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Best Geographical Feature of All Time

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    1
    Mojave Desert

    Mojave Desert

    • Category: Desert
    The Mojave Desert ( /moʊˈhɑːvi/ or /məˈhɑːvi/; High Desert) occupies a significant portion of southeastern California and smaller parts of central California, southern Nevada, southwestern Utah and northwestern Arizona, in the United States. Named after the Mohave tribe of Native Americans, it displays typical basin and range topography. The Mojave Desert's boundaries are generally defined by the presence of Yucca brevifolia (Joshua trees); considered an indicator species for this desert. The topographical boundaries include the Tehachapi together with the San Gabriel and San Bernardino mountain ranges. The mountain boundaries are quite distinct since they are outlined by the two largest faults in California: the San Andreas and the Garlock. The Great Basin shrub steppe lies to the north; the warmer Sonoran Desert (the Low Desert) lies to the south and east. The desert is believed to support between 1,750 and 2,000 species of plants. While most of the Mojave desert is sparsely populated, several large cities can be found there, including Lancaster, California and Victorville, California, with the largest being Las Vegas. The Mojave Desert receives less than 13 in (330 mm) of rain a
    7.50
    8 votes
    2
    Boundary Bay

    Boundary Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Boundary Bay is situated on the Pacific coast of North America on the border between the Canadian province of British Columbia and the U.S. state of Washington. To the north and west, Boundary Bay is bounded by the municipality of Delta. Point Roberts, Washington, lies to the southwest. The communities of Beach Grove and Boundary Bay (both situated within Delta) are to the west, while rural East Delta is to the north. Along the eastern shore are Crescent Beach and Ocean Park in the City of Surrey; further south-east, White Rock and the Semiahmoo First Nation's reserve in BC and Blaine in Washington State. The eastern section of Boundary Bay, straddling the US/Canada border and adjacent to White Rock and Blaine is known as Semiahmoo Bay; Blaine's Drayton Harbor opens into it. The northern tip of Boundary Bay is known as Mud Bay. The main rivers flowing into the bay are the Nicomekl and Serpentine Rivers falling into Mud Bay, the Campbell River falling into Semiahmoo Bay, and California Creek and Dakota Creek falling into Drayton Harbor. It is an important stop for birds migrating along the Pacific Flyway, particularly for Western Sandpiper and Dunlin, and has been designated a
    7.00
    7 votes
    3
    Moloaa Bay

    Moloaa Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Moloaʻa Bay is on the northeast shore on the island of Kauaʻi in Hawaii. The bay is 0.44 miles (710 m) long. The name comes from molo aʻa in the Hawaiian language which means "matted roots". Paper Mulberry trees (Broussonetia papyrifera, or wauke in Hawaiian) once grew so thickly that the roots were interwoven. The Moloaʻa Stream empties into the north end of a beach which is backed by high cliffs. Uphill from the bay is the Moloaʻa State Forest Reserve. Moloaʻa Bay had one of the highest runups in Kauaʻi during the April 1, 1946 tsunami from the 1946 Aleutian Islands earthquake. It experienced one of the highest wave amplitudes: 11.5 metres (38 ft). Some scenes in the Gilligan's Island pilot were filmed in Moloaʻa Bay.
    6.71
    7 votes
    4
    Buzzards Bay

    Buzzards Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Buzzards Bay is a bay of the Atlantic Ocean adjacent to the U.S. state of Massachusetts. It is approximately 28 miles (45 kilometers) long by 8 miles (twelve kilometers) wide. It is a popular destination for fishing, boating, and tourism. Since 1914, Buzzards Bay has been connected to Cape Cod Bay by the Cape Cod Canal. In 1988, under the Clean Water Act, the Environmental Protection Agency and the State of Massachusetts designated Buzzards Bay to the National Estuary Program, as "an estuary of national significance" that is threatened by pollution, land development, or overuse. It is surrounded by the Elizabeth Islands on the south, by Cape Cod on the east, and the southern coasts of Bristol and Plymouth counties in Massachusetts to the northwest. To the southwest, the bay is connected to Rhode Island Sound. The city of New Bedford, Massachusetts is a historically significant port on Buzzards Bay; it was the world's most successful whaling port during the early- and mid-19th century. Buzzards Bay was created during the latter portion of the Pleistocene epoch through the interplay of glacial and oceanic processes. Beginning fifty thousand to seventy thousand years ago, the edges of
    6.57
    7 votes
    5
    Saldanha Bay

    Saldanha Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Saldanha Bay is a natural harbour on the south-western coast of South Africa, about 105 kilometres (65 mi) north west of Cape Town. The town that developed on the northern shore of the bay, also called Saldanha, was incorporated with five other towns into the Saldanha Bay Local Municipality in 2000. The current population of the municipality is estimated at 72,000. The place is mentioned in the first edition of John Locke's Two Treatises of Government as an example of the state of nature. Saldanha Bay's location makes it a paradise for the watersport enthusiast, and its local economy being strongly dependent on fishing, mussels, seafood processing, the steel industry and the harbour. Furthermore its sheltered harbour plays an important part in the Sishen-Saldanha iron-ore project (connected by the Sishen-Saldanha Railway Line) at which Saldanha Steel takes center stage. With strong historic military links Saldanha is also host to a Naval training base and the South African Military Academy. The SAS Saldanha Nature Reserve offers a display of wildflowers during late winter and spring while Southern Right Whales also visit the waters in and around the nature reserve. The area has a
    8.60
    5 votes
    6
    Blue Grotto

    Blue Grotto

    • Category: Sea cave
    The Blue Grotto (Italian: Grotta Azzurra) is a noted sea cave on the coast of the island of Capri, Italy. Sunlight, passing through an underwater cavity and shining through the seawater, creates a blue reflection that illuminates the cavern. The Blue Grotto is one of several sea caves, worldwide, that is flooded with a brilliant blue or emerald light. The quality and nature of the color in each cave is determined by the unique lighting conditions in that particular cave. In the case of the Blue Grotto, the light comes from two sources. One is a small hole in the cave wall, precisely at the waterline, that is a meter and half in diameter. This hole is barely large enough to admit a tiny rowboat, and is used as the entranceway. In photographs taken from within the cave, the above-water half of this hole appears as a spot of brilliant white light. The second source of light is a second hole, with a surface area about ten times as large as the first, which lies directly below the entranceway, separated from it by a bar of rock between one and two meters thick. Much less light, per square meter, is able to enter through the lower opening, but its large size ensures that it is, in
    6.43
    7 votes
    7
    Sand Bay

    Sand Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Sand Bay is a strip of coast in North Somerset bordered to the south by Worlebury Hill and to the north by Middle Hope and Sand Point. It lies 2 miles (3.2 km) north of the seaside resort of Weston-super-Mare, and across the Bristol Channel from South Wales. It is adjacent to the village of Kewstoke. The north end of Sand Bay has become overgrown with spartina grass since the 1950s. This hardy grass was planted to support the banks of a tributary to the Bristol Channel further upstream than Sand Bay. Over the last 20 years the grass has rapidly taken over the north end of the beach and is now beginning to grow in isolated areas of the south end. The grass also began to grow on the beach at Weston-super-Mare, but was removed by the local council. In the 1980s part of the beach at Sand Bay was raised to prevent flooding by pumping sand from the Bristol Channel up onto the beach. The beach now has two levels, one at the original height near the sea and one bordering the adjacent road at the higher level. The upper beach level has now become covered in grass in many areas (not with the spartina grass – which is found at sea level). The beach is often littered with tidal-borne material
    7.17
    6 votes
    8
    Santa Monica Bay

    Santa Monica Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Santa Monica Bay is a bight of the Pacific Ocean in southern California, United States. Its boundaries are slightly ambiguous, but it is generally considered to be the part of the Pacific within an imaginary line drawn between Point Dume, in Malibu, and the Palos Verdes Peninsula. Its eastern shore forms the western boundary of the Los Angeles Westside and South Bay regions. Although it was fed by the Los Angeles River prior to the river's catastrophic change in course in 1825, the only stream of any size now flowing into it is Ballona Creek. Other waterways draining into the bay include Malibu Creek, and Topanga Creek. State beaches include Malibu Lagoon State Beach (Surfrider), Will Rogers State Beach, Santa Monica State Beach, and Dockweiler State Beach. Several piers extend into the bay, including Malibu Pier, Santa Monica Pier, Venice Pier, Manhattan Beach pier, Hermosa Beach pier, and Redondo Beach pier. Marina Del Rey is a dredged marina. Chevron Reef is an artificial surfing reef in the bay. In the 1930s, gambling ships anchored beyond the three mile limit, then measured from the beach. The ships were popular and a fleet of ever-larger ships and barges appeared until the
    7.17
    6 votes
    9
    Albemarle Sound

    Albemarle Sound

    • Category: Bay
    Albemarle Sound is a large estuary on the coast of North Carolina in the United States located at the confluence of a group of rivers, including the Chowan and Roanoke. It is separated from the Atlantic Ocean by the Outer Banks, a long barrier peninsula upon which the town of Kitty Hawk is located, at the eastern edge of the sound. Roanoke Island is situated at the southeastern corner of the sound, where it connects to Pamlico Sound. Much of the water in the Albemarle Sound is brackish or fresh, as opposed to the saltwater of the ocean, as a result of river water pouring into the sound. Some small portions of the Albemarle have been given their own "sound" names to distinguish these bodies of water from other parts of the large estuary. The Croatan Sound, for instance, lies between mainland Dare County and Roanoke Island. The eastern shore of the island to the Outer Banks is commonly referred to as the Roanoke Sound. The long stretch of water from near the Virginia state line south to around the Currituck County southern boundary is known as the Currituck Sound. The sound forms part of the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway. Its coast saw the first permanent English settlements in what
    8.00
    5 votes
    10
    Toetoes Bay

    Toetoes Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Toetoes Bay is the easternmost of three large bays lying on the Foveaux Strait coast of Southland, New Zealand, the others being Te Waewae Bay and Oreti Beach. Thirty kilometres (20 miles) in length, the bay is the southern end of the Awarua Plain, an area of swampy land stretching inland for about fifteen kilometres (10 miles). The eastern end of the bay is close to Slope Point, the South Island's southernmost point, and the western end of the Catlins. Tiwai Point, with its aluminium smelter, is located on a peninsula at the western end of the bay, on the edge of Bluff harbour. Waituna Lagoon is located halfway along the bay, and towards the eastern end the Mataura River has its outflow into the Foveaux Strait. The bay gets its name from a 19th Century Māori chief, Toitoi. Whalers named the Waituna Lagoon "Toetoe's Place" and the name was later given to the bay.
    8.00
    5 votes
    11
    Whitefish Bay

    Whitefish Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Whitefish Bay is a large bay on the eastern end of the southern shore of Lake Superior between Michigan and Ontario. It begins in the north and west at Whitefish Point in Michigan, about 10 miles north of Paradise, Michigan and ends at the St. Marys River at Sault Ste. Marie on the southeast. The eastern side of the bay on the Ontario side is more rugged, largely wilderness Canadian Shield. The international boundary runs through the bay, which is heavily used by shipping traffic northbound and southbound from the Soo Locks. The Whitefish Point Light marks the entry of the bay, Ile Parisienne Light is in the middle of the bay, and Point Iroquois Light lies near the mouth of the bay and the approach of the Soo Locks. Whitefish Bay became the site of numerous shipwrecks after the Soo Locks opened in 1855. Many of the shipwrecks of Whitefish Bay are protected for future generations of sports divers by the Whitefish Point Underwater Preserve, including the wrecks of the Comet, John B. Cowle, Drake, Samuel Mather, Miztec, Myron, Niagara, John M. Osborn, Sagamore, Superior City, and the Vienna. Whitefish Point is the home of a former Coast Guard station and Whitefish Point Lighthouse is
    6.00
    7 votes
    12
    Canty Bay

    Canty Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Canty Bay is a coastal hamlet off the A198, in East Lothian, Scotland, situated opposite the Bass Rock and Tantallon Castle. Settlements nearby include Auldhame, Scoughall, Seacliff, and the Peffer Sands. The Glen Golf Club is close to its western side, and to the east there are high coastal cliffs. There are two beaches separated by a rocky headland. The western beach is uninhabited and accessible by two paths that descend the grass covered cliffs from the eastern end of the Glen golf course. The eastern beach is by the hamlet. This former fishing hamlet has been immortalised by William McGonagall in his poem Beautiful North Berwick and its surroundings. The Canty Bay Inn offered hospitality to the many tourists who came to see the Rock. The tenant of the Rock was usually also the innkeeper. The William Edgar Evans Charitable Trust maintains a house and two cottages for use by Scout and Guide troops. Dolphins can be seen at Canty Bay and from the Scottish Seabird Centre.
    6.83
    6 votes
    13
    Port Phillip

    Port Phillip

    • Category: Bay
    Port Phillip (also commonly referred to as Port Phillip Bay or (locally) just The Bay), is a large bay in southern Victoria, Australia; it is the location of Melbourne. Geographically, the bay covers 1,930 square kilometres (480,000 acres) and the shore stretches roughly 264 km (164 mi). Although it is extremely shallow for its size, most of the bay is navigable. The deepest portion is only 24 metres (79 ft), and half the region is shallower than 8 m (26 ft). The volume of the water in the bay is around 25 cubic kilometres (6.0 cu mi). Prior to British settlement the area around Port Phillip was divided between the territories of the Wathaurong (to the west), Wurundjeri (north) and Boonwurrung (south and east) Nations. Its waters and coast are home to seals, whales, dolphins, corals and many kinds of seabirds and migratory waders. The first British to enter the bay were the crews of the HMS Lady Nelson, commanded by John Murray and, ten weeks later, the HMS Investigator commanded by Matthew Flinders, in 1802. Subsequent expeditions into the bay took place in 1803 to establish the first settlement in Victoria, near Sorrento, but was abandoned in 1804. Thirty years later, settlers
    6.83
    6 votes
    14
    Grand Traverse Bay

    Grand Traverse Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Grand Traverse Bay is a bay of Lake Michigan formed by part of Northern Michigan. The bay is 32 miles (51 km) long, 10 miles (16 km) wide, and up to 620 feet (190 m) deep in spots. It is divided into two arms by the Old Mission Peninsula. The entire bay is conterminous with the Grand Traverse Bay Bottomland Preserve. Traverse City is situated at the south end of the bay where the Boardman River empties into the west arm. Cherry orchards line the bay region, giving rise to Traverse City's claim to be the Cherry Capital of the World. Several nationally known companies offer cherry-based products made with Northern Michigan tart cherries including Traverse Bay Farms, Cherry Central, Fruit Advantage, American Spoon and Cherry Republic. The Grand Traverse Bay includes several important smaller bays: Northport Bay, Suttons Bay, Omena Bay, Bowers Harbor, and Old Mission Bay. Northport Bay, located at the northwest corner of Grand Traverse Bay is about 10 miles (16 km) long and 4 miles (6.4 km) wide. Northport Bay open to the east, except inside the arms at each end, with the Leelanau Peninsula on the West side. There are several shoals in Northport Bay marked by buoys. Bellows Island, a
    7.80
    5 votes
    15
    Burns Bog

    Burns Bog

    • Category: Wetland
    The Burns Bog is the largest domed peat bog on the west coast of North America. It covers an area of about 40 square kilometres (15 square miles) and occupies a quarter of Delta, British Columbia, about 25 km (16 mi) southeast of downtown Vancouver, and is bounded by BC Highway 10 on its south, the Annacis Highway on its east, and River Road, along the South Arm of the Fraser River on its northwest. It is named after the former owner, Patrick Burns of Burns Meat Packaging. Its indigenous name is Maqwum, or in proper Hunquminum orthography, Ma?qwem . The word simply means "bog" but may refer to a specific plant growing in the location as well. The bog's ecosystem sustains a wide variety of flora and fauna, including 24 species of mammal and 150 bird species. Numerous zoning codes have been enacted to protect the bog from development and retain its original state in hopes of preservation for future generations. The bog is thought to be a major regulator of the region's climate, since there is no drainage and all the rain fall is ultimately evaporated. Highway 91 and flood control measures for nearby farms have cut off periodic flooding and drainage that previously fed into the bog.
    9.00
    4 votes
    16
    Tsemes Bay

    Tsemes Bay

    • Category: Bay
    The Tsemes Bay (also Tsemess Bay and Novorossiysk Bay; Russian: Цемесская бухта, Tsemesskaya bukhta) is an ice-free bay located on the northern coast of the Black Sea, in Krasnodar Krai of Russia. It takes its name from the Tsemes River which flows into the bay. The depth of the sea varies from 21 to 27 meters. The length of the bay is 15 kilometers; its maximum width is 9 kilometers. It is bordered by the Sudzhuk Spit and Cape Doob. Although the navigation is affected by strong autumn and winter bora winds (up to 220 kilometers per hour), the bay was frequented by ancient Greek navigators who established the colony of Bata on the shore. Michael Rostovtzeff explained this by the fact that there are no other decent harbours along the coastline all the way to Batumi. During the Middle Ages, the coast was controlled by the Ghisolfi merchant family of Genoa. Novorossiysk, founded by Russians as a military facility, is the chief port on the bay. Several ships of the Black Sea Fleet were scuttled in the bay to avoid their capture by the Germans in 1918. It was also the scene of several notable shipwrecks, including that of SS Admiral Nakhimov in 1986. Following the establishment of the
    9.00
    4 votes
    17
    Sarasota Bay

    Sarasota Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Sarasota Bay is an estuary located off the west coast of Florida in the United States. The bay and its surrounding area appeared on the earliest maps of the area, being named Zarazote on one dating from the early 18th century. Hunting in the area had supported native populations for more than ten thousand years as Florida attracted some of the earliest human settlements in the hemisphere. Following the retreat of the glaciers, ocean levels rose creating the current coastline and the natural bounty of Sarasota Bay provided food for inhabitants for over five thousand years before Europeans began exploration of the area in 1513 and later, establishing settlements along its shores. Sarasota Bay is one of twenty-eight estuaries in the country that have been named by the U.S. Congress as an estuary of national significance. The bay lies between barrier islands called keys, that separate the body of water from the Gulf of Mexico and the Florida mainland. Longboat Key, Lido Key, Siesta Key, and Casey Key are the major keys that delineate the main bay and its smaller portions. Since 1921, when Sarasota County was created, the bay lies in areas governed both by Manatee County and Sarasota
    6.67
    6 votes
    18
    Aransas Bay

    Aransas Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Aransas Bay is a bay on the Texas gulf coast, approximately 30 miles (48 km) northeast of Corpus Christi, and 173 miles (278 km) south of San Antonio. It is separated from the Gulf of Mexico by San José Island (also referred to as St. Joseph Island). Aransas Pass is the most direct navigable outlet into the Gulf of Mexico from the bay. The cities of Aransas Pass and Port Aransas are located at the southern end, and Rockport is found on the central western shore. The bay is oriented laterally northeast-southwest, and is extended by Redfish Bay to the southwest, Copano Bay to the west, Saint Charles Bay to the north, and Mesquite Bay to the northeast. Aransas Bay is part of the Mission-Aransas National Estuarine Research Reserve. There is a rich history of settlements on the bay, including: ancient Native American campgrounds dating back millennia; 19th century European immigrant towns such as Lamar and Aransas; and the present day cities of Rockport, Fulton and Aransas Pass. Resources such as shrimp, fish, oysters and oil are found in or near the bay, and contribute to the local economies. Humans first inhabited the area surrounding Aransas Bay approximately 6,000 to 8,000 years
    7.60
    5 votes
    19
    Dingle Bay

    Dingle Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Dingle Bay (Bá an Daingin in Irish) is a bay located in County Kerry, western Ireland. The bay runs approximately 40 km (25 mi) from northeast to southwest into the Atlantic Ocean. It is approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) wide at the head, and 20 km (12 mi) wide at the entrance. It is flanked on the north by the Dingle Peninsula, and on the south by the Iveragh Peninsula. The River Maine enters the bay at its head. There are no notable islands within the bay, but towards the head, several peninsulas, in particular Inch Strand, extend a significant distance across its width. The harbour town of Dingle lies on the north side of the bay. It is home to Fungi the Dingle Dolphin.
    8.75
    4 votes
    20
    Liaodong Bay

    Liaodong Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Liaodong Bay (simplified Chinese: 辽东湾; traditional Chinese: 遼東灣; pinyin: Liáodōng Wān) is one of the three bays forming the Bohai Gulf, the innermost gulf of the Yellow Sea, in northeast China. It borders Liaoning province. The three bays are Laizhou Bay to the south, Liaodong Bay to the north, and Bohai Bay to the west.
    6.50
    6 votes
    21
    Copano Bay

    Copano Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Copano Bay is a northwestern extension of Aransas Bay, west of Rockport, Texas in Refugio and Aransas counties. It is supplied with seawater from the Gulf of Mexico via Aransas Bay, and fed freshwater from the Aransas River, Mission River and Copano Creek. As an estuary, the bay is home to a diverse ecosystem consisting of various birds including the endangered whooping crane, and numerous finfish including the redfish as well as shellfish such as oysters. It is classified as a nursery for shrimp, which prohibits production from the bay. Copano Bay is also an historic location for human usage and settlement that dates back to the 18th century, beginning with the historic port of El Copano and the 19th century settlements of St. Mary's of Aransas and Copano. The present-day towns of Bayside, Copano Village and Holiday Beach were all founded in the 20th century. Oil and natural gas are pumped from below the bay's surface, and contribute to the livelihood of the local economies. Copano Bay was inhabited by the nomadic Aransas Indians, who constructed camps along the shore, 4,000 years ago. The Aransas people left the area approximately 700 years ago, and were replaced around 1400 CE
    7.40
    5 votes
    22
    Firth of Forth

    Firth of Forth

    • Category: Estuary
    The Firth of Forth (Scottish Gaelic: Linne Foirthe) is the estuary or firth of Scotland's River Forth, where it flows into the North Sea, between Fife to the north, and West Lothian, the City of Edinburgh and East Lothian to the south. It was known as Bodotria in Roman times. Geologically, the Firth of Forth is a fjord, formed by the Forth Glacier in the last glacial period. The river is tidal as far inland as Stirling, but generally it is considered that the inland extent of the firth ends at the Kincardine Bridge. There are a number of towns which line the shores, as well as the petrochemical complexes at Grangemouth, the commercial docks at Leith, former oilrig construction yards at Methil, the ship-breaking facility at Inverkeithing and the naval dockyard at Rosyth, with numerous other industrial areas including the Forth Bridgehead area (i.e., Rosyth, Inverkeithing and the southern edge of Dunfermline), Burntisland, Kirkcaldy, Bo'ness and Leven. The Kincardine Bridge and the famous Forth Road Bridge and Forth Bridge carry traffic across the Firth. A fourth crossing, located next to the Kincardine Bridge, opened in 2008. On 1 October 2008 it was announced that the new bridge
    7.40
    5 votes
    23
    Gulf of Gemlik

    Gulf of Gemlik

    • Category: Bay
    The Gulf of Gemlik (Turkish: Gemlik Körfezi) is an inlet of the Sea of Marmara in the Marmara region of Turkey. The gulf is located in the southwestern part of the sea. Mudanya, Gemlik and Armutlu are the major towns surrounding the gulf.
    7.40
    5 votes
    24
    Cockburn Sound

    Cockburn Sound

    • Category: Bay
    Cockburn Sound is an inlet of the Indian Ocean on the coast of Western Australia. It extends from the south of the mouth of the Swan River at Fremantle for about 25 km to Cape Peron near Rockingham and is located at 32°10′14″S 115°43′26″E / 32.17056°S 115.72389°E / -32.17056; 115.72389. The total area of the sound is about 100 km². It is bounded on the east by the mainland and on the west by Garden Island and Carnac Island, and includes several rocky outcrops and reefs. The Gage Roads shipping channel lies to the north.
    8.50
    4 votes
    25
    Guanabara Bay

    Guanabara Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Guanabara Bay (Portuguese: Baía da Guanabara, IPA: [ɡwanaˈbaɾɐ]) is an oceanic bay located in Southeast Brazil in the state of Rio de Janeiro. On its western shore lies the city of Rio de Janeiro, and on its eastern shore the cities of Niterói and São Gonçalo. Four other municipalities surround the bay's shores. Guanabara Bay is the second largest bay in area in Brazil (after the All Saints' Bay), at 412 square kilometres (159 sq mi), with a perimeter of 143 kilometres (89 mi). Guanabara Bay is 31 kilometres (19 mi) long and 28 kilometres (17 mi) wide at its maximum. Its 1.5 kilometres (0.93 mi) wide mouth is flanked at the eastern tip by the Pico do Papagaio (Parrot's Peak) and the western tip by Pão de Açúcar (Sugar Loaf). The name Guanabara comes from the Tupi language, goanã-pará, from gwa "bay", plus nã "similar to" and ba'ra "sea". Traditionally, it is also translated as "the bosom of sea." Guanabara Bay was first encountered by Europeans on January 1, 1502, when one of the Portuguese explorers Gaspar de Lemos and Gonçalo Coelho arrived on its shores. According to some historians, the name given by the exploration team to the bay was originally Ria de Janeiro "January Sound",
    8.50
    4 votes
    26
    Korea Bay

    Korea Bay

    • Category: Bay
    The Korea Bay or West Korea Bay (simplified Chinese: 朝鲜湾; traditional Chinese: 朝鮮灣; pinyin: Cháoxiǎn Wān, Korean 서조선만, Korean pronunciation: [sʌ.dʑo.sʌn.man], meaning "West Korea Bay") is a northern extension of the Yellow Sea, between Liaoning Province of China and North P'yŏngan Province of North Korea. It is separated from the Bohai Sea by the Liaodong Peninsula, with Dalian at its southernmost point. The Yalu (Amnok) River, which marks the border between China and North Korea, empties into the Korea Bay between Dandong (China) and Sinŭiju (North Korea).
    7.20
    5 votes
    27
    Maputo Bay

    Maputo Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Maputo Bay (Baía de Maputo), formerly Delagoa Bay, Baía da Lagoa (in Portuguese) is an inlet of the Indian Ocean on the coast of Mozambique, between 25° 40' and 26° 20' S, with a length from north to south of over 90 km long and 32 km wide. The bay is the northern termination of the series of lagoons which line the coast from Saint Lucia Bay. The opening is toward the N.E. The southern part of the bay is formed the Machangulo peninsula, which on its inner or western side affords safe anchorage. At its N.W. point is Port Melville. North of the peninsula is Inhaca Island, and beyond it a smaller island known as Elephants Island. In spite of a bar at the entrance and a number of shallows within, Maputo Bay forms a valuable harbour, accessible to large vessels at all seasons of the year. The surrounding country is low and very unhealthy, but the island of Inyak has a height of 73 m, and is used as a sanatorium. A river 3.7 to 5.5 m deep, known as the Manhissa or Komati, enters the bay at its northern end; several smaller streams, the Matola (from the north), the Umbeluzi (from the west), and the Tembe (from the south), from the Lebombo Mountains, meet towards the middle of the bay in
    7.00
    5 votes
    28
    Port Jackson

    Port Jackson

    • Category: Bay
    Port Jackson, containing Sydney Harbour, is the natural harbour of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. The harbour is an inlet of the South Pacific Ocean. Widely considered to be one of the world's finest harbours, it is known for its beauty, and in particular, as the location of the Sydney Opera House and Sydney Harbour Bridge which connects central Sydney with the Northern Suburbs region extended metropolitan area. Its entrance is between North and South Heads, where naval and military stations are located. The location of the first European settlement in Australia, the harbour has continued to play a key role in the history and development of Sydney. The city itself lies on the southern shore, while the Northern Suburbs lie on the northern shore; which are linked by the Harbour Bridge and the ANZAC Bridge. The Parramatta River forms the harbour's western arm. Many recreational events are based on or around the harbour itself particularly the Sydney New Year's Eve celebrations and the starting point of the Sydney to Hobart yacht race. The land around Port Jackson was occupied at the time of European discovery and colonisation by various tribes including the Gadigal, Cammeraygal,
    7.00
    5 votes
    29
    Bohai Bay

    Bohai Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Bohai Bay (simplified Chinese: 渤海湾; traditional Chinese: 渤海灣; pinyin: Bóhǎi Wān) is one of the three bays forming the Bohai Gulf, the innermost gulf of the Yellow Sea, in northeast China. It borders Hebei province and Tianjin Municipality. The three bays are Laizhou Bay to the south, Liaodong Bay to the north, and Bohai Bay to the west. It is the most southerly sea in the northern hemisphere in which sea ice can form. The Bohai Bay is the drainage of the Haihe and 15 other rivers. Due to these rivers' muddy runoff, the bay used to be a highly silty water body, but extensive damming of the various river systems has greatly diminish siltage. Nevertheless, the Bohai Bay in effect concentrates the runoff of the whole eastern North China Plain, and the Bay is an intensely polluted body of water. Fisheries were traditionally some of the richest in China, fed by enormous sediment runoff and extensive shallows to serve as hatcheries. Pollution, eutrophication, habitat destruction caused by land reclamation, and intense overfishing have resulted in a collapse of stocks, and a decline of trawl catch per unit of effort (CPUE) from 138.8kg/net.hr to 11.2 kg/net.hr from 1959 to 1998. The Bohai
    8.00
    4 votes
    30
    Penzance Bay

    Penzance Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Penzance Bay is a popular bay located in Tennyson Inlet, within the Marlborough Sounds. Tennyson Inlet is an arm of Pelorus Sound. The bay is immediately north of Tuna Bay which is accessed by the same road. Penzance's beach is of gravel, which is unusual for this area of the Marlborough Sounds. This gives the beach a good reputation for safe and pleasant swimming. The bay contains a boat ramp, a large wharf, and a swimming island. These facilities coupled with ease of access gives the bay a great reputation for boating activities and fishing. There are walking tracks which link many of the adjacent bays together, such as Duncan Bay and Elaine Bay. Penzance is surrounded with native forest, much of it is untouched. The native forest contains large southern beech trees, Nothofagus species; along with conifers, as well as perching plants and epiphytes. In early summer, large numbers of the NZ ground orchid Pterostylis banksii are present along the walking tracks. The Maori name for the orchard is tutukiwi, or beak of a kiwi. Access to Penzance is gained through Archers Road which is off Tennyson Inlet Road. The turn off is slightly north of Rai Valley. Penzance is located about 1
    8.00
    4 votes
    31
    Godthul

    Godthul

    • Category: Bay
    Godthul is a bay 1 mile (1.6 km) long entered between Cape George and Long Point, on the north coast of South Georgia, between Cumberland East Bay and Ocean Harbour. The name Godthul (Norwegian for "Good Hollow") dates back to the period 1905–12, and was probably applied by Norwegian sealers and whalers working in the area. It operated between 1908–1929, and was only a rudimentary land base, with main operations on a factory ship. It had an interruption between 1917–22 partly due to World War I.
    6.80
    5 votes
    32
    Hawke Bay

    Hawke Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Hawke Bay is a large bay on the eastern coast of the North Island of New Zealand. It stretches from the Mahia Peninsula in the northeast to Cape Kidnappers in the southwest, a distance of some 100 kilometres. Captain James Cook, sailing in HM Bark Endeavour, sailed into the bay on 12 October 1769. After exploring it, he named it for Sir Edward Hawke, First Lord of the Admiralty on 15 October 1769, describing it as some 13 leagues (about 40 miles) across. This area of the New Zealand coast is subject to tectonic uplift, with the land being raised out of the sea. For this reason, the coastal land in this area has significant marine deposits, with both marine and land dinosaur fossils having been found inland. The Napier earthquake of 3 February 1931 resulted in several parts of the seabed close to the city of Napier being raised above sea level. Because the central mountain ranges come close to the coast at the north end of the bay, much of the bay's northerly coastline has deeply eroded tablelands that end in steep seaside cliffs which descend to narrow beaches. The town of Wairoa lies to the north end of the bay, at the mouth of the Wairoa River and its flood plain, while the port
    6.80
    5 votes
    33
    Cloudy Bay

    Cloudy Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Cloudy Bay is located at the northeast of New Zealand's South Island, to the south of the Marlborough Sounds. A recent Waitangi Tribunal settlement will see Cloudy Bay, given this name by Captain Cook in 1770, renamed Te Koko-o-Kupe / Cloudy Bay, with the Māori name recalling the early explorer Kupe scooping up oysters from the bay The area lends its name to one of the best known New World white wines (Cloudy Bay Vineyards Sauvignon Blanc) although the grapes used in production of that wine are grown in the Marlborough wine region further inland. The bay faces Cook Strait, stretching north-south over a distance of 30 kilometres from the southern extremity of the Marlborough Sounds (Port Underwood) to White Bluffs. Along its length is the delta of the Wairau River, which reaches the sea at two points. The southern of these forms an entrance to the Big Lagoon, just to the north of White Bluffs. Archaeological excavations at Wairau Bar indicate that Māori were living there in the 'moa-hunter' period about 1288 to 1300 for a period of about 20 years. This is the oldest and best researched site of early Polynesian settlement in New Zealand. Cloudy Bay was named by Captain James Cook on
    9.00
    3 votes
    34
    Smoo Cave

    Smoo Cave

    • Category: Sea cave
    Smoo Cave is a large combined sea cave and freshwater cave in Durness in Sutherland, Highland, Scotland. Smoo Cave is formed within Early Ordovician dolostones of the Durness Group (also known as the Durness Limestone). The cave has formed along the boundary between the light grey Sangomore Formation and the dark grey, mottled Sailmhor Formation (sometimes called Leopard Rock), both of which form part the Durness Group succession. These horizons close to the formation boundary are characterised by large and abundant chert nodules which can be found all along the inner stream chamber where they have been left behind after dissolution of the surrounding dolostone. The cave was formed along two geological lines of weakness by a combination of erosion from the sea and an inland underground stream which has formed the innermost chambers. Upstream of the Allt Smoo which runs into the cave, impermeable quartzites have been faulted against the Durness Limestone, causing the stream to sink down into the carbonate rock soon after it has crossed the contact between the two different rock types. The cave is unique within the UK in that the first chamber has been formed by the action of the
    7.75
    4 votes
    35
    Dalian Bay

    Dalian Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Dalian Bay (Chinese: 大连湾), is a bay on the southeast side of the Liaodong Peninsula of Northeast China, open to the Yellow Sea in the east. Downtown Dalian lies along the southern shore of the bay. Its significance is that it is ice-free year-round, while Jinzhou Bay (金州湾) on the other, northwest side of the peninsula is part of the Bohai Sea, and is shallow and closed for four months of the winter. The bay was the rendezvous point for the British fleet for the 1860 assault on China during the Second Opium War.
    6.60
    5 votes
    36
    Heligoland Bight

    Heligoland Bight

    • Category: Bay
    The Heligoland Bight, also known as Helgoland Bight, (German: Helgoländer Bucht) is a bay which forms the southern part of the German Bight, itself a bay of the North Sea, located at the mouth of the Elbe river. The Heligoland Bight extends from the mouth of the River Elbe to the islands of Heligoland and lies between the East Frisian island of Wangerooge and the North Frisian peninsula of Eiderstedt. Named after Heligoland, it was the location of naval battles in 1914 and 1917. In 1939 it also had an aerial battle named after it. In the Heligoland Basin (Helgoländer Becken), a basin lying directly southwest of Heligoland, the bight is up to 56 metres deep. One of the busiest shipping lanes in the world, from Hamburg and the mouth of the Elbe to the Straits of Dover and the English Channel, runs through the Heligoland Bight. The area also includes nature reserves such as the Heligoland Felssockel and the protected Wadden Sea, in which the Wadden Sea national parks of Schleswig-Holstein (East), Hamburg (southeast) and Lower Saxony (south) are located. Besides the aforementioned islands of Heligoland, which form the northwestern boundary of the Heligoland Bight, there is the small
    6.60
    5 votes
    37
    Plattsburgh Bay

    Plattsburgh Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Plattsburgh Bay was the site of the Battle of Plattsburgh, a naval and land engagement on September 11, 1814. During the battle, U.S. land and naval forces repulsed the last foreign invasion attempt on the northern states during the War of 1812. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1960.,
    6.60
    5 votes
    38
    Catalan Bay

    Catalan Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Catalan Bay (Spanish: La Caleta) is a small bay and fishing village in Gibraltar, on the eastern side of The Rock away from the main city. The true origin of the name of Catalan Bay is unknown, but a couple of theories exist. The first suggests that the bay is named after a group of around 350 Catalan (from Catalonia) military men believed to have settled here after having assisted the Anglo-Dutch forces who won the Capture of Gibraltar during the War of Spanish Succession on 4 August 1704. However, no evidence exists to prove that Catalans settled in Catalan Bay and although this theory is regularly used as the supporting argument for the origin of the name, it is only a supposition that they ever did. The name La Caleta (meaning 'small bay or cove') considerably pre-dates that of Catalan Bay. The fishing villages of La Tunara (La Línea de la Concepción, Spain) and La Caleta are mentioned in a Royal Dispatch of the 6 March 1634 of being under the jurisdiction of the "Tercio del Mar de Marbella y Estepona" in the Kingdom of Granada. Since it has been called La Caleta for much longer than it has ever been called Catalan Bay, the second theory and the most probably just in 1704 on
    5.00
    7 votes
    39
    Bay of Quinte

    Bay of Quinte

    • Category: Bay
    The Bay of Quinte ( /ˈkwɪnti/) is a long, narrow bay shaped like the letter "Z" on the northern shore of Lake Ontario in the province of Ontario, Canada. It is just west of the head of the Saint Lawrence River that drains the Great Lakes into the Gulf of Saint Lawrence. It is located about 200 kilometres (120 mi) east of Toronto and 400 kilometres (250 mi) west of Montreal. The name "Quinte" is derived from "Kente", which was the name of an early French Catholic mission located on the south shore of what is now Prince Edward County. The Bay, as it is known locally, provides some of the best trophy Walleye angling in North America as well as most sport fish common to the great lakes. The bay is subject to algae blooms in late summer which are a naturally occurring phenomenon and do not indicate pollution other than from agricultural runoff. Zebra mussels as well as the other invasive species found in the great lakes are present. The Quinte area played a vital role in bootlegging during Prohibition in the United States, with large volumes of booze being produced in the area, and shipped via boat on the Bay to Lake Ontario finally arriving in New York State where it was distributed.
    7.50
    4 votes
    40
    Firth of Thames

    Firth of Thames

    • Category: Bay
    The Firth of Thames is a large bay located in the north of the North Island of New Zealand. It is the firth of the rivers Waihou and Piako, the former of which was formerly named the Thames River, and the town of Thames lies on its southeastern coast. Its original name is Tikapa. The firth lies at the southern end of the Hauraki Gulf, southeast of the city of Auckland. It occupies a rift valley or graben between the Coromandel Peninsula and Hunua Ranges which continues into the Hauraki Plains to the south. The Firth of Thames is an important site for waders or shorebirds, and is listed as a wetland of international importance under the Ramsar Convention. The Miranda Shorebird Centre, operated by the Miranda Naturalists' Trust, is located on the western shore of the bay at Miranda. However, the firth overall is severely damaged by man-made influences, especially dairy-farm run-off, and has not recovered from large-scale mussel dredging over 40 years after the practice ceased (more information in the Hauraki Gulf article).
    7.50
    4 votes
    41
    Upstart Bay

    Upstart Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Upstart Bay is a bay in Queensland, Australia. It serves as the mouth of the Burdekin River.
    7.50
    4 votes
    42
    Shark Bay

    Shark Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Shark Bay is a World Heritage Site in the Gascoyne region of Western Australia. It is an area centred approximately on 25°30′S 113°30′E / 25.5°S 113.5°E / -25.5; 113.5, 800 kilometres north of Perth, on the westernmost point of Australia. An expedition led by Dirk Hartog happened upon the area in 1616, becoming the second group of Europeans known to have visited Australia. Shark Bay was named by William Dampier, in 1699. The area has a population of fewer than 1,000 people and a coastline of over 1,500 kilometres. The half-dozen small communities making up this population occupy less than 1% of the total area. The World Heritage status of the region was created and negotiated in the 1990s. The bay itself covers an area of 10,000 km², with an average depth of 10 metres. It is divided by shallow banks and has many peninsulas and islands. The coastline is over 1,500 km long. There are about 300 km of limestone cliffs overlooking the bay. One spectacular segment of cliffs in known as the Zuytdorp Cliffs. The bay is located in the transition zone between three major climatic regions and between two major botanical provinces. Dirk Hartog Island is of historical significance due to
    8.67
    3 votes
    43
    Galway Bay

    Galway Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Galway Bay (Irish: Loch Lurgan or Cuan na Gaillimhe) is a large bay (or sea lough) on the west coast of Ireland, between County Galway in the province of Connacht to the north and the Burren in County Clare in the province of Munster to the south. Galway city is located on the northeast side of the bay. It is about 50 kilometres (31 mi) long and from 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) to 30 kilometres (19 mi) in breadth. The Aran Islands (Oileáin Árann) are to the west across the entrance and there are numerous small islands within the bay. The approaches to the bay between the Aran Islands and the mainland are as follows; the North Sound (An Súnda ó Thuaidh) lies between Inishmore and Leitir Mealláin in Connemara, it was formerly known as Bealach Locha Lurgan in Irish. Gregory's Sound (Súnda Ghríoghóra) lies between Inishmore and Inishmaan, it was formerly known as Bealach na h-Áite. Foul Sound (An Súnda Salach) lies between Inishmaan and Inisheer, it was formerly known as Bealach na Fearbhaighe. South Sound (An Súnda ó Theas) formerly known as Bealach na Finnise lies between Inisheer and County Clare. Galway Bay is famous for its unique traditional sailing craft, the Galway Hooker.
    10.00
    2 votes
    44
    Sok Kwu Wan

    Sok Kwu Wan

    • Category: Bay
    Sok Kwu Wan (traditional Chinese: 索罟灣) or Picnic Bay (traditional Chinese: 野餐灣) is a bay in the Middle East coast of Lamma Island, Hong Kong. A fishing town of the same name, Sok Kwu Wan, in the bay has a cluster of seafood restaurants near the ferry pier. There is a Tin Hau Temple in Sok Kwu Wan. The town is serviced by ferries from the Outlying Ferry Pier No. 4 in Central, taking 35 to 45 minutes, and from Aberdeen via Mo Tat by Chuen Kee Ferry, taking about 30 minutes.
    10.00
    2 votes
    45
    Druridge Bay

    Druridge Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Druridge Bay is a 7 miles (11 km) long coastal bay in Northumberland, England, stretching from Amble in the north to Cresswell in the south. Northumberland Coast Country Park is situated within the bay, and part of the bay (the section near the village of Druridge, in the centre of the bay) is owned by the National Trust. Areas within the bay are set aside as nature reserves. During the Second World War defences were constructed around Druridge Bay as a part of British anti-invasion preparations of World War II. The defences included scaffolding barriers and anti-tank blocks overlooked by pillboxes and behind these were minefields and an anti-tank ditch. The bay was the focus of a long-running campaign against a proposal to construct a Pressurised Water Reactor nuclear power station during the 1980s and the large scale extraction of sand from the area in the 1990s. The campaign, along with changes in UK Government policy on nuclear power, prevented the power station from being built, and the plan was shelved for the time being in 1989. Northumberland Wildlife Trust are presently negotiating with landowners RMC Group to purchase the site, which is known for population of birds
    6.40
    5 votes
    46
    Barnegat Bay

    Barnegat Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Barnegat Bay is a small brackish arm of the Atlantic Ocean, approximately 30 miles (50 km) long, along the coast of Ocean County, New Jersey in the United States. It is separated from the Atlantic by a long barrier peninsula, as well as by the north end of Long Beach Island. The bay is fed by several small rivers, including the Toms River and Metedeconk River, which empty into the bay through small estuaries along its inner shore. The communities of Toms River, Silverton, and Forked River sit along the river estuaries on the bay. The bay is entered from the ocean through the Barnegat Inlet, along which sits the Barnegat Lighthouse. The bay is part of the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, entered on its north end by the Point Pleasant Canal and connecting on the south end with Little Egg Harbor via the small Manahawkin Bay. In a broader sense, the bay is sometimes considered to stretch to the south end of Long Beach Island and to include Little Egg Harbor. The area surrounding the Barnegat Bay and Barnegat Inlet were described by Henry Hudson, in 1609, as "...a great lake of water, as we could judge it to be ... The mouth of the lake hath many shoals, and the sea breaketh on them as
    7.25
    4 votes
    47
    Encounter Bay

    Encounter Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Encounter Bay is located on the south central coast of South Australia, some 100 km south of Adelaide, South Australia. It is named after the encounter on 8 April 1802 between Matthew Flinders and Nicolas Baudin, both of whom were charting the Australian coastline for their respective countries (Britain and France). The encounter between the scientists was peaceful, even though their countries were at war at the time. Traditionally the land of the Ramindjeri clan of the Ngarrindjeri people, the bay is a wide curve of coastline extending from Newland Head along the south coast of the Fleurieu Peninsula and southeast to Cape Jaffa, a distance of 180 km. Settlements along the bay include Victor Harbor, Port Elliot, Middleton, Goolwa and Kingston SE. The Murray, Inman and Hindmarsh Rivers drain into the bay, and a long stretch of the shore south of the Murray Mouth borders the Coorong National Park.
    8.33
    3 votes
    48
    Sandown Bay

    Sandown Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Sandown Bay is a broad bay which stretches for much of the length of the Isle of Wight's southeastern coast. It extends ten kilometres from Culver Cliff in the northeast to just south of Shanklin in the southwest. The towns of Shanklin and Sandown are located on the bay's coast. The seabed is a mixture of sand, shells and gravel. The beach is predominantly sand. The bay is best viewed from Culver Down to the north. The Isle of Wight Coastal Path follows the whole bayline either along the cliff top to the south of Sandown or the concrete seawall north of Sandown.
    8.33
    3 votes
    49
    Ago Bay

    Ago Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Ago Bay (英虞湾, Ago-wan) is a bay in the city of Shima, Mie Prefecture, Japan. It is part of the Ise-Shima region. The bay is known for its beauty and sees many tourists each year, in particular due to a train network owned by Kintetsu which runs trains from both Osaka and Nagoya to Kashiko-jima, an island in the bay. Pearl cultivation was first invented in this bay by Kōkichi Mikimoto in 1893.
    6.20
    5 votes
    50
    English Bay

    English Bay

    • Category: Bay
    English Bay is located in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, west of the downtown peninsula, which separates the bay from Burrard Inlet connecting to the northwest, and False Creek to the southeast. English Bay Beach, near the city's West End residential neighbourhood, is the most popular sunbathing, swimming, and sunset-watching beach in the downtown Vancouver area. Other downtown beaches facing English Bay include Sunset Beach, Second Beach, and Third Beach. Along the south shore of the bay lie Kitsilano Beach, Jericho Beach, the Spanish Banks beaches, and Locarno Beach, while on the North Shore are Ambleside Beach and various smaller cove-beaches in the city of West Vancouver. English Bay beaches are all major tourist attraction to visitors all year long, with the peak season being late summer. The Vancouver Seawall runs all the way around English Bay from Stanley Park in the northeast around False Creek at Point Grey facing the Strait of Georgia in the southwest. This is a favourite destination for walkers, runners, bicyclists, and roller-bladers. (Note: the Seawall is one-way for cyclists and roller-bladers, running counter-clockwise from just east of Lions Gate Bridge to
    9.50
    2 votes
    51
    Kane Basin

    Kane Basin

    • Category: Bay
    Kane Basin is an Arctic waterway lying between Greenland and Canada's northernmost island, Ellesmere Island. It links Smith Sound to Kennedy Channel and forms part of Nares Strait. It is approximately 180 kilometres in length and 130 km at its widest. It is named after Elisha Kane, whose expedition in search of the lost Franklin expedition crossed it in 1854. Kane himself had named it "Peabody Bay," in honor of philanthropist George Peabody, the major funder of Kane's expedition.
    9.50
    2 votes
    52
    Royal Bay

    Royal Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Royal Bay is a bay, 4 miles (6 km) wide and indenting 5 miles (8 km), entered between Cape Charlotte and Cape Harcourt along the north coast of South Georgia. Like other parts of the archipelago, many birds breed here, including king penguins, gentoo penguins, and blue-eyed cormorants. Royal Bay was discovered and named by a British expedition under James Cook in 1775. In 1882 a German group of the International Polar Year Investigations expedition under Schrader was sent out to observe the transit of Venus was stationed at Royal Bay. They were based on the north shore of the bay in 1882-83. The group came in on the Moltke which was the first powered vessel to reach South Georgia. Moltke Harbour, a one-mile wide bay on the northwest side of Royal Bay is named after it.
    9.50
    2 votes
    53
    Weymouth Bay

    Weymouth Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Weymouth Bay is a sheltered bay on the south coast of England, in Dorset. It is protected from erosion by Chesil Beach and the Isle of Portland, and includes several beaches, notably Weymouth Beach, a gently curving arc of golden sand which stretches from the resort of Weymouth, along to the suburbs of Greenhill, Lodmoor and Preston, and terminates just past Furzy Cliff at Bowleaze Cove — a haven for watersports, windsurfing, scuba diving, jetskiing, surfing and swimming. The bay's waters are excellent for sailing — the best sailing waters in northern Europe, one reason why it is home to the Weymouth and Portland National Sailing Academy which hosted the sailing events for the 2012 Olympic Games. Weymouth Bay is situated approximately halfway along the UNESCO Jurassic Coast World Heritage Site, a 153-kilometre (95 mi) long stretch of coast, important for its varied geology and many unique landforms. Weymouth Bay: Bowleaze Cove and Jordon Hill was painted by the leading English landscape artist John Constable in 1816–17. The painting now hangs in the National Gallery, London.
    9.50
    2 votes
    54
    Haverstraw Bay

    Haverstraw Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Haverstraw Bay, located in New York, is the widest portion of the Hudson River. The width of Haverstraw Bay is approximately 3.4 miles (5.5 kilometers). The length approximately 5 miles (8 kilometers) from river kilometer 58 (river mile 36) at Croton Point to river kilometer 66 (river mile 41) at Stony Point. The bay is bordered by the village of Haverstraw, in Rockland County, to the west and the village of Croton-on-Hudson, in Westchester County, to the east. Haverstraw Bay is bordered to the west by the town and village of Haverstraw and to the east by the northern portion of the town of Ossining, village of Croton-on-Hudson and the southern portion of the town of Cortlandt. Haverstraw Bay is approximately 35 miles (56 kilometers) to the north of New York City. A major feature of the bay is the large peninsula that forms its southern downstream border, Croton Point, which juts almost halfway across the Hudson from the eastern shore. Croton Point Park is a popular birding location, including frequent sightings of the bald eagle. The moderately saline bay is the northern, upstream boundary of the lower Hudson River estuary. The bay's physical and biological characteristics make it
    7.00
    4 votes
    55
    Mirs Bay

    Mirs Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Mirs Bay (also known as Tai Pang Wan, Dapeng Wan, Dapeng Bay) (Chinese: 大鵬灣) is a bay in the northeast of Crooked Island and Sai Kung Peninsula of Hong Kong. Ping Chau stands in the midst of the bay. The north and east shores are surrounded by Yantian, Kuichong, Dapeng (Dapeng Peninsula) and Nan'ao of Shenzhen, mainland China. Within the bay are smaller harbours or inlets on the Hong Kong side: To the south of Mirs Bay water flows out to the South China Sea. Mirs Bay along with other waterways near Hong Kong once was home to various coastal defence forts (e.g. Dapeng Fortress) used against pirates during the Ming Dynasty. Mirs Bay was used by then American Commodore (later Admiral) George Washington Dewey during the Spanish American War as refuge and repair facility for the US Navy.
    6.00
    5 votes
    56
    Basque Roads

    Basque Roads

    • Category: Bay
    Basque Roads is a sheltered bay on the Biscay shore of the Charente-Maritime département of France, bounded by the Île d'Oléron to the west and the Île de Ré to the north. The port of La Rochelle stands at the northeast corner of the roads, and the town of Rochefort is near the mouth of the Charente River to the south. It is most famous as the site of the British naval victory over a French fleet at the 1809 Battle of Basque Roads. It was also subjected to a failed British attack in 1757 during the Seven Years War
    8.00
    3 votes
    57
    East Bay

    East Bay

    • Category: Bay
    East Bay (Florida) is a bay located in the far western Florida Panhandle. Milton, which is the county seat of Santa Rosa County, is located on the north end of the bay. Unusually, East Bay is connected to open waters via Pensacola Bay to its southwest. The bay is fed primarily by the Blackwater River. During Hurricane Ivan's landfall in September 2004, the storm surge from the Gulf of Mexico came in to East Bay, flooding the shoreline of the bay.
    8.00
    3 votes
    58
    Jackson Bay

    Jackson Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Jackson Bay is a gently curving bay 24 kilometers wide, located on the West Coast of New Zealand's South Island. It faces the Tasman Sea to the north, and is backed by the Southern Alps. The westernmost point of the bay is marked by the headland of Jackson Head; in the northeast the end of the bay is less well defined, but the small alluvial fan of the Turnbull and Okuru Rivers might be considered its farthest point. The small Open Bay Islands lie five kilometres off the coast at this point. The bay marks a major change in the terrain of the west coast. To the north, narrow fertile plains lie between the mountains and the sea, allowing for moderately intensive farming of livestock. To the south, the coastal plains disappear as the land becomes steeper and more majestically mountainous. Within 60 kilometres, the first of the deep glacial valleys that further south become the fjords of Fiordland start to become evident, with Lake McKerrow at the foot of the Hollyford Track. The bay marks the farthest extent of the West Coast's road network: the small road which meanders along the coast from Haast, 32 kilometres to the northeast, terminates at the sleepy fishing village of Jackson
    8.00
    3 votes
    59
    Little Traverse Bay

    Little Traverse Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Little Traverse Bay is a small bay, 170 feet (55 m) deep, off Lake Michigan in the northern area of the Lower Peninsula of Michigan. The cities of Harbor Springs and Petoskey are on this bay. The Little Traverse Light marks the entrance to the smaller harbor within the bay, at Harbor Springs. The bay has significant publicly accessible parkland on the waterfront, including the Petoskey waterfront, the Harbor Springs waterfront and the Petoskey State Park. The Little Traverse Bay region was developed by Illinois land developers and resort founders, such as lawyers Henry Stryker, III and Henry Brigham McClure, and the Capps family of Jacksonville, Illinois and woolen mills fame. The Stryker, Capps, and McClure families were interconnected with the Jacob Bunn industrial dynasty of Chicago and Springfield, Illinois. The bay has also been used for refuge of great lakes freighters. Little Traverse Bay is commonly used during the summer for boating sailing and swimming by the numerous vacation communities on the bay, including Bay View, Wequetonsing and Harbor Point. Many of these communities also provide sailing and swimming lessons. The bay is also home to the annual Ugotta Regatta
    8.00
    3 votes
    60
    Pamlico Sound

    Pamlico Sound

    • Category: Bay
    Pamlico Sound ( /ˈpæmlɨkoʊ/ PAM-lik-oh) in North Carolina, is the largest lagoon along the U.S. East Coast, being 129 km (80 mi) long and 24 to 48 km (15 to 30 miles) wide. It is a body of water separated from the Atlantic Ocean by the Outer Banks, a row of low, sandy barrier islands, including Cape Hatteras. The Neuse and Pamlico rivers (the latter is the estuary of the Tar River) flow in from the west. Pamlico Sound is linked on the north with Albemarle Sound through Roanoke Sound and Croatan Sound (passages). Core Sound is the narrow southern end. Explorer Giovanni da Verrazzano mistook the sound for the Pacific Ocean. The sound and its ocean inlets are noted for wide expanses of shallow water and occasional shoaling, making the area hazardous for larger vessels. In addition, the shallow waters are susceptible to wind and barometric pressure-driven tidal fluctuations. This effect is amplified on the tributary rivers, where water levels can change by as much as two feet in three hours when winds are aligned with the rivers' axes and are blowing strongly. Pamlico Sound is part of a large, interconnected network of lagoon estuaries. As a whole it is the second largest estuary in
    8.00
    3 votes
    61
    Telefon Bay

    Telefon Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Telefon Bay is a small bay in the northwest side of Port Foster, Deception Island, in the South Shetland Islands. Surmounted by Telefon Ridge. The name appears on the chart of the French Antarctic Expedition under Charcot, 1908–10, and derives from the ship Telefon, which sat here awaiting repairs.  This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Telefon Bay" (content from the Geographic Names Information System).
    8.00
    3 votes
    62
    Tokyo Bay

    Tokyo Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Tokyo Bay (東京湾, Tōkyō-wan) is a bay in the southern Kantō region of Japan, and spans the coasts of Tokyo, Kanagawa Prefecture, and Chiba Prefecture. Tokyo Bay is connected to the Pacific Ocean by the Uraga Channel. Its old name was Edo Bay (江戸湾, Edo-wan). The Tokyo Bay region is both the most populous and largest industrialized area in Japan. Tokyo Bay was known as the 内海 (Uchi-umi), or "inner sea" from ancient times. By the Azuchi-Momoyama period (1568 – 1600) the bay was known as Edo Bay, a reference to the city Edo. In the modern times the bay took its present name of Tokyo Bay. Tokyo Bay juts prominently into the Kantō Plain. It is surrounded by the Bōsō Peninsula in Chiba Prefecture to the east and the Miura Peninsula in Kanagawa Prefecture to the west. The shore of Tokyo Bay consists of a diluvial plateau and is subject to rapid marine erosion. Sediments on the shore of the bay make for a smooth, continuous shoreline. In a narrow sense, Tokyo Bay is the area north of the straight line from Cape Kannon on the west of Miura Peninsula to Cape Futtsu on the east Bōsō Peninsula. This area covers about 922 square kilometres (356 sq mi). In a broader sense, Tokyo Bay includes the
    8.00
    3 votes
    63
    Whitesand Bay

    Whitesand Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Whitesands Bay (Welsh: traeth-mawr) shown as Whitesand Bay on some maps, is an EEC award-winning, Blue Flag standard, wide sandy beach in St Brides Bay in the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park, United Kingdom. The beach is located about two miles west of the small city of St. Davids and about one mile south of St Davids Head and has been described as the best surfing beach in Pembrokeshire and one of the best tourist beaches in the world. The area to the north east of the bay is dominated by a large rocky outcrop, 594 feet (181 m) at its highest point, known as Carn Llidi - which could mean Cairn of the Gates or Cairn of Wrath. The Pembrokeshire Coast Path passes alongside the bay, giving access in the north to the secluded bays of Porthlleuog and Porthmelgan (which are only accessible on foot), and the rugged coastal scenery of St Davids Head. To the south, the coastal path leads to Porthselau and St. Justinian's, with views across the Ramsey Sound to Ramsey Island. There are a number of megalithic burial chambers, stone hut circles and British Iron Age field systems and enclosures to be seen in the vicinity of Carn Llidi and St Davids Head. It is said that St. Patrick had his
    8.00
    3 votes
    64
    Cumberland Bay

    Cumberland Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Cumberland Bay is a bay, 4 miles (6.4 km) wide at its entrance between Larsen Point and Barff Point, which separates into two extensive arms that recede inland 9 miles (14 km) along the northern coast of South Georgia. It was discovered and named in 1775 by a British expedition under James Cook. During the Second World War the whaling stations were closed excepting Grytviken and Leith Harbour. Most of the British and Norwegian whaling factories and catchers were destroyed by German raiders, while the rest were called up to serve under Allied command. The resident British Magistrates (W. Barlas and A.I. Fleuret) attended to the island’s defence throughout the War. The Royal Navy armed the merchant vessel Queen of Bermuda to patrol South Georgian and Antarctic waters, and deployed two four-inch guns at key locations protecting the approaches to Cumberland Bay and Stromness Bay, i.e. to Grytviken and Leith Harbour respectively. These batteries (still present) were manned by volunteers from among the Norwegian whalers who were trained for the purpose. 54°14′S 36°28′W / 54.233°S 36.467°W / -54.233; -36.467
    6.75
    4 votes
    65
    Milne Bay

    Milne Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Milne Bay is a large bay in Milne Bay Province, southeastern Papua New Guinea. More than 35 kilometers long and over 15 kilometers wide, Milne Bay is a sheltered deep-water harbour, surrounded by the heavily wooded Stirling Range to the north and south, and on the northern shore, a narrow coastal strip, soggy with sago and mangrove swamps. The bay is named after Sir Alexander Milne.
    6.75
    4 votes
    66
    Te Waewae Bay

    Te Waewae Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Te Waewae Bay is the westernmost of three large bays lying on the Foveaux Strait coast of Southland, New Zealand, the others being Oreti Beach and Toetoes Bay. Twenty-seven kilometres in length, the western end of the bay is mountainous, with the southern terminus of the Southern Alps and Fiordland National Park. The small farming town of Orepuki is situated on the cliffs at the eastern end of the bay and the timber town of Tuatapere is located seven kilometres north of the bay, on the banks of the Waiau River, which has its outflow in the bay. The area is an important habitat for the endemic Hector's Dolphins and a winter breeding ground for Southern Right Whales.
    6.75
    4 votes
    67
    Choctawhatchee Bay

    Choctawhatchee Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Choctawhatchee Bay is a bay in the Emerald Coast region of the Florida Panhandle. The bay, located within Okaloosa and Walton counties, has a surface area of 129 mi (334 km). It is an inlet of the Gulf of Mexico, connected to it through East Pass (also known as Destin Pass), and it connects to Santa Rosa Sound in Fort Walton Beach, Florida, with the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway entering it at this point. East Pass is the only outlet of the bay into the Gulf of Mexico. The Choctawhatchee River flows into it, as do several smaller rivers and streams. The Mid-Bay Bridge crosses the bay, connecting the city of Destin to Niceville, Florida. The bay was charted by Spanish, French, and English expeditions, and appears on some charts as "St. Rose's Bay". Several towns and cities are located on Choctawhatchee Bay:
    9.00
    2 votes
    68
    Trinity Bay, Newfoundland and Labrador

    Trinity Bay, Newfoundland and Labrador

    • Category: Bay
    Trinity Bay is a large bay on the northeastern coast of Newfoundland in the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. Major fishing communities include Trinity and Heart's Content. Trinity Bay is famous as the location of a "nearly intact" specimen of giant squid found there on September 24, 1877. In April 2003, thousands of dead northern cod, washed up on the shores of Smith Sound in a single weekend, prompting scientific inquiry into the cause. Jellyfish harvesting communities include Smith Sound, Old Perlican, and Northwest and Southwest Arms.
    9.00
    2 votes
    69
    Kinnagoe Bay

    Kinnagoe Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Kinnagoe Bay is a secluded beach in Inishowen, County Donegal, Ireland. It is known for being the location of the wreck of the Spanish Armada ship "Trinidad Valencera" in 1588; in memory of which a plaque is mounted. The beach is accessible by a weaving road from the top of the hill. There is a small car park at the beach which gets very busy during the summer. the sat nav co ordinates for the car park are N 55° 15.517" W 07° 00.770" It is one of the places of interest on the Inishowen 100 scenic route. Fishing: Kinnagoe bay attracts fisherman from all around Ireland. The wreck of "la trinidad valencera" attracts a lot of fish. By either spinning from the rocks or casting from the beach there is plenty of fish to be caught, including species like : pollack, wrasse, coalfish, dogfish, bass, flounder, and more.
    5.80
    5 votes
    70
    Bahía de Banderas

    Bahía de Banderas

    • Category: Bay
    Bahía de Banderas (Bay of Flags) is both a bay and a municipality in the Mexican state of Nayarit. The bay, site of the tourist destination Puerto Vallarta, is bounded on the north by Punta Mita and on the south by Cape Corrientes. It straddles the states of Jalisco and Nayarit. At approximately 100km long, it is not the largest bay in Mexico, despite what many locals claim. The municipality had a population of 83,739 in 2005 (59,808 in 2000) in a total area of 773.3 km². The municipal seat is Valle de Banderas with a population of 5,057 in 2005. Other towns are San Juan de Abajo (8,159), Bucerías (5,711), San José del Valle (5,188), San Vicente (3,543) and Jarretaderas (3,426). The municipality was created in 1989. In the north the municipality borders Compostela, in the east with the state of Jalisco, in the south with the Pacific Ocean and the state of Jalisco, and in the west with the Pacific Ocean. The economy is based on tourism, fishing and agriculture. The main crops are corn (maize), beans, sorghum, tobacco, rice, watermelon and mango. Exotic fruits like papaya, litchi and guanábana are also grown. Most of the planted area is irrigated. There are several packing houses for
    7.67
    3 votes
    71
    Baie de la Seine

    Baie de la Seine

    • Category: Bay
    The Baie de la Seine or Baie de Seine (Bay of the Seine [River]) is a bay in northern France. It is a wide, rectangular inlet of the English Channel, approximately 100 kilometres (east-west) by 45 kilometres, bounded in the west by the Cotentin Peninsula, in the south by the Normandy coast and in the east by the estuary of the river Seine at Le Havre. The coast alternates between sandy beaches and rocky promontories and, in general, it offers little shelter for shipping. At the western end of the bay are the Îles Saint-Marcouf. Le Havre is the major port of the region; there are minor harbours at Barfleur, Port-en-Bessin, Courseulles-sur-Mer, Langrune-sur-Mer, Ouistreham, Trouville-sur-Mer and Honfleur. Domestic and foreign tourists visit the coast, given its World War II associations, sandy beaches and proximity to Paris. There are coastal resorts at Arromanches, Deauville, Cabourg, Houlgate, Villers-sur-Mer, Trouville-sur-Mer and Honfleur. The Battles of Barfleur and La Hogue were naval battles fought off Barfleur and Saint-Vaast-la-Hougue in the 17th century. The Normandy coast was the location, during World War II, of the main Allied landings in France; the unavailability of
    7.67
    3 votes
    72
    Bay of Whales

    Bay of Whales

    • Category: Bay
    The Bay of Whales is a natural ice harbor, or iceport, indenting the front of Ross Ice Shelf just north of Roosevelt Island, Antarctica. It is the southernmost point of open ocean not only of the Ross Sea, but worldwide. The Ross Sea extends much further south—as far as the Gold Coast, some 200 miles (320 km) from the South Pole—but most of that area is covered by the Ross Ice Shelf rather than open sea. Ernest Shackleton named the feature on January 24 1908, during the Nimrod Expedition, because of the large number of whales seen near this location. During his quest for the South Pole, Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen established a temporary base, which he named Framheim, at the Bay of Whales. The base was used between January 1911 – February 1912. The Bay of Whales has also served as a logistical support base for several other important Antarctic expeditions, including: The configuration of the Bay of Whales is continuously changing. A survey by the second Byrd expedition in 1934 determined that the feature lay at the junction of two separate ice systems, the movements of which are influenced by the presence of Roosevelt Island. Commander Glen Jacobsen, USN, who visited aboard
    7.67
    3 votes
    73
    Disko Bay

    Disko Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Disko Bay (Kalaallisut: Qeqertarsuup tunua; Danish: Disko Bugt) is a bay on the western coast of Greenland. The bay constitutes a wide southeastern inlet of Baffin Bay. To the south the coastline is complicated with multiple waterways of skerries and small islands in the Aasiaat archipelago. Qasigiannguit and Ilimanaq are the main settlements in the southeastern inlet, just south of the outflow of Ilulissat Icefjord. From the north the bay is bounded by Qeqertarsuaq, the largest island on the western coast. North of Ilulissat and west of Aluttoq Island the bay transforms into Sullorsuaq Strait separating Qeqertarsuaq from Nuussuaq Peninsula. Disko Bay has been an important location for centuries. Its coastline was first encountered by Europeans when Erik the Red started a settlement in 985 AD on the more habitable western coast of Greenland. The two settlements, called the Eastern and Western Settlement, were sustenance economies that survived on animal husbandry. Soon after the Western settlement was established, the Norsemen traveled up the coast during the summer thaw and discovered Disko Bay. Their special interest in this bay was due to its rich sources of Walruses for ivory,
    7.67
    3 votes
    74
    Foxe Basin

    Foxe Basin

    • Category: Bay
    Foxe Basin is a shallow oceanic basin north of Hudson Bay, in Nunavut, Canada, located between Baffin Island and the Melville Peninsula. For most of the year, it is blocked by ice floes. The nutrient-rich cold waters found in the basin are known to be especially favorable to phytoplankton and the numerous islands within it are important bird habitats, including Sabine's Gulls and many types of shorebirds. Bowhead whales migrate to the northern part of the basin each summer. The basin takes its name from the English explorer Luke Foxe. Foxe Basin is a broad, predominantly shallow depression, generally less than 100 metres (330 ft) in depth, while to the south, depths of up to 400 metres (1,300 ft) occur. The tidal range decreases from 5 m (16 ft) in the southeast to less than 1 m (3 ft 3 in) in the northwest. During much of the year, landfast ice dominates in the north, while pack ice prevails towards the south. Foxe Basin itself is rarely ice-free until September, open pack ice being common throughout the summer. Vigorous tidal currents and strong winds keep the ice pack in constant motion and contribute to the numerous polynyas and shore leads which are found throughout the
    7.67
    3 votes
    75
    Great Australian Bight

    Great Australian Bight

    • Category: Bay
    The Great Australian Bight is a large bight, or open bay, off the central and western portions of the southern coastline of mainland Australia. The International Hydrographic Organization defines the Great Australian Bight as part of the southeastern Indian Ocean, with the following limits: On the North. The South coast of Australia. On the South. A line joining West Cape Howe (35°08′S 117°37′E / 35.133°S 117.617°E / -35.133; 117.617) Australia to South West Cape, Tasmania. On the East. A line from Cape Otway, Australia, to King Island and thence to Cape Grim, the Northwest extreme of Tasmania. Another definition is that the Bight's boundaries are from Cape Pasley, Western Australia, to Cape Carnot, South Australia - a distance of 1,160 km or 720 miles. The much more generally accepted name in Australia for the adjoining waterbody is the Southern Ocean rather than the Indian Ocean. Much of the Bight lies due south of the expansive Nullarbor Plain, which straddles the two Australian states of South Australia and Western Australia. The Eyre Highway passes close to the cliffs of the Bight between the Head of the Bight and Eucla. The Great Australian Bight was first encountered by
    7.67
    3 votes
    76
    Massachusetts Bay

    Massachusetts Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Massachusetts Bay, also called Mass Bay, is a bay on the Atlantic Ocean which forms the distinctive shape of the coastline of the U.S. state of Massachusetts. It extends from Plymouth Harbor on the south to Cape Ann on the north, a distance of 42 miles (68 km). It is triangular in shape, the north and south shores inclining toward each other until at the entrance to Boston Harbor they are about five miles apart. The depth from the base of the triangle to Boston Harbor is about 21 miles (34 km). The bay's westernmost point is situated at Boston. The northern shore is rocky and irregular, the southern low, marshy, and sandy. Along the shores are a number of capes and headlands, and off the coast a number of small islands, especially in the entrance to Boston Harbor. The principal inlets are: on the north coast, Gloucester Harbor, Nahant Bay, Salem Harbor, Marblehead Harbor, and Lynn Harbor; on the west, Boston Harbor, Dorchester Bay, and Quincy Bay (the two latter being part of the Outer Boston Harbor); on the south coast, Hingham Bay. Massachusetts Bay is itself part of the Gulf of Maine, which reaches from Cape Cod up to Nova Scotia. Just south is Cape Cod Bay. Cape Cod Bay is
    7.67
    3 votes
    77
    Mount's Bay

    Mount's Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Mount's Bay is a large, sweeping bay on the English Channel coast of Cornwall in the United Kingdom, stretching from the Lizard Point to Gwennap Head on the eastern side of the Land's End peninsula. Towards the middle of the bay (and probably the origin of the name) is St Michael's Mount. Presenting a benign aspect to summer visitors of a large, scenic, natural harbour; in an onshore winter gale it presents a great danger to shipping as a "maritime trap". Especially in the days of sailing ships with an excess of 150 known wrecks in the nineteenth century. Mount's Bay is the biggest bay in Cornwall. Its half-moon shape is similar to that of Donegal Bay in Ireland and Cardigan Bay in Wales, although, unlike the aforementioned bays, Mount's Bay is relatively sheltered from the prevailing Atlantic westerlies. It is, however, a danger to shipping during onshore southerly and south-easterly gales. The coast is approximately 42 miles ([67 km) miles from Lizard Point to Gwennap Head. Heading north and west from Lizard Point, the serpentine and hornblende schist cliffs reach a maximum height of 71 m (233 ft) at Vellan Head and are only broken by small streams and coves such as at Kynance,
    7.67
    3 votes
    78
    Table Bay

    Table Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Table Bay (Afrikaans Tafelbaai) is a natural bay on the Atlantic Ocean overlooked by Cape Town (founded 1652) and is at the northern end of the Cape Peninsula, which stretches south to the Cape of Good Hope. It was named because it is dominated by the flat-topped Table Mountain. Bartolomeu Dias was the first European to explore this region in 1486. The bay, although famous for centuries as a haven for ships, is actually a rather poor natural harbour and is badly exposed to gales from both the SE and NW. Many sailing ships seeking refuge in the bay during the 17th and 18th centuries were driven ashore by storms. (See article about Wolraad Woltemade). The Dutch colonists nevertheless persisted with their colony on the shores of Table Bay because natural harbours along this coastline are scarce and the only realistic alternatives- Simon's Bay and Saldanha Bay - had almost no fresh water. Eventually a harbour was built in Table Bay by a process of land reclamation and defended by breakwaters to protect shipping. The older part of this structure is called the Victoria Dock. The newer part is called the Duncan Dock. Robben Island, where Nelson Mandela was imprisoned for decades, is in
    7.67
    3 votes
    79
    Dollart

    Dollart

    • Category: Bay
    The Dollart (Dutch: Dollard) is a bay between northern Netherlands and Germany, on the west side of the estuary of the Ems river. Most of it dries at low tide. Many water birds feed there. The Dollart was likely created between 1219 and 1413, by the rising waterlevel and some floods. However, in the beginning that wasn't a real problem. The land was protected by dikes. But in the battle between the schieringers and vetkopers, two medieval Frisian parties, some dikes were attacked. Some historians think that those dikes collapsed in 1413 and overflowed the land (Reiderland). In 1520 the Dollart had its largest surface. Between then and the 19th century, the Dollart had partly been re-empoldered again. Nowadays it's a paradise for all kinds of birds and other animals that live around water. The foundation of protecting and examining the landscape of Groningen, Het Groninger Landschap, organizes excursions to the Dollart around three times a year. The Netherlands and Germany do not agree on the exact course of the border through the bay. The territorial dispute has gained relevance as there are plans for the Borkum Riffgat offshore wind farm.
    10.00
    1 votes
    80
    German Bight

    German Bight

    • Category: Bay
    German Bight (German: Deutsche Bucht; Danish: Tyske Bugt; Dutch: Duitse Bocht; West Frisian: Dútske bocht) is the southeastern bight of the North Sea bounded by the Netherlands and Germany to the south, and Denmark and Germany to the east (the Jutland peninsula). To the north and west it is limited by the Dogger Bank. The Bight contains the Frisian and Danish Islands. The Wadden Sea is approximately ten to twelve kilometres wide at the location of the German Bight. (Hogan. 2011) The Frisian islands and the nearby coastal areas are collectively known as Frisia. The southern portion of the bight is also known as the Heligoland Bight. Between 1949 and 1956 the BBC Sea Area Forecast (Shipping Forecast) used "Heligoland" as the designation for the area now referred to as German Bight.
    10.00
    1 votes
    81
    Kealakekua Bay

    Kealakekua Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Kealakekua Bay is located on the Kona coast of the island of Hawaiʻi about 12 miles (19 km) south of Kailua-Kona. Settled over a thousand years ago, the surrounding area contains many archeological and historical sites such as religious temples, and was listed in the National Register of Historic Places listings on the island of Hawaii in 1973 as the Kealakekua Bay Historical District. The bay is a marine life conservation district, a popular destination for kayaking, Scuba diving and snorkeling. Settlement on Kealakekua Bay has a long history. Hikiau Heiau was a luakini temple of Ancient Hawaii at the south end of the bay, at coordinates 19°28′31″N 155°55′9″W / 19.47528°N 155.91917°W / 19.47528; -155.91917, associated with funeral rites. The large platform of volcanic rock was originally over 16 feet (4.9 m) high, 250 feet (76 m) long, and 100 feet (30 m) wide. The sheer cliff face called Pali Kapu O Keōua overlooking the bay was the burial place of Hawaiian royalty. The name means "forbidden cliffs of Keōua " in honor of Keōua Nui, sometimes known as the "father of kings" since many rulers were his descendants. The difficulty in accessing the cliff kept the exact burial places
    10.00
    1 votes
    82
    McNeill Bay, British Columbia

    McNeill Bay, British Columbia

    • Category: Bay
    McNeill Bay (aka Shoal Bay) lies within the boundaries of Oak Bay, British Columbia along the coast of Vancouver Island. It was named after Captain William Henry McNeill, master of the Hudson's Bay Company steamer SS Beaver, and one of the five original landowners of Oak Bay. On 14 March 1843 the SS Beaver anchored in this bay, with James Douglas (Chief Factor of the Hudson's Bay Company) as the site for Fort Victoria was being scouted. The land where the esplanade currently runs along the shoreline was a gift from Rosina Irene Margaret Ross.
    10.00
    1 votes
    83
    Mercury Bay

    Mercury Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Mercury Bay is a large V-shaped bay on the eastern coast of the Coromandel Peninsula on the North Island of New Zealand. This bay was named by the English navigator Captain James Cook during his exploratory expeditions. By the Māori it was named Te-Whanganui-o-Hei, the great bay of Hei. On 9 November 1769, Cook landed on the shores of this bay to observe a Transit of Mercury. In 1919, an area of land around Shakespeare Cliff was set aside, and a small memorial was constructed, based on the erroneous notion that it was the location of Cook's observations. But the actual site of Cook's landing and observation was the eastern end of Cook's Beach, near the Purangi estuary. A smaller memorial plinth was established there also. The mouth of Mercury Bay is ten kilometers across, and its coastline extends some 20 km. On the shore of this bay is the resort town of Whitianga, and a natural harbor is formed by an arm of the bay which extends inland a further six kilometers southward. Several small islets are located at the southern and northern extremities of the bay, and the Mercury Islands are 10 km to the north. Named locations along Mercury Bay include Buffalo Beach, Ferry Landing,
    10.00
    1 votes
    84
    Morecambe Bay

    Morecambe Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Morecambe Bay is a large bay in northwest England, nearly due east of the Isle of Man and just to the south of the Lake District National Park. It is the largest expanse of intertidal mudflats and sand in the United Kingdom, covering a total area of 310 km². The rivers Leven, Kent, Keer, Lune and Wyre drain into the Bay, with their various estuaries making a number of peninsulas within the bay, such as Humphrey Head. Much of the land around the bay is reclaimed, forming salt marshes used in agriculture. Morecambe Bay is also an important wildlife site, with abundant bird life and varied marine habitats, and there is a bird observatory at Walney Island. The bay is also notorious for its quicksand and fast moving tides (it is said that the tide can come in "as fast as a horse can run"). It is particularly infamous due to the '2004 Morecambe Bay Disaster' in which 23 Chinese illegal immigrant cockle pickers are believed to have drowned due to the tide. There have been royally appointed local guides (holding the post of Queen's Guide to the Sands) for crossing the bay for centuries. This difficulty of crossing the bay added to the isolation of the land to its north which, due to the
    10.00
    1 votes
    85
    Queen Charlotte Sound, Canada

    Queen Charlotte Sound, Canada

    • Category: Bay
    Queen Charlotte Sound is a sound of the Pacific Ocean in British Columbia, Canada, between Vancouver Island in the south and Haida Gwaii (formerly Queen Charlotte Islands) in the north. It merges with Hecate Strait in the north and Queen Charlotte Strait in the south. Queen Charlotte Sound is part of the Inside Passage shipping route. According to the BCGNIS, the northern boundary of Queen Charlotte Sound is defined as a line running from the southernmost point of Price Island to Cape St James on Kunghit Island, the southernmost point of Haida Gwaii. The western boundary is a line from Cape St James to Cape Scott at the north end of Vancouver Island. The southern boundary runs along the coast of Vancouver Island from Cape Scott to Cape Sutil, then to Cape Caution on the mainland. An older definition placed the northern boundary as a line from the southernmost point of Aristazabal Island to Cape St James. Queen Charlotte Sound was named by James Strange on August 5, 1786, in honour of Queen Charlotte, the wife of King George III. Strange was the leader of a fur trading expedition of two vessels, the Captain Cook, under Captain Henry Lawrie, and the Experiment, under Captain John
    10.00
    1 votes
    86
    Gulf of Ob

    Gulf of Ob

    • Category: Bay
    The Gulf of Ob (also known as Ob Bay) (Russian: О́бская губа́, Obskaya guba) is a gigantic bay of the Arctic Ocean, located in Northern Russia at the mouth of the Ob River. This Gulf flows into the Kara Sea between the Gydan and Yamal peninsulas. It is about 1,000 km (600 mi) long and varies in width from about 50 km (30 mi) to 80 km (50 mi), and generally runs north and south. It is relatively shallow, with an average depth from ten to twelve metres which restricts heavy sea transport. The Taz Estuary is an eastern side-branch formed by the Taz River. There are several islands near the mouth of the Ob, at the beginning of the estuary, like Khaley. All these islands are close to the shore and they are generally flat and low-lying. They are protected wetlands under Ramsar. Further north, except for a few islands located close to the shore, like Khalevigo and Nyavigo, the Gulf of Ob is free of islands until it meets the Kara Sea. Very large gas and oil deposits have been discovered in this region. Oil and gas from the wells are sent South via pipeline and rail transport. The Yamburg gas field is the world's third largest natural gas field, and is located between the southern portion
    6.50
    4 votes
    87
    Jossac Bight

    Jossac Bight

    • Category: Bay
    Jossac Bight (also, formerly "Jossac Bite") is a bight extending for 7 miles (11 km) along the south coast of South Georgia between Holmestrand and Aspasia Point. The name "Jossac Bite" [sic] was used by the early sealers for a bight to the southeast of King Haakon Bay, probably the feature now described. The compound name "Holmestrand-Hortenbucht" (presumably derived from the two existing names Holmestrand and Horten, q.v.) was later used by a German expedition under Kohl-Larsen 1928-29. A form of the earlier name has been approved.  This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Jossac Bight" (content from the Geographic Names Information System).
    5.60
    5 votes
    88
    Abu Qir Bay

    Abu Qir Bay

    • Category: Bay
    The Abū Qīr Bay (sometimes transliterated Abukir Bay or Aboukir Bay) (Arabic: خليج أبو قير‎; transliterated: Khalīj Abū Qīr) is a spacious bay on the Mediterranean Sea in Egypt, lying between Abu Qir (Near Alexandria) and the Rosetta mouth of the Nile. It contains a natural gas field, discovered in the 1970s. On August 1, 1798, Horatio Nelson fought the Battle of the Nile, often referred to as the "Battle of Aboukir Bay". (The latter title is applied more properly to an engagement between the French expeditionary army and the Ottomans fought on July 25, 1799.) On 1 March 1801, some 70 British warships, together with transports carrying 16,000 troops, anchored in Aboukir Bay near Alexandria. The intent was to defeat the French expeditionary force that had remained in Egypt after Napoleon's return to France. Bad weather delayed disembarkation by a week, but on the 8th, Captain Alexander Cochrane of HMS Ajax directed as 320 boats, in double line abreast, brought the troops ashore. French shore batteries opposed the landing, but the British were able to drive them back and by the next day all of Sir Ralph Abercromby's British Army was ashore. The British then defeated the French army
    8.50
    2 votes
    89
    Bohai Sea

    Bohai Sea

    • Category: Bay
    Bohai Bay Rim (环渤海经济圈) located at northern china around the Sea of Bo. This region has gone through major changes in economic and infrastructures. This emerging region is rising as one of Northern economic power house and would rival Pearl River Delta in south and Yangtze River Delta in east. In recent decades, petroleum and natural gas deposits have been discovered in Bo Hai. The gulf is formed by the Liaodong Peninsula to the northeast and the Shandong Peninsula to the south. Bo Hai consists of three bays: Laizhou Bay to the south, Liaodong Bay to the north, and Bohai Wan to the west. The rivers Huang He, Liao He, Hai He and Luan River empty into Bo Hai. Bo Hai borders the Chinese provinces of Shandong, Liaoning, and Hebei, and Tianjin municipality. Port cities on Bo Hai coast include: Islands include: A Xinhua News Agency report in February, 2007, states: “Effluent has turned the sea a dark red and given it an acrid stench at Guanxi’s Silver Beach, a national tourist attraction. Local staff say it is not the first time this has happened – sometimes it occurs every few days. They blame the run-off from nearby shellfish processing plants.” In April 2004, an official of the
    8.50
    2 votes
    90
    Chesapeake Bay

    Chesapeake Bay

    • Category: Bay
    The Chesapeake Bay ( /ˈtʃɛsəpiːk/ CHESS-ə-peek) is the largest estuary in the United States. It lies off the Atlantic Ocean, surrounded by Maryland and Virginia. The Chesapeake Bay's drainage basin covers 64,299 square miles (166,534 km) in the District of Columbia and parts of six states: New York, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and West Virginia. More than 150 rivers and streams drain into the bay. The Chesapeake Bay is approximately 200 miles (300 km) long, from the Susquehanna River in the north to the Atlantic Ocean in the south. At its narrowest point between Kent County's Plum Point (near Newtown) and the Harford County shore near Romney Creek, the bay is 2.8 miles (4.5 km) wide; at its widest point, just south of the mouth of the Potomac River, it is 30 miles (50 km) wide. Total shoreline for the bay and its tributaries is 11,684 miles (18,804 km), and the surface area of the bay and its major tributaries is 4,479 square miles (11,601 km). Average depth of the bay is 46 feet (14 m) and the maximum depth is 208 feet (63 m). The bay is spanned in two places. The Chesapeake Bay Bridge crosses the bay in Maryland from Sandy Point (near Annapolis) to Kent Island;
    8.50
    2 votes
    91
    Ha Long Bay

    Ha Long Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Ha Long Bay (Vietnamese: Vịnh Hạ Long,  listen, literally: "descending dragon bay") is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and a popular travel destination, located in Quang Ninh province, Vietnam. Administratively, the bay belongs to Hạ Long City, Cẩm Phả town, and part of Van Don district. The bay features thousands of limestone karsts and isles in various sizes and shapes. Ha Long Bay is a center of a larger zone which includes Bái Tử Long bay to the northeast, and Cát Bà islands to the southwest. These larger zones share similar geological, geographical, geomorphological, climate, and cultural characters. Ha Long Bay has an area of around 1,553 km, including 1,960–2,000 islets, most of which are limestone. The core of the bay has an area of 334 km with a high density of 775 islets. The limestone in this bay has gone through 500 million years of formation in different conditions and environments. The evolution of the karst in this bay has taken 20 million years under the impact of the tropical wet climate. The geo-diversity of the environment in the area has created biodiversity, including a tropical evergreen biosystem, oceanic and sea shore biosystem. Ha Long Bay is home to 14
    8.50
    2 votes
    92
    Yakutat Bay

    Yakutat Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Yakutat Bay is a 29-km-wide (18 mi) bay in the U.S. state of Alaska, extending southwest from Disenchantment Bay to the Gulf of Alaska. "Yakutat" is a Tlingit name reported as "Jacootat" and "Yacootat" by Yuri Lisianski in 1805. Yakutat Bay was the epicenter of two major earthquakes on September 10, 1899, a magnitude 7.4 foreshock and a magnitude 8.0 main shock, 37 minutes apart. The Shelikhov-Golikov company, precursor of the Russian-American Company, built a fort on Yakutat Bay in 1795. It was known as New Russia, Yakutat Colony, or Slavorossiya. Yakutat Bay has had various names.
    8.50
    2 votes
    93
    Disenchantment Bay

    Disenchantment Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Disenchantment Bay extends southwest for 16 km (10 mi) from the mouth of Russell Fiord to Point Latouche, at the head of Yakutat Bay in Alaska. Named "Puerto del Desengano", Spanish for "bay of disenchantment", by Alessandro Malaspina in 1792, upon finding that the bay was not the entrance to the legendary Northwest Passage. He sailed up the bay as far as Haenke Island, before discovering the passage blocked by ice. During the earthquake of September 10, 1899, parts of Disappointment bay were raised 47 feet 4 inches (14 metres). This is the greatest recorded vertical displacement by an earthquake.
    7.33
    3 votes
    94
    Gulf of Antalya

    Gulf of Antalya

    • Category: Bay
    The Gulf of Antalya (Turkish: Antalya Körfezi) is a large bay of the northern Levantine Sea, in the eastern Mediterranean Sea south of Antalya province, Turkey. It includes some of the main seaside resorts of Turkey, also known as the "Turkish riviera".
    7.33
    3 votes
    95
    Nashua River Watershed

    Nashua River Watershed

    The Nashua River Watershed is a major Massachusetts watershed. From its impoundment at the Wachusett Reservoir in Clinton, Massachusetts, the South Branch of the Nashua River flows north and joins the North Branch of the Nashua River in Lancaster, Massachusetts. The North Branch of the Nashua River flows southeast from Fitchburg and Leominster, Massachusetts to Lancaster. The Nashua river flows northward from Lancaster, meandering its way through the north-central Massachusetts towns of Harvard, Groton, Dunstable, and Pepperell, before eventually emptying into the Merrimack River at Nashua, New Hampshire. The Nashua River Watershed has a total drainage area of approximately 538 square miles (1393 km²), with 454 square miles (1176 km²) of the watershed occurring in Massachusetts and 74 square miles (192 km²) in New Hampshire. The Nashua River flows for approximately 56 miles (90 km), with approximately 46 of those miles (74 km) flowing through Massachusetts. The Squannacook, Nissitissit, Stillwater, Quinapoxet, North Nashua, and South Nashua Rivers feed it. The watershed encompasses all or part of thirty-one communities, seven in southern New Hampshire and twenty-four in central
    7.33
    3 votes
    96
    Nereo Cave

    Nereo Cave

    • Category: Sea cave
    The Nereo Cave is a huge underwater sea-cave situated on the north-west of Sardinia in the Coral riviera of Alghero, Italy. The name was given by the discovers in honour of the mythological figure Nereus, who is often billed as the Old Man of the Sea, father of the Nereids. The site is under the high limestone cliffs of Capo Caccia, 100 metres north of the famous Neptune's Grotto. The cave is considered the biggest marine cave in the Mediterranean Sea. With the many entrances, arches and tunnels, it is possible to make dives from 0 to 35 m, through long and large tunnels, air chambers and different ways. The walls are covered with red coral and yellow leptosamnia. With the other cape of Punta Giglio and the Porto Conte Bay, the cave is part of a Marine reserve set up in 2003. Its flora and fauna are typically Mediterranean including groupers, lobsters, congers and moray eels, and thriving crustacean life.
    7.33
    3 votes
    97
    Poverty Bay

    Poverty Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Poverty Bay is the largest of several small bays on the east coast of New Zealand's North Island to the north of Hawkes Bay. It stretches for 10 kilometres from Young Nick's Head in the southwest to Tuaheni Point in the northeast. The city of Gisborne is located on the northern shore of the bay. The name is often used by extension to refer to the entire area surrounding the city of Gisborne. The first European known to have set foot in New Zealand, Captain James Cook, did so here on 7 October 1769 (at which time it was known as Teoneroa). This first meeting led to the deaths of 6 local Maori during skirmishes with the crew. Although he was able to obtain some herbs to ward off scurvy, Cook was unable to gain many of the provisions he and his crew needed at the bay, and for this reason gave it the name Poverty Bay. Poverty Bay is one of the more fertile areas of New Zealand and famous for its Chardonnay, fruit, vegetables and avocados, with abundant sunshine and fertile alluvial soil. The bay is fed by the Waipaoa River, whose catchment is 2205 km² - large enough for individual storms and events to have a small impact on the sedimentary outflow. The river's alluvial buffering is
    7.33
    3 votes
    98
    Deep Bay, Hong Kong

    Deep Bay, Hong Kong

    • Category: Bay
    Deep Bay is a bay off the northwest coast of Lau Fau Shan, Hong Kong. It is surrounded to the north by Shenzhen proper and west by the peninsula of Nantau, China. It is also known as Hau Hoi Wan (Chinese: 后海灣) in Hong Kong, and Shenzhen Bay (Chinese: 深圳湾) in China. The local Cantonese name of the bay is Hau Hoi Wan (後海灣), which mean the back (sea) bay. It is opposite to another bay, Tsin Hoi Wan (前海灣), which means front (sea) bay, on the other side of Nantau Peninsula. The Chinese character 后 (Hau, lit. queen) in 后海灣 is the homonym of 後 (Hau, lit. back), and also its simplified character. Some attribute the character 后 (Hau) to the goddess of mercy and sea, Tin Hau (天后). The name of Shenzhen Bay came much later, at least after the establishment of Shenzhen Special Economic Zone in 1980. The name is becoming more and more notable after a hotel was named Shenzhen Bay. While the government of Shenzhen uses the name widely, the people and government in Hong Kong continue use the local name (后海灣). As the bay is largely enclosed by lands, fresh water from the surroundings are injected to the bay, formed by a large sheer with a shallow shore of wetlands. The margin of fresh water and salt
    6.25
    4 votes
    99
    Moreton Bay

    Moreton Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Moreton Bay is a bay on the eastern coast of Australia 45 km from Brisbane, Queensland. It is one of Queensland's most important coastal resources. The waters of Moreton Bay are a popular destination for recreational anglers and are used by commercial operators who provide seafood to market. The Port of Brisbane coordinates large traffic along the shipping channel which crosses the northern section of the bay. The bay serves as a safe approach to the airport and reduces noise pollution over the city to the west of the runway. A number of barge, ferry and water-taxi services also travel over the bay. Moreton Bay was the site of conflict between indigenous Australians and early European settlers. It contains environmentally significant habitats and large areas of sandbanks. The bay is the only place in Australia where dugong gather into herds. Many parts of the mainland foreshore and southern islands are settled. Moreton Bay is described as lagoonal because of the existence of a series of off-shore barrier islands that restrict the flow of oceanic water. The tidal range is moderate at 1.5–2 m in range. Moreton Bay has an average depth of 6.8 m. This shallow depth lets light filter
    6.25
    4 votes
    100
    Cam Ranh Bay

    Cam Ranh Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Cam Ranh Bay (Vietnamese: Vịnh Cam Ranh) is a deep-water bay in Vietnam in the province of Khánh Hòa. It is located at an inlet of the South China Sea situated on the southeastern coast of Vietnam, between Phan Rang and Nha Trang, approximately 290 kilometers (180 miles) northeast of Hồ Chí Minh City (former Saigon). Cam Ranh is considered the finest deepwater shelter in Southeast Asia. The continental shelf of Southeast Asia is relatively narrow at Cam Ranh Bay, bringing deep water close to land. Cam Rahn Bay is now the site of a Russian naval base which is falling into disuse. Historically, the bay has been significant from a military standpoint. The French used it as a naval base for their forces in Indochina. It was also used as a staging area for the Imperial Russian fleet under Admiral Zinovy Rozhestvensky prior to the Battle of Tsushima in 1905, and by the Japanese Imperial Navy in preparation for the invasion of Malaysia in 1942. In 1944 U.S. Naval Task Force 38 destroyed most Japanese facilities and it was abandoned. In 1964 U.S. Navy seventh fleet reconnaissance aircraft, the seaplane tender Currituck (AV-7), and Mine Flotilla 1 units carried out hydrographic and beach
    7.00
    3 votes
    101
    Khalmyer Bay

    Khalmyer Bay

    • Category: Bay
    The Khalmyer Bay is a bay on the Siberian coast in the Kara Sea. It is located in the Gydan Peninsula and it is roughly 185 km long and 47 km wide at its widest point. Lat 71°30′ N, long 76° E. This deep bay lies between the estuaries of the Ob (Gulf of Ob) and the Yenisei River, which are two of the most important rivers of Russia and the world. The peninsula formed between this bay and neighboring Yuratski Bay is known as the Mamonta Peninsula (Poluostrov Mamonta). The Khalmyer Bay is surrounded by tundra coast and there are numerous river mouths on its shores. Deep within the bay lie the settlements of Chernyy Mys and Gyda. At its mouth lie the settlements of Matyuysale and Mongatalyang. This Bay is located in the Yamal-Nenets autonomous district administrative region of the Russian Federation. The Khalmyer Bay appears also as Gydanskaya Guba in some maps in English.
    7.00
    3 votes
    102
    Lligwy Bay

    Lligwy Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Lligwy Bay (Welsh: Traeth Lligwy) is a bay of the Welsh island of Anglesey. It is on the eastward side of the island to the north of the village of Moelfre. It was the site, in October 1859, of the loss of the steam clipper Royal Charter with a loss of life in excess of 450. The bay is very popular with windsurfers and other windpowered watersport enthusiasts. There is a pay and display carpark at the end of a road leading right down to the beach.
    7.00
    3 votes
    103
    South Taranaki Bight

    South Taranaki Bight

    • Category: Bay
    The South Taranaki Bight is the name given to the large bay which extends south and east from the south coast of Taranaki in New Zealand's North Island. With more symmetry than poetry or originality, it is matched by the North Taranaki Bight to the north of Cape Egmont. The size of the bight depends to a large extent on the source referring to it. Strict definitions refer to it stretching from the mouth of the Kaupokonui Stream south of Mount Taranaki to the mouth of the Patea River. More loose descriptions of the bight, however, consider the entire lower North Island west coast as far as Waikanae on the Kapiti Coast, as being part of the bight.
    7.00
    3 votes
    104
    Hanöbukten

    Hanöbukten

    • Category: Bay
    Hanöbukten, the Bight of Hanö is a sandy bay, stretching from Listerlandet in the north to Stenshuvud in the south, on the east coast of Skåne, South Sweden.
    6.00
    4 votes
    105
    Hope Bay

    Hope Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Hope Bay (Spanish: Bahía Esperanza) on Trinity Peninsula, is 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) long and 3 kilometres (1.9 mi) wide, indenting the tip of Antarctic Peninsula and opening on Antarctic Sound. The Bay was discovered on January 15, 1902 by the Swedish Antarctic Expedition under Otto Nordenskiöld, who named it in commemoration of the winter spent there by J. Gunnar Andersson, S.A. Duse, Toralf Grunden, and José María Sobral of his expedition after his ship (the Antarctic) was crushed by the ice and lost. They were eventually rescued by Argentine corvette Uruguay. The ruins of a stone hut built by members of the expedition can still be seen. The old British Base "D" was established here in 1945. It partially burned in 1948 and was closed in 1964. On December 8, 1997 the British Antarctic Survey transferred the base to Uruguay, who renamed it Teniente Ruperto Elichiribehety Uruguayan Antarctic Scientific Station (ECARE). The present Argentine Esperanza Base was established in 1952. It is operated by the Instituto Antartico Argentino and has an average of 55 inhabitants in winter. The base installations have displaced part of a penguin rookery. The first known birth of any human being
    6.00
    4 votes
    106
    Bay of Baku

    Bay of Baku

    • Category: Bay
    Bay of Baku (Baku Bay) is a natural harbour of the Baku port and local yacht club, on the southern shore of the Absheron Peninsula in Azerbaijan. It has an area of 50 km² and a coastline of 20 km. The bay is bordered by Sultan Cape in the east, Shikh Cape on the south-west and the islands of Qum, Dash Zira and Boyuk Zira in the south and south-east. These islands are part of the Baku Archipelago which lies mostly within the bay. There lies Baku Boulevard on the seashore. During severe storms with high winds, the height of the waves in the bay can reach 1,5 m. From the I century AD till the VII century, Baku bay was dry and the islands in the bay joined the land. In Ptolemy’s map Baku was described far from the sea. After the VII century began the rising of water level of the Caspian Sea till the IX century and since then formation of Baku bay began. Severe changes were happened at the end of the XIII century, when the Caspian Sea raised up to more than ten meters. Mario Sanuto, Italian geographer of the XIV century sadly noted that: “Water level of the Caspian Sea rises each year and most cities have flooded.”, and according to words of Abd ar-Rashid al-Bakuvi, the geographer, in
    8.00
    2 votes
    107
    Bittangabee Bay

    Bittangabee Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Bittangabee Bay is a tiny picturesque bay on the rugged and remote stretch of coastline south of Eden, New South Wales in New South Wales (Australia). The bay is located in Ben Boyd National Park, with a small camping ground and facilities maintained by National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS), Merimbula office. It can be reached by an unsealed road from the Princes Highway. The bay is the only safe haven between Twofold Bay, Eden, New South Wales and Mallacoota Inlet and passing yachts are seen anchored for the night there most evenings. It is fed by Bittangabee Creek. Bittangabee Bay has a known history for the indigenous people of the region, and significant early European settlement. . Bittangabee Bay was known as 'Pertangerbee' by the original occupants of the area, the Thaua/Thawa/Thauaira people of the Yuin (Murring) nation, who have lived here for over 6,000 years. It was an important camp place and teaching ground, possibly a men's area, as Bundooro, one of the aboriginal names for Green Cape, was a teaching area for young men, and believed to be a men's area. Naa-chi (now Nadgee Nature Reserve), on the other side of Green Cape to Bittangabee Bay, is the resting-place of
    8.00
    2 votes
    108
    Botany Bay

    Botany Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Botany Bay is a bay in Sydney, New South Wales, a few kilometres south of the Sydney central business district. The Cooks River and the Georges River are the two major tributaries that flow into the bay. Two runways of Sydney Airport extend into the bay. On 29 April 1770, Botany Bay was the site of James Cook's first landing of HMS Endeavour on the continent of Australia, after his extensive navigation of New Zealand. Later the British planned Botany Bay as the site for a penal colony. Out of these plans came the first European habitation of Australia at Sydney Cove. Archaeological evidence from the shores of Botany Bay has yielded evidence of Aboriginal settlement dating back 5,000 years. The Aboriginal people of Sydney were known as the Eora with sub-groups derived from the languages they spoke. The people living between the Cooks River and the Georges River were the Bidgigal. On the southern shores of the bay were the Gweagal. On the northern shore it was the Kameygal. Captain James Cook first landed on saturday 28 April 1770, when navigating his way around Australia on his ship, the Endeavour. James Cook's landing marked the beginning of Britain's interest in Australia and in
    8.00
    2 votes
    109
    Bridgwater Bay

    Bridgwater Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Bridgwater Bay is on the Bristol Channel, 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) north of Bridgwater in Somerset, England at the mouth of the River Parrett and the end of the River Parrett Trail. It consists of large areas of mud flats, saltmarsh, sandflats and shingle ridges, some of which are vegetated. It has been designated as a Site of Special Scientific Interest since 1989, and is designated as a wetland of international importance under the Ramsar Convention. The risks to wildlife are highlighted in the local Oil Spill Contingency Plan. In addition to the rivers, Parrett, Brue and Washford several of the man-made drainage ditches, including the River Huntspill, from the Somerset Levels, including the "Pawlett Hams", also drain into the bay. The Bay occupies the sweeping arc of coastline between the wave-cut platform of Jurassic Blue Lias at the northern tip of the Quantock Hills and the cliffs of Carboniferous Dolomites and Limestone at Brean Down which project into the Severn Estuary and provide some degree of protection from the erosive tidal currents. Strong prevailing westerly winds have thrown up sand dunes at Berrow and a shingle ridge and Steart. On the beach near Stogursey are the
    8.00
    2 votes
    110
    Galveston Bay

    Galveston Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Galveston Bay is a large estuary located along the upper coast of Texas in the United States. It is connected to the Gulf of Mexico and is surrounded by sub-tropic marshes and prairies on the mainland. The water in the Bay is a complex mixture of sea water and fresh water which supports a wide variety of marine life. The bay has been historically important during Texas' history. The island of Galveston was home to eastern and coastal Texas' earliest major settlement and, during the later 19th century, it was Texas' largest city. The island's port, on the bay side, became one of the top ports in the U.S. During the 20th century as the oil boom in Texas took hold the bay became even more important as a shipping center as Houston and Texas City developed into major port and industrial centers. Today the bay is within the Houston–Sugar Land–Baytown metropolitan area, which is the fifth-largest metropolitan area in the U.S. and is home to major ports including the second-busiest port in the nation. It produces more seafood than any bay in the nation except the Chesapeake. The Gulf Coast gained its present configuration during the last ice age. Approximately 30,000 years ago sea levels
    8.00
    2 votes
    111
    Georgian Bay

    Georgian Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Georgian Bay (French: baie Georgienne) (Ojibway: Manidoowi-zaaga`igan or Waasaagamaa) is a large bay of Lake Huron, located entirely within Ontario, Canada. The main body of the bay lies east of the Bruce Peninsula and Manitoulin Island. Georgian Bay is surrounded by (listed clockwise) the districts of Manitoulin, Sudbury, Parry Sound and Muskoka, as well as the more populous counties of Simcoe, Grey and Bruce. The Main Channel separates the Bruce Peninsula from Manitoulin Island and connects Georgian Bay to the rest of Lake Huron. The North Channel, located between Manitoulin Island and the Sudbury District, west of Killarney, was once a popular route for steamships and is now used by a variety of pleasure craft to travel to and from Georgian Bay. The shores and waterways of the Georgian Bay are the traditional domain of the Anishinaabeg First Nations peoples to the North and Huron-Petun (Wyandot) to the south. The bay was thus a major Algonquian-Huron trade route. Samuel de Champlain, the first European to explore and map the area in 1615–1616, called it "La Mer douce" (the calm sea), also a reference to the bay's freshwater. It was named "Georgian Bay" (after King George IV) by
    8.00
    2 votes
    112
    Laguna Madre

    Laguna Madre

    • Category: Bay
    The Laguna Madre extends well into Mexico, to the mouth of the Río Soto la Marina in the state of Tamaulipas. It is separated from the Gulf of Mexico on the east by a number of barrier islands, including Barra Los Americanos, Barra Jesús María, and Barra Soto la Marina, and is bounded on the west by mainland Tamaulipas. It is located in the municipalities of Matamoros, San Fernando, and Soto la Marina. The Laguna Madre is very shallow, with an average depth of only 0.9 m. The lagoon is connected to the ocean by only two narrow inlets, so the tidal range – which is already minor in this part of the Gulf of Mexico – is negligible. Atmospheric effects are much more important than tides in its circulation; its weak currents generally follow the prevailing winds, and these winds can influence the water level by as much as a meter. Oceanographically, the Laguna Madre is considered a hypersaline lagoon; this indicates that it is usually much saltier than the ocean, due to being nearly landlocked in a semiarid environment This is because its salinity can vary wildly depending on rainfall and freshwater inflow, from as high as 120 ppt (12%) – over three times saltier than the ocean – to as
    8.00
    2 votes
    113
    Lyme Bay

    Lyme Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Lyme Bay is an area of the English Channel situated in the southwest of England between Start Bay in the west and Portland in the east. The counties of Devon and Dorset front onto the bay. The area around Lyme Bay is part of a World Heritage Site, the Jurassic Coast, named for its Jurassic geology. The Jurassic Coast stretches over a distance of 153 kilometres (95 mi), from Orcombe Point near Exmouth, in the west, to Old Harry Rocks in the east. The coastal exposures along the coastline provide a continuous sequence of Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous rock formations spanning approximately 185 million years of the Earths history. The localities along the Jurassic Coast includes a large range of important fossil zones. Many of the earliest discoveries of dinosaur and other prehistoric reptile remains were in the area surrounding Lyme Regis and Charmouth. Notable among these were the discoveries made by self-educated palaeontologist and fossil collector Mary Anning, in the 1820s. The weather in the bay is temperate by English standards, and far more temperate than many other places at a similar latitude. The reason for this is the warming action of the Gulf Stream. The area along
    8.00
    2 votes
    114
    San Francisco Bay

    San Francisco Bay

    • Category: Bay
    San Francisco Bay is a shallow, productive estuary through which water draining from approximately forty percent of California, flowing in the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers from the Sierra Nevada mountains, enters the Pacific Ocean. Specifically, both rivers flow into Suisun Bay, which flows through the Carquinez Strait to meet with the Napa River at the entrance to San Pablo Bay, which connects at its south end to San Francisco Bay. However, the entire group of interconnected bays is often referred to as “San Francisco Bay”. San Francisco Bay is located in the U.S. state of California, surrounded by a contiguous region known as the San Francisco Bay Area (often simply "the Bay Area"), dominated by the large cities San Francisco, Oakland, and San Jose. The waterway entrance to San Francisco Bay from the Pacific Ocean is called the Golden Gate. Across the strait spans the Golden Gate Bridge. The Bay covers somewhere between 400 and 1,600 square miles (1,040 to 4,160 square kilometers), depending on which sub-bays (such as San Pablo Bay), estuaries, wetlands, and so on are included in the measurement. The main part of the Bay measures 3 to 12 miles (5 to 20 km) wide east-to-west
    8.00
    2 votes
    115
    Thomas Bay

    Thomas Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Thomas Bay is located in southeast Alaska. It lies northeast of Petersburg, Alaska and the Baird Glacier drains into the bay. Thomas Bay is also known as "The Bay of Death" due to a massive landslide in 1750. It also has gained the name of "Devil's Country" when in 1900 several people claimed to have seen devil creatures in the area. The bay is named for U.S. Navy officer Charles M. Thomas. Thomas Bay is known for being rich in gold and quartz. The wildlife has moose, brown bears, black bears, squirrels, wolves, rabbits, and other common Alaskan creatures. The land has been used for logging. In 1750, a native (Tlingit) village on Thomas Bay was completely buried by a large landslide. Over 500 native people died in the natural disaster. From that day on the bay was dubbed "The Bay of Death" or "Geey Nana" in Tlingit. In 1900, the first documented account of the legendary devil creatures was written by Harry D. Colp. Harry Colp and three of his prospecting friends who are simply known as Charlie, John, and Fred, were staying in Wrangell, Alaska. As the story goes, Charlie received word from a native local of an area to mine for gold. He told me to go up to Thomas Bay* and camp on
    8.00
    2 votes
    116
    Burlington Bay

    Burlington Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Burlington Bay, known more commonly as Hamilton Harbour, lies on the western tip of Lake Ontario, bounded on the northwest by the City of Burlington, on the south by the City of Hamilton, and on the east by Hamilton Beach (south of the Burlington Bay James N. Allan Skyway) and Burlington Beach (north of the channel). It is joined to Cootes Paradise by a narrow channel formerly excavated for the Desjardins Canal. Within Hamilton itself, it is referred to as Hamilton Harbour, the Harbour and the Bay, but never Burlington Bay. The bay is naturally separated from Lake Ontario by a sand bar. The opening in the north end was filled in and channel cut in the middle for ships to pass. The bay was named in 1792 by John Graves Simcoe, the first lieutenant governor of Upper Canada, for the former name of the town of Bridlington in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. Access to the bay was important for the early water transportation and industrial development of the area, including Dundas, Ontario, which had an early but ultimately unrealized lead over both Burlington (Brant's Block) and Hamilton. Over the years, the bay was roughly treated by its littoral residents. Constant infilling,
    9.00
    1 votes
    117
    Commencement Bay

    Commencement Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Commencement Bay is a bay of Puget Sound in the U.S. state of Washington. The city of Tacoma is located on the bay, with the Port of Tacoma occupying the southeastern end. A line drawn from Point Defiance in the southwest to Browns Point in the northeast serves to mark the generally accepted division between the bay and the open sound. Commencement Bay has become home to one of the most active commercial ports in the world. The Port of Tacoma is the main port facility. The Puyallup River is the largest freshwater stream emptying into the bay. Others include Ruston Creek, Mason Creek, Asarco Creek, Puget Creek, Hylebos Creek, and Wapato Creek. Lieutenant Charles Wilkes of the United States Exploring Expedition named Commencement Bay in 1841, commemorating the place where he started his survey of southern Puget Sound. The first Euro-American habitation on Commencement Bay was by Swede Nicolas Delin (b. ca. 1817). He built a water-powered sawmill in 1852 where a creek entered the head of the bay. A small community grew up around the operation, but the settlers evacuated during the Puget Sound War of 1855–56 and did not return. In 1873 the Northern Pacific Railway, the first
    9.00
    1 votes
    118
    King George Sound

    King George Sound

    • Category: Bay
    King George Sound is the name of a sound on the south coast of Western Australia. Located at 35°02′S 117°56′E / 35.033°S 117.933°E / -35.033; 117.933, it is the site of the city of Albany. The sound covers an area of 110 square kilometres (42 sq mi) and varies in depth from 10 m (33 ft) to 35 m (115 ft). The sound is bordered by the mainland to the north, by Vancouver Peninsula on the west, and by Bald Head and Flinders Peninsula to the south. Although the sound is open water to the east, the waters are partially protected by Breaksea Island and Michaelmas Island. There are two harbours located within the sound, Princess Royal Harbour and Oyster Harbour. Each receive excellent protection from winds and heavy seas. Princess Royal Harbour was Western Australia's only deep-water port for around 70 years until Fremantle Harbour, south of Perth was opened. The first reported sighting of King George Sound by a European was in 1791 by the English explorer George Vancouver, Vancouver named it after the reigning monarch, King George III. The next Europeans to visit the Sound were whalers Capt. Dennis of The Kingston, and Captain Dickson aboard The Elligood who caught three whales in
    9.00
    1 votes
    119
    Mindelo Bay

    Mindelo Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Mindelo Bay is a bay located northwest of the island of São Vicente. The ferry route linking with the port of Porto Novo on Santo Antão and Mindelo on São Vicente crosses the canal with the boat named Mar d' Canal as well as shipping lines with Mindelo and other places around the world including from several African and Latin American ports and North American and European ports. Its length is approximately 6 km and its width is only 4 km, the area is approximately 20 km² and is connected with the Canal de São Vicente and the rest of the Atlantic Ocean. The bay's length goes from the northwesternmost to another cape north of Mindelo and from south Mindelo up to the islet Ilhéu dos Pássaros. The lining is circular from north Mindelo to Lazareto in the south and jagged up to the points, another point which features a mountain is northwest of the downtown area and it features a beach north of the cape and another port. The bay includes the grassy islet named Ilhéu dos Pássaros, an island with about 100 to 150 m in length and around 40 m in height and is to the north of the bay. Mindelo's port is in the southeast and extends into the bay. The port was expanded in the mid-1990s. Its
    9.00
    1 votes
    120
    Plymouth Sound

    Plymouth Sound

    • Category: Bay
    Plymouth Sound, or locally just The Sound, is a bay at Plymouth in England. Its southwest and southeast corners are Penlee Point in Cornwall and Wembury Point on Devon, a distance of about 3 nautical miles (6 km). Its northern limit is Plymouth Hoe giving a north-south distance of nearly 3 nautical miles (6 km). The Sound has three water entrances. The marine entrance is from the English Channel to the south, with a deep-water channel to the west of the Plymouth Breakwater. There are two freshwater inlets: one, from the northwest, is from the River Tamar via the Hamoaze and Devonport Dockyard, the largest naval dockyard in western Europe. The other, at northeast, is from the River Plym disgorging into its narrow estuary, Cattewater harbour between Mount Batten and the Royal Citadel. In addition to ships of the Royal Navy, large commercial vessels, including ferries to France and Spain use the Sound from Millbay Docks. Fishing vessels use it from Sutton Harbour beside the old town of Plymouth, called the Barbican. There are marinas at Sutton Harbour, Mount Wise in the Hamoaze and at Turnchapel. In the centre of the Sound, midway between Bovisand Bay and Cawsand Bay, is Plymouth
    9.00
    1 votes
    121
    Sulzberger Bay

    Sulzberger Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Sulzberger Bay (77°0′S 152°0′W / 77°S 152°W / -77; -152) is a bay between Fisher Island and Vollmer Island, along the coast of King Edward VII Land. Discovered by the Byrd Antarctic Expedition on December 5, 1929, and named by Byrd for Arthur H. Sulzberger, publisher of the New York Times, a supporter of the Byrd expeditions in 1928–1930 and 1933–1935. The Sulzberger Bay indents the front of the Sulzberger Ice Shelf (77°0′S 148°0′W / 77°S 148°W / -77; -148), an ice shelf about 137 km (85 mi) long and 80 km (50 mi) wide bordering the coast of Marie Byrd Land between Edward VII Peninsula and Guest Peninsula. The ice shelf was observed and roughly mapped by the Byrd Antarctic Expedition (1928–1930). Sulzberger Basin (77°0′S 152°30′W / 77°S 152.5°W / -77; -152.5) is an undersea basin on the central Ross shelf named in association with the Sulzberger Bay. The ice shelf released icebergs some days after March 12, 2011, within a day of the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami. Scientists have linked the ice calving to the tsunami reaching the ice shelf, some 13,600 kilometers (8,500 mi) away from the earthquake epicenter. The main iceberg was approximately the area of Manhattan
    9.00
    1 votes
    122
    Ungava Bay

    Ungava Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Ungava Bay (French: baie d'Ungava, Inuktitut (syllabics/Roman) ᐅᖓᕙ ᑲᖏᖅᓗᒃ/ungava kangiqluk) is a large bay in northeastern Canada separating Nunavik (far northern Quebec) from Baffin Island. The bay is roughly oval-shaped, about 260 km (160 mi) at its widest point and about 320 km (200 mi) in length; it has an area of approximately 50,000 km (19,000 sq mi). It is generally fairly shallow, under 150 m (490 ft), though at its border with the Atlantic Ocean depths of almost 300 m (980 ft) are reached. There are a number of islands within Ungava Bay. The largest, Akpatok Island, and others north of 60°N are part of the territory of Nunavut, while smaller islands south of 60°N belong to Quebec. Although it is quite close to the open Atlantic (separated only by Hudson Strait), Ungava Bay is generally considered part of the Arctic Ocean because the land surrounding it has an exceedingly cold climate. Due to the influence of the Labrador Current, summers are too cold for tree growth and all the land surrounding the bay is treeless tundra. Typically, temperatures in summer at Kuujjuaq about twenty kilometres up the Koksoak River are about 7 °C (45 °F), while winter temperatures are about −20
    9.00
    1 votes
    123
    Gwadar Bay

    Gwadar Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Gwadar Bay is located in the Gulf of Oman on the maritime border of Pakistan and Iran. The name is from Persian, Khalij-e Gavader or 'Gulf of Gwadar' on Arabian Sea. It is an inlet of the Arabian Sea indenting the sandy Makran coast at the Iran–Pakistan border. It is about 20 miles (32 km) long and 10 miles (16 km) wide. The Dashtiari River flows into it from the northwest, and the Dasht River from the northeast. The town of Gwadar, which has no sewerage system nor protection from the Bay, lies on the Arabian Sea coast about 30 miles (48 km) to the east of Gwadar Bay.
    6.67
    3 votes
    124
    Princess Charlotte Bay

    Princess Charlotte Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Princess Charlotte Bay is a large bay on the east coast of Far North Queensland at the base of Cape York Peninsula, 350 km north northwest of Cairns. Princess Charlotte Bay is a part of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park and it is a habitat for the dugong. Reefs in the bay are described as pristine. Barramundi habitat and associated wetlands exist in declared green zones which restrict commercial fishing. The bay is in the traditional lands of the Bakanambia and Jeteneru people. Early coastal explorers, James Cook and Matthew Flinders both failed to identify the bay. The bay was named after Princess Charlotte of Wales by Lieutenant Charles Jeffreys of the British Royal Navy in 1815. Princess Charlotte Bay and surrounds were devastated by the Mahina Cyclone of 1899 which destroyed all 100 ships moored there at the time. Other estimates suggest a lower figure of 82 boats destroyed. On the 4 March 1899, the entire North Queensland pearling fleet was in the bay where they regularly collected supplies and unloaded shells. Around 100 Aboriginals who were assisting survivors ashore and 307 men from the pearling fleet were drowned in Queensland's worst maritime disaster. The most easterly
    6.67
    3 votes
    125
    Sagami Bay

    Sagami Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Sagami Bay (相模湾, Sagami-wan, also known as the Sagami Gulf or Sagami Sea) lies south of Kanagawa Prefecture in Honshu, central Japan, contained within the scope of the Miura Peninsula, in Kanagawa, to the east, the Izu Peninsula, in Shizuoka Prefecture, to the west, and the Shōnan coastline to the north, while the island of Izu Ōshima marks the southern extent of the bay. It lies approximately 40 kilometres (25 mi) southwest of the capital, Tokyo. Cities on the bay include Odawara, Chigasaki, Fujisawa, Hiratsuka, Ito, and Kamakura. The epicenter of the Great Kantō earthquake in 1923 was deep beneath Izu Ōshima Island in Sagami Bay. It devastated Tokyo, the port city of Yokohama, surrounding prefectures of Chiba, Kanagawa, and Shizuoka, and caused widespread damage throughout the Kantō region. The shallow nature of the seabed on the north of the bay, and the funnelling effect of tsunami and typhoon wave energy, has contributed to certain parts of the Shonan coast having suffered considerable damage, including the destruction of the Kōtoku-in temple housing the Great Buddha, or Daibutsu during the massive tsunami of 1498. A branch of the warm Kuroshio Current warms the bay, allowing
    6.67
    3 votes
    126
    Miramichi Bay

    Miramichi Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Miramichi Bay is an estuary located on the west coast of the Gulf of St. Lawrence in New Brunswick, at the mouth of the Miramichi River. Miramichi Bay is separated into the "inner bay" and the "outer bay", with the division being a line of uninhabited barrier islands which are continually reshaped by ocean storms. The largest of these islands is the uninhabited Portage Island, which was broken in two during a violent storm in the 1950s. The islands provide some protection to the inner bay from ocean storms in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The Inner Miramichi Bay, and the lower portions of its tributary rivers (including the Miramichi River), are parts of a drowned river valley system. Since deglaciation, sea level rise in Miramichi Bay has flooded the mouths of these rivers with saltwater. The flooded, meandering, ancient Miramichi river channel forms a navigable route through the Inner Bay for ocean-going ships entering the port at Miramichi (formerly the ports of Chatham, New Brunswick and Newcastle, New Brunswick). The inner bay measures only 4 m deep on average, with the navigation channel measuring only 6–10 m. Since dredging maintenance of this channel has stopped, the port is
    5.75
    4 votes
    127
    St. Margarets Bay, Nova Scotia

    St. Margarets Bay, Nova Scotia

    • Category: Bay
    St. Margarets Bay is a Canadian bay located on the Atlantic coast of Nova Scotia on the border of the Halifax Regional Municipality and Lunenburg County . Opening south directly onto the Atlantic, its eastern shore is formed by the Chebucto Peninsula and its western shore by the Aspotogan Peninsula, while the head of the bay (the northern shore) is the main part of the Nova Scotia peninsula. The bay's shores are mostly rocky, although the head of the bay offers several sandy beaches at Queensland, Black Point and Cleveland; another sandy beach exists on the western shore of the bay at Bayswater; and there is a small sandy beach on eastern shore on Micou's Island. St. Margarets Bay is a cruising destination for sailing yachts and its picturesque shorelines offer protection in many natural harbours, as well as anchorages in coves and near small islands. Along the Chebucto Peninsula (from south to north): Along the head of the bay (from east to west): Along the Aspotogan Peninsula (from north to south): St. Margarets Bay contains numerous islands, particularly along its eastern shore. These islands were historically used by the Mi'kmaq Nation and some contain burial sites. The bay's
    5.75
    4 votes
    128
    Terra Nova Bay

    Terra Nova Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Terra Nova Bay is a bay which is often ice free, about 64 km (40 mi) long, lying between Cape Washington and the Drygalski Ice Tongue along the coast of Victoria Land, Antarctica. Discovered by the British National Antarctic Expedition (known as the Discovery Expedition) under Scott, 1901–1904, and named by him after the Terra Nova, one of the relief ships for the expedition. The Italian (summer) Zucchelli Station is located in the bay, as is the proposed Jang Bogo Station of South Korea.
    5.75
    4 votes
    129
    Bay of Gibraltar

    Bay of Gibraltar

    • Category: Bay
    The Bay of Gibraltar (also known as Gibraltar Bay or Bay of Algeciras or Algeciras Bay, direct translation of Spanish Bahía de Algeciras, the usual name in Spain) is a bay at the southern end of the Iberian Peninsula. It is around 10 km (6.2 mi) long by 8 km (5.0 mi) wide, covering an area of some 75 km (29 sq mi), with a depth of up to 400 m (1,300 ft) in the centre of the bay. It opens to the south into the Strait of Gibraltar and the Mediterranean Sea. The shoreline is densely settled. From west to east, the shore is divided between the Spanish municipalities of Algeciras, Los Barrios, San Roque, La Línea de la Concepción and the British Overseas Territory of Gibraltar. The larger part of the shoreline is Spanish territory, with part of the eastern half of the bay claimed by Gibraltar. The east and west entrances to the bay are marked respectively by the Europa Point Lighthouse at Europa Point, Gibraltar and the Punta Carnero lighthouse to the west of Algeciras. The bay is a breeding area for several dolphin species, notably the Common Dolphin, Striped Dolphin and Bottlenose Dolphin, and is also visited by migratory whales. It is a popular destination for tourist whale-watching
    7.50
    2 votes
    130
    Chaleur Bay

    Chaleur Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Chaleur Bay or Baie des Chaleurs - also known informally in English as Bay of Chaleur due to the influence of its French translation - is an arm of the Gulf of Saint Lawrence located between Quebec and New Brunswick. The name of the bay is attributed to explorer Jacques Cartier (Baie des Chaleurs). It translates into English as "bay of warmth" or "bay of torrid weather". The bay opens to the east with its southern shore formed by the north shore of New Brunswick. The northern shore is formed by the south shore of the Gaspé Peninsula. Chaleur Bay measures approximately 50 km (27 nmi) in width at its widest point between Bathurst and New Carlisle. The western end of the bay transitions into the estuary of the Restigouche River. The mouth of the bay is delineated by a line running from "Haut-fond Leander" near Grande-Rivière, Quebec in the north and the "Miscou Shoals" near Miscou Island, New Brunswick in the south. The shores of Chaleur Bay include numerous beaches, particularly on the southern shore. Many rivers also form barachois or barrier beaches. Incorrectly claimed by locals as the world's second longest natural sand bar, the Eel River Bar, is a barrier beach located at the
    7.50
    2 votes
    131
    Empress Augusta Bay

    Empress Augusta Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Empress Augusta Bay is a major bay on the western side of the island of Bougainville, in Papua New Guinea, at 6°25′S 155°5′E / 6.417°S 155.083°E / -6.417; 155.083. It is a major subsistence fishing area for the people of Bougainville. It is named after Augusta Viktoria of Schleswig-Holstein, wife of German Emperor William II. In November 1943, the bay was the site of the Battle of Empress Augusta Bay, between Allied and Japanese forces. During the 1970s and 1980s the bay was seriously polluted by copper tailings from the world's largest copper mine, Panguna, operated by Rio Tinto Group. This issue contributed to the formation of the secessionist Bougainville Revolutionary Army and a civil war on the island between 1989 and 1997.
    7.50
    2 votes
    132
    Sahara Desert

    Sahara Desert

    The Sahara desert ecoregion, as defined by the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF), includes the hyper-arid center of the Sahara, between 18° and 30° N. It is one of several desert and xeric shrubland ecoregions that cover the northern portion of the African continent. The Sahara is the world's largest hot desert, located in northern Africa. It stretches from the Red Sea to the Atlantic Ocean. The vast Sahara encompasses several ecologically distinct regions. The Sahara desert ecoregion covers an area of 4,619,260 km (1,783,510 sq mi) in the hot, hyper-arid center of the Sahara, surrounded on the north, south, east, and west by desert ecoregions with higher rainfall and more vegetation. The North Saharan steppe and woodlands ecoregion lies to the north and west, bordering the Mediterranean climate regions of Africa's Mediterranean and North Atlantic coasts. The North Saharan steppe and woodlands receives more regular winter rainfall than the Sahara desert ecoregion. The South Saharan steppe and woodlands ecoregion lies to the south, between the Sahara desert ecoregion and the Sahel grasslands. The South Saharan steppe and woodlands receives most of its annual rainfall during the
    7.50
    2 votes
    133
    Suvla

    Suvla

    • Category: Bay
    Suvla is a bay on the Aegean coast of the Gallipoli peninsula in European Turkey, south of the Gulf of Saros. On August 6, 1915, it was the site for the Landing at Suvla Bay by the British IX Corps as part of the August Offensive during the Battle of Gallipoli. The landing and others at various points along the peninsula were designed to capture the peninsula from Turkish troops defending it under German direction, and to open the Dardanelles Straits to British warships — thus facilitating a planned naval attack on Constantinople (Istanbul). The Gallipoli campaign ended in failure and high casualties for the British side, which included numbers of Australians, New Zealanders and Newfoundlanders. Suvla is mentioned in the classic Irish song "The Foggy Dew", second verse: "It was better to die 'neath an Irish sky than at Suvla or Sedd el Bahr." Suvla Bay also features in "And the Band Played Waltzing Matilda", the oft-covered song by Eric Bogle. Suvla is also mentioned in the song "The Connaught Rangers": "At Suvla and at Sud el Bar, we fought your every bloody war..." Suvla is also mentioned in the traditional Newfoundland song "Recruiting Sergeant": "And on the sands of Suvla, they
    7.50
    2 votes
    134
    Vanhankaupunginlahti

    Vanhankaupunginlahti

    • Category: Bay
    Vanhankaupunginselkä (also called Vanhankaupunginlahti, Swedish: Gammelstadsfjärden) is a bay area which together with parts of adjoining Viikki district constitute a natural conservation zone near downtown Helsinki in the southern part of Finland. The area is listed in Ramsar Convention on Wetlands of International Importance, is part of European Union's Natura 2000 program and is also listed as BirdLife International's Important Bird Area. Geographically the area lies east of Helsinki peninsula and is surrounded by the districts of Hermanni, Arabianranta, Viikki, Herttoniemi and Kulosaari. The Vantaa River ends at the north end of Vanhankaupunginselkä. Although the area appears to be either land or water on various maps or satellite pictures, it is largely marsh-like, impassable either on foot or on boat. Most parts of the area are covered with man high reeds, which will prevent use of boats, while the subsoil beneath the reeds is soft and muddy, thus preventing passage on foot. However, for the purposes of walking between the reeds the City of Helsinki has constructed some duckboards, which permit the visitors on the area to walk between the reeds. While these duckboards permit
    7.50
    2 votes
    135
    Arabs Gulf

    Arabs Gulf

    • Category: Bay
    The Arab's Gulf, also known as the Arab Gulf or Arab Bay (all translating the Arabic name Khalij el-Arab), is a large bay to the west of Alexandria in Egypt. It is not to be confused with the "Arabian Gulf" (a historic name for the Red Sea) or the Arabian Sea. It contains the southernmost point of the Levantine Sea, which lies about 92 km west-southwest of the center of Alexandria. Geologically, the Gulf is the result of the Arab Gulf Synclinal Basin, one of a succession of synclines along the northern coast of Africa. Just west of the apex of the Gulf is a community, developed as an oil port but now a resort, which had little significance before the Second World War: El Alamein, site of the famous 1942 battles.
    6.33
    3 votes
    136
    Conception Bay

    Conception Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Conception Bay is a Canadian bay located on the northeast coast of the island of Newfoundland. The bay indents the Avalon Peninsula with the opening of the bay to the Atlantic Ocean at the northeast. It is bounded by Cape St. Francis 47°48.63′N 52°47.15′W / 47.8105°N 52.78583°W / 47.8105; -52.78583 in the south and Split Point 48°05.99′N 52°50.94′W / 48.09983°N 52.849°W / 48.09983; -52.849 near Bay de Verde in the north. It has a maximum depth of 300 metres (980 ft). Conception Bay covers an area of 1295 square kilometres and contains several islands, the three major ones being Bell Island, Little Bell Island and Kelly's Island. The Bay is fed into by rivers from both the east and west side of the bay, which are then fed into the Atlantic Ocean. The name Conception Bay comes from the Portuguese Baía da Conceição or Baia de Comceica and was presumably given in honour of the Feast of the Conception, December 8. The name first appears on the Oliveriana map of 1505 – 1508. Conception bay was the site of Britaniola Colony, established in 1610. It was the site of Sea-Forest Plantation founded in 1610 and Bristol's Hope Plantation founded in 1619. From the late 1890s to the 1960s,
    6.33
    3 votes
    137
    Frobisher Bay

    Frobisher Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Frobisher Bay is a relatively large inlet of the Labrador Sea in the Qikiqtaaluk Region of Nunavut, Canada. It is located in the southeastern corner of Baffin Island. Its length is about 230 km (140 mi) and its width varies from about 40 km (25 mi) at its outlet into the Labrador Sea to roughly 20 km (12 mi) towards its inner end. The capital of Nunavut, Iqaluit (known as Frobisher Bay until 1987), lies near the innermost end of the bay. Frobisher Bay has a tapered shape formed by two flanking peninsulas, the Hall Peninsula to the northeast, and the Meta Incognita Peninsula to the southwest. The Bay's funnellike shape ensures that the tidal variance at Iqaluit each day is about 7 to 11 m. This shape is due to the large outlet glacier centred over Foxe Basin during the Pleistocene glaciation, which gouged the Bay's basin, now flooded by the sea. Within Frobisher Bay itself are a number of bays, inlets and sounds. Among these are Wayne Bay and Ward Inlet (up towards the far northwestern end), and also Newell Sound, Leach Bay and Kneeland Bay (along the southwest shore). Hamlen Bay, Newton Fiord, Royer Cove and Waddell Bay are to be found in the northeast shore. Indeed, Frobisher
    6.33
    3 votes
    138
    Larsen Harbour

    Larsen Harbour

    • Category: Bay
    Larsen Harbour is a narrow 2.6 miles (4.2 km) long inlet of indenting volcanic rocks and sheeted dykes known as the Larsen Harbour Formation. It is a branch of Drygalski Fjord, entered 2.5 miles (4 km) west-northwest of Nattriss Head, at the southeast end of South Georgia. It was charted by the German Antarctic Expedition, 1911–12, under Filchner, who named it for Captain Carl Anton Larsen a Norwegian Antarctic Explorer, who made significant contributions to the exploration of Antarctica. The most significant being the first discovery of fossils, for which he received the Back Grant from the Royal Geographical Society. Larsen is also considered the founder of the Antarctic whaling industry and the settlement at Grytviken, South Georgia. The peaks and mountain crests surrounding the almost land-locked harbour was described by Sir Ernest Shackleton's photographer Frank Hurley as "most beautiful and exceeding all in grandeur even that of Milford Sound ". The Niall Rankin expedition aboard the Albatross, spent some time here as they studied the Weddel seal colony before going on to Esbensen Bay. The area is rat-free, allowing species such as the South Georgia Pipit, and burrowing
    6.33
    3 votes
    139
    Resurrection Bay

    Resurrection Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Resurrection Bay is a bay on the Kenai Peninsula of Alaska, United States. Its main settlement is Seward, located at the head of the bay. It received its name from Alexandr Baranov, who was forced to retreat into the bay during a bad storm in the Gulf of Alaska. When the storm settled it was Easter Sunday, so the bay and nearby Resurrection River were named in honor of it. Resurrection Bay is the location of Caines Head, at the summit of which Fort McGilvray is situated (650 feet above sea level). This fortification was constructed by the United States Armed Forces to defend against a possible invasion by the Imperial Japanese Army during World War II. The Bay remains ice-free even in winter, making it easily navigable. The opening of the film The Hunt for Red October was filmed in Resurrection Bay, with the bay serving as a stand-in for Russia's Murmansk Fjord.
    6.33
    3 votes
    140
    Botany Bay, Kent

    Botany Bay, Kent

    • Category: Bay
    Botany Bay is a bay in Broadstairs, Kent on the south east coast of England. Botany Bay is the northern most of seven bays in Broadstairs. It features chalk cliffs and is a popular tourist location. Bathing is reportedly safe for swimming, surfing, and kayaking, and lifeguards are on duty.
    8.00
    1 votes
    141
    Gweebara Bay

    Gweebara Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Gweebarra Bay (Irish: Gaoth Beara) is located on the west coast of County Donegal, in Ireland. The mouth of the River Gweebarra and Innishkeel Island are here. The towns on the bay are Narin; Portnoo; and Cor
    8.00
    1 votes
    142
    Kāne'ohe Bay

    Kāne'ohe Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Kāneʻohe Bay, at 45 km², is the largest sheltered body of water in the main Hawaiian Islands. This reef-dominated embayment constitutes a significant scenic and recreational feature along the windward (northeast) coast of the Island of Oʻahu. The largest population center on Kāneʻohe Bay is the town of Kāneʻohe. The Bay is approximately 8 mi (12.8 km) long and 2.7 mi (4.3 km) broad, with a mouth opening of about 4.6 mi (7.4 km) and maximum depth of 40 ft (12 m) in the dredged channel. Features unique in the main Hawaiian Islands include one of only two barrier reefs (the other being the 27 mile barrier reef of Molokaʻi island) and extensive development of shoaling coral reefs within a large lagoon. Two navigable channels cut across the northern and southern ends of the barrier reef. The deeper, northern channel, located off Kualoa Regional Park, provides entrance from the North Pacific Ocean to a ship channel dredged the length of the lagoon between 1939 and 1945. The lagoon contains extensive patch and fringing reefs and its southern end is partly enclosed by the Mokapu Peninsula. This peninsula is occupied by Marine Corps Base Hawaii. The bay is located at coordinates 21°27′35″N
    8.00
    1 votes
    143
    Middendorff Bay

    Middendorff Bay

    • Category: Bay
    The Middendorff Bay, (Russian: Залив Миддендорфа) is a deeply indented bay in the shores of the Taymyr Peninsula. It is located southwest of the Nordenskiöld Archipelago in the Kara Sea and it is open towards the west. This bay is limited on its eastern side by the Zarya Peninsula, named after Baron Eduard von Toll's ship Zarya. On the northern side of the Zarya Peninsula there is a small gulf called Bukhta Kolomeitseva, named after Captain N. N. Kolomeitsev, commander of ship Zarya. The Middendorff Bay is surrounded by bleak tundra coast. It is full of small islands and island groups, foremost of which are Gavrilova Island, the Shren Islands, the Krusenstern Islands, and farther offshore, Belukha and Prodolgovatyy Islands. The small Myachina Islands are located 3 km (1.9 mi) off Cape Vilda, further west from the bay along the coast. The climate in the area is severe, with long and bitter winters and frequent blizzards and gales. This desolate bay is frozen for about nine months in a year and even in summer it is never quite free of ice floes. The Middendorff Bay and adjacent islands belong to the Krasnoyarsk Krai administrative division of the Russian Federation and the whole area
    8.00
    1 votes
    144
    Primero de Mayo Bay

    Primero de Mayo Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Primero de Mayo Bay is a bay on the southwest side of Port Foster, Deception Island, in the South Shetland Islands. Named "Bahia 1 de Mayo" or "Bahia Primero de Mayo" by the Argentine Antarctic Expedition, 1942–43, after the 1 de Mayo, an expedition ship which visited Deception Island in 1942 and 1943; she sank off the coast of Argentina on February 5, 1944.  This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Primero de Mayo Bay" (content from the Geographic Names Information System).
    8.00
    1 votes
    145
    Resolute Bay

    Resolute Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Resolute Bay is an Arctic waterway in Qikiqtaaluk Region, Nunavut, Canada. It is located in Parry Channel on the southern side of Cornwallis Island. The hamlet of Resolute is located on the northern shore of the bay and Resolute Bay Airport to the northwest. The Inuit people associated with Resolute Bay are called 'Qausuittuq' and the population hamlet in the 2006 census was 229. On the western shore, the Defence Research Telecommunications Establishment (DRTE) and the Communications Research Centre operated a launch site for sounding rockets. Between 1966 and 1971 rockets of the types Black Brant and Boosted Arcas were launched.
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    146
    Sherratt Bay

    Sherratt Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Sherratt Bay is a bay between Cape Melville and Penguin Island on the south side of King George Island, in the South Shetland Islands. The existence of the bay was known and roughly charted by sealers working in the area in the early 1820s. It was named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) in 1960 for Richard Sherratt, Master of the Lady Trowbridge from Liverpool which was wrecked off Cape Melville on December 25, 1820. Sherratt occupied his time until rescued by making an inaccurate but historically interesting map of the South Shetland Islands.  This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Sherratt Bay" (content from the Geographic Names Information System).
    8.00
    1 votes
    147
    Thorness Bay

    Thorness Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Thorness Bay is a 86.2 hectare Site of special scientific interest which is located on the north-west coast of the Isle of Wight, England, in the western arm of the Solent. The site was notified in 1966 for both its biological and geological features. The bay stretches about 3 km from Salt Mead Ledge in the west to Gurnard Head to the east. The sea bed is a mixture of mud and sand. A small unnamed brook enters the sea in the middle of the bay after passing though a marsh. Little Thorness Farm, a beef farm near the bay has 18 acres (73,000 m) of protected marshland under stewardship and is a SSSI because it is home to wildlife not found in other areas. Thorness Bay also has a holiday park run by Park Resorts. It has a direct footpath leading straight to the beach.
    8.00
    1 votes
    148
    Watsons Bay

    Watsons Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Watsons Bay is a harbourside, eastern suburb of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. Watsons Bay is located 11 km north-east of the Sydney central business district, in the local government area of the Municipality of Woollahra. Watsons Bay sits on the end of the South Head peninsula and takes its name from the sheltered bay and anchorage on its western side, in Port Jackson (Sydney Harbour). It provides views across the harbour to the Sydney Harbour Bridge. The Gap is an ocean cliff on the eastern side with views to Manly at North Head and the Pacific Ocean. Vaucluse is the only adjacent suburb, to the south. The original inhabitants of the area that is now known as Watsons Bay, were the Cadigal people. The Cadigal referred to the area as Kutti. This indigenous group of people fished and collected shellfish in the waters and bays off South Head. They acquired their resources from Camp Cove and carved rock engravings there, which have since eroded from the cliff faces and rock surfaces that line the coastline. Watsons Bay was named after Robert Watson (1756–1819), formerly of HMS Sirius, when he had to beach his three vessels at Camp Cove for many years because of
    8.00
    1 votes
    149
    Batty Bay

    Batty Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Batty Bay is an Arctic waterway in Qikiqtaaluk Region, Nunavut, Canada. It is an arm of Prince Regent Inlet on the eastern side of Somerset Island. It was an area frequented by Arctic explorers such as Sir John Franklin and Captain John Ross.
    7.00
    2 votes
    150
    Bay of Arguin

    Bay of Arguin

    • Category: Bay
    The Bay of Arguin, or Banc d'Arguin, is a bay on the Atlantic shore of Mauritania. It is south of Cap Blanc, north of Cap Timiris, and contains the islands of Arguin and Tidra. The bay contains the 12,000 km² Banc d'Arguin National Park.
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    151
    Bay of Islands

    Bay of Islands

    • Category: Bay
    The Bay of Islands is an area in the Northland Region of the North Island of New Zealand. Located 60 km north-west of Whangarei, it is close to the northern tip of the country. It is one of the most popular fishing, sailing and tourist destinations in the country, and has been renowned internationally for its big-game fishing since American author Zane Grey publicised it in the 1930s. The bay itself is an irregular 16 km-wide inlet in the north-eastern coast of the island. A natural harbour, it has several arms which extend into the land, notably Waikare Inlet in the south and Kerikeri and Te Puna (Mangonui) inlets in the north-west. The small town of Russell is located at the end of a short peninsula that extends into the bay from the southeast. Several islands lie to the north of this peninsula, notably Urupukapuka Island to the east and Moturoa Island to the north. The Purerua Peninsula extends to the west of the bay, north of Te Puna Inlet, and Cape Brett Peninsula extends 10 km into the Pacific Ocean at the eastern end of the bay. About 700 years ago, the Mataatua, one of the large Māori migration canoes which journeyed to New Zealand from Hawaiki, was sailed to the Bay Of
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    2 votes
    152
    Commonwealth Bay

    Commonwealth Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Commonwealth Bay is an open bay about 48 km (30 mi) wide at the entrance between Point Alden and Cape Gray in Antarctica. It was discovered in 1912 by the Australasian Antarctic Expedition under Douglas Mawson, who established the main base of the expedition at Cape Denison at the head of the bay. Named by Australasian Antarctic Expedition after the Commonwealth of Australia. It is listed in both the Guinness Book of World Records and the Eighth Edition of the National Geographic Atlas as the windiest place on Earth with winds regularly exceeding 240 kilometres (150 mi) per hour and an average annual wind speed of 80 kilometres (50 mi) per hour. Storms are caused by katabatic wind, a concentrated flow of cold air moving along the steep surface of the ice shield towards the sea. The air flow is accelerated by the increasing gradient of the surface of ice and the cliff monolith at Cape Denison. In the summer there are periods of relative calm but during winter storms are especially strong and long lasting, and can start and end unexpectedly. An abrupt start and end of storm might be accompanied by powerful whirlpools and expressive short-lived and fast-moving clouds at the coast
    7.00
    2 votes
    153
    Hen and Chicken Bay, New South Wales

    Hen and Chicken Bay, New South Wales

    • Category: Bay
    Hen and Chicken Bay is a bay on the Parramatta River, in the inner-west of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. It lies approximately 8 kilometres due west of Sydney's central business district. It is surrounded by the suburbs of Abbotsford, Drummoyne, Wareemba, Five Dock, Canada Bay, Concord and Cabarita. In the early days of the colony of New South Wales, it was sometimes known as Stonequarry Cove and Stone Quarry Creek. This may have been because there was once a nearby quarry in Five Dock. Much of the land around the bay is publicly accessible foreshore or parkland. The bay is a popular location for rowing regattas.
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    2 votes
    154
    Mawgan Porth

    Mawgan Porth

    • Category: Bay
    Mawgan Porth is a beach and small settlement in north Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. It is situated north of Watergate Bay approximately four miles (6 km) north of Newquay, on the Atlantic Ocean coast. Mawgan Porth is in the civil parish of Mawgan-in-Pydar at the seaward end of the Vale of Lanherne (or Vale of Mawgan) where the River Menalhyl discharges into the sea. The hamlet consists of a pub, a general store, and several hotels, guest houses and caravan parks. The sandy beach, backed by dunes with cliffs at each end, is quality-assessed and supervised by lifeguards during the summer. It is a popular surfing location. The South West Coast Path passes behind the beach and the area attracts holiday-makers In the years 1949-52, 1954 and 1974, excavations revealed a settlement of the Late Saxon Period comprising three groups of buildings ('courtyard houses') and a burial ground dating from around 850-1050. Finds included pottery and stone artefacts. The German sculptor Faust Lang lived in Mawgan Porth from 1936 to 1949. Media related to Mawgan Porth at Wikimedia Commons
    7.00
    2 votes
    155
    Monterey Bay

    Monterey Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Monterey Bay is a bay of the Pacific Ocean, along the central coast of California. The bay is south of San Francisco and San Jose, between the cities of Santa Cruz and Monterey. The Monterey Bay Area, or sometimes just Bay Area, are local colloquialisms sometimes used to describe the whole of the coastal communities of Santa Cruz and Monterey Counties. The Monterey Bay Area is also part of the larger area known colloquially as the Central Coast. The first European to discover Monterey Bay was Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo on November 16, 1542 while sailing northward along the coast on a Spanish naval expedition. He originally named the bay Bahía de los Pinos, probably because of the forest of pine trees first encountered while rounding the peninsula at the southern end of the bay. On December 10, 1595, Sebastián Rodríguez Cermeño crossed the bay and bestowed the name Bahía de San Pedro in honor of Saint Peter Martyr. The present name for the bay was documented in 1602 by Sebastián Vizcaíno, who had been tasked by the Spanish government to complete a detailed chart of the coast. He anchored in what is now the Monterey Harbor on December 16, and named it Puerto de Monterey, in honor of the
    7.00
    2 votes
    156
    Placentia Bay

    Placentia Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Placentia Bay is a body of water on the southeast coast of Newfoundland, Canada. It is formed by Burin Peninsula on the west and Avalon Peninsula on the east. Fishing grounds in the bay were used by native people long before the first European fishermen arrived in the 16th century. For a time, the French controlled the bay. They built their capital at Placentia on the east coast. The British gained Placentia during the Treaty of Utrecht in 1713. The town and nearby Castle Hill are national historic sites. English settlement followed in the bay and today the main communities are Burin, Marystown, and Placentia. On 14 August 1941 NS Argentia located in Little Placentia Sound was the site of the Atlantic Conference for the Atlantic Charter, where Winston Churchill and Franklin D. Roosevelt met face to face for the first time since both took office and the start of World War II.
    7.00
    2 votes
    157
    Recherche Bay

    Recherche Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Recherche Bay is located on the extreme south-eastern corner of Tasmania, Australia and was a landing place of the d’Entrecasteaux expedition to find missing explorer La Pérouse. It is named after the Recherche, one of the expedition's ships. The explorers set up a camp, made a garden and scientific observatory at Recherche Bay in April 1792 for 26 days, and again in January 1793 for 24 days. Both landings were made to seek refuge and replenish supplies although as much time as possible was dedicated to scientific research. The botanists Jacques Labillardière, Claude Riche and Étienne Pierre Ventenat, assisted by gardener botanist Félix Delahaye, collected and catalogued almost 5000 specimens including the blue gum (Eucalyptus globulus), which later became Tasmania's floral emblem. The expedition also made friendly contact with the Tasmanian Aboriginal people there in 1793. The scientific observatory at Recherche Bay was the site of the first deliberate scientific experiment on Australian soil. At this observatory, geoscientist Elisabeth Paul Edouard de Rossel conducted a series of measurements that proved geomagnetism varied with latitude. Being isolated from the main areas of
    7.00
    2 votes
    158
    Ringstead Bay

    Ringstead Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Ringstead Bay and the small village of Ringstead are located on the coast in Dorset, southern England. They are accessible by way of a private road that you have to pay £5 to be able to use with a car park at the end near the sea. There is an alternative car park that is free. This one is a national trust area and there is access to the sea by a 15-20 minute walk and there is also a picnic area. The area lies on the Jurassic Coast and is known for its natural beauty and fossils. Ringstead Bay has a pebble and shingle beach with some sand. There are offshore reefs approximately 600 metres in length at the western end opposite the village that are uncovered at low tide. This forms is intertidal zone between the low cliffs to the north and the English Channel to the south. The original village and church at Ringstead, located in a field to the east of the current settlement and mentioned in the Domesday Book, no longer exists. Immediately to the east are the white chalk cliffs of White Nothe, dominating the bay. It is possible to walk to the top of White Nothe and back, with spectacular views of the bay and across to the Isle of Portland. It is also possible to walk to Ringstead Bay
    7.00
    2 votes
    159
    Sanya Bay

    Sanya Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Sanya Bay (simplified Chinese: 三亚湾; traditional Chinese: 三亞灣; pinyin: Sānyà Wān) is one of the five major bays in Sanya, Hainan Province, China. It has a 22km beach. The climate is warm and sunny all year around. The man-made resort Phoenix Island is currently under construction in the bay.
    7.00
    2 votes
    160
    Spirits Bay

    Spirits Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Spirits Bay (Piwhane or Kapowairua in Maori) is an isolated bay at the end of the Aupouri Peninsula, near the northern tip of New Zealand's North Island. The bay is 12 kilometres in width. It one of two bays (the other being Tom Bowling Bay) in the short length of coast that marks the tip of the North Island. A long walking path, about 8.5 kilometers (5.3 miles) long, runs beside the bay. The bay is considered a sacred place in Maori culture as according to local legend, it is the location where spirits of the dead gather to depart from this world to travel to their ancestral home (or afterlife) from a large old pohutakawa tree above the bay. A Māori name for Spirits Bay, Kapowairua (meaning to "catch the spirit"), comes from a Maori language saying that translates into English as: "I can shelter from the wind. But I cannot shelter from the longing for my daughter. I shall venture as far as Hokianga, and beyond. Your task (should I die) shall be to grasp my spirit." The words were spoken by Tōhē, a chief of the Ngāti Kahu people, who is considered one of Muriwhenua’s most important ancestors. Tōhē made his way south, naming more than one hundred places along the western coast,
    7.00
    2 votes
    161
    Northwest Harbor

    Northwest Harbor

    • Category: Bay
    Northwest Harbor is a census-designated place named for the bay on the South Fork of Long Island connecting Sag Harbor, Shelter Island and East Hampton town to Gardiners Bay and the open waters of the Atlantic Ocean. The bay derives its name from being northwest of East Hampton village. The name Northwest Harbor is applied to the Northwest Woods neighborhood (sometimes shortened to simply Northwest) of the town of East Hampton. It is also applied to Northwest Landing at Northwest Creek (a salt water outlet from the inlet to the harbor) which was the first port for East Hampton and became a major whaling port in the late 17th and early 18th centuries until it was replaced by Sag Harbor two miles to the west of the landing where the water was deeper. Ships of Sag Harbor must pass through Northwest Harbor at the Cedar Point Lighthouse in order to reach Gardiners Bay and the open ocean. During the American Revolution it was the site of two conflicts including Meigs Raid in which Americans burned Sag Harbor and captured 90 British soldiers and an incident which Isaac Van Scoy killed a British soldier with a pitchfork. The British were to conduct another raid during the War of
    6.00
    3 votes
    162
    Au Train Bay

    Au Train Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Au Train Bay is a small bay, approximately 4 mi (6 km) across, on the southern shore of Lake Superior at 46°26′47″N 86°50′43″W / 46.44639°N 86.84528°W / 46.44639; -86.84528, along the coast of Alger County in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. The town of Au Train sits along the middle of the south shore of the bay.
    5.67
    3 votes
    163
    Everglades

    Everglades

    • Category: Wetland
    The Everglades are a natural region of subtropical wetlands in the southern portion of the U.S. state of Florida, comprising the southern half of a large watershed. The system begins near Orlando with the Kissimmee River, which discharges into the vast but shallow Lake Okeechobee. Water leaving the lake in the wet season forms a slow-moving river 60 miles (97 km) wide and over 100 miles (160 km) long, flowing southward across a limestone shelf to Florida Bay at the southern end of the state. The Everglades are shaped by water and fire, experiencing frequent flooding in the wet season and drought in the dry season. Writer Marjory Stoneman Douglas popularized the term "River of Grass" to describe the sawgrass marshes, part of a complex system of interdependent ecosystems that include cypress swamps, the estuarine mangrove forests of the Ten Thousand Islands, tropical hardwood hammocks, pine rockland, and the marine environment of Florida Bay. Human habitation in the southern portion of the Florida peninsula dates to 15,000 years ago. Two major tribes eventually formed in and around Everglades ecosystems: the Calusa and the Tequesta. After coming into contact with the Spanish in the
    5.67
    3 votes
    164
    Mahone Bay

    Mahone Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Mahone Bay is a bay located on the Atlantic coast of Nova Scotia, Canada along the eastern end of Lunenburg County. Mahone Bay was named after the French mahonne (English: Barge), which referred to a type of boat used by local privateers. Opening south directly onto the Atlantic, its eastern shore is formed by the Aspotogan Peninsula and its western shore is formed by the First Peninsula (of Lunenburg). The Chester Peninsula juts several kilometres into Mahone Bay at roughly its midpoint. The bay's geological history differs from its eastern neighbour, St. Margarets Bay, in that Mahone Bay shows a greater variety of soils and bedrock. Numerous glacial drumlins on the western shore near the towns of Mahone Bay and Lunenburg have resulted in small-scale farming operations. Mahone Bay also differs from St. Margarets Bay in that it is dotted with innumerable small and medium-sized islands throughout its waters. The shelter provided by these islands, along with the summer southwesterly flow, led to the scenery around Mahone Bay becoming a tourist attraction in itself. Today the towns of Chester and Mahone Bay have become a destination for cruising in pleasure yachts. A scenic provincial
    5.67
    3 votes
    165
    Mulroy Bay

    Mulroy Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Mulroy Bay (Irish: Cuan na Maoil Ruaidh) is a relatively small bay / sea loch on the north coast of County Donegal, Ireland. Mulroy Bay is the most convoluted of the marine inlets in north-west Ireland. It is approximately 12 km long in a north-south direction. The entrance to the bay is a narrow embayment leading to a winding entrance channel 10 km in length. This channel varies in width and depth, with three significant narrows only 100-150 m across, where the current reaches maxima of 3-5 knots. It opens into the Broad Water, an open shallow sea lough 8 km from north to south and 2.5 km from east to west, generally less than 20 m in depth and with many small rocky islands and islets. Settlements founded on the bay include Milford, Kerrykeel and Cranford. Mulroy Bay has extensive Fish and Shellfish farming operations. Mussels, Scallops and Salmon are grown on a commercial basis. Mulroy Bay on Ecoserve.ie
    5.67
    3 votes
    166
    Saginaw Bay

    Saginaw Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Saginaw Bay is a bay within Lake Huron located on the eastern side of the U.S. state of Michigan. It forms the space between Michigan's Thumb region and the rest of the Lower Peninsula of Michigan. Saginaw Bay is 1,143 square miles (2,960 km) in area. It is located in parts of five Michigan counties: Arenac, Bay, Huron, Iosco, and Tuscola. The Saginaw Bay watershed is the largest drainage basin in Michigan, draining approximately 15% of the total land area. The watershed contains the largest contiguous freshwater coastal wetland system in the United States. O-Sag-e-non or Sag-in-a-we from the Ojibwa language, which means "to flow out", is a possible origin for the name "Saginaw". It may refer to the Saginaw River, which flows out into Saginaw Bay, and eventually into Lake Huron. The name "Saginaw" is not related to Saguenay, a region in Quebec whose name is of Algonquin origin. The modern history of Saginaw Bay dates back to early 17th century. French explorers were the first Europeans to visit the Great Lakes region. The first European to visit the Saginaw Bay area was Father Jacques Marquette, a French missionary priest, who went there in 1668 after establishing a mission in St.
    5.67
    3 votes
    167
    Arabian Peninsula

    Arabian Peninsula

    • Category: Peninsula
    There were many civilization in the Arab Peninsula before Islam. One of them the Saba kingdom. It was located in Yamen and Saudi Arabia("Phoenician international center," 2012). Also, kingdom of Kinda was in located in the south of the Saudi capital Ryadh. It was 547 BC ("A timeline of," 2012). Delmon civilization was one of the pre-Islam civilization which was in Bahrain and the East coast of Saudi Arabia("Countries and their," 2012). Moreover, Masain Salih is a historical place in the north of Saudi Arabia. It belongs to the civilization that was during Salih time("Unesco," ). Countries and their cultures. (2012). Retrieved from http://www.everyculture.com/A-Bo/Bahrain.html Unesco. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/1293 Phoenician international center. (2012, 10 15). Retrieved from http://phoenicia.org/sabaeans.html A timeline of the arabs . (2012). Retrieved from http://www.scaruffi.com/politics/arabic.html The Arabian Peninsula (Arabic: شبه الجزيرة العربية‎ shibh al-jazīrah al-ʻarabīyah or جزيرة العرب jazīrat al-ʻArab) is a land mass situated north-east of Africa. Also known as Arabia or the Arabian subcontinent, it is the world's largest peninsula and covers
    6.50
    2 votes
    168
    Baja California Peninsula

    Baja California Peninsula

    • Category: Peninsula
    The Baja California peninsula (English: Lower California), is a peninsula in northwestern Mexico. Its land mass separates the Pacific Ocean from the Gulf of California. The Peninsula extends 1,247 kilometres (775 mi) from Mexicali, Baja California in the north to Cabo San Lucas, Baja California Sur in the south. The total area of the Baja California Peninsula is 143,390 square kilometres (55,360 sq mi). The Peninsula is separated from mainland Mexico by the Gulf of California and the Colorado River, though on the Colorado there are bridges to the state of Sonora. There are four main desert areas on the peninsula: the San Felipe Desert, the Central Coast Desert, the Vizcaíno Desert and the Magdalena Plain Desert. In the minds of European explorers California existed as an idea before it was discovered. The earliest known mention of the idea of California was in the 1510 romance novel Las Sergas de Esplandián by Spanish author Garci Rodríguez de Montalvo. The book described the Island of California as being west of the Indies, "very close to the side of the Terrestrial Paradise; and it is peopled by black women, without any man among them, for they live in the manner of
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    2 votes
    169
    Bay of Cárdenas

    Bay of Cárdenas

    • Category: Bay
    The Bay of Cárdenas (Spanish: Bahía de Cárdenas) is a shallow bay on Cuba's northern shore, in the province of Matanzas. It is located on the Cuban coast, facing the Nicholas Channel, and is delimited to the north by the Hicacos Peninsula. To the north-east it is flanked by cays of the Sabana-Camaguey Archipelago, such as Cayo Cruz del Padre, Cayo Galindo and Cayo Cinco Leguas. To the south-east it is bordered by the coastal wetlands and mangroves of Martí as well as the Bay of Santa Clara. The port and the city of Cárdenas are located on the south-eastern shore. The bay has a total area of more than 250 km (97 sq mi). An artificial navigation channel (Kawama Channel) connects the bay to the Straits of Florida south of the town of Varadero. Other than the industrial port of Cardenas, other marinas lining the bay are located at Siguapa and Júcaro. The waters of the bay are also used for fishing lobster. On the southern shore, a combination of cays (Cayo Cupey) and causeways is used for oil extraction. The bay was the stage of the Battle of Cárdenas on May 11, 1898, during the Spanish–American War.
    6.50
    2 votes
    170
    Duke of York Bay

    Duke of York Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Duke of York Bay is an arm of Foxe Basin, in the Qikiqtaaluk Region of Nunavut, Canada. It is located in northeastern Southampton Island. The bay is directly south of the southern end of White Island, with Comer Strait at the western entrance and Falcon Strait at the eastern entrance. Sir William Edward Parry and his crew gave the bay its name on 17 August 1821 during his second voyage for the discovery of a Northwest Passage from the Atlantic to the Pacific, in honor of Prince Frederick, the Duke of York, having first entered the bay the day before, 16 August 1821, the Duke's birthday. In January 1996, Duke of York Bay was selected by delegates from across Nunavut as the site of the first bowhead whale hunt in Nunavut's waters. When the Nunavut Wildlife Management Board switched the location to Repulse Bay the following month, the community of Coral Harbour, south of Duke of York Bay, was angered with the decision. Some thought it was politically motivated, others said that elders felt the ice conditions and strong currents in the bay would make for a difficult beaching.
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    2 votes
    171
    Jade estuary

    Jade estuary

    • Category: Bay
    The Jade Bight (German: Jadebusen) is a bay on the North Sea coast of Germany. It was formerly known simply as Jade or Jahde. About 180 km² (70 mi²) in area, the Jade was largely created by storm floods during the 12th and 16th centuries. During this period it was connected in the East to the river Weser. This connection was closed between 1721 and 1725 by dikes reconnecting Butjadingen to the mainland as a peninsula. In the West the Jade extended far into the Frisian peninsula. From the early sixteenth century a number of dikes were built against the storm floods and to arable land. The main dike, Ellenser Damm, was built between 1596 and 1615 based on an agreement between the principalities of East Frisia and Oldenburg. The Jade is a part of the German Wadden Sea National Parks. The port of Wilhelmshaven is on the western shore of the bay. During World War I, the German High Seas Fleet (Hochseeflotte), the main battle fleet of the Imperial German Navy (Kaiserliche Marine), was based at Wilhelmshaven in the Jade Bight.
    6.50
    2 votes
    172
    Maunalua Bay

    Maunalua Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Maunalua Bay is a bay on the Southeast shore of the island of Oahu, between Diamond Head and Koko Head, and forming the shoreline of the Hawaii Kai area of Honolulu. "Maunalua" in Hawaiian means two mountains. The beach park was developed by Henry J. Kaiser during the development of Hawaii Kai Marina. Historically, the beach consisted of 535,000 square feet (49,703 sq. m) of coral that was dredged and removed creating a watercraft channel. Kaiser donated it to the City and County of Honolulu in 1960. Public access to the bay is easily made through the city and county beach park off of Kalanianaole Highway across from Hawaii Kai Drive. Despite the tide height this bay and reef are always accessible to watercraft, standup paddlers and snorkelers. At low tide people can walk out on the sandbar, exploring the nearby reef. It is not uncommon to find moon jellies that got caught on the sand bar before the tide lowered. Another scenic spot for tourists near Maunalua Bay, is Hanauma Bay, known for having clear waters and many native fishes, ideal for snorkeling and sightseeing.
    6.50
    2 votes
    173
    Semiahmoo Bay

    Semiahmoo Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Semiahmoo Bay ( /ˌsɛmiˈɑːmoʊ/ SEM-ee-AH-moh) is the southeastern section of Boundary Bay on the Pacific coast of North America. The name "Semiahmoo" is a Coast Salish word for "half moon". From the north to south, the following communities and places are located on its shore: Blaine's Drayton Harbor opens into Semiahmoo Bay; the harbor is separated from the main body of the bay by Semiahmoo Spit. The Semiahmoo Resort is located on the spit. The Campbell River flows into Semiahmoo Bay on the Canadian side; California Creek and Dakota Creek flow into Drayton Harbor on the US side.
    6.50
    2 votes
    174
    Shirley's Bay

    Shirley's Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Shirleys Bay is a bay of the Ottawa River, about ten miles from Ottawa in Ontario, Canada. It is also the name of a Canadian military and civilian telecommunication research campus which is located on the shore of the bay. Organizations with facilities at the site include Defence Research and Development Canada, Communications Research Centre, the Canadian Space Agency's David Florida Laboratory, Royal Canadian Mounted Police Firearms Training Unit, Department of Defence firearms training area, and the Connaught Army Cadet National Summer Training Centre. In October 1952, the Canadian government set up an observatory to attempt to measure magnetic or radio noise disturbances. Project Magnet was an unidentified flying object (UFO) study programme established by the Department of Transport (DOT) on 2 December 1950, under the direction of Wilbert B. Smith, senior radio engineer for the DOT's Broadcast and Measurements Section. It was formally active until mid-1954, and informally until Smith's death in 1962. The station, Project Magnet, was equipped with radio monitoring equipment, Geiger counters and cameras. It allegedly recorded a suspicious signal on 8 August 1954, which some
    6.50
    2 votes
    175
    Traeth Coch

    Traeth Coch

    • Category: Bay
    Traeth Coch (Welsh for Red Beach) is a wide sandy bay and an area of outstanding natural beauty on the east coast of the island of Anglesey in Wales. The bay is also known in English as Red Wharf Bay and lies between the villages of Pentraeth and Benllech. Each year the Red Wharf Bay Sailing Club Anglesey Offshore Dinghy Race takes place from Beaumaris to Traeth Bychan. The race over 14 miles up the Menai Strait and down the Anglesey coast is an exhilarating sail. There was once a railway line which terminated at the bay, the Red Wharf Bay branch line, which left the Anglesey Central Railway at Pentre Berw.
    6.50
    2 votes
    176
    Akrotiri Bay

    Akrotiri Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Akrotiri Bay (Greek: Κόλπος Ακρωτηρίου, Kolpos Akrotiriou; Turkish: Limasol Körfezi) is a part of the Mediterranean Sea east of the Akrotiri Peninsula on the southern coast of the island of Cyprus. The Western Sovereign Base Area of Akrotiri and Dhekelia, a British Overseas Territory, administered as a Sovereign Base Area, borders the bay. The city of Limassol is also located on the bay. The southern end of the bay is formed by Cape Gata.
    7.00
    1 votes
    177
    Aniva Bay

    Aniva Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Aniva Bay (Zaliv Aniva, Aniwa Bay, or Aniva Gulf) is located at the southern end of Sakhalin Island, Russia, north of the island of Hokkaidō, Japan. The largest city on the bay is Korsakov. The bay has received news coverage because the Sakhalin-II led energy consortium has been accused of significant environmental violations and dumping dredging in the bay. This received attention from environmental groups, namely Sakhalin Environment Watch, and the harm the dredging is doing to the native wildlife. Significant fish and crab kills have occurred, and salmon in the bay have been affected.
    7.00
    1 votes
    178
    Bay of Green Bay

    Bay of Green Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Green Bay is an arm of Lake Michigan, located along the south coast of Michigan's Upper Peninsula and the east coast of Wisconsin. It is separated from the rest of the lake by the Door Peninsula in Wisconsin, the Garden Peninsula in Michigan, and the chain of islands between them, all formed by the Niagara Escarpment. Green Bay is some 120 miles (193 km) long, with a width ranging from about 10 miles (16 km) to 20 mi (32 km). It is 1,626 square miles (4,210 km) in area. At the southern end of the bay is the city of Green Bay, Wisconsin, where the Fox River enters the bay. The Leo Frigo Memorial Bridge (formerly known as the Tower Drive bridge) spans the point where the bay ends and the Fox River begins. Locally, the bay is often called the Bay of Green Bay to distinguish the bay from the city. The bay is navigable by large ships. The bay was named Baie des Puants (literally, "Bay of the Stinkers") during the French regime as attested by many French maps of the 17th and 18th centuries. The stench apparently came from algae in the stagnant water of the bay. According to George R. Stewart, the French received the name from their Indian guides, who called the Indians living near Green
    7.00
    1 votes
    179
    Belmont Bay

    Belmont Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Belmont Bay is a body of water at the mouth of the Occoquan River between Fairfax and Prince William counties, Virginia. The bay covers about 1,500 acres (6.1 km). The bay adjoins the Elizabeth Hartwell Mason Neck National Wildlife Refuge and Mason Neck State Park on the Fairfax County side and the Occoquan River National Wildlife Refuge in Prince William County. The bay was named for the home, "Belmont," which was built circa 1730 overlooking the bay by Catesby Cocke, who was the clerk of the Prince William County court. Belmont Bay is notable for sighting bald eagles that nest and feed in the refuges and for the numerous Great Blue Herons.
    7.00
    1 votes
    180
    Fingal's Cave

    Fingal's Cave

    • Category: Sea cave
    Fingal's Cave is a sea cave on the uninhabited island of Staffa, in the Inner Hebrides of Scotland, part of a National Nature Reserve owned by the National Trust for Scotland. It is formed entirely from hexagonally jointed basalt columns within a Paleocene lava flow, similar in structure to the Giant's Causeway in Northern Ireland and those of nearby Ulva. In all these cases, cooling on the upper and lower surfaces of the solidified lava resulted in contraction and fracturing, starting in a blocky tetragonal pattern and transitioning to a regular hexagonal fracture pattern with fractures perpendicular to the cooling surfaces. As cooling continued these cracks gradually extended toward the centre of the flow, forming the long hexagonal columns we see in the wave eroded cross-section today. Similar hexagonal fracture patterns are found in desiccation cracks in mud where contraction is due to loss of water instead of cooling. Its size and naturally arched roof, and the eerie sounds produced by the echoes of waves, give it the atmosphere of a natural cathedral. The cave's Gaelic name, An Uaimh Bhinn, means "the melodious cave." The cave was brought to the attention of the
    7.00
    1 votes
    181
    Langdon Bay, Kent

    Langdon Bay, Kent

    • Category: Bay
    Langdon Bay is a bay in east Kent, England. It is two miles east of the town of Dover, and is named after the nearby villages of Langdon, East Langdon and West Langdon. The cliffs around it are known as the Langdon Cliffs, there is a prominent zig-zag path that leads from the cliff top to the beach, this is visible from the sea. The bay is known for the Langdon Bay Hoard - a collection of Bronze Age scrap metal found nearby in 1974. This includes bronze axes of a French type and is thought to represent the cargo of a boat that was caught in a storm just after leaving the English coast, either jettisoned to lighten and save the boat or sunk with it (if there was a wreck, it is now lost). This demonstrates that cross-channel trade was already occurring in the Bronze Age, if not earlier. It is owned by the British Museum but on long-term loan and display in Dover Museum in Market Square, Dover. Three searchlight batteries - known as the Langdon Lights - were built into the base of the bay's cliffs during World War II, so that any ship trying to enter the bay could be illuminated while it was checked, though one has been destroyed by a cliff fall. The area above the cliffs is now a
    7.00
    1 votes
    182
    Linton Bay

    Linton Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Linton Bay is a bay on the east coast on the island of Shapinsay in the Orkney Islands. To the north of Linton Bay are the headlands of Ness of Ork, and to the south is situated The Foot. The ancient monument, the Broch of Burroughston is located slightly to the north of Linton Bay.
    7.00
    1 votes
    183
    Oxwich Bay

    Oxwich Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Oxwich Bay (Welsh: Bae Oxwich) is a bay on the south of the Gower Peninsula, Wales. Its landscape features sand dunes, salt marshes and woodland. Oxwich Bay includes a 2.5-mile long sandy beach, accessible from the village of Oxwich. It is a popular spot for swimming and watersports including diving, sailing, water skiing and windsurfing. There is a public footpath along the cliffs from Oxwich Bay, around Oxwich Point, and to Port Eynon Bay. Buses run every couple of hours between Oxwich and Port Eynon. A wetland site at the rear of the dunes forms Oxwich Burrows National Nature Reserve. The dunes are crossed by a small stream called Nicholaston Pill. The bay ends at the eastern end with the cliffs of High Tor; but at low tide, a continuous sandy beach connects with Three Cliffs Bay beyond. Submarine cables leave the mainland of Britain from Oxwich. These include the SOLAS cable across the Irish Sea, and the TAT-11 and Gemini North transatlantic telephone cables. These latter two do not terminate here but instead continue on to France (TAT-11) and England (Gemini). On 1 February 2007, The Travel Magazine named Oxwich beach the most beautiful in Britain.
    7.00
    1 votes
    184
    Palliser Bay

    Palliser Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Palliser Bay is located at the southern end of the North Island of New Zealand, to the southeast of Wellington. It runs for 40 kilometres along the Cook Strait coast from Turakirae Head at the southern end of the Rimutaka Ranges to Cape Palliser, the North Island's southernmost point. Inland from the bay is the plain of the Ruamahanga River, which has its outflow in the bay. This river flows into and also drains Lake Wairarapa, the shores of which are only 10 kilometres from the coast. There are several notable geographical features in the area, including the Pūtangirua Pinnacles, Kupe's Sail and the Whatarangi Bluff - where erosion has had dramatic effects on the coastline.
    7.00
    1 votes
    185
    Sahara

    Sahara

    • Category: Desert
    The Sahara (Arabic: الصحراء الكبرى‎, Aṣ-Ṣaḥrā´ al-Kubrā, "The Great Desert") is the world's largest hot desert and third largest desert, after Antarctica and the Arctic. At over 9,400,000 square kilometres (3,600,000 sq mi), it covers most of North Africa, making it almost as large as China or the United States. The Sahara stretches from the Red Sea, including parts of the Mediterranean coasts, to the outskirts of the Atlantic Ocean. To the south, it is delimited by the Sahel, a belt of semi-arid tropical savanna that composes the northern region of central and western Sub-Saharan Africa. Some of the sand dunes can reach 180 metres (590 ft) in height. The name comes from the Arabic word for desert: (صَحراء ṣaḥrāʾ [sˤɑħrɑːʔ] ( listen)). The Sahara's boundaries are the Atlantic Ocean on the west, the Atlas Mountains and the Mediterranean on the north, the Red Sea on the east, and the Sudan (region) and the valley of the Niger River on the south. The Sahara is divided into western Sahara, the central Ahaggar Mountains, the Tibesti Mountains, the Aïr Mountains (a region of desert mountains and high plateaus), Ténéré desert and the Libyan Desert (the most arid region). The highest peak
    7.00
    1 votes
    186
    Saint George Bay

    Saint George Bay

    • Category: Bay
    The Saint George Bay (known in Lebanon as Golfe de Saint-Georges) is located on the northern coast of the city of Beirut in Lebanon. The Saint George Bay is believed to be the place where Saint George slew the dragon. Today the bay that starts from the Cape of Beirut, houses a marina and the famous land mark, Saint George hotel, who's name derives from the bay, and it extends to the north until the marina of Dbayeh. Highrise apartment buildings and hotels overlook the bay and its palm-lined promenade, the Corniche. The Port of Beirut occupies the eastern part of the bay. The Beirut River empties in the bay. The bay was the scene of an annual international water ski championship, from 1955 until the beginning of the war. The land fill of large parts of the bay of Saint George and namely a lagoon which was to contain all the water sports has made water skying events impossible.
    7.00
    1 votes
    187
    Sandfly Bay

    Sandfly Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Sandfly Bay is a sandy bay with large dunes, located on the eastern side of the Otago Peninsula, New Zealand, 15 km east of central Dunedin. The bay is accessed from Seal Point Road or a walking track from Sandymount. At the northeastern end of the bay the Department of Conservation (DOC) has constructed wooden hides for the public and DOC staff to view Yellow-eyed Penguin, Megadyptes antipodes, activity without disturbance. The beach is a popular site for the Hooker's Sea Lion, Phocarctos hookeri, to bask on the sand. It is also an excellent site for washed up Durvillea antarctica to be found. The bay is often thought by locals to have been named for a small biting insect known as the sandfly, but this is incorrect. It was named for the sand which, given the windy nature of this coast, flies from the tall dunes surrounding the bay. A small island which lies at the northeastern end of the bay is known as Lion Rock or Lion's Head Rock, due to its shape. A distinctive landmark, it can be clearly seen in good weather from Second Beach, close to Saint Clair, 18 kilometres to the west.
    7.00
    1 votes
    188
    Bay of Pigs

    Bay of Pigs

    • Category: Bay
    The Bay of Pigs (Spanish: Bahía de Cochinos) is an inlet of the Gulf of Cazones on the southern coast of Cuba. By 1910, it was included in Santa Clara Province, and then instead to Las Villas Province by 1961, but in 1976, it was re-assigned to Matanzas Province, when the original six provinces of Cuba were re-organized into 14 new Provinces of Cuba. This bay is about 30 kilometers south of Jagüey Grande, 70 kilometers west of the city of Cienfuegos, and 150 kilometers southeast from the capital city Havana. On the western side of the bay there are coral reefs bordering the main Zapata Swamp, part of the Zapata Peninsula. On the eastern side are beaches bordering margins of firm ground with mangroves and extensive areas of swampland to the north and east. At the north end of the bay is the village of Buena Ventura adjacent to Playa Larga (Long Beach), and 35 kilometers southeast of that is Playa Girón (Giron beach) at the village of Girón, named after the notorious French pirate Gilberto Giron (c.1604). Playa Girón and Playa Larga were the landing sites for seaborne forces of armed Cuban exiles in the Bay of Pigs Invasion, an American CIA-sponsored attempt to overthrow the new
    6.00
    2 votes
    189
    Bracklesham Bay

    Bracklesham Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Bracklesham Bay is a coastal bay on the west side of the Manhood Peninsula in West Sussex, England. The bay looks out onto the English Channel and the Isle of Wight is visible from the beach, as is the Nab Tower lighthouse and the Spinnaker Tower in Portsmouth. The bay is sandy and backed with shingle. The beach is popular with windsurfers, divers, surfers (mostly longboarders given the nature of the waves), stand up paddle surfers, and also fossil hunters, as the Bracklesham Beds, a well known fossil bed, is visible at low tide. The bedrock is London clay, and bits of the clay can be found on the sands. The villages of Bracklesham and East Wittering are situated in the centre of the bay and it is bordered by the town of Selsey on the southern/eastern tip, and the village of West Wittering on the west side. The nearest city is Chichester, which is eight miles to the north. In May 1944 Bracklesham Bay was one site used in Exercise Fabius. The remains of at least one Valentine tank can be found ten metres underwater. Bracklesham Bay is mentioned in the track 'Saturdays Kids' (Paul Weller) on the 1979 album by The Jam, 'Setting Sons'; "Save up their money for a holiday/ To Selsey
    6.00
    2 votes
    190
    Cape Cod Bay

    Cape Cod Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Cape Cod Bay is a large bay of the Atlantic Ocean adjacent to the U.S. state of Massachusetts. Measuring 604 square miles (1,560 km) below a line drawn from Brant Rock in Marshfield to Race Point in Provincetown, Massachusetts, it is enclosed by Cape Cod to the south and east, and Plymouth County, Massachusetts, to the west. To the north of Cape Cod Bay lie Massachusetts Bay and the Atlantic Ocean. Cape Cod Bay is the southernmost extremity of the Gulf of Maine. Cape Cod Bay is one of the bays adjacent to Massachusetts that give it the name Bay State. The others are Narragansett Bay, Buzzards Bay, and Massachusetts Bay. In 1524 the great Italian navigator Giovanni da Verrazzano was the first European to discover Cape Cod Bay, his claim proved by a map of 1529 which clearly outlined Cape Cod. In 1620, the Pilgrims first sheltered in Provincetown Harbor where they signed the Mayflower Compact, the first democratic document signed in the New World. Most of Cape Cod is composed of glacially derived rocks, sands, and gravels. The last glaciation ended about 10,000 years BC. During the end of the last glaciation, Cape Cod Bay was probably a large freshwater lake with drainages across
    6.00
    2 votes
    191
    Kowloon Bay

    Kowloon Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Kowloon Bay (traditional Chinese: 九龍灣; simplified Chinese: 九龙湾; Mandarin Pinyin: Jiǔlóngwān; Jyutping: Gau Lung Waan ) is a bay and a town in Hong Kong. The bay is located at the east of the Kowloon Peninsula and north of Hong Kong Island. It is the eastern portion of Victoria Harbour, between Hung Hom and Lei Yue Mun. The bay was divided into half when the runway of the former Kai Tak International Airport was constructed in the middle of the bay. The reclamation of north-eastern Kowloon Bay near Ngau Tau Kok is also named Kowloon Bay. It was formerly known as Ngau Tau Kok Industrial Area. After the construction of MTR Kowloon Bay Station, the area is referred as Kowloon Bay. The area near the MTR station is residential while the area near the shore is industrial. The area is traditionally an extension of Ngau Tau Kok, and thus facilities such as Ngau Tau Kok Police Station are located there. Administratively, the reclamation of Kowloon Bay and water east of the runway except the airport area is part of Kwun Tong District. The airport and the waters of the district, on the other hand, belong to Kowloon City District. The bay has undergone massive reclamation over the past century.
    6.00
    2 votes
    192
    Lulworth Cove

    Lulworth Cove

    • Category: Cove
    Lulworth Cove is a cove near the village of West Lulworth, on the Jurassic Coast World Heritage Site in Dorset, southern England. The cove is one of the world's finest examples of such a landform, and is a tourist location with approximately 500,000 visitors a year, of whom about 30% visit in July and August. It is close to the rock arch of Durdle Door and other Jurassic Coast sites. It was featured on the TV programme Seven Natural Wonders as one of the wonders of the South, appeared in the 1976 Mike Leigh TV film Nuts in May and was used for location filming in the Doctor Who serial The Curse of Fenric. The cove has formed because there are bands of rock of alternating resistance running parallel to the shore (a concordant coastline). On the seaward side the clays and sands have been eroded away. A narrow (less than 30 metre) band of Portland limestone rocks forms the shoreline. Behind this is a narrow (less than 50 metre) band of slightly less resistant Purbeck limestone. Behind this are 300–350 metres of much less resistant clays and greensands (Wealden clays, Gault and Upper Greensand). Forming the back of the cove is a 250 metre wide band of chalk, which is considerably more
    6.00
    2 votes
    193
    Saco Bay

    Saco Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Saco Bay is a small arcuate embayment of the Gulf of Maine on the Atlantic coast of Maine in the United States. The name derives "from a map of the coastline made in 1525 by the Spanish explorer Esteban Gómez. He named the bay Bahio de Saco (Bay of the Sack)." Saco Bay is approximately 10 mi (16 km) wide, running from the Fletcher Neck (the Biddeford Pool peninsula) and the mouth of the Saco River in York County north to the Scarborough River and Prouts Neck in Scarborough, Cumberland County, Maine, approximately 13 mi (19 km) southwest of Portland. The shoreline of the bay makes the largest sand beach and salt marsh system in Maine and contains the longest unbroken stretch of beach in the state. Construction of a railroad causeway in the 19th century led to the closure of the Little River Inlet. This tidal re-entrant had formed the county line between York and Cumberland counties and the town line between Scarborough and Old Orchard Beach. Prior to its closure, the Pine Point region of Scarborough was a barrier island, the only one in Maine. Behind Pine Point is the state run wildlife management area for Scarborough Marsh. The marsh is 15% of the state's total tidal marsh area and
    6.00
    2 votes
    194
    Waimea Bay

    Waimea Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Waimea Bay is located in Haleiwa on the North Shore of O‘ahu in the Hawaiian Islands at the mouth of the Waimea River. Waimea Valley extends behind Waimea Bay. Waimea means "Red Water" in Hawaiian. Captain Charles Clerke aboard HMS Resolution stopped at Waimea Bay on 28 February 1779. Clerke had shortly before taken command of the ship after Capt. James Cook was killed at Kealakekua Bay on 14 February. Waimea Bay was the only O‘ahu anchorage visited by the expedition. Waimea Valley was densely populated at the time, and the remains of Pu‘u o Mahuka, an important heiau (Hawaiian temple) can still be seen above the bay. Pu'u o Mahuka Heiau State Monument is a Native Hawaiian historical site located just above the bay, off Pupukea Road. It is a historically important site on the North Shore, as well as providing a view of Waimea Bay and the Waianae Mountain range. Waimea Bay is located along Kamehameha Highway. The bay is on the north-west side of the highway (at the entrance point). In winter, Waimea and other North Shore locations such as Pipeline and Sunset Beach host a number of surfing contests because of the large waves found here. These waves are created by winter storms in the
    6.00
    2 votes
    195
    Western Port

    Western Port

    • Category: Bay
    Western Port, is sometimes called "Western Port Bay", is a large tidal bay in southern Victoria, Australia opening into Bass Strait. It is the second largest bay in Victoria. Geographically, it is dominated by the two large islands; French Island and Phillip Island. Contrary to its name, it lies to the east of the larger Port Phillip, and is separated from it by the Mornington Peninsula. It is visited by Australian Fur Seals, whales and dolphins, as well as many migratory waders and seabirds. It is listed under the Ramsar Convention as a wetland of international significance. The area around the bay and the two main islands were originally part of the Boonwurrung nation's territory prior to European settlement. Western Port was first seen by Europeans in 1798 when an exploration crew in a whaleboat led by George Bass, journeyed south from Sydney to explore Australia's south eastern coastline. Due in most part to a lack of food, the expedition was halted, spending two weeks in Western Port before returning to Sydney. As it was the most westerly charted point at the time, it was named Western Port, however it actually lies in the eastern half of Victoria and to the east of the larger
    6.00
    2 votes
    196
    Gulf of Gökova

    Gulf of Gökova

    • Category: Bay
    Gulf of Gökova (Turkish: Gökova Körfezi) or Gulf of Kerme (Turkish: Kerme Körfezi, Greek: Κεραμεικός κόλπος, Latin: Ceramicus Sinus, English: Ceramic Gulf or Gulf of Cos), is a long (100 km), narrow gulf of the Aegean Sea between Bodrum Peninsula and Datça Peninsula in south-west Turkey. Administratively, Gulf of Gökova coastline includes portions of the districts of, clockwise, Bodrum, Milas, Muğla, Ula, Marmaris and Datça. The Greek island of Kos lies along the entry into the Gulf. Bodrum, located in its northwest reaches, is the only large city on the gulf today. In ancient times, alongside Halicarnassus (modern-day Bodrum), the city of Ceramus, located midway along the gulf's northern shore and after which the gulf was named, was also an important urban center. Across Ceramus (Gereme) (in the modern township of Ören, at a short distance from the gulf's southern shore and not far from its outlying waters, was another historical site of note, called Cedrae in ancient times. Cedrae was located in Sedir Island, which was prized by visitors for its beach and of which some remains still exist. The alluvial plain, also named Gökova, which extends to the Gulf's end, is the location of
    5.50
    2 votes
    197
    Bonavista Bay

    Bonavista Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Bonavista Bay is a large bay located on the northeast coast of the island of Newfoundland in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador. It opens directly onto the Atlantic Ocean. The bay is demarcated by Cape Freels to the north and Cape Bonavista to the south. Cape Bonavista is also the eastern limit of the Bonavista Peninsula, which forms the bay's southern shore. The topography of the central western shore of the bay is composed of numerous channels and islands. This area also hosts Terra Nova National Park. Containing many densely forested islands, Bonavista bay is virtually landlocked. With temperatures sometimes reaching -1°C, it attracts the occasional iceberg. However, due to the dense forestry, the region inside the bay can sometimes be warm enough for lobster cultivation. The bay has a small ferry operated by the provincial government providing service from Burnside to St. Brendan's on Cottel's Island.
    4.67
    3 votes
    198
    Poole Bay

    Poole Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Poole Bay is a bay in the English Channel, off the coast of Dorset in southern England, which runs from the mouth of Poole Harbour in the west to Hengistbury Head in the east. It consists of steep sandstone cliffs and several 'chines' that allow easy access to the sandy beaches below. Poole Bay is a relatively shallow embayment delimited by the Poole Harbour tidal inlet to the southwest and Hengistbury Head/Christchurch Ledge. The coast along the bay is continuously built up, and is part of the South East Dorset conurbation, including parts of the towns of Poole, Bournemouth and Christchurch. The bay is often erroneously referred to as Bournemouth Bay, because much of it is occupied by Bournemouth. Many of the beaches along Poole Bay were replenished during the winters of 2005 and 2006 with 1.1 million m³ of sand dredged from Poole Harbour and 700,000 m³ of sand dredged from a Licensed Area off the Isle of Wight. A dedicated website has more information and charted progress with photos and a daily diary . The project was completed on January 23, 2007. The area of Poole Bay was predominantly created during the Pleistocene period, when the Solent river ran across the whole of South
    4.67
    3 votes
    199
    Bay of Bengal

    Bay of Bengal

    • Category: Bay
    The Bay of Bengal, the largest bay in the world, forms the northeastern part of the Indian Ocean. Roughly triangular in shape, it is bordered mostly by India and Sri Lanka to the west, Bangladesh to the north, and Burma (Myanmar) and the Andaman and Nicobar Islands to the east. The Bay of Bengal occupies an area of 2,172,000 km². A number of large rivers – the Ganges and its distributaries such as Padma and Hooghly, Brahmaputra and its distributaries such as Jamuna, Meghna, Irrawaddy River, Godavari, Mahanadi, Krishna and Kaveri – flow into the Bay of Bengal. Among the important ports are Cuddalore, Ennore, Chennai, Karaikal, Pondicherry, Tuticorin, Kakinada, Machilipatnam, Visakhapatnam, Gangavaram, Krishnapatnam, Paradip, Kolkata, Mongla, Chittagong and Yangon. The International Hydrographic Organization defines the limits of the Bay of Bengal as follows: On the East. A line running from Cape Negrais (16°03'N) in Burma through the larger islands of the Andaman group, in such a way that all the narrow waters between the islands lie to the Eastward of the line and are excluded from the Bay of Bengal, as far as a point in Little Andaman Island in latitude 10°48'N, longitude 92°24'E
    6.00
    1 votes
    200
    False Bay

    False Bay

    • Category: Bay
    False Bay (Afrikaans Valsbaai) is a body of water defined by Cape Hangklip (Dutch/Afrikaans for "Hang(ing)-rock") and the Cape Peninsula in the extreme South-West of South Africa. The eastern and western shores of the bay are very rocky and even mountainous; in places large cliffs plunge into deep water. Notable peaks associated with the bay include Koeelberg (1269m / 4163 feet), which rises from the water itself forming the highest point of the Kogelberg, as well as Sommerset Sneeukop (1590m / 5217 feet) and Wemmershoek Peak (1788m / 5866 feet) which are clearly visible across the bay. The highest peak visible across False Bay is Du Toits Peak near Paarl (1995m / 6545 feet). The northern shore, however, is defined by a very long, curving, sandy beach. This sandy, northern perimeter of the bay is the southern edge of the area known as the Cape Flats. The bay is 30 kilometres wide at its widest point. Some 20 kilometres across the Cape Flats there is a smaller, C-shaped bay — Table Bay — with Robben Island guarding its entrance. The central districts of Cape Town lie around Table Bay. Devil's Peak, Table Mountain, Lion's Head and Signal Hill form an amphitheatre along the western
    6.00
    1 votes
    201
    Gardiners Bay

    Gardiners Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Gardiners Bay is a small arm of the Atlantic Ocean, approximately 10 mi (16 km) long and 8 mi (13 km) wide in the U.S. state of New York between the two flukelike peninsulas at the eastern end of Long Island. It is bounded on its eastern end, where it connects to Block Island Sound, by Gardiners Island and Promised Land. Adjoining harbors include Three Mile Harbor, Clearwater beach, Acabonack Harbor, and Lazy Point's Napeague harbor. Native fish include; Striped Bass, Bluefish, Fluke, Yellowtail, flounder, blackfish, weakfish, Porgy, sea Robbin, and sea skate. The area is fed by the nearby estuaries of Three mile Harbor, Acabonack Creek, and Napeague, which produce ideal environments for shellfish and crustaceans. Blue claw crab, oysters, and hard shell clams, scallops, and conch are abundant throughout these areas. It is bounded on the western end by Shelter Island. It connects by two channels at the north and south end of Shelter Island to Great Peconic Bay. During the American Revolutionary War and the War of 1812, the bay was controlled by the British, who used Gardiners Island to store provisions. The British fleet assembled in Cherry Harbor in the bay before sailing to
    6.00
    1 votes
    202
    Kalahari Desert

    Kalahari Desert

    • Category: Desert
    The Kalahari Desert (in Afrikaans "Dorsland", meaning "thirst land" or "thirsty land") is a large semi-arid sandy savannah in Southern Africa extending 900,000 square kilometres (350,000 sq mi), covering much of Botswana and parts of Namibia and South Africa. As semi-desert, with huge tracts of excellent grazing after good rains, the Kalahari supports more animals and plants than a true desert, such as the Namib Desert to the west. Kalahari desert should not be confused with the Namib desert as these are separate deserts that have different causes. The Kalahari is formed in a region of subsidence in the Hadley cell known as the "horse latitudes" and also its continentality, but the cause of the Namib desert is the cold Benguela current in the Atlantic ocean. There are small amounts of rainfall and the summer temperature is very high. It usually receives 3–7.5 inches (76–190 mm) of rain per year. The surrounding Kalahari Basin covers over 2,500,000 square kilometres (970,000 sq mi) extending farther into Botswana, Namibia and South Africa, and encroaching into parts of Angola, Zambia and Zimbabwe. The only permanent river, the Okavango, flows into a delta in the northwest, forming
    6.00
    1 votes
    203
    Laizhou Bay

    Laizhou Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Laizhou Bay (simplified Chinese: 莱州湾; traditional Chinese: 萊州灣; pinyin: Láizhōu Wān) is the southern arm of the Bohai Sea (also known as the Bohai Gulf, or just Bo Hai), which is a large relatively shallow extension of Korea Bay (Northern Yellow Sea) behind the Liaodong Peninsula to the north, and the Shandong Peninsula to the south. Both peninsulas are roughly triangular in shape and point towards the Bohai Strait, the mouth opening out to the Yellow Sea via the southern region of Korea Bay.
    6.00
    1 votes
    204
    Liverpool Bay

    Liverpool Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Liverpool Bay is a bay of the Irish Sea between northeast Wales, Cheshire, Lancashire and Merseyside to the east of the Irish Sea. The bay is a classic example of a region of freshwater influence. Liverpool Bay has historically suffered from reduced oxygen content from prior massive discharges of sewage sludge, according to C.Michael Hogan. The rivers Alt, Clwyd, Dee, Ribble and Mersey drain into the bay. The bay is littered with wrecks and has many dive sites. The bay also contains several oil and gas fields including the Douglas Complex, with a combined daily capacity (January 2008) of 60,000 barrels. The UK's first major offshore wind farm, North Hoyle, is located in the south of the bay, which is a busy shipping route to the Mersey Docks. The land area around the bay is occasionally referred to as the "Liverpool Bay Area". Though the term is seen by some as a possible official alternative to Merseyside, it is more often used to describe a much wider area which may include the West Lancashire towns of Ormskirk and Skelmersdale to the north, St Helens and Warrington to the east and Chester plus North Wales to the south. In this sense, it is often promoted by local thinkers and
    6.00
    1 votes
    205
    Manila Bay

    Manila Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Manila Bay is a natural harbor which serves the Port of Manila (on Luzon), in the Philippines.The bay is considered to be one of the best natural harbors in Southeast Asia and one of the finest in the world. Strategically located around the capital city of the Philippines, Manila Bay facilitated commerce and trade between the Philippines and its neighbouring countries, becoming the gateway for socio-economic development even prior to Spanish occupation. With an area of 1,994 km (769.9 sq mi), and a coastline of 190 km (118.1 mi), Manila Bay is situated in the western part of Luzon and is bounded by Cavite and Metro Manila on the east, Bulacan and Pampanga on the north, and Bataan on the west and northwest. Manila Bay drains approximately 17,000 km (6,563.7 sq mi) of watershed area, with the Pampanga River contributing about 49% of the freshwater influx. With an average depth of 17 m (55.8 ft), it is estimated to have a total volume of 28.9 billion cubic meters (28.9 cubic km). Entrance to the bay is 19 km (11.8 mi) wide and expands to a width of 48 km (29.8 mi). However, width of the bay varies from 22 km (13.7 mi) at its mouth and expanding to 60 km (37.3 mi) at its widest point.
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    206
    Mirabello Bay

    Mirabello Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Mirabello Bay is an embayment of the Sea of Crete on the eastern part of Crete in present day Greece. This locale was important in prehistoric settlement of the island of Crete. The coast of the Bay of Mirabello was noted for its role in copper metallurgy development in the period circa 3000 BC. In the Late Minoan period, cities on high ground overlooking the Bay of Mirabello were founded as cities of refuge, including Karphi. Later in the Dorian Invasion, settlement occurred of other hilltop cities overlooking the Bay of Mirabello; an example of this phase of settlement was the city of Lato.
    6.00
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    207
    Tasman Bay

    Tasman Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Tasman Bay is a large V-shaped bay at the north end of New Zealand's South Island. Located in the centre of the island's northern coast, it stretches along 120 kilometres (75 mi) of coastline and is 70 kilometres (43 mi) across at its widest point. It is an arm of the Tasman Sea, lying on the western approach to Cook Strait. At the bay's western extremity, the land around the bay is rough and densely forested. Separation Point, the westernmost point of the bay, is located in Abel Tasman National Park and separates Tasman Bay from its smaller neighbour, Golden Bay. To the east, the land is also steep, with the westernmost points of sea-drowned valleys of the Marlborough Sounds. D'Urville Island sits to the northeast of Tasman Bay's easternmost point. Arrow Rock is situated off the coast of Nelson. The land between these two extremes is more gently rolling, and also includes the coastal plains around the mouth of the Waimea River at the bay's southernmost point. Other rivers entering the sea along the coast of the bay include the Riwaka, the Motueka and Serpentine Rivers. The long low form of Rabbit Island is located close to the bay's south coast. Tasman Bay contains the rare rock
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    208
    Aberlady Bay

    Aberlady Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Aberlady Bay is a bay in East Lothian, Scotland between Aberlady and Gullane. In 1952, Aberlady Bay became the UK's first Local Nature Reserve (LNR) and is served by the East Lothian Council Rangers. The Scottish Ornithologists' Club has Waterston House as its headquarters at Aberlady, with panoramic views of the Bay. Aberlady Bay is part of the John Muir Way, a long distance footpath from Fisherrow (Musselburgh) to Dunglass. It is also the East Lothian Section of the transnational North Sea Trail, a path network connecting seven countries and 26 areas. The wrecks of eight historic (19th or early 20th century) fishing vessels at Kilspindie have been designated as maritime scheduled ancient monuments. Two wrecks of XT-craft, training versions of the X craft can be seen – in 1946, the craft were towed to the bay, then moored to a concrete block and used for target practice by aircraft of the Royal Air Force. The wrecks of the submarines lie much closer to the low-water mark than the high-water mark and tides in the bay rise very quickly – those wishing to examine the wrecks should thus take note of the tides and leave plenty of time to return to the shore from the wrecks.
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    209
    Golden Bay

    Golden Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Golden Bay is a shallow, paraboloid shaped bay at the northwest end of New Zealand's South Island. An arm of the Tasman Sea, the bay lies southwest of Cook Strait and west of Tasman Bay. It is separated from the sea by the Farewell Spit. The Aorere and Takaka Rivers flow into the bay from the south. It is known for being a popular tourist destination, because of its good weather and relaxed, friendly lifestyle. The west and northern regions of the bay are largely unpopulated. Along its southern coast are the towns of Takaka and Collingwood, and also the Abel Tasman National Park. Separation Point, the natural boundary between Golden and Tasman Bays is situated within the park. In December 2011, it (as well as much of the Nelson/Tasman region) was hit by heavy rain and flooding, which caused to many homes around the Pohara/Ligar Bay/Tata Beach/Wainui area. The road to Totaranui, a popular isolated tourist destination was badly damaged and is due to reopen on 29 June 2012. The floods meant a loss of custom for many shops and businesses in the peak tourist season. By June 2012, the entirety of Golden Bay was open and operating as normal. Its beaches are popular locations for retirees
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    210
    Liscannor Bay

    Liscannor Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Liscannor Bay is a bay on the west coast of Ireland in County Clare. Hag's Head provides the northern border for the bay and Cream Point is the southern boundary. The village of Liscannor is located on the north side of the bay, while the village of Lahinch is on the eastern end of the bay. The River Dealagh and the River Inagh unite on the east side of the Lahinch Golf Club and enter Liscannor Bay together. The N67 and the R478 combine to outline the bay by road. The Cliffs of Moher begin at Hag's Head and run north along the coast.
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    211
    Pearl Harbor

    Pearl Harbor

    • Category: Bay
    Pearl Harbor, known to Hawaiians as Puʻuloa, is a lagoon harbor on the island of Oʻahu, Hawaiʻi, west of Honolulu. Much of the harbor and surrounding lands is a United States Navy deep-water naval base. It is also the headquarters of the U.S. Pacific Fleet. The attack on Pearl Harbor by the Empire of Japan on Sunday, December 7, 1941, brought the United States into World War II. Pearl Harbor was originally an extensive deep embayment called Wai Nomi (meaning, “pearl water”) or Puʻuloa (meaning, “long hill”) by the Hawaiians. Puʻuloa was regarded as the neighbor of the dolphin god, Kaʻahupahau, and his brother (or dad), Kahiʻuka, in Hawaiian legends. According to tradition, Keaunui, the head of the powerful Ewu chiefs, is credited with cutting a navigable channel near the present Puʻuloa saltworks, by which made the estuary, known as “Pearl Lake,” accessible to navigation. Making due allowance for legendary amplification, the estuary already had an outlet for its waters where the present gap is; but Keaunui is typically given the credit for widening and deepening it. During the early 19th century, Pearl Harbor was not used for large ships due to its shallow entrance. The interest of
    5.00
    2 votes
    212
    Assonet Bay

    Assonet Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Assonet Bay is a small inland bay in Assonet, a village within the town of Freetown, Massachusetts. The Assonet River connects the waters of the bay with the Taunton River.
    4.50
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    213
    Killary Harbour

    Killary Harbour

    • Category: Bay
    Killary Harbour/An Caoláire Rua is a fjord located in the West of Ireland in the heart of Connemara which forms a natural border between counties Galway and Mayo. It is 16 kilometres long and in the centre over 45 metres deep. It is one of three glacial fjords that exist in Ireland, the others being Lough Swilly and Carlingford Lough. On its northern shore lies the mountains of Mweelrea Connacht's highest mountain rising to 814 metres. To the south rise the Maumturk Mountains and the Twelve Bens. The area contains some of Ireland's most awe-inspiring and dramatic scenery. There are two minor settlements nearby. On the southern side near the mouth of the fjord lies the hamlet of Rossroe while Leenaun lies inland to the east. Close to Rosroe there is an old building which now houses a hostel. This building was formerly a modest house which was used by Ludwig Wittgenstein, the famous philosopher, as a quiet place to write shortly after World War II. A plaque acknowledging this was unveiled by President Mary Robinson in 1993. Nearby lies the so-called Green Road, a rough road running along the side of the fjord back east towards Leenane at the head of the fjord. It stretches for
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    2 votes
    214
    Swansea Bay

    Swansea Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Swansea Bay (Welsh: Bae Abertawe) is a bay on the Bristol Channel on the South Wales coast. Places on the bay include Mumbles, Swansea and Port Talbot. The River Neath, River Tawe, River Afan and Blackpill stream flow into the bay. Swansea Bay (and all of the upper reaches of the Bristol Channel) experiences one of the largest tidal ranges in the world with a maximum range of about 10 m. The shipping ports in Swansea Bay are Swansea Docks, Port Talbot Docks and Briton Ferry wharfs. Oyster fishing was once an important industry in Swansea Bay, employing 600 people at its height in the 1860s. However, overfishing, disease and pollution had all but wiped out the oyster population by 1920. In 2005 plans were announced to reintroduce the Oyster farming industry. The bay is lined with sandy beaches. Each stretch of beach within the bay has its own individual name: For the last two decades of the 20th century, the bay was blighted by pollution, partly from the surrounding heavy industry and partly from sewerage outlets being sited at inappropriate locations including the main one that was located just seaward of Mumbles Lighthouse. A pumping station inside the cliff adjacent to Knab Rock
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    2 votes
    215
    Alum Bay

    Alum Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Alum Bay is a bay near the westernmost point of the Isle of Wight, England, within sight of the Needles. Of geological interest and a tourist attraction, the bay is noted for its multi-coloured sand cliffs. Alum Bay is the location of a classic sequence of Eocene beds of soft sands and clays, separated by an unconformity from the underlying Cretaceous Chalk Formation that forms the adjoining headland of West High Down. Due to geological folding of the Alpine orogeny, the strata in the main section of the bay are vertical, with younger rocks to the west. The sands are coloured due to oxidised iron compounds formed under different conditions. Alum Bay Chine begins as a small wooded valley descending eastward from the junction of the B3322 and the road to Headon Hall. It soon broadens into the clay ravine through which the path and chairlift from Needles Park descend to the beach. On the clifftop there is an amusement park with fairground rides, souvenir shops and a restaurant. During the summer season a chair lift takes tourists to and from the pebble beach below. Alternatively, a footpath leads to the beach via Alum Bay Chine. From the beach boat trips frequently leave to tour the
    5.00
    1 votes
    216
    Iron Cove, New South Wales

    Iron Cove, New South Wales

    • Category: Bay
    Iron Cove is a bay on the Parramatta River, in the inner-west of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. It is approximately 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) due west of Sydney's central business district. It is surrounded by the suburbs of Birchgrove, Balmain, Rozelle, Lilyfield, Haberfield, Five Dock, Rodd Point, Russell Lea and Drummoyne. The bay extends from Longnose Point to the south-west. In the early days of the colony of New South Wales, the area was sometimes known as Long Cove, presumably for its long narrow shape. The origin of the name 'Iron Cove' is unclear. In his book on Sydney Harbour, P.R. Stephensen suggests that the name is derived from the iron shackles worn by convicts from Cockatoo Island who were forced to work in the area around the bay from 1839. However, he goes on to note that this is merely "a surmise". Another possible explanation for the name is that it was derived from the Ironbark trees that used to grow there. The island in the middle of the bay is called Rodd Island, in honour of Brent Clements Rodd. Iron Cove is crossed by the Iron Cove Bridge, which was first opened in 1882 and links Rozelle and Balmain to Drummoyne. The original bridge was
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    1 votes
    217
    Karamea Bight

    Karamea Bight

    • Category: Bay
    The Karamea Bight is the name given to a large bay in the Tasman Sea formed by a curved stretch of the West Coast of New Zealand's South Island. It stretches for 100 kilometres north from Cape Foulwind to just north of the mouth of the Heaphy River.
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    218
    Possession Bay

    Possession Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Possession Bay is a bay 2 miles (3.2 km) wide which recedes southwest for 5 miles (8 km), entered southeast of Black Head on the north coast of South Georgia, an island in the southern Atlantic Ocean. It was discovered and named by a British expedition under Cook in 1775. Cook made the first known landing on South Georgia in this vicinity. The great mariner Captain James Cook in HMS Resolution accompanied by HMS Adventure made the first landing, survey and mapping of South Georgia. As mandated by the Admiralty, on 17 January 1775 he took possession for Britain and renamed the island "Isle of Georgia" for King George III. German naturalist Georg Forster, who accompanied Cook during their landings in three separate places at Possession Bay on that day, wrote: Cook himself wrote in his log:  This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Possession Bay" (content from the Geographic Names Information System).
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    219
    Bay of Fundy

    Bay of Fundy

    • Category: Bay
    The Bay of Fundy (French: Baie de Fundy) is a bay on the Atlantic coast of North America, on the northeast end of the Gulf of Maine between the Canadian provinces of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, with a small portion touching the U.S. state of Maine. Some sources believe the name "Fundy" is a corruption of the French word "Fendu", meaning "split", while others believe it comes from the Portuguese fondo, meaning "funnel". The bay was also named Baie Française (French Bay) by explorer/cartographer Samuel de Champlain during a 1604 expedition led by Pierre Dugua, Sieur de Monts which resulted in a failed settlement attempt on St. Croix Island. The Bay of Fundy is known for having the highest tidal range in the world. Rivaled by Ungava Bay in northern Quebec, King Sound in Western Australia, Gulf of Khambhat in India, and the Severn Estuary in the UK, it has one of the highest vertical tidal ranges in the world. The Guinness Book of World Records (1975) declared that Burntcoat Head, Nova Scotia has the highest tides in the world: “The Natural World, Greatest Tides: The greatest tides in the world occur in the Bay of Fundy.... Burntcoat Head in the Minas Basin, Nova Scotia, has the
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    2 votes
    220
    Charlotte Bay

    Charlotte Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Charlotte Bay is a bay on the west coast of the Antarctic Peninsula indenting the west coast of Graham Land in a southeast direction for 12 nautical miles (22 km), between Reclus Peninsula and Cape Murray. The bay was discovered by Adrien de Gerlache during the 1897–99 Belgian Antarctic Expedition and named after the fiancée of Georges Lecointe, Gerlache's executive officer, hydrographer and second-in-command of the expedition. A Falkland Islands Dependency Survey (British Antarctic Survey from 1962) hut was built at Portal Point (64°30′0″S 61°45′58″W / 64.5°S 61.76611°W / -64.5; -61.76611), between Brabant Island and the Danco Coast. In the 1956–57 season, Wally Herbert, leader of a later British expedition, mapped the area from Hope Bay, and arrived at the Charlotte Bay hut for a scheduled pick up by the Shackleton. With no radio, Herbert had no way of knowing that the Shackleton had hit an iceberg and was returning to the Falkland Islands for repairs. The six men and their dogs were forced to stay in the hut for about three months without knowing their fate, and with diminishing food supplies.  This article incorporates public domain material from the United States
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    2 votes
    221
    Little Placentia Sound

    Little Placentia Sound

    • Category: Bay
    Little Placentia Sound is a small natural bay (sound) located within Placentia Bay on the Avalon Peninsula of the island of Newfoundland, in the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. During World War II the United States Navy built a naval base nearby at Argentia.
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    222
    Annapolis Basin

    Annapolis Basin

    • Category: Bay
    The Annapolis Basin is a sub-basin of the Bay of Fundy, located on the southwestern shores of the bay, along the northwestern shore of Nova Scotia and at the western end of the Annapolis Valley. The basin takes its name from the Annapolis River, which drains into its eastern end at the town of Annapolis Royal. The basin measures approximately 24 kilometres (15 mi) northeast-southwest and 6 kilometres (3.7 mi) at its widest from northwest to southeast. It is a sheltered and mostly shallow water body, framed by the ridges of the North Mountain and South Mountain ranges of the Annapolis Valley; the basin is geologically a continuation of the valley floor. A break in the North Mountain range at the northwestern edge of the basin, called Digby Gut, provides an outlet to the Bay of Fundy. The Bay Ferries Limited ferry service operating across the Bay of Fundy between Digby and Saint John maintains a terminal on the western shore of the basin near the Digby Gut. Rivers which drain into the basin include: Two major islands are located in the basin: The basin hosts several historic seaports, including: A former Royal Canadian Navy base and decommissioned Canadian Forces Base is located
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    223
    Callander Bay

    Callander Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Callander Bay is a bay at the extreme east of Lake Nipissing in Parry Sound District, Ontario, Canada. It is 3 kilometres (1.9 mi) in diameter and the main community of Callander is located on its east side. Callander Bay is an eroded Proterozoic volcanic pipe formed by the violent, supersonic eruption of a deep-origin volcano. These volcanoes originate at least three times as deep as most other volcanoes, and the resulting magma that is pushed toward the surface is high in magnesium and volatile compounds such as water and carbon dioxide. As the body of magma rises toward the surface, the volatile compounds transform to gaseous phase as pressure is reduced with decreasing depth. This sudden expansion propels the magma upward at rapid speeds, resulting in a shallow supersonic eruption. Callander Bay contains nepheline syenites, carbonatite, aegirine, amphibole, analcime, apatite, barite, biotite, calcite, cancrinite, chalcopyrite, chlorite, diopside, dolomite, fluorite, garnet, hematite, kaersutite, magnetite, muscovite, nepheline, olivine, perthite, pyrite, pyroxene and pyrrhotite.
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    224
    Cumberland East Bay

    Cumberland East Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Cumberland East Bay is a bay forming the eastern arm of Cumberland Bay, South Georgia. It is entered between Sappho Point and Barff Point, where it is nearly 3 miles (4.8 km) wide, and extends 8 miles (13 km) in a southeast direction. This feature was surveyed by the Swedish Antarctic Expedition, 1901–04, who named it "South Bay". It was remapped during 1926–29 by Discovery Investigations personnel and renamed "East Cumberland Bay", which is more descriptive of its geographic position. The shortened form "East Bay" was simultaneously used. Following the South Georgia Survey, 1951–52, the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee proposed that the name be altered to Cumberland East Bay and that all other names be rejected. This change brings together information about the whole of Cumberland Bay in one place in indexes, and will avoid confusion with East Bay in Prince Olav Harbour, South Georgia. On 22 April – 24 April, 1982, the British Special Boat Service attempted to cross Cumberland East Bay. They had landed in Hound Bay, and traversed the Sörling Valley, but were prevented from attacking Argentine positions by incessant ice and snow.
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    225
    Gorham's Cave

    Gorham's Cave

    • Category: Sea cave
    Gorham's Cave is a natural sea cave in the British Overseas Territory of Gibraltar, considered to be one of the last known habitations of the Neanderthals. It is located on the south east face of the Rock of Gibraltar. When first inhabited, it would have been approximately five kilometres from the shore but, due to changes in sea level, it is now only a few metres from the Mediterranean Sea. The cave is named after Captain A. Gorham of the 2nd Battalion Royal Munster Fusiliers who discovered it in 1907 when opening a fissure at the back of a sea cavern. Capt. Gorham inscribed his name and the date of his discovery in lamp-black on the wall of the cave which has borne his name ever since. After this initial discovery, it seems the cave was forgotten at least at an official level as Gibraltarian historian and potholer George Palao recalls an inscription on the cave wall that read J. J. Davies 1943. Since its discovery, Gorham's Cave has been a site of considerable archaeological interest. A few years later two Royal Engineers, craftsmen Keighley and Ward, were the first to find an archaeological deposit in the cave when the beach leading to Gorham’s Cave (Governor's Beach) became
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    226
    Osaka Bay

    Osaka Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Osaka Bay (大阪湾 Ōsaka-wan) is a bay in western Japan. As an eastern part of the Inland Sea, it is separated from the Pacific Ocean by the Kii Channel and from the neighbor western part of the Inland Sea by the Akashi Strait. Its western shore is formed by Awaji Island, and its northern and eastern shores are part of the Kansai metropolitan area. Major ports on Osaka Bay include Osaka, Kobe, Nishinomiya, Sakai, Amagasaki, and Hannan. A number of artificial islands have been created in Osaka Bay in past decades, including Kansai International Airport, Port Island, and Rokko Island. Several islands at the south end of Osaka Bay are part of the Seto Inland Sea National Park. Industries locate around Osaka Bay because there is a skilled and plentiful workforce, many port facilities, efficient linkages (from small to medium to large firms). There are good transport links (including the Shinkansen), room for expansion (land reclaimed form the sea), and a large local market (9 million). There has been a recent economic change in Osaka Bay: The decline of older 'heavy' industries such as Nippon Steel, and the expansion of 'new tech' companies such as ICT. There has been a growth in the
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    1 votes
    227
    Pechenga Bay

    Pechenga Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Pechenga Bay (Russian: Печенгская губа; also Petsamo Fjord and Pechenga Fjord) is a fjord-like bay of the Barents Sea on the Kola Peninsula in the Murmansk Oblast, Russia, about 25 km east from the border with Norway. It has rocky shores and stretches inland for 17 km. The Pechenga River discharges into the bay. The settlements of Pechenga and Liinakhamari are located on the shores of the bay.
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    228
    Pyasino Gulf

    Pyasino Gulf

    • Category: Bay
    The Pyasino Gulf, also known as Pyasina Bay, (Russian: Пясинский залив; Pyasinsky Zaliv) is a bay at the mouth of the Pyasina River in the Kara Sea. It is limited on its western side by the Kamennyye Islands and on its northeastern side by the Minina Skerries. The Bay of the Pyasina is surrounded by tundra coast. It is full of islands and island groups, foremost of which are the Zveroboy group (Zapadnyy, Malyy, Severnyy), the small Trio Island group and the Ptich'i Islands, the Labyrintovyye Islands, right at the large mouth of the river, the Begichevskaya Kosa string of islands and Farvaternyy Island. The climate in the area is severe, with long and bitter winters and frequent blizzards and gales. The bay is frozen for about nine months in a year and even in summer it is never quite free of ice floes. The Pyasino Gulf was explored by Baron Eduard von Toll during his last venture, the Russian Arctic Expedition of 1900-1903.
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    229
    Raritan Bay

    Raritan Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Raritan Bay is a bay located at the southern portion of Lower New York Bay between the U.S. states of New York and New Jersey and is part of the New York Bight. The bay is bounded on the northwest by New York's Staten Island, on the west by Perth Amboy, New Jersey, on the south by the Raritan Bayshore communities of Monmouth County, New Jersey, and on the east by Sandy Hook Bay. The bay is named after the Native American Raritans, a branch of the Lenape tribe who lived in the vicinity of the bay for thousands of years prior to the arrival of Dutch colonists in the 17th century. Archeological evidence suggests that humans were already in the region at the close of the Pleistocene. The early "Big Game Hunters" vanished, but the coastal regions were resettled by peoples accustomed to village-style living ("tidewater communities") that subsisted on hunting and gathering marine shellfish, and eventually, on agriculture. In pre-Columbian times "woodlands cultures" probably centered in the Ohio Valley became the dominant cultural influence in the region. Large shell middens were found around Raritan Bay and on Staten Island, a testament of the utilization of the bay for food by Algonquin
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    230
    San Rafael Bay

    San Rafael Bay

    • Category: Bay
    San Rafael Bay is an embayment of San Pablo Bay, the northern portion of the larger San Francisco Bay, on the west coast of the United States. The bay is located along the Marin County coast in county waters adjacent to the city of the same name. The embayment hosts the Marin Islands and the San Rafael Creek estuary; the river drains into the bay.
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    1 votes
    231
    Tanami Desert

    Tanami Desert

    • Category: Desert
    The Tanami Desert is a desert in northern Australia situated in the Northern Territory. It has a rocky terrain with small hills. The Tanami was the Northern Territory's final frontier and was not fully explored until well into the twentieth century. It is traversed by the Tanami Track. Under the name Tanami, it is one of the Interim Biogeographic Regionalisation for Australia (IBRA) regions. According to government commissions, the Tanami desert is uniquely "one of the most important biological areas to be found in Australia particularly as it provides refuge for several of Australia's rare and endangered species." The species that are found include: Significant bird species include: The Tanami Desert is Kukatja and Walpiri country. The Tjurabalan live at the edge of the desert. In July 2012, 10 million hectares, or 24.71 million acres of the desert area has been declared an indigenous protected area - or conservation zone
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    232
    Yuratski Bay

    Yuratski Bay

    • Category: Bay
    The Yuratski Bay (Russian: Yuratskaya Guba) is an inlet on the Siberian coast in the Kara Sea. It is located in the Gydan Peninsula and it is roughly 45 km long and 30 km wide at its widest point. Lat 71° 50’ N, long 77° 45’ E. This round and regular-shaped bay lies east of the Khalmyer Bay, between the estuaries of the Ob (Gulf of Ob) and the Yenisei River, which are two of the most important rivers of Russia and the world. Off its northern end lies Oleni Island. The peninsula formed between this bay and neighboring Khalmyer Bay is known as the Mamonta Peninsula (Poluostrov Mamonta). The Yuratski Bay is surrounded by low tundra coast and there are numerous river mouths on its shores. Winters are long and harsh in this area, so that the waters in the inlet remain frozen for at least nine months every year. The settlement of Matyuysale lies along the coast off the northeastern end of its mouth. This Bay is located in the Yamal-Nenets autonomous district administrative region of the Russian Federation.
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    233
    Antarctic Bay

    Antarctic Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Antarctic Bay is a bay 1 mile (1.6 km) wide which recedes southwest 4 miles (6 km), entered between Antarctic Point and Morse Point on the north coast of South Georgia. It was probably first sighted by a British expedition under James Cook in 1775, and was explored in 1902 by members of the Swedish Antarctic Expedition, under Otto Nordenskiöld, who named it for their ship, the Antarctic. An alternative (defunct) name for it was Woodward Harbour (Mount Woodward is nearby).
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    234
    Bay of Biscay

    Bay of Biscay

    • Category: Bay
    The Bay of Biscay (Spanish: Golfo de Vizcaya, more commonly named as Mar Cantábrico, in English Cantabrian Sea; French: Golfe de Gascogne; Basque: Bizkaiko golkoa; Breton: Pleg-mor Gwaskogn; Gascon: Golf de Gasconha) is a gulf of the northeast Atlantic Ocean located south of the Celtic Sea. It lies along the western coast of France from Brest south to the Spanish border, and the northern coast of Spain west to Cape Ortegal, and is named in English after the province of Biscay, in the Spanish Basque Country. The average depth is 1,744 metres (5,722 ft) and maximum depth is 5,049 metres (16,565 ft). Parts of the continental shelf extend far into the bay, resulting in fairly shallow waters in many areas and thus the rough seas for which the region is known. The Bay of Biscay is home to some of the Atlantic Ocean's fiercest weather. Large storms occur in the bay, especially during the winter months. Up until recent years it was a regular occurrence for merchant vessels to founder in Biscay storms, and many lives were lost. Improved ships and weather prediction have reduced the toll of the storms. The International Hydrographic Organization defines the limits of the Bay of Biscay as "a
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    235
    Bay of Isles

    Bay of Isles

    • Category: Bay
    The Bay of Isles is a bay 9 miles (14 km) wide and receding 3 miles (5 km), lying between Cape Buller and Cape Wilson along the north coast of South Georgia. It was discovered in 1775 by a British expedition under James Cook and so named by him because numerous islands (at least twelve) lie in the bay. Many of these islands are named after local birds, these include: The area, along with Grytviken is one of two Areas of Special Tourist Interest on the island. Of South Georgia's 31 breeding bird species, 17 are found here. Rosita Harbour is on the west coast of the bay.  This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Isles, Bay of" (content from the Geographic Names Information System).
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    236
    Drakes Bay, Costa Rica

    Drakes Bay, Costa Rica

    • Category: Bay
    Bahía Drake (Drakes Bay) is a small bay on the north side of the Osa Peninsula on the coast of southwestern Costa Rica. The main feature of Bahia Drake is Corcovado National Park. This wildlife preserve occupies about a third of the peninsula, and this is known for being one of the largest and most pristine parks in the country. The preservation of endemic species in the area has been made a priority by the Costa Rican government through the efforts of MINAE. Bahia Drake has been accessible only by sea until recently, and consequently remains a largely pristine low-land tropical rainforest. It is one of the last such remaining areas on the Pacific coast. Since about 1990, eco-tourism has been the principal economy of the area. Believed to be a port used by Sir Francis Drake in the 16th century and the location of one of the British pirate's fabled hidden treasures. The main town of Bahía Drake is Agujitas and has a population of about 1,000 residents. The bay is not on the beaten track and can only be reached by highway during the dry season. Boat service up the Sierpe River and air travel connect Bahía Drake to the rest of the world during the rainy season. There are miles and
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    Drygalski Fjord

    Drygalski Fjord

    • Category: Bay
    Drygalski Fjord is a bay 1 mile (1.6 km) wide which recedes northwestwards 7 miles (11 km), entered immediately north of Nattriss Head along the southeast coast of South Georgia. It was charted by the Second German Antarctic Expedition, 1911–12, under Wilhelm Filchner, and named for Professor Erich von Drygalski, the leader of the First German Antarctica Expedition, 1901–03. According to L. Harrison Matthews, Drygalski Fjord might have been the place where Anthony de la Roché spent two weeks during his stay in the island in April 1675.  This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Drygalski Fjord" (content from the Geographic Names Information System).
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    Flinders Bay

    Flinders Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Flinders Bay is a bay and locality that is immediately south of the townsite of Augusta, Western Australia, and close to the mouth of the Blackwood River and lies to the north east of Cape Leeuwin. Flinders Bay (34° 21' 00S. 115° 20' 00E) On Matthew Flinders Terra Australis Sheet 1 1801-1803 the area was originally known as Dangerous Bight. The bay runs from Point Matthew 1.5km East North East of Cape Leeuwin to Ledge Point some 8 km east. It was named by either James Stirling or Septimus Roe in 1829 or 1830. Matthew Flinders was first in the Bay on the 7th December 1801. The name of the locality of Flinders Bay is tied to the small settlement that had been a whaling and fishing location, as well as the terminus of the Busselton to Flinders Bay Branch Railway railway line (1920s - closed 1957), and the earlier Flinders Bay jetty (1890s). The settlement was in the earlier days considered to be separate from Augusta but now is more or less the southern portion of the larger community. The need for safe, and efficient transfer of whale watchers, and a safe mooring location in the Bay for fishermen has seen a proposal for a marina in 2004 which had included plans for the marina close
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    Funter Bay

    Funter Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Funter Bay is a two-mile-long (3 km) bay on the western side of Admiralty Island near its northern tip, in the Alexander Archipelago of the U.S. state of Alaska. It lies within the Hoonah-Angoon Census Area, in the Unorganized Borough of Alaska. Funter Bay was the site of a World War II internment camp for Aleuts relocated 1500 miles from their homes. It was "the site of an abandoned cannery in which the St. Paul evacuees were housed. The St. George camp was across the bay at an old mine site." . The injustices they suffered were the subject of the US Congress' Aleut Restitution Act of 1988.
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    Gobi Desert

    Gobi Desert

    • Category: Desert
    The Gobi (IPA:/ˈɡoʊ.biː/Mongolian: Говь, Govi, "semidesert"; Chinese: 戈壁; pinyin: Gēbì) is a large desert region in Asia. It covers parts of northern and northwestern China, and of southern Mongolia. The desert basins of the Gobi are bounded by the Altai Mountains and the grasslands and steppes of Mongolia on the north, by the Hexi Corridor and Tibetan Plateau to the southwest, and by the North China Plain to the southeast. The Gobi is most notable in history as part of the great Mongol Empire, and as the location of several important cities along the Silk Road. The Gobi is made up of several distinct ecological and geographic regions based on variations in climate and topography. One is the Eastern Gobi desert steppe Ecoregion, a Palearctic ecoregion in the Deserts and xeric shrublands Biome, home to the Bactrian camel and various other animals. It is a rain shadow desert formed by the Himalaya range blocking rain-carrying clouds from the Indian Ocean from reaching the Gobi territory. The Gobi measures over 1,610 km (1,000 mi) from southwest to northeast and 800 km (500 mi) from north to south. The desert is widest in the west, along the line joining the Lake Bosten and the Lop
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    Lake Maracaibo

    Lake Maracaibo

    • Category: Bay
    Lake Maracaibo (Spanish: Lago de Maracaibo) is a large brackish bay in Venezuela at 09°48′57″N 71°33′24″W / 9.81583°N 71.55667°W / 9.81583; -71.55667. It is connected to the Gulf of Venezuela by Tablazo Strait (55km) at the northern end, and fed by numerous rivers, the largest being the Catatumbo. It is commonly considered a lake rather than a bay or lagoon, and at 13,210 km² it would be the largest lake in South America. The geological record shows that it has been a true lake in the past, and as such is one of the oldest lakes on Earth at 20-36 million years old. Lake Maracaibo acts as a major shipping route to the ports of Maracaibo and Cabimas. The surrounding Maracaibo Basin contains large reserves of crude oil, making the lake a major profit center for Venezuela. A dredged channel gives oceangoing vessels access to the bay. The General Rafael Urdaneta Bridge (8.7 km long; completed 1962), spanning the bay's outlet, is one of the longest bridges in the world. The lake is also the location of Catatumbo lightning. The first known settlements on the bay were those of the Goajiros, who still are present in large numbers, but have re-settled in the western boundary area with
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    North Taranaki Bight

    North Taranaki Bight

    • Category: Bay
    The North Taranaki Bight is the name given to the large bay which extends north and east from the north coast of Taranaki in New Zealand's North Island. The name is echoed by the South Taranaki Bight to the south of Cape Egmont. As with its southern counterpart, the size of the bight depends to a large extent on the source referring to it. Strict definitions refer to it stretching from the mouth of the Waitara River 10 kilometres northeast of New Plymouth to the mouth of the Mokau River. More loose descriptions of the bight refer to it extending as far north as Tirua Point, 50 kilometres southwest of Te Kuiti, or even to Albatross Point, close to the entrance to Kawhia Harbour.
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    Ocean Harbour

    Ocean Harbour

    • Category: Bay
    Ocean Harbour is a deeply indented bay on the north coast of South Georgia which is entered 1.5 miles (2.4 km) west-northwest of Tijuca point. It was an active whaling station between 1909–1920. At one point, South Georgia was the whaling capital of the world. The names New Fortune Bay and Neufortuna Bay, probably for the Fortuna, Norwegian-Argentine whaling vessel which participated in establishing the first permanent whaling station at Grytviken, South Georgia in 1904-05, were used for this feature in 1922 by Filchner, following the German Antarctic Expedition, 1911-12. Following a survey of the island in 1951-52, the South Georgia Survey reported that the feature is known to whalers and sealers as Ocean Harbour, a name derived from the Ocean Whaling Co. which at one time had a station there. The name Ocean Harbour is approved for this feature on the basis of local usage, and also to avoid confusion of the name New Fortuna Bay with Fortuna Bay, only 22 miles (35 km) to the northwest. Old sealing trypots can still be seen here, and there is also the wreck of the Bayard here, a 1300 tonne, 67 m (220 ft) long, iron hulled boat, built in 1864. It was moored at the cooling station at
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    Port Hacking

    Port Hacking

    • Category: Bay
    Port Hacking is an Australian estuary, located in Southern Sydney, New South Wales and fed by the Hacking River and several smaller creeks, including Bundeena Creek and The Basin. It is a ria, a river basin which has become submerged by the sea. The local aboriginal people call the estuary Deeban. Matthew Flinders and George Bass (with Bass's servant William Martin) explored there in early April 1796. They called it Port Hacking after Henry Hacking who was the principal game hunter in the colony and who first told them of a large river he had seen inland on kangaroo hunting expeditions. Henry Hacking (1750–1831), was the quartermaster on Governor Phillip’s HMS Sirius, part of the First Fleet. Hacking became a skilled, adventurous bushman, who led many hunting expeditions to supplement meat rations for Australia’s first settlers. He was amongst the party that found the lost government cattle at Cowpastures in 1795. The northern headland, located at Cronulla is called Bass and Flinders Point. Port Hacking effectively forms the southern boundary of Sydney's suburban sprawl. Working inland from the sea, the indented north bank of Port Hacking is formed by the suburbs of Cronulla,
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    Port Underwood

    Port Underwood

    • Category: Bay
    Port Underwood is a sheltered harbour which forms the north-east extension of Cloudy Bay at the northeast of New Zealand's South Island, on the east coast of the Marlborough Sounds. With only a relatively narrow entrance to the south-south-east it is sheltered from almost all winds. Originally considered part of Cloudy Bay the port was named after Joseph Underwood of the shipping firm Kabel and Underwood in the early 19th century. There is evidence of a large Māori population at various times prior to European arrival in New Zealand. In the 1820s the local Rangitane were defeated by the Ngāti Toa chief Te Rauparaha. Sealers first visited about 1826 and were followed immediately by whalers. John Guard, who had started a whaling station in Tory Channel the previous year, set up a subsidiary station at Kakapo Bay in 1828. By 1840 there were approximately 150 Europeans in the area, probably the largest concentration in the South Island at that time. On 16 June HMS Herald arrived with Major Thomas Banbury on board bringing the Treaty of Waitangi for the South Island chiefs to sign. This took place on Horahora-Kakahu Island just offshore from the eastern shoreline. The only European to
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    Possiet Bay

    Possiet Bay

    • Category: Bay
    The Possiet Gulf or Posyet Bay (Russian: Залив Посьета) is a bay in the south-western part of the Peter the Great Gulf, between the promontories of Suslov and Gamov. It stretches for 31 kilometres from northeast to southwest and for 33 kilometers from northwest to southeast. The coastline, which forms part of the Khasansky District, is irregular and indented. Several townlets are situated on the bay, including Possiet, Zarubino, and Kraskino. The crew of the French corvette Caprice visited the bay in 1852, giving it the name of d'Anville. Two years later, the coastline was mapped by the expedition of Yevfimy Putyatin, including the schooner Vostok and the frigate Pallas. Putyatin had the bay renamed after Constantine Possiet, one of his associates. In 1855, at the height of the Crimean War, the bay was visited by an Anglo-French squadron whose leaders called it "The Raid of Napoleon", after the first French battleship, Le Napoléon. In July 1938, the construction of an airfield and a submarine servicing facility in the bay aroused the ire of the Japanese and touched off a Soviet-Japanese border conflict known as the Battle of Lake Khasan.
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    San Pedro Bay

    San Pedro Bay

    • Category: Bay
    San Pedro Bay is an inlet on the Pacific Ocean coast of southern California, United States. It is the site of the Port of Los Angeles and the Port of Long Beach, which together form the fifth-busiest port facility in the world (behind the ports of Shanghai, Singapore, Hong Kong, and Shenzhen) and easily the busiest in the Western Hemisphere. The community of San Pedro, Los Angeles forms the western side of the bay, and shares the name. Most of the bay is between ten and twenty mt (32 and 75 feet) deep. The seabed near Long Beach has experienced considerable subsidence as a result of oil extraction in the Wilmington Field from the 1950s onward. Ironically, this helped the Port of Long Beach surpass the Port of Los Angeles as the leading port in the United States for a time in the 1980s and 1990s, since the deeper seafloor meant that Long Beach could accommodate ships with deeper drafts than could Los Angeles. Dredging operations related to the construction of a gigantic new marine terminal at the Port of Los Angeles have since made both sides of the bay accessible to even the largest existing container ships. Natural islands in San Pedro Bay include Terminal Island (actually an
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    Sandy Hook Bay

    Sandy Hook Bay

    • Category: Bay
    Sandy Hook Bay is a triangular arm of the Raritan Bay, along the coast of northern New Jersey in the United States. It is formed along the south side of Lower New York Bay by Sandy Hook, a spit of land that protects the bay from the open Atlantic Ocean. The bay provides a sheltered marina for pleasure craft, as well as a harbor for the United States Coast Guard. It is fed by the Shrewsbury River estuary. It is bounded on the west side by the Naval Weapons Station Earle pier. The communities of Highlands and Atlantic Highlands, New Jersey in Monmouth County are located along the southern (mainland) shore of the bay.
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    To Kwa Wan

    To Kwa Wan

    • Category: Bay
    To Kwa Wan (Chinese: 土瓜灣) is a bay and an area of the eastern shore of Kowloon peninsula of Hong Kong. The area is part of urban Hong Kong, and is adjacent to Hok Yuen, Hung Hom, Ma Tau Wai and Ma Tau Kok. Administratively, the area belongs to the Kowloon City District of Kowloon. Tokwawan is a mixed residential and commercial area and located to the west of the old Kai Tak Airport. Most residential dwellings in the area are mid-rise (10 or less floors) flats built in the mid-20 Century. Newer buildings being built in or around To Kwa Wan are more than 10 stories. Those flats built along major roads like Ma Tau Wai Road have commercial space on the ground floor. Buildings along To Kwa Wan Road are mainly occupied by industry. Town Gas has storage facility in north part of To Kwa Wan. In the 1970s public housing estates were built in the area to provide relief in other crowded areas of Kowloon. Ageing and poor building standards have been highlighted by crumbling facades that have hurt and killed people in the area. The demolition of older flats have given means for developers to acquire land in Tokwawan to build newer and more profitable residential flats., With high density
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    Uggleviken

    Uggleviken

    • Category: Bay
    Uggleviken (Swedish: Owl Bay) is a former bay and lake at Norra Djurgården, a rural area in north-eastern central Stockholm, Sweden, forming part of the national city park Ekoparken. Together with Lillsjön, Laduviken, and Storängsbotten, Uggleviken used to be part of a bay forking across Norra Djurgården. Today it is reduced to a marsh or a wet alder forest with patches of reeds in its centre. It is regarded as of great natural value and have been mentioned as one of the most interesting botanical and ornithological areas in Stockholm. The spring of the lake first appears in historical records in the end of the 18th century and during the 19th century and early 20th century it became a popular Trinity spring to which Stockholmers in huge numbers would go on Trinity Sunday to drink at a ceremony. A pavilion constructed in 1902 is still reminding of the era. The marsh's catchment area, considered as one of the most important wetlands in Stockholm and an important biotope for many species, is relatively untouched by humans and mostly contains forest and open terrain. Björknäsvägen, a densely trafficked road stretching along the northern side of Uggleviken, reduces accessibility to the
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