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  • Nov 27th 2012
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Best Judge of All Time

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    1
    Martha Lee Walters

    Martha Lee Walters

    Martha Lee Walters (born October 23, 1950) is an American labor attorney and judge in the state of Oregon. As of 2008, she is the 98th Associate Justice of the Oregon Supreme Court. She became the first female justice on the state's highest court in three years when she was appointed in 2006. A native of Michigan, she worked on the Casey Martin lawsuit against the PGA Tour while in private legal practice. Walters was born on October 23, 1950, in Grand Rapids, Michigan, where she also grew up. After high school she attended the University of Michigan, where she graduated in 1972 with a Bachelor of arts degree. Walters earned her law degree from the University of Oregon School of Law in Eugene, Oregon, graduating in 1977 with her Juris Doctor and earning Order of the Coif. Walters is married to John VanLandingham IV, a low-income housing advocate and mobile home-housing specialist. The couple has two children, John VanLandingham V, a graduate of the University of Chicago, and Cassady Walters, a student at Whitman College. Justice Walters was the founder and president of the Eugene law firm of Walters, Chanti & Zennache. In 1998, she was given the Public Justice Award by the Oregon
    6.90
    10 votes
    2
    William Hunter Odell

    William Hunter Odell

    William Hunter Odell (26 November 1811 – 26 July 1891) was a Canadian lawyer, judge, and politician. Born in Fredericton, New Brunswick, the son of William Franklin Odell and Elizabeth Newell, Odell studied law at King’s College at was admitted an attorney in 1835 and a barrister in 1838. He was appointed to the Legislative Council of New Brunswick in 1850 and following Canadian confederation in 1867, Odell was appointed to the Canadian Senate by royal proclamation on 23 October 1867. A Conservative, Odell represented the senatorial division of Rockwood, New Brunswick until his death. He was married to Elizabeth Ann Bliss (1824–1901), daughter of William Blowers Bliss and Sarah Ann Anderson. They had one son Maj. William Henry Odell (1852–1894)
    8.14
    7 votes
    3
    Robert Sympson Jameson

    Robert Sympson Jameson

    Robert Sympson Jameson (1796 – August 1, 1854) was a lawyer, judge and political figure in Upper Canada. He was born in Hampshire England in 1796 and educated in Ambleside. He studied law at the Middle Temple and was called to the English bar in 1823. He practiced in London. He married Anna Murphy, a British author, in 1825. In 1829, he was appointed chief justice in the Dominica; his wife remained in Europe. In 1833, he returned to London after refusing the same post in Tobago. He was named chief justice of Upper Canada in the same year and arrived in York (Toronto) in June. He was elected to the Legislative Assembly of Upper Canada for Leeds in 1834, but his election was later invalidated after an appeal; it was found that Ogle Robert Gowan's Orange supporters had intimidated voters. His wife finally joined him in 1836 but left him after less than a year. In 1837, he was named vice-chancellor of the Court of Chancery. He was appointed to the Legislative Council of the Province of Canada in 1841 and became its first speaker. He served on the councils for King's College and Trinity College. In 1842, he was named chief superintendent of education. He also was a member of literary
    8.67
    6 votes
    4
    Horace Harmon Lurton

    Horace Harmon Lurton

    Horace Harmon Lurton (February 26, 1844 – July 12, 1914) was an American jurist who served for four years as a Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. Appointed at the age of 65, Lurton was the oldest justice appointed to the Court. Lurton was born in Newport, Kentucky, the son of a physician turned clergyman. He was a Sergeant Major in the Confederate Army during the Civil War, serving in the 5th Tennessee Infantry, 2nd Kentucky Infantry, and 3rd Kentucky Cavalry. He was twice captured by Union forces, the second time sent as a prisoner of war to Johnson's Island Prison Camp in Sandusky Bay, Ohio. He was later paroled by President Lincoln because of pleas for mercy from his mother. Before the war, he attended Douglas University, and then earned an LL.B. in 1867 at Cumberland School of Law which was then part of Cumberland University, but is now part of Samford University. At Cumberland he was a member of Beta Theta Pi. Lurton then practiced law in Clarksville, Tennessee. In 1875, Lurton left private practice after being chosen as a judge of the Tennessee Chancery Court for the Sixth Chancery Division. After three years, Lurton then returned to his practice until 1886,
    7.57
    7 votes
    5
    William Alexander Henry

    William Alexander Henry

    William Alexander Henry (December 30, 1816 – May 3, 1888) was a Canadian lawyer, politician, judge and one of the Fathers of Confederation. After service as a cabinet minister in Nova Scotia in governments led by both the Liberals and the Conservatives, Henry was a delegate to all three Confederation Conferences, and may have helped draft the British North America Act, i.e., the Canadian constitution. He was appointed to the Supreme Court of Canada in 1875.
    5.78
    9 votes
    6
    Auguste Tessier

    Auguste Tessier

    Auguste Tessier (November 20, 1853 – February 10, 1938) was a lawyer, judge and political figure in Quebec. He represented Rimouski in the Legislative Assembly of Quebec from 1889 to 1907 as a Liberal. He was born in Notre-Dame de Québec, Canada East, the son of Ulric-Joseph Tessier and Marguerite-Adèle Kelly, and was educated at the Séminaire de Québec, the Collège Sainte-Marie de Montréal and the Université Laval. Tessier was called to the Quebec bar in 1876 and set up practice in Rimouski. In 1878, he married Corinne Gauvreau. He was mayor of Rimouski parish from 1889 to 1890, mayor of the town of Rimouski from 1889 to 1899 and warden for Rimouski County from 1885 to 1889. He was first elected to the Quebec assembly in an 1889 by-election held following the death of Édouard-Onésiphore Martin. In 1899, he was named Queen's Counsel. Tessier served as speaker for the assembly in March 1905 and then served in the provincial cabinet as Minister of Agriculture from 1905 to 1906 and as provincial treasurer from 1906 to 1907. Tessier resigned his seat in the assembly in 1907 when he was named to the Quebec Superior Court for Rimouski district and, later that year, for Gaspé district. He
    7.83
    6 votes
    7
    Thomas Noon Talfourd

    Thomas Noon Talfourd

    Sir Thomas Noon Talfourd, SL (26 May 1795 – 13 March 1854), was an English judge and author. The son of a well-to-do brewer, he was born at Reading, Berkshire (not, as is sometimes stated, at Doxey, near Stafford). He received his early education at Hendon, and at the Reading grammar school. At the age of eighteen he was sent to London to study law under Joseph Chitty, the special pleader. Early in 1821 he joined the Oxford circuit, having been called to the bar earlier in the year. Fourteen years later, when he was created a serjeant-at-law, and when again he in 1849 succeeded Mr. Justice Coltman as judge of the Court of Common Pleas, he earned these distinctions more by his laborious care in the conduct of cases than for his brilliance in court. At the general election in 1835 he was elected MP for the Parliamentary Borough of Reading, a result repeated in the general election of 1837. He chose not to run in the general election of 1841, but ran again in the general election of 1847 and was elected again. In the House of Commons he introduced a Copyright Bill in 1837; his speech on this subject was considered the most telling made in the House during that session. However, the
    6.71
    7 votes
    8
    Thomas Tongue

    Thomas Tongue

    • Cases: Gustafson v. Payless
    Thomas H. Tongue III (February 12, 1912 – May 31, 1994) was an American jurist in the state of Oregon. A native of the state, he served as the 75th associate justice of the Oregon Supreme Court, serving 13 years on the state's highest court. Tongue is the grandson of U.S. Representative Thomas H. Tongue, who was an emigrant from England in the early days of the state of Oregon. Justice Tongue was born in Hillsboro, Oregon, on February 12, 1912, to the Tongue legal family. He began college in 1930 and graduated with his undergraduate degree from the University of Oregon in 1934. He then attended the School of Law at the University of Oregon, graduating with a J.D. in 1937. While at Oregon he served as class president as an undergrad, and finished first in his class in law school. Also as an undergraduate he was a member of the Chi Psi fraternity. After the University of Oregon he went on to earn an advanced degree from Yale Law School. At Yale he earned a Doctor of the Science of Law while on the Yale Sterling Fellowship that he had obtained with the assistance of Dean Wayne Morse of Oregon’s law school. Tongue began his career working in the New Deal government for the Labor
    10.00
    4 votes
    9
    Felix Frankfurter

    Felix Frankfurter

    Felix Frankfurter (November 15, 1882 – February 22, 1965) was an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Frankfurter was born in Vienna and immigrated to New York at the age of 12. He graduated from Harvard Law School and was active politically, helping to found the American Civil Liberties Union. He was a friend and adviser of President Franklin Roosevelt, who appointed him to the Supreme Court in 1939. Frankfurter served on the Supreme Court for 23 years, and was a noted advocate of judicial restraint in the judgments of the Court. Frankfurter was born into a Jewish family on November 15, 1882, in Vienna, Austria, then part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. He was the third of six children of Leopold and Emma (Winter) Frankfurter. His forebears had been rabbis for generations. In 1894, when he was twelve, his family immigrated to New York City's Lower East Side. Frankfurter attended P.S. 25, where he excelled at his studies and enjoyed chess and crap shooting on the street. He spent many hours reading at The Cooper Union and attending political lectures, usually on subjects such as trade unionism, socialism and communism. After graduating in 1902 from City College of
    7.50
    6 votes
    10
    Robert Sedgewick

    Robert Sedgewick

    Robert Sedgewick (May 10, 1848 – August 4, 1906) was a Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada. Born in Aberdeen, Scotland, Sedgewick's family immigrated to Nova Scotia while he was still an infant. He was educated at Dalhousie University in Halifax, graduating in 1867. He articled in Cornwall, Ontario, in the private practice of John Sandfield Macdonald, who was at that time both the Premier and the Attorney General of Ontario. Sedgewick was called to the bar in Ontario in 1872, and in Nova Scotia in 1873 following his return to the province. Sedgwick then established a private practice in Halifax, and subsequently played an essential role in the establishment of the law school at Dalhousie in 1883. Beginning in the 1870s, Sedgewick became active in the Conservative Party of Canada. The connections thus established would serve him well, as his friend and former Halifax colleague John Sparrow David Thompson, who had become the federal Minister of Justice, appointed Sedgewick as Deputy Minister of Justice in February 1888. In this capacity, he played an important role in the establishment of the first formalised Criminal Code of Canada, which was enacted in 1892. Thompson, who had by
    7.33
    6 votes
    11
    Ian Binnie

    Ian Binnie

    William Ian Corneil Binnie CC (born April 14, 1939) was a puisne justice of the Supreme Court of Canada, serving from 1998 to 2011. Of the justices appointed to the Supreme Court in recent years, he is one of the few to have never sat as a judge prior to his appointment. He was described by the Toronto Star as "one of the strongest hands on the court." Binnie was born in Montreal, Quebec. He graduated from McGill University in 1960, where he was a member of the Kappa Alpha Society and the Scarlet Key Honor Society, and went on the study law at Cambridge University (graduating with an LL.B in 1963 and an LL.M in 1988) and the University of Toronto (obtaining an LL.B in 1965). He was called to the Ontario bar in 1967 and practiced private law at Wright & McTaggart, and its successor firms, until 1982, at which point he went to work as Associate Deputy Minister of Justice for the Government of Canada. In 1986, he went on to practice at McCarthy Tétrault, until he was appointed to the Supreme Court of Canada in 1998, replacing Justice John Sopinka. Just as with his predecessor, Binnie had never sat as a judge before his appointment to the Supreme Court. Prior to his appointment, he had
    8.40
    5 votes
    12
    Mahlon Pitney

    Mahlon Pitney

    Mahlon Pitney (February 5, 1858 – December 9, 1924) was an American jurist and Republican Party politician from New Jersey, who served in the United States Congress and as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Pitney was born in Morristown, New Jersey, the son of Sarah Louise (née Halsted) and Henry Cooper Pitney. Pitney was a graduate of Princeton College. Pitney served two terms in Congress as a Representative from New Jersey from the 4th congressional district, and also served in the state senate and on the New Jersey Supreme Court. He was appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court by President William Howard Taft in 1912, and resigned in 1922 after suffering a stroke. He was one of only two Supreme Court Justices nominated by President Taft who also later served during Taft's tenure as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. Pitney died in 1924 in Washington, D.C., and was interred at Evergreen Cemetery, in Morristown, New Jersey. With his wife Florence Theodora Shelton, Pitney was the great-grandfather of actor Christopher Reeve.
    8.40
    5 votes
    13
    John Coleridge, 1st Baron Coleridge

    John Coleridge, 1st Baron Coleridge

    • Cases: R. v. Dudley and Stephens
    John Duke Coleridge, 1st Baron Coleridge, PC (3 December 1820 – 14 June 1894) was a British lawyer, judge and Liberal politician. He held the posts, in turn, of Solicitor General for England and Wales, Attorney General for England and Wales, Chief Justice of the Common Pleas and Lord Chief Justice of England. Coleridge was the eldest son of John Taylor Coleridge, and the great-nephew of the poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge. He was educated at Eton and Balliol College, Oxford, and was called to the bar in 1846. Coleridge established a successful legal practice on the western circuit. From 1853 to 1854 he held the post of secretary to the Royal Commission on the City of London. In 1865 he was elected to the House of Commons for Exeter for the Liberal Party. He made a favourable impression on the leaders of his party and when the Liberals came to office in 1868 under William Ewart Gladstone, Coleridge was appointed Solicitor-General. In 1871 he was promoted to Attorney-General, a post he held until 1873. In 1871 he was also involved in the high-publicity Tichborne Case. In November 1873 Coleridge succeeded Sir William Bovill as Chief Justice of the Common Pleas, and in January the
    7.17
    6 votes
    14
    Alexander McGillivray

    Alexander McGillivray

    Alexander Andrew McGillivray (February 11, 1884-December 12, 1940) was a lawyer and provincial level politician from Alberta, Canada. He served as a member of the Legislative Assembly of Alberta representing the electoral district of Calgary from 1926 to 1930. He served as leader of the Alberta Conservative party from 1925 to 1929. Alexander Andrew McGillivray was born in London, Ontario on February 11, 1884. After High School he attended St. Francis College in Richmond, Quebec and later attended Dalhousie University, receiving his LLB in 1906. After completing university he moved to Alberta in 1907 and admitted to the bar on May 14, 1907. McGillivray practiced in Stettler, Alberta until 1910 quitting his practice to run as a candidate in the 1911 federal election. After failing to win a seat, McGillivray moved to Calgary and started a law firm with Thomas Tweedie. He later became Crown Prosecutor, King's Counselor in 1919, and served as such until he was elected leader of the Alberta Conservative Party in 1925. McGillivray ran for a seat to the Canadian House of Commons in the 1911 Canadian federal election. He was defeated by incumbent Member of Parliament Michael
    8.00
    5 votes
    15
    Diana E. Murphy

    Diana E. Murphy

    Diana E. Murphy born in 1934, is a judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit. Murphy received her Bachelor of Arts from the University of Minnesota in 1954 and her Juris Doctor from the University of Minnesota Law School in 1974, where she was an editor on the Law Review. Murphy was nominated to that post by President Bill Clinton in 1994 and confirmed by the Senate. Prior to being elevated to the Court of Appeals she was a federal district judge for the District of Minnesota from 1979 to 1994, serving as chief judge from 1992 to 1994. While on the Court of Appeals she also served as Chair of the United States Sentencing Commission from 1999 to 2004. Murphy is the first and so far only woman to serve on the Eighth Circuit. In 1993 she was reputedly considered for the post of Attorney General of the United States, which later went to Janet Reno.
    8.00
    5 votes
    16
    Kenneth B. Bell

    Kenneth B. Bell

    Kenneth B. Bell (born April 20, 1956) is a former Associate Justice of the Florida Supreme Court. Bell attended Davidson College in Davidson, North Carolina as an undergraduate, and received his Juris Doctor from the Florida State University College of Law in 1982. Commencing from 1982 and for nearly a decade, Bell labored in private-practice and specialized in the field of real estate law. He became board certified in real estate law in 1989 and was confirmed by the Florida Bar in January 1991. In the same year, he became the youngest circuit judge in the history of the First Judicial Circuit of Florida. For the next 12 years Bell served on the bench and in other capacities within the community, and was consequently appointed to the Florida Supreme Court by Former Governor Bush in December 2002, took office January 2003, and labored forward with distinction as the first Justice to be returned from the Pensacola area in a century. He resigned from the bench effective October 1, 2008, and upon accepting his resignation, Governor Charlie Christ honored him with the following: "Your contributions to Florida law and the judicial system will stand for many years to come. You never
    6.83
    6 votes
    17
    Robert Baldwin Sullivan

    Robert Baldwin Sullivan

    Robert Baldwin Sullivan, QC (May 24, 1802 – April 14, 1853), was a Canadian lawyer, judge, and politician who became the 2nd Mayor of Toronto. He was born in Bandon, County Cork in the Ireland in 1802 and came to York (Toronto) with his family in 1819. He studied law and was called to the bar in 1828. He moved to Vittoria, then the district town of the London District, and married in 1829, but returned to York after his wife's death in 1830. He remarried in 1833. In 1835, he was elected to town council and was chosen to be mayor. He added a business like atmosphere to council with the official 'robes of office'. The council worked on matters like tax rates, grants and the removal of 'filth and nuisances from the city streets'. On May 6, 1835, council's committee on draining and paving approved construction of the city's first main sewer on King Street into which all drains and sewers were to be connected. In 1836, actions by new Lieutenant Governor Francis Bond Head triggered the resignation of the members of the Executive Council for the province. Sullivan accepted an appointment to the council. In the same year, he became the commissioner of crown lands. In 1839, he was appointed
    7.80
    5 votes
    18
    Ancer L. Haggerty

    Ancer L. Haggerty

    Ancer Lee Haggerty (born August 26, 1944) is a senior district judge of the U.S. District Court for the District of Oregon. At the time of his nomination to the federal bench by President Clinton in 1993, he was serving as an Oregon circuit court judge. He graduated University of Oregon with a B.S. in 1967, and after service in the United States Marine Corps from 1967 to 1970, entered Hastings College of Law of the University of California, earning a J.D. in 1973. After four years in the Metropolitan Public Defenders office in Portland, Oregon he entered private practice. He served as chief judge of the court from 2002 until 2009.
    7.60
    5 votes
    19
    Murray Dodd

    Murray Dodd

    Murray Dodd (May 23, 1843 – August 25, 1905) was a lawyer, judge and political figure in Nova Scotia, Canada. He represented Cape Breton in the Canadian House of Commons from 1882 to 1887 as a Conservative member. He was born in Sydney, Nova Scotia, the son of judge Edmund Murray Dodd and Caroline Maria Ritchie. He was educated in Sydney and Sackville. He was called to the Nova Scotia bar in 1865 and practised in Sydney. In 1879, he married Laura Isabel Archibald. The following year, Dodd was named Queen's Counsel. He was registrar for the county probate court from 1867 to 1872, when he was named judge in the same court. He resigned in 1879 to run unsuccessfully for a seat in the House of Commons. In 1888, he was named County Court Judge for Division number 7 in Nova Scotia. He died in Sydney at the age of 61 while still serving as a judge.
    7.60
    5 votes
    20
    Jonas Jones

    Jonas Jones

    Jonas Jones (May 19, 1791 – July 30, 1848) was a lawyer, judge, farmer and political figure in Upper Canada. He was born in Augusta Township, Upper Canada in 1791, the son of Ephraim Jones. He was educated at John Strachan's school in Cornwall and studied law with Levius Peters Sherwood in Elizabethtown (Brockville). During the War of 1812, he enlisted with the Leeds militia, becoming a captain. He was called to the bar in 1815 and set up a practice in Brockville. In 1816, he was elected to the 7th Parliament of Upper Canada representing Grenville and held that seat until 1828. Although conservative, he had his own views on the protection of individual rights and the independence of the elected assembly. However, he helped unseat Barnabas Bidwell in 1821. In 1822, he opposed the union of Upper and Lower Canada. He supported bills which helped fund the development of the Welland Canal and he was a member of a committee which recommended further improvements of transportation along the Saint Lawrence River. He was appointed judge in the Bathurst and Johnstown District courts. With his brother Charles Jones, who represented Leeds in the Legislative Assembly, he operated mills at
    8.50
    4 votes
    21
    8.50
    4 votes
    22
    Louis-Victor Sicotte

    Louis-Victor Sicotte

    Louis-Victor Sicotte (November 6, 1812-September 5, 1889) was a lawyer, judge and politician in Lower Canada. He was born Louis Cicot in Boucherville, Lower Canada in 1812. He studied law and was called to the bar in 1839. He helped found the Aide-toi, le Ciel t’aidera (God helps those who help themselves) society, which is credited with introducing the celebration of Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day for French Canadians, and was also its secretary-treasurer. He supported the Patriotes but apparently took no part in the Rebellions of 1837-38. He believed, correctly as it turned out, that rebellion would only lead to an imposed union with Upper Canada. In 1838, he set up a practice in Saint-Hyacinthe. In 1851, he was elected to the Legislative Assembly representing Saint-Hyacinthe. He became part of the Hincks-Morin government for a short time in August 1853. He was reelected in 1854 and elected speaker. In the same year, he was named Queen's Counsel. In 1857, he was chosen as Commissioner of Crown Lands. He was reelected in 1858 and became Commissioner of Public Works in the Cartier-Macdonald government from 1858 to 1859. He was Joint Premier of the Province of Canada with John Sandfield
    8.25
    4 votes
    23
    Igor Judge

    Igor Judge

    Igor Judge, Baron Judge PC (born 19 May 1941) is an English judge and has been Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales, the head of the English judiciary, since October 2008. He was previously President of the Queen's Bench Division, at the time a newly created post assuming responsibilities transferred from the office of Lord Chief Justice. Judge was born in Malta to Raymond and Rosa Judge (née Micallef). Judge was educated at St Edward's College, Cottonera, in Malta, from 1947 to 1954 and The Oratory School in Woodcote in Oxfordshire from 1954 to 1959, where he was Captain of School and Captain of Cricket. He was awarded an Open Exhibition to study History and Law at Magdalene College, Cambridge in 1959, and he graduated BA in 1962. While at Cambridge he had become a member of Middle Temple, and he was called to the bar in 1963. He became a Recorder in 1976 and Queen's Counsel in 1979. From 1980 to 1986, he served on the Professional Conduct Committee of the Bar Council of England and Wales. In 1987, he was elected Leader of the Midland Circuit, and he was appointed to the Queen's Bench Division of the High Court of Justice in 1988 and awarded the customary knighthood. He was
    7.00
    5 votes
    24
    Emily Murphy

    Emily Murphy

    Emily Murphy (born Emily Gowan Ferguson; 14 March 1868 – 17 October 1933) was a Canadian women's rights activist, jurist, and author. In 1916, she became the first female magistrate in Canada, and in the British Empire. She is best known for her contributions to Canadian feminism, specifically to the question of whether women were "persons" under Canadian law. Murphy is known as one of the "The Famous Five" (also called "The Valiant Five")—a group of Canadian women’s rights activists that also included Henrietta Muir Edwards, Nellie McClung, Louise McKinney and Irene Parlby. In 1927, the women launched the "Persons Case," contending that women could be "qualified persons" eligible to sit in the Senate. The Supreme Court of Canada ruled that they were not. However, upon appeal to the Judicial Committee of the British Privy Council, the court of last resort for Canada at that time, the women won their case. Emily Murphy was born the third of six children in Cookstown, Ontario to wealthy landowner and businessman Isaac Ferguson and his wife – also named Emily. As a child, Murphy frequently joined her two older brothers Thomas and Gowan in their adventures; their father encouraged this
    9.33
    3 votes
    25
    James Iredell

    James Iredell

    James Iredell (October 5, 1751 – October 20, 1799) was one of the first Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States. He was appointed by President George Washington and served from 1790 until his death in 1799. His son, James Iredell, Jr., became governor of North Carolina. James Iredell was born in Lewes, England, the oldest of five children of a Bristol merchant. The failure of his father's business (and health) impelled James to immigrate to the Colonies in 1767 at the age of 17. Relatives assisted him in obtaining a position in the customs service as deputy collector, or comptroller, of the port of Edenton, North Carolina. While working at the customs house, Iredell read law under Samuel Johnston (later governor of North Carolina), began the practice of law and was admitted to the bar in 1771. The grandson of a clergyman, he was a devout Anglican throughout his life and his writings display an interest in spirituality and metaphysics beyond a simple attachment to organized religion. In 1773, Iredell married Johnston's sister Hannah and the two had four children. The following year (1774) he was made collector for the port. Although employed by the British government,
    9.33
    3 votes
    26
    W. Michael Gillette

    W. Michael Gillette

    W. Michael Gillette (born December 29, 1941) is an American attorney and retired judge in the state of Oregon. He was an associate justice on the Oregon Supreme Court, where he served from 1986 until 2010. A graduate of Harvard Law School, he was previously a judge on the Oregon Court of Appeals from 1977 to 1986. Gillette was born about 1942 and grew up in the Eastern Oregon city of Milton-Freewater. In 1963, Gillette graduated cum laude with a bachelor’s degree in arts from Whitman College in Walla Walla, Washington. He then went on to Harvard Law School where he graduated with a bachelor of law degree in 1966. Gillette passed the Oregon State Bar in 1966 and joined the Portland, Oregon law firm of Rives and Rogers. The next year he moved on to become a Deputy District Attorney for Multnomah County, staying until 1969. Following this he was an Assistant Attorney General in American Samoa and Oregon for two years. Gillette joined the Consumer Protection Division as chief counsel, serving until 1973 when he became Chief Trial Counsel for the Oregon Department of Justice. That same year he then became Solicitor General for the state of Oregon, a position he held until 1977. In 1977,
    9.33
    3 votes
    27
    8.00
    4 votes
    28
    Owen Josephus Roberts

    Owen Josephus Roberts

    Owen Josephus Roberts (May 2, 1875 – May 17, 1955) was an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court for fifteen years. He also led the fact-finding commission that investigated the attack on Pearl Harbor. At the time of World War II, he was the only Republican appointed Justice on the Supreme Court of the United States and one of only three to vote against Franklin D. Roosevelt's orders for Japanese American internment camps in Korematsu v. United States. Roberts was born in Philadelphia and attended Germantown Academy and the University of Pennsylvania, where he was elected to the Phi Beta Kappa Society and was the editor of The Daily Pennsylvanian. He completed his bachelor's degree in 1895 and went on to graduate at the top of his class from University of Pennsylvania Law School in 1898. He first gained notice as an assistant district attorney in Philadelphia. He was appointed by President Calvin Coolidge to investigate oil reserve scandals, known as the Teapot Dome scandal. This led to the prosecution and conviction of Albert B. Fall, the former Secretary of the Interior, for bribe-taking. Roberts was appointed to the Supreme Court by Herbert Hoover after Hoover's
    8.00
    4 votes
    29
    Steven Point

    Steven Point

    Steven Lewis Point, OBC (Xwĕ lī qwĕl tĕl) (born July 28, 1951) is the 28th and current Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia. From 1975 to 1999, Steven Point served as Chief of the Skowkale First Nation. From 1994 to 1999 he served as Tribal Chair of the Stó:lō Nation. Steven Point attended the University of British Columbia, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Laws degree in May, 1985. From 1986 to 1989 he practiced criminal law and native law as a partner in the law firm of Point and Shirley. He worked for Citizenship and Immigration Canada as an immigration adjudicator for several years, starting in about 1989, at its refugee backlog office in Vancouver. In 1999, he became a British Columbia provincial court judge. On February 28, 2005, he became Chief Commissioner of the British Columbia Treaty Commission. His appointment as Lieutenant-Governor was announced on September 4, 2007 by Prime Minister Stephen Harper. He assumed his duties in a ceremony at the Legislative Assembly of British Columbia on October 1, 2007. As The Queen's vice-regal representative in British Columbia, he is styled His Honour while in office and The Honourable for life. A fire broke out at his private
    6.80
    5 votes
    30
    Cindy K. Jorgenson

    Cindy K. Jorgenson

    Cindy Kelly Jorgenson (born 1953) is a District Judge for the United States District Court for the District of Arizona. She joined the court in 2002 after being nominated by President George W. Bush. Born in Fort Ord, California, Jorgenson received a B.S. from the University of Arizona in 1974 and a J.D. from the University of Arizona College of Law in 1977 Following law school graduation, Jorgenson was a deputy county attorney in the Pima County, Arizona County Attorney's Office from 1977 to 1986. She was then an assistant United States Attorney of the U.S. Attorney's Office for the District of Arizona from 1986 to 1996. She was a judge on the Pima County Superior Court from 1996 to 2002. On September 10, 2001, Jorgenson was nominated by President George W. Bush to a new seat on the United States District Court for the District of Arizona created by 113 Stat. 1501. She was confirmed by the United States Senate on February 26, 2002, and received her commission on March 6, 2002.
    9.00
    3 votes
    31
    William Burnham Woods

    William Burnham Woods

    William Burnham Woods (August 3, 1824 – May 14, 1887) was an American jurist, politician, and soldier. Woods was born on August 3, 1824 in Newark, Ohio. He was the older brother of Charles R. Woods, another future Civil War general. He attended college at both Western Reserve University and Yale University, graduating from Yale in 1845. Upon his graduation he returned home to Newark and studied law, being admitted to the bar in 1847 and establishing a practice with his tutor. Woods, a loyal Democrat, was elected mayor of Newark in 1856, and to the Ohio General Assembly in 1858, being named Speaker of the House shortly thereafter. He opposed the Civil War but, not being a proponent of slavery, came to see the necessity of a Union victory. In 1862 he left the Ohio state house and joined the Union Army. He was appointed lieutenant colonel of the 76th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, which served in the Western Theater. He fought at the battles of Shiloh and Vicksburg, and was promoted to brigadier general. Woods commanded a brigade under William T. Sherman during the Atlanta Campaign and a division during Sherman's March to the Sea. During the Carolinas Campaign, he fought with distinction at
    9.00
    3 votes
    32
    Robert Cooper Grier

    Robert Cooper Grier

    Robert Cooper Grier (March 5, 1794 – September 25, 1870), was an American jurist who served on the Supreme Court of the United States. Grier was born in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania to a Presbyterian minister, who tutored him until he entered Dickinson College. Grier graduated from Dickinson in only one year, receiving a B.A. in 1812, and remained there as an instructor until taking a position at a school his father ran. He succeeded his father as headmaster in 1815. While a teacher, Grier read law on his own time, and passed the bar in 1817, at which time he entered private practice in Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania until 1818, and then in Danville, Pennsylvania until 1833. Grier married Isabelle Rose in 1829 and the couple had one child. Grier was a political organizer for the Jacksonians in the Democrats. In 1833 Grier was rewarded with a patronage appointment to a judgeship on the Pennsylvania state District Court for Allegheny County, newly created for him. He served there for 13 years, developing a reputation for competence. U.S. Supreme Court Justice Henry Baldwin died in 1844 during the administration of President Tyler. Tyler made two attempted appointments to the seat,
    7.75
    4 votes
    33
    Duncan Finlayson

    Duncan Finlayson

    Duncan Finlayson (September 12, 1867 – September 25, 1925) was a Canadian lawyer, judge, and politician. Born in Grand River, Novsua Scotia, the son of Donald and Annabella (Murchison) Finlayson, Finlayson was educated at the Sydney Academy and Dalhousie University where he received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1893 and a Bachelor of Laws degree in 1895. He was solicitor of the municipality of Richmond, Nova Scotia from 1896 to 1904. He sat in the Nova Scotia House of Assembly from 1897 to 1904. He was very passionate about law and wished to be a lawyer for no other reason than justice. He was first elected to the Canadian House of Commons for the electoral district of Richmond in the general elections of 1904. A Liberal, he did not stand for re-election. In 1908, he was appointed judge of the County Court, District No. 7 and was appointed surrogate judge in Admiralty for the Island of Cape Breton in 1911.
    7.50
    4 votes
    34
    Sardar Muhammad Aslam

    Sardar Muhammad Aslam

    Sardar Muhammad Aslam (Urdu: سردار محمد اسلم) is a former Justice of Lahore High Court, jurist and professional lawyer from Pakistan. He also was justice in Supreme Court of Pakistan, a former Chief Justice of Islamabad High Court. However, as result of Constitution Petition No. 09 Of 2009 and Constitution Petition No. 08 Of 2009 in the Supreme Court of Pakistan, on 31 July 2009, the court held his elevation to Supreme Court as unconstitutional, void ab initio and of no legal effect. In addition in the same decision, the institute of Islamabad High Court as held as un-constitutional and of no legal effect. Aslam has a Masters in Arts (M.A) and Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.). Aslam was appointed as Additional Judge of Lahore High Court on 3 September 2003 and confirmed as a judge in 2004. He remained on bench of Lahore High Court till 6 February 2008. He was then made the fist Chief Justice of a newly created Islamabad High Court. He took oath of that office on 7 February 2008 from President of Islamic Republic of Pakistan General Pervez Musharaf. On 7 March 2008, he was appointed to Supreme Court of President of Islamic Republic of Pakistan Asif Ali Zardari. Islamabad High Court proved
    7.50
    4 votes
    35
    Pierre-Louis Panet

    Pierre-Louis Panet

    Pierre-Louis Panet (August 1, 1761 – December 2, 1812) was a lawyer, notary, seigneur, judge and political figure in Lower Canada. He was born in Montreal in 1761, the son of Pierre Panet. Panet qualified to practice as a lawyer in 1779 and as a notary in 1780. He practiced as a notary at Montreal from 1781 to 1783 and at Quebec City from 1783 to 1785. In 1781, he purchased the seigneury of Argenteuil. In 1783, he was named French language clerk for the Court of Common Pleas in Quebec district. In 1785, he was appointed clerk in the Prerogative Court. Panet was elected to the Legislative Assembly of Lower Canada for Cornwallis in 1792 and was elected in Montreal East in 1800. In 1794, he was named clerk for the Court of King’s Bench in Quebec District. He was named judge in the same court for Montreal district in 1795. He sold his property at Argenteuil in 1800 and bought the seigneuries of Ailleboust and Ramezay. In 1801, Panet became an honorary member of the Executive Council serving as judge and executive councillor until his death. He died of a stroke at Montreal in 1812. His brother Bonaventure also served in the legislative assembly. His cousin, Jean-Antoine Panet, served as
    8.67
    3 votes
    36
    Donald P. Lay

    Donald P. Lay

    • Cases: In re Madden
    Donald Pomery Lay (August 24, 1926 – April 29, 2007) was an American jurist who served on the United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit for 40 years, including as chief judge from 1979 to 1982. Born in Princeton, Illinois, Lay was injured playing football while attending the United States Naval Academy, which ended his plans for military service. He earned a bachelor's degree from the University of Iowa in 1949 and received his law degree in 1951. After working as a trial lawyer in Milwaukee and Omaha, he was appointed to the Eighth Circuit at age 39 by President Lyndon B. Johnson. One of his most notable rulings was Jenson v. Eveleth Taconite Co., a landmark sexual harassment case that was the subject of the 2005 film North Country. The Supreme Court of the United States agreed with his 1971 dissent on behalf of two Iowa convicts whose parole was revoked without trial in Morrissey v. Brewer and his dissent in Jaycees v. McClure, which compelled the Jaycees to admit women. Lay dissented in United States v. $124,700 in U.S. Currency, a case that still stands, upholding the civil forfeiture of properties possibly connected to drugs. From 1995 to 2001, he served as a
    10.00
    2 votes
    37
    Edward Bowen

    Edward Bowen

    Edward Bowen (December 1, 1780 – April 11, 1866) was an Irish-born lawyer, judge and political figure in Lower Canada. He was the 1st Chief Justice of the Superior Court for the Province of Quebec, and the 2nd Chancellor of Bishop's University. Born in Kinsale in 1780, he was the son of James Bowen (1740–1796) of Bowen's Court, Co. Cork, a Surgeon in the British Army. His mother, Isabella, was the daughter of Richard Sheffield Cassan of Sheffield, Co. Offaly, and his wife Isabella Hamilton, sister of Hugh Hamilton. Educated at Drogheda Academy, Bowen came to Lower Canada in 1797 with his great-aunt Anne Hamilton, and her husband, Lt.-Colonel Henry Caldwell. He studied law and entered the offices of Jonathan Sewell. He was called to the bar of Lower Canada in 1803. Bowen served as Lieutenant and then Captain in the Quebec militia. In 1808, he was chosen as attorney general for Lower Canada by Governor Sir James Henry Craig; he was forced to step down after Norman Fitzgerald Uniacke was chosen by the authorities in London. He was named King's Counsel in 1809 and also served as acting attorney general from 1810 to 1812. In 1809, he was elected to the Legislative Assembly of Lower
    6.40
    5 votes
    38
    James U. Campbell

    James U. Campbell

    James Ulysses Campbell (August 29, 1866 – July 16, 1937) was an American judge and politician in Oregon. He was the 25th Chief Justice of the Oregon Supreme Court, serving on Oregon’s highest court from 1930 to 1937. A native of Prince Edward Island in Canada, he previously was a district attorney and served in the Oregon House of Representatives. James Campbell was born August 29, 1866 on Prince Edward Island in Canada. This son of John Campbell and Mary McDougall was then educated at Prince of Wales College, graduating in 1883. Then in 1888 he immigrated to Oregon in the United States where he was admitted to practice law in Oregon City in 1893. When war broke out in 1898 with Spain, Campbell went and fought in the Philippines. While in the Philippines he was promoted twice, from sergeant to second lieutenant and from that rank to first lieutenant. Campbell returned to the United States in 1899. After returning to Oregon once the war was over, he served as deputy district attorney from 1902 to 1906. Then in 1906 he was elected as a Republican to the state house representing Clackamas and Multnomah counties. He served again during the 1909 session. Also in 1909 Campbell was
    6.40
    5 votes
    39
    Albert Hudson

    Albert Hudson

    Albert Blellock Hudson (August 21, 1875—January 6, 1947) was a politician and judge from Manitoba, Canada. He served in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba from 1914 to 1920 as a member of the Manitoba Liberal Party, and was a cabinet minister in the government of Tobias C. Norris. He later served in the Canadian House of Commons from 1921 to 1925, as a member of the Liberal Party of Canada. In 1936, Hudson was appointed to the Supreme Court of Canada. Hudson was born in Pembroke, Ontario, and educated in Portage la Prairie and Winnipeg. He received a law degree from the University of Manitoba in 1898, and worked as a barrister. He founded the firm of Hudson, Ormond & Marlatt, with which he practised for thirty-one years. In religion, Hudson was a Presbyterian. He was first elected to the Manitoba legislature in the provincial election of 1914, defeating incumbent Conservative Lendrum McMeans by 998 votes in the Winnipeg South "A" constituency. The Conservatives won this election, and Hudson sat with his party on the opposition benches. The Conservative administration of Rodmond P. Roblin was forced to resign from office in 1915 amid a corruption scandal, and the Liberals were
    7.25
    4 votes
    40
    Edmund Burke Wood

    Edmund Burke Wood

    Edmund Burke Wood (13 February 1820 in Fort Erie, Ontario – 7 October 1882 in Winnipeg, Manitoba) was a Member of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario for Brant South, and served as the first provincial treasurer of Ontario from 1867 to 1871 under Premier John Sandfield Macdonald. He also served as a federal Member of Parliament representing the electoral districts of Brant South and Durham West from 1867–1874 under Prime Minister Sir John A. Macdonald. He later became Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Manitoba from 1874 to 1882. He died as Chief Justice in 1882.
    7.25
    4 votes
    41
    Dana Porter

    Dana Porter

    Dana Harris Porter (January 14, 1901 – May 13, 1967) was a Canadian politician and jurist. After graduating from the University of Toronto in 1921, Porter went to England to continue his studies at Balliol College, Oxford from which he graduated with a Master's degree in 1923. He returned to Toronto where he was called to the bar, and joined the firm of Fennel, Porter & Davis. Porter entered politics winning a seat in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario representing the downtown Toronto riding of St. George in the 1943 provincial election that brought the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario to power. He joined the cabinet of Ontario Premier George Drew as Minister of Planning and Development in 1944. In 1947, he instituted an airlift of 10,000 British immigrants to the province over the objections of the federal government. In 1948, he was appointed Minister of Education and Provincial Secretary. When Drew left provincial politics to take the leadership of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada, Porter ran to succeed him as provincial leader, but won only 65 votes in the 1949 provincial Tory leadership convention. He lost to Leslie Frost. In 1958, Porter left politics
    8.33
    3 votes
    42
    John Catron

    John Catron

    John Catron (January 7, 1786 – May 30, 1865) was an American jurist who served as a US Supreme Court justice from 1837 to 1865. Little is known of Catron's early life. He was born in Montgomery County (later Wyeth County), Virginia to Peter (Catron) Kettering, who had immigrated as a child with his parents from Mittelbrun in the German Palatinate, as part of a major migration of refugees. His mother was Maria Elizabetha Houck, whose parents were also Palatine Germans; they had settled in Virginia by way of Pennsylvania. He had a sister Mary. He was a second cousin to Thomas Benton Catron, later one of the first two senators of the state of New Mexico. His father had served in Captain William Doack's militia company in Montgomery County during the Revolutionary War. The family relocated to Kentucky in the first years of the 19th century. Catron served in the War of 1812 under Andrew Jackson. He read law and was admitted to the Tennessee bar in 1815. Catron was in private practice at Sparta in the Cumberland Mountains of Tennessee from 1815 to 1818, while simultaneously serving as a prosecuting attorney of that city. He established a land law practice in Nashville in 1818, in which
    8.33
    3 votes
    43
    John Henderson Lamont

    John Henderson Lamont

    John Henderson Lamont (November 12, 1865 – March 10, 1936) was a Canadian lawyer, politician, and Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada. Born in Horning's Mills, Canada West (now Ontario), the son of Duncan Carmichael Lamont and Margaret Robson Henderson, he received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1892 and a Bachelor of Law degree in 1893 from the University of Toronto. In 1893, he was called to the Bar of Ontario. He practiced law in Toronto until 1899 when he moved to Prince Albert, Northwest Territories (now Saskatchewan) and co-founded a law firm. In 1902, he became a Crown Prosecutor. In 1904, he was elected as a Liberal candidate to the Canadian House of Commons representing the riding of Saskatchewan (Provisional District), Northwest Territories. In this election he defeated Conservative Thomas McKay who had been elected first mayor of Prince Albert in the 1880s. He resigned on September 5, 1905 and was elected as a Liberal to represent the district of Prince Albert City in the first election of the Legislative Assembly of Saskatchewan. He was also appointed Attorney General. In 1907, he was appointed to the Supreme Court of Saskatchewan. From 1918 to 1927, he was a Justice
    8.33
    3 votes
    44
    John Marshall Harlan

    John Marshall Harlan

    John Marshall Harlan (June 1, 1833 – October 14, 1911) was a Kentucky lawyer and politician who served as an associate justice on the Supreme Court. He is most notable as the lone dissenter in the Civil Rights Cases (1883), and Plessy v. Ferguson (1896), which, respectively, struck down as unconstitutional federal anti-discrimination legislation and upheld Southern segregation statutes. These dissents, among others, led to his nickname, "the Great Dissenter." Harlan was born into a prominent Kentucky slaveholding family whose presence in the region dated back to 1779. Harlan's father was James Harlan, a lawyer and politician; his mother, Elizabeth, née Davenport, was the daughter of a pioneer from Virginia. After attending school in Frankfort, Harlan enrolled at Centre College, where he was a member of Beta Theta Pi and graduated with honors. Though his mother wanted Harlan to become a merchant, James insisted that his son follow him into the legal profession, and Harlan joined his father's law practice in 1852. Yet while James Harlan could have trained his son in the office as was the norm in that era, he sent John to attend law school at Transylvania University in 1853, where
    8.33
    3 votes
    45
    Charles Gonthier

    Charles Gonthier

    Charles Doherty Gonthier, CC (August 1, 1928 – July 16, 2009) was a Puisne judge on the Supreme Court of Canada from February 1, 1989 to August 1, 2003. He was replaced by Morris Fish. Gonthier was born in Montreal, Quebec to Georges Gonthier, an accountant who was also Auditor General of Canada from 1924 to 1939, and Kathleen Doherty. Charles was the only child the two had together, although Georges Gonthier, who had been widowed, had other children from his first marriage. Kathleen's father, Charles Doherty, was a lawyer and politician who became federal Minister of Justice. Although Charles Doherty died when Gonthier was only 3, the stories his mother recounted about his grandfather were influential upon his later interest in a law career. He was educated at École Garneau, Ottawa then at Collège Stanislas in Montreal, a Roman Catholic private school and the most elite institution of its kind in Quebec where he obtained a French Baccalaureate. He eventually earned his B.C.L. at McGill University in 1951 (first class honours). Hon. LL.D., McGill University, 1990. D.H.C., Université de Montréal, 2002. Married in 1961 to Mariette Morin, M.D., M.Sc., F.R.C.S.(C), F.A.C.O.G. Called to
    6.20
    5 votes
    46
    Robert Taschereau

    Robert Taschereau

    Robert Taschereau, PC CC (September 10, 1896 – July 26, 1970) was a lawyer who became the 11th Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada and who briefly served as acting Governor General of Canada following the death of Georges Vanier in 1967. He was born in Quebec. He studied at Laval University and obtained a BA degree in 1916 and LLL in 1920. Following a career as a lawyer, Taschereau entered politics as a Liberal and won a seat in the Quebec National Assembly in 1930. He held his seat of the riding of Bellechasse until retiring in 1936. On February 9, 1940, he was appointed to the Supreme Court of Canada, filling the vacancy created by the death of his former law partner, Lawrence Cannon. In 1946, he and fellow Justice Roy Kellock conducted the Royal Commission on Spying Activities in Canada that had been prompted by the Gouzenko Affair. Taschereau was promoted to Chief Justice in 1963. According to the Canadian rules of succession, the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court is second-in-line to the Governor Generalship, and serves in an interim capacity until a new one can be recommended by the Prime Minister and chosen by the Queen. Taschereau acted as Governor General from
    6.20
    5 votes
    47
    Sandra Day O'Connor

    Sandra Day O'Connor

    Sandra Day O'Connor (born March 26, 1930) is a retired United States Supreme Court justice. She served as an Associate Justice from her appointment in 1981 by Ronald Reagan until her retirement from the Court in 2006. She was the first woman to be appointed to the Court. Prior to O'Connor's appointment to the Court, she was an elected official and judge in Arizona. On July 1, 2005, she announced her intention to retire effective upon the confirmation of a successor. Samuel Alito was nominated to take her seat in October 2005, and joined the Court on January 31, 2006. O'Connor tended to approach each case narrowly without arguing for sweeping precedents. She most frequently sided with the court's conservative bloc. In the latter years of her tenure, she was regarded as having the swing vote in many cases as the court grew more conservative. O'Connor was Chancellor of The College of William & Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia, and currently serves on the board of trustees of the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Several publications have named O'Connor among the most powerful women in the world. On August 12, 2009, she was awarded the Presidential Medal of
    9.50
    2 votes
    48
    Brian Dickson

    Brian Dickson

    Robert George Brian Dickson, PC CC CD (May 25, 1916 – October 17, 1998), commonly known as Brian Dickson, was appointed the 15th Chief Justice of Canada on April 18, 1984. He retired on June 30, 1990 and died October 17, 1998. Dickson was born to Thomas Dickson and Sarah Elizabeth Gibson, in Yorkton, Saskatchewan, in 1916. Thus his later childhood and young adulthood occurred during the Great Depression and the Dust Bowl years. The family moved to Winnipeg, where Dickson attended the University of Manitoba. As a member of the Zeta Psi fraternity, he graduated with an LL.B in 1938. His first permanent job was with the Great-West Life Assurance Company. Dickson was called to the bar in 1940, during the Second World War. He subsequently enlisted in the armed forces and served overseas. In August 1944, during a battle near Falaise, Dickson's right leg was hit by friendly fire and had to be amputated. Upon his return to Winnipeg in 1945, Dickson joined the law firm of Aikins, Loftus, MacAulay, Turner, Thompson & Tritschler and became a successful corporate lawyer. He also lectured at the Faculty of Law of the University of Manitoba for six years, until 1954. In 1963 he was appointed to
    7.00
    4 votes
    49
    Eric J. Magnuson

    Eric J. Magnuson

    Eric John Magnuson (born January 27, 1951) is an American lawyer in private practice. He was the Chief Justice of the Minnesota Supreme Court from 2008 to 2010. Magnuson was born in Morris, Illinois. He graduated from the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis in 1972, and from William Mitchell College of Law in Saint Paul in 1976. During his third year of law school, Magnuson clerked for future state Chief Justice Douglas Amdahl, then a Hennepin County district judge. The following year, he clerked for then-Chief Justice Robert Sheran. Magnuson joined the Minneapolis law firm of Rider Bennett in 1977. An appellate lawyer in the state and federal courts, he served as president of the American Academy of Appellate Lawyers and founded the Eighth Circuit Bar Association. Governor Tim Pawlenty chose him to chair the state Commission on Judicial Selection from 2003 to 2008. In 2007, after Rider Bennett dissolved, he joined the Minneapolis law firm of Briggs & Morgan. On March 17, 2008, Governor Pawlenty appointed Magnuson Chief Justice of the Minnesota Supreme Court to succeed the retiring Russell A. Anderson. He was sworn in on June 2, 2008. Magnuson served on the State Canvassing
    7.00
    4 votes
    50
    H. Emory Widener, Jr.

    H. Emory Widener, Jr.

    • Cases: Eltra Corp. v. Ringer
    Hiram Emory Widener Jr. (April 20, 1923 – September 19, 2007) was a United States federal judge and then a Senior Judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit. Born in Abingdon, Virginia, Widener received a B.S. from U.S. Naval Academy from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1944 and then served in the Navy until 1949. In 1953 he received an LL.B. from Washington and Lee University. He was a Lieutenant in the U.S. Naval Reserve from 1951 to 1952, and was in private practice in Bristol, Virginia from 1953 to 1969. He was a Commissioner for the United States District Court for the Western District of Virginia from 1963 to 1966, and was a member of the Virginia Election Laws Study Commission from 1968 to 1969. On June 19, 1969, Widener was nominated by President Richard Nixon to a seat on the United States District Court for the Western District of Virginia vacated by Thomas Johnson Michie. Widener was confirmed by the United States Senate on July 11, 1969, and received his commission on July 14, 1969. He served as chief judge from 1971 to 1972, but on September 25, 1972, Nixon nominated Widener to a seat on the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit
    7.00
    4 votes
    51
    John Sewell Sanborn

    John Sewell Sanborn

    John Sewell Sanborn (January 1, 1819 – July 17, 1877) was a Canadian educator, lawyer, judge and political figure. Some sources give his middle name as Sewall. He was born in Gilmanton, New Hampshire and graduated from Dartmouth College, later studying at the University of Bishop’s College in Lennoxville, Quebec. He was the principal at a secondary school in Sherbrooke. He later articled in law and was called to the bar in 1847. He was elected to the 3rd Parliament of the Province of Canada representing Sherbrooke County in a by-election in March 1850. At the time, he supported annexation of the Eastern Townships with the United States. He was re-elected in 1851, no longer supporting annexation. The annexation issue had played an important role in establishing a rail link connecting the region to Maine. In 1854, he was elected in Compton. In 1863, he was acclaimed to the Legislative Council for Wellington division and he was re-elected in 1864. He supported an elected Senate in the discussions leading up to Confederation. In 1867, he was appointed to the new Senate of Canada. In 1872, he was appointed to the Quebec Superior Court for Saint-François district and he was appointed to
    7.00
    4 votes
    52
    Robert Stanley Weir

    Robert Stanley Weir

    Robert Stanley Weir, FRSC, (November 15, 1856–August 20, 1926) was a Montreal, Quebec judge and poet most famous for writing the English lyrics to O Canada, the national anthem of Canada. He was educated as a teacher and lawyer and considered one of the leading experts of the day on Quebec's municipal civil law. He was appointed a municipal court judge and a judge for the Exchequer Court of Canada. Weir published several individual poems in magazines and collections in books. His lyrics for the English version of O Canada eclipsed many others' lyrical attempts and songs to quickly become the most popular patriotic song in Canada for the past century. Robert Stanley Weir was born in Hamilton, Canada West, the son of William Park Weir and Helen Craig Smith, who had emigrated from Scotland to Canada in 1852. Weir moved to Montreal, Quebec with his family as an infant, where his father became a Surveyor of Customs in the Port of Montreal. His brother, William Alexander Weir, was born there and would later become a Cabinet Minister in the Legislative Assembly of Quebec. Weir studied at McGill Normal School, Montreal, and at the age of 19, was appointed principal of Sherbrooke Street
    7.00
    4 votes
    53
    Thomas Deacon

    Thomas Deacon

    Thomas Deacon QC (November 7, 1832 – ) was an Ontario lawyer, judge, businessman and political figure. He represented Renfrew North in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario from 1871 to 1879. He was born in Perth in Upper Canada in 1832, the son of John Deacon, an Irish immigrant. He studied law with his brother John, was called to the bar in 1862 and went on to practice in Pembroke. Deacon married Caroline Rebecca Dunlop in 1864. He was named Queen's Counsel in 1876. He served as a member of the town council. Deacon was a director of the Kingston and Pembroke Railway and president of a lumber company. He was named judge in Renfrew County in 1895. Deacon was also county master for the Orange Order. Deacon, a geographic township in Nipissing District, was named after him.
    8.00
    3 votes
    54
    Alfred S. Bennett

    Alfred S. Bennett

    Alfred Silas Bennett (June 10, 1854 – November 28, 1925) was an American judge, educator, and attorney in Oregon. He was the 49th Associate Justice of the Oregon Supreme Court, serving from 1919 to 1920. Previously he had served as a state circuit court judge and as a county school superintendent. An Iowa native, he practiced law in The Dalles, Oregon, with several cases making it to the Supreme Court of the United States. Alfred Bennett was born in Dubuque, Iowa on June 10, 1854. In 1865 he and his parents took the Oregon Trail to Oregon and settled in Washington County. By 1870 Alfred set off on his own and eventually ended up in The Dalles, Oregon where he taught and learned the law between 1873 and 1880. In 1880, he passed the bar, this was while serving as Wasco County superintendent of schools from 1878 until 1882. In September 1882 Alfred Bennett was appointed as judge of the 8th judicial district which covered Eastern Oregon and remained in that post for two years. He then returned to private practice and married Mary McCauley in 1887. In 1918 Bennett won election to the Oregon Supreme Court. He replaced Conrad P. Olson who was serving out the remainder of Frank A. Moore’s
    6.75
    4 votes
    55
    Bushrod Washington

    Bushrod Washington

    Bushrod Washington (June 5, 1762 – November 26, 1829) was a U.S. Supreme Court associate justice and the nephew of George Washington. Washington was born in Westmoreland County, Virginia, and was the son of John Augustine Washington, brother of the first president. Bushrod attended Delamere, an academy administered by the Rev. Bartholomew Booth and attended the Chapel in the Woods. He graduated from the College of William and Mary, where he was one of the first members of Phi Beta Kappa. His uncle sponsored Bushrod's legal studies with fellow Founder James Wilson. Bushrod lived in Richmond, Virginia at William Byrd III's estate, Belvidere, until his appointment to the Supreme Court in 1798. He inherited Mount Vernon from George after the latter died in 1799. Washington received a recess appointment to the seat vacated by James Wilson on September 29, 1798, after another Federalist, John Marshall, turned John Adams down and endorsed Washington. Formally nominated on December 18, 1798, he was confirmed by the United States Senate on December 20, 1798, and received his commission the same day. He became an associate justice on February 4, 1799, at the age of 36. After Marshall became
    6.75
    4 votes
    56
    Enrique Fernando

    Enrique Fernando

    Enrique M. Fernando (July 25, 1915 - October 13, 2004) was the 13th Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the Philippines. A noted constitutionalist and law professor, he served in the Supreme Court for 18 years, including 6 years as Chief Justice. Fernando was born in Malate, Manila. He obtained his Bachelor of Laws degree at the University of the Philippines College of Law, graduating magna cum laude in 1938. Shortly after admission to the bar, he joined the faculty of his alma mater, where he taught as a full-time member of the faculty until 1953, and as a professorial lecturer for decades afterwards. He was eventually appointed as the George A. Malcolm Professor of Constitutional Law. Later, he would also teach constitutional law at the Lyceum of the Philippines. Fernando was feared for his rather tyrannical manner in the classroom, yet many of his law students would emerge as Supreme Court justices or prominent practitioners in their own right. In 1947, he was admitted by the Yale Law School as the first Filipino Sterling Fellow, earning his Master of Law degree the following year. Fernando was appointed as a Code Commissioner in 1953 and served in that capacity until 1964. In
    6.75
    4 votes
    57
    Francis Alexander Anglin

    Francis Alexander Anglin

    Francis Alexander Anglin PC (April 2, 1865 – March 2, 1933) was the seventh Chief Justice of Canada from 1924 until 1933. Born in Saint John, New Brunswick, one of 9 children of Parliamentarian Timothy Anglin, and elder brother to the renowned stage actress, Margaret Anglin, he received a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Ottawa in 1887. Anglin studied law at the Law Society of Upper Canada (which in those days taught law) and was called to the bar in 1888 establishing a practice in Toronto. In 1896 he became Clerk of the Surrogate Court of Ontario. He was appointed to the Exchequer Division of the High Court of Justice of Ontario in 1904 and to the Supreme Court of Canada on February 23, 1909, becoming Chief Justice in 1924 and serving until his retirement, two days before his death, in 1933.
    6.75
    4 votes
    58
    Francis Robert Latchford

    Francis Robert Latchford

    Francis Robert Latchford (April 30, 1856 – August 13, 1938) was an Ontario lawyer, judge and political figure. He represented Renfrew South in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario from 1899 to 1904 as a Liberal member. He was born in Aylmer, Quebec, the son of James Culhane Latchford, an Irish immigrant, and studied at the University of Ottawa. Latchford was called to the bar in 1886. He was named King's Counsel in 1899. Latchford served as Commissioner of Public Works from 1899 to 1904 and Attorney General of Ontario from 1904 to 1905. He was named a judge in the Supreme Court of Ontario in 1908 and served until his death. Latchford was also an amateur conchologist specializing in fresh water molluscs. He died in Toronto.
    6.75
    4 votes
    59
    Wallace Nesbitt

    Wallace Nesbitt

    Wallace Nesbitt, KC (May 13, 1858 – April 7, 1930) was a Canadian lawyer and Puisne Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada. Born in Woodstock, Canada West (now Ontario), the son of John W. Nesbitt and Mary Wallace, he was called to the Ontario Bar in 1881. A practicing lawyer, he was appointed to the Supreme Court of Canada in 1903. He served for two years until he resigned in 1905. In 1887, Wallace Nesbitt married Louisa Andrée Plumb née Elliott (d. 1894), the widow of his one-time law partner Thomas Street Plumb (d. 1885), and became the stepfather of two young children. In memory of his stepson Gentleman Cadet Douglas Burr Plumb, who drowned at Romaine, Labrador on June 22, 1903, Wallace Nesbitt donated a stained glass memorial window in 1920 featuring a Royal Military College of Canada crest and motto.
    6.75
    4 votes
    60
    Ward Hunt

    Ward Hunt

    Ward Hunt (June 14, 1810 – March 24, 1886), was an American jurist and politician. He was Chief Judge of the New York Court of Appeals from 1868 to 1869, and an associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court from 1873 to 1882. He was the son of Montgomery Hunt, long-time Cashier of the Bank of Utica. He was a classmate of Horatio Seymour at the Oxford and Geneva Academies, and graduated from Union College in 1828, where he was an early member of the Kappa Alpha Society. Then he studied law with Juge James Gould at Litchfield Law School in Litchfield, Connecticut and with Hiram Denio in Utica, and was admitted to the bar in 1831. He was a Democratic member from Oneida County of the New York State Assembly in 1839, and was Mayor of Utica in 1844. In 1848, he joined the Free Soil Party, and in 1855 he was among the founders of the New York Republican Party. He remained in private practice until 1865, when he was elected to an eight-year term on the New York Court of Appeals on the Republican ticket, to succeed to the seat held by his former law teacher and partner Hiram Denio. Hunt became Chief Judge in 1868 after the sudden death of Chief Judge William B. Wright. In 1870, he was
    6.75
    4 votes
    61
    A. Joe Fish

    A. Joe Fish

    Allen Joe Fish (born 1942) is a senior United States District Judge for the Northern District of Texas in Dallas, Texas. Born in Los Angeles, California, Fish received his B.A. from Yale College in 1965 and his LL.B from Yale Law School in 1968. He was a Sergeant in the United States Army Reserve from 1968 to 1974, and was in private practice in Dallas, Texas, from 1968 to 1980. In 1980 he was elected to the 95th Judicial District Court of Dallas County, Texas. From 1981 to 1983 he was a judge on the Fifth District of the Texas Court of Appeals in Dallas. On January 31, 1983, Fish was nominated by President Ronald Reagan to a seat on the United States District Court for the Northern District of Texas vacated by Patrick E. Higginbotham. Fish was confirmed by the United States Senate less than a month later, on February 23, 1983, and received his commission the following day. He served as chief judge of the district from 2002 to 2007, assuming senior status on November 12, 2007.
    9.00
    2 votes
    62
    John Hugh McNary

    John Hugh McNary

    John Hugh McNary (January 31, 1867 – October 25, 1936) was an American attorney and jurist in the state of Oregon. He served as the federal judge for the United States District Court for the District of Oregon in Portland. A native of Oregon, he also served as a district attorney and as an assistant district attorney in Salem, Oregon. His brother Charles would serve as a United States Senator. John McNary was born on January 31, 1867, on a farm near Salem, Oregon in Marion County, Oregon to Hugh Linza McNary and Margaret Claggett McNary. The McNary family farm was north of Salem, where John’s parents would raise ten children. John’s grandfather was James McNary who immigrated to Oregon Country from Kentucky in 1845, while his maternal grandfather immigrated from Missouri in 1852. John’s father Hugh was a former brickyard operator and school teacher. His mother died in 1878, followed by his father’s death in 1883. John Hugh was educated in the local public schools in Marion County before attending Willamette University. John received his college education at the University of Oregon in Eugene. In 1890, he was elected as the recorder for Marion County. After college he read law under
    9.00
    2 votes
    63
    Orville C. Pratt

    Orville C. Pratt

    Orville C. Pratt (April 24, 1819-October 1891) was an American jurist and attorney. He served as the 2nd Associate Justice on the Oregon Supreme Court serving from 1848 to 1852. He wrote the lone dissenting opinion in the controversy over the Oregon Territory’s capital between Oregon City and Salem. Pratt was born on April 24, 1819 in Ontario County, New York. In New York he attended the Army Academy at West Point from 1837 to 1839. He then studied law in Rochester, New York, earning admission to the state bar in 1841. Pratt then moved to Galena, Illinois and set up practice in 1843. In 1849, Pratt moved to Oregon to assume the position of judge on the Oregon Supreme Court. When he arrived he was the lone justice, so he exercised all of the judiciary’s powers from April 1849 until William Strong arrived 18 months later. Pratt was appointed to the position by President Polk. Then in 1852 when Franklin Pierce became President Pratt was removed as judge, and when he was nominated to become chief justice of the Oregon court Stephen A. Douglas opposed the nomination and Pratt lost the nomination to George Henry Williams. While in office Pratt was controversial. He was known for
    9.00
    2 votes
    64
    Henry Boyce

    Henry Boyce

    Henry Boyce (1797 – March 1, 1873) was a United States federal judge. Born in Derry, Ireland, Boyce read law to enter the bar in 1820. He began a private practice in Bayou Leche, Louisiana by 1824, and was then in Alexandria, Louisiana from 1824 to 1828. He was a planter in Rapides Parish, Louisiana from 1828, maintaining that occupation until his death in 1873. He was a judge on the State Circuit Court of Louisiana from 1834 to 1839. He was the United States Attorney for the Western District of Louisiana in 1849. On May 9, 1849, Boyce received a recess appointment from Zachary Taylor to a new seat on the United States District Court for the Western District of Louisiana created by 9 Stat. 401. Formally nominated on December 21, 1849, Boyce was confirmed by the United States Senate on August 2, 1850, and received his commission the same day. Boyce's served in that capacity until his resignation from the bench on February 19, 1861. He was a member of the Louisiana State Legislature in 1865, and the legislature elected him to United States Senate from Louisiana. However, the U.S. Senate refused to seat Boyce. Boyce married Irene Archinard with whom he had two children, Henry
    5.80
    5 votes
    65
    Anthony Kennedy

    Anthony Kennedy

    • Cases: Dolan v. United States Postal Service
    Anthony McLeod Kennedy (born July 23, 1936) is an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court, having been appointed by President Ronald Reagan in 1988. Since the retirement of Sandra Day O'Connor, Kennedy has often been the "swing vote" on many of the Court's 5–4 decisions. Kennedy was born and raised in Sacramento, California, the son of Anthony J. Kennedy, an attorney with a reputation for influence in the California legislature, and Gladys (née McLeod), who participated in many local civic activities. As a boy, Kennedy came into contact with prominent politicians of the day, such as California Governor and later U.S. Chief Justice Earl Warren. He served as a page in the California State Senate as a young man. He is not a member of the Kennedy political family. Kennedy graduated from C. K. McClatchy High School in 1954. He was an undergraduate student at Stanford University from 1954–58, graduating with a B.A. in Political Science, after spending his senior year at the London School of Economics. He earned an LL.B from Harvard Law School, graduating cum laude in 1961. Kennedy was in private practice in San Francisco from 1961 to 1963. In 1963, following his father's
    7.67
    3 votes
    66
    Dave Lavery

    Dave Lavery

    Dave Lavery is the Program Executive for Solar System Exploration at NASA Headquarters. He is also well-known amongst participants of the FIRST Robotics Competition as a mentor of Team 116 (from Herndon High School) and was a member of the FRC Game Design Committee. As of January 2011, Lavery is no longer a member of the GDC. Dave attended Virginia Tech, where he obtained a Bachelor's Degree in Computer Science. Dave currently works at the NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC, as the Program Executive for Solar System Explorations. He oversees and is heavily involved with the Mars Exploration Rovers.
    7.67
    3 votes
    67
    Lewis Linn McArthur

    Lewis Linn McArthur

    Lewis Linn McArthur (March 18, 1843 – May 10, 1897) was an American newspaper publisher and judge in the state of Oregon. He was an Oregon Supreme Court associate justice and the father of Lewis A. McArthur, the first editor of the Oregon Geographic Names publications. He served on the court from 1870 to 1878. Another son, Clifton Nesmith McArthur, would serve in the United States Congress. Lewis McArthur was born on March 18, 1843 in the state of Virginia. Born in Portsmouth, his father was a US naval officer and hydrologist, Lieutenant Commander William Pope McArthur, and his mother was Mary Stone Young McArthur. McArthur's father died at sea in 1850 while returning from a U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey mission to survey the Oregon Coast. His father was the nephew of Missouri Senator Lewis F. Linn. Lewis McArthur grew up in Portsmouth and Baltimore, Maryland, before attending Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania where he started in 1857, but did not graduate. He then went to Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island. In Rhode Island he passed the bar in 1864 and then moved to Oregon. Once in Oregon he began working for various newspapers in Eastern Oregon before
    7.67
    3 votes
    68
    Nicholas Garaufis

    Nicholas Garaufis

    Judge Nicholas G. Garaufis (born 1948 in Paterson, New Jersey) is a United States district judge serving on the United States District Court for the Eastern District of New York. He was nominated by President Clinton on February 28, 2000, to a seat vacated by Charles P. Sifton and confirmed by the United States Senate on May 24, 2000. Garaufis received his commission on May 25, 2000. Garaufis graduated from Columbia College of Columbia University in 1969 and received his law degree from Columbia Law School in 1974. Nicholas G. Garaufis entered service as a United States District Judge in the Eastern District of New York on August 28, 2000. Judge Garaufis was nominated by President Clinton on February 28, 2000 upon the recommendation of U.S. Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan (D-NY). On May 24, 2000, the United States Senate confirmed Judge Garaufis by unanimous consent. Prior to his appointment, Judge Garaufis served for more than five years as the Chief Counsel of the Federal Aviation Administration in Washington, D.C., overseeing a staff of 200 attorneys. Prior to his appointment to the Clinton Administration in June, 1995, Judge Garaufis served for nine years as counsel to Queens
    7.67
    3 votes
    69
    William Johnstone Ritchie

    William Johnstone Ritchie

    Sir William Johnstone Ritchie (October 28, 1813 – September 25, 1892) was one of the first judges appointed to the Supreme Court of Canada and became the second Chief Justice of the court, and the longest serving Chief Justice to date. Ritchie was born in Annapolis, Nova Scotia to Thomas Ritchie and Elizabeth Wildman Johnstone. He graduated from the Pictou Academy and went to study law in Halifax in the office of his brother, John William Ritchie. He was called to the bar of Nova Scotia in 1837 but moved to Saint John, New Brunswick, and was called to the bar of that province the following year. In 1846 he was elected to the Legislative Assembly of New Brunswick. In keeping with his pledge to resign if a fellow Liberal candidate failed to win a by-election, he gave up his seat in 1851, only to be re-elected three years later. In 1855 he left politics to accept an appointment to the Supreme Court of New Brunswick, and 10 years later he was named Chief Justice of New Brunswick. He was appointed to the newly established Supreme Court of Canada on September 30, 1875 and became its chief justice on January 11, 1879. He served on the Supreme Court for 17 years until he died on September
    7.67
    3 votes
    70
    Charles Dewey Day

    Charles Dewey Day

    Charles Dewey Day, QC (May 6, 1806 – January 31, 1884) was a lawyer, judge and political figure in Canada East. He was born in Bennington, Vermont in 1806 and came to Montreal in Lower Canada with his family in 1812. The family moved again to Hull in 1828. Charles studied in Montreal, articled in law and was called to the bar in 1827. He practiced mainly in the Ottawa valley and represented lumber merchants such as the Wright family. In 1838, he was named Queen's Counsel. He spoke publicly against Papineau's Ninety-Two Resolutions in 1834. In 1840, he was appointed solicitor general in the Special Council that administered Lower Canada up until the union of the two Canadas in 1841. In 1841, he was elected to represent Ottawa County in the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Canada. During his time in the assembly, he worked to improve education in the province. He was named solicitor general in the Executive Council for the province; Robert Baldwin and other Reformers opposed Day's appointment. In 1842, he resigned to accept an appointment to the Court of Queen's Bench. In 1850, he was appointed to the Superior Court. From 1852 to 1884, he served as president of the Royal
    10.00
    1 votes
    71
    Charles E. Cox

    Charles E. Cox

    Charles E. Cox (February 21, 1860 – February 3, 1936) was an American lawyer and judge who became the 55th justice of the Indiana Supreme Court, serving from 1911 to 1917. Elected as a Democrat in the Fall of 1910, he was Chief Justice by the end of his six-year term. The "Marshall Constitution" case and the "Technical Institute" case were among the important decisions made by the court during his tenure. As a judge in the Indiana Supreme Court and in lower courts, he never had a decision reversed. Cox began studying law in 1877 while a law clerk for judge William E. Niblack, 27th justice of the Indiana Supreme Court. Cox came from a family of lawyers and judges, as brothers Jabez T. Cox and Millard F. Cox also practiced law and spent time as judges in Indiana. In private practice, Cox gained national attention assisting the prosecutor in the 1925 trial of D. C. Stephenson for the death of Madge Oberholtzer. In addition to private practice and his tenure on the Indiana Supreme Court, Cox's legal career also included librarian of the Indiana State Law Library, Marion County Deputy Prosecuting Attorney, and city judge of Indianapolis. Cox's ancestors came to America when the land was
    10.00
    1 votes
    72
    Colleen Kollar-Kotelly

    Colleen Kollar-Kotelly

    Colleen Kollar-Kotelly (born 1943, New York, New York) is a judge for the United States District Court for the District of Columbia and was presiding judge of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISC). Kollar-Kotelly, the daughter of Konstantine and Irene Kollar attended bilingual schools in Mexico, Ecuador and Venezuela. She attended Georgetown Visitation Preparatory School in Washington, D.C.. She earned both her B.A. degree in English from Catholic University of America (Delta Epsilon Honor Society) and her J.D. from Catholic University of America's Columbus School of Law (Moot court Board of Governors) in 1968. From 1968-69 Kollar-Kotelly served as a law clerk to the Hon. Catherine B. Kelly, District of Columbia Court of Appeals. From 1969 to 1972, Kollar-Kotelly was an attorney for the Department of Justice, Criminal Division, Appellate Section, after which she became chief legal counsel for St. Elizabeths Hospital, Department of Health and Human Services, from 1972 to 1984. On October 3, 1984, Kollar-Kotelly was nominated as an associate judge of the D.C. Superior Court by President Ronald Reagan; she took her oath of office on October 21. She served as Deputy
    10.00
    1 votes
    73
    Francis Forbes

    Francis Forbes

    Sir Francis Forbes (1784 – 8 November 1841) was a Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Newfoundland, and the first Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of New South Wales. Forbes was born and educated in Bermuda, the son of Dr. Francis Forbes M.D. and his wife Mary, née Tucker. At the age of 19 he traveled to London, England to enter Lincoln's Inn. He was called to the Bar in 1812 and became a Crown Law Officer in Bermuda and married Amelia Sophia Grant in 1813, returning to England in 1815. In 1816 he was invited to be Chief Justice of Newfoundland, and was sworn in at St. John's in July, 1816. While in Newfoundland, he severely curtailed the powers of the Fishing Admirals. In 1820, he wrote the lyrics of the song "The Banks of Newfoundland". In 1822, he was appointed Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of New South Wales, to oversee the reform of the administration of the legal system in the colony, following the inquiry into the colony's affairs by commissioner John Bigge. Before departing for Australia, he helped draft the "New South Wales Act" of 1823 (4 Geo. IV c. 96); this bill, along with the "Charter of Justice" issued under it on 13 October 1823, the old legal tribunals of
    10.00
    1 votes
    74
    Harry Blackmun

    Harry Blackmun

    • Cases: Diamond v. Chakrabarty
    Harold Andrew Blackmun (November 12, 1908 – March 4, 1999) was an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1970 until 1994. He is best known as the author of Roe v. Wade. Harry Blackmun was born in Nashville, Illinois, and grew up in Dayton's Bluff, a working-class neighborhood in Saint Paul, Minnesota. He attended the same grade school as future Chief Justice Warren E. Burger, with whom he eventually served on the Supreme Court for some sixteen years. He attended Harvard College on scholarship, earning an A.B. summa cum laude in mathematics and graduating Phi Beta Kappa in 1929. While at Harvard, Blackmun joined Lambda Chi Alpha Fraternity and sang with the Harvard Glee Club (with whom he performed for President Herbert Hoover in 1929, Blackmun's first visit to Washington). He attended Harvard Law School (among his professors there was Felix Frankfurter), graduating in 1932. He served in a variety of positions including private counsel, law clerk, and adjunct faculty at the University of Minnesota Law School and William Mitchell College of Law (then the St. Paul College of Law). Blackmun's practice as an attorney at the law firm now known as Dorsey &
    10.00
    1 votes
    75
    Jonathan Belcher

    Jonathan Belcher

    Jonathan Belcher (July 23, 1710 – March 30, 1776) was an American lawyer, chief justice, and Lieutenant Governor of Nova Scotia. Born in Boston, Massachusetts, second son of Jonathan Belcher and Mary Partridge, he received an Bachelor of Arts degree in 1728 and an Master of Arts degree in 1731 from Harvard College. In 1730, he studied law in Middle Temple, London and was called to the English Bar in 1734. Admitted as a fellow-commoner to Trinity College, Cambridge, he received another Master's degree in mathematics from Cambridge University in 1733. He received a third Master's degree from the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University). In 1754, he was sent to Nova Scotia to become the first Chief Justice of the Nova Scotia Supreme Court. He resigned in 1776. From 1761 to 1763, he was the Lieutenant Governor of Nova Scotia. He negotiated the peace that led to the Burying the Hatchet Ceremony (Nova Scotia).
    10.00
    1 votes
    76
    Moshe Landau

    Moshe Landau

    Moshe Landau (Hebrew: משה לנדוי‎) (29 April 1912 – 1 May 2011) was an Israeli jurist. He was the fifth President of the Supreme Court of Israel. Landau was born in Danzig, Germany (modern Gdańsk, Poland) to Dr. Isaac Landau and Betty née Eisenstädt. His father was a leading member of the Jewish Community of Danzig In 1930 he finished high school in the Free City of Danzig and in 1933 he graduated from the University of London School of Law. That year, he immigrated to the British Mandate of Palestine. In 1937 he was admitted to the Bar of Palestine. In 1940 he was made judge in the Magistrate's Court of Haifa and was appointed to the District Court in 1948. Member of the International Court of Justice. Chairman of the World Zionist Congress tribunal. Chairman of the advisory Commissions on reforming the Israeli Land Law, criminal procedure and administrative tribunals. Chairman of the Commission for recognition of righteous among the nations in Yad Vashem. From 1956 to 1962 and from 1965 to 1966 he served as Chairman of the board of directors of the Technion.
    10.00
    1 votes
    77
    Samuel B. Kent

    Samuel B. Kent

    Samuel B. Kent (born June 22, 1949, Denver, Colorado) is a former U.S District Court judge for the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Texas, who served in the single-judge Galveston Division covering Brazoria, Chambers, Galveston, and Matagorda Counties. He was nominated by President George H.W. Bush on August 3, 1990, to a seat vacated by Hugh Gibson, confirmed by the United States Senate on September 28, 1990, and received his commission on October 1, 1990. On May 11, 2009, Judge Kent was sentenced to 33 months in prison in a sex abuse case for lying to investigators about sexually abusing two female employees. Dick DeGuerin, Kent's attorney, said the judge was retiring from the bench because of a disability—which would allow him to keep receiving his $169,300-a-year salary. Retired federal judges collect their full salaries for the remainder of their lives; judges who resign get nothing. That did not satisfy the leaders of the House Judiciary Committee, Reps. John Conyers Jr., (D-Mich.) and Lamar Smith (R-Tex.), who demanded that Kent resign immediately or face possible impeachment. Judge Kent submitted his resignation on June 2, 2009, with the proviso that it
    10.00
    1 votes
    78
    James F. Watson

    James F. Watson

    James Finley Watson (March 15, 1840-June 12, 1897) was an American judge and politician in Oregon. A native of Iowa, he was the 25th Associate Justice of the Oregon Supreme Court serving from 1876 until 1878. Previously he served in the state legislature and later served as United States Attorney for the District of Oregon. James Finley Watson was born on March 15, 1840, in Dubuque, Iowa, to James and Emily Watson. In 1853, the family relocated to Douglas County in Oregon Territory. Watson then was educated in Eugene, Oregon at Columbia College before it closed after two major fires. After attempting gold mining he would learn the law under Rufus Mallory in Roseburg, Oregon, with admittance to the legal bar in 1863. He then served as a prosecutor for Oregon’s Second Judicial District from 1864 to 1872. In 1872, Watson was elected to the Oregon State Senate as a Republican from Douglas County. He won re-election in 1874 to the same seat in the senate. Next, in 1876 Watson won election to the Oregon Supreme Court to replace John Burnett. His term ended in 1878 and he left the bench, however his younger brother Edward B. Watson would join the court in 1880. In 1878, the circuit court
    6.50
    4 votes
    79
    Louis-Philippe Brodeur

    Louis-Philippe Brodeur

    Louis-Philippe Brodeur, PC QC baptised Louis-Joseph-Alexandre Brodeur (August 21, 1862 – January 1, 1924) was a Canadian parliamentarian and public servant. Born in Beloeil, Quebec, he was first elected to the Canadian House of Commons in the 1891 election as Liberal Member of Parliament (MP) for Rouville, Quebec. He represented the riding continuously until his retirement prior to the 1911 election. Brodeur was a firm supporter of Sir Wilfrid Laurier and came from a Rouges family. His father fought in the Lower Canada Rebellion of 1837, and his grandfather was killed in the Rebellion's Battle of Saint-Charles. As a young man, Brodeur studied law and engaged in journalism for Liberal newspapers such as la Patrie and L'Électeur before becoming editor of Le Soir. He was first elected to the Canadian House of Commons at the age of 29. After the Liberals won the 1896 election, Brodeur was appointed deputy speaker. He became Speaker of the Canadian House of Commons following the 1900 election. He was appointed as a Queen's Counsel in 1899. In 1904, he was appointed to the Laurier Cabinet as Minister of Inland Revenue where he introduced anti-trust legislation to protect tobacco farmers
    6.50
    4 votes
    80
    Elbert Tuttle

    Elbert Tuttle

    Elbert Parr Tuttle (July 17, 1897 – June 23, 1996), one of the "Fifth Circuit Four", and a liberal Republican from Georgia, was chief judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit from 1960 to 1967, when that court became known for a series of decisions crucial in advancing the civil rights of African-Americans. At that time, the Fifth Circuit included not only Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas (its jurisdiction as of 2012), but also Alabama, Georgia, Florida, and the Panama Canal Zone. Tuttle was born in Pasadena, California. In 1906, his family moved to Hawaii where he attended high school. In October 1910, he and his brother Malcolm built and flew the first glider in Hawaii. Tuttle then attended Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, from which he graduated in 1918. He then fought in World War I in the United States Army Air Service from 1918 to 1919. Tuttle was a member of the Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity and the Sphinx Head Society. Tuttle received an LL.B. from Cornell Law School in 1923. He was a reporter for the New York Evening World for several years while attending law school. After graduating from law school, he moved to the capital city of Atlanta,
    5.60
    5 votes
    81
    John Wellington Gwynne

    John Wellington Gwynne

    John Wellington Gwynne, QC (March 30, 1814 – January 7, 1902) was a Canadian lawyer and Puisne Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada. Born in Castleknock, Ireland, the son of William Gwynne and Eliza Nelson, he emigrated to Canada in 1832. Gwynne was elected a bencher of the Law Society of Upper Canada in 1849 and appointed QC in 1850. In 1874, he was appointed a puisne judge of the Ontario Court of Appeal. In 1879, he was appointed to the Supreme Court of Canada and he served until his death in 1902.
    8.50
    2 votes
    82
    Lance Ito

    Lance Ito

    • Cases: O. J. Simpson murder case
    Lance Allan Ito (born August 2, 1950) is an American Los Angeles County Superior Court judge, best known for his presiding decision during the O. J. Simpson murder trial. He currently hears felony criminal cases at the Clara Shortridge Foltz Criminal Justice Center in downtown Los Angeles. Los Angeles County announced on April 17, 2012 that Ito's courtroom, along with 55 others, will be closed due to budget cuts. Ito will serve as a fill-in judge. Ito was born to Jim and Toshi Ito. As children, both had been kept in Japanese American internment camps with their families during World War II. Ito attended John Marshall High School, where he was student body president and received the Scholar Athlete award in 1968. He earned his Bachelors Degree with honors from the University of California, Los Angeles in 1972, and his J.D. degree from the University of California, Berkeley's Boalt Hall in 1975. He then joined the Los Angeles district attorney's office in 1977, working in the hardcore gang unit and the organized crime and terror unit, among others. In 1981, he married Margaret Ann York, the first woman to attain the rank of Deputy Chief in the Los Angeles Police Department and that
    8.50
    2 votes
    83
    Patti B. Saris

    Patti B. Saris

    • Cases: Cook v. Gates
    Patti B. Saris (born July 20, 1951) is a District Judge for the United States District Court for the District of Massachusetts. She joined the court in 1993 after being nominated by President Bill Clinton. She is also Chair of the United States Sentencing Commission. Saris was born in Boston, Massachusetts. She received a Bachelor of Arts from Radcliffe College in 1973 and a Juris Doctor from Harvard Law School in 1976. Saris was a law clerk for the Honorable Robert Braucher, of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court from 1976-77. She was in private practice with the law firm of Foley, Hoag & Eliot in Boston from 1977–79, served as Staff counsel to the United States Senate Committee on the Judiciary from 1979–81, and then returned to private practice with the firm of Berman, Dittmar & Engel, P.C. during 1981 to 1982. Saris then served as Assistant U.S. Attorney of the District of Massachusetts from 1982 to 1986. She was Chief of the Civil Division from 1984 to 1986. From 1986-89 she was a U.S. Magistrate Judge, U.S. District Court for the District of Massachusetts. She was an Associate Justice in the Trial Court of Massachusetts, Superior Court Department from 1989 to 1993. On
    8.50
    2 votes
    84
    Walter C. Winslow

    Walter C. Winslow

    Walter C. Winslow (October 29, 1882 - May 23, 1962) was an American attorney in Oregon. A native of the state, he practiced law in Salem and later served temporarily on the Oregon Supreme Court. In legal practice he worked for brothers John Hugh McNary and Charles L. McNary in his early years as a lawyer. Walter Winslow was born in Polk County, Oregon, to Paris R. and Addie Wilson (née Vandevort) on October 29, 1882. Raised on the family farm in the Brush College area to the northwest of Salem, he received his primary education in the local public schools there and in the preparatory department at Willamette University in Salem. Winslow then attended college at the University of Oregon in Eugene where he graduated in 1906 with a bachelor of arts degree. In 1908, he graduated from Willamette University College of Law with a bachelor of laws degree. Winslow passed the bar in June 1908 in Salem and joined John H. and Charles L. McNary in legal practice in Salem. In October of the following year the Republican became a deputy district attorney in Marion County. In 1947, Oregon Supreme Court justice James T. Brand temporarily left the court to serve as a judge at the Subsequent
    8.50
    2 votes
    85
    Alfred Moore

    Alfred Moore

    Alfred Moore (May 21, 1755 – October 15, 1810) was a distinguished North Carolina judge who became a justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. Moore Square, a park located in the Moore Square Historic District in Raleigh, North Carolina was named in his honor. Moore was buried at the St. Philip's Church near Wilmington. Moore was born in New Hanover County, North Carolina. Moore's father, Maurice, preceded him in the practice of law and served as a colonial judge in North Carolina. Alfred was sent to Boston to complete his education, but he returned to North Carolina and read law as an apprentice to his father before being admitted to the bar at the age of twenty. In 1775 the American Revolutionary War broke out and Alfred served as a captain in the First Regiment, North Carolina Line, of which his uncle, James Moore, was colonel, and took part in the defense of Charleston, S.C. in June 1776. He resigned in 1777, but served in the militia against Cornwallis after the battle of Guilford Court House. The war was costly to the Moore family. British troops captured the Moore plantation and burned the family home, and Alfred’s father, brother, and an uncle were among those who
    7.33
    3 votes
    86
    Erasmus D. Shattuck

    Erasmus D. Shattuck

    Erasmus Darwin Shattuck (December 31, 1824-July 26, 1900) was an American politician and judge in the state of Oregon. He served as the 7th Chief Justice of the Oregon Supreme Court serving from 1866 to 1867. He served two separate terms on the Oregon's high court, was a district attorney, and a member of the Oregon Constitutional Convention in 1857. In Bakersfield, Vermont, on December 31, 1824, Erasmus Shattuck was born to Oliver and Sally Start Shattuck. Erasmus graduated from the University of Vermont in 1848 and then taught in Maryland and Georgia. In 1852 he was admitted to the New York state bar association. Also in 1852 he married Sarah A. Armstrong, and the two would have six children. Then in 1853 he immigrated to what was then the Oregon Territory via the Isthmus of Panama. He arrived on February 15, 1853, and began teaching at Oregon City College and the Clackamas County Female Seminary until 1855. That year he began teaching at Pacific University in Forest Grove, Oregon. From 1855 to 1856 he served as Washington County School Superintendent. In 1856, Shattuck was elected to be a probate judge as he had been practicing law in Portland, Oregon. Then in 1857 he was a
    7.33
    3 votes
    87
    Louis-Edmond Panneton

    Louis-Edmond Panneton

    Louis-Edmond Panneton (July 6, 1848 – August 5, 1935) was a lawyer, judge, educator and political figure in Quebec. He represented Sherbrooke in the Legislative Assembly of Quebec from 1892 to 1900 as a Conservative. He was born in Trois-Rivières, Canada East, the son of André Panneton and Marie Blondin, and was educated at the Séminaire de Trois-Rivières. Panneton was admitted to the Quebec bar in 1870 and set up practice in Sherbrooke. In 1886, he married Corinne, the daughter of Louis-Tréfflé Dorais. He was mayor of Sherbrooke in 1888. In 1899, Panneton was named Queen's Counsel. He was defeated in 1900 when he ran for reelection to the Quebec assembly and returned to his law practice. Panneton also taught law at Bishop's College. In 1912, he was named to the Quebec Superior Court for Montreal district. He was bâtonnier for Saint-François district in 1886, 1889, 1896, 1898, 1905 and 1907 and bâtonnier for Quebec in 1907 and 1908. He was owner and editor of the journal le Peuple. He also served as president for the Saint-Jean-Baptiste Society at Sherbrooke. Panneton died in Montreal at the age of 86 and was buried in the Notre Dame des Neiges Cemetery.
    7.33
    3 votes
    88
    Michel Mathieu

    Michel Mathieu

    Michel Mathieu (December 20, 1838 – July 30, 1916) was a Quebec lawyer, notary, judge and political figure. He was a Conservative member of the Canadian House of Commons who represented Richelieu from 1872 to 1874. He was born in Sorel, Lower Canada in 1838. He articled as a notary, becoming a member of the Sorel Board of Notaries in 1864. In 1865, he was called to the Bar of Quebec and he was appointed sheriff in the Richelieu district in 1866. In 1872, he was elected to the House of Commons; he was defeated in 1874. In 1875, he was elected to the Quebec National Assembly for Richelieu in 1875 and 1878. He also served as mayor of Sorel from 1876 to 1882. In 1881, he resigned his seat in the provincial legislature to serve as judge in the Quebec Superior Court, serving in Joliette and Montreal districts until 1909. In 1880, he was appointed Queen's Counsel. He was professor of law at the Université Laval from 1886 to 1915. In 1892, he was appointed to a royal commission in the province to investigate allegations of corruption in the government of Honoré Mercier; he did not complete this task due to health problems. In 1869, with Adolphe Germain,he founded La Revue légale, a legal
    7.33
    3 votes
    89
    Denny Chin

    Denny Chin

    Denny Chin (Chinese: 陳卓光) is a judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. He was a judge on the United States district court for the Southern District of New York before joining the federal appeals bench. President Clinton nominated Chin to the district court on March 24, 1994, and Chin was confirmed August 9 of that same year. On October 6, 2009, President Barack Obama nominated Chin to the federal appeals court. He was confirmed on April 22, 2010 by the U.S. Senate, filling the vacancy created by Judge Robert D. Sack who assumed senior status. Chin was the first Asian American appointed as a U.S. District Judge outside of the Ninth Circuit. Chin was born in 1954 in Kowloon, Hong Kong and came to the U.S. in 1956. He graduated from Stuyvesant High School in 1971. He received his A.B. magna cum laude, from Princeton University in 1975. In 1978, Chin graduated from Fordham University School of Law, where he was the Managing Editor of the Fordham Law Review. Chin currently teaches first year Legal Writing at Fordham. Following a 1978-1980 clerkship with Judge Henry Werker in the Southern District, Chin worked for the law firm of Davis Polk & Wardwell from
    6.25
    4 votes
    90
    George Okill Stuart, Jr.

    George Okill Stuart, Jr.

    George Okill Stuart (October 12, 1807 – March 5, 1884) was a Quebec lawyer, judge and political figure. He was born in (York, later Toronto), Upper Canada in 1807, the son of George Okill Stuart and was educated at Kingston and Quebec City. He articled in law with his uncle, James Stuart, and was admitted to the bar in 1830. He entered practice with his uncle from 1834 until 1838, when his uncle became chief justice for Lower Canada. Stuart served as solicitor for the city of Quebec from 1841 to 1843. In 1843, he was elected to city council and he served as mayor from 1846 to 1850. In 1851, he was elected to the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Canada for Quebec City as an independent Conservative. He was defeated in 1854 but reelected in an 1857 by-election. Stuart was bâtonnier for the bar of Lower Canada from 1851 to 1853. In 1854, he was named Queen's Counsel. He was an assistant judge in the Superior Court of Lower Canada for a short time in 1855. Stuart served as a director for the Saint Maurice Railway and Navigation Company. He started a law firm with John Murphy around 1861 that operated until 1873. In 1873, he became an assistant to Henry Black, a judge in the Vice
    6.25
    4 votes
    91
    James Wilberforce Longley

    James Wilberforce Longley

    James Wilberforce Longley (4 January 1849 – 16 March 1922) was a Canadian journalist, lawyer, politician, and judge. Born in Paradise, Annapolis County, Nova Scotia, the son of Israel Longley and Frances Manning, Longley received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1871 and a Master of Arts degree in 1877 from Acadia College. In 1871, he moved to Halifax and studied law with Hiram Blanchard. He was called to the Bar in 1875 and practiced law in Halifax from 1875 to 1882. He was also a journalist working for the Acadian Recorder. In 1887, he was appointed managing editor of the Halifax Morning Chronicle. In 1882, he was elected to the Nova Scotia House of Assembly for the electoral district of Annapolis County. From 1884 to 1886, he was a minister without portfolio in the cabinet of William Stevens Fielding. From 1886 to 1905, he was the attorney general. He ran unsuccessfully as the Liberal candidate for the Canadian House of Commons for the electoral district of Annapolis in the 1896 election. In 1898, he was made a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. In 1905, he was appointed to the Supreme Court of Nova Scotia. His uncle Avard Longley was a Member of the House of Assembly and Member
    6.25
    4 votes
    92
    Steve Leben

    Steve Leben

    Steve Leben is a judge on the Kansas Court of Appeals. He has judged on this court since June 2007. Judge Leben was born on June 23, 1956 in Eureka, Kansas. He graduated from the University of Kansas with a B.S. in journalism in 1978. After a brief engagement as press secretary for a Kansas congressman, he returned to the University of Kansas and received his law degree in 1982. Judge Leben practiced law in the Kansas City area before becoming a judge. He practiced with the law firm Stinson, Mag & Fizzell for 6 years and then practiced on his own for five years. After this, he became a District Judge. He has served on various law associations and has written and edited numerous articles. He has also taught law classes at both the University of Kansas and University of Missouri-Kansas City law schools and was the president of the American Judges Association for a time.
    6.25
    4 votes
    93
    Albert Piddington

    Albert Piddington

    Albert Bathurst Piddington (9 September 1862 — 5 June 1945) was the shortest serving Justice of the High Court of Australia, never actually sitting at the bench. Appointed on 6 March 1913, he resigned on 5 April after opponents questioned his independence. Piddington was born in 1862 in Bathurst, New South Wales. He was educated at Sydney Grammar School, and then studied at the University of Sydney. He graduated in 1883 with a Bachelor of Arts, winning the University Medal in Classics. He was appointed a vice-warden at the university's St. Paul's College in 1884, and from 1887 was a lecturer in English at the university. About this time he also started studying law. He was admitted to the New South Wales Bar in 1890. In 1895, Piddington was elected to the New South Wales Legislative Assembly for the electoral district of Tamworth, defeating the former Premier of New South Wales Sir George Dibbs. In 1896, he married Louisa O'Reilly. He was a delegate to the second constitutional convention in 1897-1898, where he campaigned against the proposed constitution, although supporting federation in general. He retired from politics in 1898. In 1910, Piddington was elected to the council of
    7.00
    3 votes
    94
    Duncan Cameron Fraser

    Duncan Cameron Fraser

    Duncan Cameron Fraser (1 October 1845 – 27 September 1910) was a Canadian lawyer, politician, judge, and the ninth Lieutenant Governor of Nova Scotia. He was born in Pictou County, Nova Scotia, the son of Alexander Fraser and Ann Chisholm. He studied at Dalhousie College, went on to article in law, was admitted to the bar in 1873 and set up practice in New Glasgow. He married Bessie Grant Graham in 1878. In the same year, he ran unsuccessfully for a seat in the provincial assembly. Fraser was a member of the province's Legislative Council from 1887 to 1891, also serving as a minister without portfolio in the Executive Council. He was elected to the Canadian House of Commons for the riding of Guysborough in the 1891 federal election. A Liberal, he was re-elected in the 1896 and 1900 elections. From 1904 to 1906, he was a judge of the Supreme Court of Nova Scotia. In 1906, he was appointed lieutenant governor of Nova Scotia and served until his death in 1910. His daughter, Margaret Marjory Fraser, was a nursing sister in World War I. She, then 33 years old, served as the matron of the 14 nurses on the last voyage of the hospital ship HMHS Llandovery Castle when it was torpedoed and
    7.00
    3 votes
    95
    John Barnes, 1st Baron Gorell

    John Barnes, 1st Baron Gorell

    John Gorell Barnes, 1st Baron Gorell PC QC (16 May 1848-22 April 1913), was a British lawyer and judge. Gorell was the eldest son of Henry Barnes, a shipowner of Liverpool, and was educated at Peterhouse, Cambridge. He began work as a solicitor, but was called to the Bar in 1876 and became a Queen's Counsel in 1888. Gorell served as a Judge of the Probate, Divorce and Admiralty Division of the High Court of Justice from 1892 to 1905 and as its President from 1905 to 1909. He was admitted to the Privy Council in 1905 and in 1909 he was raised to the peerage as Baron Gorell, of Brampton in the County of Derby. Lord Gorell married Mary, daughter of Thomas Mitchell, in 1881. He died in April 1913, aged 64, and was succeeded in the barony by his eldest son Henry Gorell Barnes.
    7.00
    3 votes
    96
    John Michael Manos

    John Michael Manos

    John Michael Manos (December 8, 1922 – July 6, 2006) was a United States federal judge for 30 years. Manos was born to Maria and Michael E. Manos on December 8, 1922, in Cleveland, Ohio. He grew up in the Tremont neighborhood. Like many Depression-era Cleveland kids, he worked odd jobs at the West Side Market. He attended Cleveland Public Schools and graduated from Lincoln High School. He went on to Case Institute of Technology, where he was quarterback and captain of the football team. He graduated from Case in 1944 with a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Metallurgy. He was in the United States Navy from 1943 to 1945. Once he returned, he attended Cleveland Law School, which would be renamed Cleveland-Marshall College of Law. During this time, Manos worked as assistant plant manager at the Lake City Malleable Iron Company. He was a member of Delta Theta Phi and Phi Alpha Delta Law Fraternities. He received a Juris Doctor (J.D.) in 1950. He was in private practice in Cleveland, Ohio from 1950 to 1963. He was a Law director, City of Bay Village, Ohio from 1954 to 1956. He was an Industries representative, Cleveland Regional Board of Review, Ohio from 1956 to 1959. Judge, Cuyahoga
    7.00
    3 votes
    97
    Robert P. Young, Jr.

    Robert P. Young, Jr.

    Robert P. Young, Jr. (born June 13, 1951) is the Chief Justice of the Michigan Supreme Court. Young was first appointed to the Michigan Supreme Court in 1999, elected in 2000 and 2002, and again won reelection in 2010 for a term ending in 2019. Currently, he is the highest black elected official serving the State of Michigan, and the only black justice on the Michigan Supreme Court. Young is readily distinguishable by his bow tie. Young was born in Des Moines, Iowa, and grew up in Detroit, Michigan. Young has recounted how he was raised in a city that was operating under de-facto segregation at the time; when he was a child, his family was one of the first to integrate northwest Detroit. He attended Detroit public elementary schools and graduated from Detroit Country Day School in 1970, with honors from Harvard College in 1974, and from Harvard Law School in 1977. In 1978, Young joined the law firm of Dickinson Wright, where he became a partner in 1982. In 1992, he joined AAA Michigan where he served as general counsel. In 1995, Young was appointed to the Michigan Court of Appeals, and later elevated to the Michigan Supreme Court by Governor John Engler in 1999 to replace resigning
    7.00
    3 votes
    98
    William Ball Gilbert

    William Ball Gilbert

    William Ball Gilbert (July 4, 1847 – April 27, 1931) was an American attorney and jurist from Oregon. He served as a judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in from 1892 until 1931. A native of Virginia, previously he was elected to the Oregon Legislative Assembly. William Gilbert was born in Lewinsville, Virginia on July 4, 1847 to Sarah Catherine Ball and John Gilbert. William was named after Colonel William Ball, the grandfather of George Washington's mother Mary Ball; he was related to the colonel from his mother's side of the family. He went to local private schools in Lewinsville, located in Fairfax County, and to schools in neighboring Falls Church. The Gilbert family had pro-Union sympathies, and moved to Ohio before the Civil War. Gilbert attended high school in Zanesville, Ohio before moving to Williamstown, Massachusetts to attend Williams College. He graduated from Williams in 1868 with a Bachelor of Arts degree. After graduation he went to the Amazon Basin on a scientific expedition followed by a geologic expedition to Ohio for two years. After giving up on a scientific career, he earned a Bachelor of Laws in 1872 from the University of
    7.00
    3 votes
    99
    Claudio Teehankee, Sr.

    Claudio Teehankee, Sr.

    Claudio Teehankee (April 18, 1918 - November 27, 1989) was the 16th Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the Philippines. He was also the most senior associate justice and chairman of the First Division of the Supreme Court of the Philippines. Teehankee was born on April 18, 1918 in Manila, Philippines. He was married to Pilar D. Javier with whom he has nine children. He received his A.B. summa cum laude in 1938 and LL.B. summa cum laude in 1940 from the Ateneo de Manila. He also garnered first place in the 1940 bar examinations with an average of 94.35 percent. He became Secretary of Justice under the Marcos administration in 1967 before being appointed as associate justice in 1968. After his retirement, he was appointed as the Philippine Ambassador to the United Nations, where he died of cancer in Manhattan, New York on November 27, 1989. He is interred at the Libingan ng mga Bayani. He was known as the court's "activist" justice because of his dissenting opinions in many vital cases affecting the Marcos administration. He was the lone dissenter in many cases, such the High Tribunal's decision upholding the constitutionality of the Judiciary Reorganization Act of 1980. He also
    8.00
    2 votes
    100
    8.00
    2 votes
    101
    Edward J. Davila

    Edward J. Davila

    Edward John Davila (born 1952) is a former judge on the Superior Court of California for Santa Clara County and is currently a judge on the United States District Court for the Northern District of California. On February 14, 2011 the Senate confirmed his nomination by a vote of 93 ayes to 0 nays and he received his commission on March 3, 2011. Davila was born in Palo Alto, California. He received a B.A. degree from San Diego State University in 1976. He then attended the University of California, Hastings College of the Law and earned his J.D. in 1979. On August 8, 2001, California Governor Gray Davis appointed Davila to serve as a judge on the Superior Court of California for Santa Clara County. Davila replaced Judge Donald Clark. While a Superior Court judge, Davila presided over the high-profile case of a Las Vegas couple, Anna Ayala and Jaime Placencia, who planted a severed human finger in a bowl of Wendy's chili. On January 18, 2006, Davila sentenced Ayala to 9 years in prison and Placencia to 12 years and 4 months in prison. During the 111th Congress, Senator Barbara Boxer recommended Davila to fill the United States District Court for the Northern District of California
    8.00
    2 votes
    102
    Leonard Percy de Wolfe Tilley

    Leonard Percy de Wolfe Tilley

    Leonard Percy de Wolfe Tilley (May 21, 1870 – December 28, 1947) was a New Brunswick lawyer, politician and the 21st Premier. Tilley was born in Ottawa, the son of Samuel Leonard Tilley, one of the Fathers of Confederation, and grew up there and in Fredericton. He was educated at the University of New Brunswick and then studied law at Dalhousie Law School. Tilley articled in law with Sir Frederick Barker, was called to the bar in 1893 and set up practice in Saint John. He also served as a captain in the militia and was Chief Recruiting Officer for the province in 1914. Tilley was elected to the provincial legislature in 1916 as a Conservative MLA and became a cabinet minister in 1925 under Premier John B. M. Baxter. In 1931 Baxter's successor, Charles D. Richards made Tilley Minister of Lands and Mines, a position he held until succeeding Richards in 1933 as Premier. The Conservative government, despite two changes in premiers, was unable to deal with the Great Depression or maintain public confidence and Tilley's government was defeated in the 1935 election. After leaving politics, Tilley became a county court judge for King and Albert Counties serving from 1935 to 1945. He also
    8.00
    2 votes
    103
    Matthew Deady

    Matthew Deady

    Matthew Paul Deady (May 12, 1824 – March 24, 1893) was a politician and jurist in the Oregon Territory and the state of Oregon of the United States. He served on the Oregon Supreme Court from 1853 to 1859, at which time he was appointed to the newly created federal court of the state. He remained on this federal trial level court, the United States District Court for the District of Oregon in Portland, Oregon, as the sole judge until his death in 1893. While on the court he presided over the trial that led to the United States Supreme Court decision of Pennoyer v. Neff concerning personal jurisdiction. Prior to joining the court, Deady served in the legislature of the Oregon Territory, including time served as the President of the Council, and was elected as President of the Oregon Constitutional Convention in 1857. A native of the state of Maryland, his first profession was as a blacksmith. He would also spend time as a teacher in both Ohio and Oregon. Deady read law in Ohio and practiced law for a time in that state before immigrating to the Oregon Territory via the Oregon Trail. In Oregon, he helped codify the laws of the state and assisted in the foundation of the Multnomah
    8.00
    2 votes
    104
    Samuel Blatchford

    Samuel Blatchford

    Samuel Blatchford (March 9, 1820 – July 7, 1893) was an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from April 3, 1882 until his death. Blatchford was born in Auburn, New York, where his father was a well known attorney and friend of Daniel Webster. He was educated at Columbia College, graduating when he was 17 years old. In 1840, he served as the private secretary to Governor William H. Seward. Blatchford read law while working for the governor and then entered into the private practice of law with his father and uncle. In 1854, he moved to New York City and started a law firm, Blatchford, Seward & Griswold, now known as Cravath, Swaine & Moore. He became well known for preparing summaries of United States circuit court cases, serving for a time as reporter of decisions for the Circuit Court in New York, and developed a lucrative practice in admiralty law. On what he thought was inside information, Blatchford sold out his shares on the eve of Fort Sumter and the onset of the Civil War, preserving his personal fortune. On May 3, 1867, Blatchford received a recess appointment from President Andrew Johnson to a seat on the United States District Court for the Southern
    8.00
    2 votes
    105
    Warren E. Burger

    Warren E. Burger

    • Cases: Diamond v. Chakrabarty
    Warren Earl Burger (September 17, 1907 – June 25, 1995) was the 15th Chief Justice of the United States from 1969 to 1986. Although Burger had conservative leanings and was considered a strict constructionist, the U.S. Supreme Court delivered a variety of transformative decisions on abortion, capital punishment, religious establishment, and school desegregation during his tenure. Burger was born in Saint Paul, Minnesota, one of seven children. His parents, Katharine (née Schnittger) and Charles Joseph Burger, a traveling salesman and railroad cargo inspector, were of Swiss German descent. His grandfather, Joseph Burger, had emigrated from Switzerland and joined the Union Army when he was 14. Joseph Burger fought and was wounded in the Civil War, and was awarded the Medal of Honor. Burger grew up on the family farm near the edge of Saint Paul. He attended John A. Johnson High School, where he was president of the student council. He competed in hockey, football, track, and swimming. While in high school, he wrote articles on high school sports for local newspapers. He graduated in 1925. That same year, Burger also worked with the crew building the Robert Street Bridge, a crossing of
    8.00
    2 votes
    106
    William W. Page

    William W. Page

    William Wilmer Page (December 4, 1836 – April 12, 1897) was an American attorney and judge in the state of Oregon. A native of Virginia, he served as the 13th Associate Justice of the Oregon Supreme Court for four months in 1862 to finish the term of Aaron E. Waite. William Page was born in December 4, 1836 in Virginia. The son of the Reverend Charles Page, he graduated from Miami University’s law school in the state of Ohio. He then practiced law in Chicago, Illinois in 1855. In 1857, Page traveled to Oregon Territory over the Oregon Trail. He arrived in Oregon City and was soon admitted to the state bar by Oregon Supreme Court justice Matthew Deady. Then in 1862 justice Waite resigned from the State Supreme Court to run for Congress. William Page was then appointed to fill Wait’s remaining term on the bench by Oregon Governor John Whiteaker in May. The term ended in September 1862 and Page left the court. After his time on the state’s highest court, Page moved to Portland, Oregon where he continued to practice law until his death on April 12, 1897. The city of Albina, Oregon was laid out with a plat for the new town filed April 1873 by Page, Edwin Russell and George Williams. The
    8.00
    2 votes
    107
    William Warren

    William Warren

    William Robertson Warren (October 9, 1879 – December 31, 1927) was a Newfoundland lawyer, politician and judge who served as the dominion's Prime Minister from July 1923 to April 1924. His parents were William Matthew Henry Warren, a surveyor, and Jessie Sophia Warren. He had at least one sibling, a sister, Alice Mary Warren (died 1930), who was married to Robert Brown Job, President of Job Brothers & Co., Limited. He received his education at Bishop Feild College, St. John's, Newfoundland and Framlingham College, in England. After studying law, Warren was admitted as a solicitor in 1901 Warren was first elected to the Newfoundland House of Assembly in 1903 as a Liberal and served as Speaker of the House from 1909-1913. In 1919 he became minister of justice in the Cabinet of Sir Richard Squires. The Squires government became embroiled in a scandal over allegations of corruption and misspending of government funds and Squires resigned in protest along with three other ministers in 1923. The next year Squires was forced to resign and Warren was chosen the party's new leader and Prime Minister. His government launced a formal inquiry into the corruption charges which resulted in the
    8.00
    2 votes
    108
    Adjutor Rivard

    Adjutor Rivard

    Adjutor Rivard (22 January 1868 - 17 July 1945) was a lawyer, writer, judge and linguist from Quebec, Canada. He studied at the Petit séminaire de Québec and Université Laval. He is known to have co-founded the Société du parler français au Canada (SPFC) and is recognized as one of the principal authors of the Glossaire du parler français au Canada published by the SPFC in 1930. With Mgr Louis-Nazaire Bégin, he also co-founded the L'Action catholique review.
    9.00
    1 votes
    109
    Aloyisus Leon Higginbotham, Jr.

    Aloyisus Leon Higginbotham, Jr.

    • Cases: Apple Computer, Inc. v. Franklin Computer Corp.
    Aloyisus Leon Higginbotham, Jr. (February 25, 1928 – December 14, 1998) was a prominent African-American civil rights advocate, author, and federal appeals court judge. Higginbotham was the seventh African-American Article III judge appointed in the United States, and the first African-American judge on the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. He served as Chief Judge of the Third Circuit Court of Appeals from 1990 to 1991. He used the name "Leon" informally. Higginbotham was born on February 25, 1928, in Ewing, a suburb of Trenton, New Jersey. His mother, Emma Lee Higginbotham, was a maid, and his father, Aloyisus Leon Higginbotham, Sr., was a factory worker. Higginbotham was raised in a largely African-American neighborhood, and attended a segregated grammar school. Higginbotham attended Lincoln School, a segregated high school in Trenton. Prior to Higginbotham, no black student had been put on the academic track (which was a significant step towards attending college), because Latin, a requirement for the program, was not taught at the black elementary schools. Higginbotham's mother convinced the principal at the junior high school to enroll him
    9.00
    1 votes
    110
    Harold Barefoot Sanders Jr.

    Harold Barefoot Sanders Jr.

    Harold Barefoot Sanders, Jr. (February 5, 1925 – September 21, 2008) was a longtime United States District Judge and counsel to President Lyndon B. Johnson. He was best known for overseeing the lawsuit to desegregate the Dallas Independent School District. Judge Sanders was married to the former Jan Scurlock. He and his wife had four children and nine grandchildren. His oldest daughter, Janet, is a Superior Court Judge in Massachusetts. Sanders was born in Dallas to H.B. Sanders, I, and the former May Elizabeth Forrester. He graduated from North Dallas High School in 1942. He served in the United States Navy during World War II between 1943 and 1946. While attending the University of Texas, Sanders was elected student body president in 1947. He was affiliated with Phi Delta Theta, Blue Key, Phi Delta Phi, Phi Delta Kappa and the Texas Cowboys. He was Methodist. Sanders received an A.B. degree from the University of Texas in 1949, and a J.D. in 1950 from the University of Texas School of Law. He was in private practice with the Dallas law firm of Clark, West, Keller, Sanders and Butler from 1950 through 1961 and from 1969 until 1979. A Democrat, Sanders served in the Texas House of
    9.00
    1 votes
    111
    Rosanna M. Peterson

    Rosanna M. Peterson

    Rosanna Malouf Peterson (born April 12, 1951) is a United States district judge on the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Washington and a former professor at Gonzaga University School of Law. Born in Salt Lake City, Peterson attended the University of Utah from 1969 until 1970 and again from 1971 until 1972. She then earned a bachelor's degree cum laude from the University of North Dakota in 1977 and a master's degree in 1983 from the school. In 1991, she earned a law degree from the University of North Dakota School of Law. Peterson worked from 1975 until 1978 as an instructor with the Grand Forks, North Dakota Park District and from 1979 until 1983 as a graduate teaching assistant at the University of North Dakota. From 1984 until 1988, Peterson was a lecturer at the University of North Dakota's Department of English. During law school in 1989, she served as a judicial extern for North Dakota Judge Bruce Bohlman, and then in 1990 she served as a legal extern for Sen. Kent Conrad. From 1991 until 1993, Peterson served as a staff attorney for United States District Court for the Eastern District of Washington Judge Frederick L. Van Sickle. Peterson then
    9.00
    1 votes
    112
    Thomas-Jean-Jacques Loranger

    Thomas-Jean-Jacques Loranger

    Thomas-Jean-Jacques Loranger (February 2, 1823 – August 18, 1885) was a Quebec judge and political figure. He was born in Yamachiche in Lower Canada in 1823. He studied at the Séminaire de Nicolet, then articled in law with Antoine Polette and was called to the bar in 1844. Loranger first practiced at Trois-Rivières, later joined the office of Lewis Thomas Drummond in Montreal and, in 1858, opened an office with his brothers Louis-Onésime and Jean-Marie. He was named Queen's Counsel in 1854. Loranger was elected to the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Canada for Laprairie in 1854; he was reelected in 1857. He served on the Executive Council as secretary for Canada East. He opposed the idea of a double majority, where legislation must be approved by a majority of the representatives from both provinces, but believed that legislation affecting one province should be approved by a majority in that province. He supported Montreal as a capital and opposed the choice of Ottawa; this led to the resignation of the government of John A. Macdonald and George-Étienne Cartier in 1858. Loranger continued as a member in the legislature until he was named judge in the Quebec Superior Court
    9.00
    1 votes
    113
    Charles Beautron Major

    Charles Beautron Major

    Charles Beautron Major (March 18, 1851 – May 15, 1924) was a lawyer, judge and political figure in Quebec. He represented Ottawa electoral district in the Legislative Assembly of Quebec from 1897 to 1904 and Labelle in the Canadian House of Commons from 1907 to 1911 as a Liberal. He was born in Sainte-Scholastique, Canada East, the son of Joseph Beautron dit Major and Elmire Biroleau. His father was a leader in the Lower Canada Rebellion. In 1876, Major married Cymodocie Trudel,. He was admitted to the Quebec bar in 1877 and set up practice in Montreal with Raymond Préfontaine. He later moved to Papineauville and then to Hull, where he practised with Hyacinthe-Adélard Fortier, who became his son-in-law in 1901. Major was a promoter and later director of the Northern Colonization Railway. He served as mayor of Papineauville and was warden for Ottawa County in 1891 and 1892. He was first elected to the House of Commons in an 1917 by-election held after Henri Bourassa resigned his seat. Major was defeated when he ran for reelection to the House of Commons in 1911. In 1913, he was named judge for Montcalm, Pontiac, Ottawa and Terrebonne districts. Major died in Papineauville at the age
    6.67
    3 votes
    114
    Chartres Brew

    Chartres Brew

    Chartres Brew (31 December 1815 – 31 May 1870) was a Gold commissioner, Chief Constable and judge in the Colony of British Columbia, later a province of Canada. Born in Corofin, Ireland, Brew served in the Royal Irish Constabulary where he ascended to the position of inspector. In 1858 he was recommended for the office of Chief Inspector of Police for the new Colony of British Columbia to maintain law and order in the goldfields. When he arrived in the Interior, however, he was appointed Chief Gold Commissioner as a constabulary was not established until after the Chilcotin War. After the attack on the road crew which launched that war, Governor Seymour dispatched Brew to lead an expedition into the Chilcotin District from the head of Bute Inlet, which met up at Puntzi Lake with another expedition from the Cariboo led by William George Cox to lead another from the Cariboo goldfields towns. The result of the expeditions was more a denouement than a show of force, with the two expeditionary forces camped out without any visible adversary, while the hunt for the Chilcotin warriors went on in the deep bush, resulting in the death by ambush of Donald MacLean, former chief trader at Fort
    6.67
    3 votes
    115
    John Green

    John Green

    John Green (May 20, 1807 – August 31, 1887) was an Indiana lawyer, judge and politician. A staunch Republican, he served as a member of the Indiana State Senate (1857–59, 1869–71), as a common pleas court judge (1860–64), and as an alternate delegate to the Republican National Convention (1868). John Green was born to James and Catherine Green in Yancey County, North Carolina. Both of his grandfathers were in the Revolutionary War. Green's parents moved to the Indiana Territory in 1810 and settled in Jefferson County. During the War of 1812 his father was enrolled as a ranger, or home-guard. In 1828 he entered Hanover College, considering the ministry as a vocation. He changed his mind and in 1832 began his farming career until 1839, in which year he began to study law. In 1844 he was licensed to practice law. He was admitted to practice in the Federal and Supreme Courts. In 1856 he was elected to the Indiana State Senate and served four years. While a member of the Upper House he was chairman of the Swamp Land Committee. After his term he was elected Judge of the Common Pleas Court for four years. He was re-elected in 1868 to the State Senate and was named as chairman of the
    5.75
    4 votes
    116
    Arthur Lewis Sifton

    Arthur Lewis Sifton

    Arthur Lewis Watkins Sifton, PC, KC (October 26, 1858 – January 21, 1921) was a Canadian politician who served as the second Premier of Alberta from 1910 until 1917 and as a minister in the Government of Canada thereafter. Born in Ontario, he grew up there and in Winnipeg, where he became a lawyer. He subsequently practiced law with his brother Clifford Sifton in Brandon, Manitoba, where he was also active in municipal politics. He moved west to Prince Albert in 1885 and to Calgary in 1889. There he was elected to the 4th and 5th North-West Legislative Assemblies; he later served as a minister in the government of Premier Frederick W. A. G. Haultain. In 1903, the federal government, at the instigation of his brother who was now one of its ministers, made Arthur Sifton the Chief Justice of the Northwest Territories. When Alberta was created out of a portion of the Northwest Territories in 1905, Sifton became its first chief justice. In 1910, the government of Alberta Premier Alexander Cameron Rutherford was embroiled in the Alberta and Great Waterways Railway scandal. The Liberal Lieutenant-Governor of Alberta, George Bulyea, determined that for the sake of the Liberal Party of
    7.50
    2 votes
    117
    Barbara M. Lynn

    Barbara M. Lynn

    Barbara M. Lynn (born 1952), also known as Barbara M.G. Lynn, is a United States District Judge for the Northern District of Texas, with chambers in Dallas, Texas. Born in Binghamton, New York, Lynn received a B.A. from University of Virginia in 1973. She received a J.D. from Southern Methodist University Dedman School of Law in 1976. Judge Lynn was in private practice from 1976 to 1999 at the law firm Carrington Coleman in Dallas, Texas. Lynn was the firm's first female associate (1976 - 1982) and then became the firm's first female partner (1983 - 1999) prior to joining the bench. On March 25, 1999, Lynn was nominated by President Bill Clinton to a seat on the United States District Court for the Northern District of Texas vacated by Harry Barefoot Sanders, Jr. She was confirmed by the United States Senate on November 17, 1999 and received her commission on November 22, 1999. Dallas Mayor corruption Judge Lynn was the presiding judge in the case of former Dallas Mayor Pro-Tempore Don Hill. Hill, and his wife Sheila Farrington Hill were sentenced on February 26, 2010 after being convicted on bribery and money laundering charges. Don Hill was sentenced to eighteen years in prison
    7.50
    2 votes
    118
    David Souter

    David Souter

    • Cases: Dolan v. United States Postal Service
    David Hackett Souter ( /ˈsuːtər/; born September 17, 1939) is a former Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. He served from 1990 until his retirement on June 29, 2009. Appointed by President George H. W. Bush to fill the seat vacated by William J. Brennan, Jr., Souter was the only Justice during his time on the Court with extensive prior court experience outside of a federal appeals court, having served as a prosecutor, a state's attorney general, and as a judge on state trial and appellate courts. Souter sat on both the Rehnquist and Roberts courts, and came to vote reliably with the court's liberal members. Following Souter's retirement announcement in 2009, President Barack Obama nominated Sonia Sotomayor as his successor. Souter was born in Melrose, Massachusetts, on September 17, 1939, the only child of Joseph Alexander Souter (1904–1976) and Helen Adams (Hackett) Souter (1907–1995). At age 11, he moved with his family to their farm in Weare, New Hampshire. Souter attended Concord High School in New Hampshire and went on to Harvard College, concentrating in philosophy and writing a senior thesis on the legal positivism of Supreme Court Justice Oliver
    7.50
    2 votes
    119
    Edward Terry Sanford

    Edward Terry Sanford

    Edward Terry Sanford (July 23, 1865 – March 8, 1930) was an American jurist who served as an Associate Justice on the United States Supreme Court from 1923 until his death in 1930. Prior to his nomination to the high court, Sanford served as an Assistant Attorney General under President Theodore Roosevelt from 1905 to 1907, and as a federal district court judge from 1908 to 1923. Sanford is typically viewed as a conservative justice, favoring strict adherence to antitrust laws, and often voted with his mentor, Chief Justice William Howard Taft. A graduate of Harvard Law School, Sanford practiced law in his hometown of Knoxville, Tennessee, during the 1890s and early 1900s (decade). As Assistant Attorney General, he rose to national prominence as lead prosecutor during the high-profile trial of Joseph Shipp in 1907, which to date is the only criminal trial conducted by the Supreme Court. Sanford's most lasting impact on American law is arguably his majority opinion in the landmark case, Gitlow v. New York (1925). This case, which introduced the incorporation doctrine, helped pave the way for many of the Warren Court's decisions expanding civil rights and civil liberties in the 1950s
    7.50
    2 votes
    120
    George M. Brown

    George M. Brown

    George M. Brown (1864–1934) was an American attorney and judge in the state of Oregon. He was the 50th Associate Justice of the Oregon Supreme Court and the 5th attorney general of the state from 1915 to 1920. An Oregon born and educated attorney, he previously worked as a district attorney in Southern Oregon. George Brown was born on May 5, 1864 in Southern Oregon’s Douglas County. His parents Thomas Brown and Sarah Fleet Brown immigrated to Oregon Country in 1847. In Oregon, George was educated in the local schools before attending and graduating from Umpqua Academy in 1883. He then went onto Willamette University in Salem, Oregon, where he graduated in 1885. After reading law in Salem, Brown passed the bar in 1891. From 1894 until 1896 George Brown was the district attorney for Oregon’s 2nd district while headquartered in Roseburg. He was then reelected and continued in that position until 1908. In 1914, Brown was elected as Oregon's Attorney General as a Republican with his term beginning on January 4, 1915. In this role he represented the state along with John O. Bailey in the United States Supreme Court case of Bunting v. Oregon that upheld an Oregon law in a landmark
    7.50
    2 votes
    121
    John Paul Stevens

    John Paul Stevens

    • Cases: Dolan v. United States Postal Service
    John Paul Stevens (born April 20, 1920) served as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from December 19, 1975 until his retirement on June 29, 2010. At the time of his retirement, he was the oldest member of the Court and the third longest-serving justice in the history of the Supreme Court. He was nominated by President Gerald Ford to replace the Court's longest-serving justice, William O. Douglas. Stevens is widely considered to have been on the liberal side of the Court. Stevens served with three Chief Justices (Warren E. Burger, William Rehnquist, and John G. Roberts). Stevens was born on April 20, 1920, in Hyde Park, Chicago, Illinois, to a wealthy family. His paternal grandfather had formed an insurance company and held real estate in Chicago, while his great-uncle owned the Chas A. Stevens department store. His father, Ernest James Stevens, was a lawyer who later became a hotelier, owning two hotels, the La Salle and the Stevens Hotel. He lost ownership of the hotels during the Great Depression and was convicted of embezzlement (the conviction was later overturned). (The Stevens Hotel was subsequently bought by Hilton Hotels and is today the Chicago
    7.50
    2 votes
    122
    Joseph Curran Morrison

    Joseph Curran Morrison

    Joseph Curran Morrison (August 20, 1816 – December 6, 1885) was a lawyer, judge and political figure in Canada West. He was born in Ireland in 1816 and came to Upper Canada with his family in 1830. He studied at Upper Canada College, studied law, articled with Simon Ebenezer Washburn and was called to the bar in 1839. In 1848, he was elected to the Legislative Assembly for the West riding of York. He was elected to represent Niagara in an 1852 by-election after Francis Hincks was elected in both Niagara and Oxford; Morrison was reelected in 1854. He served on the Executive Council as solicitor general from 1853 to 1854. In 1856, he was named receiver general, serving until 1858. He served as director and later president for the Ontario, Simcoe and Huron railway. He prosecuted the case against Grace Marks and James McDermott in 1853 and, in 1860, prosecuted James Brown for the murder of John Sheridan Hogan. He was named a puisne judge in the Court of Common Pleas in 1862 and named to the Court of Queen's Bench the following year. He heard the case against 11 persons charged in the 1866 Fenian raids. In 1877, he became a member of the Court of Appeal for Ontario serving until 1885.
    7.50
    2 votes
    123
    Joseph Jamieson

    Joseph Jamieson

    Joseph Jamieson (March 15, 1839 – March 12, 1922) was a lawyer and political figure in Ontario, Canada. He represented Lanark North in the Canadian House of Commons from 1882 to 1891 as a Conservative member. He was born in Sherbrooke, Lanark County, Upper Canada, the son of William Jamieson, an immigrant from Ireland, and was educated in Perth. In 1865, he married Elizabeth Carss. Jamieson was called to the Ontario bar in 1869. He served as reeve for Almonte, warden for Lanark County and chairman of the board of license commissioners for North Lanark. Jamieson ran unsuccessfully for a seat in the House of Commons in the 1878 federal election and an 1880 by-election. He resigned his seat in December 1891 after being named junior county judge for Wellington County.
    7.50
    2 votes
    124
    Lawrence W. Pierce

    Lawrence W. Pierce

    • Cases: Rogers v. Koons
    Judge Lawrence Pierce (born December 31, 1924) is an American lawyer who served for 24 years as a federal judge. A native of Philadelphia, Pierce attended St. Joseph's University and Fordham Law School. As a lawyer, Pierce worked as a public defender in New York City and then served as an assistant district attorney in Brooklyn. From 1961 to 1963, he was a deputy commissioner of the New York City Police Department. From 1963 to 1966, Pierce was director of the New York City Division for Youth, and from 1966 to 1970, he was director of the New York State Narcotic Control Commission. In 1971, President Richard Nixon named Pierce to serve as a judge of the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York. After Pierce served as a district judge for ten years, in 1981, President Ronald Reagan promoted him to the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. Pierce became the third African-American to serve on the Second Circuit, following Thurgood Marshall and Amalya L. Kearse. Pierce assumed senior status on the Second Circuit in 1990. In 1995, Pierce retired from the federal judiciary in order to travel abroad and become active in a project to bring law and
    7.50
    2 votes
    125
    Mirza Hameedullah Beg

    Mirza Hameedullah Beg

    Mirza Hameedullah Beg (M. H. Beg) (22 February 1913 – 1985) was the 15th Chief Justice of India, serving from January 1977 to February 1978. Born into a Muslim family, his father Mirza Samiullah Beg was the Chief Justice of Hyderabad State, making him an important figure in Hyderabad state affairs. As was the case with many children of aristocracy in Hyderabad at the time, M.H. Beg attended St. George's Grammar School, where he obtained a gold medal for securing first position in Senior Cambridge H.S.L.C. Examination. As India was still under heavy British influence, it was common for wealthy Indians to receive higher education in England, particularly when studying law. Thus, M.H. Beg joined the renowned Trinity College and Cambridge University in 1931, and obtained Honours in Archaeological and Anthropological and Historical Triposes. He studied law, economics and politics at the London School of Economics. He joined the bar through the Honourable Society of Lincoln's Inn. He was called to the Bar in England in 1941. After graduation, M.H. Beg returned to India to begin practicing as an Advocate for the Allahabad High Court, at Allahabad and Meerut. From here, M.H. Beg began
    7.50
    2 votes
    126
    Peter Vivian Daniel

    Peter Vivian Daniel

    Peter Vivian Daniel (April 24, 1784 – May 31, 1860) was an American jurist who served as an Associate Justice on the Supreme Court of the United States. Daniel was born in Stafford County, Virginia, in 1784 to a family of old colonial heritage. He was educated at home, and attended the College of New Jersey for one year before returning to Virginia. He read law under former Attorney General of the United States Edmund Randolph in Richmond, and was admitted to the bar in 1808. Daniel married Randolph's daughter. In 1809, Daniel was elected to the Virginia House of Delegates, and in 1812 became a member of the advisory Virginia Privy Council. He remained on the Council and in 1818 was elected Lieutenant Governor. He would retain both of these positions until 1836, when President Andrew Jackson appointed him to the federal judiciary. On April 6, 1836, Daniel was nominated by President Jackson to a seat on the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia vacated by the elevation of Philip Pendleton Barbour to the Supreme Court. Daniel was confirmed by the United States Senate on April 19, 1836, and received his commission the same day. On February 26, 1841, Daniel
    7.50
    2 votes
    127
    Samuel Johnathan Lane

    Samuel Johnathan Lane

    Samuel Johnathan Lane (1830 – January 28, 1891) was an English-born barrister and political figure in Ontario, Canada. He represented Grey North in the Canadian House of Commons from 1878 to 1882 as a Liberal-Conservative member. Lane served as a member of the council for Grey County in 1874 and from 1865 to 1872, serving as county warden from 1868 to 1870 and in 1872. He also served as reeve and mayor for Owen Sound. Lane was an unsuccessful candidate in Grey North in the 1874 federal election, losing to George Snider. He defeated Snider in the next general election held in 1878. Lane was defeated by Benjamin Allen when he ran for reelection in 1882. He was named junior judge for the county in 1885 and senior judge in 1889.
    7.50
    2 votes
    128
    Sonia Sotomayor

    Sonia Sotomayor

    • Cases: Pappas v. Giuliani
    Sonia Maria Sotomayor (English pronunciation: /ˈsoʊnjə ˌsoʊtoʊmaɪˈjɔr/, Spanish: [ˈsonja sotomaˈʝor]; born June 25, 1954) is an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, serving since August 2009. Sotomayor is the Court's 111th justice, its first Hispanic justice, and its third female justice. Sotomayor was born in The Bronx, New York City and is of Puerto Rican descent. Her father died when she was nine, and she was subsequently raised by her mother. Sotomayor graduated summa cum laude from Princeton University in 1976 and received her J.D. from Yale Law School in 1979, where she was an editor at the Yale Law Journal. She was an advocate for the hiring of Latino faculty at both schools. She worked as an assistant district attorney in New York for five years before entering private practice in 1984. She played an active role on the boards of directors for the Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund, the State of New York Mortgage Agency, and the New York City Campaign Finance Board. Sotomayor was nominated to the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York by President George H. W. Bush in 1991, and her nomination was confirmed in 1992. In
    7.50
    2 votes
    129
    Stephen Breyer

    Stephen Breyer

    • Cases: Dolan v. United States Postal Service
    Stephen Gerald Breyer ( /ˈbraɪər/; born August 15, 1938) is an Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. Appointed by President Bill Clinton in 1994, and known for his pragmatic approach to constitutional law, Breyer is generally associated with the more liberal side of the Court. Following a clerkship with Supreme Court Associate Justice Arthur Goldberg in 1964, Breyer became well known as a law professor and lecturer at Harvard Law School, starting in 1967. There he specialized in administrative law, writing a number of influential textbooks that remain in use today. He held other prominent positions before being nominated for the Supreme Court, including special assistant to the United States Assistant Attorney General for Antitrust and assistant special prosecutor on the Watergate Special Prosecution Force in 1973. In his 2005 book Active Liberty, Breyer made his first attempt to systematically lay out his views on legal theory, arguing that the judiciary should seek to resolve issues in a manner that encourages popular participation in governmental decisions. Breyer was born in San Francisco, the son of Anne A. (née Roberts) and Irving Gerald Breyer, and raised in a
    7.50
    2 votes
    130
    Charles James Townshend

    Charles James Townshend

    Sir Charles James Townshend (22 March 1844 – 16 June 1924) was renowned Canadian judge and politician. He was born in Amherst, Nova Scotia, son of the Rev. Canon Townshend, rector of Amherst, and Elizabeth, his wife, daughter of the late honourable Alexander Stewart, C.B., formerly master of the Rolls of the Province of Nova Scotia and judge of the Vice-Admiralty Court. Canon Townshend was the son of the late Honourable William Townshend of Wrexham, England. The family were descended from the Townshends of Norfolk, England. Charles James Townshend was educated at the Collegiate school, Windsor, Nova Scotia, and subsequently at the University of King's College, Windsor, where he graduated with high honours in 1862. His chief studies were classics, mathematics, and French and German. He took the degree of B.A in 1863, and B.C.L.. in 1872. In the old Nova Scotia militia, he was gazetted captain 1st Cumberland Regiment in 1863, and the next year was appointed adjutant to the same regiment. He continued an active officer until the change made after Confederation reorganizing the whole system, when he retired from further connection with the service. Townshend was admitted to the bar of
    5.50
    4 votes
    131
    Gabriel Duvall

    Gabriel Duvall

    Gabriel Duvall (December 6, 1752 – March 6, 1844) was an American politician and jurist. Duvall was an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1811 to 1835 during the tenure of Chief Justice John Marshall. Previously, Duvall was the Comptroller of the Treasury, a Maryland state court judge, a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Maryland, and a Maryland state legislator. Whether Duvall is deserving of the title of "the most insignificant" Justice in the history of the U.S. Supreme Court has been the subject of much academic interest, most notably a debate between University of Chicago Law Professors David P. Currie and (now-Judge) Frank H. Easterbrook in 1983. Currie argued that "impartial examination of Duvall's performance reveals to even the uninitiated observer that he achieved an enviable standard of insignificance against which all other Justices must be measured." Easterbrook responded that Currie's analysis lacked "serious consideration of candidates so shrouded in obscurity that they escaped proper attention even in a contest of insignificance," and concluded that Duvall's colleague, Justice Thomas Todd, was even more
    5.50
    4 votes
    132
    Benjamin N. Cardozo

    Benjamin N. Cardozo

    Benjamin Nathan Cardozo (May 24, 1870 – July 9, 1938) was an American jurist who served on the New York Court of Appeals and later as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court. Cardozo is remembered for his significant influence on the development of American common law in the 20th century, in addition to his modesty, philosophy, and vivid prose style. Cardozo served on the Supreme Court only six years, from 1932 until his death in 1938, and many of his landmark decisions were delivered during his eighteen-year tenure on the New York Court of Appeals, the highest court of that state. Cardozo was born in New York City, the son of Rebecca Washington (née Nathan) and Albert Jacob Cardozo. Both Cardozo's maternal grandparents, Sara Seixas and Isaac Mendes Seixas Nathan, and his paternal grandparents, Ellen Hart and Michael H. Cardozo, were Sephardi Jews of the Portuguese Jewish community affiliated with Manhattan's Congregation Shearith Israel; their families emigrated from England before the American Revolution, and were descended from Jews who left the Iberian Peninsula for Holland during the Inquisition. Cardozo family tradition held that their ancestors were Marranos from Portugal,
    6.33
    3 votes
    133
    David Mills

    David Mills

    David Mills, PC (March 18, 1831 – May 8, 1903) was a Canadian politician, author, poet and jurist. He was born in Palmyra, in southwestern Ontario. His father, Nathaniel Mills, was one of the first settlers in the area. Mills served as superintendent of schools for Kent County from 1856 to 1865. He then attended the University of Michigan, graduating with honors in 1867. He published The Present and Future Political Aspects of Canada in 1860 and The Blunders of the Dominion Government in connection with the North-West Territory in 1871. Mills was first elected to the Canadian House of Commons as a Liberal Member of Parliament (MP) in the 1867 federal election and re-elected in four subsequent votes until being defeated in the 1882 election. He returned to Parliament through an 1884 by-election. He was re-elected in subsequent elections until his defeat in the 1896 election despite this being the election that brought the Liberals back to power. He served as Minister of the Interior in the Cabinet of Alexander Mackenzie from 1876 to 1878. Sir Wilfrid Laurier appointed Mills to the Canadian Senate after he lost his Commons seat in 1896, and appointed him to Cabinet as Minister of
    6.33
    3 votes
    134
    George Duncan Ludlow

    George Duncan Ludlow

    George Duncan Ludlow (1734 – November 13, 1808) was lawyer and a Puisne Judge of the Supreme Court of the British Province of New York in the Thirteen Colonies who became the first Chief Justice of New Brunswick in Canada. George Ludlow was part of the British elite who served as Master of the Rolls and Chief Superintendent of the police for Long Island. A Loyalist during the American Revolution, in 1781 Ludlow abandoned his estate at Hempstead Plains to return to England. In 1784, he would be named the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the newly created Province of New Brunswick in Canada. James Putnam, Isaac Allen, and Joshua Upham were appointed as assistant judges. Justice Ludlow's brother, Gabriel George Ludlow, was named the first mayor of the important port city of Saint John, New Brunswick. A slave owner, George Ludlow built a large home on the Saint John River at Springhill, five miles above the new province's capital of Fredericton. He married Frances Duncan with whom he had three children. Ludlow served as Chief Justice of New Brunswick until his death in 1808. His daughter Frances Duncan Ludlow (1766–1797) was the second wife of Richard Harison. The village of
    6.33
    3 votes
    135
    John Roberts

    John Roberts

    • Cases: Dolan v. United States Postal Service
    John Glover Roberts, Jr. (born January 27, 1955) is the 17th and current Chief Justice of the United States. He has served since 2005, having been nominated by President George W. Bush after the death of Chief Justice William Rehnquist. He has been described as having a conservative judicial philosophy in his jurisprudence. Roberts grew up in northern Indiana and was educated in a private school before attending Harvard College and Harvard Law School, where he was managing editor of the Harvard Law Review. After being admitted to the bar, he served as a law clerk for Judge Henry Friendly and then Justice Rehnquist before taking a position in the Attorney General's office during the Reagan Administration. He went on to serve the Reagan Administration and the George H. W. Bush administration in the Department of Justice and the Office of the White House Counsel, before spending 14 years in private law practice. During this time, he argued 39 cases before the Supreme Court. In 2003, he was appointed as a judge of the D.C. Circuit by President George W. Bush, where he served until his nomination to be an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, initially to succeed retiring Justice
    6.33
    3 votes
    136
    Stanley Forman Reed

    Stanley Forman Reed

    Stanley Forman Reed (December 31, 1884 – April 2, 1980) was a noted American attorney who served as United States Solicitor General from 1935 to 1938 and as an Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court from 1938 to 1957. He was the last Supreme Court Justice who did not graduate from law school (though Justice Robert H. Jackson who served from 1941 to 1954 was the last such justice appointed to the Supreme Court). Stanley Reed was born in the small town of Minerva in Mason County, Kentucky, on the last day of 1884 to John and Frances (Forman) Reed. His father was a wealthy physician and a Protestant who adhered to no particular organized church. The Reeds and Formans traced their history to the earliest colonial period in America, and these family heritages were impressed upon young Stanley at an early age. Reed attended Kentucky Wesleyan College and received a B.A. degree in 1902. He then attended Yale University as an undergraduate, and obtained a second B.A. in 1906. He studied law at the University of Virginia (where he was a member of St. Elmo Hall) and Columbia University, but did not obtain a law degree. Reed married the former Winifred Elgin in May 1908. The couple had
    6.33
    3 votes
    137
    William J. Brennan, Jr.

    William J. Brennan, Jr.

    • Cases: Diamond v. Chakrabarty
    William Joseph Brennan, Jr. (April 25, 1906 – July 24, 1997) was an American jurist who served as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court from 1956 to 1990. As the seventh longest-serving justice in Supreme Court history, he was known for being a leader of the Court's liberal wing. He was known for his outspoken progressive views, including opposition to the death penalty and support for abortion rights. He authored several landmark case opinions, including Baker v. Carr, establishing the "one person, one vote" principle, and New York Times Co. v. Sullivan, which required "actual malice" in a libel suit against those deemed "public figures". Due to his ability to shape a wide variety of opinions and "bargain" for votes in many cases, he was considered to be among the Court's most influential members. Justice Antonin Scalia has called Brennan "probably the most influential Justice of the [20th] century." On November 30, 1993, Justice Brennan was presented with the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Bill Clinton. Brennan was the second of eight children. His parents, William and Agnes (McDermott) Brennan, were Irish immigrants. They met in the United States,
    6.33
    3 votes
    138
    Albert Clements Killam

    Albert Clements Killam

    Albert Clements Killam, QC (September 18, 1849 – March 1, 1908) was a Canadian lawyer, politician, judge, railway commissioner, and Puisne judge of the Supreme Court of Canada. He was the first judge from Western Canada to be appointed to the Supreme Court. Born in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, the son of George Killam and Caroline Clements, he received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1872 from the University of Toronto. He was called to the Ontario bar in 1877 and practised for two years in Windsor. In 1879, he moved to Winnipeg and was called to the Manitoba bar. In 1881 he became an examiner of the Law Society of Manitoba, and he served as a bencher of the society from 1882 to 1885. He was appointed QC by the Governor General, Lord Lansdowne on 9 May 1884. In 1883, he was elected as a Liberal to the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba for the riding of Winnipeg South. He resigned in 1885, when he was appointed to the Court of Queen's Bench of Manitoba. In 1899, he was named Chief Justice of Manitoba and was appointed to the Supreme Court of Canada in 1903. He resigned in 1905 to become Chief Commissioner of the Board of Railway Commissioners. He died in 1908. Killam, Alberta is named in his
    8.00
    1 votes
    139
    Charles Caesar

    Charles Caesar

    Sir Charles Caesar (27 January 1590 – 6 December 1642), of Benington in Hertfordshire, was an English judge who served as Master of the Rolls in the period leading up to the outbreak of the English Civil War; his father Sir Julius Caesar had held the same office for many years. Caesar entered Magdalen College, Oxford aged 12 in 1602, and was a fellow of All Souls from 1605 to 1611. He was incorporated at Cambridge with a LL.B. in 1609, but continued at Oxford, where he was made Doctor of Civil and Canon Law in 1612. In 1611 he joined the Middle Temple and began to practice in the ecclesiastical courts; he was knighted in 1613, and served as MP for Weymouth in the Addled Parliament of 1614. In 1615 he was appointed a master in chancery, no doubt through the influence of his father, and continued in this post until 1639; he was also from before 1626 a judge of the Court of Audience and Master of the Faculties, both appointments which held until his death. In 1639 the Mastership of the Rolls became vacant on the death of Sir Dudley Digges, and Caesar consulted Archbishop Laud on whether he might obtain it, but was warned "that as things then stood, the place was not like to go without
    8.00
    1 votes
    140
    Christopher Salmon Patterson

    Christopher Salmon Patterson

    Christopher Salmon Patterson (January 16, 1823 – July 24, 1893) was a Canadian Puisne judge of the Supreme Court of Canada. Born in London, England, the son of John and Ann Patterson, he studied at the Royal Belfast Academical Institution in Ireland. In 1845, he emigrated to Picton, Canada West (now Ontario), Canada. He was called to the Canada West Bar in 1851 and moved to Toronto in 1856 and practised law. In 1874, he appointed to the Ontario Court of Error and Appeal and was appointed to the Supreme Court of Canada in 1888. He served until his death in 1893. Patterson Township, Ontario is named in his honour.
    8.00
    1 votes
    141
    Clarence Thomas

    Clarence Thomas

    • Cases: Dolan v. United States Postal Service
    Clarence Thomas (born June 23, 1948) is an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. Succeeding Thurgood Marshall, Thomas is the second African American to serve on the Court. Thomas grew up in Savannah, Georgia and was educated at the College of the Holy Cross and at Yale Law School. In 1974, he was appointed an Assistant Attorney General in Missouri and subsequently practiced law there in the private sector. In 1979, he became a legislative assistant to Senator John Danforth (R-MO) and in 1981 was appointed Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights at the U.S. Department of Education. In 1982, President Ronald Reagan appointed Thomas Chairman of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC); he served in that position until 1990, when President George H. W. Bush nominated him for a seat on the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. On July 1, 1991, after 16 months of service as a judge, Thomas was nominated by Bush to fill Marshall's seat on the United States Supreme Court. Thomas's confirmation hearings were bitter and intensely fought, centering on an accusation that he had made unwelcome sexual comments to attorney Anita Hill, a
    8.00
    1 votes
    142
    David F. Levi

    David F. Levi

    David F. Levi (born August 29, 1951) is a U.S. jurist and current Dean of the Duke University School of Law. From 1990–2007, he was a Judge of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of California, serving as Chief Judge since 2003. At the time Levi left the bench, he was widely considered to be one of the top federal judges in the nation. He has been mentioned as a possible nominee to the Supreme Court. Levi was born in Chicago, Illinois. His father was Edward H. Levi, a former president of the University of Chicago and United States Attorney General under President Gerald R. Ford. He received an undergraduate degree from Harvard College, in History and Literature (magna cum laude) in 1972 and then entered the graduate program in history at Harvard where he eventually specialized in English legal history. He received his law degree in 1980 from the Stanford Law School, where he graduated Order of the Coif and was President of the Stanford Law Review. From 1980 to 1981 he served as clerk for Judge Ben C. Duniway of the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals and from 1981 to 1982 as clerk for Supreme Court Justice Lewis F. Powell. In 1983, he joined the U.S. Attorney’s
    8.00
    1 votes
    143
    Dolly M. Gee

    Dolly M. Gee

    Dolly Maizie Gee (born July 1, 1959) is a United States district judge on the United States District Court for the Central District of California. Gee was born in Hawthorne, California, the daughter of Chinese immigrants from rural China. Gee's father was a World War II veteran who later worked as an aerospace engineer on projects like the space shuttle and the Apollo missions, while her mother was a garment worker. Gee earned a B.A. from the University of California, Los Angeles in 1981 and a law degree from University of California, Los Angeles School of Law in 1984. From 1984 until 1986, Gee served as a law clerk for Judge Milton Schwartz of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of California. In 1986, Gee joined the Los Angeles law firm of Schwartz, Steinsapir, Dohrmann & Sommers LLP. She served as an associate from 1986 until 1990, and became a partner in 1990. From 1994 until 1999, Gee also served as a member of the Federal Service Impasses Panel, a federal labor relations authority. On May 27, 1999, President Bill Clinton nominated Gee to be a judge on the United States District Court for the Central District of California to replace Judge John G. Davies.
    8.00
    1 votes
    144
    Edward McTiernan

    Edward McTiernan

    • Cases: R v Burgess; Ex parte Henry
    Sir Edward Aloysius McTiernan, KBE (16 February 1892 – 9 January 1990), was an Australian jurist, lawyer and politician. He served as an Australian Labor Party member of both the New South Wales Legislative Assembly and federal House of Representatives before being appointed to the High Court of Australia in 1930. He sat on many significant cases on the bench, eventually becoming the longest-serving judge in the court's history, before finally retiring in 1976. McTiernan was born into an Irish Catholic family in Glen Innes. Educated at Marist Brothers' College, Darlinghurst, he studied arts and law at the University of Sydney. He graduated in 1915 and was called to the bar the following year. After five years as a barrister, McTiernan was elected to the New South Wales Legislative Assembly in 1920 as the Member for Western Suburbs. McTiernan served in the ministry as Minister for Justice from April to December 1920 and Attorney-General of New South Wales from April 1920 to May 1927, and was heavily involved in Premier Jack Lang's attempt to abolish the New South Wales Legislative Council. He retired from the Assembly in 1927 and took up a position as a law lecturer with his alma
    8.00
    1 votes
    145
    John Hamilton Gray

    John Hamilton Gray

    John Hamilton Gray, QC (1814 – June 5, 1889) was a politician in the Province of New Brunswick, Canada, a jurist, and one of the Fathers of Confederation. He should not be confused with John Hamilton Gray, a Prince Edward Island politician (and Father of Confederation) in the same era. Gray was born in St. George's, Bermuda. His father, William, was naval commissary in Bermuda and later served as British consul in Norfolk, Virginia. Gray's grandfather, Joseph Gray, was a United Empire Loyalist from Boston who settled in Halifax, Nova Scotia following the American Revolution. John Hamilton Gray was educated at King's College in Nova Scotia after which he became a lawyer in Saint John, New Brunswick. He also served as a captain in the New Brunswick Regiment of Yeomany Cavalry becoming a major in the Queen's New Brunswick Ranger by 1850. In 1854 he became lieutenant-colonel of the regiment. Politically, Gray was a high Tory Conservative but also a moderate reformer. He joined the New Brunswick Colonial Association after it was founded in 1849. Gray moved a motion calling for a "federal union of the British North American colonies, preparatory to their immediate independence." The
    8.00
    1 votes
    146
    K. G. Balakrishnan

    K. G. Balakrishnan

    Konakuppakatil Gopinathan Balakrishnan (K. G. Balakrishnan) (Malayalam: കൊനകുപ്പക്കാട്ടില്‍ ഗോപിനാഥന്‍ ബാലകൃഷ്ണന്‍, b. 12 May 1945) is presently the Chairperson of the National Human Rights Commission of India. He is a former Chief Justice of India. He was the first judge from the state of Kerala to become the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. He was also the first person of Dalit origin to ascend to the post of the Chief Justice in the Supreme Court of India. His tenure lasting more than three years has been one of the longest in the Supreme Court of India. K. G. Balakrishnan was born at Kaduthuruthy, near Vaikom, Kingdom of Travancore, into a Malayalam C.S.I Christian family. According to Balakrishnan (originally named Pappachan), his parents were the only source of inspiration for him: "Though my father 'Mr Joseph' was only a matriculate and my mother 'Pennamma' had her schooling only up to the seventh standard, they wanted to give their children the best education. When father being a Christian he approached the Poikail Yohannan and embraced from Christianity to Hinduism and change his name as Gopinadhan through Gazette notification and obtained a certificate as Scheduled
    8.00
    1 votes
    147
    Michael J. Wilkins

    Michael J. Wilkins

    Michael J. Wilkins (born 1948) is an American lawyer and judge. He is a retired Justice of the Utah Supreme Court and current chairman of the Utah Independent Ethics Commission. B.S., University of Utah, 1975 J.D., S. J. Quinney College of Law, University of Utah, 1977 LL.M., University of Virginia, 2001 From 1977 to 1994, Mike Wilkins practiced law in Salt Lake City. Michael J. Wilkins was appointed by Governor Mike Leavitt in August 1994 to the Utah Court of Appeals. And he served there until his appointment to the Supreme Court. Justice Wilkins served as presiding judge of the Court of Appeals. Justice Wilkins was appointed in 2000 to the Supreme Court. He served as Associate Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. Justice Wilkins has been a member of the Judicial Council and has served as chair of the Judicial Council's Policy and Planning Committee, Legislative Liaison Committee, and Standing Committee on Technology. He has chaired the Supreme Court's Committee on Professionalism, and teaches as an adjunct professor at Brigham Young University's J. Reuben Clark Law School. Justice Wilkins is a member of the Utah Legislature's Independent Ethics Commission. The five-member
    8.00
    1 votes
    148
    Roger W. Ferguson, Jr.

    Roger W. Ferguson, Jr.

    Roger W. Ferguson, Jr. (born October 28, 1951 in Washington, D.C.) is an American economist, who was Vice Chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System from 1999 to 2006 and is currently the President and Chief Executive Officer of the Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association - College Retirement Equities Fund (TIAA-CREF). Ferguson received a B.A. in economics magna cum laude in 1973, a J.D. cum laude in 1979, and a Ph.D. in economics in 1981, all from Harvard University. In 1973 and 1974, he was Frank Knox Fellow at Pembroke College, Cambridge University. In 2004 Ferguson was elected to an Honorary Fellowship there. In addition, he has honorary degrees from Lincoln College (Illinois), Webster University, Washington and Jefferson College, Michigan State University and Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Ferguson is also a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. From 1981 to 1984, Ferguson was an attorney at the New York City office of Davis Polk & Wardwell, where he worked with commercial banks, investment banks, and Fortune 500 corporations on syndicated loans, public offerings, mergers and acquisitions, and new product development. Ferguson was a
    8.00
    1 votes
    149
    V. Manicavasagar

    V. Manicavasagar

    Deshamanya Manicavasagar Vaithalingam(December 17, 1906 - December 12, 1993) was a Sri Lankan lawyer, Puisne Justice of the Supreme Court of Sri Lanka, Chancellor of the University of Jaffna and Chairman of the Commercial Bank of Ceylon. Vaithalingam was born on December 17, 1906 to prominent Colombo stockbroker Mudaliyar Arunachala Vaithalingam. Both his paternal and maternal family hails from the affluent town of Manipay, Jaffna. He began his education at the prestigious Royal College, Colombo where he excelled in academics and went on to obtain a degree in law from the Colombo Law College. Vaithalingam joined the judicial service 9 years after being called to the bar, as an Acting Magistrate in Mallakan. For over two decades, he functioned as a Magistrate and District Judge in different parts of the island and in October, 1962, he was appointed a Commissioner of Assize. He continued as such till his appointment to the Supreme Court of Sri Lanka in 1964 by President Sirimavo Bandaranaike. Mentioned below are a few of the numerous judgments in which Justice Vaithalingam was involved. All of the cases below are from the Supreme Court of Sri Lanka and no judgments from lower courts
    8.00
    1 votes
    150
    Wallace McCamant

    Wallace McCamant

    Wallace McCamant (September 22, 1867 – December 17, 1944) was an American jurist in Oregon. A Pennsylvania native, he served as the 46th Associate Justice of the Oregon Supreme Court from 1917 to 1918. Later he served briefly on the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. As a delegate to the Republican National Convention in 1920, McCamant surprised the GOP leadership by placing the name of Calvin Coolidge into nomination for Vice-President. Coolidge would become the 30th President of the United States upon the death of President Harding in 1923. Born on September 22, 1867 in Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania, McCamant was the son of Thomas McCamant and the former Delia Robbins. He grew up in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania and attended the public schools in that town. Then in 1888 he graduated from Lafayette College in Easton, Pennsylvania with a Ph.B. degree. Wallace then read law and in 1890 was admitted to the bar in Pennsylvania and subsequently moved to Oregon. He then entered private practice in Portland, Oregon. Next, in 1893 he married Katherine S. Davis, and they would have two sons. Then in 1904 McCamant became a Master in Chancery for the United States District Court
    8.00
    1 votes
    151
    William Davis Ardagh

    William Davis Ardagh

    William Davis Ardagh (March 21, 1828 – April 16, 1893) was an Ontario lawyer, judge and political figure. He represented Simcoe North in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario from 1871 to 1874. He was born in County Tipperary in Ireland in 1828 and grew up in County Kilkenny. He came to Barrie in Canada West in 1848, articled in law and was called to the bar in 1855. He entered the practice of law in Toronto with John Willoughby Crawford. He served as deputy judge in Simcoe County in 1882 and was reeve and later mayor of Barrie. He moved to Winnipeg, Manitoba, where he served as Deputy Attorney-General and County Court judge. He also served on the Board of Police Commissioners for Winnipeg. He died in Hoboken, New Jersey in 1893.
    8.00
    1 votes
    152
    William Alfred Galliher

    William Alfred Galliher

    William Alfred Galliher (July 26, 1860 – November 23, 1934) was a Canadian lawyer, judge and Liberal politician. Gallier was born in Bruce County, Canada West. In 1885, he served as part of the British Nile contingent under General Wolselsey. The son of Francis Galliher and Sarah Kirkpatrick, he was educated in Walkerton and Collingwood. He moved to western Canada, studied law and was called to the Manitoba bar in 1887, to the bar for the Northwest Territories in 1889 and to the British Columbia bar in 1897. Galliher practised law in Nelson and Victoria. In 1907, he married Margaret Louise Brown. He was a partner of noted lawyer Charles F. P. Conybeare from 1888 to 1887. Galliher was elected as MP for Yale—Cariboo in 1900, despite running against "Independent-Labour" candidate Christopher Foley, who threatened to split the Liberal vote. After the Kootenay riding was split off from Yale Cariboo in 1904, Galliher was reelected there, and remained in the House until 1908. In 1909, he was named judge in the British Columbia Court of Appeal. Galliher died in Victoria at the age of 74.
    5.25
    4 votes
    153
    William Hume Blake

    William Hume Blake

    William Hume Blake, QC (10 March 1809 – 5 November 1870) was an Irish-Canadian jurist and politician. He was the father of Edward Blake, an Ontario Premier and federal Liberal party of Canada leader. He was born at his grandfather's home, Humewood Castle, Kiltegan, County Wicklow, Ireland, the son of the Rev. Dominick Edward Blake, and Ann, daughter of William Hume (1747–1798) M.P., of Humewood Castle. His ancestors were counted among the Tribes of Galway. He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin. In 1832 he emigrated to Canada and settled on a farm in Middlesex County. In a few years he removed to Toronto, studied law, and was called to the bar in 1838. He soon distinguished himself in the profession, but was strongly interested in the political issues which agitated the province. In 1848 he was elected to the Legislature for East York (now Ontario County) and in the same year was appointed Solicitor-General for Upper Canada in the Lafontaine-Baldwin ministry. In 1849 he prepared the act reforming the practice and organization of the Court of Chancery in Upper Canada and resigned from the ministry in order to become in 1849 the first chancellor of the court. In March, 1862, he
    5.25
    4 votes
    154
    Daniel McKenzie

    Daniel McKenzie

    Daniel Duncan McKenzie, PC (January 8, 1859 – June 8, 1927) was a Canadian lawyer, judge, and politician. Born in Lake Ainslie, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, the son of Duncan and Jessie (McMillan) Mckenzie, McKenzie was educated at the Public Schools and at the Sydney Academy. He became a barrister and attorney-at-law, practicing in North Sydney, Nova Scotia. He served was Commissioner of Schools for Cape Breton and was elected ten times to the Municipal Council of North Sydney, serving as Mayor for five years. He was elected to the Nova Scotia House of Assembly in 1900 as a Liberal, and again at the general elections of 1901. He was first elected to the Canadian House of Commons for the electoral district of North Cape Breton and Victoria in the 1904 federal election. A Liberal, he resigned in 1906 when he was appointed a Judge of District No. 7, County Court of Nova Scotia. He retired in 1908 and was re-elected in the 1908 federal election. He was re-elected in 1911, 1917, and 1921. He became interim leader of the Liberal Party of Canada in 1919, following the death of former Canadian Prime minister Sir Wilfrid Laurier on February 17, 1919. He held that position, and consequently
    7.00
    2 votes
    155
    Harvey Brownstone

    Harvey Brownstone

    Harvey Brownstone is a judge of the Ontario Court of Justice. Brownstone was born on July 24, 1956 in Paris, France, and was raised in Hamilton, Ontario. He attended Scott Park Secondary School and received his LL.B. degree from Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario in 1980 and was called to the Bar of Ontario in 1983 after articling with criminal lawyer Leo Adler. Brownstone worked as a Legal Aid duty counsel lawyer in the Toronto criminal courts from 1983 to 1985, and then practised criminal law with prominent criminal lawyers William A. Gorewich (now a judge of the Ontario Court of Justice) and Stephen Price. In 1987 he joined the Research Facility of the Ontario Legal Aid Plan, where he became Head of the Family Law section. In 1989 he joined the Ministry of the Attorney General, Support and Custody Enforcement Branch, as counsel. The Support and Custody Enforcement Program was responsible for the enforcement of child and spousal support orders and custody orders. In 1991 he was appointed Legal Director of the Family Support Plan (which was the new name of the Support and Custody Enforcement Program) and in 1992 he was appointed Director of the entire Program while continuing
    7.00
    2 votes
    156
    Henri-Thomas Taschereau

    Henri-Thomas Taschereau

    Sir Henri-Thomas Taschereau (October 6, 1841 – October 11, 1909) was a lawyer, politician and judge in Quebec, Canada. The son of Jean-Thomas Taschereau, Taschereau received his basic education at the Petit Séminaire de Québec from 1851 to 1859. He then entered Université Laval were he received a law degree in 1862 and was called to the bar of Lower Canada in 1863. After passing the Bar of Quebec, he practised law in Quebec and soon built a large practice. He also pursued an interest in politics and began publishing a short-lived newspaper. Various forays into public life followed and in 1872 was elected to the Canadian House of Commons. By age 37 his reputation earned him an appointment to the Quebec Superior Court and he served there until 1901 sitting as judge in many important trials. From 1901 to 1907, he headed up two royal commissions for the federal government of Canada. In 1907, his legal stature was recognized with his appointment as chief justice of Quebec. In 1908, Edward VII knighted him. His death in 1909 left a legacy of writings on the law as part of the records in the courts and commissions where he served.
    7.00
    2 votes
    157
    J. Skelly Wright

    J. Skelly Wright

    James Skelly Wright (January 14, 1911 - August 6, 1988) was a judge for the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit and anti-segregationist. The J. Skelly Wright Professorship at Yale Law School, currently held by Heather Gerken, is named in his honor. Wright was born in 1911 in New Orleans, Louisiana, where he lived for much of his early life. Wright attended Loyola University New Orleans where he received his undergraduate in 1932, and the Loyola University New Orleans College of Law where he received his law degree in 1936. While attending Loyola he was a member of Alpha Delta Gamma National Catholic Fraternity. He was an Assistant U.S. attorney of Eastern District of Louisiana from 1937 to 1942. He was a U.S. Coast Guard Lieutenant Commander from 1942 to 1945. Wright was an Assistant U.S. attorney of Eastern District of Louisiana from 1945 to 1946 and then was in private practice of law in Washington, DC to 1948. Judge Wright served at the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana from 1949 to 1962, where he was an important leader in the battle for the desegregation of New Orleans area schools. In 1960, he struck down
    7.00
    2 votes
    158
    Lucy H. Koh

    Lucy H. Koh

    Lucy Haeran Koh (born 1968) is a United States District Judge on the United States District Court for the Northern District of California. Born in Washington, D.C., Koh earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from Harvard College in Social Studies in 1990 and a Juris Doctorate from Harvard Law School in 1993. From 1993 until 1994, Koh worked for the United States Senate Committee on the Judiciary as a Women's Law and Public Policy Fellow. From 1994 until 1997, Koh worked for the United States Department of Justice, first as a Special Counsel in the Office of Legislative Affairs (1994–1996) and then as a Special Assistant to the United States Deputy Attorney General (1996–1997). From 1997 until 2000, Koh served as an Assistant United States Attorney in the Office of the United States Attorney for the Central District of California. From 2000 until 2002, she worked as a Senior Associate at Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati, a Palo Alto, California law firm. From 2002 until 2008, Koh worked as a litigation partner at the Silicon Valley office of the law firm McDermott Will & Emery representing technology companies in patent, trade secret and commercial civil matters. In January 2008,
    7.00
    2 votes
    159
    Samuel Henry Strong

    Samuel Henry Strong

    Sir Samuel Henry Strong, PC, QC (August 13, 1825 – August 31, 1909) was a jurist and the third Chief Justice of Canada. Strong was born in Poole, England to Samuel Spratt Strong and Jane Elizabeth Goose. He emigrated to Upper Canada with his family in 1836 settling in Bytown (later known as Ottawa). He studied law in the office of local Ottawa lawyer Augustus Keefer. He was called to the bar in 1849 and established his practice in Toronto. He was elected a bencher of the Law Society of Upper Canada in 1860 and was made a QC in 1863. Following Confederation he advised Prime Minister Sir John A. Macdonald on the establishment of the Supreme Court of Canada. He was named to the new court when it was created in 1875. He became Chief Justice in 1892 serving until his retirement in 1902. He died in 1909 at the age of 84.
    7.00
    2 votes
    160
    Susan J. Dlott

    Susan J. Dlott

    Susan J. Dlott (September 11, 1949) is a United States federal judge. Born in Dayton, Ohio, Dlott received a B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1970 and a J.D. from Boston University School of Law in 1973. She was a law clerk to Alvin Krenzler and Jack Day of the Ohio Court of Appeals from 1973 to 1974, then became an assistant United States Attorney for the Southern District of Ohio from 1975 to 1979. She entered private practice in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1979 continuing in private practice until 1995. On August 10, 1995, President Bill Clinton nominated Dlott to a seat on the United States District Court for the Southern District of Ohio vacated by S. Arthur Spiegel. Dlott was confirmed by the United States Senate on December 22, 1995, and received her commission on December 26, 1995. Dlott's first husband was builder and developer Austin Eldon Knowlton. Her second and current husband is trial lawyer Stanley M. Chesley. In 2004 Chesley purchased what is believed to be the most expensive single-family home listed in Greater Cincinnati, Ohio. The home includes six bedrooms, seven full bathrooms, custom chandeliers, wine cellar, two four-car garages with apartments on top and
    7.00
    2 votes
    161
    Thomas Chandler Haliburton

    Thomas Chandler Haliburton

    Thomas Chandler Haliburton (December 17, 1796 – August 27, 1865) was a politician, judge, and author in the British Colony of Nova Scotia. He was the first international best-selling author from what is now Canada and played a significant role in the history of Nova Scotia prior to its entry into Confederation. Haliburton was born in Windsor, Nova Scotia, the son of William Hersey Otis Haliburton, a lawyer, judge and political figure, and Lucy Chandler Grant. His mother died when he was a small child, and his father remarried when he was seven, giving him as stepmother Susanna Davis, the daughter of Michael Francklin, who had been Nova Scotia's Lieutenant Governor. He attended University of King's College in Windsor and became a lawyer, opening a practice in Annapolis Royal, the former capital of the colony. Haliburton became a noted local businessman and a judge, but his great fame came from his writing. He wrote a number of books on history, politics, and farm improvement. He rose to international fame with his Clockmaker serial, which first appeared in the Novascotian and was later published in book form throughout the British Empire. The books recounted the humorous adventures
    7.00
    2 votes
    162
    Thomas Porteous

    Thomas Porteous

    Gabriel Thomas Porteous, Jr. (born 1946) is a former United States federal judge who served for sixteen years before being impeached and removed from office in December 2010. Born in New Orleans, Louisiana, Porteous received a B.A. from Louisiana State University in 1968 and a J.D. from Louisiana State University Law School in 1971. He was a special counsel to the Office of the State Attorney General, Louisiana from 1971 to 1973. He was in private practice in Gretna, Louisiana from 1973 to 1980, and in Metairie, Louisiana from 1980 to 1984. He was Chief of the Felony Complaint Division in the District Attorney's Office, Jefferson Parish, Louisiana from 1973 to 1975. He was a city attorney of Harahan, Louisiana from 1982 to 1984. He was a judge on the 24th Judicial District Court of Louisiana from 1984 to 1994. On August 25, 1994, Porteous was nominated by President Bill Clinton to a seat on the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana vacated by Robert F. Collins. He was confirmed by the United States Senate on October 7, 1994, and received his commission on October 11, 1994. He has controversially ruled in several landmark cases against the state,
    7.00
    2 votes
    163
    Timothy Black

    Timothy Black

    Timothy Seymour Black (born 1953) is a United States judge on the United States District Court for the Southern District of Ohio. Black earned an A.B. from Harvard College in 1975 and then earned a law degree in 1983 from the Salmon P. Chase College of Law at Northern Kentucky University. Black practiced law as a civil litigator for the Cincinnati law firm of Gradyon Head & Ritchey from 1983 until 1993. In 1991, Black unsuccessfully ran in a judicial election for the Hamilton County Municipal Court as a Republican. In 1993, he ran as a Democrat and defeated sitting judge David Albanese. He served as a Hamilton County Municipal Court judge from 1994 until 2004. In 2004, the judges on the United States District Court for the Southern District of Ohio selected Black as a United States magistrate judge. In July 2009, a bipartisan commission in Ohio selected Black from a list of three finalists and recommended him to President Barack Obama to fill a vacancy on the United States District Court for the Southern District of Ohio. On December 24, 2009, Obama formally nominated Black to fill the district court vacancy, which was created by Judge Sandra Beckwith taking senior status on
    7.00
    2 votes
    164
    Alfred Rochon

    Alfred Rochon

    Alfred Rochon (February 1, 1847 – November 17, 1909) was a lawyer, judge and political figure in Quebec. He represented Ottawa electoral district in the Legislative Assembly of Quebec from 1887 to 1892 as a Liberal. He was born in Sainte-Thérèse-de-Blainville, Canada East, the son of Élie Rochon and Sophie Ouimet, and was educated at the Petit Séminaire de Sainte-Thérèse. Rochon went on to study law in Montreal, was called to the Quebec bar in 1869 and set up practice in Montreal, setting in Hull in 1876. In 1872, he married Corinne Gaucher, the daughter of Guillaume Gamelin Gaucher. He served on the town council for Hull from 1877 to 1882 and from 1885 to 1889 and was mayor from 1886 to 1889. He was defeated by Narcisse-Édouard Cormier when he ran for a seat in the Quebec assembly in 1886 and, in 1887, was elected to the assembly after Cormier's election was overturned. Rochon resigned as mayor and alderman for Hull in 1889 to devote himself to his provincial duties. His election was successfully appealed in 1889 but he won the by-election that followed in 1890. He was defeated by Nérée Tétreau when he ran for reelection in 1892. Rochon was bâtonnier for the Ottawa County bar from
    6.00
    3 votes
    165
    Charles Fitzpatrick

    Charles Fitzpatrick

    Sir Charles Fitzpatrick, PC, GCMG (December 19, 1853 – June 17, 1942) was a Canadian lawyer and politician, who served as the fifth Chief Justice of Canada. He was born in Quebec City, Canada East, to John Fitzpatrick and Mary Connolly. He studied at Laval University, earning his B.A. degree (1873) and LL.B degree (1876). Called to the bar of Quebec in 1876, he established his practice in Quebec City and later founded the law firm of Fitzpatrick & Taschereau. In 1885, he acted as chief counsel to Louis Riel who was on trial for leading the North-West Rebellion. Riel was found guilty and sentenced to death. Fitzpatrick entered politics in 1890, winning election to the Quebec Legislative Assembly in Québec-Comté electoral district. He was re-elected in 1892, but resigned in June 1896 to enter federal politics. He was first elected to the Canadian House of Commons in Quebec County electoral district in the 1896 federal election as a Liberal Member of Parliament (MP). He served as Solicitor General of Canada from 1896 to 1902, and as Minister of Justice from 1902 until 1906. He was appointed to the Supreme Court of Canada as Chief Justice. He served in that position until 1918 when he
    6.00
    3 votes
    166
    Frank A. Moore

    Frank A. Moore

    Frank A. Moore (November 5, 1844 – September 25, 1918) was an American politician and judge in the state of Oregon. He was the 17th Chief Justice of the Oregon Supreme Court. He is the only person to serve as chief justice for Oregon’s highest court on four different occasions, and he spent 26 years overall on the bench. A native of Maine, he was also a two-time Republican member of the Oregon State Senate. Moore was born on November 5, 1844, in Ellsworth, Maine, to Heard L. Moore and Bathshaba Moore (née Higgins). Moore received his education in the public schools in Maine and at the state normal school in Iowa Falls, Iowa. After his education Moore became a county superintendent for schools in Hardin County, Iowa, serving from 1871 to 1875. He also read law in Eldora, Iowa, at this time under the tutelage of Enoch W. Eastman, the then lieutenant governor of Iowa. Moore passed the bar in Iowa in 1874, and practiced law in Eldora. In 1877, Moore moved to Oregon and was practicing law in St. Helens, Oregon, and was admitted to the Oregon bar in January 1879. He remained in private practice there until 1884 when he was elected as judge for Columbia County. In 1888, Moore was elected
    6.00
    3 votes
    167
    William Mulock

    William Mulock

    Sir William Mulock, PC, KCMG, MP, QC, LL.D (January 19, 1843 – October 1, 1944) was a Canadian lawyer, businessman, educator, farmer, politician, judge, and philanthropist. He served as vice-chancellor of the University of Toronto from 1881 to 1900, negotiating the federation of denominational colleges and professional schools into a modern university. He was elected to the Canadian House of Commons as a Liberal Member of Parliament and served from 1882 to 1905. Sir Wilfrid Laurier appointed him to the Canadian Cabinet as Postmaster General from 1896 to 1905. In 1900, Mulock established the Department of Labour, bringing William Lyon Mackenzie King into public life as his Deputy Minister. He initiated the final agreement for a transpacific cable linking Canada to Australia and New Zealand, and funded Marconi to establish the first transatlantic radio link from North America to Europe. In 1905 he chaired the parliamentary inquiry into telephones that led to regulation of Canadian telecommunications, and he participated in the negotiations that led to the creation of the provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan. He was Chief Justice of the Exchequer Division of the Supreme Court of
    6.00
    3 votes
    168
    Charles Evans Whittaker

    Charles Evans Whittaker

    Charles Evans Whittaker (February 22, 1901 – November 26, 1973) was an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court from 1957 to 1962. Whittaker was born on a farm near Troy, Kansas, and attended school until he dropped out in the ninth grade. He spent the next two years hunting, trapping and farming, but developed an interest in law by reading newspaper articles about criminal trials. He applied to the Kansas City School of Law (currently the University of Missouri–Kansas City School of Law) and gained admission with the condition that he first acquire a high school education. He spent two years working, and taking high school courses from a private tutor before enrolling. While he was a student at the school, from 1922 to 1924, Harry S. Truman was a classmate. He received his law degree in 1924. Whittaker joined the law firm of Watson, Ess, Marshall & Enggas in Kansas City, Missouri and built up a practice in corporate law. He had close ties to the Republican party. This led to his first appointment as a judge on the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Missouri on July 8, 1954. He then was nominated to the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals on June 5,
    5.67
    3 votes
    169
    E. Barrett Prettyman

    E. Barrett Prettyman

    Elijah Barrett Prettyman (August 23, 1891 – August 4, 1971) was a United States federal judge. Prettyman was born in Lexington, Virginia. Educated at Randolph-Macon College, he received a Bachelor of Arts in 1910 and a Master of Arts in 1911. He then earned a law degree from Georgetown University Law School in 1915. Prettyman began practicing law in Hopewell, Virginia in 1915. After serving as a captain in the United States Army during World War I, he spent the next 35 years either in private practice, working as a corporation counsel, or working for the U.S. Bureau of Internal Revenue (IRS). In particular, he was a special prosecutor for the IRS both in Washington, D.C. and New York City from 1919 to 1920, and later general counsel to the IRS from 1933 to 1934. On September 12, 1945, President Harry S. Truman appointed Prettyman to the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit to fill the seat vacated by Judge Justin Miller. He was confirmed by the United States Senate on September 24, and received his commission on September 28. From 1958 to 1960, he served as Chief Judge of the court. He assumed senior status on April 16, 1962, but remained a senior
    5.67
    3 votes
    170
    Lyman Poore Duff

    Lyman Poore Duff

    Sir Lyman Poore Duff, GCMG, PC, QC (January 7, 1865 – April 26, 1955) was the eighth Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada, was the longest serving justice of the Supreme Court of Canada, and briefly served as Acting Governor General of Canada in 1931 and 1940. Born in Meaford, Ontario to a Congregationalist minister, he received a Bachelor of Arts in mathematics and metaphysics in 1887 and a Bachelor of Laws in 1889 from the University of Toronto. He was called to the Ontario Bar in 1893. In 1901, he was created a Queen's Counsel. From 1890 to 1895, he was a mathematics teacher at Barrie Collegiate Institute. He was a lawyer in Fergus, Ontario and moved to Victoria, British Columbia in 1895 to practise law. In 1904, he was appointed a puisne judge of the Supreme Court of British Columbia. In 1906 was appointed a justice of the Supreme Court of Canada. He was appointed Chief Justice of Canada in 1933 and retired in 1944. On January 14, 1914, he was made a member of the Privy Council of the United Kingdom. In 1931, he served as Administrator of the Government of Canada between the departure of Lord Bessborough for India and the arrival of Lord Tweedsmuir. Duff took on the
    5.67
    3 votes
    171
    Tom C. Clark

    Tom C. Clark

    Thomas Campbell "Tom C." Clark (September 23, 1899 – June 13, 1977) was United States Attorney General from 1945 to 1949 and an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States (1949–1967). Clark was born in Dallas, Texas to Virginia Maxey (née Falls) and William Henry Clark. A graduate of Dallas High School, he served as a Texas National Guard infantryman in 1918; afterward he studied law, receiving his law degree from the University of Texas School of Law in 1922. He was a brother of Delta Tau Delta fraternity, and later served as their international president. He set up a law practice in his home town of Dallas from 1922 to 1937, but left private practice for a period to serve as civil district attorney for the city from 1927 to 1932. Clark, a Democrat, joined the Justice Department in 1937 as a special assistant to the U.S. attorney general for war risk litigation. He served as civilian coordinator for the forced relocation of Japanese-Americans during the opening months of World War II. He headed the antitrust division at Justice in 1943, and the criminal division from 1943 to 1945. Appointed Attorney General by President Harry Truman in 1945, Clark was nominated to
    5.67
    3 votes
    172
    Alexander Morris

    Alexander Morris

    Alexander Morris, PC (March 17, 1826 – October 28, 1889) was a Canadian politician. He served in the cabinet of Prime Minister John A. Macdonald (1869–1872), and was the second Lieutenant Governor of Manitoba (1872–1877). He also served as the founder and first Lieutenant Governor of the District of Keewatin. Morris was born in Perth, Upper Canada (now Ontario), the son of William Morris, himself a prominent Canadian businessman and Conservative politician. From this privileged social position, Morris was educated in Canada and Scotland and worked for three years at the Montreal firm of Thorne and Heward. In 1847, he moved to Kingston, Ontario and articled for a year under John A. Macdonald. In 1849, he became the first person to receive an arts degree from McGill University. He would subsequently receive other degrees from McGill, including a DCL in 1862. In 1851, he was admitted to the bar in both Canada East and Canada West; he subsequently built up a profitable legal practice. Morris was also an author, and in 1855 published an essay entitled Canada and her resources, which called for the development of national industry. In 1858, he predicted a coming federation of the British
    6.50
    2 votes
    173
    Alice Rivlin

    Alice Rivlin

    Alice Mitchell Rivlin (born March 4, 1931, in Philadelphia) is an economist, a former U.S. Cabinet official, and an expert on the budget. She has served as the Vice Chairman of the Federal Reserve, the Director of the White House Office of Management and Budget, and the first Director of the Congressional Budget Office. In early 2010, Rivlin was appointed by President Barack Obama to his National Commission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform. Rivlin is a daughter of the physicist Allan C. G. Mitchell and a granddaughter of the astronomer Samuel Alfred Mitchell. Her ancestry is in the main Cornish from Cornwall in the UK. She is a member of the Rivlin family. Rivlin grew up in Bloomington, Indiana where her father was on the faculty of Indiana University. She briefly attended University High School in Bloomington before leaving to attend high school at The Madeira School. She then went on to Bryn Mawr College. Initially, she studied history, but after taking an economics course at Indiana University she decided to major in economics instead. She earned her Bachelor's of Art in 1952, writing her senior thesis on the economic integration of Western Europe. Upon graduation, Rivlin
    6.50
    2 votes
    174
    George Alexander Drew

    George Alexander Drew

    George Alexander Drew, QC (February 21, 1826 – July 5, 1891) was a Canadian lawyer, judge and political figure. He represented Wellington North in the Canadian House of Commons as a Liberal-Conservative member from 1867 to 1872 and from 1878 to 1882. He was born near Williamstown, Upper Canada, the son of John Drew and Margaret McKay, and was educated there and in Cornwall. Drew studied law with John Sandfield Macdonald in Cornwall, was called to the bar in 1854 and set up practice in Elora. In 1856, he married Elizabeth Mary Jacob; in 1865, after his first wife's death, he married her sister, Maria Louise. Drew was named Queen's Counsel in 1872. Drew ran unsuccessfully against Nathaniel Higinbotham for the federal seat in 1872, 1874 and 1875 before defeating him in 1878. In 1882, he was named judge for Wellington County; later that same year, he was named judge in the High Court of Justice for Ontario. Drew died while still a judge at the age of 65. The community of Drew in Minto Township was named after him. His grandson, George Drew, later served as Premier of Ontario.
    6.50
    2 votes
    175
    Jacqueline Nguyen

    Jacqueline Nguyen

    Jacqueline Hong-Ngoc Nguyen (born in Da Lat, South Vietnam 1965) is a United States Circuit Judge for the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. Born Hong-Ngoc Thi Nguyen (Vietnamese: Nguyễn Thị Hồng Ngọc) in Da Lat, Vietnam, Nguyen moved to the United States when she was 10, after the fall of the South Vietnamese government in 1975. The daughter of a South Vietnamese army major who had worked closely with U.S. intelligence officials, Nguyen moved with her family first to an army tent at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, where she lived for several months. They ultimately settled in the La Crescenta-Montrose area of Los Angeles. Her family later opened a doughnut shop in North Hollywood, where Nguyen worked throughout high school and college. Nguyen earned her Artium Baccalaureus degree in English in 1987 from Occidental College. She then earned a Juris Doctor from UCLA School of Law in 1991. From 1991 until 1995, Nguyen worked in private law practice, specializing in civil litigation as a litigation associate at the firm Musick, Peeler & Garrett. In particular, she focused on commercial disputes, intellectual property and construction-defect cases. From 1995 until
    6.50
    2 votes
    176
    Jeffrey Sutton

    Jeffrey Sutton

    • Cases: Lexmark Int'l v. Static Control Components
    Jeffrey S. Sutton (born October 31, 1960 in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia) is a federal judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit. Sutton received his B.A. from Williams College in 1983. After graduating from college and prior to law school, Sutton taught high school history and was the varsity soccer coach at The Columbus Academy, a private school in Gahanna, Ohio. He received his law degree from The Ohio State University's Moritz College of Law in 1990. He then clerked for Judge Thomas Meskill of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit in 1990–1991 and then on the United States Supreme Court for Justices Antonin Scalia and Lewis Powell in 1991–1992. Sutton was in private practice in Columbus from 1992 to 1995 and 1998 to 2003. Sutton was state solicitor for the state of Ohio from 1995 to 1998. He has also served as an adjunct professor of law at the Ohio State University Moritz College of Law since 1994. He teaches state constitutional law, a pet interest of his. Sutton was first nominated by President George W. Bush on May 9, 2001 to a seat on the Sixth Circuit vacated by David A. Nelson. That nomination, made during the 107th United States
    6.50
    2 votes
    177
    Learned Hand

    Learned Hand

    • Cases: National Comics Publications v. Fawcett Publications
    Billings Learned Hand ( /ˈlɜrnɨd/ LURN-id; January 27, 1872 – August 18, 1961) was a United States judge and judicial philosopher. He served on the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York and later the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. Hand has been quoted more often than any other lower-court judge by legal scholars and by the Supreme Court of the United States. Born and raised in Albany, New York, Hand majored in philosophy at Harvard College and graduated with honors from Harvard Law School. After a short career as a lawyer in Albany and New York City, he was appointed as a Federal District Judge in Manhattan in 1909 at the age of 37. The profession suited his detached and open-minded temperament, and his decisions soon won him a reputation for craftsmanship and authority. Between 1909 and 1914, under the influence of Herbert Croly's social theories, Hand supported New Nationalism. He ran unsuccessfully as the Progressive Party's candidate for Chief Judge of the New York Court of Appeals in 1913, but withdrew from active politics shortly afterwards. In 1924, President Calvin Coolidge promoted Hand to the Court of Appeals for the
    6.50
    2 votes
    178
    Levi Ruggles Church

    Levi Ruggles Church

    Levi Ruggles Church (May 1836 – August 30, 1892) was a Quebec doctor, lawyer, judge and political figure. He was born in Aylmer in Lower Canada around May 24, 1836, the son of a doctor. He first studied medicine at Victoria College in Cobourg, the Albany Medical College in New York state and McGill College, then studied law and was called to the Lower Canada bar in 1859. He was a Conservative member of the Quebec Legislative Assembly who represented the Ottawa electoral district from 1867 to 1871 and Pontiac from 1874 to 1881. In 1868, he became crown attorney for Ottawa district and became a Queen's Counsel in 1874. He served in the provincial cabinet as attorney general from 1874 to 1876. He was a member on the first board of the Bank of Ottawa (later merged with Scotiabank), president of the Pontiac Pacific Junction Railway and a director of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Lower Canada. He was appointed a justice in the Court of Queen's Bench in 1887 and served in that post until January 1892. He died in Montreal in 1892. His uncle, Basil R. Church, was a member of the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Canada.
    6.50
    2 votes
    179
    Matthew Crooks Cameron

    Matthew Crooks Cameron

    Sir Matthew Crooks Cameron, QC (2 October 1822 – 25 June 1887) was a lawyer, judge and politician in the Canadian province of Ontario. He was born in Dundas in Upper Canada, during his studies at Upper Canada College, he lost one leg after a shooting accident. Cameron later articled in law, was called to the bar in 1849 and entered practice with William Henry Boulton in Toronto. In 1861, he was elected to the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Canada for North Ontario; he was defeated in 1863 but was elected in an 1864 by-election when the incumbent, William McDougall, was forced to run for reelection after he was named to the executive council. Cameron was opposed to Confederation, preferring a legislative union. In 1867, he ran unsuccessfully in Ontario North in the federal election but was elected for Toronto East to the provincial legislature. He was created a QC on 27 March 1863, and elected a bencher of the Law Society of Upper Canada in April 1871. Cameron entered the Cabinet of Premier John Sandfield Macdonald in 1867 as Provincial Secretary and Registrar of Ontario. In 1871, he became Commissioner of Crown Lands. With the defeat of the Macdonald government in the
    6.50
    2 votes
    180
    Adolphe-Basile Routhier

    Adolphe-Basile Routhier

    Sir Adolphe-Basile Routhier (May 8, 1839 – June 27, 1920) was a Canadian judge, author, and lyricist. He wrote the lyrics of the original French version of the Canadian national anthem O Canada. He was born in Saint-Placide, Quebec to Charles Routhier and Angélique Lafleur. Routhier studied law at Université Laval and graduated was called to the Quebec bar in 1861. He was appointed to the Quebec Superior Court in 1873 (as Chief Justice from 1904 to 1906) and Admiralty of the Exchequer Court of Canada (from 1897 to 1906). Routhier was involved in several federal elections as a Conservative candidate, but he was never elected. In June 1914, Routhier was one of the three judges appointed to conduct the Commission of Inquiry into the sinking of the British steamship the Empress of Ireland, which had resulted in the tragic loss of 1,012 lives. Routhier married Clorinde Mondelet on November 12, 1862 in Quebec and had one son. One of his descendants is Marie Routhier,a spandex designer based in Newfoundland. Many sites and landmarks were named to honour Basile Routhier. They include:
    7.00
    1 votes
    181
    Andrew Kleinfeld

    Andrew Kleinfeld

    Andrew Jay Kleinfeld (born June 12, 1945) is a senior judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, stationed in Fairbanks, Alaska. He is married to Professor Judith Kleinfeld. Kleinfeld attended Wesleyan University (B.A. 1966) and Harvard Law School (J.D., 1969). After law school, he clerked for two years for Justice Jay Rabinowitz of the Supreme Court of Alaska. He served as Fairbanks's part-time magistrate for a short time, but was generally in private practice in Fairbanks until his elevation to the bench. After completing his clerkship, Kleinfeld served for three years as a part-time magistrate judge in the United States District Court for the District of Alaska. He was nominated for a full judgeship by president Ronald Reagan on March 26, 1986, confirmed by the United States Senate on May 14, 1986, and received his commission on May 15, 1986. On May 23, 1991, President George H.W. Bush nominated Kleinfeld to a seat on the Ninth Circuit, vacated by Alfred T. Goodwin. He was confirmed by the Senate on September 12, 1991, and received his commission on September 16, 1991. Kleinfeld is generally considered a conservative judge, in contrast with the more
    7.00
    1 votes
    182
    Archibald McLean

    Archibald McLean

    Chief Justice The Hon. Archibald McLean (April 5, 1791 – October 24, 1865) was a lawyer, judge and political figure in Upper Canada. McLean was born at St. Andrews in the Lunenburg District in 1791, the son of Lt.-Col. The Hon. Neil McLean and Isabella McDonell of Leek. He studied at John Strachan's school in Cornwall and articled in law with William Firth. On the outbreak of the War of 1812 he joined the 2nd Regiment of York Militia as a Subaltern and was seriously wounded at the Battle of Queenston Heights. He crawled from the battlefield to a nearby village where his wounds were hurriedly dressed. Because of an infection caused by the late removal of a bullet he was not fit to fight when the Americans attacked York in April, 1813. McLean buried the York militia’s colours in the woods and escaped to Kingston, Ontario. He fought again at Battle of Lundy's Lane, but was captured by the Americans and held prisoner for the remainder of the war. In 1815 he turned down a commission into the British regular army, joining the law firm of William Warren Baldwin before starting his own lucrative law firm in Cornwall, Ontario. In 1820, he was elected to the Legislative Assembly of Upper
    7.00
    1 votes
    183
    Matthew Baillie Begbie

    Matthew Baillie Begbie

    Sir Matthew Baillie Begbie (9 May 1819 – 11 June 1894) was born on the island of Mauritius, thereafter raised and educated in the United Kingdom. In 1858, Begbie became the first Chief Justice of the Crown Colony of British Columbia in colonial times and in the first decades after confederation of Canada. Begbie served as the first Judge of the Supreme Court, Colony of British Columbia 1858 to 1866 and then, in the same capacity in the Supreme Court, the United Colonies of Vancouver Island and British Columbia from 1866 to 1870. He was Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the United Colonies from 1870 to 1871 and, following British Columbia joining confederation in 1871, he served as the first Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the new Province of British Columbia until his death on June 11, 1894. In the years after his death, Begbie came to be known as the Hanging Judge. However, it appears that he does not deserve this reputation. The death penalty was mandatory in murder cases in those days unless the government approved a judge's recommendation for clemency. Indeed, Begbie successfully argued for clemency in several cases. The son of an Army Colonel, Begbie was born on a
    7.00
    1 votes
    184
    Michael Kirby

    Michael Kirby

    • Cases: Re Wakim; Ex parte McNally
    Michael Donald Kirby AC, CMG, (born 18 March 1939) is an Australian retired judge, jurist, and academic who is a former Justice of the High Court of Australia, serving from 1996 to 2009. Michael Kirby attended Fort Street High School in Sydney. He received his Bachelor of Arts (1959), Bachelor of Laws (1962), Bachelor of Economics (1965) and Master of Laws (First Class Honours) (1967) from the University of Sydney. At Sydney University, he was elected President of the Students' Representative Council (1962–1963) and President of the Sydney University Union (1965). Kirby was admitted to the New South Wales Bar in 1967. His first quasi-judicial appointment was to the Australian Conciliation and Arbitration Commission, a tribunal which adjudicated labour disputes, upon which he served as a Deputy President from 1975 until 1983. From 1983 to 1984, he was a judge in the Federal Court of Australia and the youngest man appointed to the federal judiciary, before an appointment as President of the New South Wales Court of Appeal, a superior court in that state's legal system. During that period he was also the President of the Court of Appeal of Solomon Islands from 1995 to 1996. He was
    7.00
    1 votes
    185
    Herbert Stone MacDonald

    Herbert Stone MacDonald

    Herbert Stone MacDonald (February 23, 1842 – January 8, 1921) was an Ontario lawyer, judge and political figure. He represented Leeds South in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario as a Conservative member from 1871 to 1873. He was born in Gananoque in 1842, and attended Queen's University. He studied law, first articling with Albert Norton Richards, was called to the bar in 1863 and practiced law in Brockville. In 1864, he married Emma Matilda, the daughter of David Jones. He was a lieutenant in the local militia. MacDonald was a member of the Orange Order, serving as grand master for Ontario East. He introduced a bill in 1873 to incorporate the Orange Order, which was passed in the legislature but the Lieutenant Governor, William Pearce Howland, held the bill for consideration by the federal parliament and it was replaced by a later more general bill in 1874. In October 1873, MacDonald resigned his seat in the legislative assembly to become junior judge in the county court for Leeds and Grenville. In 1878, he was named senior judge in the county court. He served on the council for Trinity College, Toronto and as director for Bishop Ridley College and the Brockville General
    5.33
    3 votes
    186
    Baltasar Garzón

    Baltasar Garzón

    Baltasar Garzón Real (Spanish pronunciation: [baltaˈsar ɣarˈθon]; born 26 October 1955) is a Spanish jurist. He formerly served on Spain's central criminal court, the Audiencia Nacional, and was the examining magistrate of the Juzgado Central de Instrucción No. 5, which investigates the most important criminal cases in Spain, including terrorism, organised crime, and money laundering. He is currently head of Julian Assange's legal team. Garzón came to international attention on 10 October 1998 when he issued an international warrant for the arrest of former Chilean President, General Augusto Pinochet, for the alleged deaths and torture of Spanish citizens. Although the British government refused to extradite Pinochet, it was the first time that a former government head was arrested on the principle of universal jurisdiction. Garzón has been prevented from working as a judge in Spain since May 2010. His initial suspension was the result of legal action initiated by a group called Manos Limpias (which has been described as "far-right") and the Falange. He apparently had infuriated elements of the Spanish right. Although he was suspended from judicial activity in Spain pending trial
    4.50
    4 votes
    187
    Antonin Scalia

    Antonin Scalia

    • Cases: Dolan v. United States Postal Service
    Antonin Gregory Scalia (/skəˈlijə/; born March 11, 1936) is an American jurist who serves as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. As the longest-serving justice currently on the Court, Scalia is the Senior Associate Justice. Appointed to the Court by President Ronald Reagan in 1986, Scalia has been described as the intellectual anchor of the Court's conservative wing. Scalia was born in Trenton, New Jersey, and attended public grade school and Catholic high school in New York City, where his family had moved. He attended Georgetown University as an undergraduate and obtained his Bachelor of Laws degree from Harvard Law School. After spending six years in a Cleveland law firm, he became a law school professor. In the early 1970s, he served in the Nixon and Ford administrations, first at minor administrative agencies, and then as an assistant attorney general. He spent most of the Carter years teaching at the University of Chicago, where he became one of the first faculty advisers of the fledgling Federalist Society. In 1982, he was appointed as a judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit by President Ronald Reagan. In
    6.00
    2 votes
    188
    James D. Whittemore

    James D. Whittemore

    James David Whittemore (born 1952) is an American judge presently serving in the Tampa division of the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Florida. He was previously a Florida state trial court judge, a federal public defender, and an attorney in private practice who won a criminal case before the U.S. Supreme Court. As a federal judge, Whittemore presided over a number of high profile cases, including a lawsuit against Major League Baseball to challenge its draft procedure, and the Terri Schiavo case, after the United States Congress had specifically given the Middle District of Florida jurisdiction to hear the seven year-long fight over whether the brain-damaged Schiavo should be taken off life support. Whittemore was born in Walterboro, South Carolina. He graduated with honors from the University of Florida in 1974 with a B.S. in business administration, and then received his law degree from Stetson University Law School in 1977. He briefly worked at Bauer, Morlan & Wells, a small law firm in St. Petersburg, Florida, before becoming one of the original four federal public defenders in the Middle District of Florida in 1978. Whittemore returned to private practice in
    6.00
    2 votes
    189
    Joseph Dubuc

    Joseph Dubuc

    Sir Joseph Dubuc (26 December 1840 – 7 January 1914), was a Canadian lawyer, politician, and judge who was born in Lower Canada and became an important political figure from Manitoba. Dubuc was from a large family and was irregularly in school because of family responsibilities. He spent some time in the United States and learned English while working in a factory. Upon returning to Quebec, he completed military school in Montreal in November 1866. He further engaged in formal studies, latterly at the Petit Séminaire de Montreal, where he made friends with Louis Riel. This connection would shape his political life in the future. He received a Bachelor of Common Law degree from McGill College in 1869 and was called to the Lower Canada bar the same year. In January 1870, Riel called on him to help with the new provisional government that had been established as part of the Red River Rebellion. Dubuc left for Manitoba in June and, upon his arrival in the Red River area, became friends with Bishop Alexandre-Antonin Taché who dissuaded him of his doubts. He wrote articles for the Montreal newspaper La Minerve explaining the position of the Métis and encouraging francophones to settle in
    6.00
    2 votes
    190
    Roy McMurtry

    Roy McMurtry

    Roland "Roy" McMurtry, OC, OOnt (born May 31, 1932) is a judge and former politician in Ontario, Canada and the current Chancellor of York University. McMurtry was born in Toronto and educated at St. Andrew's College, graduating in 1950. He received a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Toronto, Trinity College in 1954, and a Bachelor of Laws degree from Osgoode Hall Law School in 1958. While attending university, he was admitted to the Zeta Psi fraternity and became a close friend of future Premier of Ontario William Davis, his Canadian football teammate. While studying he was hired to teach football at Upper Canada College. He also taught in adult literacy classes at Frontier College, working through the day on construction projects and teaching at night. He was a trial lawyer for seventeen years before entering politics. He wrote a weekly column in the Toronto Sun in the early Seventies. In the 1960s, he worked with Dalton Camp and Norman Atkins to remove John Diefenbaker as leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada. McMurtry suffered a back injury during the 1971 Ontario Progressive Conservative leadership convention, and was able to exempt himself from
    6.00
    2 votes
    191
    Thomas Andrew Lumisden Strange

    Thomas Andrew Lumisden Strange

    Sir Thomas Andrew Lumisden Strange (November 30, 1756 – July 16, 1841) was the first Chief Justice of the erstwhile Supreme Court of Madras (which has since become the High Court of Madras) and in that capacity was also the first Chief Justice of the Madras Presidency, British India from 1801 to 1817. Earlier, from 1789–1797, he had been the sixth Chief Justice of Nova Scotia. Thomas Strange was the son of Sir Robert Strange, a Scottish artist. He was born in England, studied law at Lincoln's Inn, and was called to the bar in 1785. After practicing law for only four years he was appointed Chief Justice of Nova Scotia in 1789 and sent to Halifax to quell a growing upheaval due to the "judge's affair." However, after a few years, he became unhappy with his position and attempted to find a new position in Upper Canada. Unsuccessful, he moved back to England in July 1796. He was knighted on 14 March 1798 and the same year was appointed Recorder of Fort St. George (Madras), British India. In 1800, consequent to the Regulating Act of 1797, the Recorder's Court was superseded by the Supreme Court, and Strange was appointed Chief Justice. He commanded two of the four companies of Madras
    6.00
    2 votes
    192
    William Norman Birkett, 1st Baron Birkett

    William Norman Birkett, 1st Baron Birkett

    • Cases: Entores Ltd v Miles Far East Corporation
    William Norman Birkett, 1st Baron Birkett, QC PC (6 September 1883 – 10 February 1962) was a British barrister, judge, politician and preacher who served as the alternate British judge during the Nuremberg Trials. He received his education at Barrow-in-Furness Grammar School. He was a Methodist preacher and a draper before attending Emmanuel College, Cambridge in 1907, to study theology, history and law. Upon graduating in 1910 he worked as a secretary and was called to the Bar in 1913. Declared medically unfit for military service during World War I, Birkett used the time to make up for his late entry into the legal profession and was made a King's Counsel in 1924. He became a criminal defence lawyer and acted as counsel in a number of famous cases including the second of the Brighton trunk murders. A member of the Liberal Party, he sat in Parliament for Nottingham East twice, first in 1923 and again in 1929. Despite refusing appointment to the High Court of Justice in 1928, he was offered the position again in 1941 and accepted, joining the King's Bench Division. In 1945 he served as the alternate British judge at the Nuremberg trials, and he was made a Privy Counsellor in 1947.
    6.00
    2 votes
    193
    William Alexander Weir

    William Alexander Weir

    William Alexander Weir (October 15, 1858 – October 22, 1929) was a Quebec lawyer, politician, and judge. He was the MLA for Argenteuil in the Legislative Assembly of Quebec from 1897–1910, held several ministries, and helped rewrite several provincial Codes. William Alexander Weir was born in Montreal on October 15, 1858, the son of William Park Weir and Helen Craig Smith, who had emigrated from Scotland to Canada in 1852. William Park Weir became Surveyor of Customs in the Port of Montreal. His brother, Robert Stanley Weir, would become famous as a judge and author of the English verses for O Canada. Weir attended the High School of Montreal and McGill University earning a B.C.L. in 1881 and was called to the Bar of Quebec on July 12, 1881. He married Adelaide Sayers Stewart, daughter of William C. Stewart of Hamilton, Ontario in October 1885. During the time he practised law, Weir also wrote for The Montreal Star from 1880–1881 and the Argenteuil County News from 1895–1897. Weir published several special editions of Quebec Civil Codes and he served as Secretary of the Royal Commission to revise the Code of Civil Procedure in 1897. Weir's first attempt at election to the
    5.00
    3 votes
    194
    Denis O'Brien

    Denis O'Brien

    Denis O'Brien (March 13, 1837 – May 18, 1909) was an American lawyer and politician. He was admitted to the bar in 1861, and commenced practice in Watertown. He was elected Mayor of Watertown in 1872. He was New York State Attorney General from 1884 to 1887, elected on the Democrat ticket in 1883 and 1885. In 1889, he was elected a judge of the New York Court of Appeals, was re-elected in 1903, and remained on the bench until the end of 1907 when he reached the constitutional age limit of 70 years. He died from appendicitis at his home in Watertown. His son John F. O'Brien also was a judge of the New York Court of Appeals.
    5.50
    2 votes
    195
    John Warren Davis

    John Warren Davis

    John Warren Davis (commonly known as J. Warren Davis) (March 4, 1867 – February 21, 1945) was a New Jersey politician and federal judge. Davis was born in Elizabeth City, North Carolina. He attended Bucknell University, attaining a B.A. degree in 1896 at the unusual age of 29. He then earned a Baccalaureate in Divinity from Crozer Theological Seminary (1899), where he subsequently taught Hebrew and Greek for three years. After Crozer, Davis traveled, briefly studying at the Universities of Chicago and Leipzig. Upon his return from Germany, Davis studied law at the University of Pennsylvania Law School, receiving a degree in 1906. After law school, Davis practiced law privately in Philadelphia and Camden. In 1911 he was elected to the New Jersey State Senate from Salem County, where he served less than one term. In the Senate Davis was aligned with then-Governor Woodrow Wilson. In 1913 Wilson began his tenure as President of the United States. He appointed Davis as U.S. Attorney for the District of New Jersey from 1913 to 1916. On May 6, 1916 Wilson nominated Davis to a seat on the United States District Court for the District of New Jersey. Davis was confirmed by the United States
    5.50
    2 votes
    196
    Muhammad Bilal Khan

    Muhammad Bilal Khan

    Muhammad Bilal Khan (Urdu: محمد بلال خان) is a Justice in the Lahore High Court in Pakistan. Khan was a practicing lawyer before the Supreme Court of Pakistan and the High Court. He has also served as an additional Advocate General of Punjab for almost four years. Khan was appointed to the Lahore High Court on September 3, 2003, and remained in that position until March 6, 2009. On March 7, 2008, President Asif Ali Zardari of Pakistan appointed him as second Chief Justice of the Islamabad High Court, succeeding Sardar Muhammad Aslam. On July 31, 2009, a 14-person panel of the Supreme Court of Pakistan declared the creation of the Islamabad High Court to be unconstitutional. Khan returned to be a Justice of Lahore High Court. Since he took oath on PCO 2007 (see below), in contravention of a decision of a 7-person panel of the Supreme Court, he was referred to the Supreme Judicial Council of Pakistan. On November 3, 2007, the Chief of Staff of the Pakistani Army declared a state of emergency and issued a Provisional Constitutional Order (PCO). A 7-person panel of the Supreme Court issued an order declaring the state of emergency illegal and prohibiting all judges from taking oath on
    5.50
    2 votes
    197
    William Buell Richards

    William Buell Richards

    Sir William Buell Richards, PC, Kt (May 2, 1815 – January 26, 1889) was the first Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada. Richards was born in Brockville, Upper Canada to Stephen Richards and Phoebe Buell. He earned law degree at the St. Lawrence Academy in Potsdam, New York and then articled with his uncle Andrew Norton Buell in Brockville. He was called to the bar in 1837 and continued to practice in Brockwille with George Malloch until 1853 and then with his uncle again. In 1848 Richards was elected to the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Canada and by 1848 he became the Attorney General for the province. Leaving politics in June 1853, he was appointed to the Court of Common Pleas of Canada West and by 1863 he became Chief Justice. In November 1868 Richards was appointed to Chief Justice of the province which was the highest court in Ontario at that time, the Supreme Court not yet having been created.. It was during this time that he heard the appeal of Patrick James Whelan for the murder of Thomas D'Arcy McGee. With the creation of the Supreme Court of Canada in 1875 Richards was appointed directly to the position of Chief Justice which he stayed at until his
    5.50
    2 votes
    198
    William Strong

    William Strong

    William Strong (July 15, 1817-April 10, 1887) was an American attorney and jurist in the Pacific Northwest. He was the 4th Associate Justice of the Oregon Supreme Court when the region was still the Oregon Territory. A native of Vermont, he settled in the Washington Territory after it was created in 1853 and served in the legislature of that territory and on the Washington Supreme Court. Later he returned to Oregon and settled in Portland. Strong was born on July 15, 1817 in St. Albans, Vermont to Laura Strong and Henry Pierce Strong, a preacher. He earned his primary education near the town of Rushville, New York, before entering Yale College (now university) at the age of seventeen. William graduated from Yale in 1838 and then began teaching while also studying law. At Yale he graduated with honors and then after graduation served as a principal at a school in Ithaca, New York. There in 1840 he married Lucretia Robinson, and the couple would have six children together. Then in 1840 he passed the bar and started practicing law in Cleveland, Ohio where the couple remained until 1849. In August 1850 William Strong arrived in the Oregon Territory after being appointed by President
    5.50
    2 votes
    199
    Donald Kohn

    Donald Kohn

    Donald Lewis Kohn (born November 7, 1942) is an American economist who served as the former Vice Chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. He is considered a moderate dove on monetary policy. He retired after 40 years at the central bank in September, 2010. Kohn was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He received a B.A. in economics in 1964 from The College of Wooster and a Ph.D. in economics in 1971 from the University of Michigan. Kohn and his wife, Gail, have two children, Laura and Jeffrey, both married with children. Kohn is a veteran of the Federal Reserve System. Before becoming a member of the Board, he served on its staff as Adviser to the Board for Monetary Policy (2001-02), Secretary of the Federal Open Market Committee (1987-2002), Director of the Division of Monetary Affairs (1987-2001), and Deputy Staff Director for Monetary and Financial Policy (1983-87). He also held several positions in the Board's Division of Research and Statistics--Associate Director (1981-83), Chief of Capital Markets (1978-81), and Economist (1975-78). Dr. Kohn began his career as a Financial Economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City (1970-75). Kohn took
    4.67
    3 votes
    200
    Alex Kozinski

    Alex Kozinski

    • Cases: Mattel v. MCA Records
    Alex Kozinski (born July 23, 1950) is Chief Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, an essayist, and a judicial commentator. Kozinski was born in Bucharest, Romania. In 1962, when he was 12, his parents, both Holocaust survivors, brought him to the United States. The family settled in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles, California, where his father, Moses, ran a small grocery store. Kozinski graduated from the University of California, Los Angeles, receiving an A.B. degree in 1972, and from the UCLA School of Law, receiving a J.D. degree in 1975. Kozinski clerked for future Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy on the Ninth Circuit from 1975 to 1976, and then for Chief Justice Warren Burger from 1976 to 1977. From June 5, 1981 to August 1982, Kozinski served as the first U.S. Special Counsel appointed by President Ronald Reagan. In 1982, Kozinski was appointed chief judge at the newly formed United States Court of Federal Claims. In 1985, at the age of 35, Kozinski was appointed to a new seat at the U. S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit by President Reagan, making him the youngest federal appeals court judge. Defending the court against
    6.00
    1 votes
    201
    6.00
    1 votes
    202
    Garr M. King

    Garr M. King

    Garr Michael King (born January 28, 1936) is a Judge of the U.S. District Court for the District of Oregon. He was appointed to the federal bench by President Clinton in 1997 to fill a vacancy left by Helen J. Frye's attaining senior judge status. A graduate of University of Utah, he received his LL.B. from Lewis & Clark College's Northwestern School of Law in 1963. Before becoming a federal judge, he served as a Multnomah County prosecutor, and engaged in private practice. In November 2007, King announced his desire to be given senior judge status, which will open up a position on the court. Karin Immergut was considered the early favorite to succeed him, but was not nominated. Marco A. Hernandez was initially nominated for the position in July 2008 by President George W. Bush. Hernandez was nominated again by President Barack Obama and confirmed in February 2011.
    6.00
    1 votes
    203
    George Edwin King

    George Edwin King

    George Edwin King (October 8, 1839 – May 7, 1901) was a New Brunswick lawyer, politician, jurist, and the second and fourth Premier of New Brunswick in the Canadian Confederation. King attended Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut, where he received a B.A. in 1859 and a M.A. in 1862. He was elected to the first provincial legislature of the new Canadian Confederation in 1867 and served in the Confederation Party government as minister without portfolio. When Andrew R. Wetmore resigned, the Confederation Party became the Liberal-Conservatives and King became Premier in 1870. Some members of his caucus felt he was too close to the federal Conservatives of Sir John A. Macdonald and King was maneuvered out of the leadership by George L. Hathaway with King taking a position in the new cabinet. When Hathaway died in 1872, King became Premier for a second time serving until 1878. One of King's major accomplishments was the Common Schools Act of 1871 which implemented a single, tax supported public school system. As Attorney General, King appeared in the courts to defend the Act from constitutional challenges, including appearing before the Judicial Committee of the Privy
    6.00
    1 votes
    204
    John Archibald Campbell

    John Archibald Campbell

    John Archibald Campbell (June 24, 1811 – March 12, 1889) was an American jurist. Campbell was born near Washington, Georgia, to Col. Duncan Greene Campbell (for whom the now-defunct Campbell County, Georgia was named). Considered a child prodigy, he graduated from the University of Georgia in 1825 at the age of 14, and immediately enrolled at the United States Military Academy for three years and would have graduated in 1830, but withdrew upon the death of his father (July 1828) and returned home to Georgia. He read law with former Georgia governor John Clark, and was admitted to the bar in 1829, at the age of 18 which required a special act of the Georgia legislature. While at the United States Military Academy in West Point, New York, on 24–25 December 1826, Campbell was involved in the Eggnog Riot also known as the "Grog Mutiny". Proceedings began on December 26, 1826, courts-martial was complete on 16 March 1827, and ended on May 3, 1827, with the Presidents adjusting of some of the verdicts and approval of the rest. Campbell was among 70 cadets that were involved but a review concluded that only 20 (one soldier) be charged. Many notable cadets such as Jefferson Davis (involved
    6.00
    1 votes
    205
    Marie-Claire Kirkland

    Marie-Claire Kirkland

    Marie-Claire Kirkland-Casgrain, CM CQ (born September 8, 1924) is a Quebec lawyer, judge and politician. She was the first woman elected to the National Assembly of Quebec, the first woman appointed a Cabinet minister in Quebec, the first woman appointed acting premier, and the first woman judge to serve in the Quebec Provincial Court. Born in Palmer, Massachusetts, the daughter of Charles-Aimé Kirkland, a Quebec MLA from 1939 to 1961, and Rose Demers, she received a Bachelor of Arts in 1947 and a Bachelor of Civil Law in 1950 from McGill University. She was admitted to the Quebec Bar in 1952 and was made a Queen's Counsel in 1969. From 1952 to 1961, she practiced law in Montreal. She was elected in a by-election as a Liberal in her father's riding of Jacques-Cartier after his death in 1961. She was re-elected in 1962. She held two cabinet posts in the government of Jean Lesage: Minister without Portfolio (1962 to 1964) and Minister of Transport and Communications (1964 to 1966). In 1966, she was elected in the riding of Marguerite-Bourgeoys and re-elected in 1970. She also held two cabinet posts in the government of Robert Bourassa: Minister of Tourism, Game and Fishing (1970 to
    6.00
    1 votes
    206
    Melbourne McTaggart Tait

    Melbourne McTaggart Tait

    Sir Melbourne McTaggart Tait (May 20, 1842 – February 19, 1917) was a Canadian lawyer and judge. Born in Melbourne, Canada East, studied at St Francis College and received a Bachelor of Civil Law degree from McGill University in 1862. He was called to the Bar in 1863. He served as President of the Montreal Garrick Club after 1878. He was created a Queen's Counsel in 1882. He practiced law in Melbourne until moving to Montreal in 1870. In 1887, he was raised to the judicial Bench in the Province of Quebec. He was appointed chief justice of the Superior Court in the district of Montreal in 1894. He was made a Knight Bachelor at Queen Victoria's Jubilee, 1897. In January, 1903, he headed a movement to erect Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal a Children's Hospital, as a memorial to Queen Victoria. Melbourne McTaggart Tait, then an advocate, married 1878 his second wife Lily M. Kaighn, daughter of Henry B. Kaighn, of Newport, R. I. Lady Tait performed as an actress, after her marriage, with the Montreal Garrick Club, of which her husband was President. The couple lived at 994 Sherbrooke Street, Montreal. His son, Thomas James Tait, was a railway commissioner.
    6.00
    1 votes
    207
    Roy Moore

    Roy Moore

    Roy Stewart Moore (born February 11, 1947) is an American jurist and Republican politician noted for his refusal, as the elected Chief Justice of the Alabama Supreme Court, to remove a monument of the Ten Commandments from the Alabama Judicial Building despite orders to do so from a federal judge. On November 13, 2003, the Alabama Court of the Judiciary unanimously removed Moore from his post as Chief Justice. In the years preceding his election to the state Supreme Court, Moore had successfully resisted previous attempts to have a display of the Ten Commandments removed from the courtroom. The controversy around Moore generated national attention. Moore's supporters regard his stand as a defense of "judicial rights" and the Constitution of Alabama. Moore contends that federal judges who ruled against his actions consider "obedience of a court order superior to all other concerns, even the suppression of belief in the sovereignty of God." Moore sought the Republican nomination for the governorship of Alabama in 2006, but lost to incumbent Bob Riley in the June primary by a nearly 2-to-1 margin. On June 1, 2009 he announced his campaign for the 2010 election for governor. Moore
    6.00
    1 votes
    208
    Samuel Shepherd

    Samuel Shepherd

    Sir Samuel Shepherd KS PC (6 April 1760 — 3 November 1840) was a British barrister, judge and politician who served as Attorney General for England and Wales and Lord Chief Baron of the Scottish Court of Exchequer. Born to a toymaker, he was educated at Merchant Taylors' School and, after a pupillage under Charles Runnington, was called to the Bar by the Inner Temple on 23 November 1781. He soon became a successful barrister, and was made a Serjeant-at-Law in 1796 and a King's Serjeant a year later. In 1812 he became Solicitor-General of the Duchy of Cornwall, and in 1813 Solicitor General for England and Wales, with a promotion to Attorney-General in 1817. In 1819 he was made Lord Chief Baron of the Scottish Court of Exchequer, a position he held until 1830 when he was forced to retire due to ill-health, dying in 1840. Shepherd was born on 6 April 1760 to Henry Shepherd, a London toymaker. From 1773 to 1774 he was educated at Merchant Taylors' School and then at a different school in Chiswick, entering the Inner Temple in July 1776. After a pupillage under Charles Runnington he was called to the Bar on 23 November 1781. He soon joined the home circuit, a place where, along with
    6.00
    1 votes
    209
    Samuel Alito

    Samuel Alito

    • Cases: ACLU v. Schundler
    Samuel Anthony Alito, Jr. (/əˈliːtoʊ/; born April 1, 1950) is an Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. He was nominated by President George W. Bush and has served on the court since January 31, 2006. Raised in Hamilton Township, New Jersey and educated at Princeton University and Yale Law School, Alito served as U.S. Attorney for the District of New Jersey and a judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit prior to joining the Supreme Court. He is the 110th justice, the second Italian American and the eleventh Roman Catholic to serve on the court. Alito has been described by the Cato Institute as a conservative jurist with a libertarian streak. Alito was born in Trenton, New Jersey, to Italian American parents: Italian immigrant Samuel A. Alito, Sr., and the former Rose Fradusco. Alito's father, now deceased, was a high school teacher and then became the first Director of the New Jersey Office of Legislative Services, a position he held from 1952 to 1984. Alito's mother is a retired schoolteacher. Alito grew up in Hamilton Township, New Jersey, a suburb of Trenton. He attended Steinert High School in Hamilton Township and graduated from Princeton
    4.33
    3 votes
    210
    Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.

    Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.

    Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. (March 8, 1841 – March 6, 1935) was an American jurist who served as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1902 to 1932. Noted for his long service, his concise and pithy opinions and his deference to the decisions of elected legislatures, he is one of the most widely cited United States Supreme Court justices in history, particularly for his "clear and present danger" majority opinion in the 1919 case of Schenck v. United States, and is one of the most influential American common law judges through his outspoken judicial restraint philosophy. Holmes retired from the Court at the age of 90 years, 309 days, making him the oldest Justice in the Supreme Court's history. He also served as an Associate Justice and as Chief Justice on the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court, and was Weld Professor of Law at the Harvard Law School, of which he was an alumnus. Profoundly influenced by his experience fighting in the American Civil War, Holmes helped move American legal thinking away from formalism and towards legal realism, as summed up in his maxim: "The life of the law has not been logic; it has been experience." Holmes espoused a
    5.00
    2 votes
    211
    Olivier Perrault

    Olivier Perrault

    Olivier Perrault (July 21, 1773 – March 19, 1827) was a seigneur, lawyer, judge and political figure in Lower Canada. He was also sometimes known as Jean-Baptiste-Olivier Perrault. He was born Jean-Olivier Perrault at Quebec City in 1773, the son of Jacques Perrault, and studied at the Petit Séminaire de Québec. He articled in law and qualified to practice in 1799. In 1804, he married Marie-Louise, the daughter of seigneur Gabriel-Elzéar Taschereau. He was named clerk of the land roll and inspector general of the royal domain in 1808, but resigned to allow Joseph-Bernard Planté to be named to these posts. He was named advocate general of Lower Canada later that year. In 1812, he was named an honorary member of the Executive Council. He served as lieutenant-colonel in the militia. In 1812, Perrault was named judge in the Court of King’s Bench for Quebec district. He was named to the Legislative Council in 1818 and was speaker from 1823 to 1827. Perrault owned the seigneury of Sainte-Marie. He died at Quebec City while still in office in 1827. His brother Jacques-Nicolas served in the legislative assembly and legislative council. His daughter Julie married Elzéar-Henri Juchereau
    5.00
    2 votes
    212
    Adam Wilson

    Adam Wilson

    Sir Adam Wilson (September 22, 1814 – December 28, 1891) was a lawyer, judge and political figure in Canada West. He served as mayor of Toronto in 1859 and 1860. He was born in Edinburgh, Scotland in 1815 and came to Halton County, Upper Canada in 1830 to work with his uncle. In 1834, he moved to Toronto where he studied law Robert Baldwin Sullivan and was called to the bar in 1839. In 1850, he became Queen's Counsel. Wilson was elected to Toronto city council in 1855, later serving two terms as mayor. In 1856, he was named to a commission whose work formed the basis for the l Statutes of the Province of Canada. He was elected to the Legislative Council of the Province of Canada in an 1860 by-election in the North riding of York; he was re-elected in ral for Canada West in the Executive Council. He resigned from politics in 1863 and was named judge in the Court of Queen's Bench. He served on the Ontario Law Reform Commission. In 1878, Wilson became chief justice in the Court of Common Pleas and, in 1884, was named to the same function in the Court of Queen's Bench. In 1887, he was retired and was knighted. He died in Toronto on 28 December 1891.
    4.50
    2 votes
    213
    Emory A. Chase

    Emory A. Chase

    Emory Albert Chase (August 31, 1854 - June 25, 1921) was an American lawyer and politician from New York. He was born on August 31, 1854 to Albert Chase and Laura (Woodworth) Chase in Hensonville, New York. He attended the public school at Hensonville, and continued his studies at the Fort Edward Collegiate Institute, but did not graduate. He studied law in the office of Rufus H. King and Joseph Hallock in Catskill, and was admitted to the bar in 1880, and started work at the firm of Hallock & Jennings. In 1882 he joined the firm which became Hallock, Jennings & Chase. On June 30, 1885, he married Mary E. Churchill, and they had two children: Jessie Churchill Chase and Albert Woodworth Chase. After Hallock’s retirement in September 1890, his law firm continued as Jennings & Chase until December 1896. He was a justice of the New York Supreme Court (3rd District) from 1897 to 1920, from 1900 on the Appellate Division, Third Dept. In January 1906, he was designated by Governor Frank W. Higgins to the New York Court of Appeals under the amendment of 1899. In 1912 and 1914, he ran on the Republican ticket for a regular seat on the Court of Appeals but was defeated twice. In 1920, he ran
    4.50
    2 votes
    214
    Francis Hopkinson

    Francis Hopkinson

    Francis Hopkinson (September 21, 1737 – May 9, 1791), an American author, was one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence as a delegate from New Jersey. He later served as a federal judge in Pennsylvania. He played a key role in the design of the first American flag. Francis Hopkinson was born at Philadelphia in 1737, the son of Thomas Hopkinson and Mary Johnson. He became a member of the first class at the College of Philadelphia (now the University of Pennsylvania) in 1751 and graduated in 1757, receiving his masters degree in 1760, and a doctor in law (honorary) in 1790. He was secretary to a Provincial Council of Pennsylvania Indian commission in 1761 that made a treaty with the Delaware and several Iroquois tribes. In 1763, he was appointed customs collector for Salem, New Jersey. Hopkinson spent from May 1766 to August 1767 in England in hopes of becoming commissioner of customs for North America. Although unsuccessful, he spent time with the future Prime Minister Lord North and his half-brother, the Bishop of Worcester Brownlow North, and painter Benjamin West. After his return, Francis Hopkinson operated a dry goods business in Philadelphia and married Ann Borden
    4.50
    2 votes
    215
    Ruth Bader Ginsburg

    Ruth Bader Ginsburg

    • Cases: Dolan v. United States Postal Service
    Ruth Joan Bader Ginsburg (born March 15, 1933) is an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. Ginsburg was appointed by President Bill Clinton and took the oath of office on August 10, 1993. She is the second female justice (after Sandra Day O'Connor) and the first Jewish female justice. She is generally viewed as belonging to the liberal wing of the Court. Ginsburg spent a considerable portion of her legal career before becoming a judge as an advocate for the advancement of women's rights as a constitutional principle. She advocated as a volunteer lawyer for the American Civil Liberties Union and was a member of its board of directors and one of its general counsel in the 1970s. She was a professor at Rutgers School of Law–Newark and Columbia Law School. In 1980, President Jimmy Carter appointed her to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. Born in Brooklyn, New York, Ruth Joan Bader was the second daughter of Nathan and Celia (née Amster) Bader. The family nicknamed her "Kiki". They belonged to the East Midwood Jewish Center, where she took her religious confirmation seriously. At age thirteen, Ruth acted as the "camp rabbi" at a
    4.50
    2 votes
    216
    Arthur Goldberg

    Arthur Goldberg

    Arthur Joseph Goldberg (August 8, 1908 – January 19, 1990) was an American statesman and jurist who served as the U.S. Secretary of Labor, Supreme Court Justice and Ambassador to the United Nations. Goldberg was born and raised on the West Side of Chicago, the youngest of eight children of Jewish immigrants from the Russian Empire. The paternal side of the family (Goldberg-Flaumen) originally came from the town of Oświęcim, in modernday Poland. The maternal side of the family originally came from a shtetl called Zenkhov in Ukraine. Goldberg's father, a produce peddler, died in 1916, forcing Goldberg's siblings to quit school and go to work to support the family. As the youngest child, Goldberg was allowed to continue school, graduating from high school at the age of 16. Goldberg's interest in the law was sparked by the noted murder trial in 1923 of Leopold and Loeb, two wealthy young Chicagoans who were spared the death penalty with the help of their high-powered defense attorney, Clarence Darrow. Goldberg later pointed to this case as inspiration for his opposition to the death penalty on the bench, since he had seen how inequality of social status could lead to unfair application
    5.00
    1 votes
    217
    Dominique Monet

    Dominique Monet

    Dominique Monet (January 2, 1865 – February 6, 1923) was a Canadian lawyer, politician, and judge. Born in St-Michel de Napierville, Canada East, the son of Dominique Monet, Monet was educated at L'Assomption College and received an LL.D. from Laval University in 1889. He was called to the Quebec Bar in 1889 and was created a Queen's Counsel in 1899. He practiced law in Saint-Rémi, Montreal and Saint-Jean. He was first elected to the Canadian House of Commons for the electoral district of Napierville in the 1891 federal election. A Liberal, he was re-elected in the 1896 and 1900 election for the electoral district of Laprairie—Napierville. In 1904, he was elected as the Liberal candidate to the Legislative Assembly of Quebec for the electoral district of Napierville. In February 1905, he was made a Minister Without Portfolio in the cabinet of Simon-Napoléon Parent and soon after was appointed Minister of Colonization and Public Works for a brief time. In October 1905, he was appointed Protonotary for the district of Montreal. In 1908, he was made a judge of the Superior Court for the district of d'Iberville. He died while at sea near San Juan, Puerto Rico on February 6, 1923. He
    5.00
    1 votes
    218
    Frank Merriman, 1st Baron Merriman

    Frank Merriman, 1st Baron Merriman

    Frank Boyd Merriman, 1st Baron Merriman PC, KC, OBE, GCVO (28 April 1880 – 18 January 1962), often known as Boyd Merriman, was a Conservative Party politician and judge in the United Kingdom. Merriman was born in Knutsford, Cheshire, and educated at Winchester College. He did not go to university, but became an articled clerk with a firms of solicitors in Manchester, and later studied for the bar. He was called to the bar at the Inner Temple in 1904, and became a King's Counsel (KC) in 1919. During World War I, he served with the Manchester Regiment. Merriman was elected at the 1924 general election as Member of Parliament (MP) for Manchester Rusholme, and served as Solicitor General for England and Wales under Stanley Baldwin from 1928 to 1929 and under Ramsay McDonald from 1932 to 1933. He left Parliament in 1933, when he was appointed as President of the Probate, Divorce and Admiralty Division of the High Court. He was knighted in 1928 and elevated to the peerage in 1941 as Baron Merriman, of Knutsford in the County Palatine of Chester. In 1950 he was appointed a Knight Grand Cross of the Royal Victorian Order (GCVO). Lord Merriman married three times. He married firstly Eva
    5.00
    1 votes
    219
    Hugh McDonald

    Hugh McDonald

    Hugh Macdonald, PC (May 4, 1827 – February 28, 1899) was a lawyer, judge and member of the First Canadian Parliament. He represented the Antigonish riding of Nova Scotia, from 1867 to 1869, along with William Hallett Ray, as an Anti-Confederate and, from 1869 to 1873, as a Liberal-Conservative. The son of Allan McDonald and Christina Cameron, he was educated at Saint Francis Xavier University and called to the Nova Scotia bar in 1855. McDonald married Sarah Smith in 1856. He practiced law in Antigonish, Nova Scotia. McDonald represented Antigonish County in the Legislative Assembly of Nova Scotia from 1859 to 1863. In 1872, he was named Queen's Counsel. McDonald served as President of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada and Minister of Militia and Defense in 1873. Later that year, he resigned his seat in parliament to accept an appointment to the Nova Scotia Supreme Court. McDonald served as puisne judge in the Supreme Court from November 1873 until he retired from the bench in 1893.
    5.00
    1 votes
    220
    James K. Kelly

    James K. Kelly

    James Kerr Kelly (February 16, 1819 – September 15, 1903) was an American politician born in Pennsylvania. He was a United States Senator for Oregon from 1871 to 1877, and later Chief Justice of the Oregon Supreme Court. Prior to his election to the Senate he had been elected to both houses of the local legislature, serving in the Territorial House and State Senate, and was a member of the Oregon Constitutional Convention in 1857. Kelly was born in Centre County, Pennsylvania in 1819. There he attended the school at Milton, and later the Lewisburg Academies. For his higher education, the future Congressman graduated from the College of New Jersey in 1839. James Kelly then studied law in Carlisle, Pennsylvania at the Dickinson School of Law and was admitted to practice law in Pennsylvania in 1842. Upon entering the legal profession, Mr. Kelly began private practice in Lewistown, Pennsylvania, then was the deputy attorney general for Mifflin County, Pennsylvania. In 1849 he left for California and the newly discovered gold fields, then moved on to the Oregon Territory in 1851. In Oregon he set up a law practice in Portland and was one of three people selected to help re-write the
    5.00
    1 votes
    221
    James Wilson

    James Wilson

    James Wilson (1742–1798) was one of the Founding Fathers of the United States and a signer of the United States Declaration of Independence. Wilson was elected twice to the Continental Congress, and was a major force in drafting the United States Constitution. A leading legal theorist, he was one of the six original justices appointed by George Washington to the Supreme Court of the United States. One of seven children, Wilson was born to a Presbyterian farming family on September 14, 1742 in Carskerdo, Fife, Scotland to William Wilson and Alison Landall. Wilson attended a number of Scottish universities without attaining a degree. Imbued with the ideas of the Scottish Enlightenment he moved to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in British America in 1766, carrying valuable letters of introduction. These helped Wilson to begin tutoring and then teaching at The Academy and College of Philadelphia (now the University of Pennsylvania). He petitioned there for a degree and was awarded an honorary Master of Arts several months later. Wilson began to read the law at the office of John Dickinson a short time later. After two years of study he attained the bar in Philadelphia,and in the following
    5.00
    1 votes
    222
    Janice Rogers Brown

    Janice Rogers Brown

    • Cases: Discover Bank v. Superior Court
    Janice Rogers Brown (born May 11, 1949) is a federal judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. She previously was an Associate Justice of the California Supreme Court, holding that post from May 2, 1996 until her appointment to the D.C. Circuit. President George W. Bush nominated her to her current position in 2003. However, her nomination was stalled in the U.S. Senate for almost two years because of Democratic opposition. She began serving as a federal appellate court judge on June 8, 2005. Born in Greenville, Alabama, Brown is an Alabama sharecropper's daughter who attended segregated majority African American schools as a child. Her family refused to enter places of business that segregated blacks. She earned her B.A. from California State University, Sacramento in 1974 and her Juris Doctor (J.D.) degree from the UCLA School of Law in 1977. She worked her own way through law school while being a single mother. In addition, she received an LL.M. degree from the University of Virginia School of Law in 2004. Brown has said that when she was young, she was so liberal in her politics that she was almost Maoist, although she is now
    5.00
    1 votes
    223
    Joseph Jekyll

    Joseph Jekyll

    Sir Joseph Jekyll KS (1663 – 19 August 1738) was a British barrister, politician and judge. Born to John Jekyll, he initially attended a seminary before joining the Middle Temple in 1680. Thanks to his association with Lord Somers Jekyll advanced rapidly, becoming Chief Justice of Chester in 1697 and a King's Serjeant in 1702. He was returned as a Whig Member of Parliament for Eye in 1697, and was considered an excellent speaker in the House of Commons and one of the Whig Junto. As a Member of Parliament Jekyll helped draft many bills, and was key in convincing the government to investigate the collapse of the South Sea Company in 1720. On 13 July 1717 he was made Master of the Rolls, and fulfilled his duties with "legal ability, integrity and despatch" until his death on 19 August 1738 of "a mortification in the bowels". Jekyll was born in 1663 to John Jekyll and his second wife Tryphena, and was the half-brother of Thomas Jekyll. He attended a seminary in Islington before joining the Middle Temple in 1680 and was called to the Bar in 1687. Thanks to his connections with Middle Temple he became an associate of the Lord Chancellor, Lord Somers, and later married Somers' sister,
    5.00
    1 votes
    224
    Perez Morton

    Perez Morton

    Perez Morton (November 13, 1751 - October 14, 1837) was a lawyer and revolutionary patriot in Boston, Massachusetts. Morton was born in Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1751, and raised in Boston. His father, Joseph Morton, worked as a tavern-keeper at the White Horse Tavern. Perez attended the Boston Latin School starting around 1760, and Harvard College, graduating in 1771. He was admitted to the Massachusetts bar in 1774. He participated in the Committee of Safety, and the Committee of Correspondence; he was also a Mason, serving as Deputy Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts in 1789-1790. In 1775-1776, he was Deputy Secretary of the Council of the Colony of Massachusetts Bay. On April 8, 1776, Morton spoke at the memorial service held for Joseph Warren, at King's Chapel. In 1778, he married Sarah Wentworth Apthorp. Together they had 5 children: Sarah Apthorp Morton (1782–1844); Anna Louisa Morton (1783–1843); Frances Wentworth Morton (1785–1831); Charles Ward Apthorp Morton (1786–1809); and Charlotte Morton (1787–1819) From ca.1796 to ca.1803, the Mortons owned a house on Dudley Street in Dorchester; the house may have been designed by Charles Bulfinch. Friends and
    5.00
    1 votes
    225
    Alfred Henry Clarke

    Alfred Henry Clarke

    Alfred Henry Clarke (October 25, 1860 – January 30, 1942) was a Canadian politician. Born in Manilla, Canada West, Clarke was educated at the Public School of Manilla and the Oakwood High School. In addition to studying law at the University of Toronto, he was also a Bencher of the Law Society of Upper Canada, a County Crown Attorney, and a Clerk of the Peace and Local Master in Chancery in Essex. Clarke was first elected to the Canadian House of Commons for the electoral district of Essex South in the general elections of 1904. Standing as a Liberal, he was re-elected in 1908 and 1911. He became a judge of the Supreme Court of Alberta Appellate Division in 1921 until 1942.
    4.00
    2 votes
    226
    Edward M. Chen

    Edward M. Chen

    • Cases: Oracle Corporation v. SAP AG
    Edward Milton Chen (born 1953) is a United States District Judge on the United States District Court for the Northern District of California. On May 10, 2011, the United States Senate confirmed Chen in a 56–42 vote. He received his judicial commission on May 12, 2011. Born and raised in Oakland, California, Chen earned a bachelor's degree in 1975 from the University of California, Berkeley and a law degree from Boalt Hall School of Law in 1979. After graduating law school, Chen served judicial clerkships for United States District Judge Charles Renfrew from June 1979 until April 1980 and United States Circuit Judge James R. Browning from June 1981 until June 1982. In April 2001, the judges on the United States District Court for the Northern District of California named Chen to an eight-year term as a federal magistrate judge. From 1982 until 1985, Chen served as an associate at the San Francisco law firm of Coblentz, Cahen, McCabe & Breyer. In September 1985, Chen became a staff attorney for the American Civil Liberties Union, specializing in language discrimination cases. He held that post until becoming a federal magistrate judge in 2001. Chen served as a federal magistrate
    4.00
    1 votes
    227
    Jean-Thomas Taschereau

    Jean-Thomas Taschereau

    Jean-Thomas Taschereau (December 12, 1814 – November 9, 1893) was a Canadian lawyer and judge. Born in Quebec City, Lower Canada (now Quebec), the son of Jean-Thomas Taschereau, a politician who was a Member of the Quebec National Assembly, and Marie Panet, he was called to the bar in 1836. He studied law in Paris and upon his return to Quebec City he practised for 18 years. He also taught at Université Laval from 1855 to 1857. In 1865, he was appointed a judge of the Quebec Superior Court, and in 1873, was appointed to the Court of Queen's Bench of Quebec. On September 30, 1875, he was appointed to the Supreme Court of Canada and retired on October 6, 1878. He is the father of Louis-Alexandre Taschereau, a Liberal Premier of the Canadian province of Quebec from 1920 to 1936.
    4.00
    1 votes
    228
    John O'Connor

    John O'Connor

    John O'Connor, PC (January 1, 1824 – November 3, 1887) was a Canadian politician and cabinet minister. Born in Boston, Massachusetts, the son of Irish immigrants John and Mary O’Connor, he moved with his family to Essex County, Upper Canada in 1828. A lawyer by training, he was elected to the 7th Parliament of the Province of Canada in 1863. In 1867, he was elected to the 1st Canadian Parliament representing the riding of Essex. He was re-elected to the 2nd Canadian Parliament but was defeated in the 1874 federal election. In the period of 1872 to 1873, he was President of the Privy Council, Minister of Inland Revenue, and Postmaster General. He was re-elected again in the 1878 federal election for the riding of Russell. From 1878 to 1880, he again was the President of the Privy Council. As well he was the Postmaster General in 1880 and from 1881 to 1882. From 1880 to 1881, he was the Secretary of State of Canada. In 1884, he was appointed a judge of the Court of Queen’s Bench for Ontario.
    4.00
    1 votes
    229
    Kevin Warsh

    Kevin Warsh

    Kevin Maxwell Warsh (born April 13, 1970), a lawyer, government official and academic, was a member of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System from 2006 to 2011. He is currently a distinguished visiting fellow at Stanford University's Hoover Institution. Warsh was born in Albany, New York, and grew up near Albany, attending Shaker High School in Latham. He received a B.A. in public policy (with honors) from Stanford University in 1992 with a concentration in economics and political science. He went on to study law at Harvard Law School and received a J.D. (cum laude) in 1995. He also took coursework in market economics and debt capital markets at Harvard Business School and the MIT Sloan School of Management. From 1995 to 2002, Warsh worked for Morgan Stanley in New York City, ultimately becoming a Vice President and Executive Director in the company's Mergers and Acquisitions Department. From 2002 to 2006, Warsh was Special Assistant to the President for Economic Policy, and Executive Secretary of the National Economic Council. His primary areas of responsibility included domestic finance, banking and securities regulatory policy, and consumer protection. He advised
    4.00
    1 votes
    230
    Louis Henry Davies

    Louis Henry Davies

    Sir Louis Henry Davies, PC KCMG QC (May 4, 1845 – May 1, 1924) was a Prince Edward Island (PEI) lawyer, businessman and politician, and judge. In a public career spanning six decades, he served as the third Premier of Prince Edward Island, a federal Member of Parliament and Cabinet minister, and as both a Puisne Justice and the sixth Chief Justice of Canada. He was born in Charlottetown, the son of Benjamin Davies and Kezia Attwood Watts. He read law at the Inner Temple in London and later called to bar in England in 1866. He served as lead counsel for the Prince Edward Island Land Commission, which was established in 1875 to settle the problem of absentee land ownership and to provide tenants of the Island with clear title to their lands. Davies was first elected to the House of Assembly as a Liberal in 1872 just prior to PEI entering Canadian confederation. With the issue of confederation resolved and the land question settled as a result of Canada's promise to fund land reform and the passage of the Land Purchase Act, the major issue remaining on the island was that of school funding and whether the school system should be entirely secular and public or whether separate schools
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    Pierre-Amand Landry

    Pierre-Amand Landry

    Sir Pierre-Amand Landry (May 1, 1846 – July 28, 1916) was an Acadian lawyer, judge and political figure in New Brunswick. He represented Westmorland County in the Legislative Assembly of New Brunswick from 1870 to 1874 and from 1878 to 1883. He represented Kent in the Canadian House of Commons from 1883 to 1890 as a Conservative member. He was born in Memramcook, New Brunswick, the son of Amand Landry and Pélagie Caissie, and was educated in Memramcook and Fredericton. He taught school for a time, articled in the law office of Albert James Smith and was called to the bar in 1871, becoming the first Acadian lawyer in the province. Landry set up practice in Dorchester. In 1872, he married Bridget Annie McCarthy. In 1875, he helped defend nine Acadians charged with killing an English protester at a demonstration by Acadians against a public school tax. Landry served in the province's Executive Council as Commissioner of Public Works from 1878 to 1882 and provincial secretary from 1882 to 1883. As Commissioner of Public Works, he was responsible for the construction of a new provincial building for the assembly; the old building had burned in 1880. In 1881, he was named Queen's
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    Robert Trimble

    Robert Trimble

    Robert Trimble (November 17, 1776 – August 25, 1828) was an attorney, judge, and a justice of the United States Supreme Court. Trimble was born in Berkeley County, Virginia, to William Trimble and Mary McMillan. His family moved to Kentucky when he was three years old. They settled in the area outside Boonesboro (now Clark County). Trimble's opportunities for early education were sparse, but he studied what material was available and taught school for a few years. He studied law at a new law school in Lebanon, Ohio. He also read law under George Nicholas until Nicholas' death in 1799, then continued his studies under future Louisiana Senator James Brown. He was licensed to practice law by the Kentucky Court of Appeals in 1803 and commenced practice in Paris, Kentucky. Trimble married Nancy Timberlake and the two had at least six children. In 1803, Trimble was elected to represent Bourbon County in the Kentucky House of Representatives. During his single term in the legislature, he found that he disliked the life of a politician, and thereafter refused election to any public office, including two nominations to the U.S. Senate. In 1808, Trimble was commissioned as an associate
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    Thibaudeau Rinfret

    Thibaudeau Rinfret

    Thibaudeau Rinfret, PC (June 22, 1879 – July 25, 1962) was a Canadian jurist and the ninth Chief Justice of Canada and acting Governor General of Canada in 1952. Rinfret studied law at Université Laval and McGill University and was called to the Bar of Quebec in 1901. He was appointed to the Quebec Superior Court in 1922 and to the Supreme Court of Canada in 1924. Rinfret was son of François-Olivier Rinfret and Albina Pominville. He was the brother of Fernand Rinfret, Liberal politician and Montreal Mayor, and brother of Charles Rinfret, a prominent Montreal businessman. In May 1933, his brother Charles died in an apparent suicide by jumping off a bridge in front of a passing train. Rinfret became Chief Justice on January 8, 1944, and served until his retirement on June 22, 1954. During his term as Chief Justice, Canada ended appeals to the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council making the Supreme Court of Canada the final court of appeal in Canadian jurisprudence. Rinfret was acting Governor General (or Administrator of the Government) in 1952 after the departure of Harold Alexander, 1st Earl Alexander of Tunis and until Vincent Massey could officially take his vice-regal post;
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    Angus McIsaac

    Angus McIsaac

    Angus McIsaac (1842 – June 12, 1902) was a Nova Scotia lawyer, judge and political figure. He represented Antigonish in the Canadian House of Commons as a Liberal member from 1873 to 1885. He was born in Antigonish, Nova Scotia in 1842, the son of Donald McIsaac and Catherine McGillivray, and studied at Saint Francis Xavier College. McIsaac served as inspector of schools for Antigonish County. He articled in law with William Joseph Croke and Daniel MacDonald and was called to the bar in 1871. He practised law in Antigonish. In 1882, he married Mary Power. McIsaac was elected to the House of Commons in an 1873 by-election held after Hugh McDonald was named to the Nova Scotia Supreme Court. He resigned from his seat in 1885 to accept an appointment as judge in the county court. He died in Antigonish while still a judge at the age of 60. His brother Colin Francis represented Antigonish in the Nova Scotia assembly and the House of Commons.
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    Edward Douglass White

    Edward Douglass White

    Edward Douglass White, Jr. (November 3, 1844 – May 19, 1921), American politician and jurist, was a United States senator, Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court and the ninth Chief Justice of the United States. He was best known for formulating the Rule of Reason standard of antitrust law. He also sided with the Supreme Court majority in the 1896 decision of Plessy v. Ferguson (1896), which upheld the legality of segregation in the United States, though he did write for a unanimous court in Guinn v. United States (1915), which struck down many Southern states' grandfather clauses that disenfranchised blacks. White was born on his parents' plantation near the town of Thibodeauxville (now Thibodaux) in Lafourche Parish in south Louisiana. He was the son of Edward Douglass White, Sr., a former governor of Louisiana, and grandson of Dr. James White, a U.S. representative, physician, and judge. On his mother's side, he was the grandson of U.S. Marshal Tench Ringgold, and related to the Lee family of Virginia. The White family's large plantation cultivated sugar cane and refined it into a finished product. White's paternal ancestors were of Irish descent, and he was a
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    Jay Bybee

    Jay Bybee

    • Cases: United States v. Camacho
    Jay Scott Bybee (born October 27, 1953) is a federal judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. He has published numerous articles in law journals and has taught in law school. His primary research interests are in constitutional and administrative law. While serving in the Bush administration as the Assistant Attorney General for the Office of Legal Counsel, he signed the controversial torture memos. Bybee graduated magna cum laude and with Highest Honors from Brigham Young University in 1977, majoring in Economics. He earned his Juris Doctor cum laude from BYU's J. Reuben Clark Law School in 1980. While in law school, he served on the editorial board of the BYU Law Review. Thereafter, Bybee spent one year as law clerk to judge Donald S. Russell of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit. Following three years of private practice in Washington, D.C., Bybee worked for the U.S. Department of Justice from 1984 to 1989, first in the Office of Legal Policy and then in the Civil Division. From 1989 to 1991, Bybee served as Associate Counsel to President George H. W. Bush. From 1991 to 1999, Bybee was on the faculty of the Paul M. Hebert Law
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    John Douglas Armour

    John Douglas Armour

    John Douglas Armour (May 4, 1830 – July 11, 1903) was a Canadian Puisne judge of the Supreme Court of Canada. Born in the township of Otonabee, Upper Canada (now Ontario), the son of Samuel Armour, he was educated at Upper Canada College, and received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1850 from the University of Toronto. He was called to the Bar in 1853 and practised law for 25 years in Cobourg, Ontario. In 1877, he was appointed to the Court of Queen's Bench of Ontario and was appointed as its chief justice in November of that year. In 1901, he was appointed Chief Justice of Ontario. In 1902, he was appointed to the Supreme Court of Canada but only served seven months before his death. Mount Armour, aka Boundary Peak 175, a summit on the boundary between British Columbia and the US state of Alaska, was named for him. Justice Armour was one of the original commissioners of the Alaska Boundary Tribunal and was replaced on it after his death by A.B. Aylesworth. Also Armour Township in Ontario, Canada, was named after him.
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    John Idington

    John Idington

    John Idington, QC, LL.B (October 14, 1840 – February 7, 1928) was a Canadian justice of the Supreme Court of Canada. Born in Puslinch, Upper Canada (now Ontario), the son of Peter Idington and Catherine Stewart, he received his LL.B degree from the University of Toronto and was called to the Ontario Bar both in 1864. He practiced law in Stratford, Canada West (now Ontario) for forty years. He was created a provincial QC in 1876 and a dominion QC in 1885. In 1904, he was appointed to the High Court of Justice of Ontario and he was appointed by Wilfrid Laurier to the Supreme Court on February 10, 1905. Notable decisions include his dissent in Quong Wing v. R. (49 S.C.R. 44), in which he disagreed with the effects of racist legislation, on the basis that the use of the term "Chinaman" could not have been meant to refer to naturalized Canadians of Chinese origin. He retired on March 31, 1927 after legislation was passed requiring a mandatory retirement age of 75.
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    John McCourt

    John McCourt

    John McCourt (February 26, 1874—September 12, 1924) was an American attorney and jurist in the state of Oregon. He served as the 51st Associate Justice of the Oregon Supreme Court. Prior to joinng the court, McCourt had worked as United States District Attorney for the District of Oregon. A native of Canada, he was also a state court judge and member of the Oregon House of Representatives. John McCourt was born on February 26, 1874 in Listowel, Ontario, Canada. His parents, James McCourt and Emma Farnscomb, and the rest of the family moved to California when John was young. There he received his primary education before he moved to Oregon in 1890. In Oregon he attended Willamette University in the literary department. He then switched to the law school where he graduated in 1896 and began practicing law in Salem, Oregon. He passed the bar in June 1896. In 1898, McCourt was elected and served as a Republican from Marion County, Oregon in the Oregon House of Representatives during a special session. He returned the following year for the regular legislative assembly. McCourt then moved to Eastern Oregon in 1900 where he practiced law in Pendleton until 1908. On March 17, 1908 he was
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    Joseph-Alfred Mousseau

    Joseph-Alfred Mousseau

    Joseph-Alfred Mousseau, PC (July 17, 1837 – March 30, 1886), was a French Canadian politician. He was born in Sainte-Geneviève-de-Berthier, Lower Canada, the son of Louis Mousseau, the son of Alexis Mousseau, and Sophie Duteau, dit Grandpré. Mousseau was first elected to the Canadian House of Commons as a Conservative Member of Parliament in the 1874 election for the riding of Bagot, and was re-elected three times. In 1880, he was elevated to the Cabinet of Prime Minister Sir John A. Macdonald, serving first as president of the Queen's Privy Council of Canada, and then as Secretary of State for Canada. Mousseau left federal politics to become the sixth Premier of the province of Quebec from July 31, 1882, until his resignation on January 22, 1884, after being appointed as a judge. He died in Montreal in 1886. His brother Joseph Octave Mousseau was also a member of the Canadian House of Commons.
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    Leah Ward Sears

    Leah Ward Sears

    Leah Ward Sears (born June 13, 1955) is an American jurist and former Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Georgia. Sears was the first African-American female Chief Justice in the United States. When she was first appointed as justice in 1992 by Governor Zell Miller, she became the first woman and youngest person to sit on the Georgia's Supreme Court. Leah Ward Sears was born in Heidelberg, Germany to United States Army Colonel Thomas E. Sears and Onnye Jean Sears. The family eventually settled in Savannah, Georgia, where she attended and graduated from Savannah High School. Sears received a B.S. from Cornell University in 1976, her Juris Doctor from Emory University School of Law in 1980, and a Master of Laws from the University of Virginia School of Law in 1995. At Cornell, Sears was a member of Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority and the Quill and Dagger society. She holds honorary degrees from Morehouse College, Clark-Atlanta University, LaGrange College, Piedmont College, and Spelman College. After graduating from law school, Sears was an attorney from 1980 until 1985 with the Atlanta law firm Alston & Bird. For many years she was also an adjunct Professor of Law at Emory University
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    Lewis Franklin Powell, Jr.

    Lewis Franklin Powell, Jr.

    • Cases: Diamond v. Chakrabarty
    Lewis Franklin Powell, Jr. (September 19, 1907 – August 25, 1998) was an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. He developed a reputation as a judicial moderate, and was known as a master of compromise and consensus-building. He was known for drafting the Powell Memorandum, a confidential memorandum for the US Chamber of Commerce that described a road map to defend and further their concept of free-enterprise capitalism against real and/or perceived socialist, communist, and fascist cultural trends. Powell was born in Suffolk, Virginia. He attended Washington and Lee University, earning both an undergraduate and a law degree from that university. He was elected president of student body as an undergraduate with the help of Mosby G. Perrow, Jr., and the two would later serve together on the Virginia State Board of Education in the 1960s. Powell was a member of Phi Kappa Sigma fraternity and the Sigma Society. At a leadership conference, he met Edward R. Murrow and they became close friends. He attended Harvard Law School for a master's degree. During World War II, he served years in Europe and North Africa. He started as a First Lieutenant, and eventually rose
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    Owen Dixon

    Owen Dixon

    • Cases: O'Sullivan v Noarlunga Meat Ltd
    Sir Owen Dixon, OM, GCMG, KC (28 April 1886 – 7 July 1972) Australian judge and diplomat, was the sixth Chief Justice of Australia. A justice of the High Court for thirty-five years, Dixon was one of the leading jurists in the English-speaking world and is widely regarded as Australia's greatest ever jurist. Dixon was born in Hawthorn in suburban Melbourne in 1886. His father, JW Dixon, was a barrister and subsequently a solicitor. He attended Hawthorn College and later the University of Melbourne, graduating with an Arts degree in 1907. During this time he developed his lifelong love of the classics. His BA became an MA, as was the custom then, a year later upon the payment of a small fee. He also studied law at the Melbourne Law School and was awarded a Bachelor of Laws in 1908, although he did not take his final honours exam. Dixon was later awarded honorary doctorates from Oxford, Harvard, and the University of Melbourne. Dixon was admitted to the Victorian Bar in 1910. In December 1911, Dixon appeared before the High Court of Australia for the first time, aged just 25 years. After a slow start, his career was stellar, and he became a King's Counsel in 1922. In the 1920s, Dixon
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    Richard Goldstone

    Richard Goldstone

    • Cases: National Coalition for Gay and Lesbian Equality and Another v. Minister of Justice and Others
    Richard Joseph Goldstone (born 26 October 1938) is a South African former judge. After working for 17 years as a commercial lawyer, he was appointed by the South African government to serve on the Transvaal Supreme Court from 1980 to 1989 and the Appellate Division of the Supreme Court of South Africa from 1990 to 1994. He was one of several liberal judges who issued key rulings that undermined apartheid from within the system by tempering the worst effects of the country's racial laws. Among other important rulings, Goldstone made the Group Areas Act – under which non-whites were banned from living in "whites only" areas – virtually unworkable by restricting evictions. As a result, prosecutions under the act virtually ceased. During the transition from apartheid to multiracial democracy in the early 1990s, he headed the influential Goldstone Commission investigations into political violence in South Africa between 1991 and 1994. Goldstone's work enabled multi-party negotiations to remain on course despite repeated outbreaks of violence, and his willingness to criticise all sides led to him being dubbed "perhaps the most trusted man, certainly the most trusted member of the white
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    Robert Alexander Harrison

    Robert Alexander Harrison

    Robert Alexander Harrison (August 3, 1833 – November 1, 1878) was an Ontario lawyer, judge and political figure. He represented West Toronto in the 1st Canadian Parliament as a Conservative member. Harrison was born in Montreal, Lower Canada in 1833, the son of Irish immigrants. The family moved to Markham Township and then Toronto. Harrison studied at Upper Canada College and Trinity College, Toronto. He studied law and was called to the bar in 1855. He served as chief clerk of the Crown Law Department from 1854 to 1859; and then entered private practice. In 1867, Harrison was named Queen's Counsel. He served on Toronto city council in 1867 and 1868. He was also a director of the Toronto, Grey and Bruce Railway. In 1875, he was named chief justice for the Court of Queen's Bench of Ontario. Harrison contributed articles to several legal journals and newspapers, serving for a time as joint editor for the Upper Canada Law Journal. He was one of the arbitrators involved in establishing the western boundary for the province of Ontario. Harrison died in Toronto in 1878, at the age of 45. The second wife of Hon. Robert A. Harrison, U.C.L., Chief Justice of Ontario was Kennithina Johana
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    Samuel Harrison

    Samuel Harrison

    Samuel Bealey Harrison (March 4, 1802 – July 23, 1867) was Joint Premier of the Province of Canada for Canada East from 1841 to 1842 with William Henry Draper PM for Canada West. Draper was a member of the Family Compact and Harrison was a moderate Reformer, the predecessor of the Liberal Party of Canada. Born in Manchester England to John and Mary Harrison, Harrison was a lawyer, miller, politician, and judge. He was called to the bar in 1832 and entered practice in London. Because of ill health, he retired to Upper Canada near Oakville in 1837, intending to become a gentleman farmer. He also built a sawmill and gristmill on his property. In 1839, he was called to the bar in Upper Canada and was appointed a justice of the peace in the following year. In 1841, Lord Sydenham appointed him provincial secretary for Canada West in the Executive Council of the Province of Canada. He was elected to the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Canada in Kingston and served as government leader with William Henry Draper. In 1842, he was appointed to the Board of Works which was responsible for the building and improvement of canals within the province. Harrison was responsible for drafting
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    Sherman Minton

    Sherman Minton

    Sherman "Shay" Minton (October 20, 1890 – April 9, 1965) was a Democratic United States Senator from Indiana and an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. After attending college and law school, he served as a captain in World War I, following which he launched a legal and political career. In 1930, after multiple failed election attempts, and serving as a regional leader in the American Legion, he became a utility commissioner under the administration of Indiana Governor Paul V. McNutt. Four years later, Minton was elected to the United States Senate. During the campaign, he defended New Deal legislation in a series of addresses in which he suggested it was not necessary to uphold the Constitution during the Great Depression crisis. Minton's campaign was denounced by his political opponents, and he received more widespread criticism for an address that became known as the "You Cannot Eat the Constitution" speech. As part of the New Deal Coalition, the fiercely partisan Minton championed President Franklin D. Roosevelt's unsuccessful court packing plans in the Senate and became one of his top Senate allies. After Minton failed in his 1940 Senate re-election
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    Wally Oppal

    Wally Oppal

    Wallace Oppal, Q.C. (born 1940 in Vancouver, British Columbia) is a Canadian lawyer, former judge and provincial politician, who is currently serving as the Chancellor of the Thompson Rivers University. He was first elected to the Legislative Assembly of British Columbia in 2005 as a BC Liberal MLA for the seat of Vancouver-Fraserview. Born in the Fraserview precinct of south Vancouver, Oppal is a graduate of the University of British Columbia Law School and operated his own law practice before going to the Bench. He was appointed to the County Court of Vancouver in 1981 and to the Supreme Court of British Columbia in 1985. In 2003, he was appointed to the British Columbia Court of Appeal where he served until he resigned to seek election to the provincial legislature. He is the second Indo-Canadian Attorney-General of British Columbia. Oppal served in the provincial cabinet as Attorney General of British Columbia and Minister responsible for Multiculturalism. He is also known as the author of a report: the Independent Commission of Inquiry into Policing in British Columbia (commonly referred to as the Oppal Inquiry). Oppal announced in March 2007 that he was undergoing treatment
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    Yogesh Kumar Sabharwal

    Yogesh Kumar Sabharwal

    Yogesh Kumar Sabharwal (born January 14, 1942) was the 36th Chief Justice of India. Sabharwal worked as an advocate for Indian Railways from 1969 to 1981, as an advocate for Delhi administration from 1973 to 1976-1977, later as Additional Standing Counsel and then as Standing Counsel. He also served as Counsel to the Central Government from 1980 to 1986. He represented Delhi in the Bar Council of India from 1969 to 1973. He became an Additional Judge in the Delhi High Court on November 17, 1986 and a judge soon after. On February 3, 1999, he was appointed as Chief Justice of Bombay High Court. In less than a year, he was appointed as a judge, Supreme Court of India. Being the seniormost judge of the Supreme Court of India at the time, Sabharwal was appointed as the Chief Justice of India to succeed Mr. R.C. Lahoti who was retiring on October 31, 2005. He was sworn in as the Chief Justice by the President of India, A P J Abdul Kalam on November 1, 2005 for a period of about 14 months as he would turn 65, the retirement age for Chief Justices, on January 14, 2007. As a judge of the Supreme Court, he delivered several important judgements dealing with constitutional matters. During
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