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  • Nov 27th 2012
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Best Guitar of All Time

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Best Guitar of All Time is a public top list created by Listnerd on Rankly.com on November 27th 2012. Items on the Best Guitar of All Time top list are added by the Rankly.com community and ranked using our secret ranking sauce. Best Guitar of All Time has gotten 2.687 views and has gathered 618 votes from 618 voters. Only owner can add items. Just members can vote.

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    1
    Fender Cyclone II

    Fender Cyclone II

    The Fender Cyclone II is an electric guitar made by Fender. Introduced as the successor to the Fender Cyclone in July 2002, the Cyclone II features changes such as the Mustang racing stripe as well as pickups and switching borrowed from the Fender Jaguar. Notably, the guitar employs three pickups angled in a similar fashion to the Fender Telecaster bridge pickup rather than the standard two straight pickups of a Jaguar. It also features a Fender Jazzmaster headstock, similar to a 1970's Strat headstock. It also features vintage tuning heads, as well as vintage, nickel string saddles, which were found on 1950's model Strats. It was available in a choice of two colours, candy-apple red, and Fender's Daphne Blue, both with the white racing stripe found on the Mustang. The Cyclone II has a scale of 24.75 inches, a Stratocaster style synchronized tremolo and an on/off switch for each pickup. While it is different in design to the Stratocaster, it has six pickup selections, including bridge pickup with neck pickup, not available on a standard Stratocaster. This enables the guitarist to have the mixed sound of the more 'twangy' bridge pickup, mixed with the smootheness of the neck
    8.50
    6 votes
    2
    Fender Tele Jr.

    Fender Tele Jr.

    The Fender Tele Jr. (pronounced "Telly Junior") is a variant of the Fender Telecaster electric guitar, produced in a limited run of 100 by the Fender Custom Shop in the early 1990s. While its body shape and scale length are those of the Telecaster, many of its construction and electronic features are more similar to those of a Gibson Les Paul electric guitar. While many Fender Custom Shop guitars are simply higher-quality, handmade versions of common Fender models, the Tele Jr. is unique in its appeal to guitarists who want something in between a Fender and a Gibson. Its Fender-standard scale length, chambered mahogany body, P-90 pickups, and other distinctive features contribute to the Tele Jr.'s unique sound. (The Custom Shop Tele Jr. should not be confused with the later, factory-production model of the same name.) Official Site
    8.50
    6 votes
    3
    6.71
    7 votes
    4
    ESP LTD TA-200

    ESP LTD TA-200

    ESP LTD TA-200 is an electric bass model distributed by ESP. It is the mass produced version of the custom signature model ESP Tom Araya, endorsed and used by Tom Araya of Slayer. The four-string bass guitar features passive pickup set jointly designed and produced by ESP and EMG and a fixed bridge. Electronics are controlled by master volume, master tone and pickup balance knobs. Pentagram inlays decorate the rosewood fretboard.
    6.71
    7 votes
    5
    Gibson Little Lucille

    Gibson Little Lucille

    The Little Lucille is a relatively recently designed (1996-2006) Gibson model designed mainly for blues players. It superficially resembles the Les Paul in that the body outline is similar. The Little Lucille was discontinued by Gibson in 2006. The Little Lucille is a variant on the Blueshawk that features a stop tailpiece and tune-o-matic bridge. The Little Lucille was endorsed by BB King The Little Lucille has a number of distinctive features that distinguish it from virtually all other Gibsons. The Little Lucille's body outline is the same as a slightly earlier range of guitars - the Nighthawks (1993-1999) - but unlike the Nighthawks, the Little Lucille is a semi-hollow bodied guitar with twin f-holes and a flat (uncarved) top. Other distinctive / innovative features include:
    7.17
    6 votes
    6
    Hamer Guitars

    Hamer Guitars

    • Guitarists: Gary Moore
    Hamer Guitars is an American manufacturer of electric guitars. Founded in 1973 by vintage guitar shop owners, Paul Hamer, Jol Dantzig and John Montgomery. Early instruments featured guitar designs based on the Gibson Explorer and Flying V. Hamer Guitars is generally considered to be the first "boutique" electric guitar brand that specifically catered to pro musicians. The company was incorporated in Illinois in 1976. Frank Untermyer joined the company as a partner in 1978. Hamer Guitars was acquired by Kaman Music Corporation in 1988. Kaman has since been purchased by Fender Musical Instruments Corp (2008). Hamer offers a wide array of electric guitars and electric basses, and, since its foundation placed an emphasis on producing high-quality instruments with vintage aesthetics as well as creative innovations. Hamer marketed a lower priced line of Asian-built instruments called the "XT Series". and "Slammer by Hamer" which were discontinued in 2009. As of 2011 Hamer builds guitars on a made to order basis. The first Hamer Guitar (a Flying V bass) was built at Northern Prairie Music, a vintage instrument shop owned by Hamer and Dantzig in Wilmette, Illinois. This shop catered to
    8.20
    5 votes
    7
    Ibanez

    Ibanez

    • Guitarists: Steve Vai
    • Brand: Ibanez JEM
    Ibanez (アイバニーズ, Aibanīzu) is a Japanese guitar brand owned by Hoshino Gakki. Based in Nagoya, Aichi, Japan, Hoshino Gakki were one of the first Japanese musical instrument companies to gain a significant foothold in import guitar sales in the United States and Europe, as well as the first brand of guitars to mass produce the seven-string guitar and eight-string guitar. The Hoshino Gakki company began in 1908 as the musical instrument sales division of the Hoshino Shoten, a bookstore company. The Ibanez brand name dates back to 1929 when Hoshino Gakki began importing Salvador Ibáñez guitars from Spain. When the "Salvador Ibáñez" workshop was destroyed during the Spanish Civil War, the "Ibanez Salvador" guitars were no longer available, so Hoshino Gakki bought the "Ibanez Salvador" brand name rights and started making Spanish acoustic guitars in 1935, at first using the "Ibanez Salvador" brand name, and then later using the "Ibanez" brand name. The modern era of Ibanez guitars began in 1957 and the late 1950s and 1960s Ibanez catalogues show guitars with some wild looking designs. Japanese guitar makers in the 1960s were mostly copying European guitar designs and some of the late
    8.20
    5 votes
    8
    Gibson ES-135

    Gibson ES-135

    The Gibson ES-135 is a semi-hollow body electric guitar made by the Gibson Guitar Corporation. Originally introduced in 1956, it was discontinued in 1958. The model, with some modifications, was reintroduced in 1991 and remained in production until 2002. With a florentine cutaway, a trapeze tailpiece, two P-100 pickups (stacked humbuckers with P-90 covers) with two tone and volume controls and a three-way switch. It had looks and tone reminiscent of the old ES-125 TDC, but was not a fully hollow thinline guitar, having a feedback-suppressing sustain block running under the pickups and bridge from the neck/body joint to the base of the body like the ES-335 instead, but here not made of maple but of balsa wood. The body itself and neck were again of similar construction to the ES-335, being built from laminated maple but with an unbound rosewood fingerboard with dot-style fret position markers. The metal fittings were chrome-plated, and the p-100s had black plastic "soapbar" style covers. The guitar, when launched, was the most basic and lowest-priced in the Gibson ES range, but had the same fittings, wiring and construction quality as more expensive models. At launch, Gibson claimed
    9.25
    4 votes
    9
    7.80
    5 votes
    10

    ESP EXP

    The ESP EXP Series was a guitar model distributed by ESP. the ESP EXP Series also known as the ESP Explorer where a very high quality and mainstream guitar copy of the Gibson Explorer. it was most notably used by James Hetfield of Metallica. In 1997 Gibson filed a lawsuit against ESP Guitar's claiming that the ESP EXP Series and the ESP Eclipse Series where copy's of the Gibson Explorer and the Gibson Les Paul models which can not be legally copied. ESP had to change the body styles of the EXP series and the Eclipse series and Gibson's case would not be pursued this is why the ESP Explorer is often referred to as the "Lawsuit Explorer" they have the Gibson Explorer body style not like the EX series. The EXP Series is now the ESP EX Series with a more pointy and bent body style. The EXP Series is still available for custom order only in Japan.
    9.00
    4 votes
    11
    9.00
    4 votes
    12
    Jackson Randy Rhoads

    Jackson Randy Rhoads

    The Jackson Randy Rhoads is an iconic model of electric guitar, originally commissioned by guitarist Randy Rhoads and produced by Jackson Guitars. Rhoads' first Jackson prototype was the now immortalized white, pinstriped, asymmetrical Flying V built by Grover Jackson, Tim Wilson, and Mike Shannon of Charvel Guitars. The guitar featured a maple neck and body (neck through body), ebony fretboard, medium frets, Stratocaster style tremolo, and Seymour Duncan pickups. The prototype was the first from the Charvel works to be labeled with Jackson's name. The guitar was originally slated to be called The Original SIN, but Randy nicknamed it Concorde. after the sleek, white supersonic aircraft Randy re-designed the next prototype because he felt the shape of the 'Concorde' was not distinctive enough from the traditional Flying V. His solution was to elongate the top 'horn' of the instrument such that the body bore more resemblance to a shark's fin. The second prototype featured the revised body shape, was black with a gold pickguard, and fixed tailpiece with strings anchored in the body. The guitar featured Grover locking tuners and Seymour Duncan humbucking pickups (TB-4 bridge and a SH-2
    5.86
    7 votes
    13
    8.75
    4 votes
    14

    ESP LTD M-1000

    ESP LTD M-1000 is a guitar model distributed by ESP. The Guitar features a Set-Thru construction, not to be confused with a Neck-Thru body. EMG 81 pickups, Grover tuners, and a Floyd Rose 1000 bridge.
    8.75
    4 votes
    15
    10.00
    3 votes
    16
    7.40
    5 votes
    17
    7.20
    5 votes
    18
    Steel guitar

    Steel guitar

    • Guitarists: Gabby Pahinui
    Steel guitar is a type of guitar or the method of playing the instrument. Developed in Hawaii in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, a steel guitar is usually positioned horizontally; strings are plucked with one hand, while the other hand changes the pitch of one or more strings with the use of a bar or slide called a steel (generally made of metal, but also of glass or other materials). The term steel guitar is often mistakenly used to describe any metal body resophonic guitar. Steel guitar can describe: Steel guitar refers to a method of playing on a guitar held horizontally, with the strings uppermost and the bass strings towards the player, and using a type of slide called a steel above the fingerboard rather than fretting the strings with the fingers. This may be done with any guitar, but is most common on instruments designed and produced for this style of play. The technique was invented and popularized in Hawaii. Thus, the lap steel guitar is sometimes known as the Hawaiian guitar, particularly in documents from the early 20th century, and today any steel guitar is frequently called a Hawaiian steel guitar. However, in Hawaiian music, Hawaiian guitar means slack string
    7.20
    5 votes
    19
    Gibson ES-125

    Gibson ES-125

    The Gibson ES-125 is an archtop, hollow body electric guitar model that was produced by the Gibson Guitar Corporation. Introduced in 1941 as the successor to the ES-100, the ES-125 was an entry-level archtop electric guitar. It had one P-90 single-coil pickup in the neck position, and a volume control and tone control. The pre-war model, discontinued in 1942, had a smaller 14.5" body. When reintroduced in 1946 it had the larger 16.25" wide body that the ES-150 had. The unbound rosewood fingerboard initially sported pearl trapezoid inlays; later, it would have dot inlays. In the mid-1950s, the ES-125T was introduced, which was an entry-level thinline archtop electric guitar based on the original ES-125. It would later add options for double P-90 pickups and a sharp cutaway, referred to as a florentine cutaway, similar to the ES-175. Both the thinline and the regular models would be discontinued by the 1970s. The ES-125 was equipped with one P90 pickup. The original had 6 Alnico slug pole pieces. In 1950 the P90 transitioned to 6 adjustable poles between two Alnico 5 bar magnets. The model used for the ES-125 has a string spacing on the neck pickup of 115⁄16" from high E to low E.
    8.25
    4 votes
    20
    Orville By Gibson

    Orville By Gibson

    Orville by Gibson (オービルbyギブソン), also known simply as Orville (オービル), was a brand of guitars that was managed by the Gibson Guitar Corporation for the Japanese market during the late 1980s and most of the 1990s. During the 1970s and the 1980s, certain Japanese Guitar companies using brand names such as Ibanez, Tōkai, Burny, and Greco were making high quality copies of Fender and Gibson guitars. Some brands were sold only on the Japanese market, but other brands, such as Ibanez were exported from Japan. Fender and Gibson opened Japanese branch divisions to make guitars in Japan using the Fender/Squier or Gibson/Epiphone brand names for the Japanese market. Fender established Fender Japan in 1982 and contracted Yamano Gakki (山野楽器) and Kanda Shokai (神田商会) to oversee the production and distribution of Fender Japan guitars in cooperation with Fender. Yamano Gakki (Gakki stands for musical instrument company) are one of Japan's largest musical instrument distributors/retailers and Kanda Shokai are one of Japan's largest musical instrument distributors. Gibson established Epiphone Japan in the early 1970s with the production and distribution being managed by Aria in cooperation with
    8.25
    4 votes
    21
    Fender Jaguar Bass

    Fender Jaguar Bass

    The Fender Jaguar Bass is an electric bass guitar manufactured in Japan and China by the Fender Musical Instruments Corporation. In appearance, the Jaguar Bass / Jaguar Deluxe Bass is largely faithful to the original Fender Jaguar, with exception of the neck, bridge, and pickups taken from the Fender Jazz Bass. Rather than the standard dot position markers, however, the Jaguar bass has aged pearloid block inlays, a feature generally reserved for premium instruments. The bass also has a standard vintage-style top-loading bridge and tuners. An onboard preamp is controlled by bass/treble boost rollers and an on/off switch located on the top control panel. The lower control panel holds on/off switches for each of the pickups, and a switch to toggle between parallel and series wiring of the pickups. Finally, the master control panel holds the master volume, master tone, and jack. Other features include an alder body, C-shaped maple neck, 7.25”-radius rosewood fretboard with 20 medium jumbo frets. The basic tone of the Jaguar Bass is very similar to its stablemate, the Jazz Bass, and retains the signature "growl" of the latter. The complex controls, however, lend it a unique tonal
    8.00
    4 votes
    22
    Fender Performer Bass

    Fender Performer Bass

    The Fender Performer was an electric bass guitar released and discontinued in 1985, assembled in the United States and Japan. The Performer was also available as an electric guitar. The Fender Performer bass was a uniquely styled bass guitar, designed by John Page, renowned for its extremely slender neck. The Japanese Performer Standard has an alder body, with a bolt-on 34" micro-tilt adjustable maple neck and a 2-octave rosewood fingerboard as opposed to the USA-made Performer Elite, which sports an ebony fretboard. Controls are: Tone, Volume, Pickup Selector Switch and TBX Circuit Control (Treble Bass eXpander). Both basses were available in Burgundy Mist, Gun Metal Blue, Candy Green, White and Tobacco Sunburst. All finishes were metallic except for the sunburst. The Performer Bass was available in 2 versions, Standard and Elite, with the latter lacking off a pickguard and sporting three specially designed humbucking pickups (with the first two placed side-by-side in the rear position and the third in the center) and an ebony fretboard. Unlike the Japanese-made Performer Standard, which featured a 3-ply white pickguard, two humbuckers and a rosewood fretboard, the more expensive
    8.00
    4 votes
    23
    Gibson Byrdland

    Gibson Byrdland

    The Byrdland is an electric guitar, made by Gibson. Its name derives from the names of guitarists Billy Byrd and Hank Garland for whom Gibson originally custom built the guitar. The Byrdland is the first of Gibson's Thinline series. Many guitarists did not desire the bulk of a traditional archtop guitar such as Gibson's L-5, one of Gibson's top models. The Byrdland, with its overall depth of 2¼-in, is thinner than the L-5's 3⅜" depth. Gibson's president, Ted McCarty, sought opinions and ideas about new products. The suggestions from Byrd and Garland led to the development of the Byrdland. The Byrdland, first made in 1955, is essentially a custom built, thinner, L-5CES (Cutaway-Electric-Spanish). Later, the two specified a shorter scale neck. Guitarists who had an opportunity to play Gibson samples liked the Byrdland's short scale neck (23½"), which facilitated intricate single-note patterns and unusual stretched chord voicings. The Byrdland then became a regular production instrument. Gibson developed the ES-350T from the Byrdland using less costly hardware and detailing, and offered it as a less expensive model. From 1955 to 1960, Gibson made the Byrdland with a Venetian, or
    8.00
    4 votes
    24
    6.80
    5 votes
    25
    Gibson Marauder

    Gibson Marauder

    The Gibson Marauder is an electric guitar model produced from 1974 to 1979 by Gibson. Designed to compete with guitars made by Fender, it had limited success and was discontinued with fewer than 1,400 ever made. The Marauder came at a difficult time for American guitar makers: sales in the early 1970s were down, and there was significant competition from Japanese competitors. It was Gibson's attempt to break into the single coil pickup, bolt-on neck guitar market dominated by Fender. In cooperation with Bill Lawrence, who had joined Gibson in 1972 and had already produced the L6-S, the Marauder was developed to compete with Fender, and had a pickup layout reminiscent of the Fender Telecaster, though in fact it had two humbucker pickups. The guitar, though officially introduced in 1974, began shipping in 1975 and was endorsed by Ace Frehley and Paul Stanley. Minor modifications were made in 1976 and in 1978; it was cancelled in 1979 though some were still made until 1982. In all, fewer than 1,400 were ever made. The Marauder sports a contoured single cutaway Les Paul-shaped body, and a bolt on maple neck with a headstock similar to the Flying V's. Marauders were made with alder,
    6.80
    5 votes
    26
    Fender Marauder

    Fender Marauder

    After introducing the Jazzmaster in 1959 and the Jaguar in 1962, between 1965 and 1966, Fender prototyped the Marauder. There were two "versions" made: Type I, with pickups hidden underneath the pickguard and which are shown in the 1965 catalog, and Type II, with the pickups mounted in a more conventional fashion on the pickguard and never appeared in any catalog. The original Marauders had 4 hidden, high powered pickups under the pickguard. They were never made available to the public and the 6 known production models were given away as promotions to shops around the Fullerton,California area. The Fender Book: A Complete History of Fender Electric Guitars by Tony Bacon, Paul Day. The Type II variation has three pickups, with the bridge pickup slanted as upon a Stratocaster. It also has seven switches and four knobs. The thinking behind the model was to combine the ideas behind the Stratocaster and Jaguar guitars while adding some new features to increase versatility. The guitar never officially passed the prototype stage, allegedly because the hidden pickups of the Type I variation were either too expensive for mass-production or the technology itself was too expensive to
    9.00
    3 votes
    27
    7.75
    4 votes
    28
    Parker Fly

    Parker Fly

    • Guitarists: Tim Scott
    • Brand: Parker Guitars
    The Parker Fly is a type of electric guitar built by Parker Guitars. It was designed by Ken Parker and Larry Fishman, and first produced in 1993. The Fly is unique among electric guitars in the way it uses composite materials. It is notable for its light weight (4.5 lb; 2.0 kg) and resonance. It was also one of the first electric guitars to combine traditional magnetic pickups with piezoelectric pickups, allowing the guitarist to access both acoustic and electric tones. Inspired by earlier musical instruments like the lute, Ken Parker began experimenting with hardwood exoskeletons to provide rigidity to the instrument but hardwood was too difficult to work with and did not achieve satisfactory results. Inspired by a friend who used carbon fiber to build speed boats, Ken Parker started experimenting with the material. Today, Flys are built with an exoskeleton along the back and around the neck of the guitar. It is made from a carbon fibre/glass/epoxy composite material that is thinner than the paint finish. The same composite also comprises the fretboard material. The exoskeleton provides the guitar with strength and rigidity, as well as increasing the guitar's sustain. It also
    7.75
    4 votes
    29
    5.83
    6 votes
    30
    6.60
    5 votes
    31
    7.50
    4 votes
    32
    7.50
    4 votes
    33
    7.50
    4 votes
    34
    7.50
    4 votes
    35
    7.50
    4 votes
    36
    Gibson Flying V

    Gibson Flying V

    • Guitarists: Paul Banks
    The Gibson Flying V is an electric guitar model first released by Gibson in 1958. The Flying V offered a radical, "futuristic" body design, much like its sibling, the Explorer which was released the same year. Gibson first manufactured prototypes of the guitar in 1957. Production guitars were made of korina wood, a trademarked name for limba, a wood similar to but lighter in color than mahogany. This Flying V, along with the Futura (Explorer) and, initially, the Moderne, made up a line of modernist guitars designed by Gibson's then-president Ted McCarty. These designs were meant to add a more futuristic aspect to Gibson's image, but they did not sell well. After the initial launch in 1958, the line was discontinued by 1959. Some instruments were assembled from leftover parts and shipped in 1963, with nickel- rather than gold-plated hardware. McCarty started out with a mahogany guitar that was rounded in the back instead of being cut out. Gibson decided to change the back for weight reduction. Blues-rock guitarist Lonnie Mack and blues guitarist Albert King started using the guitar almost immediately. Later, in the mid-late 1960s, such guitarists as Dave Davies and Jimi Hendrix, in
    7.50
    4 votes
    37
    C. F. Martin & Company

    C. F. Martin & Company

    • Guitarists: Tim Scott
    C.F. Martin & Company is a U.S. guitar manufacturer established in 1833 by Christian Frederick Martin. Martin is highly regarded for its steel-string guitars and is a leading mass-manufacturer of flattop acoustics. Martin instruments can cost thousands of dollars and vintage instruments often cost six figures. The company has also made several models of electric guitars and electric basses. The company's headquarters and primary factory are in Nazareth, Pennsylvania, located in the Lehigh Valley region of the state. Martin also manufactures instruments in Mexico. Martin produced 182 instruments during 1900, increasing to 24,085 in 2000. The company has been run by the Martin family throughout its history. The current chairman and CEO, C.F. 'Chris' Martin IV, is the great-great-great-grandson of the founder. The firm was the first to introduce many of the characteristic features of the modern flattop, steel-strung acoustic guitar. Influential innovations include the Dreadnought body style and scalloped bracing. Some time in the 1970s, Martin bought Levin guitars and around 200 D-18's were apparently built in Sweden; they are stamped LD-18. C.F. Martin was born in 1796 in
    8.67
    3 votes
    38
    8.67
    3 votes
    39
    5.50
    6 votes
    40

    ESP JH-3

    ESP JH-3 is a guitar model distributed by ESP. This model is now discontinued.
    7.25
    4 votes
    41
    7.25
    4 votes
    42
    Gibson Blueshawk

    Gibson Blueshawk

    The Gibson Blueshawk is a relatively recently designed (1996-2006) Gibson model designed mainly for blues players (hence the name). It superficially resembles the Les Paul in that the body outline is similar. The Blueshawk was discontinued by Gibson in Spring 2006. A variant on the Blueshawk is named Gibson Gibson Little Lucille and features a stop tailpiece and tune-o-matic bridge. The Blueshawk has a number of distinctive features that distinguish it from virtually all other Gibsons. The Blueshawk's body outline is the same as a slightly earlier range of guitars - the Nighthawks (1993-1999) - but unlike the Nighthawks, the Blueshawk is a semi-hollow bodied guitar with twin f-holes and a flat (uncarved) top. Other distinctive / innovative features include:
    7.25
    4 votes
    43
    Gibson ES-333

    Gibson ES-333

    The Gibson ES-333 is a semi hollow body electric guitar made by Gibson Guitar Corporation. The ES-333 is quite similar to the Gibson ES-335, but varies from the ES-335 in the following ways: The body is made of arched, laminated wood, with the exterior and interior laminations being made of maple. There is a maple central core in the body, to which the top and bottom, and neck are attached. The neck is one baulk of mahogany, with a rosewood fingerboard and pearloid dot markers. The hardware is nickel plated. As delivered by Gibson, the ES-333 had no pickup covers, nor pickguard, and came with black "speed" knobs. Switch tip color was alternately black or creme. The truss rod cover is unadorned, and the headstock overlay is the fibre material used on many contemporary Gibson models. The ES-333 was available in "faded" brown, cherry red, natural and sunburst finishes, which are thin satin nitrocellulose lacquer. These finishes will take on the appearance of old instruments, after a period of being played, through the action of the players hands rubbing the satin finish to a fairly glossy patina wherever the hands make frequent contact with the instrument. There were also natural
    7.25
    4 votes
    44
    8.33
    3 votes
    45
    8.33
    3 votes
    46
    8.33
    3 votes
    47

    ESP Michael Wilton

    ESP Michael Wilton is a guitar model distributed by ESP. The ESP Michael Wilton is also produced in an LTD version.
    8.33
    3 votes
    48

    ESP LTD H-1000

    ESP LTD Deluxe H-1000 is a guitar model distributed by ESP. The H-1000 is a Deluxe Horizon model. its available with EMG or Seymour Duncan Pickups. In 2007 it was discontinued and replaced by the newer H-1001 model SPECS: • SET-THRU CONSTRUCTION • 25.5” SCALE • MAHOGANY BODY • 3-PIECE MAPLE NECK • ROSEWOOD FINGERBOARD • ABALONE OFFSET BLOCK INLAYS W/MODEL NAME AT 12TH FRET • EMG 81 (B) / 85 (N) ACTIVE PICKUPS • VOLUME & TONE CONTROLS W/3-WAY SWITCH • BLACK HARDWARE • SPERZEL LOCKING TUNERS • EARVANA COMPENSATED NUT • TONEPROS LOCKING BRIDGE W/STRING-THRU-BODY • WHITE W/ABALONE BINDING ON BODY, NECK & HEADSTOCK • 24 XJ FRETS FINISHES: • BLACK (BLK) SPECS: • SET-THRU CONSTRUCTION • 25.5” SCALE • MAHOGANY BODY W/FLAMED MAPLE TOP • 3-PIECE MAPLE NECK • ROSEWOOD FINGERBOARD • ABALONE FLAG INLAYS W/MODEL NAME AT 12TH FRET • SEYMOUR DUNCAN JB (B) / 59 (N) ZEBRA PICKUPS • VOLUME & TONE CONTROLS W/3-WAY SWITCH • BLACK HARDWARE • SPERZEL LOCKING TUNERS • EARVANA COMPENSATED NUT • TONEPROS LOCKING BRIDGE W/STRING-THRU-BODY • WHITE W/ABALONE BINDING ON BODY, NECK & HEADSTOCK • 24 XJ FRETS FINISHES: • AMBER CHERRY SUNBURST (ACSB)
    9.50
    2 votes
    49

    ESP JH-2

    ESP JH-2 is a guitar model distributed by ESP. This model is now discontinued.
    7.00
    4 votes
    50
    7.00
    4 votes
    51
    Fender Mark Hoppus Jazz Bass

    Fender Mark Hoppus Jazz Bass

    The Mark Hoppus Jazz Bass was introduced by Fender Musical Instruments Corporation in 2000. It was first seen in the Blink-182 music video for "Adam's Song". It has a Fender Jazz Bass body with a string-through body design and bridge system and Fender Precision Bass neck and pickups. The model uses only a single volume knob and no tone knob. Signature Bass Colors: After having extensively used Ernie Ball Music Man Sting Ray basses in the early years of Blink-182, Mark Hoppus began to rely more on Fender Precision Basses towards the late Dude Ranch - early Enema of the State period. The first custom Fender Precision Bass was the Metallic Blue Precision Bass with one volume knob as seen in the music video "All The Small Things." Mark Hoppus later collaborated with Alex Perez of the Fender R&D Department and developed his signature model featuring the distinct Jazz Bass body, first seen in the music video "Adam's Song." In 2006, after the 2005 hiatus of Blink-182 and with the start of +44, a new bass model was produced. The pickups, Seymour Duncan Precision Bass Quarter Pound, on the basses are now reversed in order to give a thicker sound to the D and G strings as according to
    7.00
    4 votes
    52
    Gibson Les Paul Black Beauty

    Gibson Les Paul Black Beauty

    • Guitarists: Paul Banks
    The Gibson Les Paul Custom is a higher end variation of the Gibson Les Paul guitar. It was developed in 1954 after Gibson had introduced the Les Paul model in 1952. Gibson's subsidiary, Epiphone, also makes the Les Paul Custom guitar. As of 2009, it comes in various finishes and variations. It comes in Ebony (with gold hardware, chrome hardware and chrome-plated pickguard on a limited edition, and with aged white binding, gold hardware, and uncovered pickups another limited edition), Alpine White (with gold hardware), Silverburst (with chrome hardware), Prophecy EX (with EMG pickups, transparent black finish with a quilted maple top, and black hardware), Prophecy GX (Gibson Dirty Finger pickups, transparent red finish with a quilted maple top, and gold hardware), and the Zakk Wylde signature (antique ivory with bulls eye graphic and gold hardware, Camo finish with a bulls eye graphic, maple fingerboard and gold hardware, and orange with a buzzsaw graphic and chrome hardware, EMG pickups).
    6.00
    5 votes
    53
    8.00
    3 votes
    54
    8.00
    3 votes
    55

    ESP LTD VIPER-400

    ESP LTD VIPER-400 is a guitar model distributed by ESP. ESP also produces a VIPER-400 in Olympic White, Black Cherry, and Black with an EMG 81 in the bridge pickup position and an EMG 85 in the neck pickup position.
    8.00
    3 votes
    56

    Fender Zone Bass

    The Fender Zone is a fretted electric bass, introduced in 2001. It has a slightly lighter and smaller body than previous Fender basses. The 2004 models were made of solid Mahogany and Walnut or Alder and Maple timbers and have a pair of Zone humbucking pickups powered by an 18V active 3-band preamp. The model appears to be designed to appeal to adventurous and innovative players, rather than traditionalists. Part of the best-selling American Deluxe Series, the Zone Bass replaced the Japanese P-Bass Lyte Deluxe (which featured a mahogany body, an active humbucking Jazz Bass pickup in the bridge position and a single 9V powered 3-band active EQ preamp), which was gone a year earlier. The Mexican made Fender Zone bass is essentially the same design as the Fender Precision Bass Lyte, which was manufactured in Japan, except for the addition of a set of custom-wound hum-cancelling P/J pickups and a 3-band active EQ powered by a single 9V battery. The J-style bridge unit is supposed to be a customized version of a pre-2004 Deluxe Active Jazz Bass pickup. On the five-string Zone, it's essentially a Vintage Noiseless Jazz Bass pickup with solid covers. The Zone replaced the P-Bass Lyte
    8.00
    3 votes
    57
    Gibson Robot Guitar

    Gibson Robot Guitar

    The Gibson Robot Guitar (a.k.a. GOR) typically refers to a sub-class of Les Paul style guitars from Gibson. This is because the first run of limited edition Robot Guitars was exclusively made up of Les Paul bodies. Currently, there are five different Gibson models available with Robot Guitar features: The Robot Les Paul Studio, Robot SG, Robot Flying V, Robot Explorer, and a Robot Les Paul Junior. Developed by Chris Adams, its most notable feature is that it uses an onboard computer to automatically tune itself. This is not the first guitar to be able to tune itself, but it is regarded as the most modern, unique, and un-invasive self-tuning model available, because it does not employ cams or cantilevers throughout the body of the guitar. The non-limited edition SG and Les Paul Studio are available in a variety of finishes. The Flying V and Explorer are only available in metallic red. The price can range from about $1,000-$3,000 or more for custom options. In the case of the "Original 1st Production" Robot guitar, the only finish available was Blue Silverburst nitrocellulose (as in the photo to the right), and it is notable because Gibson have stated in the Robot marketing materials
    8.00
    3 votes
    58
    Gibson S-1

    Gibson S-1

    The Gibson S-1 is an electric guitar, made by the Gibson Guitar Corporation. Gibson started producing the S-1 in mid-1975, but released it on the market in 1976. Its production lifespan was 1975-1980. Like the Gibson Marauder, the S-1 was an attempt to break through into the single-coil guitar market. It too consisted of a flat Les Paul -like body with a maple Flying V neck bolted on. Unlike the Marauder, however, the S-1 featured three "see-thru" single-coil pickups designed by Bill Lawrence, with fairly elaborate circuitry to generate humbucking and single-coil pickup sounds. It also featured a "Nashville" style bridge which was used in some 70's Gibson SG models. The S-1 had one 2 way toggle switch and a "chicken head" 4 position rotary switch. The potentiometers are volume and tone. The sound was similar to that of a Fender Stratocaster or a Fender Telecaster. The Gibson S-1 was initially endorsed by Ronnie Wood and Keith Richards of The Rolling Stones, as well as Carlos Santana. Like the Marauder, the nontraditional construction and Fender-like characteristics contributed to the unpopularity and demise of the model in the early 1980s. Both the Marauder and S-1 were phased out
    8.00
    3 votes
    59
    Ibanez Universe

    Ibanez Universe

    • Guitarists: Steve Vai
    • Brand: Ibanez
    The Ibanez Universe is the world's first modern, commercial seven-string electric guitar, developed by Steve Vai and manufactured by Ibanez. The Universe is a seven-string version of the Ibanez JEM series, Vai's signature model. It slightly differs from the JEM due to the absence of a "monkey grip" cut-out handle on the body. The first Universes, the UV7 and UV77 appeared on the market in 1990, though Vai had played prototypes in live performances before that. The UV7 was available in white (UV7PWH) or black with green appointments (UV7BK). The UV77 was available in a swirled multicolor finish (UV77MC) and is now considered a collector's item. The production UV77MCs were swirled first in Japan. Steve Vai had agreed to only allow the guitars to be produced if they were swirled at the same place his prototypes were: About Time Designs. After a brief period, the UV77MC Japanese Swirls were aborted in favor of the ATD-Swirled ones. The ATD swirled models were done at the ATD factory by Darren Johansen on Long Island N.Y. In 1991, Ibanez also introduced the UV777. The most expensive Universe at the time, it was available in green with a black (white pearloid on some models) pickguard
    8.00
    3 votes
    60
    Telecaster plus

    Telecaster plus

    The Fender Telecaster Plus was a dual-pickup, solid-body electric guitar manufactured by Fender in the United States from the late 80s to the mid 90s. It is a variant of the original Fender Telecaster model, but using Lace Sensor pickups. The Telecaster Plus (Version One) came equipped with Lace Sensor pickups; "Dually Red-Red" in the bridge and "Blue" in the neck. The Telecaster Plus (Version Two) came with three "Gold" Lace Sensor pickups. The dually bridge/single neck pickup configuration was also used by Fender during approximately the same time period in its Fender Stratocaster Ultra and Fender Jeff Beck Stratocaster models. Telecaster Pluses from 1989 to 1995 (Version One) had a short style bridge (somewhat similar to that of the Stratocaster), with the bridge pickup having a small metal pickup ring which was not part of the bridge mechanism. The control plate also differed from the standard Telecaster; due to an extra mini switch between the tone and volume knobs. The three position toggle acts as a coil tap for the bridge - toward the neck for the for the pickup closest to the neck, toward the bridge for the pickup closest to the bridge and in the middle for both. This
    8.00
    3 votes
    61
    6.75
    4 votes
    62
    Fender Telecaster Custom

    Fender Telecaster Custom

    Fender Telecaster Custom is a model of electric guitar made by Fender. This model should not be confused with the "Fender Custom Telecaster" model manufactured between 1959 and 1968, which only differs from a standard Telecaster in having a bound body. Ever since the release of the Telecaster Custom the market generally refers to the guitar as the "1972 Custom", indicating the year this model was originally released. During the 1950s and early 1960s Fender's twangy single-coil sound enjoyed considerable popularity. This began to wane by the mid-1960s as new stars like Eric Clapton and Mike Bloomfield plugged their humbucker-equipped Gibsons into over-driven Marshall amps. Many players began to look for a thicker, creamier sound that the standard Telecaster didn't deliver. To achieve this sound, many players replaced the standard single coil pickups on their Telecasters and installed aftermarket humbuckers (a good example of this is Andy Summers' modified Telecaster). Another reason for replacing the Tele neck pickup was that many players felt it lacked a "Rock and Roll vibe". The original single coil neck pickup excels in jazz and blues tones but players felt replacing it with a
    6.75
    4 votes
    63
    Gibson ES-137

    Gibson ES-137

    The Gibson ES-137 is a semi-hollow-body guitar which is manufactured in Gibson's Memphis factory. It is a relatively new design in Gibson's ES line which is not based on a vintage instrument, as many of Gibson's instruments are. Gibson claims the ES-137 to be a combination of its traditional semi-hollow-body single-cutaway guitars with the sound of a Les Paul Classic. This is achieved by fitting the archtop with pickups and other features matching the Les Paul. The format of archtop with a single florentine cutaway has been used by Gibson previously. Notable comparisons would be the Gibson ES-175 and Gibson ES-135 models. The basic body shape of the ES-137 is very close to Gibson's fully hollow-bodied ES-175. Despite the 137 being somewhat thinner than the ES-175, it is not classed as a thinline model. However, the ES-137 does sport an internal center block inside the body similar to the Gibson ES-335. This design helps combat feedback problems common with hollow-bodied guitars. The center block also facilitates the use of a stop tailpiece again like the ES-335, therefore eliminating the use of a "trapeze"-style tailpiece found on most hollow-bodied Gibsons. Among others, the
    6.75
    4 votes
    64
    Gibson Kalamazoo Electric Guitar

    Gibson Kalamazoo Electric Guitar

    The Kalamazoo Electric Guitar was an electric guitar produced by Gibson during the 1960s and 1970s under Gibson's parent company Chicago Musical Instruments. A budget model, it had a body that was made of Medium-Density Fiberboard (MDF) and inexpensive components. The Kalamazoo name was actually a revival of a line of acoustic guitars manufactured by Gibson from 1933 to 1942. From 1965 to 1970, there were two prominent designs. The first, made from 1965 to 1968, was reminiscent of the Fender Mustang; the other, made from 1968 to the early 1970s, bore more resemblance to the Gibson SG. The headstock bore a "Kalamazoo USA" logo rather than Gibson's usual decal. A variety of configurations and pickup options were available, including a vibrola tremolo system, and single coil "melody maker" pickups. The initial run of the Kalamazoo featured the KG-1 single-coil pickup, KG-1A single-coil pickup and vibrola, KG-2 dual single-coil pickups, and KG-2A dual single-coil pickups and vibrola. . Gibson was sold to a different parent company, Norlin. The deal called for further restructuring and the Kalamazoo name was dropped. The Epiphone name took its place as Gibson's budget line marquis, a
    6.75
    4 votes
    65
    Gibson L6-S

    Gibson L6-S

    The Gibson L6-S was the working musician's descendant of the L5S jazz solid body electric guitar. It was the same shape - very much like a wide Gibson Les Paul, but with a 24 fret two-octave neck - the first Gibson guitar to have this. The L6-S was the first cooperation between Bill Lawrence and Gibson. It was designed in 1972 and first released in 1973. The idea was to make a "multi-sound system" under a very tight budget. The popularity of the L6-S gradually dropped after 1974, despite high profile endorsements from the likes of Al di Meola and Carlos Santana. Pat Martino also used the model during this period. All models were dropped from price lists in 1979. The L6-S Custom remained in the catalog in 1980 and was still being made in the Nashville plant. The L6-S is now generally considered to be the most underrated of all the Gibson solid bodied guitars. The original L6-S came in three variants; all were maple-bodied with twin super-humbucking pickups. Late in 2011 The Gibson company has re-issued this guitar, with slight alterations: The guitar is now called an L6S, not an L6-S, the bridge is a standard Gibson Tune-o-matic, less heavy than the Schaller-made rectangular bridges
    6.75
    4 votes
    66
    PRS Guitars

    PRS Guitars

    • Guitarists: Gary Moore
    PRS Guitars is an American guitar manufacturer headquartered in Stevensville, Maryland. PRS Guitars was founded by guitarist and luthier Paul Reed Smith in 1985. The company is one of the leading manufacturers of high-end electric guitars. The bodies of most PRS guitars are crafted of mahogany, with a maple top on most models. They often feature highly figured tops, including flame maple, quilt maple and figured maple creating the effect of tiger stripes. A small number of bodies are made of korina wood. PRS necks are usually made from mahogany, although some models feature maple or Indian or Brazilian rosewood necks; fingerboards are made of rosewood. PRS's signature fret markers include the lower end moons, and the higher end birds. The moons appear similar to standard dot inlays, but have a crescent more prominent than the rest of the dot. The bird inlays feature nine or ten different birds inlayed at the appropriate frets. Inlay materials have included semiprecious stones; iridescent shells, including abalone and abalone laminates; gold; and even unearthed ivory from the (extinct) woolly mammoth. Nuts are synthetic and tuners are of PRS's own design, although some models
    6.75
    4 votes
    67
    Rickenbacker 360/12

    Rickenbacker 360/12

    • Guitarists: George Harrison
    • Brand: Rickenbacker
    The Rickenbacker 360/12 is an electric guitar made by the Rickenbacker company; it was among the first electric twelve-string guitars. This instrument is visually similar to the Rickenbacker 360. Rickenbacker uses an innovative headstock design that incorporates both a slotted-style peghead and a solid peghead, thereby eliminating the need for the larger headstock normally associated with a twelve-string guitar. Another feature unique to Rickenbacker twelve-strings is the ordering of the courses. Most twelve-strings have the octave course on the bass side of the standard course; Rickenbacker reverses this convention. This feature along with the semi-hollow body design and thru-body neck structure contribute to its unique timbre. The 360/12 was given worldwide attention by George Harrison, who used it on many Beatles recordings, introducing the distinctive new sound of this guitar on I Call Your Name in March, 1964. Rickenbacker began developing its electric twelve-string in 1963. The folk music revival of the early '60s witnessed a surge in the popularity of acoustic twelve-string guitars, but the electric variety was still rare. The company created three prototypes, all
    6.75
    4 votes
    68

    ESP JH-1

    ESP JH-1 is a guitar model distributed by ESP. This model is now discontinued.
    9.00
    2 votes
    69

    ESP LTD H-400

    ESP LTD H-400 is a guitar model distributed by ESP. ESP also produces a H-400 in black with 2 Seymour Duncan JB-59 pickups.
    9.00
    2 votes
    70
    Fender Contemporary Stratocaster Japan

    Fender Contemporary Stratocaster Japan

    Fender Contemporary Stratocaster electric guitars were produced by Fender Japan in the 1980s. The Fender Contemporary models were the first Fender Japan models to be exported as Fender Stratocasters and Telecasters. The previous Fender Japan models exported from Japan were all Fender Squier models. The Fender Contemporary models were manufactured from 1984 to 1987 by FujiGen Gakki and these Stratocasters were designed to be Superstrats (Super Strat) with humbucking pickups and Floyd Rose like tremolos made by Schaller. There was a lower priced Fender Contemporary Squier model produced as well. The Fender Contemporary Stratocaster and Telecaster models were part of the Fender Japan E series model range. When CBS sold Fender to its current owners in 1984 there was a transitional period from 1984 to 1987 with limited Fender USA production resulting in mostly Fender Japan and leftover stock being sold. There are also Fender Contemporary Telecaster models with HSS or HH pickup configurations and switches for selecting pickup options. The Fender Contemporary Telecaster models used the same tremolo systems as the Fender Contemporary Stratocaster models. Black Francis used a Fender
    9.00
    2 votes
    71
    Gibson Firebird

    Gibson Firebird

    The Gibson Firebird is a solid-body electric guitar manufactured by Gibson from 1963 to the present. The Gibson Guitar Corporation released several new styles during the 1950s to compete with Fender's instruments, such as the Telecaster and Stratocaster. After success with the Les Paul in the 1950s, Gibson's popularity began to wane in the 1960s. Fender's colors, shapes and multiple pickups were endorsed by notable guitarists. Gibson guitars seemed old-fashioned, and this coupled with higher prices contributed to a decline in sales. Gibson had made forays into radical body shapes - the Flying V and Explorer in the 1950s - which met limited initial success. The president of Gibson, Ted McCarty, hired car designer Ray Dietrich to design a guitar that would have popular appeal. Under Dietrich, the Firebird took on the lines of mid-50s car tailfins. Dietrich took the Explorer design and rounded the edges. The most unusual aspect is that the guitar is "backward" in that the right-hand (treble) horn of the body is longer than the other. Thus, the original Firebirds were unofficially referred to as "reverse". The Firebird looks like a reverse Fender Jaguar or Jazzmaster. The Firebird is
    9.00
    2 votes
    72
    Gibson Les Paul Doublecut

    Gibson Les Paul Doublecut

    The Gibson Les Paul Doublecut is a double-cutaway version of the Gibson Les Paul electric guitar. Except for Gibson Custom Shop/Historic models, there are currently four types of the Les Paul double cut model, all of which have been discontinued: The Faded Doublecut has its origin in the Les Paul Special Doublecut, which is an all-mahogany flat-top guitar with P-90 pickups first produced from 1958–1960. The "Faded" model is called such because it does not have a glossy nitrocellulose finish, and has "wear" marks added at the factory to make the guitar look aged. The body is composed of multiple mahogany (usually four) pieces and is sold with a gig-bag (as opposed to a hard-case). The Doublecut had one major design change: the original models had the neck pickup mounted closer to the neck/body join which resulted in a weak neck join. This was changed by moving the neck pick up further into the body. The "Faded Doublecut" is one of a series (at least as of 2007) "faded" models being the SG, Les Paul (single cut with humbuckers) and Flying V. All of these models are made in the USA. It is also one of the cheapest Les Paul guitars available. It appears that Gibson has since decided to
    9.00
    2 votes
    73
    Gretsch 6120

    Gretsch 6120

    • Brand: Gretsch
    The Gretsch 6120 is a hollow body electric guitar with f-holes manufactured by Gretsch and first appearing in the mid-1950s with the endorsement of Chet Atkins. It was quickly adopted by rockabilly artist Eddie Cochran, Duane Eddy, Eric Clapton, Brian Setzer and many others. Pete Townshend got one as a gift from Joe Walsh in 1970, which he later would use on recordings for Who's Next and Quadrophenia. After George Harrison played Gretsch Country Gentleman and Tennessean models (which, like the 6120, were developed with and endorsed by Chet Atkins) Gretsch found they could scarcely keep up with demand. Due to changes in musical tastes and changes in ownership in the late 1960s resulting in deteriorating quality, production of the 6120 ceased in the late 1970s. Values of the existing instruments soared when rockabilly artist Brian Setzer of the Stray Cats was seen playing an old 6120 in his early-80s music videos. Gretsch subsequently went back into the guitar business and new 6120 guitars are widely available. Today, a wide range of 6120 models are available, including an assortment of Brian Setzer signature models and faithful reissues of 50s classics. Like most Gretsch guitars,
    9.00
    2 votes
    74

    Godin

    • Guitarists: Gaston Gagnon
    Godin is a Canadian guitar manufacturer. It is owned by Robert Godin. Godin started building Robert Godin's guitars in 1972 in La Patrie, Quebec. Godin Guitars' head office is located in Montreal, and they build their instruments in six factories in four different locations, three in Quebec and one in New Hampshire. Godin Guitars makes instruments under several different labels. Norman makes entry- to mid-level acoustic guitars. Art & Lutherie makes entry-level budget guitars. The Simon and Patrick brand make mid- to high-range steel-string acoustics. La Patrie manufactures classical guitars. Seagull is known for manufacturing solid wood entry- to mid-range acoustic guitars. Guitars under the Godin brand are primarily mid-range to top-of the-line electrics that are made of high quality wood from the northeastern part of North America. They have many models that feature synth pickups and some with piezo pickup-equipped bridges. Godin are notable for their use of synthesizer pickups as a standard feature in their high end models, and many of their electric models use piezo-acoustic pickups integrated with the bridge assembly. Aside from their technical innovations, Godin has a strong
    5.80
    5 votes
    75

    ESP Dave Mustaine

    ESP produced several guitar models based on the custom models of Dave Mustaine until 2007, when he left the brand for Dean Guitars Past ESP models: An unusual feature to note is the absence of a 24th fret inlay on the DV models. In 2006 Seymour Duncan's "Dave Mustaine Livewires" were introduced, replacing the JB/Jazz combination in all but the DV-200 which used Duncan Designed copies of the JB/Jazz. Also, in 2007, ESP released a series based on the DV models, the LTD V-500 and LTD V-200. In 2008, ESP unveiled the DV series' successor; the ESP Michael Paget Signature Series. Its differences include new pickups, EMG-81 in the bridge and an EMG-85 in the neck. It also no longer has a pickguard, and also neck profile. Michael Padget, Dave Mustaine's successor to the guitar line, is the lead guitarist for the metalcore band Bullet For My Valentine.
    7.67
    3 votes
    76
    7.67
    3 votes
    77
    7.67
    3 votes
    78

    Squier Venus

    The Squier Venus (commonly known as Fender Vista Venus) is a signature series guitar released in 1997 and co-designed by Courtney Love in conjunction with Fender's Squier brand, under the Vista series. At the time of its release, Love and Bonnie Raitt were the only two female musicians to have their own signature series of guitars. Its shape was based on Mercury, Stratocaster and Rickenbacker solidbody guitars. It was released in two configurations, six or twelve string (the Venus XII). Colors available included black, sunburst and surf green. Surf green was named after paint code #57 (surf green) from Chevrolet circa 1957. This colour configuration was outlined in the Fender catalogue in 1997. Upon its original release, the Venus retailed for USD $699.99 and the Venus XII for $999.99. It was discontinued at the end of 1998. The Venus has a one letter, six digit serial number printed on the neck of the guitar. Serial numbers beginning with the letter V were manufactured in 1997. Serial numbers beginning with the letter A were manufactured between 1997 and 1998.
    7.67
    3 votes
    79
    ESP LTD Alexi - 200

    ESP LTD Alexi - 200

    The ESP LTD Alexi-200 is the latest addition to the Alexi Laiho signature series for 2007. It features a Thin U shaped neck with 24 jumbo frets, black nickel hardware, 25.5" scale, Floyd Rose locking nut, ESP-LTD tuners, one volume knob, and all the features to the right. The MSRP is about $700, but the Alexi-200 is sold in music stores for around $500.
    10.00
    1 votes
    80
    Gibson Reverse Flying V

    Gibson Reverse Flying V

    The Gibson Reverse Flying V is a limited-edition guitar based upon the concept of the iconic Gibson Flying V style. To achieve the "reverse" style, the body of the guitar is rotated 180 degrees relative to the original Flying V. First produced in 2007 as a guitar of the week (week 29) with a run of only 400. These are distinguished from later releases which have brass 'bell' truss rod covers. Again released by Gibson in 2008, 900 were made total: 300 in Natural finish, 300 in Ebony and 300 Classic White. This is the first reverse flying V made by Gibson, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the original flying V, however it is the second Gibson guitar to have such a headstock, which was borrowed and scaled down from the 1957 Gibson Moderne Prototype. The reverse flying v features a solid mahogany body, and an ebony fretboard. It has hand-wound Gibson '57 Classic Pickups and a single volume knob.
    10.00
    1 votes
    81
    6.50
    4 votes
    82
    6.50
    4 votes
    83
    Fender Starcaster

    Fender Starcaster

    • Guitarists: Tuomas Lintulaakso
    • Brand: Fender
    The Fender Starcaster was a semi-hollowbody electric guitar made by the Fender company. The Starcaster was part of Fender's attempt to enter the semi-hollowbody market, which was dominated by Gibson's ES-335 and similar designs. The Starcaster was designed by Gene Fields to be a high quality instrument, although it was manufactured at a time when Fender's standards had lowered considerably. Unlike most semi-hollow guitars which had their necks set in the bodies in the traditional style, the Starcaster retained Fender's bolt-on neck design, which at the time, used a three-bolt joint. The Starcaster was in production from 1974 to 1977 to 1980 or 1982, depending on sources. An advertisement from 1977 states that the Starcaster's first creation was in 1975. While Fender has found a significant market for period-correct (and sometimes artificially "aged") reissues of some of its classic instruments (from the mainstay Telecaster, Stratocaster, and basses through lesser-known models such as the Mustang and 12-string Stratocaster), the company has never created a Starcaster reissue, nor an updated version of the model. There was evidence that at one point Fender were toying with the idea
    6.50
    4 votes
    84
    5.60
    5 votes
    85

    ESP LTD EX-351

    ESP LTD EX-351 is a guitar model distributed by ESP. The Diamond Plate model is known as an ESP LTD EX-351D.
    8.50
    2 votes
    86
    8.50
    2 votes
    87
    Gibson RD

    Gibson RD

    The Gibson RD series solid body electric guitars were launched in 1977 as a complementary range to Gibson's existing guitars. They were designed to be brighter sounding than the existing models (such as the Gibson Les Paul or Gibson SG) and as such were longer scale (25½" as opposed to the more usual 24¾"), maple-bodied, and with state-of-the-art pre-amplified (active) electronics. At the time Gibson was owned by Norlin who also owned Moog Music. The active electronics were designed by Bob Moog, shortly before he left his own company. The best known and top of the line RD, the Artist featured active circuitry with switchable bright mode, treble and bass boost, compression and expansion. No passive mode. The electronics consisted of a 9v battery powering a circuit board the length of the body, accessible from the back cover. Also available as a bass. The neck scale was shortened in 1979 to 24¾", a return to the standard Gibson scale used on other solid bodied guitars. The post '79 instruments are less desirable today than the original '77 Artist, which has become something of a modern classic. In recent years, RD Artists have become quite collectible among collectors and players
    8.50
    2 votes
    88
    Gibson The Paul

    Gibson The Paul

    The The Paul is an electric guitar made by Gibson Guitar Corporation. The first model was manufactured from 1978 to 1982. It was targeted to customers who wanted Gibson quality and reputation at a lower price point. It included such items as the Tune-O-Matic bridge (but nickel plated rather than gold) and attained further cost savings by not including the carved top (often maple) seen on most Les Paul variants. It has a solid walnut body and neck. In 1996, the model was resurrected with the The Paul II, with a mahogany body and carved top like a Les Paul Studio instead of the flat top of prior models of The Paul. The body is 2/3 as thick as a normal Les Paul and features a rear belly cut as well. In 1998 The Paul II was replaced by The Paul SL, itself discontinued in 1999.
    8.50
    2 votes
    89
    Epiphone Sheraton

    Epiphone Sheraton

    The Epiphone Sheraton is a thinline semi-hollow body electric guitar. Though the Sheraton and all its variations were introduced under the ownership of the Gibson Guitar Corporation, Epiphone is the exclusive manufacturer. Under the ownership of Epaminondas ("Epi") Stathopoulo, Epiphone was a leading manufacturer of hollow-body and archtop guitars. Epiphone's guitars were of such high quality that they rivaled Gibson's hollow-body guitars. Until 1957, Epiphone was one of Gibson's fiercest competitors. Epi Stathopoulos died in 1943. Control of the company went to his brothers, Orphie and Frixo. In 1951, a four month long strike forced a relocation of Epiphone from New York to Philadelphia. The company was bought out by their main rival, Gibson in 1957. In 1958, Gibson began to expand upon its Epiphone line of semi-hollow guitars. They reworked Epiphone's old Century archtop into a thinline electric fitted with a single P-90. This was followed by the introduction of a twin-pickup, double-cut thinline semi-hollowbody, the Sheraton. Gibson used the same body for the Sheraton as it was using for its new ES-335, ES-345, and ES-355 models. It featured the same double rounded horns, and
    7.33
    3 votes
    90
    7.33
    3 votes
    91
    7.33
    3 votes
    92
    7.33
    3 votes
    93
    7.33
    3 votes
    94
    Gibson Les Paul Special

    Gibson Les Paul Special

    The Gibson Les Paul Special is a variation of the Gibson Les Paul guitar. It was introduced in 1955 as a model to be an intermediate between the Gibson Les Paul Junior and the more expensive Gibson Les Paul Standard. Like most of Gibsons other budget models, the Special was produced in a TV Yellow finish, which was made by Gibson as a finish that would look good on black and white television. In 1958, the model received a major change when it was introduced as a doublecut model instead of the traditional singlecut. In 1961, the Les Paul received a drastic change when it was formed into what we know today as the Gibson SG. Once Les Paul's contract had expired later that year, the Les Paul submodels changed with it. In 1968, when the contract was renewed, the original models were rebooted, and Gibson and Gibson Custom Shop now offer a total of four Les Paul special models: two single cut and two double cut.
    7.33
    3 votes
    95
    6.25
    4 votes
    96

    ESP Tom Araya

    ESP Tom Araya is an electric bass model distributed by ESP. Tom originally discovered ESP, when his fellow musicians from Slayer, Jeff Hanneman and Kerry King used ESP guitars (Jeff has his own signature model). He was approached then by ESP, who wanted to make him a signature model. Araya said that this was fine as long as the bass he plays is the same a fan would point out at a music store and buy. He also wanted to have the lower end models be just as good as the high end models, because he said that "not all the fans can afford a bass that costs and arm and a leg" He wanted the bass to have a thin neck, like a guitar so it would be easier to play for him rather than having a really fat neck that would require more effort to reach with fingers.
    6.25
    4 votes
    97
    5.40
    5 votes
    98
    Epiphone Casino

    Epiphone Casino

    • Guitarists: Les Fradkin
    The Epiphone Casino is a thinline hollow body electric guitar manufactured by Epiphone, a branch of Gibson. It is essentially Epiphone's version of the Gibson ES-330. The guitar has been associated with such guitarists as George Harrison, John Lennon, Paul McCartney, Keith Richards, Dave Davies, Noel Gallagher, The Edge, Dave Grohl and Gary Clark, Jr. The Casino, also designated by Epiphone as model E230TD, is a thinline hollow-bodied guitar with two Gibson P-90 pick-ups. Although generally fitted with a trapeze-type tailpiece, often a Bigsby vibrato tailpiece is used in its place (either as a factory direct feature or as an aftermarket upgrade). Unlike semi-hollow body guitars such as the Gibson ES-335, which have a center block to promote sustain and reduce feedback, the Casino and its cousin, the Gibson ES-330 are true hollow-bodied guitars. This makes it lighter, and louder when played without an amplifier, but much more prone to feedback than semi-hollow or solid-body electrics. Early versions of the Casino had a spruce top. Through 1970, the Casino headstock was set at a 17-degree angle and the top was made of five laminated layers of maple, birch, maple, birch, and maple.
    7.00
    3 votes
    99

    ESP Eclipse

    ESP Eclipse is an electric guitar model distributed by ESP. There are many different variations of the Eclipse, including the Eclipse-I, Eclipse-I CTM, Eclipse-I CTM (full thickness), Eclipse-II, (USA)Eclipse-II, and Eclipse Custom. ESP also makes several models under its LTD brand that are based on the Eclipse. These include the EC-1000, EC-401, EC-330, EC-256, EC-200, EC-100, and EC-50. The Eclipse is a solid body, single cutaway, 24.75 inch scale guitar similar in shape to a Gibson Les Paul although the body of the Eclipse is significantly thinner and lighter. Common features are Mahogany body, set neck, 24.75" scale, EMG pickups (typically the EMG 81/60 combo), 3-way toggle, TonePros locking bridge and tailpiece, and locking tuners. Some models come equipped with Seymour Duncan pickups and there are a variety of finishes. Some of the lower level LTD EC models have different hardware. The EC-200, EC-100, and EC-50 have a different body contour. And the EC-100 and EC-50 have bolt-on necks. The (USA)Eclipse-II (just called the Eclipse-II in the US), Eclipse Custom, and the LTD EC line all feature two volume, one tone control, and a wider cutaway with a shorter lower horn. The
    7.00
    3 votes
    100
    7.00
    3 votes
    101

    ESP M-400

    The ESP LTD M-400 is an electric guitar, the current top model of the Ltd Standard M series produced by ESP Guitars. Notable users are Jay Reynolds of Metal Church, Dirk Sauer of Edguy s, Rob Arnold of Chimaira and Andy Hemp of SkilterSkult/Virus Of Life. The guitar is set-thru and has a scale length of 25.5". The M-400 has an alder body and is only available in a black finish. The neck is maple with a rosewood fingerboard containing 24 extra jumbo frets and arrowhead inlays. It has a Licenced Floyd Rose Locking Tremolo as the bridge. An EMG 81 active set of pickups. The nut at the top of the neck is a locking type, meaning that the 6 strings pass by 3 locks. The hardware is black nickel and has a Volume, Tone, and a 3 way toggle switch. This guitar's list price is $859.00, but retail is around $599.00.
    7.00
    3 votes
    102
    Fender Bass V

    Fender Bass V

    The original Fender Bass V was a quirky and unusual electric bass guitar model produced by Fender between 1965 and 1970. It was the world's first five string bass guitar, a popular concept today. The Fender Bass V is unusual in its dimensions: although it is three inches longer than a P-Bass, the Fender Bass V has only 15 frets. A high C string was added to a combination of traditional Fender body designs. (At the time, not much about electric bass construction was traditional because it was still a new technology.) The idea behind the top C string was to enable reading bass players to get to the high notes on the instrument easily, without having to go up the neck. The top note on the instrument is E-flat which is the same top note as a standard 20-fret 4 string Jazz or Precision bass. Originally came with chrome bridge and pickup covers. Players did not accept the Fender Bass V, partly due to its size and shape. Players also had problems with the small amount of space between strings. Only about 1000 Fender Bass V models were produced, before being discontinued in 1970. Surplus bodies were then used in the construction of the Fender Swinger. The following players are purported to
    7.00
    3 votes
    103
    Gibson ES-335

    Gibson ES-335

    • Guitarists: John Steven Test
    The Gibson ES-335 is the world's first commercial thinline arched-top semi-acoustic electric guitar. Released by the Gibson Guitar Corporation as part of its ES (Electric Spanish) series in 1958, it is neither hollow nor solid; instead, a solid wood block runs through the center of its body. The side "wings" are hollow, and the top has two violin-style f-holes over the hollow chambers. Before 1952 Gibson produced only hollow body guitars, which are prone to feedback when amplified loudly. That year saw the introduction of their first solid body, the Gibson Les Paul, based on Les Paul's experiment, "The Log," which was merely a fence post with a neck, hardware, and pickup attached. By 1958 Gibson was making a few solid body models which had much lower feedback and better sustain but lacked the darker, warmer tone and unamplified volume of hollow bodies. The ES-335 is an attempt to find a middle ground: a warmer tone than a solid body with almost as little feedback. Though semi-hollow bodies like the ES-335 are essentially a compromise of earlier designs, for the same reason they are extremely flexible as evidenced by the ES-335's popularity in a wide range of music, including blues,
    7.00
    3 votes
    104
    Hello Kitty Stratocaster

    Hello Kitty Stratocaster

    The Hello Kitty Stratocaster is an original series of electric guitar made by Squier (Fender). It is available in pink or black and is equipped with a custom pickguard in the shape of Hello Kitty's head. The guitar is equipped with a single humbucker pickup in the bridge position, a maple neck and an Agathis body. It has only one knob, which is to control the volume. It has been in production since January 2006. The guitar has not picked up very much popularity except as a novelty, owing to its inferior quality when compared with the Fender Stratocaster. Notable users of Hello Kitty Stratocasters include Brian Amadeus Moderatto, Lisa Loeb, Didier Wampas, Courtney Love & her daughter, Dave Navarro, Mike Shinoda of Linkin Park, Ezra Igor of Sastrosastri, Kevin Johansen, Jane Wiedlin of the Go-Go's, Marcus Adoro of The Eraserheads, OJ Kryptic of The Kryptics and even Ziltoid the omniscient on some Devin Townsend Band live shows.
    7.00
    3 votes
    105
    7.00
    3 votes
    106
    Music Man StingRay

    Music Man StingRay

    Music Man StingRay is an electric bass guitar by Music Man, introduced in 1976. In 1971, Fender employees Forrest White and Tom Walker, unhappy with the way CBS was managing the company, left their positions with Fender to start their own venture. First known as Tri-Sonic and then later Musitek, Inc., the new company eventually settled on the name of MusicMan, Inc. by 1974. The company began producing a hybrid tube-solid state amplifier co-designed by Tom Walker and Leo Fender, who was participating as a silent partner to the firm due to a "no compete" clause in the sales contract Fender had signed when he sold his original company to CBS in 1965. After the clause expired in 1975, he was made president of MusicMan, Inc., and by 1976 his consulting firm CLF Research had begun producing instruments bearing the MusicMan name. Designed by Fender, Walker and Sterling Ball (Sterling was a beta tester for the instrument), the StingRay bass appeared in 1976 and, though physically similar to a Fender Precision Bass, was a highly innovative instrument. It employed a "soapbar" humbucking pickup and an active pre-amp powered by a 9-volt battery. The early versions had 2-band EQ (i.e., bass and
    7.00
    3 votes
    107
    8.00
    2 votes
    108

    Fender Coronado

    The Fender Coronado was a double-cutaway thin-line hollow-body electric guitar, announced in 1965, it was manufactured by Fender Musical Instruments Corporation. It was quite a departure from previous Fender instruments, and remains an odd point in Fender's history. The very un-Fender like instrument was designed by Roger Rossmeisl (who had previously also designed instruments for Rickenbacker, but who went on to create numerous models for Fender) in an attempt to capitalise on the increasing popularity of semi-acoustic guitars following the high-profile use of hollow-bodied instruments, such as the Epiphone Casino by bands like the Beatles. During Rossmeisl's time designing for Fender he also designed the Fender Montego, a jazz box style guitar which shares the Coronado's fixed F tailpiece; and the 1967 Fender Wildwood which shares the Stratocaster headstock. Three versions of the Coronado guitar were produced from 1966 through 1972. The Fender Coronado I, discontinued in 1970, was the original single pickup design. The Coronado II had an added bridge pickup (with relative tone and volume controls). The Coronado XII, released in 1967, was a twelve-string version of the guitar.
    8.00
    2 votes
    109
    Fender Lead Series

    Fender Lead Series

    • Brand: Fender
    The Fender Lead Series was produced by the Fender/Rogers/Rhodes Division of CBS Musical Instruments. The series comprised Lead I, Lead II, Lead III and Lead Bass models. The original concept for the Lead Guitar series, including the name lead came from Dennis Handa, then Marketing director for Fender Guitars. The idea was to have a guitar that was cheaper than the Stratocaster and be attractive to players because of the neck feel as well as the pickup options. The smaller headstock and the neck were both patterned after earlier Fender necks. Originally Steve Morse of the Dixie Dregs was the first endorser of the guitar and premiered it at a Namm show in Atlanta Georgia. The Lead Guitars were manufactured between 1979 and 1982 by the Fender Musical Equipment Co. under the direction of Gregg Wilson and Freddie Tavares. Gregg Wilson was succeeded by John Page, who eventually headed the Fender Custom Shop. The Lead Series have elements of the Stratocaster and Telecaster in their design with a body that is slightly smaller and with a slightly different shape than the Stratocaster, a Stratocaster-like neck (and headstock), and hardtail bridge with Telecaster-like string ferrules on the
    8.00
    2 votes
    110
    Gibson SG

    Gibson SG

    • Guitarists: Angus Young
    • Brand: Gibson Guitar Corporation
    The Gibson SG is a model of solid-bodied electric guitar that was introduced in 1961 by Gibson, and remains popular. In 1961, Gibson Les Paul sales were significantly lower than in previous years. The following year, the Les Paul was given a thinner, flat-topped mahogany body, and had a double cutaway which made the upper frets more accessible. The neck joint was moved by three frets to further ease access to the upper frets. The simpler body construction significantly reduced production costs, and the new Les Paul, with its slender neck profile and small heel was advertised as having the "fastest neck in the world". Although the new guitar was popular, Les Paul himself did not care for the new design, and requested the removal of his name from the new model. He remained under contract to Gibson, however, and he was photographed with the new model several times. Gibson honored Les Paul's request, and the new model was renamed "SG", which stood for 'Solid Guitar'. Les Paul's name was officially deleted in 1961, but the SG continued to feature Les Paul nameplates and truss rod covers until the end of 1963. Because of its popularity and vintage heritage, the body style of the SG is
    8.00
    2 votes
    111
    Stratocaster XII

    Stratocaster XII

    • Guitarists: Les Fradkin
    The Fender Stratocaster XII is the 12 string version of the Fender Stratocaster electric guitar made by Fender. It was introduced in 1985 and re-issued 20 years later after a brief discontinuation in 1996. Unlike the Fender Electric XII, it uses a Strat-style body. Fender discontinued the Strat XII in 2009. The Stratocaster XII is designed in the United States and manufactured in Japan. The original 1985 version featured some slight differences compared to the re-issue model of 2005; it had a larger bridge and saddle system similar to that of an Electric XII and an altered headstock shape with raised machine heads. It also used a 22-fret neck with a rosewood fingerboard and pearloid dots. The current version features a modified hard-tail Strat bridge, a pao ferro fretboard with 21 frets and clay dot inlays. The Telecaster XII is similar in design, features and construction to the original Stratocaster XII of 1985, except for the addition of a 2-piece premium lightweight ash Tele-style body, a 1-ply black pickguard and a 1-piece maple neck/fingerboard with black micarta dot inlays. This American-made Custom Shop limited-edition guitar was made in 1995 and discontinued in 1998.
    8.00
    2 votes
    112
    Taylor Guitars

    Taylor Guitars

    • Guitarists: Tim Scott
    Taylor Guitars is an El Cajon, California‐based guitar manufacturer specializing in acoustic guitars, as well as semi-hollow and solidbody electric guitars. It was established in 1974 by Bob Taylor and Kurt Listug. In 1972, at age 18, Bob Taylor began working at American Dream, a guitar making shop owned by Sam Radding, where Kurt Listug was already an employee. When Radding decided to sell the business in 1974, a triumvirate of Taylor, Listug, and Schemmer bought American Dream and renamed it the Westland Music Company. Needing a more compact logo suitable for the guitars' headstock, the founders decided to change the name to "Taylor" as it sounded more American than "Listug" and because as Kurt Listug put it, "Bob was the real guitar-maker." Listug became the businessman of the partnership while Taylor was responsible on design and production. In 1976, the company decided to begin selling their guitars through retailers. In 1981, facing financial difficulties, Taylor Guitars took out a bank loan to purchase equipment. As of 2012 Taylor Guitars has more than 700 employees. The company maintains two factories: One in El Cajon, California and the other, 40 miles away in Tecate,
    8.00
    2 votes
    113
    9.00
    1 votes
    114
    Jackson Guitars

    Jackson Guitars

    • Guitarists: Buckethead
    • Brand: Jackson Guitars
    Jackson is a brand of electric guitar that bears the name of its founder, Grover Jackson. Grover Jackson obtained ownership in Charvel's Guitar Repair of Glendora, California in the 1970s with a promise to bolster Charvel's business. Wayne Charvel eventually sold his interest to Grover Jackson on November 10, 1978, which gave Jackson control of the business and the Charvel brand. Jackson Guitars originated in 1980 when guitarist Randy Rhoads approached Charvel with an idea for an individualized guitar. The collaborative design effort between Rhoads, Grover Jackson, Tim Wilson, and Mike Shannon resulted in the creation of the Concorde, an innovative revamp of the traditional Flying V. The Rhoads guitar model designs were such a departure from Charvel's Stratocaster-based models that Grover elected to label them with his own name. Throughout the heavy metal heyday of the 1980s, the Jackson brand was associated with high-quality, American-made, custom instruments, and was endorsed by many popular guitarists of the period. In addition to the original Randy Rhoads models, the 1980s spawned distinctively designed Jackson models such as the Soloist, King V, and Kelly, all of which remain
    9.00
    1 votes
    115

    Squier '51

    The Squier '51 was an electric guitar made by Squier, a subsidiary of Fender. The '51 is notable for being one of the few original designs made by Squier, which normally manufactures less expensive authorized copies of Fender's popular guitars and bass guitars. The '51 combines aspects of several of Fender's best-known instruments. The body and neck pickup resemble that of the Fender Stratocaster, while the single-ply pickguard and the control plate is borrowed from the original incarnation of the Fender Precision Bass. The neck and headstock design are reminiscent of a Fender Telecaster. The '51 uses a humbucker in the bridge position and a Stratocaster-style single-coil pickup in the neck position. The bridge of the '51 is slightly narrower than most US-made Fender guitars in order to line up better with the polepieces of the humbucker, which are designed for the narrower string spacing of Gibson-style guitars. The bridge pickup has a coil split, activated by pulling out on the volume control knob, to switch between single-coil and humbucker configuration. The second control knob, which normally would operate as a tone control on a Telecaster or early Precision Bass, is a
    9.00
    1 votes
    116
    Ukulele

    Ukulele

    The ukulele ( /ˌjuːkəˈleɪliː/ EW-kə-LAY-lee; from Hawaiian: ʻukulele [ˈʔukuˈlɛlɛ]), sometimes abbreviated to uke; is a member of the guitar family of instruments; it generally employs four nylon or gut strings or four courses of strings. The ukulele originated in the 19th century as a Hawaiian interpretation of the machete, a small guitar-like instrument related to the cavaquinho, braguinha and the rajao, taken to Hawaii by Portuguese immigrants. It gained great popularity elsewhere in the United States during the early 20th century, and from there spread internationally. The tone and volume of the instrument varies with size and construction. Ukuleles commonly come in four sizes: soprano, concert, tenor, and baritone. Ukuleles are commonly associated with music from Hawaii where the name roughly translates as "jumping flea," perhaps due to movement of the player's fingers. Legend attributes it to the nickname of Englishman Edward William Purvis, one of King Kalākaua's officers, due to his small size, fidgety manner, and playing expertise. According to Queen Liliʻuokalani, the last Hawaiian monarch, the name means “the gift that came here,” from the Hawaiian words uku (gift or
    9.00
    1 votes
    117
    6.67
    3 votes
    118

    ESP EXP-200

    ESP EXP-200 is a guitar model distributed by ESP. The ESP EXP-200 was also produced in a LTD version.
    6.67
    3 votes
    119

    ESP KH-2

    ESP KH-2 is a guitar model distributed by ESP. The ESP KH-2 is also porduced in a Neck-thru version and a Vintage version with an orange "Caution: Hot" sticker on it. It also comes with a ""Ouija" design on it in other versions.
    6.67
    3 votes
    120
    ESP Kirk Hammett

    ESP Kirk Hammett

    The ESP Kirk Hammett (or just ESP KH) is a range of electric guitars (almost all of a double-cutaway superstrat design) produced by ESP Guitars, based on the custom models of Kirk Hammett. All KH models were built by Kirk Hammett & Matt Masciandaro. The specifications can be found at http://www.espguitars.com for the KH-2 Series. ESP KH-2 Vintage: ESP KH-2 NTB ESP KH-2 ESP KH-2 Ouija Black ESP KH-2 Ouija White ESP KH-4 ESP LTD KH-602 ESP LTD KH-Ouija ESP LTD KH-202 ESP LTD KH-JR
    6.67
    3 votes
    121
    6.67
    3 votes
    122
    Fender Cyclone

    Fender Cyclone

    • Brand: Fender
    The Fender Cyclone denotes a series of electric guitars made by Fender. Introduced in late 1997, the Cyclone body is similarly styled to the Mustang, but it is a quarter of an inch thicker than the body of a Mustang and is made of poplar, whereas contemporary Mustang reissues were made of basswood. In July 2002, the Cyclone II was introduced as the successor to the Fender Cyclone and featured cosmetic changes such as the Mustang racing stripe as well as 3 vintage single-coil pickups and switching borrowed from the Fender Jaguar. As of 2006 the range included the original Cyclone, the Cyclone HH with two humbuckers, and the Cyclone II with three MIA Jaguar pickups controlled by on-off switches in place of the selector switch. As of January 2007, all Cyclone variants had been discontinued by Fender. The Cyclone has a scale of 24.75 inches, the same as a Gibson Les Paul but an unusual intermediate size for Fender, and a Fender Stratocaster-style synchronized tremolo. The original Cyclone used an Atomic humbucking pickup in the bridge, a Tex-Mex pickup in the neck position, and a conventional 3-way toggle switch. The Cyclone was also promoted as a USA-made guitar for a brief time in
    5.75
    4 votes
    123
    Danelectro Shorthorn

    Danelectro Shorthorn

    • Guitarists: Jimmy Page
    The Danelectro Shorthorn line of guitars are a dual cutaway hollow bodied design, made of Masonite and poplar. The original models were introduced in 1959 to replace the U model guitars, and were in production until the closure of the Danelectro company in 1969. There have been multiple re-issues of this line of guitars, the first two being the 59DC with two pickups and DC-3 with three pickups, sold between 1998 and 2001. The 59 Dano followed in 2007 and the 59-DC in 2009. The Shorthorn range comes in one, two and three pickup models, and has the "Coke Bottle Style" classic headstock, hollowed body cavity, and a seal shaped pick guard with two concentric "stacked" tone/volume knobs (non-stacked on some reissues). The Danelectro Convertible was a hollow-bodied thinline acoustic/electric guitar based on the Shorthorn. It had a conventional round sound hole with a lipstick pickup mounted diagonally across the hole. The Convertible name comes from the ability to play it unplugged as an acoustic guitar or plugged in as an electric guitar. The jack to accommodate the cable is located inside the guitar's strap holder on the bottom of the guitar body. The Convertible has the double cutaway
    7.50
    2 votes
    124
    DC-3

    DC-3

    • Brand: Danelectro
    DC-3 guitars were manufactured by Danelectro. A small number of DC-3's were manufactured in the late 1990s. The DC-3's design is based on classical Danelectro models, such as the DC-59. The DC-3 has three pickups, whereas the DC-59, only two. The "DC" stands for 'double cutaway'.
    7.50
    2 votes
    125

    ESP Dan Jacobs

    The ESP Dan Jacobs EX and the ESP LTD DJ-600 are guitar models by ESP. It is the same model as the guitars in the EX series however the headstock is reversed, as well as an EMG 85 pickup in the neck(rather than an EMG 60), Grover tuners, and a Floyd Rose bridge. Interestingly enough, the tone knob has been replaced by an EMG Afterburner. The only distributed model is the LTD version.
    7.50
    2 votes
    126
    7.50
    2 votes
    127
    7.50
    2 votes
    128
    7.50
    2 votes
    129
    7.50
    2 votes
    130
    7.50
    2 votes
    131

    ESP LTD MH-1000

    ESP LTD MH-1000 is a guitar model distributed by ESP. The 2006 ESP LTD MH-1000 is also produced in Dark Brown Sunburst with a Seymour Duncan JB in the bridge position and a Seymour Duncan 59 in the neck position. The 2005 version was offered in See Through Black Cherry with the Seymour Duncan pickups. The 2007 version featured a Floyd Rose tremolo bridge.
    7.50
    2 votes
    132
    Fender Jaguar Baritone Custom

    Fender Jaguar Baritone Custom

    • Guitarists: Claudio Sanchez
    Not to be confused with the Fender Jaguar Bass or the Fender Jaguar Baritone Special HH. Fender's Jaguar Baritone Custom electric guitar, also known as Fender Jaguar Bass VI Custom is more or less a combination of the Fender Jaguar electric guitar and the Fender Bass VI electric bass guitar: Its pickup configuration and switching setup is identical to the Jaguar, but uses the same heavier string gauges as the Bass VI (25-35-45-55-75-95), with a 28.5" scale-length neck (as opposed to the Bass VI's 30" scale-length), and is tuned E-E one octave lower than a standard guitar. Unlike both the Bass VI and nearly all other Jaguar models however, the Jaguar Baritone Custom has a fixed (non-tremolo) bridge. The Jaguar Baritone Custom is a Crafted-In-Japan (CIJ) model, and is almost identical to the Japanese-market "Fender Jaguar Bottom Master", though the Bottom Master has different switching options due to different internal wiring (including a "fuzz switch"). In 2006, Fender USA changed the name of the instrument to "Jaguar Bass VI Custom" in order to tie it more closely with its Bass VI heritage, and also probably to differentiate it more from the modern baritone guitar, which is usually
    7.50
    2 votes
    133
    Gibson Super 400

    Gibson Super 400

    The Gibson Super 400 is an archtop guitar, "the biggest, fanciest, and most expensive archtop ever built," and a highly influential model guitar which inspired many other guitar makers (including Elmber Stromberg and John D'Angelico). It was first sold in 1934 and named for its $400 price. The Super 400 was the largest guitar that the Gibson Guitar Corporation had produced. Until 1939, it had a hand engraved tailpiece and a hand engraved finger rest support. During the very early production stock the truss rod cover had engraved "L5 Super"; on later guitars this was changed to "Super 400". In 1939 the guitar was changed. The upper bout was enlarged, and the hand engraved tailpiece was replaced with the one fitted to the current Super 400s. The f-holes were enlarged, and a cutaway option was available. This was called the Super 400P (for Premiere), later changed to C for Cutaway. During the 1950s, Gibson released the Super 400 CES. This had a slightly thicker top to reduce feedback, two P-90 pickups, and individual tone and volume controls, along with a three way toggle switch. Later the P-90 pickups were replaced with Alnico V pickups, then in 1957, humbucking pickups. There have
    7.50
    2 votes
    134
    Telecaster bass

    Telecaster bass

    The Fender Telecaster Bass (also referred as the Tele Bass) is an electric bass introduced in 1968 by Fender Musical Instruments Corporation, famous for producing the classic basses as the Precision and Jazz, and electric guitars as the Stratocaster and the Telecaster. With few physical changes through the 1970s, it was discontinued in 1979 and reissued in 2007 by Fender's subsidiary Squier as the Squier Vintage Modified Precision Bass TB, which is still produced by the company. Released as a reissue of the original version of Fender Precision Bass, it was named as "Telecaster" after the Telecaster guitar model. The Telecaster Bass differs in shape from the original Telecaster guitar in that the latter is a single cutaway guitar and the bass is double cutaway, a feature which makes it resemble the Squier 51. The Telecaster Bass was introduced in May 1968 being essentially a straight reissue of the original 1951 Precision Bass design (which was in fact influenced by the Telecaster guitar), with a large pickguard, small Telecaster-shaped headstock, single pickup, and separate chrome control plate. Early versions had a two piece maple-capped neck with no "skunk stripe" on the back of
    7.50
    2 votes
    135
    Fender Stratocaster

    Fender Stratocaster

    • Guitarists: George Harrison
    • Brand: Fender
    The Fender Stratocaster is an electric guitar. Designed by Leo Fender, George Fullerton, and Freddie Tavares in 1954, it has been manufactured continuously by the Fender Musical Instruments Corporation to the present. It is a double-cutaway guitar, with an extended top horn for balance. Along with the Gibson Les Paul, it is one of the most popularly copied electric guitar shapes. "Stratocaster" and "Strat" are trademark terms belonging to Fender. Originally the Stratocaster was offered in a 2-color sunburst finish on a solid, deeply contoured ash body, a 21-fret one-piece maple neck with black dot inlays and Kluson tuning heads. In 1956 Fender began issuing solid Stratocasters with alder bodies. In 1960 the available custom colors were standardized, many of which were automobile lacquer colors from DuPont available at an additional 5% cost. The unique single-ply, 8-screw hole white pickguard allowed all electronic components—except the recessed jack plate—to be attached to it for easy assembly. Despite subsequent Stratocaster models (including copies) vintage Fender models are highly valued by collectors for their investment potential and players who prefer the timbre of older
    5.50
    4 votes
    136
    Univox Hi-Flier

    Univox Hi-Flier

    The Univox Hi-Flier was an electric guitar manufactured by Univox and Unicord from 1968 to 1978. It had a very similar appearance to the Mosrite Ventures guitar, though was somewhat different (and much cheaper). The Hi-Flier went through many changes, and is known as having four phases. However, the changes made that define these four phases have "transitional" periods where characteristics from an older phase carry on to a newer phase, for sometime into the production. It is impossible to date these guitars by the serial number as it is uncertain whether records were kept on their production (the original factory burned down in the 1980s), and generally, the serial numbers run from largest-to-smallest over many years. The Hi-Flier debuted around 1968. It was loosely based on the Mosrite Ventures model, and featured two P-90 style pickups. The very first Hi-Fliers had a three-tone sunburst finish, pearloid white pickguard and truss rod cover. These very early Hi Fliers are distinctly different from later models because they have much thicker bodies and necks, a "bar" type string tree that covers all six strings, larger fret markers for all frets except the two on the twelfth fret,
    5.50
    4 votes
    137
    6.33
    3 votes
    138
    6.33
    3 votes
    139
    ESP Viper

    ESP Viper

    The ESP Viper is an electric guitar manufactured by ESP Guitars. The ESP Viper has a shape similar to that of a Gibson SG, with slight variations; Vipers have a slight diagonal slope at the bottom and an asymmetrical front profile. The body is mahogany or alder. The neck is three pieces, with a rosewood fingerboard. As standard, it comes fitted with an EMG 81/85 pickup set. It has a scale length of 24.75". The LTD Vipers that are made by ESP's sister line are more affordable and of different quality in comparison to the ESP Viper. LTD Vipers are made of less expensive materials and do not possess the same specifications as ESP Vipers (with the exception of the higher-end LTDs having EMG 81/85 pickups like the ESP Viper). Unlike the ESP Viper line, the LTD line features a Viper with Seymour Duncan passive pickups. Viper Standard features: Set-through neck, 24.75" Scale, Mahogany Body, Mahogany Neck, Ebony Fingerboard, 42mm Bone Nut, Thin U Neck Contour, 24 XJ Frets, Black Nickel Hardware, Gotoh Magnum Lock Tuners, Gotoh TOM Bridge & Tailpiece, EMG 81 (B) / 85 (N) Active p.u., Finish: BLKS Viper-7 Set-Neck Construction, 25.5" Scale, Mahogany Body, Mahogany Neck, Ebony Fingerboard,
    6.33
    3 votes
    140
    Fender Esquire

    Fender Esquire

    • Brand: Fender
    The Fender Esquire is a solid body electric guitar manufactured by Fender, and was the first guitar sold by Fender in 1950. Shortly after its introduction a two-pickup version named the Broadcaster was introduced while the single pickup version retained the Esquire name. The Gretsch Company at the time marketed a drum set under the 'Broadkaster' name, and at their request Fender renamed it the 'Telecaster.' Although the one-pickup Esquire was manufactured first, it is now generally regarded as a variant of the more popular Telecaster. The first prototype for the Esquire (and the later Telecaster) was completed by Leo Fender in the fall of 1949. The prototype shared with these guitars the now-familiar slab body shape with single cutaway to allow easier access to the upper frets. It likewise featured the distinctive combination bridge and pickup assembly, with a slanted pickup with individual pole pieces for each string, and three bridge saddles which allowed adjustment of string length in pairs and individual string height. The neck, like the first Esquires manufactured in 1950, was made from a single piece of maple without a truss rod. The neck was attached to the body with four
    6.33
    3 votes
    141

    Gibson Chet Atkins SST

    The Gibson Chet Atkins SST was a revolutionary design that combined the best of Gibson's acoustic and electric guitar technology. The SST was a solid body acoustic-electric designed by the late legendary country artist Chet Atkins. The steel-string model was introduced in 1987 and was discontinued for 2006. The SST had a solid spruce or cedar top and a mahogony body. Unlike most acoustic-electrics the SST had no resonating chamber or soundhole. The acoustic sound came from a bridge mounted transducer. The SST quickly became popular among rock and country players because high volume levels could be reached without any feedback (most traditional acoustic electrics will emit moderate to high levels of feedback when they come near amplifiers, speakers or microphones). This ability made the SST the perfect acoustic guitar for live music. The SST was offered in three finishes: natural, ebony, and cherry sunburst. It had mother of pearl inlays in a star pattern on the fretboard, headstock, and bridge and features gold plated hardware. It also sports Chet Atkins's signature above the fretboard. The SST had controls for volume as well as boost and cut for both treble and bass signals.
    6.33
    3 votes
    142
    Gibson EDS-1275

    Gibson EDS-1275

    • Guitarists: Claudio Sanchez
    The Gibson EDS-1275 is a doubleneck Gibson electric guitar introduced in 1963 and still in production. Popularized by both rock and jazz musicians such as Jimmy Page and John McLaughlin, it was called "the coolest guitar in rock." The forerunner of the EDS-1275 was called the EMS-1235. From 1958 to 1961 these were produced as custom-order twin-necked hollow-body instruments with two 6-string necks; from 1962 to 1967 it had a solid body. A model with a 4-string and a 6-string neck was called the EBS-1250; it had a built-in fuzztone and was produced from 1962 to 1968 and again from 1977 to 1978. In 1963, the solid-body EDS-1275 was designed, resembling the SG model; this version of the doubleneck was available until 1968, and were being produced again in 1977. The EDS-1275 is often referred to as the "SG double neck" due to its similar shape, although both necks of the 1275 have a shorter scale fret board than the Gibson SG, and they have fixed tail pieces, where the SG has an adjustable one. The guitar was available in jet black, cherry, sunburst, and white. In 1974, Gibson started making the guitar again, in a number of additional colors, until 1998. Since then, alpine white and
    6.33
    3 votes
    143
    Gibson ES-175

    Gibson ES-175

    • Guitarists: Pat Metheny
    The Gibson ES-175 is an electric guitar manufactured by the Gibson Guitar Corporation, currently still in production. It is a 24¾" scale full hollow body guitar with a trapeze tailpiece and Tune-O-Matic bridge. It is one of the most famous jazz guitars in history. The ES-175 debuted in 1949, as Gibson's mid-level laminate top alternative to the L-5 and as an electric version of the L-4. It was also the first Gibson electric to feature a stylish Florentine cutaway. Its first incarnation had one single-coil pickup (a P-90) in the neck position, and a carved rosewood bridge. In 1953, the ES-175D, a two-pickup model, was introduced. The ES-175 or ES-175D could be ordered in either sunburst finish or in natural finish (for an additional charge). Beginning in February 1957, ES-175s came equipped with humbuckers. Many new jazz guitarists such as Pat Metheny used these to emulate the sound of Joe Pass and Wes Montgomery's "heart" L5. The ES-175 with humbuckers is prized for its full, rich tone. Some guitarists will try to mimic the rich resonant sound of this rather large hollow body instrument by turning the tone knob all the way down on smaller, or solid body, guitars. In 1976 Gibson
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    3 votes
    144
    Gibson Les Paul Junior

    Gibson Les Paul Junior

    • Guitarists: Leslie West
    The Gibson Les Paul Jr. is a solid body electric guitar introduced in 1954 as an affordable, entry-level Les Paul. It was first released with a single cut body style; models with a double cut body style were later introduced in 1958. The goal for the Les Paul Jr. was to have a high-quality guitar that was still affordable. This was achieved by stripping the Les Paul down to the basics: one pickup, one volume knob and tone knob. It was equipped with one P-90 dog ear pickup in the bridge. It was originally released in sunburst, but Gibson also introduced the TV version (a kind of yellow, also known as TV Yellow) for professional musicians, who would be featured playing the guitar on television; the yellow would look good on black and white television was introduced. In the 1960s and 1970s the Les Paul Jr. became very popular because of its simplicity and distinguishable tone when played through a high gain amplifier. The P-90 pickup gave the guitar a distinct crunch that was desired by rock and blues players of the time, including Leslie West of Mountain, Luther Grosvenor (a.k.a. Ariel Bender) of Spooky Tooth and Mott the Hoople, and Johnny Thunders of The New York Dolls and The
    6.33
    3 votes
    145

    ESP EXP-300

    ESP EXP-300 is a guitar model distributed by ESP. The ESP EXP-300 was also produced in a LTD version.
    8.00
    1 votes
    146
    ESP Jeff Hanneman

    ESP Jeff Hanneman

    ESP Jeff Hanneman is an electric guitar model distributed by ESP for Jeff Hanneman of the thrash metal band Slayer. Despite it being his signature guitar, the instrument is not exactly to the original specifications. Hanneman's own instruments (all modeled after his favorite Jackson Soloist - the guitar used on most of Slayer's albums) have pure maple, not alder, bodies. The ESP edition originally featured a Floyd Rose tremolo, which upset a large number of Slayer fans. In response, ESP began offering the Kahler 2315. The body does not feature the Oakland Raiders and Dead Kennedys stickers shown on his guitar that he plays on stage. Also the neck bindings above the 12 fret do not feature the SS runes inlays.
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    1 votes
    147
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    148
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    149
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    150
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    151
    Fender Aerodyne Jazz Bass

    Fender Aerodyne Jazz Bass

    The Fender Aerodyne Jazz Bass is an electric bass guitar created by Fender and was introduced to the US market in late 2004. The Aerodyne Jazz Bass is usually equipped with a split single-coil 'p-bass' pickup at the mid position and a single-coil pickup from a Jazz Bass at the bridge position. A number of Japanese domestic market 'non-export' models also come in a standard Jazz Bass' configuration. The bass is fitted with one volume knob per pickup, plus a master tone knob. The body outline is shaped like the Jazz Bass, though substantially lighter (the Aerodyne Jazz Bass weighs about 7 pounds, compared to the 10 pounds of the standard Jazz Bass). It's also slightly thinner than a traditional Jazz Bass body, due to its unusual 39 inch top radius unique to the Aerodyne series. The radius of the top means that the bridge is actually inset slightly into the top of the body. The Aerodyne Jazz Bass has a standard 1.5 inch nut width, a very slim "C" shaped neck and 20 medium jumbo frets. The Aerodyne Jazz Bass has various cosmetic features that differ greatly from similar Fender basses. The 'export model' is only available in black, with a matching black headstock facing, smoked chrome
    8.00
    1 votes
    152
    Gibson ES-330

    Gibson ES-330

    The Gibson ES-330 is a thinline hollowbody electric guitar model produced by the Gibson Guitar Corporation. Though similar in appearance to the popular Gibson ES-335 semi-hollow guitar, the ES-330 is a fairly different guitar in construction and sound. While the 335 is a semi-hollow guitar (that is, the central part of the guitar body is a solid block while the wings of the guitar are hollow), the 330 is a fully hollow thinline guitar. Also, the 335 features two humbucking pickups, while the 330 features two single-coil P-90 pickups; these feature black plastic covers for the first few years of production and later switched to nickel covers. Together, the 330 body construction and the different pickups create a sound that is quite different from the 335. Also, the 330 neck joines the body at the 16th fret, whereas the 335 neck joines the body at the 19th fret; later, due to complaints of the lack of access to upper frets, the neck was elongated by joining it to the body at the 19th fret. This change, however, put additional stress on the neck/body joint and these guitars had a tendency to "fold" at the neck when stressed. The guitar has been produced both as a single-pickup
    8.00
    1 votes
    153
    Gibson Spirit

    Gibson Spirit

    The Gibson Spirit is a guitar model sold under Gibson and Epiphone USA nameplates in the 1980s. This article does not refer to the made-in-China Spirit guitar sold under the Gibson Baldwin Music Education nameplate. The Gibson Spirit is a lesser-known model produced from 1982 to 1986 by Gibson in the Nashville, Tennessee, and Kalamazoo, Michigan, factories. It was initially produced in the Kalamazoo factory under the Epiphone nameplate. In response to poor sales, some Epiphone models were changed to Gibson, and a faint Epiphone logo can be seen under the Gibson logo on the peghead. Later models were produced as Gibsons in Nashville. The Spirit appears to have been modelled after the Les Paul Junior double-cutaway model, with the primary differences being the use of modern single-coil and humbucker pickups, and cutaways at the 20th fret rather than the 22nd. Common to all Spirit models is the flat top and back. One control cavity is routed into the rear of the guitar. All spirits have a double-cutaway design, with the upper horn slightly longer than the lower. The neck is set (glued) into the body and has 22 frets with pearl dot inlays. Some models have flamed/tiger maple tops and
    8.00
    1 votes
    154
    Lucille

    Lucille

    Lucille is the name given to B.B. King's guitars. They are usually black Gibson guitars similar to the ES-355. In the winter of 1949, King played at a dance hall in Twist, Arkansas. In order to heat the hall, a barrel half-filled with kerosene was lit, a fairly common practice at the time. During a performance, two men began to fight, knocking over the burning barrel and sending burning fuel across the floor. The hall burst into flames, which triggered an evacuation. Once outside, King realized that he had left his guitar inside the burning building. He entered the blaze to retrieve his beloved $30 Gibson guitar. Two people died in the fire. The next day, King learned that the two men were fighting over a woman named Lucille. King named that first guitar Lucille, as well as every one he owned since that near-fatal experience, as a reminder never again to do something as stupid as run into a burning building or fight over women. B.B. King wrote a song called “Lucille” where he talks about his guitar and how it got that name. The song was first released as part of Lucille and it is included on the B. B. King Anthology 1962–1998 album. King played guitars made by different
    8.00
    1 votes
    155

    Mark Knopfler Stratocaster

    • Guitarists: Mark Knopfler
    The Mark Knopfler Fender Stratocaster has a 1957 ash body, a 1962 C-shape maple neck with a rosewood fingerboard. The Mark Knopfler Stratocaster features 3 Texas Special single-coil pickups. The Mark Knopfler signature Stratocaster was introduced in 2003 and the suggested retail price is $1899.99.
    8.00
    1 votes
    156
    Parker Guitars

    Parker Guitars

    • Guitarists: Tim Scott
    • Brand: Parker Guitars
    Parker Guitars is an American manufacturer of electric guitars and basses, started by luthier Ken Parker in the early 90s. Parker is most famous for making the Parker Fly. Parker guitars are characterized by being thin and lightweight guitars; they are generally made from lighter woods like poplar, Basswood, and spruce, although there is a mahogany Fly. They have composite materials (resin and carbon glass skin), to reinforce a thin carved body and neck. Fingerboards are composite, and use stainless steel frets. Electronics include the integrated use of coil split humbuckers and piezo pickups with active circuitry. In October 2002, Parker initiated the first production run of the Fly bass guitar, in both 4-string and 5-string versions. The 5-strings are noted for their ease of use for 4-string players, both with respect to weight and string spacing. Parker basses produced in the original factory in Wilmington, MA have seven digit serial numbers using the same formula for dating at the original Nite Fly guitars. Basses made by Washburn have serial numbers that begin with 092. Soon after moving production to Illinois, the original, more stable multi-laminate neck construction was
    8.00
    1 votes
    157
    Seven-string guitar

    Seven-string guitar

    • Guitarists: Vladimir Vysotsky
    A seven-string guitar is a guitar with seven strings instead of the usual six. Some types of seven-string guitars are specific to certain cultures (i.e. Russian and Brazilian guitars). The standard 7-string guitar tuning is BEADGbe. Seven-string electric guitars are used particularly in certain styles of music, such as heavy metal, rock and jazz. Rock and metal artists such as A Plea For Purging, Breakthrough, Paradise Lost, Born of Osiris, Devin Townsend, Fear Factory, Steve Vai, Scribe, Dream Theater, Animals as Leaders, Bleeding Oath, Trivium, Korn, Limp Bizkit, Slayer, Megadeth,(Megadeth's lead guitarist Chris Broderick uses 7 string guitars, but a 7 string isn't required in Megadeth.) Deftones, Behemoth, Periphery, Nevermore, TesseracT, Textures and Mucc have all experimented with seven-string guitars. Jazz artists such as George Van Eps, Bucky Pizzarelli, John Pizzarelli, Howard Alden, Lenny Breau and Jimmy Bruno use 7-strings. Extra strings are usually added to extend the bass range of the 6-string guitar. These strings are commonly added in two different ways. The first and most common construction is to increase the width of the fingerboard such that the extra string (or
    8.00
    1 votes
    158
    Classical guitar

    Classical guitar

    • Guitarists: Gabby Pahinui
    The classical guitar (also called the Spanish guitar, the concert guitar or the nylon-string guitar) is a 6-stringed plucked string instrument from the family of instruments called chordophones. In addition to the instrument, the phrase "classical guitar" can refer to two other concepts: The shape, construction, and material of classical guitars vary, but typically they have a modern classical guitar shape, or historic classical guitar shape (e.g., early romantic guitars from France and Italy). Strings are usually of nylon or other synthetic material, or fine wire wrapped around a nylon or other synthetic core. Historic guitars may have strings made of gut (sheep or pig intestine). A guitar family tree can be identified. (The flamenco guitar derives from the modern classical, but has differences in material, construction and sound). The term modern classical guitar is sometimes used to distinguish the classical guitar from older forms of guitar, which are in their broadest sense also called classical, or more descriptively: early guitars. Examples of early guitars include the 6-string early romantic guitar (ca. 1790 - 1880), and the earlier baroque guitars with 5 courses. Today's
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    159
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    160

    ESP M-50

    The M-50 is the ESP guitar company's bottom line M-series guitar distributed by LTD (ESP's mass produced guitar brand). The guitar is sometimes referred to as a superstrat which is a guitar shaped like the Fender Stratocaster with humbucking pickups instead of the usual single coil pickups used on the original Stratocaster. ESP-LTD M-50
    7.00
    2 votes
    161
    Fender Precision Bass

    Fender Precision Bass

    • Guitarists: Bill Black
    • Brand: Fender
    The Fender Precision Bass (often shortened to "P Bass") is an electric bass. Designed by Leo Fender as a prototype in 1950 and brought to market in 1951, the Precision was the first electric bass to earn widespread attention and use. A revolutionary instrument for the time, the Precision Bass has made an immeasurable impact on the sound of popular music ever since. The body of the bass is very similar to the Fender Stratocaster. Although the Precision was the first mass-produced and widely-used bass, it was not the first model of the instrument, as is sometimes believed. That distinction was claimed in the late 1930s by the Audiovox Manufacturing Company in Seattle, Washington. In its stock configuration, the Precision Bass is an alder or ash-bodied solid body instrument equipped with a single split-coil humbucking pickup and a one-piece maple neck with rosewood or maple fingerboard and 20 frets. To this day, the Precision Bass is among the best-selling electric basses of all time. The Standard P-Bass is sanded, painted and assembled in Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico along with the other Standard Series guitars. As of December 5, 2008, the Standard P-Bass has been updated with
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    2 votes
    162
    Gibson Les Paul Studio

    Gibson Les Paul Studio

    • Guitarists: Claudio Sanchez
    The Gibson Les Paul Studio is an electric guitar made by the Gibson Guitar Corporation; it is a less expensive, stripped-down version of the popular model. Its users include Jade Puget of AFI, Paul H. Landers of Rammstein, Frank Iero of My Chemical Romance, Scott Kelly of Neurosis, and jazz guitarist Ulf Wakenius. The Les Paul Studio is designed for a studio musician. This means that the guitar is targeted toward guitar players more concerned with tone and playability than cosmetics thus eliminating unnecessary expenses that go into a model designed for performances. For this reason, the elements of the Gibson Les Paul that contribute to tone and playability (a carved maple top and standard mechanical and electronic hardware) are retained, while elements that do not (binding on the body and neck as well as ornate inlays) are not. Early models from 1983-1984 featured dot fret markers on top of ebony or rosewood fretboards. The neck and body bindings were offered on the Standard and Custom studios. In the mid 80's the dot markers were replaced by trapezoidal inlay. In the early 90's the option of an ebony fretboard was discontinued, but they are now available on the classic,
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    2 votes
    163
    Squier Bullet

    Squier Bullet

    The Squier Bullet Strat (known as Squier Bullet until 2007) is an electric guitar that emulates the look of the Fender Stratocaster, but with modifications to reduce cost. Like the Squier Stratocaster, it is not considered a strat copy as it is manufactured by Squier, a subsidiary of Fender and therefore carries the Fender brand name. Squier Bullets are popular with beginners due to their affordability and simple, popular layout and also with guitar mod enthusiasts due to their low price and ability to handle extreme amounts of modification work. The most common mod performed is the replacement of the stock pickups. The solid body of the current Squier Bullet is made of basswood. Its shape is the same to that of a Stratocaster with the characteristic mid-body contour and staggered double cut-outs, but slightly thinner. Along with the similar body shape, the Bullet also features several other trademark Stratocaster appointments, albeit more cost-effective in construction, including three single-coil pickups, five-way pickup switch, single-ply plastic pickguard, a bolt-on neck design, and an optional six-screw synchronized tremolo system. There were many complaints of the Squier
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    2 votes
    164
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    165
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    166

    ESP LTD VIPER-1000

    ESP LTD VIPER-1000 is a guitar model distributed by ESP. The ESP LTD VIPER-1000 is also produced in Black and Black Cherry with an EMG 81 in the bridge position and an EMG 85 in the neck position.
    6.00
    3 votes
    167
    Fender Mustang Bass

    Fender Mustang Bass

    • Brand: Fender
    The Fender Mustang Bass is an electric bass guitar model produced by Fender. Two variants, the Musicmaster Bass and the Bronco Bass, have also been produced from time to time using the same body and neck shape. Introduced in 1966 as a companion to Fender's shorter-scaled, two-pickup Fender Mustang guitars, the Mustang Bass was the last original bass designed by Leo Fender before his departure from the company in 1965. The Mustang Bass has a short 30" scale and a single split pickup (similar to the P-bass), one volume and one tone control, with strings-through-body routing. Like the early Precision and Jazz basses, the Mustang Bass was fitted with string mutes (although most players removed these). The standard finishes were red and white. Mustang basses, like all Fender guitars, were finished in nitrocellulose lacquer up until 1968, thereafter in thick polyester finish. In 1969, both the Mustang guitar and bass were issued with 'Competition' finishes, i.e. red with three white stripes, a thick one between two thinner ones, Lake Placid Blue with lighter blue stripes, etc. and were later available in various plain finishes including black and sunburst. (The yellowing of the lacquer
    5.67
    3 votes
    168

    Gibson L5S

    The Gibson L5S is a solid-body electric guitar model produced by the Gibson Guitar Corporation. Introduced in 1972, the Gibson L5S was essentially a solid-body version of the popular Gibson L-5 hollowbody. Like the L-5, it featured multiple binding on the single-cutaway body, neck, and headstock, and also featured an ebony fingerboard with block inlays. The headstock featured a flower-pot inlay similar to the L-5 archtop and most L5S models featured the L-5 trapeze tailpiece (though some had stop-bar or TP-6 fine-tuning tailpieces). However, the L5S had a thin solid body, whereas the L-5 archtop was larger in size and fully hollow. The L5S was available in various finishes, such as ebony, cherry sunburst, and natural. Upon its introduction in 1972, the L5S featured two low-impedance pickups, similar to those found on several Gibson Les Paul models of that period, such as the Recording model, the Signature model, the Personal model, and the Professional model. This incarnation of the model was not a success, however, thus Gibson switched from low-impedance pickups to regular humbucker pickups. Though it was considered one of Gibson's more top-of-the-line models, it was still not
    5.67
    3 votes
    169

    Taylor T5

    • Guitarists: Claudio Sanchez
    The Taylor Thinline Fiveway, or otherwise known abbreviatedly as T5, is the first electric guitar manufactured by Taylor Guitars. This guitar was intended by the R&D team at Taylor Guitars to merge the capabilities of an electric guitar and an acoustic guitar. It therefore features a fully hollow thinline body. It is dubbed Thinline Fiveway because of the 5-way slide-switch located on the top of the guitar which controls the combination options of a range of pickups, including a piezoelectric pickup, a humbucking pickup and body sensors. This makes the T5 a very versatile guitar. It is said by many that the T5 is the electric guitar that produces the cleanest acoustic guitar tone. At the 2005 NAMM show, many recording artists, including Jason Mraz, Switchfoot and Story of the Year demonstrated the T5's versatility and tonal superiority. Additionally, Dave Matthews of the Dave Matthews Band, first used the Taylor T5 to record the album "Stand Up," which was recorded in 2005; However, Matthews did not use the T5 in his summer tour in support of the band's new album.
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    3 votes
    170
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    171

    ESP LTD EC-1000

    ESP LTD EC-1000 is a guitar is in a Les Paul shape however has a few different features. For example the ESP LTD EC-1000 is a lot thinner thus lighter than a Gibson Les Paul. It has a set neck made from Mahogany, along with the body made from Mahogany. It also has a thin U neck contour to allow easy access to all 24 jumbo frets. It also comes in a Floyd rose version. It comes with either EMG 81/60 active pick ups or Seymour Duncan JB/59 pick ups. EC-1000
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    172
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    174

    ESP Richard Z

    • Guitarists: Richard Zven Kruspe
    ESP RZK Series is a line of guitars distributed by ESP. They are the custom guitars of Rammstein and Emigrate lead-guitarist Richard Z. Kruspe. The first model, the RZK-1, was produced with a custom platinum silver finish with a simplified Rammstein logo on the body of the guitar. Two new finishes, with variations in the pickguard color, were introduced at the Musikmesse Frankfurt show in early 2009. Construction: Neck-thru body, Scale: 25.5", Body: Alder, Neck: 3-piece Hard Maple, Fingerboard: Rosewood, Inlay: Rammstein Fat Cross, Nut: Locking (R2), Bridge: Floyd Rose, Tuners: Gotoh Deluxe, Pickups: EMG 81 with Chrome covers, Frets: 24 XJ, Control: Master Volume, 3-way toggle pickup selector, Colours: Custom Platinum finish, Black Satin, Olympic White. The body also has a strong resemblance to several Mosrite guitar bodies, such as the Mark series. The RZK-1 was also produced in an LTD version called RZK-600 from 2005 till the end of 2008. The RZK series was recently revived for the Asian, European, and Australian market. It has the original specifications of the 1st line of RZK guitars, but now comes in a custom "burnt" finish. A new signature was also released with the new
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    2 votes
    175
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    176

    ESP Travis Miguel

    The ESP Travis Miguel Viper Flat-top and the ESP LTD TM-600 is a guitar model by ESP. The LTD version is the only distributed model.
    6.50
    2 votes
    177
    Fender Jag-Stang

    Fender Jag-Stang

    • Guitarists: Kurt Cobain
    • Brand: Fender
    The Fender Jag-Stang is an electric guitar designed by Kurt Cobain, of the band Nirvana, intended as a hybrid of two Fender electric guitars: the Jaguar and the Mustang. Cobain suggested his idea for an instrument to Fender, resulting in two left-handed prototypes built by former Custom Shop Master Builder Larry L. Brooks, only one of which was played by Cobain himself. In an interview from January 4, 1994 Cobain talked about designing the Jag-Stang, at the time it had not been produced. He stated to Nardwuar that he designed it by taking a polaroid of the Mustang and Jaguar, cutting them in half and combining them. It was shipped back to Fender for repairs before Cobain brought it with him on the European leg of Nirvana's In Utero tour in 1994, where the guitar was seldom played live. Cobain sketched a basic design that was sent to Fender, which was later published as part of his Journals in 2002. Cobain's prototype Jag-Stang had a Fender Texas special pickup in the neck and a DiMarzio H-3 in the bridge. (The H-3 humbucker is not available as an individual product but the closest sounding one is the DiMarzio DP158 Pickup.) The production Jag-Stang includes a "vintage style" single
    6.50
    2 votes
    178
    Fender Telecaster

    Fender Telecaster

    • Guitarists: Joe Perry
    • Brand: Fender
    The Fender Telecaster, colloquially known as the Tele ( /ˈtɛli/), is typically a dual-pickup, solid-body electric guitar made by Fender. Its simple yet effective design and revolutionary sound broke ground and set trends in electric guitar manufacturing and popular music. Introduced for national distribution as the Broadcaster in the autumn of 1950, it was the first guitar of its kind produced on a substantial scale. Its commercial production can be traced as far back as March 1950, when the single- and dual-pickup Esquire models were first sold. The Telecaster has been in continuous production in one form or another since its first incarnation. The Fender Telecaster has been mostly used in music genres such as country and rock, but is also sometimes used in jazz. The Fender Telecaster was developed by Leo Fender in Fullerton, California in 1950. In the period roughly between 1932 and 1949, several craftsmen and companies experimented with solid-body electric guitars, but none had made a significant impact on the market. Leo Fender's Telecaster was the design that finally put the solid-body guitar on the map. Fender had an electronics repair shop called Fender's Radio Service where
    6.50
    2 votes
    179
    Gibson Sonex

    Gibson Sonex

    The Sonex guitars were a range of budget Gibsons launched in 1980. They were made from a material called Resonwood, and manufactured with Multi-phonic body construction. There were four models: Deluxe, Standard, Custom and Artist. They replaced the Marauder and S-1 guitars. Like these two instruments, the Sonex took its styling from the Les Paul guitars that had been popular for the previous decades, but using Resonwood instead of mahogany, bolt-on necks instead of set (glued-in) necks, and far less ornamentation. Meaning the Resonwood was a coating used on a solid, usually mahogany body. At its launch in mid 1980, the Sonex 180 Deluxe cost $299 which was Gibson's cheapest instrument. The Standard was $375, Custom $449 - all cheaper than the next model, the 335S at $499. There were four guitar models to choose from in the Sonex Series, all with the Gibson single cutaway design. The Sonex-180 Deluxe featured a rosewood, dot inlayed fingerboard and adjustable exposed coil high output Sonex Humbuckers. All came with a three-position pick-up selector switch, Tune-0-Matic Bridge', stop bar tailpiece and volume/tone control speed knobs. In 1981, the Standard had been dropped replaced by
    6.50
    2 votes
    180
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    181
    Fender Toronado

    Fender Toronado

    • Brand: Fender
    The Fender Toronado was an electric guitar made by Fender Musical Instruments Corporation. Introduced at NAMM in 1998, it is a part of the "Deluxe Series" of Fenders produced in Mexico, generally to higher specs than most "Standard" models. The Toronado features two Fender Atomic humbucking pickups, a rosewood fretboard, and four chrome knobs (2 volume and 2 tone). Many models also include a tortoise-shell pickguard. The headstock features the Fender "spaghetti" logo and sports vintage style Gotoh/Kluson tuners. The body shape shadows the designs of Fender's Jazzmaster and Jaguar guitars. The Toronado also has a 24.75" scale length — an unusual feature on a Fender guitar, as this scale length is usually associated with electric guitars manufactured by Gibson. The Toronado was reissued in 2004. This reissue has several differences from '98-'03 models, featuring more modern colors like Midnight Blue, Caramel Metallic, Blizzard Pearl and Chrome Red. The pickups are also open-coil as opposed to the covered humbuckers featured on the earlier models. The 2004 models were discontinued in 2006 and are rare due to their short 2-year production span. The Fender Toronado GT HH (05-06) was
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    1 votes
    182
    Gibson ES-250

    Gibson ES-250

    The Gibson ES-250 was the second edition of the Gibson ES-150 amplified guitar, though released in several different versions. It had 17" body width and a 21" body length. It had a curly maple back and a spruce top with a maple neck and rosewood fingerboard. It was used in combination with the Gibson EH-185 and EH-275 amplifier. The first version from 1939 is seen in a popular photograph with Charlie Christian. It had a sunburst finish and a 19 fret fingerboard and stair-stepped headstock and featured "open book" fret markers. The second version can also be seen in photographs of Charlie Christian. It had a natural finish and a twenty fret fingerboard and slight variations on the Charlie Christian pickup, as it has come to be known. It became available by 1940. What is called the 3rd variant resembled a Gibson L7 with a Charlie Christian pickup. It had flower pot fret markers and an ornate headstock. Other variants with differing models of the tailpiece appeared in the short period this guitar was manufactured.
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    1 votes
    183
    Hagström Viking

    Hagström Viking

    The Hagström Viking was the first semi-acoustic guitar manufactured by Hagström. It was originally launched in 1965 and was built until it was discontinued in 1979 a few years before Hagström closed down their manufacturing in Sweden. The Viking is currently being reproduced in China by new owners of the Hagström brand. The Hagström Viking was the first semi-acoustic guitar built by the Hagström company. It was launched in 1965 alongside Hagström's new 12-string guitar and two bass guitars. Two years later there was a twelve-string model launched simple called the Viking 12 and the Viking II Deluxe which featured gold plated machine heads and adjustable bridges. In 1967 Hagström player Frank Zappa's "Nifty Tough & Bitchin" advertising agency was hired to promote the Hagström brand in the USA. This resulted in three print ads: "Nifty", "Long and Slippery", and "Folk Rock is a Drag", and a radio spot: "Long and Slippery". In 1968 Hagström got much publicity when Elvis Presley played a Hagström Viking at the Elvis Presley Comeback Television Special for N.B.C. in the USA. Al Casey played a Viking II in the orchestra and was asked by producer Bones Howe if Elvis could borrow the guitar
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    1 votes
    184
    Eric Clapton Stratocaster

    Eric Clapton Stratocaster

    The Eric Clapton Stratocaster is the signature model electric guitar of English guitarist Eric Clapton, and was the first signature model guitar ever released by Fender. In 1981, Fender had informally discussed the idea of a signature model Telecaster with the legendary James Burton; however, this would not come to be until 1990. Jeff Beck had also been offered a signature model Stratocaster, but he rejected the idea until 1991, when he opted for an Artist Series signature guitar based on the Fender Stratocaster Plus Series models of 1987. Eric Clapton, though he had played Fender Telecasters and Jazzmasters in his brief career with The Yardbirds, would attain "guitar god" status while playing models such as the Gibson Les Paul, Firebird, ES-335 and SG whilst a member of Cream. However, in 1970, for his landmark Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs with a new band, Derek and the Dominos, Clapton switched to a tobacco sunburst Stratocaster from 1956, nicknamed "Brownie". This was in part due to the influence of his former Blind Faith bandmate Steve Winwood. He later assembled the best parts of three mid-'50s Strats to create his favorite guitar, the famous "Blackie", a black
    5.33
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    185
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    188
    Squier Jagmaster

    Squier Jagmaster

    The Squier Jagmaster is an electric guitar marketed by the Fender Musical Instruments Corporation under their Squier budget brand. It is based on the design of the classic Fender Jazzmaster and Fender Jaguar, but with several significant differences reflecting the tastes of modern guitarists, including much simplified electronics, Duncan-designed humbucking pickups, a standard Stratocaster-style tremolo bridge, and on Vista Series versions a short-scale, 24" neck (22 Frets). The first Jagmasters appeared in 1996, were marketed under the Vista Series, and were made in Japan. The Jagmaster in its original form was made for a period of only two years; 1996 through 1998. The first Japanese Jagmasters had a neck in which the truss rod is adjusted at the bottom of the neck, while the later Japanese models have a 70's-style 'bullet' truss rod, which is adjusted at the headstock. The original Japanese Jagmasters featured a maple neck, rosewood fretboard, and basswood body. The list price was $699.99. However, when the Japanese market crashed, Fender closed the Japanese production plants in which the Jagmaster was produced. The Jagmaster was brought back into production in 2002, this time
    5.33
    3 votes
    189
    6.00
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    190

    ESP Grynch

    ESP Grynch is a guitar model distributed by ESP. It originally came up when Hetfield would buy a regular ESP LTD VB-400 BARITONE and ask a friend to paint green flames on it. This model is now discontinued.
    6.00
    2 votes
    191
    ESP James Hetfield

    ESP James Hetfield

    The ESP James Hetfield (or just ESP JH) are ranges of electric guitars produced by ESP Guitars based on the custom models of James Hetfield. All models were built by James Hetfield & Matt Masciandaro. ESP JH-1 ESP JH-2 ESP Iron Cross ESP Truckster ESP LTD Truckster ESP LTD Snakebyte
    6.00
    2 votes
    192

    ESP Kamikaze

    ESP Kamikaze is a guitar model distributed by ESP. The Kamikaze was created when George Lynch entered an ESP shop in Tokyo while on tour looking for a replacement neck. He learned that ESP also made custom guitars, so he created the Kamikaze. The Kamikaze was the first guitar in ESP's Signature Series. Kamikaze I- Original kamikaze model with black/tan/yellow/red color scheme, ebony fretboard, maple body and neck. George Lynch's original did not have a recess cavity for the tremolo system, but it is recessed on the ESP signature Series. Kamikaze II- Same specs as the Kamikaze I with a blue/red/white color scheme, the Kamikaze II was the first kamikaze model, and therefore the first signature series guitar, that ESP has put on the market. Kamikaze III- Same as others with a White/black/tan color scheme. Kamikaze IV- much different from the other models with a fluorescent color scheme, reverse sawtooth headstock (as opposed to a reverse banana). This guitar has similar woods to a les paul (maple top on mahogany body) unlike les pauls, and other Kamikaze models, this guitar has a maple fretboard instead of ebony.
    6.00
    2 votes
    193
    Gibson Futura

    Gibson Futura

    The Gibson Futura was an electric guitar which was the precursor of the model introduced as the Explorer. These mahogany prototypes, christened "Futura" many years later, resembled the eventual Explorer design, but had a differently-proportioned body, as well as a 'split' or 'forked' headstock which survived into the first few production Explorers but was quickly replaced. Gibson obtained U.S. Design Patent number 181,865 for the Futura body shape. Gibson's designers made a very few, perhaps 2-4, of these prototypes between 1957 and early 1958, using patternmakers' mahogany as per standard practice. One of these, a mockup without electronics, was photographed at the 1957 NAMM trade show; two are known to be in existence as of 2008. When Explorer production began, with the final, wider body shape in "korina " or African limba wood, a few very early examples retained the "split-V" headstock. One of those "transitional" models is today owned by Rick Nielsen. The Explorer offered a radical, "futuristic" body design and golden-blonde korina, much like its sibling, the Flying V. Its initial run was unsuccessful and it was discontinued in 1959 after shipping fewer than 50. The Gibson
    6.00
    2 votes
    194
    5.00
    3 votes
    195

    ESP LTD SC-600

    ESP LTD SC-600 is a guitar model distributed by ESP. The body is made of Mahogany for the natural gloss version.
    5.00
    3 votes
    196

    Charvel

    • Guitarists: Gary Moore
    Charvel is a brand of guitar originally founded in the 1970s by Wayne Charvel in Azusa, California and then later, Glendora, California. Charvel guitars became popular in the 1980s due to their association with famous rock and heavy metal guitarists such as Edward Van Halen (Van Halen), Richie Sambora (Bon Jovi), Warren DeMartini (Ratt), Jake E. Lee (Ozzy Osbourne), Vinnie Vincent (KISS), Eddie Ojeda (Twisted Sister), George Lynch (Dokken), Criss Oliva (Savatage), Allan Holdsworth, Shawn Lane and others. Having worked at Fender for three years in the early 1970s, Wayne Charvel originally started "Charvel's Guitar Repair" in 1974 to refinish and repair out-of-warranty Fender instruments. The shop earned a solid reputation among performing artists for its repair work, custom finishes, and upgraded parts manufacturing. When Asian companies began copying Charvel's parts and selling them at a discount, Wayne decided to begin building complete guitars. Charvel guitars were originally constructed from wood components outsourced to Boogie and Schecter bodies, and various Charvel and aftermarket hardware. Wayne Charvel sold the company to Grover Jackson in 1978, and ceased all working
    5.50
    2 votes
    197
    5.50
    2 votes
    198
    Resonator guitar

    Resonator guitar

    • Guitarists: Orville Johnson
    A resonator guitar or resophonic guitar is an acoustic guitar whose sound is produced by one or more spun metal cones (resonators) instead of the wooden sound board (guitar top/face). Resonator guitars were originally designed to be louder than regular acoustic guitars, which were overwhelmed by horns and percussion instruments in dance orchestras. They became prized for their distinctive sound, however, and found life with several musical styles (most notably bluegrass and the blues) well after electric amplification solved the issue of inadequate guitar sound levels. Resonator guitars are of two styles: There are three main resonator designs: Many variations of all these styles and designs have been produced under many brands. The body of a resonator guitar may be made of wood, metal, or occasionally other materials. Typically there are two main sound holes, positioned on either side of the fingerboard extension. In the case of single cone models, the sound holes are either both circular or both f-shaped, and symmetrical; The older "tricone" design has irregularly shaped sound holes. Cutaway body styles may truncate or omit the lower f-hole. The resonator guitar was developed by
    5.50
    2 votes
    199
    Gibson Ripper

    Gibson Ripper

    The Gibson L9-S Ripper is a model of electric bass guitar made by Gibson Guitar Corporation. The Ripper was manufactured from 1973 until 1983; the peak year being 1976. Most had a maple body with laminated maple neck, however a significant number manufactured in 1975 had lighter alder bodies while retaining the maple neck. Also in 1975, an edgier, and slimmer body, with more beveling and contours around the horns of the bass was introduced. The new look was geared towards heavier music that was gaining popularity under the ending decade. The later models of 1976 and on featured a different routing in the body for the wires, and the pickups were screwed in by three posts as opposed to the old two-post variation. The Ripper was initially available in three colors: natural, black, and tobacco sunburst. Natural Rippers received a maple fingerboard, while black or sunburst basses received an ebony fingerboard. A handful of 1974 basses were finished in cherry sunburst, which was never listed as a standard finish option. These basses are extremely rare. Several such basses are pictured here The headstocks were painted black and featured the "Gibson" logo in gold script. Most models
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    3 votes
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    204

    ESP Truckster

    ESP James Hetfield "Truckster" is a guitar model distributed by ESP. The "Truckster" is also produced in a 'Ltd' version. The ESP James Hetfield Truckster Electric Guitar is the fifth Hetfield Signature Series guitar to carry his name since James and ESP joined forces in 1991. This latest model is manufactured to the exact specifications of James' Truckster, a modified ESP Eclipse-style stage guitar used on the St. Anger and Death Magnetic world tour. This signature ESP Truckster features a multilayered finish strategically sanded through and fully distressed to simulate the original guitar.
    6.00
    1 votes
    205
    Ibanez JEM

    Ibanez JEM

    • Guitarists: Steve Vai
    • Brand: Ibanez
    Ibanez JEM is an electric guitar manufactured by Ibanez and first produced in 1987. The guitar's most notable user is its co-designer, Steve Vai. As of 2010, there have been five sub-models of the JEM: the JEM7, JEM77, JEM777, JEM555 and the JEM333. Although the Ibanez JEM series is a signature series guitar, Ibanez mass-produces several of the guitar's sub-models. The Ibanez JEM series is heavily influenced by the superstrat to model name or bodyshape is called a soloist concept, a more aggressive guitar in terms of shape and specifications compared to the Stratocaster. Previously, Vai used a handbuilt guitar by Charvel & Jackson. With Joe Despagni and Tom Anderson he created various custom guitars and used Tom Anderson's model to record the demo of the David Lee Roth album Skyscraper. Vai also began to bring his Tom Anderson guitars on tour: "... He built this for me after my old green monster, which I used out on the road last year until it died. I was pulling on the whammy bar and ripped the bar right out of the guitar [laughs]; it was actually ripped out before the show at Madison Square Garden. I was dying. So I started using Tom's guitar as my main guitar for the rest of the
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    208
    Bass guitar

    Bass guitar

    • Guitarists: Gabby Pahinui
    The bass guitar (also called electric bass, or simply bass;  /ˈbeɪs/) is a stringed instrument played primarily with the fingers or thumb, by plucking, slapping, popping, tapping, thumping, or picking. The bass guitar is similar in appearance and construction to an electric guitar, but with a longer neck and scale length, and four, five, six, or eight strings. The four-string bass—by far the most common—is usually tuned the same as the double bass, which corresponds to pitches one octave lower than the four lower strings of a guitar (E, A, D, and G). The bass guitar is a transposing instrument, as it is notated in bass clef an octave higher than it sounds (as is the double bass) to avoid excessive ledger lines. Like the electric guitar, the bass guitar is plugged into an amplifier and speaker for live performances. Since the 1960s, the bass guitar has largely replaced the double bass in popular music as the bass instrument in the rhythm section. While the types of basslines performed by the bassist vary widely from one style of music to another, the bassist fulfills a similar role in most types of music: anchoring the harmonic framework and laying down the beat. The bass guitar is
    5.00
    1 votes
    209

    ESP EX-50

    ESP EX-50 is a guitar model distributed by ESP. It is and explorer that comes in black or silver. It's the cheapest in the ESP/LTD EX range.
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    210
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    211
    Gibson Les Paul

    Gibson Les Paul

    • Guitarists: Neil Young
    • Brand: Gibson Guitar Corporation
    The Gibson Les Paul is a solid body electric guitar that was first sold in 1952. The Les Paul was designed by Ted McCarty in collaboration with popular guitarist Les Paul, whom Gibson enlisted to endorse the new model. It is one of the most well-known electric guitar types in the world, along with the Fender Stratocaster and Telecaster. The Gibson Les Paul was the result of a design collaboration between Gibson Guitar Corporation and the late jazz guitarist and electronics inventor Les Paul. In 1950, with the introduction of the Fender Telecaster to the musical market, electric guitars became a public craze. In reaction, Gibson Guitar president Ted McCarty brought guitarist Les Paul into the company as a consultant. Les Paul was a respected innovator who had been experimenting with guitar design for years to benefit his own music. In fact, he had hand-built a solid-body prototype called "The Log", a design widely considered the first solid-body Spanish guitar ever built, as opposed to the "Hawaiian", or lap-steel guitar. This guitar is known as "The Log" because the solid core is a pine block whose width and depth are a little more than the width of the fretboard. Although numerous
    5.00
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    212
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    213
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    1 votes
    216

    ESP Max Cavalera

    ESP Max Cavalera is a guitar model distributed by ESP. The ESP Max Cavalera is also produced in an LTD version.
    4.00
    1 votes
    217
    Fender Jaguar

    Fender Jaguar

    • Guitarists: Paul Banks
    • Brand: Fender
    The Fender Jaguar is an electric guitar by Fender Musical Instruments characterized by an offset-waist body, a relatively unusual switching system with two separate circuits for lead and rhythm, and a medium-scale 24" neck. Owing some roots to the Jazzmaster, it was introduced in 1962 as Fender's feature-laden top-of-the-line model, designed to lure players from Gibson. During its initial 13-year production run, the Jaguar did not sell as well as the more inexpensive Stratocaster and Telecaster, and achieved its most noticeable popularity in the surf music scene. After the Jaguar was taken out of production in 1975, vintage Jaguars became popular first with punk rock players, and then more so during the alternative rock and indie rock movements of the 1980s and 90s. Fender began making a version in Japan in the mid-1980s, and then introduced a USA-made reissue in 1999. Since then, Fender has made a variety of Jaguars in America, Mexico, and China under both the Fender and Squier labels. Original vintage Jaguars sell for many times their original price. Both the Fender company and vintage guitar authorities date the introduction of the Jaguar to 1962. One writer states that the
    4.00
    1 votes
    218
    Fender Telecaster Thinline

    Fender Telecaster Thinline

    The Fender Telecaster Thinline is an electric guitar made by the Fender company. It is a Telecaster with body cavities. Designed by German luthier Roger Rossmeisl in 1968, it was introduced in 1969 and updated with a pair of Fender Wide Range humbucking pickups, Bullet truss-rod and 3-bolt neck fixing in 1972. The design was originally an attempt to reduce the weight of the solid-body Telecaster guitar, which had become ever heavier throughout the 1960s due to the dwindling supply of the light ash wood Fender had formerly used. The f-hole and reshaped pickguard are the most apparent visual clues to its construction. There are now two versions of the Telecaster Thinline. The 1969 version has two standard Telecaster pickups and a mahogany body, while the 1972 version, based on the Fender Telecaster Deluxe, yields two Fender Wide Range pickups and a solid natural swamp ash body. Both guitars are made in Mexico and Japan as a part of the Classic Series of guitars and basses, followed by higher-end American-made Factory Special Run (FSR) versions from the Fender Custom Shop in 2005. This short-lived model was based on the '69 Telecaster Thinline, but used many of the modern features
    4.00
    1 votes
    219
    Gibson Explorer

    Gibson Explorer

    • Guitarists: Claudio Sanchez
    The Gibson Explorer is a type of electric guitar that made its debut in 1958. The Explorer offered a radical, "futuristic" body design, much like its sibling, the Flying V which was released the same year. The Explorer was the final development of a prototype design which years later Gibson marketed under the name Futura. The Explorer's initial run was unsuccessful, and the model was discontinued in 1963. In 1976, Gibson began reissuing the Explorer after other guitar companies had success selling similar designs. The Explorer became especially popular among the hard rock and heavy metal musicians of the 1970s and 1980s. Gibson produced very few Explorers during the 1958 run of the original Korina wood model. Because production records are unclear, it is not known exactly how many were made, but the original run total has been estimated at less than 50. After the first few guitars, the Explorer had a long drooping headstock with the tuners placed in a straight line on one side (referred sometimes as "banana" and "hockey-stick"). This design has been popularized by Grover Jackson, founder of Jackson Guitars and other electric guitar makers such as Kramer and Hamer 20 years later.
    4.00
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    220

    Gibson Grabber

    The Gibson Grabber was a bass guitar introduced in 1973 along with the Gibson Ripper. The Grabber featured a bolt-on 34½" neck like the Fender basses and shared a similar body with the Ripper. The Grabber also had a V-shaped headstock like the Gibson Flying V guitar. What made the Grabber truly unique from other basses was its sliding pickup to which the name refers. The bassist was able to position the pickup by sliding it either up or down to simulate a neck or bridge pickup. The pickup was brighter than the traditional Gibson style humbuckers, which made it sound more like Fenders. The Grabber had one volume, one tone control and a removable bridge cover. The Grabber was originally built with a thin, maple body, but it was changed to alder in 1975. 1975 was also a peak year for Grabber sales, totalling 2,637 basses shipped. The Gibson Grabber was marketed in wine red, ebony, natural, walnut and white colors. The Grabber was popular and quickly replaced the Gibson EB0 as Gibson's entry level bass. The Grabber was discontinued in 1982. Later, another model of the Grabber was produced called the Gibson G3. This bass had three stationary pickups mounted in the neck,bridge and middle
    4.00
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    221
    Gibson L5

    Gibson L5

    • Guitarists: John Steven Test
    The Gibson L-5 guitar was first produced in 1922 by Gibson Guitar Corporation, then of Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA under the direction of master luthier Lloyd Loar, and has been in production ever since. It was considered the premier rhythm guitar in the big band era. It was originally offered as an acoustic instrument, with electric models made available in the 1950s. The L-5 was the first guitar with f-holes. The L-5 was first produced in a 16" body width and in late 1934 became the 17" body, compared with 18" for the larger Super 400. Wes Montgomery was a major guitarist commonly associated with the L-5; Gibson eventually produced a custom Montgomery-model L-5 with a single pickup at the neck. Also, the RCA fifties recordings of Elvis Presley feature the sound of Scotty Moore's L-5. Nashville session guitarist Hank Garland, who also recorded acclaimed jazz albums before his near-fatal automobile accident, frequently played an L-5. Contemporary guitarists who have played an L-5 include Tuck Andress from the Tuck and Patti duo, Lee Ritenour, Pat Martino and Jan Akkerman. John Mayer uses one on his cd/DVD Where the Light Is during the main concert and extra features. Eric Clapton used
    4.00
    1 votes
    222
    Gibson Nighthawk

    Gibson Nighthawk

    The Gibson Nighthawk was a short-lived electric guitar model line, manufactured by Gibson. The Nighthawk represented a radical change from traditional Gibson designs featuring many elements more commonly associated with Fender guitars. The Nighthawk superficially resembled the Les Paul, Gibson's "trademark" guitar. It had a maple top, and mahogany body. Despite the success of other Gibson guitars, the Nighthawk was never a great commercial success; production of all models was discontinued in 1998. In July 2009 Gibson reintroduced the Nighthawk 2009. There were 2 alternatives to the Nighthawk Custom, Standard, and Special. The normal 2 pickup version, or the 3 pickup version that added an NSX single coil to the middle. The 2 pickup version only had 5 tonal varieties in all, but the 3 pickup had 10 tonal varieties due to the push/pull tone knob. While the tone knob is pushed down, humbuckers work as usual humbuckers, but if it's pulled up, they divide into single coil variations to sound more like Fender guitars. With its set neck and maple-on-mahogany body, the Gibson Nighthawk was still very much structurally and aesthetically a Gibson. But certain key aspects of the Nighthawk
    4.00
    1 votes
    223
    KKV

    KKV

    The KKV (Kerry King V), also known as the Speed V, is an electric guitar designed by Kerry King of Slayer for B.C. Rich guitars. Its shape is based on the Gibson Flying V but with sharp points. B.C. Rich offers different versions of the guitar in four categories; as a signature model from the handcrafted/custom shop division, a high-end signature version, a mid-range version with lower-end pickups, and a low-end Metal Master version without a tremolo. In 2009 B.C. Rich released the Kerry King V2, featuring active pickups, Son Of Beast headstocks and the "generation 2" tribal graphics. The KKV has not always been exclusive to B.C. Rich. The guitar was briefly made by ESP Guitars when B.C. Rich closed down their custom shop during a period in the 1990s. When the company changed hands and reopened the custom shop, King returned to B.C. Rich. The ESP model featured a George Lynch style headstock and was finished in black, and black with a red splatter with eagle inlays. (Pictured right as of August 9) As of 2009, ESP has re-released their version as the NV, with a reverse ESP headstock.
    4.00
    1 votes
    224
    Yamaha SA2200

    Yamaha SA2200

    The Yamaha SA2200 is a Japanese made semi-hollowbody electric guitar model that replicates Gibson's ES-335 classic save for the popular Far Eastern variation of thinner horns. The detailing more closely resembles the more upmarket ES-347 with gold-plated hardware, split block inlaid ebony fretboard and multi-bound body and headstock detailing. The headstock angle is slightly flatter than the classic 17 degree angle used by Gibson, with Yamaha choosing to retain the volute to help strengthen the area behind the nut. The finger board uses medium gauge (2.54mm x 1.2mm) frets, which unlike the Gibson, extend over the single edge binding. The standard Gibson-style wiring is augmented by Yamaha's push-push tone pot switches which knock out the outer coils of each Alnico V humbucker allowing for combinations of humbucking to single-coil use. The coil-taps produce a Strat-style mix with both pickups on, while the neck single-coil alone provides a thinner, more acoustic like version of the plummy humbucker mode.
    4.00
    1 votes
    225
    Ashbory bass

    Ashbory bass

    The Ashbory bass, designed by Alun Ashworth-Jones, is an 18-inch scale fretless (but marked) electric bass developed in 1985. This scale is just over half of the 34-inch scale of an ordinary bass guitar. When amplified, the Ashbory produces a low, resonant bass tone similar to the tone of a pizzicato (plucked) double bass. The Ashbory uses silicone rubber strings and an acoustic piezo-transducer pickup to create the instrument's tone. The lower string tension of the instrument means that no truss rod is used in the Ashbory's neck. Unlike electric basses and electric guitars, neither the bridge nor the neck is adjustable. The manufacturer recommends that the silicone strings be dusted with talc powder to make the strings easier to play. The manufacturer recommends "standard electric bass 'fingerstyle' playing", and acknowledges that electric bass techniques such as slapping and popping and pick playing do not work as well on the Ashbory. On the other hand, the Ashbory can be used to create additional sounds. By muting the strings with the left hand and using the right hand to strike the strings, an analog-synth-like sound can be created. Snapping the strings with the right hand can
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    0 votes
    226
    Electric guitar

    Electric guitar

    An electric guitar is a guitar that uses a pickup to convert the vibration of its strings into electrical impulses. The most common guitar pickup uses the principle of direct electromagnetic induction. The signal generated by an electric guitar is too weak to drive a loudspeaker, so it is amplified before sending it to a loudspeaker. Since the output of an electric guitar is an electric signal, the signal may easily be altered using electronic circuits to add "color" to the sound. Often the signal is modified using effects such as reverb and distortion. Invented in 1931, the electric guitar became a necessity as jazz musicians sought to amplify their sound in the big band format. During the 1950s and 1960s, the electric guitar became the most important instrument in pop music. It has evolved into a stringed musical instrument that is capable of a multitude of sounds and styles. It served as a major component in the development of rock and roll and many other genres of music. Various experiments at electrically amplifying the vibrations of a string instrument date back to the early part of the twentieth century. Patents from the 1910s show telephone transmitters adapted and placed
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    227

    ESP Alexi Laiho

    ESP produces several guitar models based on the custom models of Alexi Laiho. Current ESP models: http://www.espguitars.co.jp/oversea/sig/al_st_std.html http://www.espguitars.co.jp/artist/alexi_laiho/index.html http://www.espguitars.com/guitars_alexi.html
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    232

    ESP LTD EC-400

    ESP LTD EC-400 is a guitar model distributed by ESP. ESP also produces an EC-400 in Vintage Sunburst with a Seymour Duncan Custom 5 in the bridge pickup position and a Jazz in the neck pickup position.
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    233
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    238

    ESP LTD SC-607B

    The ESP LTD SC-607B is a 7 string guitar model distributed by ESP. The body is made of Alder for the black finish version. The guitar also features a reverse headstock, as well as two EMG 81-7 active pickups.
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    239
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    240

    ESP Page Hamilton

    ESP Page Hamilton is a guitar model distributed by ESP. The ESP Page Hamilton is also produced in a LTD version.
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    241

    ESP VIPER

    ESP VIPER is a guitar model distributed by ESP. The ESP VIPER comes in multiple models, the ESP Standard Series, ESP LTD Viper Series, ESP LTD Viper Baritone, and ESP LTD Viper 7 string. The Viper is based on a Gibson SG model. Used by: Pepper J. Keenan (Down (band) and Corrosion of Conformity) Kirk Windstein (Down, Crowbar [Formally 'The Slugs'], Valume Nob and Kingdom of Sorrow) Curtis Sinden (Hungry Hungry Hippos)
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    242
    Fender Jazzmaster

    Fender Jazzmaster

    • Brand: Fender
    The Fender Jazzmaster is an electric guitar designed as an upmarket sibling to the Fender Stratocaster. First introduced at the 1958 NAMM Show, it was initially marketed at jazz guitarists, but found favor among surf rock guitarists in the early 1960s. It is frequently confused with the similar looking albeit tonally different Jaguar. The contoured "offset-waist" body was designed for comfort while playing the guitar in a seated position, as many jazz and blues artists prefer to do. A full 25½” scale length, lead and rhythm circuit switching with independent volume and tone controls, and a floating tremolo with tremolo lock, were other keys to the Jazzmaster's character. The tremolo lock can be manually activated to keep the entire guitar from going out of tune if one string breaks. The Jazzmaster also had an extra-long tremolo arm. The bridge and tremolo construction is very different from that of the Stratocaster and gives the Jazzmaster a different resonance and generally less sustain. The body is larger than that of other Fender guitars, requiring a more spacious guitar case. The Jazzmaster had unique wide, white "soapbar" pickups that were unlike any other single coil.
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    243
    Fender Telecaster Deluxe

    Fender Telecaster Deluxe

    • Brand: Fender
    The Fender Telecaster Deluxe is a solid-body electric guitar originally produced from 1972 to 1981, and since re-issued by Fender in 2004 as the '72 Telecaster Deluxe. The popularity of heavy rock in the late 1960s led Fender to re-think its strategy of exclusively using single-coil pickups, as they were not perceived as being suitable for the thick sound and extended sustain favoured by heavy rock guitarists using double-coil humbucking pickups. Consequently, Fender hired former Gibson employee Seth Lover, the inventor of the humbucker himself, to design a humbucking pickup for use in a number of Fender guitars. The result was a pickup known as the Wide Range humbucker, and it was used in a variety of different Fender models including the Deluxe, Custom, and Thinline Telecasters as well as a semi-hollowbody design called the Starcaster. The Deluxe, originally conceived as the top-of-the-line model in the Telecaster series, was the last of these to be released, in late 1972. The "humbucker" Telecasters failed to draw potential customers away from competition like Gibson's Les Paul model, and the Telecaster Deluxe was discontinued in 1981. However, in 2004 Fender decided to re-issue
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    244
    Gibson ES-150

    Gibson ES-150

    The Gibson Guitar Corporation's ES-150 guitar is generally recognized as the world's first commercially successful Spanish-style electric guitar. The ES stands for Electric Spanish, and it was designated 150 because it was priced (in an instrument/amplifier/cable bundle) around $150. The particular sound of the instrument was formed by a combination of the specific bar-style pickup and its placement, and became famous due in large part to its endorsement by notable guitar players including Charlie Christian. After its introduction in 1936, it immediately became popular in jazz orchestras of the period. Unlike the usual acoustic guitars utilized in jazz, it was loud enough to take a more prominent position in ensembles. The guitar was produced with minor variations until 1940, when the ES-150 designation (the "V2") denoted a model with a different construction and a different pickup. The ES-150 was developed and released in association with two US retailers, Montgomery Ward and Spiegel. It was preceded by Gibson adding ancillary piezo pickups to its regular acoustic guitars. The company had developed an electromagnetic pickup in 1935 (the now-famous "bar pickup", named for its
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    Gibson Melody Maker

    The Gibson Melody Maker is an electric guitar made by Gibson Guitar Corporation. The Gibson Melody Maker was first launched in 1959 and discontinued in 1971. It had a thin slab-style mahogany body and a one-piece mahogany neck. All the electronics, from the small single-coil pickups to the cable jack, were assembled on a scratchplate and installed in a rout in the front of the body. The strings ran from a straight-sided simplification of the traditional Gibson headstock at one end to a wraparound bridge/tailpiece unit at the other. From 1959 until 1961, the Melody Maker had a single cutaway slab body style similar to the early Les Paul Junior model but thinner. In 1961 the body style changed to a symmetrical double cutaway, resembling a Gretsch 6122 or a Danelectro Shorthorn; the single cutaway model was discontinued. The body style was changed in 1966 to a style similar to the SG, with pointed "horns", a large white scratchplate, and white pickup covers instead of black. Note: Melody Maker "D" refers to the double pickup model of any vintage but is often mistakenly used for the double cutaway model. Options on the Melody Maker included two pickups, the "D" model and a short-scale
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    Gibson Moderne

    Gibson Moderne

    The Gibson Moderne is an electric guitar model first designed by Gibson in 1957. It was designed alongside the Flying V and Explorer-"Futura" as part of a stylistically advanced line of electric guitars. However, unlike the Flying V and Explorer, the Moderne was not put into production until 1982. Because few if any prototypes were made in the 1950s, and no authenticated example is known to exist, the hypothetical 1958 Moderne has been called both the "Holy Grail" and the "Loch Ness Monster" of collectible guitars. By the mid-1950s Gibson Guitar Company had lost considerable market share to rival Fender's Telecaster and Stratocaster models and created three modernistic solid-body guitar concepts in an attempt to strike back. On June 27, 1957 Gibson President Theodore "Ted" McCarty filed three designs with the United States Patent Office which would come to be called "Flying V," "Explorer", and (unofficially, by later historians) "Moderne." The design patents were issued on January 7, 1958, however, the Moderne was not put into production and it is still not clear whether any were actually created at that time (there is only a vague mention of "Mod. Guitars" on a shipping list,
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    Gibson SG Special

    Gibson SG Special

    • Guitarists: Claudio Sanchez
    The Gibson SG Special is an electric guitar made by Gibson, that has been manufactured since 1961. The SG Special was between the Junior and Standard model and was introduced concurrent with the Junior. It featured two P-90 pickups with either a stoptail bridge or an optional tremolo arm. On this mid-level SG model, Gibson kept the neck binding but used dot inlays in place of the trapezoid position markers of the standard model and did not use the crown inlay on the headstock. With various minor changes, this model was produced through 1990. This model resurrected in 1995 as the SG Classic. The influence of the P90 equipped SG's of the late 1960s and later reissues (such as the SG classic - a modern reissue of the late 1960s SG Special) have spanned the rock genre and have notably been played by the likes of Pete Townshend (The Who: late 1960s SG Specials), Allison Robertson (The Donna's - Gold Medal: SG Classic with rare Walnut finish), Davey Lane (The Pictures, You Am I: SG Classic finished in Cherry), Billy Lunn (The Subways: SG Special finished in Black) and Carlos Santana (Santana: SG Special finished in Dark Cherry) Recent models of the Gibson SG Special represent a value
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    Gretsch G6131MY

    • Brand: Gretsch
    Gretsch G6131MY ("MY" stands for Malcolm Young) is an electric guitar manufactured by the Gretsch Guitar Co. The guitar was designed to replicate AC/DC rhythm guitarist Malcolm Young's Gretsch Jet Firebird, which he heavily modified over the years of use. The guitar is modeled after Malcolm Young's original 1962 Jet Firebird. Young, however, does not use his signature guitar for recording nor playing live; relying solely on the Firebird. Young does play the signature model in the "Cover You In Oil" video from the band's 1995 "Ballbreaker" album. This guitar comes in two formats, one being the Gretsch Malcolm Young I model consisting of one pickup, and a Badass Bridge. The second style is the Gretsch Malcolm Young II model. which features a second filtertron pickup at the neck position. The guitars come in the choice of three finishes; natural, flame maple and red. This Malcolm Young signature Gretsch is heavily chambered internally, and therefore is a lighter guitar compared to similar sized models. However, actual weight and degree of chambering is known to have varied throughout the life of this signature model. Some pre-Fender era models (2003) are known to be heavier at around
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    Ibanez RG

    Ibanez RG

    • Guitarists: Todd Sampson
    The Ibanez RG series has the maximum subtypes of guitars under the Ibanez Electric Guitar catalog and a popular series of Ibanez electric guitars produced by Hoshino Gakki. The Ibanez RG was originally designed as a derivative of Steve Vai's JEM\Universe series and released in 1987. Manufacture of the RG model continues through today. The RG series are among the most popular hard rock and metal guitars ever made. The RG series was first introduced in 1987 as a derivative to the Ibanez JEM and Universe series by Steve Vai, contrary to the more popular opinion that Rocky George, former lead guitarist for the California based hardcore punk/thrash metal outfit Suicidal Tendencies and current lead guitarist for Fishbone was its designer (Rocky however was one of the first famous users of the RG model). This was believed because Rocky's initials are the same as the model. The RG in the Ibanez RG name does not mean Rocky George, in reality it means Roadstar Guitar, although these instruments differ significantly from the original Roadstar II series, introduced in the early 1980s. All of the RG550s, 560s, 565s, 570s, 670s 750s, 760s and 770s have a version of the Ibanez Edge tremolo, be it
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    Twelve string guitar

    Twelve string guitar

    • Guitarists: Gabby Pahinui
    The twelve-string guitar is an acoustic or electric guitar with 12 strings in 6 courses, which produces a richer, more ringing tone than a standard six-string guitar. Essentially, it is a type of guitar with a natural chorus effect due to the subtle differences in the frequencies produced by each of the two strings on each course. The strings are placed in courses of two strings each that are usually played together. The two strings in each bass course are normally tuned an octave apart, while each pair of strings in the treble courses are tuned in unison. The tuning of the second string in the third course (G) varies: some players use a unison string while others prefer the distinctive high-pitched, bell-like quality an octave string makes in this position. Some players, either in search of distinctive tone or for ease of playing, will remove some of the doubled strings. For example, removing the higher octave from the three bass courses simplifies playing running bass lines, but keeps the extra treble strings for the full strums. The strings are generally arranged such that the first string of each pair to be struck on a downward strum is the higher octave string; however, this
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