Top List Curated by Listnerd
  • Public list
  • Nov 27th 2012
  • 5.150 views
  • 622 votes
  • 622 voters
  • 2%
Best Locomotive class of All Time

More about Best Locomotive class of All Time:

Best Locomotive class of All Time is a public top list created by Listnerd on Rankly.com on November 27th 2012. Items on the Best Locomotive class of All Time top list are added by the Rankly.com community and ranked using our secret ranking sauce. Best Locomotive class of All Time has gotten 5.150 views and has gathered 622 votes from 622 voters. Only owner can add items. Just members can vote.

Best Locomotive class of All Time is a top list in the Cars & Auto category on Rankly.com. Are you a fan of Cars & Auto or Best Locomotive class of All Time? Explore more top 100 lists about Cars & Auto on Rankly.com or participate in ranking the stuff already on the all time Best Locomotive class of All Time top list below.

If you're not a member of Rankly.com, you should consider becoming one. Registration is fast, free and easy. At Rankly.com, we aim to give you the best of everything - including stuff like the Best Locomotive class of All Time list.

Get your friends to vote! Spread this URL or share:

Items just added

    1
    LNER Class J50

    LNER Class J50

    The Great Northern Railway Class J23 was a class of 0-6-0T steam locomotive. They had long side tanks that came to the front of the smokebox, which sloped forwards to improve visibility and had a recess cut in to aid maintenance. Forty were built by the Great Northern Railway (GNR) between 1913 and 1922, with a further 62 being added by the London and North Eastern Railway (LNER) between 1924 and 1939. None of the locomotives survive today. For shunting and local goods work, the Great Northern Railway (GNR) had traditionally used saddle-tank engines of the 0-6-0 wheel arrangement; the last of these, of GNR Class J13, having been built in 1909 to the designs of H.A. Ivatt, the GNR Locomotive Superintendent. Nigel Gresley succeeded Ivatt in 1911, and soon identified a need for engines to work the short-haul coal traffic in the West Riding of Yorkshire; the nature of which required that the locomotives also be suitable for shunting. He designed a new class of 0-6-0 tank engine, using side tanks instead of saddle tanks. Gresley had recently begun the rebuilding of the GNR Class L1 0-8-2T locomotives with larger boilers, 4 feet 8 inches (1.42 m) in diameter, which left a number of
    7.25
    8 votes
    2
    British Rail Class 76

    British Rail Class 76

    The British Rail Class 76, also known as Class EM1 (Electric Mixed-Traffic 1), is a class of 1.5 kV DC, Bo-Bo electric locomotive designed for use on the now-closed Woodhead Line in Northern England. The prototype, LNER No. 6701 was completed at Doncaster Works in 1941 to a design by Sir Nigel Gresley, but electrification of the Woodhead Route was delayed by the Second World War. It was tested on the few sections of 1500 V DC lines owned by the LNER but had not worked any great distance by 1947 when it was loaned to Dutch Railways to help with their post war shortage of locomotives. In September 1945 the LNER assigned it the classification EM1; previously it had been unclassified. The prototype locomotive, renumbered 6000 in June 1946, remained on Dutch Railways until 1952 when the Woodhead electrification was complete. While in the Netherlands it gained the name Tommy after the nickname given to British soldiers and ran for the rest of its working life with a name plate which included an explanation of the origin - "So named by drivers of the Netherlands State Railway to whom this locomotive was loaned 1947-1952". It was renumbered to 26000 following the formation of British
    8.50
    6 votes
    3
    SNCF Class X 4500

    SNCF Class X 4500

    The SNCF Class X 4500 diesel multiple units were built by ANF between 1963-1970. The X4500 class are one of four classes of similar design (X4300, X4500, X4630, X4750) known as "Caravelles" as when built the engine sound reminded railwaymen of the contemporary French SE210 'Caravelle' jet airliner. X4500 are identical to the earlier Class X4300 except for having a different engine. The motor cars operate with unpowered trailers from either class XR8300 or XR8500 depending on seating demand. Most of the class has now been withdrawn. The last examples (14 as at April 2009) work around Burgundy (Nevers depot).
    7.43
    7 votes
    4
    British Rail Class 357

    British Rail Class 357

    The British Rail Class 357 "Electrostar" alternating current (AC) electric multiple units (EMUs) were built by ADtranz (now owned by Bombardier Transportation) at their Litchurch Lane Works in Derby, England, in two batches from 1999 to 2002 at a cost of approximately £292 million. They were the first member of the Electrostar family, which also includes Classes 375, 376, 377, 378, and 379, and is the most numerous type of EMU built in the post-privatisation period of Britain's railways. It shares the same basic design, bodyshell and core structure as the Turbostar diesel multiple unit (DMU), which is in turn the most common post-privatisation diesel multiple unit family, and both evolved from the Class 168 Clubman design by ADtranz. The Clubman/Turbostar/Electrostar platform is a modular design, optimised for speedy manufacture and easy maintenance. It consists of an underframe, which is created by seam-welding a number of aluminium alloy extrusions, upon which bodyside panels are mounted followed by a single piece roof, again made from extruded sections. The car ends (cabs) are made from glass-reinforced plastic and steel, and are huck-bolted onto the main car bodies. Underframe
    6.86
    7 votes
    5
    British Rail Class 11

    British Rail Class 11

    • Built by: English Electric
    The British Rail Class 11 was applied to a batch of diesel shunting locomotives built from April 1945 to December 1952, based on a similar earlier batch built by the London, Midland and Scottish Railway (LMS) between 1939 and 1942. The fourteen locomotives were built for the War Department, with the first ten subsequently going the Nederlandse Spoorwegen as NS 501–510. LMS numbers 7120–7129 went straight into LMS stock, with 7129 being the last diesel shunter to be built for the LMS. British Railways continued to build the class from 1948 to 1952, using numbers M7130–M7131 and 12045–12138. 7120–7129 and M7130–M7131 became BR numbers 12033–12044. The whole class of 12033–12138 became Class 11. Locomotives up to 12102 were built at LMS/BR Derby and 12103–12138 at BR Darlington. Close to 100 almost identical machines were built by English Electric and supplied to Nederlandse Spoorwegen (NS) as their 500 Class & 600 Class diesel locomotives. Sixty-five of the 600 Class locomotives were built by English Electric between 1950 and 1957, numbered 601–665, at either Dick, Kerr & Co. Works (601–610) in Preston or Vulcan Foundry Works (remainder) in Newton-le-Willows. Another export order was
    7.67
    6 votes
    6
    8.80
    5 votes
    7
    British Rail Class 501

    British Rail Class 501

    The British Rail Class 501 electric multiple units were built in 1957/58 for use on the former LNWR/LMS suburban electric network of the London Midland Region. A total of 57 three-car units were built. The services worked by the Class 501 units consisted of a small self-contained group of lines, which were electrified at 650V DC on the 3rd and 4th rail principle, linking London Euston to Watford, Broad Street with both Richmond and Watford plus the Croxley Green branch — which was mostly served by shuttle trains from Watford. Some of these services were partially jointly operated with London Underground's Bakerloo and District Lines. In 1970 the trains were converted to 3rd rail only operation, although the 4th rail was retained on sections of line which are shared with London Underground trains. The Class 501 units were built by British Railways in its own workshops at Eastleigh on short 57 ft frames supplied by Ashford. Despite British Railways having recently built modern sliding door trains for electric suburban services in Manchester and Liverpool it was decided that these trains would closely resemble the EPB stock of the Southern Region, which featured individual
    6.29
    7 votes
    8
    EMD E9

    EMD E9

    The EMD E9 was a 2,400-horsepower (1,790 kW), A1A-A1A passenger train-hauling diesel locomotive built by General Motors' Electro-Motive Division of La Grange, Illinois between April 1954 and January 1964. 100 cab-equipped lead A units were produced, along with 44 cabless booster B units. All were for service within the United States. The E9 was the tenth and final model of EMD E-unit produced, and differed from the earlier E8 as built only by the newer engines and a different, flusher-fitting mounting for the headlight glass, the latter being the only externally visible difference. Since some E8s were fitted with this, it is not a reliable way to distinguish between the two. The 2,400 hp (1,790 kW) was achieved with two 1,200 hp (895 kW), V12 model 567C engines, each engine driving its own generator to power the traction motors. The E9's best-known role was in powering American passenger and mail trains from the 1950s well into the late 1970s. Many of America's finest trains — such as Union Pacific Railroad's "City" fleet, Burlington's "Zephyr" fleet and Southern Pacific Railroad's Coast Daylight and Sunset Limited — had E9s pulling them. E9s and their E7 and E8 kin ran throughout
    7.17
    6 votes
    9
    British Rail APT-E

    British Rail APT-E

    • Parent class: Advanced Passenger Train
    The APT-E, for Advanced Passenger Train Experimental, was the prototype Advanced Passenger Train tilting train unit. It was powered by gas turbines, the only multiple unit so powered that was used by British Rail. The APT-E consisted of two driving power cars (PC1 and 2) and two trailer cars (TC1 and 2). Each power car was equipped with four Rover- built Leyland 2S/350 gas turbines (and a fifth for auxiliary power supplies), these initially produced 300 HP each but were progressively uprated to 330 HP. Two GEC 253AY nose suspended traction motors provided the traction on the leading bogies. The vehicles were manufactured from aluminium, approx 70 ft long (21 m) with articulated bogies between them. The APT-E made its first run on 25 July 1972 from Derby to Duffield and was immediately 'blacked' by the drivers' union ASLEF, due to concerns that the single driver's seat preempted ongoing negotiations about the single-manning of trains. It was over twelve months before it ran again on the main line in August 1973. The prototype was eventually tried out on the Great Western Main Line, nicknamed Brunel's billiard table, and achieved a new British railway speed record when on 10 August
    9.50
    4 votes
    10
    GNR Class J13

    GNR Class J13

    The Great Northern Railway (GNR) Class J13, classified J52 by the LNER is a class of 0-6-0ST steam locomotive intended primarily for shunting. The Class J13 were introduced in 1897 designed by Henry Ivatt based on the earlier domeless GNR Class J14 (LNER Class J53). Eighty-five J13s were built up to 1909. Several J14s were rebuilt as J13s from 1922. Some locomotives were fitted with condensing apparatus for working on the Metropolitan Railway. Condensing apparatus was added to, or removed from, locomotives when they were allocated to, or away from, the London area. The LNER reclassified the J13 as J52. They also introduced two subclasses, J52/1 for the rebuilt engines and J52/2 for the originals. Forty-eight J52/1s and 85 J52/2s passed to British Railways in 1948 and they were numbered 68757–68889. One, 8846 was privately preserved by Captain. Bill Smith in 1959 and became the first locomotive to be privately preserved from BR. In 1980 it was donated to the National Railway Museum and made regular visits to other preserved railways and museums on its two Boiler Ticket durations in preservation.
    8.20
    5 votes
    11
    EMD F9

    EMD F9

    The EMD F9 was a 1,750 horsepower (1,300 kW) Diesel-electric locomotive produced between February 1953 and May 1960 by the Electro-Motive Division of General Motors (EMD) and General Motors Diesel (GMD). It succeeded the F7 model in GM-EMD's F-unit sequence. Final assembly was at GM-EMD's La Grange, Illinois plant. The F9 was also built in Canada by General Motors Diesel at their London, Ontario plant. A total of 100 cab-equipped lead A units and 154 cabless booster B units were built. The F9 was the fifth model in GM-EMD's highly successful "F" series of cab unit diesel locomotives. A F9 can be distinguished reliably from a late F7 only by the addition of an extra filter grille ahead of the front porthole on the side panels on A units. Internally, the use of an 567C prime mover increased power to 1,750 hp from the F7's 1,500 hp. By the time cab units such as the F9 were built, railroads were turning to the road switcher-style of locomotive, and the F9 was succeeded in most part by the EMD GP9.
    6.14
    7 votes
    12
    SNCF Class CC 72100

    SNCF Class CC 72100

    • Built by: Alstom
    The SNCF Class CC 72100 is a class of C-C diesel locomotives rebuilt from CC 72000 locomotives during 2002–2004. 30 locomotives were converted: 21, 30, 37–41, 43, 45, 47, 48, 51, 56–60, 63, 66, 68, 72, 75–80, 82, 86, 89–90. They find use on the Paris - Mulhouse line and are based at Chalindrey.
    6.14
    7 votes
    13
    British Rail Class 81

    British Rail Class 81

    The British Rail Class 81 is an AC electric locomotive that formerly operated on the West Coast Main Line of the London Midland Region of British Rail. Originally designated AL1, it was the first type of AC electric locomotive to be delivered to British Railways. As part of the modernization of the West Coast Main Line which included electrification, 100 locomotives of five types were acquired, each type from a different manufacturer. The first locomotives to be delivered were of type AL1 designed by British Thomson-Houston (BTH), an order being placed for 25 examples. Of these, 23 were for use on passenger trains with a top speed on 100 mph and were designated Type A. The two remaining locomotives were to be for use on freight trains with a top speed of 80 mph, and were designated Type B. Before the work was completed, BTH amalgamated with Metropolitan Vickers to form AEI (Associated Electrical Industries) traction division, and it was under this name that the locomotives were built in 1959 under subcontract by Birmingham Railway Carriage & Wagon in Smethwick. The first engine, number E3001, was handed over to British Railways on November 27, 1959. The type was initially used for
    7.00
    6 votes
    14
    SNCF Class X 73500

    SNCF Class X 73500

    The X73500 is a Diesel Multiple Unit (DMU) train type operated by the SNCF in France. They were built from 1999 to 2004 by Alsthom DDF. The trains are single railcars, and have been nicknamed Blue Whales (Baleines bleues) Cucumbers (Concombres) or Sausages (Saucisses). The units were ordered joint with Deutsche Bahn, with their Class 641 units. The trains have modern features which were new to TER trains, such as: The trains can work in multiple of up to 3 sets. X73813 - X7318 are former CFL (Luxembourg) units 2101 - 2106 and operate in the Alsace region. SNCF Class X 73900 is an identical version of the X 73500, but can also operate into Germany. The units are used on rural, unelectrified railway lines in France and are operated by all TER regions except Île-de-France, Corsica and Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur. They operate the following services: This list does not include all services.
    7.00
    6 votes
    15
    British Rail Class 87

    British Rail Class 87

    • Built by: BREL
    The British Rail Class 87 is a type of electric locomotive built from 1973-75 by British Rail Engineering Limited (BREL). 36 of these locomotives were built to work passenger services over the West Coast Main Line (WCML). They were the flagships of British Rail's electric locomotive fleet until the late 1980s, when the Class 90s started to come on stream. The privatisation of British Rail saw all but one of the fleet transferred to Virgin Trains they continued their duties until the advent of the new Pendolino trains, when they were transferred to other operators or withdrawn. There is only one Class 87 still in use in Britain, and that is 87002, owned by the AC Locomotive Group but is solely used alongside 86101 for the occasional charter train. A large proportion of the fleet have now been exported to Bulgaria. A requirement for more electric locomotives came about after the electrification of the WCML was extended from Weaver Junction north of Crewe to Preston, Carlisle and Glasgow. Initially, three Class 86 locomotives were used as test-beds to trial equipment (mainly electrical equipment and suspension) that would be used in the new locomotives; effectively, these locomotives
    8.00
    5 votes
    16
    Rhaetian Railway Ge 4/4 I

    Rhaetian Railway Ge 4/4 I

    The Rhaetian Railway Ge 4/4  is a class of metre gauge Bo-Bo electric locomotives operated by the Rhaetian Railway (RhB), which is the main railway network in the Canton of Graubünden, Switzerland. The class is so named because it was the first class of locomotives of the Swiss locomotive and railcar classification type Ge 4/4 to be acquired by the Rhaetian Railway. According to that type designation, Ge 4/4 denotes a narrow gauge electric adhesion locomotive with a total of four axles, all of which are drive axles. The 10 machines in the Ge 4/4  class were also the first RhB electric locomotives without rod drive. In 1944, the Rhaetian Railway ordered four Ge 4/4  class locomotives from the Swiss Locomotive and Machine Works (SLM). The first of these machines was commissioned in July 1947. In service primarily in the haulage of fast trains, they proved themselves so well that in 1953 the Rhaetian Railway ordered six further examples. The later entry into service of the Ge 6/6  and the Ge 4/4  class locomotives led to the cascading of the Ge 4/4  class into lesser responsibilities. Between 1986 and 1991, the Ge 4/4  class was completely modernised. For example, the old cab fronts
    7.80
    5 votes
    17
    British Rail Class 15

    British Rail Class 15

    The British Rail Class 15 diesel locomotives, also known as the BTH Type 1, were designed by British Thomson-Houston, and built by the Yorkshire Engine Company and the Clayton Equipment Company, between 1957 and 1961. Following the British Railways Modernisation Plan, ten of the class were ordered for evaluation under the 'pilot scheme'. Like other locomotives designed to the 'Type 1' specification, they were intended for use on local freight and empty coaching stock trains. The design and manufacture was a collaboration between several companies. BTH (the main contractor) provided electrical equipment, Paxman supplied the power units, and Clayton supplied bogies and superstructure, with the frame construction and final assembly taking place at Yorkshire Engine's Sheffield works. These ten locomotives, numbered D8200–D8209, entered service between November 1957 and November 1958. The design showed sufficient promise for a repeat order for 34 more locomotives to be placed soon afterwards. These locomotives, numbered D8210–D8243 and built by Clayton at Hatton, Derbyshire, were delivered between October 1959 and February 1961. The first ten locomotives were delivered to the London
    6.67
    6 votes
    18
    British Rail Class 91

    British Rail Class 91

    • Built by: BREL
    The British Rail Class 91 is a class of 140 mph (225 km/h), 6,300 hp (4,700 kW) electric locomotives ordered as a component of the East Coast Main Line modernisation and electrification programme of the late 1980s. The Class 91s were given the auxiliary name of InterCity 225 to indicate their envisaged top speed of 225 km/h (140 mph). The other end of the InterCity 225 train set is formed of a Driving Van Trailer, built with a similar body shell to the Class 91 locomotives. The locomotive body shells are of all-steel construction. Unusually, the motors are body mounted and drive bogie mounted gearboxes via cardan shafts. This reduces the unsprung mass and hence track wear at high speeds. The locomotive also features an under-slung transformer so that the body is relatively empty compared to contemporary electric locomotives. Much of the engineering was derived from the research and operational experience of the APT-P. In 1985, ASEA, Brush and GEC tendered for the design and construction of the Class 91s. GEC subsequently won the bid and the fleet was built by sub-contractors BREL in Crewe between 1988 and 1991. The Class 91s began passenger service on 3 March 1989 when 91001 worked
    10.00
    3 votes
    19
    British Rail Class 37

    British Rail Class 37

    • Locomotives of this class: British Rail Class 37, 37427
    • Built by: English Electric
    The British Rail Class 37 is a diesel-electric locomotive. Also known as the English Electric Type 3, the Class was ordered as part of the British Rail modernisation plan. The Class 37 became a familiar sight on many parts of the British Rail network, in particular forming the main motive power for Inter-City services in East Anglia and within Scotland. They also performed well on secondary and inter-regional services for many years. The Class 37s are known to some railway enthusiasts as "Tractors", a nickname due to the agricultural sound of the diesel engine of the locomotive. As part of the large scale dieselisation brought about by the British Rail modernisation plan a need was identified for a number of type 3 locomotives of power output 1,500 hp (1,100 kW) to 1,999 hp (1,491 kW). English Electric had already been successful with orders for type 1 and type 4 diesels, and had produced locomotives of similar power to that which was required for railways in East Africa. A design based on the exported locomotives was put forward and accepted. The design was for a general purpose locomotive and initially found service in British Rail's Eastern Region. There was no prototype.
    6.50
    6 votes
    20
    British Rail Class 483

    British Rail Class 483

    The British Rail Class 483 electrical multiple units were originally built as 1938 tube stock units for London Underground. They were extensively refurbished between 1989 and 1992 by Eastleigh Works, for use on services on the Isle of Wight's Island Line. This was despite having already worked for nearly fifty years on the London Underground. The units replaced the even older and life-expired Class 485 and Class 486 units, which were introduced in 1967, but were originally built as 'Standard' stock units for the London Electric Railway in 1923. As of 2012, most Class 483 units are now 74 years old, making them the oldest trains in Great Britain to still be in service, though South West Trains is not looking to replace them on Island Line services. The trains were originally built by Metro-Cammell as 1938 tube stock for London Underground. An initial batch was withdrawn from service in 1973, and they were considered for use on the Island Line (which would not bear that name for another 16 years). However, the under-floor equipment was thought to be a problem, as extensive adaptations would be needed to Ryde Works to allow fitters to access it. It was also felt that the under-floor
    6.50
    6 votes
    21
    British Rail Class 07

    British Rail Class 07

    The British Rail Class 07 diesel locomotive is an off-centre cab dock shunter used in Southampton Docks, to replace SR USA Class steam locomotives. It is a 0-6-0 diesel-electric shunter built by Ruston & Hornsby in 1962. They were originally numbered D2985-D2998 and later given the TOPS numbers 07001(D2985)-07013(D2997), D2998. This class was notorious for having the axleboxes run hot when travelling at high speed. This was initially encountered during delivery of the first locomotive, and subsequent deliveries were made by road. A later trial move of one Class 07 to Selhurst depot for tyre profiling also resulted in overheating axlebox problems and all subsequent moves of any distance, particularly those to BREL workshops, were made by road. This is in contrast to other shunter classes that would commonly have had their side-rods removed and traction motors isolated and would then form part of a train heading in the appropriate direction. Class 08s were commonly moved in this fashion at up to 35 mph (56 km/h) – overnight wagon-load trains being utilised if possible. For operation at Southampton Docks the Class was based in the former steam shed in the Old Docks near the River
    8.50
    4 votes
    22
    British Rail Class ES1

    British Rail Class ES1

    British Rail Class ES1 (Electric Shunting 1) was a class of two electric locomotives commissioned by the North Eastern Railway in 1902. They were of steeplecab design. Both locomotives passed to the London and North Eastern Railway in 1923 and then to British Railways in 1948, but both were withdrawn before TOPS. The North Eastern Railway was an enthusiastic and relatively early adopter of electric traction for railways. As part of a 1902 scheme to electrify the suburban railway networks in the Tyneside area, the NER's Chief Mechanical Engineer, Wilson Worsdell, also wished to electrify a 3/4 mile, horseshoe-shaped freight line that went from Trafalgar Yard in Manors to Newcastle Quayside Yard. Passing through three tunnels, this line had gradients as steep as 1:27 and a number of sharp curves: it presented a formidable challenge for steam traction. Working conditions inside the tunnels were atrocious because the locomotives had to work exceptionally hard to manage the gradients which meant they produced vast quantities of choking fumes that could not disperse from the tunnels; the sparks they produced were a constant fire risk to the flammable packing materials in the yards.
    8.50
    4 votes
    23
    British Rail Class 82

    British Rail Class 82

    The British Rail Class 82 electric locomotives were built by Beyer, Peacock and Company between 1960 and 1962 as part of the West Coast Main Line electrification. Ten locomotives were designed by the Metropolitan-Vickers division of AEI (Associated Electrical Industries) and built by Beyer, Peacock and Company at their works in Gorton, Manchester. They were originally classified as AL2 under the pre-TOPS classification scheme and were originally numbered E3046 - E3055. During manufacture it was realised that the locomotives would be heavier than anticipated and some redesign was required to meet the British Transport Commission specification. The design modifications included replacing heavy parts with lighter aluminium or fibreglass parts, replacing heavy electrical equipment with lighter versions. The locomotives always worked on power provided by overhead catenary energized at 25,000 V AC. However, the main transformer, normally operated with the four windings in series, could be operated at 6250V AC with the transformer windings in parallel. This voltage was initially to be used where limited clearances gave concern over use of the higher voltage. The last locomotive built,
    7.20
    5 votes
    24
    British Rail Class D16/2

    British Rail Class D16/2

    British Railways Class D16/2 was a class of prototype diesel locomotive built by BR at Ashford Works and introduced in 1950-1951, with a third example being introduced in 1954. They had been designed by Oliver Bulleid for the Southern Railway before the 1948 nationalisation but did not appear until after nationalisation. The diesel engine and transmission were supplied by the English Electric company but the Bulleid influence was obvious. The box-like body style closely resembled Bulleid's electric locomotives and was quite different from the usual English Electric style, typified by British Rail Class D16/1. Percie Bollen's bogie design and the power train of 10203 were taken almost unmodified for the first ten production D16/1 (Class 40) but with a more traditional English Electric design of body with prominent noses and louvered side panels. The original locomotives, numbered 10201 and 10202, worked services on the Southern Region of British Railways. They were transferred to Camden depot in the London Midland Region in April 1955. Number 10203 was outshopped from Brighton works in March 1954, its modified engine giving a power output of 2,000 hp (1,500 kW). It was trialled on
    7.20
    5 votes
    25
    British Rail Class 378

    British Rail Class 378

    The Class 378 Capitalstar is a type of electric multiple-unit train, part of Bombardier Transportation's Electrostar family. These trains are operating on the new London Overground network. The class is derived from the Class 376 trains used by Southeastern, with the same wider metro-style sliding pocket doors for more efficient boarding and alighting, which are faster and more reliable than plug doors, although they do not provide as much insulation for heating and cooling purposes. However, they also have significant differences from the Class 376, such as fully longitudinal seating similar to that used on London Underground rolling stock to give more standing room, needed for the high-volume metro-style services on London Overground. The units were initially announced as coming in two separate batches. The deal between Bombardier and Transport for London was initially for a total of 152 individual cars costing some £223 million, with deliveries beginning in September 2008, when two trains underwent a 14-week test on the North London Line. The initial contract also contained an option to purchase additional cars up to a total of 216. A newly constructed depot near New Cross Gate
    8.25
    4 votes
    26
    British Rail Class 456

    British Rail Class 456

    The British Rail Class 456 electric multiple-unit trains were built by BREL at York Works from 1990-91. 24 two-car units were built as direct replacements for the elderly Class 416 2EPB units which operated on the Central Division of the Southern Region of British Rail. Units were delivered into traffic painted in Network SouthEast blue, red and white livery. Units were numbered in the range 456001-024. Each unit consisted of two carriages; a driving motor and a driving trailer. The technical description of the unit formation is DMSO+DTSO. Individual carriage numbers were as follows: When first introduced, the units suffered from many technical and reliability problems, which delayed the replacement of the 2EPB units. However, once they settled down the units were used on many services, including London Bridge to London Victoria via Crystal Palace, and London Victoria to Horsham. Before the lines closed in 1997 to allow the building of Tramlink, Class 456 units worked services on the West Croydon to Wimbledon Line. Recently, more Class 456 EMU trains have recently been allocated to Victoria - Epsom via Sutton and West Croydon, especially at peak times, as well as services from
    8.25
    4 votes
    27
    British Rail Class 97/6

    British Rail Class 97/6

    The British Rail Class 97/6 0-6-0 diesel shunting locomotives were purpose-built for departmental duties by Ruston & Hornsby at Lincoln in 1953 (97650) or 1959 (97651-654). There are minor technical differences between 97650 and the 1959 batch. This class of five locomotives is outwardly similar to the Class 04 locomotives built around the same time but, internally, they are quite different. The Class 97/6 is diesel-electric while the Class 04 is diesel-mechanical. The fleet was originally numbered PWM650-654 in the Western Region Permanent Way Machines series, but were renumbered into the Class 97 series between 1979-1981. Locomotives were original painted in BR Green livery, which was later superseded by BR Blue and finally Civil Engineering Yellow liveries. They were employed at various locations, including Reading West (97650/653/654), Gloucester / Cardiff Canton (97651) and Plymouth Laira (97652). A special feature of this class is that the electric traction motor can be disengaged from the wheels. This allows the locomotive to be hauled by another locomotive at speeds above 20 mph. With the privatisation of British Rail these locomotives were largely made redundant. Three
    7.00
    5 votes
    28
    SNCF Class Z 9600

    SNCF Class Z 9600

    The SNCF Class Z 9600 electric multiple units were built by Alsthom between 1984-1987. They are part of the Z2 type of electric multiple units, all similarly styled. The other Z2 classes are Z 7300, Z 7500 and Z 9500. This class operate in the Loire and the Alps. The class wear several liveries. The original livery, shown in the top picture, of Dark Blue with Red fronts. Also the Blue Regional livery and the new TER livery. In this class there are 36 units.
    7.00
    5 votes
    29
    GER Class C53

    GER Class C53

    The GER Class C53 was a class of twelve 0-6-0T steam tram locomotives designed by James Holden for the Great Eastern Railway. They passed to the London and North Eastern Railway at the grouping, and received the LNER classification J70. These locomotives had 12-by-15-inch (305 × 381 mm) outside cylinders driving 3-foot-1-inch (0.940 m) wheels; all enclosed by skirting. They were the first locomotives on the Great Eastern to use Walschaerts valve gear. They were used on the Wisbech and Upwell Tramway and the ports of Great Yarmouth and Ipswich from the 1930s to the 1950s. They replaced earlier GER Class G15 0-4-0 of similar appearance. The first withdrawal was in 1942. The remaining locomotives were renumbered 8216–8226 in 1944. The remaining eleven locomotives passed to British Railways in 1948 on nationalisation, and had 60000 added to their numbers. Withdrawals restarted in 1949, slowly at first, then more quickly, and the last went in 1955. The J70 was the inspiration for the character Toby the Tram Engine in The Railway Series by the Rev. W. Awdry, and the spin-off television series Thomas and Friends.
    8.00
    4 votes
    30
    British Rail Class 308

    British Rail Class 308

    The British Rail (BR) Class 308 alternating current (AC) electric multiple units (EMU) were built by BR at York, in three batches, from 1959–61. They were initially classified as AM8 units before the introduction of TOPS. The first batch of 33 units were built in 1959, numbered 133–165. This was later changed to Class 308/1 under the TOPS system, and units were renumbered 308133–165. These units were built to operate commuter services on the Great Eastern Main Line (GEML) from London Liverpool Street to Shenfield, Witham, Colchester, Walton-on-the-Naze and Clacton. Each unit was formed of four carriages: two outer driving trailers, an intermediate trailer, and a motor coach. Electrically the Class 308 stock has the same equipment as the Class 302 stock with a few modifications, some of these are the types of overload, the use of fan cooled rectifier continued until the rectifiers were modified to 8 diode type from 1982, this modified main rectifier was also modified and used on the Class 309 stock due to the problems of fan cooled types suffering from blocked filters causing failures in traffic. The Braking system is basically the same as the Class 302 stock with the exception of
    6.80
    5 votes
    31
    Rhaetian Railway ABe 4/4 III

    Rhaetian Railway ABe 4/4 III

    The Rhaetian Railway ABe 4/4 is a class of metre gauge electric multiple unit railcars of the Rhaetian Railway (RhB), which is the main railway network in the Canton of Graubünden, Switzerland. The class is so named because it was the third class of railcars of the Swiss locomotive and railcar classification type ABe 4/4 to be acquired by the Rhaetian Railway. According to that classification system, ABe 4/4 denotes an electric railcar with first and second class compartments and a total of four axles, all of which are drive axles. Acquired in 1988 and 1990, the six railcars in the class are numbered 51 to 56. They operate on the 1,000 V DC powered Bernina Railway, where they have helped to cope with increasing traffic. Over the years, they have also displaced the earlier ABe 4/4 class railcars into lower level services. The ABe 4/4 class was manufactured by the Swiss Locomotive and Machine Works (SLM) and ABB in two series, each of three cars. They were the first motive power on the Rhaetian Railway to use frequency changer technology together with AC induction motors. In addition, they were the world's first DC powered railway vehicles with GTO thyristors. Each ABe 4/4 class
    9.00
    3 votes
    32
    British Rail Class 111

    British Rail Class 111

    The Class 111 DMUs were based on Class 101/2s, but with different engines. The only external body difference was on the final batch of cars where a four character headcode box was fitted above the front cab windows, with the destination indicator on top of a reduced height centre window. The first cars built, part of an order for 339 Met-Camm cars, were 4 power/trailer sets for the LMR Manchester area built in early 1957. One of these was equipped with supercharged 230 hp 6-cylinder engines. This was followed by ten 3-car sets comprising DMBS/TSL/DMCL for the NER at Bradford, then a further twenty 3-car sets. One car survives, buffet 59575 currently awaiting restoration after asbestos stripping at the Great Central Railway.
    7.75
    4 votes
    33
    British Rail Class 122

    British Rail Class 122

    The British Rail Class 122 diesel mechanical multiple units were built by Gloucester RC&W in 1958. Twenty single-car driving motor vehicles, called "Bubble Cars", were built, numbered 55000–55019. These were supplemented by nine trailer vehicles, numbered 56291–56299 (some of which were later renumbered into the 54291–54299 block). The Class 122s were built mainly for use on the London Midland Region of British Rail, although some were also used in Scotland. They were used on a variety of lightly used lines, many of which were closed during the Beeching Axe in the 1960s. Routes served included the Stourbridge Town and St Albans Abbey branch lines, as well as local services between Dundee and Arbroath. (The similar Pressed Steel Company built Class 121 single units were used on the Western Region). Three Scottish Region cars (55013–55015) were converted to carry parcels traffic and were reclassified Class 131, though the vehicles themselves were not renumbered. Upon privatisation of Britain's railways, the Class 122 fleet has been withdrawn from normal service. However several units were operated by EWS and Network Rail (previously Railtrack) in departmental service, reclassified as
    7.75
    4 votes
    34
    DB Class V 80

    DB Class V 80

    The Class V 80 is a type of German diesel locomotive operated by the Deutsche Bundesbahn, that was redesignated as Class 280 from 1968. This type of locomotive was the first newly developed diesel locomotive built for main line service by the Deutsche Bundesbahn (DB). Only 10 examples of the class were built at the beginning of the 1950s, but it formed the basis for all subsequent DB designs in this sector. The locomotives were initially distributed to the locomotive depots (Bahnbetriebswerke) at Frankfurt am Main and Bamberg. In Frankfurt/Main they were used on suburban services from Frankfurt/Main Hbf to Bad Homburg v.d.Höhe and to Kronberg and also hauled fast-stopping trains (Eilzüge) between Frankfurt/Main and Cologne. The Bamberg engines were used on Nuremberg’s suburban services and on various branch lines around Bamberg. From 1963 all the locos were gathered together at Bamberg and took over passenger and goods train duties on many branch lines in northern Bavaria. The demise of branch lines in the 1970s meant that the DB could get rid of this small class of just 10 engines between 1976 and 1978, because sufficient locomotives of the comparable Class V 100 were available. A
    7.75
    4 votes
    35
    EMD GP9

    EMD GP9

    An EMD GP9 is a four-axle diesel-electric locomotive built by General Motors' Electro-Motive Division in the United States, and General Motors Diesel in Canada between January, 1954, and August, 1963. US production ended in December, 1959, while an additional thirteen units were built in Canada, including the last two in August, 1963. Power was provided by an EMD 567C sixteen-cylinder engine which generated 1,750 horsepower (1.30 MW). This locomotive type was offered both with and without control cabs; locomotives built without control cabs were called GP9B locomotives. All GP9B locomotives were built in the United States between February, 1954, and December, 1959. A total of 3,441 units of this locomotive model were built for American railroads, with an additional 646 for Canadian railroads and 10 for Mexican railroads. 5 units were built for a railroad in Brazil, 4 units were built for a railroad in Peru and 6 units were built for a railroad in Venezuela. Of the GP9B, 165 examples were built for American railroads. There were 40 GP9M units built that are included in the 3,441 units built for United States railroads. A GP9M was built with parts from another older EMD locomotive,
    7.75
    4 votes
    36
    NCC Class U2

    NCC Class U2

    The Northern Counties Committee (NCC) Class U2 4-4-0 passenger steam locomotives consisted of 18 locomotives built for service in north-east Ireland. Ten of the engines were new builds supplied by the North British Locomotive Company (NBL) or constructed at the NCC's York Road works. The remainder were rebuilds of existing locomotives. Class U2 was numerically the largest class of locomotives on the NCC, only being equalled when the last of the Class WT 2-6-4 tank engines was delivered in 1950. The first of the class was built in 1924 and construction continued over the following thirteen years until the last engine was outshopped in 1937. The Class U2 engines can be divided into four sub classes as follows: The renewals were an accounting device to avoid the capital charges associated with building new engines; it is unlikely that much of the original engines was incorporated into the resulting U2s. The engines were simples, i.e. not compound, with two 19-×-24 in (483-×-610 mm) inside cylinders. Their boilers were rated at 170 pounds per square inch (1.17 MPa) and were fitted with Schmidt superheaters. All eighteen engines, though differing slightly in appearance had, until 1945,
    7.75
    4 votes
    37
    British Rail Class 302

    British Rail Class 302

    The British Rail Class 302 (pre-TOPS AM2) was a type of electric multiple unit (EMU) introduced between 1958 - 1960 for outer suburban passenger services on the London, Tilbury and Southend Railway route. This class of multiple unit was constructed using the Mark 1 bodyshell and was slam door. Each unit was formed of four coaches in the formation BDTS - MBS - TC - DTS. Trailer coaches were originally fitted with Gresley bogies which were replaced on Driving Trailer (DT) and Trailer Standard Open (TSO) which was formerly Composite Trailer and B5 Bogies on Battery Driving Trailer which became Battery Composite Trailer, the refurbishment moved First class accommodation to a position over the Westinghouse CM38 main compressor which was noisy and caused vibration. The Motor Coach retained its Gresley derived bogies after refurbishment. The Battery Driving Trailer and Driving Trailer were fitted with drop head buckeye couplers with screw coupler in the Guards Van, retractable Buffers are also fitted only on outer ends of the Battery Driving Trailer/Driving Trailer. Originally the vehicles were insulated with "Blue" asbestos which was removed and sealed during refurbishments. Unit 302 244
    6.60
    5 votes
    38
    British Rail Class 115

    British Rail Class 115

    The British Rail Class 115 diesel multiple units were 41 high density sets which operated the outer-suburban services from Marylebone usually to destinations such as High Wycombe, Aylesbury and Banbury which are on the Chiltern Main Line and Great Central Main Line (now the London to Aylesbury Line). Sometimes, these sets used to operate 8-12 car long expresses to Nottingham Victoria in the final years of the GCML. Coincidentally, Class 115 units operated services under Table 115 in the British Rail timetable. Based on the basic Derby high density design, the sets are similar to Class 127 but were internally superior as the class had larger windows, better furnishings, lighting and wall surfaces. Some sets were also built for the CLC line between Liverpool and Manchester. These were later transferred to Marylebone. They also worked from Tyseley in the later years. The Marylebone sets, which were later transferred to Bletchley but remained on Chiltern Line duties, were declared surplus after the introduction of Class 165s, from 1991 onwards. While at Bletchley depot the class was also used on the Gospel Oak to Barking Line, units being formed as power twins. They were in turn
    7.50
    4 votes
    39
    British Rail Class 45

    British Rail Class 45

    The British Rail Class 45 also known as the Sulzer Type 4 diesel locomotives were built by British Rail at their Derby and Crewe Works between 1960 and 1962. Along with the similar Class 44 and 46 locomotives they became known as "Peaks". The Class 45s became the main traction on the Midland Main Line from 1962 and their introduction allowed considerable acceleration of the previous steam powered service. The Class 45s remained the main source of power on the Midland Main Line up to 1982 when they were relegated to secondary services following introduction of HSTs on the route. From 1986 Class 45s virtually disappeared from the line. From the early 1980s until their withdrawal c.1988 the class were regular performers on the North Trans-Pennine line working services from Liverpool Lime Street to York, Scarborough or Newcastle via Manchester Victoria, Huddersfield and Leeds. These trains were usually formed of early British Railways Mark 2 carriages of up to seven in a typical train. The engine of the Class 45 was a marine type slow revving diesel, a Sulzer 12LDA28B with a bore of 280 mm and a stroke of 360 mm. This gave 22 litres per cylinder or 264 litres for the whole engine. The
    7.50
    4 votes
    40
    New South Wales C30 class locomotive

    New South Wales C30 class locomotive

    The C30 class was a class of steam locomotive built for and operated by the New South Wales Government Railways of Australia. These 145 4-6-4T wheel arrangement locomotives were specifically designed to handle Sydney's ever increasing suburban traffic, particularly over the extremely heavy grades on the Northern, North Shore and Illawarra lines. The first batch of 35 locomotives was obtained from Beyer, Peacock and Company, being placed in service during 1903–1904. A further 60 engines were added between 1905 and 1917 from Beyer, Peacock and 50 from the New South Wales Government Railways' Workshops at Eveleigh. The electrification of the inner suburban lines resulted in a surplus of the class too valuable to scrap. Accordingly, between 1928 and 1933, 77 of these locomotives were converted to light tender 4-6-0 type locomotives and used to replace obsolete engines that were then operating on lightly built country branch lines. The remaining tank locomotives were mostly employed working Sydney's outer suburban, Newcastle and Wollongong suburban trains on locations such as the Camden, Richmond, and Carlingford Branch Lines, and the non-electrified sections from Campbelltown and
    7.50
    4 votes
    41
    British Rail Class 14

    British Rail Class 14

    The British Rail Class 14 is a type of small diesel-hydraulic locomotive built in the mid-1960s. Twenty-six of these 0-6-0 locomotives were ordered in January 1963, to be built at British Railways Swindon Works. The anticipated work for this class was yard shunting, trip work (between local yards) and short distance freight trains. The order was expanded to 56 in mid-1963, before work had started on the first order. In July 1964, the first of a class of 56 locomotives appeared from Swindon Works. These were later designated as TOPS Class 14 by British Railways. They are known as 'Teddy Bears' by enthusiasts, following a comment by Swindon Works' foreman George Cole who quipped "We've built the Great Bear, now we're going to build a Teddy Bear!". In outline they resembled the Clayton Type 1 (Class 17) locomotives, having a cab which was nearly central with bonnets at each end, but with a fixed 0-6-0 wheel configuration rather than bogies as seen on all the other Type 1 classes. The locomotives were powered by a Paxman 6-cylinder Ventura 6YJXL engine producing 650bhp (484kW), connected to a Voith L217U hydraulic transmission and Hunslet gearbox. The axles were connected by coupling
    10.00
    2 votes
    42
    British Rail Class 74

    British Rail Class 74

    British Rail Class 74 was an electro-diesel locomotive that operated on the Southern Region of British Railways, rebuilt from redundant Class 71 locomotives in the late 1960s. An electro-diesel locomotive is one that can operate either from an electrical supply, such as overhead catenary or (in this case) an energised third rail, or from an onboard diesel engine. All the locomotives were withdrawn between June 1976 and December 1977; they were scrapped between 1977 and 1981. Twenty-four examples of British Rail Class 71 (pre-TOPS type HA) were built in 1958 at the British Rail works in Doncaster and in 1964 ten were deemed surplus to requirements, withdrawn from service and placed in storage. The Southern Region was highly impressed with the "little-ED" JA & JB/class 73 locomotives and were keen to see a higher power locomotive with the same flexibility. In 1965, discussions were opened with English Electric (builders of the production JB/Class 73) to produce a high powered electro-diesel. Originally a centre-cab locomotive was envisaged similar in concept to the Clayton Class 17 but details on this are scant. This design was not pursued - possibly due to the historical frugality
    10.00
    2 votes
    43
    British Rail Class 104

    British Rail Class 104

    The British Rail Class 104 diesel multiple units were built by Birmingham Railway Carriage and Wagon Company from 1957 to 1959. The first units ordered were for the London Midland Region, with the majority of the class for use in North West of England with sets also in Tyneside (being made redundant by the opening of the Tyne & Wear Metro in 1980). In the mid-1980s a few units reallocated to Scotland, with one unit being repainted in a unique maroon and white livery for services to Oban – it became known as the "Mexican Bean". Other vehicles spent time in London and the last vehicles could be found there in the early 1990s. The class was gradually taken out of service from the early 1980s. The final vehicles were withdrawn in 1995. The Churnet Valley Railway is the main location for Class 104 preservation, with six of the thirteen preserved vehicles based there. The line is geographically appropriate to the Class, being close to Stoke-on-Trent, Macclesfield, and other lines that the Class 104s served for most of their lives. A small restoration team has returned two of the four power cars to service, the set (M50455/M50517) being launched in 2004. Attention has now turned to unique
    7.25
    4 votes
    44
    British Rail Class 150

    British Rail Class 150

    The British Rail Class 150 "Sprinter" diesel multiple-unit trains (DMUs) were built by BREL from 1984 to 1987. A total of 137 units were produced in three main subclasses, replacing many of the earlier first-generation "Heritage" DMUs. At the beginning of the 1980s, British Rail (BR) had a large fleet of ageing "Heritage" DMUs built to many different designs in the late 1950s and early 1960s. Some of the more reliable types were retained and refurbished. BR decided to replace many of the non-standard or unreliable types with new second-generation trains, built to modern standards. Two different types were developed; low-cost "Pacers", built using bus parts and intended for short-distance services; and "Sprinters", based on BR's Mark 3 bodyshell design, for use on longer-distance services. In 1984, BREL built two prototype 3-car Class 150/0 units, numbered 150001 and 150002. 150001 was fitted with Cummins engines and Voith hydraulic transmission, and 150002 was fitted with Perkins (Rolls-Royce) engines and Self-Changing Gears mechanical transmission. The design specifications of the prototypes were similar to the later production units, but they were to remain the only Class 150s
    7.25
    4 votes
    45
    British Rail Class 31

    British Rail Class 31

    The British Rail Class 31 diesel locomotives, also known as the Brush Type 2 and originally as Class 30, were built by Brush Traction from 1957-62. The Class 31 was one of the Pilot Scheme locomotives ordered by British Railways to replace steam traction. They were originally built with Mirrlees JVS12T 1,250 bhp (930 kW) and 1,365 bhp (1,018 kW) engines and Brush electrical equipment, but the engines were not successful and in 1964 a programme of works commenced to re-engine the fleet with the 1,470 bhp (1,100 kW) English Electric 12SVT engines. The locomotives were originally known as Class 30 under TOPS, with re-engined examples joining Class 31. The class was originally intended for service on the Eastern Region, but gradually became common in both the Western and London Midland regions too. Several sub-classes of Class 31 exist: These first 20 locos, originally numbered D5500-D5519, were always easily recognisable as they did not have the headcode box mounted on the roof above the cab, leading to the nickname "Skinheads". They were also nicknamed "Toffee Apples" from the shape of the control key which had to be taken from cab to cab when changing ends. These pilot scheme locos
    7.25
    4 votes
    46
    DB Class V 65

    DB Class V 65

    The DB Class V 65 locomotives (from 1968: Class 265) were German, eight-wheeled, rod-coupled diesel locomotives operated by Deutsche Bundesbahn (DB) intended for light railway services and medium-heavy shunting duties. The 15 locomotives were delivered in 1956 by MaK (Kiel) to the DB. Class V 65/Class 265 engines were delivered to the DB shortly after the arrival in service of the first V 60s. Amongst their special features were the MaK motor with only 750 rpm and the Beugniot lever between the individual axles, that improved curve running. For train heating the engine had a boiler that was heated by the engine's exhaust gases. The engine itsel had to be pre-heated with a Dofa coke oven. For this purpose up to 100 kg of coke could be carried. Although, with only 15 units, the Class V 65 was built in relatively small numbers, it was really only a slight modification of the 600 D built by MaK for private railways. These belonged to the so-called MaK rod-coupled locomotives (MaK-Stangenlokomotiven), that were operated in large numbers by private railways. Their power ranged between 240 PS and 1200 PS. The locomotives were initially deployed in the area of Marburg/Lahn ahead of light
    7.25
    4 votes
    47
    LMS Princess Coronation Class 6233 Duchess of Sutherland

    LMS Princess Coronation Class 6233 Duchess of Sutherland

    London Midland and Scottish Railway (LMS) Princess Coronation Class 6233 Duchess of Sutherland is a preserved steam locomotive. 6233 was outshopped in July 1938 from Crewe Works and was part of the third batch of her class. These were unstreamlined, painted in LMS standard crimson lake livery and had a single chimney and no smoke deflectors and an estimated cost of £13,800 each. 6233 was initially allocated to Camden, London. She acquired a double chimney in March 1941 and because of drifting smoke acquired smoke deflectors in September 1945 before being painted in postwar LMS black livery in September 1946. With the creation of British Railways on 1 January 1948 she was allocated to Crewe North depot. She was given her BR number 46233 in October 1948 and repainted in BR Brunswick green livery in 1952 or early 1953. In June 1958 she was allocated to Carlisle Upperby before eventually being withdrawn from Edge Hill depot in February 1964. During her 25 years service she ran 1,650,000 miles - the second highest mileage by any member of her class. Following her withdrawal from service she was acquired by Butlins Heads-of-Ayr holiday camp, Scotland in October 1964. Later moved to
    7.25
    4 votes
    48
    Rhaetian Railway Ge 2/2

    Rhaetian Railway Ge 2/2

    The Rhaetian Railway Ge 2/2 is a class of small metre gauge 1 kV DC electric locomotives operated by the Rhaetian Railway (RhB), which is the main railway network in the Canton of Graubünden, Switzerland. The class is so named under the Swiss locomotive and railcar classification system. According to that system, Ge 2/2 denotes a narrow gauge electric adhesion locomotive with a total of two axles, both of which are drive axles. There are only two locomotives in the class, and they are numbered 161 and 162. Both direct current locomotives were procured by the Berninabahn (BB) in 1911 for piloting duties. The then still brown liveried machines were given the numbers Ge 2/2 61 and 62, and were equipped with Lyra pantographs. After the Rhaetian Railway takeover of the BB, they were given the new numbers they still bear. Today, they work mainly as shunting locomotives in Poschiavo. On the Appenzeller Bahnen (AB), there is another locomotive, Te 49, that is of similar appearance, and dates from 1912. Between 1955 and 1975, it operated as Ge 2/2 49. This article is based upon a translation of the German language version as at January 2010.
    7.25
    4 votes
    49
    British Rail Class 26

    British Rail Class 26

    The British Rail Class 26 diesel locomotives, also known as the BRCW Type 2, were built by the Birmingham Railway Carriage & Wagon Company (BRCW) at Smethwick in 1958-59. Forty seven examples were built, and the last were withdrawn from service in 1993. Like their higher-powered sisters, the BRCW Classes 27 and 33, they had all-steel bodies and cab ends with fibreglass cab roofs. The BR Modernisation Plan contained a large requirement for small diesel locomotives in the 800 hp (600 kW) - 1,250 hp (930 kW) range and under BR's 'Pilot Scheme', small batches of locomotives were ordered from numerous different manufacturers for evaluation. BRCW obtained an order for 20 mixed traffic diesel-electric locomotives powered by 1,160 hp (870 kW) Sulzer 6LDA28 engines. The Birmingham Railway Carriage and Wagon Company was a rolling stock manufacturer, although they were building diesel multiple units for BR. The first standalone locomotives made by the company were produced in 1956-57 BRCW : 12 diesel locomotives for the Irish railways Córas Iompair Éireann (CIE 101 Class), the order going to BRCW due to capacity problems at CIÉ's own Inchicore Works; a partnership was established between BRCW
    8.33
    3 votes
    50
    British Rail Class 29

    British Rail Class 29

    The British Rail Class 29 were a class of 20 diesel-electric Bo'Bo' locomotives produced by the re-engining of the British Rail Class 21 units. The units were designed for both passenger and freight trains. The outwardly similar Class 22 shared no mechanical parts with the 29s. The machines were produced from 1963 onwards from the North British Class 21 by replacing the original unreliable licence-built MAN of the Class 21s with Paxman Ventura V12 engine at Paxman's Colchester works. The first unit to be re-engined was D6123, a further 19 machines were re-engined in 1964-1965 at Polmadie, along with other modifications including the fitting of four-character headcode displays in the nose ends. After rebuilding, they returned to service from Eastfield depot in Glasgow. Although these offered more power and much improved reliability over the original Class 21s, they did not survive much longer, due to their small class size and the use of a non-standard high-speed diesel engine. D6108 was withdrawn in May 1969 and scrapped by McWilliams of Shettleston in 1971, while the other 19 were withdrawn between April and December 1971 and scrapped at BR's Glasgow Works in 1971-72. No Class 21,
    8.33
    3 votes
    51
    British Rail Class 421

    British Rail Class 421

    The British Rail Class 421 (or 4Cig) electrical multiple units were built at BR York Works between 1964 and 1972. Units were built in two batches, and were initially introduced on services on the Brighton Main Line. Later units were introduced on services to Portsmouth. These units replaced older Southern Railway-designed units, such as the 5Bel "Brighton Belle" units, and 4Cor units. Towards the end of their life, with the increasing use of newer trains which were equipped with sliding or plug doors, these trains were known commonly as "slam door trains". The fleet's lifespan was 46 years. The standard units contained only passenger accommodation, and formed the bulk of the fleet. They were unusual in that all four traction motors were mounted on one non-driving motor coach. Units consisted of two driving trailers, sandwiching the non-driving motor coach and an intermediate trailer. Units were built in two batches. 'Phase 1' units were built from 1963 to 1966 for the Brighton Line, and were numbered 7301-7336. These were followed in 1970-72 by the 'Phase 2' units, built primarily for the Portsmouth line, numbered 7337-7438. The 4Big units were similar to the standard units, but
    8.33
    3 votes
    52
    British Rail Class D20/2

    British Rail Class D20/2

    The British Railways Class 41 diesel-hydraulic locomotives were built by the North British Locomotive Company in Glasgow during 1957 and 1958. Although they were withdrawn before TOPS was introduced, British Rail classified them as Class 41. All were named after Royal Navy vessels, hence the nameplates each bore a subtitle "Warship Class". The fleet was ordered by the British Transport Commission as direct comparison with British Rail Class 40, and were not actually wanted by the Western Region, who preferred their production fleet of D800 Warships. The D600s were the result of power politics within the BTC and the WR: the former was unwilling to sanction radical, stressed-skin lightweight construction locomotives at the time, while the latter was equally insistent that at least some of the new Type 4 power range locomotives on order be equipped with hydraulic transmission. They were much heavier than production Warships (almost 120 tons compared to 80 tons) and can be regarded as standard 1950s British design diesel locomotives that just happened to contain two lightweight, high-revving diesel engines coupled to hydraulic transmissions rather than one large, slow-revving diesel
    6.20
    5 votes
    53
    British Rail Class 486

    British Rail Class 486

    The British Rail Class 486 (or 3Tis) electrical multiple units were originally built for the London Electric Railway from 1923-31 as their 'Standard' tube stock. They were purchased by British Rail in 1967 and transported to the Isle of Wight to work 'mainline' services on the newly electrified Ryde to Shanklin line. At the time the units had already worked for over forty years on the London Underground, but their introduction allowed the final steam locomotives on the line to be withdrawn. Six three-car sets were refurbished by BR's Stewarts Lane depot in 1966-67. The units were initially classified Class 451 and numbered 031-036, later reclassified Class 486 and numbered 486031-036. A spare driving motor car was also refurbished, given the unit number 486037. Each unit was formed of a driving motor, an intermediate trailer, and a driving trailer. Thus, the formation was DMBSO+TSO+DTSO. When introduced, the units carried all-over BR blue livery. This progressed to standard blue/grey livery in the 1970s, and finally some units received Network SouthEast's blue livery with red and white stripes, following its introduction in 1986. Electric services on the Isle of Wight commenced on
    9.50
    2 votes
    54
    GWR 1101 Class

    GWR 1101 Class

    The GWR 1101 Class was a class of 0-4-0T side tank steam locomotives built by the Avonside Engine Company to the order of the Great Western Railway in 1926 for dock shunting. They passed into British Railways ownership in 1948 and were numbered 1101–1106. All were withdrawn in 1959–1960 and none is preserved.
    9.50
    2 votes
    55
    LMS Princess Coronation Class 6229 Duchess of Hamilton

    LMS Princess Coronation Class 6229 Duchess of Hamilton

    London Midland and Scottish Railway (LMS) Princess Coronation Class 6229 (British Railways number 46229) Duchess of Hamilton is a preserved steam locomotive. 6229 was built in 1938 at Crewe as the tenth member of its class and the last in the second batch of five red streamliners, complete with gold speed cheat stripes (the original five 6220-4 having been given a unique Caledonian blue livery with silver stripes). In 1939 no. 6229 swapped identities with the first of the class 6220 Coronation and was sent to North America with a specially-constructed Coronation Scot train to appear at the 1939 New York World's Fair. There was therefore for a while a blue 6229 Duchess of Hamilton in the UK and a red 6220 Coronation in the USA. R.A. Riddles drove for most of the tour, owing to the illness of the assigned driver. The locomotive (though not its carriages) was shipped back from the States in 1942 after the outbreak of the Second World War, and the identities of the locomotives were swapped back in 1943. 6229 was painted wartime black livery in November 1944. Her streamlined casing was removed for maintenance-efficiency reasons in December 1947 and she was then given the LMS 1946 black
    9.50
    2 votes
    56
    British Rail Class 44

    British Rail Class 44

    The British Rail Class 44 or Sulzer Type 4 diesel locomotives were built by British Railways' Derby Works between 1959 to 1960. They were named after British mountains, and consequently nicknamed Peaks. In part inspired by LMS prototypes 10000 and 10001, and by Southern Railway 10201-10203, the Class 44 diesels were some of the first big diesels commissioned for the British Rail modernisation project and were the precursors to the Class 45 and Class 46 locomotives of similar design. A Sulzer 12LDA28-A diesel engine drove a Crompton Parkinson GC426-A1 main generator which supplied power to six Crompton Parkinson C171-B1 traction motors. When initially put into service the locomotives were fitted with multi-unit working and steam heating boilers for passenger service. They worked regularly over the West Coast Main Line for a couple of years, also between St.Pancras and Manchester. Once the Class 45 units were available the steam heating boilers were removed and the Class 44 locomotives were assigned to freight duties, largely in the East Midlands where they were all based at Toton, where they stayed until 1980. One Class 44 appeared in Rev. W. Awdry's book Enterprising Engines, as
    7.00
    4 votes
    57
    British Rail Class 71

    British Rail Class 71

    The British Rail Class 71 was an electric locomotive used on the Southern Region of British Railways, unlike most other Southern Region electric locomotives (such as classes 73 and 74) they could not operate away from the electrified (750 V DC third rail) system. As part of the BTC Modernisation Plan of 1955, twenty-four electric locomotives were built in 1958 for the Kent Coast main lines. They were built at the British Rail workshops in Doncaster. Numbers were originally E5000 - E5023 but the first locomotive, E5000, was renumbered E5024. They were classified type HA under the pre-TOPS scheme. Power collection was from a 3rd rail at 650 volts DC (Eastern & Central sections) or 750 volts DC (Western section) and control was by flywheel booster, as in British Rail Class 70. In some yards (notably Hither Green, South East London and Snowdown colliery near Dover) overhead catenary energized to 650 V DC was used. This overhead collection method was only employed where it was deemed too dangerous to have third rail with staff constantly at ground level reaching into low running areas to couple and uncouple trains. The overhead system utilised tram-style catenary and pantographs - it
    8.00
    3 votes
    58
    K-27

    K-27

    The D&RGW K-27 class are 3 foot narrow gauge, Mikado type, 2-8-2 steam railway locomotives built for the Denver and Rio Grande Railroad by the Baldwin Locomotive Works in 1903. They eventually became known by the nickname "Mudhens". Fifteen locomotives were built, originally class 125, reclassified K-27 in 1924 when the Denver and Rio Grande became the Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad. The K-27s were built as Vauclain compounds, with two cylinders on each side, expanding the steam once in the smaller cylinder and then a second time in the larger one. The extra maintenance costs of the two cylinders were greater than the fuel saving, so they were converted to simple expansion in 1907–1909. They were Rio Grande's last purchase of compound locomotives. They were built with their main structural frames outside the driving wheels, with the counterweights and rods attached outside the frames. They had one peculiarity which arose from their outside frames and counterweights. In places where the D&RG's standard gauge system met the narrow gauge system, the railroad operated dual gauge trackage, with three rails, so that standard gauge equipment ran on the outer two rails and three
    8.00
    3 votes
    59
    EMD FP9

    EMD FP9

    The EMD FP9 was a 1,750 horsepower (1,300 kW), B-B dual-service passenger and freight-hauling diesel locomotive produced between February 1954 and December 1959 by General Motors Electro-Motive Division, and General Motors Diesel. Final assembly was at GM-EMD's La Grange, Illinois plant, except for Canadian orders, which were assembled by Canadian subsidiary GMD at London, Ontario. The FP9 was essentially EMD's F9 locomotive extended by four feet to give greater steam generator and water capacity for hauling passenger trains. A total of 90 cab-equipped lead A units were built; unlike the freight series, no cabless booster B units were sold. Regular F9B units were sometimes used with FP9 A units, since they, lacking cabs, had more room for water and steam generators. The FP9 and its predecessor, the FP7, were offshoots of GM-EMD's highly successful F-unit series of cab unit diesel locomotives. Just as in the previous FP7, the FP9's carbody is essentially the F9's with 4 feet (1.2 m) extra added a little behind the cab, just aft of the forward truck. Unlike the FP7, the forward porthole window is relocated so that it is better balanced in the space, but there is still more room
    7.67
    3 votes
    60
    GWR 5205 Class

    GWR 5205 Class

    The Great Western Railway (GWR) 5205 Class is a class of 2-8-0T steam locomotives. They were designed for short-haul coal trips from coal mines to ports in South Wales. The '42XX' Class of locomotives were introduced by the Great Western Railway in 1910 to work heavy freight trains in the coalfields of South Wales. They were strong, powerful engines capable of moving very heavy loads. The original locomotives designed by G. J. Churchward were supplemented in 1923 by slightly more powerful locomotives of the same type known as the '5205' Class. They were based on the earlier 4200 Class. Three examples of the class have been preserved:
    7.67
    3 votes
    61
    Indian locomotive class WDM-2

    Indian locomotive class WDM-2

    The class WDM-2 is Indian Railways' workhorse diesel locomotive. The first units were imported fully built from the American Locomotive Company (Alco) in 1962. Since 1964, it has been manufactured in India by the Diesel Locomotive Works (DLW), Varanasi. The model name stands for broad gauge (W), diesel (D), mixed traffic (M) engine. The WDM-2 is the most common diesel locomotive of Indian Railways. The WDM-2A is a variant of the original WDM-2. These units have been retro-fitted with air brakes, in addition to the original vacuum brakes. The WDM-2B is a more recent locomotive, built with air brakes as original equipment. The WDM-2 locos have a maximum speed of 120 km/h (75 mph), restricted to 100 km/h (62 mph) when run long hood forward - the gear ratio is 65:18. In the early 1960s Indian Railways began conversion of its mainline from steam to diesel locomotives. For this conversion General Motors Electro-Motive Division (EMD) and the American Locomotive Company (ALCO) were asked to submit designs for new diesel locomotives. Each company submitted prototypes. Indian Railways designated these prototypes the WDM-4 class and the WDM-2 class respectively. Technologically the General
    7.67
    3 votes
    62
    British Rail Class 127

    British Rail Class 127

    The British Rail Class 127 diesel multiple units were built by BR Derby in 1959. Thirty 4-car units were built, formed of two outer driving motor vehicles, sandwiching two intermediate trailers which were classified class 186. The technical description of such as 4-car unit was DMBS + TSL + TS + DMBS. Vehicles were numbered as follows: The units were almost exclusively used on London St. Pancras to Bedford commuter services, which earned the class the nickname "Bed-Pan" units. The class was maintained at a new purpose-built depot at Cricklewood. Unlike other "Heritage" DMU units, the class 127 units had hydraulic transmission (as opposed to the more standard mechanical transmission). The gear selector in the driver's cab had a "D" position where "4" would be on other standard transmission units. As built, these units were coded Blue Square, and were therefore able to work with mechanical transmission units, provided the driver remembered to use 1,2,3,D instead of just selecting D. This was changed to a unique code of Red Triangle when a driver forgot he had a mechanical transmission unit on the rear of his train, which meant this unit was driven only in fourth gear, which burnt out
    10.00
    1 votes
    63
    British Rail Class 46

    British Rail Class 46

    The British Rail Class 46 is a class of diesel locomotive. They were built from 1961-1963 at British Railways' Derby Works and were initially numbered D138-D193. With the arrival of TOPS they were renumbered to Class 46. Fifty-six locomotives were built. The first was withdrawn in 1977 and all of them were withdrawn by 1984. The Class 46 design was structurally the same as the preceding Class 45 build, and had the same Sulzer engine, but differed in the fitment of a Brush generator and traction motors, in place of the Crompton Parkinson equipment fitted to the Class 45. Along with the other Sulzer class 44 and 45 designs they are often referred to as "Peaks", so named because the earliest of the Class 44 were named after mountains. Despite intermittent use on freight trains, Class 46s were regular performers on passenger turns, particularly North East-South West, Trans-Pennine and secondary North East-London trains, and depot allocations reflected this with locos at Gateshead, Cardiff and Plymouth in 1977 giving a typical spread. Freight workings were also quite often worked over long distances, particularly "clay hoods" carrying china clay from Cornwall to the area around
    10.00
    1 votes
    64
    British Rail Class 950

    British Rail Class 950

    The British Rail Class 950 is a diesel multiple unit that was purpose-built for departmental use as a track assessment unit. It was built in 1987 using the same bodyshell as the Class 150/1 "Sprinter" units that were built from 1985-1986. It was originally classified as a Class 180 test unit, but since this designation is now used by the new First Great Western "Adelante" units, it has been reclassified into the departmental series. The unit is formed of two driving motor vehicles. The unit is currently painted in a plain overall yellow livery with Network Rail branding. It mostly works on lines also used by Sprinters and Pacers where the track quality is not good enough for larger and heavier track assessment stock. It is able to operate over most railway lines around Great Britain.
    10.00
    1 votes
    65
    British Rail Class 98

    British Rail Class 98

    TOPS Class 98 has been used to cover all steam locomotives used on the mainline in Britain, but also has a particular usage for the three Vale of Rheidol Railway-design 2-6-2T locomotives that remained in the ownership of British Rail (BR) after the end of mainline steam traction in August 1968. The locomotives on the Vale of Rheidol Railway were the only steam locomotives ever officially to carry the British Rail corporate blue and the double arrow logo. The number 98010 was assigned to an 0-6-0 Diesel-hydraulic locomotive acquired by BR in 1987. This locomotive also worked the Vale of Rheidol and was sold along with the steam locomotives. 98010 was built by the Brecon Mountain Railway, using parts supplied by Baguley-Drewry. These three steam locomotives, numbered 7-9 by the Great Western Railway and British Railways, were the only ones to survive in BR's ownership after the end of mainline steam traction in August 1968. Under TOPS they were allocated Class 98 and were nominally numbered 98007-98009, but these numbers were never actually carried on the locomotives. The Class 98 series has also been used for privately-owned steam locomotives registered to run on the mainline since
    10.00
    1 votes
    66
    GWR 7200 Class

    GWR 7200 Class

    The Great Western Railway (GWR) 7200 Class is a class of 2-8-2T steam locomotive. These engines are the holders of several records: they were the first engines with a 2-8-2T wheel arrangement built in Britain, the only 2-8-2Ts to be built in Britain, and were the largest tank engines to run on the Great Western Railway. Originally the 4200 class and 5205 class 2-8-0T were introduced for short-haul Welsh coal traffic, but the Stock Market Crash of 1929 saw coal traffic dramatically fall. Built specifically for the short runs of heavy trains in the South Wales Coalfield, Collett took the agreed decision to rebuild some of them with an extended coal carrying capacity by adding 4 feet (1.2 m) to the frames, allowing the addition of a trailing wheel set, making them 2-8-2T. With the work carried out at Swindon Works, the first to be converted was 5275, which returned to traffic numbered 7200 in August 1934. Nos. 5276–94 were similarly rebuilt between August and November 1934, becoming 7201–19, and nos. 7220–39 were rebuilt from 5255–74 between August 1935 and February 1936; with both batches, the rebuilding was not in numerical order, but the new numbers were in the same sequence as the
    10.00
    1 votes
    67
    LNER Class J38

    LNER Class J38

    The London and North Eastern Railway Class J38 was a class of steam locomotive designed for freight work. They were designed by Nigel Gresley and introduced in 1926. A total of 35 were built and they were used in Scotland. All passed into British Railways ownership in 1948 and they were numbered 65900-65934. The J39 was a later development, exchanging the J38's 4'8" driving wheels with larger 5'2", 289 J39s being built. Some of the J38s were later rebuilt with J39 boilers. All J38s were withdrawn between 1962 and 1967, with none surviving the cutter's torch. There are plans to build a replica of an LNER J38, along with a J39, for preservation in a few years to come. Ian Allan ABC of British Railways Locomotives, 1962 edition
    10.00
    1 votes
    68
    LNER Class U1

    LNER Class U1

    The London and North Eastern Railway Class U1 was a solitary 2-8-0+0-8-2 Beyer-Garratt locomotive designed for banking coal trains over the Worsborough Bank, a steeply graded line in South Yorkshire and part of the Woodhead Route. It was both the longest and the most powerful steam locomotive ever to run in Britain. It was built in 1925 with the motion at each end being based on an existing 2-8-0 design. The original number was 2395, and it was renumbered 9999 in March 1946, and then 69999 after nationalisation in 1948, although it retained its cab-side plate bearing its original number throughout its life. The locomotive ran for some time as an oil burner, and was tried out on the Lickey Incline in 1949–1950 and again, after the electrification of its home line, in 1955. These trials were unsuccessful, and so the locomotive was withdrawn in 1955 and scrapped. The Worsborough bank, sometimes referred to as the Worsborough Incline, was a steep bank on the Great Central Railway (GCR) freight line from Wath to Penistone, climbing for 3 miles (4.8 km) at a gradient of 1 in 40. The main traffic on the line was loaded trains carrying coal from the South Yorkshire coalfields to
    10.00
    1 votes
    69
    Mark VII monorail

    Mark VII monorail

    • Locomotives of this class: Mark VII monorail Red
    The Mark VII monorail is a design model of monorail train, currently in use by the Disneyland Monorail System at the Disneyland Resort in Anaheim, California, USA and replaced the Mark V monorail in mid-2008 when Disney began service with the first Mark VII Monorail, Monorail Red. They were built by Burke Composite Designs and engineered in-house by Walt Disney Imagineering and TPI Composites. Mark VII monorails feature a retro design reminiscent of the original Disneyland Mark I trains. There are currently three trains operating at the Disneyland Resort, and as with previous generations of Disney monorails, they are referred to by their colors: Red, Blue, and Orange.
    10.00
    1 votes
    70
    PRR 1737

    PRR 1737

    The Pennsylvania Railroad's K4s class Pacific number 1737 was the prototype of the class of 4-6-2 steam locomotives that eventually would number 425 locomotives. The Pennsylvania Railroad in 1914 needed a steam locomotive to haul the passenger trains that the smaller E class Atlantics (4-4-2) could not handle. The 1737 was the first K4s ever built for the PRR. In passenger service, the 1737 would handle passenger trains, like the railroads flagship passenger train, the Broadway Limited. As the 1930s began, the 1737 and the other K4s locomotives would have to double-head passenger trains. This is because the Pennsylvania Railroad had increased passenger service time tables. The K4s Pacifics were unable to keep up with the work. The "Standard Railroad Of The World" made a few attempts to replace the 1737 and its sisters. They were the classes: K5, S1, and the T1. None of the replacements were very successful in railroad service. With these being a failure, the K4s had to continue hauling passenger trains until the Pennsylvania Railroad replaced steam locomotives with the ever growing popular and less costly diesel-electric locomotives in 1957. The 1737 was no stranger to commuter
    10.00
    1 votes
    71
    SNCF Class Z 9500

    SNCF Class Z 9500

    The SNCF Class Z 9500 electric multiple units were built by Alsthom between 1982-1983.They are, together with the Z 9600 units, the dual-voltage version of the Z2 family.They are operated by TER Franche-Comté, TER Bourgogne and TER Rhône-Alpes.Many units still run in their original livery and have the original orange interior, although the first refurbished units with the unified TER-livery and AGC-style interiors are beginning to appear as of July 2007.
    10.00
    1 votes
    72
    SR Lord Nelson Class

    SR Lord Nelson Class

    The SR class LN or Lord Nelson class is a type of 4-cylinder 4-6-0 steam locomotive designed for the Southern Railway by Richard Maunsell in 1926. They were intended for Continental boat trains between London (Victoria) and Dover harbour, but were also later used for express passenger work to the South-West of England. Sixteen of them were constructed, representing the most powerful (although not the most successful) Southern 4-6-0 design. They were all named after famous admirals. The class continued to operate with British Railways until withdrawn during 1961 and 1962. Only one example of the class – the first engine, Lord Nelson itself – has been saved from scrapping. This has been seen running on mainline tours and preserved railways throughout Britain. Although the improved ”King Arthur” class 4-6-0 locomotives were capable of the heaviest express passenger work between London and South-West England, there was a growth in demand for Continental traffic travelling via Dover and Folkestone. By the mid 1920s the Southern Railway Traffic Department wished to begin operating 500-ton express trains on these routes during peak periods. These would require a more powerful locomotive,
    10.00
    1 votes
    73
    British Rail Class 251

    British Rail Class 251

    The Blue Pullman was a class of luxury train used from 1960 to 1973 by British Railways. The Blue Pullmans were the first Pullman diesel-electric multiple units, incorporating several novel features. Named after their Nanking blue livery, the trains were conceived under the 1955 Modernisation Plan to create luxury diesel express trains aimed at competing with the motor car and the emerging domestic air travel market. Although not entirely successful – they were seen as underpowered, unreliable, and ultimately not economically viable – the Blue Pullmans demonstrated the possibility of fixed-formation multiple-unit inter-city train services, and inspired the later development of the Inter City 125, which resembles them in having an integral power car at each end of the train. There were two versions: two first-class six-car sets for the London Midland Region (LMR), and three two-class eight-car sets for the Western Region (WR), built by Metro Cammell in Birmingham. They were initially operated by the luxury train operator the Pullman Car Company, which the BTC had recently acquired. Shortly after their introduction, in 1962, Pullman was fully nationalised, and operation of the Blue
    6.50
    4 votes
    74
    Rhaetian Railway Ge 4/4 II

    Rhaetian Railway Ge 4/4 II

    The Rhaetian Railway Ge 4/4  is a class of metre gauge Bo-Bo electric locomotives operated by the Rhaetian Railway (RhB), which is the main railway network in the Canton of Graubünden, Switzerland. The class is so named because it was the second class of locomotives of the Swiss locomotive and railcar classification type Ge 4/4 to be acquired by the Rhaetian Railway. According to that classification system, Ge 4/4 denotes a narrow gauge electric adhesion locomotive with a total of four axles, all of which are drive axles. The 23 Ge 4/4  locomotives, numbered 611 to 633, were placed in service in 1973 (first series) and 1984 (second series). The last example of the second series, named Zuoz and numbered 633, was completed only in 1985. The Ge 4/4  replaced the Ge 6/6  (Crocodile), which was becoming less and less reliable. Ever since its delivery, the Ge 4/4  class has been in service on the whole of the core network of the Rhaetian Railway, at the head of both passenger trains and freight trains. Since 1997, the class has also served on the Arosa Line following its conversion to 11 kV 16 ⁄3 Hz AC. The Ge 4/4 s can work double headed in multiple-unit train control operation. In
    6.50
    4 votes
    75
    SNCF Class BB 37000

    SNCF Class BB 37000

    • Built by: Alstom
    The SNCF Class BB 37000 "Prima" electric locomotives are currently being built by Alstom. These locomotives are the triple-voltage version of the Class BB 27000. Sixty of these locomotives, numbered 37001-37060, have been ordered by Fret SNCF for international freight traffic. 37007 was destroyed in the terrible Zoufftgen train accident on 11 October 2006.
    6.50
    4 votes
    76
    Bristol and Exeter Railway 4-2-2 locomotives

    Bristol and Exeter Railway 4-2-2 locomotives

    The 20 Bristol and Exeter Railway 4-2-2 locomotives were broad gauge 4-2-2 express steam locomotives built for the Bristol and Exeter Railway by the Stothert and Slaughter in Bristol. The first entered service in 1849. The Bristol and Exeter Railway was amalgamated into the Great Western Railway on 1 January 1876 and eight 4-2-2s survived at this time, the last being withdrawn in 1889. Three of the infamous 4-2-4T locomotives were rebuilt by the Great Western Railway in 1877 as 4-2-2 tender locomotives. The Bristol and Exeter Railway's first express passenger locomotives, similar in appearance to the GWR Iron Duke Class. Following rebuilding as 4-2-2 tender locomotives at Swindon, the three remaining 8 feet 10 inch 4-2-4T locomotives had slightly smaller 8 feet diameter driving wheels and worked alongside the rigid-framed GWR Rover class and the remaining 1849-built ex-Bristol and Exeter Railway 4-2-2 locomotives on express passenger trains.
    5.60
    5 votes
    77
    SNCF Class BB 16000

    SNCF Class BB 16000

    The SNCF BB 16000 are a class of 25kv 50 Hz AC electric locomotives produced by MTE. They are the AC version of the BB 9200s A total of 62 were originally built between 1959 and 1963, although some have since been withdrawn. 15 BB 16000s were reclassified as BB 16100s after being fitted with TDM control equipment for Paris Nord to St. Quentin/Amiens. Certain units of the class are fitted for push pull operations.
    5.60
    5 votes
    78
    British Rail Class 123

    British Rail Class 123

    The Class 123 was a design of Diesel Multiple Unit built for British Rail in 1963. They were built by British Rail at Swindon Works, and designed like all Swindon units as inter-city sets. Ten of the four-car sets were built and introduced in 1963. The units bear a visible similarity to the British Rail Class 309, however there is no 'relation' here as the two types were built by different manufacturers for different markets. The Class 123's structure and internal construction have much more in common with BR coaching stock (British Rail Mark 1) than they do with other DMU classes. The carriage's underframes are longer and the end gangways are built to a different style. It was also unusual for a first-generation DMU to sport a front end gangway. None of these units survive today. One of the Griddle Cars went on to be used in a Class 309 AC EMU to replace one with a underframe fault.
    8.50
    2 votes
    79
    British Rail Class 170/2

    British Rail Class 170/2

    British Rail Class 170/2 is a sub-class of the British Rail Class 170 DMU, operated by National Express East Anglia. Anglia Railways ordered two batches of Turbostars. The first batch of eight 3-car Class 170/2 units were built for London Liverpool Street to Ipswich, Norwich, Lowestoft and Bury St. Edmunds services. Class 170/2, no. 170202 at Cambridge on 21 August 2004, travelling to Norwich. This unit has been repainted in the 'one' livery.These supplemented the existing Class 86 locomotive-hauled trains from London to Norwich. Four of these units were later hired to Hull Trains from 2002–2004, before they acquired their own Turbostars. Other units, including the spot-hire set no. 170 399, were used on Anglia's short-lived Norwich to Basingstoke ‘London Crosslink’ service. In 2002, Anglia introduced a new Cambridge to Norwich direct service, and acquired four two-carriage units dedicated to working these services. This is a diagram of an Anglia Class 170 TurbostarIn 2004, Anglia Railways was merged into the new Greater Anglia franchise, which was won by the National Express Group subsidiary 'one', since rebranded as National Express East Anglia. With trains drawn by Class 90
    8.50
    2 votes
    80
    DB V 160 family

    DB V 160 family

    The DB V 160 locomotive family comprises several classes of closely related 4 axle diesel-hydraulic locomotives built in the 1960s and 1970s for the Deutsche Bundesbahn which take the moniker from the earliest built model: the 'DB Class V 160'. The DB Classes V 160 (later 216 and 215), V 162 (later 217), V 164 (later 218), V 169 (later 219) and DB Class 210 comprise the family, being supplemented by the DBAG Classes 225 and 226, formed from original rebuilt machines. They are formed the backbone of non-shunting locomotive diesel traction in Germany up to the 1990s, and continued to do so along with the Class 232 locomotives of the former Deutsche Reichsbahn in the 2000s. The first post-WWII diesel heavy-duty locomotives, such as the DB Class V 200, had two engines of 800/980 kW each. That concept proved very expensive in maintenance; therefore, in the mid-1950s, construction began for a medium-duty single engine locomotive. In 1960, the first production run of ten units was manufactured, each with one 1,320 kW engine. The name comes from its engine power in horsepower–1600 hp, V standing for Verbrennungsmotor. Maximum speed was either 80 or 120 km/h (50 or 75 mph) (depending on the
    8.50
    2 votes
    81
    DSB class MY

    DSB class MY

    The class MY is a class of diesel-electric locomotives built in the years 1954–65 by NOHAB. A total of 59 units, numbered 1101–1159, were delivered to the Danish State Railways. Powered by GM-EMD engines, the locomotives represented a significant change in rolling stock policy — motive power had largely been sourced from within Denmark for several decades. In the early 50s the DSB was starting to look for a new type of motive power that could replace steam locomotives in Denmark. The DSB ordered the first four units which arrived at Helsingør in 1954. The locomotives quickly became very popular among both passengers and crew. Units 1101–1105 and 1145–1159 had a 1,700 horsepower (1,300 kilowatts), whilst units 1106–1144 had a 1,950 horsepower (1,450 kilowatts). In their early years the locomotives hauled express trains (later known as InterCity) and heavy freight services, but in their later years they were transferred to smaller regional and light freight services. In the 1980s and 90s the DSB began to have less and less need for them, and the last ordinary MY-hauled train ran in 2001. One unit however, 1135, is now a special service locomotive which runs special trains, so DSB
    8.50
    2 votes
    82
    GER Class S56

    GER Class S56

    The GER Class S56 was a class of 0-6-0T steam tank locomotives designed by James Holden for the Great Eastern Railway. Together with some rebuilt examples of GER Class R24, they passed to the London and North Eastern Railway at the grouping in 1923, and received the LNER classification J69. The Class S56 were a development of the Class R24, being almost identical, apart from higher boiler pressure and larger water tanks. Twenty were built in 1904 at Stratford Works. All twenty passed to the LNER in 1923. Thirteen class J69 locomotives were lent to the War Department in October 1939, of which five had been built as Class S56. They were sold to the War Department in October 1940, where they were used on the Melbourne and Longmoor Military Railways. The remaining locomotives were renumbered 8617–8636 in order of construction; however gaps were left where the locomotives sold to the War Department would have been. At nationalisation in 1948, the remainder passed to British Railways, who added 60000 to their number. Post-war withdrawals started in 1958, and by 1962 all had been retired. GER no. 87 (LNER 7087, 8633, BR 68633) has been preserved, initially at the Clapham Transport Museum,
    8.50
    2 votes
    83
    SNCF Class BB 9200

    SNCF Class BB 9200

    The SNCF Class BB 9200 1500 V DC electric locomotives were built by Schneider-Jeumont/CEM between 1958-1964. 92 of them were built and 20 remain. These train engines are products of the Jacquemin product family of train engines (locomotives), offspring of the prototype BB 9004, and named after the engineer who designed their bogies. The locomotives were designed for a maximum speed of 160 km/h (99 mph) and were the first such train engines in France. In the late sixties, a small group of train engines was converted for 200 km/h (120 mph) operation, hauling prestige TEE trains like the Capitole - these train engines were called the BB 9200 Capitole. These types were later superseded by the CC 6500 train engines. Some of these train engines have been in service for more than 10,000,000 kilometers (6,200,000 mi) since they have been set to service. The regular services of the remaining BB 9200 train engines are inter-regional trains between Paris Montparnasse and Le Mans, between Paris Austerlitz and Tours and between Paris Gare de Lyon, Dijon and Lyon. Some few are in service for freight trains. Phasing out of the series of train engines was expected for 2007. The BB 9200 Capitole
    8.50
    2 votes
    84
    British Rail Class 22

    British Rail Class 22

    The British Rail Class 22 or "Baby Warship" was a class of diesel-hydraulic locomotives designed for the Western Region of British Railways and built by the North British Locomotive Company. They were very similar in appearance to the Class 21 diesel-electrics. The nickname Baby Warship related to the similarity in appearance (and internal equipment) to the British Rail Class D20/2 or Class 41 Warship Class. D6300 was introduced to traffic in 1959 and deliveries continued through until 1962. The Class 22s were allocated to Bristol Bath Road, Laira Plymouth, Newton Abbot and Old Oak Common. The majority of the class always operated in the West of England, on a range of local passenger and freight work, with smaller numbers of the later units operating on local work in the Bristol and around London Paddington (notably moving empty carriages between the main station and Old Oak Common yard). Initially the locomotives had some problems with engine and transmission faults, but could be returned to North British Locomotive Works (NBL) for repair under the contractual agreement. By 1961, reliability had improved. With the more powerful Hymeks and Warships being available, the locomotives
    7.33
    3 votes
    85
    British Rail Class 482

    British Rail Class 482

    This article concerns the trains used on the Waterloo & City Line immediately prior to its takeover by London Underground in 1994. For their service after 1994, see London Underground 1992 Stock The British Rail Class 482 electrical multiple units were built by ABB in 1992, for use on the Waterloo & City Line. The units are almost identical to the 1992 tube stock built for the Central Line. Ten 2-car units were built, numbered 482501-510. Each unit consisted of a type "E" driving motor, numbered 65501-510, and a type "F" non-driving motor, numbered 67501-510. Trains were operated using two units semi-permanently coupled, with the driving motors outermost. The units were built as direct replacements for the elderly Class 487 units, dating from 1940. They were delivered to Ruislip depot during March 1993, and were painted in Network SouthEast livery; however, as the Waterloo & City Line was completely separate from the rest of the National Rail network, they did not receive yellow front ends. Following commissioning (which included test runs as 8-car trains over most of the Central Line), they were delivered by road to the Waterloo & City line during May and June 1993, and following
    7.33
    3 votes
    86
    British Rail Class 97

    British Rail Class 97

    British Rail reserved the TOPS Class 97 designation for departmental locomotives, which were used for special or engineering duties. They were therefore of several different classes, lumped together for numbering purposes. Some locomotives were converted from redundant engines, whilst others were purpose built. In 2008, Network Rail once again used Class 97 for signalling test locomotives (Class 97/3). Class 97 numbers were allocated in one of three ways: Built by Ruston & Hornsby in January 1957 with the serial number 408493, this 0-4-0 shunter was ordered specifically for departmental use by the Signalling & Telecommunications department of the Western region in Readings Signal Works. The transmission was diesel mechanical, although the wheels were chain driven from the gearbox and the loco was rated at 88 bhp (66 kW) for a weight of only 17 tons. Tractive effort was a maximum of 9,500 lbf (42,000 N). Delivered to the WR with the number 20 it was renumbered to 97020 in May 1980. However withdrawal came in April 1981 and it was scrapped on site in August 1982 by Cartwrights of Tipton. For refuelling, it had to go via the main line to the depot at Reading. This locomotive was a
    7.33
    3 votes
    87
    British Rail Class 379

    British Rail Class 379

    The Class 379 Electrostar is a British electric multiple-unit train type ordered in April 2009 for Stansted Express services operated by National Express East Anglia (NXEA) and later Greater Anglia. The trains are also being used on services between London Liverpool Street, Cambridge and Kings Lynn. The fleet was ordered as part of the NXEA Service Improvement Plan designed to expand capacity on the heavily crowded lines into London Liverpool Street. The trains are part of Bombardier Transportation's Electrostar family and are owned by Lloyds TSB. They were built at Bombardier's Derby plant, where the first unit was unveiled on 13 October 2010. After going to the Velim railway test circuit in the Czech Republic during November 2010, the first train returned to the UK in December for further testing along with other members of the class as they are built. A phased introduction into passenger service began in March 2011. They are maintained by Bombardier at Ilford. They work alongside the Class 317. The Class 379 units feature 2+2 seating in standard class and 2+1 seating in first class. Large luggage racks are provided as befits an airport service. Wi-fi is supplied by Icomera of
    6.25
    4 votes
    88
    LMS Compound 4-4-0

    LMS Compound 4-4-0

    The London, Midland and Scottish Railway Compound 4-4-0 was a class of steam locomotive designed for passenger work. One hundred and ninety five engines were built by the LMS, adding to the 45 Midland Railway 1000 Class, to which they were almost identical. The most obvious difference is that the driving wheel diameter was reduced from 7' 0" on the Midland locomotive to 6' 9" on the LMS version. They were given the power classification 4P. The LMS continued the Midland numbering from 1045 to 1199 and then started in the lower block of 900–39. After nationalisation in 1948, BR added 40000 to their numbers so they became 40900–39 and 41045–199. None has survived to preservation, though the first of the Midland 1000 Class engines has. For terminology, see Steam locomotive components
    5.40
    5 votes
    89
    British Rail Class 04

    British Rail Class 04

    The British Rail Class 04 0-6-0 diesel-mechanical shunting locomotive class was built between 1952 and 1962 and was the basis for the later Class 03 built in the British Railways workshops. However, the first locomotive to be built to the design was actually DS1173, in 1948, which served as a departmental shunter at Hither Green depot, before being transferred to the capital stock list as D2341 in 1967. The Class 04 locomotives were supplied by the Drewry Car Co., which at the time (and for most of its existence) had no manufacturing capability. Drewry sub-contracted the construction work to two builders both of whom built other locomotives under the same arrangement. Early locomotives (including DS1173) were built by Vulcan Foundry and later examples were built by Robert Stephenson and Hawthorns. A clear line of development can be seen in the Class 04s from the 0-4-0DM locomotives built by Andrew Barclay and Drewry/Vulcan Foundry in the early 1940s. The design continued to develop during the construction period, but this was generally confined to the size of the cab windows and the diameter of the wheels. Similar locomotives had been built before the first Class 04, and others
    7.00
    3 votes
    90
    British Rail Class 05

    British Rail Class 05

    • Built by: Hunslet Engine Company
    The British Rail Class 05 is a class of 0-6-0 diesel-mechanical shunters built by Hunslet Engine Company from 1955 to 1961. They were used on the Eastern and Scottish Regions of British Railways. Initially they were numbered 11136-11176 and, later, D2550-D2619. The British Rail Class D2/5 built by Andrew Barclay Sons & Co. were reported in several sources as having received the TOPS class number 05,, though this was in error, and they are not listed as such in the latest works by Marsden, 2011. Most were withdrawn early and replaced by classes 03 and 04 but there was one exception. This was D2554 which was transferred to the Isle of Wight in 1966 to aid the electrification of the Island Line. Shortly afterwards it was given the TOPS number 05001. This shunter was the only one to receive a TOPS number. The main reason for this was that all the others were replaced and that it was best suited for the island. It remained in service until about 1985 before being sold to the Isle of Wight Steam Railway, Havenstreet. Didcot Railway Centre has an industrial example (numbered DL26 and built to the same design as a Class 05) preserved after being used by the National Coal Board in the
    7.00
    3 votes
    91
    British Rail Class 185

    British Rail Class 185

    The Class 185 Pennine Desiro is a diesel multiple-unit passenger train of the Desiro family built by Siemens in Germany for the British train operating company First TransPennine Express. 51 units were acquired, representing an investment of £250 million. The Siemens "Desiro UK" family also includes units of Classes 350, 360, 380, 444 and 450. Fifty-one of these three-carriage 185s, together with nine two-carriage 170s, have replaced the Class 158s (North and South Transpennine Express routes), Class 175s (Manchester Airport to Blackpool/Cumbria routes) and Class 220/221 Voyager trains (operated by Virgin Trains on Manchester to Scotland routes). The trains are members of the Desiro family, of which electric variants were already serving in Britain as Classes 350, 360, 444, and 450 at the time of their introduction. Depots : The first train started operating on 14 March 2006 and the full roll-out of all 51 was completed by December 2006. Two depots have been built in Manchester and York to maintain the trains, along with a new fuelling facility in Cleethorpes. These trains are powered by Cummins QSK19-R engines through a Voith 3 speed hydrodynamic transmission powering both axles
    7.00
    3 votes
    92
    British Rail Class 309

    British Rail Class 309

    The British Rail Class 309 "Clacton Express" electric multiple units (EMUs) were built by British Rail (BR) York Works from 1962-1963. They were initially classified as Class AM9 before the introduction of TOPS. These units were the first express 25 kV alternating current (AC) units to be built by British Rail, and British Rail's first EMUs to be capable of 100 mph. Twenty-three units were built in three different batches. Each unit had identical electrical equipment. The original concept called for increasing the power-to-weight ratio when strengthening trains from eight to ten cars in peak periods using the 2-car units, in order to make the peak timetable more resilient. When built, units were used exclusively on Great Eastern Main Line (GEML) express services from London Liverpool Street to Clacton-on-Sea and Walton-on-the-Naze. Trains would be formed of three units in a ten-car formation (i.e. one two car unit, and two four car units). The train would divide at Thorpe-le-Soken, with one of the 4-cars units used on the Walton section, and the remaining six cars continuing to Clacton. The Walton portion usually comprised the griddle car unit. This continued until the late 1970s,
    7.00
    3 votes
    93
    British Rail Class 411

    British Rail Class 411

    The British Rail Class 411 (or 4 Cep) electrical multiple units were built at Eastleigh works from 1956-63 for the newly electrified main lines in Kent. These units were based on the earlier Southern Railway 4 Cor design, built in 1937. Variants of the class 411 design included the class 410 and class 412 4 Bep units, which contained a buffet car in place of a standard trailer. They were later used on services in Sussex and Hampshire; following the privatisation of British Rail in 1995, the units were used by the Connex South Central, Connex South Eastern and South West Trains franchises. They were replaced by Juniper and Electrostar units. The fleet's lifespan was 49 years. A total of 133 units were built, as two different types. The majority of units were 'standard' passenger-only units, complemented by units containing a buffet car. The standard units contained passenger seating only, and formed the backbone of the new fleet. 111 units were built in several batches, initially numbered in the range 7101-7211. Units 7101-7104 were the prototype units, and were followed by 'Phase 1' units (7105-7153) and subsequently 'Phase 2' units (7154-7211). Units were formed of two outer
    7.00
    3 votes
    94
    D1 class Melbourne tram

    D1 class Melbourne tram

    The D class, or Combino is a type of electric tram operating in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. It was built by Siemens in Düsseldorf, Germany, and the first unit was delivered to the city in 2002. The trams were initially operated by M>Tram, but are now operated by Yarra Trams. The class come in two variants: the D1 class which is a three-section tram, and the larger D2 class five-section tram. The trams feature plug-type doors, next-stop display, and several other features. The trams are built '100% low-floor.' The D1-class cars can be found on Melbourne's southeastern and inner tram routes and are based at Malvern, Victoria tram depot. The first D2-class cars were delivered to the city in 2004, with the last cars entering service in November 2004. All D-class trams have a traction braking controller with an integral deadman's trigger that the driver must release and reapply every minute. If this is not done, an alarm sounds. If the alarm sounds for more than a few seconds then the disc brakes are applied firmly, stopping the tram. Originally the driver could hold it down continuously while the tram was moving, if the driver took their hand off, an alarm would sound, followed
    7.00
    3 votes
    95
    LMS Fowler Class 3F

    LMS Fowler Class 3F

    The London Midland and Scottish Railway (LMS) Fowler 3F 0-6-0T is a class of steam locomotive, often known as Jinty. They represent the ultimate development of the Midland Railway's six-coupled tank engines. The design was based on rebuilds by Henry Fowler of the Midland Railway 2441 Class introduced in 1899 by Samuel Waite Johnson. These rebuilds featured a Belpaire firebox and improved cab. 422 Jinties were built between 1924 and 1930, with it being just one of the Midland designs perpetuated by LMS. They were built by the ex-L&YR Horwich Works and the private firms Bagnall's, Beardmores, Hunslet, North British and the Vulcan Foundry. When new, they were numbered 7100–7149, 16400–16764. Numbers 7150–7156 were added when the LMS absorbed the Somerset and Dorset Joint Railway locomotives in 1930. In the 1934 LMS renumbering scheme, the locomotives were assigned the series 7260–7681. On the outbreak of the Second World War in 1939 they were initially chosen as the standard shunting locomotive for the War Department, but later the more modern Hunslet "Austerity" 0-6-0ST was chosen in preference. Nevertheless, eight were dispatched to France before its fall in 1940, and only five
    7.00
    3 votes
    96
    Mark V monorail

    Mark V monorail

    The Mark V monorail is a design model of monorail trains, formerly utilized by the Disneyland Monorail System at the Disneyland Resort in Anaheim, California, USA and replaced the Mark III monorail. They were used from 1987 until 2008 when they were completely replaced by the Mark VII monorail, which entered service in spring of 2008. They were built by WED Enterprises. The design was based on the Mark IV monorail used at the Walt Disney World Resort on its Walt Disney World Monorail. The trains consisted of five cars. The Mark V monorails were the second of the "Learjet" styled monorails used for Disney, based on the design of the Bombardier Mark IVs in service at Walt Disney World. However, the Mark Vs are smaller in capacity and size, being narrower and shorter in height than the Mark IV.
    7.00
    3 votes
    97
    NIR 1 Class

    NIR 1 Class

    • Built by: English Electric
    The Northern Ireland Railways DH class was a class of three diesel-hydraulic shunting locomotives obtained in 1969. All three have now been withdrawn, and two have since been rebuilt for work in Sri Lanka. The DH class of Northern Ireland Railways consisted of three diesel-hydraulic shunting locomotives numbered 1, 2 & 3. They were built by the English Electric Company, works numbers 3954 - 6 (although the Irish Traction Group lists them as D1266-D1268), at their Vulcan Foundry works in Newton-le-Willows in 1969. They were of 0-6-0 wheel arrangement and fitted with Dorman 12QTV engines of 620hp, connected to a EE twin-disc torque converter and a Wiseman final drive. They weighed 42.5 tonnes and had a maximum speed of 49km/h (29mph). The locomotives were of EE's standard 'Stephenson' class, and were obtained primarily for shunting work, trip freights and engineer's trains. Locomotive No. 1 was the first to enter service on 31 July 1969, with No. 2 following on 27 September and No. 3 on 4 October. However, the locomotives were not particularly successful due to problems with the engines overheating regularly while in service. All three were put into store during the late 1980s, the
    7.00
    3 votes
    98
    Saxon V K

    Saxon V K

    The Saxon Class V K were German, eight-coupled, narrow gauge steam locomotives operated by the Royal Saxon State Railways which had been primarily intended for the Müglitztalbahn. In 1925 the Deutsche Reichsbahn incorporated arranged these locomotives as DRG Class 99.61. For the hilly line of the Müglitztalbahn from Mügeln to Geising-Altenberg the Sächsische Maschinenfabrik in Chemnitz developed an eight-coupled locomotive which, it was envisaged, would handle this route better that the hitherto deployed Saxon Classes I K and IV K. In 1901 and from 1905 to 1907 a total of nine locomotives were placed in service. Those built in 1905 had a slightly larger driver's cab. Whilst the new type of drive using Klien-Lindner axles allowed the eight-coupled engines to negotiate tight curves, in the end the new Class V K proved just as complicated and maintenance-intensive as the tried and tested IV K. For that reason no more were procured, despite their better starting characteristics. All nine engines, numbered 201 to 209 were taken over in 1920 by the Deutsche Reichsbahn and in 1925 were renumbered to 99 611 to 99 619. Betwee 1934 and 1942 the locomotives were all retired. It is possible
    5.20
    5 votes
    99
    British Rail Class 124

    British Rail Class 124

    The British Rail Class 124 diesel multiple units were built by BR Swindon Works in 1960. The British Rail Class 124 was a class of initially six-car Diesel Multiple Units used and built specifically for the trans-pennine route. In the late 70s, the Class was merged with their Class 123 cousins that had been relocated from Reading services on Western region and towards the end of their days, ran as 4-car hybrid sets. They were all withdrawn in 1984 when their duties were taken over by Class 31/4, diesel electric locomotive hauled rakes of 4 coaches. The North Yorkshire Moors Railway had the idea of preserving at least one Driving unit (due to the cab windows allowing panoramic views), but the plan was scrapped when it was found that to remove the asbestos from the vehicle was cost prohibitive. The Class was not unique, the Class 124 DMUs sharing mechanical components with their sister Class 123 on Western Region and the Class 126. "Wrap-Round" windscreens where a feature that was also seen on the "Glasgow Blue Train" electric units (which were later relocated south onto the Manchester-Glossop service when the 1500dc overhead system was switched off (following the closure of Woodhead
    6.00
    4 votes
    100
    British Rail Class 114

    British Rail Class 114

    The British Rail Class 114 diesel multiple units were built by BR Derby from September 1956 to July 1957. Forty-nine 2-car units were built, numbered E50001-49 for driving motors (later renumbered 53001-49) and E56001-49 for driving trailers (later renumbered 54001-49). The units were used in the early days out of 40A Lincoln TMD (LN) on services all over the county, although a small number were transferred to 41A Sheffield (Darnall) during 1959/60. However, with their original 150hp BUT engines, they were found to be underpowered for the local scheduled services, and lost time especially when towing a van (which was a regular occurrence in that area). The most problematic stretch was the 1 in 122 for just under a mile near Ancaster which reduced these units to 45mph even on full power. As a result of this, several 3-car formations were put together using two power cars and one trailer. These were used in the main on Grantham - Boston/Skegness workings during 1957. Formations noted in Railway Observer magazine were E50008/E50007/E56007, E50011/E50012/E56012, E50038/E50039/E56015 and E50015/E50035/E56035. Spare trailers were stored at various locations - E56016/25/40 at Blankney &
    8.00
    2 votes
    101
    British Rail Class 121

    British Rail Class 121

    Sixteen Class 121 single-car driving motor vehicles were built from 1960, numbered 55020–55035. These were supplemented by ten trailer vehicles, numbered 56280–56289 (later renumbered 54280–54289). They had a top speed of 70 mph, with slam-doors, and vacuum brakes. The driving motor vehicles were nicknamed "Bubble cars" by some enthusiasts (a nickname now endorsed by current operator Chiltern Railways). The Class 121 were built for use on the Western Region of British Rail. They were used on various lightly used branch lines, including the Looe branch line (and various other branch lines) in Cornwall, the branch lines off the main line in the Thames Valley, and the Greenford Branch Line in West London. Class 121s were built with distinctive exhaust pipes, designed to fit around a large four-digit route headcode indicator box at roof level. Use of the headcode indicator box was discontinued in the 1970s, so the indicator was removed and the hole plated-up when the units were refurbished. They also had a small destination indicator inside the top of the centre cab window. The similar Class 122 units had the small destination indicator in the cab roof in place of the large headcode
    8.00
    2 votes
    102
    British Rail Class 128

    British Rail Class 128

    British Rail Class 128 was a class of diesel multiple unit, built for British Rail. Introduced in 1959, ten of the class were built by Gloucester Railway Carriage and Wagon Company, each with two 230 hp British United Traction engines. The class was built specifically for parcels, fitted out with parcel racks and bike storage at each end, and did not feature any passenger accommodation. The last members of the class were withdrawn in 1991, and none were preserved.
    8.00
    2 votes
    103
    British Rail Class 207

    British Rail Class 207

    The British Rail Class 207 (or 3D) diesel-electric multiple units were built by BR at Eastleigh in 1962. Power car (one per set) When new the class were used on the Oxted Line, and were mostly concentrated on services between London Victoria and Tunbridge Wells via Eridge. Other routes that the units operated included occasional workings on the Marshlink Line, the Three Bridges to Tunbridge Wells Central Line and the Cuckoo Line. Following the closure of the last two of these routes the unit gained workings on the Redhill to Tonbridge Line, and were known to deputise for 3R units on the North Downs Line to Reading. Most units were withdrawn in 1987 following the electrification of the Oxted Line's East Grinstead branch. Four of the seven surviving units were used on the Reading to Basingstoke Line between 1988 and 1993; once this had finished three were withdrawn and the fourth sent to join the other three survivors on the Marshlink Line; between 1995 and 1998 this included through services from Ashford International to Brighton. After this the class operated on the Marshlink Line between Ashford and Hastings and the Oxted Line between London Victoria and Uckfield for privatised
    8.00
    2 votes
    104
    British Rail Class 27

    British Rail Class 27

    British Rail's Class 27 comprised 69 diesel locomotives built by the Birmingham Railway Carriage and Wagon Company (BRCW) during 1961 and 1962. They were a development of the earlier Class 26; both were originally classified as the BRCW Type 2. Original allocations were D5347 - 5369 to Glasgow Eastfield, D5370 - 5378 to Thornaby and D5379 - 5415 to London Cricklewood for Tilbury Boat trains and Cross-London freight services. In the period September to December 1963, some of the Cricklewood allocation were transferred to Leicester and in December 1965 the Thornaby allocation was also nominally transferred to Leicester to join them. Traffic changes combined with reallocation of Class 25s led to the gradual transfer of the Leicester and Cricklewood locomotives to Scotland during 1969 thus concentrating the whole class within Scotland and being part of the replacement fleet that allowed the withdrawal of the poorly performing Clayton Class 17 locomotives from traffic. For many years they were extensively used on the West Highland Line. By September 1986, the final vacuum brake only locos had been withdrawn, regular passenger services had ceased and only 21 locos remained, allocated
    8.00
    2 votes
    105
    British Rail Class 360

    British Rail Class 360

    The British Rail Class 360 electric multiple units were built by Siemens in two sub-types from 2002–2003 and 2004-2005. These units are part of the Siemens Desiro family. The Siemens "Desiro UK" family also includes units of Classes 185, 350, 380, 444 and 450. Unlike the South West Trains and West Coast Main Line Desiros, the Class 360 lacks inter-unit gangways. This was a late design change, as the Health and Safety Executive was not happy with the driver's visibility with the previous design's gangway cab for Driver Only Operation The Class 360 is a modern unit with air conditioning, rapid acceleration technology and is powered by overhead lines with a top speed of 100 mph (161 km/h). The Class 360 will do 0–60 mph (0–97 km/h) in about 45 seconds, making it the fastest accelerating train in the Greater Anglia fleet. First Great Eastern ordered 21 4-car units to replace their elderly Class 312 slam-door units. They entered service in 2003, and by mid-2004 had completely replaced the old trains. They are primarily used on London Liverpool Street to Clacton-on-Sea, Ipswich, and Colchester services and Manningtree to Harwich services, usually running as 4 carriages to Harwich and
    8.00
    2 votes
    106
    British Rail Class 380

    British Rail Class 380

    The Class 380s is a electric multiple unit which operate on the national railway network in Scotland. The Siemens "Desiro UK" family also includes units of 185, 350, 360, 444 and 450. The trains operate First ScotRail services in the Ayrshire and Inverclyde region of Scotland and had originally been intended for the cancelled Glasgow Airport Rail Link. The construction was awarded to Siemens and announced by Transport Scotland on 11 July 2008. A total of 38 sets were ordered, comprising 22 three-car and 16 four-car units. Stations along the Ayrshire Coast Line and Inverclyde Line underwent platform extension works to allow the use of the longer trains. The trains were specified to have full access for disabled people and to have streamlined end corridor connections. On the unveiling of the first completed vehicle, it was announced that the fleet would be divided into two sub-groups, with the 3-car units classed as 380/0 and the 4-car as 380/1. In September 2010, commissioning of the fleet was suspended by ScotRail due to technical issues with the trains. The reliability issues and extended commissioning period resulted in an initially reduced service on parts of the ScotRail
    8.00
    2 votes
    107
    British Rail Class 85

    British Rail Class 85

    The British Rail Class 85 is an electric locomotive built during the early 1960s, as part of BR's policy to develop a standard electric locomotive. Five prototype classes (81-85) were built and evaluated, which eventually led to the development of the Class 86 locomotive. The locomotives of Class 85 were originally fitted with germanium rectifiers which were eventually replaced by silicon rectifiers. Forty of these locomotives were built from 1961-64 by BR at Doncaster Works. The class were used to haul trains on the then newly electrified West Coast Main Line, from Birmingham, to Crewe, Manchester Piccadilly, Liverpool and later Preston. By 1965, electrification had spread south to London Euston. Under the earlier BR classification, the type was given the designation AL5 (meaning the 5th design of 25 kV AC locomotive), and locomotives were numbered E3056-E3095. In 1968, this was changed to Class 85, when BR introduced a new computer numbering system. From 1971 onwards, locomotives were progressively renumbered into the 85001-040 series. Fifteen locomotives were converted for freight only use, numbered in the 85/1 series - see table below. These locomotives were restricted to
    8.00
    2 votes
    108
    British Rail Class 89

    British Rail Class 89

    The Class 89 is a prototype design for an electric locomotive. Only one unit was built, no. 89001, which was officially named Avocet by the then Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher on 16 January 1989 at Sandy, Bedfordshire - the home of the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (whose logo is an Avocet). It was built in 1986, by BREL at their Crewe Works, and was used on test-trains on both the West Coast Main Line and East Coast Main Line. It was fitted with advanced power control systems and develops over 6,000 bhp (4,500 kW). It was given the nickname "Aardvark" although railfans used to call it "The Badger" owing to its sloping front ends. The Class 89 locomotive was designed by Brush Traction of Loughborough to meet a specification issued by British Rail, which subsequently changed the requirements, but not before Brush had already committed to build the prototype locomotive. It was initially delivered in the old-style InterCity livery, with no British Rail double arrows, but these were added later when British Rail bought the locomotive from Brush. As the development of the ECML Electrification continued the engine was painted into the new style "InterCity Swallow" livery
    8.00
    2 votes
    109
    British Rail Class 90

    British Rail Class 90

    • Built by: BREL
    The British Rail Class 90 electric locomotives were built by BREL at Crewe in 1987-1990, weighing 84.5 tonnes and with a top speed of 110 mph (180 km/h). They operate from 25 kV AC overhead lines and produce 5,000 bhp (3,700 kW). The class is employed on express passenger and heavy freight trains. Fifty Class 90/0 locomotives were built in the late 1980s, numbered 90001-050. They were developed from the Class 87, with many improvements and new features. The Class 90s were primarily built to replace the ageing Classes 81, 82, 83, 84 and 85 dating from the early 1960s, which were prone to fire damage. The class is fitted with rheostatic brakes in addition to standard Westinghouse air brake equipment. A Time-Division Multiplexer (TDM) is fitted to enable two or more locomotives to work in multiple. It also allows a Class 90 to work a push-pull passenger train with a Driving Van Trailer (DVT), DBSO or Propelling Control Vehicle. A Class 90 with a rake of eight British Rail Mark 3 coaches and a Driving Van Trailer (DVT) will reach 60 mph (97 km/h) in just over 1 mile (1.6 km), and 100 mph (161 km/h) in another 1+⁄2 miles (2.4 km).|pre-text=|date=March 2011}}{{citation needed|reason= In
    8.00
    2 votes
    110
    SNCF Class BB 16100

    SNCF Class BB 16100

    The SNCF Class BB 16100 electric locomotives were converted from class BB 16000s by fitting TDM push-pull equipment to work the Paris Nord to St. Quentin/Amiens services as well as Paris St Lazare - Rouen.
    8.00
    2 votes
    111
    SNCF Class BB 8500

    SNCF Class BB 8500

    • Built by: Alstom
    The SNCF Class BB 8500 class are part of a series of electric locomotives built by Alsthom for SNCF. They are the direct current version of the 25kV alternating current SNCF BB 17000 and dual system SNCF BB 25500. The locomotives are fitted with monomotor bogies with two different gear ratios. This allows them to increase their tractive effort in exchange for a reduction their top speed. This makes them suitable for both freight and passenger trains. They acquired the nickname Danseuses (dancers) due to their tendency to sway from side to side at speed. This tendency lead to them being blacked at a number of depots. They were built a three distinct batches leading to detail differences. They remain in use as mixed traffic locomotives, mostly with TER and but with some remaining for special duties. 30 locomotives, dedicated to empty stock moves, have been reclassified as BB 88500. Likewise in 2001, 20 of the class were dedicated for workings on the Ligne de la Maurienne. They were classified BB 8700 for this period.
    8.00
    2 votes
    112
    SNCF Class X 73900

    SNCF Class X 73900

    The X73900 is a Diesel Multiple Unit (DMU) train type operated by the SNCF in France. They were built from 2001 to 2004 by Alsthom DDF. They are a version of the SNCF Class X 73500 equipped with train control systems for transborder services to Germany. The trains are single railcars, and have been nicknamed Blue Whales (Baleines bleues) Cucumbers (Concombres) or Sausages (Saucisses). The units were ordered joint with Deutsche Bahn, with their Class 641 units. The trains have modern features which were new to TER trains, such as: The trains can work in multiple of up to 3 sets. They are numbered X 73901 - X73919. The units are used on services that operate into Germany from France. They operate the following services: The class is allocated to Strasbourg depot.
    8.00
    2 votes
    113
    SNCF Class Z 23500

    SNCF Class Z 23500

    Class Z23500 is a class of railway electric multiple units operated in France. They were built by Alstom and Ateliers du Nord de la France, (which became Bombardier) for SNCF and are used on the TER Network. These sets consist of 2 double deck coaches. They were built from 1997 and a total of 80 units were built. The units were ordered by the following regions: Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, Nord-Pas-de-Calais and Rhône-Alpes. They are mainly used on stopping services around the French Riviera (Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur), Lille (Nord-Pas-de-Calais) and Lyon (Rhône-Alpes).They are all in the TER livery, which is a Blue Front in a diagonal line with a metallic grey side. However the Rhône-Alpes units have green and purple sides with Rhône-Alpes written on the side in Large writing.
    8.00
    2 votes
    114
    BR standard class 5 73050

    BR standard class 5 73050

    British Railways Standard Class 5 No. 73050 is a preserved British steam locomotive. Unnamed in service, it has been named City of Peterborough; it is owned by Peterborough City Council and operated by the Nene Valley Railway on a 99 year lease. 73050 left Derby Works on 14 April 1954, and was chosen to represent the class at the "International Railway Congress, Willesden, London" between 26 and 29 May. After the exhibition, 73050 moved to its home shed of Bath Green Park to take up duties on the Somerset and Dorset (S&D) line from Bath to Bournemouth. 73050 was one of only 3 BR Standard Fives (73050 to 73052) to be built with the larger BR1G tender for working over this route. The only other locomotives to use these tenders were the large 9F 2-10-0s. 73050 sometimes piloted the famous "Pines Express". It remained on the S&D until 1964 when it was moved to Shrewsbury, before spending some time in store, actually being withdrawn from stock for a few weeks. In 1966 another move took 73050 to Agecroft, in Manchester, before finally ending up at Patricroft and eventual withdrawal in July 1968 having run approximately 825,000 miles. Letters in the Nene Valley Railway's archive indicate
    9.00
    1 votes
    115
    British Rail Class 101

    British Rail Class 101

    The British Rail Class 101 diesel multiple units were built by Metro-Cammell at Washwood Heath in Birmingham from 1956 to 1959, following construction of a series of prototype units. This class proved to be one of the most successful and longest-lived of BR's First Generation DMUs, second in age only to the Class 121, with the final five units being withdrawn on 24 December 2003. The oldest set was, by then, just over 47 years old. When TOPS was originally introduced only the Driving Motor Brake Second (DMBS) and the Driving Motor Composite (with Lavatory) (DMCL) were classified as Class 101 (AEC engines) or Class 102 (Leyland engines). The Driving Trailer Composite (with Lavatory) (DTCL) were either Class 144 or Class 147. The Trailer Seconds (with Lavatory) (TSL) were Class 162, the Trailer Brake Second (with Lavatory) (TBSL) were Class 168 and the Trailer Composite (with Lavatory) (TCL) were Class 171. Later all the cars were reclassified, becoming Class 101. In The Railway Series books by the Rev. W. Awdry, the character Daisy the Diesel Rail-Car was introduced to assist on the Branch Line when Thomas was away for repair. Daisy is undoubtedly based on the Metro-Cammell DMUs,
    9.00
    1 votes
    116
    British Rail Class 375

    British Rail Class 375

    The British Rail Class 375 Electrostar electric multiple unit train was built by Bombardier Transportation (previously ADtranz) at their Derby Works, from 1999 to 2005. The Electrostar family, which also includes Classes 357, 376, 377, 378 and 379, is the most numerous type of EMU introduced since the privatisation of British Rail. These units form the basis of Southeastern's mainline fleet. These trains are owned by HSBC Rail, and leased back to Southeastern for operation from London to Kent and parts of East Sussex. The first batch of 30 trains (Class 375/6) were fitted with both a pantograph and third-rail shoes for dual voltage, where the remainder of these trains have one coach in each unit with a recess where the pantograph could be fitted, allowing for future conversion to run on AC power from overhead lines. Although the units are normally operated on 750V DC lines only, the class is numbered in the 3xx series which usually refers to AC operation. The option is available for the 375/6 units to be leased to a network which operates on 25kV AC overhead lines. Southern's Class 375 units have since been converted to Class 377. The ex-375s, akin to Southern's 377/3, have a
    9.00
    1 votes
    117
    British Rail Class 43

    British Rail Class 43

    • Built by: BREL
    The British Rail Class 43 (HST) is the TOPS classification used for the InterCity 125 High Speed Train power cars, built by BREL from 1975 to 1982. The class is the fastest diesel locomotive in the world, with an absolute maximum speed of 148 mph (238 km/h), and a regular service speed of 125 mph (201 km/h). There are claims that this diesel rail speed record has been broken twice unofficially: by the TEP80 Russian train in 1993 achieving 271 km/h (168 mph), and the Talgo XXI Spanish train reporting 158 mph (254 km/h) in 2002. In the early 1970s the British Railways Board (BRB) decided to replace its main-line express diesel traction. Financial limitations were tight, so mass electrification was not possible. As a result, a new generation of high-speed diesel trains had to be developed. Experience with the high-speed Class 55 Deltic locomotives had shown that a low axle weight was essential to avoid damage to the track at sustained high speed, and that high-speed engines were the only way to provide a good enough power/weight ratio for diesels. To power the HST at up to 125 mph (201 km/h), each power car had a new diesel engine, the 12-cylinder Paxman Valenta, running at 1,500 rpm
    9.00
    1 votes
    118
    British Rail Class 488

    British Rail Class 488

    The British Rail Class 488 are unpowered trailer sets, converted from Mark 2F coaches for the Gatwick Express service from London Victoria railway station to Gatwick Airport. The sets were converted from conventional locomotive-hauled coaching stock in 1983–1984, and were used in combination with Class 73 electro-diesel locomotives and Class 489 luggage vans. Two variations were converted: 2-car sets (containing first class accommodation) and 3-car sets (containing standard class accommodation only). They are officially formed of two subclasses. The two-car units are classified as Class 488/2 and are numbered in the range 488201–488210 and the three-car sets are Class 488/3 and are numbered 488301–19. After privatisation, the entire Class 488 fleet passed to the Gatwick Express franchise. One unit, 488301, was withdrawn before privatisation, following an accident at Battersea Park railway station in 1985. Immediately after privatisation the Class 488 fleet was used exclusively on Gatwick Express trains. They were painted in the Gatwick Express variation of InterCity livery. Some sets were later reliveried with Continental Airlines advertisements, including units 488203/04/07/08/10,
    9.00
    1 votes
    119
    British Rail Class 60

    British Rail Class 60

    The British Rail Class 60 is a class of Co-Co heavy freight diesel-electric locomotives built by Brush Traction. They are nicknamed Tugs by Rail Enthusiasts. In the 1980s, British Rail decided it had a requirement for a high powered Type 5 diesel locomotive for use on its Trainload Freight sector. On 10 August 1987, the British Rail Board issued a competitive tender for response by 7 November, for a fleet of 100 locomotives. Of the six companies invited to tender, only three bid responses were received: Of the three bidders, Brush was selected, and an order placed for 100 locomotives in a deal worth around £120 million. Brush sub-contracted parts construction, with final construction at Brush's erecting shops at Loughborough. The bodyshells, shared with the Class 92 electric locomotives, were fabricated by Procor (UK) of Wakefield. The engine was a higher-powered development of the Mirrlees engine previously fitted experimentally to British Rail Class 37 nos. 37901-37904. The first locomotive was delivered in June 1989 and sent to Derby for testing, which revealed a number of teething problems. Parts requiring modifications included the axle box suspension and the Mirlees engine
    9.00
    1 votes
    120
    DB Class V 100

    DB Class V 100

    These DB Class V 100 diesel locomotives were produced in the late 1950s by the Deutsche Bundesbahn for non-electrified branch lines as a replacement for steam locomotives. The V 100 class was built as two different versions. Decommissioned locomotives were also used in Austria by the Austrian Federal Railways during the 1990s and early 2000s, where they were registered as ÖBB Class 2048 The Class V 100.10 was a diesel locomotive for light passenger and goods traffic on branch lines. It was developed in 1956 by the Bundesbahn Central Office in Munich together with the engineering works, Maschinenbau Kiel (MaK), for the Deutsche Bundesbahn. In the late autumn of 1958 the first six trials engines were delivered. Numbers V 100 001 to 005 were fitted with a 809 kW (1,100 HP) motor, but number V 100 006 was given a 993 kW (1,350 HP) motor. The latter formed the basis for the V 100.20, later DB Class 212. Number V 100 007 was built by MaK as the seventh trial engine and tested in Sweden; it was sold in 1959 to the Deutsche Bundesbahn. In 1960, the prototype series, numbers 001 to 005 and 007 were renumbered to V 100 1001 to 1005 and 1007 in order to better distinguish them from the more
    9.00
    1 votes
    121
    LMS Hughes Crab

    LMS Hughes Crab

    The London Midland and Scottish Railway (LMS) Hughes Crab or Horwich Mogul is a class of mixed traffic 2-6-0 steam locomotive built between 1926 and 1932. They are noted for their appearance with large highly-angled cylinders caused by restricted loading gauge. These locomotives were referred to as "Crabs". Several authors have claimed that this refers to the resemblance to a crab's pincers of the outside cylinders and valve motion. Another suggestion is that the nickname refers to the "scuttling" motion felt on the footplate when the engine is being worked hard, due largely to the inclined cylinders, producing a sensation that it is walking along the track. In some areas they also received the nickname "frothblowers" from their tendency to prime easily when the boiler was overfilled, or the feedwater contaminated. Designed by George Hughes, Chief Mechanical Engineer of the LMS, and built at the ex-L&YR works at Horwich and the ex-LNWR works at Crewe, they were put into service by his successor, Henry Fowler. The design incorporated a number of advanced features for the time such as long travel valves, compensated brake gear, a new design of tender and a new boiler, the latter
    9.00
    1 votes
    122
    PRR 3750

    PRR 3750

    PRR 3750 is one of the two preserved class K4s Pacifics steam locomotive of the Pennsylvania Railroad. Just like PRR 1361 the 3750 was used to haul the PRR's main line intercity passenger trains such as The Broadway Limited. Despite the attempt by PRR management to replace the K4s with the PRR K5 and PRR T1, the K4s would remain in action until dieselization in 1957. The 3750 was spared from being scrapped because, when the PRR was considering steam engines for preservation, the first K4, #1737, was in very bad condition and only a complete rebuild would save her. The PRR decided to scrap the 1737 and repaint #3750 as #1737. As of 2010 the 3750 sits on static display at the Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania in Strasburg.
    9.00
    1 votes
    123
    Rhaetian Railway Ge 6/6 II

    Rhaetian Railway Ge 6/6 II

    The Rhaetian Railway Ge 6/6  is a class of heavy metre gauge electric locomotives operated by the Rhaetian Railway (RhB), which is the main railway network in the Canton of Graubünden, Switzerland. The class is so named because it was the second class of locomotives of the Swiss locomotive and railcar classification type Ge 6/6 to be acquired by the Rhaetian Railway. According to that type designation, Ge 6/6 denotes a narrow gauge electric adhesion locomotive with a total of six axles, all of which are drive axles. The twelve-wheel Ge 6/6  machines (UIC classification Bo′Bo′Bo′) are currently used mainly to haul goods trains. In the 1950s, traffic on the Rhaetian Railway grew so strongly that the existing Ge 6/6 Crocodiles and the Ge 4/4  Bo-Bo locomotives were no longer sufficient. Construction of the Bergell power station, begun in 1958 by the Elektrizitätswerk der Stadt Zürich, required the transfer of up to 1,000 tonnes (980 long tons; 1,100 short tons) of cement per day from the Untervaz to the Engadin. For that task, the Rhaetian Railway required a locomotive that could haul a load of 250 tonnes (250 long tons; 280 short tons) on the 3.5% gradients of the Albula Railway. The
    9.00
    1 votes
    124
    SNCF Class BB 9300

    SNCF Class BB 9300

    The SNCF Class BB 9300 electric locomotives were built by Schneider-Jeumont/CEM between 1967–1969. In recent years they have been more common on services around Marseille, Avignon, Nîmes, Narbonne and Toulouse. All are allocated Toulouse depot. They work passenger services and do not operate freight services. The main service they operate is between Marseille and Toulouse, but can be seen elsewhere in the south west.
    9.00
    1 votes
    125
    9.00
    1 votes
    126
    British Rail 10800

    British Rail 10800

    British Railways 10800 was a diesel locomotive built by the North British Locomotive Company for British Railways in 1950. It had been ordered by the London, Midland and Scottish Railway in 1946 but did not appear until after the 1948 nationalisation of the railways. Design was by George Ivatt and the locomotive was intended as a possible replacement for steam locomotives on secondary and branch lines. The single-cab layout (long bonnet forward) gave the driver a poor view of the road ahead. The view was no worse than a steam locomotive's, so it would have been considered acceptable at the time. During its brief time on the Southern Region, 10800 gained the nickname 'The Wonder Engine', from the locomotive department's daily query, 'I wonder if it will go today'. Due to having been ordered by the LMS before the creation of British Railways (BR), 10800 became the first BR mixed-traffic Diesel-Electric locomotive when it was delivered in 1950. Operationally it was successful enough for BR to order a batch of 54 in 1955 although these, destined to be come BR Class 15 and BR Class 16, used the improved YHXL engine. In 1961 or 1962 (sources differ) No. 10800 was bought by Brush Traction
    5.00
    5 votes
    127
    49 class

    49 class

    The 49 class were branchline diesel-electric locomotives order by and operated by the New South Wales Government Railways, similar to the 48 and 47 classes. When they were ordered from Clyde Engineering at Granville, New South Wales they were ordered in 3 batches, each of six locomotives: 4901 to 4906, 4907 to 4912 and finally 4913 to 4918. This was to keep Clyde interested in staying in New South Wales. On delivery they were initially placed into service in the Central West of NSW and worked on all branchlines as well as mainlines. The need for these locomotives was to replace the last steam locomotives that were in government service in country locations, and were quite trouble free riders. The locomotives had an EMD 8-567CR engine, EMD D25E generator, EMD D29 traction motors. They also were rated at 710 kW/950 HP, weighing in at 80t. They have a length of 15.35m, rode on standard gauge Co-Co bogies and had a top speed of 124 km/h. These locomotives were retired in the 1990s along with fellow classes in their generation. The classes were bought out by various rail companies, including Ritz Rail, Interail, Chicago Freight Car Leasing Australia, The Manildra Group and Patricks
    6.67
    3 votes
    128
    British Rail Class 108

    British Rail Class 108

    The British Rail Class 108 diesel multiple units were built by BR Derby from 1958 to 1961, with a final production quantity of 333 vehicles. These units stayed in regular service until 1990, when they began to be withdrawn from traffic. They were replaced on regional services by the new "Sprinter" derivative units, or by "Turbo" units on services around London. The final units lasted in traffic until October 1993, although many saw further use in departmental service, as sandite or route-learner units. Good condition and lack of asbestos has ensured that many of this class have been saved for preservation. None are currently certified for use on the main line - although the Swanage Railway's set was hauled from the railway to Eastleigh and back, for overhaul - and is believed to be the first class 108 to have been seen on main lines for a very long time. Many vehicles have been preserved on heritage railways.
    6.67
    3 votes
    129
    British Rail Class 438

    British Rail Class 438

    The British Rail TC (Trailer Control) multiple units were un-powered fixed formations of 3 or 4 carriages with a driving position at each end of the set, converted by BR at York Works from locomotive-hauled Mark 1 carriages in 1966-1967 and 1974. The units built on experience gained from the prototype 6TC unit. In time the 3 car units (3TC, numbered in the series 3xx) were reformed into four car units (4TC numbered in the series 4xx) to match the rest of the fleet and later classified as Class 442. This was later changed to Class 491, under which they spent the majority of their working lives. Shortly before withdrawal they were reclassified Class 438 and the units were renumbered to 8001-8034. The units were primarily employed on services between London Waterloo and Weymouth. One or two 4TC units would be propelled from London to Bournemouth by a 3200 HP 4REP unit, controlled from the leading cab. At Bournemouth, one or both 4TCs would continue over the un-electrified line to Weymouth, hauled by a Class 33/1 diesel locomotive, leaving the 4REP at the London end of Bournemouth station. Up trains from Weymouth would follow the same procedure in reverse: the Class 33/1 locomotive
    6.67
    3 votes
    130
    SNCF Class BB 22200

    SNCF Class BB 22200

    • Built by: Alstom
    The BB 22200 is a class of electric locomotives in service with the French railways SNCF, built by Alsthom between 1976 and 1986. They are a dual voltage version (1500 V DC and 25 kV 50 Hz AC) of the BB 7200 and BB 15000 classes. From 1994 nine of the class were used for hauling freight trains through the Channel Tunnel as the Class 92 locomotives were not yet delivered. These were numbered 22379/380/399-405, and were used until 1995. For use on British railways these locomotives were allocated the UK traction number Class 22. After the first test held in 1976, the BB 22200 were introduced on the Marseille-Nice-Ventimiglia line in southern France-northern Italy. The following year they started to haul longer distance trains such as the Train Bleu (1000 km from Ventimiglia to Paris) and the car transport train between Marseille and Paris. The BB 22200 are capable of a maximum speed of 160 kilometres per hour (99.4 mph). 8 locomotives, having a maximum power of 5,600 kilowatts (7,500 hp), were equipped for services up to 200 kilometres per hour (124 mph) and can work on TGV lines.
    6.67
    3 votes
    131
    Southern Pacific 6051

    Southern Pacific 6051

    Southern Pacific Railroad's (SP) number 6051 is an EMD E9 diesel locomotive. It was one of nine E9s built for SP by EMD in December 1954 as Construction Number 20100 on SP Order Number P-1041 and EMD Order Number 2068. It entered service on January 4, 1955 at Los Angeles. These nine locomotives allowed the dieselization of the Coast Daylight and "Lark" passenger trains. The units operated with E7s, ALCO PAs, and other passenger equipped diesels as required. Assigned to the Los Angeles passenger pool for its entire career, it worked north via the Coast Line to San Francisco or east on the Sunset route to El Paso or New Orleans. When SP and Rock Island began pooling locomotives on the Chicago-Los Angeles "Golden State" in 1967, it also worked those trains until they were discontinued the following year, often in mixed SP/Rock Island consists. SP 6051 is the only surviving Southern Pacific passenger-dedicated diesel locomotive, and it currently resides at the California State Railroad Museum in Sacramento, California. 6051 was delivered in the "Daylight" paint scheme, with Farr-Aire intake grilles, a Pyle National Gyralight in the upper headlight housing, nose MU connections, dynamic
    6.67
    3 votes
    132
    Union Pacific 9000 Class

    Union Pacific 9000 Class

    The Union Pacific 9000 Class was a class of 88 4-12-2 steam locomotives built by Alco between 1926 and 1930. Union Pacific's crossing of the continental divide had steep grades, and train tonnages were constantly increasing. During the 1920s, trains were being handled by 2-8-8-0 Mallet compounds and 2-10-2s. Speeds above 25 mph were not then possible with the Mallet arrangement, whilst 2-10-2s had limited adhesion. To enable a 12-coupled locomotive to negotiate curves, the 9000s were provided with Alco's new lateral motion device. These locomotives were used to increase the speed of freight trains in flat country, and were fairly successful, but were maintenance nightmares, largely because of their use of an inaccessible third cylinder driving a cranked second driving axle between the frames. There was no inaccessible valve gear to worry about, however. ALCO had obtained permission to use the conjugated valve gear invented by Sir Nigel Gresley. This system used two hinged levers connected to the outer cylinder's valves to operate the inner cylinder's valve. The 9000 class locomotives were the largest ever to use Gresley gear. Between 1934 and 1940 eight of the first fifteen locos
    6.67
    3 votes
    133
    British Rail Class 47

    British Rail Class 47

    The British Rail Class 47, is a class of British railway diesel-electric locomotive that was developed in the 1960s by Brush Traction. A total of 512 Class 47s were built at Crewe Works and Brush's Falcon Works, Loughborough between 1962 and 1968, which made them the most numerous class of British mainline diesel locomotive. They were fitted with the Sulzer 12LDA28C twin-bank twelve-cylinder unit producing 2,750 bhp (2,050 kW) - though this was later derated to 2,580 bhp (1,920 kW) to improve reliability - and have been used on both passenger and freight trains on Britain's railways for over 40 years. Despite the introduction of more modern types of traction, as of 2008 a significant number are still in use, both on the mainline and on heritage railways. As of March 2012, 88 locomotives still exist as Class 47s, with further examples having been converted to other classes; 27 are engaged on active work on the mainline. The Class 47 history begins in the early 1960s with the stated aim of the British Transport Commission (BTC) to completely remove steam locomotives from British Rail by a target date of 1968. The railways archive - Retrieved on 2007-06-15 They therefore
    5.75
    4 votes
    134
    British Rail Class 205

    British Rail Class 205

    The British Rail Class 205 (or 3H) diesel-electric multiple units were built by BR at Eastleigh from 1957–1962. They were replaced by Turbostar units. This class of unit were built in four different batches for use on different lines. The first batch of units, numbered 1101–1118, was built in 1957 as two-car units and classified as 2H. They were built for services in Hampshire on the non-electrified routes between Portsmouth Harbour, Salisbury and Andover and between Alton, Winchester and Southampton Terminus. The first units entered service in September 1957. However, due to increasing passenger numbers, all eighteen units were strengthened to three cars in 1958 and 1969, with the addition of a centre trailer, and therefore were reclassified as 3H units. Upon the introduction of TOPS they were reclassified as Class 205. Some of these were later converted back to 2 car sets, but they retained their Class 205 designation. The second batch of 2H units, numbered 1119–1122, was built as 2-car units in 1958. These units were built for services on the Marshlink Line from Hastings to Ashford, and associated branch lines. These units remained as two-car sets until 1979, and were
    7.50
    2 votes
    135
    British Rail Class 73

    British Rail Class 73

    • Built by: English Electric
    The British Rail Class 73 is a United Kingdom model of electro-diesel locomotive. The type is unusual in that it can operate from the Southern Region's 650/750 V DC third-rail or an on-board diesel engine to allow it to operate on non-electrified routes. This makes it very versatile, although the diesel engine produces less power than is available from the third-rail supply so the locomotives rarely stray from the former Southern Region of British Rail. Following the withdrawal and scrapping of the more powerful Class 74 electro-diesels in 1977, the Class 73 is now unique on the British railway network. 10 locomotives have been scrapped. These locomotives were ordered as part of British Railways' 1955 Modernisation plan which included the extension of the Southern Region electrification to various main lines. They were intended as mixed-traffic locomotives, hauling parcels, freight and also passenger trains, usually on routes that included some non-electrified sections, such as boat trains. This class of 49 locomotives was built in two batches using English Electric components. The first six locomotives were built by BR at Eastleigh works in 1962 and were numbered E6001-E6006 and
    7.50
    2 votes
    136
    GER Class 527

    GER Class 527

    The GER Class 527 was a class of fifteen 2-6-0 steam tender locomotives designed by William Adams for the Great Eastern Railway. This was the last design that Adams prepared for the GER, although they did not enter service until his successor Massey Bromley had taken office and incorporated some modifications to the design. In order to haul heavier trains and compete for the coal traffic into London, the GER asked William Adams to design a locomotive capable of hauling a train of 400 long tons net (700 tons gross). Tests were carried out with 265 class 4-4-0s to ensure that such trailing loads were feasible, followed by a prototype 2-6-0 number 527. Number 527 was the first locomotive in Britain to use the 2-6-0 wheel arrangement, and was named Mogul after the Great Moguls of Delhi, the epithet becoming the generic name for locomotives with that wheel arrangement. As was the GER's practice for locomotives built by outside contractors, the class was referred to by the number of the first locomotive, subsequent locos being numbered sequentially up to 541. They were used on coal trains from Peterborough to London, but were found uneconomic, and so had short lives, being withdrawn
    7.50
    2 votes
    137
    Rhaetian Railway G 4/5

    Rhaetian Railway G 4/5

    The Rhaetian Railway G 4/5 was a class of metre gauge 2-8-0 steam locomotives operated by the Rhaetian Railway (RhB), which is the main railway network in the Canton of Graubünden, Switzerland. The class was named G 4/5 under the Swiss locomotive and railcar classification system. According to that system, G 4/5 denotes a narrow gauge steam locomotive with a total of five axles, four of which are drive axles. The Rhaetian Railway procured a total of 29 examples of the G 4/5 class between 1904 and 1915. Built as tender locomotives by the Swiss Locomotive and Machine Works (SLM) in Winterthur, the G 4/5s were used mainly on the Albula Railway until that line was electrified in 1919. Two preserved examples of the class are still in service on the Rhaetian Railway network today. As early as 1902, the SLM manufactured two four-coupled saturated steam locomotives for the Imperial Railway Company of Ethiopia. In the same year, trial runs using one of these locomotives were carried out on the Rhaetian Railway. The positive results of these tests led the Board of the Rhaetian Railway to order four largely identical machines, at a price of 61,500 Swiss Francs per unit. These G 4/5 class
    7.50
    2 votes
    138
    Rhaetian Railway Ge 6/6 I

    Rhaetian Railway Ge 6/6 I

    The Rhaetian Railway Ge 6/6  is a class of metre gauge C′C′ electric locomotives operated by the Rhaetian Railway (RhB), which is the main railway network in the Canton of Graubünden, Switzerland. The class is so named because it was the first class of locomotives of the Swiss locomotive and railcar classification type Ge 6/6 to be acquired by the Rhaetian Railway. According to that classification system, Ge 6/6 denotes a narrow gauge electric adhesion locomotive with a total of six axles, all of which are drive axles. Due to their shape - they are similar in form to the SBB-CFF-FFS Crocodiles of the Gotthard Railway - the Ge 6/6  locomotives have also collectively been nicknamed the Rhaetian Crocodiles by rail fans. Their internal working RhB designation is C-C. Following the electrification of the Albula Railway in 1919, the Rhaetian Railway needed to acquire more electric locomotives. That need was met by the acquisition of six locomotives of a new class Ge 6/6, numbered 401 to 406. Manufacturers were Swiss Locomotive and Machine Works (SLM), Brown, Boveri & Cie (BBC) and Maschinenfabrik Oerlikon (MFO). The introduction of electric operations on the line from Landquart to Davos
    7.50
    2 votes
    139
    British Rail Class 13

    British Rail Class 13

    • Built by: English Electric
    The British Rail (BR) Class 13 were created in 1965 because of the need to provide more powerful shunters for the Tinsley Marshalling Yard. This was achieved by permanently coupling together two Class 08 shunters as a 'master and slave' (alternatively 'cow and calf') units, the latter with its cab removed. Both units were ballasted to improve traction. Initially the units were coupled cab-to-cab but it was found more practical to couple master nose to slave cab. A larger, rigid locomotive could not be used because of the risk of grounding on the marshalling yard hump. Three pairs were formed as follows: With the end of hump shunting at Tinsley the class became obsolete. The unique qualities of the locomotives were not required elsewhere and so withdrawal was inevitable; 13002 was withdrawn in 1983, with the remaining two locomotives going with the closure of Tinsley hump in 1985. None of this unusual class survives.
    5.50
    4 votes
    140
    British Rail Class 28

    British Rail Class 28

    The British Rail Class 28 (Metropolitan-Vickers Type 2) diesel locomotives, or 'Metrovicks' as they were popularly known, were built as part of the British Railways 1955 Modernisation Plan. The locomotives had a Co-Bo wheel arrangement (a 6-wheel bogie at one end, a 4-wheel bogie at the other) – unique in British Railways practice though not uncommon in other countries, notably Japan. This affected their route availability, due to the different axle loading at each end of the loco, and made maintenance more complicated. The maximum tractive effort of 50,000 lbf (220 kN) was unusually high for a Type 2 locomotive but, as there were five (not four) driving axles, the risk of wheelslip was minimal. With low-speed Crossley 8-cylinder HST Vee8 two stroke engines, they represented an experiment in two stroke versus four stroke engines for diesel-electric traction. The engines had exhaust pulse pressure charging and developed 1,200 horsepower (895 kW) at 625 rpm. There were no valves, and inlet and exhaust were via ports in the cylinder walls. The same engine was originally fitted in the Irish A Class and the Western Australian Government Railways X class Almost from the beginning the
    6.33
    3 votes
    141
    British Rail Class 35

    British Rail Class 35

    The British Rail (BR) Class 35 is a class of mixed-traffic B-B diesel locomotive with hydraulic transmission. Because of their Mekydro-design hydraulic transmission units, the locomotives became known as the Hymeks. The class was developed for the Western Region of British Railways, which had opted for lightweight locomotives with hydraulic transmission, when allocated funds under the British Railways Modernisation Plan of 1955. One hundred and one of the class were built between 1961 and 1964, when it became apparent that there was a requirement for a medium power diesel-hydraulic design for both secondary passenger work and freight duties. They were allocated to Bristol Bath Road, Cardiff Canton, and Old Oak Common. None of the class was named. Withdrawal from service began in 1971, and was completed by 1975. Their early withdrawal was caused, primarily, by BR classifying the hydraulic transmission as non-standard. Four examples survived into preservation. The builder, Beyer Peacock (Hymek) Ltd, was a joint venture between Bristol Siddeley Engines (BSE) (licensed to build Maybach engines), Stone-Platt Industries (licensed to build Mekydro transmissions), and the locomotive
    6.33
    3 votes
    142
    British Rail Class 43

    British Rail Class 43

    The British Rail Class 43 diesel-hydraulic locomotives were built by the North British Locomotive Company (NBL) from 1960–1962. The D800 series diesel-hydraulic 'Warship Class', of B-B wheel arrangement, was constructed by two different builders. Those locomotives built by British Railways at Swindon Works were originally numbered D800-D832 and D866-D870. They were allocated Class 42 with the advent of TOPS, while those built by the North British Locomotive Company (NBL) were originally numbered D833-D865 and allocated Class 43. Because of their early withdrawal dates, neither the Swindon- nor the NBL-built locomotives carried TOPS numbers. More detail on factors common to both types can be found in the article on the Swindon-built British Rail Class 42. The NBL-built D800s differed mechanically from the Swindon-built batch: the Swindon locomotives used Maybach engines connected to Mekydro hydraulic transmissions whereas the NBL-built examples used MAN engines and Voith transmissions. NBL had entered into an arrangement with the German company MAN AG in the early 1950s to market MAN's engine designs in the UK: NBL were anxious to enter the diesel locomotive market, especially once
    6.33
    3 votes
    143
    6.33
    3 votes
    144
    British Rail Class 01

    British Rail Class 01

    • Built by: Andrew Barclay & Sons Co.
    The British Rail Class 01 diesel locomotive was a short wheelbase 0-4-0 diesel-mechanical design intended for use in areas with tight curves and limited clearance. Four examples were built by Andrew Barclay Sons & Co. of Kilmarnock (Scotland) in 1956. They were numbered 11503-11506, then D2953-2956, and two survived long enough to enter the BR TOPS system as 01 001 (D2954) and 01 002 (D2955). Their original depot allocation was to Stratford (30A). A fifth similar locomotive was built in 1958 for departmental stock (maintenance work). It was originally No. 81 but was renumbered D2956 in July 1967 after the original D2956 had been withdrawn. The locomotives were very versatile, despite having only 153 horsepower (114 kW) available, and were small enough to operate on any railway on the BR standard gauge network — except for the small problem that they were limited to 14 ⁄4 mph (22.8 km/h). For a fleet of just five locomotives, they were also very reliable, although Stratford Docks, where they originally worked, was not noted for creating very hard labour. 01 001 and 01 002 survived in BR service because they were required to service the Holyhead breakwater, being the only locomotives
    8.00
    1 votes
    145
    British Rail Class 03

    British Rail Class 03

    The British Rail Class 03 locomotive is, together with Class 04, one of BR's most successful smaller 0-6-0 diesel-mechanical shunters. The class, numbering 230 examples, was built by British Railways' Swindon and Doncaster works in 1957-1962 and numbered D2000-D2199 and D2370-D2399 (later 03004 to 03399). D2370 and D2371 were used as departmental locomotives and originally numbered 91 and 92 respectively. Like other shunters of this size, the Class 03 was built for light duties where a larger locomotive was not needed, especially for shunting at locomotive and carriage depots and as station pilots. The reduction over time in the demand for shunting locomotives meant that they were progressively withdrawn from 1968 onwards, many being sold to private industry. However, some remained in service much longer, with two examples on the Isle of Wight lasting until 1993 (mainland examples had gone by 1987). In 1998, one of the Isle of Wight locos, no. 03 179, was re-instated into service by the West Anglia Great Northern Railway Company (WAGN) for service at their Hornsey depot. This remains the last operational Class 03 locomotive on the network. It is named Clive after a depot employee.
    8.00
    1 votes
    146
    British Rail Class 52

    British Rail Class 52

    • Locomotives of this class: Western Enterprise
    British Rail (BR) assigned Class 52 to the class of 74 large Type 4 diesel-hydraulic locomotives built for the Western Region of British Railways between 1961 and 1964. All were given two-word names, the first word being Western; thus the type became known as Westerns. When switching to diesel traction as part of the Modernisation Plan of the 1950s, BR designed, and commissioned designs for, a large number of locomotive types. At this time (and arguably right up until Sectorisation in the 1980s), BR's regions had a high degree of autonomy, which extended as far as classes of locomotives ordered and even the design criteria for those locomotives. Whilst almost all other diesel locomotives were diesel-electric, the Western Region employed a policy of using diesel-hydraulic traction, originally commissioning three classes of main line locomotives— a type 2 and two type 4s (later designations class 22, class 41 and class 42). With pressure to increase the speed of the transition from steam to diesel, volume orders for the class 22 and class 42 followed in 1957, a mere two years after the original orders and well before any idea of performance or reliability could be gained. At the same
    8.00
    1 votes
    147
    British Rail Class 77

    British Rail Class 77

    The British Rail Class 77, also known as Class EM2, is a class of 1.5 kV DC, Co-Co electric locomotive. They were built by Metropolitan-Vickers in 1953–1954 for use over the Woodhead Line between Manchester and Sheffield. Seven locomotives of this type were constructed. They represented the first Co-Co type of overhead electric locomotive built for use in the United Kingdom. The design was based on that of the smaller Class EM1, which dated from 1941. Initially, 27 locomotives of this type had been planned, but by the early 1950s, the benefits of using the 25 kV AC system had been demonstrated, which meant that the Woodhead Line would be an isolated electric system. Consequently the order was cut to just seven locomotives. The locomotives were initially numbered 27000-27006 and were painted in BR black livery. Construction took place at Gorton Works, Manchester with electrical equipment supplied by Metropolitan-Vickers. All seven were named after characters from Greek mythology in 1959-1960. They were primarily used for express passenger trains between Manchester Piccadilly and Sheffield Victoria. In 1957, the class was renumbered with the addition of an "E" prefix to the number.
    8.00
    1 votes
    148
    British Rail Class 84

    British Rail Class 84

    The British Rail Class 84 was a 25 kV AC electric locomotive that operated on the West Coast Main Line of the London Midland Region. As part of the modernization of the West Coast Main Line, which included electrification, 100 locomotives of five types were acquired from different manufacturers. Ten Class AL4 locomotives numbered E3036 - E3045 were built in 1960 to a design by GEC by the North British Locomotive Company in Springburn, Glasgow. The locomotives always worked on power provided by overhead catenary energized at 25,000 V AC. However, the main transformer, normally operated with the four windings in series, could be operated at 6250V AC with the transformer windings in parallel. This voltage was initially to be used where limited clearances gave concern over use of the higher voltage. Problems with the mercury-arc rectifiers plagued this class and in 1962 E3036 was returned to GEC, the builder of the electrical equipment, in an attempt to find a solution. Within a year, all ten were out of service for repair. The problems persisted and in 1967 they were once more placed into storage, along with Class AL3. During this time E3043 went to Rugby Testing Centre for
    8.00
    1 votes
    149
    DB Class V 51 and V 52

    DB Class V 51 and V 52

    The DB Class V 51 (from 1968: DB Class 251) and DB Class V 52 (from 1968: DB Class 252) are classes of almost identical narrow gauge 4 axle diesel hydraulic locomotives built in 1964 for the Deutsche Bundesbahn, being built for 750 mm and 1000 mm gauge lines respectively. Both are outwardly similar to the standard gauge DB Class V 100 and were built ot replace steam engines on the narrow gauge lines in Baden-Württemberg. Due to partial line closures the locomotives did not all work for long for the Deutsche Bundesbahn, subsequently working for different private companies in Italy, Spain and Austria. In the early 1960s the narrow gauge railways of Baden-Württemberg were still operated by 13 outdated steam locomotives. To enable their withdrawal, and to continue operations on the 750 mm and 1000 mm gauge railways the state of Baden-Wuerttemberg subsidised the production of diesel locomotives by the Deutsche Bundesbahn. Thus the Deutsche Bundesbahn was asked to provide locomotives with suitably low axle load, suitable for both freight and passenger work, and which were suitable for use on small radius curves. High speed was not a primary requirement, more so on ease of maintenance and
    8.00
    1 votes
    150
    K 36

    K 36

    The Denver and Rio Grande Western K-36 class are ten 3 ft  (914 mm) narrow gauge, Mikado type, 2-8-2 steam locomotives built for the Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad (DRGW) by Baldwin Locomotive Works. They were shipped to the Rio Grande in 1925, and were first used along the Monarch Branch and Marshall Pass, but were later sent to the Third Division out of Alamosa. Of the original ten, four are owned by the Durango and Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad (D&SNG) and five by the Cumbres and Toltec Scenic Railroad (C&TS). Number 485 fell into the turntable pit at Salida and was scrapped in Pueblo in 1955, with many parts being saved. The locomotives' name of K-36 comes from two different sources. The K in the name comes from the locomotives' wheel arrangement (Mikado), and the 36 stands for 36,000 pounds of tractive effort. The K-36s were used primarily as freight locomotives out of Alamosa to Durango, and to Farmington, New Mexico, as well as out of Salida to Gunnison (over Marshall Pass) until 1955 and to Monarch on the Monarch Branch until 1956. They were built with special valves to allow brake control between locomotives while double-heading, and were commonly found between
    8.00
    1 votes
    151
    SNCF Class BB 25500

    SNCF Class BB 25500

    • Built by: Alstom
    SNCF's BB 25500 class are part of a series of electric locomotives built by Alstom. They are the dual system version of the BB 17000 (AC) and BB 8500 (DC) locomotives (17000+8500=25500). They are fitted with monomotor bogies with two different gear ratios. This allows them to have increased tractive effort in exchange for a reduction in top speed. This makes them suitable for both freight and passenger trains. They were built in three distinct batches leading to detail differences. They remain in use as mixed traffic locomotives, mostly with TER and Transilien. Locomotives 25517, 25518, 25523, 25528, 25572 & 25576 have been exported to Romania. They work with former SNCF Rio carriages for Regiotrans. Services worked are: The locomotives have been renumbered by adding 400,000 to their SNCF numbers.
    8.00
    1 votes
    152
    British Rail Class 377

    British Rail Class 377

    The Class 377 Electrostar is a British electric multiple-unit train (EMU) built by Bombardier Transportation at its Derby Works, from 2001 to the present. The Electrostar family, which also includes Classes 357, 375, 376, 378, and 379, is the most numerous type of EMU built in the post-privatisation period of Britain's railways. It forms the major part of the Southern fleet. The units work suburban services in south London, and rural commuter services to Sussex, Kent and the South Coast, on which they replaced the old 4Cig and 4Vep slam-door stock. Built in the early 2000s, the units had a troubled introduction: being fully air-conditioned, their higher power consumption compared to the slam-door Mark 1-based stock that they replaced led to major upgrades being required to the 750 V DC third-rail power supply used in the former Southern region. The collapse of Railtrack following the Hatfield accident further delayed this upgrade work and the new stock did not enter squadron service until 2003. Class 377s are fitted with external CCTV. There is a disabled seating area, and both the intermediate coaches have toilets. Bodyside power doors are electrically operated, a move away from
    7.00
    2 votes
    153
    British Rail Class 86

    British Rail Class 86

    • Built by: English Electric
    The British Rail Class 86 was the standard electric locomotive built during the 1960s, developed as a result of testing with the earlier Classes 81, 82, 83, 84 and 85. One hundred of these locomotives were built from 1965-1966 by either English Electric at Vulcan Foundry, Newton-le-Willows, or British Rail (BR) at their Doncaster works. The class was built to haul trains on the then newly electrified West Coast Main Line, from London Euston, to Birmingham, Crewe, Manchester Piccadilly, Liverpool and later Preston and Glasgow. They helped to replace steam locomotives, which were finally withdrawn by BR in 1968. Under the earlier BR classification, the type was given the designation AL6 (meaning the 6th design of AC Locomotive), and locomotives were numbered E3101-E3200. In 1968, this was changed to Class 86, when BR introduced the TOPS classification system. In the early years the locomotives became notorious for track damage, being fitted with axle-hung traction motors, in place of the bogie-frame-mounted motors of the earlier designs. This additional unsprung mass was causing damage at high speeds. In 1969 number E3173, was fitted experimentally with the large helical 'flexicoil'
    7.00
    2 votes
    154
    British Rail Class 92

    British Rail Class 92

    The British Rail Class 92 is a dual-voltage electric locomotive which can run on 25 kV AC from overhead wires or 750 V DC from a third rail. It was designed specifically to operate services through the Channel Tunnel between Britain and France. Eurotunnel indicates the Class 92 locomotive as the reference for other locomotives which railway undertakings might want to get certified for usage in the Channel tunnel. Locomotives of this type are operated by Eurotunnel and DB Schenker. In France, a number were also owned and operated by SNCF; these were classified as CC 92000 on French railways. The fleet of 46 locomotives was built by a consortium of Brush Traction and ABB Traction. Parts construction was sub-contracted, with only final construction and commissioning being undertaken at Brush's erecting shops at Loughborough between 1993 and 1996 (First unit was produced from 1992, and was finished in April 1993) The bodyshells, shared with the Class 60 diesel locomotives but with a modified front end, were fabricated by Procor (UK) of Horbury and delivered pre-painted in the then-standard triple grey livery. Propulsion is provided by two ABB traction converters using GTO devices, with
    7.00
    2 votes
    155
    British Rail Class D16/1

    British Rail Class D16/1

    British Railways Class D16/1 or 10000 and 10001 were the first mainline diesel locomotives in Great Britain. They were built by the London, Midland and Scottish Railway at its Derby Works, using the EE16SVT 1600 hp diesel engine with electric transmission, in association with English Electric and the Vulcan Foundry, with whom the LMS had had a long working relationship. LMS 10000 was officially presented to the press at Derby Works in December 1947, having had its maiden run in November 1947, after several weeks of proving trials entered service on the Midland route in February 1948. 10000 was outshopped only two months before nationalisation, and when 10001 appeared in July 1948 it had British Railways livery. They operated over a number of routes out of St Pancras or Euston but their low power outputs meant they were less than inspiring when used on heavily loaded or express services. In March 1953 they were both transferred to the Southern Region of British Railways to allow direct comparison to be made between them and the SR's 10201, 10202 & 10203 and remained there until spring 1955. They (and the SR locomotives) were sent to Derby where they were overhauled and received
    7.00
    2 votes
    156
    Midland Railway 156 Class

    Midland Railway 156 Class

    The Midland Railway 156 Class was a class of 2-4-0 tender engines built at Derby Works between 1866–1874. In total 29 of the class were built under the Midland Railway and 21 survived to become part of the London, Midland and Scottish Railway (LMS) fleet of engines in 1923. By then they were reduced to the humblest of roles. The LMS recognised the significance of the class and number 156 itself was ear-marked for preservation but the decision was over turned and the engine scrapped in 1932. However fifteen years later one of its classmates was spared. One, 158A survives as a static exhibit in the Midland Railway - Butterley in Butterley, Derbyshire. The surviving example is not in as built condition. It has twice been reboilered and the front end rebuilt. The original tender was replaced a century ago.
    7.00
    2 votes
    157
    PKP class Ok22

    PKP class Ok22

    Ok22 is the name for a Polish passenger steam locomotive used by PKP. It was the first locomotive designed in Poland after World War I, so the design work was done jointly with Hanomag, based on the German class P8 (Polish PKP class Ok1) The production lasted from 1923 when the first five engines were built in Germany Hanomag until 1928 when serial production was started in Fablok in Chrzanów. The first Polish-built locomotive (OK22-6) was ready on December 31, 1928. Polish versions of the locomotive bore some improvements and changes compared with German ones, and were similar to PKP class Ty23. OK22 locomotives were the first on the PKP to be equipped with electric lights. During wartime Ok22 bore German classification numbers 38 4501 - 38 4630. Only two examples have survived to this day. Ok22-23 in Jaworzyna Śląska and Ok22-31 in Wolsztyn. Ok22-31 is still operational. It ran until 1997, and after retirement became a stationary exhibit. In 2004 the machine was restored to the working order.
    7.00
    2 votes
    158
    SNCF Class CC 7100

    SNCF Class CC 7100

    • Built by: Alstom
    SNCF's CC 7100 class are part of a series of electric locomotives built by Alsthom. The prototype 'CC 7000' (7001 & 7002) were built in 1949 and the production series locomotives CC 7101-CC 7158 followed during 1952–1955. Two of the class are notable for setting world rail speed records: CC 7121 reaching 243 kilometres per hour (151 mph) on 21 February 1954, and CC 7107 reaching 331 kilometres per hour (206 mph) on 28/29 March 1955. Developed from the CC 7000 class prototype, these locomotives were the first DC electric locomotives on the SNCF to run at more than 100 kilometres per hour (62.1 mph). During the 1950s, SNCF investigations into high speed rail saw some CC 7100 class locomotives specially modified for operation at speeds far higher than their regular service speed. These experiments provided valuable test data for the SNCF to develop increasingly more rapid regular services, including the 200 kilometres per hour (124 mph) Mistral of 1967, and ultimately the TGV. CC 7121 broke the rail speed record when it achieved 243 kilometres per hour (151 mph) on the PLM mainline between Dijon and Beaune on 21 February 1954. Preparations for further high speed tests proceeded, and
    7.00
    2 votes
    159
    SNCF Class Z 22500

    SNCF Class Z 22500

    SNCF Class Z 22500 "Eole" is a type of double-decker, dual-voltage electric multiple units operated on the French RER E line, and originally on the Paris Saint-Lazare network. These trains have been built by GEC Alstom and ANF. The Z 22500 is also known as the SNCF version of the MI 2N. SNCF Class Z 22500 looks very similar to RATP Altéo trains, but many differences exist between these models, such as motorization and design of inner spaces.
    7.00
    2 votes
    160
    British Rail Class 33

    British Rail Class 33

    The British Rail Class 33 also known as the BRCW Type 3 or Crompton is a class of Bo-Bo diesel-electric locomotives ordered in 1957 and built for the Southern Region of British Railways between 1960 and 1962. A total of 98 Class 33s were built by the Birmingham Railway Carriage and Wagon Company (BRCW) and were known as "Cromptons" after the Crompton Parkinson electrical equipment installed in them. Like their lower-powered BRCW sisters (BR Classes 26 and 27), their bodywork and cab ends were of all steel construction. The original (1957) number sequence was D6500—D6597. They began service on the South-Eastern Division of the Southern Region but rapidly spread across the whole Region and many were used much further afield - an example being the weekly Cliffe (Kent) to Uddingston (South Lanarkshire) cement train which was worked as far as York (and occasionally throughout) by a pair of the locomotives. They were built with the ability to supply only the then new electric train heating rather than the ubiquitous steam heating which passenger carriages largely used. Early delivery problems and a shortage of steam locomotives resulted in many Class 24 locomotives being borrowed from
    6.00
    3 votes
    161
    British Rail Class 40

    British Rail Class 40

    • Built by: English Electric
    The British Rail Class 40 is a type of British railway diesel locomotive. Built by English Electric between 1958 and 1962, and eventually numbering 200, they were for a time the pride of the British Rail early diesel fleet. Despite their initial success, by the time the last examples were entering service they were already being replaced on some top-link duties by more powerful locomotives. As they were slowly relegated from express passenger uses, the type found work on secondary passenger and freight services where they worked for many years, the final locomotives being retired from regular service in 1985. The origins of the Class 40 fleet lay in the prototype diesel locomotives (Types D16/1 ordered by the London, Midland and Scottish Railway and British Railways and D16/2 ordered by British Railways between 1947 and 1954) and most notably with the Southern Region locomotive No. 10203, which was powered by English Electric's 16SVT MkII engine developing 2,000 bhp (1,460 kW). The bogie design and power train of 10203 was used almost unchanged on the first ten production Class 40s. British Railways originally ordered ten Class 40s, then known as "English Electric Type 4s", as
    6.00
    3 votes
    162
    British Rail Class 206

    British Rail Class 206

    The British Rail Class 206 or 3R was a type of Diesel electric multiple unit (DEMU) first created in 1964. They were not 'built' as such but rather re-formed from Class 201 and EPB vehicles for use on Reading-Redhill-Tonbridge (North Downs Line) services. Six three-car sets were created, numbered 1201-1206. By 1964, the majority of services on the Southern Region of British Railways had been converted to diesel and electric operation. However, steam locomotives continued to operate the entire service on the North Downs Line. New trains for this route could not be justified as passenger numbers were relatively low. Twelve carriages from class 201 diesel-electric units were available for use following service cuts on the Hastings Line, so a decision was made to combine these vehicles with six redundant driving trailers from 2-EPB electric multiple units (EMU). Several changes were made to the vehicles before they entered service. The EPB vehicles were fitted with buckeye couplers to allow them to attach to the DEMU vehicles. A three-bay luggage area was created in the former EMU carriages to cope with the high level of mail traffic on the Reading to Tonbridge route, while the engines
    5.67
    3 votes
    163
    British Rail Class 41

    British Rail Class 41

    • Built by: BREL
    The British Rail Class 41 was the original classification for the power cars of the prototype High Speed Train. However, the train was later re-classified as a diesel-electric multiple unit, and the whole set became Class 252. They were of Bo-Bo wheel arrangement. Two power cars were built, 41001 and 41002. After the Class 252 re-classification these were renumbered into the carriage numbering range as 43000 and 43001. Today, 41001 is preserved in the National Railway Museum (NRM) in York, while 41002 was scrapped at CF Booth, Rotherham, in December 1990. Both were allocated to Headquarters (HQ). Plans were announced in May 2011 to return 41001 to service by the 125 group, who will be taking the power car on long term loan to complete the work required. On 29 March 2012 41001 was hauled from the NRM York to East Midlands Trains' Neville Hill Depot in Leeds by Devon & Cornwall Railways' Class 31 31601, its first main line outing since 1985. The 125 Group, under the banner of Project Miller, have now started work to return it to running order. As part of this move, it was re-registered as Class 43/9 locomotive 43000. 41001 was one of the attractions at the NRM's "Railfest" event in
    5.67
    3 votes
    164
    British Rail Class 55

    British Rail Class 55

    • Built by: English Electric
    The British Rail Class 55 is a class of diesel locomotive built in 1961 and 1962 by English Electric. They were designed for the high-speed express passenger services on the East Coast Main Line between London King's Cross and Edinburgh. They gained the name "Deltic" from the prototype locomotive, DP1 Deltic, which in turn was named for its Napier Deltic power units. Twenty-two locomotives were built: they dominated express passenger services on the East Coast Main Line (ECML) particularly London – Leeds and London – Edinburgh services until 1978 when InterCity 125 'High Speed Trains' were introduced. 1978–81 saw them gradually relegated to semi-fast or newspaper–parcel–sleeper services along the ECML (destinations including Cleethorpes, Harrogate, Hull, Scarborough and Aberdeen) plus occasional forays 'offline' – York - Liverpool Lime Street semi-fast and Edinburgh - Carlisle via Newcastle stoppers. Withdrawal came at the end of 1981. Six locomotives were preserved and are still running today. Following trials with the prototype DP1 Deltic locomotive, an order was placed with English Electric for a production fleet of 22 units (reduced from the originally-planned 23 ), replacing
    5.67
    3 votes
    165
    GWR 1361 Class

    GWR 1361 Class

    The 1361 Class were small 0-6-0ST steam locomotives built by the Great Western Railway at their Swindon railway works, England, mainly for shunting in docks and other sidings where track curvature was too tight for large locomotives. The 1361 Class were designed by Harold Holcroft, the Great Western Railway's Chief Draughtsman, by adapting the 1392 Class, originally built in 1874 for the Cornwall Minerals Railway, to conform to George Jackson Churchward's standardisation policy (Churchward was the Chief Mechanical Engineer). As such they combined unusual and outdated elements, such as saddle tanks and Allan valve gear, with current Great Western details such the cab. By 1910 the railway was busy converting all its old saddle tank locomotives to carry pannier tanks. The 11 ft 0 in (3.35 m) wheelbase allowed them to negotiate 2 chains (132 ft; 40 m) radius curves, a feature necessary for their intended duties in docks and on lightly laid branch lines. The five locomotives were built at Swindon in 1910 and were set to work alongside the ex-Cornwall Minerals Railway locomotives. Their usual home was Plymouth Millbay, Devon, (later Laira shed) from where they worked in Millbay Docks and
    5.67
    3 votes
    166
    British Rail Class 02

    British Rail Class 02

    • Built by: Yorkshire Engine Company
    The British Rail Class 02 were a class of twenty 0-4-0 diesel-hydraulic shunting locomotives built by the Yorkshire Engine Company in 1960 (first ten, D2850-D2859) and 1961 (D2860-D2869) for service in areas of restricted loading gauge and curvature such as docks. They had the door to the cab at the rear, with a railed veranda behind the cab; this feature was very unusual on British Rail locomotives although was used on many Yorkshire Engine Co. designs and was/is quite normal in North American practice. With the changes in the role of the British railway system and the closing of many of the facilities in which the Class 02 locomotives worked, they were increasingly surplus to requirements. The first locomotive was withdrawn from service in 1969 and the last one in 1973. Only three survived long enough to enter the BR TOPS computer system: 02 001 (formerly D2851), 02 003 (D2853), and 02 004 (D2856). Being only nine to fourteen years old when withdrawn, they still had a lot of life left in them, and the majority were sold to private industry. One example was employed by the National Coal Board at Chatterley Whitfield Colliery near Stoke-on-Trent; this locomotive (number unknown)
    6.50
    2 votes
    167
    British Rail Class 172

    British Rail Class 172

    The Class 172 is a British diesel multiple-unit (DMU) train type of the Turbostar family, similar to the Class 168, Class 170 and Class 171. It was built by Bombardier Transportation at its Derby Works. There will be four sub-types: The 172/0s and 172/1s resemble the existing Turbostar trains in not having end gangways. These trains have a maximum speed of 100 mph (160 km/h). The Class 172/2s and 172/3s used by London Midland resemble the Class 375, Class 377 and Class 379 Electrostars by having end gangways to allow access between units. These trains have a maximum speed of 100 mph (160 km/h). The Class 172 trains are lighter than other Turbostars thanks to the addition of lightweight bogies similar to those on the Class 220 Voyager trains. They also differ from earlier Turbostars in having mechanical transmission rather than hydraulic - gear changes can be distinctly heard as the trains accelerate and decelerate. Class 172s have fewer seats than the Class 150s they replace, but greater overall capacity due to the increased room for standing passengers as well as wider aisles intended to speed boarding and alighting and reduce waiting time in stations. The trains are
    6.50
    2 votes
    168
    British Rail Class 201

    British Rail Class 201

    The British Rail Class 201 (or 6S) six-car diesel-electric multiple units (DEMUs) were built in 1957-1958 at Eastleigh and Ashford. They were built for use on the London-Hastings line. Several tunnels along the route had restricted clearance, meaning that these units were built with a narrow body profile. Power car (two per six-car set) Original 6S Units Departmental Units Some units were disbanded during mid 1960's to provide stock for the class206 'Tadpole' Units and to reform other 'Hasting Sets' after the Hither Green crash. Set 1002 was later reformed to its original formation in 1979, but set 1004 was reformed with only its original power cars and some trailers from sister class 202 and 203 Hasting Sets. Set 1003 was reformed only for the last few months of Hasting DEMU service after its power cars were used for spears, again with none of its original trailers. Set 2007 also suffered a reformation in 1969 but it remained as a full six coach set until withdrawal in 1986. Most units were withdrawn and scrapped following electrification of the route in 1986. However, one complete unit, no. 1001, was preserved by Hastings Diesels Ltd., which is based at St Leonards-on-Sea.
    6.50
    2 votes
    169
    British Rail Class 365

    British Rail Class 365

    The British Rail Class 365 "Networker Express" are dual-voltage 25 kV AC and 750 V DC) electric multiple units built by ABB at York from 1994 to 1995. These were the last units to be built at the York factory before it closed. All Class 365 units in service have received front-end cab modifications to equip them with cab air conditioning, which was installed by WAGN and the design of which has given them the nickname "Happy Train". In the early 1990s the Networker family was entering large-scale service in the Network SouthEast sector - both third-rail EMUs (Class 465/466) and DMUs (Class 165/166) were in service, with proposals for others, including a so-called "Universal Networker", intended as Class 371 and 381, that would have dual-voltage capability. However, by 1992 no work had been done in the development of these due to a lack of funding, so a replacement plan was required. For this, the Class 465 was modified for longer-distance services - a prototype was converted from an existing unit (designated as Class 465/3) to determine suitability, before funding was authorised for the purchase of 41 dual-voltage EMUs, each of four cars. These became the Class 365. Although
    6.50
    2 votes
    170
    British Rail Class 70

    British Rail Class 70

    The Class 70 is a six axle Co-Co mainline freight GE PowerHaul locomotive series manufactured by General Electric in Erie, Pennsylvania. The use of the class 70 TOPS designation is the second on the British railway system, the first was for a class of electric locomotives, see British Rail Class 70 (electric). The orders in 2007 for 30 units for Freightliner for operations in the United Kingdom were the first orders for the PowerHaul type; General Electric's product code for the class of loco is PH37ACmi. In November 2007, Freightliner UK announced Project Genesis (unrelated to GE's Genesis series built for Amtrak), a procurement plan for 30 freight locomotives from General Electric. The locomotives ordered were intended to match older types in terms of haulage capacity whilst at the same time being more fuel efficient. The project was a collaborative effort between Freightliner and GE, with input from drivers on the cab design. The locomotives utilize a GE PowerHaul P616 diesel engine rated at 2,750 kW (3,690 hp). the locomotive meets EU Tier IIIa emission regulations. Freightliner expects that the locomotive's efficiency is 7% better than contemporary models, with a further 3%
    6.50
    2 votes
    171
    C class Melbourne tram

    C class Melbourne tram

    C class is the designation given to the type of Citadis trams used in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia by Melbourne's tram operator Yarra Trams. These three-section low-floor electric trams were built by the transport company Alstom in La Rochelle, France. The first car was delivered to Melbourne in 2001, with the last cars following in 2002. The C class can be found almost exclusively on Melbourne's route 109 from Port Melbourne to Box Hill, operated from the Kew tram depot. With the transfer of all Citadis trams to Kew Depot to make room at Southbank Depot with the arrival of the "Bumblebee trams", it is now common to see these trams on route 48 services. These trams occasionally operate route 96 services. The Citadis trams are the first low floor trams in Melbourne. Sitting only 33 centimetres from the ground, these trams were built in France and commissioned at the Preston Workshops in Melbourne. They feature ergonomic designs, panoramic windows and easy accessibility. All C-class trams have an integral traction braking controller with a sensor that drivers must touch every thirty (originally every ten) seconds. If no action is taken an alarm sounds, and the tram comes to a
    6.50
    2 votes
    172
    Caledonian Railway 812 Class

    Caledonian Railway 812 Class

    The Caledonian Railway 812 and 652 Classes were 0-6-0 steam tender locomotives designed by John F. McIntosh for the Caledonian Railway and introduced in 1899. They had the same boiler type as the 721 “Dunalastair” Class 4-4-0s. Seventeen were fitted with the Westinghouse air brakes for passenger train working, including the only surviving engine of the class, No. 828. All 96 passed to the London, Midland and Scottish Railway at the 1923 grouping. Only three, 17567, 17598 and 17610, had been withdrawn by the time of nationalisation in 1948. The last locomotive in service was not withdrawn until 1963. Locomotive 828 (LMS 17566, BR 57566) is the sole survivor of the class and is an important example of Scottish industrial heritage. It is currently in service at the Strathspey Railway. In The Railway Series children's books by the Rev. W. Awdry, the characters Donald and Douglas ("the Scottish twins"), are based on the Caledonian 812 class.
    6.50
    2 votes
    173
    MLW RS-10

    MLW RS-10

    The Montreal Locomotive Works RS-10 was a 1,600 horsepower (1,200 kW) road switcher built for the Canadian market. It was essentially an ALCO RS-3 in a redesigned carbody. It retained the RS-3's 12-cylinder Alco 244 engine. MLW built 129 of these locomotives before the model was replaced by the MLW RS-18.
    6.50
    2 votes
    174
    SNCF Class X 2100

    SNCF Class X 2100

    The SNCF Class X 2100 diesel multiple units were built by ANF between 1980-1983. They are used on TER Services, mostly in Brittany, Loire and around Limoges.
    6.50
    2 votes
    175
    SNCF Class Z 7300

    SNCF Class Z 7300

    The SNCF Class Z 7300 electric multiple units were built by Alsthom between 1980 and 1985. They are part of the Z2 family of EMUs. These are Z 7500, Z 9500 and Z 9600.
    6.50
    2 votes
    176
    LNER Gresley Classes A1 and A3

    LNER Gresley Classes A1 and A3

    The London and North Eastern Railway LNER Gresley Classes A1 and A3 locomotives represented two distinct stages in the history of the British 4-6-2 "Pacific" steam locomotives designed by Nigel Gresley. They were designed for main line passenger services, initially on the Great Northern Railway (GNR), a constituent company of the London and North Eastern Railway after the amalgamation of 1923, for which they became a standard design. The change in class designation to A3 reflected the fitting to the same chassis of a higher pressure boiler with a greater superheating surface and a small reduction in cylinder diameter, leading to an increase in locomotive weight. Eventually all of the A1 locomotives were rebuilt to A3 specifications. The names for the locomotives came from a variety of sources. The first, Great Northern, was named after its parent company. Others were given the names of high-ranking railway officials, but most were given the names of famous racehorses. One was named after the company's most famous long-distance passenger train, the Flying Scotsman. Flying Scotsman is the sole survivor of the class to be preserved. It is currently under mechanical overhaul at the
    4.75
    4 votes
    177
    BR standard class 7 70013 Oliver Cromwell

    BR standard class 7 70013 Oliver Cromwell

    70013 Oliver Cromwell is a British Railways standard class 7 (also known as the Britannia class) preserved steam locomotive. The locomotive is notable as one of the four steam locomotives which worked the last steam railtour on British Railways (BR) in 1968 before the introduction of a steam ban. One of 55 of the "Britannia" class, Oliver Cromwell was built at Crewe Works, being completed on 30 May 1951. 70013 was initially allocated to Norwich depot (BR shed code 32A) on the Eastern Region of British Railways and employed on London to Norwich expresses. Some of the Norwich diagrams (the day's operating schedule for a locomotive) required two return trips a day to London totalling 460 miles. The introduction of the Britannia Pacifics revolutionised express services in East Anglia. From 1958, diesel-electric locomotives began to replace steam locomotives. 70013 remained at Norwich until w/e 16 September 1961 when transferred to March Motive Power Depot (shed code 31B), having covered 698,000 miles in just over ten years, an excellent figure. Norwich Depot, under the shedmaster Bill Harvey, was renowned for the fine mechanical condition of its locomotives. In December 1963, 70013 was
    7.00
    1 votes
    178
    British Rail Class 139

    British Rail Class 139

    British Rail Class 139 is the TOPS classification for PPM60 model lightweight railcars built by Parry People Movers, for use on the British rail network. The class were originally built in 2008 for operation on the Stourbridge Town Branch Line following an extensive trial with a prototype registered as a Class 999 unit. The first newly constructed Class 139 was shown on 28 June 2008 at the Tyseley Locomotive Works Open Day. The full fleet of two units eventually entered public service on the branchline in June 2009. The Class 139 units are typical of the Parry People Mover concept, in that they utilise flywheel energy storage as the main source of energy, to propel the vehicle. The flywheel captures braking energy when the brakes are used, and re-uses the energy for acceleration. As the unit's primary motive power comes from the flywheel, this eliminates the need for a large diesel engine. The small onboard engine is used to power up the vehicle initially, and to provide power for the onboard systems. The concept of using the lightweight railcar came about in 2006, when a year-long pilot scheme began on the Stourbridge Town Branch Line on Sundays, using a PPM50 unit constructed in
    7.00
    1 votes
    179
    British Rail Class 312

    British Rail Class 312

    The British Rail Class 312 is a type of alternating current (AC) electric multiple unit (EMU) built in 1975-1978 for use on outer-suburban passenger services. It was the last class of multiple unit to be constructed with the British Rail Mark 2 bodyshell, and also the last with slam doors. This latter feature contributed to their relatively early withdrawal (25–28 years old, compared with a life expectancy of 30 years). The table below illustrates the original formation, numbering and areas of use: These units were based on the Class 310, used on the suburban services out of London Euston. The only significant difference between the various sub-classes was that the 312/1 units were also equipped to work on the 6.25 kV AC overhead electrification system used on parts of the Great Eastern Main Line and London, Tilbury and Southend Railway networks. As built, the 312/0 units were used on the newly-electrified Great Northern outer suburban services from London King's Cross to Royston. The 312/1s were built for Great Eastern line services from London Liverpool Street. The four 312/2 units were mainly used to enhance local services between Birmingham New Street and Birmingham
    7.00
    1 votes
    180
    British Rail Class 58

    British Rail Class 58

    • Built by: BREL
    The British Rail Class 58 is a class of Co-Co diesel locomotive designed for heavy freight. Introduced in 1983, they followed American practice of modularisation. EWS withdrew them in 2002 after 20 years in service, and 30 were subsequently hired abroad – four to the Netherlands, eight to Spain and twenty to France. In the late 1970s, British Rail wanted to develop a new, low-cost, easily maintainable freight locomotive that would handle the predicted rail freight growth during the 1980s. The Class 56 had a troublesome entry into service, and BR was also keen to enter the export market. Pre-production drawings of the Class 58s referred to them as "Standard Export Locomotives". Once a design for the new Class 58 had been approved by the British Rail Board, the contract to build the locomotives was awarded to British Rail Engineering Limited (BREL) in Doncaster where work started on a major multi-million pound upgrade of ‘E2’ shop where the locomotives would be manufactured. BREL dropped traditional locomotive construction methods in favour of an entirely new approach – an innovative modular design. This offered savings on construction and maintenance compared to previous locomotive
    7.00
    1 votes
    181
    Caledonian Railway 782 Class

    Caledonian Railway 782 Class

    The Caledonian Railway 782 Class was a class of 0-6-0T steam locomotives designed by John F. McIntosh and introduced in 1896. The 29 Class was similar but fitted with condensing apparatus. The locomotives were taken into London, Midland and Scottish Railway (LMS) ownership in 1923 and into British Railways (BR) ownership in 1948.
    7.00
    1 votes
    182
    LMS Fowler Class 4F

    LMS Fowler Class 4F

    The London Midland and Scottish Railway (LMS) Fowler 4F is a class of 0-6-0 steam locomotive designed for medium freight work. They represent the ultimate development of Midland Railway's six coupled tender engines. The 4F was based on the 197-strong Midland Railway 3835 Class of 1911, with only a few modifications, primarily the adoption of left-hand drive in favour of right-hand drive. They originally had been designed by Henry Fowler, who from 1925 became CME of the LMS. Midland Railway locomotives were notorious for their short axle-box bearings, which were prone to overheating. Why this poor design feature was perpetuated is a complete mystery but, unfortunately, the LMS 4F inherited it. The LMS constructed 530 of the locomotives between 1923 and 1928, numbered sequentially from where the Midland engines left off from 4027. A further 45 examples were reluctantly authorised by William Stanier in 1937 at the behest of the operating department. The missing numbers (4)4557–61 relate to five locomotives built for the Somerset and Dorset Joint Railway to the Midland Railway 3835 Class design in 1922, and taken into LMS stock in 1930. All entered British Railways stock in 1948. BR
    7.00
    1 votes
    183
    PRR K4s

    PRR K4s

    The Pennsylvania Railroad's K4s 4-6-2 "Pacific" (425 built 1914–1928, PRR Altoona, Baldwin) was their premier passenger-hauling steam locomotive from 1914 through the end of steam on the PRR in 1957. Attempts were made to replace the K4s, including the K5 and the T1 duplex locomotive, but none was really successful, and the K4s hauled the vast majority of express passenger trains until replaced by diesel locomotives. The K4s was not powerful enough for the weight of trains it was often called upon to haul from the mid 1930s onward, and so they were often double or even triple headed. This was effective, but wasteful in that several crews were needed. The PRR did have the extra locomotives, because many had been displaced by electrification. Since the PRR had often referred to itself as the Standard Railroad of the World, the K4 has sometimes been referred to as the Standard Passenger Locomotive of the World.. The K4s is widely considered to be one of the greatest steam locomotives of all time. It is recognized as the State Steam Locomotive of Pennsylvania. On December 18, 1987, Pennsylvania Governor Robert P. Casey signed into law House Bill No. 1211 naming the PRR K4 as the
    7.00
    1 votes
    184
    British Rail Class 09

    British Rail Class 09

    • Built by: English Electric
    The British Rail Class 09 is a class of 0-6-0 diesel locomotive designed primarily for shunting and also short distance freight trips along branch lines. The 26 locos are similar to the Class 08 shunting locomotives but have different gearing, giving a top speed of 27.5 mph (44 km/h) at the expense of a lower tractive effort. They were introduced from 1959 to 1962 and originally operated in the Southern Region of British Railways. Further locomotives were converted from Class 08 in 1992 and, following this and privatisation in 1997, the class has been distributed much further afield. The original 26 locomotives (built 1959-62) became sub-class 09/0 when further locomotives were modified from Class 08 in 1992 which became subclasses Classes 09/1 and 09/2. There were variations, which were given the following TOPS design codes: These locomotives were modified from Class 08 in 1992. TOPS numbers were 09 101 – 09 107 and 09 201 – 09 205. The design codes were as follows: Although not normally considered for passenger work, Class 09s were recorded working passenger trains between Clapham Junction and Kensington Olympia due to unavailability of the booked Class 33 diesel. They were also
    5.33
    3 votes
    185
    British Rail Class 25

    British Rail Class 25

    The British Rail Class 25 diesel locomotives were also known as Sulzer Type 2 and nicknamed Rats, as it was alleged they could be seen everywhere in Britain, and hence were "as common as rats". In total, 327 locomotives of this type were built between 1961 and 1967. The Class 24 locomotives were the precursor of the Class 25 design but after the delivery of their first few units it became apparent that the speed ceiling of 75 mph (121 km/h) was unduly restrictive and the provision of a bit more power would be advantageous. In the course of normal development the power output of the Sulzer six-cylinder engine had been increased by 90 hp to give a continuous traction output of 1,250 bhp (930 kW) at 750 rpm by the introduction of charge air cooling and the first locomotives to use this became known as Class 25 locomotives. The Class 25 locos were primarily designed for freight work, but a significant number were fitted with boilers for heating passenger trains. Throughout the 1970s they could be found at work across the whole of the British Rail network although the Eastern and Southern Regions never had an allocation. Though regular performers into the early 1980s on Crewe–Cardiff
    5.33
    3 votes
    186
    British Rail Class 457

    British Rail Class 457

    Class 316 and Class 457 were TOPS classifications assigned to a single electric multiple unit (EMU) at different stages of its use as a prototype for the Networker series. In the late 1980s, the Network SouthEast division of British Rail, which operated the railway network in South East England, started to develop a new standard train, known as the Networker. To test out the technical arrangements for the Networker, a test train was used, converted from former Class 210 carriages, which were the prototype 'Second Generation' Diesel Electric Multiple Unit (DEMU), but which never entered fleet service. Initially the test unit was formed for trials on the 750 V direct current (DC) third rail system of the Southern Region, and was numbered 457001. As with all Southern Region electric multiple units only the last four digits of the unit number were actually carried. The unit formation was: Later, the unit was altered to undertake trials on the 25kV alternating current (AC) overhead wire system used on electrified lines north of the River Thames. The unit was renumbered as a Class 316 unit, number 316999. To enable it to work on the AC electrification, a pantograph trailer from a Class
    5.33
    3 votes
    187
    British Rail Class 901

    British Rail Class 901

    The Class 901 designation is used for two former British Rail Class 101 diesel multiple units converted for departmental use. They were reclassified from the Class 960 series in early 2004 by their owner Network Rail. The two units are described below. This unit was converted in 1986 from a Class 101 power-twin unit. It was rebuilt as an Ultrasonic Test Train, replacing the former-Derby Lightweight unit that was previously used for this task. The unit was substantially rebuilt, including new headlight clusters, sealing of many windows, and later fitting of video and floodlight equipment for night-time use. The unit also incorporates a heavily-modified former Class 432 4Rep driving motor vehicle, which is now an intermediate trailer. The Units Class 101 Power Cars are unique, as they are the only first generation DMU cars to have been converted to Air Brakes (both Westinghouse and Electro-Pnumatic). Most of the brake equipment came from former Class 50 Diesel Electric Locomotives, with some parts from ex-Southern Region EMU stock. All first generation DMUs were fitted with Vacuum Brakes from new. The Power Cars DB 977391/392 are both now resident on the Churnet Valley Railway,for
    5.33
    3 votes
    188
    British Rail Class 08

    British Rail Class 08

    • Built by: English Electric
    The British Rail (BR) Class 08 is a class of diesel-electric shunting locomotive. The Pioneer Class 08 No. D3000 (currently preserved at the Heritage Shunters Trust based at Peak Rail) was built in 1952 although didn't enter service until 1953. Production continued on until 1962, 996 locomotives were produced making it the most numerous of all British locomotive classes. As the standard general-purpose diesel shunter on BR, almost any duty requiring shunting would involve a Class 08. The class became a familiar sight at many major stations and freight yards. However, since their introduction, the nature of rail traffic in Britain has changed considerably. Freight trains are now mostly fixed rakes of wagons and passenger trains are mostly multiple units, neither requiring the attention of a shunting locomotive. Consequently, a large proportion of the class has been withdrawn from mainline use and stored, scrapped, exported or sold to industrial or heritage railways. As of 2011, around 100 locomotives remain working on industrial sidings and on the main British network. On heritage railways, they have become common, appearing on many of the preserved standard-gauge lines in Britain,
    6.00
    2 votes
    189
    British Rail Class 116

    British Rail Class 116

    The British Rail Class 116 diesel multiple units were built by BR Derby from 1957 to 1961. These units stayed in regular service until 1990, when they began to be withdrawn from traffic. They were replaced on regional services by the new "Sprinter" derivative units, or by Class 323 electric multiple units on services around Birmingham. The final units lasted in traffic until 1995, although a few saw further use in departmental service, as sandite or route-learner units. Several of this class have been saved for preservation. Three units were converted to carry parcels traffic and reclassified as Class 130, though the individual coaches were not renumbered. The units involved were: To provide extra capacity, they worked with modified General Utility Vans (GUV) as centre trailers. 5 vehicles have been preserved on heritage railways.
    6.00
    2 votes
    190
    British Rail Class 59

    British Rail Class 59

    The Class 59 Co-Co diesel-electric locomotives were built and introduced between 1985 and 1995 by Electro-Motive Division (EMD) of General Motors (now independent company Electro-Motive Diesel) for private British companies, initially Foster Yeoman. They were designed for hauling heavy freight and designated JT26CW-SS. In the light of Foster Yeoman's dissatisfaction with the availability and reliability of British Rail's Class 56 diesel freight locomotive, and their satisfaction with their EMD SW1001 shunter, four Class 59/0s were ordered from EMD and arrived in 1986. A new design to the British loading gauge and specifications, derived from the EMD SD50, it used the cab layout of the British Rail Class 58 to aid driver assimilation. They were the first United States-built and the first privately owned diesel locomotives to operate regularly on the British main line, although EMD powered locomotives have been the mainstay in both the Republic of Ireland since 1961 and Northern Ireland since 1980. Following Foster Yeoman's example, Amey Roadstone Construction bought four (Class 59/1) and National Power bought six (Class 59/2) locomotives. Foster Yeoman and ARC merged their rail
    6.00
    2 votes
    191
    British Rail Class 67

    British Rail Class 67

    The Class 67 locomotives are a class of Bo'Bo' diesel electric mainline locomotives which were built for the English, Welsh and Scottish Railway between 1999 to 2000 by Alstom at Meinfesa in Valencia, Spain with drive components (engine and transmission) from General Motors Diesel. EMD's designation for this locomotive type is JT 42HW-HS. Rail enthusiasts have nicknamed the class 'skips'. Thirty locomotives were ordered in a £45million contract split between Alstom and General Motors. for use by the English, Welsh and Scottish Railway (EWS) as British Rail Class 47 replacements for use on high-speed mail trains and passenger trains. The locomotives were obtained on a 15 year lease via Angel Trains. The bodyshell is a monocoque load bearing Alstom design, the bogies are an "H" frame Alstom design, The engine, traction motors and control electronics are GM-EMD products, and the same as used in the British Rail Class 66. Unlike the Class 66, the traction motors are frame mounted rather than axle hung to reduce unsprung mass and the gear ratio is increased allowing higher speeds. The cab design has a central driving position. The locomotives are able to supply electric head end power
    6.00
    2 votes
    192
    EMD SD9

    EMD SD9

    An EMD SD9 is a 6-axle diesel locomotive built by General Motors Electro-Motive Division between January 1954 and June 1959. Power was provided by an EMD 567C 16-cylinder engine which generated 1,750 horsepower (1.30 MW). This model is, externally, similar to its predecessor, the SD7. The principal spotting feature are the classification lights on the ends of the locomotive, above the number board. The SD9's classification lights are on a small pod, canted outward. The last phase of construction had a modified carbody similar to the SD18 and SD24, and used two 48-inch cooling fans instead of four 36-inch cooling fans. Four hundred and seventy-one examples of this locomotive model were built for American railroads, and 44 for export. Some SD9 locomotives can be found in museums and on tourist lines, and at least two are in service on a working railroad. Dakota Southern Railway uses SD9 506 and SD9E 4427 in revenue freight service. Colorado & Southern 839, later Burlington Northern 6234, was donated by successor Burlington Northern Santa Fe Corp. to the Minnesota Transportation Museum. It now operates on the museum's Osceola and St Croix Valley Railway. 6234 is an example of the last
    6.00
    2 votes
    193
    EMD SW1200

    EMD SW1200

    An EMD SW1200 is a diesel switcher locomotive built by General Motors Electro-Motive Division between January 1954 and May 1966. Power was provided by an EMD 567C 12-cylinder engine which generated 1,200 hp (895 kW). Late SW1200s built in 1966 were built with the 567E 12-cylinder engine. 737 examples of this locomotive model were built for American railroads, 287 were built for Canadian railroads 4 were built for Brazilian Railroads, 25 were built for a Chile[[[[]]]]an Industrial firm, and 3 were built for the Panama Canal Railway. A Cow-calf variation, the TR12, was cataloged, but none were built. An SW1200RS is a variation of the standard SW1200 that featured large front and rear (on some units) numberboard housings, EMD Flexicoil B-B trucks, and larger fuel tanks for roadswitcher service. The majority of the Canadian National and Canadian Pacific SW1200 fleets were purchased as SW1200RS units. Lake Superior Terminal and Transfer Railway 105 is operated by the Minnesota Transportation Museum as Northern Pacific Railway 105. Terminal Railroad Association of St. Louis 1219 built for Canadian National Railway is operated by Fremont Dinner Train as the "Glen Bales" 1219 and currently
    6.00
    2 votes
    194
    Rhaetian Railway ABe 4/4 I

    Rhaetian Railway ABe 4/4 I

    The Rhaetian Railway ABe 4/4  is a class of metre gauge railcars of the Rhaetian Railway (RhB), which is the main railway network in the Canton of Graubünden, Switzerland. The class is so named because it was the first class of railcars of the Swiss locomotive and railcar classification type ABe 4/4 to be acquired by the Rhaetian Railway. According to that classification system, ABe 4/4 denotes an electric railcar with first and second class compartments and a total of four axles, all of which are drive axles. Created between 1946 and 1953 by the rebuilding of existing railcars originally built between 1908 and 1911, they carry the traffic numbers 30–38, and operate on the 1,000 V DC powered Bernina Railway. Since 1988–1990, when the ABe 4/4  class railcars were placed into service, the ABe 4/4  class has been much less frequently used on passenger trains. However, the ABe 4/4 s are still indispensable in summer, although that is about to change, following the imminent deployment of the ABe 8/12 Allegra class railcars. As at December 2009, six members of the ABe 4/4  class were still in service in working order: The Bernina Railway (BB), which opened in 1908, originally procured a
    6.00
    2 votes
    195
    SNCF Class BB 36000

    SNCF Class BB 36000

    • Built by: Alstom
    The SNCF Class BB 36000 locomotives (named Astride) are a class of triple voltage 4 axle Bo'Bo' electric locomotives built by GEC-Alsthom (later Alsthom) between 1996 and 2001 for SNCF. Sixty units were built, with thirty units later converted to subclasses 36200, and 36300 - locomotives with additional safety equipment for cross border trains between France and Italy. As of 2012 there are 30 units of the original 36000 class and 30 units of the 363000 subtype. Locomotives operating from Italy have been given the Italian designation E436. The subgroup 36001-36030 mostly operate on French-Belgian freight corridors. The first 30 locomotives of Class BB 36000 were built as a result of a modification of an order for 264 of the dual voltage SNCF Class BB 26000 (Sybic); instead only 234 Sybics were built, the last 30 of the order were instead built as a triple voltage design capable of also operating on 3 kV DC with a different electric motor type (AC induction) and newer power semiconductor device technology (GTO type); the multi-voltage specifications came from an expectation of increase cross border traffic, as encouraged by the European Unions specification of "freight corridors".
    6.00
    2 votes
    196
    British Rail Class 317

    British Rail Class 317

    The British Rail Class 317 alternating current electric multiple units (EMUs) were built by BREL York in two batches, from 1981–82 and 1985-87. They were the first of several classes of British Rail EMU to be based on the all-steel Mark 3 bodyshell, departing from the "PEP"-aluminium design which had spawned the earlier Class 313 to Class 315. The Mark 3 bodyshell was also the basis of Class 318, Class 455, and the diesel Class 150. The first batch of 48 units, built in 1981-82, were classified as Class 317/1. Units were numbered in the range 317301-348, and had a maximum speed of 100 mph. Each unit consisted of four carriages; two outer driving 2nd class only vehicles, an intermediate trailer with both 1st and 2nd class, and a motor vehicle with 2nd class seating, roof mounted Stone Faiveley AMBR pantograph and four GEC G315BZ traction motors. The technical description of the formation of the units is DTSO(A)+MSO+TCO+DTSO(B). Individual carriages were numbered as follows: These units were built to operate services on the newly electrified London St. Pancras to Bedford "Bed-Pan" route. They replaced the elderly and unreliable Class 127 diesel multiple units. However, they did not
    5.50
    2 votes
    197
    D2 class Melbourne tram

    D2 class Melbourne tram

    The D2 class, or Combino (affectionately known as "Bigbino"), electric tram operates in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. They were built by Siemens Transportation Systems, and the first unit was delivered to the city in 2004, with the last units entering service in November 2004. The D2 class is a 5-section tram and can be found on Melbourne's southeastern and inner tram routes. The fleet is operated by Yarra Trams, with some units formerly being operated by M>Tram, who ordered the fleet. The D2 cab control are identical to the those on the D1 class.
    5.50
    2 votes
    198
    PRR L1s

    PRR L1s

    Class L1s on the Pennsylvania Railroad comprised 574 2-8-2 "Mikado" type steam locomotives constructed between 1914 and 1919 by the railroad's own Juniata Shops (344 examples) as well as the Baldwin Locomotive Works (205) and the Lima Locomotive Works (25). It was the largest class of 2-8-2 locomotives anywhere, although other railroads had more Mikados in total. The L1s shared the boiler and many other components with the K4s 4-6-2 "Pacific" type, giving a total of 999 locomotives with many standard parts. Although the L1s type was quite successful, it was very much eclipsed in PRR service by the larger and more powerful I1s/I1sa 2-10-0 "Decapods", which arrived in service only two years after the L1s and were very suited to the PRR's mountain grades and heavy coal and mineral trains, and by the 1923 introduction of the M1 4-8-2 "Mountains" which took on the best high-speed freight runs. Large numbers of the class were stored out of service during the Great Depression, only to return to service during World War II. The L1s design was state-of-the-art for its time and comparable with the best being produced for any other road. In fact, the specifications of the L1s and the Santa
    5.50
    2 votes
    199
    Rhaetian Railway Ge 4/4 III

    Rhaetian Railway Ge 4/4 III

    The Rhaetian Railway Ge 4/4  is a class of metre gauge Bo-Bo electric locomotives of the Rhaetian Railway (RhB), which is the main railway network in the Canton of Graubünden, Switzerland. The class is so named because it was the third class of locomotives of the Swiss locomotive and railcar classification type Ge 4/4 to be acquired by the Rhaetian Railway. According to that classification system, Ge 4/4 denotes a narrow gauge electric adhesion locomotive with a total of four axles, all of which are drive axles. In order to manage the sharp increase in traffic on its network after the opening of the Vereina Tunnel, the Rhaetian Railway joined in 1989 with Swiss Locomotive and Machine Works and ASEA Brown Boveri, to develop a new generation of electric locomotives, the drive train of which was to be based upon AC technology with GTO Thyristors. The original plan for a six axle variant of the Ge 4/4 , which would have had benefits on the nearly straight section of line through the tunnel, was rejected, in favour of a universally deployable locomotive with four axles, which could also be used on sections with tight radius curves. The result was the Ge 4/4  class. On 7 December 1993,
    5.50
    2 votes
    200
    DB Class V 60

    DB Class V 60

    The DB Class V 60 is a German diesel locomotive operated by the Deutsche Bundesbahn (DB) and later, the Deutsche Bahn AG (DB AG), which is used particularly for shunting duties, but also for hauling light goods trains. Seventeen locomotives were bought used by the Norwegian State Railways and designated NSB Di 5. Also the Yugoslav Railways bought used units, and designated them JŽ 734; they were subsequenty designated Series 2133 by the Croatian Railways. The DB had a shortage of small shunters. As a result, in 1951, a diesel shunter was designed, almost all the major locomotive firms being involved in its development and production. The new class was initially called the V 60. In 1955 the first prototype locomotives, V 60 001–004, were delivered by Krupp, Krauss-Maffei, Mak and Henschel, each having different engines. Later that same year orders for the first production locomotives were issued; they were to have GTO 6 or GTO 6A motors from Maybach. Several of the locomotives were given a stronger frame and had a higher adhesive weight of 53 tonnes (52 long tons; 58 short tons) instead of 48.3–49.5 tonnes (47.5–48.7 long tons; 53.2–54.6 short tons). In addition these engines could
    4.67
    3 votes
    201
    2-10-4

    2-10-4

    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, a 2-10-4 locomotive has two leading wheels, ten driving wheels (in other words, five driven axles), and four trailing wheels. These were referred to as the Texas type in most of the United States, the Colorado type on the Burlington Route and the Selkirk type in Canada. Other equivalent classifications are: The 2-10-4 originated and was principally used in the USA. The evolution of this locomotive type began as a 2-10-2 "Santa Fe" type with a larger four wheeled trailing truck that would allow an enlarged firebox. A subsequent development was as a longer 2-8-4 "Berkshire" type that required extra driving wheels to remain within axle loading limits. Examples of both of these evolutionary progressions can be found. Some 2-10-4 tank locomotives also existed in eastern Europe. One bizarre experimental 2-10-4, built in the Soviet Union, had an opposed piston drive system. Outside North America, the 2-10-4 was rare. The Central Railway of Brazil, however, ordered seventeen narrow gauge (metre gauge) 2-10-4 locomotives, ten from Baldwin which were delivered in 1940, and another seven from the American Locomotive Company
    6.00
    1 votes
    202
    British Rail Class 06

    British Rail Class 06

    • Built by: Andrew Barclay & Sons Co.
    The British Rail Class 06 is a class of 0-4-0 diesel-mechanical shunters built by Andrew Barclay from 1958 to 1960 for use on the Scottish Region of British Railways. They were originally numbered D2410-D2444 and later given the TOPS numbers 06001-06010. Engine is a Gardner 8-cylinder 4 stroke "8L3" connected to a Wilson-Drewry CA5 5-speed epicyclic gearbox with Vulcan-Sinclair type 23 fluid coupling and a Wiseman type 15 RLGB gearbox. While all technically similar, the locomotives had two different designs for the back of the cab, some featuring two windows, the others featuring three. A single locomotive survives, number 06003, which is currently owned by HNRC and based at the Museum of Science and Industry, Liverpool Road, Manchester. Hornby produce a basic representation of the prototype as part of their Railroad range in BR Blue, whilst past examples have carried a variety of liveries. Media related to British Rail Class 06 at Wikimedia Commons
    6.00
    1 votes
    203
    British Rail Class 21

    British Rail Class 21

    The British Rail Class 21 was a type of Type 2 diesel-electric locomotive built by the North British Locomotive Company in Glasgow for British Railways in 1958-1960. Since 2007, the Class 21 TOPS classification has been reused for new Vossloh G1206 locomotives acquired by Euro Cargo Rail/EWS. Under the British Railways Modernisation Plan, a batch of ten 1,000 hp (746 kW) diesel-electric locomotives were ordered from the North British Locomotive Co. for evaluation under BR's dieselisation pilot scheme. At the same time, six externally similar locomotives employing hydraulic transmission were ordered for comparison, these becoming Class 22. Repeat orders resulted in a total of 58 of the diesel-electric locomotives being built (numbered D6100–6157). They were delivered between December 1958 and November 1960. The first 38 locomotives entered service in 1958-59 from the Eastern Region depots at Stratford, Hornsey and Ipswich engine shed on commuter services into London, where they were evaluated against rival designs from English Electric, British Railways, Birmingham RC&W and Brush. They were only used in this area for one or two years before all being transferred to the Scottish
    6.00
    1 votes
    204
    British Rail Class 485

    British Rail Class 485

    The British Rail Class 485 (or 4Vec) and British Rail Class 486 (or 3Tis) electrical multiple units were originally built for the London Electric Railway from 1923-31 as their 'Standard' tube stock. They were purchased by British Rail in 1967 and transported to the Isle of Wight to work 'mainline' services on the newly electrified Ryde to Shanklin line, where they worked for an additional quarter century. At the time of their purchase the units had already worked for over forty years on the London Underground, but their introduction allowed the last steam locomotives on the line to be withdrawn. Six four-car sets and six three-car sets were refurbished by BR's Stewarts Lane depot in 1966-67. The four-car sets were initially classified Class 452 and numbered 041-046, later reclassified Class 485 and numbered 485041-046. Each unit was formed of a driving motor, two intermediate trailers, and a second driving motor. Thus, the formation was DMBSO+TSO+TSO+DMBSO. Some of the intermediate trailers were former driving trailers, with the cabs locked out of use. The three-car sets were classified Class 451 and numbered 031-036, later reclassified Class 486 and numbered 486031-036. A spare
    6.00
    1 votes
    205
    British Rail Class 56

    British Rail Class 56

    • Built by: BREL
    The British Rail Class 56 is a type of diesel locomotive designed for heavy freight work. It is a Type 5 locomotive, with a Ruston-Paxman power unit developing 3,250 bhp (2,423 kW), and has a Co-Co wheel arrangement. The fleet was introduced between 1976 and 1983. The first thirty locomotives (Nos.56001-56030) were built by Electroputere in Romania, but these suffered from poor construction standards and many were withdrawn from service early. The remaining 105 locomotives were built by BREL at Doncaster Works (nos. 56031 to 56115) and Crewe Works (Nos.56116 to 56135). Enthusiasts nicknamed them "Gridirons" (or "Grids" for short), due to the grid-like horn cover on the locomotive's cab ends fitted to nos. 56 056 on. When introduced, Class 56s were arguably the first of the "second generation" of UK diesel locomotives. The engine is a direct descendent of English Electric CSVT types, its closest relative being the 16CSVT used in the Class 50. Technical advances included significantly uprated turbochargers, gear driven camshafts in place of the timing chain used on Class 50s, and uprated cylinder heads, fuel pumps and injectors. The engine was nominally rated at 3,520 hp (2,620 kW),
    6.00
    1 votes
    206
    EMD SW900

    EMD SW900

    An EMD SW900 is a diesel switcher locomotive built by General Motors Electro-Motive Division and General Motors Diesel (GMD) between December 1953 and March 1969. Power was provided by an EMD 567C 8-cylinder engine that generated 900 horsepower (670 kW). Built concurrently with SW1200, the eight-cylinder units had a single exhaust stack. 260 examples of this locomotive model were built for American railroads and 97 were built for Canadian railroads. Canadian production of the SW900 lasted three and a half years past EMD production. Seven units were exported to Orinoco Mining Co (Venezuela); two units were exported to Southern Peru Copper Co; and five units were exported to the Liberian-American Mining Co. Total production is 371 units. Some SW900s were built with the generators from traded in EMC switchers and were classified as SW900M by EMD. These units developed 600 or 660 horsepower with the older generators instead of the full 900 horsepower of the SW900. In the early 1960s, the Reading Company sent 14 of their Baldwin VO 1000 model switchers to EMD to have them rebuilt to SW900 specifications. The Reading units retained the Baldwin switcher carbody and were rated at 1000
    6.00
    1 votes
    207
    LNER Class J39

    LNER Class J39

    The London and North Eastern Railway Class J39 was a class of 0-6-0 steam locomotive designed for freight work. They were based on the previous Class J38 but with larger driving wheels. A total of 289 J39s were built over fifteen years. They were designed by Nigel Gresley and introduced in 1926. All passed into British Railways ownership in 1948 and they were numbered 64700-64988. None have survived to preservation. Bachmann manufactures the J39/2 version in 00 gauge model form. Bassett-Lowke manufactures the J39/2 version in 0 gauge model form. Graham Farish manufactures the J39 in British N-Scale Ian Allan ABC of British Railways Locomotives, 1962 edition
    6.00
    1 votes
    208
    Milwaukee Road class EP-3

    Milwaukee Road class EP-3

    The Milwaukee Road's class EP-3 comprised ten electric locomotives built in 1919 by Baldwin and Westinghouse. They were nicknamed Quills because of their use of a quill drive. Although they were good haulers and well liked by engineers, poor design and constant mechanical problems plagued them for their entire lives and they were the first of the Milwaukee Road's electric locomotives to be retired. When the Milwaukee Road decided to electrify the Coast Division in 1917, it attempted to re-equip with equipment bought from General Electric. The United States Railroad Administration, however, dictated that the order for electrical equipment be split between GE and Westinghouse. This meant that of the 15 electric locomotives needed, five (the EP-2s, or bi-polars) came from GE and 10 - the EP-3s - came from Westinghouse. The EP-3s, while designed to meet the same specifications as the bi-polars, were a completely different design from their GE counterparts. Their appearance was sleeker, albeit less distinctive, with a single long boxcab-style carbody containing all of the electric equipment. Their wheel arrangement was the same as a back-to-back pair of 4-6-2 "Pacific" steam engines,
    6.00
    1 votes
    209
    Rhaetian Railway ABe 8/12

    Rhaetian Railway ABe 8/12

    The Rhaetian Railway ABe 8/12, which is also known as the Allegra, is a class of dual voltage metre gauge three car multiple unit trains of the Rhaetian Railway (RhB), which is the main railway network in the Canton of Graubünden, Switzerland. The class is so named under the Swiss locomotive and railcar classification system. According to that system, ABe 8/12 denotes an electric railcar train with first and second class compartments, and a total of 12 axles, eight of which are drive axles. The ABe 8/12 trains were delivered between 2009 and 2011. They are used mainly on Rhaetian Railway routes with steep inclines: the Arosa line, the Bernina Railway, and the route from Landquart to Davos. They are fitted with dual voltage electical equipment, to enable them to operate on both the Rhaetian Railway's core network, which is electrified at 11 kV 16.7 Hz, and on the Bernina Railway, which is electrified at 1,000 V DC. Each of the ABe 8/12s is equipped with comfortable air conditioned compartments for both first class and second class passengers. The first class compartment at the front of each train offers a pleasant view of the track from directly behind the driver. In the middle of
    6.00
    1 votes
    210
    SNCF Class BB 16500

    SNCF Class BB 16500

    • Built by: Alstom
    The SNCF Class BB 16500 electric locomotives were built by Alsthom between 1958-1964. They are part of the family of locomotives: SNCF Class BB 8500, SNCF Class BB 88500, SNCF Class BB 17000, SNCF Class BB 20200 and SNCF Class BB 25500.
    6.00
    1 votes
    211
    ATSF 3450 class

    ATSF 3450 class

    The Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway's 3450 class comprised ten 4-6-4 "Hudson" type steam locomotives built by the Baldwin Locomotive Works in 1927. Built as coal-burners, they were converted to oil-burning during the 1930s. At the same time, the locomotives were given 79-inch driving wheels instead of their original 73-inch, and the boiler pressures increased from 220 to 230 lbf/in² (1.52 to 1.59 MPa). Combined, these changes reduced the starting tractive effort from 44,250 to 43,300 lbf (196.8 to 192.6 kN), but increased the top speed and efficiency. Their early service was in the Midwest, between Chicago, Illinois and Colorado; later, some were assigned to service in the San Joaquin Valley of California between Bakersfield and Oakland. They were smaller and less powerful locomotives than the later 3460 class, but were capable of equivalently high speeds. The first locomotive built, #3450, was donated by the Santa Fe in 1955 to the Railway and Locomotive Historical Society's Southern California chapter, and is preserved at the Society's museum in the Los Angeles County Fairgrounds at Pomona, California. It is not in operational condition but is preserved in good condition as
    5.00
    2 votes
    212
    British Rail Class 310

    British Rail Class 310

    The British Rail (BR) Class 310 is a slam-door, alternating current (AC) electric multiple unit (EMU) introduced in 1963 as part of the West Coast Main Line electrification project. They were initially classified as Class AM10 units before the introduction of the TOPS classification system. Constructed at BR's Derby Carriage and Wagon Works. They consisted of four carriages - a second class driving trailer, a second class trailer, a second class motor car (with guard's/luggage compartment above which the Stone Faiveley AMBR pantograph was mounted) and a composite (1st and 2nd class) driving trailer. The maximum speed was 75 miles per hour. A glass partition behind the driver's cab enabled passengers in the leading and rear coaches to have an excellent view of the line ahead or behind. Original livery was overall Rail Blue, later amended to the familiar blue and grey colour scheme. Initially they were primarily used on local services from London Euston to Bletchley, Milton Keynes, Northampton and Birmingham, and within the West Midlands. They were also the first EMUs to be based on the British Rail Mark 2 bodyshell, which featured semi-integral construction. During the mid 1980s
    5.00
    2 votes
    213
    British Rail Class 404

    British Rail Class 404

    The Southern Railway (SR) gave the designations 4-COR, 4-RES, 4-BUF and 4-GRI to the different types of electric multiple unit built to work the route between London Waterloo and Portsmouth Harbour. The 4-COR type units survived long enough in British Rail ownership to be allocated TOPS Class 404. The COR designation had previously been used for the 6-PUL units and was reused by them during World War II when the Pullman car was stored, but this stock was different from the 4-COR units. The SR electrified the London Waterloo to Portsmouth Harbour via Woking line in the mid-1930s, and full electric services commenced over the route from April 1937. For this service, 29 4-COR units (4-car Corridor units, numbered 3101–3129) and 19 4-RES units (4-car Restaurant units, numbered 3054–3072) were built. Corridor connections were provided throughout each unit, including between units. This gave them a distinctive front-end appearance as the headcode display was placed on the opposite side of the gangway connection to the driving cab window, leading to their nickname of Nelsons (referring to Lord Nelson's eyepatch, and also to their connection with Portsmouth). It was intended that, for
    5.00
    2 votes
    214
    British Rail Class 66

    British Rail Class 66

    The Class 66 is a type of six axle diesel electric freight locomotive developed in part from the British Rail Class 59, for use on the railways of the UK. Since its introduction the class has been successful and has been sold to British and other European railway companies. In Continental Europe it is marketed as the EMD Series 66 (JT42CWR). On the privatisation of British Rail's freight operations in 1996, EWS bought most of British Rail's freight operations. Many of the locomotives that EWS inherited were either at the end of their useful life or of doubtful reliability. EWS approached General Motors Electro-Motive Division (EMD), who offered their JT42CWR model which had the same bodyshell as the EMD built Class 59; this gave the advantage of having a locomotive of known clearance. The engine and traction motors were different models from those in the Class 59. Additionally, the Class 66s incorporated General Motors' version of a "self-steering bogie" ("radial truck", in American usage) - designed to reduce track wear and increase adhesion on curves. The initial classification was as Class 61, then they were subsequently given the Class 66 designation in the British
    5.00
    2 votes
    215
    5.00
    2 votes
    216
    Milwaukee Road class EP-2

    Milwaukee Road class EP-2

    The Milwaukee Road's class EP-2 comprised five electric locomotives built by General Electric in 1919. They were often known as Bipolars, which referred to the bipolar electric motors they used. Among the most distinctive and powerful electric locomotives of their time, they epitomized the modernization of the Milwaukee Road. They came to symbolize the railroad during their nearly 40 years of use, and remain an enduring image of mainline electrification. In 1917, following the tremendous success of the 1915 electrification of the Mountain Division, the Milwaukee Road decided to proceed with electrifying the Coast Division. As part of this project it ordered five new electric locomotives from General Electric for $200,000 apiece. Their design was radically different from the boxcab locomotives previously provided by GE for the initial electrification of the Mountain Division two years earlier. The Milwaukee Road was the only railroad to order this design of locomotive from GE. The most remarkable mechanical improvement was arguably the traction motors used on the new locomotives. They were known as bipolar motors because each of the locomotive's 12 motors had only two field poles,
    5.00
    2 votes
    217
    Advanced Passenger Train

    Advanced Passenger Train

    The Advanced Passenger Train (APT) was an experimental tilting high speed train developed by British Rail during the 1970s and early 1980s. The introduction into service of the Advanced Passenger Train was to be a three-stage project. Phase 1, the development of an experimental APT, the APT-E, was completed. Phase 2, the introduction of three prototype trains, known as the APT-P, into revenue service on the Glasgow-London route, enjoyed only limited service due to bad publicity. Phase 3, the introduction of the Squadron fleet designated APT-S, did not occur. The knowledge and experience gained enabled the construction of other high speed trains, including tilting derivatives. In the mid to late 20th century, British Rail express services compared unfavourably with France's TGV and Japan's Shinkansen. Experience with High Speed Trains on the East Coast Main Line from London to Edinburgh had shown that reduced journey times could produce a significant increase in passenger numbers, but that line was largely straight and suited to high speeds. Other lines, such as the West Coast Main Line (WCML) from London to Glasgow, were not straight enough to support high speeds with conventional
    4.50
    2 votes
    218
    British Rail Class 10

    British Rail Class 10

    The British Rail Class 10 diesel locomotive was a variation on the Class 08 diesel-electric shunter in which a Blackstone diesel engine was fitted instead of one made by the English Electric company. Traction motors were by either the General Electric Company plc (GEC) or British Thomson-Houston (BTH). The locomotives were built at the BR Works in Darlington and Doncaster over the period 1953–1962. Early batches were classified D3/4 (those with GEC motors) and D3/5 (those with BTH motors). Four Class 10 diesel shunters are currently preserved:
    4.50
    2 votes
    219
    British Rail Class 50

    British Rail Class 50

    • Built by: English Electric
    The British Rail (BR) Class 50 is a diesel locomotive built from 1967-68 by English Electric at their Vulcan Foundry Works in Newton-le-Willows. Fifty of these locomotives were built to haul express passenger trains on the, then non-electrified, section of the West Coast Main Line between Crewe, Carlisle and Scotland. They were originally hired from English Electric Leasing, not being purchased outright by BR until around 1973. Before gaining their 50xxx TOPS numbers these locomotives were known as English Electric Type 4s. The class were nicknamed "Hoovers" (sometimes shortened to "Vacs") by rail enthusiasts because of the distinctive sound made by the inertial air-filters originally fitted. These proved unreliable, and were removed during mid-life refurbishment, but the "Hoover" nickname stuck. The Class 50 fleet was developed following trials with the prototype Deltic-bodied DP2 locomotive. Fifty locomotives were built, initially numbered D400-D449. All were delivered in the BR Blue livery with yellow cab fronts. From 1973 onwards, the locomotives were renumbered into the range 50001-50050, to conform with the TOPS system. With the exception of the first-built locomotive, which
    5.00
    1 votes
    220
    British Rail Class 70

    British Rail Class 70

    The British Rail Class 70 was a class of three 3rd rail Co-Co electric locomotives. The initial two were built by the Southern Railway at Ashford Works in 1941 and 1945 and were numbered CC1 and CC2 - the SR latterly preferring continental practice for locomotive numbers to indicate of wheel arrangement. Electrical equipment was designed by Alfred Raworth and the body by Oliver Bulleid. CC2 was modified slightly from the original design by C. M. Cock who had succeeded Raworth as Electrical Engineer. The third was built by British Railways in 1948 and numbered 20003. Externally, it was clear the cab design owed a lot to Southern experience with the 2HAL multiple unit design. It has even been suggested that (in true Southern tradition) this was because the jigs for the welded cabs already existed and thus made for speedy and cheap construction. At the outbreak of war in 1939, most construction projects were put on hold in favour of the war effort. Construction of CC1 and CC2 was exempted from this because of promised savings in labour and fuel over steam locomotives. Construction was not smooth however and was brought to a halt several times due to shortage of resource. After
    5.00
    1 votes
    221
    D&RGW K-28

    D&RGW K-28

    Denver & Rio Grande Western K-28 is a class of ten narrow gauge 2-8-2, Mikado type, steam railway locomotives, built as freight locomotives in 1923 by the Schenectady Locomotive Works of the American Locomotive Company for the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad. They were the first new narrow gauge locomotives ordered by the railroad since 1903. They initially comprised class 190, but were reclassed K-28 in 1924 when the railroad reorganized into the Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad. The chassis is of outside-frame design with the drive wheels placed between the main frames, and the running gear (cranks, counterweights, rods and valve gear) to the outside. This general arrangement was also used on the earlier class K-27 and later class K-36 and K-37 engines. In later years they were tasked with carrying express passengers on the narrow gauge such as the San Juan from Alamosa to Durango, The Silverton from Durango to Silverton, the Shavano from Salida to Gunnison, and on the Chili Line. During World War II, seven of them were purchased by the US Army for use on the White Pass and Yukon Route in Alaska and the Yukon. The locomotives which went there were renumbered USA 250–256, but
    5.00
    1 votes
    222
    Rhaetian Railway ABe 4/16

    Rhaetian Railway ABe 4/16

    The Rhaetian Railway ABe 4/16 is a presently forthcoming class of metre gauge four car electric multiple unit trains of the Rhaetian Railway (RhB), which is the main railway network in the Canton of Graubünden, Switzerland. The class will be so named under the Swiss locomotive and railcar classification system. According to that system, ABe 4/16 denotes an electric railcar train with first and second class compartments, and a total of 16 axles, four of which are drive axles. The ABe 4/16 trains are scheduled to be delivered to the Rhaeitan Railway from late 2010. It is intended that these trains will be used mainly on commuter trains on the Rhaetian Railway's core network, which is electrified at 11 kV 16.7 Hz AC. Each of the ABe 4/16s will be equipped with comfortable air conditioned compartments for both first class and second class passengers.
    5.00
    1 votes
    223
    SNCF Class 241P

    SNCF Class 241P

    The 241P is a 4-8-2 'Mountain' type express passenger steam locomotive that ran on the SNCF (Société Nationale des Chemins de fer Français, French National Railways) from 1948 until 1973. Introduced as large scale electrification of the SNCF was already underway, they were the last new class of passenger steam locomotives in France. In 1944, SNCF reviewed its predicted postwar traffic requirements and determined a requirement for a locomotive capable of hauling passenger trains of 700 - 800 tons at 120 km/h (75 mph), and capable of climbing gradients of 1 in 125. A prototype 4-8-2 four cylinder compound locomotive, the 241C, had been built by Schneider in 1930 for the former Chemins de fer de Paris à Lyon et à la Méditerranée. This locomotive was utilised as the basis for the new class, but with some key design changes including the addition of an automatic stoker, strengthened frames, and boiler modifications. 35 locomotives were built by Schneider and Le Creusot between 1948 and 1952. The class was initially assigned to the line between Paris and Marseilles, hauling services including the famous Le Mistral expresses, but within a few years they were displaced by electrification.
    5.00
    1 votes
    224
    British Rail Class D2/7

    British Rail Class D2/7

    • Built by: Hudswell Clarke
    British Rail Class D2/7 was a locomotive commissioned by British Rail in England. It was a diesel powered locomotive in the pre-TOPS period built by Hudswell Clarke with a Gardner engine. The mechanical transmission, using a scoop control fluid coupling and three-speed Power-flow SSS (synchro-self-shifting) gearbox , was a Hudswell Clarke speciality. The D2/7 was of old-fashioned appearance with a full-height engine casing and a small, steam locomotive-type chimney. The later British Rail Class D2/12, although mechanically similar, was of more modern appearance. A kit is available from Invertrain in 7mm Scale ( O Gauge) Mercian Models make kits for this locomotive and the very similar industrial version, in both 4mm and 7mm scale. List of British Rail classes
    4.00
    2 votes
    225
    EMD G8

    EMD G8

    The EMD G8 was a General Motors-built diesel-electric locomotive of which 382 were built between 1954 and 1965 for both export and domestic use. They were built by both Electro-Motive Division in the United States and by General Motors Diesel Division in Canada for use in ten countries, being equipped to operate on several different track gauges. The G8 was built for use in Australia, Canada, Brazil, Cuba, Egypt, Indonesia, Iran, South Korea, Liberia, and New Zealand (NZR DB class). The 1967 Israeli invasion of Sinai captured Egyptian G8 number 3256, which became Israel Railways number 251. The G8 was also built in Australia under licence by Clyde Engineering, with Victorian Railways purchasing a total of 89 between 1955 and 1969, with later variants including a redesigned cab, carbody and radiator (the G8B) and those built after 1967 (the G18B) equipped with the newer EMD 645 engine rather than the EMD 567 which had been fitted to the earlier locomotives. They were designated as the T class. The Broken Hill Proprietary Company Ltd also purchased two G8's, classed as DE, for service on its mine railways in the Middleback Ranges, South Australia. Both locomotives also saw service on
    4.00
    2 votes
    226
    GER Class Y14

    GER Class Y14

    The Great Eastern Railway (GER) Class Y14 is a class of 0-6-0 steam locomotive. The LNER classified them J15. The Class Y14 was designed by T.W. Worsdell for both freight and passenger duties - a veritable 'maid of all work'. Introduced in July 1883, they were so successful that all the succeeding chief superintendents continued to build new batches down to 1913 with little design change, the final total being 289. During World War I, 43 of the engines served in France and Belgium. On 10–11 December 1891, the Great Eastern Railway's Stratford Works built one of these locomotives and had it in steam with a coat of grey primer in 9 hours 47 minutes; this remains a world record. The locomotive then went off to run 36,000 miles on Peterborough to London coal trains before coming back to the works for the final coat of paint. It lasted 40 years and ran a total of 1,127,750 miles. Because of their light weight the locomotives were given the Route Availability (RA) number 1, indicating that they could work over nearly all routes. A class J15 locomotive was involved in a boiler explosion at Westerfield railway station on 25 September 1900. As built all the locomotives had a stovepipe
    4.00
    2 votes
    227
    SNCF Class Z 6400

    SNCF Class Z 6400

    The SNCF Class Z 6400 electric multiple units were built by Alsthom/Carel et Fouché between 1976-1979. 75 of these 4-car units are used on suburban service in the west of Paris, operating mainly from Paris Gare Saint-Lazare.
    4.00
    2 votes
    228
    BR standard class 7

    BR standard class 7

    • Locomotives of this class: BR standard class 7 70000 Britannia
    The BR Standard Class 7, otherwise known as the Britannia Class, is a class of 4-6-2 Pacific steam locomotive designed by Robert Riddles for use by British Railways for mixed traffic duties. Fifty-five were constructed between 1951 and 1954. The design was a result of the 1948 locomotive exchanges undertaken in advance of further locomotive classes being constructed. Three batches were constructed at Crewe Works, before the publication of the 1955 Modernisation Plan. The Britannia Class was based on several previous locomotive designs, incorporating the best practices in locomotive technology as regards labour-saving and lowering maintenance costs; various weight-saving measures also increased the route availability of a Pacific-type locomotive on the British Railways network. The Britannias received a positive reception from their crews, with those regularly operating the locomotives giving them favourable reports as regards performance. However, trials in some areas of the British Railway network returned negative feedback, primarily due to indifferent operation of the locomotive, with its effects on adhering to timetables. The Britannias took their names from great Britons,
    4.00
    1 votes
    229
    British Rail Class 20

    British Rail Class 20

    • Built by: English Electric
    The British Rail (BR) Class 20, otherwise known as an English Electric Type 1, is a class of diesel-electric locomotive. In total, 228 locomotives in the class were built by English Electric between 1957 and 1968, the large number being in part because of the failure of other early designs in the same power range to provide reliable locomotives. The locomotives were originally numbered D8000–D8199 and D8300–D8327. They are known by railway enthusiasts as "Choppers", a name derived from the distinctive beat that the engine produces under load which resembles the sound of a helicopter. Designed around relatively basic technology, the 73-tonne locomotives produce 1,000 horsepower (750 kW) and can operate at up to 75 mph (121 km/h). Designed to work light mixed freight traffic, they have no train heating facilities. Locomotives up to D8127 were fitted with disc indicators in the style of the steam era; when headcodes were introduced in 1960 the locomotive’s design was changed to incorporate headcode boxes. Although older locomotives were not retro-fitted with headcode boxes, a few of the earlier batch acquired headcode boxes as a result of repairs. Unusually for British designs, the
    4.00
    1 votes
    230
    British Rail Class 445

    British Rail Class 445

    The PEP Stock were prototype electric multiple units used on British Rail's Southern and Scottish Regions during the 1970s and early 1980s. They were forerunners of the BR Second Generation electric multiple unit fleet. Three units were built, one two-car unit (2001), and two four-car units (4001/4002). Under TOPS, they were allocated Classes 445 (4PEP) and 446 (2PEP). Internal layout was for commuter services; low-backed, bus-style 2+2 seating in open saloons, wide gangways with hanging straps, and no lavatory facilities. They were the first electric multiple units designed by British Rail with electric sliding doors, outside the Scottish Region. They were unable to operate with any other stock due to their new coupling system. Externally, 2001 was finished in unpainted aluminium, while 4001/4002 were painted in all-over Rail Blue. In passenger use, they normally operated together as a ten-car formation. The production-run classes which are most visibly similar to the PEP Stock are the dual voltage 750V DC/25kV AC Class 313, the 25kV AC Classes 314 and 315, and the 750V DC Classes 507 and 508. However, subsequent builds have also drawn heavily on the experience gained by this
    4.00
    1 votes
    231
    British Rail Class 487

    British Rail Class 487

    The British Rail Class 487 electric multiple units were built by English Electric in 1940, for use on the Waterloo & City Line. Twelve motor carriages (DMBSO), numbered 51–62, and sixteen trailers (TSO), numbered 71–86, were built. Trains were formed of various formations, from a single motor carriage, to pairs of motor cars with up to three intermediate trailers. They were originally classified Class 453 under TOPS but were later reclassified Class 487. The Waterloo & City Line was operated as part of the BR Southern Region. Stock was painted in British Railways green livery, which was replaced by BR Blue in the 1970s. In 1986, the line came under the ownership of Network SouthEast, and their blue, red and white livery was applied. By the 1990s the units were urgently in need of replacing. This came in the form of new Class 482 two-car units, which were delivered to traffic in 1992/93. The final Class 487 vehicles were taken by road to Glasgow for scrap, which was their single longest journey above ground. The Class 487 units were unique on the British Rail network in not requiring yellow ends because the route they operated was entirely in tunnel where the darkness would render
    4.00
    1 votes
    232
    British Rail Class D3/12

    British Rail Class D3/12

    British Rail class D3/12 was a class of three experimental diesel-electric shunting locomotives designed by Richard Maunsell of the Southern Railway in 1937. They quickly proved their effectiveness, and although they were not immediately replicated due to the advent of the Second World War, the class were the basis for a larger class of similar locomotives introduced by Oliver Bulleid in 1949. Once the UK economy began to improve in the mid 1930s, the Southern Railway had further need for heavy shunting locomotives in its marshalling yards around London. The Z class steam locomotives had proved successful for this task but Maunsell wanted to compare their performance with diesel-electric alternatives. He therefore sought authorisation for the construction of three experimental locomotives for use in the busy Norwood marshalling yard where there was a continuous need for such locomotives. No private manufacturer was in a position to build the new locomotives and so they were jointly constructed by the Southern Railway's Ashford works, who constructed the framing, cabs and bodywork, and English Electric Ltd of Preston, who fitted the traction motors. The three locomotives were also
    4.00
    1 votes
    233
    GNR Class N2

    GNR Class N2

    The Great Northern Railway (GNR) Class N2 is an 0-6-2T side tank steam locomotive designed by Nigel Gresley and introduced in 1920. Further batches were built by the London and North Eastern Railway from 1925. They had superheaters and piston valves driven by Stephenson valve gear. Some locomotives were fitted with condensing apparatus for working on the Metropolitan Railway Widened Lines between King's Cross and Moorgate. The N2s were designed for suburban passenger operations, and worked most of the duties out of King's Cross and Moorgate, often hauling one or two quad-art sets of articulated suburban coaches. These ran to places such as New Barnet and Gordon Hill on the Hertford loop. They also hauled some empty coaching stock trains between King's Cross and Ferme Park carriage sidings. They were also a common sight in and around Glasgow and Edinburgh operating suburban services, mainly on what is today known as the North Clyde Line. British Railways numbers were: 69490-69596. One, No. 4744 (BR No. 69523) survives to preservation on the Great Central Railway. It is owned by the Gresley Society, and has appeared in both LNER Black and GNR Apple Green while in preservation.
    4.00
    1 votes
    234
    GWR 5600 Class

    GWR 5600 Class

    The GWR 5600 Class is a class of 0-6-2T steam locomotive built between 1924 and 1928. They were designed by C.B Collett for the Great Western Railway (GWR), and were introduced into traffic in 1924. Two hundred locomotives were built and remained in service until withdrawn by British Railways between 1962 and 1965. Nine of the class have survived into preservation. The railways of South Wales seem to have had a particular liking for the 0-6-2T type. This was because the nature of the work they undertook demanded high adhesive weight, plenty of power with good braking ability, but no need for outright speed, nor large tanks or bunker as the distances from pit to port were short. These Welsh locomotives were taken over by the GWR at The Grouping in 1923 and some were rebuilt with GWR taper boilers. A number of them passed into British Railways (BR) ownership in 1948, including (with some gaps in numbering): For further information on these pre-grouping locomotives see Locomotives of the Great Western Railway. When the GWR took over the Welsh valley lines, they discovered that the Welsh locomotive crews liked their 0-6-2T locomotives. Rather than a new design the 5600 Class was a
    4.00
    1 votes
    235
    SNCF Class BB 61000

    SNCF Class BB 61000

    The SNCF Class BB 61000 diesel locomotives were built by Vossloh to their G1206 design between 2002-2005 for the French state railways. Twenty three locomotives were built, numbered 61001-61023. As they are operated by the freight sector, the locomotives carry a '4' prefix (i.e. they are numbered 461001-461023). These are the second locomotives to be numbered in this range, the first being the Class C 61000 (+ TC 61100).
    4.00
    1 votes
    236
    SNCF Class Y 8000

    SNCF Class Y 8000

    The SNCF Class Y 8000 is a class of diesel shunter built between 1977 and 1990. The locomotives were developed by SNCF for shunting duties. Initial construction was by Locotracteurs Gaston Moyse until that company ceased business, then by Fauvet Girel. Y 8000 machines were used to replace older shunting engines, as well as trip work on minor lines. The locomotives were 2 axle machines with both axles powered by a Poyaud (SSCM) diesel engine via a Voith hydraulic transmission. Locomotives were later re-engined (1997) with lower emission RVI engines; when re-engined locomotives received the green SNCF Fret livery. The locomotives also are certified for use in Italy, limited to shunting work: Y 8120 has been operated by SNCF subsidiary CapTrain Italia. After 1989 production shifted to a mechanically identical Y 8400 type, which incorporated a radio control system for shunting.
    4.00
    1 votes
    237
    BR standard class 3 2-6-0

    BR standard class 3 2-6-0

    The BR Standard Class 3 2-6-0 was a class of mixed traffic steam locomotive designed by Robert Riddles for British Railways. It was essentially a hybrid design, the chassis being closely based on and sharing a number of parts with the LMS Ivatt Class 4, and having a boiler derived from a GWR No.2 boiler as fitted to the GWR Large Prairie 2-6-2T and 5600 Class 0-6-2T tank engines. The design and construction took place at the ex-GWR Swindon Works, along with the 2-6-2T tank engine version of the class. Although the boiler shared flanged plates with the GWR No.2 boiler the barrel was shortened by 5 ⁄16 inches and a dome added. Strangely the class did not share the same design of wheels as the Doncaster-designed BR Standard Class 4 2-6-0 (76XXX), which also had 5 ft 3 in (1,600 mm) driving wheels and the same piston stoke, and hence crank-pin throw. In common with a number of the other BR Standard Classes, the chassis design used a number of LMS-designed components including Brake Hanger Brackets, Flexible Stretcher Brackets and Reversing Shaft Brackets. The cylinder covers of engines as built were fitted with "screw-in" type pressure relief valves. From September 1955 revised
    0.00
    0 votes
    238
    BR standard class 9F

    BR standard class 9F

    The British Railways BR Standard Class 9F 2-10-0 is a class of steam locomotive designed for British Railways by Robert Riddles. The Class 9F was the last in a series of standardised locomotive classes designed for British Railways during the 1950s, and was intended for use on fast, heavy freight trains over long distances. It was one of the most powerful steam locomotive types ever constructed in Britain, and successfully performed its intended duties. The class earned a nickname of 'Spaceships', due to its size and shape. At various times during the 1950s the 9Fs worked passenger trains with great success, indicating the versatility of the design, sometimes considered to represent the ultimate in British steam development. Several experimental variants were constructed in an effort to reduce costs and maintenance, although these met with varying degrees of success. The total number built was 251, production being shared between Swindon (53) and Crewe Works (198). The last of the class, 92220 Evening Star, was the final steam locomotive to be built by British Railways, in 1960. Withdrawals began in 1964, with the final locomotives removed from service in 1968. Several examples
    0.00
    0 votes
    239
    British Rail Class 171

    British Rail Class 171

    The Class 171 Turbostar is a type of diesel multiple unit (DMU) built by Bombardier Transportation (previously ADtranz) at their Litchurch Lane Works in Derby, England which is identical to the Class 170, except for the replacement of the BSI (Bergische Stahl Industrie) coupler with a Dellner coupler. This provision was made to allow emergency joining with Class 377 DC third-rail electric units. The vehicles work on the southern regions of the British railway system, mainly where there are no electric lines and no third rail. The Southern fleet are fitted with coupling devices (Dellner) different from other Turbostars, and are classified as Class 171 for this reason. The four-car units were built with the new couplers, but Class 170 two car units were fitted at a later date, and reclassified as Class 171/7 after the modification. Three more two-car units were later acquired, but these were built from new with the new couplers. Southern gained 170 392 from South West Trains. The coupler on this unit has also been changed to the Dellner type. The unit has been reclassified and renumbered from 170 392 to 171 730. Ironically this unit was first delivered carrying Southern livery and
    0.00
    0 votes
    240
    British Rail Class 24

    British Rail Class 24

    The British Rail Class 24 diesel locomotives, also known as the Sulzer Type 2, were built from 1958 to 1961. One hundred and fifty-one of these locomotives were built at Derby, Crewe and Darlington, the first twenty of them as part of the British Rail 1955 Modernisation Plan. This class was used as the basis for the development of the Class 25 locomotives. The final survivor, no. 24081, was withdrawn from Crewe depot in 1980. The main power for the Class 24 was the Sulzer 6LDA28 diesel engine - denoting 6 cylinders; Locomotive use; Direct fuel injection; (turbo-charged); 28 cm (11 in) bore cylinders. This was effectively an off-the-shelf purchase with small changes to bearings, injectors and some other minor items. The diesel engine powered another off-the-shelf product, the British Thomson-Houston (BTH) RTB15656 main generator which, in the Class 24, was rated at 735 kW (986 hp), 750/525 V and 980/1400 A at 750 rpm. Traction motors, one per axle, were also by BTH being the type 137BY rated at 222 hp (166 kW), 525 V, 350 A at 560 rpm connected to the axle via a 16:81 gear stepdown ratio, each force ventilated by an AEI 12.2 hp (9.1 kW) electric motor. The original pilot scheme
    0.00
    0 votes
    241
    British Rail Class 370

    British Rail Class 370

    • Parent class: Advanced Passenger Train
    British Rail's Class 370 tilting trains, also referred to as APT-P (meaning Advanced Passenger Train Prototype), were the pre-production Advanced Passenger Train units. Unlike the earlier experimental gas-turbine APT-E unit, these units were powered by 25kV AC overhead electrification and were used on the West Coast Main Line between London Euston and Glasgow Central. The APT-P is the most powerful domestic train to have operated in Britain, the eight traction motors fitted to the two central Motor Cars giving a total output of 8,000 horsepower (6,000 kW). This enabled the train to set the UK rail speed record of 162.2 miles per hour (261.0 km/h) in December 1979, a record that stood for 23 years. Due to ongoing technical problems with these pre-production units, and a lack of cash or political will to take the project forward, the planned APT-S production-series units were never built, but did influence the design of the later InterCity 225 sets designed for the East Coast Main Line electrification. The influence is strongest with the Class 91 locos which took many features from the APT powercars. The technology was later sold to Fiat and used for improving their second generation
    0.00
    0 votes
    242
    British Rail Class 403

    British Rail Class 403

    The Southern Railway (SR) gave the designation 5BEL to the 5-car all-Pullman electric multiple units which worked the prestigious Brighton Belle trains between London Victoria and Brighton. These units survived long enough in British Rail ownership to be allocated TOPS Class 403. Between 1933 and 1935 the units were designated 5PUL (the 'PUL' code was then used for the 6PUL units). The SR electrified the London Victoria to Brighton line in the early 1930s, and full electric services commenced over the route from 1 January 1933. For the high-profile Southern Belle Pullman train three five-car units, consisting entirely of Pullman cars, were built. All fifteen cars were built by Metropolitan Cammell. In June 1934 the Southern Railway renamed the Southern Belle as the Brighton Belle. As they were Pullman cars, owned by the independent Pullman Car Company, the individual carriages were numbered in its series, taking numbers 279 to 293, and the first class cars were given ladies' name while the third (from June 1956, second) class cars carried less-inspiring Car No xx designations, derived from the second and third digits of the Pullman Car Company's number. However, the units together
    0.00
    0 votes
    243
    British Rail Class 53

    British Rail Class 53

    British Rail assigned Class 53 to the single Brush Traction-built prototype locomotive Falcon. While not in any sense a failure, the design was the victim of advances in locomotive technology (specifically, the power obtainable from single low-speed diesel engines) and was never duplicated. The Falcon project began in 1959 to design a new, lightweight diesel-electric Type 4 locomotive for a British Railways' requirement for second generation diesel locomotives. No single lightweight diesel engine was powerful enough, so the Falcon project used twin German-designed Maybach MD655 engines like those in the Class 52 'Western' diesel-hydraulic locomotives of the Western Region. These drove Brush generators and traction motors, rather than the hydraulic transmission of the 'Westerns'. The prototype, wearing a livery of lime green and chestnut brown and bearing the number D0280 after its Brush project number 280, emerged from Brush's Loughborough works in September 1961. Initial testing took place on the Eastern Region, based at Finsbury Park, and the London Midland Region, following which it was transferred to the Western Region for power-unit performance testing. Returning to Brush in
    0.00
    0 votes
    244
    British Rail Class 57

    British Rail Class 57

    The Class 57 diesel locomotives were introduced by Brush Traction between 1997-2004. They are rebuilds, with reconditioned EMD engines, of former Class 47 locomotives, originally introduced in 1962-68. The Class 57 is a re-engineered locomotive, rebuilt by Brush Traction at Loughborough from redundant Class 47 locomotives. The locomotives are fitted with a refurbished EMD engine and a reconditioned alternator, improving reliability and performance. Three variants exist, one for freight and two for passenger operations. At £500,000 it was about one-third the cost of a new build locomotive. The class has its origins in 1997 when Freightliner ordered an initial six locomotives. In 2000 a prototype locomotive was converted with electric train heating, with a view to obtaining orders from passenger companies. They are known as "Bodysnatchers", or "Zombies" to enthusiasts, by virtue of the fact that the shell (body) of the Class 47 has been stripped, rewired and re-engined and as "GM"s due to them being "genetically modified" with General Motors equipment. Direct Rail Services currently operate nine 57/0s, comprising 57002-57003 and 57007-57012 leased from Porterbrook and 57004 purchased
    0.00
    0 votes
    245
    British Rail Class 83

    British Rail Class 83

    • Built by: English Electric
    The British Rail Class 83 electric locomotives were built by English Electric at Vulcan Foundry, Newton-le-Willows as part of the West Coast Main Line electrification. Fifteen engines of British Rail Class 83 were built between 1960 and 1962 by English Electric at Vulcan Foundry, as part of British Rail's policy to develop a standard electric locomotive. Five prototype classes (81-85) were built and evaluated, which eventually led to the development of the Class 86 locomotive. Three of these engines were to have been built as Type B, geared for freight trains, but as it was only two were so built, becoming E3303 and E3304. The third Type B, E3305, was never built as such. Instead it was used as a test bed with silicon rectifiers and transducers, this being the first step towards thyristor control. It became a Type A, geared for passenger trains, and numbered E3100. The other two Type B locomotives were eventually rebuilt as Type A, being renumbered E3098 (ex E3303) and E3099 (ex E3304). Power was provided by overhead catenary energized at 25,000 V AC. As with the Class 84, the Class 83 suffered with problems due to the mercury-arc rectifiers. After spending several years in storage
    0.00
    0 votes
    246
    GWR 4073 Class

    GWR 4073 Class

    • Locomotives of this class: GWR 4073 Class 5043 Earl of Mount Edgcumbe
    The GWR 4073 Class or Castle class locomotives are a group of 4-6-0 steam locomotives of the Great Western Railway. They were originally designed by the railway's Chief Mechanical Engineer, Charles Collett, for working the company's express passenger trains. A development of the earlier Star Class, 171 Castles were built, over a 27-year span from August 1923 to August 1950. They were numbered 4073–4099; 5000–5099; 7000–7037. Although most were built new, 16 locos were rebuilt from older locomotives— 15 Star Class locomotives; and the Great Western Railway's sole 4-6-2 locomotive, number 111 The Great Bear. The Castle class was noted for superb performance overall, and notably on the Cheltenham Flyer during the 1930s: for example, on 6 June 1932 the train, pulled by 5006 Tregenna Castle, covered the 77.25 miles from Swindon to Paddington at an average speed of 81.68 mph start-to-stop (124.3 km at an average speed of 131.4 km/h). This world record for steam traction was widely regarded as an astonishing feat. The origins of this highly successful design date back to G. J. Churchward’s Star Class of 1907. Stars were 4-cylinder 4-6-0s with long-travel valves and Belpaire fireboxes, and
    0.00
    0 votes
    247
    SNCF Class BB 26000

    SNCF Class BB 26000

    • Built by: Alstom
    The SNCF BB 26000 locomotives are a class of dual voltage, four axle B'B' electric locomotives capable of a top speed of 200 km/h built by GEC Alsthom between 1988 and 1998 for SNCF. The locomotives are also commonly known as the Sybics. The class were built to fulfil both freight and passenger roles; the specifications included the ability to haul 16 Corail coaches at 200 km/h (120 mph) on a 0.25% gradient, and to haul a 2,050 t (2,020 long tons; 2,260 short tons) freight train at 80 km/h (50 mph) on a 0.88% gradient. The locomotives are a two cabin design with the body built out of steel, two pantographs are fitted; one for 1500 V operation, the other for 25 kV operation. A 25 kV AC supply is stepped down and rectified to 1500 V, a 1500 V supply feeds the power electronics directly. Each of the three elements of the thyristor bridge based three phase inverter circuits are connected in parallel, with the two three phase supplies per motor being series connected. For speeds below 15 km/h (9.3 mph) one supply voltage reducing chopper circuit (French:hacheur) per motor bogie is used to assist control. The power electronics of the two motor bogies are connected in parallel, and are
    0.00
    0 votes
    248
    SNCF Class BB 27300

    SNCF Class BB 27300

    • Built by: Alstom
    The SNCF Class BB 27300 are a series of 67 electric locomotives, built as part of the "Prima" range by Alstom. Painted in the blue and white livery of Transilien, the brand name for the SNCF network around Paris, these locomotives are the passenger equivalent of the freight-only Class BB 27000 and are equipped for push-pull operation on suburban passenger services in the Île-de-France region around Paris, working with refurbished VB2N double-deck carriages. The first batch of 60 locomotives was ordered in 2004, and following testing of the first two units in 2005, delivered progressively into 2008. Follow-up orders for five and two locomotives respectively were placed. The locomotives are numbered in series from 27301-27367, although the number carried on the locomotive is prefixed with the number 8, to denote the unit as belonging to the Île-de-France division of SNCF. The first locomotives entered service in 2006 on suburban trains from Paris-Montparnasse. Current deployment sees a total of 23 locomotives operating services from Paris-Montparnasse on trains to Dreux, Mantes-la-Jolie and Rambouillet. At Montparnasse they have displaced older BB 8500 and BB 25500 locomotives. A
    0.00
    0 votes
    249
    SNCF Class X 72500

    SNCF Class X 72500

    The SNCF Class X 72500 diesel multiple units were built by Alstom between 1997 and 2002. They operate longer distance TER services, particularly in the areas south and west of Paris, the Paris to Laon line, around Tours, Nantes, Toulouse, Lyon, Dijon, Nevers, Grenoble, Bordeaux and the South Coast of France. They do not operate in the far north of France. The X 72500 units come in two types: Three sets can be coupled where required The maximum speed is 160 kilometres per hour (99 mph). Units are equipped with two MAN six-cylinder engines of 300 kilowatts (400 hp) per motor vehicle. Each train has four engines for traction, giving a total power of 1,200 kW (1,600 hp). The engines drive a hydromechanical Voith transmission. Additionally each vehicle also includes a 135 kW (181 hp) Perkins/Mecalte diesel generator for auxiliaries (lighting, air conditioning, door controls, etc..). The braking system is provided by mechanical disc brakes coupled to a hydrodynamic engine brake. The driving position, TGV type centered in the cab, was designed to facilitate the work of the driver. It also includes elements to enable Driver Only Operation (but the absence of CCTV/mirrors require a second
    0.00
    0 votes
    250
    Vossloh G1206

    Vossloh G1206

    The Vossloh G1206 is a B'B' diesel hydraulic freight locomotive built by Vossloh and used by several mainland European railway operators. The design was created in the mid-1990s by Maschinenbau Kiel (MaK) for German coal supplier RAG Aktiengesellschaft (RAG AG) and is a follow-on to the G1205 locomotive class built as SNCB Class 77. A cab is provided above one of the bogies, with walkways on both sides along the rest of the locomotive. Rated power is 1,500 kilowatts (2,010 hp) from either a MTU or Caterpillar engines, giving a top speed of 100 kilometres per hour (60 mph). A successor is the Vossloh G1700 with a higher-rated engine. ACTS Nederland BV have 7 × G1206 locomotives numbered 7101–7107 painted in either blue and yellow or green and grey. They refer to these locomotive as the 7100 class. Angel Trains Cargo operate 3 × G1206 locomotives in the Netherlands. These are numbered 1509 (red/white), 5001571 (black) and 5001648 (black). Chemins de Fer Luxembourgeois (CFL) cargo leases 9 × G1206 locomotives which are referred to as the 1500 class. They are numbered 1501–1504, 1507 and 1581–1584. In addition CFL cargo Deutschland leases two locos numbered 1505/1506. Four G1206
    0.00
    0 votes
    Get your friends to vote! Spread this URL or share:

    Discuss Best Locomotive class of All Time

    Top List Voters