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Best House of All Time

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    1
    Hadlow Castle

    Hadlow Castle

    Hadlow Castle is a Grade I listed country house and tower in Hadlow, Kent, England. Hadlow Castle replaced the manor house of Hadlow Court Lodge. It was built over a number of years from the late 1780s, commissioned by Walter May in an ornate Gothic style. The architect was J. Dugdale,. his Son, Walter Barton May inherited the estate in 1823, and another inheritance in 1832 from his wife's family. He added a 170 feet (52 m) octagonal tower in 1838, the architect was George Ledwell Taylor. A 40 feet (12 m) octagonal lantern was added in 1840 and another smaller tower was added in 1852. This was dismantled in 1905. Walter Barton May died in 1858 and the estate was sold. Subsequent owners were Robert Rodger, JP, High Sheriff of Kent, in 1865. He died in 1882 and the castle was bought by Dr. MacGeagh, a Harley Street specialist in 1891. He would drive in his carriage to Tonbridge and catch the train to London thus being an early commuter. The castle passed to T E Foster MacGeagh and he sold it in 1919 to Henry Thomas Pearson, whose family occupied it until 1946. During the war it was used as a watchtower by the Royal Observer Corps. The unoccupied castle changed hands several times
    9.40
    5 votes
    2
    Eythrope

    Eythrope

    Eythrope (previously Ethorp) is a hamlet and country house in the parish of Waddesdon, in Buckinghamshire, England. It is located to the south east of the main village of Waddesdon. It was bought in the 1870s by a branch of the Rothschild family, and belongs to them to this day. The hamlet name is Anglo Saxon in origin, and means "island farm", referring to an island in the River Thame that flows by the hamlet. The medieval village of Eythrope is deserted and all that remains are some earthen banks and ditches on the eastern side of Eythrope Park. There was a manor house at this hamlet as early as 1309, when it was the home of the Arch family. It was extended in 1610 by Sir William Dormer. By the late 18th century it became one of the homes of Philip Stanhope, 5th Earl of Chesterfield, though he rarely used it, and it became empty and desolate. In 1875 the manor at Eythrope was bought by Alice de Rothschild for £180,000. She had been born in Frankfurt, the youngest of the seven children of Baron Anselm von Rothschild. She was the favourite child and inherited a large estate in Germany while still a minor. Orphaned young, she spent a lonely childhood living with various relations
    6.00
    8 votes
    3
    Newton History Museum at the Jackson Homestead

    Newton History Museum at the Jackson Homestead

    The Newton History Museum at the Jackson Homestead is a local history museum located at the Jackson Homestead in Newton, Massachusetts dedicated to the city's early development. Built in 1809, the homestead was a station on the underground railroad. Edward Jackson Edward Jackson was born in 1602, in the East End of London. Like his father, he was a nailmaker, and amassed a small fortune so that shortly after his arrival in New England, around 1642, he was able to purchase a house with several acres of land on Newton Corner. He would eventually become the largest landowner in Newton. His wife, Frances, died shortly after his arrival; little is known but for the fact that she produced a son, Sebas, who is believed to have been born over the Atlantic Ocean because his name is a contraction of the words sea born. There are no records of Sebas's older siblings, although they did exist; they are not identified and only Sebas is mentioned in Edward's will. Edward was admitted as a Freeman in 1645, at the age of 43, became a Cambridge Proprietor and was quickly immersed in the civil and religious life of colony and town alike. For nearly two decades Edward Jackson was Deputy to the Central
    7.67
    6 votes
    4
    Great Chalfield Manor

    Great Chalfield Manor

    Great Chalfield Manor is an English country house at Great Chalfield, near Bradford-on-Avon, Wiltshire. The house is a moated manor house built around 1465–1480 for Thomas Tropenell, a modest member of the landed gentry who made a fortune as a clothier. The independent hall, lit on both sides, is flanked by unusually symmetrical gabled cross wings, with oriel windows and lower gabled porches in the inner corners, in the north-facing former entrance court, for which the richest effects were reserved. Its external symmetry, unusual for its date, is superficial. The intimately connected parish church, largely rebuilt by Tropnell, also faces into the court, which was formerly entered obliquely through a gatehouse in the west wing; Nicholas Cooper observes of the church that "the probable need to pass through the house's forecourt in order to reach it neatly demonstrates the community of secular and religious authority". Part of a moat survives, but the forecourt has been opened up to the outside in a manner that changes its original inward-facing aspect. It was altered substantially (with some of the original character lost) after the Neale family commissioned the architect Thomas
    8.40
    5 votes
    5
    New Place

    New Place

    New Place (grid reference SP201548) is the name of William Shakespeare's final place of residence in Stratford-upon-Avon. He died there in 1616. Though the house no longer exists, the land is owned by the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust. The house rested on the corner of Chapel Street and Chapel Lane and was apparently the second-biggest dwelling in the town. It was built in 1483 by Hugh Clopton, a wealthy merchant and future Lord Mayor of the City of London. Built of timber and brick (then an innovation in Stratford) it had ten fireplaces, five handsome gables and grounds large enough to incorporate two barns and an orchard. Shakespeare bought the house in 1597, nine months after the death of his son Hamnet, for sixty British pounds. Shakespeare was associated with London for much of his life, and tradition states that he retired to Stratford in his later years, though he still visited London as late as 1614. He bought the house in 1597 but didn't move into it until 1610. In 1616 the house passed to his daughter Susanna Hall, and then his granddaughter, Elizabeth Hall, whose husband, Thomas Nash, owned the house next door. After Elizabeth died, the house was returned to the Clopton
    7.17
    6 votes
    6
    Lambton Castle

    Lambton Castle

    Lambton Castle, located in County Durham, England, between the City of Sunderland and the town of Chester-le-Street, is a stately home, the ancestral seat of the Lambton family, the Earls of Durham. It is a Grade II* listed building. Largely constructed in its present form in the early 19th century by John George Lambton, first Earl of Durham and one-time Governor General of Canada, it was built around the existing Harraton Hall, a 17th century mansion. The castle was designed by architects Joseph Bonomi the Elder and his son Ignatius and built in the style of a Norman castle, as was the fashion of the time. The building overlooks the wooded Wear Valley and it was paid for with coal mining wealth accumulated from the mines which ran below the castle and others right across County Durham. Later additions to the house built in 1862-5, including the great hall, were largely demolished in 1932. Also at this time, the contents were auctioned off to pay death duties and the family moved to the smaller Biddick Hall on the estate. The park that surrounds the castle is bordered by a high wall and is still used for an annual pheasant shoot. For a time in the 1970s, the castle's grounds were
    8.20
    5 votes
    7
    White House

    White House

    The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States. Located at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue Northwest, Washington, D.C., the house was designed by Irish-born James Hoban, and built between 1792 and 1800 of white-painted Aquia sandstone in the Neoclassical style. It has been the residence of every U.S. president since John Adams. When Thomas Jefferson moved into the house in 1801, he (with architect Benjamin Henry Latrobe) expanded the building outward, creating two colonnades that were meant to conceal stables and storage. In 1814, during the War of 1812, the mansion was set ablaze by the British Army in the Burning of Washington, destroying the interior and charring much of the exterior. Reconstruction began almost immediately, and President James Monroe moved into the partially reconstructed house in October 1817. Construction continued with the addition of the South Portico in 1824 and the North in 1829. Because of crowding within the executive mansion itself, President Theodore Roosevelt had all work offices relocated to the newly constructed West Wing in 1901. Eight years later, President William Howard Taft expanded the West
    8.20
    5 votes
    8
    Eastnor Castle

    Eastnor Castle

    Eastnor Castle is a 19th century mock castle, two miles from the town of Ledbury in Herefordshire, England, by the village of Eastnor. It was founded by John Cocks, 1st Earl Somers as his stately home and continues to be inhabited by his descendents. Currently (2011) in residence is the family of James Hervey-Bathurst, the grandson of Arthur Somers-Cocks, 6th Baron Somers. The castle is a Grade I listed building. It was constructed between 1812-20 at a cost of £85,000 or equivalent to approximately between £26 to £28 million in the present day (2007). The estate was started in the late 16th century when the Cocks family purchased local land. Subsequent marriages into the Somers and Nash families helped provide the wealth and substance necessary to build this imposing castle which was designed to look like a medieval castle guarding the Welsh borders. The castle was built to the designs of Robert Smirke in 1812-20. A.W.N. Pugin made some internal alterations - including the decoration of the Gothic Drawing Room - in 1849-50, and George E Fox made more changes in the 1860s. It is constructed of ashlar stonework, with a lead and slate roof concealed behind an embattled parapet.
    9.25
    4 votes
    9
    Halton House

    Halton House

    Halton House is a country house in the Chiltern Hills above the village of Halton in Buckinghamshire, England. It was built for Alfred de Rothschild between 1880 and 1883. It is currently used as the main officers' mess for RAF Halton. There has been a manor house at Halton since the Norman Conquest, when it belonged to the Archbishop of Canterbury. Thomas Cranmer sold the manor to Henry Bradshaw, Chancellor of the Exchequer in the mid-16th century. After remaining in the Bradshaw family for some considerable time, it was sold to Sir Francis Dashwood in 1720 and was then held in the Dashwood family for almost 150 years. The site of the old Halton House, or Manor, was west of the church in Halton village. It had a large park, which was later dissected by the Grand Union Canal. In June 1849 Sir George Dashwood auctioned the contents and, in 1853, the estate was sold to Baron Lionel de Rothschild, who was expanding his estate at Tring. Rotschild then continued his policy of expansion. The old house was uninhabited and allowed to become derelict, and finally completely demolished. Lionel then gave the estate to his son Alfred de Rothschild. At this time the estate covered
    9.25
    4 votes
    10
    Knole House

    Knole House

    Knole is an English country house in the town of Sevenoaks in west Kent, surrounded by a 1,000-acre (4.0 km) deer park. One of England's largest houses, it is reputed to be a calendar house, having 365 rooms, 52 staircases, 12 entrances and 7 courtyards. It is known for the degree to which its early 17th-century appearance is preserved, particularly in the case of the state rooms: the exteriors and interiors of many houses of this period, such as Clandon Park in Surrey, were dramatically altered later on. The surrounding deer park has also survived with little having changed over the past 400 years except for the loss of over 70% of its trees in the Great Storm of 1987. The house was built by Thomas Bourchier, Archbishop of Canterbury, between 1456 and 1486, on the site of an earlier house belonging to James Fiennes, the Lord Say and Sele who was executed after the victory of Jack Cade's rebels at the Battle of Solefields. On Bourchier's death, the house was bequeathed to the See of Canterbury — Sir Thomas More appeared in revels there at the court of John Morton — and in subsequent years it continued to be enlarged, with the addition of a new large courtyard, now known as Green
    6.83
    6 votes
    11
    Preston Hall

    Preston Hall

    Preston Hall is an early 19th century mansion house at Preston on Tees, Stockton-on-Tees, England. It has been a museum since 1953 and is owned by Stockton-on-Tees Borough Council. It is a listed building. The house stands in 100 acres (0.40 km) of parkland. The grounds of the house form Preston Park. The manor of Preston on Tees was held in 1515 by William Sayer but was lost when the estates of Lawrence Sayer, a Royalist in the English Civil War were sequestered and sold by the Commonwealth of England. In 1673 the manor was purchased by George Witham and during the residency of the Witham family the manor house was known as Witham Hall. In 1722 William Witham sold the estate to Sir John Eden Bt of Windlestone Hall and in 1820 it was sold again to David Burton Fowler. In 1825 Fowler built the present Preston Hall as a modest two-storey three-bayed rectangular structure with a service wing. The old manor house was retained in use as a farmhouse until its demolition in 1974. In 1882 Matthew Fowler sold the estate to Robert Ropner, a shipping merchant and shipbuilder, who was High Sheriff of Durham in 1896 and who became a baronet in 1904. He extended the property by the addition of
    7.60
    5 votes
    12
    Vanderbilt houses

    Vanderbilt houses

    From the late 1870s to the 1920s, the Vanderbilt family employed America's best Beaux-Arts architects and decorators to build an unequalled string of New York townhouses and East Coast palaces in the United States. Many of the Vanderbilt houses are now National Historic Landmarks. Some photographs of Vanderbilt's residences in New York are included in the Photographic series of American Architecture by Albert Levy (1870s). The list of architects employed by the Vanderbilts is a "who's who" of the New York-based firms that embodied the syncretic (often dismissed as "eclectic") styles of the American Renaissance: Richard Morris Hunt, George B. Post, McKim, Mead, and White, Charles B. Atwood, Carrère and Hastings, Warren and Wetmore, Horace Trumbauer, John Russell Pope, Addison Mizner were all employed by the descendants of "Commodore" Cornelius Vanderbilt, who built only very modestly himself.
    7.60
    5 votes
    13
    Beaumanor Hall

    Beaumanor Hall

    Beaumanor Hall is a stately home with a park in the small village of Woodhouse on the edge of the Charnwood Forest, near the town of Loughborough in Leicestershire, England. It was built in 1845-7 by architect William Railton in Elizabethan style for the Herrick family. and is a Grade II* listed building It was used during the Second World War for military intelligence. It is now owned by Leicestershire County Council as a training centre, conference centre and residential facility for young people. Until just preceding the Second World War in 1939, the Herrick family owned the park. The estate consisted of Beaumanor Hall, several farms, St Mary's in the Elms church, the vicarage house (Garats Hay), workers houses/cottages along Forest Road and 350 acres (1.4 km²) of beautiful parkland. In 1939 the War Office requisitioned the estate, including Garats Hay, and the vicar moved to a cottage in the village. The park became a secret listening station where encrypted enemy signals (Morse code) were intercepted and sent to the famous Station X at Bletchley Park (by motorbike everyday) for decoding. Beaumanor Park was to be the home of the War Office ‘Y’ Group for the duration of the
    8.75
    4 votes
    14
    Peckforton Castle

    Peckforton Castle

    Peckforton Castle is a country house built in the style of a medieval castle. It stands in woodland at the north end of Peckforton Hills 1 mile (2 km) northwest of the village of Peckforton, Cheshire, England. It has been designated by English Heritage as a Grade I listed building. The house was built in the middle of the 19th century as a family home for John Tollemache, a wealthy Cheshire landowner, estate manager, and Member of Parliament. It was designed by Anthony Salvin in the Gothic style. The Tollemache family continued to live in the house until 1939. During the Second World War it was used as a hostel for physically handicapped children. The building has not been used as a family residence since 1939. During the 1970s and 1980s it was used as a location for shooting films and television programmes. The castle was bought in 1988 by Evelyn Graybill, who converted it into a hotel. In 2006 it was purchased by the Naylor family, who expanded its use to include hosting weddings, conferences, and other functions. Peckforton Castle was built between 1844 and 1850 for John Tollemache, the largest landowner in Cheshire at the time, who was described by William Ewart Gladstone as
    8.75
    4 votes
    15
    Leinster House

    Leinster House

    Leinster House (Irish: Teach Laighean) is the name of the building housing the Oireachtas, the national parliament of Ireland. Leinster House was originally the ducal palace of the Dukes of Leinster. Since 1922, it is a complex of buildings, of which the former ducal palace is the core, which house Oireachtas Éireann, its members and staff. The most recognisable part of the complex, and the 'public face' of Leinster House, continues to be the former ducal palace at the core of the complex. Leinster House was the former ducal residence in Dublin of the Duke of Leinster, and since 1922 served as the parliament building of the Irish Free State, predecessor of the modern Irish state, before which it functioned as the headquarters of the Royal Dublin Society. The society's famous Dublin Spring Show and Dublin Horse Show were held on its Leinster Lawn, facing Merrion Square. The building is the meeting place of Dáil Éireann and Seanad Éireann, the two houses of the Oireachtas, and as such the term 'Leinster House' has become a metonym for Irish political activities. Ireland's parliament over the centuries had met in a number of locations, most notably in the Irish Houses of Parliament at
    10.00
    3 votes
    16
    Samlesbury Hall

    Samlesbury Hall

    Samlesbury Hall is an historic house in Samlesbury, a village in Lancashire, England. It was built in 1325 by Gilbert de Southworth (b. 1270) and was the primary home of the Southworth Family until the early 1600s. Samlesbury Hall was built possibly to replace an earlier building destroyed during a raid by the Scots in 1322. The Hall has been many things in its past including a public house and girls boarding school, but since 1925, when it was saved from being demolished for its timber, it has been administered by a registered charitable trust, the Samlesbury Hall Trust. This Grade I listed medieval manor house attracts over 50,000 visitors each year. The Hall was built with its solar end windows facing east, as was the practice. When the chapel was constructed 140 years later, it too was built to face east. However, when the chapel was connected to the main hall a further 60 years later, the angle of connection was less than 90° because of the solstice change in the sun's position over the years. The chapel was originally built by the Southworth family, to upgrade the house to a manor house, which had to have: Therefore Samlesbury Hall reflects the building styles and religious
    7.40
    5 votes
    17
    Holdenby House

    Holdenby House

    Holdenby House is a historic country house in Northamptonshire, traditionally pronounced and sometimes spelt Holmby. The house is situated in the parish of Holdenby, six miles (10 km) northwest of Northampton and close to Althorp. The house is a private residence, though the gardens are open to the public and include a falconry centre. The interior of the mansion is opened to the public for a few days of the year. The house was completed 1583 by the Elizabethan Lord chancellor, Sir Christopher Hatton. Following the great house's completion Hatton refused to sleep a night in the mansion until Queen Elizabeth I had slept there. Hatton's new house was in fact one of the largest palaces of the Tudor period, rivalling in size both Audley End and Theobalds and was reputed to be approximately 78,750 square feet (7,300 m²), although this probably included the two great courtyards around which it was built. The facades were symmetrical, with mullioned windows and open Doric arcades thus reflecting the arrival of the new renaissance style of architecture gradually spreading from Italy. The cost of building Holdenby financially ruined Hatton who died shortly after(1591). In 1607 the mansion
    7.20
    5 votes
    18
    Priest hole

    Priest hole

    "Priest hole" is the term given to hiding places for priests built into many of the principal Catholic houses of England during the period when Catholics were persecuted by law in England, from the beginning of the reign of Queen Elizabeth I in 1558. The measures put in force shortly after Elizabeth's accession became much harsher after the Rising of the North (1569) and numerous other plots by Catholics against Elizabeth (1571-1586); in particular, the utmost severity of the law was enforced against seminary priests. An Act was passed prohibiting a member of the Catholic Church from celebrating the rites of his faith on pain of forfeiture for the first offence, a year's imprisonment for the second, and imprisonment for life for the third. All those who refused to take the Oath of Supremacy were called "Recusants" and were guilty of high treason. A law was also enacted which provided that if any "Papist" should be found converting an Anglican or Protestant to Catholicism, both would suffer death for high treason. In December 1591, a priest was hanged before the door of a house in Gray's Inn Fields for having said Mass there the month previously. Laws against seminary priests and
    7.20
    5 votes
    19
    Chequers

    Chequers

    Chequers, or Chequers Court, is a country house near Ellesborough, to the south of Aylesbury in Buckinghamshire, England, at the foot of the Chiltern Hills. It is the country residence of the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. The original house probably gained its name in the 12th century because it may have been built or inhabited by an individual named Elias Ostiarius (or de Scaccario), who was acquiring land in the Ellesborough area at the time. The name "Ostiarius" meant an usher of the Court of the Exchequer. Elias Ostiarius' coat of arms included the chequer board of the Exchequer, so it is likely he named his estate after his arms and position at court. The house passed through generations of the De Scaccario family (spelt in many different forms) until it seems to have passed into the D'Awtrey family, whose name was eventually anglicised to Hawtrey. Another explanation sometimes offered is that the house is named after the Chequers Trees that grow in its grounds. Also known as Wild Service Tree (Sorbus torminalis), it produces small berries which are called Chequers. There is a reference to this in the book Elizabeth: Apprenticeship by David Starkey, which describes the
    8.25
    4 votes
    20
    Melrose House

    Melrose House

    Melrose House is a stately mansion located in Pretoria, South Africa. Built in 1886 by the prosperous Pretoria businessman George Jesse Heys. it was named after the famous Melrose Abbey in Scotland. Melrose House gained fame during the Second Boer War (1899–1902) when Lord Roberts requisitioned it as the headquarters for the British forces after Pretoria was invaded in June 1900. For more than 18 months instructions for the British forces in the field were issued from here. This use of the house as a military headquarters ended when the Treaty of Vereeniging, which ended the war, was signed there on 31 May 1902. Today the elegant mansion is a historic house museum. It is an example of the transition from Victorian to Edwardian architectural styles and interiors. The interior is characterised by colourful stained glass windows, paintings by English artists, carpets in rich colours, ornate ceilings and fireplaces, as well as valuable porcelain ornaments. The majority of these items belonged to the Heys family itself.
    7.00
    5 votes
    21
    Ashton Court

    Ashton Court

    Ashton Court (grid reference ST553723) is a mansion house and estate to the west of Bristol in England. Although the estate lies mainly in North Somerset, it is owned by the City of Bristol. The estate has been a venue for a variety of leisure activities, including the now-defunct Ashton Court festival, Bristol International Kite Festival and the Bristol International Balloon Fiesta. On the 18th September 2011 the estate played host to a 12 hour softball match for a cancer charity. The core of the house was built in the 15th century, but it was enlarged and adapted over the centuries by the Smyth family, who bought the estate in 1545. The south facade and the wing incorrectly attributed to Inigo Jones date from about 1633 and were extended eastwards in the 19th century. The house became derelict after the last of the Smyths died in 1946; it was taken over by the City in 1959, and restoration has been an ongoing process since then. The facilities of the house are now rented out for business conferences, parties and weddings. The mansion house and stables have been designated by English Heritage as a Grade I listed building. The lower lodge to Ashton Court and attached gates,
    8.00
    4 votes
    22
    Glendower State Memorial

    Glendower State Memorial

    Glendower, now known as Glendower State Memorial or Glendower Mansion, is an historic Greek Revival style house located at 105 Cincinnati Avenue, U.S. Route 42, Cincinnati Avenue, in Lebanon, Ohio. It was built in the 1836 by Amos Bennett for John Milton Williams, a Lebanon merchant, and named for Owen Glendower. It has been called "one of the finest examples of the Greek Revival architecture in the Middle West." On November 10, 1970, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places. Until 2007, Glendower was operated and maintained by the Ohio Historical Society. On December 3, 2007, it was transferred to the Warren County Historical Society. The Society offers tours of the home from May through October. The grounds of Glendower are often used by Civil War reenactors.
    8.00
    4 votes
    23
    Princes Risborough Manor House

    Princes Risborough Manor House

    Princes Risborough Manor House is a large manor house in Princes Risborough, Buckinghamshire, England. It is a red brick house with a facade dating from the 17th century, probably about 1630/50, though the back part of the house is older and it is mentioned (as Brooke House) in 1589. The design is of the late Carolean style. The brickwork is a mixture of English and Flemish bond indicating construction in the latter half of the 17th century when Flemish bond newly introduced to England began to compete with the earlier type of brickwork. The house's most famous resident was Sir Peter Lely, court painter to Charles II. At the centre of the principal facade is the main pedimented entrance, either side of the front door are two sash windows, the arrangement is repeated above on the next floor. Each of the five bays are divided by small Doric pilasters, typical of the Carolean period of English architecture. They are purely ornamental and serve no structural purpose. The windows originally had mullion and transom crosses. Above the first floor is an attic storey from which project three gabled windows. This principle elevation of the 'L' shaped building faces the high street of the
    6.80
    5 votes
    24
    Rousham House

    Rousham House

    Rousham House (also known as Rousham Park) is a country house at Rousham in Oxfordshire, England. The house, which has been continuously in the ownership of one family, was built circa 1635 and remodeled by William Kent in the 18th century in a free Gothic style. Further alterations were carried out in the 19th century. In the 1630s Sir Robert Dormer bought the manor of Rousham. He immediately began construction of the present house but work was halted by the start of the English Civil War. The Dormers were a Royalist family and the house was attacked by Parliamentary soldiers who stripped the lead from the newly completed roofs. In 1649 the estate was inherited by Robert Dormer's son, also Robert. He left the house much as his father had created it, only repairing the damage of the Civil War. However, he did more to restore the family fortunes by marrying twice, each time to an heiress. His second wife was the daughter of Sir Charles Cottrell, a high-ranking courtier of Charles II. Colonel Robert Dormer-Cottrell, the grandson of the house's builder, inherited Rousham in 1719 and began the huge transformation of the gardens to its current appearance. Initially he employed Charles
    6.80
    5 votes
    25
    Pickford's House Museum

    Pickford's House Museum

    Pickford's House Museum of Georgian Life and Costume is in Derby, England Pickford's House is at No 41 Friar Gate Derby, is an elegant Georgian town house built by the prominent architect Joseph Pickford in 1770 for his own family. When Pickford died he left the house to the Reverend Joseph Pickford who had the house extended and divided in to two properties.. He left the house to his cousin William Pickford in his will in 1844. William promptly mortgaged the house and by 1850 it was sold to William Evans of Allestree Hall 1788 1856. His son Sir Thomas William Evans 1st Bt, who was also a politician, sold it in 1879 to Frederick Ward who sold it to W.S.Curgenven who was the first of a number of surgeons to own it. In 1977 it was upgraded from Grade II to Grade I. It was purchased in 1982 by Derby City Council. The council did not pay enough attention to its Grade I status and they removed chimeys, floors and walls without applying for permission. The museum that was established in 1988 shows the accommodation of a late Georgian professional person. The ground floor is furnished as it might have been in Pickford's time together with displays of eighteenth and nineteenth century
    9.00
    3 votes
    26
    Aston Hall

    Aston Hall

    Aston Hall is a municipally owned Jacobean-style mansion in Aston, Birmingham, England. Washington Irving used it as the model for Bracebridge Hall in his stories in The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon. Construction commenced in April 1618 and Sir Thomas Holte moved into the hall in 1631. Construction was completed in April 1635. It was designed by John Thorpe. It is Grade I listed. The house was severely damaged after an attack by Parliamentary troops in 1643; some of the damage is still evident. There is a hole in the staircase where a cannonball went through a window, an open door and into the banister. The house was built for Sir Thomas Holte and remained in the family until 1817 when it was sold and leased by James Watt Jr., son of industrial pioneer James Watt. The house was then purchased in 1858 by a private company (the Aston Hall and Park Company Ltd) for use as a public park and museum. After financial difficulties it was then bought by the Birmingham Corporation in 1864 becoming the first historic country house to pass into municipal ownership. It was also visited by Washington Irving, who wrote about it as Bracebridge Hall, taking the name from Abraham Bracebridge,
    7.75
    4 votes
    27
    Claydon House

    Claydon House

    Claydon House is a country house in the Aylesbury Vale, Buckinghamshire, England, close to the village of Middle Claydon. It was built between 1757 and 1771 and is now owned by the National Trust. There has been a manor house on the site of the present house since before the Norman Conquest of England. In the Domesday Book (a survey of England published in 1086) the house was listed as belonging to the Peverell family, who arrived from Normandy with William the Conqueror. Their tenants, the Gresleys, were managing it for them at the time. Having passed by inheritance through two further families it was purchased by Sir John Brockley in 1433 who was Lord Mayor of London at the time. Claydon has been the ancestral home of the Verney family since 1620. The church of All Saints, Middle Claydon lies less than 50 yards from the house and contains many memorials to the Verney family: among them Sir Edmund Verney, who was chief standard bearer to King Charles I during the English Civil War. Sir Edmund was slaughtered at the Battle of Edgehill on October 23, 1642 and is buried in the church at Claydon. It is said that at dusk, on the anniversary of his death every year, an apparition of the
    7.75
    4 votes
    28
    Chiddingstone Castle

    Chiddingstone Castle

    Chiddingstone Castle is situated in the village of Chiddingstone, Kent, England, in the upper valley of the River Medway. The castle reopened in 2008 after a period of restoration and now has over 10,000 visitors a year. The castle has collections of ancient artifacts which are on display in the castle rooms. As well as the collections, the castle puts on a range of themed events. The 35 acres (140,000 m) of grounds are home to the award-winning orangery. In 2009, the castle announced plans to build the UK's largest Japanese stroll garden since Victorian times. The history of Chiddingstone Castle can be traced back to the early 16th century, and during its life, the castle has undergone a number of architectural changes and has been owned and lived in by an eclectic mix of people and families. The early timber-framed Tudor dwelling, inhabited by the Streatfeild family, was first replaced and partly transformed into High Street House in the 1670s. The building went through another transformation during the early 19th century when the then owner, Henry Streatfeild, decided to rebuild the house to resemble a medieval castle and commissioned William Atkinson to design the
    6.60
    5 votes
    29
    Childwickbury Manor

    Childwickbury Manor

    Childwickbury Manor is a manor in Hertfordshire, England, between St Albans and Harpenden. Previous owners were the Lomax family who bought the house in 1666 and who lived there until 1854 when Joshua Lomax sold it to Henry Hayman Toulmin, a wealthy ship owner and High Sheriff of Hertfordshire and mayor of St Albans. Toulmin left the property to Sir John Blundell Maple around 20 years later. Toulmin's granddaughter, the author Mary Carbery, was born at the house. Sir John Blundell Maple bred and raced Thoroughbreds and built Childwickbury Stud into a very successful horse breeding operation. Another prominent racehorse owner, Jack Barnato Joel, bought the estate including the stud farm farm in 1906. On his death in 1940, his son Jim Joel took over the operation. He too became a successful racehorse owner and breeder and maintained the property until 1978 when the stud and the manor were sold separately. It was advertised thus: “The Manor House, mainly 18th century has 12 Reception Rooms, 18 Bed and Dressing Rooms, 11 Staff Bedrooms, and 10 Bathrooms. Immaculate Timbered Grounds. Walled Garden. Courtyard with Garaging and Flat. Estate Office. Victorian Dairy House with about 19
    6.60
    5 votes
    30
    Cragside

    Cragside

    Cragside is a country house in the civil parish of Cartington in Northumberland, England. It was the first house in the world to be lit using hydroelectric power. Built into a rocky hillside above a 4 km² forest garden, it was the country home of Lord Armstrong and has been in the care of the National Trust since 1977. Cragside, named after Cragend Hill above the house, was built in 1863 as a modest two-storey country lodge, but was subsequently extended to designs by Norman Shaw, transforming it into an elaborate mansion in the Free Tudor style. At one point, the building included an astronomical observatory and a scientific laboratory. In 1868, a hydraulic engine was installed, with water being used to power labour-saving machines such as laundry equipment, a rotisserie and a hydraulic lift. In 1870, water from one of the estate's lakes was used to drive a Siemens dynamo in what was the world's first hydroelectric power station. The resultant electricity was used to power an arc lamp installed in the Gallery in 1878. The arc lamp was replaced in 1880 by Joseph Swan's incandescent lamps in what Swan considered 'the first proper installation' of electric lighting. The generators,
    6.60
    5 votes
    31
    Dalmeny House

    Dalmeny House

    Dalmeny House is a Gothic revival mansion located in an estate close to Dalmeny on the Firth of Forth, to the north-west of Edinburgh, Scotland. It was designed by William Wilkins, and completed in 1817. Dalmeny House is the home of the Earl and Countess of Rosebery. The house was the first in Scotland to be built in the Tudor Revival style. It provided more comfortable accommodation than the former ancestral residence, Barnbougle Castle, which still stands close by. Dalmeny today remains a private house, although it is open to the public during the summer months. The house is protected as a category A listed building, while the grounds are included in the Inventory of Gardens and Designed Landscapes in Scotland. In the 13th century, the estate was the property of the Mowbray family, who built Barnbougle Castle. The estate was acquired in 1662 by Sir Archibald Primrose, whose son was created Earl of Rosebery in 1703. In 1774 Neil Primrose, 3rd Earl of Rosebery, commissioned Robert Adam to design a new house at Barnbougle, and in 1788 Robert Burn also provided designs. However, the Earl concentrated on the estate, carrying out woodland planting and constructing a walled garden. The
    7.50
    4 votes
    32
    Hammerwood Park

    Hammerwood Park

    Hammerwood Park is a grade I listed country house near East Grinstead, Sussex, England at grid reference TQ442389 and Grade 1 listed of historical interest. It was the first work of the architect Benjamin Latrobe. Built in 1792, it was one of the first houses in England built in the Greek Revival style. After World War II it was divided into apartments, but the house fell into disrepair as the inhabitants left. The house was owned by Led Zeppelin who bought it in 1973 as flats for the group members and their families. It remained in their ownership until 1982. It was in bad condition when, in 1982, it had been for sale for 9 years and David Pinnegar saw an advertisement for it in Country Life. He was only 21 when he bought it - it was in a state of dilapidation and according to television interviews, he claimed that most of his friends and family thought him 'foolhardy'. The restoration of the house gained the Anne de Amodio award from IBI, the International Burgen Institute (now part of Europa Nostra) and the progress of the restoration received a lot of television coverage, appearing on Blue Peter as well as Coast to Coast and national news programmes. The house is often used for
    7.50
    4 votes
    33
    London Charterhouse

    London Charterhouse

    The London Charterhouse is a historic complex of buildings in Smithfield, London dating back to the 14th century. It occupies land to the north of Charterhouse Square. The Charterhouse began as (and takes its name from) a Carthusian priory, founded in 1371 and dissolved in 1537. Substantial fragments remain from this monastic period, but the site was largely rebuilt after 1545 as a large courtyard house. Thus, today it "conveys a vivid impression of the type of large rambling 16th century mansion that once existed all round London" (Pevsner: The Buildings of England). The Charterhouse was further altered and extended after 1611, when it became an almshouse and school, endowed by Thomas Sutton. The almshouse (a home for gentlemen pensioners) still occupies the site today under the name Sutton's Hospital in Charterhouse. In 1348, Walter de Manny rented 13-acre (0.05 km) of land in Spital Croft, north of Long Lane, from the Master and Brethren of St. Bartholomew's Hospital for a graveyard and plague pit for victims of the Black Death. A chapel and hermitage were constructed, renamed New Church Haw; but in 1371, this land was granted for the foundation of the London Charterhouse, a
    7.50
    4 votes
    34
    Lamport Hall

    Lamport Hall

    Lamport Hall in Lamport, Northamptonshire is a fine example of a Grade I Listed House. It was developed from a Tudor Manor but is now notable for its classical frontage. The Hall contains an outstanding collection of books paintings and furniture. The building includes The High Room with a magnificent ceiling by William Smith. It also has a library with 16th Century volumes and an early 19th Century Cabinet Room with Neopolitan cabinets which depict mythological paintings on glass. It is open to the public Lamport Hall was the home of the Isham family from 1560 to 1976. Sir Charles Isham, 10th Baronet is credited with beginning the tradition of garden gnomes in the United Kingdom when he introduced a number of terracotta figures from Germany in the 1840s. In 1568 John Isham a wealthy wool merchant built a manor house on the Lamport Estate. His grandson also named John became the first baronet in 1627 during the reign of Charles 1. He extended the house considerably. However the only remains of this structure is a section of the present stable wing. It was Sir Justinian Isham who built the main existing building. In 1655 he commissioned John Webb a pupil of Inigo Jones to design a
    8.67
    3 votes
    35
    Royal Pavilion

    Royal Pavilion

    The Royal Pavilion is a former royal residence located in Brighton, England. It was built in three campaigns, beginning in 1787, as a seaside retreat for George, Prince of Wales, from 1811 Prince Regent. It is often referred to as the Brighton Pavilion. It is built in the Indo-Saracenic style prevalent in India for most of the 19th century, with the most extravagant chinoiserie interiors ever executed in the British Isles. The Prince of Wales, who later became King George IV, first visited Brighton in 1783, at the age of 21. The seaside town had become fashionable through the residence of George's uncle, the Prince Henry, Duke of Cumberland, whose tastes for cuisine, gaming, the theatre and fast living the young prince shared, and with whom he lodged in Brighton at Grove House. In addition, his physician advised him that the seawater would be beneficial for his gout. In 1786, under a financial cloud that had been examined in Parliament for the extravagances incurred in building Carlton House, London, he rented a modest erstwhile farmhouse facing the Steine, a grassy area of Brighton used as a promenade by visitors. Being remote from the Royal Court in London, the Pavilion was also
    8.67
    3 votes
    36
    Monticello

    Monticello

    Monticello is the primary plantation of Thomas Jefferson, who inherited it. He was the principal author of the United States Declaration of Independence, third President of the United States, and founder of the University of Virginia. Located just outside Charlottesville, Virginia in the Piedmont region, the plantation was originally 5,000 acres, with extensive cultivation of tobacco and mixed crops, with labor by slaves. At Jefferson's direction, he was buried on the grounds, an area now designated as the Monticello Cemetery, which is owned by the Monticello Association, a lineage society of his descendants through Martha Wayles Skelton Jefferson. The house, which Jefferson designed, was based on the neoclassical principles described in the books of the Italian Renaissance architect Andrea Palladio. He reworked it through much of his presidency to include design elements popular in late eighteenth-century Europe. It contains many of his own design solutions. The house is situated on the summit of an 850-foot (260 m)-high peak in the Southwest Mountains south of the Rivanna Gap. Its name comes from the Italian "little mountain." The plantation at full operations included numerous
    10.00
    2 votes
    37
    Croxteth Hall

    Croxteth Hall

    Croxteth Hall is the former country estate and ancestral home of the Molyneux family, the Earls of Sefton. After the death of the 7th and last Earl in 1972 the estate passed to Liverpool City Council, which now manages the remainder of the estate, following the sale of approximately half of the grounds. The remaining grounds, Croxteth Park, were at one time a hunting chase of the Molyneux family and are now open to the public. The original house was built in about 1575, and has been expanded in several stages in Tudor, Georgian, and Queen Anne styles. The principal front, the west façade, was built in 1702. Queen Victoria, Prince Albert, and their children stayed at Croxteth Hall on 9 October 1851 before visiting Liverpool the following day during torrential rain. However, the visit started fine with 700 members of the local gentry being entertained in the Hall grounds. The Hall and its outbuilding are a Grade II* Listed Building, as are 3 of the outbuildings; another 15 buildings on the estate are Grade II. The Molyneux family lived at the Hall from the 16th century until 1972, when the last Earl died. His American-born widow Josephine, Countess of Sefton (1903–1980) - once a
    7.25
    4 votes
    38
    Garsington Manor

    Garsington Manor

    Garsington Manor, in the village of Garsington, near Oxford, England, is a Tudor building, best known as the former home of Lady Ottoline Morrell, the Bloomsbury Group socialite. The house is currently owned by the family of the late Leonard Ingrams and has been the setting for an annual summer opera season, the Garsington Opera up until 2011 when the opera relocated to Wormsley, the home of Mark Getty in Oxfordshire. The manor house was built on land once owned by the son of the poet Geoffrey Chaucer, and at one time had the name "Chaucers". Lady Ottoline and her husband, Philip Morrell, bought the manor house in 1914, at which time it was in a state of disrepair, having been in use as a farmhouse. They completely restored the house in the 1920s, working with the architect Philip Tilden, and creating landscaped Italian-style gardens. The parterre has 24 square beds with Irish yews at the corners; the Italian garden has a large ornamental pool enclosed by yew hedges and set about with statues; beyond, is a wild garden, with lime-tree avenues, shrubs, a stream and pond. Garsington became a haven for the Morrells’ friends, including D. H. Lawrence, Siegfried Sassoon, Lytton Strachey,
    7.25
    4 votes
    39
    Wentworth Woodhouse

    Wentworth Woodhouse

    Wentworth Woodhouse is a Grade I listed country house near the village of Wentworth, in the vicinity of Rotherham, South Yorkshire, England. It served as "One of the great Whig political palaces". Its East Front is 606-foot (185 m) long, making it the longest country house façade in Europe. It is also the largest private house in the United Kingdom.The house comprises 365 rooms and covers an area of over 2.5 acres (1.0 ha). It is surrounded by a 150-acre (61 ha) park and by an estate of 90,000-acre (36,000 ha), which is now separately owned. An existing Jacobean house was entirely rebuilt by Thomas Watson-Wentworth, 1st Marquess of Rockingham (1693–1750), and then reduced to the status of a mere wing by the immense scale of the new great addition made by his son the 2nd Marquess, who was twice Prime Minister, and who established at Wentworth Woodhouse an important Whig powerhouse. In the 19th.c. it was inherited by the Earls Fitzwilliam, who owned it until 1989, having profited greatly from the great quantities of underground coal on the estate. Wentworth Woodhouse is effectively two separate houses, forming West and East Fronts. The West Front, rarely seen or photographed, with
    8.33
    3 votes
    40
    Coombe Abbey

    Coombe Abbey

    Coombe Abbey is a hotel which has been developed from an historic grade I listed building and former country house. It is located roughly midway between Coventry and Brinklow in the countryside of Warwickshire, England. The house's original grounds are now a country park known as Coombe Country Park and run by Coventry City Council. Coombe Abbey was founded as a monastery in the 12th century. Following the Dissolution of the Monasteries in the 16th century it became royal property. Elizabeth of Bohemia, the daughter of king James I, was educated there in the early 17th century. Had the Gunpowder Plot succeeded she was to have been abducted from Coombe Abbey and proclaimed as Queen Elizabeth II. In 1682, the West Wing was added by architect Captain William Winde, who also designed Buckingham House, which later became Buckingham Palace. In 1771, Lancelot 'Capability' Brown redesigned the gardens, incorporating the Coombe Pool lake. For successive generations Coombe Abbey was owned by the Earls of Craven, in whose possession the estate remained until 1923. In November 1964 Coventry City Council bought Coombe Abbey with 150 acres (0.61 km) of land. The park was opened to the public in
    6.20
    5 votes
    41
    Neverland Ranch

    Neverland Ranch

    Neverland Valley Ranch (formerly the Sycamore Valley Ranch) is a developed property in Santa Barbara County, California, located at 5225 Figueroa Mountain Rd Los Olivos, CA 93441, most famous for being a home of American entertainer Michael Jackson from 1988 to 2005. Jackson named the property after Neverland, the fantasy island in the story of Peter Pan, a boy who never grows up. The ranch is located about five miles (8 km) north of unincorporated Los Olivos, and about eight miles (13 km) north of the town of Santa Ynez. The Chamberlin Ranch is to the west, and the rugged La Laguna Ranch, where the Zaca Fire began, is to the north. The Santa Barbara County Assessor's office says the ranch is approximately 3000 acres (1214 hectares). It is currently owned by the Sycamore Valley Ranch Company, LLC. Jackson purchased the property from golf course entrepreneur William Bone in 1988 for a sum variously reported to be $16.5 to $30 million. It was Jackson's home, private amusement park and contained a floral clock, numerous statues of children, and a petting zoo. The amusement park included two railroads: one 36" gauge with a steam locomotive (Crown 4-4-0, built 1973, with two coaches)
    6.20
    5 votes
    42
    Woodstock Palace

    Woodstock Palace

    Woodstock Palace was a royal residence in the English town of Woodstock, Oxfordshire. Henry I of England built a hunting lodge here and in 1129 he built seven miles of walls to create the first enclosed park, where lions and leopards were kept. The lodge became a palace under Henry's grandson, Henry II, who spent time here with his mistress, Rosamund Clifford. Important events that took place at the palace include: Woodstock Palace was destroyed during the English Civil War, and Blenheim Palace was later built nearby.
    6.20
    5 votes
    43
    Belcourt Castle

    Belcourt Castle

    Belcourt Castle is the former summer cottage of Oliver Hazard Perry Belmont, located on Bellevue Avenue in Newport, Rhode Island. Begun in 1891 and completed in 1894, it was intended to be used for only six to eight weeks of the year. Designed in a multitude of European styles and periods, Belcourt was designed with heavy emphasis on French Renaissance and Gothic decor, with further borrowings from German, English and Italian design. In the Gilded Age, the castle was well noted for its extensive stables and carriage areas, which were incorporated into the main structure. Located on Bellevue Avenue at Lakeview Avenue, Belcourt was designed by Richard Morris Hunt for thirty-three-year-old Oliver Belmont who was still a bachelor during the construction of his 50,000 square foot (4,600 m²), 60 room summer villa. Based on the Louis XIII hunting lodge at Versailles, Belcourt incorporated Oliver's love of pageantry, history and horses in its magnificent interior halls, salons and ballrooms. The Belmont Stakes was named for his father and he was known for his skill as a four-in-hand carriage driver.Belmont wanted Belcourt designed precisely to his specifications. Hunt was hesitant, but he
    9.50
    2 votes
    44
    Compton Wynyates

    Compton Wynyates

    Compton Wynyates is a country house in Warwickshire, England, a Grade I listed building. The Tudor period house, an example of Tudor architecture, is constructed of red brick and built around a central courtyard. It is castellated and turreted in parts. Following action in the Civil War, half timbered gables were added to replace damaged parts of the building. Today, set in its topiary gardens and green lawns, its appearance of idealized English country life contrasts sharply with the story of the family who have lived there for over five hundred years, a story inextricably linked to the history of the house as both have prospered, declined and prospered simultaneously. The Compton family, who still live today in this private house, appear in records as resident on the site as early as 1204. The family continued to live in the manor house as knights and squires of the county until Sir Edmund Compton (who died circa 1493) decided, circa 1481, to build a new family home. Edmund Compton constructed the house of bricks which have a glowing raspberry colour of striking intensity. Edmund's four-winged house around a central courtyard is recognisable by the thickness of the 4 ft deep
    9.50
    2 votes
    45
    Standen

    Standen

    Standen is an Arts and Crafts house located near East Grinstead, West Sussex, England. The house and its surrounding gardens belong to the National Trust and are open to the public. Between 1892 and 1894 architect Philip Webb, who was a friend of William Morris, designed the house for a prosperous London solicitor, James Beale, his wife Margaret, and their family. It is decorated with Morris carpets, fabrics and wallpapers, and the garden complements the beauty of the house. The house still has its original electric light fittings. The house was bequeathed to the National Trust in 1972. The estate was formed from three farms which the Beales had purchased in 1890. The Beales started planting a 12-acre (49,000 m) garden almost immediately after they had purchased the land, using the site of an 18th-century garden and orchard. In early 1891 trees were planted, a yew hedge established and the kitchen garden begun. The Beales consulted a London landscape gardener who drew up a layout that assumed that the new house would be located on the line of the existing terrace. However, Webb suggested that it rather be placed further into the hillside. The proposed planting schemes were
    9.50
    2 votes
    46
    Easton Neston

    Easton Neston

    Easton Neston is a country house near Towcester, Northamptonshire, England, and is part of the Easton Neston parish. It was designed in the Baroque style by the architect Nicholas Hawksmoor. Easton Neston is thought to be the only mansion which was solely the work of Hawksmoor. From circa 1700 Hawksmoor was to work on many buildings, including Castle Howard and Blenheim Palace, with Sir John Vanbrugh, often providing the technical knowledge to the less qualified Vanbrugh. Hawksmoor's work, even after their many collaborations, was always more classically severe than Vanbrugh's. However, Easton Neston predates this partnership by some six years. The house is a Listed building Grade I. Hawksmoor was commissioned to build Easton Neston by Sir William Fermor, later created Lord Leominster; Hawksmoor had been recommended to Fermor by his cousin by marriage Sir Christopher Wren, who had advised on the building of a new mansion on the site circa 1680. However, no details of quite what Wren envisaged survive, and work seems to have ceased following completion of the two service blocks, of which only one survives. Following Fermor's marriage to an heiress, Catherine Poulett, in 1692, he
    7.00
    4 votes
    47
    Bishopthorpe Palace

    Bishopthorpe Palace

    Bishopthorpe Palace is a stately home and historic house at Bishopthorpe south of York in the City of York unitary authority and ceremonial county of North Yorkshire, England. It is on the River Ouse and is the official residence of the Archbishop of York; within the local area it is sometimes simply called "the Archbishop's Palace". In the 13th century, Archbishop Grey bought the manor house at what was then St. Andrewthorpe and gave it to the Dean and Chapter of York Minster. Since then, the village became known as Bishopthorpe. The palace is a Grade I listed building in a wooded, rural setting and includes a gatehouse, stables, a brewhouse and brewster's cottage. It was remodelled by Thomas Atkinson between 1763 and 1769. The present archbishop, John Sentamu, did not initially move into the palace as it was just beginning a major renovation and restoration at the time.
    8.00
    3 votes
    48
    Chatsworth House

    Chatsworth House

    Chatsworth House is a stately home in North Derbyshire, England, 3.5 miles (5.6 km) northeast of Bakewell and 9 miles (14 km) west of Chesterfield (GB Grid SK260700). It is the seat of the Duke of Devonshire, and has been home to his family, the Cavendish family, since Bess of Hardwick settled at Chatsworth in 1549. Standing on the east bank of the River Derwent, Chatsworth looks across to the low hills that divide the Derwent and Wye valleys. The house is set in expansive parkland, and backed by wooded, rocky hills rising to heather moorland and contains a unique collection of priceless paintings, furniture, Old Master drawings, neoclassical sculptures, books and other artefacts. Chatsworth has been selected as the United Kingdom's favourite country house several times. Chatsworth house is built on sloping ground, lower on the north and west sides than on the south and east sides and has changed greatly since it was first built. The main block was re-built by the 1st Duke between 1687 and 1707, on the site of Bess of Hardwick's original Tudor mansion. The long north wing was added by the 6th Duke in the early nineteenth century. There are many structures other than the house on
    8.00
    3 votes
    49
    Holland House

    Holland House

    Holland House, originally known as Cope Castle, was one of the first great houses built in Kensington in London, and is situated in Holland Park. Cope Castle was built in 1605 for Sir Walter Cope. It presided over a 500 acres (200 ha; 0.78 sq mi) estate that stretched from Holland Park Avenue to the current site of Earl's Court tube station, and contained exotic trees imported by John Tradescant the Younger. Following its completion, Cope entertained the king and queen at it numerous times; in 1608, John Chamberlain, the noted author of letters, complained that he was "not allowed to touch even a cherry because the queen was expected". Following the death of King James I's son Henry Frederick, Prince of Wales in November 1612, he spent the night at Cope Castle, being joined the following day by his son Prince Charles and granddaughter Princess Elizabeth, and Frederick V, Elector Palatine. Cope's son-in-law, Henry Rich eventually inherited the house. Rich was granted the titles of Baron Kensington and Earl of Holland by James I, and upon gaining the latter renamed the building to Holland House. He was later beheaded for his Royalist activities during the Civil War and the house was
    8.00
    3 votes
    50
    Hughenden Manor

    Hughenden Manor

    Hughenden Manor is a red brick Victorian mansion, located in High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, England. In the 19th century, it was the country house of the Prime Minister, Benjamin Disraeli. Today, it is owned by the National Trust and fully open to the public. The house sits on the brow of the hill to the west of the main A4128 road that links Hughenden to High Wycombe (Ordnance survey reference 165:SU866955). The manor of Hughenden is first recorded in 1086, when formerly part of Queen Edith's lands it was held by William, son of Oger the Bishop of Bayeux, and was assessed for tax at 10 hides. Benjamin Disraeli, British Prime Minister (1868 and 1874–1880, and Earl of Beaconsfield 1876), whose father rented a house at nearby Bradenham, purchased the manor in 1848 with the help of a loan of £25,000 (equivalent to almost £1,500,000 today) from Lord Henry Bentinck and Lord Titchfield, because as leader of the Conservative Party "it was essential to represent a county," and county members had to be landowners. He and his wife Mary Anne Disraeli, alternated between Hughenden and several homes in London. The present house was built towards the end of the 18th century and was of a stuccoed
    8.00
    3 votes
    51
    La Haye Sainte

    La Haye Sainte

    La Haye Sainte (sacred hedge) is a walled farmhouse compound at the foot of an escarpment on the Charleroi-Brussels road. It has changed very little since it played a very important part in the battle of Waterloo on 18 June 1815. The road leads from La Belle Alliance, where Napoleon had his headquarters on the morning of the battle, through where the centre of the French front line was located, to a crossroads on the ridge which is at the top of the escarpment and then on to Brussels. The Duke of Wellington placed the majority of his forces on either side of the Brussels road behind the ridge on the Brussels side. This kept most of his forces out of sight of the French artillery. During the night from the 17th to the 18th, the main door to the courtyard of the farm was used as firewood by the occupying troops. Therefore, when the King's German Legion (KGL) was stationed in the farm at the morning of the battle, they had to hastily fortify La Haye Sainte. The troops were the 2nd Light Battalion KGL commanded by Major Georg Baring, and part of the 1st Light Battalion KGL. During the battle, they were supported by the 1/2 Nassau Regiment and the light company of the 5th Line Battalion
    8.00
    3 votes
    52
    Waddesdon Manor

    Waddesdon Manor

    Waddesdon Manor is a country house in the village of Waddesdon, in Buckinghamshire, England. The house was built in the Neo-Renaissance style of a French château between 1874 and 1889 for Baron Ferdinand de Rothschild (1839–1898). Since this was the preferred style of the Rothschilds it became also known as the Goût Rothschild. The house, set in formal gardens and an English landscape park, was built on a barren hilltop overlooking Waddesdon village. The last member of the Rothschild family to own Waddesdon was James de Rothschild. He bequeathed the house and its contents to the National Trust in 1957. Today, following an extensive restoration, it is administered by a Rothschild charitable trust that is overseen by Jacob Rothschild, 4th Baron Rothschild. In 2007–08 it was the National Trust's second most visited paid-entry property, with 386,544 visitors. The Baron wanted a house in the style of the great Renaissance châteaux of the Loire Valley. The Baron, a member of the Viennese branch of the Rothschild banking dynasty, chose as his architect Gabriel-Hippolyte Destailleur. Destailleur was already experienced in working in this style, having overseen the restoration of many
    8.00
    3 votes
    53
    Ardwold

    Ardwold

    Ardwold was the residence of Sir John Craig Eaton and Lady Eaton of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Sir John was the youngest son of Timothy Eaton, the founder of the T. Eaton Company Department Store, or Eaton's, and he inherited the business and became its president upon his father's death in 1907. Sir John was one of the wealthiest men in Canada, and in 1909 he commissioned a home to be built on "The Hill", a name used to describe the neighborhood on the Davenport Hill in Toronto where many wealthy families built their homes. Casa Loma, built by Henry Pellatt and the largest private house ever constructed in Canada, was near Ardwold, as were Spadina House, the mansion of James Austin, and Glenedyth, the estate of Samuel Nordheimer. Ardwold is a Gaelic term meaning "high, green hill". The massive mansion was designed by Toronto architect Frank Wickson of Wickson and Gregg Architectural firm. It was in the Georgian style, and influenced by English and Irish country homes, namely Belton House in Lincolnshire. Ardwold had fifty rooms, fourteen bathrooms, and its own hospital. Situated on eleven acres (45,000 m²) of landscaped grounds, which included a half-acre (2,000 m²) glassed area
    6.75
    4 votes
    54
    Ashridge

    Ashridge

    Ashridge is a country estate and stately home in Hertfordshire, England in the United Kingdom; part of the land stretches into Buckinghamshire and it is close to the Bedfordshire border. It is situated in the Chiltern Hills, an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, about two miles (3 km) north of Berkhamsted and twenty miles (32 km) north west of London. Surrounding villages include Aldbury, Pitstone, Ivinghoe, Little Gaddesden, Nettleden, Frithsden and Potten End. The estate comprises 20 square kilometres (5,000 acres) of woodlands (known as Ashridge Forest), commons and chalk downland which supports a rich variety of wildlife. It also offers a good choice of waymarked walks through outstanding country. The estate is currently owned by the National Trust. It should not be confused with Asheridge, which is a hamlet about five miles (8 km) south-west, the other side of Berkhamsted. In mediæval times Ashridge was the location of Ashridge Priory, a college of the monastic order of Bonhommes founded in 1283 by Edmund, 2nd Earl of Cornwall, who had a palace here. During the Dissolution of the Monasteries the Priory was surrender to Henry VIII who granted the property to his sister,
    6.75
    4 votes
    55
    Belvedere House and Gardens

    Belvedere House and Gardens

    Belvedere House and Gardens is a famous country house located near Mullingar, in county Westmeath, Ireland. Its gardens which include The Jealous Wall and many hectares of forest, attract thousands of visitors annually for their beauty. The house has been restored fully and the grounds are well maintained. The main property was initially built by a landlord, Robert Rochfort, 1st Earl of Belvedere, in the 18th century.
    6.75
    4 votes
    56
    Kruger House

    Kruger House

    Kruger House is the historical Pretoria residence of the Boer leader and President of the South African Republic, Paul Kruger. It was built in 1884 by architect Tom Claridge and builder Charles Clark. Milk was used, instead of water, for mixing the cement from which the house was constructed, as the cement available was of poor quality. The house was also one of the first in Pretoria to be lit by electricity. The house contains either the original furnishings or items from the same historical period, some of the many gifts that were presented to Kruger as well as other memorabilia. Another interesting feature of the house is two stone lions on the verandah that were presented to President Kruger as a birthday gift on 10 October 1896 by the mining magnate Barney Barnato. The Kruger House is now a house museum that tries to recreate the ambience of the period that Kruger lived in.
    6.75
    4 votes
    57
    Osterley Park

    Osterley Park

    Osterley Park is a mansion set in a large park of the same name. It is in the London Borough of Hounslow, part of the western suburbs of London. When the house was built it was surrounded by rural countryside. It was one of a group of large houses close to London which served as country retreats for wealthy families, but were not true country houses on large agricultural estates. Other surviving country retreats of this type near London include Syon House and Chiswick House. The park is one of the largest open spaces in west London, though it is marred by the presence of the M4 motorway, which cuts across the middle of it. The original building on this site was a manor house built in the 1570s for banker Sir Thomas Gresham, who purchased the manor of Osterley in 1562. The "faire and stately brick house" was complete in 1576. It is known that Queen Elizabeth visited. The stable block from this period remains at Osterley Park. Gresham was so wealthy he also bought the neighbouring Manor of Boston in 1572. His widowed stepdaughter-in-law built the present Jacobean manor house there which still stands to this day. Two hundred years later the manor house was falling into disrepair,
    6.75
    4 votes
    58
    Speke Hall

    Speke Hall

    Speke Hall is a wood-framed wattle-and-daub Tudor manor house in Speke, Liverpool, England. It is one of the finest surviving examples of its kind. Construction of the current building began in 1530, though earlier buildings had been on the site, parts of which are incorporated into today's structure. The Great Hall was the first part of the house to be built, in 1530. The Great (or Oak) Parlour) wing was added in 1531. Around this time the North Bay was also added to the house. Between 1540 and 1570 the south wing was altered and extended. The west wing was added between 1546 and 1547. The last significant change to the building was in 1598, when the north range was added by Edward Norris. Since then there have only been minor changes to the Hall and gardens. The oak frame, typical of the period, rests on a base of red sandstone surrounded by a now dry moat. The main beams of the house are stiffened with smaller timbers and filled with wattle and daub. The house features a thunderbox toilet, a priest hole and a special observation hole built into a chimney in a bedroom to allow the occupant to see the approach to the house to warn the priest that people were coming. There is also
    6.75
    4 votes
    59
    Charles Connell House

    Charles Connell House

    The Charles Connell House is the present name of the residence of the Hon. Charles Connell (1810–1873). It is located at 128 Connell Street, Woodstock, New Brunswick, Canada. The house was designated a National Historic Sites of Canada in 1975. This house was built by an unknown person circa 1839 for Connell. It represents the peak of classicism in local architecture. It was built in the Greek Revival style, where wood is used to imitate the look of stone. In the late 19th and early 20th century, it was broken up into apartments. It was made into a double tenement in the 1890s, and further subdivided into three apartments circa 1920, with a fourth created about 1960. The house was purchased by the Carleton County Historical Society in 1975, and is currently used to house the society's archives, artifacts and office. A restoration of the layout of the house, before it was broken up into apartments, was completed in 2008. The Connell House is also available for business meetings, weddings, receptions, and parties for a small fee. The Connell House is fully licensed and has a fully stocked caterer's kitchen.
    9.00
    2 votes
    60
    Chiswick House

    Chiswick House

    Chiswick House is a Palladian villa in Burlington Lane, Chiswick, in the London Borough of Hounslow in England. Set in 65 acres (0.26 km), the house was completed in 1729 during the reign of George II and designed by Lord Burlington. William Kent (1685–1748), who took a leading role in designing the gardens, created one of the earliest examples of the English landscape garden on the property. The villa is arguably the finest remaining example of Neo-Palladian architecture in London. After the death of its builder and original occupant in 1753, and the subsequent deaths of his last surviving daughter Charlotte Boyle in 1754 and his widow in 1758, the property was ceded to the Cavendish family and William Cavendish, 4th Duke of Devonshire, the husband of Charlotte. After William's death in 1764, the villa passed to his and Charlotte's orphaned young son, William, the 5th Duke of Devonshire. Although it was not used as his main residence, his wife Georgiana Spencer, a prominent but controversial figure in fashion and politics whom he married in 1774, used the house as a retreat and as a Whig stronghold for many years, being the place of death of Charles James Fox in 1806. Tory Prime
    9.00
    2 votes
    61
    Herstmonceux Castle

    Herstmonceux Castle

    Herstmonceux Castle is a brick-built Tudor castle near Herstmonceux, East Sussex, England. From 1957 to 1988 its grounds were the home of the Royal Greenwich Observatory. Today it is used by the Bader International Study Centre of Queen's University, Canada. Herstmonceux Castle is one of the oldest significant brick buildings still standing in England; brick was an unusual material for the time in Britain. The builders of Herstmonceux Castle concentrated more on grandeur and comfort than on defence. Herstmonceux Castle is home to events throughout the year, including the annual England's Medieval Festival on August Bank Holiday weekend. The first written evidence of the existence of the Herst settlement appears in William the Conqueror's Domesday Book which reports that one of William's closest supporters granted tenancy of the manor at Herst to a man named ‘Wilbert'. By the end of the twelfth century, the family at the manor house at Herst had considerable status. Written accounts mention a lady called Idonea de Herst, who married a Norman nobleman named Ingelram de Monceux. Around this time, the manor began to be called the “Herst of the Monceux”, a name that eventually became
    9.00
    2 votes
    62
    Lyveden New Bield

    Lyveden New Bield

    Lyveden New Bield (sometimes called New Build) is an unfinished summer house in the parish of Aldwinkle St Peter in the county of Northamptonshire, England. It was constructed for Sir Thomas Tresham, the fervent Roman Catholic of Rushton Hall, and is thought to have been designed by Robert Stickells. The exact date is unknown but can be estimated to circa 1604–05, the year of Tresham's death. The New Bield was on the estate of Tresham's second home Lyvedon Old Bield. Just as at Tresham's smaller folly Rushton Triangular Lodge, his principal estate, the New Bield has a religious design full of symbolism. Designed on a plan reminiscent of a Greek cross, the facades have a strict symmetry. The building has two floors above a raised basement, with mullioned and transomed windows. Each floor had three rooms with a staircase in the south projection of the cross. The exterior of the building is decorated by friezes of a religious nature. The metopes contain the emblems and motifs found also at the triangular lodge, such as the "IHS" christogram. The house was obviously meant for occupation as not only does it have a great hall and parlour on the first floor and kitchen and buttery in the
    9.00
    2 votes
    63
    Osborne House

    Osborne House

    Osborne House is a former royal residence in East Cowes, Isle of Wight, UK. The house was built between 1845 and 1851 for Queen Victoria and Prince Albert as a summer home and rural retreat. Prince Albert designed the house himself in the style of an Italian Renaissance palazzo. The builder was Thomas Cubitt, the London architect and builder whose company built the main façade of Buckingham Palace for the royal couple in 1847. An earlier smaller house on the site was demolished to make way for a new and far larger house. Queen Victoria died at Osborne House in January 1901. Following her death, the house became surplus to royal requirements and was given to the state with a few rooms retained as a private royal museum dedicated to Queen Victoria. From 1903 until 1921 it was used as a junior officer training college for the Royal Navy known as the Royal Naval College, Osborne. Today it is fully open to the public. Queen Victoria and her husband Prince Albert bought Osborne House on the Isle of Wight in October 1845.. They were searching for a home away from the stresses of court life. Queen Victoria had spent two holidays on the Isle of Wight as a young girl. The setting of the
    9.00
    2 votes
    64
    Raynham Hall

    Raynham Hall

    Raynham Hall is a country house in Norfolk, England. For nearly 400 years it has been the seat of the Townshend family. The hall gave its name to the area, known as The Raynhams, and is reported to be haunted, providing the scene for possibly the most famous ghost photo of all time, the famous Brown Lady descending the staircase. However, the ghost has been seen infrequently since the photo was taken. Its most famous resident was Charles Townshend, 2nd Viscount Townshend (1674–1738), leader in the House of Lords. Raynham Hall is one of the most splendid of the great houses of Norfolk. It was begun in 1619 by Sir Roger Townshend and was the first of its kind in England. Perhaps because of the three-year grand tour of Europe which Sir Roger had undertaken, Raynham was built in an entirely new style, abandoning native tradition and following the Italian form and plan. Raynham could easily be mistaken for a house built nearly a century later. In 1713, Lord Townshend married Robert Walpole's prettiest sister, Dorothy. She was his second wife, and is reputed in the gossip of the time to have been previously the mistress of Lord Wharton, "whose character was so infamous, and his lady's
    9.00
    2 votes
    65
    Baddesley Clinton

    Baddesley Clinton

    Baddesley Clinton (grid reference SP199714), is a moated manor house, located just north of the historic town of Warwick in the English county of Warwickshire; the house was probably established sometime in the 13th century when large areas of the Forest of Arden were cleared and eventually converted to farmland. The site is a Scheduled Ancient Monument and the Hall is a Grade I listed building. In 1438, John Brome, the Under-Treasurer of England, bought the manor. It then passed to his son, Nicholas, who is thought to have built the east range, which is the main entrance. Nicholas is also responsible for the extensive rebuilding of the nearby parish church dedicated to St. Michael, done as penance for killing the parish priest, a murder reputed to have taken place in the great house itself. The house from this period was equipped with gun-ports, and possibly a drawbridge. When Nicholas Brome died in 1517, the house passed to his daughter, who married Sir Edward Ferrers (High Sheriff of Warwickshire) in 1500. The house remained in the ownership of the Ferrers family until 1940 when it was purchased by Thomas Walker, a relative of the family who changed his name to Ferrers. His son,
    7.67
    3 votes
    66
    Fonthill Abbey

    Fonthill Abbey

    Fonthill Abbey — also known as Beckford's Folly — was a large Gothic revival country house built around the turn of the 19th century at Fonthill Gifford in Wiltshire, England, at the direction of William Thomas Beckford and architect James Wyatt. It was constructed near the site of the Palladian house, later known as Fonthill Splendens, which was constructed by his father, William Beckford, to replace the Elizabethan house that Beckford père had purchased in 1744 and which had been destroyed by fire in 1755. The abbey is now almost all demolished. Fonthill Abbey was a brainchild of William Thomas Beckford, son of wealthy English plantation owner William Beckford and a student of architect Sir William Chambers, as well as of James Wyatt, architect of the project. In 1771, when Beckford was ten years old, he inherited £1,000,000 (roughly £100 million in 2008 values) and an income which his contemporaries estimated at around £100,000 per annum, a colossal amount at the time (equivalent to £10 million in 2008), but which biographers have found to be closer to half of that sum. Newspapers of the period described him as "the richest commoner in England". He first met William Courtenay
    7.67
    3 votes
    67
    Kimbolton Castle

    Kimbolton Castle

    Kimbolton Castle in Kimbolton, Cambridgeshire, is best known as the final home of King Henry VIII's first queen, Catherine of Aragon. Originally a medieval castle but converted into a stately palace, it was the family seat of the Dukes of Manchester from 1615 until 1950. It now houses Kimbolton School. A wooden motte and bailey castle was built in Kimbolton, on a different site, in Norman times. Later, King John granted Geoffrey Fitz Peter, Earl of Essex permission to hold a fair and market in Kimbolton, as a consequence of which a market place was created, with the existing church at one end and a new castle at the other. No remains of this castle (most likely a fortified manor house) remain, although it was built on the site of the present castle. The castle went through various phases of ownership until, by the 1520s, it belonged to the Wingfield family. The medieval castle was rebuilt as a Tudor manor house, parts of which survive. Catherine of Aragon was sent here in April 1534 for refusing to give up her status or deny the validity of her marriage. The fenland climate damaged her health, and she died here in January 1536. Her body was carried in procession to the Peterborough
    7.67
    3 votes
    68
    Ordsall Hall

    Ordsall Hall

    Ordsall Hall is a historic house and a former stately home in Ordsall, an area of Salford, in Greater Manchester, England. It dates back more than 750 years, although the oldest surviving parts of the present hall were built in the 15th century. The most important period of Ordsall Hall's life was as the family seat of the Radclyffe family, who lived in the house for over 300 years. The hall was the setting for William Harrison Ainsworth's 1842 novel Guy Fawkes, written around the plausible although unsubstantiated local story that the Gunpowder Plot of 1605 was planned in the house. Since its sale by the Radclyffes in 1662, the hall has been put to many uses; working men's club, school for clergy, and a radio station amongst them. The house was bought by Salford City Council in 1959, and opened to the public in 1972, as a period house and local history museum. The hall is a Grade I listed building. In 2007 it was named Small Visitor Attraction of the Year by the Northwest Regional Development Agency. The hall was closed to the public between 2009 and 2011 while it was refurbished and reopened in May 2011. Ordsall Hall is a formerly moated Tudor mansion, the oldest parts of which
    7.67
    3 votes
    69
    Riverside

    Riverside

    Riverside was an extravagant private residence on the Upper West Side of New York City that existed in the first half of the 20th century. It was built for steel magnate Charles M. Schwab, and was the grandest and most ambitious house ever built on the island of Manhattan. Considered by many to be the classic example of a "white elephant", it was built on the "wrong" side of Central Park from the viewpoint of the more fashionable Upper East Side. The 75-room mansion between 73rd and 74th Streets was designed by an architect with only a modest reputation, Maurice Hébert (1861–1933), as an eclectic Beaux-Arts mixture of pink granite features that made the Vanderbilt mansions on Fifth Avenue look cramped. It combined details from three French Renaissance châteaux: Chenonceau, the exterior staircase from Blois, and Azay-le-Rideau. The total cost was six million dollars. Schwab's former employer Andrew Carnegie, whose own mansion on upper Fifth Avenue later became the Cooper-Hewitt Museum, once remarked, "Have you seen that place of Charlie's? It makes mine look like a shack." Schwab was a self-made man who became president of U.S. Steel and later founded Bethlehem Steel Company. Schwab
    7.67
    3 votes
    70
    Abbotsford House

    Abbotsford House

    Abbotsford is a historic house in the region of the Scottish Borders in the south of Scotland, near Melrose, on the south bank of the River Tweed. It was formerly the residence of historical novelist and poet, Walter Scott. It is a Category A Listed Building. The nucleus of the estate was a small farm of 100 acres (0.40 km), called Cartleyhole, nicknamed Clarty (i.e., muddy) Hole, and was bought by Scott on the lapse of his lease (1811) of the neighbouring house of Ashestiel. He first built a small villa and named it Abbotsford, creating the name from a ford nearby where previously abbots of Melrose Abbey used to cross the river. Scott then built additions to the house and made it into a mansion, building into the walls many sculptured stones from ruined castles and abbeys of Scotland. In it he gathered a large library, a collection of ancient furniture, arms and armour, and other relics and curiosities, especially connected with Scottish history, notably the Celtic Torrs Pony-cap and Horns and the Woodwrae Stone, all now in the Museum of Scotland. The last and principal acquisition was that of Toftfield (afterwards named Huntlyburn), purchased in 1817. The new house was then begun
    10.00
    1 votes
    71
    Badminton House

    Badminton House

    Badminton House is a large country house in Gloucestershire, England, and has been the principal seat of the Dukes of Beaufort since the late 17th century, when the family moved from Raglan Castle, which had been ruined in the English Civil War. In 1612 Edward Somerset, the 4th Earl of Worcester, bought from Nicholas Boteler his manors of Great and Little Badminton, called 'Madmintune' [sic] in the Domesday Book while one century earlier the name 'Badimyncgtun' was recorded, held by that family since 1275. Edward Somerset's 3rd son Sir Thomas Somerset modernized the old house in the late 1620s, and built a new T-shaped gabled range. Evidence suggests he also built up on the present north and west fronts. The 3rd Duke of Beaufort adapted Sir Thomas Somerset's house by incorporating his several gabled ranges around the courtyard and extending the old house eastwards to provide a new set of domestic apartments. He raised a grand Jonesian centrepiece on the north front. The two bay flanking elevations were five storeys high, and this was modified in 1713 when reduced to three storeys. The architect William Kent renovated and extended the house in the Palladian style in the early 18th
    10.00
    1 votes
    72
    Drumlanrig Castle

    Drumlanrig Castle

    Drumlanrig Castle is situated on the Queensberry Estate in Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland. The category A listed castle is the Dumfriesshire home of the Duke and Duchess of Buccleuch and Queensberry. The 'Pink Palace' of Drumlanrig, constructed from distinctive pink sandstone, is an example of late 17th century Renaissance architecture. The first Duke of Queensberry, William Douglas, had the castle built on the site of an ancient Douglas stronghold overlooking Nith Valley. The castle has 120 rooms, 17 turrets and 4 towers. The castle is home to part of the Buccleuch art collection which includes Rembrandt’s 'An Old Woman Reading', and Leonardo Da Vinci's Madonna of the Yarnwinder which was stolen in 2003 and returned in 2007 after being found in Glasgow and many other paintings, tapestries and objects of art. The stableyard houses the Stableyard Studios and cafe.
    10.00
    1 votes
    73
    Farnley Hall

    Farnley Hall

    Farnley Hall is a stately home in Farnley, North Yorkshire, England. It is located near Otley. The original early seventeenth century house was added to in the 1780s by John Carr, who also designed Harewood House. The hall is now a Grade I listed building. The property was owned by Walter Fawkes MP (1769–1825), and a regular visitor was the Victorian artist and philosopher John Ruskin, who was taken with the enormous collection of paintings by J.M.W. Turner, a friend of the owner. A selection of Turner's works from the Farnley Hall collection were sold in 1890 for £25,000. Its owner, Nicholas Horton-Fawkes, was elected President of the Turner Society. Guy Fawkes was related to the Fawkes of Farnley.
    10.00
    1 votes
    74
    Montacute House

    Montacute House

    Montacute House is a late Elizabethan country house situated in the South Somerset village of Montacute. This house is a textbook example of English architecture during a period that was moving from the medieval Gothic to the Renaissance Classical; this has resulted in Montacute being regarded as one of the finest houses to survive from the Elizabethan era. It has been designated by English Heritage as a grade I listed building, and Scheduled Ancient Monument. It was visited by 110,529 people in 2009. Designed by an unknown architect, the three floored mansion, constructed of the local Ham Hill stone, was built circa 1598 by Sir Edward Phelips, Master of the Rolls. His descendants occupied the house until the early 20th century. Following a brief period, when the house was let to tenants, it was acquired by the National Trust in 1927. Today, it is fully open to the public. Since 1975, the mansion's Long Gallery, the longest in England, has served as a regional outpost of the National Portrait Gallery and displays an important collection of oils and watercolours contemporary to the house. Montacute House was built circa 1598 by Sir Edward Phelips, whose family had been resident in
    10.00
    1 votes
    75
    Shardeloes

    Shardeloes

    Shardeloes is a large 18th century country house located one mile northwest of Amersham in Buckinghamshire, United Kingdom. grid reference SU937978. A previous manor house on the site was demolished and the present building constructed between 1758 and 1766 for William Drake, the Member of Parliament for Amersham. The architect and builder was Stiff Leadbetter, designs for interior decorations were provided by Robert Adam from 1761. Built in the Palladian style, of stuccoed brick, the mansion is nine bays long by seven bays deep. It was constructed with the piano nobile on the ground floor and a mezzanine above. The north facade has a large portico of Corinthian columns. The terminating windows of the piano nobile are pedimented and recessed into shallow niches, as are the end bays of the east front. The roof, typically for the palladian style, is hidden by a balustrade. The original plans of the house by Leadbetter show a design closer in appearance to Holkham Hall, with square end towers. Adam cancelled this idea, but embellished the front with the portico. The interior of the house has fine ornamental plaster work by Joseph Rose. The entrance hall by Adam has fluted Doric
    10.00
    1 votes
    76
    Colzium

    Colzium

    Colzium House and Estate (historically pronounced "Colly-um" but more recently "Col-zeum") is about 500 metres to the north-east of Kilsyth, North Lanarkshire, Scotland. The present house dates from 1783 and was extended and modernised in 1861. W Mackay Lennox bought the house in 1930 and in 1937, on his retiral as Town Clerk, he presented the House and its policies to Kilsyth Burgh, in memory of his mother. The house and estate are principally used for public recreation, as the venue for the annual Kilsyth International Carnival in mid August, an "Italian Picnic" – a gathering of Italian/Scottish families, and functions such as weddings and parties. There is also a fine walled garden and a small theatre, the "clock theatre" which is currently closed. A new children's adventure playground has recently been opened and is proving to be popular with local children. The estate still contains the ruins of Colzium Castle just 100 metres north of Colzium House at the point where the driveway turns sharp left to Tak-Ma-Doon Road. The first building here was a large L plan tower house built by the Livingstons of Callendar in the mid C15th to replace the ancient motte. The Civil War Battle
    6.50
    4 votes
    77
    Althorp

    Althorp

    Althorp ( /ˈɔːlθɔrp/ or /ˈɔːltrəp/) is a country estate of about 14,000 acres (60 km) and a stately home in Northamptonshire, England. It is about 5 miles (8.0 km) north-west of the county town of Northampton. Althorp was built by the Earl of Sunderland in 1688. The estate has been the ancestral home of the Spencer family since the 16th century. Their fortune derived from its earliest known ancestor, Sir John Spencer of Wormleighton, Warwickshire, who bought Althorp in 1522 from the Catesby family with the huge profits from his sheep-rearing business. The house was originally a red brick Tudor building but its appearance was radically altered in the 18th century when the architect Henry Holland was commissioned to make extensive changes starting in 1788. The interior of the house is generally considered its strongest asset as the Spencer family has assembled an impressive collection of portrait art including several pieces painted by the Flemish master Anthony van Dyck. The estate stable block has been converted into an exhibition devoted to the memory of Diana, Princess of Wales, who is buried on the estate, and provides an attractive sandstone setting that effectively offsets the
    8.50
    2 votes
    78
    Clarence House

    Clarence House

    Clarence House is a royal home in London, situated on The Mall, in the City of Westminster. It is attached to St. James's Palace and shares the palace's garden. For nearly 50 years, from 1953 to 2002, it was home to Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother. It has since been the official residence of The Prince of Wales, The Duchess of Cornwall and Prince Harry. Clarence House also served as the official residence for Prince William from 2003 until his 2011 marriage. It is open to visitors for approximately two months each summer. It is one of many royal buildings in London. The house was built between 1825 and 1827 to a design by John Nash. It was commissioned by Prince William, Duke of Clarence, who became King William IV in 1830. He lived there in preference to the nearby St. James's Palace, which he found too cramped. It passed to his sister Princess Augusta Sophia and, following her death in 1840, to Queen Victoria's mother, the Duchess of Kent. In 1866, it became the home of Queen Victoria's second son and fourth child Alfred, Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha and Duke of Edinburgh until his death in 1900. His younger brother Prince Arthur, Duke of Connaught and Strathearn, Queen
    8.50
    2 votes
    79
    Cliveden

    Cliveden

    Cliveden is an Italianate mansion and estate at Taplow, Buckinghamshire, England. Set on banks 40 metres (130 ft) above the River Thames, its grounds slope down to the river. The site has been home to an Earl, two Dukes, a Prince of Wales and the Viscounts Astor. As home of Nancy Astor, the house was the meeting place of the Cliveden set of the 1920s and 1930s - a group of political intellectuals. Later, during the 1960s, it became the setting for key events of the notorious Profumo Affair. During the 1970s, it was occupied by Stanford University of California who used it as an overseas campus. Today owned by the National Trust, the house is leased as a five-star hotel run by London & Regional Properties. "Cliveden" (pronounced CLIV-d'n) means "valley among cliffs" and refers to the dean or valley which cuts through the estate to the east of the house. "Cliveden" has been spelled differently over the centuries, some of the variations being Cliffden, Clifden, Cliefden and Clyveden. The 375 acres (152 ha) gardens and woodlands are open to the public, together with parts of the house on certain days. There have been three houses on this site: the first, built in 1666, burned down in
    8.50
    2 votes
    80
    Dundurn Castle

    Dundurn Castle

    Dundurn Castle is a historic neoclassical mansion on York Boulevard in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. The 18,000-square-foot (1,700 m) house took three years and $175,000.00 to build, and was completed in 1835. The seventy-two room castle featured the latest conveniences of gas lighting and running water. It is currently owned by the City of Hamilton, which purchased it in 1900 for $50,000. The City has spent nearly $3 million renovating the site to make 42 of the original 72 rooms open to the public. The rooms have been restored to the year 1855 when its owner Sir Allan Napier MacNab, 1st Baronet, was at the height of his career. Costumed interpreters guide visitors through the home, illustrating daily life from the 1850s. Currently, the Duchess of Cornwall, Camilla Parker-Bowles is the Royal Patron of Dundurn Castle. Dundurn Castle, a Regency house, was completed in 1835 by architect Robert Charles Wetherell. MacNab purchased the property from Richard Beasley, one of Hamilton's early settlers, when financial difficulties forced Beasley to sell lands at Burlington Heights (present day Dundurn Park), and MacNab built Dundurn Castle on the foundations of Beasley's brick home. Once
    8.50
    2 votes
    81
    John Knox House

    John Knox House

    The John Knox House is an historic house in Edinburgh, Scotland, reputed to have been owned and lived in by Protestant reformer John Knox during the 16th century, but known not to have been (Knox's house was on Warriston Close, where a plaque correctly marks the site). The house itself was built from 1490 onwards, featuring a fine wooden gallery and hand-painted ceiling. It belonged to the Mossman family, Edinburgh goldsmiths who refashioned the crown of Scotland for James V. James Mossman remained loyal to Mary, Queen of Scots when she was exiled in England. He worked in Edinburgh Castle making coins for her supporters who held the castle during the 'lang siege' on her behalf. When the Castle surrendered in August 1573, Mossman was charged with counterfeiting, hanged and beheaded. The house was forfeit for the treachery, and was given in the name of James VI of Scotland to James Carmichael younger of that ilk. The carvings date from 1850 when the building was restored. They are by Alexander Handyside Ritchie.. The building was restored again in 1984. Over the next few centuries many decorations and paintings were added, and the house and its contents are now a museum. The building
    8.50
    2 votes
    82
    Sandringham House

    Sandringham House

    Sandringham House is a country house on 8,000 hectares (20,000 acres) of land near the village of Sandringham in Norfolk, England. The house is privately owned by the British Royal Family and is located on the royal Sandringham Estate, which lies within the Norfolk Coast Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The site has been occupied since the Elizabethan era, and, in 1771, architect Cornish Henley cleared the site to build Sandringham Hall. The hall was modified during the 19th century by Charles Spencer Cowper, a stepson of Lord Palmerston, who added an elaborate porch and conservatory, designed by architect Samuel Sanders Teulon. In 1862, the hall was purchased by Queen Victoria at the request of the Prince of Wales (the future Edward VII) as a home for himself and his new bride, Alexandra. However, in 1865, two years after moving in, the prince found the hall's size insufficient for his needs, and he commissioned A. J. Humbert to raze the hall and create a larger building. The resulting red-brick house was completed in late 1870 in a mix of styles. This section incorporated the galleried entrance hall which is used by the royal family for entertaining and family occasions. A
    8.50
    2 votes
    83
    Gawsworth Hall

    Gawsworth Hall

    Gawsworth Old Hall is a Grade I listed country house in the village of Gawsworth, Cheshire, England. It is a timber-framed house in the Cheshire black-and-white style. The present house was built between 1480 and 1600, replacing an earlier Norman house. It was probably built as a courtyard house enclosing a quadrangle, but much of it has been demolished, leaving the house with a U-shaped plan. The present hall was owned originally by the Fitton family, and later by the Gerards, and then the Stanhopes. Since the 1930s it has been in the possession of the Richards family. Raymond Richards collected a number of items from other historic buildings and incorporated them into the hall. Notable residents have included Mary Fitton, perhaps the "Dark Lady" of Shakespeare's sonnets, and Samuel "Maggoty" Johnson, a playwright described as the last professional jester in England, whose grave is in the grounds. In 1712 a dispute about the ownership of the Gawsworth estate culminated in a duel, in which both the combatants were killed. The hall is surrounded by formal gardens and parkland, which once comprised an Elizabethan pleasure garden and, possibly, a tilting ground for jousting. The
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    Historic houses in Virginia

    Historic houses in Virginia

    Many historic houses in Virginia are notable sites. The U.S. state of Virginia was home to many of America's Founding Fathers, four of the first five U.S. presidents, as well as many important figures of the Confederacy. As one of the earliest locations of European settlement in America, Virginia has some of the oldest buildings in the nation. Listing includes date of the start of construction where known.
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    Mount Vernon

    Mount Vernon

    Mount Vernon, located near Alexandria, Virginia, was the plantation home of the first President of the United States, George Washington. The mansion is built of wood in neoclassical Georgian architectural style, and the estate is located on the banks of the Potomac River. Mount Vernon was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1960 and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It is owned and maintained in trust by The Mount Vernon Ladies' Association and is open every day of the year. When Augustine Washington owned the estate, it was known as Little Hunting Creek Plantation after the nearby Little Hunting Creek. Lawrence Washington, George's older half-brother, inherited the estate and changed its name to Mount Vernon in honor of Vice Admiral Edward Vernon famed for the War of Jenkin's Ear and capture of Portobelo, Colón. Vernon had been Lawrence's commanding officer in the British Royal Navy, and Lawrence greatly admired him. When George Washington inherited the property he retained the name. The early history of the estate at Little Hunting Creek is separate from that of the home, which wasn't occupied until 1743. In 1674, John Washington and Nicholas Spencer
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    Wilton House

    Wilton House

    Wilton House is an English country house situated at Wilton near Salisbury in Wiltshire. It has been the country seat of the Earls of Pembroke for over 400 years. The first recorded building on the site of Wilton House was a priory founded by King Egbert circa 871. Later, this priory, due to the munificence of King Alfred, was granted lands and manors until it became wealthy and powerful. However, by the time Wilton Abbey was dissolved during the Dissolution of the Monasteries by King Henry VIII of England, its prosperity was already on the wane — following the seizure of the abbey, King Henry presented it and the estates to William Herbert, 1st Earl of Pembroke (in the 1551 creation) in c.1544. William Herbert, the scion of a distinguished family in the Welsh marches, was a favourite of the King. Following a recommendation to King Henry by King Francis I of France, whom Herbert had served as a soldier of fortune, Herbert was granted arms after only two years. In 1538, Herbert married Anne Parr, daughter of Sir Thomas Parr of Kendal and sister of King Henry VIII's last Queen, Catherine Parr and William Parr, 1st Marquess of Northampton. The granting of an estate such as the Abbey
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    Christchurch Mansion

    Christchurch Mansion

    Christchurch Mansion is a substantial Tudor brick mansion house within Christchurch Park on the edge of the town centre of Ipswich, Suffolk, England. It is now owned by the town and since 1895 has formed one of the two principal venues of the Ipswich Corporation Museums, now part of the Colchester and Ipswich Museum Service. The Grade I listed building mansion houses a collection of pottery and glass, a contemporary art gallery and a collection of paintings by artists including John Constable and Thomas Gainsborough. There are rooms preserved as past inhabitants would have known them, complete with original items of fine clothing. The house sits within a 70 acres (280,000 m) public park which features many beautiful trees, rolling lawns and ponds. Christchurch Park was originally the grounds of the Priory of the Holy Trinity, with an area of many square miles, coming up to the medieval town walls. During Henry VIIIs dissolution of the monasteries, the monastery was dissolved and the land was purchased by Sir Edmund Withipoll, who built the mansion in 1548-50, the ground floor of which remains largely as he left it. His granddaughter, Elizabeth Withipoll, married Leicester Devereux,
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    Canons Ashby House

    Canons Ashby House

    Canons Ashby House is an Elizabethan manor house located in Canons Ashby, Daventry, Northamptonshire, England. It has been owned by the National Trust since 1981, although "The Tower" is in the care of the Landmark Trust and available for holiday lets. It has been the home of the Dryden family since its construction in the 16th century. The manor house was built in approximately 1550 with additions in the 1590s, in the 1630s and 1710; it has remained essentially unchanged since the 1710s. John Dryden had married Elizabeth Cope in 1551 and inherited, through his wife, an L-shaped farmhouse which he gradually extended. In the 1590s his son, Sir Erasmus Dryden completed the final north range of the house which enclosed the Pebble Courtyard. The interior of the house is noted for its Elizabethan wall paintings and its Jacobean plasterwork. The house sits in the midst of a formal garden with colourful herbaceous borders, an orchard featuring varieties of fruit trees from the 16th century, terraces, walls and gate piers from 1710. There is also the remains of a medieval priory church (from which the house gets its name). Gervase Jackson-Stops, who was the Architectural Adviser to the
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    89
    Eltham Palace

    Eltham Palace

    Eltham Palace is a large house in Eltham, within the Royal Borough of Greenwich, South East London, England. It is an unoccupied royal residence and owned by the Crown Estate. In 1995 its management was handed over to English Heritage which restored the building in 1999 and opened it to the public. It has been said the internally Art Deco house is a "masterpiece of modern design". The original palace was given to Edward II in 1305 by the Bishop of Durham, Anthony Bek, and used as a royal residence from the 14th to the 16th century. According to one account the incident which inspired Edward III's foundation of the Order of the Garter took place here. As the favourite palace of Henry IV it played host to Manuel II Palaiologos, the only Byzantine emperor ever to visit England, from December 1400 to January 1401, with a joust being given in his honour. There is still a jousting tilt yard. Edward IV built the Great Hall in the 1470s, a young Henry VIII back when he was known as Prince Henry also grew up here; it was here that he met and impressed the scholar Erasmus in 1499 introduced by Thomas More. Erasmus described the occasion: Tudor courts often used the palace for their Christmas
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    Friar Park

    Friar Park

    Friar Park is a 120-room Victorian neo-Gothic mansion in Henley-on-Thames once owned by an eccentric lawyer named Sir Frank Crisp and purchased in January 1970 by musician George Harrison. Since the early 1970s, the property has become synonymous with the former Beatle's home studio, known as FPSHOT. Harrison biographer Alan Clayson has described the Friar Park estate as being "as synonymous with his name as the Queen's with Windsor Castle". Harrison put the whole property up as collateral in order to fund the Monty Python comedy team's movie Life of Brian after their original backers, EMI, pulled out at the last minute. As a huge fan of the Pythons, Harrison simply wanted to get to see the film − something that his friend Eric Idle has often described as "the most expensive cinema ticket in movie history". The Friar Park estate was owned by Sir Frank Crisp from 1875 until his death in 1919. It then passed on to Roman Catholic nuns belonging to the Salesians of Don Bosco order. The nuns ran a local school in Henley, the Sacred Heart School, but by the late 1960s Friar Park was in a state of disrepair and due to be demolished. In early 1972, Harrison installed a 16-track tape-based
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    91
    Hawarden Castle

    Hawarden Castle

    Hawarden Old Castle is a medieval castle near Hawarden, Flintshire, Wales. Its oldest origins are indeterminate and the oldest fortifications on this site may date back to the Iron Age, later being used as a Norman Motte-and-bailey castle which was reportedly destroyed and replaced in a short period during the 13th century. The castle played an important role during the Welsh struggle for independence in the 13th century. At Easter 1282, Dafydd ap Gruffudd attacked Hawarden Castle, thereby starting the final Welsh conflict with Norman England, in the course of which Welsh independence was lost. King Edward I's sense of outrage was such that he designed a punishment for Dafydd harsher than any previous form of capital punishment; Dafydd was hanged, drawn, and quartered in Shrewsbury in October 1283. In 1294 the castle was captured during the revolt of Madog ap Llywelyn. After the English Civil War in the 17th century the castle was slighted on the orders of Oliver Cromwell. Its ruins are on the New Hawarden Castle estate and are open to the public on some Sundays, typically the second and fourth Sundays in summertime.
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    Hougoumont

    Hougoumont

    Château d'Hougoumont (originally Goumont) is a large farmhouse situated at the bottom of an escarpment near the Nivelles road in Braine-l'Alleud, near Waterloo, Belgium. The escarpment is where British and other allied forces faced Napoleon's Army at the Battle of Waterloo on June 18, 1815. The name "Hougoumont" is derived from "Gomme Mont" which means "Gum hill". It was built on a little hill with pine trees around it, from which pine gum was collected to make turpentine. Napoleon planned to draw Wellington's reserve to Wellington's right flank in defence of Hougoumont and then attack through the centre left of the British and allies' front near La Haye Sainte. Before the battle started, Hougoumont and its gardens, located on the allies' right flank, were garrisoned and fortified by the 1st Battalion, 2nd Nassau Regiment, with additional detachments of jägers and landwehr from von Kielmansegge's 1st (Hanoverian) Brigade. The light company of the 2nd Battalion, Coldstream Guards under the command of Lt-Colonel Henry Wyndham, was also stationed in the farm and chateaux, and the light company of the 2nd Battalion, Third Guards, under Lt-Colonel Charles Dashwood, in the garden and
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    Lacock Abbey

    Lacock Abbey

    Lacock Abbey in the village of Lacock, Wiltshire, England, was founded in the early 13th century by Ela, Countess of Salisbury, as a nunnery of the Augustinian order. Lacock Abbey, dedicated to St Mary and St Bernard, was founded in 1229 by the widowed Lady Ela the Countess of Salisbury, who laid the abbey's first stone 16 April 1232, in the reign of King Henry III, and to which she retired in 1238. Her late husband had been William Longespee, an illegitimate son of King Henry II. The abbey was founded in Snail's Meadow, near the village of Lacock. The first of the nuns were veiled in 1232. Generally, Lacock Abbey prospered throughout the Middle Ages. The rich farmlands which it had received from Ela ensured it a sizeable income from wool. Following the Dissolution of the Monasteries in the mid-16th century, Henry VIII of England sold it to Sir William Sharington, who converted it into a house starting in 1539, demolishing the abbey church. Few other alterations were made to the monastic buildings themselves: the cloisters, for example, still stand below the living accommodation. About 1550 Sir William added an octagonal tower containing two small chambers, one above the other; the
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    Longleat

    Longleat

    Longleat is an English stately home, currently the seat of the Marquesses of Bath, adjacent to the village of Horningsham and near the towns of Warminster in Wiltshire and Frome in Somerset. It is noted for its Elizabethan country house, maze, landscaped parkland and safari park. The house is set in over 900 acres (360 ha) of parkland, landscaped by Capability Brown, with 100,000 acres (40,000 ha) of woods and farmland. It was the first stately home to open to the public, and also claims the first safari park outside Africa. The house was built by Sir John Thynne, and designed mainly by Robert Smythson, after the original priory was destroyed by fire in 1567. It took 12 years to complete and is widely regarded as one of the finest examples of Elizabethan architecture in Britain. Longleat is currently occupied by Alexander Thynn, 7th Marquess of Bath, a direct descendant of the builder; however, the peer passed the management of the business to his son Viscount Weymouth early in 2010. Longleat was purchased by Sir John Thynn in 1541. He was the first of the Thynne 'dynasty' – the family name was Thynn or Thynne in the 16th century, later consistently Thynne, but the present head of
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    Lovell House

    Lovell House

    The Lovell House or Lovell Health House is an International style modernist residence designed and built by Richard Neutra between 1927 and 1929. The home, located at 4616 Dundee Drive in Los Angeles, California, was built for the physician and naturopath Philip Lovell. It is considered a major monument in architectural history, and was a turning point in Neutra's career. It is often described as the first steel frame house in the United States, and also an early example of the use of gunite (sprayed-on concrete). Neutra was familiar with steel construction due to his earlier work with the Chicago firm Holabird & Roche. Neutra served as the contractor for the project in order to manage the cost and quality. Aesthetically, the house follows many of the principles of the International Style, and was in fact included in the 1932 Museum of Modern Art exhibit that retrospectively defined that style. In essence the house reflects Neutra's interest in industrial production, and this is most evident in the repetitive use of factory-made window assemblies. In fact, Neutra's apprentice Harwell Hamilton Harris suggested that Neutra was drawn to America because of Henry Ford. The interior
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    Old Vicarage, Grantchester

    Old Vicarage, Grantchester

    The Old Vicarage in the Cambridgeshire village of Grantchester is a house associated with the poet Rupert Brooke, who lived nearby and in 1912 immortalised it in an eponymous poem. The Old Vicarage was built in around 1685 on the site of a 15th century vicarage and passed from church ownership into private hands in 1820. It was bought in 1850 by Samuel Page Widnall (1825–1894), who extended it and established a printing business, the Widnall Press. In 1910 it was owned by Henry and Florence Neeve, from whom Rupert Brooke rented a room, and later a large part of the house. Brooke's mother bought the house in 1916 and gave it to his friend, the economist Dudley Ward. In the 1980s, it was bought by the novelist and politician Jeffrey Archer and his wife, scientist Mary Archer. The Guardian crossword setter Araucaria set a famous clue: Poetic scene has, surprisingly, chaste Lord Archer vegetating (3, 3, 8, 12) giving, as an anagram, THE OLD VICARAGE GRANTCHESTER.
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    Petworth House

    Petworth House

    Petworth House in Petworth, West Sussex, England, is a late 17th-century mansion, rebuilt in 1688 by Charles Seymour, 6th Duke of Somerset, and altered in the 1870s by Anthony Salvin. The site was previously occupied by a fortified manor house founded by Henry de Percy, the 13th-century chapel and undercroft of which still survive. Today's building houses an important collection of paintings and sculptures, including 19 oil paintings by J. M. W. Turner (some owned by the family, some by Tate Britain), who was a regular visitor to Petworth, paintings by Van Dyck, carvings by Grinling Gibbons and Ben Harms, classical and neoclassical sculptures (including ones by John Flaxman and John Edward Carew), and wall and ceiling paintings by Louis Laguerre. There is also a terrestrial globe by Emery Molyneux, believed to be the only one in the world in its original 1592 state. It stands in a 283-hectare (700-acre) landscaped park, known as Petworth Park, which was designed by 'Capability' Brown. The park is one of the more famous in England, largely on account of a number of pictures of it which were painted by Turner. It is inhabited by the largest herd of fallow deer in England. There is
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    Stokesay Castle

    Stokesay Castle

    Stokesay Castle is a fortified manor house in Stokesay, a mile south of the town of Craven Arms, in southern Shropshire. It was built in the late 13th century. Currently in the guardianship of English Heritage, Stokesay Castle is a Grade I listed building. From the Norman Conquest until 1241, the area was held by the Lacy family, a powerful dynasty with lands in the Welsh Marches. On the death of the last male heir, Walter de Lacy, it was left to the husbands of his two granddaughters to divide the family estates. The manor of Stokesay went to John de Verdon. He went on crusade, leaving his property in the hands of a tenant. This tenant sold the manor in 1281 to Laurence of Ludlow. The main construction of Stokesay Castle was undertaken by Laurence of Ludlow, based in Shrewsbury, the richest local wool merchant of his generation. Extensive tree-ring dating of structural timbers shows that virtually all of the present structure was completed before 1291, the date of Edward I's license to fortify the place, which stands in the Welsh Marches, the western borderland of the Norman domain at that time. The oldest parts of the building are the lower two storeys of the north tower, begun
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    Winchester Mystery House

    Winchester Mystery House

    The Winchester Mystery House is a well-known mansion in Northern California. It once was the personal residence of Sarah Winchester, the widow of gun magnate William Wirt Winchester. It was continuously under construction for 38 years and is reported to be haunted. It now serves as a tourist attraction. Under Winchester's day-to-day guidance, its "from-the-ground-up" construction proceeded around the clock, without interruption, from 1884 until her death on September 5, 1922, at which time work immediately ceased. The cost for such constant building has been estimated at about US $5.5 million (if paid in 1922; this would be equivalent to over $71 million in 2010). The Queen Anne Style Victorian mansion is renowned for its size and utter lack of any master building plan. According to popular belief, Winchester thought the house was haunted by the ghosts of the people who fell victim to Winchester rifles, and that only continuous construction would appease them. It is located at 525 South Winchester Blvd. in San Jose, California. Although this is disputed, popular belief holds that a Boston medium told Winchester that she had to leave her home in New Haven and travel West, where she
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    10 Downing Street

    10 Downing Street

    10 Downing Street, colloquially known in the United Kingdom as "Number 10", is the headquarters of Her Majesty's Government and the official residence and office of the First Lord of the Treasury, an office now invariably held by the Prime Minister. Situated on Downing Street in the City of Westminster, London, Number 10 is one of the most famous addresses in the world. Over three hundred years old, the building contains about one hundred rooms. There is a private residence on the third floor and a kitchen in the basement. The other floors contain offices and numerous conference, reception, sitting and dining rooms where the Prime Minister works, and where government ministers, national leaders and foreign dignitaries are met and entertained. There is an interior courtyard and, in the back, a terrace overlooking a garden of 0.5 acres (2,000 m). Adjacent to St. James's Park, Number 10 is near to Buckingham Palace, the official London residence of the British Monarch, and the Palace of Westminster, the meeting place of both houses of parliament. Originally three houses, Number 10 was offered to Sir Robert Walpole by George II in 1732 . Walpole accepted on the condition that they be a
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    101
    Bowood House

    Bowood House

    Bowood is a grade I listed Georgian country house with interiors by Robert Adam and a garden designed by Lancelot "Capability" Brown. It is adjacent to the village of Derry Hill, halfway between Calne and Chippenham in Wiltshire, England. The greater part of the house was demolished in 1956. The first house at Bowood was built circa 1725 on the site of a hunting lodge, by the former tenant Sir Orlando Bridgeman, 2nd Baronet, who had purchased the property from the Crown. His grandfather Sir Orlando Bridgeman, Lord Chief Justice of the Common Pleas, had previously been granted the lease by Charles II. Bridgeman got into financial strife, and in 1739 under a Chancery Decree, the house and park were acquired by his principal creditor Richard Long. In 1754 Long sold it to the first Earl of Shelburne, who employed architect Henry Keene to extend the house. The 2nd Earl, Prime Minister from 1782 to 1783, was created Marquess of Lansdowne for negotiating peace with America after the War of Independence. He furnished Bowood and his London home, Lansdowne House, with superb collections of paintings and classical sculpture, and commissioned Robert Adam to decorate the grander rooms in Bowood
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    Kingston Russell

    Kingston Russell

    Kingston Russell is a large mansion house and manor near Long Bredy in Dorset, England, west of Dorchester. The present house dates from the late 17th century but in 1730 was clad in a white Georgian stone facade. The house was restored in 1913, and at the same time the gardens were laid out. The house is on land which was granted to the Russell family (not ancestors of the Russell Dukes of Bedford), by an early king, probably King John (1199–1216) at the end of his reign, or his son Henry III. Kingston Russell manor is now part of Long Bredy parish, but earlier appears to have had its own church. The main part of the manor adjoins Winterbourne Abbas to the east and Compton Valence to the north, whilst the house itself adjoins Long Bredy. It is situated in an area known for ancient tumuli and the Kingston Russell Stone Circle. The Poor Lot barrow group forms a boundary with Littlebredy and Winterbourne Abbas. The Victoria County History of the County of Dorset (1908) notes that Little Bredy, of which Kingston Russel is a part, may have been the borough of Brydian in the Saxon period. It goes on to say that if Little Bredy is indeed the borough of Brydian then "It was ... important
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    Aldermaston Court

    Aldermaston Court

    Aldermaston Court is a country house built in the Victorian era with incorporations from an earlier house, located in the village of Aldermaston in the English county of Berkshire. The house is now known as Aldermaston Manor and is run as a hotel and wedding venue. Robert FitzAchard (1070-1161) was granted the Aldermaston estate in 1100 by Henry I of England; no records of the house at this time have survived. FitzAchard was a distinguished Norman soldier whose son built the north transept in the parish church. According to the Pipe Rolls of 1168, the name had become Aldermannestun. The Achard family hosted Henry III at the manor in 1227, but later gave the parish church away to Monk Sherborne Priory in Hampshire; the family are all buried at their secondary manor of Sparsholt. The estate remained in the family for over 250 years until Peter Achard died in 1361 without a male heir, when the estate was inherited by Thomas de la Mare, Achard's son-in-law. De la Mare was from Somerset, and became the High Sheriff of Berkshire in 1370. His son was bestowed with this same position during Richard II's reign in the late 14th century. Robert de la Mare, Thomas's grandson, married into the
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    Bylaugh Park

    Bylaugh Park

    Bylaugh Hall, also known as Bylaugh Park, is a country house situated in the village of Bylaugh in Norfolk, England. The estate was acquired by Sir John Lombe in 1796. There is some uncertainty regarding the exact nature of the transaction. The unsubstantiated traditional story is that he won it from the former owner, Richard Lloyd, in a card game, after Lloyd's butler drugged his wine, but a more prosaic explanation seems likely. Sir John died childless in 1817 and the estate passed to his brother Edward, together with a large sum of money left by Sir John in trust for the construction of a new mansion house. After a long delay it was eventually necessary for the Court of Chancery to intervene and order the use of the trust funds for their appointed purpose, and the architects Charles Barry, Jr. and Robert Richardson Banks were at length commissioned to design a suitable house. William Andrews Nesfield advised on the position of the house, and was responsible for laying out the grounds and gardens. The clock tower and surrounding buildings are vaguely reminiscent of the new Houses of Parliament which were designed by Sir Charles Barry, Sr. The house was completed in about 1851.
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    Chartwell

    Chartwell

    Chartwell was the principal adult home of Sir Winston Churchill. Churchill and his wife Clementine bought the property, located two miles south of Westerham, Kent, England, in 1922. Extensive renovations simplifying and modernising the home were undertaken directly, completely transforming it when complete. When it became clear to the Churchills in 1946 that they could not afford to run the property, a consortium of wealthy businessmen organized by Lord Camrose purchased the estate. The arrangement was that for payment of nominal rent both Sir Winston and Lady Churchill would have the right to live there until they both died, at which point the property would be presented to the National Trust. When Sir Winston died in 1965, Clementine decided to present Chartwell to the National Trust immediately. The site had been built upon at least as early as the 16th century, when the estate had been called 'Well Street'. Henry VIII is reputed to have stayed in the house during his courtship of Anne Boleyn at nearby Hever Castle. The original farmhouse was significantly enlarged and modified during the 19th century. It became, according to the National Trust, an example of 'Victorian
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    Claremont

    Claremont

    Claremont, also known historically as 'Clermont', is an 18th-century Palladian mansion situated less than a mile south of Esher in Surrey, England. The buildings are now occupied by Claremont Fan Court School, and its landscaped gardens are owned and managed by the National Trust. The first house on the Claremont estate was built in 1708 by Sir John Vanbrugh, the Restoration playwright and architect of Blenheim Palace and Castle Howard, for his own use. This "very small box", as he described it, stood on the level ground in front of the present mansion. At the same time, he built the stables and the walled gardens, also probably White Cottage, which is now the Sixth Form Centre of Claremont Fan Court School. In 1714 he sold the house to the wealthy Whig politician Thomas Pelham-Holles, Earl of Clare, who later became Duke of Newcastle and served twice as Prime Minister. The Earl commissioned Vanbrugh to add two great wings to the house and to build a fortress-like turret on an adjoining knoll. From this so-called "prospect-house", or Belvedere, he and his guests could admire the views of the Surrey countryside as they took refreshments and played hazard, a popular dice game. In the
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    107
    Fallingwater

    Fallingwater

    Fallingwater or Kaufmann Residence is a house designed by architect Frank Lloyd Wright in 1935 in rural southwestern Pennsylvania, 43 miles (69 km) southeast of Pittsburgh. The home was built partly over a waterfall on Bear Run in the Mill Run section of Stewart Township, Fayette County, Pennsylvania, in the Laurel Highlands of the Allegheny Mountains. Hailed by Time shortly after its completion as Wright's "most beautiful job", it is listed among Smithsonian's Life List of 28 places "to visit before you die." It was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1966. In 1991, members of the American Institute of Architects named the house the "best all-time work of American architecture" and in 2007, it was ranked twenty-ninth on the list of America's Favorite Architecture according to the AIA. Almost forgotten at age 70, Frank Lloyd Wright was given the opportunity to re-emerge on the architectural scene with his design and construction of three buildings. His three great works of the late 1930s--Fallingwater, the Johnson Wax Building in Racine, Wisconsin, and the Herbert Jacobs house in Madison, Wisconsin--brought him back to the front of the architectural pack. Edgar Kaufmann Sr.
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    108
    Kingston Lacy

    Kingston Lacy

    Kingston Lacy is a country house and estate near Wimborne Minster, Dorset, England, now owned by the National Trust. From the 17th to the late 20th centuries it was the family seat of the Bankes family, who had previously resided nearby at Corfe Castle until its destruction in the English Civil War after its incumbent owners, Sir John Bankes and Dame Mary joined the side of Charles I. They owned some 8,000 acres (3,200 ha) of the surrounding Dorset countryside and coastline. Kingston Lacy takes its name from its ancient lords the Lacys, Earls of Lincoln, who held it together with Shapwick and Blandford. After the destruction of the family seat at Corfe Castle, a new site for a home was chosen on the Lacy estate by Sir John Bankes. However the house was eventually paid for and finished by his son Ralph Bankes. The original house was designed by Sir Roger Pratt and was built between 1663 and 1665, with interiors influenced by Inigo Jones, but executed by his heir John Webb. For many years, the house was believed entirely constructed by Jones, for it so resembled his work, until the plans of Webb were discovered. It is a grade I listed building. Henry Bankes, the son of Ralph Bankes
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    109
    Spencer House

    Spencer House

    Spencer House is a mansion in St James's, London. The house was commissioned by John, 1st Earl Spencer in 1756, the Earl requiring a large London house to cement his position and status. The architect he chose was John Vardy who had studied under William Kent. Vardy is responsible for the facades of the mansion that we see today. In 1758 James 'Athenian' Stuart who had studied the arcadian values of Ancient Greek architecture replaced Vardy as the architect of the project; as a direct result of this Spencer House was to have authentic Greek details in the internal decoration, and thus it became one of the first examples in London of the neoclassical style, which was to sweep the country. As the home of successive Earls and Countesses Spencer the state rooms of the house became a theatre for the pageant that was London high society. The Spencer family lived at the mansion successively until 1895, when the house was let. The Spencers returned for a brief while in the first quarter of the 20th century; then again the house was let, depending on the time as either a club or offices. During the Blitz of World War II it was stripped of its few remaining authentic treasures, specially
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    110
    Woolsthorpe Manor

    Woolsthorpe Manor

    Woolsthorpe Manor in Woolsthorpe-by-Colsterworth, near Grantham, Lincolnshire, England, was the birthplace of Sir Isaac Newton on 25 December 1642 (old calendar). At that time it was a yeoman's farmstead, principally rearing sheep (hence the wool reference in the name — thorpe comes from a Viking word meaning farmstead). Newton returned here when Cambridge University closed due to the plague, and here he performed many of his most famous experiments, most notably his work on light and optics. This is also believed to be the site where Newton observed an apple fall from a tree, inspiring him to formulate his law of universal gravitation. Now in the hands of the National Trust and open to the public from spring to autumn, it is presented as a typical seventeenth century yeoman's farmhouse (or as near to that as possible, taking into account modern living, health and safety requirements and structural changes that have been made to the house since Newton's time). New areas of the house, once private, were opened up to the public in 2003, with the old rear steps (that once led up to the hay loft and grain store and often seen in drawings of the period) being rebuilt, and the old walled
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    20 Forthlin Road

    20 Forthlin Road

    20 Forthlin Road is a National Trust property in south Liverpool, Merseyside, England. It is the house in which Paul McCartney lived for several years before he rose to fame with The Beatles. It was also the home of his brother Mike. The house was built by the local authority and the McCartney family moved into the house in 1955. In 1965, Paul bought his father, James, a house on The Wirral. The house has been in the ownership of the National Trust since 1995. The Trust markets the house as "the birthplace of the Beatles", since this is the place where The Beatles composed and rehearsed their earliest songs. Unlike Lennon's house, Mendips, 20 Forthlin Road does not have a blue plaque – and is currently ineligible to receive one – English Heritage issue a plaque once the figure has "been dead for 20 years, or [has] passed the centenary of their birth". The house was the birthplace of the group The Scaffold, of which Mike was a member. It is a Grade II listed building. The Magical Mystery Tour stops at the house for tourists to view the house from the outside. Visits within the property are run by The National Trust, and start from The Beatles Experience at the Albert Dock.
    9.00
    1 votes
    112
    Hare Hall

    Hare Hall

    Hare Hall is a house and grounds located in Gidea Park in the London Borough of Havering, east London. It was built in 1769-70 as a country house for John A. Wallinger and since 1921 has housed the Royal Liberty School. The Palladian mansion was built to designs by James Paine, who included it in his published Plans. The main north front is of five bays, with a rusticated basement storey, above which the two upper storeys are unified by a giant portico and pilasters at the angles. Attached to the south front by short corridors there were pavilions containing service rooms. The principal rooms were on the first floor, and were approached by a central staircase with curved ends and a wrought iron balustrade. The main front was of Portland stone, but the south front was of red brick. In 1896 the house was considerably enlarged on that side by filling in the space between the pavilions. At the stud maintained at Hare Park, Cherimoya, foaled in 1908, was bred by the South African mining entrepreneur and horseman W. Broderick Cloete; after Cloete's dweath in the sinking of the Lusitania, during the First World War Hare Park became Hare Hall Camp and housed the 2nd Battalion of the
    9.00
    1 votes
    113
    Hatfield House

    Hatfield House

    Hatfield House is a country house set in a large park, the Great Park, on the eastern side of the town of Hatfield, Hertfordshire, England. The present Jacobean house was built in 1611 by Robert Cecil, First Earl of Salisbury and Chief Minister to King James I and has been the home of the Cecil family ever since. It is a prime example of Jacobean architecture and is currently the home of Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, 7th Marquess of Salisbury. The house is open to the public. An earlier building on the site was the Royal Palace of Hatfield. Only part of this still exists, a short distance from the present house. This palace was the childhood home and favourite residence of Queen Elizabeth I. Built in 1497 by the Bishop of Ely, Henry VII's minister John Cardinal Morton, it comprised four wings in a square surrounding a central courtyard. The palace was seized by Henry VIII with other church properties. Henry VIII's children Edward and Elizabeth spent their youth at Hatfield Palace. His eldest daughter Queen Mary lived there between 1533 and 1536, when she was sent to wait on the then Princess Elizabeth, as punishment for refusing to recognise Henry's marriage to Anne Boleyn and his
    9.00
    1 votes
    114
    Kelmscott Manor

    Kelmscott Manor

    Kelmscott Manor is a limestone manor house in the Cotswold village of Kelmscott, Oxfordshire, England. It dates from around 1570, with a late 17th-century wing, and is a Grade I listed building. It is situated close to the River Thames, and it is frequently flooded. The nearest town is Faringdon in the Vale of the White Horse. The house was built by local farmer Thomas Turner and remained in the family for many generations. After George Turner died in 1734, the house was rented out. The house was originally called Lower House, but became Kelmscott Manor when James Turner (d.1870) purchased 53½ acres of manorial land together with the lordship in 1864. After James died the manor passed to his nephew, Charles Hobbs, who let out the property. Kelmscott Manor was the country home of the writer, designer and socialist William Morris from 1871 until his death in 1896. Today it is owned by the Society of Antiquaries of London, and is open to the public on Wednesdays and Saturdays during the summer. Morris drew great inspiration from the unspoilt authenticity of the house's architecture and craftsmanship, and its organic relationship with its setting, especially its garden. The Manor is
    9.00
    1 votes
    115
    Methven Castle

    Methven Castle

    Methven Castle is a 17th-century house situated east of Methven, in Perth and Kinross, Scotland. The lands of Methven were owned by the Mowbray family from the 12th century. The Mowbrays supported the claim of John Balliol against Robert the Bruce, and on the latter's victory, Methven was confiscated by the crown, and given to Walter Stewart, the Bruce's son-in-law. His descendant, Walter Stewart, Earl of Atholl, was deprived of the lands following his involvement in a plot to kill King James I. The castle sustained a siege in 1444, and was visited by King James II in 1450. King James IV visited several times in the 1490s. Methven Castle was the home of Margaret Tudor (1489-1541), queen of James IV, King of Scots, and daughter of Henry VII of England, after her third marriage to Henry Stewart, 1st Lord Methven in 1528. Margaret Tudor died here on 18 October 1541. After the third Lord Methven died without heir in 1584, King James VI gave Methven to his favourite, the Duke of Lennox. In 1664 the estate was purchased by Patrick Smythe of Braco. The present building is dated 1664, and was designed and built by the mason-architect John Mylne. It may incorporate older work, The Smythe
    9.00
    1 votes
    116
    Red House

    Red House

    Red House in Bexleyheath in southeast London, England, is a major building of the history of the Arts and Crafts style and of 19th century British architecture. It was designed during 1859 by its owner, William Morris, and the architect Philip Webb, with wall paintings and stained glass by Edward Burne-Jones. Morris wanted a home for himself and his new wife, Jane. He also desired to have a "Palace of Art" in which he and his friends could enjoy producing works of art. The house is of red brick with a steep tiled roof and an emphasis on natural materials. Red House is in a non-historical, brick-and-tile domestic style. It is now a Grade I listed building. The garden is also significant, being an early example of the idea of a garden as a series of exterior "rooms". Morris wanted the garden to be like an integral part of the house. The "rooms" consisted of a herb garden, a vegetable garden, and two rooms full of old-fashioned flowers — jasmine, lavender, quinces, and an abundance of fruit trees — apple, pear and cherry. Morris lived with Jane in the house for only five years, during which time their two daughters, Jenny and May, were born. Forced to sell the house for financial
    9.00
    1 votes
    117
    Traquair House

    Traquair House

    Traquair House, approximately 5 miles southeast of Peebles, is claimed to be the oldest continually inhabited house in Scotland. While not strictly a castle, it is built in the style of a fortified mansion. It predates the Scottish Baronial style of architecture, and may have been one of the influences on this style. It contains a brewery which makes Jacobite Ale and House Ale. It is built on the site of a hunting seat used by the Scottish kings from the 12th century, though no part of the present building can be dated with certainty before the 15th century. The house is open to the public and counts among its features: The Traquair House Brewery was started in 1965 by Peter Maxwell Stuart using the 18th century domestic brewery equipment that had previously been used to make beer for the house. The brewery makes a range of beers, though the two main brands are Jacobite Ale and House Ale.
    9.00
    1 votes
    118
    Crathes Castle

    Crathes Castle

    Crathes Castle is a 16th century castle near Banchory in the Aberdeenshire region of Scotland. This harled castle was built by the Burnetts of Leys and was held in that family for almost 400 years. The castle and grounds are presently owned and managed by the National Trust for Scotland and are open to the public. Crathes sits on land given as a gift to the Burnett of Leys family by King Robert the Bruce in 1323. In the 14th and 15th century the Burnett of Leys built a fortress of timbers on an island they made in the middle of a nearby bog. This method of fortification, known as a crannog, was common in the Late Middle Ages. Construction of the current tower house of Crathes Castle was begun in 1553 but delayed several times during its construction due to political problems during the reign of Mary, Queen of Scots. It was completed in 1596 by Alexander Burnett of Leys, and an additional wing added in 18th century. Alexander Burnett, who completed the construction of Crathes, began a new project, the early 17th century reconstruction of nearby Muchalls Castle. That endeavour was completed by his son, Sir Thomas Burnett. Crathes Castle served as the ancestral seat of the Burnetts of
    5.00
    5 votes
    119
    Biltmore Estate

    Biltmore Estate

    Biltmore House is a Châteauesque-styled mansion in Asheville, North Carolina, built by George Washington Vanderbilt II between 1889 and 1895. It is the largest privately owned home in the United States, at 175,000 square feet (16,300 m) and featuring 250 rooms. Still owned by one of Vanderbilt's descendants, it stands today as one of the most prominent remaining examples of the Gilded Age, and of significant gardens in the jardin à la française and English Landscape garden styles in the United States. In 2007, it was ranked eighth in America's Favorite Architecture by the American Institute of Architects. In the 1880s, at the height of the Gilded Age, George Washington Vanderbilt, youngest son of William Henry Vanderbilt, began to make regular visits with his mother, Maria Louisa Kissam Vanderbilt (1821–1896), to the Asheville, North Carolina, area. He loved the scenery and climate so much that he decided to create his own summer estate in the area, which he called his "little mountain escape," just as his older brothers and sisters had built opulent summer houses in places such as Newport, Rhode Island, and Hyde Park, New York. Vanderbilt's idea was to replicate the working
    6.67
    3 votes
    120
    Houghton House

    Houghton House

    Houghton House is a ruined house located near Houghton Conquest in Bedfordshire, on the ridge just north of Ampthill, and about 8 miles south of Bedford. It is a Grade I listed building. Being set above the surrounding countryside, it commands excellent views, and can be visited during daylight hours. It is an English Heritage property which is free to visit. The house was built in approximately 1615 for the writer, translator, and literary patron Mary Sidney Herbert, Dowager Countess of Pembroke (born 27 October 1561) but she died of smallpox on 25 September 1621, not long after its completion. A Jacobean style frieze on the western side of the house incorporated devices from Mary's ancestral Sidney and Dudley families. After the Countess' death, the house passed to Thomas Bruce, 1st Earl of Elgin in 1624. The Bruce family owned the house until the 2nd Earl of Ailesbury, a strong supporter of the Stuarts, retired to exile overseas in 1696 on account of his loyalty to King James II of England. Thomas Bruce, 2nd Earl of Ailesbury never returned to Houghton and so sold the house to John Russell, 4th Duke of Bedford in 1738, whose principal seat was Woburn Abbey, less than seven miles
    6.67
    3 votes
    121
    Winslow House

    Winslow House

    The Winslow House is a building in River Forest, Illinois designed by architect Frank Lloyd Wright. Built on a private street on the Edward Waller estate, the Winslow House was Wright's first important independent commission and his first attempt at reinventing the traditional house. In 1894, the Winslow house was a marked departure from the traditional homes in the Oak Park/River Forest area. The walls, made from Roman brick, rise straight up from a cast stone coping. The second story is covered in terra cotta. The masonry elements are in the style of Louis Sullivan. The windows rise from sill to soffit. The broad-eaved hip roof projects out over the second story windows. The chimney is long and low. The exterior was designed first, and the floor plan was then made to fit. At the rear of the house is a stable/studio that in early years had a tree growing through the roof. The design was so unusual that Winslow stopped commuting on his usual train to avoid his neighbors' comments. Many elements that are characteristic of Wright's style make an appearance in this structure. These elements serve to enhance the horizontal aspect of the house and to reduce the verticality of the two
    6.67
    3 votes
    122
    Bletchley Park

    Bletchley Park

    Bletchley Park is an estate located in the town of Bletchley, in Buckinghamshire, England, which currently houses the National Codes Centre and the National Museum of Computing. During the Second World War, Bletchley Park was the site of the United Kingdom's main decryption establishment, the Government Code and Cypher School (GC&CS), where ciphers and codes of several Axis countries were decrypted, most importantly the ciphers generated by the German Enigma and Lorenz machines. It also housed Station X, a secret radio intercept station, although interception was soon moved to a location with better reception. "Station X", "London Signals Intelligence Centre" and "Government Communications Headquarters" were all cover names that were used during the war, and the latter (GCHQ) was adopted for the successor peacetime organisation that still bears this name. For the many members of the Women's Royal Naval Service (Wrens) who worked at Bletchley Park, their posting was to HMS Pembroke V. The high-level intelligence produced at Bletchley Park, codenamed Ultra, provided crucial assistance to the Allied war effort. Sir Harry Hinsley, a Bletchley veteran and the official historian of
    5.75
    4 votes
    123
    Apsley House

    Apsley House

    Apsley House, also known as Number One, London, is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner, on the south-east corner of Hyde Park, facing south towards the busy traffic roundabout in the centre of which stands the Wellington Arch. It is a grade I listed building. The house is now run by English Heritage and is open to the public as a museum and art gallery, although the 8th Duke of Wellington still uses the building as a part-time residence. It is sometimes referred to as the Wellington Museum. It is perhaps the only preserved example of an English aristocratic town house from its period. The practice has been to maintain the rooms as far as possible in the original style and decor. It contains the 1st Duke's collection of paintings, porcelain, the silver centrepiece made for the Duke in Portugal, c 1815, sculpture and furniture. Antonio Canova's heroic marble nude of Napoleon as Mars the Peacemaker made 1802-10, holding a gilded Nike in the palm of his right hand, and standing 3.45 metres to the raised left hand holding a staff. It was set up for a time in the Louvre and was bought by the Government for Wellington in 1816 (Pevsner) and
    7.50
    2 votes
    124
    Arundel Castle

    Arundel Castle

    Arundel Castle in Arundel, West Sussex, England is a restored medieval castle. It was founded by Roger de Montgomery on Christmas Day 1067. Roger became the first to hold the earldom of Arundel by the graces of William the Conqueror. The castle was damaged in the English Civil War and then restored in the 18th and 19th centuries. From the 11th century onward, the castle has served as a hereditary stately home and has been in the family of the Duke of Norfolk for over 400 years. It is still the principal seat of the Norfolk family. It is a Grade I listed building. Work started on Arundel Castle in 1067 during the reign of William the Conqueror as a fortification for the mouth of the River Arun and a defensive position for the surrounding land against invasion from France. The original structure was a motte and double bailey castle. Roger de Montgomery was declared the first Earl of Arundel as the King granted him the property as part of a much larger package of hundreds of manors. Roger was a cousin of William's and had stayed in Normandy to keep the peace there whilst William was off in England. He was rewarded for his loyalty with extensive lands in the Welsh Marches and across
    7.50
    2 votes
    125
    Gainsborough Old Hall

    Gainsborough Old Hall

    Gainsborough Old Hall in Gainsborough, Lincolnshire is over five hundred years old and one of the best preserved medieval manor houses in England. The hall was built by Sir Thomas Burgh in 1460. The Burghs were rich, flamboyant and powerful people. Gainsborough Old Hall was not only their home, but also a demonstration of their wealth and importance. Sir Thomas was a great benefactor to Newark Church and also the founder of the Chantry and Alms House at Gainsborough. In 1470, the manor was attacked by Sir Robert Welles over a clash about lands, status, and honour, but it was not severely damaged. It was in 1484, that Sir Thomas entertained King Richard III in his hall. In 1510, Sir Thomas Burgh's son, Edward Burgh, 2nd Baron Burgh, was incarcerated at the Old Hall after being declared a lunatic. Sir Edward died in 1528, leaving his eldest son Sir Thomas as head of the family. In 1529, his son and heir, Sir Edward, married Catherine Parr, later Queen consort to King Henry VIII. The couple would stay at Gainsborough Old Hall until 1530; when they were granted their own manor in Kirton-in-Lindsey. King Henry VIII visited Gainsborough twice; once in 1509 and again in 1541 with the
    7.50
    2 votes
    126
    Haddon Hall

    Haddon Hall

    Haddon Hall is an English country house on the River Wye at Bakewell, Derbyshire, one of the seats of the Duke of Rutland, occupied by Lord Edward Manners (uncle of the current Duke) and his family. In form a medieval manor house, it has been described as "the most complete and most interesting house of [its] period". The origins of the hall date to the 11th century. The current medieval and Tudor hall includes additions added at various stages between the 13th and the 17th centuries. The Vernon family acquired the Manor of Nether Haddon by a 13th century marriage. Dorothy Vernon, the daughter and heiress of Sir George Vernon, married John Manners, the second son of Thomas Manners, 1st Earl of Rutland, in 1563. A legend grew up in the 19th century that Dorothy and Manners eloped. The legend has been made into novels, dramatisations and other works of fiction. She nevertheless inherited the Hall, and their grandson, also John Manners, inherited the Earldom in 1641 from a distant cousin. His descendant was made 1st Duke of Rutland in 1703. In the 20th century, another John Manners, 9th Duke of Rutland, made a life's work of restoring the hall. Haddon Hall remains in the Manners
    7.50
    2 votes
    127
    Molly Brown House

    Molly Brown House

    The Molly Brown House Museum (also known as House of Lions) is a house located at 1340 Pennsylvania Street in Denver, Colorado, United States that was the home of American philanthropist, socialite, and activist Margaret Brown. Brown was known as "The Unsinkable Molly Brown" because she survived the sinking of the RMS Titanic. The museum now located in her former home presents exhibits interpreting her life and that of Victorian Denver as well as architectural preservation. The house was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1972. The house was built in the 1880s by architect William A. Lang, incorporating several popular styles of the period, including Queen Anne Style architecture, for the original owners Isaac and Mary Large. They suffered financially from the crash resulting from the repeal of the Sherman Silver Purchase Act in 1893 and were forced to sell the house. It was purchased by James Joseph Brown (J.J.), Margaret's husband, in 1894 for US$30,000 and the title was transferred to Margaret in 1898, possibly due to J.J.'s deteriorating health. Margaret and the family traveled a lot of the time, and so the house was rented out. In 1902, it was the governor's
    7.50
    2 votes
    128
    Mount Stuart House

    Mount Stuart House

    Mount Stuart House on the east coast of the Isle of Bute, Scotland is a Neo-Gothic country house with extensive gardens. Mount Stuart was designed by Sir Robert Rowand Anderson for the 3rd Marquess of Bute in the late 1870s, to replace an earlier house by Alexander McGill, which burnt down in 1877. The house is the seat of the Stuarts of Bute, derived from the hereditary office "Steward of Bute" held since 1157. The family are descendants of Robert the Bruce whose daughter Marjorie married then Walter Stewart, 6th High Steward of Scotland, in 1315. Their son, King Robert II of Scotland, became the first Stuart King. The original house was built in 1719 by the 2nd Earl of Bute, but rebuilt by the 3rd Marquess of Bute following a fire on 3 December 1877. After his earlier creations of Cardiff Castle and Castell Coch in Cardiff, the Marquess imported many of the builders and workman he had already used in South Wales. The main part of the present house is a flamboyant example of 19th century Gothic Revival architecture built in a reddish brown stone. Mount Stuart's major features include the colonnaded Marble Hall at the centre of the main block and the Marble Chapel, which has an
    7.50
    2 votes
    129
    Prairie Chapel Ranch

    Prairie Chapel Ranch

    Prairie Chapel Ranch is a 1,583 acre (6.4 km²) ranch in unincorporated McLennan County, Texas, located seven miles (10 km) northwest of Crawford. The property was acquired by former President George W. Bush in 1999 and was known as the Western White House during his presidency. Bush spends vacation time at the house where he has also entertained dignitaries from around the world. The ranch gets its name from the Prairie Chapel School which was built nearby on land donated by mid-19th century German immigrant Heinrich Engelbrecht from Oppenwehe, Germany, who owned the land that now comprises the Bush ranch. Engelbrecht also donated land for the nearby Canaan Baptist Church (the "Prairie Chapel"). Engelbrecht and his heirs raised turkeys and hogs. The original Engelbrecht ranch house is about 4,400 feet (1,300 m) from the main house on Rainey Road and is now called the "Governor's House" and is used to accommodate overflow guests. The Bushes stayed in the house during construction of the new house. In 1999, a year before he became President, shortly after earning a $14.3 million profit from the sale of the Texas Rangers, former Texas Governor Bush bought the land for an estimated
    7.50
    2 votes
    130
    Sheffield Manor

    Sheffield Manor

    Sheffield Manor, also known as the Manor Lodge or Manor Castle, is a lodge built about 1516 in what then was a large deer park east of Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England, to provide a country retreat and further accommodate George Talbot, the 4th Earl of Shrewsbury, and his large family. The remnant of this estate is now known as Norfolk Park. The remains of Sheffield Manor include parts of the kitchens, long gallery, and the Grade II* listed Turret House, which contains fine seventeenth-century ceilings. Mary, Queen of Scots, was held prisoner by the 6th Earl of Shrewsbury at both Sheffield Manor and Sheffield Castle (her ghost is said by some to haunt the Turret House building). Wolsey’s Tower was built to accommodate Cardinal Wolsey, who then died after travelling on to Leicester. Mary escaped to England in 1568 seeking the support of the Catholic nobility. Mary's freedom was restricted after her cousin Elizabeth was advised of the threat that Mary posed to her own crown. She was handed over to the custody of George Talbot, 6th Earl of Shrewsbury on 4 February 1569. She was not closely guarded, however, and was able, with the help of the Duke of Norfolk and others of the
    7.50
    2 votes
    131
    Shugborough Hall

    Shugborough Hall

    Shugborough is a country estate in Great Haywood, Staffordshire, England, 4 miles from Stafford on the edge of Cannock Chase. It comprises a country house, kitchen garden, and model farm. Owned by the National Trust and maintained by the leaseholder, Staffordshire County Council, it previously belonged to the Earls of Lichfield, the Anson family. The Shugborough estate was owned by the Bishops of Lichfield until the Dissolution of the Monasteries around 1540 and therefter passed through several hands until it was purchased in 1624 by William Anson, a lawyer, of Dunston, Staffordshire In about 1693 his grandson William Anson (1656–1720) demolished the old house and created a new mansion. The entrance front then to the west, comprised a balustraded three-storey, seven-bayed central block . In about 1748 his great grandson Thomas Anson commissioned architect Thomas Wright to remodel the house, which was extended with flanking two-storey, three-bayed pavilions linked to the central block by pedimented passages. At the turn of the 18th century the house was further altered and extended by architect Samuel Wyatt, when the pavilions and passages were incorporated into the main building
    7.50
    2 votes
    132
    Appuldurcombe House

    Appuldurcombe House

    Appuldurcombe House (also spelt Appledorecombe or Appledore Combe) is the shell of a large 18th-century baroque country house of the Worsley family. The house is situated near to Wroxall on the Isle of Wight. It is now managed by English Heritage and is open to the public. A small part of the large and 1.2 km² estate which once surrounded it is still intact, but other features of the estate are still visible in the surrounding farmland and nearby village of Wroxall, including the entrance to the park, the Freemantle Gate, now used only by farm animals and pedestrians. Appuldurcombe began as a priory in 1100. It became a convent, then the Elizabethan home of the Leigh family. From there, the site came into the ownership of the Worsleys. The present house was begun in 1702, replacing the large Tudor mansion bequeathed to Sir Robert Worsley, 3rd Baronet. The architect was John James. Sir Robert never saw the house fully completed. He died on 29 July 1747, in his memory a monument was erected overlooking the house on Stenbury Down. The house was greatly extended in the 1770s by his great nephew Sir Richard Worsley, 7th Baronet of Appuldurcombe. The newly extended mansion was where Sir
    5.50
    4 votes
    133
    Pickfair

    Pickfair

    Pickfair was a 56 acre estate in the city of Beverly Hills, California designed by architect Wallace Neff for silent film actors Douglas Fairbanks and Mary Pickford. Coined "Pickfair" by the press, it was once one of the most celebrated homes in the world. Life Magazine described Pickfair as "a gathering place only slightly less important than the White House, and much more fun." Located at 1143 Summit Drive, in San Ysidro Canyon in Beverly Hills, the property was a hunting lodge when purchased by Fairbanks in 1919 for his bride, Mary Pickford. The newlyweds extensively renovated the lodge, transforming it into a 4-story, 25-room mansion complete with stables, servants quarters, tennis courts, a large guest wing, and garages. Remodeled by Wallace Neff in a mock tudor style, it took 5 years to complete. Ceiling frescos, parquet flooring, wood paneled halls of fine mahogany and bleached pine, gold leaf and mirrored decorative niches, all added to the authentic charm of Pickfair. The property was said to have been the first private home in the Los Angeles area to include an in-ground swimming pool, in which Pickford and Fairbanks were famously photographed paddling a canoe. Pickfair
    5.50
    4 votes
    134
    Saltram House

    Saltram House

    Saltram House is a George II era mansion located in Plympton, Plymouth, England. The house that can be seen today is the work of Robert Adam, who altered the original Tudor house on two occasions. The saloon (main drawing room) is sometimes cited as one of Adam's finest interiors. Complete with all of the original decor, plasterwork and furnishings, Saltram is one of Britain's best preserved examples of an early Georgian house. Originally home to the Parker family and Earls of Morley, Saltram House changed hands when, in 1957, it became a property of the National Trust, who operate it under the name "Saltram". Saltram House was used as one of several local settings for the 1995 film Sense and Sensibility. It is reportedly haunted by the ghost of a maid who was murdered there and a child. The name Saltram derives itself from the salt that was harvested on the nearby estuary and the fact that a "ham", or homestead, was on the site before the Tudor period. The first family to be associated with the house are the Mayes, or Mayhowes, who were yeoman farmers here in the 16th century. The family owned Saltram for about 50 years, their prosperity declining at the end of the century when
    5.50
    4 votes
    135
    Bamburgh Castle

    Bamburgh Castle

    Bamburgh Castle is located on the coast at Bamburgh in Northumberland, England. It is a Grade I listed building. Built on a basalt outcrop, the location was previously home to a fort of the native Britons known as Din Guarie and may have been the capital of the British kingdom of the region (see Gododdin, Bryneich and Hen Ogledd) from the realm's foundation in c.420 until 547, the year of the first written reference to the castle. In that year the citadel was captured by the Anglo-Saxon ruler Ida of Bernicia (Beornice) and became Ida's seat. It was briefly retaken by the Britons from his son Hussa during the war of 590 before being relieved later the same year. His grandson Æðelfriþ passed it on to his wife Bebba, from whom the early name Bebbanburgh was derived. The Vikings destroyed the original fortification in 993. The Normans built a new castle on the site, which forms the core of the present one. William II unsuccessfully besieged it in 1095 during a revolt supported by its owner, Robert de Mowbray, Earl of Northumbria. After Robert was captured, his wife continued the defence until coerced to surrender by the king's threat to blind her husband. Bamburgh then became the
    6.33
    3 votes
    136
    East Riddlesden Hall

    East Riddlesden Hall

    East Riddlesden Hall is a 17th-century manor house in Keighley, West Yorkshire, now owned by the National Trust. The hall was built in 1642 by a wealthy Halifax clothier, James Murgatroyd. There is a medieval tithebarn in the grounds. East Riddlesden Hall perches on a small plateau overlooking a bend in the River Aire on its way downstream from the town of Keighley. Interesting features include well-restored living accommodation on two floors, two Yorkshire Rose windows, walled garden, the ruined Starkie wing and several ghosts (reputedly). A hiding place for Catholic priests was installed during the 16th century. The property was extended and re-built by James Murgatroyd and his wife Hannah, using local Yorkshire stone, in 1648. He also built other stone manor houses throughout the West Riding of Yorkshire. In the great hall, a small fireplace can be seen above the main fireplace, where the floor for the first floor accommodation was not built. James Murgatroyd was a Royalist and this can be seen in royalist symbols and graffiti on and in the building. For example, the Bothy (now the tea room and shop) has the heads of Charles I of England and Henrietta Maria of France carved in
    6.33
    3 votes
    137
    Harlaxton Manor

    Harlaxton Manor

    Harlaxton Manor, built in 1837, is a manor house located in Harlaxton, Lincolnshire, England. Its architecture, which combines elements of Jacobean and Elizabethan styles with symmetrical Baroque massing, renders the mansion unique among surviving Jacobethan manors. The manor is a popular location for filming. Exterior and interior shots have been featured in the films The Ruling Class, The Last Days of Patton, The Lady and the Highwayman, The Haunting, and The Young Visiters. More recently, the building was used as a site in the reality television series Australian Princess. The manor currently serves as the University of Evansville's British campus. Harlaxton is first recorded in the Domesday Book as Harleston. The current mansion is the second Harlaxton Manor. The first was built on a different site during the 14th century and was used as a hunting lodge by John of Gaunt. By 1475, the de Ligne family had purchased the manor. The original house was deserted after 1780; it was inherited by Gregory Gregory, who had it torn down in 1857. The current house was built by Gregory from 1837 to 1845 and helped usher in a renaissance of Elizabethan architecture. The original architect,
    6.33
    3 votes
    138
    Kingston Maurward

    Kingston Maurward

    Kingston Maurward House is a large Georgian English country house set in a 750 acre (3 square km) estate in Dorset situated in the Frome valley two miles east of Dorchester. The mansion was built by George Pitt, cousin of William Pitt the Elder, between 1717 and 1720. The mansion was in red brick, but after derogatory comments from King George III, Pitt clad the house in Portland limestone. Much of the house is now used by Kingston Maurward College, though some of it is used for private functions. Thomas Hardy lived nearby and later referred to Kingston Maurward House as "Knapwater House" in his novel Desperate Remedies. The grounds of Kingston Maurward, which are used for the land-based college, are open to the public and include the farm areas and extensive gardens. Both the house and grounds are owned by Dorset County Council. Also in the grounds is Kingston Maurward Manor House, built in 1590, an earlier mansion which was narrowly saved from demolition when the estate was acquired. Following refurbishment it is now a hotel.
    6.33
    3 votes
    139
    Marlborough House

    Marlborough House

    Marlborough House is a Grade I listed mansion in the City of Westminster, central London, in Pall Mall, east of St James's Palace. It was built for Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough, the favourite and confidante of Queen Anne. The Duchess wanted her new house to be "strong, plain and convenient and good". The architect Christopher Wren and his son of the same name designed a brick building with rusticated stone quoins (cornerstones) that was completed in 1711. For over a century it served as the London residence of the Dukes of Marlborough. The house was taken up by the Crown in 1817. In the 1820s plans were drawn up to demolish Marlborough House and replace it with a terrace of similar dimensions to the two in neighbouring Carlton House Terrace, and this idea even featured on some contemporary maps, including Christopher and John Greenwood's large-scale London map of 1830, but the proposal was not implemented. Marlborough House was primarily used by members of the Royal Family, especially dowager queens and eldest sons of the sovereign. From 1853 to 1861 Prince Albert, the consort of Queen Victoria, arranged for the building to be used by the "National Art Training School",
    6.33
    3 votes
    140
    Sherborne Castle

    Sherborne Castle

    Sherborne Castle is a 16th-century Tudor mansion southeast of Sherborne in Dorset, England. The 1,200-acre (490 ha) park formed only a small part of the 15,000-acre (61 km) Digby estate. Sherborne Old Castle (50°56′58″N 2°30′09″W / 50.9494°N 2.5024°W / 50.9494; -2.5024 (Sherborne Old Castle)) is the ruin of a 12th-century castle in the grounds of the mansion. The old castle was built as the fortified palace of Roger de Caen, Bishop of Salisbury and Chancellor of England, and still belonged to the church in the late 16th century. Sherborne Lodge After passing through Sherborne on the way to Plymouth, Sir Walter Raleigh fell in love with the castle, and Queen Elizabeth relinquished the estate, leasing it to Raleigh in 1592, Rather than refurbish the old castle, Raleigh decided to construct a new lodging for temporary visits, in the compact form for secondary habitations of the nobility and gentry, often architecturally sophisticated, that was known as a lodge. The new house, Sherborne Lodge, was a four-story, rectangular building completed in 1594. The antiquary John Aubrey remembered it as "a delicate Lodge in the park, of Brick, not big, but very convenient for its bignes, a
    6.33
    3 votes
    141
    Temple Newsam

    Temple Newsam

    Temple Newsam (historically Temple Newsham, in legend Templestowe) (grid reference SE357322) is a Tudor-Jacobean house with grounds landscaped by Capability Brown, in Leeds, West Yorkshire, England. The estate lies to the east of the city, just south of Halton Moor, Halton, Whitkirk and Colton. Temple Newsam is also the name of an electoral ward for Leeds City Council, which includes the areas of Halton Moor, Halton, Whitkirk, Colton and Austhorpe. In the Domesday Book the property is known as Neuhusam and was owned by Ilbert de Lacy. Before that it had been owned by Dunstan and Glunier, Anglo-Saxon thanes. Around 1155 it was given to the Knights Templar. In 1307 the Templars were suppressed and in 1377 by royal decree the estate reverted to Sir Philip Darcy. Between 1500 and 1520 a Tudor country house, Temple Newsam House, was built on the site. It has been described by some as "the Hampton Court of the North". It has also been spelled "Newsham" in the past. In 1537 Darcy was executed for the part he played in the Pilgrimage of Grace and the property was seized by the Crown. In 1544 Henry VIII gave it to his niece Margaret, Countess of Lennox and her husband Matthew Stuart, Earl
    6.33
    3 votes
    142
    West Wycombe Park

    West Wycombe Park

    West Wycombe Park is a country house near the village of West Wycombe in Buckinghamshire, England, built between 1740 and 1800. It was conceived as a pleasure palace for the 18th century libertine and dilettante Sir Francis Dashwood, 2nd Baronet. The house is a long rectangle with four façades that are columned and pedimented, three theatrically so. The house encapsulates the entire progression of British 18th century architecture from early idiosyncratic Palladian to the Neoclassical, although anomalies in the design of the house also make it architecturally unique. The mansion is set within an 18th century landscaped park, containing many small temples and follies which act as satellites to the greater temple, the house. The house, which is a Grade I listed building, was given to the National Trust in 1943 by Sir John Dashwood, 10th Baronet (1896–1966), an action strongly resented by his heir. Dashwood retained ownership of the contents of the house, much of which he sold; after his death, the house was restored at the expense of his son, Sir Francis Dashwood. Today, while the structure is owned by the National Trust, the house is the home of Sir Edward Dashwood and his family.
    6.33
    3 votes
    143
    Blithfield Hall

    Blithfield Hall

    Blithfield Hall (pronounced locally as Bliffield), is a privately owned Grade I listed country house in Staffordshire, England, situated some 9 miles (14 km) east of Stafford, 7 miles (11 km) southwest of Uttoxeter and 5 miles (8.0 km) north of Rugeley. The Hall, with its embattled towers and walls, has been the home of the Bagot family since the late 14th century. The present house is mainly Elizabethan, with a Gothic façade added in the 1820s to a design probably by John Buckler. In 1945 the Hall, then in a neglected and dilapidated state, was sold by Gerald Bagot, 5th Baron Bagot together with its 650-acre (260 ha) estate to South Staffordshire Waterworks Company, whose intention was to build a reservoir (completed in 1953). The 5th Baron died in 1946 having sold many of the contents of the house. His successor and cousin Caryl Bagot, 6th Baron Bagot repurchased the property and 30 acres (12 ha) of land from the water company and began an extensive programme of renovation and restoration. In September 1959 Lord Bagot sold Blithfield Hall at an open auction held in the Shrewsbury Arms, Rugeley. The property was bought for £12,000 (2011: £210,000) by his wife Nancy, Lady
    8.00
    1 votes
    144
    Craigdarroch

    Craigdarroch

    Craigdarroch is the name of a house near Moniaive, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland. It was the seat of the Chief of the Dumfriesshire Fergussons for 600 years. Built by William Adam in 1729 over the old house dating from the earliest records (14th century). The Marriage Home of Annie Laurie (the heroine of 'the world's greatest love-song') who married Alexander Fergusson, 14th Laird of Craigdarroch, on 29 August 1709, and lived there for 33 years. The first Fergusson of Craigdarroch on record was Jonkyne, who flourished in the 14th century. Robert, his descendant in the 6th generation, married Lady Janet Cunningham, daughter of the 4th Earl of Glencairn of Maxwelton, in 1537 and their marriage stone, with the shakefork of the Cunninghams, is to be seen with the other carved stones on the base of the old tower of Craigdarroch. The upper part of the tower was demolished when the present early 18th century house was built. Their eldest grandson, Thomas, married in 1609 (marriage stone), but died soon after, without inheriting. His younger brother, Robert, married Katherine, daughter of the 6th Earl of Cunningham, and their son, William Fergusson had a marriage contract with Sara
    8.00
    1 votes
    145
    Dickinson Homestead

    Dickinson Homestead

    The Dickinson Homestead, located at 280 Main Street, Amherst, Massachusetts, was the home of poet Emily Dickinson, and currently is the site of a museum dedicated to her. The home is shown by guided tour, and special events include tours of the adjacent gardens that Emily loved, parties that feature Emily's cakes (including her famous gingerbread), readings, and other events throughout the year. A major renovation in 2004 restored the exterior of the house to the way it had looked during the poet's lifetime. Next door to the Homestead is the Evergreens, home of Emily Dickinson's brother, Austin, and his family. This Italianate house, also open to the public, contains many of the Dickinson family's possessions and furniture. As all of Emily's original possessions and family furniture are now owned by Harvard, and reside in Cambridge, Massachusetts, the house is now furnished with period antiques, not her own things, although the second floor displays a haunting re-creation of one of her elaborately woven white house dresses, specially woven in England after a dress that Emily had long ago left at the home of a relative.
    8.00
    1 votes
    146
    Graceland

    Graceland

    Graceland is a large white-columned mansion and 13.8-acre (5.6 ha) estate that was home to Elvis Presley in Memphis, Tennessee. It is located at 3764 Elvis Presley Boulevard in the vast Whitehaven community about 9 miles (14.5 km) from Downtown and less than four miles (6 km) north of the Mississippi border. It currently serves as a museum. It was opened to the public on June 7, 1982. The site was listed in the National Register of Historic Places on November 7, 1991 and declared a National Historic Landmark on March 27, 2006. Graceland has become one of the most-visited private homes in America with over 600,000 visitors a year, behind the White House and Biltmore Estate (900,000 visitors per year). Elvis Presley died at the estate on August 16, 1977. Presley, his parents Gladys and Vernon Presley, and his grandmother, are buried there in what is called the Meditation Garden. A memorial gravestone for Presley's twin brother, Jesse Garon, is also at the site. Graceland Farms was originally owned by S.C. Toof, founder of S.C. Toof & Co., a commercial printing firm in Memphis, who was previously the pressroom foreman of the Memphis newspaper, the Memphis Daily Appeal. The grounds
    8.00
    1 votes
    147
    Russborough House

    Russborough House

    Russborough House is a stately house situated near the Blessington Lakes in County Wicklow, Ireland, between the towns of Blessington and Ballymore Eustace and is reputed to be the longest house in Ireland, with a frontage measuring 210 m/700 ft. It is an example of Palladian architecture, designed by Richard Cassels for Joseph Leeson, 1st Earl of Milltown and built between 1741 and 1755. The interior of the house contains some ornate plasterwork on the ceilings by the Lafranchini brothers, who also collaborated with Cassels on Carton House. Russborough has housed two fine art collections, begun with the Milltown estate, whose collection was donated to the National Gallery of Ireland upon the death of the last Earl. Sir Alfred Beit bought the house in 1952 where he housed his own family's collection, comprising works by many great artists, including Goya, Vermeer, Peter Paul Rubens and Thomas Gainsborough. This collection was since robbed four times, in 1974 by an IRA gang including British heiress Rose Dugdale, in 1986 by Martin Cahill (nicknamed "The General"), in 2001, and in 2002 by Martin Cahill's old associate Martin Foley . Two paintings, Gainsborough's Madame Bacelli and
    8.00
    1 votes
    148
    Spadina House

    Spadina House

    Spadina Museum, also called Spadina , is a historic manor on Spadina Road in Toronto, Canada that is now a museum operated by the City of Toronto Cultural Services. The museum preserves the house much as it existed and developed historically. The art, decor and architecture of the house used to reflect the contemporary styles of the 1860s through the 1930s, including Victorian, Edwardian, Arts and Crafts, Art Deco, Art Nouveau and Colonial Revival styles. After being closed for a year for restoration work, Spadina Museum re-opened in November 2010 in the inter-war era style of the 1920s and 1930s. The estate's gardens reflect the landscape during the Austin family's occupation of the house. Many Torontonians follow a convention of pronouncing Spadina Road with the i as /aɪ/ as in mine, and Spadina House with the i as in /iː/ as in ski. Occasionally Spadina Road is pronounced the second way. South of Bloor Street, however, Spadina Road becomes Spadina Avenue, which is always pronounced the first way. The distinction between the two ways was once an economic class marker in Toronto with the upper classes favouring the second pronunciation. Now, however, even the official TTC stop
    8.00
    1 votes
    149
    Stanford Hall

    Stanford Hall

    Stanford Hall is a stately home in Leicestershire, England, near the village of Stanford on Avon (which is in Northamptonshire) and the town of Lutterworth, Leicestershire. Ancestral home of the Cave family, the hall was built in the 1690s for Sir Roger Cave on the site of an earlier manor house. It is considered a fine example of William and Mary period architecture of the late 17th century. The architect was William Smith of Warwick. In 1792 Sarah Otway, daughter of Sir Thomas Cave Bt (who in 1790 had married Henry Otway, High Sheriff of Leicestershire in 1804), inherited the estate on the death of her nephew Sir Thomas Cave, 7th Baronet. She was created Baroness Braye in 1839. Her descendants remain in residence. The River Avon flows through the grounds, with a weir downstream, so a small lake is formed. The aviation pioneer Percy Pilcher built some of his early gliders here in the 1890s; he also built a powered flying machine here that many historians believe was capable of flight, but he was killed nearby in an accident in 1899 before he could try it. An exact replica of Pilcher's "The Hawk" glider is exhibited at the hall. During World War II the hall was a safe home for nuns
    8.00
    1 votes
    150
    Dartington Hall

    Dartington Hall

    The Dartington Hall Trust, near Totnes, Devon, England, is a charity specialising in the arts, social justice and sustainability. The Trust currently runs 16 charitable programmes, including The Dartington International Summer School and Schumacher College. In addition to developing and promoting arts and educational programmes, the Trust hosts other groups and acts as a venue for retreats. The Dartington Hall Trust is based on a 1,200 acres (4.9 km) estate near Dartington in south Devon. The medieval hall was built between 1388 and 1400 for John Holand, Earl of Huntingdon, half-brother to Richard II. After John was beheaded, the Crown owned the estate until it was acquired in 1559 by Sir Arthur Champernowne, Vice-Admiral of the West under Elizabeth I. The Champernowne family lived in the Hall for 366 years. The hall was mostly derelict by the time it was bought by Leonard and Dorothy Elmhirst in 1925. They commissioned architect William Weir to renovate the buildings, restoring the magnificent hammerbeam roof on the Great Hall. Inspired by a long association with Rabindranath Tagore's Shantiniketan, where Tagore was trying to introduce progressive education and rural
    5.25
    4 votes
    151
    Beauvoir

    Beauvoir

    Beauvoir plantation is notable as the historic post-war home (1876-1889) of the former Confederate President Jefferson Davis. Its construction was begun in 1848 at Biloxi, Mississippi. It was purchased in 1873 by the planter Samuel Dorsey and his wife Sarah Dorsey. After her husband's death in 1875, the widow Sarah Ellis Dorsey learned of Jefferson Davis' difficulties. She invited him to the plantation and offered him a cottage near the main house, where he could live and work at his memoirs. He ended up living there the rest of his life. The house and plantation have been designated as a National Historic Landmark. Ill with cancer, in 1878 Sarah Ellis Dorsey remade her will, bequeathing Beauvoir to Jefferson Davis and his surviving daughter, Varina Anne Davis, known as "Winnie". His wife Varina Howell Davis was also living there, and the three Davises lived there until Jefferson Davis' death in 1889. Varina Davis and her daughter moved to New York in 1891. After the death of Winnie in 1898, Varina Howell Davis inherited the plantation. She sold it in 1902 to the Mississippi Chapter of the Sons of Confederate Veterans, with the stipulation that it be used as a Confederate veterans
    7.00
    2 votes
    152
    Bretby Hall

    Bretby Hall

    Bretby Hall is a country house at Bretby, Derbyshire, England, north of Swadlincote and east of Burton upon Trent on the border with Staffordshire. It is a Grade II* listed building. The name Bretby means "dwelling place of Britons". The first Bretby Hall was built in 1630 after Thomas Stanhope bought the manor of Bretby from the family of Stephen de Segrave, to whom it had been granted by Ranulph de Blondeville, 4th Earl of Chester. In 1628, his grandson Philip was made Earl of Chesterfield by King Charles I of England. From then on, Bretby Hall was the ancestral home of the Earls of Chesterfield. The second Earl was responsible for a complete restyling of the gardens so that some compared them favourably with the gardens at Versailles. The fifth Earl demolished the mansion and built the present Hall (c.1812) to a design by Sir Jeffry Wyatville. The sixth Earl, known as the "racing Earl", loved cricket and shooting, so he built a cricket pitch and raised game birds. Following the death of the 7th earl in 1871, the Estate passed to his widowed mother, Anne Elizabeth, Dowager Countess of Chesterfield (1802–1885), whose good friend, Benjamin Disraeli, paid frequent visits to Bretby.
    7.00
    2 votes
    153
    Bretton Hall

    Bretton Hall

    Bretton Hall is a country house in West Bretton near Wakefield, West Yorkshire, England. It housed Bretton Hall College from 1949 until 2001 and was a campus of the University of Leeds (2001–2007). It is a Grade II* listed building. In the 14th century the Bretton estate was owned by the Dronsfields and passed by marriage to the Wentworths in 1407. King Henry VIII spent three nights in the old hall and furnishings, draperies and panelling from his bedroom were moved to the new hall. A hall is marked on Christopher Saxton's 1577 map of Yorkshire. The present building replaces an earlier hall and was designed and built around 1720 by its owner, Sir William Wentworth, assisted by James Moyser. In 1792 it passed into the Beaumont family, (latterly Barons and Viscounts Allendale), and the library and dining room were remodelled by John Carr in 1793. Monumental stables designed by George Basevi were built between 1842 and 1852. The hall was sold to the West Riding County Council in 1947. Before the sale, the panelling of the "Henry VIII parlour" (preserved from the earlier hall) was given to Leeds City Council and moved to Temple Newsam house. The oldest part of the house, the south
    7.00
    2 votes
    154
    Coonley House

    Coonley House

    The Avery Coonley House, also known as Coonley House, was designed by famous architect Frank Lloyd Wright. Constructed in 1907-1908, this is an estate of several buildings built on the banks of the Des Plaines River in Riverside, Illinois, a suburb of Chicago, Illinois, United States. It is itself a National Historic Landmark and is included in another National Historic Landmark, the Riverside Historic District. Avery Coonley was heir to an industrial fortune and had an unlimited budget. The Coonleys had investigated Wright's other homes and told him that they saw in his work "the countenances of principle". Wright stated in his autobiography that "This was to me a great and sincere compliment. So I put my best into the Coonley House." The lower exterior is stucco rising to a ceramic tile banding with a geometric pattern. The gardens contain terraces, shallow planters and a large reflecting pool. For the education of the Coonley's young daughter Wright designed a playhouse nearby. Around 1960, the main house was divided into two separate residences, now with separate addresses. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1970.
    7.00
    2 votes
    155
    Down House

    Down House

    Down House is the former home of the English naturalist Charles Darwin and his family. It was in this house and garden that Darwin worked on his theories of evolution by natural selection which he had conceived in London before moving to Downe. The house stands next to Luxted Road 0.25 miles (0.40 km) south of Downe, a village 14.25 miles (22.93 km) south east of London's Charing Cross. In Darwin's day Downe was a parish in Kent: it subsequently came under Bromley Rural District, and since 1965 is part of the London Borough of Bromley. The house, garden and grounds are in the guardianship of English Heritage, have been restored and are open to the public. In the 17th century, a parcel of land including most of the current property was acquired by a Kentish yeoman family, who are thought likely to have built a farmhouse there. Some flint built walls may date from this period. The date for this is given as 1681, but a 1933 history of Downe parish states that in 1651 Thomas Manning sold an area of land including the property to John Know the elder for £345 (equivalent to £37,417 in present day terms), a price which is unlikely to have included a house. John Know was a yeoman in good
    7.00
    2 votes
    156
    Historic houses in Wales

    Historic houses in Wales

    Historic houses in Wales is a link page for any stately home or historic house in Wales. A number of houses in western parts of Herefordshire and Shropshire have shared characteristics of Welsh country houses (taî'r uchelwyr).
    7.00
    2 votes
    157
    Maison de Verre

    Maison de Verre

    The Maison de Verre (French for House of Glass) was built from 1928 to 1932 in Paris, France. Constructed in the early modern style of architecture, the house's design emphasized three primary traits: honesty of materials, variable transparency of forms, and juxtaposition of "industrial" materials and fixtures with a more traditional style of home décor. The primary materials used were steel, glass, and glass block. Some of the notable "industrial" elements included rubberized floor tiles, bare steel beams, perforated metal sheet, heavy industrial light fixtures, and mechanical fixtures. The design was a collaboration among Pierre Chareau (a furniture and interiors designer), Bernard Bijvoet (a Dutch architect working in Paris since 1927) and Louis Dalbet (craftsman metalworker). Much of the intricate moving scenery of the house was designed on site as the project developed. The external form is defined by translucent glass block walls, with select areas of clear glazing for tranparency. Internally, spatial division is variable by the use of sliding, folding or rotating screens in glass, sheet or perforated metal, or in combination. Other mechanical components included an overhead
    7.00
    2 votes
    158
    Arbury Hall

    Arbury Hall

    Arbury Hall (grid reference SP335893) is a Grade I listed country house in Nuneaton in Warwickshire, England, and is the ancestral home of the Newdigate family, later the Newdigate-Newdegate and Fitzroy-Newdegate families. The hall is built on the site of a former monastery in a mixture of Tudor and 18th-century Gothic Revival architecture, the latter being the work of Sir Roger Newdigate from designs by Henry Keene. The hall is set in 300 acres (121 ha) of parkland. The 19th-century author George Eliot (Mary Anne Evans) was born on one of the estate farms in 1819, the daughter of the estate's land agent. She immortalised Arbury Hall as "Cheverel Manor" in Scenes of Clerical Life, where it is the setting for "Mr Gilfil's Love Story". The film Angels and Insects was shot entirely at Arbury Hall and within the grounds.
    6.00
    3 votes
    159
    Auckland Castle

    Auckland Castle

    Auckland Castle (also known as Auckland Palace or locally as the Bishop's Castle or Bishop's Palace) is a castle in the town of Bishop Auckland in County Durham, England. The castle has been owned by the diocese for more than 800 years, being established as a hunting lodge for the Prince Bishops of Durham. Auckland Castle was the official residence of the Bishops of Durham from 1832 until July 2012 when ownership of the castle was transferred over to the Auckland Castle Trust, a charitable foundation whose aim is to begin a major restoration of the grounds and castle, and set up permanent exhibitions on the history of Christianity in Britain and the North East.The bishop will continue to work in Auckland Castle, but no longer resides there. It is more like a Gothic country house than a true castle with a military function. The Castle's Scotland Wing presently serves as the administrative offices of the Durham Diocesan Board of Finance. The castle's long dining room is home to 12 of the 13 17th century portraits of Jacob and his 12 sons painted by Francisco de Zurbarán. The room, in which they have hung for 250 years, was specifically designed and built for them. In 2001 the Church
    6.00
    3 votes
    160
    Boscobel House

    Boscobel House

    Boscobel House (grid reference SJ837082) is a building in the parish of Boscobel in Shropshire. It has been, at various times; a farmhouse, a hunting lodge, and a holiday home; but it is most famous for its role in the escape of Charles II after the Battle of Worcester in 1651. Today it is managed by English Heritage. The building is just inside Shropshire, as is clear from all Ordnance Survey maps of the area, although part of the property boundary is contiguous with the Shropshire - Staffordshire border, and it has a Stafford post code. Boscobel is on land which belonged to White Ladies Priory in the Middle Ages, and at that time it was extra-parochial. The priory was often described as being at Brewood, which is in Staffordshire, and this may have contributed to the widespread belief that the house and priory are in Staffordshire. Brewood is the neighbouring parish, and the house is just south of the small village of Bishops Wood, a constituent part of Brewood. Although technically still a separate civil parish, Boscobel's small population means it shares a parish council with Donington, Shropshire. Local government reform in 1974 brought the parish, including Boscobel House and
    6.00
    3 votes
    161
    Hever Castle

    Hever Castle

    Hever Castle is located in the village of Hever, Kent near Edenbridge, 30 miles (48 km) south-east of London, England. It began as a country house, built in the 13th century. From 1462 to 1539 it was the seat of the Boleyn, originally 'Bullen', family. Anne Boleyn, the second queen consort of King Henry VIII of England, spent her early youth there, after her father, Thomas Boleyn had inherited it in 1505. He had been born there in 1477, and the castle passed to him upon the death of his father, Sir William Boleyn. It later came into the possession of King Henry's fourth wife, Anne of Cleves. In the 21st century the castle is a tourist attraction. There have been three main periods in the construction of this historic castle. The oldest part of the castle dates to 1270 and consisted of the gatehouse and a walled bailey. The second period was when the castle, then in need of repair, was converted into a manor in 1462 by Geoffrey Boleyn. He added a Tudor dwelling within the walls. The third period of repair and renovation was in the 20th century when it was acquired by William Waldorf Astor. Geoffrey's grandson, Thomas Boleyn, inherited the castle in 1505. He lived there with his wife
    6.00
    3 votes
    162
    Knebworth House

    Knebworth House

    Knebworth House is a country house in the civil parish of Knebworth in Hertfordshire, England. The home of the Lytton family since 1490, when Thomas Bourchier sold the reversion of the manor to Sir Robert Lytton, Knebworth House was originally a genuine red-brick Late Gothic manor house, built round a central court as an open square. In 1813-16 the house was reduced to its west wing, which was remodelled in a Tudor Gothic style by John Biagio Rebecca for Mrs Bulwer-Lytton, and then was transformed in 1843-45 by Henry Edward Kendall, Jr. into the present Tudor Gothic structure. Its most famous resident was Edward Bulwer-Lytton, the Victorian author, dramatist and statesman, who embellished the gardens in a formal Italianate fashion. Much of the interior was redesigned by Sir Edwin Lutyens, who simplified the main parterre. A herb garden in an interlaced quincunx design was drawn by Gertrude Jekyll in 1907 but not planted until 1982. The current residents are Henry Lytton-Cobbold and his family. The house is open to the public together with its surrounding gardens and grounds. The grounds include an adventure playground, mini railway and dinosaur park and host various events
    6.00
    3 votes
    163
    Seaton Delaval Hall

    Seaton Delaval Hall

    Seaton Delaval Hall is a Grade I listed country house in Northumberland, England. It is near the coast just north of Newcastle upon Tyne. Located between Seaton Sluice and Seaton Delaval, it was designed by Sir John Vanbrugh in 1718 for Admiral George Delaval and is now owned by the National Trust. Since completion of the house in 1728, it has had an unfortunate history. Neither architect nor patron lived to see its completion; it then passed through a succession of heirs, being lived in only intermittently. The Delaval family had owned the estate since the time of the Norman conquest. Admiral Delaval, having made his fortune from bounty while in the navy, purchased the estate from an impoverished kinsman. (He had also served as a British envoy during the reign of Queen Anne.) Calling on the services of architect John Vanbrugh in 1718, the Admiral had originally wanted to modernise and enhance the existing mansion. But upon viewing the site, Vanbrugh felt he could do nothing and advised complete demolition of all except the ancient chapel near to the mansion, which is now the parish church of Our Lady. The works were completed in 1728, completed two years after the death of the
    6.00
    3 votes
    164
    Swarthmoor Hall

    Swarthmoor Hall

    Swarthmoor Hall is a mansion in Swarthmoor, in the Furness area of Cumbria in North West England. It was the home of Thomas and Margaret Fell, the latter an important player in the founding of the Religious Society of Friends (Quaker) movement in the 17th century. It remains in use today as a Quaker retreat house. Swarthmoor Hall was built by a lawyer named George Fell about 1568. His son Thomas inherited it. In 1634 Margaret Askew married Thomas, later named Vice Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and an influential supporter of Parliament during the English Civil War, and moved into the Hall. George Fox visited the Hall in 1652. Thomas Fell was travelling as a judge, but Fox had an audience with Margaret Fell, who became interested in his new doctrines. She arranged for him to preach in St. Mary's Church in nearby Ulverston and at the Hall. During his time there, many people were convinced of the truth of his teachings. When Thomas Fell returned home, he was persuaded by his wife and some others to listen to Fox, who successfully appealed to his pro-Parliamentary sentiments. Fell was never totally convinced by Fox's religious teachings, but he did allow his home to be used as a
    5.00
    4 votes
    165
    Abramtsevo Colony

    Abramtsevo Colony

    Abramtsevo (Russian: Абра́мцево) is an estate located north of Moscow, in the proximity of Khotkovo, that became a center for the Slavophile movement and artistic activity in the 19th century. Originally owned by author Sergei Aksakov, other writers and artists — such as Nikolai Gogol — at first came there as his guests. Under Aksakov, visitors to the estate discussed ways of ridding Russian art of Western influences to revive a purely national style. In 1870, eleven years after Aksakov's death, it was purchased by Savva Mamontov, a wealthy industrialist and patron of the arts. Under Mamontov, Russian themes and folk art flourished there. During the 1870s and 1880s, Abramtsevo hosted a colony of artists who sought to recapture the quality and spirit of medieval Russian art in the manner parallel to the Arts and Crafts movement in Great Britain. Several workshops were set up there to produce handmade furniture, ceramic tiles, and silks imbued with traditional Russian imagery and themes. Working together in a cooperative spirit, the artists Vasily Polenov and Viktor Vasnetsov designed a plain but picturesque church, with murals painted by Polenov, Vasnetsov and his brother, a gilded
    5.67
    3 votes
    166
    Bisham Abbey

    Bisham Abbey

    Bisham Abbey is a Grade I listed manor house at Bisham in the English county of Berkshire. The name is taken from the now lost monastery which once stood alongside. Bisham Abbey was previously named Bisham Priory, and was the traditional resting place of many Earls of Salisbury. The complex surrounding the extant manorial buildings is now one of five National Sports Centres run on behalf of Sport England and is used as a residential training camp base for athletes and teams and community groups alike. It is also a popular wedding venue with a license for civil ceremony and is increasingly popular for conferences, team building events, corporate parties and private fucntions. The manor house was built around 1260 as a community house for two Knights Templar. When the Templars were suppressed in 1307, King Edward II took over the manorial rights, granting them to various relatives. In 1310 the building was used as a place of confinement for Queen Elizabeth of the Scots, wife of King Robert the Bruce, along with her stepdaughter Princess Marjorie and sister–in–law, Lady Christine of Carrick. They had been captured on the Isle of Rathlin during the Scottish Wars of Succession, and were
    5.67
    3 votes
    167
    Blickling Hall

    Blickling Hall

    Blickling Hall is a stately home in the village of Blickling north of Aylsham in Norfolk, England, that has been in the care of the National Trust since 1940. In the fifteenth century, Blickling Hall was in the possession of Sir John Fastolf of Caister in Norfolk (1380–1459), who made a fortune in the Hundred Years' War, and whose coat of arms is still on display there. Later, the Hall was in the possession of the Boleyn family, and home to Sir Thomas Boleyn, created Earl of Wiltshire, and his wife, Elizabeth, between 1499 and 1505. It is presumed that their first two children Mary and George were born at Blickling Hall, along with several other Boleyn infants who did not live long. If the couple's most famous child, Anne Boleyn, was born before 1505 (as one school of historical thought contends) then she too was born at Blickling. Other historians maintain that Anne was born after 1505, probably in 1507, and by that time Sir Thomas had moved to Hever Castle in Kent. Nonetheless, a statue and portrait of Anne Boleyn reside in Blickling Hall claiming "Anna Bolena hic nata 1507" (Anne Boleyn born here 1507). The current Blickling Hall was built on the ruins of the old Boleyn property
    5.67
    3 votes
    168
    Eaton Hall

    Eaton Hall

    Eaton Hall is the country house of the Duke of Westminster. It is set within a large estate 1 mile (2 km) south of the village of Eccleston, in Cheshire, England (grid reference SJ413607). The house is surrounded by formal gardens, parkland, farmland and woodland. The estate covers an area of about 10,872 acres (4,400 ha). The first substantial house was built in the 17th century. In the early 19th century it was replaced by a much larger house designed by William Porden. This in turn was replaced by an even larger house, with outbuildings and a chapel, designed by Alfred Waterhouse. Building started in 1870, and took 12 years to complete. By 1960 the fabric of the house had deteriorated and, like many other mansions during this period, it was demolished, although the chapel and many of the outbuildings were retained. A new house was built but its design was not considered to be sympathetic to the local landscape, and in the late 1980s it was recased and given the appearance of a French château. The house has been surrounded by formal gardens since the 17th century, the design of which has changed over the centuries in accordance with current ideas and fashions, as has the
    5.67
    3 votes
    169
    Farnsworth House

    Farnsworth House

    The Farnsworth House was designed and constructed by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe between 1945-51. It is a one-room weekend retreat in a once-rural setting, located 55 miles (89 km) southwest of Chicago's downtown on a 60-acre (24 ha) estate site, adjoining the Fox River, south of the city of Plano, Illinois. The steel and glass house was commissioned by Dr. Edith Farnsworth, a prominent Chicago nephrologist, as a place where she could engage in her hobbies: playing the violin, translating poetry, and enjoying nature. Mies created a 1,500-square-foot (140 m) house that is widely recognized as an iconic masterpiece of International Style of architecture. The home was designated a National Historic Landmark in 2006, after joining the National Register of Historic Places in 2004. The house is currently owned and operated as a house museum by the historic preservation group, National Trust for Historic Preservation. In September 2008, the house was flooded by rains from the remnants of Hurricane Ike. Water levels reached about 18 inches (46 cm) above the floor and the 5 foot (1.5 m) stilts upon which the house rests. Much of the furniture was saved by elevating it above the flood waters.
    5.67
    3 votes
    170
    Highclere Castle

    Highclere Castle

    Highclere Castle /ˈhaɪklɪər/ is a country house in the Jacobethan style, with park designed by Capability Brown. The 1,000 acre (405 hectare) estate is in the English county of Hampshire, about 5 miles (8.0 km) south of Newbury. It is the country seat of the Earl of Carnarvon, a branch of the Anglo-Welsh Herbert family. It is the main setting for the British television period drama Downton Abbey. The castle stands on the site of an earlier house, which was built on the foundations of the medieval palace of the Bishops of Winchester, who owned this estate from the 8th century. The original site was recorded in the Domesday Book. Since 1679 the castle has been home to the Carnarvon family. In 1692, Robert Sawyer, a lawyer and college friend of Samuel Pepys, bequeathed a mansion at Highclere to his only daughter, Margaret, the first wife of the 8th Earl of Pembroke. Their second son, Robert Sawyer Herbert, inherited Highclere, began its picture collection and created the garden temples. His nephew and heir Henry Herbert was created Baron Porchester and 1st Earl of Carnarvon by King George III. The house was then a square, classical mansion, but it was remodelled and largely rebuilt
    5.67
    3 votes
    171
    Kykuit

    Kykuit

    Kykuit ( /ˈkaɪkʌt/), also known as John D. Rockefeller Estate, is a 40-room National Trust house in Westchester County, New York, built by the oil businessman, philanthropist and founder of the prominent Rockefeller family, John D. Rockefeller, and his son, John D. Rockefeller, Jr., enriched with art collected by a third-generation family member, the Governor of New York and Vice-President of the United States, Nelson A. Rockefeller. It has been the home to four generations of the family. "Kykuit" means "lookout" in Afrikaans. It is situated in Pocantico Hills, on the highest point of the local surrounds near Tarrytown and Sleepy Hollow, one hour's drive north of New York City. It overlooks the Hudson River at Tappan Zee and, in the distance, the New York skyline. One of America's most famous private residences, the stone mansion was constructed by the architects Chester Holmes Aldrich and William Adams Delano (Aldrich was a distant relative of the younger Rockefeller's wife, Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, who was involved as artistic consultant and in the interior design of the mansion). The elder Rockefeller had originally purchased land in the area as early as 1893, inspired by his
    5.67
    3 votes
    172
    Washington Place

    Washington Place

    Washington Place is a Greek Revival palace in the Hawaii Capital Historic District in Honolulu, Hawaiʻi. It was where Queen Liliʻuokalani was arrested during the overthrow of the Hawaiian Kingdom. Later it became the official residence of the Governor of Hawaiʻi. It is a National Historic Landmark, designated in 2007. The current governor's residence was built in 2008 and is located on the same grounds as Washington Place. An American merchant sea captain, John Dominis (1796–1846) came to America in 1819 from Trieste, probably from a Croatian family. After making a number of voyages across the Pacific, he relocated to the islands in 1837 with his Bostonian wife Mary Jones Dominis (1803–1889) and son John Owen Dominis (1832–1891) from New York. The captain was awarded some land in 1842 as settlement of a lawsuit with the British Consul Richard Charlton. The captain continued to take voyages to raise money for the construction of a house. In 1846 he sailed for China on the Brig William Neilson, intending to purchase Chinese-made furniture for the house, which was nearing completion. The ship was lost at sea, along with the American Agent George Brown, and Mary Dominis became a widow.
    5.67
    3 votes
    173
    Barbara Hepworth Museum

    Barbara Hepworth Museum

    The Barbara Hepworth Museum and Sculpture Garden in St Ives, Cornwall preserves the 20th century sculptor Barbara Hepworth's studio and garden much as they were when she lived and worked there. The studio, known as Trewyn Studio, was purchased by Barbara Hepworth in 1949, and is typical of the stone-built houses in St Ives. Her living room is furnished as she left it, while the workshop remains full of her tools and equipment, materials, and part-worked pieces. The sculptures featured at the museum (mainly in the secluded garden) were some of her favourites. Her workshop also includes a queue of uncut stones that one visitor has described as "still waiting for their moment in the shadow of her workshop". She was helped in the creation of the garden by her friend, the South African-born composer Priaulx Rainier. Barbara Hepworth died in a fire at this site in 1975, when she was aged 72. The museum is managed by the Tate gallery.
    6.50
    2 votes
    174
    Bolsover Castle

    Bolsover Castle

    Bolsover Castle is a castle in Bolsover, Derbyshire, England (grid reference SK471707). It was founded in the 12th century by the Peverel family, who also held Peveril Castle in Derbyshire, and it came under royal control in 1155. The site is now in the care of English Heritage and is a Grade I listed building and a Scheduled Ancient Monument. It was built by the Peverel family in the 12th century and became Crown property in 1155 when William Peverel the Younger died. The Ferrers family who were Earls of Derby laid claim to the Peveril property. When a group of barons led by King Henry II's sons – Henry the Young King, Geoffrey Duke of Brittany, and Prince Richard, later Richard the Lionheart – revolted against the king's rule, Henry spent £116 on building at the castles of Bolsover and Peveril in Derbyshire. The garrison was also increased to a force led by 20 knights and shared with the castles of Peveril and Nottingham during the revolt. John ascended to the throne in 1199 after his brother Richard's death. William de Ferrers maintained the claim of the Earls of Derby to the Peveril estates. He paid John 2000 marks for the lordship of the Peak, but the Crown retained possession
    6.50
    2 votes
    175
    Cannon Hall

    Cannon Hall

    Cannon Hall is a country house museum located between the villages of Cawthorne and High Hoyland north of Barnsley, South Yorkshire, England. Originally the home of the Spencer and later the Spencer-Stanhope family, it now houses collections of fine furniture, paintings, ceramics and glassware. It also houses the Regimental Museum of the 13th/18th Royal Hussars (Queen Mary's Own) and the Light Dragoons. Although there was a house on the site when the Domesday Survey of 1086 was conducted, Cannon Hall picked up its current name from the 13th-century inhabitant Gilbert Canun. By the late 14th century Cannon Hall was in the ownership of the Bosville family of Ardsley, now a suburb in south-east of Barnsley. It was during this period that the most violent event in Cannon Hall's history took place. The Bosvilles had let the Hall out to a family (whose name has been lost), the daughter of whom was romantically involved with a man named Lockwood. Lockwood had been involved in the murder of Sir John Eland, the Sheriff of the County. The tenant, afraid of the position in which he could find himself accommodating a fugitive, sent word to Bosville. Bosville's men arrived at Cannon Hall, where
    6.50
    2 votes
    176
    Carbisdale Castle

    Carbisdale Castle

    Carbisdale Castle was built in 1907 for the Duchess of Sutherland on a hill across the Kyle of Sutherland from Invershin in the Scottish Highlands. It is now used as a youth hostel, operated by the Scottish Youth Hostels Association. The castle is situated north of Culrain, and around 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) north-west of Bonar Bridge. The castle is in the Scots Baronial style, and is protected as a category B listed building. As of March 2012 the castle is closed for renovations. The castle was built between 1905 and 1917 for Mary Caroline, Duchess of Sutherland, the second wife of George Sutherland-Leveson-Gower, 3rd Duke of Sutherland, whom she married in 1889. She is better known as "Duchess Blair" because of her first marriage to Captain Arthur Kindersely Blair of the 71st Highland Light Infantry, who died in a hunting accident in 1883 near Pitlochry. The marriage was not well liked in the Sutherland family. When the Duke died in 1892 his will, in favour of the Duchess, was contested by his son and heir Cromartie. In a court process that followed, the Duchess was found guilty of destroying documents and was imprisoned for six weeks in London. Eventually, the Sutherland family
    6.50
    2 votes
    177
    Farnley Hall

    Farnley Hall

    Farnley Hall is a stately home in Farnley, west Leeds, West Yorkshire, England. It is a grade II listed building. It was built in Elizabethan times by the Danbys. The manor is recorded in the 1086 Domesday Book as Fernelei, so it is probable that this house was a replacement for earlier medieval structures. The Danbys owned part of the manor and the hall until 1799, when it was sold to James Armitage. Thomas Danby was first Mayor of Leeds, and Thomas Danby College in Leeds is named after him. The Hall was acquired by the Leeds City Council in 1945 and its grounds are now the public Farnley Hall Park. The Hall is used as the headquarters of the council's Parks and Countryside Service. Part of the 16th-century house still exists, including a much-eroded Danby arms. The house was drastically rebuilt in the 18th century, when much of the earlier house was demolished and replaced with an architecturally dull building. A sketch or the Tudor house survives in the British Library. In the early 19th century a classical front was added. There are fairly intact remains in the parkland at Farnley, although the current layout is from the early 19th century. 16th- and 17th-century maps show a
    6.50
    2 votes
    178
    Boldt Castle

    Boldt Castle

    Boldt Castle, located on Heart Island (New York) in the Thousand Islands of the Saint Lawrence River, along the northern border of New York State, is a major landmark and tourist attraction in its region. George Boldt, general manager of the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York City and manager of the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel in Philadelphia, and his family for several summers enjoyed an earlier frame cottage on Hart Island (the original name) which they greatly expanded. In 1900 the Boldts launched an ambitious construction campaign to build a huge masonry structure, one of the largest private homes in America. They engaged the architectural firm G. W. & W. D. Hewitt and hundreds of workers for a six-story "castle", a major international landmark. In addition, four other masonry structures on the island are architecturally notable. Equally distinctive is a huge yacht house on a neighboring island where the Boldts had another summer home and a vast estate, incorporating farms, canals, a golf course, tennis courts, stables, and a polo field. The construction of Boldt Castle ceased abruptly in early 1904 after the death of Boldt's wife, Louise Kehrer Boldt. For 73 years, the castle and
    4.75
    4 votes
    179
    Astley Hall

    Astley Hall

    Astley Hall is a country house in Chorley, Lancashire, England. Oliver Cromwell is said to have stayed here for a time. The hall is now owned by the town and is known as Astley Hall Museum and Art Gallery. The extensive landscaped grounds are now Chorley's Astley Park. The site was acquired in the 15th century by the Charnock family from the Knights of St John of Jerusalem.The Charnocks built the original timber-framed house, around a small courtyard, about 1575-1600. In 1665, Margaret Charnocke married Richard Brooke of Mere in Cheshire, and they built the present grand but asymmetrical front range of brick with a pair of vast mullion and transomed bay windows. This front has a doorway with distinctly rustic Ionic columns, remarkable at such a late date. The interior is notable for the staggering mid 17th century plasterwork in the ceilings of the Great Hall and drawing room, which have heavy wreaths and disporting cherubs. The ceilings are barbaric in their excesses, and the figures are relatively poorly modelled, although the undercutting is breathtaking. Not all the moulding is of stucco: there are elements of lead and leather too. The staircase is of the same period with a
    5.33
    3 votes
    180
    Castle Drogo

    Castle Drogo

    Castle Drogo is a country house near Drewsteignton, Devon, England. It was built in the 1910s and 1920s for Julius Drewe (businessman and founder of the Home and Colonial Stores) to designs by architect Edwin Lutyens, and is a Grade I listed building. Castle Drogo was the last castle to be built in England, and probably the last private house in the country to be built entirely of granite. Julius Drewe's first cousin was Richard Peek, the rector of Drewsteignton, named after Drogo de Teigne, and alleged forefather to the Drewes. Julius stayed on several occasions with his cousin and it must have been here that he conceived the idea of building a castle on the home ground of his ancestor. He found an ideal site, and in 1910 he bought about 450 acres (1.8 km) south and west of the village (By the time of his death in 1931 he had bought up an estate of 1,500 acres). He then went to Edwin Lutyens, the most interesting architect of the time, and asked him to build his castle. According to his son Basil, he did so on the advice of William Hudson, proprietor of the Country Life Magazine, who was both a patron and a champion of Lutyens. Drewe was now 54 years old, but he still had time,
    5.33
    3 votes
    181
    Hampden House

    Hampden House

    Hampden House is a country house in the village of Great Hampden, between Great Missenden and Princes Risborough in Buckinghamshire. It is named after the Hampden family. The Hampdens (later Earls of Buckinghamshire) are recorded as owning the site from before the Norman conquest. They lived continually in the house until 1938. The core of the present house is Elizabethan. However the south wing known, for some anachronistic reason, as King John's tower dates to the 14th century. This tower is constructed of clunch, a building material peculiar to Buckinghamshire, which is a combination of chalk and mud. The tower has traceried Gothic windows and the remains of the original spiral staircase. A legend, relevant to this part of the house, is that King Edward III and the Black Prince stayed at Hampden House. During the stay the prince and his Hampden host were jousting, when a quarrel arose, during which the prince was punched in the face by his host. This act of lèse majesté caused the king and Prince to quit the place in great wrath, and cause their host to forfeit some of his estates to the crown. There is, however no documentary evidence for this act, or of the subsequent revenge
    5.33
    3 votes
    182
    Rydal Mount

    Rydal Mount

    Rydal Mount is a house near Ambleside in the Lake District. It is best known as the home of the poet William Wordsworth from 1813 to his death in 1850. Wordsworth was born in Cockermouth in Cumberland in 1770, and knew the Lake District well from his childhood. He moved away to study at the University of Cambridge in 1787, and then travelled in Britain and Europe for 12 years. He spent over 8 years at Dove Cottage in nearby Grasmere from 1799 to 1808, but was forced to move to accommodate his growing family and many visitors. After a period in Allan Bank in Grasmere, the Wordsworths moved to Rydal Mount in 1813. Both Grasmere and Windermere lakes can be seen from the hillside grounds of Rydal Mount. William designed the layout of the gardens at Rydal, and he often said that those grounds were his office as opposed to the spacious office/writing room in his house. On the high side of the grounds, tucked away from the main house, but overlooking both the grounds and the two nearby lakes, he built the "Writing Hut" where he spent most of his writing time. This hut consisted merely of a bench with a small roof, but it provided shelter from the frequent rains and escape from the house.
    5.33
    3 votes
    183
    Anglesey Abbey

    Anglesey Abbey

    Anglesey Abbey is a country house, formerly a priory, in the village of Lode, 5+⁄2 miles (8.9 km) northeast of Cambridge, England. The house and its grounds are owned by the National Trust and are open to the public as part of the Anglesey Abbey, Garden & Lode Mill property, although some parts remain the private home of the Fairhaven family. The 98 acres (400,000 m²) of landscaped grounds are divided into a number of walks and gardens, with classical statuary, topiary and flowerbeds. The grounds were laid out in an 18th-century style by the estate's last private owner, the 1st Baron Fairhaven, in the 1930s. A large pool, the Quarry Pool, is believed to be the site of a 19th-century coprolite mine. Lode Water Mill, dating from the 18th century was restored to working condition in 1982 and now sells flour to visitors. The 1st Lord Fairhaven also improved the house and decorated its interior with a valuable collection of furniture, pictures and objets d'art. A community of Augustinian canons built a priory here, known as Anglesea or Anglesey Priory, some time during the reign of Henry I (i.e., between 1100 and 1135), and acquired extra land from the nearby village of Bottisham in
    7.00
    1 votes
    184
    Basing House

    Basing House

    Basing House was a major Tudor palace and castle in the village of Old Basing in the English county of Hampshire. It once rivaled Hampton Court Palace in its size and opulence. Today only its foundations and earthworks remain. The ruins are a Grade II listed building and a Scheduled Ancient Monument. Basing House was built from 1531 as a new palace for William Paulet, 1st Marquess of Winchester, treasurer to King Edward VI, Queen Mary I and Queen Elizabeth I. In its final form, Basing House was made up of two linked houses. The Old House replaced the keep of an older motte-and-bailey castle, so was located within a defensive ring of earthworks and walls, whilst the slightly later New House was located outside the defences. A bridge and gateway linked the two across and through the defences; a link that was to prove fatal in the final battle for Basing House. Taken together, the house had 360 rooms, was five storeys high and was considered by many to be the greatest private house in the country. For the first half of the 1630s the house was shut up, the windows boarded over, and the family decamped to other houses held by the family. The 4th Marquess' entertainments almost
    7.00
    1 votes
    185
    Calke Abbey

    Calke Abbey

    Calke Abbey is a Grade I listed country house near Ticknall, Derbyshire, England, in the care of the charitable National Trust. The site was an Augustinian priory from the 12th century until its dissolution by Henry VIII. The present building, named Calke Abbey in 1808, was never actually an abbey, but is a Baroque mansion built between 1701 and 1704. The house was owned by the Harpur family for nearly 300 years until it was passed to the Trust in 1985 in lieu of death duties. Today, the house is open to the public and many of its rooms are deliberately displayed in the state of decline in which the house was handed to the Trust. The estate was bought by Sir Henry Harpur, 1st baronet (c1579-1639) in 1622. The house was rebuilt by Sir John Harpur, 4th baronet (1680-1741) between 1701 and 1704. The house and estate were owned by successive Harpur baronets and were ultimately inherited by Sir Vauncey Harpur-Crewe (1846-1924), 10th (and last) baronet who was devoted to his collection of natural history specimens. When he died, his eldest daughter, Hilda Harpur-Crewe (1877-1949) sold some of his collection of birds, butterflies and fishes to pay death duties. She was succeeded by her
    7.00
    1 votes
    186
    Great Hospital

    Great Hospital

    The Great Hospital is a medieval hospital that has been serving the people of Norwich, Norfolk, England, since the 13th century. It is situated on a 7-acre (2.8 ha) site in a bend of the River Wensum to the north-east of Norwich Cathedral. Bishop Walter de Suffield founded St. Giles's Hospital, as the hospital was originally known, in 1249. What makes the hospital notable today is its continuous record of care, the range of existing medieval buildings on the hospital grounds, most of which are still in use, and the extensive archives that record the hospital's long history. The original beneficiaries of the new hospital in 1249 were aged priests, poor scholars, and sick and hungry paupers. Clerics remained unmarried in this period, so they had no family to support them in old age. The poor scholars, boys selected on merit from local song schools, were to receive a daily meal during term times. This was to continue until the boy had achieved a good grasp of Latin. With this help, bright but poor boys were given the chance to train as choristers or even to enter the priesthood. Thirty beds were earmarked for the sick poor, and thirteen paupers were to be fed at the hospital gates
    7.00
    1 votes
    187
    Lancaster House

    Lancaster House

    Lancaster House (previously known as York House and Stafford House) is a mansion in the St. James's district in the West End of London. It is close to St. James's Palace and much of the site was once part of the palace complex. This Grade I listed building is now managed by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. Construction of the house commenced in 1825 for the Duke of York and Albany, the second son of King George III, and it was initially known as York House, but it was only a shell at his death in 1827. The exterior was mainly designed by Benjamin Dean Wyatt. It is constructed from Bath Stone, in a neo-classical style, being the last great London mansion to use this essentially Georgian style. The building is three floors in height, the State rooms being on the first floor or piano nobile, family living rooms on the ground floor and family bedrooms on the second floor. There is also a basement containing service rooms. The interior was designed by Benjamin Dean Wyatt, Sir Charles Barry and Sir Robert Smirke and was completed in 1840. The house was purchased by and completed for the 2nd Marquess of Stafford (later 1st Duke of Sutherland) and was known as Stafford House for almost
    7.00
    1 votes
    188
    Lion House

    Lion House

    The Lion House was built in 1856 by Brigham Young in Salt Lake City, Utah to accommodate members of his enormous family. A polygamist, Young's family ultimately included more than two dozen wives, fathered 57 biological children, and had many adopted, foster, and stepchildren as well. He owned residences throughout Salt Lake City and the Utah Territory, but many of his wives and children were housed in The Lion House. The house contains large public rooms on the ground floor with 20 bedrooms on the upper floors, and was home to as many as twelve of Young's wives including Eliza Roxey Snow and to many of the children in Young's extended family. The Lion House is connected by a series of rooms used as offices to The Beehive House, Young's official residence. Truman O. Angell, Brigham Young's brother-in-law by his legal wife Mary Ann Angell and who designed the Salt Lake City Temple was also involved in the design of this home, which got its name from the statue of a lion over the front entrance, made by William Ward. The house is situated at 63 East South Temple, near the corner of South Temple and State Street just one block east of Temple Square. It is adjacent and connected by a
    7.00
    1 votes
    189
    Littlecote House

    Littlecote House

    Littlecote House is a large Elizabethan country house and estate in the civil parishes of Ramsbury and Chilton Foliat in the English county of Wiltshire (the latter formerly Berkshire) near to Hungerford. The estate includes 34 hectares of historic parklands and gardens, including a walled garden from the 17th and 18th centuries. In its grounds is Littlecote Roman Villa. The first Littlecote House was built during the 13th century. A medieval mansion, it was inhabited by the de Calstone family from around 1290. When William Darrell married Elizabeth de Calstone in 1415, he inherited the house. His family went on to build the Tudor mansion in the mid-16th century. Henry VIII courted Jane Seymour at the house; her grandmother was Elizabeth Darrell. Sir John Popham bought the reversion of Littlecote, and succeeded to it in 1589; he built the present Elizabethan brick mansion, which was completed in 1592. Elizabeth I, James I, Charles II, and William of Orange stayed there, William on his march from Torbay to London in the Glorious Revolution. Popham's descendants, the Pophams and (from 1762) the Leyborne Pophams owned the house until the 1920s. The Leyborne Pophams refurbished much of
    7.00
    1 votes
    190
    Lumley Castle

    Lumley Castle

    Lumley Castle is a 14th century quadrangular castle at Chester-le-Street in the North of England, near to the city of Durham and a property of the Earl of Scarbrough. It is a Grade I listed building. It is named for its original creator, Sir Ralph Lumley, who converted his family manor house into a castle in 1389 after returning from wars in Scotland. However, after being implicated in a plot to overthrow Henry IV he was imprisoned and ultimately executed, forfeiting his lands to the Earl of Somerset. In 1421 the ownership of the Castle reverted to Sir Ralph Lumley's grandson, Thomas. By the nineteenth century, the castle had become the residence of the Bishop of Durham, after Bishop Van Mildert gave his residence of Durham Castle to the newly founded University of Durham. The castle thus became a hall of residence for University College, Durham. Castlemen, as the students of University College, Durham are known, spent their first year at Lumley Castle and subsequent years in the Castle at Durham. Lumley Castle was sold in the 1960s by University College to fund the building of the 'Moatside' residential halls in central Durham, in order to keep all students on the same site. The
    7.00
    1 votes
    191
    Oldway Mansion

    Oldway Mansion

    Oldway Mansion is a large house and gardens in Paignton, Devon, England. It was built as a private residence for Isaac Merritt Singer (1811–1875), and rebuilt by his third son Paris Singer in the style of the Palace of Versailles. Around 1871 the Fernham estate in Paignton was purchased by Isaac Merritt Singer, the founder of the Singer Sewing Machine Company. The old buildings on the site were demolished and he commissioned a local architect, George Soudon Bridgman to build a new mansion as his home. Isaac Merritt Singer died on 23 July 1875, shortly before work on the original mansion was completed. Paris Eugene Singer, Isaac Singer's third son, supervised the alterations at Oldway Mansion between 1904 and 1907. The rebuilding work was modelled on the Palace of Versailles, and the eastern elevation of the building was inspired by the Place de la Concorde in Paris. The interior of the building is noted for its grand staircase made from marble and balusters of bronze. The ceiling of the staircase is decorated with an ornate painting based on an original design for the Palace of Versailles by the French painter and architect Joseph Lebrun. The ceiling is a replica painted by Carl
    7.00
    1 votes
    192
    Rosecliff

    Rosecliff

    Rosecliff, built 1898-1902, is one of the Gilded Age mansions of Newport, Rhode Island, now open to the public as a museum. The house has also been known as the Herman Oelrichs House or the J. Edgar Monroe House. It was built by Theresa Fair Oelrichs, a silver heiress from Nevada, whose father James Graham Fair was one of the four partners in the Comstock Lode. She was the wife of Hermann Oelrichs, American agent for Norddeutscher Lloyd steamship line. She and her husband, together with her sister, Virginia Fair, bought the land in 1891 from the estate of George Bancroft, and commissioned the architectural firm of McKim, Mead, and White to design a summer home suitable for entertaining on a grand scale. With little opportunity to channel her considerable energy elsewhere, she "threw herself into the social scene with tremendous gusto, becoming, with Mrs. Stuyvesant Fish and Mrs. O.H.P. Belmont (of nearby Belcourt) one of the three great hostesses of Newport." The principal architect, Stanford White, modeled the mansion after the Grand Trianon of Versailles, but smaller and reduced to a basic "H" shape, while keeping Mansart's scheme of a glazed arcade of arched windows and paired
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    193
    11 Downing Street

    11 Downing Street

    11 Downing Street (commonly known as Number 11), is the official residence of the Second Lord of the Treasury in Britain, who in modern times has always been the Chancellor of the Exchequer. Since 11 May 2010, it has been the official residence of George Osborne, when he was appointed Chancellor by Prime Minister David Cameron. The address is adjacent to the more famous 10 Downing Street, official residence of the First Lord of the Treasury, who since the early years of the 19th century has always been the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. Many internal refurbishments over the years have obscured the buildings to the point that they can appear to be one single complex. To the right of number 11, 12 Downing Street is the official residence of the Chief Whip but now used as the Prime Minister's press office. One can walk from 11 to 10 Downing Street without having to go outside, via an adjoining door. When Tony Blair became Prime Minister in 1997 he chose to use Number 11 rather than Number 10 as his actual (as opposed to official) residence, as its larger living areas were more suitable for his young family. In 2007, Gordon Brown became Prime Minister, he also chose to live in
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    194
    12 Arnold Grove

    12 Arnold Grove

    12 Arnold Grove, the birthplace of former Beatle George Harrison, is a house in Liverpool, England, situated in the Wavertree area. It is a small terraced house in a cul-de-sac, with a small alley to the rear. Harrison's parents, Harold and Louise, moved to the house in 1930 following their marriage. The rent was ten shillings a week. Here their four children were born—Louise (16 August 1931), Harry (1934), Peter (20 July 1940) and George (25 February 1943). Harrison recalled the only heating was a single coal fire, and the house was so cold in winter that he and his brothers dreaded getting up in the morning because it was literally freezing cold and they had to use the outside toilet. The house had tiny rooms —only ten feet squared (about 100 square feet, about 9 m) — and a small iron cooking stove in the back room, which was used as a kitchen. Describing the back garden, Harrison wrote it had "a one-foot wide flower bed, a toilet, a dustbin fitted to the back wall (and) a little hen house where we kept cockerels." During the six years Harrison lived in the property, the rent rose. The family had, by this point, been living there for nearly 20 years and finally moved out to a new
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    195
    Attingham Park

    Attingham Park

    Attingham Park is a country house in Shropshire, England, which is owned by the National Trust. It is a Grade I listed building. It is located near to the village of Atcham, on the B4380 Shrewsbury to Wellington road. Attingham Park was designed by George Steuart and was built in 1785 for Noel Hill, 1st Baron Berwick, on the site of an earlier house called Tern Hall (which had been built to his own designs by Richard Hill of Hawkstone). Later, John Nash added the picture gallery. It was the seat of the Barons Berwick until that title became extinct in 1953. Between 1948 and 1971 an Adult Education College occupied the hall, run by Sir George Trevelyan. Attingham Park is now the regional headquarters of the National Trust and also on the estate is the Shropshire office of Natural England. The park was landscaped by Humphry Repton and includes woodlands and a deer park, with between 200 and 300 head of Fallow deer (according to season). The grounds also include walled gardens and an orchard. The River Tern, which flows through the middle of the park, joins the larger River Severn near the park boundary.
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    196
    Jorasanko Thakur Bari

    Jorasanko Thakur Bari

    The Jorasanko Thakur Bari (Bengali: House of the Thakurs (anglicised to Tagore) in Jorasanko, north of Kolkata, West Bengal, India is the ancestral home of the Tagore family. It is currently located on the Rabindra Bharati University campus at 6/4 Dwarakanath Tagore Lane Jorasanko, Kolkata 700007. It is the house in which the poet and first non-European Nobel laureate, Rabindranath Tagore was born. It is also the place where he spent most of his childhood and died on 7 August 1941. It was built in the 18th century by Prince Dwarkanath Tagore (Rabindranath Tagore's grandfather). Gurudev Rabindranath Tagore (1861–1941) was born here. The house has been restored to reflect the way the household looked when the Tagore family lived in it and currently serves as the Tagore museum for Kolkata. The museum offers details about the history of the Tagore family including its involvement with the Bengal Renaissance and the Brahmo Samaj. A visit to Jorasanko Thakur Bari is always an exhilarating experience. Apart from the heritage routine, Rabindra Bharati University organizes regular cultural programmes on the poet’s birthday, Panchise Baisakh, when thousands flock to Jorasanko Thakur Bari,
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    197
    Willits House

    Willits House

    The Ward W. Willits House is a building designed by architect Frank Lloyd Wright. Designed in 1901, the Willits house is considered the first of the great Prairie houses. Built in the Chicago suburb of Highland Park, Illinois, the house presents a symmetrical facade to the street. The plan is a cruciform with four wings that extend out from a central hearth. In addition to art-glass windows and wooden screens that divide rooms, Wright also designed most of the furniture in the house.
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    198
    Wimpole Hall

    Wimpole Hall

    Wimpole Hall is a country house located within the Parish of Wimpole, Cambridgeshire, England, about 8+⁄2 miles (14 kilometres) southwest of Cambridge. The house, begun in 1640, and its 3,000 acres (12 km) of parkland and farmland are owned by the National Trust and are regularly open to the public. Wimpole is the largest house in Cambridgeshire. Over the centuries, many notable architects have worked on it, including its first owner, Thomas Chicheley (between 1640 and 1670), James Gibbs (between 1713 and 1730), James Thornhill (1721), Henry Flitcroft (around 1749), John Soane (1790s), and H. E. Kendall (1840s). Before the present Wimpole Hall was built in around 1640, there was a moated manor house set in a small 81 hectares (200 acres) deer-park. Situated to the north and south of this were three medieval villages: Bennall End, Thresham End and Green End. Wimpole Hall's grounds were laid out and modified by landscape designers such as George London and Henry Wise (1693–1705), Charles Bridgeman (1720s), Robert Greening (1740s), 'Capability' Brown (1767), and Humphry Repton (1801–1809). The parkland as it exists today is an overlay of the work of these landscape designers and
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    199
    Ightham Mote

    Ightham Mote

    Ightham Mote (pronounced "item moat") is a medieval moated manor house close to the village of Ightham, near Sevenoaks in Kent (grid reference TQ 5839 5346). The name "mote" derives from "moot", "meeting [place]", rather than referring to the body of water. Ightham Mote and its gardens are owned by the National Trust and open to the public. Originally dating to around 1320, the building's importance lies in the fact that successive owners effected relatively few changes to the main structure, after the completion of the quadrangle with a new chapel in the 16th century. Nikolaus Pevsner called it "the most complete small medieval manor house in the country", and it remains an example that shows how such houses would have looked in the Middle Ages. Unlike most courtyard houses of its type, which have had a range demolished, so that the house looks outward, Nicholas Cooper observes that Ightham wholly surrounds its courtyard and looks inward, into it, offering little information externally. It was bequeathed to the National Trust in 1985 by an American businessman, Charles Henry Robinson, who had bought it in 1953. The house is now a Grade I listed building, and parts of it are a
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    200
    Stourhead

    Stourhead

    Stourhead ( /ˈstɑːˌhɛd/) is a 1,072-hectare (2,650-acre) estate at the source of the River Stour near Mere, Wiltshire, England. The estate includes a Palladian mansion, the village of Stourton, gardens, farmland, and woodland. Stourhead has been in the ownership of the National Trust since 1946. The Stourton family, the Barons of Stourton, had lived in the Stourhead estate for 500 years until they sold it to Sir Thomas Meres in 1714. His son, John Meres, sold it to Henry Hoare I, son of wealthy banker Sir Richard Hoare in 1717. The original manor house was demolished and a new house, one of the first of its kind, was designed by Colen Campbell and built by Nathaniel Ireson between 1721 and 1725. Over the next 200 years the Hoare family collected many heirlooms, including a large library and art collection. In 1902 the house was gutted by fire. However, many of the heirlooms were saved, and the house rebuilt in a near identical style. The last Hoare family member to own the property, Henry Hugh Arthur Hoare, gave the Stourhead house and gardens to the National Trust in 1946, one year before his death. His sole heir and son, Captain "Harry" Henry Colt Arthur Hoare, of the Queen's Own
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    201
    Wollaton Hall

    Wollaton Hall

    Wollaton Hall is a country house standing on a small but prominent hill in Wollaton, Nottingham, England. Wollaton Park is the area of parkland that the stately house stands in. The house itself is a natural history museum, with other museums in the out-buildings. The surrounding land is regularly used for large scale outdoor events such as rock concerts and festivals. Wollaton Hall was built between 1580 and 1588 for Sir Francis Willoughby and is believed to be designed by the Elizabethan architect, Robert Smythson, who was the architect of Hardwick Hall. The style is Elizabethan with early Jacobean elements. The floor plan has been said to derive from Serlio's drawing (in Book III of his Five Books of Architecture) of Giuliano da Majano's Villa Poggio Reale near Naples of the late fifteenth century, with elevations derived from Hans Vredeman de Vries. The architectural historian Mark Girouard has suggested that the design is in fact derived from Nikolaus de Lyra's reconstruction, and Josephus's description, of Solomon's Temple in Jerusalem, with a more direct inspiration being the mid-sixteenth century Mount Edgcumbe in Cornwall, which Smythson knew. The building is of Ancaster
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    202
    78 Derngate

    78 Derngate

    78 Derngate is a Grade II* listed Georgian house in the Derngate area of Northampton, England, originally built in the 1820s. It is noted for its interior, which was extensively remodelled in 1916 and 1917 by noted architect Charles Rennie Mackintosh for businessman Wenman Joseph Bassett-Lowke as his first marital home. The rear elevation also features a striking extension with two elevated balconies which, in 1915, overlooked meadowland to the edge of Northampton. The design origins of this extension have been the subject of some scholarly debate and a myth of Mackintosh as a modernist pioneer in his late career has persisted. However, recent research suggests that Bassett-Lowke and Alexander Ellis Anderson (a Northampton based architect who supervised the remodelling) may also have had a hand in the design of this structure as well as Mackintosh. In 1926 the Bassett Lowkes moved to New Ways, a pioneering modernist house designed by Peter Behrens close to Abington Park. Between 1964 and 1993 the building was used by Northampton High School for girls, initially as offices but later as classrooms. In 2002 work started to restore the house to Mackintosh's original design. After
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    203
    Avila Adobe

    Avila Adobe

    The Avila Adobe, was built in 1818 by Francisco Avila, and has the distinction of being the oldest standing residence in Los Angeles, California. It is located in the paseo of historical Olvera Street, a part of Los Angeles Plaza Historic District, a California State Historic Park. The building itself is registered as California Historical Landmark #145, while the entire historic district is both listed on the National Register of Historic Places and as a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument. The Plaza is the third location of the original Spanish settlement El Pueblo de Nuestra Señora la Reina de Los Angeles sobre el Rio Porciuncula, the first two having been washed out by flooding from the swollen Rio Porciuncula (Los Angeles River). The Avila Adobe was one of the settlement's first houses to share street frontage in the Pueblo de Los Angeles of Spanish colonial Alta California. The walls of the Avila Adobe are 2.5–3 feet (0.76–0.91 m) thick and are built from sun baked adobe bricks. The original ceilings were 15 feet (4.6 m) high and supported by beams of cottonwood which was available along the banks of the Los Angeles River. Though the roof appears slanted today, the
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    204
    Bessie Surtees House

    Bessie Surtees House

    Bessie Surtees House is the name of two merchants' houses on Newcastle's Sandhill that were built in the 16th and 17th centuries. The buildings are a fine and rare example of Jacobean domestic architecture. An exhibition detailing the history of the buildings can be found on the first floor. The site is also home to the North East regional branch of English Heritage. The house is best known as the scene of the elopement of Bessie Surtees and John Scott, who later became Lord Chancellor. In July 2009 it was targeted by graffiti vandals who extensively spray-painted the roof with the tags "LG", "GRIM" and "KAME".
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    205
    Eames House

    Eames House

    The Eames House (also known as Case Study House No. 8) is a landmark of mid-20th century modern architecture located at 203 North Chautauqua Boulevard in the Pacific Palisades neighborhood of Los Angeles. It was constructed in 1949 by husband-and-wife design pioneers Charles and Ray Eames, to serve as their home and studio. Unusually for such an avant-garde design, the Eames publicized the house as a thoroughly lived-in, usable, and well-loved home. While many icons of the modern movement are depicted as stark, barren spaces devoid of human use, photographs and motion pictures taken at the Eames house reveal a richly decorated, almost cluttered space full of thousands of books, art objects, artifacts, and charming knick-knacks as well as dozens of projects in various states of completion. The Eames' gracious live-work lifestyle continues to be an influential model. The design of the house was proposed by Charles and Ray as part of the famous Case Study House program for John Entenza's Arts & Architecture magazine. The idea of a Case Study house was to hypothesize a modern household, elaborate its functional requirements, have an esteemed architect develop a design that met those
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    206
    Wightwick Manor

    Wightwick Manor

    Wightwick Manor (pronounced 'Wittick') is a Victorian manor house located on Wightwick Bank, Wolverhampton, West Midlands, England. It is one of only a few surviving examples of a house built and furnished under the influence of the Arts and Crafts movement. Wightwick was built by Theodore Mander, of the Mander family, who were successful 19th-century industrialists in the area, and his wife Flora, daughter of Henry Nicholas Paint, member of Parliament in Canada. It was designed by Edward Ould of Liverpool in two phases; the first was completed in 1887 and the house was extended with the Great Parlour wing in 1893. This family house portrays life during the Victorian era and is a notable example of the influence of William Morris, with original Morris wallpapers and fabrics, De Morgan tiles, Kempe glass, and Pre-Raphaelite works of art. The house has splendid Victorian gardens and the outbuildings house stables, a handmade pottery shop, studio workshop and an antiquarian bookshop. The house was presented to the National Trust by Sir Geoffrey Mander under the Country Houses Scheme in 1937. Descendants of the family retain rooms in the manor. It is situated just off the main A454
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    207
    Alford Manor House

    Alford Manor House

    The Manor House is a Grade II listed building which can be found on West street within Alford, Lincolnshire, England. It is believed to be the largest thatched manor house in England and was built to a traditional H plan in 1611. It is a very rare example of a composite structure, featuring a wooden frame with reed and plaster (visible from within the house), encased in brick. Ground floor and first floor rooms feature design interventions from Georgian through to Victorian times, whilst the attic floor is virtually untouched since 1611. The house owes much of its existence to the wealth of one of its owners, Sir Robert Christopher. The house was inherited by his granddaughter, Lucy, who married John Manners, Duke of Rutland. Thereafter Alford Manor House was inhabited by tenants, one of whom was John Higgins, who arrived in about 1820. He was a friend of Charles Darwin's father, Robert, and was the local Land Agent. He established his office in the nineteenth century annex which you can see on the east wing of the house. It was his descendent, Dorothy Higgins, a doctor and member of Alford Town Council, who bought the property in 1958 and gifted it to the town in 1967. Alford
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    208
    Greenway Estate

    Greenway Estate

    Greenway is an estate on the River Dart near Galmpton in Devon, England. It was first mentioned in 1493 as "Greynway", the crossing point of the Dart to Dittisham. In the late 16th century a Tudor mansion called Greenway Court was built by the Gilbert family. Greenway was the birthplace of Humphrey Gilbert. The present Georgian house was probably built in the late 18th century by Roope Harris Roope and extended by subsequent owners. Greenway was bought by Agatha Christie and her husband Max Mallowan in 1938. The house was occupied by Christie and Mallowan until their deaths in 1976 and 1978 respectively, and featured, under various guises, in several of Christie's novels. Christie's daughter Rosalind Hicks and her husband Anthony lived in the house from 1968, until Rosalind's death in 2004. The Greenway Estate was acquired by the National Trust in 1999 and it is now a Grade II* listed building. The house and garden is open to the public, as is the Barn Gallery. The large riverside gardens contain plants from the southern hemisphere, whilst the Barn Gallery shows work by contemporary local artists. Agatha Christie frequently used places familiar to her as settings for her plots.
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    209
    Harewood House

    Harewood House

    Harewood House ( /ˈhɑrwʊd/ HAR-wuud) is a country house located in Harewood ( /ˈhɛərwʊd/ HAIR-wuud) near Leeds, West Yorkshire, England. Designed by the architects John Carr and Robert Adam, it was built from 1759 to 1771 for wealthy trader Edwin Lascelles, 1st Baron Harewood. Still home to the Lascelles family, Harewood House is a member of Treasure Houses of England, a marketing consortium for nine of the foremost historic homes in England. The house itself is a Grade I listed building, there are a number of features in the grounds and courtyard that have been listed as Grade I, II and II*. The house was built from 1759 to 1771 for Edwin Lascelles, whose family had bought the estate after making its fortune in the West Indies through Customs positions, slave trading and lending money to planters. The house was designed by the architects John Carr and Robert Adam. Much of the furniture is by the eighteenth-century English furniture designer Thomas Chippendale, who came from nearby Otley. Lancelot "Capability" Brown designed the grounds to which Sir Charles Barry added a grand terrace, in 1844. Artist Thomas Girtin stayed at the house many times, painting the house itself and also
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    210
    Monkey Island, Bray

    Monkey Island, Bray

    Monkey Island is a small island in the River Thames in England, on the reach above Boveney Lock near the village of Bray, Berkshire. It is now occupied by a hotel, but sports an interesting history involving grotesquely painted monkeys and the Duke of Marlborough. Although painted monkeys still lurk in the pavilion, the name Monkey Island stems from the Old English Monks Eyot, i.e., Monks' Island, after those monks residing at Amerden Bank, a moated site near Bray Lock on the Buckinghamshire bank of the river, as part of the Merton Priory from 1197 until the Dissolution of the Monasteries. By the 14th century, Monkey Island had passed to the Canonesses of Burnham Abbey, a mile to the North, and in the Bray Court Rolls of 1361, the island is called Bournhames Eyte. That name recurs in the P.R.O. plan of 1640 as Burnham-Ayt. The island passed to the Englefield family in 1606. After the Great Fire of London in 1666, Oxfordshire stone was shipped downstream in barges for rebuilding of the City. On their return, the barges carried rubble to be dumped on the Thames islands. Such London rubble gave Monkey Island today's solid foundation, and raised it high enough to eliminate the danger
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    211
    Normanby Hall

    Normanby Hall

    Normanby Hall is a classic English mansion, located near the village of Burton-upon-Stather, 5 miles (8.0 km) north of Scunthorpe, North Lincolnshire. The present Hall was built in 1825–30 to the designs of Robert Smirke for Sir Robert Sheffield (1786–1862), whose family had lived on the site since 1539. It replaced a previous 17th century building. The family moved out of Normanby Hall in 1963. The Hall is now in the care of the North Lincolnshire Council. The former 350 acre (1.4 km²) estate around the Hall is now a Country Park. Within it, there are a restored working Victorian walled garden, a farming museum, a stableyard, duck ponds, a deer sanctuary, a fishing lake, a miniature railway and broadleaf woodland. Samantha Cameron, wife of the Conservative party leader and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, David Cameron, grew up on the Normanby Hall estate.
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    212
    Rushton Triangular Lodge

    Rushton Triangular Lodge

    The Triangular Lodge is a folly, designed and constructed between 1593 and 1597 by Sir Thomas Tresham near Rushton, Northamptonshire, England. It is now in the care of English Heritage. The stone used for the construction was alternating bands of dark and light limestone. Tresham was a Roman Catholic and was imprisoned for a total of fifteen years in the late 16th century for refusing to become a Protestant. On his release in 1593, he designed the Lodge as a protestation of his faith. His belief in the Holy Trinity is represented everywhere in the Lodge by the number three: it has three walls 33 feet long, each with three triangular windows and surmounted by three gargoyles. The building has three floors, upon a basement, and a triangular chimney. Three Latin texts, each 33 letters long, run around the building on each facade. The quotations are: The windows on each floor are of different designs, all equally ornate. The largest, those on the first floor, are in the form of a trefoil, which was the emblem of the Tresham family. The basement windows are small trefoils with a triangular pane at their centre. The windows on the ground floor are of a lozenge design, each having 12
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    2 votes
    213
    Tyntesfield

    Tyntesfield

    Tyntesfield is a Victorian Gothic Revival estate near Wraxall, North Somerset, England, near Nailsea, seven miles from Bristol. The house was acquired by the National Trust in June 2002 after a fund raising campaign to prevent it being sold to private interests and ensure it be opened to the public. It was opened to visitors for the first time just 10 weeks after the acquisition and as more rooms are restored they are added to the tour. It was visited by 104,451 people in 2009, a 3.4% rise on the previous year. The Gibbs family's fortunes originated in the establishment of a trading company by Antony Gibbs (1756–1816). Gibbs dealt mainly with Spain, and eventually took his two oldest sons (William and George) into partnership. After Antony's death, his sons built up a substantial trade in guano from the former Spanish colonies in South America. The firm's profits from this trade were such that William Gibbs became one of the richest men in England, and was able to finance the construction of Tyntesfield as a country seat for his family. William Gibbs purchased Tyntes Place, the original Regency-Gothic house that stood on the site, in 1843. In 1863 he began the full-blown rebuilding
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    214
    Queen's House

    Queen's House

    The Queen's House, Greenwich, is a former royal residence built between 1616–1619 in Greenwich, then a few miles downriver from London, and now a district of the city. Its architect was Inigo Jones, for whom it was a crucial early commission, for Anne of Denmark, the queen of King James I of England. It was altered and completed by Jones, in a second campaign about 1635 for Henrietta Maria, queen of King Charles I. The Queen's House is one of the most important buildings in British architectural history, being the first consciously classical building to have been constructed in Britain. It was Jones's first major commission after returning from his 1613–1615 grand tour of Roman, Renaissance and Palladian architecture in Italy. Some earlier English buildings, such as Longleat, had made borrowings from the classical style; but these were restricted to small details and were not applied in a systematic way. Nor was the form of these buildings informed by an understanding of classical precedents. The Queen's House would have appeared revolutionary to English eyes in its day. Jones is credited with the introduction of Palladianism with the construction of the Queen's House. Although it
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    215
    Sagamore Hill

    Sagamore Hill

    Sagamore Hill was the home of the 26th President of the United States Theodore Roosevelt from 1885 until his death in 1919. It is located at the end of Cove Neck Road in the Incorporated Village of Cove Neck, New York, on Long Island, 25 miles (40 km) east of Manhattan. Sagamore Hill is located within the Oyster Bay 11771 Zip Code. It is now the Sagamore Hill National Historic Site and also includes the Theodore Roosevelt Museum. It derives its name from Sagamore which is the title of the head of an Indian tribe. Although a native of New York City, Theodore Roosevelt spent many summers of his youth on extended vacations with his family in the Oyster Bay area. In 1880, by then a young adult of 22, Roosevelt purchased 155 acres (62.7 hectares) of land for $30,000 (equal to $680,483 today) on Cove Neck, a small peninsula roughly 2 miles (3.2 km) northeast of the village of Oyster Bay. In 1881, his uncle James A. Roosevelt had designed his estate home several hundred feet west of the Sagamore Hill property. In 1884 Theodore Roosevelt hired the New York architectural firm Lamb & Rich to design a shingle-style, Queen Anne home for the property. The twenty-two room home was completed in
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    216
    The Breakers

    The Breakers

    The Breakers is a Vanderbilt mansion located on Ochre Point Avenue, Newport, Rhode Island, United States on the Atlantic Ocean. It is a National Historic Landmark, a contributing property to the Bellevue Avenue Historic District, and is owned and operated by the Preservation Society of Newport County. The Breakers was built as the Newport summer home of Cornelius Vanderbilt II, a member of the wealthy United States Vanderbilt family. It is built in a style often described as Goût Rothschild. Designed by renowned architect Richard Morris Hunt and with interior decoration by Jules Allard and Sons and Ogden Codman, Jr., the 70-room mansion has approximately 65,000 sq ft (6,000 m) of living space. The home was constructed between 1893 and 1895 at a cost of more than $12 million (approximately $335 million in today's dollars adjusted for inflation). The Ochre Point Avenue entrance is marked by sculpted iron gates and the 30-foot (9.1 m) high walkway gates are part of a 12-foot-high limestone and iron fence that borders the property on all but the ocean side. The 250 ft × 120 ft (76 m × 37 m) dimensions of the five-story mansion are aligned symmetrically around a central Great Hall. Part
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    217
    2 Willow Road

    2 Willow Road

    2 Willow Road is part of a terrace of three houses in Hampstead, London designed by architect Ernő Goldfinger and built in 1938. It has been managed by the National Trust since 1995 and is open to the public. It was one of the first modernist buildings acquired by the Trust, giving rise to some controversy. Goldfinger lived there with his wife Ursula and their children until his death in 1987. 1–3 Willow Road was constructed in concrete and faced in red brick. A number of cottages were demolished to allow for the construction, which was strongly opposed by a number of local residents including novelist Ian Fleming (this was said to be his inspiration for the name of the James Bond villain Auric Goldfinger) and the future Conservative Home Secretary Henry Brooke. No. 2, which Goldfinger designed specifically as his own family home, is the largest of the three houses and features a spiral staircase designed by Danish engineer Ove Arup at its core. The building is supported by an external concrete frame, leaving room for a spacious interior uncluttered by structure, perhaps inspired by the Raumplan ideas of modernist architect Adolf Loos. Goldfinger himself designed much of the
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    218
    251 Menlove Avenue

    251 Menlove Avenue

    251 Menlove Avenue, named Mendips, was the childhood home of John Lennon, singer and songwriter with the Beatles, and is now preserved by the National Trust. Mendips is a 1930s semi-detached property in Woolton, South Liverpool, England. The house belonged to Lennon's Aunt Mimi and her husband George Smith. The couple took John in at the age of five, after his mother, who was living with her boyfriend, was persuaded that it would be better for Mimi and George to take care of him. He remained at Mendips until mid-1963, when he was 22 years old. Despite having purchased the childhood residence of Paul McCartney, the National Trust showed no interest in acquiring the Menlove Avenue property, claiming that, unlike McCartney's home, no Beatles' songs had been composed at Mendips. However McCartney recalls at least one song, I'll Get You, being written there. The property was eventually bought by Yoko Ono, Lennon's widow, who then donated it to the National Trust. After much restoration work to return it to a 1950s style, it was opened to the public on 27 March 2003. Said Ono, "When John's house came up for sale I wanted to preserve it for the people of Liverpool and John Lennon and
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    219
    Castle Howard

    Castle Howard

    Castle Howard is a stately home in North Yorkshire, England, 15 miles (24 km) north of York. One of the grandest private residences in Britain, most of it was built between 1699 and 1712 for the 3rd Earl of Carlisle, to a design by Sir John Vanbrugh. Although Castle Howard was built near the site of the ruined Henderskelfe Castle, it is not a true castle, but this term is often used for English country houses constructed after the castle-building era (c.1500) and not intended for a military function. Castle Howard has been the home of part of the Howard family for more than 300 years. It is familiar to television and movie audiences as the fictional "Brideshead", both in Granada Television's 1981 adaptation of Evelyn Waugh's Brideshead Revisited and a two-hour 2008 remake for cinema. Today, it is part of the Treasure Houses of England heritage group. The house is surrounded by a large estate which, at the time of the 7th Earl of Carlisle, covered over 13,000 acres (5,300 ha) and included the villages of Welburn, Bulmer, Slingsby, Terrington and Coneysthorpe. The estate was served by its own railway station, Castle Howard, from 1845 to the 1950s. The 3rd Earl of Carlisle first spoke
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    220
    Gamble House

    Gamble House

    The Gamble House, also known as David B. Gamble House, is a National Historic Landmark, a California Historical Landmark, and museum in Pasadena, California, USA. It was designed by brothers Charles Sumner Greene and Henry Mather Greene of the architectural firm Greene and Greene, and constructed 1908–09 as a home for David B. Gamble of the Procter & Gamble company. Originally intended as a winter residence for David and Mary Gamble, the three-story Gamble House is commonly described as America's Arts and Crafts masterpiece. Its style shows influence from traditional Japanese aesthetics and a certain California spaciousness born of available land and a permissive climate. The Arts and Crafts Movement in American Craftsman style architecture was focused on the use of natural materials, attention to detail, aesthetics, and craftsmanship. Rooms in the Gamble House were built using multiple kinds of wood; the teak, maple, oak, Port Orford cedar, and mahogany surfaces are placed in sequences to bring out contrasts of color, tone and grain. Inlay in the custom furniture designed by the architects matches inlay in the tile mantle surrounds, and the interlocking joinery on the main
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    Glyndebourne

    Glyndebourne

    Glyndebourne ( /ˈɡlaɪndbɔːn/) is a country house, thought to be about six hundred years old, located near Lewes in East Sussex, England. It is also the site of an opera house which, with the exception of its closing during the Second World War, for a few immediate post-war years, and in 1993 during the construction of the new theatre, has been the venue of the annual Glyndebourne Festival Opera since 1934. "There had been a manor house at Glynde Bourne (as it was often spelt) since the fifteenth century", but the exact age of the house is unknown. Some surviving timber framing and pre-Elizabethan panelling makes an early sixteenth-century date the most likely. In 1618, it came into the possession of the Hay family, passing to James Hay Langham in 1824. He inherited his father's baronetcy and estate in Northamptonshire in 1833 which under the terms of his inheritance should have led to him relinquishing Glyndebourne, but as a lunatic he was unable to do so. After litigation the estate passed to a relative, Mr Langham Christie, but he later had to pay £50,000 to persuade another relative to withdraw a rival claim. Langham Christie's son, William Langham Christie, made substantial
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    Penshurst Place

    Penshurst Place

    Penshurst Place is a historic building near Tonbridge, Kent, 32 miles (51 km) south east of London, England. It is the ancestral home of the Sidney family, and was the birthplace of the great Elizabethan poet, courtier and soldier, Sir Philip Sidney. The original medieval house is one of the most complete examples of 14th-century domestic architecture in England surviving in its original location. Part of the house and its gardens are open for public viewing. The ancient village of Penshurst was situated within the manor of that name: the manor appears as Penecestre or Penchester, a name adopted by Stephen de Penecestre, Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports, who possessed the manor towards the end of the 13th century. The present manor house was built in 1341 for Sir John de Pulteney, a London merchant and four-times Mayor of London who wanted a country residence within easy riding distance of London. This was at the time when such properties ceased to be castles: they were more dwellings that could be defended in an emergency. When Henry IV's third son, John, Duke of Bedford, occupied Penshurst, the second hall, known as the Buckingham Building, was built: so called after the
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    Port Eliot

    Port Eliot

    Port Eliot in St Germans, Cornwall, is the seat of the Eliot family, whose current head is Peregrine Eliot, 10th Earl of St Germans. Port Eliot comprises a house with its own church – which is the parish church of St Germans. An earlier church building was the cathedral for the whole of Cornwall. The house is within an estate of 6,000-acre (2,400 ha) which extends into the neighbouring villages of Tideford, Trerulefoot and Polbathic and is listed Grade I. Originally built as a priory with adjoining St Germans Priory Church parts of the house date back to the twelfth century. It was substantially altered and remodelled in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries by noted architects including Sir John Soane. In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the Eliot family invested heavily in the estate, building numerous farmhouses, fisherman's cottages and other dwellings across the land. Many of these remain part of the estate to this day and are rented out to local residents and friends of the family. Some properties, mainly lying remote from the estate, have been sold in recent years. In 1980 a small festival which had outgrown its site at Polgooth in mid-Cornwall approached the Port
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    Soho House

    Soho House

    Soho House grid reference SP053891, Matthew Boulton's home (from 1766 until he died in 1809) in Handsworth, Birmingham, England, is now a museum (opened in 1995), celebrating his life, his partnership with James Watt and his membership of the Lunar Society of Birmingham. It was designed by Samuel Wyatt and work on the current building began in 1789. Work on extending the building was completed in 1796 following the submission of designs by James Wyatt, Samuel's brother, for the additions of a main entrance front. It is a Grade II* listed building. Boulton acquired the lease of the five-year-old Soho Mill in 1761 and developed it into Soho Manufactory. He expanded the cottage next to it into Soho House, changing it several times. It is faced with sheets of painted slate to give the appearance of large stone blocks. Boulton moved in to Soho House when the Manufactory was completed in 1766. The Soho Manufactory was demolished in 1863. In 1766 Boulton became one of the founders of the Lunar Society of Birmingham. Soho House was a regular venue for meetings of the Lunar Society. As a Community Museum, that is branch museum, of the Birmingham Museums & Art Gallery it is owned and run by
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    Sudeley Castle

    Sudeley Castle

    Sudeley Castle is a castle located near Winchcombe, Gloucestershire, England. The present structure was built in the 15th century and may have been on the site of a 12th-century castle. The castle has a notable garden, which is designed and maintained to a very high standard. The chapel, St. Mary's Sudeley, is the burial place of Queen Catherine Parr (c. 1512–1548), the sixth wife of King Henry VIII, and contains her marble tomb. Unusual for a castle chapel, St Mary's of Sudeley is part of the local parish of the Church of England. Sudeley is also one of the few castles left in England that is still in residence. Because of this, the castle is only open to visitors on specific dates and private family quarters are closed to the public. Access to private apartments is available though through a guided tour. A castle may have been built on the site during the reign of King Stephen (1135–1154). In 1442, Ralph Boteler who was created Baron Sudeley by Henry VI of England, built the actual castle on its present site using what he had earned fighting in the Hundred Years' War. He built up quarters for servants and men at arms on the double courtyard that was surrounded by a moat. He also
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    Woodruff-Riter-Stewart Home

    Woodruff-Riter-Stewart Home

    The Woodruff-Riter-Stewart Home is a mansion on Capitol Hill in Salt Lake City, Utah. It sits on the corner of State Street and 200 North on the south slope of Capitol Hill. Originally built for Edward D. Woodruff, a Union Pacific doctor who partnered a successful laundry business, the home was designed by architects Headlund and Wood and was finished in 1906. The home is an example of Renaissance architecture. Originally, the house had an interior like an English home with stained glass, mahogany paneling (although it was cheap local pine painted to resemble mahogany), leather coverings, and mural-adorned walls. However, subsequent owners painted over all of the original interior. Likewise, the original red brick of the house was painted white for a time. Woodruff lived in the house his entire life and it was inherited by his daughter Leslie and her husband, General Franklin Riter, a noted local citizen. Riter was the first Utah attorney on the Board of the American Bar Association. He was also the US Judge Advocate in Germany. In 1950 the home was sold to DeVirl Stewart. For a time it was used for office space, but the building's interior and exterior is now restored.The building
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    Wormsley Park

    Wormsley Park

    Wormsley Park is a 2,500 acre (10 km²) estate and 18th century country house between Stokenchurch and Watlington in the Chiltern Hills of Buckinghamshire, England. It is the former home of the philanthropist Sir Paul Getty who moved to Wormsley in 1986. He undertook a restoration which lasted until 1991, and lived there until his death in 2003. It is now the home of Mark Getty and his family and the site of the cricket field known as Sir Paul Getty's Ground. Originally owned by the Scrope family since the late 16th century the estate belonged to Colonel Adrian Scrope the regicide. The house and estate was passed to his grandson John Scrope a baron of the Exchequer and as Scrope died without issue, his estate of Wormsley passed to the descendants of his sister Anne (died 1720), who had married Henry Fane of Brympton. Their second son, Thomas Fane, also a Bristol merchant, succeeded his uncle as Member of Parliament for Lyme Regis, beginning the Fane family's long association with the parliamentary seat of Lyme Regis. Fane also succeeded a distant cousin and became 8th Earl of Wesmoreland in 1762. The Fane family retained ownership of the house and estate until 1986 when they sold it
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    Wythenshawe Hall

    Wythenshawe Hall

    Wythenshawe Hall is a 16th-century medieval timber-framed historic house and former stately home in Wythenshawe, Manchester, England. It is east of Altrincham and south of Stretford, five miles (8 km) south of Manchester city centre, in Wythenshawe Park. The half-timbered Tudor house was the home of the Tatton family for almost 400 years. It was built in about 1540 by Robert Tatton of Chester. During the English Civil War, the hall was unsuccessfully defended by Robert Tatton against Cromwell's forces during the winter of 1643. After the war the Wythenshawe estate expanded to about 2,500 acres (10 km). In 1924 Robert Henry Grenville Tatton inherited the Wythenshawe estate and yielded to pressure from the then Manchester Corporation, who were in need of land for housing. The corporation bought 2,500 acres (1,000 ha) in 1926, and what used to be farmland became one of the largest housing estates in Europe. Wythenshawe Hall itself and 250 acres (100 ha) of its surrounding parkland were sold to Ernest Simon, who donated them to Manchester Corporation "to be used solely for the public good". The hall has been used as a museum since 1930. The park now houses, amongst other facilities, a
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    Clandon Park

    Clandon Park

    Clandon Park is an 18th century Palladian mansion in West Clandon just outside Guildford, Surrey, in the United Kingdom. It has been a National Trust property since 1956. The house was built, or perhaps thoroughly rebuilt, around 1730–33 (the latter date is on rainwater leads), designed by the Venetian architect Giacomo Leoni, replacing an Elizabethan property. The estate had been bought in 1641, together with Temple Court Farm at Merrow, by Sir Richard Onslow, MP for Surrey in the Long Parliament, from Sir Richard Weston, canal builder & pioneering agriculturalist, of nearby Sutton Place. The new building was commissioned by his great-grandson Thomas, 2nd Baron Onslow. Many members of the Onslow family followed political careers—three of them, including Arthur Onslow, were Speakers of the House of Commons. Clandon Park's interiors, which were finished into the 1740s, feature a two-storey Marble Hall, containing marble chimney pieces by English sculptor Michael Rysbrack. Since being presented to the National Trust, the house has been extensively restored and redecorated under the direction of John Fowler. The building now houses the fine collection of 18th century furniture and
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    Gracie Mansion

    Gracie Mansion

    Gracie Mansion is the official residence of the mayor of the City of New York. Built in 1799, it is located in Carl Schurz Park, at East End Avenue and Eighty-eighth Street in Manhattan. The mansion is on the shore of the East River, overlooking the channel known as Hell Gate. Archibald Gracie built the two-story wooden mansion in the Federal style. The design of the structure is attributed to Ezra Weeks, a prominent builder or John McComb, Jr., the architect of New York City Hall and Hamilton Grange, Alexander Hamilton's country home in Harlem, New York. By suggestion of Mayor Robert F. Wagner, Jr.'s wife Susan, plans were initiated for a new west wing, completed in 1966. The architect of the Susan B. Wagner Wing, as it is now called, was Mott B. Schmidt. Though criticized at the time for not being "modern," the wing has come to be regarded as an appropriate solution to the problem of expanding the small house for official functions. The Gracie Mansion Conservancy restored portions of the building during 1981-84, and made further restorations in 2002. A different building on approximately the same site was commandeered by George Washington during the American Revolutionary War, as
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    Lyme Park

    Lyme Park

    Lyme Park is a large estate located south of Disley, Cheshire. The estate is managed by the National Trust and consists of a mansion house surrounded by formal gardens, in a deer park in the Peak District National Park. The house is the largest in Cheshire, and has been designated by English Heritage as a Grade I listed building. The estate was granted to Sir Thomas Danyers in 1346 and passed to the Leghs of Lyme by marriage in 1388. It remained in the possession of the Legh family until 1946 when it was given to the National Trust. The house dates from the latter part of the 16th century. Modifications were made to it in the 1720s by Giacomo Leoni, who retained some of the Elizabethan features and added others, particularly the courtyard and the south range. It is difficult to classify Leoni's work at Lyme, as it contains elements of both Palladian and Baroque styles. Further modifications were made by Lewis Wyatt in the 19th century, especially to the interior. Formal gardens were created and developed in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The house, gardens and park have been used as locations for filming and they are open to the public. The Lyme Caxton Missal is on display
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    The Playboy Mansion

    The Playboy Mansion

    The Playboy Mansion (also known as the Playboy Mansion West) is the home of Playboy magazine founder Hugh Hefner. Located in the Holmby Hills area of Los Angeles, California, next to Beverly Hills. The mansion became famous during the 1970s through media reports of Hefner's lavish parties. The 21,987-square-foot (2,042.7 m) house is described as being in the "Gothic-Tudor" style by Forbes magazine, and sits on 5.3 acres (2.1 ha). It was built by architect Arthur R. Kelly in 1927 for Arthur Letts, Jr., son of The Broadway Department Store founder Arthur Letts and acquired by Playboy from Louis D. Statham (1908–1983), an engineer, inventor and chess aficionado, in 1971 for $US1.1 million ($US5.5 million in 2007 dollars). In early 2011 it was valued at $US54 million. It sits close to the northwestern corner of the Los Angeles Country Club, near UCLA and the Bel-Air Country Club. Fifteen million dollars has been invested in renovation and expansion. The mansion has 22 rooms including a wine cellar, a game room, a zoo and aviary (and related pet cemetery), tennis courts, a waterfall and a swimming pool area (including a patio and barbecue area, a grotto, a sauna and a bathhouse). These
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    Amport House

    Amport House

    Amport House, currently the British Armed Forces Chaplaincy Centre (AFCC), is a manor house (at grid reference SU296440) in the village of Amport, near Andover, Hampshire. The current house was built near the village of Amport in 1857 by the Marquess of Winchester and replaced two earlier houses built on the site. The gardens were designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens and planted by Gertrude Jekyll. The last of the family to reside at Amport was Henry Paulet, 16th Marquess of Winchester, marquess from 1899 to 1962. During World War II the house was taken over and used as the headquarters of Royal Air Force Maintenance Command. In 1962 the Royal Air Force Chaplains' School moved to Amport House from Dowdswell Court in Cheltenham. The School, which had included a Royal Navy chaplain staff member, became the tri-service Armed Forces Chaplaincy Centre in 1996 on the closure of the regimental Headquarters and depot of the Royal Army Chaplains' Department at Bagshot Park. A converted stable block of the house also holds the The Museum of Army Chaplaincy. The house is built in an Elizabethan style and is now a Grade II listed building, with the interior containing several Elizabethan features
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    Ascott House

    Ascott House

    Ascott House, sometimes referred to as simply Ascott, is situated in the hamlet of Ascott near Wing in Buckinghamshire, England. It is set in a 3,200-acre (13 km) estate. Ascott House was originally a farm house, built in the reign of James I and known as "Ascott Hall". In 1873 it was acquired by Baron Mayer de Rothschild (of the neighbouring Mentmore Towers estate). The Rothschild family had begun to acquire vast tracts of land in Buckinghamshire earlier in the century, on which they built a series of large mansions from 1852 onwards. Baron Mayer gave the house at Ascott to his nephew Leopold de Rothschild, who transformed it over the following decades into the substantial, but informal, country house it is today. Leopold de Rothschild, whose principal country residence was Gunnersbury Park, used Ascott at first as a hunting box, but realising the limitations imposed by its modest size, in 1874 he employed the architect George Devey to enlarge it. The present half-timbered house is largely the result of that commission. Devey attempted to design a house that rambled as though it had grown and developed over centuries. The project became a lifetime work for Devey as the house was
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    Bayard Cutting Arboretum State Park

    Bayard Cutting Arboretum State Park

    Bayard Cutting Arboretum State Park is an arboretum located in the hamlet of Great River, New York on Long Island. It was designed by Frederick Law Olmsted for William Bayard Cutting in 1887. The house at the heart of the park, Westbrook, is modeled on an English country house. Both the house and property were given to the people of Long Island by Bayard Cutting's widow and daughter "to provide an oasis of beauty and quiet for the pleasure, rest, and refreshment of those who delight in outdoor beauty; and to bring about a greater appreciation and understanding of the value and importance of informal planting". Charles Sprague Sargent, director of the Arnold Arboretum advised in developing the extensive conifer collection north of the carriage house. Some of the most mature planting was damaged in Hurricane Gloria in 1985. William Bayard Cutting's grandfather, Robert Cutting, had been Robert Fulton's partner in the ferry from Brooklyn to New York; they married sisters who were daughters of Walter Livingston. Cutting developed railroad interests in West India; his son was a pioneer in refining sugar from sugar beets. In 1895 Cutting and his brother installed a golf course at
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    Belton House

    Belton House

    Belton House is a Grade I listed country house in Belton near Grantham, Lincolnshire, England. The mansion is surrounded by formal gardens and a series of avenues leading to follies within a larger wooded park. Belton has been described as a compilation of all that is finest of Carolean architecture, the only truly vernacular style of architecture that England had produced since the Tudor period. The house has also been described as the most complete example of a typical English country house; the claim has even been made that Belton's principal facade was the inspiration for the modern British motorway signs which give directions to stately homes. Only Brympton d'Evercy has been similarly lauded as the perfect English country house. For three hundred years, Belton House was the seat of the Brownlow and Cust family, who had first acquired land in the area in the late 16th century. Between 1685 and 1688 Sir John Brownlow and his wife had the present mansion built. Despite great wealth they chose to build a modest country house rather than a grand contemporary Baroque palace. The contemporary, if provincial, Carolean style was the selected choice of design. However, the new house
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    Broadlands

    Broadlands

    Broadlands is an English country house, located near the town of Romsey in Hampshire, England, United Kingdom. The original manor and area known as Broadlands has belonged to Romsey Abbey since before the time of the 11-century English Norman Conquest. After the Dissolution of the Monasteries, Broadlands was sold to Sir Francis Fleming in 1547. His daughter married Edward St. Barbe, and the manor remained the property of the St. Barbe family for the next 117 years. Sir John St. Barbe made many improvements to the manor before it was left to his cousin Humphrey Sydenham in 1723. When Sydenham was ruined by the 18th-century South Sea Bubble, he proceeded to sell Broadlands to Henry Temple, 1st Viscount Palmerston in 1736. It was 1st Viscount Palmerston who began the deformalisation of the gardens between the river and the house and produced the (broad-lands) the "gentle descent to the river". In 1767 a major architectural "transformation" was begun by Lancelot "Capability" Brown, an architect and landscape designer, and completed by architect Henry Holland, which led to making Broadlands the Palladian-style mansion seen today. Henry Temple, 2nd Viscount Palmerston had requested that
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    Burlington House

    Burlington House

    Burlington House is a building on Piccadilly in London. It was originally a private Palladian mansion, and was expanded in the mid 19th century after being purchased by the British government. The main building is at the northern end of the courtyard and houses the Royal Academy, while five learned societies occupy the two wings on the east and west sides of the courtyard and the Piccadilly wing at the southern end. These societies, collectively known as the Courtyard Societies are: Burlington House is most familiar to the general public as the venue for the Royal Academy's temporary art exhibitions. The house was one of the earliest of a number of very large private residences built on the north side of Piccadilly, previously a country lane, from the 1660s onwards. The first version was begun by Sir John Denham in or just after 1665. It was a red-brick double-pile hip-roofed mansion with a recessed centre, typical of the style of the time, or perhaps even a little old fashioned. Denham may have acted as his own architect, or he may have employed Hugh May, who certainly became involved in the construction after the house was sold in an incomplete state in 1667 to Richard Boyle, 1st
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    Curwood Castle

    Curwood Castle

    Curwood Castle is a small castle, now a museum, located in Owosso, Michigan. Built in 1922, it was home to author James Oliver Curwood, who used one of the turrets as a writing studio. Jim Curwood was born in Owosso in 1878. He built this replica of a Norman chateau along the banks of the Shiawassee River near his home in Owosso in 1922 and 1923. The exterior is made of yellow stucco containing fieldstones he chose himself. The roof is slate with copper trim. The structure does not contain any eating or sleeping areas. He used the great room to entertain guests, including movie producers, and the largest turret as his writing studio. A hunter in his early years, Curwood later became a zealous conservationist, and was appointed to the Michigan Conservation Commission in 1926. He died a year later at age 48. In his will, the castle was given to the City of Owosso. It has served in various capacities over the years and is now a museum operated by the city, and is open to the public. Each year, the Curwood Festival takes place there to celebrate the life and works of James Oliver Curwood.
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    Dumbarton Oaks

    Dumbarton Oaks

    Dumbarton Oaks is a historic estate in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington, D.C.. It was the residence and gardens of Robert Woods Bliss (1875–1962) and his wife Mildred Barnes Bliss (1879–1969). The Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection was founded here by the Bliss couple, who gave the property to Harvard in 1940. It is currently administered by the Trustees for Harvard University. The research institute that has emerged from this bequest is dedicated to supporting scholarship in the fields of Byzantine, Pre-Columbian, and garden design and landscape architecture studies, especially through its research fellowships, meetings, exhibitions, and publications. Dumbarton Oaks also opens its gardens and museum collections to the public, and hosts public lectures and a concert series. The land of Dumbarton Oaks was formerly part of the Rock of Dumbarton grant that Queen Anne made in 1702 to Colonel Ninian Beall (ca. 1625-1717). About 1801, William Hammond Dorsey (1764–1818) built the first house on the property (the central block of the existing structure) and an orangery, and in the mid-nineteenth century, Edward Magruder Linthicum (1787–1869) greatly enlarged the
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    Elephant House

    Elephant House

    Elephant House, also known as the Edward Gorey House, is the home on Cape Cod that Edward Gorey, author, illustrator, puppeteer and playwright, lived and worked in when he left New York City. Located at 8 Strawberry Lane, Yarmouth Port, Massachusetts, USA 41°42′19″N 70°14′33″W / 41.70528°N 70.2425°W / 41.70528; -70.2425, the home currently serves as a museum celebrating the life and work of Edward Gorey. Gorey had a healthy respect and passion for animals, was an advocate for them, and contributed to animal welfare organizations. He loved cats in particular, thus the activities of the House, from art education to interactive exhibits, have a special focus on animal welfare. Gorey enjoyed collecting things of all sorts; some of them discarded objects found at the side of the road. These he loved to arrange and display on his porch and in the rooms of Elephant House. He also had a large collection of books and an overflowing library. A photo essay on these collections, the house itself, and Gorey’s life there, can be found in the book: Elephant House: Or, The Home of Edward Gorey by Kevin McDermott (Photographer). A schedule of exhibits at the house can be found at its website.
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    Filoli

    Filoli

    Filoli is a country house set in 16 acres (6.5 ha) of formal gardens surrounded by 654 acres (265 ha) estate, located in Woodside, California, about 25 miles (40 km) south of San Francisco, at the southern end of Crystal Springs Lake, on the eastern slope of the Santa Cruz Mountains. Now owned by the National Trust for Historic Preservation, Filoli is open to the public. The site is both a California Historical Landmark and listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Filoli was built between 1915 and 1917 for William Bowers Bourn II, owner of one of California's richest gold mines and president of Spring Valley Water Company, supplying San Francisco's water, and his wife, Agnes Moody Bourn. In 1910 they had bought an estate in County Kerry, Ireland, but wanted a country place nearer home. The principal designer, San Francisco architect Willis Polk, used a free Georgian style that incorporated the tiled roofs characteristic of California. Polk had previously designed Bourn's houses in Grass Valley and on Webster Street in San Francisco. Polk's friend Bruce Porter was commissioned to collaborate with the Bourns in planning the gardens, which were laid out between 1917 and
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    Hearst Castle

    Hearst Castle

    Hearst Castle is a National and California Historical Landmark mansion located on the Central Coast of California, United States. It was designed by architect Julia Morgan between 1919 and 1947 for newspaper magnate William Randolph Hearst, who died in 1951. In 1957, the Hearst Corporation donated the property to the state of California. Since that time it has been maintained as a state historic park where the estate, and its considerable collection of art and antiques, is open for public tours. Despite its location far from any urban center, the site attracts about one million visitors per year. Hearst formally named the estate "La Cuesta Encantada" ("The Enchanted Hill"), but usually called it "the ranch". Hearst Castle and grounds are also sometimes referred to as "San Simeon" without distinguishing between the Hearst property and the adjacent unincorporated area of the same name. Hearst Castle is located near the unincorporated community of San Simeon, California, approximately 250 miles (400 km) from both Los Angeles and San Francisco, and 43 miles (69 km) from San Luis Obispo at the northern end of San Luis Obispo County. The estate itself is five miles (eight kilometers)
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    Henry Francis DuPont Winterthur Museum

    Henry Francis DuPont Winterthur Museum

    Winterthur Museum and Country Estate is an American estate and museum in Winterthur, Delaware. As of 2011 it houses one of the most important collections of Americana in the United States of America. It was the former home of Henry Francis du Pont (1880–1969), a renowned antiques collector and horticulturist. Until recently, it was known as the "Henry Francis DuPont Winterthur Museum". In the early 20th century, H. F. du Pont and his father, Henry Algernon du Pont, designed Winterthur in the spirit of 18th- and 19th-century European country houses. The younger du Pont added to the home many times thereafter, increasing its number of rooms by nearly sixfold. After he established the main building as a public museum in 1951, he moved to a smaller building on the estate. Winterthur is situated on 979 acres (4 km²), near Brandywine Creek, with 60 acres (0.2 km²) of naturalistic gardens. It had 2,500 acres (10 km²) and a premier dairy cattle herd when du Pont operated it as a country estate. Initially a collector of European art and decorative arts in the late 1920s, H. F. du Pont became interested in American art and antiques. Subsequently, he became a highly prominent collector of
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    Kedleston Hall

    Kedleston Hall

    Kedleston Hall is an English country house in Kedleston, Derbyshire, approximately four miles north-west of Derby, and is the seat of the Curzon family whose name originates in Notre-Dame-de-Courson in Normandy. It has been a National Trust property since 1985, with members of the family residing in one wing and the Rectory House. The Curzon family have owned the estate at Kedleston since at least 1297 and have lived in a succession of manor houses near to or on the site of the present Kedleston Hall. The present house was commissioned by Sir Nathaniel Curzon (later 1st Baron Scarsdale) in 1759. The house was designed by the Palladian architects James Paine and Matthew Brettingham and was loosely based on an original plan by Andrea Palladio for the never-built Villa Mocenigo. At the time a relatively unknown architect, Robert Adam was designing some garden temples to enhance the landscape of the park; Curzon was so impressed with Adam's designs, that Adam was quickly put in charge of the construction of the new mansion. The design of the three-floored house is of three blocks linked by two segmentally curved corridors. The ground floor is rusticated, while the upper floors are of
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    Lansdowne House

    Lansdowne House

    Lansdowne House is a building to the southwest of Berkeley Square in central London, England. It was designed by Robert Adam as a private house and for most of its time as a residence it belonged to the Petty-FitzMaurice family, Marquesses of Lansdowne. Since 1935, it has been the home of the Lansdowne Club. The positioning of the property was rather unusual. It had a large front garden occupying the whole of the southern side of the square, which it faced side on. This arrangement gave Devonshire House on Piccadilly an open aspect to the square. Famous former owners or residents of Lansdowne House include: In the 1930s, the local council decided to construct a road link from Berkeley Square to Curzon Street. This necessitated the removal of all the front rooms of Lansdowne House. Adam's Drawing Room was removed and installed at the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Dining Room went to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. The house's collections, such as the Lansdowne Amazon and the Lansdowne Hercules, were also bought by American museums. The facade was rebuilt in a modified form at the front of the truncated house. A large office block was built on the front garden on the
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    Oak Hill

    Oak Hill

    Oak Hill is a mansion and plantation near Leesburg, Virginia that was for 22 years a home of James Monroe, the fifth U.S. President. The main mansion of the property was constructed in 1822 for Monroe, who subsequently split time between this estate and another home at Monroe Hill on the grounds of the University of Virginia after his term as President. The estate is a designated U.S. National Historic Landmark. Oak Hill was Monroe's only residence for three years, from 1827 to 1830, and it was one of his residences during 22 years. The mansion was built in 1820, during Monroe's presidency. Before that, Monroe's residence at the estate was the clapboard building known in recent years as the Monroe Cottage. The architecture is distinctive for "its unusual pentastyle portico". It is suggested that Thomas Jefferson, his close friend, may well have drawn plans for Oak Hill; the construction was supervised by James Hoban, designer and builder of the White House. Structures remaining from Monroe's time include the main house, the cottage, a smokehouse, springhouse, blacksmith's shop, a square barn, the stone Stallion Barn, and possibly the Brick House. Monroe and his uncle Joseph Jones
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    Paxton House

    Paxton House

    Paxton House is a historic house at Paxton, Berwickshire, in the Scottish Borders, a few miles south-west of Berwick-upon-Tweed, overlooking the River Tweed. It is a country house built for Patrick Home of Billie in an unsuccessful attempt to woo a Prussian heiress. Attributed to James Adam (possibly in concert with John Adam), it was built between 1758 and 1766, under the supervision of James Nisbet, with extensive interiors (c1773) by Robert Adam, as well as furniture by Thomas Chippendale. The East Wing was added in 1812-13 by architect Robert Reid to house the library and picture gallery. Formerly the seat of the Home of Paxton family, who became Foreman-Home, Milne-Home, and finally Home-Robertson as the direct male lines failed and the inheritance progressed through a female. In 1988, the last laird, John David Home Robertson, a socialist member of Parliament, placed the house and grounds into the Paxton House Historic Building Preservation Trust. It is now open to the public and is a Partner Gallery of the National Galleries of Scotland. Inside the halls of the Paxton House, lies a gallery. In the year 1780, Patrick Home of Wedderburn returned from his eight year long Grand
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    Scotney Castle

    Scotney Castle

    Scotney Castle is an English country house with formal gardens south-east of Lamberhurst in the valley of the River Bewl in Kent, England. It belongs to the National Trust. The gardens, which are a celebrated example of the Picturesque style, are open to the public. The central feature is the ruins of a medieval, moated manor house, Scotney Old Castle, which is on an island on a small lake. The lake is surrounded by sloping, wooded gardens with fine collections of rhododendrons, azaleas and kalmia for spring colour, summer wisteria and roses, and spectacular autumn colour. At the top of the garden stands a house which was built to replace the Old Castle between 1835 and 1843. This is known as Scotney New Castle, or simply Scotney Castle, and was designed by Anthony Salvin. It is an early, and unusually restrained, example of Tudor Revival architectural style in 19th century Britain. Following the death of the resident, Elizabeth Hussey, in 2006, this house was opened to the public for the first time on June 6, 2007. The earliest record from 1137 gives the owner of the estate as Lambert de Scoteni. Roger Ashburnham is credited with building the castle c.1378-80. Construction of the
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    Sudbury Hall

    Sudbury Hall

    Sudbury Hall is a country house in Sudbury, Derbyshire, England. Sudbury Hall is one the country's finest Restoration mansions and has Grade I listed building status. The Vernon family came to Sudbury as a result of the 16th century marriage of Sir John Vernon to Ellen Montgomery the Sudbury heiress. The house was built between 1660 and 1680 by George Vernon, grandfather of George Venables-Vernon the 1st Baron Vernon and is notable for its superb Great Staircase, fine Long Gallery, and portraits by John Michael Wright, and of Charles II's mistresses. Inside there are a mixture of architectural styles with beautiful carvings by Grinling Gibbons and Edward Pearce, murals by Louis Laguerre and elaborate plasterwork by Samuel Mansfield, James Pettifer and Robery Bradbury. The carvings above the main entrance porch were sculpted by William Wilson. There are formal gardens with a tree-fringed lake. The house was also used as the internal Pemberley scenes in the BBC dramatisation (1995) of Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice. The property was leased for three years from 1840 by Queen Adelaide, the widow of William IV of the United Kingdom. It is now owned and maintained by the National
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