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Best Magazine Issue of All Time

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Best Magazine Issue of All Time is a public top list created by Listnerd on rankly.com on November 27th 2012. Items on the Best Magazine Issue of All Time top list are added by the rankly.com community and ranked using our secret ranking sauce. Best Magazine Issue of All Time has gotten 489 views and has gathered 621 votes from 621 voters. O O

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    Betty Parsons

    • Magazine: Mino Argento
    • Cover artist: Betty Parsons
    Betty Parsons, born Betty Bierne Pierson, (January 31, 1900 – July 23, 1982) was an American artist, art dealer and collector known for her early promotion of Abstract Expressionism. Betty Bierne Pierson was born in 1900, the second of three daughters. She came from a wealthy New York family that spent their time in New York City, Newport, Palm Beach and Paris. At the age of ten Parsons was enrolled in Miss Chapin's school for girls in New York. She remained there for five years, but she was a mediocre student and easily bored. In 1913, Parsons visited the Armory show, the International Exhibition of Modern Art. She was delighted and inspired by what she saw and described this pivotal moment years later, "It was exciting, full of color and life. I felt like those paintings. I couldn't explain it, but I decided then that this was the world I wanted... art." Although her parents disapproved, she soon began studying art in the studio of Gutzon Borglum, who she described as a poor teacher. In 1919 Parsons married Schuyler Livingston Parsons, an affluent, New York City socialite ten years her senior. Her family hoped that after marriage Parsons would settle down into a conventional
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    Frontier Times 1960 Fall

    Frontier Times 1960 Fall

    • Magazine: Frontier Times
    • Cover artist: O'Carroll McGaughy
    The Red Buffalo, That's what the Indians called the dreaded prairie fire!, Cover Contest Results, The Echo Canyon War, Fort Lincoln's Phantom Forger, The Lost Van Duzen Mine
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    Zodiac #10

    • Magazine: Zodiac
    Zodiac #10 is the 10th issue of the Zodiac magazine, published in Milan.  This issue was published in 1962.
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    The Saturday Evening Post

    The Saturday Evening Post

    • Interior illustrations by: Harry Anderson
    The Saturday Evening Post is a bimonthly American magazine. It was published weekly under this title from 1897 until 1969, and quarterly and then bimonthly from 1971. While the publication traces its historical roots to Benjamin Franklin, The Pennsylvania Gazette was first published in 1728 by Samuel Keimer. The following year (1729), Franklin acquired the Gazette from Keimer for a small sum and turned it into the largest circulation newspaper in all the colonies. It continued publication until 1800. The Saturday Evening Post was founded in 1821 and grew to become the most widely circulated weekly magazine in America. The magazine gained prominent status under the leadership of its longtime editor George Horace Lorimer (1899–1937). The Saturday Evening Post published current event articles, editorials, human interest pieces, humor, illustrations, a letter column, poetry (with contributions submitted by readers), single-panel gag cartoons (including Hazel by Ted Key) and stories by the leading writers of the time. It was known for commissioning lavish illustrations and original works of fiction. Illustrations were featured on the cover and embedded in stories and advertising. Some
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    Frontier Times 1970 May

    Frontier Times 1970 May

    • Magazine: Frontier Times
    • Cover artist: Darwin Van Campen
    Death Valley's Fast Fading Ghost Towns, Motion Pictures Vignettes, Sacred Arrows of the Cheyennes, Saga of the Camp Bird, The Tow Boys of Falls Creek, Man on the Dodge
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    Good Housekeeping

    Good Housekeeping

    • Interior illustrations by: Harry Anderson
    Good Housekeeping is a women's magazine owned by the Hearst Corporation, featuring articles about women's interests, product testing by The Good Housekeeping Institute, recipes, diet, health as well as literary articles. It is well known for the "Good Housekeeping Seal," popularly known as the "Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval." The magazine was founded May 2, 1885 by Clark W. Bryan in Holyoke, Massachusetts. The magazine achieved a circulation of 300,000 by 1911, at which time it was bought by the Hearst Corporation. In 1966 it reached 5,500,000 readers. Good Housekeeping is one of the "Seven Sisters", a group of women's service magazines. The Hearst Corporation created a British edition along the same lines in 1922. Famous writers who have contributed to the magazine include Somerset Maugham, Edwin Markham, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Frances Parkinson Keyes, A. J. Cronin, Virginia Woolf, and Evelyn Waugh. In 1900, the "Experiment Station", the predecessor to the Good Housekeeping Research Institute (GHRI), was founded. The formal opening of the headquarters of GHRI - the Model Kitchen, Testing Station for Household Devices, and Domestic Science Laboratory - occurred in January
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    Frontier Times 1959 Summer

    Frontier Times 1959 Summer

    • Magazine: Frontier Times
    • Cover artist: Taylor Oughton
    "What A Life!" --U.S. Army 1863, "Your Law Was On Your Hip, Son!" California Range War, My Father Planned the James Boys' Capture
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    Frontier Times 1965 January

    • Magazine: Frontier Times
    • Cover artist: Taylor Oughton
    Book Bonus! Cow By The Tail! Part Two by the irrepressible Jessie James Benton  Can an ole Kentucky boy turn Injun? The Fiddling Trapper Oasis in the Mojave It's Fun to Own a Ghost Town! Little Things, Dark Forest, and Gold The Bonney Brothers A Black Day for Mr. Brown Powder Face Hated the Whites The Man Who Was Afraid Lone Prairie Graves
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    Strand Magazine

    Strand Magazine

    • Interior illustrations by: Richard Caton Woodville
    The Strand Magazine was a monthly magazine composed of fictional stories and factual articles founded by George Newnes. It was first published in the United Kingdom from January 1891 to March 1950 running to 711 issues, though the first issue was on sale well before Christmas 1890. Its immediate popularity is evidenced by an initial sale of nearly 300,000. Sales increased in the early months, before settling down to a circulation of almost 500,000 copies a month which lasted well into the 1930s. It was edited by Herbert Greenhough Smith from 1891 to 1930. The Sherlock Holmes short stories by Arthur Conan Doyle were first published in The Strand with illustrations by Sidney Paget. With the serialization of Doyle's The Hound of the Baskervilles, sales reached their peak. Readers lined up outside the magazine's offices, waiting to get the next installment. The A. J. Raffles, a "gentleman thief", stories of Ernest William Hornung first appeared in The Strand in the 1890s. Other contributors included Grant Allen, Margery Allingham, J. E. Preston Muddock, H.G. Wells, E.C. Bentley, Agatha Christie, C.B. Fry, Walter Goodman, E. Nesbit, W.W. Jacobs, Rudyard Kipling, Arthur Morrison, Dorothy
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    35

    35

    • Magazine: Cick Magazine
    35 (thirty-five) is the natural number following 34 and preceding 36. 35 is the sum of the first five triangular numbers, making it a tetrahedral number. 35 is the number of ways that three things can be selected from a set of seven unique things also known as the "combination of seven things taken three at a time". 35 is a centered cube number, a pentagonal number and a pentatope number. 35 is a highly cototient number, since there are more solutions to the equation x - φ(x) = 35 than there are for any other integers below it except 1. There are 35 free hexominoes, the polyominoes made from six squares. Since the greatest prime factor of 35 + 1 = 1226 is 613, which is obviously more than 35 twice, 35 is a Størmer number. 35 is a discrete semiprime (or biprime) (5 × 7); the tenth, and the first with 5 as the lowest non-unitary factor. The aliquot sum of 35 is 13 this being the second composite number with such an aliquot sum; the first being the cube 27. 35 is the last member of the first triple cluster of semiprimes 33,34,35. 85,86,87 is the second such triple discrete semiprime cluster. 35 is the highest number one can count to on one's fingers using base 6. 35 is also: 35 A.D.,
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    Frontier Times 1961 Winter

    Frontier Times 1961 Winter

    • Magazine: Frontier Times
    • Cover artist: Clay McGaughy
    Cord of Death, Civil War Guerrillas in the West!, Young Man's Country, Wyoming's Badman, Gunnison Massacre, River of Gold
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    Frontier Times 1967 July

    Frontier Times 1967 July

    • Magazine: Frontier Times
    • Cover artist: Dan Muller
    Walt Coburn's Tally Book, Will Rogers and Charlie Russell, Mount Franklin's Lost Treasure, "God and the Apaches", The Mason-Henry Gang, I Helped Capture Cherokee Bill!, Swift "Justice" on Chilkoot Pass, Doctor Grandma French
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    Make #13

    • Magazine: Make
    This is the 13th issue of Make magazine. The main articles are around magic and how to make your own magic tricks.
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    Cornhill Magazine

    Cornhill Magazine

    • Interior illustrations by: Richard Caton Woodville
    The Cornhill Magazine was a Victorian magazine and literary journal named after Cornhill Street in London. Cornhill was founded by George Murray Smith in 1859 and was published until 1975. It was a literary journal with a selection of articles on diverse subjects and serialisations of new novels. Smith hoped to gain some of the same readership enjoyed by All the Year Round, a similar magazine owned by Charles Dickens, and he employed as editor William Thackeray, Dickens' great literary rival at the time. The magazine was phenomenally successful, selling many more issues than anyone had thought likely, but within a few years circulation dropped rapidly. It also gained a reputation for rather safe, inoffensive content in the late Victorian era. A mark of the high regard in which it was held was its publication of Leaves from the Journal of our Life in the Highlands by Queen Victoria. The stories were often illustrated and it contained works from some of the foremost artists of the time including: George du Maurier, Edwin Landseer, Frederic Leighton, and John Everett Millais. Some of its subsequent editors included G. H. Lewes, Leslie Stephen, Ronald Gorell Barnes, James Payn, Peter
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    Punch

    Punch

    • Interior illustrations by: John Leech
    Punch, or the London Charivari was a British weekly magazine of humour and satire established in 1841 by Henry Mayhew and engraver Ebenezer Landells. Historically, it was most influential in the 1840s and 50s, when it helped to coin the term "cartoon" in its modern sense as a humorous illustration. It became a British institution, but after the 1940s, when its circulation peaked, it went into a long decline, finally closing in 1992. It was revived in 1996, but closed again in 2002. Punch was founded on 17 July 1841 by Henry Mayhew and engraver Ebenezer Landells, on an initial investment of £25. It was jointly edited by Mayhew and Mark Lemon. Initially it was subtitled The London Charivari, this being a reference to a satirical humour magazine published in France as Le Charivari. Reflecting their satiric and humorous intent, the two editors took for their name and masthead the anarchic glove puppet, Mr. Punch, of Punch and Judy; the name also referred to a joke made early on about one of the magazine's first editors, Lemon, that "punch is nothing without lemon". Mayhew ceased to be joint editor in 1842 and became "suggestor in chief" until he severed his connection in 1845. The
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    Tatler

    Tatler

    • Cover artist: Fortunino Matania
    • Interior illustrations by: Fortunino Matania
    Tatler has been the name of several British journals and magazines, each of which has viewed itself as the successor of the original literary and society journal founded by Richard Steele in 1709. The current incarnation, founded in 1901, is a glossy magazine published by Condé Nast Publications focusing on the glamorous lives and lifestyles of the upper class. A 300th anniversary party for the magazine was held in October 2009. The original Tatler was founded in 1709 by Richard Steele, who used the nom de plume "Isaac Bickerstaff, Esquire", the first such consistently adopted journalistic persona, which adapted to the first person, as it were, the 17th-century genre of "characters", as first established in English by Sir Thomas Overbury and soon to be expanded by Lord Shaftesbury's Characteristics (1711). Steele's idea was to publish the news and gossip heard in London coffeehouses, hence the title, and seemingly, from the opening paragraph, to leave the subject of politics to the newspapers, while presenting Whiggish views and correcting middle-class manners, while instructing "these Gentlemen, for the most part being Persons of strong Zeal, and weak Intellects...what to think."
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    Vogue September 2007

    • Magazine: VOGUE
    The September 2007 issue of Vogue magazine was the largest issue published during its history at 840 pages, of which, 727 were advertising pages. The cover model for the issue was Sienna Miller.
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    Frontier Times 1957 Winter

    Frontier Times 1957 Winter

    • Magazine: Frontier Times
    • Cover artist: Randy Steffen
    1st issue of the new series.

    Canyon of the Skeletons, Gentleman Killer, The Blizzard, "The Fightin'est Ranger", The Fight That Finished Tombstone, The Donner Tragedy, They Could Laugh At Death
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    Yésica Toscanini

    Yésica Toscanini (born 26 March 1986 in Junín, Argentina) is a professional Argentinian fashion model. She appeared in the 2006 and 2007 Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issues. She was photographed for the cover of the Argentinian edition of Cosmopolitan and twice for Para Ti magazine. She also appeared in the Abercrombie & Fitch catalog of 2006. She played the high school sweetheart of Enrique Iglesias in the music video for "Do You Know? (The Ping Pong Song)". In 2008 she was selected as the girl for the Intimissimi spring–summer ad campaign. Through legal counsel she requested, and was granted the right, to have all her images and data to be removed from internet search results in Argentina.
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    Harper's Magazine

    Harper's Magazine

    • Cover artist: Winslow Homer
    • Interior illustrations by: Winslow Homer
    Harper's Magazine (also called Harper's) is a monthly magazine of literature, politics, culture, finance, and the arts. Launched in June 1850, it is the second-oldest continuously published monthly magazine in the U.S. (Scientific American is the oldest). The current editor is Ellen Rosenbush, who replaced Roger Hodge in January 2010. Harper's Magazine has won many National Magazine Awards. Harper's Magazine was launched as Harper's New Monthly Magazine in June 1850, by the New York City publisher Harper & Brothers; who also founded Harper's Bazaar magazine, later growing to become HarperCollins Publishing. The first press run, of 7,500 copies, sold out almost immediately; circulation was some 50,000 issues six months later. The early issues reprinted material already published in England, but the magazine soon was publishing the work of American artists and writers, and in time commentary by the likes of Winston Churchill and Woodrow Wilson. The first appearance in print of portions of Moby Dick occurred in Harper's Magazine in Oct. 1851 under the title, "The Town-Ho's Story". In 1962, Harper & Brothers merged with Row, Peterson & Company, becoming Harper & Row (now
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    Nickelodeon

    • Cover artist: Craig Thompson
    • Interior illustrations by: Craig Thompson
    Nickelodeon Magazine was a children's magazine based on the Nickelodeon cable channel. Its first incarnation appeared in 1990, and was distributed at participating Pizza Hut restaurants; this version of the magazine only saw two issues. The magazine returned in Summer 1993 with different type of content, primarily humor and comics. Originally published on a quarterly basis, it switched to bi-monthly with the February/March 1994 issue. It then went to 10 times per year starting March 1995, with a bi-annual December/January and June/July issue. In spite of being related to the network it was named after, Nickelodeon Magazine covered all sorts of topics for kids, not just what was on the network. The magazine contained informative non-fiction pieces, humor, interviews, comics, pranks, and recipes (such as green slime cake). The magazine's mascot was Zelda Van Gutters, a Lakeland Terrier dog who appeared throughout the magazine with sarcastic asides on the articles. She was also the star of the magazine's regular photo comic strip "Ruffing It". Other contributors included Dan Abdo, John Accurso, Bill Alger, Graham Annable, Ian Baker, Martin Cendreda, Greg Cook, Dave Cooper, Jordan
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    Ladies' Home Journal

    Ladies' Home Journal

    • Interior illustrations by: Harry Anderson
    Ladies' Home Journal is an American magazine published by the Meredith Corporation. It first appeared on February 16, 1883, and eventually became one of the leading women's magazines of the 20th century in the United States. It was the first American magazine to reach 1 million subscribers in 1907. Ladies' Home Journal is one of the Seven Sisters, a group of women's service magazines. The Ladies' Home Journal arose from a popular single-page supplement in the American magazine Tribune and Farmer titled Women at Home. Women at Home was written by Louisa Knapp Curtis, wife of the magazine's publisher Cyrus H. K. Curtis. After a year it became an independent publication with Knapp as editor for the first six years. Its original name was The Ladies Home Journal and Practical Housekeeper, but she dropped the last three words in 1886. It rapidly became the leading American magazine of its type, reaching a circulation of more than one million copies in ten years. At the turn of the 20th century, the magazine published the work of muckrakers and social reformers such as Jane Addams. In 1901 it published two articles highlighting the early architectural designs of Frank Lloyd Wright. During
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    Illustrated London News

    Illustrated London News

    • Interior illustrations by: Richard Caton Woodville
    The Illustrated London News was the world's first illustrated weekly newspaper; the first issue appeared on Saturday 14 May 1842. It was published weekly until 1971 and then increasingly less frequently until publication ceased in 2003. Printer and newsagent Herbert Ingram moved from Nottingham to London in early 1842. Inspired by how the Weekly Chronicle always sold more copies when it featured an illustration, he had the idea of publishing a weekly newspaper that would contain pictures in every edition. Ingram's initial idea was that it would concentrate on crime reporting, as per the later Illustrated Police News, but his collaborator, engraver Henry Vizetelly, convinced him that a newspaper covering more general news would enjoy greater success. Ingram rented an office, recruited artists and reporters, and employed as his editor Frederick William Naylor Bayley (1808–1853), formerly editor of the National Omnibus. The first issue of the The Illustrated London News appeared on Saturday 14 May 1842. Its 16 pages and 32 wood-engravings covered topics such as the war in Afghanistan, a train crash in France, a survey of the candidates for the US presidential election, extensive crime
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    Redbook

    Redbook

    • Interior illustrations by: Harry Anderson
    Redbook is an American women's magazine published by the Hearst Corporation. It is one of the "Seven Sisters", a group of women's service magazines. The magazine was first published in May 1903 as The Red Book Illustrated by Stumer, Rosenthal and Eckstein, a firm of Chicago retail merchants. The name was changed to The Red Book Magazine shortly thereafter. Its first editor, from 1903 to 1906, was Trumbull White, who wrote that the name was appropriate because, "Red is the color of cheerfulness, of brightness, of gayety." In its early years, the magazine published short fiction by well-known authors, including many women writers, along with photographs of popular actresses and other women of note. Within two years the magazine was a success, climbing to a circulation of 300,000. When White left to edit Appleton's Magazine, he was replaced by Karl Edwin Harriman, who edited The Red Book Magazine and its sister publications The Blue Book and The Green Book until 1912. Under Harriman the magazine was promoted as "the largest illustrated fiction magazine in the world" and increased its price from 10 cents to 15 cents. According to Endres and Lueck (p. 299), "Red Book was trying to
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    Look and Learn

    • Cover artist: Fortunino Matania
    • Interior illustrations by: Fortunino Matania
    Look and Learn was a British weekly educational magazine for children published by Fleetway Publications Ltd from 1962 until 1982. It contained educational text articles that covered a wide variety of topics from volcanoes to the Loch Ness Monster; a long running science fiction comic strip, The Trigan Empire; adaptations of famous works of literature into comic-strip form, such as Lorna Doone; and serialized works of fiction such as The First Men in the Moon. The illustrators who worked on the magazine included Fortunino Matania, John Millar Watt, Peter Jackson, John Worsley, Patrick Nicolle, Ron Embleton, Gerry Embleton, C. L. Doughty, Wilf Hardy, Dan Escott, Angus McBride, Oliver Frey, James E. McConnell, Kenneth Lilly, Graham Coton, Ralph Bruce, R. B. Davis, Severino Baraldi and Clive Uptton. Among other things, it featured the Pen-Friends pages, a popular section where readers could make new friends overseas. Look and Learn was the brainchild of Leonard Matthews, the editorial director of juvenile publications at Fleetway Publications which was already publishing the long-running Children's Newspaper. An early attempt by Matthews to launch a new educational title along the
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    Collier's Weekly

    Collier's Weekly

    • Interior illustrations by: Harry Anderson
    Collier's is an American magazine, founded in 1888 by Peter Fenelon Collier, which went by the title Collier's Weekly during its early years. With the passage of decades, the title was shortened to Collier's. The magazine ceased publication with the January 4, 1957 issue and was revived in February 2012. As a result of Peter Collier's pioneering investigative journalism, Collier's Weekly established a reputation as a proponent of social reform. When attempts by various companies to sue Collier ended in failure, other magazines became involved in what Theodore Roosevelt described as "muckraking journalism." In 2010, the Collier's trademark was purchased by JTE Multimedia, which announced plans to resurrect the brand and did so in 2012 with "The Special Relaunch Issue". Irish immigrant Peter F. Collier (1849–1909) left Ireland at age 17. Although he went to a seminary to become a priest, he instead started work as a salesman for P. J. Kennedy, publisher of books for the Roman Catholic market and the paternal grandfather of U.S. President John F. Kennedy. When Collier wanted to boost sales by offering books on a subscription plan, it led to a disagreement with Kennedy, so Collier left
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    8

    8

    • Magazine: Cick Magazine
    8 (eight /ˈeɪt/) is the natural number following 7 and preceding 9. The SI prefix for 1000 is yotta (Y), and for its reciprocal, yocto (y). It is the root word of two other numbers: eighteen (eight and ten) and eighty (eight tens). Linguistically, it is derived from Middle English eighte. 8 is a composite number, its proper divisors being 1, 2, and 4. It is twice 4 or four times 2. Eight is a power of two, being (two cubed), and is the first number of the form , p being an integer greater than 1. It has an aliquot sum of 7 in the 4 member aliquot sequence (8,7,1,0) being the first member of 7-aliquot tree. It is symbolized by the Arabic numeral (figure) All powers of 2 ;(), have an aliquot sum of one less than themselves. A number is divisible by 8 if its last 3 digits are also divisible by 8. Eight is the first number to be the aliquot sum of two numbers other than itself; the discrete biprime 10, and the square number 49. 8 is the base of the octal number system, which is mostly used with computers. In octal, one digit represents 3 bits. In modern computers, a byte is a grouping of eight bits, also called an octet. The number 8 is a Fibonacci number, being 3 plus 5. The next
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    Cosmopolitan

    Cosmopolitan

    • Interior illustrations by: Harry Anderson
    Cosmopolitan is an international magazine for women. It was first published in 1886 in the United States as a family magazine, was later transformed into a literary magazine and eventually became a women's magazine in the late 1960s. Also known as Cosmo, its content as of 2011 included articles on relationships, sex, health, careers, self-improvement, celebrities, as well as fashion and beauty. Published by Hearst Magazines, Cosmopolitan has 63 international editions, is printed in 32 languages and is distributed in more than 100 countries. Cosmopolitan began as a family magazine, launched in 1886 by Schlicht & Field of New York as The Cosmopolitan. Paul Schlicht told his first-issue readers that his publication was a "first-class family magazine", adding, "There will be a department devoted exclusively to the interests of women, with articles on fashions, on household decoration, on cooking, and the care and management of children, etc.There was also a department for the younger members of the family." Cosmopolitan's circulation reached 25,000 that year, but by March 1888, Schlicht & Field were no longer in business. John Brisben Walker acquired the magazine in 1889. That same
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    Frontier Times 1958 Winter

    Frontier Times 1958 Winter

    • Magazine: Frontier Times
    • Cover artist: Gene Shortridge
    Day of Massacre, They're Dead - Let's Go!, I Smuggled Guns Across the Border, Lost: A Fortune in Silver, Durned Right There's Ghosts!, Bitter Blizzard, Lady Moon, What The Kid Said - Went!
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