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  • Nov 27th 2012
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Best Island of All Time

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    1
    Takarajima

    Takarajima

    • Island Group: Tokara Islands
    • Body Of Water: Pacific Ocean
    Takarajima (宝島, Takara-jima), literally "treasure island", is one of the Tokara Islands, belonging to Kagoshima Prefecture. The island, 7.14 7.14 km² in area, has a population of 116 persons.
    9.29
    7 votes
    2
    Siple Island

    Siple Island

    Siple Island is a 110 km (68 mi) long snow-covered island lying east of Wrigley Gulf along the Getz Ice Shelf off Bakutis Coast of Marie Byrd Land, Antarctica. Its centre is located at 73°51′S 125°50′W / 73.85°S 125.833°W / -73.85; -125.833. Its area is 6,390 km (2,467 sq mi) and it is dominated by the dormant shield volcano Mount Siple, rising to 3,110 m (10,203 ft) - making this the 17th ranking island in the world by maximum altitude. Island and mountain were named by the United States Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) in 1967 in honour of the Antarctic explorer Paul A. Siple (1909–1968), member of Admiral Byrd's expeditions.
    7.25
    8 votes
    3
    East Sister Island

    East Sister Island

    • Body Of Water: Lake Erie
    East Sister Island is a 15 hectare island in Ontario, located within Lake Erie, maintained as a Provincial Nature Reserve. This large, wooded, Lake Erie island is uninhabited except for thousands of birds. The island is part of the Pelee Archipelago which also includes West Sister Island (in Ohio, USA) and Middle Sister Island. The island has become the home of a breeding colony of double-crested cormorants. Their droppings have threatened the forest, a relict of Carolinian forest in southern Ontario. Unusual species on the island include the wild hyacinth and the Lake Erie water snake, Nerodia sipedon insularum.
    7.71
    7 votes
    4
    King William Island

    King William Island

    • Island Group: Canadian Arctic Archipelago
    King William Island (previously: King William Land; Inuktitut: Qikiqtaq) is an island in the Kitikmeot Region of Nunavut and forms part of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. In area it is between 12,516 km (4,832 sq mi) and 13,111 km (5,062 sq mi) making it the 61st largest island in the world and Canada's 15th largest island. Its population, as of the 2006 census, was 1,064, all of which live in the island's only community Gjoa Haven. The island is separated from the Boothia Peninsula by the James Ross Strait to the northeast, and the Rae Strait to the east. To the west is the Victoria Strait and beyond it Victoria Island. Within the Simpson Strait, to the south of the island, is Todd Island, and beyond it, further to the south, is the Adelaide Peninsula. Queen Maud Gulf lies to the southwest. Victory Point is on its north coast. Gore Point, Point Le Vesconte, Erebus Bay and Terror Bay are on the west coast. Douglas Bay, Booth Point, and Gjoa Haven are on the south coast. The island is known for its large populations of caribou who summer there, before walking south over the sea ice in the autumn. While searching for the Northwest Passage, a number of polar explorers visited, or
    7.71
    7 votes
    5
    Keppel Island

    Keppel Island

    • Island Group: Falkland Islands
    • Body Of Water: Atlantic Ocean
    Keppel Island (Spanish: Isla de la Vigia) is one of the Falkland Islands, lying between Saunders Island and Pebble Island, and near Golding Island to the north of West Falkland on Keppel Sound. It has an area of 3,626 hectares (8,960 acres) and its highest point, Mt Keppel, is 341 metres (1,119 ft) high. There is a wide, flat valley in the centre of the island with several freshwater lakes. The central valley rises steeply to the south-west, west and north. The north-east is low-lying, with a deeply indented coastline. The main conservation issue is the large population of Norway rats on the island. The island is named after First Lord of the Admiralty, Admiral Augustus Keppel. The island became a sheep farm in 1885, initially doubling as a missionary settlement aimed at the Yaghan people of Tierra del Fuego. More recently, it became a nature reserve. It also has a small settlement on the east coast, but no permanent population. The mission on Keppel Island was established by the South American Missionary Society in 1855, initially under Captain William Parker Snow, and remained in operation until 1898. It had been proposed by Captain Allen Gardiner, founder of the Society, before
    6.63
    8 votes
    6
    Pasque Island

    Pasque Island

    Pasque Island is one of the Elizabeth Islands of Dukes County, Massachusetts, USA. It lies between Nashawena Island to the west and Naushon Island to the east. The island has a land area of 3.45 km² (1.333 sq mi or 853 acres) and had a population of 2 persons as of the 2000 census. The island is part of the town of Gosnold, Massachusetts.
    7.43
    7 votes
    7
    Cliff Island

    Cliff Island

    • Body Of Water: Casco Bay
    Cliff Island is an island in Casco Bay Maine. It is part of the city of Portland, Maine. As of the 2000 census, the island had a year-round population of approximately 60 people. In the summer, the island's population grows to about 200, despite the fact that it is the only year-round inhabited island in Casco Bay with no paved roads. Originally named Crotch Island for its H-shape and natural harbors, the name was changed to end mail mix-ups with the other Crotch Island in Maine. In the early 20th century the island's inns were a draw for summer tourists. There are no hotels any longer, but many homes are available for weekly rentals or longer. While there are no public services, residents enjoy a community hall, a tennis court, baseball field, and playground. The residents are served by a USPS Post Office, fire department, and one-room school for elementary grades. In 1987 the feature film The Whales of August was filmed entirely on location on Cliff Island. The buoy that was used in the film as a transitioning tool is now on display outside of the Casco Bay Lines Ferry Terminal. The film was among the last for stars such as Bette Davis, Lillian Gish, Vincent Price, and Ann
    8.17
    6 votes
    8
    Sugar Island

    Sugar Island

    • Body Of Water: Great Lakes
    Sugar Island is an island in the U.S. state of Michigan in the St. Marys River between the United States and the Canadian province of Ontario. The entire island constitutes Sugar Island Township in Chippewa County at the eastern tip of the Upper Peninsula. According to the 2000 census there were 683 people living on a land area of 128 km (49 sq mi). The island lies between Lake George and Lake Nicolet, and to the north of Neebish Island and St. Joseph Island. Pine Island is just east of its southern tip. The island was part of the disputed US-Canadian border dispute settled by the Webster-Ashburton Treaty, and affirmed to be part of the United States when the treaty was signed August 9, 1842. In 1945 Sugar Island was nominated a possible location for the headquarters of the United Nations. The island has large undeveloped areas, and both the Bay Mills Indian Community and the Sault Tribe of Chippewa Indians have interests on the island. The Sault Tribe consider it to be part of their ancestral homelands. The University of Michigan Biological Station operates the Chase Osborn Preserve, a 3,200 acres (13 km) tract near the southern tip of the island. 1. University of Michigan
    6.86
    7 votes
    9
    Fugloy

    Fugloy

    • Island Group: Faroe Islands
    • Body Of Water: Atlantic Ocean
    Fugloy (Danish Fuglø, Old Norse Fuglaey) is the eastern-most island in the Faroe Islands. The name means bird island, and refers to the large number of birds that nest on the island's cliffs. There are two settlements: Kirkja on the south-coast and Hattarvík on the east-coast. The Eystfelli cliffs, which are 448m are located on the east coast. Nearby on the 47 metre high sea stack Stapin there is also a lighthouse, a natural arch feature and what looks like the outline of an Egyptian Pharaoh (the Pharaoh's Face). The island has been identified as an Important Bird Area by BirdLife International because of its significance as a breeding site for seabirds, especially Atlantic Puffins (15,000 pairs), European Storm Petrels (25,000 pairs) and Black Guillemots (100 pairs), as well as for about 50 breeding pairs of Whimbrels. There are three mountains on Fugloy: The island has been populated since the Viking age. One of the most important stories of the island is that of the Floksmenn. They were a flock (group) of rebels, in the middle ages, from Fugloy. The most notorious of the separatists, (referred by the Danish governmental officials in Tórshavn) were Høgni Nev, Rógvi Skel, Hálvdan
    6.71
    7 votes
    10
    Fehmarn

    Fehmarn

    Fehmarn (Danish: Femern) is an island and—since 2003—a town on this island in the Baltic Sea, off the eastern coast of Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, and ca. 18 kilometers south of the Danish island of Lolland. It belongs to the district of Ostholstein. Earlier names of the island are Femera, Fimbria, Cimbria parva, and Imbra. Since 1963, Fehmarn has been connected to the German mainland by a road and rail bridge crossing the Fehmarn Sound Bridge. It is 963.40 m (3160.76 ft.) long and 69 m high. The area is 185 km² and the coastline is 78 km. The highest hills are the "Hinrichsberg" (27.2 m) and the "Wulfener Berg" (26.5 m). The largest community on Fehmarn is Burg, with 6,000 inhabitants. In addition, there are many small villages. The Fehmarn Belt, a strait separating Fehmarn from Lolland, is located on the side opposite to Germany. It can be crossed by ferries travelling between the seaports of Puttgarden, Germany, and Rødbyhavn, Denmark. The crossing takes about 45 minutes. On 29 June 2007, the Danish and German authorities gave the go-ahead for the Fehmarn Belt Fixed Link project, planned for completion in 2020. The coasts serve as resting places for migratory birds, and it is
    7.50
    6 votes
    11
    Mokoia Island

    Mokoia Island

    Mokoia Island is located in Lake Rotorua in New Zealand. It has an area of 1.35 square kilometres. The island is a rhyolite lava dome, rising to 180 metres above the lake surface. It was formed after the Rotorua caldera collapsed and rhyolitic magma was pushed through the cracks. One of the cracks was below where Mokoia island is today. The foreshores of the island have geothermal springs with hot spring water forming the Hinemoa pool, known to locals as Waikimihia. It also has very rich volcanic soil, which was why the local Māori grew kumara on it. it was also a very good strategic location, which was why it was often fought over. Mokoia Island is privately owned by local Māori iwi, who run it in conjunction with the New Zealand Department of Conservation. It is a bird sanctuary and access is limited to tour parties only. It is home to several rare species, including the kokako, the kiwi, and a breeding population of the endangered Saddleback. The island is also the location of regular Mau rākau training camps in the Maori martial art of taiaha. The island is sacred to Māori of the Arawa iwi, and is the location of one of the most famous legends of New Zealand, that of Hinemoa
    7.50
    6 votes
    12
    Pulau Ujong

    Pulau Ujong

    Pulau Ujong (Malay: literally 'island at the end [of the peninsula]') or Singapore Island is the main island of the island country of Singapore. It forms the majority of the island country in terms of area and population. It was the easiest reference to the Singapore Island as anyone travelling from the Straits of Malacca to the South China Sea or vice versa would have to pass the island, hence giving it the name. Like Johor's old name, Ujong Tanah meaning "Land's End", the island was known better by the Orang laut as Pulau Ujong literally meaning "End Island". The 3rd century Chinese reference to Pu Luo Chung(蒲罗中) corresponds to the Malay reference known as Pulau Ujong. According to a third century book Record of Foreign countries during the Easter Wu Period(吴时外国传), Pu Luo Jong (Pulao Ujong) was inhabited by cannibals with five to six inch tail.
    8.60
    5 votes
    13
    Ligitan

    Ligitan

    Ligitan is a small island in Tawau, Sabah, located east of the island of Borneo, in the Celebes Sea. In the past, the island was at the centre of a territorial dispute between Malaysia and Indonesia. The matter was brought for adjudication before the International Court of Justice and, at the end of 2002, the Court awarded the island along with the island of Sipadan to Malaysia, on the basis of the "effective occupation" displayed by the latter's predecessor (Malaysia's former colonial power, Great Britain) and the absence of any other superior title. The Philippines had applied to intervene in the proceedings on the basis of its claim to Northern Borneo, but its request was turned down by the Court early in 2001.
    9.50
    4 votes
    14
    Ærø

    Ærø

    Ærø (Danish pronunciation: ['ɛːʁœːˀ] - from Danish Ær = maple and Ø = island) is one of the Danish Baltic Sea islands, and part of Region of Southern Denmark. The western portion of the island was the municipality of Ærøskøbing; the eastern portion of the island was the municipality of Marstal. On January 1, 2006, they merged to form the Ærø municipality. Ærø's length is about 30 km, its width up to 8 km. The landscape is dominated by hills, there are three small towns. The largest town is Marstal with its 2,340 inhabitants. Ærøskøbing has 978 and Søby 598. 14 villages and a number of farms are also to be found on the island. Ærø is a popular destination for hiking and cycling, and provides beaches that also attract anglers and artists. The town of Ærøskøbing represents the historic center of the island, with narrow lanes and picturesque houses from the 18th century; it remains the primary port for ferry trasportation. Marstal, also known as "skipper" village, is home to many sailors and captains and currently serves as the island's shopping center. At the highest elevation of the island near Olde, there is the "peace bench" made by the sculptor Erik Brandt. It is intended to
    8.00
    5 votes
    15
    Delos

    Delos

    • Island Group: Cyclades
    • Body Of Water: Aegean Sea
    The island of Delos (Greek: Δήλος, [ˈðilos]; Attic Δῆλος, Doric Δᾶλος), near Mykonos, near the centre of the Cyclades archipelago, is one of the most important mythological, historical and archaeological sites in Greece. The excavations in the island are among the most extensive in the Mediterranean; ongoing work takes place under the direction of the French School at Athens and many of the artifacts found are on display at the Archaeological Museum of Delos and the National Archaeological Museum of Athens. Delos had a position as a holy sanctuary for a millennium before Olympian Greek mythology made it the birthplace of Apollo and Artemis. From its Sacred Harbour, the horizon shows the two conical mounds (image below) that have identified landscapes sacred to a goddess in other sites: one, retaining its pre-Greek name Mount Kynthos, is crowned with a sanctuary of Zeus. Established as a culture center, Delos had an importance that its natural resources could never have offered. In this vein Leto, searching for a birthing-place for Artemis and Apollo, addressed the island: Investigation of ancient stone huts found on the island indicate that it has been inhabited since the 3rd
    7.60
    5 votes
    16
    Navy Island

    Navy Island

    Navy Island is a small island in the Niagara River in the province of Ontario, managed by Parks Canada as a National Historic Site of Canada. It is located about 4.5 km (2.8 mi) upstream from Horseshoe Falls, and has an area of roughly 1.2 km (0.46 sq mi). It was designated a national historic site in 1921. Navy Island was settled by the Lamoka people in approximately 2000 BC and Meadowood culture peoples in 1000 BC. During the French colonization of New France, Navy Island was known as Île de la Marina. Here the French built four ships that they used to service the Great Lakes. When New France was ceded to the British in 1763, they set up a shipyard here. In the War of 1812, they would also station a detachment on the island. In 1837, William Lyon Mackenzie and about 200 of his supporters captured the island and proclaimed the Republic of Canada there. On January 11, 1838, the rebels were forced from the island and retreated across the river into the United States. In 1875, the Queens Hotel was established as a popular summer resort on the island's south side. It was destroyed by fire in 1910. Farms and orchards were located on the northeast, south, central, northwest and
    7.60
    5 votes
    17
    Lincoln Island

    Lincoln Island

    Lincoln Island is a wooded island in Lynn Canal in Alaska, United States. Located at 58°29′41″N 134°59′40″W / 58.49472°N 134.99444°W / 58.49472; -134.99444, the island is northwest of Shelter Island and southeast of Ralston Island. It is part of the Juneau City and Borough. The first European to sight the island was Joseph Whidbey, master of the HMS Discovery during George Vancouver's 1791-95 expedition, in 1794. It was named in 1868 by Commander R. W. Meade, USN, presumably for Abraham Lincoln.
    7.20
    5 votes
    18
    Isla Ángel de la Guarda

    Isla Ángel de la Guarda

    Isla Ángel de la Guarda, also called Archangel Island, and called Xazl Iimt ([ˈχaʃɬ ˈiːmt] 'homes of the pumas' in the Seri language, is a large island in the Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez) east of Bahía de los Ángeles, and separated from the Baja California Peninsula by the Canal de Ballenas (Whales Channel). It is the second largest of the eleven Midriff Islands or Islas Grandes. It is part of the state of Baja California, located northwest of Tiburón Island. The island is uninhabited, and is a biological reserve called Isla Angel de la Guarda National Park. The island is part of the Mexicali municipality. The geologically active Ballenas Fault runs along the seabed of the linear Canal de Ballenas. A 6.9 magnitude earthquake occurred on this fault in 2009. The island is extremely dry, with no sources of freshwater other than washes following rainfall. It has an area of 931 square kilometers (359 sq mi) and a chain of mountains runs along its 69 km length, reaching a maximum of 1,300 meters (4,300 feet) above sea level. It runs northwest to southeast. The west coast is roughly straight in that direction, but the east coast runs inward near the middle before heading outward
    8.25
    4 votes
    19
    Lovells Island

    Lovells Island

    • Island Group: Boston Harbor Islands
    • Body Of Water: Boston Harbor
    Lovells Island, or Lovell's Island, is a 62-acre (250,000 m) island in the Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area, in Massachusetts. The island is across The Narrows from Georges Island and some 7 miles (11 km) offshore of downtown Boston. It is named after Captain William Lovell, who was an early settler of nearby Dorchester. The island is known as the site of several shipwrecks, including the 74-gun French warship Magnifique in 1782. Lovells Island has had a succession of owners. In 1767, the town of Charlestown deeded the island to Elisha Leavitt Jr. of Hingham, Massachusetts, an infamous Tory who also owned Grape Island, where Leavitt later invited British forces to help themselves to his hay until they were chased off by patriots. Leavitt's payment for Lovells Island was set aside to pay for the town's school. Lovells Island was used by Native Americans for fishing, gardening and trading. Later uses included harvesting the island's timber, as a fishing station, as a residence for the keepers of Boston Light, and as a rabbit run. Once the home of the Lovells Island Range Lights, the island was a buoy tending station in the early 20th century and was fortified before and
    8.25
    4 votes
    20
    Siu A Chau

    Siu A Chau

    Siu A Chau (traditional Chinese: 小鴉洲) is an uninhabited island of Hong Kong, part of the Soko Islands group, located south of Lantau Island. Siu A Chau is the northernmost and the second largest of the Soko Islands, after Tai A Chau. It is dumbbell-shaped and has a rugged indented coastline with steep slopes. The highest point of the island is at 74 meters. There is a small beach at the northernmost point of the island. In 1937, Walter Schofield, then a Cadet Officer in the Hong Kong Civil Service, wrote that Siu A Chau was "another settlement of early man" and that it had a "fishing village of huts very different from ordinary Chinese dwellings" at the time of writing. There is a temple on the south side of the island. A low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) facility began operation at Siu A Chau in July 2005. Low-level radioactive wastes which had previously been stored in disused tunnels, two factories and five hospitals were subsequently transferred to the Siu A Chau facility. Part of this waste was relocated from the disused Mount Parish air-raid tunnels at Queen's Road East, in Wan Chai. The 55 m of LLRW stored there had raised objections. The opening ceremony of the facility
    7.00
    5 votes
    21
    Brunot Island

    Brunot Island

    Brunot Island (also spelled Brunot's Island) is a 129-acre (0.52 km) island in the Ohio River at the west end of Pittsburgh in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania in the United States. It was named for Dr. Felix Brunot who settled the island with his extended family in the late 1700s.. The family entertained the Lewis and Clark expedition on the island in August 1803. The island is home to the Brunot Island Generating Station, a 315 MW fossil fuel power plant. The Ohio Connecting Railroad Bridge crosses the Ohio River at the island. The island does not otherwise connect to the land, and all vehicular traffic must use a ferry to access the island. The employees of the power plant use a pedestrian walkway on the railroad bridge to go to work. From 1903 to 1914, the island was the home of Brunots Island Race Track.
    9.33
    3 votes
    22
    Mäkiluoto

    Mäkiluoto

    Mäkiluoto (Makilo in Swedish) is a Finnish island in the Gulf of Finland, just to the south of Porkkala peninsula. It is part of Kirkkonummi municipality. The whole island is an unmanned military installation and access for civilians is heavily restricted. A number of coastal artillery guns are emplaced there.
    8.00
    4 votes
    23
    Granville Island

    Granville Island

    Granville Island is a peninsula and shopping district in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. It is located in False Creek directly across from Downtown Vancouver's peninsula, under the south end of the Granville Street Bridge. The peninsula was once an industrial manufacturing area, but today it is now a major tourist destination and working neighbourhood. In 2004, Project for Public Spaces named Granville Island "One of the World's Great Places". The city of Vancouver was once called Granville until it was renamed in 1886, but the former name was kept and given to Granville Street, which spanned the small inlet known as False Creek. False Creek in the late 19th century was more than twice the size it is today, and its tidal flats included a large permanent sandbar over which spanned the original, rickety, wooden Granville Street bridge. This sandbar, which would eventually become Granville Island, was first mapped by Captain George Henry Richards in the British Boundary Commission's naval expedition in 1858-59, and the island today conforms roughly to the size and shape documented at that time. A British Admiralty Chart of 1893 shows the island in greater detail and conforming
    6.80
    5 votes
    24
    Ingoy

    Ingoy

    Ingøy is a small island in Måsøy municipality, Finnmark county in North Norway. It lies 60 kilometres west of North Cape. At Ingøy, there is Longwave transmitter Ingøy, whose mast is the tallest structure in Scandinavia.
    6.80
    5 votes
    25
    Peaks Island

    Peaks Island

    • Body Of Water: Casco Bay
    Peaks Island is the most populous island in Casco Bay, Maine. It is part of the city of Portland and is approximately 3 miles (4.8 km) from downtown. The island became a popular summer destination in the late 19th century, when it was known as the Coney Island of Maine, home to hotels, cottages, theaters, and amusement parks. While small, the island hosts a variety of flourishing businesses that are rapidly expanding and growing. These include an ice cream parlor called Downfront, a restaurant called The Cockeyed Gull, and Wildnut Farm Market. Hollywood film director John Ford was known as "The Mayor of Peaks Island" because of his great affinity for the island. He vacationed there from boyhood through the early 1960s, worked as an usher at the Gem Theater and was a deckhand on the Casco Bay Lines ferries in his youth. Ford's relatives still live on the island. Besides the Gem, which featured famous performers including the Barrymore family, two other summer theaters were located on the island. One, the Pavilion, opened in 1887, is said to be the first summer theater in the country. The Greenwood Garden Amusement Park sported the Greenwood Garden Playhouse. George M. Cohan tried
    6.80
    5 votes
    26
    Barren Island

    Barren Island

    Barren Island was originally an island east of the southern end of the New York City borough of Brooklyn, in Jamaica Bay. The area is separated from the Rockaway Peninsula in Queens by the Rockaway Inlet. It once maintained a somewhat diverse community for its time, supported mainly by a fish rendering plant and other industries related to offal products. The island housed a plant that rendered horse bones (supplied from the streets of New York City and elsewhere) into glue. This activity inspired the name Dead Horse Bay for the still extant water body on the western shore. Today it is connected to the Brooklyn mainland, owing to reclamation ground in 1926 that united a series of marsh islands (Barren Island being the largest) to create Floyd Bennett Field. All of what was once was Barren Island is now part of the Jamaica Bay Unit of Gateway National Recreation Area, managed by the National Park Service.
    9.00
    3 votes
    27
    The Jug

    The Jug

    The Jug — formerly known as the Jug Handle — is a jug-shaped island formed by a horseshoe bend on Middle Island Creek near Middlebourne in Tyler County, West Virginia. It is maintained by the state of West Virginia as The Jug Wildlife Management Area. Middle Island Creek's most extreme meander forms a peninsula known as "the Jug," located upstream of Middlebourne. The creek rounds a 7 mile (11 km) bend only to return to within 100 feet (30 m) of itself. Sometime prior to 1800, an early European settler named George Gregg had a raceway (mill race) carved across the narrow point of the peninsula and harnessed the resulting hydropower of the stream's 13-foot (4 m) fall for a gristmill and sawmill at the site. These mills were destroyed by a flood in 1852; four more mills were subsequently built and respectively washed away by flooding in the later 19th century. Flooding had the effect of widening the raceway across the peninsula such that it became the main channel of the stream, inhibiting the flow of water through the longer loop and transforming the peninsula to an island. In 1947 the West Virginia Conservation Commission constructed a low water bridge which substantially dammed
    9.00
    3 votes
    28
    Bound Skerry

    Bound Skerry

    • Island Group: Shetland Islands
    Bound Skerry is part of the Out Skerries group in the Shetland Islands. As well as being the most easterly island of that group, it is also the easternmost point of Scotland. It has a lighthouse on it, which was built in 1857 at the cost of £21,000. Robert Louis Stevenson's family were lighthouse builders, and his signature can be seen in its guestbook. The keepers lived on nearby Grunay. The island was bombed twice in WWII by the Germans, who thought it was a munitions factory.
    7.75
    4 votes
    29
    Craigleith

    Craigleith

    • Body Of Water: Firth of Forth
    Craigleith (Scottish Gaelic: Creag Lìte) is a small island in the Firth of Forth off North Berwick in East Lothian, Scotland. Its name comes from the Scottish Gaelic Creag Lìte meaning "rock of Leith". It is 24 m at its highest point. Craigleith makes up the chain of islands near North Berwick along with Bass Rock, Fidra and The Lamb. Of the four islands it is the closest to the town's harbour. Like the other nearby islands, Craigleith is a bird colony. Divers often explore the area around the island. Craigleith is a laccolith, a lava dome. The Lothians are dotted with evidence of ancient volcanic activity, such as the Bass Rock and Arthur's Seat. It is made up of essexite which is popular for making curling stones. Historically, Craigleith was a rabbit warren, where the animals were deliberately bred for food. Rabbits were wiped out by myxomatosis in the 1950s. They were mysteriously re-introduced onto the island in 2008, and some have been seen recently. In 1814, Sir Hew Dalrymple purchased the island from North Berwick Town Council. The puffin colony on Craigleith, once one of the largest in Britain with 28,000 pairs became endangered from 1999 onwards, due to an invasion of the
    7.75
    4 votes
    30
    Levada

    Levada

    A levada (Portuguese for "led") is an irrigation channel or aqueduct specific to the island of Madeira in the Atlantic Ocean. The levadas originated out of the necessity of bringing large amounts of water from the west and northwest of the island to the drier southeast, which is more conducive to habitation and agriculture (such as sugar cane production). In the sixteenth century the Portuguese started building levadas to carry water to the agricultural regions. The most recent were made in the 1940s. Madeira is very mountainous, and building the levadas was often difficult. Many are cut into the sides of mountains, and it was also necessary to dig 25 miles (40 km) of tunnels. Today the levadas not only supply water to the southern parts of the island but provide hydro-electric power. There are over 1,350 miles (2,170 km) of levadas and they provide a remarkable network of walking paths. Some provide easy and relaxing walks through beautiful countryside, but others are narrow, crumbling ledges where a slip could result in serious injury or death. A popular levada to hike is the Levada do Caldeirão Verde which continues as the Levada Caldeirão do Inferno. Together it is about 23
    7.75
    4 votes
    31
    Lombok

    Lombok

    • Island Group: Lesser Sunda Islands
    Lombok is an island in West Nusa Tenggara (Nusa Tenggara Barat or NTB) province, Indonesia. It forms part of the chain of the Lesser Sunda Islands, with the Lombok Strait separating it from Bali to the west and the Alas Strait between it and Sumbawa to the east. It is roughly circular, with a "tail" (Sekotong Peninsula) to the southwest, about 70 km across and a total area of about 4,725 km² (1,825 sq mi). The provincial capital and largest city on the island is Mataram. It is somewhat similar in size and density with neighboring Bali and shares some cultural heritage, but is administratively part of NTB along with sparsely populated Sumbawa. It is surrounded by a number of smaller islands locally called Gili. The island is home to some 3.16 million Indonesians as recorded in the decennial 2010 census, and in 4 regencies along with the provincial capital Mataram. Lombok is under the administration of the Governor of the province of West Nusa Tenggara (Nusa Tenggara Barat). The province is administered from the provincial capital of Mataram in West Lombok. The island is divided into four regencies and one kota (city). They are: Little is known about the Lombok before the
    7.75
    4 votes
    32
    Beru Island

    Beru Island

    • Island Group: Gilbert Islands
    • Body Of Water: Pacific Ocean
    Beru Island is an island located in the Kingsmill Group of the South Gilbert Islands in the Pacific Ocean and is part of the Republic of Kiribati. Beru was previously known as Eliza, Francis Island, Maria, Peroat, Peru Island or Sunday. Beru is part of a larger reef, some 15 kilometres (9 mi) long (NW-SE) and 4.75 kilometres (3 mi) wide at the widest point (NE-SW). The center of the reef is a shallow depression called Nuka Lagoon. The land mass occupies fully a third or more of the shallow reef structure and is positioned mostly towards the northeast edge of the reef. In maximum dimension the islet is 13.9 kilometres (9 mi) long, and varies in width between 0.5 km (0 mi) and 2.9 km (2 mi). Extensive spit development has created the nearly enclosed Tabiang Lagoon at the north end where mangroves are present. A small lagoon or barachois at the northern tip is surrounded by man-made fishponds, as is a similar feature at the south end of the islet. A 3 km (2 mi) long barachois with extensive mangroves occupies the interior south of Nuka Lagoon. A causeway is present across the inlet mouth and a landing strip is present on the interior flats. The lagoon on the island known as Nuka
    6.60
    5 votes
    33
    Isla Perejil

    Isla Perejil

    • Body Of Water: Strait of Gibraltar
    The Perejil Island (Berber: Tura, Arabic: جزيرة تورة‎, Spanish: Isla de Perejil) is a small, uninhabited rocky islet located in the southern shore of the Strait of Gibraltar, 200 meters from the Moroccan coast. Its sovereignty is disputed between Spain and Morocco. It was the subject of an armed incident between the two countries in 2002. The name Isla de Perejil literally means "Parsley Island" in Spanish. Its original Berber name is Tura, meaning "empty". Moroccan media erroneously refer to it as Laila (ليلى) instead. It is sometimes referred to in Arabic as "Jazirat al-Ma'danus" (جزيرة معدنوس), which is a translation of "Parsley Island". In Moroccan historical references it is only known as "Tura". In his speech to the Moroccan people commemorating the "Throne Day" on July 30, 2002, the king of Morocco used the name "Tura" exclusively, when he mentioned the armed incident with Spain over the island. The island lies 250 metres off the coast of Morocco, 8 km from the Spanish city of Ceuta and 13.5 km from mainland Spain. The island is about 480 by 480 metres in size, with an area of 15 ha or 0.15 km². It reaches a maximum height of 74 metres. In 1415, Portugal, along with the
    7.50
    4 votes
    34
    Coron Island

    Coron Island

    Coron Island is the third-largest island in the Calamian Group of Islands in northern Palawan in the Philippines. The island is part of the larger municipality of the same name. It is about 170 nautical miles (310 km) southwest of Manila and is known for several Japanese shipwrecks of World War II vintage. The island is part of the ancestral domain of the indigenous Tagbanwa people. Known as Calis among the Tagbanwas and Coronians, its tribal chieftain is Rodolfo Aguilar I. The area around the wrecks has rock formations which provide for snorkeling opportunities, with underwater visibility extending up to 80 feet (24 m). The water is often calm. Coron is one of the most visited destinations for wreck diving in the Philippines. Wreck dive sites are found in depths as shallow as 10–30 feet and as deep as 120–140 feet (37–43 m). Most are in the range of about 60–80 feet. Dive sites around Coron include many different reef dive sites and "Günter´s Cave", also known as Cathedral Cave because during a certain time of the day, the sun throws a beam of light through a hole in the cave ceiling, illuminating the inside. It is possible to surface in the cave, as the hole in the cave-ceiling
    10.00
    2 votes
    35
    Unalaska Island

    Unalaska Island

    • Island Group: Aleutian Islands
    Unalaska (Aleut: Nawan-Alaxsxa) is an island in the Fox Islands group of the Aleutian Islands in the U.S. state of Alaska, at 53°38′N 167°00′W / 53.633°N 167°W / 53.633; -167. The island has a land area of 1,051 square miles (2,720 km). It measures 127.8 kilometres (79.4 mi) long and 55.9 kilometres (34.7 mi) wide. The city of Unalaska, Alaska, covers part of the island and all of neighboring Amaknak Island where the Port of Dutch Harbor is located. The population of the island excluding Amaknak (as of the 2000 census) was 1,759. Unalaska is the second-largest island in the Fox Islands group and the Aleutian Islands. The coastline of Unalaska is markedly different in appearance than other major Aleutian Islands, with innumerable inlets and peninsulas. The irregular coastline is broken by three long deep bays, Beaver Inlet, Unalaska Bay, and Makushin Bay, as well as by numerous smaller bays and coves. Unalaska's terrain is rugged and covered with mountains, and during the greater part of the year the higher elevations are covered with snow. Unalaska is the Aleut name for the island. Several theories about its origin exist; the most likely is that the name comes from a corruption
    10.00
    2 votes
    36
    Dall Island

    Dall Island

    • Island Group: Alexander Archipelago
    Dall Island is an island in the Alexander Archipelago off the southeast coast of Alaska, just west of Prince of Wales Island and north of Canadian waters. Its peak elevation is 2,443 feet (745 meters) above sea level. Its land area is 254.02 square miles (657.9 km²), making it the 28th largest island in the United States. Dall is used economically for fishing and limestone quarrying. The 2000 census recorded 20 persons living on the island. Alaska Natives are known to have inhabited coastal caves on the island two to three thousand years ago. Dall Island was first called Quadra, after Juan Francisco de la Bodega y Quadra, until 1879, when it was renamed in honor of naturalist William H. Dall. Cape Muzon, the southernmost point of the island, is the western terminus, known as Point A, of the A-B Line, which marks the marine boundary between the state of Alaska and the Canadian province of British Columbia as defined by the Alaska Boundary Treaty of 1903. This line is also the northern boundary of the waters known as the Dixon Entrance. Dall Island is also an island used for its timber resource. The island houses many logging camps. Columbia Helicopters of Oregon is one of the main
    6.40
    5 votes
    37
    Pfaueninsel

    Pfaueninsel

    Pfaueninsel ("Peacock Island") is an island in the River Havel situated in Berlin-Wannsee, in southwestern Berlin, near the borders with Potsdam and Brandenburg. The island is part of the Palaces and Parks of Potsdam and Berlin World Heritage Site and a popular destination for day-trippers. Pfaueninsel is also a nature reserve in accordance with the EU Habitats Directive and a Special Protection Area for wild birds. In the late 17th century the island was called Kaninchenwerder ("Rabbit Island") after a rabbit breeding station set up by Elector Frederick William I of Brandenburg. From 1685, he gave the chemist Johann Kunckel financial aid to build a glass foundry on the island. After the elector's death in 1688, however, Kunckel gained no further support, and after the foundry was destroyed by a fire, Kunckel left for Stockholm. The island remained unused for about 100 years until, in 1793, the Prussian king Frederick William II acquired the island for the Hohenzollern dynasty and had the Pfaueninsel castle built for him and his mistress Wilhelmine Enke. The small Lustschloss, in the shape of an artificial ruin, was placed on the western tip of the island, visible from the king's
    6.40
    5 votes
    38
    Mono Island

    Mono Island

    • Island Group: Solomon Islands
    Mono Island is the largest island of the Treasury Islands, Solomon Islands, at 7°21′S 155°34′E / 7.35°S 155.567°E / -7.35; 155.567. Mono island is a volcanic island in the northwest of the Solomon Islands. It is separated by the Blanche Harbour from Stirling Island and the other coral islands surrounding it. The village of Falamai is the main population centre of the island. The island is rimmed by limestone cliffs of more than twenty metres in height. The island's population is around 1,800. The earthquake of April 1, 2007 and the tsunami following the earthquake caused considerable damage in Mono. Five houses and all school buildings collapsed and four people were reported missing. The Japanese had occupied Mono during their invasion of the Solomons. On October 27, 1943 the U.S. 87th Navy Construction Battalion and the 8th Brigade of the Third New Zealand Division landed at two locations: at Falamai (site of the Japanese HQ on the island) in the south, and at Purple Beach at Soanotalu in the north. By November 7th the island was under Allied control. Twelve Americans and forty New Zealanders were killed during the campaign. For the Kiwis, it was the first opposed amphibious
    5.50
    6 votes
    39
    Bathurst Island

    Bathurst Island

    • Island Group: Canadian Arctic Archipelago
    A member of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, Bathurst Island is one of the Queen Elizabeth Islands in Nunavut Territory, Canada. The area of the island is estimated at 16,042 km (6,194 sq mi), 115 miles (185 km) to 117 miles (188 km) long and 63 miles (101 km) to 72 miles (116 km) to 92.9 miles (149.5 km) wide, making it the 54th largest island in the world and Canada's 13th largest island. It is uninhabited. The island is low-lying with few parts higher than 330 m (1,083 ft) in elevation. The highest point is 412 m (1,352 ft) at Stokes Mountain in the Stokes Range. This in turn form part of the Arctic Cordillera mountain system. Good soil conditions produce abundant vegetation and support a more prolific wildlife population than other Arctic islands. The island contains the Polar Bear Pass National Wildlife Area, and the area of the proposed Tuktusiuqvialuk National Park. Brooman Point Village on the eastern coast of Bathurst Island was the site of Thule native tribes around A.D. 1000, conceivably during a warmer climate episode. William Edward Parry was the first European to discover the island in 1819, charting its southern coast. It was named for Henry Bathurst, 3rd Earl
    7.25
    4 votes
    40
    Île Jésus

    Île Jésus

    Île Jésus (French for Jesus Island) is an island in southwestern Quebec, separated from the mainland to the north by the Rivière des Mille Îles, and from the Island of Montreal to the south by the Rivière des Prairies. The second-largest (242 km²) island in the Hochelaga Archipelago (after the Island of Montreal), Île Jésus is the major component of the City of Laval, along with the Îles Laval and several other islands. The island is still rural in nature, with most of the urban area in the central region and along the south and west river banks.
    7.25
    4 votes
    41
    Pantar

    Pantar

    • Island Group: Lesser Sunda Islands
    Pantar (Indonesian: Pulau Pantar) is the second largest island in the Indonesian Alor Archipelago, after Alor. To the east is the island of Alor and other small islands in the archipelago; to the west is the Alor Strait, which separates it from the Solor Archipelago. To the south is the Ombai Strait, and 72 km away, the island of Timor. To the north is the Banda Sea. The island is about 50 km north-to-south, and varies from 11 to 29 km in east-west width. It has an area of 728 km². The main towns on the island are Baranusa and Kabir. Administratively, the island is part of the Alor Regency. The island consists of two distinct geographic zones. The eastern zone is dominated by a range of verdant hills which drop steeply to the coast of the Alor Strait. The western zone is relatively flat, consisting of a plain which gently slopes to the west from the 900 m active volcano, Mt. Sirung. The western zone is characteristically drier and much less densely populated than the eastern zone. Owing to its relatively low elevation, the entire island is drier than neighboring Alor. The dry season is long, interspersed with heavy rainfall during the rainy season, which peaks during January and
    7.25
    4 votes
    42
    Sapelo Island

    Sapelo Island

    • Body Of Water: Chesapeake Bay
    Sapelo Island ( /ˈsæpəloʊ/) is a state-protected island located in McIntosh County, Georgia. The island is reachable only by airplane or boat, with the primary ferry coming from the Sapelo Island Visitors Center in McIntosh County, Georgia, a seven mile (11 km), twenty-minute trip. Approximately 97 percent of the island is owned by the State of Georgia and is managed by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources; the remaining is under private ownership. The western perimeter of Sapelo is the Sapelo Island National Estuarine Research Reserve (SINERR) which is part of NOAA's National Estuarine Research Reserve system (NERR). The University of Georgia Marine Institute, which is focused on research and education, is located on 1,500 acres (6.1 km) on the south end of the island. The Reynold's Mansion, a Georgia State Park, also lies on the south end of the island. Visitors to the island must be a part of an organized tour or guests of residents on the island. The island also has a small private airport run by the State of Georgia. The community of Hog Hammock includes a general store, bar, and other small businesses. There are two active churches in the town, including First African
    7.25
    4 votes
    43
    Great Barrier Island

    Great Barrier Island

    • Body Of Water: Pacific Ocean
    Great Barrier Island (often colloquially just The Barrier) is the fourth-largest island of New Zealand's main chain of islands. it is situated 100 kilometres (62 mi) to the north-east of central Auckland in the outer Hauraki Gulf. It has an area of 285 square kilometres (110 sq mi) and its highest point, Mount Hobson, is 621 metres (2,037 ft). The local authority is the Auckland Council. The remote island was initially exploited for its minerals and kauri trees and saw only some limited agriculture. It is now inhabited by a small population of 852 people, mostly living from farming and tourism. The majority of the diverse environments of the island (around 60% of the total area) is administered as nature reserve by the Department of Conservation. In 2009 the island atmosphere was described as being "life in New Zealand many decades back", not without some positive emphasis. With an area of 285 square kilometres (110 sq mi), Great Barrier is the sixth-largest island in New Zealand after the South Island, the North Island, Stewart Island/Rakiura, Chatham Island, and Auckland Island. The highest point, Mount Hobson or Hirakimata, is 621 metres (2,037 ft) above sea level. Smaller
    8.33
    3 votes
    44
    Priest Island

    Priest Island

    • Island Group: Inner Hebrides
    Priest Island (Scottish Gaelic: Eilean a' Chlèirich) is a small, uninhabited island in the Summer Isles off the west coast of Scotland. It is believed that the island was used by culdees for religious purposes, and has several stone circles. Priest Island is the outermost and most exposed of the Summer Isles, lying about 6 km off the west coast of Wester Ross. In the summer of 1960, a group from an English school studied some of the bird life of the island. Pupils and teachers from Whitgift School in South Croydon spent 2 weeks on the island with official permission to study and ring some of the birds, such as storm petrels at night time (netting and ringing) and shags on the cliffs in daytime. They took a month's supplies with them, including food, tents and equipment totalling quarter of a ton on a trek cart pulled over from Garve Station. The cart's wheel broke half a mile from Garve. After further difficulties, and help from locals, a comprehensive ornithological study was compiled. The scouts had a copy of Frank Fraser Darling's book Island Years with them, recounting, inter alia, his family's year on the Summer Isles. Eilean a' Chleirich is owned and managed as a nature
    8.33
    3 votes
    45
    Seil

    Seil

    • Island Group: Slate Islands
    One of the Slate Islands, Seil (Scottish Gaelic: Saoil) is a small island on the east side of the Firth of Lorn, 7 miles (11 km) southwest of Oban, in Scotland. Seil has been linked to the mainland by bridge since the late eighteenth century. Seil has been linked to the Scottish mainland since 1792 when the Clachan Bridge was built by engineer Robert Mylne. Also known as the Bridge Over the Atlantic, the bridge is still used today and in early summer is covered in fairy foxgloves (Erinus alpinus). Balvicar, in the centre of the island, is the main settlement with a flourishing fishing industry, the island shop, and a high percentage of houses that are occupied all year round. At the end of the road lies the former slate-mining village of Ellenabeich. This picturesque village is a conservation area with a high percentage of holiday cottages and is fully occupied only in the summer months. Parts of Ring of Bright Water were filmed here. The Ellenabeich Heritage Centre which opened in 2000, is run by the Scottish Slate Islands Trust. Located in a former slate quarry-worker's cottage, the centre has displays on life in the 19th Century, slate quarrying and the local flora, fauna and
    8.33
    3 votes
    46
    Absecon Island

    Absecon Island

    Absecon Island is a barrier island located on the Jersey Shore of the Atlantic Ocean in Atlantic County, New Jersey, USA. On the island (from north to south) are the resort communities of Atlantic City, Ventnor, Margate, and Longport. The island ends at Absecon Inlet to the north and Great Egg Harbor Inlet to the south. Absecon's earliest European settlers were English who earned their living clamming and oystering. Land there was bought not for farming but for control of the waterways. The name Absecon came from the word "Absegami" or little water, named by the Native Americans living along Absecon Creek. In 1695, Thomas Budd purchased 10,000 acres (40 km²) of land in what later became Atlantic County. He paid 4 cents an acre ($9.88/km²) for land on which Atlantic City now stands. It was called Further Island (further from Absecon) and later called Absecon Beach and finally became Atlantic City. Jeremiah Leeds was the first permanent settler on Absecon Island in 1785. He came from Leeds Point to Absecon Island when it was a complete wilderness. He built a cabin of cedar logs and cleared a field where the Atlantic City Expressway now ends in Atlantic City. The block called Columbus
    6.20
    5 votes
    47
    Lord Howe Island

    Lord Howe Island

    • Island Group: Lord Howe Island Group
    • Body Of Water: Tasman Sea
    Lord Howe Island ( /ˈhaʊ/, locally /ˈhæɔ/) (formerly Lord Howe's Island) is an irregularly crescent-shaped volcanic remnant in the Tasman Sea between Australia and New Zealand, 600 kilometres (370 mi) directly east of mainland Port Macquarie, and about 900 kilometres (560 mi) from Norfolk Island. The island is about 10 km long and between 2.0 km and 0.3 km wide with an area of 14.55 km, "of which only 398 hectares is in the lowland settled area". Along the west coast there is a sandy semi-enclosed sheltered coral reef lagoon. Most of the population lives in the north, while the south is dominated by forested hills rising to the highest point on the island, Mount Gower (875 m or 2,871 ft). The Lord Howe Island Group of islands comprises 28 islands, islets and rocks. Apart from Lord Howe Island itself the most notable of these is the volcanic and uninhabited Ball's Pyramid about 23 km to the south-east. To the north there is the Admiralty Group, a cluster of seven small uninhabited islands. The first reported sighting of Lord Howe Island was on 17 February 1788 when Lieutenant Henry Lidgbird Ball, commander of the Armed Tender HMS Supply was on its way from Botany Bay to found a
    6.20
    5 votes
    48
    Misima Island

    Misima Island

    Misima (formerly called St. Aignan) is a volcanic island in the northwest of Louisiade Archipelago within Milne Bay Province of Papua New Guinea. The island measures 40 km by 10 km and has an area of 202,5 km². It is located some 20 km north of the northwest extreme of the barrier reef of Vanatinai at Isu Raua Raua Island, and 80 km northwest of Vanatinai Island itself. Misima is mountainous and densely forested. Mt. Koia Tau, at a height of 1,036 meters, is the highest peak of the Louisiade Archipelago. The island is within the Samarai Murua District. The main town of the island and the seat of the district is Bwagaoia, located on the southeast corner of the island. Other villages are Hinauta, Boiou, Gulewa, Bagilina, Liak, Siagara, Eiaus (on the eastern north coast, reachable by road from Bwagaoia), Gulewa and Ewena or Ewana (on the western north coast), and Bwagabwaga, Gaibobo and Alhoga (on the south coast). Misima has a working airport (four flights weekly to the mainland (POM via Alotau) through Airlines of Papua New Guinea, and one charter run by Porgera Joint Venture, a high school (grades 7-10), a small market, a few small stores and a clinic/hospital, a post office,--all
    9.50
    2 votes
    49
    Orr's Island

    Orr's Island

    • Body Of Water: Casco Bay
    Orr's Island is an island in Casco Bay and the Gulf of Maine, part of the Atlantic Ocean. The island is within the town of Harpswell, Maine, U. S., and forms an archipelago with Sebascodegan Island (also known as Great Island) to its north and Bailey Island (reached by the Bailey Island (or Cribstone) Bridge) to its south. Orr's Island is connected to Great Island by the Orr's Island/Great Island Bridge, and is connected to the town of Brunswick on the mainland by Route 24 north over the Gurnett Bridge. Bowdoin College operates a 118-acre (48 ha) coastal studies center on Orr's Island. As of 2000, Orr's Island had an estimated population of 752 people. 49.2% of the population were male, and 50.8% of the population was female. 98.1% of the population were white, 1.1% were Asian, 0.5% were two or more races, and 0.3% were some other race. Additionally, 83.9% of the population was 18 years or older, 23% were 65 years or older, and 4.3% were under 5 years of age.
    9.50
    2 votes
    50
    Yeongjong Island

    Yeongjong Island

    • Body Of Water: Yellow Sea
    Yeongjong Island is an island off the west coast of the city of Incheon, South Korea. The previously separate Yongyu, Sammok, and Sinbul Islands have been joined to Yeongjong Island by an area of reclaimed land built for the construction of Incheon International Airport. The island is an exclave of Incheon Metropolitan City's Jung-gu district, and is accessed via two bridges, Yeongjong Bridge connecting to Seo-gu and Incheon Bridge connecting to Songdo. In addition to the airport, the island is known for Eulwangni Beach on the west coast, Haesoopia Spa on the south, its seafood market and Yongguksa Temple. Yeongjong Island is considered part of the Incheon Free Economic Zone with a concentration on airport logistics, travel, and tourism. The city of Incheon is also investing in its own airline which will be operated from Yeongjong Island. In addition to the Incheon Bridge, completed in October 2009, there are a number of projects either proposed or already under construction on the island. These projects include, An area focusing on tourism and leisure businesses and a theme park. Residential areas here will be aimed at foreign residents. The construction of a marina and general
    9.50
    2 votes
    51
    Barra Head

    Barra Head

    • Island Group: Outer Hebrides
    Barra Head, also known as Berneray (Scottish Gaelic: Beàrnaraigh), is the southernmost of the Outer Hebrides in Scotland. Within the Outer Hebrides, it forms part of the Barra Isles archipelago. Originally, Barra Head only referred to the southernmost headland of Berneray but is now a common name for the entire island. The highest point of the island is Sotan, a Marilyn. There are numerous prehistoric structures on the island and permanent occupation by 20–50 individuals occurred throughout the historic period, peaking in the 19th century. The economy of the residents was based on agriculture, fishing and fowling. The cliffs provide nesting sites for seabirds in such profusion that Berneray has been designated as a Special Protection Area. The island's lighthouse, built by Robert Stevenson, has operated since 1833. From 1931 to 1980 Barra Head was inhabited only by the lighthouse keepers and their wives but the lighthouse is now automated and the island completely uninhabited. The rough seas that surround the island have been used to test prototype lifeboats. The derivation of the modern name is straightforward, the Old Norse name meaning "Bjorn's island" becoming Beàrnaraigh in
    7.00
    4 votes
    52
    Rakahanga

    Rakahanga

    • Body Of Water: Pacific Ocean
    Rakahanga, part of the Cook Islands in the central-southern Pacific Ocean, is one of the most unspoiled places on earth. The atoll is 1,248 kilometres from the Cook Islands capital, Rarotonga, and lies 1,111 kilometres from the equator. Its nearest neighbour is Manihiki which is just 44 kilometres away. There are two main islands and seven motus or islets in the Rakahanga lagoon. On the east these are Akaro, Motu Ngangie, Huananui, Motu Mahuta and Motu Okakara; while on the southwest side the islet of Te Kainga guards the widest passage into the lagoon. The only village, Rakahanga, seat of Rakahanga Island Council, is on the northwest side of the southern islet. A newer, official source lists five villages, which may just be the lineages living in the same village: The island is just over 4 square kilometres in size and is so low lying that it is in serious danger from rising sea levels. It is believed that Ferdinand Magellan discovered the island in 1521, but this cannot be substantiated by historians who have researched the island's history. One of the last great Spanish voyages of exploration, under the command of Pedro Fernandes de Queirós, came upon the island on 2 March 1606.
    7.00
    4 votes
    53
    Saint John, U.S. Virgin Islands

    Saint John, U.S. Virgin Islands

    • Island Group: Virgin Islands
    • Body Of Water: Caribbean Sea
    St. John (Spanish: San Juan ; Dutch: Sint Hans; French: Saint-Jean ; Danish: Sankt Jan) is an island in the Caribbean Sea and a constituent district of the United States Virgin Islands (USVI), an unincorporated territory of the United States. St. John is located about four miles east of Saint Thomas, the location of the territory's capital, Charlotte Amalie, and four miles southwest of Tortola, part of the British Virgin Islands. It is 50.8 km² (19.61 sq mi) in area with a population of 4,170 (2010 census). Because there are no airports on St. John, the only access to the island is by boat. The ferry service runs hourly from St. Thomas and daily from Tortola; regular ferries also operate from Virgin Gorda, Jost Van Dyke and Anegada. Approximately 60% of the island is protected as Virgin Islands National Park. St. John was first settled by the Arawak Indians who had migrated north from coastal Colombia and Venezuela around AD 300. The Arawaks inhabited the island until around the year AD 1300, when they were driven off by the more aggressive and warlike Carib Indians. Extensive archaeological work has been undertaken from 1996 to the present at Cinnamon Bay. The artifacts from this
    7.00
    4 votes
    54
    Komodo

    Komodo

    • Island Group: Lesser Sunda Islands
    Komodo is one of the 17,508 islands that make up the Republic of Indonesia. The island is particularly notable as the natural habitat of the komodo dragon, the largest lizard on earth and consequently named after the island. Komodo Island has a surface area of 390 km² and a permanent population of over 2,000. The inhabitants of the island are descendants of former convicts who were exiled to the island and who have mixed with Bugis from Sulawesi. The population are primarily adherents of Islam but there are also Christian and Hindu congregations. Komodo is part of the Lesser Sunda chain of islands and forms part of the Komodo National Park. In addition, the island is a popular destination for diving. Administratively, it is part of the East Nusa Tenggara province. The earliest stories of a dragon existing in the region circulated widely and attracted considerable attention. But no one visited the island to check the story until official interest was sparked in the early 1910s by stories from Dutch sailors based in Flores about a mysterious creature. The creature was allegedly a "dragon" which inhabited a small island in the Lesser Sunda Islands (the main island of which is Flores
    6.00
    5 votes
    55
    Bressay Lighthouse

    Bressay Lighthouse

    Bressay Lighthouse is a lighthouse in the Shetland Islands, Scotland, 4 kilometres (2.5 mi) south-east of Lerwick. It is located on the island of Bressay at Kirkabister Ness overlooking Bressay Sound. It was one of four lighthouses built in Shetland between 1854 and 1858 which were designed by brothers David Stevenson and Thomas Stevenson. David Stevenson initially maintained that building a lighthouse in Shetland waters was impossible, too dangerous and too expensive, and that any ship's captain who took this route was mad. The shore station was purchased by the Shetland Amenity Trust in 1995 and has been converted into a Marine Heritage Centre. The fog signal was discontinued in the 1980's. The notable red horn was removed, however, the building that housed the siren is still in place and now houses a radar mast, and the five pressurised air tanks are still in place.
    8.00
    3 votes
    56
    Koresand

    Koresand

    Koresand is a sandbank in the Danish part of the Wadden Sea, south west of the island of Mandø. There was at least one settlement on Koresand until the frequent storm tides during the 1900s led to its being abandoned. In summer it is possible to travel from Mandø to Koresand by a tractor-drawn wagon.
    8.00
    3 votes
    57
    Tierra del Fuego

    Tierra del Fuego

    • Body Of Water: Pacific Ocean
    Tierra del Fuego ( /tiːˈɛərə dɛl ˈfweɪɡoʊ/, Spanish: [ˈtjera ðel ˈfweɣo]; Spanish for "Fireland" or "Land of Fire") is an archipelago off the southernmost tip of the South American mainland, across the Strait of Magellan. The archipelago consists of a main island Isla Grande de Tierra del Fuego divided between Chile and Argentina with an area of 48,100 km (18,572 sq mi), and a group of smaller islands including Cape Horn. While initially discovered by Europeans in 1520 (Ferdinand Magellan's expedition), they did not settle the islands until the second half of the 19th century at the height of the sheep farming and gold rush booms. Today, petroleum extraction dominates economic activity in the north of Tierra del Fuego, while tourism, manufacturing and Antarctic logistics are important in the south. The native population of Selk'nam and Yaghans was greatly reduced by unequal conflict and disease brought by settlers. Today only a few Selk'nam remain. Some of the few remaining Yaghans have settled in Villa Ukika in Navarino Island, others have scattered across Chile and Argentina. Tierra del Fuego hosts large areas protected as national parks and reserves, most of them in the
    8.00
    3 votes
    58
    Inchgarvie

    Inchgarvie

    • Body Of Water: Firth of Forth
    Inchgarvie (occasionally "Inch Garvie") is a small, uninhabited island in the Firth of Forth. Its name comes from Innis Garbhach which is Scottish Gaelic for "rough island". Local tradition has it that the island takes its name from the young herring, or "garvies" which sheltered in large shoals around its shores - this is however folk etymology as the first element is Gaelic. Although now uninhabited, Inchgarvie has been inhabited throughout various periods of history. The first recorded time was in the late 15th century. Like nearby Inchmickery, its profile and colour makes it look very much like a battleship from a distance. Inchgarvie’s fortifications pre-date the modern period. In the days when boats were the only way to cross the Firth of Forth, the island was on the main route between North Queensferry in Fife and South Queensferry in Lothian. This made it strategically important. It was near Roman forts at Cramond and Bo'ness, at the end of the Antonine Wall. Records of Danish attacks on nearby islands, particularly Inchcolm as well as Fife and Lothian may mean that it was used in some capacity by them. It may well also have had a Culdee hermit like Inchcolm and
    6.75
    4 votes
    59
    Isle of May

    Isle of May

    • Body Of Water: Firth of Forth
    The Isle of May is located in the north of the outer Firth of Forth, approximately 8 km (5.0 mi) off the coast of mainland Scotland. It is 1.8 km long and less than half a kilometre wide. The island is owned and managed by Scottish Natural Heritage as a National Nature Reserve. Most visitors to the island are daytrippers taking the ferry from Anstruther in Fife, although up to six visitors can stay at the observatory, usually for a week at a time. The only way to get there is by ferry, the journey taking 45 minutes from the small ports of Anstruther and Crail. The island is closed to visitors from 1 October until 1 May to prevent disturbance to the large number of seal pups. The Scottish Seabird Centre at North Berwick has three live cameras on the island, which can be remotely controlled by visitors at the Seabird Centre, to allow close viewing of the seabird cities in spring and summer, including puffins, guillemots, razorbills, shags, cormorants and terns and the fluffy Grey seal pups in winter, without disturbing the animals. There are now no permanent residents, but the island was the site of a priory (St. Adrian's Priory) during the Middle Ages. The island's rock is "fine
    6.75
    4 votes
    60
    Barter Island

    Barter Island

    • Body Of Water: Beaufort Sea
    Barter Island is an island located on the Arctic coast of the U.S. state of Alaska, east of Arey Island in the Beaufort Sea. It is about four miles (6 km) long and about two miles (3 km) wide at its widest point. Until the late 19th century, Barter Island was a major trade center for the Inupiat people and was especially important as a bartering place for Inupiat from Alaska and Inuit from Canada, hence its name. At one time before about 1900, there had been a large whaling village on Barter Island. Tradition has it that the Alaska Inupiat drove the villagers, Canadian Inupiat, from the island in about 1900. In about 1919, trader Tom Gordon and his wife, Mary Agiaq Gordon, moved from Barrow to Barter Island with their family, some relatives, friends, and their families. Mary's younger brother, Andrew Akootchook, helped to choose the location for the trading post, because of its good harbor and convenient and accessible location for hunting on land and sea. Tom Gordon and the settlers built a trading post at the site and a few families settled near Gordon's trading post. In 1953 and 1954, a runway and Distant Early Warning Line radar station were built on the island. Several
    9.00
    2 votes
    61
    Camano Island

    Camano Island

    • Body Of Water: Puget Sound
    Camano Island ( /kəˈmeɪnoʊ/) is a large island in the Possession Sound portion of Puget Sound, located in Island County, Washington, between Whidbey Island and the mainland. The body of water separating Whidbey Island and Camano Island is called Saratoga Passage. Camano Island is separated from mainland Snohomish County by Davis Slough near the city of Stanwood. The island is reached via State Route 532 over the Camano Gateway Bridge in the northeast of the island. There were 13,358 residents on the island as of the 2000 census, but the population peaks at 17,000 during the summer months with retired "snowbirds." The island has a total land area of 102.99 km² (39.77 sq mi), though it was larger before the Great Slide of 1825. Kristoferson Lake is the largest lake on Camano Island. Camano Island is named for the Spanish explorer Jacinto Caamaño. Charles Wilkes, during the Wilkes Expedition of 1838-1842, named it MacDonough Island in honor of Thomas MacDonough for his victory of the Battle of Lake Champlain during the War of 1812. Following this theme, Wilkes named the body of water between Camano and Whidbey Island after MacDonough's flagship the Saratoga. When Henry Kellett
    9.00
    2 votes
    62
    Gaddhoo

    Gaddhoo

    Gaddhoo, Gadhdhoo or Gaddu (Dhivehi: ގައްދޫ) is one of the inhabited islands of Gaafu Dhaalu Atoll. The local women of Gaddu Island weave beautiful mats with patterns in three colors, off-white, yellow and black. These mats are woven using the strands of the bark of Hibiscus tiliaceus (the same tree which is used for making tapa cloth in Polynesia and a kind of local grass called 'hau', which may be dyed in yellow or black. There are two qualities, thinner mats woven with simple knot, or thicker, good-quality mats woven bu means of more complex knots. Traditionally the best Gaddu mats were used by the Maldive Royal House in Malé. Part of the annual tribute from the Huvadu Atoll Chief to the royal court, used to be in the form of Gaddu mats. Nils-Finn Munch Petersen and Annegrethe Ottovar, two Danish anthropologists visited this island in the 1970s and made extensive reswarch about its mat production and the patterns used on them. The production of these mats has suffered much from the reckless activity of intermediaries. While a great price is fetched from the tourists, the women who wove them in Gaddu Island received just a small fraction of the amount. Consequently, production
    9.00
    2 votes
    63
    Isle Madame

    Isle Madame

    Isle Madame is a Canadian island located at off the southeastern corner of Cape Breton Island in Nova Scotia. The island was settled by France as part of its colony of Île-Royale (present-day Cape Breton Island). It is presumed to have been named for Madame de Maintenon, the second wife of France's King Louis XIV. After the fall of Louisbourg in 1758, 4,000 inhabitants were deported. However, a group of ten Acadian families from Port-Toulouse fled to this Isle Madame where their descendants still live today. Following the Seven Years' War, Île-Royale and its constituent territories such as Isle Madame, reverted to British control. Some Acadian families also made their way from Massachusetts to Isle Madame in 1766. Measuring 16 km long and 11 km wide, giving approximately 45 km, Isle Madame is jurisdictionally part of Richmond County and is separated from Cape Breton Island by a narrow strait named Lennox Passage. Initially crossed by ferries, the first bridge crossing Lennox Passage to connect with Isle Madame was constructed beginning in 1916 and opening in 1919. The Grandique Ferry service also crossed the passage between Martinique and Louisdale. In the early 1970s the old
    9.00
    2 votes
    64
    Lyell Island

    Lyell Island

    • Island Group: Queen Charlotte Islands
    • Body Of Water: Pacific Ocean
    Lyell Island, known also in the Haida language as Athili Gwaii, is a large island in the Queen Charlotte Islands archipelago on the North Coast of British Columbia, Canada. The island is a part of the Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve and Haida Heritage Site and had been the focus of anti-logging demonstrations that led to the park's creation. Among those arrested by the RCMP on Lyell Island was Svend Robinson, MP, at which time the Haida people conferred on him one of his bestowed indigenous names, meaning "White Swan". Lyell Island was the focus of protests as much of its forests had been a mortuary grove for those who died in the smallpox epidemics that ravaged the archipelago in the 18th and 19th Centuries. The Queen Charlotte Islands are separated from the British Columbia mainland to the east by Hecate Strait. Vancouver Island lies to the south, across Queen Charlotte Sound, while the U.S. state of Alaska is to the north, across the disputed Dixon Entrance.
    9.00
    2 votes
    65
    Mount Manuk

    Mount Manuk

    Mount Manuk is the eastern most volcano of the Banda Arc chain that forms a volcanic island. The truncated andesitic volcano rises 3,000 m from the sea floor. No confirmed historical eruptions are known from the uninhabited island. Manuk means bird in Javanese and Sundanese.
    9.00
    2 votes
    66
    Ambon Island

    Ambon Island

    • Island Group: Maluku Islands
    Ambon Island is part of the Maluku Islands of Indonesia. The island has an area of 775 km (299 sq mi), and is mountainous, well watered, and fertile. Ambon Island consists of two territories: The main city and seaport is Ambon (with a 2009 population of 284,809), which is also the capital of Maluku province and Maluku Tengah (with a 2009 population of 370,931). Ambon has an airport, and is home to the Pattimura University and Open University (Universitas Terbuka), state universities, and a few private universities, which include Darussalam University (Universitas Darussalam, UNDAR) and Universitas Kristen Indonesia Maluku (UKIM). Ambon Island lies off the south-west coast of the much larger Seram island. It is on the north side of the Banda Sea, part of a chain of volcanic islands that encircle the sea. It is 51 kilometres (32 miles) long and is of very irregular shape, being almost divided in two. The south-eastern and smaller portion, a peninsula (called Leitimor) is united to the northern (Hitoe) by a narrow neck of land. Ambon city is on the north-west of Leitimor, facing Hitoe, and has a safe harbor on Amboina Bay. The highest mountains, Wawani 1,100 metres (3,600 feet) and
    7.67
    3 votes
    67
    Governors Island

    Governors Island

    Governors Island was an island in Boston Harbor in the U.S. state of Massachusetts. The island was subsumed by land reclamation for the construction and extension of Logan International Airport. Governor's Island was the site of Fort Winthrop, a defensive fortification named after Governor John Winthrop, whose family was granted the island in 1632 and owned it until 1808, when it was acquired for the construction of the fort.
    7.67
    3 votes
    68
    Jarlshof

    Jarlshof

    Jarlshof is the best known prehistoric archaeological site in Shetland, Scotland. It lies near the southern tip of the Shetland Mainland and has been described as "one of the most remarkable archaeological sites ever excavated in the British Isles". It contains remains dating from 2500 BC up to the 17th century AD. The Bronze Age settlers left evidence of several small oval houses with thick stone walls and various artefacts including a decorated bone object. The Iron Age ruins include several different types of structure including a broch and a defensive wall around the site. The Pictish period provides various works of art including a painted pebble and a symbol stone. The Viking-age ruins make up the largest such site visible anywhere in Britain and include a longhouse; excavations provided numerous tools and a detailed insight into life in Shetland at this time. The most visible structures on the site are the walls of the Scottish period fortified manor house, which inspired the name "Jarlshof" that first appears in an 1821 novel by Walter Scott. The site is in the care of Historic Scotland and is open from April to September. In 2010 "The Crucible of Iron Age Shetland"
    7.67
    3 votes
    69
    Nixes Mate

    Nixes Mate

    • Island Group: Boston Harbor Islands
    • Body Of Water: Boston Harbor
    Nixes Mate, also known as Nixes Island, Nix's Mate and Nick's Mate, is one of the smaller islands in the Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area. The island lies about 5 nm from downtown Boston and about 0.6 nm east of Long Island Head Light. The island covers and uncovers with the tide. A prominent black and white stucco covered wood pyramidal beacon, resting atop a granite base, reaches a height of approximately 20 feet (6.1 m). The base was erected by the Boston Marine Society in 1805. By 2001, the daymark was in poor condition. The Coast Guard, which is responsible for it, announced that it would be replaced, but following public outcry they rebuilt it instead, in 2003. The island is not open to the public. It is described in the Light List as "Nixes Mate: black, white band midway of height, octagonal pyramid on square granite base", Light List number 1-11450. In 1636, Nix's Mate was granted to John Gallop, a harbor pilot who lived on nearby Gallops Island and used the then 12-acre (49,000 m) island for grazing his sheep. Ship's ballast was quarried from the island during the 17th century, followed by slate in the 18th century, resulting in today's much smaller island.
    7.67
    3 votes
    70
    Stuart Island

    Stuart Island

    • Island Group: San Juan Islands
    Stuart Island is one of the San Juan Islands in Washington state, USA, north of San Juan Island and west of Waldron Island. The 7.462-square-kilometer (2.881 sq mi) island is home to two communities of full and part-time residents, a state park, a one-room schoolhouse, and two airstrips (Stuart Island Airstrip - 7WA5 with a 2,000 ft (610 m) grass runway, and Stuart Island West - 2WA3 with a 1,560 ft (475 m) dirt runway). The 2000 census (erroneously) reported a population of 800 permanent residents. Two sites, both part of Stuart Island State Park, are on public lands. One is located near the center of the island, and another in on the western coast, the site of the Turn Point Light Station, a lighthouse guiding shipping in the busy waters of Boundary Pass to the island's north. Turn Point Light Station is on land administered by the Bureau of Land Management's Spokane District, Wenatchee Resource Area, Lopez Island Office. The lighthouse and nearby "Lover's Leap" are popular hiking destinations accessible by county road. Sheltered anchorages for boaters can be found in Reid Harbor and Prevost Harbor, with public state park facilities in each. There are no stores or other public
    7.67
    3 votes
    71
    Swinburne Island

    Swinburne Island

    Swinburne Island is the smaller of two artificial islands created in the Lower New York Bay east of South Beach, Staten Island. After several cholera pandemics in the nineteenth century, the federal government built Swinburne and Hoffman islands to serve as areas of quarantine for immigrants arriving by ship and carrying contagious diseases. Along with Hoffman Island, which was constructed in 1873, Swinburne was used through the early 20th century to quarantine immigrants to the United States who were found to be suffering dangerous contagious diseases upon arrival at the Port of New York. Immigrants suspected of having such diseases were taken to the quarantine hospital and were not allowed to go to Ellis Island for entry until they were shown to be well or were cured of the disease. The island was used to quarantine patients during the last cholera outbreak in the United States in 1910-1911, which started with a passenger from Naples on the Moltke, a ship of the Hamburg-American line. Swinburne was the second built, about a mile south of the earlier island, and it has a crematorium. The island was originally called Dix Island, but was renamed in honor of Dr. John Swinburne
    7.67
    3 votes
    72
    Yos Sudarso Island

    Yos Sudarso Island

    Pulau Yos Sudarso is an island in Papua province, Indonesia. It is separated only by narrow channels from the main island of New Guinea. It also known as Pulau Dolok, Pulau Dolak and Pulau Kimaam, has also been known as Kolepom Island, and in the Dutch colonial period was known as Frederik Hendrik Island. The island is leaf shaped, about 165 km long with an area of 11,600 km².
    7.67
    3 votes
    73
    Assumption Island

    Assumption Island

    • Island Group: Seychelles Archipelago
    Assumption Island is a small island located at 9°45′S 46°29′E / 9.75°S 46.483°E / -9.75; 46.483 in the Indian Ocean north of Madagascar and is part of the country of the Seychelles. It is located about 30 km southeast of the Aldabra Atoll and is part of the Aldabra Group. It is a single coral island which measures 11.07 km² in area and which has a small settlement on the sheltered western side, surrounded by Casuarina trees. An abandoned coconut palm plantation is just south of it. There is a concrete runway that runs from between the two sand dunes on the southeast to the settlement. The western shore features an almost uninterruptend sandy beach of 5 km. Two large sand dunes are prominent on the southeastern coast of the island, one of them 32 m high. Due to the devastating effect of guano mining which lasted until 1983, the island is dominated by expanses of bare rock and caves, and is sparsely covered with low-growing vegetation. A notable feature of this island is the Assumption Island day gecko, a subspecies of gecko found only on this island. The documentary The Silent World was partially shot on Assumption.
    10.00
    1 votes
    74
    Balchug

    Balchug

    Balchug (Russian: Ба́лчуг, IPA: [ˈbɑlt͡ɕʊk]), also known as Boloto ("The Marsh", Russian: Боло́тный о́стров), is an island in the very centre of Moscow, Russia, squeezed between the Moskva River (just opposite the Kremlin) and its old river-bed which was turned into the Vodootvodny Canal in 1786. It is an integral part of historical Zamoskvorechye area; administratively, its territory belongs to Zamoskvorechye and Yakimanka municipal districts. In a strict sense, the name Balchug refers only to the short Balchug street, crossing the center point of the island parallel to Bolshoy Moskvoretsky Bridge, and three city blocks around it. The island, like other islands on Moskva River, does not have an official name in Russian; rather, each neighborhood on the island is referred to with its own name. Unofficially it is known to Moscow residents as "Bolotny Ostrov" (Bog Island). This section is based on P.V.Sytin's "History of Moscow Streets" (1948) Balchug is one of the oldest Moscow streets outside of the Kremlin walls. It emerged towards the end of the fourteenth century, when the new Kremlin built by Dmitri Donskoi pushed the posad settlement into present-day Red Square and further
    10.00
    1 votes
    75
    Rote Island

    Rote Island

    • Island Group: Lesser Sunda Islands
    Rote Island (Indonesian: Pulau Rote, also spelled Roti) is an island of Indonesia, part of the East Nusa Tenggara province of the Lesser Sunda Islands. It has an area of 1,200 km (463 sq mi). It lies 500 km (311 mi) northeast of the Australian coast and 170 km (106 mi) northeast of the Ashmore and Cartier Islands. The island is situated to the southwest of the larger island of Timor. To the north is the Savu Sea, and to the south is the Timor Sea. To the west is Savu and Sumba. The uninhabited Dana Island (also called Ndana), just south of Rote, with an area of 14 km (5 sq mi), is the southernmost island of Indonesia. Along with some other nearby small islands, such as Ndao island, it forms the kabupaten (regency) of Rote Ndao Regency, which in 2010 decennial census recorded a population of 119,711. The main town, Ba'a, is located on the northern side of the island. Rote has a good surf area in the south around the village of Nemberala. There is a daily ferry to the island from Kupang, the provincial capital on West Timor, which provides transport for local passengers and goods as well as tourists. The trip between Kupang and Ba'a takes around 2 hours. Rote has many historical
    10.00
    1 votes
    76
    St Mary's Island, Tyne and Wear

    St Mary's Island, Tyne and Wear

    St. Mary's Island is a small island made of sandstone near the seaside resort of Whitley Bay, Tyne and Wear, UK. St. Mary's Island was originally called Bates Island, Hartley Bates or Bates Hill as it was originally owned by the Bates family who were prominent locally. It is sometimes known as Bait Island, probably due to a misunderstanding of the meaning of the name. The island is opposite Curry's Point on the mainland and is connected to the coast at low tide by a rocky causeway. The main feature of the island is St. Mary's Lighthouse which was built in 1898. In medieval times there was a chapel on the island dedicated to St Helen. Within the chapel was the Lady Light, also known as St. Katherine's Light. The light was later, wrongly, ascribed to St. Mary and, as a result, the island became known as St. Mary's Island. It is debatable whether the light was used as a warning to shipping or was purely religious. Next to the chapel was a burial ground where monks and local people were interred. Traces of St. Helen's Chapel were destroyed when the lighthouse was built in 1898. During the 19th century there was an inn, known as the 'Square and Compass', on the island, run by a Mr.
    10.00
    1 votes
    77
    Waterhouse Island, Tasmania

    Waterhouse Island, Tasmania

    Waterhouse Island is an island, with an area of 287 ha (709 ac; 1.11 mi²), in south-eastern Australia. It is part of the Waterhouse Island Group, lying close to the north-eastern coast of Tasmania. Most of it has been leased for farming and it contains a homestead, farm buildings and an airstrip. The vegetation is dominated by introduced pasture grasses. Livestock grazing has caused erosion which has affected the shearwater colonies. The island is named after Captain Henry Waterhouse of the Reliance. Nicholas Baudin stopped at the island in 1802 mistakenly thinking the name meant fresh water could be found there, which was not the case. Recorded breeding seabird species are the Little Penguin and Short-tailed Shearwater. Introduced mammals include sheep, cats, Fallow Deer and House Mice. Reptiles present include the Metallic Skink, Spotted Skink, Three-lined Skink, Bougainville's Skink and White's Skink. Besides Waterhouse Island, the Waterhouse Island Group includes the following:
    10.00
    1 votes
    78
    Kotlin Island

    Kotlin Island

    • Body Of Water: Baltic Sea
    Kotlin (or Kettle; Finnish: Retusaari) is a Russian island, located near the head of the Gulf of Finland, 20 mi (32 km) west of Saint Petersburg in the Baltic Sea. Kotlin separates the Neva Bay from the rest of the gulf. The fortified town of Kronstadt is located on the island. The naval approach to Saint Petersburg was greatly facilitated by the construction in 1875–85 of a canal, 23 ft (7.0 m) deep, through the shallows, whereas cars will soon be able to travel overland to the island by using the Saint Petersburg Dam from the north and south shores of the Gulf of Finland. Started in 1980, but delayed by political upheaval in the 1990s, the dam project was completed in 2010 and officially commissioned in 2011. In general outline, the island forms an elongated triangle, 7.5 mi (12.1 km) in length by about 1 mi (1.6 km) in breadth, with its base towards St Petersburg. The eastern or broad end is occupied by the town of Kronstadt, and shoals extend for 1.5 mi (2.4 km) from the western point of the island to the rock on which the Tolbaaken lighthouse is built. The island thus divides the seaward approach to St Petersburg into two channels; that on the northern side is obstructed by
    6.50
    4 votes
    79
    Ndere Island

    Ndere Island

    Ndere Island is a small island (4.2 km or 1.6 sq mi) in Winam Gulf of Lake Victoria in Kenya. It was gazetted as the Ndere Island National Reserve in November 1986 and has since that time been uninhabited. Ndere means "meeting place" in Dholuo. According to Luo folklore, early tribal migrants rested up near Ndere after their long journey south up the Nile River Valley. They found the lush shoreline so pleasing that they stayed. Notable fauna associated with the island include African fish eagles, swifts, hippopotamus, and Nile crocodiles. About fifty impalas have been introduced to the island.
    6.50
    4 votes
    80
    Nuns' Island

    Nuns' Island

    Nuns' Island (officially Île des Sœurs) is an island that forms a part of the city of Montreal, Quebec. It is part of the borough of Verdun. The 3.74 km² island is part of the Hochelaga Archipelago in the St. Lawrence River. It is located immediately southeast of the Island of Montreal, from which it is separated by a narrow channel, and north of the La Prairie Basin. The Décarie Expressway (Aut. 15) runs through Nuns' Island, connecting it to the south shore of the St. Lawrence River via the Champlain Bridge and to the Island of Montreal via the Pont de l'Île-des-Sœurs, part of the Champlain Bridge complex. The Clément Bridge connects the island with the Bonaventure Expressway (Aut. 10). Although the island is just a few miles from downtown Montreal, it is very secluded from the city and remains free of heavy traffic and noise of the city. The island is primarily composed of residential apartments, condos and flats. Commercial services are clustered in malls around Place du Commerce near the Champlain Bridge, with civic services including a community centre and church around Place Elgar. A recent development is the construction of the campus headquarters of Bell Canada on the
    6.50
    4 votes
    81
    Symi

    Symi

    • Island Group: Dodecanese
    • Body Of Water: Aegean Sea
    Symi also transliterated Syme or Simi (Greek: Σύμη) is a Greek island and municipality. It is mountainous and includes the harbor town of Symi and its adjacent upper town Ano Symi, as well as several smaller localities, beaches, and areas of significance in history and mythology. Symi is part of the Rhodes regional unit. The shipbuilding and sponge industries were substantial on the island and, while at their peak near the end of the 19th century, the population reached 22,500. Symi's main industry is now tourism and the population has declined to 2,500. Geographically, it is part of the Dodecanese island chain, located about 41 km north-northwest of Rhodes (and 425 km from Piraeus, the port of Athens), with 58.1 km² (22 sq mi) of mountainous terrain. Its nearest land neighbors are the Datça and Bozburun peninsulas of Muğla Province in Turkey. Its interior is dotted with small valleys, and its coastline alternates between rocky cliffs and beaches, and isolated coves. Its main town, located on the northeast coast, is also named Symi and consists of the lower town around the harbour, typically referred to as Yialos, and the upper town is called Horio or Ano Symi. Other inhabited
    6.50
    4 votes
    82
    Java

    Java

    • Island Group: Sunda Arc
    • Body Of Water: Indian Ocean
    Java (Indonesian: Jawa) is an island of Indonesia. With a population of 135 million (excluding the 3.6 million on the island of Madura which is administered as part of the provinces of Java), Java is the world's most populous island, and one of the most densely-populated places on the globe. Java is the home of 60 percent of the Indonesian population. The Indonesian capital city, Jakarta, is located on western Java. Much of Indonesian history took place on Java. It was the center of powerful Hindu-Buddhist empires, the Islamic sultanates, and the core of the colonial Dutch East Indies. Java was also the center of the Indonesian struggle for independence during the 1930s and 40s. Java dominates Indonesia politically, economically and culturally. Formed mostly as the result of volcanic eruptions, Java is the 13th largest island in the world and the fifth largest island in Indonesia. A chain of volcanic mountains forms an east-west spine along the island. It has three main languages, though Javanese is dominant, and it is the native language of about 60 million people in Indonesia, most of whom live on Java. Most of its residents are bilingual, with Indonesian as their first or second
    8.50
    2 votes
    83
    Rava

    Rava

    Rava is an island in the Croatian part of the Adriatic Sea. It is situated in the Zadar archipelago, between Iž and Dugi Otok, 16 nautical miles (30 km) from Zadar. Its area is 3.6 km, and it has a population of 98 (as of 2001). The only settlements on the island are Vela Rava and Mala Rava. The coast of the island is very indented with 13 bays and 15.45 km of coastline. The island is composed of dolomite. The primary industries are agriculture (mainly olives, but some vineyards also) and fishing.
    8.50
    2 votes
    84
    Anticosti Island

    Anticosti Island

    Anticosti Island (French, Île d'Anticosti) is an island in Quebec, Canada, at the outlet of the Saint Lawrence River into the Gulf of Saint Lawrence, between 49° and 50° N., and between 61° 40' and 64° 30' W. At 7,892.52 km (3,047.32 sq mi) in size, it is the 90th largest island in the world and 20th largest island in Canada. Anticosti Island is separated on the north from the Côte-Nord region of Quebec (the Labrador Peninsula) by the Jacques Cartier Strait, and on the south from the Gaspé Peninsula by the Honguedo Strait. Anticosti Island is large but sparsely populated (281 people in 2006), with most of the permanent population in the village of Port-Menier on the western tip of the island, consisting chiefly of the keepers of the lighthouses erected by the Canadian government. The entire island constitutes one municipality known as L'Île-d'Anticosti. Because of the more than 400 shipwrecks off its coasts, it is called the "Cemetery of the Gulf". Anticosti Island is part of the eastern Saint Lawrence lowlands. It is 217 km (135 mi) long and 16–48 km (10–30 mi) wide — 1.5 times larger than the province of Prince Edward Island. Its coastline is 520 km (320 mi) long, and is rocky
    7.33
    3 votes
    85
    Farquhar Group

    Farquhar Group

    • Island Group: Seychelles Archipelago
    The Farquhar Group belong to the Outer Islands of the Seychelles, lying in the southwest of the island nation, more than 700 kilometres southwest of the capital, Victoria, on Mahé Island. The total land area of all islands in the group is less than 11 km², but the total area of the atolls measures about 370 km². The group consists of two atolls and one separate island. In addition, there is one separate submerged reef in the area: There are only two settlements. The main settlement is on Île du Nord (North Island) of Farquhar Atoll, and the other one on Providence Island of Providence Atoll. There are records of Maldivian mariner presence in the group from the 20th century, when a trading vessel from southern Maldives lost its course and reached Providence Atoll. The oonopid monotypic spider species Farqua quadrimaculata is the only known spider that is endemic to the Farquhar Islands.
    7.33
    3 votes
    86
    Fort Charlotte

    Fort Charlotte

    Fort Charlotte in the centre of Lerwick, Shetland, is a five-sided artillery fort, with bastions on each corner. The first incarnation of the fort was built between 1652-3 during the First Anglo-Dutch War. Little is known of the original structure and no trace of it has been found. The second structure was built on the same site by Robert Mylne under the orders of Charles II at the start of the Second Anglo-Dutch War in 1665 at a cost of £28,000. It held off a Dutch fleet in 1667 which thought it was far more heavily manned and gunned than it actually was. In fact, the walls were unfinished and there were few guns. At the end of the war it was slighted when the government decided not to station a garrison in Lerwick, and it was unmanned when the Dutch burnt it in 1673 during the Third Anglo-Dutch War. It was rebuilt in its current form in 1781 and named after the wife of George III but has never seen service during hostilities since then. It housed a garrison during the Napoleonic Wars and was later a base for the Royal Naval Reserve. From 1837-75 it was used as the town jail and courthouse and later a custom house and a coastguard station. Due to land reclamation and subsequently
    7.33
    3 votes
    87
    Keewaydin Island

    Keewaydin Island

    Keewaydin Island is a primary barrier island located off the coast of Naples, in Collier County, Florida. Keewaydin Island is monitored nightly for Loggerhead turtle nesting activity by The Conservancy of Southwest Florida. Keeywadin Island is a popular destination for its public beach, which is accessible by boat. The Keewaydin Island shoreline has been mapped annually since 1997 in an effort to document shoreline change. The shoreline is also mapped after significant storm events. Mapping is done by collecting Global Positioning System locations along the dune-line and then downloaded using Geographic information system software. Keewaydin Island was once a part of the Keewaydin Camps Ltd. corporation.
    7.33
    3 votes
    88
    Koch Island

    Koch Island

    • Island Group: Canadian Arctic Archipelago
    Koch Island is one of the Canadian Arctic islands in Qikiqtaaluk Region, Nunavut, Canada. Located in Foxe Basin, it is an uninhabited Baffin Island offshore island. Located at 69°38'N 78°20'W, it has an area of 458 km (177 sq mi).
    7.33
    3 votes
    89
    Maarandhoo

    Maarandhoo

    Maarandhoo (Dhivehi: މާރަންދޫ) is one of the inhabited islands of Haa Alif Atoll administrative division and geographically part of Thiladhummathi Atoll in the north of the Maldives.
    7.33
    3 votes
    90
    Negit Island

    Negit Island

    • Body Of Water: Mono Lake
    Negit Island is an island in Mono Lake. Negit (along with nearby Paoha Island) is a volcanic cone less than 2000 years old. It can be considered to be the northernmost of the Mono Craters. Negit is composed of three dark dacite lava flows. Negit is an important nesting ground for migratory birds, including the California Gull, which can often be seen wheeling in the air above Mono Lake. The fall of the lake level since 1941 created a land bridge to the island. The land bridge permitted predators, such as coyotes, to raid the bird eggs of the island. However, since 1994, the lake level has been permitted to rise and the land bridge is currently submerged. Negit Island is accessible by boats (commonly kayaks). However, the island is off-limits from April 1 through August 1, to protect the nesting gulls.
    7.33
    3 votes
    91
    Romang

    Romang

    • Island Group: Maluku Islands
    Romang is an island, part of Barat Daya Islands in Indonesia, located at 7°35′00″S 127°26′00″E / 7.5833333°S 127.4333333°E / -7.5833333; 127.4333333, east of Wetar Island.
    7.33
    3 votes
    92
    Ruhnu

    Ruhnu

    Ruhnu (Swedish: Runö) is an island situated in the Gulf of Riga in the Baltic Sea. It belongs to Estonia and is an administrative part of Saare County. At 11.9 km it has currently less than 100, mostly ethnic Estonian permanent inhabitants. Prior to 1944 it was for centuries populated by ethnic Swedes and traditional Swedish law was used. The first archaeological artifacts of human activity in Ruhnu, assumed to be related to seasonal seal hunting, date back to around 5000 BC. The time of arrival of the first ancient Scandinavians in Ruhnu and the beginning of a permanent Swedish-speaking settlement is not known. It probably did not precede the Northern Crusades in the beginning of the 13th century, when the indigenous peoples of all the lands surrounding the Gulf of Riga were converted to Christianity and subjugated to the Teutonic Order. The first documented record of the island of Ruhnu, and of its Swedish population, is a 1341 letter sent by the Bishop of Courland which confirmed the islanders' right to reside and manage their property in accordance with Swedish law. Ruhnu was controlled by the Kingdom of Sweden (1621–1708, formally until 1721) and after that by Imperial Russia
    7.33
    3 votes
    93
    Cortes Island, British Columbia

    Cortes Island, British Columbia

    • Body Of Water: Pacific Ocean
    Cortes Island is one of the archipelago known as the Discovery Islands in British Columbia, Canada which lie beyond the northern end of the Gulf of Georgia, between Vancouver Island and the British Columbia Mainland. Cortes lies on the far side of Quadra Island from the city of Campbell River, separated from Quadra Island by Sutil Channel. To the northeast across Lewis Channel is West Redonda Island, while Desolation Sound lies to the east of Cortes Island and beyond it, the upper end of the Malaspina Peninsula. Cortes Island is located roughly halfway between Powell River and Campbell River. The island, which is in the Sayward Land District, is 25 km (15.5 mi) long, 13 km (8.1 mi) wide, and 130 km (50 sq mi)) in area. It has a population of 1,042 permanent residents (2006 census). Cortes is the largest of the Islands in Electoral Area "B" of the Strathcona Regional District, which governs zoning and septic permits. The island is in the Sunshine Coast Forest District and the Vancouver Island Ministry of Environment's Vancouver Island Region. The entire island is part of the traditional territories of the Wei We Kai, Kwiakah, Homalco and Klahoose First Nations, with the office of
    6.25
    4 votes
    94
    Sotavento

    Sotavento

    The Sotavento islands (literally, the Leeward), is the southern island group of Cape Verde archipelago. There are four main islands: Brava, Fogo and Santiago are rocky and volcanic agricultural islands, with the longest histories of human habitation and densest populations in the Cape Verdes. Maio lies to the east and is a flat desert island whose economy was primarily based on salt, giving it more in common with Sal and Boa Vista among the Barlavento. The islets Ilhéu Grande, Ilhéu de Cima, and the minor islets Ilhéu do Rei, Ilhéu Sapado and Ilhéu Luís Carneiro make up the Ilhéus Secos (or Ilhéus do Rombo) islets group north of Brava. The little Ilhéu de Santa Maria lies off Santiago.
    6.25
    4 votes
    95
    Bogø

    Bogø

    Bogø is a Danish island in the Baltic Sea, just west of Møn. The population is 1,105 (1st January 2012) with 869 living in the only town on the island, Bogø By. The island is approximately 7 km long by 3 km wide at the largest points, with a total area of 13 km². Maximum height above sea level is 32 metres. To the west of Bogø is a smaller island, Farø, which carries the E47/E55 motorway from Copenhagen to the major islands of Lolland and Falster. The motorways continue via ferry to Germany. Bogø is connected by causeway to both Farø and Møn, and carries one of the two main routes for vehicles travelling to Møn. It is part of Vordingborg Municipality. The island has a varied landscape including wooded areas and traditional villages. To the northwest of the island at Skåninge is a small harbour and bathing jetty. To the south east is a larger harbour with a car ferry which operates during summer months to Stubbekøbing on Falster. Near the centre of the island is a preserved windmill, which is presently being restored to form a working museum. The island was for a long time part of the crown estates. In 1769 it was offered for sale, and purchased by the islanders for 18,456
    7.00
    3 votes
    96
    Eilean Donan

    Eilean Donan

    • Island Group: Inner Hebrides
    • Body Of Water: Loch Duich
    Eilean Donan (Scottish Gaelic: Eilean Donnain) is a small island in Loch Duich in the western Highlands of Scotland. It is connected to the mainland by a footbridge and lies about half a mile from the village of Dornie. Eilean Donan (which means simply "island of Donnán") is named after Donnán of Eigg, a Celtic saint martyred in 617. Donnán is said to have established a church on the island, though no trace of this remains. The island is dominated by a picturesque castle which is widely familiar from many photographs and appearances in film and television. The castle was founded in the 13th century, but was destroyed in the 18th century. The present buildings are the result of 20th-century reconstruction. Eilean Donan Castle is the home of the Clan Macrae. Eilean Donan is part of the Kintail National Scenic Area, one of 40 in Scotland. In 2001, the island had a population of just one person. The presence of a vitrified fort was recorded on the island in 1912, though the nature of any early fortification is uncertain. In the 13th century, a large curtain-wall castle (wall of enceinte) was constructed. At this time the area was at the boundary of the Norse-Celtic Lordship of the
    7.00
    3 votes
    97
    Heirisson Island

    Heirisson Island

    Heirisson Island (Matagarup) is an island in the Swan River in Western Australia at the eastern end of Perth Water (31°57′59″S 115°52′57″E / 31.96639°S 115.8825°E / -31.96639; 115.8825). The city of Perth and the Town of Victoria Park are linked by The Causeway which is actually two bridges which span the two foreshores and the island. It occupies an area of roughly 285,600 square metres. Prior to development, there were actually two islands, surrounded by mudflats. It also had alternate names. The nyungar name of the island (Matagarup) and surrounds related to the nature of the mudflats being leg deep Over the years, dredging and reclamation has created a single island, which is now a landscaped nature reserve, with a two kilometre walking path. In recent years a colony of Western Grey Kangaroos have been introduced onto the island. In 2008 a new Master Plan for Heirisson Island was adopted by the City of Perth. This Master Plan integrates a proposed international quality sculpture park on the Island and the construction of a footbridge over the northern channel of the Swan River. The footbridge will link Point Fraser to the Island and provide a gateway to the proposed
    7.00
    3 votes
    98
    Polillo Island

    Polillo Island

    Polillo is an island in the Northeastern region of the Philippine archipelago. It is separated from the island of Luzon by the Polillo Strait. The island itself is subdivided across three municipalities. The municipality of Polillo takes up the Southern part of the island. The Eastern partition of the island is administered by the municipality of Burdeos, while the North is within the jurisdiction of the municipality of Panukulan. The island is also home to one of the rarest reptiles on the planet, the Butaan lizard, a highly endangered relative of the Komodo Dragon. As of the 2007 Philippine Census, the island is home to 63,448 individuals. In the mid-16th century, Spaniards came to the island and there they built a chapel. They took-charge the management of the island and many changes and development they brought there upon their times.
    7.00
    3 votes
    99
    Prescott Island

    Prescott Island

    • Island Group: Canadian Arctic Archipelago
    Prescott Island is one of the uninhabited Canadian Arctic islands in the territory of Nunavut. The island is situated in Peel Sound, between the Prince of Wales Island and Somerset Island. Prescott Island is oval-shaped, and has an area of 412 km (159 sq mi). Together with four other, smaller islands (Binstead, Lock, Pandora, and Vivian), they create a barrier at the entrance into Browne Bay on eastern Prince of Wales Island.
    7.00
    3 votes
    100
    Soay

    Soay

    • Island Group: Inner Hebrides
    Soay (Scottish Gaelic: Sòdhaigh, pronounced [ˈs̪ɔː.aj]) is an island just off the coast of Skye, in the Inner Hebrides of Scotland. Soay lies to the west of Loch Scavaig on the south-west coast of Skye, from which it is separated by Soay Sound. Unlike its neighbours Skye and Rùm, Soay is low-lying, reaching 141 metres (463 ft) at Beinn Bhreac. The dumb-bell shaped island is virtually cut in half by inlets that form Soay Harbour (N) and the main bay, Camas nan Gall (to the S). The main settlement, Mol-chlach is on the shore of Camas nan Gall. It is normally reached by boat from Elgol. The island is part of the Cuillin Hills National Scenic Area, one of 40 in Scotland. The name derives from Old Norse so-øy meaning Sheep Island. Camas nan Gall (G: Bay of Foreigners) is probably named after the Norse invaders, after whom the Hebrides (Na h-Innse Gall) are also named. The population peaked at 158 in 1851, following eviction of crofters from Skye in the Highland Clearances. In 1946, author Gavin Maxwell bought the island and established a factory to process shark oil from basking sharks. The enterprise was unsuccessful, lasting just three years. Maxwell wrote about it in his book Harpoon
    7.00
    3 votes
    101
    Eilean Chathastail

    Eilean Chathastail

    • Island Group: Inner Hebrides
    Eilean Chathastail (Eng: Castle Island) is one of the Small Isles in the Inner Hebrides of Scotland. Eilean Chathastail protects the only harbour on Eigg at Galmisdale. It is roughly 1 kilometre (1,100 yd) in length and lies only 100 metres (110 yd) off the south-east coast of the island of Eigg. Eigg lighthouse was built on the island in 1906 by brothers David A. and Charles Alexander Stevenson. In July 1884 the geologist and writer Hugh Miller arrived at the Eilean Chathastail anchorage on board the yacht Betsey. He had just begun his journey at Tobermory and he produced a diary of his travels in the Hebrides for the newspaper Witness, of which he was the editor. His contributions were later collated and published as The Cruise of the Betsey in 1856. He wrote that: "We passed the Isle of Muck, with its one low hill; saw the pyramidal mountains of Rum looming tall in the offing; and then, running along the Isle of Eigg, with its colossal Scuir rising between us and the sky, as if it were a piece of Babylonian wall, or the great wall of China, only vastly larger, set down on the ridge of a mountain, we entered the channel which separates the isle from one of its dependencies,
    6.00
    4 votes
    102
    Gibraltar Island

    Gibraltar Island

    • Body Of Water: Lake Erie
    Gibraltar Island (or the "Gem of Lake Erie") is an island in Ohio, located within Lake Erie. This small island is just offshore of South Bass Island. Gibraltar Island became a lookout point for Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry in the fight against the British during the War of 1812. Perry and his men defeated a fleet of British sailing vessels during the famous Battle of Lake Erie on September 10, 1813. As a result, the lookout point on Gibraltar Island became known as Perry's Lookout. Ownership of the island remained with Connecticut until Pierpont Edwards, a New York banker purchased the deed in 1807. Sandusky, Ohio native Jay Cooke bought the island from Edwards in 1864 and immediately began construction of a 15 room Victorian-Gothic mansion (now known as Cooke Castle). The Cooke family entertained a variety of notables, such as William Tecumseh Sherman, Salmon P. Chase, Rutherford B. Hayes, Grover Cleveland, and Benjamin Harrison. Ohio State University has had various research and teaching laboratories on Lake Erie since 1895, when Professor David S. Kellicott created a second-floor lab in a Sandusky, Ohio fish hatchery. Kellicott served as the laboratory director until his death
    6.00
    4 votes
    103
    Lavan Island

    Lavan Island

    • Body Of Water: Persian Gulf
    Lavan Island (Persian: جزیرهٔ لاوان‎) is an Iranian island in the Persian Gulf. It has an area of 76 km². The island has one of the four major terminals for export of crude oil in Iran. The largest one is in Kharg Island. Lavan island sits on top of Lavan gas field, containing 9,5 trillion cubic feet of gas.
    6.00
    4 votes
    104
    Dragon Island

    Dragon Island

    Dragon Island is a privately owned island off the northeast coast of New Zealand's Great Barrier Island. It is located 95 kilometres (59 mi) to the northeast of Auckland. The island provides Harataonga Bay on Great Barrier Island with shelter from easterly and southeasterly winds by blocking the bay from Pacific storms. The island is in relatively calm water, sheltered by the larger Rakitu Island to the north. the island was once farmed but has now reverted to scrub.
    8.00
    2 votes
    105
    Gambier Island

    Gambier Island

    • Body Of Water: Howe Sound
    Gambier Island is an island located in Howe Sound near Vancouver, British Columbia. It is about 17,000 acres (69 km²) in size and is located about 10 km north of the Horseshoe Bay community and ferry terminal in westernmost West Vancouver. A rugged and sparsely populated island, it is far quieter than its neighbour Bowen Island, which is popular with day-trippers and summer vacationers. Gambier Island is accessible only by B.C. Ferries passenger service, water taxi or other boats. There is no central road network. The island elects two trustees to the Islands Trust, an organization that unites small island communities in British Columbia to oversee development and land use. Other islands in Howe Sound include Keats Island and Anvil Island. There are under 200 long-term residents on Gambier, but the population swells to about 1,000 in the summertime due to the island's summer holiday homes. The island's scenic setting and solitude make it popular with artists and writers. The main wharf and settlement area is called New Brighton, on the west side of the island. Gambier Harbour, another small community, lies to the east, with another wharf and boat dock. A locality at the north end
    8.00
    2 votes
    106
    San Giulio Island

    San Giulio Island

    • Body Of Water: Lake Orta
    Isola San Giulio or San Giulio Island (Italian: Isola di San Giulio) is an island within Lake Orta in Piedmont, northwestern Italy. The island is 275 metres long (north/south), and is 140 metres wide (east/west). The most famous building on the island is the Basilica of Saint Giulio close to which you can see the monumental old Seminary (1840s). Since 1976 it has been transformed into a Benedictine monastery. The little island, just west of the lakeshore village of Orta San Giulio, has very picturesque buildings, and takes its name from a local patron saint (Julius of Novara), who lived in the second half of the 4th century. In the 5th century, a small chapel (oratorium) was erected on the island, probably to commemorate the great evangelizer Saint Julius, who had died there. We know from archaeological finds that a new, bigger church already existed in the 6th century: here Filacrio, the bishop of Novara, asked to be buried. In the same time an octagonal building - probably a baptistery - was erected in the middle of the island. Unfortunately every trace of it has been cancelled in the 19th century when the massive building of the Seminary was built. In the 12th century a new
    8.00
    2 votes
    107
    Bananal Island

    Bananal Island

    Bananal Island (Portuguese: Ilha do Bananal, IPA: [banaˈnaw]) is a large river island formed from the bisection of the Araguaia River, in southwestern Tocantins, Brazil. The island is formed by a fork in a very flat section of the Araguaia River. Bananal Island is the largest fluvial island in the world, at 350 km (217 mi) long and 55 km (34 mi) wide. Its total area is 19,162.25 km² (7,400 mi²), twice the size of Lebanon or Jamaica. Bananal Island is a nature and culture preserve. In accordance with Article 28 of the Statute of Indian Law (Artigo 28 do Estatuto do Indío-lei) No. 6001 laid out in 19 December 1973, an area of 5,577.26 km² is preserved as Araguaia National Park and further 13,584.99 km² as cultural preserve for indigenous peoples. The northern third of the island, which is designated as a national park, is a popular destination for ecotourism. The southern two thirds are Indigenous Territories. Although Brazilians of non-native descent lived on the island in the past, today only natives populate the island. At least four tribes live on Bananal Island: the Javaés, Karajá, Ava-Canoeiro, and Tuxá. There are sixteen aldeias or villages on the island: Barra do Rio,
    9.00
    1 votes
    108
    Big Tancook Island

    Big Tancook Island

    Big Tancook Island is a Canadian island located off the coast of Nova Scotia. The island is one of the 365 islands dotting Mahone Bay. It measures approximately 4 km (2.5 mi) long (north to south) and 1.6 km (0.99 mi) wide, forming roughly a "C" shape. The island is separated from nearby Little Tancook Island to the east by a 1 km (0.62 mi) wide strait called "The Chops". Big Tancook Island is approximately 4 km (2.5 mi) from Sandy Cove Point on the Aspotogan Peninsula - the nearest point on the mainland. The island measures 550 acres (2.2 km) and has a rocky shoreline with open fields and softwood forest dotted by ponds, tidy residential properties and fish stores. It is the largest island in Mahone Bay. The community of Big Tancook is the only one located on Big Tancook Island. Big Tancook has a population of about 200 people during the summer months and approximately 120 people during the winter months. It is home to one of the last remaining one-room schoolhouses in Canada - Big Tancook Island Elementary School. The residents primarily make their living through lobster fishing, although a unique artistic community adds a certain dynamic vibrancy to the island. Wildlife
    9.00
    1 votes
    109
    Blidö

    Blidö

    Blidö is an island in the Stockholm archipelago and a part of the Norrtälje Municipality. The journalist and author Ture Nerman owned a summer house on Blidö from 1919 until 1969.
    9.00
    1 votes
    110
    Herron Island

    Herron Island

    Herron Island is an island in central Case Inlet in the southern part of Puget Sound in the state of Washington, USA. The Pierce County island has a land area of 1.2326 km² (304.57 acres) and a population of 152 persons as of the 2000 census. Herron Island is one of the few privately-owned islands in Puget Sound. All access to the island is by boat, mostly aboard the HMC ferry, the "Charlie Wells", and a guest pass signed by an HMC member is necessary to board the ferry. The island is 1.25 miles (2.01 km) long, and 1/2 mile across. Corporate properties include the North Beach Park and small boat docks, the South Beach (undeveloped), roads and rights of way, Goodpastor Park and adjacent wetlands, Community Building and Fire Station, water system, ferry and ferry docks, as well as numerous greenbelt lots throughout the island. All other land is privately owned. Ownership of waterfront lots includes the tidelands down to the mean sea level. Herron Island was named by Charles Wilkes during the Wilkes Expedition of 1838-1842, to honor Lewis Herron, the expedition's cooper. Herron Island is a completely private island. It was incorporated on April 30, 1958 as Herron Maintenance Co.
    9.00
    1 votes
    111
    Inchmarnock

    Inchmarnock

    • Island Group: Islands of the Clyde
    Inchmarnock (Scottish Gaelic: Innis Mheàrnaig) is an island at the northern end of the Sound of Bute on the west coast of Scotland. Inchmarnock lies to the west of the Isle of Bute at the northern end of the Sound of Bute. It is around 3.5 kilometres (2.2 mi) long and rises to a height of 60 metres (197 ft). The island consists mainly of a single ridge running north to south. It is partially wooded and has sea caves at the north and the south and two tiny lochans inland. The island belongs to the traditional county of Bute and the modern unitary authority of Argyll and Bute. It is not to be confused with Inchmarnock in Aberdeenshire. Divided into three farms, Southpark, Midpark and Northpark, only the latter is currently inhabited. A short reef of drying rocks, Tràigh na h-Uil, skirts the island's west coast. The island gives its name to Inchmarnock Water, the body of water that lies between the island's western shore and the Kintyre peninsula. Inchmarnock Water connects the Sound of Bute and the Kilbrannan Sound in the south to Loch Fyne and the Kyles of Bute in the north. At the northern end of the island a Bronze Age cist contains the remains of a female skeleton, the Queen of
    9.00
    1 votes
    112
    Phu Quy

    Phu Quy

    Phú Quý is a small island located about 100 km from Phan Thiet city, Vietnam. Only the rocky, northern half of the island is inhabited, with a population of 20,698 people. Phu Quy district comprises a total of ten islands, with Phu Quy Island being the largest. The island is 16.5 km² in area. The district is 120 km south- east of Phan Thiet, 150 km south of Cam Ranh, 120 km east of Vung Tau, 333 km northeast of Con Son and 540 km west of the Spratly Islands. The highest point on the island is Mount Cam Dat, at 106 m. The north of the island is rocky, while the south consists mostly of sand. [daophuquy.org Phu Quy informations]
    9.00
    1 votes
    113
    Timor

    Timor

    • Island Group: Lesser Sunda Islands
    • Body Of Water: Pacific Ocean
    Timor is an island at the southern end of Maritime Southeast Asia, north of the Timor Sea. It is divided between an independent sovereign state, East Timor, and West Timor, which is part of the Indonesian province of East Nusa Tenggara. The island covers an area of 30,777 square kilometres. The name is a variant of timur, Malay for "east"; it is so called because it lies at the eastern end of the Lesser Sunda Islands. Similar to nearby islands, most Timorese are Melanesian and anthropologists identify eleven distinct ethno-linguistic groups in Timor. The largest are the Atoni of western Timor, and the Tetum of central and eastern Timor. Most Timor indigenous Timorese languages belong to the Austronesian group of languages spoken through the Indonesian archipelago. The non-Austronesian languages are related to languages spoken in the Halmahera in the Maluku Islands and Western New Guinea. The official languages of East Timor are Tetum and Portuguese, while in West Timor it is Indonesian. Indonesian is also widely spoken and understood in East Timor. Christianity is the dominant religion throughout the island of Timor, at about 90% of the population. Roman Catholics are the majority
    9.00
    1 votes
    114
    Antsiferova

    Antsiferova

    • Island Group: Kuril Islands
    • Body Of Water: Sea of Okhotsk
    Antsiferov Island (Russian: Остров Анциферова; also known as Shirinki (Russian: Ширинки Japanese 志林規島; Shirinki-tō) is an uninhabited volcanic island located in the northern the Kuril Islands chain in the Sea of Okhotsk in the northwest Pacific Ocean. Its former Japanese name is derived from the Ainu language for "place of tall waves". Its nearest neighbor is Paramushir, located 15 kilometers away across the Luzhin Strait. It is currently named for the cossack explorer Danila Antsiferov, who first described it along with other northern Kuril islands in the early eighteenth century. Antsiferov is a roughly circular island with an area of 6 km² and is part of a spur range extending to the west of the main Kuril islands arc. The island is a stratovolcano with a diameter of 4.25 kilometers and with a central peak (Japanese 蓮華岳; Renge-dake) with a height of 761 meters which is marked by a caldera which is 0.75 kilometer in diameter, which is breached to the south. Two lava domes are located near the walls of the breach, which appear to be of relatively recent origin, although no volcanic eruptions have been observed on Antsiferov in modern times. Much of the island is covered by pumice
    6.67
    3 votes
    115
    Gavi

    Gavi

    Gavi is a tiny island in the Tyrrhenian Sea off the west coast of Italy. With a length of about 700 metres, it is the smallest of the Pontine Islands and is located 120 metres off the north shore of Ponza. The island is quite rugged and uninhabited by humans. It has been dedicated as a wildlife refuge and is home to a variety of lizard which is found only here, as well as to mice, rabbits and scorpions.
    6.67
    3 votes
    116
    Goeree-Overflakkee

    Goeree-Overflakkee

    Goeree-Overflakkee (Dutch pronunciation: [ɣu.ˈreː ˈoː.vər.flɑ.ˌkeː]) is the southernmost delta island of the province of South Holland, Netherlands. It is separated from Voorne-Putten and Hoeksche Waard by the Haringvliet, from the mainland of North Brabant by the Volkerak, and from Schouwen-Duiveland by Lake Grevelingen. From west to east, it consists of the municipalities Goedereede, Dirksland, Middelharnis, Oostflakkee. Despite being part of South Holland Province, the island's scenery and dialect is closer related to Zeeland than to Holland. This municipality consists of a number of towns. From west to east, they are Ouddorp (with Oostdijk), Goedereede (with Havenhoofd) and Stellendam. Income consists mainly of tourism and fishery. Because of the extended and beautiful beach close by Ouddorp has a large number of camping grounds which is a big attraction for other inland Europeans, mainly Germans. Goedereede and Stellendam both have an extended fishing fleet. Entering the town of Goedereede is like entering a different time. A town that takes you back a few centuries with its beautifully shaped buildings and tall church tower. Goedereede is one of two towns on the island that
    6.67
    3 votes
    117
    Lunga

    Lunga

    • Island Group: Inner Hebrides
    The island of Lunga is the largest of the Treshnish Isles in Argyll and Bute, Scotland. Of volcanic origin, Lunga has been described as 'a green jewel in a peacock sea'. Populated until the 19th century Lunga still bears the remains of black houses. To the northeast of the island lie the remains of the ruined village, which was abandoned in 1857. Lunga is designated a Site of Special Scientific Interest because of its abundant plant life. Many rare and endangered plants are native to the island. Plants include primrose, birdsfoot trefoil, orchids, sea campion, sea thrift, sea pinks, yellow flags, tormentil and the oyster plant. Grey seals inhabit the waters surrounding the island, while birdlife includes storm-petrels, kittiwakes and Manx Shearwaters. Guillemot, puffin and razorbills breed on Lunga and on the Harp Rock, a sea stack separated by a narrow gut. Barnacle geese appear each winter. In summer, tourist boats visit Lunga from Ulva Ferry. The main attraction is the many thousands of breeding puffins which allow visitors to approach to within a few feet of them.
    6.67
    3 votes
    118
    Middle Bass Island

    Middle Bass Island

    • Body Of Water: Lake Erie
    Middle Bass Island is an island of the U.S. state of Ohio, located in Lake Erie. A small town, Middle Bass, lies on the island. The 805-acre (3.258 km²) island is shaped like the Big Dipper and is one of three Bass Islands located at the center of a group of 23 smaller islands. Some of its more famous neighbors are South Bass Island, with the town of Put-in-Bay, Kelleys Island, and Pelee Island. The island has a year-round population of 95 residents (2000 census). Seasonal population surges to near 1,500 residents during the summer. The island was landed upon by French explorer, Robert La Salle, in 1679. The abundance of wildflowers on the island impressed La Salle and his crew so much that they appropriately named it Isle des Fleures, the Island of Flowers. It would retain this name for the next 200 years until it was acquired by a German count in 1856. With the aid of immigrant German workers, the island was used for grape cultivation. This proved to be a very successful undertaking. Old aerial photos of the island (and its neighbor, North Bass Island) show the majority of the island covered with neat rows of grapevines. By 1875, Middle Bass Island's Golden Eagle Winery was
    6.67
    3 votes
    119
    Reimersholme

    Reimersholme

    Reimersholme is a small island in central Stockholm, lying to the west of Södermalm and to the south of the neighbouring island Långholmen. As of 2006 Reimersholme is inhabited by 2,324 people, living in 1,527 dwellings, and with an average annual income of SEK 306,500. 12 percent of the inhabitants have a foreign background. Until June 24th 1798 Reimersholme was called Räkneholmen. Its present name refers to Anders Reimer (1727-1816), a hatter and magistrate whose estate can still be found on the east side of the island. Despite its vicinity to Södermalm, Reimersholme formed part of Brännkyrka parish and Liljeholmen municipality from 1898 until 1912, both of which are now part of the southern suburbs, and was not incorporated into the city of Stockholm until 1913 together with the remaining part of Brännkyrka. It formed part of the parish of Brännkyrka until 1957 when it became part of Högalid parish, the western part of Södermalm. The first housing on the island was built in the 1880s close to Charlottenburg. A wool manufacturing plant, Stockholms Yllefabrik, was built during the 1860s where prisoners from Långholmen Prison used to work. The factory was declared bankrupt in 1934
    6.67
    3 votes
    120
    Tatihou

    Tatihou

    • Body Of Water: English Channel
    Tatihou is an island of Normandy in France with an area of 290,000 square metres. It is located to the east of the Cotentin peninsula just off the coast near Saint-Vaast-la-Hougue. It is almost uninhabited, and is usually reached by amphibious boat although, being a tidal island, it is also possible at low tide to walk there over the local oyster beds. Access to the island is limited to 500 visitors per day. Tatihou, like many of the islets of the Channel Islands contains the -hou suffix. In 1692 the naval Battle of La Hougue took place between the English and the French close to the island of Tatihou. In 1756 the surroundings of La Hougue were defended by many batteries and forts, but the lack of regular maintenance ensured that these quickly fell into disrepair. In 1720 Tatihou was used for quarantining plague victims from Marseilles. On 10 December 1803, the 36-gun frigate HMS Shannon grounded on Tatihou. All her crew survived to be captured by troops from a battery. The next day a party from HMS Merlin burned Shannon to prevent her arms and stores falling into French hands. Tatihou has hosted a small folk festival since 1995, Les Traversées de Tatihou, every August 15. The
    6.67
    3 votes
    121
    Nagu

    Nagu

    Nagu (Swedish pronunciation: [naːɡʉ]; Finnish: Nauvo, [ˈnɑuʋo]) is a former municipality of Finland. On 1 January 2009, it was consolidated with Houtskär, Iniö, Korpo and Pargas to form the new town of Väståboland. The municipality is located in the province of Western Finland and is part of the Finland Proper region. The municipality had a population of 1,428 (31 December 2008) and covered a land area of 246.88 km (95.32 sq mi). The population density was 5.78 inhabitants per square kilometre (15.0 /sq mi). The municipality was bilingual, with the majority (71%) being Swedish and the minority Finnish speakers. Media related to Nagu at Wikimedia Commons
    5.75
    4 votes
    122
    Sakhalin

    Sakhalin

    • Body Of Water: Sea of Okhotsk
    Sakhalin (Russian: Сахалин, pronounced [səxɐˈlʲin]), also known as Kuye (simplified Chinese: 库页; traditional Chinese: 庫頁; pinyin: Kùyè); Japanese: Karafuto (樺太); Saharin (サハリン)) or Saghalien, is a large Russian island in the North Pacific, lying between 45°50' and 54°24' N. It is Russia's largest island, and is administered as part of Sakhalin Oblast. Sakhalin, which is about one fifth the size of Japan, is just off the east coast of Russia, and just north of Japan. The indigenous peoples of the island are the Ainu, Oroks, and Nivkhs. Sakhalin has been claimed by both Russia and Japan over the course of the 19th and 20th centuries. This has led to bitter disputes between the two countries over control of the island. Russia seized the island from the Japanese near the end of World War II. Most Ainu relocated to Hokkaidō when the Japanese were displaced from the island in 1949. The European names derive from misinterpretation of a Manchu name sahaliyan ula angga hada ("peak/craggy rock at the mouth of the Amur River"). Sahaliyan, the word that has been borrowed in the form of "Sakhalin", means "black" in Manchu and is the proper Manchu name of the Amur River (sahaliyan ula, literally
    5.75
    4 votes
    123
    Auckland Island

    Auckland Island

    • Body Of Water: Pacific Ocean
    Auckland Island is the main island of the Auckland Islands, an uninhabited archipelago in the south Pacific Ocean belonging to New Zealand. It is inscribed in the UNESCO World Heritage list together with the other subantarctic New Zealand islands in the region as follows: 877-004 Auckland Isls, New Zealand S50.29 E165.52 62560Ha 1998 The island has an approximate land area of 510 square kilometres (200 sq mi), and is 42 kilometres (26 mi) long. It is notable for its steep cliffs and rugged terrain, which rises to over 600 m (1,969 ft). Prominent peaks include Cavern Peak (650 m/2,133 ft), Mount Raynal (635 m/2,083 ft), Mount D'Urville (630 m/2,067 ft), Mount Easton (610 m/2,001 ft), and the Tower of Babel (550 m/1,804 ft). The southern end of the island broadens to a width of 26 km (16 mi). Here, a narrow channel known as Carnley Harbour (on some maps the Adams Straits) separates the main island from the smaller Adams Island . The channel is the remains of the crater of an extinct volcano, Adams Island and the southern part of the main island form the crater rim. 3 km (1.9 mi) north of Carnley Harbour's mouth lies Cape Lovitt, the westernmost point of New Zealand. The island is
    7.50
    2 votes
    124
    Bartolomé Island

    Bartolomé Island

    • Island Group: Galápagos Islands
    • Body Of Water: Pacific Ocean
    Bartolomé Island (Spanish: Isla Bartolomé) is a volcanic islet in the Galápagos Islands group. It is a volcanic islet just off the east coast of Santiago Island. It is one of the "younger" islands in the Galápagos archipelago. This island, and Sulivan Bay on Santiago island, are named after naturalist and lifelong friend of Charles Darwin, Sir Bartholomew James Sulivan, who was a Lieutenant aboard HMS Beagle. With a total land area of just 1.2 km², this island offers some of the most beautiful landscapes in the archipelago. The island consists of an extinct volcano and a variety of red, orange, green, and glistening black volcanic formations. Bartolomé has a volcanic cone that is easy to climb and provides great views of the other islands. Bartolomé is famous for its Pinnacle Rock, which is the distinctive characteristic of this island, and the most representative landmark of the Galápagos. It has two visitor sites. At the first one, you may swim and snorkel around Pinnacle Rock; the underwater world there is really impressive. You can snorkel with the penguins, marine turtles, white-tipped reef sharks, and other tropical fish. The bay is also an excellent place to go swimming. The
    7.50
    2 votes
    125
    Grímsey

    Grímsey

    Grímsey is a small island in the country of Iceland, 40 kilometres (25 mi) off the north coast of the main island of Iceland and straddling the Arctic Circle, which shifts northward by about 14.5 metres per year. In January 2011 Grímsey had 86 inhabitants. Until a vote in 2009 to amalgamate with Akureyri, it constituted the hreppur (municipality) of Grímseyjarhreppur, part of the county of Eyjafjarðarsýsla. The only settlement is Sandvík. Grímsey is the northernmost inhabited Icelandic territory; the islet of Kolbeinsey lies further north, but is uninhabited. The closest land is the island of Flatey, Skjálfandi, 39.4 kilometres (24.5 mi) to the south. The Arctic Circle runs through the island, while the entirety of mainland Iceland lies south of the Arctic Circle. There are steep cliffs everywhere except on the southern shoreline. Grímsey has an area of 5.3 square kilometres (2.0 sq mi), and a maximum elevation of 105 metres (344 ft). Despite the northerly latitude, the climate is generally mild, because of the North Atlantic Current, which brings warm water from the Gulf of Mexico. A maximum temperature of 26°C (79°F) has been recorded, which equals that of the much more southerly
    7.50
    2 votes
    126
    Ischia

    Ischia

    • Body Of Water: Mediterranean Sea
    Ischia (Italian pronunciation: [ˈiskja]) is a volcanic island in the Tyrrhenian Sea. It lies at the northern end of the Gulf of Naples, about 30 km from the city of Naples. It is the largest of the Phlegrean Islands. Roughly trapezoidal in shape, it measures around 10 km east to west and 7 km north to south and has about 34 kilometres (21 mi) of coastline and a surface area of 46.3 square kilometres (17.9 sq mi). It is almost entirely mountainous, the highest peak being Mount Epomeo at 788 m. The island has a population of over 60,000 people. Ischia is the name of the main comune of the island. The other comuni of the island are Barano d'Ischia, Casamicciola Terme, Forio, Lacco Ameno and Serrara Fontana. The main industry is tourism, centering on thermal spas that cater mostly to European (especially German) and Asian tourists eager to enjoy the fruits of the island's natural volcanic activity, its thermal hot springs, and its volcanic mud. For many of the inhabitants on the Italian-speaking island, German and English are second languages. This is because of the large number of German- and English-speaking tourists who visit the island each year. The roughly trapezoidal island is
    7.50
    2 votes
    127
    Izu Oshima

    Izu Oshima

    • Body Of Water: Pacific Ocean
    Izu Ōshima (伊豆大島, Izu-ōshima) is a volcanic island in the Izu Islands and administered by the Tokyo Metropolitan government, Japan, lies about 100 km south of Tokyo, 22 km east of the Izu Peninsula and 36 km southwest of Bōsō Peninsula. Ōshima Town (大島町, Ōshima-machi) serves as the local government of the island. The town (municipality) was formed in 1955 by the amalgamation of six separate villages (municipalities), which were: Moto, which had been called Motomura (village) until then, became seat of the local government for the whole island as Motomachi (town). Izu Ōshima, at 91.06 km² is the largest and closest of Tokyo's outlying islands, which also include the Ogasawara Islands. Izu Ōshima forms part of the Fuji-Hakone-Izu National Park. Izu Ōshima is a stratovolcano. Izu Ōshima is most famous for Mt. Mihara (764 meters), which last erupted in 1990. Izu Ōshima is also a popular site for tourists from both Tokyo and Shizuoka due to its close proximity to the mainland. There are a number of ferries which leave from Takeshiba Sanbashi Pier, near Hamamatsuchō, Tokyo. Ferries also leave from Atami in Shizuoka. There are several flights per day from Ōshima Airport to Tokyo
    7.50
    2 votes
    128
    Raikoke

    Raikoke

    • Island Group: Kuril Islands
    • Body Of Water: Sea of Okhotsk
    Raikoke (Russian: Райкоке, Japanese: 雷公計島), also spelled Raykoke, is an uninhabited volcanic island near the center of the Kuril Islands chain in the Sea of Okhotsk in the northwest Pacific Ocean, 16 kilometres (9.9 mi) across Golovnin Strait from Matua. Its name is derived from the Ainu language, from “hellmouth”. Raikoke is roughly circular, with a length of 2.5 kilometres (1.6 mi) with a width of 2.0 kilometres (1.2 mi), and an area of 4.6 square kilometres (1.8 sq mi). The island is a stratovolcano which rises above a submarine terrace with a depth of 130 meters to a maximum height of 551 metres (1,808 ft) above sea level. The steep-walled crater is 700 meters wide and 200 meters deep, and lava flows extend along the eastern half of the island. The volcano erupted explosively in 1778, destroying the upper third of the island. The volcano remains active, erupting strongly again in 1924. Raikoke is one of five major Steller sea lion rookeries on the Kuril Islands and home to one of the largest Northern Fulmar aggregations on the Kurils. Captain Henry James Snow reported that in 1883 some 15,000 northern fur seals inhabited the island. However, by the 1890s only "a few scores"
    7.50
    2 votes
    129
    Rattlesnake Island, Queensland

    Rattlesnake Island, Queensland

    Rattlesnake Island is one of the islands South of the Great Palm Island group, northwest of Magnetic Island and directly east of Rollingstone in the Halifax Bay. RAAF Base Townsville (No. 323 Combat Support Squadron RAAF) conducts live firing with military aircraft on regular occasions. When the RAAF are not live firing, they also conduct survival courses on the island.
    7.50
    2 votes
    130
    Zannone

    Zannone

    Zannone is an island in the Tyrrhenian Sea off the west coast of Italy, and is part of the Pontine Islands, administratively in the comune of Ponza. The entire island is about 1 square kilometre in size and about 10 kilometres from the Ponza Island. It is part of the Circeo National Park because of its beauty and several rare biomes. The island is uninhabited but supervised by the Forestry Service, which maintains a station and small educational exhibit on top of Monte Pellegrino, the highest point on the island. There are also ruins of a Benedictine convent dating to the 13th century. However, there are no tourist facilities and camping or overnight stays are prohibited although no special permit is required to visit the island.
    7.50
    2 votes
    131
    Adonara

    Adonara

    • Island Group: Lesser Sunda Islands
    Adonara is an island in the Lesser Sunda Islands of Indonesia, located east of the larger island of Flores in the Solor Archipelago. To the east lies Lembata, formerly known as Lomblen. It is the highest of the islands of the archipelago, reaching an altitude of 1,659 metres, and it has an area of 497 km. It is in the East Nusa Tenggara province. Local history on Adonara is documented from the sixteenth century, when Portuguese traders and missionaries established a post on the nearby island of Solor. By that time Adonara and the surrounding islands were ritually divided between a population of coastal dwellers known as Paji, and a population mainly settling the mountainous inland called Demon. The Paji were susceptible to Islam, while the Demon tended to fall under Portuguese influence. The Paji areas on Adonara contained three principalities, namely Adonara proper (centered on the north coast of the island), and Terong and Lamahala (on the south coast). Together with two principalities on Solor, Lohayong and Lamakera, they constituted a league called Watan Lema ("the five shores"). The Watan Lema allied with the Dutch East India Company(VOC) in 1613, confirmed in 1646. The
    6.33
    3 votes
    132
    Amukta

    Amukta

    • Island Group: Aleutian Islands
    Amukta is a small yet mountainous island in the Islands of Four Mountains group lying between the Fox Islands and the Andreanof Islands in the Aleutian Islands. The nearest islands to it are Yunaska and Seguam Island; it is separated from Seguam Island by Amukta Pass. The small island of Chagulak lies directly northeast of it. The island reaches a total height of 3,461 feet (1,055 m). The island measures 9 kilometres (5.6 mi) long and 8.3 kilometres (5.2 mi) wide.
    6.33
    3 votes
    133
    Antikythera

    Antikythera

    • Island Group: Ionian Islands
    • Body Of Water: Aegean Sea
    Antikythera or Anticythera (/ˌæntɪkɪˈθɪərə/; Ancient Greek: Ἀντικύθηρα Greek: Αντικύθηρα, [andiˈciθira], literally "opposite Kythera") is a Greek island lying on the edge of the Aegean Sea, between Crete and Peloponnese. Since the 2011 local government reform it is part of the municipality of Kythera island. Antikythera may also refer to the Antikythera Strait, through which Modified Mediterranean Water enters the Sea of Crete. Its land area is 20.43 square kilometers, and it lies 38 kilometers south-east of Kythira. It is the most distant part of the Attica region from its heart in the Athens metropolitan area. It is lozenge-shaped, 10.5 km NNW to SSE by 3.4 km ENE to WSW. It is notable for being the location of the discovery of the Antikythera mechanism and for the historical Antikythera wreck. Its main settlement and port is Potamós (pop. 18 inhabitants in 2001 census). The only other settlements are Galanianá (pop. 17), and Charchalianá (pop. 9). Antikythera is sporadically visited by the LANE Lines ferry Vitsentzos Kornaros, on its route between Piraeus (Athens) and Kissamos-Kastelli in Crete. The earliest known inhabitants (5th or 4th millennium BC) were likely seasonal
    6.33
    3 votes
    134
    Great Nicobar

    Great Nicobar

    • Island Group: Nicobar Islands
    • Body Of Water: Andaman Sea
    Great Nicobar (Hindi: बड़ा निकोबार, Nicobarese: टोकिओंग लोंग, Tokieong Long) is the largest of the Nicobar Islands of India, north of Sumatra. Indira Point, its southernmost tip, is also the southernmost point of India. The island of Sumatra is located to the south of Great Nicobar. The island covers 1045 km² but is sparsely inhabited, with a population of 9439, largely being covered by rainforest and known for its diverse wildlife. The island was severely affected by the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake tsunami with many deaths, and was cut off from all outside contact for more than a day. The island has several rivers, including the Alexandra, Amrit Kaur, Dogmar and Galathea. Virtually all rivers flow in a southern or southwesterly direction, which is indicative of the general slope of the terrain across the island. There are undulating hills throughout the island, with the main range running in a north-south orientation. Mount Thuillier, which is part of this range, has the highest elevation of any point in the Nicobars, at 642 m above sea level. Indira Point (6°45’10″N and 93°49’36″E) is the southernmost point of the Great Nicobar Island and India itself. Indira Point subsided 4.25
    6.33
    3 votes
    135
    Kozushima

    Kozushima

    • Body Of Water: Pacific Ocean
    Kōzu-shima (神津島) is a volcanic Japanese island in the Philippine Sea, administered by Tōkyō and located approximately 30 kilometres (19 mi) northwest of the Miyake-jima and 14 kilometres (8.7 mi) southwest of the Nii-jima. It is one of the Izu Seven Islands group of the seven northern islands of the Izu archipelago. Kōzushima is administratively part of Kōzushima Village under Ōshima Subprefecture of Tokyo Metropolis. As of 2009, the island's population was 8,363. Kōzushima is also within the boundaries of the Fuji-Hakone-Izu National Park. Kōzu-shima is a compound volcanic island 6 km in length with a maximum width of 4 km. The island is formed from a cluster of eighteen lava domes, with rhyolite and pyroclastic ash deposits. The highest of these lava domes, Tenjō-san (天上山), has a height of 571 metres (1,873 ft), and was last active in 838 AD per the ancient Japanese history Shoku Nihon Kōki. Compared with most of the other islands in the Izu archipelago, Kōzu-shima is relatively flat, with small eroded hills, and lacks the high coastal cliffs found on the other islands. Earthquake swarms have occurred at Kōzu-shima during the 20th century. Kōzu-shima has been inhabited since at
    6.33
    3 votes
    136
    Slotsholmen

    Slotsholmen

    Slotsholmen (English: The Castle Islet) is an island in the harbour of Copenhagen, Denmark, and part of Copenhagen Inner City. Bishop Absalon constructed the city's first castle on the island in 1166-67 at the site where Christiansborg Palace, the seat of the Danish Parliament lies today. Sometimes referred to as 'the Island of Power', Slotsholmen houses many of the central institutions of the country. Apart from the parliament these include the Supreme Court, the Prime Minister's Office, the State Rooms of the Queen, the Ministry of Finance, and the historic buildings of the Christian IV's Stock Exchange, the Chancellery and the Royal Library. The National Archive and several museums are also located on the island. The site used to consist of several small natural islands in the sound between the islands of Zealand and Amager. On the largest of these, Strandholmen (English: Beach Islet), Bishop Absalon of Roskilde constructed a small castle in 1167. In 1250 the castle was extended with two side towers to get the appearance that is now depicted on Copenhagen's Coat of Arms. The castle was conquered by the Hanseatic League 1368 and pulled down the following year as part of peace
    6.33
    3 votes
    137
    Alor

    Alor

    • Island Group: Lesser Sunda Islands
    Alor is the largest island in the Alor Archipelago located at the eastern-most end of the Lesser Sunda Islands that runs through southern Indonesia, which from the west include such islands as Bali, Lombok, Sumbawa, Komodo, and Flores. To the east of the island across the Ombai Strait lie the islands of Wetar and Atauro, the latter belonging to East Timor. To the south, across the Strait of Alor, lies the western part of Timor. To the north lies the Banda Sea. To the west lies Pantar and the other islands of the Alor archipelago, and further yet the rest of the Sunda Islands. Alor has an area of about 2800 km², making it the largest island of the Alor archipelago. Kalabahi is the only town on the island of Alor, with a metropolitan population of about 60,000. The variety of goods obtainable in Kalabahi is surprising considering its size and location. Alor is of volcanic origin and has very rugged terrain. The region near Kalabahi is the only flat area. This is why the Dutch placed the capital and the main harbor (Alor-Kecil) of the area here in 1911. "The best" snorkelling and diving in Indonesia can be found in the Alor archipelago. Due to intriguing and often very strong currents
    8.00
    1 votes
    138
    Burano

    Burano

    Burano is an island in the Venetian Lagoon, northern Italy; like Venice itself, it could more correctly be called an archipelago of four islands linked by bridges. It is situated near Torcello at the northern end of the Lagoon, and is known for its lacework and brightly coloured homes. Burano is situated 7 kilometers from Venice, a short 40 minute trip by Venetian motorboats, "vaporetti". The island is linked to Mazzorbo by a bridge. The current population of Burano is about 2,800. Burano actually consists of four individual islands, which are separated by narrow, 10 meter wide canals, rio Pontinello in the west, rio Zuecca in the south und rio Terranova in the east. Originally, there were five islands and a fourth canal that was filled to become via e piazza Baldassare Galuppi, joining the former islands of San Martino Destra and San Martino Sinistra. Burano has historically been subdivided in to five sestieri, much like the historical center of Venice. They correspond to the five original islands. The sixth sestiere is neighboring Mazzorbo. Burano has a high population density, calculated at more than 13,000 per square kilometer, or more than twenty times the density of
    8.00
    1 votes
    139
    Maathodaa

    Maathodaa

    Maathodaa (Dhivehi: ￞ノ￞ᄃ￞フ￞ᆴ￞ム￞ᄃ) is one of the inhabited islands of Gaafu Dhaalu Atoll.
    8.00
    1 votes
    140
    North Kent Island

    North Kent Island

    • Island Group: Canadian Arctic Archipelago
    North Kent Island is one of the uninhabited Canadian arctic islands in the Qikiqtaaluk Region of Nunavut, Canada. It is located in the Cardigan Strait between Devon Island's Colin Archer Peninsula and Ellesmere Island's Simmons Peninsula. The 590 km (230 sq mi) island's terrain is flat-topped and ice-capped, with steep cliffs. North Kent Island is a Canadian Important Bird Area (#NU052), and a International Biological Program site. Notable bird species include Black Guillemot, Common Eider, Glaucous Gull, and Thayer's Gull. Walrus, Bearded seal, Ringed seal, and Narwhal frequent the area.
    8.00
    1 votes
    141
    Oléron

    Oléron

    Île d'Oléron (English: Island of Oleron) is an island off the Atlantic coast of France (due west of Rochefort), on the southern side of the Pertuis d'Antioche strait. It is the second largest French island after Corsica (not counting French overseas collectivities). In the 7th and 8th century, the island, along with Ré, formed the Vacetae Insulae or Vacetian Islands, according to the Cosmographia. Vaceti being another name for the Vascones, the reference is evidence to Basque (Gascon) settlement or control of the islands by that date. It was at Oléron in about 1152 to 1160 that Eleanor of Aquitaine introduced the first 'maritime' or 'admiralty' laws in that part of the world: the Rolls of Oleron. In 1306, Edward I of England granted the island to his son, Edward II, as part of the duchy of Aquitaine. On 20 March 1586, the island was taken by Agrippa d'Aubigné. The island has an area of about 174 km. It is a fertile and well cultivated island on the Atlantic coast of France, that is on the Bay of Biscay. The climate is generally mild (maritime temperate) with sufficient but not excessive rainfall, but with probably from 3 to 15 days of intense heat in the summer months of July and
    8.00
    1 votes
    142
    Porto da Cruz

    Porto da Cruz

    Porto da Cruz (Portuguese pronunciation: [ˈpoɾtu dɐ ˈkɾuʃ], English: port of the cross) is a civil parish in the municipality of Machico in the northeastern corner of Madeira. In 2001 the resident population included 2793 people, dispersed throughout an area of 25.22 km² (there were approximately 110 inhabitants per km² at that time). The origin of the communities name came from the fact that the original discoverer affixed a steel cross at the port, in order to better identify the location to ocean travelers. During the early settlement of the northern coast, goods destined for the northern communities (such as Santo António da Serra) were offloaded in the harbor. The parish of Porto da Cruz was created on 26 September 1577, by Jerónimo Barreto, establishing as its patron Nossa Senhora da Piedade (English: Our Lady of Piety). During the contract signing, the formal donation identified the new church as Nossa Senhora da Glória (English: Our Lady of Glory), but after being completed it was consecrated as Nossa Senhora de Guadalupe (English: Our Lady of Guadaloupe). Since its establishment, the parish pertained to the Captaincy of Machico, but in 1835, it was integrated into the
    8.00
    1 votes
    143
    Neuwerk

    Neuwerk

    Neuwerk (3 km², 39 inhabitants) is a Wadden Sea island on the German North Sea coast. Administratively, it forms a homonymous quarter (Stadtteil) of the city of Hamburg, Germany, which is part of the borough Hamburg-Mitte. This quarter includes the nearby uninhabited islands Scharhörn and Nigehörn. It is located northwest of Cuxhaven, between the Weser and Elbe estuaries. The distance to Hamburg's center is about 120 km. During low tide the island can be reached on foot or by horse carriages from Cuxhaven, at other times by ship. The smaller islands Scharhörn and Nigehörn are bird sanctuaries, closed to the public. All three islands and the Wadden Sea around them form the Hamburg Wadden Sea National Park. The oldest existing document that mentions Neuwerk is a Frisian contract of 1316, where its old name Nige O is used. Since the Elbe river was vital to the Hanseatic League's member Hamburg, in 1299 a 35 meter tower was built as lighthouse and protection against pirates. The lighthouse existing today was built between 1367 and 1369 after a fire destroyed the earlier one. It is Hamburg's oldest existing building as well as Hamburg's last fortification. Due to the Greater Hamburg Law
    5.25
    4 votes
    144
    Babar Island

    Babar Island

    • Island Group: Maluku Islands
    The Babar Islands (Pulau-pulau Babar) are located in Maluku Province, Indonesia between latitudes 7 degrees 31 minutes South to 8 degrees 13 minutes South and from longitudes 129 degrees 30 minutes East to 130 degrees 05 minutes East. Tepa (population 2000 people) is the capitol of the Babar Islands municipality ("Kecamatan Pulau-pulau Babar") actually now reduced in size to encompass only the western half of Babar Island, Wetang Island and Dai Island. The town of Letwurung on the east side of Babar island is the capitol of the new municipality called "East Babar" ("Kecamatan Babar Timor") in the east half of the Babar Islands, consisting of the East half of Babar Island, Marsela Island, Dawera Island and Dawelor Island. The islands take their name from the large central island of Babar which is roughly 20 miles across and 60 miles around. Babar Island has a maximum elevation of approximately 750 meters and is lightly covered with sub-tropical montane forest, although the 5 rivers and 2 large year-round springs afford tropical forest in their narrow ravine courses. The topography of all the Babar islands is distinctive for their marked stepped appearance, the result of a
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    145
    Furneaux Group, Tasmania

    Furneaux Group, Tasmania

    The Furneaux Group (indigenous name: Tayaritja) is a group of 52 islands, at the eastern end of Bass Strait, between Victoria and Tasmania, Australia. The islands were named, after British navigator Tobias Furneaux who sighted the eastern side of these Island after leaving Adventure Bay in 1773 on his way to New Zealand to rejoin Captain James Cook. Navigator Matthew Flinders explored the Furneaux Islands group first in the Francis in 1798 and later that year in the Norfolk. The largest islands in the group are Flinders Island, Cape Barren Island and Clarke Island. The region contains five settlements Killiecrankie, Emita, Lady Barron, Cape Barren Island and Whitemark on Flinders Island which serves as the administrative center of the Municipality of Flinders local government area. The historically notable Aboriginal woman Dolly Dalrymple was born in the area. King Island, at the western end of Bass Strait, is not a part of the group. The group of islands to the north west is the Kent Group. Smaller islands in the group include Anderson Island, Babel Island, Badger Island, Billy Goat Reefs, Big Green Island, Briggs Islet, Cat Island, Chalky Island, Cooties Reef, Doughboy Island,
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    146
    Hansan Island

    Hansan Island

    Hansan Island (한산도, 閑山島), also known as Hansando, is in South Gyeongsang Province across a relatively narrow strait from Chungmu on the Tongyeong Peninsula. The area around the island was the site of a Battle of Hansan Island during the Imjin War where Admiral Yi Sun-Sin decisively defeated the main Japanese war fleet led by Wakizaka Yasuharu. Following the battle, Admiral Yi moved his main naval base from Yeosu to Hansan Island, as it was strategically advantageous for conducting surveillance and reconnaissance of the nearby Gyeonnaeryang Strait (견내량, 見乃梁), which was an inland route leading directly to the main Japanese base located at Busan. After King Seonjo ordered Admiral Yi Sun-Sin's arrest, imprisonment, and torture Admiral Won Gyun was assigned to lead the Korean navy. However, Won Gyun attacked the Japanese base at Busan, ignoring the tides, and was forced to retreat owing to shelling from the shore. The Japanese navy pursued him relentlessly and sank all but thirteen of the Panokseon in the process. Won Gyun was killed during this disastrous retreat, and Hansan Island, and its evacuated naval base, was exposed to the Japanese forces, who eventually burned it down. After
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    147
    Kalymnos

    Kalymnos

    • Island Group: Dodecanese
    • Body Of Water: Aegean Sea
    Kalymnos, (Greek: Κάλυμνος) is a Greek island and municipality in the southeastern Aegean Sea. It belongs to the Dodecanese and is located to the west of the peninsula of Bodrum (the ancient Halicarnassos), between the islands of Kos (south, at a distance of 12 km) and Leros (north, at a distance of less than 2 km): the latter is linked to it through a series of islets. Kalymnos lies between two to five hours away by sea from Rhodes. The island is known as Càlino in Italian and Kilimli or Kelemez in Turkish. In 2001 the island had a population of 16,235, making it the third most populous island of the Dodecanese, after Kos and Rhodes. It is known in Greece for the affluence of much of its population, and also stands as both the wealthiest member of the Dodecanese and one of the wealthiest Greek islands overall. The Municipality of Kalymnos, which includes the populated offshore islands of Pserimos (pop. 130), Telendos (54), Kalolimnos (20), and Pláti (2), as well as several uninhabited islets, has a combined land area of 134.544 km² and a total population of 16,441 inhabitants. The island is roughly rectangular in shape, with a length of 21 km and a width of 13 km, and covers an
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    148
    Monte

    Monte

    Monte (English: mountain) is a civil parish in the municipality and a suburb of Funchal in the Portuguese archipelago of Madeira. Locally, the parish is also known as Nossa Senhora do Monte (English: Our Lady of the Mountain). Its population in 2001 was just over 7,444 inhabitants living in an area of approximately 18.59 km² (a density just under 400 inhabitants per km²). Monte is located a few kilometres east of Funchal and is near the road linking Funchal and Faial. Monte is between 600 and 800 m above sea level. The parish of Nossa Senhora do Monte was created in 1565, turning itself into a summer refuge for many wealthy families of Funchal. Looking to discover a mild climate in the summers, these novo riche constructed summer cottages along the hills of the district. The oldest religious building, the main church Igreja de Nossa Senhora do Monte was constructed in 1741. Monte was the final resting place for Emperor Charles I of Austria, last of the Habsburg rulers of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, who died in exile on 1 April 1922. His last residence on the island was the Quinta do Monte close to the parochial church. Similarly, the Madeirense poet, Herberto Hélder lived in a
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    149
    Stolbovoy Island

    Stolbovoy Island

    Stolbovoy Island (Russian: Столбовой остров) is a long and narrow island off the southwest side of the New Siberian archipelago in the eastern part of the Laptev Sea. It is located 184 km away from the Siberian coast and 100 km southwest of Kotelny Island, being thus quite detached from the New Siberian island group, although it belongs to the Lyakhov Islands subgroup of the New Siberian Islands. Stolbovoy Island's area is approximately 170 km². Its length is 47 km and its maximum width is 10 km. There is a 5 km long lake in the northeast of the island. It is separated from the sea by a narrow spit. The highest point of Stolbovoy Island is 222 meters. The island has 15-70 m high rocky cliffs, the lower relief down to the beach being dominated by step-like stony structures. It belongs to the Sakha Republic administrative division of the Russian Federation. The climate in the area is exceptionally severe, with prolonged, bitter winters, so that the waters of the Laptev Sea around Stolbovoy Island are covered by ice most of the year. Tectonically deformed sedimentary rocks that accumulated during Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous periods comprise Stolbovoy Island. These turbidites,
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    150
    East Redonda Island

    East Redonda Island

    • Body Of Water: Pacific Ocean
    East Redonda Island is a coastal island in British Columbia, Canada, part of the Discovery Islands archipelago. It lies just to the north of Desolation Sound Marine Park, which is located off the north end of the Malaspina Peninsula at the mouth of Toba Inlet This island is separated from the larger West Redonda Island by the Waddington Channel. The eastern side of the island is separated from the mainland by the deep Homfray Channel. Deeply incising this island from Waddington Channel is Pendrell Sound, which runs toward the northeast. At the northern end of the island is Pryce Channel. The eastern half of the island is home to the "East Redonda Island Ecological Reserve", a preserve established for forestry research and forest growth. It is 6,212 ha (15,350 acres). The highest point on East Redonda Island is Mount Addenbroke at 1,591 metres (5,220 feet). (50° 14' N; 124° 41' W) Both Redonda Islands were sighted in 1792 by the Spanish explorers Galiano and Valdés and given the name Isla Redonda, meaning "round".
    5.67
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    151
    North Bass Island

    North Bass Island

    • Body Of Water: Lake Erie
    North Bass Island is an island of the U.S. state of Ohio located in Lake Erie. A small unincorporated community, Isle Saint George, is on the island. The North Bass Island Post Office was established on May 25, 1864, and the name changed to Isle Saint George Post Office on March 2, 1874. The Isle Saint George ZIP code 43436 provides PO Box service. The 688.6-acre (2.786 km²) island is one of few islands that has not been commercially developed. The state of Ohio purchased 589 acres (2.4 km²) of the island to preserve it from development and operates it as North Bass Island State Park. Historically, North Bass was mainly used as a vineyard. According to the 2000 census the island had 13 permanent residents. As of January 2007, there were roughly two dozen permanent residents residing on the island's 12 privately owned properties. The North Bass Island Airport offers one paved (1,804') and one turf strip (1,900').
    5.67
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    152
    Tap Mun

    Tap Mun

    Grass Island (Chinese: 塔門) or Tap Mun is an island in Hong Kong, located in the northeastern part of the territory. Its area is 1.69 km². Administratively, it is part of the Tai Po District. There are about 100 people living on the island. Grass Island is located in the northeastern part of the Hong Kong territory, between Mirs Bay and the North Channel. It lies north of the Sai Kung East Country Park on the Sai Kung Peninsula. To the east is Kung Chau, to the south is the South Channel, to the west is Wan Tsai and to the southwest is Long Harbour. At its peak, Grass Island had 2,000 residents. However, many moved to the city centre to live. Now many residents run stores or restaurants for local tourists visiting the island. The villagers are mostly farmers, merchants or fishermen. The latter category has recently diminished as many youths from fishing families have chosen to work in the city instead. Due to the population outflow, the last school on the island closed down in 2003. The hilltop of Grass Island is a popular camping site, renowned for the contrast in temperature and wind conditions between day and night. Temperatures drop and winds soar during the nighttime but die
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    3 votes
    153
    Amager

    Amager

    Amager ([ˈɑmɑːˀ] or, especially among older speakers, [ˈɑmæːɪ̯ˀɐ]) is a Danish island in the Øresund. The Danish capital, Copenhagen, is partly situated on Amager, which is connected to the much larger island of Zealand by five bridges. Amager has long been populated, and well used, thanks to its rich soil and proximity to Copenhagen. In 1521, Christian II invited some Dutch farmers to move to Amager and grow vegetables to supply the Danish Court and Copenhagen. It was only in the late 19th century that Copenhagen began to expand onto the island (Sundbyerne), and in 1902 these built-up areas were incorporated into Copenhagen. During the Second World War, high unemployment in Copenhagen led authorities to drain a large part of the sea, west of the island, and build a dam to hold out the water, effectively adding one half of Amager's previous area to the island. The reclaimed area is currently known as Kalvebod Fælled, and was originally a military area, but today it is part of a major construction area called the Ørestad, being thought of as an extension to central Copenhagen. The area houses such major facilities as the Bella Center, a convention and exposition center, and Field's,
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    154
    Ambitle

    Ambitle

    Ambitle is a volcanic island which, together with Babase, another volcanic island, is one of the two Feni Islands in the Bismarck Archipelago. The island is located within the Papua New Guinea's New Ireland Province, to the east of the island of New Ireland. Ambitle is a stratovolcano, reaching 450 meters (1,476 feet) above sea level. It last erupted in about 350 BCE based on radiocarbon dating. Its caldera, 3 km or about 2 miles wide, contains thermal areas on its western side. Venting of hydrothermal water also occurs in coral reefs to the west of this island.
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    155
    Appledore Island

    Appledore Island

    • Island Group: Isles of Shoals
    • Body Of Water: Gulf of Maine
    Appledore Island, Maine, (formerly known as Hog Island) is the largest of the Isles of Shoals located about seven miles off the Maine/New Hampshire coast. It was originally settled by Europeans in the colonial era, when the ease of transport by water made farming on island economically efficient. A church was established in 1640. Near 1700, the entire settlement on this island moved to Star Island in New Hampshire to escape taxes imposed by Massachusetts (of which Maine was then a province). The heyday of the island was the artists salon that thrived there in the late 19th century, before the advent of artists' colonies as we know them today. Celia Thaxter reigned over an impressive group of friends who were also the leading artists, musicians, and writers of the day. These included Edward MacDowell and his wife; American pianist William Mason, son of Lowell Mason, who played the grand piano in her salon daily; and John Knowles Paine, America's first serious composer of note. Childe Hassam painted Celia's magnificent garden in a style similar to Monet's Giverny paintings. This rarefied atmosphere ended with Thaxter's death in 1894. The hotel burned in 1914, bringing down the final
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    156
    Beauchene Island

    Beauchene Island

    • Island Group: Falkland Islands
    Beauchene Island is the southernmost of the Falkland Islands, lying about 54 kilometres (34 mi) south of Porpoise Point in Lafonia. It was discovered in 1701 by Jacques Gouin de Beauchêne in whose honour it was named. Beauchene is the most isolated island of the Falkland archipelago. It is uninhabited, free of introduced predators and, because it is so remote, has been protected from disturbance. It is 172 hectares (430 acres) in area. The north of the island is covered in dense tussac with boulder beaches on the western coast and sloping up gently to about 30 metres (98 ft) in height. In the south of the island the land rises to around 70 metres (230 ft). There are higher cliffs on the eastern coast and the "southern quarter of the island is almost bare of vegetation." The island has a natural anchorage on the east side of the island that only be used in fair weather. There is no resident population and visitors are not permitted on the island without the permission of the Falkland Islands Executive Committee. A typical example was a request that was made by Falklands Conservation to make three visits in October 2010, January 2011 and March 2011 for the purpose of taking a bird
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    157
    Flat Island

    Flat Island

    Flat Island or Ngan Chau (Chinese: 銀洲) is an island of between Heung Leung Kok and Ocean Point in the north shore of Sai Kung Peninsula of Hong Kong. It is at the mouth of in Hoi Ha Wan and the boundary of Hoi Ha Wan Marine Park (海下灣海岸公園).
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    158
    Jekyll Island

    Jekyll Island

    • Island Group: The Golden Isles of Georgia
    Jekyll Island is an island off the coast of the U.S. state of Georgia, in Glynn County; it is one of the Sea Islands and one of the Golden Isles of Georgia. The city of Brunswick, Georgia, the Marshes of Glynn, and several other islands, including the larger St. Simons Island, are nearby. Its beaches are frequented by vacationers and guided tours of the Landmark Historic District are available. Bike trails, walks along the beaches and sandbars, and Summer Waves, a water park, are a few of the many things vacationers can do. The district consists of a number of buildings from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The island is also full of wildlife, consisting of many different mammals, reptiles, and birds living and breeding in the island's inland marshes. Jekyll Island is one of only four Georgia barrier islands that feature a paved causeway to access the island by car. It features 5,700 acres (23 km) of land, including 4,400 acres (18 km) of solid earth and a 200-acre (0.81 km) Jekyll Island Club Historic District. The rest is tidal marshlands, mostly on the island's western shore. The island measures about 7 miles (11 km) long by 1.5 miles (2.4 km) wide, has 8 miles
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    159
    Paama

    Paama

    • Island Group: Islands of Vanuatu
    Paama (Paama language: Voum) is a small island in the Malampa Province, Vanuatu. The island is about 8 km from north to south and only 5 km or so at its widest point. The island is dominated by hills, rising to a height of around 550 m in the north. Today the majority of people living on Paama live in villages close to the coast of the island and make their gardens on the hillsides nearby. Agricultural produce is by and large for subsistence although some is exported for sale in Port Vila (Vanuatu's capital on Éfaté) and Luganville (on Espiritu Santo). Paama lies a short distance south of Ambrym, a little further east of Malakula, about 7 km west of the large active volcano Lopévi (Ulvae, in the vernacular (see Crowley 1982), and a short distance north of the island of Epi. During daylight, all of Paama's neighbouring islands are clearly visible from various locations on the island. Indeed, on a clear night the red glow of Ambrym's twin volcanos can be seen clearly from the black sand beach at Liro. The now uninhabited island of Lopevi dominates the view east from the village of Lulep, on the northeast coast of the island. This active volcano is reasonably regular, erupting every
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    160
    Satava

    Satava

    Satava is a large island in the Archipelago Sea, off the coast of the city of Turku, Finland. The island is located between Hirvensalo and Kakskerta, and as many Finnish islands, it has a large amount of summer residences. Satava is also a district of Turku, encompassing the island itself and some surrounding smaller islands, such as Kulho and Järvistensaari. The current (as of 2005) population of the district is 781, and it is increasing at an annual rate of 2.22%. 18.43% of the population are under 15 years old, while 15.75% are over 65. The district's linguistic makeup is 94.49% Finnish, 4.61% Swedish, and 0.90% other. Satava was annexed to Turku in 1968 as a part of Kakskerta municipality.
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    161
    Savu

    Savu

    • Island Group: Lesser Sunda Islands
    Savu (also known as Sawu, Sabu, Sawoe, Havu, Hawu, Hawoe) is the largest of a group of three islands, situated midway between Sumba and Rote, west of Timor, in Indonesia's eastern province, East Nusa Tenggara. Ferries connect the islands to Waingapu, on Sumba, and Kupang, in West Timor. It is also possible to fly to Savu from Kupang. The Savu Islands (Indonesian: Kepulauan Savu) include Rai Hawu (or Savu), Rai Jua and Rai Dana. The three islands are fringed by coral reefs and sandy beaches. Rai Hawu is the principal island. Rai Jua is a smaller island west of Rai Hawu. Rai Dana is a small, uninhabited island, situated 30 km south-west of Rai Jua. From April to October, deep ocean swells pound the southern coastlines. The land is covered for the most part by grassland and palms. The climate is dry for much of the year because of the hot winds which blow from Australia. The main rains fall between November and March. Between 82% and 94% of all rain falls during the west monsoon with little or no rain falling between August and October. The mean annual rainfall for Savu Island is 1,019 mm. During the dry season many streams run dry and local inhabitants must depend on wells for their
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    162
    Spike Island

    Spike Island

    Spike Island, Halton Borough, Widnes, England, a birthplace of the British chemical industry, is a reclaimed toxic waste site. The island is in the Mersey Estuary, a Ramsar Convention site. Its maze of abandoned chemical factories, rail lines, canal and industrial dockage, and industrial pollution, which had declined into a rust belt toxic wilderness, was reclaimed as woodland, wetlands and green space between 1975 and 1982. A surviving warehouse is now the home of the Catalyst Museum, the only science museum in the UK solely devoted to chemistry. Spike Island was the site of a famous outdoor concert by the Manchester group The Stone Roses in May 1990. A film about the concert is being produced in 2012.
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    163
    Usedom

    Usedom

    • Body Of Water: Baltic Sea
    Usedom (German: Usedom [ˈuːzədɔm], Polish: Uznam [ˈuznam]) is a Baltic Sea island on the border between Germany and Poland. It is situated north of the Szczecin Lagoon (German: Stettiner Haff) estuary of the River Oder in Pomerania. Most of the island belongs to the German district of Vorpommern-Greifswald in the Federal State of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, with the exception of the eastern part and the city of Świnoujście (German: Swinemünde) which is in Polish West Pomeranian Voivodeship. With an annual average of 1906 sunshine hours, the island of Usedom is the sunniest region of Germany and the sunniest island in the Baltic Sea. Its area is 445 km² (the German part 373 km²; the Polish part 72 km²). Its population is 76,500 (the German part 31,500; the Polish part 45,000). The island is separated to the east from the neighbouring island of Wolin by the Świna (German: Swine) strait (or river), which is the main route connecting Szczecin Bay with the Pomeranian Bay, a part of the Baltic Sea. The strait between the island and the mainland is called the Peenestrom; it is a downstream extension of the valley of the Peene river, which flows into the westernmost part of the Stettin Lagoon.
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    164
    Virgin Gorda

    Virgin Gorda

    • Island Group: Virgin Islands
    • Body Of Water: Caribbean Sea
    Virgin Gorda is the third-largest (after Tortola and Anegada) and second most populous of the British Virgin Islands (BVI). Located at approximately 18 degrees, 48 minutes North, and 64 degrees, 30 minutes West, it covers an area of about 8 square miles (21 km). Christopher Columbus is said to have named the island "The Fat Virgin", because the island's profile on the horizon looks like a fat woman lying on her side. The main town is Spanish Town on the southwestern part of the island. An unusual geologic formation known as "The Baths" located on the southern end of the island makes Virgin Gorda one of the BVI's major tourist destinations. At The Baths, the beach shows evidence of the island's volcanic origins, as huge granite boulders lie in piles on the beach, forming scenic grottoes that are open to the sea. North of the Baths is the Virgin Gorda Yacht Harbor, formerly owned Little Dix Bay. The most notable ruin on Virgin Gorda is the old Copper Mine. In the island's North Sound is the high-end Bitter End Yacht Club, now a five-star resort. Also located on the island is Rosewood Little Dix Bay, a four diamond resort offering luxury villas and suites as well as an award winning
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    2 votes
    165
    'Eua

    'Eua

    • Body Of Water: Pacific Ocean
    ʻEua is a smaller but still major island in the kingdom of Tonga. It is close to Tongatapu, but forms a separate administrative division. It has an area of 87.44 km, and a population in 2006 of 5,165 people. ʻEua is a hilly island, the highest peaks are the Teʻemoa (chicken manure) 312 m, with the grave of the soldier on top, and the Vaiangina (watersprings) 305 m. The island is not volcanic, but was shaped by the rubbing of the Tonga plate against the Pacific plate, pushing ʻEua up and leaving the 7 km deep Tonga trench on the bottom of the ocean, a short distance towards the east. The soil of ʻEua is volcanic, as is that of Tongatapu, but only the top layer, deposited by eruptions of nearby volcanoes ten thousands years ago. Under it are the solid rocks of pushed-up coral. ʻEua counts many huge caves and holes, not all of which have yet been explored. ʻEua is the only island in Tonga that has a river, and had the only bridge in the kingdom until Vavaʻu also built one. The river drains into the harbour near the capital of the island, ʻOhonua. A unique feature is the shore between ʻOhonua and Tufuvai. It is coral reef still close to the sea level. Many small tidal pools are found,
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    166
    Čiovo

    Čiovo

    • Body Of Water: Adriatic Sea
    Čiovo (pronounced [tʃîɔv̞ɔ]; Italian: Bua) is a small island located off the Adriatic coast in Croatia with an area of 28.8 km (length 15.3 km, width up to 3.5 km), population of 6,071 inhabitants (2001) and its highest peak is 218 m (Rudine). The centre of the island has geographical coordinates 43°30′N 16°17′E / 43.5°N 16.283°E / 43.5; 16.283, and the annual rainfall is about 900 mm. Čiovo is located in central Dalmatia, protecting the city of Trogir and Kaštela gulf. On its SE part it is only two km distant from the cape Marjan, on its northern part it is connected to the mainland with a small bascule bridge in the old centre of Trogir, and actually Trogir spread itself onto the island. Besides the portion of Trogir, on the island there are several villages: Arbanija, Žedno, Okrug Gornji, Okrug Donji, Slatine and Prizidnica. The vegetation is typically Mediterranean, consisting mainly in understory (holm oak, myrtle, wormwood, juniper etc.). On the northern side (exposed to the wind bura are forests of pine and cypress. Major crops include olives, figs, almonds, vines and citrus fruit. In the Middle Ages, Čiovo had many villages and it was a place for lepers. Remainings of
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    167
    D'Urville Island, Antarctica

    D'Urville Island, Antarctica

    • Body Of Water: Pacific Ocean
    D'Urville Island is an island of Antarctica. It is the northernmost island of the Joinville Island group, 17 miles (27 km) long, lying immediately north of Joinville Island, from which it is separated by Larsen Channel. D'Urville Island is located at 63°05′S 56°20′W / 63.083°S 56.333°W / -63.083; -56.333. The single island was charted in 1902 by the Swedish Antarctic Expedition under Otto Nordenskiöld, who named it for Captain Jules Dumont d'Urville, French explorer who discovered land in the Joinville Island group.
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    168
    Hidra

    Hidra

    Hidra is an island and a former municipality in Vest-Agder county in Norway. It is located in the present-day municipality of Flekkefjord. The island has two harbours: Rasvåg and Kirkehavn. It is the largest island in Vest-Agder county and it is separated from the mainland by the 350 m (1,150 ft) wide Hidrasund fjord. Hidra was home to the landscape and coastal painter Olav Omland (1909–1998). He was also a poet and songwriter, and composed the song about Hidra "Hidrasangen". Hidra was also home to the eccentric personality and artist Tatjana Lars Kristian Guldbrandsen. The Old Norse form of the name was Hitr. The name is probably derived from a word with the meaning "split" or "cleft" (referring to the fact that the island is almost split in two by the Rasvåg fjord). Prior to 1918, the name was spelled Hitterø. Nes og Hitterø was established as a municipality on 1 January 1838 (see formannskapsdistrikt). However, on 1 January 1894, this municipality was split into two municipalities: Hitterø (population: 2,075) and Nes (population: 1,704). On 1 January 1965, Hidra (formerly called Hitterø) was merged with Nes, Gyland, most of Bakke, and the town of Flekkefjord to form the new
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    169
    Osterøy

    Osterøy

    Osterøy is an island municipality in the county of Hordaland, Norway. It is located in the traditional district of Nordhordland. The administrative centre is located in Lonevåg in the central part of the island, while the settlement with the largest population is Valestrandfossen with 1,012 inhabitants as of 1 January 2008. Osterøy municipality covers the majority of the island of the same name, although the mostly uninhabited north-eastern part is part of Vaksdal municipality. Osterøy is located just northeast of Bergen, and is surrounded by the fjords Osterfjorden and Sørfjorden. The 19th century musician and composer Ole Bull had a home on the island at Valestrandfossen. The Havrå farm is located on the island. Osterøy municipality was created on 1 January 1964. Part of Haus (population: 2,327), the Bruvikbygda area of Bruvik (population: 409), part of the municipality of Hosanger (population: 1,616), and part of the municipality of Hamre (population: 1,166) were merged to form the new municipality of Osterøy. The Old Norse form of the name was "Óstr". The last element "øy" which means "island" was added later. The meaning of the name is unknown. It is possible that it comes
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    170
    Prudence Island

    Prudence Island

    • Body Of Water: Narragansett Bay
    Prudence Island is the third largest island in Narragansett Bay in the U.S. state of Rhode Island and part of the town of Portsmouth. It is located near the geographical center of the bay. It is defined by the United States Census Bureau as Block Group 3, Census Tract 401.03 of Newport County, Rhode Island. As of the 2000 census the population was 88 people living on a land area of 14.43 km² (5.57 sq mi). The Native American name for the island was "Chibachuweset" (or "Chibachuwese"), and the Narragansetts originally offered it for sale to John Oldham if he would settle there and set up a trading post. Oldham failed to meet the condition, so in 1637 the Narragansetts sold the island to Roger Williams and John Winthrop with each man retaining a one-half interest. Williams and Winthrop hoped to farm pigs on the island. Williams named the island "Prudence" and shortly afterwards purchased and named nearby Patience Island and Hope Island. Williams sold his half interest in Prudence Island while in England on behalf of the colony, and Winthrop willed his land to his son Stephen. In colonial times, the island was used mainly for farming. During the American Revolution, the British forces
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    171
    Pulau Semakau

    Pulau Semakau

    • Body Of Water: Pacific Ocean
    Pulau Semakau is located to the south of the main island of Singapore, off the Straits of Singapore. The Semakau Landfill is located on the eastern side of the island, and was created by the amalgamation of Pulau Sakeng (also known as Pulau Seking), and "anchored" to Pulau Semakau. The Semakau Landfill is Singapore's first offshore landfill and now the only remaining landfill in Singapore. Pulau Semakau was home to a small fishing village, as was the nearby island of Pulau Sakeng (Chinese: 锡京岛) which was also known as Pulau Seking. Houses built on both islands were perched on stilts as most of the villagers were subsistence fishermen, making a living off the nearby coral reefs. Both islands had a few provision shops but the community centre was located on Pulau Semakau while the Pulau Sakeng Police Post (manned by a Marine Police officer of the Singapore Police Force) was situated on Pulau Sakeng. In 1987, the Singapore government, after having acquired the land on both islands from the islanders, set about relocating the islanders to the mainland where they were resettled in the Bukit Merah and Telok Blangah housing estate areas by HDB. One of the oldest residents continued to
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    1 votes
    172
    Solor

    Solor

    • Island Group: Lesser Sunda Islands
    Solor is a volcanic island located off the eastern tip of Flores island in the Lesser Sunda Islands of Indonesia, in the Solor Archipelago. The island supports a small population that has been whaling for hundreds of years. They speak the languages of Adonara and Lamaholot. There are at least five volcanos on this island which measures only 40 km (25 mi) by 6 km (3.7 mi). The island's area is 222 km. In 1520, the Portuguese established a trading post in the village of Lamakera on the eastern side of the island as a transit harbor between Maluku and Malacca. In 1562, Dominican priests built a palm-trunk fortress which Javanese Muslims burned down the following year. The fort was rebuilt from more durable materials and the Dominicans commenced the Christianisation of the local population. By 1590 the Portuguese and Christian population numbered about 25,000. There were, however, repeated displays of resistance against both the Portuguese and their religion; in 1598-1599, for example, the Portuguese required an armada of 90 ships to put down a Solorese uprising. At this time, there was a conflict between the traders and the priests, so the traders left Solor and settled in Larantuka
    7.00
    1 votes
    173
    South Bass Island

    South Bass Island

    • Body Of Water: Great Lakes
    South Bass Island is a small island in western Lake Erie, and a part of Ottawa County, Ohio, United States. It is the southernmost of the three Bass Islands and located 12 miles (19.3 km) from the south shore of Lake Erie. It is the third largest island in the Lake Erie Islands. The island is a popular recreation spot. South Bass Island is approximately 3.7 miles (6.0 km) long and 1.5 miles (2.4 km) wide and comprises 1,588.3 acres (642.8 ha). The island is 3 miles (4.8 km) north of the nearest point on the mainland (Scott Point on Catawba Island) and approximately 10 miles (16 km) NNE of Port Clinton, Ohio, and 14 miles (23 km) NNW of Sandusky, Ohio. As of the 2000 census there were 631 residents on the island. The only incorporated community is the village of Put-in-Bay. The village of Put-in-Bay is a popular tourist stop during the summer. The island is often referred to as the "Key West of Lake Erie". Put-in-Bay is served by ferry from nearby Port Clinton and Sandusky. Perry's Victory and International Peace Memorial, including Perry's Monument, commemorating the Battle of Lake Erie is located on South Bass Island, near Put-In-Bay. The island is also the annual host of the
    7.00
    1 votes
    174
    Sveti Đorđe Island

    Sveti Đorđe Island

    • Body Of Water: Gulf of Kotor
    Ostrvo Sveti Đorđe (pronounced [sʋɛ̂ːtiː dʑɔ̂ːrdʑɛ]; English: Island of Saint George) is one of the two islets off the coast of Perast in Bay of Kotor, Montenegro (the other being Gospa od Škrpjela). Unlike Gospa od Škrpjela, it is a natural island. The island contains Saint George Benedictine monastery from the 12th century and the old graveyard for the old nobility from Perast and further from the whole Bay of Kotor.
    7.00
    1 votes
    175
    Achadas da Cruz

    Achadas da Cruz

    Achadas da Cruz is a civil parish in the municipality of Porto Moniz in the Portuguese islands of Madeira. In 2001 the population was approximately 220 inhabitants, in an area of 7.88 km² along the north-western coast of the island of Madeira (its density was approximately 28 inhabitants per km²). Achadas da Cruz is the smallest parish by population and area on the island of Madeira and one of the two highest parishes by altitude. It is characteristic for the fact that no children have been born in the parish in the last eight years. It is connected with the main roadway that circles the island, and connects it to the regional capital, in addition to connections to Calheta and São Vicente. The Atlantic ocean, which fronts the western border is rocky with cliffs, and accessible beaches are non-existent. Forests and the Paul de Serra cover the interior (towards the east), while arable land predominates the central portion of the parish. The escarpment of Achadas is about 15 km long, connecting it with Ponta do Pargo, while ravines and river valleys front its boundaries. The settlement of Santa Maria Madalena lies to the northeast. Achadas da Cruz has a school, a lyceum, a gymnasium,
    5.33
    3 votes
    176
    Lismore, Scotland

    Lismore, Scotland

    • Island Group: Inner Hebrides
    Lismore (Scottish Gaelic: Lios Mòr, pronounced [ʎis̪ moːɾ]) is a partially Gaelic speaking island in the Inner Hebrides of Scotland. This fertile, low-lying island was once a major centre of Celtic Christianity, with a monastery founded by Saint Moluag and the seat of the Bishop of Argyll. The island of Lismore lies in Loch Linnhe, east of Mull, in Argyll and Bute Council Area. Composed almost entirely of Dalradian limestone, it has fertile soil and an abundance of trees and shrubs. The island is linked to the mainland by two ferries, a vehicle ferry making the crossing to Oban and a foot ferry making a shorter crossing from the northern tip of the island to Port Appin. Lismore Lighthouse, built by Robert Stevenson, lies on the small island of Eilean Musdile to the south west with Lady's Rock a kilometer further away in the same direction. Lismore lies at the heart of the Lynn of Lorn National Scenic Area, one of 40 in Scotland. Tirefour Castle is an Iron Age broch of uncertain date. The walls have an average thickness of 4.5 metres (15 ft) enclosing a court about 12.2 metres (40 ft) in diameter. The wall still stands 3 metres (9.8 ft) high. Lismore, like other Hebridean islands,
    5.33
    3 votes
    177
    Saint Thomas

    Saint Thomas

    • Island Group: Virgin Islands
    • Body Of Water: Caribbean Sea
    Saint Thomas (Spanish: Santo Tomás; Dutch: Sint-Thomas; Danish: Sankt Thomas) is an island in the Caribbean Sea and with the islands of Saint John, Saint Croix, and Water Island a county and constituent district of the United States Virgin Islands (USVI), an unincorporated territory of the United States. Located on the island is the territorial capital and port of Charlotte Amalie. As of the 2010 census, the population of Saint Thomas was 51,634 about 48.5% of the US Virgin Islands total. The district has a land area of 31.24 square miles (80.9 km). The island was originally settled around 1500 BC by the Ciboney people. They were later replaced by the Arawaks and then the Caribs. Christopher Columbus sighted the island in 1493 on his second voyage to the "New World". The Caribs barely survived the first decades of contact with Europeans, either due to disease, deportation or slaying. The Dutch West India Company established a post on Saint Thomas in 1657. The first congregation was the St. Thomas Reformed Church, which was established in 1660 and was associated with the Dutch Reformed Church. The Danish conquered the island in 1666, and by 1672 had established control over the
    5.33
    3 votes
    178
    Faial Island

    Faial Island

    • Island Group: Archipelago of the Azores
    • Body Of Water: Atlantic Ocean
    Faial Island (Portuguese pronunciation: [fɐˈjaɫ]), also known in English as Fayal, is a Portuguese island of the Central Group (Portuguese: Grupo Central) of the Azores. With its nearest neighbours, Pico (east across the channel) and São Jorge (northeast across the channel), it forms an area commonly known as the Trianglo (English: Triangle). The island has also referred to as the Ilha Azul (English: Blue Island), derived from the writings of Portuguese poet Raul Brandão, due to the large quantity of hydrangeas that bloom during the summer months: "The man that had the idea to border the road with these plants should have a statue on the island. In no other place, do they prosper better: they need a covering of light, humidity and heat...they are in their place. Their blue, is the blue that adorns the Azores on lipid days...this is a blue that is even more blue, the bunches of flowers of a colour more intense and more fresh. They are in every direction: rising along the roads and the fields forming hedges; they serve to divide the parcels and to cover the peaceful animals." —Raul Brandão, As Ilhas Desconhecidas (1926), p.33 During a period of medieval legends and unsubstantiated
    6.00
    2 votes
    179
    Hokkaido

    Hokkaido

    • Island Group: Japanese Archipelago
    • Body Of Water: Sea of Okhotsk
    Hokkaido (help·info) (北海道, Hokkaidō, literally "Northern Sea Circuit"), formerly known as Ezo, Yezo, Yeso, or Yesso, is Japan's second largest island; it is also the largest and northernmost of Japan's 47 prefectures. The Tsugaru Strait separates Hokkaido from Honshu, although the two islands are connected by the underwater railway Seikan Tunnel. The largest city on Hokkaido is its capital, Sapporo, which is also its only ordinance-designated city. Hokkaido was settled by Ainu, Nivkh, and Orok 20,000 years ago. The Nihon Shoki, finished in 720, is often said to be the first mention of Hokkaido in recorded history. According to the text, Abe no Hirafu led a large navy and army to northern areas from 658 to 660 and came into contact with the Mishihase and Emishi. One of the places Hirafu went to was called Watarishima (渡島), which is often believed to be present-day Hokkaido. However, many theories exist in relation to the details of this event, including the location of Watarishima and the common belief that the Emishi in Watarishima were the ancestors of the present-day Ainu people. During the Nara and Heian periods (710–1185), people in Hokkaido conducted trade with Dewa Province,
    6.00
    2 votes
    180
    Minorca

    Minorca

    • Island Group: Balearic Islands
    • Body Of Water: Mediterranean Sea
    Minorca or Menorca (Catalan: Menorca [məˈnɔrkə]; Spanish: Menorca [meˈnorka]; from Latin: Insula Minor, later Minorica "minor island") is one of the Balearic Islands located in the Mediterranean Sea belonging to Spain. It takes its name from being smaller than the nearby island of Majorca. Minorca has a population of approximately 94,383 (2010). It is located 39°47' to 40°00'N, 3°52' to 4°24'E. Its highest point, called El Toro or Monte Toro, is 358 m/1,174 ft above sea level. The island is known for its collection of megalithic stone monuments: navetes, taules and talaiots, which speak of a very early prehistoric human activity. Some of the earliest culture on Minorca was influenced by other Mediterranean cultures, including the Greek Minoans of ancient Crete (see also Gymnesian Islands). For example the use of inverted plastered timber columns at Knossos is thought to have influenced early peoples of Minorca in imitating this practice. The end of the Punic wars saw an increase in piracy in the western Mediterranean. The Roman occupation of Hispania had meant a growth of maritime trade between the Iberian and Italian peninsulas. Pirates took advantage of the strategic location of
    6.00
    2 votes
    181
    Sanibel Island

    Sanibel Island

    Sanibel Island is an island located on the Gulf coast of Florida, just offshore of Fort Myers. In 2000, it had an estimated population of 6,064 people. Located within Lee County, Sanibel is a barrier island – a collection of sand on the leeward side of the Gulf Stream from the more solid coral-rock of Pine Island. The city of Sanibel incorporates the entire island, with most of the city proper at the east end of the island. After the Sanibel causeway was built to replace the ferry in May 1963, the residents fought back against overdevelopment by establishing the Sanibel Comprehensive Land Use Plan in 1974 helping to maintain a balance between development and preservation of the island's ecology. A new, higher bridge without a bascule (drawbridge) having to open for tall boats and sailboats, was completed in late 2007. Thanks in part to the new causeway, Sanibel is rapidly becoming a popular tourist destination known for its shell beaches and wildlife refuges. More than half of the island is made up of wildlife refuges, the largest one is the J.N. "Ding" Darling National Wildlife Refuge. The Island also hosts the Sanibel Historical Village and a variety of other museums and
    6.00
    2 votes
    182
    Darwin Island

    Darwin Island

    • Island Group: Galápagos Islands
    • Body Of Water: Pacific Ocean
    Darwin Island (Spanish: Isla Darwin) is named in honor of Charles Darwin, and is among the smallest in the Galapagos Archipelago with an area of just one square kilometer. With no dry landing sites, Darwin Island's main attractions are found in the Pacific Ocean, which is teeming with a spectacular variety of marine life. Darwin Island and Wolf Island sometimes are referred to as Darwin and Wolf or Darwin Wolf. Although the island had been marked on maps, and initially had been given the name Culpepper Island on Admiralty charts, the first visit onto Darwin Island was not until 1964 using a helicopter. Darwin Island is the remains of an extinct volcano that reaches 165 meters above sea level, it is situated north west of the main Galapagos Island group on the Wolf-Darwin Lineament that extends from the Galapagos Platform to the Galapagos Spreading Center, a mid ocean ridge separating the Nazca and Cocos tectonic plates. The formation of Darwin Island is different from the formation of the main Galapagos Islands. There are currently two theories on the formation of the lineament: the first is that magma rising from the mantle plume forming the main Galapagos Islands has been
    5.00
    3 votes
    183
    Korčula

    Korčula

    • Body Of Water: Adriatic Sea
    Korčula (Croatian: [kɔ̂ːrtʃula] ( listen); Greek: Κόρκυρα Μέλαινα, Kòrkyra Melaèna, Latin: Corcyra Nigra, Korkyra Melaina, Old-Slavic Krkar, Venetian and Italian Curzola) is an island in the Adriatic Sea, in the Dubrovnik-Neretva County of Croatia. The island has an area of 279 km (108 sq mi); 46.8 km (29.1 mi) long and on average 7.8 km (4.8 mi) wide — and lies just off the Dalmatian coast. Its 16,182 (2001) inhabitants make it the second most populous Adriatic island after Krk. The population are mainly ethnic Croats (96.77%). The island of Korčula belongs to the central Dalmatian archipelago, separated from the Pelješac peninsula by a narrow strait of Pelješac, between 900 and 3,000 metres (3,000 and 9,800 ft) wide (illustration, right). It is the sixth largest Adriatic island with a rather indented coast. The highest peaks are Klupca, 568 m (1,864 ft) above sea level and Kom, 510 m (1,670 ft) high. The climate is mild; an average air temperature in January is 9.8 °C and in July 26.9 °C; the average annual rainfall is 1,100 mm. The island is largely covered with Mediterranean flora including extensive pine forests. The island also includes the towns of Korčula, Vela Luka and
    5.00
    3 votes
    184
    Yeouido

    Yeouido

    Yeouido (Yoi Island or Yeoui Island) is a large island in the Han River in Seoul, South Korea. It is Seoul's main business and investment banking district. Its 8.4 square kilometers are home to some 30,988 people. The island is located in the Yeongdeungpo-gu district of Seoul, and largely corresponds to the precinct of Yeouido-dong. The island contains the National Assembly Building, where the National Assembly of South Korea meets, Korea Financial Investment Association, the large Yoido Full Gospel Church, the 63 Building, and the headquarters of LG, KBS, and MBC, and the Korea Exchange Center. Being a vacant spot convenient to the national capital of Joseon, Yeouido was used as a national pasture for sheep and goats, according to a 16th-century geographical record. When the Han River flooded, only a small patch of high ground remained above river level: the name of the island means "You can have it (Useless)". Yeouido remained for the most part an uninhabited sandbar prior to the construction of Seoul's first airport there by the Japanese occupation government in April 1924. The airport served both international, domestic, and military flights, and was also the site of a flight
    5.00
    3 votes
    185
    Agios Efstratios

    Agios Efstratios

    • Body Of Water: Aegean Sea
    Agios Efstratios or Saint Eustratius (Greek: Άγιος Ευστράτιος), colloquially Ai Stratis (Greek: Άι Στράτης) is a small Greek island in the northern Aegean Sea about 30 km southwest of Lemnos and 80 km northwest of Lesbos. Together with Lemnos and nearby islets it forms the regional unit of Lemnos, part of the Greek archipelagic region of the North Aegean. The island was named after Saint Eustratius, who lived on the island in the 9th century as an exile, because he was opposed to the iconoclastic policies of the Byzantine Emperor Leo the Armenian. His grave is still being shown by the inhabitants. Agios Efstratios is quiet, isolated and dry, with a population of approximately 300 people. The climate is arid, with little rainfall during the winter months and long, hot summers. The landscape is mostly rocky, with scarce and low vegetation. Crops are insignificant; the surrounding sea, however, is rich in fish which are fished by local fishermen. There are numerous beaches on the island such as Agios Antonios, Lemonies, Avlakia and others, most of which are reached by caique. Agios Efstratios Island is linked by boat with Limnos, Agios Konstantinos, Kymi and Kavala. The island was
    5.50
    2 votes
    186
    Bear Island

    Bear Island

    • Island Group: Apostle Islands
    Bear Island is one of the Apostle Islands of northern Wisconsin in Lake Superior, and is part of the Apostle Islands National Lakeshore. Unlike nearby Madeline Island, it is not open to commercial development. There is another Bear Island in Balsam Lake.
    5.50
    2 votes
    187
    Cousine Island

    Cousine Island

    • Island Group: Seychelles Archipelago
    Cousine Island is a small granitic island (25 ha) in the Seychelles 6 km west of Praslin Island. It is a combination luxury resort and since 1992 a nature preserve. There are four beachfront French Colonial style villas (maximum number of guests allowed is 10) on the island with a staff of 16 employees. In 1992 the island was purchased and a conservation program introduced to protect nesting sea turtles and maintain the existing populations of endemic land birds including the Seychelles Magpie Robin, the Seychelles Warbler and the Seychelles Fody. Cousine Island is also a breeding ground for sea birds and has a population of transplanted Aldabra Giant Tortoises. The island has undergone an extensive vegetation rehabilitation program which involves planting of indigenous flora and the removal of alien plant species. Since 1995 over 2000 native trees have been planted. Indo-Pacific hawksbill turtles are known to nest on this island. It is 62 acres-wide. As of 2012, it is the world's third most expensive private island. The island has been identified by BirdLife International as an Important Bird Area because it supports populations of the Seychelles Warbler, Magpie-robin and Fody, as
    5.50
    2 votes
    188
    Ilnacullin

    Ilnacullin

    Ilnacullin, or sometimes Illaunacullin (derives from Oileán an Chulinn in Irish meaning 'island of holly') known locally as Garnish Island (properly Garinish Island or Garinis in Irish), is a very tranquil yet popular tourist attraction in Ireland, located in the small harbour of Glengarriff, County Cork which forms part of Bantry Bay. Ilnacullin is the name used by the National Parks and Monuments Service to differentiate it from Garinish Island in Co Kerry. The gardens are visited by thousands of people each year from all over the world and have been the subject of gardening programmes on television. The garden was designed by Harold Peto, (1854–1933), for its owner Annan Bryce, (1874–1924), a native of Belfast, who, with his wife Violet, purchased the island from the War Office in 1910. Violet died in 1939 and their son Roland bequeathed the island to the Irish nation in 1953. It was taken over and is still maintained by the Office of Public Works. Renowned for its beautiful gardens and architecture (a mansion was designed by Peto but was never built), the island has played host to well-known writers such as GB Shaw and Æ. There is a Martello tower on the island dating from the
    5.50
    2 votes
    189
    Isle Royale

    Isle Royale

    • Body Of Water: Great Lakes
    Isle Royale /ˌaɪl ˈrɔɪ.əl/ is an island of the Great Lakes, located in the northwest of Lake Superior, and part of the state of Michigan. The island and the 450 surrounding smaller islands and waters make up Isle Royale National Park. The island is 45 miles (72 km) long and 9 miles (14 km) wide, with an area of 206.73 square miles (535.43 km), making it the largest natural island in Lake Superior, the second largest island in the Great Lakes (after Manitoulin Island), the third largest in the contiguous United States (after Long Island and Padre Island), and the 33rd largest island in the United States. It is defined by the United States Census Bureau as Census Tract 9603 of Keweenaw County, Michigan. As of the 2000 census there was no permanent population. After the island was made a national park, some existing residents were allowed to stay, and a few leases are still in effect. Ferries from Michigan and Minnesota land at Rock Harbor on the eastern end of the island; this has a lodge, campground, and information center. Ferries from Minnesota also run to Windigo on the western end, which has a visitor center and campground. In 1875, Isle Royale was set off from Keweenaw County,
    5.50
    2 votes
    190
    St. John's Island, Egypt

    St. John's Island, Egypt

    St. John's Island (also known as Zabargad, Zebirget, Topazios) is the largest of a group of islands in Foul Bay, Red Sea in Southern Egypt. It covers an area of 4.50 square kilometres (approx.). It is not a quaternary volcanic island, but rather is believed to be an upthrusted part of upper mantle material. The nearest island is Rocky Island. The island is slightly north of the Tropic of Cancer, and its highest point is 235 metres. The island is considered geologically unique as it is uplifted mantle, a fragment of the sub-Red Sea lithosphere. Rocks on the island are mainly lower crustal metamorphic rocks. The island became present above sea level after African and Asiatic continental plates converged to cause rocks in the lower crust to be uplifted. The island comprises three massives of peridotite, which are rich in the gemstone peridote (olivine). This gem makes the island notable as it is believed to be the first discovered source of peridot, which was called topazios in ancient times, hence the Greek name for the island, Topazios. Layers of spinel-lherzolites with anhydrous Al-diopside pyroxenites and hydrous Cr-diopside pyroxenites can be found too on the island. The presence
    5.50
    2 votes
    191
    Campobello Island

    Campobello Island

    Campobello Island is a Canadian island located at the entrance to Passamaquoddy Bay, adjacent to the entrance to Cobscook Bay, and within the Bay of Fundy. The island is part of Charlotte County, New Brunswick, but is actually physically connected by the Franklin Delanor Roosevelt Bridge with Lubec, Maine - the easternmost tip of the continental United States. Measuring 14 kilometres (8.7 mi) long and about 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) wide, it has an area of 39.6 square kilometres (15.3 sq mi). In addition to the Lubec bridge, the island is accessible in the summer months by an automobile ferry from nearby Deer Island and from there by another ferry to mainland New Brunswick. The island's permanent population in 2011 was 925. The majority of residents are employed in the fishing/aquaculture or tourism industries. The island was originally settled by the Passamaquoddy Nation, who called it Ebaghuit. The first Europeans were reportedly from the French expedition of Pierre Dugua de Monts (Sieur de Monts) and Samuel de Champlain, who founded the nearby St. Croix Island settlement in 1604. France named the island Port aux Coquilles ("Shell Harbour"). Following the War of the Spanish
    4.67
    3 votes
    192
    Bouvet Island

    Bouvet Island

    • Body Of Water: Pacific Ocean
    Bouvet Island (Norwegian: Bouvetøya; earlier Bouvet-øya) is an uninhabited subantarctic volcanic island and dependency of Norway located in the South Atlantic Ocean. Lying at the southern end of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, it is the most remote island in the world. The island has an area of 49 square kilometers (19 sq mi), of which 93 percent is covered by a glacier. The center of the island is an ice-filled crater of an inactive volcano. Along the coast lie some skerries and one island, Larsøya. Nyrøysa, created by a rock slide in the late 1950s, is the only easy place to land and features a weather station. The island was first spotted on 1 January 1739 by and was later named for Jean-Baptiste Charles Bouvet de Lozier. He recorded inaccurate coordinates, and the island was not sighted again until James Lindsay named it Lindsay Island in 1808. The first claim of landing, although disputed, was by Benjamin Morrell. The island was claimed for the British Crown by George Norris in 1825, who named it Liverpool Island. He also spotted a nearby phantom island, Thompson Island. The First Norvegia Expedition landed on the island in 1927 and claimed it for Norway. After a dispute with the UK,
    6.00
    1 votes
    193
    Caniçal

    Caniçal

    Caniçal (Portuguese pronunciation: [kɐniˈsaɫ]) is a civil parish in the municipality of Machico in the Portuguese archipelago of Madeira. In 2001 the population was less than 4000 inhabitants, in an 11.85 km² area of islets and raised escarpments (its density is 328 inhabitants per kilometre square). Equidistant from Funchal and Santana (20 km) and 52 km east Porto Moniz, the community is connected to these centres by the Regional 109 roadway to many of the centres around the island. Caniçal is now the principle cargo port in Madeira. Early documents of the lands of Caniçal came from references to the region's use as a hunting preserve of rich landowners; the lands where the hereditary donation to the sons of the first Captain-donatário of Machico. Gaspar Frutuoso in Saudades da Terra, mentions Caniçal in these terms: The first area to be inhabited was the south-central coast of Caniçal, at the edge of the Ponta de São Lourenço. In those lands, which were donated to Vasco Moniz (the son of Tristão Vaz Teixeira), the first of the oldest farms were established (5 September 1489). It was not the importance of its community or level of development that justified the creation of the
    6.00
    1 votes
    194
    Cape Breton Island

    Cape Breton Island

    Cape Breton Island (French: île du Cap-Breton - formerly Île Royale, Scottish Gaelic: Ceap Breatainn or Eilean Cheap Bhreatainn, Míkmaq: Únamakika, simply: Cape Breton) is an island on the Atlantic coast of North America. The name most likely corresponds to the word Breton, the French adjective referring to the Atlantic province of Brittany. Cape Breton Island is part of the province of Nova Scotia, Canada. The 10,311 km (3,981 sq mi) island accounts for 18.7% of the total area of Nova Scotia. Although physically separated from the Nova Scotia peninsula by the Strait of Canso, it is artificially connected to mainland Nova Scotia by the 1,385 m (4,544 ft) long rock-fill Canso Causeway. The island is located east-northeast of the mainland with its northern and western coasts fronting on the Gulf of Saint Lawrence; its western coast also forming the eastern limits of the Northumberland Strait. The eastern and southern coasts front the Atlantic Ocean; its eastern coast also forming the western limits of the Cabot Strait. Its landmass slopes upward from south to north, culminating in the highlands of its northern cape. One of the world's larger salt water lakes, Bras d'Or ("Arm of Gold"
    6.00
    1 votes
    195
    Coquet Island, England

    Coquet Island, England

    Coquet Island  /ˈkoʊkət/ is a small island of about 6 hectares (15 acres), situated 1.2 kilometres (0.75 mi) off Amble on the Northumberland coast, northeast England. The Island is owned by the Duke of Northumberland. The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds manage the island as a bird reserve, for its important seabird colonies. The most numerous species is the Puffin, with over 18,000 pairs nesting in 2002, but the island is most important for the largest colony of the endangered Roseate Tern in Britain, which, thanks to conservation measures including the provision of nestboxes to protect the nests from gulls and bad weather, has risen to 92 pairs in 2005. Other nesting birds include Sandwich Tern, Common Tern, Arctic Tern, Black-legged Kittiwake, Fulmar, three gull species, and Eider Duck. The island is uninhabited in winter, but seasonal wardens are present throughout the summer to protect the nesting birds. Landing on Coquet Island for the general public is prohibited, but local boating companies from Amble sail close up to the island in good weather throughout the summer, allowing visitors to get good views of the Puffins and Roseate Terns. Coquet Island also holds the
    6.00
    1 votes
    196
    Fidalgo Island

    Fidalgo Island

    Fidalgo Island is an island in Skagit County, Washington, located about 78 miles (126 km) north of Seattle. To the east, it is separated from the mainland by the Swinomish Channel, and from Whidbey Island to the south by Deception Pass. The island is named after the Spanish explorer and cartographer Salvador Fidalgo who explored the area in 1790. Its largest city is Anacortes with a population of 14,557 according to the 2000 Census. The total population of the island was 20,700. There are ferries to Sidney, British Columbia and several ports in the San Juan Islands. Fidalgo Island has a land area of 106.684 km² (41.19 sq mi). There are at least eight major lakes on Fidalgo Island: Campbell, Little Cranberry, Erie, Heart, Mud, Pass, Trafton/Crater, and Whistle. Fidalgo Island was originally inhabited by the Samish and Swinomish peoples. Fidalgo Island is named for the Spanish explorer and cartographer Salvador Fidalgo who explored the area in 1790 with the fleet of Francisco de Eliza. Charles Wilkes discovered that it was an island rather than part of the mainland. He named it Perry Island in honor of Oliver Hazard Perry, the American commander who won the Battle of Lake Erie during
    6.00
    1 votes
    197
    Nuku Hiva

    Nuku Hiva

    • Island Group: Marquesas Islands
    • Body Of Water: Pacific Ocean
    Nuku Hiva (sometimes spelled "Nukahiva") is the largest of the Marquesas Islands in French Polynesia, an overseas territory of France in the Pacific Ocean. It was formerly also known as Île Marchand and Madison Island. Herman Melville wrote his book Typee based on his experiences in the Taipivai valley in the eastern part of Nuku Hiva. Robert Louis Stevenson's first landfall on his voyage on the Casco, was at Hatiheu, on the north side of Nuku Hiva, in 1888. Nuku Hiva was also the site for Survivor: Marquesas, the fourth installment of the popular CBS reality television show in the US. The coastline of western Nuku Hiva is characterized by a steep, but fairly regular coastline, indented occasionally by small bays leading to deep valleys, which lead into the interior. There are no villages on this side. The coastline of the eastern part of the island has few places to land by sea and takes the brunt of the ocean swells. The north, on the other hand, is indented by deep bays, the largest of which are Anaho and Hatiheu. Aakapaa bay is not as large but has a village of the same name. The south has fewer bays, among which those of Taiohae, Taipivai, Hooumi, Hakapoovai (the last three
    6.00
    1 votes
    198
    Shark Island, Namibia

    Shark Island, Namibia

    Shark Island (German Haifischinsel) is a small peninsula adjacent to the coastal city of Lüderitz in Namibia. Its area is about 40 hectares. Formerly an island, it became a peninsula from 1906 on by the creation of a wide land connection that doubled its former size. Now a campsite for tourists, from 1904 to 1907 it was the site of a concentration camp, created for members of the Herero and Nama tribes in German South West Africa. (See Shark Island Extermination Camp.)
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    1 votes
    199
    Spike Island, Bristol

    Spike Island, Bristol

    Spike Island is an area of the English port city of Bristol, adjoining the city centre. It comprises the strip of land between the Floating Harbour to the north and the tidal New Cut of the River Avon to the south, from the dock entrance to the west to Bathurst Basin in the east. The island forms part of Cabot ward. Spike Island was created by William Jessop in the early 19th century, when he constructed the New Cut, and converted the former course of the River Avon into the Floating Harbour. Until the Second World War, a lock connected Bathurst Basin with the New Cut, and Spike Island was a genuine island surrounded on all sides by water. However, fears that an aerial attack on this lock at low tide could lead to a disastrous dewatering of the docks led to the lock being filled in. Historically, Spike Island was the site of working quays, shipyards, warehousing, and other associated dockside industry. The Bristol Harbour Railway runs the length of the island, and formerly connected these working areas with the railway network. With the redevelopment of the docks, the Island has become an area popular with developers looking to create prime dock side housing such as Baltic Wharf,
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    1 votes
    200
    Sumba

    Sumba

    • Island Group: Lesser Sunda Islands
    Sumba is an island in eastern Indonesia, is one of the Lesser Sunda Islands, and is in the province of East Nusa Tenggara. Sumba has an area of 11,153 km², and the population was 656,259 at the 2010 Census. To the northwest of Sumba is Sumbawa, to the northeast, across the Sumba Strait (Selat Sumba), is Flores, to the east, across the Savu Sea, is Timor, and to the south, across part of the Indian Ocean, is Australia. Historically, this island exported sandalwood and was known as Sandalwood Island. Before colonization, Sumba was inhabited by several small ethnolinguistic groups, some of which may have had tributary relations to the Majapahit Empire. In 1522 the first ships from Europe arrived, and by 1866 Sumba belonged to the Dutch East Indies, although the island did not come under real Dutch administration until the twentieth century. Despite contact with western cultures, Sumba is one of the few places in the world in which megalithic burials, are used as a 'living tradition' to inter prominent individuals when they die. Burial in megaliths is a practice that was used in many parts of the world during the Neolithic and Bronze Ages, but has survived to this day in Sumba. Another
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    1 votes
    201
    Alexander Island, Nunavut

    Alexander Island, Nunavut

    • Island Group: Canadian Arctic Archipelago
    Alexander Island is one of the Canadian arctic islands located in Nunavut, Canada. It lies south of Massey Island and Île Marc (across Boyer Strait), and north of Bathurst Island (across Pell Inlet). Located at 79°52'N 102°37'W it has an area of 484 km (187 sq mi), 42.8 kilometres (26.6 mi) long and 19 kilometres (12 mi) wide.
    4.33
    3 votes
    202
    Mackinac Island

    Mackinac Island

    • Body Of Water: Great Lakes
    Mackinac Island ( /ˈmækɨnɔː/ MAK-in-aw) is an island and resort area covering 3.8 square miles (9.8 km) in land area, part of the U.S. state of Michigan. It is located in Lake Huron, at the eastern end of the Straits of Mackinac, between the state's Upper and Lower Peninsulas. The island was home to a Native American settlement before European exploration began in the 17th century. It served a strategic position amidst the commerce of the Great Lakes fur trade. This led to the establishment of Fort Mackinac on the island by the British during the American Revolutionary War. It was the scene of two battles during the War of 1812. In the late 19th century, Mackinac Island became a popular tourist attraction and summer colony. Much of the island has undergone extensive historical preservation and restoration; as a result, the entire island is listed as a National Historic Landmark. It is well known for its numerous cultural events; its wide variety of architectural styles, including the famous Victorian Grand Hotel; its fudge; and its ban on almost all motor vehicles. More than 80 percent of the island is preserved as Mackinac Island State Park. Mackinac Island is about 8 miles
    4.33
    3 votes
    203
    Antiparos

    Antiparos

    • Island Group: Cyclades
    • Body Of Water: Aegean Sea
    Antiparos (ancient name: Oliaros) is a small inhabited island in the southern Aegean, at the heart of the Cyclades, which is less than one nautical mile (1.9 km) from Paros, the port to which it is connected with a local ferry. Saliagos island is the most ancient settlement in the Cyclades, and Despotiko, an uninhabited island in the southwest of Antiparos, is a place of great archaeological importance. The Community of Antiparos was founded in 1914 and was promoted to a municipality in 2010 with the implementation of the Law "Kallikrates", under the principle of "each island a municipality". It occupies an area of 34.8 square kilometers, including the island of Antiparos and Despotiko. It has, according to census 2001, 1.037 permanent residents and a density of 29 inhabitants per km². The island's economy is based on tourism, fishing, farming and less on agriculture in the plains. It is known for its distinctive Cycladic beauty with white houses, cobbled streets and beautiful flowers that thrive in the yards of the houses. It is a popular tourist resort in the summer for Greeks and European visitors, as well as land investors from the U.S.A. The main settlement lies at the
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    2 votes
    204
    Bokissa

    Bokissa

    • Island Group: Islands of Vanuatu
    Bokissa is a very small island in the South Pacific island nation of Vanuatu located 10km south of Espiritu Santo. The island is owned and run as a tourist resort and is promoted as being managed in an environmentally responsible manner.
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    2 votes
    205
    Brač

    Brač

    • Body Of Water: Adriatic Sea
    Brač (Croatian pronunciation: [brâːtʃ]; local dialect: Broč; Latin: Bretia, Brattia; Italian: Brazza) is an island in the Adriatic Sea within Croatia, with an area of 396 km², making it the largest island in Dalmatia, and the third largest in the Adriatic. Its tallest peak, Vidova gora, or Mount St. Vid, stands at 778 m, making it the highest island point in the Adriatic. The island has a population of 14,436, living in numerous settlements, ranging from the main town Supetar, with more than 3,300 inhabitants, to Murvica, where less than two dozen people live. Bol Airport on Brač is the largest airport of all islands surrounding Split. Archaeological findings date the existence of human communities on the island back to the palaeolithic (in the Kopačina cave between Supetar and Donji Humac). Nevertheless, there are no traces of human habitation from the neolithic. In the Bronze Age and Iron Age, Illyrian tribes populated the inner parts of the island. Numerous villages existed at that time (but none of them survived). In the 4th century BC Greek colonisation spread over many Adriatic islands and along the shore, but none of them on Brač. Nevertheless, Greeks visited the island and
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    2 votes
    206
    Heimaey

    Heimaey

    Heimaey (Icelandic pronunciation: [ˈheiːmaˌei]), literally Home Island, is an Icelandic island. At a size of 13.4 km² (5.2 sq. miles), it is the largest island in the Vestmannaeyjar archipelago, and the largest and most populated Icelandic island outside the main island of Iceland. Heimaey lies approximately 4 nautical miles (7.4 km) off the south coast of Iceland. It is the only populated island of the Vestmannaeyjar islands, with a population of approximately 4,500. The Landnáma tells that after Ingólfur Arnarson, the first settler in Iceland, spent a winter at Ingólfshöfði, he released his "Öndvegissúlur" (chief's pillars) into the water and followed them west. (These were pillars associated with the chief's chair. They were put into the sea and let float to shore. Where they came ashore, the Viking who followed it would build his farm.) At Hjörleifshöfði, Ingólfur found that his brother/close friend Hjörleifr Hróðmarsson was dead and his slaves were missing. Out at sea he could see boats going toward a small group of islands, and he set off after them. Abducted from the north of Ireland, the slaves were called westmen (Vestmenn), as Ireland was the most western part of the
    5.00
    2 votes
    207
    Inchcolm

    Inchcolm

    • Body Of Water: Firth of Forth
    Inchcolm (from the Scottish Gaelic "Innis Choluim", meaning Columba's Island) is an island in the Firth of Forth in Scotland. Repeatedly attacked by English raiders during the Wars of Scottish Independence, it was fortified during both World Wars to defend nearby Edinburgh. Inchcolm now attracts visitors to its former Augustine Abbey. Inchcolm lies in the Firth of Forth off the south coast of Fife opposite Braefoot Bay, east of the Forth Bridge, south of Aberdour, Fife, and north of the City of Edinburgh. It is separated from the Fife mainland by a stretch of water known as Mortimer's Deep. The island forms part of the parish of Aberdour, and lies a quarter of a mile from the shore. In the days when people were compelled to cross the Firth of Forth by boat as opposed to bridge, the island was a great deal less isolated, and on the ferry routes between Leith/Lothian and Fife. The island can be broadly divided into three sections: the east, where its military defensive operations were centered during the Second World War, the lower central part, with the small natural harbour and shop, and a larger western end. Between Aberdour and Inchcolm is the channel called "Mortimer's Deep". It
    5.00
    2 votes
    208
    Man-O-War Cay

    Man-O-War Cay

    Man-O-War Cay is a small island in the Abaco region of the Bahamas. It has a population of about 300 Bahamian residents and about 135 foreign resident families. During the summer some local houses are rented by vacationing families that have a reputation as good house guests (the exclusive nature of the locals leads noisier or more youthful vacationers to other islands). The island is famous for its boat-building history. William H. Albury was famous in the country for his tremendous boat building skills. He built his first schooner at the age of 14. Albury died in 1972, but the boat building on the Cay still lives on. The last big boat built by the William H. Albury Ship Yard and "Uncle Will", as he had come to be known, was the Esperanto. The Esperanto was later renamed The William H. Albury in his honor. The newer generations have resorted to building fiberglass boats as opposed to wooden vessels. Albury Brothers Boats builds small boats in their facility next to the water. This island is about 2.5 miles long(4 km), but relatively narrow, often less than 100 metres between the harbor and beach side of the Island. A section of island called "The Narrows" by visitors and "The Low
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    2 votes
    209
    Panarea

    Panarea

    • Island Group: Aeolian Islands
    • Body Of Water: Tyrrhenian Sea
    Panarea is the second smallest (after Basiluzzo) of the eight Aeolian Islands, a volcanic island chain north of Sicily. It is a frazione of the comune of Lipari. There are currently about 280 residents living on the island year-round; however the population increases dramatically in summer with the influx of tourists. In recent years, the island has become known internationally for its celebrity visitors. The island is an inactive volcano with a total surface area of only 3.4 km (1.3 sq mi). The highest point on the island, Punta del Corvo, is 421 m (1,381 ft) above sea level. There are thermal springs near the village of Punta di Peppe e Maria. Scuba diving is a popular excursion on this tiny island, and you can even swim to a shipwreck between the offshore rocks of Lisca Bianca and Bottaro. In antiquity, the island was named "Euonymus"; the nearby islet of Basiluzzo, administered from Panarea, was named "Hycesia". There is archaeological evidence on the island dating back to Mycenaean inhabitants (~ 1200 BCE), and the island was settled by Romans. There were people still living on the island until pirates and other Mediterranean raiders made life unbearable after the Fall of
    5.00
    2 votes
    210
    Deadman's Island

    Deadman's Island

    Deadman's Island was one of two islands near San Pedro, Los Angeles, California in the 19th century. The land, sometimes referenced as Dead Man's Island, Isla Del Muerto, and Reservation Point, was dredged away in 1928 as part of a harbor development effort. Rattlesnake Island, the other islet in the area, became Terminal Island. French sea captain Captain Auguste Bernard Duhaut-Cilly visited the small islet on April 10, 1827 and on its highest point found the eyrie of a "sea eagle with two eaglets", described as "black with the under part of the tail and the top of the head a yellowish white". From this description these were probably Bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus). Richard Henry Dana, Jr. in his personal narrative Two Years Before the Mast witnessed, in 1835, the brutal flogging of a black shipmate by their captain in San Pedro Harbor. In his melancholy, he described Dead Man's Island as a "small, desolate-looking island, steep and conical...of a clayey soil on which had been buried an Englishman, the commander of a small merchant brig", who was rumored to have been poisoned by his crew. Dana wrote, "Had it been a common burying-place it would have been nothing. The
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    2 votes
    211
    Isle of Thanet

    Isle of Thanet

    The Isle of Thanet lies at the most easterly point of Kent, England. While in the past it was separated from the mainland by the nearly 2,000 feet (610 m)-wide River Wantsum, it is no longer an island. Archaeological remains testify to the fact that ancient peoples lived here. Today, it is a tourist destination, but it also has a busy agricultural base. The Port of Ramsgate serves the Continent. The name seems to be Celtic in origin, coming from the Brittonic *tanets (Welsh tân) meaning "fire", possibly a reference to a beacon on the island. Ptolemy calls it Tolianis, the Romans Tanatus and Bede referred to it as Tanatos insula. The name 'Tenet' was listed in the Domesday Book of 1086, whereas an 18th century classical dictionary lists Tane'tus, a small island of Albion. It appears as "Insula de Teynet" and "in Insula de Thaneto" in the Plea Rolls of the Common Pleas, dated 1450, where the cleric Hugh Grobham alias Gromefeld alias Bromfeld is plaintiff in a plea of debt against John Cecely, vicar of St Peters-in-Thanet. St. Isidore of Seville's etymology is, if doubtful, certainly colourful: "Thanet is an island in the Ocean in the Gallic channel (English channel), separated from
    4.50
    2 votes
    212
    Poel

    Poel

    Poel (German pronunciation: [ˈpøːl]) or Poel Island (German: Insel Poel)), is an island in the Baltic Sea. It builds the natural northern and eastern boundaries of the Bay of Wismar on the German coast. The northern coast of the island is also on the south side of the large gulf known as the Bay of Mecklenburg, which Wismar Bay enters in to. Insel Poel thus forms on its northern side the unofficial latitude of the northern boundary of the Wismar Bay. Administratively it is a municipality in the Nordwestmecklenburg district. It consists of Kirchdorf and Oertzenhof (the main towns) and the smaller villages of Timmendorf, Wangern, Hinterwangern, Weitendorf, Weitendorf-Hof, Brandenhusen, Neuhof, Seedorf, Niendorf, Schwarzer Busch, Kaltenhof, Fährdorf, Malchow, Vorwerk and Gollwitz. It covers an area of 36.02 km² and has 2873 citizens. Satellite pictures show that most of it is used as farmland. With its good air, clean water, fine beaches and sheltered harbours, it is also popular recreational area. At Timmendorf harbour there are a pilot's station and facilities for yachts and local fishermen. Kirchdorf has a yachting harbour and a boatyard. Wismar Bay is cited by the 1911
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    2 votes
    213
    The Lamb

    The Lamb

    • Body Of Water: Firth of Forth
    The Lamb, sometimes called Lamb Island or just Lamb, is a small (approx. 100m long x 50m wide), uninhabited island between the islands of Fidra and Craigleith in the Firth of Forth, off the south-east coast of Scotland. The Lamb can be reached by boat from North Berwick, although there are no landing facilities and little to attract visitors when compared to Fidra and the Bass Rock. The Lamb is flanked by two "sheep dogs" - North and South Dog Islands - which are basically small skerries. Like the other islands off North Berwick, the Lamb is a result of ancient volcanic activity, millions of years ago. The Lamb was previously owned, with North and South Dog Islands by the Brazilian Camilo Agasim-Pereira (Baron of Dirleton and Fulwood).. On 11 February 2009, the island was bought by Uri Geller, who believes that it hides Egyptian Treasure, for £30,000.
    4.50
    2 votes
    214
    Biševo

    Biševo

    • Body Of Water: Adriatic Sea
    Biševo (pronounced [bîʃɛv̞ɔ], Chakavian: Bisovo, Italian: Busi) is an island in the Adriatic Sea in Croatia. It is situated in the middle of the Dalmatian archipelago, five kilometers southwest of the Island of Vis. Its area is 5.8 km and it has a population of 11 (as of 2011). It is composed of limestone; the highest point is Straženica, 239 m high. In the center of the island there is a fertile field, the northern part of the island is covered with pine forests and the rest of the island is covered with maquis shrubland or bare rocks. The coastal sea belt is a rich fishing area. The main industries are viticulture and fishing. A Benedictine monastery was founded on Biševo in 1050 by Ivan Grlić from Split, but it was deserted two centuries later because of the danger of pirates. The church of Saint Sylvester is preserved near the ruins of the monastery. On the steep shores there are many caves, the most famous being the Blue Cave. It has been accessible since 1884, and approach to the cave is only possible by boat. It is 18 meters long, 6 meters deep and 6 meters high. The entrance to the cave is only 1.5 meters high and 2.5 meters wide. Around 10 to 13 o'clock sunbeams that
    5.00
    1 votes
    215
    Eleuthera

    Eleuthera

    Eleuthera ( /iˈluːθərə/), sometimes spelled Eleuthra, is an island in The Bahamas, lying 50 miles (80 km) east of Nassau. It is long and thin—110 miles (180 km) long and in places little more than 1 mile (1,600 m) wide. According to the 2000 Census, the population of Eleuthera is approximately 8,000. The name "Eleuthera" is derived from the feminine form of the Greek word ελεύθερος (eleutheros), "free". The topography of the island varies from wide rolling pink sand beaches to large outcrops of ancient coral reefs. The eastern side of the island faces the Atlantic Ocean while the western side faces the Great Bahama Bank, one of the two Bahama Banks. The original population of Taino, or Arawaks, was mostly deported by the Spanish to work in the mines of Hispaniola, where they died out by 1550. The island is believed to have been unoccupied until the first European settlers—puritan pilgrims—arrived in 1648 from Bermuda. These settlers, known as the "Eleutherian Adventurers", gave the island its current name—Ἐλευθεριά eleutheria means "freedom" in Greek, while Ἐλευθερά eleuthera means "free". Some people think that Christopher Columbus may have come to Eleuthera before visiting
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    1 votes
    216
    Estreito de Câmara de Lobos

    Estreito de Câmara de Lobos

    Estreito de Câmara do Lobos (Portuguese pronunciation: [(ɨ)ˈʃtɾɐjtu dɨ ˈkɐmɐɾɐ dɨ ˈlobuʃ]; Portuguese for strait of Câmara de Lobos) is a civil parish in the municipality of Câmara de Lobos in the archipelago of Madeira. In 2001 the resident population was 10,283, occupying an area of 7.87 km² (a density of approximayely 1306 inhabitants per square kilometre). Apart from its construction services and commerce, Estreito de Câmara do Lobos is important for its cultivation of grapes, for the production of Madeira wine. The parishes name derives from oral tradition; although there are no dates affixed to the origin of the parish, the Estreito de Câmara de Lobos is associated with a small place situated near the parochial church, known for its physical characteristics as a strait; its history developed from there, and residents commonly referred to the area around the church as the estreito. The parish was created in 1509, long after the first religious institutions were celebrated; parish records indicate that Franciscan clergy used to celebrate masses in an old chapel of wood around 1440 in the area of the parochial church. On 14 September 1994, the parish was elevated to the status
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    1 votes
    217
    Föhr

    Föhr

    Föhr  pronunciation (help·info) (Fering North Frisian: Feer; Danish: Før) is one of the North Frisian Islands on the German coast of the North Sea. It is part of the Nordfriesland district in the federal state of Schleswig-Holstein. Föhr is the second-largest North Sea island of Germany and a popular destination for tourists. A town and eleven distinct municipalities are located on the island. The climate is oceanic with moderate winters and relatively cool summers. Being a settlement area already in neolithic times, Föhr had been part of mainland North Frisia until 1362. Then the coastline was destroyed by a heavy storm flood and several islands were formed, Föhr among them. The northern parts of Föhr consist of marshes while the southern parts consist of sandy geest. From the middle-ages until 1864, Föhr belonged to the Danish realm and to the Duchy of Schleswig, but was then transferred to Prussia as a result of the Second Schleswig War. Seafaring has long been the most popular trade, but farming and eventually tourism became the most important economic factors after the end of the Age of Sail. The island can be reached by a car and passenger ferry service or via an
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    1 votes
    218
    Kuper Island

    Kuper Island

    • Island Group: Southern gulf islands
    • Body Of Water: Strait of Georgia
    Kuper Island is the former name of the island of Penelakut. Penelakut belongs to the Penelakut First Nation and is located in the southern Gulf Islands between Vancouver Island and the mainland Pacific coast of British Columbia, Canada. The island has a population of about 300 members of the Penelakut Band. The island has an area of 8.66 km². There is frequent car and passenger ferry service to Penelakut from Chemainus on Vancouver Island. A Mediterranean climate of mild winters and warm, dry summers supports a unique ecosystem and an ideal living environment. the island is in the rain shadow of Vancouver Island, with an annual rainfall of about 850 mm. There is a Roman Catholic Church and a longhouse, but no commercial establishments on the island. From 1890 to 1978, the Catholic Church had a Residential School on the island, and there is still much bitterness over its reputed brutal practices . The present comprehensive school is run by the Penelakut. Because it is an Indian reserve, property is not available for purchase. (There is one private lot dating from the events of 1863). British sailors surveying the area in 1851 cruised into a tiny group of five unnamed islands in the
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    1 votes
    219
    Ruissalo

    Ruissalo

    Ruissalo (Finnish; Runsala in Swedish) is an island in the Archipelago Sea and a district of the city of Turku, Finland. The island is located to the south-west of the city, between Hirvensalo and Pansio in the mainland. It is rather sparsely populated, having a population of only 126 (as of 2004), with an annual growth rate of 3.97%. One of the largest old oak forests in Finland is situated in the island and many parts of it are included in nature conservation programs. In the westernmost part of the island there is a spa and a camping area. Turku golf course is situated also here. The Botanical garden of University of Turku is situated in the middle of the island. Near the southern tip of the western part of the island is a small, unofficial nude beach. Official nude beaches in Finland can only be found in Helsinki and in Pori. 15.08% of the district's population are under 15 years old, while 13.49% are over 65. The district's linguistic makeup is 88.89% Finnish, 8.73% Swedish, and 2.38% other. The island is probably most famous as the venue of the annual rock festival Ruisrock. Paavo Nurmi Marathon route goes through Ruissalo.
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    1 votes
    220
    Sumbawa

    Sumbawa

    • Island Group: Lesser Sunda Islands
    Sumbawa is an Indonesian island, located in the middle of the Lesser Sunda Islands chain, with Lombok to the west, Flores to the east, and Sumba further to the southeast. It is in the province of West Nusa Tenggara. Sumbawa is 15,448 km or 5,965 sq mi (three times the size of Lombok) with a current population of around 1.33 million. It marks the boundary between the islands to the west, which were influenced by religion and culture spreading from India, and the region to the east that was not so influenced. In particular this applies to both Hinduism and Islam. Four principalities in western Sumbawa were dependencies of the Majapahit Empire of eastern Java. Because of Sumbawa's natural resources it was regularly invaded by outside forces – Japanese, Dutch, Makassarese. The Dutch first arrived in 1605, but did not effectively rule Sumbawa until the early 20th century. The Balinese kingdom of Gelgel ruled western Sumbawa for a short period as well. It was also home to the Sultanate of Bima. Historical evidence indicates that people on Sumbawa island were known in the East Indies for their honey, horses, sappan wood for producing red dye, and sandalwood used for incense and
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    1 votes
    221
    Tiber Island

    Tiber Island

    • Body Of Water: Tiber
    The Tiber Island (Italian: Isola Tiberina, Latin: Insula Tiberina) is one of the two islands in the Tiber river, which runs through Rome; the other, much larger one is called Isola Sacra and is near the mouth of the river at Ostia. Tiber island is located in the southern bend of the Tiber. It is boat-shaped, approximately 270 m long and 67 m wide, and has been connected with bridges to both sides of the river since antiquity. Being a seat of the ancient temple of Asclepius and later a hospital, the island is associated with medicine and healing. The island has been linked to the rest of Rome by two bridges since antiquity, and was once called Insula Inter-Duos-Pontes which means "the island between the two bridges". The Ponte Fabricio, the only original bridge in Rome, connects the island from the northeast to the Field of Mars in the rione Sant'Angelo (left bank). The Ponte Cestio, of which only some original parts survived, connects the island to Trastevere on the south (right bank). There is a legend which says that after the fall of the hated tyrant Tarquinius Superbus (510 BC), the angry Romans threw his body into the Tiber. His body then settled onto the bottom where dirt and
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    1 votes
    222
    Ushant

    Ushant

    • Body Of Water: English Channel
    Ushant, increasingly known in English by the French name Ouessant ( /ˈʌʃənt/; Breton: Enez Eusa, French: Ouessant) is an island at the south-western end of the English Channel which marks the north-westernmost point of metropolitan France. It belongs to Brittany and is in the traditional region of Bro-Leon. Administratively, Ushant is a commune in the Finistère department. It is the only place in Brittany with a separate name in English. Ushant marks a southern limit of the Celtic Sea and the southern entrance to the western English Channel, the northern entrance being the Isles of Scilly, southwest of Land's End in Cornwall, England. Although it is sometimes considered an island in the English Channel, it does not form part of the Channel Islands. According to the definitions of the International Hydrographic Organization the island lies outside the English Channel and is in the Celtic Sea. The island is a rocky landmass some 8 km (5.0 mi) by 3 km (1.9 mi) with a total area of 15 km (5.8 sq mi). Ushant is famous for its maritime past, both as a fishing community and as a key landmark in the Channel approaches. It is named in the refrain of the sea shanty "Spanish Ladies": Several
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    1 votes
    223
    Ilhéu de Sal-Rei

    Ilhéu de Sal-Rei

    Ilhéu de Sal Rei (in Cape Verdean Creole, written in ALUPEC: Djeu d Sal Rei) is an islet located 1 km west of Sal Rei and nearly 1 km southwest of its nearest point of Boa Vista Island (which includes Praia de Chaves) in Cape Verde. They are administratively a part of the municipality of Boa Vista. The islet is of volcanic origin. The islet contains dry grasslands and features bushes and grasslands, most of the island are filled with beach sands as well as rocky soils. Its length is 1.5 kilometre from northwest to southeast and approximately 500 metres from southwest to northeast. The island also features a lighthouse and it sits by a rocky shoreline in the island's northwesternmost point. The small strait lies to the northeast. Its extremities of the island includes Ponta do Sul to the southeast. The south of the island including the Portuguese fort Duque de Bragança in which in 1818, a pirate ship from South America seized the fort. Today it is laid in ruins. The islet can definitely be seen from the western part of Boa Vista including the Praia da Chave and the town of Sal Rei, it cannot be seen from Rabil since a part of the area blocks its view, the islet can also be seen from
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    Crozier Island

    Crozier Island

    Crozier Island (Danish: Crozier Ø) is one of three islands located in Kennedy Channel of Nares Strait in the high Arctic, and is part of Greenland. Its two sister islands are Franklin Island and Hans Island. The former is also part of Greenland, whilst the latter's ownership is disputed between Greenland and Canada. It is the southernmost island in Kennedy Channel. It fronts Lafayette Bugt and is reported to be easily identified. The cliffs at its southwest side rise to a height of 60 m (200 ft). It is named after the Irish-born, British naval officer Francis Rawdon Moira Crozier second-in-command (and commander after Franklin's death) of John Franklin's ill-fated Naval Northwest Passage Expedition, 1845–1848, by Elisha Kent Kane between 1854 and 1855 during his second Grinnell Expedition, after it was sighted by Hans Hendrik and the American William Morton in June 1854.
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    Dover Island

    Dover Island

    Dover Island an island located one mile (1.6 km) off the shore of West Dover, Nova Scotia. It is considered by many to be the best bouldering area around Nova Scotia and the premier bouldering destination in Atlantic Canada. Dover Island has a combination of quality bouldering problems and breathtaking scenery. It is home to over 100 bouldering problems concentrated in a tiny area ranging from V0 to V10, with many new problems yet to be discovered. It is also a vacation spot, occasionally hosting weddings. Dover Island has 13 known rare and endangered species including one of the highest concentrations of the Slender Blue Flag Iris and it is suspected to have at least 50 rare and endangered species. Most locals traditionally arranged transportation to the island with a local fisherman/blacksmith named Norm, until his retirement in 2011. As of May 2012, boat service for climbers was provided by the proprietor of a local bed and breakfast, Ocean Spray B&B. washed out to sea. Climb Nova Scotia hosts Boulderfest every year on Dover Island. Boulderfest is a popular event that usually sells out within the first day of ticket sales. Climb Nova Scotia Halifax Bouldering Climb Eastern
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    Resolution Island

    Resolution Island

    • Island Group: Canadian Arctic Archipelago
    Resolution Island is one of the many uninhabited Canadian Arctic islands in Qikiqtaaluk Region, Nunavut. It is a Baffin Island offshore island located in Hudson Strait. It has an area of 1,015 km (392 sq mi). The Lower Savage Islands lie between Resolution Island and Baffin Island, while Graves Strait separates Resolution Island from the more northern Edgell Island. English explorer Martin Frobisher landed on the island on July 28, 1576, while on a voyage to discover the fabled Northwest Passage. The island was home to an American military base, now CFS Resolution Island, that became operational in 1954 as part of the Distant Early Warning (DEW) line. The base was vacated in 1973 and turned over to the Canadian government in 1974. It was during site investigations between 1987 and 1990 that contamination at the site was first discovered. The contamination originates largely from spills from the radar equipment, which used polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) as insulators. Other pollutants include unused transformer fluids, hydrocarbons, asbestos and heavy metals in the buildings and sprinkled throughout the site. Resolution Island has been identified as having the highest level of PCB
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    Segula Island

    Segula Island

    • Island Group: Aleutian Islands
    Segula Island (Aleut: Chiĝulax̂) is an island in the Rat Islands archipelago of the western Aleutian Islands, Alaska. It consists of a Holocene stratovolcano, called Segula Volcano. Segula Island is three to four miles in diameter, and is located about 15 miles (24 km) east of Kiska Island. The island supports a large auklet colony; one of only nine in the Aleutian Island chain. Along with the other Rat Islands, Segula Island has a cool, wet, marine climate. Frequently, it snows from October to May off and on. The Rat Islands also lie in the path of major Pacific storms bringing winds of up to 100 miles (161 km) per hour. Segula hosts vegetation typical to the Aleutian Islands, largely moss, lichens, and heath, in addition to sedges, grass, fungi, various herbs, fern, and flowering plants such as Narcissus anemone, lupines, and orchids.
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    Yapen

    Yapen

    Yapen (also Japen, Jobi) is an island of western New Guinea, Indonesia. The Yapen Strait separates Yapen and the Biak Islands to the north. It is in Cenderawasih Bay. To the west is Mios Num Strait between it and Mios Num Island, and the east Kurudu Island. The southeast are the Amboi Islands and the southwest are the Kuran Islands. It is populated with communities of Yobi, Randowaya, Serui, and Ansus. Its highest point is 1,496 m.
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    Aegina

    Aegina

    • Island Group: Saronic Islands
    • Body Of Water: Saronic Gulf
    Aegina ( /ɨˈdʒaɪnə/; Greek: Αίγινα - Aígina [ˈeʝina]) is one of the Saronic Islands of Greece in the Saronic Gulf, 17 miles (27 km) from Athens. Tradition derives the name from Aegina, the mother of Aeacus, who was born on and ruled the island. During ancient times Aegina was a rival to Athens, the great sea power of the era. The municipality of Aegina consists of the island of Aegina and a few offshore islets. It is part of the Islands regional unit, Attica region. The municipality is subdivided into the following five communities (population in 2001 in brackets): The capital is the town of Aegina, situated at the northwestern end of the island. Due to its proximity to Athens, it is a popular quick getaway during the summer months, with quite a few Athenians owning second houses on the island. The province of Aegina (Greek: Επαρχία Αίγινας) was one of the provinces of the Piraeus Prefecture. Its territory corresponded with that of the current municipalities Aegina and Agkistri. It was abolished in 2006. Aegina is roughly triangular in shape, approximately 15 km (9.3 mi) from east to west and 10 km (6.2 mi) from north to south, with an area of about 87 km (34 sq mi). An extinct
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    Água de Pena

    Água de Pena

    Água de Pena is a civil parish in the municipality of Machico in the Portuguese archipelago of Madeira. In 2001, the population hovered around 1759 residents, in a flat escarpment extending 1.74 kilometres into an area of 5.15 km² along the south-east coast of the island of Madeira. The area of Água de Pena was first sited by the crew and explorers with João Gonçalves Zarco after he disembarked along the coastal spillway of Machico, likely around July 1419; the escarpment of Penedo overlook the beach of Machico, and the crew encamped in the shadow of the promontory overnight, before exploring the island the next day. Father Gaspar Frutuoso later recounted: It was this second parish that made the discoverers call port on this ignored island. The Porto do Seixo was written into the history of the discoveries as the first locality visited by the discoveres on the second day of their exploration along the coast. But, it is unclear the origin of the parish's name; there are various hypothesises. Some indicate that the primitive name was actually Água de Penha and not Pena: a common mistake/corruption during the era. The use of penha (English: rock) is a better translation for the
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    Bere Island

    Bere Island

    • Body Of Water: Bantry Bay
    Bere Island or Bear Island (Irish: Oiléan Béarra, meaning "bear island", although officially called An tOileán Mór meaning "the big island") is an island off the west coast of County Cork, Ireland. It is roughly 11 km x 5 km in dimension and has a population of 210. Legend says that the island was named by a 2nd Century king of Munster, Mogh Nuadat, in honour of his wife, Beara, the daughter of Heber Mor, King of Castile. The island is located in Bantry Bay in the western part of County Cork, about 1.5 km off the port of Castletownbere. It is served by two ferries, which can carry light vehicles. The highest point on the island is Knockanallig (270m). The main harbour is Lawrence Cove, near the main village of Rerrin (Raerainn), toward the eastern end of the island. The church and its graveyard are located in Ballinakilla. The current population is approximately 200, but the past population was significantly higher. At the time of the 1841 census the population was 2,122 but by the 1851 census the population had decreased to 1,454 due to An Gorta Mór. The population decline continued in line with the national trend for emigration throughout the 19th and 20th centuries. Unlike many
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    Dänholm

    Dänholm

    Dänholm (literally Danes' Isle) is a small island on the German coast of the Baltic Sea. It is situated in the Strelasund just east of Stralsund. Both bridges linking Rügen with the mainland, Rügendamm and Rügenbrücke, run over it. The island was the scene of an incident between the Swedish and French armies in 1807, when it belonged to Swedish Pomerania. This article is fully or partially based on material from Nordisk familjebok, 1904-1926.
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    Davaar Island

    Davaar Island

    • Island Group: Islands of the Clyde
    Davaar Island or Island Davaar (Scottish Gaelic: Eilean Dà Bhàrr) is located at the mouth of Campbeltown Loch off the east coast of Kintyre, in Argyll and Bute, Scotland. It is a tidal island, linked to the mainland by a natural shingle causeway called the Dhorlin near Campbeltown at low tide. The crossing can be made in around 40 minutes. Davaar was known as the island of Sanct Barre between the years 1449 to 1508. The modern form Davaar is from older Do Bharre - thy St Barre. Dr Gillies in his "Place Names of Argyll" appears to accept the popular derivation, Double-pointed (Da-Bharr) Island. In 1854, a Lighthouse was built on the north of the island by the lighthouse engineers David and Thomas Stevenson. The lighthouse was automated in 1983, and today, Davaar is inhabited by caretakers, sheep, goats and mink. The island is also known for its seven caves, one of which contains a life size cave painting depicting the crucifixion, painted in 1887 by local artist Archibald MacKinnon after he had a vision in a dream suggesting him to do so. The painting caused uproar in the area as it was seen as a sign from God; it is said that when the townsfolk discovered it was MacKinnon, and not
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    Dikson

    Dikson

    • Body Of Water: Kara Sea
    Dikson Island (Russian: Ди́ксон), initially Dickson, is the name of an island in Taymyrsky Dolgano-Nenetsky District (Russian: Таймы́рский Долга́но-Не́нецкий райо́н), Krasnoyarsk Krai, Russia, situated in the Kara Sea near the mouth of the Yenisei River. A nearby urban-type settlement of Dikson, which functions as a port and hydrometeorological centre is located on the mainland across from the island. It is served by the Dikson Airport. Dikson Island and its adjoining urban settlement have been named after Swedish Arctic pioneer Baron Oscar Dickson. In the 17th century the island was known as Dolgy ("long") island, or Kuzkin, after its Pomor discoverer. In 1875, the Swedish explorer Adolf Erik Nordenskiöld renamed it for the wealthy Swedish merchant and philanthropist of Scottish origin Oskar Dickson. The name was soon Russified, by dropping the "c". Dikson has been the official name of the island since 1884. Oscar Dickson, along with Aleksandr Mikhaylovich Sibiryakov, had been the patron of a number of early Arctic expeditions, including Adolf Erik Nordenskiöld's Russian Arctic explorations. In 1915 the island became the site of the first Russian radio station in the Arctic. The
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    Flores

    Flores

    • Island Group: Lesser Sunda Islands
    Flores is one of the Lesser Sunda Islands, an island arc with an estimated area of 14,300 km² extending east from the Java island of Indonesia. The population was 1,831,000 in the 2010 census and the largest town is Maumere. Flores is Portuguese for "flowers". Flores is located east of Sumbawa and Komodo and west of Lembata and the Alor Archipelago. To the southeast is Timor. To the south, across the Sumba strait, is Sumba and to the north, beyond the Flores Sea, is Sulawesi. On 12 December 1992, an earthquake measuring 7.8 on the Richter scale occurred, killing 2,500 people in and around Maumere, including islands off the North coast. In September 2004, at Liang Bua Cave in western Flores, paleoanthropologists discovered small skeletons that they described as a previously unknown hominid species, Homo floresiensis. These are informally named hobbits and appear to have stood about 1 m (3.3 ft) tall. The most complete individual (LB1) is dated as 18,000 years old. Portuguese traders and missionaries came to Flores in the 16th century, mainly to Larantuka and Sikka. Their influence is still discernible in Sikka's language, culture and religion. The Dominican order was extremely
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    Fogo Island

    Fogo Island

    Fogo Island is the largest of the offshore islands of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. It lies off the northeast coast of Newfoundland, northwest of Musgrave Harbour across Hamilton Sound, just east of Change Islands. The island is about 25 km long and 14 km wide. The total area is 237.71 km² (91.78 sq mi). The island had a population of 2,706 people in the 2006 census. Though migratory French fishers visited Fogo Island from the early 1500s until 1718, the first permanent settlement of the island took place in the 18th century. Fogo Harbour and Tilting Harbour were the first settlements on the island. The English and Irish descendants of the first inhabitants retained traces of their Elizabethan English and Old Irish dialects which can be heard on the island today. The island has many ancient folk customs brought from England and Ireland that are now disappearing. Fogo Island is one of the oldest named features on the coast of Newfoundland. The Bertius map from 1606 shows Fogo Island as one of only about a dozen important features around the coast of Newfoundland. On French maps of the 16th to 18th centuries the island is referred to as Ile des Fougues. The island was likely
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    Great Island

    Great Island

    • Body Of Water: Casco Bay
    Sebascodegan Island or Great Island is an island at the eastern edge of Casco Bay on the Gulf of Maine. It is a part of the town of Harpswell with the mainland portion of Harpswell to its west and Orr's Island and Bailey Island to its south. The town of Brunswick occupies the mainland to the north, and the towns of West Bath and Phippsburg occupy the mainland to the east, across the New Meadows River.
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    Île des Cygnes

    Île des Cygnes

    • Body Of Water: Seine
    Île aux Cygnes (French pronunciation: [il o siɲ]; English: Isle of the Swans) is a small island in the Seine in Paris, France, located in the 15th and 16th arrondissement. It is an artificially created island, formed in 1827 to protect the port of Grenelle. It should not be confused with an earlier Île des Cygnes which was attached to the Champ de Mars in the late 18th century. The narrow island is 850 metres (2,789 ft) long and 11 metres (36 ft) at its widest point. A tree-lined walkway, named "l'Allée des Cygnes", runs the length of the island. The island is served by the Passy and Bir-Hakeim Métro stations. It is crossed by three bridges: the Pont de Grenelle, the Pont Rouelle and the Pont de Bir-Hakeim. A notable feature is a one-fourth scale replica of the Statue of Liberty, 22 metres high and facing west in the direction of its larger sibling in New York City. This monument, which was inaugurated by French President Marie François Sadi Carnot on 4 July 1889 (nearly three years after its counterpart), was given to the city of Paris by the American community of Paris, commemorating the centennial of the French Revolution. The statue initially faced east, toward the Eiffel
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    Isle of Arran

    Isle of Arran

    • Island Group: British Isles
    • Body Of Water: Firth of Clyde
    Arran or the Isle of Arran (Scots Gaelic: Eilean Arainn) is the largest island in the Firth of Clyde, Scotland. With an area of 432 square kilometres (167 sq mi) it is the seventh largest Scottish island. It is in the unitary council area of North Ayrshire. In the 2001 census it had a resident population of 5,058. Although it is culturally and physically similar to the Hebrides, it is separated from them by the Kintyre peninsula. Arran is mountainous and has been described as a "geologist's paradise". Arran has been continuously inhabited since the early Neolithic period, and numerous prehistoric remains have been found. From the 6th century onwards, Goidelic-speaking peoples from Ireland colonised the island and it became a centre of religious activity. During the troubled Viking Age, Arran became the property of the Norwegian crown before becoming formally absorbed by the kingdom of Scotland in the 13th century. The 19th century "clearances" led to significant depopulation and the end of the Gaelic language and way of life. The economy and population have recovered in recent years, the main industry being tourism. There is diversity of wildlife, including three species of tree
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    Kau Sai Chau

    Kau Sai Chau

    Kau Sai Chau (Chinese: 滘西洲) is an island located off the coast of Sai Kung of Hong Kong, with an area of 6.70 km², making it the 6th largest island of Hong Kong. It is under the administration of Sai Kung District. Kau Sai Chau is located south of the Sai Kung Peninsula. Its northern shore forms part of the soutern limit of Port Shelter, of which it is the largest island. Kau Sai Chau is connected in the north by a breakwater to the smaller island Yim Tin Tsai. The southern tip of the island is separated by a narrow channel from Jin Island (Tiu Chung Chau). It has a maximum elevation of 216 m. The Jockey Club Kau Sai Chau Public Golf Course, developed and run by the Hong Kong Jockey Club, is the only public golf course in Hong Kong. Opened in 1995, it occupies approximately the northern half of the island. It comprises three 18-hole golf courses: the North and South Courses were designed by Gary Player, while Nelson & Haworth designed the East Course. Kau Sai Village is a small fishing hamlet with about ten houses. It is located at the southern tip of the island. Two declared monuments of Hong Kong are located on Kau Sai Chau: a prehistoric rock carving and a Hung Shing Temple: The
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    Kiwayu

    Kiwayu

    Kiwayuu (alternate spelling Kiwayu) is a small island in the eastern part of the Lamu Archipelago, situated in the Kiunga Marine National Reserve. The main economic activity is fishing, and there is one school, no clinic and one well on the island. The main attraction for tourists on Kiwayuu are the tidal pools and snorkeling/diving pools located on the eastern side of the island (the Indian Ocean side). The nearest hospital is on Lamu Island outside of Lamu town. To get to Kiwayuu from Lamu, you must take a dhow (7 hour trip) or a motor boat (2 hour trip).
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    Kolari (island), Russia

    Kolari (island), Russia

    • Body Of Water: Baltic Sea
    Bolshoi Tyuters (Russian: Большой Тютерс; Finnish: Tytärsaari; Estonian: Suur Tütarsaar; Swedish: Tyterskär) is an island in the Gulf of Finland of the Baltic Sea, located 75 km away from the coast of Finland, to the south-east from Hogland. The island is a part of the Leningrad Oblast, Russia. The area is approximately 8.3 km². There are no permanent inhabitants, save for a lighthouse keeper. From the 16th century to 1939, it was populated by Finns. After the Soviet Union had attacked Finland in the Winter War, the island along with other Finnish islands in the Gulf of Finland and communities in Finnish Karelia had to be ceded to Soviet Union 1940. It was a lively Finnish fisher and trading community with population 436 (1939). Many cargo and fishing ships were registered to the island. It had a 1772 built wooden church, Finnish graveyard, school, 1904 built lighthouse, Finnish Coast Guard station and weather forecast station. Tourism was growing livelihood in 1920-39. Islanders were among the Finnish evacuees. After the war they were not permitted to return back to their homes like the rest of 422,000 Soviet evicted Finns. The name Tytärsaari means in Finnish - "Daughter Island"
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    Lokrum

    Lokrum

    • Body Of Water: Adriatic Sea
    Lokrum (pronounced [lɔ̌krum], Italian: Lacroma) is an island in the Adriatic Sea 600 metres from the city of Dubrovnik, Croatia. It stretches from northwest to southeast and receives regular ferry service from the city. Austrian archduke (and short-lived Emperor of Mexico) Maximilian once had a holiday home on the island. A monastery and a botanical garden survive from his era. On the island's highest point at 96 m. above sea level stands Fort Royal Castle, which was built by the French, though it was later named "Maximilian's Tower" by the Austrians. The first written mention of Lokrum was in 1023 when the Benedictine abbey and monastery were founded. The name Lokrum comes from the Latin, 'acrumen', meaning sour fruit. This derives from the tradition of cultivating exotic plants on the island, a tradition started in the time of the Benedictines. The last Benedictines left the island in 1808. Local legend says that on their last night, the monks put a curse on the island and anyone who tried to seek it for their own in the future. According to legend, Richard the Lionheart was shipwrecked in 1192 after returning home from the crusades and was cast safely ashore on Lokrum. He
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    Mayaguana

    Mayaguana

    Mayaguana is the most easterly island and district of the Bahamas. It is one of only a few Bahamian islands which retain their Lucayan names. The population of Mayaguana in the 2000 census was 259, amounting to an estimate 312 in 2010. It has an area of about 280 km². About 100 km north of Inagua and 560 km south of the capital Nassau, Mayaguana is considered the halfway point between South Florida and Puerto Rico and is about 450 nautical miles off Palm Beach, Florida. It is a popular stopover for yachtsmen on a direct route to the Caribbean. Mayaguana was inhabited by Lucayans prior to the arrival of the Spanish following 1492. After the last of the Lucayans were carried off to Hispaniola by the Spanish early in the 16th century, the island remained uninhabited until 1812, when people began to migrate from the Turks and Caicos Islands, which are located about 100 km southeast. The Brazilan historian Francisco Adolfo de Varnhagen suggested in 1824 that Mayaguana is Guanahani, the first island visited by Christopher Columbus at his discovery of the Americas. His theory has found little support. Mayaguana apparently was the Lucayan name (meaning "Lesser Midwestern Land" ) for the
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    Monito Island

    Monito Island

    Monito Island (Little Mona) is an uninhabited island about 5 kilometers northwest of much larger Mona Island. Monito is the masculine diminutive form of Mona in Spanish. It is one of three islands in the Mona Passage, and part of the Isla de Mona e Islote Monito barrio, a subdivision of the municipality of Mayagüez, Puerto Rico. It is inaccessible by sea, barren, reaches 65 m in height, and measures 0.147 km² (0.0566 sq mi, or 36.25 acres) in area. The flora of Monito Island consists of 37 species, 36 genera, and 23 families; the largest families are Cactaceae, Poaceae and Malvaceae. The low number of species, less than 9% of the number for Mona Island, is due to several factors: Monito’s small size, less than 0.3% of the area of Mona; its low habitat diversity, in particular the absence of beach habitat, depression or bajuras, etc.; and a scarcity of exotic species. At the same time nesting birds, specially the Brown Booby, cause disturbance. The weedy taxa found are associated with openings among the shrubs where birds are nesting. The absence of readily dispersed species common in Mona’s plateau vegetation (orchids, for example) is notable. The southern and western portions are
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    Pabbay, Harris, Scotland

    Pabbay, Harris, Scotland

    • Island Group: Outer Hebrides
    Pabbay (Scottish Gaelic: Pabaigh) is an uninhabited island in the Outer Hebrides of Scotland which lies in the Sound of Harris between Harris and North Uist. The name comes from Papey, which is Norse for "Island of the papar (Culdee)" The island was once very fertile, supporting a three-figure population and exporting corn, barley and illicit whisky. Most of the stewards of St. Kilda were Pabbay men. The island was cleared for sheep in 1846.
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    Polyaigos

    Polyaigos

    • Island Group: Cyclades
    • Body Of Water: Aegean Sea
    Polýaigos (Greek: Πολύαιγος) is an uninhabited Greek island in the Cyclades near Milos and Kimolos. It is part of the community of Kimolos (Κοινότητα Κιμώλου). Its name means "many goats", since it is inhabited only by goats. Along its longest axis, it is 6 kilometres (4 mi) and among its shortest 4.3 kilometres (3 mi) wide. It has a surface area of approx. 18 km (7 sq mi) and a coastal length of 22-27 km. It is very close to the island of Kimolos (2 km north west from Polyaigos) and to the island of Milos (6.2 km west from Polyaigos). There are two mounts, Stroggylo which rises to 330 metres (1,083 ft) and Psilo Vouno (370 metres (1,214 ft)). The island is to a great extent privately owned by the Greek Orthodox church, which sublets parts of it to local herdsmen from the nearby islands of Milos and Kimolos. Its goat population maintains Polyaigos as a barren island. It has, however, some magnificent beaches, mainly on the southern part of the island, as well as many sea-surface caves, which serve as a refuge to a dwindling population of mediterranean monk seals (monachus-monachus).
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    Sumatra

    Sumatra

    • Island Group: Sunda Arc
    Sumatra (Indonesian: Sumatera) is an island in western Indonesia, westernmost of the Sunda Islands. It is the largest island entirely in Indonesia (two larger islands, Borneo and New Guinea, are shared between Indonesia and other countries) and the sixth largest island in the world at 473,481 km with a population of 50,365,538. Its biggest city is Medan with a population of 2,109,330. Sumatra forms an elongated landmass spanned diagonal northwest — southeast axis. The Indian Ocean borders the west, northwest and southwest sides of Sumatra with the island chain of Simeulue, Nias and Mentawai bordering along the southwestern coast. On the northeast side the narrow Strait of Malacca separates the island from the Malay Peninsula, an extension of Eurasian continent. On the southeast the narrow Sunda Strait separates Sumatra from Java. The northern tip of Sumatra borders the Andaman islands, while on the lower eastern side are the islands of Bangka and Belitung, Karimata Strait and the Java Sea. The Bukit Barisan mountains, which contain several active volcanoes, form the backbone of the island, while the northeast sides are outlying lowlands with swamps, mangrove and complex river
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    Trindade and Martim Vaz

    Trindade and Martim Vaz

    Trindade and Martim Vaz is an archipelago located about 1,200 kilometers (740 mi) east of Vitória in the Southern Atlantic Ocean, belonging to the State of Espírito Santo, Southeast Brazil. The archipelago has a total area of 10.4 km² (4.0 sq mi) and a population of 32 (Brazilian Navy personnel). The archipelago consists of five islands and several rocks and stacks; Trindade is the largest island, with an area of 10.1 km² (3.9 sq mi); about 49 km (30 miles) east of it are the tiny Martim Vaz islets, with a total area of 0.3 km² (30 hectares). The islands are of volcanic origin and have rugged terrain. They are largely barren, except for the southern part of Trindade. They were discovered in 1502 by Portuguese explorer Estêvão da Gama and stayed Portuguese until they became part of Brazil at its independence. From 1890 to 1896, Trindade was occupied by the United Kingdom until an agreement with Brazil was reached. During the period of British occupation, Trindade was known as "South Trinidad." The individual islands with their respective locations are given in the following: The small island of Trindade, with an area of 10.3 km², lies at the eastern end of an E-W-trending chain of
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    Ward's Island

    Ward's Island

    • Body Of Water: East River
    Wards Island is situated in the East River in New York City. Administratively it is part of the borough of Manhattan. It is bridged by rail to the borough of Queens by the Hell Gate Bridge and it is joined to Randall's Island to the north by landfill. The two islands together are run by the Randall's Island Sports Foundation under a partnership agreement with the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation. Together, the two islands form New York County's Census Tract 240, which had a total population of 1,386 living on 2.2 km of land area, according to the United States Census, 2000. Viaducts leading to the Triborough Bridge and Hell Gate bridges pass overhead. Vehicular access is by the Little Hell Gate bridge from Randall's Island, while a narrow pedestrian and bicycling bridge, Wards Island Bridge, links the island to the east side of Manhattan in Harlem. The island is home to several public facilities, including The New York State Office of Mental Health Manhattan Psychiatric Center, Kirby Forensic Psychiatric Center (which serves the criminally insane) which is patrolled by the New York State Office of Mental Health Police, and a New York City Department of Environmental
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