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Best Locomotive of All Time

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    1
    Great western 90 2-10-0 decapod

    Great western 90 2-10-0 decapod

    Strasburg Rail Road no.90 (ex: Great Western) is a 2-10-0 steam locomotive operated by the Strasburg Rail Road, outside Strasburg, Pennsylvania. It originally pulled sugar beet trains of about 40 to 50 cars length for the Great Western Railway of Colorado to the company's towering mill in Loveland, Colorado. Built in 1924 by the Baldwin Locomotive Works in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, #90 is the railroad's youngest engine; it is also the most powerful of the four steam locomotives in operation at the Strasburg Rail Road. The Strasburg Rail Road purchased it in 1967, and it is now one of the two last operating decapods in the United States.
    8.17
    6 votes
    2
    Southern Pacific 4449

    Southern Pacific 4449

    Southern Pacific 4449 is the only surviving example of Southern Pacific Railroad's (SP) GS-4 class of steam locomotives. The GS-4 is a streamlined 4-8-4 (Northern) type steam locomotive. GS stands for "Golden State", a nickname for California (where the locomotive was operated in regular service), or "General Service." The locomotive was built by Lima Locomotive Works in Lima, Ohio, for SP in May 1941; it received the red-and-orange "Daylight" paint scheme for the passenger trains of the same name which it hauled for most of its service career. No. 4449 was retired from revenue service in 1957 and put into storage. In 1958 it was donated, by the railroad, to the City of Portland, who then put it on static display in Oaks Amusement Park, where it remained until 1974. It was restored to operation for use in the American Freedom Train, which toured the 48 contiguous United States for the American Bicentennial celebrations. Since then, 4449 has been operated in excursion service throughout the continental US; its operations are based at the Oregon Rail Heritage Center in Portland, where it is maintained by a group of dedicated volunteers called Friends of SP 4449. In 1983, a poll of
    8.17
    6 votes
    3

    Fairy Queen

    The Fairy Queen, built in 1855, is the world's oldest steam locomotive in regular operation today, plying between New Delhi to Alwar in India. The locomotive was certified by the Guinness Book of Records to be the oldest operational locomotive after the Rajasthan government invoked it in 2004 to lug a deluxe train in order to boost tourism in the area. The Fairy Queen is run on the lines of the Palace on Wheels, the internationally renowned luxury train. The Fairy Queen was constructed in Leeds, England in 1855, and reached Calcutta in the same year where it was christened as the Fairy Queen. The locomotive was given its fleet number 22, by its then owner, The East Indian Railway. It began to haul light mail trains between Howrah and Raniganj, but was soon consigned to line construction duty in the state of Bihar, where it served until 1909. The locomotive spent the next thirty-four years on a pedestal outside the Howrah Railway Station near Calcutta. In 1943, the locomotive was shifted to the Railway Zonal Training School at Chandausi, where it served as a curiosity object for many of the students based there. In 1972, the Indian government bequeathed heritage status to the
    7.14
    7 votes
    4
    Puffing Billy

    Puffing Billy

    Puffing Billy is an early railway steam locomotive, constructed in 1813-1814 by engineer William Hedley, enginewright Jonathan Forster and blacksmith Timothy Hackworth for Christopher Blackett, the owner of Wylam Colliery near Newcastle upon Tyne, in the United Kingdom. It is the world's oldest surviving steam locomotive. It was the first commercial adhesion steam locomotive, employed to haul coal chaldron wagons from the mine at Wylam to the docks at Lemington-on-Tyne in Northumberland. Puffing Billy was one of the three similar engines built by Hedley, the resident engineer at Wylam Colliery, to replace the horses used as motive power on the tramway. In 1813 Hedley built for Blackett's colliery business on the Wylam Colliery line the prototypes, "Puffing Billy" and "Wylam Dilly". They were both rebuilt in 1815 with ten wheels, but were returned to their original condition in 1830 when the railway was relaid with stronger rails. Puffing Billy remained in service until 1862, Edward Blackett, the owner of Wylam Colliery, lent it to the Patent Office Museum in South Kensington, London (later the Science Museum). He later sold it to the museum for £200. It is still on display there.
    8.80
    5 votes
    5
    6.57
    7 votes
    6
    DeWitt Clinton

    DeWitt Clinton

    The DeWitt Clinton of the Mohawk and Hudson Railroad (M&H) was the first steam locomotive to operate in the state of New York and the fourth built in the United States. The locomotive began operations in 1831. It was named in honour of DeWitt Clinton, the governor of New York State responsible for the Erie Canal, who died in 1828. Portions of the steam engine were cast at the West Point Foundry in Cold Spring NY. The DeWitt Clinton's first run was from the city of Albany, New York to Schenectady, New York, a run of 16 miles. Its passenger cars were yellow stagecoaches in which the riders would sit either inside or on outdoor rumble seats. It was scrapped in 1833. The M&H became part of the New York Central Railroad system in 1853. The New York Central Railroad built a scale and operational reproduction of the DeWitt Clinton, complete with three carriages, for the 1893 Columbian Exposition in Chicago. This replica continued to work as an engaging promotional device for the railroad in many subsequent locations until purchased by Henry Ford in 1934 with the condition that it still travel periodically to fairs and expositions on behalf of the NYCR. It is kept on display at the Henry
    8.20
    5 votes
    7
    GWR 4073 Class 5043 Earl of Mount Edgcumbe

    GWR 4073 Class 5043 Earl of Mount Edgcumbe

    • Locomotive class: GWR 4073 Class
    The GWR 4073 Class 5043 Earl of Mount Edgcumbe is a steam locomotive of the GWR 'Castle' Class, built in March 1936. It was originally named Barbury Castle, and was renamed Earl of Mount Edgcumbe in September 1937. It had a double chimney and 4 row superheater fitted in October 1958. Its first shed allocation was Old Oak Common; from June 1952 to February 1956 it was based at Carmarthen, before returning again to Old Oak Common. It was transferred from Cardiff Canton TMD to Cardiff East Dock shed in September 1962. Its last shed allocation was Cardiff East Dock. It was withdrawn in December 1963 and acquired by Woodham Brothers scrapyard in Barry, South Wales. in June 1964. It was sold to the then Birmingham Railway Museum and left as the 43rd departure from Barry in September 1973. Once at Tyseley Locomotive Works many of its parts were removed for safekeeping and the locomotive was stored, initially as a spare boiler for 7029 "Clun Castle".
    8.00
    5 votes
    8
    8.00
    5 votes
    9
    7.80
    5 votes
    10
    9.00
    4 votes
    11
    Illinois Central 201

    Illinois Central 201

    Illinois Central 201 is a steam locomotive, originally owned and operated by Illinois Central Railroad. In 1949, the locomotive was operated at the Chicago Railroad Fair as part of the "Wheels A-Rolling" pageant. It is now on static display at Illinois Railway Museum in Union, Illinois.
    6.67
    6 votes
    12

    Western Maryland 202

    Western Maryland 202 is a retired 4-6-2 steam locomotive displayed in City Park, Hagerstown, Maryland. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984. 202 was cosmetically restored in 2008.
    7.60
    5 votes
    13
    8.75
    4 votes
    14

    International Limited

    The International Limited was a named passenger train operated between Chicago and Toronto, Ontario. It was originally operated by the Grand Trunk Railway of Canada and its successors the Canadian National Railway and Grand Trunk Western Railroad. When the route was revived in 1982, it was operated jointly by Via Rail and Amtrak. The Amtrak service was discontinued on April 25, 2004, due to decreasing ridership: down from 125,126 in 1997 to just 88,045 in 2003. When the Canadian National and Grand Trunk Western controlled the operations of train number 14, the International Limited, from Chicago's Dearborn Station to Montreal's Central Station, the train was around 12 cars long, including GTW & CNR baggage-express cars (two), CNR coaches (five), CNR named 12-1 Pullman sleepers (three), CNR 8-1-2 named Pullman sleeper (one), and last but not least, an unusual 2-3-1 buffet, lounge, solarium from the CNR. It departed from Dearborn Station at 8:00 pm behind a GTW U4-b 6400 Northern type steam locomotive. At Port Huron, St. Clair Tunnel Company electrics would pull the train through the tunnel to Sarnia, Ontario, where a CNR 5700 class Hudson (4-6-4 wheel arrangement) or a CNR 6400
    7.40
    5 votes
    15

    Reading 2101

    Reading 2101 is a 4-8-4 steam locomotive originally operated by the Reading Company. In 1975, the locomotive was the first to pull the American Freedom Train, which began touring the continental United States on April 1. Reading 2101 is a T1 class 4-8-4 steam locomotive that was one of 30 4-8-4s that were converted from 30 I-10a 2-8-0 Consolidation locomotives from 1945 through 1947 by the Reading Railroad when management wanted faster and stronger locomotives, but had no spare cash to order completely new locomotives. Starting in 1945 the Reading took 30 of its 2-8-0s and converted them with a little help from Baldwin Locomotive Works into 30 new 4-8-4 locomotives that were numbered 2100-2129 and classified as class "T1". 2101 was originally built by Baldwin in 1923 as I-10a 2-8-0 #2021 and was converted to Reading 2101 in 1945. For its entire service life, 2101 pulled many freight and passenger trains with ease from 1945 to 1956 when all steam vanished on the Reading except for four T1's 2100, 2101, 2102, and 2124. 2101 was cared for in the Reading's Roundhouse from 1959 to 1964 as a standby locomotive for the famous "Iron Horse Ramble" Excursions, but was never used. Oct 17,
    7.40
    5 votes
    16
    Western Pacific 805-A

    Western Pacific 805-A

    Western Pacific 805-A is a diesel-electric railroad locomotive built by the Electro-Motive Division of General Motors. It was mainly used to pull passenger trains, specifically the California Zephyr (CZ), which was operated jointly by the Western Pacific, Denver and Rio Grande Western, and the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroads. It later worked for several short line railroads before preservation at the Western Pacific Railroad Museum at Portola, California. WP 805-A was purchased to power Western Pacific Railroad's portion of the California Zephyr run less than one year after the train began on March 20, 1949. The 805-A was built in 1950 as part of an order by WP for 6 new passenger locomotives: 4 cab equipped A units numbered 804-A, 804-C, 805-A and 805-C, and 2 B units numbered 804-B and 805-B. These locomotives supplemented WP's exisitng fleet of F3 models, which were the original power for the CZ train. This cab unit, which would be joined by two cabless B units in a typical CZ motive power set, hauled the train between Oakland, California, and Salt Lake City, Utah, from 1950 until March 22, 1970, when the CZ ended. The 805-A was then placed into freight service. This
    7.40
    5 votes
    17

    Empire State Express

    The Empire State Express was one of the named passenger trains and onetime flagship of the New York Central and Hudson River Railroad (a predecessor of the modern New York Central Railroad). It became the world's first high-speed passenger train on September 14, 1891, when it covered the 436 miles (702 kilometers) between New York City and Buffalo in just 7 hours and 6 minutes (including stops). The train averaged 61.4 miles-per-hour (98.8 km/h), a new world speed record in rail travel, with an officially recorded top speed of 82 mph (132 km/h), though observers claimed to have clocked the train at 112 mph (180 km/h). In short order, the train would gain worldwide celebrity, and its route would later stretch to 620 miles (998 kilometers), with Cleveland, Ohio as its western terminus. In addition to its other notable accomplishments, the Empire State was the first passenger train to maintain a regular schedule speed of over 52 mph (84 km/h), and the first to make runs of 142.88 miles (230 km) between stops (between New York City and Albany: the longest scheduled nonstop run ever attempted). On December 7, 1941, the New York Central inaugurated a new, all-stainless-steel streamlined
    8.50
    4 votes
    18
    Canadian Pacific 2816

    Canadian Pacific 2816

    Canadian Pacific 2816, named the Empress, is a 4-6-4 H1b Hudson used by the Canadian Pacific Railway in occasional excursion service. The 2816 is the only non-streamlined H1 Hudson remaining (the other four remaining are the semi-streamlined Royal Hudsons). Locomotive 2816 was one of ten H1b-class (the "H" meant the 4-6-4 wheel configuration, the "1" was the design number and the "b" meant it was the second production run) 4-6-4 Hudson built by the Montreal Locomotive Works in 1930. It was first assigned to the line between Winnipeg and Fort William, Ontario. Later, it was transferred to service between Windsor, Ontario and Quebec City, and finally it ran a commuter train between Montreal and Rigaud, Quebec. It made its last run on May 26, 1960, after more than 2 million miles in active service. In 1963, the locomotive was sold to Monadnock, Steamtown & Northern Amusements Corp. Inc. (AKA: Steamtown, USA), which evolved into the Steamtown National Historic Site in 1986. When Steamtown USA moved from Bellows Falls, Vermont, to Scranton, Pennsylvania, in the 1980s, engine 2816 made the trip with other engines. When the National Park Service took over from the Steamtown Foundation,
    9.67
    3 votes
    19

    Hibernia

    Hibernia was a steam locomotive designed by Richard Roberts and built by Sharp, Roberts and Company in 1834 for the Dublin and Kingstown Railway (D&KR). The locomotive had vertical cylinders driving via bell cranks. Hibernia was built in 1834 for the D&KR. She was one of a class of three similar locomotives. Like Experiment, power transmission from the vertical cylinders was via bell cranks. Hibernia pulled the first train on the D&KR on 9 October 1834, which consisted of eight carriages.
    7.20
    5 votes
    20

    National Limited

    The National Limited was the premier train of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad (B&O) on its route between New York City and St. Louis, Missouri, with major station stops in Washington, D.C., and Cincinnati, Ohio. The all-Pullman version of the National Limited was introduced by the B&O on April 26, 1925, as Trains #1 (westbound) and #2 (eastbound). The B&O had previously operated through cars between New York and western points as the National Limited since December 1916. B&O's New York terminus was actually in Jersey City, New Jersey, at the Central Railroad of New Jersey Terminal. Passengers were then transferred to buses that met the train at the platform. These buses were then ferried across the Hudson River to Manhattan Island, where they proceeded to various "stations" including the Vanderbilt Hotel, Wanamaker's, Columbus Circle, and Rockefeller Center, as well as into Brooklyn. The National Limited traversed some of the most challenging terrain in eastern railroading, climbing the Appalachian Mountains in western Maryland and West Virginia. Even through the diesel era, extra motive power was added at the head-end to take the train over these ridges, which meant extra stops on
    7.20
    5 votes
    21
    7.20
    5 votes
    22

    Fire Queen

    Fire Queen is an early steam locomotive built by A. Horlock and Co. in 1848 for the Padarn Railway. It is the only surviving locomotive from that railway, and it is preserved at the Penrhyn Castle Railway Museum. Fire Queen was one of two identical locomotives built for the Padarn Railway, which connected the Dinorwic Quarry near Llanberis in north Wales with the port at Y Felinheli. The railway was opened in 1840 using horses to pull the slate trains. It replaced the even earlier Dinorwic Railway which opened in 1824. The two locomotives, Fire Queen and Jenny Lind, were built by marine engineers A. Horlock and C.; they were the only railway locomotives built by this company. The locomotives were based on an 1847 patent of Thomas Crampton, which specified a locomotive with driving wheels positioned at the ends of the boiler driven by steeply inclined cylinders placed between the wheels. The locomotives lacked a frame, and the wheels and cylinders were attached directly to the boiler. They were delivered to the railway in 1848 and continued working until the late 1880s. Jenny Lind was scrapped, but Fire Queen was placed in a small shed at the quarry workshop, Gilfach Ddu. It stayed
    7.00
    5 votes
    23
    GWR 111 The Great Bear

    GWR 111 The Great Bear

    The Great Bear, number 111, was a locomotive of the Great Western Railway. It was the first 4-6-2 (Pacific) locomotive used on a railway in Great Britain, and the only one of that type ever built by the GWR. The Great Bear was built in 1908 to satisfy demands from the directors for the largest locomotive in Britain, and much was made of the locomotive by the GWR's publicity department. She was considered the company's flagship locomotive until the building of 4073 Caerphilly Castle in 1923. In service The Great Bear was not a significant improvement on existing classes, and had a highly restrictive route availability; its 20t 9cwt axle load limiting it to the Paddington to Bristol main line, although it was once recorded to have travelled as far west as Newton Abbot. Its regular engine driver was Thomas Blackall, originally from Aston Tirrold, Oxfordshire. The GWR did not pursue the Pacific wheel arrangement, and subsequently stayed with the 4-6-0 arrangement which later became synonymous with the company. Churchward's successor Charles Collett is reputed not to have liked the loco, and is alleged to have prepared the report presented to the GWR's locomotive committee recommending
    7.00
    5 votes
    24

    Reading 902

    Reading Company 902 is a preserved ex-Reading Company EMD FP7. Reading 902 was one of the first six FP7s ordered by the railroad in March 1950 to replace passenger steam locomotives. It and sister Reading 903 were completed on June 1 of that year and delivered to the Reading via the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. The pair pulled their first train on June 6. In the following years, the two locomotives sometimes worked together, and sometimes were split, depending on the size of their trains. SEPTA inherited the units in 1974, and they were renumbered by the new Consolidated Rail Corporation in 1976, the 902 becoming 4372. The locomotive was involved in a derailment in February 1978, and when it re-entered service in June, it had new SEPTA paint. During the SEPTA years, the FP7s usually operated in push-pull. SEPTA ceased all diesel-operations in 1981, and the locomotives were retired. Locomotive 902 was eventually obtained by the Lancaster Chapter of the National Railway Historical Society (NRHS) and was stored at the Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania along with its sister, the 903, which was owned by the Philadelphia Chapter of the NRHS. The two completed restoration in 1995. In
    7.00
    5 votes
    25

    City of Portland

    The City of Portland was a named passenger train operated by the Union Pacific Railroad and Chicago and North Western Railway between Chicago, Illinois, and Portland, Oregon. It started in June 1935, using the refurbished M-10001 streamliner trainset; with only one set of equipment the train left each of its terminals five times a month (or six, for the first few months). It was the first of the Chicago-to-Coast streamliners, and also the first with sleeping cars; its 39 hour 45 minute schedule became the standard. The M-10001 was withdrawn in 1939 and replaced with another articulated trainset-- but still just one. The train was the first of the 40-hour Coast streamliners to run daily, in February 1947. In 1955 the Milwaukee Road assumed the service, replacing the Chicago and North Western between Chicago and Omaha; from January 1959 until 1967 the train ran via Denver. The train was discontinued May 1, 1971, with the inception of Amtrak. The route roughly follows the trail of the defunct Amtrak route, the Pioneer. In addition to baggage, coach, and sleeping cars, during the mid-1950s the City of Portland added a dome coach, dome observation lounge and dome dining car to each
    9.33
    3 votes
    26

    Bradyll

    Bradyll is an early steam locomotive built by Timothy Hackworth at his Soho Works in Shildon, England in 1840. She is the oldest surviving locomotive with an 0-6-0 wheel arrangement. Bradyll was built to work on the South Hetton Railway, which ran from Haswell to Seaham Docks. She was named after Colonel Thomas Bradyll, who owned the mines and promoted the railway and new port built at Seaham. Bradyll was obsolete by the 1870s, and in 1875 she was converted into a snowplough. This was done by removing her cylinders and motion, and adding a blade and weights. By World War Two, she had been withdrawn from this duty, but escaped the scrap drive as she was on an isolated piece of track. After the war, she was placed at the works gates to the Philadelphia Iron Works as a "gate guardian" and regularly painted with a tar-based paint, which helped to preserve her. Bradyll has never been restored, and is probably unique in this respect. The locomotive has an Adamson type firebox, and Wilson wheels, as used by Hackworth on the Stockton & Darlington Railway. Bradyll is currently on display at Locomotion, Shildon. She will be conserved, but no restoration will take place to return her to an
    8.00
    4 votes
    27
    8.00
    4 votes
    28
    6.80
    5 votes
    29
    6.80
    5 votes
    30
    6.80
    5 votes
    31
    Welsh Highland Railway Locomotive Russell

    Welsh Highland Railway Locomotive Russell

    Russell is a 104 year old narrow gauge steam locomotive originally built for the North Wales Narrow Gauge Railways (NWNGR), but most famously associated with the original Welsh Highland Railway (WHR), and currently undergoing a rebuild at the Welsh Highland Railway (Porthmadog). There have been a number of books written either about, or containing details of the engine, but the succinct parts are detailed below. Russell has a complex history. A 2-6-2T steam locomotive, the design of Russell is more closely related to Hunslet No 865 of 1905 otherwise known as Leeds Number 1, although certain engineering aspects can be more readily associated with design of locomotives supplied to the Sierra Leone Government Railway. One of the driving wheel centres bears the initials SLR, however this has been found to have been a later replacement and not as originally supplied. Originally built with air train brakes, it was converted to vacuum train brakes following the linking of the Welsh Highland and Ffestiniog Railways. A character, Fearless Freddie, based on this locomotive, appears in the children's TV series Thomas the Tank Engine and Friends.
    9.00
    3 votes
    32
    9.00
    3 votes
    33
    20th Century Limited

    20th Century Limited

    The 20th Century Limited was an express passenger train operated by the New York Central Railroad from 1902 to 1967, during which time it would become known as a "National Institution" and the "Most Famous Train in the World". In the year of its last run, The New York Times said that it "...was known to railroad buffs for 65 years as the world's greatest train". The train traveled between Grand Central Terminal in New York City and LaSalle Street Station in Chicago, Illinois along the railroad's famed "Water Level Route". The NYC inaugurated this train as direct competition to the Pennsylvania Railroad, aimed at upper class as well as business travelers between the two cities. It made few station stops along the way and used track pans enroute to take water at speed. Beginning on June 15, 1938, when it got streamlined equipment, it made the 960-mile journey in 16 hours, departing New York City westbound at 6:00 P.M. Eastern Time and arriving at Chicago's LaSalle St. Station the following morning at 9:00 A.M. Central Time, averaging 60 miles per hour (97 km/h). For a brief period after World War II, the eastward schedule was shortened to 15½ hours. Equal with th 20th Century's
    6.60
    5 votes
    34
    British Rail Class 455

    British Rail Class 455

    The British Rail Class 455 is a type of electric multiple unit drawing power from a 750 V DC third rail. Built by BREL at York works in the early and mid-1980s, they were initially categorised as Class 510 as the successor to the Class 508. They are used on suburban services in South London, by South West Trains and Southern. There were three batches of Class 455 units, all consisting of 4 cars: driving carriages at each end, an intermediate trailer vehicle and an intermediate motorised vehicle (powered by four GEC507-20J of 185 kW carried on the bogies of the MSO vehicle, some recovered from Class 405), all originally built to the Standard Class 3+2 seating arrangement. Technically, they are formed DTSO+MSO+TSO+DTSO. They have the same bodyshell as the Class 317 and Class 318, but as they were designed for inner suburban services they do not feature first class seating or toilet facilities and are restricted to 75 mph (121 km/h). Like the Class 317/318, as well as the diesel Class 150, they are based on British Rail's Mark 3 coaches, with a steel construction, unlike the earlier PEP-based Class 313s, 314s, 315s, 507s and 508s which had an aluminium alloy body. The first batch
    7.50
    4 votes
    35

    CIÉ No. CC1

    Córas Iompair Éireann No. CC1, generally known as the Turf Burner, was a prototype 0-6-6-0 articulated steam locomotive designed by Oliver Bulleid to burn turf (an Irish term for peat used as fuel) and built at CIÉ's Inchicore Works in Dublin. CC1 shared some, but not all, of the characteristics of Bulleid's previous attempt to develop a modern steam locomotive, the Leader. Like the one completed Leader, CC1 had a relatively short career and was never used in front-line service. It was the last steam locomotive to be constructed for an Irish railway. Experiments with turf as a fuel for steam locomotives began in the early days of Irish railways. The first use of turf in a locomotive was on the Midland Great Western Railway in 1848. Further experiments were conducted over the years on the Waterford and Limerick, Great Southern and Western, Belfast and Northern Counties and Listowel and Ballybunion Railways, but there is no evidence of routine use. During the Emergency (World War II), shortages of imported coal led to the use of turf as one of several substitutes (others included loose coal dust and briquettes of anthracite dust bonded with pitch). The first locomotives designed
    7.50
    4 votes
    36
    7.50
    4 votes
    37

    Santa Fe 3415

    Santa Fe 3415 is a restored steam locomotive that is owned by the Abilene and Smoky Valley Railroad. Retired in 1955, it sat in Eisenhower Park in Abilene, Kansas until April, 1996. At that point, it was donated by the City and put on display in the Abilene and Smoky Valley yard. Restoration began in 2005 and was completed in early 2009. It is planned for the locomotive to operate about once a month during the normal operating season. Its first revenue trip was on May 23, 2009.
    8.67
    3 votes
    38
    Flagg Coal Company 75

    Flagg Coal Company 75

    Flagg Coal Company 75 is a 0-4-0 saddletank steam locomotive built for the Flagg Coal Company in 1930. Restored and owned by John and Byron Gramling, the engine was loaned in 2002 to the Steam Railroading Institute where it is used for demonstrations and for powering train rides and excursions. Originally numbered Flagg Coal Company 2, the locomotive's number was changed to 75 when it was sold to the Solvay Process Quarry in 1935. It never actually wore "Flagg Coal Company 75" during its service life. FCC 75 went into service in December of 1930 as #2 for the Flagg Coal Company of Avoca, Pennsylvania where it was used as a switch engine. In 1935 it was sold to the Solvay Process Co. in Jamesville, New York and renumbered 75. It was then used to push 4-wheel hopper cars from the steam shovel to the crusher at the rock quarry. In the early 1950s the Solvay Process Co. replaced the 0-4-0s like # 75 with trucks and dieselized the handling of finished crushed stone with two GE 80 tonners, #5 and #6. (#6 now belongs to the Central NY Chapter, NRHS along with former Solvay Process Co. Alco 0-4-0 # 53). In 1954, #75 and twelve other locomotives were sold to Dr. Groman and his planned Rail
    10.00
    2 votes
    39
    Jenny Lind locomotive

    Jenny Lind locomotive

    The Jenny Lind locomotive was the first of a class of ten steam locomotives built in 1847 for the London Brighton and South Coast Railway by E. B. Wilson and Company of Leeds, named after Jenny Lind, who was a famous opera singer of the period. The general design proved to be very successful that the manufacturers adopted it for use on other railways, and it became the first mass-produced locomotive type. The 'Jenny Lind' type was also widely copied during the late 1840s and 1850s, and into the 1860s. David Joy, the Chief Draughtsman of E. B. Wilson and Company, was asked to visit Brighton railway works to make tracings of the drawings of a 2-2-2 locomotive designed by John Gray for the railway so that ten further examples could be built. However, before he had completed the task, Gray had been dismissed from his post of Locomotive Superintendent, and his successor Thomas Kirtley did not favour Gray's complicated horse-leg motion. As a result it was left to Joy and James Fenton the works manager at E.B. Wilson to adapt the design. Joy had spent his formative years studying all the locomotives he came across, sketching them, making notes, and interrogating their owners and crews -
    10.00
    2 votes
    40
    LNER Class A3 4472 Flying Scotsman

    LNER Class A3 4472 Flying Scotsman

    The LNER Class A3 Pacific locomotive No. 4472 Flying Scotsman (originally No. 1472) was built in 1923 for the London and North Eastern Railway (LNER) at Doncaster Works to a design of H.N. Gresley. It was employed on long-distance express trains on the LNER and its successors, British Railways Eastern and North-Eastern Regions, notably on the 10am London to Edinburgh Flying Scotsman service after which it was named. In its career 4472 Flying Scotsman has covered more than 2,000,000 miles (3,200,000 km). The locomotive was completed in 1923, construction having been started under the auspices of the Great Northern Railway (GNR). It was built as an A1, initially carrying the GNR number 1472, because the LNER had not yet decided on a system-wide numbering scheme. Flying Scotsman was something of a flagship locomotive for the LNER. It represented the company at the British Empire Exhibition at Wembley in 1924 and 1925. Prior to this event, in February 1924 it acquired its name and the new number of 4472. From then on it was commonly used for promotional purposes. With suitably modified valve gear, this locomotive was one of five Gresley Pacifics selected to haul the prestigious
    6.40
    5 votes
    41

    Southern Pacific 1293

    Southern Pacific 1293 is an S-14 class 0-6-0 steam locomotive built by Lima Locomotive Works. It was dedicated to the City of Tracy, California, on September 27, 1958, by the Southern Pacific Railroad Company (now Union Pacific Railroad). After Southern Pacific retired 1293 in 1958, SP donated 1293 for display in Dr. Powers Park in Tracy, CA. It remains there to this day, where it rests on 'Tourist Railroad'. SP 1293 is scheduled to be repainted in 2009.
    6.40
    5 votes
    42

    Daylight Limited

    The Daylight Limited was an express passenger train between Auckland and Wellington, New Zealand along the North Island Main Trunk. It commenced in 1925 and was replaced by the Scenic Daylight in 1963. After the introduction of the Night Limited in 1924, the New Zealand Railways Department investigated the possibility of a daylight train between Wellington and Auckland. It was introduced on a trial basis in 1925-26, but was then cancelled until another trial in 1929-30. The economic impact of the Great Depression intervened and the service was cut back to operating solely during the Christmas and Easter peak seasons. In the off-peak season the Night Limited catered for passenger demand between Auckland and Wellington, but at the times of the most intense demand extra trains ran. In the early years of the service, A and sometimes W class steam locomotives operated the train, and later more modern locomotives such as the K class were used, with ED and EW electric locomotives between Wellington and Paekakariki from 1940. The train made extended stops at Mercer, Frankton, Taumarunui and Marton for refreshments: Marton refreshment rooms closed in 1954 and Mercer in 1958. In 1963 the
    7.25
    4 votes
    43

    GWR 102 La France

    La France, number 102, was a locomotive of the Great Western Railway. It was bought by G.J. Churchward to evaluate French locomotive practice, and particularly the effect of compounding. George Jackson Churchward, on succeeding William Dean as Chief Mechanical Engineer of the Great Western Railway (GWR), planned the introduction of a series of locomotives designed to tackle the South Devon Banks. Churchward looked at the best practice from both Europe and America, and was impressed by the performance of the de Glehn compounds running on the Nord railway in France. A single locomotive, built specifically for the GWR by Société Alsacienne de Constructions Mécaniques on the de Glehn principles was delivered in October 1903. This locomotive was numbered 102 and named La France although the makers plates had to be moved from the cabside to the front splasher to allow the number to be fitted in the usual GWR position. La France was visibly not a GWR engine, although fitted with a Swindon chimney and paired with a standard tender, as immediately recognisable from firebox and the cab. Initially the locomotive was painted black, looking more LNWR than GWR, but she was repainted in 1905 into
    7.25
    4 votes
    44
    C. P. Huntington

    C. P. Huntington

    C. P. Huntington is a 4-2-4T steam locomotive currently on static display at the California State Railroad Museum in Sacramento, California, USA. It is the first locomotive purchased by the Southern Pacific Railroad, carrying that railroad's number 1. The locomotive is named in honor of Collis P. Huntington, the third president of the Southern Pacific Company (parent company of Southern Pacific Railroad). C. P. Huntington was originally purchased by Central Pacific Railroad (CP) in 1863 as that railroad's number 3, along with its sister engine T. D. Judah (CP no. 4). It was CP's third locomotive after Gov. Stanford (number 1, built by Norris Locomotive Works) and Pacific (number 2, built by Mason Machine Works). CP used the locomotive beginning on April 15, 1864, during construction of the western portion of the First Transcontinental Railroad in North America. Southern Pacific (SP) purchased C. P. Huntington from CP on February 5, 1871, and used it in light service in northern California. It was rebuilt twice, first in 1873 with new valves and again in 1888 with a new boiler built by CP's Sacramento shops. In 1888 the locomotive was also put on public display for the first time in
    8.33
    3 votes
    45

    City of Denver

    The City of Denver was a passenger train originally operated by the Chicago and North Western (CNW) and Union Pacific (UP) railroads between Chicago, Illinois, and Denver, Colorado. In 1955 the Milwaukee Road assumed the service, replacing the Chicago and Northwestern between Chicago and Omaha. This train was the fastest long-distance train in the world when it debuted in 1936, covering 1,048 miles (1,687 km) in as little as 16 hours (an average of about 65 miles per hour / 105 kilometres per hour). The City of Denver was involved in Colorado's worst traffic accident when, on December 14, 1961, it struck a school bus in Auburn, a few miles east of LaSalle, killing 20 children. The name has also been applied to a cafe/lounge car that is still owned and operated by the Union Pacific in employee and other special trains. This car was built by St. Louis Car Company in 1949 as UP's car #5011.
    8.33
    3 votes
    46
    The General

    The General

    The General is a type 4-4-0 steam locomotive that was the subject of the Great Locomotive Chase of the American Civil War. The locomotive is preserved at the Southern Museum of Civil War and Locomotive History in Kennesaw, Georgia, and it is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Built in 1855 by Rogers, Ketchum & Grosvenor in Paterson, New Jersey, The General provided freight and passenger service between Atlanta, Georgia, and Chattanooga, Tennessee, before the Civil War on the Western and Atlantic Railroad of the State of Georgia and later, the Western and Atlantic Railroad Company. During the Civil War on April 12, 1862, The General was commandeered by Northerners led by James J. Andrews at Big Shanty (now Kennesaw, Georgia), and abandoned north of Ringgold, after being pursued by William Allen Fuller and the Texas. Low on water and wood, the General eventually lost steam pressure and speed, and slowed to a halt two miles north of Ringgold, where Andrews and his raiders abandoned the locomotive and tried to flee. Later, the General narrowly escaped destruction when General John Bell Hood ordered the ordnance depot destroyed as he left Atlanta on September 1, 1864.
    8.33
    3 votes
    47
    6.20
    5 votes
    48
    BR standard class 8 71000 Duke of Gloucester

    BR standard class 8 71000 Duke of Gloucester

    The BR Standard Class 8 was a class of 4-6-2 Pacific steam locomotive designed by Robert Riddles for use by British Railways. Only the prototype was constructed, which was named Duke of Gloucester. Constructed at Crewe Works in 1954, the Duke, as it is popularly known, was a replacement for the destroyed Princess Royal Class locomotive number 46202 Princess Anne, which was involved in the Harrow and Wealdstone rail disaster of 1952. The Duke was based on the BR Standard Class 7 Britannia design. It incorporated three sets of modified Caprotti valve gear, relatively new to British locomotive engineering and more efficient than Walschaerts or Stephenson valve gear. The Duke was regarded as a failure by locomotive crews due to its poor steaming characteristics and its heavy fuel consumption. Trials undertaken by British Railways also returned negative feedback, reporting problems with the poor draughting of the locomotive which resulted in difficulty adhering to the timetables. The result was an operational period of only eight years. This unique locomotive was saved from being scrapped at Woodham Brothers scrapyard in Barry, Vale of Glamorgan, South Wales when it was purchased by a
    9.50
    2 votes
    49
    El Gobernador

    El Gobernador

    El Gobernador was a 4-10-0 steam locomotive built by Central Pacific Railroad at the railroad's Sacramento, California shops. It was the last of Central Pacific's locomotives to receive an official name and was also the only locomotive of this wheel arrangement to operate on United States rails. At the time it was built, El Gobernador was the largest railroad locomotive in the world. Its name is reminiscent of the railroad's first locomotive, Gov. Stanford, as El Gobernador is Spanish for The Governor. This locomotive is sometimes mistakenly referred to as a "Mastodon" type. However, this was the unofficial name for an earlier engine, No. 229, the first 4-8-0 ever built. Both engines looked nearly identical, except that El Gobernador was longer and had an additional pair of drivers. El Gobernador's construction was completed in February 1883, amid much fanfare from the railroad, but it didn't enter service until March 1884, just over a year later. During this time, while still in Sacramento, the gigantic engine was used as an advertising tool by the railroad, to spectacular effect. According to author Guy L. Dunscomb, the engine was kept under steam near the Central Pacific's
    9.50
    2 votes
    50
    9.50
    2 votes
    51
    9.50
    2 votes
    52
    7.00
    4 votes
    53
    GWR 4073 Class 4079 Pendennis Castle

    GWR 4073 Class 4079 Pendennis Castle

    Pendennis Castle is a GWR 4073 Class steam locomotive, preserved at the Didcot Railway Centre. The seventh of the first lot of 10 Castles built in 1923/4, No.4079 "Pendennis Castle" was completed at Swindon Works on 4 March 1924. She was allocated to Old Oak Common locomotive depot. The locomotive became famous in 1925 when the GWR lent her to the LNER as part of trials against the LNER's then new A1 Pacific Class, a famous example being LNER 4472 Flying Scotsman. Running from King's Cross to Grantham, and King's Cross to Doncaster, she made the ascent from King's Cross to Finsbury Park regularly in less than six minutes, a feat that the Pacifics were unable to match. Pendennis Castle was also shown to be more economical in both coal and water on the test runs, her superiority in burning unfamiliar Yorkshire coal being measured at 3.7lb per mile. Before returning to the GWR, the locomotive attended the second Wembley Exhibition between May and October 1925, displayed next to Flying Scotsman, with a notice proclaiming it to be the most powerful passenger express locomotive in Britain. Back at Old Oak Common, she continued to run the routes to South Wales and the West Country until
    6.00
    5 votes
    54
    8.00
    3 votes
    55
    Soo Line 2719

    Soo Line 2719

    Soo Line 2719 is a restored 4-6-2 steam locomotive that was originally operated by the Minneapolis, St. Paul and Sault Ste. Marie Railway (“Soo Line”). The 2719 was used to haul the Soo Line's last steam-powered train, on a June 21, 1959, round-trip excursion between Minneapolis, Minnesota, and Ladysmith, Wisconsin. The 2719 was built in May, 1923 in Schenectady, New York. It was one of 6 H-23 Pacific class steam locomotives built for the Soo Line. It operated until the mid-1950s when it was overhauled and put into storage. It was brought out of retirement to haul the last steam trains on Soo Line's tracks in 1959. It is estimated that the 2719 traveled more than 3 million miles during its time on the Soo. 2719 was then given to the City of Eau Claire, Wisconsin to be displayed in Carson Park. On May 23, 1996, a fund raising dinner, entitled "An Evening in the Club Car", was held at the Holiday Inn Convention Center in Eau Claire to benefit the restoration of the 2719. This dinner was the beginning of the restoration of the 2719. Restoration was undertaken by the Locomotive and Tower Preservation Fund, Ltd. After a very aggressive restoration schedule, the inaugural running was on
    8.00
    3 votes
    56
    8.00
    3 votes
    57
    British Rail 11001

    British Rail 11001

    11001 was one of the first British Railways diesel locomotives, built in 1949 at British Railways' Ashford Works. It was designed by O. V. S. Bulleid when he was Chief Mechanical Engineer of the Southern Railway. It was powered by a Paxman RPH Series 1 engine, capable of delivering 500 brake horsepower (370 kW) at 1,250 rpm. It was driven via a Vulcan Sinclair fluid coupling to an SSS (Synchro-Self-Shifting) Powerflow gearbox. The gearbox provided three forward and reverse gears in either high or low range, with top speed ranging from 5 mph (8 km/h) in 1st gear, low range up to 36 mph (58 km/h). It had an 0-6-0 wheel formation. Its main duties were on branch lines and shunting. It survived until 1959, when it was withdrawn in August and cut up at Ashford Works in December. Oddly, the locomotive's controls were laid out as in a steam locomotive, because there were at that time no drivers with experience of driving diesel engines. Dennis and Norman, from Thomas and Friends, are based on 11001.
    6.75
    4 votes
    58

    Southern Railway 1401

    Southern Railway 1401 is a steam locomotive that is the sole survivor of Southern Railway's Ps-4 class. Today it is on permanent display at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C.. It has a Pacific-type or 4-6-2 (Whyte notation) wheel arrangement and was built in 1926 by the American Locomotive Company (ALCO) at their Richmond works. It pulled Southern's highest-level passenger trains from 1926 until Dieselization in the early 1950s, mostly on Southern's Charlotte Division. Its most famous and historic use was as one of the locomotives that pulled President Franklin Roosevelt's funeral train from Warm Springs, Georgia, to Washington in April 1945. The Smithsonian Institution gathered information on two of 1401's engineers from a 1962 Greenville, SC newspaper interview with one of the Southern's fireman nicknamed "Box Car". "Box Car" (fireman for "DC") accidentally confused the engineers, who happened to be brothers. Oscar "OC" Surratt was one of the engineers on the train that took Roosevelt to Warm Springs. His brother Cleve "DC" Surratt was one of the engineers that brought Roosevelt's body back to Washington. In the 1950s, war hero and outside legal counsel to Southern
    6.75
    4 votes
    59
    The Salamanca

    The Salamanca

    Salamanca was the first commercially successful steam locomotive, built in 1812 by Matthew Murray of Holbeck, for the edge railed Middleton Railway between Middleton and Leeds. It was the first to have two cylinders. It was named after the Duke of Wellington's victory at the battle of Salamanca which was fought that same year. Salamanca was also the first rack and pinion locomotive, using John Blenkinsop's patented design for rack propulsion. A single rack ran outside the narrow gauge tracks and was engaged by a large cog wheel on the left side of the locomotive. The cog wheel was driven by twin cylinders embedded into the top of the centre-flue boiler. The class was described as having two 8"x20" cylinders, driving the wheels through cranks. The piston crossheads worked in guides, rather than being controlled by parallel motion like the majority of early locomotives. The engines saw up to twenty years of service. Four such locomotives were built for the railway. Salamanca was destroyed six years later, when its boiler exploded. According to George Stephenson, giving evidence to a committee of Parliament, the driver had tampered with the boiler safety valve.
    6.75
    4 votes
    60
    6.75
    4 votes
    61
    6.75
    4 votes
    62
    Tōkyū 7000 series

    Tōkyū 7000 series

    The Tokyu 7000 series (東急7000系, Tōkyū 7000-kei) is an electric multiple unit train type operated by Tokyu Corporation on the Ikegami and Tamagawa lines in Japan since December 2007. Based on the 5000 series design, cars are 18 metres long and have three sets of doors per side. These trains use a Train Automatic Stopping Controller (TASC) system allowing them to stop automatically at all stations. The trains are formed as follows. Car 2 is fitted with two single-arm pantographs. Seating is predominantly arranged longitudinally, with some transverse seating bays in the centre car. The first two 3-car sets were delivered in November 2007. A total of 19 sets are due to be delivered by the end of fiscal 2011.
    5.80
    5 votes
    63

    Atlantic

    Atlantic was the name of an early American steam locomotive built by Phineas Davis for the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad (B&O) in 1832. Built at a cost of $4,500, the Atlantic weighed 6.5 tons and had two vertical cylinders. Ox teams were used to convey the engine to Baltimore, where it made a successful inaugural trip to Ellicott's Mills, Maryland, a distance of thirteen miles (19 km). Nicknamed the 'Grasshopper' for its distinctive horizontal beam and long connecting rods, the locomotive carried 50 pounds of steam and burned a ton of anthracite coal on a 40-mile (64 km) trip from Baltimore. Satisfied with this locomotive's operations, the B&O built 20 more locomotives of a similar design at its Mt. Clare shops in Baltimore. Despite this, the Atlantic engine was scrapped in 1835. In 1892, a similar Grasshopper engine, the no. 7 Andrew Jackson built in 1836 by Ross Winans and George Gillingham, was rebuilt to resemble the 1832 Atlantic, intended to be used as a heritage showpiece. The former Andrew Jackson was first exhibited at the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago, Illinois, then exhibited again at the 1939 New York World's Fair, and finally in 1948-49 at the Chicago
    9.00
    2 votes
    64
    Santa Fe 3751

    Santa Fe 3751

    Santa Fe 3751 is a restored 4-8-4 steam locomotive that was originally owned and operated by the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway. It is located in the Central City East neighborhood of Los Angeles, California and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Built in 1927 by the Baldwin Locomotive Works, 3751 was Baldwin's and the Santa Fe's first 4-8-4. It had a 5 chime freight whistle mounted on it. Tests showed that 3751 was 20% more efficient and powerful than Santa Fe's 4-8-2 3700 class steamer, which at the point was the Santa Fe's top of the line steamer. In 1936, the engine was converted to burn oil. Two years later, the locomotive was given a larger tender able to hold 20,000 gallons of water and 7,107 gallons of fuel oil. In 1941, along with other 4-8-4s, 3751 received major upgrades including: 80-inch drive wheels, a new frame, roller bearings all around, and more. That same year, it achieved its highest recorded speed at 103 mph. It continued to be a very reliable working locomotive until 1953, when it pulled the last regularly scheduled steam powered passenger train on the Santa Fe to run between Los Angeles and San Diego on August 25, this was its last
    9.00
    2 votes
    65
    9.00
    2 votes
    66

    William Crooks

    William Crooks, named after the Superintendent of the Minnesota and Pacific RR was the first locomotive to operate in the U.S. state of Minnesota. Constructed in 1861 for the Minnesota and Pacific Railroad as their number 1, it first provided service a year later in 1862 for the St. Paul and Pacific Railroad. The St.P&P passed to the Saint Paul, Minneapolis and Manitoba Railway in June 1879, and the St.PM&M passed to the Great Northern Railway in February 1890. James J. Hill had the locomotive pull his personal train. It is reported that he was responsible for saving it from the scrap heap when engines of its vintage were being replaced by faster and more powerful vehicles. The classic 4-4-0 is one of the only locomotives from the age of the American Civil War to survive to the present day. In 1924, the locomotive went on an exhibition tour from Chicago to Seattle.William Crooks was displayed at the 1939 New York World's Fair and again at the Chicago Railroad Fair in 1948 where it was operated as part of the "Wheels A-Rolling" pageant. Its cylinders, rods and bearings were all rebuilt at the Great Northern's Dale Street Shops in St. Paul, MN in 1947-48 by machinist George A.
    9.00
    2 votes
    67
    LNER Class A4 4498 Sir Nigel Gresley

    LNER Class A4 4498 Sir Nigel Gresley

    London and North Eastern Railway (LNER) A4 Class number 4498 (original), 7 (LNER 1946) and 60007 (BR), named Sir Nigel Gresley is a preserved British steam locomotive. As with the other members of the 35-strong class, Sir Nigel Gresley wore many liveries throughout her career. She was released to traffic on 30 October 1937 in the standard LNER garter blue of the A4 Pacifics. New numbers and letters for the tender in stainless steel were added in a general overhaul 16 January 1939. Sir Nigel Gresley was repainted into wartime black with LNER markings on 21 February 1942. The next repaint was into black with NE markings on 20 October 1943, as a cutback. After the war, Sir Nigel Gresley regained LNER garter blue livery with red/white lining on 6 March 1947. With the formation of British Railways came new liveries and Sir Nigel Gresley was painted into British Railways dark blue with black and white lining on 27 September 1950. The final livery change was into British railways brunswick green livery on 17 April 1952. In preservation, Sir Nigel Gresley wore garter blue (with stainless steel letters and numbers as 4498 added later) from 1966 until her overhaul in the late 1990s, when she
    7.67
    3 votes
    68
    St. Louis Southwestern 819

    St. Louis Southwestern 819

    The St. Louis Southwestern #819 is a 4-8-4 steam locomotive. It was completed in 1943 and was the last engine built by the railway affectionately known as the "Cotton Belt Route". It was also the last locomotive built in Arkansas to date. It is located at the Arkansas Railroad Museum. The Cotton Belt initially purchased ten Northern 4-8-4 engines (#800–809) from Baldwin Locomotive Works located at Eddystone, Pennsylvania in 1930. Seven years later, Cotton Belt built five more Northern engines (#810–814) from their own shops in Pine Bluff, Arkansas in 1937. These Northern locomotives were Class L1 on the Cotton Belt. In 1942, Cotton Belt officials petitioned the War Production Board for authorization to buy five new EMD FT diesel locomotives for their growing passenger and freight lines. Instead, they were granted approval to produce five more 4-8-4 type locomotives (#815–819). Although similar to the previous set of five steam engines, these new locomotives had many modern improvements. Since the 819 was built during World War II, some materials were in short supply. The Cotton Belt emblems, which would have normally been made of brass, were made of steel to save brass for the war
    7.67
    3 votes
    69
    7.67
    3 votes
    70

    Bay Colony 1701

    Bay Colony 1701 is an EMD GP-8 locomotive currently used by Bay Colony Railroad. It was acquired by Bay Colony Railroad in March 1987. Its former ownership is as follows: Indiana Midland #50, GTW (#6050), Detroit Toledo & Shore Line #50. It was rebuilt in by BCLR in E. Wareham in 3/96 with engine from CCR GP9 #1925. Renumbered #1750 and classed GP9R. In limited service 6/7/96. Redesignated GP8, named "Gordon H. Fay. Formerly numbered BCLR #1750, Ex. BCLR GP7 #1501 before being rebuilt by BCLR. Ran briefly in DT&SL paint before being painted in gray BCLR scheme 11/88. Out Of Service with a cracked engine block 1994. Rblt into BCLR 1750. Now used on the Millis branch line Bay Colony's last standing line.
    10.00
    1 votes
    71
    Lancashire Witch

    Lancashire Witch

    Lancashire Witch was an early steam locomotive built by Robert Stephenson and Company in Newcastle-upon-Tyne in 1828. It was a development of Locomotion. Lancashire Witch was an 0-4-0 locomotive with rear mounted cylinders inclined at 45 degrees driving to the front wheels. The rear wheels were powered via coupling rods. The boiler has two flue tubes and the locomotive burnt coke, aided by bellows on the tender. It was the first locomotive with steel springs. Lancashire Witch was the very first locomotive built by Robert Stephenson and Company. Built at Newcastle-upon-Tyne in 1828, Lancashire Witch was used on the Bolton and Leigh Railway, which opened in June 1828, and also on the Liverpool and Manchester Railway. Lancashire Witch appeared on two postage stamps issued by Funafuti-Tuvalu on 24 December 1984. London, Midland and Scottish Railway Royal Scot Class 4-6-0 locomotive 6125 was originally named Lancashire Witch. This loco was built by the North British Locomotive Company at Glasgow in September 1927 and withdrawn in October 1964 as 46125 3rd Carabinier. Class 86 locomotive 86 213 was named Lancashire Witch. This locomotive has been preserved in operational condition by the
    10.00
    1 votes
    72

    Night Limited

    The Night Limited was an express passenger train that operated in New Zealand between Wellington and Auckland, utilising the entire length of the North Island Main Trunk. It commenced service in 1924 and was replaced by the Silver Star in 1971 and supplemented by the Northerner Express in 1975. When the North Island Main Trunk Railway was completed in 1908, services between Auckland and Wellington were slow and tedious, taking two days to complete the journey. The first expresses ran in February 1909 and took approximately 18 hours from end to end. The Night Limited was introduced in 1924 to provide a quicker service. Its name stemmed from the fact it ran overnight and had limited stops. A class steam locomotives were employed to haul the service, and this factor combined with the reduced stops allowed the reduction in travel time to just over 14 hours. The Night Limited's heyday was in the 1930s, when multiple extra services had to be run at the peak Christmas and Easter holiday periods to cater for the traffic volume. Accommodation on board was primarily seated, although first class sleeping cars were utilised. The sleeping cars had sixteen two-person cabins reached by a corridor
    10.00
    1 votes
    73

    Soo Line 353

    Soo Line 353 is a restored 0-6-0 type steam locomotive of the Minneapolis, St. Paul and Sault Ste. Marie Railway (“Soo Line”) B-4 class. It is now owned & operated by WMSTR (Western Minnesota Steam Threshers Reunion) every Labor Day weekend.
    10.00
    1 votes
    74

    Texas and Pacific 610

    Texas and Pacific 610 is a 2-10-4 steam locomotive that was originally operated by the Texas and Pacific Railway (T&P). In 1976, the locomotive was used to haul the American Freedom Train for the portion of its tour in Texas. After pulling the American Freedom Train, the locomotive was leased by the Southern Railway in 1977 for use in its steam excursion program. It was used by the Southern for four years until being returned to Texas in 1981. The locomotive is now on display at the Texas State Railroad in Palestine, Texas, it is the only surviving example of a T&P "Texas" type locomotive. The locomotive is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
    10.00
    1 votes
    75

    Tom Thumb

    Tom Thumb was the first American-built steam locomotive used on a common-carrier railroad. Designed and built by Peter Cooper in 1830, it was designed to convince owners of the newly formed Baltimore and Ohio Railroad to use steam engines. It is especially remembered as a participant in an impromptu race with a horse-drawn car; the "Tom Thumb" led the race until a belt slipped off a pulley and the engine lost power. The demonstration was successful, however, and in the next year the railroad, committed to the use of steam locomotion, held trials for a working engine. Tom Thumb was designed by Peter Cooper as a four-wheel locomotive with a vertical boiler and vertically mounted cylinders that drove the wheels on one of the axles. The "design" was characterized by a host of improvisations. The boiler tubes were made from rifle barrels and a blower was mounted in the stack, driven by a belt to the powered axle. Cooper's interest in the railroad was by way of substantial real estate investment in what is now the Canton neighborhood of Baltimore; success for the railroad was expected to increase the value of his holdings. Construction was carried out in the machine shop of George W.
    10.00
    1 votes
    76
    10.00
    1 votes
    77
    10.00
    1 votes
    78
    10.00
    1 votes
    79
    10.00
    1 votes
    80
    10.00
    1 votes
    81

    GWR 4073 Class 7028 Cadbury Castle

    Number 7028 Cadbury Castle was a Great Western Railway 4073 Castle class 4-6-0 steam locomotive built at the former GWR Swindon Works on 19 May 1950. The Castle Class locomotives were built as express passenger locomotives on the GWR. The Castle Class locomotives were to replace the earlier 4000 Star class locomotives. They were designed by the railway's Chief Mechanical Engineer, Charles Collett. Cadbury Castle cost £10,546 and an extra £1,094 for her Hawksworth tender. Cadbury Castle was based at Landore, Swansea for 11 years. She worked normal passenger express trains around GWR's network. On the 31 October 1961 she was moved to Llanelli and fitted with a double chimney and a 4 row superheater. She worked at Llanelli for a further two years before being withdrawn on 28 December 1963. By this time in her 13 years of service her mileage was 624,626 miles (1,005,238 km). On 19 March 1964, she was scrapped by Balborough Metals Ltd, Briton Ferry, Swansea. It is worth noting that although Cadbury Castle was of GWR design, she only served with BR, as she was built 2 years after the railways were nationalised. Cadbury Castle formed part of a Hornby model railways train set, The Western
    6.50
    4 votes
    82
    6.50
    4 votes
    83
    Experiment

    Experiment

    Experiment was a steam locomotive designed and built by Richard Roberts in 1833 for the Liverpool and Manchester Railway (L&MR). The locomotive had vertical cylinders driving via bell cranks. L&MR No.32 Experiment was built in 1833 with vertical cylinders mounted just behind the chimney, driving the wheels via a bell crank. The locomotive also had piston valves. These valves were probably the reason that the design was not a success, rather than the bell crank transmission, which was used successfully in other locomotives. Another reason that the locomotive was not successful was steam leakage from the cylinders. Experiment was withdrawn after a few months. Three similar locomotives were built for the Dublin and Kingstown Railway. Locomotives to this design were built for the Dundee and Newtyle Railway, but they were soon altered.
    8.50
    2 votes
    84
    LNER Class A4 2509 Silver Link

    LNER Class A4 2509 Silver Link

    Silver Link was the first London and North Eastern Railway (LNER) A4 Class locomotive, built in 1935 to pull a new train called the Silver Jubilee. Silver Link made its inaugural journey from King's Cross on 29 September 1935. It reached a speed of 112mph, breaking all previous records. The record provoked the LNER and their chief rival the London, Midland and Scottish Railway (LMS) into a highly competitive speed war, each attempting to outdo the other by building ever faster locomotives. The main protagonists were Sir Nigel Gresley, LNER's chief mechanical engineer, and his counterpart at LMS, Sir William Stanier. Allocated to Kings Cross shed, it was withdrawn from service in 1963 when the East Coast Main Line express services were taken over by Deltic diesel locomotives. It was not preserved after withdrawal and was broken up at Darlington Works. The locomotive made a brief appearance in the film Oh, Mr. Porter!. It was also the subject of art deco posters for the Silver Jubilee. For a number of years, one of its sister locomotives, Bittern was painted to represent Silver Link in its original silver and grey livery. Two instances of the Silver Link nameplate are on display at
    8.50
    2 votes
    85
    8.50
    2 votes
    86

    Sandusky

    Sandusky was the name of a steam railroad locomotive, a 4-2-0, built in the United States. This locomotive included engineering features that hadn't been used before in locomotive construction and it played an integral role in the railroad history of Ohio. Sandusky was the first locomotive built by Rogers, Ketchum & Grosvenor; it was completed in 1837. Thomas Rogers, the manufacturing company's founder, designed the locomotive. While some references cite Sandusky as the first locomotive built in the United States, the Best Friend of Charleston is more widely accepted as the first; the Best Friend of Charleston was built in 1831. The Sandusky, however, was the first locomotive to feature counterweights in its driving wheels to offset the force of the piston stroke and the combined weight of the axle, wheels and piston rod against the railroad track. Rogers filed a patent for the engine's counterbalance on July 12, 1837. Sandusky also featured the first use of hollow oval-shaped spokes in its driving wheels. While Sandusky was built for the New Jersey Railroad and Transportation Company, that railroad never actually purchased the engine. It was eventually sold to the Mad River and
    8.50
    2 votes
    87
    Talyllyn

    Talyllyn

    Talyllyn is a narrow gauge steam locomotive. It was built by Fletcher, Jennings & Co. in 1864 and is one of the oldest locomotives still in active service. It was delivered to the Talyllyn Railway on 24 September 1864 and continues to run on this railway. The Talyllyn Railway was the first British narrow gauge line to be built as a steam hauled railway from its conception. The company ordered two locomotives for its opening, Talyllyn and Dolgoch. Both were built by Fletcher, Jennings & Co. of Whitehaven though two very different designs. Talyllyn was the first order the company had delivered to north Wales and the first narrow gauge locomotive they had built with plate frames. It was built to the company's C Class design, although it was the first member of its class to be built to a gauge less than 2 ft 8 in (813 mm). The saddle tank locomotive was originally delivered as an 0-4-0 ST with an open cab. Early tests on the railway showed that this wheel arrangement lead to unacceptable vertical oscillation, and in January 1867, Talyllyn was returned to its manufacturer for the fitting of a pair of trailing wheels, converting it into an 0-4-2ST. A cab was subsequently fitted in the
    8.50
    2 votes
    88
    8.50
    2 votes
    89
    8.50
    2 votes
    90
    8.50
    2 votes
    91

    Caledonian

    Caledonian was an early steam locomotive which had a short career on the Liverpool and Manchester Railway (L&MR). Caledonian was an 0-4-0 locomotive, with two vertical cylinders mounted in front of the smokebox driving all four wheels by means of connecting rods. The builder was Galloway, Bowman & Glasgow of the Caledonia Foundry, Manchester. Caledonian was only in service for a few years. It was numbered 28 by the L&MR but replaced after a few months, as it had a tendency to derail. It was working as a ballast engine during the London and Birmingham Railway construction when it was involved in a fatal collision with a locomotive named Star on 28 February 1835. London, Midland and Scottish Railway Royal Scot Class 4-6-0 locomotive 6141 was originally named Caledonian. This loco was built by the North British Locomotive Company at Glasgow in September 1927 and withdrawn in April 1964 as 46141 The North Staffordshire Regiment.
    7.33
    3 votes
    92
    7.33
    3 votes
    93
    MR 0-10-0 Lickey Banker

    MR 0-10-0 Lickey Banker

    In 1919, the Midland Railway built a single 0-10-0 steam locomotive, No 2290 (later LMS (1947) 22290 and BR 58100). It was designed by James Clayton for banking duties on the Lickey Incline in Worcestershire (south of Birmingham), England. It became known as "Big Bertha" or "Big Emma" by railwaymen and railway enthusiasts. The Lickey Incline is the steepest sustained main-line railway incline in Great Britain. The function of a banker is to provide extra power on steep inclines by being added to the rear of other trains. Bankers were also used to protect against wagons or coaches breaking away, in which case they might run in front of a train going downhill. They largely went out of use with the introduction of advanced braking systems and diesel and electric locomotives, although banking on the Lickey Incline continues into 2010 with class 66 diesel electric locomotives being used for the task. No 2290 was built at the Derby Works of the Midland Railway in 1919 and was in use up to the year 1956 by the London, Midland and Scottish Railway (LMS) and British Railways (BR). She was numbered 2290 from new and kept this number through most of her LMS life, but was renumbered to 22290
    7.33
    3 votes
    94

    Nickel Plate 779

    Nickel Plate Road 779 is 2-8-4 or "Berkshire" type steam locomotive built for the New York, Chicago and St. Louis Railroad in May 1949, for use on fast freight trains. It was the last new steam locomotive to be delivered to the Nickel Plate Road, and it was one of the last steam locomotives manufactured by Lima Locomotive Works. In May 1963, it was donated to the City of Lima, Ohio and placed on display in Lincoln Park, where it remains to date.
    7.33
    3 votes
    95
    Union Pacific 3985

    Union Pacific 3985

    Union Pacific 3985 or UP 3985 is a four-cylinder simple articulated 4-6-6-4 Challenger-type steam locomotive owned by Union Pacific Railroad. The UP 3985 locomotive was built in 1943 by the American Locomotive Company of Schenectady, New York. It is currently the largest operational steam locomotive in the world. Designed by UP chief mechanical engineer Otto Jabelmann in 1941, UP 3985 was part of the second order of this second version of the Challenger. The design drew on recent experience with the enormous 4-8-8-4 Big Boy locomotives, and resulted in a locomotive in working order weighing some 317 short tons accompanied by a tender weighing 174 short tons when 2/3 loaded. Calculated tractive effort is 97,350 lbf. The Challenger class was intended to speed up freight operations on the 0.82% grades across Wyoming; the 1.14% Wasatch climb east from Ogden was to be conquered by the Big Boys without helpers. The Challengers and Big Boys arrived on the scene just as traffic was surging in preparation for American participation in World War II. UP 3985 operated in its last "regular" train service in 1957. The locomotive was retired about 1962 and after many years of storage in a
    7.33
    3 votes
    96
    7.33
    3 votes
    97
    6.25
    4 votes
    98
    6.25
    4 votes
    99
    6.25
    4 votes
    100
    Eureka Locomotive

    Eureka Locomotive

    The Eureka Locomotive is a privately owned steam locomotive in Las Vegas, Nevada. It is one of three Baldwin Class 8/18 C 4-4-0 locomotives still in existence, and is the only engine of the three that is in operating condition. It is listed on the United States National Register of Historic Places. The locomotive was built in 1875 for the Eureka and Palisade Railroad, which was built to transport passengers and goods from the mining town of Eureka to connect with the Central Pacific Railroad in Palisade. The engine served on this railroad until 1896, when it was sold to the Sierra Nevada Wood and Lumber Company. It operated on the Sierra Nevada Wood and Lumber until 1938 when the company dissolved and the engine was sold to a scrap dealer. Warner Bros. bought the engine in 1939, and it was featured in many films, such as Torrid Zone, Cheyenne Autumn, and The Great Train Robbery. The Eureka's last film appearance was in the 1976 film, The Shootist, and it was sold thereafter to Old Vegas, an amusement park in Henderson, Nevada, where it was placed on display. In 1978, the California State Railroad Museum, was in the process of restoring North Pacific Coast no. 12, another 8/18C
    5.40
    5 votes
    101
    British Rail DP1

    British Rail DP1

    DP1, known as Deltic from the name painted on the sides, is a prototype demonstrator locomotive employing a Deltic engine, built by English Electric in 1955. This locomotive resulted in 22 similar locomotives being ordered by British Railways, which became their Class 55. The English Electric company, which had absorbed the engine-maker Napier & Son into its vast empire at the instruction of the Ministry of Aircraft Production in 1942, was (among many interests) a major builder of diesel and electric locomotives. The two George Nelsons (Sir George, and his son, known in the works as "Half") saw the potential of Napier's Deltic engine for rail traction and in 1954-1955 built a demonstrator at its Dick, Kerr works in Preston. Officially numbered DP1 (Diesel Prototype number 1, although this was never borne on the locomotive), it carried the word DELTIC in large cream letters on its powder-blue sides. Plans to name the locomotive "Enterprise" never came to fruition and it was to be known to all just as "Deltic". Long aluminium beadings on the sides were painted cream, a visual device to make the locomotive's high sides appear more slender and speedier; three curved chevrons in the
    7.00
    3 votes
    102
    7.00
    3 votes
    103

    Locomotive No. 1

    Locomotive No. 1 hauled the first passenger train in New South Wales, Australia. It was built by Robert Stephenson and Company who had built the first successful engine, the Rocket. In 1846 the Sydney Railway Company was formed with the objective of building a railway line between Sydney and Parramatta. No. 1 was one of four locomotives that arrived by sea from the manufacturer in January 1855. The first passenger train hauled by No. 1 was a special service from Sydney Station to Long Cove viaduct (near the present site of Lewisham) on 24 May 1855, Queen Victoria's birthday. A common misconception is that Locomotive No.1 hauled the first train at the grand opening of the first New South Wales railway, on 26 September 1855. In fact, No. 1 was in need of maintenance that day and not in steam. Its identical sister locomotive No. 3 worked the first passenger train from Sydney at 9:00 am and this was followed by the official train at 12:00 noon hauled by No. 2, driven by William Sixsmith and fireman William Webster. The design for Locomotive No. 1 was an 0-4-2 mixed traffic variation of an 0-6-0 fast goods locomotive that had been supplied to the London and North Western Railway in
    7.00
    3 votes
    104
    Santa Fe 5000

    Santa Fe 5000

    The Santa Fe 5000 is a 2-10-4 steam locomotive constructed by Baldwin Locomotive Works in 1930 for the North American Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway. Locomotive number 5000 was immediately nicknamed "Madame Queen." and remained a one of a kind member of its own class. The 5000 was donated to the city of Amarillo, Texas in 1957 and is currently maintained by the Railroad Artifact Preservation Society. The Santa Fe 5000 is on the National Register of Historic Places. The Texas type on the Santa Fe is by design a Berkshire with an additional driving axle, as it was ordered by most railroads. Although Santa Fe 3829 was the first steam locomotive with the 2-10-4 wheel arrangement, Santa Fe 5000 served as the prototype for all further 2-10-4 locomotives rostered by the road. In 1930, the Santa Fe looked at the contemporary heavy-duty motive power policies of other railroads, and decided that its own needed substantial reappraisal. Additional locomotives were ordered as a result of this study, including the 5000. Santa Fe 5000 was placed in service between Clovis and Vaughn, New Mexico for observation. The result was the company had purchased a locomotive which would pull 15% more
    7.00
    3 votes
    105
    Saxonia

    Saxonia

    The locomotive Saxonia was operated by the Leipzig-Dresden Railway Company (Leipzig-Dresdner Eisenbahn-Compagnie or LDE) and was the first practical working steam locomotive built in Germany. Its name means Saxony in Latin. The Saxonia was built by Johann Andreas Schubert. Schubert had been inspired by the English-built locomotive, Comet, procured for the LDE, and he analysed and improved on what he saw. He used the same dimensions but, unlike Comet, two coupled axles were driven, therefore providing increased tractive force, and a carrying axle was added at the back to improve ride qualities. The development and construction of the locomotive was carried out in the Maschinenbauanstalt Übigau at Dresden, an engineering works that had been founded on 1 January 1837. From the beginning Schubert was the head of the company. The construction of the engine was a technical and economic risk for the firm. For a start, it had no technical experience at all; furthermore there were no orders for a locomotive. The Saxonia was intended to open the Leipzig-Dresden Railway, the first long-distance railway line in Germany, on 8 April 1839. But the English, who until then had a monopoly within the
    7.00
    3 votes
    106

    Severn Valley Limited

    The Severn Valley Limited is one of the principal dining trains that operates a Sunday lunch dining service on the Severn Valley Railway.
    7.00
    3 votes
    107

    Surprise locomotive

    The Surprise was a nineteenth-century British railway locomotive. It achieved notoriety by killing its crew when its boiler exploded during unsuccessful trials in the early days of the Lickey Incline. Built by William Church, who is mainly remembered for his typesetting machine, although he also experimented with locomotives, it was an 0-2-2 well tank locomotive with horizontal outside cylinders at the rear. Dr Church had invented an expanding mandrel for fixing boiler tubes, and it was the first tank engine to have a multitube boiler. It used piston valves and eccentric motion. The Surprise (named Victoria at the time) began trial runs as a ballast locomotive on the London and Birmingham Railway in January 1838, then transferred to the Grand Junction Railway. Notwithstanding its having reportedly achieved a speed of 60 miles per hour (97 km/h), it was never particularly successful. In 1840, when the Birmingham and Gloucester Railway was looking for engines to work the Lickey Incline, the locomotive, now called Surprise, was brought in, and its boiler exploded at Bromsgrove Station. Both crewmen, Thomas Scaife and John Rutherford, were killed and several people were injured. Their
    7.00
    3 votes
    108
    7.00
    3 votes
    109
    5.20
    5 votes
    110

    City of Las Vegas

    The City of Las Vegas was a named passenger train operated by the Union Pacific Railroad between Las Vegas, Nevada and Los Angeles, California beginning December 18, 1956. Train Nos. 115 and 116 initially utilized General Motors' experimental Aerotrain unitized trainset, but the Union Pacific terminated their lease within a year due to maintenance and performance issues including requiring a helper engine to cross the Cajon Pass. Service on the line continued with standard streamlined equipment painted in UP's Armour Yellow livery. On September 24, 1961 the name was changed to the Las Vegas Holiday Special, when both the consist and schedule were reduced. Service was discontinued altogether on June 15, 1968.
    6.00
    4 votes
    111
    LNER Class A4 4489 Dominion of Canada

    LNER Class A4 4489 Dominion of Canada

    60010 Dominion of Canada is an LNER Class A4 steam locomotive. She is a 4-6-2 locomotive built to the same design by Sir Nigel Gresley as the more famous Mallard. There were 35 A4 locomotives built in total. Originally numbered 4489, she was renumbered 10 on 10 May 1946, under the LNER 1946 renumbering scheme of Edward Thompson and, after nationalisation in 1948, British Railways added 60000 to its number so it became 60010 on 27 October 1948. Dominion of Canada has worn many liveries throughout her career. When released into traffic, 4489 wore garter blue livery. The coat of arms of Canada was on the side of the cab and a CPR-type bell mounted ahead of the single chimney. As a livery variation, a stainless steel strip ran along the bottom of the valances and tender and the numbers and letters of the locomotive and tender were also stainless steel. This was due to the use of this locomotive and the other A4s named after British Commonwealth countries, on the Coronation service in order to match with the rolling stock. Other A4s named after British Commonwealth countries were (BR numbers) 60009 Union of South Africa, 60011 Empire of India, 60012 Commonwealth of Australia and 60013
    6.00
    4 votes
    112

    Best Friend of Charleston

    The Best Friend of Charleston was a steam-powered railroad locomotive. It is widely acclaimed as the first locomotive to be built entirely within the United States. It also produced the first locomotive boiler explosion in the US. The locomotive was built for the South Carolina Canal and Rail Road Company by the West Point Foundry of New York in 1830. Disassembled for shipment by boat to Charleston, SC, it arrived in October of that year and was unofficially named the Best Friend of Charleston. After its inaugural run on Christmas Day, the Best Friend was used in regular passenger service along a six mile demonstration route in Charleston. For the time, this locomotive was considered one of the fastest modes of transport available, taking its passengers "on the wings of wind at the speed of fifteen to twenty-five miles per hour." The only mode of travel that was any faster was by an experienced horse and rider. On June 17, 1831, the Best Friend earned a rather grisly first — it became the first locomotive in the US to suffer a boiler explosion, seriously injuring the engine's crew. The explosion is said to have been caused by the fireman tying down the steam pressure release valve;
    8.00
    2 votes
    113
    Dolgoch

    Dolgoch

    Dolgoch is a narrow gauge 0-4-0 well tank steam locomotive. It was built by Fletcher, Jennings & Co. in 1866 and is one of the oldest locomotives still in active service. It was delivered to the Talyllyn Railway in 1866 and continues to run on this railway. The fictional Rheneas in The Railway Series by the Rev. W. Awdry was based on this engine. The design is unusual for a 0-4-0. The well tank engine has a long wheelbase and the driving axle is behind the firebox, which prevents the use of a conventional valve gear layout. Consequently, the Allan valve gear is driven from the leading coupled axle and doubled back to connect to the valve rods. The engine was renamed "Pretoria" between about 1900 and 1914 in celebration of the relief of the township of Pretoria in South Africa by Lord Roberts during the Boer war. It then reverted to the original name "Dolgoch", which it retains to this day. It is likely that, in the top left photograph, the engine carries the name "Pretoria" - the freshly painted appearance hints that this photograph was taken after the repainting and name change (records indicate it was repainted and renamed around 1900, and would have been a bit paint-weary prior
    8.00
    2 votes
    114

    LNER Class A4 4469 Sir Ralph Wedgwood

    LNER Class A4 No.4469 Sir Ralph Wedgwood was an A4 Class locomotive of the LNER. Originally named Gadwall, it was later renamed Sir Ralph Wedgwood, after the chief officer of LNER for 16 years. The locomotive, along with B16 class No. 925, were damaged beyond repair during a Baedeker Blitz air raid on York on the night of 28/29 April 1942. The remains of the locomotive were scrapped at Doncaster. 4469's chime whistle was fitted to LNER Class Y8 engine #560. The tender was stored until 1945, then repaired and attached to LNER Thompson Class A2/1 No. 3696. A plaque was placed on the spot, now within the Great Hall of the National Railway Museum, by the Gresley Society on 29 April 1992, the 50th anniversary of the raid.
    8.00
    2 votes
    115
    Milwaukee Road 261

    Milwaukee Road 261

    The Milwaukee Road 261 is a 4-8-4, steam-powered locomotive owned and maintained by a Minnesota-based nonprofit organization known as the Friends of the 261, which runs seasonal train excursions. The steam engine, rebuilt in 1993, has logged more than 25,000 miles under its own power since that time. On Friday, May 7, 2010, National Railroad Museum operations manager Bob Lettenberger announced that the Museum had sold Milwaukee Road No. 261 to the Friends of the 261 for a low six-figure price. That money will go into preserving or restoring other railroad equipment at the Museum. The formal announcement of the sale occurred on May 8, 2010 – National Train Day. The locomotive is undergoing federal mandated overhaul. Once rebuilt, Friends of the 261 will be able to resume an excursion schedule across the Upper Midwest and to the eastern United States. Built by the American Locomotive Company (ALCO) in Schenectady, New York in June 1944 in the 4-8-4 configuration, was originally operated by the Milwaukee Road when that rail company was officially known as the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific. The locomotive, which weighs in at 460,000 pounds, is rated at a maximum horsepower of
    8.00
    2 votes
    116
    North Coast Limited

    North Coast Limited

    The North Coast Limited was a named passenger train operated by the Northern Pacific Railway between Chicago and Seattle via Bismarck, North Dakota. It commenced service on April 29, 1900, served briefly as a Burlington Northern Railroad train after the merger on March 2, 1970 with Great Northern Railway and Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad, and ceased operation the day before Amtrak began service (May 1, 1971). The Chicago Union Station to St. Paul leg of the train's route was operated by the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy railroad along its Mississippi River mainline through Wisconsin. The train also had a Portland section which split off the Seattle section at Pasco, Washington and was operated by NP subsidiary Spokane, Portland and Seattle Railway between Pasco and Portland. For much of its history, the North Coast Limited was particularly noted for its dining car service which ranked among the best in the railroad passenger business. Inaugurated on April 29, 1900, between St.Paul, Minnesota, and Puget Sound, the North Coast Limited was one of the first named trains in the United States. Initially the Northern Pacific launched the train as a summer-only service but due
    8.00
    2 votes
    117
    SLSF 1522

    SLSF 1522

    SLSF 1522 is a two-cylinder, simple 4-8-2 Mountain-type steam locomotive built in 1926 by the Baldwin Locomotive Works for the St. Louis-San Francisco Railway. It was retired, and in May 1959 donated to the Museum of Transportation, St. Louis, Missouri, where it is currently on display. The 1522 was originally retired about 1951. Later, the SLSTA started the restoration in 1985 and the 1522 entered its second career in 1988. It was returned to retirement in 2002. This locomotive has done a variety of excursions throughout its excursion career. 1988: Inaugural run to Decatur, Illinois. 1990: 1522 pulled a 22-car excursion over Rolla Hill during the 1990 NRHS annual convention. The locomotive did a double-header excursion with Union Pacific 844 for the convention. 1994: 1522 was one of the locomotives to participate in the 1994 NRHS annual convention in Atlanta, Georgia and did a double-header with Norfolk and Western 611 to Birmingham, Alabama. 1995: The locomotive was the special guest of the annual haymarket heyday and did several excursions between Omaha and Lincoln, Nebraska. 2001: 1522 was invited to pull the Burlington Northern Santa Fe annual employee appreciation special
    8.00
    2 votes
    118
    Soo Line 1003

    Soo Line 1003

    Soo Line 1003 is a restored 2-8-2 Mikado type steam locomotive of the Minneapolis, St. Paul and Sault Ste. Marie Railway ("Soo Line") L-1 class. It is occasionally operated on the major railroads of the American Upper Midwest. The locomotive was built in 1913 by ALCO. It was used by the Soo Line until retirement in 1954, when it went into serviceable storage in Gladstone, Michigan as part of the railroad's strategic reserve. In December 1959, the railroad donated the locomotive to the city of Superior, Wisconsin, where it was put on public display. In the mid 1970s, Superior Shortline Steam Railroad Ltd. was organized to restore the locomotive to operations. It made a few short runs in 1983 in Superior before going back in for a major overhaul. The work slowed due to a lack of money and some notable errors (including ordering boiler flues that were three quarters of an inch too short). The locomotive was sold partially disassembled in 1994 to Wisconsin Railway Preservation Trust (WRPT), another organization whose goal was to return the locomotive to operations. WRPT raised $250,000 for the locomotive's restoration. It was originally hoped that the locomotive could be used for
    8.00
    2 votes
    119
    8.00
    2 votes
    120
    British Rail MPV

    British Rail MPV

    The Multiple-purpose Vehicle or MPV is a purpose-built departmental derivative of a diesel multiple unit. Twenty-five two-car units were ordered by Railtrack to enable it to replace its varied collection of ageing departmental vehicles, many of which were converted from redundant passenger stock. The vehicles were built in Germany by Windhoff. The design is based on the Windhoff "CargoSprinter" units that are operated by Deutsche Bahn (Germany) and CRT Group (Australia). Normally a unit consists of one powered vehicle fitted with twin 265 kW (355 hp) Railpac diesel engines, semi-permanently coupled to an unpowered slave unit without engines (effectively a driving van trailer). The later orders for the South East of England and for overhead line replacement are instead composed of two powered units, to give better acceleration and top speed. When first built there were problems with the vehicles being 'out of gauge' when running empty. The concept of the design is that each vehicle has a driving cab and an under floor engine/transmission with Multiple unit (MU) control. The majority of each vehicle is a flat load bed that can carry combinations of 10-foot and 20-foot modules that
    9.00
    1 votes
    121
    GWR 3700 Class 3440 City of Truro

    GWR 3700 Class 3440 City of Truro

    Number 3440 City Of Truro is a Great Western Railway (GWR) 3700 (or 'City') Class 4-4-0 locomotive, designed by George Jackson Churchward and built at the GWR Swindon Works in 1903. (It was rebuilt to a limited extent in 1911 and 1915, and renumbered 3717 in 1912). It is one of the contenders for the first steam locomotive to travel in excess of 100 miles per hour (160.9 km/h). Its maximum speed has been the subject of much debate over the years. The locomotive was the eighth of a batch of ten locomotives forming part of the GWR 3700 (or 'City') Class, and was delivered from Swindon Works in May 1903. All ten were named after cities on the GWR system; this batch was originally numbered 3433–42, City of Truro being 3440; like most GWR 4-4-0s, they were renumbered in December 1912, this batch becoming 3710–9 of which City of Truro became 3717. The locomotives were fitted with superheaters in 1910–12, City of Truro being so treated in September 1911. This changed its appearance quite noticeably, as it gained a longer smokebox. Most were later given piston valves instead of their original slide valves, City of Truro in November 1915. City of Truro was timed at 8.8 seconds between two
    9.00
    1 votes
    122
    InterCity 125

    InterCity 125

    The InterCity 125 was the brand name of British Rail's High Speed Train (HST) fleet, introduced in 1976. The InterCity 125 train is made up of two power cars, one at each end of a fixed formation of Mark 3 carriages, and has a top speed of 125 mph (201 km/h), making it the fastest diesel-powered train in regular service in the world at the time of its introduction and for many years afterwards. Initially the sets were classified as Classes 253 and 254. A variant of the power cars operates in Australia as part of the XPT. After three decades, the majority of the HST fleet is still in front-line revenue service under privatisation, and while the InterCity 125 brand name is rarely mentioned officially by the private train-operating companies (TOCs), the HST still forms the backbone of express services on several British main lines. Most are expected to be replaced within the next 10 years by the Intercity Express Programme, but a number will continue in use on London to Devon/Cornwall services, where there are no plans to electrify the lines. Engineers from the companies responsible have calculated that, with a certain amount of rewiring, the Mark 3 carriages used can be made to last
    9.00
    1 votes
    123

    Invicta

    Invicta is an early steam locomotive built by Robert Stephenson and Company in Newcastle-upon-Tyne in 1829. She was the twentieth locomotive built by Stephenson, being built immediately after Rocket. Invicta was built for £635 to work on the Canterbury and Whitstable Railway. She was named after the motto on the Flag of Kent, "Invicta", meaning undefeated. She was shipped by sea from Newcastle to Whitstable and hauled the inaugural train into Whitstable Harbour station on 3 May 1830. Contemporary illustrations show that Invicta was equipped with a single-axle tender, which has not survived. Modifications were carried out in 1835 to try and improve the efficiency of the locomotive, as she was unable to cope even on the flattest section of the line out of Whistable, but these were not successful. Invicta was retired in 1836 as the stationary engines proved adequate to work the line. She was offered for sale in October 1839 but did not find a buyer and Invicta was put under cover. She came into the ownership of the South Eastern Railway and was exhibited at the Golden Jubilee of the Stockton and Darlington Railway in 1875 and at the Newcastle Stephenson Centenary in 1881. Restoration
    9.00
    1 votes
    124
    LNER Class A4 4468 Mallard

    LNER Class A4 4468 Mallard

    Number 4468 Mallard is a London and North Eastern Railway Class A4 4-6-2 Pacific steam locomotive built at Doncaster, England in 1938. While in other respects a relatively typical member of its class, it is historically significant for being the holder of the official world speed record for steam locomotives. The A4 class was designed by Sir Nigel Gresley as an express locomotive type to power high-speed streamlined trains. The wind-tunnel-tested, aerodynamic body and high power allowed the class to reach speeds of over 100 miles per hour (160 km/h), though in everyday service it was relatively uncommon for any steam hauled service in the UK to reach even 90 mph, much less 100. Mallard was in service until 1963, when it was retired, having covered almost one and a half million miles (2.4 million km). It was restored to working order in the 1980s, but has not operated since, apart from hauling some specials between York and Scarborough in July 1986 and a couple of runs between York and Harrogate/Leeds around Easter 1987. Mallard is now part of the National Collection at the United Kingdom's National Railway Museum in York. On the weekend of 5 July 2008, Mallard was taken outside for
    9.00
    1 votes
    125
    Tōkyū 5000 series

    Tōkyū 5000 series

    The Tokyu 5000 series (東急5000系, Tōkyū 5000-kei) is an electric multiple unit (EMU) train type operated by Tokyu Corporation since 2002 on many of its commuter lines in the Tokyo area of Japan. First introduced in 2002, the design is based on the JR East E231 series commuter train, also manufactured by Tokyu Car Corporation (now J-TREC) in Yokohama. All trains are equipped with interior LCD screens, displaying the station names, and automatic announcements in both Japanese and English. The 5000 series uses blue seat moquette fabric, while the 5050 and 5080 series uses red seat moquette. As of September 2012, 5000 series trains are still being manufactured. All sets use the same driver's cab, with a gray color, and a single 'T' shaped brake and throttle controller. There are four throttle steps, and seven brake steps. The speedometers are equipped with ATC. To the right of the speedometer is an information screen, showing the run type (local, express, etc.), and information of the individual cars. This touch screen computer can also control interior temperature and lights. These are 10-car sets first introduced on the Den-en-toshi Line from May 2002. These sets are distinguished by a
    9.00
    1 votes
    126
    9.00
    1 votes
    127
    9.00
    1 votes
    128
    9.00
    1 votes
    129
    British Rail Class 37, 37427

    British Rail Class 37, 37427

    • Locomotive class: British Rail Class 37
    37427 "Bont Y Bermo" is an English Electric Type 3, Class 37/4 Co-Co diesel locomotive, currently in EW&S livery. 37427 was released by the English Electric Vulcan Foundry, Works Number EE/VF3548/D977, in June 1965 as D6988. In March 1974, D6988 was renumbered to 37288 under the TOPS numbering system. On 25 September 1985, 37288 entered work for rebuilding as a Class 37/4 and was renumbered to 37427. On arrival at Barmouth on Sunday the 13 April 1986, 37427 was named 'Bont Y Bermo' Welsh: Barmouth Bridge). ('Bont' meaning Bridge. 'Y Bermo' meaning Barmouth). Barmouth Bridge is on the Cambrian Coast line that runs to Pwllheli in North Wales. The bridge was completed in 1867 and is a few hundred metres from the town of Barmouth where Barmouth railway station is. 30 April 1993 saw the removal of 37427's nameplates. The nameplates were later applied to 37402 on the 28 February 1994. On 17 May 1993, 37427 was named 'Highland Enterprise' and send to Motherwell in Scotland. Interestingly, when the loco was named 'Highland Enterprise' and was sent to Scotland, 'she' become the only diesel loco to be in Regional Railways livery and receive ScotRail branding. Sometime during
    6.67
    3 votes
    130

    Grand Trunk Western 6325

    Grand Trunk Western 6325 is one of two survivng examples of the Grand Trunk Western Railroad (GTW) U-3-b class of steam locomotives. The U-3-b class is a 4-8-4 (Northern) type steam locomotive. Grand Trunk Western 6325 was built in February 1942 by ALCO along with 24 other U-3-b 4-8-4 Northern locomotive (sometimes called "Confederation" locomotives) numbered 6312 through 6336 as dual service locomotives that were the last new steam power assigned to the GTW. The U-3-b engines were right at home with GTW's road profile and characteristics, running almost a quarter of a million miles (400,000 km) between heavy repairs. 6325 could easily handle sixteen passenger cars or eighty car hotshot freights with equal ease on the Chicago division. Its forte was heavy passenger and fast freight service. All U-3-b class locomotives were known as good steamers and were liked by all engine crews and 6325 was no exception. On the GTW, it was the ultimate in modern steam power. In 1948, locomotive 6325 pulled President Harry Truman's campaign train across Michigan on Grand Trunk rails. Because of its historical significance, when 6325 was retired in 1959 it was donated to the City of Battle Creek,
    6.67
    3 votes
    131

    Soo Line 2718

    Soo Line 2718 is a Pacific class 4-6-2 steam locomotive that was originally owned by the Minneapolis, St. Paul and Sault Ste. Marie Railway (“Soo Line”), but operated by their subsidiary, the Wisconsin Central Railway. The 2718 was built in May, 1923 in Schenectady, New York. It was one of six H-23 Pacific Class steam locomotives built for the Soo Line. The 2718 was donated to the National Railroad Museum in February 1958. The museum used it for a few years to move cars around the grounds. It also saw limited service pulling the museum train. There were six H-23 class locomotives built in May 1923. Two of them are preserved.
    6.67
    3 votes
    132
    South Devon Railway 0-4-0 locomotives

    South Devon Railway 0-4-0 locomotives

    The South Devon Railway 0-4-0 locomotives were small 0-4-0 broad gauge locomotives operated on the South Devon Railway, Cornwall Railway, mainly on the dockside lines around Plymouth. On 1 February 1876 the South Devon Railway was amalgamated with the Great Western Railway, the locomotives were given numbers by their new owners but continued to carry their names too. Tiny was built by Sara and Company. It had a vertical boiler and was similar to four locomotives that later worked in the docks at Falmouth in Cornwall. After withdrawal it was used at Newton Abbot where it was used to power machinery in the workshops there. In 1927, no longer required for this purpose, it was displayed on the platform at the station opposite the workshops. It has since been moved to Buckfastleigh railway station where it is displayed in the museum of the South Devon Railway Trust. The three Owl class locomotives had well tanks and were built by the Avonside Engine Company. The seven Raven class were saddle tank locomotives and were again built by the Avonside Engine Company.
    6.67
    3 votes
    133

    Tweetsie Railroad

    Tweetsie Railroad is a family oriented railroad and Wild West theme park located between Boone and Blowing Rock, North Carolina, United States. In addition to a 3-mile (4.8 km) ride aboard an authentic steam locomotive, the park features amusement rides and other attractions geared towards families with children. Opened in 1957, Tweetsie Railroad began as an excursion train ride aboard steam locomotive #12, the only surviving narrow-gauge engine of the East Tennessee and Western North Carolina Railroad (ET&WNC). Built in 1917 by the Baldwin Locomotive Works, #12 is a 3 ft  (914 mm) (narrow gauge) 4-6-0 coal-fired locomotive that was used to haul passengers and freight over the ET&WNC's 66-mile (106.2 km) line running from Johnson City over the Appalachian Mountains to Boone, North Carolina. After the narrow gauge portion of the ET&WNC ceased operations in 1950, the locomotive was purchased by a group of railroad enthusiasts and was taken to Rockingham County, Virginia to operate as the small "Shenandoah Central” tourist line in 1952. Floodwaters from Hurricane Hazel washed out the Shenandoah Central in 1954, and Locomotive #12 was once again put up for sale. Hollywood actor Gene
    6.67
    3 votes
    134
    6.67
    3 votes
    135
    6.67
    3 votes
    136
    Sans Pareil

    Sans Pareil

    Sans Pareil is a steam locomotive built by Timothy Hackworth which took part in the 1829 Rainhill Trials on the Liverpool and Manchester Railway, held to select a builder of locomotives. The name means, roughly, 'Without equal' in French. While a capable locomotive for the day, its technology was somewhat antiquated compared to George and Robert Stephenson's Rocket, the winner of the Rainhill Trials and the £500 prize money. Instead of the fire tube boiler of Rocket, Sans Pareil had a double return flue. To increase the heating surface area, the two flues were joined by a U shaped tube at the forward end of the boiler; the firebox and chimney were both positioned at the rear same end, one on either side. Sans Pareil had two cylinders, mounted vertically at the opposite end to the chimney, and driving one pair of driving wheels directly - the other pair were driven via connecting rods, in the typical steam locomotive fashion. At the Rainhill Trials, Sans Pareil was excluded from the prize because it was slightly over the maximum permitted weight. Nevertheless it performed very well but had a strange rolling gait due to its vertical cylinders. The 'blast' from the blastpipe was, in
    7.50
    2 votes
    137
    Thuile locomotive

    Thuile locomotive

    The Thuile locomotive was a steam locomotive designed by Monsieur Thiule, of Alexandria, Egypt, and built in 1899. Thiule proposed a 6-4-8 or 6-4-6 locomotive with 3-metre-diameter (9 ft 10 in) driving wheels, but this was not built. The design was taken up by Schneider, of Le Creusot, who built a 4-4-6 with 2.5-metre-diameter (8 ft 2 in) driving wheels, and a forward cab for the driver. The two-cylinder locomotive had Walschaerts valve gear and a double-lobed boiler of nickel-steel. The locomotive was exhibited at the International Exposition in Paris in 1900, and the trials were undertaken on the Chemin de Fer de l'Etat line between Chartres and Thouars. A speed of 117 kilometres per hour (73 mph) was attained hauling a load of 186 tonnes (183 long tons). The trials ended when Thiule was killed in June 1900 - apparently by leaning too far out of the locomotive and being in collision with a lineside pole. The locomotive was returned to Schneider. It was scrapped in 1904. The tender survived until at least 1946, when it was noted at Saint Pierre-des-Corps.
    7.50
    2 votes
    138
    7.50
    2 votes
    139
    7.50
    2 votes
    140
    7.50
    2 votes
    141
    LNER Class V2 4771 Green Arrow

    LNER Class V2 4771 Green Arrow

    The LNER Class V2 2-6-2 steam locomotive, number 4771 Green Arrow was built in June 1936 for the London and North Eastern Railway (LNER) at Doncaster Works to a design of Nigel Gresley. The first-built and only surviving member of its class, it was designed for hauling express freight and passenger trains and named after an express freight service. Numbered 4771 by the LNER, the locomotive was later renumbered 800 by the LNER in November 1946, and 60800 by British Railways in February 1949. The locomotive was withdrawn from service in August 1962. Selected for preservation, it was restored at Doncaster Works, where the work was completed in April 1963. Almost ten years of storage then followed, during which it was moved several times. A transfer from Doncaster to Hellifield occurred in October 1964; the locomotive was moved to Wigston in 1967 - this was intended to be the final temporary home, since it was intended that Green Arrow would become one of the permanent exhibits in a Municipal Museum which was proposed for the nearby city of Leicester. However, before the museum was ready, demolition of Wigston locomotive depot was scheduled, and the locomotive was sent south to the
    5.50
    4 votes
    142
    5.50
    4 votes
    143
    British Rail 10100

    British Rail 10100

    British Railways 10100 was an unusual experimental diesel locomotive known informally as The Fell Diesel Locomotive (after Lt. Col. L.F.R. Fell, who was one of the designers). It was the joint production of Davey Paxman & Co, Shell Refining & Marketing Co and Lt-Col L.F.R. Fell, built for them by the London, Midland and Scottish Railway at Derby. Sir Harry Ricardo was also involved. By the time it emerged in 1950, nationalisation had taken place and it carried British Railways livery. The locomotive had six diesel engines, four of them used for traction. There were two auxiliary engines, both of which were 150 hp AEC 6-cylinder units, and these drove the pressure-chargers for the main engines and the purpose of this arrangement was to enable the main engines to deliver very high torque at low crankshaft speed. The design for 10100, a collaboration between Fell Developments Ltd and H. G. Ivatt of the LMS, aimed to address several of the weaknesses perceived of diesel powered rail traction. Weight was reduced by using several small engines, meaning that both the engines and their supporting structure could be lighter. This was also expected to save time in maintenance as an
    6.33
    3 votes
    144
    Planet

    Planet

    Planet was an early steam locomotive built in 1830 by Robert Stephenson and Company for the Liverpool and Manchester Railway. The ninth locomotive built for the L&MR, it was Stephenson's next major design change after the Rocket. It was the first locomotive to employ inside cylinders, and subsequently the 2-2-0 type became known as Planets. On 23 November 1830 No.9 Planet ran the approximately 50 km from Liverpool to Manchester in one hour. Six further of the type were ordered by the L&MR from Robert Stephenson & Co. Three more were supplied by Murray & Wood in Leeds, to whom Robert Stephenson & Co. had sent the drawings for their manufacture. The Planet (from 1830) and the Patentee (from 1833, also designed by Stephenson) were the first locomotive types to be built in large numbers. The Planet locomotives appear closer to subsequent types, and conversely look quite different from Rocket although only a year separated these two designs (Stephenson's Northumbrian representing an intermediate evolutionary step). Other improvements include: A working replica was built in 1992 by the Friends of the Museum of Science and Industry (MOSI) in Manchester, and is operated by volunteers to
    6.33
    3 votes
    145
    T. D. Judah

    T. D. Judah

    T. D. Judah was the name of a 4-2-2 steam locomotive owned by the Central Pacific Railroad. It was named in honor of the railroad's first chief engineer, Theodore Dehone Judah, who surveyed a passable route over the Sierra Nevada Mountains for the Transcontinental Railroad. Like its sister engine, C.P. Huntington, T. D. Judah was originally built by the Cooke Locomotive Works in 1863 for a railroad that was unable to pay for it. Later, the two were seen in the Cooke shops by Collis Huntington and purchased for use on the Central Pacific Railroad (CP), becoming the road's third and fourth locomotives respectively. Two other, larger engines, Gov. Stanford (number 1, built by Norris Locomotive Works) and Pacific (number 2, built by Mason Machine Works) had been purchased earlier. Originally built as a 4-2-4T Forney type, T. D. Judah was a locomotive and tender on one frame. In 1872 the engine was rebuilt as a 4-2-2 with separate tender and may have been given other mechanical upgrades like its sister engine. The rebuild reduced the locomotive's overall weight to 30,000 lb., with 15,000 lb. on the drivers. T. D. Judah was sold to the Wellington Colliery Company on Vancouver Island,
    6.33
    3 votes
    146
    6.33
    3 votes
    147
    Alice

    Alice

    Alice, a Hunslet 0-4-0 ST, used to work in the Dinorwic slate quarries at Llanberis, in North Wales. Built in 1902, as Works No. 780, the locomotive was originally called ‘No. 4’. There was an earlier Alice which was built in 1889 (Works No. 492), later renamed King of the Scarlets. There were 15 similar engines supplied between 1886 and 1932, the first of which was Velinheli (Works No. 409 of 1886), but for some reason, the Class was named after the first ‘Alice’. Over 46 years a number of changes were made to the design, some so substantial as to warrant an unofficial sub-class known as the ‘Port’ Class. Alice, in common with most of the class, did not have a dome but a steam chamber produced by the firebox outer shell being raised some six inches above the boiler barrel. It was not usual to fit cabs to these engines since they had to work under incline bridges and through tunnels in the quarries. Alice spent all of its life working on various galleries at the Dinorwic slate quarry. The locomotive was in consequence rarely photographed. By the early 1960s the locomotive was out of use and was partially dismantled to provide spares for her sister locomotives at Dinorwic. She was
    5.25
    4 votes
    148

    Reading 903

    Reading Company 903 is a preserved ex-Reading Company EMD FP7 diesel locomotive. Reading 903 was one of the first six FP7s ordered by the railroad in March 1950 to replace passenger steam locomotives. It and sister Reading 902 were completed on June the 1st of that year and delivered to the Reading via the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. The pair pulled their first train on June 6. In the following years, the two locomotives sometimes worked together, and sometimes were split, depending on the size of their trains. SEPTA inherited the units in 1974, and they were renumbered by the new Consolidated Rail Corporation in 1976, the 903 becoming 4373. It was the first FP7 to receive SEPTA paint in February 1978. During the SEPTA years, the FP7s usually operated in push-pull. SEPTA ceased all diesel-operations in 1981, and the locomotives were retired. Locomotive 903 was purchased by the Philadelphia Chapter of the National Railway Historical Society (NRHS) in September 1983 and was stored at the Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania along with its sister, the 902, which was owned by the Lancaster Chapter of the NRHS. Restoration on the two began in 1986 and was completed in 1995. Locomotives 903
    5.25
    4 votes
    149
    GSR Class B1a

    GSR Class B1a

    The Great Southern Railways Class 800 were the biggest and most powerful engines ever to run in Ireland by a large margin. They were designed under the supervision of E. C. Bredin. His Chief Draughtsman, H. J. A. Beaumont, prepared the drawings. The engines had three 18.5 by 28 inches (470 × 711 mm) cylinders and 225 pounds per square inch (1.55 MPa) boiler pressure. The nominal tractive effort was 34,799 lbf (154.8 kN), which corresponded with Great British main-line power. Further, it was the only design which exploited the full extent of the extra width afforded by the 5 ft 3 in (1.60 m) gauge. Originally four or five were to be built, named Maeḋḃ, Maċa, Táilte, Gráinne, and Deirdre, but only three were eventually turned out - 800 Maeḋḃ in 1939, with Maċa (801) and Tailté (802) in 1940, along with a fourth boiler which acted as a spare. They were intended for the Dublin–Cork route but wartime coal shortages and the early 1950s advent of diesels on main line services resulted in their never having had much chance to show what they were capable of. In the 1950s they gradually became neglected and even resorted to light goods trains on occasion, with little other work to do. The
    8.00
    1 votes
    150

    Soo Line 2713

    Soo Line 2713 is an H-21 class 4-6-2 steam locomotive that was built for the Wisconsin Central Railway in May 1911. The WC had fallen under the control of the Minneapolis, St. Paul and Sault Ste. Marie Railway (“Soo Line”) in 1909, and the locomotive fleets of both railroads were operated in a single pool. The 2713 was used to power the Soo Line and Wisconsin Central passenger trains in Wisconsin, Minnesota and North Dakota. It was retired in 1955, and since 1957 has been on display in Depot Park in Stevens Point, Wisconsin, United States.
    8.00
    1 votes
    151
    Tōkyō Metro 03 series

    Tōkyō Metro 03 series

    The Tokyo Metro 03 series (東京地下鉄03系, Tōkyō Chikatetsu 03-kei) is an electric multiple unit (EMU) train type which operates on the Tokyo Metro Hibiya Line in Tokyo, Japan. A total of 42 eight-car trainsets were built, entering service on 1 July 1988. The train is fitted with safety systems compatible with the Tōkyū Tōyoko Line and Tōbu Isesaki Line. Certain cars were built as 5-door configurations, in contrast to the usual three per car.
    8.00
    1 votes
    152
    8.00
    1 votes
    153
    8.00
    1 votes
    154
    8.00
    1 votes
    155
    California Limited

    California Limited

    The California Limited was one of the named passenger trains of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway and a true "workhorse" of the railroad. It was assigned train Nos. 3 & 4, and its route ran from Chicago, Illinois to Los Angeles, California. Operating seven sections of the Limited was common, and during peak travel periods as many as 23 westbound and 22 eastbound sections departed in a single day. The line was conceived by company president Allen Manvel as a means to "signify completion of the basic Santa Fe system." Manvel felt he could attract business and enhance the prestige of the railroad by establishing daily, first-class service from Chicago to the West Coast. The California Limited, billed as the "Finest Train West of Chicago," made its first run on November 27, 1892, with five separate trainsets making continuous round trips on a 2½-day schedule each way. The California Limited was the first of Santa Fe's name trains to feature Fred Harvey Company meal service en route. The later trains also offered all of the amenities of the day including air conditioning, an onboard barber, beautician, steam-operated clothing press, even a shower-bath. The Limited was also the
    7.00
    2 votes
    156
    LMS Royal Scot Class 6100 Royal Scot

    LMS Royal Scot Class 6100 Royal Scot

    London Midland and Scottish Railway (LMS) Royal Scot Class 6100 (British Railways' number 46100) Royal Scot is a preserved British steam locomotive. The original 6100 was the first of its class, built in 1927 by the North British Locomotive Company in Glasgow. It was named Royal Scot after the Royal Scots. In 1933, 6152 The King's Dragoon Guardsman and 6100 swapped identities permanently. 6152 had been built at Derby Works in 1930. The new Royal Scot was sent to the Century of Progress Exposition of 1933 and toured Canada and the United States with a train of typical LMS carriages. It was given special commemorative plates that sit below its nameplates which read: 6100 was renumbered 46100 by British Railways after nationalisation in 1948. In 1950 46100 was rebuilt with a 2A taper boiler, and the words "Prior to conversion" were added to its nameplates. It became a markedly different engine. In October 1962 46100 was withdrawn from service in Nottingham. 46100 was bought by Billy Butlin of Butlins holiday camps after withdrawal and after cosmetic restoration at Crewe Works, was set on a plinth at Skegness. It was painted in LMS crimson lake livery which, although the original
    7.00
    2 votes
    157

    Locomotion No 1

    Locomotion No. 1 (originally named Active) is an early British steam locomotive built for the Stockton and Darlington Railway. Built by George and Robert Stephenson's company Robert Stephenson and Company in 1825. It was the first one to run on a passenger carrying line. Locomotion used all the improvements that Stephenson had pioneered in the Killingworth locomotives. It used high-pressure steam from a centre-flue boiler, with a steam-blast in the chimney, to drive two vertical cylinders, enclosed within the boiler. A pair of yokes above them transmitted the power downwards, through pairs of connecting rods. It made use of a loose eccentric valve gear, and was one of the first locomotives to use coupling rods rather than chains or gears to link its 0-4-0 driving wheels together. The locomotive is historically important as the first one to run on a passenger carrying line, rather than for the innovations in its design. It hauled the first train on the Stockton and Darlington Railway on 27 September 1825. In 1828 the boiler exploded, killing the driver. With advances in design such as those incorporated into Stephenson's Rocket, Locomotion became obsolete very quickly. It was
    7.00
    2 votes
    158
    Mikado Locomotive No. 4501

    Mikado Locomotive No. 4501

    Southern Railway 4501 is a steam locomotive built in 1911 by the Baldwin Locomotive Works for the Southern Railway (US). The engine is a 2-8-2 Mikado type locomotive, and was the very first of that wheel arrangement the railroad owned. 4501 worked on many different divisions of the Southern Railway system from 1911 to 1948; first in Tennessee, then in Virginia, Kentucky, and lastly, in Indiana. In 1948 the Kentucky and Tennessee Railway purchased the locomotive and renumbered it as their #12. When 12 was retired by the Kentucky and Tennessee Railway in 1963, a railfan, Paul H. Merriman, bought the locomotive for The 4501 Corporation with $5,000 of his own money, and restored it for excursion use on the Southern Railway System. In 1966 the 4501 launched Southern Railway's steam excursion program, which ran for several decades until it was ended by Southern successor Norfolk Southern in 1994. 4501 is currently owned by the Tennessee Valley Railroad Museum in Chattanooga, Tennessee (which Merriman founded with Bob Soule), and was on static display. The locomotive last ran in 1998. In 2008, the locomotive was stripped down for a complete boiler inspection, and Norfolk Southern, in June
    7.00
    2 votes
    159

    Timken 1111

    Timken 1111, also called the Timken Four Aces, was a 4-8-4 steam locomotive built in 1930 by American Locomotive Company (Alco) to serve as a demonstration unit for new roller bearings produced by the Timken Roller Bearing Company. It was the first locomotive built with all sealed roller bearings rather than the friction bearings or a mix of the two types. Timken chose a 4-8-4 on which to demonstrate the company's bearings so the locomotive could be used in all types of railroad work, especially on heavy freight and fast passenger trains. A total of 52 different parts manufacturers agreed to supply their parts for the locomotive "on account" until the locomotive operated over 100,000 miles (161,000 km). The suppliers' names were placed on a plaque that was fastened to the tender for the duration of the demonstration period. Assembly took place at Alco's Schenectady, New York, plant, the former Schenectady Locomotive Works. The locomotive's first demonstration runs were hauling freight on the New York Central Railroad. After those demonstrations, it was used on thirteen other major railroads, including the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad, New Haven Railroad and Pennsylvania Railroad
    7.00
    2 votes
    160
    Union Pacific 3977

    Union Pacific 3977

    Union Pacific 3977 or UP 3977 is a 4-6-6-4 steam locomotive originally owned by Union Pacific Railroad. Its counterpart, Union Pacific 3985, is the largest operating steam locomotive in the world. 3977 was donated to the City of North Platte, Nebraska for display on October 19, 1968. It is on display in Cody Park, next to EMD DDA40X #6922.
    7.00
    2 votes
    161
    7.00
    2 votes
    162
    7.00
    2 votes
    163

    British Rail 15107

    British Rail 15107 was a locomotive commissioned by the Great Western Railway, but delivered to British Railways after nationalisation. It was a diesel powered locomotive in the pre-TOPS period built by Brush Traction with a Petter 4-cylinder engine. Its shed allocation in 1950 was Western Region, 82B, St Philips Marsh, Bristol. Number 15107 had a short life and never acquired a British Railways classification. It was withdrawn in June 1958 and broken up at Swindon Works.
    6.00
    3 votes
    164

    Moel Tryfan

    Moel Tryfan was a narrow gauge steam locomotive built for use on the North Wales Narrow Gauge Railways (NWNGRs) in 1875. The locomotive was an 0-6-4 T single Fairlie locomotive built by the Vulcan Foundry near Manchester. It spent its entire working life on the NWNGRs and its successors the Welsh Highland Railway (WHR) and the Ffestiniog Railway (FfR). The North Wales Narrow Gauge Railways was an ambitious scheme to lay 1 ft 11 ⁄2 in (597 mm) gauge railways through many of the valleys of north Wales. Only one of the proposed lines was built, connecting Dinas Junction, near Caernarfon with Rhyd Ddu, north west of Beddgelert. Two identical locomotives were ordered from the Vulcan Foundry to work the new railway. They were built to Fairlie's patent for articulated locomotives and were designed by George Percival Spooner, son of Charles Eaton Spooner, the manager of the nearby FfR. The locomotives were the first 0-6-4 Ts in the British Isles. They were named Moel Tryfan and Snowdon Ranger. Moel Tryfan was named after the local mountain where the slate quarries that provided most of the railway's commerce were located. The locomotives entered service in 1875. In 1903, Moel Tryfan
    6.00
    3 votes
    165
    Spokane, Portland and Seattle 700

    Spokane, Portland and Seattle 700

    Spokane, Portland & Seattle 700 is the only surviving example of the E-1 class 4-8-4 Northern type steam locomotive. Nearly identical to the A-3 class Northerns built for Northern Pacific Railway, but burning oil instead of coal. After years of running second-hand equipment, the Spokane, Portland and Seattle Railway (SP&S) was allowed by its parent companies, Great Northern Railway and Northern Pacific Railway, to purchase its first new locomotives. These included three Northern E-1 class locomotives (700, 701 and 702) for passenger service and 6 Z-6 class Challengers (4-6-6-4s) for freight service. After retirement from service in 1956, the SP&S 700 was donated to the City of Portland, Oregon, in 1958. It was on static public display at Oaks Amusement Park until 1987, then moved to private quarters for the continuation of work to restore it to operating condition. It began making occasional excursion runs in 1990. In 2012, the 700 was moved to a new facility where it can again be viewed by the public, the Oregon Rail Heritage Center. 700 was delivered on June 21, 1938, joining the 702 pulling overnight passenger trains between Spokane and Vancouver, Washington, along the north
    6.00
    3 votes
    166
    Union Pacific 844

    Union Pacific 844

    Union Pacific 844 is a 4-8-4 steam locomotive owned by Union Pacific Railroad. Built in 1944, it was the last steam locomotive delivered to Union Pacific and is the only steam locomotive never retired by a North American Class I railroad. Union Pacific 844 was one of 10 locomotives that were ordered by Union Pacific in 1944 and were designated as class FEF-3. The FEF-3 class was similar to the earlier FEF-2 class as both were designed as passenger engines and pulled such trains as the Overland Limited, Los Angeles Limited, Portland Rose and Challenger. UP 844 was reassigned to freight service when diesel-electric locomotives took over passenger service and operated from 1957 to 1959 in Nebraska. It was saved from scrapping in 1960. It was chosen for restoration and is now used on company and public excursion trains, along with revenue freight during ferry moves. The FEF-3 class locomotives represented the epitome of dual service steam locomotive development, as funds and research were being concentrated into the development of diesel electric locomotives. Like the rest of Union Pacific's FEF-3 locomotives, UP 844 was originally designed to burn coal, but was later converted to run
    5.00
    4 votes
    167

    ASEA Rz

    Rz was an electric locomotive built by ASEA to test out asynchronous motors. It was built in 1982 and closely related to the Rc-series. It was test run until 1989 on Siljansbanan, but there was never any mass production of it. After ASEA merged with Brown, Boveri & Cie to form Asea Brown Boveri in 1988 the development of asynchronous motors was moved to Switzerland. The Rz-technology was utilized for the development of the X2-train and the Rc5-locomotive. In 1992 the engine was donated to the Swedish Railway Museum, but they were not particularly interested in it and in 1999 it was moved to Örebro to become a parts locomotive.
    5.67
    3 votes
    168
    John Bull

    John Bull

    John Bull is a British-built railroad steam locomotive that operated in the United States. It was operated for the first time on September 15, 1831, and it became the oldest operable steam locomotive in the world when the Smithsonian Institution operated it in 1981. Built by Robert Stephenson and Company, the John Bull was initially purchased by and operated for the Camden and Amboy Railroad, the first railroad in New Jersey, which gave John Bull the number 1 and its first name, "Stevens". The C&A used the locomotive heavily from 1833 until 1866, when it was removed from active service and placed in storage. After the C&A's assets were acquired by the Pennsylvania Railroad (PRR) in 1871, the PRR refurbished and operated the locomotive a few times for public displays: it was steamed up for the Centennial Exposition in 1876 and again for the National Railway Appliance Exhibition in 1883. In 1884 the locomotive was purchased by the Smithsonian Institution as the museum's first major industrial exhibit. In 1939 the employees at the PRR's Altoona, Pennsylvania, workshops built an operable replica of the locomotive for further exhibition duties, as the Smithsonian desired to keep the
    5.67
    3 votes
    169

    TGV 001

    TGV 001 (Très Grande Vitesse 001) was a high-speed railway train built in France. It was the first TGV prototype and was commissioned in 1969, to begin testing in 1972. The TGV 001 was an experimental gas turbine-electric locomotive-powered trainset built by Alstom to break speed records between 250–300 kilometre per hour. The experimental train was part of a vast research program on high rail speeds. This program covered all technical aspects, principally traction, the behaviour of the vehicles, braking, aerodynamics and signalling. Originally, two trains were to be built, but only one was produced. The second was to be a tilting train equipped with an active tilting system, but was abandoned owing to technical difficulties. This turbotrain was built in a radically different fashion than its predecessors (the ETG and the RTG); it was composed of two locomotives and three carriages, all with driving wheels. This concept as well as the shape of the TGV 001 was kept when designing the future TGV. Each axle was equipped with electric motors with the advantage of small weight per axle but maximum power. Electric traction permitted dynamic braking, particularly effective at high speeds.
    5.67
    3 votes
    170

    The Territorial Army

    70048 The Territorial Army 1908–1958 was a British Railways BR standard class 7 (also known as Britannia class) steam locomotive, named after the Territorial Army, a part of the British Army. She was built at a cost of £23,445 at Crewe Works being completed on 8 July 1954. She was allocated a BR1D 'high sided' tender number 982 and allocated to Holyhead depot. Initially unnamed, it wasn't until 23 July 1958 when she was given her title by the Duke of Norfolk. It was probably no coincidence that the engine's driver on the day was Fred Brookes, himself a former Territorial. At the naming ceremony, Mr David Blee, General Manager of the London Midland Region, recognised that with the increasing use of diesel haulage it was likely that 70048 would not remain in service for much longer and that the name The Territorial Army 1908–1958 would be transferred to a diesel-electric locomotive although has not yet happened. During her life she was allocated to various depots including Chester, Willesden, Newton Heath, Annesley, Aston, Carlisle Upperby and finally Carlisle Kingmoor. It was from this shed that she was finally withdrawn from service on 6 May 1967 and scrapped on 12 September 1967.
    5.67
    3 votes
    171
    5.67
    3 votes
    172
    5.67
    3 votes
    173
    BR standard class 7 70000 Britannia

    BR standard class 7 70000 Britannia

    • Locomotive class: BR standard class 7
    British Railways (BR) standard class 7 (also known as Britannia class), number 70000 Britannia is a preserved steam locomotive, owned by the Royal Scot Locomotive and General Trust. Britannia was built at Crewe, completed on 2 January 1951. She was the first British Railways standard locomotive to be built and the first of 55 locomotives of the Britannia class. The locomotive was named at a ceremony at Marylebone Station by the then Minister for Transport Alfred Barnes on 30 January 1951. The BR Locomotive Naming Committee were determined not to use names already in use on other locomotives. They tried to observe this by not selecting the name Britannia for use on 70000 because it was already in use on one of the ex-LMS Jubilee Class locomotives, but Robert Riddles overruled them and the Jubilee had to be renamed. Britannia was initially based at Stratford (30A) in order to work East Anglian expresses to Norwich and Great Yarmouth. Subsequently, the loco was based at Norwich Thorpe (w/e 31 January 1959) and March (June 1961) before spending the remainder of her career on the London Midland Region: Willesden (1A) (w/e 30 March 1963), Crewe North (5A) (w/e 25 May 1963), Crewe South
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    2 votes
    174

    The Texas

    The Texas is a type 4-4-0 steam locomotive that played an important role in the Great Locomotive Chase during the American Civil War. The locomotive is preserved at the Atlanta Cyclorama building within Grant Park in Atlanta, Georgia. The Texas is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Built at a cost to its owners of $9,050 in 1856 by Danforth, Cooke and Company in Paterson, New Jersey, the Texas provided freight and passenger service between Atlanta, and Dalton, Georgia, before the Civil War on the Western and Atlantic Railroad (Antebellum trains were generally known by names, not numbers.) During early part of the Civil War, the locomotive was used primarily to haul local freight and cargo without any major incident. However, on April 12, 1862, the Texas, pulling a load of 21 cars from Dalton southbound towards Atlanta, was commandeered by William Allen Fuller to chase down spies led by James J. Andrews during the "Great Locomotive Chase." Steaming in reverse after jettisoning the railcars, the Texas pursued the fleeing General over 50 miles to Ringgold, Georgia, where the raiders abandoned their stolen train two miles north of that town and fled. The Texas's
    6.50
    2 votes
    175
    Union Pacific 4141

    Union Pacific 4141

    Union Pacific 4141 is an EMD SD70ACe locomotive owned by Union Pacific. Its paint scheme is based on that of Air Force One and "George Bush 41" is painted on the sides in honor of George H. W. Bush, the 41st President of the United States. The road number 4141 was previously occupied by an SD70M, which has since been renumbered. The unit was removed from active service due to reduced traffic levels stemming from financial crisis of 2007–2010 and was stored at UP's North Little Rock shop. According to UP chief of engines Roger Mills, it returned to service in September 2011 on a train to Chicago, Illinois and will be seen around the United States on the Union Pacific System. The unit is to have its unique paint scheme and number removed during its next overhaul.
    6.50
    2 votes
    176
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    2 votes
    177

    Illinois Central No. 1

    The Illinois Central Railroad's No. 1 was the railroad's only 4-6-4 "Hudson" type locomotive and the only 4-6-4 in North America built for freight service. It was rebuilt in the railroad's own shops from Illinois Central 7000 class 2-8-4 "Berkshire" No. 7038 in 1937 as an experiment to haul fast freight trains, which were growing too large for 4-6-2 "Pacific" types and required more speed than the road's 2-8-2 locomotives could manage. The experiment was not successful. The locomotive proved prone to slipping, because its factor of adhesion was very low; in simple terms it was too powerful for its ability to grip the rails. John L. McIntyre, the road foreman of engines at Clinton, Illinois where the locomotive was assigned during the 1938–1939 period, made some modifications to the locomotive, including to the weight equalization across the locomotives' wheels and to reduce the cylinder diameter from 27 to 24 inches (686 to 610 mm). The latter was to reduce the starting tractive effort to a level the locomotive's grip on the rails could handle. The improvements were successful, but not to the degree that the railroad ordered any further conversions. In 1945, the locomotive was
    7.00
    1 votes
    178
    Norfolk and Western 611

    Norfolk and Western 611

    Norfolk and Western Railway's J class steam locomotives were a class of 4-8-4 locomotives built by the Norfolk and Western Railway's East End Shops in Roanoke, Virginia between 1941 and 1950. The first batch, numbered 600 to 604, were built in 1941–42 and were delivered streamlined. In 1943, 605–610 were delivered without shrouding and lightweight side rods, due to the limitations on the use of certain materials during the war; due to these distinctions, they were classified J1. But, when N&W showed the War Production Board the reduced availability numbers because of this, the Board allowed the J1s to be re-fitted as Js with the lightweight rods and shrouding in 1944. The last batch, 611–613, were built in 1950, all streamlined. The Js were built and designed completely by N&W employees, something that was uncommon on American railroads. The class should not be confused with the much earlier J class of 1903. The total cost for building 611 was $251,544 in 1950. The design of the Js was completely universal. They were equipped with 300 psi boilers, 70-inch (1,778 mm) driving wheels, and roller bearings on all wheels and rods. The 70 inch drivers and 300 psi boiler allowed for a
    7.00
    1 votes
    179
    Overland Limited

    Overland Limited

    The Overland Limited was one of the named passenger trains on the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway. Operating as train Nos. 7 & 8 (sometimes known as the Overland Express) between Chicago, Illinois, and Los Angeles, California, the line was inaugurated in 1901 and ran until the Santa Fe Eight took over the route in 1915. First-class trains included a diner, while second-class trains stopped along the way at Fred Harvey Company eating houses.
    7.00
    1 votes
    180

    Santa Fe 2926

    Santa Fe 2926 is a former Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway (Santa Fe) 4-8-4 steam locomotive originally built in 1944 by Baldwin. This locomotive was part of the last group of steam locomotives, and one of the largest 4-8-4 types that was ever built, purchased new by the Santa Fe. The railroad used the locomotive in passenger service until it was retired from active service in 1956; the locomotive was then donated to the city of Albuquerque, New Mexico. The city displayed the locomotive as a static exhibit in Coronado Park until June 23, 2000, when it was moved onto a siding of the BNSF Railway near the intersection of 8th Street and Haines Avenue in preparation for its eventual move to the former ATSF locomotive repair shops in Albuquerque. The locomotive is currently undergoing restoration in this location to operating condition by the New Mexico Steam Locomotive and Railroad Historical Society (www.nmslrhs.org). On October 1, 2007, the locomotive was listed in the National Register of Historic Places.
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    181
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    182
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    183
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    184
    3801

    3801

    3801 (pronounced Thirty-eight o-one) is Australia's best known and most widely travelled steam locomotive. The streamlined locomotive was designed to haul express trains such as the Newcastle Flyer and Melbourne Limited for the New South Wales Government Railways (NSWGR). 3801 is the only steam locomotive to visit every mainland state and territory in Australia. During its preservation career, it was operated by the non-profit organisation 3801 Limited until the company's 20 year lease on the locomotive expired on 26 November 2006. The locomotive then returned to the custody of the NSW Rail Transport Museum where it performed for the public on rail tours during 2007. It is currently undergoing an overhaul at Chullora Workshops. Built in 1943 by Clyde Engineering, 3801 was the first of 30 38 class locomotives built to haul express trains and replace the 36 class on these premium workings. 3801 - 3805 were built in Sydney by Clyde Engineering to a streamlined design, whilst the other 25 locos in the class were built by the NSWGR and were unstreamlined. Of the other 38 class locomotives, only the unstreamlined 3830 is still operational. The 38 class were first conceived in 1938. They
    6.00
    2 votes
    185
    City of New Orleans

    City of New Orleans

    The City of New Orleans is a nightly passenger train operated by Amtrak that travels 934 miles (1,503 km) between Chicago, Illinois and New Orleans, Louisiana. Before Amtrak's formation in 1971, the train was operated by the Illinois Central Railroad along the same route (though changes have been made since then). The train currently operates on a 19½ hour schedule. Within Illinois the City of New Orleans shares a route also served by a daily morning train, the Saluki, and a daily afternoon train, the Illini. The Illini and Saluki terminate at Carbondale, Illinois. During fiscal year 2011, the City of New Orleans carried over 230,000 passengers, a 1.8% increase from FY2010. The train had a total revenue of $17,743,443 during FY2011, an increase of 2.9% over revenue in FY 2010. The Illinois Central Railroad introduced the original City of New Orleans on April 27, 1947 as a daytime companion to the overnight Panama Limited. EMD E7 diesel locomotives pulled a new lightweight Pullman Company coaches. The 921-mile (1,482 km) route, which the City of New Orleans covered in 15 hours 55 minutes, was the longest daytime schedule in the United States. The City of New Orleans exchanged St.
    6.00
    2 votes
    186
    LMR 57 Lion

    LMR 57 Lion

    The Liverpool and Manchester Railway (LMR) 57 Lion is an early 0-4-2 steam locomotive. One of a pair designed for hauling freight (the other, number 58 was called Tiger), built by Todd, Kitson & Laird (later Kitsons) of Leeds in 1838. In 1845 the LMR was absorbed by the Grand Junction Railway (GJR), which in turn was one of the constituents of the London and North Western Railway (LNWR) a year later. Lion received a new boiler about 1845. It was used in traffic until about 1858, and in 1859 it was sold to the Mersey Docks for use as a stationary engine. It was used in that role until 1928 when it was replaced by an electric pump. It was then "rediscovered" and preserved. A new tender for it was constructed based on contemporary drawings. Lion took part in the LMR centenary celebrations in 1930 and the London and Birmingham Railway centenary in 1938. It starred in the 1953 film The Titfield Thunderbolt, among others. During the filming of 'Thunderbolt' the tender was damaged in a shunting accident, the damage still being visible today. It is the second oldest locomotive to be steamed, the older being the British-built American locomotive John Bull. For many years, Lion was on
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    2 votes
    187
    Southern Pacific 4294

    Southern Pacific 4294

    Southern Pacific 4294 was the last steam locomotive ordered new by Southern Pacific Railroad (SP). It was built by Baldwin Locomotive Works in March 1944, and was used hauling SP's trains over the Sierra Nevada Mountains, often working on Donner Pass in California. 4294 was the last in a group of 20 locomotives that comprised SP's AC-12 class of 4-8-8-2 cab forward locomotives. Its most distinguishing feature was that the cab and firebox were at the front of the locomotive instead of the traditional rear. This specific SP design was a necessity in the long tunnels and snow sheds of Donner Pass and other mountainous regions where it kept smoke and soot away from the operating crew. It entered service on March 19, 1944, and was retired from active service on March 5, 1956. SP was convinced to preserve one of the class and donated 4294 to the city of Sacramento, California, where it was put on outdoor display October 19, 1958, at the SP station next to the C. P. Huntington, the railroad's first locomotive. Construction for Interstate 5 necessitated a move for the locomotive, and it was stored in the SP shops until May 1981. At that time it was moved again, this time to its current
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    2 votes
    188
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    189
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    191
    LNER Class A4 4496 Dwight D Eisenhower

    LNER Class A4 4496 Dwight D Eisenhower

    60008 Dwight D Eisenhower is an LNER Class A4 steam locomotive. Built for the London and North Eastern Railway in 1937, this locomotive was originally numbered 4496 and named Golden Shuttle. It was renamed Dwight D. Eisenhower after the Second World War and renumbered 8 on 23 November 1946 under Edward Thompson's LNER 1946 renumbering scheme. After nationalisation in 1948 British Railways added 60000 to the number so it became 60008 on 29 October 1948. Like the other members of the LNER A4 Pacific class, Dwight D. Eisenhower has carried numerous liveries during her career. When first introduced into traffic on 4 September 1937, locomotive 4496 was named Golden Shuttle and painted in LNER garter blue with stainless steel trim on the base of the valances and tender. The numbers and LNER lettering on the tender were also stainless steel. This livery design was also used on the A4's that were named after countries, on the Coronation service in order to match with the rolling stock. 4496's next livery was wartime black with "LNER" on the tender, applied 30 January 1942. This livery was modified to read just "NE" on the tender in a repaint on 12 March 1943. LNER garter blue was reapplied
    5.00
    3 votes
    192
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    3 votes
    193

    British Rail 11104

    British Railways' 11104 locomotive was built by F. C. Hibberd & Co Ltd and introduced by British Railways in 1959. Its departmental number was 52.
    5.50
    2 votes
    194
    Stourbridge Lion

    Stourbridge Lion

    The Stourbridge Lion was a railroad steam locomotive. It was not only the first locomotive to be operated in the United States, it was also one of the first locomotives to operate outside of Britain, where it was manufactured in 1828. The locomotive earned the name Lion from the picture of a lion's face that was painted on the front of the locomotive by its builder. The Stourbridge portion of the name is from the town of Stourbridge in England, where the locomotive was manufactured. One of the first railroads in the United States, the Delaware & Hudson Canal Company (D&H), was originally chartered in 1823 to build and operate canals between New York, NY and the coal fields around Carbondale, PA. While the line was originally planned as a canal for the entire route, company engineers began thinking about rail transportation as early as 1825; the initial plan was to build a railroad between the mines and the western end of the canal as a way to get the coal to the canal boats. John B. Jervis, who later became the designer of the 4-2-0 (the Jervis type) locomotive, was named the D&H's chief engineer in 1827. Jervis planned out a series of inclines connected by level, but themselves
    5.50
    2 votes
    195

    TCDD DH6000

    TCDD DH4100 was a single diesel-hydraulic shunter built for the Turkish State Railways by Jenbacher based on Jenbacher DH600C.
    5.50
    2 votes
    196
    Wylam Dilly

    Wylam Dilly

    Wylam Dilly is one of the two oldest surviving railway locomotives in the world; it was built circa 1815 by William Hedley and Timothy Hackworth. Wylam Dilly was initially designed for and used on the Wylam Waggonway (or Wagonway) to transport coal. The four driving wheels are connected by a train of spur wheels driven by a central crankshaft. A similar steam locomotive, Puffing Billy is in the Science Museum in London. Because it proved too heavy for the cast iron plateway in its original form, the locomotive was rebuilt with eight wheels in 1815, but returned to its original design in 1830 after the track was relaid with wrought iron rails. The locomotive was still at work in 1862 when it was moved to Craghead Colliery. After withdrawal it was presented to the Royal Museum in Edinburgh in 1883, where it is currently on display. In 1822 the locomotive was temporarily mounted on a keel and served as the engine for a steam paddlewheeler that ferried strikebreakers on the River Tyne. Until a thorough examination of Wylam Dilly and Puffing Billy was undertaken in 2008, it was thought that Wylam Dilly was the oldest surviving steam locomotive in the world. The research results,
    5.50
    2 votes
    197

    Broadway Limited

    The Broadway Limited was the Pennsylvania Railroad's (PRR) premier named passenger train, operating daily in each direction between New York City and Chicago, via North Philadelphia. It replaced its predecessors, the Pennsylvania Limited (1887–1902) and the Pennsylvania Special (1902–1912). The Broadway was inaugurated in 1912 and outlasted the Pennsylvania Railroad, operating under Amtrak until 1995. The name referred not to Broadway in Manhattan, but rather to the "broad way" of the Pennsylvania Railroad's four-track right of way along a large portion of the route. The schedule was 20 hours until 1932; it dropped to 16 hrs 30 min in 1935 and 16 hours flat when lightweight cars took over on June 15, 1938. From 1920 until 1936 the New York to Chicago fare was $32.70 plus the extra fare of $9.60, plus the Pullman charge (e.g. $9 for a lower berth). In the heavyweight era, the PRR normally operated the Broadway Limited as an extra-fare, eight-car all sleeper (no coach service) train with an open-platform observation car at the end, such as Continental Hall and Washington Hall. Inside, the observation cars were paneled in walnut and furnished with large, upholstered chairs, fresh
    6.00
    1 votes
    198

    City of Los Angeles

    The City of Los Angeles was a streamlined passenger train that ran between Chicago, Illinois, and Los Angeles, California, via Omaha, Nebraska, and Ogden, Utah. Between Omaha and Los Angeles it ran on the Union Pacific Railroad; east of Omaha it ran on the Chicago and North Western Railway until October 1955 and on the Milwaukee Road thereafter. The train had number 103 westbound and number 104 eastbound. This train was the top-of-the-line for UP, which marketed it as a direct competitor to the Super Chief, a streamlined passenger train operated by the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway, and the Golden State, a streamlined passenger train jointly operated by the Rock Island and Southern Pacific railroads. As with the City of Los Angeles, many of the train's cars bore the names of locales in and around its namkesake city. CNW / UP used one of only two sets of EMC E2 locomotives ever built as motive power for the train beginning in 1937. The UP scored a public relations coup in the mid-1950s when the City of Los Angeles was prominently featured in two consecutive episodes of the then popular television series I Love Lucy. In 1955 the Milwaukee Road assumed the service, replacing
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    1 votes
    199
    Tōkyū 8500 series

    Tōkyū 8500 series

    The Tokyu 8500 series (東急8500系, Tōkyū 8500-kei) is a commuter electric multiple unit (EMU) train type operated by Tokyu Corporation on the Tōkyū Den-en-toshi Line and Tōkyū Ōimachi Line in Japan. First introduced in 1975, the design is based on the earlier 8000 series design. Den-en-toshi Line sets 8601 to 8614 were marked with "K" stickers on the center front window of the driving cab ends, and they were restricted to operating on Den-en-toshi Line and Tokyo Metro Hanzōmon Line only, due to lack of Tobu ATS on these sets. After the opening of the Hanzōmon Line extension from Suitengūmae Station to Oshiage Station, sets 8601, 8602, 8613, and 8614 were fitted with Tobu ATS, allowing them to operate on Tōbu Isesaki Line and Tōbu Nikkō Line (and had their "K" stickers removed), while sets 8603 to 8612 were retained without Tobu ATS until their retirement from duties on the Den-en-toshi Line. A number of 8500 series trains have been resold to other operators in Japan and overseas following their withdrawal from Tōkyū services. Six 3-car sets were sold to the Nagano Electric Railway between 2005 and 2009. These retain the "8500 series" classification. One 8500 series car (DeHa 8723) was
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    1 votes
    200

    South Island Limited

    The South Island Limited was a passenger express train operated by the New Zealand Railways Department between 1949 and 1970. It operated between Christchurch and Invercargill via Dunedin, and in its heyday, it was New Zealand's premier express. Expresses between Christchurch and Dunedin began operating as soon as the Main South Line was opened. These services, the precursor to the South Island Limited, were the flagship of New Zealand's railways in the nineteenth century, and accordingly had the most modern motive power and rolling stock available. They were initially hauled by members of the first J class and limited to a speed of 60km/h, resulting in a journey time of eleven hours, but they were sped up with the introduction of the Rogers K class. The K locomotives could achieve speeds of up to 90km/h and they helped to quicken the schedule, with the T class handling the train on the hilly section between Oamaru and Dunedin. Upon their introduction in 1885, the N class took on the express duties, followed by the U and U classes, and then the Q and A class Pacifics cut the journey's time to eight hours in the early years of the twentieth century. In 1904, it became possible to
    5.00
    2 votes
    201
    Southern Pacific 4460

    Southern Pacific 4460

    Southern Pacific 4460 is the only surviving GS-6 Class steam locomotive. The GS-6 is a semi-streamlined 4-8-4 Northern type steam locomotive. GS stands for "Golden State." The locomotive was built by the Lima Locomotive Works for the Southern Pacific Railroad in 1943. The GS-6 lacked side skirting and red and orange "Daylight" paint found on previous locomotives of the GS class, and were painted black and silver instead. This was because the US government controlled locomotive manufacturers during World War II and had turned down Southern Pacific's order of fourteen new Daylight locomotives. Southern Pacific re-designed the engine for general service and it was finally approved, but the government took four of them and gave them to the smaller and power-starved Western Pacific Railroad. Their smaller size when compared to previous GS class locomotives and the fact that they were built during WWII earned them the nicknames of "War Babies" and "Baby Daylights". 4460 is famous for pulling what supposed to be the final movement of steam on the Southern Pacific Railroad in 1958. Following the final excursion, 4460 was donated to the Museum of Transportation in St. Louis, Missouri, on
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    2 votes
    202
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    203
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    205
    Gov. Stanford

    Gov. Stanford

    Gov. Stanford is a 4-4-0 steam locomotive originally built in 1862 by Norris Locomotive Works. It entered service on November 9, 1863 and it was used in the construction of the First Transcontinental Railroad in North America by Central Pacific Railroad bearing road number 1. It was Central Pacific's first locomotive and it is named in honor of the road's first president and ex-California governor, Leland Stanford. The locomotive was rebuilt by 1878 with larger cylinders and an increased boiler pressure, which increased its tractive effort to 11,081 pounds force (49,291 N). In 1891 the locomotive was renumbered to 1174. The locomotive was retired from regular service on July 20, 1895, then donated to Stanford University; however, it was not delivered to the university until 1899. The locomotive was disassembled and stored during World War II but was returned to display at the university after reassembly by retired Southern Pacific engineer Billy Jones. In the 1960s, the university needed the space occupied by the engine for other uses, so the engine was removed and loaned to the Railway & Locomotive Historical Society, which had been in the process of collecting historic
    4.50
    2 votes
    206
    4.50
    2 votes
    207

    Grand Canyon Limited

    The Grand Canyon Limited was one of the named passenger trains of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway. Unlike most named passenger trains, this is a mixed train. It was assigned train Nos. 23 & 24, and its route stretched between Chicago, Illinois, and Los Angeles, California. It's now lead by engine 3751. In 1901, the Santa Fe Railroad completed a 64-mile (103-km) long branch line from Williams, Arizona, to "Grand Canyon Village" at the South Rim of Grand Canyon National Park. The first scheduled train of the Grand Canyon Railway to convey paying passengers arrived from Williams on September 17 of that year. Branch line trains as well as special excursions departing from Southern California, Chicago, and Texas and travelling directly to the Rim were often schedule as a part of the Santa Fe's Southwestern promotional strategy. Finally, on June 29, 1929, service commenced on the Grand Canyon Limited, named for the railroad's most popular tourist attraction. It quickly became one of America's most celebrated vacation trains. Under typical operation the westward trains were split in two sections upon arrival at Barstow, in order that one section could travel directly to San
    5.00
    1 votes
    208

    Imperial Limited

    The Imperial Limited was the Canadian Pacific Railway's premier passenger train across Canada between Montreal, Quebec and Vancouver, British Columbia. It began operation June 18, 1899, seven days a week as a seasonal service supplementing the six days per week eastward Atlantic Express and its westward counterpart, the Pacific Express. It catered to travellers wanting to see the scenic Rocky Mountains and to vacation there. It was these well-to-do people that Sir William Cornelius Van Horne sought to attract in ever-increasing numbers, to travel to Canada, many on Canadian Pacific's ocean ships, then on Canadian Pacific's trains and to stay in Canadian Pacific's chalets at Banff Springs Hotel and Chateau Lake Louise. His famous quote was: "Since we can¹t export the scenery, we will have to import the tourists". And import them he did! In ever greater numbers. Equipped with luxurious sleeping and dining cars it continued the emphasis on comfort that the CPR had offered travellers from the beginning in 1886. It went to year round service in June 1911 at which time it replaced the original trains, Atlantic Express and Pacific Express. In 1929 it was renamed simply Imperial due to the
    5.00
    1 votes
    209
    LNER Class A4 4488 Union of South Africa

    LNER Class A4 4488 Union of South Africa

    60009 Union of South Africa is an LNER Class A4 steam locomotive built in Doncaster in 1937. Originally named Osprey, it is one of six surviving Gresley A4s and is presently undergoing an extensive overhaul. Built for the LNER in 1937 and originally numbered 4488, it was named after the then newly-formed Union of South Africa. Although it had previously been allocated the name "Osprey" on 17 April 1937, when it came out of the paint shop on 29 June, it had been renamed. "Osprey" name plates were fitted to the locomotive during the 1980s and early 1990s due to the politics of the time. Its name has since reverted to Union of South Africa. The works number of Union of South Africa was 1853; the plaques are located in the cab itself and not on the exterior cab sides as is the usual practice. The springbok plaque on the side of the locomotive was donated on 12 April 1954 by a Bloemfontein newspaper proprietor. Only the one plaque was fitted on the left hand side of the locomotive. The position has changed on a couple of occasions: originally the plaque was on the boiler side, being moved to the cabsides in preservation. Recently, the plaque has reverted to the historically correct
    5.00
    1 votes
    210

    Locomotive 424

    The MÁV class 424 is a famous class of hungarian steam locomotives. The class appears in numerous nostalgic remembrances, in literature, in the movies and as models. The 424 class is a double-chimneyed, superheated machine. Its nicknames were "Buffalo" and "Nurmi" (after Paavo Nurmi, a famous Finnish runner well known in Hungary). Locomotives of the same design operated in Yugoslavia as JŽ class 11. MÁVAG began to manufacture the Class 424 in 1924, with 2′D axle layout (4-8-0 in Whyte notation). It made its first test run between Budapest and Vác on 22 April 1924. The planning was led by Béla Kertész (1882–1970) locomotive constructor. The 424 was a universal main line locomotive. It was used to haul heavy freight trains, stopping trains and express trains. The 424 locomotives are well known abroad as well. Until 1958, 514 machines were produced, of which 149 were foreign orders. They remained in service until 1984, when steam engines were withdrawn in Hungary. The 424s were coal burners by design. In the early 1960s some engines were converted to burn oil, but their performance did not increase enough to compete with the diesel equipments of that time, like NOHAB DSB engines and
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    1 votes
    211
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    213
    Steam Horse locomotive

    Steam Horse locomotive

    The Steam Horse was constructed by the Butterley Company in Derbyshire in 1813 by William Brunton (1777–1851). Also known as the "Mechanical Traveller" it had a pair of mechanical legs, with feet that gripped the rails at the rear of the engine to push it forwards at about three miles an hour. To modern readers it may seem a comical contraption, but it provides an interesting insight into railway thought at the time. The collieries were well served between towns by the canal system. From the pit head to the canals, horse-drawn wagonways had been constructed and steam engines were seen as no more than a noisy and dangerous novelty. However the Napoleonic Wars from 1799 to 1815 had brought a great increase in the price of fodder. Moreover, some such "railways" were being constructed on the steeper gradients within canals, as for instance on the Charnwood Forest Canal. Nobody believed that steel wheels on smooth steel rails would give enough adhesion until Stephenson and Hedley proved otherwise in 1813 and even the former considered 1 in 100 was the absolute maximum grade. Consequently such steam operated systems as there were, were operated by cumbersome cables, or by the use of an
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    2 votes
    214
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    215
    BR standard class 9F 92220 Evening Star

    BR standard class 9F 92220 Evening Star

    British Railways Standard Class 9F number 92220 Evening Star, is a preserved British steam locomotive completed in 1960. It was the last steam locomotive to be built by British Railways. It holds the distinction of being the only British main line steam locomotive ear-marked for preservation from the date of construction. It was the 999th locomotive of the whole British Railways Standard range. Evening Star was built at Swindon railway works in 1960. Though the last to be built, it was not the last 9F numerically as Crewe had already completed engines with higher numbers. It was equipped with a BR1G-type tender and given BR Brunswick green livery, normally reserved for passenger locomotives, and was completed with a copper-capped double chimney. All other members of the class of heavy freight locomotives were painted unlined black. 92220 was the only Class 9F to be named when running with BR, although others have subsequently been named in preservation; the name Evening Star was chosen following a competition run in 1959-60 by the BR Western Region Staff Magazine. There were three competition winners, Driver T.M. Phillips (Aberystwyth), Boilermaker J.S. Sathi (Old Oak Common) and
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    1 votes
    216

    LMS 6399 Fury

    The London Midland and Scottish Railway (LMS) No. 6399 Fury was an unsuccessful British experimental express passenger locomotive. The intention was to save fuel by using high-pressure steam, which is thermodynamically more efficient than low-pressure steam. Built in 1929 by the North British Locomotive Company in Glasgow, it was based on the frames and a modified boiler from the LMS Royal Scot Class. A 3-cylindered compound locomotive, it had one small high-pressure cylinder between the frames and two larger low-pressure outside cylinders, and a water-tube boiler of the Schmidt high-pressure system. This raised high-pressure steam at 900 psi (6.2 MPa) and low-pressure steam at 250 psi (1.7 MPa). There was a sealed ultra-high-pressure circuit working between 1400 and 1800 psi (9.7 to 12.4 MPa), filled with distilled water, that transferred heat from the firebox to the high-pressure boiler. It was given the number 6399, but never taken into capital stock. During a trial on 10 February 1930 one of the ultra-high-pressure tubes burst, killing Mr Schofield of the Superheater Company. The accident was thoroughly investigated and trials continued until 1933. Fury was then laid up until
    4.00
    1 votes
    217

    Panama Limited

    The Panama Limited was a premier all-Pullman car service between Chicago, Illinois and New Orleans, Louisiana. For most of the trains' history a St. Louis section also operated between St. Louis, Missouri, and Carbondale, Illinois, where it connected to the main train. The Panama Limited was operated throughout its history by the Illinois Central Railroad, except for its last three years (1971-74), when it was operated by Amtrak. The train ran on an overnight schedule between Chicago's Central Station, St. Louis Union Station and New Orleans Union Station (replaced in 1954 by the current New Orleans Union Passenger Terminal. At various times during the history of the train it also carried through sleepers for connections to Gulfport, Mississippi, Little Rock and Hot Springs, Arkansas and San Antonio, Texas. The train, which commenced service on February 4, 1911, replaced an earlier train, the Chicago and New Orleans Limited and was named in honor of the anticipated opening of the Panama Canal. The first Panama Limited ran as train numbers 3 northbound and 4 southbound carrying only sleepers, dining and lounge cars between Chicago and Memphis and adding coaches south of Memphis. In
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    Pere Marquette 1225

    Pere Marquette 1225

    Pere Marquette 1225 is a 2-8-4 (Berkshire) steam locomotive built for Pere Marquette Railway (PM) by Lima Locomotive Works in Lima, Ohio. 1225 is one of two surviving Pere Marquette 2-8-4 locomotives and the only one operable. PM used 1225 in regular service from the locomotive's construction in 1941 until the railroad merged into Chesapeake and Ohio Railway (C&O) in 1947; it remained in use on C&O's Michigan lines until 1951. Slated for scrapping, 1225 was acquired by Michigan State University in 1957 and placed on static display. In 1971, work began to restore 1225 to operation, an effort that culminated in its first excursion run in 1988. The locomotive, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, is now used on excursion trains over the former Tuscola and Saginaw Bay Railway, now Great Lakes Central Railroad. The locomotive was built in 1941 by Lima Locomotive Works for Pere Marquette Railway (PM). PM ordered this type of locomotive in three batches from Lima: class N in 1937 (PM road numbers 1201–1215), class N-1 in 1941 (numbers 1216–1227) and class N-2 in 1944 (numbers 1228–1239). 1225 cost $200,000 to build in 1941 ($3,160,181 in current dollars). The locomotives
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    Pioneer

    Pioneer

    Pioneer is the name of the first railroad locomotive to operate in Chicago, Illinois. It was built in 1837 by Baldwin Locomotive Works for the Utica and Schenectady Railroad (U&S) in New York, then purchased used by William B. Ogden for the Galena and Chicago Union Railroad (G&CU, the oldest predecessor of Chicago and North Western Railway). The locomotive arrived in Chicago by schooner on October 10, 1848, and it pulled the first train westbound out of the city on October 25, 1848. When the locomotive was built in 1837, and the Utica and Schenectady Railroad gave it the name Alert. It worked on the U&S for nine years before it was sold to the Michigan Central Railroad. Michigan Central added a cab and tender to the locomotive and used it for two years before selling it again in 1848 to the Galena and Chicago Union Railroad. The G&CU renamed the locomotive Pioneer and used it in the construction of the G&CU until 1850, at which time the locomotive was loaned to the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad for work in and around Chicago. The locomotive has been preserved and is on display at the Chicago History Museum. The tender that was used behind the locomotive is located in
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    Pioneer Limited

    The Pioneer Limited was a United States named passenger train operated by the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad (the "Milwaukee Road") on an overnight schedule between Chicago, Illinois, and Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota. The westbound train (to Minneapolis) was Milwaukee Road train No. 1, and the eastbound train (to Chicago) was train No. 4. The Milwaukee Road began operating trains No. 1 and No. 4 in 1872, the first through trains between Chicago and the Twin Cities. The Pioneer Limited name first appeared in 1898, chosen as the result of a public contest. It was among the nation's first named trains, and the first named train on the Milwaukee Road. The Pioneer Limited was the Milwaukee Road's first premier train. The 1898 train was newly-equipped with Barney & Smith sleeping cars, the carriages described in a period brochure as "...a veritable edition de luxe, bound in covers of yellow and gold." The train was re-equipped multiple times in subsequent years, the last wooden cars being replaced by steel ones in 1914. During the train's early years, the Pioneer Limited was noted for a number of "firsts": it had the first government railway mail contract in the
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    Royal Hudson

    Royal Hudson

    The term Royal Hudson refers to a group of semi-streamlined 4-6-4 Hudson steam locomotives owned by the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) and built by Montreal Locomotive Works (MLW). The engine was built in 1938. In 1939, King George VI allowed the CPR to use the term after Royal Hudson number 2850 transported the royal train across Canada with no need of replacement. These locomotives were in service between 1937 and 1960. Four of them have been preserved, and one was used for excursion service in British Columbia. In 1939, King George VI and the queen consort, Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon visited Canada, arriving at Wolfe's Cove, Quebec, on 17 May 1939. This was the first time that a reigning monarch had visited Canada. The King and Queen took a tour of the country by rail. The CPR and the Canadian National Railways (CNR) shared the honours of transporting the royal train across the country, with the CPR undertaking the westbound journey, from Quebec City to Vancouver. The steam locomotive that the CPR used to pull the train was numbered 2850, a 4-6-4 built by Montreal Locomotive works. Specially painted in silver and blue, the locomotive ran 3,224 mi (5,189 km) across Canada, through 25
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    TCDD DH4100

    TCDD DH4100 was a single diesel-hydraulic shunter built for the Turkish State Railways by Jenbacher based on Jenbacher DH400C.
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    Union Pacific 4017

    Union Pacific 4017

    Big Boy was the nickname given to the Union Pacific Railroad's twenty-five 4000 class 4-8-8-4 steam locomotives built between 1941 and 1944 by Alco. UP 4017 was built in Schenectady, New York during 1941. During its 20 year career with the Union Pacific it ran more than 1 million miles. The Union Pacific Railroad donated 4017 to the National Railroad Museum in July, 1961. From 1961 until 2001 the 4017 sat outside, exposed to the harsh Wisconsin winters. As luck would have it, the Union Pacific took great steps to preserve the locomotive. They put a protective layer of a foam-like material in the firebox and in the smokebox to reduce the likelihood of rusting. They also applied two large covers over the massive smoke stacks. These efforts kept the inside components well preserved, but the boiler jacket was not removed. Eventually the Museum had the boiler jacket removed. This decision protected the exterior of the boiler from severe rusting from constant water contact. In 2000 the 4017 moved for the last time. 4017 is now placed indoors the Lenfesty Center at the National Railroad Museum.
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    United States Army No. 101

    United States Army No. 101

    US Army 101 is a 2-8-0 steam locomotive that was originally operated by the United States Army. It is one of two survivors of the 1,500 General Pershing locomotives built in 1916–1918 for the War Department in World War I. The 101 went on to see action in three wars — World War I, World War II, and the Korean War. The history of the 101 is something of a mystery. What we do know is that it was built for the US Army for use in World War I by Baldwin Locomotive Works. It was owned by the US Army until it was donated to Korea in 1947 - after the end of the Japanese occupation (1945) and prior to the start of the Korean War (1950). In 1953, the 101 was recovered from damaged areas and reconstructed by the Army Transportation Corps, under the direction of Col. George Simpson. It seems that the 101 was still property of the Korean Republic, however. Col. George Simpson, Harold T.I. Shannon, and Harold E. Fuller started to talk with the Korean Republic about donating the engine to the National Railroad Museum. In 1958 Korean Republic President Syngman Rhee donated the locomotive as a gift from the Korean people. Over 300 newspapers carried the story of the arrival of the engine and this
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    Capitol Limited

    Capitol Limited

    The Capitol Limited was an American passenger train run by the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, originally between New York City and Grand Central Station in Chicago, Illinois via Union Station, Washington, D. C. and Pittsburgh. For almost 48 years, it was the B&O's flagship passenger train, noted for personalized service and innovation. At the time of its discontinuation on May 1, 1971, when Amtrak took over most rail passenger service in the U.S., the Capitol Limited operated between Washington and Chicago. The Capitol Limited was inaugurated on May 12, 1923, as an all-Pullman sleeping car train running from Pennsylvania Station in New York City to Chicago, via Washington, D. C. Once west of the Hudson River in New Jersey the train used the Jersey Central and Reading Railroad as far as Philadelphia, where it reached B&O's own rails to Chicago. It was designed to compete against the luxury trains of the rival Pennsylvania Railroad and New York Central Railroad. Although the B&O's longer route put it at a competitive disadvantage in New York for time-sensitive travelers, the B&O offered such luxuries in the 1920s as onboard secretaries, barbers, manicures, and valets. The Capitol's
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    228
    Countess of Dufferin

    Countess of Dufferin

    The Countess of Dufferin was the first steam locomotive to operate in the Canadian prairie provinces and is named after Hariot Hamilton-Temple-Blackwood, Countess of Dufferin (later Marchioness of Dufferin and Ava), the wife of the Earl of Dufferin, a Governor General of Canada. The locomotive was built by the Baldwin Locomotive Works (builder's plate No. 2660) and delivered to Northern Pacific Railway as No. 21 in 1872. It was used in Minnesota and the Dakota Territory until 1877 when it was sold for $9,700 to Joseph Whitehead, a contractor for Canadian Pacific Railway. The locomotive, along with six flatcars and a caboose, was loaded onto barges at Fisher's Landing, Minnesota, and propelled by the SS Selkirk, they were shipped down the Red River to St. Boniface, now an electoral district of Winnipeg, Manitoba, arriving October 9, 1877, at a cost of $440. Upon arrival the locomotive was used on Government of Canada Contract No. 5, the first contract issued in the promised rail link that brought British Columbia into Confederation. The locomotive was used in the completion of Pembina branch to the U.S. border, linking Winnipeg with Minneapolis. Next it worked east from Winnipeg to
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    Florida East Coast Railway Locomotive No. 153

    Florida East Coast Railway Locomotive No. 153

    The Florida East Coast Railway Locomotive No. 153 is a historic Florida East Coast Railway 4-6-2 ALCO steam locomotive in Miami, Florida, USA. The locomotive served on the Florida East Coast Railway from 1922 to 1938, and pulled a train carrying President Calvin Coolidge's to Miami in 1928. In 1935, when she was in use on the run between Miami and Key West, #153 was one of the last engines to reach Miami before the hurricane that year destroyed the bridges to the Florida Keys. For pulling the "rescue train" out of Marathon, #153 (currently at the Gold Coast Railroad Museum) was designated a National Historic Site in the 1980s. After 1938 #153 was used as an industrial switcher by the United States Sugar Corporation of Clewiston, Florida. In 1957, she was donated to the University of Miami. From March 1957 until November 1966, she operated in Miami every Sunday. In 1966 she received a major overhaul, after which she was inspected and subsequently certified by the Interstate Commerce Commission. Due to age and damage by Hurricane Andrew in 1992, she is currently out of service On February 21, 1985, it was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places. It is located at the
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    Heavy Harry

    Heavy Harry

    • Locomotive class: Victorian Railways H class
    Nicknamed "Heavy Harry", H 220 was the largest locomotive ever built in Australia and the largest non-articulated steam locomotive to run on Australian railways.
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    LPHC No. 3 R.H. Smith

    LPHC No. 3 R.H. Smith

    Londonderry Port and Harbour Commissioners (LPHC) No. 3 R H Smyth is a preserved Irish steam locomotive. Built by Avonside Engineering Company of Bristol, England works No. 2021 in 1928. A fairly typical 0-6-0 saddle tank built to the 5'3" Irish broad gauge, she led a rather uneventful life shunting the dual gauge (5'3" and 3') docks in Derry on the west bank of the River Foyle in Northern Ireland. She was equipped with a single off-centre buffer and coupling at each end for shunting 3' gauge stock, in addition to conventional buffers and drawhooks for 5'3" gauge. After withdrawal, she was bought privately in 1968 before being sold for £1 to the Railway Preservation Society of Ireland at Whitehead in 1972. The engine then acquired the nickname 'Harvey' in honour of showjumper Harvey Smith. In 2000, 30 years after the end of mainline steam in Northern Ireland, No. 3 achieved something of a celebrity status when she was hired by Henry Boot Ltd to help engineering work on the relaying of the Bleach Green Junction - Antrim railway line. This was followed in 2005 by another contract assisting the relaying of the Carrickfergus - Whitehead railway line. During 2006, the locomotive was
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    M-497 Black Beetle

    The M-497 (nicknamed Black Beetle) was an experimental jet-powered locomotive test bed of the New York Central Railroad corporation, developed and tested in 1966 in the United States of America. Two second-hand General Electric J47-19 jet engines (designed as boosters for the Convair B-36 intercontinental bomber) were mounted atop an existing Budd Rail Diesel Car (an RDC-3, part coach, part baggage and mail configuration) body which had received a streamlined front cowling. The construct was then successfully sent on test runs over the existing tracks between Butler, Indiana and Stryker, Ohio (the line was chosen for its arrow-straight layout and good condition, but otherwise unmodified track). The car reached a speed of 183.68 mph (295.54 km/h), still the light-rail speed record for the United States. Even with this spectacular performance (and even though it had been built relatively cheaply, using existing parts), the project was not considered viable commercially. The railroad gathered valuable test data regarding the stresses of high-speed rail travel on conventional equipment and tracks then existing in America. The data was largely ignored, as the NYC was headed for merger
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    Napier Deltic

    Napier Deltic

    The Napier Deltic engine is a British opposed-piston valveless, two-stroke diesel engine used in marine and locomotive applications, designed and produced by Napier & Son. The cylinders were divided in three blocks in a triangular arrangement, the blocks forming sides with crankshafts located in each apex of the triangle. The term Deltic (meaning in the form of the Greek letter Delta) is used to refer to both the Deltic E.130 opposed-piston high-speed diesel engine and the locomotives produced by English Electric using these engines, including its demonstrator locomotive named DELTIC and the production version for British Railways, which designated these as (TOPS) Class 55. A single half-sized, turbocharged Deltic power unit also featured in the English Electric-built Type 2 locomotive, designated as the Class 23. Both locomotive and engine became better known as the "Baby Deltic". The Deltic story began in 1943 when the British Admiralty set up a committee to develop a high-power, lightweight diesel engine for Motor Torpedo Boats. Hitherto in the Royal Navy, such boats had been driven by petrol engines but this fuel is highly flammable, making them vulnerable to fire, and at a
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    234
    Nickel Plate 587

    Nickel Plate 587

    Nickel Plate Road 587 is a USRA Light 2–8–2 steam locomotive built in September 1918 by the Baldwin Locomotive Works for the Lake Erie and Western Railroad as its number 5541. In 1923 the LE&W was merged into the New York, Chicago and St. Louis Railroad, (“Nickel Plate Road”), and allocated 587 as its new number in 1924. The locomotive is currently being restored by the Indiana Transportation Museum. NKP No. 587 is generally referred to as a Baldwin locomotive. However, her supporting truck and cylinders are actually from another Lima Locomotive Works (LLW) engine when the original cylinders failed. 587 is the best remaining representation of the Mikado 2-8-2 locomotive style originally designed and built as part of the World War I rearmament program. NKP No. 587 was originally built for the Lake Erie & Western Railroad and originally numbered 5541. When LE&W was bought by Nickel Plate Road in 1922 the NKP spent the next 2 years consolidating and standardizing the locomotive number system. In 1924 LE&W 5541 was renumbered as NKP 587. NKP 587 served on the NKP railroad for 37 years serving the route from Indianapolis to Michigan city. The locomotive remained relatively unchanged
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    Nickel Plate 765

    Nickel Plate 765

    Nickel Plate Road 765 is a 2-8-4 Berkshire steam locomotive that is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The 765 was first assigned to Bellevue, Ohio, where it was used primarily on the Nickel Plate's fast freight trains. After the war, she worked primarily out of a classification yard in the east side of Fort Wayne, Indiana. Her final revenue run came on June 14, 1958, only fourteen years after her construction. Upon the decline of steam power, the Nickel Plate Road offered to donate a steam locomotive to the city of Fort Wayne, Indiana for display in Lawton Park. The city asked for S-2 767 because the 767 had officially opened the city's cross-town elevation project in 1955. Unfortunately, while sister engine 765 had been stored in the East Wayne engine house for the first part of its time after its last run, the 767 was stored outside and in far worse condition. Consequently, the Nickel Plate secretly switched the numbers, donated the disguised 765 on May 4, 1963, and scrapped the 767. After many years of sitting outdoors, exposed to the elements, the 765 began to deteriorate. Then in 1972, the Fort Wayne Railroad Historical Society (FWRHS) was formed, and began a
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    Southern Pacific 745

    Southern Pacific 745

    Southern Pacific 745 is a Mikado-type or 2-8-2 steam locomotive that has been restored to operating condition. It has also been known as Texas & New Orleans 745 and Galveston, Harrisburg, & San Antonio 745, reflecting two Southern Pacific Railroad subsidiaries that operated it at times. SP 745 is properly regarded as a classic among steam locomotives, and for its significance, it has been placed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places since September 4, 1998. SP 745 is a classic for several reasons. First and most basically, the Mikado-type locomotive is considered by many to be the classic American freight locomotive from the golden age of steam locomotives, before Diesel-electric locomotives became widely used. Second, despite well over 10,000 Mikados being built for American use, according to one database, only 12 remain capable of operating on standard railroad tracks (others are smaller, narrow-gauge locomotives, not capable of running on ordinary railroad tracks; and a few are tank locomotive types designed only for short-range operation). Third, SP 745 is a "Harriman standard Mikado". Railroad tycoon E. H. Harriman obtained control of the Southern Pacific and
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    Steam Elephant

    Steam Elephant

    Steam Elephant is an early steam locomotive from North East England. An illustration of the locomotive first came to modern attention in 1931 and it was then generally assumed to be the work of George Stephenson. More recent interpretation is based on research carried out at Beamish Museum for construction of a replica to work there based largely on contemporaneous paintings (one being the earliest known oil of a steam locomotive) and other material from the Museum archives. It is from the paintings that the name Steam Elephant has become associated specifically with this locomotive. Steam Elephant was a six-wheeled locomotive of approximately standard gauge with a centre-flue boiler having two vertical cylinders of about 9 inches (229 mm) x 24 inches (610 mm) set into its top centreline. The cylinders drove slide bar mounted beams which turned crankshafts driving the axles through 2:1 reduction gears between the frames. It had a tall, tapering chimney, the lower part being surrounded by a feedwater heater. It would have weighed about 7.5 tons and had a top speed of around 4.5 miles per hour (7 km/h) and a load capacity of about 90 tons over a short distance. It is now considered
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    Union Pacific 737

    Union Pacific 737

    Union Pacific Railway Engine No. 737 or UP 737 is a 4-4-0 steam locomotive. It is currently the oldest preserved Union Pacific steam locomotive. It was originally acquired by the Union Pacific Railroad in 1887. It is one of about 115 surviving American 4-4-0s in the United States(around 30 4-4-0s if reproductions are not counted) of which about 60 are operational. UP 737 began its career as part of one of the largest locomotive orders on record up to that date, for use on Union Pacific passenger and freight trains. As delivered, the locomotive had a long, pointed, vertical bar wooden pilot, an oil "box" headlight, a "diamond" stack of the shallow diamond style peculiar to the Union Pacific at that period. It had steam and sand domes that appeared comparatively square in profile and lacked the common, ornate, cast-iron dome "rings," a decorative molding that dressed up the appearance of such domes and that many 19th century locomotives sported. Upon entering service, the locomotive reportedly had the initials "O.& R.V." painted on the small panel below the windows on each side of the cab, standing for the name of a Union Pacific subsidiary in Nebraska, the Omaha and Republican
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    239
    Union Pacific Big Boy

    Union Pacific Big Boy

    Big Boy was the name of the Union Pacific Railroad's 4000-class 4-8-8-4 articulated steam locomotives, built between 1941 and 1944 by American Locomotive Company (Alco). The 25 Big Boys were the only locomotives to have the 4-8-8-4 wheel arrangement, which combined two sets of eight driving wheels with a four-wheel leading truck for stability entering curves and a four-wheel trailing truck to support the large firebox. Union Pacific Railroad (UP) introduced the Challenger-type (4-6-6-4) locomotives in 1936 on its main line across Wyoming. For most of the way, the maximum grade is 0.82% in either direction, but the climb eastward from Ogden, Utah, into the Wasatch Range (Wahsatch, on the railroad) reached 1.14%. Hauling a 3,600-short ton (3,300 t) freight train demanded doubleheading and helper operations, and adding and removing the helper engines from a train slowed operations. The answer was to design a new locomotive, but for such locomotives to be worthwhile they had to be faster and more powerful than slow mountain luggers like the earlier compound 2-8-8-0s that UP tried after World War I. To avoid locomotive changes, the new class would need to pull long trains at sustained
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