Top List Curated by Listnerd
  • Public list
  • Nov 27th 2012
  • 1.291 views
  • 622 votes
  • 622 voters
  • 10%
Best Glacier of All Time

More about Best Glacier of All Time:

Best Glacier of All Time is a public top list created by Listnerd on rankly.com on November 27th 2012. Items on the Best Glacier of All Time top list are added by the rankly.com community and ranked using our secret ranking sauce. Best Glacier of All Time has gotten 1.291 views and has gathered 622 votes from 622 voters. O O

Best Glacier of All Time is a top list in the Travel category on rankly.com. Are you a fan of Travel or Best Glacier of All Time? Explore more top 100 lists about Travel on rankly.com or participate in ranking the stuff already on the all time Best Glacier of All Time top list below.

If you're not a member of rankly.com, you should consider becoming one. Registration is fast, free and easy. At rankly.com, we aim to give you the best of everything - including stuff like the Best Glacier of All Time list.

Get your friends to vote! Spread this URL or share:

Items just added

    1
    Kennicott Glacier

    Kennicott Glacier

    Kennicott Glacier is a glacier in the U.S. state of Alaska. It trends southeast 43 km (27 mi) from Mount Blackburn to its terminus at the head of the Kennicott River in the Wrangell Mountains. It is located in Wrangell-St. Elias National Park near the small town of McCarthy, Alaska and the historic ghost town of Kennecott, Alaska. It was named in 1899 by Rohn of the United States Geological Survey for Robert Kennicott, pioneer Alaska explorer and director of the scientific corps of the Western Union Telegraph Expedition in 1865. The glacier is also the namesake of the Alaska Marine Highway vessel M/V Kennicott.
    6.78
    9 votes
    2
    Palü Glacier

    Palü Glacier

    The Palü Glacier (Romansh: Vadret da Palü) is a 3.5 km long glacier (2005) situated in the Bernina Range in the canton of Graubünden in Switzerland. In 1973 it had an area of 6.47 km.
    7.57
    7 votes
    3
    Nisqually Glacier

    Nisqually Glacier

    • Glacier Type: Mountain Glacier
    The Nisqually Glacier is one of the larger glaciers on the southern face of Mount Rainier in the U.S. state of Washington. The glacier is one of the most easily viewed on the mountain, and is accessible from the Paradise visitor facilities in Mount Rainier National Park. The glacier is currently retreating. Measurements made at 9,200 feet (2,800 m) altitude show that glacier got 56 ft (17 m) thicker between 1994 and 1997, suggesting that it will probably begin advancing in the first decade of the 21st century. Nisqually Glacier is the source of the Nisqually River. Perhaps the longest studied glacier on Mount Rainier, Nisqually's terminal point has been measured annually since 1918. In May 1970, the glacier was measured to be moving at an average of 29 inches (740 mm) per day. The glacier is one of four on Mount Rainier that are known to have released debris flows. Similar flows have stemmed from the Winthrop, Kautz, and South Tahoma glaciers as well.
    7.14
    7 votes
    4
    Tasman Glacier

    Tasman Glacier

    The Tasman Glacier is the largest of several glaciers which flow south and east towards the Mackenzie Basin from the Southern Alps in New Zealand's South Island. It is New Zealand's longest glacier. At 27 kilometres (17 mi) in length, Tasman Glacier is New Zealand's longest glacier. It is as much as 4 kilometres (2.5 mi) wide and 600 metres (2,000 ft) thick, and lies entirely within the borders of Aoraki/Mount Cook National Park. The glacier covers an area of 101 square kilometres (39 sq mi) and starts at a height of 3,000 metres (9,800 ft) above sea level. Snowfall during the winter and spring seasons accumulates to 50 metres (160 ft). After the summer melt, 7 metres (23 ft) remains. The Tasman flows south from the southern slopes of the Minarets peak, along the eastern flank of New Zealand's two highest mountains, Mount Tasman and its higher southern neighbour Aoraki/Mount Cook. Although its upper reaches are snow-covered, rocks carried by the glacier are exposed by ablation along its course, and the lower glacier is entirely rock-covered. It is almost met near its end by the meltwater of the Murchison Glacier, which approaches from the northeast before turning to flow beside the
    9.20
    5 votes
    5
    Quelccaya Ice Cap

    Quelccaya Ice Cap

    • Glacier Type: Mountain Glacier
    • Status: Retreating
    The Quelccaya Ice Cap is the largest glaciated area in the tropics. Located in the Cordillera Oriental section of the Andes mountains of Peru, the ice cap is at an average altitude of 5,470 meters (18,600 ft) and spans an area of 44 square kilometers (17 mi). As with the majority of the Earth's glaciers, the Quelccaya Ice cap has retreated significantly since it was first studied. Since 1978 the icecap has lost approximately 20% of its area, and the rate of retreat is presently increasing. Comparing pictures taken in 1963 and 1978, an annual retreat rate of 4.7 meters (15.4 ft) was estimated. In the first few years of the 21st century, the annual retreat was measured to be as much as 205 meters (672 ft), more than 40 times as fast. The major outlet glacier from the Quelccaya Ice Cap, the Qori Kalis Glacier, has also retreated significantly since 1963. Lonnie Thompson and his research team have drilled ice cores from Quelccaya that date back almost 2,000 years and have used them to study changes in atmospheric conditions over this period. In these samples, the oxygen isotope ratio, oxygen-18 to oxygen-16, has risen abruptly in the last 50 years, an indicator of regional warming. As
    7.00
    7 votes
    6
    San Rafael Glacier

    San Rafael Glacier

    The San Rafael Glacier is one of the major outlet glaciers of the Northern Patagonian Ice Field in southern Chile and is the tidewater glacier nearest the equator. It calves into the Laguna San Rafael and is contained within Laguna San Rafael National Park.
    7.33
    6 votes
    7
    Muir Glacier

    Muir Glacier

    Muir Glacier is a glacier in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is currently about 0.7 km (0.43 mi) wide at the terminus. As recently as the mid-1980s the glacier was a tidewater glacier and calved icebergs from a wall of ice 60 m (200 feet) tall. Muir Glacier has undergone very rapid, well-documented retreat since its Little Ice Age maximum position at the mouth of Glacier Bay around 1780. Between 1941 and 2004 the glacier retreated more than twelve kilometers (seven miles) and thinned by over 800 meters (2625 feet). Ocean water has filled the valley replacing the ice. The glacier is named after John Muir, the naturalist, who travelled around the area and wrote about it, generating interest in the local envirnoment and in its preservation. His first two visits were in 1878 (at age 41) and 1880. During the visits, he sent an account of his visits in installments to the San Francisco Bulletin. Later, he collected and edited these installments in a book, Travels in Alaska, published in 1915, the year after he died.
    6.29
    7 votes
    8
    Teteven Glacier

    Teteven Glacier

    Teteven Glacier (Lednik Teteven \'led-nik 'te-te-ven\) is a glacier on Greenwich Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica draining the north slopes of Dryanovo Heights into the Drake Passage in Haskovo Cove and Skaptopara Cove between Miletich Point and the ice-free area at Agüedo Point. It extends 6.5 km in east-west direction, and 3.8 km in north-south direction. The glacier is named after the town of Teteven in the central Balkan Mountains, Bulgaria. The glacier is located at 62°27′40″S 59°52′20″W / 62.46111°S 59.87222°W / -62.46111; -59.87222 (Bulgarian mapping in 2005 and 2009). This article includes information from the Antarctic Place-names Commission of Bulgaria which is used with permission.
    6.14
    7 votes
    9
    Maclure Glacier

    Maclure Glacier

    Maclure Glacier (also McClure Glacier) is a glacier located on Mount Maclure in the Sierra Nevada crest of Yosemite National Park in Tuolumne County, California, United States. The glacier is named after William Maclure. Like most glaciers in the Sierra Nevada, Maclure Glacier is a small cirque glacier that is .20 mi (0.32 km) long and covers an area of only .08 sq mi (0.21 km). The mean elevation of the glacier is around 11,400 ft (3,500 m). Both the Maclure Glacier and the Lyell Glacier, located nearby on Mount Lyell, have retreated since their first discovery.
    7.00
    6 votes
    10
    Darwin Glacier

    Darwin Glacier

    Darwin Glacier (79°53′S 159°00′E / 79.883°S 159°E / -79.883; 159) is a large glacier flowing from the polar plateau eastward between the Darwin Mountains and the Cook Mountains to the Ross Ice Shelf. The lower part of the glacier was mapped by the British National Antarctic Expedition, 1901–04, and the whole area traversed by New Zealand parties of the Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition (1956–58). The glacier was named in association with the Darwin Mountains (themselves named after Leonard Darwin).
    8.75
    4 votes
    11
    Buarbreen

    Buarbreen

    The glacier Buarbreen in is an offshoot of the Folgefonna glacier. It lies in Odda municipality of Hordaland county in Norway.
    6.50
    6 votes
    12
    Northeast Glacier

    Northeast Glacier

    Northeast Glacier is a steep, heavily crevassed glacier, 13 miles (21 km) long and 5 miles (8 km) wide at its mouth, which flows from McLeod Hill westward and then southwestwards into Marguerite Bay between the Debenham Islands and Roman Four Promontory, on the west coast of Graham Land. Northeast Glacier was first surveyed in 1936 by the British Graham Land Expedition (BGLE) under John Riddoch Rymill. Northeast Glacier was resurveyed in 1940 by members of the United States Antarctic Service (USAS), who first used this glacier as a sledging route, and so named by them because it lies at the northeast side of their base at Stonington Island.  This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Northeast Glacier" (content from the Geographic Names Information System).
    7.40
    5 votes
    13
    Hooker Glacier

    Hooker Glacier

    Hooker Glacier is one of several glaciers close to the slopes of Aoraki/Mount Cook in the Southern Alps of New Zealand. Though not as large as its neighbour, the Tasman Glacier, it is still impressive, and is some 11 kilometres (roughly 6–7 miles) in length. It is on the southwestern slopes of Aoraki/Mt Cook, and is the source of the Hooker River, a small tributary of the Tasman River, which flows into Lake Pukaki. One of New Zealand's more accessible glaciers, it can be seen clearly from the start of the Copland Track, close to The Hermitage.
    8.50
    4 votes
    14
    Pine Island Glacier

    Pine Island Glacier

    Pine Island Glacier (PIG) is a large ice stream flowing west-northwest along the south side of the Hudson Mountains into Pine Island Bay, Amundsen Sea, Antarctica. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and United States Navy (USN) air photos, 1960–66, and named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) in association with Pine Island Bay. The area drained by Pine Island Glacier comprises about 10 percent of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. Satellite measurements have shown that the Pine Island Glacier Basin has a greater net contribution of ice to the sea than any other ice drainage basin in the world and this has increased due to recent acceleration of the ice stream. The ice stream is extremely remote, with the nearest continually occupied research station at Rothera, nearly 1,300 km (810 mi) away. The area is not claimed by any nations and the Antarctic Treaty prohibits any further claims while it is in force. The Antarctic ice sheet is the largest mass of ice on earth, containing a volume of water equivalent to 57 m (187 ft) of global sea level. The ice sheet forms from snow which falls onto the continent and compacts under its own
    8.50
    4 votes
    15
    Upper Fremont Glacier

    Upper Fremont Glacier

    • Glacier Type: Mountain Glacier
    • Terminus: Moraine
    • Status: Retreating
    Upper Fremont Glacier is located in the Fitzpatrick Wilderness of Shoshone National Forest in the U.S. state of Wyoming. This Wind River Range alpine glacier is associated with the largest grouping of glaciers in the U.S. Rocky Mountains and lies on the north slope of Fremont Peak, the third tallest mountain in Wyoming. Upper Fremont Glacier is at an average altitude of 13,450 ft (4,100 m) and is one the highest altitude glaciers in the American Rockies. Ice core samples were taken from Upper Fremont Glacier in 1990-1991. These ice cores were analyzed for climatic changes as well as alterations of atmospheric chemicals. In 1998 an unbroken ice core sample of 538 ft (164 m) was taken from the glacier and subsequent analysis of the ice showed an abrupt change in the oxygen isotope ratio oxygen-18 to oxygen-16 in conjunction with what is widely regarded as the end of the Little Ice Age, a period of cooler global temperatures between the years 1550 and 1850. A linkage was established with a similar ice core study which had been undertaken on the Quelccaya Ice Cap in Peru, which also demonstrated the same changes in the oxygen isotope ratio during the same period. The climatic
    8.50
    4 votes
    16
    Giétro Glacier

    Giétro Glacier

    The Giétro Glacier or Giétroz Glacier (French: Glacier du Giétro) is a 4 km long valley glacier located in south-western Switzerland. The 1818 Giétroz glacier catastrophe, which led to lake outburst flood, is one of the most famous and most disastrous historical cases in the Swiss Alps. The Giétro Glacier lies on the northern side of the Pennine Alps in the Swiss canton of Valais. It is located in the upper Bagnes Valley, south of Martigny and Verbier. The length of the glacier is 4.55 km (1979) and its area is 5.85 km (1979). The glacier is fed by the snows of Mont Blanc de Cheilon (3,870 m) and La Ruinette (3,875 m). On the upper part, the glacier is relatively flat. It descends to the north on the side of Mont Rouge du Giétro and then curves to the west between Le Pleureur and Mont Rouge. On the lower part, the glacier reaches a steepness of 40% forming a large number of crevasses. The terminus is located at about 2,600 metres. Part of the glacier is linked to the Cheilon Glacier through the Col du Cheilon (3,243 m). The water generated by the glacier ends in the Lake Mauvoisin (artificial lake) and then reaches the Dranse de Bagnes, a tributary of the Rhone. The Giétro Glacier
    8.25
    4 votes
    17
    Pautalia Glacier

    Pautalia Glacier

    Pautalia Glacier (Lednik Pautaliya \'led-nik pa-u-'ta-li-ya\) is a glacier on Burgas Peninsula, Livingston Island, Antarctica bounded by Petko Voyvoda Peak to the west, Sozopol Gap to the northwest, Kaloyan Nunatak to the north and Shabla Knoll to the east. Extending 700 m in northwest-southeast direction and 1.1 km in southwest-northeast direction. It flows southeastward into Bransfield Strait and is named after the ancient Pautalia, ancestor of the present town of Kyustendil in Western Bulgaria. The glacier is located at 62°37′41″S 59°51′50″W / 62.62806°S 59.86389°W / -62.62806; -59.86389. This article includes information from the Antarctic Place-names Commission of Bulgaria which is used with permission.
    8.25
    4 votes
    18
    Stanton Glacier

    Stanton Glacier

    Stanton Glacier is located in the U.S. state of Montana in Flathead National Forest. The glacier is situated in a cirque on the northeast slope of Great Northern Mountain (8,705 ft (2,653 m)). Stanton Glacier is one of several glaciers that have been selected for monitoring by the U.S. Geological Survey's Glacier Monitoring Research program, which is researching changes to the mass balance of glaciers in and surrounding Glacier National Park (U.S.). Stanton Glacier is 1 mile (1.6 km) northwest of Grant Glacier.
    8.25
    4 votes
    19
    Urdoviza Glacier

    Urdoviza Glacier

    Urdoviza Glacier (Lednik Urdoviza \'led-nik ur-do-'vi-za\) is a glacier bounded by the eastern slopes of Oryahovo Heights on Livingston Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica and draining eastwards into Stoyanov Cove of Hero Bay between Agüero Point and Sandanski Point. The glacier extends 2.8 km in the east-west direction and 3 km in the north-south direction. The glacier is named after Cape Urdoviza on the Bulgarian Black Sea coast. The glacier's midpoint is located at 62°31′45″S 60°43′40″W / 62.52917°S 60.72778°W / -62.52917; -60.72778. This article includes information from the Antarctic Place-names Commission of Bulgaria which is used with permission.
    8.25
    4 votes
    20
    Canada Glacier

    Canada Glacier

    The Canada Glacier is a small polar glacier flowing southeast into the northern side of Taylor Valley, Victoria Land in Antarctica. Canada Glacier's seasonal melting feeds Lake Fryxell to the West and Lake Hoare to the East. This glacier receives less than 10 cm of snowfall annually, and is (technically) a desert ecosystem. This glacier is in the Ross Dependency. Terra Nova Expedition (1910–1913), under Robert Scott. Charles S. Wright, a Canadian physicist, was a member of the party that explored this area. Satellite map
    7.00
    5 votes
    21
    Lambert Glacier

    Lambert Glacier

    Lambert Glacier is a major glacier in East Antarctica. At about 60 miles (100 km) wide, over 250 miles (400 km) long, and about 2,500 m deep, it holds the Guinness world record for the world's largest glacier. It drains 8% of the Antarctic ice sheet to the east and south of the Prince Charles Mountains and flows northward to the Amery Ice Shelf. This glacier was delineated and named in 1952 by American geographer John H. Roscoe who made a detailed study of this area from aerial photographs taken by USN Operation Highjump, 1946-47. He gave the name "Baker Three Glacier", using the code name of the Navy photographic aircraft and crew that made three flights in this coastal area in March 1947 resulting in geographic discoveries. The glacier was described in Gazetteer No. 14, Geographic Names of Antarctica (U.S. Board on Geographic Names, 1956), but the feature did not immediately appear on published maps. As a result the name Lambert Glacier, as applied by ANCA in 1957 following mapping of the area by ANARE (Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions) in 1956, has become established for this feature. Named for Bruce P. Lambert, Director of National Mapping in the Australian
    8.00
    4 votes
    22
    Albigna Glacier

    Albigna Glacier

    The Albigna Glacier (Romansh: Vadrec da l'Albigna) is a 3.5 km long glacier (2005) situated in the Bregaglia Range in the canton of Graubünden in Switzerland. In 1973 it had an area of 3.53 km.
    6.80
    5 votes
    23
    Glacier d'Argentière

    Glacier d'Argentière

    The Argentière Glacier is a glacier lying perpendicular to the Chamonix valley above the village of Argentière in Haute-Savoie département, south-eastern France.
    9.00
    3 votes
    24
    Nef Glacier

    Nef Glacier

    • Glacier Type: Mountain Glacier
    Nef Glacier is a glacier located in Laguna San Rafael National Park, in the Aysén del General Carlos Ibáñez del Campo Region of Chile. It trends southeast from Cerro Largo to its terminus in the lake that shared its name. It is the fifth largest glacier in the Northern Patagonian Ice Field, after San Quintín, San Rafael, Steffen and Colonia.
    9.00
    3 votes
    25
    Godwin-Austen Glacier

    Godwin-Austen Glacier

    The Godwin-Austen Glacier is located near K2 in the Gilgit–Baltistan region of Pakistan. Its confluence with the Baltoro Glacier is called Concordia and is one of the most favorite spots for trekking in Pakistan since it provides excellent views of four of the five eight-thousanders in Pakistan. The glacier can be approached via the important Balti town of Skardu.The Karakoram peak K2 in the Himalayas was originally named Mount Godwin-Austin in his honour. A list of notable peaks near Concordia includes:
    7.75
    4 votes
    26
    Iskar Glacier

    Iskar Glacier

    Iskar Glacier (Iskarski Lednik \'is-k&r-ski 'led-nik\) is a glacier in Livingston Island, draining the north slopes of the Tangra Mountains between Helmet Peak to the west and Delchev Peak to the east. It flows northward into Bruix Cove between Yana Point and Rila Point, and is named after the Iskar River in western Bulgaria. The midpoint of the glacier is located at 62°38′20″S 59°59′20″W / 62.63889°S 59.98889°W / -62.63889; -59.98889 This article includes information from the Antarctic Place-names Commission of Bulgaria which is used with permission.
    7.75
    4 votes
    27
    Pimpirev Glacier

    Pimpirev Glacier

    Pimpirev Glacier (Pimpirev Lednik \pim-'pi-rev 'led-nik\) on Livingston Island drains southeastwards towards Pimpirev Beach. It is situated west of Perunika Glacier, south of Tundzha Glacier and the glacial divide between the Drake Passage and Bransfield Strait, and east of Kamchiya Glacier. The feature extends 5.5 km in a southeast-northwest direction, and 1.8 km in northwest-southeast direction. The glacier mostly terminates on the shore, on several occasions penetrating the South Bay waters east-northeast of Ereby Point. The feature is named for Christo Pimpirev, geologist in the First Bulgarian Antarctic Expedition in 1987/88 and leader of subsequent national Antarctic campaigns. The original name Pimpirev Ice Wall was given on October 29, 1996 to the 50-m high rectilinear ice scarp-slope running parallelly to and some 100 m inland from the coast of South Bay northeast of Ereby Point. Reflecting subsequent changes in the ice cap configuration, the present name form was approved for the relevant glacier on November 4, 2005. The glacier is located at 62°36′25″S 60°25′00″W / 62.60694°S 60.4166667°W / -62.60694; -60.4166667 (Mapped by the Spanish Servicio Geográfico del Ejército
    7.75
    4 votes
    28
    Shackleton Glacier

    Shackleton Glacier

    Shackleton Glacier is a major Antarctic glacier, over 96 km (60 mi) long and from 8 to 16 km (5 to 10 mi) wide, descending from the polar plateau from the vicinity of Roberts Massif and flowing north through the Queen Maud Mountains to enter the Ross Ice Shelf between Mount Speed and Waldron Spurs. The Roberts Massif is a remarkable snow-free massif exceeding 2,700 metres (8,860 ft) and about 155 km (60 sq mi) in area. It was visited by the Southern Party of New Zealand GSAE (1961–62), who named it for A.R. Roberts, leader at Scott Base for 1961-62. The glacier was discovered by the USAS (1939–41) and named by US-SCAN for Sir Ernest Shackleton, British Antarctic explorer.
    7.75
    4 votes
    29
    Conness Glacier

    Conness Glacier

    • Glacier Type: Mountain Glacier
    The Conness Glacier is a glacier located on the steep northeast cirque on Mount Conness, east of the Sierra Nevada crest. The glacier is situated at about 11,548 feet (3,520 m). and can be seen from Saddlebag Lake to the east. The glacier is the largest glacier in the Sierra Nevada north of Tioga Pass or Highway 120. In 2004, a study found that since 1900, Conness Glacier had lost half its surface area.
    6.60
    5 votes
    30
    Hubbard Glacier

    Hubbard Glacier

    Hubbard Glacier is a glacier located in eastern Alaska and part of Canada. The longest source for Hubbard Glacier originates 122 kilometres (76 mi) from its snout and is located at about at about 61°00′N 140°09′W / 61°N 140.15°W / 61; -140.15, approximately 8 kilometres (5.0 mi) west of Mt. Walsh with an altitude around 11,000 feet (3,400 m). A shorter tributary glacier begins at the easternmost summit on the Mt. Logan ridge at about 18,300 feet (5,600 m) at about 60°35′0″N 140°22′40″W / 60.583333°N 140.37778°W / 60.583333; -140.37778. Before it reaches the sea, Hubbard is joined by the Valerie Glacier to the west, which, through forward surges of its own ice, has contributed to the advance of the ice flow that experts believe will eventually dam the Russell Fiord from Disenchantment Bay waters. The Hubbard Glacier ice margin has continued to advance for about a century. In May 1986, the Hubbard Glacier surged forward, blocking the outlet of Russell Fjord and creating "Russell Lake." All that summer the new lake filled with runoff; its water level rose 25 metres (82 ft), and the decrease in salinity threatened its sea life. Around midnight on October 8 the dam began to give
    6.60
    5 votes
    31
    Bernardo Glacier

    Bernardo Glacier

    Bernardo Glacier is one of the largest glaciers in the Southern Patagonian Ice Field. It is located northeast of Témpano Glacier, within Bernardo O'Higgins National Park in Chile. The glacier flows westward Bernardo Fjord.
    7.50
    4 votes
    32
    Tyndall Glacier

    Tyndall Glacier

    Tyndall Glacier or Geike Glacier is one of the largest glaciers in the Southern Patagonian Ice Field. It is located in the Torres del Paine National Park, Chile. The glacier has its main calving front in Geikie Lake and like its neighbor, Grey Glacier, it has been significantly retreating for the last years. The glacier is named after the Irish glaciologist John Tyndall.
    7.50
    4 votes
    33
    Lang Glacier

    Lang Glacier

    The Lang Glacier (German: Langgletscher) is a 6.6 km (4.1 mi) long glacier (2005) situated in the Bernese Alps in the canton of Valais in Switzerland. In 1973 it had an area of 10.1 km (3.9 sq mi).
    8.67
    3 votes
    34
    Lower Curtis Glacier

    Lower Curtis Glacier

    Lower Curtis Glacier is located in North Cascades National Park, in the U.S. state of Washington. Named for photographer Asahel Curtis, the glacier is in a cirque on the western slopes of Mount Shuksan. Lower Curtis Glacier is rapidly retreating and has a negative mass balance, meaning that the rate of snow and ice that is falling in the accumulation zone is less than that which is lost each year in the ablation zone. Between 1908 and 1984, the glacier experienced a loss of thickness by 45 meters (147 ft). Between 1984 and 2002, the glacier lost another 6 meters (19 ft) in thickness. Lower Curtis Glacier also lost 28% of its surface area between the end of the little ice age (around 1850) and 1950. Between the years 1951 and 1979, the glacier actually lengthened by 245 meters (800 ft) but has retreated 184 m (600 ft) since 1985, partly due to the tongue of the glacier being on a steep precipice which may have increased the loss of ice at the termini.
    8.67
    3 votes
    35
    Sarpo Laggo Glacier

    Sarpo Laggo Glacier

    The Sarpo Laggo Glacier (Sarpo Laggo: young husband) is a glacier in the autonomous region Xinjiang of China, in the Karakoram mountain range of the Himalayas. It lies north of the Baltoro Muztagh range. It could be reached from the Baltoro glacier on the Pakistani side of the Karakorams via the Old Muztagh Pass northeast of the Trango Towers. It is however easier to approach the glacier from the Chinese side, starting a long hike at Kashgar on the Karakoram Highway and finally passing K2's northern base camp. The Glacier is named after Francis Younghusband, who was the first person to pass the Old Mustagh Pass and thus enter the Sarpo Laggo region. There is another glacier not far away, also named after him: Younghusband glacier (also known as Biango glacier) flows from Muztagh Tower towards the Baltoro Glacier.
    8.67
    3 votes
    36
    Southern Patagonian Ice Field

    Southern Patagonian Ice Field

    The Southern Patagonian Ice Field (Spanish: Hielos Continentales or Campo de Hielo Sur), located at the Southern Patagonic Andes between Argentina and Chile, is the world's second largest contiguous extrapolar ice field. It is the bigger of two remnant parts of the Patagonian Ice Sheet, which covered all of southern Chile during the Last glacial period, locally called the Llanquihue glaciation. The Southern Patagonian Ice Field extends from parallels 48° 20′ S to 51° 30′ S for approximately 350 kilometres (220 mi), and has an area of 16,800 km (6,500 sq mi), of which roughly 14,000 km (5,400 sq mi) fall within Chile and 2,500 km (970 sq mi) within Argentina. The ice mass feeds dozens of glaciers in the area, among which are the Upsala (902 km), Viedma (978 km) and Perito Moreno (258 km) in the Los Glaciares National Park in Argentina, and the Pío XI Glacier or Bruggen Glacier (1,265 km, the largest in area and longest in the southern hemisphere outside of Antarctica), O'Higgins (820 km), Grey (270 km) and Tyndall (331 km) in Chile. The glaciers going to the west flow into the fjords of the Patagonian channels of the Pacific Ocean; those going to the East flow into the Patagonian
    8.67
    3 votes
    37
    Taku Glacier

    Taku Glacier

    Taku Glacier is a tidewater glacier located in Taku Inlet in the U.S. state of Alaska, just southeast of the city of Juneau. Recognized as the deepest and thickest glacier known in the world, the Taku Glacier is measured at 4,845 feet (1,477 m) thick. It is about 55 kilometres (34 mi) long The glacier was originally named Schultze Glacier in 1883 and the Foster Glacier in 1890, but Taku, the name the local Tlingit natives had for the glacier, eventually stuck. It is nestled in the Coast Mountains and originates in the Juneau Icefield. It is the largest glacier in the icefield and one of the southernmost tidewater glaciers of the northern hemisphere. The glacier, which converges with the Taku River at Taku Inlet, has a history of advancing until it blocks the river, creating a lake, followed by a dramatic break of the ice dam. The most recent of these advances occurred in 1750. The glacier has advanced 7.5 kilometres (4.7 mi) since 1890, and is 1.5 kilometres (0.93 mi) from Taku Point. It is the only advancing glacier of the 20 major glaciers of the Juneau Icefield. If the advance continues it will again block the river, but this appears unlikely at present. Since 1946, the glacier
    8.67
    3 votes
    38
    Drygalski Glacier

    Drygalski Glacier

    Drygalski Glacier (64°43′S 60°44′W / 64.717°S 60.733°W / -64.717; -60.733) is a broad glacier, 18 miles (29 km) long, which flows southeast from Herbert Plateau through a rectangular re-entrant to a point immediately north of Sentinel Nunatak on Nordenskjöld Coast, the east coast of Graham Land, Antarctica. It was discovered in 1902 by the Swedish Antarctic Expedition, under Otto Nordenskiöld, and named "Drygalski Bay" after Professor Erich von Drygalski. The feature was determined to be a glacier by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey in 1947.  This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Drygalski Glacier" (content from the Geographic Names Information System).
    10.00
    2 votes
    39
    Grinnell Glacier

    Grinnell Glacier

    • Glacier Type: Mountain Glacier
    • Terminus: Proglacial lake
    • Status: Retreating
    Grinnell Glacier is located in the heart of Glacier National Park (U.S.) in the U.S. state of Montana. The glacier is named for George Bird Grinnell, an early American conservationist and explorer, who was also a strong advocate of ensuring the creation of Glacier National Park. The glacier is in the Lewis Range and rests on the north flank of Mount Gould at an altitude averaging 7,000 feet (2,100 m), in the Many Glacier region of the park. The glacier has been one of the most photographed glaciers in the park and many of these photographs date back to the mid 19th century. When compared with images taken over subsequent years, the glacier has obviously retreated substantially. In 1850, at the end of what has been referred to as the Little Ice Age, Grinnell Glacier measured 710 acres (2.9 km), including the area of The Salamander Glacier, an ice apron or shelf glacier that used to be attached to Grinnell, but is now separate. By 1993, Grinnell Glacier measured 220 acres (0.89 km) and The Salamander measured 57 acres (0.23 km). Between 1966 and 2005, Grinnell Glacier lost almost 40 percent of its acreage. Glaciologists have predicted that all the glaciers in the park, including
    10.00
    2 votes
    40
    Astrolabe Glacier

    Astrolabe Glacier

    Astrolabe Glacier is a glacier 4 miles (6 km) wide and 10 miles (16 km) long, flowing north-northeast from the continental ice and terminating at the coast in a prominent tongue at the east side of Geologie Archipelago. It was first sighted in 1840 by the French expedition under Captain Jules Dumont d'Urville, although no glaciers were noted on d'Urville's chart of this coast but a formidable icy dike with perpendicular flanks of 37.7 m high according to the joined plate, corresponding to the glacier tongue. The glacier was photographed from the air by U.S. Navy Operation Highjump in January 1947. It was charted by the French Antarctic Expedition, 1949–51, and named after d'Urville's flagship, the Astrolabe. The Astrolabe Glacier Tongue (66°42′S 140°5′E / 66.7°S 140.083°E / -66.7; 140.083) is a prominent glacier tongue about 3 miles (5 km) wide and 4 miles (6 km) long, extending northeast from Astrolabe Glacier.
    7.25
    4 votes
    41
    Dobrudzha Glacier

    Dobrudzha Glacier

    Dobrudzha Glacier (Lednik Dobrudzha \'led-nik 'do-bru-dzha\) is located on the southeast side of Tangra Mountains, Burgas Peninsula, eastern Livingston Island, and is bounded by Ruse Peak and Asen Peak to the north and by Kuber Peak to the west. The glacier flows southeastward into Bransfield Strait. The glacier is named after the Dobrudzha region in northeastern Bulgaria. The midpoint is located at 62°39′28″S 59°57′15″W / 62.65778°S 59.95417°W / -62.65778; -59.95417 which is This article includes information from the Antarctic Place-names Commission of Bulgaria which is used with permission.
    7.25
    4 votes
    42
    Frostisen

    Frostisen

    Frostisen is a glacier on the border of the municipalities of Ballangen and Narvik in Nordland county, Norway. It is one of the larger plateau glaciers in Norway. Frostisen covers an area of about 25 square kilometres (9.7 sq mi). The elevation of the glacier ranges from 840 to 1,710 metres (2,760 to 5,610 ft) above sea level. The glacier lies near the Skjomen fjord, a branch of the Ofotfjord, just southwest of the city Narvik. The lakes Geitvatnet, Isvatnet, Kjelvatnet, Nordre Bukkevatnet and Søre Bukkevatnet all lie just to the southwest of the glacier.
    7.25
    4 votes
    43
    Hofsjökull

    Hofsjökull

    Hofsjökull 64°49′N 18°49′W / 64.817°N 18.817°W / 64.817; -18.817 (Icelandic: “temple glacier”) is the third largest glacier in Iceland after Vatnajökull and Langjökull and the largest active volcano in the country. It situates at the west of the Highlands of Iceland and north of the mountain range Kerlingarfjöll, between the two largest glaciers of Iceland. It covers an area of 925 km, reaching 1,765 m (5,791 ft) at its summit. The subglacial volcano is a shield type with caldera. Hofsjökull is the source of several rivers including the Þjórsá, Iceland's longest river. In the southeast of Iceland, between the easternmost glacier tongue of Vatnajökull (Axajökull) and Þrándarjökull, is a smaller glacier (area about 4 km²), which is also called Hofsjökull.
    7.25
    4 votes
    44
    Jakobshavn Isbræ

    Jakobshavn Isbræ

    • Glacier Type: Outlet Glacier
    Jakobshavn Glacier, also known as the Jakobshavn Isbræ (in Danish) and Sermeq Kujalleq (in Greenlandic), is a large outlet glacier in West Greenland. It is located near the Greenlandic town of Ilulissat (Danish: Jakobshavn) and ends at the sea in the Ilulissat Icefjord. Jakobshavn Glacier drains 6.5% of the Greenland ice sheet and produces around 10% of all Greenland icebergs. Some 35 billion tonnes of icebergs calve off and pass out of the fjord every year. Icebergs breaking from the glacier are often so large (up to a kilometer in height) that they are too tall to float down the fjord and lie stuck on the bottom of its shallower areas, sometimes for years, until they are broken up by the force of the glacier and icebergs further up the fjord. Studied for over 250 years, Jakobshavn Glacier has helped develop our understanding of climate change and icecap glaciology. Jakobshavn has been a name used for this glacier in scientific literature since 1853 when Danish geologist Hinrich Johannes Rink referred to it as Jakobshavn Isstrøm (Danish for Jakobshavn Ice Stream). It is sometimes referred to in the international scientific literature (by glaciologists) as Jakobshavn Isbræ glacier.
    7.25
    4 votes
    45
    Unteraar Glacier

    Unteraar Glacier

    The Unteraar Glacier (Unteraargletscher in German) is the larger of the two sources of the Aar river in the Bernese Alps. It emerges from the association of the Finsteraar Glacier (near the Finsteraarhorn) and the Lauteraar Glacier (near the Lauteraarhorn) and flows for about 6 km (3.7 mi) to the east down to the Grimselsee near the Grimsel Pass. In total the glacier is 12.95 km (8.05 mi) long and 29.48 km (11.38 sq mi) in area (1973).
    7.25
    4 votes
    46
    Biferten Glacier

    Biferten Glacier

    The Biferten Glacier (German: Bifertenfirn) is a 4 km long glacier (2005) situated in the Glarus Alps in the canton of Glarus in Switzerland. In 1973 it had an area of 2.81 km². The glacier is located east of the Tödi.
    8.33
    3 votes
    47
    Perunika Glacier

    Perunika Glacier

    Perunika Glacier (Lednik Perunika \'led-nik pe-ru-'ni-ka\) is an 8 km long and 3 km wide (average) roughly crescent-shaped glacier in eastern Livingston Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica. Its head is bounded by Pliska Ridge to the south-southwest, Nesebar Gap to the south, Wörner Gap to the east, and Bowles Ridge to the north-northeast. It drains northwestwards between Burdick Ridge and Bowles Ridge, then north of Rezen Knoll turns west-southwest and flows into the head of Emona Anchorage between Bulgarian Beach and Pimpirev Beach. The glacier is heavily crevassed in its lower half, receiving ice influx also from Balkan Snowfield and from the part of the island’s ice cap that is located west of Hemus Peak and Gurev Gap and south of Saedinenie Snowfield, and is draining southwards. It exhibits pyroclastic phenomena typical of the region’s glaciology and resulting from volcanic activities at Deception Island not 40 km away. The glacier was mapped by the Spanish Servicio Geográfico del Ejército in 1991, the lower portion in greater detail. Bulgarian remapping of Perunika Glacier’s terminus from a survey made during the summer of 1995-96; mapping in 2005 and 2009 from
    8.33
    3 votes
    48
    Gangotri Glacier

    Gangotri Glacier

    Gangotri Glacier is located in Uttarkashi District, Uttarakhand, India in a region bordering China. This glacier, source of the Ganges, is one of the largest in the Himalayas with an estimated volume of over 27 cubic kilometers. The glacier is about 30 kilometres long (19 miles) and 2 to 4 km (1 to 2 mi) wide. Around the glacier are the peaks of the Gangotri Group, including several peaks notable for extremely challenging climbing routes, such as Shivling, Thalay Sagar, Meru, and Bhagirathi III. It flows roughly northwest, originating in a cirque below Chaukhamba, the highest peak of the group. The terminus of the Gangotri Glacier is said to resemble a cow's mouth, and the place is called Gomukh or Gaumukh (gou, cow + mukh, face). Gomukh, which is about 18 km (11.2 mi) from the town of Gangotri, is the precise source of the Bhagirathi river, an important tributary of the Ganges. Gomukh is situated near the base of Shivling; in between lies the Tapovan meadow. The Gangotri glacier is a traditional Hindu pilgrimage site. Devout Hindus consider bathing in the icy waters near Gangotri town to be a holy ritual, and many make the trek to Gomukh and Tapovan. In recent times, it has been
    9.50
    2 votes
    49
    Mer de Glace

    Mer de Glace

    The Mer de Glace (Sea of Ice) is a glacier located on the northern slopes of the Mont Blanc massif, in the Alps. At 7 kilometres (4.3 mi) long and 200 metres (660 ft) deep, it is the longest glacier in France. It originates at an elevation of 2,400 metres (7,900 ft) where it is fed by the confluence of Glacier du Géant, Glacier de Lechaud, and Cascade du Talèfre, north of Mont Tacul, and descends to 1,400 metres (4,600 ft). It flows north-north-west between Aiguille du Moine on the east and Trélaporte on the west. Le Grand Dru lies to the north east. It was once easily visible from Chamonix, but has been shrinking and is now barely visible from below. It lies in the Chamonix valley, it was the first place in the valley to have a ready-made tourist attraction. The Mer de Glace, like all glaciers, it is constantly renewed under the effect of two phenomena: accumulation, notably due to snowfall and ablation, essentially due to melting. The Mer de Glace flows permanently under the effect of its own weight, crusting crevasses, seracs or pockets of water to form, depending on the type of ground. The glacier's speed, although not perceptible to the naked eye, is considerable. From more
    9.50
    2 votes
    50
    Moming Glacier

    Moming Glacier

    The Moming Glacier (French: Glacier de Moming) is a 3 km long glacier (2005) situated in the Pennine Alps in the canton of Valais in Switzerland. In 1973 it had an area of 6.39 km.
    9.50
    2 votes
    51
    Tazlina Glacier

    Tazlina Glacier

    Tazlina Glacier is a 25-mile-long (40 km) glacier in the U.S. state of Alaska. It begins 1.5 miles (2.4 km) north of Mount Cashman and flows north to its terminus one mile (1.6 km) south of Tazlina Lake and 43 miles (69 km) north of Valdez. Tazlina glacier is the largest northward flowing glacier in the Chugach Mountains. The terminus of the glacier is retreating and thinning.
    9.50
    2 votes
    52
    Baltoro Glacier

    Baltoro Glacier

    • Glacier Type: Mountain Glacier
    The Baltoro Glacier, at 62 kilometers long, is one of the longest glaciers outside the polar regions. It is located in Baltistan, in the Gilgit-Baltistan region of Pakistan, and runs through part of the Karakoram mountain range. The Baltoro Muztagh lies to the north and east of the glacier, while the Masherbrum Mountains lie to the south. At 8,611 m (28,251 ft), K2 is the highest mountain in the region, and three others within 20 km top 8,000 m. The glacier gives rise to the Shigar River, which is a tributary of the Indus River. Several large tributary glaciers feed the main Baltoro glacier, including the Godwin Austen Glacier, flowing south from K2; the Abruzzi and the various Gasherbrum Glaciers, flowing from the Gasherbrum group of peaks; the Vigne Glacier, flowing from Chogolisa, and the Yermandendu Glacier, flowing from Masherbrum. The confluence of the main Baltoro Glacier with the Godwin Austen Glacier is known as Concordia; this location and K2 base camp are popular trekking destinations. The trough of this glacier is very wide. Small valley glaciers form icefalls where they meet the trunk glacier. The sidewalls vary from very steep to precipitous. The glacier has carved
    7.00
    4 votes
    53
    Upper Grindelwald Glacier

    Upper Grindelwald Glacier

    The Upper Grindelwald Glacier (German: Oberer Grindelwaldgletscher) is one of the two valley glaciers south of Grindelwald on the northern side of the Bernese Alps, in the Canton of Berne (the other being the Lower Grindelwald Glacier). It has a length of about 6 km (3.7 mi) and covers an area of nearly 10 km (3.9 sq mi). The Upper Grindelwald Glacier arises from a vast snow field south of Schreckhorn and north of Wetterhorn. The glacier tongue is currently at around 1,400 metres (4,600 ft) above sea level, making it one of the lowest glaciers in the Alps.
    7.00
    4 votes
    54
    Trift Glacier

    Trift Glacier

    The Trift Glacier (German: Triftgletscher) is a 5 km (3.1 mi) long glacier (2005) situated in the Urner Alps in the canton of Berne in Switzerland. In 1973 it had an area of 16.6 km (6.4 sq mi).
    6.00
    5 votes
    55
    Chenega Glacier

    Chenega Glacier

    • Glacier Type: Tidewater glacier
    • Terminus: Ocean
    • Status: Retreating
    Chenega Glacier is a tidewater glacier located in Prince William Sound and on the Kenai Peninsula in the U.S. state of Alaska. Chenega Glacier was named in 1905 for Chenega Island and the nearby community of Chenega Bay. The glacier is a tourist attraction, drawing many kayakers and small cruise lines to Nassau Fjord where the glacier meets the ocean. Most individual expeditions to the glacier originate in the Prince William Sound community of Whittier. The Chenega Glacier finds its source in the Sargent Icefield. The glacier is the namesake of the Alaska Marine Highway fast ferry M/V Chenega.
    8.00
    3 votes
    56
    Mittelaletsch Glacier

    Mittelaletsch Glacier

    The Mittelaletsch Glacier (German: Mittelaletschgletscher) is a 5 km long glacier (2005) situated in the Bernese Alps in the canton of Valais in Switzerland. In 1973 it had an area of 8.31 km.
    8.00
    3 votes
    57
    Greenland ice sheet

    Greenland ice sheet

    The Greenland ice sheet (Kalaallisut: Sermersuaq) is a vast body of ice covering 1,710,000 square kilometres (660,235 sq mi), roughly 80% of the surface of Greenland. It is the second largest ice body in the world, after the Antarctic Ice Sheet. The ice sheet is almost 2,400 kilometres (1,500 mi) long in a north-south direction, and its greatest width is 1,100 kilometres (680 mi) at a latitude of 77°N, near its northern margin. The mean altitude of the ice is 2,135 metres (7,005 ft). The thickness is generally more than 2 km (1.24 mi) and over 3 km (1.86 mi) at its thickest point. It is not the only ice mass of Greenland – isolated glaciers and small ice caps cover between 76,000 and 100,000 square kilometres (29,344 and 38,610 sq mi) around the periphery. Some scientists predict that climate change may be near a "tipping point" where the entire ice sheet will melt in about 2000 years. If the entire 2,850,000 cubic kilometres (683,751 cu mi) of ice were to melt, it would lead to a global sea level rise of 7.2 m (23.6 ft). The Greenland Ice Sheet is also sometimes referred to under the term inland ice, or its Danish equivalent, indlandsis. It is also sometimes referred to as an ice
    6.75
    4 votes
    58
    Mendenhall Glacier

    Mendenhall Glacier

    Mendenhall Glacier is a glacier about 12 miles (19 km) long located in Mendenhall Valley, about 12 miles (19 km) from downtown Juneau in the southeast area of the U.S. state of Alaska. Originally known as Sitaantaagu ("the Glacier Behind the Town") or Aak'wtaaksit ("the Glacier Behind the Little Lake") by the Tlingits, the glacier was named Auke (Auk) Glacier by naturalist John Muir for the Tlingit Auk Kwaan (or Aak'w Kwaan) band in 1888. In 1891 it was renamed in honor of Thomas Corwin Mendenhall. It extends from the Juneau Icefield, its source, to Mendenhall Lake and ultimately the Mendenhall River. The Juneau Icefield Research Program has monitored the outlet glaciers of the Juneau Icefield since 1942, including Mendenhall Glacier. From 1951–1958 the terminus of the glacier, which flows into suburban Juneau, has retreated 1,900 feet (580 m). The glacier has also receded 1.75 miles (2.82 km) since 1958, when Mendenhall Lake was created, and over 2.5 miles (4.0 km) since 1500. The end of the glacier currently has a negative glacier mass balance and will continue to retreat in the foreseeable future. Given that average yearly temperatures are currently increasing, and the outlook
    6.75
    4 votes
    59
    Minor Glacier

    Minor Glacier

    • Glacier Type: Mountain Glacier
    Minor Glacier is located in Bridger-Teton National Forest, in the U.S. state of Wyoming on the west side of the Continental Divide in the northern Wind River Range. Minor Glacier is in the Bridger Wilderness and is part of the largest grouping of glaciers in the American Rocky Mountains. The glacier is situated below the west flank of Gannett Peak, the tallest mountain in Wyoming.
    6.75
    4 votes
    60
    San Francisco Glacier

    San Francisco Glacier

    The San Francisco Glacier is a glacier in Monumento Natural El Morado Natural Park a hundred kilometers away from Santiago, Chile. It is a tourist attraction.
    6.75
    4 votes
    61
    Brunegg Glacier

    Brunegg Glacier

    The Brunegg Glacier (German: Brunegggletscher) is a 4 km (2.5 mi) long glacier (2005) situated in the Pennine Alps in the canton of Valais in Switzerland. In 1973 it had an area of 6.68 km (2.58 sq mi). The glacier is located north of Bishorn and Weisshorn.
    9.00
    2 votes
    62
    Struma Glacier

    Struma Glacier

    Struma Glacier (Lednik Struma \'led-nik 'stru-ma\) is a glacier in eastern Livingston Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica draining the area between Bowles Ridge and Melnik Ridge. The glacier is 4.8 km long and 1.5 km wide, flowing eastwards into Moon Bay south of Sindel Point and north of Elemag Point. It is bounded by Melnik Ridge to the north, Yankov Gap to the west and Bowles Ridge to the south. First crossed by the Bulgarians Lyubomir Ivanov and Doychin Vasilev from Camp Academia on 28 December 2004. The glacier is named after the Struma River in Bulgaria and forms part of the overland route between Pirdop Gate and Yankov Gap. The midpoint is located at 62°36′25″S 60°07′00″W / 62.60694°S 60.1166667°W / -62.60694; -60.1166667. This article includes information from the Antarctic Place-names Commission of Bulgaria which is used with permission.
    9.00
    2 votes
    63
    Chaney Glacier

    Chaney Glacier

    Chaney Glacier is located in the U.S. state of Montana in Glacier National Park (U.S.). The glacier is situated in a cirque to the southeast of Mount Kipp on the eastern side (Glacier County) of the Continental Divide. Chaney Glacier is one of several glaciers that have been selected for monitoring by the U.S. Geological Survey's Glacier Monitoring Research program, which is researching changes to the mass balance of glaciers in and surrounding Glacier National Park. The glacier is being monitored using remote sensing equipment and repeat photography, where images of the glacier are taken from identical locations periodically. Since 1911, Chaney glacier has retreated considerably. Between 1966 and 2005, the glacier lost over 29 percent of its surface area. The repeat photographs below document the changes to the glacier from 1911 to 2005.
    5.80
    5 votes
    64
    Diablerets Glacier

    Diablerets Glacier

    The Diablerets Glacier (French: Glacier des Diablerets) is a glacier situated on the summit of Les Diablerets in the Bernese Alps. It covers an area of approximatively 1 km. The Diablerets Glacier is often confused with the nearby much larger and popular Tsanfleuron Glacier.
    5.80
    5 votes
    65
    Austfonna

    Austfonna

    Austfonna is an ice cap located on Nordaustlandet in the Svalbard archipelago in Norway. Covering an area of 8,105 km (8,492 km including Vegavonna ) it is the largest ice cap by area and with 1,900 km (excluding Vegafonna) the second largest by volume in Europe, after the Vatnajökull in Iceland (not counting the still larger Severny Island ice cap of Novaya Zemlya, Russia, which is located in the extreme northeast of Europe), and the seventh largest in the world . Austfonna has a thickness of up to 560 metres (235 meters average thickness), and is and 200 km in circumference. The ice dome reaches an elevation of 783 meters above sea level. The southern third of Austfonna is sometimes called Sørfonna, which is a separate ice cap, separated from the main part of Austfonna by a long, ice-filled depression, and forming a separate crestal dome.(paper of 1956) Vegafonna in the southwest is also connected to Austfonna proper, specifically to (Sørfonna), and is separated from it by Erica Valley. Vegafonna also forms a separate dome. Immediately west of Vegafonna is Glittne ice cap, which is considered part of the former. Vestfonna in the northwest of the island is a totally separate ice
    7.67
    3 votes
    66
    Langjökull

    Langjökull

    Langjökull (Icelandic for "long glacier") is the second largest ice cap in Iceland (953 km), after Vatnajökull. It is situated in the west of the Icelandic interior or Highlands of Iceland and can be seen clearly from Haukadalur. The glacier is located at 64°45′N 19°59′W / 64.75°N 19.983°W / 64.75; -19.983. Its volume is 195 km³ and the ice is up to 580 m (1,900 ft) thick. The highest point of the ice cap (at Baldjökull at the northern end of Langjökull) is about 1,450 m (4,760 ft) above sea level. In the past, the largest recorded surface area was in 1840. The glacier is roughly parallel to the direction of the country's active volcanic zone (see volcanism in Iceland): north-east to south-west. It is about 50 km (31 mi) long and 15 to 20 km (9.3 to 12 mi) wide, and has a slightly narrower point roughly between the lake Hvítárvatn on the Kjölur mountain road to the east and the Þrístapajökull glacier to the west, near another smaller glacier, Eiríksjökull, which is not quite connected to Langjökull. It is the nearest large glacier to Reykjavík. The area of the glacier includes some mountains, e.g. Jarlhettur ("The earl's hat") on the east side of Langjökull, a palagonitic
    7.67
    3 votes
    67
    Peshtera Glacier

    Peshtera Glacier

    The Peshtera Glacier (Bulgarian Lednik Peshtera) is a glacier situated on the Rozhen Peninsula, Livingston Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica. The head of the glacier is bounded by MacKay Peak (approx. 700 m) to the southwest and Tervel Peak to the east. It flows 2 km north-northwestward to terminate at the northeast extremity of Zagore Beach. The feature is named after the Bulgarian town of Peshtera, in Pazardzhik Province. The glacier is located at 62°42′40″S 60°18′00″W / 62.71111°S 60.3°W / -62.71111; -60.3. This article includes information from the Antarctic Place-names Commission of Bulgaria which is used with permission.
    7.67
    3 votes
    68
    Rettenbach glacier

    Rettenbach glacier

    The Rettenbach glacier is a glacier located near Sölden, in the Ötztal Alps of Austria. During the winter the glacier is accessible by cable car and from spring time by car, using the Gletscherstraße. During autumn, usually in October, the 'FIS Ski world cup' is opened with the first competition of the season on the glacier. The glacier is also an attractive area for regular skiers and plays an important role in connecting the main ski area of Sölden with the Tiefenbach glacier.
    7.67
    3 votes
    69
    Vorab Glacier

    Vorab Glacier

    The Vorab Glacier (German: Vorabfirn, Romansh: Glatscher dil Vorab) is a 2 km long glacier (2005) situated in the Glarus Alps in the cantons of Glarus and Graubünden. It lies on the east side of the Vorab, between 2,600 and 3,000 metres above sea level. In 1973 it had an area of 2.17 km².
    7.67
    3 votes
    70
    Berkovitsa Glacier

    Berkovitsa Glacier

    Berkovitsa Glacier (Lednik Berkovitsa \'led-nik ber-'ko-vi-tsa\) is a glacier on Livingston Island, Antarctica. It is bounded by the southeastern slopes of Oryahovo Heights and the northwestern slopes of Snow Peak. It extends 4km in southeast-northwest direction and 2.8km in northwest-southeast direction, and drains northeastwards into Hero Bay between Avitohol Point and Remetalk Point. The glacier is named after the town of Berkovitsa in the western Balkan Mountains, Bulgaria. The glacier is centred at 62°34′20″S 60°41′15″W / 62.57222°S 60.6875°W / -62.57222; -60.6875. This article includes information from the Antarctic Place-names Commission of Bulgaria which is used with permission.
    10.00
    1 votes
    71
    Boulder Glacier

    Boulder Glacier

    • Glacier Type: Mountain Glacier
    • Terminus: Moraine
    • Status: Retreating
    Boulder Glacier is located on the southeast slope of Mount Baker, a stratovolcano near the Pacific coast of North America in the Cascade Range of Washington. Boulder Glacier is the sixth largest on Mount Baker with an area of 1.3 mi (3.4 km) (Post et al. 1971). It flows from the summit crater between Grant Peak (10,781 feet / 3,286 m) and Sherman Peak (10,140 feet / 3,091 m) to about 5,000 feet (1,524 m). It is noteworthy for retreating 1,480 feet (450 m) between 1987 and 2005 leaving newly exposed rock and soil behind. Between 1850 and 1950, the glacier retreated 8,700 feet (2,650 m). William Long of the United States Forest Service observed the glacier beginning to advance due to cooler/wetter weather in 1953. This was followed by a 2,438 feet (743 m) advance by 1979. The 1979 terminus position is where the small stream enters Boulder Creek from the southwest. Observations in 2005 suggest that the lowest thousand feet or several hundred meters of the glacier is stagnant and will likely disappear. In the pictures, this section of the glacier is gray with rock debris and has few crevasses. On the west side of Boulder Creek is a small waterfall revealed by the recent recession of
    10.00
    1 votes
    72
    Harding Icefield

    Harding Icefield

    The Harding Icefield is an expansive icefield located in the Kenai Mountains of the Kenai Peninsula in Alaska. It is also partially located in Kenai Fjords National Park. It is named for United States President Warren G. Harding. The Harding Icefield can claim to cover over 300 square miles (777 km) in its entirety (although, if one were to count its glaciers which descend from the icefield in all directions, the icefield measures in at over 1,100 square miles (2,849 km) The icefield spawns up to 40 glaciers of all types. Some of the more notable glaciers include the Tustumena Glacier, Exit Glacier, and McCarty Glacier. The Exit Glacier, however, is the most accessible of the glaciers being reached by a spur road off of the Seward Highway. The icefield is also one of four remaining icefields in the United States and is the largest icefield contained entirely within the United States. The icefield itself receives over 400 inches of snow each year. Seward residents generally ignored the huge icefield west of town before 1922. The construction of the Spruce Creek trail that year, however, made it possible to view the upper portions of the icecap, and President Harding's promise to
    10.00
    1 votes
    73
    Nabesna Glacier

    Nabesna Glacier

    Nabesna Glacier is a glacier in the U.S. state of Alaska. Fed by deep snowfall in the Wrangell Mountains, the 53 mile (85 km) long Nabesna is the longest valley glacier in North America and the world's longest interior valley glacier. The glacier flows from an extensive icefield which covers the northern flanks of 14,163 feet (4,317 m) Mount Wrangell, a large shield volcano. It heads initially east past other volcanic peaks including Mount Blackburn and Atna Peaks and then turns north to its terminus near 3,000 ft (900 m) elevation, about 15 mi (24 km) south of the old mining settlement of Nabesna at the end of the Nabesna Road. The vast expanse and length of the Nabesna is fed by approximately 40 tributary glaciers. Melting ice at its terminus forms the Nabesna River, which flows northward through Tetlin National Wildlife Refuge and into the Tanana River. The glacier was named for the Nabesna River in 1902 by F. C. Schrader of the U.S. Geological Survey. It provides the normal route of access into the heart of the eastern Wrangell Mountains, for ski mountaineers, climbers, and scientists. Ski-equipped bush planes can typically land between 6,000 and 7,000 ft (1,800-2,100 m) on
    10.00
    1 votes
    74
    Paradies Glacier

    Paradies Glacier

    The Paradies Glacier (German: Paradiesgletscher) is a 2.27 km long glacier (2007) situated in the Lepontine Alps in the canton of Graubünden in Switzerland. In 1973 it had an area of 3.99 km².
    10.00
    1 votes
    75
    Zemu Glacier

    Zemu Glacier

    Zemu Glacier is the largest glacier in the Eastern Himalaya. It is about 26 kilometres (16 mi) in length and found at the base of the Kangchenjunga in the Sikkim Himalaya, India. It may be one of the sources for the Teesta River.
    10.00
    1 votes
    76
    Johns Hopkins Glacier

    Johns Hopkins Glacier

    Johns Hopkins Glacier is a 12-mile (19 km) long glacier located in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve in the U.S. state of Alaska. It begins on the east slopes of Lituya Mountain and Mount Salisbury, and trends east to the head of Johns Hopkins Inlet, 1 mile (1.6 km) southwest of the terminus of Clark Glacier and 79 miles (127 km) northwest of Hoonah. It was named after Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland in 1893 by H.F. Reid.
    6.50
    4 votes
    77
    Queets Glacier

    Queets Glacier

    Queets Glacier is a glacier located in the Olympic Mountains in Olympic National Park. The body of ice lies on the northwest side of Mount Queets. Starting at an elevation of about 6,400 feet (2,000 m), the glacier descends northwest, bounded by two arêtes on either side. The ice reaches as low as 5,100 ft (1,600 m) before terminating and giving rise to some of the headwaters of the Queets River. There are several bodies of ice and snow located nearby the glacier.
    6.50
    4 votes
    78
    Magura Glacier

    Magura Glacier

    Magura Glacier (Lednik Magura \'led-nik ma-'gu-ra\) is located to the north of M'Kean Point on the southeast side of Tangra Mountains on Livingston Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica and is bounded by Great Needle Peak to the west, Vitosha Saddle, Vihren Peak and Helmet Peak to the northwest, Plovdiv Peak and Shishman Peak to the north, and Devin Saddle and Kuber Peak to the northeast. Extending 3.5 km in southwest-northeast direction and 1.9 km in northwest-southeast direction. It flows southeastward into Bransfield Strait and is named after Magura Cave in Bulgaria. The midpoint of the glacier is located at 62°39′55″S 60°00′00″W / 62.66528°S 60°W / -62.66528; -60 (Bulgarian mapping in 2005 and 2009). This article includes information from the Antarctic Place-names Commission of Bulgaria which is used with permission.
    8.50
    2 votes
    79
    Rhône Glacier

    Rhône Glacier

    The Rhone Glacier, or sometimes Rhône Glacier (German: Rhonegletscher) is a glacier in the Swiss Alps and the source of the Rhone River and one of the primary contributors to Lake Geneva in the far eastern end of the Swiss canton of Valais. Because the Glacier is located close to the Furka Pass road it is easily accessible. The Rhone Glacier is the largest glacier in the Urner Alps. It lies on the south side of the range at the source of the Rhone. The Undri Triftlimi (3,081 m) connects it to the Trift Glacier. The glacier is located on the northernmost part of the canton of Valais, between the Grimsel Pass and the Furka Pass and is part of the Oberwald municipality. The Dammastock (3,630 m) is the highest summit above the glacier. The Rhone Glacier is easily accessible so its evolution is observed since the 19th century. The glacier lost ~1300 m during the last 120 years leaving back a track of naked stone.
    8.50
    2 votes
    80
    Stikine Icecap

    Stikine Icecap

    The Stikine Icecap (sometimes referred to as the Stikine Icefield) is a large icefield straddled on the Alaska–British Columbia boundary in the Alaska Panhandle region. It lies in the Boundary Ranges of the Coast Mountains. Within the United States, most of it is under the administration of the Tongass National Forest and is part of the Stikine-LeConte Wilderness within the national forest. An extremely large icefield, the icecap is a primary source for both the Taku River, which forms its northern boundary, and the Taku's southern tributaries, and also the Stikine River and its lower western tributaries, notably the Chutine, which form its southern and southwestern boundary, respectively. The Stikine Icecap is the parent icefield of the LeConte and Sawyer Glaciers on its US side, and the Great Glacier on its Canadian side. Also on the Canadian side and entering the lower Stikine, like the Great Glacier, are the Mud and Flood Glaciers, which form the boundaries of the small Boundary Range, which is an eastern abutment of the range comprising the Stikine Icecap and marks the approximate boundary claimed by the United States prior to the Alaska Boundary Settlement of 1903. The
    8.50
    2 votes
    81
    Variegated Glacier

    Variegated Glacier

    Variegated Glacier is one of several glaciers which connect to Russell Fjord in Alaska. Variegated Glacier has been of considerable scientific interest because it surges every 20 years.
    8.50
    2 votes
    82
    Wulfila Glacier

    Wulfila Glacier

    Wulfila Glacier (Lednik Wulfila \'led-nik vul-'fi-la\) is located on the southern slopes of Breznik Heights, Greenwich Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica and is bounded by Oborishte Ridge to the northwest, Nevlya Peak to the north, Terter Peak and Razgrad Peak to the northeast, and Ephraim Bluff to the southeast. It extends 3 km in northwest-southeast direction, and 2 km in northeast-southwest direction, draining southwestwards into McFarlane Strait between the base of Provadiya Hook and Ephraim Bluff. The glacier is named after Bishop Wulfila (311-383 AD) of Nicopolis ad Istrum (the present Bulgarian settlement of Nikyup near Veliko Tarnovo) who created the Gothic alphabet, and laid the foundations of the Germanic literature. The glacier's midpoint is located at 62°32′39″S 59°44′32″W / 62.54417°S 59.74222°W / -62.54417; -59.74222 (Bulgarian survey Tangra 2004/05 and mapping in 2009). This article includes information from the Antarctic Place-names Commission of Bulgaria which is used with permission.
    8.50
    2 votes
    83
    Crescent Glacier

    Crescent Glacier

    Crescent Glacier (77°40′S 163°13′E / 77.667°S 163.217°E / -77.667; 163.217) is a small alpine glacier in Antarctica. It is located just east of Howard Glacier in the Kukri Hills, flowing north into Taylor Valley in Victoria Land. The glacier was studied by U.S. geologist Troy L. Pewe in December 1957, and was so named by him because of its crescent shape when viewed from the floor of Taylor Valley.
    7.33
    3 votes
    84
    Lillie Glacier

    Lillie Glacier

    Lillie Glacier is a large glacier, about 160 km (100 mi) long and 16 km (10 mi) wide, between Bowers Mountains on the west and Concord and Anare Mountains on the east, flowing to Ob' Bay on the coast and forming the Lillie Glacier Tongue. The glacier tongue was discovered by the British Antarctic Expedition, 1910-13, and named for Dennis G. Lillie, biologist on the Terra Nova. The name Lillie has since been extended to the entire glacier. The lower half of the glacier was plotted by ANARE (Thala Dan), 1962, which explored the area and utilized air photos taken by USN Operation Highjump, 1946-47. The whole feature was mapped by USGS from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960-62. Lillie Glacier Tongue (70°34′S 163°48′E / 70.567°S 163.8°E / -70.567; 163.8) is the prominent seaward extension of the Lillie Glacier into Ob' Bay. Discovered by the British Antarctic Expedition, 1910-13, when the Terra Nova explored westward of Cape North in February 1911. Named by British Antarctic Expedition for Dennis G. Lillie, biologist on the Terra Nova.  This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Lillie Glacier" (content from the Geographic
    7.33
    3 votes
    85
    Minnesota Glacier

    Minnesota Glacier

    Minnesota Glacier is a broad glacier in Antarctica. It is about 64 km (40 mi) long and 8 km (5 mi) wide, and flows east through the Ellsworth Mountains, separating the Sentinel and Heritage ranges. It is nourished by ice from the plateau west of the mountains and by the Nimitz and Splettstoesser glaciers. Minnesota Glacier merges into the larger Rutford Ice Stream at the eastern margin of the Ellsworth Mountains. It was named by the US-ACAN for the University of Minnesota Twin Cities, which sent research parties to the Ellsworth Mountains in 1961–62, 1962–63 and 1963–64.  This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Minnesota Glacier" (content from the Geographic Names Information System).
    7.33
    3 votes
    86
    Patagonian Ice Sheet

    Patagonian Ice Sheet

    The Patagonian Ice Sheet was a large elongated and narrow ice sheet that covered all of Chile south of approximately present-day Puerto Montt during the Llanquihue glaciation. Some maps have the Patagonian Ice Sheet connected to the icecaps of the Altiplano by continuous glaciers all the way through the Andes. The ice sheet extended beyond the crest of the Andes into Argentina, but because of the dryness of the climate it did not reach beyond present-day lakes such as the Yagagtoo, Musters, and Colhue Huapi. At its peak (about 18,000-17,500 years ago), the Patagonian Ice Sheet covered about 480,000 km² of land with an estimated ice-volume of more than 500,000 km³, of which about 4% remains glaciated today in two separated portions known as the Northern and Southern Patagonian Ice Fields. The ice-volume reduction contributed to a global sea-level rise of about 1.2 meters. However, during the first glacial period at the beginning of the Pleistocene ice extended to the present-day Argentine coast. With each successive glaciation it is known that the ice has stopped further and further to the west, with aridity always serving as the decisive factor halting glacier spread: it is
    7.33
    3 votes
    87
    Petersen Glacier

    Petersen Glacier

    • Glacier Type: Mountain Glacier
    Petersen Glacier is located in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, United States. The glacier is in a cirque to the west and above north Cascade Canyon at an altitude of approximately 10,000 feet (3,000 m). The glacier is named after Frank Petersen, one of the first mountaineers to climb Grand Teton in 1898. Runoff from the glacier is heavy in rock flour (glacial silt) which turns the waters of Mica Lake turquoise in appearance. The glacier is no longer visible in satellite imagery, indicating it may have disappeared. All of the existing glaciers in Grand Teton National Park were created during the Little Ice Age (1350-1850 A.D.) and have been in a general state of retreat since the mid 1800s.
    7.33
    3 votes
    88
    Peyto Glacier

    Peyto Glacier

    Peyto Glacier is situated in the Canadian Rockies in Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada, approximately 90 km (56 mi) northwest of the town of Banff, and can be accessed from the Icefields Parkway. Peyto Glacier is an outflow glacier from the Wapta Icefield, which rests along the Continental divide. The glacier snout is subject to high melt rates from season to season and there is marked surface lowering on several parts of the glacier. Glacial silt, which is carried from the glacier by streams, ensures a turquoise appearance to Peyto Lake, a popular tourist destination. As is true for the vast majority of glaciers worldwide, Peyto Glacier has been retreating rapidly, especially since the last half of the 20th century, and has reportedly lost 70% of its mass since it was first researched (Demuth and Keller, 2006). Between 1896 and 1966, the total volume loss of the Peyto Glacier was 1088.5 x 106m (Wallace, 1995). In 1987, an automatic weather station was constructed near the glacier that monitors temperature changes, radiation, and precipitation Peyto Glacier provides the most direct access to Peyto Hut, a base of both summer and winter mountaineering.
    7.33
    3 votes
    89
    Skillet Glacier

    Skillet Glacier

    • Glacier Type: Mountain Glacier
    Skillet Glacier is located in the Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, United States. The glacier is situated on the eastern cliffs of Mount Moran and is easily seen from Jackson Hole. The shape of the glacier led to the naming as the uppermost section of the glacier is long and narrow and then broadens abruptly more than halfway down the mountain into a larger area, giving it the shape of a skillet or frying pan. The glacier is one of twelve that remain in Grand Teton National Park and one of five glaciers located on Mount Moran. Mountain climbers consider the Skillet Glacier route to be the fastest and one of the easiest ways to climb Mount Moran, and was the route taken when the peak was first climbed in 1922, though it is rarely used in late summer due to poor footing. On November 21, 1950, A DC-3 crashed into Mount Moran, adjacent to Skillet Glacier, killing all 21 passengers aboard. The remains of the passengers and the plane are still on the mountain.
    7.33
    3 votes
    90
    South Cascade Glacier

    South Cascade Glacier

    South Cascade Glacier is a large alpine glacier in the North Cascades of Washington, USA. It is bordered on the east by 8,261-foot (2,518 m) Sentinel Peak, and is about 17 miles (27 km) north of Glacier Peak in the Glacier Peak Wilderness. Meltwater from the glacier flows directly into South Cascade Lake, which feeds the South Fork Cascade River, which is a tributary of the Skagit River. The South Cascade Glacier has been closely monitored by glaciologists studying the effects of climate on glaciers. As of 2009, the South Cascade Glacier has lost nearly a half of its volume since 1958.
    7.33
    3 votes
    91
    Tundzha Glacier

    Tundzha Glacier

    Tundzha Glacier (Lednik Tundzha \'led-nik 'tun-dzha\) is a glacier on Livingston Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica which is bounded by Snow Peak to the west, Teres Ridge to the east and the glacial divide between the Drake Passage and Bransfield Strait to the south. The glacier extends 14 km in east-west direction and 4.5 km in the north-south direction, and drains northwards into Hero Bay between Avitohol Point and Siddons Point. The glacier was named after the Tundzha River in Bulgaria. The midpoint of the glacier is located at 62°35′40″S 60°30′30″W / 62.59444°S 60.50833°W / -62.59444; -60.50833 (Bulgarian mapping in 2009). This article includes information from the Antarctic Place-names Commission of Bulgaria which is used with permission.
    7.33
    3 votes
    92
    Athabasca Glacier

    Athabasca Glacier

    The Athabasca Glacier is one of the six principal 'toes' of the Columbia Icefield, located in the Canadian Rockies. The glacier currently recedes at a rate of 2–3 metres (6.6–9.8 ft) per year and has receded more than 1.5 km (0.93 mi) in the past 125 years and lost over half of its volume. The glacier moves down from the icefield at a rate of several centimetres per day. Due to its close proximity to the Icefields Parkway, between the Alberta towns of Banff and Jasper, and rather easy accessibility, it is the most visited glacier in North America. The leading edge of the glacier is within easy walking distance; however, travel onto the glacier is not recommended unless properly equipped. Hidden crevasses have led to the deaths of unprepared tourists. The Icefield Interpretive Centre, closed during the winter (mid-October to mid-April), stands across from the glacier. It is used as a lodge and for ticket sales for sightseeing on the glacier. Standard buses transport tourists to the glacier edge, where they board specially designed snow coaches for transport over the steep grades, snow and ice part way up the glacier. The glacier is approximately 6 km (3.7 mi) long, covers an area of
    6.25
    4 votes
    93
    Fox Glacier

    Fox Glacier

    The Fox Glacier (Te Moeka o Tuawe in Māori) is a 13 km (8.1 mi) long glacier located in Westland Tai Poutini National Park on the West Coast of New Zealand's South Island. It was named in 1872 after a visit by the then Prime Minister of New Zealand, Sir William Fox. Fed by four alpine glaciers, Fox Glacier falls 2,600 m (8,500 ft) on its 13 km journey from the Southern Alps down to the coast, with it having the distinction of being one of the few glaciers to end among lush rainforest only 300 metres (980 ft) above sea level. Although retreating throughout most of the last 100 years, it has been advancing since 1985. In 2006 the average rate of advance was about a metre a week. In January 2009, the terminal face of the glacier was still advancing and had vertical or overhanging faces which were continually collapsing. The outflow of the glacier forms the Fox River. During the last ice age, its ice reached beyond the present coastline, and the glacier left behind many moraines during its retreat. Lake Matheson formed as a kettle lake within one of these. Like the nearby Franz Josef Glacier, it is one of the most accessible glaciers in the world, with its terminal face an easy walk
    6.25
    4 votes
    94
    Gannett Glacier

    Gannett Glacier

    • Glacier Type: Mountain Glacier
    • Terminus: Moraine
    • Status: Retreating
    Gannett Glacier is the largest glacier in the Rocky Mountains within the United States. The glacier is located on the east and north slopes of Gannett Peak, the highest mountain in Wyoming on the east side of the Continental Divide in the Wind River Range. Gannett is but one of dozens of glaciers located in the Fitzpatrick Wilderness of Shoshone National Forest. As is true with most glaciers around the world, Gannett Glacier is slowly disappearing. Photographic evidence clearly demonstrates that there has been an enormous reduction in the area of the glacier since the 1920s. The area of the glacier was estimated in 1950 to be 4.6 square kilometres (1,137 acres) and was measured in 1999 to be 3.63 square kilometres (897 acres). Measurements taken in 1958 and again in 1983 showed a depth reduction of 18.6 metres (61 ft) over 25 years. A general warming pattern and a reduction in moisture is widely believed to be the reason for the glacier retreating. Numerous other glaciers are located in the immediate area including six more that are within the top ten in size within the Rocky Mountains of the U.S. In a 1989 study, both Gannett and Dinwoody glaciers were researched to determine the
    6.25
    4 votes
    95
    Juneau Icefield

    Juneau Icefield

    The Juneau Icefield is a ice field located just north of Juneau, Alaska and continues north through the border with British Columbia and is the fifth-largest ice field in the Western Hemisphere, extending through an area of 3,900 square kilometres (1,500 sq mi) in the Coast Range ranging 140 km (87 mi) north to south and 75 km (47 mi) east to west. The icefield is the source of many glaciers including the Mendenhall Glacier and the Taku Glacier. The icefield is home to over 40 large valley glaciers and 100 smaller ones. The Icefield serves as a tourist attraction with many travellers flown in by helicopter for quick walks on the 240-to-1,400-metre (790 to 4,600 ft) deep ice and the massive, awe-inspiring crevasses. The icefield, like many of its glaciers, reached its maximum glaciation point around 1700 and has been in retreat since. In fact, of the icefield's 19 notable glaciers, the Taku Glacier is the only one presently advancing. Since 1948, the Juneau Icefield Research Program has monitored glaciers of the Juneau Icefield. On the west side of the icefield, from 1946-2009, the terminus of the Mendenhall Glacier has retreated over 700 metres (0.43 mi). Eight kilometers to the
    6.25
    4 votes
    96
    Koettlitz Glacier

    Koettlitz Glacier

    The Koettlitz Glacier is a large Antarctic glacier lying west of Mount Morning and Mount Discovery, flowing from the vicinity of Mount Cocks northeastward between Brown Peninsula and the mainland into the ice shelf of McMurdo Sound. Discovered by the British National Antarctic Expedition (1901-04) which named it for Dr. Reginald Koettlitz, physician and botanist of the expedition.  This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Koettlitz Glacier" (content from the Geographic Names Information System).
    6.25
    4 votes
    97
    Rose Valley Glacier

    Rose Valley Glacier

    Rose Valley Glacier (Bulgarian: Lednik Rozova Dolina \'led-nik 'ro-zo-va do-li-'na\) is a glacier on Varna Peninsula, eastern Livingston Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica extending 5.2 km in southeast-northwest direction, and 3.7 km in southwest-northeast direction. It drains the northeast slopes of Vidin Heights to flow into Lister Cove and McFarlane Strait between Pomorie Point and Inott Point. The feature is named after the Valley of Roses in central Bulgaria. The glacier is located at 62°30′30″S 60°06′07″W / 62.50833°S 60.10194°W / -62.50833; -60.10194 (Bulgarian topographic survey Tangra 2004/05). This article includes information from the Antarctic Place-names Commission of Bulgaria which is used with permission.
    6.25
    4 votes
    98
    Sea Lion Glacier

    Sea Lion Glacier

    Sea Lion Glacier (Lednik Morski Lav \'led-nik 'mor-ski 'l&v\) is the site of an isolated 350 metres (1,150 ft) long glacier on Hurd Peninsula, eastern Livingston Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica. It is located southwest of Hesperides Hill and northwest of Atlantic Club Ridge, separated from the latter by Sea Lion Tarn, and terminating on the South Bay coast. The glacier, subject of glaciological studies and monitoring for several years since 1993, disappeared completely within a decade. The midpoint is located at 62°38′46″S 60°22′12″W / 62.64611°S 60.37°W / -62.64611; -60.37 (Bulgarian mapping from a 1995–1996 ground survey). This article includes information from the Antarctic Place-names Commission of Bulgaria which is used with permission.
    6.25
    4 votes
    99
    Drang-drung

    Drang-drung

    The 'Drang-Drung Glacier' (also called Durung Drung Glacier) is a mountain glacier situated near the Pensi La mountain pass at the Kargil - Zanaskar Road in Kargil district of Jammu and Kashmir in India. The Drang-Drung Glacier is likely to be the largest glacier in Ladakh other than Siachen Glacier in the Karakoram Range, with a maximum length of 23 kilometres (14 mi) and at an average elevation of 15,680 ft (4,780 metres). The glacier lies in the north eastern Himalayan Range known as Zanskar Range, situated 142 kilometres (88 mi) south from Kargil and 331 kilometres (206 mi) east from Srinagar the capital of Jammu and Kashmir. The Drang-Drung Glacier is the long river of ice and snow, a source of Stod River which is a tributory of Zanskar River and Zanskar River is a tributory of Indus River. The Doda Peak with an elevation of 21,490 ft (6,550 metres) rises from the glacier. The Drang-Drung Glacier is accessible from Srinagar or Srinagar Airport in two days, 331 kilometres (206 mi) of drive by car or bus which leads by NH 1D, a national highway which connects Srinagar and Leh through the towns of Ganderbal, Kangan, Sonamarg and Drass. Kargil town is at the half way distance and
    7.00
    3 votes
    100
    Exit Glacier

    Exit Glacier

    • Glacier Type: Valley glacier
    • Terminus: River
    Exit Glacier is a glacier derived from the Harding Icefield in the Kenai Mountains of Alaska. It received its name because it served as the exit for the first recorded crossing of the Harding Icefield in 1968. In the spring of 1968, the first documented mountaineering party succeeded in crossing the Harding Icefield. Ten people were involved in the crossing, which went from Chernof Glacier east to Resurrection Glacier (Later renamed Exit as the newspaper reported that the group would be descending the "Exit Glacier"). Expedition members included Bill Babcock, Eric Barnes, Bill Fox, Dave Johnston, Yule Kilcher and his son Otto, Dave Spencer, Helmut Tschaffert, and Vin and Grace (Jansen) Hoeman. As noted above, Yule Kilcher, Dave Johnston, Vin Hoeman, and Grace Hoeman were veterans of previous attempts; of the ten, only four–Bill Babcock, Dave Johnston, Yule Kilcher, and Vin Hoeman–hiked all the way across the icefield. The expedition left Homer on April 17, bound for Chernof Glacier; eight days later, they descended Exit Glacier and arrived in Seward. Along the way, the party made a first-ever ascent of Truuli Peak, a 6,612-foot (2,015 m) eminence that protrudes from the
    7.00
    3 votes
    101
    Jostedalsbreen

    Jostedalsbreen

    Jostedalsbreen (English: Jostedal Glacier) is the largest glacier in continental Europe. It is situated in Sogn og Fjordane county in Western Norway. Jostedalsbreen lies in the municipalities of Luster, Sogndal, Jølster, and Stryn. The highest peak in the area is Lodalskåpa at a height of 2,083 metres (6,834 ft). Jostedalsbreen has a total area of 487 square kilometres (188 sq mi). The highest point is Høgste Breakulen at 1,957 metres (6,421 ft) above mean sea level. Branches of the glacier reach down into the valleys, for instance Bøyabreen in Fjærland and Nigardsbreen, both at 300 metres (980 ft) above sea level. The thickest part of the glacier is 600 metres (2,000 ft). Jostedalsbreen has a length of a little more than 60 kilometres (37 mi) and covers over half of the national park which was established in 1991 and covers 1,310 square kilometres (510 sq mi). The glacier is maintained by the high snowfall rates in the region, not the cold temperatures. This means the glacier has high melting rates in its snouts. The Jostedalsbreen has around 50 glacier arms such as the Nigardsbreen and Tunsbergdalsbreen in Jostedal, the Briksdalsbreen near Olden, the Bøyabreen by Fjærland, the
    7.00
    3 votes
    102
    Mýrdalsjökull

    Mýrdalsjökull

    Mýrdalsjökull (pronounced [ˈmirtalsˌjœːkʏtl] ( listen), Icelandic for "(the) mire dale glacier" or "(the) mire valley glacier") is a glacier in the south of Iceland. It is to the north of Vík í Mýrdal and to the east of the smaller glacier Eyjafjallajökull. Between these two glaciers is Fimmvörðuháls pass. Its peak reaches 1,493 m (4,898 ft) in height and in 1980 it covered an area of 595 km (230 sq mi). The icecap of the glacier covers an active volcano called Katla. The caldera of the volcano has a diameter of 10 km (6 mi) and the volcano erupts usually every 40–80 years. The last eruption took place in 1918. Scientists are actively monitoring the volcano, particularly after the eruption of nearby Eyjafjallajökull began in April 2010. Since the year 930, 16 eruptions have been documented. The Eldgjá, a volcanic eruption fissure about 30 km (19 mi) long, which erupted in the year 936, is part of the same volcanic system. Before the Hringvegur (the main ring road round the island) was built, people feared traversing the plains in front of the volcano because of the frequent jökulhlaups (glacial floods) and the deep rivers to be crossed, although the road is still vulnerable to
    7.00
    3 votes
    103
    Palmer Glacier

    Palmer Glacier

    • Glacier Type: Mountain Glacier
    • Status: Retreating
    Palmer Glacier is a glacier located on the south slopes of Mount Hood in the U.S. state of Oregon. The glacier is situated at an elevation range of 9,300 to 6,200 feet (2,800 to 1,900 m), and was named for Joel Palmer, an Oregon pioneer. Palmer Glacier is the most well-known of the twelve glaciers on the mountain, and is a popular destination for snow sport enthusiasts. Some of the lower part is within the Timberline ski area, and can be accessed by Sno-Cat or chairlift, conditions permitting. The glacier is a remnant of the massive glaciers that formed during the last ice age, and is the only location in North America that provides skiing and snowboarding all twelve months of the year. The glacier was considered a snow field until a Mazama committee investigated on October 19, 1924 and determined it was, in fact, a glacier and should be named on maps. For some time after that it was known as Salmon River Glacier as it is the headwaters of the Salmon River. Silcox Hut is a small lodge originally built as a warming hut for skiers and climbers, but is now available for group rental for events and rustic overnight accommodation. It is located near the base of the glacier, about 1,000
    7.00
    3 votes
    104
    San Quintín Glacier

    San Quintín Glacier

    The San Quintín Glacier is the largest outflow glacier of the Northern Patagonian Ice Field in southern Chile. Its terminus is a piedmont lobe just short of the Gulf of Penas on the Pacific Ocean and just north of 47°S. Like many glaciers worldwide during the twentieth century, San Quintín appears to be losing mass and retreating rapidly. These two photographs taken by astronauts only seven years apart show visible change. The first was taken by the crew of STS-068 in October 1994 and the second by the Increment 4 crew of the International Space Station in February 2002. San Rafael Glacier in the foreground and San Quintín Glacier behind, showing change over the interval circa 1990-2000. Both giant glaciers have been retreating rapidly in recent years (BBC story).
    7.00
    3 votes
    105
    Siachen Glacier

    Siachen Glacier

    • Glacier Type: Mountain Glacier
    The Siachen Glacier is located in the eastern Karakoram range in the Himalaya Mountains at about 35°25′16″N 77°06′34″E / 35.421226°N 77.109540°E / 35.421226; 77.109540, just north-east of the point NJ9842 where the Line of Control between India and Pakistan ends. At 70 km (43 mi) long, it is the longest glacier in the Karakoram and second-longest in the world's non-polar areas. It falls from an altitude of 5,753 m (18,875 ft) above sea level at its head at Indira Col on the China border down to 3,620 m (11,875 ft) at its terminus. The Siachen Glacier lies immediately south of the great watershed that separates the Eurasian Plate from the Indian subcontinent in the extensively glaciated portion of the Karakoram sometimes called the "Third Pole". The glacier lies between the Saltoro Ridge immediately to the west and the main Karakoram range to the east. The Saltoro Ridge originates in the north from the Sia Kangri peak on the China border in the Karakoram range. The crest of the Saltoro Ridge's altitudes range from 5,450 to 7,720 m (17,880 to 25,330 feet). The major passes on this ridge are, from north to south, Sia La at 5,589 m (18,336 ft), Bilafond La at 5,450 m (17,880 ft),
    7.00
    3 votes
    106
    Stein Glacier

    Stein Glacier

    The Stein Glacier (German: Steingletscher) is a 4 km long glacier (2005) situated in the Urner Alps in the canton of Berne in Switzerland. In 1973 it had an area of 6.06 km.
    7.00
    3 votes
    107
    Wordie Ice Shelf

    Wordie Ice Shelf

    The Wordie Ice Shelf (69°15′S 67°45′W / 69.25°S 67.75°W / -69.25; -67.75) was a confluent glacier projecting as an ice shelf into the SE part of Marguerite Bay between Cape Berteaux and Mount Edgell, along the western coast of Antarctic Peninsula. In March 2008, the British Antarctic Survey reported that it appeared ready to break away from the Antarctic Peninsula. By April 2009 it had done so, vanishing completely. Discovered by the British Graham Land Expedition (BGLE) under Rymill, 1934-37, who named this feature for Sir James Wordie, Honorary Secretary (later President) of the Royal Geographical Society, member of the Discovery Committee, and chairman of the Scott Polar Research Institute. He also had been geologist and Chief of the Scientific Staff of the British expedition, 1914-16, under Ernest Shackleton.
    7.00
    3 votes
    108
    Agassiz Glacier

    Agassiz Glacier

    Agassiz Glacier is located in the U.S. state of Montana in Glacier National Park (U.S.). It is named after Louis Agassiz, a Swiss-American glaciologist. The glacier is situated in a cirque to the southeast of Kintla Peak west of the Continental Divide. Agassiz Glacier is one of several glaciers that have been selected for monitoring by the U.S. Geological Survey's Glacier Monitoring Research program, which is researching changes to the mass balance of glaciers in and surrounding Glacier National Park. The glacier is being monitored using remote sensing equipment and repeat photography, where images of the glacier are taken from identical locations periodically. Tree ring samples have also been used previously to determine the extent of glacier retreat. Between 1966 and 2005, Agassiz Glacier lost a third of its surface area.
    6.00
    4 votes
    109
    Matanuska Glacier

    Matanuska Glacier

    Matanuska Glacier is a valley glacier in the US state of Alaska. At 27 miles (43 km) long by 4 miles (6.4 km) wide, it is the largest glacier accessible by car in the United States. Its terminus is the source of the Matanuska River. It lies near the Glenn Highway about 100 miles (160 km) northeast of Anchorage. Matanuska Glacier flows about 1 foot (30 cm) per day. Due to ablation of the lower glacier, as of 2007, the location of the glacier terminus changed little over the previous three decades. The glacier is the eponym of the Alaska Marine Highway ferry M/V Matanuska.
    6.00
    4 votes
    110
    Turtmann Glacier

    Turtmann Glacier

    The Turtmann Glacier (German: Turtmanngletscher) is a 5 km long glacier (2005) situated in the Pennine Alps in the canton of Valais in Switzerland. In 1973 it had an area of 5.91 km. The glacier is located north of Bishorn and Weisshorn. On an altitude of 3256m, at the western border of the glacier, lies the Tracuit Hut (French: Cabane de Tracuit). This hut, run by the Swiss Alpine Club (SAC), is a starting point for the ascent to the Bishorn, the Weisshorn and Les Diablons.
    6.00
    4 votes
    111
    Andrews Glacier

    Andrews Glacier

    Andrews Glacier is a cirque glacier located on the east side (Larimer County) of Andrews Pass in Rocky Mountain National Park. Neighboring peaks are Taylor and Shark Tooth (well known for rock climbing).
    8.00
    2 votes
    112
    Folgefonna

    Folgefonna

    Folgefonna is a collective term for three plateau glaciers in Hardanger, Norway, In total, Folgefonna covered 207 km (80 sq mi) in 2006. On 14 May 2005, Folgefonna National Park was established, protecting the glaciers and the surrounding areas. The glacier is home to a summer skiing resort, located on its northern region. The largest outflow glaciers from Folgefonna are Blomstølskardbreen, Bondhusbreen and Buarbreen. Since around 1960 Blomstølskardbreen on the southern end of Folgefonna has changed little. Bondhusbreen and Buerbreen further north were growing in the 1990s, but have been retreating since the year 2000. The glacier is a famous tourist attraction. Most people who visit Odda usually takes the walk to Buarbreen (a part of Folgafonna). The melt-water from this glacier is bottled at source to form the product Isklar. The melt-water also goes down the river from Buarbreen down into Sandvinsvannet. The first element is folge meaning 'thin layer of snow', the last element is the finite form of fonn meaning 'mass of snow, glacier made of snow'.
    8.00
    2 votes
    113
    Kamchiya Glacier

    Kamchiya Glacier

    Kamchiya Glacier (Lednik Kamchiya \'led-nik 'kam-chi-ya\) is located on Livingston Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica, south of the glacial divide between the Drake Passage and Bransfield Strait, and draining into South Bay between Ereby Point and Memorable Beach. It extends 5 km along an east-west axis, and is 2.2 km wide. The glacier is named after the Kamchiya River in northeastern Bulgaria. The glacier is located at 62°37′22″S 60°31′00″W / 62.62278°S 60.5166667°W / -62.62278; -60.5166667. This article includes information from the Antarctic Place-names Commission of Bulgaria which is used with permission.
    8.00
    2 votes
    114
    Kolka Glacier

    Kolka Glacier

    Kolka Glacier (Ossetic: Хъолхъа) is a glacier in North Ossetia, Russia, near Mount Kazbek, known for its surging properties. The most recent and the most powerful surge took place on September 20, 2002, resulting in deaths of at least 125 people There are only a small number of glaciers in the Genaldon River's basin, the largest being Maili at approximately 6.8 km (2.6 sq mi) in area. The Kolka Glacier, located next to Maili, is a cirque / valley glacier, with some hanging parts. Kolka is fed by avalanches and collapses of firn and ice all year-round. Its lowest and highest points are located at 3,000 m (9,800 ft) and 3,450 m (11,320 ft) above mean sea level respectively. More than two thirds of the ablation zone's surface is covered by a morainal layer up to 1 m (3 ft 3 in) thick. This and other features, such as relatively gentle slopes, a deep cirque and the presence of a lateral moraine restricting the ice flow and forcing it to make a sharp turn, makes the glacier very prone to accumulation of subglacial meltwater. Historically, the local population have been well aware of the dangers associated with the glacier, which is evident in the unusual locations of the auls. Most
    8.00
    2 votes
    115
    Porchabella Glacier

    Porchabella Glacier

    The Porchabella Glacier (Romansh: Vadret da Porchabella) is a 2.5 km long glacier (2005) situated in the Albula Range in the canton of Graubünden in Switzerland. In 1973 it had an area of 2.58 km. The glacier lies at the foot of Piz Kesch and Piz Val Müra. It gives birth to the river Ava da Salect which ends in the Albula river. In 1988, the remains of a presumed dairymaid were discovered and completely unearthed in 1992. Only they shoulders and left arm were mummified, although the rest of the skeleton was fully intact. Examination concluded that the remains dated from around 1700, and the woman being around twenty-two at the time of her death.
    8.00
    2 votes
    116
    Bering Glacier

    Bering Glacier

    Bering Glacier is a glacier in the U.S. state of Alaska. It currently terminates in Vitus Lake south of Alaska’s Wrangell-St. Elias National Park, about 10 km (6.2 mi) from the Gulf of Alaska. Combined with the Bagley Icefield, where the snow that feeds the glacier accumulates, the Bering is the largest glacier in North America. Warmer temperatures and changes in precipitation over the past century have thinned the Bering Glacier by several hundred meters. Since 1900 the terminus has retreated as much as 12 km (7.5 mi). The Bering Glacier exhibits "surges", acceleration events of the flow rate of the glacier, every 20 years or so. During these periods the glacier terminus advances. The surges are generally followed by periods of retreat, so despite the periodic advances the glacier has been shrinking overall. Most glaciers along the Alaskan coast have been retreating along with the Bering Glacier. The glacial retreat has an interesting side effect, an increase in the frequency of earthquakes in the region. The Wrangell and St. Elias mountain ranges that spawn the Bering Glacier were created by the collision of the Pacific and North American tectonic plates [the Pacific Plate is
    9.00
    1 votes
    117
    David Glacier

    David Glacier

    David Glacier is the most imposing outlet glacier in Victoria Land, Antarctica, fed by two main flows which drain an area larger than 200,000 square kilometres of the East Antarctic plateau, with an estimated ice discharge rate of 7.8 +/- 0.7 km³/year. The northern flow drains from Talos Dome to the Ross Sea, but the main branch of the stream is fed by a network of tributaries which drain a common area of the inner plateau around Dome C and converge in a spectacular icefall normally known as the David Cauldron. As the David Glacier flows into the Ross Sea, it forms a floating mass known as the Drygalski Ice Tongue. Hughes Bluff lies nearby.
    9.00
    1 votes
    118
    Davidson Glacier

    Davidson Glacier

    • Glacier Type: Valley glacier
    • Terminus: Moraine
    • Status: Retreating
    The Davidson Glacier is a large valley glacier near Haines, Alaska that finds its source in the Chilkat Range. The Davidson Glacier was originally discovered by 1867 and was recounted by John Muir in his famous travels in and around Glacier Bay in 1879. The glacier was, at that time, a tidewater glacier that protruded into the Chilkat Inlet. It has since receded into the mountains and created its very own glacial lake in the glacier's moraine (similar to the Mendenhall Glacier and lake) about one mile inland from the Chilkat Inlet. Currently, the Davidson Glacier serves as a tourist attraction for Haines. While not actually located on the Chilkat Peninsula, tour operators boat or kayak tourists over to the glacier and then drive or hike them from the shore to the glacier on a road constructed for tourists' use.
    9.00
    1 votes
    119
    Neumayer Glacier

    Neumayer Glacier

    Neumayer Glacier is a glacier, 8 nautical miles (15 km) long and 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) wide, which flows east along the north flank of the Allardyce Range to the west side of the head of Cumberland West Bay, South Georgia. Charted by the Swedish Antarctic Expedition under Otto Nordenskiöld, 1901–04, and named for Georg von Neumayer. Between 2005 and 2009, the glacier retreated 1-kilometer (0.62 mi).  This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Neumayer Glacier" (content from the Geographic Names Information System).
    9.00
    1 votes
    120
    Priestley Glacier

    Priestley Glacier

    The Priestley Glacier is a major valley glacier, about 96 km (60 mi) long, originating at the edge of the polar plateau of Victoria Land. The glacier drains southeast between the Deep Freeze and Eisenhower ranges to enter the northern end of the Nansen Ice Sheet. First explored by the Northern Party of the British Antarctic Expedition, 1910–13, and named for Raymond E. Priestley, geologist with the Northern Party. Priestley Névé (73°35′S 160°20′E / 73.583°S 160.333°E / -73.583; 160.333 (Priestley Neve)) is the névé at the head of Priestley Glacier in Victoria Land. Named by the New Zealand Antarctic Place-Names Committee (NZ-APC) in about 1966 in association with Priestley Glacier.  This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Priestley Glacier" (content from the Geographic Names Information System).
    9.00
    1 votes
    121
    Rebmann Glacier

    Rebmann Glacier

    • Glacier Type: Mountain Glacier
    • Terminus: Moraine
    • Status: Retreating
    The Rebmann Glacier is located near the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania and is a small remnant of an enormous icecap which once crowned the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro. This icecap has retreated significantly over the past century and between 1912 and the 2000, 82 percent of the glacial ice on the mountain has disappeared. Rebmann Glacier is named for the German missionary and explorer, Johann Rebmann who was the first white explorer to report of snow and glaciers atop Mount Kilimanjaro in 1848.
    9.00
    1 votes
    122
    Thwaites Glacier

    Thwaites Glacier

    Thwaites Glacier (75°30′S 106°45′W / 75.5°S 106.75°W / -75.5; -106.75) is an unusually broad and fast Antarctic glacier flowing into Pine Island Bay, part of the Amundsen Sea, east of Mount Murphy, on the Walgreen Coast of Marie Byrd Land. Its surface speeds exceed 2 km/yr near its grounding line, and its fastest flowing grounded ice is centred between 50 and 100 km east of Mount Murphy. It was named by ACAN for Fredrik T. Thwaites, a glacial geologist, geomorphologist and professor emeritus at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Thwaits Glacier drains into West Antarctica’s Amundsen Sea and is being closely watched for its potential to raise global sea levels. Along with Pine Island Glacier, Thwaites Glacier has been described as part of the "weak underbelly" of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, due to its apparent vulnerability to significant retreat. This hypothesis is based on both theoretical studies of the stability of marine ice sheets and recent observations of large changes on both of these glaciers. In recent years, the flow of both of these glaciers has accelerated, their surfaces have lowered, and their grounding lines have retreated. In 2011, using geophysical data
    9.00
    1 votes
    123
    Yahtse Glacier

    Yahtse Glacier

    Yahtse Glacier is a 40-mile-long (64 km) glacier in the U.S. state of Alaska. It begins on the southeast slope of Mount Miller and trends southeast along the north border of Guyot Glacier to Icy Bay, just east of Guyot Hills and 70 miles (113 km) northwest of Yakutat. The western extent is an icefield.
    9.00
    1 votes
    124
    Lyell Glacier

    Lyell Glacier

    • Glacier Type: Mountain Glacier
    • Status: Retreating
    Lyell Glacier is a small glacier in the Sierra Nevada of California. The glacier was discovered by John Muir in 1871., and is the largest glacier in Yosemite National Park. The glacier lies on the northern slopes of Mount Lyell. The glacier has retreated since the end of the Little Ice Age in the mid-19th century. During the mid-20th Century, the glacier split into two smaller glaciers occupying the high cirques of Mount Lyell. Since 1883, the glacier area has retreated up to 70 percent. Another glacier, the Maclure Glacier on nearby Mount Maclure, has also retreated significantly.
    5.00
    5 votes
    125
    Bow Glacier

    Bow Glacier

    Bow Glacier is located in Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada, approximately 37 km (23 mi) northwest of Lake Louise, and can be viewed from the Icefields Parkway. Bow Glacier is an outflow glacier from the Wapta Icefield, which rests along the Continental divide, and runoff from the glacier supplies water to Bow Lake and the Bow River. The glacier is credited for creating the Bow Valley before retreating at the end of the last glacial maximum. Since the end of the Little ice age in 1850, Bow Glacier has been a state of steady retreat overall. Between the years 1850 and 1953, the glacier retreated an estimated 1,100 meters (3,600 ft), and since that period, there has been further retreat which has left a newly formed lake at the terminal moraine at the glacial snout. Sedimentation has also increased in Bow Lake due to increased erosion of soil that was previously protected by the glacier, creating a small sediment delta in the west end of the lake.
    6.67
    3 votes
    126
    Columbia Icefield

    Columbia Icefield

    The Columbia Icefield is an icefield located in the Canadian Rockies, astride the Continental Divide of North America. The icefield lies partly in the northwestern tip of Banff National Park and the southern end of Jasper National Park. It is about 325 km² in area, 100 to 365 metres (328 to 1,197 ft) in depth and receives up to seven metres (275 in) of snowfall per year. The icefield feeds eight major glaciers, including: Some of the highest mountains in the Canada Rockies are located around the edges: Parts of the Icefield are visible from the Icefields Parkway. The Athabasca Glacier has receded significantly since its greatest modern-era extent in 1844. During the summer months visitors to the area can travel onto the glacier in the comfort of large "snowcoaches". The Columbia Icefield is also a major destination for ski mountaineering in the winter months. The icefield was first reported in 1898 by J. Norman Collie and Hermann Woolley after they had completed the first ascent of Mount Athabasca. The Athabasca River and the North Saskatchewan River originate in the Columbia Icefield, as do tributary headwaters of the Columbia River. As the icefield is atop a triple Continental
    6.67
    3 votes
    127
    Ferrar Glacier

    Ferrar Glacier

    Ferrar Glacier is a glacier in Antarctica. It is about 35 miles (56 km) long, flowing from the plateau of Victoria Land west of the Royal Society Range to New Harbour in McMurdo Sound. The glacier makes a right (east) turn northeast of Knobhead, where it is apposed, i.e., joined in Siamese-twin fashion, to Taylor Glacier. From there, it continues east along the south side of the Kukri Hills to New Harbour. It was discovered by the British National Antarctic Expedition, (1901–04) under Captain Robert Falcon Scott, who named this feature for Hartley T. Ferrar, geologist of the expedition. The name Ferrar Glacier was originally applied both to the part of this glacier below its right turn and to the present Taylor Glacier. Thomas Griffith Taylor, geologist of the British Antarctic Expedition, 1910–13, under Scott, found evidence that these are not two parts of a single glacier but are two glaciers apposed. With this discovery Scott gave the names Ferrar Glacier and Taylor Glacier essentially as now applied; the Taylor Glacier makes a left turn at Cavendish Rocks and drains east along the north side of the Kukri Hills.  This article incorporates public domain material from the United
    6.67
    3 votes
    128
    Harvard Glacier

    Harvard Glacier

    The Harvard Glacier is a large tidewater glacier in the Alaska's Prince William Sound. The glacier has a 1.5-mile (2 km) wide face where it calves into the College Fjord. It is 300ft thick and covers 120,000 acres of Chugach National Forest. The Harvard Glacier is the second largest glacier in the Prince William Sound, after the Columbia Glacier. It is a popular destination of cruise ships in the Prince William Sound.
    6.67
    3 votes
    129
    Hatherton Glacier

    Hatherton Glacier

    Hatherton Glacier is a large glacier flowing from the Antarctic polar plateau generally eastward along the south side of the Darwin Mountains and entering Darwin Glacier at Junction Spur. It was mapped by the Darwin Glacier Party of the Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition (1956–58), and was named for Trevor Hatherton, Scientific Officer in Charge of Antarctic Activities at the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research, Wellington, New Zealand.  This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Hatherton Glacier" (content from the Geographic Names Information System).
    6.67
    3 votes
    130
    Portage Glacier

    Portage Glacier

    • Glacier Type: Mountain Glacier
    Portage Glacier is a glacier on the Kenai Peninsula of the U.S. state of Alaska and is included within the Chugach National Forest. It is located south of Portage Lake and 6 km (4 mi) west of Whittier. Portage Glacier was a local name first recorded in 1898 by Thomas Corwin Mendenhall of the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, so called because it is on a portage route between Prince William Sound and Turnagain Arm. Hundreds of years ago the glacier filled the entire Portage Valley, a distance of 14 miles (23 km), and was connected to what are now five separate glaciers. The Begich/Boggs Visitor Center (located here 60°47′05″N 148°50′29″W / 60.78472°N 148.84139°W / 60.78472; -148.84139 (Begich, Boggs Visitor Center)) was built by the U.S. Forest Service in 1986. However, the glacier can no longer be viewed from there. A boat ride across the lake is required to view the glacier. Commercial boat tours are available. Portage Glacier is located adjacent to Turnagain Arm, 50 miles southeast of downtown Anchorage. Road access is via the Seward Highway to the former town of Portage, which was flooded and subsequently vacated following the 1964 Alaska earthquake. The Portage Glacier Road
    6.67
    3 votes
    131
    Reid Glacier

    Reid Glacier

    • Glacier Type: Mountain Glacier
    Reid Glacier is an 11-mile-long (18 km) glacier in the U.S. state of Alaska. It trends north to Reid Inlet in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, two miles (3 km) south of Glacier Bay and 72 miles (116 km) northwest of Hoonah. It was named by members of the Harriman Alaska Expedition for Harry Fielding Reid.
    6.67
    3 votes
    132
    Upsala Glacier

    Upsala Glacier

    The Upsala Glacier is a large valley glacier in Argentina's Los Glaciares National Park. It flows out from the Southern Patagonian Ice Field, which also feeds the nearby Perito Moreno Glacier. The terminus of the glacier is at Lago Argentino. The Upsala Glacier is well known for its rapid retreat, which many see as evidence for global warming. The name comes from the old spelling with one p of Uppsala University, which sponsored the first glaciological studies in the area. The glacier's almost continual recession up until 1999 has recently slowed (as of 2003). The previous acceleration in ice motion during the two decades preceding 1999 may have been augmented by the release of backstress when the glacier retreated beyond the islands in Brazo Upsala.
    6.67
    3 votes
    133
    Nordre Folgefonna

    Nordre Folgefonna

    Nordre Folgefonna (Northern Folgefonna) is one of the largest glaciers in mainland Norway. It is the northernmost of the three glaciers that make up Folgefonna. Its highest point is 1,640 m (5,381 ft) above sea level, and its lowest point is 990 m (3,248 ft) above sea level.
    5.75
    4 votes
    134
    Abbot Ice Shelf

    Abbot Ice Shelf

    The Abbot Ice Shelf is an ice shelf 250 mi (400 km) long and 40 mi (60 km) wide, bordering Eights Coast from Cape Waite to Phrogner Point in Antarctica. Thurston Island lies along the northern edge of the western half of this ice shelf; other sizable islands (Sherman, Carpenter, Dustin, Johnson, McNamara, Farwell and Dendtler) lie partly or wholly within this shelf. The ice shelf was sighted by members of U.S. Antarctic Service (USAS) in flights from the ship Bear, in February 1940, and its western portion was delineated from air photos taken by U.S. Navy (USN) Operation Highjump, 1946–47. The full extent was mapped by USGS from USN air photos of 1966. Named by US-ACAN for Rear Admiral J. Lloyd Abbot, Jr., Commanding Officer, U.S. Naval Support Force, Antarctica, February 1967 to June 1969.  This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Abbot Ice Shelf" (content from the Geographic Names Information System).
    7.50
    2 votes
    135
    Antarctic ice sheet

    Antarctic ice sheet

    The Antarctic ice sheet is one of the two polar ice caps of the Earth. It covers about 98% of the Antarctic continent and is the largest single mass of ice on Earth. It covers an area of almost 14 million square km and contains 30 million cubic km of ice. That is, approximately 61 percent of all fresh water on the Earth is held in the Antarctic ice sheet, an amount equivalent to 70 m of water in the world's oceans. In East Antarctica, the ice sheet rests on a major land mass, but in West Antarctica the bed can extend to more than 2,500 m below sea level. The land in this area would be seabed if the ice sheet were not there. The icing of Antarctica began with ice-rafting from middle Eocene times about 45.5 million years ago and escalated inland widely during the Eocene-Oligocene extinction event about 34 million years ago. CO2 levels were then about 760 ppm and had been decreasing from earlier levels in the thousands of ppm. Carbon dioxide decrease, with a tipping point of 600 ppm, was the primary agent forcing Antarctic glaciation. The glaciation was favored by an interval when the Earth's orbit favored cool summers but Oxygen isotope ratio cycle marker changes were too large to be
    7.50
    2 votes
    136
    Beardmore Glacier

    Beardmore Glacier

    The Beardmore Glacier in Antarctica is one of the largest glaciers in the world, with a length exceeding 160 km (100 mi). The glacier is one of the main passages from the Ross Ice Shelf through the Queen Alexandra and Commonwealth ranges of the Transantarctic Mountains to the Antarctic Plateau, and was one of the early routes to the South Pole. Beardmore Glacier has a steep upward incline. The glacier was discovered by Ernest Shackleton during his Nimrod Antarctic Expedition of 1908. Although Shackleton turned back before reaching the South Pole, he had discovered the first proven route to the pole, and in doing so, became the first person to set foot upon the great polar plateau. In 1911–1912, Captain Scott and his team reached the South Pole by climbing the Beardmore. However, they reached the pole a month after Roald Amundsen and his team, who had climbed the previously unknown Axel Heiberg Glacier. Beardmore Glacier is named after Sir William Beardmore, a Scottish industrialist and expedition sponsor born in 1856.
    7.50
    2 votes
    137
    Brady Glacier

    Brady Glacier

    Brady Glacier is a 24-mile-long (39 km) glacier located in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve in the U.S. state of Alaska. It begins at 58°40′N 136°47′W / 58.667°N 136.783°W / 58.667; -136.783 and trends south to Taylor Bay, 46 miles (74 km) northwest of Hoonah. It was named by the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey for missionary and later governor Rev. John Green Brady.
    7.50
    2 votes
    138
    Coleman Glacier

    Coleman Glacier

    Coleman Glacier is a glacier on Mount Baker in the U.S. state of Washington. It was named for Edmund Thomas Coleman, who made the first ascent of Mount Baker.
    7.50
    2 votes
    139
    Crowfoot Glacier

    Crowfoot Glacier

    Crowfoot Glacier is located in Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada, 32 km (20 mi) northwest of Lake Louise, and can be viewed from the Icefields Parkway. The glacier is situated on the northeastern flank of Crowfoot Mountain. Crowfoot Glacier is east of the Continental divide, and runoff from the glacier supplies water to the Bow River. The glacier has retreated since the end of the Little ice age and now has lost one entire lobe; it therefore no longer resembles the glacier which early explorers named. The glacier was measured to be 1.5 km² (0.58 miles²). The Crowfoot glacier was once connected to the Wapta Icefield, and in the 1980s and was considered to be part of a smaller icefield of 5 km² (1.9 mi²).
    7.50
    2 votes
    140
    7.50
    2 votes
    141
    Lamplugh Glacier

    Lamplugh Glacier

    Lamplugh Glacier is an 8-mile-long (13 km) glacier located in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve in the U.S. state of Alaska. It leads north to its 1961 terminus in Johns Hopkins Inlet, 1.4 miles (2.3 km) west of Ptarmigan Creek and 76 miles (122 km) northwest of Hoonah. The glacier was named by Lawrence Martin of the U.S. Geological Survey around 1912 for English geologist George William Lamplugh (1859–1926), who visited Glacier Bay in 1884.
    7.50
    2 votes
    142
    Malaspina Glacier

    Malaspina Glacier

    • Glacier Type: Piedmont Glacier
    The Malaspina Glacier in southeastern Alaska is the largest piedmont glacier in the world. Situated at the head of the Alaska Panhandle, it is about 65 km (40 mi) wide and 45 km (28 mi) long, with an area of some 3,900 km (1,500 sq mi). It is named in honor of Alessandro Malaspina, an Italian explorer in the service of the Spanish Navy, who visited the region in 1791. In 1874, W.H. Dall, of what is now the U.S. National Geodetic Survey, bestowed the name "Malaspina Plateau" on it, not realizing its true geological character. It arises where several valley glaciers, primarily the Seward Glacier and Agassiz Glacier, spill out from the Saint Elias Mountains onto the coastal plain facing the Gulf of Alaska between Icy Bay and Yakutat Bay. Although it fills the plain, nowhere does it actually reach the water and so does not qualify as a tidewater glacier. The Malaspina is up to 600 metres (2,000 ft) thick in places, with the elevation of its bottom being estimated to be as much as 300 metres (980 ft) below sea level. There are two lakes on its margins: Oily Lake to the northwest, at the foot of the Samovar Hills between the Agassiz and Seward glaciers, and Malaspina Lake to the
    7.50
    2 votes
    143
    Plaine Morte

    Plaine Morte

    The Plaine Morte is a glacier located at an elevation of 2,750 m (9,020 ft), in the canton of Bern in Switzerland. The ice field, which covers 10 square kilometres (3.9 sq mi), is located below the mountain of Wildstrubel in the Bernese Alps. The area of Plaine Morte is easily accessible from Crans-Montana by cable car and the practice of cross-country skiing is possible throughout the year. The summit of the Pointe de la Plaine Morte offers impressive views of the Valais Alps.
    7.50
    2 votes
    144
    Ross Ice Shelf

    Ross Ice Shelf

    The Ross Ice Shelf is the largest ice shelf of Antarctica (an area of roughly 487 000 km and about 800 km across: about the size of France). It is several hundred metres thick. The nearly vertical ice front to the open sea is more than 600 km long, and between 15 and 50 metres high above the water surface. Ninety percent of the floating ice, however, is below the water surface. Most of Ross Ice Shelf is located within the Ross Dependency claimed by New Zealand. The ice shelf was named after Captain Sir James Clark Ross, who discovered it on 28 January 1841. It was originally named the Victoria barrier by Ross after Queen Victoria and later the Great Ice Barrier, as it prevented sailing further south. Ross mapped the ice front eastward to 160°W. On January 5, 1841, a British Admiralty team in the Erebus and the Terror, three-masted ships with specially strengthened wooden hulls, was going through the pack ice of the Pacific near Antarctica in an attempt to determine the position of the South Magnetic Pole. Four days later, they found their way into open water and were hoping that they would have a clear passage to their destination. But on 11 January, the men were faced with an
    7.50
    2 votes
    145
    Targovishte Glacier

    Targovishte Glacier

    Targovishte Glacier (Lednik Targovishte \'led-nik t&r-'go-vi-shte\) is situated in Breznik Heights on Greenwich Island, and is bounded by Viskyar Ridge to the west, Vratsa Peak to the northeast, and Drangov Peak and Ziezi Peak to the east. It extends 700 m in east-west direction, and 1.6 km in north-south direction, draining southwards into Bransfield Strait northeast of Sartorius Point. The glacier is named after the city of Targovishte in northeastern Bulgaria. The glacier is located at 62°32′53″S 59°38′26″W / 62.54806°S 59.64056°W / -62.54806; -59.64056 (Bulgarian mapping in 2005 and 2009). This article includes information from the Antarctic Place-names Commission of Bulgaria which is used with permission.
    7.50
    2 votes
    146
    Tschingel Glacier

    Tschingel Glacier

    The Tschingel Glacier (German: Tschingelfirn) is a 3 km long glacier (2005) situated in the Bernese Alps in the canton of Berne in Switzerland. In 1973 it had an area of 6.19 km².
    7.50
    2 votes
    147
    Wapta Icefield

    Wapta Icefield

    The Wapta Icefield is located on the Continental Divide in the Canadian Rockies, in the provinces of British Columbia and Alberta. The icefield is shared by Banff and Yoho National Parks and numerous outlet glaciers extend from the icefield, including the Vulture, Bow and Peyto Glaciers. Runoff from the icefields and outlet glaciers supply water to both the Kicking Horse and Bow Rivers, as well as numerous streams and lakes. The icefield is one of the most studied in the Canadian Rockies and all evidence supports the conclusion that the icefield is shrinking in area, especially near the lowest altitudes of its outlet glaciers, including Peyto Glacier, in which the glacier has become both shorter in length and thinner in thickness. In the 1980s the icefield covered an area of approximately 80 km² (30 miles²). The icefield is easily accessible by mountaineers in both the summer and winter. Both ski trips in the winter and glacier hiking trips in the summer often combine a traverse of this icefield with a trip across the Waputik Icefield directly to the south. These are the glaciers that are part of this icefield: There are two huts which provide accommodation to mountaineers on the
    7.50
    2 votes
    148
    Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf

    Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf

    The Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf, also known as Ronne-Filchner Ice Shelf, is an Antarctic ice shelf bordering the Weddell Sea. The seaward side of the Filchner-Ronne ice shelf is divided into Eastern (Filchner) 79°00′S 40°00′W / 79°S 40°W / -79; -40 and the larger Western (Ronne) 78°30′S 61°00′W / 78.5°S 61°W / -78.5; -61 sections by Berkner Island. The whole ice shelf covers some 430,000 km², making it the second largest ice shelf in Antarctica, after the Ross Ice Shelf. It grows perpetually due to a flow of inland ice sheets. From time to time, when the shearing stresses exceed the strength of the ice, cracks form and large parts of the ice sheet separate from the ice shelf and continue as icebergs. This is known as calving. The Ronne ice shelf is the larger and western part of the Filchner-Ronne ice shelf. It is bounded on the west by the base of the Antarctic Peninsula (Graham Land with Zumberge Coast and Orville Coast) and Ellsworth Land. Commander Finn Ronne, USNR, leader of the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition (RARE) in 1947-48, discovered and photographed a strip along the entire northern portion of this ice shelf in two aircraft flights in November and December 1947.
    6.33
    3 votes
    149
    Franz Josef Glacier

    Franz Josef Glacier

    The Franz Josef (Ka Roimata o Hinehukatere in Māori) is a 12 km (7.5 mi) long glacier located in Westland Tai Poutini National Park on the West Coast of New Zealand's South Island. Together with the Fox Glacier 20 km (12 mi) to the south, it is unique in descending from the Southern Alps to less than 300 metres (980 ft) above sea level, amidst the greenery and lushness of a temperate rainforest. The area surrounding the two glaciers is part of Te Wahipounamu, a World Heritage Site park. The river emerging from the glacier terminal of Franz Josef is known as the Waiho River. The first European description of one of the west-coast glaciers (believed to be Franz Josef) was made from the steam ship Mary Louisa in 1859. The glacier was later named after Emperor Franz Joseph I of Austria by the German explorer, Julius von Haast in 1865. The Māori name for the glacier is Ka Roimata o Hinehukatere ('The tears of Hinehukatere'), arising from a local legend: Hinehukatere loved climbing in the mountains and persuaded her lover, Wawe, to climb with her. Wawe was a less experienced climber than Hinehukatere but loved to accompany her until an avalanche swept Wawe from the peaks to his death.
    6.33
    3 votes
    150
    Khumbu Icefall

    Khumbu Icefall

    The Khumbu Icefall is an icefall at the head of the Khumbu Glacier. The icefall is found at 5,486 metres (17,999 ft) on the Nepali slopes of Mount Everest not far above Base Camp and southwest of the summit. The icefall is regarded as one of the most dangerous stages of the South Col route to Everest's summit. The Khumbu glacier that forms the icefall moves at such speed that large crevasses open with little warning. The large towers of ice or seracs found at the icefall have been known to collapse suddenly. Huge blocks of ice tumble down the glacier from time to time; they range in size from cars to large houses. It is estimated that the glacier advances 3 to 4 feet (0.91 to 1.2 m) down the mountain every day. Most climbers try to cross the icefall during the very early morning, before sunup, when it has partially frozen during the night and is less susceptible to moving. As the intense sunlight warms the area, the friction between the ice structure lessens and increases the chances of crevasses opening or blocks to fall. The most dangerous time to cross the Khumbu Icefall is generally in mid- and late-afternoon. Strong, acclimatized climbers can ascend the icefall in just a few
    6.33
    3 votes
    151
    Hüfi Glacier

    Hüfi Glacier

    The Hüfi Glacier (German: Hüfifirn) is a 7 km (4.3 mi) long glacier (2005) situated in the Glarus Alps in the canton of Uri in Switzerland. In 1973 it had an area of 13.64 km (5.27 sq mi).
    8.00
    1 votes
    152
    Marinelli Glacier

    Marinelli Glacier

    Marinelli Glacier is a tidewater glacier located in Alberto de Agostini National Park, Isla Grande de Tierra del Fuego. The glacier spills out from the backbone of the Cordillera Darwin and calves into Ainsworth Bay, an embayment of the Almirantazgo Fjord. The Marinelli Glacier is in a state of retreat, beginning at least as early as 1960 and continuing to the present time. Meltwater of Marinelli glacier discharges to form the headwaters of Marinelli Creek.
    8.00
    1 votes
    153
    McCarty Glacier

    McCarty Glacier

    • Status: Retreating
    The McCarty Glacier is a tidewater glacier located in the Harding Icefield in the Kenai Mountains of the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska. The glacier is named for William McCarty, a former resident of Seward.
    8.00
    1 votes
    154
    Mueller Glacier

    Mueller Glacier

    The Mueller Glacier is a 13-kilometre (8.1 mi) long glacier flowing through Aoraki/Mount Cook National Park in the South Island of New Zealand. It lies to the south of Aoraki/Mount Cook, high in the Southern Alps, and flows north. Its meltwaters eventually join the Tasman River. The glacier was named after German-Australian botanist and explorer Baron von Mueller. Based on dating of a yellow-green lichen of the Rhizocarpon subgenus, Mueller Glacier is considered to have had a Little Ice Age maximum mass between 1725 and 1730.
    8.00
    1 votes
    155
    O'Higgins Glacier

    O'Higgins Glacier

    O'Higgins Glacier is a glacier located in Bernardo O'Higgins National Park, Chile. It is one of the principal glaciers of the Southern Patagonian Ice Field. The summit of the active Lautaro volcano is the top of the accumulation zone of the glacier. The bulk of the glacier is part of the icefield plateau. It flows eastward into O'Higgins Lake and is about 2 km (1.2 mi) wide at the terminus.
    8.00
    1 votes
    156
    Axel Heiberg Glacier

    Axel Heiberg Glacier

    The Axel Heiberg Glacier is a valley glacier, 48 km (30 mi) long, descending from the high elevations of the Antarctic Plateau into the Ross Ice Shelf (nearly at sea level) between the Herbert Range and Mount Don Pedro Christophersen in the Queen Maud Mountains. This huge glacier was discovered in November 1911 by the Norwegian polar explorer Roald Amundsen, and named by him for Axel Heiberg, a Norwegian businessman and patron of science, who contributed to numerous Norwegian polar expeditions. Amundsen used this glacier as his route up onto the polar plateau on his successful expedition to the South Pole.
    7.00
    2 votes
    157
    Emmons Glacier

    Emmons Glacier

    • Glacier Type: Mountain Glacier
    • Status: Retreating
    Emmons Glacier is a glacier on the northeast flank of Mount Rainier, in Washington. At 4.3 square miles (11 km), it has the largest surface area of any glacier in the contiguous United States. The glacier was named after the geologist Samuel Franklin Emmons after his involvement in a survey of Mount Rainier in 1870. Starting at an elevation of over 13,800 feet (4,200 m), the Emmons glacier flows down eastward. Near the Disappointment Cleaver at 12,200 feet (3,700 m), the Emmons is joined by the Ingraham Glacier flowing to the south. The glaciers flow together and remain connected until they split up upon reaching the wedge of Little Tahoma Peak. As the Emmons flows northeast, the massive glacier descends until it reaches its rocky lower terminus at about 5,100 feet (1,600 m) in elevation. In the 1930s, the glacier was found to be receding quickly. However, in 1963, a rock fall from Little Tahoma Peak covered the lower glacier with rock debris. The debris cover insulated the ice from melting. As a result of decreased melting, the glacier advanced rapidly in the early 1980s. That advance was continuing as of 1992, but at a slower rate; ice beneath the rock debris was melting
    7.00
    2 votes
    158
    Eyjafjallajökull

    Eyjafjallajökull

    Eyjafjallajökull (pronounced [ˈeːɪjaˌfjatl̥aˌjœːkʏtl̥] ( listen); Icelandic for "Island mountain glacier") is one of the smaller ice caps of Iceland, situated to the north of Skógar and to the west of Mýrdalsjökull. The ice cap covers the caldera of a volcano with a summit elevation of 1,666 metres (5,466 ft). The volcano has erupted relatively frequently since the last glacial period, most recently in 2010. Eyjafjallajökull consists of a volcano completely covered by an ice cap. The ice cap covers an area of about 100 square kilometres (39 sq mi), feeding many outlet glaciers. The main outlet glaciers are to the north; Gígjökull, flowing into Lónið, and Steinholtsjökull, flowing into Steinholtslón. The glacier is the 6th largest in Iceland. In 1967 there was a massive landslide on the Steinholtsjökull glacial tongue. On January 15, 1967 at 13.47.55 there was an explosion on the glacier. It can be timed because the earthquake meters in Kirkjubæjarklaustur monitored the movement. When about 15 million cubic meters of material hit the glacier a massive amount of air, ice, and water began to move from under the glacier out into the lagoon at the foot of the glacier. The mountain
    7.00
    2 votes
    159
    Glacier des Bossons

    Glacier des Bossons

    The Bossons Glacier is one of the glaciers found in the Chamonix valley of Haute-Savoie département, south-eastern France. It is on the north-eastern side of the valley, close to the Aiguille du Midi.
    7.00
    2 votes
    160
    Grant Glacier

    Grant Glacier

    Grant Glacier is located in the U.S. state of Montana in Flathead National Forest. The glacier is situated in a cirque and lies below the east slopes of Mount Grant (8,590 feet (2,620 m)). Grant Glacier is 1 mile (1.6 km) southeast of Stanton Glacier and both 5 miles (8.0 km) west of Glacier National Park (U.S.). Images taken of the glacier in 1902 and from the same vantage point in 1998 indicate that the glacier retreated substantially during the 20th Century.
    7.00
    2 votes
    161
    Guyot Glacier

    Guyot Glacier

    Guyot Glacier is a 34-mile (55 km) long and 8-mile (13 km) wide glacier located in the east end of the Robinson Mountains in the U.S. state of Alaska. It begins 5.6 mi (9.0 km) north of Yaga Peak and heads east-southeast to Icy Bay, south of the Guyot Hills and 73 miles (117 km) northwest of Yakutat. It borders Yahtse Glacier on the northeast. The glacier was named by the New York Times expedition of 1886 for Arnold Henry Guyot.
    7.00
    2 votes
    162
    Nordenskjold Glacier

    Nordenskjold Glacier

    Nordenskjold Glacier (54°22′S 36°22′W / 54.367°S 36.367°W / -54.367; -36.367) is a large glacier flowing north to the head of Cumberland East Bay, on the north coast of South Georgia. It was charted by the Swedish Antarctic Expedition and named for Otto Nordenskiöld, leader of the expedition.  This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Nordenskjöld Glacier" (content from the Geographic Names Information System).
    7.00
    2 votes
    163
    Oberaar Glacier

    Oberaar Glacier

    The Oberaar Glacier (German: Oberaargletscher) is a 4 km (2.5 mi) long glacier (2005) situated in the Bernese Alps in the canton of Berne in Switzerland. In 1973 it had an area of 5.82 km (2.25 sq mi).
    7.00
    2 votes
    164
    Roseg Glacier

    Roseg Glacier

    The Roseg Glacier (Romansh: Vadret da Roseg) is a 4 km long glacier (2005) situated in the Bernina Range, in the Val Roseg (Graubünden). In 1973 it had an area of 8.52 km.
    7.00
    2 votes
    165
    Schoolroom Glacier

    Schoolroom Glacier

    • Glacier Type: Mountain Glacier
    • Terminus: Moraine
    • Status: Retreating
    Schoolroom Glacier is a small glacier located in Grand Teton National Park in the U.S. state of Wyoming. This Teton Range glacier lies adjacent to the south Cascade Canyon trail at an altitude of 10,400 ft (3,200 m), approximately 12 mi (19 km) from the trailhead at Jenny Lake. The glacier has many of the classic textbook details of a glacier, namely, well defined terminal and lateral moraines, crevasses, a proglacial lake and related features which led to the naming schoolroom. As is true for a vast majority of glaciers worldwide, Schoolroom Glacier has been in a state of retreat for many decades, and if current climatic conditions persist, the glacier is anticipated to disappear by the year 2030, if not sooner.
    7.00
    2 votes
    166
    Silvretta Glacier

    Silvretta Glacier

    The Silvretta Glacier (German: Silvrettagletscher) is a 3 km long glacier (2005) situated in the Silvretta Range in the canton of Graubünden in Switzerland. In 1973 it had an area of 3.35 km².
    7.00
    2 votes
    167
    Snæfellsjökull

    Snæfellsjökull

    Snæfellsjökull (Icelandic pronunciation: [ˈstn̥aiːfɛlsˌjœːkʏtl̥], snow-fell glacier) is a 700,000 year old stratovolcano with a glacier covering its summit in western Iceland. The name of the mountain is actually Snæfell, but it is normally called "Snæfellsjökull" to distinguish it from two other mountains with this name. It is situated on the most western part of the Snæfellsnes peninsula in Iceland. Sometimes it may be seen from the city of Reykjavík over the bay of Faxaflói, at a distance of 120 km. The mountain is one of the most famous sites of Iceland, primarily due to the novel A Journey to the Center of the Earth (1864) by Jules Verne, in which the protagonists find the entrance to a passage leading to the center of the earth on Snæfellsjökull. The mountain is included in the Snæfellsjökull National Park (Icelandic: Þjóðgarðurinn Snæfellsjökull). In August 2012 the summit was ice free for the first time in recorded history. The stratovolcano, which is the only large central volcano in its part of Iceland, has many pyroclastic cones on its flanks. Upper-flank craters produced intermediate to felsic materials, while lower-flank craters produced basaltic lava flows. Several
    7.00
    2 votes
    168
    Verila Glacier

    Verila Glacier

    Verila Glacier (Lednik Verila \'led-nik ve-'ri-la\) on Livingston Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica is bounded by Rotch Dome to the west, Casanovas Peak and Snow Peak to the north, and Ustra Peak to the southeast. It is roughly crescent-shaped, extending 13 km in an east-west direction, and 4 km in a north-south direction and drains southwards into Walker Bay, Bransfield Strait between John Beach and Hannah Point. The glacier is named after Verila Mountain in Western Bulgaria. The glacier's midpoint is located at 62°36′15″S 60°42′00″W / 62.60417°S 60.7°W / -62.60417; -60.7 (Bulgarian mapping in 2009). This article includes information from the Antarctic Place-names Commission of Bulgaria which is used with permission.
    7.00
    2 votes
    169
    Waputik Icefield

    Waputik Icefield

    The Waputik Icefield is located on the Continental divide in the Canadian Rocky Mountains, in the provinces of British Columbia and Alberta. It is developed on the heights of the Waputik Range in the Central Main Ranges. The icefield is shared by Banff and Yoho National Parks and numerous outlet glaciers extend from the icefield. Runoff from the Waputik Icefield provides water for numerous lakes, streams and rivers including Hector Lake, and the Bow, Kicking Horse and Yoho Rivers. Runoff from the Daly Glacier feeds Takakkaw Falls. The icefield encompasses 40 km² (15 miles²) and is located 20 km (12 mi) northwest of Lake Louise, on the west side of the Icefield Parkway. The icefield is easily accessible by mountaineers in both the summer and winter. Both ski trips in the winter and glacier hiking trips in the summer often combine a traverse of this icefield with a trip across the Wapta Icefield directly to the north. The following glaciers are part of this icefield: There are two huts operated by the Alpine Club of Canada which are accessible from this icefield:
    7.00
    2 votes
    170
    Furtwängler Glacier

    Furtwängler Glacier

    • Glacier Type: Mountain Glacier
    • Terminus: Moraine
    • Status: Retreating
    The Furtwängler Glacier is located near the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania. Furtwängler Glacier is a small remnant of an enormous icecap which once crowned the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro. This icecap has retreated significantly over the past century; between 1912 and 2000, 82 percent of the glacial ice on the mountain has disappeared. The retreat of glacial ice on the summit is expected to continue and by the year 2020, all the glaciers on top of the mountain may be gone, although seasonal snows will continue to cover the higher sections of the mountain for several months of the year. The glacier is named after Walter Furtwängler, who along with Siegfried König, were the fourth to ascend to the summit of Kilimanjaro in 1912. Between measurements in 1976 and 2000, the area of Furtwängler Glacier was cut almost in half, from 113,000 m to 60,000 m. During fieldwork conducted early in 2006, scientists discovered a large hole near the center of the glacier. This hole, extending through the 6 meter (20 ft) remaining thickness of the glacier to the underlying rock, was expected to grow and split the glacier in two by 2007. The 2006 study found that no new glacial ice has
    6.00
    3 votes
    171
    Boulder Glacier

    Boulder Glacier

    Boulder Glacier is located in the U.S. state of Montana in Glacier National Park (U.S.). The glacier is situated to the north of Boulder Peak and west of the Continental Divide. Between 1966 and 2005, Boulder Glacier lost more than 75 percent of its surface area. As of 2005 the glacier was measured to cover only 13 acres (0.053 km), and no longer met the 25 acres (0.10 km) theshold often cited as the minimal area to qualify as an active glacier. Boulder Glacier was photographed in 2007 by researchers from the U.S. Geological Survey and those images demonstrate that the glacier has almost disappeared. Earlier images taken in 1910 depict a glacier that was far larger than what was recorded in 2007.
    5.67
    3 votes
    172
    Harker Glacier

    Harker Glacier

    Harker Glacier is a tidewater glacier on South Georgia Island in the southern Atlantic Ocean. Harker glacier was first mapped by the Swedish Antarctic Expedition (1901-1904), and named De Geer Glacier, after Gerard De Geer (1858-1943), a Swedish geologist who specialized in geomorphology and geochronology. It was remapped in 1912 by David Ferguson, and renamed for Alfred Harker (1859-1939), an English geologist who specialised in petrology and petrography. The valley in which Harker Glacier is located drains from south to north out of the Allardyce Range into Moraine Fjord in the eastern side of Cumberland Bay, south of Grytviken, the principal settlement of the island. Harker Glacier is a tidewater glacier that contributes icebergs to the bay. The glacier has not changed significantly since the 1970s, but is further advanced than when it was photographed by Frank Hurley in 1914.
    5.67
    3 votes
    173
    Kafni Glacier

    Kafni Glacier

    The Kafni Glacier is located in the upper reaches of the Kumaon Himalayas, to the southeast of Nanda Devi. The glacier gives rise to the Kafni River, which is a tributary of the Pindar River. The Pinder River is a tributary to Alaknanda River, which eventually is one of the two headstreams of the Ganges. This is relatively small glacier but a popular trekking destination along with Pindari Glacier. A list of notable peaks adjacent to or near the Kafni Glacier includes: A list of notable peaks adjacent to or near the Kafni Glacier includes: The glacier is located in Bageshwar district. From Bageshwar town it can be approached via route of Bharadi, Saung, Loharkhet, Dhakuri Pass, Khati, Dwali, and Khatiya. The route until Loharkhet is motorable, after which it is approximately a 90 km (56 mi) round trip. Khati is the last village on the route. Though Pindari is more popular tourist destination, some people find route to this glacier more beautiful. Unlike Pindari, tourists can trek up to the glacier. In case of Pindari, the trek beyond zero point becomes very tough and cannot be done without proper equipment.
    5.67
    3 votes
    174
    Rongbuk Glacier

    Rongbuk Glacier

    The Rongbuk Glacier (simplified Chinese: 绒布冰川; traditional Chinese: 絨布冰川; pinyin: Róngbù Bīngchuān) is located in the Himalaya of southern Tibet. Two large tributary glaciers, the East and West Rongbuk Glaciers flow into the Rongbuk Glacier. It flows north and forms the Rongbuk Valley north of Mount Everest. The famous Rongbuk Monastery is located at the northern end of the Rongbuk valley. Mount Everest is the source of the Rongbuk Glacier and East Rongbuk Glacier. The Englishman George Mallory first explored the Rongbuk Valley and its glaciers while searching for possible routes to the summit of Mount Everest during the initial 1921 British Reconnaissance Expedition. Climbing expeditions attempting the normal route from Tibet use this glacier to reach the Advanced Base Camp of Mount Everest at the upper end of the East Rongbuk Glacier. From there, climbing expeditions try to summit Everest by the North Col and the northeast ridge. Since 2007, American mountaineer and filmmaker David Breashears has been chronicling the rapid disappearance of the Rongbuk glacier due to global climate change. Breashears has retraced the steps of Mallory's 1921 expedition, revealing a significant loss
    5.67
    3 votes
    175
    Byrd Glacier

    Byrd Glacier

    The Byrd Glacier is a major glacier in Antarctica, about 136 km long and 24 km wide, draining an extensive area of the polar plateau and flowing eastward between the Britannia Range and Churchill Mountains to discharge into the Ross Ice Shelf at Barne Inlet. Named by the NZ-APC after Rear Admiral Byrd, US Navy, American Antarctic explorer.
    6.50
    2 votes
    176
    Getz Ice Shelf

    Getz Ice Shelf

    The Getz Ice Shelf is an Antarctic ice shelf, over 300 miles (500 km) long and from 20 to 60 miles (30 to 100 km) wide, bordering the Hobbs and Bakutis Coasts of Marie Byrd Land between the McDonald Heights and Martin Peninsula. Several large islands are partially or wholly embedded in the ice shelf. The ice shelf westward of Siple Island was discovered by the United States Antarctic Service (USAS) in December 1940. The portion eastward of Siple Island was first delineated from air photos taken by U.S. Navy Operation Highjump, 1946–47. The entire feature was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from U.S. Navy air photos of 1962–65. It was named by the USAS (1939–41) for George F. Getz of Chicago, Illinois, who helped furnish the seaplane for the expedition.  This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Getz Ice Shelf" (content from the Geographic Names Information System).
    6.50
    2 votes
    177
    Jackson Glacier

    Jackson Glacier

    • Glacier Type: Mountain Glacier
    • Terminus: Moraine
    • Status: Retreating
    Jackson Glacier is approximately the seventh largest of the remaining 25 glaciers in Glacier National Park located in the U.S. state of Montana. A part of the largest grouping of glaciers in the park, Jackson Glacier rests on the north side of Mount Jackson. The glacier was most recently measured in 2005 at 250 acres (1.0 km), yet when first documented in 1850, the glacier also included the now separate Blackfoot Glacier and together, they covered 1,875 acres (7.59 km). Between 1966 and 2005, Jackson Glacier lost almost a third of its acreage. When the two glaciers were united prior to their separation sometime before 1929, they were known simply as Blackfoot Glacier. In 1850, there were an estimated 150 glaciers in the park. Glaciologists have stated that by the year 2030, many if not all of the glaciers in the park may disappear completely. Jackson and Blackfoot glaciers have been selected for monitoring by the U.S. Geological Survey's Glacier Monitoring Research program, which is researching changes to the mass balance of glaciers in and surrounding Glacier National Park. The glacier is being monitored using remote sensing equipment and repeat photography, where images of the
    6.50
    2 votes
    178
    Kaliakra Glacier

    Kaliakra Glacier

    Kaliakra Glacier (Lednik Kaliakra \'led-nik ka-li-'a-kra\) is a glacier in northeastern Livingston Island, Antarctica extending 7 km in east-west direction and 8 km in north-south direction. It is bounded by Melnik Ridge and Bowles Ridge to the south, by Hemus Peak, Gurev Gap, Gleaner Heights, Elhovo Gap, Leslie Hill, Leslie Gap and Radnevo Peak to the west, and Miziya Peak and Samuel Peak to the north. The glacier drains eastwards into Moon Bay south of Perperek Knoll and north of Sindel Point. Kaliakra is the name of a cape on the Bulgarian Black Sea Coast. First crossed by the Bulgarians Lyubomir Ivanov and Doychin Vasilev from Camp Academia on 24 December 2004. The midpoint of the glacier is located at 62°34′35″S 60°09′30″W / 62.57639°S 60.15833°W / -62.57639; -60.15833. This article includes information from the Antarctic Place-names Commission of Bulgaria which is used with permission.
    6.50
    2 votes
    179
    Rosenlaui Glacier

    Rosenlaui Glacier

    The Rosenlaui Glacier (German: Rosenlauigletscher) is a 5-km-long glacier (2005) situated in the Bernese Alps in the canton of Berne in Switzerland. In 1973 it had an area of 6.14 km.
    6.50
    2 votes
    180
    Taylor Glacier

    Taylor Glacier

    The Taylor Glacier is an Antarctic glacier about 54 kilometres (34 mi) long, flowing from the plateau of Victoria Land into the western end of Taylor Valley, north of the Kukri Hills, south of the Asgard Range. The middle part of the glacier is bounded on the north by the Inland Forts and on the south by Beacon Valley. The glacier was discovered by the British National Antarctic Expedition (1901–04) and at that time thought to be a part of Ferrar Glacier. The Western Journey Party of the British Antarctic Expedition 1910 determined that the upper and lower portions of what was then known as Ferrar Glacier are apposed, i.e., joined in Siamese-twin fashion north of Knobhead. With this discovery Scott named the upper portion for Griffith Taylor, geologist and leader of the Western Journey Party. The Taylor Glacier has been the focus of a measurement and modeling effort carried out by researchers from the University of California at Berkeley and the University of Texas at Austin.  This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Taylor Glacier" (content from the Geographic Names Information System).
    6.50
    2 votes
    181
    Tschierva Glacier

    Tschierva Glacier

    The Tschierva Glacier (Romansh: Vadret da Tschierva) is a 4 km long glacier (2005) situated in the Bernina Range in the canton of Graubünden/Grisons in Switzerland. In 1973 it had an area of 6.2 km.
    6.50
    2 votes
    182
    Angel Glacier

    Angel Glacier

    • Glacier Type: Mountain Glacier
    • Status: Retreating
    The Angel Glacier flows down the north face of Mount Edith Cavell in Jasper National Park, Canada. It is named as such because it has the appearance of an angel with out-swept wings. It was much larger when it was named in the 19th-century, but as with most glaciers worldwide, it is melting rapidly. It is not expected to maintain its distinctive appearance for much longer, and will eventually disappear from the face of Mount Edith Cavell. The glacier is visible from the Cavell Meadows hiking trail.
    7.00
    1 votes
    183
    Sarvant Glacier

    Sarvant Glacier

    The Sarvant Glacier is a glacier located on the northern slopes of the Cowlitz Chimneys in Washington. Named for Henry M. Sarvant, who mapped Mount Rainier in 1894, the glacier starts at an elevation of about 7,000 feet (2,100 m) and descends northward down to 6,100 ft (1,900 m). There are several patches of permanent ice and snow that lie to the east and west of the glacier. These range in elevation from about 7,000 ft (2,100 m) to 5,700 ft (1,700 m). The patches of ice and snow to the west are labeled Sarvant Glaciers.
    7.00
    1 votes
    184
    Tulutson Glacier

    Tulutson Glacier

    • Glacier Type: Mountain Glacier
    The Crater Glacier (also known as Tulutson Glacier) is a geologically young glacier that is located on Mount Saint Helens, in the U.S. state of Washington. The glacier formed after the 1980 Eruption and due to its location, the body of ice grew rapidly, unknown to the public for nearly 20 years. The glacier once contained ice caves in the smooth ice before the post-2004 volcanic activity. The growth of the lava dome and volcanic eruptions since 2004 significantly altered the appearance of the glacier. In the same time period, several agencies decided to put an official name on the glacier which, at first, was Tulutson Glacier. A later decision made Crater Glacier the official glacier name. Despite the volcanic activity, the glacier continued to advance and by mid-2008, the glacier completely encircled the lava domes. In addition, new glaciers (rock or ice) have formed around Crater Glacier as well. In the months after the eruption, the crater floor of Saint Helens remained hot and unstable, with five minor volcanic eruptions, and lava dome construction between May and October 1980. After the eruptions ceased in the winter of 1980, the crater floor cooled down enough for snow and
    7.00
    1 votes
    185
    Middle Teton Glacier

    Middle Teton Glacier

    • Glacier Type: Mountain Glacier
    • Status: Retreating
    Middle Teton Glacier is located on the northeast flank of Middle Teton in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming. The alpine glacier is a popular mountaineering route for ice climbing and for access to the summit of Middle Teton and other peaks to the south. The glacier is at the west end of Garnet Canyon, which is the most popular route used by climbers ascending Grand Teton. The glacier melt feeds streams below including Spalding Falls, an 80 ft (24 m) high cascade.
    5.33
    3 votes
    186
    Amalia Glacier

    Amalia Glacier

    Amalia Glacier, also known as Skua Glacier, is a tidewater glacier located in Bernardo O'Higgins National Park. It originates in the Southern Patagonian Ice Field and from 1945 to 1986 its terminus retreated 7 km (4.3 mi), being, along with the receded of O'Higgins Glacier, the most drastic retreat of the glaciers of the mentioned icefield during that period. The glacier partially surrounds Reclus volcano and erodes the northern flank of it.
    6.00
    2 votes
    187
    Coalman Glacier

    Coalman Glacier

    The Coalman Glacier (also Coleman Glacier) is a glacier located on the upper slopes of Mount Hood in the U.S. state of Oregon. It is the mountain's highest glacier ranging from about 11,200 to 10,500 ft (3,400 to 3,200 m), located within the crater rim, southwest of the peak. It was named for Elija Coalman (variously spelled Elijah Coleman), an early mountain guide who climbed Mount Hood 586 times. Coalman Glacier is the second most frequently visited glacier on the mountain because it is part of the popular South Climbing route from Timberline Lodge. It lies entirely within Mount Hood Wilderness. The most well known feature of Coalman is the Hogsback: a snow ridge running southwest to northeast from Crater Rock toward the summit ridge. The Bergschrund is another widely known feature where the glacier pulls away from the headwall leaving a large crevasse. In 2007, it had become large enough to cause most climbers to use another route. The glacier is a remnant of the massive glaciers that formed during the last ice age. It is historically known to change configuration dramatically, at times a gradual, smooth surface to Hot Rocks; at other times the same place has a 40 ft (12 m) ice
    6.00
    2 votes
    188
    Columbia Glacier

    Columbia Glacier

    • Status: Retreating
    The Columbia Glacier is a glacier in Prince William Sound on the south coast of the U.S. state of Alaska is one of the fastest moving glaciers in the world, and has been retreating since the early 1980s. It was named after Columbia University, one of several glaciers in the area named for elite U.S. colleges by the Harriman Alaska Expedition in 1899. The Alaska Marine Highway vessel M/V Columbia is named after the Columbia Glacier. The glacier twists its way through western Alaska's Chugach Mountains. The bald streak at the bottom of the mountains, called the trimline, shows this glacier has lost 1,300 feet (400 m) of thickness. It has also retreated 10.5 miles (16.9 km) since that measurement was taken. The glacier's speed of retreat at the terminus reached a maximum of nearly 30 metres (98 ft) per day in 2001, when it was discharging icebergs at approximately 7 cubic kilometres (1.7 cu mi) per year; the glacier has subsequently slowed down, resulting in an increase in retreat rate. The terminus has retreated a total of 16 kilometres (9.9 mi) at an average rate of approximately 0.6 kilometres (0.37 mi) per year since 1982. The retreat has been accompanied by nearly 500 metres
    6.00
    2 votes
    189
    Cook Glacier

    Cook Glacier

    The Cook Glacier is a large glacier of approximately 500 km (190 sq mi) in the Kerguelen Islands in the French Southern Territories of the far southern Indian Ocean.
    6.00
    2 votes
    190
    Gauli Glacier

    Gauli Glacier

    The Gauli Glacier (German: Gauligletscher) is a 6.2 km (3.9 mi) long glacier (2005) situated in the Bernese Alps in the canton of Berne in Switzerland. In 1973 it had an area of 17.7 km (6.8 sq mi). The glacier is famous for the C-53 Dakota Crash on the Gauli Glacier and the following rescue mission, which was the first carried out by an aircraft landing on a glacier.
    6.00
    2 votes
    191
    Hardangerjøkulen

    Hardangerjøkulen

    Hardangerjøkulen is the sixth largest glacier in mainland Norway, and is located in Eidfjord and Ulvik municipalities. Hardangerjøkulen's highest point is 1,863 m (6,112 ft) above sea level, and is the highest point in Hordaland. Its lowest point is 1,050 m (3,440 ft) above sea level. The glacier is easily accessed from the north in the winter, from the railway station Finse on Bergensbanen. In the winter the highest point can be accessed from Finse using only skis. The 1980 movie Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back used Hardangerjøkulen as a filming location, for scenes of the ice planet Hoth, including a memorable battle in the snow.
    6.00
    2 votes
    192
    Khumbu Glacier

    Khumbu Glacier

    The Khumbu Glacier is located in the Khumbu region of northeastern Nepal between Mount Everest and the Lhotse-Nuptse ridge. With elevations of 4,900 m (16,100 ft) at its terminus to 7,600 m (24,900 ft) at its source, it is the world's highest glacier. The Khumbu Glacier is followed for the final part of the trail to Everest Base Camp. The start of the glacier is in the Western Cwm near Everest. The glacier has a large icefall, the Khumbu Icefall, at the west end of the lower Western Cwm. This icefall is the first major obstacle—and among the more dangerous—on the standard south col route to the Everest summit. The end of Khumbu Glacier is located at 27°55′55″N 86°48′18″E / 27.932°N 86.805°E / 27.932; 86.805.
    6.00
    2 votes
    193
    Mertz Glacier

    Mertz Glacier

    Mertz Glacier (67°30′S 144°45′E / 67.5°S 144.75°E / -67.5; 144.75) is a heavily crevassed glacier in George V Coast of East Antarctica. It is the source of a glacial prominence that historically has extended northward into the Southern Ocean, the Mertz Glacial Tongue. It is named in honor of the Swiss explorer Xavier Mertz. The Mertz-Ninnis Valley (67°25′S 146°0′E / 67.417°S 146°E / -67.417; 146 (Mertz-Ninnis Valley)) is an undersea valley named in association with the Mertz Glacier and the Ninnis Glacier. Mertz Glacier is about 45 miles (72 km) long and averaging 20 miles (32 km) wide. It reaches the sea at the head of a 60 km fjord where it continues as a large glacier tongue out between Cape De la Motte/Buchanan Bay on the West, and Cape Hurley/Fisher Bay on the east, into the Southern Ocean. The Mertz Glacier Tongue (67°10′S 145°30′E / 67.167°S 145.5°E / -67.167; 145.5 (Mertz Glacier Tongue)) is about 50 miles (80 km) long in total hence it protrudes about 20–25 km out into the Ocean. It is roughly 25 miles (40 km) wide. The Glacier delivers about 10 to 12 Gigatons of ice per year to the fjord and the Tongue advances at about 1 km per year down the fjord and out into
    6.00
    2 votes
    194
    Pindari Glacier

    Pindari Glacier

    The Pindari Glacier is a glacier found in the upper reaches of the Kumaon Himalayas, to the southeast of Nanda Devi, Nanda Kot. The glacier flows to the south for a short distance of about 3 km (1.9 mi) and gives rise to the Pindari River which meets the Alakananda at Karnaprayag in the Garhwal district. The trail to reach the glacier crosses the villages of Saung, Loharkhet, crosses over the Dhakuri Pass, continues onto Khati village (the last inhabited village on the trail), Dwali, Phurkia and finally Zero Point, Pindar, the end of the trail. Though most of the trail is along the banks of the Pindari River, the river is mostly hidden until after Khati. The Pindari Glacier trail provides for a 90 km (56 mi) round-trip trek that most people find comfortable to complete in six days.
    6.00
    2 votes
    195
    Tsanfleuron Glacier

    Tsanfleuron Glacier

    The Tsanfleuron Glacier (French: Glacier de Tsanfleuron) is a 3.5 km (2.2 mi) long glacier (2005) situated in the western Bernese Alps in the cantons of Valais and Vaud in Switzerland. In 1973 it had an area of 3.81 km (1.47 sq mi). Most of the glacier is used as a ski area and is better known under the name Glacier 3000 or Glacier des Diablerets (the latter is in fact a nearby smaller glacier on the summit of the Diablerets). The area can be reached from the Scex Rouge.
    6.00
    2 votes
    196
    Morteratsch Glacier

    Morteratsch Glacier

    • Status: Retreating
    The Morteratsch Glacier (romansh: Vadret da Morteratsch) is the largest glacier by area in the Bernina Range of the Bündner Alps in Switzerland. It is, just after the Pasterze Glacier and Gepatschferner, the third largest and by volume (1.2 km) the most massive glacier in the eastern alps. The Morteratsch Glacier is a typical valley glacier with a pronounced ice front. The accumulation zone lies between the peaks of Piz Morteratsch, Piz Bernina, Crast' Agüzza, Piz Argient, Piz Zupò and Bellavista. From Piz Argient to the ice front in the Val Morteratsch, its horizontal extent is about ~7 km (4.3 mi), with an altitude difference of up to 2,000 m (6,600 ft). Together with the Pers Glacier, originating at Piz Palü, which joins the Morteratsch just below the rock formation Isla Persa ("Lost Isle"), it covers an area of about 16 km (6.2 sq mi). The volume of the ice is estimated to be about 1.2 km. The Morteratsch Glacier drains through Inn River and Danube into the Black Sea. In spring, depending on the snow conditions, a 10-km-long ski-run accessible to skilled skiers is marked on the glacier. It leads from the Diavolezza aerial tramway terminus to the Morteratsch inn and has an
    5.00
    3 votes
    197
    Eiger Glacier

    Eiger Glacier

    The Eiger Glacier (German: Eigergletscher) is a 2.5 km long glacier (2005) situated in the Bernese Alps in the canton of Valais in Switzerland. In 1973 it had an area of 2.13 km².
    5.50
    2 votes
    198
    Meares Glacier

    Meares Glacier

    The Meares Glacier is a large and only tidewater glacier at the head of Unakwik Inlet in Chugach National Forest, Alaska. The glacier is one of the many in Prince William Sound, and is about 79.6 miles (128 km) east of Anchorage. The glacier is named for eighteenth century British naval captain John Meares. The face of the glacier is one mile (1.6 km) wide where it calves into the inlet. The glacier is sometimes visited by cruises from Valdez. Meares Glacier is currently advancing.
    5.50
    2 votes
    199
    Northern Patagonian Ice Field

    Northern Patagonian Ice Field

    The Northern Patagonian Ice Field, located in southern Chile, is the smaller of two remnant parts in which the Patagonian Ice Sheet in the Andes Mountains of lower South America can be divided. It is completely contained within the boundaries of Laguna San Rafael National Park. The Northern Patagonian Ice Field is a vestige of the Patagonian Ice Sheet, an extensive ice sheet that covered all of Chilean Patagonia and the westernmost parts of Argentine Patagonia during the Quaternary glaciations. Today, with its glaciers largely in retreat and only an area of 4,200 km (1,600 sq mi), it is still the second largest continuous mass of ice outside of the polar regions. Survival is based on its elevation (1,100 to 1,500 m (3,600 to 4,900 ft)), favorable terrain and a cool, moist, marine climate. The ice field has 28 exit glaciers, the largest two — San Quintin and San Rafael — nearly reach sea level to the west at the Pacific Ocean. Smaller exit glaciers, like San Valentin and Nef, feed numerous rivers and glacially carved lakes to the east.
    5.50
    2 votes
    200
    Ropotamo Glacier

    Ropotamo Glacier

    Ropotamo Glacier (Bulgarian: Lednik Ropotamo \'led-nik ro-po-'ta-mo\) is a glacier extending 900 m in northeast-southwest direction and 600 m in northwest-southeast direction on the Burgas Peninsula, Livingston Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica. It is named after the river Ropotamo in Bulgaria. The glacier is bounded by Asen Peak and Delchev Peak to the northwest and north, and flowing southeastwards mostly into Yantra Cove, Bransfield Strait. The glacier is centered at 62°38′55″S 59°55′34″W / 62.64861°S 59.92611°W / -62.64861; -59.92611. This article includes information from the Antarctic Place-names Commission of Bulgaria which is used with permission.
    5.50
    2 votes
    201
    Carbon Glacier

    Carbon Glacier

    • Glacier Type: Mountain Glacier
    • Terminus: Moraine
    • Status: Retreating
    The Carbon Glacier is the source of the Carbon River. It is accessible from the northwest Carbon River entrance of Mount Rainier National Park just outside the town of Carbonado Washington. The Carbon Glacier is the lowest-elevation glacier in the 48 contiguous United States at around 3700 ft. Also, it has the thickest ice in the lower 48, with maximum ice thickness at around 700 ft. The snout of the glacier is accessible by a 7-mile round trip hike.
    4.67
    3 votes
    202
    Briksdalsbreen

    Briksdalsbreen

    Briksdalsbreen (English: the Briksdal glacier) is one of the most accessible and best known arms of the Jostedalsbreen glacier. Briksdalsbreen is located in the municipality of Stryn in Sogn og Fjordane county, Norway. The glacier lies on the north side of the Jostedalsbreen, in Briksdalen (the Briks valley) which is located at the end of the Oldedalen valley, about 25 kilometres (16 mi) south of the village of Olden. It is part of Jostedalsbreen National Park. Briksdalsbreen terminates in a small glacial lake, Briksdalsbrevatnet, which lies 346 metres (1,135 ft) above sea level. The size of Briksdalsbreen is not only depending on temperature, but is also strongly affected by precipitation. Measurements since 1900 show small changes in the first decades, with advances in the glacier front in 1910 and 1929. In the period from 1934 to 1951 the glacier receded by 800 metres (2,600 ft), exposing the glacial lake. In the period from 1967 until 1997 the glacier expanded by 465 metres (1,526 ft) and covered the whole lake, with the glacier front ending at the lake outlet. The glacier attracted international attention in the 1990s, as it was growing at a time when other European glaciers
    6.00
    1 votes
    203
    Carbon Glacier

    Carbon Glacier

    • Glacier Type: Mountain Glacier
    • Status: Retreating
    Carbon Glacier is located on the north slope of Mount Rainier in the U.S. state of Washington and is the source of the Carbon River. The snout at the glacier terminal moraine is at about 3,500 feet (1,100 m) above sea level, making it the lowest-elevation glacier in the contiguous United States. The glacier also has the greatest length (5.7 miles (9.2 km)), thickness (700 feet (210 m)) and volume (0.2 cubic miles (0.83 km)) of any U.S. glacier outside of Alaska. Carbon Glacier is accessible from the northwest Carbon River entrance of Mount Rainier National Park, just outside the town of Carbonado, Washington. The glacier is accessible on foot via an 8-mile (13 km) hike from the Carbon River entrance of Mt. Rainier National Park. The road and trail is currently washed out in several areas due to flooding of the Carbon River, however reroutes are clearly marked.
    6.00
    1 votes
    204
    Dickson Glacier

    Dickson Glacier

    Dickson Glacier is located in Torres del Paine National Park of southern Chile. Geologically it is in the southeastern outflow from the Southern Patagonian Ice Field.
    6.00
    1 votes
    205
    Srebarna Glacier

    Srebarna Glacier

    Srebarna Glacier (Lednik Srebarna \'led-nik 'sre-bar-na\) on Livingston Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica draining southeast of the Great Needle Peak and Serdica Peak in Levski Ridge, Tangra Mountains to enter Bransfield Strait between Aytos Point and M'Kean Point. Extending 2.3 km in southwest-northeast direction and 1.8 km in northwest-southeast direction. It is named after Srebarna Lake in northeastern Bulgaria. The midpoint is located at 62°41′25″S 60°02′20″W / 62.69028°S 60.03889°W / -62.69028; -60.03889. This article includes information from the Antarctic Place-names Commission of Bulgaria which is used with permission.
    6.00
    1 votes
    206
    WAIS Divide

    WAIS Divide

    The West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) Divide is a deep ice core drilling project run by the United States Antarctic Program (USAP) and funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). The general purpose of the WAIS Divide project is to collect a deep ice core from the flow divide in central West Antarctica that can be used for scientific analysis and research. Specifically, scientists are looking to create the largest and most detailed record of greenhouse gases possible for the last 100,000 years, and also plan to look at the role climate change could have had on these amounts. The WAIS Divide project began during the 2005/2006 field season when the first team of scientists established the seasonal field camp and began construction on the ice core handling and processing facility. During this first season, they also dug a few shallow ice cores to test out the site. Over the 2006/2007 season, work continued on the arch handing and processing facility, as well as set up for the eventual Deep Ice Sheet Coring (DISC) drill. At the end of the 2009/2010 field season, the project had reached a depth of 2,564 meters, with a targeted depth of about 3,330 meters, about 100 meters above
    6.00
    1 votes
    207
    Debelt Glacier

    Debelt Glacier

    The Debelt Glacier (Lednik Debelt \'led-nik 'de-belt\) sits on Varna Peninsula, Livingston Island draining the southeastern slopes of Vidin Heights into Moon Bay between Edinburgh Hill and Helis Nunatak. The glacier extends three km in an east-west direction, and 1.5 km in north-south direction. 62°31′55″S 60°03′46″W / 62.53194°S 60.06278°W / -62.53194; -60.06278 (62.5319° S; 60.0628° W) Bulgarian topographic survey Tangra 2004/05 and mapping in 2005 and 2009. Named after the settlement of Debelt in Southeastern Bulgaria, successor of the ancient town of Deultum. Registered in the SCAR Composite Antarctic Gazetteer. This article includes information from the Antarctic Place-names Commission of Bulgaria which is used with permission.
    4.33
    3 votes
    208
    Gornergletscher

    Gornergletscher

    The Gorner Glacier (German: Gornergletscher) is a valley glacier found on the west side of the Monte Rosa Massif close to Zermatt in the canton of Valais, Switzerland. It is about 14 km (8.7 mi) long and 1 to 1.5 km (0.62 to 0.93 mi) wide. The entire glacial area of the glacier related to Gorner Glacier is 57 km (22 sq mi) (1999), which makes it the second largest glacial system in the Alps after the Aletsch Glacier system. Numerous smaller glaciers connect with the Gorner Glacier. Its tribunaries are (clockwise on this map ): Gornergletscher (after which the whole system is named), Grenzgletscher, Zwillingsgletscher, Schwärzegletscher, Breithorngletscher and Theodulgletscher (although this one is actually disconnected now); also Monte Rosa Glacier used to be connected. The main tributary is the Grenzgletscher. An interesting feature of this glacier is the Gornersee, an ice marginal lake at the confluence area of the Gorner- and Grenzgletscher. This lake fills every year and drains in summer, usually as a Glacial lake outburst flood. This is one of few glacial lakes in the Alps exhibiting this kind of behaviour. There are also several interesting surface features including
    5.00
    2 votes
    209
    Kander Glacier

    Kander Glacier

    The Kander Glacier (German: Kanderfirn) is a 6.6 km (4.1 mi) long glacier (2005) situated in the Bernese Alps in the canton of Berne in Switzerland. In 1973 it had an area of 13.9 km (5.4 sq mi).
    5.00
    2 votes
    210
    Larsen Ice Shelf

    Larsen Ice Shelf

    The Larsen Ice Shelf is a long, fringing ice shelf in the northwest part of the Weddell Sea, extending along the east coast of Antarctic Peninsula from Cape Longing to the area just southward of Hearst Island. Named for Captain Carl Anton Larsen, the master of the Norwegian whaling vessel Jason, who sailed along the ice front as far as 68°10' South during December 1893. In finer detail, the Larsen Ice Shelf is a series of three shelves that occupy (or occupied) distinct embayments along the coast. From north to south, the three segments are called Larsen A (the smallest), Larsen B, and Larsen C (the largest) by researchers who work in the area. The Larsen A ice shelf disintegrated in January 1995. The Larsen B ice shelf disintegrated in February 2002. The Larsen C ice shelf appeared to be stable in 2008, though scientists predict that, if localized warming continues at its current rate, the shelf could disintegrate at some point within the foreseeable future. The Larsen disintegration events were unusual by past standards. Typically, ice shelves lose mass by iceberg calving and by melting at their upper and lower surfaces. The disintegration events are linked to the ongoing climate
    5.00
    2 votes
    211
    Ried Glacier

    Ried Glacier

    The Ried Glacier (German: Riedgletscher) is a 6 km long glacier (2005) situated in the Pennine Alps in the canton of Valais in Switzerland. In 1973 it had an area of 8.22 km. The glacier lies in the Mischabel range, at the foot of Nadelhorn and not far from Dom.
    5.00
    2 votes
    212
    Chelen Glacier

    Chelen Glacier

    The Chelen Glacier (German: Chelengletscher) is a 2.5 km long glacier (2005) situated in the Urner Alps in the canton of Uri in Switzerland. In 1973 it had an area of 3.15 km².
    4.50
    2 votes
    213
    Blue Glacier

    Blue Glacier

    Blue Glacier is a large glacier located to the north of Mount Olympus in the Olympic Mountains of Washington. The glacier covers an area of 1.7 sq mi (4.4 km) and contains 580,000,000 cu ft (16,000,000 m) of ice and snow in spite of its low terminus elevation. The glacier length has decreased from about 3.4 mi (5.5 km) in 1800 to 2.7 mi (4.3 km) in the year 2000. Just in the period from 1995 and 2006, Blue Glacier retreated 325 ft (99 m). Blue Glacier is also thinning as it retreats and between 1987 and 2009 the glacier lost 178 ft (54 m) of its depth near its terminus and between 32 and 48 ft (9.8 and 15 m) in the uppermost sections of the glacier known as the accumulation zone. Starting at an elevation of 7,800 feet (2,380 m) near Mount Olympus's three summits, the Blue Glacier begins as a snow/ice field separated by arêtes. As the glacier flows north, it cascades down a steep slope and thus, the smooth ice turns into a chaotic icefall, replete with seracs and crevasses. After the ice passes the icefall, the glacier ends up in a valley and takes a left turn to the west. Another ice stream from a snowdome located to the northwest of Mount Olympus joins the Blue Glacier and
    5.00
    1 votes
    214
    Boyana Glacier

    Boyana Glacier

    Boyana Glacier (Lednik Boyana \'led-nik bo-'ya-na\) is located to the east of Vazov Rock, to the south of St. Naum Peak, Starosel Gate, Silistra Knoll and Kotel Gap, and to the west of Christoff Cliff in Levski Ridge, Tangra Mountains on Livingston Island, South Shetland Islands in Antarctica. Extending 3 km in east-west direction and 1.6 km in north-south direction. The glacier flows southeastward into the Bransfield Strait between Vazov Point and Aytos Point. The glacier is named after the Bulgarian settlement of Boyana, now part of Sofia. The midpoint of the glacier is at 62°42′18″S 60°05′30″W / 62.705°S 60.09167°W / -62.705; -60.09167 This article includes information from the Antarctic Place-names Commission of Bulgaria which is used with permission.
    5.00
    1 votes
    215
    Brüggen Glacier

    Brüggen Glacier

    Brüggen Glacier, also known as Pío XI Glacier, is in southern Chile and is the largest western outflow from the Southern Patagonian Ice Field. Now about 64 km (40 mi) in length, it is the longest glacier in the southern hemisphere outside of Antarctica. Unlike most glaciers worldwide, it advanced significantly from 1945 to 1976, Brüggen surged 5 km (3.1 mi) across the Eyre Fjord, reaching the western shore by 1962 and cutting off Lake Greve from the sea. The glacier continued advancing both northward and southward in the fjord to near its present position before stabilizing. The growth covers a distance of more than 10 km (6.2 mi) north to south, adding nearly 60 square kilometres (23 sq mi) of ice. The glacier is named after the German geologist Juan Brüggen Messtorff.
    5.00
    1 votes
    216
    Grey Glacier

    Grey Glacier

    • Glacier Type: Mountain Glacier
    Grey Glacier is a glacier in the Southern Patagonian Ice Field, just west of the Cordillera del Paine. It flows southward into the lake of the same name. The Glacier is in the south end of the Southern Patagonia Ice Field. The surface of the lake can be seen when following the big circuit of Paine Mountain Range at John Garner Pass. There is another view of the glacier from the south shore of the lake where the glacier can be seen in the background, with fragments of ice floating close to the shore. It is located to the west side of the Torres del Paine National Park.
    5.00
    1 votes
    217
    Perito Moreno Glacier

    Perito Moreno Glacier

    The Perito Moreno Glacier is a glacier located in the Los Glaciares National Park in the south west of Santa Cruz province, Argentina. It is one of the most important tourist attractions in the Argentine Patagonia. The 250 km (97 sq mi) ice formation, and 30 km (19 mi) in length, is one of 48 glaciers fed by the Southern Patagonian Ice Field located in the Andes system shared with Chile. This icefield is the world's third largest reserve of fresh water. The Perito Moreno Glacier is one of only three Patagonian glaciers that is growing. The reason remains debated by glaciologists. The terminus of the Perito Moreno Glacier is 5 kilometres (3 mi) wide, with an average height of 74 m (240 ft) above the surface of the water of Lake Argentino, in Argentina. It has a total ice depth of 170 metres (558 ft). Periodically the glacier advances over the kidney-shaped "Lago Argentino" ("Argentine Lake") forming a natural dam which separates the lake into two halves when it reaches the opposite shore. With no escape route, the water-level on the Brazo Rico side of the lake can rise by up to 30 meters above the level of the other half. The pressure produced by the height of the dammed water
    5.00
    1 votes
    218
    Polish Glacier

    Polish Glacier

    The Polish Glacier (Spanish Glaciar de los Polacos) is one of the glacial fields of Cerro Aconcagua, the highest peak in the Andes. It was named after the Polish expedition of 1934. Led by Konstanty Jodko-Narkiewicz, the team paved an alternative route to the peak, named the Polish Route, through the glacier.
    5.00
    1 votes
    219
    Suess Glacier

    Suess Glacier

    Suess Glacier (77°38′S 162°40′E / 77.633°S 162.667°E / -77.633; 162.667) is a glacier between Canada Glacier and Lacroix Glacier, flowing south into Taylor Valley in Victoria Land, Antarctica. It was charted and named by the British Antarctic Expedition under Scott, 1910–13, for Professor Eduard Suess, noted Austrian geologist and paleontologist.  This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Suess Glacier" (content from the Geographic Names Information System).
    5.00
    1 votes
    220
    West Antarctic Ice Sheet

    West Antarctic Ice Sheet

    The West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) is the segment of the continental ice sheet that covers West (or Lesser) Antarctica, the portion of Antarctica on the side of the Transantarctic Mountains which lies in the Western Hemisphere. The WAIS is classified as a marine-based ice sheet, meaning that its bed lies well below sea level and its edges flow into floating ice shelves. The WAIS is bounded by the Ross Ice Shelf, the Ronne Ice Shelf, and outlet glaciers that drain into the Amundsen Sea. It is estimated that the volume of the Antarctic ice sheet is about 25.4 million km, and the WAIS contains just under 10% of this, or 2.2 million km. The weight of the ice has caused the underlying rock to sink by between 0.5 and 1 kilometres in a process known as isostatic depression. Under the force of its own weight, the ice sheet deforms and flows. The interior ice flows slowly over rough bedrock. In some circumstances, ice can flow faster in ice streams, separated by slow-flowing ice ridges. The inter-stream ridges are frozen to the bed while the bed beneath the ice streams consists of water-saturated sediments. Many of these sediments were deposited before the ice sheet occupied the region,
    5.00
    1 votes
    221
    Prespa Glacier

    Prespa Glacier

    Prespa Glacier (Lednik Prespa \'led-nik 'pre-spa\) on Rozhen Peninsula, Livingston Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica is bounded to the east by Needle Peak and Ludogorie Peak, to the northwest by St. Cyril Peak and St. Methodius Peak, and to the southwest by Shumen Peak and Yambol Peak, and flows southeastward into Bransfield Strait between Gela Point and Samuel Point. The glacier extends 3.5 km ineast-west direction and 2.5 km in north-south direction. It is named after Prespa Peak in the Rhodope Mountains, Bulgaria. The midpoint is located at 62°43′36″S 60°12′42″W / 62.72667°S 60.21167°W / -62.72667; -60.21167 (British mapping in 1968, Bulgarian in 2005 and 2009). This article includes information from the Antarctic Place-names Commission of Bulgaria which is used with permission.
    4.00
    2 votes
    222
    Blackfoot Glacier

    Blackfoot Glacier

    • Glacier Type: Mountain Glacier
    • Terminus: Moraine
    • Status: Retreating
    Blackfoot Glacier is the second largest of the remaining 25 glaciers in Glacier National Park and is located to the north of Blackfoot Mountain. The glacier was most recently measured in 2005 at 441 acres (1.78 km), yet when first documented in 1850, the glacier also included the now separate Jackson Glacier and together, they covered 1,875 acres (7.59 km). In 1850, there were an estimated 150 glaciers in the park. Glaciologists have stated that by the year 2030, all the glaciers in the park may disappear. Jackson and Blackfoot glaciers have been selected for monitoring by the U.S. Geological Survey's Glacier Monitoring Research program, which is researching changes to the mass balance of glaciers in and surrounding Glacier National Park. The glacier is being monitored using remote sensing equipment and repeat photography, where images of the glacier are taken from identical locations periodically. Between 1966 and 2005, Blackfoot Glacier lost over 23 percent of its surface area. In the summer of 2007, a huge 23-acre (93,000 m) chunk of Blackfoot Glacier collapsed and cascaded down the mountain as an ice avalanche.
    4.00
    1 votes
    223
    Cheilon Glacier

    Cheilon Glacier

    The Cheilon Glacier (French: Glacier de Cheilon) is a 3 km long glacier (2005) situated in the Pennine Alps in the canton of Valais in Switzerland. In 1973 it had an area of 4.56 km.
    4.00
    1 votes
    224
    Falling Ice Glacier

    Falling Ice Glacier

    • Glacier Type: Mountain Glacier
    Falling Ice Glacier is located in the Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, United States. The glacier is situated on the southeastern cliffs of Mount Moran and can be seen from Jackson Hole. Runoff from the glacier flows into Leigh Lake. The glacier is located in a high altitude cirque and is along one of the major climbing routes to the summit of Mount Moran. All of the existing glaciers in Grand Teton National Park were created during the Little Ice Age (1350-1850 A.D.) and have been in a general state of retreat since the mid 1800s.
    4.00
    1 votes
    225
    Myklebustbreen

    Myklebustbreen

    Myklebustbreen, or Snønipbreen, is the seventh largest glacier in mainland Norway. It is located in the municipalities of Jølster, Gloppen, and Stryn in Sogn og Fjordane county. Its highest point is just below the nunatak Snønipa, with altitude of 1,827 metres (5,994 ft), and its lowest point is at 890 metres (2,920 ft) above sea level. The villages of Byrkjelo and Egge both lie on the highway E39 which runs north and south, 7 kilometres (4.3 mi) east of Myklebustbreen. The glacier also lies northwest of the Jostedalsbreen glacier, and both are part of Jostedalsbreen National Park. Jostedalsbreen and Myklebustbreen are separated by the Stardalen valley.
    4.00
    1 votes
    226
    Ruth Glacier

    Ruth Glacier

    Ruth Glacier is a glacier in Denali National Park and Preserve in the U.S. state of Alaska. Its upper reaches are almost three vertical miles (4.8 km) below the summit of Mount McKinley. The glacier's "Great Gorge" is one mile (1.6 km) wide, and drops almost 2,000 feet (610 m) over ten miles (16 km), with crevasses along the surface. Above the surface on both sides are 5,000-foot (1,500-m) granite cliffs. From the top of the cliffs to the bottom of the glacier is a height exceeding that of the Grand Canyon. Ruth Glacier moves at a rate of 3.3 feet (1 m) a day and was measured to be 3,800 feet (1,200 m) thick in 1983. Surrounding the Ruth Gorge are many mountains of the Alaska Range, including the Mooses Tooth, with highly technical ice and rock climbs on their faces.
    4.00
    1 votes
    227
    Saskatchewan Glacier

    Saskatchewan Glacier

    Saskatchewan Glacier is located in Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada, approximately 120 km (75 mi) northwest of the town of Banff, and can be accessed from the Icefields Parkway. Saskatchewan Glacier is the largest outflow glacier from the Columbia Icefield, which rests along the Continental divide. The glacier is a primary water source for the North Saskatchewan River. The glacier is approximately 13 kilometres (8.1 mi) long and covers an area of 30 km² (11.5 mi²) and was measured in 1960 to be over 400 metres (1,300 ft) thick at a distance of 8 kilometres (5.0 mi) from the terminal snout. Between the years 1893 and 1953, Saskatchewan Glacier had retreated a distance of 1,364 metres (4,474 ft), with the rate of retreat between the years 1948 and 1953 averaging 55 metres (180 ft) per year.
    4.00
    1 votes
    228
    Tustumena Glacier

    Tustumena Glacier

    • Glacier Type: Mountain Glacier
    • Status: Retreating
    The Tustumena Glacier is a glacier located on the Kenai Peninsula of Alaska. The Tustumena Glacier begins in the Harding Icefield and makes its way down west for about 20 miles (32 km) until its terminus roughly 5 miles (8.0 km) before Tustumena Lake. The glacier is retreating. A small lake called Arctic Lake sits alongside Tustumena Glacier, with its outflow underneath the ice. This lake periodically fills up and then drains as the glacier moves, leaving icebergs stranded in the sand. The Alaska Marine Highway ferry M/V Tustumena derives its name from this glacier.
    4.00
    1 votes
    229
    Aletsch Glacier

    Aletsch Glacier

    The Aletsch Glacier (German: Aletschgletscher) or Great Aletsch Glacier (German: Grosser Aletschgletscher) is the largest glacier in the Alps. It has a length of about 23 km (14 mi) and covers more than 120 square kilometres (46 sq mi) in the eastern Bernese Alps in the Swiss canton of Valais. The Aletsch Glacier is composed by three smaller glaciers converging at Concordia, where its thickness is estimated to be near 1 km (3,300 ft). It then continues towards the Rhone valley before giving birth to the Massa River. The whole area, including other glaciers is part of the Jungfrau-Aletsch Protected Area, which was declared a UNESCO World Heritage site in 2001. The Aletsch Glacier is one of the many glaciers located between the cantons of Berne and Valais on the Bernese Alps located east of the Gemmi Pass. The whole area is considered to be the largest glaciated area in western Eurasia. The Fiescher and Aar glaciers lying on the east have similar extensions. Except the Finsteraarhorn, all the highest summits of the Bernese Alps are located within the drainage basin of the glacier. The Jungfrau and Mönch constitute the northern boundary; the Gross Fiescherhorn and Gross Wannenhorn lie
    0.00
    0 votes
    230
    Chacaltaya

    Chacaltaya

    Chacaltaya (Aymara for "cold road") is a mountain in the Cordillera Real, one of the mountain ranges of the Cordillera Oriental, itself a range of the Bolivian Andes. Its elevation is 5,421 meters (17,785 ft). Chacaltaya's glacier - which was as old as 18,000 years – had in 1940 an area of 0.22 km (0.085 sq mi), reduced to 0.01 km (0.0039 sq mi) in 2007 and was completely gone by 2009. Half of the meltdown was done before 1980 (measured in volume). The final meltdown after 1980, due to missing precipitation and the warm phase of El Niňo, resulted in its final disappearance in 2009. The glacier was one of the highest glaciers in South America, located about 30 kilometers (19 mi) from La Paz, near Huayna Potosí mountain. The glacier on Chacaltaya served as Bolivia's only ski resort. It was the world's highest lift-served ski area, the northernmost ski area in South America as well as the world's second most equatorial after Maoke, Indonesia. The rope tow, the very first in South America, was built in 1939 using an automobile engine; it was notoriously fast and difficult, housed in the site's original clapboard lodge and is now inoperable. The road to the base of the 200-meter
    0.00
    0 votes
    231
    Fedchenko Glacier

    Fedchenko Glacier

    The Fedchenko Glacier (Russian Федченко) is a large glacier in the Pamir Mountains of north-central Gorno-Badakhshan province, Tajikistan. The glacier is long and narrow, currently extending for 77 kilometres (48 mi) and covering over 700 square kilometres (270 sq mi). It is the longest glacier in the world outside of the polar regions. The maximum thickness of the glacier is 1,000 metres (3,300 ft), and the volume of the Fedchenko and its dozens of tributaries is estimated at 144 cubic kilometres (35 cu mi)—about a third the volume of Lake Erie. The glacier follows a generally northward path to the east of the 6,595 m (21,637 ft) Garmo Peak. The glacier begins at an elevation of 6,200 metres (20,300 ft) above sea level, and eventually melts and empties into the Balandkiik River near the border with Kyrgyzstan at an elevation of 2,909 metres (9,544 ft). Its waters eventually feed down the Muksu, Surkhob, Vakhsh, and Amu Darya rivers into the Aral Sea. To the west is the Academy of Sciences Range, Mount Garmo, Ismoil Somoni Peak, Peak Korzhenevskaya and the headwaters of the Vanj River and Yazgulyam River. To the south is Independence Peak and to the east Gorbunov Peak (6,025
    0.00
    0 votes
    232
    Forno Glacier

    Forno Glacier

    The Forno Glacier (Romansh: Vadrec del Forno) is a 6 km long glacier (2005) situated in the Bregaglia Range in the canton of Graubünden in Switzerland. In 1973 it had an area of 8.72 km.
    0.00
    0 votes
    233
    Gem Glacier

    Gem Glacier

    Gem Glacier is the smallest named glacier in Glacier National Park (U.S.). Located on the east (Glacier County) side of the Continental Divide arête known as the Garden Wall, the glacier is situated on the cliff face above the better known Grinnell Glacier. Gem Glacier is a hanging glacier, and drapes down from the north face of the steep arete to which it is attached. Gem Glacier is only 5 acres (0.020 km) in area and is far below the 25 acres (0.10 km) theshold often cited as qualifying as an active glacier. Between 1966 and 2005, Gem Glacier lost 30 percent of its acreage and Grinnell Glacier lost 40 percent.
    0.00
    0 votes
    234
    Hayes Glacier

    Hayes Glacier

    Hayes Glacier in Antarctica enters the southeast part of the Weddell Sea about 17 miles (27 km) west-southwest of Dawson-Lambton Glacier. It was discovered in the course of a U.S. Navy LC-130 plane flight over the Caird Coast on November 5, 1967, and was plotted by the United States Geological Survey from photographs obtained at that time. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Lieutenant Commander Winston R. Hayes, U.S. Navy Reserve, the pilot on that flight.  This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Hayes Glacier" (content from the Geographic Names Information System).
    0.00
    0 votes
    235
    Knik Glacier

    Knik Glacier

    The Knik Glacier is located just 50 miles (80 km) east of Anchorage, Alaska on the northern end of the Chugach Mountains. The ice field averages over 25 miles (40 km) long and over 5 miles (8.0 km) across, making it one of the largest glaciers in southcentral Alaska. Knik Glacier feeds the 25-mile (40 km) long Knik River which empties into the Knik Arm section of Cook Inlet. Lake George 61°15′00″N 148°37′00″W / 61.25°N 148.6166667°W / 61.25; -148.6166667, a glacial lake formed near the face of the glacier, received national recognition by the National Natural Landmark (NNL) Program. Lake George was recognized because of a unique natural phenomenon called a "jökulhlaup", an Icelandic term for glacial lake outburst flood. The breakup of this ice dam would send a violent wall of water, ice and debris down the river valley causing massive flooding and sometimes devastation to local settlers' properties. The jökulhlaup occurred annually until it ceased in 1967 due to glacial recession, thought to be associated with the massive Good Friday Earthquake of 1964. Early pioneers were said to hold a yearly lottery, gambling on the exact date when the jökulhlaup would break and flood the
    0.00
    0 votes
    236
    Lower Grindelwald Glacier

    Lower Grindelwald Glacier

    The Lower Grindelwald Glacier is the western one and the largest of the two Grindelwald Glaciers in the Bernese Alps, south of Grindelwald, the other being the Upper Grindelwald Glacier. The Lower Grindelwald Glacier covers an area of 20.8 km (8.0 sq mi) (1973).
    0.00
    0 votes
    237
    Margerie Glacier

    Margerie Glacier

    Margerie Glacier is a 21-mile-long (34 km) tide water glacier in Glacier Bay in Alaska and is part of the Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve. It begins on the south slope of Mount Root, at the Alaska-Canada border in the Fairweather Range, and flows southeast and northeast to Tarr Inlet. It was named for the famed French geographer and geologist Emmanuel de Margerie (1862–1953), who visited the Glacier Bay in 1913. It is an integral part of the Glacier Bay, which was declared a National Monument on February 26, 1925, a National Park and Wild Life Preserve on December 2, 1980, a UNESCO declared World Biosphere Reserve in 1986 and a World Heritage Site in 1992. While most of the tidewater and terrestrial glaciers in the Park are stated to be thinning and receding over the last several decades, Margerie Glacier is said to be stable and Johns Hopkins Glacier is stated to be advancing, on the eastern face of the Fairweather Range. Located at the deep end of the Glacier Bay, Margerie Glacier extends over a width of about 1 mile (1.6 km) and extends upstream for a length of 21 miles (34 km) till its source on the southern slopes of the hill of Mount Root, at the Alaska-Canada border.
    0.00
    0 votes
    238
    Medven Glacier

    Medven Glacier

    Medven Glacier (Lednik Medven \'led-nik 'med-ven\) is a 2.5 km long and 1.5 km wide glacier bounded by the east slopes of Oryahovo Heights on Ioannes Paulus II Peninsula, Livingston Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica and draining eastwards into Prisoe Cove, Hero Bay between Remetalk Point and Agüero Point. The glacier is named after the settlement of Medven in the eastern Balkan Mountains, Bulgaria. The glacier is centred at 62°32′50″S 60°42′50″W / 62.54722°S 60.71389°W / -62.54722; -60.71389. This article includes information from the Antarctic Place-names Commission of Bulgaria which is used with permission.
    0.00
    0 votes
    239
    Murgash Glacier

    Murgash Glacier

    Murgash Glacier (Lednik Murgash \'led-nik mur-'gash\)is the 3.4 km long and 3.2 km wide glacier situated east and southeast of Lloyd Hill, west of Tile Ridge and northwest of Hebrizelm Hill on Greenwich Island, in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica. It drains southwards into Kramolin Cove in McFarlane Strait between Yovkov Point and Kaspichan Point. The glacier is named after Murgash Peak in the western Balkan Mountains, Bulgaria. The glacier's midpoint is located at 62°29′50″S 59°52′10″W / 62.49722°S 59.86944°W / -62.49722; -59.86944. This article includes information from the Antarctic Place-names Commission of Bulgaria which is used with permission.
    0.00
    0 votes
    240
    Nimrod Glacier

    Nimrod Glacier

    The Nimrod Glacier is a major glacier about 135 km (85 mi) long, flowing from the polar plateau in a northerly direction through the Transantarctic Mountains between the Geologists and Miller Ranges, then northeasterly between the Churchill Mountains and Queen Elizabeth Range, and finally spilling into Shackleton Inlet and the Ross Ice Shelf between Capes Wilson and Lyttelton. It was photographed from the air by USN Operation Highjump, 1946-47. The name, given by US-ACAN, is in association with Shackleton Inlet and is for the Nimrod, the ship of the British Antarctic Expedition (1907–09) under Ernest Shackleton.
    0.00
    0 votes
    241
    Öræfajökull

    Öræfajökull

    Öræfajökull is an ice-covered volcano in south-east Iceland. It is the largest active volcano in the country, and on its north-western rim is Hvannadalshnúkur, the highest peak in Iceland. Geographically Öræfajökull is considered part of the Vatnajökull glacier, and the area covered by glacier is inside the bounds of Vatnajökull National Park. Öræfajökull has erupted twice in historical time. In 1362 the volcano erupted explosively, with huge amounts of tephra being ejected. The district of Litla-Hérað was destroyed with floods and tephra fall. More than 40 years passed before people again settled the area, which became known as Öræfi. The name literally means an area without harbour, but it took on a meaning of wasteland in Icelandic. An eruption in August 1727 to 1728 was smaller, though floods are known to have caused three fatalities.
    0.00
    0 votes
    242
    Panchchuli Glacier

    Panchchuli Glacier

    Panchchuli Glacier is a Himalayan glacier, situated in the Pithoragarh district of Uttarakhand, India. It is located in the easternmost part of Kumaun. It is in the west and east of five peaks of Panchchuli on the Johar Valley and Darma valley. Uttari Balati glacier is situated north to it. Panchachuli group of glaciers includes: The popular trek is through the Darma Valley to East Facing glacier. Pithoragarh-Dharchula-Tawaghat-Sobla-Dar-Sela-Bailing-Son-Duktu. The glacier is the source of the Yuli River.
    0.00
    0 votes
    243
    Panega Glacier

    Panega Glacier

    Panega Glacier (Lednik Panega \'led-nik 'pa-ne-ga\) is located on Varna Peninsula, Livingston Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica and drains the southeast slopes of Vidin Heights into Moon Bay between Helis Nunatak and Perperek Knoll. The glacier extends 3.7 km in the southeast-northwest direction, and 3 km in the southwest-northeast direction. It is named after Zlatna Panega River in northern Bulgaria. The glacier is located at 62°32′25″S 60°06′49″W / 62.54028°S 60.11361°W / -62.54028; -60.11361 (Bulgarian topographic survey Tangra 2004/05 and mapping in 2005 and 2009). This article includes information from the Antarctic Place-names Commission of Bulgaria which is used with permission.
    0.00
    0 votes
    244
    Riggs Glacier

    Riggs Glacier

    • Glacier Type: Mountain Glacier
    Riggs Glacier is a glacier in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve in the U.S. state of Alaska. It begins on the southern slope of the Takhinsha Mountains, 6 km (4 mi) southeast of Mount Harris and flows south-southeast to the head of Muir Inlet, 69 km (43 mi) southwest of Skagway. It was named by the American Geographical Society in 1947 for Thomas Riggs, Jr., Governor of Alaska from 1918 to 1921.
    0.00
    0 votes
    245
    Scott Glacier

    Scott Glacier

    The Scott Glacier (85°45′S 153°0′W / 85.75°S 153°W / -85.75; -153) is a major glacier, 120 miles (190 km) long, that drains the East Antarctic Ice Sheet through the Queen Maud Mountains to the Ross Ice Shelf. The Scott Glacier is one of a series of major glaciers flowing across the Transantarctic Mountains, with the Amundsen Glacier to the west and the Leverett and Reedy glaciers to the east. The Scott originates on the Polar Plateau in the vicinity of D'Angelo Bluff and Mount Howe, and descends between the Nilsen Plateau and the mountains of the Watson Escarpment to enter Ross Ice Shelf just west of the Tapley Mountains. The Tapley Mountains, Watson Escarpment, Mount Blackburn, and the La Gorce Mountains bound the Scott Glacier on its eastern margin, while the Karo Hills, Hays Mountains, Faulkner Escarpment, and Rawson Mountains define the western edge of the Scott's drainage. Scott Glacier was discovered in December 1929 by the Byrd Antarctic Expedition geological party under Laurence Gould. The Scott Glacier was named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) after early Antarctic explorer Robert Falcon Scott, who never saw the Scott Glacier but rather ascended the
    0.00
    0 votes
    246
    Skelton Glacier

    Skelton Glacier

    Skelton Glacier 78°41′37″S 161°38′33″E / 78.6935°S 161.6424°E / -78.6935; 161.6424 is a large glacier flowing from the polar plateau into the Ross Ice Shelf at Skelton Inlet on the Hillary Coast, south of Victoria Land, Antarctica. Named after the Skelton Inlet by the New Zealand party of the CTAE, 1956-58. The glacier was chosen in 1957 as the New Zealand party's route from the Ross Ice Shelf to the polar plateau in support of the main expedition led by Vivian Fuchs to make the first overland crossing of the continent. Allison Glacier descends from the west slopes of Royal Society Range into Skelton Glacier. It was also the route of the four month 2,400 kilometres (1,500 mi) Victoria Land Traverse 1959-1960 which ascended the Skelton Glacier from the Ross Ice Shelf to make the first entry into the deep interior of Victoria Land from the head of the Skelton Glacier to the French Adelie Land Traverse of 1958-1959 near Dumont d'Urville Station on George V Coast, and thence to the Transantarctic Mountains in the vicinity of the USARP Mountains. 1. Antarctica, by A.S.Helm and J.H.Miller. The story of the New Zealand Party of the Trans-Antarctic Expedition. 1964. R.E.Owen, Government
    0.00
    0 votes
    247
    Sperry Glacier

    Sperry Glacier

    • Glacier Type: Mountain Glacier
    • Status: Retreating
    Sperry Glacier is located in Glacier National Park (U.S.) in the U.S. state of Montana. The glacier is situated on the north slopes of Gunsight Mountain, west of the Continental Divide. Although many geologic features of Glacier National Park were formed during the much longer period of glaciation ending over 10,000 years ago, Sperry Glacier, like all the glaciers in the park today, is a product of the recent Little Ice Age, the period of cooler average temperatures starting in about the 13th century and concluding in the mid-19th century. Once one of the largest glaciers in the park, the surface area of Sperry Glacier has retreated 75 percent since the mid-19th century. 2005 measurements of the surface area of the glacier resulted in an estimated area of 216 acres (0.87 km), whereby the glacier is estimated to have covered an area of 930 acres (3.8 km) at the end of the Little Ice Age in the mid-19th century. The glacier lost almost 35 percent of its surface area between 1966 and 2005. The glacier is named for Lyman B. Sperry, a professor from Oberlin College, who in 1895 was a party in an exploration of the region where the glacier is located. Like all other glaciers in the park,
    0.00
    0 votes
    248
    Strandzha Glacier

    Strandzha Glacier

    Strandzha Glacier (Lednik Strandzha \'led-nik 'stran-dzha\) is located on Burgas Peninsula, eastern Livingston Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica. Extending 1.6 km in northeast-southwest direction and 800 m in northwest-southeast firection. It is bounded by Delchev Peak to the west, Spartacus Peak, Trigrad Gap and Yavorov Peak to the northwest, and by Elena Peak to the north, and flows southeastward into Bransfield Strait. The glacier is named after Strandzha Mountain, Bulgaria. The midpoint is located at 62°38′20″S 59°54′00″W / 62.63889°S 59.9°W / -62.63889; -59.9. This article includes information from the Antarctic Place-names Commission of Bulgaria which is used with permission.
    0.00
    0 votes
    249
    Swiftcurrent Glacier

    Swiftcurrent Glacier

    Swiftcurrent Glacier is located in the U.S. state of Montana in Glacier National Park (U.S.). The glacier is on the east (Glacier County) side of the Continental Divide arête known as the Garden Wall. Swiftcurrent Glacier is one of several glaciers that are being monitored to determine stream flow alterations that occur due to glacial retreat. Compared to other glaciers in Glacier National Park, Swiftcurrent Glacier has experienced relatively slow retreat. As of 2005, the glacier had an area of 55 acres (0.22 km), a 14 percent reduction since 1966.
    0.00
    0 votes
    250
    Vatnajökull

    Vatnajökull

    Vatnajökull [ˈvaʰdnaˌjœːkʏtl̥] (meaning Glacier of Rivers), also known as the Vatna Glacier, is the largest and most voluminous Icelandic glacier, and one of the largest in area in Europe. It is located in the south-east of the island, covering more than 8 percent of the country. With an area of 8,100 km², Vatnajökull is the largest ice cap in Europe by volume (3,100 km³) and the second largest (after Austfonna on Nordaustlandet, Norway) in area (not counting the still larger Severny Island ice cap of Novaya Zemlya, Russia, which may be regarded as located in the extreme northeast of Europe). On 7 June 2008, it became a part of the Vatnajökull National Park. The average thickness of the ice is 400 m (1,300 ft), with a maximum thickness of 1,000 m (3,300 ft). Iceland's highest peak, Hvannadalshnúkur (2,109.6 m (6,921 ft)), is located in the southern periphery of Vatnajökull, near Skaftafell National Park. Under the ice cap, as under many of the glaciers of Iceland, there are several volcanoes. The volcanic lakes, Grímsvötn for example, were the sources of a large jökulhlaup (glacial lake outburst flood) in 1996. There was also a considerable but short-time eruption of the volcano
    0.00
    0 votes
    Get your friends to vote! Spread this URL or share:
    Tags: best, all, time, glacier

    Discuss Best Glacier of All Time

    Top List Voters