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Best Long-listed work of All Time

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    Darwinia

    Darwinia is a 1998 science fiction, alternate history novel written by Robert Charles Wilson. It won an Aurora Award (Canadian science fiction and fantasy) for Best Long Form in 1999, and was nominated for the Hugo Award for Best Novel that same year. Darwinia was written in segments, in Vancouver, Whitehorse (Yukon), and Toronto. In March 1912, in the event some people called the "Miracle," Europe and parts of Asia and Africa, including its inhabitants, disappear suddenly overnight and are replaced with a slice of an alien Earth, a land mass of roughly equal outlines and terrain features, but with a strange new flora and fauna which seems to have followed a different path in evolution. Seen by some as an act of divine retribution, the "Miracle" affects the lives of people all around and transforms world history. The book describes the life and the adventures of Guilford Law, a young American photographer. As a 14-year-old boy, Guilford Law witnessed the "Miracle" as shimmering lights moving eerily across the ocean sky. As a grown man, he is determined to travel to the strange continent of Darwinia and explore its mysteries. To that end, he enlists as a photographer in the Finch
    7.50
    6 votes
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    Kirinyaga

    "Kirinyaga" is a science fiction short story published in 1988 by Mike Resnick and is the first chapter in the book by the same name. The story was the winner of the 1989 Hugo Award for Best Short Story and the 1989 SF Chronicle Award. It was also nominated for the 1989 Nebula Award for Best Novelette as well as the 1989 Locus award. The story is set on an artificial orbital colony that recreates an African savannah environment. It follows a man named Koriba, the mundumugu of a Kikuyu tribe living there. Koriba was raised in a Western tradition and received several graduate degrees. Later, he led several Kikuyu colonists to Kirinyaga to recreate a traditional Kikuyu utopia. When he kills a newborn child he believes is a demon, Maintenance (the people who maintain the environment and orbit of Kirinyaga) decide to send an investigator to see if they need to interfere with and regulate the Kikuyu traditions. Koriba is unbending in his insistence that Maintenance not interfere with their traditions no matter how much they dislike them. In the end Maintenance informs Koriba that they will not tolerate the killing of infants, and thus he begins to train the young men of his tribe to be
    7.17
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    Jovah's Angel

    Jovah's Angel is a 1998 science fiction/fantasy novel by Sharon Shinn. It is the second book in the Samaria series of novels. Some 150 years have passed since the events of Archangel and weather patterns have become increasingly unstable. The current Archangel, Delilah, is injured while flying in a storm and her angelico killed. Jovah decrees that she can no longer be Archangel as she is unable to fly, and names Alleluia Archangel in her place. While many protest her elevation, others believe she has been chosen because Jovah never fails to hear her voice. Alleluia does not feel up to the task of managing the other political powers of Sammorah, but somewhat manages with the aid of the angel Samuel. As pressure continues to mount on her, the old music machines located in Eyrie begin to fail until only one is left. Seeking any diversion, Alleluia goes off in search of the inventor/engineer Caleb, whom a Edori in Velora believes may be able to fix it. She finds him in Luminaux where she discovers the former Archangel performing in a club under the name "Lilah." Delilah wants nothing to do with Alleluia, but Caleb agrees to visit Velora as soon as possible. Caleb is revealed to be
    8.00
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    9.25
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    7.60
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    7.60
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    11
    6.50
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    12

    Kings of the High Frontier

    Kings of the High Frontier is a hard science fiction novel by Victor Koman, first published (electronically) in 1996. The story is a polemic about NASA. The thesis is that NASA, far from helping space exploration, actually prevents it from going forth. The narrative follows disparate engineering efforts, ranging from New York University engineering students working out of a warehouse in the Bronx to full-fledged commercial rocket operations, to create a single-stage to orbit reusable launch vehicle. All of the science and equipment used in the story was based on technology that existed at the time of writing, like the space activity suit. The novel was first published electronically by J. Neil Schulman's pulpless.com in 1996. It has since been published in hardcover by Bereshith Publishing in 1998, first in a "deluxe edition" of 250, then as a regular hardcover in a small print-run of 1250 copies. As of 2006, there is no paperback edition.
    8.75
    4 votes
    13

    Aristoi

    Aristoi is a 1992 science fiction novel by Walter Jon Williams. It was one of the preliminary candidates for the 1993 Hugo Award for Best Novel in a particularly competitive year (only the second year in the award's history in which there was a tie). The cover art for Aristoi was nominated for the 1993 Hugo Award for Best Original Artwork. The novel describes the Logarchy, a technologically advanced human society which has spread across half the galaxy. It involves a rigid hierarchy of social classes, based on examinations. The supreme class, the "Aristoi," are given the ultimate responsibility: that of managing nanotechnology. The Aristoi (and some others) can split their minds into daimones, or "limited personalities", all which can operate as independent mental entities guided by the will of the main 'self' of the Aristos. There are several rituals designed to bring the main personality into contact with his own daimones and establish organization and control among them. In virtual reality, deployed through an implanted brain-computer interface, these selves can even be manifested as distinct individuals. The daimones can work on various projects independently without using the
    8.50
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    14
    8.50
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    En Primera Fila

    En Primera Fila (Front Row) is the third live album by Venezuelan recording artist Franco De Vita. It was released by Sony Music on May 31, 2011, after a three-year gap since the release of De Vita's last studio album. De Vita worked as producer with David Cabrera. The album is part of the live albums series entitled Primera Fila, promoted by the record label and including De Vita's greatest hits on re-worked versions and new songs. The album features collaborations by several performers, including Leonel García, Alejandra Guzmán, Debi Nova, Gilberto Santa Rosa, and Noel Schajris, among others. En Primera Fila entered the top five in Mexico and the United States. The first single, "Tan Sólo Tú", performed by De Vita and Guzmán, reached Top 20 at the Billboard Top Latin Songs. Francamente, a DVD documentary about the recording sessions, is included on the standard edition of the album. De Vita was awarded the Best Male Pop Vocal Album at the 12th Latin Grammy Awards for En Primera Fila. After selling 12 million copies of his albums and composing for various artists, including Ricky Martin and Chayanne, Franco De Vita recorded En Primera Fila as a part of the concert series promoted
    8.25
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    The Memory Cathedral

    The Memory Cathedral: A Secret History of Leonardo da Vinci is a 1995 historical fantasy fiction novel by Jack Dann. It follows Leonardo da Vinci constructing his flying machine and then travelling to the East. It was first published by Bantam Books in December 1995 and has been published in ten languages to date. It won the Australian Aurealis Award for best fantasy novel in 1997, was #1 on The Age bestseller list, and in 1996, a novella based on the novel, "Da Vinci Rising," was awarded the Nebula Award for Best Novella. The Memory Cathedral was also shortlisted for the Audio Book of the Year, which was part of the 1998 Braille & Talking Book Library Awards., and the 1997 Ditmar Award for Best Australian Long Fiction. Dann's major historical novel depicts a version of the Renaissance in which Leonardo da Vinci actually constructs a number of his inventions, such as a flying machine, whose designs are well-known from his surviving sketches. He later employs some of his military inventions during a battle in the Middle East, while in the service of a Syrian general - events which Dann projects into a year of da Vinci's life about which little is known. The novel also presents a
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    7.75
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    6.60
    5 votes
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    Celestial Matters

    Celestial Matters is a science fantasy novel, set in an alternate universe with different laws of physics, written by Richard Garfinkle and published by Tor Books in 1996. It is a work of alternate history and meticulously elaborated "alternate science", as the physics of this world and its surrounding cosmos are based on the physics of Aristotle and ancient Chinese Taoist alchemy. In the world of Celestial Matters, Ptolemaic astronomy and Aristotelian physics are valid scientific models of the surrounding world and cosmos. The Earth lies at the center of the universe, surrounded by crystal spheres which hold each of the planets, the sun and the moon, all enclosed in the sphere of the fixed stars. Earthly matter, composed of the classical four elements of earth, air, fire, and water, naturally moves in straight lines. Heavenly matter naturally rises and moves in circles. This is the universe as understood by the ancient Greeks. The science of the ancient Chinese also applies, but as the novel is told from the perspective of the Greeks, it is less well understood. Xi, the Chinese notion of spirit and flow, can be manipulated to move objects and energy. The Chinese five elements of
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    6 votes
    23
    Bloom

    Bloom

    Bloom, written in 1998, is the fifth science fiction novel written by Wil McCarthy. It was first released as a hardcover in September 1998. Almost a year later, in August 1999, its first mass market edition came out. Bloom is one of Borders' "Best 10 Books of 1998" and is a New York Times Notable Book. The premise of the book is how to handle human technology that has evolved beyond human control. Bloom is set in the year 2106, in a world where self-replicating nanomachines called "Mycora" have consumed Earth and other planets of the inner solar system, forcing humankind to eke out a bleak living in the asteroids and Galilean moons. Two groups of humanity exist—The Immunity which use "ladderdown" technology and augmented reality and lives on the moons of Jupiter, and The Gladholders which use human intelligence amplification and artificial intelligence and live in the asteroid belt. The story begins on Ganymede with an article about a “bloom”, or outbreak of Mycora, that serves to emphasize the danger and horror of this technogenic life (TGL). The author of said story, Strasheim, is also the main character. He is first seen in the office of Lottick, a major public figure, who has
    9.00
    3 votes
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    9.00
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    25

    Calculating God

    Calculating God is a 2000 science fiction novel by Robert J. Sawyer. It takes place in the present day and describes the arrival on Earth of sentient aliens. The bulk of the novel covers the many discussions and arguments on this topic, as well as about the nature of belief, religion, and science. Calculating God received nominations for both the Hugo and John W. Campbell Memorial Awards in 2001. Thomas Jericho, a paleontologist working at the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto, makes the first human-to-alien contact when a spider-like alien arrives on Earth to investigate Earth's evolutionary history. The alien, Hollus, and her crewmembers have come to Earth to gain access to the museum's large collection of fossils, and to study accumulated human knowledge in order to gather evidence of the existence of God. It seems that Earth and Hollus' home planet, and the home planet of another alien species traveling with Hollus, all experienced the same five cataclysmic events at roughly the same time. Hollus believes that the universe was created by a god, to provide a place where life could develop and evolve. Thomas Jericho is an atheist who provides a balance to the philosophical
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    4 votes
    26

    Primary Inversion

    Primary Inversion is a science fiction novel in the Saga of the Skolian Empire by Catherine Asaro. As Asaro's debut novel, it first appeared as a hardcover in 1995. It was nominated for the 1996 Compton Crook/Stephen Tall Memorial Award and placed tenth on the list for the Locus Award for Best First Novel. Primary Inversion is set in a future where three star-faring civilizations vie for control of human-settled space. Fighter pilot Sauscony (Soz) Valdoria commands a squadron of four Jagernaut pilots, neurologically enhanced empaths who have been bio-engineered as weapons. Jagernauts have extensive biomech throughout their bodies, allowing for enhanced speed and reaction, and an embedded artificial intelligence (AI) in their spinal cords. They are pitted against the legions of the Trader empire, in particular the Aristo ruling class, a race that derives pleasure from the amplified pain and anguish of empaths—especially Jagernauts, as Soz knows from personal experience. Soz is also an Imperial Heir and may someday become the military commander of the Skolian Empire, the bitter enemies of the Traders. The book is divided into three sections. In the first, Soz and her squadron are
    7.50
    4 votes
    27

    Brightness Reef

    Brightness Reef is a 1995 science fiction novel by David Brin and the fourth book of six set in his Uplift Universe (preceded by The Uplift War and followed by Infinity's Shore). It was nominated for both the Hugo and Locus Awards in 1996. Starting around the year 930 C.E., and continuing until the 23rd century, sooners belonging to eight patron-class races illegally plant colonies on the planet Jijo. ("Sooner" is a term from US history, and is used in the Uplift stories to describe illegal settlers on worlds that have been declared fallow, i.e. to be left uncolonized so that the ecosystem will recover and native intelligences may have a chance to develop.) The eight races are: g'Keks, Traeki (similar to Jophur), Glavers, Qheuen, Hoon, Tytlal (AKA noor beast), Urs, and Human. By the beginning of the novel, the Glavers have (partly) regressed to pre-sentient animals and the Tytlal have successfully disguised themselves as wildlife. The novel begins with the discovery of a badly injured stranger. The stranger is nursed by Sara, daughter of Nelo the Papermaker. The stranger cannot speak and does not seem to recall his origin. While Sara oversees his recovery, the story shifts to her
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    5 votes
    28

    Higher Education

    Higher Education is a 1995 science fiction novel by Charles Sheffield and Jerry Pournelle. It is the first in a series, published by Tor Books in their Jupiter line. The novel starts in a future dystopian earth where the United States has become a woefully inefficient bureaucratized nation. The public school system is primarily interested in promoting self-esteem rather than learning. For example, the vast majority of public high school graduates are illiterate, and end up in "the pool"; an endless crowd of unemployable youths depending on government assistance or crime for survival. The book is told from the perspective of the main character, a high school student named Rick who quickly finds himself expelled after a practical joke goes wrong. Since expulsion means that Rick's family will no longer be able to claim their welfare bonus, Rick begins looking for a job. One of his former teachers encourages him to get a job for the Vanguard Mining corporation, whose primary financial interest is in space mining of asteroids in the asteroid belt. The book follows his progress through an initial grueling examination period on Earth, initial training on an asteroid in a high orbit of
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    5 votes
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    Last Call

    Last Call (1992) is a fantasy novel by Tim Powers. It was published in New York by Harper Collins in 1996 with ISBN 0-380-72846-X. It is the first book in a loose trilogy called Fault Lines; the second book, Expiration Date (1995), is vaguely related to Last Call, the third book, Earthquake Weather (1997), acts as a sequel to the first two books. Like many of Powers' novels, Last Call features a detailed magic system, here based on divinatory tarot, and draws on mythical or historical events and characters, in this case Bugsy Siegel and the development of Las Vegas casinos as well as the legend of the Fisher King. Powers makes use of T. S. Eliot's poem The Waste Land throughout, which also features the Fisher King legend. Last Call won the World Fantasy Award for Best Novel and the Locus Award for Best Fantasy Novel in 1993.
    7.25
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    33

    When Heaven Fell

    When Heaven Fell is a 1995 military science fiction novel by William Barton. Human mercenary Athol Morrison returns to Earth after serving in the legions of the Master Race. It’s been 20 years, and his friends, and Earth, have changed. Earth has been taken over by the Master Race, a galaxy-spanning empire of artificial intelligences, and the best of Earth’s survivors are recruited into the aliens' army. Athol Morrison has served for 20 years, and heads back to Earth for a brief vacation. There, he runs into old friends, and finds it easy to give into his old feelings with his childhood girlfriend, Alexandra (Alix) Moreno. However, Alix and the rest of Athol’s friends are involved in a rebellion against Earth’s Master. They ask Athol to help and to join them, and so he helps to train them. However, concerned that any rebellion will provoke a genocidal response from the Masters, he betrays the rebellion to the local government, making sure that Alix and Davy Intäke are spared. Conflicted about what he has done, but feeling as if there was no choice, Athol rejoins up with his new command. Soon afterward comes war with the Hu, the most advanced race yet encountered—they developed
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    8.33
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    Far-Seer

    Far-Seer is a novel written by Canadian science fiction author, Robert J. Sawyer. It is the first book of the Quintaglio Ascension Trilogy, and is followed by two sequels: Fossil Hunter, and Foreigner. The book depicts an Earth-like world on a moon which orbits a gas giant, inhabited by a species of highly evolved, sentient Tyrannosaurs called Quintaglios, among various other creatures from the late cretaceous period, imported to this moon by aliens 65 million years prior to the story. Originally published in 1992 by Ace Science Fiction, it won the Homer award for "Best Novel" during its initial release date. It was reissued in 2004 by Tor Books. The story begins with the main character, Afsan, looking at the stars and reflecting upon his arrival at Capital city, where he is working as an apprentice under the Court Astrologer, Tak-Saleed. Afsan is but one of many apprentice astrologers Saleed has gone through, each one sent away for reasons unknown. Later on, Afsan, in a hurry to rendezvous with his mentor, unwittingly stumbles across a confrontation between Saleed and his old creche-mate, the master mariner Var-Keenir. Keenir has brought with him a new invention called a
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    5 votes
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    Remake

    Remake is a 1995 science fiction novel by Connie Willis. It was nominated for the Hugo Award for Best Novel in 1996. The book displays a dystopic near future, when computer animation and sampling have reduced the movie industry to software manipulation.
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    4 votes
    42

    Fossil Hunter

    Fossil Hunter is a novel written by acclaimed Canadian science fiction author, Robert J. Sawyer. It is the sequel to Far-Seer and is the second book of the Quintaglio Ascension Trilogy. The book depicts an Earth-like world on a moon which orbits a gas giant, inhabited by a species of highly evolved, sentient Tyrannosaurs called Quintaglios, among various other creatures from the late cretaceous period, imported to this moon by aliens 65 million years prior to the story. Originally published in 1993 by Ace Science Fiction, it won the Homer award for "Best Novel" during its initial release date. It was reissued in 2005 by Tor Books. The story takes place roughly sixteen years after the events of Far-Seer. In lieu of Afsan's discovery of the Quintaglio's real place in the universe, the Larskian faith has been abolished and worship of the Original Five hunters reinstated. Dybo is now the Emperor, with Afsan as his court astrologer, and Novato has been put in charge of the Quintaglio Exodus; a project meant to help the Quintaglios escape from their doomed world before it breaks apart. Toroca, son of Afsan and Novato, is now head of the Geological Survey of Land, meant to take a global
    9.50
    2 votes
    44

    Vigilant

    Vigilant is a science fiction novel written by the Canadian author James Alan Gardner, published in 1999 by HarperCollins Publishers under its various imprints. The book is the third volume in Gardner's "League of Peoples" series, after Expendable (1997) and Commitment Hour (1998). Vigilant relies on the same conceptual background and backstory as all of the novels in the series. By the middle of the 25th century, humanity is integrated into a pan-galactic civilization called the League of Peoples, dominated by species of intelligent life evolved far beyond the human level. The benefits of this association are major advanced technologies, including effective interstellar travel, genetic engineering, nanotechnology, and terraforming; the price is that humanity obey the League's one cardinal rule, to refrain from fatal violence against other sentient beings. Most of humanity has accepted this bargain: a society calling itself the Technocracy, based on a terraformed New Earth and operating through a navy-like space organization called the Outward Fleet, has spread over a range of planets and star systems. In a prefatory note titled "The Structure of the Technocracy," Gardner specifies
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    2 votes
    46
    8.00
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    7.67
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    7.67
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    The Hollow Man

    The Hollow Man (1992) is a novel by American author Dan Simmons. It narrates the story of a university lecturer who has the ability to 'hear' the thoughts of others, an ability he shares with his dying wife. There are numerous themes in this novel which are expanded in later works, most notably a set of theories on the nature of and perception of reality (see Ilium). Conversely at least one character, Vanni Fucci, appears in Simmons' earlier 1988 work, "Vanni Fucci Is Alive and Well and Living in Hell". The Hollow Man was nominated for a Locus Award in 1993. The novel itself is an expansion of an earlier short story, "Eyes I Dare Not Meet in Dreams", that appeared in his 1990 collection Prayers to Broken Stones. Original ideas and characters behind much of Simmons's subsequent works can be found in this collection. After the death of his wife Gail, Jeremy Bremen leaves his previous life by burning his home and possessions and embarking on a journey to find peace from the 'neurobabble' of humanity. Without his wife's presence Bremen cannot shield himself from the unwanted ability to read minds and hear thoughts. Bremen searches for solitude and isolation from people, which he
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    6.50
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    Permutation City

    Permutation City is a 1994 science fiction novel by Greg Egan that explores many concepts, including quantum ontology, via various philosophical aspects of artificial life and simulated reality. Sections of the story were adapted from Egan's 1992 short story "Dust" which dealt with many of the same philosophical themes. Permutation City won the John W. Campbell Award for the best science-fiction novel of the year in 1995 and was nominated for the Philip K. Dick Award that same year. The novel was also cited in a 2003 Scientific American article on multiverses by Max Tegmark. Permutation City asks whether there is a difference between a computer simulation of a person and a "real" person. It focuses on a model of consciousness and reality, the Dust Theory, similar to the Ultimate Ensemble Mathematical Universe hypothesis proposed by Max Tegmark. It uses the assumption that human consciousness is Turing computable: that consciousness can be produced by a computer program. The book deals with consequences of human consciousness being amenable to mathematical manipulation, as well as some consequences of simulated realities. In this way, Egan attempts to deconstruct notions of self,
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    5.40
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    61

    NOIR

    Noir is a science fiction novel by K. W. Jeter, published in 1998. It uses the conventions of film noir – the alienated, doomed hero, the cynical private detective, the femme fatale, universal corruption and moral breakdown – to portray a dystopian vision of capitalism run riot. Even the monochrome visual style of film noir is a factor in Noir, as the hero has had his eyes specially treated to show the world as a black-and-white movie, altering his perception of people and objects around him so they fit into the aesthetic. The hero is a detective named McNihil who is hired by corporate executives ostensibly to investigate the death of one of their colleagues. The book is set in the Pacific Fringe – the only remaining industrialised part of the world – in a society where free market capitalism holds absolute sway. Even the dead, including the hero's wife, can be brought back to life as slave labour if they fail to meet their financial obligations. The internet has evolved radically so that emails can be seen fluttering around the recipient and pestering for attention, while strange online sexual experiences can be had through electronic surrogates called prowlers.
    10.00
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    6.25
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    65

    Ammonite

    Ammonite is Nicola Griffith's first novel, published in 1992 (ISBN 0-345-37891-1). It won both the Lambda Literary Award for LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered) fiction, and the James Tiptree, Jr. Award for science fiction or fantasy that explores or expands our understanding of gender. Ammonite is the story of Marghe Taishan, an employee of the sinister, monolithic 'Company', sent to the planet GP (pronounced 'Jeep') as an anthropologist. The distinctive feature of Jeep is an endemic disease which kills all men (and some women) who contract it. While testing a vaccine made to protect unexposed people form the virus, Marghe makes a journey across Jeep, living with many of its indigenous cultures. She is enslaved by the nomadic Echraide, and then reaches the quieter village of Ollfoss, where she joins a family, learns the mystic discipline of linking, and eventually becomes a 'viajera', or traveling wise woman, giving up the vaccine in favor of accepting the virus into her body and truly learning what it is like to be a native. Afterward, she is forced to the center of a conflict between her former people, the Mirrors, with their native allies and the Echraide, who follow a
    7.33
    3 votes
    66
    7.33
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    67

    The Fortunate Fall

    The Fortunate Fall is the debut and only novel by Raphael Carter, published by Tor Books in 1996. The title comes from the Christian theological concept of felix culpa. The protagonist is Maya Andreyeva, a "camera" for a major news network in a 24th century after the fall of an US world empire, where every nation is a third-rate power except hypertechnological Africa, which requires a blood test of aspiring immigrants. As a "camera", Maya is heavily wired with sensory and telecommunications gear so that she can broadcast her perceptions, combining the functions of an on-location reporter and her camera crew, presenting both audiovisual data and its interpretation. (Related concepts include simstim in William Gibson's Sprawl trilogy, or the "gargoyles" of Neal Stephenson's Snow Crash.) Carter uses the protagonist's occupation as a focal point for analyzing the role of the media in packaging, selling, and, thus shaping history and historical truth. The reader is taken through not only the familiar slanted research and writing of a piece, but also the careful cooking of raw sense data for broadcast by a screener, the one person who experiences the camera's full sense experience,
    7.33
    3 votes
    69

    Tomorrow and Tomorrow

    Tomorrow and Tomorrow is a 1997 science fiction novel by Charles Sheffield. The book starts in approximately the year 2020 and follows the extremely protracted adventures of Drake Merlin, in his obsessive quest to save his wife from a terminal brain disease, over the course of eons. Similar premises are presented in the 2006 film The Fountain, as well as the Isaac Asimov story "The Last Question". Originally, Drake is a professional musician, with minor celebrity. When his wife Ana is diagnosed with an unspecified incurable brain disorder, Drake exhausts every option attempting to cure her. Only then does he decide to have her body cryogenically stored, in the hopes future generations will discover effective treatment. However, Drake is extremely cautious, and in case the future culture doesn't care about her plight, he has himself frozen as well. Furthermore he devotes all his energies for a decade prior to his freezing, in becoming an expert primary source on the musically notable people of his era. Assuming that if you become the world's foremost expert in any subject, and given infinite time, someone will want to write a book on that exact subject. At that time the hypothetical
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    Viva el Príncipe

    Viva el Príncipe (English: Long Live the Prince) is the thirteenth studio album by Mexican recording artist Cristian Castro, released on November 30, 2010 by Universal Music Latino. It is a tribute album to Mexican singer José José, Castro's musical idol. The album was produced by Rafael Pérez-Botija who also produced for José José. Viva el Príncipe covers twelve songs by José José and includes a poem recited by Castro's idol. Recording took place on August 2010 at The Hit Factory Criteria in Miami, Florida. To promote the recording, Castro released "La Nave del Olvido",which peaked at No. 48 on the Billboard Hot Latin Songs chart. Castro toured for the release in United States, Latin America and Spain. The album became successful in Mexico and the United States where it topped both the Mexican and Billboard Latin album charts. It was certified diamond by the Asociación Mexicana de Productores de Fonogramas y Videogramas (AMPROFON) in Mexico and double platinum (Latin field) by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) in the United States. In South America, it peaked at No. 5 on the Argentine Chamber of Phonograms and Videograms Producers (CAPIF) album chart and
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    77

    Island in the Sea of Time

    Island in the Sea of Time is the first of the three alternate history novels of the Nantucket series by S. M. Stirling. An elliptical region, including the island of Nantucket, Massachusetts and the United States Coast Guard ship Eagle, is transported by an unknown phenomenon (called "The Event") back in time to the Bronze Age circa 1250s BC (corresponding to the late Heroic Age of the Trojan War). As the truth of what has happened sinks in panic grips the island. Chief of Police Jared Cofflin is given emergency powers and begins organizing the people to help produce food for the island so they can feed themselves. Meanwhile Captain Marian Alston takes the Eagle to Britain, with Ian Arnstein and Doreen Rosenthal as interpreters, where they trade Nantucket made goods with the Iraiina, which translates as "Noble ones", a tribe that has been steadily invading the island, for grain. The Iraiina are just one of the many Sun People Tribes. As a gift the Iraiina chief gives Marian a slave, Swindapa, a captured female "Earth People" warrior. Swindapa is freed and decides to stay with Marian. The Eagle leaves for Nantucket but takes with them Isketerol, a Tartessian merchant who hopes to
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    78

    The Dark Beyond the Stars

    The Dark Beyond the Stars (ISBN 0-312-86624-0) is a 1991 science fiction novel by Frank M. Robinson. It is a Lambda Literary Award winner, published by Orb Books. Sparrow is a crew member on the Astron, a multigenerational ship sent from earth on a 2000-year search for life on other planets. Sparrow falls off a cliff and is stricken with amnesia. No one will discuss his past with him and the computer has restricted his data. Sparrow struggles to revive his memory while the captain of the Astron struggles to make a difficult decision that will affect the entire crew.
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    The Modular Man

    The Modular Man is a science fiction novel by American writer Roger MacBride Allen. It is the fourth in the Next Wave series. The novel concerns the issue of personhood and what it takes to be considered a member of the moral universe. There are three main characters: Herbert the vacuum cleaner, who is modified by his owner, David Jantille, a scientist who specializes in figuring out how to "mindload". Mindloading is the act of a human downloading their mind into a machine. A successful mindload entailss the death of the human. It is a way for humans to become immortal, if only in the form of vacuum cleaner. The book begins with the arrest of Herbert, the vacuum cleaner, for David's murder . David's wife, Suzanne Jantille, is a trial attorney who is a quadriplegic as a result of a car crash that also paralyzed her husband. She lives through a "Remote person" who has all human senses except for the ability to feel by touch. She can guide the remote person through a helmet attached to her "bio body", and retrieves all "video and audio" signals through the remote. She can function as a whole human being, but the outside world notices that she is a remote, does not approve. Suzanne
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    The Outpost

    The Outpost is a science fiction novel by Mike Resnick. The Outpost is a bar at the edge of the galaxy, in the area known as the Inner Frontier. It attracts the exceptional and extraordinary who, while drinking and relaxing, share stories of their lives. The novel is divided into 3 sections: Legend, Fact, and History. In Legend, the characters tell stories of what they were doing before they arrived and about people they met and things they did. The storytelling is interrupted by an alien invasion of the system, to which the heroes react. The History section sees everyone gathered back at the Outpost to share their stories and find out the fates of the others.
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    81

    The Trinity Paradox

    The Trinity Paradox is a time travel novel by Kevin J. Anderson and Doug Beason, exploring the premise of an anti-nuclear activist from 1990s being transported back in time to the Manhattan Project, giving her the potential to sabotage the project in an attempt to altogether prevent the development of nuclear weapons. Her attempt to do so, however, has far-reaching and unpredictable results, changing the outcome of the Second World War and the face of the post-war world. Donald Erbschloe in his review for Physics Today said that "the setting and the people of Los Alamos come alive", "the cast is impressive" and "the climax is thrilling and, as one might suspect, explosive". James P. Hogan noted that it "soberingly shows the perils of the sheep solemnly pledging themselves to vegetarianism while the wolves remain unconverted".
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    83

    Catch the Lightning

    Catch the Lightning is a novel by Catherine Asaro in the Saga of the Skolian Empire, also known as Tales of the Ruby Dynasty. The novel won the 1998 Sapphire Award for Best Science Fiction Romance and the UTC Readers Choice Award for Best Science Fiction Novel. The first half of Catch the Lightning takes place in an alternate Los Angeles on Earth in a time similar to the late 20th century. Althor Selei, a cybernetically enhanced Jag fighter pilot, is thrown into the alternate universe when his star fighter malfunctions. Tina Pulivok is a young Maya girl who has relocated to Los Angeles and is living on her own while she works as a waitress. She meets Althor late at night when she is returning home from work, and he is trying to figure out why he ended up on a planet that bears little resemblance to the Earth he expected. After Althor helps Tina escape an incident of gang violence, the two become fugitives. Althor is not a typical officer; he is a member of the Ruby Dynasty, and as such he is heir to the throne of an interstellar empire called the Skolian Imperialate. He is also a Rhon psion and can read moods, sometimes even thoughts, from other people. He is attracted to Tina, who
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    Commitment Hour

    Commitment Hour is a science fiction novel by James Alan Gardner, published in 1998. The novel is set in Gardner's "League of Peoples's" futuristic universe, and plays out in the small, isolated village of Tober Cove. Set on post-apocalyptic Earth, Tober Cove most resembles a rural, seventeenth century fishing village, with one exception: every year, everyone below the age of 21 changes gender. At the age of twenty-one, the people of the village must "commit" to being male, female or both in the form of a Hermaphrodite (a 'Neut'), forever. Commitment Hour follows the day leading up to the main character's hour of commitment. Tober Cove's society revolves around gender. Dualistic in structure, there is a matriarch and a patriarch, both of whom command equal - but different - power within the community. The patriarch is the head of the city council and the military, which also serves as the town's police force. The matriarch runs the town's health services, a vital role in a society without modern medicine. Tasks within the community are largely gender determined: men are warriors, fishermen, carpenters etc. and women are seamstresses, craft-makers, food preparers etc. Thus, in Tober
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    The Guns of the South

    The Guns of the South (1992, ISBN 0-345-37675-7) is an alternate history novel set during the American Civil War by Harry Turtledove. The story deals with a group of time-travelling Afrikaner Weerstandsbeweging members who supply Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia with AK-47s and small amounts of other supplies (including nitroglycerine tablets for treating Lee's heart condition), leading to a Southern victory in the war. It is January 1864, and the Confederacy is losing the war against the United States. Men with strange accents and oddly mottled clothing approach Robert E. Lee at the headquarters of the Army of Northern Virginia, demonstrating a rifle far superior to all other firearms of the time. The men call their organization "America Will Break" (or "AWB"), and offer to supply the Confederate army with these rifles, which they refer to as AK-47s. The weapons operate on chemical and engineering principles unknown to Confederate military engineers. Soldiers are trained by the AWB men to use their new weapons, and ammunition is issued. Confederate morale improves considerably as the men prepare to meet Union forces in the 1864 campaign. They soon engage General Grant's
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    The ABC Afternoon Playbreak

    The ABC Afternoon Playbreak is an American television anthology series that was broadcast on ABC from 1973 to 1975. The ninety-minute dramas aired once a month and featured some of the more popular television and film stars of the 1970s (Diana Hyland, Bradford Dillman, Patty Duke, Diane Baker, David Hedison). Season 1 Season 2 The series was preempted in December 1973 for the pilot of ABC's Matinee Today, another dramatic anthology series. The pilot ran daily for five days, but never returned to the ABC schedule. The five episodes are frequently listed as part of The ABC Afternoon Playbreak. The 14 episodes of these two related anthologies won 18 Daytime Emmy Awards and were nominated an additional 16 times. Prolific director Burt Brinckerhoff was nominated for a 1974 Daytime Emmy Award for his direction of "The Mask of Love" episode.
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    The Peshawar Lancers

    The Peshawar Lancers is an alternate history, steampunk, post-apocalyptic fiction adventure novel by S. M. Stirling, with its point of divergence occurring in 1878 when the Earth is struck by a devastating meteor shower. The novel's plot takes place in the year 2025, at a time when the British Empire has become the powerful Angrezi Raj and is gradually recolonizing the world alongside other nations and empires that were able to survive. The novel was published in 2002, and was a Sidewise Award nominee for best long-form alternate history. Stirling also wrote a novella, Shikari in Galveston, which is set in the same background as The Peshawar Lancers, but occurs several years earlier. It was published in the alternate history collection Worlds That Weren't. The story details a world where a heavy meteor shower, known as "the Fall," impacted with catastrophic force across much of the Northern Hemisphere in 1878, creating a massive dust cloud that blots out the sun. This in turn causes the collapse of Industrialized civilization, which is unable to survive without the ability to raise crops in winter-like conditions that last for three years. In order to survive, the British Empire,
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    Jack Faust

    Jack Faust (1997) is the fifth published novel by American author Michael Swanwick. It was nominated for the British Science Fiction Award in 1997, and for both the Hugo and Locus Awards in 1998. The plot is based around a modernization of the anti-hero, Dr. Johannes Faust, who struggles with his growing discomfort with modern thought and questions how and why things happen without scientific explanation. After burning his library and contemplating suicide, a mysterious being named Mephistopheles comes to Faust and offers him all the information of the universe. With Mephistopheles' help, the madman Dr. Johannes Faust becomes savior Jack Faust by accelerating human progress at a blinding speed, reshaping Germany and then all of Europe in his own image.
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    Holy Fire

    Holy Fire is a 1996 science fiction novel by cyberpunk writer Bruce Sterling. It was nominated for the British Science Fiction Award in 1996, and for both the Hugo and Locus Awards in 1997. Holy Fire is the story of an old woman who has gained a second youth—in a world in which radical life extension is available through highly intrusive technological means—and who has an ontological transformation as a result. It is considered one of the more literary cyberpunk novels of the 1990s, and has won a cult following among younger writers and futurists, especially those in the bright green camp. Charles Stross has recommended it.
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    Remnant Population

    Remnant Population is a 1996 science fiction novel by American writer Elizabeth Moon. The story revolves around an old woman who decides to remain behind on a colony world after the company who sent her there pulls out. It was nominated for the Hugo Award for Best Novel in 1997. The story is set on a colony identified as "Sims Bancorp Colony." No further information regarding name is given about the planet on which the colony resides. At the time of the narrative the town/village that the narrative centres on is the only human habitation on the planet. The colony was established by the Sims Bancorp Company approximately forty years prior to the narrative. The purpose of the original colony is mentioned obliquely in the narrative as the harvest of tropical timber. The colony was poorly sited both on the flood plain of a local river and in close proximity to a coastline frequently visited by tropical storms that made the flooding from the local river worse. Any suggestion to move the colony were regarded as close to heresy, assuming anyone was even brave enough to suggest it in the first place. The colonists were poorly trained/educated, while at the same time taught to distrust
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    Feersum Endjinn

    Feersum Endjinn is a science fiction novel by Scottish writer Iain M. Banks, first published in 1994. It won a British Science Fiction Association Award in 1994. It was Banks' second science fiction novel not based or set within the Culture universe. The book is set on a far future Earth where the uploading of mindstates into a world-spanning computer network (known as "the data corpus", "cryptosphere" or simply "crypt") is commonplace, allowing the dead to be easily reincarnated (though by custom, only a limited number of reincarnations are allowed). Humanity has lost much of its technological background, due partly to an exodus by much of the species, and partly to the fact that those who remained (or at least their rulers) are fighting against more advanced technology such as Artificial Intelligence. Meanwhile, the solar system is drifting into an interstellar molecular cloud ("the Encroachment"), which will eventually dim the Sun's light sufficiently to end life on Earth. The Diaspora (the long-departed segment of humanity) have left behind a device (the "Fearsome Engine" of the title) to deal with the problem; the book follows four characters who become involved in the attempt
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    The Killing Star

    The Killing Star is a hard science fiction novel by Charles R. Pellegrino and George Zebrowski, published in April, 1995. It covers several familiar speculative fiction ideas such as sublight interstellar travel, genetic cloning, virtual reality, advanced robotics, alien contact, and interstellar war. The late 21st century seems like a good time to be alive. Earth is at peace. Humans now command self-replicating machines that create engineering marvels on enormous scales. Artificial habitats dot the solar system. Anti-matter driven Valkyrie rockets carry explorers to the stars at nearly the speed of light. All seems well. Then, from the uncaring black of space come swarms of relativistic missiles. Though they are merely boulder-sized hunks of metal, they move fast enough to hit with the force of many nuclear arsenals. They are impossible to track and impossible to stop. Humanity is all but wiped out by the horrific bombardment. (To read a discussion of relativistic weapons and an excerpt of the attack, see Atomic Rockets: Relativistic Weapons). A handful of survivors desperately struggle to escape the alien mop-up fleet. They hide close to the sun, inside asteroids, beneath the
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    Hunted

    Hunted is a science fiction novel written by Canadian author James Alan Gardner, and published in the year 2000 by HarperCollins Publishers under its various imprints. The novel is the fourth in Gardner's "League of Peoples" series, after Expendable (1997), Commitment Hour (1998), and Vigilant (1999). As part of the "League of Peoples" series, Hunted exploits the same conceptual framework as the earlier books. By the middle of the 25th century, an advanced human society calling itself the Technocracy, based on a terraformed New Earth, will be part of an interstellar social order called the League of Peoples. As part of the League, humanity will benefit from many advanced technologies, interstellar space flight being only the most obvious. The price for belonging to this galactic order is relatively mild: all societies in the League must renounce fatal violence against other sentient beings. Violation of this simple cardinal rule means that the guilty individual, or society, is no longer eligible for interstellar travel—the mere attempt brings instant death from the highly advanced species (far beyond the human level) who run the League. In Hunted, for the first time in the series,
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    Pablo Alborán

    Pablo Alborán is the debut album recorded by Spanish singer-songwriter Pablo Alborán. Produced by Manuel Illán, many of the songs included in the album had already achieved YouTube attention before its release, as home videos featuring Alborán performing in front of a webcam, alone with his guitar. The album also includes duets with Carminho (Perdóname), Estrella Morente ("Desencuentro"), and Diana Navarro ("Solamente Tú"). The iTunes version adds the bonus track "Cuando te Alejas". Pablo Alborán was released on January 28, 2011, and quickly became a huge success on the Spanish Albums Chart, where it debuted at number one, preventing Sergio Dalma's Via Dalma, the best-selling album of 2010 in Spain, from an 11th consecutive week topping the charts. Pablo Alborán went on to spend 15 weeks at the top of the charts, including a run of seven consecutive weeks taking place six months after the album's release date. It was certified four-time platinum by Productores de Música de España on January 8, 2012, becoming the top-selling album of 2011 in Spain, and was also nominated for a Latin Grammy Award for Best Pop Vocal Album, Male.
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    The Ringworld Throne

    The Ringworld Throne is a novel by Larry Niven, first published in 1996. It is the direct sequel to his previous work The Ringworld Engineers (1980). He wrote it as a replacement after being unable to finish his contracted novel The Ghost Ships, the sequel to The Integral Trees and The Smoke Ring. This book consists of two main plot threads, which only come together towards the end of the book. The majority of the first half of the story is devoted to a plot where a variety of hominid species from the ring join together to kill a large nest of vampires (the shadow nest) which has been feeding on all of them. Some of the characters are also found in The Ringworld Engineers, as early on in this book Niven tells us that relatively few of the hominids died when Louis Wu and the Hindmost restabilised the ring at the end of the previous book. The second part of the book details the continuing adventures of Louis Wu, who is now aging and ill. Eventually he returns to the Hindmost and is healed, only for the pair of them—and also a Kzin called Acolyte, who is Chmee's son—to be enslaved by a vampire protector. What follows is a power struggle between Protectors on the rim wall and the
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    Once a Hero

    Once a Hero is a science fiction novel by Elizabeth Moon. It is the first of the three books of the Esmay Suiza trilogy in Moon's fictional Familias Regnant universe, following the three of the Heris Serrano trilogy. Chronologically, Once a Hero directly follows Winning Colors, even overlapping partially, but the focus distinctly shifts to young Esmay Suiza, who came to prominence after successfully leading a mutiny against her traitorous captain and intervening to decisive effect in the Battle of Xavier (as Winning Colors records). Suiza is not immediately praised and feted for her heroism, however, for her actions demand official scrutiny. Thorough and complete, neither the Board of Inquiry nor the court-martial find Suiza guilty of anything, and so she is allowed to take a vacation before her next assignment. Back home on Altiplano, Esmay is honored with Altiplano's highest award, the Starmount, although she remains convinced that she was not really a hero, that it was blind luck. While talking with an old soldier who had served under her father (one of the four highest military commanders on Altiplano) and was a family friend, she learns that the nightmares and her dislike of
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    The Chronoliths

    The Chronoliths is a 2001 science fiction novel by Robert Charles Wilson. It was nominated for the 2002 Hugo Award for Best Novel and tied for the 2002 John W. Campbell Memorial Award for Best Science Fiction Novel. Software designer Scott Warden is living with his family in early twenty-first century Thailand after his latest contract has ended. He and his friend Hitch Paley are among the first to find an enormous monolith which appears out of nowhere in the jungle. On closer examination, it is found to be a monument made of a mysterious, indestructible substance. It bears an inscription commemorating a military victory by someone named "Kuin", presumably an Asian warlord—twenty years in the future. Over the next twenty years, increasingly grand monuments to Kuin continue to appear—first in Asia, then in much of the rest of the world. Pro-Kuin and anti-Kuin political movements spring up, leading to the rise of economic problems, fatalistic cults, and open war. Scott has become entangled with his former teacher and mentor Sue Chopra, a scientist who has assembled a team of fellow researchers to investigate the chronoliths and learn to predict their appearances. With Sue's team,
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    Saint Leibowitz and the Wild Horse Woman

    Saint Leibowitz and the Wild Horse Woman (1997) is a science fiction novel written by Walter M. Miller, Jr.. It is a follow-up to Miller's 1959 book A Canticle for Leibowitz. Miller wrote the greater part of the novel before his death in 1996, and it was completed from his outline by Terry Bisson. The novel is set chronologically some eighty years after the events of the second part of A Canticle for Leibowitz, "Fiat Lux" (c. 3254 AD). As the third part of the original novel, "Fiat Voluntas Tua", is set over six centuries later (3781 AD), the novel can be seen as a 'midquel'; that is, a sequel which takes place during a chronology gap of an earlier work; rather than as a 'sequel' per se. In the novel, the city of New Rome has been captured and allowed to decay by the Empire of Texarkana, led by the emperor Filpeo Harq. The Papacy, in exile from New Rome, now resides in the city of Valana. The story chronicles the plan of a cardinal-deacon and his closest allies to unite the remaining independent nations in North America against the Empire, and to restore power to the Church. After completing Canticle, Miller signed for another book with Lippincott, but the project apparently fell
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    Against the Tide of Years

    Against the Tide of Years is the second out of the three alternate history novels of the Nantucket series by S. M. Stirling. In the Island in the Sea of Time, the island of Nantucket is transported by an unknown phenomenon (called "The Event" in the series) back in time to the Bronze Age circa 1250s BC (corresponding to the late Heroic Age of the Trojan war). Against the Tide of Years is set 10 years after this. As the series progresses, it becomes clear to Nantucket's government that sitting back and adopting isolationism will only profit those renegades who, under the leadership of ex-Coast Guard lieutenant William Walker (inspired directly by William Walker), have fled the island to exploit the Bronze Age peoples of Europe and the Middle East. Walker—who, unfortunately, is as smart as he is callous—exploits the "magic" of gunpowder, iron-forging, and the spinning jenny to build up an empire of his own, one that threatens to conquer the entire world unless the people of Nantucket build an army, a navy, and a web of foreign alliances to take the fight to Walker. Against the Tide of Years takes place approximately 10 years after the events of the first book. The leadership of the
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    Cetaganda

    Cetaganda is a science fiction novel by Lois McMaster Bujold, first published in four parts from October to December 1995 in Analog Science Fiction and Fact, and published in book form by Baen Books in January 1996. It is a part of the Vorkosigan Saga. Miles and Ivan are sent to the home world of the Cetagandan Empire to represent Barrayar at the Imperial funeral of the dowager Empress, mother of the current Emperor. They soon become entangled in an internal Cetagandan plot which leads to murder. Miles forms an unusual alliance with Rian Degtiar, the "Handmaiden of the Star Crèche", who is charged with the duties of Empress until the new one is chosen. Miles solves the complex mystery and prevents the Cetagandan Empire from fragmenting into nine dangerously expansionist-minded parts. Then, much to his chagrin, he is publicly awarded the "Order of Merit", the highest Cetagandan award, by the Emperor himself. He also picks up clues to a Cetagandan genetic experiment, which becomes the object of much skulduggery in Ethan of Athos. Cetaganda was nominated for the Locus Award in 1997, the same year as Memory, the following book in the series.
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    Starmind

    Starmind is a science fiction novel by Spider Robinson and Jeanne Robinson.
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    143

    The Wood Wife

    The Wood Wife by Terri Windling was published by Tor Books in 1996, and won the Mythopoeic Award for Novel of the Year. Set in the mountain outskirts of contemporary Tucson, Arizona, the novel could equally be described as magical realism, contemporary fantasy, or mythic fiction. Windling draws on myth, folklore, poetry, and the history of surrealist art to tell the story of a woman who finds her muse in a spirited desert landscape. The plot revolves around a reclusive English poet, Davis Cooper, and his lover, Mexican surrealist painter Anna Naverra -- a character remininscent of the real-life Mexican painter Remedios Varo. Windling subsequently published a very loosely connected story, "The Color of Angels," in 1997.
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    Aggressor Six

    Aggressor Six (1994) is one of the earliest works of science fiction writer Wil McCarthy. In this novel humanity is under assault by an overwhelming technologically superior alien race called "Waisters" who are threatening to exterminate the human race. Unlike his later books which focus on humanity's technological evolution and how it affects the definition of humanity, Aggressor Six is a piece of military science fiction. However this novel is set apart from other military science fiction novels in that it maintains Wil McCarthy's adherence to technical scientific realism, particularly during the combat scenes. One major point of the story is that the aliens are technologically far more advanced than the humans, meaning the standard naval models of combat used in many science fiction works would be impractical, requiring a re-examination of how space combat will occur. It also examines the idea that aliens, if encountered, will be truly 'alien'- driven by desires and motives which will not be immediately obvious to humans. Wil McCarthy wrote a sequel, The Fall of Sirius in 1996, and created an outline for a third novel which was never written, but which can be found on his
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    Foreigner

    Foreigner is a science fiction novel by the Canadian author Robert J. Sawyer, originally published in 1994 by Ace Books. It is the final book of the Quintaglio Ascension Trilogy, following Far-Seer and Fossil Hunter. The book depicts an Earth-like world on a moon which orbits a gas giant, inhabited by a species of highly evolved, sentient Tyrannosaurs called Quintaglios, among various other creatures from the late Cretaceous period, imported to this moon by aliens 65 million years earlier. In the beginning of the novel, Afsan is accidentally run over by a chariot, causing severe crush injuries to his face. As Quintaglios can regenerate large amounts of tissue, Afsan heals, and in the process, his eyes, which were cut out by Yenalb in Far-Seer, also regenerate. However, Afsan does not regain his sight, despite having fully anatomically functional eyes. Believing suggestions that the issue may be psychological, he consults Mokleb, who has recently pioneered the new field of psychoanalysis. While this does not cause him to regain his sight, it does cure the chronic nightmares and insomnia he suffered after setting up the royal culling in Fossil Hunter. With the moon on which the
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    One for the Morning Glory

    One For the Morning Glory is a fantasy novel by John Barnes, published 1996. It is a fairy tale where the characters know that they are in a fairy tale. The novel has a humorous tone similar to William Goldman's The Princess Bride — quite different from Barnes' usual science fiction. It forms the second part of a three book series whose first and third parts are not yet written. There is a saying in the land that someone who drinks the Wine of the Gods before he is ready is only half a man thereafter. Amatus, the prince, manages to swig down a significant amount of the Wine of the Gods, and his entire left half vanishes. His father, the normally gentle King Boniface, orders the executions of the four people responsible for this travesty—the maid, the alchemist, the witch, and the captain of the guard—and then begins the long and arduous process of interviewing to fill these four positions. A year and a day later, four strangers arrive in the kingdom. This is a magical time, and noted by all as being very auspicious. The strangers are hired by the king and become known as the prince's Companions. The rest of the tale deals with Amatus's growth into manhood, kingship, and love. It is
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    Antarctica

    Antarctica (1997) is a novel written by Kim Stanley Robinson. It deals with a variety of characters living at or visiting an Antarctic research station. It incorporates many of Robinson's common themes, including scientific process and the importance of environmental protection. Most of the story is centred around McMurdo Station, the largest settlement in Antarctica, which is run as a scientific research station by the United States. Robinson's characteristic multiple-protagonist style is employed here to show many aspects of polar life; among the viewpoints presented are those of X, an idealistic young man working as a General Field Assistant at McMurdo; Val, an increasingly embittered trek guide; and Wade Norton, who works for the Californian Senator Phil Chase (Wade and Phil also appear in the "Science in the Capital" trilogy). As well as McMurdo, the story involves the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, the Shackleton Glacier, the McMurdo Dry Valleys and a South American drilling platform near Roberts Massif. Antarctica involves many of the ideas Robinson uses elsewhere; as in the Mars trilogy, much emphasis is placed on the importance of living sustainably and the issues of
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    Children of God

    Children of God is the second book, and the second science fiction novel, written by author Mary Doria Russell. It is the sequel to the award-winning novel, The Sparrow. Emilio Sandoz is in the process of healing from his experiences on Rakhat, detailed in The Sparrow. He is exposed to Father Vincenzo Giuliani's organized crime "family," the Camorra. At a christening celebration, he meets Celestina, aged four, and her mother Gina, a divorcee with whom Emilio begins to fall in love. Emilio is released from the priesthood. He trains the second Jesuit expedition to Rakhat, composed of Sean Fein, Danny Iron Horse, and John Candotti, in the K'San (Jana'ata) and Ruanja (Runa) languages. He himself refuses to go. Gina is about to go on vacation, after which Emilio plans to marry her. Unfortunately, while Gina is on vacation, Emilio is beaten and kidnapped by Carlo, Gina's ex-husband and Celestina's father. Emilio is kept in a constantly drugged state on the Giordano Bruno, Carlo's ship. They are actually working for the Jesuits and the Vatican, who want Sandoz to return to Rakhat. It is extremely important that the Jesuits put right (as much as possible) what they destroyed on Rakhat; the
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    Jumper

    Jumper is a 1992 science fiction novel by Steven Gould. The novel was published in mass market paperback in October 1993 and re-released in February 2008 to coincide with the release of the film adaptation. It tells the story of David, a teenager who escapes an abusive household using his ability to teleport. As he tries to make his way in the world, he searches for his mother (who left when he was a child), develops a relationship with a woman he keeps his ability secret from, and is eventually brought into conflict with several antagonists. One evening, while being physically abused by his father, David Rice unexpectedly teleports (or "jumps") and finds himself in the local library. The origin of this power is never explained. Vowing never to return to his father's house, David makes his way to New York City. After being mugged and discovering that he can't get a job without a birth certificate and social security number, David robs a local bank by teleporting inside the safe, stealing nearly a million dollars. He then begins a life of reading, attending plays and dining in fancy restaurants. At a play he meets a woman named Millie Harrison, and they spend some time touring New
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    The Exile Kiss

    The Exile Kiss is a cyberpunk science fiction novel by George Alec Effinger published in 1991. It is the third novel in the three-book Marîd Audran series, following the events of A Fire in the Sun. The title of the novel comes from Coriolanus, by William Shakespeare: "O! a kiss / Long as my exile, sweet as my revenge!" (Act V, scene 3). Effinger had begun writing a fourth book in the Marîd Audran series, Word of Night, but died before that work was completed. The posthumously-published Budayeen Nights contains the first two chapters of Word of Night along with other stories of Effinger's. Married to Indihar, though from his perspective in name only, Marîd Audran gets invited to a reception at the palace of the amir of the city. Shaykh Mahali, the amir, thus wishes to end the rivalry between Friedlander Bey and Reda Abu Adil, two of the most powerful men in the city. Both Audran and Bey, or "Papa" as he's known in the Budayeen, become suspicious when their sworn enemy Abu Adil designates Audran as an officer of the "Jaish", an unofficial right-wing outfit working for Abu Adil. However, it is not until after the party that Abu Adil's scheme unfolds: Audran and Bey are put under
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    Drakon

    Drakon is a follow-up to S. M. Stirling's alternate history series, The Domination. Set centuries since the last war between the Domination and the Alliance, the Domination has conquered the Earth and the solar system, while the Alliance survivors have fled to the Alpha-Centauri star system where they have started a new civilization called the United States of Samothrace. The two societies have traded technology and skirmished some, focusing most of their efforts on colonizing all new habitable worlds they discover. Space combat is rare since faster-than-light travel is impossible. Combat only occurs when colonists from both sides reach the same world, an incident that happened only once. (Stirling later said the Samothracians won due to their superior ship .) The Draka continue their enslaving any new intelligent species they discover, using genetic engineering to produce a meek and submissive version of it. The book starts in 2442 A.D. somewhere in North America, where Gwendolyn Ingolfson is ending a camping and hunting trip. On her way back to the civilization she contacts legate Tamirindus Rohm, who sends her to the Reichart Station to oversee the creation of a wormhole
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    Beowulf's Children

    Beowulf's Children is a science fiction novel written by Larry Niven, Jerry Pournelle and Steven Barnes. It is a sequel to The Legacy of Heorot. The book was published in the United Kingdom as The Dragons of Heorot in 1995. The novel concerns the actions and fate of the second generation of colonists on the planet Avalon. As the story opens the second generation of Avalon's colonists are coming of age, and the potential for teenage rebellion has never been so strong. The original colonists (the "Earth-born"), although selected for optimal physical and mental attributes, suffered varying levels of brain damage due to the unforeseen effects of long periods of chemically- and temperature-induced hibernation necessary to survive the long journey to Avalon. Their children (the "star-born") have no such disability; instead, they are geniuses with feeble-minded parents. The Grendel Wars (in which the Earth-Born's short-sightedness nearly led to their extermination) are still fresh in their minds. The battle-proven (yet impaired) elders preach a dogma of zealous caution which might have once tried their own patience; the brilliant (and arrogant) Star-Born deem it cowardice and
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    Expendable

    Expendable is a science fiction novel by the Canadian author James Alan Gardner, published in 1997 by HarperCollins Publishers under its various imprints. It is the first book in a series involving the "League of Peoples", an assemblage of advanced species in the Milky Way galaxy. The novel introduces many concepts in Gardner's "League of Peoples" universe, such as the Explorer Corps, Sentient Citizens, and the League itself. Through the course of the novel, Gardner provides a framework, background, and conceptual structure for his future narrative. In this back-story, humanity attains a technology of "spacetime distortion" to create an effective "star drive", thus leaving the solar system to explore and colonize planets orbiting other stars. Through this exploration and colonization effort, humans come into contact with many different species of intelligent life, sometimes vastly different in nature, sometimes of a much higher state of technological and evolutionary development. The more advanced beings have forms that stretch the humans' definition of life: they can appear as "a cloud of red smoke, a glowing cube"—or as nothing at all. These species have an organization for the
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    Brown Girl in the Ring

    Brown Girl in the Ring

    Brown Girl in the Ring is a novel by writer Nalo Hopkinson. It was the winning entry in the Warner Aspect First Novel Contest and received the 1999 Locus Award for Best First Novel and earned Hopkinson the 1999 John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer. It 2008, the actress and singer Jemeni defended this novel in Canada Reads, an annual literary competition broadcast on the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. The story takes place in the city core of Metropolitan Toronto (Downtown Toronto) after the economic collapse, which saw investors, commerce and government flee to the suburbs. After the police left, the city erupted in chaos and the Riots occurred. As a consequence of the Riots, Toronto is isolated from other satellite cities in the surrounding Greater Toronto Area (North York, Scarborough, Etobicoke) by roadblocks and Lake Ontario has become a mudhole. In the twelve years since the Riots, the city is now ruled by a criminal mastermind named Rudy Sheldon. Rudy is commissioned to find a heart for the Premier of Ontario, who needs a heart transplant. Normally, the Porcine Organ Harvest Program is used, but Premier Uttley deems the program "immoral" and prefers a human donor
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    En Total Plenitud

    En Total Plenitud ("In Total Fullness") is the 9th studio album released by Marco Antonio Solís on October 12, 2010. This album became the tenth number-one set on the Billboard Top Latin Albums for Solís, the most for any artist on the chart. A Dónde Vamos a Parar was featured in the novela Teresa starring Angelique Boyer, Sebastian Rulli, Ana Brenda Contreras, and Aaron Diaz. http://pabloaguirre.net/ns/
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    178

    Flashforward

    Flashforward is a science fiction novel by Canadian author Robert J. Sawyer first published in 1999. The novel is set in 2009. At CERN, the Large Hadron Collider accelerator is performing a run to search for the Higgs boson. The experiment has a unique side effect: the entire human race loses consciousness for about two minutes. During that time, nearly everyone sees themselves roughly twenty-one years and six months in the future. Each individual experiences their own future through the senses of their future self. This "flashforward" results in countless deaths and accidents involving vehicles, aircraft, and any other device needing human control at the time of the experiment. The novel inspired the 2009 television series FlashForward. The protagonist is Lloyd Simcoe, a 45-year-old Canadian particle physicist. He works with his fiancée Michiko, who has a daughter, Tamiko. Another researcher and friend is Theo Procopides. The fallout from the flashforward occupies much of the first part of the book. The consequences include the death of Michiko's daughter as an out-of-control vehicle plows into her school. Oddly, no recording devices anywhere in the world functioned in the present
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    Groogleman

    Groogleman is a young adult science fiction novel written by Debra Doyle and James D. Macdonald and published by Harcourt in 1996. Set in a post-apocalyptic future, it is the story of 13-year-old Dan Henchard, who shows signs of an immunity to the deadly plague which threatens his village. Feeling that he may be destined to be a healer, he travels with his friend Leezie to "The Dead Lands," a plague-ravaged area, where they must face not only the plague, but the fearsome grooglemen, strange creatures who steal the heads of the plague victims. Groogleman was expanded from the short story, "Uncle Joshua and the Grooglemen," written by the same authors, which was first published in the 1993 anthology Bruce Coville's Book of Monsters. Groogleman was translated into French in 1998 and published by Hachette Livre under the title La nuit des Hommogres (ISBN 2012098185).
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    180

    Mirror Dance

    Mirror Dance is a Hugo- and Locus-award-winning science fiction novel by Lois McMaster Bujold. Part of the Vorkosigan Saga, it was first published by Baen Books in March 1994. Clone Mark masquerades as Miles Vorkosigan (his progenitor) and dupes Miles' mercenary force, the Dendarii, into a mission to free clones held "prisoner" on Jackson's Whole, an anything-goes freebooters' planet where Mark was created and raised. When Miles finds out, he attempts to rescue his troops and his brother from the mess Mark has made, but is killed by a needle-grenade. He is frozen in a cryonic chamber on the spot, but the medic in charge becomes separated from the rest of the men while retreating under fire. The medic uses an automated shipping system to send the chamber to safety, but is killed before he can tell anyone its destination. The Dendarii take Mark to Miles' parents on Barrayar. Cordelia accepts him as another son and has him acknowledged legally as a member of the family. After a while, Mark concludes that Miles is still on Jackson's Whole, and decides to go there himself to look for him, since Barrayaran Imperial Security does not believe him. Cordelia helps by buying him a
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    The Amber Spyglass

    The Amber Spyglass is the third and final novel in the His Dark Materials series, written by English author Philip Pullman, and published in 2000. The Amber Spyglass won the 2001 Whitbread Book of the Year award, a British literature award, making it the first children's novel to receive the honour. It was named Children's Book of the Year at the 2001 British Book Awards, and was also longlisted for the Man Booker Prize, again the first time this had happened to a children's book. At the end of The Subtle Knife, Marisa Coulter captured Lyra. She has now relocated her to a remote cave to hide her from the Magisterium, who are determined to kill Lyra before she yields to original sin. In order to keep her hidden, Marisa forces Lyra to drink drugged tea that puts her to sleep. While deeply asleep, Lyra dreams that she is in a wasteland (later realized as the land of the dead) talking to her deceased friend Roger Parslow, whom she promises to help. In Cittàgazze, two angels, Balthamos and Baruch, tell Will, the bearer of the Subtle Knife, that they are taking him to Lord Asriel. Will refuses to go until Lyra is rescued, to which the two assent. However, they are attacked by a soldier
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    The Phoenix Guards

    The Phoenix Guards is the first novel in the Khaavren Romances, a fantasy series by Steven Brust set in the fictional world of Dragaera. The novel is heavily influenced by the d'Artagnan Romances written by Alexandre Dumas. Brust describes the book as "a blatant ripoff of The Three Musketeers." Khaavren of Castlerock, a young gentleman in search of adventure, joins the prestigious Phoenix Guards along with three new friends and becomes embroiled in the ruthless world of court intrigue. Khaavren of Castlerock is a young Dragaeran gentleman from the House of the Tiassa whose family has fallen onto hard times. Though lacking an inheritance, Khaavren has a long sword and is "tolerably well-acquainted with its use." On his way to the capital city of the Empire, Khaavren befriends Aerich and Tazendra, nobles from the Houses of the Lyorn and Dzur who also lack income. Khaavren tells them of his plan to join the Phoenix Guards, the new Emperor's elite personal troops, and his new friends decide to accompany him. The trio arrive in Dragaera City and meet Pel, a Yendi who joined a few days previous. Pel helps the trio sign up and buy their equipment, and quickly befriends them. The four are
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    The Shattered Sphere

    The Shattered Sphere is a science fiction book by the author Roger MacBride Allen. It is a the second of The Hunted Earth series, preceded by The Ring of Charon.
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