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Best General election of All Time

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    1
    Australian legislative election, 1996

    Australian legislative election, 1996

    Federal elections were held in Australia on 2 March 1996. All 148 seats in the House of Representatives and 40 seats in the 76-member Senate were up for election. The incumbent Australian Labor Party, in power for 13 years led by Bob Hawke (1983-1991) then Paul Keating (1991-1996), was defeated by the opposition Liberal Party of Australia led by John Howard and Coalition partner the National Party of Australia led by Tim Fischer. Independents: Peter Andren, Pauline Hanson, Allan Rocher, Graeme Campbell, Paul Filing (ex-Liberal) Independents: Mal Colston (resigned from ALP in August 1996) Overall the coalition won 29 seats from Labor while the ALP won 3 seats from the Liberals. These 3 seats where Canberra and Namadgi in the ACT and Isaacs in Victoria. The ACT seats fell to Labor due to a strong return to the ALP in a traditional Labor town by public servants fearing conservative cuts. The division of Brendan Smyth's seat of Canberra into the two new (of the three) ACT seats limited his campaign to the southernmost Tuggeranong seat of Namadgi where the ACT Labor right wing stood former MLA Annette Ellis who ran a tight grassroots campaign. Isaacs fell to Labor due to demographic
    8.33
    6 votes
    2
    Florida statewide elections, 2006

    Florida statewide elections, 2006

    Florida held various statewide elections on November 7, 2006. Candidates are listed in alphabetical order by last name. Incumbents appear in bold. Section links go to relevant pages on Florida government. The previous Republican governor was Jeb Bush. Charlie Christ and Jeff Kottkamp were elected Bill Nelson was re-elected Bill McCollum was elected Florida voters had to choose whether or not each of the following will remain in office. Voters had to choose whether to retain any of the judges in their circuit court. Official summary: Proposing amendments to the State Constitution to limit the amount of nonrecurring general revenue which may be appropriated for recurring purposes in any fiscal year to 3 percent of the total general revenue funds estimated to be available, unless otherwise approved by a three-fifths vote of the Legislature; to establish a Joint Legislative Budget Commission, which shall issue long-range financial outlooks; to provide for limited adjustments in the state budget without the concurrence of the full Legislature, as provided by general law; to reduce the number of times trust funds are automatically terminated; to require the preparation and biennial
    8.00
    6 votes
    3
    United States House election, 1960

    United States House election, 1960

    The U.S. House election, 1960 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1960 which coincided with the election of President John F. Kennedy. In spite of Kennedy's victory, his Democratic Party actually lost twenty seats to the opposition Republican Party. This may have been a backlash to the major Democratic gains in the previous election. An end to the economic downturn of the middle portion of the decade was also a factor. Nonetheless, the Democrats retained a clear majority in the House. Notable freshmen included future Senate Majority Leader and presidential candidate Bob Dole (R-Kan.) and future independent presidential candidate John B. Anderson (R-Ill.). Source: Election Statistics - Office of the Clerk
    7.50
    6 votes
    4
    French legislative election, 1936

    French legislative election, 1936

    French legislative elections to elect the 16th legislature of the French Third Republic were held on 26 April and 3 May 1936. This was the last legislature of the Third Republic and the last election before the Second World War. The number of candidates set a record, with 4,807 people vying for 618 seats in the Chamber of Deputies. In the Seine Department alone, there were 1,402 candidates. The Popular Front, composed of the French Section of the Workers' International (SFIO), the Radical-Socialists, the French Section of the Communist International (SFIC), and miscellaneous leftists, won power. Léon Blum became President of the Council. For the first time, the Radical-Socialists were eclipsed on the left by the SFIO, while still keeping a considerable role in French politics.
    8.20
    5 votes
    5
    United States House of Representatives elections in New York, 2006

    United States House of Representatives elections in New York, 2006

    • Part of general election: New York state elections, 2006
    On November 7, 2006, New York, along with the rest of the country held elections for the United States House of Representatives. Democrats picked up 3 House seats, the 19th, the 20th, and the 24th. In federal elections, the Empire State has consistently handed its vote to Democratic candidates. Of New York's twenty-nine congressional districts, all but ten are centered around heavily liberal and Democratic New York City and its surrounding suburbs, including Long Island and Westchester County. In addition, Democrats were also predicting easy victories in the double digits for its gubernatorial candidate, New York State Attorney General Eliot Spitzer, and Senator Hillary Clinton. In 2002, a reapportionment was conducted and was planned as what is described as "a bipartisan incumbent protection plan". Many of the Republican-held districts were won by George W. Bush in the 2000 election while he lost statewide by a 25% margin. The primary was held on September 12, 2006. On September 11, the New York Times reported that Democrats were becoming less optimistic they could win Republican held House seats in New York this year. However, this turned out not to be the case as three districts
    8.20
    5 votes
    6
    United States House of Representatives elections in Texas, 2008

    United States House of Representatives elections in Texas, 2008

    • Part of general election: United States House elections, 2008
    • Contests: Texas’s 1st congressional district election, 2008
    The 2008 elections for the Texas delegation of the United States House of Representatives was held on November 4, 2008. 31 of 32 congressional seats that make up the state's delegation were contested. In Texas's 14th congressional district no one challenged incumbent Ron Paul. Since Representatives are elected for two-year terms, those elected will serve in the 111th United States Congress from January 4, 2009 until January 3, 2011. The 2008 Presidential election, 2008 Senate election (for John Cornyn's seat), and 2008 Texas Legislature elections occurred on the same date, as well as many local elections and ballot initiatives. The delegation prior to the election comprised 19 Republicans and 13 Democrats. Sophomore Republican Louie Gohmert of Tyler was elected in 2004 following a controversial redistricting in 2003 by then-House Majority Leader Tom DeLay that moved the district of incumbent Democrat Max Sandlin into a strongly Republican constituency. Sandlin was defeated by a 24-point margin in 2004, and Gohmert won in 2006 with 68% of the vote. The district is a purely East Texas one stretching from the Tyler and Longview-Marshall areas in the north to the Lufkin-Nacogdoches
    8.20
    5 votes
    7
    California state elections, November 2008

    California state elections, November 2008

    • Includes general election: United States House of Representatives elections in California, 2008
    • Part of general election: United States general elections, 2008
    The California state elections, November 2008 were held on November 4, 2008 throughout California. Among the elections taking place were those for the office of President of the United States, all the seats of California's delegation to the House of Representatives, all of the seats of the State Assembly, and all of the odd-numbered seats of the State Senate. Twelve propositions also appeared on the ballot. Numerous local elections also took place throughout the state. All 53 seats of the United States House of Representatives in California were up for election. Before and after the election, 34 seats were under Democratic control and 19 were under Republican control. The California State Senate is the upper house of California's bicameral State Legislature. There are a total of 40 seats and only the 20 odd-numbered ones were up for election. The Democratic Party maintained a majority of 25, with the remaining 15 seats under the control of the Republican Party. Neither party lost or gained any seats. The California State Assembly is the lower house of California's State Legislature. All 80 seats were up for election every two years. Before the election, the Democrats controlled 48
    7.00
    6 votes
    8
    Australian legislative election, 2007

    Australian legislative election, 2007

    • Includes general election: Australian Senate election, 2007
    Federal elections for the Parliament of Australia were held on Saturday 24 November 2007 after a 39 day campaign, in which 13.6 million Australians were enrolled to vote. All 150 seats in the House of Representatives and 40 of the seats in the 76-member Senate were contested in the election. The centre-left Australian Labor Party opposition, led by Kevin Rudd and deputy leader Julia Gillard, defeated the incumbent centre-right Coalition government, led by Liberal Party leader and Prime Minister, John Howard, and Nationals leader and Deputy Prime Minister, Mark Vaile. The Coalition had been in power since the 1996 election. Independents: Tony Windsor, Bob Katter At 8.00pm, the first personality to call the election was former Labor leader Bob Hawke on Sky News. At 10.29pm AEST, approximately two hours after the last polls in Western Australia closed, Liberal deputy leader Peter Costello conceded that the Coalition had lost government. At 10.36pm, John Howard delivered a speech at the Sofitel Wentworth Hotel in Sydney to concede defeat. At 11.05pm, Kevin Rudd delivered his victory speech. Labor won 83 of the 150 seats in the incoming House of Representatives. This represented a
    7.80
    5 votes
    9
    United States House election, 1800

    United States House election, 1800

    Elections to the United States House of Representatives were held in 1800, concurrently with the 1800 presidential election, in which Vice President Thomas Jefferson, a Democratic Republican, defeated incumbent President John Adams, a Federalist. The elections, to the 7th United States Congress, resulted in the Democratic-Republicans picking up 22 seats from the Federalists. This brought the Democratic-Republicans to a broad majority of 68 seats, with the Federalists retaining 38 seats. Many state legislatures also changed to Democratic-Republican control, voting in Democratic-Republicans to the Senate. The victory of Jefferson and the Democratic-Republicans can be partially attributed to unpopular Adams administration policies, including the Alien and Sedition Acts, which curtailed the Bill of Rights guarantees of freedom of speech and the press. The differences between Federalist views in favor of a strong national government and Democratic-Republican views on the primacy of the states played a prominent role in the election - taxation became an issue as Southerners and Westerners rejected federal taxes levied on property. Unlike modern day House elections, the states held their
    9.00
    4 votes
    10
    Danish parliamentary election, 1973

    Danish parliamentary election, 1973

    Parliamentary elections were held in Denmark on 4 December 1973 and in the Faroe Islands on 13 December. It has since been referred to as the Landslide Election (Danish: Jordskredsvalget), as five new or previously unrepresented parties won seats, and more than half the members of the parliament were replaced. The Social Democratic Party, which had led a minority government up until this election, lost a third of their seats. After the election Poul Hartling, the leader of the liberal Venstre, formed the smallest minority government in Denmark's history with only 22 seats, supported by the Progress Party, the Conservative People's Party, the Social Liberal Party, the Centre Democrats and the Christian People's Party. Voter turnout was 88.7% in Denmark proper, 54.6% in the Faroe Islands and 66.0% in Greenland.
    7.60
    5 votes
    11
    United States House of Representatives elections in Utah, 2008

    United States House of Representatives elections in Utah, 2008

    • Part of general election: United States House elections, 2008
    • Contests: Utah’s 1st congressional district election, 2008
    The 2008 congressional elections in Utah were held on November 4, 2008 to determine the representatives of the state of Utah in the United States House of Representatives for the 111th Congress from January 3, 2009, until their terms of office expire on January 3, 2011. Incumbent Rob Bishop (R) was reelected in Utah's 1st congressional district. Incumbent Jim Matheson (D) was reelected in Utah's 2nd congressional district. Jason Chaffetz (R) was elected to succeed Chris Cannon (R) in Utah's 3rd congressional district. Utah has three seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Representatives are elected for two-year terms. The election coincided with the 2008 U.S. presidential election. All races were forecasted as safe for the incumbent party. This district covers the northwest area of Utah including Ogden, Logan, Tooele, the northwest portion of Salt Lake City, and the entirety of the Great Salt Lake. It has been represented by Republican Rob Bishop since January 2003. His challengers were Democrat Morgan Bowen, Libertarian Joseph Geddes Buchman, and Constitution candidate Kirk D. Pearson. CQ Politics forecasted the race as 'Safe Republican'. This
    7.60
    5 votes
    12
    Australian legislative election, 1906

    Australian legislative election, 1906

    Federal elections were held in Australia on 12 December 1906. All 75 seats in the House of Representatives, and 18 of the 36 seats in the Senate were up for election. The incumbent Protectionist Party led by Prime Minister of Australia Alfred Deakin defeated the opposition Anti-Socialist Party led by George Reid. It was the third federal election in Australia following the adoption of the federal government. The election was largely important as it would demonstrate which of the parties (if any) could hold together a stable government after the unstable second term of the previous one, which saw four different governments in power. It would also see if both of the Anti-Socialist parties could survive the implementation of protectionist policies which differentiated the two. This was also the first election where all seats for the House of Representatives were voted for via a First-past-the-post system (at previous elections some states voted as one electorate, using a bloc vote), and the first time that Tasmania was divided into separate electorates. The election result was the continuation of a Protectionist government led by Deakin and supported by Labour, which remained in power
    8.75
    4 votes
    13
    United States House elections, 1994

    United States House elections, 1994

    The 1994 U.S. House of Representatives election was held on November 8, 1994, in the middle of President Bill Clinton's first term. As a result of a 54-seat swing in membership from Democrats to Republicans, the Republican Party gained a majority of seats in the United States House of Representatives for the first time since 1954. The Democratic Party had run the House for all but four of the preceding 62 years. The Republican Party, united behind Newt Gingrich's Contract with America, which promised floor votes on various popular and institutional reforms, was able to capitalize on the perception that the House leadership was corrupt, as well as the dissatisfaction of conservative and many independent voters with President Clinton's actions (including a failed attempt at universal health care and gun control measures). In a historic election, House Speaker Tom Foley (D-Washington) was defeated for re-election in his district, becoming the first Speaker of the House to fail to win re-election since the era of the American Civil War. Other major upsets included the defeat of powerful long-serving Representatives such as Ways and Means Chairman Dan Rostenkowski (D-Illinois) and
    8.75
    4 votes
    14
    United States House election, 1790

    United States House election, 1790

    The U.S. House election, 1790 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1790 which occurred in the middle of President George Washington's first term. While formal political parties did not yet exist during this election, the coalition of pro-President Washington (Pro-Administration) representatives as well as the group of Anti-Administration representatives, each gained two seats because of the addition of new states to the union. In this period each state fixed its own date for a congressional general election; as early as April 1790 (New York) or as late as October 11, 1791 (Pennsylvania). This article covers all such state elections to the 2nd Congress. Elections to a Congress took place both in the even-numbered year before and in the odd-numbered year when the Congress convened. In some states the congressional delegation was not elected until after the legal start of the Congress (on the 4th day of March in the odd numbered year). The first session of this Congress was convened in Philadelphia on October 24, 1791. North Carolina and Rhode Island each ratified the constitution on November 21, 1789 and May 29, 1790 respectively. They didn't elect
    6.50
    6 votes
    15
    Oklahoma state elections, 2006

    Oklahoma state elections, 2006

    The Oklahoma state elections were held on November 7, 2006. The primary election was held on July 25. The runoff primary election was held August 22. The 2006 elections marked the first time in 80 years that the Republican Party controlled the Oklahoma House of Representatives. In the Democratic primary, incumbent Brad Henry defeated challenger Andrew Marr 86% to 14%. In the Republican primary, Ernest Istook defeated Bob Sullivan, Jim Williamson, and Sean Evanoff. Istook took 54.7% of the vote, Sullivan 31%, Williamson 9.8%, and Evanoff 4.6%. In the general election, Henry defeated challenger Istook with 66% of the vote to remain in office for the next four years. With incumbent Mary Fallin not running for reelection as the Lieutenant Governor of Oklahoma, a new Lieutenant Governor is guaranteed. The candidates for the parties faced on in the primary election on July 25. If no party received more than 50% of the vote, a runoff election was held on August 22 to decide the winner. There were three candidates in the Republican primary for Lieutenant Governor. There were four candidates in the Democratic primary for Lieutenant Governor. In the general election, Democratic primary
    8.50
    4 votes
    16
    United States House of Representatives elections in Pennsylvania, 2008

    United States House of Representatives elections in Pennsylvania, 2008

    • Part of general election: United States House elections, 2008
    • Contests: Pennsylvania’s 1st congressional district election, 2008
    The 2008 congressional elections in Pennsylvania was held on November 4, 2008 to determine who will represent the state of Pennsylvania in the United States House of Representatives. Pennsylvania has 19 seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Representatives are elected for two-year terms; those elected will serve in the 111th Congress from January 4, 2009 until January 3, 2011. The election coincides with the 2008 U.S. presidential election. District 3 was the only seat which changed party (from Republican to Democratic), although CQ Politics had forecasted districts 3, 4, 6, 8, 10, 11, 15 and 18 to be at some risk for the incumbent party. Five-term incumbent Bob Brady (D) ran for another term after losing his bid to be mayor of Philadelphia. He was challenged by businessman Mike Muhammad (R). This race was viewed as noncompetitive, as it took place in heavily Democratic Philadelphia. Brady ran unopposed in 2006 and has generally received over 80% of the vote in his campaigns. CQ Politics had forecast the race as 'Safe Democrat'. Brady defeated Muhammed by a nearly 10 to 1 margin, winning 242,799 to 24,714, or 90.8% to 9.2%. Seven term incumbent
    8.50
    4 votes
    17
    Australian general election, 1940

    Australian general election, 1940

    Federal elections were held in Australia on 21 September 1940. All 74 seats in the House of Representatives, and 19 of the 36 seats in the Senate were up for election. The incumbent Coalition, consisting of the United Australia Party led by Prime Minister of Australia Robert Menzies and the Country Party led by Archie Cameron, defeated the opposition Australian Labor Party led by John Curtin. The Coalition won 36 seats, two short of a majority, but formed a government with the support of two independent MPs. In October 1941 the two independents switched their support to Labor, bringing Curtin to power. Independents: Arthur Coles (Henty, Vic), Alexander Wilson (Wimmera, Vic) Note that the Victorian Country Party at this election was split into two factions, the United Country Party, which was loyal to the state party, and the Liberal Country Party, loyal to the federal party and formed following John McEwen's expulsion from the UCP. The UCP elected one member and the LCP two. Both the Coalition and Labor were united on support of Australia's ongoing participation in World War II. The Coalition's advertisements asked Australians to "Cast Your Vote for Unity and an All-in War Effort /
    6.33
    6 votes
    18
    United States House election, 1868

    United States House election, 1868

    Elections to the United States House of Representatives were held in 1868 to elect Representatives to the 41st United States Congress. The election coincided with the presidential election of 1868, which was won by Ulysses S. Grant. The Democrats gained 20 seats, but Grant's Republican Party retained a commanding majority in the Reconstruction era following the American Civil War, holding onto a firm legitimacy through an association with victory. As more Southern states exited Reconstruction, more Democratic seats appeared in the South. However, Democratic gains in the South were limited, as the Republican power-brokers of Reconstruction held a great deal of influence. The small Conservative Party also picked up several Southern seats, as it had support among wealthy Southern leaders who wanted to increase the region's power.
    6.33
    6 votes
    19
    United States House elections, 1988

    United States House elections, 1988

    The U.S. House election, 1988 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1988 which coincided with the election of George H. W. Bush as President. Although Bush won with a strong majority, his Republican Party lost a net of two seats to the Democratic Party, slightly increasing the Democratic majority in the House. Key to party abbreviations: AI=American Independent, C=Constitution, D=Democrat, G=Green, I=Independent, IP=Independence Party, L=Libertarian, PF=Peace and Freedom, R=Republican. Key to color code: Blue=Democratic pickup; Red=Republican pickup. Source: "1988 General Election, November 8, 1988". Secretary of State of Georgia. http://sos.georgia.gov/elections/election_results/1988/Frame_1108.html. Retrieved September 5, 2011.
    7.20
    5 votes
    20
    United States House of Representatives elections in Kansas, 2008

    United States House of Representatives elections in Kansas, 2008

    • Part of general election: United States House elections, 2008
    • Contests: Kansas’s 1st congressional district election, 2008
    The 2008 congressional elections in Kansas were held on November 4, 2008 to determine who would represent the state of Kansas in the United States House of Representatives, coinciding with the presidential and senatorial elections. Representatives are elected for two-year terms; those elected will serve in the 111th Congress from January 3, 2009 until January 3, 2011. Kansas has four seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Its 2007-2008 congressional delegation consisted of two Republicans and two Democrats. It is now three Republicans and one Democrat. District 2 was the only seat which changed party (from Democratic to Republican), although CQ Politics had forecasted districts 2 and 3 to be at some risk for the incumbent party. The primary elections for Republican Party and Democratic Party candidates were held on August 5. Incumbent Republican Jerry Moran won re-election, defeating Democratic nominee James Bordonaro and independents Kathleen Burton and Jack Warner. CQ Politics forecasted the race as 'Safe Republican'. Republican nominee and former Kansas State Treasurer Lynn Jenkins won against Democratic incumbent Nancy Boyda, Libertarian
    7.20
    5 votes
    21
    United Kingdom general election, 1951

    United Kingdom general election, 1951

    The 1951 United Kingdom general election was held eighteen months after the 1950 general election, which the Labour Party had won with a slim majority of just five seats. Labour called the election for 25 October 1951 hoping to increase their majority. Attlee had decided to call the election after the King's concerns over leaving the country to go on his Commonwealth tour in 1952 with a government that had such a slim majority. The Labour government, which by now had achieved most of what it had set out to do, was now beginning to lose many cabinet ministers such as Ernest Bevin due to old age. The Conservatives however, due to the recent election, looked more fresh with more new MPs. As Labour began to have some policy splits during the election campaign, the Conservatives ran an efficient campaign that was well funded and orchestrated. As for the Liberals, the poor election results in 1950 only got worse. The subsequent Labour defeat is significant for several reasons: the party polled almost a quarter of a million votes more than the Tories and their National Liberal allies combined, won the most votes that Labour had ever won (and has won as of 2012), and won the most votes of
    8.25
    4 votes
    22
    United States House of Representatives elections in Rhode Island, 2008

    United States House of Representatives elections in Rhode Island, 2008

    • Part of general election: United States House elections, 2008
    • Contests: Rhode Island’s 1st congressional district election, 2008
    The 2008 congressional elections in Rhode Island were held on November 4, 2008 to determine who will represent Rhode Island in the United States House of Representatives, coinciding with the presidential and senatorial elections. Representatives are elected for two-year terms; those elected will serve in the 111th Congress from January 3, 2009 until January 3, 2011. Rhode Island has two seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Its 2007-2008 congressional delegation consisted of two Democrats, both of whom were re-elected in 2008. Thus, no districts changed party. CQ Politics forecasted both districts as "safe" for the incumbent party. This district covers the northern and East Bay sections of the state. Democratic incumbent Patrick J. Kennedy, who has represented this seat since 1995, won against Republican nominee Jonathan Scott. CQ Politics forecasted the race as 'Safe Democrat'. This district covers the areas roughly south and west of Providence. Democratic incumbent Jim Langevin, who has represented this seat since 2001, won against Republican nominee Mark Zaccaria. CQ Politics forecasted the race as 'Safe Democrat'.
    8.25
    4 votes
    23
    United States House of Representatives elections in New Mexico, 2008

    United States House of Representatives elections in New Mexico, 2008

    • Part of general election: United States House elections, 2008
    • Contests: New Mexico’s 1st congressional district election, 2008
    The 2008 congressional elections in New Mexico were held on November 4, 2008 to determine New Mexico's representation in the United States House of Representatives. The party primary elections were held June 3, 2008. Martin Heinrich, Harry Teague, and Ben R. Luján, all Democrats, were elected to represent New Mexico in the House. Representatives are elected for two-year terms; the winners of the election currently serve in the 111th Congress, which began on January 4, 2009 and is scheduled to end on January 3, 2011. The election coincided with the 2008 U.S. presidential election and senatorial elections. New Mexico has three seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Its 2007-2008 congressional delegation consisted of two Republicans and one Democrat. All three incumbents chose to vie for New Mexico's open Senate seat. The election resulted in all three New Mexico seats are being occupied by freshman Democrats. Districts 1 and 2 changed from Republican to Democratic; CQ Politics had forecast that these seats might be at risk for the Republican Party. This district includes the central area of New Mexico, in and around Albuquerque. An open seat, CQ
    7.00
    5 votes
    24
    United States House elections, 1992

    United States House elections, 1992

    The United States House of Representatives elections in 1992 coincided with the 1992 presidential election, in which Democrats Bill Clinton and Al Gore were elected as President and Vice President, respectively, defeating Republican incumbent President George H. W. Bush and Vice President Dan Quayle. Despite this, however, the Democrats lost a net of nine seats in the House to the Republicans, in part due to redistricting following the 1990 Census. The Democrats nonetheless retained a majority in the House and Senate, and with a new Democratic President, they seemed to be in a position of great strength. However, this would change in the 1994 elections. Source: Election Statistics - Office of the Clerk Key to party abbreviations: AI=American Independent, C=Constitution, D=Democrat, G=Green, I=Independent, IP=Independence Party, L=Libertarian, PF=Peace and Freedom, R=Republican, T=U.S. Taxpayers Party. The delegation increased from 45 to 52 seats. To create the seven-seat net gain, eight seats were added, designated as: the 10th, 11th, 25th, 33rd, 41st, 43rd, 49th, and 50th districts, and one seat was lost through the merger of two seats: the former 41st and 44th districts merged
    9.33
    3 votes
    25
    Canadian federal election, 2008

    Canadian federal election, 2008

    The 2008 Canadian federal election (more formally, the 40th Canadian General Election) was held on Tuesday, October 14, 2008 to elect members to the Canadian House of Commons of the 40th Canadian Parliament after the previous parliament had been dissolved by the Governor General on September 7, 2008. The election yielded a minority government under the Conservative Party of Canada, led by the incumbent Prime Minister, Stephen Harper. The election call resulted in the cancellation of four federal by-elections that had been scheduled to occur in September. In 2007, Parliament passed a law fixing federal election dates every four years and scheduling the next election date as October 19, 2009, but the law does not (and constitutionally cannot) limit the powers of the Governor General to dissolve Parliament at any time, such as when opposition parties bring down the government on a vote of confidence. In this election there was no loss of a non-confidence vote, but the Prime Minister asked the Governor General to call an election. The Governor General granted the Prime Minister's request. 64.7% of all eligible voters cast ballots in the 2006 federal election. The Conservative Party
    6.80
    5 votes
    26
    United States House election, 1922

    United States House election, 1922

    The U.S. House election, 1922 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1922 which occurred in the middle of President Warren G. Harding's term. The Republican Party lost a net of 77 seats to the opposition Democratic Party, particularly in some of the traditionally Democratic areas that had been carried by the wave of 1920. An internal split briefly undermined Republican leadership, as progressives and conservatives once again clashed. With Senator Bob La Follette as their unofficial leader, new progressives formed a somewhat small but highly vocal group. Republican troubles were extended when older era progressives who had supported Theodore Roosevelt failed to completely embrace the arguments of La Follette progressives. Republicans nonetheless retained a narrow majority, although splits in the party made it difficult for Harding to govern. In Minnesota, the Farmer-Labor Party, an offshoot of populism, also gained several seats. Pennsylvania was one of the only states to conduct redistricting between 1920 and 1922, when no nationwide reapportionment occurred. Incumbents have been shown in the most closely corresponding new districts. The four districts
    6.80
    5 votes
    27
    United States House election, 1948

    United States House election, 1948

    The U.S. House election, 1948 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1948 which coincided with President Harry Truman's re-election. Truman had campaigned against a 'do-nothing' Republican Party Congress that had opposed his initiatives and was seen as counterproductive. The Democratic Party regained control of both the House and Senate in this election. This was the last election to date where a member of a political party other than the Democrats or Republicans had one or more seats in the chamber. Notable freshmen included future President Gerald Ford (R-Mich.) and future Senator, Vice-Presidential candidate, and Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen (D-Tex.). Illinois redistricted its at-large seat into an additional geographical district for a total of 26, changing boundaries across the state and moving several seats from downstate into the Chicago suburbs.
    6.80
    5 votes
    28
    United Kingdom general election, 1966

    United Kingdom general election, 1966

    The 1966 United Kingdom general election on 31 March 1966 was called by sitting Labour Prime Minister Harold Wilson. Wilson's decision to call an election turned on the fact that his government, elected a mere 17 months previously in 1964 had an unworkably small majority of only 4 MPs. Wilson's hope that he would be returned to office with a larger majority had been encouraged by the government's victory in a by-election in Kingston upon Hull North. In the end the hope was vindicated: the Labour government was returned with a much larger majority of 96. Prior to the general election, in 1965, Labour had actually performed poorly in local elections, and lost at a crucial by-election, cutting their majority to just 2. Labour ran its campaign with the slogan "You know Labour government works". Shortly after the local elections, Sir Alec Douglas-Home was replaced with Edward Heath, as leader of the Conservative party. The Conservative campaign, although more professional than previously, had not really had time to prepare, and with Heath only having just settled in the year before, there had been little time for him to become well known among the British public. As for the Liberals
    9.00
    3 votes
    29
    United States House election, 1918

    United States House election, 1918

    The U.S. House election, 1918 was an election for the United States House of Representatives on 1918-11-05 which occurred in the middle of President Woodrow Wilson's second term. With the country now in World War I (contrary to previous promises by Wilson), and Wilson's personal popularity ebbing, the Republican Party was able to gain 25 seats and take over control of the House from Wilson's Democratic Party. Internal divide among Democratic leadership over aspects related to payment of the war also decreased the unity of the party, which had been the organization's strength during the decade. The Progressive Party also disappeared, with its former members generally becoming Democrats. Minnesota's Farmer-Labor Party, a descendant of populism, also gained its very first seat. Frederick H. Gillett (R-Massachusetts) became Speaker, and previous speaker Champ Clark (D-Missouri) became Minority Leader. One vacancy, Victor L. Berger, a member of the Socialist Party of America, whom the House refused to seat.
    9.00
    3 votes
    30
    European Parliament election, 1999

    European Parliament election, 1999

    • Includes general election: European Parliament election, 1999
    • Contests: European Parliament election, 1999
    The European Parliament Election, 1999 was a European election for all 626 members of the European Parliament held across the 15 European Union member states on 10, 11 and 13 June 1999. The voter turn-out was generally low, except in Belgium and Luxembourg, where voting is compulsory and where national elections were held that same day. This was the first such election where Austria, Finland and Sweden voted alongside other the other members, having joined in 1995 and voted separately. The next election was held in 2004 (see European Parliament Election 2004). The national results as at 13 June 1999 are as follows: The EUL/NGL group picked up one seat in the election and seven in the subsequent regrouping, raising its total from 34 to 42. The PES group did badly, losing 34 of its seats in the election and slipping to the second-biggest group. The ELDR group did moderately well, picking up one seat in the election and seven in the regrouping, giving a total of 50 seats and retaining its place as the third biggest group. The European Radical Alliance (ERA) were not so fortunate and slipped badly, losing eight of its 21 members in the election. The EPP group did well, picking up 23
    7.75
    4 votes
    31
    United States House election, 1932

    United States House election, 1932

    The U.S. House election, 1932 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1932 which coincided with the landslide election of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The overwhelming unpopularity of incumbent Herbert Hoover caused his Republican Party to lose over 100 seats to Roosevelt's Democratic Party and the small Farmer-Labor Party. The Democrats retained the majority they had gained through special elections in the last Congress, and expanded it to a commanding level. This round of elections was seen as a referendum on the once popular Republican business practices, which were buried by new, more liberal Democratic ideas. The inability of the Hoover government to cope with the Great Depression was the main issue surrounding this election. Since no reapportionment (and in nearly all states no redistricting) occurred after the 1920 census, the district boundary changes from the previous election are quite substantial, representing twenty years of population movement from small towns to the more Democratic cities. Two special elections were held apart from those in November. The elected winner would serve only the remainder of the incumbent Congress. Nine new
    7.75
    4 votes
    32
    United States House election, 1936

    United States House election, 1936

    The U.S. House election, 1936 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1936 which coincided with President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's landslide re-election. Roosevelt's Democratic Party gained twelve more net seats from the Republican Party, bringing them above a three-fourths majority. This was the largest majority since Reconstruction. The last time a party won so decisively was in 1866. Significant representation from the Progressives of Wisconsin and Farmer-Labor Party of Minnesota is also seen, as these two liberal populist groups gained a foothold. The 1936 elections showed the continuing trust of the American people in that Roosevelt would guide the nation from depression. Despite setbacks, the people had faith in the New Deal and elected leaders who supported its measures. In the 1st district, Republican Arthur B. Jenks was initially declared the winner, and sat in the House from January 1937 to June 1938, but Democrat Alphonse Roy successfully contested the election and served the remainder of the term before losing the 1938 election to Jenks.
    5.83
    6 votes
    33
    United States House election, 1966

    United States House election, 1966

    The U.S. House election, 1966 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1966 which occurred in the middle of President Lyndon Johnson's second term. As the Vietnam War continued to escalate and race riots exploded in cities across the country, Johnson's popularity had fallen, and the opposition Republican Party was able to gain a net of 47 seats from Johnson's Democratic Party, which nonetheless maintained a clear majority in the House. One notable freshman was future President George H. W. Bush (R-TX). Source: Election Statistics - Office of the Clerk One vacancy due to refusal of House to seat Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. (D-New York) [Data unknown/missing. You can help!] Florida redistricted to adjust for demographic changes; in addition to minor boundary changes a district was removed from northern Florida, and Broward County was broken out into its own district. Indiana redistricted for this election, and boundary changes forced two Republican incumbents into the same district while creating a new district that was won by another Republican. Maryland redistricted its at-large district into an 8th district around Montgomery County, managing to adjust
    5.83
    6 votes
    34
    United States House election, 1962

    United States House election, 1962

    The U.S. House election, 1962 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1962, which occurred in the middle of President John F. Kennedy's term. As in most midterm elections, Kennedy's Democratic Party lost several seats to the opposition Republican Party, but retained a majority. A notable freshman was future Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld (R-Illinois) Summary of the November 6, 1962 election results Alabama lost 1 seat in redistricting and elected all seats at-large as a method of determining which seat to eliminate. Arizona gained one seat and formed a new third district out of the northern part of the state. Arkansas lost two seats and merged the 5th and 6th districts into the other districts. 5th district incumbent Dale Alford chose to run for governor rather than face Wilbur Mills in a primary, and 6th district incumbent Catherine Dorris Norrell retired after serving out the remainder of her husband’s term. Eight new seats were added in reapportionment, including 4 additional districts in Greater Los Angeles alone as well as others in San Diego, the Northern Central Valley, Alameda County, and the Central Coast, increasing the delegation from 30 to
    5.00
    7 votes
    35
    Australian legislative election, 2004

    Australian legislative election, 2004

    • Includes general election: Australian House of Representatives election, 2004
    Federal elections were held in Australia on 9 October 2004. All 150 seats in the House of Representatives and 40 seats in the 76-member Senate were up for election. The incumbent Liberal Party of Australia led by Prime Minister of Australia John Howard and coalition partner the National Party of Australia led by John Anderson defeated the opposition Australian Labor Party led by Mark Latham. Independents: Peter Andren, Tony Windsor, Bob Katter In the House of Representatives, the Coalition won eight seats from Labor: Bass (Tas), Bonner (Qld), Braddon (Tas), Greenway (NSW), Hasluck (WA), Kingston (SA), Stirling (WA) and Wakefield (SA). Labor won four seats from the Coalition: Adelaide (SA), Hindmarsh (SA), Parramatta (NSW) and Richmond (NSW). The Coalition thus had a net gain of four seats. The redistribution had also delivered them McMillan (Vic), formerly held by Christian Zahra of Labor and won by Liberal Russell Broadbent; and Bowman (Qld), formerly held by Labor's Con Sciacca and won by Liberal Andrew Laming. Labor, meanwhile, received the new seat of Bonner (Qld) and the redistributed Wakefield (SA), both of which were lost to the Liberal Party. The Labor Party regained the
    7.50
    4 votes
    36
    Kerala state assembly election, 2006

    Kerala state assembly election, 2006

    The Kerala state assembly election of 2006, part of a series of state assembly elections in 2006, was scheduled to occur in three phases. The first phase was held on April 22, 2006, when 59 out of the 140 constituencies in Kerala voted. The second was held on April 29, 2006 for the 66 constituencies in central Kerala. The last phase of polling for the remaining 15 constituencies was on May 3, 2006. The counting was conducted on May 11, 2006. The Communist Party of India (Marxist)-led Left Democratic Front beat the incumbent Indian National Congress-led United Democratic Front by a margin of 99/140 seats. K. Karunakaram led the CPI party in 2006. He was elected as the chief minister of Kerala. irikkur - vd satheesan
    8.67
    3 votes
    37
    United States House election, 1796

    United States House election, 1796

    The U.S. House election, 1796 was an election for the United States House of Representatives to the Fifth United States Congress. Voting in the various states took place between August 1796 (North Carolina) and October 1797 (Tennessee). The first session was convened on May 15, 1797 at the proclamation of the new President. As Kentucky and Tennessee had not yet voted, they were unrepresented until the second session. A number of new seats for the Federalist Party gave President John Adams a loyal Congress. Many of the Federalist pick-ups in Congress came in the Middle Colonies, where more mixed ideologies (New England was heavily Federalist and the South and West were highly Democratic-Republican) tilted toward the party of the new president. Federalist trade and infrastructural policies gained ground in the Middle Colonies during this era. With the growth of cities in Maryland, Pennsylvania, and New York, industrialization and mercantilism became more entrenched ideas among voting citizens in these areas. In this period, each state fixed its own date for a congressional general election. This article covers all such state elections to the 5th Congress. Elections to a Congress took
    8.67
    3 votes
    38
    United States House election, 1856

    United States House election, 1856

    The U.S. House election of 1856 returned a semblance of normality to the Democratic Party, as they retook a House majority and retained the presidency (James Buchanan was elected). However, the party was permanently divided over the slavery issue. Earlier in the year, the Whig Party disbanded. With the majority of Whigs joining the Republican cause, the GOP finished second for their first time. Meanwhile, the short-lived Know Nothing movement declined and the American Party began to fall apart. The Democrats, aided by much support from recent immigrants, took advantage of the situation and became the majority, despite fragmented support within the party. Note: From statehood to 1864, California's representatives were elected at-large, with the top two vote-getters winning election from 1849 to 1858; in 1860 when California gained a seat in the House the top three vote-getters were elected.
    8.67
    3 votes
    39
    United States House election, 1938

    United States House election, 1938

    The U.S. House election, 1938 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1938 which occurred in the middle of President Franklin Roosevelt's second term. Roosevelt's Democratic Party lost a net of 72 seats to the Republican Party, who also picked up seats from minor Progressive and Farmer-Labor Parties. A contemporary account cited a number of reasons for the losses suffered by the Democrats. The first was the Recession of 1937, which had continued into the first half of 1938, and which had arguably weakened public confidence in the administration's New Deal economic policies. Controversy over a government reorganization bill (Roosevelt's "Court-packing" plan) was also a major factor. There were, in addition, strains between the more liberal New Deal supporters and the conservative wing of the Democratic party centered in the Southern states. These strains were exacerbated by an effort led by President Roosevelt to target certain conservative senators for defeat in Democratic primaries, including Walter George of Georgia, Millard Tydings of Maryland and Ellison Smith of South Carolina, along with the chairman of the House Rules Committee, John J. O'Connor of
    8.67
    3 votes
    40
    United States House election, 1952

    United States House election, 1952

    The U.S. House election, 1952 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1952 which coincided with the election of President Dwight Eisenhower. Eisenhower's Republican Party gained 22 seats from the Democratic Party, gaining a majority of the House. This would be the last time Republicans won a majority in the House until the 1994 midterm elections. Outgoing President Harry Truman's dismal approval rating was a reason why his party lost its House majority. Also, continued uneasiness about the Korean War was an important factor. Joseph W. Martin, Jr. (R-Massachusetts) became Speaker of the House, exchanging places with Sam Rayburn (D-Texas) who became the new Minority Leader. Notable freshmen included future Speaker Tip O'Neill (D-Mass.) and future Senate Majority leader Robert Byrd (D-W.Va.). Four special elections were held on dates other than in November. Arkansas lost one seat in reapportionment leaving it with 6; the existing 4th district along the western edge of the state lost some of its territory to the 3rd district in the northwest, and the rest was merged with the 7th district in the south, with minor changes to other districts. Seven new seats were
    8.67
    3 votes
    41
    United States House election, 1882

    United States House election, 1882

    The U.S. House election, 1882 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1882 which occurred during President Chester A. Arthur's term. Arthur's Republican Party was badly defeated, losing its majority to the opposition Democratic Party after a campaign that focused on the resistance of Republican leaders to reforming the Spoils system under which government jobs were handed to supporters of winning candidates. After the election, Arthur agreed with the Democrats to pass the Pendleton Civil Service Reform Act, establishing a professional civil service. However, his actions were too late, as the image of the Republican Party as corrupt was already engrained in the minds of voters. This election also saw the decline of the pro-paper money Greenback Party and the pick up of several Virginian seats by the Readjuster Party, which promoted fiscal responsibility and shunned elitism. Two new seats were added, following the 1880 U.S. Census, bringing the delegation up from four to six Representatives. The new seats were elected state-wide at-large until the next election, when six districts were mapped.
    10.00
    2 votes
    42
    United States House election, 1884

    United States House election, 1884

    The U.S. House election, 1884 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1884 which coincided with the election of President Grover Cleveland. In spite of Cleveland's victory, the opposition Republican Party gained back some of the seats it had lost in 1882, but the Democratic Party retained a majority. Republicans were able to make these slight gains by connecting their pro-business and industry message with progress. The Democrats were also hindered by the Panic of 1884, but were not greatly affected by it since the depression ended quickly. The Greenback Party all but disappeared following this election.
    10.00
    2 votes
    43
    United States House election, 1976

    United States House election, 1976

    The U.S. House election, 1976 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1976 which coincided with Jimmy Carter's election as President. Carter's narrow victory over Gerald Ford had limited coattails, and his Democratic Party gained a net of only one seat from the Republican Party in the House. This election is notable for being the last time any party had a veto-proof majority in the House. The American Independent Party, which was the third largest political party at the time, had begun to fracture prior to the election and thus allowed the fledgeling Libertarian Party to grow. Al Gore, the future Vice President and Democratic Nominee in 2000 was elected to Tennessee's 4th Congressional District, his first political office. Other notable freshmen included future Vice President Dan Quayle (R-Ind.) and future Majority Leader Dick Gephardt (D-Mo.). Summary of the November 2, 1976 United States House of Representatives election results Source: Election Statistics - Office of the Clerk Key to party abbreviations: AI=American Independent, D=Democratic, I=Independent, PF=Peace and Freedom, R=Republican
    10.00
    2 votes
    44
    United Kingdom general election, 1906

    United Kingdom general election, 1906

    The United Kingdom general election of 1906 was held from 12 January to 8 February 1906. The Liberals, led by sitting minority Prime Minister Henry Campbell-Bannerman, won a large majority in the election. The Conservatives under Arthur Balfour lost more than half their seats, while the Labour Representation Committee was far more successful than in 1900 and after the election would be reformed as the "Labour Party" with 29 MPs and Keir Hardie as leader. The Irish Parliamentary Party, led by John Redmond, achieved its seats with a relatively low number of votes, as 73 candidates stood unopposed. This election was a landslide defeat for the Conservative Party and their Liberal Unionist allies, with the primary reason given by historians as the party's weakness after its split over the issue of free trade (Joseph Chamberlain had resigned from government in September 1903 in order to campaign for Tariff Reform, which would allow 'preferential tariffs'). Many working-class people saw this as a threat to the price of food, hence the debate was nicknamed 'Big Loaf, Little Loaf'. The Liberals' landslide victory of 125 seats over all other parties led to the passing of social legislation
    5.50
    6 votes
    45
    Australian general election, 1983

    Australian general election, 1983

    Federal elections were held in Australia on 5 March 1983. All 125 seats in the House of Representatives, and all 64 seats in the Senate, were up for election, following a double dissolution. The incumbent coalition government in power since 1975, led by Malcolm Fraser (Liberal Party of Australia) and Doug Anthony (National Party of Australia), was defeated by the opposition Australian Labor Party led by Bob Hawke. Independent: Brian Harradine At the time of the election, the economy suffered from high inflation and high unemployment, alongside increases in industrial disputation and drought across much of the rural areas. The coalition government was led by Malcolm Fraser, Prime Minister since 1975. Fraser had fought off a leadership challenge from Andrew Peacock, who had resigned from the Cabinet citing Fraser's "manic determination to get his own way", a phrase Fraser had himself used when he resigned from the Gorton ministry in 1971. The Liberals unexpectedly won the December 1982 Flinders by-election, after having lost the March 1982 Lowe by-election with a large swing. Bob Hawke had entered Parliament at the 1980 federal election following a decade as leader of the Australian
    7.25
    4 votes
    46
    United States House election, 1820

    United States House election, 1820

    The U.S. House election, 1820 was an election for the United States House of Representatives to the seventeenth Congress. Voting in the various states took place between July 3, 1820 (Louisiana) and August 10, 1821 (Tennessee). In four states (Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Mississippi) the election coincided with the taking of the 4th Census (August 7, 1820). Future enumerations would henceforth be held at a different time of year. James Monroe won reelection and the Era of Good Feelings, a period of consensus rule and national harmony, continued after this campaign. However, the Democratic-Republicans lost a small number of seats, due to midterm discontent in some urban, eastern areas. However, the huge Democratic-Republican majority remained intact and the Federalist Party started to become increasingly fragmented.
    7.25
    4 votes
    47
    United States House election, 1956

    United States House election, 1956

    The U.S. House election, 1956 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1956 which coincided with the re-election of President Dwight Eisenhower. Although Eisenhower was re-elected with a large majority, his Republican Party lost a net of two seats to the majority Democratic Party. With no major national issues and the economic upswing of the 1950s in full force, voters generally chose to uphold the status quo. Notable freshmen included future Senator and presidential candidate George McGovern (D-S.D.) as well as future House Minority Leader Bob Michel.
    7.25
    4 votes
    48
    United States House elections, 2008

    United States House elections, 2008

    • Includes general election: United States House of Representatives elections in Alabama, 2008
    • Part of general election: United States general elections, 2008
    • Contests: United States House of Representatives election in Vermont, 2008
    The 2008 U.S. House of Representatives elections were held on November 4, 2008, to elect members to the United States House of Representatives to serve in the 111th United States Congress from January 3, 2009 until January 3, 2011. All 435 voting seats, as well as all 6 non-voting seats, were up for election. The Democratic Party, which won a majority of seats in the 2006 election, expanded its control in 2008. The Republican Party, hoping to regain the majority it lost in the 2006 or at least expand its congressional membership, lost additional seats. With one exception (Louisiana's 2nd district), the only seats to switch from Democratic to Republican had been Republican-held prior to the 2006 elections. Republicans gained five Democratic seats total, while losing 26 Republican seats, giving the Democrats a net gain of 21. Turnout increased due to the 2008 presidential election. The presidential election, 2008 Senate elections, and 2008 state gubernatorial elections, as well as many other state and local elections, occurred on the same date. At the end of the 110th Congress (2nd Session), the membership of the U.S. House of Representatives was composed of 235 Democrats, 199
    7.25
    4 votes
    49
    Singapore general election, 2006

    Singapore general election, 2006

    The 2006 Singapore parliamentary general election was held on 6 May 2006. 1.22 million out of the 2.16 million eligible Singaporeans voted for Members of Parliament and elected their next government. The People's Action Party (PAP), in its first election under Lee Hsien Loong, won 66.6% of the overall votes and gained 82 out of 84 seats. The PAP held the office of Prime Minister for a twelfth consecutive term. The general election was held under the first-past-the-post system. The parliament was dissolved by President S R Nathan on 20 April, three weeks before the election. On Nomination Day, the PAP gained 37 seats in divisions which were uncontested by other parties. The main election issues included employment, cost of living, housing, transport, education, the need for an effective opposition voice in parliament, and the quality of the candidates. The 2006 General Election was the 15th General Election in Singapore and the 10th since independence. The governing People's Action Party (PAP) sought to secure their twelfth consecutive term in office since 1959. This would be the first election since Lee Hsien Loong became its Secretary-General. Besides the ruling PAP, the other
    8.33
    3 votes
    50
    United States House election, 1818

    United States House election, 1818

    The U.S. House election, 1818 was an election for the United States House of Representatives to the Sixteenth United States Congress. Voting in the various states was held between April 1818 (New York) and September 1819 (Alabama). The Congress assembled on December 6, 1819. The election occurred in a time period that featured no pressing federal issues and a feeling of national consensus to the effectiveness of the ruling party. The Federalist collapse continued, as support for the party was dismal outside of New England due to a decline in an acceptance of their ideology and lingering anger over the secessionist doctrine produced at the Hartford Convention. The Democratic-Republicans used this election to increase their enormous majority.
    8.33
    3 votes
    51
    New York state elections, 2006

    New York state elections, 2006

    • Includes general election: United States House of Representatives elections in New York, 2006
    • Contests: New York United States Senate election, 2006
    New York held various elections on November 7, 2006. The Senate and Governor elections were two of the most lopsided elections in New York state-wide election history. Democratic Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton was re-elected to a 2nd 6 year term. She was first elected in 2000. Eliot Spitzer, a Democrat, was elected to replace retiring George Pataki, a Republican. Andrew Cuomo was elected to replace fellow Democrat Eliot Spitzer, who was elected governor. Democratic Comptroller Alan Hevesi was re-elected. He then resigned.
    6.20
    5 votes
    52
    United States House elections, 1954

    United States House elections, 1954

    The U.S. House election, 1954 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1954 which occurred in the middle of President Dwight Eisenhower's first term. Eisenhower's Republican Party lost eighteen seats in the House, giving the Democratic Party a majority that it would retain in every Congressional election until 1994. Perhaps the major reason for the Republican defeat was the fallout from the Army-McCarthy Hearings, in which prominent Republican Senator Joe McCarthy accused countless political and intellectual figures of having Communist ties, usually with no evidence. Another issue was the Dixon-Yates contract to supply power to the Atomic Energy Commission. Sam Rayburn of Texas became Speaker of the House, exchanging places with new Minority Leader Joseph W. Martin, Jr. of Massachusetts. [Data unknown/missing. You can help!] Of the thirty races, two incumbents retired and were replaced by new members from their party; one Republican lost re-election to a Democrat and one Democrat lost re-election to a Republican; and twenty eight
    6.20
    5 votes
    53
    United States House of Representatives elections in Nebraska, 2008

    United States House of Representatives elections in Nebraska, 2008

    • Part of general election: United States House elections, 2008
    • Contests: Nebraska’s 1st congressional district election, 2008
    The 2008 congressional elections in Nebraska were held on November 4, 2008 to determine who would represent the state of Nebraska in the United States House of Representatives, coinciding with the presidential and senatorial elections. Representatives are elected for two-year terms; those elected will serve in the 111th Congress from January 3, 2009 until January 3, 2011. Nebraska has three seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Its 2007-2008 congressional delegation consisted of three Republicans. No district changed hands, although CQ Politics had forecasted district 2 to be at some risk for the incumbent party. The party primary elections were held May 13th. This district encompasses most of the eastern quarter of the state. Republican incumbent Jeff Fortenberry (campaign website) won against Democratic nominee Max Yashirin (campaign website). CQ Politics forecasted the race as 'Safe Republican'. This district encompasses the core of the Omaha metropolitan area. Republican incumbent Lee Terry won against Democratic nominee Jim Esch, an Omaha businessman. CQ Politics forecasts the race as 'Leans Republican'. The Cook Political Report ranks it
    9.50
    2 votes
    54
    United States House election, 1822

    United States House election, 1822

    The United States House of Representatives elections in 1822, like all U.S. House elections prior to 1872, were held in various states over the course of a long election season. The first state to hold congressional elections for the 18th Congress was Louisiana on July 1–3, 1822, and the last state to vote was North Carolina on August 14, 1823. The U.S. House assembled on December 1, 1823, though the term of office technically began on March 4, 1823. The campaign was waged between the Democratic-Republican Party and the Federalist Party. However, by this time, party unity had broken down and the consensus principles of the Era of Good Feelings were giving way to fragmentation. In turn, many historians classify the parties of the Representatives based on how they voted in the Contingent Election of 1825 (where the House determined the winner of the 1824 presidential election), at the end of the 18th Congress, with results similar to those in the following table. Michael J. Dubin classifies candidates based on the political parties supporting them in the elections of 1822-1823 (though he does not provide a nationwide tally). The Democratic-Republican Party benefited heavily from the
    7.00
    4 votes
    55
    United States House election, 1842

    United States House election, 1842

    The U.S. House election, 1842 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1842. Just one election cycle after the Whig Party gained control of Congress, they lost their majority. Whig president William Henry Harrison died within a month of taking office and his successor, John Tyler, was disliked by members of both parties. Tyler's widespread unpopularity lead to an enormous defeat for his party, and the Whigs lost 70 seats, giving the Democrats a majority. With the economy rebounding, rural voters also chose the Democratic ticket to turn away from Whig policies of economic nationalism. The Law and Order Party, formed in response to the Dorr Rebellion in Rhode Island also took seats.
    7.00
    4 votes
    56
    Australian legislative election, 1993

    Australian legislative election, 1993

    Federal elections were held in Australia on 13 March 1993. All 147 seats in the House of Representatives, and 40 seats in the 76-member Senate, were up for election. The incumbent Australian Labor Party government led by Prime Minister of Australia Paul Keating defeated the opposition Liberal Party of Australia led by John Hewson with coalition partner the National Party of Australia led by Tim Fischer. Independents: Ted Mack, Phil Cleary This was the first election after the full totality of the late 80s/early 90s recession. The opposition Liberal Party under John Hewson a Professor of Economics who succeeded Liberal leader Andrew Peacock in 1990 and in 1991 launched Fightback!, a radical prescription of tough, economically "dry" measures, including a radical overhaul of Medicare and Industrial Relations. But the contentious 15 percent Goods and Services Tax (GST) was the centrepiece of the campaign. Hewson had been forced by pressure group activity and public opinion to exempt food from the proposed GST. The complexity surrounding what food was and wasn't to be exempt from the GST, and John Hewson's subsequent difficulty in explaining this to the Australian electorate was
    8.00
    3 votes
    57
    United Kingdom general election, 1950

    United Kingdom general election, 1950

    The 1950 United Kingdom general election was the first general election ever after a full term of a Labour government. Despite polling over one and a half million votes more than the Conservatives, the election, held on 23 February 1950 resulted in Labour receiving a slim majority of just five seats over all other parties, a stark contrast to the previous election in 1945, where they had achieved a massive 146-seat majority, although Labour in fact received more votes than they had during the 1945 election. The party would call another general election in 1951. Significant changes since the 1945 general election included the abolition of plural voting by the Representation of the People Act 1948, and a major reorganisation of constituencies by the House of Commons (Redistribution of Seats) Act 1949. Eleven new English seats were created, six abolished, and there were over 170 major alterations to constituencies across the country. Both the Conservative and Labour parties entered the campaign positively. The Conservatives, now having recovered from their heavy election defeat in 1945, accepted most of the nationalisation that had taken place under the Attlee government, (which
    8.00
    3 votes
    58
    United Kingdom general election, 1959

    United Kingdom general election, 1959

    This United Kingdom general election was held on 8 October 1959. It marked a third successive victory for the ruling Conservative Party, led by Harold Macmillan. The Conservatives increased their overall majority again, to 100 seats over the Labour Party under Hugh Gaitskell. Following the Suez Crisis in 1956, Anthony Eden the Conservative Prime Minister became unpopular and resigned early the following year to be succeeded by Harold Macmillan. At this stage, the Labour Party, with Hugh Gaitskell having taken over as leader from Clement Attlee just after the 1955 election, enjoyed large opinion poll leads over the Conservatives, and it looked as if they could win. The Liberals also had a new leader in Jo Grimmond, meaning that all three parties would contest the election with a new leader at the helm. However, the Conservatives enjoyed an upturn in fortunes as the economy improved under Macmillan, and his personal approval ratings remained high. By September 1958 the Conservatives had moved ahead of Labour in the opinion polls. This would be the first election in some time taking place after all of the 3 main parties changed their leaders. The Conservatives fought under the slogan
    8.00
    3 votes
    59
    United States House election, 1974

    United States House election, 1974

    The U.S. House election, 1974 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1974 that occurred in the wake of the Watergate scandal, which had forced President Richard M. Nixon to resign in favor of Gerald Ford. This scandal allowed the Democratic Party to make large gains in the House election, taking 49 seats from the Republican Party and increasing their majority above the two-thirds mark. Notable freshmen included future Senators and presidential candidates Paul Tsongas (D-Mass.), Tom Harkin (D-Iowa), and Christopher Dodd (D-Conn.). Future President Bill Clinton was the Democratic nominee for a seat in Arkansas, but lost. Wisconsin's third district= Vernon Thompson (R) [Data unknown/missing. You can help!] Key to party abbreviations: AI=American Independent, D=Democratic, I=Independent, PF=Peace and Freedom, R=Republican Since the last election, Vander Veen and Traxler had replaced Republican incumbents in special elections and Riegle had changed parties, so the net change in balance since the last election was five.
    8.00
    3 votes
    60
    United States House of Representatives elections in Mississippi, 2008

    United States House of Representatives elections in Mississippi, 2008

    • Part of general election: United States House elections, 2008
    • Contests: Mississippi’s 1st congressional district election, 2008
    The 2008 congressional elections in Mississippi were held on November 4, 2008 to determine who will represent the state of Mississippi in the United States House of Representatives. The primary election for candidates seeking the nomination of the Republican Party or the Democratic Party was held on March 11, with a run-off being held for the Republican nomination in the first and third districts, and for the Democratic nomination in the first district. Mississippi has four seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Representatives are elected for two-year terms; those elected will serve in the 111th Congress from January 4, 2009 until January 3, 2011. The election coincides with the United States Senate special election to fill the remainder of Trent Lott's term, the regularly scheduled 2008 United States Senate election, and the 2008 U.S. presidential election. With the results of the 1st congressional district special election included, the Mississippi congressional delegation consists of three Democrats and one Republican. The only race not forecasted as safe for the incumbent party was District 1. This district covers the northeastern part of
    8.00
    3 votes
    61
    United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia, 2008

    United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia, 2008

    • Part of general election: United States House elections, 2008
    • Contests: Virginia’s 3rd congressional district election, 2008
    The 2008 congressional elections in Virginia were held on November 4, 2008 to determine who would represent the state of Virginia in the United States House of Representatives, coinciding with the presidential and senatorial elections. Representatives are elected for two-year terms; those elected will serve in the 111th Congress from January 3, 2009 until January 3, 2011. Virginia has eleven seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Its 2007-2008 congressional delegation consisted of eight Republicans and three Democrats. It is now five Republicans and six Democrats. Districts 2, 5 and 11 changed from Republican to Democratic, although CQ Politics had forecasted districts 2, 5, 10 and 11 to be at some risk for the incumbent party. The Primary elections took place on June 10, 2008. The District stretches along the eastern side of the commonwealth. Republican incumbent Rob Wittman won against Democratic nominee Bill Day and Libertarian Nathan Larson. Wittman had only held the seat since January 2008, having won the Virginia's 1st congressional district special election, 2007 to succeed deceased Congresswoman Jo Ann Davis. Larson is an accountant and
    8.00
    3 votes
    62
    United Kingdom general election, 1880

    United Kingdom general election, 1880

    The United Kingdom general election of 1880 was a general election in the United Kingdom held from March to April 1880. At the culmination of the Midlothian campaign, the Liberals, led by the fierce oratory of retired former Liberal leader William Ewart Gladstone in attacking the supposedly immoral foreign policy of the Disraeli government, secured one of their largest ever majorities in the election, leaving the Conservatives a distant second. As a result of the campaign, the Liberal leaders, Lord Hartington and Lord Granville, withdrew in favour of Gladstone, who thus became Prime Minister a second time. Total votes cast: 3,359,416.
    6.75
    4 votes
    63
    United States House election, 1894

    United States House election, 1894

    The U.S. House election, 1894 was a realigning election—a major Republican landslide that set the stage for the decisive Election of 1896. The elections of members of the United States House of Representatives in 1894 came in the middle of President Grover Cleveland's second term. The nation was in its deepest economic depression ever following the Panic of 1893, so economic issues were at the forefront. In the spring, a major coal strike damaged the economy of the Midwest and Mid-Atlantic. It was accompanied by violence; the miners lost and many moved toward the Populist party. Immediately after the coal strike concluded, Eugene V. Debs led a nationwide railroad strike, called the Pullman Strike. It shut down the nation's transportation system west of Detroit for weeks, until President Cleveland's use of federal troops ended the strike. Debs went to prison (for disobeying a court order). Illinois' Governor John Peter Altgeld, a Democrat, broke bitterly with Cleveland. The fragmented and disoriented Democratic Party was crushed everywhere outside the South, losing more than half its seats to the Republican Party. Even in the South, the Democrats lost seats to Republican-Populist
    6.75
    4 votes
    64
    United States House election, 1906

    United States House election, 1906

    The U.S. House election, 1906 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1906 which occurred in the middle of President Theodore Roosevelt's second term. As in many midterm elections, the President's Republican Party lost seats to the opposition Democratic Party, but retained a large overall majority. Dissatisfaction with working conditions and resentment toward union-busting among industrial laborers in the Mid-Atlantic and Midwest caused these groups to turn out to the polls in large numbers in support of the Democratic Party. However, gains in these regions were not enough to remove the Republican majority or the firm support that the party held among the middle class.
    6.75
    4 votes
    65
    California State Assembly elections, 2008

    California State Assembly elections, 2008

    • Part of general election: California state elections, November 2008
    • Contests: California’s 26th State Assembly district election, 2008
    The 2008 California State Assembly elections took place on November 4, 2008. Voters in all 80 of California's State Assembly districts voted for their representative. Other elections were also held on November 4. Only five seats changed parties: one to the Republican Party and four to the Democratic Party, which maintained a majority with 51 seats. Of the 80 State Assembly districts, only about nine were considered truly competitive by political analysts. Below are the final official results as reported by the Secretary of State.
    9.00
    2 votes
    66
    United Kingdom general election, 1945

    United Kingdom general election, 1945

    The United Kingdom general election of 1945 was a general election held on 5 July 1945, with polls in some constituencies delayed until 12 July and in Nelson and Colne until 19 July, because of local wakes weeks. The results were counted and declared on 26 July, owing in part to the time it took to transport the votes of those serving overseas. The result was a surprise landslide victory for Clement Attlee's Labour Party, over Winston Churchill's Conservatives, giving Labour its first majority government, and a mandate to implement its postwar reforms. A khaki election held just months after VE Day, it was the first general election to be held since 1935, as general elections had been suspended until the Allied victory in the Second World War had been assured. It resulted in the election defeat of the National Government led by Winston Churchill and the landslide victory of the Labour Party led by Clement Attlee, who won a majority of 145 seats. Though Churchill's Government used the term 'National Government' and campaigned as such, it bore very little resemblance to the original National Government of 1931-40 - the three major political parties had recovered and reunified
    9.00
    2 votes
    67
    United Kingdom general election, 1997

    United Kingdom general election, 1997

    The United Kingdom general election, 1997 was held on 1 May 1997, more than five years after the previous election on 9 April 1992, to elect 659 members to the British House of Commons. Under the leadership of Tony Blair the Labour Party ended its 18 years in opposition, and won the general election with a landslide victory, winning 418 seats, the most seats the party has ever held. Blair subsequently became Prime Minister. Under the leadership of Tony Blair, the Labour Party had adopted a more centrist policy platform under the name 'New Labour'. This was seen as moving away from the traditionally more left-wing stance of the Labour Party. Labour made several campaign pledges such as the creation of a National Minimum Wage, devolution referendums for Scotland and Wales and promised greater economic competence than the Conservatives, who were unpopular following the events of Black Wednesday in 1992. The Labour campaign was ultimately a success and the party returned an unprecedented 418 MPs and began the first of three consecutive terms for Labour in government. The Conservative Party was led by then-incumbent Prime Minister John Major and ran their campaign emphasising low
    9.00
    2 votes
    68
    United States House election, 1890

    United States House election, 1890

    The U.S. House election, 1890 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1890 which occurred in the middle of President Benjamin Harrison's term. A stagnant economy which became worse after the Panic of 1890, combined with a lack of support for then Representative William McKinley's steep tariff act, which favored large industries at the expense of consumers, led to a sharp defeat for Harrison's Republican Party, giving a large majority to the Democratic Party and prefacing Harrison's defeat in 1892. The Republican-controlled Congress was highly criticized for its lavish spending, and it earned the unflattering nickname of The Billion Dollar Congress. Democrats promised to cut the outlandish budget. This election also saw the Populist Party, a coalition of farmers and laborers who wanted to overhaul the nation's financial system, make a small mark on Congress.
    9.00
    2 votes
    69
    United States House of Representatives elections in Alabama, 2008

    United States House of Representatives elections in Alabama, 2008

    • Part of general election: United States House elections, 2008
    • Contests: Alabama’s 1st congressional district election, 2008
    The 2008 United States House of Representatives elections in Alabama were held on November 4, 2008 to determine who will represent the state of Alabama in the United States House of Representatives, coinciding with the presidential and senatorial elections. Representatives are elected for two-year terms; those elected will serve in the 111th Congress from January 4, 2009 until January 3, 2011. Alabama has seven seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Its 2007-2008 congressional delegation consisted of five Republicans and two Democrats. It is now four Republicans and three Democrats. District 2 changed party (from open Republican to Democratic). The Democratic and Republican primaries were not contested. However, Democrat Thomas Fuller withdrew from the race on June 12, 2008, stating he was unable to wage a creditable campaign in the district. CQ Politics forecasted the race as 'Safe Republican'. This district covers southeastern Alabama, including Dothan and Montgomery. CQ Politics forecasted the race as 'No Clear Favorite'. The Rothenberg Political Report rated it 'Pure Toss-Up'. The Cook Political Report ranked it 'Republican Toss
    9.00
    2 votes
    70
    United Kingdom general election, 1918

    United Kingdom general election, 1918

    • Includes general election: Irish general election, 1918
    The United Kingdom general election of 1918 was the first to be held after the Representation of the People Act 1918, which meant it was the first United Kingdom general election in which nearly all adult men and some women could vote. Although polling was held on 14 December 1918, the count did not begin until 28 December. The election was won by a coalition of the Conservatives under Andrew Bonar Law, the pro-coalition Liberals under David Lloyd George, and a few independent and former Labour MPs including the anti-socialist National Democratic and Labour Party. It resulted in a government which retained Lloyd George as Prime Minister. Candidates which had the official support of the coalition were issued a letter of endorsement from Lloyd George and Bonar Law, known as a "coupon", and so this election is often called the coupon election. Coupons were issued to 159 Liberal candidates and 364 Conservatives though in some cases, they were rejected. It was also known as one of the khaki elections, due to the immediate postwar setting and the role of the demobilized soldiers. The coalition parties won the election easily, with the Conservatives the big winners. They were the largest
    5.80
    5 votes
    71
    Australian general election, 1949

    Australian general election, 1949

    Federal elections were held in Australia on 10 December 1949. All 121 seats in the House of Representatives, and 42 of the 60 seats in the Senate were up for election. The incumbent Australian Labor Party led by Prime Minister of Australia Ben Chifley was defeated by the opposition Liberal Party of Australia led by Robert Menzies with coalition partner the Country Party led by Arthur Fadden. The number of MPs in both houses had been increased at the election, and single transferable vote under a proportional voting system had been introduced in the Senate. Though Labor lost government, Labor retained a Senate majority at the election. However, this ended at the 1951 election. With the Senate changes in place, Labor has not held a Senate majority since. As of this election, single transferrable vote with proportional representation became the method for electing the Senate. This was to try to prevent the Senate from being dominated by one party, which had often occurred previously. For example, coming into this election the ALP held 33 of the 36 Senate seats, whilst the conservatives at the 1919 election held 35 of the 36 Senate seats. In addition, the House of Representatives was
    7.67
    3 votes
    72
    Australian general election, 1951

    Australian general election, 1951

    Federal elections were held in Australia on 28 April 1951. All 121 seats in the House of Representatives, and all 60 seats in the Senate were up for election, due to a double dissolution called after the Senate rejected the Commonwealth Bank Bill. The incumbent Liberal Party of Australia led by Prime Minister of Australia Robert Menzies with coalition partner the Country Party led by Arthur Fadden defeated the Australian Labor Party led by Ben Chifley. Although the Coalition had won a comfortable majority in the House in 1949, Labor still had a four-seat majority in the Senate. Chifley thus made it his business to obstruct Menzies' agenda at every opportunity. Realizing this, Menzies sought to call a double dissolution at the first opportunity in hopes of gaining control of both houses. He thought he had his chance in 1950, when he introduced a bill to ban the Australian Communist Party. However, after a redraft, Chifley let the bill pass. A few months later, the Senate rejected the Commonwealth Banking Bill, finally giving Menzies an excuse to call a double dissolution. While the Coalition lost five House seats to Labor, it still had a solid mandate. More importantly, it picked up
    7.67
    3 votes
    73
    Australian general election, 1975

    Australian general election, 1975

    Federal elections were held in Australia on 13 December 1975. All 127 seats in the House of Representatives, and all 64 seats in the Senate were up for election following a double dissolution of both Houses. Malcolm Fraser had been commissioned as caretaker prime minister following the dismissal of Gough Whitlam’s three-year old Labor government by Governor-General Sir John Kerr, on 11 November 1975. The same day, Fraser advised the calling of the election, in accordance with Kerr’s stipulated conditions (see 1975 Australian constitutional crisis). The Coalition of Fraser's Liberal Party of Australia and Doug Anthony's National Country Party secured government in its own right, winning the largest majority government in Australian history. The Liberals actually won a majority in their own right, with 68 seats. Although Fraser had no need for the support of the National Country Party, the Coalition was retained. Labor suffered a 30-seat swing and saw its caucus cut almost in half, to 36 seats. Independent: Brian Harradine The election followed the controversial dismissal of the Whitlam government by Governor-General Sir John Kerr in the 1975 constitutional crisis. Labor campaigners
    7.67
    3 votes
    74
    United Kingdom general election, 1935

    United Kingdom general election, 1935

    The United Kingdom general election held on 14 November 1935 resulted in a large, though reduced, majority for the National Government now led by Conservative Stanley Baldwin. The greatest number of MPs, as before, were Conservative, while the National Liberal vote held steady. The National Labour vote collapsed, and even leader Ramsay MacDonald lost his seat. Labour, under what was then regarded internally as the caretaker leadership of Clement Attlee, made large gains over their very poor showing in the 1931 general election. The Liberals continued their slow political demise and lost further ground, with their leader Sir Herbert Samuel losing his own seat (see Liberal Party section). The Independent Labour Party stood separately from Labour for the first time since 1895, while the Scottish National Party contested their first election, and the Communist Party gained their first parliamentary seat in almost ten years, West Fife. The major election issues were the continuing unemployment problems and the role of the League of Nations, particularly as regarding the Empire of Japan. No general elections were held during World War II until Allied victory was assured; hence the 1935
    7.67
    3 votes
    75
    United States House of Representatives elections in New York, 2008

    United States House of Representatives elections in New York, 2008

    • Part of general election: United States House elections, 2008
    • Contests: New York’s 1st congressional district election, 2008
    The 2008 congressional elections in New York were held on November 4, 2008 to determine representation in the state of New York in the United States House of Representatives. New York has 29 seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Representatives are elected for two-year terms; those elected will serve in the 111th Congress from January 4, 2009 until January 3, 2011. The election coincided with the 2008 U.S. presidential election. The races not forecasted as safe for the incumbent party were districts 13, 19, 20, 24, 25, 26 and 29. Republican incumbent Vito Fossella announced his retirement on May 20, 2008, leaving this an open seat. Democratic City Councilman Michael McMahon, endorsed by the Staten Island Democratic Party won the primary against Steve Harrison, who lost to Fossella in 2006. Republican Robert Straniere defeated Dr. Jamshad Wyne in the parimary. CQ Politics forecasted the race as 'Democrat Favored'. Democratic incumbent John Hall was challenged by Republican Kieran Lalor. CQ Politics forecasted the race as 'Democrat Favored'. Democratic incumbent Kirsten Gillibrand was challenged by Republican Sandy Treadwell. CQ Politics
    7.67
    3 votes
    76
    Oregon state elections, 2008

    Oregon state elections, 2008

    • Includes general election: United States House of Representatives elections in Oregon, 2008
    • Part of general election: United States general elections, 2008
    • Contests: Oregon United States Senate election, 2008
    On November 4, 2008, the US state of Oregon held statewide general elections for three statewide offices (secretary of state, treasurer, and attorney general), both houses of the Oregon Legislative Assembly, and twelve state ballot measures. The primary elections were held on May 20, 2008. Both elections also included national races for President of the US, US Senator, and US House Representatives. Numerous local jurisdictions — cities, counties, and regional government entities — held elections for various local offices and ballot measures on these days as well. Democrat Kate Brown won the election for Secretary of State. She defeated Rick Metsger, Vicki Walker, and Paul Damian Wells in the Democratic primary. She then won the general election, in which she faced Republican Rick Dancer (who was unopposed in the Republican primary) and Pacific Green Party nominee Seth Alan Woolley. Democrat Ben Westlund won the race for Treasurer. He and Republican Allen Alley were each unopposed in their respective primaries. Constitution Party nominee Michael Marsh was also on the November ballot. Democrat John Kroger was elected Attorney General. He won the Democratic nomination over Greg
    10.00
    1 votes
    77
    United Kingdom general election, 1841

    United Kingdom general election, 1841

    In the 1841 United Kingdom general election, there was a big swing as Sir Robert Peel's Conservatives took control of the House of Commons. The Whigs lost votes to the Irish Repeal group. The Chartists picked up few votes, despite their popular support, as voting was still restricted to a small percentage of the population. Total votes: 593,445
    10.00
    1 votes
    78
    United Kingdom general election, 1929

    United Kingdom general election, 1929

    The 1929 United Kingdom general election was held on 30 May 1929, and resulted in a hung parliament. It was the first of only three elections under universal suffrage in which a party lost the popular vote (i.e. gained fewer popular votes than some other party) but gained a plurality of seats (the others being 1951 and February 1974). In 1929 that party was Ramsay MacDonald's Labour, which won the most seats in the Commons for the first time ever but failed to get a majority. The Liberals led by David Lloyd George regained some of the ground they had lost in the 1924 election, and held the balance of power. The election was often referred to as the "Flapper Election" in that it was the first election in which women under the age of 30 were allowed to vote, under the provisions of the Fifth Reform Act. The election was fought against a background of rising unemployment with the memory of the 1926 General Strike still fresh in voters' minds. Foreign policy also took prominence in the campaign, with Austen Chamberlain's record as Foreign Secretary contributing to the Conservative defeat, as he was perceived as being "pro-French". By 1929 the cabinet was being described by many as "old
    10.00
    1 votes
    79
    United States House election, 1848

    United States House election, 1848

    Elections to the United States House of Representatives were held in 1848. The Democrats gained three seats, regaining the majority they had lost to the Whigs just two years earlier in the election of 1846. The Mexican–American War, which ended with an American victory several months before the election, was a big factor in the election. Zachary Taylor, a general in the war, was elected president as a Whig, but the Democrats, who instigated the war, were rewarded for their victory by regaining their House majority. The fiercely abolitionist Free Soil Party was a huge spoiler in this election, earning 9 seats in districts that generally supported Whig politicians. When Congress assembled on December 3, 1849, no single party was able to win a majority of the vote for Speaker of the House. The Whigs split; the majority renominating Robert Charles Winthrop of Massachusetts but the southern Whigs split off to support Meredith Poindexter Gentry of Tennessee. The Democrats put forth Howell Cobb of Georgia, while the Free Soilers supported David Wilmot of Pennsylvania, author of the Wilmot Proviso. The impasse continued until the 63d ballot. Two dozen other candidates were offered in the
    10.00
    1 votes
    80
    United States House election, 1854

    United States House election, 1854

    The U.S. House election, 1854 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1854. The 1854 election was the beginning of the end for both the Democratic and Whig Parties. Party lines were very blurred and a minority government was formed. Democrats lost a huge number of seats in the North due to the impending slavery crisis, but remained the largest party in the House. The American Party (commonly known as the "Know-Nothings"), a faction based on the fears of immigration and Catholicism which had won several seats in previous elections, became the second largest group. The large influx of immigrants from Catholic Ireland, escaping the potato famine, and from Catholic Southern Germany, departing due to political and economic instability, shocked many American Protestants and allowed the American Party to grow. The Whigs, divided over the issue of slavery, lost several seats and began to disintegrate. Meanwhile, the newly formed Republican Party, which was anti-slavery and pro-industry, quickly became a force in the North. In the end, the Democrats and a large number of American Party representatives allied to become the largest faction, although they still did
    10.00
    1 votes
    81
    United States House election, 1858

    United States House election, 1858

    Following the U.S. House election of 1858, the Republicans gained control of the House for the first time, benefiting from the continued breakdown in the anti-immigration and anti-Catholic American Party of the Know Nothing Movement, and from strife within the Democratic Party. The Republicans were actually several seats short of a numerical majority, but were able to exercise authority by mustering support from members of other parties. The deeply divided Democrats continued to fall apart due to the slavery issue, losing a number of seats, and the American Party all but collapsed. A number of former Whigs who were dissatisfied with their short membership in the Republican Party, as well as some former Know Nothings, formed the Opposition Party, which generally allied more with the Republicans than Democrats. Note: From statehood to 1864, California's representatives were elected at-large, with the top two vote-getters winning election from 1849 to 1858; in 1860 when California gained a seat in the House the top three vote-getters were elected.
    10.00
    1 votes
    82
    United States House election, 1964

    United States House election, 1964

    The U.S. House election, 1964 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1964 which coincided with the election of President Lyndon Johnson. Johnson's landslide victory over Barry Goldwater allowed his Democratic Party to gain a net of 36 seats from the Republican Party, giving them a two-thirds majority in the House. This is (as of 2011) the largest House majority held by either party since 1936. The election also marked the first time since Reconstruction that Republicans made inroads in the deep South. Notable freshmen included future Speaker Tom Foley (D-Wash.). Summary of the November 3, 1964 election results While the GOP performed badly nationally, Barry Goldwater's tremendous success in the Deep South led to the election of several Republicans to the House from those states, many of them the first Republicans elected there since Reconstruction. The "Goldwater Republicans" elected were: Alabama, which had not agreed on a redistricting plan until 1964 and had elected all members at-large in 1962, went back to electing from districts. While most of the at-large representatives were former district representatives and were thus geographically diverse, the
    10.00
    1 votes
    83
    United States House elections, 1996

    United States House elections, 1996

    The U.S. House election, 1996 was an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 5, 1996, which coincided with the re-election of Bill Clinton as President of the United States. Clinton's Democratic Party won a net of two seats from the Republican Party, but the Republicans retained an overall majority in the House for the first time since the Great Depression. This was also a rare instance in which the winning party in the House failed to win a plurality due to the geographic concentration of Democratic votes in urban areas. Source: Election Statistics - Office of the Clerk Key to party abbreviations: AI=American Independent, C=Constitution, D=Democratic, G=Green, I=Independent, IP=Independence Party, L=Libertarian, NL=Natural Law, R=Republican, Ref=Reform, T=U.S. Taxpayers Party.
    10.00
    1 votes
    84
    United States House of Representatives elections in California, 2004

    United States House of Representatives elections in California, 2004

    The United States House of Representatives elections in California, 2004 was an election for California's delegation to the United States House of Representatives, which occurred as part of the general election of the House of Representatives on November 2, 2004. The districts after the 2000 census were gerrymandered to protect incumbents of both parties, so there was no change in the party balance, 33 Democrats and 20 Republicans. The following are the final results from the Secretary of State of California.
    10.00
    1 votes
    85
    United States House of Representatives elections in Idaho, 2008

    United States House of Representatives elections in Idaho, 2008

    • Part of general election: United States House elections, 2008
    • Contests: Idaho’s 1st congressional district election, 2008
    The 2008 congressional elections in Idaho were held on November 4, 2008 to determine who would represent the state of Idaho in the United States House of Representatives, coinciding with the presidential and senatorial elections. Representatives are elected for two-year terms; those elected will serve in the 111th Congress from January 3, 2009 until January 3, 2011. Idaho has two seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Representatives are elected for two-year terms. Its 2007-2008 congressional delegation consisted of two Republicans. In the 2008 elections, District 1 was won by Democrat Walt Minnick, so Idaho's delegation to the 111th Congress consists of one Republican and one Democrat. CQ Politics had forecasted District 1 to be at some risk for the incumbent party. The statewide primary elections were held May 27, 2008. This district includes most of the Boise metropolitan area and northern Idaho, including all of the Idaho Panhandle. Major cities in the district include Nampa, Meridian, Coeur d'Alene, Lewiston as well as precincts in western Boise. Usually a Republican stronghold, in 2006 Bill Sali (campaign website) won an open seat race
    10.00
    1 votes
    86
    United States House of Representatives elections in Iowa, 2008

    United States House of Representatives elections in Iowa, 2008

    • Part of general election: United States House elections, 2008
    • Contests: Iowa’s 1st congressional district election, 2008
    The Iowa United States House of Representatives election in 2008 was held on November 4, 2008 and determined who would hold Iowa's seats in the United States House of Representatives during 2009-10. Each of the five incumbents was up for election, and each won re-election. Democrat Bruce Braley, an attorney from Waterloo, the incumbent, was completing his first term. His Republican challenger was state Senator David Hartsuch. CQ Politics forecast the race as 'Safe Democrat'. Democrat Dave Loebsack of Mount Vernon, a former political science professor at Cornell College, the incumbent, was also completing his first term. His Republican challenger was U.S. Army Lt. Col. (Ret.) Dr. Mariannette Miller-Meeks of Ottumwa, Iowa. He was also challenged by the Green Party's Wendy Barth and by Brian White, who was nominated by petition. CQ Politics forecast the race as 'Safe Democrat'. Leonard Boswell, a Democrat from Des Moines, the incumbent, was completing his sixth term. His Republican challenger was Kim Schmett and his Socialist Workers Party challenger was Frank Forrestal. CQ Politics forecast the race as 'Safe Democrat'. Republican Tom Latham of Alexander, the incumbent, was completing
    10.00
    1 votes
    87
    United States House of Representatives elections in Wisconsin, 2008

    United States House of Representatives elections in Wisconsin, 2008

    • Part of general election: United States House elections, 2008
    • Contests: Wisconsin’s 1st congressional district election, 2008
    The 2008 congressional elections in Wisconsin were held on November 4, 2008 to determine who would represent the state of Wisconsin in the United States House of Representatives. Representatives were elected for two-year terms; those elected served in the 111th Congress from January 3, 2009 until January 3, 2011. The election coincided with the 2008 U.S. presidential election and other Wisconsin elections. Wisconsin has eight seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Its 2007-2008 congressional delegation consisted of five Democrats and three Republicans. That remained unchanged after the 2008 congressional elections in Wisconsin as all incumbent candidate won re-election, although CQ Politics had forecasted Wisconsin's 8 district to be at some risk for the incumbent party. In this relatively moderate district in southeast Wisconsin, incumbent Republican Congressman Paul Ryan has enjoyed popularity and faced no serious challenge from Democratic nominee, Marge Krupp, a chemist. Despite Barack Obama's strong performance in Wisconsin that year in the presidential election, Ryan was re-elected overwhelmingly. In this very liberal district based in the
    10.00
    1 votes
    88
    Ethiopian general elections, 2005

    Ethiopian general elections, 2005

    Ethiopia held general elections on May 15, 2005, for seats in both its national and in four regional government councils. Under pressure from the international community, Prime Minister Meles Zenawi promised that this election would be proof that more democracy would come in this multi-ethnic nation; international elections observers from the European Union (EU) and the U.S.-based Carter Center were present to observe the results. This election succeeded in attracting about 90% of the registered voters to the polls. A government ban on protests was imposed throughout the election period. EU observers remarked on the "significantly enlarged freedoms for political campaigning in comparison to previous elections". Political parties campaigned actively, and opposition parties appeared to be increasingly active in the rural areas. The observer mission described the atmosphere "during the campaign was calm, culminating in two massive, peaceful rallies in Addis Ababa, one by the EPRDF and one by the opposition." Despite this, opposition parties alleged numerous cases of intimidation, and arrests of its supporters. While the EU observers could not investigate all of the alleged cases, it
    6.50
    4 votes
    89
    Portuguese election of the Constituent Assembly, 1975

    Portuguese election of the Constituent Assembly, 1975

    An election of a Constituent Assembly was carried out in Portugal on April 25 of 1975, exactly one year after the Carnation Revolution and was the first free election in fifty years, the first in the new democratic regime created after the revolution which made the turnout the highest ever. The main aim of the election was the election of a Constituent Assembly, in order to write a new Constitution to replace the Estado Novo regime's authoritarian Constitution of 1933 and so, the elected parliament had a single year mandate and no government was based on the parliament support, the country continued to be governed by a military-civilian provisional administration. The election was, perhaps surprisingly, won by the Socialist Party. The Social Democratic Party was the second most voted party, defending a project that it would soon abandon, the social-democracy becoming the major right-wing party in the country a few years after. The parliament had a large majority of parties defending socialist or "democratic socialist" ideas and the Constitution, approved one year after, reflected such influence. The Portuguese Communist Party achieved a surprisingly low voting, considering the
    6.50
    4 votes
    90
    United States House election, 1876

    United States House election, 1876

    The U.S. House election, 1876 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1876 which coincided with the (heavily contested) election of President Rutherford B. Hayes. Hayes' Republican Party was able to recover from the Democratic Party many of the seats it had lost two years before as the economy improved slightly. However, the Democrats retained a majority and were able to use the disinterest of the people in Republican Reconstruction-led projects to help keep crucial seats. Republican Congressional leadership had a difficult time distancing itself from the corruption of the Grant administration or the legislature's impact on the economy downturn.
    6.50
    4 votes
    91
    United Kingdom general election, 1837

    United Kingdom general election, 1837

    The 1837 United Kingdom general election saw Robert Peel's Conservatives close further on the position of the Whigs, who won their fourth election of the decade. The election produced the first parliament after the death of William IV and the first of Victoria's reign. Total votes cast: 798,025
    5.60
    5 votes
    92
    United Kingdom general election, 1992

    United Kingdom general election, 1992

    The United Kingdom general election of 1992 was held on 9 April 1992, and was the fourth consecutive victory for the Conservative Party. This election result took many by surprise, as polling leading up to the day of the election had shown Labour under leader Neil Kinnock to be consistently, if narrowly, ahead. John Major had won the leadership election in November 1990 following the resignation of Margaret Thatcher. During his term leading up to the 1992 elections he oversaw the British involvement in the Gulf War, introduced legislation to replace the unpopular Community Charge with Council Tax, and signed the Maastricht treaty. The UK had gone into recession around the time of Major's appointment, along with most of the other industrialised nations. John Major announced the date of the election on 11 March shortly after Chancellor of the Exchequer Norman Lamont had delivered the Budget. It was one of the most dramatic elections in the UK since the end of the Second World War, after the Conservative Party defeated the initial favourites, the Labour Party. The BBC's live television broadcast of the election results were presented by David Dimbleby and Peter Snow, with John
    8.50
    2 votes
    93
    United States House election, 1874

    United States House election, 1874

    The U.S. House election, 1874 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1874, which occurred in the middle of President Ulysses S. Grant's second term with a deep economic depression underway. It was an important turning point, as the Republicans lost heavily and the Democrats gained control of the House. It signaled the imminent end of Reconstruction, which Democrats opposed. Historians emphasize the factors of economic depression and attacks on the Grant administration for corruption as key factors in the vote. With the election following the Panic of 1873, Grant's Republican Party was crushed in the elections, losing their majority and almost half their seats to the Democratic Party. This was the first period of Democratic control since the pre-war era. The economic crisis and the inability of Grant to find a solution led to his party's defeat. In the south, the Democrats and Conservatives continued their systematic destruction of the Republican coalition. In the South, Scalawags moved into the Democratic Party. The Democratic landslide signaled the imminent end of Reconstruction, which Democrats opposed and a realignment of the Republican coalition that
    8.50
    2 votes
    94
    Australian legislative election, 1984

    Australian legislative election, 1984

    Federal elections were held in Australia on 1 December 1984. All 148 seats in the House of Representatives (24 of them newly created), and 46 of 76 seats in the Senate (12 of them newly created), were up for election. The incumbent Australian Labor Party led by Prime Minister of Australia Bob Hawke, defeated the opposition Liberal Party of Australia led by Andrew Peacock with coalition partner the National Party of Australia led by Ian Sinclair. The election had a long ten-week campaign and a high rate of informal voting for the House of Representatives, but decreased rate in the Senate (due to the introduction of the Group voting ticket). The election was held 18 months ahead of time, partly in order to bring the elections for the House of Representatives and Senate back into line following the double dissolution election of 1983. The legislated increase in the size of the House of Representatives by 24 seats and the Senate by 12 seats came into effect at the 1984 election. Prior to 1984 the electoral commission did not undertake a full distribution of preferences for statistical purposes. The stored ballot papers for the previous election were put through this process prior to
    7.33
    3 votes
    95
    Irish general election, 1927

    Irish general election, 1927

    The Irish general election of June 1927 was held on 9 June 1927. The newly elected members of the 5th Dáil assembled at Leinster House on 23 June when the new President of the Executive Council and Executive Council of the Irish Free State were appointed. The election saw the establishment of Fianna Fáil as a participant in the Dáil, taking most of the support and many of the members of the abstentionist Anti-Treaty Sinn Féin. The impact of this shift was to remove Cumann na nGaedheal's working majority among TDs attending, making the Dáil short-lived.
    7.33
    3 votes
    96
    United Kingdom general election, 1886

    United Kingdom general election, 1886

    The 1886 United Kingdom general election took place from 1–27 July 1886. It resulted in a major reversal of the results of the 1885 election as the Conservatives, led by Lord Salisbury in an electoral pact with the breakaway Unionist wing of the Liberals - led by Lord Hartington (later the Duke of Devonshire) and Joseph Chamberlain. The new Liberal Unionist party gave the Conservatives their parliamentary majority but did not join them in a formal coalition. William Ewart Gladstone's Liberals, who supported Irish Home Rule, and their sometimes allies, the Irish Parliamentary Party led by Charles Stewart Parnell, placed a distant second. This ended the period of Liberal dominance - they had held power for 18 of the 27 years since 1859 and won five of the six elections held during that time, but would only be in power for three of the next 19 years.
    7.33
    3 votes
    97
    United States House election, 1789

    United States House election, 1789

    The U.S. House elections, 1789 were the first elections for the United States House of Representatives in 1789, which coincided with the election of President George Washington. Some candidates were chosen in 1788, others in 1789. Dates and manners of elections were set by the states. Actual political parties did not yet exist, but new members of Congress were informally categorized as either "pro-Administration" (i.e., pro-Washington and pro-Hamilton) or "anti-Administration." The first session of the first House of Representatives came to order on March 4, 1789 with only thirteen members. The requisite quorum (thirty members out of fifty-nine) was not present until April 1, 1789. The first order of business was to elect a Speaker. On the first ballot, Frederick Muhlenberg was elected Speaker by a majority of votes. The business of the first session was largely a matter of procedure rather than policy. In this period each state fixed its own date for a congressional general election. This article covers all such state elections to the 1st Congress. Elections to a Congress took place both in the even-numbered year before and in the odd-numbered year when the Congress convened. In
    7.33
    3 votes
    98
    United States House election, 1830

    United States House election, 1830

    The U.S. House election, 1830 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1830. The brass style of Congress during the reign of Andrew Jackson caused a number of Americans to become discontent with the government and both of its major parties. Anger over the Tariff of 1828 also provided a major issue, particularly in the agricultural South. The Democrats remained firmly in control of the House, but lost several seats, as did the minority National Republicans. The Anti-Masonic Party, an aspiring third party which was based on a single issue (distrust of Freemasonry), was actually able to gain several seats, and four South Carolina Congressman who called themselves Nullifiers (based on the principle of states' rights) were also elected. Thus, this was the first election in the House where both major parties lost seats at the same time; this would not occur again until the 1854 elections.
    7.33
    3 votes
    99
    United States House of Representatives elections in California, 2008

    United States House of Representatives elections in California, 2008

    • Part of general election: United States House elections, 2008
    • Contests: California’s 1st congressional district election, 2008
    The United States House of Representatives elections in California, 2008 were held on November 4, 2008 to determine who would represent California various congressional districts in the United States House of Representatives. In the 111th Congress, California has 53 seats in the House, apportioned accordingly after the 2000 United States Census. Representatives are elected to two-year terms; those elected will serve in the 111th Congress from January 3, 2009 to January 3, 2011. The election coincides with the United States presidential election as well as other elections in California. According to CQ Politics, the districts considered the most competitive were the 4th and 11th, with the 3rd, 8th, 26th, 46th and 50th as less than safe as well. Below are the final official results as reported by the Secretary of State. (map) (map) (map) (map) On December 2, 2008, Republican Tom McClintock declared victory over Democrat Charlie Brown in the race in the 4th congressional district. Brown conceded his defeat the next day. The race had been so close that it took four weeks of counting all mailed and provisional ballots before McClintock could be assured of victory. CQ Politics had
    7.33
    3 votes
    100
    United States House election, 1828

    United States House election, 1828

    The U.S. House election, 1828 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1828. In 1828, the newly formed Democratic Party soundly took control of the presidency, with Andrew Jackson's victory, and greatly increased their majority in Congress. Outgoing President John Quincy Adams' unpopularity played a major role in the Democratic pick-up, as did the perception of the National Republican Party as urban and elitist. Major increases in suffrage also heightened Democratic wins, as newly enfranchised voters tended to associate with Jacksonian principles. The Anti-Masonic Party, a single issue faction based on distrust of Freemasonry, became the first third party in American history to garner a seat in the House.
    6.25
    4 votes
    101
    United States House elections, 1844

    United States House elections, 1844

    Elections to the United States House of Representatives to elected Representatives to the 29th United States Congress were held in the various states between July 1, 1844 and November 4, 1845. All 227 members of the House of Representatives elected took their seats when Congress convened December 1, 1845. The elections mostly coincided with the 1844 presidential election, won by dark horse Democratic candidate James K. Polk, who won on a campaign advocating territorial expansion. The new states of Texas and Iowa were added during this Congress, electing their Representatives in 1846. Despite Polk's victory, the Democrats did have a net loss of five Representatives. however, they retained a large majority of 142-79 over their major rivals, the Whigs. The American Party, based on the nativist "Know Nothing" movement characterized by opposition to immigration and anti-Catholicism, gained six seats, its first in Congress. The fragmentation of votes by this new party, combined with a generally negative political environment cause by dislike of outgoing President John Tyler, contributed to the slight Democratic loses.
    6.25
    4 votes
    102
    Australian legislative election, 2001

    Australian legislative election, 2001

    Federal elections were held in Australia on 10 November 2001. All 150 seats in the House of Representatives and 40 seats in the 76-member Senate were up for election. The incumbent Liberal Party of Australia led by Prime Minister of Australia John Howard and coalition partner the National Party of Australia led by John Anderson defeated the opposition Australian Labor Party led by Kim Beazley. Independents: Peter Andren, Tony Windsor, Bob Katter The following table indicates seats that changed hands from one party to another at this election. It compares the election results with the previous margins, taking into account redistributions in New South Wales, Western Australia, South Australia, Tasmania and both territories. As a result, it includes the seats of Macarthur and Parramatta, which were held by Liberal members but had notional Labor margins. The table does not include the new seat of Hasluck (retained by Labor); the abolished Northern Territory, which was divided into Lingiari (retained by Labor) and Solomon (retained by the CLP); or Paterson, a Labor seat made Liberal by the redistribution Throughout much of 2001, the Coalition had been trailing Labor in opinion polls,
    5.40
    5 votes
    103
    Australian federal election, 2010

    Australian federal election, 2010

    A federal election was held on Saturday, 21 August 2010 for members of the 43rd Parliament of Australia. The incumbent centre-left Australian Labor Party led by Prime Minister Julia Gillard won a second term against the opposition centre-right Liberal/National Coalition led by Opposition Leader Tony Abbott, after Labor formed a minority government with the support three independent MPs and one Australian Greens MP. Labor and the Coalition each won 72 seats in the 150-seat House of Representatives, four short of the requirement for majority government, resulting in the first hung parliament since the 1940 election. Six crossbenchers held the balance of power. Greens MP Adam Bandt and independent MPs Andrew Wilkie, Rob Oakeshott and Tony Windsor declared their support for Labor on confidence and supply. Independent MP Bob Katter and National Party of Western Australia MP Tony Crook declared their support for the Coalition on confidence and supply. The resulting 76–74 margin entitled Labor to form a minority government. The Prime Minister, government ministers and parliamentary secretaries were sworn in on 14 September 2010 by the Governor-General Quentin Bryce. In November 2011,
    7.00
    3 votes
    104
    United Kingdom general election, 1987

    United Kingdom general election, 1987

    The United Kingdom general election of 1987 was held on 11 June 1987, to elect 650 members to the British House of Commons. The election was the third consecutive election victory for the Conservative Party under the leadership of Margaret Thatcher, who became the first Prime Minister since the 2nd Earl of Liverpool in 1820 to lead a party into three successive election victories. The Conservatives ran a campaign focusing on lower taxes, a strong economy and defence. They also emphasised that unemployment had fallen below 3 million for the first time since 1981, and inflation was standing at 4%, its lowest level for some 20 years. The tabloid media also had strong support for the Conservatives, particularly The Sun, which ran anti-Labour articles with headlines such as: Why I'm backing Kinnock, by Stalin. The Labour Party, led by Neil Kinnock was slowly moving towards a more centrist policy platform. The main aim of the Labour party was, arguably, not to win a majority of parliamentary seats but simply to re-establish themselves as the main progressive centre-left alternative to the Conservatives, after the rise of the SDP forced Labour onto the defence. Indeed, the Labour party
    7.00
    3 votes
    105
    United States House election, 1798

    United States House election, 1798

    Elections to the United States House of Representatives took place in 1798 and 1799. Voting in the various states for Representatives in the Sixth United States Congress took place at times ranging from April 1798 in New York to August 1799 in Tennessee, even after the legal beginning of the Congress term on March 4, 1799. The first session of this Congress met in Philadelphia on December 2, 1799. It was the last session before moving to the new capital at Washington. President John Adams, a Federalist elected two years prior in the election of 1796, remained popular during a time of national economic growth, and the Federalists made a modest gain of three seats at the expense of the opposition Democratic-Republicans, the party of Vice President and future President Thomas Jefferson, resulting in further Federalist control of the House, 60-46 seats. Despite this, a variety of controversial new laws passed by Congress in the summer of 1798, including the Naturalization Act of 1798 and the Alien and Sedition Acts eventually hurt Adams and the Federalists. The House during this Congress would ultimately elect Thomas Jefferson over Aaron Burr in the tied election of 1800.
    7.00
    3 votes
    106
    United States House of Representatives elections in Minnesota, 2008

    United States House of Representatives elections in Minnesota, 2008

    • Part of general election: United States House elections, 2008
    • Contests: Minnesota’s 1st congressional district election, 2008
    The 2008 Minnesota U.S. House of Representatives elections took place on November 4, 2008. All 8 congressional seats that make up the state's delegation were contested. Representatives are elected for two-year terms; those elected will serve in the 111th United States Congress from January 4, 2009 until January 3, 2011. The 2008 Presidential election, 2008 Senate election (for the seat held by Republican Norm Coleman), and 2008 Minnesota Legislature elections occurred on the same date, as well as many local elections and ballot initiatives. The 110th congressional delegation from the U.S. state of Minnesota has 3 Republicans and 5 Democratic Farmer Labor Party members (DFLers). Six are men; 2 are women. Three were freshman in the 110th congress. The veterans range in experience from Jim Oberstar with 32 years of experience and the chairman of the Transporatation Committee to John Kline with just four years of experience. This district extends across southern Minnesota from the border with South Dakota to the border of Wisconsin. DFLer Tim Walz defeated 6-term veteran Republican Gil Gutknecht in 2006 in somewhat of a surprise victory. Walz had no opponent in the race for the DFL
    7.00
    3 votes
    107
    Australian legislative election, 1963

    Australian legislative election, 1963

    Federal elections were held in Australia on 30 November 1963. All 122 seats in the House of Representatives were up for election. The incumbent Liberal Party of Australia led by Prime Minister of Australia Robert Menzies with coalition partner the Country Party led by John McEwen defeated the Australian Labor Party led by Arthur Calwell. See Australian federal election, 1961 and Australian Senate election, 1964 for Senate compositions. The election was held following the early dissolution of the House of Representatives. The Prime Minister of Australia, Robert Menzies, gave as his reason for calling an election within two years that there was an insufficient working majority in the House. The 1961 election had been won with a substantially reduced majority of only two seats. One of the consequences of an early House election was that there were separate Senate and House elections until 1974. The Coalition government of the Liberal Party led by Robert Menzies and the Country Party led by John McEwen was returned with a substantially increased majority over the Australian Labor Party led by Arthur Calwell. Indigenous Australians could vote in federal elections on the same basis as
    6.00
    4 votes
    108
    United Kingdom general election, 1885

    United Kingdom general election, 1885

    The 1885 United Kingdom general election was from 24 November to 18 December 1885. This was the first general election after an extension of the franchise and redistribution of seats. For the first time a majority of adult males could vote and most constituencies returned a single-member to Parliament. It saw the Liberals, led by William Ewart Gladstone, win the most seats, but not an overall majority. As the Irish Nationalists held the balance of power between them and the Conservatives, this exacerbated divisions within the Liberals over Irish Home Rule and led to a split and another general election the following year. Total votes cast: 4,638,235. All parties shown.
    6.00
    4 votes
    109
    United Kingdom general election, 1923

    United Kingdom general election, 1923

    The United Kingdom general election of 1923 was held on 6 December 1923. The Conservatives, led by Stanley Baldwin, won the most seats, but Labour, led by Ramsay MacDonald, and H. H. Asquith's reunited Liberal Party gained enough to produce a hung parliament. As the election had been fought on the Conservative proposals for tariff reform it was inevitable that they could not retain office and so the first ever Labour government was formed. Being in a minority it only lasted 10 months and another election was held in October 1924. This was the last election in which a third party (the Liberals) won more than 100 seats, or received more than 26% of the vote. During 1923 the Ruhr crisis led to a growing feeling of German sympathy in Britain, with people increasingly fed up of international crises in Europe. By May 1923 the then Prime Minister Bonar Law fell ill and resigned on 22 May, after just 209 days in office. He was replaced by Baldwin. Having only had an election just the year before, Baldwin's party had a comfortable majority in the commons and could have waited another four years, but the government was concerned with unemployment and protectionism. He felt the need to
    8.00
    2 votes
    110
    United Kingdom general election, 1955

    United Kingdom general election, 1955

    The 1955 United Kingdom general election was held on 26 May 1955, four years after the previous general election. It resulted in a substantially increased majority of 60 for the Conservative government under new leader and prime minister Sir Anthony Eden against Labour Party, now in their 20th year of leadership by Clement Attlee. Boundary changes however make a direct comparison with 1951 impossible. This election has been described by many since as one of the "dullest" post war elections, due to there being little change in the country, with Labour steadily losing ground due to infighting. This was due to Nye Bevan, who had initiated a split in the party between the left (Bevanites) and the right (Gaitskellites). This resulted in an unclear election message from the Labour party. It would also be the 5th and last election fought by Labour leader Clement Attlee, who by this time was 72. Eden had only just became leader of the Conservative party a few weeks before the election, after the retirement of Winston Churchill. Despite this however Eden had for sometime been considered the natural heir apparent to the Conservative leadership. For the first time Television took a prominent
    8.00
    2 votes
    111
    United States House election, 1892

    United States House election, 1892

    The U.S. House election, 1892 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1892 which coincided with the election of Grover Cleveland as President for the second time, defeating incumbent Benjamin Harrison. In spite of the presidential results, Harrison's Republican Party gained back some of the seats that had been lost in 1890 to the Democratic Party, but was still deep in the minority. The Republican pickups were a result of a number of Republican-friendly Northern districts reverting to form after voting Democratic in the previous election cycle. The third party Populists, who had high support among farmers and laborers in the South and West, also gained a few seats.
    8.00
    2 votes
    112
    United States House of Representatives elections in New Jersey, 2008

    United States House of Representatives elections in New Jersey, 2008

    • Part of general election: United States House elections, 2008
    • Contests: New Jersey’s 1st congressional district election, 2008
    The 2008 congressional elections in New Jersey were held on November 4, 2008 to determine who would represent the state of New Jersey in the United States House of Representatives. New Jersey has thirteen seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Representatives are elected for two-year terms; those elected will serve in the 111th Congress from January 4, 2009 until January 3, 2011. The election coincided with the 2008 U.S. presidential election. The statewide Party primary elections were held June 3, 2008. District 3 was the only seat which changed party (from open Republican to Democratic), although CQ Politics had forecasted districts 3, 5 and 7 to be at some risk for the incumbent party. This district contains all or parts of Burlington, Camden and Gloucester counties. Rob Andrews was the Democratic nominee and the Saints Prison Ministry founder Dale Glading was the Republican nominee. CQ Politics forecasted the race as 'Safe Democrat'. Incumbent Democrat Rob Andrews, in a surprise move on April 2, 2008, announced that he would be challenging incumbent Sen. Frank Lautenberg in the Democratic primary in June. His House seat, which is reliably
    8.00
    2 votes
    113
    United States House of Representatives elections in Ohio, 2008

    United States House of Representatives elections in Ohio, 2008

    • Part of general election: United States House elections, 2008
    • Contests: Ohio’s 1st congressional district election, 2008
    The 2008 congressional elections in Ohio were held on November 4, 2008 and determined who will represent the state of Ohio in the United States House of Representatives. The primary election was held on March 4, 2008. Ohio has eighteen seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Representatives are elected for two-year terms; those elected in November 2008 will serve in the 111th Congress from January 4, 2009 until January 3, 2011. The election coincided with the 2008 U.S. presidential election. Districts 1, 15 and 16 changed party (from Republican to Democratic), although CQ Politics had forecasted districts 1, 2, 14, 15, 16 and 18 to be at some risk for the incumbent party. District 15 was not decided until December 8, 2008. Democratic nominee Steve Driehaus won against Republican incumbent Steve Chabot. CQ Politics rated the race as 'No Clear Favorite'. The following candidates ran in the general election: Republican incumbent Jean Schmidt won against Democratic nominee Victoria Wulsin and Independent candidate David Krikorian. CQ Politics rated the race as 'Leans Republican'. The following candidates ran in the general election: Republican
    8.00
    2 votes
    114
    Victorian state election, 2002

    Victorian state election, 2002

    Elections were held in the Australian state of Victoria on Saturday 30 November 2002 to elect the 88 members of the state's Legislative Assembly and 22 members of the 44-member Legislative Council. The Labor government led by Premier Steve Bracks was returned for a second term with a landslide that saw the Liberal opposition, led by Robert Doyle, reduced to 17 seats — their worst result since the 1952 election. Labor also won a majority of seats in the Legislative Council for the first time in its history. The Nationals (who after breaking off their Coalition with the Liberals renamed themselves the 'VicNats') retained the 7 seats they held from the 1999 election. Labor was assisted by a strong economy and by the popularity of Steve Bracks, while the Liberal Party was badly divided between the Kroger and the Kennett factions. The Liberal campaign was also damaged by the revelation that the shadow treasurer, Robert Dean, had failed to ensure he was on the electoral roll and therefore could neither vote nor stand as a candidate. This was the last Victorian election where the Legislative Council was elected using preferential voting in single-member districts (while each province has
    8.00
    2 votes
    115
    Mississippi United States Senate election, 2008

    Mississippi United States Senate election, 2008

    • Part of general election: United States Senate elections, 2008
    • Contests: United States Senate Class I special election in Mississippi, 2008
    The 2008 United States Senate election in Mississippi was held on November 4, 2008. The seat was regularly scheduled for election, unlike the special election taking place on the same day. Incumbent Republican U.S. Senator Thad Cochran won re-election to a sixth term. CQ Politics rated the race as 'Safe Republican'. The Cook Political Report considered it 'Solid Republican'. The Rothenberg Political Report considered it a 'Safe Republican'.
    9.00
    1 votes
    116
    United Kingdom general election, 1852

    United Kingdom general election, 1852

    The July 1852 United Kingdom general election was a watershed election in the formation of the modern political parties of Britain. Following 1852, the Tory/Conservative party became, more completely, the party of the rural aristocracy, while the Whig/Liberal party became the party of the rising urban bourgeosie in Britain. The results of the election were extremely close in terms of both the popular vote and number of seats won by the main two parties. As in the previous election of 1847, Lord John Russell's Whigs won the popular vote, but the Conservative party won a very slight majority of the seats. However, a split between Protectionist Tories, led by the Earl of Derby and the Peelites made the formation of a majority government very difficult. Lord Derby's minority Protectionist government ruled from February 23, 1852 until December 17, 1852. Derby appointed Benjamin Disraeli as Chancellor of the Exchequer in this minority government. However, in December 1852, Derby's minority government collapsed because of issues arising out of the budget introduced by Disraeli. A Peelite-Whig coalition government was then formed under Lord Aberdeen, one of the leading Peelites. Although,
    9.00
    1 votes
    117
    United States House election, 1824

    United States House election, 1824

    The elections for the United States House of Representatives in 1824 coincided with the contentious presidential election of that year. There were 213 seats in the House up for election, and those elected served in the 19th United States Congress that convened on December 5, 1825. While the bulk of states held their elections in 1824, seven states scheduled their general elections at various times during 1825. By 1823, the year that marked the end of the consensus-driven Era of Good Feelings, the national wing of the Federalist Party had disbanded and the Democratic-Republican Party, which was left as the only major political party, was being destroyed by internal divisions. The party fractured after the 1824 presidential election between those who supported the new president, John Quincy Adams, and those who supported Andrew Jackson. Jackson was defeated after the House decided the contested election in favor of Adams. Representatives who supported Adams won a slim majority in the House, and would later form the National Republican Party in 1825. Jackson supporters continued calling themselves Democratic-Republicans, and later became the Democratic Party in 1828. The following
    9.00
    1 votes
    118
    United States House election, 1898

    United States House election, 1898

    The U.S. House election, 1898 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1898 which occurred in the middle of President William McKinley's first term. As in many midterm elections, the President's Republican Party lost seats, but was able to hold a majority over the Democratic Party. The Populist Party also lost many seats, as their movement began to decline. Many Populists rallied behind William Jennings Bryan's increasingly powerful branch of the Democratic Party, which built the rural economic issues advocated by Populists into their platform. As a result, the Democrats won a number of Western seats as well many in the Mid-Atlantic.
    9.00
    1 votes
    119
    United States House of Representatives elections in Connecticut, 2008

    United States House of Representatives elections in Connecticut, 2008

    • Part of general election: United States House elections, 2008
    • Contests: Connecticut’s 1st congressional district election, 2008
    The 2008 congressional elections in Connecticut were held on November 4, 2008 to determine who will represent the state of Connecticut in the United States House of Representatives, coinciding with the presidential election. Representatives are elected for two-year terms; those elected will serve in the 111th Congress from January 3, 2009 until January 3, 2011. Connecticut has five seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Its 2007-2008 congressional delegation consisted of four Democrats and one Republican. In the 2008 elections, District 4 changed from Republican to Democratic, so Connecticut's congressional delegation to the 111th Congress consists of five Democrats. Christopher Shays, the Republican incumbent in District 4, had been the last remaining Republican representative in New England. Prior to the election, CQ Politics forecasted districts 2, 4 and 5 to be at some risk for the incumbent party. The Primary election was held August 12th. This district covers much of central Connecticut and includes municipalities within Hartford, Litchfield, and Middlesex counties. Five-term incumbent John B. Larson faced Republican Joe Visconti and Green
    9.00
    1 votes
    120
    United States House of Representatives elections in Maine, 2008

    United States House of Representatives elections in Maine, 2008

    • Part of general election: United States House elections, 2008
    • Contests: Maine’s 1st congressional district election, 2008
    The 2008 congressional elections in Maine were held on November 4, 2008 to determine representation for the state of Maine in the United States House of Representatives, coinciding with the presidential and senatorial elections. Representatives are elected for two-year terms; those elected will serve in the 111th Congress from January 3, 2009 until January 3, 2011. Maine has two seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Its 2007-2008 congressional delegation consisted of two Democrats. No districts changed party, although CQ Politics forecasted district 1 to be at some risk for the incumbent party. The primary election for Republican Party and Democratic Party candidates was held on June 10. This was an open seat in 2008 because incumbent Democrat Tom Allen ran for the U.S. Senate seat held by Republican Susan Collins. Democrats were favored to hold this seat but were not assured of victory; John Kerry won 55% here in 2004 (CPVI=D+6). The Democratic nominee was Chellie Pingree, former Common Cause President and former Maine Senate Majority Leader who ran against Collins in 2002. The Republican nominee was Charlie Summers, former Maine State
    9.00
    1 votes
    121
    United States House of Representatives elections in North Carolina, 2008

    United States House of Representatives elections in North Carolina, 2008

    • Part of general election: United States House elections, 2008
    • Contests: North Carolina’s 1st congressional district election, 2008
    The United States House of Representative elections of 2008 in North Carolina were held on 4 November 2008 as part of the biennial election to the United States House of Representatives. All thirteen seats in North Carolina, and 435 nation-wide, were elected to the 111th United States Congress. The party primary elections were held 6 May 2008. Carried on the coattails of Barack Obama winning the state in the presidential election, the Democrats added one seat to their seven won in 2006. The Republican Party won the other five. In the 8th district, Democrat Larry Kissell defeated incumbent Robin Hayes. All other incumbents won re-election. The Republicans' hold on the 10th district had been thought to be at risk by CQ Politics, but Republican Patrick McHenry won re-election. The Democrats increased their total vote share by 1.5% state-wide, and 2.5% if excluding the 1st, which the Republicans didn't contest in 2006. It is not to be confused with the election to the North Carolina House of Representatives, which was held on the same day. This district, located in the northeastern portion of the state, is represented by Democrat G.K. Butterfield, who first won it in a 2004 special
    9.00
    1 votes
    122
    New York state election, 1950

    New York state election, 1950

    The 1950 New York state election was held on November 7, 1950, to elect the Governor, the Lieutenant Governor, the State Comptroller, the Attorney General and a U.S. Senator, as well as all members of the New York State Assembly and the New York State Senate. The Socialist Workers state convention met on July 9, and nominated Michael Bartell for Governor; Gladys Barker for Lieutenant Governor; and Joseph Hansen for the U.S. Senate. The petition to nominate candidates was filed on September 5 with the Secretary of State. The American Labor state convention met on September 6 and nominated John T. McManus for Governor; Dr. Clementina J. Paolone, an obstetrician, for Lieutenant Governor; Michael Jiminez for Comptroller; Frank Scheiner for Attorney General; and Dr. W.E.B. DuBois for the U.S. Senate. The Republican state convention met on September 7 at Saratoga Springs, New York. They re-nominated Governor Thomas E. Dewey and Attorney General Nathaniel L. Goldstein; and nominated Lieutenant Governor Joe R. Hanley for the U.S. Senate; Comptroller Frank C. Moore for Lieutenant Governor; and State Senator J. Raymond McGovern for Comptroller. The Democratic state convention met on
    6.67
    3 votes
    123
    Portuguese legislative election, 1999

    Portuguese legislative election, 1999

    The Portuguese legislative election of 1999 took place on October 10. The Socialist Party was aiming a second term under the lead of António Guterres, in the end the Socialist Party won the election, but missed what would be an historical absolute majority for the party by only one MP. The Social Democratic party under the lead of José Manuel Durão Barroso was still away from the preferences of the majority of the Portuguese people, after the ten years cycle under the lead of Cavaco Silva that had terminated four years before. The Portuguese Communist Party achieved an important climb in the scorecard, against those who predicted its irreversible decline after the end of the Socialist Bloc in the early 1990s. For the first time, the Leftwing Bloc, formed after the merger of several minor left-wing parties became represented in the parliament after electing two MPs. Turnout in this election was very low, only being surpassed in 2009 and 2011 when turnout was just less than 60%. The major parties involved were listed with their leaders: António Guterres, leader of the Socialist Party, was nominated Prime Minister for the second time, and missed the absolute majority by one MP,
    6.67
    3 votes
    124
    Saskatchewan general election, 2003

    Saskatchewan general election, 2003

    The Saskatchewan general election of 2003 was the twenty-fifth provincial election held in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan. It was held on November 5, 2003, to elect the 58 members of the Legislative Assembly of Saskatchewan (MLAs). The election was called on October 8 by Lieutenant-Governor of Saskatchewan Lynda Haverstock, on the advice of Premier Lorne Calvert. Going into the election, the popularity of the New Democratic Party of Saskatchewan (NDP) had declined because of controversy on a number of issues. Voters in this agrarian province were disgruntled because of a mediocre harvest, a disastrous summer for cattle producers – the American border had been closed to Canadian beef due to fears of mad cow disease, and the actions of a member of the NDP Cabinet who was found to have misled the people of the province on the nature of the Saskatchewan Potato Utility Development Company ("SPUDCO"), a publicly owned potato company that was inappropriately characterized as a public-private partnership. Election issues included emigration (the province's population was falling because young people were leaving the province to look for work), honesty and integrity, privatization of
    6.67
    3 votes
    125
    United Kingdom general election, 1983

    United Kingdom general election, 1983

    The 1983 United Kingdom general election was held on 9 June 1983. It gave the Conservative Party under Margaret Thatcher the most decisive election victory since that of Labour in 1945. The opposition vote split almost evenly between the SDP/Liberal Alliance and Labour. With its worst performance since 1918, the Labour vote fell by over 3 million from 1979 and this accounted for both a national swing of almost 4% towards the Conservatives and their larger parliamentary majority of 144, even though the Conservatives' total vote fell by almost 700,000. Thatcher's first four years as prime minister had not been an easy time. Unemployment had rocketed in the first three years of her term as she battled to control inflation that had ravaged Britain for most of the 1970s. By the start of 1982, unemployment had passed the 3,000,000 mark - for the first time since before the Second World War - and the economy had been in recession for nearly two years. However, British victory in the Falklands War later that year sparked a dramatic rise in Tory popularity, and as Mrs Thatcher's new found popularity continued in 1983 the Tories were most people's firm favourites to win the election. The
    6.67
    3 votes
    126
    United States House election, 1794

    United States House election, 1794

    The U.S. House election, 1794 was an election for the United States House of Representatives to the Fourth United States Congress during President George Washington's second term. Voting in the various states took place between August 1794 (New Hampshire and Rhode Island) and September 1795 (Kentucky). Congress was convened on December 7, 1795. Tennessee elected their first Representative (Andrew Jackson) on October 7, 1796. In the second election with organized political parties, the Thomas Jefferson-led Democratic-Republican Party once again defeated the Alexander Hamilton-led Federalist Party and slightly increased their majority. These new wins by the Democratic-Republicans can mostly be attributed to the support of Jeffersonian ideas of agrarian democracy, which gained great footholds in the West. During this period each state fixed its own date for a congressional general election. This article covers all such state elections to the 4th Congress. Elections to a Congress took place both in the even-numbered year before and in the odd-numbered year when the Congress convened. In some states the congressional delegation was not elected until after the legal start of the Congress
    6.67
    3 votes
    127
    United States House election, 1914

    United States House election, 1914

    The U.S. House election, 1914 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1914 which occurred in the middle of President Woodrow Wilson's first term. The opposition Republican Party had recovered from the split they underwent during the 1912 presidential election, and they made large gains in seats from the Democratic Party, though not enough to regain control of the body. The burgeoning economy greatly adied Republicans, who pushed for pro-business principles and took credit for the success that had been reached in the industrial sector. Many former Progressives rejoined the Republican Party, but a number of the most liberal members of the House remained under this banner. Congressman Carl Vinson D-Georgia, who would set the since broken record for longest continuous tenure in the House, was elected to his first full term in this election.
    6.67
    3 votes
    128
    United States House of Representatives elections in Massachusetts, 2008

    United States House of Representatives elections in Massachusetts, 2008

    • Part of general election: United States House elections, 2008
    • Contests: Massachusetts’s 1st congressional district election, 2008
    The 2008 congressional elections in Massachusetts were held on November 4, 2008 to determine who will represent the state of Massachusetts in the United States House of Representatives. Representatives are elected for two-year terms; whoever is elected will serve in the 111th Congress from January 4, 2009 until January 3, 2011. The election coincides with the 2008 U.S. presidential election. Massachusetts has ten seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Its 2007-2008 congressional delegation consisted of ten Democrats. This remains unchanged, and CQ Politics had forecasted all districts safe for its Democratic incumbent. Massachusetts's 1st congressional district covers roughly the northwest half of the state. It has been represented by Democrat John Olver since June, 1991. CQ Politics forecasted the race as 'Safe Democrat'. Massachusetts's 2nd congressional district lies in the south-central part of the state. It has been represented by Democrat Richard Neal since 1989. CQ Politics forecasted the race as 'Safe Democrat'. Massachusetts's 3rd congressional district lies in the central and southeastern part of the state. It has been represented by
    6.67
    3 votes
    129
    Danish parliamentary election, 1987

    Danish parliamentary election, 1987

    The Danish parliamentary election of 1987 was held on 8 September 1987. Although the Conservative-lead government had slight losses, the minority government could continue. In this election the new party Common Course got representation for its first and only time with 4 seats.
    5.75
    4 votes
    130
    United States House of Representatives elections in Colorado, 2008

    United States House of Representatives elections in Colorado, 2008

    • Part of general election: United States House elections, 2008
    • Contests: Colorado’s 1st congressional district election, 2008
    The 2008 congressional elections in Colorado were held on November 4, 2008 to determine who will represent the state of Colorado in the United States House of Representatives, coinciding with the presidential and senatorial elections. Representatives are elected for two-year terms; those elected will serve in the 111th Congress from January 6, 2009 until January 3, 2011. Colorado has seven seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Its 2007-2008 congressional delegation consisted of four Democrats and three Republicans. It is now five Democrats and two Republicans. District 4 changed party (from Republican to Democratic), which was the only district CQ Politics had forecasted to be at some risk for the incumbent party. The Primary election was held August 12, 2008. Democratic incumbent Diana DeGette (campaign website) won against Republican nominee George Lilly (campaign website). DeGette was unopposed in her primary, and Lilly won against Charles Crain in his primary. CQ Politics forecasted the race as 'Safe Democrat'. Democratic nominee Jared Polis (campaign website), a businessman, won against Republican nominee Scott Starin (campaign website),
    5.75
    4 votes
    131
    Georgia statewide elections, 2006

    Georgia statewide elections, 2006

    The Georgia statewide elections were held on November 7, 2006. The primary election was held on July 18. Contests in which no single candidate received a majority of the vote were decided in a runoff election on August 8. Prior to the election, Democrats held five of the eight statewide offices, although the Governor and a majority of each house of the Georgia General Assembly were Republicans. In the Republican primary, incumbent Sonny Perdue defeated challenger Ray McBerry by a margin of 88 percent to 12 percent. In the Democratic primary, Lieutenant Governor Mark Taylor defeated state Secretary of State Cathy Cox, Bill Bolton, and Mac McCarley with 51.7 percent of the vote to Cox's 44 percent, Bolton's 2 percent, and McCarley 2 percent. Libertarian Garrett Michael Hayes faced Perdue Mark Taylor in the general election. Independent John Dashler withdrew from the race, unable to collect the 40,000 signatures required for ballot access. Perdue was re-elected to a second term, winning 57.9 percent of the vote. Democrats Republicans Libertarian Democrats Republicans Libertarian Democrats Republicans Libertarian Democrats Republicans Libertarian Democrats Republicans This is a
    7.50
    2 votes
    132
    Irish general election, 1918

    Irish general election, 1918

    • Part of general election: United Kingdom general election, 1918
    The Irish general election of 1918 was that part of the 1918 United Kingdom general election that took place in Ireland. It is seen as a key moment in modern Irish history. This is because it saw the overwhelming defeat of the moderate nationalist Irish Parliamentary Party (IPP), which had dominated the Irish political landscape since the 1880s, and a landslide victory for the radical Sinn Féin party, which had never previously enjoyed significant electoral success. In Ulster, however, the Unionist Party was the most successful party. The aftermath of the elections the Sinn Féin elected members refused to attend Westminster having instead formed their own parliament Dáil Éireann the Irish for "Assembly of Ireland" which is now known as the First Dáil. The Irish War of Independence was conducted under this revolutionary government who sought international recognition, and set about the process of state-building. In 1918 the whole of Ireland was a part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and was represented in the British Parliament by 105 MPs. Whereas in Great Britain most elected politicians were members of either the Liberal Party or the Conservative Party, from
    7.50
    2 votes
    133
    United Kingdom general election, 1979

    United Kingdom general election, 1979

    The United Kingdom general election of 1979 was held on 3 May 1979 to elect 635 members to the British House of Commons. The Conservative Party, led by Margaret Thatcher ousted the incumbent Labour government of James Callaghan with a parliamentary majority of 43 seats. The election was the first of four consecutive election victories for the Conservative Party, and Thatcher became the United Kingdom's - and Europe's - first female head of government. The previous parliamentary term had begun in October 1974, when Harold Wilson led Labour to a majority of three seats, but within 18 months he had resigned as prime minister to be succeeded by James Callaghan, and within a year the government's narrow parliamentary majority had gone. Callaghan had made agreements with the Liberals, the Ulster Unionists, as well as the Scottish and Welsh nationalists in order to remain in power. When the Scottish Nationalists withdrew support, a vote of no confidence was passed on Callaghan's government, triggering a general election. The Labour campaign was hampered by the series of industrial disputes and strikes during the Winter of 1978-79, known as the Winter of Discontent and the party focused
    7.50
    2 votes
    134
    United States House election, 1920

    United States House election, 1920

    The U.S. House election, 1920 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1920 which coincided with the election of President Warren G. Harding. The incumbent Democratic administration of Woodrow Wilson had lost popularity in the wake of World War I, as American voters hoped to return to isolationism and to avoid future conflict. However, Wilson advocated American leadership in a new international order under the League of Nations and constantly struggled with Congress. Harding's Republican Party promised a new start and disassociation with Europe's political troubles. In turn, the Republicans gained a net of 62 seats, with most of their gains coming in Democratic-leaning districts in the big industrial cities and the border states, many of which they took for the only time in decades, including the Missouri district of Democratic leader Champ Clark. Although the South remained for the most part solidly Democratic, the Republicans now held more than 90% of the seats outside the South, giving them their largest majority of the 20th century. These were the first national elections where women were allowed to vote in all states, following the passage of the 19th
    7.50
    2 votes
    135
    United States House elections, 1982

    United States House elections, 1982

    The U.S. House election, 1982 was an election for the United States House of Representatives held on November 2, 1982, in the middle of President Ronald Reagan's first term, whose popularity was sinking due to economic conditions under the 1982 recession. Therefore, the President's Republican Party lost seats in the House. Unlike most midterm election cycles, the number of seats lost—27 seats to the Democratic Party--was a comparatively large swap. It included most of the seats that had been gained the previous election, cementing the Democratic majority. In the previous election of 1980 Republicans gained many seats as the result of the popularity of Ronald Reagan. Many of these elected officials were summarily rejected in 1982. Notable freshmen included future Senator and Presidential candidate John McCain (R-Ariz.), future Governor John McKernan (R-Me.), and future Governor, UN Ambassador, Cabinet Secretary and Presidential candidate Bill Richardson (D-N.M.). Key to party abbreviations: AI=American Independent, C=Constitution, D=Democrat, G=Green, I=Independent, IP=Independence Party, L=Libertarian, PF = Peace & Freedom, R=Republican. Arizona received an additional seat at
    7.50
    2 votes
    136
    United States House of Representatives elections in Arkansas, 2008

    United States House of Representatives elections in Arkansas, 2008

    • Part of general election: United States House elections, 2008
    • Contests: Arkansas’s 1st congressional district election, 2008
    The 2008 United States House of Representatives elections in Arkansas were held on November 4, 2008 to determine who will represent the state of Arkansas in the United States House of Representatives. Arkansas has four seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Representatives are elected for two-year terms; those elected will serve in the 111th Congress from January 4, 2009 until January 3, 2011. The election coincides with the 2008 presidential election. No incumbent was opposed by a candidate from the other major party. The Green Party of Arkansas is the only opponent to the incumbent in most districts. This is the largest number of congressional candidates fielded by an Arkansas party other than the Democratic or Republican parties since the People's Party in 1894. All incumbents were reelected. Note that results from Arkansas's 1st congressional district, where only one Democratic ran, were not reported. This district covers the northeast part of the state. CQ Politics forecasted the race as 'Safe Democrat'. Marion Berry won unopposed. The Secretary of State of Arkansas did not report vote totals for the election. This district covers central
    7.50
    2 votes
    137
    United States House election, 1888

    United States House election, 1888

    The U.S. House election, 1888 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1888 which coincided with the election of President Benjamin Harrison. Harrison's Republican Party gained a majority in the House at the expense of the Democratic Party, even though incumbent President Grover Cleveland actually received more votes than Harrison. The issue of tariffs played a key role in this election. The Democrats, with the support of farmers and laborers, wanted to lower tariffs in order to promote free trade, while the Republicans, backed by industry and big business, believed that higher tariffs were necessary to protect American manufacturing. Especially in industrializing regions, voters chose the Republican view on tariffs, as they gave the party a slim majority in the House. [Data unknown/missing. You can help!] [Data unknown/missing. You can help!] [Data unknown/missing. You can help!] [Data unknown/missing. You can help!] [Data unknown/missing. You can help!] [Data unknown/missing. You can help!] [Data unknown/missing. You can help!] [Data unknown/missing. You can help!] [Data unknown/missing. You can help!] [Data unknown/missing. You can help!] [Data
    4.80
    5 votes
    138
    Newfoundland and Labrador general election, 2003

    Newfoundland and Labrador general election, 2003

    The 46th Newfoundland and Labrador general election was held on October 21, 2003, to elect the 48 members of the 45th General Assembly of Newfoundland and Labrador, the 17th general election for the province of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. The election was called on September 29 by Premier Roger Grimes of the Liberal Party of Newfoundland and Labrador. This election marked only the third change of government in the 54 years since the province joined Canada. The Liberals, led by Roger Grimes, were soundly defeated by the Danny Williams-led Progressive Conservative Party, who took almost three-quarters of the seats in the House of Assembly and well over half of the popular vote. The Liberals lost seven of their 17 Cabinet ministers, along with the Speaker of the House, from the preceding government. Jack Harris and the New Democrats hopes to increase their seat total from two were frustrated, although their incumbents were re-elected. Exploits (resignation of Roger Grimes), June 23, 2005: Placentia and St. Mary's (resignation of Fabian Manning), February 21, 2006: Signal Hill-Quidi Vidi (resignation of Jack Harris), November 1, 2006: Ferryland (resignation of Loyola
    6.33
    3 votes
    139
    United States House election, 1806

    United States House election, 1806

    The U.S. House election, 1806 was an election for the United States House of Representatives to the Tenth United States Congress. Voting in the various states took place between April 1806 (New York) and August 1807 (Tennessee) with the Congress meeting on October 26, 1807. The Democratic-Republicans continued to command a huge supermajority, as they gained a small number of new seats. Commitment to agrarian policy allowed the Democratic-Republicans to dominate rural districts, which represented the bulk of the nation. Meanwhile, supporters of the Federalists, even in their traditional base of support in the urban centers of coastal New England, continued to grow with discontent over party ineffectiveness.
    6.33
    3 votes
    140
    United States House election, 1864

    United States House election, 1864

    Elections to the United States House of Representatives were held in 1864 to elect Representatives to the 39th United States Congress. The election coincided with the presidential election of 1864, in which President Abraham Lincoln was re-elected. In the midst of the American Civil War, the opposition Democrats were divided between the Copperheads, a group that demanded an immediate negotiated settlement with the Confederate States of America, and the War Democrats, who supported the war. The Democrats lacked a coherent message, and Lincoln's Republican Party gained 50 seats, increasing their majority over the Democrats. The National Union Party (formerly known as the Unionists) lost seven seats, retaining control of 18 seats (some classify the Representatives as including 13 Unconditional Unionists and five Unions), all from the border states of Maryland, Tennessee, and Kentucky, as well as West Virginia. Note: This was the first election in which California elected representatives from congressional districts.
    6.33
    3 votes
    141
    United States House election, 1912

    United States House election, 1912

    The U.S. House election of 1912 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1912 which coincided with the election of President Woodrow Wilson. Wilson's victory was partly due to the division of the opposition Republican Party into conservative and progressive factions. While many progressives stayed within the party framework, they maintained lukewarm relationships with Republican leadership. Others formed a third party known as the Progressives and several switched allegiance to the Democrats. A message of unity was portrayed by the Democrats, allowing this group to present themselves as above the bickering and corruption that had become associated with the Republican internal feud. Many of the new seats that were added after the prior census ended up in Democratic hands. The number of seats in the chamber changed for this election, which is reflected in the seat totals for both sides. Notable freshmen included future Speaker Sam Rayburn (D-Texas) and future Vice President and Senate Majority Leader Alben W. Barkley (D-Kentucky). California gained three seats in apportionment.
    6.33
    3 votes
    142
    United States House election, 1934

    United States House election, 1934

    The United States House of Representatives elections of 1934 occurred in the middle of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's first term. The Democratic Party continued its progress, gaining another 9 net seats from the opposition Republican Party, who also lost seats to the Progressive Party. The Republicans were reduced below one-fourth of the chamber for the first time since the creation of the party. The Wisconsin Progressive Party, a liberal group which allied with the Democrats, also became a force in Wisconsin politics. The 1934 elections can be seen as a referendum on New Deal policies. While conservatives and people among the middle class who did not bear the brunt of the depression saw New Deal programs as radical, ordinary people overwhelmingly voted in this election cycle to continue implementation of Roosevelt's agenda. One special election was held apart from those in November. The elected winner would serve only the remainder of the incumbent Congress.
    6.33
    3 votes
    143
    United States House of Representatives elections in Louisiana, 2008

    United States House of Representatives elections in Louisiana, 2008

    • Part of general election: United States House elections, 2008
    • Contests: Louisiana’s 1st congressional district election, 2008
    The 2008 congressional elections in Louisiana to determine representation for the state of Louisiana in the United States House of Representatives occurred November 4, 2008. Louisiana has seven seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Representatives are elected for two-year terms; those elected will serve in the 111th Congress from January 4, 2009 until January 3, 2011. The election coincided with the 2008 U.S. presidential election. The primary elections were to be held September 6, 2008, but were rescheduled for October 3, 2008 due to storm damage following Hurricane Gustav. The necessary party runoffs were held on November 4, the same date as the presidential election, and the general election for those races was held December 6th. Republican incumbent Steve Scalise won against Democratic nominee Jim Harlan, a businessman. CQ Politics forecasted the race as 'Safe Republican'. The district includes nearly all of New Orleans and some of its suburbs, and is heavily Democratic: John Kerry won 75% of the vote here in 2004. CQ Politics forecasted the race as 'Safe Democrat'. The primary runoff in this district was held on November 4 in place of the
    6.33
    3 votes
    144
    United States House of Representatives elections in South Carolina, 2008

    United States House of Representatives elections in South Carolina, 2008

    • Part of general election: United States House elections, 2008
    • Contests: South Carolina’s 1st congressional district election, 2008
    The 2008 South Carolina House of Representatives elections were held on Tuesday, November 4, 2008. The primary elections were held on June 10 and the runoff elections were held two weeks later on June 24. The composition of the state delegation before the election was four Republicans and two Democrats. All seats were considered safe for their incumbent parties except for districts 1 and 2. Incumbent Republican Congressman Henry E. Brown, Jr. defeated Democratic candidate Linda Ketner by a surprisingly thin margin to win a fifth term in Congress. Ketner's performance was the strongest performance by a Democrat that Brown had seen in his career and was made all the more surprising by the fact that she was openly lesbian and the 1st district, stretching across the coast of South Carolina, was strongly conservative. Incumbent Republican Congressman Joe Wilson defeated Democrat and Iraq War Veteran Rob Miller by the thinnest margin of his electoral career. Miller's performance in this conservative district rooted in eastern and southern South Carolina was surprising, though ultimately was not strong enough to unseat Wilson in his bid for a fifth term. Though two of his fellow
    6.33
    3 votes
    145
    Croatian parliamentary election, 1995

    Croatian parliamentary election, 1995

    Parliamentary elections were held in Croatia on 29 October 1995. The result was a victory for the Croatian Democratic Union, which won 75 of the 127 seats. Voter turnout was 68.8%. The term of the existing Chamber of Representatives was to expire one year later, in 1996. However, Croatian government of Franjo Tudjman and his Croatian Democratic Union party hoped to exploit national euphoria over the success of Operation Storm. Chamber of Representatives was quickly dissolved, but not before passing yet another piece of electoral legislation, introducing new voting system which was to improve chances of ruling party. According to the new electoral law, 28 seats were won in individual constituencies on First past the post basis, while 80 seats were to be distributed on the basis of proportional representation, with the threshold being raised from previous 2% to 5%. Another addition was raised threshold for lists of party coalitions - 8% for coalition of two parties and 11% for coalition of three and more parties. It is more than obvious that the new rules were introduced to discourage coalitions of small opposition parties and subsequently have their votes dispersed and wasted below
    8.00
    1 votes
    146
    New York gubernatorial election, 1936

    New York gubernatorial election, 1936

    The 1936 New York state election was held on November 3, 1936, to elect the Governor, the Lieutenant Governor, the State Comptroller, the Attorney General, a judge of the New York Court of Appeals and two U.S. Representatives-at-large, as well as all members of the New York State Assembly and the New York State Senate. The Communist state convention met on June 14, and nominated Robert Minor for Governor; Julian S. Sawyer, of Buffalo, for Lieutenant Governor; and Irving Schwab, of New York City, for the Court of Appeals. The Socialist state convention met on June 27 at the Hotel Delano in New York City, and nominated Dr. Harry W. Laidler for Governor; the Rev. Herman J. Hahn for Lieutenant Governor; Edward Marks of Freeport for Attorney General; and Coleman B. Cheney for Comptroller. The Democratic state convention met on September 29 at Syracuse, New York, and re-nominated the incumbents Lehman, Bray, Tremaine and Bennett; and completed the ticket with Harlan W. Rippey for the Court of Appeals. The Republican state convention met on September 29 at Albany, New York, and nominated Justice William F. Bleakley, of Yonkers, for Governor on the first ballot (vote: Bleakley 680, George
    8.00
    1 votes
    147
    United Kingdom general election, 1857

    United Kingdom general election, 1857

    In the 1857 United Kingdom general election, the Whigs, led by Lord Palmerston, finally won a majority in the House of Commons as the Conservative vote fell significantly. The election had been provoked by a vote of censure in Palmerston's government over his approach to the Arrow affair which led to the Second Opium War. Total votes cast: 716,552. "Others" are mostly Irish Independent Opposition. The Conservative total votes cast and MPs includes around 26 Peelites - some reference works claim it was as few as 18.
    8.00
    1 votes
    148
    United States House election, 1810

    United States House election, 1810

    The U.S. House election, 1810 was an election for the United States House of Representatives to the Twelfth United States Congress. Voting in the various states took place between April 1810 (New York) and August 1811 (Tennessee). Louisiana elected its first representative in September 1812. Congress assembled on November 4, 1811. With the repeal of the Embargo Act of 1807, the Democratic-Republicans enjoyed a renewed popularity, increased their majority, and regained about half of the seats that were lost in the prior election. As the economy improved following the reopening of the export market, many of the seats that had entered Federalist hands over economic concerns reverted back to the Democratic-Republicans.
    8.00
    1 votes
    149
    United States House election, 1832

    United States House election, 1832

    Elections to the United States House of Representatives were held in 1832. They were held concurrently with the 1832 presidential election, in which Democrat Andrew Jackson was reelected. The Democrats gained 17 seats, picking up several new seats in districts that were created following the 1830 Census; the rival National Republican Party lost a net total of three seats. Economic issues were key factors in this election. Southern agricultural districts reacted angrily to passage of the Tariff of 1832, which led to the Nullification Crisis. President Andrew Jackson and the Democrats showed a distrust for the banking sector, particularly the central Second Bank of the United States, which was strongly supported by the rival National Republican Party. The third party Anti-Masonic Party, based anti-Masonry, gained eight seats, and Nullifier Party, a John C. Calhoun-led state's rights party that supported South Carolina in the Nullification Crisis, picked up five seats, including seven of the nine Representatives in the South Carolina delegation.
    8.00
    1 votes
    150
    United States House election, 1880

    United States House election, 1880

    The U.S. House election, 1880 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1880 which coincided with the election of President James A. Garfield. Garfield's Republican Party managed to gain an outright majority of seats from the opposition Democratic Party. The Democratic loss of control in the House is historically seen as somewhat surprising, since no major issue played a role in their defeat. The end of Reconstruction and the pro-business nature of the Republicans were both minor factors. The ability of the Republican Party to paint several key Democratic leaders as corrupt also helped to alter the composition of the part just enough so that the Republicans gained a majority. The Greenback Party, which promoted the use of the paper currency and was seen as a pro-farmer party, also lost several seats due to national economic recovery, which aided the Republicans.
    8.00
    1 votes
    151
    United States House election, 1896

    United States House election, 1896

    The U.S. House election, 1896 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1896 which coincided with the election of President William McKinley. In spite of McKinley's victory over William Jennings Bryan, both the Democratic and Populist parties gained seats from McKinley's Republican Party. This is most likely a reaction to the extraordinary Republican gains in 1894, in which many normally Democratic districts switched parties due to the severity of and fallout from the Panic of 1893. Many Mid-Atlantic and Midwestern regions that were dominated by Catholic and working-class voters, switched to Republican in 1894, but returned to the Democratic Party during this election cycle. The Populist Party also made huge gains as Republicans were ousted in Western states. Despite this, the Republicans did maintain a strong majority in the House. Also, several Western Republicans split with the party in 1896, joining the tiny Silver Republican Party, which advocated a silver standard. This election marked the zenith of the Populist Party, which would go on to lose most of its seats in the 1898 election and thereafter slowly fade from prominence. Democrats gained four
    8.00
    1 votes
    152
    United States House of Representatives elections in Oklahoma, 2008

    United States House of Representatives elections in Oklahoma, 2008

    • Part of general election: United States House elections, 2008
    • Contests: Oklahoma’s 1st congressional district election, 2008
    The 2008 congressional elections in Oklahoma were held on November 4, 2008 to determine who will represent the state of Oklahoma in the United States House of Representatives. Oklahoma has five seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Representatives are elected for two-year terms; whoever is elected will serve in the 111th Congress from January 4, 2009 until January 3, 2011. The election coincides with the 2008 U.S. presidential election. This district is in the northeastern corner of the state and includes the Tulsa metropolitan area as well as all of Tulsa County. It also includes Washington County, Wagoner County, and parts of Rogers County and Creek County. It has been represented by Republican John A. Sullivan since February 2002. The Democratic nominee was Georgianna Oliver, a CEO residing in Tulsa. CQ Politics forecasted the race as 'Safe Republican'. This district covers roughly the eastern quarter of the state, and has been represented by Democrat Dan Boren since 2005. His Republican challenger was Raymond Wickson of Okmulgee. CQ Politics forecasted the race as 'Safe Democrat'. This district covers the Oklahoma Panhandle and northwest
    8.00
    1 votes
    153
    Western Australian state election, 2001

    Western Australian state election, 2001

    Elections were held in the state of Western Australia on 10 February 2001 to elect all 57 members to the Legislative Assembly and all 34 members to the Legislative Council. The two-term Liberal–National coalition government, led by Premier Richard Court, was defeated by the Labor Party, led by Opposition Leader Dr Geoff Gallop. The election produced the biggest change of seats at any election since 1911, with Labor winning 14 seats from the Coalition as well as an Independent-held seat, while losing the seat of Kalgoorlie for the first time since 1923 to Liberal candidate Matt Birney. Meanwhile, a minister in the outgoing Government, Doug Shave, lost his seat of Alfred Cove to Independent candidate Dr Janet Woollard, who was also a member of the Liberals for Forests party. Notes: Notes:
    8.00
    1 votes
    154
    United States House election, 1928

    United States House election, 1928

    The U.S. House election, 1928 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1928 which coincided with the election of President Herbert Hoover. The strong economy gave Hoover's Republican Party victory in the election, picking up 32 House seats, almost all from the opposition Democratic Party, and increasing their majority. The big business-supported wing of the Republican Party continued to cement control. Republican gains proved larger than anticipated during this election cycle, as an internal party feud over the Prohibition issue weakened the Democratic standing. Loses of several rural, Protestant Democratic seats can be somewhat linked to anti-Catholic sentiments directed toward the party's presidential candidate, Al Smith.
    5.25
    4 votes
    155
    United Kingdom general election, 1931

    United Kingdom general election, 1931

    The United Kingdom general election on Tuesday 27 October 1931 was the last in the United Kingdom not held on a Thursday. It was also the last election, and the only one under universal suffrage, where one party (the Conservatives) received an absolute majority of the votes cast. The 1931 general election was the first to be held since the onset of the Great Depression, and by 1931 Ramsay MacDonald's Labour government had reached a deadlock over a response to the crisis. Influential members of the Labour Cabinet, such as Arthur Henderson, were not willing to support the budget cuts advised by the civil service, while the Chancellor of the Exchequer, Phillip Snowden refused to consider deficit spending or tariffs. MacDonald was then encouraged to form an all-party National Government to deal with the financial crisis. MacDonald's decision before the election to form a coalition with the Conservatives saw him expelled from the Labour Party. He was replaced as leader by Henderson. MacDonald and a small group of supporters then formed National Labour. The Labour split persuaded MacDonald that a quick election was necessary. The Liberals opposed the calling of an election and Liberal
    7.00
    2 votes
    156
    United States House elections, 1998

    United States House elections, 1998

    The U.S. House elections in 1998 were part of the midterm elections held during President Bill Clinton's second term. They were a major disappointment to the Republican Party, which was expecting to gain seats due to the embarrassment Clinton suffered during the Monica Lewinsky scandal, and the "six year itch" effect observed in most second-term midterm elections. Instead, the GOP lost five seats to the Democratic Party, but retained a narrow majority in the House. A wave of Republican discontent with Speaker Newt Gingrich prompted him to resign shortly after the election. The campaign was marked by Republican attacks on the morality of President Clinton, with Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr having released his report on the Lewinsky scandal and House leaders having initiated an inquiry into whether impeachable offenses had occurred. However, exit polls indicated that most voters opposed impeaching Clinton, and predictions of high Republican or low Democratic turnout due to the scandal failed to materialize. Some speculate that the losses reflected a backlash against the Republicans for attacking the popular Clinton. With the GOP having lost 5 House seats and failing to gain any
    7.00
    2 votes
    157
    United States House of Representatives elections in Oregon, 2008

    United States House of Representatives elections in Oregon, 2008

    • Part of general election: United States House elections, 2008
    • Contests: Oregon’s 1st congressional district election, 2008
    The United States House of Representatives elections in Oregon, 2008 were held on November 4, 2008, to determine who will represent the state of Oregon in the United States House of Representatives, coinciding with the presidential and senatorial elections. Representatives are elected for two-year terms those elected will be serving in the 111th Congress from January 3, 2009 until January 3, 2011. Oregon has five seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Its 2007–2008 congressional delegation consisted of four Democrats and one Republican. This remains unchanged although CQ Politics had forecasted district 5 to be at some risk for the incumbent party earlier in the year. A primary election for Democrats and Republicans was held on May 20. To be eligible for the primaries, candidates had to file for election by March 11. Other parties had other procedures for nominating candidates. Democratic incumbent David Wu has represented Oregon's 1st congressional district since 1998 and is the Democratic nominee in 2008, defeating Will Hobbs and Mark Welyczko in the primary. Hobbs, a political novice, earned some attention late in the race, by winning the
    7.00
    2 votes
    158
    United Kingdom general election, 1847

    United Kingdom general election, 1847

    The 1847 United Kingdom general election saw candidates calling themselves Conservatives win the most seats, in part because they won a number of uncontested seats. However, the split among the Conservatives between the majority of Protectionists, led by Lord Stanley, and the minority of free traders, known also as the Peelites, led by former prime minister Sir Robert Peel, left the Whigs, led by Prime Minister Lord John Russell, in a position to continue in government. The Irish Repeal group won more seats than in the previous general election, while the Chartists gained the only seat they were ever to hold, Nottingham's second seat, held by Chartist leader Feargus O'Connor. Total votes cast: 482,429. "Others" includes Irish Confederate Party.
    6.00
    3 votes
    159
    United States House elections, 1908

    United States House elections, 1908

    The U.S. House election in 1908 for the U.S. House of Representatives coincided with the 1908 presidential election, which William Howard Taft won. Taft was not as popular as his predecessor, Theodore Roosevelt, but won with Roosevelt's backing, and his Republican Party lost only a handful of seats to the opposition Democrats. Without any striking national issues, the Republicans were able to remain in control. Regional issues led to some changes in House membership, but new Democrats who were elected by dissatisfied industrial workers were balanced out by new Republicans who gained seats in districts with a strong middle class presence.
    6.00
    3 votes
    160
    Australian legislative election, 1901

    Australian legislative election, 1901

    Federal elections for the inaugural Parliament of Australia were held in Australia on 29 March and 30 March 1901 following Federation and the establishment of the Commonwealth of Australia. The first Prime Minister of Australia, Edmund Barton, contested the inaugural 1901 federal election as head of a caretaker Protectionist Party federal government. No party won a majority, however the incumbent Barton Protectionist government was supported by the Australian Labor Party, against the opposition Free Trade Party. The event would be important for setting the template for future federal elections and the fact that those elected determined much of the character of Australian parliamentary democracy and protocol from then to the present day. Independents: Alexander Paterson (Capricornia, Qld), James Wilkinson (Moreton, Qld) Following the federation of the colonies of New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Tasmania, Victoria and Western Australia on 1 January 1901 to form the Commonwealth of Australia, an election was announced for 29 March (in Western Australia, Victoria, New South Wales and Tasmania) and 30 March 1901 (in South Australia and Queensland) to elect the inaugural
    5.00
    4 votes
    161
    United States House election, 1958

    United States House election, 1958

    The U.S. House election, 1958 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1958 which occurred in the middle of Dwight Eisenhower's second term. The economy was suffering the Recession of 1958, which Democrats blamed on Eisenhower. The President's Republican Party lost 48 seats in this midterm election, increasing the Democratic Party's majority to a commanding level. Another factor which may have contributed to the Democratic gains include public consternation over the launch of Sputnik and Cold War politics. Increase is due to the admission of Alaska and Hawaii, whose seats were temporarily additional to the usual 435, until reapportionment following 1960. [Data unknown/missing. You can help!] Texas eliminated its at-large district and added a new 22nd district formed from part of the Houston area 8th district. Washington redistricted its at-large seat into a 7th district formed in the Seattle suburbs designed to include the at-large incumbent Don Magnuson's residence.
    5.00
    4 votes
    162
    California State Senate elections, 2008

    California State Senate elections, 2008

    • Part of general election: California state elections, November 2008
    • Contests: California’s 15th State Senate district election, 2008
    The 2008 California State Senate elections took place on November 4, 2008. Voters in California's odd-numbered State Senate districts, a total of 20, voted for their state senators. No seats changed parties and the Democratic Party party maintained its 25-seat majority, while the Republican Party held 15 seats. Other elections also took place in California on November 4. Only a single State Senate district, the 19th, was considered truly competitive by political analysts. The following candidates are the official results from the California Secretary of State.
    5.67
    3 votes
    163
    United States House of Representatives elections in Missouri, 2008

    United States House of Representatives elections in Missouri, 2008

    • Part of general election: United States House elections, 2008
    • Contests: Missouri’s 1st congressional district election, 2008
    The 2008 congressional elections in Missouri were held on November 4, 2008 to determine who will represent the state of Missouri in the United States House of Representatives. The primary election for candidates seeking the nomination of the Republican Party, the Democratic Party, and the Libertarian Party will be held on August 5. Missouri has nine seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Representatives are elected for two-year terms; those elected will serve in the 111th Congress from January 4, 2009 until January 3, 2011. The election coincides with the 2008 U.S. presidential election. The races not forecasted as safe for the incumbent party were 6 and 9; however, the Republicans held both seats. Incumbent Democratic Congressman William Lacy Clay, Jr. easily dispatched with Libertarian challenger Robb Cunningham in this St. Louis-based liberal district. Incumbent Republican Congressman Todd Akin easily won re-election to a fifth term over Democratic nominee Bill Haas and Libertarian candidate Thomas Knapp in this conservative district rooted in the northern and western suburbs of St. Louis. In this fairly liberal district based in the southern
    5.67
    3 votes
    164
    Prince Edward Island general election, 2003

    Prince Edward Island general election, 2003

    The Canadian province of Prince Edward Island conducted a general election in September 2003 to elect the 27 members of the Legislative Assembly of Prince Edward Island. The election was called on September 2 by Premier Pat Binns, who enjoyed a high level of popularity among voters. Polling took place on September 29, despite a blackout across two-thirds of the province and other damage caused by Hurricane Juan. Binns' Progressive Conservatives were re-elected to a third consecutive majority government, the first time this had happened in Island history (for the Cons/PC party). The Premier, who ran in Murray River-Gaspereaux, was re-elected, along with his entire existing cabinet. The Liberals wrested three seats from the Tories, increasing their standing to four seats. The party's new leader, Robert Ghiz, was one of those. The son of former premier Joe Ghiz beat Charlottetown mayor George MacDonald in the riding of Charlottetown-Rochford Square in Charlottetown. The New Democrats did not win any seats; their leader, Gary Robichaud, was defeated by a Tory incumbent in Wilmot-Summerside. The five largest margins of victory were: The five smallest margins of victory were:
    6.50
    2 votes
    165
    United Kingdom general election, 1868

    United Kingdom general election, 1868

    The 1868 United Kingdom general election was the first after passage of the Reform Act 1867, which enfranchised many male householders, thus greatly increasing the number of men who could vote in elections in the United Kingdom. It was the first election held in the United Kingdom in which more than a million votes were cast; nearly triple the number of votes were cast compared to the previous election. The result saw the Liberals, led by William Ewart Gladstone, again increase their large majority over Benjamin Disraeli's Conservatives to more than 100 seats. This was the last election at which all the seats were taken by only the two leading parties, although the parties at the time were loose coalitions and party affiliation was not listed on ballot papers. Total votes cast: 2,333,251
    6.50
    2 votes
    166
    United States House election, 1804

    United States House election, 1804

    The U.S. House election, 1804 was an election for the United States House of Representatives to the Ninth United States Congress. Voting in the various states took place between April 1804 (New York) and August 1805 (Tennessee) with the Congress meeting on December 2, 1805. Under the popular reign of Thomas Jefferson, the president's party continued to gain seats in the House. Territorial and economic expansion both gave voters a positive view of the Democratic-Republicans, which eclipsed the 3/4 mark in terms of seat percentage. Following this election, Federalists held few seats outside of New England and party legitimacy was being corroded as political thought turned away from the rather aristocratic Federalist ideals.
    6.50
    2 votes
    167
    United States House election, 1814

    United States House election, 1814

    The U.S. House election, 1814 was an election for the United States House of Representatives to the Fourteenth United States Congress. Voting in the various states was held between April 1814 (New York) and August 10, 1815 (North Carolina). The Congress met on December 4, 1815. Indiana elected its first Representative on August 5, 1816. Although this election was fought in the middle of the War of 1812, which was extremely unpopular in certain portions of the country, the ruling Democratic-Republican Party made slight gains. Despite the negatives of the war, including the failed American invasion of Upper Canada (Ontario) and the siege of the nation's capital by the British, the war was viewed by many as relatively successful. National morale was high because the small American military had been able to fight a relatively even war with the powerful, but overstretched, British forces in this mostly coastal and frontier conflict.
    6.50
    2 votes
    168
    United States House election, 1846

    United States House election, 1846

    Elections to the United States House of Representatives were held in 1846. The Whigs picked up 37 seats, while the rival Democrats lost 32 seats. The result was a switch of partisan control of the House, with the Whigs gaining a narrow majority of 116 to 110. The Whigs picked up seats in New England and the South. The nativist American Party, dedicated to opposition to immigration and anti-Catholicism, lost five of its Representatives and was left with only a single seat. The Mexican–American War was the biggest issue of concern during this election. While the war was widely supported west of the Appalachian Mountains, many people in eastern urban regions were opposed. The extreme loyalty of the Democratic Congress—with only 14 representatives voting against the war—was a huge factor in the Whig pick-up. Growing divisions over slavery were also a contentious concern, as this ever-present issue had been brought to the forefront by Congressional rejection of the Wilmot Proviso. Notable freshmen include future president Abraham Lincoln, elected as a Whig to his first and only term in this election. http://clerk.house.gov/histHigh/Congressional_History/index.html
    6.50
    2 votes
    169
    United States House election, 1866

    United States House election, 1866

    Elections to the United States House of Representatives were held in 1866 to elect Representatives to the 40th United States Congress. The elections occurred just one year after the American Civil War ended at Appomattox, in which the Union defeated the Confederacy. The 1866 elections were a decisive event in the early Reconstruction era, in which President Andrew Johnson faced off against the Radical Republicans in a bitter dispute over whether Reconstruction should be lenient or harsh toward the vanquished South. Most of the congressmen from the former Confederate states were either prevented from leaving the state or were arrested on the way to the capital. A Congress consisting of mostly Radical Republicans sat early in the Capitol and aside from the delegation from Tennessee who were allowed in, the few Southern Congressmen who arrived were not seated. Johnson, a War Democrat, had been elected Vice President in the 1864 presidential election as the running mate of Abraham Lincoln, a Republican. (The Republicans had chosen not to re-nominate Hannibal Hamlin for a second term as Vice President). Lincoln and Johnson ran together under the banner of the National Union Party, which
    6.50
    2 votes
    170
    United States House election, 1950

    United States House election, 1950

    The U.S. House election, 1950 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1950 which occurred in the middle of President Harry Truman's second term. As the Korean War began and Truman's personal popularity plummeted for a second time during his presidency, his Democratic Party lost a net 28 seats to the Republican Party. This was the first election since 1908 where no third parties acquired any seats in the House. Three special elections were held on dates other than in November.
    6.50
    2 votes
    171
    United States House elections, 1990

    United States House elections, 1990

    The U.S. House election, 1990 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1990 which occurred in the middle of President George H. W. Bush's term. As in most midterm elections, the President's Republican Party lost seats to the Democratic Party, slightly increasing the Democratic majority in the chamber. Notable freshmen included Bernie Sanders of Vermont, the first independent Representative elected since 1950, and future Speaker John Boehner (R-OH). Key to party abbreviations: AI=American Independent, C=Constitution, D=Democratic, G=Green, I=Independent, IP=Independence Party, L=Libertarian, PF=Peace & Freedom, R=Republican. Key to color code: Blue=Democratic pickup; Red=Republican pickup.
    6.50
    2 votes
    172
    United Kingdom general election, 1892

    United Kingdom general election, 1892

    The 1892 United Kingdom general election was held from 4 July to 26 July 1892. It saw the Conservatives, led by Lord Salisbury, win the greatest number of seats, but not enough for an overall majority as William Ewart Gladstone's Liberals won many more seats than in the 1886 general election. The Liberal Unionists who had previously supported the Conservative government saw their vote and seat numbers go down. Despite being split between Parnellite and anti-Parnellite factions, the Irish Nationalist vote held up well. As the Liberals did not have a majority on their own, Salisbury refused to resign on hearing the election results and waited to be defeated in a vote of no confidence on 11 August. Gladstone formed a minority government dependent on Irish Nationalist support. The totals above exclude two Irish candidates whose party affiliation was unclear to F. W. S. Craig at the time he compiled his voting figures: Col. J. C. Lowry who gained 897 votes standing for University of Dublin as either an Independent or Official Conservative, and John O'Connor Power who gained 609 votes standing in Mayo West as a Gladstonian Liberal. Craig labelled both candidates: "Others". Total votes
    4.20
    5 votes
    173
    United States House elections, 1978

    United States House elections, 1978

    The U.S. House election, 1978 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1978 which occurred in the middle of President Jimmy Carter's term, when the country was going through an energy crisis and facing rapid inflation. The President's Democratic Party lost seats to the opposition Republican Party, in this case a net of 15, but the Democrats still retained a rather large majority. Notable freshmen included future Vice President Dick Cheney (R-Wy.), future Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.), future Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle (D-S.D.), and future U.S. Senator Olympia J. Snowe (R-Me.). Future president George W. Bush was the Republican nominee for a seat in Texas, but lost. Source: Election Statistics - Office of the Clerk [Data unknown/missing. You can help!] Key to party abbreviations: AI=American Independent, D=Democrat, PF=Peace and Freedom, R=Republican.
    4.75
    4 votes
    174
    Northwest Territories general election, 2003

    Northwest Territories general election, 2003

    The Northwest Territories general election, 2003 was the 20th general election in the Canadian territory's history, conducted on November 24, 2003, to elect the 19 members of the Legislative Assembly. The election was called on October 27. Premier Stephen Kakfwi had previously chosen not to run. The territory operates on a consensus government system with no political parties; the premier is subsequently chosen by and from the Members of the Legislative Assembly (MLAs). There were 21,474 registered voters at the time of the election. Issues at the election included: Elections were held in 14 of the 19 electoral districts. The following five districts acclaimed their MLA: The following is a list of the districts with their winning candidates. Results (CBC News) Joe Handley was acclaimed premier by the legislature on December 10, 2003. His two prospective opponents, Roger Allen and Floyd Roland, had announced that they would not run against him. In an unusual occurrence, the riding of Inuvik Twin Lakes experienced 150% voter turnout. 356 people were registered to vote in that riding, but an additional 187 showed up at the ballot box. A resident of a riding eligible but not
    7.00
    1 votes
    175
    United Kingdom general election, 1874

    United Kingdom general election, 1874

    In the 1874 United Kingdom general election, the Liberals, led by William Ewart Gladstone, won a majority of the votes cast, but Benjamin Disraeli's Conservatives won the majority of seats in the House of Commons, largely because they won a number of uncontested seats. It was the first Conservative victory in a General Election since 1841. The election also saw Irish nationalists in the Home Rule League become the first significant third party in Parliament. This was the first General Election that used a secret ballot following the 1872 Secret Ballot Act. The Irish Nationalist gains could well be attributed to the effects of the secret ballot as tenants faced less of a threat of eviction if they voted against the wishes of their landlords. Total votes cast: 2,466,037. "Others" include the Catholic Union.
    7.00
    1 votes
    176
    United Kingdom general election, 2005

    United Kingdom general election, 2005

    The United Kingdom general election of 2005 was held on Thursday, 5 May 2005 to elect 646 members to the British House of Commons. The Labour Party under Tony Blair won its third consecutive victory, but its majority now stood at 66 seats compared to the 160-seat majority it had previously held. The Labour campaign emphasised a strong economy, however Blair had suffered a decline in popularity even before the decision to send British troops to invade Iraq in 2003. The Conservative Party, led by Michael Howard since late 2003, campaigned on policies, such as immigration limits, improving poorly managed hospitals and reducing high crime rates, all under the slogan 'Are you thinking what we're thinking?'. The Liberal Democrats, led by Charles Kennedy were staunchly opposed to the Iraq War from the start and collected votes from disenchanted Labour voters. Tony Blair was returned as Prime Minister, with Labour holding 355 MPs but with a popular vote of 35.2%, the lowest of any majority government in British history. In terms of votes they were only narrowly ahead of the Conservatives, but still had a comfortable lead ahead of them in terms of seats. The Conservatives however did manage
    7.00
    1 votes
    177
    United States House election, 1802

    United States House election, 1802

    The U.S. House election, 1802 was an election to the United States House of Representatives for the Eighth United States Congress. Voting in the various states took place between April 1802 (New York) and December 1803 (New Jersey-after Congress had assembled) with the Congress, convened by a proclamation of President Jefferson, meeting on October 17, 1803. With a number of new districts created due to a growing population west of the Appalachian Mountains, the House grew greatly prior to the 1802 elections. Nearly all of these new seats went to the Democratic-Republicans, the party that more closely aligned itself with the agrarian interests of Western farmers. As a result, the Democratic-Republicans were given a veto-proof supermajority in the House.
    7.00
    1 votes
    178
    United States House election, 1838

    United States House election, 1838

    The U.S. House election, 1838 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1838. The Panic of 1837 set the background for this election cycle, as the carryover effects of the economic downturn led to Whig gains. President Martin Van Buren was deeply unpopular and Whig ideas for economic nationalism made slight inroads in suffering districts. However, the Democrats were able to lessen their loss by portraying the crisis as the result of missteps within the private banking industry and not as caused by government inactivity. The Anti-Masonic Party remained as a presence during this election, but also saw a drop in its seat total. http://clerk.house.gov/histHigh/Congressional_History/index.html
    7.00
    1 votes
    179
    United States House election, 1902

    United States House election, 1902

    The 1902 elections for the United States House of Representatives occurred in the middle of President Theodore Roosevelt's first term, about a year after the assassination of President William McKinley in September 1901. Due to the increase in the size of the House, both Roosevelt's Republican Party and the opposition Democratic Party gained seats. The Democrats increased their share of the House, but not by enough to regain control. With a stable economy and no cornerstone issue, Democratic gains can mostly be linked to the effects of redistricting. Many of the new seats were in areas that featured a high number of immigrants, either Eastern and Southern Europeans industrial workers or Northern European farmers. New immigrant groups trended Democratic. The Populist Party disappeared from the House, with its supporters almost unanimously switching to the Democratic Party. Notable freshmen included future Vice President and Speaker John Nance Garner (D-Texas).
    7.00
    1 votes
    180
    United States House election, 1904

    United States House election, 1904

    The U.S. House election, 1904 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1904 which coincided with the re-election of President Theodore Roosevelt. Roosevelt's popularity swept many Republican house candidates into office, cementing their majority over the opposition Democratic Party. Because Roosevelt came from a liberal wing of the Republican Party, his ideology was prevalent among freshman representatives. Progressive Republicanism mobililized a new base of support and proved to be especially popular among the Protestant middle class workers who held jobs in business or in the front offices of industrial facilities.
    7.00
    1 votes
    181
    United States House election, 1930

    United States House election, 1930

    The U.S. House election, 1930 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1930 which occurred in the middle of President Herbert Hoover's term. During the election cycle, the nation was entering its second year of the Great Depression. Hoover was perceived as doing little to solve the crisis, and his personal popularity was extremely low. His Republican Party was initially applauded for instituting protectionist economic policies, which were intended to limit foreign imports to stimulate the domestic market. However, after the passage of the heavily damaging Smoot Hawley Tariff, a policy that was bitterly opposed by the Democratic Party, Republican policies began to fall out of favor as the majority view. Democrats gained a total of 52 seats in the 1930 election. Although the Republicans retained a narrow majority after the polls closed, they lost a number of special elections following the deaths of 19 representatives and representatives-elect prior to the reconvening of Congress. This resulted in the new chamber having a razor-thin one-seat minority at the opening of the legislature, which then rose to a four-seat majority after the first month of the
    7.00
    1 votes
    182
    United States House election, 1946

    United States House election, 1946

    Elections to the United States House of Representatives for the 80th United States Congress took place in 1946. These midterm elections occurred in the middle of President Harry S. Truman's first term. Truman was Vice President under President Franklin D. Roosevelt and was thrust into the presidency following Roosevelt's death. Truman did not garner the same support as the deceased president. Democrats had controlled Congress since 1933, for 14 years, and Roosevelt had been elected to a record four terms in office. In the 1946 election, the election resulted in a Republican picked up 55 seats and won a majority. Joseph William Martin, Jr., Republican of Massachusetts, became Speaker of the House, exchanging places with Sam Rayburn, Democrat of Texas, who became the new Minority Leader. The Democratic defeat was the largest since they were trounced in the 1928 pro-Republican wave that brought Herbert Hoover to power. The vote was largely seen as a referendum on Truman, whose approval rating had sunk to 32 percent over the president's controversial handling of a wave of post-war labor strikes, including a United Auto Workers strike against Ford and General Motors in 1945, a United
    7.00
    1 votes
    183
    United Kingdom general election, 1900

    United Kingdom general election, 1900

    The United Kingdom general election of 1900 was held between 26 September and 24 October 1900, following the dissolution of Parliament on 25 September. Also known as the khaki election (the first of several elections to bear this sobriquet), it was held at a time when it was widely believed that the Second Boer War had effectively been won (though in fact it was to continue for a further two years). The Conservatives, led by Lord Salisbury with their Liberal Unionist allies, secured a large majority of 130, despite securing only 5.6% more votes than Henry Campbell-Bannerman's Liberals. This was largely due to the Conservatives winning 163 uncontested seats. The Labour Representation Committee, later to become the Labour Party, participated in a general election for the first time even though they had only been in existence for a few months. As a result, Keir Hardie and Richard Bell were the only LRC members of parliament in 1900. This was the first time that Winston Churchill was elected to the House of Commons. He had stood in the same seat, Oldham, in a by-election the previous year, but had lost. It was also the final general election of the Victorian era and the 19th
    5.33
    3 votes
    184
    United States House election, 1840

    United States House election, 1840

    The U.S. House election, 1840 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1840. The 1840 election gave the Whig Party control of the House of Representatives for the first time. The Panic of 1837 had created an economic depression and the perceived mishandling of this crisis by President Martin Van Buren, gave the Whigs the presidency (William Henry Harrison was elected) and a majority in the House. The Whigs campaigned for neo-mercantilist reform based on modernization and economic nationalism, ideas which had previously been unpopular outside of urban regions, but gained footholds because of the depression. The engulfment of the Anti-Masonic Party in 1839 also gave the Whigs the advantage of having several incumbents turn from rivals to party members.
    5.33
    3 votes
    185
    United States House election, 1944

    United States House election, 1944

    The U.S. House election, 1944 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1944 which coincided with President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's re-election to a fourth term. Roosevelt's popularity allowed his Democratic Party to gain a total of twenty seats from the Republican and minor parties, cementing the Democratic majority. Also, Americans rallied behind allied success in World War II, and in turn voted favorably for the administration's course of action. Source: Election Statistics - Office of the Clerk Some special elections were held on dates other than in November. Florida redistricted for this cycle, converting the 6th seat it had previously gained at reapportionment from an at-large seat to an additional district near Fort Lauderdale. New York, after having used 2 at-large districts to avoid redistricting at the last reapportionment, redistricted into 45 districts for this election, with substantial boundary changes across the state. Manhattan went from 10 districts to 6, with Long Island, Brooklyn and Queens going from 10 to 15. Pennsylvania redistricted from 32 districts and an at-large seat to 33 districts.
    5.33
    3 votes
    186
    United States House of Representatives elections in California, 2002

    United States House of Representatives elections in California, 2002

    The United States House of Representatives elections in California, 2002 was an election for California's delegation to the United States House of Representatives, which occurred as part of the general election of the House of Representatives on November 5, 2002. California gained 1 seat because of Congressional apportionment following the Census, which Republicans won. Democrats gained the open 39th district. In the 18th district, Democrat Gary Condit, under fire from the Chandra Levy scandal, lost in the primary to his former chief of staff, Dennis Cardoza. Final results from the Secretary of State of California:
    5.33
    3 votes
    187
    Australian general election, 1980

    Australian general election, 1980

    Federal elections were held in Australia on 18 October 1980. All 125 seats in the House of Representatives, and 34 of the 64 seats in the Senate, were up for election. The incumbent Liberal Party of Australia led by Malcolm Fraser with coalition partner the National Country Party led by Doug Anthony was elected to a third term in government, defeating the Australian Labor Party led by Bill Hayden. Independent: Brian Harradine The Fraser Government had lost a degree of popularity within the electorate by 1980. The economy had been performing poorly since the 1973 oil shock. However, Hayden was not seen as having great electoral prospects. Perhaps as evidence of this, then ACTU President Bob Hawke (elected to Parliament in the election as the Member for Wills) and then Premier of New South Wales Neville Wran featured heavily in the campaign, almost as heavily as Hayden. In the election, Labor finished only 0.8 percent behind the Coalition on the two-party vote—a four-percent swing from 1977. However, due to the uneven nature of the swing, Labor came up 12 seats short of a majority, giving the Coalition a third term in government. Hayden, however, did manage to regain much of what
    6.00
    2 votes
    188
    European Parliament election, 1999

    European Parliament election, 1999

    • Part of general election: European Parliament election, 1999
    • Contests: European Parliament election in Veneto, 1999
    The European Parliament election of 1999 in Italy was the election of the delegation from Italy to the European Parliament in 1999.
    6.00
    2 votes
    189
    European Parliament election, 2004

    European Parliament election, 2004

    • Includes general election: European Parliament election, 2004
    • Contests: European Parliament election, 2004
    Elections to the European Parliament were held from 10 June 2004 to 13 June 2004 in the 25 member states of the European Union, using varying election days according to local custom. Votes were counted as the polls closed, but results were not announced until 13 and 14 June so results from one country would not influence voters in another where polls were still open; however, the Netherlands, voting on Thursday 10, announced nearly complete provisional results as soon as they were counted, on the evening of its election day, a move heavily criticized by the European Commission. 342 million people were eligible to vote, the second-largest democratic electorate in the world after India. It was the biggest transnational direct election in history, and the 10 new member states elected MEPs for the first time. The new (6th) Parliament consisted of 732 Members of the European Parliament (MEPs). Results showed a general defeat of governing parties and an increase in representatives from eurosceptic parties. No majority was achieved. The balance of power in the Parliament remained the same (largest party EPP-ED, second largest PES) despite the 10 new member states. The national results as
    6.00
    2 votes
    190
    New Zealand general election, 1975

    New Zealand general election, 1975

    The 1975 New Zealand general election was held to elect MPs to the 38th session of the Parliament of New Zealand. It was the first election in New Zealand where 18-20 year olds and all permanent residents of New Zealand were eligible to vote, although only citizens were able to be elected. The incumbent Labour Party, following the sudden death of Labour leader Norman Kirk, was led by Bill Rowling, a leader who was characterised as being weak and ineffectual by some political commentators. Labour's central campaign was the so-called "Citizens for Rowling" petition which attacked National leader Rob Muldoon's forthright leadership style. This campaign was largely seen as having backfired on Labour. The National Party responded with the formation of "Rob's Mob". As former Minister of Finance in the previous National government, Muldoon focused on the economic impact of Labour's policies. National's campaign advertising suggested that Labour's recently introduced compulsory personal superannuation scheme would result in the Government owning the New Zealand economy using the workers's money (akin to a communist state). Muldoon argued that his New Zealand superannuation scheme could be
    6.00
    2 votes
    191
    United States House election, 1862

    United States House election, 1862

    Elections to the United States House of Representatives were held in 1862, mostly in November, in the middle of President Abraham Lincoln's first term. His Republicans lost 22 seats in Congress, while the Democrats picked up 28, for a net swing of 50 seats (or 27 percent) out of a total House membership of 185. The mid-term elections in 1862 brought the Republicans serious losses due to sharp disfavor with the Administration over its failure to deliver a speedy end to the war, as well as rising inflation, high new taxes, ugly rumors of corruption, the suspension of habeas corpus, the draft law, and fears that freed slaves would undermine the labor market. The Emancipation Proclamation announced in September gained votes in Yankee areas of New England and the upper Midwest, but it lost votes in the ethnic cities and the lower Midwest. While Republicans were discouraged, Democrats were energized and did especially well in Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, and New York. Elated Democrats from the Northwest hailed the elections as a repudiation of the emancipation heresy.. The Republicans did keep control of the major states except New York. Most important, the Republicans retained control
    6.00
    2 votes
    192
    United States House elections, 1986

    United States House elections, 1986

    The United States House of Representatives election, 1986 was held on November 4, 1986, in the middle of President Ronald Reagan's second term in office. As in most midterm elections, the President's party—in this case, the Republican Party — lost seats, with the Democratic Party gaining a net of five seats and cementing its majority. These results were not as dramatic as those in the Senate, where the Republicans lost control of the chamber to the Democrats. Source: Election Statistics - Office of the Clerk Forty incumbents retired. Nineteen incumbent Democrats retired. Twenty-one incumbent Democrats retired. Key to party abbreviations: AI=American Independent, C=Constitution, D=Democrat, G=Green, I=Independent, IP=Independence Party, L=Libertarian, PF=Peace and Freedom, R=Republican.
    6.00
    2 votes
    193
    United States House election, 1826

    United States House election, 1826

    The U.S. House election, 1826 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1826. In these midterm campaigns, the aftershock of the contested 1824 presidential election remained a major issue. From the ruins of the imploded Democratic-Republican party, supporters of President John Quincy Adams had organized the National Republican Party, which campaigned on a platform of economic nationalism and modernization. Supporters of Andrew Jackson continued to call themselves Democratic-Republicans (but actually laid the framework for the modern Democratic Party, which was formed two years later). The Democratic-Republican Party was able to pick up a slim majority in the House by painting an image of the National Republicans as elitist and of the Democrats as the party of the common farmer or artisan. This tactic helped them pick up a number of rural seats. http://clerk.house.gov/histHigh/Congressional_History/index.html
    5.00
    3 votes
    194
    British Columbia general election, 2005

    British Columbia general election, 2005

    The 38th British Columbia general election was held on May 17, 2005, to elect members of the Legislative Assembly of the Province of British Columbia (BC), Canada. The BC Liberal Party formed the government of the province prior to this general election under the leadership of Premier Gordon Campbell. The government claimed New Democratic Party's two MLAs were not enough to qualify them for official opposition status. The Liberals retained power, with a reduced majority of 46 out of 79 seats, down from the record 77 out of 79 in 2001. Voter turnout was 58.2 per cent. Under amendments to the BC Constitution Act passed in 2001, BC elections are now held on fixed dates: the second Tuesday in May every four years. This was the first provincial election for which elector data in the provincial elector list was synchronised with the National Register of Electors. The BC electoral reform referendum was held in conjunction with this election. This referendum asked voters whether or not they support the proposed electoral reforms of the Citizens' Assembly on Electoral Reform, which included switching to a single transferable vote (STV) system. Had it been approved by 60% of voters in 60% of
    4.25
    4 votes
    195
    Montenegrin parliamentary election, 2001

    Montenegrin parliamentary election, 2001

    Montenegrin parliamentary elections were held on April 22, 2001. The Democratic Party of Socialists of Montenegro received 30 seats, while the Socialdemocratic Party of Montenegro received 6 seats. Milo lost the elections as the remainder united under the Yugoslav movement. The Socialist People's Party of Montenegro received 21 seat, People's Party of Montenegro got 9 and the Serbian People's Party of Montenegro 3. The coalition won these elections and had support of the majority of the Parliament, but inner conflicts and organized obstruction from the opposition under Milo Djukanovic, prevented it from succeeding in forming the government which was supposed to be led by Prime Minister candidate Predrag Bulatović. The deadline passed an Predrag reformed a more organized and stronger coalition determined to repeat the election in 2002, however disappointment returned Milo Đukanović's DPS CG to power which won the election.
    5.50
    2 votes
    196
    Portuguese legislative election, 1987

    Portuguese legislative election, 1987

    The Portuguese legislative election of 1987 took place on July 19. In the last election, in 1985, the Social Democratic Party had achieved a relative majority, thing that made its government very weak, managing to survive in coalition with the Democratic and Social Center and the Democratic Renewal Party, and after the approval of a no confidence resolution from the left-wing parties, with the aid of the Democratic Renewal Party, the government fell and Mário Soares, the President at the time, called for a new election. The election was won by the Social Democratic Party, that with a growing popularity, won with a large majority, the biggest ever in the Portuguese parliamentary history. The left-wing Democratic Unity Coalition lost some of its MPs to the Socialist Party and the Democratic Renovator Party lost almost all of its influence, mainly due to its responsibility in the fall of the former government. The right-wing Democratic and Social Center lost almost a half of the voting, due to the useful voting effect on the also right-wing, Social Democratic Party. European elections were held on the same day. The major parties involved and the respective leaders: Aníbal Cavaco
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    2 votes
    197
    United Kingdom general election, 2001

    United Kingdom general election, 2001

    The United Kingdom general election, 2001 was held on Thursday 7 June 2001 to elect 659 members to the British House of Commons. It was dubbed "the quiet landslide" by the media, as the Labour Party was re-elected with another landslide result and only suffered a net loss of 6 seats, and turnout for the election was relatively low. Tony Blair went on to become the first Labour Prime Minister to serve a full second consecutive term in office. There was little change at all – outside Northern Ireland – with 620 out of 641 seats remaining unchanged. Labour boasted a strong economy and falling unemployment, as well as having delivered on many key election pledges made in 1997. The Conservative Party, under William Hague's leadership, was still deeply divided on the issue of Europe and the party's policy platform was considered to have shifted to a right-wing focus. Hague was also hindered by a series of embarrassing publicity stunts, which overshadowed his talents as a skilled orator. The election was essentially a repeat of the 1997 election, with Labour losing a mere 6 seats overall and the Conservatives making a net gain of 1 seat (gaining 9 seats, but losing 8). The Conservatives
    5.50
    2 votes
    198
    United States House election, 1816

    United States House election, 1816

    The U.S. House election, 1816 was an election for the United States House of Representatives to the Fifteenth United States Congress. Voting in the various states took place between April 1816 (New York) and August 14, 1817 (North Carolina). The Congress met on December 1, 1817. Illinois elected its first Representative on September 17, 1818. The Democratic-Republican Party made huge gains during this election cycle, which helped to usher in what is known as the Era of Good Feelings under President James Monroe. The Federalist Party was in a state of collapse, as the publication of the secessionist doctrine authored by party members at the Hartford Convention had created an almost treasonous image of the group outside its base in urban New England. The conclusion of the War of 1812, where the small American military fought to a draw with the powerful British forces, had increased nationalistic pride and had caused the public to rally around its ruling party. These two factors led to a period of nonpartisan, consensus rule, despite the remnants of party divisions.
    5.50
    2 votes
    199
    Australian legislative election, 1987

    Australian legislative election, 1987

    Federal elections were held in Australia on 11 July 1987, following the granting of a double dissolution on 5 June by the Governor-General Sir Ninian Stephen. Consequently, all 148 seats in the House of Representatives as well as all 76 seats in the Senate were up for election. The incumbent Australian Labor Party led by Prime Minister Bob Hawke defeated the opposition Liberal Party of Australia led by John Howard and the National Party of Australia led by Ian Sinclair. Note: As this was a double-dissolution election, all Senate seats were contested. The 1987 federal election was called 6 months early by Labor Prime Minister Bob Hawke to capitalise on disunity in the opposition. The trigger for the double dissolution was legislation for the Australia Card, although it did not figure prominently in the campaign. Opposition Leader John Howard had dismissed his predecessor Andrew Peacock from the shadow ministry in March, following unfortunate remarks by Peacock to Victorian state opposition leader Jeff Kennett in an infamous car phone conversation. Howard, who had succeeded Peacock in 1985, was fighting a war on two fronts – the origin of his oft-repeated remark that, in politics,
    6.00
    1 votes
    200
    United Kingdom general election, 1859

    United Kingdom general election, 1859

    In the 1859 United Kingdom general election, the Whigs, led by Lord Palmerston, held their majority in the House of Commons over the Earl of Derby's Conservatives. This election is also considered to be the first to be contested by the Liberal Party - a name unofficially adopted to cover the alliance of Whigs, Peelites, Radicals and Irish Brigade who had previously voted against the Derby administration in the House of Commons that had led to the election. It was also the last general election entered by the Chartists, before their organisation was dissolved. Total votes cast: 565,500
    6.00
    1 votes
    201
    United Kingdom general election, 1865

    United Kingdom general election, 1865

    The 1865 United Kingdom general election saw the Liberals, led by Lord Palmerston, increase their large majority over the Earl of Derby's Conservatives to more than 80. The Whig Party changed its name to the Liberal Party between the previous election and this one. Palmerston died later in the same year and was succeeded by Lord John Russell as Prime Minister. This was the last United Kingdom general election where a party increased its majority after having been returned to office at the previous election with a reduced majority. Total votes: 854,856
    6.00
    1 votes
    202
    United States House election, 1942

    United States House election, 1942

    The U.S. House election, 1942 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1942 which occurred in the middle of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's third term. Two main factors led to the Republican gains during this election cycle. Concern over World War II and American involvement in it was one factor in majority party decline, with the Democratic Party losing many votes among Italian and German ethnic communities in particular. Also, many voters were becoming tired with the policies of Roosevelt, who had served an unprecedented amount of time in the White House, and felt that the nation needed to change its direction. Roosevelt's Democratic Party lost 45 seats, retaining only a slender majority though they lost the popular vote. This would be the last election until 1996 that the party who won the popular vote did not win the majority of the House of Representatives. Source: Election Statistics - Office of the Clerk Some special elections were held on dates other than in November. Source: Election Statistics - Office of the Clerk Arizona received a second representative in reapportionment; it continued to elect both representatives at large rather than
    6.00
    1 votes
    203
    United States House election, 1968

    United States House election, 1968

    The U.S. House elections, 1968 were elections for the United States House of Representatives in 1968 which coincided with Richard M. Nixon's election as President. Nixon's narrow victory yielded only limited gains for his Republican Party, which picked up a net of five seats from the Democratic Party. The Democrats retained a majority in the House. The election coincided with the presidential campaign of George Wallace, who unsuccessfully attempted to deny a majority in the Electoral College to any of his opponents. Had Wallace succeeded he would have given the House the ability to elect the president. As a result of this election, Democrats formed a majority of 26 state House delegations, with Republicans forming a majority in 19 and the other five delegations being evenly split (each state's House delegation receives one vote in such an election). However, the Democrats' nominal majority of state delegations includes those of the Southern states who were more inclined to support Wallace as opposed to Democratic candidate Hubert Humphrey. Wallace believed the Southern representatives would be able to use the clout his campaign was trying to give them to force an end to federal
    6.00
    1 votes
    204
    United States House elections, 1984

    United States House elections, 1984

    The U.S. House election, 1984 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1984 which coincided with the re-election of President Ronald Reagan in a landslide. This victory also yielded gains for Reagan's Republican Party in the House, where they picked up a net of sixteen seats from the Democratic Party. The Democrats nonetheless retained a commanding majority in the House and gained seats in the Senate. Key to party abbreviations: AI=American Independent, C=Constitution, D=Democratic, G=Green, I=Independent, IP=Independence Party, L=Libertarian, PF=Peace and Freedom, R=Republican.
    6.00
    1 votes
    205
    Australian legislative election, 1903

    Australian legislative election, 1903

    Federal elections were held in Australia on 16 December 1903. All 75 seats in the House of Representatives, and 19 of the 36 seats in the Senate were up for election. The incumbent Protectionist Party led by Prime Minister of Australia Alfred Deakin defeated the opposition Free Trade Party led by George Reid. Independent: Frederick Holder (Wakefield, SA), James Wilkinson (Moreton, Qld) Independent: William Trenwith (Vic) The election saw the Labour party make significant gains outside New South Wales and Victoria. As a result of Labour's gains, the numbers of the three parties in Parliament were very close to equal, leading to unstable governments. Alfred Deakin would describe it as a parliament of "three elevens" (three cricket teams). Although the Protectionists were able to retain their minority government with the qualified support of the Labour Party, the equal numbers would see a record three changes of government over the course of the Parliamentary term, with each of the three parties holding office at least once during the term of the Parliament. The three parties that contested the 1901 election also contested the 1903 election, with only the Protectionists changing
    5.00
    2 votes
    206
    Australian legislative election, 1990

    Australian legislative election, 1990

    Federal elections were held in Australia on 24 March 1990. All 148 seats in the House of Representatives and 40 seats in the 76-member Senate were up for election. The incumbent Australian Labor Party led by Bob Hawke defeated the opposition Liberal Party of Australia led by Andrew Peacock with coalition partner the National Party of Australia led by Charles Blunt. Independents: Ted Mack The 1990 election resulted in a swing to the Coalition, which was attributed to the late 80's/early 90's recession, although Labor retained government. This was Labor’s fourth successive electoral victory with Bob Hawke as leader, a level of political success which no previous Labor government or Labor leader had enjoyed. The election was to be Hawke’s last as Prime Minister and Australian Labor Party leader; he was replaced by Paul Keating on 20 December 1991. John Howard lost the 1987 election to Hawke, and Andrew Peacock was elected Deputy Leader in a show of party unity. In May 1989 Peacock's supporters mounted a party room coup which returned Peacock to the leadership. Peacock, now 50, cultivated a new mature image, enhanced by a second marriage to Margaret St George. Hawke's Treasurer, Paul
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    2 votes
    207
    Danish parliamentary election, 1990

    Danish parliamentary election, 1990

    Parliamentary elections were held in Denmark on 12 December 1990. Although the election resulted in a strong gain for the Social Democratic Party, Poul Schlüter's coalition government was able to continue despite the Danish Social Liberal Party leaving. Schlüter's coalition consisted of the Conservative People's Party and Venstre. Voter turnout was 82.8% in Denmark proper, 54.4% in the Faroe Islands and 50.8% in Greenland.
    5.00
    2 votes
    208
    United States House election, 1926

    United States House election, 1926

    The U.S. House election, 1926 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1926 which occurred in the middle of President Calvin Coolidge's second term. Coolidge's Republican Party lost seats to the opposition Democratic Party, but it retained a majority. The most pressing national matters at the time were fragmented, generally related to government's relationship to business or to providing social aid. However, no predominant issue was able to cast a shadow over the election. The small, populist Farmer-Labor Party also held two seats following the election.
    5.00
    2 votes
    209
    Danish parliamentary election, 1988

    Danish parliamentary election, 1988

    The Danish Parliamentary election of 1988 was held on 10 May 1988, only 7 months after the last election. Prime Minister Poul Schlüter chose to call for an election after the Conservative-Liberal government came in minority in a foreign policy issue, when the government and the Social Democrats came in a disagreement. In a parliamentary debate Prime Minister Poul Schlüter accused the leader of the Social Democrats, Svend Auken, for breaking a political deal between the two of them, while Auken accused Schlüter for lying to the public. The election did not chance much in the balance of power in the Folketing. Common Course did not make it to the 2 percent threshold and lost their 4 seats. In government the Centre Democrats and Christian People's Party left the government and were replaced by the Social Liberal Party. The reason for doing this was that it gave Schlüter a majority in foreign policy issues, which had caused this election. The Centre Democrats and Chritian People's Party continued to support the government though.
    4.50
    2 votes
    210
    Japan general election, 2003

    Japan general election, 2003

    A general election took place in Japan on November 9, 2003. Incumbent Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi of the Liberal Democrat Party won the election but with a reduced majority. The main opposition Democratic Party made considerable gains, winning 177 of the 480 seats in the House of Representatives, its largest share ever. Other traditional parties like the Communist Party and the Social Democrat Party lost a significant numbers of seats, making a two-party system a possibility in future Japanese politics. On October 11, 2003, Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi dissolved the House of Representatives of the Diet after he was re-elected as the Liberal Democrat Party chief on September 20. The dissolution was based on Article 7 of the Constitution of Japan, which can be interpreted as saying that the Prime Minister has the power to dissolve the lower house after so advising the Emperor. The election was the first since Koizumi was named Prime Minister in April 2001. The major participants were the Liberal Democrat Party (LDP) and the Democrat Party (DPJ). The LDP retains strong support in rural areas and among older voters due to heavy subsidies in agriculture, while the DPJ has had
    4.50
    2 votes
    211
    United States House election, 1852

    United States House election, 1852

    Elections to the United States House of Representatives were held in 1852. This election cycle saw the Democrats increase their House majority and gain the presidency (under Franklin Pierce). Although sectionalism remained a huge problem, the parties got a slight boost of stability due to the unity of a bitter presidential campaign. Two small third parties, the Constitutional Unionists and States' Rights parties, quickly collapsed prior to this election, while the anti-slavery Free Soil Party held onto its four seats. [Data unknown/missing. You can help!] [Data unknown/missing. You can help!] Note: From statehood to 1864, California's representatives were elected at-large, with the top two vote-getters winning election from 1849 to 1858; in 1860 when California gained a seat in the House the top three vote-getters were elected. [Data unknown/missing. You can help!] [Data unknown/missing. You can help!] [Data unknown/missing. You can help!] [Data unknown/missing. You can help!] [Data unknown/missing. You can help!] [Data unknown/missing. You can help!] [Data unknown/missing. You can help!] [Data unknown/missing. You can help!] [Data unknown/missing. You can help!] [Data
    4.50
    2 votes
    212
    United States House election, 1916

    United States House election, 1916

    The U.S. House election, 1916 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1916 which coincided with President Woodrow Wilson's re-election. Although Wilson eked out a narrow victory, his Democratic Party lost seats to the opposition Republican Party. Wilson's hybrid approach, which injected a progressive element into Democratic policies, had proved to be dissatisfying to much of the nation. International affairs also became important in the traditionally non-interventionist United States, as voters attempted to determine which party would be best served to keep the nation from entering The Great War. Although the Democrats lost a plurality, they narrowly maintained control of the chamber with minor party support, forming an alliance with the remaining third party Progressives and Socialist Meyer London. This is the last example (to date) of a type of coalition holding power in the House, rather than a single party (as is normally the case). The Democrats would not win a majority of seats again until 1930. Notable freshman included Jeannette Rankin a Republican from Montana who was the first woman ever elected to congress. [Data unknown/missing. You can help!]
    4.50
    2 votes
    213
    United States House election, 1972

    United States House election, 1972

    The U.S. House election, 1972 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1972 which coincided with the landslide re-election victory of President Richard M. Nixon. Nixon's Republican Party managed to gain a net of twelve seats from the Democratic Party, although the Democrats retained a majority. This was also the first election the Libertarian Party participated in, nominating only one candidate, Pipp M. Boyls, to run for Colorado's 5th congressional district. Notable freshmen included future Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott (R-Miss.). Source: "Election Statistics". Office of the Clerk. http://clerk.house.gov/member_info/electionInfo.  Some special elections were held on days other than the November election. Alabama was reapportioned from 8 to 7 seats and eliminated the old 3rd district, dividing it between the old 2nd and 4th and making compensating boundary changes elsewhere. Incumbent Nick Begich won re-election three weeks after having disappeared in a plane crash October 16; challenger Don Young would later win a March special election after Begich was declared dead on December 29. Arizona was reapportioned from 3 seats to 4 and carved a new district
    4.50
    2 votes
    214
    United States House elections, 1886

    United States House elections, 1886

    The U.S. House election, 1886 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1886 which occurred in the middle of President Grover Cleveland's first term. As in many midterm elections, Cleveland's Democratic Party lost seats to the opposition Republican Party, although a narrow majority was retained. Many of these Republican pickups were in the industrializing Midwest states, where the debate over tariffs, which were advocated by Republicans to protect domestic industry but opposed by Democrats to allow for free agricultural trade, lead to political change. The small Labor Party, supported by industrial workers, gained several seats in Wisconsin.
    4.50
    2 votes
    215
    Australian general election, 1977

    Australian general election, 1977

    Federal elections were held in Australia on 10 December 1977. All 124 seats in the House of Representatives, and 34 of the 64 seats in the Senate, were up for election. The incumbent Liberal Party of Australia led by Malcolm Fraser with coalition partner the National Country Party led by Doug Anthony, in government since 1975, was elected to a second term over the Australian Labor Party led by Gough Whitlam. While the Coalition suffered a five-seat swing, it still had a substantial 48-seat majority in the House. Whitlam was unable to recover much of the ground Labor had lost in its severe defeat of two years prior, and resigned as leader shortly after the election. Independent: Brian Harradine The government offering tax cuts to voters and ran advertisements with the slogan "fistful of dollars". The tax cuts were never delivered; instead a "temporary surcharge" was imposed in 1978. The election coincided with the retirement of the Governor-General, Sir John Kerr. Kerr had appeared drunk at the Melbourne Cup in November and the public outcry resulted in the cancellation of his appointment as Ambassador to UNESCO. The 1977 election was held a year earlier than required, partly to
    5.00
    1 votes
    216
    Somaliland parliamentary election, 2010

    Somaliland parliamentary election, 2010

    A parliamentary election was due to be held in Somaliland in September 2010, but Parliament, President and Electoral Commission have said it is not possible to hold it. Consequently, mandates for the current legislators have been extended into 2012. Opposition parties claim the move is illegal.
    5.00
    1 votes
    217
    Swedish general election, 2006

    Swedish general election, 2006

    A general election was held in Sweden on 17 September 2006, to elect members to the Swedish parliament. All 349 seats were up for election: 310 "fixed seats" in 29 constituencies and 39 members at a national level for what are called "adjustment seats", used to ensure that parties have representation in the Riksdag proportional to their vote. The electoral system used was semi-open list proportional representation using the Sainte-Laguë method of allocating seats. Elections for County and Municipal councils were also held on the same day. Fredrik Reinfeldt from the Moderate Party was able to form a majority government together with the Centre Party, Liberal People's Party and the Christian Democrats following the election, which also ousted the Social Democrats after twelve years in power. The minority government of Göran Persson's Social Democratic Party attempted, and failed, to gain enough seats to form a majority government, to continue in minority or to govern in a red-green coalition government. His party had been in power since the 1994 election, and Persson has been Prime Minister since 1996. The Social Democrats before the election had an agreement with the Left Party and
    5.00
    1 votes
    218
    United Kingdom general election, 1910

    United Kingdom general election, 1910

    The United Kingdom general election of January 1910 was held from 15 January to 10 February 1910. The election produced a hung parliament, with the Conservative Party led by Arthur Balfour and their Liberal Unionist allies receiving the largest number of votes, but the Liberals led by H. H. Asquith winning the largest number of seats, returning two more MPs than the Conservatives. Asquith formed a government with the support of the Irish Parliamentary Party, led by John Redmond. A second election was soon held in December. The Labour Party, led by Arthur Henderson, continued to gain strength, going from 29 seats to 40. All parties shown.
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    1 votes
    219
    United States House election, 1792

    United States House election, 1792

    The U.S. House election, 1792 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1792 which coincided with the re-election of President George Washington. While Washington ran for president as an independent, his followers (and more specifically, supporters of Alexander Hamilton) formed the nation's first organized political party, the Federalist Party. In response, followers of Thomas Jefferson and James Madison created the opposition Democratic-Republican Party. These loose organizations represented a grand division in American political thought. The Federalists represented urbanization, industralization, mercantilism, centralized government, and broad constitutional interpretation. In Contrast, Democratic-Republicans supported an agrarian republic based on self-sufficient farmers and small, localized governments with limited power. Despite nearly unanimous support for Washington, Jeffersonian ideas edged Hamiltonian thoughts at the ballot box, with the Democratic-Republicans taking 24 seats more than they did prior to organization (mostly due to the additions of new seats in the Western states, where Democratic-Republican support was highest because of a farming
    5.00
    1 votes
    220
    United States House election, 1910

    United States House election, 1910

    The U.S. House election, 1910 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1910 which occurred in the middle of President William Howard Taft's term. The conservative Taft contended with major factional splits within his Republican Party. Instead of using his position as president to bridge compromise, Taft alienated the progressive wing of the party, which had championed his predecessor, Theodore Roosevelt. While conservatives controlled the largest number of elected positions for Republicans, progressive politics had been what brought many voters to the polls. The clash of these units of the Republican Party, combined with the message of unity from the Democratic Party, was enough to allow the Democrats to take control of the House. The first ever socialist was also elected to Congress during this election cycle.
    5.00
    1 votes
    221
    United States House election, 1924

    United States House election, 1924

    The U.S. House election, 1924 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1924 which coincided with the election of President Calvin Coolidge, who had replaced Warren Harding following his death. Coolidge's popularity helped his Republican Party to gain a net 22 seats from the opposition Democratic Party, cementing their majority. The burgeoning economy and Republican pro-business policies caused the party to gain popularity. An internal split somewhat reduced House gains, as a progressive faction of the party continued to antagonize party leadership. In the early stages of the election, there were fears that the Republicans would be swamped at the polls due to several scandals in the administration of President Warren Harding. However, after the chief executive's death, his incidents were painted as personal problems that did not reflect the state of the party. The populist Farmer-Labor Party also gained a seat in Minnesota.
    5.00
    1 votes
    222
    Wyoming United States Senate elections, 2008

    Wyoming United States Senate elections, 2008

    • Part of general election: United States Senate elections, 2008
    • Contests: United States Senate Class II election in Wyoming, 2008
    The 2008 United States Senate election in Wyoming was held November 4, 2008. Incumbent Republican U.S. Senator Mike Enzi won re-election to a third term. CQ Politics ranked the race as 'Safe Republican'.
    5.00
    1 votes
    223
    United States House election, 1900

    United States House election, 1900

    The U.S. House election, 1900 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1900 which coincided with the re-election of President William McKinley. McKinley's Republican Party gained thirteen seats from the Democratic Party and independents, cementing their majority. A reassertion of Republican control in the Mid-Atlantic was key in the gain of new seats. However, with an improved economy, especially in the industrial sector, the election cycle featured no keystone issue, resulting in a general support for the status quo. The fading Populist Party held on to five House seats.
    4.00
    2 votes
    224
    United Kingdom general election, 1895

    United Kingdom general election, 1895

    The United Kingdom general election of 1895 was held from 13 July - 7 August 1895. It was won by the Conservatives led by Lord Salisbury who formed an alliance with the Liberal Unionist Party and had a large majority over the Liberals, led by Lord Rosebery. The Irish Parliamentary Party was split at this time, the majority of its MPs (the "Anti-Parnellites") following John Dillon whilst a rump (the "Parnellites") followed John Redmond. Total votes cast: 3,866,282. All parties shown. For an alternative view of the count where each vote in a two-member seat is counted as half a vote (because each elector had two votes) see:
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    1 votes
    225
    United States House election, 1860

    United States House election, 1860

    Elections among the 33 states to the 37th United States Congress of the House of Representatives were held August 1860 through September 1861. Following the presidential election of 1860, Electoral College vote and Inauguration swearing-in, their term would coincide with the first two years of Abraham Lincoln's first administration. Republican candidates won increasing percentages of the House in 1856, 1858 and, in 1860, after secessionist losses, they amounted to 59% of the House. In the same six-year period of political chaos running up to the American Civil War, the Democratic Party atrophied from holding the presidency and a two-third’s majority, to a minority caucus of less than one-third and loss of supporting presidential patronage. This election forged Northern unity behind the pro-union Republican Party of 108 Representatives, and broad based pro-union majorities in the north and south border states among the mostly Douglas Democrats with 45 members and the Unionists and others amounting to another 28. The last of a Democratic Party dominated by the slave-holding states was left to a remnant. The national party was destroyed by infighting over slavery, with minority cotton
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    1 votes
    226
    United States House election, 1872

    United States House election, 1872

    The U.S. House election, 1872 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1872 which coincided with the re-election of President Ulysses S. Grant. Grant's Republican Party increased its majority greatly at the expense of the opposition Democratic Party. The pro-industry outlook of the Republicans appealed to many Northern voters, especially as the post-war economy exploded, and this allowed the party to flourish as the Industrial Revolution grew more widespread. The Republicans also benefited from a continuing association with Civil War victory as well as disarray amongst Democratic leadership. A new seat was added, following the 1870 U.S. Census, bringing the delegation up from three to four Representatives.
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    1 votes
    227
    United States House elections, 1980

    United States House elections, 1980

    The U.S. House election, 1980 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1980 which coincided with the election of Ronald Reagan as President. Reagan's victory also allowed many Republican House candidates to secure election, and the Republicans gained a net of 35 seats from the Democratic Party. The Democrats nonetheless retained a significant majority, unlike the Senate elections, where Republicans gained control of the chamber. Many Democratic congressman from the south (known as "boll weevils") frequently took conservative stances on issues, allowing Republicans to have a working ideological majority for some of President Reagan's proposals during his first two years in office. This election marked the first time since Reconstruction that Republicans were given a sizable majority of Representatives from a Deep South state (South Carolina). It was also the first time that the new Libertarian Party became the third largest political party in Congress, a title it still retains to this day. Summary of the November 4, 1980 United States House of Representatives election results Source: Election Statistics - Office of the Clerk [Data unknown/missing.
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    1 votes
    228
    United States House of Representatives elections in Nevada, 2008

    United States House of Representatives elections in Nevada, 2008

    • Part of general election: United States House elections, 2008
    • Contests: Nevada’s 1st congressional district election, 2008
    The 2008 congressional elections in Nevada were held on November 4, 2008, to determine who will represent the state of Nevada in the United States House of Representatives, coinciding with the presidential election. The election coincides with the 2008 U.S. presidential election. Representatives are elected for two-year terms; those elected will serve in the 111th Congress from January 3, 2009 until January 3, 2011. Nevada has three seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Its 2007–2008 congressional delegation consisted of two Republicans and one Democrat. It now consists of one Republican and two Democrats. District 3 changed from Republican to Democratic, although CQ Politics had forecasted districts 2 and 3 to be at some risk for the incumbent party. This district covers most of the City of Las Vegas, as well as parts of North Las Vegas and parts of unincorporated Clark County. In the general election, the incumbent Democrat Shelley Berkley defeated Republican Kenneth Wegner, a Gulf War veteran and part-time Bail Enforcement Agent. This district covers all of Nevada except for parts of Clark County. Reno, along with surrounding Washoe County,
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    United States Senate elections, 2008

    United States Senate elections, 2008

    • Includes general election: Mississippi United States Senate election, 2008
    • Part of general election: United States general elections, 2008
    • Contests: Minnesota United States Senate election, 2008
    Elections for the United States Senate were held on November 4, 2008, with 35 of the 100 seats in the Senate being contested. Thirty-three seats were regular elections; the winners were eligible to serve six-year terms from January 3, 2009, to January 3, 2015, as members of Senate Class II. There were also two special elections: one in Mississippi and another in Wyoming; the winners serve the remainder of terms that expire on January 3, 2013, as members of Senate Class I. The 2008 presidential election, elections for all House of Representatives seats, and several gubernatorial elections, as well as many state and local elections, occurred on the same date. Going into the 2008 election, the Senate consisted of 49 Democrats, 49 Republicans, and two independents (Bernie Sanders of Vermont and Joe Lieberman of Connecticut) who caucused with the Democrats. Of the seats up for election in 2008, 23 were held by Republicans and 12 by Democrats. At the start of the 111th Congress, the Democrats held 56 seats in the Senate, with the two independents continuing to caucus with the Democrats for a total of 58. For the second consecutive election cycle, no incumbent Democratic senators lost
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    Australian legislative election, 1998

    Australian legislative election, 1998

    Federal elections were held in Australia on 3 October 1998. All 148 seats in the House of Representatives and 40 seats in the 76-member Senate were up for election. The incumbent Liberal Party of Australia led by Prime Minister of Australia John Howard and coalition partner the National Party of Australia led by Tim Fischer defeated the opposition Australian Labor Party led by Kim Beazley. Independents: Peter Andren The election returned the Member of the House of Representatives for its 1998–2001 term and half of Australia's senators, who then served in the 1999–2002 Senate. Despite gaining almost 51 percent of the two-party-preferred vote, the Australian Labor Party fell short of forming government by 8 seats. The government was re-elected with 49.02% of the two-party-preferred vote, compared to 50.98% for the Australian Labor Party, the largest difference of six election results where the winner did not gain a two-party preferred majority, since 2PP results first estimated from 1937. The election on 3 October 1998 was held six months earlier than required by the Constitution. Prime Minister John Howard made the announcement following the launch of the coalition's Goods and
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    Honduran general election, 2005

    Honduran general election, 2005

    General elections were held in Honduras to elect the President of Honduras, Vice-President, and deputies to the National Congress of Honduras on 27 November, 2005. For the 2005 election the constitution was amended to create a single vice-president (Hondurans previously elected three 'presidential designates' on a ticket along with the presidential candidate). For the 2005 election the system of proportional representation was also changed from a closed list to an open list - the parties also used open-list primaries to select candidate slates. The list system reduced the re-election rate of incumbents, with just 31% of deputies in the new Congress having seats in the 2002–2006 Congress. Primary elections (internal party elections) were held for the first time in Honduras in this election, in February 2005. Only the Liberal Party and National Party participated in these elections, since the smaller parties lack significant factions. They were supervised by the official electoral body, and the 72-hour ban on the sale of alcohol which accompanies all official elections was also imposed over that weekend. 45% of the electorate voted in the primaries: 24% for the Liberals and 21% for
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    Oregon legislative elections, 2008

    Oregon legislative elections, 2008

    • Part of general election: Oregon state elections, 2008
    • Contests: Oregon’s 1st Senate district election, 2008
    Elections for the 75th Oregon Legislative Assembly took place in 2008. The Republican and Democratic primary elections were on May 20, 2008, and the general election was held on November 4, 2008. Fifteen of the Oregon State Senate's thirty seats were up for election, as were all 60 seats of the Oregon House of Representatives. In the general election, there were 39 races with both Democratic and Republican candidates; 24 were in districts previously represented by a Republican, 15 in districts previously represented by Democrats. Sixteen Democrats ran without a Republican opponent, and five Republicans ran without a Democratic opponent. Eighteen incumbent House members and six incumbent Senators earned enough write-in votes in the opposing party's primary to earn a dual endorsement. Every two years, half of the state senate seats come up for election. In 2008 there was also an election for District 17, resulting from Senator Brad Avakian's appointment to Oregon Labor Commissioner. Thus, 16 seats were up for election. Nine of the 16 Senate seats up for election were previously held by Democrats. Four of these races had both Democratic and Republican candidates in the general
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    Surinamese legislative election, 2005

    Surinamese legislative election, 2005

    The 2005 Surinamese legislative elections were held in Suriname on 25 May 2005. The governing New Front for Democracy and Development of president Ronald Venetiaan lost seats, remaining the largest party but failing to get a majority in the National Assembly of Suriname. Despite this Venetiaan was re-elected as president after obtaining sufficient support to win a majority in the election for president. Suriname became independent from the Netherlands in 1975 and in 1980 a coup brought the military to power. By 1982 Desi Bouterse had become head of state and remained in effective control of Suriname until international pressure led to a return to democracy in 1991. The 1991 election saw the opposition New Front for Democracy and Development win the election and Ronald Venetiaan became president for the first time. In the 1996 election Venetiaan and the New Front were defeated by National Democratic Party (NDP) led by a former aide to Bouterse, Jules Wijdenbosch. However soaring inflation meant a new election was called one year early in 2000. The New Front won a big victory in the 2000 election winning 33 of the 51 seats, compared to 7 for the NDP, and 5 for the People's Alliance
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    United Kingdom general election, 1835

    United Kingdom general election, 1835

    The 1835 United Kingdom general election was called when Parliament was dissolved on 29 December 1834. Polling took place between 6 January and 6 February 1835, and the results saw Robert Peel's Conservatives make large gains from their low of the 1832 election, but the Whigs maintained a large majority. The Whigs had entered into an electoral pact with the Irish Repeal Association of Daniel O'Connell, which had contested the previous election as a separate party. Total votes cast: 611,137 The eleventh United Kingdom Parliament was dissolved on 29 December 1834. The new Parliament was summoned to meet on 19 February 1835, for a maximum seven year term from that date. The maximum term could be and normally was curtailed, by the monarch dissolving the Parliament, before its term expired. At this period there was not one election day. After receiving a writ (a royal command) for the election to be held, the local returning officer fixed the election timetable for the particular constituency or constituencies he was concerned with. Polling in seats with contested elections could continue for many days. The general election took place between January and February 1835. The first
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    United Kingdom general election, 1910

    United Kingdom general election, 1910

    The United Kingdom general election of December 1910 was held from 3 to 19 December. It was the last British election to be held over several days and the last to be held prior to the First World War (1914-1918). The Conservatives, led by Arthur Balfour with their Liberal Unionist allies, and the Liberals, led by H. H. Asquith, could not break the deadlock produced in the January general election, with the Conservatives again winning the largest number of votes. The Liberal Party under Asquith formed a government with the support of the Irish Nationalists. This was the last election in which the Liberals won the highest number of seats in the House of Commons.
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    United Kingdom general election, 1922

    United Kingdom general election, 1922

    The United Kingdom general election of 1922 was held on 15 November 1922. It was the first election held after most of the Irish counties left the United Kingdom to form the Irish Free State, and was won by Andrew Bonar Law's Conservatives, who gained an overall majority over Labour, led by John Robert Clynes, and a divided Liberal Party. The Liberal Party were split between the "National Liberals" following David Lloyd George and the "Liberals" following Herbert Henry Asquith. However, some candidates stood calling for a reunited Liberal party whilst others appear to have backed both Asquith and Lloyd George. Few sources are able to agree on exact numbers, and even in contemporary records held by the two groups some MPs were claimed for both sides. In any case, it was the first election where Labour surpassed the combined strength of both Liberal parties, in votes as well as seats. Until the previous month the Conservatives had been in coalition with the Lloyd George Liberals - some Lloyd George Liberals were not opposed by Conservative candidates (e.g. Winston Churchill, who was defeated at Dundee nonetheless) whilst many leading Conservatives (e.g. former leaders Sir Austen
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    237
    United Kingdom general election, 1924

    United Kingdom general election, 1924

    The 1924 United Kingdom general election was held on 29 October 1924. It was the third general election to be held in less than two years. The Conservatives, led by Stanley Baldwin performed dramatically better, in electoral terms, than in the 1923 general election and obtained a large parliamentary majority. Labour, led by Ramsay MacDonald, lost 40 seats. The election also saw the Liberal Party, led by Herbert Henry Asquith, lose 118 of their 158 seats which helped to polarise British politics between the Labour Party and Conservative Party. The Conservative landslide victory and the Labour defeat in this general election has been, in part, attributed to the Zinoviev letter, a forgery, which was published in the Daily Mail four days before the election. However, it is difficult to prove that this had a major impact on the election result. The Labour vote actually increased by around one million popular votes in comparison to the 1923 general election, however, the increase in the number of popular votes for the Labour Party may be due, in part, to the party putting up eighty-seven more candidates than it did in the previous year's general election. It is widely speculated that the
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    238
    United Kingdom general election, 1964

    United Kingdom general election, 1964

    The United Kingdom general election of 1964 was held on 15 October 1964, more than five years after the preceding election, and thirteen years after the Conservative Party had retaken power. Both major parties had changed leaders in 1963: after the sudden death of Hugh Gaitskell, Labour chose Harold Wilson (who was then thought of as being on the party's centre-left), and the Conservatives had chosen Alec Douglas-Home (then the Earl of Home) as their new leader after Harold Macmillan announced his resignation (Home shortly after disclaimed his title under the Peerage Act 1963 in order to lead the party from the Commons). Macmillan's government had been increasingly unpopular in the mid-term, and Douglas-Home faced a difficult task in rebuilding the party's popularity. Wilson had begun to try to tie the Labour Party to the growing confidence of Britain in the 1960s, asserting that the "white heat of [the] revolution" would sweep away "restrictive practices... on both sides of industry". This helped him secure victory with a small overall majority of five. In addition, the resurgence of the Liberal Party, which doubled its share of the vote in this election, arguably contributed to
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    239
    United Kingdom general election, 1970

    United Kingdom general election, 1970

    The United Kingdom general election of 1970 was held on 18 June 1970, and resulted in a surprise victory for the Conservative Party under leader Edward Heath, who defeated the Labour Party under Harold Wilson. The election also saw the Liberal Party and its new leader Jeremy Thorpe lose half their seats. The Conservatives, including the Ulster Unionists, were given a majority of 31. The election was the first in which people could vote from the age of 18, after the Representation of the People Act 1969. Most opinion polls prior to the election had indicated a comfortable Labour victory and had put Labour up to 12.4% ahead of the Conservatives. However on election day, a late swing gave the Conservatives a 3.4% lead. The Election date was supposedly chosen because Harold Wilson wanted to go to the polls before the introduction of decimal coinage in early 1971, for which his government had been responsible and which he thought was hugely unpopular and because Wilson sought to gain some momentum by surprising the Conservatives, who were expecting an October election. Commentators believed that an unexpectedly bad set of balance of payments figures released in polling week, and loss of
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    240
    United States House election, 1808

    United States House election, 1808

    The U.S. House election, 1808 was an election for the United States House of Representatives to the Eleventh United States Congress. Voting in the various states took place between April 1808 (New York) and May 1809 (Tennessee) with the Congress meeting on May 22, 1809. Although Democratic-Republicans maintained control of the presidency (under James Madison) and Congress, Federalists made gains in the House, mainly due to the unpopularity of the Embargo Act of 1807. As a result, voters in New England, who often had ties to the shipping or manufacturing industries, overwhelmingly chose to send Federalists to Washington. Economic stagnation due to the closing of the export market and fears that Democratic-Republican policies had the potential for leading America into a naval war with France or Britain were key issues that allowed for a brief Federalist resurgence.
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    241
    United States House election, 1812

    United States House election, 1812

    The U.S. House election, 1812 was an election for the United States House of Representatives to the thirteenth Congress. Voting in the various states took place between August 3, 1812 (Kentucky) and May 1, 1813 (North Carolina). The Congress was convened on May 24, 1813. A significant expansion of the House occurred prior to this election cycle, with many new seats being added in Western areas. With America entering the War of 1812 against Britain, the Democratic-Republican and Federalist Parties effectively served as pro-war and anti-war camps. Democratic-Republican delegates from Southern and Western states had been the primary leaders in the push to declare war, asserting that the British had violated America's sovereign rights. High levels of support for the conflict in agrarian regions resulted the Democratic-Republicans taking many newly-created rural districts. However, the Federalists and their key supporters in New England opposed the war from the start, citing its potential for damaging American trade and infrastructure. The 1812 elections are marked by massive Federalist gains, with many coming in the Middle Colonies, where support for the war became lukewarm after the
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    United States House election, 1850

    United States House election, 1850

    Elections to the United States House of Representatives were held in 1850. The Democrats gained 14 seats, increasing their majority relative to the Whigs, who lost 23 seats. Whig President Millard Filmore, the Whig who had gained the presidency after the death of Zachary Taylor, grew increasingly unpopular. The election saw sectionalism and slavery continue to emerge as major issues. The Constitutional Union Party, formed in support of the Compromise of 1850, gained 10 seats (its first ever) and was concentrated in Georgia. The Free Soil Party, which was strongly abolitionist, lost five seats and was reduced to four Representatives, all in New England districts. The States' Rights Party, a pro-slavery state's rights party, gained ground in South Carolina. Note: From statehood to 1864, California's representatives were elected at-large, with the top two vote-getters winning election from 1849 to 1858; in 1860 when California gained a seat in the House the top three vote-getters were elected. http://clerk.house.gov/histHigh/Congressional_History/index.html
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    243
    United States House election, 1870

    United States House election, 1870

    The U.S. House election, 1870 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1870 which occurred in the middle of President Ulysses S. Grant's first term. With Grant's administration rocked by a number of scandals (including a shady deal for gold speculation that led to a crash in the market and several business deals that saw high-ranking governmental officials gain kickbacks) and Reconstruction winding down, his Republican Party lost seats to the opposition Democratic Party but retained an overall majority. Also, since Democratic Party controlled governments were reestablishing themselves in some portions of the South, the Democrats were able to make huge gains in this election.
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    244
    United States House election, 1940

    United States House election, 1940

    The U.S. House election, 1940 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1940 which coincided with President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's re-election to an unprecedented third term. His Democratic Party narrowly gained seats from the opposition Republican Party, cementing their majority. However, the election gave firm control of the US House of Representatives and Senate to the New Dealers once again, as Progressives dominated the election. The upswing in the economy that occurred following the Recession of 1937-38 encouraged voters that the New Deal plan had actually been working. This allowed the Democrats to stabilize their support. Source: Election Statistics - Office of the Clerk Three special elections were held apart from those in November. The elected winner would serve only the remainder of the incumbent Congress. Several close allies of former governor Huey Long were defeated in primaries by reform candidates.
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    United States House election, 1970

    United States House election, 1970

    The U.S. House election, 1970 was an election for the United States House of Representatives held on November 3, 1970, in the middle of President Richard M. Nixon's first term. The President's Republican Party lost seats, in this case a net of 12, to the Democratic Party, which thus increased modestly its majority in the House. Many viewed the results as the American public showing fatigue over the ongoing Vietnam War. Summary of the November 3, 1970 election results [Data unknown/missing. You can help!] One Democratic seat was lost to Republicans. Democrats, therefore, retained a 20-18 margin over Republicans.
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    United States House elections, 1878

    United States House elections, 1878

    The U.S. House election, 1878 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1878 which occurred in the middle of President Rutherford B. Hayes' term. With a sour economy as the nation's pressing issue, both major parties lost seats to the new Greenback Party, which was established to promote the long-term use of paper money as a solution to stop enormous economic fluctuations. The Democratic Party remained the largest party, but lost its majority. However, it allied with several independent politicians and was able to remain in power. Notable freshmen included James B. Weaver, who would later run for President as the Populist candidate in the 1892 election. This was the fourth and last recorded House election where both both major parties lost seats at the same time.
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    United States House of Representatives elections in Hawaiʻi, 2008

    United States House of Representatives elections in Hawaiʻi, 2008

    • Part of general election: United States House elections, 2008
    • Contests: Hawaiʻi’s 1st congressional district election, 2008
    The 2008 congressional elections in Hawaii were held on November 4, 2008 to determine who was to represent the state of Hawaii in the United States House of Representatives for the 111th Congress from January 3, 2009, until their terms of office expire on January 3, 2011. Incumbent Neil Abercrombie (D) was reelected in Hawaii's 1st congressional district. Incumbent Mazie Hirono (D) was reelected in Hawaii's 2nd congressional district. Hawaii has two seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Representatives are elected for two-year terms. The election coincided with the 2008 U.S. presidential election. This district has been represented by Democrat Neil Abercrombie since 1991. He ran against Republican Steve Tataii and Libertarian Li Zhao. CQ Politics forecasted the race as "Safe Democrat". This district has been represented by Democrat Mazie Hirono since 2007. She ran against Republican Roger B. Evans, Independent Shaun Stenshol, and Libertarian Jeff Mallan. CQ Politics forecasted the race as "Safe Democrat".
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    United States House of Representatives elections in Illinois, 2008

    United States House of Representatives elections in Illinois, 2008

    • Part of general election: United States House elections, 2008
    • Contests: Illinois’s 1st congressional district election, 2008
    The 2008 congressional elections in Illinois were held on November 4, 2008 to determine who would represent the state of Illinois in the United States House of Representatives, coinciding with the presidential and senatorial elections. Representatives are elected for two-year terms; those elected served in the 111th Congress from January 3, 2009 until January 3, 2011. Illinois has nineteen seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Its 2007-2008 congressional delegation consisted of eleven Democrats and eight Republicans. It became, following the election, twelve Democrats and seven Republicans. District 11 was the only seat which changed party (from open Republican to Democratic), although CQ Politics had forecasted districts 6, 8, 10, 11, 13, 14 and 18 to be at some risk for the incumbent party. This district includes part of Cook County. Democratic incumbent Bobby Rush, who has held the seat since 1993, ran against Republican nominee Antoine Members. CQ Politics forecast the race as 'Safe Democrat'. This district includes parts of Cook and Will counties. Democratic nominee Jesse Jackson, Jr., who has held the seat winning a special election in
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    United States House of Representatives elections in Michigan, 2008

    United States House of Representatives elections in Michigan, 2008

    • Part of general election: United States House elections, 2008
    • Contests: Michigan’s 1st congressional district election, 2008
    The 2008 congressional elections in Michigan were held on November 4, 2008 to determine who would represent the state of Michigan in the United States House of Representatives. Michigan has fifteen seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Representatives are elected for two-year terms; those elected will serve in the 111th Congress from January 4, 2009 until January 3, 2011. The election coincided with the 2008 U.S. presidential election. The 7th and 9th district seats were considered to be competitive. Both seats were occupied by Republicans who lost to Democratic opponents. The makeup of the Michigan congressional delegation in 2008 consisted of nine Republicans and six Democrats. As a result of the 2008 election, the delegation in 2009/2010 consists of eight Democrats and seven Republicans. The two Democratic Party gains came in the 7th and 9th districts. Popular incumbent Bart Stupak was unopposed in the Democratic primary. Conservative state Representative Tom Casperson, from Escanaba, won the Republican primary election over Linda Goldthorpe and Don Hooper. The Libertarian Party nominated Daniel Grow; the U.S. Taxpayers Party nominated
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    250
    United States House of Representatives elections in Tennessee, 2008

    United States House of Representatives elections in Tennessee, 2008

    • Part of general election: United States House elections, 2008
    • Contests: Tennessee’s 1st congressional district election, 2008
    The 2008 congressional elections in Tennessee were held on November 4, 2008 to determine who will represent the state of Tennessee in the United States House of Representatives. Tennessee has nine seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Representatives are elected for two-year terms; the elected served in the 111th Congress from January 4, 2009 until January 3, 2011. The election coincided with the 2008 U.S. presidential election. This district covers northeast Tennessee, including all of Carter, Cocke, Greene, Hamblen, Hancock, Hawkins, Johnson, Sullivan, Unicoi, and Washington counties and parts of Jefferson County and Sevier County. It has been represented by Republican David Davis since 2007. Johnson City mayor Roe narrowly defeated Davis in the Republican primary by a margin of 50% to 49% (only 500 votes). Davis was elected in 2006, succeeding retiring congressman Bill Jenkins, winning the Republican nomination over a crowded field which included Roe. Roe, a retired OB/GYN, was endorsed by several local newspapers, refused PAC and special interest money, and promised not to serve any more than ten years in Congress. He was a shoo-in for
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