, under the editorship of Arthur Grissom, who also worked at Town Topics. As editor, Grissom created the formula of the magazine that would remain intact throughout the greater part of its existence: 160 pages containing a novelette, a short play, several poems, and several witticisms to fill blank space. Grissom died of typhoid fever a year later, and Marvin Dana took over
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    1 votes
    229
    Vula

    Vula

    Vula appeared in Cape Town in December 1984. Distributed to beach bathers and the like, it quickly became one of the country's top, alternative publications, before disappearing sometime in 1987. VVVhttp://www.italiancharm.it/virtual-tour-360-italy/index.htm
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    230
    Babaganewz

    Babaganewz

    BabagaNewz was a full-color Jewish [values] classroom magazine that was published from 2001-08. In 2009 a scaled down version was published online. The publication was for kids in 4th through 7th grade that presents current events, science, Torah, Israel, holidays and traditions through a Jewish lens. Every month during the year, Babaganewz, along with its Teachers' Guide and website at Babaganewz.com, focuses on a timeless Jewish value that provides educational depth and personal reference for children in their formative years. The magazine has many sections, including "Check It Out" (trends), "Kid Power" (Jewish kids doing great things), "News 'N' Views", and "Babagonuts" (puzzles). On the cover of each magazine, the Jewish month (e.g. Tishrei, Kislev, Iyar) and the Jewish value are vibrantly stated. Online activities include interviews, educational games, and virtual tours of Israel. BabagaNewz is published by The AVI CHAI Foundation in partnership with Jewish Family & Life. BabagaNewz was a full-color Jewish [values][1] classroom magazine that was published from 2001-08. In 2009 a scaled down version was published online. The publication was for kids in 4th through 7th grade
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    231
    Barely Legal

    Barely Legal

    • Genre: Men's magazine
    Barely Legal is the name of an adult magazine targeted primarily at heterosexual men. The magazine features explicit photos of naked young women, all of whom are at least 18 years old. The models are selected and photographed to emphasize their youth. The pictorials do not feature simulated or hardcore sex with men; models either appear by themselves or in groups of two or more women. In each issue, one of the models is singled out as the "Barely Legal Teen Queen of the Month," whose pictorial includes the centerfold. Each pictorial is accompanied by what purports to be a profile of or interview with the model, although a disclaimer in the fine print of each issue's indicia clearly states that this text is fiction and likely has little to no basis in reality. These profiles tend to pander to the readers' fantasies by portraying the models as somewhat naive and sexually inexperienced, but curious and eager to start satisfying their sexual appetites, especially with the older men who make up the main demographic of the magazine, now that they have reached the age of consent. In addition to the pictorials, most issues feature a letters column with responses (attributed to the models)
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    232
    Blackwood's Magazine

    Blackwood's Magazine

    Blackwood's Magazine was a British magazine and miscellany printed between 1817 and 1980. It was founded by the publisher William Blackwood and was originally called the Edinburgh Monthly Magazine. The first number appeared in April 1817 under the editorship of Thomas Pringle and James Cleghorn. The journal was unsuccessful and Blackwood fired Pringle and Cleghorn and relaunched the journal as Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine under his own editorship. The journal eventually adopted the shorter name and from the relaunch often referred to itself as Maga. The title page bore the image of George Buchanan, a 16th-century Scottish historian. Blackwood's was conceived as a rival to the Whig-supporting Edinburgh Review. Compared to the rather staid tone of The Quarterly Review, the other main Tory work, Maga was ferocious and combative. This is due primarily to the work of its principal writer John Wilson, who wrote under the pseudonym of Christopher North. Never trusted with the editorship, he nevertheless wrote much of the magazine along with the other major contributors John Gibson Lockhart and William Maginn. Their mixture of satire, reviews and criticism both barbed and insightful was
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    233
    Boston magazine

    Boston magazine

    Boston is a monthly magazine concerning life in the Greater Boston area and has been in publication for more than 40 years. The magazine is self-described as: Sophisticated, intellectual, and full of charm, Boston is a world center of higher education, medicine, finance, and biotechnology, with some of the nation's leading cultural institutions, best restaurants, trendiest shopping, top universities, and smartest people. Then there's the other Boston: a city of power struggles, politics, expensive real estate, and cutting-edge music and arts. The magazine claims a publication of 500,000 issues per month, its percentage of newsstand copies sold is among the highest of any magazine of any kind in the United States, and it has been named among the three best city magazines in the nation seven times in the last eight years by the City and Regional Magazine Association. "Best of Boston" (registered trademark of the magazine) is an award given by Boston magazine in an annual issue which is "the definitive guide to the city’s finest". This award is given in a wide range of categories that vary from year-to-year. Recent awards include best clam chowder, cookware, day spa, gym, jewelry
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    234
    CRAWL magazine

    CRAWL magazine

    • Genre: Automobile magazine
    CRAWL Magazine is a magazine published by CRAWL2 Media, LLC. CRAWL Magazine first appeared in November 2005 with the introduction of its premiere issue. The CRAWL Magazine title was acquired in June, 2009 by CRAWL2 Media LLC and is published bimonthly. The magazine is distributed for retail sale in the United States and Canada and is independently published. Subscriptions are available for worldwide delivery. CRAWL Magazine is known for its photography, edgy editorial and dedication to documenting the world of offroading and rockcrawling specifically. The taglines Hardcore Offroad speak to the core of the sport that CRAWL covers. The editorial focus is primarily on trail reports from rides and get-togethers around the country; trail rigs (built both by the amateur enthusiast and professional); hardcore tech that the amateur enthusiast can immediately apply to their own vehicles and; professional rockcrawling and rock racing event coverage such as W.E.Rock and XRRA.
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    235
    Electronics Weekly

    Electronics Weekly

    • Genre: Computer magazine
    Electronics Weekly is a weekly trade journal for electronics professionals which has been published by Reed Business Information for 47 years. Electronics Weekly is published by the Reed Electronics Group, an arm of Reed Business Information, which is a division of Reed Elsevier. Electronics Weekly is available in print and electronic formats, and the readership is audited by BPA Worldwide, which verifies its circulation twice yearly. The magazine's circulation in 2007 was 40,918. Topics covered within the magazine include news and features on design, components, production and research, as well as news stories and product listings. Career Moves is the magazine's recruitment section, which provides listings of electronics jobs. Electronics Weekly is available free to qualified electronics professionals. The bulk of revenue received to fund the magazine comes from display and recruitment advertising. ElectronicsWeekly.com is a website for electronics professionals and provides users with news, analysis, features and business stories. ElectronicsWeekly.com also provides information via blogs and RSS feeds. The site features Circuit Break which includes a daily Dilbert, sudoku, Slack
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    236
    Finance New Europe

    Finance New Europe

    Finance New Europe is an English language magazine and website based in Prague, Czech Republic. It has been published since 2003 and is known to be the only business magazine focused on the central and eastern European (CEE) region as a whole, rather than on one single country. The magazine is a bi-monthly (issued once every two months), and is printed on glossy color paper stock. Starting with the October-November 2006 issue, the main FNE magazine is accompanied by a stand-alone special supplement on a topic of interest to its readers. FNE's most recent printed issues were the February-March 2007 and the December 2006-January 2007 editions, the latter of which featured its annual Achievement Awards. FNE's main magazine totals 64 interior pages, and has regular features such as the Focus omnibus of stories, Regional roundup (brief news bulletins separated by country), Eye on banks, two pages of statistics and one non-business feature, Almost the last page. True to its title, FNE emphasizes business in the "New" Europe, i.e. recent European Union inductees Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, the Baltic States, Slovakia, Slovenia, Bulgaria and Romania. It also covers non-EU nations of
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    237
    Game World Navigator

    Game World Navigator

    Game World Navigator (Russian: Навигатор игрового мира) is a Russian computer games magazine founded in 1997. It is owned by Navigator Publishing, which also produces other gaming magazines. The magazine is published monthly and features news of the gaming industry, previews of future games and reviews of the latest popular games. Much attention is being paid to massively multiplayer online games. The magazine's logo is hidden on each cover.
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    238
    London Magazine

    London Magazine

    • Genre: Literary magazine
    The London Magazine is a historied publication of arts, literature and miscellaneous interests. Its history ranges nearly three centuries and several reincarnations, publishing the likes of William Wordsworth, William S. Burroughs and John Keats. The London Magazine was founded in 1732 in political opposition to the Tory-based Gentleman's Magazine and ran for 53 years until its closure in 1785. In 1820, the London Magazine was resurrected by the publishers Baldwin, Craddock & Joy under the editorship of John Scott who formatted the magazine along the lines of the Edinburgh publication Blackwood's Magazine. It was during this time the magazine enjoyed its greatest literary prosperity publishing poetic luminaries such as William Wordsworth, Percy Bysshe Shelley, John Clare and John Keats. In September 1821, the first of two installments of Thomas De Quincey's Confessions of an English Opium-Eater appeared in the journal; these were later published in book form. Scott quickly began a literary row with members of the Blackwood's, in particular with Dr. John Gibson Lockhart in regards to many subjects including the Blackwood's virule criticism of the Cockney School under which Leigh
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    239
    Metropolis

    Metropolis

    • Genre: Listings magazine
    Metropolis is an 80-page free weekly city guide, news and classified ads glossy magazine published by Crisscross KK targeting English-speaking foreigners in Tokyo, Japan. As of April 2011, its circulation was about 30,000. The magazine was first published in 1994 as the Tokyo Classified. Early editions, in the broadsheet style, consisted of classified advertisements sourced from shop notice boards. Initially distributed with the Daily Yomiuri, the company created an independent distribution network after the newspaper censored advertisements it found objectionable. The magazine is distributed to companies, embassies, hotels, bars, and restaurants. The magazine was originally owned and operated by Mark and Mary Devlin. It was renamed Metropolis in 2001. Since 1999 the magazine hosted an annual Halloween party "Glitterball" at Roppongi's Velfarre club. Since 2003, Metropolis has donated some of the profits each year to the Make-A-Wish Foundation of Japan and the YMCA. Metropolis is owned by Japan Inc. Holdings (JIH).
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    240
    NOW!

    NOW!

    NOW! was a British newsmagazine founded by entrepreneur Sir James Goldsmith, partly as a vehicle for his right-wing political opinions. It was established in 1979, taking advantage of the market opportunity created by the closure of The Times and The Sunday Times during a labour dispute. Despite good sales for the first issue, NOW! misjudged the market and the competition from Sunday newspapers and the newsmagazines The Economist, Time and Newsweek. It never met circulation targets and incurred heavy losses. After 84 issues, Goldsmith closed it in 1981. Issue one featured on the cover a grainy black-and-white photograph of Brigadier Khalil al-Azzawi, Director of Iraqi Military Intelligence with the banner "Exclusive: How this man's agents spy on Britain..." and a tag for a "Special NOW! Enquiry" on "What the Young Generation really thinks". Its editor was Anthony Shrimsley and senior staff and contributors included, Frank Johnson, Clive Barnes, Art Buchwald and Patrick Hutber. This first issue was dated September 14-20 1979, ran to 142 pages and was priced at 50p.
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    241
    Parents

    Parents

    Parents, published by Meredith Corporation, is an American mass circulation monthly magazine that features scientific information on child development geared to help parents in raising their children. It was first published in October 1926 and soon was selling 100,000 copies a month. Its editorial focus is on the daily needs and concerns of mothers with young children. The glossy monthly features information about child health, safety, behavior, discipline and education. There are also stories on women's health, nutrition, pregnancy, marriage, and beauty. It is aimed primarily at women ages 18–35 with young children. Columns include As They Grow, which cover age-specific child development issues, as well as the reader-generated Baby Bloopers, It Worked for Me and Goody Bag. The magazine also produces a website, an iPhone app for kids, Parents Flash Cards, and a blog called GoodyBlog.com. WCBS-TV aired segments about this magazine during its afternoon newscasts throughout the 1990s. The magazine was started by George J. Hecht in 1926, and he hired Clara Savage Littledale to be its first editor. She was followed by Mary Buchanan. The magazine was sold to Gruner + Jahr in 1978, at
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    242
    Russian Life

    Russian Life

    • Genre: World magazine
    Russian Life, previously known as The USSR and Soviet Life, is a 64-page color bimonthly magazine of Russian culture. It celebrated its 50th birthday in October 2006. The magazine is written and edited by American and Russian staffers and freelancers. While its distant heritage is as a "polite propaganda" tool of the Soviet and Russian government, since 1995 it has been privately owned and published by a US company, Russian Information Services. In October 1956, a new English language magazine, The USSR, appeared on newsstands in major US cities. Given the level of anti-communist sentiment at the time, it would hardly have seemed an auspicious name under which to launch such a magazine title. The publication was edited by Enver Mamedov (born 1923), a polyglot native of Baku, who had the distinction of being one of the youngest Soviet diplomats when he was appointed the press secretary of the Soviet Embassy in Italy in 1943, and who had been the handler of the Soviet prosecutors' star witness, Friedrich Paulus, at the Nuremberg Trials. Meanwhile, at newsstands in Moscow, Leningrad, Kiev and other Soviet cities, Amerika magazine made its second debut. Amerika had been inaugurated in
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    243
    Sojourners Magazine

    Sojourners Magazine

    Sojourners magazine is progressive monthly publication of the Christian social justice organization Sojourners, which arose out of the Sojourners Community. It was first published in 1971 under the original title of The Post-American. The magazine publishes editorials and articles on Christianity and politics, the church and social issues, social justice, and Christian living. Articles frequently feature coverage of fair trade, interfaith dialogue, peacemaking, and work to alleviate poverty. The offices of the magazine are in Washington, D.C. The founding editor-in-chief is Jim Wallis, author of God's Politics; the editor is Jim Rice. Sojourners has consistently won awards from both the Associated Church Press and the Evangelical Press Association. In 2008 and 2009, "Sojourners" won the first place “best in class” award from both religious press associations. Sojourners magazine was originally published under the name "The Post American," coming out of the Sojourners Community. The name was changed to "Sojourners" in 1975, when the community moved from Trinity Evangelical Divinity School in Deerfield, Illinois to Columbia Heights in Washington, D.C.. The mission of Sojourners is
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    244
    The Art Journal

    The Art Journal

    The Art Journal, published in London, was the most important Victorian magazine on art. It was founded in 1839 by Hodgson & Graves, print publishers, 6 Pall Mall, with the title the Art Union Monthly Journal, the first issue of 750 copies appearing 15 February 1839. Hodgson & Graves hired Samuel Carter Hall as editor, assisted by James Dafforne. Hall soon became principal proprietor, but, unable to turn a profit on his own, the London publisher George Virtue purchased into Hall's Art Union Monthly Journal in 1848, retaining Hall as editor. Virtue renamed the periodical The Art Journal in 1849. In 1851, Hall's engravings, 150 pictures from the private collection of the Queen and Prince Albert, were featured in The Art Journal as the "Great Exhibition of 1851". Though this feature was popular, the publication remained unprofitable, forcing Hall to sell off his share of the journal to Virtue, while staying on as editor. In 1852, the journal finally turned a profit. As editor, Hall exposed the profits that custom-houses were earning by importing old masters, and showed how paintings are manufactured in England. Simultaneously, The Art Journal became notable for its honest portrayal of
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    245
    The Delineator

    The Delineator

    The Delineator was an American women's magazine of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, founded by the Butterick Publishing Company in 1869 under the name The Metropolitan Monthly. Its name was changed in 1875. In November 1926, under the editorship of Mrs. William Brown Meloney, it absorbed The Designer, founded in 1887 and published by the Standard Fashion Company, a Butterick subsidiary. One of The Delineator's managing editors was writer Theodore Dreiser, who worked with other members of the staff such as Sarah Field Splint (later known for writing cookbooks ) and Arthur Sullivant Hoffman. The Delineator featured the Butterick sewing patterns and provided an in-depth look at the fashion of the day. Butterick also produced quarterly catalogs of fashion patterns in the 1920s and early 1930s. In addition to clothing patterns, the magazine published photos and drawings of embroidery and needlework that could be used to adorn both clothing and items for the home. It also included articles on all forms of home decor. It also published fiction, including many short stories by L. Frank Baum. Endres, Kathleen L. and Therese L. Lueck, eds. Women's Periodicals in the United States:
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    246
    The New Republic

    The New Republic

    • Issues: The New Republic, 29 Jan 1990
    • Genre: News magazine
    The New Republic (TNR) is an American magazine of politics and the arts published continuously since 1914. A weekly for most of its history, it is currently published twenty times per year with a circulation of approximately 50,000. In March 2012, Chris Hughes became the publication's owner, editor-in-chief, and publisher. Domestically, TNR as of 2011 supports a largely modern liberal stance on fiscal and social issues, according to editor Franklin Foer, who stated that it "invented the modern usage of the term 'liberal', and it's one of our historical legacies and obligations to be involved in the ongoing debate over what exactly liberalism means and stands for." As of 2004, however, some, like Anne Kossedd and Steven Rendall, contend that it is not as liberal as it was before 1974. The magazine's outlook is associated with the Democratic Leadership Council and "New Democrats" such as former US President Bill Clinton and Connecticut Senator Joseph Lieberman, who received the magazine's endorsement in the 2004 Democratic primary; so did Barack Obama over Hillary Clinton in 2008. Whilst defending federal programs, like Medicare and the EPA, it has advocated some policies that, while
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    247
    The Walrus

    The Walrus

    The Walrus is a Canadian general interest magazine which publishes long form journalism on Canadian and international affairs, along with fiction and poetry by Canadian writers. It launched in September 2003, as an attempt to create a Canadian equivalent to American magazines such as Harper's, The Atlantic Monthly or The New Yorker. The magazine's mandate is "to be a national general interest magazine about Canada and its place in the world. We are committed to publishing the best work by the best writers from Canada and elsewhere on a wide range of topics for readers who are curious about the world." The magazine is published by the charitable, not-for-profit Walrus Foundation, and won the 2006 National Magazine Award for Magazine of the Year in Canada. In 2002, David Berlin, a former editor and owner of the Literary Review of Canada, began promoting his vision of a world-class Canadian magazine. This led him to meet with then-Harper's editor Lewis H. Lapham to discuss creating a "Harper's North," which would combine the American magazine with 40 pages of Canadian content. As Berlin searched for funding to create that content, a mutual friend put him in touch with Ken Alexander, a
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    Third Way Magazine

    Third Way Magazine

    Third Way is a UK current-affairs magazine written from a Christian perspective. It is distinctively biblical, fairly intellectual and culturally aware. It can call on well-known Christian thinkers and writers (its columnists include high-profile journalists, clergy and BBC comedy writers) to comment on news issues, much as the New Statesman or Spectator calls on those from left or right. Third Way magazine is not affiliated with either the minor British political party Third Way, or with the centrist "Third Way" policies of Tony Blair and Bill Clinton. In 1974, thousands of Christians meeting at the First International Congress on World Evangelization held in Lausanne, Switzerland signed a covenant pledging to commit themselves to bringing the Christian gospel to bear on social issues. This sparked a lively debate in the Christian monthly magazine Crusade between the Rt Rev David Sheppard, later Bishop of Liverpool, and the Rev John Pridmore. The debate inspired the editor of Crusade, John Capon, to launch Third Way as a fortnightly magazine in January 1977, putting a Christian perspective on current affairs and the arts. Its title referred to a comment by the theologian Os
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    Vedem

    Vedem

    • Genre: Literary magazine
    Vedem (In the Lead) was a Czech-language literary magazine that existed from 1942 to 1944 in the Terezín concentration camp, during the Holocaust. It was hand-produced by a group of boys living in the Home One barracks, led by editor-in-chief Petr Ginz. Altogether, some 700 pages of Vedem survived World War II. The magazine was written, edited, and illustrated entirely by young boys, aged twelve to fifteen, who lived in Barracks L417, or Home One, which the boys referred to as the Republic of Shkid. The content of Vedem included poems, essays, jokes, dialogues, literary reviews, stories, and drawings. The issues were then copied manually and read around the barracks on Friday night. For some time, it was also posted on the barracks bulletin board, however, it was decided to discontinue this practice because it was deemed dangerous in case of SS inspections. The inspiration for the authors of Vedem was their teacher, twenty-eight year old "Professor" Valtr Eisinger, who was appointed to supervise the boys in that barracks. He fostered their love of literature and encouraged them to express themselves creatively, describing both what they witnessed (often in a humorous tone) and
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    Writers Notes Magazine

    Writers Notes Magazine

    • Genre: Literary magazine
    Writers Notes Magazine was an American magazine that published fiction, poetry, essays, humor, interviews, and visual arts; it was established by in 2002 and was published by Hopewell Publishers in Titusville, New Jersey. Christopher Klim was the senior editor. The magazine printed interviews with William Styron, Tim O'Brien, Mary Gordon, and others. The magazine at one time hosted an annual book award and prose award. WorldCat lists no libraries holding copies of the publication any longer. The publication was discontinued in 2006.
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