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Best HUD Foreclosure Area of All Time

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    1
    Monroe County

    Monroe County

    Monroe County is a county located in the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 13,502. Its county seat is Union. Monroe County was created from Greenbrier County in 1799. It was named for James Monroe who eventually became the fifth President of the United States. Monroe County was the home of Andrew Summers Rowan of Spanish-American War fame, who is immortalized in Elbert Hubbard's classic A Message to Garcia. The county was also the site of the 1928 discovery of the 34.48 carat (6.896 g) Jones Diamond by Grover C. Jones and his son, William "Punch" Jones. Monroe County celebrates its own holiday, Farmer's Day, and is known for its close community. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 474 square miles (1,227 km²), of which 473 square miles (1,226 km²) is land and 0 square miles (1 km²) (0.06%) is water. Tributaries of the James River, part of the Chesapeake Bay Tributaries of the New River Tributaries of the Greenbrier River Monroe County was formed on January 14, 1799 from portions of Greenbrier County. It was named after James Monroe, a Virginia statesman and senator, and the future fifth President of the United
    8.33
    6 votes
    2
    Fairfax County

    Fairfax County

    Fairfax County is a county in Virginia, in the United States. As of the 2010 census, the population of the county is 1,081,726, making it the most populous jurisdiction in the Commonwealth of Virginia, with 13.5% of Virginia's population. The county is also the most populous jurisdiction in the Washington Metropolitan Area, with 19.8% of the MSA population, as well as the larger Baltimore–Washington Metropolitan Area, with 13.1% of the CSA population. Fairfax was the first county in the United States to reach a six-figure median household income, and has the second-highest median household income of any local jurisdiction in the United States after neighbor Loudoun County. The county is home to the headquarters of intelligence agencies such as the Central Intelligence Agency, National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, and National Reconnaissance Office, as well as the National Counterterrorism Center and Office of the Director of National Intelligence. The county is also home to ten of the metropolitan area's Fortune 500 companies. Fairfax County was formed in 1742 from the northern part of Prince William County. It was named for Thomas Fairfax, 6th Lord Fairfax of Cameron
    7.29
    7 votes
    3
    Jackson County

    Jackson County

    Jackson County is a county located in the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 29,211. Its county seat is Ripley and its largest municipality is Ravenswood. Jackson County was formed in 1831 from parts of Kanawha, Wood, and Mason Counties, and named for Andrew Jackson, seventh President of the United States. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 472 square miles (1,222.5 km), of which 466 square miles (1,206.9 km) is land and 6 square miles (15.5 km) (1.23%) is water. The Ohio River forms part of Jackson County's western border. Sandy Creek and Mill Creek, tributaries of the Ohio, flow through the northern and central portions of the county. As of the census of 2000, there were 28,000 people, 11,061 households, and 8,207 families residing in the county. The population density was 60 people per square mile (23/km²). There were 12,245 housing units at an average density of 26 per square mile (10/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 98.75% White, 0.08% Black or African American, 0.21% Native American, 0.23% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.10% from other races, and 0.62% from two or more races. 0.29% of the population were
    9.00
    5 votes
    4
    Anderson County

    Anderson County

    Anderson County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was formed in 1827. In 2010 the population was 21,421. Its county seat is Lawrenceburg, Kentucky. The county is named for Richard Clough Anderson, Jr., a Kentucky Legislator, U.S. Congressman and minister to Colombia. Anderson County is part of the Frankfort Micropolitan Statistical Area. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 204.28 square miles (529.1 km²), of which 202.67 square miles (524.9 km²) (or 99.21%) is land and 1.61 square miles (4.2 km²) (or 0.79%) is water. At the 2000 census, there were 19,111 people, 7,320 households and 5,526 families residing in the county. The population density was 94 per square mile (36/km²). There were 7,752 housing units at an average density of 38 per square mile (15/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 96.53% White, 2.35% Black or African American, 0.12% Native American, 0.12% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.17% from other races, and 0.70% from two or more races. 0.80% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 7,320 households of which 37.00% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.80% were married couples
    7.67
    6 votes
    5
    Bedford County

    Bedford County

    Bedford County is a county located in the US state of the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was to be 68,676. Its county seat is the city Bedford and is part of the Lynchburg Metropolitan Statistical Area. As an independent city, Bedford is not a part of Bedford County, despite being the county seat. On September 14, 2011, the Bedford City Council voted to transition into a town, ending its independent city status. The supervisors of Bedford County also voted to accept the town of Bedford as part of the county when it loses city status. The transition is expected to begin in July 2013. The Piedmont area had long been inhabited by indigenous peoples. At the time of European encounter, mostly Siouan-speaking tribes lived in this area. Bedford County was established by European Americans on December 13, 1753 from parts of Lunenburg County. The county is named for John Russell, the fourth Duke of Bedford, who was a Secretary of State of Great Britain. In 1782, Campbell County was formed from parts of Bedford County. Also in 1786, Franklin County was formed from Bedford County. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 769 square
    6.57
    7 votes
    6
    Fluvanna County

    Fluvanna County

    Fluvanna County is a county located in the Piedmont of the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 25,691. Its county seat is Palmyra. Fluvanna County is part of the Charlottesville Metropolitan Statistical Area. The area which is now Fluvanna County was once part of Henrico County, one of the original shires of the Virginia Colony. Henrico was divided in 1727 and the Fluvanna County area became a part of Goochland County. In 1744 Goochland was divided and the area presently known as Fluvanna became a part of Albemarle County. Finally, in 1777, Albemarle County was divided and Fluvanna County established. The County was named for the Fluvanna River, the name given to James River west of Columbia. Fluvanna means "Annie's River" in honor of Queen Anne of England. Located in the Piedmont above the fall line, the county has the James and Rivanna rivers running through it. The Point of Fork (near Columbia where the James and Rivanna rivers meet) was the site of a major Monacan village of the Native Americans in pre-colonial times. In the late eighteenth century, Thomas Jefferson improved the navigability of the Rivanna River, as he owned much property along its upper
    8.40
    5 votes
    7
    Fredericksburg

    Fredericksburg

    Fredericksburg is an independent city in the Commonwealth of Virginia located 49 miles (79 km) south of Washington, D.C., and 58 miles (93 km) north of Richmond. As of the 2010 census, the city had a population of 24,286. The Bureau of Economic Analysis combines the city of Fredericksburg with neighboring Spotsylvania County for statistical purposes. Fredericksburg is part of the Washington Metropolitan Area. Located near where the Rappahannock River crosses the Fall Line, Fredericksburg was a prominent port in Virginia during the colonial era. During the Civil War, the town, located halfway between the capitals of the opposing forces, was the site of the Battle of Fredericksburg and Second Battle of Fredericksburg, preserved in part as the Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park. Tourism is a major part of the economy, with approximately 1.5 million people visiting the Fredericksburg area annually, including the battlefield park, the downtown visitor center, events, museums and historic sites. Fredericksburg is home to several major commercial centers including Central Park (as of 2004, the second-largest mall on the East Coast) and Spotsylvania Towne Centre,
    8.20
    5 votes
    8
    Falls Church

    Falls Church

    Falls Church is an independent city in Virginia, United States, in the Washington Metropolitan Area. The city population was 12,332 at the 2010 census, up from 10,377 at the 2000 census. Taking its name from The Falls Church, an 18th-century Anglican parish, Falls Church gained township status within Fairfax County in 1875. In 1948, it was incorporated as the City of Falls Church, an independent city with county-level governance status. It is also referred to as Falls Church City. The city's corporate boundaries do not include all of the area historically known as Falls Church; these areas include portions of Seven Corners and other portions of the current Falls Church postal districts of Fairfax County, as well as the area of Arlington County known as East Falls Church, which was part of the town of Falls Church from 1875 to 1936. For statistical purposes, the US Department of Commerce's Bureau of Economic Analysis combines the City of Falls Church with Fairfax City and Fairfax County. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 2.2 square miles (5.7 km), all of it land. The center of the city is the crossroads of Virginia State Route 7 (W. Broad
    8.00
    5 votes
    9
    Lee County

    Lee County

    Lee County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of 2010, the population was 7,887. Its county seat is Beattyville. It is a prohibition or dry county. Lee County was formed in 1870. Many sources say it was named for General Robert E. Lee, which is certainly possible given that it was formed near the time of Lee's death. On the other hand, this area of Kentucky was strongly pro-Union during the Civil War. Other sources say the County was named for Lee County, Virginia, or for Henry "Light Horse Harry" Lee. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 211.22 square miles (547.1 km), of which 209.86 square miles (543.5 km) (or 99.36%) is land and 1.36 square miles (3.5 km) (or 0.64%) is water. Lee County lies within the Eastern Mountain Coal Fields region of Kentucky. The very rugged terrain greatly defines the area. Roughly half of the county lies within the Daniel Boone National Forest. Timber and coal remain economically significant. Harmful effects from strip mining and clear cut logging are still being corrected. The proliferation of kudzu has proved difficult to address. However, with the growing environmental movement and the developing tourism
    8.00
    5 votes
    10
    Covington City

    Covington City

    Covington is an independent city in the U.S. state of Virginia, located at the confluence of Jackson River and Dunlap Creek. It is surrounded by Alleghany County, of which it is also the county seat. The population was 5,961 in 2010. The Bureau of Economic Analysis combines the city of Covington with Alleghany county for statistical purposes. Covington is one of three cities (with Roanoke and Salem) in the Roanoke Regional Partnership. The current mayor of Covington is Robert Bennett. The city's media and news needs are served by The Virginian Review newspaper, which has been continuously published since August 10, 1914, and by AM radio station WKEY. Fire protection is provided by the Covington Fire Department, which was chartered on March 4, 1902. The Covington Rescue Squad provides emergency medical services to the city of Covington. Both the fire department and rescue squad are volunteer organizations. The rescue squad was organized in 1933 and is the third oldest volunteer rescue squad in Virginia. Covington is named in honor of General Leonard Covington, hero of the War of 1812 and friend of James Madison and Thomas Jefferson. The city has a rich history and heritage and today
    7.80
    5 votes
    11
    Pike County

    Pike County

    Pike County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of 2010, the population was 65,024. Its county seat is Pikeville. Pike is Kentucky's largest county in terms of land area. Pike County is the 11th largest county in Kentucky in terms of population preceded by Bullitt County and followed by Christian County. Pike County is Kentucky's third largest banking center, with financial institutions and holding companies having more than $1 billion in assets. In the five years spanning 1995-2000, personal income increased by 28%, and the county's per capita income exceeded the national and state average growth rates of the past decade. With regard to the sale of alcohol, it is classified as a moist county—a county in which alcohol sales are prohibited (a dry county), but containing a "wet" city, in this case two cities: Pikeville and suburb Coal Run Village, where package alcohol sales are allowed. Pike County was founded on December 19, 1821. The county was named for General Zebulon Pike, the explorer who discovered Pikes Peak. Between 1860 and 1891 the Hatfield-McCoy feud raged in Pike and in bordering Mingo County, West Virginia. On May 6, 1893, Pikeville officially became
    7.80
    5 votes
    12
    Russell County

    Russell County

    Russell County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 28,897. Its county seat is Lebanon. On January 2, 1786, Russell County was established from a section of Washington County. L.P. Summers, a Washington County historian later wrote, "Washington County lost a great extent of country and many valuable citizens when Russell County was formed." The county was named for Culpeper County native Colonel William Russell, who assisted in the drafting of the Declaration of Independence. The first court met in May 1786 in the Castle's Woods settlement (present-day Castlewood) in the house of William Robinson. Later, a new place was built to house the County Seat. The structure used as a courthouse still stands, and is referred to as "The Old Courthouse." The present Courthouse, located in Lebanon, has been in use since 1874. The County has been home for many well known persons such as Daniel Boone, Governor H.C. Stuart, and State Senator M.M. Long. Russell County was also the birthplace of other counties. The counties of Wise, Lee, Tazewell, and Scott were formed from parts of Russell County. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a
    6.67
    6 votes
    13
    Lyon County

    Lyon County

    Lyon County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of 2000, the population was 8,080. Its county seat is Eddyville. Separated from Caldwell County, Kentucky in 1854, although Eddyville was that county's seat prior to the separation, the county was named for former Congressman Chittenden Lyon. It is a limited dry county, meaning that the sale of alcoholic beverages is prohibited except by the drink in restaurants in the city of Kuttawa that seat at least 100 diners and derive at least 70% of total sales from food. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 256.42 square miles (664.1 km), of which 215.70 square miles (558.7 km) (or 84.12%) is land and 40.71 square miles (105.4 km) (or 15.88%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 8,080 people, 2,898 households, and 2,043 families residing in the county. The population density was 38 per square mile (15 /km). There were 4,189 housing units at an average density of 19 per square mile (7.3 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 91.86% White, 6.72% Black or African American, 0.30% Native American, 0.17% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.40% from other races, and 0.54% from two or more races.
    7.60
    5 votes
    14
    Grayson County

    Grayson County

    Grayson County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was formed in 1810. As of 2000, the population was 24,053. Its county seat is Leitchfield. The county is named for William Grayson (1740-1790), a Revolutionary War colonel and a prominent Virginia political figure. It is a prohibition or dry county, though a bill was passed on March 23, 2010 to allow limited alcohol sales in restaurants. Grayson County is part of the Western Coal Fields region of Kentucky. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 510.85 square miles (1,323.1 km), of which 503.68 square miles (1,304.5 km) (or 98.60%) is land and 7.17 square miles (18.6 km) (or 1.40%) is water. Grayson County is home to two large lakes, the Rough River Lake on the northern border of the county and Nolin River Lake in the south. The lakes attract many tourists and have led to the nickname "Twin Lakes" region being applied to the county as a whole. As of the census of 2000, there were 24,053 people, 9,596 households, and 6,966 families residing in the county. The population density was 48 per square mile (19 /km). There were 12,802 housing units at an average density of 25 per square mile
    5.71
    7 votes
    15
    Bristol

    Bristol

    Bristol is an independent city in Virginia, United States, bounded by Washington County, Virginia; Bristol, Tennessee; and Sullivan County, Tennessee. The 2010 U.S. Census revealed a population of 17,835. It is the twin city of Bristol, Tennessee, just across the state line, which runs down the middle of its main street, State Street. The Bureau of Economic Analysis combines the city of Bristol, Virginia with Washington County for statistical purposes. Bristol is a principal city of Kingsport–Bristol–Bristol, TN-VA Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is a component of the Johnson City–Kingsport–Bristol, TN-VA Combined Statistical Area – commonly known as the "Tri-Cities" region. Originally named Goodson, it was renamed Bristol (after Bristol, England) in 1890. Bristol is located at 36°36′N 82°11′W / 36.6°N 82.183°W / 36.6; -82.183 (36.6111, -82.1762). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 13.2 square miles (34 km), of which, 12.9 square miles (33 km) of it is land and 0.3 square miles (0.78 km) of it (2.05%) is water. The city is served by I-81, US-58, US-421, and US-11. As of the census of 2000, there were 17,367 people, 7,678 households,
    6.50
    6 votes
    16
    Butler County

    Butler County

    Butler County is a county located in the US state of Kentucky. It was formed in 1810, becoming Kentucky's 53rd county. As of 2000, the population was 13,010. Its county seat is Morgantown, Kentucky. Butler is a prohibition or dry county. The area now known as Butler County was first settled by the families of Richard C. Dellium and James Forgy, who founded a town called Berry's Lick. The first industry was salt-making. On January 18, 1810, the Kentucky General Assembly created Butler County from portions of Logan and Ohio counties. The new county was named for Major General Richard Butler, who died at the Battle of the Wabash in 1791. Butler County has one of only two Civil War monuments in Kentucky that honor the soldiers of both sides. The Confederate-Union Veterans' Monument in Morgantown, a zinc monument, was dedicated in 1907 on the Butler County Courthouse lawn. Butler County is part of the Western Coal Fields region of Kentucky. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 431.52 square miles (1,117.6 km), of which 428.08 square miles (1,108.7 km) (or 99.20%) is land and 3.44 square miles (8.9 km) (or 0.80%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were
    6.50
    6 votes
    17
    James City County

    James City County

    James City County (formally, the County of James City) is a county located on the Virginia Peninsula in the Hampton Roads metropolitan area of the Commonwealth of Virginia, a state of the United States. Its population was 67,009 (as of Census 2010), and it is often associated with Williamsburg, an independent city, and Jamestown which is within the county. As of 2007, the median household income was $70,487. First settled by the English colonists in 1607 at Jamestown in the Virginia Colony, the County was formally created in 1634 as James City Shire by order of King Charles I. James City County is considered one of only five original shires of Virginia to still be extant today in essentially the same political form. The Jamestown 2007 celebration marked the 400th anniversary of the founding of Jamestown. Today, James City County remains an important site of growth and economic development. With an increasing population and a generous endowment of skilled labor, the County attracts not only new businesses and entrepreneurs looking to take advantage of an ideal mid-Atlantic location, and one of the northernmost right to work counties in the country, but also successful retirees
    9.67
    3 votes
    18
    Clarke County

    Clarke County

    Clarke County is a county in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 14,034. Its county seat is Berryville. Clarke County was established in 1736 by Thomas Fairfax, 6th Lord Fairfax of Cameron who built a home, Greenway Court, on part of his 5 million acre (20,000 km²) property, near what is now the village of White Post. White Post was named for the large signpost pointing the way to Lord Fairfax's home. Many of the early settlers of what became Clarke County were children of Tidewater planters, who settled on large land grants from Lord Fairfax. 2/3 of the county was settled by the plantation group, and the plantation lifestyle thrived until the Civil War. Clarke was known for its large crops of wheat. During the Civil War, John S. Mosby, "the Gray Ghost" of the Confederacy, raided General Sheridan's supply train in the summer of 1864, in Berryville. The Battle of Cool Spring was fought in Clarke County on July 17 and 18th, 1864, and the Battle of Berryville on September 3, 1864. Early in the 20th century, future Virginia politician Harry F. Byrd, Sr. and his wife established their first home near Berryville, where he undertook extensive agricultural activity
    7.20
    5 votes
    19
    Fauquier County

    Fauquier County

    Fauquier ( /fɔːˈkɪər/) is a county located in the United States Commonwealth of Virginia. As of 2010, the county's population was 68,010. Fauquier County's county seat is Warrenton, and the county is a part of the Washington Metropolitan Area. At the time of European encounter, a sub-group of the Siouan-speaking Manahoac tribe, the Whonkentia, inhabited the area. They were forced out around 1670 by the Iroquois (Seneca), who did not resettle the area. The Conoy camped briefly near The Plains, from 1697 to 1699. The Six Nations ceded the entire region including modern Fauquier to Virginia Colony at the Treaty of Albany, in 1722. Fauquier County was established on May 1, 1759, from Prince William County. It is named for Francis Fauquier, Lieutenant Governor of Virginia at the time, who won the land in a poker game, according to legend. American Civil War battles in Fauquier County included (in order) the First Battle of Rappahannock Station, Battle of Thoroughfare Gap, Battle of Kelly's Ford, Battle of Aldie, Battle of Middleburg, Battle of Upperville, First and Second Battle of Auburn, Battle of Buckland Mills, and the Second Battle of Rappahannock Station. Fauquier County
    8.25
    4 votes
    20
    Giles County

    Giles County

    Giles County is a county located in the U.S. state of Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 17,286. Its county seat is Pearisburg. Giles County is part of the Blacksburg–Christiansburg–Radford Metropolitan Statistical Area. Giles County is the location of Mountain Lake, one of only two natural fresh water lakes in Virginia. The Lake drains into Little Stony Creek, which passes over "The Cascades", a spectacular waterfall, before reaching the New River. Giles County was established in 1806 from Montgomery, Monroe, Wythe, and Tazewell counties. The county is named for William Branch Giles who was born in Amelia County in 1762. Giles became a lawyer and from there was elected to the United States House of Representatives where he served from 1790 to 1815. He also served on the Virginia General Assembly from 1816 to 1822. In 1827, he was elected Governor. In all, he served his nation and state around a total of forty years. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 360 square miles (932.4 km), of which 357 square miles (924.6 km) is land and 3 square miles (7.8 km) (0.85%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 16,657 people, 6,994 households, and
    8.25
    4 votes
    21
    Sagadahoc County

    Sagadahoc County

    Sagadahoc County is a county located in the U.S. state of Maine. As of 2010, the population was 35,293. Its county seat is Bath. In total area, it is the smallest county in Maine. Sagadahoc County is part of the Portland–South Portland–Biddeford, Maine, Metropolitan Statistical Area. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 370.19 square miles (958.8 km), the smallest county in Maine, of which 253.90 square miles (657.6 km) (or 68.59%) is land and 116.29 square miles (301.2 km) (or 31.41%) is water. Sagadahoc County was initially part of York and, later, Lincoln County before being set off and incorporated in 1854. Samuel de Champlain led the first known visit of Europeans to the region. In 1607, the English Popham Colony was established in what is now Phippsburgh; it was abandoned a year later, but English fishermen and trappers continued to visit the area. John Smith explored the region in 1614 and reported back to King Charles I, who named the Sagadahoc area "Leethe." When the Plymouth Council for New England was dissolved in 1635, 10,000 acres (40 km) on the east side of the Kennebec River were divided up and granted to private owners. Over the years, these
    8.25
    4 votes
    22
    Berkeley County

    Berkeley County

    Berkeley County is a county located in the Eastern Panhandle region of the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population is 104,169, making it the second-most populous county in West Virginia, behind Kanawha. Its county seat is Martinsburg. The county lies adjacent to the Washington-Baltimore Metropolitan Area and is one of three counties in Hagerstown-Martinsburg, MD-WV Metropolitan Statistical Area. Due to its proximity to Washington, D.C., Berkeley County is the fastest growing county in the State of West Virginia and among the fastest growing in the entire country. Berkeley is the second oldest county in West Virginia. The county was created by an act of the House of Burgesses in February 1772 from the northern third of Frederick County (Virginia). At the time of the county's formation it also consisted of the areas that make up the present-day Jefferson and Morgan counties. Most historians believe that the county was named for Norborne Berkeley, Baron de Botetourt (1718–1770), Colonial Governor of Virginia from 1768 to 1770. West Virginia's Blue Book, for example, indicates that Berkeley County was named in his honor. He served as a colonel in England's
    7.00
    5 votes
    23
    Isle of Wight County

    Isle of Wight County

    Isle of Wight County is a county located in the Hampton Roads metropolitan area of the Commonwealth of Virginia, a state of the United States. Its county seat is Isle of Wight. According to the 2010 Census, its population was 35,270 and the median household income was $58,840 . Isle of Wight County features two incorporated towns, Smithfield and Windsor. The original courthouse for the county was built in Smithfield in 1750. The original courthouse and its associated tavern (The Smithfield Inn) are still standing. A new courthouse was built near the center of the county in 1800. The 1800 courthouse and its associated tavern (Boykin's Tavern) are also still standing. During the 17th century, shortly after establishment of the settlement at Jamestown in 1607, English settlers explored and began settling the areas adjacent to Hampton Roads. Captain John Smith in 1608 crossed the James River and obtained fourteen bushels of corn from the Native American inhabitants, the Warrosquyoackes or Warraskoyaks. They were a tribe of the Powhatan Confederacy, who had three towns in the area of modern Smithfield. The Warraskoyaks were driven off from their villages in 1622 and 1627, as part of the
    7.00
    5 votes
    24
    Nicholas County

    Nicholas County

    Nicholas County is a county located in the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 23,233. Its county seat is Summersville. Nicholas County was created in 1818 by the Virginia General Assembly and named for Virginia Governor Wilson Cary Nicholas. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 654 square miles (1,695 km²), of which 649 square miles (1,680 km²) is land and 6 square miles (15 km²) (0.88%) is water. Canifax Ferry Battlefield, The Battle of Forks and Spoons- Kesslers Cross Lanes As of the census of 2000, there were 26,562 people, 10,722 households, and 7,762 families residing in the county. The population density was 41 people per square mile (16/km²). There were 12,406 housing units at an average density of 19 per square mile (7/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 98.84% White, 0.05% Black or African American, 0.24% Native American, 0.19% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.10% from other races, and 0.55% from two or more races. 0.48% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 10,722 households out of which 30.70% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.70% were married couples
    7.00
    5 votes
    25
    Southampton County

    Southampton County

    Southampton County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia, a state of the United States. As of 2010, the population was 18,570. Its county seat is Courtland. During the 17th century, shortly after establishment of Jamestown, Virginia in 1607, English settlers explored and began settling the areas adjacent to Hampton Roads. In 1634, the English colony of Virginia was divided into eight shires (or counties) with a total population of approximately 5,000 inhabitants. Most of Southampton County was originally part of Warrosquyoake Shire. The shires were soon to be called counties. Warrosquyoake Shire was renamed Isle of Wight County in 1637. In 1749, the portion of Isle of Wight County west of the Blackwater River became Southampton County. Later, part of Nansemond County, which is now the Independent City of Suffolk, was added to Southampton County. In August 1831, enslaved Nat Turner led a slave rebellion of Black slaves in Southampton County against local Whites. When the rebellion was crushed, Turner and other Blacks were executed. Southampton County may have been named for Southampton, a major city in England, or for Henry Wriothesley, 3rd Earl of Southampton, one of
    7.00
    5 votes
    26
    Bath County

    Bath County

    Bath County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was formed in 1811. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 283.94 square miles (735.4 km), of which 279.46 square miles (723.8 km) (or 98.42%) is land and 4.48 square miles (11.6 km) (or 1.58%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 11,085 people, 4,445 households, and 3,195 families residing in the county. The population density was 40 per square mile (15 /km). There were 4,994 housing units at an average density of 18 per square mile (6.9 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 96.87% White, 1.85% Black or African American, 0.21% Native American, 0.02% Asian, 0.40% from other races, and 0.66% from two or more races. 0.80% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 4,445 households out of which 32.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.70% were married couples living together, 10.30% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.10% were non-families. 25.30% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.00% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.47 and the average family
    9.33
    3 votes
    27
    Lee County

    Lee County

    Lee County is a county located in the U.S. Commonwealth of Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 25,587. Its county seat is Jonesville. Lee County is the westernmost county in Virginia. The first Europeans to enter what is present-day Lee County were a party of Spanish explorers in 1540, sent by Hernando de Soto, in search of gold. The county was formed in 1793 from Russell County. It was named for Light Horse Harry Lee, the Governor of Virginia from 1791 to 1794, who was known as "Light Horse Harry" for his exploits as a leader of light troops in the American Revolutionary War. He was the father of the Confederate General Robert E. Lee. Among the largest early landowners in the county was Revolutionary War officer and explorer Joseph Martin, for whom Martin's Station and Martin's Creek at Rose Hill are named, and who was awarded some 25,000 acres (100 km) in the county, which he later sold. Martin was among the earliest explorers of the region. In 1814, parts of Lee County, Russell County, and Washington County were combined to form Scott County. In 1856, parts of Lee County, Russell County, and Scott County were combined to form Wise County, Virginia. Andrew Taylor
    9.33
    3 votes
    28
    Elliott County

    Elliott County

    Elliott County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was formed in 1869. As of 2010, the population is 7,852. Its county seat is Sandy Hook, Kentucky. The county is named for John Milton Elliott, U.S. Congressman; Confederate Justice of the Kentucky Court of Appeals. In regard to alcohol sales, Elliott County is a dry county, meaning the sale of alcoholic beverages is prohibited everywhere in the county. It was formed on April 1, 1869, from parts of Morgan, Lawrence, and Carter counties. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 235.20 square miles (609.2 km), of which 233.96 square miles (606.0 km) (or 99.47%) is land and 1.24 square miles (3.2 km) (or 0.53%) is water. Elliott County has voted for the Democratic Party's nominee in every Presidential election since it incorporated in 1869. This is the longest ongoing streak of any county voting Democratic in the United States. Elliott County was the second whitest county in the country, at 99.04%, to vote for Barack Obama in the 2008 Presidential election, the whitest being Mitchell County, Iowa. Obama garnered 61% of the vote, while John McCain received 36%. In 2008, Elliott county provided Obama
    6.80
    5 votes
    29
    Madison County

    Madison County

    Madison County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 13,308. Its county seat is Madison. Madison County was established in December 1792, created from Culpeper County. The county is named for the Madison family that owned land along the Rapidan River. President James Madison is a descendant of that family. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 322 square miles (830 km), of which 321 square miles (830 km) is land and 0 square miles (0 km) (0.11%) is water. A significant portion of western Madison County is within Shenandoah National Park, including Old Rag, one of its most popular tourist destinations, and Rapidan Camp, the presidential retreat built by Herbert Hoover. As of the census of 2000, there were 12,520 people, 4,739 households, and 3,521 families residing in the county. The population density was 39 people per square mile (15/km²). There were 5,239 housing units at an average density of 16 per square mile (6/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 86.71% White, 11.41% Black or African American, 0.14% Native American, 0.50% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.29% from other races, and 0.93% from two
    6.80
    5 votes
    30
    McLean County

    McLean County

    McLean County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky; its population was 9,938 in the 2000 Census. McLean County's county seat is at Calhoun. McLean County, with Daviess and Hancock Counties, is part of the Owensboro Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), which has a population of some 110,314 (2002 estimate). McLean is a prohibition or dry county. The county was formed by act of the Kentucky legislature on February 6, 1854 from portions of surrounding Daviess, Ohio, and Muhlenberg Counties, and was named for Judge Alney McLean, founder of Greenville, the county seat of Muhlenberg County. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 256.17 square miles (663.5 km), of which 254.30 square miles (658.6 km) (or 99.27%) is land and 1.88 square miles (4.9 km) (or 0.73%) is water. McLean County is part of the Western Coal Fields region of Kentucky. The county is transected southeast to northwest by Green River, the longest river entirely within the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Bridge crossings of Green River are at Calhoun, Livermore and west of Beech Grove. Green River is navigable throughout McLean County, with Army Corps of Engineers Lock and Dam #2 at Calhoun
    6.80
    5 votes
    31
    Craig County

    Craig County

    Craig County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 5,190. Its county seat is New Castle. Craig County is part of the Roanoke Metropolitan Statistical Area. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 331 square miles (857.3 km), all land. As of the census of 2000, there were 5,091 people, 2,060 households, and 1,507 families residing in the county. The population density was 15 people per square mile (6/km²). There were 2,554 housing units at an average density of 8 per square mile (3/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 98.94% White, 0.20% Black or African American, 0.22% Native American, 0.16% Asian, 0.14% from other races, and 0.35% from two or more races. 0.33% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 2,060 households out of which 30.80% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.90% were married couples living together, 7.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.80% were non-families. 23.90% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.45 and the
    9.00
    3 votes
    32
    Jefferson County

    Jefferson County

    Jefferson County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It is the most populous county in Kentucky and is more than twice as populous as the second most populous, Fayette. It was formed in 1780. The population was 741,096 in the 2010 Census, but estimated at 752,866 in 2011. Jefferson County is the most populous county in the Louisville/Jefferson County, KY–IN Metropolitan Statistical Area. Jefferson County was organized in 1780 and one of the first three counties formed out of the original Kentucky County, which was still part of Virginia at the time (the other two being Fayette and Lincoln). The county is named for Thomas Jefferson, who was governor of Virginia at the time. The last major American Indian raid in present day Jefferson County was the Chenoweth Massacre on July 17, 1789. In 2003, its government merged with that of its largest city and county seat, Louisville, forming a new entity, the Louisville-Jefferson County Metro Government (the official long form) or simply Louisville Metro (the official short form). Prior to this merger, the head of local government was the County Judge/Executive, a post that still exists but now has few powers. The current
    9.00
    3 votes
    33
    Marshall County

    Marshall County

    Marshall County is a county located in the U.S. state of West Virginia. It is part of the Wheeling, West Virginia, Metropolitan Statistical Area. As of 2010, the population was 33,107. Its county seat is Moundsville. Its southern border is the Mason-Dixon line. Marshall County is home to the largest conical burial mound in North America, at Moundsville. Marshall County was formed in 1835 from Ohio County by act of the Virginia Assembly. In 1852, on Christmas Eve, workers completed the Baltimore & Ohio railroad at Rosby's Rock in Marshall County. It is home to the New Vrindaban community of Hare Krishnas, and Prabhupada's Palace of Gold. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 312 square miles (809 km²), of which 307 square miles (795 km²) is land and 5 square miles (13 km²) (1.66%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 35,519 people, 14,207 households, and 10,101 families residing in the county. The population density was 116 people per square mile (45/km²). There were 15,814 housing units at an average density of 52 per square mile (20/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 98.40% White, 0.43% Black or African American, 0.11% Native
    7.75
    4 votes
    34
    Morgan County

    Morgan County

    Morgan County is a county located in the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 17,541. Its county seat is Berkeley Springs. The county is one of three in Hagerstown-Martinsburg, MD-WV Metropolitan Statistical Area. Morgan County was formed in 1820 from parts of Hampshire and Berkeley Counties and named in honor of General Daniel Morgan, prominent soldier of the American Revolutionary War. It is the home of an important mine producing special sand for the glass industry. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 230 square miles (595 km²), of which 229 square miles (593 km²) is land and 1 square mile (2 km²) (0.30%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 14,943 people, 6,145 households, and 4,344 families residing in the county. The population density was 65 people per square mile (25/km²). There were 8,076 housing units at an average density of 35 per square mile (14/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 98.30% White, 0.60% Black or African American, 0.17% Native American, 0.12% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.23% from other races, and 0.57% from two or more races. 0.83% of the population were Hispanic or
    7.75
    4 votes
    35
    Ohio County

    Ohio County

    Ohio County is a county located in the Northern Panhandle of West Virginia. Formed from the District of West Augusta, Virginia, in 1776. It was named for the Ohio River which forms its western boundary. West Liberty (formerly Black's Cabin) was the county seat from 1777 to 1797. The city of Wheeling, West Virginia has been the county seat since that time. As of 2010, the population was 44,443. Ohio County is part of the Wheeling, West Virginia metropolitan area. Ohio County is governed by a three-member county commission. The three county commissioners are elected from single-member magisterial districts and serve six-year terms, staggered so that one seat is up for election every even year. The County Commission annually chooses its own President. The Ohio County Commissioners in 2009 are David Sims, Tim McCormick, and Randy Wharton, all Democrats. Mr. McCormick was re-elected in November 2008. The county commission typically appoints a county administrator to oversee the daily executive duties for the Commission. The current county administrator is Greg Stewart. In addition to the three members of the county commission, other elected officials include a county clerk, currently
    7.75
    4 votes
    36
    Clinton County

    Clinton County

    Clinton County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was formed in 1836. As of 2010, the population was 10,272. Its name is in honor of the seventh Governor of New York State, DeWitt Clinton. Its county seat is Albany, Kentucky, and it is a prohibition or dry county. . According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 205.54 square miles (532.3 km), of which 197.46 square miles (511.4 km) (or 96.07%) is land and 8.09 square miles (21.0 km) (or 3.94%) is water. Clinton County was formed on February 20, 1836 from portions of Cumberland and Wayne counties. It was named for the governor of New York, DeWitt Clinton. As of the census of 2000, there were 9,634 people, 4,086 households, and 2,811 families residing in the county. The population density was 49 per square mile (19 /km). There were 4,888 housing units at an average density of 25 per square mile (9.7 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 99.09% White, 0.10% Black or African American, 0.25% Native American, 0.04% Asian, 0.11% Pacific Islander, 0.08% from other races, and 0.32% from two or more races. 1.22% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 4,086 households out of
    6.60
    5 votes
    37
    Rockingham County

    Rockingham County

    Rockingham County is a county located in the U.S. state of Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 76,314. Its county seat is Harrisonburg. Rockingham County is included in the Harrisonburg, Virginia, Metropolitan Statistical Area and is home of the Rockingham County Baseball League. Settlement of the county began in 1727, when Adam Miller (Mueller) staked out a claim on the south fork of the Shenandoah River, near the line that now divides Rockingham County from Page County. On a trip through eastern Virginia, the German-born Miller had heard reports about a lush valley to the west which had been discovered by Governor Alexander Spotswood's legendary Knights of the Golden Horseshoe Expedition, and then moved his family down from Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. In 1741, Miller purchased 820 acres (3.3 km), including a large lithia spring, near Elkton, VA, and lived on this property for the remainder of his life. Much-increased settlement of this portion of the Colony of Virginia by Europeans began in the 1740s and 1750s. Standing between the Tidewater and Piedmont regions to the east in Virginia and the Shenandoah Valley and the area beyond (known in old Virginia as the
    6.60
    5 votes
    38
    York County

    York County

    York County is a county located on the north side of the Virginia Peninsula in the Hampton Roads metropolitan area of the Commonwealth of Virginia, a state of the United States. Situated on the York River and many tributaries, the county seat is the unincorporated town of Yorktown. The county shares land borders with the independent cities of Williamsburg, Newport News and Poquoson, as well as James City County, and shares it border along the York River with Gloucester County. Formed in 1634 as one of the eight original shires (counties) of the Virginia Colony, York County is one of the oldest counties in the U.S. Yorktown is one of the three points of the Historic Triangle of Colonial Virginia, and the location where victory was accomplished in 1781 at the conclusion of the American Revolutionary War to gain independence from Great Britain. In modern times, the county is home to several important U.S. military installations. There are many miles of waterfront residential and recreational areas. York County adjoins the Busch Gardens Williamsburg theme park and includes within its borders the affiliated Water Country USA water park, Presidents Park, the Yorktown Riverfront area,
    6.60
    5 votes
    39
    Tucker County

    Tucker County

    Tucker County is a county located in the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 7,141. Its county seat is Parsons. Tucker County was created in 1856 from a part of Randolph County, then part of Virginia. In 1871, a small part of Barbour County, West Virginia, was transferred to Tucker County. The county was named after Henry St. George Tucker, Sr., a judge and Congressman from Williamsburg, Virginia. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 421 square miles (1,091 km²), of which 419 square miles (1,085 km²) is land and 2 square miles (6 km²) (0.53%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 7,321 people, 3,052 households, and 2,121 families residing in the county. The population density was 18 people per square mile (7/km²). There were 4,634 housing units at an average density of 11 per square mile (4/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 98.85% White, 0.07% Black or African American, 0.19% Native American, 0.01% Asian, 0.12% Pacific Islander, 0.10% from other races, and 0.66% from two or more races. 0.25% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 3,052 households out of which 27.00% had
    5.67
    6 votes
    40
    Grant County

    Grant County

    Grant County is a county located in the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 11,937. Its county seat is Petersburg. Grant County was created from Hardy County in 1866 and named for General Ulysses Simpson Grant. After the American Civil War, there was an effort by former Confederates to name it 'Lee County' instead after General Robert E. Lee, but the effort proved fruitless. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 480 square miles (1,243.2 km), of which 477 square miles (1,235.4 km) is land and 3 square miles (7.8 km) (0.62%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 11,299 people, 4,591 households, and 3,273 families residing in the county. The population density was 24 people per square mile (9/km²). There were 6,105 housing units at an average density of 13 per square mile (5/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 98.33% White, 0.67% Black or African American, 0.26% Native American, 0.14% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.13% from other races, and 0.45% from two or more races. 0.55% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 4,591 households out of which 30.20% had children under the
    7.50
    4 votes
    41
    Meade County

    Meade County

    Meade County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of 2010, the population was 28,602. Its county seat is Brandenburg. Meade County is part of the Louisville/Jefferson County, KY–IN Metropolitan Statistical Area. The county is named for Captain James M. Meade of the 17th U.S. Infantry Regiment, who was killed in action at the Battle of River Raisin during the War of 1812. All 56 miles (90 km) of the county's northern border face the Ohio River. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 324.22 square miles (839.7 km), of which 308.51 square miles (799.0 km) (or 95.15%) is land and 15.71 square miles (40.7 km) (or 4.85%) is water. The Regional planning group One Knox considers the largest road projects needed to support the growth from the BRAC realignment at Fort Knox to include extending Kentucky Route 313 to US 60 in Meade County and then into Brandenburg creating a corridor between Radcliff and Elizabethtown running parallel to U.S. Route 31W, and building a new extension from Bullion Boulevard in Fort Knox to KY 313 in Radcliff. The group estimates that buying the right of way for the KY 313 project to Brandenburg would cost nearly $30 million.
    7.50
    4 votes
    42
    Calloway County

    Calloway County

    Calloway County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was formed in 1823. As of 2010, the population was 37,191. Its county seat is Murray, Kentucky. The county is named for Colonel Richard Callaway, one of the founders of Boonesborough. It was created on November 3, 1822, from Hickman County. As of July 18, 2012 Calloway County is no longer a limited dry county, the sale of alcohol in the county is no longer prohibited. Calloway County is home to two school systems, the Murray Independent School District and the Calloway County School District. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 410.79 square miles (1,063.9 km), of which 386.25 square miles (1,000.4 km) (or 94.03%) is land and 24.53 square miles (63.5 km) (or 5.97%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 34,177 people, 13,862 households, and 8,594 families residing in the county. The population density was 88 per square mile (34 /km). There were 16,069 housing units at an average density of 42 per square mile (16 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 93.48% White, 3.56% Black or African American, 0.20% Native American, 1.33% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.46% from other
    8.67
    3 votes
    43
    Harrison County

    Harrison County

    Harrison County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was formed in 1794. As of 2010, the population was 18,846. Its county seat is Cynthiana. The county is named for Colonel Benjamin Harrison, an advocate for Kentucky statehood, framer of the Kentucky Constitution, and Kentucky legislator. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 309.88 square miles (802.6 km), of which 309.68 square miles (802.1 km) (or 99.94%) is land and 0.20 square miles (0.52 km) (or 0.06%) is water. Harrison County was formed on December 21, 1793 from portions of Bourbon County and Scott County. It was named after Colonel Benjamin Harrison, an early settler in the area. On June 11–12, 1864 the Civil War Battle of Cynthiana was fought near Kellar Bridge. On the first day, Confederate General John Hunt Morgan and his 1,200 Kentucky cavalrymen captured the town, making prisoners of its Union garrison and the entire 171st Ohio Infantry Regiment. Despite being low on ammunition, Morgan chose to stay and fight the enemy forces he knew were on their way. Union General Stephen G. Burbridge and his 2,400 cavalry and mounted infantry attacked him the next morning, driving the
    8.67
    3 votes
    44
    Oldham County

    Oldham County

    Oldham County is a county located in the commonwealth of Kentucky. The population was 60,316 in the 2010 Census. Its county seat is La Grange. The county is named for Colonel William Oldham. Oldham County was a prohibition or completely dry county until January 2005 as the result of a 2004 'moist' vote, permitting sales of alcohol in restaurants that seat at least 100 patrons in which 70%+ of total revenue is derived from sales of food. It is part of the Louisville/Jefferson County, KY–IN Metropolitan Statistical Area. Oldham County is the wealthiest county in Kentucky and 48th wealthiest county in the U.S. and ranks second highest in Kentucky for percent of college educated residences. While the causes for this are complicated, areas east of Louisville have long been popular with wealthy residents, first as summer residences eventually as year-round suburban estates and bedroom communities. Oldham County lies northeast of the best known of these areas, Anchorage, just outside of Louisville's East End. Oldham County was established on December 15, 1823 from parts of Henry, Jefferson, and Shelby Counties. It was the 74th Kentucky county, and was named in honor of Col. William Oldham
    8.67
    3 votes
    45
    Taylor County

    Taylor County

    Taylor County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of 2010, the population was 24,512. Its county seat is Campbellsville. The county is named for President Zachary Taylor, who served from 1849 to 1850. Taylor is a moist county. Selected restaurants serve alcoholic beverages. The Campbellsville Micropolitan Statistical Area includes all of Taylor County. It is represented in the Kentucky House of Representatives by the Republican John "Bam" Carney, an educator. Carney in 2009 succeeded fellow Republican Russ Mobley, a retired associate professor of theatre arts at Campbellsville University, in the position. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 277.05 square miles (717.6 km), of which 269.83 square miles (698.9 km) (or 97.39%) is land and 7.22 square miles (18.7 km) (or 2.61%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 22,927 people, 9,233 households, and 6,555 families residing in the county. The population density was 85 per square mile (33 /km). There were 10,180 housing units at an average density of 38 per square mile (15 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 93.62% White, 5.06% Black or African American, 0.10% Native American,
    8.67
    3 votes
    46
    Warren County

    Warren County

    Warren County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 37,575. Its county seat is Front Royal. This county is considered to be a distant part of the Washington Metropolitan Area. Warren County was established in 1836 by Lindsey Miranda. The county is named for Joseph Warren. During the Civil War the Battle of Front Royal took place in the county on May 23, 1862. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 216 square miles (560 km²), of which 214 square miles (553 km²) is land and 3 square miles (7 km²) (1.22%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 31,584 people, 12,087 households, and 8,521 families residing in the county. The population density was 148 people per square mile (57/km²). There were 13,299 housing units at an average density of 62 per square mile (24/km²). The demographics of the county is (2000) 92.71% White, 4.83% Black or African American, 0.27% Native American, 0.43% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.46% from other races, and 1.29% from two or more races. 1.56% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 12,087 households out of which 32.80% had children under the age
    8.67
    3 votes
    47
    Fleming County

    Fleming County

    Fleming County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was formed in 1798. As of 2010, the population was 14,348. Its county seat is Flemingsburg. The county is named for Colonel John Fleming. It's a prohibition or dry county. In 1998, the Kentucky General Assembly designated Fleming County as the Covered Bridge Capital of Kentucky. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 351.47 square miles (910.3 km) or 224,940.8 acres, of which 350.84 square miles (908.7 km) (or 99.82%) is land and 0.62 square miles (1.6 km) (or 0.18%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 13,792 people, 5,367 households, and 3,966 families residing in the county. The population density was 39 people per square mile (15/km²). There were 6,120 housing units at an average density of 17 per square mile (7/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 97.33% White, 1.41% Black or African American, 0.14% Native American, 0.17% Asian, 0.28% from other races, and 0.67% from two or more races. 0.75% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 5,367 households out of which 34.80% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.30% were married couples
    10.00
    2 votes
    48
    Ballard County

    Ballard County

    Ballard County is a county located in west of the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was created by the Kentucky State Legislature in 1842, and is named for Captain Bland Ballard, a soldier, statesman, and member of the Kentucky General Assembly. He was one of the few Kentucky volunteers to survive the notorious River Raisin Massacre during the War of 1812. Its county seat is Wickliffe, Kentucky. As of 2010 the population is 8,249. Ballard is a prohibition or dry county. Ballard County is part of the Paducah, KY-IL Micropolitan Statistical Area. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 273.60 square miles (708.6 km), of which 251.16 square miles (650.5 km) (or 91.80%) is land and 22.44 square miles (58.1 km) (or 8.20%) is water. Ballard County was formed from portions of Hickman County and McCracken County. It was named for Bland Ballard (1761–1853), a Kentucky pioneer and soldier who served as a scout for General George Rogers Clark during the American Revolutionary War, and later commanded a company during the War of 1812. On February 17, 1880, the courthouse was destroyed by a fire, which also destroyed most of the county's early records. As of the census of 2000,
    7.25
    4 votes
    49
    Greenup County

    Greenup County

    Greenup County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was formed in 1804. As of 2000, the population was 36,891. Its county seat is Greenup. The county is named in honor of Christopher Greenup. Greenup County is a part of the Huntington-Ashland, WV-KY-OH, Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). As of the 2000 census, the MSA had a population of 288,649. Greenup County was formed by an act of the General Assembly of Kentucky on December 12, 1803 from Mason County which covered the majority of eastern Kentucky at the time. Greenup County natives of note include: According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 354.51 square miles (918.2 km), of which 346.11 square miles (896.4 km) (or 97.63%) is land and 8.41 square miles (21.8 km) (or 2.37%) is water. U.S. Highway 23 is the primary route for travel through Greenup County. It enters Greenup County at the southeastern most point and follows the Ohio River north along the eastern border passing through Russell, Flatwoods, Raceland, Wurtland, and Greenup. It then exits just west of South Shore crossing the Ohio River again via the U.S. Grant Bridge into Portsmouth, Ohio and continuing north towards Columbus,
    7.25
    4 votes
    50
    Marshall County

    Marshall County

    Marshall County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of 2000, the population was 30,125. The 2007 Census Bureau population estimate was 31,258. Its county seat is Benton. It was a dry county until 2004, when residents of Calvert City voted to allow sales of liquor by the drink in restaurants. It is the only Purchase Area county to not border another state. The county was formed in 1842 from part of Calloway County. The first settlement was around 1818, when the area was bought from Native Americans as part of the Jackson Purchase. Marshall County was named in honor of Chief Justice John Marshall, who had died not long before the founding of the county. From its settlement until the 1930s, the county was nearly completely agricultural. The creation of Kentucky Lake by the Tennessee Valley Authority in the 1940s brought tourism and industry to the county with resorts along the lake. The Kentucky Dam's cheap and plentiful electricity also attracted chemical and manufacturing plants, mostly in the Calvert City area. The creation of the lake led to the destruction of two Marshall County towns: Birmingham, located about six miles north of the present day town of
    7.25
    4 votes
    51
    Montgomery County

    Montgomery County

    Montgomery County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. The population was 26,499 as of the 2010 Census. Its county seat is Mount Sterling. With regard to the sale of alcohol, it is classified as a moist county—a county in which alcohol sales are prohibited (a dry county), but containing a "wet" city where package alcohol sales are allowed, in this case Mount Sterling. Montgomery County is part of the Mount Sterling Micropolitan Statistical Area. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 198.80 square miles (514.9 km), of which 198.59 square miles (514.3 km) (or 99.89%) is land and 0.21 square miles (0.54 km) (or 0.11%) is water. Montgomery County was named in honor of Richard Montgomery, an American Revolutionary War Brigadier General killed in 1775 while attempting to capture Quebec City, Canada. An alternative story holds that the County was named for Thomas Montgomery, from Virginia, who served in the Revolutionary War. In 1793 Thomas Montgomery settled in Mt. Sterling. In 1805, Thomas Montgomery moved on to Gibson County, Indiana. As of the census of 2000, there were 22,554 people, 8,902 households, and 6,436 families residing in the county. The
    7.25
    4 votes
    52
    Cumberland County

    Cumberland County

    Cumberland County is a county located in the U.S. state of Maine. As of 2010, the population was 281,674. Its county seat is Portland, and is the most populous of the sixteen Maine counties, as well as the most affluent. Cumberland County has the deepest and second largest body of water in the state, Sebago Lake, which supplies tap water to most of the county. The county is the economic and industrial center of the state, having the resources of the Port of Portland, the Maine Mall, and having corporate headquarters of major companies such as Fairchild Semiconductor, IDEXX Laboratories, Unum, and TD Bank. Cumberland County is part of the Portland–South Portland–Biddeford, Maine, Metropolitan Statistical Area. Cumberland County was founded in 1760 from a portion of Yorkshire County. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 1,216.89 square miles (3,151.7 km), of which 835.51 square miles (2,164.0 km) (or 68.66%) is land and 381.38 square miles (987.8 km) (or 31.34%) is water. As of the census of 2000 , there were 265,612 people, 107,989 households, and 67,709 families residing in the county. The population density was 318 people per square mile (123/km²). There
    8.33
    3 votes
    53
    Halifax County

    Halifax County

    Halifax County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 36,241. Its county seat is Halifax. Occupied by varying cultures of indigenous peoples for thousands of years, in historic times English colonists encountered Siouan-speaking Native Americans. Halifax County was established in 1752 by English colonists from Lunenburg County. The county was named for George Montague-Dunk, 2nd Earl of Halifax. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 830 square miles (2,149.7 km), of which 819 square miles (2,121.2 km) is land and 10 square miles (25.9 km) (1.24%) is water. Through the 1990 Census, the City of South Boston in Halifax County was a separate county. South Boston became a town again and rejoined Halifax County on July 1, 1995. As of the census of 2000, there were 37,355 people, 15,018 households, and 10,512 families residing in the county. The population density was 46 people per square mile (18/km²). There were 16,953 housing units at an average density of 21 per square mile (8/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 60.32% White, 38.02% Black or African American, 0.20% Native American, 0.24% Asian, 0.01%
    8.33
    3 votes
    54
    Mercer County

    Mercer County

    Mercer County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of 2000, the population was 20,817. Its county seat is Harrodsburg. The county is named for General Hugh Mercer. It is a prohibition or dry county but Harrodsburg and Pleasant Hill allow the sale of alcohol by the drink. Pleasant Hill, also known as Shakertown, is the site of a former Shaker community, active especially during the antebellum years before the American Civil War. It is a National Historic Landmark District, consisting of more than 30 historic buildings. The property also includes acres of farm and parkland. 19th Regiment Kentucky Volunteer Infantry was organized at Camp Harwood in Harrodsburg, Kentucky and mustered in for a three-year enlistment on January 2, 1862 under the command of Colonel William J. Landram. Company D of the 192nd Tank Battalion in the Battle of Bataan was from Harrodsburg. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 253.11 square miles (655.6 km), of which 250.92 square miles (649.9 km) (or 99.13%) is land and 2.20 square miles (5.7 km) (or 0.87%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 20,817 people, 8,423 households, and 6,039 families residing in the
    8.33
    3 votes
    55
    Rowan County

    Rowan County

    Rowan County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of 2010, the population was 23,333. Its county seat is Morehead. The county was created in 1856 from adjacent counties originally part of Mason county, and named for John Rowan, who represented Kentucky in the U.S. House and Senate. With regard to the sale of alcohol, it is classified as a moist county—a county in which alcohol sales are prohibited (a dry county), but containing a "wet" city, in this case Morehead, where package alcohol sales are allowed. According to the 2010 census, the county has a total area of 286.25 square miles (741.4 km), of which 280.82 square miles (727.3 km) (or 98.10%) is land and 5.43 square miles (14.1 km) (or 1.90%) is water. Its highest point is "Limestone Knob" at about 1,409 feet (429 m) above mean sea level. As of the census of 2010, there were 23,333 people, and 7,956 households residing in the county. The population density was 83.4 per square mile (32.2 /km). There were 10,102 housing units at an average density of 34 per square mile (13 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 96.1% White, 1.5% Black or African American, 0.1% Native American, 0.8% Asian, 0% Pacific Islander,
    6.20
    5 votes
    56
    Amelia County

    Amelia County

    Amelia County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 12,690. Its county seat is Amelia Courthouse. Amelia County was created by a legislative act in 1734 and 1735 from parts of Prince George and Brunswick counties. The County is named for Princess Amelia of Great Britain, daughter of King George II. Twice Amelia County was reduced in size to form newer counties; in 1754, Prince Edward County was formed from parts of Amelia County, and in 1789, Nottoway County was formed. During the Civil War General Robert E. Lee and his Army spent April 4 and 5, 1865 at Amelia Courthouse before his surrender to General Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox. The last major battle of the war was fought at Sayler’s Creek on April 6. Amelia is known for its minerals, including the nation's best supply of Amazonite found at the Morefield mine. The Amelia County Fair was home to the world's largest potato pancake (with apple sauce) which was built to raise money for the German American National Scholarship Fund in 1986. It weighed over two and one quarter tons and used four truck loads of potatoes. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of
    9.50
    2 votes
    57
    Braxton County

    Braxton County

    Braxton County is a county located in the central part of the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 14,523. Braxton County was formed in 1836 from parts of Lewis, Kanawha, and Nicholas counties and named for Carter Braxton, a Virginia statesman and signer of the Declaration of Independence. The county seat is Sutton. The center of population of West Virginia is located in Braxton County, in the town of Gassaway . Important salt works were formerly located at Bulltown and here, in 1772, Captain Bull and his family and friendly Delaware Indians were massacred by frontiersmen. Jesse Hughes helped Jeremiah Carpenter and track and kill the Indians responsible for the Carpenter massacre. Jeremiah was a notable fiddle player who wrote a song Shelvin’ Rock about the experience of escaping to rock shelter. According to the Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 516 square miles (1,336.4 km), of which 513 square miles (1,328.7 km) is land and 3 square miles (7.8 km) (0.52%) is water. In 1950, 18,082 people lived in Braxton County. As of the census of 2000, there were 14,702 people, 5,771 households, and 4,097 families residing in the county. The
    9.50
    2 votes
    58
    Casey County

    Casey County

    Casey County is a county located in the U.S. Commonwealth of Kentucky. It was formed in 1807 from the western part of Lincoln County. As of 2010, the population was 15,955. Its county seat is Liberty, Kentucky. The county is named for Colonel William Casey, a pioneer settler who moved his family to Kentucky in 1779. It is the only Kentucky county entirely in Knobs region. Casey County is home to annual 'Casey County Apple Festival', and is a prohibition or dry county. It is considered part of the Appalachian region of Kentucky. The highest point in Casey County is Green River Knob at 1,789 feet (545 m). According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 445.73 square miles (1,154.4 km), of which 445.61 square miles (1,154.1 km) (or 99.97%) is land and 0.12 square miles (0.31 km) (or 0.03%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 15,447 people, 6,260 households, and 4,419 families residing in the county. The population density was 35 per square mile (14 /km). There were 7,242 housing units at an average density of 16 per square mile (6.2 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 98.30% White, 0.33% Black or African American, 0.28% Native American, 0.06% Asian, 0.05%
    9.50
    2 votes
    59
    Letcher County

    Letcher County

    Letcher County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of 2010, the population was 24,519, a decrease of 3.0% from the 2000 census. Its county seat is Whitesburg, population 1,600. The county is named for Robert P. Letcher, Governor of Kentucky from 1840-1844. It is a dry county, with the only exceptions being the Highland Winery, the city of Whitesburg, and the city of Jenkins. The killing of filmmaker Hugh O'Connor by a local landowner in 1967 brought Letcher County to national attention. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 339.12 square miles (878.3 km), of which 339.04 square miles (878.1 km) (or 99.98%) is land and 0.07 square miles (0.18 km) (or 0.02%) is water. Letcher County's natural areas include Bad Branch Falls and the Lilley Cornett Woods. In an effort to bring tourists to Letcher County and to revitalize the local economy, the Pioneer Horse Trail is currently under construction on Pine Mountain. The trail, part of an "adventure tourism" initiative spearheaded by Governor Steve Beshear, Beshear's wife Jane, and Lieutenant Governor Daniel Mongiardo, is scheduled for completion in the spring of 2009. However, controversy has arisen
    9.50
    2 votes
    60
    Wythe County

    Wythe County

    Wythe County is a county located in the U.S. state of Virginia. As of the 2010 Census, the population was 29,235. Its county seat is Wytheville. Wythe County was formed from Montgomery County in 1790. It was named after George Wythe, the first Virginian signer of the Declaration of Independence. During the Civil War the Battle of Cove Mountain was fought in the county. Wythe County is also home to the Austinville community which was founded by Stephen and his brother Moses Austin, father of the famous Stephen F. Austin. In the 1790s the Austins took over the mines that produced lead and zinc; the town was named for the Austin surname, and not for any one particular Austin of the brothers who bore that surname. Lead was mined and shipped throughout the fledgling country; lead shot was also produced. Located near Fosters Falls, Jackson Ferry Shot Tower still stands as a testament to the citizens of Wythe County. Lead was hoisted to the top of the tower using block and tackle and oxen. The lead was melted in a retort and then poured through a sieve at the top of the tower. The droplets of molten lead would become round during the 150-foot descent. The shot would collect in a kettle of
    7.00
    4 votes
    61
    Morgan County

    Morgan County

    Morgan County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of 2010, the population was 13,923. Its county seat is West Liberty. The county is among the dry counties, which means that the sale of alcohol is restricted or prohibited. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 383.73 square miles (993.9 km), of which 381.26 square miles (987.5 km) (or 99.36%) is land and 2.47 square miles (6.4 km) (or 0.64%) is water. Morgan County was formed on December 7, 1822 from portions of Bath County and Floyd County. It was named for Daniel Morgan, a general in the American Revolutionary War. The history of Christian Churches in the county was documented in A History of the Churches of Christ in Morgan County Kentucky, a thesis by Luke Bolin in 1941. That thesis included pictures of churches and group pictures of people associated with the Christian Churches. As of the census of 2000, there were 13,948 people, 4,752 households, and 3,568 families residing in the county. The population density was 37 per square mile (14 /km). There were 5,487 housing units at an average density of 14 per square mile (5.4 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 94.59% White, 4.38%
    6.00
    5 votes
    62
    Appomattox County

    Appomattox County

    Appomattox County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 14,973. Its county seat is Appomattox. For a long time, Appomattox was a prohibition or dry county. However, a law has recently been passed to permit the sale of alcohol. Appomattox County is part of the Lynchburg Metropolitan Statistical Area. Appomattox County was formed in 1845 from Buckingham, Prince Edward, Campbell and Charlotte Counties. In 1848, another part of Campbell County was added. It was named for the Appomattox River. On April 9, 1865, Confederate General Robert E. Lee met with Union General Ulysses S. Grant at the village of Appomattox Court House. The surrender of Lee took place at the McLean House, home of Wilmer McLean. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 335 square miles (867.6 km), of which 334 square miles (865.1 km) is land and 1 square mile (2.6 km) is water. The total area is 0.31% water. As of the census of 2000, there are 13,705 people, 5,322 households, and 4,012 families residing in the county. The population density is 41 people per square mile (16/km²). There are 5,828 housing units at an average density of 18 per
    8.00
    3 votes
    63
    Hardin County

    Hardin County

    Hardin County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was formed in 1793. As of the 2010 United States Census, the population was 105,543. Its county seat is at Elizabethtown. Hardin County is part of the Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Metropolitan Statistical Area, part of the overall Louisville metro area. The county is named for John Hardin, a Continental Army officer during the American Revolution. President Abraham Lincoln was born in what was then Hardin County near Hodgenville, now part of modern-day LaRue County. According to the 2010 census, the county has a total area of 630.14 square miles (1,632.1 km), of which 623.28 square miles (1,614.3 km) (or 98.91%) is land and 6.86 square miles (17.8 km) (or 1.09%) is water. Hardin County borders the most counties, and the most Kentucky counties, among the state's 120 counties. As of the census of 2010, there were 105,543 people, 39,853 households, and 28,288 families residing in the county. The population density was 167.5 per square mile (64.7 /km). There were 43,261 housing units at an average density of 68.7 per square mile (26.5 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 80.5% White (77.8% non-Hispanic), 11.6% Black
    8.00
    3 votes
    64
    Upshur County

    Upshur County

    Upshur County is a county located in the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 24,254. . Its county seat is the City of Buckhannon. Upshur County was formed in 1851 from Randolph, Barbour, and Lewis Counties and named for Abel Parker Upshur, a distinguished statesman and jurist of Virginia. Upshur served as United States Secretary of State and Secretary of the Navy under President John Tyler. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 355 square miles (919 km²), of which 355 square miles (919 km²) is land and 0 square miles (0 km²) (0.03%) is water. The county falls within the United States National Radio Quiet Zone. Upshur County's six districts were formed on July 31, 1863: As of the census of 2000, there were 23,404 people, 8,972 households, and 6,352 families residing in the county. The population density was 66 people per square mile (25/km²). There were 10,751 housing units at an average density of 30 per square mile (12/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 98.19% White, 0.62% Black or African American, 0.17% Native American, 0.31% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.13% from other races, and 0.58% from two or more
    8.00
    3 votes
    65
    Washington County

    Washington County

    Washington County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of 2000, the population was 10,916. Its county seat is Springfield. The county is named for George Washington. Washington County was the first county formed in the Commonwealth of Kentucky when it reached statehood. The center of population of Kentucky is located in Washington County, in the city of Willisburg. The county is dry, meaning that the sale of alcohol is prohibited, but it contains the "wet" city of Springfield, where retail alcohol sales are allowed. This classifies the jurisdiction as a moist county. Three wineries operate in the county and are licensed separately to sell to the public. Jacob Beam, founder of Jim Beam whiskey, sold his first barrel of whiskey in Washington County. The Washington County Courthouse, completed in 1816, is the oldest courthouse still in use in Kentucky. A significant county court record is the marriage bond of Thomas Lincoln and Nancy Hanks, parents of President Abraham Lincoln. The bond is dated June 10, 1806; it was written the day before the marriage in the small community of Beechland on the Little Beech River. The marriage return was signed by Jesse Head, the
    8.00
    3 votes
    66
    Buchanan County

    Buchanan County

    Buchanan County is a county located in the U.S. state of Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 24,098. Its county seat is Grundy. As of 2009, it was the poorest county in the state of Virginia and one of the 100 poorest counties in the United States, when ranked by median household income. The county was formed in 1858 from parts of Russell County and Tazewell County. It was named for James Buchanan, the 15th President of the United States.In 1880 the southwestern part of Buchanan County was combined with parts of Russell County and Wise County to become Dickenson County. Helen Timmons Henderson (1877–1925) helped participate in the work of the Buchanan Mission School at Council, Va. She and Sarah Lee Fain (1888–1962) of Norfolk became the first two women to be elected into the Virginia General Assembly. They were both Democrats in the House of Delegates. When Helen was in office, the delegates agreed to let 6.2 miles of improved road to be placed from Russell County, across Big "A" Mountain, to Council. Route 80 is also known as "Helen Henderson Highway,In 1876,Grundy was chosen and became the county seat of Buchanan County,it was named in honor of Felix Grundy,a Senator from
    6.75
    4 votes
    67
    Christian County

    Christian County

    Christian County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was formed in 1797. As of 2010, its population was 73,955. Its county seat is Hopkinsville, Kentucky. Christian County is part of the Clarksville, TN–KY Metropolitan Statistical Area. The county is named for Colonel William Christian, a native of Augusta County, Virginia, and a veteran of the Revolutionary War. He settled near Louisville, Kentucky in 1785, and was killed by Native Americans in southern Indiana in 1786. Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of America was born in Fairview, Christian County, as was Adlai E. Stevenson I. The United States Supreme Court case Barker v. Wingo, 407 U.S. 514 (1972), arose out of a 1958 double-murder in Christian County, Kentucky. In 2006 and 2008, tornadoes touched down across northern Christian County, damaging homes in the Crofton area. In 2017, northwestern Christian County will experience the longest duration of totality in the solar eclipse of August 21, 2017 that will cross North America. The center will be in the Bainbridge/Sinking Fork area of the county, on the Orchard Dale farm. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 724.01
    6.75
    4 votes
    68
    Nicholas County

    Nicholas County

    Nicholas County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of 2010, the population was 7,135. Its county seat is Carlisle. The county is named for George Nicholas, the "Father of the Kentucky Constitution". According to the 2010 census, the county has a total area of 196.85 square miles (509.8 km), of which 196.61 square miles (509.2 km) (or 99.88%) is land and 0.24 square miles (0.62 km) (or 0.12%) is water. As of the census of 2010, there were 7,135 people, 2,809 households, and 1,956 families residing in the county. The population density was 35 per square mile (14 /km). There were 3,261 housing units at an average density of 16 per square mile (6.2 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 97.9% White, 0.6% Black or African American, 0.1% Native American, 0.2% Asian, 0.5% from other races, and 0.7% from two or more races. 1.4% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 2,809 households out of which 29.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.60% were married couples living together, 11.10% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.9% had a male householder with no wife present, and 30.40% were non-families. 25.60% of
    6.75
    4 votes
    69
    Campbell County

    Campbell County

    Campbell County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was formed on December 17, 1794, from sections of Scott, Harrison and Mason counties. As of 2010, the population was 90,336. Its county seats are Alexandria and Newport. The county is named for Colonel John Campbell (1735–1799), Revolutionary War soldier. It is part of the Cincinnati-Northern Kentucky metropolitan area. Campbell County was founded December 17, 1794, two years after the creation of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, becoming the state's 19th county. Campbell County was carved out of Scott, Harrison and Mason counties. The original county included all of present Boone, Kenton, Pendleton, and most of Bracken and Grant counties. Campbell County is named in honor of John Campbell, an Irish immigrant who was a soldier, explorer, statesman and one of the drafters of the Kentucky Constitution. Wilmington, a pioneer settlement, was the original county seat of Campbell County from 1794 until 1797. Newport was the county seat of Campbell County, Kentucky from 1797 until 1823. The county seat was moved to Visalia in 1823, as it was the geographical center of the county at that time, but this was an unpopular
    9.00
    2 votes
    70
    Lancaster County

    Lancaster County

    Lancaster County is a county located on the Northern Neck in the Commonwealth of Virginia, a state in the United States. As of 2010, the population was 11,391. Its county seat is Lancaster. It is located near the mouth of the Rappahannock River. The county is part of the Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace wine-growing region recognized by the United States as an American Viticultural Area. Lancaster County is the most densely populated county in the Northern Neck. Lancaster County's largest town is Kilmarnock, Virginia. The county's area code is '804'. Lancaster County was established in 1651 from Northumberland and York counties. Historic attractions open to the public include the Mary Ball Washington Museum and Library, Belle Isle State Park and the eighteenth-century Christ Church). According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 231 square miles (598.3 km), of which 133 square miles (344.5 km) is land and 98 square miles (253.8 km) (42.45%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 11,567 people, 5,004 households, and 3,412 families residing in the county. The population density was 87 people per square mile (34/km²). There were 6,498 housing
    9.00
    2 votes
    71
    Wayne County

    Wayne County

    Wayne County is the westernmost county located in the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 42,481. Its county seat is Wayne. Wayne County is a part of the Huntington-Ashland, WV-KY-OH, Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). As of the 2000 census, the MSA had a population of 288,649. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 512 square miles (1,327 km²), of which 506 square miles (1,310 km²) is land and 6 square miles (17 km²) (1.25%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 42,903 people, 17,239 households, and 12,653 families residing in the county. The population density was 85 people per square mile (33/km²). There were 19,107 housing units at an average density of 38 per square mile (15/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 98.79% White, 0.13% Black or African American, 0.23% Native Americans, 0.20% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.08% from other races, and 0.56% from two or more races. 0.47% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 17,239 households out of which 31.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.20% were married couples living together, 10.80% had a female householder
    9.00
    2 votes
    72
    Buckingham County

    Buckingham County

    Buckingham County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia, USA. As of 2010, the population was 17,146. Its county seat is Buckingham. Peter Francisco, an American Revolutionary War soldier, grew up in the county. Buckingham County, lying south of the James River at the geographic center of the state, was established on May 1, 1761 from the southeastern portion of Albemarle County. The origin of the county name probably comes from the Duke of Buckingham (Buckinghamshire, England). Some sources say that the county was named for Archibald Cary's estate "Buckingham" which was located on Willis Creek. This is the only Buckingham County in the United States. In 1778 a small triangular area bordering the James River was given to Cumberland County. In 1845, another part was taken from Buckingham to form the northern portion of Appomattox County. A final adjustment of the Appomattox-Buckingham county line was made in 1860 and Buckingham's borders then became fixed in their current form. A fire destroyed the courthouse (designed by Thomas Jefferson) in 1869 and most of the early records of this county were lost. In the nineteenth century the county was devoted chiefly to large
    7.67
    3 votes
    73
    Franklin

    Franklin

    Franklin is an independent city in Virginia. The Bureau of Economic Analysis combines the city of Franklin with Southampton county for statistical purposes. The population was 8,582 in 2010. The city of Franklin had its humble beginnings in the 1830s as a railroad stop along the Blackwater River. During this era, the Blackwater River was used to transport goods to and from the Albemarle Sound in North Carolina. In 1862 the American Civil War came to Franklin, in what was referred to as the Joint Expedition Against Franklin As several United States Navy Flag steamships, led by the USS Commodore Perry, tried to pass through Franklin on the Blackwater River, a band of local Confederates opened fire on the ships. As stated by an officer aboard one of the ships, "The fighting was the same—Here and there high banks with dense foliage, a narrow and very crooked stream, with frequent heavy firing of musketry." In all, the battle yielded five naval casualites and 16 wounded. As the naval vessels retreated, the Confederates tried to block the narrow Blackwater River by felling large trees across the width. In the end, the Confederate attempts failed as no soldiers were captured and no ships
    7.67
    3 votes
    74
    Monroe County

    Monroe County

    Monroe County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of 2000, the population was 11,756. Its county seat is Tompkinsville. The county is named for President James Monroe. It is a prohibition or dry county. Monroe County is the only county of the 2,957 in the United States named for a President where the county seat is named for his Vice-President. The county was formed in 1820; and named for James Monroe the fifth President, author of the Monroe Doctrine. The county seat was named for Daniel Tompkins. Two terms for each covered 1817 - 1825. Confederate Gen. John Hunt Morgan's first Kentucky raid occurred here on July 9, 1862. Morgan's Raiders, coming from Tennessee, attacked Major Thomas J. Jordan's 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry at USA garrison. Raiders captured 30 of retreating enemy and destroyed tents and stores. They took 20 wagons, 50 mules, 40 horses, sugar and coffee supplies. At Glasgow they burned supplies, then went north, raiding 16 other towns before returning to Tennessee. President Abraham Lincoln's half third cousin, Thomas Lincoln (1780–1844), lived in the Meshack Creek area of present day Monroe County and served two terms as constable of Cumberland
    7.67
    3 votes
    75
    Androscoggin County

    Androscoggin County

    Androscoggin County is a county located in the U.S. state of Maine. As of the 2010 U.S. census, the county's population was 107,702. Its county seat is Auburn. It is included within the Lewiston-Auburn, Maine, Metropolitan Statistical Area and partially included within the Lewiston-Auburn, Maine, Metropolitan New England City and Town Area. Bates College is located in the Androscoggin County city of Lewiston. Demand for a new county emerged when the rapidly growing town of Lewiston complained of the long distance it had to travel to reach Wiscasset, the county seat of Lincoln County, which Lewiston was originally in. It was also an impractical circumstance as Lewiston's neighbor, Auburn, was part of Cumberland County. As the growing partnership of the two towns emerged, the case for the towns to be in the same county grew. Different plans were discussed, including Lewiston joining Cumberland County. Eventually, the idea of a new county came to the table. At this point in time there was a debate between which town the new county would be its center. With Bath, Brunswick, and Lewiston each pining for a county in which it was the center, Lewiston would eventually win the debate.
    10.00
    1 votes
    76
    Dinwiddie County

    Dinwiddie County

    Dinwiddie County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 28,001. Its county seat is Dinwiddie. The first inhabitants of the area were Paleo Indians, prior to 8000 BC. They are believed to have been nomadic hunter-gatherers following animal migrations. Early stone tools have been discovered in various fields within the county. At the time of European contact, Native Americans had territory in the region. Dinwiddie County was formed May 1, 1752 from Prince George County. The county is named for Robert Dinwiddie, Lieutenant Governor of Virginia, 1751–58. The county raised several militia units that would fight in the American Revolution. Dinwiddie County was the birthplace of Elizbeth (Burwell) Hobbs Keckly, a free black dressmaker who worked for two presidents' wives: Mrs. Jefferson Davis and later Mary Todd Lincoln. Thomas Day was also a native; he was well known later at Milton, North Carolina, as a free black cabinetmaker. Another native son was Dr. Thomas Stewart, perhaps America's first free black 18th-century rural physician. (Source Virginia Gazette Nov. 1778 as found in Freeafricanamericans.com) During the Civil War the Battle of
    10.00
    1 votes
    77
    Grant County

    Grant County

    Grant County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was formed in 1820. As of 2010, the population was 24,682. Its county seat is Williamstown. The county is named for Colonel John Grant. Grant County is a limited dry county, meaning that sale of alcohol in the county is prohibited, except in Crittenden, Corinth, Dry Ridge and Williamstown, where it is legal by the drink in restaurants seating at least 100 diners and deriving at least 70% of total sales from food. The Grant County News, established in 1906 and published in Williamstown, is preserved on microfilm by the University of Kentucky Libraries. The microfilm holdings are listed in a master negative database on the UK Libraries Preservation and Digital Programs website. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 260.79 square miles (675.4 km), of which 259.93 square miles (673.2 km) (or 99.67%) is land and 0.86 square miles (2.2 km) (or 0.33%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 22,384 people, 8,175 households, and 6,221 families residing in the county. The population density was 86 per square mile (33 /km). There were 9,306 housing units at an average density of 36 per square
    10.00
    1 votes
    78
    Mathews County

    Mathews County

    Mathews County is a county on the Middle Peninsula of the Hampton Roads metropolitan area of the U.S. state of Virginia. As of the 2010 Census, the population was 8,978. Its county seat is Mathews. Originally inhabited by the Chiskiake Indians, under Chief Powhatans rule, this area was transferred to English speaking persons under suspicious circumstances. After the death of his father(and tribal head), a young "boy king", and his "protector", with a name sounding like "Pindavako" to English ears, supposededly signed over the northern areas of the county to the invaders. This is highly suspect, since native people did not sign their names(no writing). This "gift" was likely made under the barrell of a gun. During Virginia's Colonial Era, the area which later became Mathews County was a portion of Gloucester County. The small town at Mathews Court House (also known as simply "Mathews") was originally named Westville, and was established around 1700. In 1691, the Virginia General Assembly had directed that each county designate an official port-of-entry. Westville was located along Put-in Creek, a waterway which is a tidal tributary of Virginia's East River, feeding into Mobjack Bay,
    10.00
    1 votes
    79
    Warren County

    Warren County

    Warren County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky, specifically the Pennyroyal Plateau and Western Coal Fields regions. It is included in the Bowling Green, Kentucky, Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 113,792 in the 2010 Census. The county seat is Bowling Green. The county would be dry, meaning that the sale of alcohol is prohibited, but contains the wet city of Bowling Green, where retail alcohol sales are allowed. Therefore, this makes Warren County a moist county. Warren County was the location of several Native American villages and burial mounds. The first white men to enter the area were the long hunters in the 1770s. General Elijah Covington was among the first landowners. McFadden's Station, one of the earliest settlements, was established in 1785 by Andrew McFadden on the northern bank of the Barren River at the Cumberland Trace. Warren County became the 23rd county of Kentucky on December 14, 1796, from a section of Logan County. It was named after General Joseph Warren of the Revolutionary War. He dispatched William Dawes and Paul Revere on their famous midnight ride to warn residents of the approaching British troops. He was also a hero of
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    1 votes
    80
    Madison County

    Madison County

    Madison County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. According to the 2010 census, the population was 82,916. Its county seat is Richmond. The county is named for Virginia statesman James Madison, who later became the fourth President of the United States. This is also where famous pioneer Daniel Boone lived and built Fort Boonesborough, now a state historic site. Madison County is part of the Richmond-Berea micropolitan area. It is considered a moist county, meaning that the county prohibits the sale of alcoholic beverages (a dry county), but contains a city where retail alcohol sales are allowed, specifically Richmond (although two of the city's 19 precincts are dry.). Alcohol can also be sold by the drink by the Arlington and Bull Run golf clubs. In addition, the Acres of Land Winery is authorized to make and sell wine, and is also allowed to sell beer and wine by the drink at its on-site restaurant. Madison County is home to Eastern Kentucky University and Bybee Pottery,(closed February 2011) one of the oldest pottery operations in the United States. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 443.11 square miles (1,147.6 km), of which 440.68
    6.50
    4 votes
    81
    Pendleton County

    Pendleton County

    Pendleton County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of 2010, the population was 14,877. Its county seat is Falmouth. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 281.87 square miles (730.0 km), of which 280.54 square miles (726.6 km) (or 99.53%) is land and 1.33 square miles (3.4 km) (or 0.47%) is water. Pendleton County was created from parts of Campbell County and Bracken County in 1798. The County was named after Edmund Pendleton (1721–1803), a longtime member of the Virginia House of Burgesses (1752–74), the Continental Congress and chief justice of Virginia. Falmouth, the future county seat, began as a settlement called Forks of Licking in about 1776. It was the site of the Battle of Blue Licks during the Revolutionary War. Native Americans who were helping the British ambushed Kentuckians on August 19, 1782 on the Licking River. In a matter of fifteen minutes, 60 were killed. Falmouth was chartered in 1793. Its name came from the Virginians who settled there from Falmouth, Virginia. It was also in 1793 that one of the first sawmills in Kentucky was built in Falmouth. Falmouth was designated the county seat in 1799. The county courthouse was
    6.50
    4 votes
    82
    Penobscot County

    Penobscot County

    Penobscot County is a county located in the U.S. state of Maine. For U.S. Census statistical purposes, it is part of the Bangor, Maine, New England County Metropolitan Area . As of 2010, the population was 153,923. Its county seat is Bangor. Penobscot County was established on 15 February 1816 from a portion of Hancock County. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 3,556.14 square miles (9,210.4 km), of which 3,395.73 square miles (8,794.9 km) (or 95.49%) is land and 160.41 square miles (415.5 km) (or 4.51%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 144,919 people, 58,096 households, and 37,820 families residing in the county. The population density was 43 people per square mile (16/km²). There were 66,847 housing units at an average density of 20 per square mile (8/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 96.60% White, 0.49% Black or African American, 1.00% Native American, 0.70% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.23% from other races, and 0.96% from two or more races. 0.61% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 17.8% were of English, 17.3% United States or American, 14.0% French, 13.0% Irish and 6.7% French Canadian ancestry according to
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    4 votes
    83
    Richmond County

    Richmond County

    Richmond County is a county located on the Northern Neck in the Commonwealth of Virginia, a state in the United States. As of 2010, the population was 9,254. Its county seat is Warsaw. The rural county should not be confused with the large city and state capital Richmond, Virginia, which is over an hour's drive away. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 216 square miles (560 km), of which 191 square miles (490 km) is land and 25 square miles (65 km) (11.52%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 8809 people, 2,937 households, and 2,000 families residing in the county. The population density was 46 people per square mile (18/km²). There were 3,512 housing units at an average density of 18 per square mile (7/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 64.77% White, 33.17% Black or African American, 0.09% Native American, 0.32% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 0.85% from other races, and 0.73% from two or more races. 2.10% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 2,937 households out of which 27.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.30% were married couples living together, 11.80% had a female householder
    6.50
    4 votes
    84
    Wetzel County

    Wetzel County

    Wetzel County is a county located in the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 16,583. Its county seat is New Martinsville. Its northern border is the Mason-Dixon line. The county is named for Lewis Wetzel, a famous frontiersman and Indian fighter. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 361 square miles (936 km²), of which 359 square miles (930 km²) is land and 2 square miles (6 km²) (0.59%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 17,693 people, 7,164 households, and 5,079 families residing in the county. The population density was 49 people per square mile (19/km²). There were 8,313 housing units at an average density of 23 per square mile (9/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 98.92% White, 0.08% Black or African American, 0.10% Native American, 0.32% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.03% from other races, and 0.53% from two or more races. 0.42% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 7,164 households out of which 30.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.70% were married couples living together, 9.30% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.10% were
    6.50
    4 votes
    85
    Brunswick County

    Brunswick County

    Brunswick County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 17,434. Its county seat is Lawrenceville. The first English settlers in Brunswick county swarmed into the lands near Fort Christanna during its 4 years of operation (1714–1718). Brunswick County was established in 1720 from Prince George County. In 1732 the county received more land from parts of Surry and Isle of Wight counties. The county is named for the former Duchy of Brunswick-Lunenburg in Germany, because one of the titles carried by Britain's Hanoverian kings was Duke of Brunswick-Lunenburg. Today Brunswick County is bisected by Interstate 85, U.S. 1 and U.S. Highway 58. Originally cultivated for tobacco by slave labor in colonial times, its mostly rural economy was diversified for lumber and other mixed farm crops before the American Civil War. Cotton is grown in the far south. The small Saint Paul's College, Virginia is located in the county, as well as a campus of Southside Virginia Community College. The Fort Pickett Army National Guard base is partly in the county. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 569 square miles (1,473.7 km), of
    8.50
    2 votes
    86
    Cabell County

    Cabell County

    Cabell County is a county located in the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 96,319. It was organized in 1809 and named for William H. Cabell, the Governor of Virginia from 1805 to 1808. Its county seat is Huntington. Cabell County is a part of the Huntington-Ashland, WV-KY-OH, Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). As of the 2000 census, the MSA had a population of 288,649. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 288 square miles (745.9 km), of which 282 square miles (730.4 km) is land and 6 square miles (15.5 km) (2.23%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 96,784 people, 41,180 households, and 25,490 families residing in the county. The population density was 344 people per square mile (133/km²). There were 45,615 housing units at an average density of 162 per square mile (63/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 93.37% White, 4.29% Black or African American, 0.18% Native American, 0.77% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.20% from other races, and 1.14% from two or more races. 0.68% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 41,180 households out of which 25.20% had children under the age of 18
    8.50
    2 votes
    87
    Clay County

    Clay County

    Clay County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was formed in 1807. As of 2010, the population was 21,730. Its name is in honor of Green Clay (1757–1826). Clay was a member of the Virginia and Kentucky State legislatures, first cousin once removed of Henry Clay, U.S. Senator from Kentucky and Secretary of State in the 19th century. Its county seat is Manchester, Kentucky. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 471.08 square miles (1,220.1 km), of which 471.01 square miles (1,219.9 km) (or 99.99%) is land and 0.07 square miles (0.18 km) (or 0.01%) is water. As of the census of 2010, there were 21,730 people, 8,556 households, and 6,442 families residing in the county. The population density was 52 people per square mile (20/km²). There were 9,439 housing units at an average density of 20 per square mile (8/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 93.92% White, 4.80% Black or African American, 0.21% Native American, 0.12% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.23% from other races, and 0.71% from two or more races. 1.36% of the population were Hispanics or Latinos of any race. There were 8,556 households out of which 36.90% had children under the
    8.50
    2 votes
    88
    Gloucester County

    Gloucester County

    Gloucester County is a growing metropolis within the Commonwealth of Virginia in the Hampton Roads metropolitan area in the USA. Formed in 1651 in the Virginia Colony, the county was named for Henry Stuart, Duke of Gloucester, third son of King Charles I of Great Britain. Located in the Middle Peninsula region, it borders the York River and the lower Chesapeake Bay. It is about 75 miles east of Virginia's capital, Richmond. According to the 2010 Census, the population is 36,858. The county seat is Gloucester Courthouse. Gloucester County has much history important to the Hampton Roads region of Virginia. It was the site of Werowocomoco, a capital of the large and powerful Native American Powhatan Confederacy, which affiliated 30 tribes under a paramount chief. It was home to members of early colonial First Families of Virginia and important leaders in the period up to the American Revolutionary War. Thomas Jefferson wrote early work for Virginia and colonial independence at Rosewell Plantation, then the home of John Page, his close friend and fellow student at the College of William and Mary. As the war concluded with the British surrender at Yorktown, directly across from
    8.50
    2 votes
    89
    Green County

    Green County

    Green County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was formed in 1793. As of 2010, the population was 11,258. Its county seat is Greensburg. The county is named for Revolutionary War hero General Nathanael Greene. Green is a prohibition or dry county. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 288.78 square miles (747.9 km), of which 288.66 square miles (747.6 km) (or 99.96%) is land and 0.12 square miles (0.31 km) (or 0.04%) is water. Green county is in the central time zone. As of the census of 2000, there were 11,518 people, 4,706 households, and 3,378 families residing in the county. The population density was 40 per square mile (15 /km). There were 5,420 housing units at an average density of 19 per square mile (7.3 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 96.19% White, 2.61% Black or African American, 0.10% Native American, 0.13% Asian, 0.31% from other races, and 0.65% from two or more races. 0.95% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 4,706 households out of which 29.90% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.70% were married couples living together, 8.50% had a female householder with no husband
    8.50
    2 votes
    90
    Hickman County

    Hickman County

    Hickman County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was formed in 1822. The elevation in the county ranges from 276 feet (84 m) to 510 feet (160 m) above sea level. As of 2010, the population was 4,902. Its county seat is Clinton. It is the least densely populated county in the state and is a prohibition or dry county. Hickman County was the seventy-first in order of formation. It was named for Captain Paschal Hickman of the 1st Rifle Regiment, Kentucky Militia. A resident of Franklin County, Kentucky, Hickman was wounded and captured at the Battle of Frenchtown in January 1813 and was killed by Indians in the Massacre of the River Raisin. Columbus, in the northwest of the county on the Mississippi River, was the original county seat. A log structure built in 1823 served as the courthouse. In 1830, the county seat was moved to the more centrally located Clinton. Early in the American Civil War, the Confederate Army established Fort de Russey on the strategically located bluffs across the river from Belmont, Missouri. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant attacked Belmont in November 1861 his first battle of the war, but was defeated by Confederate troops from Columbus. The site of
    8.50
    2 votes
    91
    Knox County

    Knox County

    Knox County is a county located in the U.S. state of Maine. As of 2010, the population was 39,736. Its county seat is Rockland. The county is named for American Revolutionary War general and Secretary of War Henry Knox, who lived in the county from 1795 until his death in 1806. The county was established on April 1, 1860, carved from parts of Waldo and Lincoln counties. The Union Fair, started in 1868, began as the efforts of the North Knox Agricultural and Horticultural Society. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 1,142.10 square miles (2,958.0 km), of which 365.67 square miles (947.1 km) (or 32.02%) is land and 776.43 square miles (2,010.9 km) (or 67.98%) is water. It was originally part of the Waldo Patent. As of the census of 2000, there were 39,618 people, 16,608 households, and 10,728 families residing in the county. The population density was 108 people per square mile (42/km²). There were 21,612 housing units at an average density of 59 per square mile (23/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 98.28% White, 0.24% Black or African American, 0.22% Native American, 0.36% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.12% from other races, and 0.78% from two or
    8.50
    2 votes
    92
    Martin County

    Martin County

    Martin County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of 2010, the population was 12,929. Its county seat is Inez. The county is named for Congressman John Preston Martin. It is a prohibition or dry county. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 230.81 square miles (597.8 km), of which 230.70 square miles (597.5 km) (or 99.95%) is land and 0.11 square miles (0.28 km) (or 0.05%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 12,578 people, 4,776 households, and 3,620 families residing in the county. The population density was 54 per square mile (21 /km). There were 5,551 housing units at an average density of 24 per square mile (9.3 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 99.25% White, 0.03% Black or African American, 0.06% Native American, 0.07% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 0.01% from other races, and 0.52% from two or more races. 0.62% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 4,776 households out of which 39.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.50% were married couples living together, 12.50% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.20% were non-families. 21.80% of all households
    8.50
    2 votes
    93
    Mason County

    Mason County

    Mason County is a county located in the U.S. state of [[West Virginia]. Before the Civil War, the county was located in the State of Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 27,324. Its county seat is Point Pleasant. The county was named for George Mason (1725–1792), one of the principal architects of the 1776 Virginia Constitution and known as "Father of the Bill of Rights". Mason County is part of the Point Pleasant, WV-OH Micropolitan Statistical Area. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 445 square miles (1,152 km²), of which 432 square miles (1,118 km²) is land and 13 square miles (34 km²) (2.91%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 25,957 people, 10,587 households, and 7,569 families residing in the county. The population density was 60 people per square mile (23/km²). There were 12,056 housing units at an average density of 28 per square mile (11/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 98.37% White, 0.50% Black or African American, 0.18% Native American, 0.27% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.11% from other races, and 0.56% from two or more races. 0.47% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 10,587
    8.50
    2 votes
    94
    Piscataquis County

    Piscataquis County

    Piscataquis County is a county located in the U.S. state of Maine. In 2010, its population was 17,535, making it Maine's least-populous county. Its county seat is Dover-Foxcroft. Piscataquis County was incorporated on 23 March 1838, taken from parts of adjacent Penobscot and Somerset counties. It is located at the geographic center of Maine. Originally it extended north to the Canadian border, but in 1844 its northern portion was annexed by Aroostook County. In land area, Piscataquis is one of the largest U.S. counties east of the Mississippi River. It is also one of two counties in the Northeast (and seven counties east of the Mississippi River) that meets Frederick Jackson Turner's requirements for "frontier" country - that is, having fewer than six inhabitants per square mile, the other being Hamilton County, New York. Piscataquis is an Abenaki word meaning "branch of the river" or "at the river branch." Baxter State Park, a large wilderness preserve, is located in Piscataquis County. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 4,377.36 square miles (11,337.3 km), of which 3,966.22 square miles (10,272.5 km) (or 90.61%) is land and 411.14 square miles
    8.50
    2 votes
    95
    Preston County

    Preston County

    Preston County is a county located in the U.S. state of West Virginia. It is part of the Morgantown, West Virginia, Metropolitan Statistical Area and the Pittsburgh DMA. It was formed from Monongalia County in 1818 and named for Virginia Governor James Patton Preston. As of the 2010 census, the population was 33,520. Its county seat is Kingwood. For media market purposes the county is defined entirely as part of the Pittsburgh market. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 651 square miles (1,687 km²), of which 648 square miles (1,679 km²) is land and 3 square miles (8 km²) (0.47%) is water. As of the census of 2010, there were 33,520 people, 12,895 households, and 9,038 families residing in the county. The population density was 52 people per square mile (20/km²). There were 15,097 housing units at an average density of 23 per square mile (9/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 97.63% White (97.13% non-Hispanic), 1.08% Black or African American, 0.19% Native American, 0.14% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.16% from other races, and 0.84% from two or more races. 0.68% of the population were Hispanics or Latinos of any race. There were 12,895
    8.50
    2 votes
    96
    Culpeper County

    Culpeper County

    Culpeper County is a county located in the central region of the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 46,689. Its county seat and largest population center is Culpeper, the only town in Culpeper County. Although the Town of Culpeper has experienced explosive growth in recent years the county as a whole has remained extremely rural. At the time of European encounter, the inhabitants of the area that became Culpeper County were a Siouan-speaking sub-group of the Manahoac tribe called the Tegninateo. Culpeper County was established in 1749 from Orange County. The county is named for Thomas Culpeper. During the Civil War the Battle of Cedar Mountain took place on August 9, 1862 and the Battle of Brandy Station on June 9, 1863, in Culpeper County. In May 1749, the first Culpeper Court convened in the home of Robert Coleman, not far from where the Town of Culpeper is presently located. In July 1749, 17-year-old George Washington was commissioned as the first County surveyor. One of his first duties was to lay out the County's courthouse complex, which included the courthouse, jail, stocks, gallows and accessory buildings. By 1752 the complex stood at what is presently
    7.33
    3 votes
    97
    Fulton County

    Fulton County

    Fulton County is the westernmost county of the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was formed in 1845 from Hickman County, Kentucky. As of 2000, the population was 7,752. Its county seat is Hickman. The county is named for American inventor Robert Fulton. Pro-Confederate during the American Civil War, Fulton County saw both armies pass through it during the conflict. Fulton County is part of the Union City, TN–KY Micropolitan Statistical Area. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 230.55 square miles (597.1 km), of which 208.95 square miles (541.2 km) (or 90.63%) is land and 21.60 square miles (55.9 km) (or 9.37%) is water. About 11 square miles (28 km) of the county is separated from the rest of the state by the Mississippi River, requiring travelers to cross into Tennessee by road (there is no bridge from Missouri), to reach the Kentucky Bend exclave. The lowest point in the state of Kentucky is located on the Mississippi River in Kentucky Bend in Fulton County, where it flows out of Kentucky and into Tennessee and Missouri. As of the census of 2000, there were 7,752 people, 3,237 households, and 2,113 families residing in the county. The population density was 37
    7.33
    3 votes
    98
    Livingston County

    Livingston County

    Livingston County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of 2000, the population was 9,804. Its county seat is Smithland. The county is named for Robert R. Livingston. It is a prohibition or dry county. Livingston County is part of the Paducah, KY-IL Micropolitan Statistical Area. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 342.20 square miles (886.3 km), of which 316.08 square miles (818.6 km) (or 92.37%) is land and 26.12 square miles (67.7 km) (or 7.63%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 9,804 people, 3,996 households, and 2,893 families residing in the county. The population density was 31 per square mile (12 /km). There were 4,772 housing units at an average density of 15 per square mile (5.8 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 98.49% White, 0.14% Black or African American, 0.42% Native American, 0.03% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.28% from other races, and 0.63% from two or more races. 0.75% of the population were Hispanics or Latinos of any race. There were 3,996 households out of which 29.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.40% were married couples living together, 7.90% had a female householder
    7.33
    3 votes
    99
    Mason County

    Mason County

    Mason County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of 2010, the population was 17,490. Its county seat is Maysville. The county is named for George Mason, a Virginia delegate to the U.S. Constitutional Convention, known as the "Father of the Bill of Rights". Mason County was partitioned from Bourbon County, Kentucky, in 1788. Mason County is part of the Maysville Micropolitan Statistical Area. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 246.60 square miles (638.7 km), of which 241.11 square miles (624.5 km) (or 97.77%) is land and 5.49 square miles (14.2 km) (or 2.23%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 16,800 people, 6,847 households, and 4,697 families residing in the county. The population density was 70 per square mile (27 /km). There were 7,754 housing units at an average density of 32 per square mile (12 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 90.88% White, 7.16% Black or African American, 0.15% Native American, 0.37% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.57% from other races, and 0.85% from two or more races. 0.95% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 6,847 households out of which 31.30% had children
    7.33
    3 votes
    100
    Shenandoah County

    Shenandoah County

    Shenandoah County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. It is part of the Shenandoah Valley region of Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 41,993. Its county seat is Woodstock. Shenandoah County was established in 1772, it was originally named Dunmore County for Virginia Governor Lord Dunmore. The county was renamed Shenandoah in 1778, named for the Senedos Indian tribe. During the Civil War the Battle of New Market took place May 15, 1864. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 513 square miles (1,327 km²), of which 512 square miles (1,327 km²) is land and 0 square miles (1 km²) (0.06%) is water. The Fort Valley and western slopes of the Massanutten Mountain are located within the county. As of the census of 2000, there were 35,075 people, 14,296 households, and 10,064 families residing in the county. The population density was 68 people per square mile (26/km²). There were 16,709 housing units at an average density of 33 per square mile (13/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 95.60% White, 1.17% Black or African American, 0.18% Native American, 0.35% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 1.79% from other races, and 0.89% from two or
    7.33
    3 votes
    101
    Smyth County

    Smyth County

    Smyth County is a county located in the U.S. state of Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 32,208. Its county seat is Marion. Smyth County was formed on February 23, 1832, from Washington and Wythe counties . The county is named after Alexander Smyth, a general during the War of 1812 who was elected to the state Senate and House of Delegates, and was a Representative to the United States Congress. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 452 square miles (1,170 km), of which 452 square miles (1,170 km) is land and 0 square miles (0 km) (0.05%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 33,081 people, 13,493 households, and 9,607 families residing in the county. The population density was 73 people per square mile (28/km²). There were 15,111 housing units at an average density of 33 per square mile (13/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 96.86% White, 1.87% Black or African American, 0.15% Native American, 0.18% Asian, 0.32% from other races, and 0.60% from two or more races. 0.86% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 13,493 households out of which 29.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.70%
    7.33
    3 votes
    102
    Clifton Forge

    Clifton Forge

    Clifton Forge is a town in Alleghany County, Virginia, United States which is part of the Roanoke Region. The population was 3,884 at the 2010 census. The Jackson River flows through the town, which as a result was once known as Jackson's River Station. Clifton Forge was an independent city during the 2000 census. However, in 2001, Clifton Forge gave up its city status and reverted to a town. In previous decades, the railroad was a major employer. Clifton Forge is known for its mountain views and clear streams. It is home to one of the original six state parks of Virginia, Douthat State Park, built during Franklin D. Roosevelt's presidency by the Civilian Conservation Corps. Amtrak, the national passenger rail service, provides service to the Clifton Forge station with the Cardinal route. Also Clifton Forge serves a major locomotive fuel facility for CSX Transportation and is home to the Chesapeake & Ohio Historical Society and C&O Railway Heritage Center. Clifton Forge is serviced by three major highways, Interstate 64, U.S. 60, and U.S. 220. Clifton Forge is located at 37°49′11″N 79°49′24″W / 37.81972°N 79.82333°W / 37.81972; -79.82333 (37.819801, -79.823584). According to the
    6.25
    4 votes
    103
    Logan County

    Logan County

    Logan County is a county located in the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 36,743. Its county seat is Logan. Logan County was formed in 1824 from parts of Giles, Tazewell, Cabell, and Kanawha counties. It is named for Chief Logan, famous Native American chief of the Mingo tribe. In 1921 it was the location of the Battle of Blair Mountain, one of the largest armed uprisings in U.S. history. More recently, the Buffalo Creek Flood of February 26, 1972, killed 125 people when a coal slurry dam burst under the pressure of heavy rains, releasing over 100,000,000 US gallons (380,000,000 L) of waste and water in a 30-foot (9.1 m) wave onto the valley below. The communities of Lorado and Lundale were destroyed and 14 other communities heavily damaged, including Saunders, Amherstdale, Crites, and Latrobe. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 456 square miles (1,180 km²). 454 square miles (1,176 km²) of it is land and 1 square mile (4 km²) of it (0.31%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 37,710 people, 14,880 households, and 10,936 families residing in the county. The population density was 83 people per square
    5.40
    5 votes
    104
    Buena Vista city

    Buena Vista city

    Buena Vista ( /ˌbjuːnəˈvɪstə/ BEW-nə-VIS-tə) is an independent city located within the confines of Rockbridge County, Virginia. The population was 6,650 in 2010. The Bureau of Economic Analysis combines the city of Buena Vista (along with Lexington) with Rockbridge County for statistical purposes. Buena Vista is located at 37°43′55″N 79°21′11″W / 37.73194°N 79.35306°W / 37.73194; -79.35306 (37.732184, -79.353325). The Maury River bisects Buena Vista, with the city proper to the east and Glen Maury Park to the west. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 6.8 square miles (18 km), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 6,349 people, 2,547 households, and 1,749 families residing in the city. The population density was 929.5 people per square mile (358.9/km²). There were 2,716 housing units at an average density of 397.6 per square mile (153.5/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 93.56% White, 4.80% Black or African American, 0.30% Native American, 0.43% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.08% from other races, and 0.82% from two or more races. 1.01% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 2,547 households
    7.00
    3 votes
    105
    Charlottesville

    Charlottesville

    Charlottesville is an independent city geographically surrounded by, but separate from, Albemarle County in Virginia, United States, and named after Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, the queen consort of King George III of the United Kingdom. The official population estimate for the city, calculated in 2010, was 43,475. It is the county seat of Albemarle County though the two are separate legal entities. The Bureau of Economic Analysis combines the city of Charlottesville with Albemarle County for statistical purposes, bringing the total population to 118,398. The city is the heart of the Charlottesville metropolitan area which includes Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene and Nelson counties. Charlottesville is best known as the home to two U.S. Presidents (Thomas Jefferson and James Monroe), and nearby is that of James Madison in Orange, as well as the home of the University of Virginia, which, along with Monticello is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Monticello, Jefferson's mountain-top home, attracts approximately half a million tourists every year. While both served as Governor of Virginia, they lived in Charlottesville and traveled to and from the capitol (Richmond, Virginia) along the
    7.00
    3 votes
    106
    Grayson County

    Grayson County

    Grayson County is a county located in the southwestern part of the Commonwealth of Virginia of the United States. As of 2010, the population was 15,533. Its county seat is Independence. Mount Rogers, the state's highest peak at 5,729 feet (1,746 m), is in Grayson County. Grayson County was founded in 1793 from part of Wythe County. It was named for William Grayson, delegate to the Continental Congress from 1784 to 1787 and one of the first two U.S. Senators from Virginia. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 446 square miles (1,155.1 km), of which 443 square miles (1,147.4 km) is land and 3 square miles (7.8 km) (0.73%) is water. The southernmost point in Virginia lies in Grayson County. As of the census of 2000, there were 17,917 people, 7,259 households, and 5,088 families residing in the county. The population density was 40 people per square mile (16/km²). There were 9,123 housing units at an average density of 21 per square mile (8/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 91.70% White, 6.79% Black or African American, 0.12% Native American, 0.07% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.70% from other races, and 0.60% from two or more races. 1.55% of
    7.00
    3 votes
    107
    Jessamine County

    Jessamine County

    Jessamine County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It is within the Inner Blue Grass region, which was the center of farming and blooded stock raising, including thoroughbred horses. It was formed in 1799. The population was 48,586 in the 2010 Census. Its county seat is Nicholasville. Jessamine County is part of the Lexington-Fayette, KY Metropolitan Statistical Area. With regard to the sale of alcohol, it is classified as a "moist county", where alcohol sales are prohibited (a dry county), but that contains a "wet" city, in this case Nicholasville, where package alcohol sales are allowed. The Chrisman Mill Vineyards is also authorized to operate and sell its product in the dry portion of the county. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 174.45 square miles (451.8 km), of which 173.13 square miles (448.4 km) (or 99.24%) is land and 1.32 square miles (3.4 km) (or 0.76%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 39,041 people, 13,867 households, and 10,663 families residing in the county. The population density was 226 per square mile (87 /km). There were 14,646 housing units at an average density of 85 per square mile (33 /km). The racial
    7.00
    3 votes
    108
    Bullitt County

    Bullitt County

    Bullitt County is a county in the U.S. state of Kentucky located in the far western Bluegrass region known as the Knobs, with an area of 300 square miles (780 km). The population was 74,319 in the 2010 Census. Just south of the city of Louisville, part of the Louisville metropolitan area commonly known as Kentuckiana, the county is home to several commuter towns including the cities of Hillview, Lebanon Junction, Mount Washington and Shepherdsville - the county seat. The western fifth of the county (40,000 acres (160 km)) is reserved for military training as part of the United States Army post of Fort Knox. The first inhabitants of the land that would become Bullitt County were the Paleo-Indians who entered North America approximately 11,500 to 10,000 years BP. These people, whose ancestors can be traced back to Central Asia, were nomadic, hunters and gatherers whose remains have been discovered near the area's mineral springs or salt licks where big game such as the mammoth, bison and ground sloth once gathered. Native Americans, including the Shawnee people who probably considered this region part of their homeland and certainly valued it as a hunting ground, were their
    6.00
    4 votes
    109
    Muhlenberg County

    Muhlenberg County

    Muhlenberg County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of the 2010 Census, the population was 31,499. The county is named for Peter Muhlenberg. Its county seat is Greenville. The Central City Micropolitan Statistical Area includes all of Muhlenberg County. Central City is the largest city in the county with a 2010 Census of 5,978 residents. Muhlenberg County is part of the Western Coal Fields region of Kentucky. According to the 2010 census, the county has a total area of 479.43 square miles (1,241.7 km), of which 474.72 square miles (1,229.5 km) (or 99.02%) is land and 4.71 square miles (12.2 km) (or 0.98%) is water. The two primary aquatic features of Muhlenberg County are the Green River and Lake Malone. The northern portion of the county is typically gently rolling hills, river flatlands, and some sizeable bald cypress swamps along Cypress Creek and its tributaries. The southern portion consist of rolling hills with higher relief. Many of the valleys in the southern part of the county are rather deep and in places and somewhat rugged. This area is also known for many sandstone formations and some small limestone caves, of which only two known limestone caves
    6.00
    4 votes
    110
    Nelson County

    Nelson County

    Nelson County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 15,020. Its county seat is Lovingston. It is also home to Wintergreen Resort, a local ski area; Swannanoa (mansion), a "summer home" for James H. Dooley of Richmond, VA; and is the location of Walton's Mountain made famous by the television show, The Waltons. Nelson County is also home to many thriving vineyards, a growing number of craft breweries, and Crabtree Falls. Nelson County is part of the Charlottesville Metropolitan Statistical Area. At the time of European encounter, the inhabitants of the area that became Nelson County were a Siouan-speaking tribe called the Nahyssan, who were likely connected to the Manahoac. Nelson County was established in 1807 when it was separated from Amherst County, and the government actually formed in 1808. The county is named for Thomas Nelson, Jr., a signer of the U.S. Declaration of Independence, who served as Governor of Virginia in 1781. An earlier Virginia county, also named to honor Governor Nelson, became part of Kentucky when that state was formed from Virginia in 1792. (see Nelson County, Kentucky). On the night of August 19–20, 1969,
    6.00
    4 votes
    111
    Doddridge County

    Doddridge County

    Doddridge County is a county located in the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 8,202. Its county seat is West Union. Doddridge County was created in 1845 from parts of Harrison, Tyler, Ritchie, and Lewis Counties, and named for Philip Doddridge (1773–1832), a distinguished statesman of Western Virginia, who spent the greater part of his life in Brooke County, West Virginia. Doddridge County is part of the Clarksburg, WV Micropolitan Statistical Area. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 320 square miles (828.8 km), of which 0.02% is water. James Caldwell, the first known landowner in what was to become Doddridge County, owned 20,000 acres in the area sometime prior to 1787. As of the census of 2000, there were 7,403 people, 2,845 households, and 2,102 families residing in the county. The population density was 23 people per square mile (9/km²). There were 3,661 housing units at an average density of 11 per square mile (4/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 98.31% White, 0.27% Black or African American, 0.31% Native American, 0.15% Asian, 0.14% from other races, and 0.82% from two or more races. 0.57% of the
    8.00
    2 votes
    112
    Owen County

    Owen County

    Owen County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. According to the 2010 Census, the population was 10,841. Its county seat is Owenton. The county is named for Colonel Abraham Owen. It is a prohibition or dry county, with the exception of a winery (Elk Creek Vineyards) that is authorized to sell its product to the public. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 354.16 square miles (917.3 km), of which 352.14 square miles (912.0 km) (or 99.43%) is land and 2.02 square miles (5.2 km) (or 0.57%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 10,547 people, 4,086 households, and 2,995 families residing in the county. The population density was 30 per square mile (12 /km). There were 5,345 housing units at an average density of 15 per square mile (5.8 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 97.03% White, 1.13% Black or African American, 0.27% Native American, 0.23% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.46% from other races, and 0.85% from two or more races. 1.00% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 4,086 households out of which 33.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.70% were married couples living
    8.00
    2 votes
    113
    Perry County

    Perry County

    Perry County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of 2010, the population was 28,712. Its county seat is Hazard. The county is named for Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry, a naval hero in the War of 1812. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 342.64 square miles (887.4 km), of which 342.15 square miles (886.2 km) (or 99.86%) is land and 0.49 square miles (1.3 km) (or 0.14%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 29,390 people, 11,460 households, and 8,491 families residing in the county. The population density was 86 per square mile (33 /km). There were 12,741 housing units at an average density of 37 per square mile (14 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 97.34% White, 1.64% Black or African American, 0.05% Native American, 0.49% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.04% from other races, and 0.43% from two or more races. 0.52% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 11,460 households out of which 34.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.70% were married couples living together, 13.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.90% were non-families. 23.30% of all households
    8.00
    2 votes
    114
    Union County

    Union County

    Union County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was formed in 1811. As of 2010, the population was 15,007. Its county seat is Morganfield. Union County is part of the Western Coal Fields region of Kentucky. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 363.43 square miles (941.3 km), of which 345.10 square miles (893.8 km) (or 94.96%) is land and 18.33 square miles (47.5 km) (or 5.04%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 15,637 people, 5,710 households, and 4,082 families residing in the county. The population density was 45 per square mile (17 /km). There were 6,234 housing units at an average density of 18 per square mile (6.9 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 85.04% White, 12.89% Black or African American, 0.17% Native American, 0.15% Asian, 0.39% from other races, and 1.37% from two or more races. 1.56% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 5,710 households out of which 32.10% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.50% were married couples living together, 11.40% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.50% were non-families. 26.10% of all households were made up of
    8.00
    2 votes
    115
    Webster County

    Webster County

    Webster County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. Webster County was formed in 1860 from parts of the counties of Henderson, Hopkins, and Union. As of 2000, the population is 14,120. Its county seat is Dixon. The county was named for American statesman Daniel Webster (1782-1852). It was mainly pro-Confederate during the American Civil War and was the site several skirmishes and some guerrilla warfare. It is a prohibition or dry county. Webster County is part of the Evansville, IN-KY Metropolitan Statistical Area. Webster County is part of the Western Coal Fields region of Kentucky. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 335.68 square miles (869.4 km), of which 334.75 square miles (867.0 km) (or 99.72%) is land and 0.93 square miles (2.4 km) (or 0.28%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 14,120 people, 5,560 households, and 4,053 families residing in the county. The population density was 42 per square mile (16 /km). There were 6,250 housing units at an average density of 19 per square mile (7.3 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 93.63% White, 4.67% Black or African American, 0.11% Native American, 0.06% Asian, 0.08% Pacific
    8.00
    2 votes
    116
    Bedford

    Bedford

    Bedford is an independent city located within the confines of Bedford County in the U.S. state of Virginia. It serves as the county seat of Bedford County. As of the 2010 census, the city had a total population of 6,222. The Bureau of Economic Analysis combines the city of Bedford with surrounding Bedford county for statistical purposes. It is part of the Lynchburg Metropolitan Statistical Area. Bedford is home to the National D-Day Memorial. (despite the "National" in its name, the memorial is owned and operated by a Non-governmental, non-profit, education foundation). The United States Congress warranted that this memorial would be the nation's D-Day Memorial and President Bill Clinton authorized this effort in September 1996. President George W. Bush dedicated this memorial as the nation's D-Day memorial on June 6, 2001. Bedford lost more residents per capita in the Normandy landings than any other American community. Nineteen soldiers from Bedford, whose 1944 population was about 3,200, were killed on D-Day. Three other Bedford soldiers died later in the Normandy campaign. Proportionally this community suffered the nation's severest D-Day losses. Bedford City and County
    9.00
    1 votes
    117
    Boone County

    Boone County

    Boone County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was formed in 1798. The population was 118,811 in the 2010 Census. Its county seat is Burlington. The county is named for frontiersman Daniel Boone. It is the location of the headquarters of Comair and the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport, which serves Cincinnati and the tri-state area. It is part of the Cincinnati-Northern Kentucky metropolitan area. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 256.96 square miles (665.5 km), of which 246.26 square miles (637.8 km) (or 95.84%) is land and 10.70 square miles (27.7 km) (or 4.16%) is water. Its location along the Ohio River was key to its early development, as the river was the major transportation route. As of the census of 2000, there were 85,991 people, 31,258 households, and 23,443 families residing in the county. The population density was 349 per square mile (135 /km). There were 33,351 housing units at an average density of 135 per square mile (52 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 95.15% White, 1.52% Black or African American, 0.23% Native American, 1.29% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.75% from other races, and 1.03%
    9.00
    1 votes
    118
    Bracken County

    Bracken County

    Bracken County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was formed in 1797. The population was 8,488 in the 2010 Census. Its county seat is Brooksville, Kentucky. Bracken County was organized as Kentucky's 23rd county in 1796 from parts of Mason and Campbell counties. It is named for William Bracken, an 18th century explorer and surveyor who visited the area in 1773. He was later killed by Indians during the Northwest Indian War. The county originally extended to southern Nicholas County, north to the Ohio River, west to the Licking River and east to Dover, Kentucky. Several early settlers were veterans of the American Revolutionary War, including Captain Abner Howell, who brought his family came from Pennsylvania. He died in Bracken County in 1797. The county government moved from Augusta to Woodward's Crossing (now Brooksville) in 1833. Bracken was the birthplace on Sept. 9, 1816 of John Gregg Fee, founder of Berea College and Kentucky'`s most noted abolitionist. He was a graduate of Augusta College and Lane Theological Seminary. In 1822 Augusta College was founded as the first Methodist College in the world. Anti-slavery activists in Bracken County played a major
    9.00
    1 votes
    119
    Caldwell County

    Caldwell County

    Caldwell County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was formed in 1809 from Livingston County, Kentucky. As of 2010, the population was 12,984. Its county seat is Princeton, Kentucky. The county is named for John Caldwell, who participated in the George Rogers Clark Indian Campaign of 1786 and was the second lieutenant governor of Kentucky. Caldwell is a prohibition or dry county. Caldwell County was formed from Livingston County in 1809. Prior to that, Caldwell County had been part of Christian, Logan, and Lincoln Counties — Lincoln County having been one of the three original counties of Kentucky. In the early nineteenth-century, Caldwell County witnessed the passage of the forced migration of the Cherokee to the West on the Trail of Tears during Indian removal. The Cherokee camped for several weeks in Caldwell County during the winter of 1838, mainly at Big Springs, now in downtown Princeton; at Skin Frame Creek, and in the Centerville area near Fredonia. In 1860, the construction of Princeton College began, but it was delayed by the Civil War. Confederate troops camped on the grounds of Princeton College in 1861, using one of its buildings as a hospital.
    9.00
    1 votes
    120
    Knox County

    Knox County

    Knox County is a county located near the southeastern corner of the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of 2010, the population was 31,883. Its county seat is Barbourville. The county is named for General Henry Knox. It is a prohibition or dry county, with the exception of the portion of the city of Corbin that lies within Knox County. The city had voted in 2006 to allow sales of alcohol by the drink in qualifying restaurants, and then approved full retail sales in 2012. It is one of the few coal-producing counties in Kentucky not to experience massive population loss. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 387.71 square miles (1,004.2 km), of which 387.66 square miles (1,004.0 km) (or 99.99%) is land and 0.04 square miles (0.10 km) (or 0.01%) is water. Knox County was formed on December 19, 1799 from portions of Lincoln County. It was named for Henry Knox, a general and United States Secretary of War. The Civil War Battle of Barbourville was fought on September 19, 1861 between 800 Confederate soldiers from General Felix Zollicoffer's command and 300 Union troops who attempted to defend the Union's Camp Dick Robinson. The Union men tore up the planks on the bridge in
    9.00
    1 votes
    121
    Lunenburg County

    Lunenburg County

    Lunenburg County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 12,914. Its county seat is Lunenburg. Lunenburg County was established on May 1, 1746, from Brunswick County. The county is named for the former Duchy of Brunswick-Lunenburg in Germany, because one of the titles also carried by Britain's Hanoverian kings was Duke of Brunswick-Lunenburg. It is nicknamed "The Old Free State" as during the build up of the Civil War, it let Virginia know it would break off and join North Carolina if they did not join The Confederacy. Among the earliest settlers of the county was William Taylor, born in King William County, Virginia. He was the son of Rev. Daniel Taylor, a Virginia native and Anglican priest educated at Trinity College, Cambridge University in England, and his wife Alice (Littlepage) Taylor. William Taylor married Martha Waller, a daughter of Benjamin Waller of Williamsburg, Virginia. In 1760 Taylor purchased three adjoining tracts of land in Lunenburg County totaling 827 acres (3.35 km). Taylor soon became one of the county's leading citizens, representing Lunenburg in the Virginia House of Burgesses from 1765 until 1768. In that
    9.00
    1 votes
    122
    Mineral County

    Mineral County

    Mineral County is a county located in the U.S. state of West Virginia. It is part of the Cumberland, MD-WV Metropolitan Statistical Area. As of 2010, the population was 28,212. Its county seat is Keyser. Indigenous peoples lived throughout the highlands along rivers in this area for thousands of years. Archeologists have identified artifacts of the Adena culture, dating from 1000 BC to 200 BC. They were among the several early Native American cultures who built major earthwork mounds for ceremonial and burial use. Remnants of their culture have been found throughout West Virginia. They were followed by other indigenous peoples. With the growth of fur trading to the north after European encounter in the coastal areas, the nations of the Haudenosaunee (or Iroquois Confederacy), based in present-day New York, moved into the Ohio Valley in search of new hunting grounds. By the 17th century they had conquered other tribes, pushed them out to the west, and preserved the area for hunting. John Lederer, a German physician and explorer employed by Sir William Berkeley, colonial governor of Virginia, is believed to be the first European to set foot in present-day Mineral County. He explored
    9.00
    1 votes
    123
    Montgomery County

    Montgomery County

    Montgomery County is a county located in the U.S. state of Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 94,392. Its county seat is Christiansburg. It is part of the Blacksburg–Christiansburg–Radford Metropolitan Statistical Area which encompasses all of Montgomery County and the city of Radford. Montgomery County was established in 1777 from Fincastle County. The county is named for Richard Montgomery, an American Revolutionary War general killed in 1775 while attempting to capture Quebec City, Canada. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 389 square miles (1,009 km²), of which 388 square miles (1,005 km²) is land and 1 square mile (3 km²) (0.31%) is water. The county is bordered by Craig County to the north, Floyd County to the south, Giles County to the northwest, the City of Radford and Pulaski County to the southwest, and Roanoke County to the east. As of the census of 2000, there were 83,629 people, 30,997 households, and 17,203 families residing in the county. The population density was 215 people per square mile (83/km²). There were 32,527 housing units at an average density of 84 per square mile (32/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 90.00%
    9.00
    1 votes
    124
    Roane County

    Roane County

    Roane County is a county located in the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 14,926. Its county seat is Spencer. Roane County was created by an act of the Virginia General Assembly on March 11, 1856. It was named for the jurist Spencer Roane of Virginia, born in Essex County April 4, 1762. The county's seat Spencer was also named for judge Roane. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 484 square miles (1,253 km²), of which 484 square miles (1,252 km²) is land and 0 square miles (0 km²) (0.04%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 15,446 people, 6,161 households, and 4,479 families residing in the county. The population density was 32 people per square mile (12/km²). There were 7,360 housing units at an average density of 15 per square mile (6/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 98.56% White, 0.22% Black or African American, 0.21% Native American, 0.23% Asian, 0.19% from other races, and 0.60% from two or more races. 0.67% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 6,161 households out of which 30.70% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.10% were married couples
    9.00
    1 votes
    125
    Scott County

    Scott County

    Scott County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. The population was 47,173 in the 2010 Census. Its county seat is Georgetown. Scott County is part of the Lexington–Fayette Metropolitan Statistical Area. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 285.30 square miles (738.9 km), of which 284.72 square miles (737.4 km) (or 99.80%) is land and 0.57 square miles (1.5 km) (or 0.20%) is water. Scott County was explored as early as 1774. One of the early settlers was John McClelland of Pennsylvania. The area became subject to hostile Indian attacks, and was abandoned by 1777. In 1783, Robert Johnson established the first permanent settlement at Johnson's Station. In 1786, Maryland Catholics established the second parish in Kentucky at St. Francis, Kentucky. Scott County was formed in 1792. It was one of the first counties created after Statehood. It was named for Revolutionary War hero, Gen. Charles Scott, who led the Kentucky Militia at the disastrous Battle of the Wabash in 1791. Gen. Scott went on to the 1794 victory at the Battle of Fallen Timbers, and served as Governor from 1808 - 1812. In 1825, the Choctaw Nation established the Choctaw Academy at
    9.00
    1 votes
    126
    Spotsylvania County

    Spotsylvania County

    Spotsylvania County is a county in the U.S. state of Virginia. As of the 2000 census, the population was 90,395, growing to 122,397 by 2010, a 35.40% increase since 2000, making it the 84th fastest growing county in the nation during this time period.. Its county seat is Spotsylvania Courthouse. The independent city of Fredericksburg is located northeast of the county but is politically separate. The county is a part of the Washington Metropolitan Area. A number of commuters travel north on Interstate 95 or the Virginia Railway Express (VRE) for work in Washington, D.C. . At the time of European encounter, the inhabitants of the area that became Spotsylvania County were a Siouan-speaking tribe called the Manahoac. Spotsylvania County was established in 1721 from Essex, King and Queen, and King William counties. The county was named in Latin for Lieutenant Governor of Virginia Alexander Spotswood. Many battles were fought in this county during the Civil War, including the battles of Chancellorsville, the Wilderness, Fredericksburg, and Spotsylvania Court House. Stonewall Jackson was shot and mortally wounded in Spotsylvania County during the Battle of Chancellorsville. A group of
    9.00
    1 votes
    127
    Chesapeake

    Chesapeake

    Chesapeake is an independent city located in the South Hampton Roads portion of the Hampton Roads metropolitan area of Virginia in the United States. One of the cities Hampton Roads, Chesapeake was formed in 1963 by a political consolidation of the city of South Norfolk with the former Norfolk County, which dated to 1691. Chesapeake is the second-largest city by land area in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Chesapeake is a diverse city with few urban areas as well as many square miles of protected farmland, forests, and wetlands, including a substantial portion of the Great Dismal Swamp. Extending all the way from the rural border with North Carolina to the harbor area of Hampton Roads adjacent to the cities of Norfolk and Portsmouth, Chesapeake is located on the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway and has miles of waterfront industrial, commercial and residential property. It is currently the third largest city in Virginia in terms of population. According to the 2010 Census, its population is 222,209. In 2011, Chesapeake was named the 21st best city in America by Bloomberg Businessweek In 1963, the new independent city of Chesapeake was created when the former independent city of South
    6.67
    3 votes
    128
    Franklin County

    Franklin County

    Franklin County is a county located in the U.S. state of Maine. As of 2010, the population was 30,768. Its county seat is Farmington. Franklin County was established on 9 May 1838. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 1,744.31 square miles (4,517.7 km), of which 1,697.81 square miles (4,397.3 km) (or 97.33%) is land and 46.50 square miles (120.4 km) (or 2.67%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 29,467 people, 11,806 households, and 7,744 families residing in the county. The population density was 17 people per square mile (7/km²). There were 19,159 housing units at an average density of 11 per square mile (4/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 97.96% White, 0.24% Black or African American, 0.37% Native American, 0.43% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.17% from other races, and 0.81% from two or more races. 0.54% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 26.3% were of English, 13.8% United States or American, 12.2% French, 9.2% Irish, 7.9% French Canadian, and 5.3% Scottish ancestry according to Census 2000. 95.7% spoke English and 2.9% French as their first language. There were 11,806 households out of which 29.50% had children
    6.67
    3 votes
    129
    Henderson County

    Henderson County

    Henderson County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was formed in 1799. As the latest census data update of 2010, the population was counted 46,250. The county seat is the City of Henderson. The county was named for Colonel Richard Henderson who originally purchased 17,000,000 acres (69,000 km) of land from the Cherokee Indians, only to have the purchase voided by the Virginia legislature. Then, in 1778, the Richard Henderson Company was granted 200,000 acres (810 km) in recognition of the $50,000 paid by the company to the Cherokee Indians in the Treaty of Watauga. Land in that grant is included in the present boundary of Henderson County. Henderson County is part of the Evansville-Henderson, IN-KY Metropolitan Statistical Area. The Kentucky clergyman and university president LaVerne Butler was born in Henderson County in 1926. Henderson County is part of the Western Coal Fields region of Kentucky. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 467.24 square miles (1,210.1 km), of which 440.12 square miles (1,139.9 km) (or 94.20%) is land and 27.11 square miles (70.2 km) (or 5.80%) is water. Also the home of the Southern Cherokee Nation in 1893 the
    6.67
    3 votes
    130
    Pleasants County

    Pleasants County

    Pleasants County is a county located in the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 7,605. Its county seat is St. Marys. It was created by the Virginia General Assembly in 1851 and named for US Senator and Virginia Governor James Pleasants, Jr. Pleasants County is included in the Parkersburg-Marietta-Vienna, West Virginia-Ohio (part) Metropolitan Statistical Area. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 135 square miles (349 km²), of which 131 square miles (339 km²) is land and 4 square miles (10 km²) (2.87%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 7,514 people, 2,887 households, and 2,136 families residing in the county. The population density was 58 people per square mile (22/km²). There were 3,214 housing units at an average density of 25 per square mile (9/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 98.30% White, 0.48% Black or African American, 0.47% Native American, 0.20% Asian, 0.07% from other races, and 0.49% from two or more races. 0.37% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 2,887 households out of which 32.70% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.10% were married couples
    6.67
    3 votes
    131
    Washington County

    Washington County

    Washington County is a county located in the U.S. state of Maine. In 2010, its population was 32,856. Its county seat is Machias. It is sometimes referred to as "Sunrise County" because it is the easternmost county in the United States, and it is often where the rising sun first shines on the 48 contiguous states. Many small seaside communities have small-scale fishing-based economies. Tourism is also important along the county's shoreline, but it is not as important as elsewhere in the state. The blueberry crop plays a major role in the county's economy; nearly 85% of the world's supply of wild blueberries comes from Washington County. Washington County was established on June 25, 1789. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 3,254.91 square miles (8,430.2 km), of which 2,568.48 square miles (6,652.3 km) (or 78.91%) is land and 686.44 square miles (1,777.9 km) (or 21.09%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 33,941 people, 14,118 households, and 9,303 families residing in the county. The population density was 13 people per square mile (5/km²). There were 21,919 housing units at an average density of 8 per square mile (3/km²). The racial makeup of
    6.67
    3 votes
    132
    Hart County

    Hart County

    Hart County is a county located in the U.S. state — or, more correctly, "Commonwealth" — of Kentucky. It was formed in 1819. As of 2000, the population was 17,445. Its county seat is Munfordville. The county is named for Captain Nathaniel G. S. Hart, a Kentucky militia officer in the War of 1812 who was wounded at the Battle of Frenchtown and died in the Massacre of the River Raisin. The Battle of Munfordville, a Confederate victory, was fought in the county in 1862, during the American Civil War. Hart County is a prohibition or dry county. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 417.91 square miles (1,082.4 km), of which 415.93 square miles (1,077.3 km) (or 99.53%) is land and 1.98 square miles (5.1 km) (or 0.47%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 17,445 people, 6,769 households, and 4,812 families residing in the county. The population density was 42 per square mile (16 /km). There were 8,045 housing units at an average density of 19 per square mile (7.3 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 92.58% White, 6.20% Black or African American, 0.22% Native American, 0.11% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.18% from other races, and 0.69% from two or
    5.75
    4 votes
    133
    Lawrence County

    Lawrence County

    Lawrence County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of 2010, the population was 15,860. Its county seat is Louisa. The county is named for James Lawrence, and co-founded by Isaac Bolt, who served as a Lawrence County Commissioner and Justice of the Peace. It is the home of country music star Ricky Skaggs. It is the birthplace of the late Chief Justice of the United States Frederick Moore Vinson and former Kentucky Governor Paul E. Patton. In regard to alcohol sales, Lawrence County is a dry county, meaning the sale of alcoholic beverages is prohibited everywhere in the county. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 420.12 square miles (1,088.1 km), of which 418.78 square miles (1,084.6 km) (or 99.68%) is land and 1.35 square miles (3.5 km) (or 0.32%) is water. The bridge from Louisa, in eastern Lawrence County, to Fort Gay, West Virginia is something of a geographic and architectural oddity. The quarter-mile concrete span spans two forks of the Big Sandy River, connects two states and has a right turn at its halfway point, which connects traffic to the Point Section neighborhood of Louisa. Yatesville Lake was opened in 1992 and is a 2,300
    7.50
    2 votes
    134
    Lincoln County

    Lincoln County

    Lincoln County is a county located in the U.S. state of Maine. As of 2010, the population was 34,457. Its county seat is Wiscasset. It was founded in 1760 and named after the English city Lincoln. At its founding, it accounted for three-fifths of the State's land, and stretched east to Nova Scotia. Thirteen counties were cut out of this land including Sagadahoc County to the west. The county flag is a traditional New England flag, adopted in 1977. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 699.81 square miles (1,812.5 km), of which 455.99 square miles (1,181.0 km) (or 65.16%) is land and 243.82 square miles (631.5 km) (or 34.84%) is water. As of the census of 2010, there were 34,457 people. As of 2000, there were 14,158 households, and 9,542 families residing in the county. The population density was 74 people per square mile (28/km²). There were 20,849 housing units at an average density of 46 per square mile (18/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 98.46% White, 0.17% Black or African American, 0.26% Native American, 0.37% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.10% from other races, and 0.61% from two or more races. 0.46% of the population were Hispanic or Latino
    7.50
    2 votes
    135
    Ritchie County

    Ritchie County

    Ritchie County is a county located in the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 10,449. Its county seat is Harrisville. It was created in 1843 by the Virginia General Assembly and named for Richmond newspaper publisher Thomas Ritchie. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 454 square miles (1,175 km²), of which 454 square miles (1,175 km²) is land and 0 square miles (0 km²) (0.02%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 10,343 people, 4,184 households, and 2,999 families residing in the county. The population density was 23 people per square mile (9/km²). There were 5,513 housing units at an average density of 12 per square mile (5/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 98.68% White, 0.14% Black or African American, 0.27% Native American, 0.13% Asian, 0.11% from other races, and 0.69% from two or more races. 0.47% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 4,184 households out of which 30.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.20% were married couples living together, 9.70% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.30% were non-families. 25.00% of all
    7.50
    2 votes
    136
    Russell County

    Russell County

    Russell County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. The population was 17,565 in the 2010 Census. Its county seat is Jamestown. The county is named for William Russell. It is a prohibition or dry county, meaning that the sale of alcohol is restricted or prohibited. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 282.82 square miles (732.5 km), of which 253.53 square miles (656.6 km) (or 89.64%) is land and 29.29 square miles (75.9 km) (or 10.36%) is water. The highest point is 1,140 feet (350 m) atop Dickerson Ridge in the extreme northern part of the county and the lowest point is 530 feet (160 m) along the Cumberland River. Russell County was formed on December 14, 1825 from portions of Adair County, Cumberland County and Wayne County. It was named after Colonel William Russell. As of the census of 2000, there were 16,315 people, 6,941 households, and 4,796 families residing in the county. The population density was 64 per square mile (25 /km). There were 9,064 housing units at an average density of 36 per square mile (14 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 98.34% White, 0.58% Black or African American, 0.12% Native American, 0.14% Asian, 0.02%
    7.50
    2 votes
    137
    Wolfe County

    Wolfe County

    Wolfe County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of 2010, the population was 7,355. Its county seat is Campton. The county is named for Nathaniel Wolfe. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 222.86 square miles (577.2 km), of which 222.78 square miles (577.0 km) (or 99.96%) is land and 0.08 square miles (0.21 km) (or 0.04%) is water. Wolfe County was formed on March 5, 1860 from portions of Breathitt County, Morgan County, Owsley County and Powell County. It was named for Nathaniel Wolfe, a member of the legislative assembly. Campton, the county's seat was reportedly formed from camp town in Wolfe County. A small creek winding through Campton, Swift Creek, is named after Jonathan Swift of the legend of Swift's silver mine. Swift supposedly buried treasure in the area which has never been recovered. As of the census of 2000, there were 7,065 people, 2,816 households, and 1,976 families residing in the county. The population density was 32 per square mile (12 /km). There were 3,264 housing units at an average density of 15 per square mile (5.8 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 99.24% White, 0.24% Black or African American, 0.08% Native
    7.50
    2 votes
    138
    Larue County

    Larue County

    LaRue County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It is included in the Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Metropolitan Statistical Area. As of 2010, the population was 14,193. Its county seat is Hodgenville. LaRue is a prohibition or dry county.. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 263.72 square miles (683.0 km), of which 263.20 square miles (681.7 km) (or 99.80%) is land and 0.53 square miles (1.4 km) (or 0.20%) is water. LaRue County was formed on March 4, 1843 from portions of Hardin County. It was named after John LaRue, an early settler in this area. It contains the birthplace of Abraham Lincoln. As of the census of 2000, there were 13,373 people, 5,275 households, and 3,866 families residing in the county. The population density was 51 people per square mile (20/km²). There were 5,860 housing units at an average density of 22 per square mile (9/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 94.65% White, 3.54% Black or African American, 0.19% Native American, 0.16% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.34% from other races, and 1.10% from two or more races. 1.05% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 5,275 households out of
    5.50
    4 votes
    139
    Campbell County

    Campbell County

    Campbell County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. The population was 64,842 at the 2010 census. Its county seat is Rustburg. The county is named after General William Campbell of the Revolutionary War. Campbell County is part of the Lynchburg Metropolitan Statistical Area. Campbell County was established in 1782 from Bedford County. The county was named for Revolutionary War hero, General William Campbell, who is known for the 1780 Battle of Kings Mountain. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 507 square miles (1,313.1 km), of which 504 square miles (1,305.4 km) is land and 3 square miles (7.8 km) (0.55%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 51,078 people, 20,639 households, and 14,694 families residing in the county. The population density was 101 people per square mile (39/km²). There were 22,088 housing units at an average density of 44 per square mile (17/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 83.24% White, 14.71% Black or African American, 0.19% Native American, 0.62% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.33% from other races, and 0.90% from two or more races. 0.83% of the population were caucasian or south america
    6.33
    3 votes
    140
    Carter County

    Carter County

    Carter County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was formed in 1838 and was named for William Grayson Carter, a state senator at the time of its creation. The county seat is named for his uncle, Robert Grayson. As of 2010, the population was 27,720. Its county seat is Grayson, Kentucky. In 2003, Carter County was added to the Huntington-Ashland, WV-KY-OH, Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) area and is somewhat of an exurb county for those cities. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 412.15 square miles (1,067.5 km), of which 410.60 square miles (1,063.4 km) (or 99.62%) is land and 1.55 square miles (4.0 km) (or 0.38%) is water. Carter County was formed on February 9, 1838 from portions of Greenup County and Lawrence County. It was named after Colonel William Grayson Carter, a Kentucky state Senator. As of the census of 2000, there were 26,889 people, 10,342 households, and 7,746 families residing in the county. The population density was 66 per square mile (25 /km). There were 11,534 housing units at an average density of 28 per square mile (11 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 99.02% White, 0.13% Black or African American, 0.25%
    6.33
    3 votes
    141
    Galax city

    Galax city

    Galax ( /ˈɡeɪlæks/) is an independent city in the southwestern part of the Commonwealth of Virginia. It is bounded to the northeast by Carroll County and to the southwest by Grayson County. The population was 7,042 as of 2010. The Bureau of Economic Analysis combines the city of Galax with neighboring Carroll County for statistical purposes. Galax is located at 36°39′52″N 80°55′12″W / 36.66444°N 80.92°W / 36.66444; -80.92 (36.664675, -80.920275). The United States Census Bureau says the city has a total area of 8.2 square miles (21 km), all land. As of the census of 2000, there were 6,837 people, 2,950 households, and 1,843 families residing in the city. The population density was 830.9 people per square mile (320.8/km²). There were 3,217 housing units at an average density of 391.0 per square mile (150.9/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 86.11% White, 6.26% Black or African American, 0.45% Native American, 0.70% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 5.51% from other races, and 0.95% from two or more races. 11.07% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 2,950 households out of which 27.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.0% were
    6.33
    3 votes
    142
    McCracken County

    McCracken County

    McCracken County is a county located in the Jackson Purchase, the extreme western end of the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of 2010, the population was 65,565. The county seat, largest community, and only municipality is Paducah. McCracken County is part of the Paducah, KY-IL Micropolitan Statistical Area. McCracken County was founded in 1825, from Hickman County. The county was named for Captain Virgil McCracken of Woodford County, Kentucky, who was killed in the Battle of Frenchtown in southeastern Michigan during the War of 1812. The Battle of Paducah occurred in McCracken County on March 25, 1864. The skirmish between the Union and Confederate troops ended in a Confederate victory. Altogether 140 men fell in the battle. McCracken County is represented congressionally as District 1 of the Commonwealth of Kentucky. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 268.08 square miles (694.3 km), of which 251.02 square miles (650.1 km) (or 93.64%) is land and 17.05 square miles (44.2 km) (or 6.36%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 65,514 people, 27,736 households, and 18,444 families residing in the county. The population density was 261 per square mile
    6.33
    3 votes
    143
    Powell County

    Powell County

    Powell County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of 2010, the population is 12,613. Its county seat is Stanton. The county was formed January 7, 1852, by Kentucky Governor Lazarus W. Powell. It is a prohibition or dry county. Powell County is home to Natural Bridge State Park and the Red River Gorge Geologic Area, two of Kentucky's most important natural areas and ecotourism destinations, as well as Pilot Knob State Nature Preserve. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 180.20 square miles (466.7 km), of which 180.14 square miles (466.6 km) (or 99.97%) is land and 0.07 square miles (0.18 km) (or 0.04%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 13,237 people, 5,044 households, and 3,783 families residing in the county. The population density was 74 per square mile (29 /km). There were 5,526 housing units at an average density of 31 per square mile (12 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 98.56% White, 0.62% Black or African American, 0.12% Native American, 0.05% Asian, 0.07% from other races, and 0.58% from two or more races. 0.66% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 5,044 households out of which
    6.33
    3 votes
    144
    Westmoreland County

    Westmoreland County

    Westmoreland County is a county located in the Northern Neck of the Commonwealth of Virginia, a state in the United States. As of 2010, the population was 17,454. Its county seat is Montross. As originally established by the House of Burgesses from Northumberland County, Virginia in 1653, the territory of Westmoreland County encompassed much of what later become the various counties and cities of Northern Virginia, including the city of Alexandria, Arlington County, Fairfax County, and Prince William County. These remained Westmoreland until 1664, when Stafford County, Virginia was formed. Westmoreland County was the birthplace of George Washington, the first President of the United States (at the former settlement of Bridges Creek, Virginia); James Monroe, the fifth President of the United States; and General Robert E. Lee, commander of the Confederate armies. It was the residence of Col. Nicholas Spencer, who patented the land at Mount Vernon in 1674 with his friend Lt. Col. John Washington, ancestor of George Washington. Spencer, who served as President of the Council and acting Governor of Virginia, was the cousin of and agent for the Barons Colepeper, proprietors of the
    6.33
    3 votes
    145
    Wyoming County

    Wyoming County

    Wyoming County is a county located in the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 23,796. Its county seat is Pineville. Wyoming County was created in 1850 from Logan County and named for the Delaware Indian word meaning "large plains." According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 502 square miles (1,300 km²), of which 501 square miles (1,297 km²) is land and 1 square mile (2 km²) (0.19%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 25,709 people, 10,454 households, and 7,704 families residing in the county. The population density was 51 people per square mile (20/km²). There were 11,698 housing units at an average density of 23 per square mile (9/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 98.59% White, 0.63% Black or African American, 0.12% Native American, 0.08% Asian, 0.07% from other races, and 0.51% from two or more races. 0.53% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 10,454 households out of which 31.00% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.30% were married couples living together, 10.50% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.30% were non-families. 24.40% of all
    6.33
    3 votes
    146
    Bath County

    Bath County

    Bath County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. In 2010, Bath County's population was estimated to be 4,731 residents. Its county seat is Warm Springs. It is home to the Bath County Pumped Storage Station, a pumped storage hydroelectric power plant. The Homestead, a luxury mountain resort in Hot Springs, is the county's major employer. The resort grew around the area's natural hot mineral springs, such as the Jefferson Pools. The county is represented in the Virginia General Assembly by two Democrats, Senator Creigh Deeds and Delegate Jim Shuler. The American educator C. E. Byrd was born in Bath County in 1859. Bath County was established on December 14, 1790 from Augusta, Botetourt and Greenbrier counties. The county is named for the English resort city of Bath. Bath County comprises a number of villages including Hot Springs, Warm Springs, Millboro and Mountain Grove. Hot Springs and Warm Springs are the most well known of the villages. Each has healing springs that have attracted visitors since the 1700s. For over 270 years Bath County has been defined by its natural beauty and hospitality. Located along the western central border with West Virginia, Bath County
    8.00
    1 votes
    147
    Carroll County

    Carroll County

    Carroll County is a county located in the southwestern part of the U.S. state of Virginia. It is the only county in Virginia with Piedmont Topography of roughly one fifth in the southeast part of the county and Mountain topography of roughly four fifths elsewhere of the county. The Blue Ridge escarpment usually defines the county lines in both North Carolina and Virginia. The CDP community of Cana is in the Virginia Piedmont while the rest of the county is in the Appalachian Mountains. As of 2010, the population was 30,042. Its county seat is Hillsville. Carroll County was established in 1842 from Grayson County. The county is named for Charles Carroll, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, from Maryland. Part of Patrick County was added later. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 478 square miles (1,238.0 km), of which 476 square miles (1,232.8 km) is land and 1 square mile (2.6 km) (0.27%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 29,245 people, 12,186 households, and 8,786 families residing in the county. The population density was 61 people per square mile (24/km²). There were 14,680 housing units at an average density of 31 per
    8.00
    1 votes
    148
    Garrard County

    Garrard County

    Garrard County ( /ˈɡærɪd/ GAIR-id;) is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was formed in 1797 and was named for James Garrard, Governor of Kentucky from 1796 to 1804. Its county seat is Lancaster. The population was 16,912 in the 2010 Census. It is a prohibition or dry county but Lancaster is wet. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 233.88 square miles (605.7 km), of which 231.21 square miles (598.8 km) (or 98.86%) is land and 2.67 square miles (6.9 km) (or 1.14%) is water. Garrard County was formed on December 17, 1796 from parts of Lincoln County, Madison County and Mercer County. Harriet Beecher Stowe, author of Uncle Tom's Cabin, visited the Kennedy home in Garrard County in ger only visit to the South while gathering material for the book. The cabin of the inspiration for Uncle Tom stood behind the plantation house. County officials hope to recreate the slave cabin on the grounds of the Governor William Owsley House. In the United States Senate, Garrard County is represented by US Senator Mitch McConnell and US Senator Rand Paul. Garrard County is in the 6th Congressional District, represented by US Rep. Ben Chandler; in the 22nd State
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    149
    Goochland County

    Goochland County

    Goochland County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 21,717. Its county seat is Goochland. It is located in the Richmond-Petersburg region and is a portion of the Richmond Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). Native Americans had lived along the waterways for several thousand years. Siouan-speaking tribes were the ones encountered by English colonists. Their numbers were sharply reduced by European infectious diseases to which they had no immunity, which caused widespread social disruption. In 1634, the colonial government organized the territory of Virginia into eight shires, to be governed as shires were in England. Henrico was one of these shires. Goochland was founded in 1728 as the first county formed from Henrico shire, followed by Chesterfield County in 1749. Goochland was named for Sir William Gooch, the royal lieutenant governor from 1727-1749, at which time the nominal governor, the Earl of Albemarle, remained in England. Goochland originally included all of the land from Tuckahoe Creek, on both sides of the James River, west as far as the Blue Ridge Mountains. As the colonists moved into the Piedmont west of Richmond, they
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    1 votes
    150
    Graves County

    Graves County

    Graves County is a county located in the U.S. Commonwealth of Kentucky. It was formed in 1824. As of 2000, the population was 37,028. Its county seat is Mayfield. The county is named for Major Benjamin Franklin Graves, soldier in the War of 1812. The Mayfield Micropolitan Statistical Area includes all of Graves County. Graves County is a “limited” dry county, meaning that sale of alcohol in the county is prohibited except for wine and beer in restaurants in Mayfield which have seating for at least 100 patrons or at the Mayfield Golf & Country Club. As one of Kentucky's largest counties, Graves's history of legends and leaders includes a US Vice President, four US Congressmen, famous and infamous heroes, singers and songwriters, noted writers and a legacy of historic sites. The fertile land attracted early settlers from Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee, who brought with them a degree of education and culture and a fierce determination to succeed on the land. Remarkable in their achievements as craftsmen and farmers they put down roots to blend a political, economic, and social environment unique, perhaps only to Graves County. Tobacco was very much as part of
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    151
    Mingo County

    Mingo County

    Mingo County is a county located in the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 26,839. Its county seat is Williamson. Created in 1895, Mingo is West Virginia's newest county. It is named for the historic Iroquoian Mingo people. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 424 square miles (1,097 km²), of which 423 square miles (1,095 km²) is land and 1 square mile (3 km²) (0.24%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 28,253 people, 11,303 households, and 8,217 families residing in the county. The population density was 67 people per square mile (26/km²). There were 12,898 housing units at an average density of 30 per square mile (12/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 96.39% White, 2.34% Black or African American, 0.24% Native American, 0.21% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.06% from other races, and 0.74% from two or more races. 0.48% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 11,303 households out of which 33.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.20% were married couples living together, 12.70% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.30% were
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    152
    New Kent County

    New Kent County

    New Kent County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia, a state of the United States. In 2010, the population was 18,429. Its county seat is New Kent. It is located in the Richmond-Petersburg region and is a portion of the Richmond Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). New Kent County was established in 1654 from York County. The county is named for Kent, England. New Kent County is the birthplace of two U. S. Presidents' wives - Martha Washington and Letitia Christian Tyler. The church where George and Martha Washington are believed to have been wed, St. Peters, still holds services today. The Chickahominy Indians frequented this area as well as nearby Charles City County and two tribes are still well-established in this area. Among the earliest settlers of New Kent County was Nicholas Gentry, who settled in New Kent in 1684. The parish register books of St. Peter's Parish show that Nicholas Gentry's daughter was baptized in the church in 1687. The records also reflect other Gentrys, probably Nicholas Gentry's relations, Peter and Samuel Gentry. Many later county records were burned, making identifying relationships between family members difficult. In 2006, the U.S.
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    153
    Wise County

    Wise County

    Wise County is a county located in the U.S. state of Virginia. In 1856, the county was formed from land taken from Lee, Scott, and Russell Counties. It was named after Henry A. Wise, who was the Governor of Virginia at the time. As of 2010, the population was 41,452, making it the largest jurisdiction in terms of population outside of any metropolitan area in Virginia. Its county seat is Wise. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 405 square miles (1,050 km²), of which 404 square miles (1,046 km²) is land and 1 square mile (3 km²) (0.29%) is water. The county is part of the Appalachians and has many mountainous features, including the peak of High Knob and Powell Valley. As of the census of 2010, there were 41,452 people, 15,968 households, and 10,892 families residing in the county. The population density was 102.8 people per square mile (38/km²). There were 17,940 housing units at an average density of 44 per square mile (17/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 93% White, 5.2% Black or African American, 0.10% Native American, 0.30% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, and 0.90% from two or more races. 1.10% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of
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    154
    Scott County

    Scott County

    Scott County is a county located in the U.S. state of Virginia. Scott County was formed by an act of the General Assembly on November 24, 1814 from parts of Washington, Lee, and Russell Counties and was named for Virginia born General Winfield Scott. As of 2010, the population was 23,177. Its county seat is Gate City. Scott County is part of the Kingsport–Bristol (TN)–Bristol (VA) Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is a component of the Johnson City–Kingsport–Bristol, TN-VA Combined Statistical Area – commonly known as the "Tri-Cities" region. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 539 square miles (1,400 km), of which 537 square miles (1,390 km) is land and 2 square miles (5.2 km) (0.38%) is water. The residents of Scott County, Virginia recently received new addresses due to the new 911 emergency contact system. Everyone now has a house number and street address as opposed to the rural route addresses of the past. As of the census of 2000, there were 23,403 people, 9,795 households, and 7,023 families residing in the county. The population density was 44 people per square mile (17/km²). There were 11,355 housing units at an average density of 21 per
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    155
    Alexandria

    Alexandria

    Alexandria is an independent city in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of 2010, the city had a total population of 139,966. Located along the Western bank of the Potomac River, Alexandria is approximately six miles (9.6 kilometers) south of downtown Washington, D.C. Like the rest of Northern Virginia, as well as central Maryland, modern Alexandria has been shaped by its proximity to the nation's capital. It is largely populated by professionals working in the federal civil service, the U.S. military, or for one of the many private companies which contract to provide services to the federal government. The latter are known locally as beltway bandits, after the Capital Beltway, an interstate highway that circles Washington, D.C. One of Alexandria's largest employers is the U.S. Department of Defense. Others include the Institute for Defense Analyses and the Center for Naval Analyses. In 2005, the United States Patent and Trademark Office moved 7,100 employees from 18 separate buildings in nearby Crystal City into a new headquarters complex in the city. The historic center of Alexandria is known as Old Town. With its concentration of boutiques, restaurants, antique shops and theaters,
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    156
    Clark County

    Clark County

    Clark County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. Its county seat is Winchester. The county was created in 1792 from Bourbon and Fayette counties and is named for Revolutionary War hero George Rogers Clark. Clark County is part of the Lexington–Fayette Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 35,613 in the 2010 Census. Many pioneers traveled through nearby Fort Boonesborough (alternatively known as Fort Boonesboro) in Madison County, Kentucky, before establishing permanent settlement in Clark County. At least nineteen pioneer stations or settlements are believed to have been established in the area. Among these were Strode's Station (1779), near Winchester; McGee's Station (ca. 1780), near Becknerville; Holder's Station (1781), on Lower Howard's Creek; and Boyle's Station (ca. 1785), one mile west of Strode's Station. Among the early settlers were a group of forty Baptist families led by Capt. William Bush, who settled on Lower Howard's Creek in 1775. In 1793 the group erected the Old Stone Meeting House. Another pioneer group was the Tracy settlement, founders in the 1790s of a church building that survived well into the 20th century. When the Indian threat
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    157
    Daviess County

    Daviess County

    Daviess County (pronounced /'deɪvɨs/, sometimes incorrectly /'deɪviz/), is a county in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It is the 58th county in order of formation; formed from part of Ohio County on January 14, 1815. The county's borders were altered in 1829 to form Hancock County, in 1830 to absorb a small area surrounding Whitesville, in 1854 to cede land to McLean County, and in 1860 to annex 44 square miles (110 km) from Henderson County. Daviess County measures 463 square miles (1,200 km), making it 18th in size in the commonwealth. The population estimate for 2008 is 94,418. It is included in the Owensboro, Kentucky, Metropolitan Statistical Area. Its county seat is Owensboro. The county is named for Major Joseph Hamilton Daveiss (a recording error in the State Clerk's office accounts for the error in spelling, which was never corrected), the United States Attorney who unsuccessfully prosecuted Aaron Burr. Daviess County is part of the Western Coal Fields region of Kentucky. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 476.27 square miles (1,233.5 km), of which 462.39 square miles (1,197.6 km) (or 97.09%) is land and 13.88 square miles (35.9 km) (or 2.91%) is
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    158
    Emporia

    Emporia

    Emporia is an independent city located within the confines of Greensville County, Virginia, United States. The population was estimated to be 5,927 in 2010. The Bureau of Economic Analysis combines the city of Emporia with surrounding Greensville county for statistical purposes. It is the county seat of Greensville County. The Town of Hicksford (also sometimes called Hick's Ford) was settled in 1710 in the Virginia Colony, where the Fort Road of eastern Virginia crossed the Meherrin River en route to Fort Christanna. After statehood, the Town of Belfield was established in 1798 on the north bank of the river. The two Greensville County towns merged in 1887 to form the new incorporated town of Emporia, which was named after the town of Emporia, Kansas. The Town Emporia was re-chartered by the Virginia General Assembly as an independent city in 1967. Emporia has long been a transportation crossroads. Currently, a major north-south railroad line of CSX Transportation crosses with an east-west line of Norfolk Southern. U.S. Route 58 crosses east-west and Interstate 95 and U.S. Route 301 crosses north-south. Emporia is located at 36°41′34″N 77°32′17″W / 36.69278°N 77.53806°W /
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    2 votes
    159
    Estill County

    Estill County

    Estill County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was formed in 1808. As of 2010, the population was 14,672. Its county seat is Irvine, Kentucky. Formed in 1808, the county is named after Captain James Estill, a Kentucky militia officer killed in the Battle of Little Mountain during the American Revolutionary War. It is a prohibition or dry county. In 2008, Estill County welcomed the Estill County Bicentennial that included a yearlong celebration of themed months showcasing 200 years of history, importance and the viability of Estill County and its Twin Cities of Irvine and Ravenna. Both cities sit along the Kentucky River. Ravenna is home to CSX Transportation and the historic Fitchburg & Cottage Furnaces and conducted the Ravenna Railroad Festival in August 2008. Irvine is home to the manufacturing headquarters of Carhartt, Inc. and annually hosts the Mountain Mushroom Festival over last weekend of April. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 255.70 square miles (662.3 km), of which 253.93 square miles (657.7 km) (or 99.31%) is land and 1.76 square miles (4.6 km) (or 0.69%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 15,307 people,
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    160
    Gallatin County

    Gallatin County

    Gallatin County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky along the Ohio River, which at its formation was the main transportation route. It was formed in 1799. As of 2010, the population was 8,589. Its county seat is Warsaw. The county is named for Albert Gallatin, a Swiss native who served as Secretary of the Treasury for President Thomas Jefferson. The county was formed on December 14, 1798. Gallatin was the 31st Kentucky county to be established. It was derived from parts of Franklin and Shelby counties. Later, parts of the county were pared off to create three additional counties: Owen in 1819, Trimble in 1836 and Carroll in 1838. Today Gallatin is one tenth of its original size. Its northern border is the Ohio River. The American Civil War disrupted the lives of Gallatin residents. Skirmishes occurred in the county and Union forces arrested some men for treason. After the end of the Civil War, the Ohio River near Warsaw was the scene of one of the worst steamboat accidents in history. Two passenger steamers, the America and the United States, collided. As the United States carried a cargo of barrels of kerosene which caught fire, soon both boats were in flames. The
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    2 votes
    161
    Hopkins County

    Hopkins County

    Hopkins County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was formed in 1807. As of 2000, the population was 46,519. Its county seat is Madisonville. The county is named for General Samuel Hopkins, an officer in both the American Revolutionary War and War of 1812, and later a Kentucky legislator and U.S. Congressman. It was founded in 1807, as an outgrowth of Henderson County. The Madisonville Micropolitan Statistical Area includes all of Hopkins County. The topography ranges from flatlands along the broad river valleys of the Pond River, Tradewater River, and Green River, to hilly and rolling land in the southern and central parts of the county. Coal mines operate in the southern part of Hopkins County and agriculture is a mainstay in the northern part. Major crops are soybeans, corn, and tobacco. Along with coal, resources include oil and natural gas. Hopkins County ranks second in the state both in terms of total coal extracted (782 million tons) and in total coal reserves remaining (7.2 billion tons). The earliest inhabitants were prehistoric Native Americans who lived, hunted, and farmed in the region. One of their settlements was a rough stone structure on Fort
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    2 votes
    162
    Jefferson County

    Jefferson County

    Jefferson County is a county located in the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 53,498. Its county seat is Charles Town. Jefferson County is part of the Washington Metropolitan Area. Jefferson County was formed from Berkeley County in 1801 and named for Thomas Jefferson, author of the Declaration of Independence and third President of the United States. Virginia previously had a Jefferson County, which was lost to form the new state of Kentucky. Accordingly, in the State records of Virginia, there will be listings for Jefferson County from 1780-1792 and Jefferson County from 1801-1863. Neither is still located in Virginia and despite naming a county after him twice, Virginia no longer has a county named for its hero Thomas Jefferson. The county's courthouse was the site of the trial for the abolitionist John Brown after his October 1859 raid on the federal armory in Harpers Ferry. Some 90 U.S. Marines serving under then Army Colonel Robert E. Lee and Lieutenants J.E.B. Stuart and Israel Green put down the rebellion. Brown was sentenced to death for murder, treason against the Commonwealth of Virginia, and conspiring with slaves to rebel. On 2
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    163
    Metcalfe County

    Metcalfe County

    Metcalfe County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of 2000, the population was 10,037. Its county seat is Edmonton. The county is named for Thomas Metcalfe, Governor of Kentucky from 1828-32. It is a prohibition or dry county. Metcalfe County is part of the Glasgow Micropolitan Statistical Area. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 290.96 square miles (753.6 km), of which 290.90 square miles (753.4 km) (or 99.98%) is land and 0.07 square miles (0.18 km) (or 0.02%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 10,037 people, 4,016 households, and 2,883 families residing in the county. The population density was 34 per square mile (13 /km). There were 4,592 housing units at an average density of 16 per square mile (6.2 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 97.26% White, 1.64% Black or African American, 0.25% Native American, 0.07% Asian, 0.13% from other races, and 0.65% from two or more races. 0.53% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 4,016 households out of which 32.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.10% were married couples living together, 10.00% had a female householder with no
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    2 votes
    164
    Nelson County

    Nelson County

    Nelson County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of 2010, the population was 43,437. Its county seat is Bardstown. The county is part of the Louisville/Jefferson County, KY–IN Metropolitan Statistical Area. The fourth county created in what is now Kentucky, it was formed from Jefferson County, Virginia in 1784 shortly after the Revolutionary War. The county is named for Thomas Nelson, Jr., a Virginia Governor who signed the Declaration of Independence. In 1808, another new Virginia county was named for Governor Nelson. (see Nelson County, Virginia). According to the 2010 census, the county has a total area of 424.08 square miles (1,098.35 km), of which 417.51 square miles (1,081.35 km) (or 99.66%) is land and 6.56 square miles (17.00 km) (or 0.34%) is water. As of the census of 2010, there were 43,437 people and 18,075 housing units in the county. The population density was 102.4 per square mile (39.5 /km). There were 18,075 housing units at an average density of 42.6 per square mile (16.4 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 93.48% White (90.93% non-Hispanic), 5.03% Black or African American, 0.12% Native American, 0.50% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.78%
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    2 votes
    165
    Owsley County

    Owsley County

    Owsley County is a county located in the Eastern Mountain Coal Fields region of Kentucky. As of 2010, the population was 4,755. According to the 2010 Census reports, Owsley County is the "poorest county in the United States'" Its county seat is Booneville and it is a dry county. The county was organized Jan 23, 1843 from Clay, Estill, and Breathitt counties. The county is named for William Owsley (1782–1862), the judge of the KY Court of Appeals and Governor of Kentucky (1844–48). Owsley County was formed in 1843 from portions of Clay, Breathitt, and Estill Counties and was named for Governor William Owsley. Owsley County was Kentucky's 96th county. Parts of Owsley County were used to form Jackson County in 1858 and Lee County in 1870. The first settlers in Owsley County were John Renty Baker and John Abner. They first settled in 1780 near the present Clay County line at Courtland. The exact year of their settlement is unknown, however, a gravestone found in a cemetery on Upper Buffalo Creek reads, "Milly, wife of John Abner, died March 1846." John Renty Baker along with his sons, who were all gunsmiths, also invented and developed hand-operated machines to cut the rifle barrels.
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    166
    Somerset County

    Somerset County

    Somerset County is a county located in the U.S. state of Maine. As of 2010, the population was 52,228. Its county seat is Skowhegan. Somerset County was established on March 1, 1809 from portions of Kennebec County and was named after Somerset County in England. Somerset County is part of Maine's 2nd congressional district. In 1992 Somerset County was one of three counties in the state (the others being Knox and Piscataquis) where Ross Perot received over 38% of the vote and won. In 2008 Barack Obama received 51.9% of the vote. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 4,095.37 square miles (10,607.0 km), of which 3,926.50 square miles (10,169.6 km) (or 95.88%) is land and 168.87 square miles (437.4 km) (or 4.12%) is water. There are 27 towns and 6 plantations in Somerset County. Somerset County's unorganized territories, listed as four political subdivisions composed of a total of 82 townships, are currently part of County District #1. Central Somerset (2 townships) Northeast Somerset (17 townships) Northwest Somerset (20 townships) Seboomook Lake (43 townships) As of the census of 2000, there were 50,888 people, 20,496 households, and 14,121 families residing
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    2 votes
    167
    Breckinridge County

    Breckinridge County

    Breckinridge County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. It was formed in 1799. The population was 20,059 in the 2010 Census. Its county seat is Hardinsburg, Kentucky. The county is named for John Breckinridge (1760–1806), a former Kentucky Attorney General, state legislator, United States Senator, and United States Attorney General. Breckinridge is a prohibition or dry county, although on March 30, 2010, a referendum passed whereby Hardinsburg will become "moist". The county was formed out of Hardin County by a 1799 enactment of the Kentucky General Assembly, but the first Fiscal Court did not meet until 1800. In 1816, when future United States President Abraham Lincoln was seven years old, his father, Thomas Lincoln and his family spent a few weeks in Hardinsburg and occupied a small cabin near what is now the Kentucky FFA Leadership Training Camp in Hardinsburg. Local residents gave them a cow for milk. The Lincolns left Kentucky through Breckinridge County, the Ohio River at Cloverport, on a ferry operated by Jacob Weatherholt. During the American Civil War, Confederate cavalry burned the local courthouse, which was being used by Union troops as a barracks, but
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    3 votes
    168
    Johnson County

    Johnson County

    Johnson County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was formed in 1843. As of 2010, the population was 23,356. Its county seat is Paintsville. The county is named for Richard Mentor Johnson, War of 1812 general, United States Representative, Senator, and Vice President of the United States. Johnson County is classified as a moist county, which is a county in which alcohol sales are not allowed (a dry county), but containing a "wet" city, in this case Paintsville, where alcoholic beverage sales are allowed. In 1843, Johnson County was formed. The land now occupied by Johnson County was previously part of Floyd County. At that time, its county seat of Paintsville had already been a chartered city for nine years. Homes had been built in Paintsville as early as the 1810s. Most of the families at the beginning of Johnson County's formation were of Scottish, Irish, English, or German descent. May of them moved from North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and Virginia following their participation in the Revolutionary War. For about its first twenty-five years, Johnson County and Paintsville struggled along. Roads and highways were nonexistent. Mail and supplies reached Johnson
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    3 votes
    169
    Prince George County

    Prince George County

    Prince George County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 35,725. Its county seat is Prince George. It is in Tri-Cities area of the Richmond–Petersburg region and is a portion of the Richmond, VA MSA (Metropolitan Statistical Area). According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 282 square miles (730 km²), of which 266 square miles (688 km²) is land and 16 square miles (42 km²) (5.76%) is water. The northwestern corner of the county near the cities of Hopewell and Petersburg, and the location of Fort Lee is suburban, but the rest of the county is still very rural with most land devoted to agriculture and timber production. Prince George County was formed in 1703 in the Virginia Colony from a portion of Charles City County. It was named in honor of Prince George of Denmark, husband of England's reigning monarch, Queen Anne. In 1619, "Charles Cittie" [sic] was one of four "boroughs" or "incorporations" created by the Virginia Company. The first Charles City County courthouses were located along the James River at Westover and City Point. The Virginia Company lost its charter in 1624, and Virginia became a royal
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    3 votes
    170
    Tazewell County

    Tazewell County

    Tazewell County is a county located in the southwestern portion of the U.S. state of Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 45,078. It is part of the Bluefield, West Virginia-Virginia micropolitan area which has a population of 107,342. Its county seat is the town of Tazewell. Before the arrival of pioneers Tazewell County was a hunting ground for Native Americans. Although rare in the eastern United States, there are petroglyphs near the summit of Paintlick Mountain. In the spring of 1771 Thomas and John Witten established the first permanent settlement in Tazewell County at Crab Orchard. Tazewell County was created on December 20, 1799. The land for the county was taken from portions of Wythe and Russell Counties. It was named after Henry Tazewell, a United States Senator from Virginia as well as a state legislator and judge. Delegate Littleton Waller Tazewell originally opposed the formation of the new county but when Simon Cotterel, who drew up the bill to form the county, changed the originally proposed name of the county to Tazewell's namesake, in honor of his father Henry who had died months earlier, the bill passed. Later, the town of Jeffersonville was renamed
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    3 votes
    171
    Breathitt County

    Breathitt County

    Breathitt County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was formed in 1839.The population was 13,878 in the 2010 Census. Its county seat is Jackson, Kentucky. The county is named for John Breathitt who was Governor of Kentucky from 1832 to 1834. Breathitt County is a prohibition or dry county. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 495.29 square miles (1,282.8 km), of which 495.19 square miles (1,282.5 km) (or 99.98%) is land and 0.09 square miles (0.23 km) (or 0.02%) is water. The North Fork of the Kentucky River and the Middle Fork of the Kentucky River pass through the county as the main water sources. Breathitt County was formed on February 8, 1839 from portions of Clay County, Estill County and Perry County. It was named after Governor John Breathitt. During World War I, Breathitt county attained national prominence by filling its quota of service men by volunteers. No men had to be drafted from Breathitt, the only county in U.S. with this record. During the war 3,912 men registered, 405 volunteered; of 324 called, 281 were inducted and 43 rejected. Kentuckians ranked among highest in nation in physical fitness. Currently, a Kentucky
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    4 votes
    172
    Bourbon County

    Bourbon County

    Bourbon County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It is the remnant of what was previously a much larger Bourbon County, established as part of Virginia in 1785, and comprising what are now thirty-four modern Kentucky counties. It was originally part of the French province of Louisiana, then after 1763 became part of Virginia, but was transferred to the newly formed Commonwealth of Kentucky in 1792. The population of Bourbon County was recorded as 19,985 in the 2010 United States Census. Its county seat is Paris, Kentucky. It is best known for its historical association with bourbon whiskey, although no bourbon whiskey is currently made or sold within Bourbon County. Bourbon County is part of the Lexington–Fayette Metropolitan Statistical Area. According to the 2000 United States Census, the county has a total area of 291.66 square miles (755.4 km), of which 291.43 square miles (754.8 km) (or 99.92%) is land and 0.23 square miles (0.60 km), or 0.08%, is water. There are no sizable lakes in the county, although there are several streams. Primary among these is Stoner Creek, on which the county seat is situated. This large stream is a principal tributary of the South
    5.67
    3 votes
    173
    Boyd County

    Boyd County

    Boyd County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was formed in 1860. Its 160 square miles (410 km) are found at the northeastern edge of the state the near the Ohio River and Big Sandy River, nestled in the verdant rolling hills of Appalachia. The county seat is Catlettsburg. Its largest municipality is the city of Ashland. The population was 49,542 in the 2010 Census. Boyd County is a part of the Huntington-Ashland, WV-KY-OH, Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). As of the 2000 census, the MSA had a population of 288,649. Boyd County was the 107th of 120 counties formed in the state of Kentucky. The county was established in 1860 from parts of surrounding Greenup, Carter, and Lawrence counties. It was named for Linn Boyd of Paducah, former U.S. congressman, Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, who died in 1859 soon after being elected lieutenant governor of Kentucky. The earliest evidence of human habitation in Boyd County exists in the forms of numerous earthen mounds containing human skeletons and burial goods giving evidence that prehistoric Native Americans inhabited the area. A 1973 archeological find revealed a serpent-shaped mound built of
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    3 votes
    174
    Pulaski County

    Pulaski County

    Pulaski County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. The population was 63,063 in the 2010 Census. Its county seat is Somerset. The county is named for Count Kazimierz Pułaski. Pulaski County is a "Moist" county as defined by The Kentucky Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control. The County features 2 "Small Farm Wineries" that sell wine to the public. The City of Burnside allows restaurants to serve alcoholic beverages by the drink but does not allow packaged liquor sales. The City of Somerset voted on June 26, 2012 to go fully "wet" which means alcoholic beverages can be purchased by the package and restaurants and bars can serve alcoholic beverages by the drink. All other areas of Pulaski County are "Dry". According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 677.05 square miles (1,753.6 km), of which 661.60 square miles (1,713.5 km) (or 97.72%) is land and 15.45 square miles (40.0 km) (or 2.28%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 56,217 people, 22,719 households, and 16,334 families residing in the county. The population density was 85 per square mile (33 /km). There were 27,181 housing units at an average density of 41 per square mile (16 /km).
    5.67
    3 votes
    175
    Raleigh County

    Raleigh County

    Raleigh County, founded in 1850, is a county located in the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 78,859. Its county seat is Beckley. Raleigh County was formed on January 23, 1850 from portions of Fayette County, then a part of Virginia. Alfred Beckley (1802–1888) said he gave Raleigh County its name in honor of Sir Walter Raleigh (1552–1618), the “enterprising and far-seeing patron of the earliest attempts to colonize our old Mother State of Virginia,” according to Raleigh County: West Virginia by Jim Wood. The county was the scene in 1914 of the Eccles Mine Disaster, the second-worst coal mining disaster in West Virginia history. The death toll was at least 180. More recently, the Upper Big Branch Mine disaster of 2010, which killed 29, also occurred in Raleigh County. Longtime Senator Robert Byrd's home town was Sophia, WV. Originally born in North Carolina as Cornelius Calvin Sale, Jr., he was ten months old when his mother, Ada Mae (née Kirby), died in the 1918 Flu Pandemic. In accordance with his mother's wishes, his father, Cornelius Calvin Sale, dispersed the family children among relatives. Titus and Vlurma Byrd, the infant's uncle and
    5.67
    3 votes
    176
    Adair County

    Adair County

    Adair County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of 2010, the population is 18,656. Its county seat is Columbia, Kentucky. The county is named for John Adair, then Speaker of the House in Kentucky and later Governor of Kentucky (1820 - 1824). Adair County also has one of the few remaining American Chestnut trees in America. Adair County is a prohibition or completely dry county. It is represented in District 51 in the Kentucky House of Representatives by the Republican, John "Bam" Carney of Campbellsville, the seat of Taylor County. Its previous representatives, all Republicans, included were Russ Mobley, Ricky Lee Cox, Ray H. Altman, and Herman Rattliff. The state senator from District 16 is David L. Williams of Burkesville, the President of the Kentucky Senate. Williams's predecessor, Doug Moseley, who served from 1974–1987, formerly resided in Adair County. Adair County is part of the Pennyroyal Plateau region of Kentucky and is part of western Appalachia. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 412.23 square miles (1,067.7 km), of which 406.84 square miles (1,053.7 km) (or 98.69%) is land and 5.39 square miles (14.0 km) (or 1.31%) is
    6.50
    2 votes
    177
    Barren County

    Barren County

    Barren County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was founded on December 20, 1798, from parts of Warren and Green Counties. It was named for the Barrens, the meadowlands that cover the northern third. As of 2010 the population was 42,173. Its county seat is Glasgow, Kentucky. The county is part of the Glasgow Micropolitan Statistical Area. In 2007 Barren County was named the "Best Place to Live in Rural America" by Progressive Farmer Magazine. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 499.93 square miles (1,294.8 km), of which 490.97 square miles (1,271.6 km) (or 98.21%) is land and 8.96 square miles (23.2 km) (or 1.79%) is water. Barren River Lake is located in the southern part of the county, forming part of its boundary with Allen County. Barren River Lake State Resort Park is located primarily within Barren County, along the lake's shoreline. As of the census of 2000, there were 38,033 people, 15,346 households, and 10,941 families residing in the county. The population density was 78 per square mile (30 /km). There were 17,095 housing units at an average density of 35 per square mile (14 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 94.30%
    6.50
    2 votes
    178
    Lincoln County

    Lincoln County

    Lincoln County is a county located in the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 21,720. Its county seat is Hamlin. The county was named for Abraham Lincoln. Lincoln County is part of the Charleston, WV metropolitan area, which had an estimated a 2006 Census population estimate of 305,526 people. Lincoln County was created by an act of the West Virginia Legislature on February 23, 1867, from parts of Boone, Cabell, Kanawha and Putnam counties. Jesse, John, David, William, and Moses McComas were the first English settlers in what is now Lincoln County. They cultivated 20 acres (81,000 m) of corn, the first ever grown in the area, in 1799. Later that year, they returned to eastern Virginia to get their families. Their families were initially left behind because it was not known if there were any hostile Native Americans in the area, or if the soil would be suitable for cultivation. John Lucas, William Hinch, and John Johnson soon joined the McComas' in the county. They built cabins in the county around 1800. After the Civil War, there was an effort by former Confederates to rename the area "Davis County" after Confederate president Jefferson Davis, but the
    6.50
    2 votes
    179
    Oxford County

    Oxford County

    Oxford County is a county located in the U.S. state of Maine with a population of 57,833 as of the 2010 U.S. census. Its county seat is Paris. Part of Oxford County is included in the Lewiston-Auburn, Maine, metropolitan New England City and Town Area while a different part of Oxford County is included in the Portland-South Portland-Biddeford, Maine, metropolitan New England City and Town Area. Oxford County was formed on 4 March 1805 from northerly portions of York and Cumberland counties. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 2,175.26 square miles (5,633.9 km), of which 2,078.00 square miles (5,382.0 km) (or 95.53%) is land and 97.26 square miles (251.9 km) (or 4.47%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 54,755 people, 22,314 households, and 15,173 families residing in the county. The population density was 26 people per square mile (10/km²). There were 32,295 housing units at an average density of 16 per square mile (6/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 98.25% White, 0.17% Black or African American, 0.28% Native American, 0.37% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.11% from other races, and 0.80% from two or more races. 0.53% of the population
    6.50
    2 votes
    180
    Allen County

    Allen County

    Allen County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of 2010, the population is 19,956. Its county seat is Scottsville, Kentucky. The county is named for Colonel John Allen, who was killed at the Battle of Frenchtown, Michigan during the War of 1812. Allen County is a prohibition or completely dry county. It was formed in 1815 from parts of Barren and Warren counties. Evangelist Mordecai Ham was born on a farm in Allen County in 1877. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 352.04 square miles (911.8 km), of which 346.12 square miles (896.4 km) (or 98.32%) is land and 5.92 square miles (15.3 km) (or 1.68%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 17,800 people, 6,910 households, and 5,113 families residing in the county. The population density was 51 per square mile (20 /km). There were 8,057 housing units at an average density of 23 per square mile (8.9 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 97.62% White, 1.07% Black or African American, 0.16% Native American, 0.12% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.36% from other races, and 0.66% from two or more races. 0.83% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 6,910
    7.00
    1 votes
    181
    Brooke County

    Brooke County

    Brooke County is a county located in the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 24,609. Its county seat is Wellsburg. Brooke County was created in 1797 from part of Ohio County and named in honor of Robert Brooke, Governor of Virginia from 1794 to 1796. Brooke County is part of the Weirton-Steubenville, WV-OH Metropolitan Statistical Area. Brooke County is governed by a three member County Commission who each serve in rotating 6-year terms. The terms are designed such that one seat is up for election in even years. The County Commission annually chooses its own President. The Brooke County Commissioners in 2008 are President Bernard Kazienko, Marty Bartz, and Norma Tarr. Brooke County is part of the First Judicial Circuit of West Virginia, which also includes Hancock and Ohio counties. In West Virginia, Circuit Judges are elected in partisan elections to eight-year terms. The current judges of the First Judicial Circuit are the Hon. Martin J. Gaughan, the Hon. James Mazzone, the Hon. Arthur M. Recht, and the Hon. Ronald E. Wilson. All four Circuit Court judges were re-elected in November 2008. Brooke County is part of the First Family Court Circuit of West
    7.00
    1 votes
    182
    Calhoun County

    Calhoun County

    Calhoun County is a county located in the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 7,627. Its county seat is Grantsville. Calhoun County is named for South Carolina politician John C. Calhoun. Calhoun County is home to five public parks, The Upper West Fork Park in Chloe on West Virginia Route 16, which offers free rough camping, camping hook ups for $5 a night, and free bluegrass music on summer Saturdays. The West Fork Park in Arnoldsburg on U.S. Route 33 hosts the annual Molasses Festival, offers camping and has a walking trail. Mt. Zion Park on West Virginia Route 16 hosts the annual Ox Roast. Calhoun County Park on West Virginia Route 16 includes hiking and bicycle trails, and is home to Heritage Village, historic buildings moved to the location then renovated to period history and includes a one room school house, and an old store. Wayne Underwood Park in Grantsville is the county's newest park, and includes a paved walking trail, a pavilion, and picnic tables. Calhoun is home to the annual Ramp Festival in April, the West Virginia Wood Festival in June, the Bluegrass Festival in May, another Bluegrass Festival in August, the West Virginia
    7.00
    1 votes
    183
    Floyd County

    Floyd County

    Floyd County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 15,279. Its county seat is Floyd. Floyd County's recorded history begins with the arrival of traders, trappers and hunters in Southwest Virginia in the 18th century. The earliest known travel way through present day Floyd County was the Trader's Path, running from east to west across the Roanoke River where Back Creek enters the river, by John Mason's, R. Poage's, the headwaters of Back Creek and southwest over Bent Mountain. The trail continued westward through the Little River area to the Lead Mines. The first known attempts to settle the area appear to have been made during the 1740s. In 1745 the Virginia Council granted James Patton, of Augusta County, among others, 100,000 acres (400 km) on the New River and the westward flowing waters, including the Little River area. In 1749 the Royal Company of Virginia also received a grant on the westward flowing waters, putting the two companies in competition with one another to settle the area. The first surveying of the land occurred in the late 1740s. On January 15, 1831, the General Assembly of Virginia passed an act creating the present
    7.00
    1 votes
    184
    Floyd County

    Floyd County

    Floyd County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was formed in 1800. As of 2010, the population was 39,451. Its county seat is Prestonsburg. The county is named for Colonel John Floyd (1750–1783). On December 13, 1799, the Kentucky General Assembly passed legislation to form Floyd County as the 40th county of Kentucky. The county was made from parts of Fleming, Montgomery, and Mason County, Kentucky. The legislation became effective on June 1, 1800. The county was named for James John Floyd. The county seat was Preston's Station, later renamed Prestonsburg. The first court house burned down on April 8, 1808, destroying all the early records, so the earliest records of government activity come from the year 1808. Prestonsburg was used as a Confederate stronghold during the Civil War and two battles took place nearby: the Battle of Ivy Mountain on November 8, 1861 and the Battle of Middle Creek on January 10, 1862. Both were Union victories. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 395.46 square miles (1,024.2 km), of which 394.29 square miles (1,021.2 km) (or 99.70%) is land and 1.16 square miles (3.0 km) (or 0.29%) is water. As of the census of
    7.00
    1 votes
    185
    Leslie County

    Leslie County

    Leslie County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of 2010, the population was 11,310. Its county seat is Hyden. The county is named for Preston H. Leslie, Governor of Kentucky (1871-1875). Leslie is a prohibition or dry county. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 404.36 square miles (1,047.3 km), of which 404.03 square miles (1,046.4 km) (or 99.92%) is land and 0.33 square miles (0.85 km) (or 0.08%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 12,401 people, 4,885 households, and 3,668 families residing in the county. The population density was 31 per square mile (12 /km). There were 5,502 housing units at an average density of 14 per square mile (5.4 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 97.18% White, 0.07% Black or African American, 0.09% Native American, 0.12% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.05% from other races, and 0.50% from two or more races. 0.62% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 4,885 households out of which 35.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.30% were married couples living together, 12.90% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.90% were
    7.00
    1 votes
    186
    Pocahontas County

    Pocahontas County

    Pocahontas County is a county located in the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 8,719. It was established in 1821 and is named after the Native American chief's daughter from Jamestown, Virginia. Its county seat is Marlinton. Pocahontas County is the home to the National Radio Astronomy Observatory Green Bank Telescope and is part of the National Radio Quiet Zone. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 942 square miles (2,439 km²), of which 940 square miles (2,435 km²) is land and 2 square miles (4 km²) (0.17%) is water. The highest point is believed to be Thorny Flat on Cheat Mountain in the northwestern part of the county. At an estimated 4,848 feet (1,478 m), it is the second-highest summit in West Virginia. The county is the site of the headwaters for eight rivers: Cherry River, Cranberry River, Elk River, Gauley River, Greenbrier River, Tygart Valley River, Williams River, and Shavers Fork of the Cheat River. The Monongahela National Forest protects much of the river headwaters, thereby helping to ensure improved downstream water quality. {{ When Andrew Lewis, early American pioneer, soldier, surveyor, and
    7.00
    1 votes
    187
    Waldo County

    Waldo County

    Waldo County is a county located in the U.S. state of Maine. As of 2010, the population was 38,786. Its county seat is Belfast. Waldo County was founded on 7 February 1827 from a portion of Hancock County. It was named after Brigadier-General Samuel Waldo, proprietor of the Waldo Patent. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 852.74 square miles (2,208.6 km), of which 729.73 square miles (1,890.0 km) (or 85.57%) is land and 123.01 square miles (318.6 km) (or 14.43%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 36,280 people, 14,726 households, and 10,057 families residing in the county. The population density was 50 people per square mile (19/km²). There were 18,904 housing units at an average density of 26 per square mile (10/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 97.89% White, 0.19% Black or African American, 0.40% Native American, 0.21% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.16% from other races, and 1.15% from two or more races. 0.59% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 24.8% were of English, 14.7% United States or American, 12.7% Irish, 8.5% French and 5.6% German ancestry according to Census 2000. 97.1% spoke English and 1.5% French as
    7.00
    1 votes
    188
    Magoffin County

    Magoffin County

    Magoffin County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky which was formed from parts of Floyd, Johnson, and Morgan Counties and officially created on 22 February 1860. As of 2010, the population was 13,333. Its county seat is Salyersville. The county is named for Beriah Magoffin who was Governor of Kentucky (1859-62). According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 309.44 square miles (801.4 km), of which 309.44 square miles (801.4 km) (or 100%) is land and 0.01 square miles (0.026 km) (or 0.00%) is water. It is watered by Licking River. As of the census of 2000, there were 13,332 people, 5,024 households, and 3,858 families residing in the county. The population density was 43 per square mile (17 /km). There were 5,447 housing units at an average density of 18 per square mile (6.9 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 99.29% White, 0.15% Black or African American, 0.20% Native American, 0.08% Asian, 0.02% from other races, and 0.27% from two or more races. 0.42% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There is a significant Melungeon or Black Dutch population in Magoffin County, known locally as the "Brown People of Magoffin County". In a
    4.50
    4 votes
    189
    Albemarle County

    Albemarle County

    Albemarle County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Figures from the 2010 US Census give a population of 98,970. The county seat is Charlottesville, which is an Independent city enclave entirely surrounded by the county. Albemarle County is part of the Charlottesville Metropolitan Statistical Area. At the time of European encounter, the inhabitants of the area that became Albemarle County were a Siouan-speaking tribe called the Saponi. In 1744, the Virginia General Assembly created Albemarle County by taking the northern portion of Goochland County. The county was named in honor of Willem Anne van Keppel, 2nd Earl of Albemarle and titular Governor of Virginia at the time. The large county was divided in 1761, forming Buckingham and Amherst counties, at which time the county seat was moved from the formerly-central Scottsville to a piece of newly central land, christened Charlottesville. President Thomas Jefferson was born in the county at Shadwell, though it was then part of Goochland County. However, his home of Monticello is located in the county. Albemarle is governed by a six-member Board of Supervisors. The body's key political issue is growth and
    6.00
    2 votes
    190
    Charles City County

    Charles City County

    Charles City County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 7,256. Its county seat is Charles City. It is located in the Richmond-Petersburg region east of Richmond and west of Jamestown, with a southern border on the James River and an eastern border on the Chickahominy River. It is part of the Richmond Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 204 square miles (528.4 km), of which 183 square miles (474.0 km) is land and 21 square miles (54.4 km) (10.51%) is water. There are no incorporated towns in Charles City County, but the following unincorporated communities are located in the county: As of the census of 2000, there were 6,926 people, 2,670 households, and 1,975 families residing in the county. The population density was 38 people per square mile (15/km²). There were 2,895 housing units at an average density of 16 per square mile (6/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 35.66% White, 54.85% Black or African American, 7.84% Native American, 0.10% Asian, 0.17% from other races, and 1.37% from two or more races. 0.65% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any
    6.00
    2 votes
    191
    Charlotte County

    Charlotte County

    Charlotte County is a county located in the south central part of the Commonwealth of Virginia. The county was formed in 1764 from Lunenburg County, and it is named for Queen Charlotte, wife of King George III of England. Its county seat is Charlotte Court House, and, as of 2010, the population was 12,586. Notable residents of Charlotte County include John Randolph and Patrick Henry after which the County's high school, Randolph-Henry High School, built in 1939, is named and Ambassador David K. E. Bruce. Ambassador Bruce's generosity towards the County allowed for the construction of many of the historic buildings in the town of Charlotte Court House. Charlotte is a semi-dry county, meaning restaurants may not serve liquor by the drink but beer and wine can be sold by grocery and convenience stores. The County is a predominately rural area and is one of the few counties in Virginia without a traffic signal. (Bath County & Mathews County are the others.) According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 477 square miles (1,235.4 km), of which 475 square miles (1,230.2 km) is land and 2 square miles (5.2 km) (0.51%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were
    6.00
    2 votes
    192
    Clay County

    Clay County

    Clay County is a county located in the U.S. state of West Virginia. Its name is in honor of Henry Clay, famous American statesman, member of the United States Senate from Kentucky and United States Secretary of State in the 19th century. As of the 2010 census, the population was 9,386. Its county seat is Clay. Clay County is part of the Charleston, WV metropolitan area. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 344 square miles (891.0 km), of which 342 square miles (885.8 km) is land and 1 square mile (2.6 km) (0.41%) is water. Major routes include the major roads of Route 04, Route 16, Route 26, Route 36, and Interstate 79. Other major routes include the country routes of route 5 near in Elkhurst, Triplett Ridge, from Clay to Widen, Summer Fork Roane Road, which takes you to Wallback and Grannies Creek in Roane County, and Queen Shoals Road (Queen Road) which starts in the small town of Queen Shoals in Kanawha County, and ends in Indore, Clay County. As of the census of 2000, there were 10,330 people, 4,020 households, and 2,942 families residing in the county. The population density was 30 people per square mile (12/km²). There were 4,836 housing units
    6.00
    2 votes
    193
    Frederick County

    Frederick County

    Frederick County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. It is included in the Winchester, Virginia-West Virginia Metropolitan Statistical Area. It was formed in 1743 by the splitting of Orange County. For ten years it was the home of George Washington. As of 2010, the population was 78,305. Its county seat is Winchester. The northernmost point in Virginia is located in Frederick County. The area that would become Frederick County, Virginia was inhabited and transited by various indigenous peoples for thousands of years before European colonization. The "Indian Road" refers to a historic pathway made by local tribes. European Americans established Frederick County in 1743 from Orange County. Anglo-American settlers named the county for Frederick Louis, Prince of Wales (1707–1751), the eldest son of King George II of Great Britain. Commander-in-Chief of the Colonial forces, General George Washington's headquarters were located in Winchester. Washington represented Frederick County in his first elective offices, having been elected to the House of Burgesses in 1758 and 1761. Daniel Morgan was another famous General during the American Revolutionary War, from (present day
    6.00
    2 votes
    194
    Hancock County

    Hancock County

    Hancock County is a county located in the U.S. state of Maine. As of 2010, the population was 54,418. Its county seat is Ellsworth. It was incorporated on June 25, 1789. Hancock County was named for John Hancock, the first governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 2,351.03 square miles (6,089.1 km), of which 1,587.70 square miles (4,112.1 km) (or 67.53%) is land and 763.33 square miles (1,977.0 km) (or 32.47%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 51,791 people, 21,864 households, and 14,233 families residing in the county. The population density was 33 people per square mile (13/km²). There were 33,945 housing units at an average density of 21 per square mile (8/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 97.61% White, 0.25% Black or African American, 0.37% Native American, 0.38% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.20% from other races, and 1.15% from two or more races. 0.65% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. The largest ancestry groups in Hancock County, Maine according to Census 2000 are: 96.8% spoke English, 1.5% French and 1.0% Spanish as their first language. There were 21,864
    6.00
    2 votes
    195
    Laurel County

    Laurel County

    Laurel County is a county in the U.S. state of Kentucky. The population was 58,849 in the 2010 Census. Its county seat is London. The London Micropolitan Statistical Area includes all of Laurel County. Laurel County is a limited dry county, meaning that sale of alcohol in the county is prohibited except in certain areas as voted on by the residents of the area. In the case of Laurel County, by-the-drink alcohol sales is permitted only in restaurants in the city of London seating at least 100 diners and derive at least 70% of their total sales from food. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 443.74 square miles (1,149.3 km), of which 435.67 square miles (1,128.4 km) (or 98.18%) is land and 8.07 square miles (20.9 km) (or 1.82%) is water. Part of Laurel River Lake is in Laurel County. As of the census of 2000, there were 52,715 people, 20,353 households, and 15,366 families residing in the county. The population density was 121 per square mile (47 /km). There were 22,317 housing units at an average density of 51 per square mile (20 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 95.66% White, 1.63% Black or African American, 0.37% Native American, 0.35% Asian, 0.01%
    6.00
    2 votes
    196
    McDowell County

    McDowell County

    McDowell County is a county in the U.S. state of West Virginia. The land that became McDowell was originally part of Tazewell County, Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 22,113. Its county seat is Welch. McDowell county is the southern-most county in the state, geographically. It was created in 1858 by the Virginia General Assembly and named for Virginia Governor James McDowell. It became a part of West Virginia in 1863, when several counties seceded from the state of Virginia during the American Civil War. McDowell County was also home of the famous Rocket Boys, who were from Coalwood. Following the American Revolutionary War, the United States federal government sold acres of land within the county for as much as three cents to Wilson Cary Nicholas, Robert Morris, and David Paterson. Paterson, in turn, sold his land to Robert Pollard. By 1795, it was Morris who owned most of the land that is now McDowell County. The first known settlers who occupied McDowell County was the Englishman Mathias Harman and his wife who settled in a cabin in 1802. Twenty-seven years later, William Fletcher had been issued a patent for 20 acres (8.1 ha) in what is now known as Welch.
    6.00
    2 votes
    197
    Rockcastle County

    Rockcastle County

    Rockcastle County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of 2010, the population was 17,056. Its county seat is Mt. Vernon. The county is named for the Rockcastle River which runs through it. The river, in turn, is named for its majestic rock cliffs. Rockcastle County is part of the Richmond–Berea Micropolitan Statistical Area. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 318.06 square miles (823.8 km), of which 317.53 square miles (822.4 km) (or 99.83%) is land and 0.54 square miles (1.4 km) (or 0.17%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 16,582 people, 6,544 households, and 4,764 families residing in the county. The population density was 52 per square mile (20 /km). There were 7,353 housing units at an average density of 23 per square mile (8.9 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 98.81% White, 0.14% Black or African American, 0.24% Native American, 0.13% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.04% from other races, and 0.63% from two or more races. 0.62% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 6,544 households out of which 33.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.90% were married couples living
    6.00
    2 votes
    198
    Surry County

    Surry County

    Surry County is a county located in the Hampton Roads metropolitan area of the Commonwealth of Virginia, a state of the United States. As of 2010, the population was 7,058. Its county seat is Surry. In 1652, Surry County was formed from the portion of James City County south of the James River. In 1676, a local Jacobean brick house was occupied as a fort or "castle" during Bacon's Rebellion against the Royal Governor, Sir William Berkeley. Today the landmark is known as Bacon's Castle. One hundred years later, Surry County became part of the new Commonwealth of Virginia, one of the first 13 United States after winning independence from Great Britain in the American Revolutionary War. During the American Civil War (1861–1865), the Confederate Army had units called the Surry Light Artillery and the Surry Cavalry. The county is known for farming, curing Virginia Hams, and harvesting lumber, notably Virginia Pine. For more than 350 years, Surry County has maintained its heritage and rural nature. It is convenient to the Jamestown Ferry and Virginia's Historic Triangle of the colonial era, featuring the major tourist attractions of Jamestown, Williamsburg, and Yorktown, linked by the
    6.00
    2 votes
    199
    Sussex County

    Sussex County

    Sussex County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 12,087. Its county seat is Sussex. The county is named after the county of Sussex, England. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 493 square miles (1,276 km²), of which 491 square miles (1,271 km²) is land and 2 square miles (5 km²) (0.43%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 12,504 people, 4,126 households, and 2,809 families residing in the county. The population density was 26 people per square mile (10/km²). There were 4,653 housing units at an average density of 10 per square mile (4/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 36.39% White, 62.13% Black or African American, 0.13% Native American, 0.12% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.54% from other races, and 0.67% from two or more races. 0.82% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 4,126 households out of which 28.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.00% were married couples living together, 18.90% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.90% were non-families. 28.20% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.40% had
    6.00
    2 votes
    200
    Tyler County

    Tyler County

    Tyler County is a county located in the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 9,208. The County is named after John Tyler, Sr., father of President John Tyler. Its county seat is Middlebourne. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 261 square miles (675 km²), of which 258 square miles (667 km²) is land and 3 square miles (8 km²) (1.20%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 9,592 people, 3,836 households, and 2,834 families residing in the county. The population density was 37 people per square mile (14/km²). There were 4,780 housing units at an average density of 19 per square mile (7/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 99.35% White, 0.02% Black or African American, 0.05% Native American, 0.08% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.03% from other races, and 0.45% from two or more races. 0.43% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 3,836 households out of which 30.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.40% were married couples living together, 8.60% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.10% were non-families. 23.10% of all households were made up of
    6.00
    2 votes
    201
    Carroll County

    Carroll County

    Carroll County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky and located at the confluence of the Kentucky and Ohio rivers. It was formed in 1838 and named for Charles Carroll of Carrollton, the last living signer of the Declaration of Independence. The population was 10,811 at the 2010 census. Its county seat is Carrollton, Kentucky. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 137.27 square miles (355.5 km), of which 130.09 square miles (336.9 km) (or 94.77%) is land and 7.18 square miles (18.6 km) (or 5.23%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 10,155 people, 3,940 households, and 2,722 families residing in the county. The population density was 78 per square mile (30 /km). There were 4,439 housing units at an average density of 34 per square mile (13 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 95.16% White, 1.94% Black or African American, 0.23% Native American, 0.17% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 1.42% from other races, and 1.04% from two or more races. 3.25% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 3,940 households out of which 33.10% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.40% were married couples living
    5.00
    3 votes
    202
    Ohio County

    Ohio County

    Ohio County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of 2010, the population was 23,842. Its county seat is Hartford. The county is named for the Ohio River, which originally formed its northern boundary. It is a dry county, which means that the sale of alcohol is restricted or prohibited. Ohio County is part of the Western Coal Fields region of Kentucky. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 596.73 square miles (1,545.5 km), of which 593.79 square miles (1,537.9 km) (or 99.51%) is land and 2.94 square miles (7.6 km) (or 0.49%) is water. Much of Ohio County is farmland and the eastern and northern parts have rolling hills. Of the 120 counties in Kentucky, it is the fifth largest. Ohio County was formed on December 17, 1798 from portions of Hardin County, Kentucky. It was named for the Ohio River, which originally formed its northern boundary, but lost its northern portions in 1829, when Daviess County and Hancock County were formed. The first settlements in Ohio County were Barnetts Station and Hartford. In the American Civil War the courthouse in Hartford was burnt down by CSA forces in 1865. Ohio County is famous for its coal mines which in the
    5.50
    2 votes
    203
    Page County

    Page County

    Page County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 24,042. Its county seat is Luray. Page County was formed in 1831 from Shenandoah and Rockingham counties. It was named for John Page, Governor of Virginia from 1802 to 1805. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 314 square miles (813 km), of which 311 square miles (806 km) is land and 3 square miles (8 km) (0.95%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 23,177 people, 9,305 households, and 6,634 families residing in the county. The population density was 74 people per square mile (29/km). There were 10,557 housing units at an average density of 34 per square mile (13/km). The racial makeup of the county was 96.65% White, 2.61% Black or African American, 0.15% Native American, 0.24% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.48% from other races, and 0.68% from two or more races. 1.08% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 9,305 households out of which 29.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.80% were married couples living together, 10.50% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.70% were
    5.50
    2 votes
    204
    Shelby County

    Shelby County

    Shelby County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of 2010, the population was 42,074. Its name honors Isaac Shelby, the first Governor of Kentucky. The county seat is Shelbyville. The county is part of the Louisville/Jefferson County, KY–IN Metropolitan Statistical Area. Shelby County was historically a prohibition or completely dry county, but the city of Shelbyville is now wet (i.e., allows retail alcohol sales), and the county has voted to allow restaurants outside Shelbyville to sell alcoholic beverages by the drink if they seat at least 100 patrons and derive at least 70% of their total sales from food. Today, Shelby County is officially classified by the Kentucky Office of Alcoholic Beverage Control as a moist county. Shelby County's motto is "Good Land, Good Living, Good People". One of the earliest families to settle in Shelby County was that of Daniel Ketcham of Washington County, Maryland. Ketcham, who arrived in 1784, had been a soldier in the American Revolution. He had 9 children. His oldest, John Ketcham, moved to Indiana, become involved in politics, and laid the groundwork for the creation of Indiana University. Another early settler was Thomas
    5.50
    2 votes
    205
    Franklin County

    Franklin County

    Franklin County is a county located in the Blue Ridge foothills of the U.S. state of Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 56,159. Its county seat is Rocky Mount. The Roanoke River forms its northeast boundary with Bedford County. Franklin County is part of the Roanoke Metropolitan Statistical Area and located in the Roanoke Region of Virginia. The Blue Ridge Foothills had long been inhabited by indigenous peoples. At the time of European encounter, mostly Siouan-speaking tribes lived in this area. The county was formed in 1785 from parts of Bedford and Henry counties. It was named for Benjamin Franklin. During Prohibition, local wits named Franklin County the "Moonshine Capital of the World", a name used today by the local chamber of commerce as a historic identification. Moonshine is still being made in the area. In the 1920s, it was estimated that 99 out of every 100 Franklin County residents were in some way involved in the illegal liquor trade. In 2002, a book was published about The Great Moonshine Conspiracy Trial of 1935 in the county. The 2012 movie Lawless is set in Franklin County during the Prohibition era. Since the 1980s, much residential development has occurred
    6.00
    1 votes
    206
    Crittenden County

    Crittenden County

    Crittenden County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky.It was formed in 1842. As of 2010, the population was 9,315. Its county seat is Marion. The county is named for John J. Crittenden who was Governor of Kentucky 1848-1850. Generally pro-Confederate during the American Civil War, both armies passed through the county repeatedly and several skirmishes took place. The county court house was burned by guerrillas in 1865, during the last months of the war. It is a prohibition or dry county. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 370.95 square miles (960.8 km), of which 362.14 square miles (937.9 km) (or 97.63%) is land and 8.81 square miles (22.8 km) (or 2.37%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 9,384 people, 3,829 households, and 2,707 families residing in the county. The population density was 26 per square mile (10 /km). There were 4,410 housing units at an average density of 12 per square mile (4.6 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 98.24% White, 0.65% Black or African American, 0.15% Native American, 0.09% Asian, 0.14% from other races, and 0.74% from two or more races. 0.51% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any
    5.00
    2 votes
    207
    Danville

    Danville

    Danville is an independent city in Virginia, United States, bounded by Pittsylvania County, Virginia and Caswell County, North Carolina. It was the last capital of the Confederate States of America. The Bureau of Economic Analysis combines the city of Danville with Pittsylvania county for statistical purposes under the Danville, Virginia Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 43,055 according to the 2010 U.S. Census. It hosts the Danville Braves baseball club of the Appalachian League. Dan River Industries closed its local mill in 2006, leaving a large number of Danvillians without jobs. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 43.9 square miles (114 km), of which 43.1 square miles (112 km) is land and 0.9 square miles (2.3 km) is water. As of 2010, Danville had a population of 43,055. Races in Danville were White Non-Hispanic 46.7%, African American 48.3%, Hispanic 2.9%, Asian 0.9%, American Indian or Alaska Native 0.2%, and two or more races 1.3%. 25.4% of the population Never Married, 46.6% are married, 5.4% are separated. 11.6% are widowed, 11.0% are divorced. There were 59 registered sex offenders living in Danville in early
    5.00
    2 votes
    208
    Todd County

    Todd County

    Todd County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of 2010, the population is 12,460. Its county seat is Elkton. The county is named for Colonel John Todd, who was killed at the Battle of Blue Licks in 1782. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 376.97 square miles (976.3 km), of which 376.35 square miles (974.7 km) (or 99.84%) is land and 0.62 square miles (1.6 km) (or 0.16%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 11,971 people, 4,569 households, and 3,367 families residing in the county. The population density was 32 per square mile (12 /km). There were 5,121 housing units at an average density of 14 per square mile (5.4 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 89.32% White, 8.75% Black or African American, 0.15% Native American, 0.17% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.87% from other races, and 0.71% from two or more races. 1.66% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 4,569 households out of which 33.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.70% were married couples living together, 11.60% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.30% were non-families. 23.00% of all households
    5.00
    2 votes
    209
    Gilmer County

    Gilmer County

    Gilmer County is a county located in the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 8,693. Its county seat is Glenville. Gilmer County was formed in 1845 from parts of Lewis and Kanawha Counties, and named for Thomas Walker Gilmer, Governor of Virginia from 1840 to 1841. Gilmer was later a representative in the United States Congress and Secretary of the Navy in President John Tyler's cabinet. Cedar Creek State Park offers camping, hunting, fishing and hiking. The West Virginia State Folk Festival is held each June. Glenville State College has a full community activity center, a state-of-the-art library, and a complete collection of hand-carved, West Virginia–native birds on public display. The Gilmer County Recreation Center Complex includes a small golf course, a convention / reunion hall, and bunk houses. Gilmer County is home to ten nationally registered historic landmarks, the Cedar Creek Backway, and the annual West Virginia Folk Festival. Media outlets for the community include The Glenville Democrat/Pathfinder, the county newspaper, and Two-Lane Livin', a regional magazine. The Federal Correction Institution - Gilmer, located on Route 5, is a
    4.50
    2 votes
    210
    Whitley County

    Whitley County

    Whitley County is a situated in the U.S. state of Kentucky. The population is 35,637 as of the 2010 Census. The county seat is at Williamsburg, though the largest city is Corbin, and the county's District Court (a trial court of limited jurisdiction) sits in both cities. The Corbin, KY Micropolitan Statistical Area includes all of Whitley County, but does not include all of the city of Corbin. Whitley County was created on January 17, 1818 from adjacent Knox County, Kentucky . In the years prior to its establishment as an independent county, many skirmishes were fought between native Indians and hunters and trappers in the area. The namesake of the county, Colonel William Whitley, is famous locally for fighting many of these battles within the area, safeguarding the Wilderness Road, as well as for his service in the War of 1812, where he was killed at the Battle of the Thames. The county seat, Williamsburg, is also named for Colonel Whitley, with the first court held at the home of the town's earliest resident, Samuel Cox . Its rugged terrain, densely forested woodlands, and a history of conflict with local Indian tribes all combined to make for a very slow rate of growth in
    4.50
    2 votes
    211
    Woodford County

    Woodford County

    Woodford County is a county located in the heart of the Bluegrass region of the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of 2000, the population was 23,208. Its county seat is Versailles. The county is named for General William Woodford, who was with General George Washington at Valley Forge. It is part of the Lexington-Fayette, KY Metropolitan Statistical Area. Woodford County is home to Woodford Reserve, the Kentucky bourbon manufactured at the Labrot & Graham Distillery. Established in 1812, it is the oldest Bourbon distillery in the state. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 191.98 square miles (497.2 km), of which 190.68 square miles (493.9 km) (or 99.32%) is land and 1.30 square miles (3.4 km) (or 0.68%) is water. The county was formed from a part of Fayette County, Virginia in 1788. It was named for William Woodford, an American Revolutionary War general from Virginia who died while a prisoner of war in 1780. It was the last of the original 9 counties established that formed the Commonwealth of Kentucky in 1792. Scott County was formed from part of the county in 1792. Franklin County took another part of the county in 1794. As of the census of 2000, there were
    4.50
    2 votes
    212
    Carlisle County

    Carlisle County

    Carlisle County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was formed in 1886 and as of 2010, had a population of 5,104. Its county seat is Bardwell, Kentucky. The county is named for John Griffin Carlisle, a Speaker of the United States House of Representatives from Kentucky. Carlisle is a prohibition or dry county. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 199.02 square miles (515.5 km), of which 192.49 square miles (498.5 km) (or 96.72%) is land and 6.54 square miles (16.9 km) (or 3.29%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 5,351 people, 2,208 households, and 1,574 families residing in the county. The population density was 28 per square mile (11 /km). There were 2,490 housing units at an average density of 13 per square mile (5.0 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 97.78% White, 0.95% Black or African American, 0.41% Native American, 0.07% Asian, 0.22% from other races, and 0.56% from two or more races. 0.82% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 2,208 households out of which 30.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.50% were married couples living together, 9.30% had a female
    5.00
    1 votes
    213
    Caroline County

    Caroline County

    Caroline County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 28,545. Its county seat is Bowling Green. Caroline County is also home to The Meadow stables, the birthplace of the renowned racehorse Secretariat, winner of the 1973 Kentucky Derby, Preakness Stakes and Belmont Stakes; the Triple Crown. Caroline County was established in the British Colony of Virginia in 1728 from Essex, King and Queen, and King William counties. It was named for Caroline of Ansbach, the wife of King George II of Great Britain. During the Colonial Period, Caroline County was the birthplace of Thoroughbred horse racing in North America. Arabian horses were imported from England to provide the basis for American breeding stock. Patriot Edmund Pendleton played a large role in the Virginia Resolution for Independence (1775). Caroline native John Penn was a signer of the Declaration of Independence, albeit as a delegate from North Carolina. Explorers William Clark and his slave York were members of the Lewis and Clark Expedition (1803–1805), and William's older brother, General George Rogers Clark--conqueror of the old Northwest Territory and Revolutionary War hero. Both
    5.00
    1 votes
    214
    Dickenson County

    Dickenson County

    Dickenson County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 15,903. Its county seat is Clintwood. Dickenson County, formed in 1880 from parts of Buchanan County, Russell County, and Wise County, is Virginia's youngest county. It was named for William J. Dickenson, delegate to the Virginia General Assembly from Russell County, 1859–1861, 1865–1867, and 1877-1882. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 334 square miles (865.1 km²), of which 332 square miles (859.9 km²) is land and 2 square miles (5.2 km²) (0.57%) is water. The county is divided into five supervisor districts: Clintwood, Ervinton, Kenady, Sandlick, and Willis. As of the census of 2000, there were 16,395 people, 6,732 households, and 4,887 families residing in the county. The population density was 49 people per square mile (19/km²). There were 7,684 housing units at an average density of 23 per square mile (9/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 98.96% White, 0.35% Black or African American, 0.12% Native American, 0.07% Asian, 0.05% from other races, and 0.45% from two or more races. 0.43% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.
    5.00
    1 votes
    215
    Jackson County

    Jackson County

    Jackson County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. It was formed in 1858 and was named for President Andrew Jackson. As of 2010, the population was 13,494. Its county seat is McKee. It is a prohibition or dry county. Jackson County is home to the Daniel Boone National Forest. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 346.57 square miles (897.6 km), of which 346.33 square miles (897.0 km) (or 99.93%) is land and 0.24 square miles (0.62 km) (or 0.07%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 13,495 people, 5,307 households, and 3,953 families residing in the county. The population density was 39 per square mile (15 /km). There were 6,065 housing units at an average density of 18 per square mile (6.9 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 99.17% White, 0.05% Black or African American, 0.19% Native American, 0.01% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.04% from other races, and 0.52% from two or more races. 0.53% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 5,307 households out of which 35.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.20% were married couples living together, 10.30% had a female householder with no
    5.00
    1 votes
    216
    Kenton County

    Kenton County

    Kenton County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Kentucky, United States. It was formed in 1840. In 2010, the population was 159,720. It is the third most populous county in Kentucky behind Jefferson County and Fayette County. Its county seats are Covington and Independence. It was, until November 24, 2010, the only county in Kentucky to have two legally recognized county seats; Campbell County now joins Kenton County in that distinction. The county is named for Simon Kenton, a frontiersman notable in the early history of the state. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 164.38 square miles (425.7 km), of which 161.97 square miles (419.5 km) (or 98.53%) is land and 2.42 square miles (6.3 km) (or 1.47%) is water. The county is located at the confluence of the Licking River and Ohio River, in the Outer Bluegrass area of the Bluegrass region of the state. The elevation in the county ranges from 455 feet (139 m) to 960 feet (293 m) above sea level. As of the census of 2000, there were 151,464 people, 59,444 households, and 39,470 families living in the county. The population density was 935 per square mile (361 /km). There were 63,571 housing units at an
    5.00
    1 votes
    217
    King William County

    King William County

    King William County is a county located about 35 miles northeast of Richmond in the U.S. state of Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 15,935. Its county seat is King William. For thousands of years before European contact, indigenous peoples of North America lived in the Tidewater area of present-day Virginia. At the time of the founding of Jamestown, 30 Virginia Indian tribes comprised the Powhatan paramountcy, numbering 14,000-21,000 people. The Algonquian-speaking Mattaponi Indian Tribe and Upper Mattaponi Indian Tribe, among the 11 tribes recognized by the state of Virginia, are located in the county. The Mattaponi are one of two Virginia Indian tribes who still occupy reservation land first allocated by the English under treaty in the 17th century. English colonists formed King William County in 1702 out of King and Queen County. The county is named for William of Orange, King of England. The Courthouse, built in 1725, is the oldest courthouse in continuous use in the United States. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 286 square miles (740.7 km), of which 275 square miles (712.2 km) is land and 10 square miles (25.9 km) (3.58%) is water.
    5.00
    1 votes
    218
    Logan County

    Logan County

    Logan County is a county located in the southwest area of the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of 2000, the population was 26,573. Its county seat is Russellville. The county is named for Benjamin Logan, a Revolutionary War militia colonel and local leader. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 557.10 square miles (1,442.9 km), of which 555.68 square miles (1,439.2 km) (or 99.75%) is land and 1.41 square miles (3.7 km) (or 0.25%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 26,573 people, 10,506 households, and 7,574 families residing in the county. The population density was 48 per square mile (19 /km). There were 11,875 housing units at an average density of 21 per square mile (8.1 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 90.70% White, 7.62% Black or African American, 0.21% Native American, 0.17% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.33% from other races, and 0.96% from two or more races. 1.08% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 10,506 households out of which 33.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.20% were married couples living together, 11.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.90% were
    5.00
    1 votes
    219
    Patrick County

    Patrick County

    Patrick County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 18,490. Its county seat is Stuart. It is located within both the rolling hills and valleys of the Piedmont Region of Virginia and mountainous Southwest Virginia. Patrick County was formed in 1791, when Patrick Henry County was divided into Patrick County and Henry County. Patrick Henry County was named for Patrick Henry, and was formed in 1777. Prior to the formation of Patrick County, one of the Virginia colony's first frontier forts lay within the boundaries of what was then Halifax County on the banks of the North Mayo River. The location of Fort Mayo, now marked by a Virginia state historic marker, lies within present-day Patrick County. It was one of a number of such forts built from the Potomac River south to North Carolina, and was commanded by Captain Samuel Harris in 1756, the year in which George Washington made a tour of Fort Mayo and several other forts on the Virginia frontier. Fort Mayo was the southernmost of the Virginia frontier forts and saw action during the French and Indian War. One of Patrick County's most prominent early settlers was Col. Abraham Penn (sometimes
    5.00
    1 votes
    220
    Trigg County

    Trigg County

    Trigg County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was formed in 1820. As of 2000, the population was 12,597. Its county seat is Cadiz. The county is named for Stephen Trigg, a frontier officer in the American Revolutionary War who died in the Battle of Blue Licks. Trigg was a prohibition or dry county until 2009, when the county's voters narrowly approved a referendum to repeal the prohibition on alcohol sales. Trigg County is governed by a Fiscal Court, which is led by a Judge-Executive. The current Judge-Executive is Stanley H. Humphries (R). Trigg County is part of the Clarksville, TN–KY Metropolitan Statistical Area. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 481.13 square miles (1,246.1 km), of which 443.12 square miles (1,147.7 km) (or 92.10%) is land and 38.01 square miles (98.4 km) (or 7.90%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 12,597 people, 5,215 households, and 3,765 families residing in the county. The population density was 28 per square mile (11 /km). There were 6,698 housing units at an average density of 15 per square mile (5.8 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 88.34% White, 9.79% Black or African American, 0.21%
    5.00
    1 votes
    221
    Monongalia County

    Monongalia County

    Monongalia County, known locally as Mon County, is a county located in the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 96,189. Its county seat is at Morgantown. The county is included in the Morgantown, West Virginia Metropolitan Statistical Area, and is the largest county in North-Central West Virginia. It is defined entirely as part of the Pittsburgh media market. Monongalia County takes its name from the Monongahela River. The name Monongalia may be a misspelling of Monongahela. Alternatively, the conventional Latinate ending "-ia" (designating "land of..." or "country of..." — as in Arabia, Bolivia or Columbia) may have been added to Monongahela (i.e., "Land of the Monongahela"). Monongalia County was formed in 1776 when Virginia's remote District of West Augusta was divided into three counties: Ohio, Yohogania and Monongalia, all named for their most prominent rivers. Ohio County then encompassed most of the western region of the district bordering the Ohio River, including parts of what is now southwestern Pennsylvania. Yohogania County consisted of much of what is now southwestern Pennsylvania and the present counties of Hancock and the northern
    4.00
    2 votes
    222
    Pendleton County

    Pendleton County

    Pendleton County is a county located in the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 7,695. Its county seat is Franklin. It was created by the Virginia General Assembly in 1788 from parts of Augusta, Hardy, and Rockingham Counties and was named for Edmund Pendleton (1721–1803), a distinguished Virginia statesman and jurist. Pendleton County was strongly pro-Confederate during the American Civil War, but in 1863 it was included by the federal government in the new state of West Virginia against the inhabitants' wishes. Spruce Knob, located in Pendleton County, is the highest point in the state and in the Alleghenies, its elevation being 4,863 feet. Parts of the Monongahela and George Washington National Forests are also located in Pendleton. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 698 square miles (1,808 km²), of which 698 square miles (1,807 km²) is land and 0 square miles (1 km²) (0.04%) is water. Pendleton County, West Virginia As of the census of 2000, there were 8,196 people, 3,350 households, and 2,355 families residing in the county. The population density was 12 people per square mile (5/km²). There were 5,102
    4.00
    2 votes
    223
    Bell County

    Bell County

    Bell County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was formed August 1, 1867, from parts of Knox and Harlan Counties and augmented from Knox County in 1872. As of 2010 the population was 28,691. Its county seat is Pineville. The county is named for Joshua Fry Bell, and was originally called "Josh Bell" but shortened to "Bell" by 1880. Bell County is a dry county, meaning that the sale of alcohol is prohibited. The Middlesborough, KY Micropolitan Statistical Area includes all of Bell County. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 361.35 square miles (935.9 km), of which 360.77 square miles (934.4 km) (or 99.84%) is land and 0.58 square miles (1.5 km) (or 0.16%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 30,060 people, 12,004 households, and 8,522 families residing in the county. The population density was 83 per square mile (32 /km). There were 13,341 housing units at an average density of 37 per square mile (14 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 96.02% White, 2.40% Black or African American, 0.25% Native American, 0.35% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.12% from other races, and 0.83% from two or more races. 0.65% of the population
    4.00
    1 votes
    224
    Franklin County

    Franklin County

    Franklin County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was formed in 1795 from parts of Woodford, Mercer and Shelby counties. As of 2007, its population was 48,183. Its county seat is Frankfort, the state capital. It was named after the American inventor and statesman Benjamin Franklin. Franklin County is part of the Frankfort micropolitan area. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 212.11 square miles (549.4 km), of which 210.46 square miles (545.1 km) (or 99.22%) is land and 1.65 square miles (4.3 km) (or 0.78%) is water. Franklin County's voter registration is overwhelmingly Democratic. Registered Democrats outnumber Republicans by a ratio of more than 4 to 1. . However, in national elections the county has supported both Democrats and Republicans. In 2000 Democrat Al Gore won 50% of the vote to Republican George W. Bush's 47%. In 2004, Bush won 50% of the vote to Democrat John Kerry's 48%. In 2008 Republican John McCain defeated Democrat Barack Obama 49.47% to 48.87%, a difference of only 144 votes. As of the census of 2000, there were 47,687 people, 19,907 households, and 12,840 families residing in the county. The population density was
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    Harlan County

    Harlan County

    Harlan County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was formed in 1819. As of 2010, the population was 29,278. Its county seat is Harlan. The Commonwealth's highest natural point, Black Mountain (4,145 feet (1,263 m)), is in Harlan County. With regard to the sale of alcohol, it is classified as a moist county—a county in which alcohol sales are prohibited (a dry county), but containing a "wet" city, in this case Cumberland, where package alcohol sales are allowed. In Harlan City, restaurants seating 100+ may serve alcoholic beverages Harlan County was formed in 1819 from a part of Knox County. It is named after Silas Harlan. A pioneer, he was born on March 17, 1753 in Berkeley County, West Virginia (when it was still part of Virginia), the son of George and Ann (Hurst) Harlan. Journeying to Kentucky as a young man with James Harrod in 1774, Harlan served as scout, hunter, and held the rank of Major in the Continental Army. Harlan assisted Harrod's party in Harrodsburg to deliver gunpowder to settlers in Kentucky, and to assist them against the British in the Revolutionary War. Harlan built a log stockade with the help of his uncle Jacob and his brother James near
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    McCreary County

    McCreary County

    McCreary County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of 2010, the population was 18,306. Its county seat is Whitley City. The county is named for James B. McCreary, a Confederate war hero and Governor of Kentucky from 1875 to 1879. It is the only Kentucky county to not have a single incorporated city. Because of this, county government is the sole local government agency for the entire county. Attractions in McCreary County include the Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area, Cumberland Falls State Park, and the Big South Fork Scenic Railway, which tours several former coal camps. The majority of the county is owned by the federal government. 63% is owned and managed by the Daniel Boone National Forest, and 18% owned and managed by the National Park Service as the Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area. McCreary County was formed on March 12, 1912, the final county in order of formation. The present county boundaries contain 427.7 square miles (1,107.7 km) of land area. The majority of the county was carved out of Wayne and Whitley Counties, with a large center strip following the rail line and roadway from Pulaski County. The early history of
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    Spencer County

    Spencer County

    Spencer County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was formed from land from nearby existing counties in 1824. The population was 17,061 in the 2010 Census. Its county seat is Taylorsville. The county was named for Spier Spencer. Taylorsville Lake, located primarily within Spencer County, serves as a major economic resource for the area. Spencer was a dry county until 2009 when the county's residents voted to overturn the ban on alcohol sales. From 2000 to 2005, Spencer County ranked 19th out of all U.S. counties in percent growth, with a 33% increase. It is part of the Louisville/Jefferson County, KY–IN Metropolitan Statistical Area. Spencer County was formed in January 1824, by the 32nd Kentucky General Assembly. The land that now makes up Spencer County was taken from Bullitt County, Shelby County, and Nelson County. Spencer County became Kentucky's 77th county. The county was named for Kentucky's own Captain Spier Spencer, a hero who fought and died in the Battle of Tippecanoe. Later that year, in December 1824, Taylorsville was made the county seat. In 1829, the city was incorporated. During the American Civil War, the courthouse at Taylorsville was burned by
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    Boyle County

    Boyle County

    Boyle County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. Its county seat is Danville. In 2010, its population was 28,432. It was formed in 1842 and named for John Boyle (1774–1835), a U.S. Representative, chief justice of the Kentucky Court of Appeals and later federal judge for the District of Kentucky. The county is part of the Danville micropolitan area. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 182.99 square miles (473.9 km), of which 181.90 square miles (471.1 km) (or 99.40%) is land and 1.09 square miles (2.8 km) (or 0.60%) is water. In 1820, a portion of Casey County, now south of KY Route 300, was annexed to Mercer County. This became part of Boyle County when Boyle County was formed on February 15, 1842 from sections of Lincoln County and Mercer County. It is named for John Boyle, Congressman, Chief Justice of the Kentucky Court of Appeals, and U.S. District Judge. During the American Civil War, the Battle of Perryville took place here on October 8, 1862, fought between the Confederate Army of the Mississippi and the Union Army of the Ohio. 7407 men fell in the battle. As of the census of 2000, there were 27,697 people, 10,574 households, and
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    Colonial Heights

    Colonial Heights

    Colonial Heights is an independent city in Virginia, United States. The population was 17,411 as of 2010. The Bureau of Economic Analysis combines the City of Colonial Heights (along with the City of Petersburg) with Dinwiddie County for statistical purposes. It is located in the Tri-Cities area of the Richmond-Petersburg region and is a portion of the Richmond Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). Like much of eastern Virginia, the site of Colonial Heights was located within the Algonquian-speaking confederation known as Tenakomakah, ruled by Chief Powhatan, when the English colonists arrived at Jamestown on May 14, 1607. Captain John Smith's early map of Virginia testifies that the present area of Colonial Heights included the principal town of the Appamattuck subtribe, led by their weroance, Coquonasum, and his sister, Oppussoquionuske. In the aftermath of the Indian attacks of 1622 and 1644, they became tributary to England and relocated to nearby Ettrick, and its opposite bank, near Fort Henry (within modern-day Petersburg, Virginia). The area including present-day Colonial Heights was made a part of "Henrico Cittie", one of 4 huge "incorporations" formed in the Virginia Colony
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    230
    Cumberland County

    Cumberland County

    Cumberland County is a county located in the state of Kentucky in the United States. It was formed in 1799. As of 2010, the population was 6,856. Its county seat is Burkesville, Kentucky. The county is named for the Cumberland River; it is a prohibition or dry county. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 310.85 square miles (805.1 km), of which 305.82 square miles (792.1 km) (or 98.38%) is land and 5.02 square miles (13.0 km) (or 1.61%) is water. Major waterways include the Cumberland River and a small branch of Dale Hollow Lake which covers the southern end of the county. Thomas Lincoln 1780-1844, the first Constable of Cumberland County, KY, was the son of Hannaniah Lincoln 1756-1816. His bond for constable was signed by his father-in-law, Jesse Gee. Thomas Lincoln moved to Preble County, Ohio and later to Montgomery County, Indiana. This Thomas Lincoln was a half second cousin to Thomas Lincoln, father of U.S. President Abraham Lincoln. The first American oil well was struck 3 miles north of Burkesville in 1829 on highway 61, but it is generally not recognized as such because the drillers were not searching for oil. Cumberland County was the birthplace of
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    Edmonson County

    Edmonson County

    Edmonson County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was formed in 1826. As of 2007, the population was 11,978. It is included in the Bowling Green Metropolitan Statistical Area. Its county seat is Brownsville. The county is named for Captain John Edmonson (1764–1813), a veteran of the American Revolutionary War who was killed at the Battle of Frenchtown during the War of 1812. The sale of alcohol is currently prohibited in Edmonson County. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 308.01 square miles (797.7 km), of which 302.62 square miles (783.8 km) (or 98.25%) is land and 5.39 square miles (14.0 km) (or 1.75%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 11,644 people, 4,648 households, and 3,462 families residing in the county. The population density was 38 per square mile (15 /km). There were 6,104 housing units at an average density of 20 per square mile (7.7 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 98.39% White, 0.58% Black or African American, 0.44% Native American, 0.07% Asian, 0.06% from other races, and 0.46% from two or more races. 0.56% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 4,648 households out of
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    Essex County

    Essex County

    Essex County is a county located in the Middle Peninsula in the U.S. state of Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 11,151. Its county seat is Tappahannock. Essex County was established in 1692 from Rappahannock County. The county is named for either the shire or county in England, or for the Earl of Essex. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 286 square miles (740.7 km), of which 258 square miles (668.2 km) is land and 28 square miles (72.5 km) (9.84%) is water. Its main town, Tappahanock, is focused at the Rappahanock River. As of the census of 2000, there were 9,989 people, 3,995 households, and 2,740 families residing in the county. The population density was 39 people per square mile (15/km²). There were 4,926 housing units at an average density of 19 per square mile (7/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 57.96% White, 39.04% Black or African American, 0.55% Native American, 0.81% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.32% from other races, and 1.28% from two or more races. 0.72% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 3,995 households out of which 28.00% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.70% were
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    Fayette County

    Fayette County

    Fayette County is a county located in the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 46,039. Its county seat is Fayetteville. Fayette County was created by Act of the Virginia General Assembly, passed February 28, 1831, from parts of Greenbrier, Kanawha, Nicholas, and Logan counties. It was named in honor of the Marquis de la Fayette, who had played a key role assisting the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War. Virginia previously had a Fayette County, which was lost to form the new state of Kentucky. Accordingly, in the State records of Virginia, there will be listings for Fayette County from 1780–1792 and Fayette County from 1831-1863. Neither location is still located in Virginia and despite naming a county after him twice, Virginia no longer has a county named for the Marquis de la Fayette. A substantial portion was subdivided from Fayette County to form Raleigh County in 1850. Fayette was one of 50 counties that broke off from the rest of Virginia and formed the new state of West Virginia during the American Civil War. In 1871, an Act of the West Virginia Legislature severed a small portion to form part of Summers County. Fayette
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    Greensville County

    Greensville County

    Greensville County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 12,243. Its county seat is Emporia. Greensville County was established in 1781 from Brunswick County. The county is probably named for Sir Richard Grenville, leader of the settlement on Roanoke Island, 1585. There is also belief that it may be named after Nathanael Greene, a Major General of the Continental Army and one of George Washington's brightest officers. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 297 square miles (769.2 km), of which 295 square miles (764.0 km) is land and 1 square mile (2.6 km) (0.46%) is water. The Meherrin River forms the boundary between Greensville County and Southampton County. As of the census of 2000, there were 11,560 people, 3,375 households, and 2,396 families residing in the county. The population density was 39 people per square mile (15/km²). There were 3,765 housing units at an average density of 13 per square mile (5/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 38.94% White, 59.75% Black or African American, 0.10% Native American, 0.40% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.47% from other races, and 0.32% from two or more
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    Hampshire County

    Hampshire County

    Hampshire County is a county located in the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 23,964. Its county seat is Romney, West Virginia's oldest town (1762). Hampshire County was created by the Virginia General Assembly on December 13, 1753, from parts of Frederick and Augusta counties (Virginia) and is the oldest county in the state of West Virginia. The county lies in both West Virginia's Eastern Panhandle and Potomac Highlands regions. Hampshire County is part of the Winchester, VA-WV Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). Although its creation was authorized in 1753, Hampshire County was not actually organized until 1757 because the area was not considered safe due to the outbreak of the French and Indian War (1754–1763). According to Samuel Kercheval's A History of the Valley of Virginia (1833), the county was named in honor of its several prize hogs. The story goes that Thomas Fairfax, 6th Lord Fairfax of Cameron (1693-1781), who owned the Royal Grant to the area, came upon some very large hogs in Winchester and asked where they had been raised. He was told that they were from the South Branch Potomac River Valley (now Hampshire County). He remarked that when a
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    Hancock County

    Hancock County

    Hancock County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was formed in 1829. As of 2000, the population was 8,392. It is included in the Owensboro, Kentucky, Metropolitan Statistical Area. Its county seat is Hawesville. The county is named for John Hancock. Hancock is a prohibition or dry county. Hancock County is part of the Western Coal Fields region of Kentucky. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 198.92 square miles (515.2 km), of which 188.80 square miles (489.0 km) (or 94.91%) is land and 10.12 square miles (26.2 km) (or 5.09%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 8,392 people, 3,215 households, and 2,436 families residing in the county. The population density was 44 per square mile (17 /km). There were 3,600 housing units at an average density of 19 per square mile (7.3 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 97.97% White, 0.85% Black or African American, 0.29% Native American, 0.17% Asian, 0.17% from other races, and 0.56% from two or more races. 0.76% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 3,215 households out of which 36.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 64.40% were married
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    Hardy County

    Hardy County

    Hardy County is a county located in the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 14,025. Its county seat is Moorefield. Hardy County was created from Hampshire County in 1786 and named for Samuel Hardy, a distinguished Virginian. Through this county flows the South Branch Potomac River with its surrounding magnificent valley. Several miles wide, "the Valley," as it is commonly called, contains lands whose fertility lends itself to successful farming. Agriculture and stock raising have always been the main source of employment in this area, with corn, wheat, apples, peaches, melons, cattle and poultry having important interests. Truck-farming has a vital role, each household possessing its own small garden. On either side of the Valley are high mountains with rough terrain and heavy timber. Throughout the area wildlife is plentiful, and hunting has always been a major diversion and source of meat supply. In the winter snows are whipped by winds of gale force, and snowdrifts are usually numerous. The South Branch is a clear stream, quite wide, and of considerable depth in many places. Watering the Valley, the river abounds in fish and creates many picturesque
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    King George County

    King George County

    King George County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia, a state in the United States. As of 2010, the population was 23,584. Its county seat is King George. The county's largest employer is the U.S. Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division. It is adjacent to the two-lane, 2-mile long Harry W. Nice Memorial Bridge carrying U.S. Highway 301 over the Potomac River. It contains the ZIP codes 22448 (Dahlgren) and 22485 (all other locations). It is within the area code 540 and contains the exchanges: 775, 644, 663, and 653. Indigenous peoples of varying cultures lived along the waterways for thousands of years before Europeans arrived. Among the historic Native American tribes who came into conflict with the English were the Algonquian-speaking Nanzatico. In 1704 colonists retaliated for the tribe's attacking the farm of John Rowley, "known for his disputes" with them. They captured and shipped 40 people, including children older than 12, to Antigua in the Caribbean, where they were sold into slavery. King George County was established in 1720 when land was split from Richmond County, Virginia. The county is named for King George I of Great Britain. It was
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    Knott County

    Knott County

    Knott County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was formed in 1884. As of 2010, the population was 16,346. Its county seat is Hindman. The county is named for James Proctor Knott, Governor of Kentucky (1883–1887). It is a prohibition or dry county. Notable inhabitants include U.S. Congressman Carl D. Perkins, Appalachian author James Still, poet Albert Stewart, country music star David Tolliver from Halfway to Hazard and actress Rebecca Gayheart. Its county seat is home to the Hindman Settlement School, founded as America's first settlement school. The Knott County town of Pippa Passes is home to Alice Lloyd College. Tourism is increasing in the county, especially the popularity of elk viewing. Knott County and its surrounding counties are home to 5,700 free ranging elk, the largest elk herd east of the Mississippi River. Knott County tourism has expanded in recent years, with the opening of an ATV Training Center dedicated to the safety of ATV usage amongst riders and the Knott County Sportsplex, a sports complex dedicated to bringing athletic opportunities to people of all ages, through indoor basketball courts, outside baseball fields, a soccer field, and a
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    Lincoln County

    Lincoln County

    Lincoln County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. The population was 24,742 in the 2010 Census. Its county seat is Stanford. Lincoln is a prohibition or "dry county" and is part of the Danville Micropolitan Statistical Area. Lincoln County, organized in 1780, was one of three counties formed out of the original Kentucky County, which then constituted the westernmost part of Virginia. The other counties were Fayette and Jefferson. In 1792 the three counties were separated from Virginia and became the Commonwealth of Kentucky, the 15th state. The county is named for American Revolutionary War General Benjamin Lincoln. It was not named for President Abraham Lincoln, who was born 29 years after its creation. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 336.47 square miles (871.5 km), of which 336.26 square miles (870.9 km) (or 99.94%) is land and 0.21 square miles (0.54 km) (or 0.06%) is water. Lincoln County is located in South Central Kentucky in the southern part of the ring of Knobs around the Bluegrass region. It includes the headwaters of the Green River. As of the census of 2000, there were 23,361 people, 9,206 households, and 6,729 families
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    Louisa County

    Louisa County

    Louisa County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 33,153. The county seat is Louisa. Louisa County was established in 1742 from Hanover County. The county is named for Princess Louise of Great Britain, youngest daughter of King George II, and wife of King Frederick V of Denmark. Patrick Henry lived for some time in Louisa County on Roundabout Creek in 1764. Henry was being mentored at that time by the Louisa County magnate Thomas Johnson the representative of Louisa County in the House of Burgesses. In 1765, Patrick Henry won his first election to represent Louisa County in the House of Burgesses. At the end of the eighteenth century and in the early nineteenth century, numerous free mixed-race families migrated together from here to Kentucky, where neighbors began to identify them as Melungeon. The Virginia Central Railroad was completed through Louisa County in 1838-1840. During the Civil War, it was an important supply line for the Confederate armies. As a result, several significant cavalry actions took place in the county, particularly one fought at Trevilians in 1864. The Twin Oaks Community is one of the country's oldest
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    Marion County

    Marion County

    Marion County is a county located in the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 56,418. Its county seat is Fairmont. Marion County was created in 1842 from parts of Monongalia and Harrison Counties, and named in honor of General Francis Marion, of American Revolutionary War fame, known in history as "The Swamp Fox." According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 311 square miles (807 km²), of which 310 square miles (802 km²) is land and 2 square miles (5 km²) (0.58%) is water. Marion County was formed on January 14, 1842 from portions of Harrison County and Monongalia County. It was named after Francis Marion, a.k.a. "Swamp Fox", a General in the Continental Army and later Brigade general of the South Carolina militia in the American Revolutionary War. As of the census of 2000, there were 56,598 people, 23,652 households, and 15,515 families residing in the county. The population density was 183 people per square mile (71/km²). There were 26,660 housing units at an average density of 86 per square mile (33/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 95.10% White, 3.22% Black or African American, 0.20% Native American, 0.41% Asian,
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    Marion County

    Marion County

    Marion County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of 2010, the population was 19,820. Its county seat is Lebanon. The county is named for Francis Marion. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 346.86 square miles (898.4 km), of which 346.39 square miles (897.1 km) (or 99.86%) is land and 0.47 square miles (1.2 km) (or 0.14%) is water. Marion County includes the geographic center of the state of Kentucky. The center is 3 miles NNW of Lebanon, just off KY 429. Marion county is Kentucky's most Catholic county. The first Catholic settlers in Kentucky came to Holy Cross in the western part of the county. As of the census of 2000, there were 18,212 people, 6,613 households, and 4,754 families residing in the county. The population density was 53 per square mile (20 /km). There were 7,277 housing units at an average density of 21 per square mile (8.1 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 89.17% White, 9.12% Black or African American, 0.09% Native American, 0.43% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.35% from other races, and 0.82% from two or more races. 0.79% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 6,613 households out of
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    Mecklenburg County

    Mecklenburg County

    Mecklenburg County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of 2010, the population was 32,727. Its county seat is Boydton. Mecklenburg County was established in 1765 from Lunenburg County. Mecklenburg County is governed by a 9-member Board of Supervisors. They serve as the legislating and policy body for the county enacting laws, ordinances, and taxes . They appoint a County Administrator to conduct day-to-day operations. H. Wayne Carter, III is the current County Administrator, Judy P. Sheffield is the current Assistant County Administrator. The board members are: Under the Virginia Constitution, each county and city within the state must install Constitutional Officers. Counties under the Traditional Form of Government must install all five officers. The majority of Virginia counties operate under the Traditional Form. Counties with the County Executive Form, Urban County Executive, or County Manager Plan of Government usually install just three (Clerk, Commonwealth Attorney, and Sheriff) opting for a Director of Finance appointed by the Board to take the place of the Commissioner of Revenue and Treasurer. Examples are (Fairfax, Henrico and Prince William
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    Menifee County

    Menifee County

    Menifee County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of 2010, the population was 6,306. Its county seat is Frenchburg. The county is named for Richard Hickman Menefee, U.S. Congressman, although the spelling has changed. It is a prohibition or dry county. Menifee County is located in the foothills of the Cumberland Plateau. It is part of the Mount Sterling Micropolitan Statistical Area. Menifee County was formed on May 29, 1869, from portions of Bath, Montgomery, Morgan, Powell, and Wolfe counties. In the 2008 Presidential Election Menifee County was one of eight in the state of Kentucky where the majority of voters voted for Barack Obama. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 206.03 square miles (533.6 km), of which 203.90 square miles (528.1 km) (or 98.97%) is land and 2.13 square miles (5.5 km) (or 1.03%) is water. Menifee County is mountainous and heavily forested. Much of the land is within Daniel Boone National Forest. Only about 10% of the county's land is in cultivated farms, and the county ranks 102nd of Kentucky's 120 counties in agricultural revenue. As of the census of 2000, there were 6,556 people, 2,537 households, and 1,900
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    Roanoke County

    Roanoke County

    Roanoke County is a county located in the U.S. state of the Commonwealth of Virginia. It is part of the Roanoke Metropolitan Statistical Area and located within the Roanoke Region of Virginia. As of the 2000 census, the population was 85,778. As of 2010, the population was 92,376. The independent cities of Roanoke and Salem (incorporated as such in 1884 and 1968 respectively) are located within the boundaries of Roanoke County, but are not a part of the county. The incorporated town of Vinton is the only incorporated municipality within the county. While significant areas of the county are rural and mountainous, most residents live in the suburbs near Roanoke and Salem in the Roanoke Valley. The county was established by an act of the Virginia Legislature on March 30, 1838 from the southern part of Botetourt County. It was named for the Roanoke River, which in turn was derived from a Native American term for money. Additional territory was transferred to Roanoke County from Montgomery County in 1845. Salem was originally the county seat. When Salem became an independent city, by agreement with the county the Roanoke County Courthouse remained in Salem and the two localities share a
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    Robertson County

    Robertson County

    Robertson County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of 2010, the population was 2,282. Its county seat is Mount Olivet, Kentucky. The county is named for George Robertson, a Kentucky Congressman from 1817 to 1821. Robertson is a prohibition or dry county. It is the smallest county by population and total area in Kentucky. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 100.11 square miles (259.3 km), the smallest county in Kentucky, of which 100.07 square miles (259.2 km) (or 99.96%) is land and 0.04 square miles (0.10 km) (or 0.04%) is water. Robertson County was formed on February 11, 1867 from portions of Bracken County, Harrison County, Mason County and Nicholas County. It was named after George Robertson, a judge and member of Congress. As of the census of 2000, there were 2,266 people, 866 households, and 621 families residing in the county. The population density was 23 per square mile (8.9 /km). There were 1,034 housing units at an average density of 10 per square mile (3.9 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 98.63% White, 0.04% Black or African American, 0.04% Native American, 0.22% from other races, and 1.06% from two or more races.
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    Simpson County

    Simpson County

    Simpson County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of 2000, the population was 16,405. Its county seat is Franklin. The county is named for Captain John Simpson, a Kentucky militia officer who fought in Battle of Fallen Timbers in the Northwest Indian War, and was killed in the Battle of River Raisin during the War of 1812. It is a limited dry county; sales of alcoholic beverages are prohibited except by the drink in restaurants in the city of Franklin that seat at least 100 diners and derive at least 70% of total revenues from food. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 236.19 square miles (611.7 km), all land. As of the census of 2000, there were 16,405 people, 6,415 households, and 4,638 families residing in the county. The population density was 70 per square mile (27 /km). There were 7,016 housing units at an average density of 30 per square mile (12 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 87.84% White, 10.22% Black or African American, 0.17% Native American, 0.55% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 0.30% from other races, and 0.87% from two or more races. 0.91% of the population were Hispanics or Latinos of any race. There were 6,415
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    Trimble County

    Trimble County

    Trimble County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of 2010, the population was 8,809. Its county seat is Bedford. The county is named for Robert Trimble. Trimble is a prohibition or dry county. It is part of the Louisville/Jefferson County, KY–IN Metropolitan Statistical Area. Trimble County is home to the Trimble County High School (TCHS), Trimble County Middle School (TCMS), Bedford Elementary School, and Milton Elementary School. Both Trimble County High School, and Trimble County Middle School's mascot is the Raider. Bedford Elementary's mascot is the Bear, and Milton Elementary's mascot is the Panther. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 156.23 square miles (404.6 km), of which 148.85 square miles (385.5 km) (or 95.28%) is land and 7.38 square miles (19.1 km) (or 4.72%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 8,125 people, 3,137 households, and 2,296 families residing in the county. The population density was 55 per square mile (21 /km). There were 3,437 housing units at an average density of 23 per square mile (8.9 /km). The racial makeup of the county was 97.90% White, 0.30% Black or African American, 0.37% Native American,
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    Wayne County

    Wayne County

    Wayne County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of 2010, the population was 20,813. Its county seat is Monticello. The county was named for Gen. Anthony Wayne. It is a prohibition or dry county. Wayne County was formed December 13, 1800 from Pulaski and Cumberland Counties. It was the 43rd county and is named for General "Mad Anthony" Wayne, a hero of the American Revolution and the Northwest Indian War. Wayne's victory at the Battle of Fallen Timbers virtually ended the Indian threat against Kentucky settlers. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 484.20 square miles (1,254.1 km), of which 459.40 square miles (1,189.8 km) (or 94.88%) is land and 24.80 square miles (64.2 km) (or 5.12%) is water. The county's elevation ranges from 723 feet (220 m) to 1,788 feet (545 m), at the Monticello/Wayne County Airport the elevation is 963 feet (294 m). Wayne County is located in the Pennyrile Plateau (image) and Eastern Coal Field (image) regions of Kentucky. Wayne County is on Eastern Time; however, its western border, shared with Clinton and Russell Counties, is part of the Eastern/Central time zone boundary, as is its southern border with Pickett
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