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Best Legislative committee of All Time

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    1

    United States House Select Bipartisan Committee to Investigate the Preparation for and Response to Hurricane Katrina

    The Select Bipartisan Committee to Investigate the Preparation for and Response to Hurricane Katrina was the House of Representatives' congressional committee investigating the United States Government's failure to respond appropriately to Hurricane Katrina. The committee was directed to cease 30 days after releasing its final report. That report was released February 15, 2006. Despite the committee's name, it actually did not operate on a bipartisan basis. The committee was to have 20 members, with 11 members from the Republican majority and 9 members from the Democratic minority. However, Democrats did not to appoint any members to the committee.
    7.13
    8 votes
    2

    Committee on Budgetary Control

    The Committee on Budgetary Control (CONT) is a committee of the European Parliament. As the name suggests, the CONT is the European Parliament committee charged with producing reports relating to the European Union's Budget. Members of the Committee (7th legislature)
    6.88
    8 votes
    3

    Canadian House of Commons Standing Committee on International Trade

    The Standing Committee on International Trade (CIIT) is a committee in the Canadian House of Commons. It focuses on international trade. The committee was established in the 39th Parliament, having split off from the Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Trade. Standing Committee on International Trade (CIIT)
    8.50
    6 votes
    4
    7.83
    6 votes
    5

    United States Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry

    The Committee of Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry is a committee of the United States Senate empowered with legislative oversight of all matters relating to the nation's agriculture industry, farming programs, forestry and logging, and legislation relating to nutrition and health. Founded in 1825 the Committee was formed at the request of Senator William Findlay from Pennsylvania. Arguing that agriculture was as important to national progress as commerce and manufacturing, Findlay succeeded in persuading the full Senate to divide the Committee on Commerce and Manufactures into two separate committees. The Committee on Agriculture was formed by resolution on December 9, 1825. During the first four decades of the existence of this committee, the need for it was repeatedly called into question. At that time in America, nearly ²⁄3 of the population was directly engaged in agriculture. As such, issues related to agriculture overlapped with areas covered by other committees and were often referred to those committees instead of the Agriculture Committee. Following a debate over the necessity of various committees to have need of the services of a dedicated clerk, a Special Committee
    8.80
    5 votes
    6
    6.29
    7 votes
    7

    United Nations Special Committee on Palestine

    The United Nations Special Committee on Palestine (UNSCOP) was created on 15 May 1947 in response to a United Kingdom government request that the General Assembly "make recommendations under article 10 of the Charter, concerning the future government of Palestine". The British government had also recommended the establishment of a special committee to prepare a report for the General Assembly. The General Assembly adopted the recommendation to set up the UNSCOP to investigate the cause of the conflict in Palestine, and, if possible, devise a solution. UNSCOP was made up of representatives of 11 nations. UNSCOP visited Palestine and gathered testimony from Zionist organisations in Palestine and in the US. The Arab Higher Committee boycotted the Commission, explaining that the Palestinian Arabs' natural rights were self-evident and could not continue to be subject to investigation, but rather deserved to be recognized on the basis of the principles of the United Nations Charter. The Committee actively followed the unravelling of the SS Exodus, carrying 4554 Jewish Holocaust refugees seeking to illegally immigrate to Palestine. Some Committee members were present at the port of Haifa
    8.20
    5 votes
    8

    United States House Judiciary Subcommittee on Immigration, Border Security, and Claims

    The United States House Judiciary Subcommittee on Immigration, Border Security, and Claims has jurisdiction over immigration and naturalization, border security, admission of refugees, treaties, conventions and international agreements, claims against the United States, federal charters of incorporation, private immigration and claims bills, non-border enforcement, other appropriate matters as referred by the Chairman, and relevant oversight. Judiciary House Immigration
    9.25
    4 votes
    9

    United States Senate Subcommittee on Internal Security

    The Special Subcommittee to Investigate the Administration of the Internal Security Act and Other Internal Security Laws, 1951–77, more commonly known as the Senate Internal Security Subcommittee (SISS) and sometimes the McCarran Committee, was authorized under S. 366, approved December 21, 1950, to study and investigate (1) the administration, operation, and enforcement of the Internal Security Act of 1950 (Pub.L. 81-831, also known as the McCarran Act) and other laws relating to espionage, sabotage, and the protection of the internal security of the United States and (2) the extent, nature, and effects of subversive activities in the United States "including, but not limited to, espionage, sabotage, and infiltration of persons who are or may be under the domination of the foreign government or organization controlling the world Communist movement or any movement seeking to overthrow the Government of the United States by force and violence." The resolution also authorized the subcommittee to subpoena witnesses and require the production of documents. Because of the nature of its investigations, the subcommittee is considered by some to be the Senate equivalent to the older House
    6.83
    6 votes
    10

    Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments

    The Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments was established in 1994 to investigate questions of the record of the United States government with respect to human radiation experiments. The special committee was created by President Bill Clinton in Executive Order 12891, issued January 15, 1994. Ruth Faden of The Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics chaired the committee. Jonathan D. Moreno was a senior staff member of the committee. He later wrote the 1999 book Undue Risk: Secret State Experiments on Humans. The thousand-page final report of the Committee was released in October 1995 at a White House ceremony. The scandal first came to public attention in a newsletter called Science Trends in 1976 and in Mother Jones in 1981. Mother Jones reporter Howard Rosenburg used the Freedom of Information Act to gather hundreds of documents to investigate total radiation studies which were done at the Oak Ridge Institute for Nuclear Studies (now the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education). The Mother Jones article triggered a hearing before the Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight of the House Science and Technology Committee. U.S. Representative Al Gore of
    7.80
    5 votes
    11

    Independent International Commission on Decommissioning

    The Independent International Commission on Decommissioning (IICD) was established to oversee the decommissioning of paramilitary weapons in Northern Ireland, as part of the peace process. An earlier international body, set up during the ceasefires to report on how decommissioning might be achieved, presented its report on 22 January 1996. This recommended that the decommissioning process should take place "to the satisfaction of an independent commission". The Decommissioning Act, 1997 in the Republic of Ireland and the Northern Ireland Arms Decommissioning Act 1997 in the United Kingdom enabled such a body, which was then set up in an agreement between the British and Irish governments on 26 August 1997. The Commission was made up of: Its objective was to facilitate the decommissioning of firearms, ammunition and explosives, by: In the Belfast Agreement, signed in 1998, the participants reaffirmed their commitment to the total disarmament of all paramilitary organisations, and confirmed their intention to continue to work constructively and in good faith with the Independent Commission, and to use any influence they may have, to achieve the decommissioning of all paramilitary
    7.80
    5 votes
    12
    House Committee on House Administration

    House Committee on House Administration

    The United States House Committee on House Administration deals with the general administration matters of the United States House of Representatives. The Committee on House Administration is a standing committee of the United States House of Representatives. The powers and duties of the Committee include the statutory responsibilities of the Committee on House Administration, as determined primarily by the Legislative Reorganization Acts of 1946 and 1970; the House of Representatives Administrative Reform Technical Corrections Act of 1996; and the Rules of the House of Representatives adopted on January 6, 1999. The Committee on House Administration, which consists of 9 members, has jurisdiction over all legislation and other matters relating to the House of Representatives, such as: Additionally, the Committee: Source: Due to its relatively small size, the House Administration Committee has not had subcommittees for most of its existence. For the 110th Congress, Chairwoman Millinder-McDonald recommended the creation of two new subcommittees, which were approved by the full committee on February 16, 2007. The Committee on House Administration was created by the Legislative
    9.00
    4 votes
    13
    Attorney General's Commission on Pornography

    Attorney General's Commission on Pornography

    The final report of the Attorney General's Commission on Pornography (usually referred to as (the) Meese Report, for U.S. Attorney General Edwin Meese) is the result of a comprehensive investigation into pornography ordered by U.S. President Ronald Reagan. It was published in July 1986 and contains 1,960 pages. The following people comprised the commission (nicknamed The Meese Commission): The report is divided into five parts and 35 chapters and details most aspects of the pornography industry, including the history of pornography and the extent of First Amendment protections. The report also documents what the committee found to be the harmful effects of pornography and connections between pornographers and organized crime. The report was criticized by many inside and outside the pornography industry, calling it biased, not credible, and inaccurate. The "Meese Report" was preceded by the report of presidents Lyndon B. Johnson's and Richard Nixon's Commission on Obscenity and Pornography, which was published in 1970 and recommended loosening the legal restrictions on pornography.
    7.60
    5 votes
    14
    Special Committee on Decolonization

    Special Committee on Decolonization

    The Special Committee on Decolonization (also known as the U.N. Special Committee of the 24 on Decolonization, the Committee of 24, or simply, the Decolonization Committee) was created in 1961 by the General Assembly of the United Nations with the purpose of monitoring implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples and to make recommendations on its application. The committee is also a successor to the former Committee on Information from Non-Self-Governing Territories, with which it was merged in 1963. The full official name of the Special Committee is the Special Committee on the Situation with Regard to the Implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples. Hoping to speed the progress of decolonization, the General Assembly had adopted in 1960 the Resolution 1514, also known as the "Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples" or simply "Declaration on Decolonization". It stated that all people have a right to self-determination and proclaimed that colonialism should be brought to a speedy and unconditional end. Subsequently, in 1990, the
    7.60
    5 votes
    15

    United States Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation

    • Legislature: United States Senate
    The United States Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation is a standing committee of the United States Senate in charge of all senate matters related to the following subjects: It also studies and reviews matters relating to science and technology, oceans policy, transportation, communications, and consumer affairs, and reports on those findings. The Committee is chaired by Democrat Jay Rockefeller of West Virginia and the Ranking Member is Republican Kay Bailey Hutchison of Texas. Source: 2011 Congressional Record, Vol. 157, Pg. S557{{{3}}} The original progenitors of this committee were:
    7.60
    5 votes
    16

    House Committee on Education and Labor

    The Committee on Education and the Workforce is a standing committee of the United States House of Representatives. From 1947 until 1994 and again from 2007 to 2011, during Democratic control of the House, it was known as the Committee on Education and Labor. Attempts were made to create a congressional committee on education and labor starting with the early congresses but issues over Congress's constitutional ability to oversee such issues delayed the committee's formation. Finally, on March 21, 1867, the Committee on Education and Labor was founded following the end of the Civil War and during the rapid industrialization of America. On December 19, 1883, the committee was divided into two, the Committee on Education and the Committee on Labor. The committees again merged on January 2, 1947, after the passage of the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946, becoming the Committee on Education and Labor again. On January 4, 1995, when the Republicans took over the House, the Committee was renamed the Committee on Economic and Educational Opportunities. It was renamed again as the Committee on Education and the Workforce two years later on January 7, 1997. On January 4, 2007, with
    8.75
    4 votes
    17

    United States House Committee on Science

    The Committee on Science, Space and Technology is a committee of the United States House of Representatives. It has jurisdiction over non-defense federal scientific research and development. Specifically, the committee has partial or complete jurisdiction over the following federal agencies: NASA, the Department of Energy, EPA, ATSDR, NSF, FAA, NOAA, National Institute of Standards and Technology, FEMA, the U.S. Fire Administration, and United States Geological Survey. In the wake of the Soviet Sputnik program in the late 1950s, Congress created the Select Committee on Astronautics and Space Exploration in 1958. This select committee drafted the National Aeronautics and Space Act that created the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). A staff report of the committee, the Space Handbook: Astronautics and its Applications, provided non-technical information about spaceflight to U.S. policy makers. The committee also chartered the permanent House Committee on Science and Astronautics, which officially began on January 3, 1959, and was the first new standing committee established in the House since 1946. The name was changed in 1974 to the House Committee on Science and
    8.75
    4 votes
    18

    United States House Select Committee on Astronautics and Space Exploration

    The Select Committee on Astronautics and Space Exploration was established in 1958 in response to the Soviet Sputnik program in the late 1950s. This select committee drafted the National Aeronautics and Space Act that created the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). It also chartered the permanent House Committee on Science and Astronautics, which officially began on January 3, 1959, and was the first new standing committee established in the House since 1946. The name was changed in 1974 to the Committee on Science and Technology. The name was changed again in 1987 to the Committee on Science, Space and Technology. After the Republican Party gained a majority in Congress in 1994, the name of the committee was changed again to its current name, the "House Committee on Science". A staff report of the committee, the Space Handbook: Astronautics and its Applications, provided non-technical information about spaceflight to U.S. policy makers. Astronautics and Space Exploration
    8.75
    4 votes
    19

    United States House Armed Services Subcommittee on Total Force

    House Armed Services Subcommittee on Military Personnel is a subcommittee of the House Armed Services Committee in the United States House of Representatives. The Military Personnel Subcommittee exercises oversight and legislative jurisdiction over: U.S. Senate Armed Services Subcommittee on Personnel
    6.50
    6 votes
    20

    National Commission on the Disappearance of Persons

    National Commission on the Disappearance of Persons (Spanish: Comisión Nacional sobre la Desaparición de Personas, CONADEP) was an Argentine organization created by President Raúl Alfonsín on 15 December 1983, shortly after his inauguration, to investigate the fate of the desaparecidos (victims of forced disappearance) and other human rights violations (see: Dirty War) performed during the military dictatorship known as the National Reorganization Process between 1976 and 1983. The research of the investigation commission was documented in the Nunca Más (Never Again) report, which was a complete summary published as an official report in Spanish, and delivered to Alfonsín on 20 September 1984, which opened the doors to the trial of the military juntas of the dictatorship. CONADEP recorded the forced disappearance of 8,961 persons from 1976 to 1983, although it noted that the actual number could be higher (estimates by human rights organizations usually place it at 30,000 persons). The report also stated that about 600 people were "disappeared" and 458 were assassinated (by death squads such as the Argentine Anticommunist Alliance) during the Peronist governments from 1973 to 1976.
    7.40
    5 votes
    21

    Pilkington Committee on Broadcasting

    The Pilkington Committee was set up on 13 July 1960 under the chairmanship of British industrialist Sir Harry Pilkington to consider the future of broadcasting, cable and "the possibility of television for public showing". One of its main conclusions stated that the British public did not want commercial radio broadcasting and it offered criticism of the existing commercial television licensees. The members were: The Report, published on 27 June 1962, recommended the introduction of colour television licences and that Britain's third national television channel (after the BBC Television Service and ITV) should be awarded to the BBC. BBC2 was launched two years later. It also criticised the populism of ITV by attacking its American originated acquired programming such as Westerns and crime series. The Report recommended that the BBC should extend its activities to the creation of local radio stations in order to prevent the introduction of commercial radio. In deciding that the British public did not want commercial radio, it slammed the door to licences that were being sought by over 100 British registered commercial radio companies. Its immediate result was historic in nature
    8.50
    4 votes
    22

    United States Congressional subcommittee

    A congressional subcommittee in the United States Congress is a subdivision of a United States congressional committee that considers specified matters and reports back to the full committee. Subcommittees are formed by most committees to share specific tasks within the jurisdiction of the full committee. Subcommittees are responsible to, and work within the guidelines established by, their parent committees. In particular, standing committees usually create subcommittees with legislative jurisdiction to consider and report bills. They may assign their subcommittees such specific tasks as the initial consideration of measures and oversight of laws and programs in the subcommittees’ areas. Service on subcommittees enables members to develop expertise in specialized fields. Subcommittees diffuse the legislative process. For the most part, they are independent, autonomous units with written jurisdictions, and, pursuant to longstanding practice, most bills are referred by a full committee to them. General requirements for establishing subcommittees are established in House or Senate rules, but specifics with respect to subcommittee assignments and their jurisdiction are left up to the
    8.50
    4 votes
    23
    Texas Commission on Environmental Quality

    Texas Commission on Environmental Quality

    The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) is the environmental agency for the U.S. state of Texas. The commission is headquartered at 12100 Park 35 Circle in Austin. The agency was formed by act of the Texas Legislature in 1993 by consolidating the Texas Air Control Board (1965–1993) and Texas Water Commission (1985–1993) with the aim of increasing efficiency in enforcement of environmental laws, statutes, and regulations. They have come under fire in recent years for allowing fracking companies (hydraulic fracturing) to drill for gas within city limits which encompasses mostly residential areas. The TCEQ has been accused of derelict of duty, conflict of interest, and kickbacks, regarding shale gas and other air, land, water, and human risks. Shell gas emissions have placed Dallas and Houston in the top ten most polluted cities category. Originally known as the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission, it acquired its present name in 2002. It is the primary state agency charged with enforcement of environmental regulations and with issuing air and water operating permits to businesses operating in Texas. These permits typically specify the types and maximum amounts
    6.17
    6 votes
    24
    Royal Commission on Genetic Modification

    Royal Commission on Genetic Modification

    The Royal Commission on Genetic Modification was established by the New Zealand Government to look into and report on the issues surrounding genetic modification in New Zealand. The overall conclusion recommended a 'proceed, with caution' approach to the industry. The Commission was chaired by Thomas Eichelbaum and it produced the Report of the Royal Commission on Genetic Modification in 2001.
    7.00
    5 votes
    25

    United States Senate Committee on Corporations Organized in the District of Columbia

    The United States Senate Committee on Corporations Organized in the District of Columbia was formed as a select committee in 1892, and became a standing committee in 1896. In 1921, it was abolished. Robert M. La Follette had the distinction of chairing the committee during the 63rd through the 65th Congress, even though he was a member of the minority Republican Party. This was because the Senate had 73 standing committees in the 63rd Congress, several more than there were Democrats to chair them. Therefore, some members of the minority party were allowed to chair certain minor committees.
    7.00
    5 votes
    26

    Church Committee

    The Church Committee is the common term referring to the United States Senate Select Committee to Study Governmental Operations with Respect to Intelligence Activities, a U.S. Senate committee chaired by Senator Frank Church (D-ID) in 1975. A precursor to the U.S. Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, the committee investigated intelligence gathering for illegality by the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) after certain activities had been revealed by the Watergate affair. By the early years of the 1970s, the unpopularity of the Vietnam War and the unfolding Watergate scandal brought the era of minimal oversight to an abrupt halt . The US Congress was determined to rein in the Nixon administration and to ascertain the extent to which the nation's intelligence agencies had been involved in questionable, if not outright illegal, activities. A series of troubling revelations started to appear in the press concerning intelligence activities. First came the revelations of Christopher Pyle in January 1970 of the U.S. Army's spying on the civilian population and Sam Ervin's Senate investigations that resulted. The dam broke on 22 December 1974,
    8.00
    4 votes
    27
    Commission on Industrial Relations

    Commission on Industrial Relations

    The Commission on Industrial Relations (also known as the Walsh Commission) was a commission created by the U.S. Congress on August 23, 1912. The commission studied work conditions throughout the industrial United States between 1913 and 1915. The final report of the Commission, published in eleven volumes in 1916, contain tens of thousands of pages of testimony from a wide range of witnesses, including Clarence Darrow, Louis Brandeis, Mary Harris "Mother" Jones, Theodore Schroeder, William "Big Bill" Haywood, scores of ordinary workers, and the icons of capitalism, including Daniel Guggenheim, George Walbridge Perkins, Sr. (of U.S. Steel), Henry Ford, and Andrew Carnegie. In 1871, there was a failed attempt to create an Industrial Commission. There was also the Hewitt committee hearings of 1878-79, the three-year study of the Blair committee which ended in 1886, and a probe conducted from 1898-1902 by the United States Industrial Commission, appointed by President William McKinley. In 1910 two leaders of the Structural Ironworkers Union, the McNamara Brothers dynamited the Los Angeles Times building, killing twenty people. There was public outcry as a result and so President
    8.00
    4 votes
    28

    Royal Commission on Renewing and Strengthening Our Place in Canada

    The Government of Newfoundland and Labrador announced the Royal Commission on Renewing and Strengthening Our Place in Canada on 19 March 2002, in the Speech from the Throne. On 19 April 2002, the appointment of Commissioners Vic Young, (Chair), Sister Elizabeth Davis and Judge James Igloliorte, were announced. The Commissioners formally assumed their duties on 3 June 2002 and filed its final report on 30 June 2003. The mandate of the Royal Commission was to conduct a critical assessment of Newfoundland and Labrador’s strengths and weaknesses and to bring forward recommendations as to how they can renew and strengthen their place in Canada.
    8.00
    4 votes
    29

    United States Senate Committee on the District of Columbia

    The United States Senate Committee on the District of Columbia was one of the first standing committees created in the United States Senate, in 1816. It had jurisdiction over the District of Columbia. It continued to exist until the reorganization of 1977 when, following the granting of home rule to the district, its duties were transferred to the Committee on Governmental Affairs.
    6.80
    5 votes
    30
    Committee on Alleged German Outrages

    Committee on Alleged German Outrages

    The Committee on Alleged German Outrages, often called the Bryce Committee after its chair, Viscount James Bryce (1838-1922), is best known for producing the "Report of the Committee on Alleged German Outrages" published on May 12, 1915. The report is seen as a major propaganda form that Britain and America used in order to educate the world on the behavior of Germany who had invaded Belgium the year before. The Report was translated by the end of 1915 into every major European language and had a profound impact on public opinion in Allied and neutral countries, particularly in the USA. Though the findings of the Report have been substantiated by several scholars in the 21st century, the eyewitness testimony published in its 320-page Appendix A included some sensationalist accounts of mutilations and rapes for which there is no other evidence. These invented atrocities stigmatized the Report and made it a target for revisionist historians and writers on propaganda down to the present day. By the middle of September, 1914, the Belgian Government had issued three reports on German war crimes committed during the invasion of the country, and there were calls in the British Parliament
    9.00
    3 votes
    31

    Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples

    The Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples (RCAP) was a Canadian Royal Commission established in 1991 to address many issues of aboriginal status that had come to light with recent events such as the Oka Crisis and the Meech Lake Accord. The commission culminated in a final report of 4000 pages, published in 1996. To date the federal government has not implemented the RCAP recommendations. The original report "set out a 20 — year agenda for implementing changes." The Commission of Inquiry investigate the evolution of the relationship among aboriginal peoples (First Nations, Inuit and Métis), the Government of Canada, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada and part of the Culture of Canada as a whole. It proposed specific solutions, rooted in domestic and international experience, to the problems which have plagued those relationships and which confront aboriginal peoples today. The Commission examined many issues which it deems to be relevant to any or all of the Aboriginal peoples in Canada. The study of the historical relations between the government and aboriginal people, in order to determine the possibility of Aboriginal self-government, and the legal status of previous agreements
    9.00
    3 votes
    32
    Standing Committee on Energy and the Environment

    Standing Committee on Energy and the Environment

    The Standing Committee on Energy and the Environment (Norwegian: Energi- og miljøkomiten) is a standing committee of the Parliament of Norway. It is responsible for policies relating to petroleum, energy, hydroelectricity, environmental protection and regional planning. It corresponds to the Ministry of Petroleum and Energy and Ministry of the Environment. The committee has 14 members and is chaired by Erling Sande of the Centre.
    9.00
    3 votes
    33
    9.00
    3 votes
    34

    United States Senate Special Committee on Aging

    The United States Senate Special Committee on Aging was initially established in 1961 as a temporary committee; it became a permanent Senate committee in 1977. As a special committee, it has no legislative authority, but it studies issues related to older Americans, particularly Medicare and Social Security. Prior to the passage of Medicare, the committee was studying health care insurance coverage for elderly American citizens. The committee conducts oversight of the Medicare program, Social Security and the Older Americans Act. Some of the issues that have been examined by the committee include unacceptable conditions in nursing homes, protection from age discrimination, and pricing practices for prescription drugs. The Committee is chaired by Democrat Herb Kohl of Wisconsin, and the Ranking Member is Republican Bob Corker of Tennessee. Source: 2011 Congressional Record, Vol. 157, Pg. S557{{{3}}} ; S.Res. 179
    7.75
    4 votes
    35

    Committee on Gender, Family, Youths, and People with Disabilities

    The Committee on Gender, Family, Youths and People with Disabilities is one of the ten permanent committees of the Pan-African Parliament. It concentrates on issues concerning women, family and people and children with disabilities. Functions of the Committee: Chairperson of the Committee is the Hon Bwambale Biira Loice (Uganda). The Deputy Chairperson is the Hon Blandine Sawagogo Ouedraogo (Burkina Faso). The Rapporteur is the Hon Paul Temba Nyathi (Zimbabwe).
    6.60
    5 votes
    36

    Select Committee on Reserves Bill 2003

    The Select Committee on Reserves (Reserve 43131) Bill 2003 is an Australian select committee that investigated the eviction of the Swan Valley Nyungah Community (SVNC) from their traditional land through the use of the Reserves (Reserve 43131) Bill 2003. It investigated the motives of the Western Australian Gallop government in proposing and passing the bill. The Nyungah Aboriginal peoples have made attempts to reclaim their traditional land since 1919 when the Guildford Aboriginals were transhipped to the Moore River native settlement. Robert Bropho, an Aboriginal elder, and his extended family campaigned vigorously for the right to occupy the area which presently takes in Reserve 43131. The SVNAC was established in 1977 and under the Aboriginal Heritage Act 1972 they were given control of the reserve. On 12 February 1999 a 15 year old Aboriginal woman named Susan Taylor committed suicide in the reserve and on 22–30 October 2001 a coronial inquiry was held. The inquest investigated the circumstances in which Susan Taylor and other Aboriginal young people lived. It accepted evidence that rape and sexual abuse of Aboriginal minors was widespread in Western Australia; that sexually
    6.60
    5 votes
    37

    Committee on Standards and Privileges

    The Standards and Privileges Committee of the United Kingdom House of Commons was established in 1995 to replace the earlier Committee of Privileges. Ten Members of Parliament sit to make recommendations to the House on complaints of breach of Parliamentary privilege. The Committee is appointed by the House of Commons to oversee the work of the Parliamentary Commissioner for Standards. It examines the arrangements for the compilation, maintenance and accessibility of the Register of Members' Interests and considers specific complaints made in relation to the registering or declaring of interests and any matter relating to the conduct of Members, including specific complaints in relation to alleged breaches in the Code of Conduct which have been drawn to the Committee's attention by the Commissioner. On the 9th of December 2010 Geoff Hoon along with Stephen Byers and Richard Caborn were banned from entering the Parliamentary estate; the Committee banned Geoff Hoon for five years as his was the most serious breach, whilst Byers received two years and Caborn six months. This was due to the 2010 Cash for Influence Scandal As of 22 November 2010, the members of the committee are as
    7.50
    4 votes
    38
    7.50
    4 votes
    39

    Commission on the Unification of Democratic Forces

    The Commission on the Unification of Democratic Forces (in Russian: Комиссия по объединению демократических сил) was established on February 16, 2006 by the federal political council of the Union of Right Forces party with a mandate to achieve, by December 2006, the unification of all democratic opposition forces in Russia and to lead to the creation of a United Democratic Party in time for the 2007 parliamentary elections. The Commission is chaired by Boris Nemtsov, who was Deputy Prime Minister of Russia from 1997 to 1998 and led the Union of Right Forces from 2000 to 2003. The Commission members are Leonid Gozman, Vladimir V. Kara-Murza, Sergei Kolesov, Boris Nadezhdin, Oleg Naumov, Viktor Nekrutenko, Oleg Permyakov and Yevgeny Yasin.
    10.00
    2 votes
    40

    United States Senate Committee on the Mississippi River and Its Tributaries

    The United States Senate Committee on the Mississippi River and Its Tributaries was established in 1879 to replace the Select Committee on the Levee System of the Mississippi River (1870–1879) and oversaw the activities of the United States Army Corps of Engineers and the Mississippi River Commission. The committee was abolished in 1921. The Committee was at various times called the Committee on the Mississippi River and Its Tributaries, the Committee on Levees and Improvements of the Mississippi River, and the Committee on the Improvement of the Mississippi River and Its Tributaries.
    10.00
    2 votes
    41

    United States Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Terrorism, Technology and Homeland Security

    The United States Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Terrorism and Homeland Security is one of seven subcommittees within the Senate Judiciary Committee. The subcommittee's jurisdiction includes oversight of the Departments of Justice and Homeland Security and the State Department's consular operations with regard to anti-terrorism enforcement and policy. The jurisdiction also includes oversight of government encryption policies and encryption export licensing and oversight of espionage laws and their enforcement. The subcommittee is chaired by Democrat Benjamin Cardin of Maryland, and the Ranking Minority Member is Republican Jon Kyl of Arizona.
    10.00
    2 votes
    42
    House Committee on the Judiciary

    House Committee on the Judiciary

    The U.S. House Committee on the Judiciary, also called the House Judiciary Committee, is a standing committee of the United States House of Representatives. It is charged with overseeing the administration of justice within the federal courts, administrative agencies and Federal law enforcement entities. The Judiciary Committee is also the committee responsible for impeachments of federal officials. Because of the legal nature of its oversight, committee members usually have a legal background, but this is not required. In the 112th Congress, the chairman of the committee is Republican Lamar Smith of Texas, and the ranking minority member is Democrat John Conyers of Michigan. The committee was created on June 6, 1813 for the purpose of considering legislation related to the judicial system. This committee approved articles of impeachment against three Presidents: Andrew Johnson (1868), Richard Nixon (1974), and Bill Clinton (1998). Source: Source:a "Chairman Smith Announces Subcommittee Chairmen". January 7, 2011. http://judiciary.house.gov/news/2011/jan/110107_subcommittee_chairmen.html. Retrieved 2011-01-07.  Chairman: Jim Sensenbrenner (R-WI); Ranking member: John Conyers
    6.40
    5 votes
    43

    United Nations Commission on the Status of Women

    The Commission on the Status of Women (CSW or UNCSW) is a functional commission of the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), one of the main UN organs within the United Nations.Every year, representatives of Member States gather at United Nations Headquarters in New York to evaluate progress on gender equality, identify challenges, set global standards and formulate concrete policies to promote gender equality and advancement of women worldwide. UN agencies actively followed their mandates to bring women into development approaches and programs and the conferences. They participate at the prepcoms, design strategy, hold caucus meetings, network about the various agenda items being negotiated in the different committees, and work as informed lobbyists at the conferences themselves. The CSW is one of the commissions of the UN that do not limit participation to states only. For example, NGOs are also allowed to participate in sessions of the CSW, attending caucuses and panels and organizing their own parallel events through the NGO Committee on the Status of Women, NY (NGO CSW/NY). This is particularly important for contested territories such as Taiwan, which is not a
    6.40
    5 votes
    44
    7.25
    4 votes
    45

    Committee on Trade, Customs, and Immigration Matters

    The Committee on Trade, Customs, and Immigration Matters is one of the ten permanent committees of the Pan-African Parliament. It concentrates on the following: The Committee is chaired by Lee Maeba of Nigeria. The Deputy Chairperson of the committee is Dr. Faeka AlReafi from Egypt. The Rapporteur of the Committee is Tsudao Gurirab from Namibia.
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    4 votes
    46
    7.25
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    47

    House Committee on the Budget

    The U.S. House Committee on the Budget, commonly known as the House Budget Committee, is a standing committee of the United States House of Representatives, the lower house of Congress. Its responsibilities include legislative oversight of the federal budget process, reviewing all bills and resolutions on the budget, and monitoring agencies and programs funded outside of the budgetary process. The committee briefly operated as a select committee in 1919 and 1921, during the 66th and 67th Congresses, before being made a standing committee in 1974. The primary responsibility of the Budget Committee is the drafting and preparation of the Concurrent Resolution on the Budget, commonly referred to as the "budget resolution." This resolution sets the aggregate levels of spending and revenue that is expected to occur in a given fiscal year. Hence each session of Congress, a budget resolution by law must be enacted by April 15. This target date is rarely met, and in at least four years (FY1999, FY2003, FY2005, and FY2007) no budget resolution was ultimately adopted. This resolution also gives to each committee of the House an "allocation" of "new budget authority." This allocation is
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    4 votes
    48

    House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure

    • Legislature: United States House of Representatives
    • Subcommittees: United States House Transportation Subcommittee on Economic Development, Public Buildings and Emergency Management
    The U.S. House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure is a standing committee of the United States House of Representatives. John Mica (R-Florida) currently chairs the committee. The Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure has formerly been known as the Committee on Public Works and Transportation, and the Committee on Public Works between 1947 and 1968. This committee was formed in 1842. Under the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946 the Committees on Public Buildings and Grounds (1837-1946), Rivers and Harbors (1883-1946), Roads (1913–46), and the Flood Control (1916–46) were combined to form the Committee on Public Works. Its jurisdiction from the beginning of the 80th Congress (1947–48) through the 90th Congress (1967–68) remained unchanged. While these four original committees retained their separate identities, they were reduced to subcommittees. Addition subcommittees were formed for issues on Beach Erosion, 80th Congress (1947–48) and for Watershed Development, 86th-90th Congresses (1959–68). Special Subcommittees included those: to Investigate Questionable Trade Practices, 80th Congress; to Study Civil Works, 82nd Congress (1951–52); on the Federal-Aid
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    4 votes
    49

    House of Lords Committee on Privileges

    The Committee for Privileges and Conduct is a select committee of the House of Lords in the Parliament of the United Kingdom. The committee's remit is to make recommendations to the House on complaints of breach of parliamentary privilege. The committee also considers petitions to claim any peerage. When considering Claims of Peerage, the committee must sit with at least three Lords of Appeal present. The committee is presided over by the Chairman of Committees. As of 16 May 2012, the members of the committee are as follows:
    7.25
    4 votes
    50

    Committee on Foreign Affairs

    The Committee on Foreign Affairs (AFET, after the French name "Affaires étrangères"), previously called Political Affairs, is a committee of the European Parliament. Composed of 75 members and 74 substitutes, it has two subcommittees: the Subcommittee on Human Rights (DROI) and the Subcommittee on Security and Defence (SEDE). Foreign affairs is not an area that Parliament has much power over, yet attracts a high proportion of the more well-known and influential MEPs given the prestige of the area. For an up to date list of members, see: the European Parliament website: AFET members
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    3 votes
    51

    Committee on Health, Labour, and Social Affairs

    The Committee on Health, Labour, and Social Affairs is one of the ten permanent committees of the Pan-African Parliament. It takes the following actions: Chairperson of the Committee is Hon Dr Khauhelo Deborah Raditapole from Lesotho. Deputy Chairperson of the Committee Hon Dr Aribot Belly from Guinea. Rapporteur of the Committee is Hon Ahmed Mohamed Hassan from Djibouti. Other members of the Committee include: Hon Mbonda Elie from Cameroon among others.
    8.33
    3 votes
    52

    United States House Armed Services Subcommittee on Terrorism, Unconventional Threats and Capabilities

    Subcommittee on Emerging Threats and Capabilities is a subcommittee of the House Armed Services Committee in the U.S. House of Representatives. Prior to the 112th Congress, it was known as the Subcommittee on Terrorism, Unconventional Threats and Capabilities. The Emerging Threats and Capabilities Subcommittee has jurisdiction over Department of Defense counter proliferation and counter terrorism programs and initiatives Special Operations Forces; defense science and technology policy and programs, such as the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency; information technology programs; as well as intelligence support and cyber operations, strategic communications, and information operations. The subcommittee is chaired by Mac Thornberry of Texas, and the Ranking Member is Jim Langevin of Rhode Island. Pursuant to the committee's rules, the chairman and ranking member of the full committee may serve as ex officio members of each subcommittee. United States Senate Armed Services Subcommittee on Emerging Threats and Capabilities
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    3 votes
    53

    United States House Committee on Ventilation and Acoustics

    The United States House Committee on Ventilation and Acoustics is a former standing committee of the United States House of Representatives. The committee was established to have jurisdiction over subjects related to the ventilation and acoustics of the Hall of the House of Representatives. The ventilation and acoustics of the House Chamber had been known to be unsatisfactory from 1857 when the chamber was first occupied. Before the establishment of the standing committee, numerous select committees were named to study the problem and suggest solutions. In 1911 the committee was abolished and the subjects in its jurisdiction were included in the jurisdiction of the Committee on Accounts.  This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the National Archives and Records Administration.
    8.33
    3 votes
    54

    United States House Science Subcommittee on Space and Aeronautics

    The Science Subcommittee on Space and Aeronautics is one of five subcommittees of the United States House Committee on Science and Technology. The subcommittee has legislative jurisdiction and general and special oversight and investigative authority on all matters relating to astronautical and aeronautical research and development including: Chairs of the subcommittee:
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    3 votes
    55
    United States Senate Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship

    United States Senate Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship

    The U.S. Senate Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship is a standing committee of the United States Senate. It has jurisdiction over the Small Business Administration and is also charged with researching and investigating all problems of American small business enterprises. The Senate Committee on Small Business was first established as the Select Committee on Small Business on February 20, 1950, with approval of Senate Resolution 58 during the 81st Congress. That first committee had just nine members. It was the first select committee created by the Senate that still operates today. The committee's jurisdiction has been changed several times since it was first created, through additional powers or by changing the manner in which committee members are appointed. While first established as a select committee with limited responsibilities, it now possesses virtually all the characteristics of a standing committee, as outlined under Senate Rule 25. During the 96th Congress, the committee acted on legislation to reauthorize the Small Business Administration that expanded the agency to include loan programs for employee ownership, Small Business Development Centers, and
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    3 votes
    56
    United States Senate Committee on the Philippines

    United States Senate Committee on the Philippines

    The Committee on the Philippines was a standing committee of the United States Senate from 1899 to 1921. The committee was established by Senate resolution on December 15, 1899, to oversee administration of the Philippines, which Spain had ceded to the United States as part of the settlement of the Spanish-American War. The committee was established by Senate resolution on December 15, 1899, even though the treaty of December 10, 1899, had not yet been ratified. In 1921, the Committee was terminated and jurisdiction over legislative matters concerning the Philippines was transferred to the newly created Committee on Territories and Insular Possessions. At the time of the creation of the committee, the Philippines were in a state of civil turmoil that greatly concerned the Senate, where a debate raged between those who wished to extend U.S. sovereignty over the Filipinos and the anti-imperialists. Like the Committee on the Pacific Islands and Puerto Rico, the Committee on the Philippines focused on primarily on legal and economic matters, such as Philippine independence, administration of the islands by the U.S. Philippine Commission, and trade issues. Matters relating to the
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    3 votes
    57

    United States Senate Committee to Establish a University of the United States

    Founded June 2, 1890 as a Select Committee, the Committee to Establish a University of the United States was an initiative of the United States Senate which became a Standing Committee on March 19, 1896. During this time there was also a National University Committee outside of the Senate. On 1897 the committee tried to pass a bill to create a University of the United States, and three years later it presented a bill to allow the Smithsonian Institution to give out degrees. Neither bill was successful. The committee was disbanded in 1921 as part of a "housecleaning" that got rid of several largely inactive or defunct committees which still officially existed.
    8.33
    3 votes
    58

    United States Senate Select Committee on Intelligence

    • Legislature: United States Senate
    The United States Senate Select Committee on Intelligence (sometimes referred to as SSCI) is dedicated to overseeing the United States Intelligence Community—the agencies and bureaus of the federal government of the United States who provide information and analysis for leaders of the executive and legislative branches. The Committee was established in 1976 by the 94th Congress. The Committee is “select” in that membership is temporary and rotated among members of the chamber. The committee comprises 15 members. Eight of those seats are reserved for one majority and one minority member of each of the following committees: Appropriations, Armed Services, Foreign Relations, and Judiciary. Of the remaining seven, four are members of the majority, and three are members of the minority. In addition, the Majority Leader and Minority Leader are non-voting ex officio members of the committee. As part of its oversight responsibilities, the Committee performs an annual review of the intelligence budget submitted by the president and prepares legislation authorizing appropriations for the various civilian and military agencies and departments comprising the intelligence community. These
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    3 votes
    59
    United States Commission on Ocean Policy

    United States Commission on Ocean Policy

    The United States Commission on Ocean Policy (sometimes known as the Watkins Commission, after the chairman of the commission during its first gathering, James Watkins) was created by an act of the 106th United States Congress known as the Oceans Act of 2000. The commission's mandate was to establish findings and develop recommendations for a new and comprehensive national ocean policy. The final report was delivered in September 2004, and shortly afterwards the commission was terminated, as scheduled by the Oceans Act. In the course of its work, the Commission established four working groups to address the following issues: The previous review of U.S. ocean policy had been conducted thirty-five years before by the Stratton Commission, published in 1969. To account for changes in the intervening years, the U.S. Congress decided to form the Commission on Ocean Policy to conduct a new review, and develop recommendations for future ocean policy. The Oceans Act of 2000 was passed in the Senate June 6, 2000, and become effective on January 20, 2001. The Commission is composed of 16 members. Per the Act, the House of Representatives and Senate Majority each nominated eight people, and
    9.50
    2 votes
    60

    Committee on Cooperation, International Relations, and Conflict Resolutions

    The Committee on Cooperation, International Relations, and Conflict Resolution is one of the ten permanent committees of the Pan-African Parliament. It is charged with the following duties: Chairperson of the Committee is Hon Elhadj Diao Kante from Guinea. Deputy Chairperson of the Committee Hon Mrs Diye Ba Mauritania. Rapporteur of the Committee is Hon Symon V Kaunda of Malawi.
    7.00
    4 votes
    61

    Committee on Rules, Privileges, and Discipline

    The Committee on Rules, Privileges and Discipline is one of the ten permanent committees of the Pan-African Parliament. Its functions are to: Chairperson of the committee is Hon Miria Matembe (Uganda) The Deputy Chairperson is the Hon Ismaël Tidjani Serpos (Benin) The Rapporteur of the committee is the Hon Abraham Ossei Aidooh (Ghana)
    7.00
    4 votes
    62

    Council Learned in the Law

    The Council Learned in the Law was a highly controversial tribunal of Henry VII of England's reign. The brainchild of Sir Reginald Bray, the Council Learned was introduced in 1495 to defend Henry’s position as a feudal landlord. It dealt with the king's fiscal matters and enforced payments of debts. It proved to be much more efficient than the Exchequer. By the end of Henry VII's reign, the Council Learned had become very unpopular, and after his death in 1509, it was abolished. Its most prominent councilors, Edmund Dudley and Sir Richard Empson were imprisoned. They were convicted of treason, even though evidence was scarce, attainted and executed in 1510. There is much controversy about the Council Learned in the Law because most existing sources date after 1509 when it had been officially condemned. In the Tower, Dudley confessed to having issued harsher penalties than lawful in several cases, a statement which has given the Council a strongly negative connotation.
    7.00
    4 votes
    63

    Royal Commission on the Defence of the United Kingdom

    In 1859 Lord Palmerston instigated the Royal Commission on the Defence of the United Kingdom because of serious concerns that France might attempt to invade the UK. The recent period had seen great improvements in gunnery (with RML and RBL designs); the widespread introduction of steam propulsion in ships (the French La Gloire and British response HMS Warrior are examples); and the growth of the French battle fleet (between 1854-1858 it had achieved numerical equality to the British). These factors convinced him that Britain's coastal defences were inadequate to prevent invasion by Napoleon III if the Royal Navy was lured elsewhere. The Commission consisted of six eminent naval and military officers, plus a civilian representative of the Treasury, James Fergusson, who in 1856-57 had published papers warning of the vulnerability of Portsmouth. Its brief was to enquire into the state and sufficiency of fortifications existing and planned for defending the UK, with a specific focus on naval dockyards. They concluded in their report in February 1860 that the fleet, standing army and volunteer forces, even combined, did not provide sufficient defence. An intensive programme of
    7.00
    4 votes
    64
    Texas Commission on Jail Standards

    Texas Commission on Jail Standards

    The Texas Commission on Jail Standards (TCJS) is an agency of the Tex Mex government. Headquartered in the William Clements State Office Building in Downtown Austin, the agency oversees county jails to ensure standards of construction and operation. The agency was created in 1975.
    7.00
    4 votes
    65

    United States House Committee on Mileage

    The United States House Committee on Mileage is a former standing committee of the United States House of Representatives. The jurisdiction of the committee is described in Rule XI: "The ascertaining of the travel of Members of the House shall be made by the Committee on Mileage and reported to the Sergeant at Arms." The committee was an outgrowth of the Committee on Accounts which originally was charged with the audit of Members' mileage. In 1927 the Committee on Mileage was discontinued and these duties were returned to the Accounts Committee. In addition to determining the travel expenses of Members, the committee reported on bills, resolutions, and petitions and memorials related to this subject.
    7.00
    4 votes
    66

    United States Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Immigration, Border Security and Citizenship

    The Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Immigration, Border Security and Citizenship is one of seven subcommittees within the Senate Judiciary Committee. Jurisdiction: (1) Immigration, citizenship, and refugee laws; (2) Oversight of the Department of Homeland Security U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services and the immigration functions of the U.S Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, and Directorate of Border and Transportation Security; (3) Oversight of the immigration-related functions of the Department of Justice, the Department of State, the Department of Health and Human Services Office of Refugee Resettlement, and the Department of Labor; (4) Oversight of international migration and refugee laws and policy: and (5) Private immigration relief bills. The Committee is chaired by Democrat Ted Kennedy of Massachusetts, and the Ranking Minority member is Republican John Cornyn, of Texas. Senior Subcommittee Staff Bill Yeomans, Democratic Chief CounselReed O'Connor, Republican Chief Counsel United States Senate Committee on the JudiciarySubcommittee on Immigration, Border Security and Citizenship224 Dirksen Senate Office BuildingWashington,
    7.00
    4 votes
    67
    8.00
    3 votes
    68

    United States House Committee on the Election of the President, Vice President and Representatives in Congress

    The United States House Committee on the Election of the President, Vice President, and Representatives in Congress is a former standing committee of the United States House of Representatives. The committee was established in 1893 with jurisdiction over legislation concerning the election of the officials enumerated in its title, including proposed changes to the Constitution that affected the terms of office of the named officials, the succession to the offices of the President and Vice President, the direct election of Senators, and the meeting times of Congress. The committee considered national election laws and their enforcement, including such topics as the disqualification of polygamists from election to Congress, the use of electric voting machines in congressional elections, the necessary and proper expenses related to nominations and elections, and the publication of campaign expenses. It was responsible for changes in the law regarding the electoral count and resolutions regulating the actual electoral vote count by the Senate and House of Representatives.
    8.00
    3 votes
    69

    United States Senate Committee on Civil Service

    United States Senate Committee on Civil Service is a defunct committee of the United States Senate. The first standing Senate committee with jurisdiction over the civil service was the United States Senate Committee on Civil Service and Retrenchment, which was established on December 4, 1873, following unanimous approval of a resolution introduced by Henry B. Anthony of Rhode Island. On April 18, 1921, the committee was renamed the United States Senate Committee on Civil Service. The Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946 retained the Committee on Civil Service and established the committee's jurisdiction over all the aspects of civil service, the Census Bureau and the government's gathering of statistics, and the National Archives. The act also transferred to the committee jurisdiction over the postal service. On April 17, 1947, as specified by S. 99 of the 80th United States Congress, the committee's name was changed from the Committee on Civil Service to the United States Senate Committee on Post Office and Civil Service. The committee ceased to exist in February 1977, under S. Res. 4 of the 95th Congress when its functions were transferred to the Committee on Governmental
    8.00
    3 votes
    70
    6.75
    4 votes
    71

    Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales

    The Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales (Welsh: Comisiwn Brenhinol Henebion Cymru) is a Welsh Government sponsored body based in Aberystwyth, Wales. It was founded in August 1908. It maintains and curates the National Monuments Record of Wales (NMRW) holding the national collection of information about the archaeological, architectural and historical heritage of Wales and provides a public information service, drawing on both archival and published sources and benefiting from specialist advice from RCAHMW staff. The National Monuments Record includes drawings, photographs, maps, plans and descriptions for a total of over 80,000 sites, buildings and maritime remains. With 1.5 million photographs, it is the largest photographic archive in Wales. Coflein is the online database for the National Monuments Record of Wales (NMRW). The name is derived from the Welsh cof (memory) and lein (line). Coflein contains details of many thousands of archaeological sites, monuments, buildings and maritime sites in Wales, together with an index to the drawings, manuscripts and photographs held in the NMRW archive collections. The Commission has published over a hundred
    6.75
    4 votes
    72
    United States Senate Watergate Committee

    United States Senate Watergate Committee

    • Legislature: United States Senate
    The Senate Watergate Committee was a special committee convened by the United States Senate to investigate the Watergate burglaries and the ensuing Watergate scandal after it was learned that the Watergate burglars had been directed to break into and wiretap the headquarters of the Democratic National Committee by the Committee to Re-elect the President, President Richard Nixon's re-election campaign fund raising organization. The formal, official name of the committee was the Select Committee on Presidential Campaign Activities. The Committee played a pivotal role in gathering evidence that would lead to the indictment of forty administration officials and the conviction of several of Nixon's aides for obstruction of justice and other crimes. Its revelations prompted the introduction of articles of impeachment against the President in the House of Representatives, which led to Nixon's resignation. The members of the Senate Watergate Committee were: The Committee had two chief counsels, Sam Dash and Fred Thompson, who advised the Democratic and Republican members of the committee, respectively. Hearings opened on May 17, 1973, and the Committee issued its seven-volume, 1,250-page
    6.75
    4 votes
    73
    9.00
    2 votes
    74
    House Committee on Ways and Means

    House Committee on Ways and Means

    The Committee of Ways and Means is the chief tax-writing committee of the United States House of Representatives. Members of the Ways and Means Committee are not allowed to serve on any other House Committees unless they apply for a waiver from their party's congressional leadership. The Committee has jurisdiction over all taxation, tariffs and other revenue-raising measures, as well as a number of other programs including: The U.S. Constitution requires that all bills regarding taxation must originate in the House of Representatives. Since House procedure is that all bills regarding taxation must go through this committee, the committee is very influential, as is its Senate counterpart, the U.S. Senate Committee on Finance. The Ways and Means Committee in the 111th Congress was chaired by Charlie Rangel, who had taken a leave of absence as chairman until House ethics violations were resolved. However, his leave of absence as chairman was ruled to be a resignation. Pete Stark resigned as acting chairman, so Sander Levin held that position until the start of the 112th Congress. Dave Camp became the committee chair for the 112th Congress, after the Republicans won control of the
    9.00
    2 votes
    75

    United States Congress Joint Committee on the Library

    The Joint Committee on the Library is a joint committee of the United States Congress devoted to the affairs and administration of the Library of Congress, which is the library of the federal legislature. There are five members of each house on the committee. It has no subcommittees. The committee was originally established in 1806 (House Journal. 1806. 9th Cong., 1st sess., 27 February.) to support the expansion of a congressional library. The Committee currently has oversight of the operations of the Library of Congress, as well as management of the congressional art collection and the United States Botanic Garden, but does not have legislative authority. The committee is authorized to accept any work of the fine arts on behalf of Congress and designate a location in the United States Capitol for the work of art. (Pursuant to the Revised Statutes) This authority was expanded in 1875 to require that artwork that was not the property of the United States could not be displayed in the Capitol and that rooms in the Capitol cannot be used as private studios for works of art without written permission of the Committee. The Architect of the Capitol has the authority to enforce this
    9.00
    2 votes
    76

    United States House Committee on Science, Space and Technology

    The Select Committee on Astronautics and Space Exploration was established in 1958 in response to the Soviet Sputnik program in the late 1950s. This select committee drafted the National Aeronautics and Space Act that created the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). It also chartered the permanent House Committee on Science and Astronautics, which officially began on January 3, 1959, and was the first new standing committee established in the House since 1946. The name was changed in 1974 to the Committee on Science and Technology. The name was changed again in 1987 to the Committee on Science, Space and Technology. After the Republican Party gained a majority in Congress in 1994, the name of the committee was changed again to its current name, the "Committee on Science".Science, Space and Technology
    9.00
    2 votes
    77

    United States Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works

    The United States Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works is responsible for dealing with matters related to the environment and infrastructure. The Committee is chaired by Democrat Barbara Boxer of California, and the Ranking Member is Republican James Inhofe of Oklahoma. Source: 2011 Congressional Record, Vol. 157, Pg. S557{{{3}}}
    9.00
    2 votes
    78
    9.00
    2 votes
    79

    United States Senate Committee on Rules

    The United States Senate Committee on Rules is a defunct Congressional committee, replaced by the United States Senate Committee on Rules and Administration. The Committee was first created as the Select Committee to Revise the Rules of the Senate on December 3, 1867. On December 9, 1874, it became a standing committee. On 1947-01-02 it was absorbed into the United States Senate Committee on Rules and Administration along with four other committees.
    9.00
    2 votes
    80

    Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies

    The Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies, Inc., (CALEA®) is a credentialing authority (accreditation), based in the United States, whose primary mission is to accredit public safety agencies, namely law enforcement agencies, training academies, communications centers, and campus public safety agencies. The Commission was created in 1979 as an independent accrediting authority by the four major law enforcement membership associations: The primary purpose of the Commission is to improve law enforcement service by creating a national body of standards developed by law enforcement professionals. Furthermore, it recognizes professional achievements by establishing and administering an accreditation process through which a law enforcement agency can demonstrate that it meets those standards. CALEA derives its general authority from the four major law enforcement membership associations whose members represent approximately 80% of the law enforcement profession in the United States. Members to the Commission are appointed by the Executive Directors of these four associations. A majority vote is required for each appointment. Commissioners are appointed to a term of
    7.67
    3 votes
    81

    Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States

    The Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS, commonly pronounced "sifius") is an inter-agency committee of the United States Government that reviews the national security implications of foreign investments in U.S. companies or operations. Chaired by the Secretary of the Treasury, CFIUS includes representatives from 16 U.S. departments and agencies, including the Defense, State and Commerce departments, as well as (most recently) the Department of Homeland Security. CFIUS was established by Gerald Ford's Executive Order 11858 in 1975. President Reagan delegated the review process to the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States with the Executive Order 12661 in 1988. This was in response to U.S. Congress giving authority to the President to review foreign investments, in the form of Exon-Florio Amendment. Companies proposing to be involved in an acquisition by a foreign firm are supposed to voluntarily notify CFIUS, but CFIUS can review transactions that are not voluntarily submitted. CFIUS reviews begin with a 30-day decision to authorize a transaction or begin a statutory investigation. If the latter is chosen, the committee has another 45 days to
    7.67
    3 votes
    82
    7.67
    3 votes
    83
    7.67
    3 votes
    84
    Legislative Council of Hong Kong

    Legislative Council of Hong Kong

    The Legislative Council or the LegCo is the unicameral legislature of Hong Kong. The Legislative Council of Hong Kong was set up in 1843 as a colonial legislature under British rule. Hong Kong's first constitution, in the form of Queen Victoria's Letters Patent which was entitled the Charter of the Colony of Hong Kong, authorized the establishment of the Legislative Council to advise the Governor's administration. The Council had four Official members when it was first established. The first direct elections of the Legislative Council were held in 1991. The Legislative Council became a fully elected legislature for the first time in its history in 1995. To prepare for the handover of the sovereignty of Hong Kong from the British government to the Chinese government, a Provisional Legislative Council was established by the Preparatory Committee for the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) under the National People's Congress of the People's Republic of China in 1996. The Provisional Legislative Council, in operation from January 1997 to June 1998, initially held its meetings in Shenzhen. The Legislative Council of the HKSAR was established in 1998 under The Basic Law of
    7.67
    3 votes
    85

    United States Senate Agriculture Subcommittee on Production and Price Competitiveness

    The U.S. Senate Agriculture Subcommittee on Commodities, Markets, Trade and Risk Management is one of four subcommittees of the U.S. Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry. This subcommittee has jurisdiction over legislation on agricultural commodities, including cotton, dairy products, feed grains, wheat, tobacco, peanuts, sugar, wool, rice, oilseeds and soybeans and price and income support programs. The subcommittee was renamed for the 112th United States Congress (2011). It was previously: The Subcommittee is chaired by Democrat Ben Nelson of Nebraska, and the Ranking Minority Member is Republican Saxby Chambliss of Georgia.
    7.67
    3 votes
    86
    7.67
    3 votes
    87
    10.00
    1 votes
    88

    Committee on Petitions

    The Committee on Petitions (PETI) is a committee of the European Parliament. Petitions can also be brought forward by any EU citizen on a matter within the EU's sphere of activities. The Committee hears cases, some 1500 each year, sometimes presented by the citizen themselves at the Parliament. While the Parliament attempts to resolve the issue as a mediator, they do resort to legal proceedings if it is necessary to resolve the citizen's dispute.
    10.00
    1 votes
    89

    New Jersey Commission on Higher Education

    The New Jersey Commission on Higher Education is a government agency in New Jersey that is responsible for providing coordination, planning, policy development, and advocacy for the state's higher education system. The Commission is also responsible for licensing of institutions and the administration of the Educational Opportunity Fund. It was established by the Higher Education Restructuring Act of 1994. The Commission serves as the principal advocate for an integrated system of higher education which provides a broad scope of higher education programs and services. The system includes both public and independent institutions and enrolls over 380,000 full-time and part-time credit-seeking students statewide. The 31 public colleges and universities comprise Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey; the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey; the New Jersey Institute of Technology; four state colleges and five state universities; and 19 county colleges. The 26 independent institutions include 14 senior colleges and universities with a public mission, two independent two-year religious colleges, eight rabbinical schools and theological seminaries, both Catholic and
    10.00
    1 votes
    90
    Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology

    Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology

    The Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology, (POST) is the Parliament of the United Kingdom's in-house source of independent, balanced and accessible analysis of public policy issues related to science and technology. POST serves both Houses of Parliament (the House of Commons, and the House of Lords), through output that is apolitical and of potential value to Parliamentarians of all parties. Thorough quality-control ensures that MPs and Peers can have confidence in the information should they wish to cite it in debate. These principles are reflected in the structure of POST’s Board with members from the Commons and Lords together with distinguished scientists and engineers from the wider world. In 2009 POST celebrated its 20th anniversary with a special conference on "Images of the Future". The keynote participants were the Hon. Bart Gordon, Chair of the US House of Representatives' Committee on Science and Technology and Dr Jim Dator of the University of Hawaii Futures Research Centre. Since 1939, a group of MPs and peers interested in science and technology, through the first parliamentary "All Party Group" - the UK Parliamentary and Scientific Committee had encouraged
    10.00
    1 votes
    91
    United States House Permanent Select Committee on Aging

    United States House Permanent Select Committee on Aging

    The United States House Permanent Select Committee on Aging was a permanent select committee of the United States House of Representatives between 1974 and 1992. The committee was created with the intent not of forming legislation directly, but of conducting investigations and holding hearings. In such a manner it would spur legislation and other action via regular committee channels. The action to approve the committee was passed on October 8, 1974, by a 299–44 margin in the House. The committee became operational in June 1975 and initially had 35 members. Its first chair was Missouri's William J. Randall. The committee soon grew to 65 members. Florida's Claude Pepper, a powerful and influential member of Congress known for his commitment to representing the elderly, became chair in 1977 following Randall's retirement. In his late seventies and early eighties while chairing the committee, Pepper was renowned for his fast-paced presence in Congress; he used himself and the committee to focus attention against the problem of age stereotyping. The committee soon grew to 65 members. In 1983, Pepper stepped aside and Edward R. Roybal of California became chair. The committee conducted
    10.00
    1 votes
    92

    United States House Science Subcommittee on Environment, Technology, and Standards

    The Science Subcommittee on Technology and Innovation is one of five subcommittees of the United States House Committee on Science and Technology. The subcommittee has legislative jurisdiction and general and special oversight and investigative authority on all matters relating to competitiveness, technology, and environmental research, development, and demonstration including: Chairs of the subcommittee:
    10.00
    1 votes
    93

    Committee on Development

    The Committee on Development (Commission du développement, DEVE) is a standing committee of the European Parliament responsible for promoting, implementing and monitoring the development and cooperation policy of the European Union, notably talks with developing countries; aid to developing countries; and promotion of democratic values, good governance and human rights in developing countries. The committee has thirty-four members and the same number of substitute members. As of 2009 the committee is headed by Eva Joly.
    6.50
    4 votes
    94

    House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform

    The Committee on Oversight and Government Reform is a United States House of Representatives committee that has existed in varying forms since 1816. The Committee on Oversight and Government Reform is the main investigative committee in the U.S. House of Representatives. After Republicans gained control of the House in 1995, the committee was reorganized to include just seven subcommittees. This reorganization consolidated the jurisdiction previously covered by 3 full committees and 14 subcommittees, and resulted in a 50 percent cut in staff. In 2007, Henry Waxman, (D-CA) the chairman of the committee proposed an additional reorganization which combined the duties of the seven previous subcommittees into five. This reorganization was adopted by the full committee January 18, 2007. As of the 112th Congress, the Chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee is Rep. Darrell Issa of California and the Ranking Member is Maryland Congressman Elijah Cummings. The Committee's government-wide oversight jurisdiction and expanded legislative authority make it one of the most influential and powerful committees in the House. The Committee serves as Congress' chief
    6.50
    4 votes
    95
    United States Congressional committee

    United States Congressional committee

    A congressional committee is a legislative sub-organization in the United States Congress that handles a specific duty (rather than the general duties of Congress). Committee membership enables members to develop specialized knowledge of the matters under their jurisdiction. As "little legislatures," committees monitor on-going governmental operations, identify issues suitable for legislative review, gather and evaluate information, and recommend courses of action to their parent body. Woodrow Wilson once said, "… it is not far from the truth to say that Congress in session is Congress on public exhibition, whilst Congress in its committee rooms is Congress at work." It is neither expected nor possible that a member of Congress be an expert on all matters and subject areas that come before Congress. Congressional committees provide invaluable informational services to Congress by investigating and reporting about specialized subjects. Congress divides its legislative, oversight, and internal administrative tasks among approximately 200 committees and subcommittees. Within assigned areas, these functional subunits gather information; compare and evaluate legislative alternatives;
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    4 votes
    96

    United States Senate Agriculture Subcommittee on Forestry, Conservation, and Rural Revitalization

    The U.S. Senate Agriculture Subcommittee on Conservation, Forestry and Natural Resources is one of five subcommittees of the U.S. Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry. This subcommittee has jurisdiction over rural development legislation and rural electrification legislation, oversight of rural electrification, agricultural credit, the Farm Credit System, the Farm Credit Administration, and the Farmers Home Administration and its successor agencies. It also has jurisdiction over crop insurance, forestry in general and forest reserves that were acquired from state, local, or private sources, soil conservation, stream channelization, and watershed and flood control programs involving structures of less than 4,000 acre feet (4,900,000 m) storage capacity. The subcommittee was renamed for the 112th Congress (2011). It was formerly named the Subcommittee on Rural Revitalization, Conservation, Forestry and Credit Jurisdiction. The subcommittee is chaired by Democrat Michael Bennet of Colorado, and the Ranking Minority Member is Republican John Boozman of Arkansas.
    6.50
    4 votes
    97

    House Committee on Veterans' Affairs

    The standing Committee on Veterans' Affairs in the United States House of Representatives oversees agencies, reviews current legislation, and recommends new bills or amendments concerning U.S. military veterans. Jurisdiction includes retiring and disability pensions, life insurance, education (including the G.I. Bill), vocational training, medical care, and home loan guarantees. The committee oversees the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), veterans' hospitals, and veterans' cemeteries, except cemeteries under the Secretary of the Interior. The committee was created by Section 121(a) of the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946 (Public Law 79-601), which authorized a standing committee of 27 members. The chairs of the committee: Source:
    8.50
    2 votes
    98

    United States House Committee on Accounts

    The United States House Committee on Accounts is a former committee of the United States House of Representatives from 1803 to 1927. The committee was created on December 27, 1803, and was made a standing committee in 1805. In 1911 the functions of the Committee on Ventilation and Acoustics were transferred to the Committee on Accounts, and in 1927 the functions of the Committee on Mileage were similarly transferred. In 1947, the duties of the Committee on Accounts were moved into the newly-formed Committee on House Administration. Its jurisdiction covered all subjects "touching the expenditure of the contingent fund of the House, [and] the auditing and settling of all accounts which may be charged therein to the House." In addition, the committee was responsible for the accountability of officers of the House, the procurement of rooms for the use of House committees and for the Speaker, and for recommending and authorizing the employment of such persons as stenographers, reporters of debates, janitors, and clerks and staff assistants for committees, members and senators.  This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the National Archives and
    8.50
    2 votes
    99

    United States Senate Committee on the Census

    The United States Senate Select Committee on the Tenth Census was created in 1878. It continued to operate until 1887, when it became the United States Senate Committee on the Census. The Committee was abolished in 1921. Issues related to the U.S. Census and the U.S. Census Bureau are now under the jurisdiction of the United States Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs.
    8.50
    2 votes
    100
    National Commission on Terrorism

    National Commission on Terrorism

    The U.S. Commission on National Security/21st Century (USCNS/21), also known as the Hart-Rudman Commission or Hart-Rudman Task Force on Homeland Security, was chartered by Secretary of Defense William Cohen in 1998 to provide a comprehensive review of US national security requirements in the 21st century. USCNS/21 was tasked "to analyze the emerging international security environment; to develop a US national security strategy appropriate to that environment; and to assess the various security institutions for their current relevance to the effective and efficient implementation of that strategy, and to recommend adjustments as necessary". Released on 31 January 2001, USCNS/21 is the most exhaustive review of US national security strategy since the National Security Act of 1947. USCNS/21 was released in three distinct phases. The first phase, New World Coming: American Security in the 21st Century (see further below), anticipates the emerging international security environment within the first quarter of the 21st century and examines how the US fits into that environment. The second phase, Seeking a National Strategy: A Concert for Preserving Security and Promoting Freedom (see
    7.33
    3 votes
    101

    United States Congress Joint Committee on Reconstruction

    The Joint Committee on Reconstruction, also known as the Joint Committee of Fifteen, was a joint committee of the United States Congress that played a major role in Reconstruction in the wake of the American Civil War. It was created to "inquire into the condition of the States which formed the Confederate States of America, and report whether they, or any of them, are entitled to be represented in either house of Congress." This committee also drafted the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, and required southern states to approve that amendment before being readmitted to representation in Congress. The committee was established on December 13, 1865, after both houses reached agreement on an amended version of a House concurrent resolution introduced by Representative Thaddeus Stevens of Pennsylvania to establish a joint committee of 15 members. Senator William P. Fessenden of Maine served as chairman. The joint committee divided into four subcommittees to hear testimony and gather evidence regarding the situation in each of four military districts in the South - the First Military District, Second Military District, Third Military District, and Fourth Military
    7.33
    3 votes
    102
    United States Senate Committee on the Judiciary

    United States Senate Committee on the Judiciary

    • Legislature: United States Senate
    The United States Senate Committee on the Judiciary (informally Senate Judiciary Committee) is a standing committee of the United States Senate, of the United States Congress. The Judiciary Committee, with 18 members, is charged with conducting hearings prior to the Senate votes on confirmation of federal judges (including Supreme Court justices) nominated by the president. In recent years, this role has made the committee increasingly a point of contention, with numerous party-line votes and standoffs over which judges should be approved. The committee also has a broad jurisdiction over matters relating to federal criminal law, as well as human rights, immigration law, intellectual property rights, antitrust law, and Internet privacy. It is also Senate procedure that all proposed Constitutional Amendments pass through the Judiciary Committee. The committee is one of the oldest in the Senate. It was initially created in 1816. The Committee is chaired by Democrat Patrick Leahy of Vermont and the Ranking Member is Chuck Grassley of Iowa. Source: 2011 Congressional Record, Vol. 157, Pg. S557{{{3}}}
    7.33
    3 votes
    103

    Commission on Elections

    The Commission on Elections, or COMELEC, is one of the three constitutional commissions of the Philippines. Its principal role is to enforce all laws and regulations relative to the conduct of elections, initiatives, referendums, and recall elections. Under the Constitution, the Commission on Elections is independent of the Executive, Legislative and Judicial branches of the Philippine Government. It has the following functions: The Commission Proper is the policy-making body composed of the Chairman and six Commissioners who must be natural-born citizens of the Philippines; at least thirty-five years of age at the time of their appointment; holders of a college degree, with a majority of them, including the Chairman, members of the Philippine Bar who have been engaged in the practice of law for at least ten (10) years; and must not have been a candidate for any elective position in the immediate preceding elections [Article IX-C, Section 1, 1987 Constitution]. The Chairman and the Commissioners are appointed by the President, with the consent of the Commission on Appointments.n They hold office for seven years, without reappointment. The Commissioners exercise quasi-legislative
    6.25
    4 votes
    104

    National Commission on Marihuana and Drug Abuse

    The National Commission on Marijuana and Drug Abuse was created by Public Law 91-513 to study marijuana abuse in the United States. While the Controlled Substances Act was being drafted in a House committee in 1970, Assistant Secretary of Health Roger O. Egeberg had recommended that marijuana temporarily be placed in Schedule I, the most restrictive category of drugs, pending the Commission's report. On March 22, 1972, the Commission's chairman, Raymond P. Shafer, presented a report to Congress and the public entitled "Marijuana, A Signal of Misunderstanding," which favored ending marijuana prohibition and adopting other methods to discourage use. The Commission's report acknowledged that, decades earlier, “the absence of adequate understanding of the effects of the drug” combined with “lurid accounts of [largely unsubstantiated] ‘marijuana atrocities” greatly affected public opinion and labeled the stereotypical user as “physically aggressive, lacking in self-control, irresponsible, mentally ill and, perhaps most alarming, criminally inclined and dangerous.” However, the Commission found that the drug typically inhibited aggression “by pacifying the user… and generally
    6.25
    4 votes
    105
    Standing Committee on Health and Care Services

    Standing Committee on Health and Care Services

    The Standing Committee on Health and Care Services (Norwegian: Helse- og omsorgskomiteen) is a standing committee of the Parliament of Norway. It is responsible for policies relating to health services, care and attendance services, public health, drug and alcohol policy, and pharmaceuticals. It corresponds to the Ministry of Health and Care Services. The committee has 15 members and is chaired by Bent Høie of the Conservative Party.
    7.00
    3 votes
    106

    United States Congress Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War

    The Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War was a United States Congressional investigating committee created to handle issues surrounding the American Civil War. It was established on December 9, 1861, following the embarrassing Union defeat at the Battle of Ball's Bluff, at the instigation of Senator Zachariah T. Chandler of Michigan, and continued until May 1865. Its purpose was to investigate such matters as illicit trade with the Confederate states, medical treatment of wounded soldiers, military contracts, and the causes of Union battle losses. The Committee was also involved in supporting the war effort through various means, including endorsing emancipation, the use of black soldiers, and the appointment of generals who were known to be aggressive fighters. It was chaired throughout by Senator Benjamin Wade of Ohio, and became identified with the Radical Republicans who wanted more aggressive war policies than those of Abraham Lincoln. Union officers often found themselves in an uncomfortable position before the Committee. Since this was a civil war, pitting neighbor against neighbor (and sometimes brother against brother), the loyalty of a soldier to the Union was simple
    7.00
    3 votes
    107

    United States House Committee on Elections

    The United States House Committee on Elections is a former standing committee of the United States House of Representatives. Article 1, section 5, of the Constitution of the United States specifies: "Each House shall be the Judge of the Elections, Returns, and Qualifications of its own Members." The Committee on Elections was established as the first standing committee of the House to perform this function on April 13, 1789, just two weeks after the first quorum allowed the House of Representatives to organize itself. Rule number 7 of the first rules adopted by the House of Representatives specifies the character and jurisdiction of the committee: From 1789 until the mid-19th century the number of contested election cases remained stable at an average of three per Congress. After the 34th Congress (1855–57) the number of contested seats rose sporadically to a peak of 38 during the 54th Congress (1895–97). In 1895, due to the increase in workload, the committee was split into three separate committees: Elections #1, Elections #2, and Elections #3. After 1935 the number of contested elections returned to an average of three per Congress, and in 1947 the three Elections Committees
    7.00
    3 votes
    108
    General Commission on Christian Unity and Interreligious Concerns

    General Commission on Christian Unity and Interreligious Concerns

    The General Commission on Christian Unity and Interreligious Concerns (GCCUIC) addresses the interreligious and ecumenical concerns of The United Methodist Church. The GCCUIC's office is located at The Interchurch Center in New York City. The Commission's President is Bishop Mary Ann Swenson and the General Secretary is Rev. Dr. Stephen J. Sidorak, Jr.. The Ecumenical Officer of the Council of Bishops is Bishop Sharon Zimmerman Rader and serves as the corporate ecumenical officer of The United Methodist Church, working in collaboration with GCCUIC. This organization is the United Methodist Church's face in the ecumenical community developing relationships with other church bodies and is diligently seeking relationships with other faith bodies such as Muslim, Hindu, Buddhist and Jewish communities to manifest the unity God has already given and for which Christ prayed (John 17:20-21). It also diligently seeks relationships with other faith bodies, heeding the prophets’ and Jesus’ call to live lives of compassion, peace, justice, and stewardship of our natural world. The GCCUIC’s leadership role in ecumenism extends to facilitating deeper relationships and understandings within the
    6.00
    4 votes
    109
    House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence

    House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence

    The United States House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence is a committee of the United States House of Representatives, currently chaired by Mike Rogers. It is the primary committee in the U.S. House of Representatives charged with the oversight of the United States Intelligence Community, though it does share some jurisdiction with other committees in the House, including the Armed Services Committee for some matters dealing with the Department of Defense and the various branches of the U.S. military. The committee was preceded by the Select Committee on Intelligence between 1975 and 1977. House Resolution 658 established the permanent select committee, which gave it status equal to a standing committee on July 14, 1977. The committee oversees all or part of the following executive branch departments and agencies: The committee is chaired by Mike Rogers from Michigan's 8th congressional district. Source: 2011 Congressional Record, Vol. 157, Pg. H200{{{3}}} Prior to establishing the permanent select committee in 1977, the House of Representatives established the "Select Committee on Intelligence", commonly referred to as the "Pike Committee", so named after its last
    6.00
    4 votes
    110

    United States House Committee on Enrolled Bills

    The United States House Committee on Enrolled Bills is a former standing committee of the United States House of Representatives. The House standing Committee on Enrolled Bills was a result of the dissolution of the old Joint Committee on Enrolled Bills. The Joint Committee on Enrolled Bills was established on July 27, 1789, with the responsibility for the enrollment of engrossed bills. The enacting resolution states the following: After a bill shall have passed both Houses, it shall be duly enrolled on Parchment by the Clerk of the House of Representatives or the Secretary of the Senate, as the bill may have originated in one or the other House, before it shall be presented to the President of the United States. . . . When bills are enrolled they shall be examined by a joint committee for that purpose, who shall carefully compare the enrollment with the engrossed bills as passed in the two Houses, and, correcting any errors that may be discovered in the enrolled bills, make their report forthwith to their respective Houses. In 1876 the joint rules of Congress were allowed to lapse, and although the committee continued to be referred to as a "joint committee," it consisted
    6.00
    4 votes
    111

    Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names

    The Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (ACAN or US-ACAN) is an advisory committee of the United States Board on Geographic Names responsible for recommending names for features in Antarctica. The United States does not recognise territorial boundaries within Antarctica, so ACAN will assign names to features anywhere within the continent, in consultation with other national nomenclatural bodies where appropriate. ACAN has a published policy on naming, based on priority of application, appropriateness, and the extent to which usage has become established.
    8.00
    2 votes
    112

    Committee on Constitutional Affairs

    The Committee on Constitutional Affairs (AFCO) is a committee of the European Parliament dealing with institutional matters such as the treaties and the Parliament's rules of procedure. It is currently chaired by Carlo Casini MEP, (European People's Party (European Parliament group)).
    8.00
    2 votes
    113

    Griffiths Commission on Personal Debt

    The Griffiths Commission on Personal Debt was launched in 2004 by Oliver Letwin, MP, the then Conservative Shadow Chancellor, to investigate the increasing problem of personal debt in the United Kingdom. Although initially formed by the Conservative Party, the Commission took evidence from individuals of all political persuasion and none, and sought to achieve consensus across the political divide. The final report entitled What Price Credit? was published by the Centre for Social Justice in March 2005. Elements of the report were welcomed by the Conservative and Liberal Democrat parties, although there was no official response from the ruling Labour Party. The Commission members were as follows: Although the Commission report did not directly lead to any change in policy, it has been quoted and referenced by a number of subsequent reports such as the House of Lords EU Select Committee Thirteenth Report when they were investigating EU Consumer Credit harmonisation. Arguably the biggest failure was the party-political aspect of the launch of the Commission. The Commission was first launched by the Conservative Party, which lead to a mistaken belief that the resulting report would be
    8.00
    2 votes
    114
    8.00
    2 votes
    115
    Committee on Climate Change

    Committee on Climate Change

    The Committee on Climate Change is an independent body which advises the UK and devolved Governments on tackling and preparing for climate change. The Committee provides advice on setting carbon budgets (for the UK Government carbon budgets are designed to place a limit or ceiling on the level of economy-wide emissions that can be emitted in a five year period), and reports regularly to the Parliaments and Assemblies on the progress made in reducing greenhouse gas emissions. For the UK Government the Committee advises the Department of Energy and Climate Change and its powers are invested by Part 2 of the Climate Change Act 2008. It was formally launched as a statutory committee in December 2008 with Lord Adair Turner as its chair. The other committee members are David Kennedy (CEO), Lord Robert May, Sir Brian Hoskins, Lord John Krebs, Professor Julia King; Professor Jim Skea; Professor Michael Grubb and Sam Fankhauser. An Adaptation Sub-Committee was set up in 2009 to provide advice to Government about adaptation i.e. the steps the UK should be taking to prepare for climate change impacts. Lord John Krebs is Chair of the Adaptation Sub-Committee, the other Committee members are
    9.00
    1 votes
    116

    Committee on Industry, Research and Energy

    The Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE) is a committee of the European Parliament. Its areas of responsibility relate to industry, especially technology-intensive manufacturing, information technology, and telecommunications. It also coordinates European space policy, and as such, has ties with the European Space Agency. It has oversight duties on the Joint Research Centre and the Central Office for Nuclear Measurements, as well as similar projects. One major area of activity for the committee is energy policy, safety, and efficiency. They monitor compliance with the Euratom Treaty around nuclear waste disposal. In the past the ITRE committee also used to deal with transport, apart from the other three areas of responsibility of which it is still in possession. European Union transport policy is now, however, coordinated from the Committee on Transport and Tourism in the European Parliament.
    9.00
    1 votes
    117
    Executive Committee

    Executive Committee

    An Executive Committee was the title of a three-person committee which served as the executive Branch of the Provisional Government of Oregon in the disputed Oregon Country. This arrangement was announced on July 5, 1843, after three months of study by the Provisional Legislature at Champoeg. Two different Executive Committees served until the system was abandoned in 1845 in favor of an elected single chief executive. The Executive Committee was empowered to grant reprieves and pardons, recommend legislation, and call out the militia.
    9.00
    1 votes
    118

    United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space

    The United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (COPUOS) was established in 1958 (shortly after the launch of Sputnik) as an ad hoc committee. In 1959, it was formally established by United Nations resolution 1472 (XIV). The mission of COPUOS is "to review the scope of international cooperation in peaceful uses of outer space, to devise programmes in this field to be undertaken under United Nations auspices, to encourage continued research and the dissemination of information on outer space matters, and to study legal problems arising from the exploration of outer space." The Committee has two subcommittees, the Scientific and Technical Subcommittee and the Legal Subcommittee. COPUOS oversees the implementation of five treaties and agreements: As of 2011, the Committee has 71 member States and is one of the largest committees of the General Assembly of the United Nations. The member States of the Committee are: Albania, Algeria, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belgium, Benin, Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Brazil, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Canada, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Cuba, Czech Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, France, Hungary, Germany,
    9.00
    1 votes
    119

    United States House Armed Services Subcommittee on Tactical Air and Land Forces

    House Armed Services Subcommittee on Tactical Air and Land Forces is a subcommittee of the House Armed Services Committee in the United States House of Representatives. The Air and Land Forces Subcommittee exercises oversight and legislative jurisdiction over: Does not include strategic missiles, special operations and information technology programs. U.S. Senate Armed Services Subcommittee on Airland
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    1 votes
    120
    United States Senate Committee on Armed Services

    United States Senate Committee on Armed Services

    • Legislature: United States Senate
    The Committee on Armed Services is a committee of the United States Senate empowered with legislative oversight of the nation's military, including the Department of Defense, military research and development, nuclear energy (as pertaining to national security), benefits for members of the military, the Selective Service System and other matters related to defense policy. The Armed Services Committee was created as a result of the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946 following U.S. victory in the Second World War. It merged the responsibilities of the Committee on Naval Affairs (established in 1816) and the Committee on Military Affairs (also established in 1816). Considered one of the most powerful Senate committees, its broad mandate allowed it to report some of the most extensive and revolutionary legislation during the Cold War years, including the National Security Act of 1947. The committee is highly influential. According to the Senate Rules Committee, all proposed legislation, messages, petitions, memorials, and other matters relating to the following subjects are referred to the Armed Services Committee: The Committee is chaired by Democrat Carl Levin of Michigan, and
    9.00
    1 votes
    121
    9.00
    1 votes
    122

    United States Senate Committee on Indian Affairs

    The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs is a committee of the United States Senate charged with oversight in matters related to the American Indian, Native Hawaiian, and Alaska Native peoples. A Committee on Indian Affairs existed from 1820 to 1947, after which it was folded into the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. A new Indian Affairs Committee was created in 1977, initially as a select committee, as a result of the detachment of indigenous affairs from the new Committee on Energy and National Resources, which had succeeded the old Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. The committee was initially intended to be temporary, but was made permanent in 1984. The committee tends to include senators from Western and Plains states, who have more American Indian constituents. In 1977, the Senate approved S.Res. 4 which re-established the Committee on Indian Affairs as a temporary select committee. The Select Committee was to disband at the close of the 95th Congress, but following several interim extensions, the Senate voted to make the Committee permanent on June 6, 1984. The committee has jurisdiction to study the unique problems of American Indian, Native Hawaiian, and
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    1 votes
    123

    Committee on Standards in Public Life

    The Committee on Standards in Public Life is an advisory non-departmental public body of the United Kingdom Government. The Committee on Standards in Public Life is constituted as a standing body with its members appointed for up to three years. The committee was established in October 1994 by Prime Minister John Major in response to concerns that conduct by some politicians was unethical - for example, during the cash-for-questions affair. The Committee's original terms of reference were: The term "public office" includes ministers, civil servants and advisers; Members of Parliament and UK Members of the European Parliament; Members and senior officers of all non-departmental public bodies and of national health service bodies; non-ministerial office holders; members and other senior officers of other bodies discharging publicly-funded functions; and elected members and senior officers of local authorities. The Committee's First Report established The Seven Principles of Public Life, also known as the "Nolan principles". They are included in the Ministerial Code. They are: In 1997, Tony Blair extended the Committee's terms of reference: "To review issues in relation to the funding
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    3 votes
    124

    Democratic Caucus of the United States House of Representatives

    The House Democratic Caucus nominates and elects the Democratic Party leadership in the United States House of Representatives. The group is composed of all Democratic Representatives in the House. In its role as a party conference, the caucus writes and enforces rules of conduct and discipline for its members, approves committee assignments, and serves as the primary forum for development of party policy and legislative priorities. It hosts weekly meetings for these purposes and to communicate the party's message to members. At the Organizational Meeting on November 18, 2008, of the Democratic Caucus for the 111th Congress, Representative John B. Larson (D-Connecticut) was elected Caucus Chairman by acclamation. The election was presided over by the outgoing Chairman of the Democratic Caucus for the 110th Congress, former Representative Rahm Emanuel (D-Illinois). Rep. Larson officially assumed the position of Chairman on the first day of the 111th Congress, January 3, 2009. After his election as Chairman at the Organizational Meeting on November 18, Chairman Larson presided over the election of Rep. Xavier Becerra (D-California), who defeated Representative Marcy Kaptur of Ohio by
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    3 votes
    125

    House Committee on Rules

    The Committee on Rules, or (more commonly) Rules Committee, is a committee of the United States House of Representatives. Rather than being responsible for a specific area of policy, as most other committees are, it is in charge of determining under what rule other bills will come to the floor. As such, it is one of the most powerful committees, and often described as "an arm of the leadership" and as the "traffic cop of Congress." A rule is a simple resolution of the House of Representatives, usually reported by the Committee on Rules, to permit the immediate consideration of a legislative measure, notwithstanding the usual order of business, and to prescribe conditions for its debate and amendment. When a bill is reported out of one of the other committees, it does not go straight to the House floor, because the House, unlike the United States Senate, does not have unlimited debate and discussion on a bill. Instead, what may be said and done to a bill is strictly limited. This limitation is performed by the Rules Committee. Technically, when a bill is reported out of another committee with legislative jurisdiction, it is placed on the appropriate House Calendar for debate. Common
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    3 votes
    126

    National Commission on Resources for Youth

    The National Commission on Resources for Youth was an American program established in 1970. The Commission was charged with identifying and promoting youth participation in schools and communities across the United States, and was largely funded by the U.S. Government and the Ford Foundation. In addition to publications and studies on a range of youth participation topics, the Commission held meetings, training events and conferences across the country, with youth engagement in schools and community development seeing a significant increase. The Commission succeeded in seeding national movements in youth voice, youth participation, and community youth development. Aside from defining and fostering these efforts across the nation, the Commission provided expert knowledge and resources to support ongoing activities long after its closure. The National Commission on Resources for Youth was preceded in federal legislation by the National Youth Administration, a 1930s federally coordinated youth program. Its recent political successor is the Tom Osborne Federal Youth Coordination Act, passed in 2006 to direct federal interaction among youth-serving agencies and grant programs. Several
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    3 votes
    127
    President's Committee on the Arts and Humanities

    President's Committee on the Arts and Humanities

    The President's Committee on the Arts and the Humanities (PCAH) was established in Washington, DC in 1982 by an Executive Order from President Ronald Reagan and works with each Administration to incorporate the arts and the humanities into White House objectives. Michelle Obama currently serves as the Honorary Chairwoman; Rachel Goslins is Executive Director. The members of the Committee are 26-30 Presidentially-appointed private citizens as well as the heads of federal agencies with cultural programs: the National Endowment for the Arts; the National Endowment for the Humanities; the Institute of Museum and Library Sciences; the Departments of Education, Interior, and State; the National Gallery of Art; the Smithsonian Institution; the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts; and the Library of Congress. The President also appoints a Chairman or Co-Chairmen from among the private members. Co-Chairmen: George Stevens, Jr. and Margo Lion; Vice Chairman: Mary Schmidt Campbell; Executive Director: Rachel Goslins Because of its unique membership, the PCAH is able to bridge the federal agencies and the private sector. It recognizes cultural excellence, engages in research and
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    3 votes
    128

    Royal Commission on Bilingualism and Biculturalism

    The Royal Commission on Bilingualism and Biculturalism (also known as the Bi and Bi Commission and the Laurendeau-Dunton Commission.) was a Canadian royal commission established on 19 July 1963, by the government of Prime Minister Lester B. Pearson to "inquire into and report upon the existing state of bilingualism and biculturalism in Canada and to recommend what steps should be taken to develop the Canadian Confederation on the basis of an equal partnership between the two founding races, taking into account the contribution made by the other ethnic groups to the cultural enrichment of Canada and the measures that should be taken to safeguard that contribution". Throughout the Quiet Revolution, Canada saw the rise of modern Quebec nationalism as the federation-wide French Canadian nationalism became less and less supported by the younger Francophone generations of this province. The perceived failure of Canada to establish the equality of the English and French languages within governmental institutions is one of main reasons for the rise of the Quebec secessionist movement. The Commission was jointly chaired by André Laurendeau, publisher of Le Devoir, and Davidson Dunton,
    6.67
    3 votes
    129

    Royal Commission on National Development in the Arts, Letters and Sciences

    The Royal Commission on National Development in the Arts, Letters and Sciences, otherwise known as the Massey–Lévesque Commission, chaired by Vincent Massey, examined Canada's cultural sovereignty from the United States and various other nations. The report released its findings in 1951 when it concluded that Canada was indeed threatened, culturally, by the United States of America. The Massey Report recommended the creation of cultural institutions such as the National Library of Canada, the Canada Council, and other grant-giving government agencies.
    6.67
    3 votes
    130

    Standing Committee on Pressure Groups

    The Standing Committee on Pressure Groups (SCOPG) was a secret committee set up in 1978 by the Hong Kong government to monitor the activities of pressure groups. The existence of this committee was first revealed in the New Statesman on 12 December 1980. The article, written by Duncan Campbell, asserted that any political group had been subjected to surveillance. Furthermore the SCOPG had actively sought to undermine, co-opt or coerce eleven groups that were specifically targeted in a confidential report obtained by the paper. What was even more surprising, the SCOPG had been set up to infiltrate pressure groups. The greatest emphasis was placed on a group called the Hong Kong Observers Ltd. Due to political pressure the committee ceased to exist in 1983. The government officially recognized the existence of the committee but denied that it had any sinister motives. The claim was that it was set up to monitor pressure groups in order to better understand the groups' opinions. Furthermore the government attacked the New Statesman for inaccuracies and lies (such as the allegation that the committee had sought to infiltrate pressure groups). The report had also put pressure on the
    6.67
    3 votes
    131

    United States House Armed Services Subcommittee on Readiness

    House Armed Services Subcommittee on Readiness is a subcommittee of the House Armed Services Committee in the United States House of Representatives. The Readiness Subcommittee exercises oversight and legislative jurisdiction over: United States Senate Armed Services Subcommittee on Readiness and Management Support
    6.67
    3 votes
    132

    United States House Science Subcommittee on Research

    The Science Subcommittee on Research and Science Education is one of five subcommittees of the United States House Committee on Science and Technology. The subcommittee has legislative jurisdiction and general and special oversight and investigative authority on all matters relating to science policy including: Chairs of the subcommittee:
    6.67
    3 votes
    133

    United States Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources

    The United States Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources has jurisdiction over matters related to energy and nuclear waste policy, territorial policy, native Hawaiian matters, and public lands. Its roots go back to the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. In 1977, it became the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, and Indian Affairs were removed from its jurisdiction into its own committee. The Committee is chaired by Democrat Jeff Bingaman, of New Mexico, and the Ranking Member is Lisa Murkowski of Alaska. Source: 2011 Congressional Record, Vol. 157, Page S557 ; S.Res. 179 The Energy Committee operates with 4 subcommittees.
    6.67
    3 votes
    134

    European Committee on Radiation Risks

    The European Committee on Radiation Risks (ECRR) was a committee set up in 1997 to, alongside the European Parliament¬タルs work, discuss the contents of the European Directive 96/29/Euroatom which sets out the basic standards regarding radiation protection in the European Union. The group included several prominent critics of the dominant view of radiation risk such as articulated by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR). Professor Alice Stewart, the first scientist to establish the health effects of low doses of radiation, was the first Chair of the ECRR. The Chair of the Scientific Committee was Professor Inge Schmitz-Feuerhake. The Scientific Secretary was Dr. Chris Busby. Radiation Risks, European Committee on
    5.75
    4 votes
    135

    United States Senate Select Committee on Ethics

    The U.S. Senate Select Committee on Ethics is a select committee of the United States Senate charged with dealing with matters related to senatorial ethics. It is also commonly referred to as the Senate Ethics Committee. Senate rules require the Ethics Committee to be evenly divided between the Democrats and the Republicans, no matter who controls the Senate, although the chairperson always come from the majority party. The Committee is chaired by Democrat Barbara Boxer of California, and the Vice Chairman is Johnny Isakson of Georgia. Pursuant to Senate Rule 25, the committee is limited to six members, and is equally divided between Democrats and Republicans. Source: 2011 Congressional Record, Vol. 157, Pg. S557{{{3}}} (incomplete list)
    5.75
    4 votes
    136
    Standing Committee on Education, Research and Church Affairs

    Standing Committee on Education, Research and Church Affairs

    The Standing Committee on Education and Church Affairs (Norwegian: Kirke, utdannings- og forskningskomiteen) is a standing committee of the Parliament of Norway. It is responsible for policies relating to education, research and church affairs. It corresponds to the Ministry of Education and Research and the church affairs section of the Ministry of Culture and Church Affairs. The committee has 16 members and is chaired by Marianne Aasen of the Labour Party.
    7.50
    2 votes
    137

    United States Commission on International Religious Freedom

    The United States Commission on International Religious Freedom (USCIRF) is an independent, bipartisan U.S. federal government commission created by the International Religious Freedom Act of 1998. USCIRF Commissioners are appointed by the President and the leadership of both political parties in the Senate and the House of Representatives. USCIRF's principal responsibilities are to review the facts and circumstances of violations of religious freedom internationally and to make policy recommendations to the President, the Secretary of State, and the Congress. It describes itself as "[g]rounded in and informed by the American experience". It is rooted in the U.S. Evangelical movement and its original intention was to protect Christians around the world. Such organisations as Christian Solidarity International, International Christian Concern, Open Doors and the Cardinal Kung Foundation as well as the lawyer Michael Horowitz were influences for the foundation of the International Religious Freedom Act. It is funded entirely by the federal government on an annual basis and its staff members are government employees. As of June 2010, the Commissioners are: 1) Leonard Leo
    7.50
    2 votes
    138
    United States House Select Committee to Investigate Alleged Corruptions in Government

    United States House Select Committee to Investigate Alleged Corruptions in Government

    The Select Committee to Investigte Alleged Corruptions in Government was as select committee of the United States House of Representatives which operated during the spring and summer of 1860 during the 36th Congress. The committee was charged with a broad investigation of the administration of President James Buchanan, including possible impeachment. It was also referred to as the Covode Committee after its chairman, John Covode of Pennsylvania. The committee was established March 5, 1860 when the House adopted a resolution offered by John Covode, which was adopted by a vote of 115 to 45. Resolved, That a committee of five members be appointed by the Speaker for the purpose of investigating whether the President of the United States, or any other officer of the government, has, by money, patronage, or other improper means, sought to influence the action of Congress, or any committees thereof, for or against the passage of any law appertaining to the rights of any State or Territory; and also to inquire into and investigate whether any officer or officers of the government have, by combination or otherwise, prevented and defeated, or attempted to prevent or defeat, the execution of
    7.50
    2 votes
    139

    United States Senate Committee on Veterans' Affairs

    The United States Senate Committee on Veterans' Affairs deals with oversight of United States veterans issues. The Committee is chaired by Democrat Patty Murray of Washington, and the Ranking Member is Republican Richard Burr of North Carolina. Source: 2011 Congressional Record, Vol. 157, Pg. S557{{{3}}} This senate committee came under scrutiny when its oversight role over Walter Reed Army Hospital was questioned following discoveries of negligent maintenance of certain facilities. The scrutiny escalated as individual members have been questioned on their individual negligence in overseeing this veterans' hospital.
    7.50
    2 votes
    140

    United States Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Crime and Drugs

    The Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Crime and Drugs is one of seven subcommittees within the Senate Judiciary Committee. Jurisdiction: (1) Oversight of the Department of Justice's (a) Criminal Division; (b) Drug Enforcement Administration; (c) Executive Office of the U.S. Attorneys; (d) Violence Against Women's Office; and (e) U.S. Marshals Office; (2) Oversight of the U.S. Sentencing Commission; (3)Youth violence and directly related issues; (4) Federal programs under the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974, as Amended (including the Runaway and Homeless Youth Act), and (5) Criminal justice and victim's rights legislation; (6) Oversight of the Office of National Drug Control Policy; (7) Oversight of Community Oriented Policing Office and Related law Enforcement grants; and (8) Oversight of the U.S. Secret Service. U.S. House Judiciary Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, and Homeland Security
    7.50
    2 votes
    141

    House Committee on Foreign Affairs

    The Committee on Foreign Affairs of the U.S. House of Representatives, also known as the House Foreign Affairs Committee, is a standing committee of the United States House of Representatives which has jurisdiction over bills and investigations related to the foreign affairs of the United States. It is less powerful than its Senate counterpart, the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, because the House committee does not consider the ratification of treaties or the confirmation of presidential appointments, such as are made for ambassadors and Secretaries of State. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen of Florida became chairperson of the committee in 2011, following the Republican majority obtained as a result of the United States House of Representatives elections, 2010. She succeeds Howard Berman, of California. From 1975 to 1978 and from 1995 to 2007, it was renamed the Committee on International Relations. In January 2007 (and January 1979), it changed back to its original name. Its jurisdiction is and was the same under both names. Sources:
    6.33
    3 votes
    142

    United States Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development

    The U.S. Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development is one of twelve subcommittees of the U.S. Senate Committee on Appropriations. This subcommittee, as its name implies, is responsible for funding related to the Department of Energy and water development projects in the United States. It also oversees the Tennessee Valley Authority, the federal power marketing administrations, and non-defense nuclear power, including nuclear waste disposal and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. It is also responsible for the multi-billion dollar budget of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Interior Department's U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. The Corps of Engineers is the primary federal agency with responsibility over "waters of the United States" that plans, designs, builds, and operates water resources and other civil works projects, while the Bureau of Reclamation oversees federal dams, irrigation, and rural drinking water projects in the Western United States. The Committee is currently chaired by Democrat Dianne Feinstein of California, and the Ranking Minority Member is Republican Lamar Alexander of Tennessee
    6.33
    3 votes
    143
    United States Senate Committee on Appropriations

    United States Senate Committee on Appropriations

    • Legislature: United States Senate
    The United States Senate Committee on Appropriations is a standing committee of the United States Senate. It has jurisdiction over all discretionary spending legislation in the Senate. The Senate Appropriations Committee is the largest committee in the U.S. Senate, with 30 members at the end of the 111th Congress. Its role is defined by the U.S. Constitution, which requires "appropriations made by law" prior to the expenditure of any money from the Treasury, and is therefore one of the most powerful committees in the Senate. The committee was first organized on March 6, 1867, when power over appropriations was taken out of the hands of the Finance Committee. The chairman of the Appropriations Committee has enormous power to bring home special projects (sometimes referred to as "pork barrel spending") for his or her state as well as having the final say on other senators' appropriation requests. For example, in fiscal year 2005 per capita federal spending in Alaska, the home state of then-Chairman Ted Stevens, was $12,000, double the national average. Alaska has 11,772 special earmarked projects for a combined cost of $15,780,623,000. This represents about 4% of the overall spending
    6.33
    3 votes
    144

    United States Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights and Property Rights

    The Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on the Constitution is one of seven subcommittees within the Senate Judiciary Committee. The subcomittee was best known in the 1970s as the committee of Sam Ervin, whose investigations and lobbying — together with Frank Church and the Church Commission — lead to the founding of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. From the Senate Judiciary Committee website:
    6.33
    3 votes
    145

    Committee on Justice and Human Rights

    The Committee on Justice and Human Rights is one of the ten permanent committees of the Pan-African Parliament. It is in charge of law and justice issues in Africa. Functions of the committee: Chairperson of the Committee is the Hon Abdelahad Gamaleldin (Egypt) The Deputy Chairperson is the Hon Efigênia dos Santos Lima Clemente (Angola) Rapporteur of the Committee is Hon Abdu Katuntu (Uganda)
    8.00
    1 votes
    146

    House Committee on Appropriations

    The Committee on Appropriations is a committee of the United States House of Representatives. It is in charge of setting the specific expenditures of money by the government of the United States. As such, it is one of the most powerful of the committees, and its members are seen as influential. The constitutional basis for the Appropriations Committee comes from Article one, Section nine, Clause seven of the U.S. Constitution, which states that: This clearly delegated the power of appropriating money to Congress, but was vague beyond that. Originally, the power of appropriating was taken by the Committee on Ways and Means, but the United States Civil War placed a large burden on the Congress, and at the end of that conflict, a reorganization occurred. The Committee was created on December 11, 1865, when the House separated the tasks of the Committee on Ways and Means into three parts. The passage of legislation affecting taxes remained with Ways and Means. The power to regulate banking was transferred to the Committee on Banking and Commerce. The power to appropriate money—to control the federal pursestrings—was given to the newly-created Appropriations Committee. At the time of
    8.00
    1 votes
    147

    Report of the Commission on Obscenity and Pornography

    A 1969 United States Supreme Court decision that held that people could view whatever they wished in the privacy of their own homes caused the United States Congress to fund the President's Commission on Obscenity and Pornography, set up by President Lyndon B. Johnson to study pornography. The commission was established to study and report on; Initial: Edward E. Elson, Thomas D. Gill, Edward D. Greenwood, Reverend Morton A. Hill, S.J., G. William Jones, Joseph T. Klapper, Otto N. Larsen, Rabbi Irving Lehrman, Freeman Lewis, Reverend Winfrey C. Link, Morris A. Lipton, William B. Lockhart (chair), Thomas C. Lynch, Barbara Scott, Cathryn A. Speits, Frederick Herbert Wagman, Kenneth Keating and Marvin Wolfgang. K. Keating was replaced with Charles Keating, Jr, by R. M. Nixon. The commission's report, called Report of the Commission on Obscenity and Pornography, and published in 1970, recommended sex education, funding of research into the effects of pornography and restriction of children's access to pornography, and recommended against any restrictions for adults. On balance the report found that obscenity and pornography were not important social problems, that there was no evidence
    8.00
    1 votes
    148

    United States Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs

    United States Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs is one of twelve subcommittees of the United States Senate Committee on Appropriations. This subcommittee oversees the U.S. State Department and several international programs and agencies, including international programs within the Department of Defense. It also manages the Peace Corps, the Export-Import Bank, the Millennium Challenge Corporation, the Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe, and United States contributions to the International Monetary Fund and United Nations activities. The Committee is currently chaired by Democrat Patrick Leahy of Vermont, and the Ranking Minority Member is Republican Lindsey Graham of South Carolina.
    8.00
    1 votes
    149

    United States Senate Committee on Aeronautical and Space Sciences

    The Committee on Aeronautical and Space Sciences was a standing committee of the United States Senate from 1958 until 1977, when it was folded into the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation. It was preceded by the Special Committee on Space and Astronautics, which operated from February 6, 1958, to March 11, 1959. The Committee on Aeronautical and Space Sciences was established July 24, 1958, when the Senate adopted S. Res. 327, introduced by Senator Lyndon Johnson. The resolution also extended the term of the Special Committee on Space and Astronautics until March 11, 1959, so it could complete its final report. Many of the members of the special committee joined the new standing committee. The standing committee was given jurisdiction over the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and all aeronatical and space sciences generally. However, matters concerning the development of weapons systems or military operations were reserved for the Senate Armed Services Committee. However, the Space Committee was permitted to survey, review, and report on both military and civilian space activities of the United States. According to Senate Rule 25, as amended
    8.00
    1 votes
    150

    United States Senate Committee on Commerce and Manufactures

    The United States Senate Committee on Commerce and Manufactures was one of the original standing committees created in the Senate in 1816, but it only lasted nine years, when it was split into the Committee on Commerce and the Committee on Manufactures. It functions are now under the jurisdiction of the United States Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation. The Committee on Commerce and Manufactures was established as one of the original standing committees, following adoption of a resolution proposed by James Barbour of Virginia on December 10, 1816. The committee`s records consist of petitions and memorials referred to the committee for the whole period and committee reports and papers from 1818. With its brief existence, the records show substantial committee activity, especially regarding petitions received. In all Congresses the principle record subjects are tariffs and the regulation of shipping and revenue collection. Other subjects included the welfare of sick and disabled seamen between the 15th and 17th Congress, and harbor improvements such as lighthouses between the 16th and 18th Congress. The single most prominent subject was tariffs, particularly the
    8.00
    1 votes
    151

    United States Senate Committee on Finance

    • Legislature: United States Senate
    The U.S. Senate Committee on Finance (or, less formally, Senate Finance Committee) is a standing committee of the United States Senate. The Committee concerns itself with matters relating to taxation and other revenue measures generally, and those relating to the insular possessions; bonded debt of the United States; customs, collection districts, and ports of entry and delivery; deposit of public moneys; general revenue sharing; health programs under the Social Security Act (notably Medicare and Medicaid) and health programs financed by a specific tax or trust fund; national social security; reciprocal trade agreements; tariff and import quotas, and related matters thereto; and the transportation of dutiable goods. It is considered to be one of the most powerful committees in Congress. The Committee on Finance is one of the original committees established in the Senate. First created on December 11, 1815, as a select committee and known as the Committee on Finance and an [sic] Uniform National Currency, it was formed to alleviate economic issues arising from the War of 1812. On December 10, 1816 the Senate officially created the Committee on Finance as a standing committee.
    8.00
    1 votes
    152
    8.00
    1 votes
    153
    Commission on the Future of the United States Aerospace Industry

    Commission on the Future of the United States Aerospace Industry

    The Commission on the Future of the United States Aerospace Industry was formed jointly by United States President George W. Bush and the United States Congress in 2001. Its first public meeting was held on November 27, 2001, and its final report was given on November 18, 2002. An excerpt from the introduction of the Interim Report #2 of the commission: The Commission consisted of 12 members, six of whom were appointed by the President, and six appointed by Congress (three from the House and three from the Senate). Executive Director - Charles H. Huettner The commission produced three interim reports and a final report. The commission held six public meetings the hear testimonies and gain different perspectives. The first meeting was held on November 27, 2001, where the commission heard testimonies from the Administration, Congress, and the Executive Brach. The second meeting was held on February 12, 2002, which consisted of Air Transportation Capacity / Infrastructure discussions, and well as Export Control discussions. The third meeting was held on May 14, 2002, and included discussions on Space, including a testimony from Sean O'Keefe. The three other public meetings were held
    5.25
    4 votes
    154
    7.00
    2 votes
    155

    Commission on Higher Education

    The Commission on Higher Education of the Philippines, (Filipino: Komisyon sa Lalong Mataas na Edukasyon), abbreviated as CHED. The CHED is attached to the Office of the President for administrative purposes. It covers both public and private higher education institutions as well as degree-granting programs in all post-secondary educational institutions in the country. The CHED was established on May 18, 1994 through Republic Act No. 7722 or the Higher Education Act of 1994 which was authored by Senator Francisco Tatad. The creation of CHED was part of a broad agenda for reforms in the country's education system, outlined by the Congressional Commission on Education (EDCOM) in 1992. Part of the reforms is the trifocalization of the education sector. The three governing bodies in the education sector are the Commission on Higher Education (CHED) for tertiary and graduate education, the Department of Education (DepEd) for basic education, and the Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (TESDA) for technical-vocational and middle level education. The former chairman of the Commission on Higher Education was Romulo Neri, formerly Director General of the National Economic
    7.00
    2 votes
    156
    House Committee on Homeland Security

    House Committee on Homeland Security

    The U.S. House Committee on Homeland Security is a standing committee of the United States House of Representatives, the lower house of Congress. Its responsibilities include U.S. security legislation and oversight of the Department of Homeland Security. The committee conducts oversight and handles legislation (and resolutions) related to the security of the United States. The committee may amend, approve, or table homeland security related bills. It also has the power to hold hearings, conduct investigations, and subpoena witnesses. Additionally, the committee has authorization and policy oversight responsibilities over the Department of Homeland Security. The committee meets on the first Wednesday of each month while the House is in session. It is not permitted to conduct business unless a quorum is present, which the rules define as one third of its members. A majority of members are required for certain actions including: issuing a subpoena, entering executive session, and immunizing a witness. Committee members have access to classified information but must adhere to stringent access control procedures. In the 107th Congress, the House Select Committee on Homeland Security was
    7.00
    2 votes
    157

    Moynihan Commission on Government Secrecy

    Commission on Protecting and Reducing Government Secrecy, also called the Moynihan Secrecy Commission, was a bipartisan statutory commission in the United States created under Title IX of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act for Fiscal Years 1994 and 1995 (P.L. 103-236 SEC. 900) to conduct "an investigation into all matters in any way related to any legislation, executive order, regulation, practice, or procedure relating to classified information or granting security clearances" and to submit a final report with recommendations. The Commission’s investigation was the first authorized by statute to examine government secrecy since the Wright Commission in 1957. The Commission’s final report, issued on March 3, 1997, was unanimous. Among its key findings were Sen. Moynihan reported that approximately 400,000 new secrets are created per year at the top level alone—Top Secret—the disclosure of any one would cause, as defined by law, "exceptionally grave damage to the national security." In 1994 it was estimated that the United States government had over 1.5 billion pages of classified material that was 25 years old and older. In 1995, when President Bill Clinton signed Executive
    7.00
    2 votes
    158
    United States House Select Committee on Assassinations

    United States House Select Committee on Assassinations

    The United States House of Representatives Select Committee on Assassinations (HSCA) was established in 1976 to investigate the assassinations of John F. Kennedy and Martin Luther King, Jr. and the shooting of Alabama Governor George Wallace. The Committee investigated until 1978 and issued its final report, and ruled that Kennedy was very likely assassinated as a result of a conspiracy. However, the Committee noted that it believed that the conspiracy did not include the governments of the Soviet Union or Cuba. The Committee also stated it did not believe the conspiracy was organized by any organized crime group, nor any anti-Castro group, but that it could not rule out individual members of any of those groups acting together. The House Select Committee on Assassinations suffered from being conducted mostly in secret, and then issued a public report with much of its evidence sealed for 50 years under Congressional rules. In 1992, Congress passed legislation to collect and open up all the evidence relating to Kennedy's death, and created the Assassination Records Review Board to further that goal. The HSCA was a followup to the Hart-Schweiker and Church Committee hearings that had
    7.00
    2 votes
    159

    United States House Ways and Means Subcommittee on Health

    The U.S. House Energy Subcommittee on Health is a subcommittee within the House Committee on Energy and Commerce. The House Subcommittee on Health has general jurisdiction over bills and resolutions relating to issues within the scope of the Subcommittee's jurisdiction, and has oversight responsibilities over agencies, programs and activities that fall within its jurisdiction which is defined by the House Rules, and can recommend funding appropriations for governmental agencies, programs, and activities that fall within its jurisdiction. As a Standing Subcommittee of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, it holds regular meetings and performs any functions assigned to it by that committee's rules in addition to those assigned to it by the House Rules.
    7.00
    2 votes
    160

    United States Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Agriculture, Rural Development, and Related Agencies

    The U.S. Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies is one of twelve subcommittees of the U.S. Senate Committee on Appropriations. It was formerly known as the Subcommittee on Agriculture, Rural Development, and Related Services, but was renamed in 2007 to more accurately reflect the programs under its jurisdiction, and to more closely align the subcommittee with its counterpart on the House Appropriations Committee. This subcommittee has jurisdiction over the Department of Agriculture discretionary spending (does not include the Food Stamp Program or farming subsidies that are mandatory spending), as well as food safety programs at the Food and Drug Administration and foreign agriculture assistance programs. The subcommittee also oversees rural development programs, such as loan guarantees for rural housing and the rural electrification program The Committee is currently chaired by Democrat Herb Kohl of Wisconsin, and the Ranking Minority Member is Republican Roy Blunt of Missouri.
    7.00
    2 votes
    161
    United States Senate Committee on Foreign Relations

    United States Senate Committee on Foreign Relations

    • Legislature: United States Senate
    • Subcommittees: United States Senate Foreign Relations Subcommittee on African Affairs
    The United States Senate Committee on Foreign Relations is a standing committee of the United States Senate. It is charged with leading foreign-policy legislation and debate in the Senate. The Foreign Relations Committee is generally responsible for overseeing (but not administering) and funding foreign aid programs as well as funding, arms sales and training for national allies. The committee is also responsible for holding confirmation hearings for high-level positions in the Department of State. The committee has considered, debated, and reported important treaties and legislation, ranging from the purchase of Alaska in 1867 to the establishment of the United Nations in 1945. It also holds jurisdiction over all diplomatic nominations. Along with the Finance and Judiciary Committees, the Foreign Relations Committee is one of the oldest in the Senate, going back to the initial creation of committees in 1816. Its sister committee in the House of Representatives is the Committee on Foreign Affairs (renamed from International Relations by the 110th Congress in January 2007). The Committee is chaired by Democrat John Kerry of Massachusetts, and the Ranking Member is Republican Richard
    7.00
    2 votes
    162

    United States Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Administrative Oversight and the Courts

    The Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Administrative Oversight and the Courts is one of seven subcommittees within the Senate Judiciary Committee. Jurisdiction: (1) Court administration and management; (2) Judicial rules and procedures; (3) Creation of new courts and judgeships; (4) Bankruptcy; (5) Administrative practices and procedures; (6) Legal reform and liability issues; (7) Oversight of the Department of Justice grant programs, as well as government waste and fraud; (8) Private relief bills other than immigration; (9) Oversight of the Foreign Claims Settlement Commission.
    7.00
    2 votes
    163
    Royal Commission on the Electoral System

    Royal Commission on the Electoral System

    The Royal Commission on the Electoral System was formed in New Zealand in 1985, and reported in 1986. The decision to form the Royal Commission was taken by the Fourth Labour government, after the Labour party had received more votes, yet won fewer seats than the National Party in both the 1978 and 1981 elections. The Royal Commission's report Towards a Better Democracy was instrumental in effecting New Zealand to change its electoral system from first-past-the-post to mixed member proportional. The Royal Commission consisted of The Royal Commission established ten criteria for choosing an electoral system. The criteria were not weighed equally by the commission, and a balance was sought. 1. Fairness between political parties 2. Effective representation of minority and special interest groups 3. Effective Māori representation 4. Political Integration 5. Effective representation of constituents 6. Effective voter participation 7. Effective government 8. Effective Parliament 9. Effective parties 10. Legitimacy The Commission evaluated first-past-the-post, single transferable vote, Supplementary Member, Alternative Vote and mixed member proportional. In 1992 and 1993, two referendums
    6.00
    3 votes
    164

    United States Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Defense

    The U.S. Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Defense is one of twelve subcommittees of the U.S. Senate Committee on Appropriations. Military defense spending is the largest individual component of federal discretionary spending, making the Defense Subcommittee one of the more powerful Appropriations subcommittees. When referring to federal discretionary spending as a whole, many budget analysts make a distinction between defense and non-defense discretionary spending. Funding requirements for the United States military are laid out in the U.S Constitution. In addition to the general requirement that funds withdrawn from the Treasury only through "appropriations made by law" (Article I, Section 9), the Constitution gives Congress the authority to "raise and support Armies," but limits funding for the military to a maximum of two years (Article I, Section 8). This restriction is generally not an issue for Congress, since by law, the federal budget operates on a year-to-year basis. The subcommittee oversees overall funding for the Department of Defense, including the Army, Navy, Air Force. The subcommittee is also responsible for funding for the Central Intelligence Agency. Some
    6.00
    3 votes
    165

    Committee on Culture and Education

    The Committee on Culture and Education (CULT) is a committee of the European Parliament. This committee has focused on the well-being of all members of the human race and the increased opportunities for education in all countries of the European Union. The Committee has 6 aspects of focus. In this current term, the Committee on Culture and Education has looked at three issues. The first issue is the protection of members of circuses in the European Union. The Committee has declared these members of society as a recognized culture in the EU and desires the circus vocational schools to become accredited among other provisions. This resolution passed on July 12, 2005 with a vote of 29 in favor, 1 against, and 2 abstained. The second dealt with the standardization of higher education systems through thorough internal assessments in accordance with the European Higher Education Area. Education also must promote diversity in its students and in the programs offered by the various institutions. It was adopted on August 30, 2005 with a vote of 24 in favor, 1 against, and 1 abstained. The third issue has regarded the protection of minors. The committee has brought forth a resolution for the
    5.67
    3 votes
    166

    Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People

    The Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People (CEIRPP) was founded in 1975 by resolution 3376 of the United Nations General Assembly. In its inception year, the CEIRPP urged the SC to promote action for a fair solution- recommending “a two-phase plan for the return of Palestinian to their homes and property, a timetable for the withdrawal of Israeli forces from the occupied territories by 1 June 1977, with the provision, if necessary, of temporary peacekeeping forces to facilitate the process.” The committee oversees "a programme of implementation to enable the Palestinian people to exercise their inalienable right to self-determination without external interference, national independence and sovereignty; and to return to their homes and property." The committee reports to the Assembly annually, and the mandate is renewed each year. The creation of the CEIRPP was a significant step that aligned Palestinians with repatriation rights. In the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) article 13 states “everyone has the right to leave any country, including his own, and to return to his country.” From 1953 to 1973, the Palestinian Question was
    5.67
    3 votes
    167

    National Commission on Federal Election Reform

    The United States presidential election, 2000 was one of the most controversial ever. Legal challenges were taken all the way to the Supreme Court of the United States before Al Gore conceded the election to President George W. Bush. As a result of this contentious election, the National Commission on Federal Election Reform was formed by the University of Virginia's Miller Center of Public Affairs and The Century Foundation. Its goal was to evaluate election reform, review policy proposals, and offer a bipartisan analysis to the United States Congress, the US Executive Branch, and the American people. The Commission was cochaired by former Presidents Jimmy Carter (honorary), Gerald Ford (honorary), Robert H. Michel and Lloyd N. Cutler, and included distinguished public leaders from across the political spectrum The Commission held four public hearings and organized task forces on the federal election system, election administration, and constitutional and federal election law issues. They released its final report to Congress and the White House on July 31, 2001. In 2002, the bipartisan Help America Vote Act (HAVA) was passed by the Congress and signed into law by President Bush.
    5.67
    3 votes
    168

    Advisory Committee on Business Appointments

    The Advisory Committee on Business Appointments is an non-departmental public body in the UK, which was set up in 1975 to provide advice on applications from the most senior Crown servants who wish to take up outside appointments after they leave Crown service. Since 1995 it has also provided advice to former Ministers on their employment in the two years after leaving office. The committee is chaired by Lord Lang. In March 2010, the Advisory Committee on Business Appointments revealed that Tony Blair was involved in business consulting to an oil firm with interests in Iraq. Blair had managed to prevent the committee from publicizing the news for almost two years until it finally decided to release the information to the public.
    6.50
    2 votes
    169

    Commission on the Political and Constitutional Future of Quebec

    The Commission on the Political and Constitutional Future of Quebec, also known as the Bélanger-Campeau Commission, was established by the Lieutenant Governor of Quebec, at the initiative of Premier Robert Bourassa, after the demise of the Meech Lake Accord. The commission was mandated to examine the political and constitutional status of Quebec and to make recommendations for changes. The Bélanger-Campeau Report was published in 1991 and revised in 2002.
    6.50
    2 votes
    170

    Committee on Fisheries

    The Committee on Fisheries (PECH) is a committee of the European Parliament. FRAGA ESTÉVEZ, Carmen is the Chairman. List of members for the 7th legislature
    6.50
    2 votes
    171

    Committee on Transport, Industry, Communications, Energy, Science, and Technology

    The Committee on Transport, Industry, Communications, Energy, Science and Technology is one of the ten permanent committees of the Pan-African Parliament. Itis responsible for the following areas: Chairperson of the Committee is Hon Mostefa Boudina of Algeria. Deputy Chairperson of the Committee is Hon Henriette Massounga Nono from Gabon. Rapporteur of the Committee is the Hon Suzanne Vos from South Africa.
    6.50
    2 votes
    172
    House Committee on Financial Services

    House Committee on Financial Services

    The United States House Committee on Financial Services (also referred to as the House Banking Committee) is the committee of the United States House of Representatives that oversees the entire financial services industry, including the securities, insurance, banking, and housing industries. The Committee also oversees the work of the Federal Reserve, the United States Department of the Treasury, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, and other financial services regulators. It is chaired by Spencer Bachus (R-AL) and the ranking Democrat is Barney Frank (D-MA). The committee was once known as the Committee on Banking and Currency. The Banking and Currency Committee was created in 1865 to take over responsibilities previously handled by the Ways and Means Committee. It continued to function under this name until 1968, when it assumed the current name. Source: The Financial Services Committee operates with six subcommittees. This is an increase from five subcommittees in the 110th Congress. The former Domestic and International Monetary Policy, Trade, and Technology Subcommitee has been split into two subcommittees. The jurisdiction over insurance was transferred in 2001 to the
    6.50
    2 votes
    173

    United States Congress Joint Committee on Printing

    The Joint Committee on Printing is a joint committee of the United States Congress devoted to overseeing the functions of the Government Printing Office and general printing procedures of the federal government of the United States. The authority vested in the Committee is derived from 44 U.S.C. § 101 and the Committee is thereby responsible for ensuring compliance by federal entities to these laws and the Government Printing and Binding Regulations. The current joint committee was created by the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946 and combined the functions of the United States House Committee on Printing and the United States Senate Committee on Printing. The Committee traces its lineage back to a similar one created by an act of August 3, 1846 (9 Stat. 114, §2) consisting of three members each from the two houses. By virtue of this it is the oldest joint committee of the Congress, although not continuously organized as such. There are five members of each house on the committee, which has no subcommittees. The Committee consists of a Chairman and four members of the United States Senate Committee on Rules and Administration and the United States House Committee on House
    6.50
    2 votes
    174

    United States Congress Joint Committee on Taxation

    The Joint Committee on Taxation is a Committee of the U.S. Congress established under the Internal Revenue Code at 26 U.S.C. § 8001. The Joint Committee is composed of ten Members: five from the Senate Finance Committee and five from the House Ways and Means Committee. The Joint Committee is chaired on a rotating basis by the Chair of the Senate Finance Committee and the Chair of the House Ways and Means Committee. During the first Session of each Congress the House has the joint committee chair and the Senate has the vice-chair; during the second session the roles are reversed. The Members of the Joint Committee choose the Chief of Staff of the Joint Committee, who is responsible for selecting the remainder of the staff on a nonpartisan basis. Since May 15, 2009, the Chief of Staff of the Joint Committee has been Thomas A. Barthold. The duties of the Joint Committee are: With respect to the estimation of revenues for Congress, the Joint Committee serves a purpose parallel to that of the Congressional Budget Office for the estimation of spending for Congress, the Department of the Treasury for the estimation of revenues for the executive branch, and the Office of Management of
    6.50
    2 votes
    175

    United States House Armed Services Subcommittee on Projection Forces

    House Armed Services Subcommittee on Seapower and Projection Forces is a subcommittee of the House Armed Services Committee in the United States House of Representatives. The Seapower and Expeditionary Forces Subcommittee exercises oversight and legislative jurisdiction over the United States Navy, United States Marine Corps, Navy Reserve equipment, and maritime programs. The subcommittee does not have jurisdiction over strategic weapons (weapons of mass destruction), space or NASA, special operations, and information technology programs.
    6.50
    2 votes
    176

    United States Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, State and the Judiciary

    U.S. Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies, often referred to colloquially as the CJS Subcommittee is one of twelve subcommittees of the U.S. Senate Committee on Appropriations. It was formerly known as the Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, State, and the Judiciary during the 108th Congress (2003-2005), but responsibility for the State Department and the federal Judiciary are now handled by separate subcommittees. This subcommittee is responsible for discretionary spending at the Commerce Department and the Justice Department, as well various independent federal agencies, such as the International Trade Commission, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, and the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. The Committee is currently chaired by Democrat Barbara Mikulski of Maryland, and the Ranking Minority Member is Republican Kay Bailey Hutchison of Texas.
    6.50
    2 votes
    177

    United States Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Homeland Security

    U.S. Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Homeland Security is one of twelve subcommittees of the U.S. Senate Committee on Appropriations. It was formally established in 2003 in response to the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 to oversee national security programs and the newly created Department of Homeland Security. The subcommittee is responsible for the Department of Homeland Security and its related agencies, including the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the Transportation Security Administration, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, the U.S. Secret Service, and the United States Coast Guard. The subcommittee also provides funding for state and local prepardeness efforts. The Committee is currently chaired by Democrat Mary Landrieu of Louisiana, and the Ranking Minority Member is Republican Dan Coats of Indiana.
    6.50
    2 votes
    178

    United States Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Corrections and Rehabilitation

    The Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Privacy, Technology and the Law is one of seven subcommittees within the Senate Judiciary Committee. It is a new subcommittee for the 112th Congress. Jurisdiction: (1) Oversight of laws and policies governing the collection, protection, use and dissemination of commercial information by the private sector, including online behavioral advertising, privacy within social networking websites and other online privacy issues; (2) Enforcement and implementation of commercial information privacy laws and policies; (3) Use of technology by the private sector to protect privacy, enhance transparency and encourage innovation; (4) Privacy standards for the collection, retention, use and dissemination of personally identifiable commercial information; and (5) Privacy implications of new or emerging technologies.
    6.50
    2 votes
    179
    Commission on the Future of Higher Education

    Commission on the Future of Higher Education

    The formation of a Commission on the Future of Higher Education, also known as the Spellings Commission, was announced on September 19, 2005 by U.S. Secretary of Education, Margaret Spellings. The nineteen member Commission was charged with recommending a national strategy for reforming post-secondary education, with a particular focus on how well colleges and universities are preparing students for the 21st-century workplace, as well as a secondary focus on how well high schools are preparing the students for post-secondary education. In the report, released on September 26, 2006, the Commission focuses on four key areas: access, affordability (particularly for non-traditional students), the standards of quality in instruction, and the accountability of institutions of higher learning to their constituencies (students, families, taxpayers, and other investors in higher education). Since the report's publication, the implementation of its recommendations were been made the responsibility of the then-recently-appointed U.S. Under Secretary of Education, Sara Martinez Tucker (appointed August 2006). A significant motivation behind the Spellings Commission's formation was the fear
    5.33
    3 votes
    180

    United Nations Commission on Conventional Armaments

    The United Nations Commission on Conventional Armaments was founded as a result of the founding United Nations treaty in 1946. The goal of the commission was to find ways to reduce the size of non-nuclear armaments around the world. The Commission was formally established by the Security Council on 15 February 1947. The five permanent members of the United Nation Security Council could not agree on how to achieve this aim and so the first report of the Commission in 1949 made no substantial recommendations. In 1950, the Soviet Union refused to sit with the representatives of the "Kuomintang group" (i.e. the non-communist Chinese representatives) on the Commission. This brought an effective end to the Commission's discussion. It was formally dissolved in 1952.
    5.33
    3 votes
    181

    United States Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs

    The United States Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs (formerly the Committee on Banking and Currency) has jurisdiction over matters related to: banks and banking, price controls, deposit insurance, export promotion and controls, federal monetary policy, financial aid to commerce and industry, issuance of redemption of notes, currency and coinage, public and private housing, urban development and mass transit, and government contracts. The Committee is one of twenty standing committees in the United States Senate. The Committee was formally established as the "Committee on Banking and Currency" in 1913, when Senator Robert L. Owen of Oklahoma sponsored the Federal Reserve Act. Senator Owen served as the Committee's inaugural Chairman. The Committee is chaired by Democrat Tim Johnson of South Dakota, and the Ranking Member is Republican Richard Shelby of Alabama. Source: 2011 Congressional Record, Vol. 157, Page S557
    5.33
    3 votes
    182
    7.00
    1 votes
    183
    House Committee on Energy and Commerce

    House Committee on Energy and Commerce

    The Committee on Energy and Commerce is one of the oldest standing committees of the United States House of Representatives. Established in 1795, it has operated continuously—with various name changes and jurisdictional changes—for more than 200 years. The two other House standing committees with such continuous operation are the House Ways and Means Committee and the House Rules Committee. The Committee has served as the principal guide for the House in matters relating to the promotion of commerce and to the public’s health and marketplace interests, with the relatively recent addition of energy considerations among them. The House Committee on Energy and Commerce has developed what is arguably the broadest (non-tax-oriented) jurisdiction of any Congressional committee. Today, it maintains principal responsibility for legislative oversight relating to telecommunications, consumer protection, food and drug safety, public health, air quality and environmental health, the supply and delivery of energy, and interstate and foreign commerce in general. This jurisdiction extends over five Cabinet-level departments and seven independent agencies—from the Department of Energy, Health and
    7.00
    1 votes
    184

    House Committee on Natural Resources

    The U.S. House Committee on Natural Resources, or Natural Resources Committee (often referred to as simply "Resources") is a Congressional committee of the United States House of Representatives. Originally called the "Committee on Interior & Insular Affairs," the name was changed to the Natural Resources Committee in 1993. The name was shortened to the Resources Committee in 1995 by the new Chairman, Don Young (at the same time, the committee took over the duties of the now-defunct Merchant Marine and Fisheries Committee). Following the Democratic takeover of the House of Representatives in 2006, the name of the committee was changed back to its title used between 1993 and 1995. Source: Rules of the House of Representatives One Hundred Ninth Congress The committee chairman is Doc Hastings of Washington, and the Ranking Member is Ed Markey of Massachusetts. Source: In the 111th Congress, the number of subcommittees was reduced from 5 to 4. The Subcommittees on Insular Affairs and Fisheries, Wildlife and Oceans were merged into the Subcommittee on Insular Affairs, Oceans and Wildlife. In the 112th Congress, the number was again increased to 5, adding the Subcommittee on Indian and
    7.00
    1 votes
    185

    Independent Commission on Policing for Northern Ireland

    The Independent Commission on Policing for Northern Ireland was established in 1998 as part of the Belfast Agreement, intended as a major step in the Northern Ireland peace process. Chaired by Conservative politician Chris Patten, it was better known as the Patten Commission. The other members of the Commission were Maurice Hayes, Peter Smith, Kathleen O'Toole, Gerald W. Lynch, Sir John Smith, Lucy Woods and Professor Clifford Shearing. The Secretary to the Commission was Bob Peirce, who drafted the report. Under the terms of reference defined in the Belfast Agreement, the Commission was to inquire into policing in Northern Ireland, consult widely, and make proposals for future policing structures and arrangements, including the police force composition, recruitment, training, culture, ethos and symbols. The aim of the proposals was to create a police service that would be effective, operate in partnership with the community, cooperate with the Garda Síochána and other police forces, and be accountable both to the law and the community which it was to serve. On September 9 1999 the Commission produced its report, entitled A New Beginning: Policing in Northern Ireland popularly
    7.00
    1 votes
    186
    Nye Committee

    Nye Committee

    The Nye Committee, officially known as the Special Committee on Investigation of the Munitions Industry, was a United States Senate committee chaired by U.S. Senator Gerald Nye. The committee investigated the financial and banking interests which underlay United States' involvement in World War I, and was a significant factor in public and political support for American neutrality in the early stages of World War II. During the 1920s and 1930s, dozens of books and articles appeared which argued that arms manufacturers had tricked the United States into entering World War I. One of the best-known and deeply-informed critics was Smedley D. Butler, a Major General the U.S. Marine Corps, who published War is a Racket in 1935. The push for the appointment of Senator Gerald Nye (R-ND) to the chairmanship of this committee came from Senator George Norris (R-NE). According to peace activist Dorothy Detzer, Norris said, "Nye's young, he has inexhaustible energy, and he has courage. Those are all important assets. He may be rash in his judgments at times, but it's the rashness of enthusiasm." Norris proposed Nye as "...the only one out of the 96 whom he deemed to have the competence,
    7.00
    1 votes
    187
    7.00
    1 votes
    188

    United States President's Commission on CIA activities within the United States

    The U.S. President's Commission on CIA activities within the United States was set up under President Gerald Ford in 1975 to investigate the activities of the Central Intelligence Agency and other intelligence agencies within the United States. The commission was led by the Vice President, Nelson Rockefeller, and is sometimes referred to as the Rockefeller Commission. The commission was created in response to a December 1974 report in The New York Times that the CIA had conducted illegal domestic activities, including experiments on U.S. citizens, during the 1960s. The commission issued a single report in 1975, touching upon certain CIA abuses including mail opening and surveillance of domestic dissident groups. It publicized Project MKULTRA, a CIA mind control study. It also studied issues relating to the John F. Kennedy assassination, specifically the head snap as seen in the Zapruder film (first shown on television in 1975), and the possible presence of E. Howard Hunt and Frank Sturgis in Dallas, Texas. A larger investigation, the Church Committee, was set up on 27 January 1975 by the U.S. Senate. The Nedzi Committee was created in the U.S. Congress on 19 February 1975. It was
    7.00
    1 votes
    189
    House Committee on Agriculture

    House Committee on Agriculture

    The U.S. House Committee on Agriculture, or Agriculture Committee is a standing committee of the United States House of Representatives. The House Committee on Agriculture has general jurisdiction over federal agriculture policy and oversight of some federal agencies, and it can recommend funding appropriations for various governmental agencies, programs, and activities, as defined by House rules. The Agriculture Committee was created on May 3, 1820, after Lewis Williams of North Carolina sponsored a resolution to create the committee and give agricultural issues equal weight with commercial and manufacturing interests. The committee originally consisted of seven members, from the states of Maryland, New Hampshire, New York, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Vermont, and Virginia. Thomas Forrest of Pennsylvania was the first chairman. The Agriculture Committee remained a seven-member body until 1835, when two more members were added. It was not until 1871 that the next two members were added. Since then it has gradually grown to its current size of 46 members. The U.S. Senate counterpart to the House Agriculture Committee, the U.S. Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and
    6.00
    2 votes
    190

    Steering and Policy Committee of the United States House of Representatives

    In the United States House of Representatives, the House Democratic Caucus includes a Steering and Policy Committee. Its primary purpose is to assign fellow party members to other House committees, and it also advises party leaders on policy. The House Republican Conference divides the duties of this committee between two groups: a Policy Committee and a Steering Committee. The House Democratic Steering and Policy Committee is chaired by the party leader in the House, which has been Nancy Pelosi since 2003, in her capacities as Minority Leader (2003-2007, 2011-present) and Speaker of the House (2007-2011), when the Democrats had the minority and majority of seats in the House, respectively. The party leader also appoints two co-chairs to assist her on the committee. Rosa DeLauro (for Steering) and George Miller (for Policy) have served in these positions since 2003. Tom Price currently chairs the Policy Committee. In early 2011, he succeeded Thaddeus McCotter, who had proposed eliminating the committee in 2010. McCotter was preceded by Adam Putnam, who chaired the committee from February 2006 through the end of the 109th Congress. In the Republican House leadership hierarchy, the
    6.00
    2 votes
    191
    6.00
    2 votes
    192

    United States Congress Joint Economic Committee

    The Joint Economic Committee (JEC) is one of four standing joint committees of the U.S. Congress. The committee was established as a part of the Employment Act of 1946, which deemed the committee responsible for reporting the current economic condition of the United States and for making suggestions for improvement to the economy. The JEC is chaired by Senator Bob Casey of Pennsylvania.
    6.00
    2 votes
    193

    United States House Science Subcommittee on Energy

    The Science Subcommittee on Energy and Environment is one of five subcommittees of the United States House Committee on Science, Space and Technology. In 2007, the subcommittee held the first Congressional hearing on global climate change for the 110th Congress. The Hearing on the State of Climate Change Science 2007: The Findings of the Fourth Assessment Report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Working Group I Report, included four climate scientists who authored the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) assessment report and Speaker Nancy Pelosi. Legislative jurisdiction and general oversight and investigative authority on all matters relating to energy research, development, and demonstration and projects therefor, commercial application of energy technology, and environmental research including: Chairs of the subcommittee:
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    2 votes
    194

    United States Senate Foreign Relations Subcommittee on African Affairs

    • Subcommittee of: United States Senate Committee on Foreign Relations
    The Senate Foreign Relations Subcommittee on African Affairs is one of seven subcommittees of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. The Subcommittee on African Affairs is responsible for United States relations with countries in Africa, with the exception of countries bordering on the Mediterranean Sea from Egypt to Morocco, which are under the jurisdiction of the Subcommittee on Near Eastern and South and Central Asian Affairs. This corresponds to the geographic area under the purview of the Bureau of African Affairs in the Department of State, and includes the countries of Madagascar, Equatorial Guinea, São Tomé and Príncipe, Seychelles, Mauritius, and Comoros. This subcommittee is also responsible for all matters within the region's under its jurisdiction with respect to terrorism and non-proliferation, crime and illicit narcotics, U.S. foreign assistance programs, and the promotion of U.S. trade and exports. The Committee is chaired by Democrat Chris Coons of Delaware, and the Ranking Minority member is Republican Johnny Isakson of Georgia. United States House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Africa and Global Health
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    2 votes
    195

    Committee on Monetary and Financial Affairs

    The Committee on Monetary and Financial Affairs is one of the ten permanent committees of the Pan-African Parliament. It deals with the following concerns: Chairperson of the Committee is Peter Daka from Zambia. Deputy Chairperson Babacar Gaye from Senegal. Rapporteur is Wycliffe Oparanya from Kenya.
    5.00
    3 votes
    196

    House Committee on Armed Services

    The U.S. House Committee on Armed Services, commonly known as the House Armed Services Committee, is a standing committee of the United States House of Representatives. It is responsible for funding and oversight of the Department of Defense (DOD) and the United States armed forces, as well as substantial portions of the Department of Energy. The Armed Services Committee was created by the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946, which consolidated the functions of two predecessor committees: the Committee on Military Affairs and the Committee on Naval Affairs, which were established as standing committees in 1822. Another predecessor, the Committee on the Militia, was created in 1835 and existed until 1911 when it was abolished and its jurisdiction transferred to the Committee on Military Affairs. When Republicans took control of the House of Representatives in 1994, the committee was renamed the Committee on National Security. It was later renamed the Committee on Armed Services. The committee chairman is Republican Buck McKeon of California, and the Ranking Member is Democrat Adam Smith of Washington. Source:
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    2 votes
    197

    Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research

    The Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR) is an interdisciplinary body of the International Council for Science (ICSU). It was established in February 1958 to continue the international coordination of Antarctic scientific activities that had begun during the International Geophysical Year of 1957-58. SCAR is charged with the initiating, developing and coordinating scientific research in the Antarctic region. The scientific business of SCAR is conducted by its Standing Scientific Groups. SCAR also provides scientific advice to the Antarctic Treaty Consultative Meetings and other organizations on issues of science and conservation affecting the management of Antarctica and the Southern Ocean. In that role, SCAR has made numerous recommendations on a variety of matters, very few of which have been incorporated into Antarctic Treaty instruments. SCAR meets every two years to conduct its administrative business at the SCAR Delegates Meeting. An Executive Committee elected from the delegates is responsible for the day-to-day administration of SCAR though its Secretariat at the Scott Polar Research Institute in Cambridge, England. The Executive Committee comprises the
    5.50
    2 votes
    198

    United States Senate Foreign Relations Subcommittee on East Asian and Pacific Affairs

    • Subcommittee of: United States Senate Committee on Foreign Relations
    The Senate Foreign Relations Subcommittee on East Asian and Pacific Affairs is one of seven subcommittees of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. The Subcommittee on East Asian and Pacific Affairs oversees United States relations with countries in East Asia and the Pacific Rim. This corresponds to the geographic region under the purview of Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs in the Department of State. This is a geographic area from the Japan, China and Mongolia to Burma, including Southeast Asia, the Pacific Islands, New Zealand, Australia, and Indonesia. The subcommittee also oversees regional organizations such as the Association of Southeast Asian Nations and the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation. This subcommittee is also responsible for all matters within the region's under its jurisdiction with respect to terrorism and non-proliferation, crime and illicit narcotics, U.S. foreign assistance programs, and the promotion of U.S. trade and exports. The Committee is chaired by Democrat Jim Webb of Virginia, and the Ranking Minority member is James Inhofe of Oklahoma. U.S. House Financial Services Subcommittee on Asia, the Pacific, and the Global Environment
    4.67
    3 votes
    199
    Committee on National Security Systems

    Committee on National Security Systems

    The Committee on National Security Systems (CNSS) is a United States intergovernmental organization that sets policy for the security of the US security systems. The National Security Telecommunications and Information Systems Security Committee (NSTISSC) was established under National Security Directive 42, "National Policy for the Security of National Security Telecommunications and Information Systems", dated 5 July 1990. On October 16, 2001, President George W. Bush signed Executive Order 13231, the Critical Infrastructure Protection in the Information Age, re-designating the National Security Telecommunications and Information Systems Security Committee (NSTISSC) as the Committee on National Security Systems. The CNSS holds discussions of policy issues, sets national policy, directions, operational procedures, and guidance for the information systems operated by the U.S. Government, its contractors or agents that either contain classified information, involve intelligence activities, involve cryptographic activities related to national security, involve command and control of military forces, involve equipment that is an integral part of a weapon or weapons system(s), or are
    6.00
    1 votes
    200

    House Committee on Standards of Official Conduct

    The Committee on Ethics, often known simply as the Ethics Committee, is one of the committees of the United States House of Representatives. Prior to the 112th Congress it was known as the Committee on Standards of Official Conduct. The House Ethics Committee has often received criticism. In response to criticism, the House created the Office of Congressional Ethics (OCE), an independent non-partisan entity established to monitor ethical conduct in the House. The committee has an equal number of members from each party, unlike the rest of the committees, which are constituted with the majority of members and the committee chair coming from the party that controls the House. This even split has limited its power by giving either political party an effective veto over the actions of the committee. Source: It has many functions, but they all revolve around the standards of ethical conduct for members of the House. Under this authority, it: The committee has a long history; the first matter it handled was on January 30, 1798, when Rep. Matthew Lyon of Vermont was accused of "gross indecency" after he spat on Rep. Roger Griswold of Connecticut after an exchange of insults (a week later,
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    1 votes
    201

    Ontario Civilian Commission on Police Services Board of Inquiry

    Ontario Civilian Commission on Police Services Board of Inquiry was the civilian oversight of police services in Ontario until 1990, after which the Special Investigations Unit took over the role. The Board was under the then Ontario Civilian Commission on Police Services, since renamed as the Ontario Police Commission.
    6.00
    1 votes
    202

    Pearson Commission on International Development

    The Pearson Commission on International Development investigated the effectiveness of the World Bank's development assistance in the 20 years to 1968 and made recommendations for future operation of the organization. In August 1968 Robert S. McNamara, then President of the World Bank, formed the commission, asking former Canadian Prime Minister and Nobel Peace Prize winner Lester Bowles Pearson to head the commission. On September 15, 1969 Pearson and seven colleagues on the Commission on International Development delivered their report, Partners in Development.
    6.00
    1 votes
    203

    Report of the National Commission on Terrorism

    The Report of the National Commission on Terrorism, also known as the Bremer Commission, "Countering The Changing Threat of International Terrorism", Pursuant to Public Law 277, 105th Congress, was published June 2000. Ambassador L. Paul Bremer III served as Chairman, and Maurice Sonnenberg served as Vice Chairman. The most controversial conclusions included the Report's call "for the monitoring of all foreign students, using criminals and terrorists as American spies, and making wiretapping easier" (Lodal, 2001, p. 100). The report clearly names state sponsors of terrorism including Iran and Syria. It specifically says this about Iran's involvement: The Department of State's 1999 "Patterns of Global Terrorism" provides the following account of Iranian support for terrorism: It recommends name Afghanistan, under the Taliban, as a state sponsor: "Recommendation: (See Appendix C of the Report)
    6.00
    1 votes
    204

    United States House Committee on the Disposition of Executive Papers

    The United States House Committee on the Disposition of Executive Papers is a former standing committee of the United States House of Representatives. The committee was established on February 16, 1889, by "An Act to authorize and provide for the disposition of useless papers in the Executive Departments." The act provided that whenever an executive department accumulated files of papers that were not needed for the transaction of current business and possessed no permanent value or historical interest, the head of the agency would submit a report to Congress with a concise statement of the character and condition of such papers. The President of the United States Senate and the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives would, upon receipt of the report, each appoint two Members to sit on a joint committee to meet and examine the reports and papers, and report on them. If the report of the joint committee agreed that the papers were useless, the head of the department would be ordered to sell them as wastepaper or otherwise dispose of them. As the disposition process became institutionalized a Select Committee on the Disposition of (Useless) Executive Papers was
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    1 votes
    205

    United States Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Interior and Related Agencies

    The U.S. Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies is one of twelve subcommittees of the U.S. Senate Committee on Appropriations. It was formerly known as the Subcommittee on Interior and Related Agencies, but was renamed to reflect its jurisdiction over funding for federal environmental programs, and to more closely align the subcommittee with its counterpart on the House Appropriations Committee. This subcommittee has jurisdiction over all Department of Interior discretionary spending (except the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) as well as the funding for the U.S. Forest Service within the Department of Agriculture. They oversee Native American programs, including the Interior Department's Bureau of Indian Affairs and the Indian Health Service, a division of the Department of Health and Human Services. Finally, the subcommitte oversees independent agencies of the federal government, including the Environmental Protection Agency and several cultural and historical agencies such as the Smithsonian Institution. The subcommittee previously had responsibility for several Department of Energy fossil energy programs, the Strategic Petroleum Reserve,
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    1 votes
    206

    United States Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Intellectual Property

    Jurisdiction: (1) Intellectual Property laws, including those affecting patents, copyrights and trademarks; (2) Oversight of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office; (3) Oversight of the U.S. Copyright Office; and (4) Oversight of the intellectual property laws, treaties and policies affecting international trade. Republican Members Orrin Hatch, UT (Chairman) Jon Kyl, AZ R. Michael DeWine, OH Lindsey Graham, SC John Cornyn, TX Sam Brownback, KS Tom Coburn, OK Democratic Members Patrick Leahy, VT (Ranking Member) Edward Kennedy, MA Joe Biden, DE Dianne Feinstein, CA Herbert Kohl, WI Richard Durbin, IL Senior Subcommittee Staff Bruce Artim, Majority Chief Counsel Bruce Cohen, Democratic Chief Counsel U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary Subcommittee on Intellectual Property 224 Dirksen Senate Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510 Majority Office Phone: (202) 224-5251 Majority Office Fax: (202) 224-6331 Democratic Office Phone: (202) 224-7703 Democratic Office Fax: (202) 224-9516
    6.00
    1 votes
    207

    Central Committee of the Communist Party of China

    The Central Committee of the Communist Party of China (simplified Chinese: 中国共产党中央委员会; traditional Chinese: 中國共產黨中央委員會; pinyin: Zhōngguó Gòngchǎndǎng Zhōngyāng Wěiyuánhuì), known as the Central Executive Committee until 1927, is the highest authority within the Communist Party of China. Its approximately 350 members and alternates are selected once every five years by the CPC National Congress. The membership of the Central Committee experiences rapid turnover. Over the past 30 years, an average of 62% of the membership of the outgoing Central Committee has been replaced at each party congress. The current Central Committee has 204 members and 167 alternates and will be replaced at the 18th National Party Congress. The Central Committee appoints many of the most powerful people in China, including the General Secretary and the members of the Politburo, Standing Committee, and Central Military Commission. The Secretariat of the Central Committee is the working body of the Politburo and its Standing Committee. Members of the Secretariat are nominated by the Standing Committee and are subject to endorsement by the Central Committee. They include the Central Propaganda Department, the
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    President's Commission on the HIV Epidemic

    The President's Commission on the HIV Epidemic was a commission formed by then-President Ronald Reagan in 1987 to investigate the AIDS pandemic. It is also known as the Watkins Commission for its chairman, James D. Watkins. Watkins, who chaired the ten-member Commission, won the support of many AIDS awareness advocates when his conservative panel unexpectedly recommended supporting anti-bias laws to protect HIV-positive people, on-demand treatment for drug addicts, and the speeding of AIDS-related research. During a press conference in 1988, Watkins said "Semen, blood, and ignorance surround this epidemic, and we were in that last category." The Commission submitted 597 recommendations to the Reagan administration. Reagan is often criticized by AIDS-awareness groups for responding too little, too late to the growing cries for an inquiry into rapidly-spreading HIV. Critics of Reagan's response to the Commission's findings state that the recommendations of the Commission went largely ignored by both the Reagan administration and its successor, the George H. W. Bush administration.
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    Presidential Commission on the Status of Women

    The Presidential Commission on the Status of Women (PCSW) was established to advise the President of the United States on issues concerning the status of women. It was created by John F. Kennedy's executive order 10980 signed December 14, 1961. John F. Kennedy's administration proposed the Presidential Commission on the Status of Women as a "compromise" measure. It would address people who were concerned about women's status while avoiding alienating the Kennedy administration's labor base through a potential mention of the Equal Rights Amendment. While running for the presidency in 1960 John F. Kennedy approached Eleanor Roosevelt for political support. It was granted in exchange for a promise to establish the Presidential Commission on the Status of Women. Legislation related to women in the workplace up to this time had usually taken the form of protective legislation. Protective legislation advocated gender-based workplace restrictions for women on the belief that their biological differences needed to be accommodated in the workplace. Supported by many 19th century progressives including some feminists (difference feminists), protective legislation was supposed to help working
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    United States Senate Committee on Patents

    The United States Senate Committee on Patents was a committee of the United States Senate. It was established September 7, 1837 as the "Committee on Patents and the Patent Office" when the Senate approved a resolution of Henry Hubbard of Kentucky. Prior to this, legislation and other matters relating to patents and the Patent Office were referred to the United States Senate Committee on the Judiciary. In 1869, the name of the committee was shortened to simply the Committee on Patents, which it remained until the committee was eliminated by the provisions of the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946. Beginning January 2, 1947, jurisdiction over patents, the Patent Office, and patent law reverted to the United States Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Patents, Copyrights, and Trademarks.
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    Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment

    The Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment (SCOPE) was established by the 10th meeting of the Executive Committee of the ICSU in 1969. SCOPE's members include 38 national science academies and research councils, and 22 international scientific unions. SCOPE exists primarily to develop scientific reviews of key environmental issues around the themes of Managing Societal and Natural Resources, Ecosystem Processes and Biodiversity, Health and Environment. Recent reports include biofuels, environmental nitrogen, and biodiversity. In 2012 SCOPE started a collaboration with the publishing house Elsevier. A new journal, Environmental Development was introduced The journal has 4 volumes a year. The current president is Lu Yonglong (Chinese Academy of Sciences). The secretariat is located in Paris. The SCOPE-Zhongyu Environmental Awards were introduced in 2010, They include three categories of Young scientist awards - environmental sciences; environmental technologies; and environmental management - that are awards annually. Every second year the Lifetime Achievements Award is given to two scientists with major contribution to the environmental sciences. SCOPE has through the
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    Standing Committee on Local Government and Public Administration

    Standing Committee on Local Government and Public Administration

    The Standing Committee onLocal Government and Public Administration (Norwegian: Kommunal- og forvaltningskomiteen) is a standing committee of the Parliament of Norway. It is responsible for policies relating to local government, regional and rural policy, immigration policy, housing policy, building and construction, national minorities, Sami issues, matters relating to the organization and operation of state administration, government administration, personnel policy for state employees including pay and pensions, and support for political parties.. It corresponds to the Ministry of Local Government and Regional Development and Ministry of Government Administration and Reform. The committee has 14 members and is chaired by Heikki Holmås of the Socialist Left Party.
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    United States Congress Conference committee

    United States Congress Conference committee

    A conference committee is a committee of the Congress appointed by the House of Representatives and Senate to resolve disagreements on a particular bill. The conference committee is usually composed of the senior Members of the standing committees of each House that originally considered the legislation. Conference committees operate after the House and the Senate have passed different versions of a bill. Conference committees exist to draft a compromise bill that both houses can accept. Both houses of Congress must eventually pass the identical legislation for the bill to become law. (See U.S. Const., art I, sec. 7.) The two houses can reach that identical product through the process of amendments between Houses, where the House passes the Senate bill with a House amendment, or vice versa, but this process can be cumbersome. Thus most major bills become law through using a conference committee. (See Sen. Procedure, 449.) After one house passes a bill, the second house will often pass the same bill, with an amendment representing the second house’s work product. The second house will then send a message between houses to the first house, asking the first house to concur with the
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    United States Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions

    The United States Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP) generally considers matters relating to these issues. Its jurisdiction extends beyond these issues to include several more specific areas, as defined by Senate rules. The chairman of the committee is Democrat Tom Harkin of Iowa, and the Ranking Member is Republican Mike Enzi of Wyoming. Source: 2011 Congressional Record, Vol. 157, Pg. S557{{{3}}} The committee has had other notable subcommittees in the past, such as:
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    216

    Canberra Commission on the Elimination of Nuclear Weapons

    The Canberra Commission on the Elimination of Nuclear Weapons was initiated by the Prime Minister of Australia the Honourable Paul Keating in November 1995 to deliberate on issues of nuclear proliferation and how to eliminate the world of nuclear weapons. The result of the Commission was published as the Canberra Report in August 1996. The report was presented by Alexander Downer, Australia's Minister of Foreign Affairs, to the United Nations on 30 September 1996 and the Conference on Disarmament on 30 January 1997. The Commission was convened in the Australian Federal capital city of Canberra in the Australian Capital Territory. Subsequent meetings were held in Vienna and New York. The Commission consisted of a number of notable persons including Professor Joseph Rotblat, recipient of the 1995 Nobel Peace Prize; Michel Rocard, former Prime Minister of France; Robert McNamara, former United States Secretary of Defense and President of the World Bank Group; General George Butler, former Commander of the United States Strategic Air Command; Doctor Maj Britt Theorin, then President of the International Peace Bureau; Field Marshal Michael Carver, former Chief of the General Staff and
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    217

    Commission on the Unification of Pronunciation

    The Commission on the Unification of Pronunciation (讀音統一會 Pinyin: Dúyīn Tǒngyī Huì) was established in the Republic of China from 1912 to 1913 to select ancillary phonetic symbols for Mandarin, (Zhuyin was the product) and set the standard Guoyu pronunciation of basic Chinese characters. It was decided in a draft on August 7, 1912, a month after a conference led by the Cai Yuanpei on July 10, that a set of phonetic symbols were to be used for education purposes. The Commission was set up in December, led by Woo Tsin-hang. The Commission ended on May 22, 1913. A later similar organization that still exists, also headed by Woo Tsin-hang for a while, is the Mandarin Promotion Council. The first meeting took place on February 15, 1913 in Beijing, with 44 delegates. The chairman was Woo; vice-chairman Wang Zhao (王照). There were two representatives per each of the 26 provinces. The Tibetans, the Mongolians and the overseas Chinese each had one representative. Prominent members included: There were three main ideas of how the phonetic symbols should be: The three groups discussed for two months and adopted 15 symbols from Zhang Binglin's all-Zhuanshu Jiyin Zimu (記音字母), which was the
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    Committee of the Whole

    In the United States House of Representatives, the Committee of the Whole, short for Committee of the Whole House on the State of the Union, is a parliamentary device in which the House of Representatives is considered one large congressional committee. The presiding officer is chosen by the Speaker of the House and is normally a member of the majority party who does not hold the chair of a standing committee. Procedurally, the Committee of the Whole differs from the House of Representatives even though they have identical membership. The Committee of the Whole only requires 100 members for a quorum, while only 25 members are required to force a recorded rather than voice vote. In the version of the Committee of the Whole that existed in the British House of Commons, the original use of this committee was to debate bills privately and prevent a recorded vote from being taken. It is normally invoked to give initial consideration of important legislation, including bills for raising revenue, and serves to expedite the process since debate over amendment occurs under a special five-minute rule. The House and the Committee of the Whole do not operate at the same time; rather, to
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    French Parliamentary Commission on Rwanda

    The French Parliamentary Commission on Rwanda was invested in the beginning of 1998, following a press-led campaign and articles by journalist Patrick de Saint-Exupéry in the Figaro newspaper, which called for an examination into the role of the French government in the events surrounding the 1994 genocide in Rwanda. The Belgian Senate undertook a similar initiative in 1997. The French deputies decided to examine French policy in Rwanda between 1990 and 1994. For the first time in the history of the Fifth Republic, the Assembly examined events related to the "reserved domains" of the President of the Republic, in other words, functions of government historically seen as the exclusive realm of presidential authority. Composed of members of the Foreign Relations Parliamentary Committee and the National Defence and Armed Forces Parliamentary Committee, this mission was thus an expression of a renewed intent of parliamentarians to extend the democratic field of the Parliament. The commission was presided over by Paul Quilès, and the hearings took place between March 24 and July 9, 1998. In connection with the inquiry, the committee members spent two days in Rwanda, visiting the Murambi
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    International Narcotics Control Caucus

    The United States Senate Caucus on International Narcotics Control (also known as the Senate Narcotics Caucus) was created to monitor and encourage the U.S. government and private programs seeking to expand international cooperation against drug abuse and narcotics trafficking, and promote international compliance with narcotics control treaties, including eradication. As a formal organization of the United States Senate, the Caucus has the status of a standing committee. It has subpoena power and is authorized to take testimony of witnesses and to produce books, records, papers, and documents that it deems necessary. In the past it has dealt with international cooperation, eradication, trafficking, interdiction, border control, drug strategies, assessments of Federal programs, and money laundering issues. The Caucus has held numerous hearings over the years and has issued a number of reports on U.S. narcotics control policy. The primary responsibilities of the INCC have involved monitoring of compliance with international narcotics control treaties and agreements, and oversight of U.S. counter narcotics policy and activities. The United States Senate Caucus on International
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    United States Senate Agriculture Subcommittee on Marketing, Inspection, and Product Promotion

    The U.S. Senate Agriculture Subcommittee on Livestock, Dairy, Poultry, Marketing and Agriculture Security is one of five subcommittees of the U.S. Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry. This subcommittee has jurisdiction over legislation on foreign agricultural trade, foreign market development, and agriculture product promotion and domestic marketing programs. It oversees international commodity agreements and export controls on agricultural commodities, foreign assistance programs and Food for Peace, marketing orders, inspection and certification of meat, flowers, fruit, vegetables and livestock. The subcommittee was renamed for the 112th United States Congress (2011). It was previously the Subcommittee on Domestic & Foreign Marketing, Inspection, & Plant & Animal Health. The Subcommittee is chaired by Democrat Kirsten Gillibrand of New York, and the Ranking Minority Member is Republican Mike Johanns of Nebraska.
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    United States Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on District of Columbia

    U.S. Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Financial Services and General Government is one of twelve subcommittees of the U.S. Senate Committee on Appropriations. It was renamed from the Subcommittee on District of Columbia in 2007 align the operations of the House and Senate Appropriations Committees. This subcommittee continues to have jurisdiction over the budget of the District of Columbia, and was given jurisdiction over agency funding handled by the Subcommittee on Transportation, Treasury, the Judiciary and Housing and Urban Development. The new subcommittee is responsible for funding general provisions of the federal government, with primary jurisdiction over discretionary spending of the Treasury Department, the United States federal judiciary, and the District of Columbia. The most diverse subcommittee, it also oversees funding for the Executive Office of the President and the Office of Management and Budget as well as various independent federal agencies, including the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, the Federal Communications Commission, the Federal Election Commission, the National Archives and Records Administration, and Office of National Drug Control
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    United States Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations

    The Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations (PSI) is the oldest subcommittee of the U.S. Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs (formerly the Committee on Government Operations). The Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations was created at the same time as the Committee on Government Operations in 1952. According to Ruth Young Watt, chief clerk of the subcommittee for more than 30 years, the subcommittee calls itself "permanent" but it really is not; nor is it independent of the full Government Operations (now Governmental Affairs) Committee. The PSI has, however, been a useful and powerful tool for several of the chairmen of the committee because it has a broad mandate to investigate inefficiency, mismanagement, and corruption in government. The PSI is sometimes thought of as the successor to the U.S. Senate Special Committee to Investigate the National Defense Program, 1941-1948, also known as the "Truman Committee". The Truman Committee under then Senator Harry S. Truman established a process and precedent whereby investigators could obtain copies of an individual or corporate tax return. When the Truman Committee was terminated in 1948, the
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    Advisory Committee on the Microbiological Safety of Food

    The Advisory Committee on the Microbiological Safety of Food is a statutory committee advising the British government. The ACMSF was set up in 1990 and is attached to the Food Standards Agency. Its quarterly meetings are open to members of the public and are generally held at its headquarters at Aviation House, Kingsway, London.
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    Central Committee

    Central Committee was the common designation of a standing administrative body of communist parties, analogous to a board of directors, whether ruling or non-ruling in the 20th century and of the surviving states in the early 21st century. In such party organizations the committee would typically be made up of delegates elected at a party congress. In those states where it constituted the state power, the Central Committee made decisions for the party between congresses, and usually was responsible for electing the Politburo. In non-ruling Communist parties, the Central Committee is usually understood by the party membership to be the ultimate decision-making authority between Congresses once the process of democratic centralism has led to an agreed-upon position. Non-Communist organizations also have Central Committees, such as the Mennonite Church and Alcoholics Anonymous, as well as the Central Committee for Conscientious Objectors (to war). In the United States the Democratic and the Republican Parties both have Central Committees; these act as the leading body of those organizations at the national/administrative level, as well as local committees in a similar capacity within
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    Commission on Accreditation and Rehabilitation Facilities

    The Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF), is an international, non-profit organization founded in 1966 with the assistance of Mary E. Switzer, then U.S. Social and Rehabilitation Services Commissioner. For some institutions, it represents an alternative to Joint Commission certification. Revenue sources include contributions from the International Advisory Council, which consists of entities being accredited. CARF's mission is to provide accreditation standards and surveyors for organizations working in the human services field worldwide. Among the many areas of practice represented in the CARF standards are aging services; behavioral health, which includes psychosocial rehabilitation and assertive community treatment; child and youth services; DMEPOS; employment and community services; medical rehabilitation; and opioid treatment programs. CARF International is based in Tucson, Arizona, in the USA, with offices in Washington, D.C., and Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Brian J. Boon, Ph.D., is president/CEO. In 2012, Narconon Arrowhead was under investigation by the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation, the Pittsburg County Sheriff's Office, the Oklahoma
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    Commission on Audit

    Commission on Audit

    The Commission on Audit is an independent constitutional commission established by the Constitution of the Philippines. It has the primary function to examine, audit and settle all accounts and expenditures of the funds and properties of the Philippine government. The Commission on Audit is composed of a Chairperson and two Commissioners. They must be natural-born citizens of at least thirty-five years of age, and must be either a Certified Public Accountant or a lawyer. The members of the Commission are appointed by the President of the Philippines, with the consent of the Commission of Appointment, for a term of seven years without reappointment. On April 18, 2008, President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo appointed Reynaldo Villar as chairman of the Commission until February 2, 2011, in lieu of the retiring Guillermo Carague. The Commission has the power, authority and duty to examine, audit and settle all accounts and expenditures of the funds and properties of the Philippine government. Towards that end, it has the exclusive authority to define the scope, techniques and methods of its auditing and examination procedures. It also may prevent and disallow irregular, unnecessary,
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    Commission on the Filipino Language

    The Commission on the Filipino Language (Filipino: Komisyon sa Wikang Filipino; Cebuano: Komisyon sa Pinulongang Filipino; Hiligaynon: Komisyon sa Panghambal nga Filipino; Ilocano: Komision iti Pagsasao a Filipino; Kapampangan: Komisyun king Amanung Filipinu; Pangasinan: Komisyon na Salitan Filipino; Waray: Komisyon ha Yinaknan nga Filipino) is the official regulating body of the Filipino language and the official government institution tasked with developing, preserving, and promoting the various local Philippine languages. It was established in accord with the 1987 Constitution of the Philippines. In October 2008, José L. Santos, a native of Hagonoy, Bulacan, was appointed chairman of the Commission, succeeding Ricardo María Duran Nolasco. The Commission, created by Republic Act No. 7104, signed on August 14, 1991, by Former President Corazón Cojuangco Aquino, replaced the Institute of Philippine Languages (IPL) which replaced the Institute of National Language (INL) by virtue of Executive Order No. 117 issued by President Aquino in January 1987. The INL, established in 1937 by Commonwealth Act No. 184, s. 1936, is the first government agency to initiate the development of the
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    Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs

    The Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs (ECON) is a committee of the European Parliament. Since Economic and Monetary Union (EMU), the most important function of this committee has been in relation to the European Central Bank (ECB). Although guaranteed independence under the Treaty, the ECB is accountable for its actions to ECON. Every three months, the President of the ECB, or occasionally his deputy, appears before the Committee to report on monetary policy; both actions taken, and future prospects. He then answers question from MEPs. These proceedings are televised; a verbatim report appears immediately on both the Parliament and ECN websites.
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    Committee on Education, Culture, Tourism, and Human Resources

    The Committee on Education, Culture, Tourism and Human Resources is one of the ten permanent committees of the Pan-African Parliament. It deals with issues relating to education, cultural issues, tourism and human resources. Functions of the committee: Chairperson of the Committee is Hon William F. Shija from (Tanzania). Deputy Chairperson of the Committee is the Hon Maidagi Allambeye from (Niger). Rapporteur of the Committee is the Hon Draoui Mohamed (Algeria).
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    Congressional Hispanic Caucus

    Congressional Hispanic Caucus

    The Congressional Hispanic Caucus (CHC) comprises 21 Democratic members of the United States Congress of Hispanic descent. The Caucus is dedicated to voicing and advancing, through the legislative process, issues affecting Hispanics and Latinos in the United States and Puerto Rico. The CHC was founded in December 1976 as a legislative service organization of the United States House of Representatives. Today, the CHC is organized as a Congressional Member organization, governed under the Rules of the U.S. House of Representatives. The Congressional Hispanic Caucus aims to address national and international issues and the impact these policies have on the Hispanic community. The function of the Caucus is to serve as a forum for the Hispanic and other Members of Congress to coalesce around a collective legislative agenda. In addition to covering legislative action, the CHC also monitors Executive and Judicial issues. CHC legislative priorities cover all areas that have a direct impact on the Hispanic or Latino community. In order to best address these diverse issues, members work in smaller task forces that draw on their expertise and develop priority legislation within each area. The
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    International Commission on English in the Liturgy

    The International Commission on English in the Liturgy is a commission set up by a number of episcopal conferences of English-speaking countries for the purpose of providing English translations of the liturgical books of the Roman Rite, the originals of which are in Latin. Decisions to adopt these translations are made by the episcopal conference of the country concerned, and these decisions are reviewed by the Holy See before being put into effect. Bishops from English-speaking countries who were in Rome for the Second Vatican Council set up the Commission in 1963 in view of their intention to implement the Council's authorization to use more extensively the vernacular language, instead of Latin, in the liturgy. On 15 September 2003, it was formally established as a mixed commission of several bishops conferences in accordance with the Instruction Liturgiam authenticam As of 2010, eleven bishops conferences are full members of ICEL, each of them represented by a bishop: those of Australia, Canada, England and Wales, India, Ireland, New Zealand, Pakistan, the Philippines, Scotland, South Africa, and the United States of America. Another 15 are associate members: those of the
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    Pecora Commission

    The Pecora Investigation was an inquiry begun on March 4, 1932 by the United States Senate Committee on Banking and Currency to investigate the causes of the Wall Street Crash of 1929. The name refers to the fourth and final chief counsel for the investigation, Ferdinand Pecora. The investigation was launched by a majority-Republican Senate, under the Banking Committee's chairman, Senator Peter Norbeck. Hearings began on April 11, 1932, but were criticized by Democratic Party members and their supporters as being little more than an attempt by the Republicans to appease the growing demands of an angry American public suffering through the Great Depression. Two chief counsels were fired for ineffectiveness, and a third resigned after the committee refused to give him broad subpoena power. In January 1933, Ferdinand Pecora, an assistant district attorney for New York County was hired to write the final report. Discovering that the investigation was incomplete, Pecora requested permission to hold an additional month of hearings. His exposé of the National City Bank (now Citibank) made banner headlines and caused the bank's president to resign. Democrats had won the majority in the
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    President's Commission on Implementation of United States Space Exploration Policy

    President's Commission on Implementation of United States Space Exploration Policy

    The President's Commission on Implementation of United States Space Exploration Policy was a Presidential Commission formed by United States President George W. Bush on January 27, 2004, through the Executive Order 13326. Its final report was submitted on June 4, 2004. There were nine members of the commission: There were five public hearings held by the commission to gain a variety of different perspectives. They were as follows:
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    237

    President's Committee on Civil Rights

    The President's Committee on Civil Rights was established by Executive Order 9808, which Harry Truman, who was then President of the United States, issued on December 5, 1946. The committee was instructed to investigate the status of civil rights in the country and propose measures to strengthen and protect them. After the committee submitted a report of its findings to President Truman, it disbanded in December 1947. The committee's terms of reference were: (1)to examine the condition of civil rights in the United States, (2)to produce a written report of their findings, and (3)to submit recommendations on improving civil rights in the United States. In October 1947, To Secure These Rights: The Report of the President’s Committee on Civil Rights was produced. The 178-page report proposed improving existing civil rights laws. More specifically, it aimed to establish a permanent Civil Rights Commission, a Joint Congressional Committee on Civil Rights, and a Civil Rights Division in the Department of Justice, to develop federal protection from lynching, to create a Fair Employment Practices Commission (FEPC), to abolish poll taxes, among other measures. On July 26, 1948, President
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    Secretary's Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills

    The Secretary's Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS) was appointed in 1990 by Lynn Martin, the Secretary of the United States Department of Labor. The commission was made up of 30 business, school, union and parental representatives. The SCANS' job was to examine the demands of the future workplace, and they eventually developed a list of skills "that high-performance workplaces require and that high-performance schools should produce." It consists of five basic competencies that are built on a three-part foundation, which define what an effective worker should know and have skill in. 1. Resources - allocating, time, money, materials and staff 2. Interpersonal - working on teams, teaching others, serving customers, leading, negotiating, and working well with people from culturally diverse backgrounds. 3. Information - acquiring and evaluating data, organizing and maintaining files, interpreting and communicating, and using computers to process information. 4. Systems - understanding social, organizational, and technological systems, monitoring and correcting performance, and designing or improving systems 5. Technology - selecting equipment and tools, applying
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    Standing Committee on Language Education and Research

    The Standing Committee on Language Education and Research is a quasi-governmental advisory body set up to carry out research into language education, including public consultation exercises, and to give advice on language education policy including medium of instruction policy to the Hong Kong Government's Education and Manpower Bureau (formerly the Education Department. It is currently chaired by Michael Tien.
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    Sub-Commission on the Promotion and Protection of Human Rights

    The Sub-Commission on the Promotion and Protection of Human Rights (before 1999, known as the Sub-Commission on Prevention of Discrimination and Protection of Minorities) was a think tank of the United Nations Commission on Human Rights. It was wound up in late August, 2006. With the dissolution of the Commission on Human Rights and its replacement by the Human Rights Council in 2006, responsibility for the Sub-Commission passed from the former to the latter. On 30 June 2006 the Council resolved to extend the Sub-Commission's mandate on an exceptional one-year basis and subject to the Council's subsequent review. The Sub-Commission met for the final time in August 2006; among the recommendations it adopted at that session was one for the creation of a human rights consultative committee as a standing body to assist the Human Rights Council. The Sub-Commission was first formed in 1947, under the auspices of the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC). Its primary mandate is described as: Other functions and tasks could also be assigned to it by ECOSOC or the Commission on Human Rights. It was composed of 26 human rights experts, each with an alternate and each elected for a term of
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    241

    United States House Committee on Science and Astronautics

    The Select Committee on Astronautics and Space Exploration was established in 1958 in response to the Soviet Sputnik program in the late 1950s. This select committee drafted the National Aeronautics and Space Act that created the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). It also chartered the permanent House Committee on Science and Astronautics, which officially began on January 3, 1959, and was the first new standing committee established in the House since 1946. The name was changed in 1974 to the Committee on Science and Technology. The name was changed again in 1987 to the Committee on Science, Space and Technology. After the Republican Party gained a majority in Congress in 1994, the name of the committee was changed again to its current name, the "House Committee on Science". Science and Astronautics
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    United States Senate Agriculture Subcommittee on Research, Nutrition, and General Legislation

    TheU.S. Senate Agriculture Subcommittee on Nutrition, Specialty Crops, Food and Agricultural Research is one of five subcommittees of the U.S. Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry. This subcommittee has jurisdiction over "domestic and international nutrition and food assistance and hunger prevention; school and child nutrition programs; local and healthy food initiatives; futures, options and derivatives; pesticides; and general legislation". The origins of the subcommittee lay in the Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs that was active from 1968 to 1977 before being subsumed into the Agriculture Committee. The subcommittee was renamed for the 112th United States Congress (2011). It was previously the Subcommittee on Nutrition and Hunger, Nutrition and Family Farms. The subcommittee is chaired by Democrat Bob Casey, Jr. of Pennsylvania, and the Ranking Minority Member is Republican Richard Lugar of Indiana.
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    United States Senate Committee on Canadian Relations

    The United States Senate Committee on Canadian Relations existed from July 31, 1888, when it was created as a select committee, until April 18, 1921, and dealt with issues related to U.S. relations with Canada. It became a standing committee on January 13, 1892. Chairmen of Senate Standing Committees U.S. Senate Historical Office, January 2005.
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    United States Senate Committee on Claims

    The United States Senate Committee on Claims was among the first standing committees established in the Senate. It dealt generally with issues related to private bills and petitions. After reforms in the 1880s that created judicial and administrative remedies for petitioners, it declined in importance, and was abolished in 1947. The United States House of Representatives also had a Committee on Claims until 1946, when its duties were absorbed by the United States House Committee on the Judiciary.
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    246

    United States Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs

    The United States Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs is the chief oversight committee of the United States Senate. It has jurisdiction over matters related to the Department of Homeland Security and other homeland security concerns, as well as the functioning of the government itself, including the National Archives, budget and accounting measures other than appropriations, the Census, the federal civil service, the affairs of the District of Columbia, and the United States Postal Service. The committee had been called the United States Senate Committee on Governmental Affairs before homeland security was added to its responsibilities in 2004. While elements of the Committee can be traced back into the 19th century, its modern origins began with the creation of the Committee on Expenditures in the Executive Departments on April 18, 1921. The Committee on Expenditures in the Executive Department was renamed the Committee on Government Operations in 1952, which was reorganized as the Committee on Governmental Affairs in 1978. After passage of the Intelligence Reform and Terrorist Prevention Act of 2004, the Committee became the Committee on Homeland
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    United States Senate Committee on Rules and Administration

    • Legislature: United States Senate
    The Senate Committee on Rules and Administration (also called the Senate Rules Committee) is responsible for the rules of the United States Senate, administration of congressional buildings, and with credentials and qualifications of members of the Senate, including responsibility for dealing with contested elections. The committee is not as powerful as its House counterpart, the House Committee on Rules as it does not set the terms of debate for individual legislative proposals, since the Senate has a tradition of open debate. Some members of the committee are also ex officio members of the Joint Committee on Printing. The Committee was first created as the Select Committee to Revise the Rules of the Senate on December 3, 1867. On December 9, 1874, it became a standing committee. On January 2, 1947, its name was changed to the Committee on Rules and Administration, and it took over the functions of the following committees: The Committee is chaired by Democrat Chuck Schumer of New York, and the Ranking Member is Republican Lamar Alexander of Tennessee. Source: 2011 Congressional Record, Vol. 157, Pg. S557{{{3}}}
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    United States Senate Committee on the Budget

    United States Senate Committee on the Budget

    • Legislature: United States Senate
    The United States Senate Committee on Budget was established by the Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974. It is responsible for drafting Congress's annual budget plan and monitoring action on the budget for the Federal Government. The committee has jurisdiction over the Congressional Budget Office. The committee briefly operated as a special committee from 1919 to 1920 during the 66th Congress, before being made a standing committee in 1974. The Budget Committee is often confused with the Finance Committee and the Appropriations Committee, both of which have different jurisdictions: The Finance Committee is analogous to the Ways and Means Committee in the House of Representatives; it has legislative jurisdiction in the areas of taxes, Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid and some other entitlements. The Appropriations Committee has legislative jurisdiction over appropriations bills, which provide funding for government programs. While the budget resolution prepared by the Budget Committee sets out a broad blueprint for the Congress with respect to the total levels of revenues and spending for the government as a whole, these other Committees prepare the
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    United States Senate Select Committee on Improper Activities in Labor and Management

    United States Senate Select Committee on Improper Activities in Labor and Management

    The United States Senate Select Committee on Improper Activities in Labor and Management (also known as the McClellan Committee) was a select committee created by the United States Senate on January 30, 1957, and dissolved on March 31, 1960. The select committee was directed to study the extent of criminal or other improper practices in the field of labor-management relations or in groups of employees or employers, and to suggest changes in the laws of the United States that would provide protection against such practices or activities. It conducted 253 active investigations, served 8,000 subpoenas for witnesses and documents, held 270 days of hearings, took testimony from 1,526 witnesses (343 of whom invoked the Fifth Amendment), and compiled almost 150,000 pages of testimony. At the peak of its activity in 1958, 104 persons worked for the committee. The select committee's work led directly to the enactment of the Labor-Management Reporting and Disclosure Act (Public Law 86-257, also known as the Landrum-Griffin Act) on September 14, 1959. In December 1952, Robert F. Kennedy was appointed assistant counsel for the Committee on Government Operations by the then-chairman of the
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