Top List Curated by Listnerd
  • Public list
  • Nov 27th 2012
  • 4.312 views
  • 624 votes
  • 624 voters
  • 3%
Best Hospital of All Time

More about Best Hospital of All Time:

Best Hospital of All Time is a public top list created by Listnerd on Rankly.com on November 27th 2012. Items on the Best Hospital of All Time top list are added by the Rankly.com community and ranked using our secret ranking sauce. Best Hospital of All Time has gotten 4.312 views and has gathered 624 votes from 624 voters. Only owner can add items. Just members can vote.

Best Hospital of All Time is a top list in the Health & Fitness category on Rankly.com. Are you a fan of Health & Fitness or Best Hospital of All Time? Explore more top 100 lists about Health & Fitness on Rankly.com or participate in ranking the stuff already on the all time Best Hospital of All Time top list below.

If you're not a member of Rankly.com, you should consider becoming one. Registration is fast, free and easy. At Rankly.com, we aim to give you the best of everything - including stuff like the Best Hospital of All Time list.

Get your friends to vote! Spread this URL or share:

Items just added

    1
    Athens Lunatic Asylum

    Athens Lunatic Asylum

    The Athens Lunatic Asylum was a mental hospital operated in Athens, Ohio from 1874 until 1993. During its operation, the hospital provided services to a variety of patients including Civil War veterans, children, and violent criminals suffering from various mental disabilities. It is best known as a site of the infamous lobotomy procedure, as well as various supposed paranormal sightings. After the hospital's original structure closed, the state of Ohio acquired the property and renamed the complex and its surrounding grounds "The Ridges". According to The Guide of Repository Holdings, the term “The Ridges” was derived from a naming contest in 1984 to re-describe the area and its purpose. It began operation on January 9, 1874. Within two years of its opening, the hospital was renamed The Athens Hospital for the Insane. Later, the hospital would be called the Athens Asylum for the Insane, the Athens State Hospital, the Southeastern Ohio Mental Health Center, the Athens Mental Health Center, the Athens Mental Health and Mental Retardation Center, the Athens Mental Health and Developmental Center, and then (again) the Athens Mental Health Center. The facility also included divisions
    8.33
    6 votes
    2
    Siriraj

    Siriraj

    Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University (Thai: คณะแพทยศาสตร์ศิริราชพยาบาล) is the oldest and largest Medical School and oldest of any kind of university faculty in Thailand. The faculty is now part of Mahidol University. Founded in 1889, the faculty was run in coorporation with Siriraj Hospital, the first public hospital in Thailand, which provided the students the clinical experiences. The faculty's campus and hospital is in the Bangkok Noi district, Bangkok on the former Rear Palace[วังหลัง]. The medical school accepted about 250 students for the undergraduate education and more than 100 to postgraduate studies each year. The logo of the Siriraj Hospital and Medical School is the Naga curled into a shape of "ศ" (pronounce as "Sor-Sala"), the first Thai alphabet of the hospital name with the Royal Diadem on top of the Naga. Siriraj Hospital, the first public hospital in Siam, was founded in 1888 under commissions and subsidy of King Chulalongkorn, named after the deceased Prince Siriraj Kakuthpan. However, the modern medical practitioners were still lacked as they refused to came under government's employments. The medical school was established in May 1889 known
    9.20
    5 votes
    3
    Depot Field Hospital

    Depot Field Hospital

    Depot Field Hospital was one of seven hospitals operated at City Point, Virginia during the Siege of Petersburg during the American Civil War. The largest was the Depot Field Hospital which covered nearly 200 acres (800,000 m²) and could hold up to 10,000 patients. Twelve hundred tents, supplemented by ninety log barracks in the winter, comprised the compound, which included laundries, dispensaries, regular and special diet kitchens, dining halls, offices and other structures. Army surgeons administered the hospital aided by civilian agencies such as the United States Sanitary Commission and the U.S. Christian Commission. Male nurses, drawn from the ranks, made sure each patient had his own bed and wash basin; and regularly received fresh pillows and linens. The excellence of the facilities and the efficiency and dedication of the staff not only made the Depot Field Hospital the largest facility of its kind in America but also the finest.
    7.00
    7 votes
    4
    Toronto General Hospital

    Toronto General Hospital

    • Medical Specialties: Organ transplant
    The Toronto General Hospital (TGH), is a part of the University Health Network, and a major teaching hospital in downtown Toronto, Ontario. It is located in the Discovery District, directly north of the Hospital for Sick Children, across Gerrard Street West, and east of Princess Margaret Hospital and Mount Sinai Hospital, across University Avenue. They are steps from Queen's Park and the Queen's Park subway station. The West Wing of the hospital is now called the Harry Tchalikian Wing, pursuant to a generous donation made by an anonymous donor. The emergency department now treats 28,065 persons each year, while the hospital also houses the major transplantation service for Ontario, performing heart, lung, kidney, liver, pancreas and small intestine, amongst others, for patients referred from all over Canada. In doing this, the TGH teaches resident physicians, nurses, and technicians, and conducts research through the Toronto General Research Institute. Currently, Sophie, Countess of Wessex, as a member of the Canadian Royal Family, is patron of the hospital. The hospital started as a small shed in the old town and was used as a military hospital during the War of 1812, after which
    6.13
    8 votes
    5
    Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne

    Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne

    The Royal Children's Hospital (RCH) is a major children's hospital in Melbourne, Australia. As the major specialist paediatric hospital in Victoria, the Royal Children's Hospital provides a full range of clinical services, tertiary care and health promotion and prevention programs for children and young people. The hospital is the designated statewide major trauma centre for paediatrics in Victoria and a Nationally Funded Centre for cardiac and liver transplantation. Its campus partners are the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute and The University of Melbourne Department of Paediatrics, which are based onsite with the hospital. The hospital is surrounded by the parkland of Royal Park, with views of trees and lots of natural light. The hospital was established in 1870 and moved to its present site in Parkville on the corner of Flemington Road and Gatehouse Street in 1963. The Royal Children's Hospital was founded by Doctors John Singleton and William Smith, in response to their serious concerns about infant mortality in the fledgling city of Melbourne. The original "Free Hospital for Sick Children" was set up in a small house at 39 Stephen Street (now 49 Exhibition Street) and
    7.83
    6 votes
    6
    Thomas Jefferson University

    Thomas Jefferson University

    Thomas Jefferson University is a private health sciences university in Center City, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in the United States. The university consists of six constituent colleges and schools, Jefferson Medical College, Jefferson College of Graduate Studies, Jefferson School of Health Professions, Jefferson School of Nursing, Jefferson School of Pharmacy, and Jefferson School of Population Health. In 2011, the medical college (JMC) was ranked #42 among the nation's medical schools by U.S. News & World Report. During the early 19th century, several attempts to create a second medical school in Philadelphia had been stymied, largely due to the efforts of University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine alumni In an attempt to circumvent that opposition, a group of Philadelphia physicians led by Dr. George McClellan sent a letter to the trustees of Jefferson College in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania (now Washington & Jefferson College) in 1824, asking the College to establish a medical department in Philadelphia. The trustees agreed, establishing the Medical Department of Jefferson College in Philadelphia. In spite of a vigorous challenge, the Pennsylvania General Assembly granted an
    6.71
    7 votes
    7
    National Dental Centre

    National Dental Centre

    The National Dental Centre of Singapore (NDC; Chinese: 国牙科中心) is a modern facility in Singapore dedicated to delivering specialist oral healthcare services. Commencing operations on 1 March 1997, it offers the largest concentration of specialist expertise in a single facility. The Centre’s specialist teams sees over 700 walk-in and referred patients each day at its 92-chair facility, which also includes a day surgery suite. The Centre has three specialist clinical departments to attend to a wide range of different oral conditions, namely the Departments of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Orthodontics and Restorative Dentistry. Endodontics, Paediatric Dentistry, Periodontics and Prosthodontics are sub-units which may be found within the Department of Restorative Dentistry. Sub-speciality multidisciplinary services are available through NDC’s Centres for Corrective Jaw Surgery, Maxillofacial Rehabilitation and Facial Pain. The Centre is active in research as well as training activities, in particular the continuing professional education of dentists. Since 2002, NDC has been under the management of Singapore Health Services Pte Ltd. NDC is located within Singapore's premier
    7.50
    6 votes
    8
    St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

    St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

    • Medical Specialties: Pediatrics
    St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, founded in 1962, is a pediatric treatment and research facility focused on children's catastrophic diseases. It is located in Memphis, Tennessee, and is a nonprofit medical corporation chartered as a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization under IRS regulations. St. Jude was founded by entertainer Danny Thomas, with help from Dr. Lemuel Diggs and close friend, Miami Florida auto magnate Anthony Abraham., on the premise that "no child should die in the dawn of life". This idea resulted from a promise that Danny Thomas had made to a saint years before the hospital was founded. Thomas was a comedian, who was struggling to get a break in his career and living paycheck to paycheck. When his first child was about to be born, he attended a mass in Detroit and put his last $7 in the offering bin after being incredibly moved by the service. He prayed to St. Jude Thaddeus for a means to provide for his family, and about a week later, he obtained a gig that paid 10 times what he had put in the offering bin. After that time, Thomas believed in the power of prayer. He promised St. Jude Thaddeus that if he made him successful, he would one day build him a shrine.
    6.57
    7 votes
    9
    National Defence Medical Centre

    National Defence Medical Centre

    The National Defence Medical Centre(NDMC) was the national and largest hospital of the Canadian Forces in Ottawa, Canada. It served the needs of the members of the military. Constructed in 1961, it was closed in the 1990s due to budget cutbacks in National Defence and Veterans' Affairs Canada. The building now houses Canadian Forces Health Services Group Headquarters, the CF Health Services Centre Ottawa and other military units. All in-patient and surgical services for the Canadian Forces in the Ottawa region are done at the Civic Campus of The Ottawa Hospital where they have a 4 bed unit, and their own Operating Theater. It was announced in 2003 that they will be moving to 2 floors of the new Montfort Hospital.
    8.40
    5 votes
    10
    Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham

    Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham

    The Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham is an NHS hospital in the Edgbaston area of Birmingham, situated very close to the University of Birmingham. The hospital, which cost £545 million to construct, opened in June 2010 replacing the previous Queen Elizabeth Hospital and Selly Oak Hospital. The Trust employs more than 6,900 staff and provides adult services to more than half a million patients every year. It is named after Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother, who was Queen Consort and wife of King George VI from 1936 until his death in 1952. The hospital provides a whole range of services including secondary services for its local population and regional and national services for the people of the West Midlands and beyond. The hospital has the largest solid organ transplantation programme in Europe. It has the largest renal transplant programme in the United Kingdom and it is a national specialist centre for liver, heart and lung transplantation, as well as cancer studies. The hospital has the largest single-floor critical care unit in the world, with 100 beds and is the home of the Royal Centre for Defence Medicine for military personnel injured in conflict zones. It is also a
    7.17
    6 votes
    11
    Tyrone County Hospital

    Tyrone County Hospital

    Tyrone County Hospital (Irish: Otharlann Contae Thír Eoghain) is the main hospital in Omagh, County Tyrone, Northern Ireland. The hospital has occupied the same site in the town since 1899. As of 2009, the hospital is facing closure because of a decision of then Health Minister Bairbre de Brún. The Maternity, Paediatric and Intensive Care units have all been closed and children are not allowed to be taken into Accident & Emergency. Because of this, patients face travelling distances of approximately 43 km (27 mi) south to the Erne Hospital in Enniskillen (which has a smaller population than Omagh), 57 km (35 mi) north to Altnagelvin Area Hospital in Derry, or as far as Craigavon, which is over 80 km (50 mi) away. These journeys pose a risk to people requiring urgent treatment. Michael McGimpsey has so far defended the decision. As part of the campaign against the proposals to close the hospital, local GP Kieran Deeny was elected to the Northern Ireland Assembly on the single issue of retaining the hospital in the 2003 elections. On 15 October 2005, there was a mass protest outside the hospital, which made television news, both local and national newspapers and radio. On 28 November
    7.17
    6 votes
    12
    Grand River Hospital

    Grand River Hospital

    Grand River Hospital is a 495-bed hospital serving Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada and surrounding communities, primarily through the K-W Health Centre and the Freeport Health Centre, both located in Kitchener. The two health centres are formerly independent hospitals that merged in April 1995. The hospital also provides programs at the Guelph Dialysis Centre in Guelph, along with the Hazelglen Outreach Mental Health and the Waterloo Regional Withdrawal Management Centre in Kitchener. The K-W Health Centre is located on King Street West, near the Kitchener-Waterloo border. It was originally known as the Berlin-Waterloo Hospital, founded in 1895 on land donated by entrepreneur Joseph E. Seagram. It later changed its name to K-W Hospital. The Grand River Regional Cancer Centre opened at this site in 2003. The Freeport Health Centre is located on King Street East on the shore of the Grand River. It was formerly a tuberculosis sanatorium in the early 20th century, and in the late 1980s was transformed into a regional chronic care facility, as a new structure was built onto the previous one, expanding it. Cancer treatment, stroke recovery, breast clinic, gynaecology clinic, physical
    7.00
    6 votes
    13
    Royal Victoria Hospital

    Royal Victoria Hospital

    • Medical Specialties: Internal medicine
    The Royal Victoria Hospital (French: Hôpital Royal Victoria), or as it is popularly known, the "Royal Vic" or "The Vic", is a hospital in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. It is located at 687 Pine Avenue on the slope of Mount Royal in the borough of Ville-Marie. It has nine pavilions: Administrative (A), Centennial (C), Outpatient clinics (E), Women's (F), Hersey (H), Medical Labs (L), Medical (M), Surgical (S), and Ross (R). The A, E, and L pavilions form what was the original hospital and were designed by Henry Saxon Snell in the Scottish baronial style. The Royal Victoria Hospital was established in 1893, through the financial contributions of two Scottish immigrants, Donald Smith and George Stephen. The two men each provided half C$500,000 for the construction of the hospital on the condition that the City of Montreal sold ten acres of land on the slopes of Mount Royal. The hospital originally had 150 employees, including 14 medical doctors. The Scottish architect Henry Saxon Snell drew the plans for the building, inspired by the Scottish baronial style of the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh with its crenelated structures and turrets. The original part of the building was completed in
    9.25
    4 votes
    14
    Steinhof

    Steinhof

    Steinhof is a hospital in Vienna, Austria. It was originally a psychiatric hospital and center for pulmonology. The hospital lies in the 14th district of Vienna, Penzing, and was built according to the plans of architect Otto Wagner and opened in 1907. The building is made up of 60 pavilions that were designed by Carlo von Boog. The Kirche am Steinhof is located at the center of the compound. An art nouveau theater is found further in. In 2000, five health facilities were consolidated under the label Sozialmedizinisches Zentrum Baumgartner Höhe - Otto Wagner Spital mit Pflegezentrum (Baumgartner Höhe Social Medicine Center - Otto Wagner Hospital and Care Center). The five facilities are Förderpflegeheim Baumgartner Höhe (advancing care), Neurologisches Krankenhaus Maria-Theresien-Schlössl (neurology), Pflegeheim Sanatoriumstraße (nursing care), Psychiatrisches Krankenhaus Baumgartner Höhe (psychiatry), and Pulmologisches Zentrum Baumgartner Höhe (pulmonology). The center also hosts the Gedenkstätte zur Geschichte der NS-Medizin in Wien (Memorial to the History of Nazi-Medicine in Vienna) memorial and exhibition.
    8.00
    5 votes
    15
    Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

    Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

    • Medical Specialties: Internal medicine
    Originally established as Kaspare Cohn Hospital in 1902, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center is a non-profit, tertiary 958-bed hospital and multi-specialty academic health science centre located in West Hollywood, California, United States. Part of the Cedars-Sinai Health System, the hospital employs a staff of over 2,000 physicians and 10,000 employees. A team of 2,000 volunteers and more than 40 community groups support a patient-base of over 16,000 people. Over 350 residents and fellows participate in more than 60 graduate medical education programs. Cedars-Sinai focuses on biomedical research and technologically advanced medical education — based on an interdisciplinary collaboration between physicians and clinical researchers. The facility has research centers covering cardiovascular, genetics, gene therapy, gastroenterology, neuroscience, immunology, surgery, organ transplantation, stem cells, biomedical imaging and cancer — with more than 800 research projects underway (led by 230 Principal Investigators). Certified as a level I trauma center for adults and pediatrics, Cedars-Sinai trauma-related services range from prevention to rehabilitation and are provided in concert with the
    7.80
    5 votes
    16
    Karolinska University Hospital

    Karolinska University Hospital

    The Karolinska University Hospital (Swedish: Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset) is a university hospital in Stockholm, Sweden, with two major sites in the municipalities of Huddinge and Solna. The present day Karolinska University Hospital is the result of a 2004 merger between the former Huddinge University Hospital (Huddinge Universitetssjukhus) in Huddinge, south of Stockholm, and the Karolinska Hospital (Karolinska Sjukhuset) in Solna, north of Stockholm. The new hospital has about 15,000 employees and 1,700 patient beds. The Karolinska University Hospital is closely affiliated with the Karolinska Institute (Karolinska institutet). It incorporates the Astrid Lindgren Children’s hospital in Solna and the Children’s Hospital in Huddinge. The facilities of the Karolinska University Hospital in Solna is in the process of becoming replaced by The New Karolinska Solna University Hospital, to be completed by 2015.
    7.60
    5 votes
    17
    Epworth Hospital

    Epworth Hospital

    Epworth HealthCare is a provider of acute medical, surgical and rehabilitation services in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. The group has four divisions: Epworth Richmond, Epworth Eastern, Epworth Cliveden, Epworth Freemasons and Epworth Rehabilitation, with rehabilitation sites at Richmond, Camberwell and Brighton. With over 1,200 beds and more than 4,000 staff, Epworth HealthCare is Victoria’s largest not-for-profit private hospital group. Epworth Hospital opened in March 1920, as a community hospital initiated by the Annual Methodist Conference. A donation of £6,000 by Sir Aaron Danks led to the purchase of the mansion “Yallcowinna”, situated in one and half acres of gardens in Richmond. Renovations to convert the mansion into a hospital cost £3,324, part of which was donated by Dr. Georgina Sweet and her father in memory of Dr. Margaret Sweet who “gave her life during the 1919 influenza epidemic”. The influence of the Methodist traditions can be found in the name Epworth, as this was the name of the village where John Wesley, founder of the Methodist Church, was born. There proved to be such a need for the hospital that within five months patients were being turned away and the
    8.75
    4 votes
    18
    Kings Park Psychiatric Center

    Kings Park Psychiatric Center

    The Kings Park Psychiatric Center, known by Kings Park locals simply as 'The Psych Center', is a former state-run psychiatric hospital located in Kings Park, New York. It operated from 1885 until 1996, when the State of New York closed the facility, releasing its few remaining patients or transferring them to the still-operational Pilgrim Psychiatric Center. The Kings Park Psychiatric Center was established in 1885 by Kings County in nearby Suffolk County, adjoining the "Society of St. Johnland" established by William Augustus Muhlenberg, prior to the merger of Kings County with Queens County, New York County, Richmond County, and the Bronx County, to form the modern New York City. The official name of the hospital in its first ten years was the "Kings County Asylum," taken from the name of the county that Brooklyn occupied. The hospital was revolutionary at the time in the sense that it was a departure from the asylums of folklore, which were overcrowded places where gross human-rights abuses often occurred. The asylum, built by Brooklyn to alleviate overcrowding in its own asylums, was a "Farm Colony" asylum, where patients worked in a variety of farm-related activities, such as
    10.00
    3 votes
    19
    Princess Margaret Hospital

    Princess Margaret Hospital

    • Medical Specialties: Oncology
    Princess Margaret Hospital is located in downtown Toronto, Ontario, Canada on University Avenue at College Street. It is part of the University Health Network. Located in the city's Discovery District, Princess Margaret is a cancer research hospital fully affiliated with the University of Toronto, and is under royal patronage of Anne, Princess Royal, as a member of the Canadian Royal Family. The hospital was named after Princess Margaret, sister of Queen Elizabeth II. The hospital specializes in the treatment of cancer, and offers the majority of its services to residents of the Greater Toronto Area. It frequently hosts patients from other parts of Canada for access to a high calibre of treatment.. In particular, the hospital offers expertise in the fields of surgical oncology, medical oncology including bone marrow transplantation, radiation oncology, psychosocial oncology, medical imaging, and radiation therapy. The hospital houses one of the largest radiation therapy departments in the world. It has 17 radiation treatment machines, all of which are equipped with the latest technologies, a superficial ortho-voltage X-Ray machine, and operates a Gamma Knife stereotactic
    8.50
    4 votes
    20
    Piedmont Sanatorium

    Piedmont Sanatorium

    Piedmont Sanatorium was a rest home for tubercular African Americans in Burkeville, Virginia from 1917 to 1965. It was the first facility of its kind ever to be established in the United States. The Sanatorium later became the site of Piedmont Geriatric Hospital. Tuberculosis was the leading cause of death in the early twentieth century, accounting for one out of every 10 deaths . Those infected with the disease were isolated from society in sanatoriums. These self-contained communities became known as "waiting rooms for death." Piedmont Sanatorium was established circa 1917 in Burkeville, Virginia as a rest home for blacks suffering from tuberculosis. Concerns about the health of whites were what led to its construction. In the 1910s, as increasing urbanization began bringing whites and blacks into closer contact, Virginia health officials started compiling evidence of the "Negro Health Problem" - high disease, death, and maternal and infant mortality rates among blacks. Hard physical labor along with poor diet and sanitation contributed to the problem. Disease flourished in the crowded black neighborhoods, where garbage piled up, sewage went untreated, and running water was often
    6.33
    6 votes
    21
    Val-de-Grâce

    Val-de-Grâce

    This article describes the hospital and former abbey. For the main article on Mansart and Lemercier's central church, see Church of the Val-de-Grâce. The Val-de-Grâce (Hôpital d'instruction des armées du Val-de-Grâce or HIA Val-de-Grâce) is a military hospital located in the 5th arrondissement of Paris, France . The church of the Val-de-Grâce (48°50′26″N 2°20′31″E / 48.84056°N 2.34194°E / 48.84056; 2.34194) was built by order of Queen Anne of Austria, wife of Louis XIII. After the birth of her son Louis XIV, Anne (previously childless after 23 years of marriage) showed her gratitude to the Virgin Mary by building a church on the land of a Benedictine convent. Louis XIV himself is said to have laid the cornerstone for the Val-de-Grâce in a ceremony that took place April 1, 1645, when he was seven years old. The church of the Val-de-Grâce, designed by François Mansart and Jacques Lemercier, is considered by some as Paris's best example of baroque architecture (curving lines, elaborate ornamentation and harmony of different elements). Construction began in 1645, and was completed in 1667. The Benedictine nuns provided medical care for injured revolutionaries during the French
    7.20
    5 votes
    22
    Massachusetts General Hospital

    Massachusetts General Hospital

    • Medical Specialties: Internal medicine
    Massachusetts General Hospital (Mass General or MGH) is the primary teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School and a biomedical research facility located in the West End neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts. With the opening of the Lunder Building in 2011, it is the largest hospital in New England with 1,051 beds. It has most recently been ranked as the top hospital overall in the United States by U.S. News & World Report. It is ranked nationally in all adult specialties as well as four pediatric specialties. MGH was the original teaching affiliate of Harvard Medical School and is currently one of over a dozen hospitals affiliated with HMS. MGH is owned by Partners HealthCare, which was formed by MGH and Brigham and Women's Hospital in 1994. MGH is also a member of the consortium which operates Boston MedFlight. MGH is affiliated with the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute through Dana-Farber/Partners Cancer Care and the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center. Founded in 1811, the original hospital was designed by the famous American architect Charles Bulfinch. It is the third-oldest general hospital in the United States, only Pennsylvania Hospital (1751) and NewYork–Presbyterian Hospital
    8.25
    4 votes
    23
    Royal Liverpool University Hospital

    Royal Liverpool University Hospital

    The Royal Liverpool University Hospital (RLUH) is a large teaching hospital and the main hospital serving the city of Liverpool, England. Along with Broadgreen Hospital, the hospital operates on behalf of the Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospital NHS Trust and is associated with the University of Liverpool and Liverpool John Moores University. The building was constructed by Alfred McAlpine between 1966 and 1978 on a site opposite the old Liverpool Royal Infirmary. It has the largest accident and emergency department of its kind in the country. The Hospital was officially opened by Princess Alexandra. In 2000, The Linda McCartney Centre, a cancer clinic, had its grand opening at The Royal Liverpool University Hospital. The main hospital building is earmarked for demolition in 2012 when a £451 million complex is expected to be built on the same site. In 2007, the Healthcare Commission rated Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals NHS Trust "Good" for 'Quality of Services' and Good for 'Use of Resources'. In 2009, Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals NHS Trust was rated "Excellent" for the quality of its services and the quality of its
    8.25
    4 votes
    24
    Montfort Hospital

    Montfort Hospital

    The Montfort Hospital is a hospital in Ottawa, Canada. It is noted for being one of a few fully bilingual hospitals in the province of Ontario. The hospital was founded in 1953 by the Filles de la Sagesse Catholic order and was named after one of its founders Saint Louis-Marie Grignion de Montfort. It was secularized in 1970. In the late 1980s it was rebuilt with a large modern section added. In February 1997 the Health Services Restructuring Commission, appointed by the provincial government of Mike Harris, announced that the hospital would be closed in 1999 alongside the Riverside and Grace Hospital due to lack of funding at the Provincial level. This caused an outcry in the Franco-Ontarian community. Quebec premier Lucien Bouchard and Prime Minister Jean Chrétien both lent their support to keeping the hospital open. Quebec Liberal leader Daniel Johnson and federal Progressive Conservative leader Jean Charest also asked Harris to keep the hospital open. The Tory government asserted that francophone access to medical service would be fully available at the bilingual Ottawa Hospital and that the 200 bed Montfort was too small to operate efficiently. Harris criticized Bouchard and
    7.00
    5 votes
    25
    National Jewish Medical and Research Center

    National Jewish Medical and Research Center

    National Jewish Health (previously National Jewish Medical and Research Center) is a research institute located in Denver, Colorado specializing in respiratory, immune and allergic research and treatment. It was founded in 1899 to treat tuberculosis, and is today considered one of the world's best medical research and treatment centers. It is a non-sectarian institution but received funding from B'nai B'rith until the 1950s. Today, clinical functions at National Jewish are limited to research, diagnosis, and ambulatory outpatient care. By the late 19th century, Colorado and the American Southwest had become famous for the health benefits of a dry, sunny climate. At that time, the only known treatment for tuberculosis (TB) was clean air and sunshine and hundreds of people with tuberculosis descended upon Denver in hopes of finding a miracle cure for what was then the nation’s leading cause of death. Consequently, many TB sufferers spent their last dollars coming to Colorado. By the 1890s, it was estimated that one out of every three residents of the state was there for respiratory reasons. However, no facilities existed to provide treatment or shelter to these victims. In Denver,
    9.33
    3 votes
    26
    Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital

    Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital

    The Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital (Groupe hospitalier Pitié-Salpêtrière) is a celebrated teaching hospital in Paris. Part of the Assistance publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, it is one of Europe's largest hospitals. It is where Diana, Princess of Wales, died in August 1997 following a car crash. The Salpêtrière was originally a gunpowder factory ("salpêtre" being a constituent of gunpowder), but was converted to a dumping ground for the poor of Paris. It served as a prison for prostitutes, and a holding place for the mentally disabled, criminally insane, epileptics, and the poor; it was also notable for its population of rats. In 1656, Louis XIV charged the architect Libéral Bruant to build a hospital on the location of the factory, founding the Hospice de la Salpêtrière. The building was expanded in 1684. By the eve of the Revolution, it had become the world's largest hospital, with a capacity of 10,000 patients plus 300 prisoners, largely prostitutes swept from the streets of Paris. From La Salpêtrière they were paired with convicts and forcibly expatriated to New France. During the September massacres of 1792, the Salpêtrière was stormed on the night of 3/4 September by a mob from the
    9.33
    3 votes
    27
    Fremantle Hospital

    Fremantle Hospital

    Fremantle Hospital is a 24 hour acute-care public teaching hospital situated in central Fremantle, Western Australia, south of Perth. Fremantle Hospital and Health Service provides 575 beds across all campuses, including a 66 bed psychiatric and psychogeriatric service. The main facility of Fremantle hospital looks out over the nearby fishing boat harbour, the Port of Fremantle and the Indian Ocean. The hospital is also within walking distance of the Fremantle Markets, and Fremantle Oval, home of the Fremantle Dockers.
    8.00
    4 votes
    28
    Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

    Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

    The Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, (established in 1975, in Seattle, Washington) is one of the world’s leading cancer research institutes. Its interdisciplinary teams of scientists conduct research in the laboratory, at patient bedside, and in communities throughout the world to advance the prevention, early detection, and treatment of cancer and other diseases. The Center's mission is "the elimination of cancer and related diseases as causes of human suffering and death". Center researchers pioneered bone-marrow transplantation for leukemia and other blood diseases. This research has cured thousands of patients worldwide and has boosted survival rates for certain forms of leukemia from zero to as high as 85 percent. The Center grew out of the Pacific Northwest Research Foundation, founded in 1956 by Dr. William Hutchinson. The Foundation was dedicated to the study of heart surgery, cancer, and diseases of the endocrine system. In 1964, Dr. Hutchinson's brother Fred Hutchinson, who had been a baseball player for the Seattle Rainiers and Detroit Tigers and later managed the Rainiers, the Tigers, the St. Louis Cardinals and the Cincinnati Reds, died of lung cancer. The next
    6.80
    5 votes
    29
    Evelina Children's Hospital

    Evelina Children's Hospital

    Evelina Children's Hospital is a specialist NHS hospital in London. It is administratively a part of Guy’s & St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust and provides teaching hospital facilities for King's College London. Formerly housed at Guy's Hospital, it moved to a new building alongside St Thomas' Hospital, opened on 31 October 2005. The hospital was founded in 1869 (as Evelina Hospital for Sick Children) by Baron Ferdinand de Rothschild, whose wife, Evelina, and their child had died in premature labour. It was established in a purpose-built hospital in Southwark Bridge Road, Southwark, opposite what was originally the headquarters of the London Fire Brigade at 94 Southwark Bridge Road. It was nationalised in 1948, becoming a branch of Guy's Hospital. In 1976 the original hospital building was closed, and the children's wards were moved to the newly built Guy's Tower. The original buildings have since been demolished, and the site is currently a green space. In 1999 a decision was made to re-establish Evelina Children's Hospital as a new specialist hospital for all children's services at Guy’s & St Thomas', on the site of a former nurses' home. An architectural design competition was
    9.00
    3 votes
    30
    Queen Elizabeth II Jubilee Hospital

    Queen Elizabeth II Jubilee Hospital

    The Queen Elizabeth II Jubilee Hospital (QE II) is a public hospital located in Coopers Plains, Brisbane, Australia. The hospital originally was developed to be a site for future expansion of the Mater Children's Hospital, a center for servicing the needs of the Commonwealth Games held nearby and a range of other initiatives that never eventuated. At one point in its history it was almost closed but after vigorous protests by the local community it was reopened and continues as an elective surgical hospital and an active general medical facility. In 2007 it became part of the newly formed Brisbane South Health District and the QEII Hospital Health Service District will no longer exist. QEII Hospital will be part of four hospital services including Beaudesert, Logan, Bayside and QEII. There was also a proposal to build a stand alone 'surgicentre' at QEII to provide for increased elective surgery. The eventual outcome was a range of internal redevelopments including an enhanced outpatients area, a new ward, an additional operating theatre and considerable infrastructure upgrades. In January 2008 it was announced that the Federal Government would provide funding of $2 Billion for
    7.75
    4 votes
    31
    St Mary's Hospital, Manchester

    St Mary's Hospital, Manchester

    • Medical Specialties: Gynecology
    St Mary's Hospital is a hospital in Manchester, England. It is part of Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. It was founded in 1790. St Mary's provides a unique range of inter-related services specifically for women and children. Out-patient and in-patient facilities exist to provide mainstream and speciality services in the areas of: In addition, the Sexual Assault Referral Centre, also based at St Mary's, represents a unique collaboration between Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and the Greater Manchester Police Authority. The Centre accepts emergency or self referrals from adults who have been raped or sexually assaulted. St Mary's Hospital is headed by a Clinical Director and a Divisional Director. The multi-disciplinary approach adopted by clinicians aims to provide the highest standard of care for mother and child. More than 1200 staff, including doctors, nurses, midwives, clinical and non-clinical support staff work in St Mary's Hospital. A range of clinical and non clinical support services are based at the site to support the work undertaken, including well established departments of radiology and physiotherapy. As a
    7.75
    4 votes
    32
    Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital

    Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital

    The Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital (NNUH) is a National Health Service academic teaching hospital located on the Norwich Research Park off the A11 road and the Watton Road (B1108) on the southern outskirts of Norwich, England. The university hospital replaced the former, Norfolk and Norwich Hospital, which was founded in 1771, and the West Norwich Hospital. The Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital was built under the Private Finance Initiative (PFI), and opened in late 2001: it has 987 acute beds and offers a wide range of NHS acute health services plus private patient facilities. It is one of the largest hospitals in the United Kingdom in terms of in-patient capacity. The hospital is part of the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. NNUH was the first new NHS teaching hospital built in England for more than 30 years and the hospital trust is a joint venture partner in the University of East Anglia School of Medicine, Health Policy and Practice. The hospital is a teaching centre for nurses (adult and children's), midwives, doctors, therapists and operating department practitioners. It hosts the Norwich GP speciality training scheme. On 11
    6.60
    5 votes
    33
    Changi General Hospital

    Changi General Hospital

    Changi General Hospital (Abbreviation: CGH; Chinese: 樟宜综合医院; Malay: Hospital Besar Changi) is a 790-bed hospital located in Simei, eastern Singapore. It is Singapore's first purpose-built general hospital to serve communities in the east and north-east regions. The hospital has a comprehensive range of more than 23 medical services, from general surgery, internal medicine, cardiology, ENT to orthopaedic surgery and sports medicine. It houses six specialist centres – Breast Centre, Changi Sports Medicine Centre, Diabetes Centre, Geriatric Centre, Integrated Sleep Service and Medical Centre for International Travellers. The hospital is JCI (Joint Commission International) accredited. On 15 February 1997, the Old Changi Hospital merged with Toa Payoh Hospital to form New Changi Hospital and began to move into the present premises. The hospital was declared officially opened on 28 March 1998 by then Deputy Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong. Under Singapore’s public healthcare restructuring, the hospital became part of the Singapore Health Services (SingHealth) cluster in 2000. Over the years, the hospital expanded its clinical services to include Sports Medicine, Dermatology,
    7.50
    4 votes
    34
    Victoria Hospital for Sick Children

    Victoria Hospital for Sick Children

    Victoria Hospital for Sick Children is a building in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. It was built in 1892 by the architectural firm of Darling and Curry, and served as the hospital that is now called Hospital for Sick Children (or "SickKids") until 1951. The construction of the five-storey building was a very important step in the history of the hospital since it was previously located in a small downtown house which was rented for sixteen years by Elizabeth McMaster, the founder of the hospital, with support from a group of Toronto women (Toronto Archives). The invention of pablum, the introduction of incorporated x-rays in 1896, and the origins of the battle for compulsory milk pasteurization in 1908 occurred in this building (Adams 206). Since 1993, it has been home to Canadian Red Cross Regional Blood Centre and the later the Canadian Blood Services Regional Blood Centre. It is located at the corner of College and Elizabeth streets, near the Toronto General Hospital. The building, which is made of sandstone, expresses the mood of the late 1880s when, under the influence of American architecture, Richardsonian Romanesque became a new trend in the design of buildings. In essence, as
    7.50
    4 votes
    35
    Clarke Institute of Psychiatry

    Clarke Institute of Psychiatry

    • Medical Specialties: Psychiatry
    The Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (College St. Site) is a psychiatric hospital in Toronto, Ontario. Much of their work focuses on forensic psychology, sex addiction, drug addiction, and research designed to shape public policy. The hospital was originally named the Clarke Institute of Psychiatry, after Charles Kirk Clarke, a pioneer in mental health in Canada. In 1998, it merged with several other Ontario institutions to form the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH), and the facility is now called the CAMH College St. Site. It is located on College Street.
    8.67
    3 votes
    36
    Kirkbride Plan

    Kirkbride Plan

    The Kirkbride Plan refers to a system of mental asylum design advocated by Philadelphia psychiatrist Thomas Story Kirkbride in the mid-19th century. The establishment of state mental hospitals in the U.S. is partly due to reformer Dorothea Dix, who testified to the Massachusetts legislature in 1844, vividly describing the state's treatment of people with mental illness: they were being housed in county jails, private homes and the basements of public buildings. Dix's effort led to the construction of the New Jersey State Lunatic Asylum, the first asylum built on the Kirkbride Plan. Kirkbride developed his requirements based on a philosophy of Moral Treatment. The typical floor plan, with long rambling wings arranged en echelon (staggered, so each connected wing received sunlight and fresh air), was meant to promote privacy and comfort for patients. The building form itself was meant to have a curative effect: "a special apparatus for the care of lunacy, [whose grounds should be] highly improved and tastefully ornamented." The idea of institutionalization was thus central to Kirkbride's plan for effectively treating patients with mental illnesses. The asylums tended to be large,
    8.67
    3 votes
    37
    Royal Perth Hospital

    Royal Perth Hospital

    Royal Perth Hospital (RPH) is an 855-bed teaching hospital located on the northeastern edge of the CBD of Perth, Western Australia (31°57′15″S 115°51′59″E / 31.95417°S 115.86639°E / -31.95417; 115.86639). Royal Perth Hospital also has specialised rehabilitation facilities at Shenton Park. The Hospital traces its history back to the first colonial hospital which was established in a tent on Garden Island, just off the coast of Western Australia, in June 1829. In June 1830, the hospital tent was re-erected in Cathedral Avenue, Perth. From 1833 a more substantial colonial hospital operated for a short time from a rented room in a private house. Six years later, in December 1840, this was re-opened in a building formerly used as stables on the corner of St Georges Terrace and Irwin Street. The Hospital commenced operations on its present site on 14 July 1855 and was formally named the Colonial Hospital. In the years since, the Hospital has been known variously as the Perth Public Hospital, the Perth Hospital and finally, from 1946, as Royal Perth Hospital. During 2005 the Western Australian Government announced plans to relocate RPH operations to purpose built facilities in Murdoch,
    8.67
    3 votes
    38
    SUNY Downstate Medical Center

    SUNY Downstate Medical Center

    SUNY Downstate Medical Center, located in central Brooklyn, New York, is the only academic medical center for health education, research, and patient care serving Brooklyn’s 2.5 million residents. As of Fall 2011, it had a total student body of 1,738 and approximately 8,000 faculty and staff. Downstate Medical Center comprises a College of Medicine, Colleges of Nursing and Health Related Professions, Schools of Graduate Studies and Public Health, and University Hospital of Brooklyn. It also includes a major research complex and biotechnology facilities. SUNY Downstate ranks eighth nationally in the number of alumni who are on the faculty of American medical schools. More physicians practicing in New York City graduated from Downstate than from any other medical school. With 1,040 residents (young physicians in training), Downstate's residency program is the 16th largest in the country. SUNY Downstate Medical Center is the fourth largest employer in Brooklyn. Eighty-six percent of its employees are New York City residents; 68 percent live in Brooklyn. The medical center's total direct, indirect, and induced economic impact on New York State is in excess of $2 billion. SUNY Downstate
    8.67
    3 votes
    39
    Ashworth Hospital

    Ashworth Hospital

    Ashworth Hospital is a high-security psychiatric hospital at Maghull in the Metropolitan Borough of Sefton on Merseyside, England. Ashworth is one of only three high-security specialist psychiatric hospitals in England and Wales, alongside Rampton and Broadmoor, that exist to work with people who require treatment due to their "dangerous, violent or criminal propensities". It is managed by Mersey Care NHS Trust. Ashworth was formed from the merger of the old Moss Side Hospital (originally a learning-disability unit once used for the treatment of shell shock in World War I) and the vastly more modern and considerably more appropriate Park Lane Hospital, opened as a Broadmoor overspill unit in the early 1970s. The hospital has had a mixed history and has been the subject of two major public inquiries: Blom-Cooper in 1992 and Fallon in 1998. It currently houses some 275 male patients. The old East site of the hospital has been leased to Her Majesty's Prison Service, and is now the location of HMP Kennet. In the surrounding area of Maghull, Lydiate, Melling and beyond, Ashworth is noted for the weekly test of its alarm system, sounded at 9:00 am every Monday morning. Such an alarm
    10.00
    2 votes
    40
    Eden Hospital

    Eden Hospital

    Eden Hospital, established in 1881, houses the Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Medical College Kolkata, India. The gynecological & midwifery care at Medical College received a great boost with the establishment of the Eden Hospital in 1881. The admission of patients started from 17 July 1882 with accommodation for 41 European and 42 Indians. This was the largest obstetrics & gynecological ward in the whole of Asia. The Eden Hospital extension was completed in 1931 to accommodate a further 38 patients. In 1933, the trustees of the Estate of the late Mary Helena Mauger of Darjeeling donated Rs 3,07,00 for Eden Hospital. Two hostels for junior doctors, namely Bonophool Hostel & Eden Roof Hostels, were built above the 3rd floor of the Eden Hospital in the 1970s.
    10.00
    2 votes
    41
    Eloise

    Eloise

    Eloise was a psychiatric hospital located in southeastern Michigan. It operated from 1839 to the early 1980s, and housed not only the mentally ill, but poor and sick people as well. At its prime, Eloise consisted of 78 buildings and 902 acres (3.7 km²) of land. Now only ruins, an unmarked cemetery, sewer lids with "Eloise Hospital" engraved on them, and 4 of the original 78 buildings remain. Eloise was voted into existence as a poor house by Detroit voters in 1832. In 1839, Wayne county added a former stagecoach stop to the complex. It wasn't until 1911 that Eloise gained its most famous name from the near-by post office. In the 1930s Eloise was running at its best. The psychiatric hospital was self-sufficient, containing a dairy farm, its own fire department, and over 7000 people. In 1984 Eloise officially closed its doors and rapidly went into decay. There are now four buildings standing to this day. The Kay Beard Building faces front to Michigan Avenue. This building was a hospital, in which the patients would live on the top floors, and the nurses and manager lived on the bottom two floors. The manager's office is the first door on your left when you walk in. The other
    10.00
    2 votes
    42
    Royal Adelaide Hospital

    Royal Adelaide Hospital

    • Medical Specialties: Pulmonology
    The Royal Adelaide Hospital (RAH) is Adelaide's largest hospital, with 680 beds. Founded in 1840, the Royal Adelaide provides tertiary health care services for South Australia and provides secondary care clinical services to residents of Adelaide's city centre and inner suburbs. The hospital is situated in the Adelaide Park Lands on the north side of North Terrace between Frome Road and the Adelaide Botanic Gardens. It neighbours the Adelaide Zoo, and both the University of Adelaide and the University of South Australia. The land which it covers is also home to the Adelaide Medical School, the Adelaide Dental Hospital, The Hanson Institute and the Institute of Medical and Veterinary Science. In June 2007, plans were unveiled by the State Government to build a new central hospital for Adelaide to replace the Royal Adelaide Hospital. To be completed in 2016, the new hospital will be built on the railyards in the Adelaide Park Lands on the north side of North Terrace, between Morphett Street and West Terrace. The State Government plans that the current Royal Adelaide Hospital will close when the new hospital is completed, and some of the land currently occupied by the hospital will be
    6.40
    5 votes
    43
    Utica Psychiatric Center

    Utica Psychiatric Center

    The Utica Psychiatric Center, also known as Utica State Hospital, which opened in Utica in 1843, was New York's first state-run facility designed to care for the mentally ill and was one of the first such institutions in the United States, predating and perhaps influencing the Kirkbride Plan which called for similar institutions nation-wide. It was originally called the New York State Lunatic Asylum at Utica. The Greek Revival structure was designed by Captain William Clarke and was funded through a combination of money provided by the state and contributions raised by Utica residents. The asylum's first director was Dr. Amariah Brigham, who in 1844 became one of the original founders of American Psychiatric Association. An early proponent of treating mental illness rather than simply confining its sufferers, Dr. Brigham believed that his patients would benefit from the opportunity to work on the asylum's farm and grounds and on other useful occupational projects. Dr. Brigham established a print shop at the asylum, where he published the American Journal of Insanity (later known as the American Journal of Psychiatry). Some of the asylum inmates also produced a journal, called The
    6.40
    5 votes
    44
    Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong

    Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong

    Queen Mary Hospital (Chinese: 瑪麗醫院), located in Pok Fu Lam on Hong Kong Island of Hong Kong, is the flagship teaching hospital of the Faculty of Dentistry and Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine of the University of Hong Kong. It has around 1,400 beds. It provides general medical and surgical services to the residents of Western and Southern districts and is a tertiary referral centre for the whole territory of Hong Kong and beyond. The hospital was founded in 1937, and its first building was opened that year by Andrew Caldecott, the then Governor of Hong Kong. The hospital was named for Queen Mary, widow of King George V of the United Kingdom. It then replaced the Government Civil Hospital as the main accident and emergency hospital for Hong Kong Island. The hospital was greatly expanded over the years, with two major expansion projects completed in 1955 and 1983. Queen Mary Hospital's main ward tower, Block K, is the tallest hospital building in Asia at 137 metres (28 storeys), and is the third tallest in the world, behind London's Guy's Hospital and Houston's O'Quinn Medical Tower at St. Luke's Hospital.
    7.25
    4 votes
    45
    TYKS

    TYKS

    Turku University Hospital (Finnish: Turun yliopistollinen keskussairaala, TYKS, Swedish: Åbo universitetscentralsjukhus, ÅUCS) is a hospital in Turku, Finland. The hospital serves as the central hospital for southwestern Finland. It is located near the city centre of Turku and the university, and has branches in the nearby towns of Raisio and Paimio. The hospital unit in Paimio operates in a former tuberculosis sanatorium, the Paimio Sanatorium, designed by the Finnish architect Alvar Aalto. The hospital is owned and operated by the Hospital District of Southwest Finland which is a joint municipal authority responsible for production of specialized medical services in the region. The hospital has been affiliated with the University of Turku since 1958 and it is used as a teaching hospital by the Faculty of Medicine. Approximately 1,500 students in medicine and nursery practice there every year. Having been founded in 1756, it is the second oldest hospital in the Nordic countries, after Rigshospitalet in Copenhagen. T-hospital is new part of TYKS and its construction was started 2007 and it is still under construction. In 2009 the construction of first part (part-D) was finished and
    7.25
    4 votes
    46
    VA Boston Healthcare System

    VA Boston Healthcare System

    The VA Boston Healthcare System is a set of hospitals run by the United States Department of Veterans Affairs in the Greater Boston area. It comprises nine campuses, with three major medical centers in Jamaica Plain, West Roxbury, and Brockton. The Jamaica Plain building was the site of a great deal of research in neuropsychology. Edith Kaplan, Norman Geschwind and Harold Goodglass developed many neuropsychological tests here to describe and treat aphasia along with other psychological problems. After it was retired as an inpatient facility, many of the rooms were converted into offices that now support researchers from Harvard and Boston University. Current research activities include the Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology Research and Information Center (MAVERIC), the Behavioral Science Division of the National Center for PTSD, the Women's Health Sciences Division of the National Center for PTSD, and a Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center GRECC.
    7.25
    4 votes
    47
    Lokmanya Tilak Hospital

    Lokmanya Tilak Hospital

    LTMGH, (Lokmanya Tilak Municipal General Hospital), locally known as "Sion Hospital", is a general municipal hospital situated in Sion, a suburb of Mumbai. It was started in 1947 with 10 beds initially, which has now grown into multi-speciality hospital with more than 1,400 beds. In the same campus, it is attached to LTMMC (Lokmanya Tilak Municipal Medical College) which is a teaching institute for undergraduate and post graduate studies in medical sciences. It is named after Lokmanya Tilak, an eminent Maharashtrian freedom fighter in pre-independence India. It is surrounded by Sulochana Shetty Road, Near Bhau Daji Circle, sided by Eastern Express Highway (National Highway Number 3).
    8.33
    3 votes
    48
    King's Mill Hospital

    King's Mill Hospital

    King's Mill Hospital (or King's Mill Centre) is a hospital situated in Sutton-in-Ashfield, UK. The Hospital serves the towns in the Mansfield Urban Area. The next nearest hospital is Queen's Medical Centre in Nottingham, where patients may be sent in the event that King's Mill cannot provide sufficient facilities. The hospital contains a full Accident & Emergency Department, as well as a helipad situated in the nature reserve to the rear of the hospital, where the air ambulance can land. King's Mill Hospital is the primary site of Sherwood Forest Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. Providing healthcare services to around 300,000 people, it is situated in Sutton-in-Ashfield and serves Mansfield, Ashfield and the surrounding Areas. King's Mill Centre joined with Newark General Hospital and Ashfield and Mansfield District Community Hospitals in 2001 to form Sherwood Forest Hospitals NHS Trust, which in February 2007 became Sherwood Forest NHS Foundation Trust following its successful application to Monitor, the governing body. Sherwood Forest Hospitals is currently undertaking a £320 million Modernisation of Acute Services which has seen a large reconstruction of the existing site. The
    9.50
    2 votes
    49
    Kwong Wah Hospital

    Kwong Wah Hospital

    Founded by the Tung Wah Group of Hospitals in 1911, the Hospital provides a full range of services to the population of West Kowloon and Wong Tai Sin. It is Kowloon West Cluster's major acute teaching hospital, and also a Neurosurgical and Antenatal Diagnosis referral centre. The Hospital has established various clinical centers in recent years, including Mr & Mrs. Lai Kwok Wing Urology Centre, Minimally Invasive Surgery Training Centre and Chan Feng Men Ling Cardiac Centre, to provide quality healthcare services which meet the needs of the society. There are integrated Breast Centre and Dr Stephen Chow Chun-kay Assisted Reproduction Centre to serve patients with needs. It has established a Community Based Geriatric Service, Respiratory Care Unit, Acute Stroke Unit, TWGHs BOCHK Diabetes Centre, Wong Wha San Renal Memorial Centre, and a Nuclear Medicine site equipped with the most advanced technology. Kwong Wah Hospital is also a pioneer in Integrative Chinese and Western Medicine. TWGHs has established TWGHs Wilson T S Wang Integrated Chinese and Western Medicine Treatment Centre in Kwong Wah. The hospital has participated through joint consultation for designated diseases under
    9.50
    2 votes
    50
    North York General Hospital

    North York General Hospital

    North York General Hospital (NYGH) is one of Toronto's many hospitals and serves the area of north central Toronto (formerly North York). It is well respected as one of the leading community teaching hospitals in Canada, affiliated with the University of Toronto. It is one of the 3 constituent hospitals of the Peters-Boyd Academy of the University of Toronto Faculty of Medicine. It has one of the busiest emergency departments in the country. The current President & CEO is Dr. Tim Rutledge. The current Chief of Medicine is Dr. David Baron. The General Site is located at Leslie Street and Sheppard Avenue. It was opened in 1968 by the Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire (IODE), Missionary Health Institute and Canadian Mothercraft Society. Some 3,000 volunteers collected $3.2 million of the $8.6 million cost of the new hospital. The hospital underwent an expansion in the 2003 and work is now completed with additional bed spaces. North York General is a primary multi-care facility (open 24 hours) in the North York area, an Academic community hospital and famous for neo-natal care. After Mount Sinai Hospital, North York General currently performs the second highest number of
    9.50
    2 votes
    51
    Pilgrim Psychiatric Center

    Pilgrim Psychiatric Center

    • Medical Specialties: Psychiatry
    Pilgrim Psychiatric Center, formerly known as Pilgrim State Hospital, is a state-run psychiatric hospital located in Brentwood, New York. At the time it opened, it was the largest hospital of any kind in the world. Its size has never been exceeded by any other facility, though it's now far smaller than it once was. By 1900 overcrowding in New York City's psychiatric asylums had become a serious problem. There were several strategies implemented to deal with the escalating patient overload. One was to put the patients to work, farming in a relaxed setting on what was then rural Long Island. The new state hospitals were dubbed "farm colonies" because of their live-and-work treatment programs and emphasis on agriculture. However, these farm colonies, Kings Park State Hospital, (later named Kings Park Psychiatric Center) and Central Islip State Hospital (later named Central Islip Psychiatric Center), became overcrowded, like the institutions they were meant to replace. New York State began making plans for a third farm colony, which was to become Pilgrim State Hospital, named in honor of the former New York State Commissioner of Mental Health, Dr. Charles W. Pilgrim. The state bought
    9.50
    2 votes
    52
    St Mary's Hospital

    St Mary's Hospital

    St Mary's Hospital is a hospital located in Paddington, London, England that was founded in 1845. Since the UK's first academic health science centre was created in 2008, it is operated by Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, which also operates Charing Cross Hospital, Hammersmith Hospital, Queen Charlotte's and Chelsea Hospital, Teddington Memorial Hospital, and Western Eye Hospital; and runs some services at St Charles Hospital in Ladbroke Grove. Until 1988 the hospital ran St Mary's Hospital Medical School, part of the federal University of London. In 1988 it merged with Imperial College London, and then with Charing Cross and Westminster Medical School in 1997 to form Imperial College School of Medicine. Imperial College left the federal university in 2007, to become independent. St Mary's Hospital first opened its doors to patients in 1851, the last of the great voluntary hospitals to be founded. With the shift towards community healthcare delivered in the early 20th century, partly due to the social medicine revolution, pressure on bed occupancy relaxed, and with the formation of the NHS in the 1940s, many of the local hospitals of the St Mary's teaching hospital group
    9.50
    2 votes
    53
    Blacktown Hospital

    Blacktown Hospital

    Blacktown Hospital is an acute care hospital in Blacktown, New South Wales, Australia. Together with Mount Druitt Hospital and associated community health centres, it forms Blacktown-Mt Druitt Health, which is a unit within the Western Sydney Local Health District (WSLHD). Blacktown hospital has approximately 400 beds, It provides a wide range of health services; It operates a 24-hour emergency department and a full Intensive Care Unit and CCU. It also has 24 hour medical imaging and pathology services on site. The hospital is a teaching hospital of the University of Western Sydney's Blacktown-Mount Druitt Clinical School (commenced in October 2007) and University of Sydney's Western Clinical School. The Hospital complex also includes Bungarribee House, a psychiatric unit that, along with Cumberland Hospital provides mental health services to western Sydney. Following a stabbing of a nurse at the hospital in July 2011 NSW Health Minister Jillian Skinner called for a review of hospital security. The state government has announced full-time security.
    5.33
    6 votes
    54
    Rotunda Hospital

    Rotunda Hospital

    The Rotunda Hospital (Ospidéal an Rotunda in Irish) is one of the three main maternity hospitals in the city of Dublin, the others being the The Coombe and The National Maternity Hospital. The hospital is located just off the top of O'Connell Street, on Parnell Square, on the north side of the city. The hospital, originally known as "The Dublin Lying-In Hospital", was founded in 1745 by Bartholomew Mosse (1712-1759), a surgeon and man-midwife who was appalled at the conditions that pregnant mothers had to endure at the time. Initially located in George's Lane on the site of a recently closed theatre, the hospital was later moved to its present location in 1757 where it became known as "The New Lying-In Hospital", referred to today as "The Rotunda". Records indicate that around 1781, "when the hospital was imperfectly ventilated, every sixth child died within nine days after birth, of convulsive disease; and that after means of thorough ventilation had been adopted, the mortality of infants, within the same, in five succeeding years, was reduced to one in twenty". This issue was not limited to the Lying-In-Hospital. In that era, ventilation improvement was a general issue in patient
    7.00
    4 votes
    55
    Royal Alexandra Hospital for Children

    Royal Alexandra Hospital for Children

    The Royal Alexandra Hospital for Children (otherwise known as The Children's Hospital at Westmead) is a children's hospital in Sydney, Australia. The Hospital was founded in 1880 as "The Sydney Hospital for Sick Children". Its name was changed to the "Royal Alexandra Hospital for Children" on 4 January 1904 when King Edward VII granted use of the appellation ‘Royal’ and his consort, Queen Alexandra, consented to the use of her name. It is one of three children's hospitals in NSW located on Hawkesbury Road in Westmead and is affiliated with the University of Sydney. On July 1, 2010 it became part of the newly formed 'Sydney Children's Hospital Network (Randwick and Westmead) incorporating the Royal Alexandra Hospital for Children'. The hospital was opened in 1880 as the Sydney Hospital for Sick Children by a group of concerned citizens, led by Lady Allen the wife of Sir George Wigram Allen, who were worried about the health of the younger members of society in New South Wales. It soon out-grew the small building in which it was housed at Glebe Point and had to move in 1906 to Camperdown, where it stayed for 89 years before relocating to its current location of Westmead in 1995 to
    7.00
    4 votes
    56
    National University Hospital

    National University Hospital

    The National University Hospital (Abbreviation: NUH; Chinese: 国立大学医院; Malay: Hospital Universiti Nasional Singapura)was established in 1985 and it serves as a tertiary hospital, clinical training centre and research centre for the medical and dental faculties of the National University of Singapore (NUS). NUH is also a referral centre for a wide range of medical, surgical and dental specialties including Cardiology, Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Oncology, Ophthalmology, Paediatrics and Orthopaedic Surgery and Hand and Reconstructive Microsurgery. A member of the National University Health System, it is the principal teaching hospitals for the NUS Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine (YLL SoM). Today, NUH is a 1032-bed tertiary hospital serving more than 670,000 outpatients and 51,000 inpatients. NUH was originally known as the Kent Ridge Hospital according to its proposal as early as 1972, with a second plan drawn in 1975 by the then-University of Singapore Development Unit, when the hospital was planned at the Kent Ridge area, which actually costs $193 million to built, with an initial projection of 752 beds and a cost of $143 million. Construction began
    8.00
    3 votes
    57
    Philippine General Hospital

    Philippine General Hospital

    The Philippine General Hospital (PGH) is a tertiary state-owned hospital administered and operated by the University of the Philippines Manila, the University of the Philippines System's Health Sciences Center. It is the largest government hospital administered by the university, and is designated as the National University Hospital. It is located at Ermita, Manila in the Philippines. It is the biggest hospital in the country with a 1,500-bed capacity. It is a mixed-use hospital, with 1,000 beds for indigent patients and 500 beds for private patients, and offers some of the lowest rates for patients and is generally known as the hospital for indigent patients. The PGH, being the largest training hospital in the country, is the laboratory hospital of health science students enrolled in the University of the Philippines. This includes students of medicine, nursing, physical therapy, pharmacy, occupational therapy, dentistry and speech pathology. There are 14 clinical departments--Anesthesiology, Internal Medicine, Surgery, Neurosciences, Pediatrics, Otorhinolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Ophthalmology, Orthopedics, Rehabilitation Medicine, Psychiatry, Radiology, Pathology,
    8.00
    3 votes
    58
    Providence Portland Medical Center

    Providence Portland Medical Center

    Providence Portland Medical Center, located at 4805 NE Glisan St. in the North Tabor neighborhood of Portland, Oregon, is a full-service medical center specializing in cancer and cardiac care. Opened in 1941, the hospital is licensed for 483 beds, and has over 3,000 employees. There are approximately 1000 physicians on staff. The campus is also home to Providence Child Center, a 58-bed facility dedicated exclusively to medically fragile children. Providence Portland Medical Center is part of the Providence Health & Services in Oregon. Providence Portland Medical Center is also one of only three nursing magnet hospitals in Oregon, the other being Providence St. Vincent Medical Center and the Veterans Affairs hospital in Portland. The Catholic Sisters of Providence order was asked to expand their healthcare offerings on the east side of Portland in 1937. At that time, Archbishop Edward D. Howard requested that the order construct a hospital, originally to be named St. Vincent Hospital East, in reference to the existing St. Vincent Hospital (now Providence St. Vincent Medical Center), which at that time was located in Northwest Portland. The next year the Sisters' plans to build a
    8.00
    3 votes
    59
    St John of God Hospital

    St John of God Hospital

    St John of God Hospital Geelong is a division of St John of God Health Care, one of the largest providers of health care services in Australia. Founded in 1974, the facility provides medical and social services to the Barwon South West region. St John of God Hospital Geelong has 184 beds, 9 operating theatres, a catheterisation laboratory, oncology centre and a 24-hour critical care unit. The facility also operates a Day Specialist Surgery centre opposite the hospital. The centre houses consulting suites, surgical theatres and a pathology collection centre. In November 2010, St John of God Health Care announced plans for a major redevelopment project to take place at its Geelong hospital. Part of a five-year plan for the hospital, the $56.3 million redevelopment will include the addition of 64 new beds, the establishment of an emergency facility and rehabilitation service, three new operating theatres, new nurse units for oncology, palliative care and orthopedic services, an education and training centre, and additional car-parking. Services offered by St John of God Hospital Geelong include: The hospital also operates the nearby Raphael Centre, a support and information service
    8.00
    3 votes
    60
    St. Elizabeths Hospital

    St. Elizabeths Hospital

    St. Elizabeths Hospital is a psychiatric hospital operated by the District of Columbia Department of Mental Health. It was the first large-scale, federally run psychiatric hospital in the United States. Housing several thousand patients at its peak, St. Elizabeths had a fully functioning medical-surgical unit and offered accredited internships and psychiatric residencies. It has since fallen into disrepair and the grounds are mostly abandoned, although the east campus is still operational and it opened a new facility in 2010. The Department of Homeland Security announced in March 2007 plans to relocate its headquarters, along with most of its Washington, D.C.-area facilities, to the abandoned federally owned western campus of St. Elizabeths, beginning in 2010. The hospital was founded by the United States Congress in 1852, largely as the result of the efforts of Dorothea Dix, a pioneering advocate for people living with mental illnesses. It opened in 1855 as the Government Hospital for the Insane, and rose to prominence during the Civil War when it was converted temporarily into a hospital for wounded soldiers. During this time, the hospital temporarily housed animals which were
    8.00
    3 votes
    61
    Ullevål University Hospital

    Ullevål University Hospital

    Ullevaal, Oslo University Hospital (Norwegian: Ullevål universitetssykehus) was opened in 1887. From January 1, 2009, the hospital is part of the Oslo University Hospital. Ullevål has more than 8,600 employees. 940 of them are doctors and 2,400 nurses. With a total of 1,200 beds Ullevål, admits some 45,000 patients per year and its polyclinics have about 400,000 consultations per year. The main hospital is located near the centre of the Norwegian capital Oslo. Ullevaal University Hospital is a highly specialised hospital with many different functions. The hospital also runs many residency training programmes for different groups engaged in health care, such as doctors, nurses and medical laboratory technicians. The hospital is a level I trauma center, servicing approximately half of Norway's population. The Hospital is affiliated with the medical faculty of the University of Oslo, and constitutes one the faculty's five faculty divisions (which are all hospitals in the Oslo area; the faculty additionally consists of five institutes). As such, medical research and education is an important task of Ullevål University Hospital. The hospital is served by Ullevål sykehus station of the
    8.00
    3 votes
    62
    Rigshospitalet

    Rigshospitalet

    Rigshospitalet - Copenhagen University Hospital, or simply Riget, is the national hospital of Denmark, located in the capital city of Copenhagen, between the streets of Blegdamsvej, Tagensvej and Nørre Allé. Rigshospitalet is part of the Copenhagen University Hospital, together with the faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Copenhagen. Rigshospitalet was founded in 30 March 1757 under the name "Kongelig Frederiks Hospital", named after King Frederick V. It was back then located in Bredgade in central Copenhagen. Since 1903 the state has been the owner of the hospital (whereas other hospitals in Denmark are owned by the Regions). Rigshospitalet's mission is to be Denmark's leading hospital for patients needing highly specialized treatment.. Rigshospitalet's main specialist role has been enhanced in recent years by the decision that it should serve as the host institution for many of Copenhagen's speciality departments. Because of this, other hospitals refer patients to Rigshospitalet for the unique expertise available there. Rigshospitalet’s neighbor, Panum Institute, houses the Health Sciences Faculty of Copenhagen University, and this proximity optimizes a close
    6.75
    4 votes
    63
    Saint Marys Hospital

    Saint Marys Hospital

    Saint Marys Hospital is one of two hospitals in Rochester, Minnesota operated by the Mayo Clinic, the other being Rochester Methodist Hospital. St Marys has a 61-bed emergency department but no obstetrics department, while Rochester Methodist lacks an emergency department but contains an obstetrics department. It was founded in 1889 by a local Franciscan religious community, the Sisters of Saint Francis of Rochester, Minnesota, led by Mother Mother Alfred Moes, with encouragement from Dr. William Worrall Mayo. Today it is a large hospital campus with 1,265 licensed beds and 55 operating rooms, making it the largest privately operated hospital in the nation. In 2008, there were 43,000 admissions as well as 28,000 surgical cases. The buildings comprising it are named after Franciscan sisters who were the hospital's administrators: Mother Alfred, Joseph, Domitilla, Mary Brigh, and Generose, as well as the Francis Building, so named to commemorate the service of the Franciscan sisters over the years. The hospital includes the 85-bed Mayo Eugenio Litta Children's Hospital, offering world-class multidisciplinary pediatric and adolescent care. The Mayo Clinic Psychiatry and Psychology
    6.75
    4 votes
    64
    Satterlee Hospital

    Satterlee Hospital

    Satterlee U.S.A. General Hospital, which existed from 1862 to 1865 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was one of the largest Union Army hospitals of the Civil War. Founded in 1862 by order of Surgeon-General William Alexander Hammond, the hospital was built in the sparsely developed West Philadelphia neighborhood near the intersection of 42nd Street and Baltimore Avenue. Its 15-acre (61,000 m) grounds ran north to 45th and Pine Streets. It was the second-largest hospital in the country, with 21 wood-frame wards and hundreds of tents containing 4,500 beds. The hospital featured a library, reading room, barber shop and a printing office that printed its newspaper, The Hospital Register. It was commanded by Dr. Isaac Israel Hayes, surgeon, C.S.V. and famed Arctic explorer. Nursing was carried out by the Sisters of Charity, who lived in a convent on the grounds. By May 1864, Satterlee had treated more than 12,000 patients and suffered only 260 deaths, a remarkable accomplishment considering the sanitary conditions of the day. After the war ended in 1865, the hospital was closed and the buildings razed. In the 1890s, much of the site was covered with residential housing. The lower portion
    6.75
    4 votes
    65
    St. Michael's Hospital

    St. Michael's Hospital

    St. Michael's Hospital is a teaching hospital and medical centre in Downtown Toronto, Ontario, Canada. It was established by the Sisters of St. Joseph in 1892, with the founding goal of taking care of the sick and poor of Toronto's inner city. The hospital provides tertiary and quaternary services in cardiovascular surgery, neurosurgery, inner city health and therapeutic endoscopy. It is one of two Level 1 adult trauma centres in Greater Toronto, along with the larger Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre. The hospital is located near the intersection of Queen Street and Yonge Street in downtown Toronto's Garden District. The hospital serves a diverse population that includes the affluent condominium complexes in Harbourfront, the underprivileged of the inner city of Regent Park, and the gay and lesbian community in Church and Wellesley. The hospital has 475 beds and extensive outpatient clinics. The current Physician-in-Chief is Dr. Tom Parker, the Surgeon-in-Chief is Dr. Ori Rotstein and the President and CEO is Dr. Bob Howard. The hospital also has a large team of volunteers that contribute their skills and caring to help achieve the Hospital's commitment to healing. The hospital
    9.00
    2 votes
    66
    Toronto Rehabilitation Institute

    Toronto Rehabilitation Institute

    • Medical Specialties: Physical medicine and rehabilitation
    Toronto Rehabilitation Institute or Toronto Rehab is the largest rehabilitation hospital in Canada. Toronto Rehab has six sites located in Toronto, Ontario. By a Special Act of Legislation, on November 2, 1998, the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute was created with the amalgamation of three hospitals. These were: Lynhurst began in 1945 as Lyndhurst Lodge to deal with returning Canadian veterans with spinal injuries from World War II. The institution was named after the street of first site on Lyndhurst Avenue in Toronto and led by Dr. Albin T. Jousse. In 1950 it was acquired by the Canadian Paraplegic Association and by 1974 it moved to the current and larger location. In 1998 it merged with several other rehabilitation instituttions to form TRI. Rehabilitation Institute of Toronto was formed in 1997 with the merger of two other hospitals, Queen Elizabeth and Hillcrest Hospitals. The Queen Elizabeth was established in 1874 as a chronic care and long term health care facility. In the 1930s services added included physiotherapy and occupational therapy. By 1970s it became a dedicated rehabilitation institution. Hillcrest Hospital opened in 1886 as long-term care and evolved into a
    9.00
    2 votes
    67
    Austin State Hospital

    Austin State Hospital

    • Medical Specialties: Psychiatry
    Austin State Hospital (ASH), formerly known as the State Lunatic Asylum, is the oldest psychiatric hospital in the state of Texas, operated by the Texas Department of State Health Services. Established by the Legislature in 1856, it began operating in 1861 with twelve patients. The name was changed in 1925. The Hospital is the subject of a history by Sarah C. Sitton, Life at the Texas State Lunatic Asylum 1857 - 1997, published by the Texas A&M University Press in 1999 as Number 82 in the Centennial Series. The Austin State Hospital (ASH) mission is "partnering to find solutions toward wellness." The 299-bed facility is located in the heart of Austin, Texas. Programs such as Peer Support and "SHAC at ASH" are helping bridge the gap between inpatient and outpatient treatment. By partnering with NAMI-Austin, SHAC, and other organizations that share the ASH mission, the hospital is creating new opportunities for patients to build social networks and hope for recovery. Austin State Hospital's Volunteer Services Council (VSC) is a 501(c)(3) corporation dedicated to improving the lives of adults and children at the hospital. The VSC conducts fundraiser and donation programs and helps
    7.67
    3 votes
    68
    Broadgreen Hospital

    Broadgreen Hospital

    Broadgreen Hospital is a large teaching hospital located on Thomas Drive, in the suburb of Broadgreen, Liverpool, England, part of the Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals NHS Trust. Broadgreen was first established as an epileptic home and later as a sanatorium for the treatment of tuberculosis in the early 20th century, when it was then known as Highfield Infirmary. The site is also home to the Liverpool Heart & Chest Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, specialising in cardiothoracic medicine and the Broadoak Unit of Mersey Care NHS Trust which specialises in mental health. Broadgreen Hospital also contains Liverpool's only broadcasting hospital radio service. Radio Broadgreen broadcasts live from within the hospital and broadcasts 50 hours of live programming a week through its dedicated team of volunteers. Following the bombing of city centre hospitals during World War II, and the introduction of the National Health Service (NHS) in 1948, Broadgreen was expanded into a significant district general hospital. However, shortly after the Pan-Liverpool review of local health care provisions within the city in 1989 and the ongoing reforms of the NHS, the Conservative
    7.67
    3 votes
    69
    Broadmoor Hospital

    Broadmoor Hospital

    Broadmoor Hospital is a high-security psychiatric hospital at Crowthorne in the Borough of Bracknell Forest in Berkshire, England. It is the best known of the three high-security psychiatric hospitals in England, the other two being Ashworth and Rampton. Scotland has a similar institution at Carstairs, officially known as the State Hospital but often called Carstairs Hospital, which serves Scotland and Northern Ireland. The Broadmoor complex houses about 260 patients, all of whom are men since the female service closed with most of the women moving to a new service in Southall in September 2007, a few moving to the national high secure service for women at Rampton and a few elsewhere. At any one time there are also approximately 36 patients on trial leave at other units. Most of the patients there suffer from severe mental illness; many also have personality disorders. Most have either been convicted of serious crimes, or been found unfit to plead in a trial for such crimes. The average stay for the total population is about six years, but this figure is skewed by some patients who have stayed for over 30 years; most patients stay for considerably less than six years. The catchment
    7.67
    3 votes
    70
    Guy's Hospital

    Guy's Hospital

    • Medical Specialties: Dentistry
    Guy's Hospital is a large NHS hospital in the borough of Southwark in Central London, England. It is administratively a part of Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust. It is a large teaching hospital and is, with St. Thomas' Hospital and King's College Hospital, the location of King's College London School of Medicine (formerly known as the GKT School of Medicine). The Tower Wing (formerly known as Guy's Tower) is the tallest hospital building in the world, standing at 142.6m, with 34 floors. The hospital was founded in 1721 by Thomas Guy (1644/45–27 December 1724), a publisher of unlicensed Bibles who had made a fortune in the South Sea Bubble. It was originally established as a hospital to treat "incurables" discharged from St Thomas' Hospital. Guy had been a Governor and benefactor of St Thomas' and his fellow Governors supported his intention by granting the south-side of St Thomas' Street for a peppercorn for 999 years. Guy is interred in the crypt of the Chapel of his foundation. Guy's has expanded over the centuries. The original buildings formed a courtyard facing St Thomas Street, comprising the hall on the east side and the Chapel, Matron's House and Surgeon's House on
    7.67
    3 votes
    71
    Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center

    Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center

    Los Angeles County+USC Medical Center, also known as County/USC, by the abbreviation LAC+USC, or by the name Los Angeles County General, is a 600-bed public teaching hospital located in the Boyle Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles, California. It is jointly operated by Los Angeles County, California and the University of Southern California. Los Angeles County+USC Medical Center is one of the largest public hospitals and medical training centers in the United States, and the largest single provider of healthcare in Los Angeles County. It provides healthcare services for the region's medically underserved, is a Level I trauma center and treats over 28 percent of the region's trauma victims (2005). It provides care for half of all AIDS and sickle-cell anemia patients in Southern California. LAC+USC Medical Center is owned and operated by the County of Los Angeles. Although by law the emergency room must evaluate all patients to determine if a life-threatening emergency exists, regardless of ability to pay, hospital care is not free. LAC+USC accepts self-pay patients as well as patients covered by private insurance, Medicare, and Medicaid (Medi-Cal). The LAC+USC Medical Center
    7.67
    3 votes
    72
    Royal North Shore Hospital

    Royal North Shore Hospital

    The Royal North Shore Hospital (RNSH) is a major public teaching hospital in Sydney, Australia, located in St Leonards. It serves as a teaching hospital for Sydney Medical School at the University of Sydney and has approximately 740 beds. It is the referral hospital for Northern Sydney and the Central Coast. Its primary referral area accommodates 5.7% of the Australian population or 17% of the NSW population. The Royal North Shore Hospital began as a cottage hospital located in Willoughby Rd, Crows Nest. The foundation stone was laid by Sir Henry Parkes, 18 June 1887. The hospital was opened with accommodation for 14 patients, with the requisite office and rooms for the medical and nursing staff. Medical staff numbered 4 honorary doctors and nursing staff numbered 5. The site of the original hospital was bounded by Willoughby Rd., Albany and Holterman Streets and Zig Zag Lane. The old site is now a busy part of the commercial centre of Crows Nest. In 1902 it opened on its current site at St Leonards, with 48 beds available for patients. New departments and wards were added over the next fifty years, reflecting the increasing diversity and professionalisation of healthcare. Polio
    7.67
    3 votes
    73
    Royal Prince Alfred Hospital

    Royal Prince Alfred Hospital

    The Royal Prince Alfred Hospital (abbreviated RPAH or RPA, and sometimes shortened to PA Hospital) is a major public teaching hospital in Sydney, Australia, located on Missenden Road in Camperdown. It is a teaching hospital of the Central Clinical School of Sydney Medical School at the University of Sydney and is situated in proximity to the Blackburn Building of the university's main campus. RPAH is the largest hospital in the Sydney Local Health District, with approximately 700 beds (circa 2005). Following a $350 million redevelopment, the perinatal hospital King George V Memorial Hospital has been incorporated into it. An Australian television documentary, RPA, is filmed there and depicts the everyday workings of a major metropolitan hospital. Royal Prince Alfred is one of the oldest hospitals in NSW. The funds were raised by public subscription. This was in an effort to make a monument to commemorate the assassination attempt on Prince Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh by Henry James O'Farrell. It was only two years after its establishment in 1882 that the hospital accepted its first medical students from the Medical School of the University of Sydney. Since then, the hospital has
    7.67
    3 votes
    74
    Seth Gordhandas Sunderdas Medical College and King Edward Memorial Hospital

    Seth Gordhandas Sunderdas Medical College and King Edward Memorial Hospital

    King Edward Memorial (KEM) Hospital and Seth G.S. Medical College (Marathi: राजा एड्वर्ड (सातवे) स्मारक रुग्णालय व सेठ गोवर्धनदास सुंदरदास वैद्यकीय महाविद्यालय) is amongst the foremost teaching and medical care providing institutions in India. It was founded in 1926 in Mumbai. The Seth G.S. Medical College is affiliated to the Maharashtra University of Health Sciences (MUHS), Nashik and is consistently ranked as one of the most prestigious medical college in India. The medical school (Seth Gordhandas Sunderdas Medical College) provides training to about 2000 students in undergraduate, postgraduate and super-speciality medical courses. The institute also provides undergraduate and postgraduate courses in physical therapy and occupational therapy apart from Master's and PhD courses in various allied specialities. A nursing school is also maintained by the institution. With about 390 staff physicians and 550 resident doctors, the 1800 bedded hospital treats about 1.8 million out-patients and 78,000 in-patients annually and provides both basic care and advanced treatment facilities in all fields of medicine and surgery. Funded mainly by the Municipal Corporation of Greater Mumbai,
    7.67
    3 votes
    75
    Singapore General Hospital

    Singapore General Hospital

    The Singapore General Hospital (abbrev: SGH; Chinese: 新加坡中央医院; Malay: Hospital Besar Singapura; Tamil: சிங்கப்பூர் தேசிய மருத்துவமனை) is the largest and oldest hospital in Singapore, of which the foundation of its first building was laid in 1821. The Singapore Health Services hospital occupies sprawling grounds at Outram Park, sharing space with four specialist medical centres, namely the Singapore National Eye Centre (SNEC), the National Heart Centre (NHC), the National Cancer Centre (NCC) and the National Dental Centre (NDC). The Singapore General Hospital was established in 1821, when the first General Hospital was located in the cantonment for British troops near the Singapore River. It later shifted to Pearl's Bank and then to the Kandang Kerbau district, before finally settling at Sepoy Lines in Outram Road in 1882. The modern history of Singapore General Hospital began on 29 March 1926, with the opening of 800 beds in the Bowyer, Stanley and Norris Blocks. Today, only the Bowyer Block with its historically distinctive clock tower remains. The Bowyer Block is now home to the Singapore General Hospital Museum (SGH Museum). In 1981, the hospital was rebuilt, with its current
    7.67
    3 votes
    76
    Texas Medical Center

    Texas Medical Center

    The Texas Medical Center is the largest medical center in the world with one of the highest densities of clinical facilities for patient care, basic science, and translational research. Located in Greater Houston, the center contains 50 medicine-related institutions, including 15 hospitals and two specialty institutions, three medical schools, four nursing schools, and schools of dentistry, public health, pharmacy, and other health-related practices. All 50 institutions are not-for-profit. Exceeding one thousand acres in size, the center is larger than downtown Dallas. Some member institutions are located outside of the city of Houston. The center is where one of the first and largest air ambulance services was created and where one of the first successful inter-institutional transplant programs was developed. More heart surgeries are performed in the center than anywhere else in the world. The Texas Medical Center receives 160,000 daily visitors and over six million annual patient visits, including over 18,000 international patients. In 2010, the center employed over 93,500 people, including 20,000 physicians, scientists, researchers and other advanced degree professionals in the
    7.67
    3 votes
    77
    Glasgow Royal Infirmary

    Glasgow Royal Infirmary

    • Medical Specialties: Gynecology
    The Glasgow Royal Infirmary (GRI) is a large teaching hospital, operated by NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, With a capacity of around 1000 beds, the hospital campus covers an area of around 20 acres, situated on the north-eastern edge of the city centre of Glasgow, Scotland. Designed by Robert and James Adam, the original Royal Infirmary building was opened in December 1794. The infirmary was built beside Glasgow Cathedral on land that held the ruins of the Bishop's Castle, which dated from at least the 13th century but had been allowed to fall into disrepair. A Royal Charter was obtained in 1791, that granted the Crown-owned land to the hospital. The original Adams building had five floors (one underground) holding eight wards (giving the hospital just over a hundred beds) and a circular operating room on the fourth floor with a glazed dome ceiling. After a number of additional buildings were added, the first in 1816, a specialist fever block in 1829 and a surgical block in 1861. Following the amalgamation of the old St. Mungo's College of Medicine into the University of Glasgow Medical School in 1947, the old College buildings on Castle Street officially became part of the
    10.00
    1 votes
    78
    Hadassah Medical Center

    Hadassah Medical Center

    Hadassah Medical Center (Hebrew: מרכז רפואי הדסה‎) is a medical organization that operates two University hospitals at Ein Kerem and Mount Scopus in Jerusalem, Israel, as well as schools of medicine, dentistry, nursing, and pharmacology affiliated with the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. The hospital was founded by Hadassah, the Women's Zionist Organization of America, which continues to underwrite a large part of its budget today. The Medical Center ranks as the sixth-largest hospital complex in Israel. In 2005, Hadassah was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize in acknowledgment of its equal treatment of all patients, regardless of ethnic and religious differences, and efforts to build bridges to peace. The Hadassah organization was established in 1912 in New York City to provide health care in Ottoman-occupied Jerusalem. In 1913, Hadassah sent two nurses to Palestine. They set up a small public health station in Jerusalem to provide maternity care and treat trachoma, a dreaded eye disease rampant in the Middle East. In 1918, Hadassah established the American Zionist Medical Unit (AZMU), manned by 45 medical health professionals. The AZMU helped to establish six hospitals in
    10.00
    1 votes
    79
    Maudsley Hospital

    Maudsley Hospital

    The Maudsley Hospital is a British psychiatric hospital in South London. The Maudsley is the largest mental health training institution in the country. The hospital's trust describes itself as a world leader in research and also works in partnership with the Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London. The hospital is part of South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, provider of an extensive portfolio of mental health services in the United Kingdom, and a research institute working in partnership with the Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London. The Maudsley dates from 1907, when Dr Henry Maudsley offered London County Council £30,000 (subsequently increased to £40,000) to help found a new mental hospital that would: During World War I the hospital was a war hospital, not opening as a mental health resource until 1923. It remains notable that a specific Act of Parliament had to be obtained (1915) to allow the institution to accept voluntary patients. The Maudsley was returned to the control of London County Council after the First World War, and finally opened in February 1923. Its nursing staff comprised a matron, assistant matron, six sisters and 19 staff nurses
    10.00
    1 votes
    80
    Morton Hospital and Medical Center

    Morton Hospital and Medical Center

    • Medical Specialties: Internal medicine
    Morton Hospital and Medical Center is a medical complex located on Washington Street near Route 140 and Route 138 in Taunton, Massachusetts, USA. The facility serves the Greater Taunton Area and is equipped with its own heliport for medical emergency flights. Also, it owns a small rehabilitation facility down the street at Mill River Plaza. Morton Hospital opened in the latter half of the 19th century. It originally occupied the former home of the late Massachusetts Governor Marcus Morton. In the 20th century, the hospital administered its own nursing school. The Morton Hospital Heliport (FAA LID: 1MA9) is a heliport composed of one helipad on the roof of Morton Hospital. The heliport is privately owned and is primarily used at the utmost discretion of the hospital for medical emergency airlifts and transport. Most often, critically injured patients are airlifted from the hospital to large and well-equipped medical facilities around the region; sometimes as far as Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. The heliport is made of asphalt and its dimensions are 40 x 40 ft / 12.2 x 12.2 m.
    10.00
    1 votes
    81
    Psikhushka

    Psikhushka

    In the Soviet Union, systematic political abuse of psychiatry took place. Soviet psychiatric hospitals known as "psikhushkas" were used by the authorities as prisons in order to isolate hundreds or thousands of political prisoners from the rest of society, discredit their ideas, and break them physically and mentally. This method was also employed against religious prisoners and most especially against well-educated former atheists who adopted a religion. In such cases their religious faith was determined to be a form of mental illness that needed to be cured. Formerly highly classified extant documents from "Special file" of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union published after the dissolution of the Soviet Union demonstrate that the authorities of the country quite consciously used psychiatry as a tool to suppress dissent. Following the fall of the Soviet Union, it was often reported that some opposition activists and journalists were detained in Russian psychiatric institutions in order to intimidate and isolate them from society. In modern Russia, human rights activists also face the threat of psychiatric diagnosis as a means of political repression.
    10.00
    1 votes
    82
    Stoke Military Hospital

    Stoke Military Hospital

    Stoke Military Hospital in Plymouth, England, was completed in 1797. It was built for the British Army on the north side of Stonehouse Creek, to match the Royal Naval hospital on the south side. The workforce was made up of Napoleonic prisoners of war who were housed in prison ships on the Hamoaze. The Stonehouse Creek was later filled in during the 1960s to become Victoria Park, The Stonehouse Sharks Junior Rugby Team's grounds and The playing fields of Devonport High School for Boys. The hospital was used by the army for 148 years, until the end of World War II in 1945. At this time Devonport High School for Boys returned from wartime evacuation and took over the buildings. Before the hospital became Devonport High School for Boys part of it was Tamar High School. Both schools were approached by a central driveway from Paradise Road, with Devonport High to the left and Tamar High to the right. Tamar's motto was "The best is yet to be"; Tamar was a school strong in sport and admitted girls for the first time in 1973. Tamar closed after the 1988–89 academic year and was absorbed into Devonport High School, which also acquired the property. The admission of female sixth-formers from
    10.00
    1 votes
    83
    University of Ottawa Heart Institute

    University of Ottawa Heart Institute

    • Medical Specialties: Cardiology
    The University of Ottawa Heart Institute (UOHI) is Canada’s largest and foremost cardiovascular health centre. It began as a department in The Ottawa Hospital, and since has evolved into Canada’s only complete cardiac centre, encompassing prevention, diagnosis, treatment, rehabilitation, research, and education. UOHI cares for more than 80,000 cardiac patients each year, and patient satisfaction is among the highest in Ontario, averaging 98 percent. The Heart Institute is affiliated with The Ottawa Hospital and the University of Ottawa. The Institute also provides training to more than 100 physicians annually and runs an extensive cardiovascular research program, with 60 principal investigators and research funding of approximately $65 million a year. UOHI was founded in 1969 by Dr. Wilbert J. Keon, with financial support from the Ontario Ministry of Education. Dr. Keon worked with numerous partners, including all of the hospitals in the region, the University of Ottawa, and the Ottawa Hospital Regional District Planning council, to ensure the vision of a world-renowned Institute would unfold as planned. The first phase of the Heart Institute—the Cardiac Unit, as it was then
    10.00
    1 votes
    84
    Barnes-Jewish Hospital

    Barnes-Jewish Hospital

    Barnes-Jewish Hospital is the largest hospital in the U.S. state of Missouri. It is the adult teaching hospital for Washington University School of Medicine, and is located in St. Louis, Missouri. It is consistently rated one of the top hospitals in the United States by U.S. News & World Report. In 2012-13, it was ranked 6th-best medical center overall. Barnes-Jewish Hospital is a member of BJC HealthCare and located within the confines of the Washington University Medical Center. Barnes-Jewish is the largest private employer in Greater St. Louis. As of 2009, it employs 9,438 people, 1,845 of which are physicians. It is responsible for the education of 803 interns, residents, and fellows. Barnes-Jewish has 1,228 beds, 54,733 inpatient admissions a year, and has 83,997 emergency department visits in 2009. Nearly 18,351 outpatient surgeries and 19,160 inpatient surgeries were performed at Barnes in 2009. Barnes-Jewish was formed by the 1996 merger of two hospitals, Barnes Hospital and The Jewish Hospital of St. Louis, which were built in proximity to each other on the eastern edge of Forest Park. Barnes Hospital opened on December 7, 1914 at its current location on Kingshighway
    6.50
    4 votes
    85
    Foote Hospital

    Foote Hospital

    Allegiance Health is a community-owned and locally-governed health system located in Jackson in the U.S. state of Michigan. It was founded in 1918 as Foote Hospital when a local citizen, Mrs. Ida Foote, donated land for construction of the new hospital in honor of her late husband, W.A. Foote. In 1975, Foote Hospital merged with Mercy Hospital, which was operated by the Sisters of Mercy. Several years later, the two hospitals combined into one facility. The current facility was completed in 1983 and is located near the site of the original hospital. The former hospital, now named the Charles Anderson Building, is used for specialized practices such as sleep disorders, behavioral health, and volunteer services. In July 2008, Foote Hospital was renamed Allegiance Health. The mission of Allegiance Health is to "lead our community to better health and well-being at every stage of life." Its vision is to create Michigan's healthiest community through exceptional health care and inspiring a passion for wellness. Allegiance Health supports a 480-bed system with more than 400 physicians and 3,700 staff members. The health system offers specialized services including a new cancer center and
    6.50
    4 votes
    86
    Akershus University Hospital

    Akershus University Hospital

    The Akershus University Hospital (Norwegian: Akershus universitetssykehus, abbreviated to Ahus) is a Norwegian public university hospital located in the Lørenskog municipality, in the county of Akershus, east of the Norwegian capital Oslo. It is a teaching hospital and one of four university hospitals affiliated with the University of Oslo. The hospital has 8,400 employees. Akershus University Hospital has 515 beds in somatic sector (including technical beds – neonatal, heart supervision and intensive care), and 196 beds in psychiatric sector. In November 2008 a new hospital building designed by Danish architecture practice Arkitektfirmaet C. F. Møller opened. Setting new standards for hospital architecture in Norway, it claims to be the most modern in Europe. Akershus University Hospital was officially opened on 15 May 1961 as the Akershus Central Hospital (SIA). The area on which it was built, Nordbyhagen in Lørenskog eventually became developed with more homes and appartments, nursery schools, convenience store and several buildings with associated with hospital functions. In 1978, the hospital began its second major phase, and it has since been built a series of individual
    8.50
    2 votes
    87
    Allen Hospital

    Allen Hospital

    Allen Hospital is a 228-bed, not-for-profit community hospital in Waterloo, Iowa. The hospital, located at 1825 Logan Ave, is one of three hospitals located in the Waterloo - Cedar Falls, Iowa area, and is part of the Iowa Health System. The hospital features a cardiac care unit, which performs about 250 open heart procedures per year. The hospital features a Level II neonatal nursery and delivers about 900 babies a year. It has invested $1.4 million on the Da Vinci Surgical System in order to reduce costs and surgical wait times. A new 70,000-square-foot Emergency Department was built in 2009. It was named the Pauline Barrett Pavilion for the $5 million donation local philanthropist Pauline Barrett gave in 2007.
    8.50
    2 votes
    88
    Centre for Addiction and Mental Health

    Centre for Addiction and Mental Health

    The Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) is a consortium of mental health clinics at several sites in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Its name in French is Centre de toxicomanie et de santé mentale. (The acronym CAMH is most commonly pronounced "Cam-H".) Among the focuses of the organization are the assessment and treatment of schizophrenia, mood & anxiety disorders, and personality disorders. There is also a focus on addictions to alcohol, drugs, and problem gambling at the former ARF site. CAMH also has a Law and Mental Health Programme (forensic psychiatry and forensic psychology) and is a major research centre. CAMH is a teaching hospital with central facilities located in Toronto and 26 community locations throughout the province of Ontario. CAMH is fully affiliated with the University of Toronto and is a Pan American Health Organization and World Health Organization Collaborating Centre. In October 2008, CAMH was named one of "Canada's Top 100 Employers" by Mediacorp Canada Inc., and was featured in Maclean's newsmagazine. Later that month, CAMH was also named one of Greater Toronto's Top Employers, which was announced by the Toronto Star newspaper. CAMH was the recipient
    8.50
    2 votes
    89
    Prince of Wales Hospital

    Prince of Wales Hospital

    Prince of Wales Hospital (Chinese: 威爾斯親王醫院) is a major public and teaching hospital located in Sha Tin, New Territories in Hong Kong. The hospital is affiliated with the Medical Faculty of the Chinese University of Hong Kong. Named after and officially opened by Charles, Prince of Wales in 1984, Prince of Wales Hospital now provides approximately 1,360 hospital beds and 24 hours accident and emergency service with almost 4,000 staff. It is also the regional hospital responsible for the Eastern New Territories serving Shatin, Tai Po, North New Territories, Sai Kung and the outlying islands in East New Territories. The hospital is supported by the Li Ka-shing Specialist Clinics for specialty outpatient services. The Hospital Governing Committee is the ultimate decision making authority of the hospital. The current chief executive of the Hospital is Dr. Fung Hong.
    8.50
    2 votes
    90
    Royal Sussex County Hospital

    Royal Sussex County Hospital

    The Royal Sussex County Hospital is an acute teaching hospital in Brighton, England. Together with the Princess Royal Hospital (Haywards Heath), it is administered by the Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust. The services provided at the hospital include an Emergency Department, cancer services at the Sussex Cancer Centre, cardiac surgery, maternity services, and both adult and neonatal intensive care units. The main building was designed by Charles Barry, who was later architect for the Houses of Parliament, and is still called the Barry Building. The foundation stone was laid on 16 March 1826 by the Earl of Egremont, and the hospital was opened on 11 June 1828 as the Sussex County Hospital. The Victoria Wing was added in 1839, and the Adelaide Wing in 1841. The Sussex County Hospital became the Royal Sussex County Hospital in about 1911. On New Year's Day 1872, a fire broke out on the top floor of the Adelaide Wing of the hospital, in Ward 6. Initially this fire threatened to destroy the building, but the efforts of volunteer firefighters and a detachment of the 19th Hussars saved the building. The Jubilee Building was added to the hospital in 1887, the Sussex Eye
    8.50
    2 votes
    91
    Augusta Victoria

    Augusta Victoria

    Augusta Victoria is a church-hospital complex located on the Mount of Olives, Jerusalem. Augusta Victoria was built in 1907 as a center for the German Protestant community in Ottoman Palestine. The complex, completed in 1910, included the Evangelical Lutheran Church of the Ascension with a 65-metre belltower and a hospice for Christian pilgrims. During World War II, it was converted into a hospital by the British. The complex was named for Augusta Viktoria of Schleswig-Holstein, wife of German Kaiser Wilhelm II, who visited Jerusalem in 1898. The architect, Robert Leibnitz, was inspired by German palaces, such as the German Hohenzollern Castle. After the Kaiser's visit, he commissioned the construction of a guesthouse for German pilgrims. Private donations were collected throughout Germany and donators honoured with the Cross of the Mount of Olives. Many of the building materials were imported from Germany. A 50-metre high church tower was constructed with four bells, the largest of them weighing six tons. To transport these bells from Jaffa, the road to Jerusalem had to be widened and paved. The expense was more than double the cost of transporting the bells from Hamburg to Jaffa.
    7.33
    3 votes
    92
    Dwight D. Eisenhower Army Medical Center

    Dwight D. Eisenhower Army Medical Center

    The Dwight D. Eisenhower Army Medical Center, a 300-bed hospital, is based at Fort Gordon, located near Augusta, Georgia and serves as the headquarters of the Army's Southeast Regional Medical Command, or SERMC. SERMC oversees the Army's hospitals and clinics within the southeastern United States and Puerto Rico. The hospital started as Camp Gordon Station Hospital in 1941, caring for World War II casualties and dependents. It was closed in 1946, but reopened as Camp Gordon became the more permanent Fort Gordon during the Cold War. The hospital's current building, opened for patients in 1976, replaced sprawling, outdated buildings from the World War II era. During the building's dedication a year prior its opening, it was dedicated in honor of former General of the Army and President Dwight D. Eisenhower, who made his farewell address to the Army at Fort Gordon in 1961. President Eisenhower frequented nearby Augusta, Georgia and played golf at the Augusta National Golf Club, home of The Masters Tournament. Active-duty personnel and their TRICARE beneficiaries use the hospital and clinics as their primary hospital center. Numerous military retirees in the Augusta, Georgia area use
    7.33
    3 votes
    93
    Rikshospitalet

    Rikshospitalet

    Rikshospitalet (The National Hospital) is located in Oslo, Norway. From January 1, 2009, the hospital is part of Oslo University Hospital. It is a highly specialized university hospital with special assignments in research and the development of new methods of treatment. Rikshospitalet is a part of Southern and Eastern Norway Regional Health Authority, and is affiliated with the University of Oslo. About 60% of the patients admitted to Rikshospitalet are referred from other hospitals in Norway for more specialized investigations and treatment. In Norway, Rikshospitalet plays an important part with expert knowledge of the treatment of rare and complicated disorders. Rikshospitalet covers the whole country in various fields, including organ and bone marrow transplants, advanced neurosurgery, and treatment of children with congenital malformations. Rikshospitalet is also responsible for health care to the Norwegian Royal Family. Rikshospitalet had (2005) 585 beds. It is renowned for its architecture. Rikshospitalet merged in (2005) with the Norwegian Radium Hospital to create Rikshospitalet–Radiumhospitalet. The English form of the name was The University Hospital
    7.33
    3 votes
    94
    Royal Hallamshire Hospital

    Royal Hallamshire Hospital

    The Royal Hallamshire Hospital is a general and teaching hospital located in Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England. It is in the city's West End, facing Glossop Road and close to the main campus of University of Sheffield and the Collegiate Crescent campus of Sheffield Hallam University. The hospital is run by the Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (which also runs the Northern General Hospital), and is also in proximity to the Charles Clifford Dental Hospital and Weston Park Hospital--both of which are part of the Trust--and the Sheffield Children's Hospital, which is not. The main building was completed in 1979 and was opened by HRH Prince Charles, Prince of Wales. The previous low-rise outpatient buildings (in the foreground) date from the 1950s and the 1960s. The building is in the shape of a T with the rear part of the building overhanging a service road. The hospital consists of three main interlinked buildings, the most significant being the monolithic 21-storey concrete structure, the third highest in Sheffield after St Pauls Tower and the Arts Tower which results in some commanding views over most of the city. The hospital can also be seen from just about
    7.33
    3 votes
    95
    Southmead Hospital

    Southmead Hospital

    Southmead Hospital is a large hospital, situated in the northern suburbs of Bristol, England, part of the North Bristol NHS Trust. The hospital opened in 1902 as a 64 bed workhouse for poor sick people. By 1911 there were 520 beds. During World War I, the facilities were used as an army hospital. The facilities reverted back to a workhouse in the early 1920s and were then greatly extended to accommodate all the sick poor. In 1924, the Southmead Infirmary was built and was later renamed Southmead Hospital. The hospital has been greatly expanded and now covers 60 acres (240,000 m). In 2005 another expansion was planned which will include moving some services from Frenchay Hospital to the Southmead site. This will result in Frenchay Hospital being downgraded to a Community Hospital. The project should be finished in 2013. Full approval for the project was given by the NHS South West board in January 2009. Southmead is served by local charity Freewheelers EVS, whose volunteers provide a free-of-charge motorcycle courier service between Southmead and other hospitals in the area. Notable former medical staff include Geoffrey Tovey, serologist and founder of the UK Transplant Service,
    7.33
    3 votes
    96
    Toronto Western Hospital

    Toronto Western Hospital

    • Medical Specialties: Neuroscience
    The Toronto Western Hospital (TWN) is located at the corner of Bathurst Street and Dundas Street West in Toronto, Canada. It is part of the University Health Network (UHN). TWH has 256 beds, with 46,000 visits to its emergency department annually. It is known for neurosurgery and was one of the first centres in Canada to use the gamma knife. It is also home to the Donald K. Johnson Eye Centre. In 1895, doctors serving what was then the west end of Toronto united in hopes of building a full hospital facility to serve this overlooked locale. Twelve doctors signed a pledge to fulfill their vision and soon after, the Toronto Western Hospital was born. The Toronto Western Hospital opened first as a public dispensary, followed by a 30-bed hospital operating out of two rented houses on Manning Avenue. With the support of several influential citizens, enough money was raised by 1899 to acquire a nearby farmhouse property and to build the Western on its present site at the corner of Bathurst and Dundas Streets. During construction, patients were treated under large tents until the hospital opened year-round in 1905. Like the Toronto General, Toronto Western Hospital saw several renovations
    7.33
    3 votes
    97
    Gaebler Children's Center

    Gaebler Children's Center

    Gaebler Children's Center was a psychiatric institution for severely mentally ill children and adolescents, located in Waltham, Massachusetts. The center opened on October 8, 1955 near the grounds of the Metropolitan State Hospital and closed on January 31, 1992. It was named after William C. Gaebler, the second superintendent of the Metropolitan State Hospital. The Massachusetts Department of Mental Health (DMH) closed the center as it was antiquated and could no longer serve the needs of the children it housed. According to the DMH, this closure coincided with the decision to place mentally ill children in community settings instead of in institutional settings. Others felt the center was closed due to budget cuts. According to the Waltham Land Trust and The Boston Globe, the grounds of the Gaebler Center are currently being considered for redevelopment. (The Gaebler Center is now slated for Demolition with bids to be received prior to April 15, 2010) Demolition and site development contractor Testa Corp won the bid to begin destruction of the area, as indicated by a sign recently erected at the entrance. Mayor Jeanette McCarthy said the building was bought by the city of Waltham
    6.25
    4 votes
    98
    Gleneagles Hospital and Medical Centre

    Gleneagles Hospital and Medical Centre

    Gleneagles Hospital and Medical Centre (Chinese: 鹰阁医院) is a 380-bed private hospital, located in Napier Road, Singapore. It provides medical and surgical services. It was founded in 1957 as a 45-bed nursing home. In 1979, it was expanded to become a 126-bed hospital providing a wider range of medical services. In 1993, Gleneagles became a tertiary care hospital, with a ten-storey building. A year later, the Gleneagles Medical Centre was set up with 150 medical specialists. By 1997, the hospital had expanded to a 380-bed institution. In 22 May 2005, an operating team in Gleneagles Hospital performed a 10-hour operation to separate two Indonesian 15-month-old conjoined twins who were joined at the hip.
    6.25
    4 votes
    99
    National Taiwan University Hospital

    National Taiwan University Hospital

    National Taiwan University Hospital (NTUH, 國立台灣大學醫學院附設醫院) started operations under Japanese rule in Dadaocheng on June 18, 1895, and moved to its present location in 1898. The Hospital was later annexed to the Medical School of Taipei Imperial University and renamed Taipei Imperial University Medical School Affiliated Hospital in 1937. The present name was adopted in 1949, when the Republic of China took over the hospital upon Taiwan's retrocession in 1945. On October 19, 1991, the completion of a large new building complex on the so-called East Site marked another milestone in the history of the NTUH. Today, the (new) East and (old) West Sites together have more than 4,000 employees, serving 2,000 inpatients and 8,000 outpatients daily. The hospital remains the best-known and most highly-renowned medical center in Taiwan. The hospital is a world-renowned medical center for liver diseases. Advanced surgical, angiographical, and endoscopic procedures are routinely performed. The NTUH Heart Transplant is a staple part of National Taiwan University Hospital. It has performed numerous successful heart transplants since the founding of the hospital in 1895. Despite its relatively young
    6.25
    4 votes
    100
    Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney

    Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney

    The Prince of Wales Hospital is a major public teaching hospital located in Sydney's eastern suburb of Randwick, providing a full range of hospital services to the people of New South Wales, Australia. The hospital has strong ties to the University of New South Wales. The Prince of Wales Hospital had its origins in 1852 with the formation of the Society for Destitute Children which established the Asylum for Destitute Children with the first building opened on 21 March 1858 in Paddington. After an appeal for funds in 1870, the Catherine Hayes Hospital opened, reputedly with plans approved by Florence Nightingale. In 1915, during the First World War the hospital was converted by the NSW Government into a military hospital and then a repatriation hospital, and renamed the Fourth Australian Repatriation Hospital. In 1927 an association between the Coast Hospital and the Fourth Australian Repatriation Hospital at Randwick began. With the opening of the Concord Repatriation General Hospital in 1953, the hospital was renamed the Prince of Wales Hospital, and operated as an annexe of Sydney Hospital. Restructuring and hospital redevelopment has continued to occur to enhance the medical
    6.25
    4 votes
    101
    David Hare Block

    David Hare Block

    The David Hare Block is a part of Medical College Kolkata. Most of the General Surgical wards are situated in this building. It is named after David Hare, founder of Hare School. The Professor of Surgery at Medical College had no separate Surgical wards and had a single OT at the MCH building. At the instance of Principal G. Bomford and Surgeon Richard Havelock Charles, the building of a modern surgical hospital was undertaken. In 1910, the Prince of Wales Hospital was opened with 88 beds. The total cost of building the hospital was Rs 10,17,585/- & was so named to commemorate the visit of the Prince of Wales to India. It was formally inaugurated on 22 March, 1911 by H.E.Lady Hardinge. In 1976, the Prince of Wales Hospital was renamed the David Hare Block and a new floor has been constructed. It now houses the Surgery and Cardiothoracic Surgery departments.
    7.00
    3 votes
    102
    Harborview Medical Center

    Harborview Medical Center

    Harborview Medical Center, located on Seattle's First Hill, is a public hospital in King County, Washington and is managed by UW Medicine. Harborview Medical Center is the designated Disaster Control Hospital for Seattle and King County, as it has the only Level I adult and pediatric trauma and burn center serving the states of Washington, Alaska, Montana and Idaho. Its burn center is one of the largest in the United States, specializing in pioneering treatments, including the use of artificial skin products, which have cut mortality rates dramatically for severely burned patients. Harborview's Center for Sexual Assault provides medical and counseling services to sexual assault victims and their families. Thousands of patients are treated each year in Harborview's Neurosurgery Department for disorders of the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves, including head and spinal cord injuries, stroke, brain tumors, degenerative disc disease, and spinal disc herniations. Its orthopedics service has often been listed as one of the top 10 services of its kind in the country by U.S. News and World Report. Harborview’s operating budget for fiscal year 2007 was $568 million and income from
    7.00
    3 votes
    103
    King's College Hospital

    King's College Hospital

    • Medical Specialties: Neurosurgery
    King's College Hospital is an acute care facility in the London Borough of Southwark, referred to locally and by staff simply as "King's" or abbreviated internally to "KCH". It serves an inner city population of 700,000 in the London boroughs of Southwark and Lambeth but also serves as a tertiary referral centre in certain specialties to millions of people in southern England. It is a large teaching hospital and is, with Guy's Hospital and St. Thomas' Hospital, the location of King's College London School of Medicine. King's was originally opened in 1840 in the disused St Clement Danes workhouse in Portugal Street close to Lincoln's Inn Fields. It was used as a training facility where medical students of King's College London could practice and receive instruction from the college's own professors. The surrounding area there was composed of overcrowded slums characterised by poverty and disease. Within two years of opening, the hospital was treating 1,290 inpatients in 120 beds, with two patients sharing a bed by no means unusual. The main contractor for the new hospital was Lucas Brothers. Pioneer of aseptic surgery Joseph Lister performed the first major elective surgery under
    7.00
    3 votes
    104
    Mayo Clinic

    Mayo Clinic

    Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit medical practice and medical research group based in Rochester, Minnesota, specializing in treating difficult cases (tertiary care). Patients are referred to Mayo Clinic from across the U.S. and the world, and it is known for innovative and effective treatments. Mayo Clinic is known for being at the top of most accredited quality standard listings; for example, it has been near the top of the U.S. News & World Report List of "Best Hospitals for more than 20 years". The practice is distinguished by integrated care, and a strong research presence is evidenced by the fact that over 40% of its resources are devoted towards research (rather than just medical practice). Mayo Clinic has been on the list of America's "100 Best Companies to Work For" published by Fortune magazine for eight years in a row. From its humble beginnings as a family venture between a father and his two sons, the practice later became America's first integrated group practice, a model that is now standard in the United States. The current-day Mayo Clinic is an integrated practice of more than 3,700 physicians and scientists, and a total employment including nurses, students, and
    7.00
    3 votes
    105
    Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Hong Kong

    Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Hong Kong

    Queen Elizabeth Hospital (Chinese: 伊利沙伯醫院), QE in short, is a hospital at King's Park in Kowloon, Hong Kong. It was named after Queen Elizabeth II. The hospital is a major hospital in southern Kowloon. This hospital has around 1,800 beds. It has more or less 350 physicians and surgeons. The total number of nurses are 1,000 more or less. Queen Elizabeth Hospital (QEH) was opened in 1963 and it is the major acute general hospital in Kowloon. It has 1,850 beds and 13 clinical departments, and a staff force of 4,600. It serves an effective population of about 900,000 and about one-third of all cancer patients in Hong Kong. It is the largest acute hospital in Hong Kong despite not being a university hospital. The hospital has a full complement of services including 24-hour Accident and Emergency and specialist services. Clinics are located at three different sites to serve the district. They are the Queen Elizabeth Hospital Specialist Clinic, Yau Ma Tei Polyclinic, and the 'L' Block Clinic. The hospital provides high-intensity care for all clinical specialties, and a tertiary referral centre for major specialties. It is also a teaching centre for basic and post-graduate training of
    7.00
    3 votes
    106
    Saint Peter's University Hospital

    Saint Peter's University Hospital

    Saint Peter's University Hospital (SPUH) is a Roman Catholic hospital on Easton Avenue in New Brunswick, New Jersey. The hospital is a member of the Saint Peter's Healthcare System, Inc. a New Jersey nonprofit corporation sponsored by the Roman Catholic Diocese of Metuchen. Saint Peter's University Hospital is a non-profit, 478-licensed-bed acute care teaching hospital. Saint Peter's has been designated by the state of NJ as a Specialty Acute Care Children's Hospital, Regional Perinatal Center, and Stroke Center that operates one of the largest maternity services in New Jersey and in the country. The hospital is a Regional Medical Campus of Drexel University College of Medicine, providing full-time training to as many as 60 students in their 3rd or 4th years of medical school, and has a clinical affiliation with The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. According to the official website of Saint Peter's, the hospital's mission statement is: "Keeping faith with the teachings of the Roman Catholic Church and guided by the Bishop of Metuchen, Saint Peter's University Hospital is committed to humble service to humanity, especially the poor, through competence and good stewardship of
    7.00
    3 votes
    107
    Westmead Hospital

    Westmead Hospital

    Westmead Hospital is a major 975 bed tertiary hospital in Sydney, Australia, opened on 10 November 1978 by the then Premier, Neville Wran, and guest of honour was former Prime Minister Gough Whitlam. It is a teaching hospital of Sydney Medical School at the University of Sydney and forms part of the Western Sydney Local Health Network. The hospital serves a population of 1.85m people (43% of the population of Sydney) and is located on one of the largest health and hospital campuses in Australia. In 2008/09, Westmead Hospital provided more than 1.3m occasions of care to outpatients, in addition to 86,392 inpatients. Annually, there are around 14,000 medical operations, in excess of 4,600 births, more than 55,000 presentations to emergency department of which nearly one-third are admitted to hospital. Westmead Hospital is located on the junction of Darcy and Hawkesbury Roads in Westmead and provides a full range of tertiary medical and dental services except for paediatrics which is serviced by the adjacent Children's Hospital at Westmead, relocated from Camperdown to Westmead in 1995. The Hospital includes a large Dental Clinical School and extensive clinical pathology and medical
    6.00
    4 votes
    108
    Ether Dome

    Ether Dome

    The Ether Dome is an amphitheater in the Bulfinch Building at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. It served as the hospital's operating room from its opening in 1821 until 1867. It was the site of the first public demonstration of the use of inhaled ether as a surgical anesthetic on 16 October 1846. Crawford Long, a surgeon in Georgia, had previously administered ether, but this went unpublished until 1849. The Ether Dome event occurred when William Thomas Green Morton, a local dentist, used ether to anesthetize Edward Gilbert Abbott. John Collins Warren, the first dean of Harvard Medical School, then painlessly removed a tumor from Abbott's neck. After Warren had finished, and Abbott regained consciousness, Warren asked the patient how he felt. Reportedly, Abbott said, "Feels as if my neck's been scratched". Warren then turned to his medical audience and uttered "Gentlemen, this is no Humbug". This was presumably a reference to the unsuccessful demonstration of nitrous oxide anesthesia by Horace Wells in the same theater the previous year, which was ended by cries of "Humbug!" after the patient groaned with pain. The Ether Dome is now used for medical conferences and
    8.00
    2 votes
    109
    Froedtert Hospital

    Froedtert Hospital

    Froedtert Hospital, (pronounced "fray-dert"), located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, is a teaching hospital and an Level I adult trauma center, one of two such facilities in Wisconsin. Froedtert is the primary teaching affiliate of the Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW), where MCW students and residents receive their clinical education. Froedtert is licensed for 655 beds. Froedtert is located on the Milwaukee Regional Medical Center grounds, which is a consortium of six health care institutions. Froedtert is an organ transplant center, performing heart, lung, kidney, liver, and pancreas transplants. Froedtert was the first hospital in Wisconsin and was the second academic hospital in the U.S. to be primary stroke center certified by the Joint Commission. The Eye Institute is located at Froedtert Hospital and manages all serious types of eye conditions. It is also nationally ranked in the areas of Endocrinology and Respiratory Disorders. Froedtert, founded as Froedtert Memorial Lutheran Hospital opened on September 29, 1980, and was named after Kurtis Froedtert, the Milwaukee businessman who donated $11 million to found the hospital after his death in 1951. The year of Froedtert's
    8.00
    2 votes
    110
    New York State Psychiatric Institute

    New York State Psychiatric Institute

    • Medical Specialties: Psychiatry
    The New York State Psychiatric Institute, established in 1895 and located on Riverside Drive at the foot of Washington Heights, the far upper west side of Manhattan in New York City, was one of the first institutions in the United States to integrate teaching, research and therapeutic approaches to the care of patients with mental illnesses. In 1925, the Psychiatric Institute affiliated with Presbyterian Hospital, adding general hospital facilities to the Institute's psychiatric services and research laboratories. Currently, it is part of Columbia University Medical Center. Through the years, distinguished figures in American psychiatry have served as directors of the Psychiatric Institute, including Drs. Ira Van Gieson, Adolph Meyer, August Hoch, Lawrence Kolb, Edward Sachar and Herbert Pardes. The current director is Dr. Jeffrey Lieberman.
    8.00
    2 votes
    111
    Royal Berkshire Hospital

    Royal Berkshire Hospital

    The Royal Berkshire Hospital is a National Health Service hospital in the town of Reading in the English county of Berkshire. It provides acute hospital services to the residents of the western and central portions of Berkshire, and is managed by the Royal Berkshire NHS Foundation Trust. The hospital provides 813 inpatient beds (627 acute, 66 paediatrics and 120 maternity), together with 204 day beds and spaces. In doing so, it employs over 4,000 staff and has an annual budget of £228 million. The Royal Berkshire Hospital was opened in 1839 on the London Road on land donated by Henry Addington, 1st Viscount Sidmouth, a local resident and former Prime Minister. The hospital was built by local architect and builder Henry Briant, who won the design competition. King William IV took a keen interest in the hospital before it was built, and as a consequence his arms appear on the central pediment, although he died before the hospital opened. The first patron of the hospital was William's niece and successor, Queen Victoria. In the 1860s, the original building was extended with east and west wings designed by Joseph Morris. In the 1880s, a new chapel was added to the rear of the main
    8.00
    2 votes
    112
    St John of God Health Care

    St John of God Health Care

    St John of God Health Care is Australia's third largest private hospital operator, with 13 hospitals and facilities in the states of Western Australia, New South Wales and Victoria, as well as in New Zealand. In February 2011, St John of God Health Care was shortlisted by Western Australia’s State Government to build the $360 million Midland Health Campus - Perth’s next major public hospital. The winner of the bid is to be decided by the end of 2011. St John of God Health Care Inc is a wholly owned and controlled entity of St John of God Australia Ltd, established in 2004 to sponsor the ministry that until then was run solely by the Sisters of St John of God. The congregation of the Sisters of St John of God was founded in 1871 in Wexford, Ireland. In 1895, Perth’s Bishop Matthew Gibney sent a request to the Sisters for help to care for people suffering from typhoid during the 1890s Gold Rush. The Sisters of St John of God went on to establish hospitals, pathology and social outreach services in Western Australia, Victoria and New South Wales. In 2007, St John of God Health Care merged with the services previously operated by the Hospitaller Order of St John of God in Victoria, New
    8.00
    2 votes
    113
    Stony Brook University Hospital

    Stony Brook University Hospital

    • Medical Specialties: Internal medicine
    The Stony Brook University Hospital, previously known as the Stony Brook University Medical Center located in Stony Brook, New York, is the largest academic medical center on Long Island It comprises Stony Brook University School of Medicine and Stony Brook University Hospital, which is the only tertiary care hospital and Level 1 trauma center in Suffolk County. With 540 beds and 5,100 employees, the hospital is the largest in Suffolk County. The Heart Center performs the only open-heart surgery in Suffolk and the Cancer Center and Cerebrovascular Center attract patients from throughout the region with cutting edge diagnostic and treatment facilities. Stony Brook is home to Long Island's first kidney transplantation program which has performed over 1,000 transplants, and initiated the nation's first Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Center. The hospital is also the regional referral center for trauma, perinatal and neonatal intensive care, burns, bone marrow and stem cell transplantation, cystic fibrosis, pediatric and adult AIDS, and is the regional resource center for emergency management. Stony Brook's Stroke program is certified by the Joint Commission and the NYS Department of
    8.00
    2 votes
    114
    Texas Children's Hospital

    Texas Children's Hospital

    Texas Children's Hospital is a pediatric hospital located in the Texas Medical Center in Houston, Texas. With 639 licensed beds and 465 beds in operation, Texas Children's is the largest children's hospital in the United States and is affiliated with the Baylor College of Medicine as that institution's primary pediatric training site. Texas Children's has garnered widespread recognition for its expertise and breakthrough developments in the treatment of pediatric cancer, diabetes, asthma, HIV, premature birth, attention-related disorders, organ transplants and cardiovascular disorders. As of 2011, U.S. News & World Report ranks Texas Children's Hospital #4 amongst the pediatric hospitals in the nation, the highest rank for any Pediatric Hospital in the Southern United States. More than 42 pediatric subspecialties are available to patients at Texas Children's. The hospital's medical staff includes more than 1,580 board-certified, primary-care physicians, pediatric subspecialists, pediatric surgeons and dentists. In 2003, Texas Children's more than 1,000 nurses achieved national Magnet Recognition, one of the highest honors in nursing. In 2011-12 U.S. News and World Report ranked
    8.00
    2 votes
    115
    Aradale Mental Hospital

    Aradale Mental Hospital

    Aradale Mental Hospital was an Australian psychiatric hospital, located in Ararat, a rural city in Victoria, Australia. Originally known as Ararat Lunatic Asylum, Aradale and its two sister asylums at Kew and Beechworth were commissioned to accommodate the growing number of 'lunatics' in the colony of Victoria. Construction began in 1864, and the guardhouses are listed as being built in 1866 though the list of patients extends as far back as the year before (1865). It was closed as an asylum in 1998 and in 2001 became a campus of the Northern Melbourne Institute of TAFE (NMIT) administered Australian College of Wine. The asylum was designed by G.W. Vivian and his assistant J.J. Clark, adapting Vivian's initial designs for Kew. Building commenced at Kew, Ararat and Beechworth at roughly the same time, however Ararat was completed first. The building of Ararat was contracted to O'Grady, Glynn and O'Callaghan and not patients (or "inmates" as they were called) as many erroneously believe. The asylum was built as a town within a town with its own market gardens, orchard, vineyards, piggery and other stock kept on the grounds. At its height it had over 500 staff and as it stands today
    9.00
    1 votes
    116
    Bethlem Royal Hospital

    Bethlem Royal Hospital

    The Bethlem Royal Hospital is a hospital for the treatment of mental illness located in London, United Kingdom and part of the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust. Although no longer based at its original location, it is recognised as the Europe's first and oldest institution to specialise in mental illnesses. It has been known by various names including St Mary Bethlehem, Bethlem Hospital, Bethlehem Hospital and Bedlam. The Hospital is closely associated with King's College London and in partnership with the King's College London Institute of Psychiatry is a major centre for psychiatric research. It is part of both the King's Health Partners academic health science centre and the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre for Mental Health. The word bedlam, meaning uproar and confusion, is derived from the hospital's prior name. Although currently a modern psychiatric facility, historically it became representative of the worst excesses of asylums in the era of lunacy reform. Bethlem is Europe's oldest extant psychiatric hospital and has operated as such, continuously, for over six hundred years. It has also been the continent's most famous and, indeed, infamous specialist
    9.00
    1 votes
    117
    Cleveland Clinic

    Cleveland Clinic

    The Cleveland Clinic (formally known as the Cleveland Clinic Foundation) is a multispecialty academic medical center located in Cleveland, Ohio, United States. The Cleveland Clinic is currently regarded as one of the top 4 hospitals in the United States as rated by U.S. News & World Report. The Cleveland Clinic was established in 1921 by four physicians for the purpose of providing patient care, research, and medical education in an ideal medical setting. One of the largest private medical centers in the world, the Cleveland Clinic saw more than 3,200,000 patient visits in 2009, with almost 80,000 hospital admissions. Patients arrive at the Cleveland Clinic from all 50 states and more than 100 nations. The Cleveland Clinic's approximately 2,500 staff physicians and residents represent 120 medical specialties and subspecialties. The Cleveland Clinic was ranked number one in America for cardiac care from 1994 to 2012. Cleveland Clinic is also an Ohio nonprofit corporation which as of December 2010 had 10 regional hospitals in Northeast Ohio, a hospital and family health center in Florida, and a health center in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, a specialty center in Las Vegas, and a hospital
    9.00
    1 votes
    118
    Les Invalides

    Les Invalides

    Les Invalides (French pronunciation: [lezɛ̃valid]), officially known as L'Hôtel national des Invalides (The National Residence of the Invalids), is a complex of buildings in the 7th arrondissement of Paris, France, containing museums and monuments, all relating to the military history of France, as well as a hospital and a retirement home for war veterans, the building's original purpose. The buildings house the Musée de l'Armée, the military museum of the Army of France, the Musée des Plans-Reliefs, and the Musée d'Histoire Contemporaine, as well as the burial site for some of France's war heroes, notably Napoleon Bonaparte (lists below). Louis XIV initiated the project by an order dated 24 November 1670, as a home and hospital for aged and unwell soldiers: the name is a shortened form of hôpital des invalides. The architect of Les Invalides was Libéral Bruant. The selected site was in the then suburban plain of Grenelle (plaine de Grenelle). By the time the enlarged project was completed in 1676, the river front measured 196 metres and the complex had fifteen courtyards, the largest being the cour d'honneur ("court of honour") for military parades. It was then felt that the
    9.00
    1 votes
    119
    Metropolitan State Hospital

    Metropolitan State Hospital

    Metropolitan State Hospital is an American public hospital for the mentally ill, located in the city of Norwalk in Los Angeles County, California. Metropolitan State Hospital provides mental health care and treatment to forensic and civilly committed patients in need of a structured and secure environment. As of July 2002 it had about 825 patients. The hospital offers inpatient mental health care for the surrounding counties, specializing in legal commitments, programs for Spanish speaking patients, Intensive Treatment and includes a Clinical Research Unit. The hospital is unique among State facilities serving the mentally disordered in that it admits a large proportion of acutely ill psychiatric patients resulting in a rapid turnover rate and a shorter length of stay. The Intensive Treatment and Research Unit, which is a male inpatient facility for the chronically persons with mental disabilities, is co-sponsored by Metropolitan State Hospital and the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine. The program is a major component of research being conducted by the two institutions with the treatment focus directed toward the chronically refractory and treatment-resistant
    9.00
    1 votes
    120
    Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre

    Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre

    The Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre (AIMS) is a ISO 9001:2000 certified and NABH accredited private medical college near Edapally in Kochi, India. It is also a 1,450-bed hospital, It was inspired by Mata Amritanandamayi and inaugurated on May 17, 1998 by then Prime Minister, Atal Bihari Vajpayee in presence of Mata Amritanandamayi. The Mata Amritanandamayi Math is its parent organization. Ron Gottsegen is the Executive Director and Dr. Prem Nair is the Medical Director of AIMS. Dr. Damodaran M. Vasudevan is the principal of the institute and the Dean of the Amrita College of Medicine |Medical under the aegis of Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham. The center was awarded medical university status by the state government of Kerala and on 10 August 2002, AIMS was chosen for the Central Government's pilot project on telemedicine. Amrita Institute of Medical Science (AIMS) offers facilities comprising 25 modern operating theatres, 210 equipped intensive-care beds, a fully computerized and networked Hospital Information System (HIS), a fully digital radiology department, a 24/7 telemedicine service and a clinical laboratory. This healthcare infrastructure with over
    6.67
    3 votes
    121
    Austin Hospital, Melbourne

    Austin Hospital, Melbourne

    The Austin Hospital is a major teaching public hospital located in Melbourne's north eastern suburb of Heidelberg, and is administrated by Austin Health, along with the Heidelberg Repatriation Hospital and the Royal Talbot Rehabilitation Centre. The Austin hospital was founded in 1882 as a charitable mental institution. It had five name changes (including "Austin Hospital for Incurables") before becoming the Austin Hospital. During World War II, two military hospitals were located at the site - the 115th Australian General Hospital, operated by the Australian Army, between 13 March 1941 and 19 May 1947, and the 6th RAAF Hospital, operated by the Royal Australian Air Force, between 1942 and 1947. After the military hospital was handed over by the Australian Army to the Repatriation Commission on 19 May 1947, it became known as the Repatriation General Hospital Heidelberg. The Repatriation Commission (Department of Veterans' Affairs) operated the hospital until 31 December 1994. In the decade leading up to transfer of the hospital to the state hospital system the name was modified to its current name - Heidelberg Repatriation Hospital. The Austin Hospital was transferred into the
    6.67
    3 votes
    122
    Martha Jefferson Hospital

    Martha Jefferson Hospital

    Martha Jefferson Hospital is a nonprofit community hospital in Charlottesville, Virginia. It was founded in 1903 by eight local physicians. The 176-bed hospital has an employed staff of 1,600 and has 365 affiliated physicians. In its fiscal year ending September 30, 2010, Martha Jefferson Hospital: The hospital owns 10 primary care and three specialty practices. Major services include a Cancer Care Center, Digestive Care Center, Cardiology Care Center, Orthopedics including Spine Surgery & Joint Replacement Surgery, Bariatric (Weight Loss) Surgery, Neurosciences including Neurosurgery and a Stroke Care Center, Thoracic Surgery, Vascular Medicine & Surgery, and a Women's Health Center. Over the years, the hospital expanded at its downtown-Charlottesville location on Locust Avenue. However, in the early 2000s, it was clear a new facility needed to be built to accommodate a growing number of patients and the ability to expand further in a more open area. The hospital chose an 84-acre (340,000 m2) campus adjacent to their current Outpatient Care Center on Pantops Mountain for the new facility. The new building is designed by Kahler Slater of Milwaukee, WI. Engineering firms include
    6.67
    3 votes
    123
    Monklands Hospital

    Monklands Hospital

    Monklands District General Hospital, is a district general hospital in Airdrie, North Lanarkshire, Scotland. Administered by NHS Lanarkshire, it serves a population of approximately 260,000 people of North and South Lanarkshire council areas. The hospital has recently been in the Scottish media due to the decision to downgrade the accident and emergency A&E department and subsequent reversal of this decision by the newly elected Scottish Government. In 1887 Sir John Wilson Bt JP - a late 19th century businessman and local politician - bought the Airdrie House estate. Upon his death, he bequeathed the land to the people of Airdrie and it became the local maternity hospital (Airdrie House Maternity Home Hospital) in 1919. This closed in 1962 and was demolished in 1964 to make way for the current Monklands District General Hospital. Monklands was the first new hospital, that is, one which did not provide new accommodation for an existing hospital to be built in Scotland in the post World War II era. Planned to be known as 'Airdrie District General Hospital', it was renamed with the introduction of local council reorganisation, to Monklands District General Hospital. The first patients
    6.67
    3 votes
    124
    Scarborough Hospital

    Scarborough Hospital

    The Scarborough Hospital (TSH) is a hospital network based in Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. It operates two campuses, the General Campus and the Birchmount Campus (previously Grace Campus). The Scarborough Hospital, located in east Toronto, Ontario, is a community hospital situated in one of the most ethnically diverse communities in the world. It is affiliated with the University of Toronto Faculty of Medicine. The hospital comprises two campuses, the General campus and the Birchmount campus, as well as six community satellite sites. In 2008/09, The Scarborough Hospital had nearly 96,000 Emergency visits, 5,200 births, and 43,000 surgeries. Approximately 3,400 staff members, more than 700 physicians and 600 volunteers help the hospital provide a diverse range of services including: The Scarborough Hospital was founded as Scarborough General Hospital by the Sisters of Misericorde in 1956. In 1985, The Salvation Army Scarborough Grace Hospital was opened in northeast Scarborough; it was later voluntarily amalgamated with Scarborough General to form The Scarborough Hospital in 1998, as part of a successful proposal to the Health Services Restructuring Commission. The
    6.67
    3 votes
    125
    Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre

    Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre

    Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, abbreviated SHSC and known simply as Sunnybrook, is an academic health sciences centre located in Toronto, Ontario. It is the largest trauma centre in Canada and is one of two major trauma centres in Toronto; the other is St. Michael's Hospital. It offers comprehensive care and is a national leader in image-guided therapies. In 2008, Sunnybrook made history when it received an unprecedented $74.6 million dollar research award. It is one of the fastest growing hospitals in North America, and is the nation's largest maternity hospital with the new Women & Babies Program, which opened on September 12, 2010. Sunnybrook is home to the Edmond Odette Regional Cancer Centre and the Schulich Heart Centre, both national leaders in the respective areas of medicine. As of October 2008, Sunnybrook was named one of Greater Toronto's Top Employers by Mediacorp Canada Inc., which was announced by the Toronto Star newspaper. The Kilgour Wing (K Wing) is a long-term care centre with the large majority of patients being war veterans. The hospital was a centre used to handle the wounded after World War II. Alice M. Kilgour donated the Sunnybrook Farm to the City of
    6.67
    3 votes
    126
    National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery

    National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery

    • Medical Specialties: Neurosurgery
    The National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery (informally the NHNN, The National or Queen Square) is a neurological hospital in London, United Kingdom and part of the University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. It was the first hospital to be established in England dedicated exclusively to treating the diseases of the nervous system. It is closely associated with University College London (UCL) and in partnership with the UCL Institute of Neurology, which occupies the same site, is a major centre for neuroscience research. It supports the Sir William Gowers Epilepsy Assessment Unit at the National Society for Epilepsy Centre at Chalfont St Peter, Buckinghamshire. The NHNN also runs The National Hospital Development Foundation, a charity dedicated to supporting the Hospital for the funding of equipment, buildings and research. The hospital is located on Queen Square in the Bloomsbury area of Central London. The hospital was founded in 1859 and originally called The National Hospital for Diseases of the Nervous System including Paralysis and Epilepsy and later the National Hospital for Nervous Diseases. The current name, National Hospital for Neurology and
    5.75
    4 votes
    127
    All India Institute of Medical Sciences

    All India Institute of Medical Sciences

    The All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMSs)are a group of autonomous public medical colleges of higher education. The AIIMSs are located in: AIIMS New Delhi is governed by the The All India Institute of Medical Sciences Act,1956. The All-India Institute of Medical Sciences (Amendment) Bill, 2012,was introduced in the Lok Sabha on August 27,2012. This bill will also replace a recent Ordinance which allowed the six AIIMS—like institutes to become operational from September 2012. Lok Sabha passed the AIIMS (Amendment) Bill, 2012 on August 30,2012. The proposed measure will help the Centre change the status of the six new AIIMS registered under the Indian Societies Registration Act to be autonomous body corporate on the lines of the existing AIIMS in Delhi.AIIMS(Amendment) Bill,2012 was introduced in Rajya Sabha on September 3,2012.Rajya Sabha passed the AIIMS (Amendment) Bill, 2012 on September 4,2012. In 2012, 6 new AIIMS like institutes will start under the Pradhan Mantri Swastha Suraksha Yojana at Bhopal, Bhubaneshwar, Jodhpur, Patna, Raipur and Rishikesh. AIIMS New Delhi, has been mentoring the two new AIIMS in Patna and Bhubaneswar, PGI Chandigarh has been mentoring
    7.50
    2 votes
    128
    Children's Hospital Boston

    Children's Hospital Boston

    • Medical Specialties: Pediatrics
    Boston Children's Hospital is a 395-licensed-bed children's hospital in the Longwood Medical and Academic Area of Boston, Massachusetts. At 300 Longwood Avenue, Children's is adjacent both to its teaching affiliate, Harvard Medical School, and to Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. (Dana-Farber and Children's jointly operate Dana-Farber/Children's Hospital Cancer Care, a 60-year-old partnership established to deliver comprehensive care to children with and survivors of all types of childhood cancers.) In 2010, for the 21st year in a row, U.S. News & World Report rated Boston Children's Hospital one of the nation's top hospitals specializing in pediatric care. (Children's ranked in the top three of all pediatric specialty categories, and number one in heart & heart surgery, neurology & neurosurgery, urology, nephrology and orthopedics Children's was the first stand-alone pediatric hospital in New England to be awarded Magnet status by the American Nurses Credentialing Center. One of the largest pediatric medical centers in the United States, Children's offers a complete range of health care services for children from birth through 21 years of age. Its Advanced Fetal Care Center can begin
    7.50
    2 votes
    129
    Manchester Royal Infirmary

    Manchester Royal Infirmary

    The Manchester Royal Infirmary (MRI) is a hospital in Manchester, England which was founded by Charles White in 1752 as a cottage hospital capable of caring for twelve patients. Manchester Royal Infirmary is part of a larger NHS Trust incorporating several hospitals called Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. It is a teaching hospital of the School of Medicine, University of Manchester and part of the Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (former Central Manchester and Manchester Children's University Hospitals NHS Trust). Other teaching hospitals which are part of the same NHS trust are: St Mary's Hospital, Manchester (founded 1790), the Manchester Royal Eye Hospital (1814), and the University Dental Hospital of Manchester (1884); Royal Manchester Children's Hospital (1829). Manchester Royal Infirmary now has over 750 beds. On the same site since summer 2009 are the new Children's Hospital, St Mary's Hospital (Maternity and Babies), the new wing of Manchester Royal Infirmary, and the new Eye Hospital (one of the largest teaching hospitals for ophthalmology in Europe). It is possible to access one hospital from the others without
    7.50
    2 votes
    130
    O'Bleness Memorial Hospital

    O'Bleness Memorial Hospital

    O'Bleness Memorial Hospital is a 144 bed community hospital at 55 Hospital Drive, Athens, Ohio 45701. O'Bleness overlooks the Hocking River. The westernmost wing of the hospital is known as the Cornwell Center, which houses medical offices; a separate office building slightly northwest of this was recently built, and is known as the Castrop Center. The Tri-County Mental Health Services complex is also next door to the west. The predecessor to O'Bleness was the nearby Sheltering Arms Hospital, which has been placed on the National Register. Sheltering Arms began as a birthing center in a private house at 19 Clark Street. A neighboring house was then purchased, and the two were connected and additional areas were added.
    7.50
    2 votes
    131
    Royal Ottawa Hospital

    Royal Ottawa Hospital

    The Royal Ottawa Mental Health Centre (also known as Royal Ottawa Hospital, Royal Hospital or ROH) is a 207-bed mental health facility located in Ottawa, Canada which began operation in 1961. It acts as a teaching hospital for the University of Ottawa. The in-patient portion of the hospital is composed of 9 units: Geriatrics (North and South), Schizophrenia, Mood and Anxiety, Substance Use and Concurrent Disorders. Intensive Assessment, Youth, Forensic Assessment and Forensic Rehabilitation. Treating clients in and out of the community. The ROHCG conforms to new age psychiatry practices, using both new methods of establishing staff-client relationships and discarding those that have become obsolete.
    7.50
    2 votes
    132
    Stoke Mandeville Hospital

    Stoke Mandeville Hospital

    Stoke Mandeville Hospital is a large National Health Service hospital within Aylesbury Urban Area to the south of the town of Aylesbury, near the village of Stoke Mandeville in Buckinghamshire. It is part of Buckinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust. The hospital's National Spinal Injuries Centre is one of the largest specialist spinal units in the world, and the pioneering rehabilitation work carried out there by Sir Ludwig Guttmann led to the development of the Paralympic Games. Mandeville, one of the official mascots for the 2012 Summer Olympics and Paralympics in London, was named in honour of the hospital's contribution to Paralympic sports. In the early 1830s the village of Stoke Mandeville was badly affected by cholera epidemics that swept across England. A cholera hospital was established on the parish border between Stoke Mandeville and Aylesbury. It was founded with monies provided by both parishes, but was built separately from both places as cholera was very contagious and the inhabitants were anxious to avoid infection. By the start of the Twentieth century the hospital had developed into an Infectious Diseases Hospital, treating all infections, not just cholera. However
    7.50
    2 votes
    133
    The Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital

    The Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital

    The Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital, known to many simply as Sheppard Pratt, is a psychiatric hospital located in Towson, a northern suburb of Baltimore, Maryland. The hospital was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1971. Founded in 1853 by the Baltimore merchant Moses Sheppard, after a visit by the mental health rights advocate and social reformer Dorothea Lynde Dix, the hospital was originally called the Sheppard Asylum. The original buildings were designed by the famous architect Calvert Vaux and constructed on what had previously been a 340-acre (1.4 km) farm. The cornerstone of the original building was laid in spring of 1862. The facility was designed according to the Kirkbride Plan. Sheppard stipulated that the following conditions were to be imposed for the Asylum: “Courteous treatment and comfort of all patients; that no patient was to be confined below ground; all were to have privacy, sunlight and fresh air; the asylum's purpose was to be curative, combining science and experience for the best possible results; and that only income, not principal would be used to build and operate the asylum.” As a result of these financial restrains, the Asylum did not open
    7.50
    2 votes
    134
    Veterans Health Administration

    Veterans Health Administration

    The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) is the component of the United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) led by the Under Secretary of Veterans Affairs for Health that implements the medical assistance program of the VA through the administration and operation of numerous VA outpatient clinics, hospitals, medical centers and long-term healthcare facilities (i.e., nursing homes). The VHA division has more employees than all other elements of the VA combined. The VHA is distinct from the U.S. Department of Defense Military Health System of which it is not a part. The first Federal agency to provide medical care to veterans was the Naval Home in Philadelphia, PA. The home was created in 1812 and was followed by the creation of Soldiers Home in 1853 and St. Elizabeth’s Hospital in 1855. Congress created the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers in 1865 in response to the high number of Civil War casualties. These homes were initially intended to be room and board for disabled veterans. However, by the late 1920’s, the homes were providing a level of care comparable to hospital care. President Hoover created the Veterans Administration (VA) in 1930 to consolidate all
    7.50
    2 votes
    135
    Queen's Medical Centre

    Queen's Medical Centre

    The Queen's Medical Centre (popularly known as QMC or Queen's Med) situated in Nottingham, England, is the largest hospital in the United Kingdom, and the largest teaching hospital in Europe. It was officially opened by the Queen on 28 July 1977, and admitted its first patient in 1978. It currently has more than 1300 beds and employs more than 6000 people. QMC was the first purpose built teaching hospital in the UK, and also contains University of Nottingham Medical and Nursing Schools, Mental Health Wards and the privately run (by Nations/Circle) Nottingham Treatment Centre. On 1 April 2006 it merged with Nottingham City Hospital to form Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust. Its present Chief Executive is Dr Peter Homa and the Medical Director is Dr Stephen Fowlie. Some 6,000 NHS staff are employed at the hospital. The hospital hosts an annual pantomime with staff and students in the medical school and is one of the best in Nottingham. The hospital is conveniently situated at the junction of the dual-carriageway Nottingham Ring Road (A6514) and the east-west A52 and A6200. It is easiest to get to from the south of Nottingham (A453, A606, A52 and A46). The hospital is powered
    5.50
    4 votes
    136
    Brewster Hospital

    Brewster Hospital

    The Brewster Hospital is a historic U.S. hospital in Jacksonville, Florida. It is located at 915 West Monroe Street. On May 13, 1976, it was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places. Brewster Hospital was the first african american hospital in the U.S. It served African Americans in Jacksonville from 1901 to 1966. The hospital was founded because the healthcare facilities in Jacksonville and surrounding areas denied treatment to African-Americans until the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Faced with competition from previously segregated facilities, Brewster Hospital was closed in 1966. The original Brewster Hospital building was recently moved and is being preserved.
    6.33
    3 votes
    137
    Frimley Park Hospital

    Frimley Park Hospital

    Frimley Park Hospital is a large, 720-bed NHS hospital in Frimley, Surrey, part of the Frimley Park Hospital NHS Foundation Trust. It opened in 1974 to provide a full range of district general hospital services for North East Hampshire and West Surrey, a catchment population of about 365,000. The catchment area includes Frimley, Camberley, Bagshot, Crowthorne, Sandhurst, Yateley, Fleet, Farnborough, Aldershot and Farnham. It gained NHS Foundation Trust status on 1 April 2005. The Hospital was one of five selected in 1995 by the Ministry of Defence (MOD) to host a Ministry of Defence Hospital Unit, and this was established in February 1996. Military staff are integrated into the hospital workforce and treat both military and civilian patients. The hospital consists of many departments including an accident and emergency department (A&E) a Special Care Baby Unit (SCBU) and multiple operating theatres. Dr. Farouk Massouh, a general surgeon at Frimley Park Hospital, developed a popular clinical sign for diagnosing acute localised appendicitis. This test, which is popular through southwest England, is called the Massouh sign. It was the birthplace of the two children of the Earl and
    6.33
    3 votes
    138
    Groote Schuur Hospital

    Groote Schuur Hospital

    Groote Schuur Hospital is a large, government-funded, teaching hospital situated on the slopes of Devil's Peak in the city of Cape Town, South Africa. It was founded in 1938 and is famous for being the institution where the first human heart transplant took place, conducted by University of Cape Town-educated surgeon Christiaan Barnard on the patient Louis Washkansky. Groote Schuur is the chief academic hospital of the University of Cape Town's medical school, providing tertiary care and instruction in all the major branches of medicine. The hospital underwent major extension in 1984 when two new wings were added; the old main building now mainly houses several academic clinical departments as well as a museum about the first heart transplant. The hospital is an internationally acclaimed research institution and is world-renowned for its trauma unit, anaesthesiology and internal medicine departments. Groote Schuur attracts many visiting medical students, residents and specialists each year who come to gain experience in various fields. As at December 2006 the hospital employed over 500 doctors, 1300 nurses and 250 allied health professionals. Groote Schuur is Dutch for 'Great Barn'
    6.33
    3 votes
    139
    Memorial Hermann Hospital

    Memorial Hermann Hospital

    • Medical Specialties: Internal medicine
    Memorial Hermann Healthcare System is the largest not-for-profit hospital system in Houston, Texas, and consists of 11 hospitals, 7 Cancer Centers, 3 Heart & Vascular Institutes, and 27 sports medicine and rehabilitation centers, in addition to other outpatient and rehabilitation centers. It was formed in the late 1990s when the Memorial and Hermann systems joined. Both the Memorial and Hermann health care systems started in the early 1900s. The administration is housed in the new Memorial Hermann Tower, along with the existing System Services Tower (formerly called the North Tower). Memorial Hermann–Texas Medical Center (formerly known as Hermann Hospital before the 1997 merger with Memorial Health Care System) was opened in 1925. It was the first of two hospitals with a Level I trauma center rating to be located in Houston, Texas inside the Texas Medical Center. It is the flagship of a large system of hospitals and clinics located in and around the greater Houston area, in various neighborhoods as well as some suburbs. The different hospitals are distinguished by further designation indicating their location. (Texas Medical Center, Northwest, Southwest, Woodlands, etc.) This
    6.33
    3 votes
    140
    Pennsylvania Hospital

    Pennsylvania Hospital

    Pennsylvania Hospital ("Pennsy") is a hospital in Center City, Philadelphia, affiliated with the University of Pennsylvania Health System ("Penn Medicine"). Founded on May 11, 1751 by Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Bond, it was the first hospital in the United States. It is also home to the first surgical amphitheatre and first medical library in America. The Hospital was originally conceived in 1751 by Dr. Thomas Bond as an institution "for the reception and cure of the sick poor... free of charge," and was funded grace to donations of the people of Philadelphia. On September 2, 1751, Mathias Koplin donated the first plot of ground for the new hospital. In 1752, the first (temporary) building was opened on High (now Market) Street. Elizabeth Gardner (a Quaker widow) was appointed Matron. In 1755, the cornerstone was laid for the East Wing of what would become the hospital's permanent location at 8th and Pine Streets. Patients were first admitted to the permanent hospital in 1756. The site continued to grow through the years with the addition of more wings (such as the West Wing of the building which was built in 1796) and buildings, extra land and further expansion. Pennsylvania
    6.33
    3 votes
    141
    St George Hospital, Sydney

    St George Hospital, Sydney

    The St George Hospital and Community Health Service is a tertiary referral hospital located in Kogarah, a southern suburb of Sydney, NSW, Australia. It is part of the South East Sydney Local Health Network and is an accredited principal teaching Hospital of the University of New South Wales. As a major tertiary and teaching hospital, St George accepts patients from other parts of Sydney, NSW and beyond. It primarily serves about 250,000 residents of southern Sydney, in the St George area bounded by Botany Bay, Cooks River in the north, Georges River in the south and Salt Pan Creek in the west. Approximately 35% of the St George area's residents are from a non-English speaking background. The Hospital is also the nearest provider of specialist medical services for around 200,000 residents of the Sutherland Shire. The hospital has a designated medical trauma service and is the Medical Retrieval Service Coordination Centre for NSW. The Hospital's departments include anaesthesia, critical care, surgery, cancer care, medicine, women's and children's health, mental health, community health and medical imaging. In the 2002-2003 financial year there were more than 45,000 admissions
    6.33
    3 votes
    142
    Darlinghurst Gaol

    Darlinghurst Gaol

    Darlinghurst Gaol was an Australian prison located in Darlinghurst, New South Wales. The site is bordered by Victoria, Burton and Forbes streets, with entrances on Forbes and Burton Streets. Construction on Darlinghurst Gaol wall began in 1822, with completion of some of the cellblocks in 1840. The gaol was ready for occupation in a year later, with the first prisoners occupying the gaol on 7 June 1841. The gaol was finally completed in 1885. The main material used for construction of the gaol is Sydney sandstone, cut into large blocks by convicts. Convict markings on the blocks are visible along the upper half of the wall on Darlinghurst Road. A tall circular chapel stands in the middle of the site, around which are sited the six rectangular cellblocks in a radial fashion. Australian poet Henry Lawson spent time incarcerated here during some of the turbulent years of his life and described the gaol as Starvinghurst Gaol due to meagre rations given to the inmates. The site is now open to the public as The National Art School. The last hanging at the gaol was in 1907. Hangings were open to public viewing throughout several decades. People would gather at the front gate of the gaol
    8.00
    1 votes
    143
    Liverpool Women's Hospital

    Liverpool Women's Hospital

    Liverpool Women's Hospital is NHS Foundation Trust in Liverpool, England. The Trust uses the Single Transferable Vote voting system to elect its Members' Council. In 1985 three hospitals, the Women's Hospital in Catherine Street, Liverpool Maternity Hospital, and Mill Road Maternity Hospital, joined together under the management of the Liverpool Obstetric and Gynaecology Unit. This became a NHS trust in 1992 and changed its title to the Liverpool Women's Hospital NHS Trust in 1994. In 1995 the three hospitals merged and moved into the present hospital, a new building in Crown Street. This was designed by the Percy Thomas Partnership, and is constructed in red brick with white cladding, and light blue metal roofs. Outside the main entrance to the hospital is a sculpture entitled Mother and Child created in 1999 by Terry McDonald. Bliss, the special care baby charity are currently funding research at Liverpool Women's Hospital into parenteral nutrition for premature and sick babies. Other funded research projects at the Trust include; • the LAMB (Liverpool Archive of MRI in Babies) study looks to use MRI scans to understand how nutrition and medicines affect the development of the
    8.00
    1 votes
    144
    Princess Alexandra Hospital

    Princess Alexandra Hospital

    The Princess Alexandra Hospital (PAH) is on Ipswich Road in Woolloongabba, Australia. It is one of the major hospitals in Brisbane and is a teaching hospital of the University of Queensland. It is a tertiary level teaching hospital with all major medical and surgical specialities onsite except for obstetrics, gynaecology and paediatrics. A new building was opened in 2000 to replace the ageing red-brick PA Hospital complex built in the 1950s. The hospital was opened by and named after HRH Princess Alexandra of the United Kingdom in 1959, to mark the Centennial of Queensland. It has a catchment population of 1.6 million people with 780 beds and 5800 full-time equivalent staff. Queensland's spinal injuries unit and the liver and kidney transplantation services are based at the hospital. The P.A. Foundation is located at the Princess Alexandra Hospital. The foundation raises money for medical research on the P.A hospital campus. In April 2008, the Diamantina Institute for Cancer, Immunology and Metabolic Medicine was opened at the hospital. From 2009 to 2011 major expansion works are planned or have commenced, including the doubling in size of the emergency department, the construction
    8.00
    1 votes
    145
    Royal Manchester Children's Hospital

    Royal Manchester Children's Hospital

    The Royal Manchester Children's Hospital is a children's hospital in Chorlton-on-Medlock, Manchester, England. It was opened on 11 June 2009, after the closure of the Royal Manchester Children's Hospital (founded 1829) in Pendlebury, near Manchester, and Booth Hall Children's Hospital in Blackley, North Manchester, as well as the existing St Mary's Hospital for neonatal services previously based nearby. The Royal is part of the Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and is based adjacent to the Manchester Royal Infirmary. It offers a range of specialities including oncology, haematology, bone marrow transplant, burns, genetics, and orthopaedics. The hospital has 371 beds and with 185,000 annual patient visits. The Royal Manchester Children's Hospital was the first hospital in the United Kingdom to treat only children when it was initially founded in 1829. It started as a small dispensary at 25 Back King Street in Manchester city centre for the treatment of sick children. By 1855, it had developed to a six-bed hospital. In 1873, the hospital moved to Pendlebury, just off Manchester Road (the A6). In 1923, it was granted Royal Patronage. The hospital in
    8.00
    1 votes
    146
    Adarsh Hospital

    Adarsh Hospital

    'Adharsh Hospital' is a 50-bedded multi-speciality hospital, situated in the Robertsonpet area of the Kolar district in Karnataka state, India. The director of the hospital is Dr M. Nagappa.
    7.00
    2 votes
    147
    Barnwood House Hospital

    Barnwood House Hospital

    Barnwood House Hospital (1860–1968) was a private mental hospital in Barnwood, Gloucester, England. It was founded by the Gloucester Asylum Trust in 1860 as Barnwood House Institution and later became known as Barnwood House Hospital. The hospital catered for well-to-do patients, with reduced terms for those in financial difficulties. It was popular with the military and clergy, and once counted an Archbishop amongst its patients. During the late nineteenth century Barnwood House flourished under superintendent Frederick Needham, making a healthy profit and receiving praise from the Commissioners in Lunacy. Even the sewerage system was held up as a model of good asylum practice. After World War I service patients, including war poet and composer Ivor Gurney, were treated with a regime of psychotherapy and recreations such as cricket. During the 1960s Barnwood House experienced financial problems and closed in 1968. The grounds are now an arboretum run by Gloucester City Council. Barnwood House Trust continues to exist as a charity that supports research and awards grants to people with physical or mental disabilities in Gloucestershire. Barnwood House opened its doors to patients
    7.00
    2 votes
    148
    Flinders Medical Centre

    Flinders Medical Centre

    Flinders Medical Centre is a 580 bed public teaching hospital and medical school, co-located with Flinders University and the 130 bed Flinders Private Hospital located at Bedford Park, South Australia. It opened in 1976. It is one of the major public hospitals operating in metropolitan Adelaide. It serves as the trauma centre for the southern suburbs generally and obstetrics in particular. It is the liver and corneal transplant centre for South Australia. FMC is part of the Southern Adelaide Health Service (Southern Health) which includes Repatriation General Hospital Daw Park, Noarlunga Health Services, Drug and Alcohol Services South Australia and a range of outreach and community based services. Flinders Medical Centre recently underwent a $163 million redevelopment. The centrepiece of the redevelopment is the construction of a new south wing building which is now complete. The new south wing building is a three-storey building linked to the main Flinders Medical Centre building. It includes a Birthing and Assessment Suite on level 3 and a Maternity and Gynaecology Unit on level 4. Services previously offered in the main Flinders Medical Centre building have moved into the new
    7.00
    2 votes
    149
    Royal Buckinghamshire Hospital

    Royal Buckinghamshire Hospital

    The Royal Buckinghamshire Hospital (colloquially called the Royal Bucks) was founded in 1832 in response to the cholera epidemic that swept across England at that time. It is situated in Aylesbury in Buckinghamshire. The construction was based on the design of a stately home to help dissociate the assumption at the time that hospitals were a place of death. When it first opened treatment was received by payment only: admissions were only taken at 11 o'clock every morning (except Sundays) and if you hadn't paid your one guinea a year subscription to the hospital (a kind of insurance to ensure treatment when it was needed) you were charged sixpence on admission and were then required to pay a further guinea for further treatment. If you were too poor to pay these fees, you went to the workhouse located on Bierton Hill (now the Tindal Centre). The current building dating from 1862 replaced an earlier building on the site. The design was influenced by Florence Nightingale who had recently returned from the Crimea and was the first pavilion style civilian hospital to be completed in the UK. Letters and sketches by her about the design are in the Bucks County Council Reference
    7.00
    2 votes
    150
    Swedish Medical Center

    Swedish Medical Center

    Swedish Medical Center is a 368 bed acute care hospital located in Englewood, Colorado, United States. It is operated by HealthONE Colorado, a joint venture between Hospital Corporation of America and The Colorado Health Foundation. Swedish Medical Center was founded in 1905 in Colorado as a tuberculosis sanatorium. In 1924, the hospital was expanded with funds donated by the Swedish Women of Chicago. In 1956, with the decline of TB as a major health threat, the hospital's focus turned to general healthcare. Swedish Medical Center was the first hospital in Colorado to use MRI and CT technology, as well as angiography. Swedish is a regional referral center for neurotrauma and in 2003 it was designated one of the four Level I Trauma Centers in Colorado. Swedish also became the first Comprehensive Stroke Center in Colorado in 2004. Wayne F.J. Yakes, M.D. founded the Vascular Malformation Center in 1991. It is the only center in the world that dedicates its care to the management of vascular malformations in all anatomic locations. Swedish employs more than 2,000 people and has a medical staff of 1,200 physicians and allied health professionals. The hospital runs many community health
    7.00
    2 votes
    151
    Tan Tock Seng Hospital

    Tan Tock Seng Hospital

    The Tan Tock Seng Hospital (Abbreviation: TTSH; Chinese: 陈笃生医院; Malay: Hospital Tan Tock Seng) is the second-largest hospital in Singapore after the Singapore General Hospital, but its accident and emergency department is the busiest in the country largely due to its geographically centralised location. Set up in 1844 by entrepreneur and philanthropist Tan Tock Seng, the hospital came under the international spotlight when it was designated as the sole treatment centre for the SARS epidemic which struck the country in 2003. Singapore was a successful trading centre. Large numbers of immigrants came, hoping to make their fortune here. The majority of immigrants were poor and destitute. Malnutrition was common and it was estimated that about 100 immigrants died each year from starvation. The British government set up a pauper's hospital in the 1820s but it closed in the 1830s because of insufficient funds. The government then suggested that the better-off members of each community take care of their own poor. Subsequently, some of the more benevolent members of the community responded. One such person was Tan Tock Seng, a successful businessman, philanthropist and the first Asian
    7.00
    2 votes
    152
    Brigham and Women's Hospital

    Brigham and Women's Hospital

    • Medical Specialties: Internal medicine
    Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH, "The Brigham") is the largest hospital of the Longwood Medical and Academic Area in Boston, Massachusetts. It is directly adjacent to Harvard Medical School of which it is the second largest teaching affiliate with 793 beds. With Massachusetts General Hospital, it is one of the two founding members of Partners HealthCare, the largest healthcare provider in Massachusetts. Brigham and Women's is a partner in the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center, which has 13 separate cancer treatment centers. Generally, outpatient care for cancer and related diseases takes place at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and inpatient care takes place at BWH, with the two facilities connected by bridges. BWH also treats patients at Faulkner Hospital, a community teaching hospital located in the Jamaica Plain section of Boston, and at Brigham and Women's/Mass General Health Care Center at Foxborough, in Foxborough, Massachusetts. The hospital is a Level I Burn and Trauma Center. A rooftop helipad on the BWH campus accommodates helicopter patients. BWH is part of the consortium of hospitals which operates Boston MedFlight. Construction was recently completed on the Carl J.
    6.00
    3 votes
    153
    Hospital for Special Surgery

    Hospital for Special Surgery

    • Medical Specialties: Orthopedic surgery
    Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) is a hospital in New York City that specializes in orthopedic surgery and the treatment of rheumatologic conditions. Founded in 1863 by Dr. James Knight, HSS is the oldest orthopedic hospital in the United States and is considered one of the top hospitals in the world for joint replacement. The hospital also performs the most knee replacement surgeries of any hospital in the United States. Thomas Sculco, M.D. serves as the Medical Director and Surgeon-in-Chief and Louis Shapiro serves as its President and Chief Executive Officer. Additional areas of expertise at HSS include spine surgery and sports medicine. HSS physicians with a subspecialty training in the field of spine surgery focus on patients who suffer from congenital or acute spinal disorders as well as from chronic back pain. The sports medicine services at HSS treat athletic injuries of the musculoskeletal system with a special focus on shoulder, elbow, and knee injuries. In addition, orthopedic surgeons at HSS perform limb lengthening, a procedure that uses the body’s capacity to create new bone as well as the soft tissues, ligaments, blood vessels, and nerves that surround and support
    6.00
    3 votes
    154
    St. Helena Hospital

    St. Helena Hospital

    St. Helena Hospital is operated by Adventist Health, a group of 17 hospitals in the western United States, and is located in the Napa Valley, California, between the town of St. Helena, and the community of Angwin, which is home to Pacific Union College. St. Helena Hospital was established in 1878 as the Rural Health Retreat; it is the oldest Seventh-day Adventist hospital in the United States. After the turn of the century, St. Helena Hospital became a full-service community hospital. St. Helena Hospital operates St. Helena Hospital Clearlake in Lake County and a 61-bed behavioral health hospital in Vallejo, California that provides mental health care services for children, adolescents and adults across northern California. St. Helena Hospital has a teaching affiliation with Pacific Union College.
    6.00
    3 votes
    155
    The Alfred Hospital

    The Alfred Hospital

    The Alfred, also known as Alfred Hospital or The Alfred Hospital, is a major hospital in Melbourne, Victoria. It is the second oldest hospital in Victoria, and the oldest Melbourne hospital still operating on its original site. It is located at the corner of Commercial and Punt Roads, Prahran, opposite Fawkner Park. Moves were already underway to establish a second hospital when Prince Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh, in Australia on a royal visit, was shot in an unsuccessful assassination attempt. The new "Hospital by the Yarra" (as well as Sydney's Royal Prince Alfred Hospital) was named for him. It was founded in 1871. In 1957, The Alfred was the first hospital in Australia to place a patient on cardiopulmonary bypass to treat complex cardiac lesions. It is a major teaching hospital affiliated with Monash University. The Alfred Hospital provides specialty services in the treatment of cancer, asthma, psychiatry, and allergies, in cardiology, and in neurosurgery; houses the largest intensive care unit in Australia; and contains many unique state health facilities, including adult cystic fibrosis services and the only adult burns centre in Victoria and Tasmania. It has always been a
    6.00
    3 votes
    156
    Tripler Army Medical Center

    Tripler Army Medical Center

    Tripler Army Medical Center is the headquarters of the Pacific Regional Medical Command of the armed forces administered by the United States Army in the state of Hawaii. It is the largest military hospital in the Asian and Pacific Rim region and serves a military sphere of jurisdiction that spans over 52% of the Earth's surface. Located on the slopes of Moanalua Ridge overlooking the Honolulu neighborhoods of Moanalua and Salt Lake, Tripler Army Medical Center's massive coral pink structure can be seen from any point in the Honolulu District. Tripler Hospital was established in 1907, housed in several wooden structures within Fort Shafter on the island of Oʻahu. In 1920 it was named after a legendary American Civil War medic, Brigadier General Charles Stuart Tripler, who made significant contributions to the development of military medicine. Tripler Army Medical Center was commissioned by Lt. General Robert C. Richardson Jr. who was Military Governor of the Territory of Hawaiʻi during World War II. General Richardson hired the New York City based architectural firm of York & Sawyer to design the Modernist medical complex. The noted local landscape architect Robert O. Thompson
    6.00
    3 votes
    157
    University Hospital of Wales

    University Hospital of Wales

    University Hospital of Wales (referred to locally as "the Heath" or UHW), opened in November 1971, is a major 1000-bed hospital situated in the Heath district of Cardiff, Wales. UHW is the third largest University Hospital in the UK and the largest hospital in Wales, providing 24-hour Accident & Emergency and various other specialist departments. The hospital is split into 3 blocks (A, B and C Block). It is also a teaching hospital of Cardiff University School of Medicine. In January 2009, it was announced that the BBC 1 was to broadcast a documentary series at the hospital, filmed in August 2008. A new series will be broadcast on 10 January 2011. In November 2009, the first person-to-person transmission of Tamiflu-resistant H1N1 in the world was confirmed at the hospital. Five patients were infected, with three apparently having been infected in the hospital itself in a case of iatrogenic transmission. The hospital was previously part of Cardiff & Vale NHS Trust, with Huw Ross being the Chief Executive, Ian Lane the Medical Director and Judith Hardisty the Director of Personnel. In 2010 the Trust was dissolved and the hospital is now run by a health board. Postmortem examinations
    6.00
    3 votes
    158
    Wagga Wagga Base Hospital

    Wagga Wagga Base Hospital

    Wagga Wagga Base Hospital is located in the City of Wagga Wagga, the largest inland city of New South Wales, Australia. The hospital is the largest in the region, providing medical services to the wider Riverina.It is the regional referral hospital for outlying areas, and provides medical, surgical, orthopaedic, psychiatric and paediatric inpatient services in addition to emergency care. Wagga Wagga also is home to a private hospital, Calvary Hospital, which is also important for the region. The hospital was founded as Wagga Wagga District Hospital in 1865 and a number of its early buildings were designed by William Monks, a local architect. in 1938 it became known as Wagga Wagga Base Hosputal. On 30 November 2007 the Greater Southern Area Health Service publicly released the concept plans of the new base hospital which will be located on the current hospital site and cost an estimated $275 million which will have a total of 460 beds.
    6.00
    3 votes
    159
    Trillium Health Centre

    Trillium Health Centre

    Trillium Health Centre is a hospital serving the residents of central and south Mississauga and south Etobicoke (now the western part of the City of Toronto) in Ontario, Canada, and has campuses located in Mississauga and Etobicoke/West Toronto. It was formed with the amalgamation of the Mississauga Hospital and the Queensway General Hospital in April 1998. Located at 100 Queensway West, Mississauga: Located at 150 Sherway Drive: The hospital's annual Diwali dinner has become known as one of Mississauga's premier social events. The Trillium Health Centre Bus Terminal is located in Mississauga, Ontario, Canada. It is situated on the northern end of the Mississauga site. The bus terminal only contains a bus shelter. For the Mississauga site, bus service is exclusively by MiWay. For the West Toronto site, bus service is by MiWay and TTC. This site does not have a terminal; however, buses stop at the street at the West Mall.
    5.67
    3 votes
    160
    Ballarat Base Hospital

    Ballarat Base Hospital

    The Ballarat Base Hospital is a hospital located in Ballarat, Victoria, Australia. It is a public hospital operated by Ballarat Health Services. Ballarat Health Services employs approximately 3000 staff at the Base Hospital, the nearby Queen Elizabeth Centre, and 13 off-site facilities in the surrounding area. During the gold rush of the 1850s the Government Camp provided medical support but mainly for officers and not for miners and the general community. Those wounded at the Eureka Stockade in 1854 received varying attention and the need for a hospital became apparent. A year later building of a hospital commenced. The five storey Henry Bolte wing, designed by architects Bates Smart was completed in 1994. Styled in postmodern design to blend with the city's heritage buildings it has become a landmark in Ballarat, however many consider the building ugly and bulky. In 1997, the Ballarat Base Hospital merged with the Queen Elizabeth Centre and the Grampians Psychiatric Service to form Ballarat Health Services. In 2005 Ballarat Health Services was awarded the Premier's Award for the Outstanding Rural and Regional Health Service in Victoria. In 2004/05 Ballarat Health Services treated
    6.50
    2 votes
    161
    Great Ormond Street Hospital

    Great Ormond Street Hospital

    Great Ormond Street Hospital (informally GOSH or Great Ormond Street, formerly the Hospital for Sick Children) is a children's hospital located in the Bloomsbury area of London, United Kingdom and a part of Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust. Great Ormond Street is closely associated with University College London (UCL) and in partnership with the UCL Institute of Child Health, which it is located adjacent to, is the largest centre for research and postgraduate teaching in children’s health in Europe. It is part of both the Great Ormond Street Hospital/UCL Institute of Child Health Biomedical Research Centre and the UCL Partners academic health science centre. Great Ormond Street is known internationally for receiving the rights from J. M. Barrie to his play Peter Pan, or the Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up in 1929, which have provided significant funding for the institution. After a long campaign by Dr Charles West, the Hospital for Sick Children was founded on 14 February 1852 and was the first hospital providing in-patient beds specifically for children in the English-speaking world. Despite opening with just 10 beds, it grew into the world's leading
    6.50
    2 votes
    162
    Metropolitan State Hospital

    Metropolitan State Hospital

    The Metropolitan State Hospital was an American public hospital for the mentally ill, located in the city of Waltham, Massachusetts. At one time the hospital was the largest and most modern facility of its type in Massachusetts. The Gaebler Children's Center for mentally ill youths was located on the grounds of the hospital. It was closed in January 1992 as a result of the state's cost-cutting policy of closing its mental hospitals and moving patients into private care (see privatization). As of 2009, the main complex of buildings has been demolished and a large apartment complex has been built. The Hospital's infamous cemetery still rests on the grounds, maintained by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Gravestones are marked by number and religion, with but a few markings bearing names. In 1978, Metropolitan State patient Anne Marie Davee was murdered by another patient, Melvin W. Wilson. Wilson dismembered Davee's body and kept seven of her teeth which were discovered in his possession by employees of the hospital. Despite this discovery and its obvious implications, no action was taken against Wilson until Massachusetts State Senator Sen. Jack Backman (D-Brookline) led a Senate
    6.50
    2 votes
    163
    Mount Elizabeth Hospital

    Mount Elizabeth Hospital

    Mount Elizabeth Hospital (Chinese: 伊丽莎白医院) is a 373-bed private hospital in Singapore operated by Parkway Health. It was started in 1976 and officially opened in 8 December 1979. The hospital specializes in cardiology, oncology, and neuroscience, among other tertiary services. Since 1995, it is owned by Parkway Holdings Ltd.
    6.50
    2 votes
    164
    Philippine Heart Center

    Philippine Heart Center

    The Philippine Heart Center in Quezon City was established through Presidential Decree No. 673 issued by president Ferdinand E. Marcos in 1975. Its original name was the Philippine Heart Center for Asia and was changed to its current form in 1975. It was inaugurated on Valentine's Day, February 14, 1975 and graced by renowned cardiovascular experts such as Dr. Christiaan Barnard, Dr. Denton Cooley, Dr. Donald Effler, and Dr. Charles Bailey. The first Director of the PHC was Dr. Avenilo P. Aventura (1974-1986), a cardiovascular surgeon who performed many pioneering operations in the Philippines including the first successful renal transplantation in 1970, the first CABG in 1972, and developed and implanted the first ASEAN bioprosthesis, the PHCA porcine valve. The first patient to be admitted to the PHC was Ms. Imelda Francisco on April 14, 1975.
    6.50
    2 votes
    165
    Princess Margaret Hospital

    Princess Margaret Hospital

    Princess Margaret Hospital is located in Christchurch, New Zealand. Princess Margaret Hospital is a public hospital which is run by the Canterbury District Health Board. Opened on 31 August 1959 as a general hospital, it is now primarily used for older persons health care and mental health services. It also houses much of the administration of Canterbury District Health Board. It is built at the foot of the Port Hills, at the western edge of the suburb of Cashmere. The hospital was named after the late Princess Margaret, sister of Queen Elizabeth II. The land was purchased from the Cracroft Wilson estate and the buildings designed by the Christchurch architectural partnership of Seward and Stanton. Charles Luney was chosen as the construction professional. The complex was opened by the then Governor-General of New Zealand, Charles Lyttelton, 10th Viscount Cobham. Princess Margaret Hospital has a regional service that specially caters for people suffering from eating disorders known as the South Island Eating Disorders Service. The unit is the only place in New Zealand which has a in-patient unit specifically offering a dedicated weight gain programme to treat people with eating
    6.50
    2 votes
    166
    Royal Brompton Hospital

    Royal Brompton Hospital

    Royal Brompton Hospital is the largest specialist heart and lung centre in the United Kingdom (UK). The hospital is part of Royal Brompton & Harefield NHS Foundation Trust is a national and international specialist heart and lung centre based in Chelsea, London and Harefield, Middlesex. The Trust helps patients from all age groups who have heart and lung problems and is the country's largest centre for the treatment of adult congenital heart disease. In the 19th century, consumption was a common word for tuberculosis. At the time consumptive patients were turned away from other hospitals as there was no known cure. Hospitals that dealt with such infectious diseases later came to be known as sanatoriums. The prospectus for the Hospital stated that for the last 6 months of 1837 out of 148,701 deaths from all causes, 27,754 were from consumption. The hospital was founded in the 1840s by Philip Rose, the first meeting to establish the Hospital was on 8 March 1841. It was to be known as The Hospital for Consumption and Diseases of the Chest. It amalgamated on 25 May 1841 with The West London Dispensary for Diseases of the Chest, which was based at 83 Wells Street, near Oxford Street.
    6.50
    2 votes
    167
    Royal London Hospital

    Royal London Hospital

    The Royal London Hospital was founded in September 1740 and was originally named The London Infirmary. The name changed to The London Hospital in 1748 and then to The Royal London Hospital on its 250th anniversary in 1990. The first patients were treated at a house in Featherstone Street, Moorfields in November 1740. In May 1741, the hospital moved to Prescot Street, and remained there until 1757 when it moved to its current location on the south side of Whitechapel Road, Whitechapel, in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. The Royal London is part of Barts Health NHS Trust. The Royal London provides district general hospital services for the City and Tower Hamlets and specialist tertiary care services for patients from across London and elsewhere. It is also the base for the HEMS helicopter ambulance service, operating out of a specially built roof area. There are 675 beds at The Royal London Hospital. The London Hospital Medical College, the first in England and Wales, was founded in 1785. It amalgamated in 1995 with St Bartholomews Hospital Medical College, under the aegis of Queen Mary and Westfield College, now known as Queen Mary, University of London, to become St
    6.50
    2 votes
    168
    Spring Grove Hospital Center

    Spring Grove Hospital Center

    Spring Grove Hospital Center, formerly known as Spring Grove State Hospital, is a psychiatric hospital located in the Baltimore, Maryland suburb of Catonsville. Founded in 1797, Spring Grove is the second oldest continuously operating psychiatric hospital in the United States. Today, the hospital operates 426 beds and has approximately 800 admissions and discharges a year. Service lines include adult and adolescent acute psychiatric admissions, long term inpatient care, medical-psychiatric hospitalization, forensic evaluation services, inpatient psychiatric research, and assisted living services. The facility is owned and operated by the State of Maryland and is the location of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center which is renowned for its research into the causes of, and best treatments for, schizophrenia. Founded in 1797, Spring Grove is the nation's second-oldest psychiatric hospital. Only the Eastern State Hospital which was founded in 1773 in Williamsburg, Virginia, is older. In its long history it has been variously known as The Baltimore Hospital, The Maryland Hospital, The Maryland Hospital for the Insane, and finally as The Spring Grove Hospital Center. The present
    6.50
    2 votes
    169
    Zwiefalten Abbey

    Zwiefalten Abbey

    Zwiefalten Abbey (German: Kloster Zwiefalten, Abtei Zwiefalten or after 1750, Reichsabtei Zwiefalten) was a Benedictine monastery situated at Zwiefalten near Reutlingen in Baden-Württemberg in Germany. The monastery was founded in 1089 at the time of the Investiture Controversy by Counts Gero and Kuno of Achalm, advised by Bishop Adalbero of Würzburg and Abbot William of Hirsau. The first monks were also from Hirsau Abbey, home of the Hirsau Reforms (under the influence of the Cluniac reforms), which strongly influenced the new foundation. Although Pope Urban VI granted special privileges to it, Zwiefalten Abbey was nevertheless the private monastery of the Counts of Achalm, later succeeded by the Counts of Württemberg. The abbey was plundered in 1525 during the German Peasants' War. In 1750 the abbey was granted the status of Reichsabtei, which meant that it had the status of an independent power subject only to the Imperial Crown and was free of the rule of Württemberg. On 25 November 1802, however, it was secularised and dissolved and became a lunatic asylum and later psychiatric hospital, which it is today, as well as the site of the Württemberg Psychiatry Museum. The present
    6.50
    2 votes
    170
    Institute of Mental Health

    Institute of Mental Health

    • Medical Specialties: Psychiatry
    The Institute of Mental Health (Abbreviation: IMH; Chinese: 心理卫生学院) is a medical complex in Singapore specialising in the treatment of patients with mental illnesses. The Institute was also popularly known by its former name as the Woodbridge Hospital (板桥医院). Today, the name Woodbridge refers only to the hospital wing of IMH, part of the IMH's complex of outpatient clinics, services and research units. The hospital has 2,425 beds. Woodbridge Hospital began as a 30-bed building at the corner of Bras Basah Road and Bencoolen Street in 1841. It was then known as The Insane Hospital. It was renamed the Lunatic Asylum in 1861, and moved to a site near the old Kandang Kerbau Maternity Hospital, and then to Sepoy Lines in 1887. Relocated for the last time to Yio Chu Kang in 1928, it became known as The Mental Hospital. For a brief period from 1945 to 1947, the British Royal Air Force from the nearby Seletar Airfield requisitioned the hospital for use to treat the sick and wounded of Allied servicemen and Japanese POWs after the end of hostilities of World War II. Thus, the female section was converted into the RAF Hospital while the male section was allocated for use as the Japanese
    4.75
    4 votes
    171
    University of Pittsburgh Medical Center

    University of Pittsburgh Medical Center

    The University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) is a $10 billion integrated global nonprofit health enterprise that has 54,000 employees, 20 hospitals, 4,200 licensed beds, 400 outpatient sites and doctors’ offices, a 1.5 million-member health insurance division, as well as commercial and international ventures. UPMC is closely affiliated with its academic partner, the University of Pittsburgh. It is considered a leading American health care provider, as it has ranked in US News & World Report "Honor Roll" of the approximately 15 to 20 best hospitals in America for over a decade. As of 2012, UPMC was ranked 10th nationally among the best hospitals (and first in Pennsylvania) by US News & World Report and ranked in 15 of 16 specialty areas, including 9 specialties for which UPMC placed in the top 10. This does not include Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC which ranked in the top 9 of pediatric centers in a separate US News ranking. UPMC has its roots in the 1893 establishment of Presbyterian Hospital, which serves as the medical center's flagship facility, and the 1886 founding of the Western Pennsylvania Medical College. Soon after its founding, the medical college
    4.75
    4 votes
    172
    Alta Bates Summit Medical Center

    Alta Bates Summit Medical Center

    Alta Bates Summit Medical Center is a hospital located in the East Bay of the San Francisco Bay Area. Its three campuses are located in Berkeley (Alta Bates Campus, Herrick Campus) and Oakland (Summit Campus). Alta Bates Summit is a non-profit community-based medical center and is part of the Sutter Health network. The flagship Berkeley campus of the hospital was named after Alta Bates, a nurse. Until its affiliation with Summit Medical Center, it was known simply as Alta Bates Medical Center, and originally, as Alta Bates Hospital. Bates was a prominent early California Nurse Anesthetist. The CANA (Calif. Assoc. of Nurse Anesthetists) Bulletin of December, 1955 reported that Bates was the first graduate of a nurse's training program in Eureka, California, and the first woman in the San Francisco Bay Area to become an outstanding anesthetist. Alta Bates administered over 14,000 anesthetics during a career lasting more than fifteen years. In 1904, Dr. LeRoy Francis Herrick, a graduate of the Kentucky College of Medicine (1893), purchased a Berkeley mansion known as the Hume House, located on the same block upon which the current Herrick Campus is situated, between Dwight and
    7.00
    1 votes
    173
    Ichilov General Hospital

    Ichilov General Hospital

    Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center (commonly referred to as Ichilov Hospital) is the main hospital serving Tel Aviv, Israel, and its metropolitan area. It is the third-largest hospital complex in the country. The complex is spread out over an area of 150,000 m² and incorporates three hospitals: Ichilov General Hospital and Ida Sourasky Rehabilitation Center, Lis Maternity Hospital, and Dana Children's Hospital. The director of the hospital is Prof. Gabriel Barabash. Ichilov Hospital was founded in 1963 as a one-building facility designed by architect Arieh Sharon. Renamed Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, it now encompasses three hospitals over an area of 150,000 square meters: Ichilov General Hospital and Ida Sourasky Rehabilitation Center, Lis Maternity Hospital, and Dana Children's Hospital. The center also serves as an instructional and research center affiliated with Tel Aviv University's Sackler Medical School and Sheinborn Nursing School. The main building of Ichilov Hospital was built with the donations of Ted Arison and Shari Arison. In 2011, a 700-1,000 bed bombproof emergency facility was opened. The building, with 13 stories above ground and four stories underground,
    7.00
    1 votes
    174
    John Sealy Hospital

    John Sealy Hospital

    John Sealy Hospital is a hospital that is a part of the University of Texas Medical Branch complex in Galveston, Texas, United States. Sealy opened on January 10, 1890. It was founded by the widow and brother of one of the richest citizens of Texas, John Sealy after his death. Accompanied by the John Sealy Hospital Training School for Nurses, which was opened two months after the hospital, the foundation became the primary teaching facility of University of Texas Medical Branch opened in October 1891. In 1922, John Sealy's children, John Sealy, II and Jennie Sealy Smith established the Sealy & Smith Foundation for the hospital. This enabled construction of several new facilities, including the Rebecca Sealy Nurses' home. A second John Sealy Hospital was built in 1954 to replace the 1890 building. Today it is known as the John Sealy Annex and houses administrative and support services. The current John Sealy Hospital was completed in 1978 at a cost of $32.5 million and was funded in full by the Sealy & Smith Foundation. The 12-story hospital includes single-patient rooms and specialized intensive care units. Other features include the Acute Care for Elders Unit, or ACE Unit and a
    7.00
    1 votes
    175
    Johns Hopkins Hospital

    Johns Hopkins Hospital

    The Johns Hopkins Hospital is the teaching hospital and biomedical research facility of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, located in Baltimore, the U.S. state of Maryland. It was founded using money from a bequest by philanthropist Johns Hopkins. The Johns Hopkins Hospital and the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine are the founding institutions of modern American medicine and are the birthplace of numerous traditions including "rounds", "residents" and "housestaff". Many medical specialties were formed at The Johns Hopkins Hospital, including neurosurgery, by Harvey Williams Cushing; urology; endocrinology; cardiac surgery, by Alfred Blalock; pediatrics (Park) and child psychiatry, by Leo Kanner. The Johns Hopkins Hospital is widely regarded as one of the world's greatest hospitals. It has been ranked by U.S. News & World Report as the best overall hospital in America for 21 consecutive years. The hospital's main medical campus in East Baltimore is served by the eastern terminus of the Baltimore Metro Subway. Johns Hopkins, a Baltimore merchant and banker, left an estate of $7 million (US$123.8 million in 2009) when he died on Christmas Eve 1873 at the age of
    7.00
    1 votes
    176
    Kandang Kerbau Women's and Children's Hospital

    Kandang Kerbau Women's and Children's Hospital

    KK Women's and Children's Hospital (abbreviation: KKH; Chinese: 竹脚妇幼医院; Malay: Hospital Wanita dan Kanak-kanak Kandang Kerbau), formerly known as "Kandang Kerbau Hospital", is the largest hospital specialising in healthcare for women and children in Singapore. From its humble beginnings as a small general hospital in 1858 to a 30-bed maternity hospital in 1924, KKH has grown into an 830-bed hospital providing obstetric and gynaecology, neonatology and paediatric services. Often affectionally referred to as "KK" amongst locals, it is the birthplace of a sizeable proportion of Singaporeans, delivering over half of total newborns in the country as early as 1938. In 1966, the hospital entered the Guinness Book of Records for delivering the highest number of newborns within a single maternity facility for that year, and it continued to hold on to this record for a full decade, delivering 85% of the population. In 1997, the hospital moved to its present site. In 2003, the old premises was marked as a historical site by the National Heritage Board , a tribute to an institution that has been the birthplace of over 1.2 million Singaporeans since its inception. The hospital's come from the
    7.00
    1 votes
    177
    Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital NHS Trust

    Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital NHS Trust

    The Norfolk and Norwich University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust is an academic teaching NHS Foundation Trust which operates hospitals in Norfolk, England. The trust was first established on 8 February 1994 as the Norfolk and Norwich Health Care NHS Trust and authorised as the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust on 1 May 2008. In 2000 the Government announced that a joint venture bid with the University of East Anglia to have a medical school and university hospital in Norwich had been successful. As a result, the trust had been established as the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital NHS Trust on 18 January 2001. In 2009 the health watchdog, the Care Quality Commission, rated the trust's hospitals as Fair for Quality of Services and Good for Use of Resources. The trust serves a catchment population of 654,900. The trust is a joint venture partner in University of East Anglia’s School of Medicine, Health Policy and Practice, including undergraduate and postgraduate medical education. A five-year MB/BS programme began in September 2002 with an intake of over 160 students a year. There are strong links with the University of East Anglia (UEA) centred in
    7.00
    1 votes
    178
    Rampton Secure Hospital

    Rampton Secure Hospital

    Rampton Secure Hospital is a high security psychiatric hospital near the village of Woodbeck between Retford and Rampton in the Bassetlaw District of Nottinghamshire, England. It is situated 2.3 km (1.4 mi) west-south-west of Rampton village, at Ordnance Survey grid reference SK 775 776 GB Grid. Rampton Hospital houses about 400 patients who have been detained under the Mental Health Act 1983 under one of these classifications: Rampton Hospital has a staff of about 2000 and provides the national services for patients with a learning disability, women and deaf men requiring high security care. It also provides services for men suffering from mental illness and personality disorder. The hospital has a Dangerous and Severe Personality Disorder Unit opened in 2004 as part of a national DSPD pilot, the Peaks Unit, which is the only remaining DSPD unit in a hospital setting in Britain. About a quarter of the patients have had no significant contact with the criminal justice system, but have been detained under the Mental Health Act and are considered to require treatment in conditions of high security owing to their "dangerous, violent or criminal propensities". Others have been
    7.00
    1 votes
    179
    Royal Free Hospital

    Royal Free Hospital

    The Royal Free Hospital (also known simply as the Royal Free) is a major teaching hospital in Hampstead, London. It has been rated 'excellent for quality of services and 'good' for quality of financial management by the Healthcare Commission in 2009. The hospital is part of the Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust, which is a member of the UCL Partners' academic health science centre. The nearest London Underground station is Belsize Park. The Royal Free Hospital was founded in 1828 by the surgeon William Marsden to provide - as the name indicates - free care to those of little means. It is said that Marsden found a young girl in the churchyard of St. Andrew's Church, Holborn, suffering from hypothermia, and sought help from one of the nearby hospitals. However, none would take the girl in, and she died in agony in Marsden's arms; the horror of the experience led him to establish the Royal Free. In 1828 Marsden set up a small dispensary at 16 Greville Street, Hatton Garden, Holborn, called the London General Institution for the Gratiutious Care of Malignant Diseases. A royal charter was granted by Queen Victoria in 1837 after a cholera epidemic in which the hospital had extended
    7.00
    1 votes
    180
    Columbia Hospital for Women

    Columbia Hospital for Women

    The Columbia Hospital for Women was a hospital located in Washington, D.C. Originally opening in 1866 as a health-care facility for wives and widows of Civil War soldiers, it moved in 1870 from Thomas Circle to its later location at 2425 L Street, NW in the West End neighborhood. The Columbia became a private, non-profit hospital when President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed legislation transferring it to a board of directors in 1953. The facility closed in 2002 and the building was converted into a condominium, The Columbia Residences. Columbia Hospital for Women was the birthplace of Al Gore.
    5.33
    3 votes
    181
    Alexandra Hospital

    Alexandra Hospital

    Alexandra Hospital (Abbreviation: AH; Chinese: 亚历山大医院) is a 400-bed hospital located in the south-western part of Singapore. Nestled in a 110,000 square metre land, the hospital is a picture of tranquil setting, lined with mostly colonial style buildings built since the late 1930s. It was also the site of a massacre during World War II. Established in 1938, the hospital served as the principal hospital for the British in the Far East and was known as the British Military Hospital. During the Battle of Singapore in February 1942, the hospital was the scene of a massacre by Japanese soldiers of the wounded British and some of the medical staff. After World War II to the 1970s, Alexandra Hospital remained as one of the most modern hospitals in Singapore right to the 1970s. In its heyday, Alexandra Hospital was an institution that adopted cutting-edge medical technology and was the first hospital in Southeast Asia to successfully perform limb re-attachment to a patient. Alexandra Hospital possessed several well-known medical expertise. These include: The hospital was handed over to the government of Singapore in 1971 and remained as Alexandra Hospital. On 1 October 2000, the hospital
    6.00
    2 votes
    182
    Bryce State Mental Hospital

    Bryce State Mental Hospital

    • Medical Specialties: Psychiatry
    Bryce Hospital, opened in 1861 in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA, is Alabama's oldest and largest inpatient psychiatric facility. First known as the Alabama State Hospital for the Insane and later as the Alabama Insane Hospital, the building is considered an architectural model. The hospital currently houses 268 beds for acute care, treatment and rehabilitation of full-time (committed) patients. The Mary Starke Harper Geriatric Psychiatry Hospital, a separate facility on the same campus, provides an additional 100 beds for inpatient geriatric care. The main facility was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1977. The plans for a state hospital for the mentally ill in Alabama began in 1852. The new facility was planned from the start to utilize the "moral architecture" concepts of 1830s activists Thomas Story Kirkbride and Dorothea Dix. Dix's reformist ideas, in particular, are credited as the driving force behind the construction of the hospital. Architect Samuel Sloan designed the Italianate building using the Kirkbride Plan. Construction of the building began in 1853 but was not completed until 1859. The hospital was the first building in Tuscaloosa with gas lighting and
    6.00
    2 votes
    183
    Hospital Authority

    Hospital Authority

    The Hospital Authority (traditional Chinese: 醫院管理局; pinyin: Yīyuàn Guǎnlǐjú) is a statutory body managing all the public hospitals and institutes in Hong Kong. It is managed by the Hospital Authority Board and is under the monitor of the Secretary for Food and Health of the Hong Kong Government. Its chairman is Mr. Anthony Wu, who is also the chair of BFRC, and a member of HKGCC. Before the establishment of the authority, all health and medical issues were under the management of the Medical and Health Department. In 1990, a new health administration system was introduced. The department became the Department of Health and in 1991, the management of all the public hospitals was passed to a new statutory body, the Hospital Authority, which was established in 1990 under the Hospital Authority Ordinance. In 2003, the General Outpatient Clinics of Department of Health were transferred to the Authority. On the day when a Hong Kong girl was diagnosed as the territory's first victim of the 2008 Chinese milk scandal, anxious parents were frustrated to discover that doctors at the special unit set up at the Princess Margaret Hospital were taking the day off. Deputy Director of Health Gloria
    6.00
    2 votes
    184
    Portland Shriners Hospital

    Portland Shriners Hospital

    The Shriners Hospital for Children is a 29-bed, non-profit pediatric hospital located in Portland, Oregon. It specializes in orthopaedics, cleft lip, and palate disorders as part of the 22-hospital system belonging to the Shriners Hospitals for Children. The hospital is located on the Oregon Health and Science University campus, and is active in the research and development of new technology.
    6.00
    2 votes
    185
    Dammasch State Hospital

    Dammasch State Hospital

    Dammasch State Hospital was a mental hospital, asylum, and educational center located in Wilsonville, Oregon, United States. It opened in 1961 and closed in 1995. After its closure, the former site was embroiled in local controversy as it was a proposed location for a women's prison, which angered local residents as the site is less than a mile from residential neighborhoods. The Dammasch building was demolished, and the Villebois housing development occupies its former site.
    5.00
    3 votes
    186
    Maine Medical Center

    Maine Medical Center

    Maine Medical Center (commonly abbreviated to MMC or contracted to Maine Med) is a 637 licensed-bed teaching hospital located in Portland, Maine, United States with a staff of over 6,000 people. Founded in 1874, it is the largest hospital in northern New England with 27,000 inpatients, more than 500,000 outpatient visits and over 16,000 surgeries performed annually. MMC is structured as a non-profit, private corporation governed by volunteer trustees. Maine Medical Center is the largest tertiary care hospital in Northern New England, serving all of Maine and parts of Vermont and New Hampshire. It is a Level One Trauma Center, most recently named by U.S. News & World Report as one of the top hospitals in America for heart care, orthopedics and gynecology, and home to the Barbara Bush Children's Hospital, cited as one of the Top 25 children's hospitals in the country. Maine Medical Center is a teaching hospital, with an affiliation with the University of Vermont College of Medicine. As a part of its mission, MMC is also a leader in biomedical research, through its Maine Medical Center Research Institute, ongoing clinical trials, and translational research. The present-day complex of
    5.00
    3 votes
    187
    University of Rochester Medical Center

    University of Rochester Medical Center

    The University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC), located in Rochester, New York, is one of the main campuses of the University of Rochester and comprises the university's primary medical education, research and patient care facilities. URMC is one of the largest facilities for medical treatment and research in Upstate New York and includes a regional Perinatal Center, Trauma Center, Burn Center and the James P. Wilmot Cancer Center, an Epilepsy Center, Liver Transplant Center and Cardiac Transplant Center and also includes a major AIDS Treatment Center and an NIH-designated AIDS Vaccine Evaluation Unit. A large portion of the university's biomedical research is conducted in the Arthur Kornberg Medical Research Building and the Aab Institute of Biomedical Sciences. URMC occupies a 4,000,000-square-foot (370,000 m) complex located between Elmwood Avenue, Mount Hope Avenue, Genesee Valley Park, and Lattimore Road. In January 2008 the University of Rochester announced a $500 million strategic plan geared toward expansion in research and patient services. The plan will potentially add 800 new jobs to the university. Part of the expansion will include building a new 6-story, 123-bed
    5.00
    3 votes
    188
    Bristol Royal Infirmary

    Bristol Royal Infirmary

    The Bristol Royal Infirmary, also known as the BRI, is a large teaching hospital situated in the centre of Bristol, England. It has links with the medical faculty of the nearby University of Bristol, and the Faculty of Health and Social Care at the University of the West of England, also in Bristol. The BRI is one of eight hospitals operated by the University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust (UHBristol), Bristol's largest NHS trust. A wealthy city merchant, Paul Fisher, was prominent in the foundation of hospital in 1735. In 1904, Sir George White, who gave Bristol its first electric tramway service and established what was to become the Bristol Aeroplane Company, saved the hospital from a major financial crisis, and later masterminded the construction of the BRI Edward VII Memorial Wing, designed by Charles Holden. Acquired by the National Health Service in 1948, the hospital's facilities were greatly extended in the 1960s. The Queen's Building extension opened in 1972. The Bristol Haematology and Oncology Centre, located behind the main hospital building, opened in 1971. The Bristol heart scandal, which resulted in the deaths of a number of babies and young children during
    5.50
    2 votes
    189
    Hennepin County Medical Center

    Hennepin County Medical Center

    Hennepin County Medical Center (HCMC) is a Level I trauma center based in Minneapolis, Minnesota, the county seat of Hennepin County. The primary 422-bed facility is located on five city blocks across the street from the Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome, with satellite clinics in Minneapolis, Brooklyn Center, Brooklyn Park, St. Anthony and Richfield. HCMC has been listed among America's Best Hospitals by US News & World Report magazine every year since 1999. Some patients come a long distance to be treated at HCMC because of the recognized trauma surgery specialists, transplant services, stroke specialists, advanced endoscopy/hepatobilliary center, and hyperbaric oxygen chamber. The original hospital building, established in 1887 as Minneapolis City Hospital, before being referred to as "General Hospital" or "City Hospital," sat a block from its current main location. Ownership was transferred to the county in 1964, when it was renamed Hennepin County General Hospital. The hospital took its current name in 1974. By the early 1970s, the hospital was a disorganized patchwork of buildings, leading to the decision to clear and rebuild the facility. The current hospital facility was
    5.50
    2 votes
    190
    Klinikum Aachen

    Klinikum Aachen

    The Klinikum Aachen, full German name "Universitätsklinikum Aachen" (University Hospital Aachen), abbreviated UKA, formerly known as "Neues Klinikum", is the largest hospital in Europe, located in Aachen (Germany). It is part of the RWTH Aachen and contains its whole medical faculty. Seen from far away, for many visitors the Klinikum Aachen looks like an oil refinery rather than a hospital, due to the huge striped ventilation pipes that are attached to the outer walls. The Klinikum Aachen contains many specialised clinics, theoretical and clinical institutes and other research facilities, lecture halls, schools for jobs in the medical field, and all facilities necessary for a hospital like a laundry and central sterilisation. It is the biggest single-building hospital in Europe. In 1966 the faculty of medicine at the RWTH Aachen was founded. Automatically the municipal hospitals in Aachen became university hospitals, but soon it was realised that they were too small. In 1972 the constructions of the Klinikum Aachen began. Ten years later the first rooms could be used by the faculty. The rest of the building was finished section by section. The constructions were delayed due to
    5.50
    2 votes
    191
    McGill University Health Centre

    McGill University Health Centre

    The McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) (in French, Centre universitaire de santé McGill) is a network of teaching and community hospitals in Montreal, Quebec, Canada affiliated with McGill University. The MUHC has one Board of Directors and was formed from the legal merger of Montreal General Hospital, Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal Children's Hospital, Montreal Neurological Hospital and the Montreal Chest Institute, which had already merged with the Royal Victoria Hospital. The most recent member of the MUHC is The Lachine Hospital and Camille-Lefebvre Pavilion. A teaching hospital, the MUHC is officially a bilingual institution, providing services in both French and English, as well as a number of other languages, as necessary. The MUHC provides tertiary and quaternary care to patients from across Quebec and elsewhere, as well as primary and secondary care and trauma emergency services to adults and children in the Montreal region. The seven clinical missions of the MUHC are: Pediatric Medicine (The Montreal Children’ s Hospital), Medicine, Surgery, Neurosciences (The Montreal Neurological Hospital), Women’s Health, Mental Health and Cancer Care. The Research Institute of
    5.50
    2 votes
    192
    Royal Hospital Chelsea

    Royal Hospital Chelsea

    The Royal Hospital Chelsea is a retirement home and nursing home for some 300 British soldiers who are unfit for further duty due to injury or old age, located on Royal Hospital Road in Chelsea, London, in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea. It is a true hospital in the original sense of the word - that is, a place where hospitality was provided. The residents in the Royal Hospital are referred to as "in-pensioners" (or more colloquially, as Chelsea pensioners). The Royal Hospital was founded by King Charles II in 1682 as a retreat for veterans. The provision of a hostel rather than the payment of pensions was inspired by Les Invalides in Paris. The site for the Hospital was an area of Chelsea which held an incomplete building — "Chelsey College", a theological college founded by James I in 1609. The property was acquired by Sir Stephen Fox out of his own funds and Sir Christopher Wren was commissioned to design and erect the building. The first patients included those injured at the Battle of Sedgemoor. Wren expanded his original design to add two additional quadrangles to the east and west of the central court; these were known respectively as the "Light Horse Court" and
    5.50
    2 votes
    193
    St. Vincent's University Hospital

    St. Vincent's University Hospital

    St. Vincent's Hospital (Gaeilge:Ospidéal Ollscoile Naomh Uinseann ) is a teaching hospital located at Elm Park, south of the city of Dublin, Ireland. It is at the junction of Merrion Road and Nutley Lane opposite the Merrion Centre and adjacent to Elm Park Golf Club. St. Vincent's Hospital was founded in 1834 on St. Stephen's Green, Dublin, by Mother Mary Aikenhead, foundress of the Roman Catholic order Religious Sisters of Charity. The hospital was open to all who could afford its services, irrespective of their religious persuasion. The hospital was subsequently moved to its current site in Elm Park in 1970, and in 1999 was renamed St. Vincent's University Hospital (SVUH), to highlight its position as a principal teaching hospital of University College Dublin. St. Vincent's University Hospital serves as a regional centre for emergency medicine and medical care at an inpatient and outpatient level. Many patients from regional and tertiary hospitals are referred to SVUH for specialist care, and it is the national referral centre for liver transplantation and adult cystic fibrosis. Tied closely to the University, it serves as a training ground for doctors, nurses, radiographers and
    5.50
    2 votes
    194
    University College Hospital

    University College Hospital

    University College Hospital (UCH) is a teaching hospital located in London, United Kingdom. It is part of the University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and is closely associated with University College London (UCL). The hospital has 665 in-patient beds, 12 operating theatres and houses the largest single critical care unit in the NHS. The Accident & Emergency department sees approximately 80,000 patients a year. It is a major teaching hospital and a key location for the UCL Medical School. It is also a major centre for medical research and part of both the UCLH/UCL Comprehensive Biomedical Research Centre and the UCL Partners academic health science centre. The hospital is located on Euston Road in the Fitzrovia area of the London Borough of Camden, adjacent to the main campus of UCL. The nearest London Underground station is Euston Square, with Warren Street and Goodge Street nearby. The hospital was founded as the 'North London Hospital' in 1834, eight years after UCL (then known as the London University), in order to provide clinical training for the "medical classes" of the university, after a refusal by the governors of the Middlesex Hospital to allow students
    5.50
    2 votes
    195
    University Hospitals of Cleveland

    University Hospitals of Cleveland

    University Hospitals (also called Case Medical Center) is a major not-for-profit medical center in Cleveland, Ohio, United States. Case Medical Center is the primary affiliate hospital of Case Western Reserve University - a relationship that was first established in 1896. With 150 locations throughout northeast Ohio, it encompasses a network of hospitals, outpatient centers and primary care physicians. University Hospitals Case Medical Center is home to world-class clinical and research centers, including cancer, pediatrics, women's health, orthopedics spine, radiology, radiation oncology, neurosurgery, neuroscience, cardiology, cardiovascular surgery, organ transplantation, and human genetics. 2009 U.S. News & World Report National Rankings' Some of the famous patients treated at Case Medical Center include: Vision 2010 is the largest construction and upgrade project in the history of University Hospitals. New construction will include a new 200-bed cancer hospital, upgraded emergency room facilities at CMC, a new neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital, and new construction at other hospital sites. The capital expenditure for this project,
    5.50
    2 votes
    196
    Werribee Mercy Hospital

    Werribee Mercy Hospital

    Werribee Mercy Hospital, located in Werribee, Victoria on the Princes Highway, about 25 km west of Melbourne, is a large regional community public hospital that provides a broad range of services which include surgical, maternity, obstetric care, dialysis, emergency, mental health, aged and palliative care, allied health services and a 24 hour emergency department. As part of the Werribee Mercy Mental Health Program the hospital offers a range of acute and community psychiatric services. The hospital opened in January 1994 and has rapidly expanded to cope with the expanding population in Melbourne's fast growing western suburbs. The hospital has a capacity of 189 beds, and in April 2004 commenced a $10 million upgrade to facilities, funded by the Victorian Government, including a new Emergency Department, palliative care centre, increased clinical support areas, an extra theatre and better vehicle access. The hospital was often depicted as the 'Mount Thomas Hospital' in the popular local police drama Blue Heelers.
    5.50
    2 votes
    197
    St Patrick's Hospital

    St Patrick's Hospital

    St. Patrick's University Hospital is Ireland's largest independent not-for-profit mental health hospital. It is located near Kilmainham and the Phoenix Park in Dublin. Its sister hospital, St. Edmundsbury is located in Lucan County Dublin. St. Patrick's also provides a network of community mental health clinics called the Dean Clinics in several locations across Ireland. Currently there are clinics available in Dublin, Cork and Galway. St. Patrick's provides a wide range of treatment programmes. These include programmes for mood disorders (depression and bipolar depression), anxiety disorder, an alcohol dependence / substance abuse programme, eating disorders, anorexia nervosa and bulimia, cognitive behavioural therapy, a young adult programme, an adolescent service, a dual diagnosis programme, a memory clinic and general mental health care. It has departments of occupational therapy, social work, cognitive behavioural therapy, clinical psychology and psychiatry. It offers day hospital, outpatient, inpatient, and community mental health services. The St. Patrick's Hospital Foundation raises funds for St. Patrick's. The hospital (originally St. Patrick's Hospital for Imbeciles) was
    4.67
    3 votes
    198
    Betty Ford Center

    Betty Ford Center

    The Betty Ford Center (BFC), is a non-profit, separately licensed residential chemical dependency recovery hospital in Rancho Mirage, California, that offers inpatient, outpatient, and day treatment for alcohol and other drug addictions as well as prevention and education programs for family and children. The Betty Ford Center, which is adjacent to Eisenhower Medical Center, has 100 inpatient beds available on their campus and additional lodging for 84 clients in the Residential Day Treatment program. The Betty Ford Center opened on October 4, 1982. The Center was co-founded by late U.S. First Lady Betty Ford, Leonard Firestone and Dr. James West in 1982. West also served as the Betty Ford Center's first medical director from 1982 until 1989. He left that position to become the Betty Ford Center's director of outpatient services. Betty Ford's decision to undertake such a project followed on the heels of her own battle with alcohol dependence and opioid analgesic addiction, and after her release from the Long Beach Naval Hospital, she pursued the goal of creating a treatment center that emphasized the needs of women. In September 2010, the Center introduced a pain management track.
    6.00
    1 votes
    199
    Concord Repatriation General Hospital

    Concord Repatriation General Hospital

    Concord Repatriation General Hospital (abbreviated CRGH), commonly referred to as simply Concord Hospital, is a major hospital in Sydney, Australia, located on Hospital Road in Concord. It is a teaching hospital of Sydney Medical School at the University of Sydney, where it is referred to as Concord Clinical School, and a major facility in the Sydney Local Health District and the former Sydney South West Area Health Service. The NSW Statewide Severe Burn Injury Service and the Bernie Banton Centre, an asbestos diseases research institute, are located at CRGH. Parts of the television series All Saints were filmed at CRGH. Prior to the Second World War, the 16 hectare Yaralla Estate on which the hospital is built belonged to philanthropist Thomas Walker and subsequently his daughter Dame Eadith Walker. A small hospital had already been established on the site, known as the Thomas Walker Convalescent Hospital. Following the death of Dame Eadith in 1937, the property was bequeathed to the Crown for development as a public hospital. The current hospital was commissioned in 1939 as a general hospital for the Australian Army. When completed in 1942, the 2000 bed Yaralla Military Hospital
    6.00
    1 votes
    200
    Hospital for Sick Children

    Hospital for Sick Children

    The Hospital for Sick Children (also known as SickKids Hospital) is a major paediatric centre for the Greater Toronto Area, serving patients up to age 18. Located on University Avenue in Downtown Toronto, SickKids is part of the city’s Discovery District, a critical mass of scientists and entrepreneurs who are focused on innovation and application of new ideas and knowledge. SickKids is a teaching hospital for the University of Toronto. Sick Kids is one five free-standing children's hospitals in Canada (others being Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario in Ottawa, Alberta Children's Hospital in Calgary, BC Children's Hospital in Vancouver and IWK Health Centre in Halifax). SickKids has built an integrated environment of patient care, research and learning with six centres of excellence, in bone health, brain and behaviour, cancer, cystic fibrosis, heart, pain and transplantation. In 2009–2010, SickKids admitted 14,000 in-patients who stayed for an average of 7.1 days. The operating room treated 11,000 cases; there were 58,000 visits to the emergency department and 215,000 visits to the hospital’s ambulatory clinics. SickKids has about 370 beds and provides the highest level of
    6.00
    1 votes
    201
    Hôtel-Dieu de Montréal

    Hôtel-Dieu de Montréal

    The Hôtel-Dieu de Montréal is the oldest hospital in Montreal, Quebec. Since 1996 it has been one of the three hospitals making up the Centre hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal (CHUM). "Hôtel-dieu," literally "hostel of God," is an archaic French term for hospital, referring to the origins of hospitals as religious institutions. The origins of the Hôtel-Dieu de Montréal date back to Paul Chomedey's arrival on the Island of Montreal in 1642 to found the French colony of Ville-Marie. With him came Jeanne Mance, the first nurse in New France. She founded the hospital on October 8, 1645. This was confirmed by letters patent of Louis XIV of France in April 1669. Guillaume Bailly, a Sulpician missionary, is credited with drawing up the plans for the stone version built in 1688. Although Jeanne Mance was a laywoman, her hospital would be later staffed by the Religious Hospitallers of St. Joseph (Religieuses hospitalières de Saint-Joseph) order of nuns, which were founded in 1636 by a layman, Jérôme Le Royer de la Dauversière along with Mother Marie de la Fere, in La Fleche, France. The hospital burned and was rebuilt three times between 1695 and 1734. After the conquest of New France
    6.00
    1 votes
    202
    King Edward Memorial Hospital for Women

    King Edward Memorial Hospital for Women

    King Edward Memorial Hospital for Women (KEMH) is located at 374 Bagot Road, Subiaco, Western Australia. It provides pregnancy and neonatal care within the greater Perth Metropolitan area. In cases where patients have gone to private maternity clinics, they may be moved to KEMH if complications occur. All cases of complicated pregnancy in Western Australia are transferred to KEMH by the Royal Flying Doctor's Service. KEMH is affiliated with the medical faculty of the University of Western Australia in the clinical teaching of Obstetrics and Gynaecology and related disciplines. The course coordinators, Dianne Carmody and Alexandria Tregonning, are senior lecturers and midwives working at KEMH. The hospital commenced operating on 14 July 1916. 101 babies were born in the first 6 months of operation. At the time, the hospital charged a standard fee of £3 3s for 'confinement' and fourteen days of post-natal care. The hospital was named after King Edward VIII, who reigned for ten months. After his abdication, It was renamed in memorial of his time as King, as he was no longer a king but still living. In 1994 the organisational structure for King Edward Memorial Hospital and the Princess
    6.00
    1 votes
    203
    Memorial Medical Center, New Orleans

    Memorial Medical Center, New Orleans

    Ochsner Baptist Medical Center is a hospital in New Orleans, Louisiana. The complex of hospital buildings is located on Napoleon Avenue in Uptown New Orleans. Formerly known as Southern Baptist Hospital, it was founded in 1926 by the Southern Baptist Convention. In 1969, the religious organization separated itself from the hospital (and several others) and Southern Baptist Hospital became an independent non-profit entity. In the early 1980s the hospital spent over $100,000,000 (Project 2000) to add to and renovate the original building. In 1990 it merged with Mercy Hospital (now called Lindy Boggs Medical Center, located near the end of Bayou St. John on Jefferson Davis Parkway) and the two hospitals operated as Mercy-Baptist Medical Center, with the old Southern Baptist Hospital called the Uptown Campus and Mercy called the Mid-City campus. The combined hospitals were acquired by Tenet Healthcare, and the old Baptist Hospital was renamed Memorial Medical Center in 1996. (It was known colloquially as "Memorial Baptist.") After Hurricane Katrina in 2005, Tenet sold several of its hospitals in New Orleans to Ochsner Health System, and in 2006 the name was changed to Ochsner Baptist
    6.00
    1 votes
    204
    Taunton State Hospital

    Taunton State Hospital

    • Medical Specialties: Psychiatry
    The Taunton State Hospital (formerly known as the State Lunatic Hospital at Taunton) is a psychiatric hospital built in 1854 in Taunton, Massachusetts. The architecture of most of the facility's buildings is of a unique and rare neo-classical style, designed by the architect Elbridge Boyden. It is also a Kirkbride Plan Hospital. To relieve the pressure of a rising patient population from its only asylum, the state appointed a commission to find a site for a new asylum in 1851. After its completion in 1854, the second State Lunatic Hospital began taking in patients. One of the building's most beautiful features was its breezeways, which were added in the 1890s to connect the end of the wards to the hospitals infirmary buildings. Its distinct cupolas, large dome, cast-iron capitals and window bar gave this building its own very unusual personality. In 1975 the hospital was abandoned, as it was no longer needed. In 1999 the large dome which towered over the hospital's administration collapsed. Then, on the night of March 19, 2006 a massive fire broke out in the center of the building, which included the administration and theater. Sections damaged by fire were then leveled, leaving
    6.00
    1 votes
    205
    Whitby Psychiatric Hospital

    Whitby Psychiatric Hospital

    Whitby Psychiatric Hospital, also known as Whitby Psych, Ontario Hospital for the Insane, Ontario Hospital, Whitby, or OHW, was a mental health facility located in Whitby, Ontario. It has been replaced by Ontario Shores Centre for Mental Health Sciences, which operates on the same site. In 1911, the Government of Ontario announced that a new 'asylum' would be built to replace a similar facility in Toronto, and a 624-acre (2.53 km²) site on Lake Ontario in Whitby was selected the following year. Whitby was chosen due its relative proximity to Toronto and for cheap power and water provided by local utilities. Most of the buildings of the new Ontario Hospital for the Insane were constructed from 1913 to 1916. Upon completion, the site was taken over by the Government of Canada to serve as a military convalescent hospital for soldiers wounded in the First World War. The facility was returned to the Ontario government in 1919. The hospital was considered a model of mental health care for its era. Patients were housed in a cottage setting in an attempt to provide a home-like atmosphere to those undergoing treatment. The lakeside fresh-air environment was also seen as beneficial, as was
    6.00
    1 votes
    206
    Gold Coast Hospital

    Gold Coast Hospital

    Gold Coast Hospital, located on the Gold Coast, Queensland is a major teaching and referral hospital and the third largest in Queensland. The Gold Coast Hospital has one of the busiest emergency departments in the state. The Hospital admits over 60 000 patients annually. The hospital is located in Nerang Street in Southport's medical district. The Gold Coast Hospital has a Robina campus near Robina station. The main referral hospital is Princess Alexandra Hospital. The hospital has recently received national publicity. Dr Mohamed Haneef who had been working at the hospital since September 2006 was arrested in connection to terrorist attacks in the UK while leaving Australia on a one way ticket. Dr Haneef's temporary skilled worker permit was subsequently cancelled. All charges against Dr Haneef were subsequently dropped. The premier of Queensland, Mr Peter Beattie stated that Dr Haneef could return to work at the Gold Coast Hospital should the federal government reinstate Dr Haneef's work visa. Dr Brian Bell, the executive director of medical services at the Gold Coast Hospital, says many hospitals would welcome Dr Haneef onto their staff. In February 2008 it was reported that
    5.00
    2 votes
    207
    Nova Scotia Hospital

    Nova Scotia Hospital

    The Nova Scotia Hospital is a psychiatric hospital in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. It is the province's largest mental health facility. Co-founded by the Hon. Hugh Bell and Dorothea Dix, it opened its doors in 1858 as the Mount Hope Asylum for the Insane and today it is a fully accredited teaching facility affiliated with Dalhousie University. It is operated by the Capital District Health Authority. The former Nova Scotia Hospital Foundation is now the Mental Health Foundation of Nova Scotia.
    5.00
    2 votes
    208
    Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute

    Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute

    The Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, alternatively Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute is a major centre for cancer treatment, professional oncologist training, and oncology research in Australia. It is named after Professor Sir Peter MacCallum. The centre is Australia’s only public hospital dedicated to cancer treatment, research and education. It is one of the few cancer treatment facilities in the world that has a fully integrated clinical and laboratory program situated alongside a hospital. This facilitates the translation of research findings into clinical outcomes within the single site. Research programs at the Centre include the Australian Cancer Research Foundation (ACRF) Cancer Cell Biology Program and the ACRF Victorian Centre for Functional Genomics in Cancer. The Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre offers much in the way of integrated services — including medical oncology and radiation oncology facilities and links with allied health services such as physiotherapy, occupational therapy, dietetics, speech therapy and social services. The Victorian Cancer Institute's cancer hospital was given the title "Peter MacCallum Clinic" after the (then) Dean of the Faculty of Medicine at
    5.00
    2 votes
    209
    Queensway-Carleton Hospital

    Queensway-Carleton Hospital

    Queensway-Carleton Hospital, opened in 1976 by William Davis, is a 240-bed facility in Ottawa's west end, and serves a population of over 400,000. The hospital provides Emergency, Childbirth, Geriatrics, Mental Health, Rehabilitation, Medical and Surgical Services, and is currently undergoing a much-needed expansion. Queensway Carleton Hospital was built on NCC land, and since its opening, had paid roughly $1 million in rent to the federal government. Rent of $23,000 per year was set for a contract through to 2013, at which point the rent was expected to increase to reflect the current market value of the land. Pierre Poilievre, MP representing Nepean—Carleton, attempted to reduce the rent of the hospital to $1 per year during his first term in office. Poilievre, a Conservative in the opposition at the time, introduced a bill in November 2005 seeking to reduce the hospital's rent. It was supported by the Conservatives and the New Democratic Party, but was voted down by the Liberals and Bloc Québécois. Poilievre was re-elected in the 2006 election, this time as part of the Conservative minority government. He was named Parliamentary secretary to John Baird, President of the Treasury
    5.00
    2 votes
    210
    Sheba Medical Center

    Sheba Medical Center

    The Chaim Sheba Medical Center at Tel Hashomer (Hebrew: המרכז הרפואי ע"ש חיים שיבא – תל השומר‎), also Tel HaShomer Hospital, is the largest hospital in Israel, located in the Tel HaShomer area of Ramat Gan. The hospital was named after Chaim Sheba, the founding director. It was established in 1948 as the country's first military hospital to treat casualties of Israel's War of Independence. Situated on a 150-acre (0.61 km) campus on the outskirts of Ramat Gan, Sheba today operates 120 departments and clinics. It has 1,700 beds, over 1,400 physicians, 2,600 nurses and 3,300 other healthcare workers. It handles over a million and a half patient visits a year, including 200,000 emergency visits annually, and conducts more than two million medical tests of all types each year, on a $320 million (approximate) annual budget. Sheba is supported by donations from a network of philanthropists and friends from around the world. Sheba includes an acute care hospital, a rehabilitation hospital, a women's hospital, a children's hospital, a laboratory division, an outpatient division, and an academic campus. The medical center is also home to the Israel National Center for Health Policy and
    5.00
    2 votes
    211
    St Thomas' Hospital

    St Thomas' Hospital

    St Thomas' Hospital is a large NHS hospital in Central London, England. It is administratively a part of Guy's & St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust. It is a large teaching hospital and is, with Guy's Hospital and King's College Hospital, the location of King's College London School of Medicine. It has provided health care freely or under charitable auspices since the 12th century and was originally located in Southwark. St Thomas' Hospital is one of London's most famous hospitals, associated with names such as Astley Cooper, William Cheselden, Florence Nightingale, Linda Richards, Edmund Montgomery and Agnes Elizabeth Jones. It is a prominent London landmark - largely due to its location on the opposite bank of the River Thames to the Houses of Parliament. St Thomas' Hospital is accessible from Westminster tube station (10 min walk across Westminster bridge), Waterloo station (tube and national rail, 10 min walk) and Lambeth North tube station (10 min walk). The hospital was described as ancient in 1215 and was named after St Thomas Becket — which suggests it may have been founded after 1173 when Becket was canonised. However, it is possible it was only renamed in 1173 and that it was
    5.00
    2 votes
    212
    Yale-New Haven Hospital

    Yale-New Haven Hospital

    Yale-New Haven Hospital (abbreviated YNHH), Connecticut's largest hospital with 1,541 beds, is located in New Haven, Connecticut. The hospital is owned and operated by the Yale New Haven Health System, Inc. Yale-New Haven Hospital includes the 168-bed Smilow Cancer Hospital at Yale-New Haven; the 201-bed Yale-New Haven Children's Hospital; the 511-bed Yale-New Haven Hospital/Saint Raphael Campus; and the 76-bed Yale-New Haven Psychiatric Hospital, making it one of the largest hospitals in the world and in New England. Yale-New Haven is the primary teaching hospital for Yale School of Medicine and Yale School of Nursing. Yale-New Haven Hospital is accredited by The Joint Commission. In 2012, YNHH was once again ranked by U.S. News & World Report as one of the best hospitals in the United States. YNHH had one specialty ranked in the nation's top 10: diabetes & endocrine disorders (#5). In addition to its top 10-ranked specialty, Yale-New Haven also ranked among the very best in the nation in nine additional medical specialties: cancer (#35); heart & heart surgery (#32); ear, nose & throat (#48); digestive disorders (#28); geriatric care (#20); gynecology (#13); nephrology (#30);
    5.00
    2 votes
    213
    Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

    Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

    The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) is one of the largest and oldest children's hospitals in the world. CHOP has been ranked as the best children's hospital in the United States by U.S. News & World Report and Parents Magazine in recent years. As of 2012, it was ranked number one in the nation by U.S. News for six out of ten specialties. The hospital is located next to the University of Pennsylvania and its physicians serve as the pediatrics department of the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. CHOP has over 459 beds, 40 percent of which are allocated to neonatal, cardiac, and pediatric intensive care. Each year the hospital admits more than 28,000 children and more than 1,167,000 are seen in the emergency and outpatient departments. In 1855, Philadelphia had a population of about 460,000, and recorded 10,507 deaths. Leading causes of death were smallpox, typhoid, and scarlet fever. In the worst month of 1855, 300 children under 12 years old died, primarily of infectious diseases. A Philadelphia physician, Dr. Francis West Lewis, inspired by a visit to the new Great Ormond Street Hospital for Sick Children in London (founded 1852), enlisted
    4.50
    2 votes
    214
    Mount Sinai Hospital

    Mount Sinai Hospital

    • Medical Specialties: Internal medicine
    Mount Sinai Hospital, founded in 1852, is one of the oldest and largest teaching hospitals in the United States. In 2011-2012, Mount Sinai Hospital was ranked as one of America's best hospitals by U.S. News & World Report in 12 specialties. Located on the eastern border of Central Park, at 100th Street and Fifth Avenue, on New York City's Manhattan Island, Mount Sinai has a number of hospital affiliates in the New York metropolitan area, and an additional campus, the Mount Sinai Hospital of Queens. The hospital is also affiliated with one of the foremost centers of medical education and biomedical research, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, which opened in September 1968. Together, the two comprise the Mount Sinai Medical Center. As U.S. cities grew more crowded in the mid-19th Century, philanthropist Sampson Simson (b 1780, d 1857) founded a hospital to address the needs of New York's rapidly growing Jewish immigrant community. It was the second Jewish hospital in the United States. The Jews' Hospital in the City of New York, as it was then called, was built on 28th Street in Manhattan, between 7th & 8th Avenues, on land donated by Simson; it opened two years before Simson's death.
    4.50
    2 votes
    215
    Boulder City Hospital

    Boulder City Hospital

    Boulder City Hospital, is a 67 bed non-profit hospital in Boulder City, Nevada. The hospital was built by Six Companies while the company was building Hoover Dam. The hospital opened on November 15, 1931 with 20 beds. The hospital closed in 1935 when the dam was finished. It was not until 1943 when the hospital reopened. The old hospital building, currently called The Life-Giving Spring Retreat Center is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, was abandoned when a new building for the hospital opened on December 8, 1973, a mile away to the southwest at the intersection of Adams Boulevard and Buchanan Boulevard, on the southeast corner.
    5.00
    1 votes
    216
    McLean Hospital

    McLean Hospital

    • Medical Specialties: Psychiatry
    McLean Hospital ( /məkˈleɪn/; also known as Somerville Asylum or Charlestown Asylum) is a psychiatric hospital in Belmont, Massachusetts. It is noted for its clinical staff expertise and ground-breaking neuroscience research. It is also known for the large number of famous people who have been treated there, including mathematician John Nash, singer-songwriters James Taylor and Ray Charles, poet Sylvia Plath, and authors Susanna Kaysen and David Foster Wallace. McLean maintains the world's largest neuroscientific and psychiatric research program in a private hospital. It is the largest psychiatric facility of Harvard Medical School, an affiliate of Massachusetts General Hospital and owned by Partners HealthCare, which also owns Brigham and Women's Hospital. McLean was founded in 1811 in a section of Charlestown, Massachusetts, that is now a part of neighboring Somerville, Massachusetts. Originally named Asylum for the Insane, it was the first institution organized by a cooperation of prominent Bostonians who were concerned about homeless mentally ill persons "abounding on the streets and by-ways in and about Boston." The effort was organized by Rev. John Bartlett, chaplain of the
    5.00
    1 votes
    217
    Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

    Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

    • Medical Specialties: Oncology
    Memorial Sloan–Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) is a cancer treatment and research institution founded in 1884 as the New York Cancer Hospital. The main campus is located at 1275 York Avenue, between 67th and 68th Streets, in New York City. MSKCC has other locations in Manhattan and Brooklyn, and regional care facilities in Basking Ridge, New Jersey; and on Long Island and in Westchester County, New York. Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center is composed of two intimately related institutions: Memorial Hospital for Cancer and Allied Diseases provides patient care and Sloan–Kettering Institute is focused on basic-science research. Memorial Hospital was founded in 1884 as the New York Cancer Hospital by a group that included John Jacob Astor and his wife, Charlotte, the hospital was originally located on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. The hospital was later renamed General Memorial Hospital for the Treatment of Cancer and Allied Diseases. In 1936, the hospital began its move to its present location on York Avenue when John D. Rockefeller, Jr., donated the land upon which, in 1939, Memorial Hospital was constructed. The current Physician-In-Chief is Robert E.
    5.00
    1 votes
    218
    NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital

    NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital

    • Medical Specialties: Internal medicine
    NewYork–Presbyterian Hospital is a university hospital in New York City affiliated with two Ivy League medical schools: Columbia University's College of Physicians and Surgeons and Cornell University's Weill Medical College. It is composed of two distinct medical centers, Columbia University Medical Center and Weill Cornell Medical Center. A major international and regional referral center, the hospital is considered among the best in the world and is currently ranked 7th in the nation by U.S. News and World Report. The New York Hospital was founded in 1771 by a Royal Charter granted by King George III of England and became associated with Weill Cornell Medical College upon the latter institution's founding in 1898. It was the second oldest hospital in the United States after Pennsylvania Hospital (1751). A 1927 endowment of more than $20 million by Payne Whitney expanded the hospital significantly and the Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic is named in his honor. Other prominent donors have included Edward S. Harkness and Anna Harkness, Howard Hughes, William Randolph Hearst, Harry and Leona Helmsley, Maurice R. Greenberg, and the Baker, Whitney, Lasdon, and Payson families. The
    5.00
    1 votes
    219
    Northwick Park Hospital

    Northwick Park Hospital

    Northwick Park Hospital (NPH) is a large hospital in the northwest corner of the London Borough of Brent in Greater London, England. NPH is primarily a National Health Service (England) (NHS) hospital, although it has some private funding units. It is part of The North West London Hospitals NHS Trust. St. Mark's Hospital, a national centre of gastrointestinal medicine is based at the same site, as is the British Olympic Association's Olympic Medical Institute. The hospital has its own hospital radio station, Radio Northwick Park. Northwick Park is also one of the few hospitals in England to have a Paternoster lift transport system. This was featured in the film The Omen. The system is controlled by smart card access for staff only. Northwick Park is also a teaching hospital for students of Imperial College School of Medicine. A number of bus routes including 182, 223, 186 and H9, serve the hospital, most of them calling at dedicated bus interchange sited within the hospital grounds near the main Watford Road entrance on the west side of the site; other buses pass nearby on Kenton Road and Watford Road without entering the hospital. The nearest railway stations are Kenton, Northwick
    5.00
    1 votes
    220
    Queen Elizabeth Hospital, King's Lynn

    Queen Elizabeth Hospital, King's Lynn

    The Queen Elizabeth Hospital (also known as the QEH) is an acute NHS District General Hospital located in the town of King’s Lynn in Norfolk, England. It is located on the outskirts of King’s Lynn, to the eastern edge of the town. The catchment area of the Queen Elizabeth Hospital covers the West Norfolk area, South Lincolnshire and North East Cambridgeshire, an area of approximately 1500 km² and 250,000 people. The hospital has approximately 480 beds at time of writing, although the number of beds can vary – due to seasonal pressures e.g. norovirus. At full capacity, the hospital has around 574 beds. The Hospital employs around 2400 staff and has around 100 volunteers, making it the biggest single employer in the town. Locally the Queen Elizabeth Hospital is often known as “The QE” or “the QEH”. It is occasionally (and incorrectly) referred to as “The Queen Elizabeth II Hospital” – however, the hospital is named after Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother (Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon), not the current Queen. In February 1998 the Queen Mother was taken to the QE after she fractured her hip at nearby Sandringham, then later transferred to The King Edward VII Hospital in London. In January 1999,
    5.00
    1 votes
    221
    Danvers State Hospital

    Danvers State Hospital

    Danvers State Hospital, also known as the State Lunatic Hospital at Danvers, The Danvers Lunatic Asylum, and The Danvers State Insane Asylum, was a psychiatric hospital located in Danvers, Massachusetts. It was built in 1874 and opened in 1878 under the supervision of prominent Boston architect Nathaniel Jeremiah Bradlee, on an isolated site in rural Massachusetts. It was a multi-acre, self-contained psychiatric hospital designed and built according to the Kirkbride Plan. It is rumored to have been the birthplace of the pre-frontal lobotomy. Constructed at a cost of $1.5 million, with the estimated yearly per capita cost of patients being $3,000 the hospital originally consisted of two main center buildings, housing the administration, with four radiating wings. The administration building measured 90 by 60 feet (18 m), with a 130 feet (40 m) high tower. The kitchens, laundries, chapel, and dormitories for the attendants were in a connecting 180 by 60 feet (18 m) building in the rear. In the rear was the boiler house of 70 feet (21 m) square, with boilers 450 horsepower (340 kW), used for heating and ventilation. Middleton Pond supplied the hospital its water. On each side of the
    4.00
    2 votes
    222
    University of Washington Medical Center

    University of Washington Medical Center

    The University of Washington Medical Center is a nationally renowned hospital located along the Montlake Cut and Portage Bay in the University District of Seattle, Washington, USA. It is one of the teaching hospitals affiliated with the University of Washington School of Medicine. UW Medical Center has 450 beds. The 2007 issue of U.S. News & World Report's "America's Best Hospitals" ranks the UWMC 11th out of 5,462 hospitals nationwide. Many UWMC programs score extremely high in specialty rankings, including: primary care (1); rehabilitation medicine (3); otolaryngology (13); endocrinology (16); orthopedics (15); internal medicine (6); pediatrics (8); rural medicine (1); geriatrics (13); oncology (6); gastroenterology (30); pulmonology (14); nephrology (16); neurology/neurosurgery (30); rheumatology (20); gynecology (9); urology (24). The University of Washington Medical Center opened on May 5, 1959. It grew out of the medical school that the university opened on October 2, 1946. It is home to the world's first pain center and was the location of the world's first long-term kidney dialysis, developed by UW professor Belding H. Scribner, M.D.
    4.00
    2 votes
    223
    Addenbrooke's Hospital

    Addenbrooke's Hospital

    Addenbrooke's Hospital is a world-renowned teaching hospital in Cambridge, England, with strong affiliations to the University of Cambridge. Addenbrooke's Hospital is based on the Cambridge Bio-Medical Campus. The hospital was founded in 1766 on Trumpington Street with £4,500 from the will of Dr John Addenbrooke, a fellow of St Catharine's College. In 1976, the hospital moved to its present premises on the southern edge of the city at the end of Hills Road. The old building now houses the Judge Business School. The hospital is run by Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and is a designated academic health science centre. Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust is a member of the National Institute for Health Research Cambridge Biomedical Research Centre and Cambridge University Health Partners. The University's medical school is also based on the Cambridge Bio-Medical Campus. According to the QS World University Rankings 2010, it ranks as the second best medical school in the world. Addenbrooke's provides a full range of clinical services, with the exception of cardiothoracic surgery, which is provided at the nearby Papworth Hospital (due to be re-located
    4.00
    1 votes
    224
    Bellevue Hospital Center

    Bellevue Hospital Center

    • Medical Specialties: Internal medicine
    Bellevue Hospital Center, most often referred to as "Bellevue", was founded on March 31, 1736 and is the oldest public hospital in the United States. Located on First Avenue in the Kips Bay neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, Bellevue is famous from many literary, film and television references, and as the training ground for many of America's leaders in medicine. Affiliated with the New York University School of Medicine since 1968, Bellevue has been the site of many milestones in the history of medicine, from the establishment of the first ambulance service and first maternity ward, to Nobel Prize-winning cardiac catheterization laboratory. Bellevue is exceptionally well known for its psychiatric facilities and its emergency department, being named New York's #1 hospital in Emergency Care by New York Magazine. It has opened a new ambulatory care building dedicated to serving over 300,000 outpatients a year as well as burn units for pediatric (children) and adult burn patients. The hospital serves as a primary referral center for cardiac catheterization, catheter-based treatment of heart rhythm disorders, cardiovascular surgery, neurosurgery, physical rehabilitation and
    4.00
    1 votes
    225
    Caritas Medical Centre

    Caritas Medical Centre

    Caritas Medical Centre (Chinese: 明愛醫院) is a hospital in Cheung Sha Wan, New Kowloon, Hong Kong. It is the major hospital in Sham Shui Po District and managed by the Hospital Authority and Caritas Hong Kong. Founded by Caritas-Hong Kong in 1964, Caritas Medical Centre is an acute general hospital with around 1,100 beds situated in Shamshuipo. It provides a full range of acute and rehabilitation care, ambulatory and community medical services, including a 24-hour accident and emergency service, general outpatient service, and inpatient and outpatient specialist services in a one-stop setting - so called single episode care. The hospital maintains close ties with its parent organization, Caritas-Hong Kong, and a strong Catholic culture under the motto "Love in the Service of Hope". The hospital has well-developed supporting services, including Pathology, Radiology, Anaesthesiology and Allied Health services. Other ambulatory and outreach community services include Geriatric Day Hospital and Community Geriatric Assessment Team, Community Nursing service, and Palliative Home Care service. The services provided reflect the needs of the population served - ageing, low income, new
    4.00
    1 votes
    226
    Foothills Medical Centre

    Foothills Medical Centre

    Foothills Medical Centre (FMC) is the largest hospital in Alberta, Canada and is located in the City of Calgary. It is one of Canada's most recognized medical facilities and is one of the leading hospitals in Alberta, providing advanced healthcare services to over two million people from Calgary, Southern Alberta, southeastern British Columbia, and southern Saskatchewan. Formerly operated by the Calgary Health Region, it is now under the authority of Alberta Health Services. The main building of the hospital was opened in June 1966. It was originally named 'Foothills Provincial General Hospital' and later known simply as Foothills Hospital. With the addition of other medical facilities, it became known by its present name. Foothills Medical Centre is an accredited tertiary Level 1 trauma centre by the Trauma Association of Canada and is the largest regional trauma centre in Southern Alberta. In addition, FMC is accredited by Accreditation Canada for stroke rehabilitation. FMC works in conjunction with the nearby University of Calgary for the purposes of educating students as well as providing facilities for medical research. FMC includes the University of Calgary Medical Centre
    4.00
    1 votes
    227
    Monash Medical Centre

    Monash Medical Centre

    Monash Medical Centres (MMC) is a multicampus teaching hospital in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. The Clayton campus is located in Clayton, whilst the Moorabbin Campus is at Bentleigh East. It provides specialist care to the State's south-east, including the south-east suburbs of Melbourne. Monash Medical centre is part of Southern Health, the largest public health service in Victoria. Monash Medical Centres was formed in 1987 with the amalgamation of the "Queen Victoria Medical Centre" (an obstetric and gynaecological hospital), "Prince Henry's Hospital" (a general hospital) and "Moorabbin Hospital". It is designated a national provider of renal and pancreatic transplants. This is a legacy of the vibrant and cutting edge endocrinology service provided at the former Prince Henry's Hospital, which transferred its services to Monash Medical Centre, Clayton in 1987. It is currently the second largest renal transplant unit in Melbourne in terms of numbers, after the Royal Melbourne Hospital. In 2011, there was a record number of kidney transplants performed at the Monash Medical Centre, with 92 recorded . The renal ward at Monash Medical Centre, Clayton is 34 South, which has 18 beds
    4.00
    1 votes
    228
    Mont Park Asylum, Melbourne

    Mont Park Asylum, Melbourne

    Mont Park Asylum was a psychiatric hospital located in Melbourne, Australia. It was closed in the late-1990s. Located on a huge area of land around 37°43′20″S 145°03′53″E / 37.7221°S 145.0647°E / -37.7221; 145.0647, Mont Park was built during the government policies of institutionalisation of the mentally ill and insane in the early 20th century. The complex was served by the freight only Mont Park railway branch line. The empty land was used for the establishment of La Trobe University in 1967. It is now the site of Springthorpe Housing Development. Part of the old patient hospital was taken over by La Trobe University for the Graduate School of Management/Business. Mont Park was closely linked with Plenty Valley Repatriation Psychiatric Hospital and Larundel Psychiatric Hospital, which both closed in the late 1990s. These sites are also being redeveloped. The buildings of Mont Park were used for the 2004 documentary Troubled Minds - The Lithium Revolution which portrayed Dr John Cade's discovery of the use of lithium in mental illness.
    4.00
    1 votes
    229
    Mount Sinai Hospital

    Mount Sinai Hospital

    Mount Sinai Hospital (MSH) is a hospital in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Although it is physically linked by bridges and tunnels to three University Health Network hospitals (Toronto General Hospital, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, and Princess Margaret Hospital), Mount Sinai is an independently operated facility. It is one of many hospitals on Hospital Row, a section of University Avenue where several major hospitals are located. In its most recent annual charity information return to the Canada Revenue Agency in 2005, the hospital reported having assets of roughly $520 million CAD. Mount Sinai Hospital has existed in Toronto since 1923 under various names; it has occupied its present site on University Avenue since 1973. As of 2007, Mount Sinai operated 472 inpatient beds. In the fiscal year ending March 2004, MSH admitted nearly twenty-five thousand patients, delivered almost seven thousand babies, and carried out almost nineteen-thousand operations. Toronto and area residents made more than half a million ambulatory visits to Mount Sinai. More than 600 staff work at the Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai's research facility. The Institute was established in 1985.
    4.00
    1 votes
    230
    Royal Melbourne Hospital

    Royal Melbourne Hospital

    The Royal Melbourne Hospital (RMH), located in Parkville, Victoria an inner suburb of Melbourne is one of Australia’s leading public hospitals. It is a major teaching hospital for tertiary health care with a reputation in clinical research. The hospital is managed as part of Melbourne Health which comprises the Royal Melbourne Hospital, North West Dialysis Service and North Western Mental Health. Established in 1848 as the Melbourne Hospital, it was one of Melbourne's leading hospitals. Originally located on the corner of Swanston and Lonsdale Streets, Melbourne, in 1935 the hospital was renamed the Royal Melbourne Hospital and, in 1944 it moved to Grattan Street, Parkville by provision of lands in the Royal Melbourne Hospital Act. The Royal Women's Hospital was previously located in Carlton, Melbourne. The hospital moved in late 2008 to a new building, the new Royal Women's Hospital, co-located on the Royal Melbourne Hospital site in Parkville. During World War II, the Parkville hospital, which was under construction, was occupied by the US Army 4th General Hospital between 1942 and 1944. While the hospital was under construction a temporary tent hospital was set up by the US Army
    4.00
    1 votes
    231
    St Bartholomew's Hospital

    St Bartholomew's Hospital

    St Bartholomew's Hospital, also known simply as Barts, is a hospital in Smithfield in the City of London. Barts is the oldest hospital in London, having been founded in 1123, and the oldest in the United Kingdom that still occupies its original site. London's only statue of King Henry VIII is located above a gate at the hospital. Barts is part of Barts Health NHS Trust. Barts was founded in 1123 by Rahere (died 1144, and entombed in the nearby priory church of St Bartholomew-the-Great), a favourite courtier of King Henry I. The Dissolution of the Monasteries did not affect the running of Barts as a hospital, but left it in a precarious position by removing its income. It was re-founded by King Henry VIII in December 1546, on the signing of an agreement granting the hospital to the City of London, which was reaffirmed in the Letters Patent of January 1547 endowing it with properties and income. The hospital became legally known as the "House of the Poore in West Smithfield in the suburbs of the City of London of Henry VIII's Foundation", although the title was never used by the general public. The first superintendent of the hospital was Thomas Vicary; sergeant-surgeon to Henry and
    4.00
    1 votes
    232
    Sydney Hospital

    Sydney Hospital

    Sydney Hospital is a major hospital in Sydney, Australia, located on Macquarie Street in the Sydney central business district. It is the oldest hospital in Australia, dating back to 1788, and has been at its current location since 1811. It first received the name Sydney Hospital in 1881. Currently the hospital comprises 113 inpatient beds. Specialist services attract patients from all over New South Wales. It specialises in ophthalmology and hand surgery and is a referral hospital for patients requiring these services. It also houses a rudimentary 6-bed Emergency Department. Sydney Hospital is associated with University of Sydney through the Department of Ophthalmology and Save Sight Institute. Many of the 736 convicts who survived the voyage of the First Fleet from Portsmouth, England arrived suffering from dysentery, smallpox, scurvy, and typhoid. Soon after landing Governor Phillip and Surgeon-General John White established a tent hospital along what is now George Street in The Rocks to care for the worst cases. Subsequent convict boatloads had even higher rates of death and disease. A portable hospital which was prefabricated in England from wood and copper arrived in Sydney
    4.00
    1 votes
    233
    Walter Reed Army Medical Center

    Walter Reed Army Medical Center

    The Walter Reed Army Medical Center (WRAMC) was — along with its precursor, the Walter Reed General Hospital — the U.S. Army's flagship medical center from 1909 to 2011. Located on 113 acres (457,000 m²) in Washington, D.C., it served more than 150,000 active and retired personnel from all branches of the military. The center was named after Major Walter Reed (1851–1902), an army physician who led the team that confirmed that yellow fever is transmitted by mosquitoes rather than direct contact. Since its origins, the WRAMC medical care facility grew from a bed capacity of 80 patients to approximately 5,500 rooms covering more than 28 acres (113,000 m²) of floor space. WRAMC combined with the National Naval Medical Center at Bethesda, Maryland in 2011 to form the tri-service Walter Reed National Military Medical Center (WRNMMC). Fort Lesley J. McNair, located in southwest Washington, D.C. on land set aside by George Washington as a military reservation, is the third oldest U.S. Army installation in continuous use in the United States after West Point and Carlisle Barracks. Its position at the confluence of the Anacostia River and the Potomac River made it an excellent site for the
    4.00
    1 votes
    234
    Women's and Children's Hospital, Adelaide

    Women's and Children's Hospital, Adelaide

    • Medical Specialties: Pediatrics
    The Women's and Children's Hospital is located on King William Road in North Adelaide, Australia. It is one of the major hospitals in Adelaide and is a teaching hospital of the University of Adelaide, the University of South Australia and Flinders University. It was created through the amalgamation of the Queen Victoria Hospital and Adelaide Children's Hospital in March 1989. The new (in name) hospital occupies the site of the former Adelaide Children's Hospital. The hospital is part of the Children, Youth and Women's Health Service along with the Child and Youth Health (CYH). The Children's and adolescents' wards cater for all paediatric specialities. The women's wards cater for antenatal, gynaecology, neonatal, and postnatal disciplines. The Women's and Children's Hospital Foundation is the primary charity for the hospital and exists to raise money and invest initiatives that support the care and future health of South Australia’s women, babies and children. The Women's and Children's Hospital Paediatric Emergency Department is open 24 hours, 7 day a week and is located on the ground floor, with access from Kermode Street, Sir Edwin Smith Avenue and Brougham Place.
    4.00
    1 votes
    235
    Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza

    Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza

    Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza (Home for Relief of the Suffering) is a private hospital in San Giovanni Rotondo, founded by Saint Pio of Pietrelcina. Inaugurated May 5, 1956, the hospital has adopted modern technologies and is considered one of the most efficient hospitals in Italy and Europe. It is known for its exceptional hygiene. The building is situated in the highest part of the city.
    0.00
    0 votes
    236
    Charité

    Charité

    The Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin is the medical school for both the Humboldt University and the Free University of Berlin. After the merger with their fourth campus in 2003, the Charité is one of the largest university hospitals in Europe. Complying with an order of King Frederick I of Prussia from November 14, 1709, it was initially established in 1710 north of the Berlin city walls in anticipation of an outbreak of bubonic plague that already had depopulated East Prussia. After the plague spared the city it came to be used as a charity hospital for the poor. On January 9, 1727 Frederick William I of Prussia gave it the name Charité, meaning "charity". The construction of an anatomical theatre in 1713 marks the beginning of the medical school, then supervised by the collegium medico-chirurgicum of the Prussian Academy of Sciences. 1795 saw the establishment of the Pépinière school for the education of military surgeons. After the University of Berlin (today Humboldt University) had been founded in 1810, the dean of the medical college Christoph Wilhelm Hufeland in 1828 integrated the Charité as a teaching hospital. Rudolf Virchow, once student at the Pépinière, worked with
    0.00
    0 votes
    237
    Eisenhower Medical Center

    Eisenhower Medical Center

    The Eisenhower Medical Center is a not-for-profit hospital located in Rancho Mirage, California. It was named one of the top one hundred hospitals in the United States in 2005 and is adjacent to the world-famous Betty Ford Center. Named for U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower, the hospital credits its initial creation to two events in 1966 when entertainer Bob Hope was asked to lend his name to a charity golf tournament and to serve on the board of the hospital that would be built from the tournament's proceeds. The original 80 acres (320,000 m) of land were donated by Bob and Dolores Hope and both helped raise private funds for the hospital's construction. Construction began in 1969; the groundbreaking ceremony was attended by President Richard Nixon, Vice President Spiro Agnew, Governor Ronald Reagan, and entertainers Bob Hope, Frank Sinatra, Bing Crosby, Gene Autry, and Lucille Ball. The main Eisenhower hospital opened in November 1971, containing 289 beds. Among the early trustees were actress Martha Hyer (the wife of film producer Hal B. Wallis) and Roy W Hill. The now world-famous Betty Ford Center was established in 1982 by former First Lady Betty Ford, a resident of Rancho
    0.00
    0 votes
    238
    Fox Chase Cancer Center

    Fox Chase Cancer Center

    The Fox Chase Cancer Center is a National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center research facility and hospital located in the Fox Chase section of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States. The main facilities of the center are located on property adjoining Burholme Park. The center is an independent, non-profit institution which specializes in the treatment and prevention of cancer. The center was formed in 1974 by the merger of the American Oncologic Hospital, which was founded in 1904 as the first cancer hospital in the United States, and the Institute for Cancer Research, founded in 1927. Today it has almost 2,400 employees and an operating budget of $281.7 million for fiscal year 2006. Research is conducted in more than 80 laboratories by a staff of more than 325 physicians and scientists who hold medical degrees, Ph.D.s or both. Fox Chase's 100-bed hospital is one of the few facilities in the country devoted entirely to cancer care. Annual hospital admissions average about 4,100 and outpatient visits to physicians exceed 69,000 a year. As of 2011, the Fox Chase Cancer Center was ranked as the thirty-eighth best cancer hospital in the United States by U.S.
    0.00
    0 votes
    239
    John H. Stroger, Jr. Hospital of Cook County

    John H. Stroger, Jr. Hospital of Cook County

    • Medical Specialties: Internal medicine
    The John H. Stroger, Jr. Hospital of Cook County, formerly Cook County Hospital is a public urban teaching hospital in Chicago that provides primary, specialty and tertiary healthcare services to the five million residents of Cook County, Illinois. The hospital has a staff of 300 attending physicians along with more than 400 medical residents and fellows. The hospital campus, located at 1901 W. Harrison Street Chicago, Illinois, is a part of the 305 acre (1.2 km²) Illinois Medical District, which is one of the largest concentrations of medical facilities in the world. The hospital’s 1,200,000 square feet (110,000 m) represent the equivalent of 25 football stadiums. The layout of the facility organizes services in a “main street-style” to accommodate the needs of patients, physicians and staff. The hospital offers dedicated units for obstetrics and pediatrics, intensive care, and burns. It boasts one of the most respected emergency rooms in the country and a Level 1 Trauma Center. The Adult ER treats over 110,000 patients annually, while the Pediatrics ER treats 45,000 children and adolescents each year. The Ambulatory Screening Clinic treats approximately 105,000 patients per year.
    0.00
    0 votes
    240
    Kaédi Regional Hospital

    Kaédi Regional Hospital

    The Kaedi Regional Hospital is the largest health facility in Southern Mauritania, and one known for its innovative architecture. The new hospital (actually a large extension onto an existing concrete structure) involves the use of handfired locally made brick and a design based on a sequence of simple and complex dome structures. The structure was intended to be both to be naturally cool even while letting in significant light from the outdoors. The hospital was designed by Frabrizio Carola of ADAUA, the Association for the Development of Traditional African Urbanism and Architecture. ADUA also used the design and construction project to develop and disseminate both a new "urban vernacular" architecture for the region and to train workers in new, low-cost and locally appropriate techniques in construction. Workmen were trained on site in the new techniques The hospital won the Aga Khan Award for Architecture in 1995.
    0.00
    0 votes
    241
    Princess Margaret Hospital, Hong Kong

    Princess Margaret Hospital, Hong Kong

    Princess Margaret Hospital (Chinese: 瑪嘉烈醫院) or PMH is a hospital in south Kwai Chung, near Lai Chi Kok, Hong Kong. It is a major hospital mostly serving Kwai Tsing District and managed by Hospital Authority. Although it is not the main teaching hospital of the two medical faculties in Hong Kong, it provides tertiary specialist services in urology and nephrology and has been widely regarded by Hong Kong people as the best specialist hospital in kidney related services and research. Another hospital nearby, Kwai Chung Hospital, provides psychiatric services. Established in 1975, Princess Margaret Hospital is an acute hospital serving the Kowloon West and New Territories South regions in Hong Kong, which include Lai Chi Kok, Kwai Chung, Tsing Yi, Tsuen Wan and Tung Chung areas. The Hospital has about 1,200 beds and a staff of over 3,000. The hospital was named after the late Princess Margaret, Countess of Snowdon, sister of Queen Elizabeth II. The Hospital provides 24-hour accident and emergency services and a wide range of specialist, ambulatory and convalescent services for patients. It is a tertiary referral centre for renal diseases and infectious diseases in the whole territory
    0.00
    0 votes
    242
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital

    Sahlgrenska University Hospital

    The Sahlgrenska University Hospital (Swedish: Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhuset) is a system of hospitals associated with the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden. The hospital is named after philanthropist Niclas Sahlgren and is one of the largest hospitals in Northern Europe. It serves the Gothenburg region, which comprises approximately 900,000 people, and also offers highly specialised medical care for the whole of Sweden. The total number of staff is 17,000. The Sahlgrenska Hospital was founded in 1772 following a donation by Niclas Sahlgren. The current hospital was formed in 1997 by integrating the three hospitals Sahlgrenska sjukhuset, Östra sjukhuset and Mölndals sjukhus. The Sahlgrenska University Hospital has been operated by the Västra Götaland Regional Council since its formation in 1999. Location of Sahlgren Hospital: On 24 June 2009, a 24,000 square metre (260,000 ft²) new facility with 312 beds was officially opened. The new facility will enable rebuilding and renovation of older facilities at Sahlgrenska. The facility also features nephrology centre, dialysis, transplantation centre, stroke unit, hematology, and wards for medicine and
    0.00
    0 votes
    243
    Soutra Aisle

    Soutra Aisle

    Soutra Aisle, just within the Scottish Borders, not far from Fala, is the remains of the House of the Holy Trinity, a church that was part of a complex comprising a hospital and a friary. It lies half a mile along the B6368 from its junction with the A68. The hospital was founded in 1164 by Malcolm IV, when he granted it the lands of Brotherstanes up to and including the lands of Lyndean. The complex at Soutra was built close to the Via Regia, the main route from the North to the Borders Abbeys, the hospital was known as the House of the Holy Trinity, and was run by Augustinian Order and is believed to have been the largest hospital in mediæval Scotland. In an extensive Supplication to Rome dated October 7, 1444 the whole status of the foundation and the purpose of the hospital is discussed, where it is stated that it was "the founders intention to found there a hospital for the reception of the poor rather than a religious place". Its description of the site says: "the church is built at the top of a hill near a public way where there often fierce winds and frequent cold spells". The Great Seal of Scotland mentions Thomas Lauder (later Bishop of Dunkeld) as Master of the Hospital
    0.00
    0 votes
    244
    St George's Hospital

    St George's Hospital

    Founded in 1733, St George’s Hospital is one of the UK's largest teaching hospitals. It shares its main hospital site in Tooting, England with the St George's, University of London which trains NHS staff and carries out advanced medical research. The hospital has around 1,000 beds and most general tertiary care such as accident and emergency, maternity services and care for older people and children. However, as a major acute hospital, St George's Hospital also offers specialist care for the more complex injuries and illnesses, including trauma, neurology, cardiac care, renal transplantation, cancer care and stroke. It is also home to one of four major trauma centres and one of eight hyper-acute stroke units for London. St George's Hospital also provides care for patients from a larger catchment area in the South East of England, for specialties such as complex pelvic trauma. Other services treat patients from all over the country, such as family HIV care and bone marrow transplantation for non-cancer diseases. The trust also provides a nationwide state-of-the-art endoscopy training centre. In 1716 Henry Hoare, William Wogan, Robert Witham and Patrick Cockburn decided to open the
    0.00
    0 votes
    245
    St James's University Hospital, Leeds

    St James's University Hospital, Leeds

    St. James's University Hospital is in Leeds, West Yorkshire, England. It is popularly known as Jimmy's and is one of the United Kingdom's most famous hospitals. Its fame derives in part from its extensive television coverage in the documentary series also titled "Jimmy's", screened by Yorkshire Television (YTV) between 1987 and 1994 with a theme tune performed by Snake Davis. St James's was formerly claimed to be the largest teaching hospital in Europe. It is one of six centres which conduct liver transplants. St James's was the location of the first living-related donor liver transplant on the NHS. It is part of the Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, along with the Leeds General Infirmary (LGI), Seacroft Hospital, Wharfedale Hospital, Chapel Allerton Hospital and until April 2008 (when it closed), Cookridge Hospital. Both St James's and the LGI are extensively involved in the teaching of medical students, nurses and junior doctors. All of the Hospital buildings except Chancellor's Wing are named after surrounding streets in the Leeds suburb of Harehills (Chancellor's Wing is named after the then Chancellor of the University of Leeds, HRH The Duchess of Kent, who opened the
    0.00
    0 votes
    246
    Tung Wah Coffin Home

    Tung Wah Coffin Home

    Tung Wah Coffin Home (Chinese: 東華義莊) is a Coffin Home located upon the hill above Sandy Bay on the Hong Kong Island, Hong Kong. The Tung Wah Coffin Home has had a very long history since 1875, and was first built by Man Mo Temple. The Coffin Home was originally located in Kennedy Town near a slaughter home. The Tung Wah Group of Hospitals then took over the responsibility of managing the coffin home, and it was rebuilt in 1899 near Sandy Bay on Hong Kong Island. It was then renamed as the Tung Wah Coffin Home. The Coffin Home was originally established in 1875 by the Man Mo Temple in Kennedy Town near a slaughter house. In 1899, it was rebuilt in its current location under the new management of Tung Wah Group of Hospitals, thus giving its present name, Tung Wah Coffin Home. The Coffin Home is a temporary coffin and urn depository awaiting transference to the birthplaces of the deceased. The coffins mainly belong to overseas Chinese who are transferred and buried in their home villages in China. The Tung Wah Coffin Home has always been changing and developing since its relocation in Sandy Bay. The Coffin Home experienced its first reconstruction period in 1913, which built a
    0.00
    0 votes
    247
    UCLA Medical Center

    UCLA Medical Center

    The Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center (also commonly referred to as UCLA Medical Center) is a hospital located on the campus of the University of California, Los Angeles in Los Angeles, California, United States. UCLA Medical Center has research centers covering nearly all major specialties of medicine as well as dentistry and is the primary teaching hospital for the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. The hospital's emergency department is certified as a level I trauma center for adults and pediatrics. Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center is a constituent part of the UCLA Health System, a comprehensive consortium of research hospitals and medical institutes affiliated with UCLA, including: Collectively, the hospitals and specialty-care facilities of the UCLA Health System make it among the most comprehensive and advanced healthcare systems in the world. It is rated as one of the top five hospitals in the United States and is the top hospital on the West Coast according to US News & World Report. The hospital has been ranked in the top twenty in 15 of the 16 medical specialties ranked by the US News ranking. Ten of those specialties were ranked in the top ten. In 2005, the
    0.00
    0 votes
    248
    University Health Network

    University Health Network

    University Health Network (UHN) is a medical centre that comprises four hospitals: Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto General Hospital, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute These are a network of teaching hospitals affiliated with the University of Toronto Faculty of Medicine. In total, the organization devotes C$150 million a year to research and trains more than 3000 undergraduate, graduate and medical students at its member hospitals and institutes. Physicians, scientists and researchers at the organization collaborate extensively with the University of Toronto, where many of them hold professorial appointments. In October 2008, UHN was named one of "Canada's Top 100 Employers" by Mediacorp Canada Inc., and was featured in Maclean's newsmagazine. Later that month, UHN was also named one of Greater Toronto's Top Employers, which was announced by the Toronto Star, a local daily newspaper in Toronto. Princess Margaret Hospital contains the largest oncology research and treatment facility in Canada. It is home to the Ontario Cancer Institute and the Princess Margaret Hospital Foundation. In 1998, the hospital relocated to a new site south of Queen's Park on
    0.00
    0 votes
    249
    University of California, Irvine Medical Center

    University of California, Irvine Medical Center

    The University of California, Irvine Medical Center (or UCI Medical Center) is a major research hospital located in the City of Orange. It is Orange County's central public hospital and the teaching center for the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine. Plans had been in place since the founding of the school for a medical division. Space was set aside on campus for what was envisioned to become the heart of busy medical, veterinary, and dental facilities, with a major hospital as the centerpiece. This would model the emerging and eventually preeminently successful hospital campuses at the University of California, Los Angeles and the University of California, San Diego. The medical school wasn't originally planned to begin until the university had time to establish itself and stabilize sources of funding. Political wrangling between the American Medical Association and Californian osteopaths brought the medical school to UCI early. The California School of Medicine was the oldest continuously operating medical college in the Southwest United States. Starting in 1896, as the Pacific College of Osteopathy, it changed name to the College of Osteopathic Physicians and
    0.00
    0 votes
    250
    Walter E. Fernald State School

    Walter E. Fernald State School

    The Walter E. Fernald State School, now the Walter E. Fernald Developmental Center, located in Waltham, Massachusetts, is the Western hemisphere's oldest publicly funded institution serving people with developmental disabilities. Originally a Victorian sanatorium, it became a "poster child" for the American eugenics movement during the 1920s. It later was the scene of medical experiments in the 20th century. Investigations into this research led to new regulations regarding human research in children. The Fernald Center, originally called the Massachusetts School for Idiotic Children, was founded by reformer Samuel Gridley Howe in 1848 with a $2,500 appropriation from the Massachusetts State Legislature. The school eventually comprised 72 buildings total, located on 196 acres (0.79 km). At its peak, some 2,500 people were confined there, most of them "feeble-minded" boys. Under its first resident superintendent, Walter E. Fernald (1859–1924), an advocate of eugenics, the school was viewed as a model educational facility in the field of mental retardation. It was renamed in his honor in 1925, following his death the previous year. The institution did serve a large population of
    0.00
    0 votes
    Get your friends to vote! Spread this URL or share:
    Tags: best, all, time, hospital

    Discuss Best Hospital of All Time

    Top List Voters