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Best Lighthouse of All Time

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    1
    Presque Isle Light

    Presque Isle Light

    The Presque Isle Light is one of three lighthouses on Lake Erie in U.S. state of Pennsylvania. The lighthouse is located on the northern shore of Presque Isle State Park, near Erie. It was built in 1872 and was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1983. Its construction began in 1872, and the light was first lit on July 12, 1873. It was originally 40 feet (12 m) tall before the tower was raised to its current height in 1896. Its original light characteristic, two red flashes followed by four white flashes, was changed to an alternating red and white flash when it was electrified in the 1920s. The Presque Isle Light was commonly known as the "flashlight" to locals. In 1962, the station was fully automated and the characteristic was changed to a 3 second-on, 3 second-off white light. The Presque Isle Light was added to the National Register of Historic Places on August 4, 1983 as part of a group listing of lighthouses and light stations operated by the United States Coast Guard on the Great Lakes.
    7.14
    7 votes
    2
    Ediz Hook Light

    Ediz Hook Light

    • Construction: Wood
    Ediz Hook Lighthouse is a lighthouse in Port Angeles, Washington, United States. Originally constructed in 1865, the lighthouse structure was later replaced in 1908 by a new structure, and finally in 1946 by an automated beacon on the United States Coast Guard air station on the end of Ediz Hook.
    7.00
    7 votes
    3
    Fishing Battery Light

    Fishing Battery Light

    • Construction: Brick
    Fishing Battery Light was the last lighthouse constructed in Maryland by John Donahoo. While still standing, it has been supplanted by a steel tower which stands adjacent to it. Fishing Battery (also known as Donahoo Battery and Shad Battery at times) is an artificially constructed island, created to allow fishermen to transfer their catches to paddleboats whose draft barred them from entry to Havre de Grace. In 1851 Congress appropriated $5000 to erect a light on the island; this light was constructed in 1853 by John Donahoo, the last light he built on the Chesapeake Bay. His role in the purchase of the land for the light is a bit obscure, because although the main payment went to one Otho Scott, Donahoo was later paid $10 for the same plot. Donahoo had owned the island some ten years prior, and it is unclear whether he was paid for brokering the sale or to quit title claims. The original structure was a brick one and half story house with the lantern in the center of the roof ridge, similar in form to those built at Point Lookout and Blakistone Island. Originally equipped with an all-but-obsolete wick and reflector, it gained a sixth order Fresnel lens within a few years, to be
    7.83
    6 votes
    4
    Hillsboro Inlet Light

    Hillsboro Inlet Light

    • Construction: Iron
    Hillsboro Inlet Light is located on the north side of Hillsboro Inlet, midway between Fort Lauderdale and Boca Raton, in Hillsboro Beach, Florida. The light marks the northern limit of the Florida Reef, an underwater coral formation on the lower east coast of the state. In 1901, the United States Lighthouse Establishment persuaded Congress to authorize the construction of a lighthouse in the dark area between Jupiter Inlet Light and Fowey Rocks Light. In the second half of the 20th century, this inlet became an increasingly busy waterway. Hillsboro Inlet Light is considered one of the most powerful lights in the world with a beam that can be seen 28 miles (45 km). The octagonal iron pyramidal tower was built at Russel Wheel & Foundry Co in Detroit, Michigan, moved to the Hillsboro Inlet Light Station in 1906, and lit on March 7, 1907. Its second-order bivalve Fresnel lens emits a light measuring 5.5 megacandelas and is placed 136 feet (41 m) above sea level. Automated in 1974, the light acts both as a coastal navigational aide and as a support to local water traffic. The light was relit in 2000, with 400 pounds (180 kg) of mercury replaced by a specially designed ball-bearing
    10.00
    4 votes
    5
    Greens Ledge Light

    Greens Ledge Light

    • Construction: Cast iron
    Greens Ledge Lighthouse is a sparkplug lighthouse in Connecticut, United States, off the southwest end of the Norwalk Islands, Long Island Sound, near Norwalk, Connecticut. It is on north side of the west end of Greens Ledge, west of Norwalk Harbor a mile south of the entrance to Five Mile River at Rowayton, and just over a mile southwest of Sheffield Lighthouse. When it was built in 1902, the "sparkplug" style lighthouse replaced the Sheffield Island Light. At first it had a fifth order Fresnel lens. Three months after it was first lit, it was upgraded to a fourth order Fresnel lens. The 52-foot (16 m) tower developed a tilt over time and the keepers also complained the station’s generators caused the furniture to move to one side of the tower. They solved the problem by keeping all the furniture on one side. The light was automated by the United States Coast Guard in 1972. The light is an active aid to navigation and is not open to the public. Since 1935, swimmers have been competing annually in the Arthur J. Ladrigan Swim Race, a one-mile (1.6 km) race from the lighthouse to Bayley Beach in the Rowayton section of Norwalk. The light was added to the National Register of Historic
    7.50
    6 votes
    6
    Chicago Harbor Lighthouse

    Chicago Harbor Lighthouse

    • Construction: Cast iron
    The Chicago Harbor Lighthouse is an automated active lighthouse, and stands at the end of the northern breakwater protecting the Chicago Harbor, to the east of Navy Pier and the mouth of the Chicago River. It was constructed in 1893 for the World's Columbian Exposition and moved to its present site in 1919. The United States Lighthouse Board prominently displayed "its 'state of the art' wares and engineering achievements." Prominently featured was "the engineering marvel" of Spectacle Reef Light and a 111-foot-tall (34 m) skeletal cast iron lighthouse tower. Also displayed were a number of Fresnel lenses, including a stunning Third Order Fresnel lens which previously was awarded first prize at a Paris glass exhibition. The lens featured alternating red and white panels, and had been ordered for installation in the new lighthouse at Point Loma Light (new) in California. The coincidental conclusion of construction of the new Chicago Harbor light and the close of the Exhibition prompted the Lighthouse Board keep the lens in Chicago, and thus the lens was installed in the lantern room of the new tower. Surrounded by rip rap, the structure has several levels: a concrete base and two red
    9.75
    4 votes
    7
    Baileys Harbor Range Lights

    Baileys Harbor Range Lights

    The Baileys Harbor Range Lights are a pair of lighthouses arranged in a range light configuration, located near Baileys Harbor in Door County, Wisconsin. The range lights replaced the Baileys Harbor Lighthouse in 1870 at a cost of $6,000. They are approximately 980 feet (300 m) apart and aligned on a 340° bearing line to guide boats safely into the harbor. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1988 or 1989, as reference number 89001466 as the Baileys Harbor Range Light. Currently part of the Ridges wildlife sanctuary, which is listed on the List of National Natural Landmarks in Wisconsin. It is closed to the public, but may be viewed from Ridges Road. The skeleton tower is listed in Volume VII of the United States Coast Guard light list. The Bailey's Harbor Range Light is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, Reference #89001466, as BAILEYS HARBOR RANGE LIGHT. It is also on the State List/Inventory as of 1988. Door County has the most lighthouses of any Wisconsin county. Highway 57 just north of Baileys Harbor, Wisconsin, turn east onto Ridges Road. Proceed 0.3 mi (0.48 km)to the Bailey Harbor Range Lights. The Ridges Sanctuary, which charges a
    7.33
    6 votes
    8
    Gibbs Hill Lighthouse

    Gibbs Hill Lighthouse

    Built in 1844 by the Royal Engineers, the Gibbs Hill Lighthouse is the taller of two lighthouses on Bermuda, and the first of only a few lighthouses in the world to be made of cast-iron. This is because at that time, steel still was not able to be bent. The optic consists of a Fresnel lens from 1904 revolving on steel bearings. However for most of its history, the lens revolved on a bed of 1,200 pounds of mercury. While it is certainly not extremely tall in lighthouse standards, the hill that it stands on is one of the highest on the island. The light's focal plane on Gibbs Hill Lighthouse, therefore, is at 354 feet (108 m) above sea level. Airplanes can see its flashes from over 100 miles (160 km) away. The lighthouse has 185 steps to the top in eight flights. Until 1964, most of the light was run by hand, but in June of that year, the whole system was automated and runs on electricity. Sixty-thousand people ascended the lighthouse in 1985, and it continues to be a popular tourist attraction. A radar antenna for marine shipping was installed atop the lighthouse in 1987 supported on a steel space frame fixed at the original bolt locations. The radar and supporting frame were
    7.33
    6 votes
    9
    Fort Washington Light

    Fort Washington Light

    • Construction: Wood
    Fort Washington Light is an unusual lighthouse located on the banks of the Potomac River on the grounds of its namesake fort. Although there has been a lighthouse on this location since 1857, the current light was converted from a fog bell tower in 1901. Fort Washington projects into the Potomac River where the river turns north, and in 1856 Jefferson Davis, in his capacity of Secretary of War, authorized the construction of a lighthouse on the fort property, to be maintained by post personnel. Minimal funds were appropriated, and a temporary cast iron tower was constructed the following year. Almost immediately this light was found inadequate, and in 1870 a 16-foot (4.9 m) replacement tower was constructed in Baltimore and erected on a site closer to the water. This tower had a sixth-order Fresnel lens. In 1882 a wooden fog bell tower was erected, and in the following years a keeper's house and various other structures sprung up around the old tower, largely obscuring it. In 1900 a request was made to build a third, taller tower, and as a temporary expedient, a light was added to the fog bell tower, sitting on a platform attached near the top. The replacement light tower was never
    8.20
    5 votes
    10
    Tawas Point Light

    Tawas Point Light

    Tawas Point Light is located in the Tawas Point State Park off Tawas Bay in Lake Huron in Baldwin Township in Northern Michigan. In 1850, Congress appropriated $5,000 for the construction of a lighthouse. In 1852, construction started, and the lighthouse was commissioned in 1853. After the lighthouse was built, many problems were encountered. Shifting sands caused the point to be extended by nearly a mile. The original light was a 5th Order Fresnel lens, later upgraded when the building was replaced. Moreover, the structure was failing, and a ship disaster in the 1870s led to the decision to construct a new lighthouse in 1875. In 1876, construction was completed, with a final cost of $30,000. It was originally known as Ottawa Point. The name was officially changed to Tawas Point in 1902. The point is a substantial hazard to navigation. Additionally, because it is tucked behind the point, Tawas Bay is an ideal shelter from storms, wind and waves out of the north and northest. The point juts out into Lake Huron, and has been getting much larger over time. A map is available, which shows the accretion. The original light was begun in 1852, and completed in 1853. The light was fueled
    8.00
    5 votes
    11
    Wollongong Lighthouses

    Wollongong Lighthouses

    Wollongong Head Lighthouse, also known as Flagstaff Lighthouse or Flagstaff Point Light, is an active lighthouse located in Wollongong, a coastal city south of Sydney, New South Wales. It overlooks the Tasman Sea from the top of Flagstaff Point, directly east of the city centre. Wollongong is the only place in the east of Australia to have two lighthouses located in close proximity of each other, the other being Wollongong Breakwater Lighthouse. Wollongong Harbour is home to private vessels and the local fishing fleet in its inner Belmore Basin. South of the city is Port Kembla, a major steelmaking, minerals, grain and vehicle handling harbour. A further hazard to shipping is an island group known collectively as The Five Islands lying a short distance off the coast. Built by the Department of Shipping and Transport in 1936 to guide maritime traffic into Port Kembla Harbour located to the south. It was not only the first new lighthouse in New South Wales since 1903 but also the first to install fully automatic flashing lights. The tower is constructed of reinforced concrete to withstand the strong winds and splashing waves where it stands on the eastern side of Flagstaff Point. The
    8.00
    5 votes
    12
    South Bishop Lighthouse

    South Bishop Lighthouse

    The South Bishop Lighthouse is a lighthouse on South Bishop Island (also known as Emsger), a small rock approximately 5 miles (8 km) west of St Davids Head in Pembrokeshire, Wales. Designed by James Walker, it was built on the island in 1839, acting both as a waymark for vessels navigating offshore and as assistance to ships navigating around the island group. The lighthouse was converted to electric operation in 1959, and in 1971 a helipad was constructed at the site. Finally, the lighthouse was automated and demanned in 1983. Like many in the UK, it is now monitored from the control centre at Trinity House in Harwich, Essex, England. It was built in the path of many migrating sea birds, and the brilliance of the light at night often led the birds to dash themselves against the lantern. Many died and, when Trinity House and the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds teamed up, they together came to the conclusion to build special bird perches on the side of the lighthouse lantern. After this the amount of deaths decreased considerably.
    6.83
    6 votes
    13
    Long Beach Light

    Long Beach Light

    Long Beach Light also known as the Long Beach Harbor Light, is a lighthouse on Long Beach Harbor in California. Long Beach Harbor Light looks different from a traditional lighthouse. Labeled the "robot light" when established in 1949, it is completely automated and was the forerunner of the new version of 20th-century lighthouses on America's West Coast. The 42-foot (13 m) high white, rectangular tower with a columnar base, features a 36-inch (910 mm) airway-type beacon and is controlled by the ANRAC system from the Los Angeles Harbor Light. The three-story facility, of monolithic design, is built of concrete supported on six cement columns cast into six pockets of a crib. It had dual tone fog signals and a radio beacon. In its commanding position in San Pedro's middle breakwater, the lighthouse was considered an uncanny mechanical wonder when first established. Later, another navigation light in the Long Beach area was erected atop the pilot station at the Port of Long Beach in 1968. Marking the harbor entrance channel, the light is accompanied by one of the United States Coast Guard's radar scanners. This lighthouse is inaccessible to the public but can be viewed from East Ocean
    10.00
    3 votes
    14
    Lindesnes fyrstasjon

    Lindesnes fyrstasjon

    Lindesnes Lighthouse (Norwegian: Lindesnes fyrstasjon) is a coastal lighthouse on the southernmost tip of mainland Norway, the peninsula Neset. It is also the oldest lighthouse station in Norway, first lit in 1655. To avoid confusion with the lighthouse at Skagen in Denmark, it was lit in conjunction with Markøy Lighthouse. It has gone through several changes since it was built: In 1822, it was refitted with a coal lamp, and in 1854 a new lamp was installed with the current lens. The current cast iron tower was set up in 1915 and fitted with the old Fresnel lens. In 1920 the lighthouse station got its first fogsignal, a sirene. The fogsignal and its machinery is placed in a building beside the tower. During WW2 Lindesnes lightouse was taken over by the Germans. Being an important watchpoint the German built a little fortress with four guns and, after a while, a radarantenna. The traces from WW2 are visible as trenches, tunnels etc. In the 1950s the lighthousestation was electrified and the fogsignal was changed into a powerful Diaphone. The fogsignal was closed as a navigational aid in 1988 but it is still operational and being used at special occasions. Lindesnes lighthouse is
    8.50
    4 votes
    15
    White River Lighthouse

    White River Lighthouse

    The White River Light is a lighthouse on Lake Michigan near the city of Whitehall, Michigan. It sits on a thin peninsula of land separating Lake Michigan from White Lake. The building was built in 1875. Some of the buildings in existence for the lightstation consisted of the tower and attached dwelling, the South Pier-head Beacon light, oil house, woodshed or strage building and Privy. The lighthouse is open to the public as a museum with regular hours posted from Memorial Weekend through August 31. The lighthouse is also open through September and October with reduced hours. The museum has a number of artifacts from the passenger and freight shipping on the lakes in addition to information on the light itself.
    8.50
    4 votes
    16
    Williamstown Lighthouse

    Williamstown Lighthouse

    • Construction: Bluestone
    The Williamstown Lighthouse is situated at Gellibrand Point, in the Melbourne suburb of Williamstown. It was erected in 1852, and replaced earlier navigational aids established from the time of the first settlement in 1835. Built of local basalt, the unusual square plan form is the second oldest in Victoria after the Cape Otway lighthouse. Its height is 17 metres built on an elevation of 22 metres. The first lighthouse was built in 1839-40. This timber structure was replaced with a square bluestone lighthouse tower, designed by Henry Ginn. The bluestone section has battered lower stories featuring rusticated masonry with smooth string courses and originally had a castellated parapet with mast and spherical, copper plate timeball above. The masonry was quarried and worked by prisoner labour. Four lamps were shining in May 1849; a larger lamp was installed in August 1849. A timeball apparatus mounted on top of the bluestone tower operated regularly until 1926. Its original use was as a signalling device to ships. From 1858 until 1926 the large ball on the top was dropped each afternoon at one o'clock to allow shipmasters moored offshore to correct their chronometers. The Timeball
    8.50
    4 votes
    17
    Baileys Harbor Lighthouse

    Baileys Harbor Lighthouse

    The Baileys Harbor lighthouse is a lighthouse located near Baileys Harbor in Door County, Wisconsin. Replaced by the Baileys Harbor Range Lights and the Cana Island Lighthouse in 1869. It is one of a few lighthouses in the country to have retained its bird-cage lantern.
    9.67
    3 votes
    18
    Lincoln Rock Light

    Lincoln Rock Light

    • Construction: Wood
    The Lincoln Rock Lighthouse was a lighthouse located on Lincoln Island, a small islet in Clarence Strait in southeastern Alaska, USA. It lies just off the west coast of Etolin Island, between it and Prince of Wales Island. The original lighthouse was built in 1903 and was abandoned in 1909 after being damaged by a storm. In 1911 a manned fog signal station was built on Lincoln Island about 440 yards from the rock, and in 1944 a skeletal light tower was added. The lighthouse was deactivated in 1968. The lighthouse was later demolished and only the foundation of the buildings remain.
    7.20
    5 votes
    19
    Pointe-au-Père lighthouse

    Pointe-au-Père lighthouse

    The 3rd Pointe-Au-Père lighthouse was built in 1909 in the city of Pointe-au-Père, near Rimouski, Quebec, Canada. This city was well known in naval circles as the location of the pilot station for the Bas-Saint-Laurent (lower St. Lawrence) zone. The lighthouse is 108 feet tall, which makes it the second tallest in eastern Canada. It is built in a characteristic shape, employing eight concrete buttresses to support a slender central cylinder. It was replaced by an electronic lighthouse in 1975 and the site is now open for visitors as part of the Site historique maritime de la Pointe-au-Père. The RMS Empress of Ireland shipwrecking is documented in the Empress of Ireland Pavilion and you can also visit the only submarine open to the public in Canada, HMCS Onondaga (S73). The site was designated a National Historic Site of Canada in 1974.
    7.20
    5 votes
    20
    Assateague Light

    Assateague Light

    • Construction: Brick
    Assateague Light is the 142-foot-tall (43 m) lighthouse located on the southern end of Assateague Island off the coast of the Virginia Eastern Shore, USA. The lighthouse is located within the Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge and can be accessed by road from Chincoteague Island over the Assateague Channel. It is owned and operated by the U.S. Coast Guard and is still used as an active aid in navigation. The keeper's quarters are used as seasonal housing for refuge temporary employees, volunteers, and interns. Constructed in 1867 to replace a shorter lighthouse (45-feet-tall) built in 1833, the lighthouse is conical in shape and is painted in alternating bands of red and white. Originally, no light existed between Cape Henlopen, Delaware and Cape Charles, Virginia. In 1830 the United States Congress appropriated money for a light in the general vicinity of Chincoteague Island. The following year, the Collector of Customs in Norfolk selected Assateague Island. The original Assateague Lighthouse was built on the southern tip of the island. Since barrier islands like Assateague shift and change, it is no wonder that the island has grown approximately 5 miles since the site was
    8.25
    4 votes
    21
    Duxbury Pier Light

    Duxbury Pier Light

    Duxbury Pier lighthouse also called Duxbury Light (nicknamed the "Bug Light") is a lighthouse located in Plymouth Harbor, Massachusetts. Duxbury Pier Light was built in 1871 on the north side of the main channel in Plymouth Harbor to mark the dangerous shoal off Saquish Head. The unusual coffeepot-shaped lighthouse is locally known as "Bug Light" or simply "The Bug." It was the first so-called sparkplug lighthouse in the United States.The lighthouse contains three levels that were used as living quarters and a watchroom. The lantern room held a fourth order Fresnel lens, first lighted on September 15, 1871.To protect the structure, 100 tons of stones were placed around the base in 1886. A 700-gallon water cistern was added in 1900. The lighthouse was automated in 1964 and the keepers were removed. A modern optic replaced the Fresnel lens. Over the next two decades Duxbury Pier Light fell victim to much vandalism and seabirds made themselves a home in the interior. Bug Light survived the Hurricane of 1944 when 30-foot (9.1 m) waves battered the isolated station. Heavy seas on the east side destroyed the fog bell mechanism, the lightkeepers’ boat, and its outhouse. In 1983 Duxbury
    8.25
    4 votes
    22
    Hook Lighthouse

    Hook Lighthouse

    The Hook Lighthouse (also known as Hook Head Lighthouse) is a building situated at the tip of the Hook Peninsula in County Wexford, in Ireland. It is one of the oldest lighthouses in the world, and the oldest operating lighthouse in Ireland. It is operated by the Commissioners of Irish Lights, the Irish Lighthouse Authority, it marks the eastern entrance to Waterford Harbour. The current structure has stood for almost 800 years. The existing tower dates from the twelfth century, though tradition states that Dubhán, a missionary to the Wexford area, established some sort of beacon as early as the fifth century. The headland is known in Irish as Rinn Dubháin, St. Dubhán's Head. According to Onomasticon Goidelicum (1910, p582) Rinn Dubáin Ailithir is mentioned in the Book of Leinster, written about 1079. However, the similar-sounding Irish word 'duán' means a fish hook, hence the English name. It is known locally as "the tower of Hook." The exact circumstance of the initial construction on the present structure are the subject of some controversy. It had been thought that the tower was constructed in 1172 by Raymond LeGros following the Norman Invasion in 1169, both to establish the
    8.25
    4 votes
    23
    New Point Comfort Light

    New Point Comfort Light

    • Construction: Sandstone
    New Point Comfort Light is a lighthouse in the Virginia portion of the Chesapeake Bay. It is the third oldest surviving light in the bay, and the tenth oldest in the United states. New Point Comfort was one of four locations in the Chesapeake Bay designated for a lighthouse by the newly formed federal government, and in 1801 funds were appropriated for its construction along with a light at Smith Point. Both were constructed by Elzy Burroughs, who also constructed the light at Old Point Comfort which is nearly the twin of this light. (Note that Old Point Comfort and New Point Comfort are two different locations, not two different lights on the same spot.) Burroughs's involvement with New Point Comfort, however, extended beyond construction. New Point Comfort at the time was a small island separated from the mainline by a narrow passage named Deep Creek. A dispute with the owner of the island over the portion needed for the light led first to an additional appropriation; but then Burroughs bought the entire island and sold the government the few acres needed for the light. His decision to subcontract out the construction of the keeper's house proved unwise, and the subcontractor
    8.25
    4 votes
    24
    Toledo Harbor Lighthouse

    Toledo Harbor Lighthouse

    • Construction: Steel
    The Toledo Harbor Lighthouse is a lighthouse in Lake Erie near Toledo, Ohio, in the United States. It is an active aid to navigation. The lighthouse is built on a 20 foot (6 m) deep stone crib 8.4 miles (14 km) from the mouth of the Maumee River, marking the entrance to the Toledo harbor. It is also approximately 7 miles (11 km) north of Maumee Bay State Park. After the channel was widened and deepened in 1897, shipping traffic increased. Construction began in 1901 when the United States Army Corps of Engineers built the crib to serve as the base for a lighthouse situated miles from shore. The light replaced the 1837 lighthouse on Turtle Island at the mouth of the Maumee River. Crib construction was perfected on the Great Lakes on such earlier lights as White Shoal Light, Stannard Rock Light, and Rock of Ages Light, which was developed by Engineer Col. Orlando M. Poe. The tip of the lantern vent is 85 feet (26 m) high above the lake, has a 3 story dwelling and is brick with a steel frame. Described as Romanesque, its style is unique among Great Lakes lighthouses. The original cost was $152,000, so that it comes close to rivaling Spectacle Reef Light, the most expensive lighthouse
    8.25
    4 votes
    25
    Woodman Light

    Woodman Light

    Woodman Light, also known as Woodman Point Lighthouse, Gage Roads Lighthouse and Coogee Lighthouse, is a lighthouse in Western Australia. Located on Woodman Point in the City of Cockburn, it has been in continuous operation since 1902. It is 32 feet (9.8 m) high, and constructed of locally quarried limestone. It is located on the highest point of land in the area, which is unusually far inland for a lighthouse. On the same block of land are two Federation Bungalow style keepers' cottage, also built of limestone. The lighthouse is operated and maintained by the Fremantle Port Authority for the benefit of coastal shipping approaching Fremantle Harbour from the south west. It is not usually open to the public. The keepers' cottages have not been used as such since the light was electrified in 1955; currently they are used as private residences. Originally known as Gage Roads Lighthouse, it was the first lighthouse built in the Cockburn area. It provided a light for coastal shipping for the Port of Fremantle, which commonly anchored offshore in Gage Roads. Previously such shipping had relied on the light on Arthur Head, but this was considered too small. Construction of the Gage Roads
    8.25
    4 votes
    26
    Castle Point Lighthouse

    Castle Point Lighthouse

    Castle Point Lighthouse is a lighthouse near the village of Castlepoint in the Wellington Region of the North Island of New Zealand. It is owned and operated by Maritime New Zealand. The light was built in 1913 and was originally fueled by oil. In 1954 the oil lamp was replaced with an electric one powered by a local diesel generator. This was subsequently replaced by a connection to the mains grid in 1961. The nearby Castlepoint beach is popular with holiday makers and the lighthouse itself became a popular tourist attraction, acquiring the nickname "The Holiday Light". The light was fully automated in 1988 and is now managed from a central control room in Wellington.
    6.17
    6 votes
    27
    Brenton Reef Light

    Brenton Reef Light

    The Brenton Reef Light was a steel tower lighthouse at the entrance to Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, south of Beavertail Point. Erected to replace a lightship in 1962, it was decommissioned in 1989 due to its deteriorating condition. This offshore station was marked by a succession of lightships beginning in 1853, with new vessels being assigned to the station in 1856, 1897, and 1935. In the early 1960s the United States Coast Guard initiated a program to replace these lightships with large steel towers, commonly known as Texas towers. Brenton reef was selected for such replacement, but a somewhat smaller facility was constructed instead. This light was originally a manned station, with living quarters and galley, as well as engine room to supply power to the light and living quarters. It was connected to the Beavertail Light by submarine cables and maintained by Coast Guardsmen out of the Newport, Rhode Island station, and was converted to fully automatic operation during its active lifetime. At its activation in 1962, it became the second such light tower on the east coast. These towers deteriorated relatively quickly, and in 1983 the Coast Guard first suggested decommissioning
    7.00
    5 votes
    28
    Sand Island Light

    Sand Island Light

    Sand Island Lighthouse is a lighthouse located at the southernmost point of the state of Alabama, United States, near Dauphin Island, at the mouth of Mobile Bay, Alabama. It is located roughly three miles offshore from the primary Mobile Bay entrance, bounded on the east by Mobile Point and on the west by Dauphin Island. The lighthouse is 132 feet (40 m) high. An earlier lighthouse on Sand Island was destroyed during the Civil War, on February 23, 1863 by Confederate John W. Glenn. Sand Island itself faced continuous erosion, to the point where granite blocks were being added to the island to try and stave off the erosion and loss of the lighthouse. Restoration efforts resulted primarily in stabilization of the island through 2008. Sand Island Lighthouse's dire situation is similar to "its sister light", the Morris Island Lighthouse, near Charleston, South Carolina. Both lighthouses were situated on sandy islands that have eroded, leaving the towers surrounded by water. It is on the Lighthouse Digest Doomsday List as one of the most endangered lighthouses in the country. The Sand Island Lighthouse (and Mobile Bay light) were damaged by Hurricane Ivan in 2004 and Hurricane Katrina
    7.00
    5 votes
    29
    Charlotte Harbor Light

    Charlotte Harbor Light

    The Charlotte Harbor Light was placed at a bend in the deeper part of Charlotte Harbor to guide ships to the railroad docks in Punta Gorda, Florida. Punta Gorda lost importance as a port when railroad lines reached Boca Grande on the southern end of Gasparilla Island at the entrance to Charlotte Harbor in 1906. The lighthouse steadily deteriorated and had to be demolished in 1943. The iron pilings were removed in 1975.
    8.00
    4 votes
    30
    Mayo Beach Light

    Mayo Beach Light

    • Construction: Cast iron
    The Mayo Beach Light was an early lighthouse on Cape Cod. Deactivated in 1922, the second tower was moved to California and re-erected as the Point Montara Light in 1928. This light was erected to help guide boats into the Wellfleet, Massachusetts harbor. The first light consisted of a brick house with a lantern set in the center of the roof. The usual multiple lamp and reflector system of the day was used, though four of the ten lamps were found to shine over land only and were shortly discontinued. Ironically, three wrecks occurred in the light's vicinity within the first fifteen years of its operation. In 1857 the light was upgraded with a Fresnel lens. The condition of the house was reviled by early keepers, and Stephen Pleasanton, the first federal supervisor of lighthouses, had requested the light's disestablishment. Nevertheless it remained in service until 1881. In that year a totally new light was erected on the same location. This consisted of a short cast iron cylindrical tower which stood immediately adjacent to a newly erected keeper's house, the old building having been demolished as an obstruction. This light remained in service until 1922, when the station was
    8.00
    4 votes
    31
    Race Rocks Lighthouse

    Race Rocks Lighthouse

    Race Rocks Light is one of two lighthouses that were built on the west coast of Canada, financed by the British Government and illuminated in 1860. It is the only lighthouse on that coast built of rock, (granite) purportedly quarried in Scotland, and topped with sandstone quarried on Gabriola Island. The Islands of Race Rocks are located just off the southern tip of Vancouver Island, about 16 km southwest of Victoria, British Columbia. The lighthouse was built between 1859–1860 by the crew of HMS Topaze and outside labourers under a contract awarded to John Morris by the British Government.. It was illuminated on 26 December 1860, six weeks after the smaller Fisgard Island lighthouse built at the entrance to Esquimalt Harbour near Victoria. In 2010, both lighthouses celebrated their sesquicentennial. It has a 24.4 m cylindrical tower with black and white bands, and flashes a white light every 10 seconds. Its foghorn sounds three blasts at one minute intervals. On Christmas Day 1865 a group of five visiting the lightkeeper capsized their boat in a tide rip while attempting to land and all were drowned. The lighthouse has been automated since 1997 at which time Lester B. Pearson
    8.00
    4 votes
    32
    Piedras Blancas Light

    Piedras Blancas Light

    • Construction: Brick
    Piedras Blancas Light Station is located at Point Piedras Blancas, about 5.5 miles (8,900 m) west by NW of San Simeon, California. The first order Fresnel lens at Piedras Blancas was first illuminated on February 15, 1875. The Piedras Blancas lighthouse was originally 100 feet high to the top of the ventilator ball. Earthquakes over the years damaged the structure. On December 31, 1948, final damage from an earthquake centered 6 miles (9.7 km) off the point led to the decision to remove the upper three floors: fourth landing, watch room, and lantern. Missing the beautiful ornate upper portion, the truncated lighthouse now stands about 70 feet (21 m) tall. The first order lens was moved and is on display in the nearby community of Cambria. The United States Lighthouse Service staffed the site from 1875 to 1939. In 1906 a sound was added. The United States Coast Guard managed the light station from 1939 to 2001. In 1975 the light was automated, the sound signal removed, and the light station was unmanned. A group of biologists with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service received permission to establish a biological research station in 1977. The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) assumed
    6.80
    5 votes
    33
    Ar Men

    Ar Men

    Ar Men ("the rock" in Breton) is a lighthouse at one end of the Chaussée de l'Île de Sein, at the west end of Brittany. It shares its name with the rock on which it was erected between 1867 and 1881. Ar Men is one of the best known lighthouses because of its isolated situation and the considerable difficulties its construction has presented, and the danger in evacuating its personnel. Considered as one of the most challenging workplaces by the community of lighthouse keepers, it has been named "The Hell of Hells". The light was automated and electrified on 10 April 1990 with a 250 watt halogen lamp. Its signal is three white flashes every twenty seconds, with an accompanying signal of three sounds every sixty seconds.
    7.75
    4 votes
    34
    Roe Island Light

    Roe Island Light

    • Construction: Wood
    Roe Island Lighthouse was a lighthouse in United States, on the east end of Suisun Bay, California The Roe Island Light was built on the Suisun Bay across from Port Chicago, 33 miles (53 km) inland from the Golden Gate and five miles (8 km) east of Benicia. In the 1900s a second dwelling similar to the lighthouse without the lantern were built adjacent to the lighthouse. During World War II trains delivered ammunition to ships at the Port Chicago Navy Depot which was near the Roe Island Lighthouse.On 17 July 1944 two ships, Quinault Victory and E. A. Bryan were being loaded with tons of munitions. Approximately 10:20 pm there was an enormous explosion. Over 300 men, both ships, two Coast Guard vessels and much of the train were completely destroyed. The explosion damaged the lighthouse which was 3,000 yards (2,700 m) away. With changes in the shipping waterways in the area the light was no longer needed anyway so it was decommissioned in 1945 and sold. An 11 August 1944 Coast Guard report noted that the station: "consists of the light, with two keepers, with dwellings, outhouses, power house, water supply tanks, wharf, walkways, boat harbor and boatways. No fog signal is
    6.60
    5 votes
    35
    Sand Island Lighthouse

    Sand Island Lighthouse

    The Sand Island Light is a lighthouse located on the northern tip of Sand Island, one of the Apostle Islands, in Lake Superior in Bayfield County, Wisconsin, near the city of Bayfield. The Lighthouse Board chose to use a design that had been used on McGulpin Point Light in 1868; Eagle Harbor Light in 1871; and White River Light in 1875. Currently owned by the National Park Service and part of the Apostle Islands National Lakeshore, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1977, part of reference number 77000145. Listed in the Library of Congress Historic American Buildings Survey, WI-313. Attached to the lighthouse is a Norman gothic keepers quarters. In 1871, the Lighthouse Board asked Congress for funds to construct a lighthouse on Sand Island to both better guide ships toward the Raspberry Island Light and mark the Western edge of the Apostle Islands. However, Congress rejected the request for this and the next six years. In 1880, Congress finally agreed to erect a lighthouse, and sent an engineer to begin planning for the construction of the station. Sand Island Light was built from the same designs as three other lighthouses, but with the local Apostle
    5.67
    6 votes
    36
    Bass Harbor Head Light

    Bass Harbor Head Light

    • Construction: Brick
    Bass Harbor Head Light is a lighthouse located within Acadia National Park on the southeast corner of Mount Desert Island, Maine, marking the entrance to Bass Harbor and Blue Hill Bay. The history of Bass Harbor Head Light started in 1855 when it was deemed that there was sufficient reason for a lighthouse at the mouth of Bass Harbor. $5000 was appropriated by Congress for its construction in 1858. The construction of a fog bell and tower, which no longer remains today, was completed in 1876 with a much larger 4000 pound (1800 kg) bell being placed inside the tower in 1898. The keeper's house remains in its original configuration with the exception of a 10-foot addition that was added in 1900. The lighthouse was added to the National Register of Historic Places as Bass Harbor Head Light Station on January 21, 1988, reference number 87002273. In 1902, an oil storage house constructed of brick was built 205 feet northwest of the lighthouse. Bass Harbor's fifth order Fresnel lens was replaced in 1902 with a larger fourth order. This lens was manufactured by the French company Henry-Lepaute. This lens remains in service today. Today, the house is a private residence for a local Coast
    7.50
    4 votes
    37
    Cape Rachado Lighthouse

    Cape Rachado Lighthouse

    The Cape Rachado Lighthouse (Malay: Rumah Api Tanjung Tuan) is a lighthouse located in Tanjung Tuan, also known as Cape Rachado, in Malacca, Malaysia. The lighthouse is believed to be the oldest in the country, its history allegedly dating back to Portuguese rule of Malacca during the 16th century. The early history of the lighthouse remains largely unverified, with unofficial accounts by locals tracing the lighthouse's history back to a period following the conquest of Malacca by Portugal in 1511. The Portuguese government in Malacca vested interest in the construction of a lighthouse to guide its ships through the narrow Straits of Malacca, completing the first iteration of the structure on Cape Rachado (a name given by the Portuguese, meaning "Broken Cape") in the 16th century. Possession of the lighthouse was handed over to the Dutch VOC, alongside Malacca in entirety in 1641, and a second version of the building was claimed to have been built in 1817, during temporary rule by the British under William Farquhar, seven years before Malacca's total changeover to the British in 1824. The present lighthouse was constructed in 1863, during Malacca's status as a British-ruled Straits
    7.50
    4 votes
    38
    Lazaretto Point Light

    Lazaretto Point Light

    • Construction: Brick
    The Lazaretto Point Light was a historic lighthouse in Baltimore harbor. Though long demolished, a replica stands near its original site. Lazaretto Point, directly opposite from Fort McHenry, acquired its name from a smallpox quarantine hospital which once occupied the point. By the time that John Donahoo began construction of a brick tower light in 1831, the hospital was gone; the name was destined to live on in local naval lore, however, as in 1863 a depot was established around the tower for the construction and resupply of lighthouses throughout the bay. Many screw-pile lighthouses were prefabricated at the depot in preparation for erection at their final sites. Iron was for a time mined at the point, and industrial sites sprung up around it, leading to years of complaints about the visibility of the light. A fourth order Fresnel lens installed in 1852 provided some improvement, as did a change from red to white aspect in 1870. In 1914 the light was electrified, and the fourth order lens replaced with a 3½ order. In spite of this the light be came increasingly obscure, and the old tower was torn down in 1926, replaced by a taller steel skeleton tower. This tower survived until
    7.50
    4 votes
    39
    Pages Rock Light

    Pages Rock Light

    • Construction: Wood
    The Pages Rock Light was a lighthouse located in the York River in the Chesapeake Bay. This light was constructed in 1893, a late date for a screw-pile structure. The hexagonal house was prefabricated at Lazaretto Point in Baltimore and apparently had an unexciting career before its removal in 1967 as part of the general program of decommissioning screw pile lights in the bay.
    7.50
    4 votes
    40
    Phare du Petit Minou

    Phare du Petit Minou

    The Phare du Petit Minou is a lighthouse in the roadstead of Brest, standing in front of the Fort du Petit Minou, in the commune of Plouzané. By aligning it with the phare du Portzic, it shows the safe route to follow for ships to enter the roadstead. It also has a red signal that indicates a dangerous sector around the plateau of les Fillettes (literally the girls), one of the submerged rocks in the goulet of Brest — sailors remember this by using the mnemonic "the Minou blushes when he covers les Fillettes".
    7.50
    4 votes
    41
    Lamberts Point Light

    Lamberts Point Light

    • Construction: Cast iron
    The Lambert Point Light was a small screwpile lighthouse in Norfolk, Virginia; it was built in 1872. The lighthouse was meant to serve the increased shipping traffic on the Elizabeth River, and initially was designed with six piles. The plans were changed when five surplus piles were found; in the end the structure was square, and sat on these five piles. The building was painted brown, and showed a red light from a fifth-order Fresnel lens. Within a few months the lighthouse had settled more than a foot on one side. The reason was never discovered, but it was believed that the missing sixth pile might have contributed to the problem. Eventually the structure sat at a tilt, with the west side about fourteen inches lower than the east. To stabilize the building, more piles were added to the foundation; at this time a dock and pier were added to the station. The lighthouse gradually became useless due to construction at the point, and eventually it was surrounded by piers and warehouses built by the Norfolk and Western Railroad. It was eventually suggested that a new lighthouse be built at Bush's Bluff, some miles upriver, and that this might supersede the light at Lamberts Point.
    8.67
    3 votes
    42
    Barns Ness Lighthouse

    Barns Ness Lighthouse

    Barns Ness Lighthouse is located 5 km from Dunbar and was constructed by engineer David A. Stevenson between 1899-1901. Taking approximately 2.5 years to construct, it was illuminated in October 1901 and was constructed from stone quarried from Craigree (near Cramond) and Barnton. The stone proved resilient during the second world war, where the lighthouse was machine-gunned, yet sustained no damage. The lighthouse had been manned by two lighthouse-keepers; however, in 1966 it was electrified, with a backup generator and emergency battery (used if the generator failed). It remained semi-automated, requiring only a single keeper, until 1986, when it was completely automated. In early 2005, the UK and Ireland lighthouse authorities issued a consultation regarding a review of lighthouses, and it was decided that the Barns Ness Lighthouse was no longer needed. It was finally deactivated in October, 2005.
    10.00
    2 votes
    43
    Great Captain Island Light

    Great Captain Island Light

    • Construction: Wood
    Great Captain Island Lighthouse is a lighthouse on Great Captain Island in the western Long Island Sound off the coast of Greenwich, Connecticut, United States. The lighthouse is no longer in use. A single dirt road leads to the lighthouse on the eastern side of the island, where most if the island's egrets tend to nest. The Greenwich Department of Parks and Recreation oversees the island. The town government of Greenwich hopes to restore the lighthouse and re-light it. The restorations would allow public access to the interior, including possibly allowing people into the tower without having to go through the caretakers' quarters. To that end, the government authorized a $1 million appropriation for restoration work in May 2007. The renovations were expected to start as early as June 2007. A total of $1.2 million was budgeted for the restoration project in 2008. Restoration plans call for a new beacon and restoration of the caretaker's cottage quarters in the same building. A memorial walkway, garden and plaque will honor victims of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. Interior work on the lighthouse was scheduled for April through July, with no exterior work during that
    10.00
    2 votes
    44
    Torre della Lanterna

    Torre della Lanterna

    The Lighthouse of Genoa (Italian: faro di Genova, but simply called Lanterna), is the main lighthouse for the city's port. Besides being an important aid to night navigation in the vicinity, the tower serves as a symbol for the City of Genoa, and is one of the oldest standing structures of its kind in the world. It is built on the hill of San Benigno at some little distance from the Sampierdarena neighborhood. At 249 feet (76 m) it is the world's second tallest "traditional lighthouse" built of masonry. It is constructed in two square portions, each one capped by a terrace; the whole structure is crowned by a lantern from which the light is shone. The cape on which the Lanterna stands was at one time a peninsula before the nearby coastline was filled in and reshaped. To the west, it marked the entrance to the original port of Genoa, today the Porto Antico. Over time, the hill on the cape assumed the name "Capo di Faro", or "Lighthouse Cape"; it is also sometimes referred to as the cape of San Benigno, after the convent that once stood there. Today, the hill is gone save for a small rise upon which the lighthouse stands; the rest of it was removed to provide infill for other areas
    10.00
    2 votes
    45
    Cape Beale Lightstation

    Cape Beale Lightstation

    Cape Beale Lightstation is a manned lighthouse on Vancouver Island in British Columbia., Canada. The lighthouse was built in 1874 and its focal plane is 51 meters above sea level. The present tower was built in 1958 and marks the entrance to Barkley Sound. It is 10 metres tall. Cape Beale received its name from Charles William Barkley, captain of the Imperial Eagle, who named it for his ship's purser, John Beale. The lighthouse is best known for its proximity to the West Coast Trail which is the theoretical route survivors of shipwrecks would take to get to the nearby community of Bamfield.
    7.25
    4 votes
    46
    Cape Poge Light

    Cape Poge Light

    Cape Poge Light, sometimes called Cape Pogue Light, is at the northeast tip of Chappaquiddick, an island that is part of Martha's Vineyard, off the coast of Cape Cod, Massachusetts. At least four towers have been built on Cape Poge, with many moves. In 1801 the first 35-foot (11 m) wooden Cape Poge Lighthouse was built for $2,000. During the War of 1812 the light was extinguished for a few months and its apparatus was hidden in the cellar of a Chappaquiddick house. This first lighthouse was moved in 1825 and again in 1838 due to an eroding bluff. In 1844 a new tower was built for $1,600 and in 1857 supplied with a fourth order Fresnel lens. However, in 1878 it was reported that the keeper's house would probably "fall into the sea within two years." A third lighthouse was therefore built in 1880. Finally, in 1893 the current, 35-foot (11 m), white conical wood tower was constructed, 40 feet (12 m) inland from the previous one. The current tower has been moved four times, in 1907, 1922, 1960, and in 1987 when it became the first lighthouse to be moved by helicopter). The light was automated in 1943. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1987. The current light
    7.25
    4 votes
    47
    Gorleston (Range Rear) Lighthouse

    Gorleston (Range Rear) Lighthouse

    Gorleston (Range Rear) Lighthouse is located near mouth of River Yare in the town of Gorleston on sea in the English county of Norfolk. The lighthouse was built in 1878. Gorleston lighthouse carries two lights. The rear light for the harbor entrance range (white light, 4 seconds on, 2 seconds off) is mounted on the tower with a focal plane of 23 feet; a fixed red light is also displayed from the gallery with a focal plane of 66 feet.
    7.25
    4 votes
    48
    Kampen lighthouse, Sylt

    Kampen lighthouse, Sylt

    The Kampen lighthouse is located on the geestland core of the German island of Sylt, south of Kampen. It is a white conical stone tower with a broad black band. When Sylt belonged to the Danish realm in 1853, king Frederick VII ordered the construction of a lighthouse on Sylt's highest elevation, the red cliff. The tower was first lit in 1856. Its original petroleum lantern was at the time a technical revolution and was displayed at the Paris World Exhibition in 1855. The tower was originally constructed from yellow Bornholm bricks and was reinforced with iron rings in 1875. Until 1953 the lighthouse used to be greyish-yellow, the colour of the whithered bricks. Only then it was painted with its characteristic black and white. In the early years after its inauguration, the facility became popular with locals and tourists. Specifically guest books from the 1970s and 80s bear witness to this. Unlike today, the tower could then still be accessed and visited by the public and provided a spectacular view across the island. In 1929 the so far greatest modification was made when the entire lantern house was altered and the light source was changed from petroleum to electricity. There are
    7.25
    4 votes
    49
    New Dungeness Lighthouse

    New Dungeness Lighthouse

    • Construction: Stucco
    The New Dungeness lighthouse is located on the Dungeness Spit in the Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge near the town of Sequim in Clallam County in the U.S. state of Washington, on the Strait of Juan de Fuca. It was first lit in 1857 and was the second lighthouse established in the Washington territory. The original New Dungeness lighthouse was a 1 ½ story duplex with a tower rising from the roof. The tower stood at 100 feet (30 m) painted black on the top half and white on the lower section. Over time, the tower developed structural cracks from the artillery at nearby forts. In 1927, the cracks in the tower were so severe that the lighthouse inspector feared that the tower would topple. It was decided that year that the tower would be lowered to its current height of 63 feet (19 m). With the new tower dimensions, the original 3rd order Fresnel lens was too large for the tower. To save costs, the lantern room from the decommissioned Admiralty Head lighthouse was removed and placed atop the shorter tower. The newly painted tower was relit with a revolving 4th order Fresnel Lens. In the mid-1970s the Coast Guard decided to remove the Fresnel lens and test a DCB airport style beacon.
    7.25
    4 votes
    50
    Ram Island Ledge Light

    Ram Island Ledge Light

    Ram Island Ledge Light is a lighthouse in Casco Bay, Maine, United States. In 1855 an iron spindle was erected to protect sailors from dangerous underwater ledges surrounding Ram Island Ledge. The ledge continued to be the site of repeated shipwrecks. On February 24, 1900 the Allan Line steamship Californian (formerly named the State of California) ran aground on the ledge while en route from Portland to Glasgow, Scotland via Halifax, Nova Scotia. As a result of that accident, the United States Congress appropriated funds to build a lighthouse. Construction began on May 1, 1903 and was completed in 1905. It is a twin of the Graves Light off Boston. The lighthouse was built of granite quarried from Vinalhaven, Maine. The lighthouse originally included a third-order Fresnel lens. The lighthouse was electrified in 1958, and then automated in 1959. The light was converted to solar power in January 2001. The Ram Island Ledge Light was added to the National Register of Historic Places as Ram Island Ledge Light Station on March 14, 1988, reference number 88000157. In July 2010, Ram Island Ledge Light was put up for sale to the general public. The minimum bid was $10,000. The property had
    7.25
    4 votes
    51
    Round Island Light

    Round Island Light

    Round Island Lighthouse (Cornish: Golowji an Voth, the hump lighthouse), in the Isles of Scilly was designed by William Tregarthen Douglass for Trinity House and completed in 1887. At the time of building it was one of three lights in the Isles of Scilly, the others being the Bishop Rock and St Agnes lighthouse. The light was modernised in 1966, automated in 1987 and the island designated as a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) in 1995. It is now managed by the Isles of Scilly Wildlife Trust, and except for the maintenance of the Grade 2 listed lighthouse, landing is not allowed. A cairn or burial chamber was destroyed when the lighthouse was built. Cairns on the Isles of Scilly date back to the Bronze Age and at that time Round Island was probably a peninsula on the northern shore of the main island in the Isles of Scilly. The granite, ashlar, 19 metres (62 ft) tall tower was designed by William Tregarthen Douglass, chief engineer for the Commissioners of Irish Lights and is built on a 35 metres (115 ft) tall mass of Hercynian granite. At the time of building the only access was up a flight of steps cut out of the rock and supplies were taken up the rock face by an aerial
    7.25
    4 votes
    52
    Sandhammaren

    Sandhammaren

    Sandhammaren is a Swedish lighthouse, and the name of both a beach and a point east of Ystad in Scania. At first two identical lighthouses were constructed, because it was a risk to mistake this lighthouse with the one on Ertholmene. The flame first ran on colza oil. Later on (1891), one of the lighthouses was put out of service and moved to Pite-Rönnskär in Norrland, at the same time the lamp was transformed to a paraffin lamp. The lighthouse was electrified in 1942. The Swedish Maritime Administration owns and runs the lighthouse.
    7.25
    4 votes
    53
    Phare du Portzic

    Phare du Portzic

    The phare du Portzic is situated on the north-eastern extremity of the Goulet de Brest (Finistère, France) and is the nearest lighthouse to the town of Brest. It was inscribed as a monument historique before 1987. On the seaward side of the bottleneck entrance to the goulet, the lighthouse faces the Pointe des Espagnols. It was built on military land in 1848, at the same time as the phare du Petit Minou (started slightly earlier to the north of the Goulet. It was electrified in 1953 and automated in 1984 (though a semaphore post set up at its base in 1987 to regulate traffic in and out of the goulet is still permanently manned).
    8.33
    3 votes
    54
    Point Diablo Light

    Point Diablo Light

    • Construction: Wood
    The Point Diablo Light is a lighthouse in California, United States, about halfway between Point Bonita and Lime Point on the northern side of the Golden Gate Bridge, California In 1923, the Lighthouse Service decided to mark this navigational hazard, and a small white shack with a pitched red roof was placed on the sloping point some eighty feet above the water. An array of solar panels now powers the modern beacon positioned atop the shack.
    6.20
    5 votes
    55
    Portland Head Light

    Portland Head Light

    • Construction: Brick
    Portland Head Light is a historic lighthouse in Cape Elizabeth, Maine that sits at the entrance of the shipping channel into Casco Bay. The headlight was the first built by the United States government, and is now a part of Fort Williams Park. Construction began in 1787 at the directive of George Washington, and was completed on January 10, 1791. Whale oil lamps were originally used for illumination. In 1855, following formation of the Lighthouse Board, a fourth-order Fresnel lens was installed; that lens was replaced by a second-order Fresnel lens, which was replaced later by an aero beacon in 1958. That lens was updated with an DCB-224 aero beacon in 1991. In 1787, while Maine was still part of the state of Massachusetts, George Washington engaged two masons from the town of Portland, Jonathan Bryant and John Nichols, and instructed them to take charge of the construction of a lighthouse on Portland Head. Washington reminded them that the early government was poor, and said that the materials used to build the lighthouse should be taken from the fields and shores, which could be handled nicely when hauled by oxen on a drag. The original plans called for the tower to be 58 feet
    6.20
    5 votes
    56
    Battery Point Light

    Battery Point Light

    • Construction: Brick
    Battery Point Light is a lighthouse in Crescent City, California, United States. It is registered as California Historical Landmark number 951. It was one of the first lighthouses on the California coast. Rugged mountains and unbridged rivers meant coastal travel was essential for the economic survival of this region. In 1855, Congress appropriated $15,000 for the construction of a lighthouse on the tiny islet, which is connected to Battery Point by an isthmus at low tide. Although not included in the 1852 contract by the United States Lighthouse Service for the first eight west coast lighthouses, the Battery Point Lighthouse was actually lit ten days before the Humboldt Harbor Lighthouse, the last of the original eight to become operational. The fourth-order Fresnel lens was lit in 1856. The lighthouse was automated in 1953, and a modern 375mm lens replaced the fourth-order Fresnel lens. Theophilis Magruder was the station's first keeper; Wayne Piland was its last before automation in 1953. The 1964 Alaska earthquake, the strongest earthquake ever recorded in the northern hemisphere, caused a tsunami. The lighthouse survived, but the following year, the modern beacon that replaced
    9.50
    2 votes
    57
    Cape Lookout Lighthouse

    Cape Lookout Lighthouse

    • Construction: Brick
    The Cape Lookout Lighthouse is a 163-foot high lighthouse located on the Southern Outer Banks of North Carolina. It flashes every 15 seconds and is visible at least 12 miles out to sea and up to 19 miles. The Cape Lookout Light is one of the very few lighthouses that operate during the day. It became fully automated in 1950. The Cape Lookout Lighthouse is the only such structure in the United States to bear the checkered daymark, intended not only for differentiation between similar light towers, but also to show direction. The side points of the black diamonds point in a north-south direction, while the side points of the white diamonds point east-west. It is the second lighthouse that has stood at this location, and is nearly identical to the Bodie Island Lighthouse, which has horizontal stripes. The more famous Cape Hatteras Lighthouse bears spiral stripes. The first lighthouse at Cape Lookout was completed and lighted in 1812 at a cost of more than $20,000, which Congress authorized in 1804. It was the fourth lighthouse to be built in North Carolina and was a 96 foot high brick tower with wooden shingles painted with red and white horizontal stripes. But it proved to be too
    9.50
    2 votes
    58
    Ludington Lighthouse

    Ludington Lighthouse

    The Ludington Light is a 57 feet (17 m) tall steel-plated lighthouse in Ludington, Michigan, which lies along the eastern shores of Lake Michigan, at the end of the breakwater on the Pere Marquette Harbor. Given its location on the northern breakwater where the Pere Marquette River meets Lake Michigan, it is sometimes known as the Ludington North Breakwater Light. Underlying the building itself is a prow-like structure, which is designed to break waves. The station was established in 1871. This light was first lit in 1924, and it is presently operational. It was automated in 1972. The light is structurally integrated into the steel and reinforced concrete pier upon which it is built. It has a square pyramidal form, and is white with a black lantern. The original lens was a Fourth Order Fresnel lens. On October 17, 1995 the Fresnel lens was removed from the lantern. It was replaced by a Tideland Signal 300 mm acrylic optic. The original lens was loaned to Historic White Pine Village where it is displayed as part of their maritime history exhibit. A fog signal building is integrated into the tower. It originally had a Type F Diaphone signal, and a FA-232 is now in operation. A radio
    9.50
    2 votes
    59
    Patos Island Lighthouse

    Patos Island Lighthouse

    • Construction: Wood
    Patos Island Lighthouse is a lighthouse at Alden Point on the western tip of Patos Island in the San Juan Islands of Washington state, USA. The original light station was a post light and third-class Daboll trumpet fog signal. Beginning operation on November 30, 1893, the light was used as a navigational aid to steamships traveling to ports around Georgia Strait such as Vancouver, and up the Inside Passage to Alaska. The lighthouse was improved in 1908 with a new fog signal and a 38-foot tower, which housed a fourth-order Fresnel lens. The light was automated in 1974. Today, it has a modern lens which flashes a white light once every six seconds and has two red sectors marking dangerous shoals off the island. The original fourth-order Fresnel lens, which was also used at the Alki Point lighthouse, is now in private ownership in Oregon. The early years of the light were recorded in The Light on the Island, the childhood recollections of Helene Glidden, daughter of Edward Durgan who was lighthouse keeper from 1905-1913.
    9.50
    2 votes
    60
    Bodkin Island Light

    Bodkin Island Light

    The Bodkin Island Light was a small lighthouse on Chesapeake Bay, USA, the first erected in Maryland. The lighthouse was constructed as an aid to shipping entering Baltimore; it was built on Bodkin Island, and was the first lighthouse in Maryland. The station was built by Thomas Evans and William Coppeck, who completed the 35-foot (11 m) stone tower and attached one-storey keeper's dwelling in October 1821. Thirteen lamps were purchased from Winslow Lewis, and the station was formally inaugurated in January 1822. The lighthouse was plagued by problems stemming from its poor construction during much of its brief existence, and it was replaced in 1856 by the Seven Foot Knoll Light in the Patapsco River. A fisherman is said to have lived in the dwelling for a time, but eventually the island was completely abandoned; the old tower collapsed in 1914. Today, Bodkin Island has disappeared, eaten away by erosion. What remains of the site is marked as a "navigational hazard" on sea charts.
    7.00
    4 votes
    61
    Concord Point Light

    Concord Point Light

    • Construction: Granite
    Concord Point Light is a lighthouse in Havre de Grace, Maryland, overlooking the point where the Susquehanna River flows into the Chesapeake Bay, an area of increasing navigational traffic at the time it was constructed in 1827. It was built by John Donahoo who built many lighthouses in Maryland. It is the Northern-most lighthouse on the Chesapeake Bay. Concord Point Light is a 36-foot (10.97 m) tower that was built in 1827. It is the second oldest tower lighthouse still standing on the Chesapeake Bay. The lighthouse is constructed of Port Deposit granite. The walls are 31 inches (79 cm) thick at the base and narrow to 18 inches (46 cm) at the parapet. John Donahoo also built the keeper's house across the street. The lantern was originally lit with 9 whale oil lamps with 16-inch (41 cm) tin reflectors. In 1854, a sixth-order Fresnel lens was installed. This was later upgraded to a fifth-order Fresnel lens. The lighthouse was automated in 1920. Several members of the O'Neill family served as keepers at Concord Point from 1827 to the mid-1900s. There were other keepers not related to the O'Neills who served as well. The first O'Neill, John, defended the town of Havre de Grace by
    7.00
    4 votes
    62
    Au Sable Light

    Au Sable Light

    Au Sable Light is an active lighthouse in the Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore west of Grand Marais, Michigan off H-58. Until 1910, this aid to navigation was called "Big Sable Light" (not to be confused with Big Sable Point Light near Ludington, Michigan on Lake Michigan or Little Sable Point Light south of Pentwater, Michigan). The Au Sable Light Station was built in 1874 on Au Sable Point, a well known hazard on Lake Superior's "shipwreck coast". The Au Sable Point reef is a shallow ridge of sandstone that in places is only 6 feet (1.8 m) below the surface and extends nearly 1 mile (1.6 km) into Lake Superior. The Au Sable Point reef was one the greatest dangers facing ships coasting along the south shore of Lake Superior during the early shipping days when keeping land in sight was the main navigational method. The Au Sable Point reef was known as a "ship trap" that ensnared many ships, including the passenger ship Lady Elgin which was stranded there in 1859. The shoreline in this area is considered one of North America's most beautiful, "but in the 1800s it was considered one of the most deadly because of unpredictable features below the surface and violent storms and
    6.00
    5 votes
    63
    Bell Rock Lighthouse

    Bell Rock Lighthouse

    • Construction: Granite
    Bell Rock Lighthouse is the world's oldest surviving sea-washed lighthouse and was built on Bell Rock (also known as Inchcape) in the North Sea, 11 miles (18 km) off the coast of Angus, Scotland, east of the Firth of Tay. It was built by Robert Stevenson between 1807 and 1810, and standing at 35 m high, the light is visible from 35 statute miles (56 km) inland. The masonry work on which the lighthouse rests was constructed to such a high standard that it has not been replaced or adapted in 200 years. The lamps and reflectors were replaced in 1843, with the original equipment being used in the lighthouse at Cape Bonavista, Newfoundland where they are currently on display. The working of the lighthouse has been automated since 1988. The lighthouse operated in tandem with a shore station, the Bell Rock Signal Tower, built in 1813 at the mouth of Arbroath harbour. Today this building houses the Signal Tower Museum, a visitor centre detailing the history of the lighthouse. The challenges faced in the building of the lighthouse have led to it being described as one of the Seven Wonders of the Industrial World. According to legend, the rock is called Bell Rock because of a 14th century
    6.00
    5 votes
    64
    Cedar Key Light

    Cedar Key Light

    The Cedar Key Light is located on Seahorse Key across the harbor from Cedar Key, Florida. Seahorse Key was the site a watchtower erected in 1801 by followers of William Augustus Bowles, self-designated Director General of the State of Muscogee, an attempt to set up an independent state in the western part of East Florida. The watchtower was destroyed by a Spanish naval force in 1802. Seahorse Key was used as a detention center for Seminoles captured in the Second Seminole War (1835–1842) before transfer to the West. At that time the Federal government reserved several of the islands in the Cedar Keys archipelago for military use. Cedar Key became an important port during the 1840s, and in 1850 Congress appropriated funding for a lighthouse on Seahorse Key. Lieutenant George Meade helped design the lighthouse. The lighthouse was completed and lit in 1854. At the beginning of the American Civil War Confederate sympathizers extinguished the light. Federal troops occupied Seahorse Key in 1862, and used it as a prison for the duration of the war. The lighthouse was put back into service after the war ended. As of 2006, the lighthouse is serving as a 26 bunk dormitory, operated by the
    8.00
    3 votes
    65
    Cove Point Light

    Cove Point Light

    • Construction: Brick
    The Cove Point Light is a lighthouse located on the west side of the Chesapeake Bay. This light was built in 1828 by John Donahoo, who erected a brick conical tower along the plan he had used at several other sites in the Bay. In 1825 Congress had allocated funds to build a light at Cedar Point, four miles south at the mouth of the Patuxent River, but further consideration led to a decision to mark Cove Point and the shoal which jutted into the bay. A new appropriation in 1828 allowed construction of the light and keeper's house in the same year. The original Argand lamps were replaced in 1855 with a fifth-order Fresnel lens; this in turn was upgraded to a fourth-order lens in 1857. A fog bell added in 1837 was moved several times and was mounted on both wood and iron towers before ending up on the roof of a wooden shed built in 1902 to house a foghorn. The foghorn equipment was moved in 1950 to a separate brick building, but the fog bell remains on the shed. Erosion was a significant problem, but was eventually brought under control through a seawall initially constructed in 1892 and upgraded in 1913 and 1993. The keeper's house was enlarged in 1881 when it was converted to a
    8.00
    3 votes
    66
    Happisburgh Lighthouse

    Happisburgh Lighthouse

    Happisburgh Lighthouse in Happisburgh on the North Norfolk coast is the only independently operated lighthouse in Great Britain. It is also the oldest working lighthouse in East Anglia. The lighthouse is painted white with three red bands and has a light characteristic of Fl(3)30s (3 white flashes, repeated every 30 seconds) at a height of 135 ft (41.1 m) with a range of 14 miles (22.5 km). The building was constructed in 1790 as one of a pair of candle-powered lights ("High Lighthouse" and "Low Lighthouse"). It was electrified in 1947. The tower is 85 ft (25.9 m) tall, putting the lantern at 134 ft (40.8 m) above sea level. The other lighthouse - the "low light" was 20 ft (6.1 m) lower. It was decommissioned and demolished in 1883 before it could be lost due to coastal erosion. Together they formed a pair of range lights that marked a safe passage around the southern end of the offshore Haisborough Sands 8 miles (12.9 km) to the safe waters of 'The Would'. In 1987 Happisburgh was one of five lighthouses declared redundant by Trinity House and deactivation was planned for June 1988. Villagers organised a petition to oppose the closure, and as a result the date was postponed. Under
    8.00
    3 votes
    67
    St. Johns River Light

    St. Johns River Light

    The St. Johns River Light is a decommissioned lighthouse in Jacksonville, Florida, U.S., which formerly marked the mouth of the St. Johns River. It is located on the grounds of Naval Station Mayport in the Mayport area. Constructed in 1858, it was decommissioned in 1929 and replaced with a lightship. It is sometimes known as the "Old St. Johns River Light" to distinguish it from the modern St. Johns Light, built in 1954. The Old St. Johns River Light was the third lighthouse to be erected at the mouth of the St. Johns. It is the oldest one still standing, and is in fact the oldest surviving building in Mayport. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1976 and underwent restoration in 1980. The St. Johns River Light was erected in 1858 at Mayport, on what is now the property of Naval Station Mayport. It was the third lighthouse to stand at the mouth of the St. Johns River, and was designed specifically to overcome the previous structures' problems with visibility and erosion. The first St. Johns lighthouse was erected in 1830, after the U.S. purchase of Florida, and was funded by the U.S. Congress. However, it was built too close to the water and had to be
    8.00
    3 votes
    68
    Cape Borda

    Cape Borda

    Cape Borda is a headland with a lighthouse on the west coast of Kangaroo Island, South Australia and is situated 70 kilometres west from the town of Kingscote. It is named after the French mathematician, physicist, naturalist, sailor Jean-Charles de Borda (1733-1799). Cape Borda Lightstation was built in 1858 and is the third oldest remaining and only square stone lighthouse in South Australia. The Lighthouse was built to guide ships travelling along the Roaring Forties trade route heading into the Investigator Strait towards Port Adelaide. Originally there was no road linking Cape Borda to the rest of Kangaroo Island and all supplies had to be hauled up from ships via a steep steel railway at Harvey's Return then taken to the Lighthouse every three months. Its focal plane is situated at a height of 155 metres, the light characteristic is a group of four white flashes that occurs every 20 seconds. The lightstation was automated in 1989 and is still fully operational. In 1999 the original fog signal cannon was restored, today it is fired daily at 12:30 hours. The Lightstation and surrounding cottages are looked after by Parks SA while the top floor of the lightstation and the light
    6.75
    4 votes
    69
    Sherwood Point Lighthouse

    Sherwood Point Lighthouse

    The Sherwood Point lighthouse is a lighthouse located near Idlewild in Door County, Wisconsin. Situated on the west side of the north entrance to Sturgeon Bay, it was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1984, as the Sherwood Point Light Station, reference #84003663.
    6.75
    4 votes
    70
    Stonington Harbor Light

    Stonington Harbor Light

    • Construction: Granite
    The Stonington Harbor Light is a historic nineteenth century lighthouse located on the east side of Stonington Harbor in Stonington, Connecticut. A light housed in a small granite lighthouse known by this name was originally built by the federal government in 1824, and was located on Windmill Point in the harbor. Erosion led to the lighthouse being torn down and relocated to its current site in 1840. A second stone building was constructed and the 35 feet (11 m) tower was attached to the structure. In the 1880s, the Stonington Breakwater Light was constructed farther out in the harbor, and the Stonington Harbor Light was decommissioned in 1889. The site is now the home of the Stonington Historical Society, which uses the building as The Old Lighthouse Museum. Holdings in the museum document the area's long and distinguished cultural and nautical history, and exhibits include a sixth-order Fresnel lens.
    6.75
    4 votes
    71
    Carysfort Reef Light

    Carysfort Reef Light

    Carysfort Reef Light is located approximately six nautical miles east of Key Largo, Florida. The lighthouse has an iron screw-pile foundation with a platform, and a skeletal, octagonal, pyramidal tower, which is painted red. The light is 100 feet (30 m) above the water. The original lens was a first-order Fresnel lens. The light is currently a xenon flashtube beacon. It is the oldest functioning lighthouse of its type in the United States, completed in 1852. Carysfort Reef is named for HMS Carysfort (1766), a 20-gun Royal Navy post ship that ran aground on the reef in 1770. The original Carysfort Reef light was a lightship named Caesar, starting in 1825. The first lightship was built in New York City. While being sailed to its station, it went aground near Key Biscayne during a storm, and its crew abandoned the ship. The ship was salvaged by wreckers and taken to Key West, Florida. The owners bought the ship back and it was placed on station at Carysfort Reef. The lightship was often blown off-station by storms, and even went aground on the reef at one point. That first lightship had to be replaced after only five years because of dry rot. The second lightship was named
    9.00
    2 votes
    72
    Destruction Island Lighthouse

    Destruction Island Lighthouse

    Destruction Island Lighthouse is a lighthouse on Destruction Island off the coast of Washington state in the north-west of the United States. Construction on the Destruction Island Lighthouse began in 1888. The island was proposed as a site for a lighthouse years earlier, but a shortage of funds and shifting priorities delayed the project. After the 94-foot conical tower was complete, it was wrapped in a skin of iron to protect it from the elements. The fog signal was installed on 1891 and the five concentric wicks of the lamp were set afire for the first time. The Coast Guard assumed responsibility for the lighthouse in 1939 before it was automated in 1968. At that time, the Coast Guard was in hopes of turning off the beacon for good. Protests from local fishermen hindered their decision. The first order Fresnel lens continued its countless revolutions until it was removed in 1995 and replaced with a Vega Rotating Beacon. At that time the use of the underwater power cable was retired to solar panels. The Coast Guard gutted the original fog signal building and developed it into temporary housing just in case weather prevented maintenance crews from leaving the island. The two
    9.00
    2 votes
    73
    Egmont Key Light

    Egmont Key Light

    The current Egmont Key Light dates from 1858. It is the oldest structure still used for its original purpose, and believed to be the oldest structure of any sort, in the Tampa Bay area. When the first Egmont Key Light was built in 1848, it was the only lighthouse on the Gulf coast of Florida between Key West and St. Marks. In September 1848 a hurricane covered the island with six feet of water and damaged the new lighthouse. The keeper and his family rode out the storm in a small boat tied to a tree. When the keeper saw the damage to the lighthouse, he rowed off to Tampa and never returned. Another hurricane a few weeks later caused more damage, and beach erosion threatened to topple the tower. A hurricane in 1852 again threatened to topple the tower by undermining it. In 1857 work was begun rebuilding the tower. It apparently was moved 90 feet (27 m) inland at that time. The reconstruction was completed in 1858, and the lighthouse was placed back in service with a new third order Fresnel lens. The lens was removed by Confederates during the Civil War to frustrate the Union Navy efforts to blockade Tampa Bay but was restored after the war. In 1944 the lantern was removed from the
    9.00
    2 votes
    74
    Point Reyes Light

    Point Reyes Light

    • Construction: Cast iron
    The Point Reyes Lighthouse, also known as Point Reyes Light or the Point Reyes Light Station, is a lighthouse in the Gulf of the Farallones on Point Reyes in Marin County, California, U.S.A. A lighthouse was assigned to Point Reyes in 1855, but construction was delayed for fifteen years because of a dispute between the United States Lighthouse Board and the landowners over a fair price for the land. The lighthouse is a sixteen sided, 37-foot (11 m) tower, and a twin of Cape Mendocino Light. The first-order Fresnel lens was first lit on December 1, 1870. Electricity came to the lighthouse in 1938, and concrete steps were built into the cliff in 1939. The station was automated in 1975. The following historical information from March 1962 is maintained on the USCG web site: Point Reyes Light Station was established in 1870 at Point Reyes, Calif., 19 miles (31 km) from the nearest town of Inverness. It is a family station with a complement of four men who maintain a first order light, fog signal and radio beacon. The light tower itself is a sixteen-sided structure of forged iron plate (the original tower) bolted to solid rock. The top of the lantern is 37 feet (11 m) above the ground
    9.00
    2 votes
    75
    Seven Foot Knoll Light

    Seven Foot Knoll Light

    • Construction: Cast iron
    The Seven Foot Knoll Light was built in 1855 and is the oldest screw-pile lighthouse in Maryland. It was initially installed on a shallow shoal, Seven Foot Knoll, at the mouth of the Patapsco River. The northern reach of this river is the Baltimore Harbor, where the now-decommissioned lighthouse has been placed as a museum. Constructed of 1-inch (25 mm) rolled iron, the lighthouse consists of three main sections. The gallery deck was located 9 feet (2.7 m) above the average high tide waters. The house was the second section, sitting directly atop the gallery deck. This is where the keeper and his family would live. Atop the housing area was the third section of the lighthouse, the light beacon. A 4th order Fresnel lens was housed in the small light compartment. It was visible for 12 miles (19 km). The first requests for a light came in 1848, with initial appropriations in 1851. Delays in planning and bidding pushed the start of construction to 1854. Total construction costs came to $43,000 by its completion the following year. Most parts were fabricated in Baltimore at the Murray and Hazelhurst iron foundry. The parts were then shipped to Seven Foot Knoll by boat where they were
    9.00
    2 votes
    76
    La Pointe Lighthouse

    La Pointe Lighthouse

    • Construction: Cast iron
    The La Pointe Light is a lighthouse located on Long Island, one of the Apostle Islands, in Lake Superior in Ashland County, Wisconsin, near the city of Bayfield. Currently owned by the National Park Service and part of the Apostle Islands National Lakeshore, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1983, as reference number 83003366. Listed in the Library of Congress, Historic American Buildings Survey, WI-325 and WI-325-A. One of the oldest skeletal lighthouses on the Great Lakes, it played an important role in transportation on Lake Superior. A square wooden tower, constructed in 1858, was located around 3,000 feet (910 m) west (0.9 km) of the current light. The previous lens was moved to the Chequamegon Point Lighthouse in 1897. It is one of the Apostle Islands Lighthouses. Most of the Apostle Islands light stations may be reached on the Apostle Islands Cruise Service water taxi or by private boat during the summer. During the Annual Apostle Island Lighthouse Celebration ferry tour service is available for all the lighthouses. In the tourist season, volunteer park rangers are on the many of the islands to greet visitors.
    5.80
    5 votes
    77
    Cape Campbell Lighthouse

    Cape Campbell Lighthouse

    Cape Campbell Lighthouse is a lighthouse at Cape Campbell in the Marlborough region of the South Island of New Zealand. It is owned and operated by Maritime New Zealand. The original lighthouse at this site was first lit on August 1, 1870. However, this lighthouse was constructed of timber, and in 1898 these timbers were found to be decaying. This led to the construction of the current cast iron tower, which began operating in October 1905. The light was originally fueled by oil. In 1938 the oil lamp was replaced with an electric one powered by a local diesel generator. This was subsequently replaced by a connection to the mains grid in the 1960s. The light was fully automated in 1986 and is now managed from a control room in Wellington.
    7.67
    3 votes
    78
    Deepwater Shoals Light

    Deepwater Shoals Light

    • Construction: Cast iron
    The Deepwater Shoals Light was a lighthouse located in the James River upstream from Newport News, Virginia. This light was erected in 1855 to mark the western edge of the channel. Ice damaged the light in the following year, and again in 1867; in the latter case the light had to be rebuilt completely, at which time the light was upgraded to a sixth-order Fresnel from the previous masthead light. During the Civil War the light was extinguished by confederate forces; relit in 1862, the Lighthouse Board reconsidered and removed the lighting apparatus to Fort Monroe for safekeeping. Decommissioning came in 1936, and the house was torn down in 1966. A steel tower light has been erected on the old iron foundation.
    7.67
    3 votes
    79
    Gasparilla Island Lights

    Gasparilla Island Lights

    The Gasparilla Island Lights are on Gasparilla Island in Boca Grande, Florida. The Port Boca Grande Light is on the south tip of Gasparilla Island, and marked the Boca Grande Pass entrance to Charlotte Harbor. It has also been known as the Gasparilla Island Light and the Boca Grande Light. The Gasparilla Island Light is one mile (1.6 km) north of the first lighthouse. It has also been known as the Boca Grande Light and the Boca Grande Light Rear Range. Port Boca Grande Light was first lit on December 31, 1890. It is a two-story frame dwelling raised on iron screw-piles, with the lantern placed in a cupola at the peak of the roof. The keeper lived in the lighthouse. A similar house (without a lantern) built next to it was the assistant keeper's dwelling. The Port Boca Grande Light originally served ships transporting cattle from ports on Charlotte Harbor to Cuba. Phosphate ore from the Peace River area became an important cargo in the 1890s, and an extension of the Seaboard Air Line Railroad to Port Boca Grande in 1909 resulted in increased traffic. Ship traffic to Port Boca Grande peaked at more than 30 ships a day during World War II, when Port Boca Grande served as a safe harbor
    7.67
    3 votes
    80
    Sapelo Island Range Front Light

    Sapelo Island Range Front Light

    • Construction: Cast iron
    The Sapelo Island Range Front Light is a lighthouse in Georgia, United States, on Sapelo Island, Georgia. Sapelo Island Range Front Lighthouse was built in 1877. It was restored in 1997.
    7.67
    3 votes
    81
    Tiritiri Matangi Lighthouse

    Tiritiri Matangi Lighthouse

    • Construction: Cast iron
    Tiritiri Matangi Lighthouse is a lighthouse on Tiritiri Matangi, an island in the Hauraki Gulf 28 km north of Auckland in the North Island of New Zealand. It is owned and operated by Maritime New Zealand. It is considered the best-preserved lighthouse complex in the country, and is the oldest lighthouse in New Zealand still in operation. It was once the most powerful lighthouse in the Southern Hemisphere. Constructed in 1864 from cast iron, the light was first lit on 1 January, 1865. The light was first automated in 1925 and used an acetylene burning revolving light. Keepers returned to the light in 1947 and it remained manned until 1984 when the light was fully automated. The light's last keeper, Ray Walter, remained on the island working with his wife Barbara as Department of Conservation rangers until their retirement in 2006. The lighthouse along with the nearby visitor centre is a popular destination, although the light itself is not open to the public. The building has a Category I listing with the New Zealand Historic Places Trust.
    7.67
    3 votes
    82
    Cape Fear Lighthouse

    Cape Fear Lighthouse

    Cape Fear Lighthouse was built in 1903, replacing the Bald Head Lighthouse as the main navigation aid for Cape Fear and the Frying Pan Shoals off the coast of the U.S. state of North Carolina. It stood near the cape on Bald Head Island. It was a steel skeleton frame lighthouse, as opposed to the brick lighthouses usually associated with the state. It was painted red and white horizontal stripes: three white and two red. It was maintained for most of its lifetime by Capt. Charlie Swan, its lighthouse keeper. On December 5, 1932, first assistant lighthouse keeper, Devaney F. Jennette, died while in the watch tower. He was talking to Capt. Swan at the time. The Cape Fear Lighthouse was demolished in 1958 and replaced by the powerful Oak Island Lighthouse.
    10.00
    1 votes
    83
    Cherrystone Bar Light

    Cherrystone Bar Light

    • Construction: Cast iron
    The Cherrystone Bar Light was a lighthouse located at the entrance to Cape Charles, Virginia harbor in the Chesapeake Bay. It was the only light in the bay moved to another location, becoming the Choptank River Light in 1921. This light was constructed shortly before the Civil War, and as with other Virginia lights, it was put out of commission by Confederate forces. It was reactivated by Union forces in 1862. . In 1919, a simple skeleton tower on a small caisson was erected to replace the old light. The following year, the house was lifted from its foundation and barged north, where it was set on a new foundation to replace the Choptank River Light, which had been destroyed by ice in 1918. This light was eventually dismantled in 1964, but the caisson light at the original location remains in use.
    10.00
    1 votes
    84
    Eagle River Light Station

    Eagle River Light Station

    The Eagle River Light is a decommissioned lighthouse at the mouth of the Eagle River in the community of Eagle River on the Keweenaw Peninsula in the U.S. state of Michigan. With the discovery of the "Cliff Lode" in 1845 and the subsequent copper mining operations there, Eagle River became a booming port city and rivalled Copper Harbor as the biggest boom town in the Keweenaw. On September 28, 1850, the United States Congress appropriated $6,500 to construct a light at Eagle River. A site was selected that year, but it took until 1853 for the Michigan Legislature to obtain title to the site. Construction was not completed until 1857. The light was situated on a sand bluff overlooking Lake Superior on the west bank of the river. The tower was only 24 feet (7 m) high, but because of its location on a bluff, the sixth order Fresnel lens could be seen for a distance of ten nautical miles. Cracks at the base of the station were documented in 1867, and the entire structure was said to be in danger of collapsing. Congress appropriated $14,000 in 1869 to build a replacement, but recalled the funds in 1870 due to a shortfall in the federal budget. After copper in the Keweenaw area was
    10.00
    1 votes
    85
    Little Sable Point Light

    Little Sable Point Light

    • Construction: Brick
    The Little Sable Point Light is a lighthouse located south of Pentwater in the lower peninsula of the U.S. state of Michigan. It is in the southwest corner of Golden Township, just south of Silver Lake State Park. The lighthouse was designed by Col. Orlando M. Poe and has been described as "A classic Poe tower." The design used 109 1-foot-diameter wood pilings to be driven into the sand, capped by 12 feet of stone as a stout base for the brick tower. The walls of the tower are 5 feet thick at the base and 2 feet at its zenith. Following the loss of the Schooner Pride in 1866, public outcries for a light at this locale were finally heard and heeded. Congress approved funding in 1871, but construction was delayed until 1874 due to lack of roads to the site. The station was originally named "Petite Pointe Au Sable Lighthouse", which is the name used on most official records; officially, however, the name was changed in 1910. Although commonly called "Little Sable Point Light", it is listed by the National Park Service as "Little Point Sable Light". The lantern room has eight fixed panels in its lower section, and the upper has ten rotating panels. In 1954, the Lighthouse keeper's
    10.00
    1 votes
    86
    Longstone Lighthouse

    Longstone Lighthouse

    Longstone Lighthouse was built and designed by Joseph Nelson in 1826, and was originally called the Outer Farne lighthouse. The site had a long history of need for a light. In the late 17th century Sir John Clayton, and later, in 1755, Captain J. Blackhead, requested a light for the island. Both were turned down because the authorities, the Elder Brethren of Trinity House, were unable to persuade affected parties to contribute to the maintenance of the light. In the mid 1820s the welfare of shipping won over and it was agreed that a lighthouse be constructed. The lighthouse originally used Argand lamps, but in 1952 was finally electrified, and in 1990 became fully automated. The lighthouse is known for the 1838 wreck of the Forfarshire and the role of Grace Darling, the lighthouse keeper's daughter, in rescuing survivors. Tours of the lighthouse, which is accessible by boat, are operated by The Golden Gate Boat Trip Company under license from Trinity House.
    10.00
    1 votes
    87
    Old Field Point Light

    Old Field Point Light

    Old Field Point Light is a lighthouse within the village of Old Field, New York between the entrances to Port Jefferson Harbor and Stony Brook Harbor on the north shore of Long Island. The structure is of the same design as lighthouses at Sheffield Island in Norwalk, Connecticut; Morgan Point in Noank, Connecticut; Great Captain Island in Greenwich, Connecticut, Plum Island on Plum Island in New York; and Block Island North on Block Island in Rhode Island. The Archives Center at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History has a collection (#1055) of souvenir postcards of lighthouses and has digitized 272 of these and made them available online. These include postcards of Old Field Point Light with links to customized nautical charts provided by National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration.
    10.00
    1 votes
    88
    Fingal Head

    Fingal Head

    Fingal Head was first sighted by James Cook about 17:00 on 16 May 1770 (log date and time). The area and small town is often just called Fingal. It is located on the Far North Coast of New South Wales in Tweed Shire, about 5 km south of the New South Wales and Queensland border, and south of the Gold Coast. At the 2006 census, Fingal Head had a population of 575 people. The Tweed River, (discovered by John Oxley in October 1823) on the north coast of New South Wales runs northwards close to the coast for about 6 km before reaching its mouth just south of present day Point Danger. A spit about 500–800 metres wide called "Letitia Spit" (named after the first ship to enter the river in July 1840) runs south for 2 km to Fingal Head. The headland itself was made from a lava flow from the now extinct Tweed Volcano. The rock composition in the area is mainly basalt or andesite. There are walking tracks all over this area. About 500 metres offshore from the headland is Cook Island, a rocky uninhabited island first charted by James Cook in 1770. The stretch of water to the island is called the "Giants Causeway", named after the famous Giants Causeway between Northern Ireland and Western
    6.50
    4 votes
    89
    Fourteen Foot Bank Light

    Fourteen Foot Bank Light

    • Construction: Cast iron
    Fourteen Foot Bank Light is a lighthouse in Delaware, United States, in the Delaware Bay near Bowers Beach. Built in 1885-1886 at the south end of Joe Flogger Shoal, it was the first lighthouse to be built using a pneumatic caisson. The wooden caisson structure was excavated to a depth of 23 feet (7.0 m) below the seabed, then filled with 2000 cubic yards of concrete. A cast iron base was meanwhile erected on the caisson as it sank. A house-like structure was built on top of the base, designed by H.A. Ramsay and Son of Baltimore. Engineers for the structure were Anderson and Barr, and the contractor was D.P. Heap. The light is eleven miles offshore, and therefore not visible from land. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1989.
    8.50
    2 votes
    90
    Hornby Lighthouse

    Hornby Lighthouse

    Hornby Lighthouse, also known as South Head Lower Light, is an active lighthouse located on the tip of South Head, New South Wales, Australia, a headland to the north of the suburb Watsons Bay. It marks the southern entrance to Port Jackson and Sydney Harbour, as well as lighting the South Reef, a ledge of submerged rocks. It is the third oldest lighthouse in New South Wales. The need for a lighthouse at the entrance of Jackson Bay was made evident by the loss of two ships. First was the Dunbar, wrecked in August 1857, with the loss of 121 lives. The second was Catherine Adamson, two months later in October 1857, with a loss of twenty-one lives. A committee of the Light, Pilot and Navigation Board took evidence in September 1857 and recommended the construction of a 30 feet (9.1 m) lighthouse on the inner South Head, showing a fixed white light (F.W.), although a red light was also considered. The lighthouse was designed by Alexander Dawson, the New South Wales Government Architect at that time. Dawson approved the recommended location as having adequate foundations, and also reported that the government stores already had a catoptric lens apparatus available that has been
    8.50
    2 votes
    91
    South Bass Island Light

    South Bass Island Light

    South Bass Island Light is a lighthouse on the southern end of its eponymous island in Lake Erie. It was listed in the National Register of Historic Places on April 5, 1990 and is thought to be the only lighthouse in the United States that is owned by a university - Ohio State. Increasing tourist traffic to the island in the late 1800s prompted the Lighthouse Board to approve construction of a light in 1893. The light was to help to mark the southern passage from Sandusky to Toledo, along with several other lights in the vicinity. The site chosen was Parker Point on the southwest corner of the island, and in 1895 a two-acre plot was purchased. Construction was protracted due to the failure of the original contractors to secure proper bonds, and the light was not brought into service until 1897. It is an atypical structure for its era, a large 2 ⁄2-story brick Queen Anne house with a 3-story tower built into one corner. It was fitted with a fourth order Fresnel lens, originally lit by oil, but eventually converted to electricity. The tenure of the first keeper, Harry Riley, and his assistant, Sam Anderson, was brief. Concerns about a smallpox outbreak on the island were realized in
    8.50
    2 votes
    92
    8.50
    2 votes
    93
    Anclote Keys Light

    Anclote Keys Light

    The Anclote Keys Light was a lighthouse built in 1887 on Anclote Key, the largest of the Anclote Keys. It is a skeletal square pyramidal tower, painted brown, with a black lantern. After the lighthouse was automated in 1952 the tower and other buildings at the site were often vandalized, interfering with the operation of the light. The Coast Guard determined that the light was no longer needed and deactivated in 1984. The site was eventually turned over to the State of Florida and added to Anclote Key Preserve State Park. As of 2003 the lighthouse has been restored and relit using a reproduction fourth-order Fresnel lens. Anclote Key is accessible only by boat. It is listed as Anclote Key Light number 1555 in the USCG light lists.
    7.33
    3 votes
    94
    Hawkins Point Light

    Hawkins Point Light

    • Construction: Cast iron
    The Hawkins Point Light was an unusual screw-pile lighthouse which displayed the front light to the Brewerton Channel Range. It was eventually superseded by an iron tower on the same foundation. This light was built in 1868 as part of a project to mark the Brewerton Channel, which had been excavated in the 1850s to provide a fixed deepwater channel into Baltimore Harbor. It served as the front of a pair of range lights, with the Leading Point Light serving as the rear. Like most lights constructed on the bay in this period, Hawkins Point was a screw-pile structure, but of a unique configuration. The square foundation had an outrigger on each side, so that the rectangular house, viewed from above, appeared to sit diagonally on its base. As originally built, it housed two lights. The range light itself shone from a window in the second story of the house, while a second beacon was mounted in a tower on the roof. This tower was removed in the early 1900s, leaving a curiously truncated roofline. In 1924 the house was removed, and a skeletal tower erected on the iron foundation. This light continues to serve as the front light of the Brewerton Channel Range, but it no longer is given a
    7.33
    3 votes
    95
    Mispillion Light

    Mispillion Light

    • Construction: Wood
    Mispillion Lighthouse is a lighthouse in Delaware, United States, on the Mispillion River near the Delaware Bay, Delaware The original Mispillion Lighthouse was built in 1831. The second Mispillion Lighthouse was a 65 ft square cylindrical wood tower rising from one corner of a 2 story Gothic style wood keeper's house and was built in 1873. It served until 1929 when it was deactivated and replaced by a steel skeleton tower that had originally served at Cape Henlopen. Over many year's of private ownership and neglect, the lighthouse had fallen into an extreme state of disrepair, and was considered by Lighthouse Digest Magazine to be America's Most Endangered Lighthouse. After a fire started by lightning destroyed most of the tower portion of the lighthouse, the remains of the lighthouse were sold in 2002. A replica of the lighthouse was rebuilt at Shipcarpenter Square in Lewes, Delaware in 2004 using what was left of the structure of the old lighthouse, and based on the original plans. The new owners also added a substantial addition during reconstruction, used as their living quarters. The steel skeletal tower remains at the original location but is not active or open to the
    7.33
    3 votes
    96
    Phare du Cap Leucate

    Phare du Cap Leucate

    The Phare du Cap Leucate is a lighthouse situated on the Cap Leucate, located in the south-eastern part of the Corbières maritimes in the French Department Aude on the territory of the commune of Leucate. It was constructed in 1950 and illuminated in 1951. It is an automatic but guarded lighthouse; visits are not permitted.
    7.33
    3 votes
    97
    Raspberry Island Lighthouse

    Raspberry Island Lighthouse

    • Construction: Wood
    The Raspberry Island Lighthouse is a lighthouse located on the southern part of Raspberry Island, marking the west channel of the Apostle Islands in Lake Superior in Bayfield County, Wisconsin, near the city of Bayfield. It was erected in 1873, marking the western channel. It is said to be "one of the few surviving wood framed lighthouses left on Lake Superior. The complex includes a square tower rising up from the attached Lighthouse keeper's quarters, a brick fog signal building, frame barn, brick oil house, boathouse, two outhouses, and a dock. The light was doused in 1947, and was transferred to the National Park Service as part of the Apostle Islands National Lakeshore. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1977, part of reference number 77000145. Listed in the Library of Congress Historic American Buildings Survey, WI-312. The original Fresnel lens is on display at the Madeline Island historical museum. The old battery system in the fog signal building was replaced by a solar powered 300 mm Tideland Signal acrylic optic atop a pole, which continues to light the island to this day. The location is an active aid to navigation, with a characteristic white
    7.33
    3 votes
    98
    Vinga Lighthouse

    Vinga Lighthouse

    Vinga Lighthouse (Vinga fyr), is a Swedish lighthouse on Vinga island built in 1890. But Vinga has been an important island for sea travelers for a long time. The lighthouse in use now is the third one on the island. It is one of Sweden's most famous lighthouses and a special symbol for the city of Gothenburg. The first tower was built in 1841, it was the first Swedish lighthouse with lens. A second was built in 1854 to make the island a "double lighthouse". There had been some complaints that it was hard to figure out if it was the lighthouse in Skagen (Denmark) or Vinga that you saw on a long distance. The flame ran on colza oil. In the 1880s the need for a better and higher lighthouse was urgent and in 1890 the new lighthouse was built, it ran on paraffin. The oldest lighthouse was transformed to a watch tower (the red and gray short tower on the picture). The second lighthouse was eliminated. In 1948 the tower was electrified and in 1974 it was automated. It is now remote controlled by the Swedish Maritime Administration, who wanted to deactivate the lighthouse in 2007 because the commercial shipping does not need it anymore, but it was met with heavy protesting. For now, the
    7.33
    3 votes
    99
    Windmill Point Light

    Windmill Point Light

    • Construction: Cast iron
    The Windmill Point Light was a lighthouse located at the mouth of the Rappahannock River. This light was erected in 1869 to replace the last of three lightships stationed at this location to mark the end of the Rappahannock Spit, a shoal extending east from Windmill Point itself. These lightships were stationed beginning in 1839, the first being seized by the Confederates in the Civil War. As was typical of such an exposed location, ice was a serious threat, and the light was badly damaged in the winter of 1917–1918, with repairs not completed until 1921. Automation came in 1954, and the house was removed in favor of a skeleton tower in 1965. As with the nearby Stingray Point Light, a private party, one Dr William Atwood, purchased portions of the house in hopes of reassembling it on shore. As with the other light, however, Dr Atwood was unable to complete his plan. The tower and original foundation remain in service. As of the 2007–2008 winter, the old girder works of the original lighthouse were removed and replaced by a single concrete-filled caisson with superstructure tower and light and placards. Note the rip rap of the original light surrounds the new structure, which is
    7.33
    3 votes
    100
    Jordan Point Light

    Jordan Point Light

    • Construction: Wood
    The Jordan Point Light was a lighthouse located on Jordan Point on the James River in Virginia, near the south end of the present Benjamin Harrison Memorial Bridge. The history of this station is confused at points, but it appears that a light was first constructed on the point in 1855. This consisted of a keeper's house with a masthead light on the roof. Erosion at the point threatened this building, and it was torn down in 1875 (or possibly 1870) and replaced with a pyramidal wooden tower. A new, separate, keeper's house was built in 1888. Erosion continued to eat away at the projecting point, and in 1927 the whole station was abandoned. In 1941 a new skeleton tower was erected at the site of the old tower; the skeleton tower is in service as the rear light of the Jordan Point Range, Light List #2-12420.
    6.25
    4 votes
    101
    Alnes lighthouse

    Alnes lighthouse

    Alnes lighthouse was established in 1852 to guide fishing boats safely to the harbor of the small fishing community of Alnes on Godøy island on the west coast of Norway. It is located on the north side of Godøy island in the municipality of Giske in Møre og Romsdal county, about 4 kilometres (2.5 mi) northwest of Leitebakk. The current lighthouse was built in 1876 and is still in operation with a few modifications. The lighthouse was automated in 1982 and is now owned by the municipality of Giske. The galley and the tower are open for tourists from May through October, and the old keeper's house has a café and an exhibition hall where artwork from local artists are displayed. There is also a small historical museum inside the lighthouse tower. Only a 30-minute drive from Ålesund, it is easily accessible for visitors and is one of the most visited lighthouses in Norway.
    7.00
    3 votes
    102
    Nansemond River Light

    Nansemond River Light

    • Construction: Cast iron
    The Nansemond River Light was a screwpile lighthouse located at the confluence of the Nansemond and James rivers in Virginia. This light was erected in 1878 to mark the east side of the entrance to the Nansemond River. Some parts were recycled from the old Roanoke Marshes Light, which had been replaced the previous year. Little of note is recorded about this light, though in 1915 the keeper was cited for recovering a woman's wristwatch dropped overboard. The light was an early victim of automation in 1935, and in the late 1980s the whole structure was removed, leaving no trace of the light to be seen.
    7.00
    3 votes
    103
    West Point Lighthouse

    West Point Lighthouse

    • Construction: Stucco
    The West Point Light, also known as the Discovery Park Lighthouse, is a 23-foot-high lighthouse on Seattle, Washington's West Point which juts into Puget Sound and marks the northern extent of Elliott Bay. Opening on November 15, 1881, and featuring a fourth-order Fresnel lens, it was the first manned light station on Puget Sound and cost $25,000 to build. It was illuminated with a kerosene lamp for its first 44 years, until it was attached to Seattle's electric grid in 1926. The lighthouse was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1977. It became automated in 1985, the last station in Washington to do so. Under the National Historic Lighthouse Preservation Act of 2000, in early 2003, Seattle's Department of Parks and Recreation applied to the United States Department of the Interior to take custody of the lighthouse from the United States Coast Guard and incorporate it into Discovery Park. Nineteen groups applied, including Nick Korstad, former owner of Virginia's Wolf Trap Lighthouse. The city was granted the property in October 2004 after many debates. Included in the transfer of the property was the station's original 4th order Fresnel Lens. Upon signing over of
    7.00
    3 votes
    104
    Mumbles Lighthouse

    Mumbles Lighthouse

    Mumbles Lighthouse (completed in 1794) is a lighthouse located in Mumbles, near Swansea. The structure, which sits on the outer of two islands off Mumbles Head, is clearly visible from any point along the five mile sweep of Swansea Bay. Along with the nearby lifeboat station, it is the most photographed landmark in the village. The tower has two tiers and initially two open coal fire lights were displayed. These open coal fire lights were difficult to maintain and were soon replaced by a single oil powered light within a cast iron lantern. In 1860, the oil powered light was upgraded to a dioptric light and the fort that surrounds the tower was built by the War Department. In 1905, an occulting mechanism, where the light was made to flash, was fitted. This was partially automated in 1934. By 1977, the cast iron lantern had deteriorated beyond repair and was removed. A different lantern was added in 1987. In 1995, the main light was replaced and an array of solar panels and emergency monitoring equipment were added.
    5.20
    5 votes
    105
    Bathurst Lighthouse

    Bathurst Lighthouse

    Bathurst Lighthouse is one of two lighthouses on Rottnest Island, the other being Wadjemup Lighthouse. It is located on Bathurst Point, in the north east of the island, and was activated in 1900. The lighthouse was erected in response to a series of shipping disasters in the area, which included the loss of the City of York in 1899. The lightsource and lantern house were originally to be used at Cape Leeuwin but were then built in on Rottnest Island. In 1920 the original acetylene flame was replaced by a flasher, which made the keeper superfluous. An electric light was installed in 1986. Bathurst Lighthouse serves as the rear light in the pair of Kingston Reef's leading lights, which guide ships departing from Fremantle through the reefs near the island. Its light is characterised by a group of four flashes that occurs every sixteen seconds.
    6.00
    4 votes
    106
    Ashland Harbor Breakwater Lighthouse

    Ashland Harbor Breakwater Lighthouse

    The Ashland Harbor Breakwater lighthouse, also known as Ashland Breakwater Lighthouse, is a lighthouse located near Ashland in Ashland County, Wisconsin, USA. It sits at the end of a long and detached breakwater, which creates an artificial harbor. Lighthouse keeper's quarters and a boathouse were constructed in 1916 near the light. Quarters also are located on 2nd and 3rd story of the lighthouse.
    8.00
    2 votes
    107
    Cape Egmont Lighthouse

    Cape Egmont Lighthouse

    Cape Egmont Lighthouse is a Lighthouse at Cape Egmont in the Taranaki Region of the North Island of New Zealand. It is owned and operated by Maritime New Zealand. The light was manufactured by Simpson & Co., Pimlico, London, in 1864 and erected on Mana Island to the north west of Porirua in 1865, but it was sometimes confused with the Pencarrow Head light at the entrance to Wellington Harbour and in 1877 the light was dismantled and moved to Cape Egmont. The light was fully automated in 1986.
    8.00
    2 votes
    108
    Cape Hatteras Light

    Cape Hatteras Light

    Cape Hatteras Light is a lighthouse located on Hatteras Island in the Outer Banks of North Carolina near the community of Buxton, and is part of the Cape Hatteras National Seashore. The Outer Banks are a group of islands on the North Carolina coast that separate the Atlantic Ocean from the coastal sounds and inlets. Atlantic currents in this area made for excellent travel for ships, except in the area of Diamond Shoals, just offshore at Cape Hatteras. Nearby, the warm Gulf Stream ocean current collides with the colder Labrador Current, creating ideal conditions for powerful ocean storms and sea swells. The large number of ships that ran aground because of these shifting sandbars, including the Civil War ironclad warship USS Monitor, gave this area the nickname “Graveyard of the Atlantic.” It also led Congress to authorize the construction of the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse which is recognized by the National Park Service as the tallest lighthouse in America. The lighthouse is one of several on the North Carolina coast that are still operational including the Currituck, Bodie Island, Ocracoke, Cape Lookout, and Oak Island lighthouses. At a height of 200 feet (61 m) it is the 23rd
    8.00
    2 votes
    109
    Douglas Head Lighthouse, Isle of Man

    Douglas Head Lighthouse, Isle of Man

    Douglas Head Lighthouse is a lighthouse at Douglas Head on the Isle of Man between England and Ireland. The light was established in 1857 although the vicinity was in the control of the Isle of Man Harbour Board from 1832. The lighthouse was built by the engineering brothers David and Thomas Stevenson who built it with a total elevation of 32 metres. The white tower is 20 metres in height and the light itself at a height of 12 metres. The lighthouse staircase has 71 steps and the light has a nominal range of 24 miles. The lantern is composed of 8 brilliant reflectors made of pure silver and which are dated back to 1831. The light flashes white every 10 seconds. In 1855 the Lord Commissioners of the Admiralty requested that the lighthouse be installed other than the Harbour Light at Douglas Harbour. A parliamentary report at the time revealed that the light already existing in Douglas had been out of operation since 1850. There were originally two lighthouses, one on the pier which had to remain a harbour light and this one. The Douglas Head Lighthouse is the only sea light between the Calf of Man and the Point of Ayre - some 40 miles away. Structural problems meant the lighthouse
    8.00
    2 votes
    110
    Fowey Rocks Light

    Fowey Rocks Light

    • Construction: Cast iron
    Fowey Rocks Light is located seven miles southeast of Cape Florida on Key Biscayne. The lighthouse was completed in 1878, replacing the Cape Florida lighthouse. It was automated on May 7, 1975 and is still in operation today. The structure is cast iron, with a screw-pile foundation, a platform and a skeletal tower. The light is 110 feet above the water. The tower framework is painted brown, while the dwelling and enclosed circular stair to the lantern is painted white. The original lens was a first-order drum Fresnel lens which stood about 12 feet (4 m) high and weighed about a ton (tonne). The light has a nominal range of 15 miles in the white sectors, and 10 miles in the red sectors. Fowey Rocks are named for the Royal Navy frigate HMS Fowey which was wrecked on a different reef to the south in 1748. During construction of the lighthouse the workers lived on a platform built over the water to minimize the danger of transporting them and their supplies each day from the mainland. The Labor Day Hurricane of 1935 washed away the first deck of the lighthouse, 15 feet above the water, but the tower survived. The lighthouse is inside the boundaries of Biscayne National Park. In June
    8.00
    2 votes
    111
    Love Point Light

    Love Point Light

    • Construction: Cast iron
    Love Point Light was a screw-pile lighthouse in the Chesapeake Bay, off the northern end of Kent Island, Maryland. Local pressure to build at light at this site was noted as early as 1837, but an appropriation in 1857 was insufficient, and it was not until 1872 that a light was constructed, using the same plan as the original Choptank River Light. As with many screw-pile structures, it had several run-ins with ice, with several pilings being damaged in its first winter. It was threatened again in 1879, but escaped further damage. Automation and dismantling followed the pattern of other screw-pile lights in the bay; it was automated in 1953 and the house removed in 1964, replaced by a small light and fog bell on the old foundation.
    8.00
    2 votes
    112
    Maryland Point Light

    Maryland Point Light

    • Construction: Cast iron
    The Maryland Point Light was a screw-pile lighthouse located in the Potomac River. A light was first proposed for the shoal at Maryland Point in 1887, but an appropriation was not made until 1890. The original proposal was to construct a caisson light, but tests of the bottom convinced the engineers that a screw-pile structure could be made to work. The house was assembled at the Lazaretto Depot in the fall of 1892, and the light was first exhibited in December of that year. The light was automated in 1954 and dismantled in 1963.
    8.00
    2 votes
    113
    Somers Cove Light

    Somers Cove Light

    • Construction: Cast iron
    The Somers Cove Light was a screw-pile lighthouse located near Crisfield, Maryland. Dismantled early, its remains are a landmark to watermen in the area. Little is known about this minor light, other than that it was constructed in 1867 to at the cost of $10,000. Unlike many other screw-pile lighthouses it was apparently never threatened by ice, and thus passed a quiet life until it was dismantled in 1932, replaced by a skeleton tower. The ferry to Tangier Island passes its remains.
    8.00
    2 votes
    114
    Thimble Shoal Light

    Thimble Shoal Light

    • Construction: Cast iron
    Thimble Shoal Light is a sparkplug lighthouse in the Virginia portion of Chesapeake Bay, north of the Hampton Roads channel. The third light at this location, it is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The first light at this location was a hexagonal screw-pile lighthouse erected in 1872, replacing the last lightship stationed within the bay. It was destroyed by fire in 1880 and replaced in the same year with a new house on the same foundation. This was facilitated by the availability of a newly constructed house originally intended for the Bells Rock Light, so that the light was out of service for only fifty-five days. The second light was plagued by collisions with passing ships: it was struck by a steamer in 1891, by a coal barge in 1898, and finally by the schooner Malcolm Baxter, Jr., which struck the lighthouse on December 27, 1909 while under tow. This last collision damaged the foundation and overturned the stove in the house, which was destroyed by fire. A caisson light was placed next to the old site in 1914; in the meantime, a temporary light perched on the remains of the old screw-pile foundation. This light has several unusual features for such lights in
    8.00
    2 votes
    115
    East Point Light

    East Point Light

    The East Point Light, known as the Maurice River Light before 1913, is a lighthouse located in Heislerville, New Jersey on Delaware Bay at the mouth of the Maurice River. The light was inactive from 1941 and was nearly destroyed by fire in 1971. The light was reinstated by the United States Coast Guard in 1980. Exterior restoration was completed in 1999. Listed in the National Register of Historic Places as Maurice River Lighthouse, reference #95001047.
    9.00
    1 votes
    116
    Hooper Island Light

    Hooper Island Light

    The Hooper Island Light is a lighthouse in the Chesapeake Bay, west of Middle Hooper Island in Maryland. The initial request of a light at this site was made in 1897, but construction was delayed until 1901 after the Variety Iron Works Company failed to deliver materials in time. Unlike earlier caisson lights in the bay, the foundation was placed using the pneumatic process, in which the caisson is kept under pressure to expel water, and the interior is excavated to bring the cylinder down to the desired depth. The tower is taller than other Maryland sparkplug lights because of the provision for a watch room as well as a lantern atop the tower, the only example in the state. A fog bell was originally housed on the lower gallery but was later moved to the watch room level, a backup to the fog horn added in the 1930s. The characteristic was changed several times through the years, with different patterns of flashes and eclipses. Along with many other Chesapeake Bay lights, automation came in the early 1960s. In 1976 the original fourth-order Fresnel lens was stolen, and it was replaced with a solar-power lamp. The lighthouse was added to the National Register of Historic Places on
    9.00
    1 votes
    117
    Muckle Flugga Lighthouse

    Muckle Flugga Lighthouse

    Muckle Flugga lighthouse punctuates the rocky stack of Muckle Flugga, in Shetland, Scotland. Originally called North Unst Lighthouse, it was renamed in 1964. The brothers Thomas and David Stevenson designed and built the lighthouse in 1854 and Thomas's son Robert Louis Stevenson, the writer, visited it as a young man. As a result Unst became his inspiration for the map of 'Treasure Island'. The lighthouse was served by the Grace Darling which was launched from the boat house below the lighthouse shore station in Burrafirth . Supplies were winched up by the blondin cable hoist to the courtyard, from the boat in a natural cleft of the rocks that provides a degree of harbourage. This lighthouse was also used as a setting for the wartime comedy, now in Public Domain, "Back-Room Boy".
    9.00
    1 votes
    118
    Newport News Middle Ground Light

    Newport News Middle Ground Light

    • Construction: Cast iron
    Newport News Middle Ground Light is a lighthouse near the Monitor-Merrimac Memorial Bridge-Tunnel on Interstate 664 in Hampton Roads. It is the oldest caisson lighthouse in Virginia. This light marks a small rise in the center of Hampton Roads which became a hazard as ships drew more water. The initial request was made in 1887, and after several economizing changes to the design, construction began in 1890 and was completed in the spring of the following year. This was the first sparkplug lighthouse built in Virginia. Automation came in 1954, and with it the first of a series of characteristic changes, from a fixed to a flashing white light. The light was described as a "second class tall nun buoy". It also marked the beginning of a period of neglect. In 1979 the now unmanned light was struck by a tugboat, and an inspection in 1982 showed serious damage to the first floor gallery and leaks into the foundation; broken and jammed windows allowed seagulls into the interior. Some repairs were made, but more significant changes were made in 1986-87, when the light was converted to solar power. The new beacon was placed outside the lantern, and the following year a more substantial
    9.00
    1 votes
    119
    Nugget Point Lighthouse

    Nugget Point Lighthouse

    Nugget Point Lighthouse is a lighthouse at Nugget Point in the Otago region of the South Island of New Zealand. It is owned and operated by Maritime New Zealand. The light was built in 1870 and was originally fueled by oil. In 1949 the oil lamp was replaced with an electric one powered by a local diesel generator. This was subsequently replaced by a connection to the mains grid although the original lens for the light is still in place and used to this day. The light was fully automated in 1989 and is now managed from a control room in Wellington. In 1901 Walter Hutton Champion was the lighthouse keeper along with his wife Alice.
    9.00
    1 votes
    120
    Ona lighthouse

    Ona lighthouse

    Ona Lighthouse (Norwegian: Ona fyr) is located on the small island of Ona in the municipality of Sandøy in Møre og Romsdal county, Norway. The lighthouse is built on Onakalven, the highest cliff on the island overlooking the harbor and the few, clustered wooden houses on this small island. The lighthouse was built in 1867 and was fully automated in 1971. The round metal lighthouse has a focal height of 28 metres (92 ft) above sea level.
    9.00
    1 votes
    121
    Outer Island Lighthouse

    Outer Island Lighthouse

    The Outer Island lighthouse is a lighthouse located on the northern tip of Outer Island, one of the Apostle Islands, in Lake Superior in Ashland County, Wisconsin, near the city of Bayfield. The light was designed by United States Lighthouse Board Eleventh District Chief Engineer Orlando Poe and constructed under the supervision of his successor, Godfrey Weitzel. Currently owned by the National Park Service and part of the Apostle Islands National Lakeshore, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1977, part of reference number 77000145. It is listed in the Library of Congress Historic American Buildings Survey, WI-318. The lighthouse is attached to a two-story, red brick keeper's quarters. On September 2, 1905, Outer Island Keeper John Irvine performed a heroic rescue, when the 337-foot, three-masted schooner-barge Pretoria lost the line to its towing steamer Venezuela during a fierce storm. The Pretoria attempted to anchor about 1.5 miles off the island, but when the ship began to break up, the ten-man crew attempted to flee in a lifeboat. Sixty-one-year-old keeper Irvine was alone on the island, his assistants having gone to town, but when the lifeboat
    9.00
    1 votes
    122
    West Quoddy Head Light

    West Quoddy Head Light

    • Construction: Brick
    West Quoddy Head in Lubec, Maine is the easternmost point of the contiguous United States and the closest point to Europe from a point in the fifty States. West Quoddy Head overlooks Quoddy Narrows, a strait between Canada and the United States. Since 1808, there has been a lighthouse there to guide ships through the waterway. The current one, with distinctive red-and-white stripes, was built in 1858. Photographs and paintings of this lighthouse are frequently reproduced. The 3rd order Fresnel lens is the only 3rd order and one of only eight Fresnel lenses still in use on the Maine Coast. West Quoddy Head Light was added to the National Register of Historic Places as West Quoddy Head Light Station on July 4, 1980, reference number 80004601. A lighthouse at West Passamaquoddy Head, Maine, was authorized by Congress in 1806. The light station was finished on April 21, 1808, at a cost of $5,000. In 1820, Congress authorized the first fog signal at the station, a 500-pound bell, for a cost of $1,000. The current tower was built in 1858.
    9.00
    1 votes
    123
    Alappuzha Lighthouse

    Alappuzha Lighthouse

    The Alappuzha Lighthouse is situated in the coastal town of Alappuzha, Kerala. It was built in 1862 and is a major tourist attraction. Visitors are allowed between 1500 hours and 1630 hours on every weekday at an admission fee of ten rupees. Most of the information for this section has been obtained from and Alappuzha, the place where India's Alleppey Lighthouse stands, was one of the busiest ports and trade centers of Kerala. Alappuzha, a part of Travancore, was ruled by Rajas of Earstwhile Travancore before India's independence. After the arrival of the Portuguese, Dutch and English trades, Vizhinjam, Kollam, Travancore and Purakad were the main ports of Earstwhile Travancore through which foreign trade flourished. The decline of the Port of Purakkad necessitated the rehabilitation of the traders for which Alappuzha was selected as a port and an infrastructure was developed. The port was opened to foreign traders in 1792. There was no regular lighthouse provided in 18th century-only a light, provided on the pier head.served the mariners. As port activities increased, the authorities had to provide for a lighthouse. The construction of the present lighthouse began in the reign
    6.67
    3 votes
    124
    Burrewarra Point

    Burrewarra Point

    Burrewarra Point is to the north of Broulee and 25 kilometres south of Batemans Bay on the south coast of New South Wales, Australia. An active lighthouse, Burrewarra Point Light, is located at Burrewarra Point. It was built in 1974. Also at Burrewarra Point are the remains of concrete igloo buildings of No. 17 Radar Station used by the Royal Australian Air Force during World War II. Also present at the location is a commemorative plaque.
    6.67
    3 votes
    125
    Cape St. George Light

    Cape St. George Light

    The Cape St. George Light is a 74-foot (23 m) high brick lighthouse which had originally stood for 153 years on St. George Island, Florida, until toppling into the Gulf of Mexico October 22, 2005. The pieces of the lighthouse were retrieved, and in April 2008, the light's restoration was completed. The first lighthouse on St. George Island was erected in 1833 near the island's western tip. It marked the narrow entrance to Apalachicola Bay at West Pass between St. George Island and St. Vincent Island. At the time, Apalachicola was an important cotton port. The tower was 65 feet (20 m) tall, and held 13 lamps with 15-inch reflectors (although the captain of a revenue cutter reported in 1834 that the tower was 75 feet (23 m) tall and had 11 lamps). Due to the sharp convex bend of St. George Island's southern coast at Cape St. George, southeast of the light, ships approaching from the eastern Gulf could not easily see it. In 1847 Congress appropriated $8,000 for a new lighthouse on the cape, two miles (3 km) southeast of the original site. Materials from the old tower were used in the construction of the new tower in 1847-48. It was built on a foundation of bricks just 18 inches (0.5
    6.67
    3 votes
    126
    Covesea Skerries Lighthouse

    Covesea Skerries Lighthouse

    Covesea Skerries Lighthouse, belonging to the Northern Lighthouse Board (NLB), is built on top of a small headland on the south coast of the Moray Firth at Covesea, near Lossiemouth, Moray, Scotland. Following a storm in the Moray Firth in November 1826 when 16 vessels were sunk, applications were made for lighthouses at Tarbat Ness, on the opposite coast, and at Covesea Skerries. The Commissioners of Northern Light Houses (the precursor of the NLB) and Trinity House felt that a lighthouse at Covesea was unnecessary but this was against public opinion. Many letters and petitions were delivered to them. Eventually, the engineer and a committee of the Board surveyed the coastline and the Elder Brethren were asked to look for the best location. They recommended a lighthouse on the Craighead with a beacon on Halliman's Skerries, which the Commissioners agreed to. A grid iron tower was erected on the Halliman's Skerries in 1845, and in 1846, the Covesea Skerries Lighthouse was completed at a cost of £11,514. The surrounding walls, because of their height, caused vortices in the yard area in strong winds. This interfered with lightkeepers lookout so the walls were lowered in 1907. In
    6.67
    3 votes
    127
    Yokohama Marine Tower

    Yokohama Marine Tower

    Yokohama Marine Tower (横浜マリンタワー, Yokohama Marin Tawā) is a 106 metre high (348 ft) lattice tower with an observation deck at a height of 100 metres in Naka Ward, Yokohama, Japan. The light characteristic is marked by a flash every twenty seconds, whereby the light's colour is alternating red and green. Originally, at night, the tower shaft itself was lit green and red according to its markings, but now, after the reopening on May 2009, the lights are white. Yokohama Marine Tower was inaugurated in 1961. The Marine Tower is billed "the tallest lighthouse in the world", although this depends on what lighthouses are considered. In clear conditions, visitors can see Mount Fuji from the 100-metre high observation deck. On December 25, 2006, Marine Tower temporarily shut its doors. Then the city of Yokohama took over ownership, to restore it. After the renovations, Marine Tower was reopened on May 23, 2009, in time for the city's 150th anniversary celebrations.
    6.67
    3 votes
    128
    Drum Point Light

    Drum Point Light

    • Construction: Cast iron
    Drum Point Light is one of three surviving Chesapeake Bay screw-pile lighthouses. Originally located off Drum Point at the mouth of the Patuxent River, it is now an exhibit at the Calvert Marine Museum. The earliest recorded call for a light at Drum Point came in report by one Lt. William D. Porter to the Secretary of the Treasury. In the 1850s funds were appropriated and some initial surveys made; disputes between the state of Maryland and the federal government over the property to be used eventually brought these efforts to naught. If this project had been carried through, it would have been an early example of a screw-pile lighthouse in the bay, as the Pungoteague Creek Light had been finished only two years earlier. In spite of subsequent requests by steamship operators, it was not until 1882 that a $25,000 appropriation was made, and in the following year a 5-acre (20,000 m) offshore lot was obtained. The original appropriation was to construct a pair of range lights, for reasons that remain obscure. The funds were not adequate for such a project and it was never seriously considered for execution. Instead, a screw-pile light was prefabricated in parts at Lazaretto Point, and
    5.75
    4 votes
    129
    Booby Island, Torres Strait

    Booby Island, Torres Strait

    Booby Island is an island 45 km northwest of Muttee Heads at the tip of Cape York Peninsula, Queensland, Australia. This island in the Torres Strait, 32 km west of Thursday Island and 23 kmwest of Prince of Wales Island. In the 19th century such a high number of ship were lost in the area, that provisions were stored on Booby Island for shipwrecked sailors. Wrecks include: Struck a sunken reef near Booby Island, 24 July 1862. As she was undermanned, the boats were launched with difficulty after big seas had driven her over the rocks into calm water. Natives and adverse currents prevented them reaching safety on the Australian coast before one boat was abandoned and a course set for Timor Foundered in a heavy gale south of Booby Island, Queensland, 19 January 1894. She was overloaded with guano from Rocky Islet in the Gulf of Carpentaria; struck by heavy seas, she rolled over, giving the crew only a short time to launch boats and escape Lost in Torres Strait, from Sydney to Singapore, 28 May 1866. Crew landed on Booby Island and a ship took them on to Singapore In 1890 a lighthouse eventually took up service on the island, an 18 metres (59 ft) tall timber framed iron clad conical
    7.50
    2 votes
    130
    Calumet Light

    Calumet Light

    The Calumet Harbor lighthouse is a three-storey, open-air lighthouse and observation tower located in Calumet Harbor, in the town of Calumet, Wisconsin, approximately one mile west of Pipe, Wisconsin. It is located on the eastern shore of Lake Winnebago, inside the Columbia Park, a Fond du Lac County park. The structure is a steel skeletal tower with two flashing white strobe lights located on top.
    7.50
    2 votes
    131
    Cape Palliser Lighthouse

    Cape Palliser Lighthouse

    Cape Palliser Lighthouse is a Lighthouse at Cape Palliser in the Wellington region of the North Island of New Zealand. It is owned and operated by Maritime New Zealand. The light was built in 1897 and was originally fueled by oil. In 1954 the oil lamp was replaced with an electric one powered by a local diesel generator. This was subsequently replaced by a connection to the mains grid in 1967, although a diesel generator is retained for emergency power. The light was fully automated in 1986 and is now managed from a control room in Wellington. Cape Palliser Lighthouse has 250+ steps to reach the base of the lighthouse, replacing an extremely dangerous and steep climb to the top of the bank which could result in injuries and possibly death if the user wasn't careful. Since the stairs were installed, the lighthouse became more popular around New Zealand and even other parts of the world. 41°36′43″S 175°17′25″E / 41.6119°S 175.2902°E / -41.6119; 175.2902
    7.50
    2 votes
    132
    Chicken Rock

    Chicken Rock

    Chicken Rock (Manx: Carrick ny Kirkey) is the southernmost island administered by the Isle of Man and belongs to the parish of Rushen. It lies to the southwest of the Calf of Man, 4.5 kilometres (2.8 mi) off Spanish Head on the Manx mainland. The 0.1 hectare rock is home to a 44 m (144 ft) lighthouse which was designed by engineers David and Thomas Stevenson after it was realised that the lights on the Calf of Man were not sufficient to warn ships away. Construction of this tapered granite structure was completed in December 1874 and the first official lighting day was on 1 January 1875. A fire heavily damaged the interior of the lighthouse on 23 December 1960, leading to automation of the light in 1961. The lighthouse is owned and maintained by the Northern Lighthouse Board.
    7.50
    2 votes
    133
    Copper Harbor Light

    Copper Harbor Light

    The Copper Harbor Light is a lighthouse located in the harbor of Copper Harbor, Michigan USA on the Keweenaw Peninsula of Upper Michigan inside Fort Wilkins Historic State Park. It is a Michigan State Historic Site and listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The Copper Harbor Lighthouse was built on the tip of the eastern point of land that hugs the harbor. The lighthouse aided in the transport of copper from the Upper Peninsula. Ships carrying immigrants, supplies, and equipment increased dramatically. Funding to build the light was approved in 1847. The first tower was constructed in 1848 and resembled that at Old Presque Isle Lighthouse. The Stone Masonry was dismantled, and the stones used as the foundation for the replacement lighthouse built in 1866. The current lightkeeper's dwelling house is a survivor of the first light tower. An improved lighthouse, which also survives, was raised in 1866 three years before the installation of the Copper Harbor Front Range Light and the Copper Harbor Rear Range Light. The steel light tower in current use went into service in 1933. The station was established in 1849. A Fresnel lens was installed in 1856. The current tower was
    7.50
    2 votes
    134
    Flåvær fyrstasjon

    Flåvær fyrstasjon

    Flåvær fyr is a coastal lighthouse on the island of Vardholmen in the Flåvær islands in the Herøyfjord in the municipality of Herøy on west coast of Norway. The lighthouse is located southwest of Fosnavåg and Eggesbønes and north of the island of Gurskøya. The 13.8-metre (45 ft) tall lighthouse was first built in 1870, and it was renovated in 1887 and 1914. In 1952 it was connected to the electrical power grid, and it was fully automated in 1979.
    7.50
    2 votes
    135
    Garden Key Light

    Garden Key Light

    The Garden Key Light, also known as the Tortuga Harbor Light, is located at Fort Jefferson, on Garden Key in the Dry Tortugas, Florida. The first lighthouse, started in 1824 and first lit in 1826, was a brick conical tower. The lighthouse and its outbuildings were the only structures on Garden Key until construction started on Fort Jefferson in 1846. Construction continued until 1861, but the fort was never completed. In 1858 the Dry Tortugas lighthouse was built on a nearby island, and the first order Fresnel lens was moved there from the Garden Key lighthouse. The Garden Key lighthouse received a fourth order Fresnel lens, and became the harbor light for Fort Jefferson. In 1877 the brick tower was razed and replaced with a boilerplate iron tower on top of a stairwell in the fort. In 1912, the keeper's house burned down, and the lighthouse was automated with tanks of compressed acetylene replacing the butts of kerosene to fuel the lights. The light was deactivated in 1924. The USS Maine was part of the squadron stationed at Garden Key when it exploded and sank in the harbor of Havana, Cuba. James Fenimore Cooper's 1848 novel Jack Tier: or the Florida Reefs, is set at the Garden
    7.50
    2 votes
    136
    Great Beds Lighthouse

    Great Beds Lighthouse

    Great Beds Light is a sparkplug lighthouse in Raritan Bay in South Amboy, New Jersey. Over the years the lighthouse has become the symbol for the city of South Amboy. It was added to the New Jersey Register of Historic Places and National Register of Historic Places in 2008.
    7.50
    2 votes
    137
    Katiki Point Lighthouse

    Katiki Point Lighthouse

    The Katiki Point Lighthouse, also known as Moeraki Lighthouse, shone for the first time on April 22, 1878, following several accidents on the dangerous reefs around the area, to make the area safer for ships that sailed past on their way to Port Chalmers, Dunedin. The lighthouse was built between the settlements of Moeraki and Katiki, on the tip of the Moeraki Peninsula, which is known as Katiki Point or Moeraki Point. The point has a long history of wrecks, notably the wrecking of the ancestral waka atua on a return trip from Hawaiiki, leaving some of the cargo being on the beach at Katiki, below the lighthouse. Tradition holds that the remains of the cargo are the Moeraki Boulders. The wooden tower stands 26 feet (8 m) high and 190 feet (58 m) above sea level. The light flashes on for 6 seconds and off for 6 seconds, and can be seen for 10 nautical miles (20 km). The light-emitting diode beacon is supplied by mains electricity, with a battery for standby power. The original lens operated with a 1000-watt lamp supplied by mains electricity, with a diesel generator for standby power. It can still be seen in the lantern room at the top of the tower. The light was fully automated in
    7.50
    2 votes
    138
    Stratford Point Light

    Stratford Point Light

    • Construction: Cast iron
    Stratford Point Light is a historic lighthouse in Stratford, Connecticut, United States, at the mouth of the Housatonic River. The second tower was one of the first prefabricated cylindrical lighthouses in the country and remains active. It sits on a 4-acre (16,000 m) tract at the southeastern tip of Stratford Point. The first Stratford Point Lighthouse was built in 1822. In 1855 a fifth order lens was added to the 28-foot (8.5 m) wooden tower. In 1881, the tower and dwelling were razed and replaced with a 35-foot (11 m) tall, brick lined cast-iron tower and equipped with a third order Fresnel lens. The light was automated in 1970 with a modern beacon. It is an active aid to navigation and is used for Coast Guard housing. The lighthouse was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on June 29, 1990.
    7.50
    2 votes
    139
    Point Sherman Light

    Point Sherman Light

    • Construction: Wood
    The Point Sherman Light was a lighthouse located 38 miles (61 km) north of Juneau, Alaska, along the east side of Lynn Canal, eight miles (13 km) south of Eldred Rock Light. It is no longer standing. Construction was completed in 1904 and the light was first lit on October 18, 1904. The original light was reduced to a minor light shortly before 1917. In 1932, the station was transferred to the Forest Service and replaced by a nearby buoy. A dayboard and a light were placed on the site of the original light in 1981.
    5.50
    4 votes
    140
    Thomas Point Shoal Light

    Thomas Point Shoal Light

    • Construction: Cast iron
    The Thomas Point Shoal Light, also known as Thomas Point Shoal Light Station, is a historic lighthouse in the Chesapeake Bay on the east coast of the United States, and the most recognized lighthouse in Maryland. It is the only screw-pile lighthouse in the bay which stands at its original site. The current structure is a 1½ story hexagonal wooden cottage, equipped with a foghorn as well as the light. A stone lighthouse was constructed in 1825 on shore at Thomas Point by John Donahoo. It was replaced in 1838 by another stone tower. The point was subject to continuing erosion (which would eventually bring down the lighthouse on the point in 1894), and in 1873 Congress appropriated $20,000 for the construction of a screw-pile structure. With an additional $15,000 appropriation in 1875, the light was built and activated in November of that year. Ice was a perpetual threat to screw-pile lights on the Chesapeake, and in 1877 the original lens was destroyed when it toppled by shaking from ice floes. This lens was replaced, and the additional piles and riprap were placed around the foundation in order to protect it. By 1964 it was the last manned light in the Chesapeake Bay, and it was not
    5.50
    4 votes
    141
    Devils Island Lighthouse

    Devils Island Lighthouse

    • Construction: Cast iron
    The Devils Island Lighthouse is a lighthouse located on Devils Island, one of the Apostle Islands, in Lake Superior in Ashland County, Wisconsin, near the city of Bayfield. Currently owned by the National Park Service and part of the Apostle Islands National Lakeshore, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1977, as reference number 77000145. Listed in the Library of Congress Historic American Buildings Survey, WI-324. Several other structures in the vicinity are also listed in HABS. The original third order Fresnel lens manufactured by Henry-Lepaute was removed by the U.S. Coast Guard in 1989, but a new third order Fresnel lens was replaced by the N.P.S. in 1992. The site originally had a 10-inch (250 mm) steam whistle in a fog signal building. That was removed in 1925, and "a much improved air-operated diaphone fog signal" was accomplished. In 1928, a diesel-powered electrical generator was installed, and the light intensity increased to 300,000 candela for the white flash and 180,000 candela for the red. A previous skeletal, wooden structure was constructed in 1891 has since been demolished. Historical brick Queen Anne style keepers quarters (1896) are
    6.33
    3 votes
    142
    Hog Island Light

    Hog Island Light

    The Hog Island Light was a lighthouse roughly marking its eponymous island, and thus the north side of the Great Machipongo Inlet on the Virginia coast. There have been two lights at this location, a barrier island south east of Exmore, Virginia. The first light was erected in 1853 and consisted of a stone tower with a keeper's dwelling adjacent to it. It was ostensibly equipped with a first-order fresnel lens, though a report in 1870 stated that it had been assigned a fourth order lens instead. Erosion of the island eventually endangered the first light, and in 1896 a steel skeletal tower was erected to replace it. The island continued to shift and in 1948 this second lighthouse was demolished, as the waves threatened to bring it down. The first order lens was first displayed at the Newport News Mariners Museum; in 2004 it was moved to an enclosed pavilion on the Portsmouth, Virginia waterfront. .
    6.33
    3 votes
    143
    Pencarrow Head Lighthouse

    Pencarrow Head Lighthouse

    • Construction: Concrete
    • Tower shape: Conical
    Pencarrow Head Lighthouse is a decommissioned Lighthouse at Pencarrow Head in the Wellington Region of the North Island of New Zealand. It was the first permanent lighthouse built in New Zealand and was constructed from sections of cast iron that were shipped from England. Its first keeper, Mary Jane Bennett, was the first and only female lighthouse keeper in New Zealand. The light was decommissioned in 1935 when it was replaced by the Baring Head Lighthouse and offered to the New Zealand Historic Places Trust in 1966. The lighthouse is now registered as a Category I Historic Place. A new low level lighthouse was commissioned in 1906 due to the problem of the high level lighthouse being frequently obscured by fog and cloud. This lighthouse is still in use.
    6.33
    3 votes
    144
    Sea Girt Light

    Sea Girt Light

    The Sea Girt Light is a lighthouse marking the inlet leading to the Wreck Pond in Sea Girt, New Jersey. It hosted the first radio beacon mounted in a shore installation in the United States. The New Jersey shore between the Barnegat and Navesink lighthouses, a distance of nearly 40 miles, was unlit in the 1800s, and in 1888 the Lighthouse Board requested funds to establish a light in this area. The original site was to be at Manasquan Inlet, just to the south of Sea Girt; however, the site was found to be unsuitable and the present lot was obtained on the beach at Sea Girt, near Wreck Pond. An L-shaped brick house with an integral tower was constructed, and the light was first exhibited in December 1896. This was the last shore lighthouse with an integral keeper's residence built on the east coast of the United States. Moving sand and erosion were problems from early on, but fencing in 1900 and steel pilings in the 1920s arrested the threat. In 1921 Sea Girt Light was equipped with a radio beacon, the first such installation on a shore-based light. It was installed in conjunction with transmitters on the Ambrose and Fire Island lightships; with a radio direction finder, a ship
    6.33
    3 votes
    145
    Waipapa Point Lighthouse

    Waipapa Point Lighthouse

    Waipapa Point Lighthouse is a lighthouse located at Waipapa Point, Southland, New Zealand. It was first lit on January 1, 1884. The lighthouse was built in response to the wreck of the passenger steamer Tararua on reefs off Waipapa Point on April 29, 1881, with the loss of 131 lives. With its sibling, the retired Kaipara North Head lighthouse, this was one of the last two wooden lighthouses built in New Zealand. The lighthouse was automated and keepers withdrawn in 1976. It has been solar powered since 1988. Restoration work conducted in 2008 ensured it was weatherproof and secure from vandalism.
    6.33
    3 votes
    146
    Cape Schanck Lighthouse

    Cape Schanck Lighthouse

    • Construction: Limestone
    The Cape Schanck lighthouse was built in 1859 as the second coastal lighthouse in Victoria. It is located on the southernmost tip of the Mornington Peninsula in Victoria, Australia. The tower was built from limestone, it is 21 metres tall. The light's focal plane is situated 100 metres above sea level, the light characteristic is the Morse Code letter "N", a long signal of 10.8 seconds followed by a flash. Depending on the bearing of the light, the colours are either white (south to west sector) or red (east sector). Due to its powerful lantern of one million candela and a first order Fresnel lens, which was installed in 1915, the light has a range of 26 nmi (48 km). The lighthouse was not only one of the first such buildings in Victoria, it was moreover Australia's first lighthouse tower with stone stairs. During the 1970s and 1980s the facility was restored and has since become an attraction for tourists. Today there is a museum in the old assistants' quarters. Accommodation is available in the old residences of the lighthouse keeper.
    8.00
    1 votes
    147
    Cheboygan Crib Lighthouse

    Cheboygan Crib Lighthouse

    The Cheboygan Crib Light is a light that marks the west pierhead of the mouth of the Cheboygan River into Lake Huron. The pierhead, in the center of the municipality of Cheboygan, is located at the north or lake end of Huron Street, and is one of the centerpieces of Cheboygan's Gordon Turner Park. The Crib Light is called a "light" rather than a "lighthouse" because it does not contain a structure in which a keeper lived. The Light was originally built in Lake Huron in 1884 on a "crib", an artificial-island landfill, more than 2,000 feet (610 m) from the Cheboygan shore. It is assumed that the keeper lived in Cheboygan; this would have required him to boat daily to the crib, despite weather conditions, to maintain the kerosene-fired light. This was hazardous duty, and in due course davits were installed on the Crib Light; this enabled a boat making dock at the crib to be raised, more easily unloaded, and be protected from the waves. In 1901 this station was painted white to increase its visibility as a daymark. In 1903 Two years later, the wooden superstructure was removed and replaced with sturdier concrete. Iron railings were also installed to aid with safety; the railing was
    8.00
    1 votes
    148
    Diamond Shoal Light

    Diamond Shoal Light

    Diamond Shoal Light was an off-shore lighthouse marking Diamond Shoals off Cape Hatteras. Diamond Shoals, which extend many miles out from Cape Hatteras, is considered to be one of the most dangerous spots on the Atlantic seaboard. While a light was exhibited from the cape itself from 1804, its range was insufficient, and a lightship was stationed on the shoal itself in 1824. It was driven off station numerous times, eventually being wrecked near Ocracoke Inlet in 1827. Various buoys were placed beginning in 1852, but all were short-lived. In 1889 congress authorized construction of a permanent lighthouse on the shoal, at a cost not to exceed $500,000. The firm of Anderson & Barr, which had constructed the Fourteen Foot Bank Light in Delaware Bay in 1885-1887, was awarded the contract. A caisson was constructed in Norfolk, Virginia and towed to the site in June 1891. It was sunk into the shoal on July 1 and immediately began to tilt due to the sandy bottom and severe scour by the currents. Addition of iron plates at the top of the structure merely succeeded in keeping it marginally above water. A storm on July 4 drove the work crews away and destroyed the structure. Anderson, who
    8.00
    1 votes
    149
    East Cape Lighthouse

    East Cape Lighthouse

    East Cape Lighthouse is a lighthouse sited on Otiki Hill above East Cape, the easternmost point on the North Island of New Zealand. It is owned and operated by Maritime New Zealand. The lighthouse was originally constructed on nearby East Island. However the island was difficult to access (four men died during tower construction when their boat capsized) and proved to be susceptible to earthquakes and subsequent landslips. In 1920 a decision was made to relocate the light to the mainland and in April 1922, the light was extinguished and then relit at its current location in December of that year. Originally manned by three lighthouse keepers, the light's staffing was progressively reduced until it was fully automated in 1985. It is now controlled from the Maritime New Zealand headquarters in Wellington. While the area around the light is accessible by foot, the lighthouse itself is not open to the public.
    8.00
    1 votes
    150
    Eddystone Lighthouse

    Eddystone Lighthouse

    • Construction: Masonry
    Eddystone Lighthouse is on the treacherous Eddystone Rocks, 9 statute miles (14 km) south of Rame Head, United Kingdom. While Rame Head is in Cornwall, the rocks are in Devon and composed of Precambrian Gneiss. The current structure is the fourth to be built on the site. The first and second were destroyed. The third, also known as Smeaton's Tower, is the best known because of its influence on lighthouse design and its importance in the development of concrete for building. Its upper portions have been re-erected in Plymouth as a monument. The Eddystone Rocks are an extensive reef approximately 12 miles SSW of Plymouth Sound, one of the most important naval harbours of England, and midway between Lizard Head and Start Point. They are submerged at high spring tides and were so feared by mariners entering the English Channel that they often hugged the coast of France to avoid the danger and thus resulted not only in shipwrecks locally but on the rocks of the north coast of France and the Channel Islands. Given the difficulty of gaining a foothold on the rocks particularly in the predominant swell it was a long time before anyone attempted to place any warning on them. The first
    8.00
    1 votes
    151
    Start Point Lighthouse

    Start Point Lighthouse

    • Construction: Masonry
    Start Point lighthouse was built in 1836 to protect shipping off Start Point in south Devon England. Open to the public in summer months, it is a grade II listed building owned and operated by Trinity House. Start Point is one of twenty nine towers designed by James Walker. The lighthouse is in the gothic style, topped by a crenellated parapet. The main tower is built of tarred and white-painted granite ashlar with a cast-iron lantern roofed in copper. The tall circular tower is 28 metres (92 ft) high with a moulded plinth and pedestal stage and two diminishing stages above that. There are two entrances porches, on the north and south sides. The porch on the south side is blocked and has a 4-centred arch hoodmould, whilst the doorway to the north porch has a Tudor arch. Both have raised parapets with Trinity House arms. The inside of the tower includes a cantilevered granite staircase around the inside well of the tower with an iron balustrade completed by a cast-iron newelan. The lighthouse originally had the keepers' living accommodation on the ground and first floors but this was removed in 1871 when new keepers' houses were built nearby. It has been designated by English
    8.00
    1 votes
    152
    Pensacola Light

    Pensacola Light

    • Construction: Brick
    The Pensacola Light is a lighthouse at the entrance to Pensacola Bay at Pensacola, Florida. The first Pensacola Light was the lightship Aurora Borealis. It was moved to Pensacola in 1823 from its previous post at the mouth of the Mississippi River after a lighthouse had been completed there. Because of frequent rough seas, the lightship had to be anchored inside the bay entrance, behind Santa Rosa Island, and could not reliably be seen from ships outside the bay. In 1825 a 40-foot (12 m) tower was built on a 40-foot (12 m) bluff at the south entrance to Pensacola Bay. This light was also partially obscured by trees close to the tower and on Santa Rosa Island. In 1858 a new tower was built on the north side of the bay entrance, and was lit on January 1, 1859. The new, and current, tower is 150 feet (46 m) tall, and also sits on a 40-foot (12 m) bluff located on the Pensacola Naval Air Station, placing the light 190 feet (58 m) above sea level. The new location allowed the tower to serve as the rear range light marking the passage across the Pensacola Bar. Little is known of the first front range light. In 1879 a new front range beacon was erected 448 feet (137 m) southeast of the
    5.25
    4 votes
    153
    Alki Point Lighthouse

    Alki Point Lighthouse

    The Alki Point Light is located at Alki Point, at the southern entrance to Seattle's Elliott Bay. In 1887, the United States Lighthouse Board finally recognized the need for an official light and placed a lens-lantern atop a wooden post at the point. Several years later, the Lighthouse Service decided to upgrade the light and add a fog signal at the point. The present concrete fog signal building with the 37-foot octagonal tower was completed in 1913. The fourth-order Fresnel lens was eventually replaced by a modern optic during the 1960s. Alki Point remains in service today. It is listed as Alki Point Light, number 16915 in the USCG light lists.  This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Government document "Historic Light Station Information & Photography - Washington, United States Coast Guard".  This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Government document "National Park Service - Inventory of Historic Light Stations - Alki Point Light, National Park Service".
    7.00
    2 votes
    154
    Alte Weser

    Alte Weser

    The Alte Weser Lighthouse is located offshore from the estuary mouth of the river Weser in the German Bight, southern North Sea. It was built on sand between 1961 and 1964. The Alte Weser lighthouse took over duties and replaced the historical Roter Sand lighthouse on September 1, 1964. The latter had been built from 1883 to 1885. The "Alte Weser" lighthouse was built between 1961 and 1964. It consists of steel-coated ferroconcrete and a steel superstructure. It was built offshore into a sand bed at a depth of 11 m below mean sea level. Its height measures about 40m above msl. Depending on the color of the light beam, its visibility is between 18 and 23 sm. The only inhabited place where the Alte Weser or Roter Sand lighthouse can be seen with the naked eye is the German island of Wangerooge. The light characteristic is "F WRG", i.e. a continuous light, coloured white, red or green depending on the bearing of the lighthouse. The light is emitted by a 2000 Watts Xenon lamp. On low visibility conditions a foghorn sounds a signal, the Morse code letters "AL" with an intervall of one minute. On the tower a number of additional navigational and meteorological devices are installed next
    7.00
    2 votes
    155
    Cockspur Island Light

    Cockspur Island Light

    The Cockspur Island Light is a small lighthouse located in Chatham County, Georgia. It ceased operation as an active beacon in 1909. It has been relit since 2007 for historical rather than navigational purposes. The lighthouse is situated on an islet off Cockspur Island at the south channel of the Savannah River near Lazaretto Creek, northwest of Tybee Island, Georgia. It is part of Fort Pulaski National Monument and can be reached from that site. The island is subject to tidal flooding and as a result transportation to the lighthouse is most often by small boat, but can be accessed by crossing a small body of water from Cockspur Island. This is approximately 4 to 5 feet (1.5 m) deep at low tide and does have a current, so crossing on foot or by swimming is not advisable. The lighthouse is built on an oyster and mussel bed. This lighthouse is unique in that the base is shaped like the prow of a ship to reduce the impact of the waves on the structure. The lighthouse is open to the public although no official tours or accommodations are made. However, visitors to the area frequently access the beacon by kayak. The National Park Service cut a trail to the lighthouse through the brush
    7.00
    2 votes
    156
    Kenosha Southport Lighthouse

    Kenosha Southport Lighthouse

    Kenosha Light (also called Southport Light) is a lighthouse located near Kenosha in Kenosha County, Wisconsin, USA. Also known as the "Old Kenosha Light", it was replaced by the Kenosha North Pier Light in 1906. The keeper's house continued to be used for many years, however. The light is listed in the National Register of Historic Places as the Kenosha Light Station, Reference #90000995. It has been an active aid to navigation since 1996, but is not listed in Volume VII United States Coast Guard light list. The lantern room was removed in 1913 but replicated in 1994. The Fresnel Lens was replaced by a 300 mm Tidaland Signal plastic lens – a medium range lens commonly used on the Great Lakes. A historical marker in front of the lighthouse reads: The building is currently maintained by the City of Kenosha and the Kenosha County Historical Society. It is also on the State List/Inventory, having been listed in 1975. The keeper's house is open to the public on Saturdays and Sundays during the tourist season, although it is currently under renovation (see the Kenosha History Center website, below, for further information). The tower is open for climbers many weekends of the summer. The
    7.00
    2 votes
    157
    Killock Shoal Light

    Killock Shoal Light

    • Construction: Cast iron
    The Killock Shoal Light was a lighthouse located at the north end of the channel west of Chincoteague, Virginia. This light was erected in 1886. It was unlike other screw-pile structures in the area, with the lantern set at one corner of a small square frame house. It was automated in 1923, and decommissioned in 1939, with the house being replaced by a steel tower. The structure is now unlit.
    7.00
    2 votes
    158
    Marquette Harbor Light

    Marquette Harbor Light

    The Marquette Harbor Light is located on Lake Superior in Marquette, Michigan, a part of the Upper Peninsula. It is an active aid to navigation. To help navigation towards ore docks, Congress approved funds to build the Marquette Harbor Light in 1850. Construction took place in 1852, and first lit in June 1853. However, the initial structure deteriorated rapidly, and funds were approved in 1865 for a replacement tower. In 1875 the Army Corps of Engineers built a 2,000 foot breakwater to reduce the force of wind and waves in Marquette Harbor. A strong storm destroyed the original light in 1889. The new light sits on a concrete crib at the southernmost end of the breakwater wall. The original lighthouse included seven 14-inch (360 mm) Lewis lamps, and a small detached 24 by 30 dwelling constructed of similar materials to that of the tower. In 1853, the United States Lighthouse Board was created and a major system upgrade brought on an installation of a Sixth Order French Fresnel lens in 1856. The new lens was visible up to ten miles (16 km). Because of weather conditions, installation, maintenance and operation of a foghorn was integral to the operation. In July, 1899 the lighthouse
    7.00
    2 votes
    159
    Pemaquid Point Light

    Pemaquid Point Light

    • Construction: Rubble masonry
    The Pemaquid Point Light Station is a historic U.S. lighthouse located in Bristol, Maine, at the tip of the Pemaquid Neck. The lighthouse was commissioned in 1827 by John Quincy Adams and built that year. Due to poor workmanship (salt water was used in the mortar mix), the lighthouse began to crumble and was replaced in 1835. The second contract for the construction stipulated that only fresh water be used. Keeper Isaac Dunham oversaw the construction and wrote in a letter to the US Lighthouse Establishment that the agreement was upheld and the work went well. The original light was an Argand-Lewis parabolic reflector, lit with candles and with a visibility of 2 miles. Augustin Fresnel invented a superior way of focusing light in the early 1850s and most lighthouses in the US were converted to the Fresnel Lens, with Pemaquid Point receiving a fourth order Fresnel in 1856. The lens is one of only six Fresnel lenses still in service in Maine. The keeper's house was built in 1857. Marcus A. Hanna, the only man ever awarded both the Medal of Honor (earned during Civil War for bravery on July 4, 1863 ) and the Gold Lifesaving Medal (for rescuing life on 28 January 1885 at Cape
    7.00
    2 votes
    160
    Split Point Lighthouse

    Split Point Lighthouse

    Split Point Lighthouse is a lighthouse located in Aireys Inlet, a small town on the Great Ocean Road, Victoria, Australia. Originally called Eagles Nest Point, the lighthouse was originally built in 1891. It was converted to automatic operation in 1919. The original British-made first order Fresnel lens is still in use. However, the factory in Birmingham, where the lens was built, was bombed during war-time and the essential formulae for making the unique lens crystal were lost, should a replacement ever be needed. A Japanese firm, consulted by the Australian Maritime Safety Authority, estimated the cost of replacing the lens at more than A$1 million. Under standard Australian lighthouse convention, red filters would usually be placed to the extreme left and right of the beam (indicating "danger zones" for a passing ship, in-line with the jagged coastline). For reasons unknown, the Split Point Lighthouse operated for many years under the opposite system; although this has now been corrected. Since summer 2005, the Split Point Lighthouse has been offering regular 30 minute guided tours, during which visitors have the chance to climb the original staircase and experience the view
    7.00
    2 votes
    161
    Turtle Rock Light

    Turtle Rock Light

    • Construction: Brick
    The Turtle Rock Light is a lighthouse built in 1887 to aid traffic on the Schuylkill River near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The lighthouse was constructed by Frank Thurwanger at a cost of $2,663 on an area of land just west of Boathouse Row. The lighthouse has a hexagonal lantern room with an octagonal walkway. Gas was first used to power the light, but in 1990, when the lighthouse was repainted and received a new wooden balustrade and newel posts, the beacon was electrified. The lighthouse is operated by the Sedgeley Club, a social club located at #15 Boathouse Row in the historic Boathouse Row along the Schuylkill River, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and designated a National Historic Landmark. In 1897, the club was founded as the Bicycle, Barge and Canoe Club, but quickly changed its name to the Sedgeley Club. The Club initially occupied #14 Boathouse Row, until 1902, when the Fairmount Park Commission permitted the Club to build its own boathouse. The building, designed by Arthur H. Brockie, was adapted to encompass the lighthouse that predates it. Brockie designed a shingle, colonial revival house. After completing this design, Brockie joined the
    7.00
    2 votes
    162
    Browns Point Lighthouse

    Browns Point Lighthouse

    The Browns Point Lighthouse is located in Browns Point, Washington near Tacoma in Pierce County, Washington. The original lighthouse station was designed by Carl Leick and established in 1887. The current structure was built in 1933 and automated in 1963. The lighthouse and the nearby keeper's cottage are on the National Register of Historic Places. The Points Northeast Historical Society rents out the keeper's cottage, and the renter serves as an honorary "light keeper" and opens the lighthouse for tours on Thursday and Friday afternoons. The Society also operates two museums by the lighthouse. The History Center features changing historical exhibits, and the Boat House Museum displays a replica surfboat and maritime artifacts.
    6.00
    3 votes
    163
    Galle Lighthouse

    Galle Lighthouse

    Galle Lighthouse is an offshore Lighthouse in Galle, Sri Lanka and is operated and maintained by the Sri Lanka Ports Authority. This is Sri Lanka's oldest light station dating back to 1848, but the original lighthouse was destroyed by fire in 1934. The light station is within the walls of the ancient Galle fort, a UNESCO world heritage site and well known tourist attraction, making this the country's most often visited lighthouse.
    6.00
    3 votes
    164
    Fort Point Light

    Fort Point Light

    • Construction: Cast iron
    Fort Point Light was a lighthouse on Fort Point, directly beneath the south anchorage of the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco, California. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1970, reference #70000146. There have been three lighthouses at Fort Point. The original lighthouse, built in 1853, was a Cape Cod style lighthouse with an integral tower. It stood for only three months, and was never lit. While awaiting the arrival of its lens (from Paris), it was torn down to make room for the Army fort. The second lighthouse at Fort Point was a squat wooden 36-foot (11 m) tower with four sides that sloped up to a square watch room. It was built on the narrow ledge between the fort and the water. In 1855, the light behind its fourth-order Fresnel lens was lit for the first time. Erosion undermined its foundation, and in 1863 it was torn down to make way for a bigger seawall. Fort Point’s third lighthouse was built atop the wall of the fort. It was originally a small iron skeleton tower with a fifth-order lens. In 1902, the lens was upgraded to a fourth-order lens, which produced alternating white and red flashes. In 1933, when work on the Golden Gate Bridge began,
    5.67
    3 votes
    165
    Point Adams Light

    Point Adams Light

    Point Adams Light was a lighthouse near the mouth of the Columbia River on the Oregon Coast of the United States. It operated from February 15, 1875 until 1899, when it became obsolete by the extension of the south jetty and the establishment of the Lightship Columbia in 1892. The lighthouse was considered a fire hazard and demolished in 1912. It was located about a mile south of Point Adams—named by Captain Robert Gray in 1792 —near what is now Battery Russell in Fort Stevens State Park. The combination of the Point Adams Light with the Cape Disappointment Lighthouse on the north side of the river effectively framed the entrance to the Columbia. The keeper's quarters and light were a combined structure, similar to the Yaquina Bay Light, in Newport, and used the same structure, materials, and optics as Point Fermin Light south of Los Angeles, California. The light was changed from alternating red and white to fixed red on January 21, 1881 to reduce confusion with the nearby just-completed Tillamook Rock Light. The change caused HMS Fern Glen to run aground, evidently unaware of the change. At the same time, the fog signal was removed: it had long been criticized by mariners as
    5.67
    3 votes
    166
    Bald Head lighthouse

    Bald Head lighthouse

    Bald Head Lighthouse, known as Old Baldy, is the oldest lighthouse still standing in North Carolina. It is the second of three lighthouses that have been built on Bald Head Island since the 18th century to help guide ships past the dangerous shoals at the mouth of the Cape Fear river. A ten-acre site on the west side of Bald Head Island, along the banks of the Cape Fear River, was selected for North Carolina’s first lighthouse. The property was purchased from Benjamin Smith, who would later become the governor of North Carolina. In 1792, Congress appropriated $4,000 to complete the lighthouse that had been started by the North Carolina Colony before becoming part of the United States. Work on the lighthouse was overseen by Abisha Woodward, who would later build two lighthouses in Connecticut: New London and Falkner's Island. The lighthouse, which was first activated on December 23rd 1794, directed traffic to the Cape Fear River and the growing port of Wilmington, located several miles upstream. In less than two decades this lighthouse was threatened due to severe erosion of the river bank. Between 1813 and 1817 funds were approved for rebuilding Bald Head Lighthouse. The
    6.50
    2 votes
    167
    Campen Lighthouse

    Campen Lighthouse

    Campen Lighthouse is an active lighthouse in the village Campen, by the Ems estuary, northwest of Emden, in the East Frisia region, state of Lower Saxony, Germany. At a height of 213 feet (65 m) it is the fourteenth tallest "traditional lighthouse" in the world and the tallest in Germany. The structure consists of a free-standing lattice tower with the stair shaft inside. The lighthouse was built in 1889 and went in service in 1891. The lamp of Campen Lighthouse has a light intensity of 4.5 million candelas, the most powerful lighthouse lamp in Germany. Remarkably, the aperture of its flashing light to the left and right has an angle of only 0.3 degrees. The continuous light aperture is also quite small, less than 0.6 degrees. The machine building contains the oldest workable diesel engine in Germany. It was built in 1906 and has a power of 15 kilowatts.
    6.50
    2 votes
    168
    Cape Canaveral Light

    Cape Canaveral Light

    The Cape Canaveral Light is a historic lighthouse on the east coast of the U.S. state of Florida. The current Cape Canaveral Light is not the first lighthouse on Cape Canaveral. A 60-foot (18 m) tall brick structure was built on the Cape in 1848. The light consisted of 15 lamps each with a 21-inch (530 mm) reflector. The first lighthouse keeper left the lighthouse during a Seminole War scare, and refused to return to his post. Sailors heavily criticized the lighthouse, with complaints that the light was too weak and too low to be seen before ships were on the reefs near the Cape. the government contracted for construction of a new lighthouse in 1860, but the start of the American Civil War stopped work. The lamps and mechanism for the light were removed from the lighthouse and buried in the lighthouse keeper's orange grove to protect them from Federal raids. At the end of the war construction resumed on the lighthouse. It was completed in 1868, receiving a first-order Fresnel lens. Erosion of the shoreline threatened the lighthouse, and the United States Congress appropriated funds to move the lighthouse inland. The old (1848) was blown up and the rubble used to prepare a
    6.50
    2 votes
    169
    Cape Disappointment Lighthouse

    Cape Disappointment Lighthouse

    • Construction: Brick
    The Cape Disappointment Light is a lighthouse on Cape Disappointment near the mouth of the Columbia River in the U.S. state of Washington. In 1848 a lighthouse was recommended to be located at Cape Disappointment in what was then the Oregon Territory. $53,000 was appropriated in 1852. After the lighthouse was designed, a first-order Fresnel lens was ordered. When the lens arrived it was found to be too large for the tower. Rebuilding the tower took an additional two years. The first lighthouse in the Pacific Northwest was finally lit in 1856. In addition to the light, the station was equipped with a 1600-pound bell powered by a striking mechanism. The keeper's residence was about a quarter mile away. The lighthouse had several shortcomings. The fog bell was sometimes inaudible due to the roar of ocean waves. It was discontinued in 1881 and moved to West Point Light in Seattle, and eventually to Warrior Rock Light near Portland. Also, the light was not visible to ships approaching from the north. This problem was corrected by building a lighthouse at North Head, two miles from Cape Disappointment. The first-order lens was moved to North Head and a fourth-order lens installed at Cape
    6.50
    2 votes
    170
    6.50
    2 votes
    171
    Halfway Rock Light

    Halfway Rock Light

    Halfway Rock Lighthouse is a lighthouse located on a barren ledge in Casco Bay, Maine. The lighthouse tower, which has a height of 76 feet (23 m), and the attached ex-boathouse are all that remain, as the other buildings have been taken away in storms. The name "Halfway Rock" comes from the position of the rock which is half way between Cape Elizabeth and Cape Small, Maine, the southwest and northeast extremities of Casco Bay, which are about 18 nautical miles (33 km) apart. Halfway Rock Light was added to the National Register of Historic Places as Halfway Rock Light Station on March 14, 1988, reference number 88000150. The need for a lighthouse on Halfway Rock first came to attention when, in the year 1835, a ship called Samuel ran aground on the rock during a storm. Because the ledge is only ten feet above high tide on a calm day, it becomes hard to see during storms. The cry for a lighthouse was ignored in Washington until, again, in 1861, a ship ran aground on Halfway Rock. This time, it was taken a bit more seriously. Construction began, but was delayed time and time again due to lack of supplies and lack of workmen. Ten years later, in 1871, the first light shone from
    6.50
    2 votes
    172
    Mukilteo Lighthouse

    Mukilteo Lighthouse

    • Construction: Wood
    The Mukilteo Light at Mukilteo, Washington is an operational lighthouse with non-rotating fresnel lens. It originally had a revolving Fresnel lens until 1927, when it was replaced with a fixed lens. The grounds and interior, inside a city park adjacent to the Washington State Ferries Mukilteo ferry terminal, are open to the public. The Mukilteo Historical Society maintains the lighthouse and the exhibits about the lighthouse and city history in the keeper's house. The lighthouse went into operation in 1906. The lighthouse and a modern fog signal were automated in 1979, and in 1981, a remote fog sensor was installed. It was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1977, and in 1991 the Coast Guard leased the lighthouse to the city of Mukilteo, although navigational equipment is still maintained by the Coast Guard. The lighthouse is one of only a few lighthouses constructed of wood. There is a seasonal gift shop on site, a small museum, and friendly volunteers taking visitors to see the Fresnel lens and answer questions. Weddings can be arranged to be held on the grounds by contacting the Historical Society. A park and public boat launch are next to the light station
    6.50
    2 votes
    173
    New Presque Isle Lighthouse

    New Presque Isle Lighthouse

    • Construction: Brick
    The New Presque Isle Light was built in 1870, at Presque Isle, Michigan, east of Grand Lake (Presque Isle, Michigan), and sits on the namesake peninsula. It is one of 149 lighthouses in Michigan, more than any other state. Because of changing shoreline particularly, or alternatively deterioration of the original building, it is not uncommon for a replacement lighthouse to be placed in the vicinity of an earlier light, in this case, the Old Presque Isle Light. It was U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Major Orlando M. Poe who designed the plans for the new lighthouse, and proposed the total construction cost to be 21,000 dollars more than what was previously appropriated; the amount proposed was relatively modest, given the then astounding figures he would expend on building the Spectacle Reef Light. (Poe was also the chief engineer on General William Tecumseh Sherman’s famous “March to the Sea” during the Civil War.) When he received enough funding, he gathered construction materials, obtained bids for labor, and organized a working crew. The tender Warrington brought the working party and materials to the harbor in the summer of 1870. A lighthouse tender was a smaller ship that would
    6.50
    2 votes
    174
    Nobbys Head

    Nobbys Head

    Originally called Coal Island, Nobbys Head is a headland on the south side of the entrance to Newcastle Harbour, New South Wales, Australia. It is the location of Nobbys Head Lighthouse, the third lighthouse built in New South Wales after the Macquarie Lighthouse in 1818 and the Hornby Lighthouse which was also built in 1858. The lighthouse is included in Newcastle's Coat of Arms. Nobbys Head was first sighted by Europeans on 10 May 1770 by Captain James Cook from the ship Endeavour and was described by Cook as; "A small round rock or Island, laying close under the land, bore South 82 degrees West, distance 3 or 4 Leagues". It was not until the discovery of coal by Lt. John Shortland in 1797, that the island was viewed as having any significance. In 1804, Signal Head was the first place in Newcastle that any form of Navigational aid was set up. Originally a coal burning light, it was changed over to oil in 1821 for a short period of time but was reverted back to coal as the oil system was not reliable. Governor Macquarie ordered a pier to be built to join Coal island to Collier Point. The pier was started on 5 August 1818 and convict labour was used to do the construction. It took
    6.50
    2 votes
    175
    Pooles Island Light

    Pooles Island Light

    Pooles Island Light is the oldest lighthouse still standing in Maryland and the fourth oldest in the Chesapeake Bay area. Pooles Island was originally named Powell's Island by John Smith, but over the years the name was changed, possibly to reflect the numerous springs and pools on the island. The island was famed in the 18th and 19th centuries for its fertility, particularly for the peaches raised there in the 1880s and '90s. As it lies near the center of the bay near the mouth of the Gunpowder River, it was one of the first places considered for a lighthouse, and in 1824 Congress appropriated $5000 for construction of a light. John Donahoo and Simon Frieze won the contract to build it, the first of many lights constructed by Donahoo. The roughly constructed granite tower and keeper's house were joined three years later by a fog bell tower, the first in the state. In 1857 the original system of Argand lamps and reflectors was replaced by a fourth order Fresnel lens. As part of the establishment of Aberdeen Proving Ground in 1917, Pooles Island was purchased by the federal government, and the light station turned over to the Army. The light was automated the following year. In
    6.50
    2 votes
    176
    Dondra Head Lighthouse

    Dondra Head Lighthouse

    Dondra Head Lighthouse is an offshore lighthouse in Dondra, Sri Lanka and is operated and maintained by the Sri Lanka Ports Authority. It is located on Dondra Head near the southernmost point in Sri Lanka and is the tallest lighthouse in the country. It was designed by Sir James Nicholas Douglass and constructed by William Douglass. This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Wood, James, ed. (1907). "". The Nuttall Encyclopædia. London and New York: Frederick Warne.
    7.00
    1 votes
    177
    Fort Queenscliff Lighthouse

    Fort Queenscliff Lighthouse

    The Queenscliff High Light, also variously known as the Black Lighthouse, Fort Queenscliff Lighthouse or Shortland Bluff Light, stands in the grounds of Fort Queenscliff in Queenscliff, Victoria, Australia. It is one of three black lighthouses in the world, and the only one in the Southern Hemisphere. Together with the nearby white Queenscliff Low Light, it was built in 1862 to replace the former sandstone lighthouse of 1843 on the same site which was underpowered and deteriorating. The lightsource is located 40 metres above sea level (focal plane). Depending on the tower's bearing it emits either a fixed light or an occulting signal with an interval of 15 seconds. The black lighthouse is one of four in Queenscliff that are used as a leading line to guide ships through the notoriously dangerous mouth of Port Phillip Bay. There are two conflicting legends about where the bluestone for the building came from. One version states that it came from Scotland as a ships ballast. In the other more likely version, the stone was quarried in Melbourne and shipped to Queenscliff. The fact that the stone was shipped may have led to the former theory's conception. Fort Queenscliff was built
    7.00
    1 votes
    178
    La jument

    La jument

    • Construction: Concrete
    La Jument is the name of a lighthouse at the Northwestern part of France, Brittany. The lighthouse is built on a rock (that is also called La Jument) about 300 metres from the coast of the island of Ushant, in the middle of the ocean. There is also an almost identical lighthouse about 3 kilometres to the North, the Nividic lighthouse. Together with the Kreac'h lighthouse, they are the 3 most famous lighthouses of the region. This section of the coastline of Brittany, the west coast of Northern France, had always been known by sailors to be a rugged and dangerous area. Being the westernmost point of land, it is a heavily trafficked sealane, and additionally experiences severe weather during much of the year. As such, the area has experienced many shipwrecks over the centuries. One such accident, the wreck of the steam ship Drummond Castle in June, 1896, was responsible for the deaths of nearly 250 people. Construction began on the lighthouse on the rock of la Jument in 1904, and it was completed in 1911. The lighthouse became well known in 1989, through a series of photographs taken by Jean Guichard during a storm and while the lighthouse keepers were stranded. Upon viewing the
    7.00
    1 votes
    179
    Mary Island Light

    Mary Island Light

    The Mary Island Light Station is a lighthouse located on the northeastern part of Mary Island in southeastern Alaska, USA. Mary Island Light Station was opened in 1903, and was one of a series of staffed lights established by the U.S. Government to guide ships through the treacherous waters of Southeast Alaska's Inside Passage. In 1937, a concrete lighthouse and fog signal building replaced the original wood tower. Situated behind the light were two lightkeeper houses which housed the Coast Guard Lightkeepers. One of the houses burned down in 1965(?); the other house was moved off the island to nearby Ketchikan, Alaska. In 1969 the station was automated and the radio beacon was removed. No other buildings and structures at the station stand today, other than an outhouse. Actually, the northern of the two keepers dwellings was moved in 1964 while I was there. The southern dwelling was used by the 4 man crew until the station was decommissioned in 1969, and in 1970 the dwelling was moved. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places as Mary Island Light Station in 2005.
    7.00
    1 votes
    180
    Sommers

    Sommers

    Sommers (Russian: Соммерс, Finnish: Someri, Swedish: Sommarö) is an islet and a lighthouse in the eastern part of the Gulf of Finland, and arm of the Baltic Sea, just outside the Gulf of Vyborg, about 19 kilometres south of Virolahti, Finland, but it is now possessed by Russia. The lighthouse is situated on a rocky skerry, which is elevated a maximum of 16 metres above the Baltic Sea. The first lighthouse on this islet was built in 1808. That construction was a brick building, chalked in white, about five metres high, with a lanternine on its top. The light source was modernized in 1866, and it was also raised to an elevation of eight metres. The lighthouse was given a third class lens system and a clockwork which rotated an oil lamp with a double wick. This gave the lighthouse beacon a reddish gloom. The lighthouse men lived along with their families in a wooden house next to the lighthouse. A fog horn was constructed at the other end of the island by the beginning of the 20th century. The Imperial Russian Army began constructing defense works on this island when World War I erupted, but these were never completed. In 1918, Finnish maritime authorities manned the lighthouse. The
    7.00
    1 votes
    181
    Tacking Point Lighthouse

    Tacking Point Lighthouse

    Tacking Point Lighthouse is Australia's third oldest lighthouse. It was built on a rocky headland about 8 kilometres south of Port Macquarie in 1879 by Shepard and Mortley, to a design by the New South Wales Colonial Architect, James Barnet. It is operated by the Australian Maritime Safety Authority and is classified by the National Trust of Australia (NSW). Tacking Point was named by explorer Matthew Flinders in 1802 during his 1802–1803 circumnavigation of Australia. Its nearest lighthouses are Smoky Cape Lighthouse at South West Rocks, to the north, and Crowdy Head Light, to the south. In the mid-nineteenth century, there were few lights in the Tacking Point area and over 20 ships were wrecked. The first wrecks occurred in 1823 and were the schooner Black Joe and the steamer Sumatra. Consequently, in 1879, a fixed catadioptric light of less than 1000 candelas was erected on Tacking Point. It was the fourth of five small navigational lighthouses built to a design by James Barnet. The other four lighthouses were Crowdy Head Light, Fingal Head Light, Richmond River Light and Clarence River Light (now demolished). Only two of these lighthouses, Tacking Point and Crowdy Head still
    7.00
    1 votes
    182
    Wind Point Lighthouse

    Wind Point Lighthouse

    • Construction: Brick
    Wind Point Lighthouse (or Windpoint Light Station) is a lighthouse located at the north end of Racine Harbor in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. It is in the village of Wind Point, Wisconsin, on Lighthouse Road, next to the Shoop Park golf course. The lighthouse stands 108 feet (33 m) tall. One of the oldest and tallest active lighthouses on the Great Lakes, it is listed on the National Register of Historic Places (Reference #84003780). Wind Point Lighthouse was designed by Orlando Metcalfe Poe and constructed in 1880. The beacon was originally powered by a three-wicked kerosene lamp, magnified by a third-order Fresnel lens. The light was electrified in 1924, and replaced by a DCB-24R airport beacon in 1964. The light can be seen for 19 miles (31 km). A signal house (horns removed, resonators still in place) remains on the grounds as well as a garage, two storage buildings, and an oil house. The Village of Wind Point has maintained the lighthouse and grounds since 1964, and uses the old keepers' quarters as a village hall and police headquarters. In the summer of 2007, the lighthouse tower underwent a US$210,000 restoration, during which windows and doors were replaced, brickwork
    7.00
    1 votes
    183
    Phare de l'Espiguette

    Phare de l'Espiguette

    The Phare de l'Espiguette (Espiguette Lighthouse) is a 27-m-high square tower. Built in 1869, the lighthouse is found on the Pointe de l'Espiguette, near to Le Grau-du-Roi on the Gulf of Lion in Languedoc-Roussillon, France. L'Espiguette appears on some of the oldest maps: on the Barentzoom map of 1593 it is called Lapiquete and was an island. The channels in the Rhone delta are constantly changing, it was in 1570 that the Grau de Roi opened up, and the subsequent channelling of this watercourse and the silting of the land along side it led to the fishing village of Le Grau-du-Roi, and the silting made a land bridge through to L'Espiguette. To the south of L'Espiguette is the Mediterranean sea and to the north the Lagune de la Sicarex, which in itself is a protected breeding ground for endangered avian species. The point consists of 197 ha of sand dunes, and is a protected nature reserve. The beaches are popular with tourists, and host a large naturist beach. The square tower was built in 1869, 150m from the mean high tide mark, the silting has continues and it is now situated in sand dunes more than 700m from the water. A 1000W Halogen lamp throws its beam 24 nautical miles south.
    5.33
    3 votes
    184
    Wilsons Promontory Lighthouse

    Wilsons Promontory Lighthouse

    Wilsons Promontory Lighthouse is situated on South East Point, Wilsons Promontory, Victoria, Australia. From its pont on the peninsula, it commands almost 360° views of Bass Strait. The Wilson's Promontory lighthouse is the southernmost lighthouse on mainland Australia. The 18-kilometre (11 mi) walk from the nearest town, Tidal River is well worth it to experience its spectacular location. Dormitory-style accommodation is available in the lighthouse. The lighthouse protects shipping travelling through Bass Strait. The Wilsons Promontory Lighthouse is the main part of the Wilsons Promontory Lightstation. The Wilson's Promontory Lighthouse was constructed with the use of convict labour over a period of approximately 7 years starting in 1853 through to completion in 1859. The lighthouse stands 19 metres (62 ft) tall and along with the keepers' cottage is constructed from local granite. From 1869 to 1878 the lighthouse keeper was Captain Thomas Musgrave.
    5.33
    3 votes
    185
    Brant Point Light

    Brant Point Light

    • Construction: Wood
    Brant Point Light is a lighthouse located on Nantucket Island. It was established in 1746, automated in 1965, and is still in operation. The light station was added to the National Register of Historic Places on October 28, 1987. It has the distinction of being the tenth light on the point, in addition to several range lights. Four of the others burned or blew down, two were condemned, two were unsatisfactory, and the remaining one stands unused. At a town meeting at Nantucket on January 24, 1746, the sea captains of the island spoke out for a lighthouse and the sum of 200 pounds was voted "in supposition that the owners of or others concerned in, shipping will maintain a light therein", but the town actually paid for its maintenance. The wood 1746 tower burned in 1758. Town meeting authorized a new light, which was completed in 1759, which lasted until 1774. From the March 12, 1774, issue of The Massachusetts Gazette and the Boston PostBoy and Advertiser, "We hear from Nantucket that on Wednesday the 9th of March Instant (1774) at about 8 o’clock in the Morning, they had a most violent Gust of Wind that perhaps was ever known there, but it lasted only about a Minute. It seemed to
    6.00
    2 votes
    186
    Cape Liptrap Lighthouse

    Cape Liptrap Lighthouse

    Cape Liptrap Lighthouse stands upon the rocky cliff top of Cape Liptrap peninsula, on a solitary part of the South Gippsland coastline. The lighthouse warns ships of the rocks in treacherous Bass Strait. The first Cape Liptrap lighthouse was established in 1913. It was a 2.1 metre steel tower with an acetylene light. As a lighthouse keeper was never stationed at Cape Liptrap, it is really the first automatic Commonwealth funded light to be put into service. The current lighthouse was built in 1951 in cast concrete and is devised in a square shape with flattened edges. The light characteristic is one flash every 12 seconds, emitted from a height of 93.6 m above sea level. The lighthouse was converted to electrical power in 1970.
    6.00
    2 votes
    187
    Fond du Lac Lighthouse

    Fond du Lac Lighthouse

    The Fond du Lac lighthouse is a lighthouse located at the entrance to the harbor and Yacht Club, in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. It is located on the southern end of Lake Winnebago. It is currently incorporated in the Fond du Lac City Seal. Construction of the lighthouse started in May 1933 and was completed shortly after October. It replaced an ordinary red light that previously marked the harbor entrance. After years of neglect it was saved from demolition in 1967 and restored in 1993 with help from local community organizations. The lighthouse is also the focal point of the seasonal holiday lights in Lakeside Park; a cutout of Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer is adorned to the light house using the red light on top of the lighthouse as the nose.
    6.00
    2 votes
    188
    Fort Canning Lighthouse

    Fort Canning Lighthouse

    Fort Canning Lighthouse also known as Fort Canning Light is located on top of Fort Canning Hill and was formerly one of the 13 important lighthouses in the Straits of Malacca. Located nearby with The Flagstaff and the Time Ball, the three navigation structures played an essential role during the early maritime history of Singapore. Fort Canning Hill, with its strategic location overlooking the Singapore Harbour, was used as a communication centre after the British established port here in 1819. The first communication facility built on the hill was a flagstaff. The flagstaff was used to display the arrival, identity, location and status of ships entering Singapore Harbour. This was followed by a time ball, a lighthouse and a telegraph office in later years. Fort Canning Lighthouse was built on the southern side of Fort Canning Hill to guide ships safely towards the Singapore Harbour. The first signal light on Fort Canning was a simple lantern attached to the top of the Flagstaff in 1855. The Flagstaff light was replaced by the Lighthouse in 1903 by Riley, Hargreaves & Co., who in 1909 combined with another company to form United Engineers that is still present to this day at nearby
    6.00
    2 votes
    189
    Manistique East Breakwater Light

    Manistique East Breakwater Light

    The Manistique Breakwater lighthouse is located in the harbor of Manistique, Michigan. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2005. At the beginning of the 20th century, Manistique was a boom town, with timber and pig iron shipping from the harbor daily. However, the harbor itself was protected only be timber crib piers origininally constructed in the 1870s. However, by 1910, leaders in Manistique managed to convince the Federal government of the financial importance of the harbor, and an Army Corps of Engineers harbor expert was sent to Manistique to draw up plans for a concrete breakwater structure. The contract to construct the breakwaters was awarded to the Greiling Brothers Company, and construction was started in 1910. At the same time, George Putnam, the newly appointed Commissioner of lighthouses, recommended the erection of lights on the breakwater. In 1912, the Lighthouse Service erected temporary range lights on one of the piers. Funding for permanent lights was approved in 1913, and by 1914 permanent lights on the west breakwater were complete. The east breakwater itself was not completed until 1915, at which time work began on the east breakwater
    6.00
    2 votes
    190
    Price Creek Light

    Price Creek Light

    The Price Creek Lighthouse, also known as the Price's Creek Lighthouse, is a structure located near Southport, North Carolina. It was one of two range lights at Price Creek in a series of lights to guide ships from Cape Fear to Wilmington, North Carolina. In 1849, a two-story, brick lightkeeper's house with a wooden lantern was built as one of the lights. During the American Civil War, this served the Confederacy as a signal house to communicate between Fort Fisher and Fort Caswell. This house was destroyed by storms. The second range light is a conical brick tower originally 20 feet (6 m) tall with a base diameter of 17 feet (5 m). The light was approximately 25 feet (8 m) above sea level. The bricks had been imported from England. It originally had eight lamps with reflectors measuring 18 inches (46 cm) in diameter. The tower was later extended to a height of 26 feet (8 m), but suffered damage from shells during the Civil War. The lantern has been removed. The surviving range light is located at the edge of Archer Daniels Midland's industrial site on the bank of the Cape Fear River. It is currently in private hands, but can be best viewed from the Southport-Fort Fisher ferry or
    6.00
    2 votes
    191
    Sandy Point Shoal Light

    Sandy Point Shoal Light

    • Construction: Brick
    Sandy Point Shoal Light is a brick three story lighthouse on a caisson foundation that was erected in 1883. It lies about 0.6 mi (0.97 km) off Sandy Point, north of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge, from whose westbound span it is readily visible. The current light replaced a brick tower on the point itself, integral to the keeper's house, which was erected in 1857. By 1874 the Lighthouse Board complained that the extent of the shoal and the poor equipment of the lighthouse made a new light necessary; appropriations were not forthcoming, however, until 1882. The whole gamut of light sources has been run, from oil wicks to incandescent oil vapor (1913) to electricity (1929). The characteristic changed from flashing to fixed and back to flashing along with the change in light source. The present light is powered by a pair of solar panels attached to the roof on the south side. After automation in 1963, the light became subject to vandalism due to its visibility and its accessibility. The original lens was destroyed in 1979, apparently smashed with a baseball bat. Though the Coast Guard made efforts at maintaining and restoring the structure from 1988 to 1990, it continued to deteriorate. In
    6.00
    2 votes
    192
    The Graves Light

    The Graves Light

    The Graves Light is a lighthouse located on The Graves, the outermost island of the Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area, and 9 miles (15 km) offshore of downtown Boston, Massachusetts, USA. At 113 feet (34m), it is the tallest lighthouse in the approaches to the Port of Boston, and is an important navigation aid for traffic to and from the port. It was built at the same time that the North Channel into Boston Harbor was dredged to become the principal entrance for large vessels. The Graves are the outermost rocks near the outer end of the North Channel. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places as Graves Light Station on September 28, 1987, reference number 87002041. The lighthouse was built in 1905, to a conical design using granite blocks on a granite foundation, and equipped with one of the few first-order Fresnel lens used. The lens assembly stands about 12 ft (4m) tall and is now at the Smithsonian Institution. The light was the setting for the climactic storm in the 1948 film Portrait of Jennie. Operated by the United States Coast Guard, the light was automated in 1976 and has a characteristic of two white flashes every 12 seconds. Various sources
    6.00
    2 votes
    193
    Windmill Point Light

    Windmill Point Light

    The Windmill Point Light in Vermont is the northernmost lighthouse on Lake Champlain. Extinguished for seventy years, it was reactivated in 2002 to replace the skeleton tower erected next to it. The first lighthouse on this site was privately erected in 1830. In 1858, the Lighthouse Service contracted with the Ellis and O'Neil firm to erect the present octagonal tower, which is connected directly to the keeper's house. Together with the Isle La Motte Light, it forms a rough line marking the channel through the center of the lake. It remained in service until 1931, when a steel tower was erected on the property with an automated acetylene light on top. The keeper's house was transferred to the customs service for use in battling smuggling during Prohibition. The tower and house were eventually sold to a private individual. In 1963 the light was purchased by Lockwood Clark, who had come across the then-owner while showing his bride-to-be around the point. In 2001, he was approached by the Coast Guard about returning the light to the original tower. This would have not only the sentimental value of bringing the old light back to life, but would save the Coast Guard a considerable sum,
    6.00
    2 votes
    194
    Erie Harbor North Pier Light

    Erie Harbor North Pier Light

    • Construction: Steel
    The Erie Harbor North Pier Light, also known as the Presque Isle North Pier Light, is one of the three lighthouses near Erie, Pennsylvania in the United States. The light, situated at the far eastern end of Presque Isle State Park, helps mariners as they traverse the narrow inlet between Lake Erie and Presque Isle Bay. Originally constructed as a wooden tower in 1830, that light was swept away by a schooner in 1857. The current structure was forged in France and assembled on site in Erie. It was moved in 1882 and again in 1940. The United States Coast Guard, which operates the beacon, changed its fixed red beam to an automated red flashing light in 1995, at which time the 4th order Fresnel lens was sent to the Erie Maritime Museum.
    5.50
    2 votes
    195
    Fort Ripley Shoal Light

    Fort Ripley Shoal Light

    • Construction: Cast iron
    The Fort Ripley Shoal Light (or Middle Ground Light) was a lighthouse in the Charleston, South Carolina harbor approaches. The channels approaching Charleston fork shortly after passing Fort Sumter, split by a large shoal extending southeast from Shutes Folly Island. The southern portion, known as the Middle Ground, was the site of the Civil War era Fort Ripley, cobbled together on an artificial island. The fort has since slumped beneath the waves, and is now evidenced by nothing more than a daymark and notation of submerged rocks on the chart. In 1878 a screw-pile lighthouse was erected a short distance from the remains of the fort, to mark the shoal. Little is recorded of its history, and it was deactivated and dismantled in 1932. However, a much larger skeleton tower was erected on the same site to replace the old rear light of the Fort Sumter Range. This tower remains in service, though unnamed on charts. It displays three lights: a pair at 166 and 170 feet to present the day and night aspects of the range, and a third at 50 feet, to guide passing ships.
    5.50
    2 votes
    196
    Kilauea Light

    Kilauea Light

    • Construction: Steel
    Kīlauea Lighthouse is located on Kīlauea Point on the island of Kauaʻi, Hawaiʻi in the Kīlauea Point National Wildlife Refuge. Kīlauea Point, a narrow, lava peninsula protruding from the northern shore of Kauaʻi, was purchased from the Kīlauea Sugar Plantation Company in 1909 for one US dollar. Before construction could begin, a method for delivering supplies to the point had to be developed. Due to the lack of good roads from the Nawiliwili harbor, the decision was made to bring the materials in by sea. The lighthouse tender Kukui would anchor offshore and then dispatch small boats with supplies to a cove near the point. Since there was no beach landing, the boats would anchor to cleats cemented into the lava rocks at the point. A boom derrick, constructed on a ledge above the water, would pluck the supplies from the boats and place them on a loading platform 110 feet (34 m) above the water. Finally, after almost four years of planning, construction began in July 1912 and the light was dedicated on May 1, 1913. The tower was built in a Classical Revival architecture style out of reinforced concrete. The tower is a slightly tapering cylinder about 52 feet (16 m) high. The upper
    5.50
    2 votes
    197
    Cape Sorell, Tasmania

    Cape Sorell, Tasmania

    Cape Sorell is the headland and lighthouse outside Macquarie Harbour on the West Coast of Tasmania. It is an important orientation point for all vessels entering Macquarie Heads - and then through Hells Gates at the entrance to the harbour. It is named after Lieutenant-Governor of Tasmania William Sorell who was lieutenant-governor from 1817 to 1824. Cape Sorell Lighthouse is on the Australian Heritage Register. It was inaugurated in 1899. The light characteristic is a group of two flashes that occurs every fifteen seconds, its focal plane is at 51 metres above sea level. Originally, the site had a number of keeper's houses which were torn down though in 1988. The Cape Sorell Waverider Buoy (Also known as Captain Fathom) is a swell-measuring buoy located west of Cape Sorell some 10 km kilometres west of Ocean Beach (42°12′S 145°03′E / 42.2°S 145.05°E / -42.2; 145.05). It is unique in that it is one of the few wave-riding swell measuring buoys close to land in the region within the Roaring Forties of the Southern Ocean apart from those in New Zealand. Originally known as the 'Strahan' waverider buoy it was deployed in January 1998 and had recorded maximum waves of 18 m within
    6.00
    1 votes
    198
    Chequamegon Point Lighthouse

    Chequamegon Point Lighthouse

    The Chequamegon Point Lighthouse is a lighthouse located on Long Island, one of the Apostle Islands, in Lake Superior in Ashland County, Wisconsin, near the city of Bayfield. The Chequamegon Point light was maintained by the keeper of the La Pointe Light (about a mile away) and its original lens came from there. A boardwalk connected them, so light keepers could ride bicycles between the lights. It is currently owned by the National Park Service and part of the Apostle Islands National Lakeshore. The lighthouse was moved back on to the shoreline after it was replaced by a modern D9 cylindrical tower (a "sewer pipe" with light and fog signal) constructed in 1986. In 1868 the original was established on Long Island's western end, marking the entrance to Chequamegon Bay and with it the towns of Washburn and Ashland. In 1896, it was replaced by a square, white steel room sitting on steel legs. The room is topped by an octagonal lantern with a red roof. The concept echoes that of Lake Huron's Alpena Light. There are also skeletal towers of various other designs in the western Great Lakes. In 1986, the Coast Guard moved the light back from the shore, where it was threatened by erosion.
    6.00
    1 votes
    199
    Currituck Beach Light

    Currituck Beach Light

    • Construction: Brick
    The Currituck Beach Light is a lighthouse located on the Outer Banks in Corolla, North Carolina. An example of Gothic Revival architecture, the Currituck Beach Light was added to the National Register of Historic Places on October 15, 1973. On December 1, 1875, the Currituck Beach Light was completed, located between Cape Henry Light and Bodie Island. Unlike its fellows, Currituck Beach Light was not painted, leaving its brick facade visible. In 1939, the lighthouse was automated following a merger of the United States Coast Guard with the Bureau of Lighthouses. The Outer Banks Conservationists (OBC) performed much of the reconstruction and refurbishing work since 1980 through private funding and volunteer work. Since 1991 visitors have been allowed to climb the original 214 steps to the outdoor gallery. Access to the lens room is not permitted as the first order lens is not only the original lens, but it is still a functioning one. The light comes on every night and shines from 158 feet (48 m) at 20-second intervals to warn ships hugging the chain of barrier islands along the coast. In 2003 the Federal Government granted OBC the title to the lighthouse itself. The Coast Guard
    6.00
    1 votes
    200
    Esopus Meadows Lighthouse

    Esopus Meadows Lighthouse

    Esopus Meadows Lighthouse, nicknamed "Maid of the Meadows" and often simply referred to as the Esopus Light or Middle Hudson River Light is a lighthouse on the Hudson River near Esopus, New York. The lighthouse stands on the west side of the channel, in the river, its granite foundation built atop piles that have been driven into the riverbed, and is accessible only by boat. Construction of the first lighthouse on the site began in 1838 when the land was ceded for $1.00 by the town of Esopus to the US government and the US government appropriated $6,000 to build the light. The light became active in 1839. It was a twin to the Roundout II lighthouse further north up the Hudson river. By 1867, however, the building was heavily damaged by flood and ice and funds for a new lighthouse were appropriated in 1870. The current lighthouse was completed in 1871 and is the last wooden lighthouse in existence on the Hudson and the only Hudson lighthouse with a clapboard exterior. It was lighted in 1872. One of a group of lighthouses in the Northeast built to an award-winning design by a Vermont architect, Esopus Meadows Light has sister lights at Rose Island Light, Sabin Point, Pomham Rocks,
    6.00
    1 votes
    201
    Grotto Point

    Grotto Point

    Grotto Point Light, also known as Port Jackson Entrance Range Front Light, is an active lighthouse located at Grotto Point, a rocky headland at the southernmost tip of Balgowlah Heights, New South Wales, Australia, on the north side of Sydney Harbour. It serves as the front range light, Rosherville Light serving as the rear light, into Port Jackson. Rosherville Light is located almost exactly 1 mile (1.6 km) (1,690 yards (1,550 m) to be exact) behind Grotto Point Light. The decision to build the range lights was taken in 1909. Construction began in 1910 and the light was first lit on September 1, 1911. It is one of four such lighthouses designed by architect Maurice Festu in a style now sometimes called "Disney Castle", the others being Rosherville Light, Vaucluse Bay Range Front Light and Vaucluse Bay Range Rear Light. The original light source was a carbide lamp (acetylene gas) which was initially generated on-site, and later replaced by compressed gas cylinders brought by boat. Later, the light was electrified and connected to the mains electricity. The structure is a masonry and brick domed tower, attached to two barrel-vaulted service sections in decreasing heights, all
    6.00
    1 votes
    202
    Mackinac Point Lighthouse

    Mackinac Point Lighthouse

    • Construction: Cream City brick
    Mackinaw Point marks the junction of Lake Michigan and Lake Huron. Founded in 1889, the Old Mackinac Point Light Station was in operation from 1890 until 1957. Even before the advent of European explorers, the Straits of Mackinac were a significant hazard to water borne travelers. Consequently, before lighthouses, the Ojibwa lit the shore with fires. In the early 19th century, with large vessel traffic increasing from Lake Huron into the Straits, the first step in guarding the Straits was taken in 1829, through the construction of Bois Blanc Lighthouse to both guide mariners in making the westerly turn into the Straits, and to warn them of the shoals and shallows surrounding the island. Three years later in 1832, Congress acted on Stephen Pleasonton’s recommendation that a lightship be placed on Waugoshance Shoal as the first attempt to mark the western entrance to the Straits. In 1838, Lieutenant James T. Homans reported that the lightship was wholly inadequate. He recommended a better solution for Waugoshance and also that a light be built on the point to the west of Mackinaw Harbor. Nothing came of Homans' recommendations. In 1854, the new Lighthouse Administration decided
    6.00
    1 votes
    203
    Phare de la Vieille

    Phare de la Vieille

    La Vieille ("The Old Lady") is a lighthouse in the département of Finistère at the commune of Plogoff, on the northwest coast of France. It lies on the rock known as Gorlebella (Breton for "farthest rock"), guiding mariners in the strait Raz de Sein, across from the companion lighthouse Tourelle de la Plate—also known as Petite Vieille ("Little Old Woman"). It is among the small class of lighthouses around the coasts of France carrying the moniker "hell", due to a remote position in rough seas. Initial planning talks began as early as 1861, though the construction project was not confirmed until twenty years later. Fierce tides limited the period in which building work could take place to less than half of each year. After five years, construction was complete and its beam first shone in 1887. The light is occulting, with a range of 18 nautical miles (33 km); a foghorn was installed in the early twentieth century. La Vieille achieved notoriety in the 1920s when two disabled war veterans were stranded there for weeks by storms, their health deteriorating. They were employed under a new law reserving the job of lighthouse keeper to those who had served in the war. The tremendous
    6.00
    1 votes
    204
    Piney Point Light

    Piney Point Light

    • Construction: Brick
    The Piney Point Light was built in 1836 located at Piney Point on the Potomac River in Maryland just up the river from the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay. The Coast Guard decommissioned it in 1964 and it has since become a museum. It is known as the Lighthouse of Presidents because several early US Presidents visited or stayed on the grounds. Congress appropriated $5000 to build the lighthouse in 1836. The lighthouse was built by John Donahoo and had a range of 10 miles (16 km). The lamp was replaced in 1855 with a Fresnel lens upgrading the range to 11 miles (18 km). A bell tower was added in 1880 and was in service until 1954 when Hurricane Hazel damaged it beyond repair. The federal government deeded the property to St. Mary's County in 1980 and in 1990 the Museum Division of St. Mary’s County Department of Recreation and Parks began to renovate the grounds. Exhibits at the Piney Point Lighthouse Museum focus on the lighthouse, the United States Coast Guard, the Piney Point area, and the story of the Black Panther U-1105 German submarine sunk in the Potomac that now serves as a shipwreck dive preserve. The Potomac River Maritime Exhibit displays four historic wooden vessels in a
    6.00
    1 votes
    205
    Plum Island Range Lights

    Plum Island Range Lights

    The Plum Island Range Lights are a pair of range lights located on Plum Island in Door County, Wisconsin. They were part of the Plum Island United States Life-Saving Station. Plum Island was transferred to the United States Fish and Wildlife Service in 2007 and became part of the Green Bay National Wildlife Refuge. The life-saving station was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2010. Plum Island is closed to the public to protect ground nesting migratory birds. Plum Island is an island at the western shore of Lake Michigan in the southern part of the town of Washington in Door County, Wisconsin, USA. The uninhabited island has a land area of 1.179 km² or 117.87 ha (0.455 sq mi, or 291.25 acres). There have been hundreds of shipwrecks off the island's shores. The Front and Rear Range Lights were part of the United States Life-Saving Station that was established on Plum Island in 1896. The lights were originally lit in 1897 and are 1,650 feet (500 m) apart, aligned on a 330° bearing line to guide boats safely into the Porte des Morts Passage. The Plum Island front range light was originally identical to the front range light of the Baileys Harbor Range Lights, but
    6.00
    1 votes
    206
    Point Loma Light

    Point Loma Light

    New Point Loma Lighthouse is a lighthouse on Point Loma in California, United States, near San Diego, California. It was built in 1891 to replace the Old Point Loma lighthouse, which was ineffective due to elevation (fog). "The current iron skeleton tower of the present Point Loma Light was built on the extremity of the point with the light only 88 feet (27 m) above the water. Point Loma has a 600,000 candlepower light which can be seen a distance of approximately 15 miles (24 km). In addition to the light, there is a two-tone diaphone fog signal, which, when operating in inclement weather, is synchronized with a radio-beacon every three minutes for distance finding. The skeleton frame of the light surrounds an enclosed stairway to the tower platform, where the lantern is located. At the base of the structure is the fog signal building. Pathways, surrounded by lush green lawns provide access to three family dwellings and one bachelor quarters. The area is enclosed by a modern concrete block wall. At present, three wives, four children, and five men live in the quarters available."
    6.00
    1 votes
    207
    Pointe aux Barques Light

    Pointe aux Barques Light

    • Construction: Brick
    The Pointe aux Barques Lighthouse ranks among the ten oldest lighthouses in Michigan. It is an active lighthouse maintained by the US Coast Guard remotely, located in Lighthouse County Park on Lake Huron near Port Hope, Michigan in Huron County. "Pointe aux Barques" means 'Point of Little Boats', a descriptor of the shallow shoals and reefs that lurk beneath these waves, presenting a hazard to boats as they round Michigan's Thumb. In the mid-19th century most travel was by sailing vessel. There were few or no roads, and only a few steamships were operating on the Great Lakes. Navigation was still primitive by today’s standards. Vessels followed the coastline of the lakes until there was a need to cross a large body of water, and then a compass and sextant were the major navigation tools. Sailing schooners left Detroit and the St. Clair River and soon left the sight of the 1825 Fort Gratiot Light and began the perilous trip north along the Lake Huron shore. The next light to the north was located at Thunder Bay Island (1832), more than 150 miles (240 km) north of Fort Gratiot. Any vessel sailing up the Lake Huron coast stood a good chance of running aground on the reef extending out
    6.00
    1 votes
    208
    Round Island Light

    Round Island Light

    • Construction: Brick
    The Round Island Light, also known as the "Old Round Island Point Lighthouse" is a lighthouse located on the west shore of Round Island in the shipping lanes of the Straits of Mackinac, which connect Lake Michigan and Lake Huron. It was deemed necessary because the island is a significant hazard to navigation in the straits, and was seen as an effective complement to the other lights in the area. Because of its color scheme and form — red stone base and wood tower — it has been likened to an old-fashioned schoolhouse. Ferries regularly pass it on their way to (and from) Mackinac Island, and it is a recognizable icon of the upper Great Lakes. This light is a twin of the Two Harbors Light in Minnesota. Located in Coast Guard District 9, the Round Island Light was built of painted brick in 1895 by a predecessor agency of the United States Coast Guard. It served as an active, manned lighthouse and fog signal in 1895–1947. It was abandoned in 1947 and replaced by the Round Island Passage Light, an automated light tower located in the adjacent Round Island Channel. Abandoned, the lighthouse fell prey to plunderers and vandals. The structure's deterioration was almost complete in 1972
    6.00
    1 votes
    209
    Bois Blanc Light

    Bois Blanc Light

    Bois Blanc Light can refer to one of five lighthouses erected on Bois Blanc Island, Michigan, in Lake Huron. Two of the lighthouses are currently standing. The original structure, built in 1829, was the second lighthouse constructed on Lake Huron. Due to rising water levels, the lighthouse became unstable, and eventually collapsed on December 9, 1837. The lighthouse was rebuilt in the summer of 1839, further inland from the original structure. Eventually this structure also became dilapidated, and a new lighthouse was constructed in 1867. This light was decommissioned in 1924 and boarded up, being replaced by an automated acetylene light atop a 35-foot (11 m) tall black steel skeleton tower to the east of the old light. The old station property and buildings were sold to Earl J. Coffey on August 24, 1925, and some time thereafter the steel skeletal tower was replaced by the currently operational cylindrical D9 tower with solar-powered 200 mm acrylic optic, which is basically a tube with a light on the top. It is functional, but spartan. The 1867 lighthouse is now owned by the Martin and Reinhart Jahn families, who have gone to great lengths in restoring the historic structure,
    5.00
    2 votes
    210
    Cape Reinga Lighthouse

    Cape Reinga Lighthouse

    Cape Reinga Lighthouse is a lighthouse at Cape Reinga in the Northland Region of the North Island of New Zealand. It is owned and operated by Maritime New Zealand. The lighthouse is a common New Zealand icon and a popular tourist destination although the lighthouse itself is not open to the public. The lighthouse was built in 1941 and first lit during May of that year. It was the last manned light to be built in New Zealand and replaced the Cape Maria Van Diemen Lighthouse, located on nearby Motuopao Island, which had been built in 1879. Accessing that lighthouse was difficult due to the rough seas in the area, so in 1938, it was decided to move the lighthouse to Cape Reinga for safety reasons. The complete lantern fittings from Motuopao Island were reused at Cape Reinga, though the new lighthouse was fitted with a 1000 watt electrical lamp instead that could be seen for 26 nautical miles (48 km). The lamp was powered by a diesel generator. In 1987, the lighthouse was fully automated and the lighthouse keepers were withdrawn. The lighthouse is now monitored remotely from Wellington. In May 2000 the original lens and lamp were replaced by a 50 watt beacon. The beacon is powered by
    5.00
    2 votes
    211
    Crooked River Light

    Crooked River Light

    The Crooked River Light, also known as the Carrabelle Light, was built in 1895 to replace the Dog Island Light on Dog Island, which had been destroyed in 1875 by a hurricane. The location on the mainland allowed the light to serve as the rear range light for the channel to the west of Dog Island, used by ships in the lumber trade. The Crooked River Lighthouse, built in 1895, replaced three lighthouses on Dog Island that over the years were destroyed by storms. The lightstation grounds originally included a house for both the Keeper and the Assistant Keeper, and several outbuildings. At first the lighthouse was painted metallic brown, then the lower half was painted white, and finally the present daymark of the upper half red and the lower half white was chosen. After being electrified in 1933, the lighthouse was automated and unmanned in 1952. In 1964 the two houses and all outbuildings were sold and removed from the site. The original 4th Order lens was removed by the Coast Guard in 1976, due to mercury leakage in the float container. The lens was replaced by a modern optic and this beacon remained in operation until the lighthouse was decommissioned in 1995. In 1999 the
    5.00
    2 votes
    212
    Guard Island Light

    Guard Island Light

    The Guard Island Light is a lighthouse located on a small island near the entrance to the Tongass Narrows, in Clarence Strait in southeastern Alaska. The western entrance to the Behm Canal also lies nearby. The lighthouse location was prioritized sixth in a 1901 study of 15 Alaska proposed sites. It would assist shipping along the Southeast Alaska Inside Passage, at the north end of the Tongass Narrows, "one of the more difficult passages along the route" of Klondike Gold Rush-related shipping to Juneau and to Skagway. Construction of the Guard Island Lighthouse began in the summer of 1903 and was completed by September 1904. The 34-foot (10 m) wooden tower housed a fourth order Fresnel lens that produced a fixed white light. However, the wood used for Guard Island Light Station, as well as for several other Alaskan lighthouses, soon deteriorated in the harsh weather conditions. By the 1920s, all the lighthouses except Eldred Rock were falling apart, and in 1922, Congress authorized the reconstruction of Guard Island Light. In 1924, the dilapidated light tower was replaced with a new single-story rectangular tower of reinforced concrete. The station was automated by the Coast Guard
    5.00
    2 votes
    213
    Morris Island Light

    Morris Island Light

    Morris Island Light is a lighthouse on Morris Island in South Carolina. The light stands on the southern side of the entrance to Charleston Harbor, north of the City of Folly Beach. The lighthouse was named to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982. The lighthouse is unusual in that it now stands several hundred feet offshore. When constructed in 1876 the light was approximately 1,200 feet (370 m) from the water's edge. However, the construction in 1889 of the jetties which protect the shipping lanes leading to Charleston Harbor altered ocean currents, resulting in the rapid erosion of Morris Island and the destruction of many structures and historical sites (such as Fort Wagner). By 1938 the shoreline had reached the lighthouse, forcing its automation as it was no longer safe or practical to keep it manned. In 1962 the Morris Island Light was decommissioned and replaced by the new Charleston Light, located on Sullivan's Island at the north end of the harbor. The Morris Island Light, located on Morris Island, at the entrance to the harbor of Charleston, SC, was one of the colonial lights turned over to the Federal Government under the terms of the act of August 7, 1789.
    5.00
    2 votes
    214
    Point Conception Light

    Point Conception Light

    • Construction: Wood
    Point Conception Light is a lighthouse on Point Conception at the west entrance of the Santa Barbara Channel, California. It is one of the earliest California lighthouses and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo sailed along the California coast in search for glory and gold. On October 18, 1542, he encountered heavy winds upon rounding the Point and was forced to turn back to San Miguel Island where he died. Second-in-command Bartolomé Ferrelo took charge and again tried to round the Point but he was also unsuccessful. The Point was named Punta de la Limpia Concepcion by Sebastián Vizcaíno in 1602, who was the next Spanish sailor to venture the Pacific waters along the California coast after Juan Cabrillo. The 1835 experience of the sailing ship Pilgrim, which was damaged and nearly capsized in a sudden change of weather here, is typical of boaters even today. It was here at Point Conception in 1856, that the lighthouse was built high on the sandstone cliffs, above the location of the present lighthouse. The first order Fresnel lens and steel tower for the lighthouse were made in France at a cost of $65,068 and was transported around Cape
    5.00
    2 votes
    215
    Boon Island Light

    Boon Island Light

    Boon Island Light is located on the 300x700 foot Boon Island off the southern coast of Maine, United States, near Cape Neddick. Boon Island Light has the distinction of being the tallest lighthouse in both Maine and New England at 133 feet. The lighthouse has a focal plane at 137 feet above mean high water. The light's beacon flashes white every 5 seconds. Talk of building a lighthouse on Boon Island dates back as early as 1710 when the ship Nottingham Galley ran aground on the barren outcrop that makes up the island. The crew of the Galley were forced to resort to cannibalism before being rescued. In 1799 the first day marker and the station itself were established on the island. In 1811 the station was converted to a full light station and a granite tower was constructed. The first tower along with a subsequent replacement were both washed away in storms. The current cylindrical brown granite tower was constructed in 1855 and originally had a second order Fresnel lens installed. Boon Island Light suffered extensive damage in a blizzard in 1978. Several stones that make up the tower itself were washed into the sea as were all of the keepers dwellings and other outbuildings that
    4.50
    2 votes
    216
    Cordouan lighthouse

    Cordouan lighthouse

    Cordouan lighthouse is an active lighthouse located 7 km at sea, near the mouth of the Gironde estuary in France. At a height of 223 feet (68 m) it is the tenth tallest "traditional lighthouse" in the world. The Tour de Cordouan, the 'Patriarch of Lighthouses', is by far the oldest lighthouse in France. It was designed by leading Paris architect Louis de Foix, and is something of a Renaissance masterpiece, an amalgam of royal palace, cathedral and fort. Started in 1584 and finished in 1611, it still stands today. De Foix first built a round base 135 feet (41 m) in diameter and 8 feet (2.4 m) high to take the onslaught of the waves. Within it was a cavity 20 feet (6.1 m) square for storing water and other supplies. Above it were constructed four storeys of diminishing size. The ground floor consisted of a circular tower 50 feet (15 m) in diameter, with apartments for four keepers around its inner wall. In the centre was richly decorated entrance hall 22 feet (6.7 m) square and 20 feet (6.1 m) high. The second storey was the King's Apartment, consisting of a drawing room, anteroom and a number of closets. The third storey was a chapel with a domed roof notable for the beauty of its
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    217
    Esha Ness Lighthouse

    Esha Ness Lighthouse

    Esha Ness Lighthouse is situated on the Northmavine peninsula in the north-west of the Shetland Islands, Scotland. It sometimes rendered as Eshaness Lighthouse. The lighthouse has a tapering, square tower 12m high and was built by David Alan Stevenson, one of the famous 'lighthouse' Stevensons, between 1925 and 1929. It was built from concrete because of the unsuitability of local stone. It flashes white every 12 seconds and has a nominal range of 25 nautical miles (46 km). The light was automated in 1974 and the former lighthouse keepers' accommodation now serves as holiday accommodation. It is owned by the Shetland Amenity Trust.
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    2 votes
    218
    Gull Rocks Light

    Gull Rocks Light

    Not to be confused with the Gull Rock Light in Lake Superior. The Gull Rocks Light was a lighthouse at the entrance to Newport harbor northwest of Rose Island. A unique A-frame structure, it was supplemented with a skeleton tower in 1928. The Gull Rocks obstruct the passage north of Rose Island, and in the mid-19th century the Old Colony Steamboat Company took steps to mark the reef. Initially an employee of the company was stationed on the rocks with a horn; later, a lamp on a post was erected. In 1885 the Lighthouse Service made its first request to replace this lamp with a federal lighthouse, but the replacement was not constructed until 1887. The wooden A-frame house was unlike anything else in the area, and it had neither tower nor lantern room. Instead, a lamp was hung in either gable: red on one end, and white on the other. The unique roof caused some problems with the usual practice of collecting rainwater in cisterns, as it was prone to contamination from salt spray. The first keeper, Frederick Purinton, was badly injured in 1894 by an assailant believed to be a local lobsterman, and quit the post two weeks later. In 1900 the original lamps were replaced by brighter
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    2 votes
    219
    Penfield Reef Light

    Penfield Reef Light

    • Construction: Wood
    Penfield Reef Lighthouse is a lighthouse in Connecticut, United States, on Penfield Reef at the south side of Black Rock Harbor entrance on the Long Island Sound, off the coast of Fairfield, Connecticut. Constructed in 1874, it was one of the last offshore masonry lights. Most offshore lights built after this were cast iron towers built on cylindrical cast iron foundations. Penfield Reef has been called one of the most treacherous areas of western Long Island Sound. The structure is about 1.1 miles (1.8 km) off Fairfield Beach, on one end of the reef. The lighthouse's foundation, structure and roofs were in good condition, according to a 2004 Town of Fairfield report, but the wood frame supporting the balcony around the tower was in need of major repairs. Other problems include asbestos tiles on the floor, lead paint on the walls, mold in most places and decaying brick and mortar work in the basement. The U.S. Coast Guard last had the lighthouse repaired in 2003. The lighthouse is connected to a two-floor keeper's quarters built of granite and timber frames on a concrete foundation surrounded by rocks. The Penfield Reef Light was constructed in 1874. The light is an active aid to
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    2 votes
    220
    Stingray Point Light

    Stingray Point Light

    • Construction: Cast iron
    The Stingray Point Light was a lighthouse located at the mouth of the Rappahannock River. Stingray Point took its name from an incident in which John Smith was stung by a stingray while fishing nearby. The light was built in 1858 to mark the entrance to the Deltaville harbor, just west of the point. A report from 1865 indicates repairs done after the light "plundered of all movable articles", but it is not indicated whether this reflects Confederate raids (as affected other lighthouses in the area during the Civil War). The light remained in service until 1965, when the house was removed and a skeleton tower erected on the old foundation. It had just recently been automated. This light remains in service. Sections of dismantled house were sold to one Gilbert Purcell, who owned a boatyard and intended to reconstruct the light on his property. His plans were never realized, but the Stingray Point Marina later constructed a full size replica of the light which still stands.
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    221
    Tater Du Lighthouse

    Tater Du Lighthouse

    Tater Du Lighthouse is Cornwall's most recently built lighthouse. The construction of the lighthouse came out of the tragedy of losing a small Spanish coaster called the Juan Ferrer on the 23rd of October 1963, on the nearby Boscawen Point, the vessel capsized with the loss of 11 lives. After the tragedy the Newlyn and Mousehole Fishermen's Association put pressure on Trinity House for a lighthouse to be built, stating that similar tragedies could happen again. Designed by Michael H. Crisp, the lighthouse was constructed with a completely automatic installation which is remotely controlled from the Trinity House depot in Penzance. The lighthouse, built with concrete blocks, was completed by July 1965. The short building houses a 7 foot 1 inch lantern with an electric light which is powered from batteries which are charged from mains electricity during the day. The light is 3 white lights flashed every 15 seconds, with a range of 23 miles. There is a separate red fixed light that shows in the line over the Runnelstone Rock. The fog signal was originally a series (72 in total) of Tannoy units built into the lighthouse tower. This was replaced by a short-range Pharos Marine
    4.50
    2 votes
    222
    Ailsa Craig Lighthouse

    Ailsa Craig Lighthouse

    The Ailsa Craig Lighthouse, located on Ailsa Craig, an island in the Firth of Clyde, just offshore from Girvan, South Ayrshire, Scotland, was completed in 1886, the construction being overseen by Thomas and David Stevenson. Initially, the lighthouse used oil-burning lamps, but by 1911, these were replaced with incandescent lighting. Fog signals were discontinued in 1987. Then, in 1990, the lighthouse was automated, and a refurbishment took place in 2001, when it was converted to run on solar power. Ailsa Craig is also known as "Paddy's Mile Stone" as it lies halfway between the cities of Glasgow and Belfast. As well as being a local landmark and a well known marine navigational hazard the island is a protected bird sanctuary, sheltering thousands of breeding pairs of sea birds. Other wild life found on and around the island are a colony of grey seals as well as the occasional whale, and more commonly large basking sharks during the summer months. The basking shark is a large but harmless shark: it can often be seen from boats feeding at the surface on the planktonic bloom which grows in great abundance around the British Isles during the warmer months. Geologically, the island was
    5.00
    1 votes
    223
    Biloxi Light

    Biloxi Light

    • Construction: Cast iron
    Biloxi Light is a lighthouse in Biloxi, Mississippi, adjacent to the Mississippi Sound of the Gulf of Mexico. The lighthouse has been kept by female keepers for more years than any other lighthouse in the United States. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973 and declared a Mississippi Landmark in 1987. On March 3, 1847, the United States Congress authorized $12,000 for the construction of a lighthouse at Biloxi. The United States Department of the Treasury let a contract, dated October 15, 1847, to Murray & Hazlehurst to build an iron lighthouse for $6,347.00. The keeper's house was contracted separately. The Collector at Mobile, Alabama, purchased the site. The tower was completed and placed in operation in 1848. The tower was 45 feet (14 m) from the base to the lantern room and displayed nine lamps. The first keeper was Marcellus J. Howard. Mary Reynolds, with a "large family of orphan children" was appointed keeper on April 11, 1854. She remained in service until the U.S. Civil War. She owed her appointment to Governor Albert Gallatin Brown. In 1856 the light was "refitted." In 1860 a hurricane swept the coast and destroyed some lighthouses, but not
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    1 votes
    224
    Bodie Island Light

    Bodie Island Light

    • Construction: Cast iron
    The current Bodie Island Lighthouse is the third that has stood in this vicinity of Bodie Island on the Outer Banks in North Carolina and was built in 1872. It stands 156 feet (48 m) tall and is located on the Roanoke Sound side of the first island that is part of the Cape Hatteras National Seashore. The lighthouse is just south of Nags Head, a few miles before Oregon Inlet. It is currently not climbable by the public, but restoration work is underway to make it safe for climbing. The preceding Bodie Island lighthouses actually stood south of Oregon Inlet on Pea Island in an area now under water. The first was built in 1847 and then abandoned in 1859 due to a poor foundation. The second, built in 1859, was destroyed in 1861 by retreating Confederate troops who feared it would be used as a Union observation post during the Civil War. The third and current lighthouse, with its original first order Fresnel lens, was completed in 1872. In 1932, the light was upgraded to an electric lamp by using oil-fueled electrical generators. It remained manned until 1940, when the lighthouse was fully automated. In 1953, the generators were disconnected and power was supplied from the commercial
    5.00
    1 votes
    225
    Minot's Ledge Light

    Minot's Ledge Light

    • Construction: Granite
    Minot's Ledge Light, officially Minots Ledge Light, is a lighthouse on Minot's Ledge, one mile offshore of the towns of Cohasset and Scituate, Massachusetts, to the southeast of Boston Harbor The current lighthouse is the second on the site, the first having been washed away in a storm after only a few months of use.. In 1843, lighthouse inspector I. W. P. Lewis compiled a report on Minot's Ledge, showing that over 40 vessels had been lost due to the ledge from 1832 to 1841, with serious loss of life and damage to property. The most dramatic incident was the sinking of a ship with ninety-nine Irish immigrants, who all drowned within sight of their new home land. It was initially proposed to build a lighthouse similar to John Smeaton's pioneering Eddystone Lighthouse, situated off the south-west coast of England. However Captain William H. Swift, put in charge of planning the tower, believed it impossible to build such a tower on the mostly submerged ledge. Instead he successfully argued for an iron pile light, a spidery structure drilled into the rock. The first Minots Ledge Lighthouse was built between 1847 and 1850, and was lighted for the first time on January 1, 1850. One night
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    1 votes
    226
    Point Cabrillo Light

    Point Cabrillo Light

    • Construction: Wood
    Point Cabrillo Light is a lighthouse in northern California, United States, between Point Arena and Cape Mendocino, just south of the community of Caspar. It should not be confused with the inactive Old Point Loma lighthouse or the active New Point Loma lighthouse in San Diego, California, both of which lie within the grounds of Cabrillo National Monument and are sometimes referred to as the Cabrillo lighthouse. The Point Cabrillo Lighthouse complex is located about 1.5 miles (2.4 km) from Fort Bragg, California, and includes the lighthouse itself together with several outbuildings. Most of the original structures remain, but the barn is missing: in 1986 it was destroyed in a fire department exercise. The remaining lighthouse station is "one of the most complete light stations in the United States". Atop the lighthouse spins a third order Fresnel lens with four panels containing 90 lead glass prisms and weighing 6800 pounds, constructed by Chance Brothers, an English company, and shipped to Point Cabrillo around Cape Horn. The light is only 32 feet (9.8 m) above the ground, but because of the height of the headlands it stands 81 feet (25 m) above sea level. It was originally lit by
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    227
    Stamford Harbor Ledge Light

    Stamford Harbor Ledge Light

    • Construction: Cast iron
    Stamford Harbor Ledge Lighthouse is a lighthouse in Connecticut, United States, on the Stamford Harbor entrance on Chatham Rock near Stamford, Connecticut. The lighthouse has a floating dock and from the upper balcony Long Island Sound, Stamford, Stamford Harbor, and Manhattan skyscrapers can be seen. The interior of the structure has seven levels. The Stamford Harbor Ledge lighthouse was built in 1882 and was a sparkplug lighthouse cast iron tower, manufactured in Boston. The light, 3,600 feet (1,100 m) from shore, was sold to a private party in 1955. Several lighthouse keepers and their families lived in the lighthouse at various times. In 2008, the property was put up for sale, with an asking price of $1.75 million as of September 25, 2008. By June 2009, the asking price had fallen to $1.595 million, according to the real estate agent's website. According to an advertisement for the real estate offering, the property includes the lighthouse, Chatham Rock and, in words that were in quotes in the advertisement, "surrounding underwater land embraced within a circle, seven hundred fifty (750) feet in diameter, the center of which is Chatham Rock".
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    228
    Tarbat Ness Lighthouse

    Tarbat Ness Lighthouse

    The Tarbat Ness Lighthouse is located at the North West tip of the Tarbat Ness peninsula near the fishing village of Portmahomack on the east coast of Scotland. It was built in 1830 by Robert Stevenson and has an elevation of 53 metres (174 ft) and 203 steps to the top of the tower. At the Battle of Tarbat Ness in the 11th century, Thorfinn the Mighty defeated "Karl Hundason", possibly a Viking name for Macbeth. Further down the peninsula at Portmahomack, in the 1480s the Clan Ross slaughtered a raiding party from the Clan Mackay by locking them in the Tarbat Old Church and setting fire to it. This event is known as the Battle of Tarbat. A storm in the Moray Firth in November 1826 saw the loss of 16 vessels and brought many applications for lighthouses to be constructed at Tarbat Ness and at Covesea Skerries. Tarbat Ness Lighthouse was engineered by Robert Stevenson for the Northern Lighthouse Board and the light was first exhibited on 26 January 1830. James Smith of Inverness was the contractor responsible for the building of the lighthouse which cost £9,361. The lighthouse tower is the third tallest in Scotland behind North Ronaldsay and Skerryvore and is notable for having two
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    229
    Tybee Island Light

    Tybee Island Light

    • Construction: Brick
    Tybee Island Lighthouse is a lighthouse in Georgia, United States, next to the Savannah River Entrance, on the northeast end of Tybee Island, Georgia. The original Tybee Island Lighthouse was built in 1736 and was a wooden tower. It was destroyed in 1741 by a storm. In 1742, the second lighthouse, made of stone and wood, was finished. In 1773 the third lighthouse was completed and had a brick 100 ft (30 m) tower. The light was refitted with 16-inch reflectors in 1841. In 1857 the light was renovated and fitted with a second-order lens. In 1862, during the American Civil War, the interior of the tower and the lantern were destroyed by fire and the lens was removed. By 1865, the beacon had been relighted but not the main light. In 1857 a second order Fresnel lens was installed. In 1867, a new brick and cast iron lighthouse was built. The lower sixty feet of the previous light was used as the foundation for the new 144 ft (44 m) tall tower, and equipped with a 1st order Fresnel lens In 1869, Tybee beacon was moved back 165 feet (50 m) as the site was threatened by storms. In 1871, gales, which had caused great damage along the southern coast, had so greatly damaged the tower that is
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    1 votes
    230
    Wood Island Light

    Wood Island Light

    • Construction: Granite Rubble
    Wood Island Light is an active lighthouse on the eastern edge of Wood Island in Saco Bay, Maine. The light is just outside the entrance to Biddeford Pool and the end of the Saco River. The lighthouse is a 47 feet (14 m) tall conical white tower constructed of granite rubble. The light itself sits 71 feet (22 m) above mean high water. It currently is automated and has an alternating green and white beacon every 10 seconds. Wood Island Light is Maine's second oldest lighthouse (after Portland Head Light) and the nation's eleventh oldest. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places as Wood Island Light Station on January 21, 1988, reference number 87002274. Wood Island Light was constructed in 1808 under the orders of President Thomas Jefferson. The original tower was an octagonal wooden structure that had rotted out by the 1830s. In 1839 a granite tower was erected replacing the original wood structure. The current tower was constructed in 1858 as a renovation of the 1839 tower to allow for the installation of a 4th order Fresnel Lense. Also built in 1858 were the current keepers dwellings which are still standing. In 1960s the original lantern room was removed and an
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    231
    Plum Island Light

    Plum Island Light

    Plum Island Light, also known as Plum Gut Light, is located on the western end of Plum Island, which lies east of Orient Point which in turn is at the end of the North Fork of Long Island in the US state of New York. An historic granite lighthouse originally built in 1869 sits at the site, but no longer serves as an active aid to navigation. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2011. A short distance northwest of the granite lighthouse building is a 14 feet (4.3 m) metal tower that holds the automated light that has served as an aid to navigation since the earlier light was decommissioned in 1978. In 1826 the west end of Plum Island was purchased from Richard Jerome for $90 for the purpose of building a lighthouse. The following year a 35 feet (11 m) high stone tower had been constructed to support the first light. That first light consisted of ten whale oil lamps with reflectors. The light helped navigation near the entrance to Long Island Sound, especially through the "Plum Gut" channel between Orient Point and Plum Island. In 1856 the original lamps and reflectors were replaced by a sixth-order Fresnel lens. By the late 1860s the lighthouse was falling
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    2 votes
    232
    Marrowstone Lighthouse

    Marrowstone Lighthouse

    The Marrowstone Point Lighthouse is located on Marrowstone Point, which is located at the northern tip of Marrowstone Island and forms the eastern entrance to Port Townsend Bay in Washington, USA. The point was first marked by a lens lantern on a pole in 1888. A fog bell was added to the station in 1896, and a one-and-a-half-story dwelling was constructed on the point to house Marrowstone Point’s first station keeper, Osmond Hale Morgan (1826–1907), a sea captain, who came from Whidbey Island with his wife, Frances Elizabeth (Avery) Morgan (1833–1899), and five children. In 1912, the light was placed on a small, concrete structure. Mariners complained that the fog bell at the point was often inaudible, so a small, square cement building outfitted with three large trumpets was put into service in 1918, solving the fog signal problem. The light was eventually mounted on top of the fog signal building.
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    233
    Sultan Shoal Lighthouse

    Sultan Shoal Lighthouse

    The Sultan Shoal Lighthouse (Chinese: 苏丹浅滩灯塔) was built in 1895 during the time when the late Commander Charles Quentin Gregan Craufurd (from the Royal Navy) was the Master Attendant (equivalent to the present day Port Master) of Singapore. It was built to replace the beacon previously established there. Three single-wick lamps fitted with parabolic reflectors were used. Incandescent oil dioptric light with ‘Hood’ burner was used in 1931 with a 3rd Order 500 mm optic. (The Order is a system of classifying the type of lenses used based on the focal length of the lens). This optic revolved on mercury, producing an intensity of 670,000 candelas with a visibility range of 22 nautical miles (about 40 km). This kerosene burning lighting equipment was replaced in 1967 by an electrically operated 100-volt/1,000-watt light source. A generator room was built on the east side of the lighthouse to house three generators. With the generators, the seven-men lighthouse crew was reduced to four. The 3rd Order optic was replaced by a rotating beacon, which possessed a revolving array of 24 lamps-cum-reflectors. An ‘S’ and ‘X’ band radar beacon was also installed in 1984 which provides additional
    4.00
    1 votes
    234
    Avery Point Light

    Avery Point Light

    Avery Point Lighthouse is a lighthouse in Groton, Connecticut, United States, on the Avery Point Campus of the University of Connecticut. It was the last lighthouse built in the state. Avery Point Lighthouse, built as a memorial to all other lighthouses and light keepers, was finished in 1943, during World War II, and was not lighted right away due to concerns about possible enemy invasions by sea. It finally went into service in 1944. The light was deactivated on June 25, 1967 when the United States Coast Guard moved its training facility from Avery Point to Governor's Island and was abandoned until 1999. Restoration finally began in 2004 and was completed in 2006. It was relit and listed as an official aid to navigation and an active light on navigation charts. The relighting and rededication of the lighthouse was held on October 15, 2006. The lighthouse was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2002.
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    235
    Bete Grise Lighthouse

    Bete Grise Lighthouse

    The Mendota Light, also known as the Bete Grise light, was built on the Keweenaw Peninsula of Michigan to facilitate travel between Lake Superior and Lac La Belle, Michigan (an artificial canal having been made to connect the two). The original plans were laid in 1867 and the lighthouse was constructed in 1869. Only one year later, the light was decommissioned as it was found by navigators to be of no assistance (nor was there any other commercial reason to make this trip). The tower was removed and taken to Marquette, but the keeper's house remained in place. In 1892, ships tried to use this bay for a safe harbor during a storm, and the seafarers, observing the house (at this point deserted), suggested that the harbor would be easier to find if there was a light present. By 1895, funds had been allocated to re-establish the light, but it was determined that the existing structure had deteriorated so much that it could not be used. A new structure was built using the original foundations. In 1933 the light was automated and in 1956 it was decommissioned. It was a private residence until 1996. The lighthouse, only accessible by boat since no roads or private drives lead to it, was
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    236
    Bressay Lighthouse

    Bressay Lighthouse

    Bressay Lighthouse is a lighthouse in the Shetland Islands, Scotland, 4 kilometres (2.5 mi) south-east of Lerwick. It is located on the island of Bressay at Kirkabister Ness overlooking Bressay Sound. It was one of four lighthouses built in Shetland between 1854 and 1858 which were designed by brothers David Stevenson and Thomas Stevenson. David Stevenson initially maintained that building a lighthouse in Shetland waters was impossible, too dangerous and too expensive, and that any ship's captain who took this route was mad. The shore station was purchased by the Shetland Amenity Trust in 1995 and has been converted into a Marine Heritage Centre. The fog signal was discontinued in the 1980's. The notable red horn was removed, however, the building that housed the siren is still in place and now houses a radar mast, and the five pressurised air tanks are still in place.
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    Cape Brett Lighthouse

    Cape Brett Lighthouse

    Cape Brett Lighthouse is a lighthouse at Cape Brett in the Northland Region of the North Island of New Zealand. The site was surveyed and chosen in 1908 by Captain John Bollons of NZGSS Hinemoa. The lighthouse was deactivated and keepers withdrawn in 1978 and replaced by an automated beacon on the same site.
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    Cape du Couedic

    Cape du Couedic

    Cape du Couedic is the south-western point of Kangaroo Island, off the coast of South Australia. Cape du Couedic was named in 1803 by French explorer Nicolas Baudin in honour of his friend and famous French sea captain Charles Louis, Chevalier du Couëdic de Kergoualer (1740–1780). The Cape du Couedic Lighthouse is a prominent landmark. Constructed between 1906–1909, it consists of a tower built from 2,000 pieces of local stone, together with three four-roomed cottages to house the head keeper and two assistants with their families. The light characteristic shows two flashes every ten seconds, emitted at a focal plane height of 103 metres. A Fresnel lens made by Chance Brothers is used there. For many of its early years the site was inaccessible by land. Stores, materials and equipment brought by boat were hauled up to the lighthouse by a flying fox winching system originally powered by a pair of horses. Today the lighthouse is automated and visitors to the area can stay in the old keepers' cottages.
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    239
    Cape Mendocino Light

    Cape Mendocino Light

    • Construction: Cast iron
    Cape Mendocino Light is an automated beacon at Cape Mendocino, California. The former lighthouse was relocated to Shelter Cove near Point Delgada, California in 1998, and the historic Fresnel lens to Ferndale, California in 1948. After many ships, including the SS Northerner and a lighthouse tender with supplies to build the facility, were lost to the jagged rocks surrounding the 326-foot (99 m) foot sea stack "Sugar Loaf" and Blunt's Reef offshore of Cape Mendocino, the lighthouse with attendant buildings including a carpenter shop, an oil house, a barn and a two-story residence were built on 171 acres (69 ha; 0.267 sq mi) of remote rangeland. On December 1, 1868, the light began sending a signal of one white flash every thirty seconds. The United States Coast Guard took control of the Cape Mendocino Lighthouse in 1939 when the United States Lighthouse Service merged with the Coast Guard. The lighthouse was a 43-foot (13 m) iron tower, sixteen-sided and double balconied, a twin to the lighthouse at Point Reyes but for the roof shape. At 43-foot (13 m) the height of the light exceeded the 420 feet (130 m) Makapuu Point Light, making it the had the highest focal plane of any
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    240
    Cape St. Elias Light

    Cape St. Elias Light

    The Cape St. Elias Light is a lighthouse located on Kayak Island in Alaska. Congress approved the construction of a light station at Cape St. Elias in October 1913, appropriating $115,000 for the construction. construction began in 1915 and a third order Fresnel lens was installed. In 1927 the station was equipped with radio beacon facilities, which was the second such facility in Alaska. The light was automated by the United States Coast Guard in 1974. In 1998 a solar powered Vega optic was installed, replacing the original lens, which is in the Cordova Museum in Cordova, Alaska. Cape St. Elias Lighthouse was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1975. It is now being leased by the Cape St. Elias Lightkeepers Association, a non-profit organization dedicated to preserving, restoring and sharing the lighthouse. It began operations in 1916, which was the year that the Alaska Engineering Commission started building the Alaska Railroad "which eventually established Southcentral Alaska as the economic hub of all Alaska". This lighthouse "proved to be an indispensable navigational aid along the shipping lanes from the contiguous American states and Southeastern Alaska to
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    241
    Craney Island Light

    Craney Island Light

    • Construction: Cast iron
    The Craney Island Light was a screwpile lighthouse located just east of Craney Island at the mouth of the Elizabeth River in Virginia. This light replaced the first permanently stationed lightship in the United States. Craney Island forms the west side of the entrance to Norfolk's harbor and has been used as a military facility since the War of 1812. In 1820 a lightship was stationed off its eastern side to protect the edge of the channel. This ship had previously been stationed off Willoughby's Shoal, but was quickly moved after it was determined that the first location was too exposed. This was the first permanent lightship station in the country; it was replaced in 1859 by the first of two screw-pile lights, a square house which survived until 1884. In that year the decrepit structure was replaced with a new hexagonal house, which in turn was removed in 1936, to be replaced by an automated light on the old foundation. In the early 1970s the light was completely removed and replaced by a buoy.
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    242
    Macquarie Lighthouse

    Macquarie Lighthouse

    • Construction: Sandstone
    The Macquarie Lighthouse, also known as South Head Upper Light, was the first, and is the longest serving, lighthouse site in Australia. It is located on Dunbar Head, Vaucluse (approximately 2 km south of South Head) near the entrance to Sydney Harbour. There has been a navigational aid in this vicinity since 1791 and a lighthouse near the present site since 1818. The current lighthouse was completed in 1883. The lighthouse is still fully operational and is under the control of the Australian Maritime Safety Authority. The grounds are managed by the Sydney Harbour Federation Trust. The lighthouse was featured on the arms of Macquarie University from inception, up until the present Vice Chancellor decided the university needed a change of logo. In 2008, the lighthouse was replaced with what the university describes as an 'abstract, timeless image' of water lillies. In 1791 and within one year of the arrival of the First Fleet, a flagstaff was erected on the site. This was followed, in 1793, by a tripod mounted iron basket which originally burned wood, and later coal. On July 11, 1816, the foundation for the first lighthouse was laid by Lachlan Macquarie, Governor of New South Wales,
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    243
    Milwaukee Breakwater Lighthouse

    Milwaukee Breakwater Lighthouse

    • Construction: Cast iron
    The Milwaukee Breakwater lighthouse is located in the harbor of Milwaukee in Milwaukee County, Wisconsin. It protects the entrance to the Milwaukee River. This lighthouse, owned and operated by the United States Coast Guard, is an active aid to navigation. The steel tower has a square Balcony and "round cast iron lantern room [that] features helical astragals" in the lantern. The two-story steel lighthouse keeper's quarters are in the art deco style. The structure rests on a 60 feet (18 m) by 54 feet (16 m) concrete pier, which rises more than 20 feet (6.1 m) above the lake's surface. The tower rests 14 feet (4.3 m) above the second floor and is 53 feet (16 m) tall overall. The red light has a focal plane of 67 feet (20 m) feet above Lake Michigan. The lantern and parapet are painted black. The structure is near the middle of the four-mile-long Milwaukee breakwater. It is built to withstand heavy weather and waves when Lake Michigan becomes roughest. The building is made of quarter-inch "steel plates over a steel skeletal frame, and is equipped with windows and portholes with glass a full half inch in thickness." The structure was originally painted red, but became white
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    244
    Morgan Point Light

    Morgan Point Light

    • Construction: Wood
    Morgan Point Lighthouse is a lighthouse in Noank, Connecticut, United States, on the west side of the mouth of the Mystic River. In 1831 the original 25-foot (7.6 m) granite tower was built. However, there were many complaints that the light was too dim, so as shipbuilding became more prominent in the area, a new lighthouse was needed and the current Morgan Point Lighthouse was built in 1868. In 1919, Morgan Point was discontinued and later sold to a private owner. The structure is of the same design as lighthouses at Sheffield Island in Norwalk; Great Captain Island in Greenwich; Old Field Point Light and Plum Island in New York; and Block Island North in Rhode Island. It is a granite ashlar building with an octagonal tower rising above. It has a "dentillated cornice and a slate-shingled roof. Inside, the lightkeeper's room is fitted out like a cabin, with fold-out desk and built-in bunk." As of 1978, it was a private residence and the lamp had been removed. It is included in the Noank Historic District, which was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1978. It is no longer an active aid to navigation and is not open to the public.
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    Navesink Twin Lights

    Navesink Twin Lights

    • Construction: Brownstone
    The Navesink Twin Lights is a non-operational lighthouse and museum located in Highlands, New Jersey overlooking Sandy Hook Bay, the entrance to the New York Harbor and the Atlantic Ocean. The Twin Lights, as the name implies, are a pair of beacons located 246 feet (75 m) above sea level on the headlands of the Navesink Highlands. In 1962, the State of New Jersey acquired Twin Lights. At the current museum facility, tours of the lighthouse, a climb of the North Tower and its expansive ocean view, and a view of the lighthouse equipment, await visitors. Twin Lights is listed on the State and National Register of Historic Places. The Twin Lights State Historic Site is part of the New Jersey Coastal Heritage Trail Route. A lighthouse existed on the site since 1828, when it became an important guide and landmark for ships navigating the treacherous entrances to New York Harbor. The current lighthouse was constructed in 1862. The non-identical towers by day and the two beacons by night—one flashing and one fixed—allowed ready identification by mariners of the identity of the facility, thus allowing a rough determination of their location approaching the harbor. This was the first
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    Newport Harbor Light

    Newport Harbor Light

    The Newport Harbor Light (also known as the Goat Island Light or Green Light), built in 1842, is located on north end of Goat Island, which is part of the city of Newport, Rhode Island, United States, in Narragansett Bay. The first light on Goat Island was constructed in 1823-1824, but was later transported to Prudence Island in 1851 where the structure still remains as the Prudence Island Light. The current light was constructed in 1842 a few yards off the coast of Goat Island and was connected to Goat Island by a narrow dike (the area was filled in the 1960s for the hotel) because the previous light failed in adequately warning ships of a reef just a few yards off Goat Island. The original lighting apparatus was, however, transferred to the newer lighthouse in 1842. In 1864 an attached lighthouse keeper's house was built. In 1921, a submarine hit the breakwater, damaging the foundation of the keeper's house. An electric light was placed in the tower the following year. The damaged keeper's dwelling was later torn down. After a private developer purchased Goat Island in the 1960s, the land between the northern end of Goat Island and the light was filled in to build a hotel. On
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    Point of Ayre

    Point of Ayre

    The Point of Ayre is the northernmost point of the Isle of Man. It lies at the northern end of Ramsey Bay 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) north of the town of Ramsey. The point can be accessed by the A16 road from Bride. It is the closest point on the Isle of Man to the British Mainland, being 26 kilometres (16 mi) south of Burrow Head in Scotland. The name Ayre comes from the Norse word Eyrr meaning gravel bank. Strong currents off-shore cause an ever changing build-up of shingle which literally means the beach changes shape with each tide, i.e. twice a day. The considerable difference between high and low water at the Point of Ayre provides excellent fishing from the beach. Many visitors are attracted by the beautiful carpet of gorse and heather which surrounds the lighthouse and merges with sand dunes stretching to the south-west, providing cover for rare wild flowers and forming part of a Manx National Nature Reserve. A wide variety of land and sea birds visit the area throughout the year, as do a number of grey seals. The Point of Ayre lighthouse is the oldest lighthouse on the Isle of Man. It was designed and built by Robert Stevenson, grandfather of prolific writer and novelist
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    Rebecca Shoal Light

    Rebecca Shoal Light

    The Rebecca Shoal Light was located on a treacherous coral bank, Rebecca Shoal, 10 km west of the Marquesas Keys and 50 km east of the Dry Tortugas. The bank has a least depth of 3.4 meters and is subject to strong currents and rough seas. The first attempt to place a light on Rebecca Shoal was under the direction of Lt. George Meade starting in 1854. After structures were washed away twice in 1855 while still being erected, Meade wrote, "I believed then, and am satisfied now, that no light-house structure of any kind has been erected, either in this country or in Europe, at a position more exposed and offering greater obstacles than the Rebecca shoal." A lighthouse was finally successfully erected on Rebecca Shoal in 1886. It was a 1⁄2-story square house set on high pilings. It was often impossible to land supplies or keepers at the lighthouse during bad weather. The lighthouse survived several hurricanes. The 1919 Florida Keys Hurricane broke the glass in the lighthouse's lantern and damaged the lens. The Spanish steamer Valbanera sank in that same hurricane five miles east of Rebecca Shoals, with the loss of all 488 people aboard. The lighthouse deteriorated after the light was
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    Sharps Island Light

    Sharps Island Light

    The Sharps Island Light is the third lighthouse to stand nearly 3 miles (5 km) south-southwest from the southern end of Tilghman Island in Maryland's Chesapeake Bay. The structure is best known today for evoking the Leaning Tower of Pisa, a condition caused by an ice floe in 1977. The first lighthouse was built on Sharps Island in 1838, but due to the island's erosion it was moved in 1848. This was replaced with a screwpile lighthouse in 1866 near the original location of the first structure. The second lighthouse lasted until 1881 when it was forced off its foundations by an ice floe. It floated nearly five miles down the Chesapeake—with its keepers still inside—until it ran aground, allowing the men to escape unharmed. The current light, a sparkplug lighthouse, was constructed in 1882 with a concrete caisson foundation and a 35-foot (10.7 m) cast iron tower. The fourth-order Fresnel lens was replaced with a 250 mm lens in 1977; the focal plane is 54 feet (16.5 m) above sea level. The tower includes an integral dwelling and was manned until 1938 when the United States Coast Guard automated the light. Leaning by about 15° since it was ice-damaged in 1977, the structure is
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    York Spit Light

    York Spit Light

    • Construction: Cast iron
    The York Spit Light was a lighthouse located at the mouth of the York River in the Chesapeake Bay, marking a long shoal paralleling the main channel into the river. This light replaced lightships stationed at this location beginning in 1853. Extra fender piles were added to the usual six pile structure in order to provide extra stability against the current. In 1903 riprap was placed around the piles for additional protection. A hurricane in September 1933 damaged the light. The house was removed and replaced with an automated light in 1960 as part of the program of decommissioning at that time. More recently this light was damaged in a hurricane, and a separate light on a single pole was erected next to the old screw-pile foundation.
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