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Best Illustrator of All Time

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    1
    E. H. Shepard

    E. H. Shepard

    • Books illustrated: When We Were Very Young
    Ernest Howard Shepard (10 December 1879 – 24 March 1976) was an English artist and book illustrator. He was known especially for his human-like animals in illustrations for The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame and Winnie-the-Pooh by A. A. Milne. Shepard was born in St John's Wood, London. Having shown some promise in drawing at St Paul's School, Shepard enrolled in Heatherleys School of Fine Art in Chelsea. Having spent a productive year there, Shepard won a scholarship to the Royal Academy Schools where he would meet Florence Eleanor Chaplin who would become his first wife. By 1906 Shepard had become a successful illustrator, having produced work for illustrated editions of Aesop's Fables, David Copperfield, and Tom Brown's Schooldays, as well as an illustration for Punch. In 1915, Shepard received a commission in the Royal Artillery. By 1916 Shepard started working for the Intelligence Department sketching the combat area within the view of his battery position. In 1918 he was awarded the Military Cross for his service in World War I. Throughout the war he had been contributing to Punch. He was hired as a regular staff cartoonist in 1921 and became lead cartoonist in 1945
    8.57
    7 votes
    2

    Nicolas Sidjakov

    • Books illustrated: Baboushka and the Three Kings
    Nicholas Sidjakov (born December 16, 1924 in Riga, Latvia) is a Latvian-American illustrator of children's books. He studied at the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris, and moved to the United States in 1954. His first book was published in 1957, and in 1961, he won the Caldecott Medal for Baboushka and the Three Kings.
    7.50
    8 votes
    3

    Lynd Ward

    • Books illustrated: The Biggest Bear
    Lynd Kendall Ward (26 June 1905 – 28 June 1985) was an American artist and storyteller, and son of Methodist minister and prominent political organizer Harry F. Ward. He illustrated some 200 juvenile and adult books. Ward was best known for his wood engraving and is considered one of the founders of the American graphic novel but he also worked in watercolor, oil, brush and ink, lithography and mezzotint. Ward spent his childhood in Illinois, Massachusetts and New Jersey. When he was in the first grade, Ward discovered that his last name spelled "draw" backwards, and decided that he wanted to be an artist. He studied fine arts at Columbia Teachers' College in New York. There he met his future wife, May McNeer, and they were married shortly after their graduation in 1926. The first year of their marriage was spent in Europe, where Ward studied printmaking and book design at the National Academy of Graphic Arts in Leipzig, Germany. While browsing in a bookstore in Leipzig, Ward came upon a book by the Belgian engraver Frans Masereel which told a story in woodcuts. This was the spark which inspired Ward to create his first graphic novel, Gods' Man, published in October 1929, the same
    7.25
    8 votes
    4
    John Sell Cotman

    John Sell Cotman

    • Book editions illustrated: Paradise regained
    • Books illustrated: Liber Studiorum: A Series of Sketches and Studies
    John Sell Cotman (16 May 1782 – 24 July 1842) was an English marine and landscape painter, etcher, illustrator and author, a leading member of the Norwich school of artists. Cotman was born in Norwich, England, on 16 May 1782, the eldest son of a prosperous silk merchant and lace dealer, and was educated at the Free Grammar School. He showed a talent for art from an early age and would often go out on frequent drawing trips into the surrounding countryside. His father intended him to go into the family business but instead, intent on a career in art, he moved to London in 1797-8, initially making a living through commissions from print-sellers. He came under the patronage of Dr. Thomas Monro, physician to Bridewell and the Bethlehem Hospital, whose house in Adelphi Terrace was also a studio and a meeting place for artists. There Cotman made the acquaintance of J M W Turner, Peter de Wint and Thomas Girtin - the last, in particular, becoming a very influential figure in his artistic development. He joined a sketching club started by Girtin, and went on drawing expeditions to Wales and Surrey. In 1800, at the age of eighteen, Cotman exhibited at the Royal Academy for the first time,
    7.83
    6 votes
    5
    Anthony Browne

    Anthony Browne

    Anthony Edward Tudor Browne (born 11 September 1946) is a British author and illustrator of children's books, with nearly forty titles to his name. He won the international, biennial Hans Christian Andersen Award for career contribution to children's literature in 2000, the first British illustrator to do so. From 2009 to 2011 he was Children's Laureate. Browne won two Kate Greenaway Medals from the Library Association, recognising the year's best children's book illustration, and his 1983 winner Gorilla was named one of the top ten winning works for the 50th anniversary of the Medal (1955–2005), selected by a panel to compose the ballot for a public election of the all-time favourite. Anthony Browne was born in Sheffield, Yorkshire. His parents, Jack and Doris May Browne, owned a pub near Bradford, Yorkshire, and Browne and his older brother Michael grew up there. As a young boy, he enjoyed art, and used to draw with his father. He also played rugby in school, as well as football and cricket. His future ambition was to be a journalist, a cartoonist, or a boxer. He studied graphic design at Leeds College of Art, where he graduated in 1967. He intended to become a painter, but being
    7.50
    6 votes
    6
    George Cattermole

    George Cattermole

    • Books illustrated: Barnaby Rudge
    George Cattermole (10 August 1800 – 24 July 1868) was an English painter and illustrator, chiefly in watercolours. He was a friend of Charles Dickens and many other literary and artistic figures. He was born at Dickleburgh, near Diss, Norfolk. At the age of fourteen he began working as an architectural and topographical draughtsman; afterwards he contributed designs to be engraved in the annuals then so popular; thence he progressed into water-colour painting, becoming an associate of the Royal Watercolour Society in 1822, and a full member in 1833. In 1850 he withdrew from active connection with this society, and took to painting in oil. His most fertile period was between 1833 and 1850. At the Paris Exhibition of 1855 he received one of the five first-class gold medals awarded to British painters. He also enjoyed professional honors in Amsterdam and in Belgium. Among his leading works are The Murder of the Bishop of Liege, The Armourer relating the Story of the Sword, The Assassination of the Regent Murray by Hamilton of Bothwellhaugh, and (in oil) A Terrible Secret. He was largely employed by publishers, illustrating the Waverley Novels and the Historical Annual of his brother
    7.50
    6 votes
    7

    Don Dixon

    Born in Easton, Pennsylvania in 1951, Don Dixon is an astronomical artist practicing space art in the tradition of Chesley Bonestell, who believed that scientific accuracy is a fundamental aspect of the esthetic of this genre. Space artists attempt to depict realistically parts of the universe that have not yet been explored by astronauts or robotic probes. Dixon has created cover art for Scientific American, Sky and Telescope, Omni, The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, Astronomy Magazine, and many other publications. Dixon's paintings have been used to illustrate the covers of several science fiction books, such as the Mars Trilogy by Kim Stanley Robinson and the Galactic Center Saga by Gregory Benford. He directed and co-wrote the immersive animated film Centered in the Universe, which premiered in 2006 at the Samuel Oschin Planetarium at Griffith Observatory, where he has served as Art Director since 1991. He is a founding member of the International Association of Astronomical Artists (IAAA) and was elected a Fellow of that organization in 2000. He lives in Long Beach, California. Colleague Ron Miller has described Dixon's work as "softly luminescent." Dixon's early work
    8.60
    5 votes
    8
    Larry Elmore

    Larry Elmore

    • Book edition covers: Stormblade
    • Book editions illustrated: The Legend of Huma
    Larry Elmore (born August 5, 1948 in Louisville, Kentucky) is an American fantasy artist whose work includes creating illustrations for video games, comics, magazines and fantasy books. His list of work includes illustrations for Dungeons & Dragons, Dragonlance, and the comic strip series SnarfQuest. He is author of the book Reflections of Myth. Elmore was born August 5, 1948 in Louisville, Kentucky, and grew up in Grayson County in midwestern Kentucky. Elmore describes his schools days by saying "The rural school I attended didn't have any art program, so I spent my time drawing - and daydreaming. I was a pretty bad student. ... I was always getting into trouble for drawing in class. I wish I had a quarter for every drawing of mine a teacher destroyed." He majored in art at Western Kentucky University. A month after graduating from college, Elmore was drafted into the U.S. Army and stationed in Germany. While in the army, he drove a tank. After getting out of the service, Elmore worked as an illustrator for the United States government for the Fort Knox Training Aids Department. Three years later, Elmore turned to freelance work, getting his art published in National Lampoon and
    9.50
    4 votes
    9
    Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

    Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

    • Books illustrated: The Little Prince
    Antoine de Saint-Exupéry (French pronunciation: [ɑ̃twan də sɛ̃tɛɡzypeʁi]), officially Antoine Marie Jean-Baptiste Roger, comte de Saint Exupéry (29 June 1900 – 31 July 1944, Mort pour la France), was a French aristocrat, writer, poet, and pioneering aviator. He became a laureate of several of France's highest literary awards and also won the U.S. National Book Award. He is best remembered for his novella The Little Prince (Le Petit Prince) and for his lyrical aviation writings, including Wind, Sand and Stars and Night Flight. Saint-Exupéry was a successful commercial pilot before World War II, working airmail routes in Europe, Africa and South America. At the outbreak of war he joined the Armée de l'Air (French Air Force), flying reconnaissance missions until France's armistice with Germany in 1940. After being demobilized from the French Air Force he voyaged to the United States to convince its government to enter the war against Nazi Germany quickly. Following a 27-month hiatus in North America, during which he wrote three of his most important works, he joined the Free French Air Force in North Africa, although he was far past the maximum age for such pilots and in declining
    9.25
    4 votes
    10
    8.00
    5 votes
    11
    John Leech

    John Leech

    • Book editions illustrated: The Book of Ballads
    John Leech (29 August 1817 – 29 October 1864 in London) was an English caricaturist and illustrator. John Leech was born in London. His father, a native of Ireland, was the landlord of the London Coffee House on Ludgate Hill, "a man", on the testimony of those who knew him, "of fine culture, a profound Shakespearian, and a thorough gentleman." His mother was descended from the family of Richard Bentley. It was from his father that Leech inherited his skill with the pencil, which he began to use at a very early age. When he was only three, he was discovered by John Flaxman, who was visiting, seated on his mother's knee, drawing with much gravity. The sculptor admired his sketch, adding, "Do not let him be cramped with lessons in drawing; let his genius follow its own bent; he will astonish the world"—advice which was followed. A mail-coach, done when he was six years old, is already full of surprising vigour and variety in its galloping horses. Leech was educated at Charterhouse School, where William Makepeace Thackeray, his lifelong friend, was a fellow pupil, and at sixteen he began to study for the medical profession at St Bartholomew's Hospital, where he won praise for the
    6.83
    6 votes
    12
    M. A. R. Barker

    M. A. R. Barker

    Muhammad Abd-al-Rahman Barker (born Phillip Barker, November 3, 1929 – March 16, 2012), was a professor of Urdu and South Asian Studies who created one of the first roleplaying games, Empire of the Petal Throne, and wrote several fantasy/science fantasy novels based in his associated world setting of Tékumel. Born in Spokane, Washington, descended from ancestors who had originally settled in America in 1626, Barker's childhood was spent around Washington and Idaho. As a youth he had an interest in "fairy stories, history and literature" which would be further influenced by such films as The Thief of Bagdad; all of which helped to turn his casual "wargames" with toy soldiers more towards fantasy. From this his fictional lands of Tsolyanu and others, in what was later to become Tékumel, emerged and were embellished further in middle and high school years during which time he commenced construction of armies of hand-carved figures to represent his creations. Also at an early age, Barker's interest in languages was piqued by neighboring children of Basque origin who were able to exclude others from their secret conversations in their native tongue. In, and just before 1950, while
    6.83
    6 votes
    13
    Harry Furniss

    Harry Furniss

    • Books illustrated: Sylvie and Bruno
    Henry (Harry) Furniss (March 26, 1854 - January 14, 1925) was an artist and illustrator, born in Wexford, Ireland. His father was English and his mother Scottish, Furniss identifying himself as English. He was educated in Wesley College. His first job as an illustrator was for the Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News, and when it was purchased by the owner of The Illustrated London News he moved to that magazine. There he produced illustrations of social events such as the Boat Race, Goodwood and even the annual fancy dress ball at Brookwood Asylum, as well as acting as a special correspondent reporting on less pleasant aspects of life in contemporary England, such as the scandalous divorce trial of Lady Colin Campbell. The following extract from his autobiography gives due warning that his illustrations should not always be thought of as being produced by a witness to the events depicted. One boat race, for example, is very much like another. Some years ago I executed a panoramic series of sketches of the University Race from start to finish, and as they were urgently wanted, the drawings had to be sent in the same day. Early in the morning, before the break of fast, I found
    7.80
    5 votes
    14
    Victor Ambrus

    Victor Ambrus

    Victor Ambrus (born László Győző Ambrus, 19 August 1935, in Hungary) is a British illustrator of history, folk tale, and animal story books. He has also become known from his appearances on the Channel 4 television archaeology series Time Team, where he visualises how sites under excavation may have once looked. Ambrus is an Associate of the Royal College of Art and a Fellow of both the Royal Society of Arts and the Royal Society of Painters, Etchers and Engravers. He is also a patron of the Association of Archaeological Illustrators and Surveyors. Laszlo Gyozo Ambrus was born on 19 August 1935 in Budapest, Hungary. He continued to live in the capital, but spent many childhood holidays in the country, where he learnt to draw horses. As he grew older he became an admirer of the illustrators, Zichy, E. H. Shepard, Joyce Lankester Brisley, and of the large historical paintings which he saw in public galleries.He received his secondary education at the St Imre Cistercian College, Budapest (1945-1953), before going on to study at the Hungarian Academy of Fine Arts for three years (1953-1956), where he was given a thorough grounding in drawing, anatomy and print-making. His four-year
    7.80
    5 votes
    15
    Luke Fildes

    Luke Fildes

    • Books illustrated: The Mystery of Edwin Drood
    Sir Samuel Luke Fildes, KCVO, RA (3 October 1843 – 28 February 1927) was an English painter and illustrator born at Liverpool and trained in the South Kensington and Royal Academy schools. At the age of seventeen Luke Fildes became a student at the Warrington School of Art. Fildes moved to the South Kensington Art school where he met Hubert von Herkomer and Frank Holl. All three men became influenced by the work of Frederick Walker, the leader of the social realist movement in Britain. Fildes shared his grandmother's concern for the poor and in 1869 joined the staff of The Graphic newspaper, an illustrated weekly edited by the social reformer, William Luson Thomas. Fildes shared Thomas' belief in the power of visual images to change public opinion on subjects such as poverty and injustice. Thomas hoped that the images in the Graphic would result in individual acts of charity and collective social action. Fildes' illustrations were in the black-and-white style popular in France and Germany during the era. He worked in a social realist style, compatible with the editorial direction of The Graphic, and focussed on images depicting the destitute of London. The Graphic published an
    9.00
    4 votes
    16
    Raoul Ubac

    Raoul Ubac

    • Books illustrated: Journal d'un fantôme
    Raoul Ubac (31 August 1910, Cologne - 24 March 1985, Dieudonné, Oise) was a French painter, sculptor, photographer and engraver. In 1937, he made Tete du Mannequin, a photograph taken of a mannequin (made by André Masson) consisting of everyday objects. Another of his work's include the photograph 'La Conciliabule'. He also created a color lithograph Three Seated Nudes, signed lower right margin (edition of 200, 21" x 27 1/2").
    9.00
    4 votes
    17
    Yusuf Islam

    Yusuf Islam

    • Books illustrated: Teaser and the Firecat
    Yusuf Islam (born Steven Demetre Georgiou, 21 July 1948), commonly known by his former stage name Cat Stevens, is a British singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, educator, philanthropist, and prominent convert to Islam. His early 1970s record albums Tea for the Tillerman and Teaser and the Firecat were both certified triple platinum in the United States by the RIAA. His 1972 album Catch Bull at Four sold half a million copies in the first two weeks of release alone and was Billboard's number-one LP for three consecutive weeks. He has also earned two ASCAP songwriting awards in consecutive years for "The First Cut Is the Deepest", which has been a hit single for four different artists. Stevens converted to Islam in December 1977 and adopted the name Yusuf Islam the following year. In 1979, he auctioned all his guitars for charity and left his music career to devote himself to educational and philanthropic causes in the Muslim community. He has been given several awards for his work in promoting peace in the world, including the 2003 World Award, the 2004 Man for Peace Award, and the 2007 Mediterranean Prize for Peace. In 2006, he returned to pop music with his first album of new
    7.60
    5 votes
    18
    Bruce Lee

    Bruce Lee

    • Books illustrated: Chinese Gung-Fu: The Philosophical Art of Self Defense
    Bruce Lee (traditional :李小龍) (born Lee Jun-fan; 27 November 1940 – 20 July 1973) was an actor, martial arts instructor, philosopher, film director, film producer, screenwriter, founder of Jeet Kune Do, and the son of Cantonese opera star Lee Hoi-Chuen. He is widely considered by commentators, critics, media and other martial artists to be one of the most influential martial artists of all time, and a pop culture icon of the 20th century. He is often credited with changing the way Asians were presented in American films. Lee was born in Chinatown, San Francisco on 27 November 1940 to parents from Hong Kong and was raised in Kowloon with his family until his late teens. Lee returned to San Francisco at the age of 18 to claim his U.S. citizenship and receive his higher education. It was during this time that he began teaching martial arts, which soon led to film and television roles. His Hong Kong and Hollywood-produced films elevated the traditional Hong Kong martial arts film to a new level of popularity and acclaim, sparking a surge of interest in Chinese martial arts in the West in the 1970s. The direction and tone of his films changed and influenced martial arts and martial arts
    8.75
    4 votes
    19
    J. G. Jones

    J. G. Jones

    • Books illustrated: Wonder Woman: The Hiketeia
    J.G. Jones is an American comic book artist, known for his work on books such as Wanted and Final Crisis. Jones hails from Walker, Louisiana and attended Louisiana State University and the University of New York at Albany where he received his Masters Degree in Fine Arts. Jones is best known for his work as cover artist on various comic book series, including a stint on Brian K. Vaughan's Y: The Last Man (Vertigo Comics), and, for DC Comics, the six-issue limited series Villains United written by Gail Simone, as well as all 52 covers for the maxi-series 52. Jones' interior art credits include: Wonder Woman: The Hiketeia (pencils only) written by Greg Rucka, Mark Millar's Wanted (pencils and inks) published by Top Cow and Grant Morrison's Marvel Boy published by Marvel. Jones was intended to be the sole artist on the Grant Morrison DC event book Final Crisis. However, due to delays, Jones was assisted by artists Carlos Pacheco, Marco Rudy & Doug Mahnke for issues #4–6, and replaced for issue 7 by Mahnke. Jones noted that "Any problems completing the series are my own. I love Doug Mahnke’s art, and he would have probably been a better choice to draw this series in the first
    8.75
    4 votes
    20
    Lewis Carroll

    Lewis Carroll

    • Book editions illustrated: Alice's Adventures Under Ground
    Charles Lutwidge Dodgson ( /ˈtʃɑrlz ˈlʌtwɪdʒ ˈdɒdʒsən/ CHARLZ LUDT-wij DOJ-sən; 27 January 1832 – 14 January 1898), better known by the pseudonym Lewis Carroll (/ˈkærəl/ KARR-əl), was an English author, mathematician, logician, Anglican deacon and photographer. His most famous writings are Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and its sequel Through the Looking-Glass, as well as the poems "The Hunting of the Snark" and "Jabberwocky", all examples of the genre of literary nonsense. He is noted for his facility at word play, logic, and fantasy, and there are societies in many parts of the world (including the United Kingdom, Japan, the United States, and New Zealand) dedicated to the enjoyment and promotion of his works and the investigation of his life. Dodgson's family was predominantly northern English, with Irish connections. Conservative and High Church Anglican, most of Dodgson's ancestors were army officers or Church of England clergy. His great-grandfather, also named Charles Dodgson, had risen through the ranks of the church to become the Bishop of Elphin. His grandfather, another Charles, had been an army captain, killed in action in Ireland in 1803 when his two sons were hardly
    8.75
    4 votes
    21

    Eric Rohmann

    • Books illustrated: My Friend Rabbit
    Eric Rohmann is a Caldecott-winning author and illustrator of children's books from Chicago, Illinois. Born in Riverside, Illinois, in 1957, Rohmann is a graduate of Illinois State University and Arizona State University. He won the 2003 Caldecott Medal for his book My Friend Rabbit and won the 1995 Caldecott Honor Award for his book Time Flies.
    6.50
    6 votes
    22
    Henri Matisse

    Henri Matisse

    • Books illustrated: Jazz
    Henri-Émile-Benoît Matisse (French pronunciation: [ɑ̃ʁi matis]; 31 December 1869 – 3 November 1954) was a French artist, known for his use of colour and his fluid and original draughtsmanship. He was a draughtsman, printmaker, and sculptor, but is known primarily as a painter. Matisse is commonly regarded, along with Picasso and Marcel Duchamp, as one of the three artists who helped to define the revolutionary developments in the plastic arts in the opening decades of the 20th century, responsible for significant developments in painting and sculpture. Although he was initially labelled a Fauve (wild beast), by the 1920s he was increasingly hailed as an upholder of the classical tradition in French painting. His mastery of the expressive language of colour and drawing, displayed in a body of work spanning over a half-century, won him recognition as a leading figure in modern art. Matisse was born in Le Cateau-Cambrésis, Nord, France, the oldest son of a prosperous grain merchant. He grew up in Bohain-en-Vermandois, Picardie, France. In 1887 he went to Paris to study law, working as a court administrator in Le Cateau-Cambrésis after gaining his qualification. He first started to
    7.40
    5 votes
    23

    Paul O. Zelinsky

    • Books illustrated: Rapunzel
    Paul O. Zelinsky (born 1953) is an American author and illustrator of children's books. He was awarded the Caldecott Medal in 1998 for his Rapunzel. The best-selling movable book The Wheels on the Bus is his most popular work. Paul O. Zelinsky was born in 1953 in Evanston, IL. He grew up in Wilmette, Illinois. During his childhood years, he spent much of his time drawing. Often with his friends he would make up imaginary worlds and draw them. When he was only four, he submitted work to Highlights magazine, and his artwork was first showcased. Some of his influential childhood book favorites included The Color Kittens and The Tawny Scrawny Lion. Zelinsky said in reference to memories of what he had read, "Feelings come to me as a sort of flavor. I know that when I call up my earliest memories, what I remember seeing and hearing is accompanied by a flavor-like sense of what it felt like to be there and see that.” In later years of his youth, his favorite authors were William Pène du Bois and Robert Lawson. He especially loved the books The Twenty-One Balloons and The Fantastic Flight. At New Trier High School, Paul Zelinsky was interested in natural history as well as architecture
    8.50
    4 votes
    24
    W. Heath Robinson

    W. Heath Robinson

    • Books illustrated: Heath Robinson's book of goblins
    William Heath Robinson (signed as W. Heath Robinson, 31 May 1872 – 13 September 1944) was an English cartoonist and illustrator, best known for drawings of eccentric machines. In the UK, the term "Heath Robinson" has entered the language as a description of any unnecessarily complex and implausible contraption, similar to "Rube Goldberg" in the U.S. "Heath Robinson" is perhaps more often used in relation to temporary fixes using ingenuity and whatever is to hand, often string and tape, or unlikely cannibalisations. Its popularity is undoubtedly linked to Second World War Britain's shortages and the need to "make do and mend". William Heath Robinson was born at 25 Ennis Road on 31st May 1872 into a family of artists in an area of London known as Stroud Green. His father and brothers (Thomas Heath Robinson and Charles Robinson) all worked as illustrators. His early career involved illustrating books - among others: Hans Christian Andersen's Danish Fairy Tales and Legends (1897); The Arabian Nights, (1899); Tales From Shakespeare (1902), and Twelfth Night (1908), Andersen's Fairy Tales (1913), A Midsummer Night's Dream (1914), Charles Kingsley's The Water-Babies (1915), and Walter de
    8.50
    4 votes
    25
    Beni Montresor

    Beni Montresor

    • Books illustrated: May I Bring a Friend?
    Beni Montresor (born March 31, 1926 in Bussolengo, Italy -- died October 11, 2001 in Verona, Italy) was a versatile Italian artist, opera and film director, set designer, author and children's book illustrator. He won the Caldecott Medal in 1965 for May I Bring a Friend?. The Italian government knighted him in 1966 for his contributions to the arts. Montresor was particularly known in the United States as a designer of sets, lighting and costumes for opera. He designed sets and costumes for the American premiere of Gian Carlo Menotti's opera, The Last Savage at the Spoleto Festival USA in Charleston, South Carolina. He also designed the evocative and ephemeral scenery and lighting for the Washington Opera/New York City Opera revival of the Montemezzi opera The Love of Three Kings in 1981. He was the Artistic Director of the Teatro dell'Opera di Roma in 1988-1989. He directed two films,"Pilgrimage" (1972), starring Cliff De Young and"La Messe Doree" (1975), starring Lucia Bose. He was also a stage and film set designer with commissions from La Scala, Spoleto, the Glyndebourne Festival, the New York City Opera and the Metropolitan Opera for productions like La Gioconda, Esclarmonde,
    7.20
    5 votes
    26

    Ezra Jack Keats

    • Books illustrated: The Snowy Day
    Ezra Jack Keats (March 11, 1916 – May 6, 1983) was a children's literature author and illustrator. His first picture book, The Snowy Day, was awarded the Caldecott Medal and is considered one of the most important American books of the 20th century. Keats is best known for introducing multiculturalism into mainstream American children's literature. He was one of the first children’s book authors to use an urban setting for his stories and he developed the use of collage as a medium for illustration. Ezra Jack Keats was born Jacob Ezra Katz on March 11, 1916 in East New York, Brooklyn, the third child of Polish-Jewish immigrants Benjamin Katz and Augusta Podgainy. The family was very poor. Jack, as he was known, was artistically gifted from an early age, joyfully made pictures out of whatever scraps of wood, cloth and paper that he could collect. Benjamin Katz, who worked as a waiter, tried to discourage his son, insisting that artists lived terrible, impoverished lives. Nevertheless, he sometimes brought home tubes of paint, claiming, “A starving artist swapped this for a bowl of soup.” With little encouragement at home, Keats sought validation for his skills at school and learned
    7.20
    5 votes
    27
    Luis Royo

    Luis Royo

    • Book edition covers: A Thousand Words for Stranger
    Luis Royo (born 1954 in Olalla, Teruel, Spain) is a Spanish artist, known for his sensual and dark paintings, its apocalyptic imagery, his fantasy worlds and mechanical life forms. He has also recently moved into sculpture. Royo has produced paintings for both his own books and exhibitions and other media; such as video games, music CD and novels covers, tarot cards. He is famous for his work collected in books published worldwide. Shortly after his birth, Royo's family moved to Zaragoza, where he first started school, his first memories are accompanied with drawing which plays an important role in his life. His practical standpoint, acquired from his economically humble family, led him to study Technical Drawing for construction. He soon discovered that geometric forms did not satisfy him fully. Later, he began to study painting, decoration and interior design at the Industrial School and the School of Applied Arts, and combined with different jobs in interior design and decoration studios in 1970 and 1971. During this time he also combined his work with painting. Influenced by the student revolts of May 1968, he painted large format tiles with social issues and made exhibitions
    7.20
    5 votes
    28

    David Wiesner

    • Books illustrated: Flotsam
    David Wiesner (born February 5, 1956) is an American author and illustrator of children's books and publications. His work has won several honors, including three Caldecott Medals and two Caldecott Honors. He started his career as a book illustrator with Honest Andrew by Gloria Skurzynski, 1980. After co-authoring Loathsome Dragon with his wife, in 1987, he authored and illustrated Free Fall, which was awarded a 1989 Caldecott Honor Medal. This book is the first example of the predominant style of his self-authored books, which tell a fantastical, often dream-like story without words, only illustrations. He won the Caldecott Medal for three later self-authored books, Tuesday (1991), The Three Pigs (2001) and Flotsam (2007). Wiesner won another Caldecott Honor award in 2000 for Sector 7. He was born and raised in Bridgewater, New Jersey, and graduated from Rhode Island School of Design with a BFA in Illustration. In 1983 Wiener married surgeon Kim Kahng.
    8.25
    4 votes
    29
    Enki Bilal

    Enki Bilal

    • Books illustrated: The Hunting Party
    Enki Bilal (born October 7, 1951) is a French comic book creator, comics artist and film director. Born Enes Bilalović in Belgrade, Yugoslavia, to a Slovakian mother and a Bosniak father who had been Josip Broz Tito's tailor, he moved to Paris at the age of 9. At age 14, he met René Goscinny and with his encouragement applied his talent to comics. He produced work for Goscinny's comics magazine Pilote in the 1970s, publishing his first story, Le Bal Maudit, in 1972. In 1975, Bilal began working with script writer Pierre Christin on a series of dark and surreal tales, resulting in the body of work titled Légendes d'Aujourd'hui. He is best known for the Nikopol trilogy (La Foire aux Immortels, La Femme Piège and Froid Équateur), which took more than a decade to complete. Bilal wrote the script and did the artwork. The final chapter, Froid Équateur, was chosen book of the year by the magazine Lire and is acknowledged by the inventor of chess boxing, Iepe Rubingh as the inspiration for the sport. Bilal's most recent publication is Quatre? (2007), the last book in the Hatzfeld tetralogy, which deals with the breakup of Yugoslavia from a future viewpoint. The first installment came in
    7.00
    5 votes
    30
    Samuel Howitt

    Samuel Howitt

    • Book editions illustrated: Oriental Field Sports, Being a Complete, Detailed and Accurate Description of the wild Sports of the East, an Exhibiting in a Novel and Interesting Manner the Natural History of the Elephant, the Rhinocerous the Tiger .. the whole Interspersed with a Vari
    Samuel Howitt (1756/7 – 1822) was an English painter, illustrator and etcher of animals, hunting, horse-racing and landscape scenes. He worked in both oils and watercolors. Howitt was a member of an old Nottinghamshire quaker family. In early life he lived at Chigwell, near Epping Forest, Essex, was financially independent and devoted himself to field sports. However he ran into financial difficulties and was obliged to turn to art as a profession - which up until then he had engaged in as a talented amateur. Coming to London, he was for a time a drawing master at Samuel Goodenough's school in Ealing. In 1783, he exhibited 3 coloured drawings of hunting subjects with the Society of British Artists. From time to time he also exhibited at the Royal Academy, London: in 1784, a hunting piece; in 1785, 2 landscapes - "A view of the ruins of an abbey" and "Fairlop oak"; in 1793, "Jaques and the Deer" and "A Fox Hunt"; in 1794, "Smugglers alarmed"; in 1800, 2 pictures titled "Deer"; in 1814 "Dead game"; and in 1815, "Bella, horrida Bella". He probably exhibited relatively little because he was so much in demand as a commercial illustrator. He worked both in oils and water-colours,
    7.00
    5 votes
    31

    Stephen Gammell

    • Books illustrated: Song and Dance Man
    Stephen Gammell (b. February 10, 1943) is an American illustrator of children's books. His awards include the Caldecott Medal. Stephen Gammell grew up in Iowa. His father, an art editor for a major magazine, brought home periodicals that gave Stephen early artistic inspiration. His parents also supplied him with lots of pencils, paper, and encouragement. He is self-taught. He started his career with commercial freelance work, but became interested in children's book illustration. His first book, A Nutty Business, was published in 1973. Since then, he has illustrated over fifty titles. He is particularly well known for the surreal, unsettling illustrations he provided for Alvin Schwartz's Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark series of horror short stories, still a favorite in adolescent fiction. Stephen and his wife, Linda, a photographer, live in St. Paul, Minnesota. He works daily in his studio, located over a restaurant.
    9.33
    3 votes
    32
    Heorhiy Narbut

    Heorhiy Narbut

    • Books illustrated: Armorial of Little Russia
    Heorhiy Narbut (Ukrainian: Георгій Іванович Нарбут, February 25 [O.S. March 3] 1886 in Narbutivka — May 23, 1920 in Kiev) was a Ukrainian painter. He is known for creating Ukrainian coats of arms, banknotes, postage stamps, charters, and his many illustrations in books and magazines. He is also known as Georgy Narbut and George Narbut. He was a brother of a noted Russian Acmeist poet Vladimir Narbut. Heorhiy Narbut was born in the village Narbutivka, Ukraine not far off from Hlukhiv. His family had origins of ancient Lithuanian nobility. His first painting education was self-taught. At about age 20, Narbut settled in Saint Petersburg from 1906 to 1917. There he studied with painters Ivan Bilibin and Mstislav Dobuzhinsky. In 1909, Narbut continued some of his studies in Munich, in the school of Simon Hollósy. After his return to Saint Petersburg he joined the organization Mir iskusstva. In 1910-1912 Narbut was an illustrator of the fairy tales Hans Christian Andersen, the fables of Ivan Krylov, and folk tales. In March 1917, Narbut moved to Kiev. In September 1917, he became professor and rector of the Ukrainian Academy of Arts. During this time he created his Ukrainian banknotes,
    8.00
    4 votes
    33
    John Charles Dollman

    John Charles Dollman

    • Books illustrated: Told by the Northmen
    John Charles Dollman RWS RI ROI (1851–1934) was an English painter and illustrator. Dollman was born in Hove on 6 May 1851 and moved to London to study at South Kensington and the Royal Academy Schools, after which he set up a studio at Bedford Park, London. He exhibited at the Royal Academy from 1870 to 1912, and was elected RWS (Member of the Royal Watercolour Society) in 1913. Dollman was also an illustrator, working in black and white or colour for magazines such as the Graphic during and after the 1880s. Some of his early work has been said to have influenced Van Gogh. A central theme was ambitious mythological pictures such as a Viking Foray, a Viking horde entitled the Ravagers, The Unknown (1912), featuring a girl surrounded by chimps and Orpheus and his Lute with Lions. He also produced bold compositions of animals and people such as Robinson Crusoe and His Man Friday, Polo and Mowgli made leader of the Bandar-log (1903). His best known work is possibly A London Cab Stand (1888), focussing on a group of horses in a stormy scene. He composed at least three variants of this picture, and there are other instances where he made copies or near-copies of individual pictures. In
    8.00
    4 votes
    34
    Bryan Talbot

    Bryan Talbot

    • Books illustrated: Alice in Sunderland
    Bryan Talbot (born 24 February 1952) is a British comic book artist and writer, best known as the creator of The Adventures of Luther Arkwright and its sequel Heart of Empire. Bryan Talbot was born in Wigan, Lancashire, on 24 February 1952. He attended Wigan Grammar School, the Wigan School of Art, and Harris College in Preston, Lancashire, from which he graduated with a degree in Graphic Design. Talbot began his comics work in the underground comix scene of the late 1960s. In 1969 his first work appeared as illustrations in Mallorn, the British Tolkien Society magazine, followed in 1972 by a weekly strip in his college newspaper. He continued in the scene after leaving college, producing Brainstorm Comix, the first three of which formed The Chester P. Hackenbush Trilogy (a character reworked by Alan Moore as Chester Williams for Swamp Thing). He started The Adventures of Luther Arkwright in 1978. It was originally published in Near Myths and continued on over the years in other publications. It was eventually collected together into one volume by Dark Horse. Along with When the Wind Blows it is one of the first British graphic novels. In the early to mid-eighties he provide art
    7.75
    4 votes
    35

    Marcia Brown

    • Books illustrated: Once a Mouse
    Marcia Joan Brown (born July 13, 1918) is an American children's author and illustrator of more than 30 children's books. She has won the Caldecott Medal three times, the only person to do so until David Wiesner in 2007. She is also the winner of the 1977 Regina Medal, a six-time recipient of the Caldecott Honor, and the winner of the 1992 Laura Ingalls Wilder Medal. Many of her titles have been produced in other languages, including Afrikaans, German, Japanese, Spanish and Xhosa-Bantu. Born in Rochester, New York, she enrolled in the New York State College for Teachers, the University at Albany's predecessor. Marcia taught at Cornwall High School in New York City, where she began her writing career with the publication of The Little Carousel in 1946. Growing up during the Depression, Brown considered becoming a doctor. She decided, however, to take up teaching and, later, writing. The Caldecott Medal List contains information on these and other Caldecott Medal Winners and Caldecott Honor Books.
    6.60
    5 votes
    36

    Roger Duvoisin

    • Books illustrated: White Snow, Bright Snow
    Roger Duvoisin (1904–1980) was a Swiss-American author and illustrator. Born in Geneva, Switzerland, his first job was making textiles. He moved to New York City in 1927 where he wrote his first book. He received a Caldecott Medal for White Snow, Bright Snow by Alvin Tresselt. He is now known mostly for his Veronica and Happy Lion series. He married author Louise Fatio. In 1961 he received an award from the Society of Illustrators. In 1966 he received the Rugers Bi-Centennial award. He also won a Caldecott Honor Award for Hide and Seek Fog in 1966. In 1968 he received a Hans Christian Anderson Biennial runner-up award. He won the 1956 Deutscher Jugendliteraturpreis.
    6.60
    5 votes
    37
    Władysław T. Benda

    Władysław T. Benda

    • Book editions illustrated: My Ántonia
    Władysław Teodor "W.T." Benda (January 15, 1873, Poznań, Poland (Posen, German Empire) - November 30, 1948, Newark, New Jersey, United States) was a Polish-American painter, illustrator, and designer. The son of musician Jan Szymon Benda, and a nephew of the actress Helena Modrzejewska (known in the United States as Helena Modjeska), W.T. Benda studied art at the Krakow College of Technology and Art in his native Poland and at the School of Fine Arts in Vienna, Austria. He came to the United States at the very end of the 19th century, to visit his Aunt Helena, who then lived in California. He stayed, and moved to New York City in 1902, where he attended the Art Students League of New York and the William Merritt Chase School. While there, Benda studied under Robert Henri and Edward Penfield. He joined the Society of Illustrators in 1907, the Architectural League in 1916, and became a naturalized American in 1911. He was also a member of the National Society of Mural Painters. He remained in NYC for the rest of his life. Benda married Romola Campfield, and they had two daughters, Eleanora and Baria, who were both artists. Starting in 1905, Benda was primarily a graphic artist. He
    6.60
    5 votes
    38
    Dave McKean

    Dave McKean

    • Book edition covers: The Dark Tower IV -Wizard and Glass
    • Books illustrated: The Day I Swapped My Dad for Two Goldfish
    David McKean (born 29 December 1963 in Maidenhead, Berkshire) is an English illustrator, photographer, comic book artist, graphic designer, filmmaker and musician. His work incorporates drawing, painting, photography, collage, found objects, digital art and sculpture. McKean's most recent projects are directing an original feature called Luna, and a book with the evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins. After a trip to New York in 1986 during which he failed to find work as a comics artist, McKean met writer Neil Gaiman, and the pair collaborated on a short graphic novel of disturbing childhood memories, Violent Cases, published in 1987. This was followed in 1988 by a Black Orchid miniseries (again with Gaiman) and Hellblazer covers for DC Comics. In 1989, he illustrated the Batman graphic novel, Arkham Asylum: A Serious House on Serious Earth, with writer Grant Morrison. His work during this period was often compared to that of Bill Sienkiewicz. From 1989–1996 McKean produced the covers for Gaiman's celebrated series The Sandman, all its collected editions, and many of its spin-offs. Further collaborations with Gaiman produced the graphic novels Signal to Noise in 1992 (previously
    7.50
    4 votes
    39
    Hammatt Billings

    Hammatt Billings

    • Book editions illustrated: Uncle Tom's Cabin; or, Life Among the Lowly
    Charles Howland Hammatt Billings (1818–1874) was an artist and architect from Boston, Massachusetts. Among his works are the original illustrations for Uncle Tom's Cabin (both the initial printing and an expanded 1853 edition), the National Monument to the Forefathers, the Civil War monument in Concord, Mass., and the 19th-century granite canopy (since replaced) for the Plymouth Rock memorial. He worked for some years with his brother Joseph Edward Billings, also an architect. He was the artist of one of the well-noted portrayals of the Battle of Lexington.
    7.50
    4 votes
    40
    Tomi Ungerer

    Tomi Ungerer

    • Book editions illustrated: Omnibus Edition
    Jean-Thomas "Tomi" Ungerer (born 28 November 1931) is an award-winning illustrator and a trilingual author. He has published over 140 books ranging from his much loved children’s books to his controversial adult work. He is famous for his sharp social satire and his witty aphorisms and he ranges from the fantastic to the autobiographical. Tomi Ungerer was born in Strasbourg, France, the youngest of four children of Alice (Essler) and Theo Ungerer. The family moved to Logelbach, near Colmar, after the death of Tomi's father, Theodore — an artist, engineer, and astronomical clock manufacturer — in 1936. Ungerer also lived through the German occupation of Alsace and the requisitioning of the family home by the Wehrmacht. As a young man, Ungerer was inspired by the illustrations appearing in The New Yorker magazine, particularly the work of Saul Steinberg.) Ungerer moved to the United States in 1956. The following year, he published his first children's book for Harper & Row, The Mellops Go Flying. He also did illustration work for such publications as The New York Times, Esquire, Life, Harper's Bazaar, The Village Voice, and for television during this time, and began to create posters
    7.50
    4 votes
    41
    David Petersen

    David Petersen

    • Books illustrated: Mouse Guard Volume One: Fall 1152
    David E. Petersen (born July 4, 1977) is an American comic book creator best known for the series Mouse Guard. David Petersen was influenced by animated television series such as The Transformers. "When it comes to story telling, I’m a big fan of Mike Mignola and Frank Miller. Although Mouse Guard doesn’t look like either of their work. My ink work is something that comes from my printmaking background, something you don’t associate with comics, but after seeing some folks like Rick Geary and Gary Gianni doing comics in styles with line quality different than traditional comics, I knew I could incorporate it as well." "I have long been a fan of classic adventure stories and at one time planned on doing a cross between an adventure story and an anthropology experiment with only animals natural to the same habitat as the main characters. It gave me a problem of coming up with story devices and plot to keep everyone from simply eating each other. It more closely resembled Disney's Robin Hood than Mouse Guard. In giving the mice a leg up, the idea of the mouse guard and how the mice hide themselves away became the most interesting focus. I quickly shifted all attention to their story.
    10.00
    2 votes
    42
    Henry Thomas Alken

    Henry Thomas Alken

    • Books illustrated: The National Sports of Great Britain
    Henry Thomas Alken (12 October 1785 – 7 April 1851) was an English painter and engraver chiefly known as a caricaturist and illustrator of sporting subjects and coaching scenes. His most prolific period of painting and drawing occurred between 1816 and 1831. Alken was born on 12 October 1785 in Soho London and baptised on November 6 at St James's Church, Piccadilly. He was the third son of Samuel Alken, a sporting artist. Two of his brothers were George, Samuel Jr (also an artist) and Sefferien John. In 1789, Henry's family moved to 2 Francis Street East, Bedford Square. Young Henry first studied under his father and then with the miniature painter John Thomas Barber Beaumont (1774–1841), also known as J.T. Barber. In 1801, Alken sent a miniature portrait of Miss Gubbins to the Royal Academy Exhibition. He exhibited a second miniature at the Royal Academy before abandoning miniature painting and taking on painting and illustrating. Early in his career, he painted sporting subjects under the name of "Ben Tally-O". Alken married Maria Gordon on October 14, 1809 at St. Clement’s Parish Church in Ipswich. On August 22 a year later the couple's first son was baptised. Alken went on to
    10.00
    2 votes
    43
    Chikabo Kumada

    Chikabo Kumada

    • Books illustrated: Kumada Chikabo's World Book 3
    Chikabo Kumada is a highly-regarded botanical artist, book illustrator, and author who may be to Japan and insects what James Audubon was to North America and birds. Kumada is often identified as a pioneer in the field of botanical art in Japan but he may be better known for the vibrantly-painted insects in the series of books titled "Kumada Chikabo’s World". Born in 1911, the artist was just entering adolescence when the “Great Kanto Earthquake” virtually destroyed his hometown of Yokohama and the city of Tokyo on September 1, 1923. In all, approximately 140,000 lost their lives to the earthquake and the resulting fires. Kumada began his career in the 1930s as a graphic designer. A deep interest in nature developed while a child grew stronger as a young adult and he quite the advertising business to create illustrated books, which he continued to do up until his death at the age of 98 on August 13, 2009. Exhibitions of his work went on a traveling tour in 2009 with plans to stage a grand home exhibition in Yokohama in the year of the author/artist’s birthday centennial.
    6.40
    5 votes
    44
    Joe Madureira

    Joe Madureira

    • Book editions illustrated: Races of Eberron
    Joe Madureira (often called Joe Mad), is a comic book writer/artist and game developer, best known for his work on Marvel Comics' Uncanny X-Men and his creator-owned comic book Battle Chasers. Madureira's style combines Western comic book influences with aspects of Japanese manga, and has been credited for helping the latter influence the American comic book industry. Madureira attended the High School of Art and Design in Manhattan. At age 16, while still in high school, Madureira started at Marvel Comics as an intern, working under editor Danny Fingeroth. His first published work was an eight-page story for the anthology series Marvel Comics Presents, starring Northstar. He became the regular penciler on Uncanny X-Men in 1994 illustrating that book's installments of the "Age of Apocalypse" storyline. He left Uncanny X-Men in 1997 to work on his own sword and sorcery series Battle Chasers for Wildstorm Comics' creator-owned Cliffhanger imprint (before it was sold to DC Comics). Madureira produced a total of nine issues in four years (publishing two to three a year), a pace for which he was criticized. He canceled Battle Chasers #10, and placed the series on indefinite hiatus after
    5.50
    6 votes
    45
    Bernie Wrightson

    Bernie Wrightson

    • Book edition covers: Wolves of the Calla
    Bernie "Berni" Wrightson (born October 27, 1948, Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.) is an American artist known for his horror illustrations and comic books. Wrightson received training in art from reading comics, particularly those of EC, as well as through a correspondence course from the Famous Artists School. In 1966, Wrightson began working for The Baltimore Sun newspaper as an illustrator. The following year, after meeting artist Frank Frazetta at a comic-book convention in New York City, he was inspired to produce his own stories. In 1968, he showed copies of his sequential art to DC Comics editor Dick Giordano and was given a freelance assignment. Wrightson began spelling his name "Berni" in his professional work to distinguish himself from an Olympic diver named Bernie Wrightson, but later restored the final "e" to his name. In 1968 he drew his first professional comic book story, "The Man Who Murdered Himself", which appeared in House of Mystery #179 (March-April 1969). He continued to work on a variety of mystery and anthology titles for both DC and, a few years later, its principal rival, Marvel Comics. It was for Marvel's Chamber of Darkness and Tower of Shadows titles where
    7.25
    4 votes
    46
    Dorothy P. Lathrop

    Dorothy P. Lathrop

    • Books illustrated: Animals of the Bible
    Dorothy Pulis Lathrop (1891–1980) was an American author and illustrator of children's books. Lathrop was born April 16, 1891 in Albany, New York. During her lifetime of achievements, her notable prominence in the publishing world of children's literature includes the combined skills, mastery, and talents Lathrop displayed within the pages and color plates of the more than 38 books published with her illustrations. The prolific popularity of her talent was one of a steady production, primarily between the years of 1919 to 1962. In the 1930s, Lathrop published 9 children's books. Lathrop's career as an illustrator and author began with using her artistic skills as an illustrator for other authors of children's literature, beginning around 1919. With the exception of several topical nonfiction books written by Lathrop, most of her art for illustrations, in her lifetime, remained dedicated to that of children's fictional literature. This included art for the book by Hans Christian Andersen, The Little Mermaid (1939, and Walter de la Mare's books for children, including his Down-adown Derry, Fairy Poems, published in 1922. In year 1919, Lathrop's first published "suite" of expressive
    7.25
    4 votes
    47
    Émile Bayard

    Émile Bayard

    • Books illustrated: Les Misérables
    Émile-Antoine Bayard (1837-1891) was born November 2, 1837, in La Ferté-sous-Jouarre, Seine-et-Marne. A student of Léon Cogniet, he is best known by many for his illustration of Cosette from Les Misérables by Victor Hugo. He died in Cairo in December 1891. Starting in 1853, Bayard was a student of Cogniet for five years, publishing his first cartoons at the age of fifteen, often using the anagrammatic pseudonym Abel De Miray. Between 1857 and 1864, he worked in the mediums of charcoal drawings, paintings, water colors, woodcuts, engravings, and lithographs. In 1864 he began to work primarily for magazines, and illustrated current events, such as the Franco-Prussian War of 1870-1871. At the end of the 19th century, with a growing interest in photography displacing documentary drawing, Bayard moved to illustrating novels, including Les Misérables by Victor Hugo, Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe, L'Immortel by Alphonse Daudet, and From the Earth to the Moon by Jules Verne. His illustration of Cosette from Les Misérables was adapted for the logo from the Cameron Mackintosh musical. While there had been art depicting spaceflight and alien worlds prior to 1865, they were
    7.25
    4 votes
    48
    Why the lucky stiff

    Why the lucky stiff

    • Books illustrated: Why's Guide to Ruby
    Jonathan Gillette, better known as why the lucky stiff (often abbreviated to Why or _why), was until 2009 a prolific writer, cartoonist, artist, and computer programmer notable for his work with the Ruby programming language. He was known as "one of the most unusual, and beloved, computer programmers" in the world before he abruptly disappeared from public view. Along with Yukihiro Matsumoto and David Heinemeier Hansson, he was seen as a key figure in the Ruby community. _why was the keynote speaker at RailsConf in 2006. He also had a speaking session titled "A Starry Afternoon, a Sinking Symphony, and the Polo Champ Who Gave It All Up for No Reason Whatsoever" at the 2005 O'Reilly Open Source Convention held in Portland, Oregon. It explored how to teach programming and make it more appealing to adolescents. On 19 August 2009, his online presence was drastically truncated; his accounts on Twitter and GitHub were shut down, along with many of his personally maintained sites. His projects have since been collected and centralized on the whymirror GitHub account. His best known work is Why's (poignant) Guide to Ruby, which "teaches Ruby with stories." Paul Adams of Webmonkey describes
    7.25
    4 votes
    49
    Don Davis

    Don Davis

    Don Davis (born October 21, 1952) is an artist known for his portrayals of space related subjects. His work is characterised by attention to detail and authentic portrayals based on what is known of the subject. Chesley Bonestell, considered by many to be one of the most accomplished practitioners of the space art genre, critiqued Davis' early paintings and encouraged him to pursue an artistic career. Davis worked for the U. S. Geological Survey's branch of Astrogeologic Studies during the Apollo Lunar expeditions and has since painted many images for NASA. The NASA art included portrayals of interiors of giant space colonies, based on the work of Gerard O'Neill. He was part of the team of space artists gathered to provide the visual effects for the PBS series Cosmos by Carl Sagan. Later he painted the cover of Sagan's Pulitzer Prize winning book The Dragons of Eden. Other books by Carl Sagan including Don's work are Comet and Pale Blue Dot. Davis has made numerous paintings of impact events for publications and for NASA. In the early 1980s he created planetary texture maps for use in Jet Propulsion Laboratory computer graphic simulations of the Voyager encounters with the outer
    8.33
    3 votes
    50
    Mo Willems

    Mo Willems

    • Books illustrated: Knuffle Bunny Too: A Case of Mistaken Identity
    Mo Willems (born February 11, 1968) is an American writer, animator, and children's books author/illustrator. Willems was raised in New Orleans, where he graduated from Trinity Episcopal School and the Isidore Newman School. He graduated cum laude from New York University's Tisch School of the Arts. He married Cheryl Camp in Brooklyn, New York, in 1997. Willems now resides with his family in Northampton, Massachusetts. After graduating from Tisch, Willems spent a year traveling around the world drawing a cartoon every day, all of which have been published in the book You Can Never Find a Rickshaw When it Monsoons. Returning to New York, he kicked off his career as a writer and animator for Sesame Street, where he earned six Emmy Awards for writing during his tenure from 1993 to January 2002. During this period he also performed stand-up comedy in NYC and recorded essays for BBC Radio along with making a promo for Cartoon Network and animating the opening for a show on Nickelodeon. He later created two animated television series: The Off-Beats for Nickelodeon's Kablam, and Sheep in the Big City for Cartoon Network. Sheep in the Big City was a success with the critics but ultimately
    8.33
    3 votes
    51
    Shane Davis

    Shane Davis

    • Books illustrated: Superman: Earth One
    Shane Davis is an American comic book artist, currently under exclusive contract for DC Comics. Davis broke into the industry in 2003 by illustrating Robin #110 and a spot illustration in JLA-Z #3. The following year he illustrated other DC Comics books including Nightwing #88 and Wonder Woman #201, as well as the Marvel Comics' book Marvel Halloween Ashcan 2004. In the ensuing years he illustrated a variety of books for both publishers, such as Marvel Age Hulk, Action Comics and Batman. One of his more notable Batman stories was 2006's Batman Annual #25, which featured the return story of Jason Todd. That same year he illustrated Jay Faerber's series, Noble Causes #17, for Image Comics. Davis also drew the miniseries Mystery in Space vol. 2, written by Jim Starlin and featuring Captain Comet. In 2007 Davis illustrated the first issue of the JLA/JSA crossover storyline "The Lightning Saga", and then went on to be the penciller for Superman/Batman for issues #44-49. In 2008, Davis was tapped by writer Geoff Johns to be the artist for a Final Crisis tie-in one-shot entitled Rage of the Red Lanterns, which featured a lead-up to a story in the main Green Lantern title and its 2009
    6.20
    5 votes
    52
    Bronwyn Bancroft

    Bronwyn Bancroft

    • Book edition covers: Snake dancing
    • Book editions illustrated: Stradbroke Dreamtime (Imprint Lives)
    • Books illustrated: The Fat and Juicy Place
    Bronwyn Bancroft (born 1958) is an Australian artist, notable for being amongst the first Australian fashion designers invited to show her work in Paris. Born in Tenterfield, New South Wales, and trained in Canberra and Sydney, Bancroft worked as a fashion designer, and is an artist, illustrator, and arts administrator. In 1985, Bancroft established a shop called Designer Aboriginals, selling fabrics made by Aboriginal artists including herself. She was a founding member of Boomalli Aboriginal Artists Co-operative. Art work by Bancroft is held by the National Gallery of Australia, the Art Gallery of New South Wales and the Art Gallery of Western Australia. She has provided art work for more than 20 children's books, including Stradbroke Dreaming by writer and activist Oodgeroo Noonuccal, and books by artist and writer Sally Morgan. She has received design commissions, including one for the exterior of a sports centre in Sydney. Bancroft has a long history of involvement in community activism and arts administration, and has served as a board member for the National Gallery of Australia. Her painting Prevention of AIDS (1992) was used in a campaign to raise awareness of HIV/AIDS in
    9.50
    2 votes
    53
    Hans Arp

    Hans Arp

    • Books illustrated: L'Extrême-Occidentale
    Jean Arp / Hans Arp (16 September 1886 – 7 June 1966) was a German-French, or Alsatian, sculptor, painter, poet and abstract artist in other media such as torn and pasted paper. When Arp spoke in German he referred to himself as "Hans", and when he spoke in French he referred to himself as "Jean". Many people believe that he was born Hans and later changed his name to Jean, but this is not the case. Arp was born in Strasbourg. The son of a French mother and a German father, he was born during the period following the Franco-Prussian War when the area was known as Alsace-Lorraine (Elsass-Lothringen in German) after it had been returned to Germany by France. Following the return of Alsace to France at the end of World War I, French law determined that his name become Jean. In 1904, after leaving the École des Arts et Métiers in Strasbourg, he went to Paris where he published his poetry for the first time. From 1905 to 1907, Arp studied at the Kunstschule, Weimar, Germany and in 1908 went back to Paris, where he attended the Académie Julian. In 1915, he moved to Switzerland, to take advantage of Swiss neutrality. Arp later told the story of how, when he was notified to report to the
    7.00
    4 votes
    54

    Marie Hall Ets

    • Books illustrated: Nine Days to Christmas
    Marie Hall Ets (born December 16, 1895 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin; died in 1984) is an American author and illustrator. She attended Lawrence College, and in 1918, Mrs. Ets journeyed to Chicago where she became a social worker at the Chicago Commons, a settlement house on the northwest side of the city. In 1960 she won the Caldecott Medal for her illustrations of Nine Days to Christmas. She died in 1984. Just me and In the Forest are both Caldecott Honor books. The black-and-white charcoal illustrations in Just Me "almost take on the appearance of woodcuts" and are similar in style to the illustrations in In the Forest. Constantine Georgiou comments in Children and Their Literature that Ets' "picture stories and easy-to-read books" (along with those of Maurice Sendak) "are filled with endearing and quaint human touches, putting them at precisely the right angle to life in early childhood." Play With Me, says Georgiou, is "a tender little tale, delicately illustrated in fragile pastels that echo the quiet mood of the story."
    7.00
    4 votes
    55
    Bill Mauldin

    Bill Mauldin

    • Books illustrated: Back home
    William Henry "Bill" Mauldin (October 29, 1921 – January 22, 2003) was a two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist from the United States. He was most famous for his World War II cartoons depicting American soldiers, as represented by the archetypal characters "Willie and Joe", two weary and bedraggled infantry troopers who stoically endure the difficulties and dangers of duty in the field. These cartoons were broadly published and distributed in the American army abroad and in the United States. Mauldin was born in Mountain Park, New Mexico. His grandfather had been a civilian cavalry scout in the Apache Wars and his father was an artilleryman in World War I. After growing up there and in Phoenix, Arizona, Mauldin took courses at the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts under the tutoring of Ruth VanSickle Ford. While in Chicago, Mauldin met Will Lang Jr. and became fast friends with him. Mauldin entered the US Army via the Arizona National Guard in 1940. While in the 45th Infantry Division, Mauldin volunteered to work for the unit's newspaper, drawing cartoons about regular soldiers or "dogfaces". Eventually he created two cartoon infantrymen, Willie (who was modeled after his
    6.00
    5 votes
    56
    Georges Ribemont-Dessaignes

    Georges Ribemont-Dessaignes

    Georges Ribemont-Dessaignes (June 19, 1884–July 9, 1974) was a French writer and artist associated with the Dada movement. He was born in Montpellier and died in Saint-Jeannet. In addition to numerous early paintings, Ribemont-Dessaignes wrote plays, poetry, manifestos and opera librettos. He contributed to the Dada (and later surrealist) periodical Literature. Among Ribemont-Dessaignes' works for the theater are the plays The Emperor of China (1916) and The Mute Canary (1919), and the opera libretti The Knife's Tears (1926) and The Three Wishes (1926), both with music by Czech composer Bohuslav Martinů. His novels include L'Autruche aux yeux clos (1924), Ariane (1925), Le Bar du lendemain (1927), Céleste Ugolin (1928), and Monsieur Jean ou l'Amour absolu (1934). Dada Performance. Edited by Mel Gordon. PAJ Publications; New York, 1987. Les Larmes Du Couteau. CD recording of Martinu's opera. Commentary by Ales Brezina. Supraphon, 1999. The French Literature Companion.
    6.00
    5 votes
    57
    Abigail May Alcott Nieriker

    Abigail May Alcott Nieriker

    • Book editions illustrated: Little women; or, Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy
    (Abigail) May Alcott Nieriker (July 26, 1840 – December 29, 1879) was an American artist and the youngest sister of Louisa May Alcott. She was the basis for the character Amy (an anagram of May) in her sister's semi-autobiographical novel Little Women (1868). She was named after her mother, Abigail May, and first called Abba, then Abby, and finally May, which she asked to be called in November 1863 when in her twenties. Born at the Hosmer Cottage, Abigail May was the youngest of the four Alcott sisters. Artistically gifted from an early age, she painted decorative figures and faces throughout Orchard House, the family home. May aided the meager family income by selling her art and teaching painting, drawing and modeling clay. She studied teaching at the Bowdoin School, a Boston public school. Taking over for Louisa in 1861, May taught at the first Kindergarten founded by Elizabeth Palmer Peabody for a month before returning to her own work. May later taught an early form of art therapy at an asylum in Syracuse, New York, then returned home in 1862 to begin teaching art at the Concord school run by Franklin Benjamin Sanborn, a friend of Amos Bronson Alcott. At the school of design
    8.00
    3 votes
    58
    Chris Achilleos

    Chris Achilleos

    • Book edition covers: Die Goldene Kurtisane
    Chris Achilleos (born 1947) is a painter and illustrator who specialises in fantasy artwork and glamour illustration. Born in Famagusta, Cyprus, his family emigrated to the United Kingdom in 1959, where he currently resides. His work has appeared in Heavy Metal and Radio Times magazines, on book covers (including series based on the Conan the Barbarian character, TV's Doctor Who and the Fighting Fantasy gamebook series), and in collections of his own work. He has also worked on various film projects as a conceptual artist. Achilleos created the controversial cover for Whitesnake's 1979 album, Lovehunter, which featured a naked woman straddling a giant serpent. In an interview with MelodicRock, Gary Hughes stated that Achilleos thereafter "had a policy of not working with bands". The original artwork, along with several other pieces, were stolen from him in the 1980s and sold to a private collector. In 2003, Achilleos created the covers and artwork for the rock opera by Gary Hughes, The Once And Future King. Several book collections of Achilleos works have been published, including:
    8.00
    3 votes
    59
    James Daugherty

    James Daugherty

    • Books illustrated: Gillespie and the Guards
    James Henry Daugherty (June 1, 1889 Asheville, North Carolina – February 21, 1974) was an American modernist painter, muralist, children's book author, and illustrator. He lived in Indiana, Ohio, and at the age of 9 he moved to Washington, D.C., where he studied at the Corcoran School of Art. Later, he went to London and studied under Frank Brangwyn. During World War I, he was commissioned to produce propaganda posters for various US Government agencies, including the United States Shipping Board. Daugherty wrote and illustrated several children's books during his career. In his book Daniel Boone won the Newbery Medal. His book with Benjamin Elkin, Gillespie and the Guards, won the Caldecott Honor in 1957. He was also the author of Walt Whitman's America Selections and Drawings by James Daugherty. In September 2006, controversy erupted at Hamilton Avenue School, an elementary school in Greenwich, Connecticut, over Daugherty's depiction of Bunker Hill hero and Connecticut native Israel Putnam in a mural commissioned by Public Works of Art Project for the town hall, and installed in the school in 1935. The mural was restored, and revealed a scene, filled with violent and
    8.00
    3 votes
    60
    Mary GrandPré

    Mary GrandPré

    • Books illustrated: The Tales of Beedle the Bard
    Mary GrandPré is an American illustrator and writer, best known for her cover and chapter illustrations for the American editions of the Harry Potter books, published by Scholastic. As of 2007, her artwork, which GrandPré creates with paint and pastels, has illustrated more than twenty books, as well in gallery exhibitions and periodicals such as The New Yorker, Atlantic Monthly and The Wall Street Journal. Mary GrandPré was born in South Dakota, but spent most of her life in Minnesota. She began drawing when she was only five years old, beginning with a reproduction of Mickey Mouse. By age ten, she was imitating Salvador Dalí, experimenting with stretched objects painted with oils, before graduating to copying black-and-white photos from the encyclopedia. After receiving an undergraduate degree at Pomona College, GrandPré earned a bachelor of fine arts degree from the Minneapolis College of Art and Design. After her graduation, GrandPré spent several years as a waitress while working to be noticed by ad agencies and attempting to find her own style. Her drawing evolved into what she calls "soft geometry," featuring pastels used in a "colorful, light-hearted, and whimsical" manner.
    8.00
    3 votes
    61
    Richard Caton Woodville

    Richard Caton Woodville

    Richard Caton Woodville (7 January 1856–17 August 1927) was an English artist and illustrator, who is best known for being one of the most prolific and effective painters of battle scenes in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The son of Richard Caton Woodville, Sr., who was also a talented artist, Woodville studied at the Düsseldorf school of painting under the Prussian military artist Wilhelm Camphausen, and then Eduard von Gebhardt, before briefly studying in Russia and then Paris under Jean-Léon Gérôme. Woodville spent most of his career working for the Illustrated London News, where he quickly developed a reputation as a talented reporter and writer, but was also published in Cornhill Magazine, Strand Magazine, and The Tatler. Richard Caton Woodville first experienced battle first-hand when he was sent by the Illustrated London News to report upon the Russo-Turkish War (1877–1878), and then again in the 1882 Anglo-Egyptian War, where he made numerous sketches in December 1882, and also obtained photographs of the trenches at Tel-e-Kebir for his friend and co-artist Alphonse-Marie-Adolphe de Neuville, who had been commissioned to paint a scene of the battle. In 1879,
    8.00
    3 votes
    62
    Chris Riddell

    Chris Riddell

    • Books illustrated: Jonathan Swift's Gulliver
    Chris Riddell (born 1962) is a British illustrator and occasional writer of children's books and a political cartoonist for The Observer. He has won two Kate Greenaway Medals, the British librarians' annual award for the best-illustrated children's book, and two of his works were commended runners up, a distinction dropped after 2002. Books that he wrote or illustrated have won three Nestlé Smarties Book Prizes and have been silver or bronze runners up four times. Chris Riddell was born in 1962 in South Africa where his father was a "liberal Anglican vicar" and was opposed to the system of Apartheid. The family returned to England when Chris was one year old, where he spent the rest of his childhood with his sister and three brothers who are now living in South Africa, Brighton, England, and Egypt. Chris displayed artistic talent from an early age, and was encouraged in this by his mother. (She gave him paper and pen to keep quiet during father's sermons.) As a child, his favourite artists were John Tenniel, the first illustrator of Alice in Wonderland, and W. Heath Robinson. At Brighton Polytechnic he studied illustration; one teacher was Raymond Briggs, an earlier winner of two
    6.75
    4 votes
    63
    Frank Bernard Dicksee

    Frank Bernard Dicksee

    • Books illustrated: Othello
    Sir Francis Bernard Dicksee KCVO (27 November 1853 – 17 October 1928) was an English Victorian painter and illustrator, best known for his pictures of dramatic historical and legendary scenes. He also was a noted painter of portraits of fashionable women, which helped to bring him success in his own time. Dicksee was born in London, England. His father, Thomas Dicksee, was a painter who taught Frank as well as his brother Herbert and his sister Margaret from a young age. Dicksee enrolled in the Royal Academy in 1870 and achieved early success. He was elected to the Academy in 1891 and became its President in 1924 He was knighted in 1925, and named to the Royal Victorian Order by King George V in 1927. Dicksee painted The Funeral of a Viking in 1893, which now resides in Manchester Art Gallery, having been there since 1928 when it was presented by Arthur Burton in memory of his mother to the Corporation of Manchester. Victorian critics gave it both positive and negative reviews, for its perfection as a showpiece and for its dramatic and somewhat staged setting, respectively. The painting was used by Swedish Viking/Black metal band Bathory for the cover of their 1990 album,
    6.75
    4 votes
    64
    Mark Texeira

    Mark Texeira

    • Book edition covers: Two for the Money
    Mark Texeira is an American comic book artist. Classically trained as a painter, Texeira broke into the comics field in the early 1980s. Mark Texeira was born and raised in New York City. He attended Manhattan's High School of Art and Design, and was granted a Presidential Scholarship at the School of Visual Arts, where he attended for two years before dropping out to pursue a freelance commercial art career. During this period, Texeira took classes at the Art Students League. His oil paintings soon won mentions at the Salmagundi Club and the Society of Illustrators. Comics titles Texeira has contributed to include Jonah Hex and its spinoff Hex (1985–1986), Psi-Force (1986–1987), Punisher War Journal (1990), Ghost Rider vol. 2 (1990–1992, 1997–1998), and vol. 5, Wolverine vol. 2 (1993), Sabretooth (1993), Spider-Man: Legacy of Evil (1996), Black Panther vol.3 (1998), Moon Knight vol. 4 (1999), Vampirella, Cyclops (2001), Hercules vol. 4 (2005) and Wolverine vol. 3 (2005). When painting, Texeira begins with a penciled layout on loose paper, and following approval of the layout, will acquire reference photos or hire models to pose for him, in order to "capture the feeling of the
    6.75
    4 votes
    65
    David Gentleman

    David Gentleman

    • Book editions illustrated: Ask the Fellows Who Cut the Hay
    • Books illustrated: David Gentleman’s Britain
    David Gentleman (born 11 March 1930, London) is an English artist-designer. He studied illustration at the Royal College of Art under Edward Bawden and John Nash. He has worked in various media - watercolour, lithography, wood engraving - and at scales ranging from the platform-length murals for Charing Cross underground station in London to postage stamps and logos. His themes too have varied widely, from paintings of landscape and environmental posters for the National Trust to drawings of street life in London and protest placards against the Iraq war. He has written and illustrated many books about countries and cities and has travelled widely throughout Britain, France, Italy and India. Gentleman grew up in Hertford, the son of artists who had met as painting students at the Glasgow School of Art. He attended Hertford Grammar School and to the St Albans School of Art, did national service as an education sergeant in the Royal Army Education Corps in charge of an art room in Cornwall, and then went to the Royal College of Art. He stayed on there as a junior tutor for two years before becoming a freelance artist ready to take on whatever work came his way, however unfamiliar.
    9.00
    2 votes
    66
    Kim Hiorthøy

    Kim Hiorthøy

    • Books illustrated: Fisken
    Kim Hiorthøy (born March 17, 1973) is a Norwegian electronic musician, graphic designer, illustrator, filmmaker and writer. Hiorthøy was born and raised in Trondheim, Norway, and studied at the Trondheim Academy of Fine Art (1991–96) as well as the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts in Copenhagen (1999-2000). During his tenure at the Trondheim Academy of Fine Art, Hiorthøy spent a year abroad in 1994 to attend the School of Visual Arts in New York. Currently, he lives and works in Berlin, Germany. A fictionalized version of Hiorthøy is a character in Erlend Loe's novel L. Hiorthøy began making music while attending the Trondheim Academy of Fine Art; he worked in the academy's sound studio until he left school and purchased his own equipment. After various “collaborations and accidents”, his music was eventually introduced to DJ Joakim Haugland of the Smalltown Supersound record label. Haugland asked Hiorthøy to work with the label, and in 2001 Hiorthøy released his debut album, “Hei”. He has subsequently released several albums, EPs, and 7 inch records with Smalltown Supersound. Hiorthøy’s musical style is difficult to classify; the Smalltown Supersound website offers the following
    9.00
    2 votes
    67
    Pamela Colman Smith

    Pamela Colman Smith

    • Book editions illustrated: Rider-Waite tarot deck
    Pamela Colman Smith (16 February 1878 – 18 September 1951), also nicknamed Pixie, was an artist, illustrator, and writer. She is best known for designing the Waite-Smith deck of divinatory tarot cards (also called the Rider-Waite or the Rider-Waite-Smith deck) for Arthur Edward Waite. Smith was born in Pimlico, Middlesex (now London), England the only child of an American merchant from Brooklyn, Charles Edward Smith and his wife Corinne Colman. The family was based in Manchester for the first decade of Smith's life, but the family moved to Jamaica when Charles Smith took a job in 1889 with the West India Improvement Company (a financial syndicate involved in extending the Jamaican railroad system). The family lived in Kingston, Jamaica, for several years but traveled between Jamaica, London, and Brooklyn, New York. By 1893, Smith had moved to Brooklyn, where, at the age of 15, she enrolled at the relatively new Pratt Institute and studied art under the noted artist teacher Arthur Wesley Dow. Her mature drawing style shows clear traces of the visionary qualities of fin-de-siècle Symbolism and the romanticism of the preceding Arts and Crafts movement. While Smith was in art school,
    9.00
    2 votes
    68
    Sydney Prior Hall

    Sydney Prior Hall

    • Books illustrated: Tom Brown at Oxford
    Sir Sydney Prior Hall MVO, MA (18 October 1842 – 1922) was a British portrait painter and illustrator and one of the leading reportage artists of the later Victorian period. The son of animal portraitist Harry Hall, Sydney Hall was educated at Merchant Taylors' School. He decided on a career as an artist while at Oxford University and joined the staff of The Graphic, an illustrated newspaper, shortly after its foundation in late 1869. He immediately established his name with a series of vivid drawings made at the front during the Franco-Prussian War. As stated in the contemporary publication The Art Journal, his drawings of the Parnell Commission were among his finest achievements in the medium of graphic journalism: "he was in court the whole time, busy with a swift revealing pencil which missed no turn of affairs". He illustrated a number of books including Tom Brown at Oxford by Thomas Hughes. Hall married Hannah Holland, and was the father of Egyptologist Henry R. H. Hall.
    9.00
    2 votes
    69
    Alberto Giacometti

    Alberto Giacometti

    Alberto Giacometti (Italian pronunciation: [alˈbɛrto dʒakoˈmetti]; 10 October 1901 – 11 January 1966) was a Swiss sculptor, painter, draughtsman, and printmaker. Alberto Giacometti was born in the canton Graubünden's southerly alpine valley Val Bregaglia and came from an artistic background; his father, Giovanni, was a well-known post-Impressionist painter. Alberto was the eldest of four children and was interested in art from an early age. Giacometti was born in Borgonovo, now part of the Swiss municipality of Stampa, near the Italian border. He was a descendant of Protestant refugees escaping the Italian Inquisition. His father, Giovanni Giacometti, was a painter. Alberto attended the School of Fine Arts in Geneva. In 1922 he moved to Paris to study under the sculptor Antoine Bourdelle, an associate of Auguste Rodin. It was there that Giacometti experimented with cubism and surrealism and came to be regarded as one of the leading surrealist sculptors. Among his associates were Joan Miró, Max Ernst, Pablo Picasso, Bror Hjorth and Balthus. Between 1936 and 1940, Giacometti concentrated his sculpting on the human head, focusing on the sitter's gaze. He preferred models he was close
    7.67
    3 votes
    70
    Art Adams

    Art Adams

    • Books illustrated: Monkeyman & O'Brien
    Arthur "Art" Adams is an American comic book artist and writer. He first broke into the American comic book industry with the 1985 Marvel Comics miniseries Longshot. His subsequent interior comics work includes a number Marvel's major books, including The Uncanny X-Men, Excalibur, X-Factor, Fantastic Four, Hulk and Ultimate X, as well books by various other publishers, such as Action Comics, Vampirella, The Rocketeer and The Authority. Adams has also illustrated books featuring characters for which he has a personal love, such as Godzilla, The Creature from the Black Lagoon and Gumby, the latter of which garnered him a 1988 Eisner Award for Best Single Issue. In 1994, Adams joined a group of creators that included Frank Miller, John Byrne and Mike Mignola to form Legend, an imprint of creator-owned comics published by Dark Horse Comics, through which Adams published Monkeyman and O'Brien, a science fiction adventure series featuring archetypal sci-fi monsters that Adams wrote and illustrated. Although the Legend imprint ceased in 1998, Monkeyman and O'Brien continued to appear in print, sometimes in crossover stories with other comics characters, such as Gen¹³/Monkeyman and O'Brien
    7.67
    3 votes
    71
    Giovanni Battista Piranesi

    Giovanni Battista Piranesi

    • Book editions illustrated: Zobeck Gazetteer Volume 2: Dwarves of the Ironcrags
    Giovanni Battista (also Giambattista) Piranesi (Italian pronunciation: [dʒoˈvanni batˈtista piraˈnesi]; 4 October 1720 – 9 November 1778) was an Italian artist famous for his etchings of Rome and of fictitious and atmospheric "prisons" (Carceri d'Invenzione). Piranesi was born in Mogliano Veneto, near Treviso, then part of the Republic of Venice. His brother Andrea introduced him to Latin and the ancient civilization, and later he studied as an architect under his uncle, Matteo Lucchesi, who was Magistrato delle Acque, a Venetian engineer who specialized in excavation. From 1740 he was in Rome with Marco Foscarini, the Venetian envoy to the Vatican. He resided in the Palazzo Venezia and studied under Giuseppe Vasi, who introduced him to the art of etching and engraving. After his studies with Vasi, he collaborated with pupils of the French Academy in Rome to produce a series of vedute (views) of the city; his first work was Prima parte di Architettura e Prospettive (1743), followed in 1745 by Varie Vedute di Roma Antica e Moderna. From 1743 to 1747 he sojourned mainly in Venice where, according to some sources, he frequented Giovanni Battista Tiepolo. He then returned to Rome,
    7.67
    3 votes
    72
    Jack Coggins

    Jack Coggins

    • Books illustrated: Rockets, Jets, Guided Missiles and Spaceships
    Jack Banham Coggins (July 10, 1911 – January 30, 2006) was an artist, author, and illustrator. He is known in the United States for his oil paintings, which focused predominantly on marine subjects. He is also known for his books on space travel, which were both authored and illustrated by Coggins. Besides his own works, Coggins also provided illustrations for advertisements and magazine covers and articles. During World War II, he served as an artist and correspondent for YANK magazine, capturing and conveying wartime scenes from the front lines. Over the course of his career, Coggins produced more than 1,000 paintings and taught art classes for 45 years. He retired in May 2001 and died at his home in Pennsylvania in January 2006. Coggins was born in London, England on July 10, 1911, the only child of Ethel May (née Dobby) and Sydney George Coggins. Sydney Coggins was Regimental Corporal Major of the First Regiment of Life Guards, the part of the Household Cavalry responsible for guarding the British Monarch; Jack Coggins was born in his father's barracks. During World War I, Sydney Coggins served with, and was commissioned by the regiment. After the war, he was appointed
    7.67
    3 votes
    73
    Kate Greenaway

    Kate Greenaway

    • Books illustrated: The Pied Piper of Hamelin
    Catherine Greenaway (17 March 1846 – 6 November 1901), known as Kate Greenaway, was an English children's book illustrator and writer. Greenaway spent much of her childhood at Rolleston, Nottinghamshire. She studied at what is now the Royal College of Art in London, which at that time had a separate section for women, and was headed by Richard Burchett. Her first book, Under the Window (1879), a collection of simple, perfectly idyllic verses about children, was a bestseller. Greenaway's paintings were reproduced by chromoxylography, by which the colours were printed from hand-engraved wood blocks by the firm of Edmund Evans. Through the 1880s and 1890s, her only rivals in popularity in children's book illustration were Walter Crane and Randolph Caldecott. As well as illustrating books Greenaway also produced a number of bookplates. "Kate Greenaway" children, all of them little girls and boys too young to be put in trousers, according to the conventions of the time, were dressed in her own versions of late eighteenth century and Regency fashions: smock-frocks and skeleton suits for boys, high-waisted pinafores and dresses with mobcaps and straw bonnets for girls. The influence of
    7.67
    3 votes
    74
    Luther E. Vann

    Luther E. Vann

    • Book edition covers: Christmas When Music Almost Killed the World
    • Book editions illustrated: ELEMENTAL, The Power of Illuminated Love
    Luther E. Vann was born in Savannah, Georgia, but grew up in both Savannah and New York City. As a child, he was surrounded by and studied with such artists of the Harlem Renaissance as Charles Alston. His work and life are the principle focus of the book ELEMENTAL, the Power of Illuminated Love. He has won numerous awards for his art and was the first Savannah-born African American to have an exhibit at the world famous Telfair Museum of Art Jepson Center for the Arts. He was honored in 2009 by prestigious King-Tisdell Cottage Foundation for his contributions to the cultural legacy of Savannah and the state of Georgia.
    7.67
    3 votes
    75
    Sebastiano Ricci

    Sebastiano Ricci

    • Book edition covers: Lawyers in Hell
    Sebastiano Ricci (1 August 1659 – 15 May 1734) was an Italian painter of the late Baroque school of Venice. About the same age as Piazzetta, and an elder contemporary of Tiepolo, he represents a late version of the vigorous and luminous Cortonesque style of grand manner fresco painting. He was born in Belluno, son of Andreana and Livio Ricci. In 1671, he apprenticed to Federico Cerebri of Venice. Others claim Ricci’s first master was Sebastiano Mazzoni. In 1678, a youthful indiscretion led to an unwanted pregnancy, and ultimately to a greater scandal, when Ricci was accused of attempting to poison the young pregnant woman to avoid marriage. Imprisoned, he gained release only after intervention of a nobleman, probably a Pisani family member. He married the pregnant mother in 1691, although this was a stormy union. After his arrest, he moved to Bologna, where he domiciled near the Parish of San Michele del Mercato. His painting style there was apparently influenced by Giovanni Gioseffo dal Sole. On 28 September 1682 he was contracted by the "Fraternity of Saint John of Florence" to paint a Decapitation of John the Baptist for their Oratory. On 9 December 1685, the Count of San
    7.67
    3 votes
    76
    Alan Lee

    Alan Lee

    • Books illustrated: The Children of Húrin
    Alan Lee (20 August 1947) is an English book illustrator and movie conceptual designer. He was born in Middlesex, England and studied at the Ealing School of Art. Lee has illustrated several fantasy books including some nonfiction and has illustrated dozens of covers. Among the most notable interiors are several works of J.R.R. Tolkien: the centenary edition of The Lord of the Rings (1991), a 1995 edition of The Hobbit, and the first edition of Narn i Chîn Húrin: the tale of the children of Húrin (2007). The latter is his work most widely held in WorldCat participating libraries. Other books he has illustrated include Faeries (with Brian Froud), Lavondyss by Robert Holdstock (as well as the cover of an early print of this book), The Mabinogion, Castles and Tolkien's Ring (both by David Day), The Mirrorstone by Michael Palin, The Moon's Revenge by Joan Aiken and Merlin Dreams by Peter Dickinson. He has also illustrated Rosemary Sutcliff's adaptations of the Iliad and the Odyssey (Black Ships Before Troy) and The Wanderings of Odysseus) and did a cover painting for Mervyn Peake's Titus Groan. Alan did the artwork for the CD Alive! by the Dutch band Omnia, released on 3 August 2007
    10.00
    1 votes
    77
    Louis Wain

    Louis Wain

    • Books illustrated: Father Tuck's Annual
    Louis Wain (5 August 1860 – 4 July 1939) was an English artist best known for his drawings, which consistently featured anthropomorphised large-eyed cats and kittens. In his later years he suffered from schizophrenia, which, according to some psychologists, can be seen in his works. Louis William Wain was born on 5 August 1860 in Clerkenwell in London. His father was a textile trader and embroiderer; his mother was French. He was the first of six children, and the only male child. None of his five sisters ever married. At the age of thirty, his youngest sister was certified as insane, and admitted to an asylum. The remaining sisters lived with their mother for the duration of their lifetimes, as did Louis for the majority of his life. Wain was born with a cleft lip and the doctor gave his parents the orders that he should not be sent to school or taught until he was ten years old. As a youth, he was often truant from school, and spent much of his childhood wandering around London. Following this period, Louis studied at the West London School of Art and eventually became a teacher there for a short period. At the age of 20, Wain was left to support his mother and his five sisters
    10.00
    1 votes
    78

    Mary Azarian

    • Books illustrated: Snowflake Bentley
    Mary Azarian (born 1940) is an American woodcut artist and children's book illustrator. In 1999 she won the Caldecott Medal for her book, Snowflake Bentley, a picture book of the life of Wilson Bentley. She produces original prints and has illustrated over 50 books. Azarian attended Smith College, where she studied printmaking and painting. Before beginning her career as a full time artist, Azarian taught in a one-room schoolhouse for three years. She lives in Plainfield, Vermont.
    10.00
    1 votes
    79
    Şerban Foarţă

    Şerban Foarţă

    • Books illustrated: Infernala comedie
    Şerban (Nicolae) Foarţă (born on 8 July 1942, Turnu Severin) is a contemporary Romanian writer.
    10.00
    1 votes
    80
    Wanda Gág

    Wanda Gág

    • Books illustrated: Millions of Cats
    Wanda Hazel Gág (1893–1946) was an American artist, author, translator and illustrator. She is most noted for writing and illustrating the children's book Millions of Cats which won a Newbery Honor Award and the Lewis Carroll Shelf Award. It is the oldest American picture book still in print. The ABC Bunny also received a Newbery Honor Award. Her books Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs and Nothing at All each won a Caldecott Honor Award. In 1940 a book of edited excerpts from her diaries covering the years 1908 to 1917 was published as Growing Pains; it received wide acclaim. She was born March 11, 1893 in New Ulm, Minnesota, named Wanda Hazel Gag. Her parents, Elisabeth Biebl Gag and Anton Gag, were artists and photographers of Bohemian descent. Wanda was the eldest of seven children who all drew and sang; most of them wrote stories and poems as well. While still a young teen Wanda's illustrated story Robby Bobby in Mother Goose Land was published in The Minneapolis Journal in their Junior Journal supplement. When Wanda was fifteen her father died of tuberculosis. She became determined to make a good living from being an artist, at least partially due to her father's final words to
    10.00
    1 votes
    81
    William Blake

    William Blake

    • Book edition covers: The Creator by Dejan Stojanovic
    William Blake (28 November 1757 – 12 August 1827) was an English poet, painter, and printmaker. Largely unrecognised during his lifetime, Blake is now considered a seminal figure in the history of both the poetry and visual arts of the Romantic Age. His prophetic poetry has been said to form "what is in proportion to its merits the least read body of poetry in the English language". His visual artistry has led one contemporary art critic to proclaim him "far and away the greatest artist Britain has ever produced". Although he lived in London his entire life except for three years spent in Felpham he produced a diverse and symbolically rich corpus, which embraced the imagination as "the body of God", or "Human existence itself". Considered mad by contemporaries for his idiosyncratic views, Blake is held in high regard by later critics for his expressiveness and creativity, and for the philosophical and mystical undercurrents within his work. His paintings and poetry have been characterised as part of both the Romantic movement and "Pre-Romantic", for its large appearance in the 18th century. Reverent of the Bible but hostile to the Church of England – indeed, to all forms of
    10.00
    1 votes
    82

    William Steig

    • Books illustrated: Sylvester and the Magic Pebble
    William Steig (November 14, 1907 – October 3, 2003) was a prolific American cartoonist, sculptor and, later in life, an author of popular children's literature. Most noted for the books Sylvester and the Magic Pebble, Abel's Island and Doctor De Soto, he also created the character Shrek, who inspired the popular movie series. Steig was born in Brooklyn, New York, to Polish-Jewish immigrants from Austria, both socialists. His father, Joseph Steig, was a house painter, and his mother, Laura Ebel Steig, was a seamstress who encouraged his artistic leanings. As a child, he dabbled in painting and was an avid reader of literature. Among other works, he was said to have been especially fascinated by Pinocchio. In addition to his artistic endeavors, he also did well at athletics, being a member of the collegiate All-American water polo team. He graduated from Townsend Harris High School at 15 but never completed college, though he attended three, spending two years at City College of New York, three years at the National Academy of Design and a mere five days at the Yale School of Fine Arts before dropping out of each. Steig began drawing illustrations and cartoons for The New Yorker in
    10.00
    1 votes
    83
    H. M. Bateman

    H. M. Bateman

    • Books illustrated: Rebound
    Henry Mayo Bateman (15 February 1887 – 11 February 1970, Gozo) was a British humorous artist and cartoonist. H. M. Bateman was noted for his "The Man Who..." series of cartoons, featuring comically exaggerated reactions to minor and usually upper-class social gaffes, such as "The Man Who Lit His Cigar Before the Loyal Toast", "The Man Who Threw a Snowball at St. Moritz" and "The Boy Who Breathed on the Glass at the British Museum." He was born in the small village of Sutton Forest in New South Wales, Australia. His parents were Henry Charles Bateman and Rose Mayo. His father had left England for Australia in 1878 at the age of 21 to seek his fortune, then returned to England briefly in 1885 before going back with an English wife. Soon after Henry was born, his strong-willed mother insisted that they return to London 'and civilisation'. He had one sister, Phyllis, three years younger. Henry remained in England for the remainder of his life except for one disappointing visit to his birthplace. Henry was always drawing from an early age, consistently producing funny drawings that told stories. He was inspired by comics, and he had a keen critical eye, and was enthusiastically drawing
    6.50
    4 votes
    84
    Paul Chadwick

    Paul Chadwick

    Paul Chadwick (born 1957) is an American comic book creator best known for his series Concrete about a normal man trapped in a rock-hard body. Born in Seattle, Chadwick grew up in its suburb Medina, where his father, Stephen F. Chadwick, was the City Attorney. As a teenager, he participated in Apa-5, the amateur press alliance of comics fans, and he then attended Art Center College of Design, majoring in illustration. Graduating in 1979, he began his career creating storyboards for Disney, Warner Brothers, Lucasfilm and other film studios, contributing to such films as Pee Wee's Big Adventure, Strange Brew, The Big Easy, Ewoks: The Battle for Endor, Lies and Miracle Mile. Chadwick provided art for the Dazzler comic book, published by Marvel Comics, before creating Concrete, first published by Dark Horse Comics in Dark Horse Presents #1 (July 1986). He wrote Gifts of the Night for DC Comics' Vertigo with art by John Bolton. After working on several Matrix comics, Chadwick was asked by the Wachowski Brothers to write The Matrix Online. He outlined the general story direction (and various natural offshoots) of events to take place in the MMORPG game. He illustrated cards for the
    6.50
    4 votes
    85
    Aberjhani

    Aberjhani

    Aberjhani is an American historian, columnist, novelist, poet, and editor. Although well known for his blog articles on literature and politics, he is perhaps best known as co-author of Encyclopedia of the Harlem Renaissance and author of I Made My Boy Out of Poetry. The encyclopedia won a Choice Academic Title Award in 2004. Aberjhani grew up in Savannah, Georgia. Upon graduating from Savannah High School in 1975, he studied journalism, creative writing, and the American community at a variety of colleges: Savannah State College (now University); Eckerd College in St. Petersburg, Florida; Macalester College in St. Paul, Minnesota; Temple University in Philadelphia; and the New College of California in San Francisco. He completed additional studies in journalism at the Fort Benjamin Harrison School of Journalism in Indianapolis, Indiana. He served a two-year tour of duty with the U.S. Air Force in Fairbanks, Alaska; four years in Suffolk, England; and another two years with the USAF Reserves in [[Charleston, South Carolina. He studied Equal Opportunity and Human Relations Counseling at the DEOMI Institute at Tyndale AFB, Florida. Aberjhani, the name he assumed for publication as
    5.60
    5 votes
    86
    Edward Lear

    Edward Lear

    • Books illustrated: Illustrations of the Family of the Psittacidae, or Parrots
    Edward Lear (12 May 1812 – 29 January 1888) was a British artist, illustrator, author, and poet, renowned today primarily for his literary nonsense, in poetry and prose, and especially his limericks, a form that he popularised. From childhood he suffered ill health, including epilepsy, of which he was ashamed, and depression. He travelled widely over much of his life before settling in Sanremo. He never managed to marry, though he did propose it, but he had good friends and doted on his cat. When, after a long decline in health, he died of heart disease, sadly, none of his friends were able to attend his funeral. His principal areas of work as an artist were threefold: as a draughtsman employed to illustrate birds and animals; making coloured drawings during his journeys, which he reworked later, sometimes as plates for his travel books; as a (largely frustrated) illustrator of Tennyson's poems. As an author, Lear is principally known for his popular nonsense works, rather than as a travel writer. These show a great ability to use with relish the sound of real and invented English words. He was particularly adept at surprising his readers, and, in his limericks, had a genius for
    8.50
    2 votes
    87

    Katherine Milhous

    • Books illustrated: The Egg Tree
    Katherine Milhous (1894–1977) was an American writer, illustrator and artist. She is best known as the author and illustrator of The Egg Tree, which won the Caldecott Medal for the "most distinguished" picture book for children of 1951. Born into a Quaker family active in the printing industry in Philadelphia, Milhous is also known for her graphic designs for the Works Progress Administration(WPA). Her work has been exhibited at the 1939 New York World's Fair and at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. Katherine Milhous was born Nov. 27, 1894 to Osborn and Katherine Daly Milhous of Philadelphia, Quakers who made their living as printers. When she was young they moved to Pitman, a small camp-meeting town in New Jersey. She returned to Philadelphia to attend the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and the Pennsylvania Museum of Industrial Art. Milhous helped support her schooling by illustrating magazines. In 1934, while at the Academy of Fine Arts, she won the Cresson Traveling Fellowship, which allowed her to study overseas. She then returned to Philadelphia where, for forty years, she shared a studio with friend and fellow-artist Frances Lichten. From 1935 to 1940 Milhous
    8.50
    2 votes
    88
    Leonid Pasternak

    Leonid Pasternak

    • Books illustrated: Resurrection
    Leonid Osipovich Pasternak (born Yitzhok-Leib, or Isaak Iosifovich, Pasternak; Russian: Леони́д О́сипович Пастерна́к, 4 April 1862 N.S. - 31 May 1945) was a Russian post-impressionist painter. He was the father of the poet and novelist Boris Pasternak. Leonid Pasternak was born in Odessa to an Orthodox Jewish family on 4 April 1862. The family claimed to be distantly descended, in one line, from Isaac Abrabanel, the famous 15th-century Jewish philosopher and treasurer of Portugal, although no independent evidence of this existed. Leonid's father made an income by renting out a guest house. The courtyard of the guest house, with its adjoining coach-house, first awakened Leonid's artistic imagination. He was the youngest of the six children in the family. He started to draw very early, but his family tried to discourage him, as they feared that his drawing would interfere with his studies. His first sponsor was the local street cleaner who began buying Pasternak's art when Leonid was seven years old. From 1881 to 1885, Leonid studied at the Moscow University, first at the Medical Department, then at the Department of Law. Eventually he decided to devote his life to art and entered
    8.50
    2 votes
    89

    Marc Simont

    • Books illustrated: A Tree is Nice
    Marc Simont (born November 23, 1915) is an artist, political cartoonist, and illustrator of more than a hundred children's books. The Paris-born Simont, inspired by his father, Spanish painter Joseph Simont, began drawing at an early age. Simont settled in New York City in 1935 after encouragement from his father, attended the New York National School of Design, and served three years in the military. Simont's first illustrated children's book was published in 1939, and since then, he has received the Caldecott Honor for his illustrations of Ruth Krauss' The Happy Day and the Caldecott Medal for A Tree Is Nice by Janice May Udry. He illustrated most of the Nate the Great books, as well as the book Top Secret. Simont and his wife, Sara Dalton, live in West Cornwall, Connecticut.
    8.50
    2 votes
    90
    Maurice Sendak

    Maurice Sendak

    • Books illustrated: Where The Wild Things Are
    Maurice Bernard Sendak (/ˈsɛndæk/; June 10, 1928 – May 8, 2012) was an American writer and illustrator of children's literature. He was best known for his book Where the Wild Things Are, first published in 1963. Sendak was born in Brooklyn, to Polish Jewish immigrant parents Sadie (née Schindler) and Philip Sendak, a dressmaker. Sendak described his childhood as a "terrible situation" because of his extended family's dying in The Holocaust, which exposed him at an early age to death and the concept of mortality. His love of books began at an early age when he developed health problems and was confined to his bed. He decided to become an illustrator after watching Walt Disney's film Fantasia at the age of twelve. One of his first professional commissions was to create window displays for the toy store F.A.O. Schwarz. His illustrations were first published in 1947 in a textbook titled Atomics for the Millions by Dr. Maxwell Leigh Eidinoff. He spent much of the 1950s illustrating children's books written by others before beginning to write his own stories. His older brother Jack Sendak also became an author of children's books, two of which were illustrated by Maurice in the
    8.50
    2 votes
    91
    Tony DiTerlizzi

    Tony DiTerlizzi

    • Book editions illustrated: Deities and Demigods
    Tony M. DiTerlizzi (born September 6, 1969) is an American fantasy artist, children's book creator, and motion picture producer. DiTerlizzi created The Spiderwick Chronicles series with Holly Black, and was an executive producer on the 2008 film adaptation of the series. He won a Caldecott Honor Medal for his adaptation of The Spider and the Fly. In the gaming industry, he best known for his work in the collectible card game Magic: The Gathering and on the Planescape product line for the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game. DiTerlizzi was born into an artistic household in Los Angeles in 1969, the first of three children. The name DiTerlizzi means "from Terlizzi", a village in Italy's Pulia province. He grew up in South Florida where he attended South Fork High School. He went to college at the Florida School of the Arts and The Art Institute of Fort Lauderdale where he earned a graphic design degree in 1992. During his childhood he was introduced to the work of a variety of artists including Norman Rockwell and Dr. Seuss, that he cites as major creative influences. "Many good fantasy artists will tell you their influences are Frazetta or Boris Vallejo. Realizing this, I went for
    8.50
    2 votes
    92
    Charles R. Knight

    Charles R. Knight

    • Books illustrated: Animals of the past
    Charles Robert Knight (October 21, 1874 in Brooklyn – April 15, 1953 in Manhattan) was an American artist best known for his influential paintings of dinosaurs and other prehistoric animals. His works have been reproduced in many books and are currently on display at several major museums in the United States. As a child, Knight was deeply interested in nature and animals, and spent many hours copying the illustrations from his father’s natural history books. Though legally blind because of astigmatism and a subsequent injury to his right eye, Knight pursued his artistic talents with the help of specially-designed glasses, and at the age of twelve, he enrolled at the Metropolitan Art School to become a commercial artist. In 1890, he was hired by a church-decorating firm to design stained-glass windows, and after two years with them, became a freelance illustrator for books and magazines, specializing in nature scenes. In his free time, Knight visited the American Museum of Natural History, attracting the attention of Dr. Jacob Wortman, who asked Knight to paint a restoration of a prehistoric pig, Elotherium, whose fossilized bones were on display. Knight applied his knowledge of
    7.33
    3 votes
    93
    Francis Tsai

    Francis Tsai

    • Book editions illustrated: Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Bestiary
    Francis Tsai is an American comic book artist, illustrator, author and conceptual artist. He is of Taiwanese and Japanese ancestry. Tsai was born in Honolulu, Hawaii and raised in Lubbock, Texas. He was initially trained in chemistry, before receiving a graduate degree in architecture. In 1998, Francis Tsai joined Presto Studios as Conceptual Designer where he provided visual development and game design for the video games Myst 3 and Star Trek: Hidden Evil. In 2003, Tsai joined High Moon Studios where he was principal concept artist for the video games The Bourne Conspiracy and Darkwatch. Tsai has illustrated cards for the Magic: The Gathering collectible card game. Tsai is currently working on a five-issue graphic novel miniseries called Tracker for Top Cow Productions. Tsai also contributes covers and interior art for Marvel Comics. Tsai provided interior artwork for Secret Identities: The Asian American Superhero Anthology as well as covers and interior artwork for the serialized graphic novel Mercy Thompson: Homecoming, which reached number eight on the Comics Bestsellers list in October 2009. In a generally favorable review of the novel, Martha Cornog wrote, "Francis Tsai's
    7.33
    3 votes
    94
    Winslow Homer

    Winslow Homer

    • Books illustrated: The courtin'
    Winslow Homer (February 24, 1836 – September 29, 1910) was an American landscape painter and printmaker, best known for his marine subjects. He is considered one of the foremost painters in 19th century America and a preeminent figure in American art. Largely self-taught, Homer began his career working as a commercial illustrator. He subsequently took up oil painting and produced major studio works characterized by the weight and density he exploited from the medium. He also worked extensively in watercolor, creating a fluid and prolific oeuvre, primarily chronicling his working vacations. Born in Boston, Massachusetts in 1836, Homer was the second of three sons of Charles Savage Homer and Henrietta Benson Homer, both from long lines of New Englanders. His mother was a gifted amateur watercolorist and Homer's first teacher, and she and her son had a close relationship throughout their lives. Homer took on many of her traits, including her quiet, strong-willed, terse, sociable nature; her dry sense of humor; and her artistic talent. Homer had a happy childhood, growing up mostly in then rural Cambridge, Massachusetts. He was an average student, but his art talent was evident in his
    7.33
    3 votes
    95
    John Howe

    John Howe

    • Book edition covers: Forest Mage
    • Books illustrated: Beowulf: A Tale of Blood, Heat, and Ashes
    John Howe (born August 21, 1957 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada) is a Canadian book illustrator, living in Neuchâtel, Switzerland. One year after graduating from high school, he studied in a college in Strasbourg, France, then at the Ecole des Arts Décoratifs. He is best known for his work based on J. R. R. Tolkien's worlds. Howe and noted Tolkien artist Alan Lee served as chief conceptual designers for Peter Jackson's The Lord of the Rings movie trilogy, and Howe also did the illustration for the "Lord of the Rings" board game created by Reiner Knizia. Howe also re-illustrated the maps of The Lord of the Rings, The Hobbit, and The Silmarillion in 1996–2003. His work is however not limited to this, and includes images of myths such as the Anglo Saxon legend of Beowulf (he also illustrated Knizia's board game Beowulf: The Legend). Howe illustrated many other books, amongst which many belong to the fantasy genre (Robin Hobb's books for instance.) He also contributed to the film adaptation of The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe by C. S. Lewis. In 2005 a limited edition of George R. R. Martin's novel A Clash of Kings was released by Meisha Merlin, complete with numerous
    6.25
    4 votes
    96
    Johnny Gruelle

    Johnny Gruelle

    • Book editions illustrated: Raggedy Ann stories
    • Books illustrated: Raggedy Ann Stories
    Johnny Gruelle (December 24, 1880 – January 9, 1938) was an American artist, political cartoonist, children's book author and illustrator (and even songwriter). He is known as the creator of Raggedy Ann and Raggedy Andy. He had such confidence in his design that often he would create the final ink work without first sketching in pencil. He was born John Barton Gruelle in Arcola, Illinois. His father Richard Gruelle was an artist affiliated with the Hoosier Group of Indiana artists. His first well known cartooning work was Mr. Twee Deedle which Gruelle created after he beat out 1,500 entrants to win a cartooning contest sponsored in 1911 by The New York Herald. Mr. Twee Deedle was in print from 1911 to 1914. Gruelle gave his daughter Marcella a dusty, faceless rag doll which she found in the attic. He drew a face on the doll and named her Raggedy Ann. Marcella played with the doll so much, Gruelle figured other children would like the doll too. Gruelle's Raggedy Ann doll U.S. Patent D47,789 was dated September 7, 1915. In 1918, the PF Volland Company published Raggedy Ann Stories. Gruelle then created a series of popular Raggedy Ann books and dolls. These became Volland's major
    6.25
    4 votes
    97
    Man Ray

    Man Ray

    Man Ray (born Emmanuel Radnitzky, August 27, 1890 – November 18, 1976) was an American modernist artist who spent most of his career in Paris, France. He was a significant contributor to the Dada and Surrealist movements, although his ties to each were informal. He produced major works in a variety of media but considered himself a painter above all. He was best known in the art world for his avant-garde photography, and he was a renowned fashion and portrait photographer. Ray is also noted for his work with photograms, which he called "rayographs" in reference to himself. Ray's work was not appreciated during his lifetime, with the exception of his fashion and portrait photography; especially in his native United States. Nevertheless, his reputation has grown steadily in the decades since. During his career as an artist, Man Ray allowed few details of his early life or family background to be known to the public. He even refused to acknowledge that he ever had a name other than Man Ray. Man Ray was born as Emmanuel Radnitzky in South Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. in 1890. He was the eldest child of Russian Jewish immigrants. He had a brother and two sisters, the youngest born
    6.25
    4 votes
    98
    Arthur Rackham

    Arthur Rackham

    • Book editions illustrated: Zobeck Gazetteer Volume 2: Dwarves of the Ironcrags
    Arthur Rackham (19 September 1867 – 6 September 1939) was an English book illustrator. Rackham was born in London as one of 12 children. In 1884,at the age of 17,he was sent on an ocean voyage to Australia to improve his fragile health, accompanied by two Aunts. At the age of 18, he worked as a clerk at the Westminster Fire Office and began studying part-time at the Lambeth School of Art. In 1892 he left his job and started working for The Westminster Budget as a reporter and illustrator. His first book illustrations were published in 1893 in To the Other Side by Thomas Rhodes, but his first serious commission was in 1894 for The Dolly Dialogues, the collected sketches of Anthony Hope, who later went on to write The Prisoner of Zenda. Book illustrating then became Rackham's career for the rest of his life. In 1903 he married Edyth Starkie, with whom he had one daughter, Barbara, in 1908. Rackham won a gold medal at the Milan International Exhibition in 1906 and another one at the Barcelona International Exposition in 1912. His works were included in numerous exhibitions, including one at the Louvre in Paris in 1914. Arthur Rackham died in 1939 of cancer in his home in Limpsfield,
    7.00
    3 votes
    99
    Olly Smith

    Olly Smith

    • Books illustrated: Eat & Drink
    Olly Smith (born September 18, 1974) is a TV presenter, wine expert and newspaper columnist. He is the presenter of The Secret Supper Club and Iron Chef UK for Channel 4, and has regularly appeared on BBC1's Saturday Kitchen, BBC Breakfast, Great Food Live, Food Uncut "Fern" and Taste, and formerly presented the Richard & Judy Wine Club on Channel 4. Smith presented Cheers from Chile (Spanish name: Descorchando Chile, "Cheers from Chile"), a 13 part series on Chilean wine broadcasted in the Chilean TV channel Canal 13. He works with P&O Cruises, in particular the wine bar and restaurant known as The Glass House on board the MS Azura, and blends the house wines for the rest of their fleet. Smith also creates the wine lists for Marco Pierre White's Ocean Grill across P&O's fleet. Since June 2009, he has written a weekly wine column for Live magazine in The Mail on Sunday. Smith writes his free online wine bulletin at hotbottle.co.uk and currently writes a weekly column in Waitrose Weekend. His book Eat & Drink is published by Headline and his Wine App is featured in The Sunday Times World's Best Apps. Smith also designed The Glass with Zalto for tasting and evaluating both red and
    7.00
    3 votes
    100
    Óscar Domínguez

    Óscar Domínguez

    Oscar M. Domínguez (January 3, 1906 – December 31, 1958) was a Spanish surrealist painter. Born in San Cristóbal de La Laguna on the island of Tenerife, Domínguez spent his youth with his grandmother in Tacoronte and devoted himself to painting at a young age after suffering a serious illness which affected his growth and caused a progressive deformation of his facial bone frame and limbs. He went to Paris at 21 where he first worked for his father in the central market of Les Halles, and spent his nights diving in cabarets. He then frequented some art schools, and visited galleries and museums. Domínguez was rapidly attracted by avant-garde painters, notably Yves Tanguy and Pablo Picasso, whose influences were visible in his first works. At 25 he painted a self-portrait full of premonition as he showed himself with a deformed hand and with the veins of his arm cut. He chose to kill himself 27 years later by cutting his veins. In 1933 Domínguez met André Breton, a theoretician of Surrealism, and Paul Éluard, known as the poet of this movement, and took part a year later in the Surrealist exhibition held in Copenhagen and those of London and Tenerife in 1936. He took up the
    7.00
    3 votes
    101

    Peter Spier

    • Books illustrated: Noah's Ark
    Peter Spier (born June 6, 1927 in Amsterdam, North Holland) is a Dutch-born American author and illustrator who has published more than thirty children's books. Spier grew up in Broek in Waterland as the son of Jo Spier, a very popular Dutch artist and illustrator, and Tineke van Raalte. His father was Jewish, and, during the Second World War, Peter was one of nine prisoners of Villa Bouchina and was later in Theresienstadt. After the war he studied at the Rijksakademie in Amsterdam and joined the Royal Netherlands Navy for four years. The entire Spier family emigrated to the United States in 1950. Peter started his career at advertisement agencies and only later focused on writing and illustrating children's books. Like other children's illustrators such as Beatrix Potter, Peter Spier demonstrates his talent and skills as an artist/illustrator using pen, ink and watercolour on paper. Many of Spier's illustrations are extremely detailed and historically accurate. Close examination will often yield a humorous scene not readily apparent at first glance the finding of which often delights readers of all ages. Spier reserved all rights and retained the copyrights to his works. In
    7.00
    3 votes
    102
    Jon J. Muth

    Jon J. Muth

    • Books illustrated: Zen Shorts
    Jon J. Muth (born July 28, 1960, in Cincinnati, Ohio) is an American comic book artist and children's book illustrator, known for his painted artwork. Muth studied stone sculpture and shodō (書道) (brush calligraphy) in Japan; and studied painting, printmaking, and drawing in England, Austria, and Germany. His works include J. M. DeMatteis' graphic novel Moonshadow, Neil Gaiman's The Sandman: The Wake (along with Michael Zulli and Charles Vess), Mike Carey's Lucifer: Nirvana and Swamp Thing: Roots. Muth has gone on to an award-winning career as a children's book writer and illustrator. He received a Gold Medal from the Society of Illustrators, in 1999, for his illustrations in Come On, Rain! by Karen Hesse. Muth has illustrated cards for the Magic: The Gathering collectible card game. He has also created a version of the Stone soup fable set in China. Muth has authored and illustrated a number of books for a variety of publishing houses. (Due to new editions, publishing dates may not be completely accurate.)
    6.00
    4 votes
    103
    Marcel Marlier

    Marcel Marlier

    • Books illustrated: Martine baby-sitter
    Marcel Marlier (18 November 1930 – 18 January 2011) was a Belgian artist and illustrator. He was born in Herseaux, Belgium. When he was 16, he enroled in decorative art at Saint-Luc de Tournai. He finished his studies in 1951 with the greatest distinction. He returned as a teacher two years later. The Belgian publisher La Procure à Namur organized a drawing contest. They were interested in finding talented artists to illustrate works for school children. Marlier won the competition. Two books resulted from this and these books guided a whole generation of Belgian children through the first few years of school, I Read with Michel and Nicole and I Calculate with Michel and Nicole. Marlier's collaboration with La Procure à Namur lasted more than 25 years. Pierre Servais at Casterman, a Belgian publishing company, began to notice Marlier's drawings in 1951. He suggested that Marlier should illustrate a series of books for children. The result was editions of Alexandre Dumas' adventure books. This was followed in 1953 by illustrations for a book by Jeanne Cappe about two very similar rabbits. Marlier also took part in the Farandole series, intended for children. From 1954, Marlier
    6.00
    4 votes
    104
    Matt Cavotta

    Matt Cavotta

    • Book edition covers: Unearthed Arcana
    • Book editions illustrated: Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Bestiary
    Matt Cavotta is an American artist and writer. His artwork is currently focused on the fantasy genre, with notable contributions to popular games such as Magic: The Gathering and Dungeons & Dragons. He wrote a weekly column for MagicTheGathering.com called "Taste the Magic" from February 2005 to September 2007. The column focused on development of the world, art, characters, and other intellectual property for Magic, the first to do so comprehensively. He has also written and illustrated three unpublished children's books, and provided interior illustrations in Oriental Adventures, Manual of the Planes, and Deities and Demigods. Matt is the second of three children born to his parents Mike ("Finn") and Maureen Cavotta, after his older brother Michael but before his younger sister Haley. Matt was raised in Moreland Hills, Ohio. He was educated at the Orange Schools in neighboring Pepper Pike, Ohio. He graduated from Orange High School in 1989. In his late high school days Matt played in several rock bands, mostly within the hard-rock and heavy metal genre. Matt is a graduate of the Columbus College of Art & Design with a focus on painting and illustration. After an early art career
    6.00
    4 votes
    105

    Phil Hale

    • Book edition covers: The Dark Tower II -The Drawing of the Three
    Philip Oliver Hale, born in 1963, is an American figurative painter who currently resides in London, England. Prior to turning to fine arts he worked as an illustrator, doing mostly figurative work. He was apprenticed to/ partnered with American painter Rick Berry. His current work focuses on figure as well, in depictions of slightly surreal scenes with strange characters performing various physical feats, usually in a confrontation of some sort. He seems to take keen interest in tension and emphasis of angular and dynamic aspects of the figure, almost always incorporating slight anatomical distortions to great effect. A portrait of former UK Prime Minister, Tony Blair by the artist was unveiled in Westminster on April 23, 2008. Mr Blair sat for the portrait during his final months in office in 2007. He also recently formed the movie production company "unprofessional.com" with his son Callum Hale Thomson. It specialises in bespoke analogue filmmaking. He was commissioned by Penguin Classics to paint new covers for new editions of six Joseph Conrad books, published in 2007: Heart of Darkness and The Congo Diary, Typhoon and Other Stories, Lord Jim, Under Western Eyes, The Nigger of
    6.00
    4 votes
    106
    Borin Van Loon

    Borin Van Loon

    • Books illustrated: DNA for Beginners
    Borin Van Loon is a freelance illustrator (since 1976). He is an author, collagist and surrealist painter and has worked for a wide variety of clients in editorial, publishing and promotion. He has created an eclectic collage/cartoon mural on the subject of DNA and genetics for the Health Matters Gallery in London's Science Museum. Van Loon published The Bart Dickon Omnibus of his hero's derring-do in 2005 comprising a surrealist collage graphic novel. Roger Sabin, a writer about comics and lecturer at Central St. Martins in London, England, said of the Bart Dickon series: "Van Loon’s dapper, nay sartorially gifted, creation Bart Dickon is ostensibly an affectionate homage to the boys’ heroes of the 1930s-40s story papers and comics. But look closer and you begin to see that the wonderful collage style of the stories hearkens back to a different period – namely, the high-water mark of underground experimentation in the 1960s and 70s (think Oz/IT/Cyclops) – and that Dickon is a very different kind of hero, again with echoes from that Hippie era (his intra-dimensional adventuring is pure Jerry Cornelius, and his left-wing politics certainly don’t fit the 1930s-40s template). Dickon
    8.00
    2 votes
    107
    Carol Wald

    Carol Wald

    • Books illustrated: Twenty-Nine Essays
    Carol S. Wald (January 21, 1935 – September 8, 2000) was an American artist who was also widely known for her talents as an illustrator. Her collages and paintings appeared in Time, Fortune, and Ms, and on the covers of Business Week, the New York Times Sunday Magazine, and Saturday Review. Carol Wald was born in Detroit, Michigan, where she began studying art at age twelve. At age sixteen, while still a student at Detroit's Cass Technical High School, her talent was recognized by mayor Albert Cobo, and in 1954 she was awarded a four year scholarship at the Art School of the Society of Arts and Crafts in Detroit. In 1960, the Detroit Institute of Arts purchased one of her paintings, "Children On Stilts". In 1963, she studied under Ben Shahn at the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Skowhegan, Maine, and in 1967 she studied at the Cranbrook Educational Community in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. In 1964 she was given a ten-year retrospective exhibition at the Flint Institute of Arts in Flint, Michigan. By 1970 the National Gallery of Art and the Minnesota Museum of American Art had each purchased paintings by her for their permanent collections. She left Detroit for New York
    8.00
    2 votes
    108
    John Lennon

    John Lennon

    • Books illustrated: In his own write
    John Ono Lennon, MBE, born John Winston Lennon (9 October 1940 – 8 December 1980) was an English musician, singer and songwriter who rose to worldwide fame as a founder member of The Beatles, one of the most commercially successful and critically acclaimed acts in the history of popular music. Together with Paul McCartney, he formed one of the most celebrated songwriting partnerships of the 20th century. Born and raised in Liverpool, Lennon became involved as a teenager in the skiffle craze; his first band, the Quarrymen, evolved into the Beatles in 1960. As the group disintegrated towards the end of the decade, Lennon embarked on a solo career that produced the critically acclaimed albums John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band and Imagine, and iconic songs such as "Give Peace a Chance" and "Imagine". After his marriage to Yoko Ono in 1969, he changed his name to John Ono Lennon. Lennon disengaged himself from the music business in 1975 to devote time to raising his infant son Sean, but re-emerged with Ono in 1980 with the new album Double Fantasy. He was murdered three weeks after its release. Lennon revealed a rebellious nature and acerbic wit in his music, writing, drawings, on film and
    8.00
    2 votes
    109
    Rick Veitch

    Rick Veitch

    • Books illustrated: The Adventures of Unemployed Man
    Richard "Rick" Veitch (born May 7, 1951) is an American comic book artist and writer who has worked in mainstream, underground, and alternative comics. Veitch studied cartooning at The Kubert School, and was in the first class to graduate from the school in 1978, along with his future long-time collaborators Steve Bissette and John Totleben. Veitch had already made his publishing debut prior to attending the Kubert School: in 1972, he illustrated the horror parody Two-Fisted Zombies (written by his brother Tom Veitch), but this one-shot failed to make a splash in the fading underground comix field of the '70s. His next major project was an adaptation, with Bissette, of the film 1941. During the 1980s, Veitch became known as a distinctive fantasy artist and writer for Marvel's Epic Comics line, for which he created three graphic novels, Abraxas and the Earthman (serialized in Epic Illustrated), Heartburst (published as a standalone graphic novel) and The One (originally published as a six-issue comic book limited series). Heartburst was straightforward science fiction, while The One was an ambitious and bizarre fantasy-adventure involving monstrous superheroes, the Cold War, and
    8.00
    2 votes
    110
    Albert Gleizes

    Albert Gleizes

    Albert Gleizes (Paris, 8 December 1881 – Avignon, 23 June 1953), was a French artist, theoretician, philosopher, a founder of Cubism and an influence on the School of Paris. Albert Gleizes and Jean Metzinger wrote the first major treatise on Cubism, Du "Cubisme", 1912. Gleizes was a founding member of the Section d'Or group of artists. He was also a member of Der Sturm, and his many theoretical writings were originally most appreciated in Germany, where especially at the Bauhaus his ideas were given thoughtful consideration. Gleizes spent four crucial years in New York, and played an important role in making America aware of modern art. He was a member of the Society of Independent Artists, founder of the Ernest-Renan Association, and both a founder and participant in the Abbaye de Creteil. Gleizes exhibited regularly at Léonce Rosenberg’s Galerie de l’Effort Moderne in Paris; he was also a founder, organizer and director of Abstraction-Création. From the mid-1920s to the late 1930s much of his energy went into writing (e.g., La Peinture et ses lois (Paris, 1923), Vers une conscience plastique: La Forme et l’histoire (Paris, 1932) and Homocentrisme (Sablons, 1937). Born Albert Léon
    9.00
    1 votes
    111
    Antonio Saura

    Antonio Saura

    • Books illustrated: Three Visions
    Antonio Saura (September 22, 1930, Huesca – July 22, 1998, Cuenca) was a Spanish artist and writer, one of the major post-war painters to emerge in Spain in the fifties whose work has marked several generations of artists and whose critical voice is often remembered. He began painting and writing in 1947 in Madrid while suffering from tuberculosis, having already been confined to his bed for five years. In his beginnings he created numerous drawings and paintings with a dreamlike surrealist character that most often represented imaginary landscapes, employing a flat smooth treatment that offers a rich palette of colors. He claimed Hans Arp and Yves Tanguy as his artistic influences. He stayed in Paris in 1952 and in 1954–1955 during which he met Benjamin Péret and associated with the Surrealists, although he soon parted with the group, joining instead the company of his friend the painter Simon Hantaï. Using the technique of scraping, he adopted a gestural style and created an abstract type of painting, still very colorful with an organic, aleatory design. The first appearances in his work of forms that will soon become archetypes of the female body or the human figure occur in the
    9.00
    1 votes
    112
    Chris Moore

    Chris Moore

    • Book edition covers: House of Suns
    Chris Moore (born 1947) is a British illustrator, particularly noted for his book covers, especially in the field of science fiction. He has created cover images for works by many of the most famous authors in science fiction, including since 1998 the majority of book covers for Orion Publishing's SF Masterworks series. Non SF authors whose work he has provided covers for include Jeffrey Archer, Frederick Forsyth, Jackie Collins, Claire Francis, Stephen Leather, Wilbur Smith, Terence Strong, Alastair Reynolds, Joseph Heller, and Colin Forbes. In the 1970s he also created a number of album covers, for recording artists including Rod Stewart (The Vintage Years), the group Magnum, Journey, Fleetwood Mac (Penguin), The Allman Brothers Band, Lindisfarne (Magic in The Air and The News), Status Quo (Just Supposin' and 12 Gold Bars), and Pentangle (Pentangling).
    9.00
    1 votes
    113
    Fernand Léger

    Fernand Léger

    Joseph Fernand Henri Léger (February 4, 1881 – August 17, 1955) was a French painter, sculptor, and filmmaker. In his early works he created a personal form of Cubism which he gradually modified into a more figurative, populist style. His boldly simplified treatment of modern subject matter has caused him to be regarded as a forerunner of Pop art. Léger was born in Argentan, Orne, Lower Normandy, where his father raised cattle. Fernand Léger initially trained as an architect from 1897–1899, before moving in 1900 to Paris, where he supported himself as an architectural draftsman. After military service in Versailles, Yvelines, in 1902–1903, he enrolled at the School of Decorative Arts after his application to the École des Beaux-Arts was rejected. He nevertheless attended the Beaux-Arts as a non-enrolled student, spending what he described as "three empty and useless years" studying with Gérôme and others, while also studying at the Académie Julian. He began to work seriously as a painter only at the age of 25. At this point his work showed the influence of Impressionism, as seen in Le Jardin de ma mère (My Mother's Garden) of 1905, one of the few paintings from this period that he
    9.00
    1 votes
    114
    Jaime Hernandez

    Jaime Hernandez

    • Book edition covers: Love and Rockets: New Stories no.1
    • Book editions illustrated: Love and Rockets: New Stories no.1
    • Books illustrated: Love and Rockets: New Stories no.1
    Jaime (sometimes spelled Xaime) Hernandez (born 1959) is the co-creator of the independent comic book Love and Rockets (along with his brothers Gilbert and Mario). Jaime Hernandez grew up in Oxnard, California. He is the youngest of his family, with four older brothers and one sister. His family embraced comics: their mother read them frequently and old issues were kept in large quantities in the house, to be read and re-read by all over the years. "We grew up with comics," Hernandez says. "I wanted to draw comics my whole life." The brothers read all types of comics and enjoyed those that gave a fairly realistic depiction of family life as well as the standard superhero adventures. Hernandez was particularly influenced by Hank Ketcham's Dennis the Menace and Dan DeCarlo's Archie' comics. The children in his otherwise rather realistic stories are often drawn to resemble Ketcham's, and Jaime's character's often strike very DeCarlo-esque poses. The work of Alex Toth, Charles Schulz, Jesse Marsh and Jack Kirby were also hugely influential. Hernandez has a lifelong fascination with pro wrestling, especially women's wrestling, and it has been a regular part of his work. Hernandez has
    9.00
    1 votes
    115

    Mordicai Gerstein

    • Books illustrated: The Man Who Walked Between the Towers
    Mordicai Gerstein, born November 24, 1935 in Los Angeles, California is an American artist, writer, and film director, best known for illustrating and writing children's books. In 2004, Gerstein received the Caldecott Medal for his book The Man Who Walked Between the Towers. Written in response to the September 11 attacks, the book tells the story of Philippe Petit's August 7, 1974 unauthorized high-wire walk between the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center. Gerstein lives in Westhampton, Massachusetts. Gerstein has written and illustrated the following books: Gerstein has written the following books which were illustrated by his wife, Susan Yard Harris: Gerstein has also illustrated a number of books by other authors, including
    9.00
    1 votes
    116
    Peter Paul Rubens

    Peter Paul Rubens

    • Book edition covers: The Fish the Fighters and the Song-girl
    • Book editions illustrated: The Fish the Fighters and the Song-girl
    • Books illustrated: Wars don’t bring lasting peace, only lasting death.
    Sir Peter Paul Rubens (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈrybə(n)s]; 28 June 1577 – 30 May 1640), was a Flemish Baroque painter, and a proponent of an extravagant Baroque style that emphasised movement, colour, and sensuality. He is well known for his Counter-Reformation altarpieces, portraits, landscapes, and history paintings of mythological and allegorical subjects. In addition to running a large studio in Antwerp that produced paintings popular with nobility and art collectors throughout Europe, Rubens was a classically educated humanist scholar, art collector, and diplomat who was knighted by both Philip IV, King of Spain, and Charles I, King of England. Rubens was born in Siegen, Germany, to Jan Rubens and Maria Pypelincks. His father, a Calvinist, and mother fled Antwerp for Cologne in 1568, after increased religious turmoil and persecution of Protestants during the rule of the Spanish Netherlands by the Duke of Alba. Jan Rubens became the legal advisor (and lover) of Anna of Saxony, the second wife of William I of Orange, and settled at her court in Siegen in 1570. Following Jan Rubens's imprisonment for the affair, Peter Paul Rubens was born in 1577. The family returned to Cologne the
    9.00
    1 votes
    117
    Simeon Solomon

    Simeon Solomon

    • Books illustrated: Lesbia Brandon
    Simeon Solomon (9 October 1840 No. 3 Sandys Street, Bishopsgate, London, England – 14 August 1905 in St. Giles's Workhouse, Endell Street) was an English Pre-Raphaelite painter Solomon was born into a prominent Jewish family. He was the eighth and last child born to merchant Michael (Meyer) Solomon and artist Catherine (Kate) Levy. Solomon was a younger brother to fellow painters Abraham Solomon (1824–1862) and Rebecca Solomon (1832–1886). Born and educated in London, Solomon started receiving lessons in painting from his older brother around 1850. He started attending Carey's Art Academy in 1852. His older sister first exhibited her works at the Royal Academy during the same year. As a student at the Royal Academy Schools, Solomon was introduced through Dante Gabriel Rossetti to other members of the Pre-Raphaelite circle, as well as the poet Algernon Charles Swinburne and the painter Edward Burne-Jones in 1857. His first exhibition was at the Royal Academy in 1858. He continued to hold exhibitions of his work at the Royal Academy between 1858 and 1872. In addition to the literary paintings favoured by the Pre-Raphaelite school, Solomon's subjects often included scenes from the
    9.00
    1 votes
    118

    Louis Slobodkin

    • Books illustrated: Many Moons
    Louis Slobodkin (February 19, 1903 – May 1975), born in Albany, New York was a sculptor, author and illustrator of numerous children's books. At the age of 15, he attended the Beaux Arts Institute of Design in New York City from 1918 to 1923. He worked then as an elevator operator to sustain his living, as he studied Plato, Aquinas, Kant, and Goethe. He would deliberately get his elevator 'stuck' between floors so he could read his books. Slobodkin married Florence Gersh, a poet and children's book writer in 1927, but he didn't immediately become involved with children's literature. He illustrated his first children's book in 1941, The Moffats, by his friend, Eleanor Estes, with whom he collaborated on five more books. In 1944, he won the Caldecott Medal for illustrating Many Moons, written by American writer James Thurber. He wrote and illustrated the popular The Spaceship Under the Apple Tree book series. He was also the author of Sculpture; Principles and Practice. During his career, Slobodkin illustrated nearly 90 books, 50 of which he also wrote. He and his wife, Florence, collaborated on five books from 1958 to 1969, including The Cowboy Twins (1960). Slobodkin's last book
    5.00
    5 votes
    119

    Emily Arnold McCully

    • Books illustrated: Mirette on the High Wire
    Emily Arnold McCully is a children's author and illustrator who was born in Galesburg, Illinois, in 1939, but grew up in Garden City, New York. She attended Pembroke College (now a part of Brown University) and earned an M.A. in Art History from Columbia University. At Brown University, she acted in the inaugural evening of Production Workshop and other plays, co-wrote the annual musical, Brownbrokers, and earned a Phi Beta Kappa key. In 1976, she published a short story in The Massachusetts Review. It was selected for the O’Henry Collection: Best Short Stories of the Year. Two novels followed: A Craving in 1982, and Life Drawing in 1986. In 2012, McCully published Ballerina Swan with Holiday House Books for Young People, written by legendary prima ballerina Allegra Kent. It has received rave reviews from The New York Times, Kirkus Reviews, and School Library Journal. As an actor, she performed in Equity productions of Elizabeth Diggs’ Saint Florence at Capital Rep in Albany and The Vineyard Theater in New York City. Among the awards she has won, Ms. McCully has received a Christopher Award for Picnic, and the Caldecott Medal for Mirette on the High Wire, the Jane Addams Award, the
    6.67
    3 votes
    120
    Gahan Wilson

    Gahan Wilson

    • Book edition covers: A Walking Tour of the Shambles
    Gahan Wilson (born February 18, 1930 in Evanston, Illinois) is an American author, cartoonist and illustrator known for his cartoons depicting horror-fantasy situations. Since 1966, he has been married to the author Nancy Winters (née Nancy Dee Midyette). Wilson's cartoons and illustrations are drawn in a playfully grotesque style and have a dark humor that is often compared to the work of The New Yorker cartoonist and Addams Family creator Charles Addams. But while both feature vampires, cemeteries and other traditional horror elements in their work, Addams' cartoons are gothic, reserved and old-fashioned, while Wilson's work is more contemporary, gross and confrontational, featuring atomic mutants, subway monsters and serial killers. It could be argued that Addams' work was probably meant to be funny without a lot of satirical intent, while Wilson often has a very specific point to make. Wilson was inspired by the irreverent work of the various satiric Mad and Punch cartoonists, as well as the science fiction monster films of the 1950s. His cartoons and prose fiction appeared regularly in Playboy, Collier's and The New Yorker for almost 50 years. In addition to his cartoons for
    6.67
    3 votes
    121
    Leonardo da Vinci

    Leonardo da Vinci

    • Books illustrated: De divina proportione
    Leonardo di ser Piero da Vinci (Italian pronunciation: [leoˈnardo da ˈvintʃi]  pronunciation (help·info)) (April 15, 1452 – May 2, 1519, Old Style) was an Italian Renaissance polymath: painter, sculptor, architect, musician, scientist, mathematician, engineer, inventor, anatomist, geologist, cartographer, botanist, and writer. His genius, perhaps more than that of any other figure, epitomized the Renaissance humanist ideal. Leonardo has often been described as the archetype of the Renaissance Man, a man of "unquenchable curiosity" and "feverishly inventive imagination". He is widely considered to be one of the greatest painters of all time and perhaps the most diversely talented person ever to have lived. According to art historian Helen Gardner, the scope and depth of his interests were without precedent and "his mind and personality seem to us superhuman, the man himself mysterious and remote". Marco Rosci states that while there is much speculation about Leonardo, his vision of the world is essentially logical rather than mysterious, and that the empirical methods he employed were unusual for his time. Born out of wedlock to a notary, Piero da Vinci, and a peasant woman,
    6.67
    3 votes
    122
    Russ Nicholson

    Russ Nicholson

    • Books illustrated: The Warlock of Firetop Mountain
    Russ Nicholson is a British illustrator. Russ Nicholson is an illustrator best known over the years for his black and white fantasy art. He has contributed to such notable game related titles such as The Warlock of Firetop Mountain, first in the illustrated series of Fighting Fantasy game books by Steve Jackson and Ian Livingstone. He also illustrated many creatures in the original UK contribution to the first edition of the Fiend Folio Advanced Dungeons and Dragons game book, and the six original published "episodes" of 'The Fabled Lands' created by Dave Morris and Jamie Thomson, and numerous Games Workshop products, including Warhammer Fantasy Battle, Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay, Warhammer 40,000 and to their magazine White Dwarf. He studied at Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, which later became part of Dundee University, Scotland. Russ moved to England in the 1970s and, save for a brief sojourn in Papua New Guinea, has lived and worked in England ever since. For over forty years Russ has produced work for a wide range of companies and publishers, including Puffin, Pan, Collins, Hodder and Stoughton, TSR, Games Workshop, Hoggshead Publishing, DC Thomson, and Le
    6.67
    3 votes
    123
    Howard Terpning

    Howard Terpning

    • Books illustrated: Spirit of the Plains people
    Howard Terpning (born November 5, 1927) is an American painter and illustrator best known for his paintings of Native Americans. Terpning was born in Oak Park, Illinois. His mother was an interior decorator, and his father worked for the railroad. He grew up in the Midwest living in Iowa, Missouri and Texas as well as Illinois. As a boy he liked to draw and knew by the age of seven that he wanted to be an artist. At age 15, he became fascinated with the West and Native Americans when he spent the summer camping and fishing with a cousin near Durango, Colorado. When he turned 17, he enlisted in the Marine Corps and served from 1945 through 1946. He was stationed in China for nine months. After leaving the Marines he enrolled at the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts in their two-year commercial art program using the G.I. Bill to pay his tuition. To further his study he attended the American Academy of Art in Chicago for six months where he honed his life drawing and painting skills. After art school a family friend introduced Terpning to Haddon Sundblom, a successful and highly regarded illustrator of that time. Based on the recommendation and the strength of Terpning's drawings Sundblom
    5.75
    4 votes
    124
    Michael Nasser

    Michael Nasser

    • Books illustrated: The Adventures of Unemployed Man
    Michael Netzer (born Michael Nasser on 9 October 1955) is an American artist best known for his comic book work for industry leaders DC Comics and Marvel Comics in the 1970s, as well as for his online presence. Michael Nasser (later Netzer) was born in Detroit, Michigan, to parents of Lebanese origin. He contracted polio at the age of eight months which partially paralyzed his left hip and leg. After two years of medical treatment, he was sent with his mother and siblings to his father's Druze hometown, Dayr Qūbil, Lebanon. In 1967, at the age of 11, he returned to Detroit. In school, he became interested in comic book illustration and storytelling, and began developing skills as an artist. He used his art for a campaign that won him election of vice-president of his senior class in Redford High School, where he also gained the rank of lieutenant colonel in the JROTC program. During high school, Netzer met Greg Theakston, who introduced him to the world of professional comics art. He worked as a sign painter and graphic designer while attending Wayne State University in Michigan for two years. Theakston later introduced him to Neal Adams at the Detroit Triple Fan Fair comics
    5.75
    4 votes
    125

    Virginia Lee Burton

    • Books illustrated: The Little House
    Virginia Lee Burton (August 30, 1909 – October 15, 1968), also known by her married name, Virginia Demetrios, was an American illustrator and children's book author. She wrote and illustrated seven children's books, including the Caldecott Medal-winning The Little House. Virginia Burton was born in Newton Centre, Massachusetts, the daughter of a British poet-musician mother and a father whom she said was the first dean of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. When she was approximately 8 years old, the family moved to San Diego, California, and a year later settled nearby in Carmel-by-the-Sea. Burton won a state scholarship to the California School of Fine Arts, in San Francisco. Living across the bay in Alameda, while attending art school, she used the long commute by train, ferry boat and cable car "to train myself in making quick sketches from life and from memory of my unaware fellow passengers." In 1928, after a year at art school, she moved to Boston, Massachusetts, where her father lived and near her sister, a dancer in New York City, New York. She found work as a "sketcher" on the newspaper the Boston Evening Transcript, working for two-and-a-half years under its
    5.75
    4 votes
    126
    Anonymous

    Anonymous

    • Book editions illustrated: Tempus with his right-side companion Niko
    Anonymous is a band from Andorra that in 2007 represented the country with the song "Salvem el món" in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007 after winning the national selection. The song, however, failed to make it through past the semi-final stage. The top ten acts are moved up to the finals, and Andorra came in 12th. The band was formed in 2004 and has had some success in Andorra and northern Spain (mainly Catalonia). The band sang "Salvem el món" for Andorra - however, Narvaez was underage for the contest, so only Francesca, Martínez, and Gallego were able to perform. The band did not move on to the finals, as they came in 12th place. However, this is the best Andorra has ever done.
    7.50
    2 votes
    127
    Anton Otto Fischer

    Anton Otto Fischer

    • Books illustrated: Once to Every Man
    Anton Otto Fischer (February 23, 1882 - March 26, 1962) was an illustrator for the Saturday Evening Post. Born in Germany and orphaned at any early age, he ran away at the age of 15 to escape being forced into priesthood. He came to America as a deck hand on a German vessel. He sacrificed two months’ pay to obtain his freedom and then went on to sail on American ships for three years. For a fourteen-month period in 1905-1906, he worked as a model and general handyman for artist Arthur Burdette Frost. He went to Paris in October 1906 and studied for two years with Jean Paul Laurens at the Academie Julian, spending summers painting landscapes in Normandy. Fischer returned to New York City in January 1908. After being influenced by Howard Pyle, he moved to Wilmington, Delaware where he established a studio at 1110 Franklin Street. Pyle helped him transformed his firsthand knowledge into pictorial drama, but had little success in enlivening his lead-colored palette. He freelanced in “subject pictures,” or illustrations telling a human interest story that were in popular magazines of the day. During World War II he was made the artist laureate of the United States Coast Guard. Fischer
    7.50
    2 votes
    128
    Bob Eggleton

    Bob Eggleton

    • Book edition covers: Memorare
    Bob Eggleton (born September 13, 1960) is a science fiction, fantasy, and horror artist. Eggleton has been honored with the Hugo Award for Best Professional Artist eight times, first winning in 1994. He also won the Hugo Award for Best Related Book in 2001 for his art book "Greetings From Earth". He has also won the Chesley Award for Artistic Achievement in 1999 and was the guest of honor at Chicon 2000. Eggleton's drawing and paintings cover a wide range of science fiction, fantasy, and horror topics, depicting space ships, alien worlds and inhabitants, dragons, vampires, and other fantasy creatures. His view on space ships were that they should look organic, and claimed that as a child, he was disappointed with the space shuttles and rockets NASA produced; they were nothing like fantasy artists of the twenties and thirties had promised. His fascination with dragons originated with his childhood interest of dinosaurs, which can be seen in the book Greetings From Earth. His paintings are commissioned and bought at science fiction conventions, and used as book covers. Eggleton has illustrated cards for the Magic: The Gathering collectible card game. Eggleton received massive
    7.50
    2 votes
    129

    David Wisniewski

    • Books illustrated: Golem
    David Jonathan Wisniewski (March 21, 1953 in England – September 11, 2002 in Alexandria, Virginia at age 49), was a children's author and illustrator. He attended the University of Maryland, College Park but quit after one semester to join the Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Clown College, graduating in 1973. He worked for several years as a clown before moving to Maryland and joining the Prince George's Country Puppet Theatre where he met his wife Donna Harris. In 1980, they started the Clarion Puppet Theatre (later known as the Clarion Shadow Theatre) which toured in schools, theaters and at the Smithsonian. After his children were born, he become a full-time author/ illustrator, using layers of cut paper to illustrate children's books. His book Golem, won the 1997 Caldecott Medal. In his acceptance speech, he said of himself: "I am a self-taught artist and writer who depends on instincts developed through years of circus and puppet performance to guide a story's structure and look."
    7.50
    2 votes
    130
    Ernest L. Blumenschein

    Ernest L. Blumenschein

    • Book editions illustrated: Tales
    • Books illustrated: Love of Life And Other Stories
    Ernest Leonard Blumenschein (26 May 1874 – 6 June 1960) was an American artist and founding member of the Taos Society of Artists. He is noted for paintings of Native Americans, New Mexico and the American Southwest. Ernest Blumenschein was born on May 26, 1874 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. When four years later his mother died, his father accepted a position as director of the Dayton Philharmonic in Ohio, where Blumenschein grew up. When he finished high school, Blumenschein received a scholarship to study violin at the Cincinnati College of Music. While in Cincinnati, he also attended an illustration course from Fernand Lungren at the Cincinnati Art Academy, causing him to change his studies from music to art. He moved to New York City in 1892, studying at the Art Students League of New York. Attracted by the idea of studying art in Europe, he enrolled at the Académie Julian in Paris in 1894. There he met and became friends with Bert Phillips and the older and more experienced artist Joseph Henry Sharp, who told the two younger artists about his 1893 visit to Taos, New Mexico. Blumenschein returned to New York in 1896, to work as an illustrator in a studio shared with Bert
    7.50
    2 votes
    131
    John Everett Millais

    John Everett Millais

    • Books illustrated: Orley Farm
    Sir John Everett Millais, 1st Baronet, PRA (/ˈmɪleɪ/; 8 June 1829 – 13 August 1896) was an English painter and illustrator and one of the founders of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood. Millais (pronounced Mih-lay) was born in Southampton, England in 1829, of a prominent Jersey-based family. The author Thackeray once asked him "when England conquered Jersey." Millais replied "Never! Jersey conquered England." (cited in Chums annual, 1896, page 213). His prodigious artistic talent won him a place at the Royal Academy schools at the unprecedented age of eleven. While there, he met William Holman Hunt and Dante Gabriel Rossetti with whom he formed the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood (known as the "PRB") in September 1848 in his family home on Gower Street, off Bedford Square. Millais's Christ In The House Of His Parents (1850) was highly controversial because of its realistic portrayal of a working class Holy Family labouring in a messy carpentry workshop. Later works were also controversial, though less so. Millais achieved popular success with A Huguenot (1852), which depicts a young couple about to be separated because of religious conflicts. He repeated this theme in many later works. All
    7.50
    2 votes
    132
    Michael Whelan

    Michael Whelan

    • Book edition covers: The Dark Tower VII -The Dark Tower
    Michael Whelan (born June 29, 1950) is an American artist of imaginative realism. For more than 30 years he worked as an illustrator specializing in science fiction and fantasy cover art. Since the mid-1990s he has pursued a fine art career, selling non-commissioned paintings through galleries in the United States and through his website. The Science Fiction Hall of Fame inducted Whelan in June 2009, the first living artist so honored. According to his Hall of Fame citation, Michael Whelan is one of the most important contemporary science fiction and fantasy artists, and certainly the most popular. His work was a dominant force in the transition of genre book covers away from the surrealism introduced in the 1950s and 1960s back to realism. His paintings have appeared on the covers of more than 350 books and magazines, including many Stephen King novels, most of the Del Rey editions of Anne McCaffrey's Dragonriders of Pern series, Piers Anthony's Incarnations of Immortality series, the Del Rey edition of Edgar Rice Burroughs' Mars series, Melanie Rawn's Dragon Prince and Dragon Star series, the DAW editions of Michael Moorcock's Elric books, numerous DAW editions of C. J. Cherryh's
    7.50
    2 votes
    133
    Paul Stickland

    Paul Stickland

    I am the Author, Illustrator and popup engineer of many children's books. For the past few years, despite a rigorous publishing schedule, I have spent as much time as I can out on the road, giving inspirational talks and fun workshops to children (and their parents) in schools, libraries and literary festivals, from Edinburgh, Cheltenham, even to Glastonbury. I have worked in the UK, Italy and America, in a great diversity of settings, the more challenging the better! The visits start with the simplest of readings, through explanations of the process of creating and producing a children's book, to drawing workshops and hands on pop-up workshops. I am happy to work with all sizes of groups. I have found working with children with special needs to be particularly rewarding. I am a passionate advocate for the world of children's books and as the years pass, I have become more and more drawn to working with and empowering young children to expand their creativity through this magical world. I find this work immensely satisfying and incredibly stimulating and I have been looking for ways to expand this side of my life.
    7.50
    2 votes
    134
    Howard Pyle

    Howard Pyle

    • Books illustrated: Stops of Various Quills
    Howard Pyle (March 5, 1853 – November 9, 1911) was an American illustrator and author, primarily of books for young people. A native of Wilmington, Delaware, he spent the last year of his life in Florence, Italy. During 1894 he began teaching illustration at the Drexel Institute of Art, Science and Industry (now Drexel University), and after 1900 he founded his own school of art and illustration named the Howard Pyle School of Illustration Art. The term Brandywine School was later applied to the illustration artists and Wyeth family artists of the Brandywine region by Pitz. Some of his more famous students were N. C. Wyeth, Frank Schoonover, Elenore Abbott, Ethel Franklin Betts, Anna Whelan Betts, Harvey Dunn, Clyde O. DeLand, Philip R. Goodwin, Violet Oakley, Ellen Bernard Thompson Pyle, Olive Rush, Allen Tupper True, and Jessie Willcox Smith. His 1883 classic publication The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood remains in print, and his other books, frequently with medieval European settings, include a four-volume set on King Arthur. He is also well known for his illustrations of pirates, and is credited with creating the now stereotypical modern image of pirate dress. He published an
    5.50
    4 votes
    135
    P. Craig Russell

    P. Craig Russell

    • Books illustrated: Coraline: The Graphic Novel
    Philip Craig Russell (b. October 30, 1951 in Wellsville, Ohio), also known as P. Craig Russell, is an American comic book writer, artist, and illustrator. His work has won multiple Harvey and Eisner Awards. Russell was the first mainstream comic book creator to come out as openly gay. Russell broke into comics in 1972, and first became well known with his 11-issue Amazing Adventures run and subsequent graphic novel featuring Killraven, hero of a future version of H. G. Wells' The War of the Worlds, collaborating with writer Don McGregor. Comics historian Peter Sanderson wrote that, "McGregor's finest artistic collaborator on the series was P. Craig Russell, whose sensitive, elaborate artwork, evocative of Art Nouveau illustration, gave the landscape of Killraven's America a nostalgic, pastoral feel, and the Martian architecture the look of futuristic castles." Withdrawing for a while from mainstream comics, Russell produced a number of experimental strips, many of which were later published in his Night Music series and in Epic Magazine. Russell's first Elric story, the Roy Thomas scripted "The Dreaming City", was published by Marvel Comics in 1982 as Marvel Graphic Novel #2,
    6.33
    3 votes
    136
    William Hofmann

    William Hofmann

    • Book edition covers: Backtrack
    • Books illustrated: Backtrack
    William Hofmann illustrated books in the late 1950s and the 1960s. The works he illustrated include: He also illustrated the dust jackets of:
    6.33
    3 votes
    137
    Adam Rex

    Adam Rex

    • Book edition covers: Races of Stone
    • Book editions illustrated: Races of Faerûn
    Adam Rex is an American illustrator and author of children's books living in Tucson, Arizona. Adam Rex received a Bachelor of Fine Arts from the University of Arizona. He has contributed illustrations to Magic: The Gathering and other fantasy art and has illustrated several children's books. Adam has noted that his history with fantasy drawings initially hurt his entry into children's books. His first books, Tree-Ring Circus and Frankenstein Makes a Sandwich, were published in 2006. Frankenstein Makes a Sandwich went on to become a New York Times best seller. Another picture book Pssst! and the illustrated novel The True Meaning of Smekday were published in 2007. Adam received the Jack Gaughan Award for Best Emerging Artist in 2005. His first foray into illustration of children's books, 2003's The Dirty Cowboy, written by Amy Timberlake, received positive reviews, including from The Capital Times, which described Rex's work as "gorgeous... This is his first book, but you wouldn't know it from looking. His artwork has real resonance". The Santa Fe New Mexican wrote, "The consummate skill of Rex's illustrations combines with wit and knowledge of the physical and emotional terrain".
    8.00
    1 votes
    138
    Gilberto Hernandez

    Gilberto Hernandez

    • Book edition covers: Speak of the Devil
    • Book editions illustrated: Love and Rockets: New Stories no.1
    • Books illustrated: Speak of the Devil
    Gilberto Hernández (/hiːlˈbɛərtoʊ/ heel-BAIR-toh; Spanish pronunciation: [xilˈβerto]; born 1 February, 1957; usually credited as Gilbert Hernandez and also by the nickname Beto (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈbeto])), is an American cartoonist. He is best known for his Palomar/Heartbreak Soup stories in Love and Rockets, an alternative comic book he shared with his brothers Jaime and Mario. Gilbert Hernández was born and grew up in Oxnard, California to a Mexican father and Texas-born mother. He had five brothers and one sister, raised by their mother and grandmother, as their father was rarely around. They were exposed to comic books early in life through their mother, who passed on her love of the medium to her children. Young Gilbert read all he could, with the exception of romance comics. He set his passions on becoming a graphic storyteller, learning everything he could by studying what he found in comics, while developing his drawing skills through constant practice. The radio was always on at home, and he grew up listening to the rock and roll of The Beatles, The Beach Boys and The Rolling Stones. Hernandez found high school boring, sympathizing neither with the jock nor the nerd
    8.00
    1 votes
    139
    James Sowerby

    James Sowerby

    • Books illustrated: English Botany
    James Sowerby (21 March 1757 – 25 October 1822) was an English naturalist and illustrator. Contributions to published works, such as A Specimen of the Botany of New Holland or English Botany, include his detailed and appealing plates. The use of vivid colour and accessible texts were intended to reach a widening audience in works of natural history. James Sowerby was born in Lambeth, London, his parents were named John and Arabella. Having decided to become a painter of flowers his first venture was with William Curtis, whose Flora Londinensis he illustrated. Sowerby studied art at the Royal Academy and took an apprenticeship with Richard Wright. He married Anne Brettingham De Carle and they were to have three sons: James De Carle Sowerby (1787–1871), George Brettingham Sowerby I (1788–1854) and Charles Edward Sowerby (1795–1842), the Sowerby family of naturalists. His sons and theirs were to contribute and continue the enormous volumes he was to begin and the Sowerby name was to remain associated with illustration of natural history. An early commission for Sowerby was to lead to his prominence in the field when the botanist L'Hértier de Brutelle invited Sowerby to provide the
    8.00
    1 votes
    140
    Jim Burns

    Jim Burns

    • Book edition covers: The Forever War
    Jim Burns (born April 10, 1948) is a Welsh artist born in Cardiff, Wales. In 1966 he joined the Royal Air Force, but soon thereafter he left and signed up at the Newport School of Art for a year's foundation course. After that, he went on to complete a 3-year Diploma in Art and Design at St. Martin's School of Art in London. When he left St. Martin's in 1972 he had already joined the recently established illustration agency Young Artists. He has been with this agency, later renamed Arena, ever since. He is today a contemporary British science fiction illustrator. His work mostly deals with science fiction with erotic overtones. His paintings are generally intricate photo-realistic works of beautiful women set against advanced machines and spaceships. While his preparatory sketches are more erotically focused, his final works and published book covers have a more academic tone portraying far off and imaginary worlds. Apart from book and game covers, Burns briefly worked with Ridley Scott on Blade Runner, and his illustrations and paintings comprise much of the book Mechanismo by Harry Harrison. He has also had books of his own works published, including Lightship, Planet Story
    8.00
    1 votes
    141
    Ralph Steadman

    Ralph Steadman

    • Book editions illustrated: The complete Alice & The hunting of the snark
    • Books illustrated: Fear and Loathing: On the Campaign Trail '72
    Ralph Steadman (born 15 May 1936) is a British cartoonist best known for his work with American author Hunter S. Thompson. Steadman was born in Wallasey, Cheshire, and brought up in Abergele, North Wales. From a lower middle class background, his father was a commercial traveller and his mother was a shop assistant at T J Hughes in Liverpool. He attended Ysgol Emrys Ap Iwan (high school), and then later East Ham Technical College and the London College of Printing during the 1960s, doing freelance work for Punch, Private Eye, the Daily Telegraph, The New York Times and Rolling Stone during this time. Steadman currently lives with his wife in Kent, England. Steadman is renowned for his political and social caricatures, cartoons and picture books. Awards that he has won for his work include the Francis Williams Book Illustration Award for Alice in Wonderland, the American Society of Illustrators' Certificate of Merit, the W H Smith Illustration Award for I Leonardo, the Dutch Silver Paintbrush Award for Inspector Mouse, the Italian Critica in Erba Prize for That's My Dad, the BBC Design Award for postage stamps, the Black Humour Award in France, and several Designers and Art
    8.00
    1 votes
    142

    Robert McCloskey

    • Books illustrated: Time of Wonder
    John Robert McCloskey (September 15, 1914 – June 30, 2003) was an American author and illustrator of children's books. McCloskey wrote and illustrated eight books, two of which won the Caldecott Medal, the American Library Association's annual award of distinction for children's book illustration. Many of McCloskey's books were set on the Maine coast, including One Morning in Maine and Burt Dow, Deep Water-man. Born on September 15, 1914, in Hamilton, Ohio, McCloskey arrived in Boston in 1932 after being awarded a scholarship to the Vesper George Art School. He then moved to New York to study at the National Academy of Design. In 1940, he married Peggy Durand, daughter of children's author Ruth Sawyer. They had two daughters, Sally and Jane, and settled in New York State, spending summers on Scott Island, Maine. That was the setting for his Caldecott Honor book, Blueberries for Sal, whose characters little Sal and her mother are reputed to be based on McCloskey's wife and eldest daughter Sally. McCloskey's wife Peggy died in 1991. Twelve years later, in 2003, McCloskey died at his home in Deer Isle, Maine. Make Way for Ducklings was the 1942 Caldecott Medal winner. The book tells
    8.00
    1 votes
    143
    Wifredo Lam

    Wifredo Lam

    • Books illustrated: L'Extrême-Occidentale
    Wifredo Óscar de la Concepción Lam y Castilla (Chinese: 林飛龍, December 8, 1902 – September 11, 1982), better known as Wifredo Lam, was a Cuban artist who sought to portray and revive the enduring Afro-Cuban spirit and culture. Inspired by and in contact with some of the most renowned artists of the 20th century, Lam melded his influences and created a unique style, which was ultimately characterized by the prominence of hybrid figures. Though he was predominantly a painter, he also worked with sculpture, ceramics and printmaking in his later life. Wifredo Lam was born and raised in Sagua La Grande, a village in the sugar farming province of Villa Clara, Cuba. He was of mixed-race ancestry: his father, Yam Lam, was a Chinese immigrant and his mother, the former Ana Serafina Castilla, was born to a Congolese former slave mother and a Cuban mulatto father. In Sagua La Grande, Lam was surrounded by many people of African descent; his family, like many others, practiced Catholicism alongside their African traditions. Through his godmother, Matonica Wilson, a Santería priestess locally celebrated as a healer and sorceress, he was exposed to rites of the African orishas. His contact with
    8.00
    1 votes
    144

    David Macaulay

    • Books illustrated: Black and White
    David Macaulay (born December 2, 1946) is a British-born American author and illustrator. Now a resident of Norwich, Vermont, United States, he is an alumnus and faculty member at the Rhode Island School of Design. Born in Lancashire, UK, Macaulay moved to Bloomfield, New Jersey at the age of eleven. He began drawing while in the United States. After graduating from high school in Cumberland, Rhode Island in 1964, he enrolled in the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD), from which he received a bachelor's degree in architecture. He spent his fifth year at RISD in the European Honors Program, studying in Rome, Herculaneum and Pompeii. Macaulay's books have sold more than two million copies in the United States, been translated into a dozen languages, and been widely praised. Time magazine said of his work, "What [Macaulay] draws, he draws better than any other pen-and-ink illustrator in the world". His numerous awards include the MacArthur Fellows Program award, the Caldecott Medal, won for his book Black and White, the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award, the Christopher Award, an American Institute of Architects Medal, the Washington Children's Book Guild Nonfiction Award, the Deutscher
    5.25
    4 votes
    145
    Cecil Aldin

    Cecil Aldin

    • Books illustrated: A dog day
    Cecil Charles Windsor Aldin (28 April 1870 – 6 January 1935) was a British artist and illustrator best known for his paintings and sketches of animals, sports, and rural life. Born in Slough, he was educated at Eastbourne College and Solihull Grammar School. He studied anatomy at South Kensington and animal painting under William Frank Calderon. He lived at The Abbots, Sulhamstead Abbots from 1913 to 1914 and was church warden of St Mary's church. Early influences included Randolph Caldecott and John Leech. His drawings first made their way into print in The Building News of 12 September 1890, and began to appear throughout many popular journals and magazines; his work was published in The Graphic in 1891. His illustrations include two of the original 1894 magazine publications of stories from Rudyard Kipling's The Second Jungle Book, the 1910 edition of Charles Dickens' The Pickwick Papers and The Bunch Book (1932, about Bunch, a Sealyham Terrier) by James Douglas. He also published a short series of fully illustrated books in 1923, Old Manor Houses and Old Inns. His village scenes and rural buildings were executed in chalk, pencil and wash sketching was used for country scenes.
    7.00
    2 votes
    146
    Christopher Wren

    Christopher Wren

    • Books illustrated: Micrographia
    Sir Christopher Michael Wren FRS (20 October 1632 – 25 February 1723) is one of the most highly acclaimed English architects in history. He was accorded responsibility for rebuilding 52 churches in the City of London after the Great Fire in 1666, including his masterpiece, St. Paul's Cathedral, on Ludgate Hill, completed in 1710. The principal creative responsibility for a number of the churches is now more commonly attributed to others in his office, especially Nicholas Hawksmoor. Other notable buildings by Wren include the Royal Naval College in Greenwich and the south front of Hampton Court Palace. Educated in Latin and Aristotelian physics at the University of Oxford, Wren was a notable astronomer, geometer, and mathematician-physicist, as well as an architect. He was a founder of the Royal Society (president 1680–82), and his scientific work was highly regarded by Sir Isaac Newton and Blaise Pascal. Wren was born at East Knoyle in Wiltshire, the only surviving son of Christopher Wren Sr. (1589–1658) and Mary Cox, the only child of the Wiltshire squire Robert Cox from Fonthill Bishop. Christopher Sr. was at that time the rector of East Knoyle and later Dean of Windsor. It was
    7.00
    2 votes
    147

    Dong Kingman

    • Book edition covers: Only in San Francisco
    Dong Kingman (Chinese: 曾景文, 31 March 1911 - 12 May 2000) was a Chinese American artist and one of America's leading watercolor masters. As a painter on the forefront of the California Style School of painting, he was known for his urban and landscape paintings as well as his graphic design work in the Hollywood film industry. He has won widespread critical acclaim and his works are included in over 50 public and private collections worldwide, including Metropolitan Museum of Art, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Brooklyn Museum; deYoung Museum and Art Institute, Chicago. Dong Kingman was born Dong Moy Shu in Oakland, California, the son of Chinese immigrants from Hong Kong. At the age of five, he travelled with his family back to Hong Kong where his father established a dry goods business. He began his formal education at the Bok Jai School, where he was given a school name in accordance with Chinese customs. Hearing that he aspired to be an artist, his instructor gave him the name "King Man" (lit. "scenery" and "composition" in Cantonese). He would later combine the two names into Kingman, placing his family name first in accordance with Chinese naming conventions, creating the name
    7.00
    2 votes
    148

    Glen Orbik

    • Book edition covers: Branded Woman
    Glen Orbik (born 1963) is an American illustrator known for his fully painted paperback and comic covers, often executed in a noir style. He studied art at the California Art Institute then located in Encino, later Calabasas, California and currently located in Westlake Village. He studied under the school's founder, retired movie and advertisement illustrator Fred Fixler. He eventually took over the classes when Fixler retired from teaching and still currently teaches figure drawing after returning from an extended hiatus. His work has been compared to Alex Ross and Robert Mcginnis and he is a popular teacher among fine art, comic, and video game artists. He is currently working on a series of paperback covers for the Hard Case Crime series of novels and currently resides in Van Nuys, California.
    7.00
    2 votes
    149
    Greg Bear

    Greg Bear

    Gregory Dale Bear (born August 20, 1951) is an American science fiction and mainstream author. His work has covered themes of galactic conflict (Forge of God books), artificial universes (The Way series), consciousness and cultural practices (Queen of Angels), and accelerated evolution (Blood Music, Darwin's Radio, and Darwin's Children). His most recent work is the Forerunner Trilogy, written in the Halo universe. Greg Bear has written 44 books in total over the years since he started writing. Bear was born in San Diego, California. He attended San Diego State University (1968–73), where he received a Bachelor of Arts degree. At the University, he was a teaching assistant to Elizabeth Chater in her course on science fiction writing, and in later years her friend. Bear is often classified as a hard science fiction author, based on the scientific details in his work. Early in his career, he also published work as an artist, including illustrations for an early version of the Star Trek Concordance and covers for Galaxy and F&SF. He sold his first story, "Destroyers", to Famous Science Fiction in 1967. Bear often addresses major questions in contemporary science and culture with
    7.00
    2 votes
    150
    John Lewin

    John Lewin

    • Books illustrated: Birds of New South Wales with their Natural History
    John William Lewin (1770 – 27 August 1819) was an English-born artist active in Australia from 1800. The first professional artist of the colony of New South Wales, he illustrated the earliest volumes of Australian natural history. Lewin was the son of a professional scientific artist, William Lewin, who was the author of an eight-volume work The Birds of Great Britain (1789–94). William Lewin's two sons, John William and Thomas, worked with him preparing work. William acknowledges their work in the preface to his book. Around 1797, John Lewin was keen to visit New South Wales. John Lewin planned to travel on the Buffalo for New South Wales in 1799 to record ornithological and entomological life for a British patron, Dru Drury. Somehow he missed this voyage but his wife travelled on it and arrived 3 May 1799. Lewin did travel on the Minerva, arriving 11 January 1800, becoming the first resident professional artist in the colony. The resulting books were intended to fund his passage home, but the fashion for Australian natural wonders was already fading by the time he published Prodromus Entomology, Natural History of Lepidopterous Insects of New South Wales, in 1805. Only six
    7.00
    2 votes
    151

    John Schoenherr

    • Book editions illustrated: The Illustrated Dune
    • Books illustrated: Owl Moon
    John Schoenherr (July 5, 1935 – April 8, 2010) was an American illustrator. Schoenherr may be best known as the original illustrator for Dune by Frank Herbert, creating the canonical images for elements such as sandworms. However, he is also very well known as a wildlife artist and children's book illustrator, with over forty books to his credit. Most of his black-and-white illustration work used the scratchboard technique, and he was long known as the only commercial artist who specialized in it. His paintings were often egg tempera, another unusual medium. Mr. Schoenherr also completed paintings for NASA. Beginning in the 1960's, Mr Schoenherr created numerous science fiction illustrations, in addition to illustrations in other genres. Among the books he illustrated are The Wolfling and Rascal by Sterling North (the latter of which received a Newbery Honor) and The Illustrated Dune by Frank Herbert. This last grew out of his work for Analog magazine, especially under John W. Campbell, Jr. and Ben Bova. He illustrated the original magazine serializations of Dune for them, as well as the covers for Anne McCaffrey's "Weyr Search" and "Dragonrider," which were later revised into the
    7.00
    2 votes
    152
    Le Nain

    Le Nain

    • Book edition covers: The Three Musketeers
    The three Le Nain brothers were painters in 17th-century France: Antoine Le Nain (c.1599-1648), Louis Le Nain (c.1593-1648), and Mathieu Le Nain (1607–1677). They produced genre works, portraits and portrait miniatures. The brothers were born in or near Laon in northern France. Mathieu was born in 1607; Antoine and Louis were originally believed to have been born in 1588 and 1593, respectively, but are now thought to have been born later; the National Gallery gives them birth dates of "c. 1600? and c. 1603?". By 1630, all three lived in Paris, where they shared the studio founded by Antoine, who was admitted to the Paris painters' guild, enabling his two brothers to train under him without paying fees. Within a few years they were receiving important commissions, Antoine painting a group portrait of the aldermen of Paris in 1632. In 1648 the three brothers were received into the Académie de peinture et de sculpture on the year of its founding. Because of the remarkable similarity of their styles of painting and the difficulty of distinguishing works by each brother (they signed their paintings only with their surname, and many may have been collaborations), they are commonly
    7.00
    2 votes
    153
    Lee Brown Coye

    Lee Brown Coye

    • Book editions illustrated: The seventh ogre: from an old East Indian folk tale
    Lee Brown Coye (July 24, 1907 – September 5, 1981) was an American artist. Coye is probably best remembered for his black-and-white illustrations for pulp magazines and horror fiction, but he produced many other works in other media. Coye was born in Syracuse, New York, and as a young man lived in nearby Tully. He spent his entire life in the Central New York area. He and his wife, Ruth, lived in Syracuse for many years where Coye's activities included teaching adult art classes; working under the Works Progress Administration to paint a mural in the Cazenovia High School in 1934 (since destroyed); advertising for the WSYR Broadcasting System in upstate New York, producing a variety of commissioned works. The Coyes settled in Hamilton, New York, in 1959 when Lee went to work for Sculptura, a small company that reproduced antique sculptures. The move to Hamilton allowed Coye to fulfill his ambition of returning to a small town and maintaining his own art studio. Coye was almost entirely self-taught as an artist, and his entire life was devoted to art-related work. As a young man, he attended one semester of night art classes, but his artistic knowledge and abilities came from many
    7.00
    2 votes
    154
    Phil Foglio

    Phil Foglio

    • Books illustrated: Girl Genius, Volume 8: Agatha Heterodyne and the Chapel of Bones
    Philip "Phil" Foglio (born May 1, 1956) is an American cartoonist and comic book artist best known for his humorous science fiction and fantasy work. Foglio was born on May 1, 1956 in Mount Vernon, New York, and moved with his family to Hartsdale, New York, where he lived until he was 17. He attended the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts in Chicago, Illinois, and was a member of the university's science fiction club, art-directing & co-editing the group's fanzine, Effen Essef. He was nominated for both the Hugo Award for Best Fan Artist and the Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation in 1976, and won Best Fan Artist in 1977 and 1978. After living in the DePaul dorms for a few years, Phil moved to the Rogers Park neighborhood of Chicago, and hosted weekly Thursday Night Meetings of Chicago-area science fiction fans. He drew the first known Unix daemons for a limited series of T-shirts in 1979. Beginning in 1980, Foglio wrote and illustrated the comic strip What's New with Phil & Dixie for Dragon Magazine from TSR Games, satirizing the world of role-playing games. The strip ran monthly for three years. In the early 1980s, after some time in Chicago attempting to find work doing science
    7.00
    2 votes
    155
    Ramona Fradon

    Ramona Fradon

    • Books illustrated: The Adventures of Unemployed Man
    Ramona Fradon (born October 1, 1926) is an American comic book and comic strip artist, known for her work illustrating Aquaman and Brenda Starr, and co-creating the superhero Metamorpho. Her career began in 1950, when it was even more unusual for women to illustrate superhero comics. Fradon entered cartooning just after graduating from the Parsons School of Design. Comic-book letterer George Ward, a friend of her husband (New Yorker cartoonist Dana Fradon), asked her for samples of her artwork to pitch for job openings. She landed her first assignment on the DC Comics feature Shining Knight. Her first regular assignment was illustrating an Adventure Comics backup feature starring Aquaman, for which she co-created the sidekick Aqualad. Following her time with Aquaman, and taking a break to have her daughter, Fradon returned to co-create Metamorpho, drawing four issues of the series. She returned briefly to design a few covers for the title. From 1965 to 1972, Fradon left comics to raise her daughter. In 1972, she returned to DC, with assignments drawing Superman, Batman, and Plastic Man. Her other work includes Marvel's The Cat and Fantastic Four; and DC's Freedom Fighters and Super
    7.00
    2 votes
    156
    Richard Doyle

    Richard Doyle

    • Books illustrated: Fairy Tales from All Nations
    Richard "Dickie" Doyle (September 1824 – 11 December 1883) was a notable illustrator of the Victorian era. His work frequently appeared, amongst other places, in Punch magazine; he drew the cover of the first issue, and designed the magazine's masthead, a design that was used for over a century. Born at 17 Cambridge Terrace, London, one of seven children of Irish cartoonist John Doyle (known as 'H.B'), a noted political caricaturist, two of his brothers, James and Charles, were also artists. The young Doyle had no formal art training other than his father's studio, but from an early age displayed a gifted ability to depict scenes of the fantastic and grotesque. Throughout his life he was fascinated by fairy tales. He produced his first complete illustrated book, Home for the Holidays, when he was 12; it was published posthumously in 1887. He joined the staff of Punch in 1843 aged 19, remaining there for seven years. He was the uncle of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, author of the Sherlock Holmes stories. Doyle's first published illustrations appeared in The Eglinton Tournament (1840), a humour book set in the Middle Ages, which met with commercial success. Doyle collaborated with John
    7.00
    2 votes
    157
    Tasha Tudor

    Tasha Tudor

    • Book editions illustrated: Little Women
    Tasha Tudor (August 28, 1915 – June 18, 2008) was an American illustrator and author of children's books. Tasha Tudor was born in Boston, Massachusetts as Starling Burgess, the daughter of naval architect W. Starling Burgess, known as "the Skipper" and noted portrait painter, Rosamund Tudor. At birth, she was named after her father, but he was an admirer of the War and Peace character Natasha, and his daughter was soon re-christened Natasha. The name was later shortened to Tasha. When socializing with her mother's friends, Tudor was usually introduced as "Rosamund Tudor's daughter, Tasha", leading others to believe that her last name was Tudor. Liking the sound of it, she adopted the name and eventually changed her surname legally following her second divorce. She married Thomas McCready in 1938 in Redding, Connecticut. Tasha and Thomas McCready purchased a large old farm in Webster, New Hampshire, where four children, Bethany, Seth, Thomas, and Efner, were raised. Her first story, Pumpkin Moonshine, was published in 1938, as a gift for a young niece of her husband. They were divorced in 1961, and her children legally changed their names from McCready to Tudor. A later marriage, to
    7.00
    2 votes
    158
    Alan Dapre

    Alan Dapre

    • Books illustrated: Cuddle Muddle
    Alan Dapré (born 1965) is a British writer who has successfully written for television, radio and publishers for over 20 years. He worked as a creative and originator for Ragdoll Productions for eight years, and his episodes of Brum, Boohbah and Blips are broadcast worldwide. He co-wrote with Robin Stevens and with Joel Wilenius developed many quirky stories and characters for the new BBC show, Tronji. Alan Dapré is author of over 60 books for children, and 'Everything You Need To Know When You're Eight' was read in audio book form by Tony Robinson. Alan Dapré has written plays for BBC Radio 4 including 'Stranger In The Home' - a monologue read by Bernard Hepton. His play 'Comeback' was staged at the Nottingham Playhouse in 1987 with performances by Philip Middlemiss and William Ivory. His popular plays for Primary schools help developing readers gain fluency. Formerly a Deputy Headteacher in Nottingham and primary school teacher at Haddon primary and nursery school Nottingham, Alan Dapré now lives in Glasgow with his wife Kate and young daughter.
    6.00
    3 votes
    159

    Blair Lent

    • Books illustrated: The Funny Little Woman
    Blair Lent (January 20, 1930 – January 27, 2009) was an American author and illustrator of mostly Chinese-themed books, including the popular 1968 children's book Tikki Tikki Tembo. In 1973 he was awarded the Caldecott Medal for his illustrations of The Funny Little Woman, by Arlene Mosel. He also illustrated the book House of Stairs. Lent used a wide range of techniques in his illustrations, including acrylic painting, cardboard cutouts, colored pencil and ink and wash. Born in Boston, Lent attended the Boston Museum School where he graduated with a degree in art in 1953, after which he went to Italy and Switzerland on a study grant. He worked for the Container Corporation of America designing labels for cans and worked for the Bresnick Advertising Company where he designed bank advertisements. After receiving positive feedback from a juvenile-books editor at Atlantic Monthly Press, he put out Pistachio, a story published in 1964 about a green cow and a circus that he wrote and illustrated. Under the pen name of Ernest Small, he wrote the 1966 books Baba Yaga about a witch, and John Tabor's Ride, a fanciful yarn about a sailor from New England. Other works written and illustrated
    6.00
    3 votes
    160
    Francis Picabia

    Francis Picabia

    Francis Picabia (French: [fʁɑ̃sis pikabja]; born Francis-Marie Martinez de Picabia, 22 January 1879 – 30 November 1953) was a French painter, poet, and typographist, associated with Cubism, Abstract art, Dada and Surrealism. Francis Picabia was born in Paris of a French mother and a Spanish-Cuban father who was an attaché at the Cuban legation in Paris. His mother died of tuberculosis when he was seven. Some sources would have his father as of aristocratic Spanish descent, whereas others consider him of non-aristocratic Spanish descent, from the region of Galicia. Financially independent, Picabia studied under Fernand Cormon and others at the École des Arts Decoratifs in the late 1890s. In 1894, Picabia financed his stamp collection by copying a collection of Spanish paintings that belonged to his father, switching the originals for the copies, without his father's knowledge, and selling the originals. Fernand Cormon took him into his academy at 104 boulevard de Clichy, where Van Gogh and Toulouse-Lautrec had also studied. From the age of 20, he lived by painting; he subsequently inherited money from his mother. In the beginning of his career, from 1903 to 1908, Picabia was
    6.00
    3 votes
    161
    Gordon Browne

    Gordon Browne

    • Books illustrated: Hop o' My Thumb
    Gordon Frederick Browne (15 April 1858 – 27 May 1932) was an English artist and children's book illustrator in the late 19th century and early 20th century. He was born in Banstead, the younger son of notable book illustrator Hablot Knight Browne (who as "Phiz" illustrated books by Charles Dickens). He studied art at the Heatherley School of Fine Art and South Kensington Schools and started to receive professional commissions while still at college. From the 1880s, Browne was one of Britain's most prolific illustrators, his work appearing in newspapers, magazines and many books by children's authors including Frederic William Farrar, G.A. Henty, Juliana Horatia Ewing, Andrew Lang, Talbot Baines Reed, L. T. Meade, Catherine Christian and E. Nesbit. Browne worked in watercolour and pen and ink. He was a member of the Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours (RI) and the Royal Society of British Artists (RBA). He died in Richmond, London in 1932.
    6.00
    3 votes
    162
    John Tenniel

    John Tenniel

    • Book edition covers: Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass
    • Book editions illustrated: Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass
    • Books illustrated: Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
    Sir John Tenniel (Bayswater, London, 28 February 1820 – 25 February 1914) was a British illustrator, graphic humourist and political cartoonist whose work was prominent during the second half of England’s 19th century. Tenniel is considered important to the study of that period’s social, literary, and art histories. Tenniel is most noted for two major accomplishments: he was the principal political cartoonist for England’s Punch magazine for over 50 years, and he was the artist who illustrated Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass. He was born in London and educated himself for his career, although he became a probationer, and then a student, of the Royal Academy. In 1836 he sent his first picture to the exhibition of the Society of British Artists, and in 1845 he contributed a 16-foot (4.9 m) cartoon, An Allegory of Justice, to a competition for designs for the mural decoration of the new Palace of Westminster. For this he received a £200 premium and a commission to paint a fresco in the Upper Waiting Hall (or Hall of Poets) in the House of Lords. In 1840 Tenniel, while practicing fencing with his father, received a serious wound in his eye
    6.00
    3 votes
    163

    Nicholas Mordvinoff

    • Books illustrated: Finders Keepers
    Nicholas Mordvinoff (September 27, 1911-1973) was a Russian born American artist who won the Caldecott Medal in 1952 for Finders Keepers, by William Lipkind, both writing under the pseudonym Nicholas and Will.
    6.00
    3 votes
    164
    Sophie Taeuber-Arp

    Sophie Taeuber-Arp

    Sophie Taeuber-Arp ( /ˈtɔɪbər ˈɑrp/; 19 January 1889 - 13 January 1943) was a Swiss artist, painter and sculptor. Born in Davos, Switzerland, Sophie Täuber began her art studies in her homeland, at the School of Applied Arts in St. Gallen (1908–1910). She then moved on to the workshop of Wilhelm von Debschits in Munich, where she studied in 1911 and again in 1913; in between, she studied for a year at the School of Arts and Crafts in Hamburg. In 1916, she attended the Laban School of Dance in Zurich. In 1915 she met the Dada artist Jean Arp, with whom she was to collaborate on numerous joint projects until her death in 1943. They married in 1922 and she changed her last name to Taeuber-Arp. Taeuber-Arp taught weaving and other textile arts at the Zurich School of Arts and Crafts from 1916 to 1929. During this period, she was involved in the Zürich Dada movement, which centered on the Cabaret Voltaire. She took part in Dada-inspired performances as a dancer, choreographer, and puppeteer; and she designed puppets, costumes, and sets for performances at the Cabaret Voltaire as well as for other Swiss and French theaters. She also made a number of sculptural works, such as a set of
    6.00
    3 votes
    165
    A. B. Frost

    A. B. Frost

    • Books illustrated: Phantasmagoria
    Arthur Burdett Frost (January 17, 1851 - June 22, 1928), was an early American illustrator, graphic artist and comics writer. He was also well known as a painter. Frost's work is well known for its dynamic representation of motion and sequence. Frost is considered one of the great illustrators in the "Golden Age of American Illustration". Frost illustrated over 90 books and produced hundreds of paintings; in addition to his work in illustrations, he is renowned for realistic hunting and shooting prints. Frost was born on January 17, 1851, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the eldest of ten children; his father was a literature professor. He became a lithographer, and in 1874 he was asked by a friend to illustrate a book of humorous short stories, "Out of the Hurly Burly", by Charles Heber Clark, which was a commercial success, selling more than a million copies. In 1876, Frost joined the art department at the publisher Harper & Brothers, where he worked with such well-known illustrators as Howard Pyle, E. W. Kemble, Frederic Remington and C. S. Reinhart. While there, he learned a wide variety of techniques, from cartooning to what later came to be called photorealistic painting.
    6.50
    2 votes
    166

    Brian Selznick

    • Books illustrated: The Invention of Hugo Cabret
    Brian Selznick (born July 14, 1966) is a Caldecott-winning American author and illustrator of children's books. Selznick, the oldest of three children, was born and grew up in East Brunswick Township, New Jersey. His grandfather was a cousin of Hollywood producer David O. Selznick. He graduated from the Rhode Island School of Design and then worked for three years at Eeyore's Books for Children in Manhattan while working on his first book, The Houdini Box. Selznick received the 2008 Caldecott Medal for The Invention of Hugo Cabret. He also won the Caldecott Honor for The Dinosaurs of Waterhouse Hawkins in 2002. Additional awards include the Texas Bluebonnet Award, the Rhode Island Children's Book Award, and the Christopher Award. The Invention of Hugo Cabret has also inspired students to action, including a fourth grade class staging a silent film festival, and a group of fifth graders who turned the book into a 30 minute modern dance. The Invention of Hugo Cabret follows a young orphan in Paris in the 1930s as he tries to piece together a broken automaton. The book was inspired by a passage in the book Edison’s Eve by Gaby Wood that tells of the collection of automata that
    6.50
    2 votes
    167

    Gail E. Haley

    • Books illustrated: A Story a Story
    Gail E. Haley (born 1939) is an American author and illustrator. She has won the annual awards for children's book illustration from both the American and British librarians, for two different picture books. She won the 1971 Caldecott Medal for A Story a Story (Atheneum Books, 1970), which she retold from an African folk tale, and the 1976 Kate Greenaway Medal for The Post Office Cat, her own historical fiction about a London post office. Haley was born Gail Einhart in Charlotte, North Carolina. At The Charlotte Observer where her father was art director, she later recalled, "In the art department and pressrooms I soaked up the exciting smells and sounds of the graphic arts. I've had printer's ink and rubber cement in my veins ever since." She studied at Richmond Professional Institute and the University of Virginia (graphics and painting). She married mathematician Joseph A. Haley in 1959. Her debut book both as writer and as illustrator was My Kingdom for a Dragon, published in 1962 by Crozet Print Shop of Crozet, Virginia. It was printed from wood and linoleum blocks in a limited edition of 1000 that she helped bind and sell. After a divorce she married Arnold Arnold in 1966 and
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    2 votes
    168
    Henry Holiday

    Henry Holiday

    • Book editions illustrated: The Hunting of the Snark
    • Books illustrated: The Hunting of the Snark
    Henry Holiday (17 June 1839 – 15 April 1927) was an English historical genre and landscape painter, stained glass designer, illustrator and sculptor. He is considered to be a member of the Pre-Raphaelite school of art. Holiday was born in London. He showed an early aptitude for art and was given lessons by William Cave Thomas. He attended Leigh's art academy (where a fellow student was Frederick Walker) and in 1855, at the age of 15, was admitted to the Royal Academy. Through his friendship with Albert Moore and Simeon Solomon he was introduced to the artists Rosetti, Burne Jones and William Morris of the "Pre-Raphaelite brotherhood". This movement was to be pivotal in his future artistic and political life. In that same year, 1855, Holiday made a journey to the Lake District. This was to be the first of many trips to the area, where he would often holiday for long periods of time. Whilst in the Lake District, he spent much of his time sketching the views which were to be seen from the various hills and mountains. He wrote, "For concentrated loveliness, I know nothing that can quite compare with the lakes and mountains of Westmorland, Cumberland and Lancashire." Holiday worked in
    6.50
    2 votes
    169

    Jamie Bishop

    • Book edition covers: A Reverie for Mister Ray: Reflections on Life, Death, and Speculative Fiction
    Christopher James Bishop (November 9, 1971 – April 16, 2007), known as Jamie Bishop, was an instructor of the German language at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, as well as an artist and craftsman. He was among those shot in the Virginia Tech massacre. He was the son of Michael Bishop, an award-winning science fiction author. Bishop grew up in Pine Mountain, Georgia, and earned his bachelor's and master's degrees in German from the University of Georgia. He was a Fulbright scholar at Christian-Albrechts University in Kiel, Germany. He helped run an exchange program at Darmstadt University of Technology in Germany. Bishop spent four years living in Germany, where (according to his web site) he "spent most of his time learning the language, teaching English, drinking large quantities of wheat beer and wooing a certain fraulein," Stephanie Hofer, who later became his wife. From 1995 to 1996 he taught at the Zentrales Sprachlabor of Ruprecht-Karls University of Heidelberg, and collected survey data for his Master's Thesis, Jugendsprache: a critical study of German "Youth Language." Before teaching at Virginia Tech, Bishop worked in the Office of Arts and Sciences
    6.50
    2 votes
    170

    Ludwig Bemelmans

    • Books illustrated: Madeline's Rescue
    Ludwig Bemelmans (April 27, 1898 – October 1, 1962) was an Austrian author, an internationally known gourmet, and a writer and illustrator of children's books. He is most noted today for his Madeline books, six of which were published from 1939-1961. A seventh was discovered after his death and published posthumously in 1999. Bemelmans was born to the Belgian painter Lambert Bemelmans and the German Frances Fischer in Meran, Austria-Hungary (now Merano, Italy). His father owned a hotel. He grew up in Gmunden on the Traunsee in Upper Austria. His first language was French and his second German. In 1904, his father left the family for Ludwig's governess, after which his mother took Ludwig and his brother to her native city of Regensburg, Germany. Bemelmans had difficulty in school, as he hated the German style of discipline. He was apprenticed to his uncle Hans Bemelmans at a hotel in Austria, where he reportedly shot and seriously wounded a waiter. Given the choice between being institutionalized and emigrating to the United States, he chose the latter. He spent the next several years working at hotels and restaurants in the US. In 1917, he joined the U.S. Army but was not sent to
    6.50
    2 votes
    171
    Paul Păun

    Paul Păun

    • Books illustrated: Teribilul interzis
    Paul Păun or Paúl Yvenez (born Paul Zaharia; September 5, 1915 – April 9, 1994) was a Romanian Surrealist artist and writer, as well as a trained physician. Păun was a native of Bucharest. Inspired mostly by Geo Bogza's style, he debuted in 1930 in the Surrealist magazine Alge. In 1933, he and his colleagues (Gherasim Luca, Aurel Baranga, Sesto Pals and the painter Jules Perahim) were prosecuted on charges of pornography. Among the other magazines to which he contributed were unu, Azi, Viaţa Românească, Viaţa imediată, Meridian, and Reporter. After 1939, Păun became a member of the Romanian Surrealist group, along with Luca, Gellu Naum, Virgil Teodorescu and Dolfi Trost. After 1947, when Surrealism faced a backlash in Communist Romania, Păun left the country and settled in Israel. He was exhibited in various galleries in Tel Aviv, Haifa and London. He died in Haifa in April 1994.
    6.50
    2 votes
    172

    Peggy Rathmann

    • Books illustrated: Officer Buckle and Gloria
    Margaret Crosby "Peggy" Rathmann (born March 4, 1953) is an award-winning American author and illustrator. She was born in St. Paul, Minnesota, and graduated from the University of Minnesota. Her first book, Ruby the Copycat, earned Ms. Rathmann the "Most Promising New Author" distinction in Publishers Weekly's 1991 annual Cuffie Awards. That book was followed by her illustrations of Barbara Bottner's Bootsie Barker Bites, Good Night Gorilla about Peggy's experiences with gorillas, and Rathmann's Caldecott Medal winning Officer Buckle and Gloria. Since that book, Rathmann has written two more: Ten Minutes till Bedtime and The Day The Babies Crawled Away (which made it onto the Horn Book Fanfare List for the best books of 2003). Rathmann lives in Nicasio, California.
    6.50
    2 votes
    173
    André Rouveyre

    André Rouveyre

    André Rouveyre (1879–1962) was an early twentieth-century French writer, caricaturist, and graphic artist. A member of several culturally elite circles of his day, he is perhaps equally remembered as the subject of drawings by prominent European artists Henri Matisse and Amedeo Modigliani. Having met Matisse in Gustave Moreau's atelier in 1896, the two would continue a lifelong friendship that included hundreds of letters of published correspondence as well as collaboration on such works as "Repli" (1947) and "Apollinaire" (1953). Rouveyre's own drawings show a mixture of early Minimalism (reminiscent of Matisse) with Expressionism. The caricatural nature of his work is aptly described by Aldous Huxley in the novel Crome Yellow when a character encounters his own unflattering portrait: "A mute, inglorious Rouveyre appeared in every one of those cruelly clear lines." Rouveyre died in December 1962 in Barbizon, France.
    7.00
    1 votes
    174
    Boris Kustodiev

    Boris Kustodiev

    • Books illustrated: Dubrovsky
    Boris Mikhaylovich Kustodiev (Russian: Бори́с Миха́йлович Кусто́диев) (March 7, 1878 – May 28, 1927) was a Russian painter and stage designer. Boris Kustodiev was born in Astrakhan into the family of a professor of philosophy, history of literature, and logic at the local theological seminary. His father died young, and all financial and material burdens fell on his mother's shoulders. The Kustodiev family rented a small wing in a rich merchant's house. It was there that the boy's first impressions were formed of the way of life of the provincial merchant class. The artist later wrote, "The whole tenor of the rich and plentiful merchant way of life was there right under my nose... It was like something out of an Ostrovsky play." The artist retained these childhood observations for years, recreating them later in oils and water-colours. Between 1893 and 1896, Boris studied in theological seminary and took private art lessons in Astrakhan from Pavel Vlasov, a pupil of Vasily Perov. Subsequently, from 1896 to 1903, he attended Ilya Repin’s studio at the Imperial Academy of Arts in St. Petersburg. Concurrently, he took classes in sculpture under Dmitry Stelletsky and in etching under
    7.00
    1 votes
    175
    Cecil Beaton

    Cecil Beaton

    • Books illustrated: The Glass of Fashion
    Sir Cecil Walter Hardy Beaton, CBE (14 January 1904 – 18 January 1980) was an English fashion and portrait photographer, diarist, painter, interior designer and an Academy Award-winning stage and costume designer for films and the theatre. He was named to the International Best Dressed List Hall of Fame in 1970. Beaton was born on 14 January 1904 in Hampstead the son of Ernest Walter Hardy Beaton (1867–1936), a prosperous timber merchant, and his wife Etty Sissons (1872–1962). His grandfather, Walter Hardy Beaton (1841–1904), had founded the family business of Beaton Brothers Timber Merchants and Agents, and his father followed into the business. Ernest Beaton was also an amateur actor and had met his wife, Cecil's mother, when playing the lead in a play. She was the daughter of a Cumbrian blacksmith named Oldcorn who had come to London to visit her married sister. It is through this connection that Cecil is related to the Blessed Father Edward Oldcorne who was involved in the Gunpowder Plot. They had four children — in addition to Cecil there were two daughters Nancy (1909–99) and Baba (1912–73), and another son Reggie (1905–33). Nancy married Sir Hugh Smiley (1905–90) and Baba
    7.00
    1 votes
    176
    David Bomberg

    David Bomberg

    • Books illustrated: Russian Ballet
    David Garshen Bomberg (5 December 1890 – 19 August 1957) was an English painter, and one of the Whitechapel Boys. Bomberg was one of the most audacious of the exceptional generation of artists who studied at the Slade School of Art under Henry Tonks, and which included Mark Gertler, Stanley Spencer, C.R.W. Nevinson and Dora Carrington. Bomberg painted a series of complex geometric compositions combining the influences of cubism and futurism in the years immediately preceding World War I; typically using a limited number of striking colours, turning humans into simple, angular shapes, and sometimes overlaying the whole painting a strong grid-work colouring scheme. He was expelled from the Slade School of Art in 1913, with agreement between the senior teachers Tonks, Frederick Brown and Philip Wilson Steer, because of the audacity of his breach from the conventional approach of that time. Whether because his faith in the machine age had been shattered by his experiences as a private soldier in the trenches or because of the pervasive retrogressive attitude towards modernism in Britain Bomberg moved to a more figurative style in the 1920s and his work became increasingly dominated by
    7.00
    1 votes
    177
    Gustave Doré

    Gustave Doré

    • Books illustrated: The Complete Fairy Tales of Charles Perrault
    Paul Gustave Doré (French pronunciation: [pɔl ɡystav dɔʁe]; January 6, 1832 – January 23, 1883) was a French artist, engraver, illustrator and sculptor. Doré worked primarily with wood engraving and steel engraving. Doré was born in Strasbourg and his first illustrated story was published at the age of fifteen. His talent was evident even earlier, however. At age five he had been a prodigy troublemaker, playing pranks that were mature beyond his years. Seven years later, he began carving in cement. Subsequently, as a young man, he began work as a literary illustrator in Paris, winning commissions to depict scenes from books by Rabelais, Balzac, Milton and Dante. In 1853, Doré was asked to illustrate the works of Lord Byron. This commission was followed by additional work for British publishers, including a new illustrated English Bible. In 1856 he produced twelve folio-size illustrations of The Legend of The Wandering Jew for a short poem which Pierre-Jean de Ranger had derived from a novel of Eugène Sue of 1845. In the 1860s he illustrated a French edition of Cervantes's Don Quixote, and his depictions of the knight and his squire, Sancho Panza, have become so famous that they
    7.00
    1 votes
    178
    Jeff Easley

    Jeff Easley

    • Book edition covers: Dungeon Masters Guide
    • Book editions illustrated: Deities and Demigods
    Jeff Easley (born 1954 in Nicholasville, Kentucky) is an oil painter who creates fantasy artwork in the tradition of Frank Frazetta. Easley was born in Nicholasville, Kentucky in 1954. He drew a lot as a child, particularly creatures such as ghosts and monsters. "I watched lots of monster movies on the late show, and built every monster model kit I could get my hands on," he said. He attended high school in Nicholasville, and then went to college at Murray State University in Murray, Kentucky. Easley earned a BFA in painting from the university in 1976. While there, he met and married his wife Cynthia, a fellow art major. Their children include Casey, Christopher, Cara, and Charles. After Cynthia finished with grad school, the couple moved to Massachusetts with some friends, where Easley began his career as a professional artist. "I did freelance work for Warren Publications, including covers and comic strips for Creepy, Eerie, and Vampirella, and for Marvel magazines, including covers for Savage Sword of Conan and Bizarre Adventures. But my real income came from my job at the Okey-Doke Popcorn Company." Easley met fellow Kentucky native and artist Larry Elmore through a mutual
    7.00
    1 votes
    179
    Leo Politi

    Leo Politi

    • Books illustrated: Song of the Swallows
    Leo Politi (1908–1996) was an Italian-American artist and author who wrote and illustrated some 20 children's books, as well as Bunker Hill, Los Angeles (1964), intended for adults. His works often celebrated cultural diversity, and many were published in both English and Spanish. Politi was the youngest of two children, born Atiglio Leoni Politi on November 21, 1908, to Lodovico Politi and Mary Cazzola. Politi’s sister, Marie Therese, was two years older. Leo Politi’s life was the stuff that picture books are made of. He was transported to Italy at the age of seven — in an “Indian Chief suit,” via transcontinental railroad and ocean liner — and grew up, constantly drawing, in his mother’s native village of Broni near Milan. Lodovico left the family to take a job as a cobbler in Piacenza. Marie went to live with a poor aunt who operated a roadside inn. Politi was placed in a boarding home with an elderly woman and her daughter. Politi loved Broni, a deep affection that remained for the rest of his life. In Broni he began to develop his artistic sense, drawing sketches of village life. By 1920 the Politis reunited and moved to London where Politi was exposed to the culture and
    7.00
    1 votes
    180
    Léopold Survage

    Léopold Survage

    Léopold Survage (31 July 1879 – 31 October 1968) (variant names Léopold Sturzwage, Leopold Sturwage, Leopoldij Sturzwasgh, Leopoldij Lvovich Sturzwage) was a French painter of Russian-Danish-Finnish descent born in Vilmanstrand, Finland (with selected references indicating a birthplace of Moscow, Russia). At a young age, Survage was directed to enter the piano factory operated by his Finnish father. He learned to play piano, then completed a commercial diploma in 1897. After a severe illness at the age of 22, Survage rethought his career and entered the Moscow School of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture. Introduced to the modern movement through the collections of Sergei Shchukin and Ivan Morozov, he cast his lot with the Russian avant-garde and, by 1906, was loosely affiliated with the circle of the magazine Zolotoye runo (Golden fleece—see also Maximilian Voloshin). He met Alexander Archipenko, exhibiting with him in the company of David Burlyuk, Vladimir Burlyuk, Mikhail Larionov and Natalia Goncharova. With Hélène Moniuschko, later his wife, he travelled to Western Europe, visiting Paris in July 1908. The couple eventually settled in Paris where Survage worked as a piano
    7.00
    1 votes
    181
    Milton Glaser

    Milton Glaser

    • Book edition covers: Down and Out in Paris and London
    Milton Glaser (born June 26, 1929, in New York City) is an American graphic designer, best known for the I ♥ NY logo, his Bob Dylan poster, the DC bullet logo used by DC Comics from 1977 to 2005, and the Brooklyn Brewery logo. He also founded New York Magazine with Clay Felker in 1968. Glaser was born into a Hungarian Jewish family in New York. Glaser was educated at Manhattan's High School of Music and Art (now Fiorello H. LaGuardia High School of Music and Art and Performing Arts), graduated from the Cooper Union in 1951 and later, via a Fulbright Scholarship, the Academy of Fine Arts in Bologna under Giorgio Morandi. He was greatly inspired by his sister's partner, who had studied typography in great depth. In 1954 Glaser was a founder, and president, of Push Pin Studios formed with several of his Cooper Union classmates. Glaser's work is characterized by directness, simplicity and originality. He uses any medium or style to solve the problem at hand. His style ranges wildly from primitive to avant garde in his countless book jackets, album covers, advertisements and direct mail pieces and magazine illustrations. He started his own studio, Milton Glaser, Inc, in 1974. This led
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    1 votes
    182
    Paul Goble

    Paul Goble

    • Books illustrated: The Girl Who Loved Wild Horses
    Paul Goble (born September 27, 1933) is an award-winning author and illustrator of children's books, mostly Native American stories. Goble has received a number of honors for his books including the prestigious Caldecott Medal. Goble, a native of Haslemere, England, studied at the Central School of Art in London where he worked as a furniture designer, industrial consultant, and art instructor. He published his first children’s book in 1969, entitled Red Hawk's Account of Custer's Last Battle. In 1977, he moved to the Black Hills in South Dakota and was adopted by Chief Edgar Red Cloud. Goble was greatly influenced by Plains Indian culture and his subsequent children’s books reflect this. "I feel that I have seen and learned many wonderful things from Indian people which most people would never have the opportunity to experience. I simply wanted to express and to share these things which I love so much." In 1978 Goble received the Caldecott Medal award, presented each year to the most distinguished children's picture book. It was awarded for The Girl Who Loved Wild Horses. Most of his books, retellings of ancient stores, are told from the perspective of the American Indian; part of
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    1 votes
    183
    Saşa Pană

    Saşa Pană

    • Books illustrated: Atentat la bunele tabieturi. Hârtii lipite. Frontispiciu poema Lumina în relief
    Saşa Pană (pen name of Alexandru Binder; 8 August 1902—22 August 1981) was a Romanian avant-garde poet, novelist, and short story writer. Born to a Jewish family in Bucharest, he trained as a physician in Iaşi and Bucharest, becoming a qualified combat medic in 1927. He was more interested in a literary career, which he had begun in 1925, after publishing several Symbolism-inspired poems under the title Răbojul unui muritor ("A Mortal's Tally"). He was to be more attracted to Dada themes, moving on to Surrealism soon after. Pană financed and edited the 1928 avant-garde magazine named unu (lower case was used on purpose). The magazine was the basis for a publishing house of the same name, which Pană used for printing works by the likes of Urmuz, Tristan Tzara, Stephan Roll, Ilarie Voronca, as well as his own. His prose took the form of very short pieces that merged the short story form with poem, reportage, and manifesto. He adapted André Breton's pure psychic automatism technique to his own creations - Diagrame ("Diagrams"; 1930), Echinox orbitor ("Blinding Equinox"; 1931), Viaţa romanţată a lui Dumnezeu ("The Romanticized Life of God"; 1932). In later volumes such as Cuvântul
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    1 votes
    184
    William Pars

    William Pars

    • Books illustrated: Travels in Asia Minor, 1764-1765
    William Pars (28 February 1742 – 1782) was an English watercolour portrait and landscape painter, draughtsman and illustrator. Pars was born in London, the son of a metal engraver. He studied at "Shipley's Drawing School" (in the Strand), St. Martin's Lane Academy, and also in the Duke of Richmond's Gallery. In 1761, at the age of 17, he exhibited a portrait and miniatures at the Incorporated Society of Artists, and became a member of the Free Society of Artists in 1763. In 1764 he obtained the Society of Arts' medal for an historical painting. In June 1764, he was selected by the Dilettanti Society to accompany, as draughtsman, Richard Chandler and Nicholas Revett to Greece. The result was published in 'Ionian Antiquities' (4 volumes) which was illustrated from Pars's drawings. Pars returned to England on 2 December 1766, and soon after accompanied Henry Temple, 2nd Viscount Palmerston to the continent, making drawings in Switzerland, the Tyrol, and Rome. In 1769 he contributed seven views from Greece to the first exhibition of the Royal Academy. He was elected an associate in 1770, and in the following year he sent eight European views, chiefly of Switzerland and the Tyrol,
    7.00
    1 votes
    185
    Marcel Janco

    Marcel Janco

    • Books illustrated: Joc secund
    Marcel Janco (German: [maɐ̯ˈsɛl ˈjaŋko], French: [maʁsɛl ʒɑ̃ko], common rendition of the Romanian name Marcel Hermann Iancu pronounced [marˈt͡ʃel ˈherman ˈjaŋku], last name also Ianco, Janko or Jancu; May 24, 1895 – April 21, 1984) was a Romanian and Israeli visual artist, architect and art theorist. He was the co-inventor of Dadaism and a leading exponent of Constructivism in Eastern Europe. In the 1910s, he co-edited, with Ion Vinea and Tristan Tzara, the Romanian art magazine Simbolul. Janco was a practitioner of Art Nouveau, Futurism and Expressionism before contributing his painting and stage design to Tzara's literary Dadaism. He parted with Dada in 1919, when he and painter Hans Arp founded a Constructivist circle, Das Neue Leben. Reunited with Vinea, he founded Contimporanul, the influential tribune of the Romanian avant-garde, advocating a mix of Constructivism, Futurism and Cubism. At Contimporanul, Janco expounded a "revolutionary" vision of urban planning. He designed some of the most innovative landmarks of downtown Bucharest. He worked in many art forms, including illustration, sculpture and oil painting. Janco was one of the leading Romanian Jewish intellectuals of
    5.33
    3 votes
    186
    Chip Kidd

    Chip Kidd

    • Book edition covers: Lunar Park
    Chip Kidd (born September 12, 1964) is an American author, editor, and graphic designer, best known for his book covers. Born in Reading, Pennsylvania, Kidd grew up in the Reading suburb of Shillington, strongly influenced by American popular culture. Kidd is currently associate art director at Knopf, an imprint of Random House. He first joined the Knopf design team in 1986, when he was hired as a junior assistant. Turning out jacket designs at an average of 75 a year, Kidd has freelanced for Doubleday, Farrar Straus & Giroux, Grove Press, HarperCollins, Penguin/Putnam, Scribner and Columbia University Press in addition to his work for Knopf. Kidd also supervises graphic novels at Pantheon, and in 2003 he collaborated with Art Spiegelman on a biography of cartoonist Jack Cole, Jack Cole and Plastic Man: Forms Stretched to Their Limits. His output includes cover concepts for books by Mark Beyer, Bret Easton Ellis, Haruki Murakami, Dean Koontz, Cormac McCarthy, Frank Miller, Michael Ondaatje, Alex Ross, Charles Schulz, Osamu Tezuka, David Sedaris, Donna Tartt, John Updike and others. His design for Michael Crichton's Jurassic Park novel was carried over into marketing for the film
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    2 votes
    187
    Clarence Gagnon

    Clarence Gagnon

    • Books illustrated: Le Grand Silence blanc
    Clarence Gagnon (8 November 1881 – 5 January 1942) was a Québécois painter. A native of Montreal, he studied at the Art Association of Montreal in 1897. Early in life, his mother had encouraged him to learn drawing and painting, but his father wanted him to become a businessman. Desiring to improve his knowledge about art, he went to the Académie Julian, Paris, and studied under Jean-Paul Laurens from 1904 to 1905. He then lived in Baie-Saint-Paul, where he produced many paintings depicting nature and the Canadian people. He invented a new kind of winter landscape that consisted of mountains, valleys, sharp contrasts, vivid colours, and sinuous lines. He became a member of the Royal Academy of the Arts in 1910. Gagnon took trips to Venice, Rouen, Saint-Malo and the Laurentians to paint landscapes. He illustrated the pages of the novel Maria Chapdelaine by Louis Hémon. As well, he was the illustrator for Louis-Frédéric Rouquette in 1929 in the white silence. He lived in France from 1924 to 1936. Gagnon advanced modernist painting within Canada. He died in 1942. One of his disciples is the painter René Richard. Galerie Clarence Gagnon has a bust in his memory located in the city of
    6.00
    2 votes
    188
    Damion Scott

    Damion Scott

    Damion Scott (born December 28, 1976, in Spanish Town, Jamaica) is an American comic book artist and writer. Scott is a graduate of The Kubert School. His drawing style is influenced by the graffiti art and the Hip hop culture. He has published a book entitled How To Draw Hip-Hop on the subject. Scott has worked on several DC Comics, including Batman, Robin, and Batgirl. Scott has also worked on Spider-Man, for Marvel Comics. He was the featured artist in issue #10 of the Solo series (2006). Scott's most recent project was the Raven limited-series for DC Comics. He currently lives in Japan and is heavily involved in the local art scene, having started an art studio in Tokyo and a Japanese comic titled Saturday Morning Cartoons or SAM-C. He is participating in an Art Showcase in Harajyuku on October 17–18, 2009, entitled "Battle for the Big Toy". He has recently drawn two issues of Web of Spider-Man and has a new series titled Duppy.
    6.00
    2 votes
    189
    Georges Braque

    Georges Braque

    Georges Braque (13 May 1882 – 31 August 1963) was a major 20th-century French painter and sculptor who, along with Pablo Picasso, developed the art style known as Cubism. Georges Braque was born on 13 May 1882, in Argenteuil, Val-d'Oise. He grew up in Le Havre and trained to be a house painter and decorator like his father and grandfather. However, he also studied artistic painting during evenings at the École des Beaux-Arts, in Le Havre, from about 1897 to 1899. In Paris, he apprenticed with a decorator and was awarded his certificate in 1902. The next year, he attended the Académie Humbert, also in Paris, and painted there until 1904. It was here that he met Marie Laurencin and Francis Picabia. His earliest works were impressionistic, but after seeing the work exhibited by the artistic group known as the "Fauves" (Beasts) in 1905, Braque adopted a Fauvist style. The Fauves, a group that included Henri Matisse and André Derain among others, used brilliant colors to represent emotional response. Braque worked most closely with the artists Raoul Dufy and Othon Friesz, who shared Braque's hometown of Le Havre, to develop a somewhat more subdued Fauvist style. In 1906, Braque traveled
    6.00
    2 votes
    190
    Ingri & Edgar Parin d'Aulaire

    Ingri & Edgar Parin d'Aulaire

    • Books illustrated: Abraham Lincoln
    Ingri (December 27, 1904 – October 24, 1980) and Edgar (September 30, 1898 – May 1, 1986) Parin d'Aulaire were two writers and illustrators of children's books in the 20th century. Edgar Parin, originally of Swiss citizenship, was born in Munich, Germany to the noted Italian portrait painter Gino Parin (1867–1944) and Ella Auler, a talented artist and musician who had moved from St. Louis to Paris. Edgar Parin took his mother's maiden name when she changed it to d'Aulaire. After studying architecture for a year in Munich, Edgar began his art studies at the School of Arts and Crafts there. Edgar, a pupil of Hans Hofman and Henri Matisse, studied fresco in Florence, painted murals in France and Norway, and had exhibitions in Paris, Berlin and Oslo. He illustrated many books in Germany from 1922 to 1926 and painted frescoes in Norway from 1926 to 1927. Ingri Mortenson was born in Kongsberg, Norway. When she was 15, the renowned Norwegian painter Harriet Backer encouraged her to pursue art as a career. Ingri later studied at art schools in Norway, Germany, and France. Ingri and Edgar met in Munich. They were married in 1925. A modest insurance settlement following a near-fatal
    6.00
    2 votes
    191
    James Atkinson

    James Atkinson

    • Books illustrated: Sketches in Afghanistan
    James Atkinson (17 March 1780 – 7 August 1852) was a surgeon, artist and Persian scholar - "a Renaissance man among Anglo-Indians" Atkinson was born in Darlington, County Durham, England, the son of a woolcomber. He showed at an early age a remarkable gift for languages and portraiture and was enabled by the kindness of a friend to study medicine at Edinburgh and London. He first sailed to India in 1802 as Surgeon’s Mate on board a ship of the Honourable East India Company (HEIC). On his second trip in 1805 he was appointed Assistant Surgeon in the Bengal service of the HEIC and placed in medical charge of the station of Backergunj near Dacca in present day Bangaladesh. It was whilst at Backergunj that he began his study of Persian and other oriental languages. He became a close friend of Sir Charles D’Oyly who was the Collector of Dacca (1808–1812) and a keen amateur artist. George Chinnery stayed with D’Oyly during this period and both D’Oyly and Atkinson became his pupils becoming heavily influenced by his passion for painting Indian landscapes and village life. It was Atkinson's proficiency with languages that brought him to the attention of The Lord Minto, the Governor
    6.00
    2 votes
    192
    Shaun Tan

    Shaun Tan

    • Books illustrated: Tales from Outer Suburbia
    Shaun Tan (born 1974) is an Australian illustrator and author of children's books and speculative fiction cover artist. He won an Academy Award for The Lost Thing, a 2011 animated film adaptation of a 2000 picture book he wrote and illustrated. Beside The Lost Thing, The Red Tree and The Arrival are chapterbooks he has written and illustrated. Tan was born in Fremantle, Western Australia in 1974 and, after freelancing for some years from a studio at Mount Lawley, relocated to Melbourne, Victoria in 2007. In 2006, his wordless graphic novel The Arrival won the "Book of the Year" prize as part of the New South Wales Premier's Literary Awards. The same book won the Children's Book Council of Australia "Picture Book of the Year" award in 2007. and the Western Australian Premier's Book Awards Premier's Prize in 2006. Tan was the University of Melbourne's Department of Language Literacy and Arts Education Illustrator In Residence for two weeks through an annual Fellowship offered by the May Gibbs Children’s Literature Trust. In 2010, Shaun Tan was the Artist Guest of Honour at the 68th World Science Fiction Convention held in Melbourne, Australia. For his career contribution to
    6.00
    2 votes
    193
    Benjamin Fawcett

    Benjamin Fawcett

    • Books illustrated: Ruined abbeys of Britain
    Benjamin Fawcett (December 1808 Bridlington - January 1893) was one of the finest of English nineteenth century woodblock colour printers. The son of a ship's master, he was apprenticed at age 14 for seven years to William Forth, a Bridlington bookseller and printer. In 1831 he started his own business in Middle Street, Driffield, as music seller, bookbinder and printer, bookseller and stationer. He married Mary Ann Woodmansey in 1830, from whom he had two sons before her death in 1834. He was married again in 1848, to Martha Porter, and raised a large family of four daughters and six sons. His early works were mostly children's books published by Webb & Millington of Leeds. In about 1845 he formed a close working association with Francis Orpen Morris. This relationship would last nearly 50 years and have a profound effect on British ornithology. Morris wrote the text for books which were financed and printed by Fawcett, and were engraved by Alexander Francis Lydon (1836-1917), who had started his career as Fawcett's apprentice. Colour printing showed an enormous improvement over the work of Thomas Bewick (1753-1828). At first wood-engraving illustrations were coloured by hand, but
    5.00
    3 votes
    194
    J. K. Rowling

    J. K. Rowling

    • Books illustrated: The Tales of Beedle the Bard
    Joanne "Jo" Rowling, ( /ˈroʊlɪŋ/) OBE, FRSL (born 31 July 1965), pen name J. K. Rowling, is a British novelist, best known as the author of the Harry Potter fantasy series. The Potter books have gained worldwide attention, won multiple awards, sold more than 400 million copies to become the best-selling book series in history and been the basis for a popular series of films, in which Rowling had overall approval on the scripts as well as maintaining creative control by serving as a producer on the final instalment. Rowling conceived the idea for the series on a train trip from Manchester to London in 1990. Rowling has led a "rags to riches" life story, in which she progressed from living on social security to multi-millionaire status within five years. As of March 2011, when its latest world billionaires list was published, Forbes estimated Rowling's net worth to be US$1 billion. The 2008 Sunday Times Rich List estimated Rowling's fortune at £560 million ($798 million), ranking her as the twelfth richest woman in the United Kingdom. Forbes ranked Rowling as the forty-eighth most powerful celebrity of 2007, and Time magazine named her as a runner-up for its 2007 Person of the Year,
    5.00
    3 votes
    195
    Rick Geary

    Rick Geary

    • Book editions illustrated: Great expectations
    Rick Geary (b. 1946 in Kansas City, Missouri) is an American cartoonist and illustrator. Rick Geary was born on February 25, 1946 in Kansas City, Missouri. Geary was initially introduced to comics readers with his contributions to the Heavy Metal and National Lampoon magazines. He has also created a number of postcards as well as illustrations for all kinds of publications. Perhaps his most widely circulated illustration is his logo for the audiobook publisher Recorded Books. Geary's distinctive cartooning style evolved from his early imitations of Edward Gorey. His drawings typically consist of stark clean black lines against a white background, with a total absence of half-tone or shading. Even more distinctive is Geary's method of panel art. Most comics artists will draw several consecutive sequential panels of the same characters in the same setting: Geary, uniquely, almost never devotes two consecutive panels to the same locale or character. This creates a constant impression of jumping from one image to another. Geary has drawn a variety of solo comic books and graphic novels for various publishers, including adaptations of Great Expectations, The Invisible Man and Wuthering
    5.00
    3 votes
    196
    Christopher Moeller

    Christopher Moeller

    • Book edition covers: Iron Empires Volume 1: Faith Conquers
    Christopher Moeller (born May 1, 1963) is a writer and painter, specializing in fully painted graphic novels. Moeller's signature creation is the Iron Empires science-fiction universe, comprising two fully painted graphic novels Faith Conquers and Sheva's War, a short story in Dark Horse Presents, and a second in the anthology Negative Burn. In 2006, an Iron Empires role-playing game was published, called Burning Empires. Moeller was born in Ithaca, New York and currently lives in Mt. Lebanon, Pennsylvania. He received a BFA in painting from the University of Michigan School of art, and an MFA in illustration from Syracuse University. His professional debut was in 1991, writing and painting Innovation Comic's Rocketman: King of the Rocketmen. This was followed by a run on Anne Rice's Interview with the Vampire, also from Innovation, for which he provided artwork and a number of cover illustrations. Moeller moved to Dark Horse Comics in 1994, writing and painting the first of his Iron Empires graphic novels (at that time called Shadow Empires) Faith Conquers, as well as the short story The Passage in Dark Horse Presents, #79-81. He illustrated Andrew Vachss' short story Treatment,
    5.50
    2 votes
    197

    Ed Emberley

    • Books illustrated: Drummer Hoff
    Edward Randolph Emberley (born October 19, 1931 in Malden, Massachusetts) is an American artist and illustrator. Emberley studied art at the Massachusetts School of Art in Boston (now Massachusetts College of Art and Design), from which he received a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in painting and illustration. He also studied at the Rhode Island School of Design. He married Barbara, a librarian and writer, in 1955; they have two children, Rebecca and Michael. They currently live in Ipswich, Massachusetts. Emberley is best known for his children's book work - particularly instructional drawing books. Emberley believes that everyone can learn to draw. His drawing books for children feature clear step-by-step instructions employing numbers, letters, and shapes graded to the early elementary school level. For example, the book Ed Emberley's A.B.C. uses this style of instruction, presenting a single letter-based drawing for each letter of the alphabet. Emberley has illustrated or contributed to over 50 books, many of which were first published between the 1960s and 1980s. Renewed interest in Emberley's work has come from adults who first encountered his books as children and now are
    5.50
    2 votes
    198
    Jia Lu

    Jia Lu

    • Book edition covers: Transcendent: Figurative Art by Jia Lu
    • Book editions illustrated: Transcendent: Figurative Art by Jia Lu
    Jia Lu (Simplified: 吕嘉; Traditional: 吕嘉; Pinyin: Lǚ Jiā;) is an oil painter working in America, known for blending Asian and European imagery in her paintings, predominantly of women. Jia Lu was born in 1954 in Beijing and is the daughter of Chinese oil painter Lu Enyi (吕恩谊). While living in China, Jia Lu worked as an operating room nurse, an actress and magazine editor. In 1980 she was admitted to the Central Academy of Arts and Design (中央工艺美术学院), now part of Tsinghua University and studied under Fan Zeng, graduating in 1983. Jia Lu's works include Chinese ink paintings, oil paintings, watercolors, drawings, sculpture and prints. Her early work strongly reflected the traditional aesthetics of her teacher Fan Zeng, but by the time she exhibited in Canada, she was critiquing new social developments, consumerism and power relations in China through a series of mixed-media self-portraits.[12] Her mature work in oils demonstrates an interest in Buddhism[13] and a purely feminine aesthetic,[14] and can be seen as a response to the masculine, sensual approach to the female nude. However, she has also painted male figures.[15] In numerous interviews she has emphasized the importance of beauty in her work, which she describes as "strength and wisdom."[16]
    4.67
    3 votes
    199
    Boris Vallejo

    Boris Vallejo

    • Book edition covers: Gateway
    • Books illustrated: The Ultimate Collection
    Boris Vallejo (born January 8, 1941) is a Peruvian-born American painter. He immigrated to the United States in 1964, and he currently resides in Allentown, Pennsylvania. He frequently works with Julie Bell, his wife, painter, and model. Vallejo works almost exclusively in the fantasy and erotica genres. His hyper-representational paintings have graced the covers of dozens of science fiction paperbacks and are featured in a series of best-selling glossy calendars. Subjects of his paintings are typically Sword and sorcery gods, monsters, and well-muscled male and female barbarians engaged in battle. Some of his male figures were modeled by Vallejo himself, and many of his later female characters were modeled by his wife. His latest works still retain heavy fantasy elements, but lean more towards the erotic rather than pure fantasy themes. Vallejo commenced painting at the age of thirteen and had his first illustration job at the age of sixteen. After emigrating to the United States in 1964, he quickly garnered a fan following from his illustrations of Tarzan, Conan the Barbarian, Doc Savage and various other fantasy characters (often done for paperback fiction works featuring the
    6.00
    1 votes
    200
    Giorgio de Chirico

    Giorgio de Chirico

    • Books illustrated: Întrebătorul
    Giorgio de Chirico (Italian pronunciation: [ˈdʒordʒo deˈkiːriko]; July 10, 1888 – November 20, 1978) was a Greek-born Italian artist. In the years before World War I, he founded the scuola metafisica art movement, which profoundly influenced the surrealists. After 1919 he became interested in traditional painting techniques, and worked in a neoclassical or neo-Baroque style, while frequently revisiting the metaphysical themes of his earlier work. He was born in Volos, Greece, to a Genovese mother and a Sicilian father. After studying art in Athens—mainly under the guidance of the influential Greek painter Georgios Roilos—and Florence, De Chirico moved to Germany in 1906, following his father's death in 1905. He entered the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich, where he read the writings of the philosophers Nietzsche, Arthur Schopenhauer and Otto Weininger and studied the works of Arnold Böcklin and Max Klinger. He returned to Italy in the summer of 1909 and spent six months in Milan. At the beginning of 1910, he moved to Florence where he painted the first of his 'Metaphysical Town Square' series, The Enigma of an Autumn Afternoon, after the revelation he felt in Piazza Santa Croce. He
    6.00
    1 votes
    201
    Jeff Kinney

    Jeff Kinney

    • Books illustrated: Diary of a Wimpy Kid
    Jeffrey "Jeff" Kinney (born February 19, 1971) is an American game designer, cartoonist, producer, and author of children's books including the Diary of a Wimpy Kid book series. He is also attributed as the creator of the child-oriented website Poptropica. Jeffrey Kinney was born and grew up in Fort Washington, Maryland, United States. He attended the University of Maryland at College Park in the early 1990s. It was in college that Kinney created the popular comic strip, Igdoof that ran in the campus newspaper, The Diamondback. While at college, he wanted to become a cartoonist. In 2004, FunBrain and Kinney released an online version of Diary of a Wimpy Kid. The website made daily entries until June 2005. The book became an instant hit, with the online version receiving about 20 million views as of 2007. When many online readers requested a printed version, Kinney agreed and in 2007, Diary of A Wimpy Kid was published. To date, eight Wimpy Kid books have been released, including a do-it-yourself book and a movie diary. In 2009, Kinney was named one of Time magazine's 100 "Most Influential People" in the world. Kinney works full-time as a writer and designer of online games. He also
    6.00
    1 votes
    202

    Leo and Diane Dillon

    Leo (March 2, 1933 – May 26, 2012) and Diane Dillon (née Sorber; born March 13, 1933) were an American husband and wife team of illustrators. They won two consecutive Caldecott Medals (for Why Mosquitoes Buzz In People's Ears and Ashanti To Zulu: African Traditions); the couple remain the only two individuals to have won two consecutive Cadlecott Medals. Leo Dillon, of Trinidadian immigrant parentage, was born and raised in East New York, Brooklyn, New York and Diane Sorber hails from the Greater Los Angeles Area. Leo enlisted in the Navy for three years' service so that he could attend art school. The couple met met at the Parsons School of Design in New York City in 1953; they graduated in 1956 and married the next year. They describe their work as incorporating motifs derived from their respective heritages. They have worked on both on children's literature and adult paperbacks. An association with writer Harlan Ellison led to jobs doing book covers for his short story collections and both cover and interior woodcut illustration for his anthology Dangerous Visions. They illustrated a large number of book covers for the original Ace Science Fiction Specials. A detailed biography
    6.00
    1 votes
    203

    Robert Lawson

    • Books illustrated: They Were Strong and Good
    Robert Lawson (October 4, 1892 – May 27, 1957) was an American author and illustrator of children's books. Born in New York City, Lawson spent his early life in Montclair, New Jersey. Following high school, he studied art for three years under illustrator Howard Giles (an advocate of dynamic symmetry as conceived by Jay Hambidge) at the New York School of Fine and Applied Art (now Parsons School of Design), marrying fellow artist and illustrator Marie Abrams in 1922. His career as an illustrator began in 1914, when his illustration for a poem about the invasion of Belgium was published in Harper's Weekly. He went on to publish in other magazines, including the Ladies Home Journal, Everybody's Magazine, Century Magazine, Vogue, and Designer. During World War I, Lawson was a member of the first U.S. Army camouflage unit (called the American Camouflage Corps), in connection with which he served in France with other artists, such as Barry Faulkner, Sherry Edmundson Fry, William Twigg-Smith and Kerr Eby (Behrens 2009). In his autobiography, Faulkner recalls that Lawson had a remarkable "sense of fantasy and humor", which made him especially valuable when the camoufleurs put on musical
    6.00
    1 votes
    204
    Salvador Dalí

    Salvador Dalí

    Salvador Domingo Felipe Jacinto Dalí i Domènech, 1st Marqués de Dalí de Pubol (May 11, 1904 – January 23, 1989), known as Salvador Dalí (Catalan pronunciation: [səɫβəˈðo ðəˈɫi]), was a prominent Spanish surrealist painter born in Figueres, Spain. Dalí was a skilled draftsman, best known for the striking and bizarre images in his surrealist work. His painterly skills are often attributed to the influence of Renaissance masters. His best-known work, The Persistence of Memory, was completed in 1931. Dalí's expansive artistic repertoire included film, sculpture, and photography, in collaboration with a range of artists in a variety of media. Dalí attributed his "love of everything that is gilded and excessive, my passion for luxury and my love of oriental clothes" to a self-styled "Arab lineage", claiming that his ancestors were descended from the Moors. Dalí was highly imaginative, and also enjoyed indulging in unusual and grandiose behavior. His eccentric manner and attention-grabbing public actions sometimes drew more attention than his artwork, to the dismay of those who held his work in high esteem, and to the irritation of his critics. Salvador Domingo Felipe Jacinto Dalí i
    6.00
    1 votes
    205
    Victor Brauner

    Victor Brauner

    • Books illustrated: Restrişti
    Victor Brauner (Romanian pronunciation: [ˈviktor ˈbrawner], also spelled Viktor Brauner; June 15, 1903 – March 12, 1966) was a Romanian Jewish painter of surrealistic images. He was born in Piatra Neamţ, the son of a timber manufacturer who subsequently settled in Vienna with his family for a few years. It is there that young Victor attended elementary school. When his family returned to the country in 1914, he continued his studies at the Evangelical school in Brăila; he began to be interested in zoology in that period. He attended the National School of Fine Arts in Bucharest (1919–1921) and Horia Igiroşanu's private school of painting. He visited Fălticeni and Balcic, and started painting landscapes in the manner of Paul Cézanne. Then, as he testified himself, he went through all the stages: "Dadaist, Abstractionist, Expressionist". On September 26, 1924, the Mozart Galleries in Bucharest hosted his first personal exhibition. In that period he met poet Ilarie Voronca, together with whom he founded the 75HP magazine. It was in this magazine that Brauner published the manifesto The Pictopoetry and the article The Surrationalism. He painted and exhibited Christ at the Cabaret (in
    6.00
    1 votes
    206
    Helen Allingham

    Helen Allingham

    • Books illustrated: Far from the Madding Crowd
    Helen Allingham (née Helen Mary Elizabeth Paterson) (26 September 1848 – 28 September 1926) was an English watercolour painter and illustrator of the Victorian era. Helen Mary Elizabeth Paterson was born in Britain on 26 September 1848, at Swadlincote in Derbyshire, England, the daughter of a medical doctor and the eldest of seven children. The family moved to Altrincham in Cheshire when she was one year old. In 1862, at the age of 13, she suffered a tragedy when her father and 3 year-old sister Isabel died of diphtheria, after which the family had to move to Birmingham where Helen's aunts helped provide for them. Her younger sister Caroline Paterson also became a noted artist. Helen showed a talent for art from an early age, drawing some of her inspiration from her maternal grandmother Sarah Smith Herford and aunt Laura Herford, both accomplished artists of their day. She initially studied art for three years at the Birmingham School of Design (founded 1843), then from 1867 attended the "Female School of Art", a section of which became the Royal College of Art in London. While studying at the Royal College, Helen worked as an illustrator, eventually deciding to give up her studies
    4.33
    3 votes
    207
    Frank Miller

    Frank Miller

    • Books illustrated: Elektra Lives Again
    Frank Miller (born January 27, 1957) is an American writer, artist, and film director best known for his dark, film noir-style comic book stories and graphic novels Ronin, Daredevil: Born Again, Batman: The Dark Knight Returns, Sin City and 300. He also directed the film version of The Spirit, shared directing duties with Robert Rodriguez on Sin City and produced the film 300. Miller was born in Olney, Maryland, and raised in Montpelier, Vermont, the fifth of seven children of a nurse mother and a carpenter/electrician father. His family was Irish Catholic. Living in New York City's Hell's Kitchen influenced Miller's material in the 1980s. Miller lived in Los Angeles, California in the 1990s, which influenced Sin City. Miller moved back to Hell's Kitchen by 2001 and was creating Batman: The Dark Knight Strikes Again as the 9/11 terrorist attacks occurred about 4 miles from that neighborhood. Miller was formerly married to colorist Lynn Varley, who colored many of his noted works (from Ronin (1984) through 300 (1998), and the backgrounds to the movie 300 (2007)). Miller and Varley divorced in 2005. He has since been romantically linked to New York-based Shakespearean scholar
    5.00
    2 votes
    208
    J. M. W. Turner

    J. M. W. Turner

    • Books illustrated: Scott's Poetical Works
    Joseph Mallord William Turner RA (23 April 1775 – 19 December 1851) was an English Romantic landscape painter, water-colourist, and printmaker. Turner was considered a controversial figure in his day, but is now regarded as the artist who elevated landscape painting to an eminence rivaling history painting. Although renowned for his oil paintings, Turner is also one of the greatest masters of British watercolour landscape painting. He is commonly known as "the painter of light" and his work is regarded as a Romantic preface to Impressionism. Joseph Mallord William Turner was born on or around the 23 April 1775 in Maiden Lane, Covent Garden, London, England. His father, William Turner (1738–7 August 1829), was a barber and wig maker, His mother, Mary Marshall, came from a family of butchers. A younger sister, Mary Ann Turner, was born in September 1778 but died aged four in August 1783. In 1785, as a result of a "fit of illness" in the family the young Turner was sent to stay with his maternal uncle, Joseph Mallord William Marshall, in Brentford, which was then a small town west of London on the banks of the River Thames. From this period, the earliest known artistic exercise by
    5.00
    2 votes
    209

    Kevin Henkes

    • Books illustrated: Kitten's First Full Moon
    Kevin Henkes (b. November 27, 1960, Racine, Wisconsin) is a successful children's book illustrator and author known for winning both the Caldecott Medal for illustration and the Newbery Honor for writing. He is perhaps most famous for his book, Kitten's First Full Moon, which won the 2005 Caldecott Medal. Kevin Henkes (pronounced HANK-us) thought he would be an artist until his junior year of high school, when one of his teachers encouraged him in his writing efforts. He discovered that children's books combined both his literary and artistic interests. Henkes is author and illustrator of children's picturebooks, many of which feature mice as their main characters. He also writes young-adult fiction. Henkes wrote his first book during his freshman year in college. The book's theme deals with how a child describes the pleasures of occasional solitude. This theme is common in many of Henkes' later books. Henkes, one of five children, says that many of his storylines are inspired by his family and the neighborhood where he grew up in Racine, Wisconsin. Henkes' first book, All Alone, was published in 1981 by Greenwillow Books. More than 30 books followed, including Chrysanthemum and
    5.00
    2 votes
    210
    Gustaf Tenggren

    Gustaf Tenggren

    • Books illustrated: The Poky Little Puppy
    Gustaf Adolf Tenggren (November 3, 1896 - April 9, 1970) was a Swedish-American illustrator. He is known for his Arthur Rackham-influenced fairy-tale style and use of silhouetted figures with caricatured faces. Tenggren was a chief illustrator for The Walt Disney Company in the late 1930s, in what has been called the Golden Age of American animation, when animated feature films such as Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Fantasia, Bambi and Pinocchio were produced. Gustaf Tenggren was born in 1896 in Magra Parish (now part of Alingsås Municipality), in Västra Götaland County, Sweden. In 1913 he received a scholarship to study painting at Valand, the art school in Gothenburg, Sweden. Tenggren's early schooling and artistic influences were solidly grounded in Scandinavian techniques, motifs and myths; he worked with illustrating in the popular Swedish folklore and fairy tales annual Bland Tomtar och Troll ("Among Elves and Trolls"), where he succeeded illustrator John Bauer. After his first exhibition in 1920, Tenggren left Sweden and moved to Cleveland, Ohio, in the United States, where his sister lived, and from there, in 1922, to New York City. By 1923, he was illustrating children's
    4.50
    2 votes
    211
    Jacques Villon

    Jacques Villon

    • Books illustrated: Miennes
    Jacques Villon (July 31, 1875 - June 9, 1963) was a French cubist painter and printmaker. Born Gaston Emile Duchamp in Damville, Eure, in the Haute-Normandie region of France, he came from a prosperous and artistically inclined family. While he was a young man, his maternal grandfather Emile Nicolle, successful businessman and artist, taught him and his siblings. Gaston Duchamp was the elder brother of: In 1894, he and his brother Raymond moved to the Montmartre area of Paris. There, he studied law at the University of Paris but received his father's permission to study art on the condition that he continue studying law. To distinguish himself from his siblings, Gaston Duchamp adopted the pseudonym of Jacques Villon as a tribute to the French medieval poet François Villon. In Montmartre, home to an expanding art community, Villon lost interest in the pursuit of a legal career, and for the next 10 years he worked in graphic media, contributing cartoons and illustrations to Parisian newspapers as well as drawing color posters. In 1903 he helped organize the drawing section of the first Salon d'Automne in Paris. In 1904-1905 he studied art at the Académie Julian. During the First
    4.50
    2 votes
    212
    Jamie Wyeth

    Jamie Wyeth

    • Books illustrated: The Stray
    James Browning Wyeth (born July 6, 1946) is a contemporary American realist painter. He was raised in Chadds Ford Township, Pennsylvania, son of Andrew Wyeth and grandson of N.C. Wyeth. He is artistic heir to the Brandywine School tradition, painters who worked in the rural Brandywine River area of Delaware and Pennsylvania, portraying its people, animals, and landscape. James “Jamie” Wyeth was the second child of Andrew and Betsy Wyeth, born three years after brother Nicholas. He was raised on his parents' farm "The Mill" in Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania, in much the same way as his father had been brought up, and with much the same influences. He demonstrated the same remarkable skill in drawing as his father had done at comparable ages. He attended public school for six years and afterwards was privately tutored by his family, concentrating on art. His brother Nicholas, his only sibling, became an art dealer. At age 12, Jamie studied with his aunt Carolyn Wyeth, a well-known artist in her own right, and the resident at that time of the N. C. Wyeth House and Studio, filled with the art work and props of his grandfather. In the morning he studied English and history at his home, and
    4.50
    2 votes
    213

    Richard Egielski

    • Books illustrated: Hey, Al
    Richard Egielski (born July 16, 1952 in New York City) is an American illustrator most famous for Hey, Al, a book that Arthur Yorinks wrote, but for which Egielski won the 1987 Caldecott Medal for his illustrations. Egielski is married to Denise Saldutti who is also an artist/illustrator and the couple have a son Ian Joseph Egielski. Egielski lives in Milford, New Jersey. He was featured in the October 2011 issue of BookPage.
    4.50
    2 votes
    214

    Barbara Cooney

    • Book editions illustrated: The crows of pearblossom
    • Books illustrated: Ox-Cart Man
    Barbara Cooney (August 6, 1917 – March 10, 2000) was an American children's author and illustrator of more than 200 books and double Caldecott Medalist. She has written books for six decades. Her books have been translated into 10 languages. Cooney was born on 6 August 1917 in Room 1127 of the Hotel Bossert in Brooklyn, New York, to Russell Schenck Cooney (a stockbroker) and Mae Evelyn Bossert (a painter). She had a twin brother and two younger brothers. She attended Buckley Country Day School and later Boarding School. She later graduated from Smith College with a history degree, and her first book illustrated, Ake and His World, by the Swedish poet Bertil Malmberg, was published a year after graduation. During World War II, she served in the Women’s Army Corps. Soon after her service, she met and married Guy Murchie(Jr), in 1944 and had two children (Gretel and Barnaby.) She later divorced, and remarried Charles Talbot Porter in July 1949 and had two more children (Charles and Phoebe.) Ten years later, she won her first Caldecott for Chanticleer and the Fox , a book that she illustrated and adapted the text from Chaucer. Between then and when she picked the other Caldecott in
    5.00
    1 votes
    215
    Jean-Michel Moreau le Jeune

    Jean-Michel Moreau le Jeune

    • Books illustrated: Candide, ou l'Optimisme
    Jean-Michel Moreau (26 March 1741 – 30 November 1814), also called Moreau le Jeune ("the younger"), was a French draughtsman, illustrator and engraver. Moreau le Jeune, as he is usually called, was born in Paris. He was the pupil of the painter Louis-Joseph Le Lorrain who accompanied his master to St Petersburg in 1758 when Le Lorrain went to be the first director of the Saint Petersburg Academy of Fine Arts established the previous year, where Moreau briefly taught drawing before returning to Paris in 1759, after Le Lorrain's unexpected death. He worked for the engraver Jacques-Philippe Lebas, producing reproductive drawings of contemporary paintings and those of Old Masters for engravers to work from and learning etching During the 1760s he also provided drawings to be engraved for the Recueil d’antiquités of the comte de Caylus, who kept a benevolent watch over him. For Diderot and Alembert’s Encyclopédie he provided pen and wash drawings for the engravers, illustrating artisanal processes. As an engraver he collaborated with François Boucher, Hubert Gravelot and others on illustrations for an edition of Ovid’s Metamorphoses. In 1765 he married Françoise-Nicole Pineau, daughter
    5.00
    1 votes
    216
    John Romita, Jr.

    John Romita, Jr.

    • Books illustrated: Daredevil: The Man Without Fear
    John S. Romita, Jr. (born August 17, 1956) is an American comic book artist best known for his extensive work for Marvel Comics from the 1970s to the 2000s. He is often referred to as JRJR (the abbreviation of John Romita, Jr.) John Romita, Jr. is the son of comic-book artist John Romita, Sr., one of the signature Spider-Man artists since the 1960s. Romita, Jr. began his career at Marvel UK, doing sketches for covers of reprints as a favor thanks to his respected father. His American debut was with a six page story entitled "Chaos at the Coffee Bean!" in The Amazing Spider-Man Annual #11 (1977). Romita's early popularity began with his run on Iron Man with writer David Michelinie and artist Bob Layton which began in 1978. In the early 1980s, he had his first regular run on the Amazing Spider-Man series and also was the artist for the launch of the Dazzler series. Working with writer Roger Stern on Amazing Spider-Man, he co created the character Hobgoblin. From 1983 to 1986 he had a run on the popular Uncanny X-Men with Dan Green and author Chris Claremont. He would return for a second run on Uncanny X-Men in 1993. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, Romita enjoyed an extended stint
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    217
    Marc Chagall

    Marc Chagall

    Marc Zaharovich Chagall (/ʃəˈɡɑːl/ shə-GAHL; Yiddish: מאַרק זאַהאַראָוויטש שאַגאַל; Russian: Марк Заха́рович Шага́л; Belarusian: Марк Захаравіч Шагал;) (7 July [O.S. 24 June] 1887 – 28 March 1985), was a Russian-French artist associated with several major artistic styles and one of the most successful artists of the 20th century. He was an early modernist, and created works in virtually every artistic medium, including painting, book illustrations, stained glass, stage sets, ceramic, tapestries and fine art prints. Art critic Robert Hughes referred to Chagall as "the quintessential Jewish artist of the twentieth century". According to art historian Michael J. Lewis, Chagall was considered to be "the last survivor of the first generation of European modernists". For decades, he "had also been respected as the world's preeminent Jewish artist". Using the medium of stained glass, he produced windows for the cathedrals of Reims and Metz, windows for the UN, and the Jerusalem Windows in Israel. He also did large-scale paintings, including part of the ceiling of the Paris Opéra. Before World War I, he traveled between St. Petersburg, Paris, and Berlin. During this period he created his
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    218

    Allen Say

    • Books illustrated: Grandfather's Journey
    Allen Say (born James Allen Koichi Moriwaki Seii in 1937; surname written as Seii (清井) in Japanese) is an Asian American author and illustrator best known for his book Grandfather's Journey, a picture book detailing his grandfather's voyage from Japan to the United States and back again, which won the 1994 Caldecott Medal. This story is autobiographical and relates to Say's constant moving during his childhood. His work mainly focuses on Japanese and Japanese American characters and their stories, and several works have autobiographical elements. Allen Say was born in Yokohama, Japan, to a Japanese family: a Japanese American mother and a Korean father who was adopted by British parents and raised in Shanghai. At age 12, four years after his parents' divorce, Say went to live with his grandmother, but received her permission a short time later to live alone. The boy apprenticed himself for many years to his favorite cartoonist, Noro Shinpei, an experience detailed in his autobiographical novel The Ink-Keeper's Apprentice. In time Say came to think of Shinpei as his "spiritual father," as well as a mentor. When his father decided to move to the United States with his new family,
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    219
    Anselm Feuerbach

    Anselm Feuerbach

    • Book edition covers: The Sacred Band
    • Book editions illustrated: The Sacred Band
    • Books illustrated: The Sacred Band
    Anselm Feuerbach (September 12, 1829 – January 4, 1880) was a German painter. He was the leading classicist painter of the German 19th-century school. Feuerbach was born at Speyer, the son of the well-known archaeologist Joseph Anselm Feuerbach and the grandson of the legal scholar Paul Johann Anselm Ritter von Feuerbach. After having passed through the art schools of Düsseldorf and Munich, he went to Antwerp and subsequently to Paris, where he benefited by the teaching of Couture, and produced his first masterpiece, Hafiz at the Fountain in 1852. He subsequently worked at Karlsruhe, and then Venice. In Venice, he fell under the spell of the greatest school of colourists, and several of his work demonstrate a close study of the Italian masters. He then proceeded to Rome and then Vienna. In Vienna, he associated with Johannes Brahms. In 1873, he became professor in the Vienna Academy, but disappointed with the reception given in Vienna to his design of The Fall of the Titans for the ceiling of the new Artists' House Museum, he went to live in Venice, where he died in 1880. After his death, Brahms composed Nänie, a piece for chorus and orchestra, in his memory. He is associated with
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    220

    Chris Van Allsburg

    • Books illustrated: Jumanji
    Chris Van Allsburg (born June 18, 1949) is an American author and illustrator of children's books. He twice won the Caldecott Medal, for Jumanji (1982) and The Polar Express (1985), both of which he wrote and illustrated, and both of which were later adapted into successful motion pictures. He received the Caldecott Honor Medal in 1980 for The Garden of Abdul Gasazi. He received the honorary degree of Doctor of Humane Letters from the University of Michigan in April 2012. Van Allsburg was born in East Grand Rapids, Michigan where he was the second child to his mother Doris Christianen Van Allsburg and his father Richard Van Allsburg. Van Allsburg's older sister was born in 1947. When Chris was born, his family lived in an old farm house. His family then moved to a new house at the edge of Grand Rapids when Chris was three years old. His new house was located close enough to his elementary school that he could walk there for class. His family later moved again to East Grand Rapids. He attended middle school and high school at East Grand Rapids. Van Allsburg attended the College of Architecture and Design at the University of Michigan, which at that time included the art school. He
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    221
    Craig Thompson

    Craig Thompson

    • Book edition covers: Good-Bye, Chunky Rice
    • Book editions illustrated: Good-Bye, Chunky Rice
    • Books illustrated: Carnet de Voyage
    Craig Matthew Thompson (born September 21, 1975) is a graphic novelist best known for his books Good-bye, Chunky Rice (1999), Blankets (2003), Carnet de Voyage (2004) and Habibi (2011). Thompson has received four Harvey Awards, two Eisner Awards, and two Ignatz Awards. In 2007, his cover design for the Menomena album Friend and Foe received a Grammy nomination for Best Recording Package. Craig Thompson was born in Traverse City, Michigan in 1975. He and his brother grew up in rural Marathon, Wisconsin, in a fundamentalist Christian family. His father was a plumber, and his mother alternated between working as a stay-at-home mom and a visiting-nurse assistant for the disabled. Media such as films and televisions shows were screened or altogether censored by their parents, and the only music allowed was Christian music. Thompson's only access to the arts were the Sunday funnies and comics, since they were assumed to be for children, to which Thompson attributes his early affinity for the medium. Thompson and his brother were particularly enamored of black and white independent comics in the 1980s, such as the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, and the do-it-yourself ethic that they
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    222

    Ed Young

    • Books illustrated: Lon Po Po: A Red-Riding Hood Story from China
    Ed Young (born Ed (Tse-chun) Young; November 28, 1931) is a Caldecott Medal-winning illustrator and author of picture books. Ed Young was born on November 28, 1931 in Tianjin, China. When he was three years old, he and his family moved to Shanghai. His mother would ring a bell at mealtimes, and he would slide down the banister with his brothers and sisters. “I have never lost the child in me. My father would spin endless tales of his own to entertain our imaginations on summer nights lying on the flat roof of our house. I have never forgotten the images I saw in my mind.” From an early age, Ed loved to create stories and draw pictures and thought he could "disappear" into his own world, brought to life through his illustrations. In 1951, Young came to America to study architecture. Instead, he grew more interested in art, and soon switched his major. Young’s first job was with a New York advertising agency where he spent his lunch breaks sketching animals at Central Park Zoo. During that time, he received a letter from his father which said, “A successful life and a happy life is one measured by how much you have accomplished for others and not one measured by how much you have
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    223
    Ivan Aivazovsky

    Ivan Aivazovsky

    • Book edition covers: The Sun Watches the Sun by Dejan Stojanovic
    Ivan Aivazovsky (Armenian: Հովհաննես Այվազովսկի Hovhannes Aivasovsky, originally Aivazian; Russian: Иван Константинович Айвазовский) (July 29, 1817 – May 5, 1900) was a Russian world-renowned painter of Armenian descent living and working in Crimea, most famous for his seascapes, which constitute more than half of his paintings. Aivazovsky is widely considered as one of the greatest seascape painters of all times. Aivazovsky was born in the town of Feodosiya (Theodosia), Crimea (Russian Empire) to a poor Armenian family. His brother was the Armenian Archbishop Gabriel Aivazovsky. His family moved to the Crimea from Galicia (then in southern Poland, now in Ukraine) in 1812. His parents' family name was Aivazian but in Poland it was written Haivazian. Some of the artist's paintings bear a signature, in Armenian letters, "Hovhannes Aivazian" (Հովհաննես Այվազյան). His father taught him to play the violin and speak Polish and Ukrainian fluently. His talent as an artist earned him sponsorship and entry to the Simferopol gymnasium №1 and later the St.Petersburg Academy of Arts, which he graduated with a gold medal. Earning awards for his early landscapes and seascapes, he went on to paint
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    224
    Marcus Stone

    Marcus Stone

    • Books illustrated: Our Mutual Friend
    Marcus Stone (4 July 1840 – 24 March 1921), English painter, son of Frank Stone, ARA, was trained by his father and began to exhibit at the Royal Academy before he was eighteen; and a few years later he illustrated with much success books by Charles Dickens, Anthony Trollope, and other writers, friends of his family. He was elected an associate of the Royal Academy in 1877, and academician in 1887. In his earlier pictures he dealt much with historical incidents, but in his later work he occupied himself chiefly with a particular type of dainty sentiment, treated with much charm, refinement and executive skill. One of his canvases is in Tate. Most of his works have been engraved, and medals were awarded to him at exhibitions in all parts of the world. See the Life and Work of Marcus Stone, R.A., by Alfred Lys Baldry (Art Journal office, 1896). Stone and fellow painter Luke Fildes both lived in Melbury Road, Kensington, in houses designed by Richard Norman Shaw. A blue plaque commemorates Stone at 8 Melbury Road, Kensington.  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.). Cambridge
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    225
    Arthur Suydam

    Arthur Suydam

    • Book edition covers: Dead Street
    Arthur Suydam is an American comic book artist and musician. He has done artwork for magazines including Heavy Metal, Epic Illustrated and National Lampoon, while his comic book work includes Batman, Conan, Tarzan, Predator, Aliens, Death Dealer, and Marvel Zombies. Suydam has contributed work to many publications, including Heavy Metal, House of Secrets, House of Mystery, Penthouse Comix, Epic Illustrated and National Lampoon, as well as international sci-fi and comic anthologies. His own projects include Arthur Suydam: The Art of the Barbarian, Skin Deep, The Alien Encounters Poster Book, Visions: The Art of Arthur Suydam, Mudwogs, Mudwogs II, Bedtime Stories for the Incarcerated, Libby in the Lost World and The Adventures of Cholly and Flytrap. Arthur Suydam's comic book work includes such titles as Batman, Conan, Tarzan, Predator, Aliens and Death Dealer. Recently, his work has primarily been on covers, including Marvel Zombies, Ghost Rider, Hellstorm, Moon Knight, Wolverine, Marvel Zombies vs. The Army of Darkness, and Raise the Dead. Suydam also created the box art for the game Touch the Dead, and provided the cover art to the Mickey Spillane (with Max Allan Collins) novel
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    226
    Boris Kourtoukov

    Boris Kourtoukov

    A professional web designer and front end developer. In the past he dabbled in game development, digital painting and project management.
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    227

    Chris Raschka

    • Books illustrated: The Hello, Goodbye Window
    Chris Raschka (born Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, March 6, 1959) is an American author, illustrator, and violist. His Yo! Yes? was a Caldecott Honor book in 1994 but he may be most famous for his Hello, Goodbye Window, winner of the 2006 Caldecott Medal. Also, his book A Ball for Daisy won the 2012 Caldecott Medal. Though he grew up in suburban Chicago, IL, Chris spent part of his childhood in Austria, his mother's homeland. He is a graduate of St. Olaf College. He lives in New York City. He has also written Ring! Yo! Mr. Raschka is the author and illustrator of "Charlie Parker Played Be Bop", a wondrous introduction to the great saxophone player/composer Charlie Parker. (Scholastic, 1997) Two of his books have meet with controversy: Happy to Be Nappy, written by bell hooks and his own Arlene Sardine.
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    228
    Daniel Clowes

    Daniel Clowes

    • Book edition covers: Prisoner of X: 20 Years in the Hole at Hustler Magazine
    Daniel Gillespie Clowes (born April 14, 1961) is an American author, screenwriter, and cartoonist of alternative comic books. Much of Clowes's work first appeared in his anthology comic Eightball, which featured self-contained serialized narratives. All of the serialized narratives have been collected and published as graphic novels, most notably Ghost World. With filmmaker Terry Zwigoff, Clowes adapted Ghost World into the 2001 film of the same name, and he also adapted another Eightball story into the 2006 film Art School Confidential. Clowes was born in Chicago, Illinois, to an auto mechanic mother and a furniture craftsman father. His father was Jewish and his mother was from a "reserved WASPish Pennsylvania" family. In 1979, Clowes finished high school at the University of Chicago Laboratory Schools and attended the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York. After earning his BFA, he unsuccessfully attempted to find work in New York as an illustrator. From 1985 to 1989 he contributed both art and stories to Cracked magazine, working extensively on a feature called "The Uggly Family." In 1985, Clowes wrote his first Lloyd Llewellyn story, which he sent to Fantagraphics' Gary Groth,
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    229
    Dennis Calero

    Dennis Calero

    • Book editions illustrated: Races of Faerûn
    • Books illustrated: Cowboys & Aliens
    Dennis Calero is a American comic book artist and illustrator, known for his work on titles such as X Factor, Legion of Superheroes, and Kolchak. Calero'swork includes Acclaim Comics' licensed-product titles Sliders and Magic: The Gathering; Moonstone Books' TV tie-in titles Cisco Kid and Kolchak: The Night Stalker, Platinum Comics' Cowboys & Aliens; IDW Publishing's Masters of Horror: Dreams in the Witch House; and Marvel Comics' X-Factor, during his tenure on which the title was nominated for the Harvey Award for Best New Series (2006). In 2006, IDW announced that Calero will be one of the cover artists on its six-issue Star Trek: The Next Generation TV tie-in miniseries The Space Between, scheduled for 2007. Calero drew an arc of Legion of Super-Heroes for DC Comics and his new Marvel series, X-Men: Noir, was released by Marvel in December 2008. X-Men Noir: Mark of Cain was released in 2010. That same year, he drew the Dark Horse Comics relaunch of the former Gold Key and Valiant character, Doctor Solar, Man of the Atom, which was written by Jim Shooter. Calero has also provided illustrations sporadically for role-playing games, beginning in 1996 for White Wolf Publishing. He
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    230
    Endre Szász

    Endre Szász

    • Books illustrated: Milky Way: Szasz Endre
    Endre Szász (7 January 1926 - 18 August 2003) was a Hungarian graphic artist, printmaker, illustrator, muralist and ceramics decorator. He described himself as a Folk Surrealist. His father, Béla Szász, was a doctor, and he legated the talent of the art from his mother's (Erzsébet Susenka) family. Since his childhood he draw by nature. He used oil, acrylic, tempera, pencil, ink, charcoal, monotype, drypoint, lithography, etching and aquatint, and he painted on several materials, like posters and porcelain, and he had several book illustrations, too. He studied at the University of Fine Art in Budapest. Between the late 1940s until the late 1960s he worked as an illustrator, during this time he illustrated few hundred books. In 1959 he won an illustrator prize in the Leipzig Fair. In 1964 he presented in a British museam exhibition with this work about Omar Khayyam's Rubaiyat. He had several exhibitions all over the world, including the Museum of Modern Art (Mexico City), Auschwitz Museum (Poland), the Hungarian National Gallery (Budapest), and also exhibited in Madrid, Copenhagen, Brussels, Berlin, Rome, Oslo, Johannesburg, New Orleans, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Budapest, Amman
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    231
    Frank Kelly Freas

    Frank Kelly Freas

    • Book edition covers: Shadow on the Stars
    Frank Kelly Freas (27 August 1922 – 2 January 2005), called the "Dean of Science Fiction Artists", was an American science fiction and fantasy artist with a career spanning more than 50 years. Born in Hornell, New York, United States, Freas (pronounced like "freeze") was the son of two photographers, and was raised in Canada. He was educated at Lafayette High School in Buffalo, where he received training from long-time art teacher Elizabeth Weiffenbach. He entered the United States Army Air Forces right out of high school (Crystal Beach, Ontario, Canada). He flew as camera man for reconnaissance in the South Pacific and painted bomber noses during World War II. He then worked for Curtis-Wright for a brief period, then went to study at The Art Institute of Pittsburgh and began to work in advertising. He married Pauline (Polly) Bussard in 1952; they had two children, Jacqui and Jerry. Polly died of cancer in January 1987. In 1988 he married (and is survived by) Dr. Laura Brodian. For Weird Tales (November 1950), Freas did his first fantasy magazine cover, illustrating H. Russell Wakefield's "The Third Shadow" with his painting "The Piper". With his illustrating career underway, he
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    232
    Gary Ruddell

    Gary Ruddell

    • Book edition covers: City at the Edge of Time
    Gary Ruddell (born 16 November 1951 in San Mateo, California) is an American artist best known for his cover paintings for works of science fiction and fantasy literature. His cover artwork for Dan Simmons's novel Hyperion was nominated for the 1990 Hugo Award for Best Original Artwork. Ruddell's commercial clients include Bantam Books, Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Avon Books, Ace Books, Ballantine Books and Baen Books. His artwork has been featured on the covers of books by such science fiction luminaries as Robert Lynn Asprin, Lois McMaster Bujold, C. J. Cherryh, and Connie Willis. Other commercial clients have included Playboy Magazine, Rolling Stone Magazine, Broderbund Software, Magic: The Gathering and Sega Corporation. In addition to his commercial artwork, Ruddell creates and exhibits oil paintings. He has cited N. C. Wyeth as a significant influence on his art. He has said of his work, "I like to think of my paintings as stills in a film, suspended moments, a private glimpse into the human condition." Ruddell was raised in Northern California and holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from the California College of the Arts (1975).
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    233
    Harry Clarke

    Harry Clarke

    Harry Clarke (March 17, 1889 – January 6, 1931) was an Irish stained glass artist and book illustrator. Born in Dublin, he was a leading figure in the Irish Arts and Crafts Movement. The son of a craftsman, Joshua Clarke, Clarke the younger was exposed to art (and in particular Art Nouveau) at an early age. He went to school in Belvedere College in Dublin. By his late teens, he was studying stained glass at the Dublin Art School. While there his The Consecration of St. Mel, Bishop of Longford, by St. Patrick won the gold medal for stained glass work in the 1910 Board of Education National Competition. Completing his education in his main field, Clarke travelled to London, where he sought employment as a book illustrator. Picked up by London publisher Harrap, he started with two commissions which were never completed: Samuel Taylor Coleridge's The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (his work on which was destroyed during the 1916 Easter Rising) and an illustrated edition of Alexander Pope's The Rape of the Lock. Difficulties with these projects made Hans Christian Andersen's Fairy Tales by Hans Christian Andersen his first printed work, however, in 1916—a title that included 16 colour
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    234
    Jan van Os

    Jan van Os

    • Book edition covers: Sacred Economics: Money, Gift and Society in the Age of Transition
    Jan van Os (1744 – 1808) was a Dutch painter and a member of the renowned Van Os family of artists. Van Os was born in Middelharnis. He was taught by Aert Schouman in The Hague, where he would spend the rest of his life. In 1773, he recorded in the painters' confraternity. In 1775, he married Susanna de La Croix, a deaf-mute pen portraitist. Van Os is mostly known for his fruit and flower still life paintings, though he started his career painting seascapes. His floral still lifes were painted in the style of Jan van Huysum, with the flowers usually presented on a marble ledge against a green background. He was the father of artists Pieter van Os, Maria Margaretha van Os, and Georgius Jacobus Johannes van Os and grandfather to the painter Pieter Frederik van Os.
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    235
    Joan Miró

    Joan Miró

    • Books illustrated: L'antitête, vol. III: Le Désespéranto
    Joan Miró i Ferrà (Catalan pronunciation: [ʒuˈam miˈɾo]) (April 20, 1893 – December 25, 1983) was a Spanish Catalan painter, sculptor, and ceramicist born in Barcelona. A museum dedicated to his work, the Fundació Joan Miró, was established in his birth city in 1975. Earning international acclaim, his work has been interpreted as Surrealism, a sandbox for the subconscious mind, a re-creation of the childlike, and a manifestation of Catalan pride. In numerous interviews dating from the 1930s onwards, Miró expressed contempt for conventional painting methods as a way of supporting bourgeois society, and famously declared an "assassination of painting" in favour of upsetting the visual elements of established painting. Born to the families of a goldsmith and a cabinet-maker, he grew up in the Barri Gòtic neighborhood of Barcelona. His father was Miquel Miró Adzerias and his mother was Dolores Ferrà. He began drawing classes at the age of seven at a private school at Carrer del Regomir 13, a medieval mansion. In 1907 he enrolled at the fine art academy at La Llotja, to the dismay of his father. He studied at the Cercle Artístic de Sant Lluc and he had his first solo show in 1918 at the
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    236
    John Picacio

    John Picacio

    John Picacio (born September 3, 1969) is an American artist specializing in science fiction, fantasy and horror illustration. Picacio was born on September 3, 1969, in San Antonio, Texas. As of 2007, he still lives and works in San Antonio, together with his wife and daughter. He earned a Bachelor of Architecture degree from the University of Texas at Austin in 1992, and illustrated his first book - Behold the Man: The Thirtieth Anniversary Edition by Michael Moorcock (Mojo Press) - in 1996. In May, 2001 he ended his career in architecture to became a full-time illustrator. He advocates his own method of gaining attention - sending physical samples to art directors of books and magazines - since: His early work featured in many annuals and art compendiums, including Spectrum: The Best in Contemporary Fantastic Art, as well as magazines such as Realms of Fantasy. Picacio has since produced design work and - particularly - cover art for many notable SF, fantasy and horror books printed by many different publishers, from some of the longest-established and largest American SF&F imprints (Random House/Ballantine Books/Del Rey; HarperCollins/Eos; Roc Books; Tor Books), to more recent,
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    237
    Juliusz Kossak

    Juliusz Kossak

    Juliusz Fortunat Kossak (Nowy Wiśnicz, 15 December 1824 – 3 February 1899, Kraków) was a Polish historical painter and master illustrator who specialized in battle scenes, military portraits and horses. He was the progenitor of an artistic family that spanned four generations, father of painter Wojciech Kossak and grandfather of painter Jerzy Kossak. Juliusz Kossak grew up in Lwów during the military partitions of Poland. He obtained a degree in law at the Lwów University encouraged by his mother. At the same time he studied painting with Jan Maszkowski and Piotr Michałowski. Beginning in 1844 Kossak worked on commissions for the local aristocracy in Malopolska, Podolia and Wolyn. He married Zofia Gałczyńska in 1855 and together they left for Paris where they spent five years. His sons were born there, the twin brothers: Wojciech and Tadeusz (on New Year's Eve 1856–1857) and the younger Stefan in 1858. The family came to Warsaw in 1860 where Kossak obtained a position as the head illustrator and engraver for Tygodnik Illustrowany magazine. They moved to Munich for a year and in 1868 settled in Kraków blessed with five children already. Kossak bought a small estate there, known as
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    238

    Leonard Weisgard

    • Books illustrated: The Little Island
    Leonard Joseph Weisgard (December 13, 1916-January 14, 2000) was an award-winning American author and illustrator of more than 200 children's books, most famous for his collaborations with Margaret Wise Brown. He was born in New Haven, Connecticut, and spent most of his childhood in England. Weisgard studied art at the Pratt Institute. His first book, Suki the Siamese Pussy, was published in 1937 and his first collaboration with Brown was two years later with The Noisy Books. The Little Island, written by Brown and illustrated by Weisgard, won the Caldecott Medal in 1948. They collaborated again on The Important Book, published by Harper & Brothers in 1949. In 1956 The Secret River, which Weisgard illustrated for Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, won the Newbery Honor award. Weisgard married Phyllis Monnot in 1951 and, with her and their three children, moved to Copenhagen, Denmark, in 1969. He died on January 14, 2000, in Denmark.
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    239
    Marla Frazee

    Marla Frazee

    • Books illustrated: All the World
    Marla Frazee (born January 16, 1958) is an American author and illustrator of children's literature. She twice received a Caldecott Honor and has won numerous awards in her field. Frazee was born in Los Angeles, California and moved to Glendale, California, during her childhood. She found her early inspiration in children's books such as Maurice Sendak's Where the Wild Things Are and Robert McCloskey's Blueberries for Sal. She illustrated her first book in third grade, which was called The Friendship Circle. After it won awards in state competitions, Frazee created a duplicate for her school library. It was Frazee's first book. She attended college in the Greater Los Angeles Area, where she earned her bachelor of fine arts at Art Center College of Design and graduated in 1981. While attending school, Frazee met photographer Tim Bradley. The two married in Pasadena, California, and have lived there since 1986. She has three sons. After graduating from college, Frazee worked for various companies in advertising, educational publishing, toys, games, and magazines. She did toy design with companies like Mattel, Milton Bradley, and Parker Brothers. Frazee made Happy Meal boxes for
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    240
    Michele Wood

    Michele Wood

    • Book edition covers: I Lay My Stitches Down
    • Books illustrated: I See the Rhythm
    Indiana-born artist Michele Wood has won national and international acclaim since 1993 and 1994 when she produced the coveted Atlanta Jazz Series Poster. The posters instantly elevated her work to the status of highly-valued collectibles. Since then her art has been acquired and commissioned by such organizations as the Toni Morrison Society, Black Entertainment Network, St. Jude Christian Church in Atlanta, the Didi Museum in Lagos, Nigeria, and Indiana State Museum. She has also illustrated a number of highly acclaimed children's books based on her original concepts, including "Going Back Home: An Artist Returns to the South," and "I See the Rhythm of Gospel."
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    241
    Nick Sharratt

    Nick Sharratt

    Nick Sharratt (born in London, 1962) is a British illustrator and author of children's books, and was chosen to be the Official Illustrator for World Book Day 2006. Sharratt has illustrated around 200 books, including over 40 books by award-winning author Jacqueline Wilson, among them The Lottie Project, Little Darlings and The Story of Tracy Beaker which was the most borrowed library book in the UK for the first decade of this century. . he illustrates alotof stuff Nick grew up in Suffolk, Nottinghamshire and Manchester and was trained in graphic design at St. Martin's School of Art. He takes his inspiration from the pop and graphic art of the 1960s, which he experienced as a child. His work is split between illustrating for other writers, most notably Jacqueline Wilson and Jeremy Strong as well as Kes Gray, Giles Andreae, Julia Donaldson and Michael Rosen, and producing his own picture books for a younger audience. He has won numerous awards including the Children's Book Award, the Nestle Children's Book Award, The Right Start Award (book category), the Under Fives non-fiction She/WHSmith Award and the Educational Writers Award. He has won regional library book prizes in
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    242
    Norm Breyfogle

    Norm Breyfogle

    • Book edition covers: The .40 Caliber Mouse
    • Book editions illustrated: The .40 Caliber Mouse
    • Books illustrated: The .40 Caliber Mouse
    Norman Keith "Norm" Breyfogle (b. February 27, 1960) is an American comic book artist, fine artist, illustrator, and writer. He was involved with the character of Batman consistently from 1987-1995. Breyfogle has worked on many different characters for most comic book publishers at one time or another. He co-created the character of Prime for Malibu Comics, and created and owns the copyright and trademark for the character Metaphysique. When Breyfogle was 12 years old, he began taking private lessons from commercial artist Andrew Benson. Around this time, he also won his first award at a town and country art show. The Daily Mining Gazette, a newspaper in Houghton, Michigan, profiled him in 1976 as "Norm Breyfogle: Near Master Cartoonist at 16." During his time in high school, he co-plotted, wrote, and illustrated a comic book titled Tech-Team for Michigan Technological University. After high school, Breyfogle attended Northern Michigan University, studying painting and illustration. During his time in college, Breyfogle worked as an illustrator for a local magazine and also for a graphics company. In 1980, he illustrated a book titled Bunyan: Lore’s Loggin’ Hero, published by Book
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    243
    Pablo Picasso

    Pablo Picasso

    • Books illustrated: De mémoire d'homme: Poème
    Pablo Ruiz y Picasso, known as Pablo Picasso (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈpaβlo piˈkaso], 25 October 1881 – 8 April 1973), was a Spanish painter, sculptor, printmaker, ceramicist, and stage designer who spent most of his adult life in France. As one of the greatest and most influential artists of the 20th century, he is widely known for co-founding the Cubist movement, the invention of constructed sculpture, the co-invention of collage, and for the wide variety of styles that he helped develop and explore. Among his most famous works are the proto-Cubist Les Demoiselles d'Avignon (1907), and Guernica (1937), a portrayal of the German bombing of Guernica during the Spanish Civil War. Picasso, Henri Matisse and Marcel Duchamp are commonly regarded as the three artists who most defined the revolutionary developments in the plastic arts in the opening decades of the 20th century, responsible for significant developments in painting, sculpture, printmaking and ceramics. Picasso demonstrated extraordinary artistic talent in his early years, painting in a realistic manner through his childhood and adolescence. During the first decade of the 20th century, his style changed as he experimented
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    244
    Pentagram

    Pentagram

    • Book edition covers: Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead
    Pentagram is a design studio that was founded in 1972 by Alan Fletcher, Theo Crosby, Colin Forbes, Kenneth Grange and Mervyn Kurlansky in Needham Road, West London, UK. They now have offices in London, New York, San Francisco, Austin and Berlin. Pentagram was founded on the premise of collaborative interdisciplinary designers working together in an independently owned firm of equals. Theo Crosby claimed the structure was suggested to him by his experience of working on the seminal late-1950s exhibition This is Tomorrow: "it was my first experience at a loose, horizontal organisation of equals. We have brought it ... to a kind of practical and efficient reality at Pentagram". The firm currently comprises 16 partner-designers in 4 cities, each managing a team of designers and sharing in common overhead and staff resources. The partners in each office share incomes equally and all the partners own an equal portion of the total firm. This equality, along with the tradition of periodically inviting new members to join, renews the firm while giving even the newest members an equal footing with the partners of long standing. This 'flat' organization (there are no executive officers, CEO,
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    245
    Rockwell Kent

    Rockwell Kent

    • Books illustrated: Moby-Dick; or, The Whale
    Rockwell Kent (June 21, 1882–March 13, 1971) was an American painter, printmaker, illustrator, and writer. Rockwell Kent was born in Tarrytown, New York, the same year as fellow American artists George Bellows and Edward Hopper. Kent lived much of his early life in and around New York City where he attended the Horace Mann School, and moved in his mid-40s to an Adirondack farmstead that he called Asgaard where he lived and painted until his death. Kent studied with the influential painters and theorists of his day. He studied composition and design with Arthur Wesley Dow at the Art Students League in the fall of 1900, and he studied painting with William Merritt Chase each of the three summers between 1900 and 1902 after which he entered, in the fall of 1902 Robert Henri's class at the New York School of Art, which Chase had founded. During the summer of 1903 Kent was apprenticed to painter and naturalist Abbott Handerson Thayer. An undergraduate background in architecture at Columbia University prepared Kent for occasional work in the 1900s and 1910s as a draftsman and carpenter. Kent's early paintings of Mount Monadnock and New Hampshire were first shown at the Society of
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    246
    Ron Cobb

    Ron Cobb

    Ron Cobb (born 1937) is an American cartoonist, artist, writer, film designer, and film director. By the age of 18, with no formal training in graphic illustration, Cobb was working as an animation "inbetweener" artist for Disney Studios in Burbank, California. He progressed to becoming a breakdown artist on the animation feature Sleeping Beauty (1959). (This was the last Disney film to have cels inked by hand.) After Sleeping Beauty was completed in 1957, Disney laid off Cobb and he spent the next three years in various jobs — mail carrier, assembler in a door factory, sign painter's assistant — until he was drafted in 1960 into the US Army. For the next two years he delivered classified documents around San Francisco, then, after signing up for an extra year to avoid assignment to the infantry, was sent to Vietnam in 1963 as a draughtsman for the Signal Corps. On his discharge, Cobb began freelancing as an artist. He began to contribute to the Los Angeles Free Press in 1965. Edited and published by Art Kunkin, the Los Angeles Free Press was one of the first of the underground newspapers of the 1960s, noted for its radical politics. Cobb's editorial/political cartoons were a
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    247

    Simms Taback

    • Books illustrated: Joseph Had a Little Overcoat
    Simms Taback (February 13, 1932 – December 25, 2011) was an American author, graphic artist, and illustrator and winner of the Caldecott Medal. Taback has illustrated over 35 books, including the Caldecott Medal winning Joseph Had a Little Overcoat and the Caldecott Honor book There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly. Taback graduated from the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Art and served in the United States Army. He was a designer for CBS Records and The New York Times. He was the founder and president of the Illustrators Guild (later the New York Graphic Artists Guild) and taught art at the School of Visual Arts and Syracuse University. Taback designed the first McDonalds Happy Meal box in 1977. He died in 2011 of pancreatic cancer. The following is a partial list of Simms Taback books:
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    248

    Thomas Handforth

    • Books illustrated: Mei Li
    Thomas Scofield Handforth (1897–1948) was an American artist and etcher. He wrote and illustrated the book Mei Li about his personal experiences in China and won the 1939 Caldecott Medal. Born in Tacoma, Washington, he studied at the University of Washington. Today, Mei Li is a reissue of a book originally published in 1938. Thomas Handforth's magnificent drawings of China in the 1930s are still animated and compelling; the story of Mei Li's Chinese New Year is wordy forced, and sexist by contemporary standards. A Caldecott Medal winner. He was born in Tacoma, Washington in 1897-1948. He studied art at the University of Washington, and at L’Ecole des Beaux Arts in France. He lived in various locations such as Paris, India, North Africa, Mexico and China. Best known work is Mei Li (1938) which won the Caldecott in ’39. Mei Li is about a girl who escapes her traditional life in the Chinese countryside to visit a New Year’s fair.
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    249

    Trina Schart Hyman

    • Books illustrated: Saint George and the Dragon
    Trina Schart Hyman (April 8, 1939–November 19, 2004) was an American illustrator of children's books. She illustrated over 150 books, including fairy tales and Arthurian legends, and was the recipient of three Caldecott Honors and one Caldecott Medal. Born in Philadelphia to Margaret Doris Bruck and Albert H. Schart, she grew up in a rural area of Pennsylvania and learned to read and draw at an early age. Her favorite story as a child was Little Red Riding Hood, and she spent an entire year of her childhood wearing a red cape. She enrolled at the Philadelphia Museum College of Art (now part of the University of the Arts) in 1956, but moved to Boston, Massachusetts, in 1959 after marrying Harris Hyman, a mathematician and engineer. She graduated from School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, in 1960. The couple then moved to Stockholm, Sweden, for two years, where Trina studied at the Konstfackskolan (Swedish State Art School) and illustrated her first children's book, titled Toffe och den lilla bilen (Toffe and the Little Car). In 1963, the couple's daughter, Katrin Tchana (née Hyman), was born, but in 1968, they divorced, and Trina and Katrin moved to Lyme, New Hampshire. Trina
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    250
    Watch Tower Bible and Tract Society of Pennsylvania

    Watch Tower Bible and Tract Society of Pennsylvania

    The Watch Tower Bible and Tract Society of Pennsylvania is a non-stock, not-for-profit organization headquartered in the New York City borough of Brooklyn, United States. It is the main legal entity used worldwide by Jehovah's Witnesses to direct, administer and develop doctrines for the religion and is often referred to by members of the religion simply as "the Society". It is the parent organization of a number of Watch Tower subsidiaries, including the Watchtower Society of New York and International Bible Students Association. Membership of the society is limited to between 300 and 500 "mature, active and faithful" male Jehovah's Witnesses. About 5800 Jehovah's Witnesses provide voluntary unpaid labour, as members of a religious order, in three large Watch Tower Society facilities in New York; nearly 15,000 other members of the order work at the Watch Tower Society's other facilities worldwide. The organization was formed in 1881, as Zion's Watch Tower Tract Society, for the purpose of distributing religious tracts. The society was incorporated in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on December 15, 1884. In 1896, the society was renamed Watch Tower Bible and Tract Society. Following a
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