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Best Grape Variety of All Time

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    1

    Alicante Bouschet

    Alicante Bouschet or Alicante Henri Bouschet is a wine grape variety that has been widely cultivated since 1866. It is a cross of Petit Bouschet (itself a cross of the very old variety Teinturier du Cher and Aramon) and Grenache. Alicante is a teinturier, a grape with red flesh. It is one of the few teinturier grapes that belong to the Vitis vinifera species. Its deep color makes it useful for blending with light red wine. It was planted heavily during Prohibition in California for export to the East Coast. Its thick skin made it resistant to rot during the transportation process. The intense red color was also helpful for stretching the wine during prohibition, as it could be diluted without detracting from the appearance. At the turn of the 21st century, Alicante Bouschet was the 12th most planted red wine grape in France with sizable plantings in the Languedoc, Provence and Cognac regions. The grape was first cultivated in France in 1866 by Henri Bouschet as a cross of Petit Bouschet and Grenache. The Petit Bouschet grape was created by his father Louis Bouschet. The result was to produce a grape with deep color grape of higher quality than the Teinturier du Cher. Several
    7.88
    8 votes
    2

    Bual

    Boal is a name given to several varieties of grape cultivated in Portugal, notably in the production of medium-rich fortified wines from Madeira Island. On many wine labels of Madeira wine, the variety's name is anglicized as Bual. Madeira from Bual is typically less sweet than that from Malmsey, but more sweet than Sercial or Verdelho. The vines are also common in Portugal and Spain, where the fruit is used in the same way for fortified wines. Most of the Boal grown on Madeira is more fully known as Boal Cachudo (a synonym for the Spanish variety Doña Blanca, though the two may be different grapes), which has been shown by DNA profiling to be identical to the Malvasia Fina grown in the Douro valley. Buckingham Palace holds 25,000 bottles of wine, the oldest being a bottle of bual from 1815.
    7.43
    7 votes
    3

    Parellada

    Parellada (Catalan pronunciation: [pəɾəˈʎaðə]) is a white grape variety of Catalan origin specially grown in Catalonia. With Macabeu and Xarel·lo, is one of the three traditional varieties used to make the sparkling wine Cava, which is primarily produced in Catalonia. Besides its use in Cava, it is used mostly for blending in young white wines, although some more ambitious oaked blends with Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc are also used. Spanish plantations stood at 10,000 hectares (25,000 acres) in 2004, Its good acidity and freshness make these wines extremely suitable for the aperitif. A prime example of this is the micro-distilled Obsello Absinthe which, in addition to being produced in the same region, uses the wine of these grapes in its base spirit. Parellada is also known under the following synonyms: Martorella, Montonec, Montonech, Montonega, Montoneo, Montonero, Montonet, Parellada Blanc, Perelada and Perellada.
    7.43
    7 votes
    4
    Kohyo grape

    Kohyo grape

    Kyoho grapes (巨峰ぶどう, Kyohō budō, literally "giant mountain grapes") are a Concord-like cross (Vitis vinifera x Vitis labrusca) between Ishihara and Centennial grape varieties. Like Concord, Kyoho is a slip-skin variety, meaning that the skin is easily separated from the fruit. Kyoho grapes are blackish-purple, or almost black, with large seeds. While the seeds are bitter and the skin is not traditionally eaten, the flesh is juicy with high sugar content and mild acidity. Kyoho grapes were first produced in 1937 in Shizuoka Prefecture, but were not so named until 1946. They are popular in Japan, China, Taiwan, and Korea for their size and very sweet flesh. They are traditionally served peeled as a dessert, and the juice is used in making chūhai cocktails. Areas of production include Nagano Prefecture, Yamanashi Prefecture, California's Central Valley, Changhua County in Taiwan, and Chile.
    7.14
    7 votes
    5
    Dornfelder

    Dornfelder

    Dornfelder is a dark-skinned variety of grape of German origin used for red wine. It was created by August Herold (1902–1973) at the grape breeding institute in Weinsberg in the Württemberg region in 1955. Herold crossed the grape varieties Helfensteiner and Heroldrebe, the latter which bears his name, to create Dornfelder. Helfensteiner (Frühburgunder × Trollinger) and Heroldrebe (Blauer Portugieser × Lemberger) were both crosses created some decades earlier by Herold. Dornfelder received varietal protection and was released for cultivation in 1979. It was named in honour of Immanuel August Ludwig Dornfeld (1796–1869), a senior civil servant who was instrumental in creating the viticultural school in Weinsberg. Dornfelder has become quite popular in Germany since it performs well under viticultural conditions which traditionally were seen as more suitable for white wine production. Traditionally, the red wines of Germany were mostly pale and light-bodied, but new breeds of dark-skinned grapes led by Dornfelder have allowed the production of more internationally-styled reds. Dornfelder has a depth of colour, good acidity and the ability to benefit from barrique aging and the
    6.86
    7 votes
    6
    Aglianico

    Aglianico

    • Wine styles: Taurasi
    Aglianico (pronounced [aʎˈʎaːniko], roughly "ahl-YAH-nee-koe") is a black grape grown in the Basilicata and Campania regions of Italy. The vine originated in Greece and was brought to the south of Italy by Greek settlers. The name may be a corruption of Vitis hellenica, Latin for "Greek vine". Another etymology derives the name Aglianico from a corruption of Apulianicum, the Latin adjective which indicates the whole of southern Italy in the Roman age. In early Roman times, it was the principal grape of the famous Falernian wine which was the Roman equivalent of a First Growth wine today. The vine was believed to have first been cultivated in Greece by the Phoceans from an ancestral vine that ampelographers have not yet identified. From Greece it was brought to Italy by settlers to Cumae near modern day Pozzuoli, and from there spread to various points in the regions of Campania and Basilicata. While it is still grown in Italy, the original Greek plantings seem to have disappeared. In Ancient Rome the grape was the principal component of the world's earliest First Growth wine, Falernian. Along with a white grape known as Greco (today grown as Greco di Tufo), the grape was commented
    7.67
    6 votes
    7
    Aligoté

    Aligoté

    Aligoté is a white grape used to make dry white wines in the Burgundy region of France, and which also has significant plantings in much of Eastern Europe including Romania, Russia, Ukraine, Moldova and Bulgaria. With 45,000 hectares (110,000 acres), it was the 22nd most planted vine variety in the world in 2004. The wine was first recorded in Burgundy in the 18th century. Aligoté is used to produce a varietal white wine, and can be used in the blend of Burgundy's sparkling wine, called Crémant de Bourgogne. In the varietal appellation Bourgogne Aligoté AOC up to 15% Chardonnay grapes may be blended in. Traditionally, the cocktail kir (also known as vin blanc cassis in French) is made by adding cassis to an Aligoté white wine. In Burgundy, where it often loses land to more prestigious grape varieties, Aligoté is often planted only in the poorer vineyard sites at the tops and bottoms of the slopes. This variety is more tolerant to the cold. The grape ripens early with moderate yields and produces wines high in acidity that can be drunk young. Its aroma includes elements of apples and lemons. Clive Coates says it is a variety very much of secondary importance in Burgundy which
    7.67
    6 votes
    8
    Hárslevelű

    Hárslevelű

    Hárslevelű (in Hungarian), also called Lipovina (in Slovak), Frunza de tei (in Romanian), Lindenblättriger (in German) and Feuille de Tilleul (in French) is a grape variety from the Pontian Balcanica branch of Vitis vinifera. The name refers to the "lime (tree) leaf" in each of these languages. The grape is native to the Carpathian Basin and is planted in several Hungarian wine regions, but most prominently in the tiny wine region of Somló, and especially in Tokaj-Hegyalja, where it is blended with Furmint to produce Tokaji Aszú and other dessert wines. The grape is also planted in the Slovakian wine region of Tokaj where it is used to produce similar wines. Vinified as a pure varietal dry wine, Hárslevelű is capable of yielding a dense, full-bodied, green-gold wine with an intense aroma of spice, pollen and elderflowers. Hárslevelű is also planted in South Africa. Hárslevelű is also known under the synonyms Budai Goher, Feuille de Tilleul, Frunza de Tei, Frunze de Tei, Gars Levelyu, Garsh Levelyu, Garsleveliu, Garsz Levelju, Gorsh Levelyu, Hachat Lovelin, Harch Levelu, Harchlevelu, Hars Levelu, Hars Levelü, Hárs Levelű, Hars Levelyu, Harslevele, Hárslevele, Harst Leveliu,
    7.50
    6 votes
    9
    Manseng

    Manseng

    Petit Manseng (sometimes translated: Small Manseng, rarely "Little Manseng") is a white wine grape variety that is grown primarily in South West France. It produces the highest quality wine of any grape in the Manseng family. The name is derived from its small, thick skin berries. Coupled with the small yields of the grapevine, most Petit Manseng farmers produce around 15 hl of wine per hectare. The grape is often left on the vine till December to produce a late harvest dessert wine. The grape is grown primarily in the Languedoc, Jurançon and Pacherenc du Vic-Bilh but has recently drawn interest in New World wine regions like California, Virginia and Australia. The reason is that it is expected to follow Viognier's path to popularity among white wine drinkers. It was already present in Uruguay, when Basque settlers brought "Manseng" and Tannat vines with them to their new home. Despite being easily recognizable as a white grape while true Manseng is a black grape, wine that is Petit Manseng is still normally labeled as just "Manseng". The grape is often left on the vine to produce a late harvest wine made from its nearly raisin like grapes. Petit Manseng is also known under the
    8.60
    5 votes
    10
    Auxerrois Blanc

    Auxerrois Blanc

    Auxerrois Blanc (pronounced: [o.sɛʁ.wa blɑ̃]) or Auxerrois Blanc de Laquenexy is a white wine grape that is important in Alsace, and is also grown in Germany and Luxembourg. It is a full sibling of Chardonnay that is often blended with the similar Pinot Blanc. Auxerrois Blanc is thought to have originated in Lorraine, rather than near Auxerre in the Yonne. Recent DNA fingerprinting suggests that it is a cross between Gouais blanc and Pinot noir, the same ancestry as Chardonnay. The name Auxerrois Blanc has actually been used as a synonym for Chardonnay in the Moselle region in France, which explains why there is also a longer name (Auxerrois Blanc de Laquenexy) for the grape variety. Seldom seen in the New World, a little is grown in North America and South Africa. France's 1,950 hectares (4,800 acres) of Auxerrois Blanc are mostly in Alsace, with some in the Côtes de Toul of Lorraine. It is mostly blended into wines called "Pinot Blanc" (which may actually consist of Auxerrois Blanc, the variety Pinot Blanc, Pinot Gris and Pinot Noir vinified white). It is an important component of Crémant d'Alsace. Some is grown in Germany and Luxembourg, where it is known simply as
    7.33
    6 votes
    11

    Agawam

    Agawam (or Rogers 15) is a hybrid grape variety. It is a crossing of Carter (another hybrid grape with Vitis labrusca and Vitis vinifera in its pedigree) and Muscat Hamburg (a Vitis vinifera cultivar). Agawam is one of the so-called Rogers' Hybrids created by E.S. Rogers in the early-to-mid-19th century, and is unique among the named cultivars of that group in that it is self-fertile. It can be used to make a rosé wine having a "foxy" flavor. Agawam is also called Agavam, Rogers 15, and Rogers' Hybrid Nr. 15.
    7.17
    6 votes
    12
    Madeleine Royale

    Madeleine Royale

    Madeleine Royale is a variety of white grape. It is mostly grown for table grapes or ornamental purposes, but is notable as a parent of Müller-Thurgau and Madeleine Angevine. It ripens extremely early, in some cases by the 22 July, the feast day of Mary Magdalene - hence the name. Madeleine Royale was selected in 1845 in the Loire nurseries of Moreau-Robert. It was believed to be a seedling of Chasselas (Gutedel), but DNA fingerprinting has shown that it is a cross of Pinot and Trollinger. Recent DNA evidence has shown that Madeleine Royale pollinated Riesling to produce Müller-Thurgau, one of the most widely planted grapes in Germany. Madeleine Angevine was another Moreau-Robert creation in 1857. It is a cross between Précoce de Malingre and Madeleine Royale. Prachttraube is a French cross between Boskokisi and Madeleine Royale. Aside from the above, The VIVC give Madeleine Royale as the pollinator of the following crosses: Airosa, Buleria, Canaleja, Claire Kuehlmann, Dalmasso 10-4, Dalmasso 10-10, Fruehgipfler, Geisenheim 248, Geisenheim 249, Geisenheim 250, Geisenheim 251, Girolamo Molon, Institut, Kuhlmann 473-3, Kuhlmann 474-3, Madeleine Salomon, Markant, Oberlin 571, Oberlin
    8.20
    5 votes
    13
    Sagrantino

    Sagrantino

    Sagrantino is an Italian grape variety that is indigenous to the region of Umbria in Central Italy. It is grown primarily in the village of Montefalco and its surrounding areas, with only 250 acres (1.0 km) dedicated to the grape in the hands of about 25 producers. With such small production, the wine is not widely known outside of Italy, even though it was granted DOCG status in 1991. The grape is one of the most tannic varieties in the world, and creates wines that are inky purple with an almost-black center. The bouquet is one of dark, brooding red fruits with hints of plum, cinnamon, and earth. The Sagrantino di Montefalco DOCG requires 100 percent Sagrantino used, with a required at least 29 months aging before release. A passito is still made, a thick, syrupy wine with raisin and blueberry qualities. The alcohol content is around 16 percent. The origins of the grape are widely disputed, but what is known is that it was used primarily for dessert wines for many years, the grape being dried in the passito style, much like a Recioto di Valpolicella. At some point, the wines were made in a dry style, and that is how they are primarily produced today. Australia has now seen forms
    8.00
    5 votes
    14
    Baroque

    Baroque

    Baroque (often spelled Barroque) is a white French wine grape planted primarily in South West France around the Tursan region. It can make full bodied wines with nutty flavors. Ampelographers suspect that the grape maybe a crossing of Folle Blanche (which it shares the synonym Bordeleza zuria with) and Sauvignon blanc. While the exact origins of the grape are not clear, ampelographers believe it may be descended from a crossing of the French white grapes Folle Blanche and Sauvignon blanc. While it was once grown throughout southwest France, today its plantings are primarily isolated to the Landes department which contains Vin délimité de qualité supérieure (VDQS) wine region of Tursan. In the 20th century, Baroque gained favor among vine growers because of its resistance to powdery mildew which decimated many other grape varieties. However, by the 1980s the grape was virtually on the edge of extinction because of the ripping out of vineyards in the Landes and converting the land to other agricultural and development enterprises. Wine historian and expert Jancis Robinson notes that Baroque was saved from extinction by the efforts of chef Michel Guérard, owner of the 3 star Michelin
    6.83
    6 votes
    15
    Durif

    Durif

    Durif is a variety of red wine grape primarily grown in California, Australia, France, and Israel. Since the end of the 20th century, wineries located in Washington's Yakima River Valley, Maryland, Arizona, West Virginia, Chile, Mexico's Baja Peninsula, and Ontario's Niagara Peninsula have also produced wines from Durif grapes. It is the main grape known in the U.S. and Israel as Petite Sirah, with over 90% of the California plantings labeled "Petite Sirah" being Durif grapes; the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) recognizes "Durif" and "Petite Sirah" as interchangeable synonyms referring to the same grape. It produces tannic wines with a spicy, plummy flavour. The grape originated as a cross of Syrah pollen germinating a Peloursin plant. On some occasions, Peloursin and Syrah vines may be called Petite Sirah, usually because the varieties are extremely difficult to distinguish in old age. The grape is named after François Durif, a botanist at the University of Montpellier. It was in a Peloursin vineyard near the university that he discovered the unique vine that he named for himself in 1880. As a conclusion of DNA fingerprinting at the University of
    6.83
    6 votes
    16
    Muscat

    Muscat

    • Wine styles: Vin doux naturel
    The Muscat variety of grapes of the species Vitis vinifera is widely grown for wine, raisins and table grapes. Their color ranges from white to near black. Muscat almost always has a pronounced sweet floral aroma. Muscat grapes are grown around the world. The breadth and number of varieties of muscat suggest that it is perhaps the oldest domesticated grape variety, and there are theories that most families within the Vitis vinifera grape variety are descended from the Muscat variety. All together there are a couple of hundred Muscat varieties recorded, with many overlapping synonyms. Muscat grapes are one of the major varieties grown for table wine in Chile, and is a minor variety in California and Italy. In Italy, it is widely used in sweeter sparkling wines like Asti_(wine). Their "grapey" quality makes many wines made from Muscat easy to identify. Moscato d'Asti is a lightly sparkling (frizzante) variety of Muscat, made from the Moscato Bianco (Muscato Canelli) grape of the Piedmont region of Italy. This region has a DOCG designation and produces Barbera d'Asti, Dolcetto d’Asti, and Asti. In Lithuania, it is also used for making a sparkling wine called Alita. Muscat grapes are
    7.80
    5 votes
    17
    Xynisteri

    Xynisteri

    Xynisteri (also spelled xynistery, xinisteri; Greek: ξυνιστέρι) is an indigenous white grape grown on Cyprus. 13% of Cyprus vineyards, or 500 hectares (1250 acres) on the south slopes of the Troodos mountain range are planted with this grape variety. It is used in the production of several local (mainly white) wines. It is blended with Mavro grapes for the production of Commandaria, a Cypriot dessert wine.
    7.80
    5 votes
    18

    Beta

    Beta is a winter-hardy variety of North American grape derived from a cross of the Vitis labrusca-based cultivar Concord and a selection of Vitis riparia, the wild riverbank grape, called Carver). It is an extremely cold-hardy grape that is self-fertile. This variety is grown successfully in Finland and was widely planted in Minnesota in the early 20th century. It ripens in late September in New York State. It bears dark, blue-black fruit that is used for jellies, fruit juices, etc. but rarely for wine. Beta was released by Louis Suelter, and named for his wife. Because of this, the proper pronunciation is actually "Bett-uh", but the name is more commonly assumed to follow the pronunciation of the Greek letter. Suelter released a number of other cultivars from the same cross, including the equally hardy Suelter grape.
    9.00
    4 votes
    19

    Arbois

    Arbois or Arbois Blanc is a white French wine grape variety planted primarily in the Loire regions. Despite being a minor grape, in the late 20th century it was the third most widely planted grape variety in the Loir-et-Cher département which includes the winemaking areas of Cheverny, Cour-Cheverny, Montrichard, Oisly, Saint-Romain-sur-Cher, Valençay as well as vineyards that make wines under the Touraine AOC, Cremant de Loire AOC and Vin de Pays du Loir et Cher. By 2004 acreage had steadily declined to around 750 acres (300 hectares). It is still a permitted grape variety in the Appellation d'origine contrôlée (AOC) regions of Cheverny AOC, Valençay AOC and Vouvray AOC. Ampelographers are not completely sure about Arbois' origins though some of the grape's synonyms seem to suggest a relationship with the Pinot family, as does its weak association with the Jura wine region of Arbois AOC (mostly through its similarities in leaf structure with Savagnin). It is most likely that the grape is native to the Loire Valley. Most of the grape's viticultural history is tied in to the historic Touraine region where it is still most prevalent today, particularly in the Loir-et-Cher département.
    7.60
    5 votes
    20
    Grenache Blanc

    Grenache Blanc

    Grenache blanc is a variety of white wine grape that is related to the red grape Grenache. It is mostly found in Rhône wine blends and in northeast Spain. Its wines are characterized by high alcohol and low acidity, with citrus and or herbaceous notes. Its vigor can lead to overproduction and flabbiness. However, if yields are controlled, it can contribute flavor and length to blends, particularly with Roussanne. Since the 1980s, it has been the fifth most widely planted white wine grape in France after Ugni blanc, Chardonnay, Semillon and Sauvignon blanc. Grenache blanc is thought to have originated as a mutation of the red version of Grenache in Spain. It then spread across the Pyrenees to France, finding a second home in the Rhône. Grenache blanc is an important variety in the French wine region of the Rhône Valley, often blended with Roussanne in wines and even being included in some red wines. It is a major component in the white wines of the Châteauneuf-du-Pape and Côtes du Rhône AOCs. Up to 10% Grenache blanc is permitted to be included in the red wines of the Côtes du Rhône Villages AOC. In the Rivesaltes AOC, the grape is used as a blending component in some of the regions
    7.60
    5 votes
    21
    Arrufiac

    Arrufiac

    Arrufiac (or Arrufiat) is a white French wine grape variety that is primarily planted in the Gascony region of South West France. It is a secondary grape in the wines from the Pacherenc du Vic-Bilh Appellation d'origine contrôlée (AOC). While the grape has had a long history being blended with Petit Courbu in Gascon wines, it has only recently experienced a resurgence of interest in the late 20th century following the release of white blends from Andrė Dubosc of Producteurs Plaimont, one of the region's largest co-operative wineries, in the 1980s. Arrufiac has had a long history of use in the wines of Gascony, particularly those from the AOC region of Pacherenc du Vic-Bilh near Madiran and the Béarn AOC in the Vic-Bilh hills. There the grape was often blended with Petit Courbu which, along with Arrufiac's distinctive gunflint aroma, gave the wines of Pacherenc du Vic-Bilh a distinctive contrast to the white wines of nearby Jurançon. Additionally winemakers in Gascony have blended Arrufiac with the other grapes of Jurançon Petit Manseng and Gros Manseng. Arrufiac is used primarily as a blending wine with its medium body and relatively low alcohol levels for a wine grown in southern
    8.75
    4 votes
    22
    Vitis cinerea

    Vitis cinerea

    Vitis cinerea is a variety of grape. It has small black berries that are mildly unpleasant to eat. It grows in Oklahoma and Texas. It is also known by the name "winter grape" or "possum grape." Vitis Cinerea is an American native grape. The leaves are cordiform-emarinate, flabby, dull, limb finely wrinkled (like crepe) between the sub-veins. The teeth of the leaf are very blunt. The buds are grey-ashy-violet.
    7.40
    5 votes
    23
    Moscofilero

    Moscofilero

    Moschofilero (Greek Μοσχοφίλερο) is an aromatic white grape of Greek origins with a pink/purple skin and quite spicy flavor with good acidity. Grown throughout much of Greece but especially in the Peloponnese where it is traditionally used to make a dry and bold wine with lots of spice and perfume. It is characterized by a "rose garden' bouquet and is usually paired with fresh fruit or fruit-based desserts. It makes still, sparkling, and dessert wines, and can have characteristics similar to the Muscat. It ripens late and can have problems with hot weather. It is the grape required to make the "Mantineia" PDO blanc de gris wines. Moschofilero is also known under the synonyms Fileri Trigoleos, Fileri Tripoleos, Filleri Tripoleos, Moschofilero, Moschophilero, Moscophilero, Mosxofilero, Phileri Tripoleos. The Filéri family of cultivars also includes the white and black Filéri varietals.
    8.50
    4 votes
    24
    Noah grape

    Noah grape

    The Noah grape is a cultivar derived from the grape species Vitis labrusca or 'fox grape' which is used for table, juice and wine production. Noah has berries of a light green/yellow and has medium sized, cylindrical-conical, well formed fruit clusters with thick bloom similar to those of Elvira. Although popularly classified as Vitis labrusca, Noah is the result of a 50/50 cross between Taylor (Vitis riparia) and an unknown Vitis labrusca with other reports claiming the labrusca to be Hartford . The vines are moderately vigorous and moderately cold hardy. It buds late with secondary buds being fruitful and ripens approximately at the same time as Concord. Noah is very disease resistant and shows resistance to mildew, black rot and phylloxera - it is used as a rootstock. It is a slip skin variety, meaning that the skin separates easily from the fruit. The grapes are used to make wine, most notably Uhudler and to a lesser extent Fragolino. Noah being Vitis x labruscana imparts a 'foxiness' to the wine and because of this is thought to be objectionable, therefore it is not seen as a grape capable of making wines of good quality though does have its admirers. Noah is not a
    8.25
    4 votes
    25

    Rkatsiteli

    Rkatsiteli (Pronounced "rkah-tsee-tely"; Georgian რქაწითელი; literally "red stem") is a kind of grape used to produce white wine. This ancient vinifera originates in Georgia and is one of the oldest grape varieties. In Georgia, clay vessels were found with seeds of Rkatsiteli grapes which date back to 3000 BC. Rkatsiteli was popular in the Soviet Union prior to its fall and at one point was responsible for more the 18% of all Soviet wine production. There it was used to make everything from table wine to liqueurs to Sherry-like fortified wine. Prior to President Gorbachev's vine pull scheme, it was possibly the world's most widely planted white wine grape. In Kakheti it was particularly known for its sweet dessert wines fashioned in the same manner as port wine. There were many attempts to create a sparkling wine from the grape but its naturally high alcohol levels prevented it from being much of a success. It is still preferred in Russia. The grape is mostly planted in its ancestral home of Georgia though there are still sizable plantings in other Eastern European countries like Russia, Bulgaria, Moldova, Romania, Macedonia, Azerbaijan and Ukraine. It is also planted, in small
    8.25
    4 votes
    26

    Rondinella

    • Wine styles: Bardolino
    Rondinella is an Italian wine grape mainly grown in the Veneto region of Italy and used in wines such as Valpolicella and Bardolino. It is often blended Corvina, whom DNA evidence has shown is a parent variety, and Molinara. The grape has rather neutral flavors but is favored by growers due to its prolific yields. The vine is very resistant to grape disease and produces grapes that, while they don't necessarily have high sugar levels, do dry out well for use in the production of straw wines and recioto blends.
    8.25
    4 votes
    27
    Montepulciano d'Abruzzo

    Montepulciano d'Abruzzo

    Montepulciano d'Abruzzo is a red Italian wine made from the Montepulciano wine grape in the Abruzzo region of east-central Italy. It should not be confused with Vino Nobile di Montepulciano, a Tuscan wine made from Sangiovese and other grapes. Montepulciano d'Abruzzo was classified as Denominazione di origine controllata (DOC) in 1968; a separate Denominazione di origine controllata e Garantita (DOCG) for wine produced around Teramo, Montepulciano d'Abruzzo Colline Teramane, was established in 1995 and promoted in 2003. In the late 20th and early 21st century, Montepulciano d'Abruzzo earned a reputation as one of the most widely exported DOC wines in Italy. It is typically dry with soft tannins and often consumed young. In addition to Montepulciano, up to 15% Sangiovese is permitted in the blend. Wines aged by the maker for more than two years may be labeled "Riserva." The DOC region for Montepulciano d'Abruzzo covers a vast expanse of land in the Abruzzo region between the Apennines foothills down to the a few miles inland from the Adriatic coast. The region is one of Italy's most mountainous with more than 65% of all Abruzzo being considered mountainous terrain with the
    6.17
    6 votes
    28
    Fer

    Fer

    Fer (also known as Fer Servadou, Pinenc, Mansois and several other synonyms) is a red French wine grape variety that is grown primarily in South West France and is most notable for its role in the Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée (AOC) wines of Gaillac, Marcillac and Béarn but can also be found as minor component in the wines of Madiran, Cabardès and Bergerac. The grape is also featured in red blends from several vin de pays regions in the south west with significant plantings coming from the Aveyron department. According to wine expert Oz Clarke, wine made from Fer is often characterized by its perfumed aromas of currants and red fruit, soft tannins, and concentration in fruit. The grape is not related to the clone of Malbec known as Fer that is widely planted throughout Argentina. The name Fer is French for iron (Latin Ferrum), a reference to the very hard and "iron-like" wood of the vine's above ground canopy. Because of this very hard wood stock, the vine can be difficult to prune and trellis. Fer has a long tradition in the southwestern wine regions of France and is possibly indigenous to the area. For centuries many of the full-bodied red wines of the many wine-producing
    9.33
    3 votes
    29
    Grolleau

    Grolleau

    Grolleau or Grolleau Noir is a red French wine grape variety grown primarily in the Loire Valley of France. The name is derived from the French word grolle, meaning "crow" and is said to reflect the deep black berries of the Grolleau vine. The grape is most commonly made into rosé wine, particularly when it is grown in the Anjou region where is the primarily grape of the Rosé d'Anjou wine. Grolleau wines tend to be low in alcohol and have high acidity. The first documented plantings of Grolleau was in the Charente region in the early 19th century. Ampelographers believe that the grape is likely related to the ancient variety Gouais blanc. The Grolleau vine experienced its high point of popularity during the mid to late 20th century with the wide spread marketing appealing of Rosé d'Anjou wine, of which Grolleau was the principal component. Often blended with Gamay, Grolleau dominated Rosé d'Anjou was a sweet, easy drinking quaffing wine. Towards the turn of the 21st century, Rosé d'Anjou (and by extension Grolleau), started to fall out of favor in lieu of the Cabernet Franc and Cabernet Sauvignon dominated rosé Cabernet d'Anjou. By 2000 there were only 5,500 acres (2,200 hectares)
    8.00
    4 votes
    30
    Niagara grape

    Niagara grape

    Niagara grapes are a variety of the North American grape species Vitis labrusca and are used as table grapes and for wines, as well as jams and juice. Niagara is the leading green grape grown in the United States. The Niagara grape was created in Niagara County, New York, in 1868 when C. L. Hoag and B. W. Clark cross-bred Concord grapes with white Cassady grapes. It was first sold commercially in 1882. Niagara grapes are considered to be poor shipping grapes, and so are usually only found near where they are grown. They are most commonly found in the United States in New York, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Washington, and Ohio, and are also grown in Ontario in Canada, as well as in Brazil, and New Zealand. While only rarely available fresh outside of these areas, Niagara grapes are well known to most American consumers as the source of most white grape juice. The fresh grape is large and juicy, round to oval-shaped, pale greenish-white in color and has a sweet, very pleasant aroma. It also has a sweet and generally pleasant flavor, sometime being described as "foxy". One reviewer, Paul Bulas, attempted to characterize the "foxy" description. In analyzing the Niagara grape, he detected
    6.80
    5 votes
    31
    Refosco dal Peduncolo Rosso

    Refosco dal Peduncolo Rosso

    Refosco dal Peduncolo Rosso is a red Italian wine grape grown predominantly in the Friuli-Venezia Giulia region of northeast Italy. The grape is a variety in the Refosco family (which also includes e.g. Terrano) and derives its name from its red stems. It is found in the Denominazione di origine controllata (DOC) of Colli Orientali del Friuli, Friuli Aquileia, Friuli Grave and Friuli Latisana. It is also found in the Veneto portion of the Lison Pramaggiore and in the Slovenian wine region of Koper. In Slovenia, Refosco dal Peduncolo Rosso and Refosco are both called Terrano and are commonly used in a field blend. Like the other Refosco grapes, the origins of Refosco dal Peduncolo Rosso are not completely known but current evidence suggest that it is indigenous to Italy. The grape was well known in antiquity and it or a similar variety was praised by the Roman writer Pliny the Elder in the first century for the quality of wine it produced. In 1390, the Italian writer Francesco di Manzano noted that wine made from Refosco dal Peduncolo Rosso was the favorite of Augustus's wife Livia. Beginning in the 1980s, the grape experienced a revival in interest along with other Friuli-Venezia
    6.80
    5 votes
    32
    Verdelho

    Verdelho

    Verdelho is a white wine grape grown throughout Portugal, though most associated with the island of Madeira, and also gives its name to one of the four main types of Madeira wine. At the turn of the 20th century it was the most widely planted white grape in Madeira. The grape has traditionally been one of the most popular grapes planted on the small island of Madeira since vines were first planted there in the 15th century. It was however badly affected by the Phylloxera plague and the number of vines has decreased greatly in the century since then. Since 1993 any Madeira wine labeled as Verdelho must contain at least 85 percent of the grape, which wasn't previously the case. The variety of Madeira wine known as Verdelho lies between those of Sercial and Bual in style, being drier than Bual but not as dry as Sercial. The variety is known for its high acidity when aged, but if drunk young generally possesses more fruit flavor than the other Madeiras. Some producers are experimenting with making a table-style wine by allowing the grapes to ripen more prior to harvesting and blending with the grape Arnsburger to balance Verdelho's naturally high acidity. Verdelho is one of the three
    6.80
    5 votes
    33

    Vitis lincecumii

    Vitis lincecumii is a type of grape. It is often referred to by the nicknames: Big Summer Grape, Pine Wood Grape, Post Oak Grape, Sand Grape, South Western Aestivalis, Turkey Grape, and Vine Wood Grape. Vitis lincecumii is very similar to another type of grape, the Vitis aestivalis. In the his work Keys to the Flora of Oklahoma, U.T. Waterfall notes that "Observations of V. linsecumii and V. aestivalis do not justify separation of these species." The fruits of V. linsecumii type tend to be larger, ranging from 10–25 mm compared to the 4–12 mm fruit of the V. aestivalis. Seeds are often are larger with the V. linsecumii as well, ranging from 5–6 mm, as opposed to just 3–4 mm for the V. aestivalis. A hybrid of two American species, V. lincecumii and Vitis rupestris, is Jaeger 70. Jaeger 70 is the female progenitor of many French American hybrid grapes. Unlike most types of Vitis, V. linsecumii can not be easily propagated by dormant cuttings.
    6.80
    5 votes
    34
    Sauvignon blanc

    Sauvignon blanc

    • Wine styles: Sauternes
    Sauvignon Blanc is a green-skinned grape variety which originates from the Bordeaux region of France. The grape most likely gets its name from the French word sauvage ("wild") and blanc ("white") due to its early origins as an indigenous grape in South West France., a possible descendant of savagnin. Sauvignon blanc is planted in many of the world's wine regions, producing a crisp, dry, and refreshing white varietal wine. The grape is also a component of the famous dessert wines from Sauternes and Barsac. Sauvignon Blanc is widely cultivated in France, Chile, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Brazil, Moldova and California. Some California Sauvignon Blanc's are also called "Fume Blanc", this is often perceived to be a different type of wine. Depending on the climate, the flavor can range from aggressively grassy to sweetly tropical. Wine experts have used the phrase "crisp, elegant, and fresh" as a favorable description of Sauvignon Blanc from the Loire Valley and New Zealand. Sauvignon Blanc, when slightly chilled, pairs well with fish or cheese, particularly Chèvre. It is also known as one of the few wines that can pair well with sushi. Along with Riesling, Sauvignon
    9.00
    3 votes
    35
    Catawba

    Catawba

    Catawba is a red hybrid grape variety used for wine as well as juice, jams and jellies. The grape can have a pronounced musky or "foxy" flavor. Grown predominantly on the East Coast of the United States, this purplish-red grape is a likely cross of the native American Vitis labrusca and another Vitis species, potentially even Vitis vinifera. Its exact origins and parentage are unclear but it seems to have originated somewhere on the East coast from the Carolinas to Maryland. Catawba played an important role in the early history of American wine. During the early to mid-19th century, it was the most widely planted grape variety in the country and was the grape behind Nicholas Longworth's acclaimed Ohio sparkling wines that were distributed as far away as California and Europe. Catawba is a late-ripening variety, ripening often weeks after many other labrusca varieties and, like many vinifera varieties, it can be susceptible to fungal grape diseases such as powdery mildew. The exact origins and parentage of the Catawba grape are unclear. While most sources agree that Major John Adlum was growing the variety at his nursery in Georgetown, Washington, D.C by at least 1823, where he got
    7.75
    4 votes
    36
    Counoise

    Counoise

    Counoise is a dark-skinned wine grape grown primarily in the Rhône valley region of France. Counoise adds a peppery note and good acidity to a blended red wine, but does not have much depth of colour or tannin. There were 638 hectares (1,580 acres) of Counoise in France in 2000. Counoise is one of the grapes allowed into the blend of Châteauneuf-du-Pape wine. In 2004 only 0.5% of the appellation's surface was planted with Counoise. Some producer which favour the variety use about 5% of it in their blends, and account for most of the plantations. One such producer is Château de Beaucastel, which is noted for using all the 13 allowed varieties. Counoise is easily confused with Aubun, because of a large similarity in the vineyards. Counoise and Aubun were also grown mixed in a field blend in some older vineyards. However, Counoise is considered to be a grape of higher quality, while Aubun has a reputation for giving simpler wines. Synonyms for Counoise include Aubon, Caula, Conese, Connoges, Connoise, Couneso, Counoise noir, Counoiso, Counoueiso, Damas noir, Grosse Rogettaz, Guenoise, Moustardier, Quennoise. Counoise is also listed as a syononym for Aubun, most likely due to confusion
    7.75
    4 votes
    37
    Faberrebe

    Faberrebe

    Faberrebe or Faber is a grape variety used for white wine. It was created in 1929 by Georg Scheu at the Landesanstalt für Rebenzüchtung in Alzey and was released with varietal protection in 1967. Scheu created Faberrebe by crossing Pinot Blanc and Müller-Thurgau. (Some sources erroneously state it to be a cross between Silvaner and Müller-Thurgau.) The name "Faber" (Latin for smith) was chosen in honour of Karl Schmitt in Landau, who hosted the trial plantations. The "Rebe" suffix is German for vine. Wines produced from Faberrebe are fruity and rather "muscaty" aromas and a fresh taste with rather good acidity, and are light to golden yellow in colour. In 2006, there were 689 hectares (1,700 acres) of Faberrebe in Germany, with a decreasing tendency. There are also some minor plantations in England.
    7.75
    4 votes
    38
    Terret Noir

    Terret Noir

    Terret Noir is a dark-skinned French wine grape variety grown primarily in the Rhône valley region of France. It is a mutation of the old Vitis vinifera vine Terret. It is a permitted blending grape for Châteauneuf-du-Pape. Like the related Terret Gris and Terret Blanc, the vine tends to bud late and grow vigorously. Terret Noir produces a light color wine that is perfumed and tart. In 2007, there were 189 hectares (470 acres) of Terret Noir in France. This was a steep decline from the 400 ha (1000 acres) plantings that the Institut national de l'origine et de la qualité (INAO) reported in 2000. Terret noir is a permitted grape variety in several Rhone, Provence and Languedoc AOCs including: Terret Noir is also known under the synonyms Terre Chernyi, Terret Bourret and Terret du Pays.
    7.75
    4 votes
    39
    Ciliegiolo

    Ciliegiolo

    Ciliegiolo is a variety of red wine grape from Italy, named after the Italian for 'cherry'. It is a minor component of traditional blends such as Chianti, but interest has revived in recent years. In Umbria it is made into a light quaffing wine, in Tuscany it is made into a bigger, more structured style. A study published in 2007 using DNA typing tentatively identified the Ciliegiolo and Calabrese di Montenuovo as the parents of Sangiovese, but this was immediately disputed by another study published the same year which claimed Ciliegiolo was the offspring of Sangiovese rather than the other way around. Thus, the exact nature of the genetic relationship (but not the presence of a close relationship) between Cilieglio and Sangiovese remains disputed. Some legend claims that Ciliegiolo came to Italy from Spain, but the genetic link between Ciliegiolo and Sangiovese is practically impossible to reconcile with a Spanish origin. There are around 5000 hectares of Ciliegiolo in Italy, a figure that has been in steady decline. It is used in the wines from Torgiano Rosso Riserva, Parrina, Colli Lucchesi, Chianti, Val di Cornia, Golfo del Tigullio and Colli di Luni. It's possibile find
    7.50
    4 votes
    40

    Alvarelhão

    Alvarelhão is a red wine grape grown in northern Portugal. Alvarelhão must have originated in northern Portugal, but little is known of its ancestry. DNA studies have shown some similarity to Esgana Cão. In Portugal there are 470 hectares of either Alvarelhão or the grape called Brancelho. It is blended into red wine in the Dão region. It is said to be part of the port wine blend in the Douro, although it is not mentioned on the IVDP website as one of the main 11 red grapes of the Douro. There have been some experiments with the port grapes in California. It is possible that some vines have been misidentified, as the University of California, Davis clone Alvarelhão FPMS 02 has now been confirmed as a Touriga Nacional. Having evolved in the Dão, the vine is both rough and hardy, having strong defenses against temperature extremes and inclement weather. Alvarelhao, Alvarello, Locaia, Pilongo and Varancelha. German sources, including de:Brancelho, refer to a Brancelho grape used in Vinho Verde whose synonyms include Alvarelhão Ceitão, Varancelho and Verancelha. It is not certain that this is the same grape as Alvarelhão.
    8.67
    3 votes
    41
    Cabernet Dorsa

    Cabernet Dorsa

    Cabernet Dorsa is a dark-skinned variety of grape used for red wine. It was created at a grape breeding institute in Weinsberg in the Württemberg wine region of Germany in 1971 by crossing Dornfelder and Cabernet Sauvignon. Cabernet Dorsa received varietal protection and was released for general cultivation in 2003. The vines of Cabernet Dorsa show good winter hardiness and the grapes reach higher must weights than Dornfelder or Spätburgunder under typical German growing conditions. In 2006, there were 214 hectares (530 acres) of Cabernet Dorsa in Germany, with an increasing trend. In 2000, before the variety's general release, there existed only 2.87 hectares (7.1 acres) of experimental plantations. Cabernet Dorsa wines are deep in colour, rich in tannin, have noticeable aromas of cherry and bell peppers and are considered well suited for oak barrel aging. It is known under the synonyms (breeding codes) We 71-817-92 with We denoting Weinsberg.
    8.67
    3 votes
    42
    Cabernet Mitos

    Cabernet Mitos

    Cabernet Mitos is a dark-skinned variety of grape used for red wine. It was created at a grape breeding institute in Weinsberg in the Württemberg wine region, Germany in 1970 by crossing Blaufränkisch and Cabernet Sauvignon (clone Levadoux). "Mitos" is the German word for mitosis, a stage in the cell cycle. Cabernet Mitos received varietal protection and was released for general cultivation on January 24, 2001. The vines of Cabernet Mitos show good winter hardiness. In 2006, there were 317 hectares (780 acres) of Cabernet Mitos in Germany, with an increasing trend. Cabernet Mitos wines are full bodied and rich in tannin, and are well suited for oak barrel aging. The wines show similarities in aromas to Cabernet Sauvignon. It is known under the synonyms (breeding codes) We 70-77-4 F and Weinsberg 70-77-4 F.
    8.67
    3 votes
    43
    Norton

    Norton

    Norton, a grape cultivar believed to be largely derived from Vitis aestivalis, is grown in the Midwestern United States, Mid-Atlantic States and northeastern Georgia. Norton was first cultivated in Richmond, Virginia and is the official grape of the State of Missouri and is considered the cornerstone of the Missouri wine industry. Strong evidence indicates that Dr. Daniel Norton first purveyed the Norton cultivar during the early 19th century from his vineyards in Virginia, USA. Further evidence has been reported that Dr. Norton developed the cultivar from seeds from a now extinct variety with unconfirmed parentage, Bland, pollinated by a Vitis Aestivalis grapevine. In 2009 Riedel designed stemware specifically for wine made from the Norton grape. The glass was unveiled at Les Bourgeois Winery near Columbia, Missouri. It was introduced by Dr. Daniel Norborne Norton of Richmond, Virginia, who selected it from among what he believed were seedlings of a long forgotten grape variety called Bland, though there is some doubt as to whether it was the actual source of the seed which yielded Norton. The male parent, presumably, was a wild vine of Vitis aestivalis. Another cultivar, called
    8.67
    3 votes
    44

    Touriga Nacional

    Touriga Nacional is a variety of red wine grape, considered by many to be Portugal's finest. Despite the low yields from its small grapes, it plays a big part in the blends used for ports, and is increasingly being used for table wine in the Douro and Dão. Touriga Nacional provides structure and body to wine, with high tannins and concentrated flavors of black fruit. Jancis Robinson has compared its relationship with Touriga Francesa to the partnership between Cabernet Sauvignon and Cabernet Franc, the former providing structure, the latter filling out the bouquet. The vine is very vigorous, and good results depend on keeping it in check. In the Douro it is grown in searing heat in steep schisty vineyards that are more rock than soil. The alternative name of Mortágua pays tribute to these harsh conditions. It is usually trained under one of the Guyot systems, and needs severe pruning to keep it under control. In contrast, the vine produces just a few bunches of blue-black grapes which vary in size from 'small' to 'tiny'. Thus yields are among the lowest of any commercial grape variety. In recent years, scientists have been working on cloning the Touriga Nacional to produce vines
    8.67
    3 votes
    45
    Souzão

    Souzão

    Souzão (or Sousão or Vinhão) is Portuguese wine grape that is used in the production of port wine. While originating in the Minho regions, it is used primarily in Australia, California and South Africa. In Portugal, it is also an authorized planting in the Douro, and Dão-Lafões area (Vinho do Dão). The grape is known for the deep color it produces in a wine as well as its coarse and raisiny taste.. In Australia Souzao is used to make port style wines and also table wines, often blended with other Portuguese grape varieties. In Australia Souzao is used to make port style wines and also table wines, often blended with other Portuguese grape varieties.
    10.00
    2 votes
    46
    Garganega

    Garganega

    Garganega is a variety of white Italian wine grape widely grown in the Veneto region of North East Italy, particularly in the provinces of Verona and Vicenza. It is Italy's 6th most widely planted white grape. It forms the basis of Venetian white wine Soave and is also a major portion of the blend used to make Gambellara. DNA typing studies in 2003 and 2008 have confirmed that the Grecanico Dorato (Grecanio) grape of Sicily is identical to Garganega. Already before these studies, ampelographers believed the grapes to be related due to the similarities of clusters, berries and leaf characteristics. In the Soave region, Garganega is the primary grape and can compose anywhere from 70 to 100% of the blend with Trebbiano and Chardonnay being its usual blending partners. In the Classico zone of Soave, where yields are most often kept in check, the grape can produce a delicate wine with lemon, almond and spicy notes. In addition to Soave, Garganega is also widely grown in the Gambellara, Bianco di Custoza, Colli Berici and Colli Euganei DOCs. Outside of the Veneto, there are some plantings in the Umbria and Friuli wine regions. When grown in Sicily under the name Grecanico Dorato, the
    7.25
    4 votes
    47

    Picolit

    Picolit (also known as Piccolit and Piccolito) is a white Italian wine grape grown predominately in the Friuli-Venezia Giulia region of northeast Italy. The grape is allowed in the Denominazione di origine controllata e garantita (DOCG) wines of Colli Orientali del Friuli. The grape is most commonly associated with sweet dessert wines often made in the passito style. Historically planted in poor and infertile vineyards, the grape gets it name from the very small piccolo yields that the vine produce. The grape had a worldwide reputation in the 18th century when it was featured in royal courts from Great Britain to the Russian Empire. While experiencing cult wine popularity in the 1960s & 1970s, Picolit's extremely small yields have made it economically difficult to grow and has limited the number of plantings. It was assumed to be identical with the Hungarian grape variety Kéknyelű. But in 2006 isoenzymes and microsatellite analyses have confirmed that this two cultivars are different. While the exact origins of the grape are not clear, Picolit was well known internationally during the 18th century as a favorite of Count Fabio Asquini. The Count oversaw production of more than
    7.25
    4 votes
    48

    Macabeo

    Macabeo, also called Viura or Macabeu (Catalan: [məkəˈβew], French: [makabø]) is a white variety of wine grape. It is widely grown in the Rioja region of northeastern Spain, the Cava producing areas south of Barcelona, and the Languedoc-Roussillon region of France. Spanish plantations stood at near 32,000 hectares (79,000 acres) in 2004, and French plantations at 2,800 hectares (6,900 acres) in 2007. The grape is mostly used to make mildly acidic and young white wines mostly suitable for early consumption or blending with other varieties, both red and white. It is often the main grape of white Rioja and is sometimes blended in small amounts with Tempranillo and red Garnacha, both in unoaked and oaked versions. It was introduced in Rioja after the phylloxera epidemic, where it largely replaced Malvasia and Garnacha Blanca, partially because of the ability of its wines to better withstand oxidation. Some producers of white Rioja make superior wines (Reserva and Gran Reserva) subjected to extended ageing that can span decades, resulting in a highly distinctive and aromatic wine. Macabeo (or Macabeu as it is known in Catalan) is traditionally blended with Xarel·lo and Parellada to make
    8.33
    3 votes
    49

    De Chaunac

    De Chaunac is a French-American hybrid wine grape variety used to make red wines. It was developed by Albert Seibel circa 1860. It is also known as Seibel 9549 and is a cross of Seibel 5163 and possibly Seibel 793. The grape was named after Adhemar de Chaunac, a pioneer in the Ontario wine industry. De Chaunac is known to have a very vigorous growth habit and good resistance to powdery mildew and downy mildew. It is grown in varying amounts for wine production across the northeastern side of North America, especially in the winegrowing regions of New York, Pennsylvania, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Michigan, and other northeastern wine growing areas.
    9.50
    2 votes
    50
    Grechetto

    Grechetto

    Grechetto or Grechetto Bianco is an Italian wine grape of Greek origins. The grape is planted throughout central Italy, particularly in the Umbria region where it is used in the Denominazione di origine controllata (DOC) wine Orvieto. It is primarily a blending grape, though some varietal wine is also produced. Grechetto is commonly blended with Chardonnay, Malvasia, Trebbiano and Verdello. The grape's thick skin provides good resistance to downy mildew which can attack the grape late in the harvest season. This makes Grechetto a suitable blending grape in the production of vin santo. In Italy, the Grechetto grape is found in DOCs of the central region-most notably Umbria's Orvieto region as well as the DOCs of Torgiano and Colli Martani. The grape has been developing more of a presence in the area as winemakers are finding more potential in the grape than in the other main Umbria white grape varieties-Drupeggio and Trebbiano. In Lazio, the grape is found in the Cervaro region where the Antinori family has actively promoted its Cervaro blend of Grechetto and Chardonnay. The thick skin of Grechetto grapes allows the grape to be harvested late with high sugar levels. This works well
    9.50
    2 votes
    51
    Kerner grape

    Kerner grape

    The Kerner grape is an aromatic white grape variety. It was bred in 1929 by August Herold by crossing Trollinger (a red variety also known as Schiava grossa or Vernatsch) and Riesling. Herold was working at a plant breeding station in Lauffen in the Württemberg region of Germany. This station belonged to a state breeding institute headquartered in Weinsberg. It received varietal protection and was released for general cultivation in 1969. Kerner has been named in honour of a poet and physician from Swabia, Justinus Kerner, whose works included songs and poetry on wine. In 2006 Kerner was the 8th most planted variety in Germany with 4,004 hectares (9,890 acres) and 3.9% of the total vineyard surface. The trend since the mid-1990s is that German plantations of Kerner decrease, just as the case for all other "new breeds" of white varieties, such as Müller-Thurgau and Bacchus. German plantations of Kerner reached their highest point around 1990, with around 8,000 hectares (20,000 acres) and 7.5% of the total German vineyard surface. For a while around 1995 it was in fact the third most planted variety in Germany after Riesling and Müller-Thurgau. Kerner is most commonly planted in the
    9.50
    2 votes
    52
    Nebbiolo

    Nebbiolo

    • Wine styles: Barbaresco
    For the graphic arts firm and type foundry, see Nebiolo Printech Nebbiolo (Italian), or Nebieul (Piedmontese) is a red Italian wine grape variety predominantly associated with the Piedmont region where it makes the Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita (DOCG) wines of Barolo, Barbaresco, Gattinara and Ghemme. Nebbiolo is thought to derive its name from the Italian word nebbia which means "fog." During harvest, which generally takes place late in October, a deep, intense fog sets into the Langhe region where many Nebbiolo vineyards are located. Alternative explanations refers to the fog-like milky veil that forms over the berries as they reach maturity or that perhaps the name is derived instead from the Italian word nobile, meaning noble. Nebbiolo produces lightly colored red wines which can be highly tannic in youth with scents of tar and roses. As they age, the wines take on a characteristic brick-orange hue at the rim of the glass and mature to reveal other aromas and flavors such as violets, tar, wild herbs, cherries, raspberries, truffles, tobacco, and prunes. Nebbiolo wines can require years of aging to balance the tannins with other characteristics. Ampelographers
    9.50
    2 votes
    53

    Valdeguié

    Valdiguié is a red wine grape grown primarily in the Languedoc-Roussillon region of southern France, where it is generally known by the alias Gros Auxerrois. In Gaillac it is known as Brocol, and in California it has been known as Napa Gamay or Gamay 15. Until 1980 Napa Gamay was believed to be the Gamay of Beaujolais, but following genetic analysis the name 'Napa Gamay' has been banned from U.S. wine labels since January 1999. Confusingly, both the Pinot Noir clone Gamay Beaujolais and 'Napa Gamay' could be labelled 'Gamay Beaujolais', a name banned on labels from April 2007. Other synonyms include Valdiguer, Cahors, Jean-Pierrou at Sauzet, Quercy and Noir de Chartres. Valdiguié was first commercially propagated in 1874, although its origin is unclear. There are three main theories : It produces medium to large conical clusters of dark blue-black fruit. It is a high yielding vine that is fairly resistant to oidium (powdery mildew). Valdiguié produces dark colored wines that are low in alcohol. The wines tend to be of light to medium body and are frequently made in a style similar to the true Gamay of Beaujolais. Some producers (such as J. Lohr and Paul Mathew) utilize carbonic
    9.50
    2 votes
    54

    Vinho Alvarinho

    Vinho Alvarinho is a special variety of white Vinho Verde, the production of which is restricted by EU law to a small sub-region of Monᅢ댃o, Portugal. It has more alcohol (11.5 to 13%) than the other varieties (8 to 11.5%). The Alvarinho wine is also known by the floral and tropical aromas.
    9.50
    2 votes
    55
    Colombard

    Colombard

    Colombard is an early fruiting white variety of wine grape, better known as French Colombard in North America. It is possibly the offspring of Gouais Blanc and Chenin Blanc. In France it was traditionally grown in the Charentes and Gascony for distilling into Cognac and Armagnac respectively. Today it is still among the permitted white grape varieties in Bordeaux wine, and in Gascony for Vins de Pays Côtes de Gascogne and the white Floc de Gascogne. Old vine grapes are crushed by some northern Californian producers and made into a fruity white wine of interesting character in both dry and sweet versions. This grape is mainly grown in California to provide backbone, due to its natural acidic character, for white "jug wine" blends. It is also widely grown in South Africa where it is known as Columbar, and to a lesser extent in Australia. Colombard is also known under the synonyms Bardero, Blanc Emery, Blanquette, Bon Blanc, Chabrier Vert, Charbrier Vert, Colombar, Colombeau, Colombie, Colombier, Coulombier, Cubzadais, Donne Rousse, Donne Verte, French Colombard, Gros Blanc Doux, Gros Blanc Roux, Guenille, Kolombar, Martin Cot, Pied Tendre, Quene Tendre, Quene Vert, Queue Tendre,
    7.00
    4 votes
    56
    Freisamer

    Freisamer

    Freisamer is a white German wine grape variety grown primarily in the Baden region with some plantings in eastern Switzerland. The variety was created in 1916 by Karl Müller at the Staatliches Weinbauinstitut in Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany by crossing Pinot Gris and Silvaner. The purpose of the crossing was to find an improved variety similar to Pinot Gris. Freisamer is primarily used to make full bodied sweet wines. In 2008, there were only 4 hectares (9.9 acres) of Freisamer plantations in Germany, most of which were in Baden. Freisamer is also known under its breeding code Freiburg 25-1 or Fr. 25-1 and the synonym Freiburger.
    6.00
    5 votes
    57
    Len de l'El

    Len de l'El

    Len de l'El (various spellings have been reported: Len de l'Elh, Len del El, Lendelel, Loin-de-l'oeil ; also known as cavalié or cavalier) is a white French wine grape variety native to South West France. Appellation d'origine contrôlée (AOC) regulation dictate that the white wines from Gaillac must include at least 15% Len de l'El blended with Mauzac, though there has been movements to allow substitution of Sauvignon Blanc (and since 2007 growers have been officially permitted to do so). Prior to the phylloxera epidemic, Len de l'El constituted more than 30% of all plantings in the Gaillac region. But the grapes are prone to rot and have been declining in plantings in recent times. The wines made from the grape are typically full bodied with low acidity but powerful fruit notes. Ampelographers believe that Len de l'El is native to Gaillac region of Southwest France where it has had a long history of wine production. Even as the 20th century saw the introduction of new grape varieties and a push towards more international and marketable varieties, strong regional attachment to the variety has kept the grape from falling into obscurity. Like the Manseng family of grapes in the
    6.00
    5 votes
    58

    Chelois

    Chelois is a variety of hybrid grape used in the production of red wines. The fruit are small blue-black berries, which appear in compact, medium-sized clusters. "Chelois" is among the "less hardy" hybrids of red-wine grapes.
    8.00
    3 votes
    59
    Olmo grape

    Olmo grape

    Olmo grapes are wine and table grape varieties produced by University of California, Davis viticulturist Dr. Harold Olmo. Over the course of his nearly 50 year career, Dr. Olmo bred a wide variety of both grapes by means of both crossing varieties from the same species or creating hybrid grapes from cultivars of different Vitis species. Over 30 new grape varieties were created by Dr. Olmo and introduced to the California wine and table grape industries. Ruby Cabernet is the most notable and widely planted Olmo grape. It is a crossing between the Vitis vinifera varieties Cabernet Sauvignon and Carignan that was first trailed by Dr. Olmo in 1936 before being released in 1948. The grape is primarily used as a blending component, adding color and tartness, but producers such as E & J Gallo Winery have produced varietal wines from the grape. According to wine expert Jancis Robinson, Ruby Cabernet can have some aromas reminiscent of a young Cabernet Sauvignon with the color of a Carignan but it lacks the structure and body to produce premium wines. In California, the variety is widely planted in the Central Valley where it can withstand the hot continental climate of the valley and still
    8.00
    3 votes
    60
    Caladoc

    Caladoc

    Caladoc is a red French wine grape variety planted primarily in the southern wine regions such as the Languedoc. The grape is a crossing of Grenache and Malbec created by Paul Truel in 1958 at Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA). While the grape is used in several vin de pays in the Languedoc and Provence wine regions, it is not officially permitted in any Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée (AOC) wines. Caladoc was created by grape breeder Paul Truel at the Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique in 1958. The grape as a crossing between Grenache and Malbec that Truel created with the aim of having a vine that could grow in southern France that was less prone to coulure than either of its parents. While Caladoc is officially not permitted in any AOC wines, several winemakers in southern France (most notably the Languedoc and Provence) have experimented with the variety in red vin de pays blends. Outside of France there are limited plantings in Lebanon , South America and Portugal. Caladoc grapes have high phenolic levels that produce wines with significant tannins levels and dark red colors. In blends the grape can contribute to the aroma of the wine, sharing
    6.75
    4 votes
    61
    Müller-Thurgau

    Müller-Thurgau

    Müller-Thurgau is a variety of white grape (sp. Vitis vinifera) which was created by Hermann Müller from the Swiss Canton of Thurgau in 1882. It is a crossing of Riesling with Madeleine Royale. It is used to make white wine in Germany, Austria, Northern Italy, Hungary, England, in Australia, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Slovenia, New Zealand, United States and Japan. There are around 42,000  hectares (104,000 acres) cultivated world-wide, which makes Müller-Thurgau the most widely planted of the so-called "new breeds" of grape varieties created since the late 19th century. Although plantings have decreased significantly since the 1980s, as of 2006 it was still Germany's second most planted variety at 14,000 hectares and 13.7% of the total vineyard surface. In 2007, the 125th anniversary was celebrated at the Geisenheim Grape Breeding Institute. Müller-Thurgau is also known as Rivaner (Austria, Germany, Luxemburg, and especially for dry wines), Riesling x Sylvaner, Riesling-Sylvaner (Switzerland), Johannisberg (Wallis canton in Switzerland) and Rizlingszilváni (Hungary). Most grapes have been created from a desire to harness qualities in two separate grapes and to generate a new vine
    6.75
    4 votes
    62
    Marechal Foch

    Marechal Foch

    Marechal Foch (pronounced "mar-esh-shall-fosh"), is an inter-specific hybrid red wine grape variety. It was named after the French marshal Ferdinand Foch (1851-1929), who played an important role in the negotiation of the armistice terms during the closing of the First World War. It was developed in Alsace, France by grape hybridizer Eugene Kuhlmann. Some believe it to be a cross of Goldriesling (itself an intra-specific cross of Riesling and Courtiller Musqué) with a Vitis riparia - Vitis rupestris cross. Others contend that its pedigree is uncertain and may contain the grape variety Oberlin 595. It ripens early, is cold-hardy, is resistant to fungal diseases, but because of its small berry size is prone to bird injury. The quality of wine produced by Marechal Foch vines is highly dependent upon vine age, and the flavor profile associated with many new-world hybrid varietals is much reduced in examples made with fruit picked from older vines. The berry size of this variety is small. Marechal Foch was formerly commonly grown in the Loire, but today it is limited to a small number of hectares in Europe. Because it is a hybrid variety, cultivation for commercial wines in Europe is
    9.00
    2 votes
    63
    Melon de Bourgogne

    Melon de Bourgogne

    Melon de Bourgogne or Melon is a variety of white grape grown primarily in the Loire Valley region of France. It is also grown in North America. It is best known through its use in the white wine Muscadet. As its name suggests, the grape originated in Burgundy and was grown there until its destruction was ordered in the early 18th century. In the vineyards around Nantes and the western Loire, however, the harsh winter of 1709 destroyed so many vines that a new variety was needed, and the Melon grape was introduced. Melon is distinguished by its great resistance to frost. Since then it has been used solely in the production of the light dry white wine Muscadet, which is made entirely from the Melon grape. The grape is so associated with its appellation that the grape itself is often known as Muscadet. DNA analysis has revealed Melon de Bourgogne to be a cross between Pinot blanc and Gouais blanc. In the U.S., Federal law prevents "Muscadet" from being used for American-produced wine; only the full name of the grape, or the shortened "Melon" can be used. As of 2007, the grape is grown in Oregon. where it is known simply as Melon. The grape has been introduced into Washington by
    9.00
    2 votes
    64
    Rieslaner

    Rieslaner

    Rieslaner is a breed cross of the Silvaner and Riesling grape that was first bred in Veitshöcheim, Franconia, Germany in 1921 by the grape breeder August Ziegler. It is a late ripening grape that is fairly high in acidity. Today it is mostly grown in the Franconia (Franken) region and in the Palatinate (Pfalz) region where the grape is often affected by botrytis. Rieslaner is bred to do well with botrytis, and it holds a lot of potential to form an acidic, fruity, and full yield when it is ripened.
    9.00
    2 votes
    65
    Vignoles

    Vignoles

    Vignoles (aka Ravat 51) is a complex hybrid wine grape variety produced from a cross made by J.F. Ravat of two grapes, Seibel 8665 and Pinot de corton. In New York state's Finger Lakes region, in Southern New Hampshire, and along the Missouri River near Augusta, Missouri, it makes a wine with a sweet and flowery bouquet with a clean crisp sweet pineapple flavor balanced with agreeable acidity.
    9.00
    2 votes
    66
    Delaware

    Delaware

    The Delaware grape is a cultivar derived from the grape species Vitis Labrusca or 'Fox Grape' which is used for the table and wine production. The skin of the Delaware grape when ripened is pale red almost pinkish in colour that has a tender skin and juicy sweet flesh. It has small fruit clusters with small berries that do not have the pronounced 'foxiness' of other Labrusca grapes. It is a slip-skin variety, meaning that the skin is easily separated from the fruit. The grapes are used to make wines including dry, sweet, icewine but is famed for spicy sparkling wines that do not have much of the objectionable foxiness character that other labrusca grapes contribute to their wines. The wine is light pink to white in colour. It is a commercially viable grape vine which is grown in the North East and Mid West of America and is vigorous when grafted onto a phylloxera resistant root stock. The Delaware grape is susceptible to downy mildew and ripens earlier than Concord. The Delaware grape is also a table grape variety sold in supermarkets throughout Japan, where labrusca grape varieties are popular for their fragrance. Delaware Punch is named for the Delaware grape from which its
    5.80
    5 votes
    67
    Silvaner

    Silvaner

    Sylvaner or Silvaner is a variety of white wine grape grown primarily in Alsace and Germany, where its official name is Grüner Silvaner. In Germany it is best known as a component of Liebfraumilch and production boomed in the 1970s to the detriment of quality, but it has long enjoyed a better reputation in Franconia than in other German wine regions. While the Alsatian versions have primarily been considered simpler wines, it was recently (2006) included among the varieties that can be used to produce Alsace Grand Cru wine together with the four 'noble grapes' of Alsace, although only in one vineyard, Zotzenberg. This dichotomy is explained by the vigour of the Sylvaner vine and the grape's neutral flavour, which can lead to blandness unless yields are controlled. On the other hand it gives a blank canvas for the expression of terroir, and on good sites with skilled winemaking, Sylvaner can produce elegant wines. It has high acidity but naturally reaches high must weights, so is often blended with other varieties such as Riesling or Elbling, and is sometimes made into a dessert wine. Sylvaner is an ancient variety that has long been grown in Central Europe, in Transylvania. DNA
    5.80
    5 votes
    68
    Clairette Blanc

    Clairette Blanc

    Clairette blanche is a white wine grape variety most widely grown in the wine regions of Provence, Rhône and Languedoc in France. At the end of the 1990s, there were 3,000 hectares (7,400 acres) of Clairette Blanche grown in France, although volumes are decreasing. Clairette Blanche was often used to make vermouth, to which it is suited as it produces wine high in alcohol and low in acidity, and therefore yields wines that are sometimes described as "flabby" and which tend to oxidize easily. These problems have sometimes been partially overcome by blending it with high-acid varieties such as Piquepoul Blanc. It is allowed into many appellations of Southern Rhône, Provence and Languedoc. The white wines Clairette de Bellegarde and Clairette du Languedoc are made entirely from Clairette Blanche, while the sparkling wine Clairette de Die can also contain Muscat Blanc à Petits Grains. Clairette Blanche is frequently used in the blended white Vin de pays from Languedoc. It is also one of the thirteen grape varieties permitted in the Châteauneuf-du-Pape appellation. With 2.5% of the appellation's vineyards planted in Clairette Blanche in 2004 it is the most common white variety in
    7.67
    3 votes
    69
    Listán Negro

    Listán Negro

    Listán Negro (also known as Listan Prieto) is a red Spanish wine grape variety that is widely planted in the Canary Islands, particularly on the island of Tenerife where it is a permitted variety in the Denominaciones de Origen (DO) wines of Tacoronte-Acentejo, Valle de la Orotava, Ycoden-Daute-Isora and Valle de Güímar. It is also permitted in the Spanish wine regions of El Hierro, Gran Canaria, La Gomera, La Palma, Lanzarote. Across the Canary Islands more than 5,000 hectares (12,000 acres) are planted to the variety. Listán Negro is the black-skin version of the Palomino grape (Listan Blanco) that used in the production of the fortified wine Sherry. In 2007, DNA fingerprinting done by the Centro Nacional de Biotecnología in Madrid, Spain discovered that Mission grape that was widely planted in the earliest New World vineyards in the America was a genetic match to Listán Negro. Despite the genetic match, there is enough clonal variation that has occurred over the centuries of geographical separation that the Mission grape of the Americas and the Listán Negro grape of the Canary Islands are classified by the Vitis International Variety Catalogue as two separate grape varieties.
    7.67
    3 votes
    70
    Muscat Blanc à Petits Grains

    Muscat Blanc à Petits Grains

    • Wine styles: Constantia
    Muscat Blanc à Petits Grains is a white wine grape that is a member of the Muscat family of Vitis vinifera. Its name comes from its characteristic small berry size and tight clusters. It is known under a variety of local names such as Muscat Blanc, Muscat Canelli, Moscato Bianco, Muscat de Frontignan, Muscat de Lunel, Muscat d'Alsace, Muskateller, Moscatel de Grano Menudo, Moscatel Rosé and Sárgamuskotály . While technically a white grape, there are strains of Muscat Blanc à Petits Grains vines that produce berries that are pink or reddish brown. The same vine could potentially produce berries of one color one year and a different color the next. These strains are more prevalent in Australia, where the grape is also known as Frontignac and Brown Muscat. South Africa's Muskadel strain tends to show the same darker characteristics. Variants where the differing grape colour is stable are typically classified as separate grape varieties Muscat Rouge à Petit Grains for red skin colour and Muscat Rose à Petit Grains for pink skin colour. In France, the grape is used as a blending grape with Grenache Blanc and Muscat of Alexandria in vins doux naturels wines from the Frontignan area such
    7.67
    3 votes
    71
    Ortega

    Ortega

    Ortega is a grape variety used for white wine. It was created in 1948 by Hans Breider at the Bayerischen Landesanstalt für Wein-, Obst- und Gartenbau in Würzburg and was released with varietal protection in 1981. It is a cross between Müller-Thurgau and Siegerrebe. Breider chose to name the variety in honour of the Spanish poet and philosopher José Ortega y Gasset. Ortega ripens early, is not sensitive to frost and reaches quite high must weights, typically 20 degrees Oechsle higher than Müller-Thurgau. It is therefore often used for sweet wines, which are considered to improve with cellaring. Ortega wines have aromas of Muscat and peach and are high in extract. Ortega is also used as a table grape. In 2006, there were 686 hectares (1,700 acres) of Ortega in Germany, with a decreasing tendency. It is also found in England.
    7.67
    3 votes
    72
    Sultana

    Sultana

    The sultana is a "white" (pale green), oval seedless grape variety also called the sultanina, oval-fruited Kishmish, Lady de Coverly (England), and Thompson Seedless (United States). It is assumed to originate from the Asian part of the Ottoman Empire. In some countries, especially Commonwealth countries, it is also the name given to the raisin made from it; such sultana raisins are often called simply sultanas or sultanis. These are typically larger than Zante currants (which are actually a kind of dried grape, not currants in the botanical sense), but smaller than "normal" raisins. Sometimes, the name "sultana" is applied to all raisins, to the extent that the breakfast cereal known as Raisin Bran in the United States and most other English-speaking countries is known as "Sultana Bran" in Australia and the United Kingdom. Sultana raisins are small, sweet and have a golden colour. Another seedless grape variety from the former Ottoman Empire, the round-fruited Kishmish, is also called the sultana. The sultana raisin was traditionally imported to the English-speaking world from the Ottoman Empire. Turkey and Australia are major producers. The sultana grape's American name, Thompson
    7.67
    3 votes
    73
    Blauer Portugieser

    Blauer Portugieser

    Blauer Portugieser is a red Austrian and German wine grape found primarily in the Rheinhessen, Pfalz and wine regions of Lower Austria. It is also one of the permitted grapes in the Hungarian wine Egri Bikavér (Bull's blood). In Germany, the cultivated area covered 4,551 hectares (11,250 acres) or 4.5% of the total vineyard area in 2007. Wine cellars usually vinify a simple light red wine, which is characterized by a fresh, tart and light body. It is also frequently vinified as a rosé. Blauer Portugieser is also very well suited as table grapes, however it is not sold as such because the selling of wine grapes as table grapes is not permitted in the European Union. Since 2000, higher quality wines have been vinified from Portugieser grapes. The use of oak provides additional aromas in order to compete with Bordeaux varieties. Despite the suggestion of the grape's name of having Portuguese origin, there is little evidence that ampelographers have uncovered to suggest that is the case. It is often said that the Austrian Johann von Fries brought it from Oporto to his estates near Voslau in 1772. In Hungary it was until recently called kékoportó for that reason. There is evidence to
    10.00
    1 votes
    74
    Orléans

    Orléans

    Orléans is a variety of white grape (sp. Vitis vinifera) which up until the 19th century was much grown in Germany, but in very little use since the early 20th century. It has large berries with thick skins and a high yield. Young Orléans wine has been described as somewhat reminiscent of wine made from white varieties of the pinot family, but with pineapple aromas. German legends claim that the variety is French in origin, actually from the city of Orléans, and that Charlemagne (742-814) was responsible for the first German plantings, which should have been in Rüdesheimer Berg in Rheingau, which were locally known as Berg Orléans. However, there seem to be no documentary evidence to support this, and other legends point to Charlemagne as an importer of red varieties. The origin of this grape variety is not known with precision; it could have been brought from France by the Cistercian monks who founded much of the German wine industry along Rhine. What is known is that has a long history in the wine-growing areas along the Rhine, where Orléans and Trollinger were common earlier than Riesling. In the 19th century, it was widely used in Gemischter Satz plantation together with
    10.00
    1 votes
    75
    Regent

    Regent

    Regent is a dark-skinned inter-specific hybrid grape variety, used for making wine. It has both European (Vitis vinifera) and American vine species in its pedigree and a broad resistance against the most significant fungal diseases which affect grapes, such as downy mildew. Regent was created in 1967 by Professor Gerhardt Alleweldt at the Geilweilerhof Institute for Grape Breeding by crossing Diana, a Silvaner x Müller-Thurgau cross and thus a Vitis vinifera variety, with the interspecific hybrid Chambourcin. Experimental plantings followed in 1985, and it received varietal protection in 1994 and was released for cultivation in the first German region in 1996. It is at present among the most important new fungal-resistant quality grape variety world-wide, especially in German wine regions. The cultivated area in Germany was 2,183 hectares (5,390 acres) in 2006, with an increasing trend. This made it Germany's 12th most cultivated variety, and the most cultivated hybrid grape variety. Regent is also grown in the United Kingdom with some success. Regent wines are colour intensive red wines with moderate acidity, can have rather much tannin and show aromas of cherries or
    10.00
    1 votes
    76

    St. Pepin

    St. Pepin is a modern hybrid variety of wine grape, mostly grown in North America. It produces grapes suitable for making fruity white wines similar to Riesling or as a base for blended wines. The grapes also make a good seeded table grape for eating. It has the benefits of early ripening and when hardened properly in the fall it is winter hardy to at least −25 °F (−32 °C). As such it best suited to growing in more northern climates. St. Pepin was breed by Elmer Swenson circa 1970 and released in 1986. It is a hybrid of the male Seyval blanc crossed to a seedling of Minnesota 78 by Seibel 1000 (aka Rosette). Unlike most modern grapes it is a pistillate female and so needs to be planted next to male vines from a close sibling variety to achieve pollination. To clarify the parentage of St. Pepin;
    10.00
    1 votes
    77
    Tannat

    Tannat

    Tannat is a red wine grape, historically grown in South West France in the Madiran AOC and is now one of the most prominent grapes in Uruguay, where it is considered the "national grape". It is also grown in Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Peru, and in Italy's Puglia region where it is used as a blending grape. In the US state of Virginia, there are small experimental plantings of the vine, and plantings in California have increased dramatically in the first years of the 21st Century. Tannat wines produced in Uruguay are usually quite different in character from Madiran wines, being lighter in body and lower in tannins. It is also used to make Armagnac and full bodied rosé. In France, efforts to solve the harsh tannic nature of the grape lead to the development of the winemaking technique known as micro-oxygenation. Tannat is normally found in the Basque-influenced regions of France near the Pyrénées. The wine is notable for its very high tannin levels and is often blended with Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet franc and Fer to soften the astringency and make it more approachable. In addition to Madiran, Tannat is also produced in Irouléguy, Tursan and Béarn. Modern winemaking in the
    10.00
    1 votes
    78
    Tempranillo

    Tempranillo

    Tempranillo is a variety of black grape widely grown to make full-bodied red wines in its native Spain. Its name is the diminutive of the Spanish temprano ("early"), a reference to the fact that it ripens several weeks earlier than most Spanish red grapes. Tempranillo has been grown on the Iberian Peninsula since the time of Phoenician settlements. It is the main grape used in Rioja, and is often referred to as Spain's noble grape. Grown early in the 20th century to produce jug wines in California, toward the end of the 20th century Tempranillo enjoyed a renaissance there and throughout the world as a fine wine. The grape has been planted in Mexico, New Zealand, South America, USA, South Africa, Australia, Argentina, Turkey and Canada. Often blended with Grenache and Cariñena (known in Rioja as Mazuelo), Tempranillo is bottled either young or after several years of barrel aging. In Portugal, it is blended with others to produce port wine. Often growing its best at higher altitudes, the grape yields wines that are ruby in colour, with aromas and flavours of berries, plum, tobacco, vanilla, leather and herb. For some time, Tempranillo was thought to be related to the Pinot Noir
    10.00
    1 votes
    79
    Bronner

    Bronner

    Bronner is a white grape variety used for wine. It was bred in 1975 by Norbert Becker at the viticultural institute in Freiburg, Germany. The variety was initially known under its breeding code FR 250-75, and was later named in honour of Johann Philipp Bronner (1792-1864), who was a German pharmacist and viticultural pioneer. It received varietal protection in 1977. Bronner shows good resistance against fungal diseases and is in many respects similar to Pinot Blanc. Becker created Bronner by crossing Merzling (mother vine) and Gm 6494 (father vine). "Gm" is used in breeding codes for grapes from the Geisenheim grape breeding institute, but Gm 6494 was originally created in Czechoslovakia in 1964 by Professor V. Kraus by crossing Zarya Severa and St. Laurent. Kraus offered several of his crosses to Dr. Helmut Becker in Geisenheim, where additional work was carried out, and where his plants were given serial numbers. The grape variety Rondo was created by selecting a Gm 6494 plant with particular properties. Initially, the father vine of Gm 6494 was thought to be Saperawi Severni, but Becker's successor Volker Joerger and his colleagues were able to identify Zarya Severa instead. Gm
    6.50
    4 votes
    80
    Folle Blanche

    Folle Blanche

    Folle Blanche was the traditional grape variety of the Cognac and Armagnac regions of France. It is also known as Picpoule (with various variations of spelling (Piquepoul, Picpoul), although it is in fact unrelated to the Picpoul of the Languedoc) as well as Gros Plant and Enrageat Blanc. Folle Blanche is an offspring of Gouais Blanc, with the other parent so far unidentified. It has been mostly replaced by its hybrid offspring Baco Blanc due to phylloxera damage. Baco Blanc (also known as Baco 22 A) is a cross of Folle Blanche and the Vitis riparia × Vitis labrusca hybrid Noah. Folle Blanche is also the parent of the very hardy and disease-resistant Baco 1 (or Baco noir), a cross of Folle Blanche and a Vitis riparia variety. Baco noir and Baco 22 A, like Folle Blanche and their other parents, produce a very acid wine. This makes them more suited to distillation than less acidic grapes. Folle Blanche is used in the Loire Valley area around Nantes to produce Gros Plant du Pays Nantais, a very dry and often tartly acidic VDQS wine that pairs well with shellfish. Approximately 3,000 hectares (7,400 acres) are planted with the variety in the Loire Valley. There it is used both in the
    6.50
    4 votes
    81
    Rara neagră

    Rara neagră

    Rara Neagră (Romanian pronunciation: [ˈrara ˈne̯aɡrə]) is an indigenous Moldovan dark-skinned variety of grape used for red wine. The name translates as The loose black (grape). (Loose - as opposed to tight bunch) It is a late-ripening variety that gives red wines which are typically dark colored, rich in acid and may exhibit a pronounced fruity character. Rara Neagră is responsible for the fame of the Purcari wines in the 18th century, before Cabernet Sauvignon was introduced in Moldova. This variety is used as a important blend component in the most famous Purcari wine, Negru de Purcari. The grape is also grown in Romania, where it is called Băbească Neagră (in particular in the Nicoreşti region) and in Ukraine, where it is called Sereksia. Rara Neagră can also be found on limited acreages in the Finger Lakes region of New York State, where this variety was originally successfully cultivated by Dr. Frank. Called Sereksiya Charni here (the Russian name), it is used there to create an aromatic, fruity red wine (called "Black Russian"), blended with Saperavi and having excellent aging potential. The variety also has a pink mutation which is called Babească Gris in Romania and
    6.50
    4 votes
    82
    Shiraz

    Shiraz

    Syrah or Shiraz is a dark-skinned grape grown throughout the world and used primarily to produce powerful red wines. Whether sold as Syrah or Shiraz, these wines enjoy great popularity. Syrah is used as a varietal and is also blended. Following several years of strong planting, Syrah was estimated in 2004 to be the world's 7th most grown grape at 142,600 hectares (352,000 acres). DNA profiling in 1999 found Syrah to be the offspring of two obscure grapes from southeastern France, Dureza and Mondeuse Blanche. Syrah should not be confused with Petite Sirah, a synonym for Durif, a cross of Syrah with Peloursin dating from 1880. Syrah has a long documented history in the Rhône region of southeastern France, and it was not known if it had originated in that region. In 1998, a study conducted by Carole Meredith's research group in the Department of Viticulture and Enology at University of California, Davis used DNA typing and extensive grape reference material from the viticultural research station in Montpellier, France to conclude that Syrah was the offspring of the grape varieties Dureza (father) and Mondeuse Blanche (mother). Dureza, a dark-skinned grape variety from the Ardèche
    6.50
    4 votes
    83
    Albana

    Albana

    Albana is a white Italian wine grape planted primarily in the Emilia-Romagna region. The wine made from the grape, Albana di Romagna, was first awarded DOCG status (Denominazione Origine Controllata e Garantita) in 1987. The grape produces deeply colored wines and could be related to Greco di Tufo. The history of this grape variety is unclear and confused with legends; it is believed that it was introduced to the region by the ancient Romans. The name Albana refers to the colour of the grapes (Albus = white in Latin). In the 13th century Pier de' Crescenzi in his famous Treatise on Agriculture, describes Albana as "a powerful wine with an axcellent taste, but at the same time easy to be preserved". Also in the 13th century, agricultural writer Petrus di Crescentiis mentions the grapes used in wine being produced in the Emilia-Romagna region. In the 18th century, an agronomist from Bologna, Vincenzo Tamara, mentioned this grape variety. An Italian study published in 2008 using DNA typing showed a close genetic relationship between Garganega on the one hand and Albuela and several other grape varieties on the other hand. It is therefore possible that Garganega is one of the parents
    5.60
    5 votes
    84
    Plavac Mali

    Plavac Mali

    Plavac Mali (Croatian pronunciation: [plǎːʋat͡s mǎli]), a cross between ancestral Zinfandel (known locally in Croatian as Crljenak Kaštelanski) and Dobričić grapes, is the primary red wine grape grown along the Dalmatian coast of Croatia. The name refers to the small blue grapes that the vines produce: in Croatian plavo means blue; mali means small. Plavac Mali is known for producing rich, flavorful wines that are high in both alcohol (typically 12% but up to 17%) and grape tannins. Common flavors and aromas include blackberries, dark cherries, pepper, and spices. Croatian wines from this grape include the reds from Dingač and Postup (both growing regions on the Pelješac peninsula), Ivan Dolac and Sveta Nedilja (Hvar island), Bolski plavac (Brač island) and the rosé Opol (a vinification style). In the 1980s, Plavac Mali was incorrectly thought to be an ancestor of Zinfandel. In 1998, while researching the origins of Zinfandel through DNA fingerprinting, Dr. Carole Meredith at UC Davis with the urging from Mike Grgich (a well-known winemaker in Napa Valley originally from Croatia) and researchers from the University of Zagreb discovered that Zinfandel is actually one parent of
    5.60
    5 votes
    85
    Brun Argenté

    Brun Argenté

    Brun Argenté or Vaccarèse is a red wine grape that is grown primarily in the Rhone Valley in France. It is a permitted grape in the blend of Châteauneuf-du-Pape, where the name Vaccarèse is used. However, in 2004 only 0.15% of the appellation's surface was planted with the variety. In similarity to Muscardin and Aubun, Brun Argenté is indigenous to this area of France. Descriptions of the grape's character diverge somewhat. It has been described as having similar characteristics as Syrah, producing wines with a peppery and tannic structure, but also as similar to Cinsaut and a producer of light red wines. The vine tends to bud late and is sensitive to downy mildew. Synonyms for Brun Argenté include Arzhente, Bakarezo, Bryun, Camarese, Camarezo, Camares du Gard, Kamaredyu Gard, Kamarez, Madeleine, Vacareze Blanc, Vaccarèse, Vaccareso, Vakarez.
    8.50
    2 votes
    86
    Cesanese Comune

    Cesanese Comune

    Cesanese Comune (more commonly known as just Cesanese) is a red Italian wine grape variety that is grown primarily in the Lazio region. The grape has three Denominazione di origine controllata (DOC) regions dedicated to it-Cesanese di Affile DOC, Cesanese di Olevano DOC and Cesanese di Piglio DOC. Cesanese di Affile appears to be a distinct sub-variety of Cesanese Comune unique to the commune of Affile. (much like Brunello is a unique clone of Sangiovese unique to commune of Montalcino) There are noticeable differences between Cesanese Comune and the grapes found in Cesanese di Affile, including the size of the grape berry itself. The sub-variety Cesanese d'Affile is considered to be of superior quality of Cesanese Comune and is used as minor ingredient in the Tuscan cult wine Trinoro. The grape has very old origins, and may have been used in Roman winemaking. Today it is rarely seen outside of the Lazio. Cesanese Comune has had a long history in the Lazio regions with ampelographers believing the grape to be indigenous to the region. While it may have been used in Roman winemaking, in recent centuries the grape has been on a steady decline. By 2000 there were less than 2,500 acres
    8.50
    2 votes
    87
    Chenin Blanc

    Chenin Blanc

    Chenin blanc (known also as Pineau de la Loire among other names), is a white wine grape variety from the Loire valley of France. Its high acidity means it can be used to make everything from sparkling wines to well-balanced dessert wines, although it can produce very bland, neutral wines if the vine's natural vigor is not controlled. Outside the Loire it is found in most of the New World wine regions; it is the most widely planted variety in South Africa, where it is also known as Steen. The grape may have been one of the first to be grown in South Africa by Jan van Riebeeck in 1655, or it may have come to that country with Huguenots fleeing France after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685. Chenin Blanc was often misidentified in Australia as well, so tracing its early history in the country is not easy. It may have been introduced in James Busby's collection of 1832, but C. Waterhouse was growing Steen at Highercombe in Houghton, South Australia by 1862. It provides a fairly neutral palate for the expression of terroir, vintage variation and the winemaker's treatment. In cool areas the juice is sweet but high in acid with a full-bodied fruity palate. In the unreliable
    8.50
    2 votes
    88
    Tourbat

    Tourbat

    Tourbat is a white grape variety planted primarily in the French wine region of the Côtes du Roussillon AOC where is sometimes called Malvoisie du Roussillon. It is also found in the Italian wines from Sardinia where the grape is known as Torbato and in the Aragon region of Spain. As a varietal, Tourbat is known for its smokey notes. The exact origins of Tourbat are unknown, with some ampelographers and wine historian suggesting that it has a similar origins as Grenache and is likely a Spanish variety. Its presence in Roussillon seems to trace to that area's time under the Kingdom of Majorca with James I of Aragon was lord of over a wide expanse of land that crosses the modern-day borders of southern France and northern eastern Spain. Similarly, like Grenache, Tourbat may have spread to Sardinia when the island was under the rule of the Kingdom of Aragon. Plantings of Tourbat greatly declined in the 20th century with Sardinia remaining the one significant source of the variety for a large part of that century. Even there the grape was on the verge of extinction until one producer, Sella & Mosca, began focusing on the variety and propagating healthier cuttings. There work also lead
    8.50
    2 votes
    89

    Welschriesling

    Welschriesling is an ancient variety of white grape, unrelated to the Rhine Riesling, that is grown throughout Central Europe. The descendance of Welschriesling is uncertain. The German name Welschriesling literally means 'Romanic Riesling' (cf. Walhaz), and most of the synonyms in Central Europe are variations on 'Italian Riesling'. Welschriesling may have been brought to Central Europe by the ancient Romans. However, the Croatian name Graševina suggests that the origin might be somewhere to the east of the Balkans. A modern theory claims that Welschriesling originated in the Champagne region and came as welsch (in this case French) Riesling via Heidelberg to the lands of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy. Aminea Gemela, Biela Sladka, Bielasladka Grasica, Glasica, Grasavina Talijanska, Grasevina, Grasica, Groshevina, Italianski Rizling, Laški Rizling, Nemes Olasz Rizling, Olaszrizling, Olasz Rizling, Petit Riesling, Petracine, Rakusky Rizling, Riesler, Riesli, Riesling, Riesling Italian, Riesling Italico, Risling Italyanskii, Risling Vlashskii, Rismi, Rizling Italico, Rizling Vlašský, Talianska Graseviana, Talijanski Rizling, Vlasak, Italian Riesling, Ryzlink vlašský
    8.50
    2 votes
    90

    Chancellor

    Chancellor is a hybrid wine grape variety produced by Albert Seibel circa 1860. It is also known as Seibel 7053 and is a cross of Seibel 5163 and Seibel 880. The grape produces a fruity red wine. It is susceptible to both downy and powdery mildew. Bical is also known under the synonyms or breeding codes S 70-53, S-7053, Seibel 70-53, and Seibel 7053.
    7.33
    3 votes
    91

    Crouchen

    Crouchen is a white South African and Australian wine grape variety that originated in the western Pyrenees of France but is now virtually extinct in France due to its high susceptibility to fungal diseases like powdery and downy mildew. The grape is known under a wide variety of synonyms including Clare Riesling and Cape Riesling though it is not related to the well known international variety Riesling. Recent European Union regulation aimed at standardizing wine labelling laws has encouraged wineries to move away from these synonyms but their use still persists. Records indicate that Crouchen was first shipped from France to the Clare Valley of South Australia in 1850. From there the grape became misidentified as both Semillon and Riesling before eventually being considered by the Australians to be a new variety known as Clare Riesling. In 1976 ampelographer Paul Truel positively identified the vines growing in Australia as the French variety Crouchen. In the early 1990s there over 1000 acres (420 hectares) of Crouchen growing throughout Australia but its numbers have been steadily declining over the past few decades. Here is it is primarily used as a blending variety to enhance
    7.33
    3 votes
    92
    Duras

    Duras

    Duras is a traditional French variety of red wine grape that is mostly grown around the Tarn River, northeast of Toulouse. It is usually blended with other traditional varieties, but production has been declining in recent years. Despite the name the grape appears to have no connection with of the Côtes de Duras east of Bordeaux, at least it is not grown there today. Nor is any link known to the Durasa of Piedmont. Viticulture came to the Tarn with the Romans, but little is known of the history of Duras. DNA fingerprinting has recently suggested that with Petit Verdot from Bordeaux, it is a parent of the Tressot variety. Duras is only really found in the upper reaches of the Tarn River, in Gaillac, the Côtes de Millau and the Vins d'Estaing north of Rodez. It makes robust red wines with a peppery note that are typically blended with other traditional varieties such as Fer and Négrette. The vine is susceptible to oidium and black rot with a tendency to bud early. Cabernet Duras, Durade, Duras Femelle, Duras Male, Duras Rouge, Durasca, Duraze
    7.33
    3 votes
    93
    Gamay

    Gamay

    Gamay is a purple-colored grape variety used to make red wines, most notably grown in Beaujolais and in the Loire Valley around Tours. Its full name is Gamay Noir à Jus Blanc. It is a very old cultivar, mentioned as long ago as the 15th century. It has been often cultivated because it makes for abundant production; however, it can produce wines of distinction when planted on acidic soils, which help to soften the grape's naturally high acidity. The Gamay grape is thought to have appeared first in the village of the Gamay, south of Beaune, in the 1360s. The grape brought relief to the village growers following the decline of the Black Death. In contrast to the Pinot Noir variety, Gamay ripened two weeks earlier and was less difficult to cultivate. It also produced a strong, fruitier wine in a much larger abundance. In July 1395, the Duke of Burgundy Philippe the Bold outlawed the cultivation of the grape, referring to it as the "disloyal Gaamez" that in spite of its ability to grow in abundance was full of "very great and horrible harshness", due in part to the variety's occupation of land that could be used for the more "elegant" Pinot Noir. 60 years later, Philippe the Good,
    7.33
    3 votes
    94
    Vitis aestivalis

    Vitis aestivalis

    Vitis aestivalis (Summer Grape) is a species of grape native to eastern North America from southern Ontario east to Vermont, west to Oklahoma, and south to Florida and Texas. It is a vigorous vine, growing to 10 m or more high in trees. The leaves are 7–20 cm long, suborbicular, and usually a little broader than long; they are variable in shape, from unlobed to deeply three- or five-lobed, green above, and densely hairy below. The flowers are produced in a dense panicle 5–15 cm long. The fruit is a small grape 5–14 mm diameter, dark purple or black in color. It is the official state grape of Missouri. There are four varieties: Several cultivars have been selected, including 'Norton', a cultivar with a substantial V. aestivalis background, is believed to be the oldest American grape cultivar in commercial production. Selections of V. aestivalis such as Norton, and inter-hybrids made with the species have shown several useful traits for commercial wine production when compared other North American native grape varieties. These traits include: lower acidity, neutral, "vinifera-like" flavour profile, good tannin structure, and excellent disease resistance. Unlike most other species in
    7.33
    3 votes
    95
    Brunello di Montalcino

    Brunello di Montalcino

    Brunello di Montalcino is a red Italian wine produced in the vineyards surrounding the town of Montalcino located about 120 km south of Florence in the Tuscany wine region. Brunello, a diminutive of Bruno, a male given name which means brown, is the name that was given locally to what was believed to be an individual grape variety grown in Montalcino. In 1879 the Province of Siena's Amphelographic Commission determined, after a few years of controlled experiments, that Sangiovese and Brunello were the same grape variety, and that the former should be its designated name. In Montalcino the name Brunello evolved into the designation of the wine produced with 100% Sangiovese. In 1980, Brunello di Montalcino was awarded the first Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita (DOCG) designation and today is one of Italy's best-known and most expensive wines. One of the first records of "Brunello" was a red wine that was made in the Montalcino area in the early 14th century. In 1831, marchese Cosimo Ridolfi (who was later appointed Prime Minister of Tuscany by the Grand Duke Leopold II) praised the merits of the red wines of Montalcino above all others in Tuscany. In 1865, an
    6.25
    4 votes
    96
    Marsanne

    Marsanne

    Marsanne is a white wine grape, most commonly found in the Northern Rhône region. It is often blended with Roussanne. In Savoie the grape is known as grosse roussette. Outside France it is also grown in Switzerland (where it is known as ermitage blanc or just ermitage), Spain (where it is known as Marsana), Australia and the United States. The grape most likely originated in the Northern Rhone region where it is widely planted today. It is a principal component of the white wines from the Hermitage, Crozes-Hermitage and Saint-Joseph AOCs. It is the most widely planted white wine grape in the Hermitage AOC, where it is often blended with Roussanne. Along with Roussanne, up to 15% of Marsanne can be added to the red wine of Hermitage under Appellation d'origine contrôlée (AOC) regulations. In the Saint-Péray AOC, it is used for both still and sparkling wine production. In the Southern Rhone, Marsanne is not one of the white grapes permitted in the Châteauneuf-du-Pape AOC, although Roussanne is. (In Châteauneuf-du-Pape blends, Clairette blanc adds similar characteristics as Marsanne.) It can be found in some white wines from the Côtes du Rhône AOC. Although Marsanne is mostly made
    6.25
    4 votes
    97

    Tarrango

    Tarrango is a red grape variety used in Australian wine production. This slow-ripening grape was created in 1965 by the CSIRO Horticultural Research Station at Merbein in Victoria, Australia, as a hybrid of Touriga Nacional and Sultana in order to create wines of good acidity, but low in tannin. Its wines are often similar to Beaujolais in style. Requiring an unusually warm climate, it is principally grown in the wine-producing areas of northern Victoria.
    6.25
    4 votes
    98
    Vitis girdiana

    Vitis girdiana

    The wild grape species Vitis girdiana is known as the desert wild grape and Southern California wild grape. It is quite similar to the California wild grape, Vitis californica. They are currently treated as two different species but may be subspecies of one. It is a climbing grapevine growing at low elevation in Southern California, including some of the Channel Islands, and adjacent Baja California. It is a member of the chaparral plant community and can be found in riparian woodlands. It is tolerant of a wide variety of soils and does well in drought conditions. It bears bunches of small, sweet, edible purple to black grapes up to 8 millimeters in diameter which are browsed by wildlife. It is also grown as an ornamental plant for its attractive hanging foliage and tendrils. The Cahuilla of southern California made wine and raisins from the grapes.
    6.25
    4 votes
    99
    Bobal

    Bobal

    Bobal is a variety of Vitis Vinifera, a red grape used in winemaking. It is native to the Utiel-Requena region in Valencia, Spain. The name derives from the Latin bovale, in reference to the shape of a bull’s head. It is grown predominantly in the Utiel-Requena DO where it represents about 90% of all vines grown, and is also present in significant quantities in Valencia, Cuenca and Albacete. It can only be found in small quantities in other regions of Spain: La Manchuela (Castile La Mancha), selected vineyards in Ribera de Guadiana DO, Alicante DO, Murcia, Campo de Borja, Calatayud, Cariñena, Valdejalón. Small quantities are also grown in Rosellón (south of France) and in Sardinia (Italy). A rare white variety of the same name also exists. According to the data from the Spanish Vine Registry (Registro Vitícola Español) of 31 July 2004, Bobal is the third most planted variety in Spain with 90,000 ha (8%), coming behind Airén 305,000 ha (27%) and Tempranillo 190,000 (17%). The vine is very vigorous and highly productive, has a natural semi-erect posture, with long, strong, trailing shoots, which makes it a difficult vine to work in the summer. The shoots often completely cover the
    7.00
    3 votes
    100
    Dolcetto

    Dolcetto

    • Wine styles: Dolcetto d'Alba
    Dolcetto is a black Italian wine grape variety widely grown in the Piedmont region of northwest Italy. The Italian word dolcetto means "little sweet one", but it is not certain that the name originally carried any reference to the grape’s sugar levels: it is possible that it derives from the name of the hills where the vine is cultivated. In any case the wines produced are nearly always dry. They can be tannic and fruity with moderate, or decidedly low, levels of acidity and are typically meant to be consumed one to two years after release. One theory suggests the grape originated in France and was brought to Monferrato some time in the 11th century. A competing theory has the grape originating in the Piedmontese village of Dogliani. In 1593, an ordinance of the municipality of Dogliani which forbade the harvesting of dozzetti grapes earlier than Saint Matthew's Day, unless an exceptional authorization had been granted, has been taken to refer to this variety, which is still known in local dialects under the names duzet and duset. A document of 1633 records the presence of Dolcetto in the cellars of the Arboreo family of Valenza. In 1700, Barnabà Centurione sent the wine as a gift
    7.00
    3 votes
    101
    Gros Manseng

    Gros Manseng

    Gros Manseng (sometimes translated: Large Manseng, rarely "Big Manseng") is a white wine grape variety that is grown primarily in South West France, and is part of the Manseng family. It produces dry wines in the Jurançon and Béarn regions of Southwest France. In Gascony it is permitted in the Pacherenc du Vic-Bilh Appellation d'origine contrôlée (AOC), in the Côtes de Gascogne and in the Floc de Gascogne. While the grape vines of Gros Manseng and Petit Manseng look very similar to each other, there are distinct differences. Gros Manseng's berries are larger and less susceptible to coulure. The vine also produces much higher yields but the resulting wine is less elegant and rich than wine made from Petit Manseng. Though on its own, Gros Manseng does have the potential to produce intensely flavored wines with high acidity, apricot and quince fruit along with spicy and floral notes. The time of harvest will play a large role in the type of wine that the grape will produce. When it is picked at a potential alcohol level of 11.5-12%, the resulting wine will have more characteristics of fresh fruit and flowers. If picked later at a potential alcohol content of 12.5-13.5, the flavors
    7.00
    3 votes
    102
    Kotsifali

    Kotsifali

    Kotsifali (Greek: Κοτσιφάλι) is a red Greek wine grape that is indigenous to the island of Crete. It is mainly grown in the Heraklion regional unit and sporadically on the Cyclades. The grape alone gives moderately red wine with high alcohol content and rich flavor. It is often blended with Mandilaria, yielding a ruby-colored dry wine with pleasant taste and aroma that requires minimal aging.
    7.00
    3 votes
    103
    Gewürztraminer

    Gewürztraminer

    Gewürztraminer [ɡəˈvʏɐtstʁaˈmiːnɐ] is an aromatic wine grape variety, used in white wines, and performs best in cooler climates. It is sometimes referred to colloquially as Gewürz, and in French it is written Gewurztraminer (without the umlaut). Gewürztraminer is a variety with a pink to red skin colour, which makes it a "white wine grape" as opposed to the blue to black-skinned varieties commonly referred to as "red wine grapes". The variety has high natural sugar and the wines are white and usually off-dry, with a flamboyant bouquet of lychees. Indeed, Gewürztraminer and lychees share the same aroma compounds. Dry Gewürztraminers may also have aromas of roses, passion fruit and floral notes. It is not uncommon to notice some spritz (fine bubbles on the inside of the glass). Gewürztraminer's sweetness may offset the spice in Asian cuisine. It goes well with Hirtenkäse, Münster cheese, and fleshy, fatty (oily) wild game. Smoked salmon is a particularly good match. The name literally means "Spice Traminer", or "Perfumed Traminer". The history of the Traminer family is complicated, and not helped by its rather unstable genome. The story starts with the ancient Traminer variety, a
    6.00
    4 votes
    104
    Helfensteiner

    Helfensteiner

    Helfensteiner is a dark-skinned German wine grape crossing of the species Vitis vinifera, that was created in 1931 with the crossing of Frühburgunder (Pinot Précoce Noir) and Trollinger (Schiava Grossa). It was created by August Herold at the grape breeding institute in Weinsberg in the Württemberg region. The name of the variety is derived from that of the castle ruin Helfenstein close to Geislingen an der Steige. A relatively small amount of Helfensteiner is cultivated in Württemberg, 19 hectares (47 acres) in 2008 (and less than 1 ha in the rest of Germany combined). It produces red wines of a fruity character, and rosé wines. The reason for the variety's limited popularity with growers is its very variable yield, which is due to its susceptibility to flowering problems. Helfensteiner was later, in 1955, crossed by Herold with Heroldrebe to produce the much more successful Dornfelder. The variety Hegel shares the same parentage as Dornfelder. Helfensteiner is also known under its breeding code Weinsberg S 5332 and the synonyms Blauer Weinsberger and Helfensteyner.
    6.00
    4 votes
    105
    Grillo

    Grillo

    • Wine styles: Marsala wine
    Grillo, also known as Riddu, is a white wine grape variety which withstands high temperatures and is widely used in Sicilian wine-making and, in particular, for Marsala. Its origins are uncertain, but it may have been introduced into the island of Sicily from Puglia. It was already widely planted in the Province of Trapani by 1897; today it may be grown throughout Sicily and also in the Aeolian Islands. Although this grape has had a long association with Marsala, in recent years it has become widely used in such DOC wines as 100% Grillo IGT wines are also produced, although blending with for example Chardonnay is also common. Riddu is the only recorded synonym of Grillo.
    8.00
    2 votes
    106
    Malvasia

    Malvasia

    • Wine styles: Vin santo
    Malvasia (Italian pronunciation: [malvaˈziːa], also known as Malvazia) is a group of wine grape varieties grown historically in the Mediterranean region, Balearic islands, Canary Islands and the island of Madeira, but now grown in many of the winemaking regions of the world. In the past, the names Malvasia, Malvazia, and Malmsey have been used interchangeably for Malvasia-based wines; however, in modern oenology, "Malmsey" is now used almost exclusively for a sweet variety of Madeira wine made from the Malvasia grape. Grape varieties in this family include Malvasia Bianca, Malvasia di Schierano, Malvasia Negra, Malvasia Nera, Malvasia Nera di Brindisi and a number of other varieties. Malvasia wines are produced in Italy (including Lombardia, Sicily, Lipari, and Sardinia), Slovenia, Croatia, Corsica, the Iberian Peninsula, the Canary Islands, the island of Madeira, California, Arizona, Australia and Brazil. These grapes are used to produce white (and more rarely red) table wines, dessert wines, and fortified wines of the same name, or are sometimes used as part of a blend of grapes, such as in Vin Santo. Most ampelographers believe that the Malvasia family of grapes are of ancient
    8.00
    2 votes
    107
    Morio Muscat

    Morio Muscat

    Morio Muscat (also known as Morio-Muskat) is a white wine grape that was created by viticulturalist Peter Morio at the Geilweilerhof Institute for Grape Breeding in the Palatinate in 1928. He claimed to have crossed the varieties Silvaner and Pinot Blanc, but based on the variety's properties it has been speculated that he actually crossed Silvaner and Muscat Blanc à Petits Grains. But so far this speculation has yet to be conclusively proven. The grape is highly aromatic with a "grapey" characteristic reminiscent of Muscat grape varieties. The grape is rarely used for varietal wines because it requires a high level of ripeness to avoid producing wine with a "mousey" flavor, a coarse texture and overabundance of acidity. Viticulturalist Peter Morio created this grape variety from, what was reported as, Silvaner and Weissburgunder (Pinot Blanc) as a potential blending partner for Müller-Thurgau and component in Liebfraumilch. Despite being the offspring of two grape varieties (Silvaner & Pinot blanc) that are not very aromatic, the Morio Muscat is a very aromatic grape variety with aromas more closely aligned with the Muscat family. Morio Muscat remains the most popular "Muscat" in
    8.00
    2 votes
    108
    Pinot Noir

    Pinot Noir

    • Wine styles: Red Burgundy
    Pinot noir (French: [pino nwaʁ]) is a black wine grape variety of the species Vitis vinifera. The name may also refer to wines created predominantly from Pinot noir grapes. The name is derived from the French words for "pine" and "black" alluding to the grape variety's tightly clustered dark purple pine-cone shaped bunches of fruit. Pinot noir grapes are grown around the world, mostly in the cooler regions, but the grape is chiefly associated with the Burgundy region of France. It is widely considered to produce some of the finest wines in the world, but is a difficult variety to cultivate and transform into wine. Pinot noir's home is France's Burgundy region, particularly in Côte-d'Or. It is also planted in Austria, Argentina, Australia, Azerbaijan, Canada, Chile, north parts of Croatia, the Republic of Georgia, Germany, Italy, Hungary, Kosova, the Republic of Macedonia, Moldova, Greece, Romania, New Zealand, South Africa, Serbia, Slovenia, Switzerland, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, United States, Uruguay, Ukraine and Slovakia. The United States has increasingly become a major Pinot noir producer, with some of the best regarded coming from the Willamette Valley in Oregon and
    8.00
    2 votes
    109
    Vitis californica

    Vitis californica

    Vitis californica, the California wild grape, is a wild grape species native to most of California and southwestern Oregon. The California wild grape grows along streams and rivers and thrives in damp areas; however, like most other native California plants it can withstand periods of dry conditions Vitis californica is a deciduous vine which can grow to over 10 m (30 feet) in length. It climbs on other plants or covers the ground with twisted, woody ropes of vine covered in green leaves. In the fall the leaves turn many shades of orange and yellow. Bunches of small and often sour but edible purple grapes hang from the vines in autumn. The grapes provide an important food source for a variety of wild animals, especially birds, and the foliage provides thick cover. The grapes are a common sight along the banks of the Sacramento River. The wild grape is strong and robust, and viticulturists worldwide often use it as rootstock for their wine grapes. In some areas where the plant is not native it has the capacity to become a noxious weed. Vitis californica is cultivated as an ornamental plant. The interesting shape and color of the leaves and the lush, trainable vines make this species
    8.00
    2 votes
    110
    Aleatico

    Aleatico

    Aleatico is a red wine grape. Ampelographers suspect that Muscat Blanc à Petits Grains may be a mutation of the Aleatico cultivar. Aleatico is notable for being the primary grape in the cult wine Aleatico di Portoferraio made in Elba. It is grown most commonly in the Puglia and Lazio region of Italy. In Chile is known as Red Moscatel. The grape has also been cultivated at Mudgee in New South Wales and in California. Ampelographers suspect that Aleatico may be a dark skin variant of the French wine grape Muscat Blanc à Petits Grains which is part of the extensive Muscat family of grapes, believed to be the oldest family of Vitis Vinifera in the world. DNA profiling conducted at Istituto Agrario di San Michele all’Adige suggest that the relationship between Muscat Blanc à Petits Grains and Aleatico maybe that of a parent-offspring rather than just a mutation. Other alternative theories has the grape being descended from Muscat noir. Historians also disagree on the wine's exact origins with competing theories of the grape being brought to Italy by the ancient Greeks or being native to then southern Italian region of Pulgia. During the 14th century, the Italian wine writer Pietro
    9.00
    1 votes
    111

    Aurore

    Aurore is a white hybrid grape variety produced by Albert Seibel circa 1860 and used for wine production. Over a long lifetime Seibel produced many complex hybrid crosses of Vitis vinifera to American grapes. It is also known as Seibel 5279. It is a cross of Seibel 788 (which is Sicilien × Clairette Dorée Ganzin) and Seibel 29 (which is Munson × an unidentified Vitis vinifera ). Aurore may be used as a table or wine grape. It tends not to be used as a table grape due to unsuitability for shipping and is generally used for bulk wine production for blending with labrusca wines. It is also used to a lesser extent to make fruity and sparkling wines though considered to be mediocre in quality. Fruit ripening is early in the season between late August and Early September. Although the vine is resistant of many mildew diseases, is productive and vigorous; the fruit suffers susceptibility from bunch rot and bird attack. Aurore is planted where growing seasons are short like the Northern USA, Canada and the UK but is also planted in more temperate climates to extend the harvest season. Athiri is also known under the synonyms Aurora, Feri Szölö, Financ Szölö, Redei, S-5279, and Seibel 5279.
    9.00
    1 votes
    112
    Bacchus grape

    Bacchus grape

    The Bacchus is a white wine grape that was created by viticulturalist Peter Morio at the Geilweilerhof Institute for Grape Breeding in the Palatinate in 1933. He crossed a Silvaner x Riesling cross with Müller-Thurgau. Bacchus received varietal protection and was released for general cultivation in 1972. Its name is taken from Roman name of the Greek wine god Dionysus. Bacchus can reach high must weights, and has no high requirement for sites it can be planted. It can therefore be used where e.g. Riesling does not ripen reliably. It ripens early, about the same time as Müller-Thurgau, and has a similar high productivity as that variety. Bacchus wines can have powerful flavours and character, which have even been described as "exuberant", but only if it is allowed to ripen fully. It is however low in acidity, which does not always make it very well suited for varietal wines under typical German growing conditions. Among the new breeds, it is considered to give less elegant wines than Kerner. Therefore, Bacchus is often used for blending into Müller-Thurgau, to give the latter more flavour. Within Germany, Franconia is considered as the source of some of the more successful varietal
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    113

    Corvina

    • Wine styles: Bardolino
    Corvina is an Italian wine grape variety that is sometimes also referred to as Corvina Veronese or Cruina or it is mainly known in Europe as"Cassabria". It is mainly grown in the Veneto region of northeast Italy. Corvina is used with several other grapes to create the light red regional wines Bardolino and Valpolicella that have a mild fruity flavor with hints of almond. These blends include Rondinella, Molinara (and Rossignola for the latter wine). It is also used for the production of Amarone and Recioto. In Valpolicella, Corvina generally made up to 70% of the alcohol. It is also used to be made high as 85% in some parts of Southern Italy. Corvina produces light to medium body wines with a light crimson coloring. The grapes' naturally high acidity can make the wine somewhat tart with a slight, bitter almond note. The finish is sometimes marked with sour cherry notes. In some regions of Valpolicella, producers are using barrel aging to add more structure and complexity to the wine. The small berries of Corvina are low in tannins and color extract but have thick skins that are ideal for drying and protecting the grape from rot. The Corvina vine ripens late and is prone to
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    114
    Mencia

    Mencia

    Mencía is a Spanish grape variety primarily found in the northwestern part of the country. It is planted on over 9,100 hectares (22,000 acres), and it is primarily found in the Bierzo, Ribeira Sacra and Valdeorras regions. Most wines produced from Mencía have traditionally been light, pale, relatively fragrant red wines for early consumption. This style of wine was the result of post-Phylloxera plantations on fertile plains, which tended to give high yields but diluted wine. In recent years, much more concentrated and complex wines have been produced by a new generation of winemakers, primarily from old vines growing on hillsides, often on schist soils, in combination with careful vineyard management. This has led to a renewed interest in Mencía and the Denominaciones de Origen using it, such as Bierzo, Valdeorras, Ribeira Sacra and the little-known Liébana. Since the 1990s, the grape is increasing in popularity, and an increasing number of noted Spanish winemakers are now working with it. It was once thought to be an ancient clone of Cabernet Franc, with which it shares some of its aromas, an impression which has been dispelled with DNA profiling. It is often cited as being
    9.00
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    115

    Muscadelle

    • Wine styles: Sauternes
    Muscadelle is a white wine grape variety. It has a simple aroma of grape juice and raisins like grapes of the Muscat family of grapes, but it is unrelated. DNA analysis has indicated that Muscadelle is a cross between Gouais Blanc and an unidentified grape variety. In France, it is a minor constituent in the dry and sweet wines of Bordeaux, such as Sauternes. It rarely makes up more than 10% of the blend, which is dominated by Sémillon and Sauvignon Blanc. Throughout the 1990s and the beginning of the 21st century, plantings of the grape were falling. Some sweet wines from Monbazillac, on the other hand, can have a higher proportion of Muscadelle. In Australia, where it is known as Tokay, the grape is used to make an increasingly popular fortified wine, sometimes known as Liqueur Tokay. Those made in the Rutherglen region generally receive considerable aging in hot cellars, leading to a maderised and oxidative character. A few other Australian wine regions, including the Barossa Valley, make similar wines. A few other Australian wineries use the Muscadelle to make table wines in a similar way to French wineries. Due to EU law, Australian wines are no longer supposed to use the word
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    116
    Nielluccio

    Nielluccio

    Nielluccio is a red French wine grape variety that is widely planted on Corsica. It is the principal grape variety used in the production of the Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée AOC red wine Patrimonio, where it must by law make up 95% of the blend. An early budding vine, Nielluccio produces wines lacking in color and with high alcohol levels. It is commonly used to make rosé wine. There is confusion about the grape's exact origins with some wine experts describing the grape as being indigenous to Corsica while other theories report that the grape is of Italian origins and possibly even a genetically identical clone of the Tuscan wine grape Sangiovese that came to Corsica from Genoa. The exact origins of Nielluccio are disputed. While the grape is today known as primary a French, or more specifically, Corsican grape, ampelographers in the late 20th century began to believe that the grape was likely of Italian origins. Nielluccio close genetic similarities to the indigenous Italian variety Sangiovese suggest that the two grapes are closely related. The grape was likely introduced to Corsica by the Genoese during their long rule over the island from the 13th century to the 18th
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    117
    Poulsard

    Poulsard

    Poulsard (also Ploussard) is a red French wine grape variety from the Jura wine region. The name Ploussard is used mainly around the town of Pupillin but can appear on wine labels throughout Jura as an authorized synonyms. While technically a dark-skinned noir grape, the skins of Poulsard are very thin with low amounts of color -phenols and produces very pale colored red wines, even with extended maceration and can be used to produce white wines. Because of this, Poulsard is often blended with other red-skin varieties or used to produce lightly colored rosé wines. Additionally the grape is used to make blanc de noir white wines and sparkling cremants. Poulsard is an authorized grape variety in the Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée (AOC) wines of Arbois AOC, Côtes du Jura AOC, Crémant du Jura AOC, L'Etoile AOC and Macvin du Jura AOC. Outside of Jura, Poulsard is also grown in Bugey AOC of the Ain département in eastern France. Poulsard is found almost exclusively in eastern France, particularly in the Jura between Burgundy and Switzerland where it has been grown since the 15th century. Because of its versatility and its distinctive floral aromas, the grape was once the most widely
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    118
    Saperavi

    Saperavi

    Saperavi (Georgian: საფერავი; literally "paint, dye" - due to its intensive dark-red colour) is an acidic, teinturier-type grape variety native to Georgia, where it is used to make many of the region's distinctive wines, along with the Alexandreuli and Rkatsiteli varieties. Leaves are 3-lobed, large, and roundish. Berries are medium to large, elliptic, dark bluish, and thin-skinned; with a maturation period of approximately 5 months and moderate productivity. Saperavi is also the name for a red wine made from the Saperavi grape variety grown in some areas of Kakheti. It is an extractive wine with a characteristic bouquet, a harmonious taste and pleasant astringency. Its strength is 10.5-12.5% and titrated acidity 5-7%. At the international wine competitions this wine received one gold and one silver medal. It has been produced since 1886. Saperavi grapes produce substantial deep red wines that are suitable for extended aging (perhaps up to fifty years). It has the potential to produce high alcohol levels, and is used extensively for blending with other lesser varieties. It is the most important grape variety used to make Georgian red wines. Saperavi is a hardy variety, known for
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    119

    Touriga Francesa

    Touriga Franca (or Touriga Francesa) is one of the major grape varieties used to produce port wine. Touriga Franca is lighter and more perfumed than Touriga Nacional, adding finesse to the wine. Touriga Franca has been described by Jancis Robinson as playing "Cabernet Franc to Touriga Nacional’s Cabernet Sauvignon". Not much is known about the origins, but it was probably a cross of Mourisco de Semente and Touriga Nacional. Touriga Franca is quite similar to Touriga Nacional, needing harsh conditions to keep vigor down as it gets on the steep arid slopes of the Douro. It is usually trained low to the ground under one of the Royat systems. Yields are medium (1,5 kg/vine), not as bad as Touriga Nacional. Albino de Souza, Esgana Cao, Rifete, Touriga Francesa, Touriga Franca, Touriga Francesca.
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    120
    Verdejo

    Verdejo

    Verdejo is a variety of wine grape that has long been grown in the Rueda region of Spain. The grape originated in North Africa, and was spread to Rueda in about the 11th Century, possibly by Mozarabs. Verdejo was generally used to make a strongly oxidized, Sherry-like wine. In the 1970s the winemaking company Marqués de Riscal began to develop a fresher style of white wine based on Verdejo with the help of French oenologist Émile Peynaud. In 1980 white wines from the Rueda region were recognized by a Denominación de Origen (DO). Wines labeled Rueda must contain 50% Verdejo; the remainder is typically Sauvignon blanc or Macabeo. Wines designated "Rueda Verdejo" must contain 85% Verdejo, and are often 100% Verdejo. The Verdejo grapes are generally harvested at night. This means that the grapes enter the cellar at the lower night-time temperature of between 10-15 C instead of the daytime temperature which in September can reach as high as 28 or 30 C. Lower temperatures means less oxidation, or browning of the juice. Verdejo wines are aromatic, often soft and full-bodied.
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    1 votes
    121
    Vitis mustangensis

    Vitis mustangensis

    Vitis mustangensis, commonly known as the Mustang Grape, is a species of grape that is native to the southern United States. Its range includes western Louisiana, Texas, and Oklahoma. This woody species produces small clusters of hard green fruit that ripen into soft ⁄4-inch (2 cm) dark purple berries in August-September. The fruit can be potentially irritating to the skin when picked or eaten, and are mildly unpleasant to eat because of its bitterness and high acidity content. They have a thick outer layer of flesh and on average contain four seeds. This variety of grape is recognized by the white velvet-like underside of the leaves, and often covers small trees, shrubs, fences and other objects that it grows near. Media related to Vitis mustangensis at Wikimedia Commons Data related to Vitis mustangensis at Wikispecies
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    1 votes
    122
    Arneis

    Arneis

    Arneis is a white Italian wine grape variety originating from Piedmont, Italy. It is most commonly found in the hills of the Roero, northwest of Alba, where it is part of the white Denominazione di origine controllata (DOC) wines of Roero. It can also be used to produce DOC wines in Langhe. Arneis (literally: little rascal, in Piemontese) is so called because it is regarded as a somewhat difficult variety to grow. It is a crisp and floral varietal, and has been grown for centuries in the region. The white wines made from the Arneis grape tend to be dry and full body with notes of pears and apricots. For centuries the white Arneis grape was used to soften the tannins and harshness of Nebbiolo grape in the wines of the Barolo region, hence the common synonym of Barolo Bianco or "white Barolo". In the 20th century, as Barolo producers begun focusing on 100% varietal Nebbiolo, acreage steadily declined almost to the point where the variety was on the verge of extinction. By the 1970s, only two producers were making any kind of Arneis. The 1980s saw a renaissance in interest for white Piedmont wines and plantings began to increase. As of 2006 there were nearly 1,500 acres (610 ha) of
    6.67
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    123
    Sémillon

    Sémillon

    • Wine styles: Sauternes
    Sémillon is a golden-skinned grape used to make dry and sweet white wines, most notably in France and Australia. The origin of the Sémillon grape is hard to determine. It is known that it first arrived in Australia in the early 19th century and by the 1820s the grape covered over 90 percent of South Africa's vineyards, where it was known as Wyndruif, meaning "wine grape". It was once considered to be the most planted grape in the world, although this is no longer the case. In the 1950s, Chile's vineyards were made up of over 75% Sémillon. Today, it accounts for just 1% of South African Cape vines. Sémillon, which is relatively easy to cultivate, consistently produces six to eight tons of grapes per acre from its vigorous vines. It is fairly resistant to disease, except for rot. The grape ripens early, when, in warmer climates, it acquires a pinkish hue. Since the grape has a thin skin, there is also a risk of sunburn in hotter climates; it is best suited to areas with sunny days and cool nights. The Sémillon grape is rather heavy, with low acidity and an almost oily texture. It has a high yield and wines based on it can age a long time. Along with Sauvignon Blanc and Muscadelle,
    6.67
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    124

    Traminette

    Traminette is a cross of the French American hybrid Joannes Seyve 23.416 and the German Vitis vinifera cultivar Gewürztraminer made by Herb C. Barrett ca. 1965 at the University of Illinois, Urbana/Champaign. His intention was to produce a large clustered table grape with the flavor of Gewürztraminer. He sent the cross to the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station grape breeding program at Cornell for development when he departed from Illinois. Traminette was found to have excellent wine quality, combined with good productivity, partial resistance to several fungal diseases, and cold hardiness superior to its acclaimed parent, Gewürztraminer, while retaining a similar character. Traminette produces solid yields, ranging in studies from 12-22 lbs/vine average. Traminette wine has been chosen by the Indiana Wine Grape Council as the signature wine of the state.
    6.67
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    Vitis labrusca

    Vitis labrusca

    Vitis labrusca (Fox grape) is a species of grapevines belonging to the Vitis genus in the flowering plant family Vitaceae. The vines are native to the eastern United States and are the source of many grape cultivars, including Catawba and Concord grapes, and many hybrid grape varieties such as Agawam, Alexander and Onaka. Among the characteristics of this vine species in contrast to the European wine grape Vitis vinifera are its "slip-skin" that allows the skin of the grape berries to easily slip off when squeezed, instead of crushing the pulp, and the presence of tendrils on every node of the cane. Another contrast with European vinifera is the characteristic "foxy" musk of V. labrusca, best known to most people through the Concord grape. This musk is not related to the fox animal, but rather the earthy, redolent aromas characteristics of the fox grapes that were known by early American settlers to the New World. The term "foxy" became a sort of catchall for the wine tasting descriptors used for these American wines that were distinct from the familiar flavors of the European vinifera based wines. According to wine historian Edward Hyams and wine expert Jancis Robinson, Vitis
    6.67
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    126
    Albariño

    Albariño

    Albariño (Galician pronunciation: [alβaˈɾiːɲo]) or Alvarinho (Portuguese: [aɫvaˈɾiɲu]) is a variety of white wine grape grown in Galicia (northwest Spain), Monção and Melgaço (northwest Portugal), where it is used to make varietal white wines. Albariño is actually the Galician name for the grape. In Portugal it is known as Alvarinho, and sometimes as Cainho Branco. It was presumably brought to Iberia by Cluny monks in the twelfth century. Its name "Alba-Riño" means "the white [wine] from the Rhine" and it has locally been thought to be a Riesling clone originating from the Alsace region of France, although earliest known records of Riesling as a grape variety date from the 15th, rather than the 12th, century. It is also theorized that the grape is a close relative of the French grape Petit Manseng. It should not be confused with the Alvarinho Liláz grape of Madeira. Spain produces Albariño to a significant degree in the Rías Baixas DO, especially in the town of Cambados. It is also common in the Vinho Verde region of Portugal, but it is only authorized to be grown in Monção and Melgaço. In other locations such as Ribeiro (DO), Lima, Braga or Valdeorras (DO) it is often mixed with
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    Canaiolo

    Canaiolo

    Canaiolo (also called Canaiolo Nero or Uva Canina) is a red Italian wine grape grown through Central Italy but is most noted in Tuscany. Other regions with plantings of Canaiolo include Lazio, Marche and Sardegna. In Umbria a white berried mutation known as Canaiolo Bianco exist. Together with Sangiovese and Colorino it is often used to create Chianti wine and is an important but secondary component of Vino Nobile di Montepulciano. In the history of Chianti it has been a key component blend and during the 18th century may have been the primarily grape used in higher percentage than Sangiovese. Part of its popularity may have been the grape's ability to partially dry out without rotting for use in the governo method of prolonging fermentation. In the 19th century, the Chianti recipe of Bettino Ricasoli called for Canaiolo to play a supporting role to Sangiovese, adding fruitiness and softening tannins without detracting from the wine's aromas. In the aftermath of the phylloxera epidemic, the Canaiolo vines did not take well to grafting onto new American rootstock and the grape began to steadily fall out of favor. As of 2006, total plantings of Canaiolo throughout Italy dropped to
    5.75
    4 votes
    128

    Kratosija

    Kratosija (Macedonian: Кратошија) (also Kratoshija or Kratoshiya) is a red wine grape variety grown in the Tikveš wine-growing region of The Republic of Macedonia. This wine is characterized by an intense ruby-red color and aroma of red berry fruits.
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    129
    Prieto Picudo

    Prieto Picudo

    Prieto Picudo is a red wine grape that is grown primarily in Spain. It is a grape of Valdevimbre, in León, Spain. Valdevimbre is an international place of wines. The Prieto Picudo is sometimes blended with the grape Mencia and as a varietal it produces wine with similar characteristics to Tempranillo.
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    130
    Blaufränkisch

    Blaufränkisch

    Blaufränkisch (German for blue "Frankish") is a dark-skinned variety of grape used for red wine. Blaufränkisch, which is a late-ripening variety gives red wines which are typically rich in tannin and may exhibit a pronounced spicy character. The grape is grown across Central Europe, including Austria, Czech Republic (in particular southern Moravia where it is known as Frankovka), Germany and Washington State (where it is known as Lemberger, or Blauer Limberger), Slovakia (where it is known as "Frankovka modrá"), Croatia ("frankovka") and Slovenia (known as "modra frankinja"). In Hungary the grape is called Kékfrankos (also lit. blue Frankish) and is grown in a number of wine regions including Sopron, Villány, Szekszárd, and Eger (where it is a major ingredient in the famous red wine blend known as Egri Bikavér (lit. Bull's Blood) having largely replaced the Kadarka grape). It has been called "the Pinot Noir of the East" because of its spread and reputation in Eastern Europe. DNA profiling has shown that Blaufränkisch is a cross between Gouais blanc (Weißer Heunisch) and an unidentified Frankish variety. One of the candidates for the Frankish parent is Blauer Silvaner. For a long
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    131
    Cabernet Franc

    Cabernet Franc

    Cabernet Franc is one of the major black grape varieties worldwide. It is principally grown for blending with Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot in the Bordeaux style, but can also be vinified alone - as in the Loire's Chinon. In addition to being used in blends and produced as a varietal in Canada and the United States it is made into ice wine there. Cabernet Franc is lighter than Cabernet Sauvignon, making a bright pale red wine and contributing finesse and a peppery perfume to blends with more robust grapes. Depending on growing region and style of wine, additional aromas can include tobacco, raspberry, bell pepper, and cassis, sometimes even violets. Records of Cabernet Franc in Bordeaux go back to the end of the 18th century; it was planted in Loire long before that. DNA analysis indicates Cabernet Franc is one of two parents of Cabernet Sauvignon, a cross between it and Sauvignon Blanc. Cabernet Franc is believed to have been established in the Libournais region of southwest France sometime in the 17th century when Cardinal Richelieu transported cuttings of the vine to the Loire Valley. They were planted at the Abbey of Bourgueil under the care of an abbot named Breton, whose name
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    132
    Frontenac grapevine

    Frontenac grapevine

    Frontenac is a French-American hybrid grapevine that is a result of research and cross-breeding by the University of Minnesota. It was grown from a crossing of the complex interspecific hybrid Landot 4511 and a very cold hardy selection of Vitis riparia. It was released in 1996. Frontenac gris is a white wine version of Frontenac, introduced in 2003. It started as a single bud mutation of Frontenac, yielding gray (thus named gris) fruit and amber-colored juice. Frontenac blanc will be introduced in 2012 from white fruited mutations found in both Fronenac and Frontenac gris vines in Minnesota and Canada. The vines produce loose clusters of dark, highly acidic, high sugar berries. Frontenac is quite vigorous, extremely cold hardy (below -30C), highly resistant to downy mildew, and resistant to powdery mildew and botrytis. Frontenac has been used for the production of dry red wines, rose, as well as for fortified wine in the style of port. The wines produced from Frontenac typically present aromas of cherry and other red fruits. While producing a pleasing wine, the ripeness of the grapes is difficult to judge from sugar levels alone, and wine-makers are often challenged by its high
    7.50
    2 votes
    133
    Roussanne

    Roussanne

    Roussanne is a white wine grape grown originally in the Rhône wine region in France, where it is often blended with Marsanne. It is the only other white variety, besides Marsanne, allowed in the northern Rhône appellations of Crozes-Hermitage AOC, Hermitage AOC and Saint-Joseph AOC. In the southern Rhône appellation of Châteauneuf-du-Pape AOC it is one of six white grapes allowed, along with Grenache blanc, Piquepoul blanc, Clairette, Bourboulenc and Picardan. The Châteauneuf-du-Pape appellation also allows it to be blended into red wines. The grape is also planted in various wine-growing regions of the New World, such as California, Washington, and Australia as well as European regions such as Crete, Tuscany and Spain. The berries are distinguished by their russet color when ripe — roux is French for the reddish brown color russet, and is probably the root for the variety's name. The aroma of Roussanne is often reminiscent of a flowery herbal tea. In warm climates, it produces wines of richness, with flavors of honey and pear, and full body. In cooler climates it is more floral and more delicate, with higher acidity. In many regions, it is a difficult variety to grow, with
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    2 votes
    134

    Symphony

    The Symphony grape is one of dozens of new grapes bred by Dr. Harold Olmo, Professor Emeritus of the University of California, Davis Department of Viticulture and Enology. Its development began in 1948 and was completed and introduced commercially in 1981. It was patented in 1983. It is a cross between Muscat of Alexandria and Grenache Gris. The grape makes a white wine with a slight spiciness and pleasant fruit aromas, sometimes including citrus or apricot and peach. It is most often used for blending, due to its ability to bring out aroma and flavors in other wines. It has been made on its own in limited quantities and is planted in limited amounts.
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    2 votes
    135
    Colorino

    Colorino

    Colorino is a red Italian wine grape variety planted primarily in Tuscany. The grape is known for its deep dark coloring and is used primarily as a coloring agent in red blends. In the history of Chianti it played a minor role, mostly for its affinity and use to the governo winemaking technique. Like Canaiolo, Colorino did not rot easily while going through the partial drying process to later be added to the fermenting grape must. However the grape did not provide the same level of fruit and softening effect that Canaiolo did and fell out of favor. In the late 1980s, there was a surge of interest in the variety among Tuscan winemakers who saw in this local grape variety similarity to the role Petite Verdot plays in Bordeaux blends. Colorino was planted and used to add darker colors and structure from phenolic compounds in the grape's thick skin without the overpowering aromatics that Cabernet Sauvignon could add. This enthusiasm was short lived and by the turn of the 21st century Colorino returned once again to a minor role in Tuscan wines. In addition to Tuscany, the grape is also found in the Umbria region of Central Italy. It is a principle grape variety in the Denominazione di
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    4 votes
    136
    Gouais Blanc

    Gouais Blanc

    Gouais Blanc or Weißer Heunisch is a white grape variety that is seldom grown today but is important as the ancestor of many traditional French and German grape varieties. The name Gouais derives from the old French adjective ‘gou’, a term of derision befitting its traditional status as the grape of the peasants. Likewise, the German name Weißer Henuisch labels it as one the lesser, Hunnic grapes. Gouais is known to have been widely planted in central and northeastern France in Medieval times. At this time, it was used to produce simple, acidic white wines, and were primarily grown in less good plots that were not suited for the much more highly regarded Pinot Noir or Pinot Gris. Gouais Blanc was thus the grape of the peasantry rather than of the nobility. Its history before Medieval times is not known with any certainty, but is the subject of much conjecture, in similarity to many other grape varieties with a long history. Gouais Blanc has been proposed as a candidate for the grape given to the Gauls by Marcus Aurelius Probus (Roman Emperor 276–282), who was from Pannonia and who overturned Domitian's decree banning grape growing north of the Alps. Another hypothesis claims it
    5.50
    4 votes
    137
    Cabernet Gernischt

    Cabernet Gernischt

    Cabernet Gernischt is a red wine grape variety used in China believed to be of European origin, and similar if not identical to Cabernet Franc. In the late 19th century, the Phylloxera epidemic destroyed most of the European vineyards, most notably in France. It is believed that one of the varieties lost to the European vineyards was the Cabernet Gemischt grape (also occasionally spelt as 'Cabernet Gernischt'), an ancestor of today’s Cabernet Franc. A number of winemakers and Chinese wine industry figures believe that Cabernet Gernischt could be the same grape as Carmenère, being mistakenly called "mixed cabernet" when it arrived in China. However, the grape variety was introduced into the Shandong region of China in 1892 by Zhangyu Winery (aka. Changyu Pioneer Wine Co.) The name has been changed to Cabernet Gernischt (either by intent or by misspelling), but it still maintains the grape’s aromas and flavors.
    6.33
    3 votes
    138

    Grignolino

    Grignolino is a red Italian wine grape variety commonly grown in the Piedmont region. It makes light colored wines and rosés with very fruity aromas, strong acidity and tannins. The name Grignolino derives from the word grignole which means "many pips" in the local Piedmontese dialect of the Asti region. The abundance of pips, or seeds, contribute to the strong, bitter tannins associated with the wine. Modern winemaker try to avoid the excess tannins with gentle and slow pressings. Grignolino has two Denominazione di origine controllata (DOCs) that produce wine from it - Asti and Monferrato Casale. Ampelographers believe that the grape is native to the Monferrato hills located between the towns of Asti and Casale. The name Grignolino derives from the word grignole which means "many pips" in the local dialect of the region. Producers in the Asti region try to model Grignolino on the wines of Beaujolais and those made from the Dolcetto grape in the Cuneo. These light bodied, pale colored wines are made to be consumed young and while waiting for the brawnier, Nebbiolo and Barbera based wines of the region age. While the grapes are relatively low in alcohol at around 11-12% ABV, they
    6.33
    3 votes
    139
    Seyval Blanc

    Seyval Blanc

    Seyval Blanc (or Seyve-Villard hybrid number 5276) is a hybrid wine grape variety used to make white wines. Its vines ripen early, are productive and are suited to fairly cool climates.Seyval Blanc is grown mainly in England, the United States east coast (specifically the Finger Lakes region of upstate New York, and Virginia), as well as to a lesser extent in Canada. Seyval Blanc was created either by Bertille Seyve, or his son-in-law Villard, as a cross of Seibel 5656 and Rayon d'Or (Seibel 4986), and was used to create the hybrid grape St. Pepin. Seyval Blanc has a characteristic citrus element in the aroma and taste, as well as a minerality that may be compared to white Burgundy. It is often oaked and subjected to a stage of malolactic fermentation. As it contains some non-vinifera genes, it is outlawed by the EU authorities for quality wine production, which is an issue of conflict with the English wine industry. Seyval Blanc is known under the synonyms Seival, Seyval, Seyve Villard 5-276, Seyve Villard 5276, and SV 5276.
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    140

    Charbono

    Charbono or Corbeau or Bonarda is a grape variety from the Savoie region of France. It is the second most commonly grown variety in Argentina, where it is known as Bonarda (which is not the same as the Bonarda Piemontese varietal). It is also found in California. The wine made from Charbono tends to be dark, with medium to high tannins and acidity. After genetic testing conducted by Carole Meredith, it was determined to be the same grape as the grape known as Corbeau, Douce Noire, or Charbonneau in the Savoie region of France; but in spite of repeated references, it is probably not related to Dolcetto of the Piedmont. It is likely that this confusion arose because an Italian synonym for Dolcetto is "Dolce Nero" which translates to "sweet black," as does the French name "Douce Noire" for Charbono.
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    1 votes
    141
    Dunkelfelder

    Dunkelfelder

    Dunkelfelder is a dark-skinned variety of grape used for red wine. It was created by German viticulturalist Gustav Adolf Froelich (1847-1912). He probably crossed Färbertraube (a teinturier) with Blauer Portugieser. The variety, initially called Froelich V 4-4, did not receive any attention for several decades until work was continued on it at Geisenheim grape breeding institute in the 1930s. It was named Dunkelfelder (dunkel = dark) by ampelographer Helmut Becker, due to its unclear parentage and its dark colour. Dunkelfelder received varietal protection and was released for general cultivation in 1980. In 2006, there were 372 hectares (920 acres) of Dunkelfelder in Germany, with an approximately constant trend. Plantings of Dunkelfelder are primarily found in Ahr, Baden, Nahe, Palatinate and Rheinhessen. Dunkelfelder wines are deep and dark red in colour, which used to be difficult to achieve with German red wines, and it has therefore often been used for blends, although varietal Dunkelfelder wines are also produced. It is known under the synonyms Farbtraube Froelich, Froelich V 4-4 and Purpur.
    8.00
    1 votes
    142
    Fiano

    Fiano

    Fiano is a white Italian wine grape variety that is grown primarily in the Campania region of southern Italy and on the island of Sicily. In Campania, this fairly strong flavored white wine grape is particularly noted around Avellino where the Denominazione di origine controllata e Garantita (DOCG) wine of Fiano di Avellino is produced. The grape has a long history in the Campanian region and is believed to have been the grape behind the ancient Roman wine Apianum. Even today, the name Apianum is permitted to appear on wine labels of the DOCG wine Fiano di Avellino. Outside of Italy, several Australian wine producers have begun to use the grape. Production seems to be increasing, although the number of vineyards growing it is still small. One place of production is in the McLaren Vale wine region of South Australia. More recently, some winemakers in Argentina are producing Fiano in the La Rioja district, north of Mendoza . Beyond its strong flavors and intense aroma notes, the Fiano grapevine is noted viticulturally for the relatively low yields it produces. Ampelographers and wine historians consider Fiano a "classical vine" of southern Italy that likely has its origins in ancient
    8.00
    1 votes
    143
    Lagrein

    Lagrein

    Lagrein (pronounced lah-GRAH’EEN, lah-GRINE or lah-GRI’NE) is a red wine grape variety native to the valleys of South Tyrol, northern Italy. Along with Marzemino, it is a descendant of Teroldego, and related to Syrah, Pinot noir and Dureza. The name suggests its origins lie in the Lagarina valley of Trentino. It was mentioned as early as in the 17th century, in records of the Muri Abbey near Bolzano. The variety is ferociously vigorous, with drooping canes and a tendency to grow lateral shoots, making canopy management a key issue in cooler areas. It is a generous yielding variety, so overcropping can also be a problem. In the Peter May/Victoria cultivar at least, the variety is deeply coloured, tannic and has very good acidity at ripeness. Unusually, even the free run juice is tannic. Lagrein produces wine which has high acidity and low pH, and is also highly tannic, which is why blending with less tannic varietals works so well. Eric Asimov says Lagrein produces "congenial, straightforward wines that can be deliciously plummy, earthy and chewy, dark and full-bodied but not heavy, with a pronounced minerally edge." As a single varietal wine, Lagrein can be extremely astringent. To
    8.00
    1 votes
    144

    Negroamaro

    Negroamaro, also Negro amaro, is a red wine grape variety native to southern Italy. It is grown almost exclusively in Puglia and particularly in Salento, the peninsula which can be visualised as the “heel” of Italy. The grape can produce wines very deep in color. Wines made from Negroamaro tend to be very rustic in character, combining perfume with an earthy bitterness. The grape produces some of the best red wines of Puglia, particularly when blended with the highly scented Malvasia Nera, as in the case of Salice Salentino. Although amaro is the Italian for ‘bitter’, the name is thought to derive from two words meaning ‘black’: the Latin language ‘negro’ and the ancient Greek ‘maru’. 'Maru' shares a root with "merum", a wine brought to Puglia by Illyrian colonists before the Greeks arrived in the 7th century BC. Horace and other Roman writers mention "mera tarantina" from Taranto, and Pliny the Elder describes Manduria as 'viticulosa' (full of vineyards). But after the fall of the Roman Empire winemaking declined until it was only kept alive in the monasteries - Benedictine on Murgia and Greek Orthodox in Salento. Negroamaro could be the grape used in merum, or it could have been
    8.00
    1 votes
    145
    Trousseau Gris

    Trousseau Gris

    Trousseau Gris is a French variety of white wine grape. It is occasionally found in eastern France and was once widely grown in California under the name Gray Riesling. In cool climates it can produce fresh aromatic wines. It needs gentle handling and careful winemaking to bring out its best. It is a white mutation of the red Trousseau grape. The 'gris' mutant seems to have arisen in Eastern France, perhaps in Alsace or Lorraine. These days Trousseau Gris is mostly found in the Jura, Alsace, Lorraine and sometimes in Champagne. "Gray Riesling" was once widely planted in California, but the land for winemaking declined sharply in the 1980s, now while some Trousseau Gris can be found in old field-blended Zinfandel vineyards, the only standing block is ten acers of the Fanucchi Wood Road Vineyard in the Russian River Valley. In addition to making an aromatic still wine of its own, it has often been blended with Chardonnay, Viognier, White Zinfandel rosé and even some red wines! It has also been used in dessert wines, sparkling wines and fortified wines. As a mutant of a port grape, Trousseau Gris can thrive in hot, dry conditions, producing lots of sweet fruit (As dose any grape in
    8.00
    1 votes
    146
    Viognier

    Viognier

    Viognier (French pronunciation: [viɔɲje]) is a white wine grape. It is the only permitted grape for the French wine Condrieu in the Rhone valley. The origin of the Viognier grape is unknown. Viognier is presumed to be an ancient grape, possibly originating in Dalmatia (present day Croatia) and then brought to Rhône by the Romans. One legend states that the Roman emperor Probus brought the vine to the region in 281 AD. Another legend has the grape packaged with Syrah on a cargo ship navigating the Rhone River en route to Beaujolais when it was captured near the site of present day Condrieu by a local group of outlaws known as culs de piaux. The origin of the name Viognier is also obscure. The most common namesake is the French city of Vienne, which was a major Roman outpost. Another legend has it drawing its name from the Roman pronunciation of the via Gehennae, meaning the "Valley of Hell". Probably this is an allusion to the difficulty of growing the grape. Viognier was once fairly common. Now it is a rare white grape grown almost exclusively in the northern Rhône regions of France. In 1965, the grape was almost extinct when there were only eight acres in Northern Rhône producing
    8.00
    1 votes
    147
    Carmenère

    Carmenère

    The Carménère grape is a wine grape variety originally planted in the Médoc region of Bordeaux, France, where it was used to produce deep red wines and occasionally used for blending purposes in the same manner as Petit Verdot. A member of the Cabernet family of grapes, the name "Carménère" originates from the French word for crimson (carmin) which refers to the brilliant crimson colour of the autumn foliage prior to leaf-fall. The grape is also known as Grande Vidure, a historic Bordeaux synonym, although current European Union regulations prohibit Chilean imports under this name into the European Union. Along with Cabernet sauvignon, Cabernet franc, Merlot, Malbec and Petit verdot, Carménère is considered part of the original six red grapes of Bordeaux, France. Now rarely found in France, the world's largest area planted with this variety is in Chile in South America, with more than 8,800 hectares (2009) cultivated in the Central Valley. As such, Chile produces the vast majority of Carménère wines available today and as the Chilean wine industry grows, more experimentation is being carried out on Carménère's potential as a blending grape, especially with Cabernet
    7.00
    2 votes
    148
    Cortese

    Cortese

    Cortese is a white Italian wine grape variety predominantly grown in the southeastern regions of Piedmont in the provinces of Alessandria and Asti. It is the primary grape of the Denominazione di origine controllata (DOC) wines of Cortese dell'Alto Monferrato and Colli Tortonesi as well as the Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita (DOCG) wine of Cortese di Gavi. Significant plantings of Cortese can also be found in the Lombardy region of Oltrepò Pavese and in the DOC white blends of the Veneto wine region of Bianco di Custoza. Cortese has a long history in Italian viticulture with written documentation naming the grape among the plantings in a Piedmontese vineyard as early as 1659. The grape's moderate acidity and light flavors has made it a favorite for the restaurants in nearby Genoa as a wine pairing with the local seafood caught off the Ligurian coast. One of the earliest documentation of the Cortese grape dates back to a 1659 report to the Marchesa Doria from the estate manager of the family's villa in Montaldeo that states that all the vineyards were planted with Cortese and Vermentino. In 1870, the ampelographers P.P. DeMaria and Carlo Leardi noted that the
    7.00
    2 votes
    149

    Kay Gray

    Kay Gray was developed by the Wisconsin grape breeder Elmer Swenson circa 1980 and is named after a family friend. It is a seedling of Swenson's own ES 217 (a cross of MN 78 and Golden Muscat). Swenson collected open-pollinated seeds from this vine, and one seedling eventually became Kay Gray. Because of this, the male parent is unknown, though Swenson suspected it might be a nearby vine of Onaka, an old South Dakota cultivar. Kay Gray itself is female and requires a pollen source in order to set fruit. In some environments it can produce an odd flavored wine that is vastly improved by modest levels of blending. Had it not been for its exceptional disease resistance and winter hardiness it probably would not have been selected. In subsequent years Swenson used this grape as a parent for the more conventionally flavored cultivars 'Louise Swenson' and 'Brianna'.
    7.00
    2 votes
    150
    Pais

    Pais

    Pais is a red wine grape that has played a prominent role in the Chilean wine industry. Up until the turn of the 21st century, it was Chile's most planted variety until it was overtaken by Cabernet Sauvignon. Today it is most commonly used in the creation of jug wine in the Bío-Bío, Maule and Itata River regions in the south. The grape is sometimes known as Negra Peruana. In Argentina the grape is known as Criolla Chica. The Pais has one of the longest viticultural history in Chile, believed to have been brought to the region by Spanish conquistadors from Peru during their colonization of the continent in the 16th century. Ampelographers believe that along with the Criolla Grande grape of Argentina and Mission grape of California, that the Pais grape is descended by the Spanish "common black grape" brought to Mexico in 1520 by the Spanish conquistador Hernán Cortés. That early grape was then cultivated by Spanish missionaries and spread throughout the Americas. The Pais remained Chile's primarily wine grape until the emergence of the Bordeaux wine varietal in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Pais produces a thin bodied, rustic red wine that typically has a light brown
    7.00
    2 votes
    151
    Riesling

    Riesling

    Riesling is a white grape variety which originated in the Rhine region of Germany. Riesling is an aromatic grape variety displaying flowery, almost perfumed, aromas as well as high acidity. It is used to make dry, semi-sweet, sweet and sparkling white wines. Riesling wines are usually varietally pure and are seldom oaked. As of 2004, Riesling was estimated to be the world's 20th most grown variety at 48,700 hectares (120,000 acres) (with an increasing trend), but in terms of importance for quality wines, it is usually included in the "top three" white wine varieties together with Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc. Riesling is a variety which is highly "terroir-expressive", meaning that the character of Riesling wines is clearly influenced by the wine's place of origin. In 2006, Riesling was the most grown variety in Germany with 20.8% and 21,197 hectares (52,380 acres), and in the French region of Alsace with 21.9% and 3,350 hectares (8,300 acres). There are also significant plantings of Riesling in Austria, Czech Republic, Luxembourg, northern Italy, Australia, New Zealand, Finger Lakes, USA, Canada, South Africa, China and Ukraine. In the countries where it is cultivated, Riesling
    7.00
    2 votes
    152

    Sercial

    Sercial is the name of a white grape grown in Portugal, especially on the island of Madeira. It has given name to the dryest of the four classic varieties of Madeira fortified wine. The grape is grown in diminishing quantities at the southern end of the island. After phylloxera devastated the Madeira's vineyards the grape became more common on the mainland, where it is known as Esgana or Esgana Cão. Its late ripening allows it to retain its characteristic acidity. The anglicised name Sercial came to be associated with the Madeira style rather than the grape variety, being the lightest, most acidic and delicate expression of Madeira that takes the longest to mature. EU rules for varietal names on wine labels now require Madeiras labelled Sercial to be made from minimum 85% Sercial.
    7.00
    2 votes
    153
    Boal

    Boal

    Boal (Eonavian: Bual) is a municipality, a civil parish and a town in the Autonomous Community of the Principality of Asturias (Spain). It borders north with El Franco and Coaña, south with Illano, west with Castropol and east with Villayón. The main way of access to the municipality is the regional road AS-12, which connects Navia with Grandas de Salime. The whole municipality has a population of 1,863 inhabitants, whereas there are about 555 inhabitants in the capital town. Etymologically, it is usually considered that "Boal" comes either from the Indo-european languages, *bod- (stream, ditch), or from the Latin, bove or *bovale (ox). Although some authors believe that "Boal" could be understood as the expression of an old anthroponym or person name, Bovali (iler) or Baudiliu (adducing the form Baudali), it is common to consider its original meaning either as "terreno frecuentado y apropiado para el pasto del ganado vacuno" ("land frequented and appropriate for the grazing of cattle") or as "corral de bueyes o dehesa boyal" ("corral for oxes or ox pasture". In fact, Corominas mentions in Aragonese boalage, boalar, "dehesa boyal" ("ox pasture") as derivatives of boal, which would
    6.00
    3 votes
    154
    Lambrusco

    Lambrusco

    Lambrusco is the name of both a red wine grape and an Italian wine made principally from the grape. The grapes and the wine originate from four zones in Emilia-Romagna and one in Lombardy, principally around the central provinces of Modena, Parma, Reggio nell'Emilia, and Mantua. The grape has a long winemaking history with archaeological evidence indicating that the Etruscans cultivated the vine. In Roman times, the Lambrusco was highly valued for its productivity and high yields with Cato the Elder stating that produce of two thirds of an acre could make enough wine to fill 300 amphoras. The most highly rated of its wines are the frothy, frizzante (slightly sparkling) red wines that are designed to be drunk young from one of the five Lambrusco denominazione di origine controllata (DOC) regions: Lambrusco Grasparossa di Castelvetro, Lambrusco di Sorbara, Lambrusco Salamino di Santa Croce, Lambrusco Reggiano, and Lambrusco Mantovano. Throughout the 1970s and 1980s, Lambrusco was the biggest selling import wine in the United States. During that time the wine was also produced in a white and rosé style made by limiting the skin contact with the must. The most commonly found six
    6.00
    3 votes
    155
    Rolle

    Rolle

    Rolle is a municipality in the Canton of Vaud in Switzerland. It was the seat of the district of Rolle until 2006, when it became part of the district of Nyon. It is located on the northwestern shore of Lake Geneva (Lac Léman) between Nyon and Lausanne. Rolle is approximately 30 kilometers (19 mi) northeast of Geneva (Genève) in the La Côte wine-growing region, and commands spectacular views of the high Alps. Rolle is also the birthplace of Frédéric-César de la Harpe (1754–1838), who was the tutor of Alexander I of Russia and was largely responsible for the independence of the Canton of Vaud from the Bernese. Rolle is first mentioned in 1294 as Rotuli. A late Bronze Age lake side settlement was discovered and partially destroyed in 1835 during construction of the artificial island of Ile de La Harpe. A second settlement from the same period was found in Fleur d'Eau. In 1984, in La Combe, a first to third century AD Gallo-Roman estate was discovered. The remains of the moat and the ramparts of Rolle Castle were uncovered in 1985. Fragments of a medieval city wall were found in the Champ de verse which may have come from the village of Saint-Nicolas de Ver. In 1261, the Lords of Mont
    6.00
    3 votes
    156

    Xynomavro

    Xinomavro (Greek: Ξινόμαυρο, English translation: "sour black") is the principal red wine grape of the uplands of Naousa in the regional unit of Imathia, and around Amyntaio, in Northern Greece. Various writers have compared Xinomavro to Bordeaux, Burgundy, and Barolo. This grape is primarily cultivated in Naousa, Goumenissa, Amyntaio, Rapsani, Trikomo, Siatista, Velventos, and, on a lesser scale, on Mount Athos, at Ossa, Ioannina, Magnesia, Kastoria and Trikala. The total cultivated area is about 18 km².
    6.00
    3 votes
    157
    Trebbiano

    Trebbiano

    • Wine styles: Vin santo
    Trebbiano is the second most widely planted grape in the world. It gives good yields, but makes undistinguished wine at best. It can be fresh and fruity, but does not keep long. Its high acidity makes it important in Cognac production. Also known as Ugni Blanc, in particular in France, it has many other names reflecting a family of local subtypes, particularly in Italy and France. Trebbiano may have originated in the Eastern Mediterranean, and was known in Italy in Roman times. A subtype was recognised in Bologna in the thirteenth century, and as Ugni Blanc it made its way to France, possibly during the Papal retreat to Avignon in the fourteenth century. An Italian study published in 2008 using DNA typing showed a close genetic relationship between Garganega on the one hand and Trebbiano and several other grape varieties on the other hand. It is therefore possible that Garganega is one of the parents of Trebbiano, however, since the parents of Garganega have not been identified, the exact nature of the relationship could not be conclusively established. Like many Italian grapes, Trebbiano came to Argentina with Italian immigrants. "White Hermitage" came to Australia with James
    5.00
    4 votes
    158
    Godello

    Godello

    Godello is a white variety of wine grape grown in northwestern Spain, in particular in Galicia. The Gouveio found in northern Portugal is thought to be the same grape variety. Godello can produce fine white wines, and yields the best results in Valdeorras, where plantations have increased after having previously been in decline. Total Spanish plantations of Godello stood at 880 hectares (2,200 acres) in 2004. Godello is also known under the following synonyms: Agodello, Agodenho, Agudanho, Agudelha, Agudelho, Agudello, Agudelo, Agudenho, Berdello, Godelho, Godella, Godenho, Ojo de Gallo and Trincadente.
    5.67
    3 votes
    159
    Ruby Cabernet

    Ruby Cabernet

    Ruby Cabernet is a red Olmo grape variety that is a cross between Cabernet Sauvignon and Carignan, it can produce wines with good colour and a pleasant cherry flavour, but is mostly blended into bulk wines. The purpose for the creation of the crossing of the grape varieties utilized to produce Ruby Cabernet was to obtain the superior quality of a Cabernet wine, and the resistance to heat of the Carignan combined in an inexpensive table wine. Even though the wine made from these grapes does not possess the distinctive flavor and the overall structure of other types of Cabernet wines, it does carry their fruitful essence. The grape for this type of red wine was developed for California's hot climate, specially for regions such as the San Joaquin and the Napa Valleys. Ruby Cabernet has improved the quality of the bulk wines produced in these areas thanks to its natural, special acidity. Ruby Cabernet is a cross between Cabernet Sauvignon and Carignan created in 1936 by Dr Harold Olmo at UC Davis in California. The intention was to combine Carignan's heat tolerance with Cabernet Sauvignon's quality, like the Cinsaut x Pinot Noir cross that led to Pinotage a few years previously. A
    5.67
    3 votes
    160

    Vitis x labruscana

    Vitis × labruscana is a subgroup of grapes originating from a hybridization of Vitis labrusca and other species, most commonly Vitis vinifera. Popular examples include Concord and Niagara grapes, which comprise nearly all grapes processed for juice or jelly in the United States. Such cultivars are frequently referred to as "labrusca", however many are as little as half Vitis labrusca in their pedigree. Another common term, arguably more accurate, is "labrusca-type". These varieties do in fact possess many of the traits of Vitis labrusca, frequently including slipskin fruit, strong "foxy" flavor/odor, and large leaves with lighter colored and pubescent undersides. Most are self-fertile, unlike wild Vitis labrusca. For much of the history of American viticulture, such varieties made up the bulk of production, particularly outside of California. In more recent years, however, the introduction of chemical pesticides and the development of rootstocks able to tolerate phylloxera have reduced their importance considerably in favor Vitis vinifera. Nonetheless, such cultivars, particularly Concord, remain a significant and vital part of the North American and Japanese grape industries.
    5.67
    3 votes
    161
    Zinfandel

    Zinfandel

    • Wine styles: White Zinfandel
    Zinfandel is a variety of red grape planted in over 10 percent of California vineyards. DNA fingerprinting revealed that it is genetically equivalent to the Croatian grape Crljenak Kaštelanski, and also the Primitivo variety traditionally grown in Puglia (the "heel" of Italy), where it was introduced in the 18th century. The grape found its way to the United States in the mid-19th century, and became known by variations of the name "Zinfandel", a name of uncertain origin. The grapes typically produce a robust red wine, although a semi-sweet rosé (blush-style) wine called White Zinfandel has six times the sales of the red wine in the United States. The grape's high sugar content can be fermented into levels of alcohol exceeding 15 percent. The taste of the red wine depends on the ripeness of the grapes from which it is made. Red berry fruit flavors like raspberry predominate in wines from cooler areas, whereas blackberry, anise and pepper notes are more common in wines made in warmer areas and in wines made from the earlier-ripening Primitivo clone. Archaeological evidence indicates that domestication of Vitis vinifera occurred in the Caucasus region around 6000 BC, and winemaking
    5.67
    3 votes
    162

    Bastardo grape

    Bastardo (Trousseau Noir, Trousseau) is an old variety of red wine grape. It is grown in small amounts in many parts of Western Europe; most famously it is used in Portuguese port wine. It makes deep cherry red wines with high alcohol and flavours of red berry fruits. Trousseau Gris is a white mutation, occasionally found in Jura and once common in California under the name 'Gray Riesling'. Genouillet is the result of a cross between Gouais Blanc (Heunisch) and Bastardo. In 1938 Harold Olmo used Trousseau to pollinate the rupestris hybrid Alicante Ganzin to produce the Royalty variety. Bastardo was crossed with the Georgian variety Saperavi to produce the Bastardo Magarachskii variety used in the Crimea. A little is grown in Argentina and in several regions of Spain, including the Canary Islands. A small amount is grown in Australia under the name Gros Cabernet. It is grown in small amounts in eastern and southern France, notably to stiffen blends with the pale Poulsard in the Jura. It's part of the blend for port wine and also an important variety for red wines in the Dão. As in Portugal, it is used to make fortified wines in California. Not much is grown, although some is
    6.50
    2 votes
    163
    Dimiat

    Dimiat

    Dimiat (Bulgarian: димят; also romanized as Dimyat or Dimjat) is a white Bulgarian wine grape. It is one of Bulgaria's most widely planted white grape varieties, second only to Rkatsiteli. Wines made from this variety are noted for their perfume aromas. While some ampelographers believe that the variety is indigenous to Bulgaria, legends have developed around Dimiat being named after a town in the Nile Delta and was brought back to Europe by Crusaders in the Middle Ages. The exact origins of the Dimiat grape are unknown, with some ampelographers believing the vine to be native to the Bulgaria area. Recent DNA typing has shown it to be a crossing of Gouais Blanc (Weißer Heunisch) with another, unidentified grape variety. Gouais is a parent of several older European grape varieties. One alternative hypothesis, which is highly improbable given the Gouais parentage, is the legendary tale that the grape was native to the Nile Delta valley (where today there is an Egyptian town with a similar name, Damietta) and was brought back to Thrace by Christian Crusaders. It is likely that the grape crossed with Riesling to produce the pink-skinned Misket Varnenski grape variety. The Dimiat grape
    6.50
    2 votes
    164
    Marselan

    Marselan

    Marselan is a French wine grape that is a cross between Cabernet Sauvignon and Grenache. It was first bred in 1961 near the French town of Marseillan. The vine is grown mostly in the Languedoc region with some plantings on Northern Coast of California. The grape produces a medium body red wine.
    6.50
    2 votes
    165
    Merlot

    Merlot

    Merlot is a darkly blue-coloured wine grape, that is used as both a blending grape and for varietal wines. The name Merlot is thought to derive from the Old French word for young blackbird, merlot, a diminutive of merle, the blackbird (Turdus merula), probably from the color of the grape. Merlot-based wines usually have medium body with hints of berry, plum, and currant. Its softness and "fleshiness", combined with its earlier ripening, makes Merlot a popular grape for blending with the sterner, later-ripening Cabernet Sauvignon, which tends to be higher in tannin. Along with Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Malbec and Petit Verdot, Merlot is one of the primary grapes in Bordeaux wine where it is the most widely planted grape. Merlot is also one of the most popular red wine varietals in many markets. This flexibility has helped to make it one of the world's most planted grape varieties. As of 2004, Merlot was estimated to be the third most grown variety at 260,000 hectares (640,000 acres) globally, with an increasing trend. This puts Merlot just behind Cabernet Sauvignon's 262,000 hectares (650,000 acres). Researchers at University of California, Davis believe that Merlot is an
    6.50
    2 votes
    166

    Nero d'Avola

    Nero d'Avola ("Black of Avola" in Italian) is "the most important red wine grape in Sicily" and is one of Italy's most important indigenous varieties. It is named after Avola in the far south of Sicily and its wines are compared to New World Shirazes, with sweet tannins and plum or peppery flavours. It also contributes to Marsala blends. "The Black Grape of Avola" appears to have been selected by growers near Avola (a small town in south east Sicily) several hundred years ago. Initially, it was confined to the southern tip of the island but more recently has spread throughout the island. The vine likes hot arid climates. The districts around Noto (above all Buonivini, Bufalefi and Maccari) and Pachino in the south of the province of Siracusa are reputed for the quality of their Nero d'Avola grapes. The first American producer of Nero d'Avola is Chiarito Vineyards in Ukiah, California (Mendocino County.)
    6.50
    2 votes
    167
    Tinta Cao

    Tinta Cao

    Tinta Cão is a red Portuguese wine grape variety that has been grown primarily in the Douro region since the sixteenth century. The vine produces very low yields which has led it close to extinction despite the high quality of wine that it can produce. Improvements in bilateral cordon training and experiments at University of California, Davis have helped to sustain the variety. The vine favors cooler climates and can add finesse and complexity to a wine blend.
    6.50
    2 votes
    168
    Trollinger

    Trollinger

    Trollinger (or Schiava and Vernatsch) is a red, German/Italian wine grape variety that was likely first originally cultivated in the wine regions of South Tyrol and Trentino but today is almost exclusively cultivated on steep, sunny locations in the Württemberg wine region of Baden-Württemberg. It primarily known under the synonyms Trollinger in Germany, Vernatsch in South Tyrol and Schiava in other Italian regions. As a table grape the variety is sometimes known as Black Hamburg, which is commonly confused with the similar synonym for Black Muscat--a variety that is actually a cross of Trollinger and Muscat of Alexandria. According to wine expert Oz Clarke, Trollinger has moderate acidity and tends to produce light bodied wines with fruity strawberry and subtle smokey notes. While the grape is likely northern Italian in origins, the synonym Schiava is closely related to the Italian word for "Slave" and may hint at Slavic origins for the grape variety. Records show that the grape has been growing in the Trentino-Alto Adige region since at least the 13th century. The German synonym Trollinger appears to a be corruption of the word Tirolinger meaning "of Tyrol". The synonym Vernatsch
    6.50
    2 votes
    169
    Assyrtiko

    Assyrtiko

    Assyrtiko or Asyrtiko is a white Greek wine grape indigenous to the island of Santorini. Assyrtiko is widely planted in the arid volcanic-ash-rich soil of Santorini and other Aegean islands, such as Paros. It is also found on other scattered regions of Greece such as Chalkidiki. On Santorini, many old vine plantations (over 70 years of age) of Assyrtiko exists, of which many are non-grafted. These plantations have shown resistance to Phylloxera. The mineral profile of the grapes bodes well for blending and in recent times its has been blended often with Sauvignon blanc, Sémillon and Malagousia. Assyrtiko grapes clusters are large, with transparent yellow-gold skin and juicy flesh. In the volcanic soil of Santorini, there appear to be some unique characteristics that develop in the grape variety, and therefore in the wine. One of these characteristics is that Assyrtiko does not lose its acidity even if it is very ripe. Throughout Greece, the grape is vinified to make a variety of dry and sweet wines, including Vinsanto-like musky and syrup-sweet dessert wines. In Retsina, it is often blended with the less-acidic Savatiano grape. Assyrtiko is also known under the synonyms Arcytico,
    7.00
    1 votes
    170
    Bourboulenc

    Bourboulenc

    Bourboulenc is a white wine grape variety primarily grown in southern France. The variety is found in the regions Southern Rhône, Provence and Languedoc. Bourboulenc is a late-ripening grape variety with tight bunches of large grapes, that can be prone to rot in some years. Well-made Bourboulenc wine can have good acidity level, body, penetrating character, citrus aromas and a hint of smoke, but if the grapes are picked too soon the wines have a thin, neutral taste. There were about 800 hectares (2,000 acres) of Bourboulenc in France around the year 2000. Varietal Bourboulenc is rare, but is allowed into a number of white wine appellations of southern France. Only in white La Clape, a geographical designation that may be used in conjunction with the Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée (AOC) Coteaux du Languedoc, is Bourboulec the dominant grape variety. White La Clape must contain a minimum of 40% Bourboulenc. French AOCs that may include the variety are: Bourboulenc has been grown in southern France for centuries, and it has been proposed that it could be of Greek origin. The French vineyard area grown with Bourboulenc dropped by about half in the 1970s and doubled again in the 1980s,
    7.00
    1 votes
    171

    Chambourcin

    Chambourcin is a French-American interspecific hybrid grape variety used for making wine. Its parentage is uncertain. The hybrid was produced by Joannes Seyve who often used Seibel hybrids produced in the 1860s. The grape has only been available since 1963. Chambourcin has a good resistance to fungal disease. Chambourcin is one of the parents of the new disease resistant variety, Regent, which is increasing in popularity among German and Okanagan Valley grape growers. The grape produces a deep-colored wine with a full aromatic flavor, and no unpleasant hybrid flavors. It can be made into a dry style or one with a moderate residual sugar level, giving it a pleasant but not overbearing sweetness. Chambourcin wines are often served with dark chocolate (or desserts made from the chocolate), as the flavors of the wine and chocolate intermingle exceptionally well. Chambourcin has been planted widely in the mid-Atlantic region of North America, particularly in such states as New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and North Carolina. It is also grown in Harrow and Ruthven, Ontario, and in Kelowna, B.C., Canada; Floyd, Wythe, Rockbridge, and Fauquier counties, Virginia; Harford County,
    7.00
    1 votes
    172
    Irsai Oliver

    Irsai Oliver

    Irsai Olivér is a Hungarian white table/wine variety, crossed between Pozsonyi and Pearl of Csaba in 1930. It is early ripening, with a distinctive Muscat character. Irsai Olivér is also known under the synonyms Aranyló, Aranyló Korai, Carola, Irchai Oliver, Irsai, Irsai Olivér Muskotály, Irshai Oliver, Karola, Korai Aranyló, Muscat Oliver, Muskat Irsai Oliver, Muskat Oliver, Olivér Irsai, Oliver Irsay, Zoeloetistii Rannii, Zolotisti Ranij, Zolotistyi Rannii, Zolotistyi Ranniy, Zolotistyj Rannij, and Zolotisztuej Rannij.
    7.00
    1 votes
    173
    Limnio

    Limnio

    Limnio (LIM-nee-oh) is a red Greek wine grape variety that is indigenous to the Greek island of Lemnos. The grape has had a long history of wine production that may extend back to Ancient Greece with wine historians widely believing it was the grape variety, Lemnia, that was described by Aristotle as producing the famous red Lemnian wine. According to wine expert Oz Clarke, Limnio is "One of Greece's most important red vines." According to wine expert Jancis Robinson, Limnio was almost certainly the Lemnia grape described by Aristotle as a specialty of the island of Limnos-an assessment shared by other wine experts and historians. A Limnia grape was also referenced in Ancient Greek writings by Hesiod and Polydeuctes. Today Limnio is still being produced on Lemnos, though it is not utilized in the appellation wine produced on the island. (Technically the only appellation wine produced on Lemnos is from Muscat of Alexandria According to information by the Union of Agricultural Cooperatives of Lemnos (E.A.S.) the total production of Muscat of Alexandria (white wine), delivered by the producers to the Union, was 2,449 tones of grapes, while Limnio (Kalambaki) was 86 tones.) with
    7.00
    1 votes
    174
    Mavro

    Mavro

    Mavro (Greek: μαύρο, meaning "black") is an indigenous red grape cultivated on the island of Cyprus. The grape takes its name from its dark colour. The Italian ampelographer, Count Giuseppe di Rovasenda refers to it in 1877 as Cipro Nero (Cyprus black) . An ancient variety, its suitability to the hot Cypriot climate has made it the dominant cultivated vine on the island. It accounts for 70% of cultivated vines . Of note is that Mavro continues to grow on ancient rootstock unlike most mainland European grapes that are grafted on North American rootstock. This is a consequence of Cyprus’ escape from the phylloxera epidemic that had devastated most other European vineyards, in the 19th century. Mavrud is a Bulgarian wine with a similar name made from mavrud grapes. Recent genotyping has shown that these two varieties (Mavro and Mavrud) are not related . Mavro grapes are used in the production of several (predominantly red) local wines. Most notably however, Mavro is blended with the Xynisteri grape for the production of Commandaria, a well-known Cypriot dessert wine. It is also used in the production of the spirit zivania . Harvesting usually takes place in September.
    7.00
    1 votes
    175
    Petit Verdot

    Petit Verdot

    Petit Verdot is a variety of red wine grape, principally used in classic Bordeaux blends. It ripens much later than the other varieties in Bordeaux, often too late, so it fell out of favour in its home region. When it does ripen, it is added in small amounts to add tannin, colour and flavour to the blend. It has attracted attention among winemakers in the New World, where it ripens more reliably and has been made into single varietal wine. It is also useful in 'stiffening' the mid palate of Cabernet Sauvignon blends. When young its aromas have been likened to banana and pencil shavings. Strong tones of violet and leather develop as it matures. Petit Verdot probably predates Cabernet Sauvignon in Bordeaux, but its origins are unclear. There are records of it in the eighteenth century, but its characteristics suggest an origin in much hotter climes than the Gironde. It is one parent of Tressot, the other parent being Duras, a grape from the upper Tarn valley near Toulouse. It's possible that both were brought to the region by the Romans as they moved inland from the Mediterranean. There are some blocks of Petit Verdot in Argentina, although for many years it was labelled as
    7.00
    1 votes
    176
    Prosecco

    Prosecco

    Prosecco is an Italian white wine — generally a Dry or Extra Dry sparkling wine — normally made from Glera ("Prosecco") grapes. DOC prosecco is produced in the regions of Veneto and Friuli Venezia Giulia in Italy, and traditionally mainly in the areas near Conegliano and Valdobbiadene, in the hills north of Treviso. Prosecco is known as the main ingredient of the Bellini cocktail and has more recently become popular as a less expensive substitute for Champagne. Up until the 1960s, Prosecco sparkling wine was generally rather sweet and barely distinguishable from the Asti wine produced in Piedmont. Since then, production techniques have improved, leading to the high-quality dry wines produced today. According to a 2008 New York Times report, Prosecco has sharply risen in popularity in markets outside Italy, with global sales growing by double-digit percentages since 1998, aided also by its comparatively low price. It was introduced into the mainstream US market in 2000 by Mionetto, now the largest importer of Prosecco, who also reported an "incredible growth trend" in 2008. Until the 2008 vintage Prosecco was protected as a DOC within Italy, as Prosecco di Conegliano-Valdobbiadene,
    7.00
    1 votes
    177
    Rondo grape

    Rondo grape

    Rondo is a dark-skinned grape variety, used for making red wine. It is a hybrid grape or inter-specific crossing. It was created in 1964 by Professor V. Kraus in then-Czechoslovakia by crossing the varieties Zarya Severa (a hybrid which has Vitis amurensis in its pedigree) and St. Laurent. He offered it to Dr. Helmut Becker (1927-1990) of the Geisenheim Grape Breeding Institute who conducted further work on it, which explains why the grape is known under a Geisenheim designation. The variety has been protected since 1997. This very early maturing variety possesses high resistance against winter frost and downy mildew from its Asiatic Vitis amurensis parent. However annual treatments against powdery mildew may still be necessary in the vineyards. Rondo produces a ruby-red wine which is also used for blending. Rondo is cultivated in many locations in northern Europe where dark-skinned Vitis vinifera varieties are difficult to ripen properly, as it tends to yield good colour and aroma even in those locations. Rondo is cultivated in Rheinhessen and in many locations in northern Europe including Denmark, England, Ireland, the Netherlands and Sweden. In 2011 the British winery Denbies
    7.00
    1 votes
    178
    Sangiovese

    Sangiovese

    • Wine styles: Brunello di Montalcino
    Sangiovese (san-jo-veh-zeh [sandʒoˈveːze]) is a red Italian wine grape variety whose name derives from the Latin sanguis Jovis, "the blood of Jove". The most accredited theory about the origin of Sangiovese is in Romagna in the Town of Santarcangelo where the Roman was used to store the wine in Grotte Tufacee (caves) inside the Mons Jovis. Though it is the grape of most of central Italy from Romagna down to Lazio, Campania and Sicily, outside Italy it is most famous as the main component of the blend Chianti, Carmignano, Vino Nobile di Montepulciano and Morellino di Scansano, although it can also be used to make varietal wines such as Brunello di Montalcino, Rosso di Montalcino or Sangiovese di Romagna, as well as modern "Super Tuscan" wines like Tignanello. Young Sangiovese has fresh fruity flavours of strawberry and a little spiciness, but it readily takes on oaky, even tarry, flavors when aged in barrels. Sangiovese was already well known by the 16th century. Recent DNA profiling by José Vouillamoz of the Istituto Agrario di San Michele all’Adige suggests that Sangiovese's ancestors are Ciliegiolo and Calabrese Montenuovo. The former is well known as an ancient variety in
    7.00
    1 votes
    179

    Vitis x doaniana

    Vitis × doaniana (Doan's Grape) is a hybrid grape resulting from the natural hybridization of Vitis mustangensis with Vitis acerifolia. Its native range is Oklahoma, Colorado, Texas, and New Mexico.
    5.33
    3 votes
    180
    Carignane

    Carignane

    Carignan is a red wine grape that may have originated in Cariñena, Aragon and was later transplanted to Sardinia, elsewhere in Italy, France, Algeria, and much of the New World. Along with Aramon, it was once considered one of the main grapes responsible for France's wine lake. In California, the grape is rarely used to make varietal wines, but some examples from old vines do exist. In Australia, Carignan is used as a component of blended wines. In the Languedoc, the grape is often blended with Cinsaut, Grenache, Syrah, Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Mourvèdre and Merlot. It has an upright growth habit and can be grown without a trellis. It was crossed to Cabernet Sauvignon to give Ruby Cabernet. Carignan is believed to have originated in Spain in the Aragon region and was historically a component of neighboring Rioja's red wine blend. From Spain it gained prominence in Algeria and fed that country's export production to France. Upon Algeria's independence in 1962, the French supply of Carignan wine was cut off and growers in Southern France began to plant the vine for their own production. The grape's prominence in France hit a high point in 1988 when it accounted for 167,000
    6.00
    2 votes
    181

    Chardonel

    Chardonel is a late ripening white wine hybrid grape which can produce a high quality wine with varietal character. It is a result of a cross made by the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station of the popular French American hybrid Seyval and the classic vitis vinifera Chardonnay. It is distinguished by its superior wine quality combined with high productivity and cold hardiness superior to its acclaimed parent Chardonnay. The vine is vigorous and productive, producing green grapes with large clusters.
    6.00
    2 votes
    182
    Chardonnay

    Chardonnay

    • Wine styles: White Burgundy
    Chardonnay (pronounced: [ʃaʁ.dɔ.nɛ]) is a green-skinned grape variety used to make white wine. It originated in the Burgundy wine region of eastern France but is now grown wherever wine is produced, from England to New Zealand. For new and developing wine regions, growing Chardonnay is seen as a "rite of passage" and an easy entry into the international wine market. The Chardonnay grape itself is very neutral, with many of the flavors commonly associated with the grape being derived from such influences as terroir and oak. It is vinified in many different styles, from the lean, crisply mineral wines of Chablis, France to New World wines with oak, and tropical fruit flavors. Chardonnay is an important component of many sparkling wines around the world, including Champagne. A peak in popularity in the late 1980s gave way to a backlash among those wine drinkers who saw the grape as a leading negative component of the globalization of wine. Nonetheless, it remains one of the most widely-planted grape varieties, with over 160,000 hectares (400,000 acres) worldwide, second only to Airén among white wine grapes and planted in more wine regions than any other grape – including Cabernet
    6.00
    2 votes
    183

    Edelweiss

    Edelweiss is a very winter-hardy wine grape variety derived from crossing the Minnesota 78 and Ontario grapes. It was developed by Elmer Swenson in 1980 in cooperation with the University of Minnesota. The clusters are large and rather loose, weighing a pound or more. Early picking of the grape is essential for making a wine. Should Edelweiss not be harvested early, the completely ripe Vitis labrusca flavoring becomes too strong for the palate of most. Edelweiss was first developed as a table grape. This variety bears the Minnesota winters, but mulching is encouraged. During this process be wary when tying the shoots together because they break easily. Edelweiss has strong resistance to grape disease and fungus and can tolerate negative thirty-five degree temperatures.
    6.00
    2 votes
    184
    Muscadine

    Muscadine

    Muscadines (Vitis rotundifolia) are a grapevine species native to the present-day southeastern United States that has been extensively cultivated since the 16th century. Its natural range is recognized in the following states of the US: Alabama, Arkansas, the Carolinas, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Missouri, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia. They are well adapted to their native warm and humid climate; they need fewer chilling hours than better known varieties and they thrive on summer heat. Muscadine berries range from bronze to dark purple to black in color when ripe. However, many wild varieties stay green through maturity. They have skin sufficiently tough that eating the raw fruit often involves biting a small hole in the skin to suck out the pulp inside. Muscadines are not only eaten fresh, but also are used in making wine, juice, and jelly. Muscadine grapes are rich sources of polyphenols and other nutrients studied for their potential health benefits. Gallic acid, (+)-catechin and epicatechin are the major phenolics in seeds, while ellagic acid, myricetin, quercetin, kaempferol, and trans-resveratrol are the
    6.00
    2 votes
    185
    Torrontés

    Torrontés

    Torrontés is a white Argentine wine grape variety, producing fresh, aromatic wines with moderate acidity, smooth texture and mouthfeel as well as distinctive peach and apricot aromas on the nose. Three Torrontés varieties exist in Argentina: Torrontés Riojano, the most common, Torrontés Sanjuanino, and Torrontés Mendocino. It is primarily Torrontés Riojano that has received attention for the quality of its wines, and is the variety used for most Argentine wines simply labeled Torrontés. The three grapes are relatively similar but do have some noticeable differences. Torrontés Riojano and Torrontés Sanjuanino both tend to have large loose bunches of pale grapes while Torrontés Mendocino, however, has smaller, tighter bunches of darker yellow grapes. Torrontés Riojano is the most aromatic of the three, with aromas reminiscent of Muscat and Gewurtztraminer wines. The least aromatic, and least widely planted, is Torrontés Mendocino with the aromatics and plantings of Torrontés Sanjuanino falling in between. All three Argentine Torrontés varieties belong to the Criollas group of grape varieties, which is a term used for presumably American-born cultivars the European grapevine Vitis
    6.00
    2 votes
    186
    Vitis berlandieri

    Vitis berlandieri

    Vitis berlandieri is a species of grape native to the southern North America, primarily Texas, New Mexico and Arkansas. It is primarily known for good tolerance against soils with a high content of lime, which can cause chlorosis in many vines of American origin. Lime is a characteristic of the soils of many classical French wine regions and highly regarded vineyard sites, and many Vitis vinifera cultivars were well suited to these growing conditions. When American vines were imported to Europe as rootstocks for grafting V. vinifera on, in the wake of the Great French wine blight, it initially proved difficult to find vine species that would grow well in lime-rich soil. V. berlandieri, which had adapted to limestone hills in central Texas, provided the lime tolerance needed to solve this problem. However, V. berlandieri itself is poorly adapted to grafting. Therefore, various rootstocks resistant against both phylloxera and lime, and suitable for viticulture, were produced by crossing V. berlandieri and Vitis riparia, Vitis rupestris or V. vinifera. V. berlandieri is also known as Fall Grape. In some classifications it is considered to be a subspecies of Vitis cinerea.
    6.00
    2 votes
    187

    Rubired

    Rubired is a variety of red grape used to make red wine in several Australia vineyards. It is also a major source of red food coloring in California. Rubired is a teinturier variety, meaning that it has pigmented juice. Most red wine grapes have clear juice; the red color of wines comes from extraction of pigment from the wine skins, not the grape juice itself. Tenturiers have pigment in both the skin and the juice making them useful for blending color into otherwise light-colored wines. Rubired can often be identified from the road in the fall because its leaves will turn to bright red instead of yellow / brown. The variety was created by Dr. Harold Olmo, a viticulturist, at University of California at Davis in California as a cross of the grapes Tinto Cão and Alicante Ganzin. Originally intended to create port, its intensely dark colour means that it is often used as a colouring in other red wines, but it is also used to make a red wine in its own right. In California, most of this variety is used to create grape concentrate for non-wine food purposes as it serves both as a natural food color and sweetener.
    5.00
    3 votes
    188
    St. Laurent

    St. Laurent

    St. Laurent (sometimes written in French as Saint Laurent or in German as Sankt Laurent) is a highly aromatic dark-skinned wine grape variety of the same family as Pinot Noir, originating in France. St. Laurent is the most widely planted red grape variety in the Czech Republic, growing in all wine subregions in both Moravia and Bohemia. It comprises approximately 9% of total vineyards, or 1,730 hectares (4,300 acres). In Austria, it is primarily found in the regions Niederösterreich and Burgenland. In 2008, Austrian plantations stood at 794 hectares (1,960 acres), and have expanded in the 2000s as a part of general red wine trend in Austria, after having declined somewhat during the 1990s. A small quantity of St. Laurent is also grown in New Zealand after an import in 2002 into Alexandra, Central Otago. The St. Laurent varietal is also finding a small foothold in Canada. Currently four wineries in Prince Edward County, Ontario and one in the Okanagan Valley, British Columbia are cultivating and producing wine from this grape. St. Laurent is known under the following synonyms: Blauer Saint Laurent, Chvartser, Laourentstraoube, Laurenzitraube, Laurenztraube, Lorentstraube,
    5.00
    3 votes
    189
    Tibouren

    Tibouren

    Tibouren is a red French wine grape variety that is primarily grown in Provence but originated in Greece and possibly even the Middle East. Intensely aromatic, with an earthy bouquet that wine expert Jancis Robinson describes as garrigue, Tibouren is often used in the production of rosés. While the unique aroma and character of the wines produced by Tibouren are valued by producers, it is not a widely planted variety. This is due, in part, to the viticultural issues of the grape's sensitivity to coulure and tendency to produce highly irregular yields from vintage to vintage. While Tibouren today is almost exclusively associated with the Provence wine region, French ampelographer Pierre Galet suspects that the grape probably has Greek origins or possibly Middle Eastern. Galet's theory derives from the uniquely shaped leaves of the Tibouren vine, which include deeply incised lobes that are usually seen in Vitis families of the Middle East. He speculates that over the evolution of the grape its ancestor vines were brought to Greece and from there it was probably introduced to France by the Ancient Greeks at their settlement in Marseilles. One competing theory is that the variety was a
    5.00
    3 votes
    190

    Cayuga White

    Cayuga White is a wine grape was developed from crosses of the hybrids Schuyler and Seyval Blanc done at Cornell University's New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, New York. It is a hardy vine with some bunch-rot disease resistance. It should be picked at low sugars to avoid over-ripe, sometimes labrusca-like, flavors. Picked at the proper time it can produce a very nice sparkling wine with good acid balance, structure, and pleasant aromas or a fruity white wine similar to a Riesling.
    5.50
    2 votes
    191
    Pinot Gris

    Pinot Gris

    Pinot gris (also known as pinot grigio) is a white wine grape variety of the species Vitis vinifera. Thought to be a mutant clone of the Pinot noir grape, it normally has a grayish-blue fruit, accounting for its name (gris meaning "grey" in French) but the grape can have a brownish pink to black and even white appearance. The word pinot, which comes from the word meaning "pine cone" in French, could have been given to it because the grapes grow in small pine cone-shaped clusters. The wines produced from this grape also vary in colour from a deep golden yellow to copper and even a light shade of pink, and it is one of the more popular grapes for orange wine. The clone of Pinot gris grown in Italy is known as Pinot grigio. Pinot gris has been known from the Middle Ages in the Burgundy region, where it was probably called Fromenteau. It spread from Burgundy, along with Pinot noir, arriving in Switzerland by 1300. The grape was reportedly a favorite of the Emperor Charles IV, who had cuttings imported to Hungary by Cistercian monks: the brothers planted the vines on the slopes of Badacsony bordering Lake Balaton in 1375. The vine soon after developed the name Szürkebarát meaning "grey
    5.50
    2 votes
    192
    Solaris

    Solaris

    Solaris is a variety of grape used for white wine. It was created in 1975 at the grape breeding institute in Freiburg, Germany by Norbert Becker. Becker created Solaris by crossing the variety Merzling (which is Seyve-villard 5276 x (Riesling x Pinot Gris)) as mother vine with Gm 6493 (which is Zarya Severa x Muscat Ottonel) as the father vine. Gm 6493 was one of several crossings created in Czechoslovakia in 1964 by Professor V. Kraus. Kraus offered several of his crosses to Dr. Helmut Becker at the Geisenheim grape breeding institute, where additional work was carried out, and where his plants were given "Gm" serial numbers for Geisenheim. Gm 6493 has previously been erroneously stated to be Saperawi Severni x Muscat Ottonel but is now identified as Zarya Severa x Muscat Ottonel. Solaris is thus a hybrid grape rather than a pure Vitis vinifera, since it contains several hybrid grapes in its pedigree. However, it is formally listed as a Vitis vinifera cultivar. It received varietal protection in 2001. Solaris was the product of a programme for breeding disease-resistant grape varieties, and has good resistance against fungal attacks. As it is a hardy variety, it is commonly grown
    5.50
    2 votes
    193
    Verdicchio

    Verdicchio

    Verdicchio is a white Italian wine grape variety grown primarily in the Marche region of central Italy. The name Verdicchio derives from verde (or "green") and refers to the slight green/yellow hue that wines made from the grape can have. Verdicchio is the principal grape behind two Denominazione di Origine Controllata (DOC) wines produced in the provinces of Ancona and Macerata, Verdicchio dei Castelli di Jesi and Verdicchio di Matelica. In addition to producing still wines, Verdicchio grapes are also used to make sparkling wine and straw wine. Verdicchio has had a long history in the Marche region of central Italy with documents noting its presence there since at least the 14th century. Despite its sensitivity to climate conditions and propensity to produce variable yields of variable quality wine, Verdicchio was a very popular planting in central Italy with an estimated 65,000 hectares planted in the mid-1980s. These figures made Verdicchio the 15th most planted variety of any grape in the world, ahead of well known varieties like Chardonnay, Pinot noir, Sauvignon blanc and Sangiovese. While ampelographers believe that Verdicchio is probably indigenous to the Marche, there
    5.50
    2 votes
    194
    Pinot Blanc

    Pinot Blanc

    Pinot blanc is a white wine grape. It is a point genetic mutation of Pinot noir. Pinot noir is genetically unstable and will occasionally experience a point mutation in which a vine bears all black fruit except for one cane which produced white fruit. In Alsace, Germany, Luxembourg, Italy, Hungary, Czech Republic and Slovakia, the wine produced from this grape is a full-bodied white. In 2000, there were 1,300 hectares (3,200 acres) of Pinot blanc in France, with most of the plantations found in Alsace, where it is used for both still white wines and is the most common variety used for sparkling wine, Crémant d'Alsace. Somewhat confusingly, the designation "Pinot blanc" for Alsace AOC wine does not necessarily mean that the wine is varietally pure Pinot blanc. (This is in difference to Pinot gris, which is a "true" varietal designation in Alsace.) Rather, the designation means that it is a white wine made from Pinot varieties. Under Alsace appellation rules, the varieties Pinot blanc, Auxerrois blanc, Pinot gris and Pinot noir (vinified white, without skin contact) may all be used, but a blend of Pinot blanc and Auxerrois is the most common. The most full-bodied "Pinot blanc" wines
    4.67
    3 votes
    195

    Baco 22A

    Baco Blanc or Baco 22A is a French-American hybrid grape variety. It is a cross of Folle Blanche and the Noah grape, created in the 1898 by the grape breeder François Baco. Folle Blanche is its Vitis vinifera parent. Noah, its other parent, is itself a cross of Vitis labrusca and Vitis riparia. Baco Blanc was developed to produce some of the same flavors as Folle Blanche but without the susceptibility to American grape disease and phylloxera. In the 20th century it was widely planted in the Gascony region for uses in brandy production. Both Armagnac and Cognac (from the Charentes and Charente-Maritime districts north of Gascony) are brandies made from white grapes - Ugni Blanc, Folle Blanche and Colombard - but only Armagnac was permitted under French regulations to use Baco Blanc and until the late 1970s, Baco Blanc was the primary grape of Armagnac. Following the grape's decline in the late 20th century, there was some speculation about the future of the variety, especially after a 1992 Institut National des Appellations d'Origine (INAO) decree that all vines of Baco Blanc were to be uprooted by 2010. However, advocates for the grape variety and its historical role in Armagnac
    6.00
    1 votes
    196
    Chasselas

    Chasselas

    Chasselas or Chasselas Blanc is a wine grape variety grown in Switzerland, France, Germany, Portugal, Hungary, Romania and New Zealand. Chasselas is mostly vinified to be a full, dry and fruity white wine. It is also suitable as a table grape, grown widely for this purpose in Turkey. Theories of its origin vary. Pierre Galet believes it is a native Swiss variety. In 1940, Chasselas was crossed with Silvaner to produce the white grape variety Nobling. Widely grown in the cantons of Switzerland where it has several regional synonym names, the main one being Fendant in the Valais canton. It is considered an ideal pairing for raclette or fondue. Chasselas is also known as Perlan in the Mandement district. In 2009, it was Switzerland's second most grown grape variety at 4,013 hectares (9,920 acres). In Germany with 1,123 hectares (2,770 acres), it is almost exclusively grown in the wine region of Baden under the name Gutedel. In France it is mostly grown in the Loire region where it is converted into a blend with Sauvignon Blanc called "Pouilly-sur-Loire" and in the Savoie region where it is treated in the Swiss manner. In New Zealand it is mainly made into popular sweet white wines.
    6.00
    1 votes
    197
    Furmint

    Furmint

    Furmint is a variety of wine grape from the Pontian Balcanica branch of Vitis vinifera, used for white wines. The name Furmint is taken from the word "froment" for the wheat-gold color of the wine it produces. While it is possible that the grape is native to Hungary, the grape was likely brought to Hungary in the 13th century during the reign of King Béla IV. It is a late variety, usually ripening in the second half of October, and is often inflicted with Botrytis. Today, Furmint is most widely grown in Hungary, particularly in the Tokaj-Hegyalja wine region where it is used to produce single-varietal dry wines as well as being the principal grape in the better known Tokaji dessert wines. It is also grown in the tiny Hungarian wine region of Somló. Furmint plays a similar role in the Slovakian wine region of Tokaj. It is also grown in Austria where it is known as Mosler. Smaller plantings are found in Slovenia where it is known as šipon. The grape is also planted in Croatia, Romania and the former republics of the Soviet Union. While the exact origins of Furmint are not clear, it is generally well established that the grape was introduced to the Austro-Hungarian area in the
    6.00
    1 votes
    198
    Grenache

    Grenache

    • Wine styles: Vin doux naturel
    Grenache (pronounced gren-aash) (Spanish: Garnacha, IPA: [ɡarˈnatʃa]; Catalan: Garnatxa, IPA: [ɡərˈnatʃə] or [ɡaɾˈnatʃa]) is one of the most widely planted red wine grape varieties in the world. It ripens late, so it needs hot, dry conditions such as those found in Spain, the south of France, and California's San Joaquin Valley. It is generally spicy, berry-flavored and soft on the palate with a relatively high alcohol content, but it needs careful control of yields for best results. It tends to lack acid, tannin and color, and is usually blended with other varieties such as Syrah, Carignan, Tempranillo and Cinsaut. Grenache is the dominant variety in most Southern Rhône wines, especially in Châteauneuf-du-Pape where it is typically over 80% of the blend. In Australia it is typically blended in "GSM" blends with Syrah and Mourvèdre. Grenache is also used to make rosé wines in France and Spain, notably those of the Tavel district in the Côtes du Rhône. And the high sugar levels of Grenache have led to extensive use in fortified wines, including the red vins doux naturels of Roussillon such as Banyuls, and as the basis of most Australian fortified wine. Grenache or Garnacha (as it is
    6.00
    1 votes
    199
    Grüner Veltliner

    Grüner Veltliner

    Grüner Veltliner (German pronunciation: [ˈɡʀyːnɐ vɛltˈliːnɐ]), ˈɡʀyːnɐ fɛltˈliːnɐ, or ˈɡʀyːnɐ ʋɛltˈliːnɐ) is a variety of white wine grape variety grown primarily in Austria, Slovakia, and the Czech Republic. It has a reputation of being a particularly food-friendly wine. It is made into wines of many different styles - much is intended for drinking young in the Heuriger (bars serving new wine) of Vienna, a little is made into sparkling wine, but some is capable of long aging. The steep, Rhine-like vineyards of the Danube west of Vienna produce very pure, minerally Grüner Veltliners intended for laying down. Down in the plains, citrus and peach flavours are more apparent, with spicy notes of pepper and sometimes tobacco. It is sometimes said that Grüner Veltliner dates back to Roman times and that its name is derived from Veltlin (Valtellina) in northern Italy. However, the current name appeared in a document for the first time in 1855 - before that time it was known as Weißgipfler. Only by the 1930s was Grüner Veltliner established as the standard name of the grape. Until the Second World War it was regarded as just another Austrian grape, it took Lenz Moser's Hochkultur system of
    6.00
    1 votes
    200
    Huxelrebe

    Huxelrebe

    Huxelrebe is a white grape used for wine. Huxelrebe is primarily found in Germany, where the cultivated area covered 677 hectares (1,670 acres) in 2006, with a decreasing trend. It is primarily found in the German wine regions Rheinhessen, Palatinate and Nahe. Small plantations are also found in England. Huxelrebe is a very high-yielding variety which ripens early. If yields are controlled, it can make very high-quality wines, primarily sweet wines as an apéritif or dessert wine, and it usually can reach Auslese ripness even in a lesser year. The wines tend to be high in acidity and have aromas of rhubarbs. Higher-end Huxelrebe wines made from riper grapes often have muscat-like aromas in addition. Huxelrebe was created by German viticulturalist Dr. Georg Scheu (1879-1949) in 1927, when he was working as director of a grape-breeding institute in Alzey in Rheinhessen, by crossing Gutedel (Chasselas) with Courtiller Musqué (Muscat Précoce de Saumur). It received varietal protection in 1969. Initially known under its breeding code Alzey S 3962, the variety was named after viticulturalist and nursery owner Fritz Huxel (1892-1972), who was the first to cultivate it extensively. This
    6.00
    1 votes
    201
    Palomino

    Palomino

    Palomino is a white grape widely grown in Spain and South Africa, and best known for its use in the manufacture of sherry. In Spain, the grape is split into the sub-varieties Palomino Fino, Palomino Basto, and Palomino de Jerez, of which Palomino Fino is by far the most important, being the principal grape used in the manufacture of sherry. The wine formed by fermentation of the grape is low in both acidity and sugar which, whilst suitable for sherry, ensures that any table wine made from it is of a consistently low quality, unless aided by acidification. In France, it is referred to as Listán, and in South Africa as Fransdruif or White French. It is also found in Australia and California where it is also used mainly to produce fortified wines, the grape was once thought to be the Golden Chasselas, a grape grown in California. The wine-must has tendency to oxidise quickly, a characteristic that can be ignored when used for sherry production. In December 2006 Spanish researchers, using DNA techniques, discovered that the Mission grape of California and Latin America, cultivated by the Jesuit and Franciscan missionaries throughout the New World, is in fact the now rare Listan Prieto
    6.00
    1 votes
    202
    Vitis amurensis

    Vitis amurensis

    Vitis amurensis, the Amur grape, is a species of grape native to the Asian continent. Its name comes from the Amur Valley in Russia and China. It is very resistant to frost, but is not tolerant to drought. Selections vary, but as a species it has strong resistance to anthracnose and ripe rot, and moderately strong resistance to downy mildew and powdery mildew. By hybridization with the European wine grape (Vitis vinifera), several cultivars resistant to low temperatures have been produced, such as "Zarja severa" (Northern dawn), Severny and Rondo. The oligostilbenes amurensin A, B, G and H can be found in V. amurensis.
    6.00
    1 votes
    203
    Vitis vinifera

    Vitis vinifera

    Vitis vinifera (Common Grape Vine) is a species of Vitis, native to the Mediterranean region, central Europe, and southwestern Asia, from Morocco and Portugal north to southern Germany and east to northern Iran. It is a liana growing to 35 yards tall, with flaky bark. The leaves are alternate, palmately lobed, 5–20 cm long and broad. The fruit is a berry, known as a grape; in the wild species it is 6 mm diameter and ripens dark purple to blackish with a pale wax bloom; in cultivated plants it is usually much larger, up to 3 cm long, and can be green, red, or purple (black). The species typically occurs in humid forests and streamsides. The wild grape is often classified as V. vinifera subsp. sylvestris (in some classifications considered Vitis sylvestris), with V. vinifera subsp. vinifera restricted to cultivated forms. Domesticated vines have hermaphrodite flowers, but subsp. sylvestris is dioecious (male and female flowers on separate plants) and pollination is required for fruit to develop. The grape is eaten fresh, processed to make wine, or dried to produce raisins. Cultivars of Vitis vinifera form the basis of the majority of wines produced around the world. All of the
    4.33
    3 votes
    204
    Chasan

    Chasan

    Chasan is a white French wine grape variety grown primarily in the Languedoc wine region. According to the Vitis International Variety Catalogue, the variety is a crossing of Listan and Pinot. However, some sources (such as wine experts Jancis Robinson and Oz Clarke) describe the grape as a crossing between Listan and Chardonnay. All sources agree, however, that the variety was created in 1958 by Paul Truel at the Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA) - Unité Expérimentale du Domaine de Vassal & Montpellier SupAgro. One possible source for the confusion of the grapes parentage is that a common synonym of several clones of Chardonnay are sometimes listed as Pinot Chardonnay and Chardonnay, itself, was a crossing of Pinot and the obscure French wine grape Gouais blanc. While the grape is a recommended planting for every major French wine region except Alsace, Chasan is only planted on a limited scale in the Languedoc region where it is usually found in experimental vin de pays blends. Like Chardonnay, Chasan is an early budding variety and can be at risk for springtime frost. However, like the Pinot family, the variety tends to ripens late and often doesn't develop the
    5.00
    2 votes
    205
    Ehrenfelser

    Ehrenfelser

    Ehrenfelser is a white wine grape variety of German origin. It was created by Dr. Heinrich Birk (1898-1973) at the Geisenheim Grape Breeding Institute in 1929, by crossing the varieties Riesling and Silvaner, with the identification of Silvaner being somewhat uncertain. Ehrenfelser is grown primarily in the Palatinate and Rheinhessen regions in Germany with some experimental plantings in Washington State. However, as is the case with most white German "new crosses", plantings within Germany have decreased considerably in recent years. In 2006, only 112 hectares (280 acres) of plantings remained, down from 255 hectares (630 acres) in 1999. Several vineyards in the Okanagan Valley of British Columbia also grow Ehrenfelser, including at least Cedar Creek, Lake Breeze, Gray Monk, Gehringer Brothers, Mount Boucherie and Summerhill. The grape tends to ripen earlier and produce higher yields than Riesling but its quality is not on par with that of this, its parent grape. The variety normally consistently produces grapes of at least Kabinett level ripeness and tends to produce well in vineyards where Riesling has difficulties. Ehrenfelser derives its name from the Burg Ehrenfels ruins
    5.00
    2 votes
    206
    Isabella grape

    Isabella grape

    The Isabella grape is a cultivar derived from the grape species Vitis labrusca or 'fox grape' which is used for table, juice and wine production. The skin of Isabella when ripened is a dark purple, almost black with a tender green-yellow flesh. It has large well formed fruit clusters with thick bloom. It is a slip skin variety, meaning that the skin separates easily from the fruit. The grapes are used to make wine, most notably Uhudler and Fragolino. The Isabella being of the genus Vitis x Labruscana imparts a "foxiness" to the wine and because of this is thought to be objectionable, therefore it is not seen as a grape capable of making fine wines. For the table the flavour is good though with the astringent tough skin and "foxy" aroma is objectionable for some tastes. The deciduous vine is very easy to propagate. When the vine is bare of leaves in winter, it is good to prune the vine back by about one-third. Save the branches that are 15cm long and pencil-thick. Cut straight across at the proximal end (nearest the root), and oblique at the distal end. Put a bundle of about 10 cuttings in potting mix, the flat ends down, and keep reasonable moist throughout winter. They will sprout
    5.00
    2 votes
    207

    Mauzac

    Mauzac or Mauzac Blanc a white variety of grape used for wine, of the species Vitis vinifera. It is mainly grown in the Gaillac and Limoux regions in the southwest of France. Total French plantations of Mauzac stood at 3,200 hectares (7,900 acres) in the year 2000. In Gaillac its aromatic wines are blended with Len de l'El to create mildly sweet and sparkling white blended wines. Since the late 1980s, some Gaillac producers have created an interest in Mauzac by producing better wines. In Limoux, Mauzac is a compulsory part of the Blanquette de Limoux, where it may be blended with Chenin Blanc and Chardonnay. However, in Limoux, plantations of Mauzac are decreasing at it is losing ground to Chardonnay. The grape is also one of the seven permitted white varieties in Bordeaux wine. Mauzac buds and ripens late, and was traditionally picked quite late, when temperatures had dropped in Limoux. This allowed for slow fermentation which preserved residual sugar for a "natural" second fermentation in the spring, creating a sparkling wine. Today, its more common to pick Mauzac earlier, giving a more crisp wine with higher acidity, but also without much of its particular aromas. Mauzac Blanc,
    5.00
    2 votes
    208
    Zierfandler

    Zierfandler

    Zierfandler is a grape variety used to make white wine in the Thermenregion of Austria. It is also known as Spätrot ("late red") because it turns red just before harvest time. It is traditionally blended with Rotgipfler but is increasingly being sold as a single varietal wine. Zierfandler wines are typically elegant and quite sweet, but with lots of balancing acidity and a nutty bouquet of pistachios and almonds. They are capable of ageing well. Zierfandler is probably a cross between Roter Veltliner and something like Traminer. A "weiss" (white) form is found in Hungary. Zierfandler may be the inadvertent origin of the name Zinfandel, which has its roots in a Croatian grape collected by the Habsburg monarchy in Vienna. George Gibbs, a horticulturist on Long Island, received several shipments of vines from the Imperial nursery in the 1820s, one of which he called "Black Zinfardel of Hungary". This doesn't correspond to any known grape, but Webster suggests that Zinfandel is a corruption of tzinifándli (czirifandli), a Hungarian word derived from the German word Zierfandler. Since Zierfandler is very different from Zinfandel, someone must have mixed up labels along the way. There
    5.00
    2 votes
    209
    Pinot meunier

    Pinot meunier

    Pinot Meunier, pronounced: [pi.no mø.nje], also known as Meunier or SchwarzRiesling, is a variety of black wine grape most noted for being one of the three main varieties used in the production of champagne (the other two are the black variety Pinot noir and the white Chardonnay). Until recently, champagne makers generally did not acknowledge Pinot Meunier, preferring to emphasise the use of the other noble varieties, but now Pinot Meunier is gaining recognition for the body and richness it contributes to Champagne. It is a chimeric mutation of Pinot: its inner cell layers are composed of a Pinot genotype which is close to Pinot noir or Pinot gris; the outer, epidermal, layer is however made up of a mutant, distinctive, genotype. Pinot Meunier was first mentioned in the 16th century, and gets its name and synonyms (French Meunier and German Müller - both meaning miller) from flour-like dusty white down on the underside of its leaves. Pinot Meunier can be identified by ampelographers by its indented leaves that appear downy white, like flour has been dusted liberally on the underside, and lightly on the upper side, of the leaf. The name "Meunier" comes from the French word for
    4.50
    2 votes
    210

    Acolon

    Acolon is a German wine grape variety. It is a crossing between Blauer Lemberger (Blaufränkisch) and Dornfelder. It was created in 1971 at the Staatliche Lehr- und Versuchsanstalt für Wein- und Obstbau in Weinsberg (nr. Württemberg), Germany. The variety was officially recognised in 2002. It ripens early and produces a very color-intensive wine with mild tannins, resembling Lemberger. Currently it is growing experimentally on 1.35 square kilometres. Since 1981 it has often been used as a partner to create new genetically-diverse varieties.
    5.00
    1 votes
    211
    Black Muscat

    Black Muscat

    Black Muscat is a Vitis vinifera grape variety derived from the crossing of the Schiava Grossa and Muscat of Alexandria varieties. It is known under a variety of local names such as Golden Hamburg, and Black Hamburg in the US; Muscat de Hambourg (or Hamburgh) in France; Moscato di Amburgo in Italy; and Muscat Gamburgskiy in Russia and former Soviet Union countries. Confusingly, Black Hamburg is also used as a synonym for its maternal parent. It is commonly produced as table wine but in California's Central Valley it has been used in the production of dessert wine. As a dessert wine it can be highly aromatic with a rich coloring. In the US it is grown in wine appellations in California, Virginia, Oregon, Texas, and Washington. In Canada, it is also found on Vancouver Island. In France, the grape is used chiefly as a component of fruit baskets. In Eastern Europe, the grape produces a light, dry red wine. It is also starting to gain popularity as a table wine component in China. Horticulturist Walter Clore has postulated that this grape might have been one of the first Vitis vinifera varieties planted in Washington State in the early 19th century.
    5.00
    1 votes
    212

    Canadice

    Canadice is a cultivar of seedless red grape with a bit of a spicy flavor. It is a late season cultivar ripening about mid-September into October and is hardy up to -20 degrees Fahrenheit. It is used as a table grape and is described as productive with a flavor similar to Delaware grapes. Also, these grapes come in large, cylindrical and somewhat compact clusters and are medium in individual size. Negative attributes of this particular grape are that it is highly susceptible or sensitive to black rot as well as moderately susceptible or sensitive to downy mildew and Botrytis. It is also slightly susceptible or sensitive to powdery mildew. However, tests have shown that Canadice grapes will maintain a high quality for up to four months in storage with high post-harvest sulfur dioxide fumigation. Canadice resulted from a cross of Bath by Himrod and was released by the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, New York, in 1977. Like several other releases from this program, it was named for one of the Finger Lakes, Canadice Lake.
    5.00
    1 votes
    213
    Grasă de Cotnari

    Grasă de Cotnari

    Grasă de Cotnari (Romanian pronunciation: [ˈɡrasə de kotˈnarʲ]) is a Romanian wine variety associated with the Cotnari vineyard, Moldavia, where it has been grown ever since the rule of Prince Stephen the Great (1457–1504). With the general decline in demand for sweet wines after the second world war and bad wine making during the communist era, Grasă de Cotnari became largely forgotten in the international wine market. Even today it is seldom available, although the offered qualities have improved considerably in recent years. Grasă de Cotnari is usually a botrytised sweet wine (although semi-sweet varieties are also made) and usually has a high residual sugar content, sometimes as much as 300g/liter. The harvest of 1958 reached the maximal sugar content in the history of this wine of about 520g/liter. The wine is made primarily from a grape variety also called Grasă de Cotnari. or Grasă (an old white grape cultivated in the Furmint group), although some additional Fetească Alba is allowed. It is produced from grapes that fully reached and exceeded their maturity, hence the high residual sugar content. A carefully made Grasă de Cotnari is a golden yellow wine, and in spite of its
    5.00
    1 votes
    214
    Heroldrebe

    Heroldrebe

    Heroldrebe is a red German wine grape variety produced by crossing Blauer Portugieser and Lemberger. It was created by August Herold at the grape breeding institute in Weinsberg in the Württemberg region in 1929, and was named after him. One of Heroldrebe's drawbacks is its relatively late ripening; it is harvested at about the same time as Pinot Noir. Heroldrebe was grown on a total of 155 hectares (380 acres) in Germany in 2008, with a decreasing trend. There were 99 hectares (240 acres) in Palatinate, 32 hectares (79 acres) in Rheinhessen, and 23 hectares (57 acres) in Württemberg. In Palatinate it is typically used to produce light, almost pinkish, colored wines. The only synonyms of Heroldrebe is its breeding code We S 130 or Weinsberg S 130. Heroldrebe was later crossed with Helfensteiner by Herold to produce Dornfelder, which has become the most widely planted of the grape varieties created by Herold. Hegel is also Helfensteiner × Heroldrebe.
    5.00
    1 votes
    215
    Mavrud

    Mavrud

    Mavrud (Bulgarian: мавруд, from Greek, mavro, "black") is a red wine grape that is used as both a blending grape and for varietal wines, indigenous to the region of Kara Thrace in Bulgaria. The grape has been described as a characterful, low-yielding, small-berried and late-ripening grape capable of producing tannic, spicy wine with a potential for ageing. Legend contends that during the reign of Khan Krum of Bulgaria, all vineyards were ordered destroyed. Later, a lion escaped from its cage and terrorized the city. However, a fearless young man named Mavrud (now the name of a wine grape) confronted and slew the lion. The king summoned Mavrud's mother to learn the source of such courage. She said she had secretly saved a vine, made wine, and that this was the source of Mavrud's bravery. Khan Krum ordered the vineyards replanted. Regarded as one of the most highly esteemed local wines, Mavrud vineyards are mainly be found around Asenovgrad and Perushtitsa, as well as more rarely near Pazardzhik, Stara Zagora and Chirpan.
    5.00
    1 votes
    216
    Muscardin

    Muscardin

    Muscardin is a dark-skinned grape variety primarily found in the southern part of the Rhône region. It is primarily noted for being one of the thirteen grape varieties permitted in the Châteauneuf-du-Pape appellation. It is a very rare variety, and in 2004 only 0.4% of the appellation's vineyards were planted with Muscardin. The resulting red wines tends to have high acid levels, low alcohol, light tannic structure but can show attractive flowery aromas. The color is also lighter than most Rhone varieties and the wine is prone to the wine fault of oxidation. Muscardin appears to be nearly identical to Mondeuse Noire except that it has less sensitivity to downy mildew. They are however not thought to be the same variety. Muscardin is also known under the synonyms Muscadin and Muscardin Noir.
    5.00
    1 votes
    217

    Pedro Ximénez

    Pedro Ximénez (also known as PX and many other variations) is the name of a white grape grown in certain regions of Spain, and also a varietal wine, an intensely sweet, dark, dessert sherry. Pedro Giménez (Pedro Jiménez) is a widely grown criolla variety in South America whose relationship to Pedro Ximénez is uncertain, as it shows ampelographic differences. Legend has it that Pedro Ximénez originated in the Canary Islands before being taken to the Rhine. The grape then came to Jerez in the baggage of a soldier called Pedro Ximénez (or Pedro Siemens or Pedro Ximen), serving in the navy of Charles V (1500–1558) in the Spanish Netherlands. It seems unlikely that a grape that so likes warm weather would have done well so far north, and no current Rhine grape resembles PX, so the story is probably apocryphal. An origin in the Canaries is possible, perhaps the most plausible explanation is that it is a Moorish grape that was 'rebranded' after the Reconquista. "Pedro Giménez" is the most widely planted white grape in Argentina, where it is used to make fortified wines like those of its homeland in Jerez. As noted below, it is a criolla variety that is different from Spanish Pedro
    5.00
    1 votes
    218
    Petit Rouge

    Petit Rouge

    Petit Rouge is a red Italian wine grape variety that ampelographers believe is indigenous to the Valle d'Aosta region of northwest Italy. However, there is some confusion about whether Petit Rouge is the same variety as the red Swiss wine grape Rouge de Valais. The grape is somewhat obscure and is not widely grown outside the Valle d'Aosta where it is primarily a blending variety but some varietal wines are produced. In blends, it adds floral aroma notes and dark color to the wines. Petit Rouge is primarily found in the Valle d'Aosta region of northwest Italy between Piedmont and the Alps separating Italy from France and Switzerland. In general, altitude determines which varieties of grapes may be grown in a particular location, with reds growing at lower elevations and whites at higher elevations. However, despite its high altitude and mountainous location, nearly 90% of the wine in the Valle d'Aosta is red or rosé with Petit Rouge playing a considerable role in many of the blends produced under the Denominazione di Origine Controllata (DOC) designation of the region. This is because the variety thrives during the hot, dry mouths of the summer, allowing time to develop sufficient
    5.00
    1 votes
    219

    Pinotage

    Pinotage /ˈpɪnətɑːʒ/PIN-ə-tahzh is a red wine grape that is South Africa's signature variety. It was bred there in 1925 as a cross between Pinot noir and Cinsaut (Cinsaut was known as "Hermitage" in South Africa during that time, hence the portmanteau name of Pinotage). It typically produces deep red varietal wines with smoky, bramble and earthy flavors, sometimes with notes of bananas and tropical fruit, but has been criticized for sometimes smelling of acetone. Pinotage is often blended, and also made into fortified wine and even red sparkling wine. The grape is a viticultural cross of two varieties of Vitis vinifera, not a hybrid. Pinotage is a grape variety that was created in South Africa in 1925 by Abraham Izak Perold, the first Professor of Viticulture at Stellenbosch University. Perold was attempting to combine the best qualities of the robust Hermitage with Pinot Noir, a grape that makes great wine but can be difficult to grow. Perold planted the four seeds from his cross in the garden of his official residence at Welgevallen Experimental Farm and then seems to have forgotten about them. In 1927 he left the university for a job with KWV co-operative and the garden became
    5.00
    1 votes
    220
    Vespaiola

    Vespaiola

    Vespaiola is a white Italian wine grape variety planted primarily in the Veneto region of northeastern Italy where it is often dried to produce passito style dessert wines. Along with Friulano, Vespaiola is an important component in the Denominazione di origine controllata (DOC) white wine of Breganze produced in the province of Vicenza. Vespaiola grapes ripen to high sugar levels and are used to produce sweet wines with a characteristic golden hue. In fact, the grapes of Vespaiola get so concentrated with sugars that the name Vespaiola comes from Vespa in reference to wasps that are attracted to the sugary aromas in vineyards. Despite its similar sounding name, Vespaiola should not be confused with red Italian wine grape, Vespolina, which is grown in the Piedmont and Lombardy regions. The Breganze DOC, located in the foothills of the Alps, contains a significant number of plantings of Vespaiola where the grape can be included in the generic Breganze blend or produced in a varietal style. To be included in the DOC wine, the grapes must be harvested up to a maximum yield 14 tonnes/hectare (13 tonnes for the varietal style) with the finished wine fermented to a minimum alcohol level
    5.00
    1 votes
    221

    Airén

    Airén is a variety of Vitis vinifera, a white grape commonly used in winemaking. This grape is native to Spain where it represents about 30% of all grapes grown. As of 2004, Airén was estimated to be the world's most grown grape variety in terms of planted surface, at 306,000 hectares (760,000 acres), although it is almost exclusively found in Spain. Since Airén tends to be planted at a low density, several other varieties (including Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot) are more planted in terms of number of vines. Plantations of Airén are declining as it is being replaced in Spanish vineyards with various red varieties, such as Tempranillo. Airén is also known by the following other names: The grapes have a cotton-like bud burst, which is bronze or yellowish in colour, with light reddish edge, and not very intense at the tip. The grapes have a trailing growing habit. The leaves of the Airén are average in size and have a pentagonal shape. The lower lateral sinuses are less marked than the upper ones and the upper face of the leaf is yellowish green in color while the lower face is velvety. The grape bunch is large in size and has an average compactness. It can grow in two different
    4.00
    2 votes
    222
    Scheurebe

    Scheurebe

    Scheurebe or Sämling 88 is a white wine grape variety. It is primarily grown in Germany and Austria, where it often is called Sämling 88 (English: Seedling 88), and some parts of the New World. Scheurebe wines are highly aromatic, and the variety is often used for sweet wines, although dry Scheurebe wines have become more common in Germany. Scheurebe was created by German viticulturalist Dr. Georg Scheu (1879–1949) in 1916, when he was working as director of a grape-breeding institute in Alzey in Rheinhessen, by crossing Riesling with an unknown wild vine. According to the German grape-breeder Helmut Becker, Scheu's purpose was to create a superior version of Silvaner, with more aroma and greater resistance to frost damage and chlorosis. It was long assumed that Scheurebe was Silvaner x Riesling, but DNA analysis in the late 1990s ruled out Silvaner as a parent, while confirming Riesling as the father. It is known that Scheu was working on wild vines, so it is possible that a misidentification of the cross took place. Seedling (in German Sämling) number 88 was simply Scheu's serial number for the vine plant selected for its properties. It was named in Scheu's honour in 1945. The
    4.00
    2 votes
    223
    Baco noir

    Baco noir

    Baco noir (pronounced BA-koh NWAHR) is a hybrid red wine grape variety produced from a cross of Vitis vinifera var. Folle Blanche, a French wine grape, and an unknown variety of Vitis riparia indigenous to North America. Baco noir produces a medium body, deeply tinted, acidic red wine which is fruit forward and often carries aromas of black fruits and caramel. Ageing potential is 5–8 years for good examples of this wine. The grape tends to be vigorous and is fairly resistant to the common ills of grapes in the eastern U.S., including black rot, powdery mildew, and downy mildew. It grows well on 6–8-foot (1.8–2.4 m) cordons, with vertical shoot positioning. The vines can carry up to 3 clusters per shoot without overcropping. The vine tolerates highly acid soil (pH 4.9) and is not susceptible to phylloxera. The vine is not particularly attractive to Japanese beetles. In droughty years, the vine is balanced. In wet years, there is no coulure; however, the vines produce more vine than needed and may need to be hedged many times. The vine is not recommended for planting in good soil. At one time Baco noir was grown in France, but by European Union regulation, the commercial use of
    4.00
    1 votes
    224
    Concord grape

    Concord grape

    Concord grapes are a cultivar derived from the grape species Vitis labrusca (a.k.a. fox grape) which are used as table grapes, wine grapes and juice grapes. They are often used to make grape jelly, grape juice, grape-flavored soft drinks, and candy. The grape is sometimes used to make wine, particularly kosher wine, though it is not generally favored for that purpose due to the strong "foxy" (sometimes described as candied-strawberry/musky) flavor. Traditionally, most commercially produced Concord wines have been finished sweet, but dry versions are possible if adequate fruit ripeness is achieved. The skin of a Concord grape is typically dark blue or purple, and often is covered with a lighter-coloured "bloom" which can be rubbed off. It is a slip-skin variety, meaning that the skin is easily separated from the fruit. Concord grapes have large seeds and are highly aromatic. The Concord grape is particularly prone to the physiological disorder Black leaf. In the United States 417,800 tons were produced in 2011.. The major growing areas are the Finger Lakes District of New York, Lake Erie, Lake Ontario, Southwestern Michigan, and the Yakima Valley in Washington. Concord grapes are
    4.00
    1 votes
    225

    Fromenteau

    Fromenteau (sometimes called Beurot) is the name for several grape varieties, most importantly the medieval name for a Burgundian variety which had pale red berries and white juice, and is probably the ancestor of Pinot gris. It is also used as a synonym for the several grapes
    4.00
    1 votes
    226

    La Crosse

    La Crosse is a modern hybrid cultivar of wine grape, mostly grown in North America. It produces grapes suitable for making fruity white wines similar to Riesling or as a base for blended wines. The grapes also make a good seeded table grape for eating. It has the benefits of early ripening and when hardened properly in the fall it is winter hardy to at least -25° F. As such it best suited to growing in more northern climates. La Crosse was produced and patented by Elmer Swenson around 1970. It is a hybrid of Seyval crossed to a cross of Minnesota 78 by Seibel 1000 (aka Rosette). To clarify the parentage of La Crosse: Minnesota 78 is recorded as a cross of Beta by Witt, however many have disputed this pedigree based its characteristics, and Elmer Swenson speculated that the pollen parent was likely Jessica, which was used in many crosses. Beta is a cross of a selection of the wild grape Vitis riparia, Carver, by Concord. Jessica is a cross of a selection of Vitis labrusca by Vitis aestivalis. Seyval is a cross of Seibel 5656 and Seibel S4986. Both these hybrids are a complex set of crosses of other Seibel hybrids.
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    227
    Mourvèdre

    Mourvèdre

    Mourvèdre (also known as Mataró or Monastrell) is a red wine grape variety that is grown in many regions around the world including the Rhône and Provence regions of France, the Valencia and Jumilla denominación de origens of Spain, California and Washington State and the Australian regions of South Australia and New South Wales. In addition to making red varietal wines, Mourvèdre is a prominent component in "GSM" blends where it is blended with Grenache and Syrah. The variety is also used to make rosé and port-style fortified wines. Mourvèdre tends to produce tannic wines that can be high in alcohol. The style of wine produced from the grapes varies greatly according to where it is produced, but according to wine expert Jancis Robinson Mourvèdre wines often have wild game and/or earthy notes to them, with soft red fruit flavors. According to wine expert Oz Clarke, young Mourvèdre can come across as faulted due to the reductive, sulfur notes and "farmyard-y" flavors that some wines can exhibit before those flavors mellow with age. The variety can be a difficult grape to grow, preferring "its face in the hot sun and its feet in the water" meaning that it needs very warm weather, a
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    228
    Vidal Blanc

    Vidal Blanc

    Vidal Blanc is an inter-specific hybrid variety of white wine grape, a cross of Ugni Blanc and Rayon d'Or (Seibel 4986). It manages to produce high sugar levels in cold climates while maintaining good acid levels. Vidal Blanc was developed in the 1930s by French breeder Jean Louis Vidal; his primary goal in developing the variety was to produce vines suitable for the production of Cognac in the Charente region of France. However, due to its winter hardiness this grape variety is cultivated most extensively in Canada and in the north-eastern United States. It is somewhat resistant to powdery mildew. The wine produced from Vidal Blanc is fruity, with grapefruit and pineapple notes. Due to its high acidity and fruitiness it is particularly suited to sweeter, dessert wines. In particular, because of the tough outer skin of the fruit, it is well adapted for the production of ice wine, especially in Ontario and the Great Lakes region of the United States. Synonyms: Vidal, Vidal 256
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    229
    Zweigelt

    Zweigelt

    Zweigelt is a red wine grape variety developed in 1922, at the Federal Institute for Viticulture and Pomology at Klosterneuburg, Austria, by Fritz Zweigelt. It was a crossing of St. Laurent and Blaufränkisch. It is now the most widely-grown red grape variety in Austria, as well as having some presence in Canada's vineyards. In 2008, Austrian plantations stood at 6,512 hectares (16,090 acres), and have expanded in the 2000s as a part of general red wine trend in Austria. Widely planted in Austria, vines have made inroads in the Canadian wine regions of Ontario's Niagara Peninsula and of British Columbia, with limited plantings in Hungary. In the Czech Republic it is known as Zweigeltrebe and is the third most widely planted red grape variety, comprising approximately 4.7% of total vineyards. It grows in most of the wine regions in Slovakia. As of 2010, newly-established Belgian and Polish vineyards have also started to plant Zweigelt. Zweigelt is also known as Rotburger (not to be confused with Rotberger), Zweigeltrebe, and Blauer Zweigelt.
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    230

    Agiorgitiko

    Agiorgitiko (Greek: Αγιωργίτικο; also known as Aghiorghitiko, Mavro Nemeas and St. George) is one of the two widely-grown heat-resistant Greek wine-making grape varieties, the other being Xynomavro. It is a red variety that has traditionally been grown in the Nemea region of the Peloponnese. It is one of the more commercially important indigenous Greek varieties, and it can take on a large range of characteristics, from soft to very tannic, depending on factors in the growing and winemaking processes. The grape is generally planted in dry, infertile soil, in order to encourage the production of fewer but more concentrated grapes, and ripens after mid-September. It is frequently host to a number of viruses, which may actually be in part responsible for its typical characteristics. The grape is typically made in a varietal style though it is notably blended with Cabernet Sauvignon in the area around Metsovo to make the table wine which is traditionally called Katoi. In the region of Nemea it is often made into rosés of oak-aged red wines. The wines are known for their high level of fruitiness but tend to lack some acidity and body. After Xynomavro, it is Greece's second most widely
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    231

    Barbaroux

    Barbaroux is the French wine grape variety, known as Barbarossa in Italy. It is used in the Cassis AOC in France, and in Provence and Corsica, and in Bertinoro in Emilia-Romagna.
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    232
    Barbera

    Barbera

    • Wine styles: Barbera d'Alba
    Barbera is a red Italian wine grape variety that, as of 2000, was the third most-planted red grape variety in Italy (after Sangiovese and Montepulciano). It produces good yields and is known for deep color, low tannins and high levels of acid. Century-old vines still exist in many regional vineyards and allow for the production of long-aging, robust red wines with intense fruit and enhanced tannic content. The best known appellation is the DOCG (Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita) Barbera d'Asti in the Piedmont region. When young, the wines offer a very intense aroma of fresh red and blackberries. In the lightest versions notes of cherries, raspberries and blueberries and with notes of blackberry and black cherries in wines made of more ripe grapes. Many producers employ the use of toasted (seared over a fire) oak barrels, which provides for increased complexity, aging potential, and hints of vanilla notes. The lightest versions are generally known for flavors and aromas of fresh fruit and dried fruits, and are not recommended for cellaring. Wines with better balance between acid and fruit, often with the addition of oak and having a high alcohol content are more
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    233
    Cabernet Sauvignon

    Cabernet Sauvignon

    Cabernet Sauvignon (French: [ka.bɛʁ.nɛ so.vi'ɲɔ̃]) is one of the world's most widely recognized red wine grape varieties. It is grown in nearly every major wine producing country among a diverse spectrum of climates from Canada's Okanagan Valley to Lebanon's Beqaa Valley. Cabernet Sauvignon became internationally recognized through its prominence in Bordeaux wines where it is often blended with Merlot and Cabernet Franc. From France, the grape spread across Europe and to the New World where it found new homes in places like California's Napa Valley, Australia's Coonawarra region and Chile's Maipo Valley. For most of the 20th century, it was the world's most widely planted premium red wine grape until it was surpassed by Merlot in the 1990s. Despite its prominence in the industry, the grape is a relatively new variety, the product of a chance crossing between Cabernet franc and Sauvignon blanc during the 17th century in southwestern France. Its popularity is often attributed to its ease of cultivation—the grapes have thick skins and the vines are hardy and resistant to rot and frost—and to its consistent presentation of structure and flavours which express the typical character
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    234
    Cinsaut

    Cinsaut

    Cinsaut or Cinsault (/ˈsænsoʊ/SAN-soh) is a red wine grape, whose heat tolerance and productivity make it important in Languedoc-Roussillon and the former French colonies of Algeria and Morocco. It is often blended with grapes such as Grenache and Carignan to add softness and bouquet. It has many synonyms, of which perhaps the most confusing is its sale as a table grape called 'Oeillade', although it is different from the "true" Oeillade which is no longer cultivated. In South Africa, it was known as "Hermitage", hence the name of its most famous cross Pinotage. Cinsault appears to be an ancient variety that may have originated in the Hérault, but could equally have been brought by traders from the eastern Mediterranean. Cinsaut is popular in Algeria for its drought resistance, and is used to make large volumes of wine. Cinsaut is grown under a variety of names such as Black Prince, Blue Imperial, Oeillade and Ulliade Cinsaut is the fourth most widely-planted grape variety in France, and is especially important in Languedoc-Roussillon. Known as Ottavianello, there is one tiny DOC devoted to Cinsaut - Ostuni Ottavianello, with a total production of less than 1000 cases. However,
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    235
    Elbling

    Elbling

    Elbling is a variety of white grape (sp. Vitis vinifera) which today is primarily grown in the upstream parts of the Mosel region in Germany and in Luxembourg, the vineyards of which are also located along Moselle River. The variety has a long history, and used to cover much of Germany's vineyards from medieval times and was that country's most cultivated variety until the early 20th century, but has been in decline ever since. As of 2006, there were 583 hectares (1,440 acres) of Elbling vineyards in Germany, which made it the country's 23rd most grown variety of grape. Of that vineyard surface, 575 ha or 98.6% was found in the Mosel region In the same year, there were 122.9 hectares (304 acres) of Elbling grown in Luxembourg. It has been speculated that Elbling was grown along Mosel already in Roman times, and that it could even be identical to the Vitis albuelis described by Lucius Columella in his De re rustica and the Vitis alba described by Pliny the Elder, although this has by no means been proven. Both Latin names mean "the white grape" and would then have been corrupted to Elbling at some later stage. DNA profiling has indicated that Elbling is an offspring of Gouais blanc
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    236
    Gamay Beaujolais

    Gamay Beaujolais

    Gamay Beaujolais is a varietal designation for a Californian grape variety that is an early ripening clone of Pinot noir. In the late 1930s an early pioneer of the American viticulture, Paul Masson, brought with him several Burgundian grapes for his winery in California. One of those grapes he believed to be the Gamay variety from the Beaujolais region in France, which in the 1940s University of California at Davis (UCD) researchers christened "Gamay Beaujolais". In the late 1960s, UCD scientists decided that Gamay Beaujolais was a clonal selection of Pinot noir, and that California's version of the true Gamay was in fact the Napa Gamay. In fact the Napa Gamay isn't the true Gamay either, it was subsequently found to be the Valdiguié grape from Languedoc-Roussillon. The US Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) has been discouraging the use of the term 'Gamay Beaujolais'. They ruled that from 1997 it could only be used as a secondary designation on wines made from more than 75% Pinot Noir or Valdiguié, and from April 2007 the term 'Gamay Beaujolais' has been banned from labels in the US.
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    237
    Greco

    Greco

    Greco is an Italian wine grape that may be of Greek origin. The name relates to both white (Greco bianco) and black (Greco nero) wine grape varieties. While there is more land area dedicated to Greco nero, the Greco bianco is the grape most commonly referred to by the shorthand "Greco". In the Campania region it is used to produce the Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita (DOCG) wine Greco di Tufo. In Calabria, it is used to make the Denominazione di Origine Controllata (DOC) wine Greco di Bianco. The name "Greco" is sometimes used as a synonym for several varieties of supposed Greek origins-most notably Trebbiano. Over 2,500 years ago, the ancient Greeks imported the ancestor of the Greco vine to southern Italy. Historians and Italian growers have speculated that the grape may have been a blending component in the ancient Roman "cult wines" of Falernian and Aminean. As the grape vine has propagated throughout Italy, the name "Greco" (or Greek vine) has been ascribed to several varieties that may have historically been linked to Greece. Ampelographers disagree about whether or Greco is a single variety with several clones or an agglomeration of several varieties under
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    238

    Himrod

    Himrod is a white table grape, released in 1952 by the New York Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, New York. It is seedless and known for ripening quickly and its sweet flavor. Himrod is considered very productive and reliable. Himrod resulted from a cross of Ontario by Thompson Seedless, a particularly successful cross which resulted in the eventual release of four cultivars, the others being Interlaken, Romulus, and Lakemont. All were named for towns in the Finger Lakes region, near Geneva. These grapes are all quite productive, but they have some differences. Lakemont (grape) Interlaken (grape)
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    239
    Malbec

    Malbec

    Malbec (pronounced: [mal.bɛk]) is a purple grape variety used in making red wine. The grapes tend to have an inky dark color and robust tannins, and are known as one of the six grapes allowed in the blend of red Bordeaux wine. The French plantations of Malbec are now found primarily in Cahors in South West France. It is increasingly celebrated as an Argentine varietal wine and is being grown around the world. Called Auxerrois or Côt Noir in Cahors, called Malbec in Bordeaux, and Pressac in other places, the grape became less popular in Bordeaux after 1956 when frost killed off 75% of the crop. Despite Cahors being hit by the same frost, which devastated the vineyards, Malbec was replanted and continued to be popular in that area where it was mixed with Merlot and Tannat to make dark, full-bodied wines, and more recently has been made into 100% Malbec varietal wines. A popular but unconfirmed theory claims that Malbec is named after a Hungarian peasant who first spread the grape variety throughout France. However the French ampelographer and viticulturalist Pierre Galet notes that most evidence suggest that Côt was the variety's original name and that it probably originated in
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    240
    Marzemino

    Marzemino

    Marzemino is a red Italian wine grape that is primarily grown around Isera, south of Trentino. The wine is most noted for its mention in the opera Don Giovanni of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart ("Versa il vino! Eccellente Marzemino!"). The vine ripens late and is susceptible to many grape diseases including oidium. Wine produced from the grape has a characteristic dark tint and light plummy taste. Ampelographers have long theorized that the grape originated in northern Italy. Recent DNA profiling conducted at the research facility in San Michele all'Adige revealed Marzemino to have a parent-offspring relationship with the grapes Refosco dal Peduncolo Rosso and Teroldego, from Friuli-Venezia Giulia and Trentino respectively, which gives further evidence to its likely origins in this region. Marzemino is found throughout northern Italy most notably in the Lombardia, Trentino, Veneto and Friuli-Venezia Giulia wine region. In Lombardy it is often used as a blending grape, most often partnering with Barbera, Groppello, Merlot or Sangiovese. In Trentino, it is often made as a varietal wine. While it is believed to have played a minor role in the history of Chianti, today it is rarely seen in
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    241
    Mavrodafni

    Mavrodafni

    • Wine styles: Mavrodafni
    Mavrodafni (also Mavrodaphne, Greek: Μαυροδάφνη) is both a black wine grape indigenous to the Achaea region in Northern Peloponnese, Greece, and the sweet, fortified wine produced from it. Mavrodafni is initially vinified in large vats exposed to the sun. Once the wine reaches a certain level of maturity, fermentation is stopped by adding distillate prepared from previous vintages. Then the Mavrodafni distillate and the wine, still containing residual sugar, is transferred to the underground cellars to complete its maturation. There it is "educated" by contact with older wine using the solera method of serial transfusions. Once aged, the wine is bottled and sold as a dessert wine under the "Mavrodafni OPAP" designation. Mavrodafni is a dark, almost opaque wine with a dark purple reflected color and a purple-brown transmitted color. It presents aromas and flavors of caramel, chocolate, coffee, raisins and plums. The name Mavrodafni was given to the grape variety and the wine by Gustav Clauss, the founder of the oldest and most famous winery of Greece, Achaia Clauss. It was named after his greek fiancée, whose name was Daphne, who died young before their marriage.
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    242
    Merzling

    Merzling

    Merzling is a white grape variety used for wine. It was bred in 1960 by Johannes Zimmermann at the viticultural institute in Freiburg, Germany by crossing Seyve-Villard 5276 with the cross Riesling x Pinot Gris. The variety was initially known under its breeding code FR 993-60, and was later named after Merzhausen, a location on the southern edge of Freiburg where some of the vineyards of the institute are located. It received varietal protection in 1993. Merzling ripens early, give high yields and shows good resistance against fungal diseases and spring frosts. Its wines are similar to those of Müller-Thurgau. The only synonyms of Merzling are FR 993-60 or Freiburg 993-60. Due to its resistance against fungal diseases, Merzling and Merzling offspring has been used as a crossing partner for many other new crossings, including Baron, Bronner, Cabernet Cantor, Cabernet Carol, Cabernet Cortis, Helios, Monarch, Prior and Solaris.
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    243
    Piquepoul

    Piquepoul

    Piquepoul or Picpoul is a variety of wine grape grown primarily in the Rhone Valley and Languedoc regions of France. It exists both in dark-skinned (Piquepoul noir) and light-skinned (Piquepoul blanc) versions, as well as a very little grown Piquepoul gris. Piquepoul blanc is the most common of the Piquepouls, with 1,000 hectares (2,500 acres) cultivated in France in 2000, and an increasing trend. Piquepoul tends to bud late and has some sensitivity to oidium. Its name means "lip-stinger" and refers to the high acidity of the grapes. Piquepoul has a long history in the Languedoc region, and along with Cinsaut and Clairette Blanche is one of the oldest domestic grape varieties of that region. It was first guessed that the wine was a poison, but the belief was quickly assaughed after a famous visitor drank a glass, and pronounced it good. Piquepoul had a reputation as a quality grape as early as the early 17th century. It was blended with Clairette Blanche to produce the wine Picardan in the 17th & 18th centuries. After the Great French Wine Blight, when large shifts in varieties planted took place, Piquepoul lost popularity due to its susceptibility to fungal diseases such as oidium
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    244

    Rotberger

    Rotberger is a wine grape variety. Its parentage is not known with certainty but it is thought to be from a cross of Trollinger and Riesling grapes). Dr. Heinrich Birk (1898-1973) produced the cross at the Geisenheim Grape Breeding Institute in 1928. It is used to produce fruity, early maturing light red wines in cool-climate areas. It is often best drunk when young and can be used to produce a rosé or sparkling wine. It has no relationship with the Rotburger variety bearing a nearly similar name which is also known as Zweigelt. Production of rotberger is quite small and primarily limited to Austria, Canada, Germany, and Liechtenstein.
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    245
    Savagnin

    Savagnin

    Savagnin or Savagnin Blanc is a variety of white wine grape with green-skinned berries. It is mostly grown in the Jura region of France, where it is made into the famous vin jaune and vin de paille. The history of Savagnin is complicated and it not helped by its rather unstable genome. The story starts with the ancient Traminer variety, a green-skinned grape recorded in the Tyrolean village of Tramin from ca. 1000 until the 16th century. (This region now lies in the Italian province of South Tyrol). The famous ampelographer Pierre Galet thought that Traminer was identical to the green-skinned Savagnin Blanc in the Jura. More recently it has been suggested that Savagnin Blanc acquired slight differences in its leaf shape and geraniol content as it travelled to the other end of the Alps. Frankisch in Austria, Heida in Switzerland, Formentin in Hungary and Grumin from Bohemia are all very similar to Savagnin Blanc and probably represent clones of the Traminer family, if not Traminer itself. The Viognier of the Rhone Valley may be a more distant relative of Savagnin Blanc. At some point, either Traminer or Savagnin Blanc mutated into a form with pink-skinned berries, called Red
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    246
    Schonburger

    Schonburger

    Schönburger, also spelled Schoenburger, or Schonburger is a variety of grape, formally designated Geisenheim 15-114, a crossing developed at Geisenheim Institute for Grape Breeding in Germany, and released in 1979, of Pinot Noir x (Chasselas x Muscat Hamburg). It is grown now in Germany, as well as in England where it is gaining popularity in the early 2000's and is "authorized". It can also be found in British Columbia Canada , and in western Washington state, western Oregon state, USA. A common feature of these areas is a cool climate, often maritime influenced. This is a reliable early-ripening grape, though is susceptible to powdery mildew. The wine produced is typically a soft while full and fruity white.
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    247
    Scuppernong

    Scuppernong

    The scuppernong (/ˈskʌpərˌnɒŋ/) is a large variety of muscadine (Vitis rotundifolia), a species of grape native to the southeastern United States. It is usually a greenish or bronze color and is similar in appearance and texture to a white grape, but rounder and larger and first known as the 'big white grape'. The grape is commonly known as the "scuplin" in some areas of the Deep South. It is also known as the "scupanon", "scupadine" or "scufadine" in some parts of the South. The name comes from the Scuppernong River in North Carolina mainly along the coastal plain. It was first mentioned as a "white grape" in a written logbook by the Florentine explorer Giovanni de Verrazzano while exploring the Cape Fear River Valley in 1524. He wrote "...Many vines growing naturally there...". Sir Walter Raleigh's explorers, the captains Phillip Amadas and Arthur Barlowe, wrote in 1584 that North Carolina's coast was "...so full of grapes as the very beating and surge of the sea overflowed them...in all the world, the like abundance is not to be found." He may have been referring to Sargasso seaweed from coral reefs, which can been seen washed up on shore after a major storm off of the NC coast.
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    Vitis rupestris

    Vitis rupestris

    Vitis rupestris is a kind of grape native to the Southern and Western United States that is known by many common names including July, sand, sugar, beach, bush, currant, ingar, rock, and mountain grape. It is used for breeding several French-American hybrids as well as many root stocks. Rupestris St. George has been widely used in breeding and as a root stock; it is perhaps the best known. Vitis rupestris is a self-supporting bushy plant that does not grow in the shade, and was once found in well-drained prairie draws that collect water. Grazing has forced it into less grazed creek beds. Heavy use of grazing and herbicides have killed out much of the population. Vitis rupestris has been listed as threatened or endangered by Indiana, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, and Tennessee. Known locations of wild Vitis rupestris are quickly disappearing, which may threaten the future of this grape species .
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    249
    Xarel·lo

    Xarel·lo

    Xarel·lo (Catalan pronunciation: [ʃəˈɾɛɫːu]) is a white grape variety of Spanish origin specially grown in Catalonia. With Macabeu and Parellada, is one of the three traditional varieties used to make the sparkling wine Cava. Spanish plantations stood at 8,750 hectares (21,600 acres) in 2004, Xarel·lo wine can be strongly flavored, and is more aromatic than the other two Cava grape varieties. Xarel·lo is also known under the following synonyms: Cartoixa, Cartuja, Cartuxa, Moll, Pansa, Pansa Blanca, Pansal, Pansalat, Pansalet, Pansar, Pensal, Prensa Branco, Vinate, Vinyater, Xarell-Lo, Xarello and Xarelo Blanco. The Cava grape Macabeo/Viura also shares a similar synonym-Xarello.
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    Zante currant

    Zante currant

    Zante currants (in the United States), or currants (in other English-speaking countries), or Corinthian raisins, are dried berries of small, sweet, seedless grape cultivar 'Black Corinth' (Vitis vinifera). The name comes from the Anglo-French phrase "raisins de Corinthe" (raisins of Corinth) and the Ionian island of Zakynthos (Zante), which was once the major producer and exporter. It is not related to black, red or white currants, which are berries of shrubs in the Ribes genus. The currant is one of the oldest known raisins. The first written record was in 75 AD by Pliny the Elder, who described a tiny, juicy, thick-skinned grape with small bunches. The next mention is a millennium later, when the raisins became a subject of trade between Venetian merchants and Greek producers from Ionian coasts. In the 14th century, they were sold in the English market under the label Reysyns de Corauntz, and the name raisins of Corinth was recorded in the 15th century, after the Greek harbor which was the primary source of export. Gradually, the name got corrupted into currant. However, by the 17th century, the trade shifted towards the Ionian islands, particularly Zakynthos (Zante), after which
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