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  • Nov 27th 2012
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Best Game of All Time

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Best Game of All Time is a public top list created by Listnerd on Rankly.com on November 27th 2012. Items on the Best Game of All Time top list are added by the Rankly.com community and ranked using our secret ranking sauce. Best Game of All Time has gotten 4.624 views and has gathered 618 votes from 617 voters. Only owner can add items. Just members can vote.

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    1
    13 Dead End Drive

    13 Dead End Drive

    13 Dead End Drive is a murder-themed board game from Milton Bradley. Released in 1993, it was followed in 2002 by a sequel, 1313 Dead End Drive. The story behind the game indicates the death of a wealthy old woman triggers feuding over her will. The players utilize traps located on the game board, which represents a mansion, to kill characters controlled by other players in order to claim the estate for themselves. At the start of gameplay, players are passed out "Character cards" which correspond to matching pawns on the board. Since there are 12 characters, it is often the case that players control more than one character. However, which player controls which character is not revealed. Along with the character cards, there are also Portrait Cards, which determine who the current favorite for the inheritance is, and Trap Cards, which are used to spring traps and knock off other players. During each turn, a player would roll two dice and move two pawns, one pawn for each die. It is legal for players to move a pawn that is not theirs in order to bring it closer to or onto a Trap Space. All pawns must be moved off the red chair spaces before any pawns can be moved a second time or
    8.86
    7 votes
    2
    Hand

    Hand

    Hand Solitaire is a solitaire game using one deck of playing cards, but it can be played in the hand, making it ideal when space is limited. The deck is held, face down, in the hand. One card at a time is flipped face up from the back of the deck. Once four cards are in play, the first and last card are of interest. If they are the same suit, the middle cards can be removed. If they are the same number, all four cards can be removed. Remove cards by placing them face up on the bottom of the deck. Continue playing by flipping over the last card from the back of the deck. Only the last four cards played can be used. The object of the game is to have 4 or less cards remaining in play. You should always end with an even number left, since you only remove an even number at a time. Note: When dealing the cards, flip them face up from the back of the deck, laying them on top of the previously dealt card. (The images show inserting the dealt card between the dealing deck and the up cards). It is much faster dealing this way and produces the same outcome, always looking at the top 4 cards of the face up cards.
    8.00
    7 votes
    3
    Liverpool Rummy

    Liverpool Rummy

    Liverpool Rummy is a multi-player, multi-round card game similar to other variants of rummy that adds features like buying and going out. It's the same as Contract Rummy, except that if a player manages to cut the exact number of cards required to deal the hand and leave a face-up card, then the cutting player's score is reduced by 50 points. The game is played with multiple (typically 2, for four to five players, 3 decks for more) standard 52-card packs of playing cards. The ranking from low-to-high is A-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10-J-Q-K-A. Aces can be low or high. Dealership rotates to each player from round to round. The dealer to the first round is usually determined by cutting the deck. Low card deals. The dealer deals a ten-card hand to each player. (In some circles, a 12-card hand is dealt, this variant is sometimes called Peruvian rummy) After all the players' hands have been dealt, another card (the upcard), is placed face-up in a central location known as the discard pile. The remainder of the pack is called the deck. The player to the immediate left of the dealer plays first. On each turn, a player: Play continues, in alternating turns, until one player goes out, or has no cards
    8.00
    7 votes
    4
    Candy Land

    Candy Land

    • Genre: Children's game
    Candy Land (also Candyland) is a simple racing board game. The game requires no reading and minimal counting skills, making it suitable for young children. Due to the design of the game, there is no strategy involved - players are never required to make choices, just follow directions. A "winner" is predetermined only by the shuffle of the cards. The race is woven around a storyline about finding the lost king of Candy Land. The board consists of a winding, linear track made of 134 spaces, most red, green, blue, yellow, orange or purple. The remaining pink spaces are named locations such as Candy Cane Forest and Gum Drop Mountain, or characters such as Queen Frostine and Gramma Nutt. Players take turns removing the top card from a stack, most of which show one of six colors, and then moving their marker ahead to the next space of that color. Some cards have two marks of a color, in which case the player moves his or her marker ahead to the second-next space of that color. The deck has one card for each named location, and drawing such a card moves a player directly to that board location. This move can be either forward or backward in the classic game; backward moves can be ignored
    7.29
    7 votes
    5
    Domino art

    Domino art

    • Genre: Tile-based game
    Domino art is the art of decorating domino tile. First the domino is sprayed with an acrylic paint. Once it has dried, it is stamped with a rubber stamp and then various colors of ink are applied. Some artists drill holes in them before spraying and wire wrap the finished piece.
    7.00
    7 votes
    6
    Biriba

    Biriba

    Biriba (Greek: Μπιρίμπα) is the Greek partnership version of a rummy card game of Italian origin called it:Pinnacola. The Greek name comes probably from the Italian game Biribara, or Biribisso, or Biribi, even if this game is totally different (more similar to the roulette). It is played by two to six players, with two decks and 4 Jokers comprising 108 cards. If 6 players play, one more deck and two 2 jokers more are added. Biriba can also be played by three players with or without partnership rules. While there are many variations of Biriba, the basic rules and objective are the same. The player to the right of the dealer shuffles the cards and his partner cuts the deck (the starting dealer is selected by a random draw, the lowest card winning the privilege to receive cards and play first.) Eleven cards are dealt to each player while two other sets of 11 cards are also dealt by one of the opponents and put face down to the side. These cards (two secondary 11-card hands) are called Paketa ("packages" or "parcels") or Biribakia (Greek for "small Biribas".) The objective of the game is to be the first player or team to surpass a pre-determined point total (commonly 2500 or 3000,
    10.00
    4 votes
    7
    Krutzjass

    Krutzjass

    Krutzjass is a Swiss German trick-taking card game in some ways similar to Contract bridge. The name, literally translated into English, is Cross-Game, a name derived from the fact that it is played between two teams or partnerships of two, where team members sit opposite each other, with an opponent on either side. There are many variants of the game, however, this article deals primarily with the double-deck variant. Unlike most card games, the variant of Krutzjass is not played with a 52 card deck. It is played with a 48 card deck, consisting of only 6 denominations: 9, 10, Jack, Queen, King and Ace. In the deck there are two cards of every denomination, so that, for example, it is possible to have 2 nines of spades in one's hand. Like Euchre and bridge, trump does appear in Krutzjass, and trump affects the relative power of certain cards. In a non-trump suit, Aces are high, with cards descending in power in the normal fashion. However, in trump, the hierarchy is as follows, from high to low: Jack, 9, Ace, King, Queen, 10. Also, in trump a 9 is referred to as a knell, and a Jack as a Bauer. Unlike in Euchre, there is no such thing as a left bauer. Furthermore, one should note
    7.50
    6 votes
    8
    Hive

    Hive

    • Genre: Tile-based game
    Hive is a bug-themed tabletop game, designed by John Yianni and published in 2001 by Gen42 Games. The object of Hive is to capture the opponent's queen bee by completely surrounding it, while avoiding the capture of one's own queen. Hive is an abstract strategy game. Hive shares elements of both tile-based games and board games. It differs from other tile-based games in that the tiles, once placed, can then be moved to other positions according to various rules, much like chess pieces. Thus, the game has mechanics comparable to an abstract strategy board game and is marketed in that genre. It does not fit the classical definition, however, as there is no gameboard involved; the pieces are simply placed on some relatively flat surface. The game uses hexagonal tiles to represent the various contents of the hive. The original two editions used wooden tiles with full-color insect illustrations on blue and silver stickers to represent the units, but the current third edition has been published using black and almond phenolic resin ("Bakelite") tiles with single-color painted etchings. There are 22 pieces in total making up a Hive set, with 11 pieces per player, each representing an
    6.43
    7 votes
    9
    Tarneeb

    Tarneeb

    Tarneeb (Arabic: طرنيب‎, literally meaning trump, translit: ṭarnīb, also spelled Tarnibe and Tarnib and called hakam Arabic: حكم‎ in the Persian gulf region, the Arabic word for "trump"), is a popular plain trick-taking card game played in various middle eastern countries, most notably in the countries of the Fertile Crescent and Tanzania. The game may be considered a variation of Whist. Tarneeb was probably inspired by many other Arabic card games, though many different nations throughout the Middle East claim that Tarneeb was created in their respective countries. Historically Tarneeb can be traced back to Bla'd Al Sham, more specifically Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, and Palestine, however the game seems to have truly flourished only from the early 18th century on. The aim of tarneeb is to win a set of continuous hands. There are four players in partnerships of two teams. A standard 52 card deck is used, each suit ranking in the usual way from Ace (high) down to two (low). The game is played in a counterclockwise fashion. The teams stay together for all the games of a set. In tarneeb tournament, at the end of a set, the losing team is replaced for the next set. The two members of each
    7.33
    6 votes
    10
    3B/RTR Spades

    3B/RTR Spades

    Spades was invented in the United States of America in the 1930s and is played quite widely in North America. 3B/RTR Spades was invented at Bell Laboratories in Lisle Illinois in the 1980s. Number of Players: Three to five; each game is slightly different and referred to as "the 3 handed game", "the 4 handed game" , and "the 5 handed game". The Deck: Standard 52 card deck for three handed. Add a JOKER to make it 53 when playing 4 handed or 5 handed. Rank of Suit: Spade always trump. Other suits have no intrinsic value. Rank of cards:A (high), K, Q, J, 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, A (low). Note: The Aces can be called high or low ONLY in the 4 and 5 handed game. With 17 cards the 3 handed game does not need the added complexity of the high/low Aces. When using the JOKER (4 and 5 handed version) it is alway the highest spade. The Extra Card Object of the game:Not to lose and become the TRAY-PERSON. To accumulate the most points; points are accrued by winning at least the number of tricks bid in each hand. There is a variation where the object is not to lose - the loser having an amusing penalty. Player to the left of the dealer plays the first card of the first trick and play goes
    7.00
    6 votes
    11
    Fitchneal

    Fitchneal

    Fitchneal (also Fidchell, Fithchill or Finchnell) is an Irish game from the Middle Ages. It is descended from the Norse game Hnefatafl. Its rules are the same as those described on Hnefatafl#Reconstruction
    8.00
    5 votes
    12
    Windmill

    Windmill

    Windmill is a solitaire card game played with two decks of playing cards. It is so called because the initial layout resembles a windmill's sails. First, an ace is placed at the center. Then eight cards are placed around in such a way that the layout looks like a cross. The ace forms the primary foundation and the eight cards form the reserve. The gaps at the corner of the "sails" are reserved for kings and form the secondary foundations. The suits of the kings to be placed on the secondary foundations are disregarded. The object of the game is to build the primary foundation up to king with 52 cards in it and the secondary foundations down to ace with 13 cards each in them. All foundations are built regardless of suit. The illustration below shows how the tableau is initially laid out. (A) is for the primary foundation, R for the reserve (8 free cells) and (K) for the secondary foundations, empty at first. Game starts by moving cards from the reserve to either the primary foundation or if available, either one of the secondary foundations. Gaps at the reserve can be filled by cards from the wastepile, or if the empty, from the stock. If no more moves are possible from the reserve,
    8.00
    5 votes
    13
    Acquire

    Acquire

    • Publisher: Avalon Hill
    • Genre: German-style
    Acquire is a board game designed by Sid Sackson. The game was originally published in 1962 by 3M as a part of their bookshelf games series. In most versions, the theme of the game is investing in hotel chains. In the 1990s Hasbro edition, the hotel chains were replaced by generic corporations, though the actual gameplay was unchanged. The game is currently published by Hasbro under the Avalon Hill brand, and the companies are once again hotel chains. The object of the game is to earn the most money by developing and merging hotel chains. When a chain in which a player owns stock is acquired by a larger chain, players earn money based on the size of the acquired chain. At the end of the game, all players liquidate their stock in order to determine which player has the most money. The components of the game have varied over the years. In particular, the tiles have been made from wood, plastic, and cardboard in various editions of the game. In the current 2008 version, the tiles are cardboard. The following components are included in all versions: The array on the game board is arranged with lettered rows (A through I) and numbered columns (1 through 12). The 108 tiles correspond to
    6.83
    6 votes
    14
    Parcheesi

    Parcheesi

    • Genre: Cross and Circle game
    Parcheesi is a brand name American adaptation of the Indian Cross and Circle game Pachisi. Created in India perhaps as early as 500 AD, the board game is subtitled Royal Game of India because royalty played using color-costumed members of their harems as pieces on large outdoor boards. Such a court is preserved at Fatehpur Sikri (image at right). The game and its variants are known worldwide; for example, a similar game called Parchís is especially popular in Spain, and Parqués is a Colombian variant. A version is available in the United Kingdom under the name of Ludo. Parcheesi is played with one or two dice and the goal of the game is to move each of one's pieces home to the center space. The most popular Parcheesi boards in America have 72 spaces around the board, twelve of which are darkened safe spaces where a piece cannot be captured. Each player selects four pieces of the same color and places them in their "nest," or starting area. The board game should be positioned so that each player's nest is to his right. Pieces enter play onto the darkened space to the left of the nest and continue counter-clockwise around the board to the home path directly in front of the
    6.83
    6 votes
    15
    Horserace

    Horserace

    Horserace is a qualitydrinking game for all the family. Using playing cards that is inspired by horse racing. Participants bet amounts of alcohol on one of four aces, much like bettors would bet money on horses at a racing track. The horseracing game requires active participation by only one person: the announcer. The announcer should preferably be an exciting narrator. The announcer prepares the field by searching through the deck, taking out the ace (horse) of each suit, and laying them face-up and side-by-side at one end of the table (this is "the gates"). He then shuffles the deck and lays out a variable number of cards face-down (these form the "links" of the race) in a straight line perpendicular to the row of aces. A typical race has from six to eight links. The cards thus appear to form an "L" or the two legs of a right triangle. The field is now set. Before the game begins, each player makes bets based on their favorite horse. Bets are generally as simple as "five on diamonds" but can get as complex as any true horse race. Announcers may choose to allow such exotic bets as Trifectas, Exactas, Daily Doubles, etc. In another variation, players may simply pick their favorite
    7.80
    5 votes
    16
    Scotland Yard

    Scotland Yard

    • Genre: Cooperative board game
    Scotland Yard is a board game in which a team of players, as police, cooperate to track down a player controlling a criminal around a board representing the streets of London. It is named after Scotland Yard, the headquarters of London's Metropolitan Police Service. Scotland Yard is an asymmetric board game, with the detective players cooperatively solving a variant of the pursuit-evasion problem. The game is published by Milton Bradley in the United States and Ravensburger in Canada and much of Europe. It received the Spiel des Jahres (Game of the Year) award in 1983. A sequel to Scotland Yard was released called "Mister X". One player controls "Mr. X", a criminal whose location is only revealed periodically, and the other players each control a detective, which is always present on the board. All players start with a number of tokens allowing them a certain number of moves using the following methods: Each player (Mr. X and the detectives) draws one of 18 possible cards which show where a player has to start. The places are divided well enough so that Mr.X won't be caught in the first round of players moving. Each detective begins with a total of 22 tokens. Once each transport
    6.67
    6 votes
    17
    Brain Chain

    Brain Chain

    • Genre: Party game
    Brain Chain is a strategy-driven trivia board game played by two or three players or teams. The object is to be the first player or team to connect an unbroken row of six "links" horizontally, vertically, or diagonally. The game is played on a 10x10 category grid surrounded by an exterior track. Brain Chain has been described as Trivial Pursuit with a Go-Moku win mechanic plus a dash of Pueblo added in. Brain Chain was designed by Alicia Vaz and Scot Blackburn, who are Los Angeles attorneys, and Kris Harter, a graduate of Pacific Union College and a teacher at Loma Linda Academy. Roy Ice designed all of the graphics on the gameboard and box. Brigit Warner edited all of the trivia questions. Brain Chain is currently owned and distributed by Brain Chain Games, Inc. Games Magazine has named Brain Chain a Top 100 Game. Before play begins, the players agree on the number of links necessary to win the game. A game of Brain Chain takes approximately 30 minutes if the goal is four links in a row, an hour if the goal is five links, or 90 minutes if the winning condition is a six-link chain. Each turn begins with the playing of one movement card and as many Brain Pills as the player wishes
    7.60
    5 votes
    18
    Decade

    Decade

    Decade also known by the name of Ten-Twenty-Thirty is a Patience game played with a traditional 52 card deck that is akin to another solitaire game called Accordion. Like Accordion, it is traditionally played with the cards in a line. Because of its minimal use of space, it can also be played in one hand by placing the deck face down in the hand, and placing the line in a stack on top of the deck, with the discard pile face up on the bottom (as seen in picture to right). Taking a standard 52-card deck of playing cards (without Jokers), three cards are drawn from the bottom of the deck and placed face up in a line on the table laid out in the order they were drawn so the faces can be read. Spot cards (cards from ace, deuce, etc. to ten) have their face value while face cards (jack, queen, and king) are valued at ten points. If the total of at least two consecutive cards in the line equals 10, 20, or 30, they are discarded. The cards are treated as if in a straight line, so cards coming from both the front and back of the line that value to ten, twenty, or thirty are not considered consecutive unless they occupy a physically adjacent position to the card. After this has been repeated
    7.60
    5 votes
    19
    Poker

    Poker

    • Genre: Card game
    Poker is a family of card games involving betting and individualistic play whereby the winner is determined by the ranks and combinations of their cards, some of which remain hidden until the end of the game. Poker games vary in the number of cards dealt, the number of shared or "community" cards and the number of cards that remain hidden. The betting procedures vary among different poker games in such ways as betting limits and splitting the pot between a high hand and a low hand. In most modern poker games, the first round of betting begins with one of the players making some form of forced bet (the ante). In standard poker, each player is betting that the hand he has will be the highest ranked. The action then proceeds clockwise around the table and each player in turn must either match the maximum previous bet or fold, losing the amount bet so far and all further interest in the hand. A player who matches a bet may also "raise," or increase the bet. The betting round ends when all players have either matched the last bet or folded. If all but one player fold on any round, then the remaining player collects the pot and may choose to show or conceal their hand. If more than one
    8.50
    4 votes
    20
    Whist

    Whist

    • Genre: Trick-taking game
    Whist is a classic English trick-taking card game which was played widely in the 18th and 19th centuries. It derives from the 16th century game of trump or ruff, via Ruff and Honours. Although the rules are extremely simple, there is enormous scope for scientific play. Originating in the early 17th century, the now obsolete adjective whist and variant spelling wist (in which the word wistful has its roots), meant quiet, silent, and/or attentive. The adverb wistly is also defined as meaning intently. In its heyday a large amount of literature about how to play whist was written. Edmond Hoyle, of "According to Hoyle" fame, wrote an early popular and definitive textbook, A Short Treatise on the Game of Whist. It is important to note that this game, called "French ruff" by Charles Cotton, is similar to écarté. English ruff-and-honours, also described by Cotton, is similar to whist. If we admit that ruff and trump are convertible terms, of which there is scarcely a doubt, the game of trump was the precursor of whist. A purely English origin may, therefore, be claimed for trump (not la triomphe). No record is known to exist of the invention of this game, nor of the mode of its growth
    8.50
    4 votes
    21
    Proroctví

    Proroctví

    Proroctví (literally Prophecy) is a Czech fantasy board game published by Altar Games. The game is for 2 to 5 players and lasts 3 to 5 hours. Each player plays a mighty hero fighting with monsters and other enemies with weapons and magic and tries to build and strengthen his character. A player wins if he collects at least 4 out of 5 artefacts, which can be obtained by defeating very powerful monsters who guard them. Before a player dares to fight them, he must improve his character in some or all of the following aspects: Two extensions to this game have been published so far: "Dragon's realm" and "Water realm" (Czech: Dračí říše, Vodní říše). The game is played on the original game plan, but some of the artefacts can be gained only in another world (Dragon's realm or Water realm) where the hero can get teleported.
    6.17
    6 votes
    22
    Chutes and Ladders

    Chutes and Ladders

    • Genre: Roll and move
    Snakes and Ladders (or Chutes and Ladders) is an ancient Indian board game regarded today as a worldwide classic. It is played between two or more players on a gameboard having numbered, gridded squares. A number of "ladders" and "snakes" (or "chutes") are pictured on the board, each connecting two specific board squares. The object of the game is to navigate one's game piece from the start (bottom square) to the finish (top square), helped or hindered by ladders and snakes, respectively. The historic version had root in morality lessons, where a player's progression up the board represented a life journey complicated by virtues (ladders) and vices (snakes). The game is a simple race contest lacking a skill component, and is popular with young children. The size of the grid (most commonly 8×8, 10×10, or 12×12) varies from board to board, as does the exact arrangement of the snakes and ladders, with both factors affecting the duration of play. Random dice rolls determine game piece movement in the traditional form of play. Snakes and Ladders originated in India as part of a family of dice board games, including pachisi (present-day Ludo). It was known as moksha pAtam or
    7.00
    5 votes
    23
    Écarté

    Écarté

    • Genre: Trick-taking game
    Écarté is a two-player card game originating from France, the word literally meaning "discarded". It is a trick-taking game, similar to whist, but with a special and eponymous discarding phase. It is closely related to Euchre, a card game played mainly in the United States. Écarté was popular in the 19th century, but is now rarely played. All cards from two to six are removed from a 52-card pack, to produce the Piquet pack of thirty-two cards, which rank from the lowest 7, 8, 9, 10, ace, knave, queen, to king high. Note that the ace ranks between ten and knave, making the king the highest card. The players cut to determine the dealer, who deals five cards each in packets of two and three, or three and two, either to whim or some agreement. The eleventh card is dealt face up to determine the trump suit. If this card is a king, the dealer can immediately mark an extra point for himself. The elder hand (the player opposite the dealer) is then entitled, if desired, to begin the exchange -- a crucial part of the game. This involves discarding cards in order to improve their hand with fresh cards from the remaining pack. To make an exchange, the elder hand must make a proposal to the
    7.00
    5 votes
    24
    El Grande

    El Grande

    • Designer: Wolfgang Kramer
    • Publisher: Hans im Glück
    El Grande is a German-style board game for 2-5 players, designed by Wolfgang Kramer and Richard Ulrich, and published in 1995 by Hans im Glück in German, by Rio Grande Games in English, and by 999 Games in Dutch. The game board represents renaissance-era Spain where the nobility (the Grandes) fight for control of the nine regions. El Grande was awarded the Spiel des Jahres prize and the Deutscher Spiele Preis in 1996. The game is played in nine rounds. Three of these (rounds 3, 6, and 9) are scoring rounds, when player scores are counted according to their positions within the various regions. When the game is played with two players, it can be rather fast-paced. If five players participate, the game becomes very complex and challenging, as it becomes almost impossible to "do the mathematics" on the regions, and players team up and compete to keep others from winning, or to score more points for themselves. There are no dice in the game, and players have many chances to influence the turn order. Thus the game is all about decisions. Often the path to scoring more points is clear, but sometimes it can be wiser to prevent opponents from scoring. Since the game is played without dice,
    7.00
    5 votes
    25
    Stalactites

    Stalactites

    Stalactites is a solitaire card game which uses a deck of 52 playing cards. The game is similar to Freecell, but it is different because of the way building onto the foundations and the tableau. The player deals four cards from the deck. These four cards form the foundations. They are turned sideways (although it is not necessary to do so). The rest of the cards are dealt into eight columns of six cards each on the tableau. These cards can only be built up on the foundations regardless of suit and they cannot be built on each other. Before the game starts, the player can decide on how the foundations should be built. Building can be either in ones (A-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10-J-Q-K) or in twos (A-3-5-7-9-J-K-2-4-6-8-10-Q). Once the player makes up his mind, he begins building on the foundations from the cards on the tableau. The foundations are built, as already mentioned, up regardless of suit, and it goes round the corner, building from King to Ace (if building by ones) or from Queen to Ace (if building by twos) if necessary. The foundation cards turned sideways, though not necessarily be done, is a reminder of the last card's rank on each foundation. The cards in the tableau should be
    7.00
    5 votes
    26
    Auf Achse

    Auf Achse

    Auf Achse (literally on the axle; figuratively on the road) is a logistics-themed board game designed by Wolfgang Kramer and published in 1987 by FX Schmid. The game won the Spiel des Jahres award. In 1992, a junior edition was released; and in 1994 a rummy-like card game spinoff was released. In 2007 a revised edition was published by Schmidt Spiele.
    9.33
    3 votes
    27
    Knock-out Whist

    Knock-out Whist

    Knock-out Whist is a member of the Whist family known by a variety of names including Trumps in Britain, Reduction Whist, Diminishing Whist (from the way one less card is dealt each hand) and Rat. It is often simply called Whist by players who are unfamiliar with the game properly called Whist. It is a basic trick-taking game and is a good way to teach the concept of "tricks" to children. The ultimate object of Knockout Whist is to be the last player still "standing" at the end of the game, with the object in each round being to win a majority of tricks.. A standard 52 card pack is used. The cards in each suit rank from highest to lowest: A K Q J 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2. The game may be played by two to seven players. For the first deal the dealer deals seven cards to each player and one card is turned up to indicate that its suit is the trump suit for the first round. (In subsequent rounds, the winner of the previous round selects the trump suit). The player to the dealer's left leads to the first trick; any card may be led. The other players, in clockwise order, each play a card to the trick and must follow suit by playing a card of the suit led if they have one. A player with no
    9.33
    3 votes
    28
    Polarity

    Polarity

    Polarity is a board game that requires strategic thinking and dexterity to control hovering magnetic discs. Polarity was invented in 1985 by Canadian artist and designer Douglas Seaton. It was first published in 1986. The game has had a tumultuous past, with its rights changing hands several times over the past 2 decades. The game has been published by Telemotion Technologies, Irwin Toy, briefly with Mattel and most recently by Temple Games. The game ships in a canvas sleeve and include the magnets, the board, and a paper rulebook. An unrelated game of the same name is published by a company called Mindwalk (Company). The purpose of the game is to gain points by forming towers of discs. The playing pieces are magnets shaped like discs, with one side white and the other black, north and south respectively. They are identical with the exception of a neutral central disc which is coloured red. Play starts with one player tossing the central red disc in order to determine which player plays with which colour/magnetic polarity. Each player then lays 5 'foundation discs' of their colour starting with the white player. Each disc can be placed on the playing area with no limitation other
    9.33
    3 votes
    29
    Bid whist

    Bid whist

    Bid whist is a partnership trick-taking variant of the classic card game whist. As indicated by the name, bid whist adds a bidding element to the game that is not present in classic whist. It is generally accepted that the game of bridge came from the game of whist. Bid whist, along with spades, remains popular particularly in US military culture and a tradition in African-American culture with probable roots in the period of slavery in the United States. The general play of bid whist is similar to that of whist, with four notable exceptions. In whist, the trump suit for a given hand is determined at random by the last card dealt, whereas in bid whist, the trump suit (or whether there will even be a trump suit) for a given hand is determined by the outcome of the bidding process. Secondly, whether a trick is won by the higher-ranking card of the winning suit, or by the lower-ranking card of that suit is also determined by the outcome of the bidding process. Thirdly, whether the ace is the highest-ranking card of the suit or the lowest-ranking card can change from hand to hand, depending on whether higher-ranking cards or lower-ranking cards win in that hand. And lastly, the scoring
    6.80
    5 votes
    30
    Kill Doctor Lucky

    Kill Doctor Lucky

    • Designer: James Ernest
    • Publisher: Titanic Games
    Kill Doctor Lucky is a humorous board game designed by James Ernest and released in 1996 by Cheapass Games. In 1998, Kill Doctor Lucky won the Origins Award for Best Abstract Board Game of 1997. Kill Doctor Lucky is, in concept, a sort of inversion and perhaps a parody of Cluedo (Clue in North America). Both games are set in a sprawling mansion full of colorfully named rooms and a variety of dangerous weapons and deal with the murder of the mansion's owner. Cluedo begins after the murder has been committed, and players compete to solve it, but Kill Doctor Lucky ends when the murder is committed, and players compete to commit it. The gameboard is a floor plan of Doctor Lucky's mansion, and it is accompanied by a deck of cards representing the objects and opportunities that can be found there. Players take turns moving through the rooms of the mansion and accumulating cards, while Doctor Lucky moves through the mansion following a predetermined path. A player may attempt to kill Doctor Lucky by playing a weapon card (such as a runcible spoon, a monkey hand, a letter opener, or pinking shears) while the player's token is in the same room as Doctor Lucky and out of sight of all other
    6.80
    5 votes
    31
    Nertz

    Nertz

    Nertz is a fast-paced, real-time, multiplayer card game involving multiple decks of playing cards. It is often described as a combination of the card games Speed and Solitaire. Nertz is known by a number of different names, although the name "Nertz" appears to be the most recognized. Pounce, Nerts, and Peanuts are alternate names that are often common substitutes when referring to the game of Nertz. According to the National Nertz Association (U.S.), there is not a known inventor or a specific date of creation for the game of Nertz. The NNA also claims that this game has been around since the 1940s. Canfield, a card game similar in set-up to Nertz, was created in the 1890s and seems to be the closest relative in the family tree of cards games. In fact, if one were to attempt to play Nertz alone, one would essentially be playing Canfield, a variant of Klondike Solitaire or Patience. What makes Nertz different from Solitaire (aside from the fact that it is not played alone) or any other card game for that matter is the fact that players have the option to play cards communally, in real-time, using multiple decks of playing cards. The object in a hand of Nertz is to be the first
    9.00
    3 votes
    32
    Setback

    Setback

    Setback, also known as Pitch, is a trick-taking card game somewhat similar to Spades. It is generally played by four individual players, however there are variations in which 8 may play, sometimes in teams of 2 or 4 players. The object of Setback is to accumulate a predefined number of points, typically 11, 15 or 21, over the course of several hands. The trump suit, determined by the highest bidder, is the highest suit. All other suits are equal. It is played with a single standard deck of playing cards. The rank order is A-K-Q-J-10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2. The starting dealer is selected by whatever means seems appropriate at the time, and continues clockwise from that point on. Six cards are dealt to each player, typically in groups of 2 or 3, face down and starting to the dealer's left. A variation from rural West Virginia has an extra hand dealt face down, which is called "the widows." The player who wins the auction gets to add the widow to his or her hand and then discards six cards to bring the hand back to six cards. The player who has the widow does not get to draw any more cards than are contained in the original hand plus the widow, minus the six discards. The Player then
    9.00
    3 votes
    33
    Flower Garden

    Flower Garden

    Flower Garden is a solitaire card game using a deck of 52 playing cards. It is not known why the game is called such, but the terms used in this game do have a relation to those in gardening and it takes merit that some skill is needed. It is also known under the names The Bouquet and The Garden. Thirty-six cards are dealt in to six columns, each containing six cards. The columns are called the "flower beds" and the entire tableau is sometimes called "the garden." The sixteen leftover cards become the reserve, or "the bouquet." The top cards of each flower-bed and all of the cards in the bouquet are available for play. Cards can only be moved one at a time and can be built either on the foundations or on the other flower beds. The foundations are built up by suit, from Ace to King (a general idea of the game is to release the aces first). The cards in the garden, on the other hand, can be built down regardless of suit and any empty flower bed can be filled with any card. The cards in the bouquet can be used to aid in building, be put into the foundations, or fill an empty flower bed. The game is won when all cards end up in the foundations.
    7.75
    4 votes
    34
    Battle Masters

    Battle Masters

    • Genre: Board game
    Battle Masters is a board game by Milton Bradley made in collaboration with Games Workshop in 1992. It is a game that simulates the type of battles as seen in Warhammer Fantasy Battle, but with much simpler game mechanics not based on its parent game. The game, like its sibling Milton Bradley/Games Workshop partnerships HeroQuest and Space Crusade, was designed by Stephen Baker, who later went on to design the popular game Heroscape. In Germany it is called Die Claymore-Saga, in France Seigneurs de guerre and in the Netherlands Ridderstrijd. Battle Masters focuses on a battle between the forces of good, or The Empire, against the forces of evil, or Chaos, which is a combined army including forces from the Chaos and Orcs and Goblins armies of the Warhammer Fantasy setting including creatures such as Ogres. The game is played on a large vinyl mat which is painted to look like a battle field with large, almost 8 inch, hexes superimposed on it. A large number of plastic miniatures included in the game are similar in size and style to the Warhammer miniatures produced by Games Workshop. However, instead of individual bases they are designed to be mounted on unit bases of 5 infantry or 3
    5.83
    6 votes
    35
    Amazing Labyrinth

    Amazing Labyrinth

    Labyrinth is a board game for one to four players, published by Ravensburger in 1986 simultaneously with the film Labyrinth. The game board forms a maze built of both fixed and moving pieces. The players rearrange the maze to their advantage by moving a row of pieces in turn. Each player has one token, which they move in the maze. The player's goal is to collect treasures in the labyrinth and then return to their own starting position. The treasures appear in the cards that are dealt to the players in the beginning of the game. The player is allowed to see only the card that shows his current destination. The player has to reveal the card when he has reached the destination, and take a new card from his pile. The other players notice when the pile is empty, and then usually try to prevent the leading player from returning to the starting position. Advanced players also try to guess other players' destinations in order to make their proceeding more difficult or try to trap them in dead ends. The game was designed by the German psychologist Max Kobbert and published by Ravensburger under the name "Das verrückte Labyrinth", which is a pun on the German words "verrücken" (displace) and
    6.60
    5 votes
    36
    PÜNCT

    PÜNCT

    • Designer: Kris Burm
    • Publisher: Rio Grande Games
    PÜNCT is a two-player strategy board game. It is the sixth (and final) release in the GIPF project of six abstract strategy games, although it is considered the fifth game in the project. It was released in 2005. PÜNCT won the Games Magazine Best Abstract Strategy game for 2007. PÜNCT is a connection game. The objective is to connect two sides of a hexagonal board, using pieces which cover three hexes each. The pieces can be placed, moved, rotated, and stacked in various ways, restricted by the geometry of the board, the shape of the pieces, and gravity.
    6.60
    5 votes
    37
    Snip Snap Snorem

    Snip Snap Snorem

    Snip Snap Snorem, or Snip Snap Snorum, is a matching-type card game heading a range of children's games which certainly go back to the 18th century and probably derive from a more ancient and bibulous gambling game. Almost identical is the German game of Schipp-Schnapp-Schnurr-Burr-Basilorum, except that Kings are not stops but are followed by Ace, two, et cetera. There are several methods of playing the game, but in the most common a full whist pack is used and any number of players may take part. The pack is dealt, one card at a time, and the eldest hand places upon the table any card he likes. Each player in his turn then tries to match the card played just before his, making use of a prescribed formula if successful. Thus, if a King is played, the second player lays down another king (if he can) calling out "Snip!" The next player lays down the third King, saying "Snap!" and the next the fourth King with the word "Snorem." A player not being able to pair the card played may not discard, and the holder of Snorem has the privilege of beginning the next round. The player who gets rid of all his cards first wins a counter from his companions for each card still held by them. Earl
    5.67
    6 votes
    38
    Elfenland

    Elfenland

    • Designer: Alan R. Moon
    • Publisher: Rio Grande Games
    • Genre: Fantasy
    Elfenland is a German-style board game designed by Alan R. Moon and published by Amigo Spiele in German and Rio Grande Games in English in 1998. It is originally based on his earlier game Elfenroads (published by White Wind), but since Elfenroads took about four hours for a game, the play was simplified to reduce the time closer to an hour, making it appeal more as a family game. It won the Spiel des Jahres award in 1998 and won the third place Deutscher Spiele Preis award in 1998. The game is played by 2–6 players, with 4–5 making for the best game. Each player tries to reach as many cities as possible and then return to his "home city." Home cities are drawn at the beginning of the game from a pack of city cards and they remain hidden throughout the game. The game is thus reminiscent of the traveling salesman problem. Players move using transportation cards. Elves can travel on a wide variety of vehicles including troll wagons, elf cycles, rafts, giant pigs, unicorns, dragons and magic clouds. Different types of transportation will travel better over different terrain, and some methods of transport cannot cross certain terrains at all. There is only one problem: you cannot travel
    7.50
    4 votes
    39
    GiftTRAP

    GiftTRAP

    • Genre: Party game
    Gift Trap is an indie party board game, invented by Nick Kellet (based on an idea inspired by his eldest daughter in 2004). Gift Trap is billed as "The hilarious gift-exchange party game". Gift Trap relies on the players' personal knowledge of each other. Madhouse Creative created the packaging and brand identity for the game. Images used for the gift cards in the game were licensed using a Creative Commons Attribution license; Crowdsourcing was used to collect images for use in the game via both a photo contest and through the use of online websites such as Flickr.com. Winners received a free copy of the game along with having their names included in the game. Gift Trap was released in mid 2006. It won a MAJOR Fun Party Award from Bernie DeKoven in September 2006, and was featured on CBC Venture's show Dreamers & Schemers in December 2006. Reviews by Tom Vasel, Bruno Faidutti, Scott Nicholson and Greg Schloesser helped create early awareness for Gift Trap in the run up to its first holiday season. Gift Trap donated one copy to the charity Right To Play for every ten copies sold from the first production run of 10,000 games. In 2007 "Gift Trap" won party game of the year in France
    7.50
    4 votes
    40
    Precedence

    Precedence

    Precedence (also known as Order of Precedence) is a solitaire card game which uses two decks of playing cards. It is a building game where the playing does not have to worry about a tableau or playing area. In the book 100 Solitaire Games by Sloane Lee and Gabriel Packard, it is known under the name Downing Street. At the start of the game, a king is removed from the rest of the deck and placed on the first of eight foundations. (Some rule sets state that as the cards are deal, the first King that becomes available is placed on the first foundation.) After that, the following cards must be placed on the next seven foundations: a queen, a jack, a 10, a 9, an 8, a 7, and a 6. These cards should be placed on their respective foundations in this order and a foundation should not start until the foundation to its immediate left does. So the fourth foundation (which starts with a 10) for instance should not start unless the third one (which starts with a jack) is already in place. Also, when one foundation is already been started, it can immediately be built down regardless of suit until it has thirteen cards. (It is suggested that it should overlap to keep track on which card should end
    7.50
    4 votes
    41
    Talisman

    Talisman

    • Designer: Robert J. Harris
    • Publisher: Games Workshop
    • Genre: Adventure board game
    Talisman: The Magical Quest Game is a fantasy themed adventure board game for two to six players, originally designed and produced by Games Workshop and now published by Fantasy Flight Games. The game was first released in 1983 and has gone through several revisions. While the most recent revision is the revised Fourth Edition (2008), the Second Edition was available longer than and is more popular than the Third Edition. The older versions of Talisman are out of print. The Third Edition and some of the Expansion Sets are loosely connected to Games Workshop's Warhammer Fantasy setting. The Revised Fourth Edition is currently available. The game was created by Robert Harris who thought it up for the amusement of himself and his friends. In its original inception, the game's objective was to become prefect of a boy's school. Changing the theme to fantasy, he found a publisher in the form of Games Workshop and agreed a contract for royalties (Games Workshop would later buy out his remaining interest sometime after the introduction of the Third Edition). The game was renamed "Talisman" and it was shown at Games Day 1983. The second edition of Talisman was nearly identical to the first
    7.50
    4 votes
    42
    Caylus

    Caylus

    • Designer: William Attia
    • Publisher: Rio Grande Games
    • Genre: Economic simulation
    Caylus is a strategy oriented, German-style board game designed by William Attia and independently published in 2005 by Ystari in France and England, and Rio Grande Games in North America. Caylus has a mix of building, producing, planning, and bargaining — without direct conflict or dice-rolling mechanics. An iOS version of Caylus that can be played on the iPhone and iPad was launched on January 16, 2012. A card-game version, Caylus Magna Carta, was published in 2007, as well as a limited premium version of the game, with redesigned medieval-styled artwork and metallic coins. The goal of Caylus is to amass the most prestige points by constructing buildings and by working on the castle of Caylus in medieval France. Caylus does not include the random elements found in many board games, such as cards and dice. The only exceptions to this are the placement of the six neutral buildings and the starting turn order, both of which are determined randomly at the beginning of the game. The basic mechanics of the game include: A turn in Caylus consists of 8 phases: The player who is at the top of the turn order starts the next turn. The game ends when the bailiff reaches the Tower scoring
    8.67
    3 votes
    43
    Doppelkopf

    Doppelkopf

    Doppelkopf (German, lit. double-head), also abbreviated to "Doko," is a trick-taking card game for four players. The origins of this game are not well known; it is assumed that it originated from the game Schafkopf. In Germany, Doppelkopf is nearly as popular as Skat, especially in Northern Germany and the Rhein-Main Region. Schafkopf however is still the preferred trick-taking variant in Bavaria. Unlike in Skat, there are numerous variants. Although the Deutscher Doppelkopf-Verband developed standard rules for tournaments, informal games often play many variants and players adopt their own house rules. Before playing with a new group of players, it is therefore advisable to agree on a specific set of rules before their first game. Note: In the following section, the most common rules are described. Doppelkopf is a team game where each team normally consists of two players. The most distinguishing feature of the game is that the actual pairing is not known from the start, which is what makes the game interesting for most players. The deck of cards consists of either 48 or 40 cards: Each group of 8 cards consists of 2 cards from each suit: Diamonds, Hearts, Spades and Clubs. Each
    8.67
    3 votes
    44
    Osmosis

    Osmosis

    Osmosis (also known as Treasure Trove) is a solitaire game played with a deck of 52 playing cards where the object, like many solitaire games, is to put the cards into foundations, although not in numerical order. Game play consists of four, vertically arranged reserve piles of four cards each (one face-up card on top of three face-down cards). A seventeenth card is put in the first (top) of four foundations, which are also arranged vertically to the right of the reserve piles. Cards with the same suit as this card must be moved to this foundation. The other three foundations are also built by suit, but must begin with cards of the same rank as the first card of the top foundation (the 17th card previously mentioned). Foundation piles are fanned from left to right. All undealt cards make up the stock. To begin, the top cards in each reserve pile are the only cards in play and must be moved to the foundations if possible. A card can be moved to a foundation if a card of the same value has already been placed in the foundation above it. Once all possible cards have been placed in the foundations, the next face-down cards remaining in the reserve piles are turned face-up. When placing
    8.67
    3 votes
    45
    War

    War

    War is a card game typically involving two players. It uses a standard French playing card deck. Due to its simplicity, it is played most often by children. The deck is divided evenly among the two players, giving each a down stack. In unison, each player reveals the top card on his deck (a "battle"), and the player with the higher card takes both the cards played and moves them to the bottom of his stack. If the two cards played are of equal value, each player lays down three face-down cards and picks one of the cards out of the three (a "war"), and the higher-valued card wins all of the cards on the table, which are then added to the bottom of the player's stack. If one of the players has no more cards in a battle that player wins that battle. In the case of another tie, the war process is repeated until there is no tie. The face value of each cards is as follows: Ace=14 King=13 Queen=12 Jack=11 2 through 10=Same as number on card (10=10, etc.) A player wins by collecting all the cards. If a player runs out of cards while dealing the face-down cards of a war, he may play the last card in his deck as his face-up card and still have a chance to stay in the game. When the cards are
    10.00
    2 votes
    46
    Pedro

    Pedro

    Pedro (pronounced "peedro") is an American trick-taking card game of the All Fours family based on Auction Pitch. Its most popular variant is known as Cinch, Double Pedro or High Five. Developed in Denver, Colorado in the 1880s, it was soon regarded as the most important member of the All Fours family. Although it went out of fashion with the rise of Auction Bridge, it is still widely played at the western coast of the United States and in its southern states, being the dominant game in some locations in Louisiana. Forms of the game have been reported from Nicaragua, the Azores, Italy and Finland. The game is primarily played by 4 players in fixed partnerships, but can also be played by 2–6 individual players. Pedro uses a regular pack of 52 cards, but some variants add a Joker. The game is considerably simplified when compared to Pitch, in that all points are awarded to the winners of the tricks containing certain specific cards. This includes the Game point, which goes to the winner of the trump Ten. The winner of the Pedro (Five of trumps) receives 5 points. In Cinch or Double Pedro the same holds for the Left Pedro (Off-Five), which counts as a trump. The practice of making
    6.40
    5 votes
    47
    Rumino

    Rumino

    Rumino, rumina, is a powerful and intense knock rummy card game of Italian origin played up to 6 players in which players try to form sets or sequences of cards. It may possibly have been devised in American during the 40's by Italian immigrants by adapting the game Scala Quaranta to Gin rummy. It is usually played for small stakes Two 52-card decks are used plus four Jokers comprising 108 cards. The aim of the game is to push the players over 100 points and keep a score low. All players draws a card from the deck, and the high card determines the dealer. Subsequent deals are passed to the left. Each player is dealt 7 cards, and the remaining stock pile is spread on the table. The top card of the deck is then turned face up to start the discard pile, and the player to the left of the dealer draws the top card from the stock pile or discard pile to make combinations of three or four-card "lays", e.g. Three of a kind, Four of a kind, a three straight flush or a four card straight flush. Aces can only be played Low and Jokers are wild. After a card is drawn, one must be discarded, and the next player to the left has the option of drawing either the top discard or top stock card, then
    6.40
    5 votes
    48
    Kingdoms

    Kingdoms

    • Designer: Reiner Knizia
    • Publisher: Fantasy Flight Games
    Kingdoms is a German-style board game for 2-4 players designed by Reiner Knizia and released in 2002 by Fantasy Flight. The game is based on Knizia's original German game Auf Heller und Pfennig, but has been given a Medieval Fantasy theme. In 2003, Kingdoms won the Origins Award for Best Abstract Board Game of 2002. Players take turns drawing tiles from a stack and laying them on an orthogonal grid, representing a kingdom being settled. Tiles can be either resources (with value +1 to +6) or hazards (-1 to -6). The sum of all tile values on a row or column determines the score for that row or column. A special case is the mountain tile, which splits the row and column it occupies into two, so that each section is scored separately. Players may also play castle tiles, ranked 1 through 4. To score points from a row or column, a player must have a castle there; castles score the points of the row and column they occupy times the rank of the castle. This score may be a negative number. A player has a limited number of castles; castles other than rank 1 cannot be reused. There are two special tiles, besides the mountain tile mentioned above: the dragon and the gold mine. The dragon
    7.25
    4 votes
    49
    Power Grid

    Power Grid

    • Designer: Friedemann Friese
    • Publisher: Rio Grande Games
    • Genre: German-style
    Power Grid is the English-language edition of the multiplayer German-style board game Funkenschlag (in its second incarnation) designed by Friedemann Friese. Power Grid is published by Rio Grande Games. In the game, each player represents a company that owns power plants and tries to supply electricity to cities. Over the course of the game, the players will bid on power plants and buy resources to produce electricity to provide power to the growing number of cities in their expanding network. The game comes with a double-sided board with a map of the United States of America on one side and Germany on the other. Each map consists of six regions featuring cities with connections of varying costs between them. The number of regions used is based on the number of players. Map design itself is a key feature in the strategy of game play as some areas of the map feature generally higher connection costs compared to other areas of the map. The game is played in rounds, with each round consisting of 5 phases: 1. Determining Player Order 2. Auction Power Plants 3. Buying Resources 4. Building 5. Bureaucracy The game ends after one player builds a fixed number of cities. The winner is the
    7.25
    4 votes
    50
    Railway Rivals

    Railway Rivals

    • Genre: Railroad
    Railway Rivals is a railroad-themed board game designed by Glynn and David Watts and popularised by Games Workshop in 1985. Players build railways and then run trains along them. The game is in two stages; in the first part players draw tracks on the card using washable finetip pens (allowing the board to be cleaned for reuse). Players have a building allowance each turn; building through difficult terrain costs more moves. Players earn money for connecting cities to their railway network, and pay other players for connecting to or building alongside their track. Once all cities are joined by railway tracks, the second part of the game starts. Players race their trains along the tracks between randomly-chosen pairs of cities; just as in real life, players must pay other players to use elements of their track if they don't have a complete route of their own. The choice of routes raced is random; each city is used one or more times. Money is awarded to the trains that arrive first and second, and the player with the most money when all routes have been raced is the winner. Watts, a geography teacher, originally developed the game as a teaching aid to help students become familiar
    8.33
    3 votes
    51
    Shithead

    Shithead

    • Genre: Shedding-type game
    Shithead (as known also Palace or Palase) is a card game originating from South London similar to Paskahousu. In the game the object is to lose all of one's cards, with the last player to do so being the "shithead", who must deal the next game and may be subject to some minor forfeit of the group's choice, such as fetching the next round of drinks. The game, and variations of it, is popular in many countries amongst teenage and twenty-something travelers. Although the basic structure of the game generally remains constant there are often regional variations of the game's original "Terry Rules". Shithead has no documented origin. The game is generally believed however to have emerged in the early 1960s under the name of "Terry" in the South London town of Sutton. "Terry" fast became a popular game among members of the military and has since been exported worldwide by both the armed forces as well as backpackers. It is believed that the ease with which the game may be learned, the emphasis on not-losing rather than winning and the versatility in the rules have made the game the worldwide phenomenon it is today. The word "Shithead" has been attributed to the game since 1983 when a
    8.33
    3 votes
    52
    Through the Desert

    Through the Desert

    • Designer: Reiner Knizia
    • Publisher: Kosmos
    Through the Desert is a German-style board game designed by Reiner Knizia. It was originally released in 1998 by German game publisher, Kosmos, under the name Durch die Wüste. Players place pastel colored plastic camels on a hexagon-based board in an attempt to score points by capturing watering holes and reaching oases. Before the game starts, the board is seeded with watering holes and oases. Each player then places one camel in each of the five colors with a caravan leader of their color on the board. On a player's turn, he places two additional camels of any color on the board. A camel must be played adjacent to a camel of the same color and that group of camels must include the player's caravan leader. A player may never combine two different groups of the same colored camels. During the game, players score points by placing a camel on top of a watering hole or playing a camel adjacent to an oasis. At the end of the game, players score points for the longest caravan (most camels) of each color and for areas that have been enclosed by one of their caravans. The game ends when the supply of camels for any one color has been exhausted. The player with the most points wins.
    8.33
    3 votes
    53
    400

    400

    400 is a Lebanese trick-taking card game played in two partnerships with a standard deck of 52 playing cards. The object of the game is to be the first team to reach forty-one points. The game somewhat resembles Spades, but with subtle differences. To accumulate the most points at or beyond 41; points are accrued by winning at least the number of tricks bid in each hand, where each trick that is bid is worth one point. Hearts are always trump and other suits have no innate value. Cards rank: A K Q J 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 The first dealer is chosen by a draw for high card, and thereafter the turn to deal proceeds counter clockwise. The entire deck is dealt two cards at a time, face down, beginning on the dealer's right (The first deal being either one card or three cards per player, in order to arrive at thirteen cards each). The players then pick up their cards and arrange them by suits. If one player prematurely runs out of cards, that is, either extra cards were dealt elsewhere or one or more cards are missing, the hand is considered void and the deal passes to the player's right. Each player decides how many tricks he will be able to take. The player to the dealer's right starts
    9.50
    2 votes
    54
    Pinochle

    Pinochle

    • Genre: Trick-taking game
    Pinochle or Binocle (sometimes pinocle, or penuchle) is a trick-taking card game typically for two to four players and played with a 48 card deck. Derived from the card game bezique, players score points by trick-taking and also by forming combinations of cards into melds. It is thus considered part of a "trick-and-meld" category which also includes a cousin, belote. Each hand is played in three phases: bidding, melds, and tricks. The standard game today is called "partnership auction pinochle." Pinochle derives from the game bezique. The French word "binocle" also meant "eyeglasses". The word is also possibly derived from the French word, "binage", for the combination of cards called "binocle". This latter pronunciation of the game would be adopted by German speakers. German immigrants brought the game to America, where it was later mispronounced and misspelled "Pinochle." Auction pinochle for three players has some similarities with the German game skat, although the bidding is more similar to that of bid whist. During World War I, the city of Syracuse, New York outlawed the playing of pinochle in a fit of anti-German sentiment. Pinochle was the favorite card game of American
    9.50
    2 votes
    55
    Railroad Tycoon

    Railroad Tycoon

    • Designer: Glenn Drover
    • Publisher: Eagle Games
    • Genre: Railroad
    Railroad Tycoon is a railway-themed board game designed by Martin Wallace and Glenn Drover. The game, published in 2005 by Eagle Games, is derived from Wallace's earlier railway-themed game Age of Steam with more stylistic box art and simplified rules. Railroad Tycoon takes place in the eastern United States in 1830. Each player takes charge of a pioneering new railway company. The hex-based gaming board depicts the eastern United States, and features cities, open terrain, hills and rivers. Players score victory points by delivering goods between cities, using their own railway links as much as possible. In order to do that, players must build railroad tracks between cities, upgrade locomotives and find the best delivery lines to get the right cargo to the right city. At the beginning of the game each city is given a number of goods cubes (determined by its size). Each player draws a Tycoon card, which outlines a task they may fulfill by the end of the game to earn additional Victory Points. Players begin the game without money. Whenever a player is short on cash they may issue a share certificate. These give the player a certain amount of money. Once issued by the player these
    9.50
    2 votes
    56
    Che Deng

    Che Deng

    Che Deng (斜釘, Cantonese: che4 deng1) literally means diagonal nails in Cantonese. It is the name of a Chinese game that plays with the Chinese dominoes set. Che refers to the diagonal pattern of the "three" pip on the tile. Deng refers to the "one" pip on the tile.
    7.00
    4 votes
    57
    Monte Carlo

    Monte Carlo

    Monte Carlo (also known as Weddings and Double and Quits, which is not to be confused with Double or Quits) is a Patience pair-matching card game (using a deck of 52 playing cards) where the object is to remove pairs from the tableau. Contrary to its name, it has no relation to the city with the same name nor to any casino-related game. Game starts when 25 cards are laid out in such a way that they form a 5x5 grid (one version states that 20 cards are dealt to form a 5x4 grid). The rest of the deck are set aside for later as the reserve. Cards that make up a pair (such as two Kings or two Sixes) are removed when they are immediately next to each other horizontally, vertically, or diagonally. Once all pairs have been removed, the cards are consolidated, i.e. moving cards to the left as if towards the upper left corner to fill any gaps left behind by the discarded pairs. New cards are then laid out from the reserve to form a fresh layout of 25 cards. This removal of pairs, consolidation of cards, and addition of new cards continue until the reserve cards have run out. After this, removal of pairs and consolidation continues. The game finishes when all cards have been discarded. The
    7.00
    4 votes
    58
    The Game of Life

    The Game of Life

    • Designer: Reuben Klamer
    • Publisher: Milton Bradley Company
    • Genre: Economic simulation
    The Game of Life, also known simply as LIFE, is a board game originally created in 1860 by Milton Bradley, as The Checkered Game of Life (and later produced by the Milton Bradley Company of Springfield, Massachusetts). The Game of Life was America's first popular parlor game. The game simulates a person's travels through his or her life, from college to retirement, with jobs, marriage, and possible children along the way. Two to six players can participate in one game, however, variations of the game have been made to accommodate a maximum of only eight or ten players. The modern version was originally published 100 years later, in 1960. It was created by toy and game designer Reuben Klamer and was "heartily endorsed" by Art Linkletter. It is now part of the permanent collection of the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History. It later spawned a book, The Game of Life: How to Succeed in Real Life No Matter Where You Land (Running Press), by Lou Harry. The game was originally created in 1860 by Milton Bradley as The Checkered Game of Life. This was the first game created by Bradley, a successful lithographer, whose major product until that time was a portrait of Abraham
    7.00
    4 votes
    59
    Tabula

    Tabula

    Tabula was a Roman board game, and is generally thought to be the direct ancestor of modern backgammon. The earliest description of tabula is in an epigram of Byzantine Emperor Zeno (476–481), given by Agathias of Myrine (527–567), who describes a game in which Zeno goes from a strong position to a very weak one after an unfortunate dice roll. The rules of Tabula were reconstructed in the 19th century by Becq de Fouquières based upon this epigram. Tabula was most likely a later refinement of ludus duodecim scriptorum, with the board's middle row of points removed, and only the two outer rows remaining. The game was played on a board nearly identical to a modern backgammon board. Two players had 15 pieces each, and moved them in opposing directions around the board, according to the roll of three dice. A piece resting alone in a space on the board was vulnerable to being hit.
    6.00
    5 votes
    60
    Cuarenta

    Cuarenta

    Cuarenta is the national card game of Ecuador. It is a fishing game played with the standard 52 card pack of Anglo-American playing cards, but all 10s, 9s and 8s are omitted (ace is low). This card game is almost exclusively played in Ecuador. The name of the game, cuarenta is Spanish for the number 40 (forty). This refers to the number of points that are required to win a chica (small division of the game) and also to the number of cards used to play it. Two chicas or the first chica with zapatería (loss of the chica by scoring less than ten points) win the game (a completed game is called a "mesa", which means "match"). The game can be played by 2 players, or 4 players split into two teams. The score is kept with two kinds of chips, the two-point tantos (points) and the ten-point perros (dogs). When a standard 52 card pack is used, the 8s, 9s and 10s can be used to keep the score. Five cards are dealt to each player, given out as a batch of five cards at a time. The opponent of the dealer or the opponents of the dealer's team are given ten points if there are any irregularities during the deal itself, and the dealer's turn is handed over to the opponent ("pasa la mano con diez",
    8.00
    3 votes
    61
    Go

    Go

    • Genre: Zero-sum
    Go (Chinese: 圍棋 wéiqí, Japanese: 囲碁 igo, Korean: 바둑 baduk, Vietnamese: cờ vây, common meaning: "encircling game") is a board game for two players that originated in China more than 2,500 years ago. The game is noted for being rich in strategy despite its relatively simple rules. According to chess master Edward Lasker: "The rules of Go are so elegant, organic, and rigorously logical that if intelligent life forms exist elsewhere in the universe, they almost certainly play Go." The two players alternately place black and white playing pieces, called "stones", on the vacant intersections (called "points") of a grid of 19×19 lines (beginners often play on smaller 9×9 and 13×13 boards). The object of the game is to use one's stones to surround a larger total area of the board than the opponent. Once placed on the board, stones may not be moved, but stones are removed from the board if captured. When a game concludes, the controlled points (territory) are counted along with captured stones to determine who has more points. Games may also be won by resignation. Go originated in ancient China. Archaeological evidence shows that the early game was played on a board with a 17×17 grid, but
    8.00
    3 votes
    62
    Phase 10

    Phase 10

    • Publisher: Fundex Games
    Phase 10 is a card game created in 1982 by Kenneth Johnson and originally sold by Fundex Games, now a subsidiary of Mattel. Phase 10 is based on a variant of rummy known as Liverpool Rummy, and is a member (along with Liverpool) of the contract rummy family. It requires a special deck or two regular decks of cards; it can be played by two to six people. The game is named after the ten phases (or melds) that a player must advance through in order to win. Phase 10 is Fundex's best selling product, selling 32,658,846 units to date, making it the 2nd best-selling commercial card game behind Mattel's Uno. In December 2010, Fundex sold the rights to Phase 10 to Mattel, and now develops and markets a line of games based on brands and other IP formerly exclusive to Mattel as well as Fundex's own brands. The object of the game is to be the first person to complete all 10 phases. In the case of two players completing the last phase in the same hand, the player with the lowest score out of the tied players is the winner. If those scores also happen to be tied, a tiebreaker round is played where the tying players attempt to complete phase 10 (or in variants, the last phase each player had
    8.00
    3 votes
    63
    TransAmerica

    TransAmerica

    • Designer: Franz-Benno Delonge
    • Publisher: Rio Grande Games
    • Genre: Railroad
    TransAmerica is a railroad board game centered on the construction of railroad track in the United States. The game was created by Franz-Benno Delonge and developed by Team Annaberg. It is published in the United States by Rio Grande Games. In 2003 it was a Mensa Select recipient. The cities on the board are divided into five different regions with seven cities per region. These regions are denoted by circles of different colors. If there are two or three players, the ten cards with dashed circles are removed from play. These cities are the two most difficult to build to in each region. Each player selects one set of markers of the same color; a train for scorekeeping and a cylinder to mark the starting location. The train markers are placed on the thirteen on the score track. The "starting player" is then determined randomly. The game is played until one or more players reach zero points when the player with the most points remaining wins. If after the second round, the player with the least number of points has at least four points, the number of points needed to end the game is moved to three points below the player with the least number of points remaining. In each round, the
    8.00
    3 votes
    64
    Klondike

    Klondike

    Klondike is a patience game (solitaire card game). Many people refer to Klondike as patience or solitaire (North America). Taking a shuffled standard 52-card deck of playing cards (without Jokers), one upturned card is dealt on the left of the playing area, then six downturned cards (from left to right). On top of the downturned cards, an upturned card is dealt on the left-most downturned pile, and downturned cards on the rest until all piles have an upturned card. The piles should look like the figure to the right. The four foundations (light rectangles in the upper right of the figure) are built up by suit from Ace (low in this game) to King, and the tableau piles can be built down by alternate colors, and partial or complete piles can be moved if they are built down by alternate colors also. Any empty piles can be filled with a King or a pile of cards with a King. The aim of the game is to build up a stack of cards starting with 2 and ending with King, all of the same suit. Once this is accomplished, the goal is to move this to a foundation, where the player has previously placed the Ace of that suit. Once the player has done this, they will have "finished" that suit- the goal
    6.75
    4 votes
    65
    YINSH

    YINSH

    • Designer: Kris Burm
    • Publisher: Rio Grande Games
    YINSH is an abstract strategy board game by game designer Kris Burm. It is the fifth game to be released in the GIPF Project. At the time of its release in 2003, Burm stated that he intended it to be considered as the sixth and last game of the project, and that the game which he had not yet released, PÜNCT, would be logically the fifth game . However, an entry in his blog on 19 June 2005 suggests that he is reconsidering this. Gameplay consists of moving rings to flip Reversi-like discs. YINSH is played on a board shaped like a partial six-pointed star with 85 points. The main pieces are black and white rings, of which each player has five. Also used are a number of markers which are black on one side and white on the other (similar to Reversi pieces). The object of the game is to remove three of one's own rings from the game. Since this is the goal of the game, getting closer to winning necessitates weakening oneself, which considerably complicates strategy as a move which brings one closer to winning the game may end up being a very poor move. The game starts with an empty board, and proceeds in two phases. During the first phase both players, beginning with white, place one of
    6.75
    4 votes
    66
    42

    42

    • Genre: Tile-based game
    42, also known as Texas 42, is a trick-taking game played with a standard set of double six dominoes. 42 is often referred to as the "national game of Texas", and continues to be very popular in much of the state. Tournaments are held in many towns, and the State Championship tournament is held in Hallettsville, Texas the first Saturday of March each year. In 2011 it was designated the official State Domino Game of Texas. Based on a 1985 news article written by Christopher Evans of the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, the game of 42 originated in Garner, Texas. Two local boys, William Thomas and Walter Earl, developed the game in response to a general disapproval of card-playing games held by many Protestants at that time. William and Walter were able to incorporate dominoes in their game that mimicked the mechanics of a trick-taking card game. The game they developed, which was the precursor to today's 42, found acceptance since dominoes did not carry the negative stigma of card-playing. From there, the game spread throughout Texas. The game is played by four people, in teams of two each, who sit facing each other across the table. The object of the game is to be the first team to reach
    9.00
    2 votes
    67
    Beleaguered Castle

    Beleaguered Castle

    Beleaguered Castle is a solitaire card game played with a deck of 52 playing cards. It is one of the card games touted as "Freecell without cells" because its game play is somewhat akin to the popular solitaire computer game but without extra empty spaces to maneuver. This game is also called Laying Siege and Sham Battle. First, the player removes the aces from the deck and aligns them vertically without overlapping them. They form the foundations. Then cards are dealt to the left and right of the aces, forming eight rows of six overlapping cards each. The top card of each row (the cards that are exposed) is available for play either on the foundations or on any other row. The foundations are built up to kings by suit. Cards in the rows are built down in sequence regardless of suit. Once a row becomes empty, it can be filled by any card. The game is won when all of the cards are built onto the foundations. However, this is easier said than done because most games are doomed to fail in just a few moves. In the 2011 film Source Code, "Beleaguered Castle" is the call sign for the Source Code program.
    9.00
    2 votes
    68
    Border Reivers

    Border Reivers

    • Designer: Jackson Pope
    • Publisher: Reiver Games
    Border Reivers is a light warfare/economic development board game designed by Jackson Pope published in 2006 by Reiver Games in English. Players assume the roles of clans on the Scottish and English Borders during the Middle Ages, striving to achieve ascendancy via economic or military means. Border Reivers can be played by two to four players and takes around 30 to 90 minutes to play. Players take it in turns to complete six phases of their turns. The game ends when all but one player have been annihilated, or a player starts their turn with 40 gold. The six phases are: Strategically, Border Reivers is based around the need to balance spending your money on the reinforcements necessary to cement your clan's safety and improve your economy, while keeping enough money available to rein in a player who tries to race to an economic victory. The game is often won by the player who best judges when to stop spending their income and start saving for an economic victory. However, careful use of the strategy cards will enable other players to delay or even stop a player saving for victory. The ability to choose the strategy card received in the reinforcements phase makes the cards a
    9.00
    2 votes
    69
    President (card game)

    President (card game)

    Scum (also known as President, Kings, and many other names), an Americanized version of Dai Hin Min, is a card game for three or more in which players race to get rid of all of the cards in their hands in order to become President in the following round. It can also be played as a drinking game. Gameplay is similar to Dai Hin Min, in which players attempt to get rid of their cards first. When played as a drinking game, the following rules may be used: There may be many titles used by players during the game. Often, players move seats to sit in the order of their place, so as not to forget the order. There is generally at least a President, Vice President and Scum. More or fewer titles may be used, depending on how many players are in the game. Common extra titles include the Secretary one level below VP, Citizens, Normals, Neutrals or Average Joes in between the high and low named ranks, and Clerk one level above Vice-Asshole. Other ranking systems use the presidential line of succession. The Secretary and Clerk are generally only used with six or more players, and rules regarding card passing or drinks can be changed to accommodate these two positions as desired. A large and/or
    9.00
    2 votes
    70
    Spiderette

    Spiderette

    Spiderette is a solitaire card game which uses a deck of 52 playing cards. It is basically a one-deck version of Spider, a popular two-deck solitaire card game. This game should not be confused with Little Spider, which is played differently. The first 28 cards are dealt the same way as in another popular solitaire game Klondike, i.e. the first column should have one face-up card, the second column should have one face-up card and one face down card at the bottom, and so on. Cards in the tableau are built down regardless of suit. Only the top cards of each column can be moved; however, a sequence of cards that are in suit (such as 9-8-7-6♥) can be moved as one unit. Face-down cards that become exposed are turned face-up and empty column spaces on the tableau are filled by any card. If all possible plays have been made, a new set of seven cards (one for each column) are dealt, provided that each column must contain at least one card. After three such deals, and the game becomes stuck, the three left over cards are dealt on the first three columns. Once a suit sequence of 13 cards from king down to ace is successfully built, it is discarded from the game. The game is won when four
    9.00
    2 votes
    71
    Twister

    Twister

    • Genre: Party game
    Twister is a game of physical skill produced by the Milton Bradley Company. It is played on a large plastic mat that is spread on the floor or ground. The mat has four rows of large colored circles on it with a different color in each row: red, yellow, blue and green. A spinner is attached to a square board and is used to determine where the player has to put their hand or foot. The spinner is divided into four labeled sections: right foot, left foot, right hand and left hand. Each of those four sections is divided into the four colors (red, yellow, blue and green). After spinning, the combination is called (for example: "right hand yellow") and players must move their matching hand or foot to a circle of the correct color. In a two-player game, no two people can have a hand or foot on the same circle; the rules are different for more players. Due to the scarcity of colored circles, players will often be required to put themselves in unlikely or precarious positions, eventually causing someone to fall. A person is eliminated when they fall or when their elbow or knee touches the mat. There is no limit to how many can play at once, but more than four is a tight fit. Twister was
    9.00
    2 votes
    72
    Cranium

    Cranium

    • Genre: Party game
    Cranium is a party board game based on Ludo. Whit Alexander and Richard Tait created Cranium in 1998 after Richard spent a weekend playing games with another family and recognized the need for a game involving a variety of skills. He left his job at Microsoft, convincing friend and co-worker Whit Alexander to join him in the creation of Cranium. Cranium is manufactured by Hasbro subsidiary Cranium, Inc. Cranium is billed as "The Game for Your Whole Brain." Unlike many other party games, Cranium includes a wide variety of activities. Giorgio Davanzo created the packaging and brand identity for the game, and Gary Baseman, creator of the animated series Teacher's Pet, did the art. Players are divided into two, three, or four teams; each team picks a mover and puts it on the "Planet Cranium" Start space. The board is laid out as a circuit, consisting of different color spaces. Each color corresponds to a question card category. Purple "Planet Cranium" spaces give the team their choice of category. The rules of Cranium state that the team with the player whose birthday is coming up next starts the game. Play then continues clockwise to the next team. Creative Cat These blue cards are,
    7.67
    3 votes
    73
    Egyptian Ratscrew

    Egyptian Ratscrew

    Egyptian Ratscrew (commonly known by Egyptian Rat's Crew, Egyptian Rattlesnake, Egyptian War, Egyptian Rat War, ERS, Egyptian Rat Slap, Egyptian Ratskee, Slaps, Acid, Egyptian Canasta, Egyptian Costanza, and Egyptian Rascal, Purple Monkey Dishwasher, as well as many other names) is a card game of the matching family of games, reminiscent of Slapjack and Beggar-My-Neighbour, but more complex. The game appears to be a combination of Beggar-My-Neighbour, mentioned by Charles Dickens in his Great Expectations (published originally as a weekly serial from 1860 to 1861 in Britain), and the concept of slapping for cards, possibly derived and expanded from the gameplay of Slapjack. The game is played with a standard 52-card deck, or with multiple standard decks shuffled together for large numbers of players. As a variation, one or more Jokers may be added. Players are dealt an equal number of cards from the deck, using as many as possible. If two people are playing, each player will receive 26 cards from a 52-card deck; if there is a large number of players, multiple decks may be used. (As many players can play as can reach at arm's length into the middle of a general circle that they will
    7.67
    3 votes
    74
    Hare and Tortoise

    Hare and Tortoise

    • Designer: David Parlett
    • Publisher: Intellect Games
    • Genre: German-style
    Hare and Tortoise is a German-style board game designed by David Parlett in 1974 and first published by Intellect Games. In 1978 it was released by Ravensburger in Germany, where the game became a huge hit. It has since sold some 2 million units in at least ten languages, including two known pirated editions. The current edition is published by Rio Grande Games (United States), Abacus Spiele (Germany), and The Board Game Company (UK). The game is based on Aesop's fable "The Tortoise and the Hare", in which the hare and tortoise decide to race. The tortoise wins the race by cunning while the hare fails because he overestimates himself and takes a nap during the race. The moral of the story is "slow and steady wins the race" which is incorporated in the game mechanic. In Germany, there is another fable by a similar name, Hase und Igel (Hare and hedgehog), made popular by the Brothers Grimm, in which the hedgehog wins because his wife is at the finish line, and the hare mistakes her for his race opponent. The game used a then new (as of 1974) game mechanic. Until then movement of pieces in race games was largely determined by the roll of dice. In Hare and Tortoise players pay carrots
    7.67
    3 votes
    75
    Mahjong

    Mahjong

    • Genre: Tile-based game
    Mahjong is a game that originated in China, commonly played by four players (with some three-player variations found in Korea and Japan). While the single player tile matching game mahjong solitaire is familiar in the West, in Asia it is the four-player table version which holds predominance and has little in common with the solitaire version other than using the same tiles. Similar to the Western card game rummy, mahjong is a game of skill, strategy and calculation and involves a certain degree of chance. The game is played with a set of 136 tiles based on Chinese characters and symbols, although some regional variations use a different number of tiles. In most variations, each player begins by receiving thirteen tiles. In turn players draw and discard tiles until they complete a legal hand using the fourteenth drawn tile to form four groups (melds) and a pair (head). There are fairly standard rules about how a piece is drawn, stolen from another player and thus melded, the use of simples (numbered tiles) and honours (winds and dragons), the kinds of melds, and the order of dealing and play. However there are many regional variations in the rules; in addition, the scoring system
    7.67
    3 votes
    76
    Nsolo

    Nsolo

    Nsolo also called Chisolo is the Zambian version of mancala. Nsolo game is usually played by scooping holes in the ground and using small stones or Mongongo nuts for playing pieces. Two players scoop four rows of holes in the ground and begin to play, usually with the help of a number of bystanders. However carved wooden game boards exist from earlier years and can also still be bought at tourist markets in Livingstone and Lusaka. Several variations of the game exist.
    7.67
    3 votes
    77
    Soureh

    Soureh

    Soureh is a matching card game originated in the Middle East. The aim of the game is to transform eight given cards into four valid coops while preventing opponents from doing the same. It is a very strategic game, and involves much thinking and memory. Pariah, an Americanized variation on the game, uses a different scoring system and adds the elements of face cards. Soureh is played with two standard 52-card decks of playing cards with the jokers and face cards removed. The object of Soureh is to obtain the lowest score by creating valid coops of cards. A coop consists of two cards, one face up and one face down. The validity of a coop is determined by the following rules: At the beginning of a round, each player is dealt four face down cards side by side and four face up cards facing the center of the playing table, one in front of each face down card. The four parallel pairs of face up and face down cards form the player's four coops. A player may look at his own face down cards whenever he chooses, while his opponents may not look at them. The remainder of the deck is placed face down in the center of the playing table as the stock pile. On each turn, a player draws a card from
    7.67
    3 votes
    78
    Spinner

    Spinner

    A spinner is a method of randomly determining something in a game, often movement. There are several types of spinners:
    7.67
    3 votes
    79
    Probe

    Probe

    • Genre: Word
    The parlor game Probe was introduced in the 1960s by Parker Brothers. It is reminiscent of the simple two-person game Hangman, whose object is to guess a word chosen by another player by revealing specific letters. Probe extends the number of players to a maximum of four and introduces additional game elements that increase the levels of both skill and chance. Like Hangman, each player has a secret chosen word. But unlike hangman, the game ends when the last word, not the first word, is revealed. All players remain in the game until the end. The original game set includes four plastic display racks and four decks of 96 cards. Each card has either one letter or a blank on it. Each deck has 5 each of A, S, blank;  3 each of B, F, H, P, W, Y, Z;  2 each of J, Q, V, X;  and 4 each of all the other letters.  Each display rack can hold up to twelve cards, with a point value assigned to each card position: 5-10-15-15-10-5-5-10-15-15-10-5. The cards are used to spell out each player's secret word face-down on one of the racks. For words less than 12 letters, blank cards may be used at one or both ends of the word to disguise its true length. In the most basic form of the game, the
    10.00
    1 votes
    80
    Shogun

    Shogun

    • Designer: Dirk Henn
    • Publisher: Queen Games
    Shogun is a strategy board game designed by Dirk Henn and published by Queen Games in 2006. It is based on his earlier game Wallenstein, but it is set in the Sengoku period, which ends with the inception of the Tokugawa Shogunate. Japan during the Sengoku or “Warring States” Period: each player assumes the role of a great Daimyo with all his troops. Each Daimyo has the same 10 possible actions to develop his kingdom and secure points. To do so he must deploy his armies with great skill. Each round, the players decide which of the actions are to be played out and in which of their provinces. If battle ensues between opposing armies, the unique Cubetower plays the leading role. The troops from both sides are thrown in together and the cubes that fall out at the bottom show who has won immediately. Owning provinces, temples, theaters and castles means points when scores are tallied. Whichever Daimyo has the highest number of points after the second tally becomes shogun and wins the game. The main game board is printed on both sides, one being printed with a sun symbol and the other with a moon symbol. Each side displays 5 regions. These 5 regions each contain 9 internal provinces.
    10.00
    1 votes
    81
    Shove ha'penny

    Shove ha'penny

    Shove ha'penny (or shove halfpenny), also known in ancestral form as shoffe-grote ['shove-groat' in Modern English], slype groat ['slip groat'], and slide-thrift, is a pub game in the shuffleboard family, played predominantly in the United Kingdom. Two players or teams compete against one another using coins or discs on a tabletop board. Shove ha'penny is played on a small, rectangular, smooth board usually made of wood or stone. A number of parallel lines or grooves run horizontally across this board, separated by about one-and-a-half coin diameters. The spaces between the lines (usually nine) are called the "beds". Five British Half Penny coins (now obsolete pre-decimalisation coinage) or similarly-sized coins or metal discs are placed one-by-one at one end of the board slightly protruding over the edge and are shoved forward toward scoring lines, with a blow from the palm of the hand. In the humorously opinionated (and exceedingly rare) book "The Shove Ha'penny Board Displayed" (Christophers, London 1934), author Trelawney Dayrell-Reed asserts that the best boards are made of unvarnished walnut or mahogany. In parts of South West England, primarily Dorset and Hampshire, the
    10.00
    1 votes
    82
    Stonewall

    Stonewall

    Stonewall is a solitaire card game using a deck of 52 playing cards. It is probably named because the player seems to break down walls in exposing more of the face-down cards. Its tableau is similar to that of Flower Garden with its beds as columns. Thirty-six cards are dealt onto the tableau into six columns of six cards each. The exposed (top) card and the third and fifth cards from it are faced up while the second, fourth, and sixth cards from the top are faced down. The 16 leftover cards act as the reserve. The object of the game is to move the Aces to the foundations and build each of them up by suit. The top cards of each column, as well as all the cards in the reserve, are available for play to the foundations or the tableau. Building on the tableau is down by alternating colors and a sequence (or a part of a sequence) can be moved as unit. Any gap on the tableau can be filled by any exposed card or any sequence. The game is won when all cards are built onto the foundations. But chances of winning are low, especially, for instance, that the needed cards are those faced down.
    10.00
    1 votes
    83
    Trax

    Trax

    • Genre: Tile-based game
    Trax is a two-player abstract strategy game of loops and lines invented by David Smith in 1980. The game is played with a set of identical square tiles. One side of the tile has red and white straight lines and the other red and white curves. Trax was invented in 1980 and first published in the United States in 1982. Originally the tiles were made out of cardboard and were red with black and white lines. As the game became more popular the tiles were changed to high density plastic. The change to black tiles with red and white lines took place in 2005. The reigning world champion is Donald Bailey an engineering professor at Massey University in New Zealand. With the exception of a loss in the 1994 final, he has won every Trax world championship since 1990. Players place tiles adjacent to those already in play such that the colours of the tracks match. The objective is to get a loop or line of your colour while attempting to stop your opponent from completing a loop in their colour. If a tile played in any turn forms an adjacent space or spaces into which same coloured track enters from two edges, that same player must play a further tile into each such space so as to join up the
    6.50
    4 votes
    84
    Bao

    Bao

    Bao is a traditional mancala board game played in most of East Africa including Kenya, Tanzania, Comoros, Malawi, as well as some areas of DR Congo and Burundi. It is most popular among the Swahili people of Tanzania and Kenya; the name itself "Bao" is the Swahili word for "board" or "board game". In Tanzania, and especially Zanzibar, a "bao master" (called bingwa, "master"; but also fundi, "artist") is held in high respect. In Malawi, a close variant of the game is known as Bawo, which is the Yao equivalent of the Swahili name. Bao is well known to be a prominent mancala in terms of complexity and strategical depth, and it has raised interest in scholars of several disciplines, including game theory, complexity theory, and psychology. Official tournaments are held in Tanzania, Zanzibar, Lamu (Kenya), and Malawi, and both mainland Tanzania and Zanzibar have their Bao societies, such as the Chama cha Bao founded in 1966. In Zanzibar and Tanzania there are two versions of Bao. The main version, which is also the most complex and most appreciated, is called Bao la kiswahili ("Bao of the Swahili people"). The simplified version is called Bao la kujifunza ("Bao for beginners"). There
    5.60
    5 votes
    85
    Java

    Java

    • Genre: Economic simulation
    Java is a German-style board game designed by Wolfgang Kramer and Michael Kiesling and published in 2000 by Ravensburger in German and by Rio Grande Games in English. It is illustrated by Franz Vohwinkel. Java won the Deutscher Spiele Preis 9th place in 2001 and the Games Magazine Best Advanced Strategy Game in 2002. It is the second game in the Mask Trilogy, following Tikal and followed by Mexica. The game provides the atmosphere of the island of Java on a hexagonal board. Players build the island and score by setting up palace festivals at opportune moments. When players run out of hexagons to build the island, the game is over. A final scoring phase now takes place and a winner is declared.
    8.50
    2 votes
    86
    Musta Maija

    Musta Maija

    • Genre: Shedding-type game
    Musta Maija is a Finnish card game. It is primarily a children's game, but due to tactical possibilities, it can be enjoyed by adults as well. The game suits to 3-5 players, and it uses the standard deck of 52 cards. Ace is the highest. Everyone is dealt five cards, and the rest of the cards forms a face-down stock. The top card of the stock is placed face up under the stock, and it determines the trump suit. If it is spades, the card is returned into the middle of the stock, and a new card is turned to determine the trumps. The queen of spades is a special card, and it is called Maija (Black Maria). Whenever, during the play, a player has less than five cards in his hand and there are cards left in the stock, the player must take cards from the stock so that he has five cards. In each turn the player in turn plays one or more cards from his hand onto the table with the following restrictions: The cards must all be of a same suit (in this purpose, Maija counts as a spade). Their number must not exceed the number of cards that the player left to the one in turn has in his hand. Playing cards onto the table is one action, and the player is not allowed to take cards from the stock in
    8.50
    2 votes
    87
    Pilotta

    Pilotta

    Pilotta (in Greek Πιλόττα) is a trick-taking 32-card game whose origin probably goes back to the Frankish occupation of the Greek lands after 1204. The game is broadly similar to Contract Bridge and closely related to the French game Belote. It is played primarily in Cyprus, being very popular among the Cypriot population, especially the youngsters, who usually arrange “pilotta meetings” in places such as cafés and cafeterias. Its counterpart played in Greece is named Vida (in Greek βίδα) One variation from the French Belote is based on biddings. In Pilotta seeds which are allowed to bid on are: "No trumps" and "All trumps" are excluded in Cyprus Pilotta, since Pilotta is a variation of Contract Belote and not Modern Belote, which does not have these special options or rules. There is a more recent variation to the game known as Pilotta Palaristi, which reintroduces a point-based bidding system. Bids correspond to the total expected value of the bidders tricks. The winning bidder must gain at least the number of points that have bid, or they forfeit all points in the hand to the opposing team. Bidding is typically performed in increments of 10, with the lowest opening bid being
    8.50
    2 votes
    88
    Triominos

    Triominos

    • Genre: Tile-based game
    Triominoes is a variant of dominoes using triangular tiles. A popular version of this game is marketed as Tri-Ominos by the Pressman Toy Corp. A triomino is in the shape of an equilateral triangle approximately 1 inch (2.5 cm) on each side and approximately 1/4" (6.35mm) thick. Each point of the triangle has a number (most often from 0-5), and each triomino has a unique combination of numbers (with repetition of a number allowed in the combination). With the 6 possible end values commonly seen, and with the additional condition that the three numbers do not decrease clockwise, there are 56 unique combinations and thus the standard triomino set has 56 tiles. Larger sets are possible; including 6 as a possible end number would result in 84 tiles. Tiles are most often made out of a plastic or resin that approximates the feel of stone or ivory, similar to most modern commercial domino sets. Numbers are recessed into the surface and painted black. Some "deluxe" sets include a raised brass tackhead in the center which assists in mixing up or shuffling tiles, as the tackhead reduces the surface area of the tile contacting the table, so tiles move more freely. Valid play of a triomino is
    8.50
    2 votes
    89
    Settlers of Catan

    Settlers of Catan

    • Designer: Klaus Teuber
    • Publisher: 999 Games
    • Genre: German-style
    The Settlers of Catan is a multiplayer board game designed by Klaus Teuber and first published in 1995 in Germany by Franckh-Kosmos Verlag (Kosmos) as Die Siedler von Catan. Players assume the roles of settlers, each attempting to build and develop holdings while trading and acquiring resources. Players are rewarded points as their settlements grow; the first to reach a set number of points is the winner. At no point in the game is any player eliminated. The Settlers of Catan was one of the first German-style board games to achieve popularity outside of Europe. By 2009, over 15 million games in the Catan series had been sold, The game has been translated into thirty languages from the original German. It is especially popular in the United States where it has been called "the board game of our time" by the Washington Post. A 2012 US-American documentary film titled Going Cardboard (featuring Klaus Teuber) is about this game's impact on American gaming communities and what came of it. The standard game and its many expansions are published by Kosmos, Mayfair Games, Filosofia, Capcom, 999 Games, Κάισσα, and Devir. The players in the game represent settlers establishing colonies on
    7.33
    3 votes
    90
    Carpet

    Carpet

    Carpet is a solitaire game where the object is to discard all cards to the foundations where the aces are already dealt. The game starts with the aces separated from the deck to form the foundations. After the remaining 48 cards are shuffled, 20 cards are laid out on the tableau in a 5x4 grid fashion to form "the carpet." The remaining 28 cards make up the stock. All cards from "the carpet" must be moved to the foundations up by suit (i.e. 2♠ over A♠). Any "holes on the carpet," i. e. gaps left behind by the cards that are moved to the foundations, are filled by cards from the waste pile or, if the waste pile is empty, the stock. The stock cards are dealt one at the time on the waste pile and can be moved to the foundations or to the carpet if necessary. Once the stock is used up, all cards on the waste pile cannot be used as a new stock. Only the top card of the waste pile can be played. The game is won when all of the cards are moved into the foundations.
    6.25
    4 votes
    91
    Scopa

    Scopa

    • Genre: Fishing game
    Scopa is an Italian card game, and one of the two major national card games in Italy. It is also popular in Brazil, brought in by Italian immigrants, mostly in the Scopa di Quindici variation. It is played with a standard Italian 40-card deck, mostly between two players or four in two partnerships, but it can also be played by 3, 5, or 6 players. The name is an Italian noun meaning "broom", since taking a scopa means "to sweep" all the cards from the table. Watching a game of scopa can be a highly entertaining activity, since games traditionally involve lively, colorful, and somewhat strong-worded banter in between hands. However, skill and chance are more important to the outcome of the game. A deck of Italian cards consist of 40 cards, divided into four suits. Neapolitan, Piacentine, Triestine, and Sicilian cards are divided into Coppe (Cups), Ori or Denari (Golds or Coins), Spade (Swords) and Bastoni (Clubs), while Piemontesi, Milanesi and Toscane cards use the 'French' suits, that is Cuori (Hearts), Quadri (Diamonds, literally "Squares"), Fiori (Flowers) and Picche (Spades, literally "Pikes"). The values on the cards range numerically from one through seven, plus three face
    6.25
    4 votes
    92
    Afrikan tähti

    Afrikan tähti

    • Designer: Kari Mannerla
    Afrikan tähti (Finnish) or Afrikas stjärna (Swedish), meaning "the star of Africa", is a Finnish board game designed by Kari Mannerla originally in 1951. It has been one of the most popular board games in both Finland and Sweden for decades. The game was first published in 1951, with a revision to the rules made in 2005 concerning sea-travel within game. The publishing rights are held by the Peliko company. Afrikan tähti is set in colonial Africa, with the object being to find and retrieve the famous diamond the Star of Africa, which the game is named after. Afrikan tähti is a race between several players. The minimum is two players, and the maximum is theoretically unlimited, although with more than five or six players the game starts to become unplayable, due to too long gaming turns and insufficient resources. The board covers the continent of Africa, with famous cities marked as big red circles, and with routes consisting of small black circles connecting them. Players can start from either Cairo, Egypt or from Tangiers, Morocco, whichever they want. The game uses a dice and play money. Notes in the values £100, £500 and £1000 are supplied (referred to as dollars in the
    7.00
    3 votes
    93
    Age of Steam

    Age of Steam

    • Designer: Martin Wallace
    Age of Steam is a strategy board game by Martin Wallace published in 2002 by Warfrog Games on license from Winsome Games. The game depicts the development of railroads in the United States, as well as several other countries using the expansion maps. It can be played by three to six players, usually takes between 2 and 3 hours to complete, and is intended for ages 13 and above. "Age of Steam" is a trademark of Winsome Games. Age of Steam won the 2003 International Gamers Award. and is one of the top twenty rated games on BoardGameGeek. Age of Steam support dozens of expansion maps, including several from Bézier Games, AoS Team and Steam Brothers.
    7.00
    3 votes
    94
    BattleLore

    BattleLore

    BattleLore is a strategy board wargame for two players, created by Richard Borg and initially published by Days of Wonder (and later by Fantasy Flight Games). The game is based on the same mechanics as Battle Cry, Memoir '44 and Commands & Colors: Ancients, but has a fantasy and medieval theme. BattleLore debuted at the 2006 Spiel game fair in Essen, Germany and was released worldwide on November 30 of that year. Typical setup for a game is 10–15 minutes. Beginning players can expect a 45-60 minute duration game, but experienced players can usually finish a game in about 30–45 minutes. Each player has a set of quick reference cards to help him keep rules in mind. Experienced players will rarely have to pull out the rulebook for clarification. The scenario book that comes with the basic box is organised as a tutorial sequence that introduces concepts one adventure at a time, making the game very easy to learn. Each adventure in Battlelore is pre-constructed, leaving the work of creating armies to the scenario author. Although with the Call to Arms Expansion (released May 2007) the players have (limited) control on deploying units to any given scenario. The Battlelore website offers
    7.00
    3 votes
    95
    Blackjack

    Blackjack

    Blackjack, also known as twenty-one, is the most widely played casino banking game in the world. Blackjack is a comparing card game between a player and dealer and played with one or more decks of 52 cards. The player or players are dealt an initial two card hand and add the total of their cards. Face cards (Kings, Queens, and Jacks) are counted as ten points. The player and dealer can count their own Ace as 1-point or 11 points. All other cards are counted as the numeric value shown on the card. After receiving their initial two cards, players have the option of getting a "hit" (taking additional cards) to bring their total value of cards to 21 points, or as close as possible without exceeding 21 (called "busting"). The dealer has to take hits until his cards total less 17 or more points. If his initial two cards equal 17, the dealer does not take a hit. However, if his first two cards are a six and an ace (equaling 17) his hand is called a soft 17 and the dealer will then have to take a hit. Players who do not bust and have a total higher than the dealer, win. The dealer will lose if he or she busts, or has a lesser hand than the player who has not busted. If the player and
    7.00
    3 votes
    96
    Desmoche

    Desmoche

    Desmoche is a popular rummy card game usually played for small stakes which closely resembles other games in the rummy family, like Conquian and gin rummy, more than poker. It was probably devised in Nicaragua in the first half of the 20th century. The object of Desmoche is to play, in either runs or sets, exactly ten cards on the table. The game is played by 2, 3 or 4 players with a standard deck of 52 playing cards and aces can be either played as a high or low card. Any player may start out as the dealer, which then rotates from round to round in a counter-clockwise fashion. The player on the dealer's right cuts, then the dealer deals the cards face-down starting with the player on the right and continuing until each player receives 9 cards. If the dealer deals an incorrect amount of cards to any player, he forfeits the hand, and his cards are removed from the game. Cards that are not dealt remain in the deck, which is placed in the middle of the table and used throughout the game. The winner of the prior hand will become the dealer of the following hand. After the deal and before play begins, each player chooses one card from their hand and passes it face down to the player on
    7.00
    3 votes
    97
    Niagara

    Niagara

    • Designer: Thomas Liesching
    • Publisher: Rio Grande Games
    Niagara is a German-style board game designed by Thomas Liesching and published in 2004 by Zoch zum Spielen and Rio Grande Games. The game is played on a hinged board designed to sit atop the game box and represent Niagara Falls as a flap hanging over the box edge. The river is represented using clear plastic discs in a grooved surface, allowing board spaces to move downstream toward the waterfall. Players collect gems along a river. Players move canoes to transport the gems, and can steal gems from other players' canoes. They may also influence the speed with which the board spaces move downstream. The first player to acquire four gems of one colour, or one of each of the five colours, or seven gems of any colour, is the winner. Although the game box states that gems closer to the waterfall are of higher value, the game treats all colours equally. Given away at the Spiel 2005 game festival, Diamond Joe adds another canoe which is controlled indirectly by the players, and which participates in trades, generally bringing the harder-to-reach gems upstream. Released in 2006, Spirits of Niagara adds double-capacity canoes, pieces for a sixth player, additional paddle cards with new
    7.00
    3 votes
    98
    Tock

    Tock

    Tock is a board game, similar to Ludo or Sorry!, in which players race their four tokens around the game board from start to finish—the objective being to be the first to take all of one's tokens "home". Like Sorry!, it is played with cards rather than dice. Tock is a Cross and Circle game in the style of Pachisi, an Indian game played since the first millennium BC. Its exact source is unclear, but it probably began as a variant of Ludo, a board game which appeared in England in 1896. Some versions of the game use pawns or "men"; other versions use marbles instead, which advance on a wooden board with circular indentations in it to hold the marbles. While the game is designed on the basis of a French deck of cards with jokers removed, there are some versions that come with cards specially made for the game that depict the actions they allow. At the beginning of each round players are dealt a number of cards which they play in turns to move their tokens around the board. While most cards provide only a single specific number of fields to move forward, some cards have special functions. If at any time a token lands exactly on the field occupied by another token then the moved token
    7.00
    3 votes
    99
    Car Wars

    Car Wars

    • Publisher: Steve Jackson Games
    Car Wars is a vehicle combat simulation game developed by Steve Jackson Games. It was first published in late 1980 (1981). In Car Wars, players assume control of one or more automobiles, which may include any powered vehicle, from motorcycles to semi trucks. Optional rules include piloting helicopters, ultralights, balloons, boats, submarines and tanks. The vehicles are typically outfitted with weapons (such as missiles and machine guns), souped-up components (like heavy-duty fire-proof wheels, and nitro injectors), and defensive elements (armor plating and radar tracking systems). Within any number of settings, the players then direct their vehicles in combat. The published games use paper counters to represent vehicles in a simulated battle upon printed battlemaps. Most editions of the game were published to use a 1-inch = 15-feet scale (1:180 scale), although the Fifth Edition switched to 1-inch = 5-feet (1:60 scale). At this larger scale, players can use miniature toy vehicles such as Hot Wheels or Matchbox cars, S gauge model railroading scenery, or 28mm-30mm scale wargaming miniatures. Some play at yet other scales by using toys such as Micro Machines, or even 1/25th scale
    8.00
    2 votes
    100
    Concentration

    Concentration

    Concentration, also known as Memory, Pelmanism, Shinkei-suijaku, Pexeso or simply Pairs, is a card game in which all of the cards are laid face down on a surface and two cards are flipped face up over each turn. The object of the game is to turn over pairs of matching cards. Concentration can be played with any number of players or as solitaire and is an especially good game for young children, though adults may find it challenging and stimulating as well. The scheme is often used in quiz shows and can be employed as an educational game. Any deck of playing cards may be used, although there are special cards available, as shown in the picture above. The rules given here are for a standard deck of 52 cards, which are normally laid face down in 4 rows of 13 cards each. The two jokers may be included for a tableau of 6 rows of 9 cards each. In turn each player chooses two cards and turns them face up. If they are of the same rank and color (e.g. 6 of hearts and 6 of diamonds, queen of clubs and queen of spades, or both jokers, if used) then that player wins the pair and plays again. If they are not of the same rank and color, they are turned face down again and play passes to the
    8.00
    2 votes
    101
    Deflexion

    Deflexion

    Khet is a chess-like abstract strategy board game using lasers that was formerly known as Deflexion. Players take turns moving Egyptian-themed pieces around the playing field, firing their low-powered laser diode after each move. Most of the pieces are mirrored on one or more sides, allowing the players to alter the path of the laser through the playing field. When a piece is struck by a laser on a non-mirrored side, it is eliminated from the game. A few elements of the gameplay, therefore, are slightly similar to the computer game Laser Chess. Under its original name, the game was a Mensa Select Award winner. Its name was changed on September 15, 2006. The new game retains the same rules of gameplay, but has a different design, including a new color scheme and a new box design. Under the new name, the game was one of five finalists for the 2007 Toy of the Year award. Professor Michael Larson and two students, Del Segura and Luke Hooper, designed the game as a class project at Tulane University. (Professor Larson is now at the University of Colorado.) The game was introduced to the public in the spring of 2005, and was first brought to prominence at the New York Toy Fair of that
    8.00
    2 votes
    102
    Dominoes

    Dominoes

    • Genre: Tile-based game
    Dominoes (or dominos) generally refers to the collective gaming pieces making up a domino set (sometimes called a deck or pack) or to the subcategory of tile games played with domino pieces. In the area of mathematical tilings and polyominoes, the word domino often refers to any rectangle formed from joining two congruent squares edge to edge. The traditional Sino-European domino set consists of 28 dominoes, colloquially nicknamed bones, cards, tiles, tickets, stones, or spinners. Each domino is a rectangular tile with a line dividing its face into two square ends. Each end is marked with a number of spots (also called pips) or is blank. The backs of the dominoes in a set are indistinguishable, either blank or having some common design. A domino set is a generic gaming device, similar to playing cards or dice, in that a variety of games can be played with a set. The earliest mention of dominoes is from Yuan Dynasty China, found in the text Former Events in Wulin. Dominoes first appeared in Italy during the 18th century, and although it is unknown how Chinese dominoes developed into the modern game, it is speculated that Italian missionaries in China may have brought the game to
    8.00
    2 votes
    103
    Kaiser

    Kaiser

    Kaiser, or three-spot, is a trick-taking card game popular in the prairie provinces in Canada, especially Saskatchewan and parts of its neighbouring provinces. It is played with four players in two partnerships with a 32-card deck. The origins of this game are a mystery and there seems to be no historical record (spoken or written) that justifies it being a solely Saskatchewan-area game. It is especially popular among Ukrainian communities, and was possibly brought to Canada by Ukrainian immigrants, although it is not now played in Ukraine. Kaiser is played by four people: two teams of two players each. Unlike many card games, only 32 cards are used out of a normal 52-card deck. The deck contains the cards from 8 to ace inclusively (8, 9, 10, jack, queen, king, ace) for each suit. The other four cards are the 7 of clubs, 7 of diamonds, 5 of hearts and 3 of spades. All 32 cards are dealt out: 8 to each player. Unique to Kaiser, the cards may be dealt in any order to any player at so long as each player ends up with 8 cards. In a clockwise manner, starting with the player to the dealer's left, each player may bid on the number of points that he believes he can make. The minimum bid
    8.00
    2 votes
    104
    Mao

    Mao

    Mao (or Mau) is a card game of the shedding family, in which the aim is to get rid of all of the cards in hand without breaking certain unspoken rules. The game is from a subset of the Stops family, and is similar in structure to the card game Uno or Crazy Eights. The game forbids its players from explaining the rules, and new players are often told only "the only rule you may be told is this one." The ultimate goal of the game is to be the first player to get rid of all the cards in their hand. Specifics are discovered through trial and error. A player who breaks a rule is penalized by being given an additional card from the deck. The person giving the penalty must state what the incorrect action was, without explaining the rule that was broken. There are many variants of Mao in existence. While beginners sometimes assume that the dealer (sometimes called the "Chairman", the "Mao" or the "Grand Master") and other experienced players are simply making up possibly inconsistent rules (as in the game Mornington Crescent), the rules of Mao are consistent within each game and can be followed correctly. Mao is most likely descended from the German game Mau Mau, or from Eleusis, which was
    8.00
    2 votes
    105
    MooT

    MooT

    MooT is a board game that consists of tough questions about the etymology, semantics, and grammar of the English language. It is published and distributed world-wide by Blair Arts, Ltd. MooT consists of 1008 difficult questions about the semantics, etymology, and grammar of the English language, as well as one 12-sided die and a crib-board-like score-keeping board. Because each question demands prolonged thought and discussion, MooT should be played in teams with team-mates who like to talk. The following describes the two ways that MooT can be played. 1. Everyone is on the same team -- i.e., the collective. Place the red marker on the square labeled RED and the blue marker on BLUE. Using the red marker, the collective plays the left side of the board up to 30 and blue plays the right. 2. A member of the collective rolls the die and selects a question that matches the number rolled (see Card Values below). 3. Without looking at the answer, the member reads the question out loud; all members now discuss it until an answer is agreed upon. 4. If the answer is correct, move the red marker forward the amount shown on the die. If the answer is incorrect, move the blue marker forward the
    8.00
    2 votes
    106
    Old Maid

    Old Maid

    Old maid is a Victorian card game for two to eight players probably deriving from an ancient gambling game in which the loser pays for the drinks. It is known in Germany as Schwarzer Peter, in Sweden as Svarte Petter and in Finland as Musta Pekka (all meaning "black Peter") and in France as le pouilleux ("the lousy/louse-ridden one") or vieux garçon ("old boy"). The game spawns an element of bluffing, commonly used in poker. There are retail card decks specifically for playing old maid, but it is just as easy to play with a regular deck of 52 cards. When using a regular deck, a card is either added or removed, resulting in one unmatchable card. The most popular choices are to remove the ace of clubs or queen of clubs or to add a single joker. The ace of spades, queen of spades or joker, respectively, becomes the "old maid"; it cannot be matched, and whoever holds it at the end of the game is the loser. It is possible to discard a single card from the deck face-down; if this is done, players cannot know which card is the old maid. The dealer deals all of the cards to the players. Some players may have more cards than others; this is acceptable. Players look at their cards and
    8.00
    2 votes
    107
    Trouble

    Trouble

    • Genre: Children's game
    Trouble is a board game in which players compete to be the first to send four pieces all the way around a board. Pieces are moved according to the roll of a die. Trouble was developed by the Kohner Brothers and initially manufactured by Irwin Toy Ltd., later by Milton Bradley (now part of Hasbro). The game was launched in the United States in 1965. It is very similar to the much older game, Mensch ärgere dich nicht. Players can send opponents' pieces back to the start by landing on them. Pieces are protected from capture after arriving in the final few slots. Unlike more complex race games, however, counters cannot be maneuvered to block opponents' moves. The most notable feature of Trouble is the "Pop-O-Matic" die container. This device is a clear plastic hemisphere containing the die, placed over a flexible sheet. Players roll the die by pressing down quickly on the bubble, which flexes the sheet and causes the die to tumble upon its rebound. The Pop-O-Matic container produces a popping sound when it is used, and prevents the die from being lost (and players from cheating by improper rolling). It allows for quick die rolls, and players' turns can be performed in rapid succession.
    8.00
    2 votes
    108
    Alhambra

    Alhambra

    • Designer: Dirk Henn
    • Publisher: Queen Games
    • Genre: Tile-based game
    Alhambra (German: Der Palast von Alhambra, literally " The Palace of the Alhambra") is a 2003 tile-based German-style board game designed by Dirk Henn. It was originally published in Germany by Queen Games in a language-interdependent version; an English-specific version was released in North America by the now-defunct Überplay. The game is an Arabian-themed update, set during the construction of the Alhambra palace in 14th century Granada, of the 1998 stock trading board game Stimmt So!, which in turn was an update of the 1992 mafia influence board game Al Capone; the original version was subsequently released as Alhambra: The Card Game. Alhambra won the Spiel des Jahres award, the Schweizer Spielepreis for Family Games, the As d'Or and the Essen Feather for the year of its release and placed second in the Deutscher Spiele Preis. Its success has led to the release of numerous expansion packs and spin-off games, and is becoming Queen Games' flagship franchise. The game consists of a deck of "currency cards" of various values in four currencies (suits) and a bag of "building tiles" of various prices, as well as a number of boards (a currency market, a building market, a reserve
    9.00
    1 votes
    109
    Captive Queens

    Captive Queens

    Captive Queens is a solitaire card game using a deck of 52 playing cards. The game is so named because the queens become "enclosed" as the foundations are built. There are two ways that the queens are played in this game: either they are laid in the center of the table immediately or shuffled into the deck and laid out later. Either way, their role is purely decorative and play no functional role in the game. The game starts by laying cards from the stock one at a time into a wastepile in search for fives or sixes. Once any of these cards are found, it becomes a foundation and can be placed on a circle surrounding the area where queens are placed; it can be built upon immediately. The foundations' places in this circle are irrelevant. The fives then receive cards lower than five while the sixes receive higher cards, all by suit. Here's the chart of which cards are placed on these cards: After the foundation cards are found, the rest of the stock is dealt to look for cards that can be built on the foundations. In case the queens are shuffled into the deck, when a queen is found, it is placed on the center. Once the stock runs out, the cards are gathered from the wastepile and become
    9.00
    1 votes
    110
    Jass

    Jass

    Jass (pronounced /jas/) is a trick taking card game and a distinctive branch of the Marriage family, popularly supposed to be the progenitor of the American game of Pinochle. It is popular throughout the Alemannic German speaking area of Europe (German-speaking Switzerland, Liechtenstein, Alsace part of France, Vorarlberg province of Austria, South-Western Germany (Baden-Wuerttemberg land) and beyond in Romansh-speaking Graubünden and in French-speaking Suisse romande of Switzerland as well as German-speaking South Tyrol in Italy. The most common variant of Jass is the Schieber (in Vorarlberg also known as Krüzjass), played by two teams of two players each. It is often considered Switzerland's national card game, and is so popular there that the Swiss have come to apply the name Jass to trick-taking card games in general. Jass, first mentioned in Switzerland in 1796, was originally the name of the highest trump, the Jack, in a family of related games originally spread from the Netherlands during the Late Middle Ages. Today, Jass is the name of the game. The traditional 36-card, Swiss-German-suited pack with which it is played is called Jasskarten. By extension, Jass is often used
    9.00
    1 votes
    111
    Nightmare

    Nightmare

    • Genre: Party game
    Atmosfear (previously known as Nightmare) is an Australian horror video board game series released from 1991 by Phillip Tanner and Brett Clements. Two years after the game's launch in 1991, the two millionth Nightmare board game was sold. Since then, three game expansions have been released. A major refresh to the series was released in 1995, titled The Harbingers, which sold above the industry's sales predictions in Australia and became one of the top-ten best-selling games in the United States and the United Kingdom within months of its release. The series was revived in 2004 with the release of The Gatekeeper, which included a DVD to replace the video cassette which, with the help of random programming, allows the creators to give a whole new game every time the DVD is played. A second DVD board game was released in 2006 entitled Khufu the Mummy. The object of the games is to collect six different coloured "Keystones" and thus beat the host. For most games in the series, the "Gatekeeper" is the host but other characters have "stepped in" and taken his place. To beat the host, the players must face their worst fear. If none of the players is able to win the game within the time
    9.00
    1 votes
    112
    Piquet

    Piquet

    • Genre: Trick-taking game
    Piquet (/ˈpɪkɨt/; French pronunciation: [pike]) is an early 16th-century trick-taking card game for two players. Piquet has long been regarded as one of the all-time great card games still being played. It was first mentioned on a written reference dating to 1535, in Gargantua and Pantagruel by Rabelais. Although legend attributes the game's creation to Stephen de Vignolles, also known as La Hire, a knight in the reign of Charles VII during the Hundred Years' War, it may possibly have come into France from Spain because the words "pique" and "repique", the main features of the game, are of Spanish origin. The game was introduced in Germany during the Thirty Years War, and texts of that period provide substantial evidence of its vogue, like the metaphorical use of the word "Repique" in the 1634-8 political poem Allamodisch Picket Spiel ("Piquet Game à la mode"), which reflects the growing popularity of the game at that time. As with other games like Bête, the substantive form of the word "Piquet" was turned into a verb and this is used substantially by Rist's 1640 Spiele: die man Picquetten who gives the word his grudging assent. Until the early 20th century, Piquet was perhaps the
    9.00
    1 votes
    113
    Pitchnut

    Pitchnut

    Pitchnut is a wooden tabletop game of French Canadian origins, similar to carrom and pichenotte, with mechanics that lie somewhere between pocket billiards and air hockey. There are no records of the game being mass-produced. All existing boards are handmade and frequently handed down from generation to generation. The game is common on the farming villages surrounding Trois-Rivières and Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada. Very little about the history of the game has been written. Crokinole historian Wayne Kelly states that the game is one of many efforts to combine crokinole with pichenotte, the French Canadian version of carrom. A similar board was patented in 1893 by E.L. Williams, but that game board had 8 pegs in the center of the board (like crokinole) but had only one peg in front of each pocket. Wayne Kelly's crokinole.com web site shows an image of a board that looks very similar to pitchnut, but the pegs in front of the pockets take the form of a wicket through which the players had to shoot their pieces, according to Mr. Kelly. Pitchnut is primarily played in the farming villages around Three Rivers and Sherbrooke, Quebec. As descendents of those villages moved to small cities
    9.00
    1 votes
    114
    Primo visto

    Primo visto

    Primo visto, Primavista, Prima-vista, Primi-vist, Primiuiste, Primofistula, or even Primefisto, is a 16th-century gambling card game fashionable c. 1530-1640. Very little is known about this game, but judging by the etymology of the words used to describe the many local variants of the game, it appears to be one of Italian origin. Based upon references in period literature it appears to be closely related to the game of Primero, with some later authorities claiming that the two games were in fact the very same. Opposing claims to this theory include the fact that the earliest known reference to the name Primo visto appears in Greene's "Notable Discovery of Coosnage" published in 1591, more than half a century after the name Primero was in common use. John Minsheu, an English linguist and lexicographer, claims that Primero and Prima vista (hence Primo visto) were two distinct card games - "That is, first and first seen, because he that can shew such an order of cardes first winnes the game", although he gives but one set of names and just one reason for their names Robert Nares in his book "A Glossary" states that the circumstance of the cards being counted in the same way, with the
    9.00
    1 votes
    115
    Slapjack

    Slapjack

    Slapjack, also known as Slaps, is a simple standard-deck card game, generally played among children. It can often be a child's first introduction to playing cards. The game is related to Egyptian Ratscrew and is also sometimes known as Heart Attack. It is also related to the simpler 'slap' card games often called snap. A 52-card deck is divided into face-down stacks as equally as possible between all players. One player removes the top card of his stack and places it face-up on the playing surface within reach of all players. The players take turns doing this in a clockwise manner until a Jack is placed on the pile. At this point, any and all players may attempt to slap the pile with the hand they used to place the card; whoever covers the stack with his hand first takes the pile, shuffles it, and adds it to the bottom of his stack. If a card covers the jack it does not count. When a player has run out of cards, he has one more chance to slap a jack and get back in the game, but if he fails, he is out. Gameplay continues with hands of this sort until one player has acquired all of the cards. Snap is a popular card game in which the object is to win all the cards. Gameplay is
    9.00
    1 votes
    116
    Sorry!

    Sorry!

    • Publisher: Parker Brothers
    • Genre: Children's game
    Sorry! is a board game that is based on the ancient Cross and Circle game Pachisi. Players try to travel around the board with their pieces faster than any other player. Distributed by Parker Brothers, Sorry! is marketed for two to four players, ages six through adult. The game title comes from the many ways in which a player can negate the progress of another, while issuing an apologetic "Sorry!" The objective is to be the first player to get all four of his or her colour pawns from his or her Start location to his or her Home space. The pawns are normally moved in a clockwise direction, but can be moved backward if directed. Movement of pawns are directed by the drawing of a card. The board game is laid out in a square with fifteen spaces per side, with each player assigned his or her own colored Start location and Home locations offset towards the center, one per side. Four five-square paths, one per color, lead from the common outer path towards a player's Home and are designated his or her "Safety Zone." On each side are two "Slides," grouping four or five spaces each. Older versions of Sorry! contain a coloured "diamond space" directly one space back from each start square,
    9.00
    1 votes
    117
    Take it Easy

    Take it Easy

    Take It Easy is an abstract strategy board game created by Peter Burley. It can be characterized as a spatial bingo-like game, and has been published by Ravensburger and subsequently by several other publishers since 1983. Each player gets a board with places for 19 hexagon tiles to place in a hexagon shape. Additionally, players get identical sets of tiles which have different types of colored/numbered lines crossing in three directions. One player draws a tile randomly and then tells the others which he drew. Each player then puts their matching tile on their board in any available spot. This is repeated until the board is filled. The object is to complete same colored/numbered lines across your board, for which points are scored according to the numbers on those lines. The maximum score possible is 307.
    9.00
    1 votes
    118
    Novuss

    Novuss

    Novuss (also known as koroona) is a two-player (or four-player, doubles) game of physical skill which is closely related to carrom and pocket billiards. Novuss is a national sport in Latvia. The board is approximately 100 centimetres (39 in) square, typically made of wood, has pockets in each corner, and lines marked on the surface. The board is usually placed on a stand, but may be placed on a barrel or other surface that allows the pockets to hang down properly. It uses small discs instead of balls, and each player has their own small puck instead of the cue ball used in other cue sports. Players use a small cue stick to propel their pucks into their colored object discs (the novuss equivalent of object balls), knocking them into the pockets. The winner is the first one to sink all eight of their object discs (of which there are sixteen in total in two different-coloured sets, plus the two pucks). The game is sometimes informally referred to as "Baltic billiards" or "Scandinavian billiards", but these are misnomers, since although it is a cue sport in the broad sense, novuss does not use billiard tables and balls. According to Jānis-Ēriks Piebalgs, President of Latvian Novuss
    6.67
    3 votes
    119
    Panguingue

    Panguingue

    • Genre: Matching game
    Panguingue (pronounced pan-geen-eee), Tagalog Pangginggí, also known as Pan, is a 19th century gambling card game probably of Philippine origin similar to rummy, first described in America in 1905. It used to be particularly popular in Las Vegas and other casinos in the American southwest. Its popularity has been waning, and now is only found in a handful of casinos in California, in house games and at online poker sites. The game traditionally is played using a 320-card deck, constructed from eight decks of playing cards, removing all eights, nines, tens, and Jokers. In some localities, 5 or 6 decks are used, and often one set of spades is removed. Each player pays an ante one chip, called the top. The value of the top sets the value of all pays in the game. Some high stakes games are played with a two chip ante, which is called double tops. The rotation of dealing and playing is to the right, not to the left as in most card games. Each player receives 10 cards. Beginning with the eldest hand, each player either folds their hand (going out on top) or agrees to play. The player who folds loses their top. If all but one fold, the final player receives the tops, and the hand is
    6.67
    3 votes
    120
    Sheepshead

    Sheepshead

    Sheepshead or Sheephead is a trick-taking card game related to the Skat family of games. It is the Americanized version of a card game that originated in Central Europe in the late 18th century under the German name Schafkopf. Although Schafkopf literally means "sheepshead", it has nothing to do with sheep. The term probably was derived and translated incorrectly from Middle High German and referred to playing cards on a barrel head (from kopf, meaning head, and Schaff, meaning a barrel). In the United States, sheepshead is most commonly played in Wisconsin, which has a large German-American population. Numerous tournaments are held throughout Wisconsin during the year, with the largest tournament being the "Nationals", held annually during the first or second weekend in November, and mini-tournaments held hourly throughout Germanfest in Milwaukee during the last weekend of each July. Sheepshead is most commonly played by five players, but variants exist to allow for two to eight players. The six-player version consists of one player dealing to five others. The dealer sits out for that round, but the position rotates among the players. Sheepshead is played with 7-8-9-10-J-Q-K-A in
    6.67
    3 votes
    121
    Tales of the Crystals

    Tales of the Crystals

    Tales of the Crystals is an interactive children's fantasy role playing game, aimed mostly towards young girls (ages 8 and up). It was published in 1993 by Milton Bradley Company. The game contains an audio cassette that gives the players certain tasks to do to guide them through four different adventures. There are also cards that list various tasks as well. The game also contains a few props to add to the excitement of the game such as "magic" crystals and a journal that the players can use to write about their adventures. The game requires the players to co-operate and interact together. It is required of the players to act, recite, and perform tasks. As opposed to remaining seated and inactive during gameplay, players must move around their physical environment and are encouraged to use their imagination to recreate a fantasy world around them.
    6.67
    3 votes
    122
    Torres

    Torres

    • Designer: Wolfgang Kramer
    • Publisher: Rio Grande Games
    Torres is a German-style board game designed by Wolfgang Kramer and Michael Kiesling and published in 1999 by FX Schmid in German and by Rio Grande Games in English. The game strongly influenced Kramer and Kiesling's Mask Trilogy of games, but is not considered to be a part of the trilogy. The game has since been reprinted (in 2005). Game play revolves around constructing an abstract set of castles set on a grid. Each player is allotted several knight pieces, which are placed within the castles. The higher the knights' placement during a scoring round, the greater the payoff for the controlling player. The number of points a player receives per phase is based on the height times the surface area of the highest point of the castle that the knight is standing upon. If the knight is on the 3rd level of a castle, and the castle occupies 5 squares on the board, the player receives 15 points. A King piece is also placed on the board and acts as a bonus modifier to any knights that occupy the same level and castle as the King at the end of a phase. The game is composed of three different phases, with each phase having three to four rounds each depending on the number of players. Each
    6.67
    3 votes
    123
    Winner Card Game

    Winner Card Game

    Winner (Chinese: 争上游; Pinyin: Zheng Shangyou) is a card game popular in China, similar to the game President, the game Big Two, and other shedding games. It is the game from which Tien Len and other similar games are derived. The game uses a standard 52-card deck, with thirteen cards in four suits. Diamond is the lowest suit, followed by clubs, then hearts, then spade. Like Big Two, twos rank high, and the rest of the deck ranks as usual: aces above kings, kings above queens, and so on, with threes being the lowest. The Jokers are the highest singles, and the red joker ranks higher than the black joker. Two decks may be used for four or more players. Cards may be played as singles, pairs, three of a kind, full house, four of a kind, straights (3 or more in a row), straight flushes (3 or more in a row of the same suit), pair straights, and three of a kind straights. The leading card to a trick sets down the type of play. The combinations and their rankings are as follows. The dealer (who may be chosen by cutting the cards, as usual) shuffles the deck to begin with and begins dealing out the cards singly, starting with himself, in a clockwise manner around the table. The cards are
    6.67
    3 votes
    124
    Beggar-My-Neighbour

    Beggar-My-Neighbour

    Beggar-My-Neighbour (alternatively Beggar-Thy-Neighbour or Beggar-Your-Neighbour, each a bowdlerization reflecting the substitution of "beggar" for "bugger"), also known by the etymologically unrelated names Jack Daniels, Beat Jack Out of Doors, Beat Your Neighbour Out of Doors, Beat your Neighbour Out of Town, Strip Jack Naked, Picture and Draw the Well Dry, is a simple card game somewhat similar in nature to War, and has spawned a more complicated variant, Egyptian Ratscrew. The game was probably invented in Britain and has been known there since at least the 1860s. It appears in Charles Dickens's 1861 novel Great Expectations, as the only card game Pip, the book's protagonist, as a child seems to know how to play. A standard 52-card deck is divided equally between two players, and the two stacks of cards are placed on the table face down. The first player lays down his top card face up, and the opponent plays his top card on it, and this goes on alternately as long as no ace or face card (King, Queen, or Jack) appears. If either player turns up such a card, his opponent has to pay a penalty: four cards for an ace, three for a King, two for a Queen, or one for a Jack. When he has
    7.50
    2 votes
    125
    Cinch

    Cinch

    Cinch, also known as Double Pedro or High Five, is an American trick-taking card game derived from Pitch via Pedro. Developed in Denver, Colorado in the 1880s, it was soon regarded as the most important member of the All Fours family but went out of fashion with the rise of Auction Bridge. The game is primarily played by 4 players in fixed partnerships, but can also be played by 2–6 individual players. The game uses a regular pack of 52 cards. As in Pedro, all points are awarded to the winners of the tricks containing certain cards rather than to the players who originally held them. This includes the Game point, which goes to the winner of the trump Ten. Five points each go the winner of the Right Pedro (Five of trumps) and Left Pedro (Off-Five), respectively. The game is played for, for example, 42 or 51 points, of which up to 14 can be won in a single deal. The name Cinch comes from a Mexican word that is applied to the practice of securing the tricks that contain a Left or Right Pedro, but it was once also common to refer to the Left Pedro as the Cinch. The following rules are based on Foster's Complete Hoyle of 1897 and are very similar to the modern Bicycle rules. The game is
    7.50
    2 votes
    126
    Contract bridge

    Contract bridge

    • Genre: Trick-taking game
    Contract bridge, or simply bridge, is a trick-taking game using a standard 52-card deck. It is played by four players in two competing partnerships, with partners sitting opposite each other around a table. Millions of people play bridge worldwide in clubs, tournaments, online and with friends at home, making it one of the world's most popular card games, particularly among seniors. The World Bridge Federation is the governing body for international competitive bridge. The game consists of several deals each progressing through four phases: dealing the cards, the auction (also referred to as bidding), playing the hand, and scoring the results. Dealing the cards and scoring the results are procedural activities while the auction and playing the hand are the two actively competitive phases of the game. In its most basic form, bridge is a game played by two competing partnerships, i.e. four people. For purposes of scoring and reference, each player is identified by one of the points of the compass and thus North and South play against East and West. More can participate, either as individuals or pairs or as teams of up to six, in formal tournaments or social gatherings where the
    7.50
    2 votes
    127
    Game of the Goose

    Game of the Goose

    • Genre: Roll and move
    The Game Of The Goose or Goose game is a board game with uncertain origins. Some people connect the game with the Phaistos Disc (because its spiral shape), others claim that it was originally a gift from Francesco I de' Medici of Florence to King Philip II of Spain sometime between 1574 and 1587, while the latest theories attribute to the Templars the creation of the game. According to these theories the Templars, possibly inspired by other games or discs (as the Phaistos Disc) from the Holy Land, developed a game and a secret or encrypted guide to the Way of St. James, representing each numbered space in the game a different stage in this journey. Furthermore, the hidden messages would not be just in the game but in the monuments, cathedrals and churches along the Way to Santiago de Compostela. In June 1597 John Wolfe had attested that the game existed in London. It is thought to be the prototype for many of the commercial European racing board games of recent centuries. The game is mostly played in Europe and seen as family entertainment. Commercial versions of the game appeared in the 1880s and 1890s, and feature typical old European characteristics such as an old well and
    7.50
    2 votes
    128
    Junta

    Junta

    • Genre: Board game
    Junta is a board game designed by Vincent Tsao originally published by Capri in 1975, and later published, as of 1985, by West End Games. Players compete as the corrupt power elite families of a fictional parody of a stereotypical banana republic (specifically Republica de los Bananas) trying to get as much money as possible into their Swiss bank accounts before the foreign aid money runs out. Fighting in the republic's capital during recurrent coup attempts encompasses most of the game's equipment, rules and playtime. This game-within-the-game is however actually tangential to the players' main goal. The length of the game depends on how often coups are declared, but can often exceed six hours. Perhaps as a result of this, the game never achieved broad-based popularity, although it still retains a cult following of fans. Since West End Games filed for bankruptcy in 1998, copies of the game became hard to find until the 3rd edition was released in 2005. The game's title is taken from the Spanish term "Junta" which originally referred to the executive bodies that frequently came to power after a military coup in 20th century Latin America (the Spanish version is called Golpe, which
    7.50
    2 votes
    129
    Little Spider

    Little Spider

    Little Spider is a solitaire card game using a deck of 52 playing cards. Because of its form of game play and dealing, it should not be confused with two other solitaire games: Spider and its one-deck cousin Spiderette. Game play is composed of two parts. At first, eight cards are dealt into two rows of four cards each, with a space in the middle for the four foundations. At the first part of game play, two aces of one color and two kings of the other should be found and transferred to the foundations. When at least one of them is available, it is built immediately; the kings are built down to ace while the aces are built up to kings, in both cases by suit. Game play in this part is composed strictly of moving cards from the two rows to the foundations. Cards from the upper row can be placed on any of the foundations, while cards from the lower row can only be placed on the foundations directly on top of it. Once possible plays are made, eight new cards are dealt from the stock, one on each pile, empty or otherwise. Once the entire stock is dealt, the second part of game play begins. At the second part of game play, cards from both rows can be placed on the foundations as well as
    7.50
    2 votes
    130
    Royal Game of Ur

    Royal Game of Ur

    The Royal Game of Ur, also known as the Game of Twenty Squares, refers to two game boards found in the Royal Tombs of Ur in Iraq by Sir Leonard Woolley in the 1920s. The two boards date from the First Dynasty of Ur, before 2600 BC, thus making the Royal Game of Ur one of the older examples of board gaming equipment found, although Senet boards found in Egyptian graves predate it as much as 900 years. The game is still played. One of the two boards is exhibited in the collections of the British Museum in London. The Royal Game of Ur was played with two sets, one black and one white, of seven markers and three tetrahedral dice. The rules of the game as it was played in Mesopotamia are not known but there is a reliable reconstruction of gameplay based on a cuneiform tablet of Babylonian origin dating from 177–176 BC by the scribe Itti-Marduk-Balāṭu. It is universally agreed that the Royal Game of Ur, like Senet, is a race game. Both games may be predecessors to the present-day backgammon. A graffito version of the game was discovered on one of the human-headed winged bull gate sentinels from the palace of Sargon II (721 - 705 BC) in the city of Khorsabad, now in the British Museum in
    7.50
    2 votes
    131
    Shadows Over Camelot

    Shadows Over Camelot

    • Designer: Bruno Cathala
    • Genre: Board game
    Shadows Over Camelot is an Arthurian-themed board game designed by Serge Laget and Bruno Cathala. The game was also published in French as Les Chevaliers de la Table Ronde and in German as Schatten über Camelot. Players take on the roles of Knights of the Round Table (with the possibility that one player takes the role of traitor) and play the game by fulfilling quests. The game is cooperative in that a shared victory or loss is possible in the absence of a traitor, and a traitor does not benefit by revealing himself too early. The endgame with a revealed traitor is, by contrast, a competitive game of asymmetric teams. The game was unveiled by the publishers Days of Wonder at the 2005 American International Toy Fair and was more widely released in May and June 2005. In 2008, an expansion for Shadows over Camelot was released titled Merlin's Company. The Knights of the Round Table in the game are King Arthur, Sir Galahad, Sir Gawain, Sir Kay, Sir Percival, Sir Palamedes, Sir Tristan of Lyonesse. Additionally, an alternate character, Sir Bedivere, has been distributed in games trade magazines and at conventions as a promotional item. The character is also available as part of the
    7.50
    2 votes
    132
    Stock Ticker

    Stock Ticker

    • Genre: Economic simulation
    Stock Ticker is a now out of print board game that was popular upon its release and is still played today. It was released by Copp-Clark Publishing, a venerable Canadian publisher. The game has six stocks, which in fact are commodities. These six are gold, silver, Bonds, oil, industrials, and grain. During gameplay all the stocks are identical. Each stock begins costing a dollar apiece. Players are given starting money of $5000 and they buy shares in groups of 500, 1000, 2000, or 5000. The stocks move based on the throw of three dice. The first die picks the stock that will be affected, with one of the commodities on each side of the die. The second die determines what whether the stock will move up, down, or pay a dividend. The third die decides if the movement or dividend will be five, ten, or twenty cents. For instance a roll of Industrials, Down, 20 will move the industrials stock from its start value of $1.00 to 80 cents. A roll of Grain, Up, 5 would move grain up to $1.05. Dividends are paid out only for any stocks that are at or above $1.00 in value. For instance, a five cent dividend pays five cents for each share owned. Thus if a roll is Oil, Dividend, 10, and you own a
    7.50
    2 votes
    133
    Tri

    Tri

    Tri is a two- or three-player matching card game in which players attempt to achieve at least 65 net points in one suit. The suit is not verbally declared; players select a suit by using plays, discards, and pick-ups as signals. The game was developed in March 2001 by Will M. Baker and Pete Richert, in an attempt to create a card game that was entirely cooperative. The game went through many revisions and much playtesting, seeing crucial rules added and ineffective rules dropped. The game reached its final form sometime in April 2001. Tri was created using the 5-suited "Instinct" deck produced by Wizards of the Coast. The suit names (Stars, Fire, Skulls, Drips, and Brocs) were derived directly from the images on the "Instinct" cards. ('Brocs' is, perhaps, the only obscure suit title; the true suit image is that of a tree, but it has an uncanny resemblance to broccoli.) The title comes simply from the game's process of "trying" to select a suit. Tri was developed by Will M. Baker and Pete Richert in March 2001. A computerized version is in planning stages. Played in a format similar to Gin, players each take turns drawing from either the discard pile or the deck, then discarding,
    7.50
    2 votes
    134
    Truco

    Truco

    Truco is a variant of Truc and a popular trick-taking card game originary from Valencia and Balearic Islands (Spain) and played in Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay, Italy (in Piemonte, in Lomellina, and a particular variant in the towns Porto San Giorgio, Sirolo, Numana, Porto Recanati, Potenza Picena (Marche) and Paulilatino (Sardegna) ), Uruguay, southern Chile and Venezuela. It is played using a Spanish deck, by two, four or six players, divided into two teams. Except for the variant played in Rio Grande do Sul and Santa Catarina, in the Brazilian states of Minas Gerais, São Paulo and many others, Truco is played with a 32-card French deck - See below. Each player is dealt three cards from a subset of the deck consisting of the numbers 1 to 7 and figures sota in Spanish or valete in Portuguese (jack, worth 10), caballo in Spanish or dama in Portuguese (equivalent to a queen, worth 11) and rey in Spanish or rei in Portuguese (king, worth 12). The most common form of the game is the four-player version, in which there are two teams of two players, who sit opposite each other. For six players, there are two teams of three players, with every second player on the same team. The game is
    7.50
    2 votes
    135
    Tsumeshogi

    Tsumeshogi

    Tsumeshogi (詰将棋, tsumeshōgi) or tsume is the Japanese term for a shogi problem in which the goal is to checkmate the opponent's King. Tsume problems present a situation that might occur in a shogi game, and the solver must find out how to achieve checkmate. It is similar to a chess problem. Tsume problems have set rules for how they must be constructed and completed. If the solver breaks any of the rules, he has not solved the problem correctly. If the composer breaks any rules, he has not constructed a tsumeshogi. Tsume problems can be used to fulfill one of two tasks: to train in shogi strategy or to be created as a work of art. Tsume problems are considered very good training for playing shogi. They teach not only how to effectively checkmate the king but also to predict moves and plan out a long series of moves before achieving a goal. There are many websites and books dedicated to tsume problems for this purpose. Many shogi players for centuries have created tsume problems with long and deliberate mating lines as artwork. They might consist of the pieces making geometric shapes, a theme which is used throughout the problem, the removal of all pieces on the board (called a
    7.50
    2 votes
    136
    Canasta

    Canasta

    • Genre: Matching game
    Canasta ( /kəˈnæstə/; Spanish for "basket") is a card game of the rummy family of games believed to be a variant of 500 Rum. Although many variations exist for 2, 3, 5 or 6 players, it is most commonly played by four in two partnerships with two standard decks of cards. Players attempt to make melds of 7 cards of the same rank and "go out" by playing all cards in their hand. It is the only partnership member of the family of Rummy games to achieve the status of a classic. The game of Canasta was devised by Segundo Santos and Alberto Serrato in Montevideo, Uruguay, in 1939. In the 1940s the game quickly spread in myriad variations to Chile, Peru, Brazil and Argentina, where its rules were further refined before being introduced to the United States in 1948, where it was then referred to as the Argentine Rummy game by Ottilie H. Reilly in 1949 and Michael Scully of Coronet magazine in 1953. The game quickly became a card-craze boom in the 1950s providing a sales avalanche of card sets, card trays and books about the subject. The classic game is for four players in two partnerships. Variations exist for two and three player games wherein each plays alone, and also for a six player
    5.50
    4 votes
    137
    Big Two

    Big Two

    Big Two (also known as Deuces and other names, see below; Chinese: 大老二;; pinyin: dà lǎo èr; Cantonese: 鋤大D; jyutping: co4 daai6 di2) is a card game similar to the game of Asshole, Crazy Eights, Bullshit, Winner, and other shedding games. It is sometimes called "Chinese poker" because of its Chinese origin and its use of poker hands, though there is actually a different game by that name of an entirely different nature. In Malta it is often referred to as Giappuniza or Ciniza due to its Asian origin. This card game has many names, including Big Deuce, Big Two, Top Dog, "The Hannah Game" (used in Canada), Da Lao Er (Mandarin Chinese), Sho Tai Ti, Choh Dai Di, Dai Di (Cantonese), Cap Sa (Hokkien, used in Indonesia), and Pusoy Dos (a Philippine variant of the game). A common mistake is to confuse this game with Tien Len or Thirteen or 13 because these two games are actually different in the sense that Big Two involves poker hands but Tien Len does not. The game is very popular in East Asia and South East Asia, especially throughout China (including Hong Kong and Macau), Taiwan, Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore. It is played both casually and as a gambling game. It is usually played
    6.33
    3 votes
    138
    Cartagena

    Cartagena

    • Designer: Leo Colovini
    • Publisher: Rio Grande Games
    Cartagena is a critically acclaimed German-style board game released in 2000, that takes as its theme the legendary 1672 pirate-led jailbreak from the dreaded fortress of Cartagena. The game supposedly became popular in the pirate coves of the Caribbean. With its very simple concept, this game of strategy gives each player a group of six pirates and the objective is to have all six escape through the tortuous underground passage that connects the fortress to the port, where a sloop is waiting for them. The first player to move all of his or her pirates from the Cartagena prison to the sloop is the winner. The game board and its pieces were designed by Leo Colovini and drawn by artists Christoph Clasen, Claus Stephan, Didier Guiserix, Martin Hoffmann, and Studio Tapiro. The board itself is made up of six double-sided sections, each of which has a different permutation of the same six pictures: daggers, pirate hats, pistols, bottles of rum, skulls, and skeleton keys. These six sections can be combined in any order, to make thousands of different games (although nowhere near as many as the 720 combinations theoretically possible). Each player is dealt six cards out of a set of 102: 17
    6.33
    3 votes
    139
    Don't Break the Ice

    Don't Break the Ice

    • Genre: Children's game
    Don't Break the Ice is a children's tabletop game for two to four players ages 3 and up. Originally marketed by Schaper Toys in 1968, the game is presently manufactured by Hasbro subsidiary Milton Bradley. The game is played with a set of plastic 'ice blocks', a stand, and included miniature mallets. The stand is turned upside down and the ice blocks placed into the frame, so that the "shared" uniform compression of the blocks pressed against each other will cause them to stay in place when the stand is turned upright. The players take turns removing blocks by tapping with the mallets. The game ends when one player 'breaks the ice', causing all remaining blocks to fall. The player who removed the most blocks without 'breaking the ice' is the winner.
    6.33
    3 votes
    140
    Poker Square

    Poker Square

    Poker Square (sometimes known either by its plural or Poker Solitaire) is a Patience game with a very unusual objective: to build the best poker hand using just 25 cards from the deck. The game starts with placing a card onto a space in a 5x5 grid. Placing cards are done one at a time and once a card is placed on the grid, it can no longer be moved. Once all 25 cards are dealt, points are scored on hands formed horizontally or vertically. The number of points depend on the hierarchy of poker hands. There are two systems of scoring: The English and the American point systems. The English system reflects the difficulty of getting the hands in the game; the American system reflects the difficulty of getting the hands in actual poker. The two systems rate the hands' scores as follows: The points scored from each hand are added to the total score. Sloane Lee and Gabriel Packard suggest (in their book 100 Best Solitaire Games, ISBN 1-58042-115-6) that to win one must score at least 200 points in the American system or 70 in the English system. Because of the application of the point system, this solitaire is more prevalent as a computer game. Take the image above for instance.
    6.33
    3 votes
    141
    Solarquest

    Solarquest

    Solarquest is a space-age real estate trading game published in 1985. Patterned after Monopoly, the game replaces pewter tokens with rocketships and hotels with metallic fuel stations. Players travel around the sun acquiring monopolies and fending off attacks. They seek to knock their opponents out of the game through a combination of bankruptcy, laser blasts, and dwindling fuel supplies. Renowned for its playability and appealing design, this board game developed a devoted fan base before going out of print in the late 1990s. The company that introduced it, Golden Press/Western Publishing Company, is now a part of Random House. Solarquest has attracted a renewed following in recent years due to its availability on eBay and other auction sites. Players travel through the solar system acquiring properties, charging rent, and building fuel stations within individual planetary systems. The player who builds the greatest financial empire and survives the perils of space travel to become the last player on the board wins the game, according to the 1986 Solarquest rules. A journey around the Sun encompasses: Players roll dice and travel along a blue flight path from planet to planet.
    6.33
    3 votes
    142
    Tsuro

    Tsuro

    • Genre: Tile-based game
    Tsuro is a tile-based board game designed by Tom McMurchie, originally published by WizKids and now published by Calliope Games. Tsuro is a board game for two to eight players. Each player takes their turn by selecting a tile from their "hand", and places the tile on the board to build a path that begins at the edge of the board and travels around the interior. The object of the game is to travel the path and to avoid ending your journey at the edge of the game board, and to be the last remaining piece in the play area. Playing pieces: The board is a square, subdivided into a six-by-six grid of squares. The squares are the size of the tiles. Stones: Eight markers, differently-colored for identification, serve to represent up to eight players' individual positions on the board. The first edition box contains thirty-six tiles, but one--the dragon tile--is differentiated from the others by its front and back; there are, therefore, thirty-five standard tiles. The dragon tile is used to indicate the right to draw first in the event that the draw pile has run out and is then partly replenished by returning the unplayed tiles of an eliminated player. In editions by other companies there
    6.33
    3 votes
    143
    Blockhead!

    Blockhead!

    • Genre: Party game
    Blockhead! is a game invented in 1952 by G.W. "Jerry" D'Arcey and developed by G.W. and Alice D'Arcey in San Jose, California. Originally consisting of 20 brightly colored wooden blocks of varying shapes, the object of the game is to add blocks to a tower without having it collapse on your turn. The first player sets one of the blocks on a flat surface; this is the only block allowed to touch the base. Each player then takes turns adding a single block until the tower collapses. The player that knocks over the tower on their turn loses. A player who loses three times is eliminated. The last player remaining wins. Blockhead! uses slang terms with a block theme: A player who has lost once is called a "square"; a player who has lost twice is a "character"; a player who loses three times and is eliminated is a "blockhead". The game was first published by G.W. "Jerry" D'Arcey in 1952. In 1954 Saalfield Publishing Company released the first 25-block version of the game. The design of the blocks has remained consistent through each edition, the only change being modifying the yellow “double hump” to be more heart shaped. Currently, the game is produced by Pressman Toy
    8.00
    1 votes
    144
    Conquian

    Conquian

    Conquian is a card game which probably dates back to seventeenth-century Central America, but which was popularized and extended to the United States, especially Texas, from Mexico, although this allegation is still much controversial. It was first described in detail in R. F. Foster's Hoyle in 1897. And according to David Parlett, it is an ancestor to all modern rummy games, a kind of proto-Gin Rummy. The name is thought to either derive from "con quién" – Spanish "with whom", or from the Chinese game Kon Khin, a variation of the earlier game Khanhoo. It is sometimes corrupted to Coon Can (first described in The Standard Hoyle in 1887 and today known in the United States as Double Rum for being played with two packs), Councan, Conca and Cunca, a South American variation of the game. However, no Chinese card game by the name of ‘Kon Khin’ has ever been found, and these words do not even match any of the many card games that have prevailed in Ming-Qing China. In 19th-century Mexican literature (e.g. Luis Gonzaga Inclán’s Astucia, 1865; Juan Antonio Mateos’s Sacerdote y caudillo, 1869) the word is spelled cunquián, in italics, showing thus it has nothing to do with the phrase "¿Con
    8.00
    1 votes
    145
    Die Macher

    Die Macher

    • Designer: Karl-Heinz Schmiel
    • Genre: Economic simulation
    Die Macher is a strategy board game designed by Karl-Heinz Schmiel of Germany. The game is based on the German electoral system and each player takes the role of one of five political parties (in the 2006 edition, the CDU/CSU, FDP, SPD, Greens, and Die Linke). Parties score points based on seats won in seven state (Land) elections, the size of their national party base, the amount to which they control the national media, and how well their party platform aligns with national opinion. Each state election is a "mini game" on its own. Each state has its own interests (such as "do we support higher taxes, or not?"), and a party will do better if its platform aligns with the local concerns. Players can deploy a limited number of "party meetings" (groups of grassroots activists) to a state; the more they have there, the more votes they will generate when the election is resolved. "Shadow Cabinet" cards, representing influential party officials, can be used to perform some special actions, and each party tracks its "trend" (favorability rating) in the state using a sliding scale. When the election is held, each party scores votes based on the formula (trend + interest alignment)* (number
    8.00
    1 votes
    146
    Key Largo

    Key Largo

    Key Largo is a German-style board game designed by Paul Randles with Mike Selinker and Bruno Faidutti. It was published in 2005 by Tilsit Editions and in 2008 by Paizo Publishing. The game takes place in 1899 in the Key Largo area of Florida, where treasure-hunting companies seek gold and artifacts from shipwrecks before the hurricane season. The players hire divers, buy equipment, and search wrecks throughout the game. The game has a simultaneous action sequence which lets players choose locations for their ships to go twice per day, in the course of a ten-day game sequence. Though not published by the same companies, in many ways it is a thematic sequel to Randles' game Pirate's Cove. The cover of the French edition, by artist David Cochard, is a parody of an illustration in the Tintin comic Red Rackham's Treasure. Hurricane Katty is named for Randles' widow, Katty Pepermans. The faces on the money are caricatures of Randles, Faidutti, Selinker, Cochard, and game editor Nicolas Anton.
    8.00
    1 votes
    147
    Mare Nostrum

    Mare Nostrum

    Mare Nostrum is a board game for 3 to 5 players, designed by Philippe Keyaerts, Serge Laget and published in 2003 by Eurogames. It was also the name of a 1983 board game in the Fronte Mare series. Players assume the roles of one of five Mediterranean empires - Rome, Greece, Babylon, Egypt or Carthage. Units are placed on a game board representing the Mediterranean and the surrounding area, divided into provinces which contain one or more resources. Players take turns in rounds of three phases: The first player to do any of the following wins the game: Mare Nostrum is intended by the designer to be a more playable version of Civilization. The goal of the game is to bring glory to your civilization by acquiring great heroes and by building architectural wonders in your kingdom. Prominently featured in the game are historic personalities such as Julius Caesar, Cleopatra, Hammurabi, as well as the Seven Wonders of the World. The game incorporates many features found in other games, for example: The game itself supports three to five players, but it is best played with all five. The game has been criticised as being too inflexible in the player's roles; for example, Rome must play
    8.00
    1 votes
    148
    Monopoly

    Monopoly

    • Designer: Elizabeth Magie
    • Publisher: Parker Brothers
    • Genre: Economic simulation
    Monopoly is a board game published by Parker Brothers, a subsidiary of Hasbro. The game is named after the economic concept of monopoly, the domination of a market by a single entity. Monopoly is a redesign of an earlier game "The Landlord's Game", first published by the Quaker and political activist Elizabeth Magie. The purpose of that game was to teach people how monopolies end up bankrupting the many and giving extraordinary wealth to one or few individuals. Since the game was created, more than one billion people have played it, making it "the most played (commercial) board game in the world. The 1999 Guinness Book of Records cited Hasbro's previous statistic of 500 million people having played Monopoly. Games Magazine has inducted Monopoly into its Hall of Fame.
    8.00
    1 votes
    149
    Twenty-eight

    Twenty-eight

    This is one of a group of Indian trick-taking card games in which the Jack and the Nine are the highest cards in every suit. 28 is usually played by four players in fixed partnerships, partners facing each other. 32 cards from a standard 52-card pack are used for play. There are eight cards in each of the usual "French" suits: hearts, diamonds, clubs and spades. The cards in every suit rank from high to low: J-9-A-10-K-Q-8-7. The aim of the game is to win tricks containing valuable cards. The total number of points in the deck is 28, hence the name of the game. The values of the cards are: Deal and play are counter-clockwise; the cards are shuffled by the dealer and cut by the player to dealer's left. Four cards are then dealt to each player. Based on these four cards, players bid for the right to choose trumps. Each bid is a number, and the highest bidder undertakes that his or her side will win in tricks at least the number of points bid. The player to dealer's right speaks first, and must bid at least 17 or it can be more. Subsequent players, in counter-clockwise order, may either bid higher or pass. The auction continues for as many rounds as necessary until three players pass
    8.00
    1 votes
    150
    Xactika

    Xactika

    Xactika is a proprietary card game for two to ten players created by Set Enterprises in 2002. The trick-taking game is played with a dedicated deck of 81 cards, in which the object is to obtain the highest number of points after eight rounds of play. Points are awarded by taking the exact number of tricks that one bids before each round. The card deck consists of cards with face values ranging from 4 to 12, each with different combinations of four different suits -- balls, cubes, cones and stars. A card can have anywhere from one to three of each of the suits, the sum of all of the shapes equaling the face value of the card. For example, a card with a face value of 9 could have 1 ball, 3 cubes, 3 cones, and 2 stars, as 1+3+3+2=9. Alternatively, a card with a face value of 9 could also have 2 balls, 2 cubes, 2 cones, and 3 stars (or any other combination of suits that sums 9). The deck is not composed of an even distribution of face-values. For example, there is only one card in the deck with face-value of four, and likewise for face-value of 12. The most common face-value in the deck is eight (19 of the 81 cards have a face-value of eight). The following table outlines how many
    8.00
    1 votes
    151
    Battling Tops

    Battling Tops

    • Genre: Children's game
    Battling Tops is a children's game first manufactured by Ideal in 1968. In 1977 it was renamed Battling Spaceships in response to Star Wars fervor. After Ideal was sold in 1982, Marx took over the game. By the late 1980s, the game was out of production. In recent years Mattel has rereleased Battling Tops. The game has similarities to gasing pangkah, a traditional Malay sport. Two to four players launch spinning tops into an arena. The object of the game is to have the last standing spinning top. The game takes place on a circular concave arena with four spinning top launch positions. Players wind a string (attached to a pull tab) around their tops, place them in the launch positions, then pull the tab vigorously to release the top. The concave surface forces the tops together to battle. The outcome is somewhat indeterminate, but there is a slight element of skill. Pegs in holes on the rim of the arena mark victories. The first to win ten battles wins the game. There were eight different colored tops to choose from, although as noted only four could battle at one time. The tops were composed of octagonal discs slipped over a ridged shaft that had a notch to engage the string. The
    7.00
    2 votes
    152
    Boku

    Boku

    Bōku is an abstract strategy board game played by putting marbles on a perforated hexagonal board with 80 spaces. The object of the game is to get 5 marbles in a row. The game has also been sold under the name Bollox, and later Bolix and won a Mensa Select award in 1999. Invented by Rob Nelson, the former Portland Mavericks left-handed pitcher and creator of Big League Chew bubblegum. The idea for the game came to Nelson in 1991 when he was in London pitching for the Enfield Spartans. Along with good friend and owner of the Spartans Malcolm Needs they developed and marketed the game. Distributed by the London Games Company in Europe and Cadaco Toys in North America, for a time it enjoyed the position of being the best selling two player strategy games in both Harrods and Hamleys. The game was awarded a Mensa International Gold Star. Bōku belongs to the class of connection games ("n-in-a-row" games) similar to Gomoku or Connect Four. It has two main rules: The official Boku world championships have been held as part of the Mind Sports Olympiad since 2000 in England and the champion of 2006 was David M. Pearce (England). The 2005 Bōku World Champion was Joey Ho from London, who was
    7.00
    2 votes
    153
    Forty-fives

    Forty-fives

    Forty-Fives (also known as Forty-Five, Forte Fives, Auction Forty-Fives, Auction 120s, 120, Growl, Spoil Five, Maw and Strong Fives) is a trick-taking card game that is played in Ireland and on the island portion of Newfoundland and Labrador, as well as in some parts of New England, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, and Nova Scotia where it is known as Forte Fives. It is closely related to the game One-hundred and ten (110) also described below. The game may have got its name from "forte" which is Latin for strong which describes the 5's in the deck. The origin of this game is thought to be Ireland. In the 1920s, the game became Forte Fives when it moved south into the Merrimack Valley of Massachusetts and New Hampshire with French Canadian immigrants. Today, Forty-fives continues to be very popular in the Merrimack Valley. It is played with a standard deck of 52 cards (sometimes with jokers). Forty-Fives is a descendant of the Irish game Spoil Five, which in turn is a descendant of a game that King James VI of Scotland popularized in the 17th century called Maw. Maw was first seen being played in 1511 and the earliest written rules of 1576, the incomplete "Groom Porter's lawes
    7.00
    2 votes
    154
    Hoity Toity

    Hoity Toity

    • Designer: Klaus Teuber
    • Publisher: Überplay
    • Genre: Economic simulation
    Hoity Toity (German: Adel Verpflichtet, meaning "Noblesse oblige") is a multiplayer board game created by Klaus Teuber in 1990, and published in the United States by Überplay in 2008. The game was also published in the United States under the name, By Hook or Crook, and in the United Kingdom under the name Fair Means or Foul. The players in the game represent the members of the pretentious Antique Club. Their goal in life is to have a better collection of old stuff than every other member in the club. There are two options every turn; the Auction House to bid on an antique or, 2) to a manor house to participate in a competitive exhibit. The outcome of the players' actions depends on the choices and card play of the other players in the same location. The game therefore includes a considerable bluffing component. The winner is the player to move the farthest on the board, or whomever finishes the fastest.
    7.00
    2 votes
    155
    Klaverjas

    Klaverjas

    Klaverjas, or Klaverjassen, is the Dutch name for a four player trick-taking card game using the piquet deck of playing cards. It is closely related to the Hungarian/Romanian card game klaberjass, also known as Kalabriasz, Klobiash, Clobiosh, and other similar spellings. It is one of the most popular card games in the Netherlands, traditionally played in cafes and social clubs. The game offers a considerable level of complexity and depth. It has numerous variants, but the core rules are basically the same. The name dates to 1890–95 from the Dutch word klaverjas, combining klaver (the suit of clubs, literally "clover") plus jas, the original name for the highest trump card. According to Scarne, its origin has been variously claimed by the Dutch, Swiss, French, and Hungarians. The game is played clockwise by four players in two teams, partners sitting opposite as in whist. It uses a piquet deck, i.e. a set of 32 cards in the four French suits: Ace, King, Queen, Jack and 7–10. All cards are dealt to the players, in batches of 3–2–3 or 4–4. Starting with the elder hand, the first player prepared to do so chooses a trump suit and thereby becomes obliged to win the deal. Various versions
    7.00
    2 votes
    156
    Königrufen

    Königrufen

    Königrufen or Königsrufen ("The Calling of a King" Tarock) is a trick-taking card game four-player variant played in Austria and nearby areas in Central Europe, especially in Slovenia. Also five players may play the game with the dealer sitting out. Austrian Königrufen has a common core set of rules with considerable variation in the types of announcements and bonuses permitted, along with scoring, with most groups of players creating their own house rules. Although widely accepted tournament rules have been developed, such rules vary depending on the region where the game is played. Königrufen evolved from the older 18th century tarock games which borrowed their concepts of bidding from the card game Quadrille, an Hombre variant, to determine who played with whom. The earliest reference of the game appears in Wien, in a book written in 1840. Its closest cousin is Tapp Tarock, extensively played in Austria. The 54-card Tarock deck with combined value of 70 points is used. Each player receives 12 cards and 6 cards called the Talon are placed in the center. Players take turn in a counter-clockwise direction. After the exchange with the Talon, the player to the right of the dealer
    7.00
    2 votes
    157
    Napoleon

    Napoleon

    Napoleon or Nap is a straightforward trick taking game in which players receive five cards each; whoever bids the highest number of tricks chooses trumps and tries to win at least that many. It is a simplified relative of Euchre, and with many variations throughout Northern Europe. It's been popular in England for 200 years and has given the language a slang expression, "to go nap", meaning to take five of anything. It may be less popular now than it was, but it is still played in some parts of southern England and in Strathclyde. Despite its title and allusions, it is not recorded before the last third of the nineteenth century, and may have been first named after Napoleon III. The old game of Napoleon consists simply of five cards dealt out singly with the various players bidding in their turn how many tricks they think they can make. The player to the dealer’s left has the privilege of bidding first, and then every player after him may bid up to the limit, Napoleon, which is a declaration to take 5 tricks. Whoever bids highest leads first, the card led determining the trump for that round, and the winner of the trick then leads to the next. The cards are not gathered or packed
    7.00
    2 votes
    158
    Primordial Soup

    Primordial Soup

    Primordial Soup is a board game designed by Doris Matthäus & Frank Nestel and published by Z-Man Games. It was first published in 1997 in Germany by Doris & Frank under the name Ursuppe and this original version won 2nd prize in the 1998 Deutscher Spiele Preis. Each player guides a species of primitive amoeba drifting through the primordial soup. The player controls whether and how his amoebas move, eat and procreate using the 10 biological points which he receives each turn. A player may evolve his species by buying gene cards, which give the amoebas abilities such as faster movement. The abilities are pictured on the gene cards, showing amoebas growing fins, tentacles, spines, etc. A key feature of the game is its self-balancing ecosystem. The food required by each amoeba is a mixture of the excrement of the other players' species. Food may become scarce and cause amoebas to starve, die and decompose into food. If one species becomes scarce, this will then cause problems for the other players, since their amoebas depend on all the other species to supply their food. Genes may mitigate this, for example by turning a species into a predator. However, this still requires some
    7.00
    2 votes
    159
    Puerto Rico

    Puerto Rico

    • Designer: Andreas Seyfarth
    • Publisher: Rio Grande Games
    • Genre: German-style
    Puerto Rico is a German board game designed by Andreas Seyfarth, and published in 2002 by Alea in German, by Rio Grande Games in English and by Κάισσα in Greek. Players assume the roles of colonial governors on the island of Puerto Rico during the age of Caribbean ascendancy. The aim of the game is to amass victory points by shipping goods to the Old World or by constructing buildings. Puerto Rico can be played by three to five players, although an official two player variant also exists. There is an official expansion which adds new buildings that can be swapped in for or used along with those in the original game. In February 2004, Andreas Seyfarth released a separate card-game called San Juan based on Puerto Rico and published by the same companies. Puerto Rico is one of the highest rated games on BoardGameGeek. Each player uses a separate small board with spaces for city buildings, plantations, and resources. Shared between the players are three ships, a trading house, and a supply of resources and doubloons. The resource cycle of the game is that players grow crops which they exchange for points or doubloons. Doubloons can then be used to buy buildings, which allow players to
    7.00
    2 votes
    160
    Shuffleboard

    Shuffleboard

    Shuffleboard, more precisely deck shuffleboard, and also known as shuffle-board, shovelboard, shovel-board and shove-board [archaic], is a game in which players use broom-shaped paddles to push weighted pucks, sending them gliding down a narrow and elongated court, with the purpose of having them come to rest within a marked scoring area. As a more generic term, it refers to the family of shuffleboard-variant games as a whole. The full history of shuffleboard is not known. Though there is some knowledge of its development, its actual origins, the place and date where it was first played, remain a mystery. Inevitably, this uncertainty gives rise to some debate, even disagreement, about which country can claim to have invented it. However there is no dispute concerning its age as a form of popular amusement, and in Europe has a history that goes back over 500 years. The game was played and gambled over by King Henry VIII of England, who prohibited commoners from playing; evidently he did not always win, as the record of royal expenses for 1532 show a payment from the Privy Purse of GB£9, 'Paied to my lord Wylliam for that he wanne of the kinges grace at shovillaborde' (contemporary
    7.00
    2 votes
    161
    Tantrix

    Tantrix

    • Genre: Tile-based game
    Tantrix is a hexagonal tile-based abstract game invented by Mike McManaway from New Zealand. Each of the 56 different tiles in the set contains three lines, going from one edge of the tile to another. No two lines on a tile have the same colour. There are four colours in the set: red, yellow, blue, and green. No two tiles are identical, and each is individually numbered from 1 through 56. In the multiplayer version of the game, each player chooses a colour, so you have between two and four players. Each draws one tile from the bag, and the person who draws the highest number goes first. Each player then takes six tiles from the bag, and places them face up in front of them. The first person plays one tile, usually with their colour on it. Play then rotates clockwise. After playing a tile, each player takes a replacement tile from the bag, so that they always have six in front of them. Tiles played must match the colour of the edges adjoining it. When three tiles surround an empty space, so that it is effectively half covered, this is called a forced space. If the person whose turn it is has a tile that fills that space, then they must play it. They repeat this process until there
    7.00
    2 votes
    162
    Tien Gow

    Tien Gow

    Tien Gow (Sometimes spelled Tin Kau, transliteration of the Chinese characters: (天九, Cantonese: tin1 gau2) in Cantonese Heaven and Nine) is the name of a Chinese trick-taking gambling game for 4 players played with a set of Chinese dominoes. In the game, Heaven is the top rank tile of the civilian suit, while Nine is the top rank tile of the military suit of the domino set. The game of Tien Gow is quite different from Pai Gow. The only similarities are the tiles set and the names of the tiles. It is analogous to comparing the games of poker and bridge. Pai gow is more like poker where the players compare which hand has a higher rank. Tien gow is more like playing bridge with no trump suit and no partner, except that the number of tricks taken does not determine the winner. The player who takes the last trick is the winner of tien gow. There are complex rules to the game play and scoring. There is an accumulating multiplier to the winning and loss as the game proceeds. Since the last trick determines who collects the winning, the players need to rely on luck and strategies to save the strong hand to the last trick. It is a very challenging game to learn and master. Only a small
    7.00
    2 votes
    163
    Top Secret Spies

    Top Secret Spies

    Top Secret Spies (German name: Heimlich and Co.) is a spy-themed German-style board game designed by Wolfgang Kramer and published in 1984 by Ravensburger. The game, also known as Under Cover or Detective & Co, won the Spiel des Jahres award in 1986. The object of the game is to score the most points, while not revealing which colour you are until the end. It requires good bluffing and analytical skills. 7 colours are used, and there can be up to 4 "robot" colours moving around. On their turn a player rolls a die and can move any number of pieces a total number of spaces that adds up to the number on the die. This can result in a score, and the game continues until one player reaches 129+ points. At this time all players make secret guesses as to which player is which colour (gaining +5 points at the end of the game for each correct answer). The game ends when a spy reaches 142+ points, and then a winner is determined after guess points are added.
    7.00
    2 votes
    164
    Wahoo

    Wahoo

    • Genre: Cross and Circle game
    Wahoo is a cross and circle board game similar to Parchisi that involves moving a set number of marbles around the board, trying to get them into the safety zone. The game originated in the Appalachian hills. Most boards are used by four to six players. Wahoo has been a popular game for decades. Even today, custom-made boards proliferate on eBay and game manufacturer Parker Brothers has sold their own version of the game, under the title Aggravation, for decades. Number of Players: 2 to 6 Object: To be the first player to move all of the player’s individual marbles out of the starting area, around the board, and into home, whether by going the distance or taking a shortcut. Setting Up: Each player places his marbles in the starting area. After setting up, each player rolls the die. The highest number goes first, then play proceeds to the left. If two or more players roll the same number, they roll again to break the tie. Die: The die that is being used in the game must be a normal die that has pointed corners. The sides of the die must be about a centimeter long. Playing: To move a marble out of the Starting Area to the Starting Position, a player must roll a 1 or a 6. The Starting
    7.00
    2 votes
    165
    Alex Moiseyev

    Alex Moiseyev

    Alex Moiseyev (born in Moscow in 1959) is a draughts player from Russia. He began playing Russian draughts at seven and by age fifteen he achieved a Master Rating. He had further success in Russian draughts, but switched to International draughts in 1979 or 1980 (sources conflict). In 1991 he left Russia and settled in the U.S.. He won the US title at the international form in 1995 and then switched to what is commonly called English draughts or American checkers. He went on to win the US National Tournament in 1999. He is a Grandmaster in International, Russian, and English draughts. In 2003 he won the world title in 3 move draughts. In 2008 he won the 1st World Mind Sports Games in American checkers. 5 time world champion (Three-move): 2002, 2003, 2005, 2009, 2011
    6.00
    3 votes
    166
    HeroQuest

    HeroQuest

    • Publisher: Games Workshop
    • Genre: Adventure board game
    HeroQuest, sometimes also written as Hero Quest, is an adventure board game that was created by Milton Bradley in conjunction with the British company Games Workshop and set in the latter's Warhammer Fantasy fictional universe. The setting is revealed by a map of the Warhammer 'Old World' printed on the back of the Quest Book for the Return of the Witch Lord expansion pack. The game was based loosely around archetypes of fantasy role-playing games: the game itself was actually a game system, allowing the gamemaster (called "Morcar" in the original British version and most localizations, but "Zargon" in the USA) to create dungeons of his or her own design using the provided game board, tiles, furnishings and monsters. Several expansions were released, each adding new tiles, artifacts and new monsters to the core system. HeroQuest was created by Stephen Baker, who worked for the UK division of Milton Bradley (MB). The game was released in Britain, Europe and Australia around 1989. It was released in North America in 1990 in a slightly different version. In 1992, HeroQuest won the Origins Award for "Best Graphic Presentation of a Boardgame of 1991". The game consisted of a board and a
    6.00
    3 votes
    167
    Spectrangle

    Spectrangle

    • Publisher: Educational Insights, Inc
    • Genre: Tile-based game
    Spectrangle is a triangular tile-based abstract strategy game invented by Alan John Fraser-Dackers, Maxwell Graham Gordon and Lester Wynne Jordan. The principles behind the game are based on the work of British mathematician Percy Alexander MacMahon. The original game was for up to 8 players and used 60 tiles. A later more compact version for up to four players uses 36 tiles. It is this version that is described here. The game uses colourful double-sided triangular playing tiles called trangs. The trangs use all the permutations of red, yellow, green, cyan and magenta to give 35 unique trangs, plus one all-white 'joker'. Each trang is marked with a number that is the basic scoring value of that tile. The trangs are played onto a triangular game board; some of the spaces are marked with a number that is the bonus value of the space (unmarked spaces having a bonus value of 1). The aim of the multi-player game is to score the most points by playing your trangs most effectively. All the trangs are placed the provided cloth bag, each player draws a trang from the bag. The player drawing the highest valued trang becomes the opening player. The trangs are returned to the bag and each
    6.00
    3 votes
    168
    Spider

    Spider

    Spider is a type of Patience game. It is one of the more popular two-deck solitaire games. The main purpose of the game is to remove all cards from the table, assembling them in the tableau before removing them. Initially, 54 cards are dealt to the tableau in ten piles, face down except for the top cards. The tableau piles build down by rank, and in-suit sequences can be moved together. The 50 remaining cards can be dealt to the tableau ten at a time when none of the piles are empty. The most common software version of Spider is the one included in the Vista, ME and XP versions of Microsoft Windows, Spider Solitaire. Spider Solitaire was introduced in the Microsoft Plus! 98 addition pack for Windows 98. On Unix operating systems, an early version was developed around 1989 at Sun Microsystems. A version of Spider Solitaire typically comes bundled with both the KDE and GNOME desktop environments on other Unix-like operating systems such as Linux and BSD, under the names KPatience and Aisleriot Solitaire, respectively. Versions for Macintosh and most other operating systems are also available. The Windows version offers three levels of difficulty, with one, two, or four suits. These
    6.00
    3 votes
    169
    Three card brag

    Three card brag

    Three card brag is a 16th century British card game, and the British national representative of the vying or "bluffing" family of gambling games. Brag is a direct descendant of the Elizabethan game of Primero and one of the several ancestors to poker, just varying in betting style and hand rankings. The game is very popular in India and Nepal, where it is known both as "Flush" and "Teen Patti" (literally translated from Hindi as "three cards"), played with some minor variations. At large gatherings and especially during festival times, it is the game of choice since many people of different skills can play together and have fun. It is also a very popular game among British fairground showmen, who usually get together at the bigger fairs and play for quite high stakes. Three card brag was played in the film Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels directed by Guy Ritchie, where it was played without table stakes. Everyone antes, and players are each dealt three cards face down. There is a single round of betting, with action starting to the left of the dealer. Each player has the option of betting or folding. If there was a previous bet, the player must contribute at least that much more
    6.00
    3 votes
    170
    Cross and Circle game

    Cross and Circle game

    Cross and Circle is a board game design used for race games played throughout the world. Strictly, the design comprises a circle divided into four equal portions by a cross inscribed inside it; the classic example of this design is Yut. However, the term "cross and circle" is typically taken to include boards that replace the circle with a square, and cruciform boards that collapse the circle onto the cross; all 3 types are topologically equivalent. Ludo and Parcheesi (both descendants of Pachisi) are frequently played cruciform games. The category may also be expanded to include circular or square boards without a cross which are nevertheless quartered (Zohn Ahl), and boards that have more than 4 "spokes" (Aggravation, Trivial Pursuit). The Aztec game board for Patolli which—because it consists of a collapsed circle without an interior cross—has the distinction of being a cross that is a circle (topologically), without being a cross plus circle. Markers are moved around spaces drawn on the circle and on the cross, with the goal of being the first player to move all markers all the way around the board. Generally the circle of the cross and circle forms the primary circuit followed
    5.67
    3 votes
    171
    Euchre

    Euchre

    Euchre ( /ˈjuːkər/) or eucre, is a trick-taking card game most commonly played with four people in two partnerships with a deck of 24 standard playing cards. It is the game responsible for introducing the joker into modern packs; this was invented around 1860 to act as a top trump or best bower (from the German word Bauer, "farmer", denoting also the jack). It is believed to be closely related to the French game Écarté that was popularized in the United States by the Cornish and Pennsylvania Dutch, and to the seventeenth-century game of bad repute Loo. It may be sometimes referred to as Knock Euchre to distinguish it from Bid Euchre. Euchre appears to have been introduced into the United States by the early German settlers of the state of Michigan, and from that state gradually to have been disseminated throughout the nation. It has been more recently theorized that the game and its name derives from an eighteenth-century Alsatian card game named Juckerspiel, a derivative of Triomphe. Also, it may have been introduced by immigrants from Cornwall, England, where it still remains a popular game. It is also played in the neighboring county of Devon, where one theory is that it was
    5.67
    3 votes
    172
    All-Fours

    All-Fours

    • Genre: Trick-taking game
    All Fours, also known as High-Low-Jack or Seven Up, is an English tavern trick-taking card game that was popular as a gambling game until the end of the 19th century. It is the eponymous and earliest recorded game in a family that flourished most in 19th century North America, notable other members being Auction Pitch, Pedro and Cinch, which competed against Poker and Euchre. Nowadays the original game is especially popular in the Caribbean, but a simpler variant has also survived in parts of England. Each player is dealt six cards. In trick play, players are allowed to trump instead of following suit. The title refers to the possibility of winning four game points by being dealt both the highest and the lowest trump in play, capturing the Jack of trumps and winning the greatest number of card-points. Two or more players play individually or in equal-sized teams, seated alternatingly. Default play rotation is clockwise in most areas. Players cut for first deal. Cards rank as in Whist and have certain numerical card-point values as shown in the table. In each deal up to 4 scoring points are distributed among the parties. The game is won by the party that first reaches the previously
    6.50
    2 votes
    173
    Australia

    Australia

    Australia: Aufbruch ins Abenteuer is a board game intended for two to five people. It is authored by Wolfgang Kramer and Michael Kiesling, and is published by Ravensburger. It is recommended for ages 10 and over. Australia won the GAMES Magazine Game of the Year award in 2006. Players take on the role of politicians in Australia in the 1920s. The government wants to modernize their industries, but at the same time, they want to develop several national parks, and other conservation projects.
    6.50
    2 votes
    174
    Belot

    Belot

    Belot also Bridge belot is the name of a French trick-taking card game very popular in Bulgaria, in some parts of Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Macedonia (Especially Bitola), and in Saudi Arabia. It is also very popular in Armenia and extensively played by the Armenian Diaspora, in former USSR area (Russia, Ukraine, Republic of Moldova) and by Jewish communities worldwide. The rules of Belot are very close to those of the French card game Belote, and Jewish card game Clobyosh, but with a few significant differences in each. The game is played by 2, 3 or 4 players. The 4-player version is considered to be the standard game, and other two are just crippled versions played only if there aren't enough players available. The 4 players are 2 teams of two. The other variations each player is alone. 2 player and 3 players use the 24-card deck (9 to Ace). Note that these rules are slightly different among countries. Each round of Belot (no matter how many players) consists of these steps: dealing, bidding, declaration, playing and scoring: The best world player ever is the Bulgarian Nikola Trifonski, many times national champion, the yongest world champion with special
    6.50
    2 votes
    175
    Five-Handed Euchre

    Five-Handed Euchre

    This article deals with variations in game playing. For a description on variations in game rules and terminology, see Euchre variations. Euchre has many variations in game playing. Some of them are designed for two, three, five or even six hands. Described below are some of these regional variations. A common variation played in southwestern England competitive pub leagues uses the standard Euchre deck with an extra card, usually a Joker or 2 of spades, called the "Benny" (often called the "Bird" in Australia). This card is the highest trump no matter what suit is called. When the Benny is turned over by the dealer, the dealer must choose a suit to call as trumps before looking at his or her hand. Bidding then proceeds normally. The Duchy of Cornwall lays claim to the origin of the Benny in Euchre, its usage being exported from Cornwall to the USA, Australia and Canada by emigrant Cornish miners in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Four Bennies In southwestern Ontario (Canada), there is an extension of this style wherein the 9s are removed from the deck and up to four "Bennys" are added. These usually take the form of either one or two Jokers and/or one or two Deuces (of
    6.50
    2 votes
    176
    Gin rummy

    Gin rummy

    • Genre: Matching game
    Gin rummy, or simply gin, is a two-player card game created in 1909 by Elwood T. Baker and his son C. Graham Baker. According to John Scarne, Gin evolved from 19th-century Whiskey Poker and was created with the intention of being faster than standard rummy, but less spontaneous than knock rummy. Gin is played with a standard 52-card pack of playing cards. The ranking from high to low is K-Q-J-10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-A. The objective in gin rummy is to score points and reach an agreed number of points or more, usually 100, before your opponent does. The basic game strategy is to improve one's hand by forming melds and eliminating deadwood. Gin has two types of meld: Sets of 3 or 4 cards sharing the same rank, e.g. 8♥ 8♦ 8♠; and runs of 3 or more cards in sequence, of the same suit. e.g. 3♥ 4♥ 5♥ or more. Deadwood cards are those not in any meld. In gin rummy aces are considered low and can form any set of aces but only the low end of runs (e.g. A♠ 2♠ 3♠ etc.). Q♠ K♠ A♠ is not a legal run in gin rummy. A player can form any combination of melds within their hand, whether it contains all sets, all runs, or both. A hand can contain three or fewer melds to knock or form legal gin. The
    6.50
    2 votes
    177
    GIPF

    GIPF

    • Designer: Kris Burm
    • Publisher: Rio Grande Games
    GIPF is an abstract strategy board game by Kris Burm, the first of six games in his series of games called the GIPF Project. GIPF was recommended by Spiel des Jahres in 1998. Players take turns pushing tokens (one player taking black, the other white) from the edge of the tri-gridded, hexagonal board, with pieces already in play pushed in front of the new placements rather than allowing more than one piece on any space. The game is lost if a player has no more tokens to play, and since each starts with a set number of tokens, it is clearly necessary to recycle pieces already positioned to keep playing. This is achieved by contriving to line up four pieces of the same colour in a row on the board, at which point those tokens are returned to their owner, and any opposing tokens extending from the line of four are captured. Because a single player will often move several pieces and change numerous on-board relationships, it is remarkably difficult to predict the state of the board more than one turn ahead, despite GIPF being a game of perfect information. Play tends to be highly fluid and there is no real concept of long term territorial or spatial development. The game can be
    6.50
    2 votes
    178
    Kings Cribbage

    Kings Cribbage

    • Genre: Word
    Kings Cribbage is a board game released by Cococo Games that counts like cribbage, but plays like a crossword puzzle. It uses a raised-grid gameboard and features playing card tiles, 4 tile holders and a bag. Game play for Kings Cribbage is much like Scrabble. Players first draw a letter from a bag to see who draws (and goes) first. Unlike Scrabble, however, players only draw 5 tiles rather than 7. The first player tries to find the best Cribbage hand within his 5 tiles and then places them in a line (in any order) anywhere on the board. The first play must be between 2 and 5 tiles, but all subsequent plays can be anwhere from 1 to 5 tiles. Points are tallied based on the rules of Cribbage. He then restocks his tiles and the play continues to the next person. The next player must then find his best hand (using his tiles and the tiles already on the board) and places it next to the tiles on the board. The game continues until one player has used up all his/her tiles. Players who are caught at the end with tiles must subtract their point values from their hand (subtracted points do not go to the player who went out first). All tiles placed on the board must contribute toward a
    6.50
    2 votes
    179
    Ruff and Honours

    Ruff and Honours

    Ruff and Honours, a successor of the French game Triomphe (M.Eng. Triumph, Trump) with many different spellings, is a 17th century card game derivative of Ruff, the ancestor of Whist, which in turn was the forerunner of bridge and many other trick-taking card games like Whisk and Swabbers. This game was first mentioned in 1522 by Bernadine of Sienna in his sermon "Ye Tryumphe." There seemed to be two slightly different games at that time. In the game of Ruff, a pack of 52 cards was used and 12 cards dealt to each player, with the first of the remaining four cards turned over to determine the trump suit. In Honours, 48 cards were used with the last of the cards dealt to the player on the dealers left turned over to determine trumps. Some versions of this game seem to have been among the principal forms of card games in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, but by the end of the eighteenth they had already been replaced by Whist. Other forms seem to have been around since the mid-fifteenth century, judging by a reference to the game of Roufle (M.Fr. Roffle, earlier Romfle (1414), from It. Ronfa) in a letter of Jean de Lannoy in 1875. Many scholars on card games have speculated
    6.50
    2 votes
    180
    Tarocchi

    Tarocchi

    Tarocchi (Italian, plural form of Tarocco), also known as Tarock (German-Austrian name), '''Tarot''' (French name) and similar names in other languages, is a specific form of playing card deck, which in its history was used for different trick-taking game and later for cartomantic interests and divination (concrete forms appear at least since the article of Court de Gebelin in the year 1781), also as a field for artists to display specific iconographical forms often connected to an ideological system in the background. It is recorded as one of the oldest types of playing card decks known. The playing material (a deck with usually 4ᅢラ14 normal Italian suits and court cards, which include in contrast to other forms a cavallo or knight, with additional 21 trumps; the suits may differ from other national patterns) is older than the name of the game, which, according to the current state of research, became known in the year 1505 parallel in France (Taraux) and Ferrara (Italy, as Tarocchi) (Tarot press note) (Details). An earlier form of the game had the name Trionfi or triumphs, this name developed later as general term for trick-taking (trumpfen in German, to trump in English) and
    5.33
    3 votes
    181
    Dutch Blitz

    Dutch Blitz

    Dutch Blitz is a fast-paced, family oriented, action card game played with a specially printed deck. The game was created by Werner Ernst George Muller, a German immigrant from Bucks County, Pennsylvania. The game is very popular among the Pennsylvania Amish and Dutch community, and among Christian groups in the United States and Canada (primarily in Dutch and German communities). The game is essentially the same as Nertz, with the essential difference being that Nertz is played with four standard playing decks, but Dutch Blitz must be played with specialized decks. It is similar to and possibly derived from the European game of Ligretto manufactured in Germany. Blitz Pile: This pile of 10 cards is the most important pile of cards to each player since it is the key towards "Blitzing" the other players when all cards from this pile have been cleared. Dutch Piles: Stacks of cards in each of the four colors - 1 through 10 an ascending sequence - placed in the center of the table and played upon by all players. Each player accumulates scoring points here. Post Piles: Groups of cards placed to the left of both the Blitz and Wood piles in descending sequence For each player, the Post
    7.00
    1 votes
    182
    Escoba

    Escoba

    Escoba is a variant of the Italian fishing card game Scopa, which means "broom", a name that refers to the situation in the game where you "sweep" all of the cards from the board in one turn. The game is usually played with a deck of traditional Spanish playing cards, called naipes. The object of the game is to be the first player to score 15 points through capturing cards. Points are scored in a variety of ways as detailed below. It does not necessarily follow that the player with the most captured cards in any particular round will get the greatest score. A traditional Spanish deck of 40 cards is used to play. For traditional decks which have 1 through 12 of each suit, you must remove the 8 and 9 of each suit, leaving 40 cards. A standard deck of playing cards (having Ace,2-10,Jack,Queen,King) can be modified by removing the 8, 9, and 10 of every suit, leaving 40 cards. At the start of each round the dealer will deal three cards to each player, face down. After all the players have been dealt cards, four board cards are dealt, face up, in the center of the table, and play commences. On rare occasions where the four initial cards dealt to the board add up to 15, they are taken by
    7.00
    1 votes
    183
    Ludo

    Ludo

    • Genre: Children's game
    Ludo /ˈluːdəʊ, ˈljuː-/ (from Latin ludo, "I play") is a board game for two to four players, in which the players race their four tokens from start to finish according to die rolls. Like other cross and circle games, it is similar to the Indian Pachisi, but simpler. The game and its variants are popular in many countries under various names. Pachisi originated/started in India by the 6th century. The earliest evidence of this game in India is the depiction of boards on the caves of Ajanta. This game was played by the Mughal emperors of India; a notable example being that of Jalaluddin Muhammad Akbar. Variations of the game made it to England during the late 19th century. One which appeared around 1896 under the name of Ludo was then successfully patented. In North America, the game is sold under the brand name "Parcheesi". Variations of the game are sold under the brand names "Sorry!" and "Trouble". In Germany, this game is called "Mensch ärgere dich nicht" which means "Man, don't get irritated", and has equivalent names in Dutch, Serbo-Croatian, Bulgarian, Czech and Slovak. In Sweden it is known as "Fia", a name derived from the Latin word fiat which means "so be it!" Common
    7.00
    1 votes
    184
    Okey

    Okey

    • Genre: Tile-based game
    Okey (pronounced "ohkay") is a tile-based game, very popular in Turkey. It is almost always played with 4 players, though in principle can be played with two or three. It is very similar to the game Rummikub as it is played with the same set of boards and tiles but with different rules. The game apparently evolved from the original Rummikub through cultural contacts of Gastarbeiter in Germany. In Turkey and among Turkish communities abroad, it is very popular not only at homes but also at coffeehouses. Distribution of Tiles and Determination of Joker The first dealer is chosen at random. After the hands have been played and scored, the turn to deal passes to the right. The 106 tiles are placed face down on the table and thoroughly mixed. Then the players set them up into 21 stacks of five tiles, the tiles in each pile being face down. One tile is left over - this is temporarily kept by the dealer. There is no specific rule about how many stacks should be in front of each player. It is convenient to have at least six in front of the dealer, but this makes no real difference to the game. The dealer now throws the die twice. The result of the first throw selects one of the tile stacks
    7.00
    1 votes
    185
    Pitch

    Pitch

    • Genre: Trick-taking game
    Pitch is an American trick-taking card game derived from the English game of All Fours (Seven Up). Historically, Pitch started as "Blind All Fours", a very simple All Fours variant that is still played in England as a pub game. The modern game involving a bidding phase and setting back a party's score if the bid is not reached came up in the middle of the 19th century and is more precisely known as Auction Pitch or Setback. Pitch was allegedly invented by eight men during a deer hunting trip in Mayfield, Kentucky. One of the eight men, Ernest Ray Cole, reported that the men were snowed in during the hunting trip in a log cabin and had nothing better to do with themselves. Ernest, though a boy at the time, was likely in attendance with his father, Pleasant Grant Cole and possibly on the property of Robert or Thomas Cole, brothers who at one time had adjacent properties in the latter half of the 19th century (Reference = Mayfield County Property Records and Deeds, Clerk of Courts, Mayfield, KY). Unlike most Kentucky winters, the hunters could not hunt at dusk or dawn because the weather was so bad that it was "pitch black" (as black as tar pitch from a tree) outside most of the time,
    7.00
    1 votes
    186
    Rummy

    Rummy

    Rummy is a group of matching card games notable for similar gameplay based on the matching cards of the same rank or sequence and same suit. The basic goal any form of rummy is to build melds which consists of sets, three or four of a kind of the same rank, or runs, three or more cards in sequence, of the same suit. The original form of rummy is called Sai rummy or Basic rummy. The Mexican game of Conquian is considered by David Parlett to be ancestral to all rummy games, which itself is derived from a Chinese game called Khanhoo and, going even further back, Mahjong. A book consists of at least three cards of the same rank or consecutive cards of the same suit. This is an almost universal pattern, although there exist minor variations, such as allowing only melds of the first type or requiring in melds of the second type that the cards are all of a different suit. In some games it is required that the melds of the second type contain at least four cards. Some games also feature wild cards, which can be used to represent any card in a meld. The number of wild cards in a meld may be restricted. A fairly large number of cards is used. This varies from one standard deck upwards. There
    7.00
    1 votes
    187
    Sechsundsechzig

    Sechsundsechzig

    Sixty-six or Schnapsen is a fast 5- or 6-card point-trick game of the marriage type for 2–4 players, played with 20 or 24 cards. First recorded in 1718 under the name Mariagen-Spiel, it is the national card game of Austria and also popular in Germany and Hungary. Closely related games for various numbers of players are popular all over Europe and include Czech/Slovak Mariáš, Hungarian Ulti, Finnish Marjapussi, French Bezique and American Pinochle. Together with the Jack–Nine family they form the large King–Queen family of games. German Sixty-six is a 6-card game played with a deck of 24 cards consisting of the Ace, Ten, King, Queen, Jack and Nine, worth 11, 10, 4, 3, 2 and 0 card-points, respectively. The other major variant is Austrian Schnapsen, which does not make use of the Nines and has a hand size of 5 cards. The trump suit is determined randomly. Players each begin with a full hand and draw from the stock after each trick. The object in each deal is to be the first player to score 66 points. The cards have a total worth of 120 points, and the last trick is worth 10 points. A player who holds King and Queen of the same suit scores 20 points, or 40 points in trumps, when
    7.00
    1 votes
    188
    Titan

    Titan

    • Publisher: Avalon Hill
    • Genre: Board game
    Titan is a fantasy board game for two to six players, designed by Jason McAllister and David A. Trampier. It was first published in 1980 by Gorgonstar, a small company created by the designers. Soon afterward, the rights were licensed to Avalon Hill, which made several minor revisions and published the game for many years. Titan went out of print in 1998, when Avalon Hill was sold and ceased operations. A new edition of Titan, with artwork by Kurt Miller and Mike Doyle and produced by Canadian publisher Valley Games became available in late 2008. The Valley Games edition was adapted to the Apple iPad and released on December 21, 2011. Each player controls an army of mythological creatures such as gargoyles, unicorns, and griffons, led by a single titan. The titan is analogous to the king in chess in that the death of a titan eliminates that player and his entire army from the game. The player controlling the last remaining titan wins the game. The main game board consists of 96 interlocking hexes, each with a specified terrain type. Each player's army is organized into "legions" of one to seven creature tokens stacked face down. The legions move according to die roll, subject to
    7.00
    1 votes
    189
    Tressette

    Tressette

    Tressette or Tresette is one of Italy's major national trick-taking card games, together with Scopa and Briscola. It is recorded only from the early 18th century, though greater antiquity is suggested by its trumplessness. The name of the game, literally "three Sevens" may refer to a scoring combination no longer recognized, or to the fact that it is played up to twenty-one. There are many variants depending on the region of Italy the game is played in. Tressette is played with a standard Italian 40-card deck and the cards are ranked as follows from highest to lowest: 3-2-Ace-King-Knight-Knave and then all the remaining cards in numerical order from 7 down to 4. The game may be played with four players playing in two partnerships, or in heads-up play. In either case, ten cards are dealt to each player. In one on one play, the remaining twenty cards are placed face down in front of both players. The object of the game is to score as many points as possible until a score of 21 is achieved. Players must follow suit unless that suit does not remain in their hand, and players must show the card they pick up off the card pile to their opponent. Points are scored by collecting the face
    7.00
    1 votes
    190
    Trick-taking game

    Trick-taking game

    A trick-taking game is a card game or tile-based game in which play of a "hand" centers on a series of finite rounds or units of play, called tricks, which are each evaluated to determine a winner or "taker" of that trick. The object of such games then may be closely tied to the number of tricks taken, as in plain-trick games such as Whist, Contract Bridge, Spades, Napoleon, Rowboat, and Spoil Five, or on the value of the cards contained in taken tricks, as in point-trick games such as Pinochle, the Tarot family, Rook, All Fours, Manille, Briscola, and most "evasion" games like Hearts. The domino game Texas 42 is an example of a trick-taking game that is not a card game. Trick-and-draw games are trick-taking games in which the players can fill up their hands after each trick. Typically players are free to play any card into a trick in the first phase of the game, but must follow suit as soon as the score is depleted. Certain actions in trick-taking games with three or more players always proceed in the same direction. In games originating in North and West Europe, Russia, and the United States and Canada, the rotation is typically clockwise, i.e. play proceeds to the left; in South
    7.00
    1 votes
    191
    Clock patience

    Clock patience

    Clock patience, also known as clock solitaire is a solitaire card game with the cards laid out to represent the face of a clock. One deck of cards (minus jokers) is used. The deck is shuffled and twelve piles of four cards each are laid out, face down, in a circle. The remaining four cards are placed, also face down, in a pile in the center of the circle. The twelve positions around the circle represent the 12 hour clock and the pile in the middle represents the hands. Play starts by turning over the top card of the central pile. When a card is revealed, it is placed face up under the pile at the corresponding hour (i.e. Ace = 1 o'clock, 2 = 2 o'clock, etc. The Jack is 11 o'clock and the Queen is 12 o'clock) and the top card of the pile of that hour is turned over. If a King is revealed, it is placed face up under the central pile. Play continues in this fashion and the game is won if all the cards are revealed. The game is lost if all four Kings are revealed and face-down cards are still present. This is a game of zero skill and is a purely mechanical process. The chances of winning are 1 in 13. There is no possible way to win the game if none of the bottommost cards in the twelve
    6.00
    2 votes
    192
    Ligretto

    Ligretto

    Ligretto is a card game for two to twelve players. The aim of the game is to get rid of all your cards faster than all the other players by discarding them in the middle of the table. Instead of taking turns, all players play simultaneously. Play is fast and lively, and demands attention to the cards being played by others as well as one's own cards. It can be played and enjoyed equally by children from 8 years old to adult with youth being at no disadvantage. The game, in its present form, was published in 1988 by Germany's Rosengarten Spiele (Rose Garden games) designed by Michael Michaels. An earlier form of the game was published at the start of the 1960s. Since the year 2000 the game has been published by Schmidt-Spiele of Berlin, Germany. In 2009, Playroom Entertainment began publishing the game for North America and other English-speaking countries. The game is similar to Dutch Blitz, which is based upon the original 1960s Ligretto. The game uses a special deck of cards: each face is red, green, yellow, or blue, and is numbered from 1 to 10. Each player gets 40 cards (ten of each color) which have a distinctive design on the reverse unique to that player. Before starting a
    6.00
    2 votes
    193
    Ra

    Ra

    • Designer: Reiner Knizia
    • Publisher: Rio Grande Games
    Ra is a board game for two to five players designed by Reiner Knizia and themed around Ra, the sun-god of Heliopolis in ancient Egyptian culture. Originally published in Germany, it was republished in an English language translation by Rio Grande Games. Subsequent English language editions have been published by Überplay and again by Rio Grande Games. The last of these increased the number of players from the original 3-5 to 2-5, but otherwise all editions have used the same rules. Ra won the 2000 International Gamers Award, placed 2nd in the 1999 Deutscher Spiele Preis, and is one of the top 30 user-rated games at BoardGameGeek Ra is an auction game, where the players are all competing for the same resources. The game is played in three rounds, called Epochs, reflecting the history of ancient Egypt. Players use their sun tokens to bid against each other on auctions for tiles. At the end of an epoch, points will be scored for the number and types of tiles a player managed to win. The price of the tiles is determined by the players bidding for them, and values can shift rapidly. Players are faced with a constant balance between "what should be done eventually" and "what can actually
    5.00
    3 votes
    194
    Wiz-War

    Wiz-War

    • Designer: Tom Jolly
    Wiz-War is a board game created by Tom Jolly and first published in 1985 through Jolly’s company, Jolly Games. It is described as a "beer and pretzels game". The board in Wiz-War is made up of individual segments that form a labyrinth that the players must navigate. The layout of is different each time the game is played and can also be modified by players during gameplay. Wiz-War uses cards to represent (among other things) spells cast by players. Some concepts, like magical combat and hit points, should be familiar to players of Dungeons & Dragons and other role-playing games. After spending nearly 15 years out of print, Wiz-War was recently released in a new 8th Edition by Fantasy Flight Games in February 2012. The first edition of the game had an extremely low production value and consisted of photocopied typewritten rules, simply designed two-by-three-inch cards, silkscreened cardboard boards, and photocopied chits, all contained in a clear plastic Ziploc bag. Jolly silkscreened the game boards by hand. Later editions featured slightly more sophisticated game materials (such as a box), but the essential simplicity of the game has been preserved. Several expansion sets have
    5.00
    3 votes
    195
    Cassino

    Cassino

    Cassino, also known as Casino, is an Italian fishing card game for two, three, four players in two partnerships, or even theoretically five players. It is the only one to have penetrated the English-speaking world, via Italian immigrants to America. First recorded just before 1800 (1797), it seems to have been heavily elaborated in 19th century American practice. It is mostly played by two with a standard deck of playing cards, being the object of the game to score 21 points by fishing up cards displayed on the table. It is very similar to and probably descended from the Italian game Scopa. The dealer deals four cards to each player, two at a time, and, in the first deal, four cards face up to the table. The dealer has the option to deal any number of cards at one time to each person so long as each person is dealt in sequence. This can include a deal of one, two, three, or four cards to each. In subsequent deals, the dealer replenishes the players' hands, but not the table. The deal rotates only at the end of a complete round, when the deck has been exhausted. Beginning with the player to the dealer's left, each player plays one card at a time, performing one (or more) of the
    5.50
    2 votes
    196
    Cắt Tê

    Cắt Tê

    Cắt Tê, (Vietnamese for six cards), or catte, is a trick taking card game popular in Vietnam and expatriate Vietnamese communities. Unlike other trick games, in which the objective is either to collect tricks, avoid tricks, or fulfill a contract; the object of Cắt Tê is to win the last trick in a given round. The game is similar to Tien Gow, but played with cards instead of dominoes. It can be played by 3-6 players. Gambling is an essential part of Cắt Tê. Like mahjongg, there is only one betting round per game; and all players make the same bet. Also like Mahjongg, there are additional rewards and penalties for certain outcomes. It is possible for a player to be required to forfeit more than his additional bet at the conclusion of a game. The object of Cắt Tê is to either: After the fourth trick, players who have won no tricks are eliminated, so it is not possible to win the sixth trick without winning one of the first four tricks. There are never more than six tricks played per game. Cắt Tê is played with a standard deck of 52 cards, with jokers removed. As in Bridge, the rank-order is A-K-Q-J-10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2, from high to low. There is no trump suit. Cắt Tê is played in
    5.50
    2 votes
    197
    Spoil-Five

    Spoil-Five

    Spoil-Five, Spoilt Five, Five and Ten, is the traditional book version of the Irish national card game called Twenty-Five, which underlies the Canadian game of Forty-Five. Charles Cotton describes it in 1674 as "Five Fingers", a nickname applied to the Five of Trumps extracted from the fact that the Irish word cuig means both 'five' and 'trick'. It is supposed to be of great antiquity, and widely believed to have originated in Ireland. It may be identified with the game of Maw, of which James I of England was very fond. Edmund Hoyle in his The Complete Gamester describes it as Five-cards. In the game of Five Cards, for example, when played by only two persons, Five and Ten, the card second in value is stated to be the ace of hearts, instead of the knave of trumps. Spoil Five is a respected member of one of the most prolific families of card games based on this pattern: each player receives five cards, or six or nine, and another is turned up to fix the trump suit. The object of the play is to win one trick, or at least three or five. The game is played by 2–8 persons, five being the best number. When three play at this game, it is still necessary that one of them should win the
    5.50
    2 votes
    198
    Shanghai rum

    Shanghai rum

    Shanghai rum is a Rummy card game, based on gin rummy and a variation of Contract rummy played by 3 to 8 players. It is also known as California rummy. Shanghai rum is played with multiple decks of 54 standard playing cards, including the Jokers. Aces are high (above a King), and Jokers are wild cards. The number of decks varies from 2 to 4 and is based on the number of players (see chart). Each game is based on 7 hands, and the rules for each hand are unique. One person begins as dealer for the first hand, and then the person to the dealer's left becomes dealer for the next hand, and so on. Each player is dealt eleven cards. The rest of the deck is then placed face down in the middle of the players; this is referred to as the stock. One card is taken from the top of the stock and placed face up next to it. This card is called the upcard and becomes the beginning of the discard pile, other wise known as "dead", or no longer in the game. The first player to play is the player to the dealer's left. Play always progresses in this clockwise direction. Each player has a choice at the beginning of their turn. They may either pick up one new card from the top of the stock or take the
    4.67
    3 votes
    199
    Chaupar

    Chaupar

    Chaupar is a board game of the Cross and Circle family played in India that is very similar to Pachisi. It is believed that both games were created around the 4th century. The board is made of wool or cloth. The dice are six cowry shells and the pawns are made of wood. It's usually played on a table or the floor. There are palaces in Allahabad and Agra which served as giant Chaupar boards for the Indian Emperor Akbar I from the Mogul Empire in the 16th century. The board was made of inlaid marble and it had red and white squares. He used to sit in the center and toss the shells; 16 women from his harem were the pawns and they moved the way he told them. This game is usually played in a banter style of fashion and it is quite common for opponents to diss each others play just before the chori's are thrown! The best examples of these are to snort, crack knuckles, pretend to spit or make absurd noises to "curse" or spoil your opponents turn! If any of the players does not have his "thore" (to have killed at least one pawn) by the end of the game, then that player is known to have lost with a "bay-thoree" which is the most disgraceful form of losing! There are famous stories amongst
    6.00
    1 votes
    200
    Crokinole

    Crokinole

    Crokinole ( /ˈkroʊkɨnoʊl/ KROH-ki-nohl) is an action board game similar in various ways to pitchnut, carrom, marbles, and shove ha'penny, with elements of shuffleboard and curling reduced to table-top size. Players take turns shooting discs across the circular playing surface, trying to have their discs land in the higher-scoring regions of the board, while also attempting to knock away opposing discs. Board dimensions vary with a playing surface typically of polished wood or laminate approximately 27 inches (690 mm) in diameter. The arrangement is 3 concentric rings worth 5, 10, and 15 points as you move in from the outside. There is a shallow 20-point hole at the center. The inner 15-point ring is guarded with 8 small bumpers or posts. The outer ring of the board is divided into four quadrants. The outer edge of the board is raised a bit to keep errant shots from flying out, with a gutter between the playing surface and the edge to collect discarded pieces. Crokinole boards are typically octagonal or round in shape. The discs are roughly checker-sized, slightly smaller in diameter than the board's central hole, and often have concave faces to reduce sliding friction.
    6.00
    1 votes
    201
    Guess Who?

    Guess Who?

    • Genre: Children's game
    Guess Who? is a two-player guessing game created by Ora and Theo Coster, also known as Theora Design, first manufactured by Milton Bradley in 1979 in Great Britain. It was brought to the United States in 1982. Each player starts the game with a board that includes cartoon images of 24 people and their first names. The game starts with each player selecting a card of their choice from a separate pile of cards containing the same 24 images. The object of the game is to be the first to determine which card one's opponent has selected. Players alternate asking various yes or no questions to eliminate candidates, such as "Does this person wear glasses?" Well-crafted questions allow players to eliminate one or more possible cards. Early versions included fewer women than men; the 1987 edition featured only 5 women compared to 19 men. In the mid-2000s, the faces were changed and the sexes made more even. Special editions which have different faces have been released, including Star Wars, Marvel Comics and Disney. There are smaller, "travel" editions which have only 20 different faces. In 2008 & 2010, extra & mix 'n mash games were released. In the United States, advertisements for the
    6.00
    1 votes
    202
    Karnöffel

    Karnöffel

    Karnöffel is a card game which probably came from the upper-German language area in Europe in the first quarter of the 15th century. It first appeared "listed in a municipal ordinance of Nördlingen, Bavaria, in 1426 among the games that could be lawfully played at the annual city fête. This makes the game the oldest identifiable European card game in the history of playing cards. The name Karnöffel, is probably derived from another card game, Kanjafah or Kanjifah (called in contemporary manuscripts, Karniffel, Karnueffel and Karnoeffelins ), of Persian origin, which bears also a similarity with the name Ganjifa, Ganjifeh, of Indian origin. Karnöffel is unique in that it had a trump suit of cards with a higher priority than any other suit in the deck, which indicates that it might be a possible precursor to the trump cards of Tarot, as well as the Joker card found in modern card decks. In contrast to modern card games such as poker and gin rummy, Karnöffel utilizes a deck of 48 cards. The earliest substantial reference to Karnöffel is a poem by Meissner, discovered by Dr. von Leyden, written in or before 1450. A derivative of the game is still played around Stans and in the
    6.00
    1 votes
    203
    Ludus duodecim scriptorum

    Ludus duodecim scriptorum

    Ludus duodecim scriptorum, or XII scripta, was a board game popular during the time of the Roman Empire. The name translates as "game of twelve markings", probably referring to the three rows of 12 markings each found on most surviving boards. The game tabula is thought to be a descendant of this game, and both are similar to modern backgammon. It has been speculated that XII scripta is related to the Egyptian game senet. but some consider this doubtful because, with the exception of limited superficial similarities between the appearance of the boards, and the use of dice, there is no known evidence linking the games. Another factor casting doubt on this link is that the latest known classical senet board is over half of a millennium older than the earliest known XII scripta board. Very little information about specific gameplay has survived. The game was played using three cubic dice, and each player had 15 pieces. A possible "beginners' board", having spaces marked with letters, has suggested a possible path for the movement of pieces. The earliest known mention of the game is in Ovid's Ars Amatoria (The Art of Love) (written between 1 BC and 8 AD).
    6.00
    1 votes
    204
    Pictionary

    Pictionary

    • Genre: Party game
    Pictionary is a guessing word game designed by Robert Angel and first published in 1985 by Seattle Games Inc. Hasbro has been the publisher since 1994. The game is played with teams with players trying to identify specific words from their teammates' drawings. Each team moves a piece on a game board formed by a sequence of squares. Each square has a letter or shape identifying the type of picture to be drawn on it. The objective is to be the first team to reach the last space on the board. To achieve this a player must guess the word or phrase being drawn by their partner, or if the player lands on an "all play" square, one player from each team attempts to illustrate the same concept simultaneously, with the two teams racing to guess first. The team chooses one person to begin drawing; this position rotates with each word. The drawer chooses a card out of a deck of special Pictionary cards and tries to draw pictures which suggest the word printed on the card. The pictures cannot contain any numbers or letters. The teammates try to guess the word the drawing is intended to represent. There are five types of squares on the board, and each Pictionary card has a list of five words
    6.00
    1 votes
    205
    Rummikub

    Rummikub

    • Genre: Tile-based game
    Rummikub (also known as Rummy-O, Rummycube, Rummyking Tile rummy and Rummy Tile) is a tile-based game for two to four players. Rummikub was invented by Ephraim Hertzano, a Romanian-born Jew, who immigrated to Mandate Palestine in the early 1930s. He hand-made the first sets with his family in the backyard of his home. The game combines elements of rummy, dominoes, mah-jongg and chess. Hertzano sold the first sets door-to-door and on a consignment basis at small shops. Over the years, the family licensed it to other countries and it became Israel’s #1 export game. In 1977, it became a bestselling game in the United States. Hertzano's 'Official Rummikub Book', published in 1978, describes three different versions of the game: American, Sabra and International. Modern Rummikub sets include only the Sabra version rules, with no mention of the others, and there are variations in the rules between publishers. The game was first made by Lemada Light Industries Ltd, founded by Hertzano. "Six handed" (a game with 6 colors) is available in Germany. It tends to be more fun for larger parties, but less challenging, as it is much easier to make a set of 3 different colors when there are 6
    6.00
    1 votes
    206
    Taboo

    Taboo

    • Genre: Party game
    Taboo is a word guessing party game published by Hasbro in 1989. The objective of the game is for a player to have his/her partner(s) guess the word on his/her card without using the word itself or five additional words listed on the card. The game is similar to Catch Phrase, also from Hasbro, in which a player tries to get his or her teammates to guess words using gestures and verbal clues. Taboo was later the basis for a 2002 game show of the same name on TNN (now Spike), hosted by comedian Chris Wylde. Some early editions include a board to track progress (as shown in the photo on this page), but current editions do not. The second edition of the game, produced in 1994, has a round, pink squeaker, or hooter instead of a buzzer, as do the 1993 and 1990 editions. Taboo Junior, the game for younger players, includes a purple squeaker, as do a few of the other editions from 1996 and 2002. In 1990, Hasbro sold packs of additional words, but they are no longer in production. An even number of players from four to ten sit alternating around in a circle. Players take turns as the "giver," who attempts to prompt his or her teammates to guess as many keywords as possible in the allotted
    6.00
    1 votes
    207
    Thurn and Taxis

    Thurn and Taxis

    • Designer: Andreas Seyfarth
    • Publisher: Rio Grande Games
    • Genre: Transportation
    Thurn and Taxis is a board game designed by Karen and Andreas Seyfarth and published in 2006 by Hans im Glück in German (as Thurn und Taxis) and by Rio Grande Games in English. In the game, players seek to build postal networks and post offices in Bavaria and surrounding areas, as did the house of Thurn und Taxis in the 16th century. The game won the prestigious 2006 Spiel des Jahres award. Each turn players draw one or more cards representing cities in southern Germany. They then play one or more cards comprising a route. After reaching a certain length, a route may be scored. Players choose to put markers on some of the cities through which the scored route passes. One may either choose a particular province and assign markers to each city within that province represented in the route, or assign a marker to one city per province represented in the route. Points are awarded for the length of the route and domination of the different regions. The player who triggers the game-end condition also receives a bonus point. Three expansions have been released for Thurn and Taxis. The first, Der Kurier der Fürstin, was a small expansion released in the October 2005 issue of Spielbox
    6.00
    1 votes
    208
    Tigris and Euphrates

    Tigris and Euphrates

    • Designer: Reiner Knizia
    • Publisher: Hans im Glück
    • Genre: German-style
    Tigris and Euphrates (German: Euphrat und Tigris) is a German-style strategy board game designed by Reiner Knizia and first published in 1997 by Hans im Glück. Before its publication, it was highly anticipated by German gamers hearing rumors of a "gamer's game" designed by Knizia. Tigris and Euphrates won first prize in the 1998 Deutscher Spiele Preis. A card game version was released in 2005. The game is set as a clash between neighboring dynasties at the dawn of civilization. The game is named after the rivers Tigris and Euphrates in the region now called the Middle-East. The rivers together formed natural borders for an area which harboured several grand ancient civilizations, including Sumer, Babylonia, and Assyria. The Greeks called this area Mesopotamia, which literally means "between the rivers". The game can be played by 2, 3 or 4 people. The play offers both tactical and strategic objectives. As with many games, short term objectives gain prominence when more players participate, as players have less chance to follow up on previous moves. Luck plays a role, as players draw tiles from a bag, but it is seldom decisive. Players may selectively discard and redraw their tiles
    6.00
    1 votes
    209
    Vegas Showdown

    Vegas Showdown

    • Genre: Economic simulation
    Vegas Showdown is a board game for players aged 12 and above. From the publisher: Build your own hotel/casino by bidding against the other players to acquire tiles that represent slot machines, lounges, restaurants, and other casino-related places. Put those tiles on your player board, which represents your own customized casino. The tiles will allow you to increase your revenue, services, and fame. Build buzz for your casino through publicity events like hosting a Biz Markie concert or staging a food fight. The player who builds the most famous hotel/casino wins the game. The game was Games Magazine's 'Game of the Year' for 2007. Online Play: Online Play Gametableonline hosts Vegas Showdown and it is regularly played online. There have emerged two waring factions, the Sith and the Jedi. The Sith follow the rule of two as in the Star Wars Universe. A player by the name of FreshPrince is the Dark Lord and his apprentice is Darth Hitman. On the opposite side the Jedi have two Masters, several Knights, and a few apprentices. The requirements to become a Knight include good moral character and a history of beating the Grand Master Ugly in game many times or beating the Sith in game
    6.00
    1 votes
    210
    Panupol Sujjayakorn

    Panupol Sujjayakorn

    Panupol Sujjayakorn (born 1984) is a Thai Scrabble player, an economics student at university and anlyst at Exxon Mobile. He won the Thailand Matchplay Championship 2002, World Scrabble Championship 2003, Thailand King's Cup 2005 and was runner-up in the American National Scrabble Championship 2005 to David Wiegand. He is known for his encyclopedic knowledge of words despite having only conversational English. In the World Scrabble Championship 2003, Sujjayakorn won his first 8 games and 18 of his first 21 before losing the final three games to finish with 18 wins, 6 losses, first place. He then played fellow countryman Pakorn Nemitrmansuk in the best-of-five final. The final was tied at two wins each before Sujjayakorn won the final game 444-387 to be crowned World Scrabble champion in his first appearance at the tournament. In the 2005 National Scrabble Championship Sujjayakorn won his first 9 consecutive games and 14 of his first 15, but won just 7 of his final 13 games. He qualified in second place for the final where he played David Wiegand, and led 2-0 in the final before Wiegand won all of the final three games to win the tournament.
    5.00
    2 votes
    211
    Scorpion

    Scorpion

    Scorpion is a Patience game using a deck of 52 playing cards. Although somewhat related to Spider, the method of game play is akin to Yukon. The object of this game is to form four columns of suit sequence cards from king down to ace. The game starts with 49 cards dealt into seven columns of seven cards each on the tableau. The first four columns each have three face-down cards with four face-up cards placed over them. The cards in the remaining three columns are all faced up. The three leftover cards are set aside for later. Cards in the tableau are built down by suit and every face up card is available for play, no matter where in the column it is. That means that any card can be placed on top of a card that is a rank higher. However, once a card from the bottom or middle of a column is moved, all cards on top of it are moved as well as one unit. Also, nothing can be placed on an ace and gaps on the tableau can only be taken by kings or sequences with Kings as their top cards. Furthermore, once a face-down card is exposed, it is turned face up. When no more moves are possible, the three leftover cards are dealt onto the first three columns and put into play. As earlier mentioned,
    5.00
    2 votes
    212
    Scrabble

    Scrabble

    • Designer: Alfred Mosher Butts
    • Publisher: J. W. Spear & Sons
    • Genre: Word
    Scrabble is a word game in which two to four players score points by forming words from individual lettered tiles on a gameboard marked with a 15-by-15 grid. The words are formed across and down in crossword fashion and must appear in a standard dictionary. Specified reference works (e.g., the Official Club and Tournament Word List, the Official Scrabble Players Dictionary) provide a list of permissible words. The name Scrabble is a trademark of Hasbro, Inc. in the United States and Canada; elsewhere, it is trademarked by Mattel. The game is sold in 121 countries and there are 29 different language versions. Approximately 150 million sets have been sold worldwide, and sets are found in roughly one-third of American homes. The game is played by two to four players on a square board with a 15-by-15 grid of cells (individually known as "squares"), each of which accommodates a single letter tile. In official club and tournament games, play is between two players or, occasionally, between two teams each of which collaborates on a single rack. The board is marked with "premium" squares, which multiply the number of points awarded: eight dark red "triple-word" squares, 17 pink
    5.00
    2 votes
    213
    Ingenious

    Ingenious

    • Designer: Reiner Knizia
    • Publisher: Fantasy Flight Games
    Ingenious is the English name for Einfach Genial (Simply Ingenious), a German abstract strategy board game designed by Reiner Knizia under commission from Sophisticated Games and published in 2004 by Kosmos. Across most of Europe it is titled as the local translation of Ingenious or Simply Ingenious, the notable exception being Mensa Connections in the UK. With the exception of the game box and rule sheet (which require regional translations), identical components are used in each version of the game. There are six coloured symbols used in the game: Tiles are in the shape of two conjoined hexagons, with one of the coloured symbols in each hexagon. There are six tiles for each two-colour combination (e.g. red/orange) and five for each double (e.g. blue/blue). The combination of colours and symbols aids visually impaired players. The game can be played by two, three or four players, with additional rules provided for solo and four-player partnership play. Each player has a rack of six randomly-chosen tiles which are concealed from the other players. The board is also made up of a number of hexagons, with the two outermost rings reserved for three- and four-player games respectively.
    4.50
    2 votes
    214
    Skat

    Skat

    • Genre: Trick-taking game
    Skat is an early 19th century 3 player trick-taking card game devised in Germany. Along with Doppelkopf it is the most popular card game in Germany and Silesia. Skat features prominently in Günter Grass's novel The Tin Drum and leads a trail connecting the plot. It is also played by many soldiers in Remarque's novel All Quiet on the Western Front, and was a favorite game of Richard Strauss, who included a hand in his opera Intermezzo. Skat was developed by the members of the Brommesche Tarok-Gesellschaft between 1810 and 1817 in Altenburg, in what is now the Federated State of Thuringia, Germany, based on the three-player game of Tarock, also known as Tarot, and the four-player game of Schafkopf (the American equivalent being Sheepshead). In the earliest known form of the game, the player in prior position was dealt twelve cards to the other players' ten each, made two discards, constituting the skat, and then announced a contract. But the main innovation of this new game was then that of the Bidding process. The first text book on the rules of Skat was published in 1848 by a secondary school Professor called J. F. L. Hempel. Nevertheless, the rules continued to differ by region
    4.50
    2 votes
    215
    Speed

    Speed

    Speed is a game for two or more players of the shedding family of card games, in which each player tries to get rid of all of his/her cards. Speed is a game associated with the game Nertz. Each player is dealt five cards to form a hand, and each player is dealt 15 cards face down to form a draw pile. If you are playing with jokers, you use them as wild cards and give each draw pile 16 cards. Two stacks of five cards, placed face down on each side between the players, serves as a replacement pile. Finally, two cards are placed face down in the center between the replacement piles. The round begins when the players each flip one of the face-down cards simultaneously from their own pile. By using cards from their hand, the players must place cards one above or one below or the same on the top card of either pile (suit of the cards does not matter). For example, a pile with a six on top may have a five, six,or a seven placed on it (You may not lay down more than one card at once, but you can lay down two cards with the same number when playing). King and Ace are considered adjacent so that there is a continuous loop of options. A common variant, good for younger children, is to allow
    4.50
    2 votes
    216
    Thud

    Thud

    Thud is a board game devised by Trevor Truran and first published in 2002, inspired by the Discworld novels of Terry Pratchett. It bears a strong resemblance to the ancient Norse games of Hnefatafl and Tablut but has been radically redefined to be less one-sided. The two sides are dwarfs and trolls. In the game, the objective is to eliminate as many of the opposition's pieces as possible. The two antagonists are the trolls and the dwarfs, the trolls being few in number (but individually very powerful), while there are a large number of dwarfs, but each individual dwarf is very weak and requires support from nearby dwarfs to be of use against the trolls. As in fox games, the two sides have different pieces with different movement and attacking styles. Thud uses an unconventional, octagonal board divided into smaller squares, with only one piece allowed to occupy each square. The game, supposedly called in Dwarfish "Hnaflbaflwhiflsnifltafl", represents the famous Battle of Koom Valley between dwarfs and trolls. The game was first directly referenced in Going Postal, being played by Vetinari, and became a central concept in the immediate sequel Thud!. The release of Thud! led to a
    4.50
    2 votes
    217
    Baraja

    Baraja

    The Baraja (literally deck/pack of cards) is a deck of playing cards associated with Spain. It is usually called Baraja Española (literally Spanish Deck). It has four suits and is usually made up of 40 cards. It has a quite high resemblance to the Latin deck, and somewhat less to the Anglo-American-French deck. The traditional 40-card Spanish baraja is an ancient deck that existed in Spain since between the 14th-16th century. The suits closely resemble those of Italian cards and Latin suited Tarot decks. In fact, the Baraja, like the tarot, are used for both game playing and cartomancy. The Baraja have been widely considered to be part of the occult in many Latin-American countries, yet they continue to be used widely for card games and gambling, especially in Spain. Among other places, the Baraja have appeared in One Hundred Years of Solitude and other Spanish and Latin American literature (e.g., Viaje a la Alcarria by Camilo José Cela). The Baraja is widely used in Spain, Portugal, and Latin America and almost every Spanish family has at least one Baraja. Baraja in the Spanish language can refer to any type of card deck. A traditional Spanish deck consists of four suits of ten
    5.00
    1 votes
    218
    Belote

    Belote

    Belote is a 32-card trick-taking game played in France, and is currently one of the most popular card games in that country. It was invented around 1920, probably from Klaverjas, Klaverjassen, a game played since at least the 17th century in the Netherlands. Closely related games are played throughout the world, and its rules first published in 1921. In Bulgarian the official name is Bridge-Belote (Бридж-белот), in Greece it is called Vida (Βίδα), in Cyprus it is called Pilotta (Πιλόττα), in Quebec the word was shortened to the first syllable and spelled bœuf, and in Croatian a similar game with different rules exists, called Bela. In Saudi Arabia it is Baloot. In Bulgaria it is usually called Belot (Белот). In Macedonia it is Belyot (Бељот) and it is especially played in Bitola region. Belot in Armenia, more commonly known as Bazaar Belote, is also a very popular game, and it is played in a slightly different way. It is also the number one card game in Saudi Arabia; although, the rules in the Saudi version are very different from the rules generally played by in Europe. Within the game's terminology, belote is used to designate a pair of a King and a Queen of a trump suit,
    5.00
    1 votes
    219
    Intelligence

    Intelligence

    Intelligence is a Patience game which uses two decks of playing cards mixed together. It is basically a two-deck version of another solitaire game La Belle Lucie and its game play is somewhat closer to the parent game than its cousins House in the Wood and House on the Hill. First, 18 piles (or fans) of three cards are dealt. During this deal any ace encountered regardless of where it would end up in the pile will be moved to a foundation and be replaced with another card. As they become available, the other aces are placed on the foundations, which are all built up by suit. The top cards of the piles are available to be built on the foundations or on each other's piles on the tableau. When building on the tableau, the cards are built either up or down by suit. Aces cannot be placed over kings, however, and vice versa. When a gap occurs, it is immediately filled by three new cards from the stock. This is the only way cards from the stock are introduced from the game and the only way spaces are refilled. As in the original deal, any ace that comes up is immediately placed on the foundations. When all moves have been made and become stuck, even if there are still cards in the stock,
    5.00
    1 votes
    220
    Tarocchini

    Tarocchini

    Tarocchini is a point trick-taking Tarot card game from the 17th century. The diminutive form of Tarocco (referring to the reduction of the Bolognese pack from 78 to 62 cards, which probably occurred in the early 16th century), the game is also known as Partita. Tarocchini is played by 4 players in two partnerships sitting opposite each other. The middle part of the game is very similar to the basic Tarot game. It adds a round of point-counting before and after the game based on sets and runs of the cards. An unusual feature is that the partners are allowed to make certain limited signals to each other during play. The game is popular in the Bologna region of Italy and has been confined mostly to this area. Tarocchini is a very complex game of cards, yet the rules have changed little over the years. Partita can be played with a standard Tarot deck (where the 2–5 number cards in each suit have been removed), though normally, a special Tarot deck, the Tarocco Bolognese is used. The trump cards are in a non-standard order (probably because of this, the Bologna tarot decks were amongst the last to add numbers to the trump cards). The biggest difference in ordering is amongst what is
    5.00
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    221
    Three-card Monte

    Three-card Monte

    Three-card Monte, also known as the Three-card marney, Three-card trick, Three-Way, Three-card shuffle, Menage-a-card, Triplets, Follow the lady, Les Trois Perdants (French for Three Losers), le Bonneteau, Find the lady, Bola bola or Follow the Bee is a confidence game in which the victim, or mark, is tricked into betting a sum of money, on the assumption that they can find the money card among three face-down playing cards. It is the same as the shell game except that cards are used instead of "shells". In its full form, Three-card Monte is an example of a classic "short con" in which a shill pretends to conspire with the mark to cheat the dealer, while in fact conspiring with the dealer to cheat the mark. This confidence trick was already in use by the turn of the 15th century. The Three-card Monte game itself is very simple. To play, a dealer places three cards face down on a table, usually on a cardboard box which provides the ability to set up and disappear quickly. The dealer shows that one of the cards is the target card, e.g., the queen of hearts, and then rearranges the cards quickly to confuse the player about which card is which. The player is then given an opportunity
    5.00
    1 votes
    222
    Amun-Re

    Amun-Re

    • Designer: Reiner Knizia
    • Publisher: Hans im Glück
    Amun-Re is a game designed by Reiner Knizia and first published in 2003 by Hans im Glück in German and in English by Rio Grande Games. Players are leaders of different Egyptian dynasties who try to gain influence in 15 provinces of ancient Egypt. Influence and building pyramids earns points for the players. Points are scored at two instances during the game, at the end of the "Old Kingdom" and at the end of the "New Kingdom", and the player who amasses the most points wins the game. Amun-Re is played in six rounds, where each round consists of an auction of provinces, followed by the purchase of "power cards" (for special use or that give bonuses in scoring), farmers (that generate income), and bricks (which are converted into pyramids on a three-for-one basis), a sacrifice phase, and then income. All prices in auctions, as well as for purchases, are based on the triangular numbers. The number of provinces available for auction in each round is equal to the number of players, but it is randomly determined which provinces will be available. Each province gives the player who wins it different abilities. For example, some provinces can support more farmers, some allow the players to
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    2 votes
    223
    Black Lady

    Black Lady

    Black Lady is an extremely combative variant of the card game Whist that is popular in the United Kingdom and is similar to the North American game Hearts. It is commonly played among large groups of players, typically 8 to 10, using two decks of cards, or it can be played by as few as three players using a single deck. The penalty cards are : There are therefore 205 points to be taken per deck, per hand. One variant makes the 10♠ worth 15 points, so the total is exactly 200. The cards are dealt out evenly among all the players, using standard Whist conventions for rotating dealership and lead. This requires that the number of cards in play is divisible by the number of players, so before any hands are dealt, the pack(s) is inspected and the appropriate number of innocuous cards of trivial denomination (low Diamonds/Clubs) are extracted and discarded. When multiple packs are in use, there are multiple cards of each face. When the winning card face in a trick is played multiple times to that trick, the first such card played is the one which takes the trick. After the deal and before the first lead, each player must select three of his dealt cards and pass them covertly to his
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    2 votes
    224
    Pichenotte

    Pichenotte

    Pichenotte is a French Canadian tabletop game, with a board, game pieces and rules similar to carrom. Used more broadly, the term is a general name for tabletop games played with small (usually wooden) pieces that are flicked using the thumb and index (or middle) finger, including such games as carrom, sharing a similarity in that their mechanics lie somewhere between pocket billiards and shuffleboard. The term is sometimes also mistakenly used as the actual name of other games of this class, such as carrom and crokinole. Commercially produced boards are available, some under the trade name Pinnochi. The game is sometimes referred to as "piche" or "pish". In Canadian French, the flicking action used in the game is called a "pichenotte" (standard French "pichenette"), from which the game name is derived. While the specifics are uncertain, pichenotte certainly must have originated from the Indian game carrom. In the mid-19th century, carrom was likely brought to Canada by Indian or British immigrants. The game is played on a board of lacquered plywood, normally 28 inches square (71 cm). The edges of the playing surface are bounded by raised wooden sides. The object of the game is to
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    2 votes
    225
    Tournament

    Tournament

    Tournament is a solitaire card game which uses two decks of playing cards shuffled together. Despite the name, the game play doesn't seem to be related to the word tournament. First, the cards are shuffled and dealt as two columns of four cards laid out. The player must make sure that these eight cards include either a king, an ace, or both. If neither a king nor an ace is found among these eight cards, all cards are collected and shuffled and two new columns of four cards are dealt. As long there is no king or ace among the eight cards, the shuffling and dealing continues. When at least a king or an ace are present, six columns of four cards are then dealt. At least a king or an ace must be present among the first eight cards for the game to work. The first eight cards compose the reserve (or "the kibitzers") and the six columns of four cards form the tableau (or "the dormitzers"). The object of the game is to free one king and one ace of each suit and built them by suit. The kings should be built down while the aces should be built up. The top cards of each column on the tableau and all eight cards on the reserve are available. The cards on the reserve are available to be built
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    2 votes
    226
    *Star

    *Star

    *Star is a complex abstract strategy game by Ea Ea, a designer of Y. It is a redevelopment of his earlier game Star. *Star can be played on graphs of different sizes. The three shown boards have 105, 180, and 275 nodes of which 30, 40, and 50 are on the perimeter. Note that the edges between the five centermost nodes cross each other. Two players alternately place stones of their colour on empty nodes. The game ends when the board is filled up (or when both players agree that the score is decided). Each node on the perimeter of the board counts as one "peri". Connected groups of one color that contain fewer than two peries are removed, with the possible peri going to the surrounding group. Each remaining group is worth the number of peries it contains minus four. The player with more points wins. Draws are decided in favour of the player owning more corners. For example, a group containing exactly two peries is worth 2-4 = -2 points. This is the same as the two peries being given to the opponent. That is, creating a group with just two peries is worthless unless it disconnects opponent groups or contains a corner. *Star is closely related to games of Hex and Y where the goal is to
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    1 votes
    227
    Gate

    Gate

    Gate is a solitaire card game which is played using a deck of 52 playing cards. It gets its name because the cards are laid out in such a way that they form a gate. First, two columns of five cards are dealt face up. These act as the reserve or "gate posts." Then, between these columns, two rows of four cards are dealt, again face-up. These compose the "rails" or the tableau. The spaces for the foundations are allotted over the first row of cards. The object of the game, like many solitaire games, is to find the aces, place then onto the foundations, and build each of them up by suit to kings. The cards in the rails are available for play, to be placed on the foundations or onto other cards in the rail. The cards in the rails are built down by alternating color (a card with a red suit over a one with a black suit, and vice versa). Spaces in the rails are filled using cards from the gate posts. If the cards in the gate posts are used up, the top card of the wastepile, or the next card in the stock if there is no wastepile, can be used to fill spaces. The gate posts are never replenished. Generally, one card can be moved at a time. The most prevalent rule regarding moves of sequences
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    228
    Grandfather's Clock

    Grandfather's Clock

    Grandfather's Clock is a solitaire game using a deck of 52 playing cards. Its foundation is akin to Clock Solitaire; but while winning the latter depends on the luck of the draw, this game has a strategic side. Before the game begins, the following cards are taken out of the deck: 2♥, 3♠, 4♦, 5♣, 6♥, 7♠, 8♦, 9♣, 10♥, J♠, Q♦, and K♣. They are then arranged in a circular fashion like a clock face with the 2♥ on the "five o' clock" position, 3♠ on the "six o' clock" position, and so on. These cards will be the foundations. The remaining cards are then shuffled and dealt into eight columns of five cards each on the tableau. The object of the game is to distribute the cards to the foundations to point that the top cards of the foundations show the correct numbers on the clock face. (A queen is equal to twelve, a jack eleven.) Each foundation should be built up by suit until the card with the correct corresponding number on the clock face is placed. The cards on the tableau on the other hand are built down regardless of suit. The top cards of each column are the only ones available for play. Only one card can be played at a time and any space that occurs is filled with any available
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    229
    Parchís

    Parchís

    Parchís (Catalan: parxís; Basque: partxis) is a Spanish board game of the Cross and Circle family. It is an adaptation of the Indian game Pachisi. Parchís was a very popular game in Spain at one point, and it is still popular. Since it uses dice, Parchís is not usually regarded as an abstract strategy game like checkers or chess. It does not depend entirely on luck either, since the four pawns under a player's command demand some sort of strategy. Parchís is license-free in Spain, so in stores it is just as easy to find as a deck of cards, and is usually cheaper. Although the original game allows up to four players (that is, the board counts four colors: yellow, blue, red and green), six-player versions are not hard to find (adding orange and purple, in that order), and eight-player boards can be found in big toy stores. Traditionally, each player has a cubilete (dice cup) to shake and toss the dice. This does not affect the course of the game itself, but most habitual players find it imperative. On the reverse of the board it is usual to find a board for the Game of the Goose. This game is played with 1 die and 4 pawns per player. Dice cups are optional, but most game sets include
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    230
    Primero

    Primero

    Primero, Prime, Primus, Primiera, Primavista, often referred to as “Poker’s mother”, as it is the first confirmed version of a game directly related to modern day poker, is a 16th century gambling card game of which the earliest reference dates back to 1526. The game of Primero is closely related to the game of Primo visto, if not the same. It still seems uncertain whether the game of Primero is of Spanish or Italian origin. Although Daines Barrington is of opinion that it is of Spanish origin, the poem of Francesco Berni, the earliest writer to mention the game, affords proof that it was at least commonly played in Italy at the beginning of the 16th century. His work entitled Capitolo del Gioco della Primiera, published in Rome in 1526, and believed to be the earliest work extant describing a card game, contains some particulars on the game of Primero. According to David Parlett, the game is still very much played in central Europe and Spain with Italian-suited cards under the name of Goffo or Bambara, remaining the major native vying game of Italy. This old game of cards was called Prime in France, Primera in Spain, and Primiera in Italy. All names derived from the Latin
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    231
    The London Game

    The London Game

    • Genre: Railroad
    The London Game is a British board game based on the London Underground in London, England. The game was first released in 1972 by the game company Condor. The game was re-released in 1997 to celebrate 25 years of the game's existence with a new all-colour board, with new cards. The aim of the game is to start at one of five major stations (Paddington, Liverpool Street, Kings Cross St. Pancras, Victoria and Waterloo) before working your way around six other random stations in the central area, then returning to the terminal that you started from. However, the player has to navigate around certain things such as station blockages and hazard cards, as well as the mind of the other player. Each player at the start gets dealt their six "station cards". These cards consist of all of the main stations on the central tube, reaching as far out as Wembley, Arsenal and Oval. Once the player has their cards, they can add two station blocks on any stations where two lines meet (indicated by a circle). The players use small purple counters to indicate this. Once the player has done that, and chosen their main station to commence the game, it begins. There is a certain amount of strategy
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    232
    Upwords

    Upwords

    • Designer: Elliot Rudell
    • Publisher: Hasbro
    • Genre: Word
    Upwords, recently renamed "Scrabble Upwords" by Hasbro, is a board game invented by Elliot Rudell and originally published by the Milton Bradley Company (which is now a division of Hasbro). The game is based on Scrabble, except that letters can be stacked on top of other words to create new words. The higher the stack of letters, the more points are scored. This often makes words built in later turns of the game more valuable than earlier words, increasing play intensity. The game is available in about twenty languages. Hasbro has recently licensed electronic marketing rights to Microsoft, making it available electronically for the first time since AOL bought Games.com and withdrew the game. There have been national tournaments played in Hungary and Turkey. Players draw letter tiles until they have seven tiles on their racks. The first player forms a word that covers one or more of the central squares. After forming a word, the player draws more tiles to replenish their rack. Play continues to the left. Subsequent plays may put tiles on the board and on top of tiles already played, so long as all words formed are found in the dictionary being used. For example, if a word on the
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    233
    Agnes

    Agnes

    Agnes is a solitaire card game which is a variant of the very popular game Klondike. It is similar to the latter except on how the stock is dealt. Dealing the first 28 cards onto the tableau is a lot like in Klondike. Then a card is placed in the first of the four foundations. This card will be the first card of that foundation and all other cards with the same rank should be placed at the other three foundations. Seven cards are then dealt in a row either above or below the tableau. This will act as the reserve. The cards in the reserve are available for play. Playing the game is a lot like Klondike except that any gaps are filled in by a card a rank lower than the first card of the foundation. For instance, if the first card of each foundation is a 10, gaps are only filled by 9s. Foundations are built up by suit, while the columns on the tableau are built down in alternating colors, wrapping from Ace to King if necessary. When play is no longer possible on the tableau, any card on the reserve can be used to continue the game. Gaps in the reserve are not filled until a new set is dealt. If the game cannot continue even from the reserve, a new set of seven cards is dealt from the
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    234
    Alex Randolph

    Alex Randolph

    Alexander Randolph (4 May 1922 – 28 April 2004) was a designer of board games. Randolph's game creations include TwixT, Breakthru, Inkognito (with Leo Colovini), Raj, Ricochet Robot, and Enchanted Forest (with Michael Matschoss). Randolph was born on a ranch by the Colorado River in Arizona. He attended school as a Swiss boarder, studying Philosophy and Semantics. Randolph spent many of his early years in various occupations, including military intelligence and as an advertising copy editor in Boston. In 1961, Randolph moved to Japan and became a professional game developer, performing initial work on TwixT. During this time he became a dan player in shogi. In 1962, Randolph (along with Sid Sackson) was commissioned to start a new game division for Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing (also known as 3M). Though 3M, Randolph created and published such games as Breakthru, Evade, Oh-Wah-Ree, and TwixT. Randolph moved to Venice, Italy in 1968, continuing his career as a game developer with the company Venice Connection established with Dario De Toffoli and Leo Colovini. Randolph died in Venice on 28 April 2004. Spiel des Jahres Origins Awards Hall of Fame
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    235
    Barbarossa

    Barbarossa

    • Designer: Klaus Teuber
    • Publisher: Rio Grande Games
    Barbarossa is a plasticine-shaping German-style board game for 3 to 6 players, designed by Klaus Teuber in and published in 1988 by Kosmos in German and by Rio Grande Games in English. Barbarossa won the 1988 Spiel des Jahres award. The game is played on a circular board, with three tracks running around it. Around the outside are the scoring track and the elfstone (money) track. Further in there is a circular track with twelve marked spaces on it, and in the center there is a space for sculptures. Later editions of the game change the shape of the board but not its contents. At the start of the game, each player chooses two objects from a list provided and creates plasticine sculptures of each, and places them in the middle of the board. Each player places on the board three tokens: a magician, a witches' hat and an Elfstone. The hats are placed on the scoring track; the elfstones are placed on the elfstone track, and the magicians are placed on the space marked "A". Each player receives three curse tokens. Players then take turns as follows: They may begin either by rolling a six-sided die and moving their magician that many spaces, or by forfeiting their roll and instead
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    236
    Bashi Fen

    Bashi Fen

    Shēng Jí (升級; Advance in Level) is a family of point trick-taking card games played in China and in Chinese immigrant communities. They have a dynamic trump, i.e., which cards are trump changes every round. As these games are played over a wide area with no standardization, rules vary widely from region to region. The game can be played with multiple decks of cards. With one deck, it may be called Dǎ Bǎi Fēn (打百分; Competing for a Hundred Points) or Sìshí Fēn (四十分; Forty Points); with two decks, as is most commonly played, it may be called Bāshí Fēn (八十分; Eighty Points), Tuō Lā Jī (拖拉機; Tractor), Zhǎo Péngyǒu (找朋友; Looking for Friends), and Shuāi Èr (摔二; Throw Two). The article below mainly describes the Bashi Fen variant, with players playing with two decks and in fixed partnerships. The game is played with four players in fixed partnerships, with players sitting across each other forming a team. Each team has a rank that they are currently playing, henceforth referred to as their score. At the beginning of a match, everyone starts at a score of 2. The teams are divided into the Declarers (also known as Defenders) and the Opponents (also known as Attackers), which are determined in
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    237
    Bezique

    Bezique

    • Genre: Trick-taking game
    Bezique, or Bésigue, is a 19th-century French melding and trick-taking card game for two players. The game is derived from Piquet, possibly via Marriage (Sixty-six) and Briscan, with additional scoring features, notably the peculiar liaison of the Q♠ and J♦ that is also a feature of Pinochle, Binokel, and similarly named games that vary by country. Bezique was developed in France from the game Piquet, although the word Bezique, formerly Bésique or Bésigue, was known in France in the 17th century, coming probably from the Italian card game Bazzica. The word bezique once meant "correspondence" or "association". In English-speaking nations, Binocles, meaning eyeglasses with this pronunciation, became the name for Bezique with minor rule variations, ultimately evolving into Pinochle. Two-handed Pinochle and two-handed Bezique are almost identical. The former, together with Six-Pack Bezique and Rubicon Bezique, is still played in the United States of America. The game achieved its greatest popularity in Paris by 1860 and in England a few years later. Perhaps the most famous proponent of the game was Winston Churchill, an avid player and early expert of Six-Pack, or "Chinese" Bezique.
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    238
    Bid Euchre

    Bid Euchre

    Bid Euchre, is the name given to a group of card games played in North America based on the popular game Euchre. It introduces an element of bidding in which the trump suit is decided by which player can bid to take the most tricks. Bid Euchre is very similar to Euchre, the primary differences being the number of cards dealt, absence of any undealt cards, the bidding and scoring process, and the addition of a no trump declaration. Local rules may allow a low no trump declaration. It is typically a partnership game for four players, played with a 24, 32 or 36-card pack, or even two decks of 24 cards each. The game is also known as Hoss or Pepper, a delineation which comes from "Hasenpfeffer", a German dish of marinated and stewed trimmings of hare. A pack of 24 cards containing 9, 10, J, Q, K, and A in each suit. The rank of the cards in the trump suit is: J (of trump suit, also known as the right bower; high), J (of the other suit of the same color as the trump suit, also known as the left bower), A, K, Q, 10, 9 (low). In the plain suits the rank is: A (high), K, Q, J, 10, 9 (low). When playing with no trumps, all four suits follow the 'plain suit' ranking. Cards are dealt one at a
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    239
    Cheops

    Cheops

    Cheops is a board game produced by Cyril F Andersen. The name Cheops comes from the Greek name for the pharaoh Khufu. The objective of the game is to build a pyramid in the fewest moves possible. Cydot Products (created by Cyril and his wife Dorothy) created Cheops in 1979.
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    240
    David Wiegand

    David Wiegand

    Dave Wiegand (born 1974) is an American Scrabble player who won the National Scrabble Championship in 2005 and 2009. Wiegand placed second in the same event in 1994 and third in 2000. He also finished eighth (of 102 competitors) in the World Scrabble Championship in 2005. Since his career began in 1993, he has played over 3,000 tournament games, winning over 67%, and has earned over $103,000 in prize money, ranking fifth among all players. In the 2009 NSC, Wiegand defeated defending champion and top seed Nigel Richards in the tournament's final two games to earn his second national title. Wiegand lives with his wife and two daughters in Portland, Oregon and works as a mortgage underwriter.
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    241
    Escape from Atlantis

    Escape from Atlantis

    • Publisher: Parker Brothers
    Escape from Atlantis is a board game that portrays the sinking of Atlantis and the attempts by the population to escape the sinking island. It was originally released in the USA under the title of Survive! and first published in the English language by Parker Brothers in 1982. Survive! was also marketed in Canada, Italy, Spain, and in many other countries. In 1986, Waddingtons launched their three-dimensional version Escape from Atlantis in the UK with revised rules. Waddingtons also sold a bilingual (English/French) version of Escape from Atlantis in Canada. The game was sublicensed in 1987 and sold in Australia and New Zealand. Waddingtons also sublicensed Escape from Atlantis in Europe to Schmidt Spiele of Germany. The game sold in Europe in many languages including Finnish, Dutch, French and German. In 1996 Hasbro relaunched Escape from Atlantis in Europe under the Waddington's brand. This version of the game had rules which were further revised. The game was invented by Julian Courtland-Smith. Early copies of Escape from Atlantis include the name of the then co-copyright owner, C. Courtland-Smith. World sales of Escape from Atlantis now exceed 1.25 million units. In April
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    242
    Golf

    Golf

    Golf is a card game where players try to earn the lowest number of points (as in golf, the sport) over the course of nine deals (or "holes" to further use golfing teminology). It is a game for four or more players using a double-deck of 108 cards. The multi-player game of golf has little in common with its solitaire cousin. Four or more players use two standard 52-card decks plus 2 or 4 Jokers . Each player is dealt 6 cards face down from the deck, the remainder is placed face down and the top card is turned up to start the discard pile beside it. Players arrange their 6 cards in 2 rows of 3 in front of them and turn 2 of these cards face up. This arrangement is maintained throughout the game and players always have 6 cards in front of them. The object is for players to reduce the value of the cards in front of them by either swapping them for lesser value cards or by pairing them up with cards of equal rank. Beginning at dealer's left, players take turns drawing single cards from either the stock or discard piles. The drawn card may either be swapped for one of that player's 6 cards, or discarded. If the card is swapped for one of the face down cards, the card swapped in remains
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    243
    Isola

    Isola

    Isola is a two-player abstract strategy board game. It is played on a 7x7 board which is initially filled with squares, except at the starting positions of the pieces. Both players have one piece; it is in the middle position of the row closest to his/her side of the board. A move consists of two subsequent actions: The player who cannot make any more loses the game.
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    244
    Mexica

    Mexica

    Mexica is a board game designed by Wolfgang Kramer and Michael Kiesling and published in 2002 by Ravensburger in German and Rio Grande Games in English. Mexica was awarded 5th prize in the 2002 Deutscher Spiele Preis. Mexica is the third game in the Mask Trilogy, after Tikal and Java. Players attempt to partition the city of Tenochtitlan in Lake Texoco into districts, and then gain influence over the most developed districts.
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    245
    Pyramid

    Pyramid

    Pyramid is a solitaire game where the object is to get all the cards from the pyramid to the foundation. The object of the game is to remove pairs of cards that add up to the total of the highest card in the deck from an arrangement of cards - a pyramid of 28 cards. When using the common French deck, Jacks value at 11, Queens 12, and Kings 13. So the highest value is 13. In the numbered Spanish deck the highest numbers are also the Kings at 12, so the pairs must add up to 12. To set up the pyramid, deal one card face up at the top of the playing area, then two cards beneath and partially covering it, then three beneath them, and so on till you have dealt out a row of seven cards for a total of 28 cards dealt. Refer to image. The remaining cards are placed to the side face down. This is the Stock. To play, pairs of exposed cards can be removed to the Foundation if their values total 13 (12 if using the Spanish deck). Thus, kings can be removed immediately to the Foundation. Cards must not be covered. Thus when an Ace rests on a Queen, that Queen can not be removed. You may draw cards from the Stock one at a time and match it with any exposed card. if no match is made the drawn Stock
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    246
    Risk 2210 A.D.

    Risk 2210 A.D.

    • Publisher: Avalon Hill
    Risk: 2210 A.D. is a 2-5 player board game by Avalon Hill that is a futuristic variant of the classic board game Risk. Risk 2210 A.D. was designed by Rob Daviau and Craig Van Ness and first released in 2001. In 2002, Risk 2210 A.D. won the Origins Award for Best Science Fiction or Fantasy Board Game of 2001. The boxed set includes: 2210 A.D. originally came packaged in a rectangular boxed set with a playing board that folded into fourths. At some point the design changed to a square, like the packaging for Risk Godstorm. The board in the square box folds into sixths and the cardboard playing pieces are one-sided as opposed to being printed on both sides as they were for the rectangular box. Before the game, 4 cards are randomly selected from the land territory deck. Each of the territories drawn will have a "devastation marker" placed on it, and is impassable for the game - thus making every game different. Then players take turns selecting from the remaining land territories (water and moon colonies will be used later). Once the land territories are filled, players continue placing their alloted number of MODs on territories they own. Then each player places a space station, a
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    247
    Saint Petersburg

    Saint Petersburg

    • Designer: Jay Tummelson
    • Publisher: Hans im Glück
    • Genre: German-style
    Saint Petersburg (German: Sankt Petersburg) is a card-driven designer board game, with the design of the game credited to Michael Tummelhofer, a pseudonym for Michael Bruinsma, Jay Tummelson and Bernd Brunnhofer. Most of the design work was done by Brunnhofer. The game was published in 2004 by Hans im Glück and Rio Grande Games, and won the Deutscher Spiele Preis and International Gamers Award for that year. The first expansion, by Karl-Heinz Schmiel, is The Banquet, appearing first as an insert in a magazine, and consists of 12 new cards (3 normal and 9 special), as well as rules to use them. The second expansion, by Tom Lehmann, is The New Society and consists of 36 cards (28 normal, 7 replacement, and a fifth role card), plus rules to use them and to expand the game to five players. Both expansions were bundled together and sold as the St. Petersburg Expansion.
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    248
    Sueca

    Sueca

    Sueca (meaning Swedish (female) in Portuguese) is a 4 player-partnership point trick-taking card game. The game is most popular in Portugal, Brazil and Angola. Its closest known relative is the very similar German game Einwerfen. The game is normally played by 4 players, where a 2 person-team sits across from each other, and compete against the other team by capturing as many points as possible, ala the bridge card game. Sueca is played with 40 cards by removing 7s, 8s, 9s, and 10s, from a standard 52 card deck. The rank of the cards in each suit, from highest rank to lowest one, is: Ace, 7, King, Jack, Queen, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2. The entire deck is distributed equally to the 4 players by sequencially rotating the dealer, who will turn one of his/her cards face-up to establish the trump suit. Rules of the game requires every player to follow suit, and can trump in only when void in the lead-suit. Player winning a hand then has honors to lead the next card. The 10 cards per suit are valued at 30 points; where Ace=11 points, 7=10 points, K=9, J=8, and Q=7. With 120 points at stake in every round (hand) of play, first team of 2 to reach 61 points wins the game/hand. If a team recahes more
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    Tichu

    Tichu

    Tichu is a multi-genre card game; primarily a shedding game that includes elements of Bridge, Daihinmin, and Poker played between two teams of two players each. Teams work to accumulate points; the first team to reach a predetermined score (usually 1,000 points) is the winner. Tichu is the trade name for what appears to be a variant of Choi Dai Di (Hong Kong slang: "Step on the little guy") or Da Lao Er (Mandarin slang: "Big penis") combined with Zheng Fen ("Competing for Points"). It is also marketed asTai-Pan in Dutch. The following covers the basic rules of gameplay. However, for more comprehensive rulesets, consult the links below. Each player sits across from their teammate so that play alternates between the two teams. The game is traditionally run counter-clockwise, but is frequently played clockwise. The game is played with a deck of 56 cards, consisting of a 52-card deck of four suits (Jade, Sword, Pagoda, Star) plus four special cards (Mah Jong, Dog, Phoenix, Dragon). A standard 52-card deck with 4 jokers (marked to indicate the special cards) can also be used. Each player is dealt (or alternately draws, in Chinese play) eight cards, and may call "Grand Tichu," a
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    250
    Ticket to Ride

    Ticket to Ride

    • Designer: Alan R. Moon
    • Publisher: Days of Wonder
    • Genre: German-style
    Ticket to Ride is a railway-themed German-style board game designed by Alan R. Moon and published in 2004 by Days of Wonder. The game is also known as Zug um Zug (German), Les Aventuriers du Rail (French), Aventureros al Tren (Spanish), Wsiąść do pociągu (Polish), and Menolippu (Finnish). The game won the 2004 Spiel des Jahres, the Origins Award for Best Board Game of 2004, the 2005 Diana Jones award, the 2005 As d'Or Jeu de l'année, and placed second in the Schweizer Spielepreis for Family Games. Ticket to Ride: Europe won the 2005 International Gamers Award. As of August 2008, over 750,000 copies of the game have been sold according to the publisher. At the beginning of the main game, players are dealt four train car cards as their playing hand. They are also dealt three 'destination ticket' cards, each of which shows a pair of cities on the map. These become goals, representing two end-points which players are secretly attempting to connect. The player must keep at least two of these destination cards and discard unwanted tickets to the bottom of the stack, if any. Once kept, a destination ticket may not be discarded for the rest of game. Each player also selects a group of 45
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