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  • Nov 27th 2012
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Best Hybrid of All Time

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    3
    Rosa 'Ingrid Bergman'

    Rosa 'Ingrid Bergman'

    Rosa 'Ingrid Bergman' is a hybrid tea rose, bred by Olesen and introduced by Danish rose growers Poulsen in 1984. It is a cross between Rosa 'Precious Platinum' and a seedling. 'Ingrid Bergman' has moderately fragrant, velvety, dark red flowers up to 10cm diameter from June to September. It was named after the Swedish actress Ingrid Bergman. It was selected as "World Favourite Rose" in 2000 by the World Federation of Rose Societies and is listed in their "Rose Hall of Fame".
    6.13
    8 votes
    6
    Rosa 'Precious Platinum'

    Rosa 'Precious Platinum'

    Rosa 'Precious Platinum' is a medium red hybrid tea rose. It is a hybrid of Rosa 'Red Planet' and Rosa 'Franklin Engelmann'. It was bred by Patrick Dickson in the Northern Ireland in 1974. Alternative names are 'Opa Pötschke' and 'Red Star'. It is a vigorous shrub which grows up to 1 metre high. The prolific, large red flowers are high centred. They have long, strong stems and are mildy fragrant making them suitable for cutting. The dark green leathery foliage provides a good contrast to the flowers. The cultivar is suitable for mass plantings, as a hedge or grown in containers. It is regarded as easy to grow, being disease-resistant and tolerant of poor soils. It prefers a position in full sun.
    7.67
    6 votes
    7
    Tigon

    Tigon

    A tiglon ( /ˈtaɪɡlən/) or tigon (not tigron) is a hybrid cross between a male tiger (Panthera tigris) and a lioness (Panthera leo). Thus, it has parents with the same genus but of different species. The tiglon is not currently as common as the converse hybrid, the liger; however, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, tiglons were more common than ligers. Tiglons can exhibit characteristics of both parents: they can have both spots from the mother (lions carry genes for spots—lion cubs are spotted and some adults retain faint markings) and stripes from the father. Any mane that a male tiglon may have will appear shorter and less noticeable than a lion's mane and is closer in type to the ruff of a male tiger. It is a common misconception that tiglons are smaller than lions or tigers. They do not exceed the size of their parent species because they inherit growth-inhibitory genes from the lioness mother, but they do not exhibit any kind of dwarfism or miniaturization; they often weigh around 180 kilograms (400 lb). A century ago, tiglons were evidently more common than ligers. Gerald Iles, in At Home in the Zoo (1961), was able to obtain three tiglons for Manchester's Belle Vue
    7.67
    6 votes
    12
    Tiger trout

    Tiger trout

    The tiger trout (Salmo trutta X Salvelinus fontinalis) is a sterile, intergeneric hybrid of the brown trout (Salmo trutta) and the brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis). The name derives from the pronounced vermiculations, evoking the stripes of a tiger. It is a rare phenomenon in the wild, with the brook trout having 84 chromosomes and the brown trout 80. Records show instances as far back as 1944. Tiger trout can be produced reliably in hatcheries. This is done by fertilizing brown trout eggs with brook trout milt and heat shocking them, which causes creation of an extra set of chromosomes and increases survival from 5% to 85%. Tiger trout have been reported to grow faster than natural species, though this assessment is not universal, and they have been widely stocked for sport fishing. Tiger trout are known to be highly piscivorous (fish-eating), and are a good control against rough fish populations. This makes tigers popular with many fish stocking programs, such as with the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources. Their own population numbers can be tightly controlled as well, since they are sterile. Many states have had stocking programs for tiger trout. Wisconsin discontinued its
    8.40
    5 votes
    13
    Rosa 'Double Delight'

    Rosa 'Double Delight'

    'Double Delight' (syn. 'ANDeli') is a hybrid tea rose cultivar bred by Swim & Ellis and introduced in 1977. The plant grows about 90 to 150 cm high, blooms repeatedly and has strongly fragrant white flowers with dark red edges. The flowers have up to 30 petals. It was included into the Rose Hall of Fame in 1985.
    8.20
    5 votes
    14
    Rosa 'Iceberg'

    Rosa 'Iceberg'

    Iceberg is a floribunda rose cultivar that was bred in Germany in 1958. It is also known by the names 'Korbin' (the registered cultivar name), Fée des Neiges and Schneewittchen. It is among the world's best known roses. Iceberg is a modern cluster-flowered floribunda rose cultivar. The cultivar is commercially available in two main forms. These are as a tall bush and a standard rose produced by grafting. Weeping and climbing forms are also available. Shrub forms of the cultivar have an upright habit and are 75 to 150 cm wide high and 60 cm wide. Leaves are light green and glossy. Blooms are about 5 cm in diameter and have 25 to 35 petals. Buds are long and pointed. The fragrant flowers usually appear throughout the year. The cultivar was developed by prolific German rose breeder Reimer Kordes in Germany in 1958. He and his father Wilhelm had initially specialised in developing bush roses that were suitable for small gardens. The parent varieties of Iceberg are 'Robin Hood', a red hybrid musk rose, developed by Joseph Pemberton in 1927 in England, and 'Virgo', a white hybrid-tea rose bred in France by Charles Mallerin in 1927. The plant was registered under the cultivar name
    8.20
    5 votes
    16

    Beta

    Beta is a winter-hardy variety of North American grape derived from a cross of the Vitis labrusca-based cultivar Concord and a selection of Vitis riparia, the wild riverbank grape, called Carver). It is an extremely cold-hardy grape that is self-fertile. This variety is grown successfully in Finland and was widely planted in Minnesota in the early 20th century. It ripens in late September in New York State. It bears dark, blue-black fruit that is used for jellies, fruit juices, etc. but rarely for wine. Beta was released by Louis Suelter, and named for his wife. Because of this, the proper pronunciation is actually "Bett-uh", but the name is more commonly assumed to follow the pronunciation of the Greek letter. Suelter released a number of other cultivars from the same cross, including the equally hardy Suelter grape.
    8.00
    5 votes
    17
    Rosa 'Chrysler Imperial'

    Rosa 'Chrysler Imperial'

    Chrysler Imperial is a strongly fragrant, dark red hybrid tea rose cultivar. This variety was bred and publicly debuted by Dr. Walter E. Lammerts of Descanso Gardens, La Cañada, California, USA in 1952. It's stock parents 'Charlotte Armstrong' (cerise pink) and 'Mirandy' (dark oxblood red) are both All American Rose Selections (awarded in 1940 and 1945). The elegantly tapered buds open into high-centered blossoms with a diameter of about 11 – 13 cm (5 inches) and can have up to 45-50 petals (which is a high number for a hybrid tea rose) with a rich, deep, velvety red color. The cultivar flushes in a chronological blooming pattern throughout its local season, starting in late spring until fall. The long-stemmed rose flowers are long lasting and showy and make excellent cut flowers. The rose bush reaches 75 to 200 cm (30 to 72 inches) height, and a diameter og 60 to 120 cm (24 to 48 inches). The shrub has an upright form with very thorny canes and semi-glossy dark green foliage. It is not a cold hardy rose (USDA zone 6b through 9b) and needs good sun exposure. Without good air circulation it is susceptible to mildew and blackspot, particularly in cool climates. Cultivar (PP01528),
    8.00
    5 votes
    19
    7.80
    5 votes
    20

    Baco 22A

    Baco Blanc or Baco 22A is a French-American hybrid grape variety. It is a cross of Folle Blanche and the Noah grape, created in the 1898 by the grape breeder François Baco. Folle Blanche is its Vitis vinifera parent. Noah, its other parent, is itself a cross of Vitis labrusca and Vitis riparia. Baco Blanc was developed to produce some of the same flavors as Folle Blanche but without the susceptibility to American grape disease and phylloxera. In the 20th century it was widely planted in the Gascony region for uses in brandy production. Both Armagnac and Cognac (from the Charentes and Charente-Maritime districts north of Gascony) are brandies made from white grapes - Ugni Blanc, Folle Blanche and Colombard - but only Armagnac was permitted under French regulations to use Baco Blanc and until the late 1970s, Baco Blanc was the primary grape of Armagnac. Following the grape's decline in the late 20th century, there was some speculation about the future of the variety, especially after a 1992 Institut National des Appellations d'Origine (INAO) decree that all vines of Baco Blanc were to be uprooted by 2010. However, advocates for the grape variety and its historical role in Armagnac
    6.67
    6 votes
    23
    8.50
    4 votes
    24

    Aurore

    Aurore is a white hybrid grape variety produced by Albert Seibel circa 1860 and used for wine production. Over a long lifetime Seibel produced many complex hybrid crosses of Vitis vinifera to American grapes. It is also known as Seibel 5279. It is a cross of Seibel 788 (which is Sicilien × Clairette Dorée Ganzin) and Seibel 29 (which is Munson × an unidentified Vitis vinifera ). Aurore may be used as a table or wine grape. It tends not to be used as a table grape due to unsuitability for shipping and is generally used for bulk wine production for blending with labrusca wines. It is also used to a lesser extent to make fruity and sparkling wines though considered to be mediocre in quality. Fruit ripening is early in the season between late August and Early September. Although the vine is resistant of many mildew diseases, is productive and vigorous; the fruit suffers susceptibility from bunch rot and bird attack. Aurore is planted where growing seasons are short like the Northern USA, Canada and the UK but is also planted in more temperate climates to extend the harvest season. Athiri is also known under the synonyms Aurora, Feri Szölö, Financ Szölö, Redei, S-5279, and Seibel 5279.
    7.20
    5 votes
    25
    8.25
    4 votes
    33
    8.00
    4 votes
    36
    6.60
    5 votes
    37
    Rosa 'Garden Party'

    Rosa 'Garden Party'

    'Garden Party' is a hybrid tea rose cultivar created by Herbert C. Swim in 1959. The double-shaped flowers are creamy-white with pink on the ends and have 25-28 petals. 'Garden Party' blooms repeatedly throughout the season. It is a parent to both 'Gold Medal' and 'Double Delight'.
    6.60
    5 votes
    41
    8.67
    3 votes
    42
    Rosa 'Schoener's Nutkana'

    Rosa 'Schoener's Nutkana'

    'Schoener's Nutkana' is a rose variety named after Father Georg Schoener, a priest who became a notable rose breeder, who developed this rose in 1930 as a cross between Rosa nutkana and Rosa 'Paul Neyron'. This variety is a shrub rose, with single rose flowers, five-petalled but sometimes with another one or two, deep pink in color with a large circle of yellow stamens. The plant tends to be a sprawling shrub, with very few thorns on the stems and small light green leaves.
    8.67
    3 votes
    46
    La France

    La France

    La France is a rose developed in 1867 by Jean-Baptiste Guillot (1803–1882). It is generally accepted to be the first Hybrid Tea rose, and for this reason, its introduction is also considered the birth of the modern Rose. The plant grows about 120 cm high and has large, light pink flowers with up to 60 petals and a strong fragrance.
    8.33
    3 votes
    50

    Litigon

    A litigon is a second-generation hybrid cross between a tiglon and a lion.
    9.50
    2 votes
    51
    9.50
    2 votes
    53
    7.00
    4 votes
    67
    9.00
    2 votes
    68
    Splake

    Splake

    The splake (Salvelinus namaycush X Salvelinus fontinalis) is a hybrid of two fish species resulting from the crossing of a male brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) and a female lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush). The name itself is a portmanteau of speckled trout (another name for brook trout) and lake trout, and may have been used to describe such hybrids as early as the 1880s. Hybrids of the male lake trout with the female brook trout (the so-called "brookinaw") have also been produced, but are not as successful. The intrageneric hybrid is of the genus Salvelinus and, hence, is most properly known as a char or charr. In some locales, the fish is referred to as the wendigo. Although the hybrid is genetically stable and is, theoretically, capable of reproducing, splake reproduction is extremely rare, for behavioural reasons, outside the hatchery environment. The only known natural reproduction has occurred in five lakes in Algonquin Provincial Park in Ontario, Canada and, in each case, only a handful of progeny were produced. Because splake typically do not reproduce, they are used as a sport fish in many lakes across the US. Fisheries managers are able to control populations
    9.00
    2 votes
    69
    Żubroń

    Żubroń

    Żubroń ( /ˈzjuːbrən/; Polish: Żubroń; [ˈʐubrɔɲ]) is a hybrid of domestic cattle and wisent. The wisent (żubr in Polish) is the European bison; hence, the żubroń is analogous to the American beefalo. The name żubroń was officially chosen from hundreds of proposals sent to the Polish weekly magazine Przekrój during a contest organised in 1969. The żubroń was first created by Leopold Walicki in 1847, although the hybrid may also have appeared at an earlier time. After World War I, various scientists considered żubroń a possible replacement for domestic cattle. Żubroń turned out to be more durable and less susceptible to disease. In addition, the animal could be bred on marginal grazing land with no farm infrastructure and with minimal husbandry in huge state agricultural farms (SAFs). From 1958, the work on żubroń herds was continued by the Polish Academy of Sciences in various laboratories, most notably in Białowieża and Młodzikowo. During the first 16 years of experiments, a total of 71 animals were born, including Filon, the first żubroń born to a żubroń mother (August 6, 1960). The animal was intended to become a hardy and cheap alternative to cattle. The experiment was continued
    9.00
    2 votes
    70
    5.80
    5 votes
    73
    7.67
    3 votes
    78
    Rosa 'Wife of Bath'

    Rosa 'Wife of Bath'

    Rosa 'Wife of Bath' also known as 'Glücksburg' and 'AUSbath', is a shrub rose with a strong, sweet fragrance of myrrh. It was created by David C.H. Austin in 1969 from the varieties Rosa 'Mme Caroline Testout' × (Rosa 'Ma Perkins' × Rosa 'Constance Spry'). It is named after a character from Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales. 'Wife of Bath' has pink blossoms and red buds, that are up 7 cm wide and a flat flower is informally with many petals arranged in the center to the outside light. The flowers appear continuously throughout the summer in clusters of 3-9. Of about 1.20 m tall growing shrub is described as robust and has small, medium green leaves. The variety is suitable for container plants and as cut rose.
    7.67
    3 votes
    80
    10.00
    1 votes
    81
    Rosa 'Camp David'

    Rosa 'Camp David'

    'Camp David' is a red hybrid tea rose developed by Mathias Tantau, Jr. in 1984. The cultivar forms nearly black buds, which turn a deep red when blooming - and retain that color better under sun exposure than many other red roses. The fragrant flowers have an average diameter of about 13 cm and conserve their elegant form for a long time. Due to their solitary growth, they are used as cut flowers as well as in gardens. The robust shrubs are of average height (~1,5 m), very weather and disease resistant and bloom in flushes throughout the season. While the rose was hybridized in Germany, it was not introduced in its home country but in Australia, where the cultivar is well liked.
    10.00
    1 votes
    90
    10.00
    1 votes
    91
    Coydog

    Coydog

    A coydog is the hybrid offspring of a coyote (Canis latrans) and a dog (Canis lupus familiaris). Together they are genetically capable of producing fertile young. Coyotes and 'dogs are both the same species as proved by recent research in the genomes - they are merely different breeds. The prevalence of naturally occurring coydogs is problematic. If interbreeding between the species were common, the coyote population would be expected to acquire more dog-like traits with each successive generation. Breeding experiments in Germany with poodles and coyotes, as well as with wolves, jackals and later on with the resulting dog-coyote hybrids showed a decrease in fertility and significant communication problems as well as an increase of genetic diseases after three generations of interbeeding between the hybrids, unlike with wolfdogs. This suggests that genetic mutations could be the problem. The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation casts doubt on the existence of naturally occurring coydogs in any significant number, at least in New York State, despite the widespread presence of coyotes: "Coyotes and dogs theoretically can interbreed to produce what is called a
    6.50
    4 votes
    93
    Violet Carson

    Violet Carson

    Violet Carson is a rose cultivar, an uncommon hybrid of the Mme Leon Cuny and Spartan varieties, created between 1963 and 1964. It was named after Violet Carson, the actress who played Ena Sharples in Coronation Street, the British soap opera. It is a shrub which grows to a height of between 0.75 to 1.5 meters (2.5 to 5 feet) with semi-double flowers (ranging from a blush pink, peachy-pink, to a strong pink), with a silvery reverse. The flower has been notably featured in the graphic novel V for Vendetta, but in the movie version, is renamed to the fictitious "Scarlet Carson" which was portrayed in the film by red Grand Prix roses.
    6.50
    4 votes
    96
    8.50
    2 votes
    100
    7.33
    3 votes
    101
    7.33
    3 votes
    103
    7.33
    3 votes
    107
    7.00
    3 votes
    108
    7.00
    3 votes
    111
    Rosa 'Sun Flare'

    Rosa 'Sun Flare'

    'Sun Flare' is a floribunda rose cultivar that was bred in the United States in 1981 by William A. Warriner. Its scientific name is JACjem, after the company which introduced the rose commercially, Jackson & Perkins Co., but is known to most by its common name, 'Sun Flare' or 'Sunflare'. The cultivar forms a bush to between 60 to 120 cm in height. The flowers, which are yellow, appear in flushes throughout the flowering season and have a mild licorice fragrance.
    7.00
    3 votes
    115

    Hawkinsara

    Hawkinsara, abbreviated Hknsa. in the horticultural trade, is an intergeneric hybrid of orchids, with parent genera Broughtonia, Cattleya, Laelia and Sophronitis.
    8.00
    2 votes
    116

    Huarizo

    A huarizo is a cross between a male llama and a female alpaca. The most common hybrid between South American camelids, huarizo tend to be much smaller than llamas, but their fiber is longer. Huarizo are generally sterile, but recent genetic research conducted at the University of Minnesota Rochester suggests that it may be possible to preserve fertility with minimal genetic modification.
    8.00
    2 votes
    119
    8.00
    2 votes
    123
    8.00
    2 votes
    125

    Alexander

    Alexander (also known as Tasker's Grape) is a sponteneous cross of vines from which the first commercial wines in America were made. It was discovered in 1740 in the neighborhood of Springgettsbury, Philadelphia, in a vineyard where James Alexander (d. 1778), William Penn's gardener, had originally planted cuttings of vinifera in 1683. It was popularized by the Bartram family at Bartram's Garden, Philadelphia, and widely distributed after the American Revolution by William Bartram. The Alexander grape is a hybrid grape of Vitis labrusca and another species, which may probably be Vitis vinifera. In the 18th century and much of the 19th century it was impossible to grow European wine grapes in the open air in the eastern half of North America. The Alexander combined disease and pest resistance from North American grapes with some of the better qualities of European wine grapes. It was an acceptable grape for large-scale planting and wine production. The Alexander was the basis for the first successful North American wine industry over much of the east coast, in Pennsylvania in the 1790s, in Virginia, Maryland, New Jersey, Ohio, and in Indiana in 1806. The Alexander grape may be
    9.00
    1 votes
    129

    Rosa 'Nevada'

    Rosa 'Nevada' is a rose cultivar. The white Hybrid Moyesii was bred by Pedro Dot in Spain in 1927 and is one of his most successful creations. It is a cross between Dot's Hybrid Tea 'La Giralda' and 'Altaica' and is named for its colour as nevada means snowy. The semi-double flowers have an open bloom form with an average diameter of 4" (10 cm). They have a mild, sweet fragrance and are creamy white with golden-yellow stamens, but can turn pink in hot weather. Blooming season is in early summer and spasmodically throughout the season. 'Nevada' forms tall climbing bushes and reaches an average height of 7' to 13' (2 to 4 m) and due to its arching habit a width of 8' to 13' (2,5 to 4 m), but can grow even higher in warmer climates. The vigorous cultivar is very hardy (USDA zone 3b and warmer), but can be susceptible to black spot. To encourage re-bloom, spent blooms should be removed.
    9.00
    1 votes
    132
    6.67
    3 votes
    136
    6.67
    3 votes
    139
    Rosa 'Abraham Darby'

    Rosa 'Abraham Darby'

    Abraham Darby (synonyms AUScot, Candy Rain, Country Darby tree) is a popular rose cultivar which was introduced by David Austin in England in 1985. The English rose was bred by crossing the climber 'Aloha' with the floribunda 'Yellow Chushion' and is named after the industrialist Abraham Darby. It's deeply cupped flowers have an average diameter of 5 inches (11 cm) and up to 70 petals. The color varies according to the climate and ranges from soft apricot pink on the inside, pale yellow on the outside in warmer areasto a rich peachy pink with lighter edges in cooler climates. The flowers grow in small clusters, are usually very fragrantand appear throughout the season. As they tend to bow their heads, Abraham Darby is suited to be trained as a climber. Abraham Darby is winter hardy (USDA zone 5b - 10b) and generally disease resistant, but can be susceptible to rust. The plant grows approximately 5 to 10 ft (150 cm - 300 cm) high and 3 to 5 ft (90 to 150 cm) wide. It is almost thornless and has glossy, medium green foliage.
    7.50
    2 votes
    142
    7.50
    2 votes
    146
    7.50
    2 votes
    147
    7.50
    2 votes
    149

    Rosa 'Sunsprite'

    Sunsprite (syn. 'KORresia', 'Friesia') is a rose variety developed by Reimer Kordes and introduced in 1973. The rose was derived from the cultivars 'Friedrich Wörlein' × 'Spanish Sun' and is one of the most successful floribunda roses. Its sunny yellow blooms are large and flat with 17 to 25 petals and have a very strong fragrance. The blooming period lasts from June to September. The flower is not well suited as a cutflower, as it has short stems and only lasts for a short period of time after cutting. The plant has light-green, glossy leaves, reaches about 40 to 60 cm height, is very disease resistant and hardy (USDA zone 6b) and can be grown on the ground or in containers.
    7.50
    2 votes
    150

    Cabernet Cortis

    Cabernet Cortis is a dark-skinned grape variety used for wine. It was bred in 1982 by Norbert Becker at the viticultural institute in Freiburg, Germany as part of a programme searching for disease-resistant grape varieties. It received German varietal protection in 2003. From 1999 to 2005, Cabernet Cortis and four other Freiburg-created varieties were evaluated in experimental plantations at Pully in the Lake Geneva region of Switzerland. Cabernet Cortis ripens early, is highly resistant to downy mildew and botrytis, but is sensitive to powdery mildew. Cabernet Cortis yields highly coloured, tannic and intense wines with a herbal-vegetal character that are supposed to be Cabernet-styled. Becker created Cabernet Cortis by crossing Cabernet Sauvignon and Solaris. Thus, Cabernet Cortis is a hybrid grape, but is formally classified as a Vitis vinifera cultivar. Cabernet Carol is a full sibling sharing the same pedigree and was created at the same time. The only synonyms of Cabernet Cortis are FR 437-82 r or Freiburg 437-82 r.
    6.33
    3 votes
    152
    6.33
    3 votes
    153
    6.33
    3 votes
    154
    6.33
    3 votes
    156
    8.00
    1 votes
    159
    8.00
    1 votes
    161
    Rosa 'Wife of Bath'

    Rosa 'Wife of Bath'

    Rosa 'Wife of Bath' also known as 'Glücksburg' and 'AUSbath', is a shrub rose with a strong, sweet fragrance of myrrh. It was created by David C.H. Austin in 1969 from the varieties Rosa 'Mme Caroline Testout' × (Rosa 'Ma Perkins' × Rosa 'Constance Spry'). It is named after a character from Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales. 'Wife of Bath' has pink blossoms and red buds, that are up 7 cm wide and a flat flower is informally with many petals arranged in the center to the outside light. The flowers appear continuously throughout the summer in clusters of 3-9. Of about 1.20 m tall growing shrub is described as robust and has small, medium green leaves. The variety is suitable for container plants and as cut rose.
    8.00
    1 votes
    162
    Wolfdog

    Wolfdog

    A wolfdog (also called a wolf–dog hybrid or wolf hybrid) is a canid hybrid resulting from the mating of a wolf (various Canis lupus subspecies) and a dog (Canis lupus familiaris). The term "wolfdog" is preferred by most of the animals' proponents and breeders because the domestic dog was taxonomically recategorized in 1993 as a subspecies of the gray wolf. The American Veterinary Medical Association and the United States Department of Agriculture refer to the animals as wolf–dog hybrids. Rescue organizations consider any dog with wolf heritage within the last five generations to be a wolfdog, including some established wolfdog breeds. In 1998, the USDA estimated an approximate population of 300,000 wolfdogs in the United States (the highest of any country world-wide), with some other sources giving a population possibly as high as 500,000. In first generation hybrids, gray wolves are most often crossed with wolf-like dogs (such as German Shepherds, Siberian Huskies, and Alaskan Malamutes) for an appearance most appealing to owners desiring to own an exotic pet. Evidence for prehistoric domesticated wolfdogs in the Americas dates back at least 10,000 years while fossil evidence in
    5.25
    4 votes
    163

    Agawam

    Agawam (or Rogers 15) is a hybrid grape variety. It is a crossing of Carter (another hybrid grape with Vitis labrusca and Vitis vinifera in its pedigree) and Muscat Hamburg (a Vitis vinifera cultivar). Agawam is one of the so-called Rogers' Hybrids created by E.S. Rogers in the early-to-mid-19th century, and is unique among the named cultivars of that group in that it is self-fertile. It can be used to make a rosé wine having a "foxy" flavor. Agawam is also called Agavam, Rogers 15, and Rogers' Hybrid Nr. 15.
    7.00
    2 votes
    164
    7.00
    2 votes
    165
    Liger

    Liger

    The liger is a hybrid cross between a male lion (Panthera leo) and a tigress (Panthera tigris). Thus, it has parents with the same genus but of different species. It is distinct from the similar hybrid tiglon. It is the largest of all known extant felines. Ligers enjoy swimming, which is a characteristic of tigers, and are very sociable like lions. Ligers exist only in captivity because the habitats of the parental species do not overlap in the wild. Historically, when the Asiatic Lion was prolific, the territories of lions and tigers did overlap and there are legends of ligers existing in the wild. Notably, ligers typically grow larger than either parent species, unlike tiglons which tend to be about as large as a female tiger. The history of ligers dates to at least the early 19th century in India (Asia). In 1798, Étienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire (1772–1844) made a colour plate of the offspring of a lion and a tiger. In 1825, G. B. Whittaker made an engraving of liger cubs born in 1824. The parents and their three liger offspring are also depicted with their trainer in a 19th century painting in the naïve style. Two liger cubs born in 1837 were exhibited to King William IV and to
    7.00
    2 votes
    166
    Rosa 'Angel Face'

    Rosa 'Angel Face'

    Angel Face is a large flowered hybrid tea rose introduced in 1968 by Swim & Weeks. 'Angel Face', is a cross between ('Circus' × 'Lavender Pinocchio') × 'Sterling Silver'. In certain sunlight it is possible to detect a faint silvery sheen as a hint of its parentage. The fragrance of this AARS Winner is a sweet fruity scent. It is as appealing as its lavender colour. It has 3", lavender ruffled-edge blossoms, edged in an attractive deeper ruby, and often grow on single stems as well as in clusters. 'Angel Face' is an upright, bushy plant with lustrous foliage and a neat 3-foot-tall and -wide form. It is a good rose to use as a cut flower, both for its beauty and its deep fragrance. It is a compact growing plant, and blooms abundantly. It does best in full sun and any well-drained soil. It is hardy in zones 5-9.
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    Seedling

    A seedling is a young plant sporophyte developing out of a plant embryo from a seed. Seedling development starts with germination of the seed. A typical young seedling consists of three main parts: the radicle (embryonic root), the hypocotyl (embryonic shoot), and the cotyledons (seed leaves). The two classes of flowering plants (angiosperms) are distinguished by their numbers of seed leaves: monocotyledons (monocots) have one blade-shaped cotyledon, whereas dicotyledons (dicots) possess two round cotyledons. Gymnosperms are more varied. For example, pine seedlings have up to eight cotyledons. The seedlings of some flowering plants have no cotyledons at all. These are said to be acotyledons. During germination, the young plant emerges from its protective seed coat with its radicle first, followed by the cotyledons. The radicle orients towards gravity, while the hypocotyl orients away from gravity and elongates through cell expansion to push the cotyledons out of the ground. Dicot seedlings grown in the light develop short hypocotyls and open cotyledons exposing the epicotyl. This is also referred to as photomorphogenesis. In contrast, seedlings grown in the dark develop long
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    Breidecker

    Breidecker is white variety of grape. It is a hybrid grape, an interspecific crossing (Riesling × Silvaner) × Seibel 7053. It can be used to make a German style light white wine with apple and pear flavors. "This cultivar was released by the Geisenheim Research Station, Germany, in 1962. Has the technical name GM 4894. It was derived from a Müller-Thurgau cross with the Chancellor (a.k.a. Seibel 7053) hybrid cultivar and can currently be found in limited areas on the south island of New Zealand where it is mainly used for producing somewhat neutral varietal and blend white wines. Resistant to bunch rot and downy mildew fungus diseases. Breidecker was named after Heinrich Breidecker, one of New Zealand pioneer grape growers." Breidecker is also known under the synonyms or breeding codes CD 4984, Geisenheim 4984, and Gm 49-84.
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    Baco noir

    Baco noir

    Baco noir (pronounced BA-koh NWAHR) is a hybrid red wine grape variety produced from a cross of Vitis vinifera var. Folle Blanche, a French wine grape, and an unknown variety of Vitis riparia indigenous to North America. Baco noir produces a medium body, deeply tinted, acidic red wine which is fruit forward and often carries aromas of black fruits and caramel. Ageing potential is 5–8 years for good examples of this wine. The grape tends to be vigorous and is fairly resistant to the common ills of grapes in the eastern U.S., including black rot, powdery mildew, and downy mildew. It grows well on 6–8-foot (1.8–2.4 m) cordons, with vertical shoot positioning. The vines can carry up to 3 clusters per shoot without overcropping. The vine tolerates highly acid soil (pH 4.9) and is not susceptible to phylloxera. The vine is not particularly attractive to Japanese beetles. In droughty years, the vine is balanced. In wet years, there is no coulure; however, the vines produce more vine than needed and may need to be hedged many times. The vine is not recommended for planting in good soil. At one time Baco noir was grown in France, but by European Union regulation, the commercial use of
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    Mule

    Mule

    A mule is the offspring of a male donkey and a female horse. Horses and donkeys are different species, with different numbers of chromosomes. Of the two F1 hybrids between these two species, a mule is easier to obtain than a hinny (the offspring of a male horse and a female donkey). While there is no known instance of a male mule siring offspring, female mules have on very rare occasion given birth to viable offspring. The size of a mule and work to which it is put depends largely on the breeding of the mule's dam. Mules can be lightweight, medium weight, or even, when produced from draught horse mares, of moderately heavy weight. It has been claimed that mules are "more patient, sure-footed, hardy and long-lived than horses, and they are considered less obstinate, faster, and more intelligent than donkeys." A female mule that has estrus cycles and thus, in theory, could carry a fetus, is called a "molly" or "Molly mule," though the term is sometimes used to refer to female mules in general. Pregnancy is rare, but can occasionally occur naturally as well as through embryo transfer. One of several terms for a gelded mule is a "John mule." The median weight range for a mule is
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    Cassady grape

    Cassady is a grape variety which is greenish-white in color. It is related to the "Fox Grape", Vitis labrusca, and it is an offspring of an open pollination variant of V. labrusca, which means that it is classified as an interspecific crossing, a hybrid grape. It was first described in the Interim Fruit Report of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society in November, 1853. The first Cassady grapevine sprang up as a volunteer (unplanted) seedling in the yard of P.H. Cassady at 29 Logan Square, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1847. It did not bear fruit for five years, but when it finally did, the grapes it produced were found by Cassady to be juicy, pleasantly flavoured, and of very good quality. The Cassady grape was propagated and subsequently crossed with the better-known Concord grape to produce a new white grape variety, the Niagara grape, which is the cultivar most commonly used for the production of white grape juice in North America. The original description of the Cassady grape was published in November 1853 on page 563 of The Magazine of Horticulture, Botany, and All Useful Discoveries and Improvements in Rural Affairs, Vol. XIX, 1853: ART. III. Societies. PENNSYLVANIA
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    Peace

    Peace

    The Peace rose is a well-known and successful garden rose. Over one hundred million plants had been sold, as of 1992. It is a Hybrid Tea rose with large flowers of a light yellow to cream color, slightly flushed at the petal edges with crimson-pink. It is hardy and vigorous and relatively resistant to disease, making it popular in gardens as well as in the floral trade. It was developed by French horticulturist Francis Meilland in the years 1935 to 1939. When Meilland foresaw the German invasion of France he sent cuttings to friends in Italy, Turkey, Germany, and the United States to protect the new rose. It is said, that it was sent to the US on the last plane available before the German invasion, where it was safely propagated by the Conard Pyle Co. during the war. As Meilland sent his cuttings just before the war, communication between the cultivators was not possible, which is why the rose received different names. In France it was called 'Madame A. Meilland', in honour of the breeder's mother. This is the formal cultivar name; all other names are selling names. In Italy it was called Gioia (It. for joy), in Germany Gloria Dei (lat. for glory to god) and in the USA Peace. The
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    Zony

    A zony is the offspring of a zebra stallion and a pony mare. Medium size pony mares are preferred in order to produce riding zonies, but zebras have been crossed with smaller pony breeds such as the Shetland resulting in so-called "Zetlands". It is a zebroid: this term refers to any hybrid equine with zebra ancestry. Cossar Ewart, Professor of Natural History at Edinburgh (1882–1927) and a keen geneticist, crossed a zebra stallion with pony mares in order to investigate the theory of telegony, or paternal impression. His interest had been provoked by the famous zebra/horse hybrids bred by Lord Morton in 1815 from a chestnut 7/8ths Arabian mare and a quagga stallion. In "Origin of Species" (1859) Charles Darwin wrote that "In Lord Morton's famous hybrid from a chestnut mare and male quagga, the hybrid, and even the pure offspring subsequently produced from the mare by a black Arabian sire, were much more plainly barred across the legs than is even the pure quagga." During the South African War, the Boers crossed the Chapman's zebra with the pony, to produce an animal for transport work, chiefly for hauling guns. A specimen was captured by British forces and presented to King Edward
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