Top List Curated by Listnerd
  • Public list
  • Nov 27th 2012
  • 1.377 views
  • 615 votes
  • 615 voters
  • 9%
Best Game expansion of All Time

More about Best Game expansion of All Time:

Best Game expansion of All Time is a public top list created by Listnerd on Rankly.com on November 27th 2012. Items on the Best Game expansion of All Time top list are added by the Rankly.com community and ranked using our secret ranking sauce. Best Game expansion of All Time has gotten 1.377 views and has gathered 615 votes from 615 voters. Only owner can add items. Just members can vote.

Best Game expansion of All Time is a top list in the Games category on Rankly.com. Are you a fan of Games or Best Game expansion of All Time? Explore more top 100 lists about Games on Rankly.com or participate in ranking the stuff already on the all time Best Game expansion of All Time top list below.

If you're not a member of Rankly.com, you should consider becoming one. Registration is fast, free and easy. At Rankly.com, we aim to give you the best of everything - including stuff like the Best Game expansion of All Time list.

Get your friends to vote! Spread this URL or share:

Items just added

    1

    Rahasia

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons Basic Set
    Rahasia is an adventure module published by TSR, Inc. in 1984, for the Basic Set rules of the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. Its product designation is TSR 9115. The book was designed by Tracy and Laura Hickman, and features artwork by Jeff Easley and Timothy Truman. In RPGA1 Rahasia, the heroes seek to save a kidnapped elven maid, and to do so they must enter the Temple of the Sacred Black Rock, break a curse, and capture the evil Rahib. In the revised module B7 Rahasia, the adventures must save a group of kidnapped elven women held in the dungeons beneath a good elven temple taken over by an evil cleric. An elven village is threatened by a dark Priest only known as the Rahib. He has kidnapped two of the village's fairest maidens and now demands that Rahasia, the most beautiful elf, is to surrender herself to free the others. The player characters are drawn into this adventure when they find a plea for help from Rahasia. The only way to free the captured maidens is to enter an old temple, built upon the ruins of a wizard's tower buried under a mountain. The original Rahasia was written by Laura Hickman, and was first published in 1979 by Daystar West Media as a
    6.63
    8 votes
    2

    D20 Future

    • Game: d20 Modern
    d20 Future is an accessory for the d20 Modern role-playing game written by Christopher Perkins, Rodney Thompson, and JD Wiker. It facilitates the playing of campaigns in the far future, using elements such as cybernetics, mecha, mutations, robotics, space travel, starships, and xenobiology. d20 Future is one of the most extensive of science-fiction d20 games, and has its own SRD, being a source for many other sci-fi d20 games. d20 Future introduced a number of new elements to d20 Modern, including: The book presented a number of campaign models, which provided a framework for building a full campaign setting but did not include a full-scale setting. Campaign models introduced include: d20 Cyberscape is an expansion for the d20 Future supplement of d20 Modern. It adds more Cybernetics to accompany those found in d20 Future, as well as alternate forms of cybernetics, such as cybernetics in fantasy. It also includes a cyberpunk campaign model called CyberRave, in which the world has become a collection of corporation-owned and run countries. d20 Future Tech is a 96 page supplement for the d20 Modern role-playing game and the d20 Future supplement. This supplement contains rules which
    6.50
    8 votes
    3
    Sword and Fist

    Sword and Fist

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Sword and Fist: A Guidebook to Fighters and Monks is an optional rulebook for the 3rd edition of Dungeons & Dragons, written by Jason Carl and notable for its trade paperback format. The guidebook provides supplemental information for characters belonging to the Fighter and Monk base classes. This book contained tips for creating and playing characters of the aforementioned class, as well as a large number of prestige classes, most of which have been reintroduced in the 3.5 supplemental sourcebook Complete Warrior. This chapter gives descriptions of 31 new martial-related feats (such as Circle Kick and Rapid Reload) and 6 new knowledge-based skills (such as Literature and Mathematics). Several standard skills are also clarified to include new uses. This chapter gives descriptions and advancement information for the following prestige classes: This chapter discusses means of smoothly incorporating Fighters and Monks into the world around them. It also contains histories for several martial organizations that can be added to a campaign setting. This chapter contains tips on playing a martial class or prestige class and possible strategies and tactics to succeed in a campaign. Rules
    7.14
    7 votes
    4

    Book of Exalted Deeds

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    The Book of Exalted Deeds (ISBN 0786931361) is an optional sourcebook for the 3.5 edition of the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game, providing supplementary game material for campaigns involving characters of good alignment. Within the game, it is also the name of a powerful magical artifact. The Book of Exalted Deeds contains rules for good occurrences, acts, and characters in the game, and thus is only useful for campaigns including good forces. It is one of two manuals for the game to carry a "For Mature Audiences Only" warning label on the cover (the other is Book of Vile Darkness, devoted to evil). The Book of Exalted Deeds appears to make reference to gnostic myth in the figure of Pistis Sophia. She is one of the Celestial Hebdomad, a body of seven mighty archons that administer the Seven Mounting Heavens of Celestia for an unknown and unknowable entity that (maybe) resides in the Seventh Heaven. Her followers are commonly ascetics and focused on self-improvement, through physical perfection and harmony, not gnosis. Mortal souls which go to Celestia also attain purity and grace in a physical journey that resembles gnosis, learning about the nature of Law and Good
    7.83
    6 votes
    5

    Zendikar

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Zendikar (codenamed Live) is a Magic: The Gathering expansion set, that was released on October 2, 2009. It consists of 249 cards. Zendikar is the first set in the Zendikar block. Its tagline is "Deadly perils, priceless treasures." The eponymous setting is a vast, untamed wilderness, whose few bastions of civilization exist primarily for outfitting treasure-seeking expeditions to distant locales. Colossal stones called "hedrons" float in the sky, and a phenomenon known as "the Roil" causes frequent geological upheaval as it sweeps across the land. Unlike the previous two blocks, there is no multicolored theme (in fact, every colored card in the set is monocolored). Instead, the set's themes revolve around lands. The first cards revealed from the set were a selection of basic lands, each printed with both a traditional frame and a full-art frame reminiscent of lands from Unglued and Unhinged. Cards with the "Landfall" mechanic have effects that are triggered when a land enters the battlefield under the card's owner's control. Adding to the land theme, there are a number of non-basic lands, including lands with a variety of enters-the-battlefield effects that were formerly
    7.83
    6 votes
    6
    6.57
    7 votes
    7
    9.75
    4 votes
    8

    City of Skulls

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
    For the short story see The City of Skulls (short story) The City of Skulls is an adventure module for the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy roleplaying game, set in the game's World of Greyhawk campaign setting. The adventure takes place in the Kingdom of Furyondy and the Empire of Iuz following the Greyhawk Wars. The city referenced in the book's title is Dorakaa, the capital of Iuz's empire. The module bears the code WGR6 and was published by TSR, Inc. in 1993 for the second edition Advanced Dungeons & Dragons rules. The module was written by Carl Sargent with cover art by Jeff Easley and interior art by Eric Hotz. The publication was designed for use with the From the Ashes updated setting information for Greyhawk and Sargent's sourcebooks Iuz the Evil and The Marklands. None of these are strictly necessary for use of the module, however. City of Skulls was ranked the 26th greatest Dungeons & Dragons adventure of all time by Dungeon magazine in 2004, on the 30th anniversary of the Dungeons & Dragons game. The City of Skulls at the TSR Archive
    8.40
    5 votes
    9

    Return to the Temple of Elemental Evil

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Return to the Temple of Elemental Evil is an adventure module for the 3rd edition of the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy roleplaying game, set in the game's World of Greyhawk campaign setting. The module was published by Wizards of the Coast in 2001 for the 3rd edition Dungeons & Dragons rules. It was written by Monte Cook, and is a sequel to module T1-4 The Temple of Elemental Evil (TSR, 1985). It features cover art by Brom and interior art by David Roach. Reviewer Alan Kohler stated that "the material is well written and consistent with the D&D rules" but that he doesn't consider this to be Monte Cook's best adventure. Furthermore, he said that the adventure "involves mostly a series of interconnected dungeon crawls" and that "the players' motivations are weak" but that "it is still an immense adventure with tons of usable material, with a sort of brooding Masks of Nyarlothotep feel to it". Matthew Pook, in his review, stated that one problem with the adventure "may be in getting the party to the starting point ... to begin the campaign". He stated that the adventure "is a large and detailed dungeon bash" and it "resemble[s] the onionskin model exemplified by many of Chaosium's Call
    8.00
    5 votes
    10

    The Ghost Tower of Inverness

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
    The Ghost Tower of Inverness is an adventure module for the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy roleplaying game, set in the game's World of Greyhawk campaign setting. The module's title refers to an ancient magical tower located in the southern Abbor-Alz Hills. The "C" in the module code represents the first letter in the word "competition," the name of C1 – C6 module series. The player characters go on a quest to find the fabled Soul Gem, a legendary artifact of great power. They must gather the four parts of a key granting them entrance to the Ghost Tower. The adventure was written by Allen Hammack, with art drawn by Jim Roslof and Erol Otus. The module was originally used for the AD&D tournament at Wintercon VIII which took place on November 1979 in Detroit, MI. The module had an original print run of 300 numbered copies for sale at the convention in 1979 as a set of 40 loose-leaf pages and a zip-lock bag. This version included never-reprinted illos by Erol Otus. A printed version bearing a green monochrome cover without the "C2" designation was made available for sale at the convention, but was never published for general distribution. The version is quite rare and highly prized by
    7.60
    5 votes
    11

    The Shining South

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    The Shining South is an accessory for the fictional Forgotten Realms campaign setting for the second edition of the Advanced Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. The book, with product code TSR 9388, was published in 1993, and was written by Tom Prusa, with cover art by Jeff Butler. The 96-page booklet is wrapped in a removable gatefold cover. The book includes a one-page introduction, explaining that this book covers the region known as the Shining South, and the various countries that comprise it. Pages 3-22 detail the land of Halruaa, a rich, reclusive land famous for its magic. Described are Halruaa's geography and climate, history, government and politics, people and customs, languages, social customs, religion, money and commerce, cities, places of interest, NPCs, adventures, magic spells, magical items, and its famed skyships. Pages 23-41 detail the land of Dambrath, a land populated by half-drow, including its geography and climate, history, government and politics, people and customs, languages, social customs, religion, money and commerce, cities, villages and ranchos, places of interest, NPCs, and adventures. Pages 42-52 detail the land of Luiren, the land of
    7.60
    5 votes
    12

    Elder Evils

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Elder Evils is an official supplement for the 3.5 edition of the Dungeons and Dragons role-playing game. It includes new content for epic level characters, in the form of extremely powerful, alien monstrosities intent on destroying the world (and designed as a way of providing game masters a means of ending a current campaign). The book presents nine “elder evils”: Much of the book seems to be inspired, at least to some degree by the Great Old Ones of the Cthulhu Mythos, although some of the Elder Evils (such as the Leviathan) have more “normal” appearances than those generally associated with the Great Old Ones. Many of the Elder Evils also pay homage to various other creatures from literature, mythology or even Hollywood. For example, Atropus’ aspect resembles the Great Old One known as Y'golonac, and his true form bears a resemblance to the Outer God Ghroth. Father Llymic has some elements in common with Levistus, an arch-devil created for the Dungeons and Dragons game, as well as Ithaqua the Wendigo of Lovecraft lore. The Hulks of Zoretha are reminiscent of the Colossus. The Leviathan has much in common with any sea serpent (and a monster of the same name is also featured in
    8.75
    4 votes
    13

    The Lost Caverns of Tsojcanth

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
    The Lost Caverns of Tsojcanth is an adventure module for the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. It was written by Gary Gygax and published by TSR in 1982 for the first edition Advanced Dungeons & Dragons (AD&D) rules. The 64-page adventure bears the code "S4" ("S" for "special") and is set in the World of Greyhawk campaign setting. It is divided into two parts, a 32 page adventure, and a 32 page booklet of monsters and magic items. The plot involves the player characters investigating rumors of lost treasure. After traversing a wilderness and two levels of dungeons, the players face Drelzna, the vampiric daughter of long-deceased archmage Iggwilv. The Lost Caverns of Tsojcanth was published in 1982 and is a revised and expanded version of The Lost Caverns of Tsojconth, a tournament adventure that Gygax wrote for 1976 WinterCon V gaming convention. Gygax expanded the tournament adventure by adding a wilderness area, with part of it based on earlier work by Rob Kuntz. Work on the adventure delayed the completion of The Temple of Elemental Evil, another Gygax adventure. The Lost Caverns of Tsojcanth was included in the 1987 supermodule Realms of Horror, and updated for v3.5
    6.50
    6 votes
    14

    Faiths and Pantheons

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Faiths and Pantheons is a campaign accessory for the 3rd edition of the Dungeons & Dragons, for the Forgotten Realms campaign setting. It details the mechanics of the system established at the end of the Time of Troubles, in which a divine figure's relative power would be determined by the quantity of their worshipers. Faiths and Pantheons also features the power levels and exact abilities of the various major deities of Faerûn (those with divine rank 15+), as of 3rd Edition, and has descriptions of the dogmas and churches of all of the intermediate deities, lesser deities, and demigods named in the setting's core rulebook. It even features the names of various monster deities and others unmentioned in the core book, with descriptions of some, as well as 20 prestige classes for player characters and non-player characters alike. This book was written by Eric L. Boyd and Erik Mona and published in May 2002. Cover art is by Brom, with interior art by Glen Angus, Carlo Arellano, Brom, Dennis Calero, Michael Dubisch, Wayne England, Mark Evans, Scott Fischer, Lars Grant-West, Michael W. Kaluta, Vince Locke, Todd Lockwood, Raven Mimura, Puddnhead, Corey Macourek, Stephanie Pui-Mun Law,
    10.00
    3 votes
    15

    Monster Manual IV

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Monster Manual IV is an optional supplemental source book for the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game.
    7.40
    5 votes
    16

    Complete Arcane

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Complete Arcane is a supplemental rulebook for the 3.5 edition of the Dungeons and Dragons role-playing game. It expands upon and replaces an earlier soft-cover rulebook entitled Tome and Blood. It presents additional rules and advice for the creation and use of character classes which specialize in arcane (as opposed to divinely-inspired) magic. Arcane magic, within the framework of the Dungeons & Dragons game system, represents magic that is learned through research or inherent power. It also provides a catchall for anything that doesn't fit into Complete Adventurer, Complete Divine, Complete Warrior, or Complete Psionic. The Complete Arcane introduces three new base classes to the 3rd edition game. Closer to a sorcerer than a wizard, the Warlock has been given supernatural powers. Either he or his ancestors made a deal with a supernatural being. A warlock has an innate magical ability called the eldritch blast, a damaging ray-like ability. The damage for this attack increases as the warlock gains levels. Instead of spells, warlocks gain a limited number of invocations, spell-like abilities with a distinctively sinister flavor. Most of these invocations may be performed at will,
    8.50
    4 votes
    17

    Darksteel

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Darksteel is an expansion set for the game Magic: The Gathering, the second in the Mirrodin block of sets that also features Mirrodin and Fifth Dawn. It was released in February 2004, containing 165 cards. Darksteel continued the themes established in Mirrodin: Artifact cards, equipment and the mechanics that debuted. The expansion symbol for the set is the miniature version of the stylized Shield of Kaldra. Darksteel featured the powerful single card drawing engine masked as the infamous equipment Skullclamp. When it was eventually banned during block constructed a few months after Darksteel's release, Skullclamp was the first to have been banned in block constructed since Mercadian Masques' Rishadan Port. Darksteel was the first "small" expansion to have 165 cards, whereas previous small expansions had 143, (with the exception of Legions which had 145 as a balance among the five colors.) The Darksteel Eye is the second novel in the Mirrodin Cycle by Jess Lebow. It continues the journey of Glissa, an elf, after the infiltration of the Synod and the recollection of all the golem Bosh's memories. They now must travel back across Mirrodin to seek the power that resides in the center
    8.50
    4 votes
    18

    Dungeon Masters Guide

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 2nd Edition
    The Dungeon Master's Guide for the second edition of Advanced Dungeons & Dragons.
    8.50
    4 votes
    19

    Dragons of Ice

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
    Dragons of Ice is the start of the second major story arc in the Dungeons & Dragons Dragonlance series of game modules. It is one of the 14 DL modules published by TSR between 1984 and 1986. Its cover features a painting of a white dragon attacking sail powered ice boats by Larry Elmore. The module launches players into the story of the second book of the Dragonlance Chronicles, Dragons of Winter Night. In Dragons of Ice, after leaving Thorbardin, the player characters head south into the polar regions, journeying along the glaciers in search of Icewall Castle. The characters encounter Ice Folk, ice-skate boats, and the Walrus-Men. Characters begin play at the ancient port city of Tarsis in the world of Krynn. After an attack by the Dragonarmies on Tarsis, the party is driven south to Icewall Castle, which is home to a white dragon and one of the legendary Dragon Orbs. After the Cataclysm, the seas receded from the port city Tarsis, so instead of finding a port the characters have found a land locked city 40 miles inland. The adventure series version of Dragons of Winter Night, book two of the Dragonlance saga, will follow part of the party from the first book, Dragons of Autumn
    9.67
    3 votes
    20

    Fifth Dawn

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Fifth Dawn is a Magic: The Gathering expansion set which was released in May 2004. It is the third and final set of the Mirrodin block. There are 165 cards overall, and like the rest of Mirrodin, an unusually large number of them are artifacts. However, Fifth Dawn adds a new twist to artifact theme of Mirrodin and Darksteel: it encourages using colored mana for playing artifact spells, via the Sunburst mechanic (see below). Fifth Dawn 's expansion symbol is a small image of Helm of Kaldra, a card from this set. Fifth Dawn introduced an enhanced design for artifact cards, which uses a darker inner border to help players distinguish artifacts from white cards. Fifth Dawn theme decks contained a few reprints from Mirrodin and Darksteel with the improved card face. The name Fifth Dawn is derived from the plane's five suns. Each sun is associated with a color of mana and the green sun, which has long been absent, returns to the sky as part of this set's storyline. Glissa, Bosh, and Slobad journey deep within Mirrodin's core to confront the insidious Memnarch. With them is the Kaldra avatar—an immensely powerful being of energy summoned when Kaldra's sword, shield, and helm were brought
    9.67
    3 votes
    21

    Tome of Magic

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 2nd Edition
    The supplementary book for the 2nd Edition of Advanced Dungeons and Dragons.
    9.67
    3 votes
    22

    Expanded Psionics Handbook

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    The Expanded Psionics Handbook is a sourcebook by Bruce Cordell for the 3.5 edition of the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy roleplaying game that contains a multitude of rules and options for integrating psychic powers (a.k.a. psionics) into the D&D game. Along with its 3.0 predecessor, the Psionics Handbook, the Expanded Psionics Handbook expands and adapts the psionics concept with a new emphasis on balance and playability. The Expanded Psionics Handbook builds on the original by introducing two more new Base Classes, alters some rules and includes a new system for becoming psionically focused. Base classes in this book include the psion and psychic warrior, the wilder, and the Soulknife. There are also several prestige classes. They are the Cerebremancer, Elocater, Fist of Zuoken, Illithid Slayer, Metamind, Psion Uncarnate, Pyrokineticist, Thrallherd, and the War Mind. The Expanded Psionics Handbook was published in 2004, and was designed by Bruce R. Cordell. Cover art was by Henry Higginbotham, with interior art by Steven Belledin, Brian Despain, Wayne England, Lars Grant-West, Heather Hudson, Jeremy Jarvis, Chuck Lukacs, David Martin, Monte Moore, Jim Pavelec, Wayne Reynolds, Arnie
    7.20
    5 votes
    23

    Complete Scoundrel

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Complete Scoundrel: A Player's Guide to Trickery and Ingenuity is a supplemental rule book for the 3.5 edition of the Dungeons and Dragons role-playing game. The book provides feats, prestige classes, and other options for characters interested in playing trickster characters. It has introduced the idea of Skill tricks, which are feat-like character moves that cost skill points to learn and may only be used once per encounter. The Prestige Classes in this book are the: Avenging Executioner, Battle Trickster, Cloaked Dancer, Combat Trapsmith, Fortunes's Friend, Gray Guard, Magical Trickster, Malconvoker, Master Of Masks, Mountebank, Psibond Agent, Spellwarp Sniper, and the Uncanny Trickster. Some of the feats in this book have been specialized for the Sneak attack. There are also Luck feats, which give the character a reroll on certain actions in order to get a better result. There are also Bardic Music feats, which give the bard the option to use up one of his daily bard performance in order to gain specific effects. Complete Scoundrel was written by Mike McArtor and F. Wesley Schneider, and published in January 2007. Cover art is by William O'Connor, and interior art is by David
    8.25
    4 votes
    24

    The Sinister Secret of Saltmarsh

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
    The Sinister Secret of Saltmarsh is a module for the Advanced Dungeons & Dragons (AD&D) roleplaying game, written by Dave J. Browne with Don Turnbull. The module details a mysterious abandoned mansion at the edge of a town called Saltmarsh, and the secrets contained therein. The adventure is set in the World of Greyhawk campaign setting. The Sinister Secret of Saltmarsh received positive reviews from critics. The Sinister Secret of Saltmarsh can be played by five to ten characters of 1st–3rd levels. The module includes optional pre-generated first level characters for use by the players. The scenario is the first of the Underwater (U) series of modules set in Saltmarsh, and details a ghostly ship and the haunted mansion of an evil alchemist. The module sleeve contains the following description: The module is divided into two parts, The Haunted House and Sea Ghost, which are intended to be played consecutively. The first part is set in the town of Saltmarsh and deals with unraveling the secret of the haunted house that lies on the edge of town. The abandoned, dilapidated mansion of an evil alchemist has been the subject of rumors about hauntings and treasure. The second part of the
    8.25
    4 votes
    25

    DM Option: High-Level Campaigns

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 2nd Edition
    DM Option: High-Level Campaigns is a supplemental sourcebook to the core rules of the second edition of the Advanced Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. This 192-page book was published by TSR, Inc. in 1995. The book was designed by Skip Williams. Cover art is by Jeff Easley and interior art is by Eric Hotz, Ken Frank, and Stephan Peregrine. The book begins with a one-page foreword by Skip Williams. Chapter One (pages 6–29) explains the seven maxims for running high-level AD&D campaigns: Don't depend on the dice, Use adversaries intelligently and inventively, Control magic, Be aware of demographics, Think on an epic scale, Plan ahead, and Share responsibility with your players. Chapter Two (pages 30–67) provides advice on how to construct adventures. Chapter Three (pages 68–85) expands on the use of spells and magical items. Chapter Four (pages 86–95) presents a guide for spellcasting characters to create magical items. Chapter Five (pages 96–117) details how to conduct magical duels between spellcasters. Chapter Six (pages 118-141) details true dweomers, spells more powerful than those presented in the Player's Handbook. Chapter Seven (pages 142-179) details how to
    9.33
    3 votes
    26
    8.00
    4 votes
    27

    The Forge of Fury

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    The Forge of Fury is an adventure module for the 3rd edition of the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. The Forge of Fury is a dungeon crawl, a site-based adventure describing the stronghold of Khundrukar. The great dwarven smith Durgeddin the Black founded the secret stronghold within a great underground cavern system two hundred years ago when he and his clan were driven from his home by a horde of orcs and trolls. The orcs discovered the location of Khundrukar a century ago when they captured one of Durgeddin's clansmen, and raised a great army that stormed the stronghold and slew the dwarves, allowing its five levels to fall into ruins as goblins, orcs, and other monsters used the place as a base. Legends tell of the extraordinary blades Durgeddin forged in anger, enticing the player characters to come to the ruins of Khundrukar in search of these weapons. The book was published in 2000, and was written by Richard Baker, with cover art by Todd Lockwood and interior art by Dennis Cramer. The Forge of Fury was ranked the 12th greatest Dungeons & Dragons adventure of all time by Dungeon magazine in 2004, on the 30th anniversary of the Dungeons & Dragons game. Dungeon
    8.00
    4 votes
    28

    From the Vault: Dragons

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    From the Vault: Dragons is a limited edition Magic: The Gathering boxed set to commemorate the game's fifteenth anniversary. The set includes 15 limited edition dragon cards, six of which were given new art. The cards are all foil, using a new method of "foiling" the cards. FtV:D was released in English only and costs $34.99 (MSRP). This is not a normal expansion set, so tournament-legality of the cards depends on the most recent normal expansion they were printed in. Hellkite Overlord was special in that its first regular appearance in Magic expansion would be in the Shards of Alara expansion set, which was released 3 October 2008, two months after From the Vault: Dragons. It became tournament-legal only with the release of Shards of Alara. The box set also contains a red and black 20-sided spin-down die with the FtV:D expansion symbol in place of the 20. The 15 cards in the set are: The cards with new art are marked with an "*".
    6.80
    5 votes
    29

    In the Dungeons of the Slave Lords

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
    In the Dungeon of the Slave Lords is an adventure for the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game. Lawrence Schick wrote In the Dungeon of the Slave Lords (A4) as the finale in a series of four modules, which were presented as a tournament including all four modules at the Gen Con XIII convention in August of 1980. The module's difficulty level is set for a group of six to eight characters of fourth to seventh level in experience. It is 34 pages long not including the front and back cover. The other modules in the series include Slave Pits of the Undercity A1, Secret of the Slavers Stockade A2, and Assault on the Aerie of the Slave Lords A3, all by different authors. The introduction reads: Trapped in the dungeons of the Slave Lords! The hardy adventurers must find a way out, with only their wits and courage to help them. But can they do it before everything is destroyed by the dreaded Earth Dragon? The beginning of the dungeon sees the group imprisoned. Anyone running this as an independent module must first position the group in these circumstances. In the final round a different system of scoring determines the winning team. Each character who survives earns the
    9.00
    3 votes
    30

    Expedition to the Ruins of Greyhawk

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Expedition to the Ruins of Greyhawk is an adventure book for the 3.5 edition of the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. The adventure is set in the game's World of Greyhawk campaign setting, specifically in and around Castle Greyhawk and its dungeons. As such, it is an update to the 1990 adventure module WGR1 - Greyhawk Ruins. The adventure also provides updates on a number of important Greyhawk personages as well as encounters in the Free City of Greyhawk itself. The Expedition to the Ruins of Greyhawk adventure puts the adventuring party on a quest into the depths of the Ruins of Castle Greyhawk to save the Free City from the forces of the foul demigod Iuz the Evil - the half-fiend son of the demon lord Graz'zt and the evil archmage Iggwilv. Iuz built a sinister empire that once held the northern lands of the Flanaess in fear and constantly threatened the surrounding kingdoms in an attempt to rule the entire world of Oerth. Iuz's empire fell apart 200 years earlier after Iuz was captured by the Free City's founding wizard, the mad Zagig Yragerne, who imprisoned Iuz in a device called the "godtrap" as part of a bizarre experiment to achieve divinity for himself. Decades
    7.75
    4 votes
    31

    Tournament Season 1

    • Game: Yu-Gi-Oh! Trading Card Game
    Tournament Pack 1 (TP1) was the first tournament booster released for the Yu-Gi-Oh! Trading Card Game. It contained 1 Ultra Rare, 4 Super Rares, 10 rares, and 15 Commons for a total of 30 cards.
    7.75
    4 votes
    32

    Vecna Lives!

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 2nd Edition
    Vecna Lives! is an adventure module for the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy roleplaying game, set in the game's World of Greyhawk campaign setting. The adventure concerns the lich Vecna and his disembodied hand and eye—both powerful magical artifacts. Vecna has ascended to demigod status, and serves as the ultimate foe for the adventurers in the module. Assuming the players are successful in defeating Vecna, he is transported to and imprisoned within the Ravenloft campaign setting. The module bears the code WGA4 and was published by TSR, Inc. in 1990 for the second edition Advanced Dungeons & Dragons rules. The module was written by David "Zeb" Cook and edited by Mike Breault with cover art by Jeff Easley and interior art by Ken Frank.
    7.75
    4 votes
    33

    Underdark

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    The Underdark sourcebook for the Forgotten Realms campaign setting of the 3.5 edition of the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game. The sourcebook covers gaming material such as new character classes, Drow Judicator as well as covering the geography of this fictional setting. This book was written by Bruce R. Cordell, Gwendolyn F.M. Kestrel, and Jeff Quick, and was released in October 2003 published by Wizards of the Coast. Cover art was by Sam Wood, with interior art by Kalman Andrasofszky, Matt Cavotta, Mike Dubisch, Wayne England, Matt Faulkner, Vance Kovacs, Vince Locke, Raven Mimura, Jim Pavelec, Vinod Rams, Richard Sardinha, Stephen Tappin, and Joel Thomas. The editor from rpgnews.com stated the book did not deliver on the price it costs, was incomplete, contained a lot of assumed information making it difficult for casual readers to understand references without knowledge of the novels; however, fans of the novels might enjoy it.
    6.60
    5 votes
    34

    Castle Greyhawk

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 2nd Edition
    Castle Greyhawk is a comedic adventure module for the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy roleplaying game set in the World of Greyhawk campaign setting. The module bears the code WG7 and was published by TSR, Inc. in 1988 for the first edition Advanced Dungeons & Dragons rules. Castle Greyhawk is a large multipart scenario consisting of eleven dungeon levels below Greyhawk Castle, including "Where the Random Monsters Roam" and "The Temple of Really Bad Dead Things". WG7 Castle Greyhawk was edited by Mike Breault with Jon Pickens, with a cover by Keith Parkinson and interior illustrations by Jeff Easley and Jim Holloway, and was published by TSR in 1988 as a 128-page book. The designers of this twelve level dungeon were each given a single level to develop. In Castle Greyhawk, TSR parodied its own scenario style, as a send-up of the illogical gilded hole labyrinth dungeons. The product contains many references to contemporary popular culture, along with a bitingly satirical treatment of TSR's approach to earlier Greyhawk publications. The module's back cover states "The common theme of this dungeon is that no joke is so old, no pun is so bad, and no schtick is so obvious that it can’t be
    7.50
    4 votes
    35
    7.50
    4 votes
    36

    Ebony Kingdom

    • Game: Vampire: The Eternal Struggle
    Ebony Kingdom (EK) is the sixteenth expansion of White Wolf, Inc.'s trading card game Vampire: The Eternal Struggle, and was released on May 27, 2009. The expansion's theme is the Laibon sect consisting of vampires native to Africa. The expansion features four clans, namely Akunanse, Ishtarri, Guruhi and Osebo and thereby continues the support for the Laibon clans started in the Legacies of Blood expansion. This expansion consists only of booster packs with 11 cards each (7 common, 3 uncommon, and 1 rare). There is a total of 60 new cards, i.e. 20 new common, 20 uncommon (= vampires) and 20 rare cards.
    7.50
    4 votes
    37

    Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells is an optional supplemental source book for the 3.5 edition of the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game. Tyrants of the Nine Hells expands on previous editions of Dungeons & Dragons supplement books, namely the Book of Vile Darkness. It describes origins of devils, the rise of the most powerful devil, Asmodeus, and the mystery of how he came to the Nine Hells of Baator in the first place. It also describes in detail each layer of the Hells, such as their physical features, social structure, rulers, and even the personalities of those who rule over each layer respectively. This chapter describes the economy and society of the devils in hell, their relationship with demons, their origins, and their soul harvesting of mortals. This chapter describes the nine layers of hell; Avernus, Dis, Minauros, Phlegethos, Stygia, Malbolge, Maladomini, Cania, and Nessus. The Hellbreaker specializes in infiltrating the strongholds of devils and relieving them of their treasures. They develop a number of techniques useful for combating the forces of hell. Hellbreakers are always chaotic-good, chaotic-neutral, or chaotic-evil and often start out as rogues or
    7.50
    4 votes
    38

    Heroes of Horror

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Heroes of Horror (ISBN 0-7869-3699-1) is a hardcover supplement to the 3.5 edition of the Dungeons and Dragons role-playing game. It is intended for use by Dungeon Masters who want to incorporate elements of horror into their game. It contains ideas for pacing and other elements of horror drama into the game, new rules for horror themed games (including the third iteration of the taint mechanic), as well as horror themed base classes, feats, prestige classes and NPCs (non-player characters). Heroes of Horror was written by James Wyatt, Ari Marmell, and C.A. Suleiman, and published in October 2005. Cover art was by David Hudnut, with interior art by Daarken, Wayne England, Randy Gallegos, Des Hanley, Michael Phillippi, Eric Polak, Steve Prescott, Wayne Reynolds, and Dan Scott.
    7.50
    4 votes
    39

    Legends are Made Not Born

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    A d20 Dungeon Crawl Classics adventure written for Dungeons and Dragons by Chris Doyle. The first DCC to feature 0-level characters (PCs with 1 level in an NPC class). For the past few years, an ogre that lairs in a cave near the wilderness town of Dundraville has demanded tributes of ale and supplies. The villagers were happy to comply, lest the brute attack them or destroy their property. But recently, the ogre changed his demands. Now he wants gold, building supplies -- and captives! The villagers have no heroes to protect them -- so someone must rise to the challenge! Six determined townsfolk have taken decided to take justice into their own hands. Can these village commoners defeat the ogre in his own lair before their fellows are eaten?
    7.50
    4 votes
    40

    Palace of the Silver Princess

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons Basic Set
    Palace of the Silver Princess is an adventure module for the Dungeons & Dragons Basic Set. It is notable as being the D&D module that was recalled on the same day it was released, then rewritten and re-released some months later. The original version, with an orange cover, was written in 1980 by Jean Wells. When the orange version was recalled (and most copies destroyed), the module was rewritten by Tom Moldvay and released with a green cover. Writing credit on the second version was given to both Moldvay and Wells, although there was very little of Wells' original content in Moldvay's version. Palace of the Silver Princess contains a single D&D adventure laid out in a format suitable for a single gaming session. The module includes game maps on the unattached outside cover. The module has been described as a low-level scenario, which involves the legends surrounding a ruined palace, a white dragon, and a giant ruby. The player characters encounter evil creatures that have taken over the palace. The plot of Palace of the Silver Princess revolves around a country frozen in time by a strange red light. The only seemingly unaffected location and the apparent source of the glow is the
    7.50
    4 votes
    41

    Portal Three Kingdoms

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Portal Three Kingdoms is the third Magic: The Gathering expansion of the Portal block, and the third starter level set. Like the other expansions in the Portal block, Portal: Three Kingdoms is designed for beginners to Magic. The setting is heavily based on the Chinese historical novel Romance of the Three Kingdoms by Luo Guanzhong. Each card, including each basic land, was illustrated by a Chinese artist. Portal Three Kingdoms was released mainly in Asia-Pacific markets. These cards were printed in Japanese, Simplified Chinese, and Traditional Chinese. A very short English printing run was done, but these versions of the cards were released primarily in Australia and New Zealand and are relatively difficult to find. On October 20, 2005, the DCI legalized cards from the Portal expansions. Now, almost all cards in the Portal block are legal in Vintage and Legacy tournaments. Allowing this set to be played in tournaments had the effect of making many cards from this set very expensive, like Imperial Seal, Imperial Recruiter, Loyal Retainers and Ravages of War. The value of those cards now often exceeds 250USD a piece. Many cards from this set are now worth more than 5USD, making the
    7.50
    4 votes
    42
    Complete Divine

    Complete Divine

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Complete Divine is a supplemental rulebook for the 3.5 edition of the Dungeons and Dragons fantasy role-playing game published by Wizards of the Coast. It replaces and expands upon earlier rulebooks entitled Masters of the Wild and Defenders of the Faith, as well as being a catchall for anything that doesn't fit into Complete Adventurer, Complete Arcane, Complete Warrior, or Complete Psionic. It presents additional base classes, prestige classes, and feats. It also contains additional rules and character ideas based on belief and the afterlife, as well as a chapter on magic items based on the original D&D pantheon gods/goddesses. Updated from Oriental Adventures, the shugenja utilizes primal energies, and tapping into the earth to cast spells. It is a charisma based sorcerer-style divine casting class, with a spell list biased towards elemental spells. Updated from the Miniatures Handbook, the Favored Soul is a spontaneously casting divine class, with a couple of additional divine abilities closely tied to his or her deity. The class has a fairly narrow divine spell selection. The spirit shaman cast spells as sorcerers do, but they change their spell selection each day by sending
    8.67
    3 votes
    43
    Races of the Wild

    Races of the Wild

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Races of the Wild is an optional supplemental source book for the 3.5 edition of the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game. Races of the Wild contains background information on the elves and halflings, introduces a race of winged humanoids called "raptorans," as well as giving rules for playing wilderness based creatures such as fey and centaurs as player characters. Races of the Wild was written by Skip Williams and published in February 2005. Cover art was by Adam Rex, with interior art by Tom Baxa, Steve Belledin, Dennis Crabapple McClain, Wayne England, Matt Faulkner, Emily Fiegenschuh, Jeremy Jarvis, Chuck Lucaks, Larry MacDougal, Vinod Rams, Sam Wood, and James Zhang.
    8.67
    3 votes
    44

    Book of Vile Darkness

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Book of Vile Darkness is an optional supplemental sourcebook for the 3rd edition of the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game. The book was written by Monte Cook and published by Wizards of the Coast in October 2002. Described as a "detailed look at the nature of evil," it was the first Dungeons & Dragons book labelled for mature audiences. The second was the "good" companion volume Book of Exalted Deeds. As with most new products, Wizards of the Coast announced and previewed Book of Vile Darkness on its website during the months before its release. Unlike other products, previewer Mat Smith revealed virtually no hard details about the book's contents because the book "is being released as a 'Mature Audiences Only' title." Instead, he stressed that this book was something its developers felt had been requested by the community, something that "many, many gamers have been asking for." Also, as part of the promotion of the book, Paizo Publishing included sealed "mature" sections in both official Dungeons & Dragons magazines. Dragon issue 300 included flesh and skin themed magic, while an adventure printed in Dungeon issue 95, "The Porphyry House of Horror", called on players to
    10.00
    2 votes
    45

    Fallen Empires

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Fallen Empires was the ninth Magic: The Gathering set and the fifth expansion set, released in November 1994. Out of the set of 187 cards, 102 were functionally unique, with the remainder being variant illustrations of other cards in the set. The mechanics of Fallen Empires include a tribal subtheme and heavy use of counters and tokens. Thematically the set experiments with conflict within the colors. The expansion symbol for the set is a crown. Fallen Empires takes place on the continent of Sarpadia after the Brothers' War in Antiquities. Each of the major cultures on Sarpadia is confronted with internal threats caused by the cooling weather: the dwarves are attacked by orcs and goblins; the Vodalian merfolk face the homarid menace; the elves of the forest struggle to contain the fungus-like thallids; the proud soldiers of Icatia confront opposition from religious zealots; and the dark Order of the Ebon Hand fights a thrull revolt. The storyline of Fallen Empires is continued in the Ice Age set. Fallen Empires is widely regarded as one of the weakest sets in the game's history. Wizards of the Coast even points out on the product page of Fallen Empires that the set "with mixed
    10.00
    2 votes
    46

    Fate of Istus

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
    Fate of Istus is a multipart adventure for the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game, taking place in the World of Greyhawk campaign setting. The module is designed for characters of any class or level, and was published as an in-game vehicle to explain the transition from the game's first to second edition. This is accomplished by goddess Istus's re-evaluation of the inhabitants of Oerth and making changes to the abilities of each character class. Fate of Istus is a series of 10 linked adventure scenarios, each one intended for player characters a different character class, and set in a different city from the Bandit Kingdom to Furyondy to the Wild Coast. As part of the plot, the goddess Istus has inflicted the world of Greyhawk with a plague to cull out the weaker adventurers. A deadly plague has stricken civilization; the players suspect this is a sinister test of some sort and venture out to stop it. WG8 Fate of Istus was written by Nigel Findley, Dan Salas, Stephen Inniss, and Robert J. Kuntz, with a cover by Daniel Horne and interior illustrations by Karl Waller, and was published by TSR in 1989 as a 128-page book. Authors: Nigel Findley, Dan Salas, Stephen Inniss, Robert J.
    6.40
    5 votes
    47

    The Throne of Bloodstone

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
    H4 - The Throne of Bloodstone is an Official Game Adventure or "module" for the Advanced Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. In The Throne of Bloodstone, the player characters take a trip to the Abyss to steal the wand of the demon prince Orcus. This module is recommended for characters between levels 18 and 100. They play the rules of Bloodstone Pass. A war against the Witch-King of Vaasa has come to a standstill. The players venture into the 'Abyss', destroy a mighty demon, steal the Wand of Orcus and take it to the Seven Heavens to be destroyed. The battle between the mighty undead army of the Witch-King of Vaasa and the forces of Bloodstone has come to a standstill. As long as the source of the Witch-King's power is at work, his evil forces will never be defeated! This module requires the Player Characters, as the rulers of Bloodstone Pass if following the series, to find the true power behind the Witch-King and defeat it. The module requires the players to journey to the Abyss, confront Orcus, one of its greatest demons, steal the Wand of Orcus, and destroy it. The wide range of levels the module is for is dealt with in several ways as well as the general principles
    6.40
    5 votes
    48

    Dungeonscape

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Dungeonscape (ISBN 978-0-7869-4118-6) is a supplement for the 3.5 edition of Dungeons & Dragons. It focuses on the finer points of the dungeon, the medium for adventure and danger in the Dungeons & Dragons game. Dungeon masters may use this supplement to include new traps, monsters, descriptions, and rules for older dungeon-related errata. Players may use the information in this book to shape their characters for the dungeon, including new feats, skills, prestige classes, and equipment. Dungeonscape introduces a new base character class, the factotum (previously known as the journeyman), which uses an ability called "inspiration" to perform action such as to cast spells, master any skill, take extra actions, make sneak attacks, and attack with weapons. Other features of the class include trapfinding, the ability to heal other characters, and turn undead. The book adds at least one alternative class ability to each of the standard D&D classes, designed to make a character better at dealing with situations encountered in dungeons. The book also provides new feats, new alchemical and magical items, and also new gear options, many of which were adapted from older supplements such as
    7.25
    4 votes
    49

    Epic Level Handbook

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    The Epic Level Handbook is a rulebook by Wizards of the Coast for the 3rd edition of Dungeons & Dragons. This books contained rules for Dungeons & Dragons 3rd edition characters to attain levels above 20, the limit in the core rulebooks. It provides epic-level progression information for all the core classes in the Player's Handbook and the prestige classes listed in the Dungeon Master's Guide, as well as the classes from the Psionics Handbook. It also provides epic-level prestige classes, magical items, and artifacts designed to be used by epic-level characters, and monsters that provide epic-level challenges. It also provides information on "Epic Spells", spells that must be researched and developed, and may only be cast by one particular spellcaster. The Epic Level Handbook was designed by Andy Collins and Bruce R. Cordell, and published in 2001. Cover art is by Arnie Swekel, with interior art by Daren Bader, Brom, David Day, Brian Despain, Larry Dixon, Michael Dutton, Jeff Easley, Lars Grant-West, Rebecca Guay, Jeremy Jarvis, Alton Lawson, Todd Lockwood, David Martin, Raven Mimura, Matthew Mitchell, Vinod Rams, Wayne Reynolds, Darrell Riche, Richard Sardinha, Marc Sasso, Mark
    7.25
    4 votes
    50

    The Gem and the Staff

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons Expert Set
    The Gem and the Staff, by John and Laurie Van De Graaf, is an adventure module for the Dungeons & Dragons Expert Set. Rather than a typical group adventure, it was designed for head-to-head tournament-style play, with players separately playing the same adventure and competing against each other for points earned by accomplishing certain goals. It is only playable with one dungeon master (DM) and one player. Gem and the Staff is an adventure for a DM and a single player using a provided thief character. The player must search for a magic gem and a staff of power inside an evil wizard's tower. This module is divided into two separate adventures, which can be played as successive scenarios. The player takes the role of an experienced thief named Eric the Bold, who is pressed in both adventures into special thieving services. In the first adventure, Eric's task is to steal a certain gem from the trap-riddled tower of the wizard Tormag. The second adventure involves Tormag hiring Eric to steal a mighty magic wand from his arch-rival Felspel. Both modules are set with a time limit of thirty real-world minutes to complete the task. This adventure was originally published as Quest for the
    7.25
    4 votes
    51

    Torment

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Torment is the second set in the Odyssey Block for the collectible card game Magic: The Gathering. This expansion set, which focused on black, is unique in that it is the first set to focus on a single color. It has 40 Black cards, 28 Blue cards, 28 Red cards, 21 Green Cards and 21 White cards. This imbalance is, however, balanced by the release of the third expansion set in the Odyssey Block, Judgment. Torment tells the story of Chainer, a Dementia Summoner of the Cabal, who first discovers the Mirari and rises through the ranks of the Cabal, eventually becoming rival to the Cabal Patriarch himself. Torment continued the Flashback and Threshold mechanics began in Odyssey and introduced Madness. The "black corruption" theme of Torment spreads beyond sheer numbers of cards. Here are more examples of card cycles that represent black's influences: Torment's release marked a tremendous power boost to the color black. The "Swamp Rewards" cards along with Chainer's Edict and Nantuko Shade were incredibly potent in tournament play, spawning the MonoBlack Control archetype (or the more appropriately named Coffers Control) that could destroy its opponent's creatures, hand, and life total
    8.33
    3 votes
    52

    Weatherlight

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Weatherlight is the nineteenth Magic: The Gathering set and eleventh expert level set, third and last in the Mirage Block. Its expansion symbol is a book (the Thran Tome). It was released in June 1997 and later released for Magic: The Gathering Online on 12 December 2007. Weatherlight marks a turning point in design and marketing philosophy for the Magic game & brand. While previous sets included allusions to an overarching story, Weatherlight was the first set to explicitly tell an ordered narrative focused on developed, archetypical characters. The new approach to designing and marketing Magic proved to be a huge success both popularly and commercially. The Weatherlight set was accompanied by a series of fictional works collectively known as the Weatherlight Saga. The saga was intended to be a "hero's journey"-style story, in which the characters were classic archetypes. Each was also assigned to represent a color in Magic's color wheel, so that the narrative and mechanical elements of the project would be more closely joined. Then-developer Mark Rosewater chose the skyship Weatherlight and it's captain, Sisay, as the germ of the new story. Rosewater has stated that basing the
    8.33
    3 votes
    53

    Beatdown Set

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Beatdown is a box set for the card game Magic: The Gathering, and the fourth compilation set. It is a box set focused on the brutal destruction of opponents. It was created for special reprint purposes only and was not legal in Standard at the time of its release. Beatdown was released as a pair of preconstructed decks combined with accessories, unlike the normal distribution of Magic cards in randomized packs. At the time of release it sold for around $30.00 MSRP, but prices have risen since 2000. Alternate art was done for four cards: Sengir Vampire, Erhnam Djinn, Ball Lightning, and Clockwork Beast. The set is white-bordered, and the expansion symbol is a mace. There are no White cards in the set. The set includes 122 special edition Magic cards divided into two theme decks, Aerodoom and Ground Pounder. The focus of the two decks in the Beatdown box set is to overwhelm your opponent with decks that included some of the more powerful creatures in the game, to that date, such as the aforementioned Erhnam Djinn, Sengir Vampire, Ball Lightning and Clockwork Beast. The Beatdown set was released in October 2000. aproriate
    9.50
    2 votes
    54

    Nemesis

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Nemesis is the second set in the Mercadian Masques block of sets in the Magic: The Gathering game, along with the expansions Mercadian Masques and Prophecy. Its expansion symbol is an axe. The set consists of 143 cards and was released on February 14, 2000. Nemesis is set on the plane of Rath. The Phyrexian invasion of Dominaria is nearing; the Dark Lord's plans are almost complete. Only the Planeswalker Urza stands in his way. At the same time, Yawgmoth's Inner Circle decides on the election of the evincar to replace Volrath. The Phyrexian emissary Belbe has to choose between Greven Il-Vec, Ertai, Crovax, and the newly-returned Volrath. Nemesis prerelease events were held on February 5, 2000. At these events the prerelease card, a foil Rathi Assassin, was handed out. The set was officially released on February 14, 2000. Nemesis had a fair share of cards appear in well-placing tournament decks. Many of the cards with Fading were quite powerful; the cards Parallax Wave, Parallax Tide, Blastoderm, Saproling Burst, and Tangle Wire all appeared in decks in various formats. The 143 Nemesis cards come in three rarities, common, uncommon, and rare. 55 cards are common, 44 are uncommon,
    7.00
    4 votes
    55

    Tomb of Horrors

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
    Tomb of Horrors is an adventure module written by Gary Gygax for the Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) role-playing game. It was originally written for and used at the 1975 Origins 1 convention. Gygax designed the adventure both to challenge the skill of expert players in his own campaign, and to test players who boasted of having mighty player characters able to best any challenge. The module, coded S1, was the first in the S-series, or special series of modules. Several versions of the adventure have been published, the first in 1978, and the most recent, published for the D&D fourth edition, in 2010. It also served as the basis for a novel published in 2002. The module's plot revolves around the tomb of the demi-lich Acererak. The player characters must battle their way past a variety of monsters and traps, with the ultimate goal of destroying Acererak. Tomb of Horrors is considered one of the greatest Dungeons & Dragons modules of all time, as well as one of the most difficult. The module has influenced later Dungeons & Dragons products, and was followed by three other (unrelated) modules in the S-series: S2 White Plume Mountain, S3 Expedition to the Barrier Peaks, and S4 Lost Caverns
    7.00
    4 votes
    56

    Antiquities

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Antiquities was the fifth Magic: The Gathering set and the second expansion set. It was the first set to have an original backstory that explores the mythos of the Magic universe (see Magic: The Gathering storylines). The story is primarily about the brothers Urza and Mishra who are inseparable at first, but become sworn enemies over the finding of two power stones. Trying to get hold of the other's stone they eventually lay waste to the whole continent of Terisiare. The set was created by the group of students at the University of Pennsylvania that had helped Richard Garfield design the original game. Mechanically Antiquities revolves around artifacts. Only 35 of the 85 different cards are colored, the remaining 50 cards being artifacts and lands. The expansion symbol for Antiquities was an anvil. Antiquities managed to solve many of the printing errors that had plagued previous sets, although the expansion symbol was omitted from Reconstruction and the circle around the activation cost of Tawnos's Weaponry was omitted in half the printing. The only major problem noticed by players was the poor collation of the set; many booster boxes contained several packs with exactly the same
    8.00
    3 votes
    57
    6.75
    4 votes
    58

    Exodus

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Exodus was the 22nd Magic: The Gathering set, fourteenth expert level set, and the third and final set in the Rath Block, released on 15 June 1998. Its expansion symbol is a bridge. On 7 December 2009 Exodus was released on Magic: The Gathering Online. The crew of Weatherlight has rescued the pieces of the Legacy and Captain Sisay, and now must retreat through Volrath's Stronghold and escape to the portal that would lead them off of Rath. Volrath and his main lieutenant Greven il-Vec will stop at nothing to destroy them and reclaim the ancient artifacts that will allow Volrath to oppose his hidden master. However, they must also stave off the combined assault of Volrath's Stronghold by the elves of the Skyshroud forest and the human tribes of the Kor, Vec, and Dal, recently reunited by Gerrard of Weatherlight. Also, a disturbing change has happened to Crovax, the noble who accompanied Weatherlight to Rath. His newly-formed bloodlust and thirst for power threatens to destroy the entire ship. Exodus is the first set to make a card's rarity visibly apparent on the card itself. All previous expansions had no way to tell whether a card was a common card or a rare card. From Exodus on,
    6.75
    4 votes
    59

    Legions

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Legions is the second set in the Onslaught block of cards of Magic: The Gathering, along with the expansions Onslaught and Scourge. It contained 145 cards which continued on the themes started in Onslaught. Its expansion symbol is two spears behind a shield. Legions is the only expansion in Magic to be 100% creature cards. This was done to help amplify the creature-based mechanics of the block such as Morph and Tribal. Due to the complete absence of non-creature cards and a limited number of tournament staples, Legions is one of the most controversial set releases by Wizards of the Coast among many players. The set does feature the return of a fan favorite creature type, Sliver. Kamahl and the Cabal, in their uneasy alliance, set out to defeat the threat of Akroma. Ixidor was killed, but Akroma continues her mission to destroy Phage. Meanwhile, the slivers (last spotted in Tempest and its era) have been reintroduced as clones of the originals. In a final battle, Phage and Akroma merge into one being, Karona, the false god. The following mechanics first appeared in Legions:
    6.75
    4 votes
    60

    Red Hand of Doom

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Red Hand of Doom is a 128-page adventure module for the 3.5 edition of Dungeons & Dragons (D&D). It is designed to be used as a generic D&D adventure, which can be dropped into any campaign world, including a personal one. Instructions are given in the first pages of the module on where to place it in the worlds of Greyhawk, the Forgotten Realms, and Eberron, the three primary campaign settings of D&D at the time of release. The adventure was indicated as appropriate for characters of experience levels six to twelve, but the designers have stated that it is targeted to levels five to eleven. It is also the first Wizards of the Coast Dungeons & Dragons adventure to make significant use of designer notes. The adventure is expected to take players weeks—or even months—to complete. The plot of Red Hand of Doom follows a group of adventurers who have entered the Elsir Vale, a thinly populated frontier region. The party uncovers and then is placed in the position of stopping a massive hobgoblin horde who are fanatically devoted to the dark goddess Tiamat and led by the charismatic half-dragon warlord Azarr Kul. To stop the horde, the players have to muster the inhabitants of the Vale,
    6.75
    4 votes
    61
    Urza's Saga

    Urza's Saga

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Urza's Saga is the 15th expert level set, a 350-card expansion set for the fantasy game Magic: The Gathering. It debuted in October 1998. Some employees of Wizards consider it one of the most powerful sets ever released, with many cards now banned in tournament formats. The expansion symbol features a pair of gears. Urza's Saga has a storyline and thematic feel that suggest an artifact-based set, although the set was originally designed to be an enchantment-themed block. According to Mark Rosewater the decision to make the storyline of the set a story about Urza was made only when the design of the set had advanced beyond the point where the mechanical focus of the set could be shifted. Among players as well as designers, the Urza block is widely considered to be the most powerful block of all time. Urza's block ushered in a new era of combo decks. The period of play after the release of Urza's Saga is often referred to as "Combo Winter" by both players and Wizards staff. Standard and Urza Block constructed decks were so fast that they could often win before turn three. Several articles on the Wizards of the Coast website MagicTheGathering.com discuss various tournaments in which
    6.75
    4 votes
    62
    Arms and Equipment Guide

    Arms and Equipment Guide

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    The Arms and Equipment Guide is the name of two supplementary rule books for the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. Each describes various equipment that can be used in a campaign. The original version, for the 2nd edition of Advanced Dungeons & Dragons, was published in 1991. The book was designed by Grant Boucher, Troy Christensen, Jon Pickens, John Terra, and Scott Davis, and edited by Anne Brown and Jon Pickens. Interior artists included Daniel Horne, Erik Olson, Keith Parkinson, Michael Weaver, Kelly Freas, Laura Freas, Mark Nelson, Karl Waller, Valerie Valusek, Stephen D. Sullivan, Ken Frank, and Ned Dameron. The d20 system, 3rd edition version of the Arms and Equipment Guide was printed in 2003 and was designed by Eric Cagle, Jesse Decker, Jeff Quick, and James Wyatt. Cover art was by Eric Peterson, with interior art by Dennis Cramer, David Day, David Martin, Scott Roller, and Sam Wood. This book has an introduction, six chapters, and an appendix containing random treasure tables. Chapters are "Weapons and Armor", "Adventuring Gear", "Vehicles", "Hirelings and Creatures", "Magical Items", and "Special Magical Items". The first section of the book is concerned with
    9.00
    2 votes
    63

    Masters Edition

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Masters Edition (officially abbreviated "MED") is a Magic: The Gathering expansion, exclusive for Magic: The Gathering Online, that was released on September 10, 2007. It is the sixth compilation set, and features 195 cards printed before Mirage, 60 of each rarity and the 15 basic lands of Beta. The first implement of Masters Edition has no clear focus on the mechanical side, thus keyworded abilities are all abilities that were part of the original Magic core sets. Invasion was the first expansion released on Magic Online. Since then, the older expansions from Mirage forward have been retroactively released with accompanying draft and sealed queues. The sets before Mirage, however, were not built for limited play and would not present a fun or balanced draft environment. Because of the nature of the online environment, most cards enter the system through drafting. The Masters Edition series is Wizards of the Coast's solution to bring the game's earliest cards online in draftable sets. Masters Edition was originally meant to be drafted with 10th Edition but its popularity led Wizards to create Masters Edition-only drafts. The set was heavily focused on nostalgia and included some of
    9.00
    2 votes
    64

    The Bloodstone Wars

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
    H3 - The Bloodstone Wars is an Official Game Adventure or "module" for Advanced Dungeons & Dragons. The Bloodstone Wars consists of a Battlesystem scenario depicting a battle to rid a city of a bandit horde. The module is designed for 1st edition AD&D and makes considerable use of some rules that were removed in 2nd edition, notably the assassin character class. There are two main parts of the module, the War itself which includes preparation and fighting out Battlesystem battles, and a small "dungeon" adventure which could occur at several points of the war. While the module provides alternatives for those who do not want to use miniatures to fight out the battles, the Battlesystem scenarios take a considerable portion of the module information. Players without Battlesystem would likely feel they were not getting full value from the module. H3 Bloodstone Wars was written by Douglas Niles and Michael Dobson, and published by TSR in 1987 as a 32-page booklet with a large color map and an outer folder. Cover art was by Larry Elmore. While this is the third adventure in the Bloodstone pass saga it is the first publication that places The Barony of Bloodstone and surrounding kingdoms
    9.00
    2 votes
    65

    Tournament Season 8

    • Game: Yu-Gi-Oh! Trading Card Game
    Tournament Pack 8 (TP8) was the eighth tournament booster released for the Yu-Gi-Oh! Trading Card Game. It was given out at tournaments after Tournament Season 7 packs went out-of-print. This set is notable as it was the last Tournament Pack released. The Tournament Pack series have since been replaced by the Champion Pack series. It contains 1 Ultra Rare, 4 Super Rares, 4 Rares, and 11 Commons.
    5.80
    5 votes
    66

    Conflux

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Conflux is a Magic: The Gathering expansion set, released on February 6, 2009. It is the 48th limited-edition expansion set for Magic and includes 145 cards. Conflux follows the publishing standards set by Wizards of the Coast in Shards of Alara. That is, mythic rares are included in one out of every eight packs. Intro packs contain 41 cards and one booster pack, and replace pre-constructed theme decks. Nicol Bolas, originally printed as a dragon creature in the Legends set, returned in Conflux via the card Nicol Bolas, Planeswalker. Like the original creature, the planeswalker card is red, blue and black, representing Nicol Bolas's existence on the Grixis shard. In advance of the set's release, Wizards of the Coast published artwork featuring the new planeswalker, including a mural which appeared on the set's booster boxes. The storyline focuses on the chaos which results from the Shards being forced together in a ring, constantly raking against one another. Esper finds itself clashing with Grixis and Bant, Bant is wedged between Esper and Naya, Naya finds its way between Bant and Jund, Jund conflicts with Grixis and Naya, and Grixis is pressed between Esper and Jund. This set
    7.67
    3 votes
    67

    Psionics Handbook

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    The Psionics Handbook is a sourcebook for the 3rd edition of the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game that contains a multitude of rules and options for integrating psychic powers (a.k.a. psionics) into the D&D game. This book adapted the psionics concept for third edition D&D, with a new emphasis on balance and playability. The book mixed elements from previous versions of the game (such as Power Points from second edition) along with a number of innovations like linking the system closer to the new system of DnD as well as balance changes such as removing the randomness that had characterized the original system. One of the key innovations was integrating the psionics system into the feats and class system that third edition emphasized. In the earlier editions most characters had a small chance to receive psionic powers as an extra set of abilities; a lucky character could receive powers that were equivalents of magical spells that were not available until mid-to-high levels. In 3.0 characters must take psionic classes or feats to access the abilities forcing a player to forgo other abilities in exchange for psionic powers. The Psionics Handbook is intended for use with
    7.67
    3 votes
    68

    Return to the Tomb of Horrors

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Return to the Tomb of Horrors is a boxed set adventure module for the Advanced Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game released in 1998 by TSR, Inc.. This module expanded significantly upon the plot of the original Tomb of Horrors, revealing that the tomb of the first adventure was merely an antechamber to the lich Acererak's true resting place, and the demilich "slain" in the first adventure was both decoy and key to proceeding further. The dust from the destroyed skull opened a way to the cursed city of Moil in a pocket universe of eternal darkness and ice, and beyond that to Acererak's fortress hovering at the edge of the Negative Energy Plane itself. Acererak is revealed in this publication to be near the completion of a multi-thousand-year project to achieve godhood, powered by souls consumed over the years. He now needs only three additional souls to complete the process, but they must be of exceptional purity and strength; to this end he constructed his tomb to serve as an ultimate challenge for heroes, hoping to winnow out all but the very best. He would then consume them when they reached the center of his fortress, where his own undead essence resides in his phylactery. If
    7.67
    3 votes
    69
    7.67
    3 votes
    70

    Eventide

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Eventide is an expansion set, codenamed "Doughnut", from the trading card game Magic: The Gathering. It was released on July 25, 2008. The pre-release events for this set were held on July 12–13, 2008. Eventide is the second set in the Shadowmoor block, which is part of the Lorwyn/Shadowmoor superblock. The two blocks mirror each other in many different ways including flavor and mechanics. Even the expansion symbol of Eventide has striking similarities to that of Morningtide, its counterpart in Lorwyn: where the Morningtide symbol suggests a full sun, the Eventide symbol suggests a mostly eclipsed sun. Eventide continues the block theme of hybrid cards and color matters that Shadowmoor started, as well as further use of the Wither and Persist key words. Where Shadowmoor focused on allied color hybrids, Eventide focuses on enemy color hybrid cards. Eventide also introduces two new mechanics: The Eventide booster packs also include a rules card/token card in addition to the normal 15 game cards. Five theme decks were released as part of the set. The preconstructed theme decks are: "Life Drain" (White/Black), "Sidestep" (Blue/Red), "Death March" (Black/Green), "Battle Blitz"
    10.00
    1 votes
    71

    Player's Option: Spells & Magic

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 2nd Edition
    Player's Option: Spells & Magic is an accessory for the 2nd edition of the Advanced Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game, published in 1996.
    10.00
    1 votes
    72

    Queen of the Demonweb Pits

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
    Queen of the Demonweb Pits (Q1) is an adventure module for the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game written by David Sutherland. The "Q" in the module code represents the first letter in the word "queen." This module is a sequel to the D series of modules. Queen of the Demonweb Pits was novelized in 2001 under the same title. Queen of the Demonweb Pits is the seventh in an epic series of adventures set in the World of Greyhawk, starting with persistent raiding by local hill giants and other events described in the G1-3 Against the Giants modules. The series continues from there on an odyssey into the Underdark as described in the "Drow" series of modules: D1 – Descent into the Depths of the Earth, D2 – Shrine of the Kuo-Toa, and D3 – Vault of the Drow. (D1 and D2 were later compiled into a single adventure, D1-2 – Descent into the Depths of the Earth). This module sends the player characters to the demonic abyss to defeat the evil demigod Lolth, the demonic goddess of the drow. At the conclusion of Vault of the Drow, the characters find an astral gate leading to the Abyssal realm of Lolth, Demon Queen of Spiders, goddess of the drow elves and architect of the sinister plot described
    10.00
    1 votes
    73

    Tome of Battle: The Book of Nine Swords

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Tome of Battle: The Book of Nine Swords is a rules supplement for the 3.5 edition of the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game, published by Wizards of the Coast in 2006. The purpose of the book is to increase the viability of melee combatants in the D&D game to continue to be comparable to magic user characters into high-level play, by giving them versatile combat maneuvers and stances that can be expended as magic users expend spells. The Book of Nine Swords introduces three new "Martial Adept" core classes (the Crusader, Swordsage and Warblade) and a system of "martial powers" for them to use, followed by the usual accompaniment of new skills and feats. The core and largest percentage of the book is the list of maneuvers and stances, which the martial adept character can use to enhance their power and damage similar to the way a magic-using character uses spells. Also described are several new Prestige Classes for martial characters, and eight new Legacy weapons that exemplify the philosophies of the nine schools (the ninth, Desert Wind, the exemplar of the eponymous school, is a slightly modified reprint from the Weapons of Legacy book). A number of martially-oriented monsters,
    10.00
    1 votes
    74

    Future Sight

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Future Sight is an expansion set, codenamed "Pop", for the trading card game Magic: The Gathering. The set was released worldwide on May 4, 2007. The pre-release events for this set were held on April 21 and April 22, 2007. Teferi, Jhoira, and Venser continue their battle to heal the time rifts that plague Dominaria. The rift in Tolaria is so severe that it cannot be healed in the present day. In order to remedy it, Karn travels back in time. He manages to close the time rift, but in the process is lost. The planeswalker Jeska returns to Dominaria. Finding her friend Karn gone, she becomes angry and is manipulated by the planeswalker Leshrac into using Radha as a kind of mana focuser to close the time rifts without using up her planeswalker spark. She sets out to continue her mentor's work, and seals both the Zhalfirin and Yavimayan rifts, respectively losing Zhalfir proper and Multani in the process. It is revealed later on that Leshrac was using Jeska to gain the dark power of one of her former selves, Phage. Having gained that power, Leshrac then challenges the powerful planeswalker Nicol Bolas to a duel, only to be defeated by him. Bolas then uses what remains of Leshrac to
    6.50
    4 votes
    75

    Tournament Season 4

    • Game: Yu-Gi-Oh! Trading Card Game
    Tournament Season 4 (TP4) was the fourth tournament booster released for the Yu-Gi-Oh! Trading Card Game. It was given out at tournaments after the Tournament Season 3 packs had gone out-of-print This set is notable because it contained the first Tournament Pack Ultra Rare that was not a monster card, but a trap card, the card being Royal Decree. It contains 1 Ultra Rare, 4 Super Rares, 4 Rares, and 11 Commons.
    6.50
    4 votes
    76

    Dark Tower

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    The revised edition of this Dungeon & Dragons adventure for the 3rd Edition of D&D.
    8.50
    2 votes
    77

    Dead Gods

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 2nd Edition
    Dead Gods is an adventure module for the second edition of the Advanced Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. Dead Gods is composed of two adventures which revolve around the theme of death and resurrection of a god: "Out of the Darkness" and "Into the Light". Each adventure can be played separately, although the two plots can be woven together by the Dungeon Master. "Out of the Darkness" consists of nine chapters. Long ago, Orcus the tanar'ri lord of the undead had grown fat and inattentive towards his realm in the Abyss. The minor demipower Kiaransalee, drow goddess of vengeance, conspired against Orcus and slew him, supplanting his realm and position and even banishing his name across the planes. Orcus’ corpse lay dead on the Astral Plane for some time, until he began to stir in the not-so-distant past. His form changed to become thin, small and shadowy, but rather than being truly restored to life he had become an undead god much less powerful than before. Orcus eventually disappeared from the Astral and chose a new name for himself: Tenebrous. He sought to gain revenge on everyone in the multiverse, and raised his former demonic servants as undead called visages to
    8.50
    2 votes
    78

    Fiendish Codex I: Hordes of the Abyss

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Fiendish Codex I: Hordes of the Abyss is an optional supplemental source book for the 3.5 edition of the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game. Explains a number of well known aspects of demons, including their physiology, their interactions on the Material Plane, the roles they fit into, and how possession works. Also details the Black Scrolls of Ahm. Discusses the difference between the three main subtypes of demon: loumara, obyrith, and tanar'ri. Also includes information on 16 different types of demons: Armanite, Bar-Lgura, Broodswarm, Bulezau, Chasme, Dybbuk, Ekolid, Goristro, Guecubu, Lilitu, Mane, Molydeus, Nabassu, Rutterkin, Sibriex, and Yochlol. Discusses the following 14 demon lords: Baphomet, Dagon, Demogorgon, Fraz-Urb'luu, Graz'zt, Juiblex, Kostchtchie, Malcanthet, Obox-ob, Orcus, Pale Night, Pazuzu, Yeenoghu, and Zuggtmoy. Their statistics are given at lower Challenge Ratings than in previous books such as Book of Vile Darkness, ranging from Juiblex at CR 19 to Demogorgon at CR 23. It also provides tips on advancing the demon lords so that they can be as powerful as you like. Discusses various ways of interacting with demons, from fighting them to allying with them.
    8.50
    2 votes
    79

    GURPS Runal

    GURPS Runal (ガープス・ルナル) is a role-playing game supplement that was written in Japanese language for the GURPS game rules. It was written by Shou Tomono and Group SNE, then first published in 1992. Over twenty novels of a series named Runal Saga (ルナル・サーガ) have been published based upon GURPS Runal. The setting is a fantasy world named Runal that was strongly influenced from RuneQuest. There are seven mysterious Moons grant magic power to worshipers. The seven colors Moons are worshiped by various people as follows: The Rhiado continent is the main land and focus of the game. The strongest nation is the Tor-Addness Empire which is modeled after the Tang Dynasty of China. Its state religion is the worship of the Blue Moon. The Toru-Addness Empire are disputing with neighboring countries which worship the Red Moon. GURPS Yuel, the sequel of GURPS Runal was released in 2005 as a supplement of GURPS 4th ed.
    8.50
    2 votes
    80

    Tempest

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Tempest was the 20th Magic: The Gathering set and twelfth expert level set, and the first set in the Rath Block, released in October 1997. The release of Tempest represented a large jump in the power level of the card set, compared to the previous Mirage block. Many cards from Tempest instantly became (and still are) tournament staples. Its expansion symbol is a cloud, with a lightning bolt erupting out. On 8 December 2008 Tempest was released for Magic: The Gathering Online. Tempest was the second set and the first standalone in the Weatherlight Saga, a continuous storyline for over four years' worth of Magic expansions. Originally Tempest was intended to have a major "poison" theme, but in the end all poison cards were pulled from the set. Tempest introduced two new keyworded mechanics to Magic: Buyback and Shadow. Buyback appeared on instants and sorceries. Spells with buyback had an optional buyback cost which, if paid, caused the spell to return to its owner's hand after being cast instead of being placed in the graveyard. Shadow appeared on creatures. Creatures with shadow could not block or be blocked, except by creatures with shadow. The shadow ability only appeared on
    8.50
    2 votes
    81

    The Assassin's Knot

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
    The Assassin's Knot is an adventure module written by Lenard Lakofka for the first edition of Advanced Dungeons & Dragons and published by TSR in 1983. It is designed for novice and intermediate players with characters of levels 2-4. The Assassin's Knot is a sequel to The Secret of Bone Hill, and is the second of three modules in the Lendore Isle series. It was ranked the 29th greatest Dungeons & Dragons adventure of all time by Dungeon magazine. The player characters must solve the mystery of who killed the Baron of Restenford, with evidence pointing to somebody from the town of Garrotten. The scenario describes the town and its castle. The Assassin's Knot module is different from most of its contemporaries in that it contained no dungeon or dungeon-like area. The longer the players take to find the murderer, the more unfortunate events occur in the village. The village, Garrotten, is reputed to be the place to go to have someone killed. The entire village shuts down when the Baron of Restenford is found dead, mutilated beyond the possibility of magical restoration. Three small clues are all the player characters have to unravel the mystery. The Assassin's Knot was written by Len
    8.50
    2 votes
    82

    Tournament Season 2

    • Game: Yu-Gi-Oh! Trading Card Game
    Tournament Pack 2 (TP2) was the second tournament booster released for the Yu-Gi-Oh! Trading Card Game. It was given out at tournaments after the Tournament Season 1 packs had gone out-of-print. It contains 1 Ultra Rare, 4 Super Rares, 10 Rares, and 15 Commons.
    8.50
    2 votes
    83

    Unhinged

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Unhinged is the name of one of the few English-only expansions to the game Magic: The Gathering. It is a humorous parody set, and is far less serious than traditional Magic expansions. Mark Rosewater, lead designer for Magic: The Gathering, has written in several articles that, due to the nature of the humor and the many plays-on-words used in both Unhinged and Unglued, sets such as these will always be English language only. The only other English language only sets were released before Magic gained enough popularity to support foreign markets. Wizards released a humor-themed Magic expansion set, Unglued, on 7 August 1998. Much of the set's humor came from meta-humor references at the game itself and its mechanics. Many cards featured mechanics deemed too strange or impractical for a "serious," tournament-legal expansion. Because of the success of the set, designers began work on an Unglued sequel, named Unglued 2: The Obligatory Sequel. However, Wizards of the Coast felt that releasing another comedy set along with the standard serious sets, would go beyond market saturation. Unglued 2 was scrapped. Since then, many players asked for a sequel to Unglued. However, they were always
    8.50
    2 votes
    84

    Day of Al'Akbar

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
    Day of Al'Akbar (I9) is a Dungeons & Dragons module. Author: Allen Hammack (1986) Day of Al'Akbar is a scenario set in an Arabian Nights-style desert land, where the player characters search the sewers under the city of Khaibar for an entrance to the tomb of Al'Akbar to find the holy Cup and Talisman, which can save their home from a plague. The module describes Khaibar City and the sultan's palace. In this adventure, the player characters must save Arabic lands from a red plague by retrieving a magical artifact. The adventure involves wilderness encounters, dungeon crawling in a sewer, tomb-robbing, some detective work in a desert town, and a final confrontation in the Sultan's palace. The land of Arir, a once peaceful desert country, has fallen into the hand of infidels. The ruler, Sultan Amhara, was killed in the battle for the capital city of Khaibar. He left behind one of the greatest treasure stores ever amassed, including the Cup and Talisman of Al'Akbar. A deadly plague sweeps your land. The holy men could cure the deadly plague which sweeps the land, if they had the Talismanm which the player characters must find. I9 Day of Al'Akbar was written by Allen Hammack, with a
    7.33
    3 votes
    85

    Dissension

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Dissension is the 60th Magic: The Gathering set, 38th expert level set, and the third and final set in the Ravnica Block, released on May 5, 2006. Ravnica was conceived following the success of Invasion. Invasion, released in 2000, emphasized interactions between the colors, and it was one of Magic's most popular releases ever. Lead designer Mark Rosewater wanted to expand on the multicolor theme in a new way. Therefore, the design of Ravnica block is based around ten two-color pairs, including cards in which those pairs of colors work in concert. Of the ten guilds that rule the city of Ravnica, three are the sole focus of this third set in the block. The previous expansions, Ravnica: City of Guilds and Guildpact, focused on seven of these guilds. Dissension brings it to a close by introducing the last three guilds. Each guild corresponds to a different two-color combination. The three guilds featured in Dissension are: Ravnica block includes many mono-color cards which encourage people to play with multiple colors. Ravnica: City of Guilds featured cards which have activated abilities that use mana of different color from the cards' color. Guildpact introduced cards which are
    7.33
    3 votes
    86

    Kindred of the Ebony Kingdom

    • Game: Vampire: The Masquerade
    Kindred of the Ebony Kingdom is a source-book, alternative setting, and stand-alone pen-and-paper RPG designed for Vampire: The Masquerade, Vampire: The Dark Ages, and other games set in the Old World of Darkness developed by White Wolf Game Studios. It was released in 2003 and dealt with vampires throughout the African continent (a location only briefly examined in previous Old World of Darkness games). The Kindred of the Ebony Kingdom, known among themselves as the Laibon, are vampires native to Africa in the Old World of Darkness setting. Though having the same roots as the western Kindred (traditional vampires) and being afflicted with the same curse, the Laibon have existed in relative isolation from the western Kindred for an extended period, and have become distinct in a variety of ways. Additionally, they do not believe themselves descended from Caine (the first vampire), but rather view their existence in relation to various African myths and legends. The most striking difference between the Laibon and the normal Vampire:the Masquerade Kindred is their tenuous balance between the world of mortals and that of the supernatural. Unlike Kindred (who are most commonly defined
    7.33
    3 votes
    87

    Mirrodin

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Mirrodin was the 50th Magic: The Gathering set, the 30th expert level set, and the first set in the Mirrodin Block, released in October 2003. It is a 306-card expansion set. It is also the name of the block containing the Mirrodin, Darksteel and Fifth Dawn expansion sets. This expansion, as well as the rest of the block, is centered around artifacts and is only the second set to do so (from a card frequency point of view) since Antiquities. The percentage of artifact cards is much higher than in any preceding set. Mirrodin 's expansion symbol is a small image of Sword of Kaldra, a card from this set. The setting for Mirrodin is a plane by the same name. An artificial world created by the planeswalker Karn, and named after the Mirari by Memnarch, Mirrodin's environments and inhabitants mix organic and metallic. Mirrodin is orbited by four satellites, which are called suns and moons interchangeably, that correspond to red, black, white and blue magic. Green was notably absent until Glissa Sunseeker became a conduit for its birth. The set focuses on five main regions on Mirrodin, each corresponding to a part of the Magic color pie: The main character of the story is the elf Glissa
    7.33
    3 votes
    88

    Monster Manual

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
    The Monster Manual for the 1st Edition of Advanced Dungeons & Dragons.
    7.33
    3 votes
    89

    Onslaught

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Onslaught is the 27th Magic: The Gathering expert-level expansion set. It was released in October 2002. The set's main theme is creature types (for example, Clerics and Goblins), and much of the game play concerns interactions between these "tribes". The story continues the saga of the Mirari from the previous block of expansion sets. The expansion symbol is an artist's rendition of a "morphed" creature (see Mechanics below). The story of Onslaught mainly concerns characters introduced in the Odyssey block. Kamahl the Barbarian has relocated to the Krosan Forest with the Mirari and becomes a druid of Krosa. The power of the Mirari begins to work on the forest, mutating its residents and growing some of them to gigantic proportions. Meanwhile, Kamahl's sister Jeska is transformed by foul Cabal healing magic, into Phage, a pit fighter whose touch brings death. Phage then allies herself with the Cabal. Ixidor, an illusionist, fights in the pits with his partner, a beautiful sorceress named Nivea, who ends up being killed off by Phage. Ixidor then wanders the desert in grief, and discovers his new powers of reality sculpting. Ixidor uses his new power to create a palace in the desert,
    7.33
    3 votes
    90

    Sandstorm

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Sandstorm is an optional supplemental source book for the 3.5 edition of the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game. Sandstorm describes how DMs can create adventures and even campaigns set in a desert or wasteland environment. The book details many hazards that are associated with real-life dangers to desert travelers. Furthermore, Sandstorm corrects many false ideas about deserts, such as the belief that quicksands are commonly found in the desert; the book explains that quicksands require water to form, and are usually found near an oasis, although quicksands are still rare even there. The book gives ideas for DMs as well as players in using new prestige classes and new races. In addition, book references several 3rd edition books, such as Deities and Demigods. At the beginning of the book, examples of wasteland areas found in the campaign settings of Greyhawk and the Forgotten Realms are given. Sandstorm was written by Bruce R. Cordell, Jennifer Clarke Wilkes, and JD Wiker, and was published in March 2005. Cover art was by Ben Thompson, with interior art by Steven Belledin, Matt Cavotta, Mitch Cotie, Ed Cox, Wayne England, David Hudnut, Dana Knutson, Doug Kovacs, Todd Lockwood,
    7.33
    3 votes
    91

    The Faction War

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 2nd Edition
    The Faction War is a book published by TSR in 1998. Part of the Dungeons & Dragons series. It was a published adventure meant for those who were playing in Dungeons & Dragons's fantasy role-playing game Planescape campaign setting, also published by TSR. The culmination of several adventures leading up to that point, The Faction War brought an end to the factions' control of the city. Instigated by the power-hungry Duke Rowan Darkwood, factol of the Fated, in a bid to dethrone the Lady of Pain and rule Sigil himself, the war spread throughout the city before the Lady of Pain, with the aid of a group of adventurers (the players' characters), intervened. In the Dragon Magazine #315 (January 2004) the result of the Faction War were as follows:
    7.33
    3 votes
    92

    Under Illefarn

    Under Illefarn is a Dungeons & Dragons module. It was the first module designed for use with the Forgotten Realms campaign setting and officially labeled as such. Under Illefarn is a scenario designed for beginning players in the Forgotten Realms setting. The player characters are residents of the town of Daggerford, and are therefore automatically members of the town militia and thus required to deal with local perils, such as fighting lizardmen raiders, rescuing a kidnapped noblewoman, and guarding a caravan. The module describes Daggerford and its personalities, as well as the nearby dwarf and orc lairs of Illefarn. Daggerford is fairly quiet for a frontier town. Sure, lizard men raid the local baron's holding now and then, orcs sneak out of the Misty Forest to raid caravans on the Trade Way, and lady Bronwyn has a few suitors who are a touch too passionate, but there's nothing going on that a member of the renowned Daggerford militia can't handle. Except that the Shining River has turned green, the cattle are dying. Except that the Elf King of Laughing Hollow, a place where no human dares to go without fearing for his life, is asking the militia for help. Except that strange
    7.33
    3 votes
    93

    Asticlian Gambit

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 2nd Edition
    Asticlian Gambit is an adventure for the 2nd edition of the Advanced Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game, published in 1992.
    6.25
    4 votes
    94

    Magic of Faerûn

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Magic of Faerûn is an accessory for the fictional Forgotten Realms campaign setting for the 3rd edition of the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. This 192-page book begins with a one-page introduction written from the perspective of the fictional character Khelben "Blackstaff" Arunsun. Chapter 1: Understanding Magic, on pages 4–11, describes the nature of magic in the Realms, including the deities who most represent magic: Mystryl, Mystra, and Midnight, Azuth, Savras, Shar, and Velsharoon. This chapter also defines the terminology of magic, and explains the Weave—the barrier and gate between raw magic and the world. Chapter 2: Magic Variants, on pages 12–19, presents several forms of magic beyond the standard type, including elemental magic, elven high magic, gem magic, the mageduel, moonfire, rune magic, spellfire, and spellpools. Chapter 3: Practitioners of Magic, on pages 20–41, gives information in increasing a player character's abilities, including new skills and feats, and ten new prestige classes. Chapter 4: Places of Power, on pages 42–67, describes exotic places to explore, including natural sites (mystic maelstroms, sparks, fey mounds, boomshroom patches, doom
    6.25
    4 votes
    95

    Monster Manual III

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Monster Manual III is a manual published in 2004 by Wizards of the Coast, for use with the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game. It is the first of the monster specific books published by Wizards of the Coast to be made for the 3.5 edition of the game. It cites sources from Dragon Magazine, Manual of the Planes, the Planes of Law Campaign Expansion, and the first edition of Fiend Folio. The book is notable for being published for use with the two main endorsed campaign settings of Forgotten Realms and Eberron with many creatures containing sections explaining where they might be found in the campaign setting. It is uncertain whether Wizards of the Coast will publish more Monster Books in this format, which appears to be an obvious endorsement for their campaign settings.
    6.25
    4 votes
    96

    Stronghold

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Stronghold was the 21st Magic: The Gathering set and thirteenth expert level set, and the second set in the Rath Block, released in March 1998. The block includes Tempest and Exodus. Stronghold contains 143 cards. Its expansion symbol is the closed portcullis of Volrath's stronghold. The crew of Weatherlight approaches Volrath's Stronghold in search for Sisay and the missing pieces of the Legacy. Deep in the Dream Halls, Gerrard learns that Volrath was his former blood brother Vuel and the one who stole the Legacy. What appears to be a final conflict between Gerrard and Volrath ends instead with the death of an imposter shapeshifter. Stronghold was the last set in which multi-colored cards appeared until the 2000 expansion Invasion. On 13 April 2009 Stronghold was released on Magic Online. It went off sale on 27 April 2009, but was available again for the release of Exodus on 7 December 2009. Stronghold is currently not available for purchase in Magic Online. A prominent creature type in Stronghold is the Spikes. While first introduced in Tempest, Stronghold greatly expanded on this creature type that can make other creatures larger. The En-Kor are creatures that can redirect
    6.25
    4 votes
    97

    Urza's Legacy

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Urza's Legacy is a Magic: The Gathering set, second in the Urza Block. Urza's Legacy was released in February 1999. This set is the first set to feature premium cards also known as foil cards, inserted randomly into boosters and taking the place of a card in the common slot. Urza's Legacy continues the prequel storyline started in Urza's Saga, following Urza's quest to fight Phyrexia's godlike master, Yawgmoth, and his plans to conquer his home world, Dominaria. After an attempt to manipulate time goes catastrophically wrong, Urza searches for more allies as he builds a skyship to lead the war against Phyrexia. While he is away, the people of his Tolarian Academy have to battle a Phyrexian infestation on the island itself. The story of this set is recounted in the book Time Streams. Urza's Legacy expanded on some of Urza's Saga's mechanics. Numerous cards with Echo had additional effects when they came into play, making it often useful to cast the cards without having to pay the echo cost on the next turn. Also, three non-creature artifacts were printed with Echo. More "Sleeping" enchantments were introduced, including four that turned into creatures, and one of each color that
    6.25
    4 votes
    98

    GURPS Infinite Worlds

    • Game: GURPS
    GURPS Infinite Worlds is a supplement for the Fourth Edition of the GURPS role-playing game, published by Steve Jackson Games in 2005 and written by Kenneth Hite, Steve Jackson, and John M. Ford. It expands upon the campaign setting of conflict between the Infinity Patrol, which is the time-travel agency on "our" Earth, referred to as Homeline, and Centrum across a multiplicity of alternate history Earths. This was presented in the Fourth Edition GURPS Basic Set (and originated in the Third Edition supplements GURPS Time Travel, GURPS Alternate Earths, and GURPS Alternate Earths II). It won the 2005 Origins Award as Best Game Supplement. GURPS Infinite Worlds has eight chapters: Infinity Unlimited, Enemies Everywhen, Present at the Creation, Worlds Enough, ...And Time, Infinite characters, Infinite Campaigns, and Alternate Infinities. This chapter describes one of the two worlds (known locally as Homeline) that have full-fledged, public "parachronics" programs (the technology behind traveling between parallel universes) Travel between worlds is generally done through ground-based equipment ("projectors") or vehicles ("conveyors"), but magic, parahuman abilities and even stranger
    5.40
    5 votes
    99

    Babylon 5: A Call to Arms

    • Game: Babylon 5 Roleplaying Game
    Babylon 5: A Call to Arms (ACtA) is a tabletop miniatures boardgame released in September 2004 by Mongoose Publishing, designed initially as an expansion to their Babylon 5: The Roleplaying Game, it is a complete game in its own right. Babylon 5: A Call to Arms is based upon the sci-fi television series Babylon 5 and draws heavily on material from the television show and the boardgame Babylon 5 Wars. The game's popularity exceeded Mongoose Publishing's initial expectations and has expanded to include new rules supplements and new miniatures; a second edition of the game was released in August 2007. Mongoose Publishing announced on their website in February 2008 that all production of miniatures for the line would cease as of March 2008. Mongoose have indicated they will continue to support the game however through supplements and articles in their in-house magazine Signs and Portents. ACtA won a Gamers' Choice award at Origins Awards 2004 and continues to be one of Mongoose Publishing's leading brands. Since its initial release in 2004, A Call to Arms has gone though several significant changes, with the release of supporting material and supplements. Initially the main boxed set
    7.00
    3 votes
    100

    Bloodstone Pass

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
    H1 Bloodstone Pass is an adventure module for the first edition of the Advanced Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) fantasy role-playing game. It was written by Douglas Niles and Michael Dobson and published by TSR, Inc., in 1985. While it contained some traditional D&D elements, the main portion of the module was a series of mass battles using the D&D Battlesystem. Bloodstone Pass combines a role-playing scenario with Battlesystem combat. In the plot, the player characters are hired to organize the defense of the town of Bloodstone Pass against an army of orcs, goblins, giants. The army also included human renegades led by a powerful assassin. The module's action focuses on leading the armies rather than having the battle occur in the background while the players adventure to find a MacGuffin. Bloodstone Pass was originally the working name of what became the first edition of Battlesystem. However, it was felt that the name did not convey the feeling of the system. After the developers had settled on the name Battlesystem, they used the "Bloodstone Pass" name for the first Battlesystem game accessory. Bloodstone Pass was written by Douglas Niles and Michael Dobson and published by TSR, Inc.,
    7.00
    3 votes
    101

    D20 Apocalypse

    • Game: d20 Modern
    d20 Apocalypse is a 96-page softcover supplement to the d20 Modern role-playing game, providing a rules framework and setting guides for campaigns set in a post-apocalyptic setting. Included in the rulebook are a listing of general ways in which the modern world might experience an apocalypse, drawing on sources which include religious eschatology, current science, and popular fiction. These methods include, among others: an environmental disaster, alien invasion, nuclear war, plague, and supernatural disaster. For each scenario, a brief description outlines the scenario and its particular effects on the setting. For instance, a plague scenario would not carry with it the same radiation dangers and physical damages to the infrastructure as would a nuclear war. Following the apocalyptic event, the post-apocalyptic setting is further defined based on the amount of time which has passed since the event. The varying amounts of time are divided into four distinct eras: A second section details types of societies which are likely to appear following a re-ordering of society. These include tribal groups, ethnic groups, religious societies, etc. Given the collapse of society, the Wealth
    7.00
    3 votes
    102

    Ghostwalk

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Ghostwalk is a book that introduced a campaign setting for the 3rd edition of the Dungeons & Dragons game, similar to Forgotten Realms or Dragonlance. Unlike most other D&D settings, however, Ghostwalk was designed to be released as a single book which would contain all the material for the world. The central locale for the Ghostwalk setting is a city called Manifest, a mausoleum city built atop a geological feature known as the Well of Souls which leads the spirits of the departed on to the True Afterlife. In the immediate surroundings of the city of Manifest, the ghosts of the dead may cross the barrier into the land of the living and interact with their loved ones as translucent beings forged of ectoplasm, their ghost bodies marked by whatever injuries killed them and often driven by some craving for some aspect of the living world, such as music or food. A manifested ghost may fairly easily be returned to his body by resurrection magic and so in the City of Manifest one may die a great many times and be returned to his body with no harmful side effects. The one danger in exploring the other side of death as a ghost is the Calling, an unshakable urge that overcomes ghosts at
    7.00
    3 votes
    103

    Mirage

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Mirage was the fifteenth Magic: The Gathering set and ninth expert level set, released in October 1996. This expansion began the first official block set with one large expansion being followed by two smaller expansions all tied together through card mechanics and setting. This expansion also introduced 5th Edition rules (5th Edition was released in March 1997). Mirage's expansion symbol is a palm tree. On 5 December 2005 Mirage was released on Magic: The Gathering Online. It was the first set that was retroactively released on Magic Online. The story concerns three of the most powerful nations of Jamuraa (a tropical continent modeled after Africa) — the militaristic kingdom of the Zhalfirins, the religious state of Femeref, and the trading province of the Suq'Ata empire. Zhalfir was the warrior nation, based mainly on red. Femeref was mainly white, and featured clerics and healers, while the seafaring traders of Suq'Ata were mostly blue. Mirage concerned these three nations and their struggle against the evil wizard Kaervek. Kaervek has imprisoned the powerful wizard and diplomat Mangara in an amber prison and the bulk of the story details the Jamuraans attempting to free Mangara.
    7.00
    3 votes
    104

    Shadowmoor

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Shadowmoor is an expansion set, codenamed "Jelly", from the trading card game Magic: The Gathering. It was released on May 2, 2008. The pre-release events for this set were held on April 19–20, 2008. Shadowmoor is the first set of the Shadowmoor block, which started May 2008. Shadowmoor is the first large expansion to be released in a month other than October since Ice Age’s June 1995 release. The designers of the set are Mark Rosewater (lead), Sean Fletcher, Mark Gottlieb, Devin Low, and Ken Troop; the developers of the set are Aaron Forsythe (lead), Devin Low, Alexis Janson (the winner of The Great Designer Search Contest), Matt Place, Jake Theis, Steve Warner, and Doug Beyer. The Shadowmoor symbol might suggest a bat wing or dead leaf, but is a Jack-o'-lantern lid taken from the art of the card Reaper King, the King of the scarecrows, a prominent creature type in the set. The set's theme is color, utilizing hybrid (as seen in Ravnica) across the allied color pairs, along with innovations in hybrid mana. A new action is introduced in this set, called "Q", representing the untap symbol; according to Rosewater, this has "never [been] done before." Rosewater also stated that "the
    7.00
    3 votes
    105
    Dungeon Master's Guide II

    Dungeon Master's Guide II

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    The Dungeon Master's Guide II is a book of rules for the 3.5 edition of the Dungeons & Dragons seminal fantasy role-playing game. Like the Dungeon Master's Guide it is focused on providing Dungeon Masters with assistance in running the game. It contains a number of chapters providing advice on the more difficult aspects of running a game as well as complex pregenerated characters (often using Prestige Classes). The DM Guide II introduces Dungeon Masters to various types of people who enjoy the D&D game, and it explains what exactly they enjoy. Examples include: This book was written by Jesse Decker, David Noonan, Chris Thomasson, James Jacobs, and Robin D. Laws, and was published in June 2005. Cover art is by Matt Cavotta, with interior art by Kalman Andrasofszky, Mitch Cotie, Ed Cox, Steve Ellis, Wayne England, Emily Fiegenschuh, Randy Gallegos, Brian Hagan, Ginger Kubic, Raven Mimura, William O'Connor, Michael Phillippi, Vinod Rams, Wayne Reynolds, Dan Scott, Ron Spencer, Arnie Swekel, and Franz Vohwinkel. This is the first Dungeon Master's Guide II to be published; however, it was followed by the Player's Handbook II. The 4th edition Dungeon Master's Guide 2 was released on
    6.00
    4 votes
    106

    Lorwyn

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Lorwyn is the 66th Magic: The Gathering set, 43rd expert level set, and the first set in the Lorwyn Block, released in October 2007. It is codenamed "Peanut". The pre-release events for this set were held on September 29–30, 2007. The designers of the set were Aaron Forsythe (lead designer), Mark Rosewater, Paul Sottosanti, Brady Dommermuth, Nate Heiss, and Andrew Finch; the developers of the set were Devin Low (lead developer), Bill Rose, Matt Place, Henry Stern, Mike Turian, and Doug Beyer. Lorwyn is set in a more traditional fantasy world, inspired by Welsh folklore. The plane is a pastoral world inhabited by several major races: boggarts (goblins), faeries, elves, giants, treefolk, merfolk, elementals (including the flamekin) and kithkin. Lorwyn saw the release of an entirely new card type, the Planeswalker. This marks the first time that Wizards has added a new card type to the current game, as Alpha introduced all current card types, other than the type "Tribal". A single tribal card, Bound in Silence, was printed as a future-shifted card in Future Sight. The set has a tribal theme, focusing heavily on creature subtypes, revolving around eight primary creature types. Each of
    6.00
    4 votes
    107

    The Veiled Society

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons Basic Set
    The Veiled Society is an adventure module for the Basic Rules of the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. Its product designation is TSR 9086. The Veiled Society is set in the city of Specularum, where the players must determine which of three rival factions is responsible for a murder. In the violent city of Specularum, the Veiled Society has spies everywhere. Specularum is the capitol of the Grand Duchy of Karameikos, and the adventure involves the party in a struggle between the city's three major families (the Vorloi, Radu, and Torenescu). The sixteen page booklet with an outer folder was published by TSR in 1984 and designed by David "Zeb" Cook. It features cover artwork by Steve Chappell with interior illustrations by Jim Roslof. The module includes cardstock miniatures and sixteen pages of fold-together pieces which form nine cutout houses and a cutout gate. The module was featured in the compilation B1-B9 In Search of Adventure in 1987. Graham Staplehusrt reviewed this module for White Dwarf issue No. 63, giving it 9 out of 10 overall, and felt it had "all the hallmarks of a classic adventure" despite what he felt were the "useless" cutouts. Staplehurst felt that
    6.00
    4 votes
    108

    Tournament Season 5

    • Game: Yu-Gi-Oh! Trading Card Game
    Tournament Season 5 (TP5) was the fifth tournament booster released for the Yu-Gi-Oh! Trading Card Game. It was given out at tournaments after Tournament Season 4 packs went out-of-print. It contains 1 Ultra Rare, 4 Super Rares, 4 Rares, and 11 Commons.
    6.00
    4 votes
    109

    Chronicles

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Chronicles was the twelfth Magic: The Gathering set, and the first compilation set, released in July 1995 by Wizards of the Coast. The set is one of two sets that have been sold in twelve-card booster packs, the other having been Alliances. Chronicles introduced no new cards; the set was designated as an extension of the 4th Edition core set for the purpose of tournament play. Chronicles consists entirely of cards reprinted from the first four Magic: the Gathering expansions: Arabian Nights, Antiquities, Legends, and The Dark. The cards in Chronicles are white-bordered, in accordance with the Wizards of the Coast policy of the time that black-bordered cards would only be reprinted with white borders. In addition, the game text on many Chronicles cards was updated to reflect then-current rules, rulings, and templating. For example, Cyclone from Arabian Nights instructed players to place "chips" on the card to mark its status, while the Chronicles reprint of Cyclone used "counters" instead, as had become standard usage. Arabian Nights, Antiquities, Legends, and The Dark quickly sold out in the hobby-gaming market, so both new and existing players had extremely limited access to cards
    8.00
    2 votes
    110

    Fantasy Hero

    Fantasy Hero is a role-playing game book that supports the Fantasy genre using the Hero System rules. Since the release of the 5th edition of the Hero System, Steven S. Long of Hero Games has published a new version of the Fantasy Hero book, as well as several supplementary publications to support Fantasy Hero-based campaigns. The Hero system book is required to make full use of this work in a game. The book contains information that is useful to both the Game Master (GM) and the Players. Recently, a new edition of Fantasy Hero has been released, updating the genre book to the new Hero System 6th Edition. The 5th edition book is a fairly extensive work, with 416 pages of text bound in a stiff-paper cover. Each 21.5 × 27.5 cm-sized page is printed in double-column text with occasional side-bar information. The interior is moderately illustrated with non-color drawings, while the jacket has a full-color painting. The book received the Gold Medal ENnie Award in 2004 for Best Non-D20 Supplement. A substantial portion of the book consists of information about fantasy gaming that is non-game-system-specific. This content can be used by game masters who want to create their own campaign
    8.00
    2 votes
    111

    Idylls of the Rat King

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Idylls of the Rat King is a d20 Dungeon Crawl Classics adventure written for Dungeons & Dragons by Jeffrey Quinn. For character levels 1-3, DCC #1 pits PCs against a wererat king and his wicked minions. As of 2006, Idylls of the Rat King has been reprinted three times. The 3rd printing features the art of classic TSR artist, Jim Holloway. The title is a reference to Idylls of the King, a cycle of narrative poems by Alfred Tennyson. In Idylls of the Rat King, goblin bandits have taken up residence in an abandoned mine northwest of Silverton. Someone must get rid of them. But this is no ordinary abandoned mine. It was deliberately barricaded generations ago when the Gannu family, founders of Silverton, discovered an unspeakable evil on its lowest levels. And these are no ordinary goblins, for the curse of the Gannu family courses through their veins. DCC #1 received an Honorable Mention for Best Adventure, ENnies 2003.
    8.00
    2 votes
    112

    Judgment

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Judgment is the third set in the Odyssey Block for the collectible card game Magic: The Gathering. This is the second expansion set made that did not have an equal number cards from each color. The first expansion with such an imbalance was its predecessor, the Torment expansion set, which was skewed towards the color black. The Judgment expansion set was meant to balance this, and skews towards green and white, black's enemy colors. The expansion symbol for Judgment was a scale. The set contains 33 Green cards, 33 White cards, 27 Red cards, 27 Blue cards and 16 Black cards. All multicolored cards in the set are both green and white. With Jeska mortally wounded by his own sword, Kamahl leaves his sister to the care of his centaur friend Seton, setting out on a quest to find a way to heal her. Her wound festers from the might of the Mirari, currently fixed to the pommel of Kamahl's sword. Meanwhile, Laquatus schemes as much as ever to persuade Empress Llawan to aid him in finding the Mirari. Along with his bodyguard Burke (Laquatus' Champion), the ever-demented Braids, and Commander Eesha of the Aven, each plays a part in the war over the Mirari. Kamahl trains with the Nantuko
    8.00
    2 votes
    113

    Planar Chaos

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Planar Chaos is an expansion set, codenamed "Crackle," from the trading card game Magic: The Gathering. The set was released on February 2, 2007. The pre-release events took place on January 20 and 21, 2007. It is the second set in the Time Spiral block. The symbol for Planar Chaos is a Möbius strip. The temporal stresses being applied to Dominaria have expanded, causing multiple parallel universes (versions of Dominaria where history played out differently) to merge into the already colliding past-present-future of current events. Designed by Bill Rose (lead designer), Matt Place, Mark Rosewater and Paul Sottosanti, and developed by Devin Low (lead developer), Zvi Mowshowitz, Brian Schneider, Henry Stern and Mike Turian, Planar Chaos was tasked with representing the present in a set focused on the cycle of time. The design team considered a number of ways to represent an alternate present, including the introduction of purple as a new color. Eventually, the team chose to represent alternate realities where elements of the color pie were shifted, placing spell types and abilities into unusual colors. These alternate realities were epitomized by the set's 45 "Timeshifted" cards.
    8.00
    2 votes
    114

    The Keep on the Borderlands

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons Basic Set
    The Keep on the Borderlands is a Dungeons & Dragons module by Gary Gygax, first printed in December 1979. In it, player characters are based at a keep and investigate a nearby series of caves that are filled with a variety of monsters. Designed to be used with the Dungeons & Dragons Basic Set, it was included in the 1979–1982 editions of the Basic Set. It was designed for people new to Dungeons & Dragons. The Keep on the Borderlands went out of print in the early 1980s, but has been reprinted twice; a sequel was also made. A novelized version of the adventure was published in 1999. The module received generally positive reviews, and was ranked the 7th greatest Dungeons & Dragons adventure of all time by Dungeon magazine in 2004. Player characters begin by arriving at the eponymous keep, and can base themselves there before investigating the series of caverns in the nearby hills teeming with monsters. These Caves of Chaos house multiple species of vicious humanoids. Plot twists include a treacherous priest within the keep, hungry lizardmen in a nearby swamp, and a mad hermit in the wilderness. It typifies the dungeon crawls associated with beginning D&D players, while permitting
    8.00
    2 votes
    115

    Tournament Season 6

    • Game: Yu-Gi-Oh! Trading Card Game
    Tournament Season 6 (TP6) was the sixth tournament booster released for the Yu-Gi-Oh! Trading Card Game. It was given out at tournaments after Tournament Season 5 packs went out-of-print. It contains 1 Ultra Rare, 4 Super Rares, 4 Rares, and 11 Commons.
    8.00
    2 votes
    116

    Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    The Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting is a role-playing game sourcebook, first published in 1987. It details the Forgotten Realms setting and contains information on characters, locations and history, and sets specific rules for the Dungeons & Dragons (often abbreviated as "D&D") role-playing game. The latest edition was published in 2008 by Wizards of the Coast, for use with the 4th edition Dungeons & Dragons rules. The "Dungeon Master's Sourcebook of the Realms" describes how to set up and run a campaign in the Forgotten Realms. A pair of miniscenarios is included, and information is provided on wilderness terrain and movement, important personalities, rumors, and significant and magical books. Written from the perspective of Elminster the sage, the book introduces the campaign setting, explains how to use it, and offers adventure resources. Large areas were set aside to be developed for house campaigns, and no published materials were intended to be printed to exploit those areas, while one area detailed in this package was intended to have no subsequent publications use that area. The package covers only the western half of a single continent, with the eastern half reserved for
    9.00
    1 votes
    117

    GURPS Banestorm

    Banestorm, written by Phil Masters and Jonathan Woodward was released in October 2005. It is a setting sourcebook for the fourth edition of the GURPS Role-playing game. It details a fantasy setting called Yrth that has been updated from older GURPS Fantasy source books. The standard fantasy elements such as Wizards, Orcs, Elves, and Dwarves are present, along with connections to Infinite Worlds. There are also some more unusual fantastic races like the Reptile Men, and several others which can be added in as desired by the game master. A basic premise of the setting is that magical banestorms pick up people and whole villages from other worlds (including Earth) and deposit them on Yrth. As a result many of the societies and cultures are reminiscent of a Crusades-era Earth, albeit with magic. One significant difference this brings is that, unlike many fantasy settings, Yrth has many of the major Earth faiths as its core religions, including Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism and others. The settings's official timeline syncs up with our own, so that a "normal" campaign would be set in 2005 or 2006. The Banestorm started about 1,000 years ago when a group of "Dark
    9.00
    1 votes
    118
    9.00
    1 votes
    119

    Master of the Desert Nomads

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons Expert Set
    Master of the Desert Nomads is a Dungeons & Dragons adventure module designed by David Cook for use with the Expert D&D set. This is the first part of a two-part adventure, with Temple of Death being the second part. In this scenario, the adventurers follow a river and cross the desert to find an evil abbey. The adventure details a number of wilderness encounters. Tribes of nomad raiders from the Great Waste have begun sacking town, prompting the governor of the Republic to send out a call for help to fight these nomads. When the party joins the reserves to meet the main army at a recently-liberated village, they discover signs of the nomads and camp there for several days. At the beginning of the mission, the player characters must use stealth to find out more about the Master of these nomads, and report back to those who hired the party. X4 Master of the Desert Nomads was written by David Cook, with art by Tim Truman, and was published by TSR in 1983 as a 32-page booklet with an outer folder. This module was the first in the "Desert Nomads" series. Rick Swan reviewed the adventure in The Space Gamer No. 71. Swan felt that "Not only does Master of the Desert Nomads provide welcome
    9.00
    1 votes
    120

    Ice Age

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Ice Age is the eleventh Magic: The Gathering set and the sixth expansion set, released in June 1995. Set in the years from 450 to 2934 AR, the set describes a world set in perpetual winter due to the events in Antiquities. Of the 383 cards in the set most are new, but a few are also reprint cards from the core game. The Brothers' War, referenced in the set Antiquities and the Urza block, has thrown Dominaria into a drastic climate change. The temperature has dropped sharply and a new Ice Age has begun. Most of society has been lost; all that remains are the soldier nation of Kjeldor, the barbarians of Balduvia, and the elvish society of Fyndhorn. These people must battle against the necromancer Lim-Dûl who has begun to conduct twisted experiments. Meanwhile the wizard Zur the Enchanter trains new wizards to survive in the harsh environment. Ice Age was the first "stand-alone" expansion; that is, it was the first set that could be played independently of other Magic: The Gathering products. It was the first expansion to reprint all five basic lands. Ice Age is also the first set that was printed for a certain period. Previous sets had a previously specified print run and were then
    5.75
    4 votes
    121

    Ruins of Undermountain

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 2nd Edition
    Ruins of Undermountain is boxed set for the Forgotten Realms campaign setting for the second edition of the Advanced Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. The set, with product code TSR 1060, was published in 1991, and was written by Ed Greenwood, with box cover art by Brom. The set consists of a 128-page booklet titled "Campaign Guide to Undermountain", a 32-page booklet titled "Undermountain Adventures", 8 double-sided loose-leaf monster statistics pages, 8 double-sided heavy-stock "adventure aid" cards, and 4 color fold-out poster maps. The Campaign Guide to Undermountain book uses the same Brom cover art as the box cover itself, with interior art by Karl Waller and cartography by Diesel, Steve Beck, and David Sutherland. This book contains detailed information on the dungeon Undermountain, including non-player characters (such as Halaster Blackcloak) that can be encountered within the dungeons or in the city above it, as well as spells and magic items that can be found. The book also keys the maps to what can be found in various locations, and contains expansion guidelines for creating future adventures and deeper parts of the dungeon. The Undermountain Adventures
    5.75
    4 votes
    122

    The Sunless Citadel

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    The Sunless Citadel is an adventure module for the 3rd edition of the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. This 32-page book begins with a two-page introduction. According to the adventure background provided, the plot involves a fortress that became buried in the earth ages ago, and became known as the Sunless Citadel. In the citadel's core grows the terrible Gulthias Tree, shepherded by the twisted druid, Belak the Outcast. The Tree spawns magical life giving (and life stealing) fruit, as well as evil creatures known as twig blights. The adventure starts with player characters hearing rumors about the citadel while staying in the nearby small town of Oakhurst. The majority of the adventure then focuses on the characters exploring the citadel and encountering the malign creatures that have taken up residence within, such as kobolds and goblins. The characters eventually come upon the Twilight Grove and its blighted foliage, where they find the Gulthias Tree and encounter the druid Belak. He explains that the tree grew from a yet-green wooden stake that had been used to kill a vampire on that very spot, and the tree accepts humanoids bound to its bole as "supplicants",
    5.75
    4 votes
    123

    Blizzard Pass

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons Basic Set
    Blizzard Pass is a 1983 solo adventure module for the Basic Rules of the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. Blizzard Pass is a solo adventure for a thief level 1–3. The thief must cross Blizzard Pass, and then penetrate a cavern system within Blizzard Pass to free the other adventurers from a prison. The module also contains a short adventure for a party of characters level 2–3, dealing with the exploration of the Pass. Blizzard Pass was written by David Cook and published in 1983. Module M1 consisted of a 32-page booklet with an "invisible ink" pen attached to its outer folder and featured a cover by Tim Truman. Blizzard Pass is designed for use with the Basic Rules. Hidden messages written in invisible ink are placed throughout the module in blank boxes. The module comes with a special pen which, when rubbed over a box, reveals the hidden message. The 10th Anniversary Dungeons & Dragons Collector's Set boxed set, published by TSR in 1984, included the rulebooks from the Basic, Expert, and Companion sets; modules AC2, AC3, B1, B2, and M1, Blizzard Pass; Player Character Record Sheets; and dice; this set was limited to 1,000 copies, and was sold by mail and at GenCon
    7.50
    2 votes
    124

    Castle Amber

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons Expert Set
    Castle Amber is a Dungeons & Dragons adventure module designed by Tom Moldvay. This was the second module designed for use with the Expert D&D set. The player characters explore the haunted mansion of the Amber family, and encounter new monsters such as the brain collector. The module is described as a medium to high-level scenario which takes place in a castle surrounded by a strange gray mist. During their night's rest on their way to Glantri, the player characters are unexpectedly drawn into a large castle surrounded by an impenetrable, deadly mist. This is the result of a curse the wizard-noble Stephen Amber (Etienne d'Amberville) put on his treacherous relatives for murdering him. The only way to escape Castle Amber (or Château d'Amberville) is to explore the castle, putting up with the demented and at times insane members of the d'Amberville family and the other, often hostile, denizens, and open a hidden portal to the wilderness of the world of Averoigne, where the party can find the means to reach the inter-dimensional tomb in which Stephen Amber rests, in order to break the curse and return home. In this world, magic is frowned upon, and spellcasters may come to the
    7.50
    2 votes
    125

    Dragons of Despair

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
    Dragons of Despair is the first in a series of 16 Dragonlance adventures published by TSR, Inc. (TSR) between 1984 and 1988. It is the start of the first major story arc in the Dragonlance series of Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) role-playing game modules, a series of ready-to-play adventures for use by Dungeon Masters in the game. This series provides a game version of the original Dragonlance storyline later told in the Dragonlance Chronicles trilogy of novels. This module corresponds to the events told in the first half of the novel Dragons of Autumn Twilight by Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman. Its module code is DL1, which is used to designate it as the first part of the Dragonlace adventure series. As with most D&D adventures, the exact storyline varies based on the actions that the game's players choose for their player characters (PCs), although a general course of action is assumed by the adventure. The story begins with the PCs meeting up in the elven settlement of Solace after five years of unsuccessful individual quests to find any sign of "true clerics". A series of wilderness encounters are used to direct the PCs to find the Blue Crystal Staff and take it to the ancient
    7.50
    2 votes
    126

    Dragons of Faith

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
    Dragons of Faith is the conclusion of the third major story arc in the Dungeons & Dragons Dragonlance series of game modules. It is one of the 14 Dragonlance adventures published by TSR between 1984 and 1986. Its cover featured a painting by Jeff Easley. In this scenario, the player characters flee the evil city of Flotsam, crossing the Blood Sea, where they may encounter Istar the City of the Deep and become involved in an undersea battle. The Dungeon Master draws from a deck of Talis cards (the tarot of Krynn), to determine the events of the adventure. The player characters must sail across the Blood Sea of Istar into enemy territory. There, they must evade the forces of the Dragon Highlords, and, according to the module's teaser, "capture the crucial pawn before darkness snatches it away!" This module could be played as a stand alone adventure, or used as part of the larger sequence of Dragonlance adventures. The module includes a sheet of cut-apart Talis cards, as well as statistics and counters for an underwater Battlesystem battle. DL12 Dragons of Faith was written by Harold Johnson and Bruce Heard, with a cover by Jeff Easley and interior illustrations by Diana Magnuson, and
    7.50
    2 votes
    127
    Drow of the Underdark

    Drow of the Underdark

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Drow of the Underdark is the name of two supplemental rules books for the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game, providing supplementary game rules focusing on drow culture, equipment and folklore for both players and Dungeon Masters. The 2nd edition "The Drow of the Underdark" book was written by Ed Greenwood in 1991, and focuses primarily on the drow of the Forgotten Realms campaign setting. The book features cover art by Jeff Easley, and interior art by Tim Bradstreet and Rick Harris. This book details the nature of dark elves, dark elven society, drow religion (including Eilistraee, Ghuanadar/The Elder Elemental God, Lolth, and Vhaeraun), the high history of the drow, drow spells, drow magical items, drow craftwork, drow languages, drow nomenclature, and dark elven runes. This book also details the Underdark of the Forgotten Realms, as well as several monsters of the Underdark (including the myrlochar and the yochlol). The 3rd edition Drow of the Underdark is not tied to any specific campaign setting. The book's format and contents are similar to that of Draconomicon, Libris Mortis, and Lords of Madness. Although primarily intended for DM use, players can use information
    7.50
    2 votes
    128

    GURPS Discworld

    GURPS Discworld and the related supplements are role-playing game sourcebooks set in Terry Pratchett's Discworld fantasy universe using the GURPS role-playing game system. GURPS Discworld was written by Phil Masters and Terry Pratchett. Cover and illustrations were done by Paul Kidby. It was published by Steve Jackson Games in 1998. It was the first GURPS supplement to be published with the GURPS Lite rules as an appendix, meaning it was not necessary to purchase GURPS Basic in order to play. The game included a lot of detail about Discworld, appealing to both roleplaying and Discworld fans. It has also been attributed to introducing roleplayers to the series of Discworld books. In March 2001, Steve Jackson Games published a sequel under the title GURPS Discworld Also. It was written by Phil Masters, again with the assistance of Terry Prachett. Cover and illustrations were done by Sean Murray. The supplement covered recent events in the book series, including details about the Unseen University. Among the scenarios included is EckEckEcksEcksian Cart Wars, based on the Mad Max parody segments of The Last Continent and Steve Jackson Games' own Car Wars and GURPS Autoduel setting. It
    7.50
    2 votes
    129
    Masters of the Wild

    Masters of the Wild

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Masters of the Wild: A Guidebook to Barbarians, Druids, and Rangers is an optional rulebook for the 3rd edition of Dungeons & Dragons, and notable for its trade paperback format. The guidebook provides supplemental information for characters belonging to the Druid, Ranger, and Barbarian base classes. This book introduced Natural Feats, which were still used in version 3.5. This book also contained tips for creating and playing characters of the aforementioned class, as well as several prestige classes. Masters of the Wild was written by David Eckelberry and Mike Selinker and published in 2001 by Wizards of the Coast. Cover art was by Jeff Easley, with interior art by Dennis Cramer, David Day, and Wayne Reynolds. It was not updated to 3.5 Edition, although most of the prestige classes were reintroduced in the 3.5 supplemental sourcebook Complete Divine.
    7.50
    2 votes
    130

    Races of Faerûn

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Races of Faerûn is an optional supplemental sourcebook for the Forgotten Realms campaign setting for the 3rd edition of Dungeons & Dragons. This book centers on the races which inhabit Faerûn, the fictional continent where most of the Forgotten Realms setting is set, giving detailed information on the histories of the races in the Realms, their languages, clothing, relations to other races, culture and so on. And also, much to the delight of players, it gave detailed information on how to play the races as characters. Races explored were the major races dwarves, elves, gnomes, half-elves, half-orc, halflings, humans, and planetouched, as well as minor races, aarakocra, centaurs, goblinoids, kir-lanan, lizardfolk, lycanthropes, shades, wemics, and yuan-ti, and the various subraces (in the case of humans, ethnic groups) of each of the races. A handful of new feats, spells, magic items, prestige classes, and monsters are also given. The book does not detail all of the races in the Forgotten Realms setting. Some other races which are known to inhabit it, including gnolls, naga, thri-kreen, loxos, fey, giants, ogres, trolls, sahuagin, saurials, and numerous others, are left out, as well
    7.50
    2 votes
    131

    Worldwake

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Worldwake is a Magic: The Gathering expansion set that was released February 5, 2010. It is the second set of the Zendikar block, so many of the themes introduced in Zendikar are expanded upon in Worldwake. It consists of 145 cards. Its tagline is "A World Enraged." The expansion symbol for the set is an activated hedron, ancient floating structures prevalent in the world of Zendikar. As the harsh habitats of Zendikar become more dangerous, planeswalker characters gather to Zendikar to explore the ancient ruins for vast treasures and search for answers. The land itself comes to life and ravages its surroundings, consuming forests and destroying mountains. The inhabitants seek answers from their ancestors to discover the cause of this worldwide awakening. Worldwake expands on the Landfall, Ally, Trap, and Quest mechanics of Zendikar, as well as introducing some new ones.
    7.50
    2 votes
    132

    The Mines of Bloodstone

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
    H2 The Mines of Bloodstone is an Official Game Adventure or "module" for the Advanced Dungeons & Dragons (1st edition) fantasy role-playing game. The characters need to journey through a blizzard to get to the Bloodstone Mines, which lead to the duergar kingdom of Deepearth, and the Temple of Orcus. The adventure begins with a set of village encounters, before some further encounters in a big valley. The player characters then proceed into the Mines of Bloodstone, where the duergar and svirfneblin are at war, and then on to the demonic temple of Orcus of the duergar. This is an attempt to gain an ancient treasure to help the belagured innocent citizens of Bloodstone Pass. The module includes two Battlesystem conflicts, between armies of gnomes and duergar. The Mines of Bloodstone was written by Michael Dobson and Douglas Niles, with a cover by Keith Parkinson, and was published by TSR in 1986 as a 48-page booklet with an outer folder. Cover art was by Keith Parkinson, with interior art by Graham Nolan. It is a sequel to H1 Bloodstone Pass which although originally a stand alone adventure, was now to be the first in the four part Bloodstone Pass saga. This module continued the
    5.50
    4 votes
    133

    Advanced Civilization

    • Game: Civilization
    Advanced Civilization is the expansion game for the board game Civilization, published in 1991 by Avalon Hill. Ownership of the original game is necessary to play. Both games are no longer published, following the dissolution of the original Avalon Hill game company and sale of all rights to titles to Hasbro in 1998. Advanced Civilization enhances the game as much as it expands it, clarifying rules and simplifying certain aspects of the game. New features include: Avalon Hill has created a computer version of this game, called Avalon Hill's Advanced Civilization. The rules are slightly modified from the board version to make it suitable for computer play.
    6.33
    3 votes
    134

    Faiths & Avatars

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 2nd Edition
    Faiths & Avatars is an Advanced Dungeons & Dragons Forgotten Realms campaign expansion book. The book was designed by Julia Martin with Eric L. Boyd, and additional design by Ed Greenwood, L. Richard Baker III, and David Wise. Cover art is by Alan Pollack, with interior illustrations by Earl Geier and color plates by Victoria Lisi and Ned Dameron. This book contains an exhaustive list of all the Lesser through Greater human gods and their churches. The supplement provides numerous spells and special powers with which to make each different faith unique from the others. Faiths & Avatars details the clergy, the ethos, and all important information needed to accurately depict the Faerunian pantheon in a campaign setting. This book is first in a series of sourcebooks about the Faerûnian pantheon, followed by Powers & Pantheons and Demihuman Deities.
    6.33
    3 votes
    135

    Planar Handbook

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Planar Handbook is an optional supplemental source book for the 3.5 edition of the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy roleplaying game. It contains updates for the 3.5 edition of the fictional Dungeons & Dragons universe for some material from the Planescape campaign setting, along with new races, equipment, spells and feats for characters adventuring on the Planes. The Planar Handbook was written by Bruce R. Cordell and Gwendolyn F.M. Kestrel, and was published in July 2004. Cover art was by Matt Cavotta, with interior art by Brent Chumley, Emily Fiegenschuh, David Hudnut, Dana Knutson, Doug Kovacs, David Martin, Dennis Crabapple-Martin, James Pavelec, Steve Prescott, Vinod Rams, and David Roach.
    6.33
    3 votes
    136

    The Fright at Tristor

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    The Fright at Tristor is an adventure module for the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. The 32-page adventure was published by Wizards of the Coast in 2001 and distributed primarily through the company's Role-Playing Games Association. It was designed for use as either an introductory module for the Living Greyhawk campaign or as a generic D&D adventure for low-level characters. Instructions are provided for placing the adventure in the worlds of Greyhawk, the Forgotten Realms and Eberron, the three primary campaign settings of D&D. The plot of The Fright at Tristor begins with a mention of the brutal murders occurring in the hamlet of Tristor, in the northern reaches of the Theocracy of the Pale. The townsfolk fear that they may be the next target of these attacks. The party has been hired to investigate, a reward being offered if they can stop these murders occurring. Some believe the source of the attacks to be a band of orcs following a mysterious entity known as "The Watcher." When outlying farms are attacked outright, it is up to the adventurers to halt these killings and save the town. The Fright at Tristor was designed by Keith Polster, and was published in 2000.
    6.33
    3 votes
    137

    Cityscape

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Cityscape is an optional supplemental source book for the 3.5 edition of the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy roleplaying game. This book was written specifically for Dungeon Masters, and details how to create and effectively run campaigns centered around cities (and less often, towns). The book is divided into five chapters, each concerned with a particular aspect of urban world building. The first chapter, The Scope of the City, is concerned with general city-building for Dungeon Masters. Secondly, The Urban Adventurer, gives new spells and abilities for player characters based in an urban setting. The third chapter, Politics and Power, discusses the interactions and behaviors of organizations within a city. The fourth chapter, Events and Encounters, gives examples and plans regarding encounters in an urban environment. Lastly, Running the City clears miscellaneous features as well as giving directions for narrative and world building. Cityscape was written by Ari Marmell and C.A. Suleiman, and was published in November 2006. Cover art is by Jeff Nentrup, and interior art is by Dave Allsop, David Bircham, Daarken, Carl Frank, Brian Hagan, Jon Hodgson, Ralph Horsley, Michael Komarck,
    8.00
    1 votes
    138

    Kindred Most Wanted

    • Game: Vampire: The Eternal Struggle
    Kindred Most Wanted (KMW) is the eighth expansion of White Wolf, Inc.'s trading card game Vampire: The Eternal Struggle released on February 21, 2005. The expansion's theme are the most wanted vampires (kindred) who appear on the so-called Red List. These vampires are also called Anathema. The vampires whose duty it is to hunt down and destroy the Anathema are called Alastors. The boosters also contain a number of cards which are related to the Independent clans (e.g. Assamites or Ravnos), continuing the support for these started in the Final Nights expansion. Part of the expansion are 4 different pre-constructed decks with 89 cards each as well as boosters with 11 cards each (7 common, 3 uncommon, and 1 rare). There is a total of 150 new cards, i.e. 50 new common, 50 uncommon (=Vampire) and 50 rare cards. The pre-constructed decks are: The vampire Echo (also included in this set) was given as a promo card in a number of magazines.
    8.00
    1 votes
    139

    Slave Pits of the Undercity

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
    David Cook wrote Slave Pits of the Undercity (A1) as the first in a series of four modules presented at Gencon XIII at the University of Wisconsin-Parkside in August of 1980. The series of four modules, later released as Scourge of the Slave Lords, played sequentially at the event as a tournament. The module¬タルs difficulty level is set for a group of six to eight characters of fourth to seventh level in experience. It is 24 pages long not including the front and back cover. The other modules in the series include Secret of the Slavers Stockade, Assault on the Aerie of the Slave Lords, and In the Dungeons of the Slave Lords all by different authors. It is time to put a stop to the marauders! For years the coastal towns have been burned and looted by the forces of evil. You and your fellow adventurers have been recruited to root out and destroy the source of these raids. But beware, hundreds of good men and women have been taken by the slavers and have never been seen or heard from again! Thus begins the description of the module. Because the module ran as a tournament event it comes with nine characters ready to use by players immediately. The characters come in a broad
    8.00
    1 votes
    140

    The Forgotten Temple of Tharizdun

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
    The Forgotten Temple of Tharizdun is an adventure module for the Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) role-playing game, for use in the World of Greyhawk campaign setting. The module was published by TSR, Inc. in 1982 for the first edition Advanced Dungeons & Dragons rules. The Forgotten Temple of Tharizdun is set in the World of Greyhawk. This adventure starts with an incident from The Lost Caverns of Tsojcanth. The player characters (PCs) follow a band of marauding norkers from the caverns, discovering the temple along the way. They must search through the dangerous mountain passes to find the norker lair inside the temple. The adventurers are drawn into the story by a gnomish community and travel to the temple. After battling their way in, the PCs explore the temple chambers, which contain mundane creatures and new monsters from the Fiend Folio supplement. During their exploration, the characters may reach chambers of the temple in which religious rituals were performed, and risk insanity and death as they encounter remnants of worshipers of the imprisoned god Tharizdun. To progress further, the characters must enact portions of the rituals of worship of Tharizdun, traveling into an
    8.00
    1 votes
    141

    Tournament Season 7

    • Game: Yu-Gi-Oh! Trading Card Game
    Tournament Pack 7 (TP7) was the seventh tournament booster released for the Yu-Gi-Oh! Trading Card Game. It was given out at tournaments after Tournament Season 6 packs went out-of-print. It contains 1 Ultra Rare, 4 Super Rares, 4 Rares, and 11 Commons.
    8.00
    1 votes
    142

    Visions

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Visions was the sixteenth Magic: The Gathering set and tenth expert level set, released in February 1997. This expansion continued the Mirage block by using the same setting and mechanics introduced in Mirage. The expansion symbol for Visions is a V-shaped symbol, which is the "triangle of war" used by the Zhalfir in the story. On 10 April 2006 Visions was released on Magic: The Gathering Online. The story continues the struggle between the nations of Jamuraa against the evil Kaervek, only now Femeref has been destroyed and Suq'Ata and Zhalfir begin to have internal problems as well. There is hope, however, when Kaervek's ally Jolrael betrays him at the urging of the planeswalker Teferi. Jamuraa's leaders, led by Jolrael's visions, free Mangara from the amber prison and begin to fight against Kaervek. The Visions expansion originated as a split from "Menagerie" (the original name for Mirage), which had grown too large for a single set. For a brief time during its development, Visions was known by the codename "Mirage Jr." It received its final name shortly later. Visions was the first set to have the same name as a Magic card printed earlier: Visions, the card, was first printed in
    8.00
    1 votes
    143
    Cities and Knights of Catan

    Cities and Knights of Catan

    • Game: Settlers of Catan
    The Cities and Knights of Catan (German: Städte und Ritter) is an expansion to the board game The Settlers of Catan for three to four players (five to six player play is also possible with the Settlers and Cities and Knights five to six player extensions; two-player play is possible with the Traders & Barbarians expansion). It contains features taken from The Settlers of Catan, with emphasis on city development and the use of knights, which are used as a method of attacking other players as well as helping opponents defend Catan against a common foe. Cities and Knights can also be combined with the Seafarers of Catan expansion or with Catan: Traders & Barbarians scenarios (again, five to six player play only possible with the applicable five to six player extension(s)). Because of the new rules introduced in Cities and Knights, the game is played to 13 victory points, as opposed to 10 as in the The Settlers of Catan base game. The following cards are not used in Cities and Knights: One of the main additions to the game is commodities, which are a type of secondary resource produced only by cities. Like resources, commodities are associated with a type of terrain, can be stolen by
    7.00
    2 votes
    144

    Eberron Campaign Setting

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Eberron Campaign Setting is a hardcover accessory for the 3.5 edition of the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. The Eberron Campaign Setting book introduced Eberron, and provides the core campaign setting, including the campaign specific rules and details on the continent of Khorvaire. It is a basic requirement to use other Dungeons & Dragons 3.5 Eberron products. It includes the introductory adventure "The Forgotten Forge." The Eberron Campaign Setting book was published in June 2004, and was designed by Keith Baker, Bill Slavicsek, and James Wyatt. The cover illustration was by Wayne Reynolds, with interior illustrations by Dave Allsop, Kalman Andrasofszky, John Avon, Ted Beargeon, Beet, David Bircham, Tomm Coker, Rafa Garres, Frazer Irving, Andrew Jones, Dana Knutson, Ron Lemen, Lee Moyer, Lucio Parrillo, Martina Pilcerova, Steve Prescott, Anne Stokes, Mark Tedin, Franz Vohwinkel, Kev Walker, Sam Wood, and James Zhang.
    7.00
    2 votes
    145

    Forgotten Realms Adventures

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 2nd Edition
    Forgotten Realms Adventures is an accessory for the fictional Forgotten Realms campaign setting for the second edition of the Advanced Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. The book, with product code TSR 2106, was published in 1990, and was written by Jeff Grubb and Ed Greenwood, with cover art by Clyde Caldwell and interior art by Steven Fabian, Ned Dameron, Larry Elmore, Caldwell, and Jeff Easley. Forgotten Realms Adventures is a revision of the Forgotten Realms Sourcebook and Cyclopedia material, taking into account the 2nd edition rules and the three years of Forgotten Realms products released up to that time. Among other things, this book cover the deities, secret societie, treasures, specific spells and magic rules of the campaign setting, as well as brief descriptions of the land and cities of the heartlands, with maps. The 154-page hardcover book features a one page foreword from each of the authors. Jeff Grubb explains that this book introduces the Realms to the second edition of Advanced Dungeons & Dragons, and gives a brief overview of setting's history. Chapter 1 (pages 1–13) details the changes that have occurred to the Forgotten Realms setting since the
    7.00
    2 votes
    146

    Heroes of Battle

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Heroes of Battle (ISBN 0-7869-3686-X) is a hardcover supplement to the 3.5 edition of the Dungeons and Dragons role-playing game. It is intended for use by Dungeon Masters who want to incorporate large-scale, epic battles into their game. It contains ideas for wartime adventures, new rules for wartime games, and military-oriented feats, prestige classes and NPCs (non-player characters). Heroes of Battle was written by David Noonan, Will McDermott and Stephen Schubert, and published May 2005. Cover art is by David Hudnut, with interior art by Wayne England. Doug Kovacs, Chuck Lukacs, Roberto Marchesi, Mark Nelson, Eric Polak, Wayne Reynolds, and Franz Vohwinkel.
    7.00
    2 votes
    147

    Isle of Dread

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons Expert Set
    The Isle of Dread is an adventure for the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game. The adventure, module code X1, was originally published in 1981. Written by David "Zeb" Cook, and Tom Moldvay, it is among the most widely circulated of all Dungeons & Dragons adventures due to its inclusion as part of the D&D Expert Set. In the adventure, the player characters search for a lost treasure, journey to the prehistoric Isle of Dread, and there meet new nonhuman races. The Isle of Dread is meant to introduce players and Dungeon Masters familiar with only dungeon crawl-style adventures to wilderness exploration. As such, the adventure has only a very simple plot, even by the standards of its time. The module has been described as a medium to high level scenario, which takes place on a mysterious tropical island divided by an ancient stone wall. The characters somehow find a fragment from a ship's log, describing a mysterious island on which many treasures can be found, and set out to explore it. Typically, the characters will first make landfall near the more or less friendly village of Tanaroa, which is reminiscent of the village depicted in King Kong, and after possibly dealing with some
    7.00
    2 votes
    148

    Oasis of the White Palm

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
    Oasis of the White Palm is a scenario for the Advanced Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game. It forms the sequel to the Pharaoh module and is part of the Desert of Desolation module series. Design: Philip Meyers & Tracy Hickman Editing: Brand Manager: Cover Art: Interior Art: Cartography: Typesetting: Art Direction: Electronic Prepress Coordination: Playtesters: Distributed to the book trade in the United States by Random House, Inc., and in Canada by Random House of Canada, Ltd. Distributed to the toy and hobby trade by regional distributors. Distributed in the United Kingdom by TSR UK Ltd. product number 9053 ISBN Tired and sore, you struggle over the burning sands towards the long-forgotten city. Will you reach the place in time to save yourselves from the evil Efreeti? The sun beats down, making your wounds stiff and worsening the constant thirst that plagues anyone who travels these waterless wastes. But there is hope - are those the ruins over there? In the midst of broken columns and bits of rubble stands a huge statue. This is the place! You've found it at last. Gratefully you sink onto the sand. But there's no time to lose. You must hurry. So with a quavering voice you
    7.00
    2 votes
    149

    Players Handbook

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
    The Players Handbook for the 1st Edition of Advanced Dungeons & Dragons.
    7.00
    2 votes
    150
    Stormwrack

    Stormwrack

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Stormwrack is a supplemental source-book for the 3.5 edition of the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. The book has detailed information and descriptions on various types of both realistic and fantastical watery environments, including underwater, the open ocean, ships, coral reefs, grottos, swamps and such. Watery hazards such as waves, storms, exposure, rain and the like are deeply explored. Several new sea-affiliated races, the darfellan, the aventi are introduced. Old races, such as the hadozee (a yazarian-like race from the Spelljammer setting) and kopru (originally from Isle of Dread) are given new details. Sea elves are given detailed rules on how to use them as player characters. There are new prestige classes, new magic items, new spells, new monsters, and various other rules additions. Finally, a few pre-made adventures are included at the end, set in aquatic/coastal environments, for players to test the new content on. Stormwrack was written by Richard Baker, Joseph D. Carriker Jr., and Jennifer Clarke Wilkes, and published in 2005. Cover art was by Jeremy Jarvis, with interior art by Chris Appel, Drew Baker, Wayne England, David Griffith, Fred Hooper, Lee
    7.00
    2 votes
    151

    The Iron Crypt of the Heretics

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Iron Crypt of the Heretics is a d20 Dungeon Crawl Classics adventure written for Dungeons & Dragons by Harley Stroh. For character levels 11-13, DCC #12.5 send the PCs into a forbidden crypt rife with deadly traps and challenging puzzles. In 2006, Iron Crypt of the Heretics was released in a 1e version at GenCon Indy. The 1e release included new encounters by Harley Stroh, and the 1e coversions by Jon Hershberger. After all copies sold out the first day of the convention, the 1e version was printed a second time. The first printing of the 1e version of the adventure is highly sought after, and sellers sometimes misrepresent the original 3.5 version, and the second 1e printing as the true GenCon first printing. Identifying characteristics of the 1e version (either 1st or 2nd printing) is the starbust on the cover that mark the adventure as an ENnie nominee. Identifying characteristics of the true 1e first printing are the mis-numbered area key on the map on the inside cover. Buyers should be careful and wary if they believe they are purchasing the true 1e first printing. DCC #12.5 received a nomination for Best Adventure, ENnies 2006.
    7.00
    2 votes
    152
    Tome and Blood

    Tome and Blood

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Tome and Blood: A Guidebook to Wizards and Sorcerers is an optional rulebook for the 3rd edition of Dungeons & Dragons, and notable for its trade paperback format. The guidebook provides supplemental information for characters belonging to the Wizard and Sorcerer base classes. This book contained tips for creating and playing characters of the aforementioned class, as well as a large number of prestige classes. Tome and Blood includes 15 prestige classes. Tome and Blood was published in 2001 by Wizards of the Coast, and was designed by Bruce R. Cordell and Skip Williams. Cover art was by Todd Lockwood, with interior art by Wayne Reynolds. The book was not updated to 3.5 Edition, although most of the prestige classes were later reintroduced in the 3.5 supplemental sourcebook Complete Arcane.
    7.00
    2 votes
    153

    Urza's Destiny

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Urza's Destiny is a Magic: The Gathering set, third in the Urza Block. Urza's Destiny was released on June 23, 1999. It was released in digital form on Magic Online on April 13, 2011. With the skyship Weatherlight completed, Urza now works on a eugenics program to create a perfect crew for it, as well as engineering a race of soldiers to fight the Phyrexian invasion. One of his geneticists, Gatha, defects, and uses his knowledge to improve the Keldon race. Meanwhile, the Phyrexians create the plane of Rath as a staging ground for the invasion. Urza's Destiny expanded further on some of the mechanics introduced in Urza's Saga. Several creatures and enchant creatures trigger various abilities when put into a graveyard from play. Famous examples of this mechanic include Pattern of Rebirth, Academy Rector, and Gamekeeper. Some permanents have the ability to be sacrificed for 2 mana to draw a card, like a cycling ability for cards in play that are no longer useful. Three creatures have this ability in addition to a "graveyard from play" ability. Yavimaya Elder is the most popular, a small green creature that can put three cards in its controller's hand. There is a class of spells that
    7.00
    2 votes
    154

    Complete Adventurer

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Complete Adventurer is a supplemental hard-cover rulebook for the 3.5 edition of the Dungeons & Dragons game system published by Wizards of the Coast. It focuses on the skill based character classes of D&D, replacing and expanding upon an earlier soft-cover rulebook entitled Song and Silence. It also provides a catchall for anything that doesn't fit into Complete Arcane, Complete Divine, Complete Warrior, or Complete Psionic. It presents additional base classes, prestige classes, and feats. Complete Adventurer introduces three new character classes to D&D 3.5. These classes are strongly related to the rogue class, and are highly skill based. The classes added are Ninja, Scout and Spellthief. The ninja class represents the standard image of a stealthy fighter. A ninja can come unseen, attack quickly but furiously, then leave unseen. The ninja excels at quick, powerful attacks but lacks the combat stamina of other classes such as monks and fighters. A scout is a bit like a rogue of the wilderness. The scout is an expert at tracking, scouting enemy positions, and finding their way through familiar and unfamiliar landscapes. A scout has a mix of rogue and ranger traits, as well as some
    6.00
    3 votes
    155
    Races of Destiny

    Races of Destiny

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Races of Destiny is a supplement for the 3.5 edition of the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game. This book deals with races that live primarily in urban settings, specifically humans, half-orcs, and a new race called the Illumian, whose most notable features are the sigils that constantly orbit their heads. This book is centered around races, their human blood and the effects of this. Many of the resources in Races of Destiny deal specifically with urban settings and nearly all have racial requirements. Races of Destiny was written by David Noonan, Eric Cagle, and Aaron Rosenberg, and was published in December 2004. Cover art was by Adam Rex, with interior art by Ed Cox, Wayne England, David Hudnut, Chuck Lukacs, Jeff Miracola, Monte Moore, Jim Nelson, Michael Phillippi, Eric Polak, Richard Sardinha, and Ron Spencer. Noonan, David; Eric Cagle, Aaron Rosenberg (December 2004). Races of Destiny. Wizards of the Coast. ISBN [[Special:BookSources/0-7859-3653-3|0-7859-3653-3]].
    6.00
    3 votes
    156

    Races of Stone

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Races of Stone (sometimes abbreviated to RoS) is an optional sourcebook for the 3.5 edition of the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. Races of Stone focuses on gnomes, dwarves, and a new race, called goliaths, providing cultural information for these races as well as subraces. Races of Stone was written by David Noonan, Jesse Decker, and Michelle Lyons, and published in August 2004. Cover art was by Adam Rex, with interior art by Thomas Baxa, Steve Belledin, Wayne England, Jeremy Jarvis, Doug Kovacs, Chuck Lukacs, Dennis Crabapple-McClain, Jim Nelson, Wiliam O'Connor, Scott Roller, Ron Spencer, Joel Thomas, Franz Vohwinkel, and Brad Williams. A web enhancement for the book was published in 2004 by Wizards of the Coast. Races of Stone was later included, along with Races of Destiny and Races of the Wild in the Dungeons & Dragons Races Gift Set, released in 2005. The racial substitution levels in the book have been praised because "[the] mechanic lets you play more than just another dwarven fighter or gnome bard." The book has also been criticized for its focus on three different races, because "By splitting its attention three ways, odds are only a third of this book is
    6.00
    3 votes
    157

    Vault of the Drow

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
    Vault of the Drow is an adventure module for the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game written by Gary Gygax. The module bears the code "D3" and was published in 1978 by TSR, Inc. for use with the Advanced Dungeons & Dragons first edition rules. This module was received with considerable praise for its epic scope and detail. The D-Series modules were given an extensive overview review by British RPG magazine White Dwarf wherein it cautioned Dungeon Masters that running this module was unlike any they had run before. The module is the third and final in the "Drow" series of adventures that began with D1 - Descent into the Depths of the Earth, which was followed by D2 - Shrine of the Kuo-Toa (later compiled into a single adventure titled simply Descent Into the Depths of the Earth). Its setting is Erelhei-Cinlu, an underground stronghold of the drow. The "D" series itself is part of a larger overall campaign of adventures set in the World of Greyhawk campaign setting. The overall campaign begins with the three modules in the Against the Giants series (G1, G2, and G3), continues through the "D" series, and concludes with module Q1 - Queen of the Demonweb Pits. The latter segments of the
    6.00
    3 votes
    158

    Planeshift

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Planeshift is the name of the second set in the Invasion block of cards of Magic: The Gathering, along with the expansions Invasion and Apocalypse. It contained 143 cards. Planeshift continued Invasion's theme of multi-colored "gold" cards. Its major themes revolved around multicolor decks and strategies. The following unnamed mechanics first appeared in Planeshift:
    5.00
    4 votes
    159

    Horror on the Hill

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons Basic Set
    Horror on the Hill is an adventure module published by TSR, Inc. in 1983, for the Basic Rules of the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. Its product designation was TSR 9078. This 32-page book was designed by Douglas Niles, and features cover artwork by Jim Roslof. It is intended for beginning gamemasters and 5-10 player characters of level 1-3. The module contains around 20 encounters on the surface, a monastery, three dungeon levels and three new monsters. In this scenario, the player characters must penetrate a cave labyrinth, which turns out to be a three-level dungeon where an army of goblins and hobgoblins is gathering. The scene of the action is Guido's Fort, located at the end of a road, with only the River Shrill, a mile wide, separating it from "The Hill". At the Fort, hardy bands of adventurers gather to plan their conquests of The Hill, the hulking mass that looms over this tiny settlement. They say the Hill is filled with monsters, and that an evil witch makes her home there. No visitor to The Hill has ever returned to prove the rumors true or false. Only the mighty river Shrill separates the player characters from the mysterious mountain. A series of caves
    5.67
    3 votes
    160

    Player's Option: Combat & Tactics

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 2nd Edition
    Player's Option: Combat & Tactics (abbreviated CT, or C&T) is a supplemental sourcebook to the core rules of the second edition of the Advanced Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. This 192-page book was published by TSR, Inc. in 1995. The book was designed by L. Richard Baker III and Skip Williams. Cover art is by Jeff Easley and interior art is by Doug Chaffee, Les Dorscheid, Larry Elmore, Ken and Charles Frank, Roger Loveless, Erik Olson, and Alan Pollack. The book begins with a one-page introduction by Baker and Williams, which explains that this book is intended to provide details to make combat more believable. Chapter One (pages 6–37) describes the Player's Option combat system, which was expanded from the Player's Handbook and Dungeon Master's Guide, and is played on a gridded battle map with 1-inch squares. Chapter Two (pages 38–55) describes a set of combat options for the new combat system, including battle tactics, attack options, fighting styles, dueling, and brawling. Chapter Three (pages 56–69) describes how the climate and terrain of a battlefield affects combat. Chapter Four (pages 70–81) presents details on weapon specialization and mastery, revising the
    5.67
    3 votes
    161

    Arabian Nights

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Arabian Nights was the fourth Magic: The Gathering set and the first expansion set. The set is composed entirely of new cards. The setting of Arabian Nights is inspired by the themes and characters of the Thousand and One Arabian Nights with some of the characters and places coming directly from these tales. Arabian Nights is the only regular Magic expansion based on real-world fiction. All other sets with the exception of the Portal Three Kingdoms introductory set are based on fiction created exclusively for the game. The expansion symbol of Arabian Nights is a scimitar. Richard Garfield, Magic creator, acted as the sole designer for the set, and developed it in parallel with other teams working on what would become Ice Age and Mirage. The Ice Age design team, composed of Jim Lin, Chris Page, Dave Pettey, and Skaff Elias, was called upon to become the development team for Arabian Nights as well, but instead of playtesting the set they managed only to submit some comments because their schedule was so tight. At that point in Magic's development, the role of expansions was relatively undefined, and Garfield intended for Arabian Nights cards to bear a purple and gold back that would
    6.50
    2 votes
    162
    Champions of Kamigawa

    Champions of Kamigawa

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Champions of Kamigawa (Champions or CHK) is the name of the Magic: The Gathering expansion set released October 1, 2004. The first set of the Kamigawa block, it set the stage for the block's story, which was inspired by Japanese myths and revolves around the battle between spirits (kami) and living beings. The set's expansion symbol is a torii, the entrance to the Shinto temple. This is especially important, as Kamigawa's original idea was summed up as "Shinto gone horribly wrong": Kami warring against their human worshippers. Champions of Kamigawa introduced several new mechanics to the game: Champions of Kamigawa introduced changes to two common creature types. The Legend creature type was replaced with the Legendary supertype. The Wall creature type was freed from the associated rules that prevented Walls from attacking; Each Wall creature was changed to have the new Defender keyword which prevents them from attacking, allowing for a simpler use of the "wall" type creature across different creature types. For example, this allowed for the Lorwyn changelings, which have all creature types. Under the old rules, changelings would not be able to attack, through sheer result of being
    6.50
    2 votes
    163

    Coldsnap

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    For other uses of this term, see Cold snap. Coldsnap is the third set in the Ice Age block for the Magic:The Gathering collectible card game. It was released on July 21, 2006 by Wizards of the Coast. The set came out over ten years after Ice Age was released in June 1995, the longest period of time between the beginning and the completion of a full block in Magic. Coldsnap replaced Homelands in the Ice Age block. In the initial announcement, Randy Buehler said that Coldsnap was designed around the same time as Ice Age and Alliances but was never released because "internal politics" had "forced" Wizards to release Homelands instead. Buehler said that although the set was not a modern design, it would go through modern development and released with modern Magic text and wordings. However, in the Ask Wizards section on November 10, 2005, a player pointed to several inconsistencies in Buehler's story and suggested that Coldsnap was in fact a newly designed set. While Buehler did not explicitly confirm that the player's analysis was correct, he did imply as much by saying only that the notion that Coldsnap was "from the vault" was more fun to think about. Mark Rosewater confirmed in his
    6.50
    2 votes
    164

    In Search of the Unknown

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons Basic Set
    For the book of the same name, see Robert W. Chambers In Search of the Unknown is a module for the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game, designed for use with the Basic Set of rules. It was written by game designer Mike Carr and was first published in 1979 by TSR, Inc. The module details a hidden complex known as the Caverns of Quasqueton. Reviewers considered it a good quality introduction to the game that was written in the so-called dungeon crawl style, where the primary goal of the players is the exploration of a dangerous labyrinth to battle monsters and obtain treasure. The module was included with the 1st edition of the D&D Basic Set. The module was written by Mike Carr, and printed as a thirty-two page booklet with an outer folder and a two-color cover; the original version also included a section on page six for "Using this Module with AD&D". The AD&D section was deleted in the 1981 printing. The adventure ran through six different printings in addition to a pre-production version that appeared in promotional artwork. The first printing was in 1978, although an incorrect copyright lists it as 1979. In Search of the Unknown was an introductory scenario intended to teach
    6.50
    2 votes
    165
    6.50
    2 votes
    166

    Races of the Dragon

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Races of the Dragon is an optional supplemental source book for the 3.5 edition of the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. This book contains info on two new races. This book offers a new race that works well with the Dungeons & Dragons sorcerers, a class that uses magical power derived from having dragon blood. The book also contains new prestige classes, feats, and spells. Races of the Dragon was written by Gwendolyn F.M. Kestrel, Jennifer Clarke Wilkes, and Kolja Raven Liquette, and was published in January 2006. Cover art was by Steve Prescott, with interior art by Steven Belledin, Ed Cox, Daarken, Wayne England, Emily Fiegenschuh, Carl Frank, Dan Frazier, Brian Hagan, Ralph Horsley, Chris Malidore, Jim Nelson, and Eric Polak.
    6.50
    2 votes
    167

    Ravenloft

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
    Ravenloft is an adventure module for the Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) fantasy role-playing game. The American game publishing company TSR, Inc. released it as a standalone adventure booklet in 1983 for use with the first edition Advanced Dungeons & Dragons game. It was written by Tracy and Laura Hickman, and includes art by Clyde Caldwell with maps by David Sutherland III. The plot of Ravenloft focuses on the villain Strahd von Zarovich, a vampire who pines for his lost love. Various story elements, including Strahd's motivation and the locations of magical weapons, are randomly determined by drawing cards. The player characters attempt to defeat Strahd and, if successful, the adventure ends. The Hickmans began work on Ravenloft in the late 1970s, intent on creating a frightening portrait of a vampire in a setting that combined Gothic horror with the D&D game system. They play-tested the adventure with a group of players each Halloween for five years before it was published. Strahd has since appeared in a number of D&D accessories and novels. The module has inspired numerous revisions and adaptations, including a campaign setting of the same name and a sequel. In 1999, on the 25th
    6.50
    2 votes
    168

    Lord of the Iron Fortress

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Lord of the Iron Fortress is an adventure module for the 3rd edition of the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. This 48-page book begins with a two-page introduction. According to the adventure background provided, the plot involves the Blade of Fiery Might once wielded by the sultan of the efreet, which was destroyed and scattered across the planes. Imperagon, a half-duergar/half-dragon and ruler of the Iron Fortress of Zandikar on the plane of Acheron, has been reforging the sword using the trapped spirits of the greatest forgemasters of history as slave labor. Imperagon intends to wield the ancient blade at the head of a great army to conquer and build a kingdom on the Material Plane, with allies among the drow, the illithids, and fellow natives of the evil Outer Planes. The adventure begins when the player characters investigate events involving local craftsmen, following the trail of clues to the city of Rigus, which leads into the plane of Acheron. Once there, the characters encounter formian settlers from Mechanus, whose hive can serve as a base of operations while preparing an assault on the Iron Fortress. If successful in defeating the golems and steel predators
    4.75
    4 votes
    169

    Secret of the Slavers Stockade

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
    Secret of the Slavers Stockade (A2) is an adventure module for the Advanced Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game. It was designed to be suitable for tournament use. Harold Johnson and Tom Moldvay wrote Secret of the Slavers Stockade (A2) as the second in a series of four modules presented at Gencon XIII at the University of Wisconsin, Parkside in August of 1980. The series of four modules, later released as Scourge of the Slave Lords, played sequentially at the event as a tournament. The module¬タルs difficulty level is set for a group of six to eight characters of fourth to seventh level in experience. It is 42 pages long not including the front and back cover. The others modules in the series include Slave Pits of the Undercity, Assault on the Aerie of the Slave Lords, and In the Dungeons of the Slave Lords all by different authors. The battle against the slavers continues! You and your fellow adventurers have defeated the slavers of Highport, but you have learned of the existence of another slaver stronghold, and you have decided to continue the attack. But beware! Only the most fearless of adventurers could challenge the slavers on their own ground, and live to tell
    5.33
    3 votes
    170

    Tomb of the Lizard King

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
    Tomb of the Lizard King is a D&D adventure module published in 1982 by TSR. In Tomb of the Lizard King, the players are employed by the Count of Eor to discover what monstrous force has been terrorizing caravans and peasants near the village of Waycombe. The adventure is appropriate for large groups of players of level 5-7, or smaller groups with higher levels. The scenario is a three part adventure which involves a wilderness trek, a battle against brigands, and a venture into the tomb of a lizard king. Brigands have been wreaking havoc on the southern trade routes, while merchants have been demanding that the Count of Eor puts an end to the attacks. The Count is seeking brave adventurers to end the evil brigands' activities and discover the power behind the attacks. A short wilderness adventure follows the opening, and leads the characters to the tomb of the lizard king. Tomb of the Lizard King was written by Mark Acres, with illustrations by Jim Holloway and Jeff Easley. It was published by TSR in 1982, as a thirty two page booklet with an outer folder. The adventure was edited by Michael Williams. While Tomb of the Lizard King was originally published to be played in any
    5.33
    3 votes
    171

    Dwellers of the Forbidden City

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
    Dwellers of the Forbidden City is an adventure module, or pre-packaged adventure booklet, ready for use by Dungeon Masters in the Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) fantasy role-playing game. The adventure was first used as a module for tournament play at the 1980 Origins Game Fair, and was later published by TSR in 1981 for use with the first edition Advanced Dungeons & Dragons rules. The module was written by game designer David "Zeb" Cook, who partly ascribes his hiring by TSR to his work on this module. In the adventure, the characters are hired to find an object taken to a lost oriental-style city, which has been taken over by a cult of snake-worshipers, the yuan-ti, and their servants, the mongrelmen and tasloi. The module was ranked as the 13th greatest Dungeons & Dragons adventure of all time by Dungeon magazine for the 30th anniversary of the Dungeons & Dragons game in 2004. The adventure begins when the player characters hear reports of bandits waylaying and attacking caravans in a jungle region. Most of the ambushed merchants and guards have been killed, but the few who have returned alive tell fantastic stories about deformed plants and deadly beasts in the jungle. The stolen
    7.00
    1 votes
    172

    From the Vault: Exiled

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    From the Vault: Exiled is a Magic: The Gathering limited edition boxed set released on August 28, 2009. It contains fifteen cards, eight with new alternate art, all of which had previously been banned or restricted. The cards in From the Vault: Exiled are: Cards marked with "*" have received a new artwork for From the Vault: Exiled. As of August 28th, 2009 some of these cards are still banned or restricted in the following formats:
    7.00
    1 votes
    173

    Guildpact

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Guildpact is a Magic: The Gathering set, second in the Ravnica Block. Guildpact was released on February 3, 2006. Ravnica was conceived following the success of Invasion. Invasion, released in 2000, emphasized interactions between the colors, and it was one of Magic's most popular releases ever. Lead designer Mark Rosewater wanted to expand on the multicolor theme in a new way. Therefore, the design of Ravnica block is based around ten two-color pairs, including cards in which those pairs of colors work in concert. Of the ten guilds that rule the city of Ravnica, three are the sole focus of this second set in the block. The previous expansion, Ravnica: City of Guilds, focused on four of these guilds. Dissension brought it to a close by introducing the last three guilds. Each guild corresponds to a different two-color combination. The three guilds featured in Guildpact are: Guildpact also includes Magic's first and (so far) only creatures with just four colors, the Nephilim. Guildpact is the second installment of the Ravnica Cycle, written by Cory J. Herndon and published by Wizards of the Coast. Like its predecessor, Ravnica: City of Guilds, this novel stars Agrus Kos and his
    7.00
    1 votes
    174

    Lost Tomb of Martek

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
    Desert of Desolation is a compilation adventure module published by TSR for the Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) fantasy roleplaying game. It combines three previously published individual modules: Pharaoh, Oasis of the White Palm, and Lost Tomb of Martek. They were made for use with the 1st edition Advanced Dungeons & Dragons (AD&D) rules. Pharaoh was created by Tracy and Laura Hickman soon after they were wed in 1977, and published by TSR in 1982. Oasis of the White Palm was a collaboration between Tracy Hickman and Philip Meyers, while Tracy Hickman wrote Lost Tomb of Martek; both were printed in 1983. Each module is an Egyptian-styled adventure. The individual modules were well received by critics at the time of their release, and the compilation has garnered accolades in the 2000s. Pharaoh is an Egyptian-styled adventure that includes a pyramid map and a trap-filled maze. In Pharaoh, the player characters (PCs) are driven into the desert for a crime they did not commit. The characters journey to the sunken city of Pazar, and from there they travel to the haunted tomb of an ancient pharaoh. While in the desert, the characters encounter the spirit of Amun-Re, a pharaoh, cursed to wander
    7.00
    1 votes
    175

    Mercadian Masques

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Mercadian Masques is the nineteenth Magic: The Gathering expansion and was released in October 1999 as the first set in the Masques block. It is notable for being the first set not protected by Wizards of the Coast's "Reprint Policy". Mercadian Masques is set on the plane of Mercadia. Mercadian Masques featured 350 cards and was the first large expansion to use the new 6th Edition rules. This was the first set to have an accompanying fat pack. Unusually, Masques introduced no new keyword abilities to the game, although it did have several themes that were continued throughout its block. These included: Mercadian Masques has eight cycles: For years after its release Mercadian Masques was considered to be an underpowered set. Reportedly, the designers were extremely gun-shy following the runaway power of the previous block and dialed back the power a tad too much; the same phenomenon would take place between the latter-day Mirrodin block and Kamigawa blocks. However, the set did produce a respectable amount tournament-quality cards, some of which are: The following cards have been reprinted from previous sets and included in Mercadian Masques: Mercadian Masques has 17 functional
    7.00
    1 votes
    176

    Morningtide

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Morningtide is an expansion set, codenamed "Butter", for the trading card game Magic: The Gathering. It is the 44th expert level set, and it was released on February 1, 2008. The pre-release events for this set were held on January 19 and January 20, 2008. Morningtide is the second and final set of Lorwyn block. The following set, Shadowmoor, is not part of Lorwyn block, as originally announced, but the first set of the Shadowmoor block, another two set block. Though separate blocks, these two mini-blocks will rotate into and out of official tournament formats as though they were a single block. As revealed in an advertisement in the trade publication ICv2 and later confirmed by Mark Rosewater in his column, Morningtide expands upon Lorwyn flavor and theme by focusing on at least five classes (Soldiers, Shamans, Wizards, Warriors, and Rogues) as well as a few minor class-based tribes (Druids, Archers, Knights, Clerics, and Assassins) in addition to the eight races of Lorwyn (Kithkin, Merfolk, Faeries, Elementals [Flamekin and Greater], Goblins, Giants, Treefolk, and Elves). Additionally, three new mechanics were keyworded with this expansion, namely; Prowl, Reinforce, and Kinship.
    7.00
    1 votes
    177

    Player's Option: Skills & Powers

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 2nd Edition
    Player's Option: Skills & Powers (abbreviated SP, or S&P) is a supplemental sourcebook to the core rules of the second edition of the Advanced Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. This 192-page book was published by TSR, Inc. in 1995. The book was designed by Douglas Niles and Dale Donovan. Cover art is by Jeff Easley and interior art is by Thomas Baxa, Doug Chaffee, Les Dorscheid, Jeff Easley, Ken Frank, and Eric Hotz. The book begins with a one-page foreword by Niles and Donovan. Chapter One (pages 6–11) describes the character points system for Player's Option, which are used to improve the abilities of player characters. Chapter Two (pages 12–21) describes ability scores, each of which is divided into two subabilities. Chapter Three (pages 22–45) describes the racial requirements for each character race. Chapter Four (pages 46–63) presents details on how the various character classes work in the Player's Option system. Chapter Five (pages 64–85) provides 30 character kits, various character packages. Chapter Six (pages 86–111) details how nonweapon proficiencies work in play. Chapter Seven (pages 112-135) details weapon proficiency and mastery. Chapter Eight (pages
    7.00
    1 votes
    178

    Time Spiral

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Time Spiral is a Magic: The Gathering expansion set, released October 6, 2006. The set is laden with references to previous Magic: the Gathering sets. The references are reflected in the card design, which incorporates special rules from older sets, and in the "Timeshifted" cards, which are cards reprinted from older sets using the older card design (abandoned three years previous with the 2003 release of Core Set 8th Edition.) The Time Spiral expansion symbol is an hourglass. Time Spiral is the first set in the block of the same name. (A "block" consists of three theme-related expansion sets released over a period of a year.) It is followed by Planar Chaos, which deals with alternate timelines and includes many cards reprinted from previous sets but changed in some fundamental way, and Future Sight, which is forward-looking, both in that it includes cards from settings not yet explored in previous sets as well as including game mechanics that did not exist until it came out. As with all Magic: the Gathering sets in this period, Time Spiral is accompanied by a tie-in novel of the same name. Time Spiral, written by Scott McGough, focuses on the efforts of Teferi to deal with the
    7.00
    1 votes
    179

    Alliances

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Alliances is the fourteenth Magic: The Gathering set and eighth expansion set, released on 10 June 1996. It was released 8 months after Homelands, which is the longest gap between expansion sets in the history of the game. It is now the middle set in the Ice Age block since the July 2006 release of Coldsnap. Prior to the Coldsnap release it was the third and final set in the Ice Age block with Homelands being the second set then. The story follows the events of Ice Age, after the so-called goddess (actually a planeswalker) Freyalise had used her magic to end the Ice Age. As the lands grew warmer, conflicts began to erupt. The Balduvian Barbarians were under constant attacks from a vigilante group headed by a former Kjeldoran knight, General Varchild, and needed to turn to their former foes for help. The Soldevi alliance was breaking down amid fears that their unearthing of artifacts of the Brothers' War (as described in Antiquities) could restart that destructive conflict. And all the while, the wicked necromancer known as Lim-Dûl gathered forces to conquer the entire world. Although Alliances did not feature new keywords, it did introduce a cycle of cards with an alternate casting
    6.00
    2 votes
    180

    Complete Mage

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Complete Mage is a supplemental rule book for the 3.5 edition of the Dungeons and Dragons role-playing game. It is effectively the sequel to Complete Arcane. The book provides feats, prestige classes, and other options for characters interested in magic. Unlike Complete Arcane, Complete Mage contains no new core classes, but it contains alternative class features for existing classes. Complete Mage was written by Skip Williams, Penny Williams, Ari Marmell, and Kolja Raven Liquette, and was published in October 2006. Cover art was by Matt Cavotta, and interior art is by Miguel Coimbra, Eric Deschamps, Wayne England, Carl Frank, Randy Gallegos, Ralph Horsley, Jim Nelson, Eric Polak, Mike Schley, Ron Spencer, Anne Stokes, Arnie Swekel, Eva Widermann, and Kieran Yanner.
    6.00
    2 votes
    181
    Complete Warrior

    Complete Warrior

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Complete Warrior is a supplemental rulebook for the 3.5 edition of the Dungeons and Dragons role-playing game, published by Wizards of the Coast. It replaces and expands upon an earlier rulebook entitled Sword and Fist. It presents additional rules and advice for the creation and use of character classes which specialize in melee and ranged combat. It also provides a catchall for anything that doesn't fit into Complete Adventurer, Complete Divine, Complete Arcane, or Complete Psionic. The Hexblade mixes martial prowess with a unique curse ability, the ability to cast arcane spells and good resistance against spells and spell effects. Similar in concept to the sorcerer, the Hexblade is an individual who possesses unnatural jinxes or an evil eye, and uses it towards combat. With a d10 for hit points, a 1/1 base attack bonus advancement, and a very slow spell advancement, the hexblade is more like an arcane ranger or paladin than a bard. The Samurai is a brave and noble warrior, possessing martial prowess and unique abilities to intimidate and terrify his opponents. Like the other classes, the Samurai has a d10 for hit points and a 1/1 base attack bonus advancement. The main drawback
    6.00
    2 votes
    182

    Die Vecna Die!

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 2nd Edition
    Die Vecna Die! is an Advanced Dungeons & Dragons (AD&D 2nd edition) module released in 2000 by Wizards of the Coast, Inc.. The module is divided into three sections, each taking part in a different campaign setting: Greyhawk, Ravenloft, and Planescape. It was one of the last official adventures released for the 2nd edition of Dungeons & Dragons. This adventure, and Vecna's multiverse-shattering plan contained within it, have been used by some D&D fans as an in-game explanation of the differences between the 2nd and 3rd editions of Dungeons & Dragons. The closing paragraph of the module reads as follows: Die Vecna Die! was written by Bruce R. Cordell and Steve Miller, with cover art by Paul Bonner and interior art by Kevin McCann. It is a 160 page softcover book designed for four to six characters of levels 10 to 13.
    6.00
    2 votes
    183

    Fantastic Locations: Dragondown Grotto

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Fantastic Locations: Dragondown Grotto is a generic setting adventure module for the 3.5 edition of the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game. The adventure is designed for 10th level characters. It contains a 16 page adventure as well as two poster sized double-sided maps for use in miniatures play. Created as a supplement to the War of the Dragon Queen series of Dungeons and Dragons Miniatures. The adventure is broken into four chapters designed to make use of the four poster sized maps included with the product and features many antagonists drawn from the War of the Dragon Queen miniatures set. The adventure concerns the recovery of two magical dragon eggs which, when hatched, produce Aspects of the fictional Dragon gods Bahamut and Tiamat. These are to be used to prevent the wizard Targan Klem from resurrecting a fallen Dracolich. In the first chapter, Spawnscale Nursery, the characters are told of (or discover) an underground complex used to rear abandoned dragon eggs. The self-styled dragonlord Meepo, a kobold fighter has taken charge of the hatchlings, raising them as siblings and has reputedly been selling them as mounts or guardians to various patrons. His dealings have been
    6.00
    2 votes
    184

    Legends

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Legends was the seventh Magic: The Gathering set and the third expansion set, released in June 1994. It was the first expansion set to be sold in packs of 15 (previous expansions had been sold in packs of 8). The set was designed by Wizards of the Coast co-founder Steve Conard and friend Robin Herbert in Canada before the game was initially released. Legends introduces several mechanics and keywords to the game, but the focus of the set lies clearly on the Legends themselves. These were the first mulitcolored cards in the game. They are also special in that they are all Legendary creatures, meaning that only one of each type can be in play. The expansion symbol for Legends is the capital of a column. Legends had none of the errors that were common in the preceding Magic sets. The problem of poor collation, that had already plagued Antiquities, persisted, though. Each booster box contained only half of the uncommon cards in the set. This along with the limited number of cards available made collecting the entire 310-card set very difficult. Legends is the oldest expansion to have been printed in a foreign language; the Italian Leggende was released in 1995, shortly after L'Oscurità
    6.00
    2 votes
    185

    Magic 2010

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Magic 2010 is a Magic: The Gathering expansion set, that was released on July 17, 2009. It is the eleventh core set for Magic: the Gathering. It is the first Core Set since Limited Edition Beta (which included two cards accidentally left out of the original Limited Edition Alpha) to feature new cards; about half the cards were new with the rest being reprints (in contrast to most previous core sets, which consisted entirely of reprints). Magic 2010 (also known as M10) marked a major shift in the way Wizards of the Coast produces and markets the "Core" set of their marquee trading card game, Magic: The Gathering. M10 was the first core set since Revised (the third edition) to not be labeled with an ordinal number. Another important marketing change starting with M10 is Wizards of the Coast decision to releases a new core set every year, instead of every two years, as they did since 1995. Most significantly, Magic 2010 was the first core set since the very first editions of the game (Alpha & Beta, both released in 1993) to contain new cards; every other core set has contained only reprints from previous sets. Previous policy regarding which cards to reprint in the core sets led to
    6.00
    2 votes
    186
    Promethean: The Created

    Promethean: The Created

    • Game: Promethean: The Created
    Promethean: The Created is a role-playing game published by White Wolf, set in the new World of Darkness. The game is inspired by the classic tales of Frankenstein's monster, the Golem and other such simulacra. The characters are individuals created by first dismembering and reassembling human corpses to form a human body, then animating the body with Pyros, the Divine Fire. The resulting creation is known as a Promethean. Animated by the Divine Fire, but lacking a soul, Prometheans seek the greatest prize they know: humanity. Prometheans have no direct equivalent in the original World of Darkness (though Frankenstein's monster, and the ability to create such, were products of the Sons of Ether), but elements of the game, on the surface, recall elements of such games as Wraith: The Oblivion and Mummy: The Resurrection.
    6.00
    2 votes
    187

    Ravenloft II: The House on Gryphon Hill

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
    Ravenloft II: The House on Gryphon Hill is a Dungeons & Dragons module, coded I10, written for use with the First Edition Advanced Dungeons & Dragons ruleset, by TSR. It is credited to husband-wife duo Tracy and Laura Hickman While following the Hickman's outline for the module, most of the writing was done by David "Zeb" Cook, Jeff Grubb, Harold Johnson and Douglas Niles, each working on their own section in order to meet a deadline. Clyde Caldwell, who had done all the art for the original Ravenloft, again provided the cover, but this time interior art was provided by Jeff Easley.
    6.00
    2 votes
    188

    Homelands

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Homelands was the thirteenth Magic: The Gathering set and seventh expert level set, released in October 1995. It was considered to be part of the Ice Age block until the announcement of Coldsnap in October 2005. The set takes place in a plane known as Ulgrotha. Homelands begins 600 years ago, during a war between the Tolgath, planeswalkers who desire knowledge, and the Ancients, wizards who are prepared to be cruel to defend 'their' mysteries. A Tolgath planeswalker named Ravi used an artifact called the Apocalypse Chime, given to her by her master, to destroy all life and mana on Ulgrotha. The plane became a prime battleground for wizards, until the planeswalker Feroz happened upon it. He wished to protect the plane, so he, along with the planeswalker Serra, created a ban to keep other planeswalkers out. Feroz died in the process, and Serra died soon afterwards. (Serra would appear briefly in the novelization of a later set, Urza's Saga, but that appearance occurred prior to her coming to Ulgrotha). The events surrounding the set begin many years after Feroz's death, when his ban begins to fade. The residents of Ulgrotha (now known to its inhabitants as the Homelands) are at war
    5.00
    3 votes
    189

    Tempest Feud

    Tempest Feud is an adventure written by Jeff Grubb and Owen K.C. Stephens for the d20 System version of the Star Wars Roleplaying Game. It was published by Wizards of the Coast in March 2002 for the original edition of the game, two months before the revised edition was released. The adventure revolves around various dealings with the Hutts and consists of three acts. Tempest Feud is suitable for any era of the Star Wars Roleplaying Game and intended for 9th-level characters. Playing through the three acts of the adventure takes roughly twelve sessions according to the book, and more if the two intermissions are given focus as well. Out of the 17 sourcebooks published for the Star Wars Roleplaying Game so far, Tempest Feud is the first and currently only adventure. The adventure's storyline is adapted to fit in any era—except for the Yuuzhan Vong invasion in the New Jedi Order era—and doesn't conflict with any of the movies, making it very flexible. In addition, the book contains several sidebars providing contingency plans for dealing with unexpected storyline twists. Note: The following summary is not a definite description of how the adventure may play out, but rather the path
    5.00
    3 votes
    190

    Assault on the Aerie of the Slave Lords

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
    Assault on the Aerie of the Slave Lords is an adventure module originally designed for the pen and paper role-playing game Dungeons & Dragons. Allen Hammack wrote Assault on the Aerie of the Slave Lords (A3) as the third in a series of four modules presented at Gencon XIII at the University of Wisconsin, Parkside in August of 1980. The series of four modules, Scourge of the Slave Lords, played sequentially at the event as a tournament. The module¬タルs difficulty level is set for a group of six to eight characters of fourth to seventh level in experience. It is 34 pages long not including the front and back cover. The other modules in the series include Slave Pits of the Undercity A1, Secret of the Slavers Stockade A2, and In the Dungeons of the Slave Lords A4, all by different authors. The introduction to the module reads: For those playing the entire series the first section of this module, Part A, is the last section of the first round of elimination. Part B and part C together form the semi-final round of the tournament. If playing the tournament from the beginning the group continues with the characters generated in Slave Pits of the Undercity. If the group is
    5.50
    2 votes
    191

    Betrayers of Kamigawa

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Betrayers of Kamigawa (Betrayers or BoK) is the name of the Magic: The Gathering expansion set which came out in February 2005, and is the second set in the Kamigawa block. It contains 165 cards. The set's story is inspired by Japanese medieval myths and revolves around the battle between spirits (kami) and living beings. The set's expansion symbol is a shuriken, or ninja throwing star. Betrayers of Kamigawa introduces two new mechanics to the game. Betrayers also features the first non-Wall creatures with defender.
    5.50
    2 votes
    192

    Complete Champion

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Complete Champion (ISBN 9780786940349) is a supplement for the 3.5 edition of the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. Somewhat of a sequel to Complete Divine, the book is geared for characters who fight for a cause. Complete Champion was written by Ed Stark, Chris Thomasson, Rhiannon Louve, Ari Marmell, and Gary Astleford, and was published in May 2007. Cover art was by Eric Polak, with interior art by Steve Argyle, Stephen Belledin, Miguel Coimbra, Thomas Denmark, Eric Deschamps, Wayne England, David Griffith, Fred Hooper, Ralph Horsley, Howard Lyon, Eva Widermann, and Sam Wood. Thomasson defined the use of "champion" in the title to mean a "champion of faith", rather than in the more general sense of the term: "All characters have the potential to be champions; this book is focused on the divine, specifically divine magic and the religions of D&D --the goal we had was to make those elements of the game more accessible to characters other than paladins, clerics and druids."
    5.50
    2 votes
    193
    5.50
    2 votes
    194

    Spell Compendium

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Spell Compendium (ISBN 0-7869-3702-5) is an optional, 288-page supplemental source book for the 3.5 edition of the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game. It compiles spells from a variety of other Dungeons & Dragons books and updates them to use the v3.5 version of the rules. Spell lists are included for all spellcasting classes in the Player's Handbook and Dungeon Master's Guide, along with a selection of cleric domains. Sources used for the Spell Compendium include Draconomicon, Manual of the Planes, and Savage Species, along with numerous issues of Dragon and articles originally found on the Wizards of the Coast website. The Spell Compendium was compiled by Matthew Sernett, Jeff Grubb, and Mike McArtor, and was published in December 2005. Cover art was by Victor Moray and Nyssa Baugher, with interior art by Steven Belledin, Mitch Cotie, Chris Dien, Wayne England, Jason Engle, Carl Frank, Brian Hagan, Fred Hooper, Ralph Horsley, Jeremy Jarvis, David Martin, Jim Nelson, William O'Connor, Lucio Parrillo, Michael Phillippi, Eric Polak, Wayne Reynolds, Ron Spears, Joel Thomas, and Franz Vohwinkel.
    5.50
    2 votes
    195

    The Temple of Elemental Evil

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
    The Temple of Elemental Evil is an adventure module for the fantasy role-playing game Dungeons & Dragons, set in the game's World of Greyhawk campaign setting. The module was published by TSR, Inc. in 1985 for the first edition Advanced Dungeons & Dragons rules. It was written by Gary Gygax and Frank Mentzer, and is an expansion of an earlier Gygax module, The Village of Hommlet (TSR, 1979). The Temple of Elemental Evil is also the title of a related 2001 Thomas M. Reid novel and an Atari computer game, and the term is used by fans of the setting to refer to the fictional Temple itself. The Temple of Elemental Evil was ranked the 4th greatest Dungeons & Dragons adventure of all time by Dungeon magazine in 2004, on the 30th anniversary of the Dungeons & Dragons game. These classic, early D&D adventures helped first popularize the World of Greyhawk campaign setting. In the module T1 The Village of Hommlet, the player characters must defeat the raiders in a nearby fort, and thereafter Hommlet can be used as a base for the party's subsequent adventures. The adventure begins in the eponymous village of Hommlet, situated near the site of a past battle against evil forces operating from
    5.50
    2 votes
    196

    Curse of Xanathon

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons Expert Set
    Curse of Xanathon is a Dungeons & Dragons adventure module designed by Douglas Niles for use with the D&D Expert Set. The Duke of Rhoona has begun issuing strange proclamations, such as decreeing that all taxes are to be paid in beer, horses are to be ridden backwards, and all dwarves are to be shaved and stretched to make them "presentable to human sensibilities". Duke Stephan is suffering from a curse which was brought upon him by Xanathon, chief cleric of the Ethengar Khanate immigrants living inside Rhoona's walls, and Stephen's own treacherous guard captain, Draco Stormsailer. The player characters must discover the nature of the Duke's affliction. They will need to learn how to lift the curse from the Duke of Rhoona, as he is needed to lead his troops against an invading army. They will need to find the antidote for the curse, battling Xanathon, Draco, and their minions to achieve their goal. Lawrence Schick, in his sourcebook of roleplaying games, Heroic Worlds, describes the module as a town adventure in which the players are tasked with solving a mystery in order to remove a curse. The cursed town is threatened by a dwarven army, and the player characters must save the
    6.00
    1 votes
    197
    Libris Mortis: The Book of Undead

    Libris Mortis: The Book of Undead

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Libris Mortis: The Book of Undead is a book which is an official supplement for the 3.5 edition of the Dungeons and Dragons role-playing game. It is about the fictional undead within the D&D universe and comprises seven chapters, introducing new content for Dungeon Masters and players, as well as providing general information about undead. It was received positively by reviewers, with praise for its material for Dungeon Masters and its illustrations, but received criticism for its weak player-oriented content. The book was the second in the series of books about specific monster types, the first being Draconomicon. Similar books published since include Lords of Madness. Libris Mortis included content from older books, such as Tome and Blood and the Book of Vile Darkness, that had been reworked. Libris Mortis was written to present "a comprehensive overview of the undead" within the Dungeons & Dragons universe, offering new game rules and content, for both players and Dungeon Masters. The book is in the same format as the earlier published Draconomicon, which instead focused on Dragons, and was described as "a super-sized monster ecology" by the Nuketown podcast. Similar books that
    6.00
    1 votes
    198
    6.00
    1 votes
    199

    Player's Handbook

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 2nd Edition
    The Player's Handbook for the 2nd Edition of Advanced Dungeons & Dragons.
    6.00
    1 votes
    200
    Savage Species

    Savage Species

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Savage Species is a sourcebook for use as a supplement in the 3rd edition of the Dungeons & Dragons game, detailing the use of monstrous races as PC races. Savage Species introduces several new classes and outlines rules for playing monstrous races as PCs, but its most notable feature is the introduction of taking racial levels - levels in the player character's race instead of in a given class. Savage Species was written by David Eckelberry, Rich Redman, and Jennifer Clarke Wilkes, and was published in 2003. Cover art was by Jeff Easley, with interior art by Dennis Cramer, Brian Despain, Emily Fiegenschuh, Jeremy Jarvis, John and Laura Lakey, Alan Pollack, Vinod Rams, Wayne Reynolds, David Roach, Scott Roller, Mark Sasso, Arnie Swekel, and Sam Wood.
    6.00
    1 votes
    201
    Song and Silence

    Song and Silence

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Song and Silence: A Guidebook to Rogues and Bards is an optional rulebook for the 3rd edition of Dungeons & Dragons, and notable for its trade paperback format. The guidebook provides supplemental information for characters belonging to the Rogue and Bard base classes. This book contained tips for creating and playing characters of the aforementioned class, as well as a large number of prestige classes. This book was written by David Noonan and John D. Rateliff and published in 2001 by Wizards of the Coast. Cover art was by Todd Lockwood, with interior art by David Roach and Wayne Reynolds. Although it was not updated to 3.5 Edition, most of the prestige classes were reintroduced in the 3.5 supplemental source book Complete Adventurer, and a few in Complete Arcane.
    6.00
    1 votes
    202

    Temple of Death

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons Expert Set
    Temple of Death is a Dungeons & Dragons adventure module designed by David Cook for use with the D&D Expert Set. In Master of the Desert Nomads, the tribes of the Sind Desert have rallied together under the leadership of the enigmatic figure known as the Master, and it is the mission of the player characters to neutralize this threat to the Republic. In Temple of Death, the characters approach the Black Mountains and traverse the Great Pass through them to reach the land of Hule. Having negotiated the Great Pass, the adventurers must cross the "sanctified land" of Hule. Hule is an oppressive totalitarian state in which social orders are carefully defined, and where the Master's stronghold is located. The characters must make their way to Hule's capital without attracting the attention of the Diviners. The adventurers then need to penetrate the Dark Wood to find the Temple of Death. The scenario includes wilderness, town, and dungeon encounters. Temple of Death was written by David Cook, with art by Tim Truman, and was published by TSR in 1983 as a thirty two page booklet with an outer folder. It is the second part of the two part Desert Nomads series, following Master of the Desert
    6.00
    1 votes
    203

    Alara Reborn

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Alara Reborn (codenamed Scissors) is a Magic: The Gathering expansion set which was released on April 30, 2009. It includes 145 cards. To take advantage of International Workers' Day/Labor Day in Europe, it was released on a Thursday instead of the traditional Friday. The pre-release date was April 24, 2009. Alara Reborn is the third set in the Alara block, following Shards of Alara and Conflux. Alara Reborn follows the new publishing standards set by Wizards of the Coast in Shards of Alara. That is, mythic rares are included in one out of every eight packs. Intro packs contain 41 cards and one booster pack, and replace preconstructed theme decks. Its tagline is, "The birth of one world. The death of five." Alara Reborn is the first set in the history of Magic the Gathering to consist entirely of multicolored, or "gold", cards (cards which require mana of more than one color to play). It expands on the mechanics, themes and flavor laid down in Shards of Alara and Conflux, but creates new combinations of creatures under the influence of more than one shard, such as coloured artifact creatures from Esper that have the Bant ability Exalted. This set continues on the Shards of Alara
    5.00
    2 votes
    204
    Book of Challenges

    Book of Challenges

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Book of Challenges (ISBN 0786926570) is a supplemental rulebook for the 3rd edition of the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game that presents a number of ready-made dungeon encounters that a Dungeon Master can insert into a scenario. The encounters range from straightforward traps (such as a domed room with a hinged floor that serves as the hidden lair for a beholder), to challenging logic puzzles, riddles and even roleplaying encounters where combat or skill mechanics take a secondary role to the players' own wits and intelligence. All are categorized by challenge rating and run from CR 1 to CR 22. The book also includes advice for DMs on constructing similar traps to the ones presented, including tutorials on basic logic puzzles. All of the Treasure, None of the Traps A series of already-sprung traps in a spiral corridor that automatically reactivate once the players reach the center. Fire and Water A logic puzzle that connects the pulling of colored levers with musical tones to prevent the players from accidentally unleashing either lava or rushing water. Curse of Iron A magically-locked door that bears a riddle, the solution to which is the only sure means of entry. Medusa's
    5.00
    2 votes
    205

    Queen of the Spiders

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
    Queen of the Spiders is an adventure module for the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. It was published by TSR, Inc. in 1986 and is a compilation of seven previous related modules, often referred to as a "supermodule." Together, the seven adventures form an integrated campaign that begins in the World of Greyhawk, continues underground into the Underdark, and concludes in the Demonweb Pits, the abyssal lair of the demonic goddess Lolth. The campaign was originally intended for use with the first edition Advanced Dungeons & Dragons rules. The 152-page supermodule bears the code "GDQ1-7" for "Giants, Drow and Queen," and can be further combined with two other campaigns to form an even larger campaign. The larger campaign begins with T1-4 - The Temple of Elemental Evil, continues on to A1-4 - Scourge of the Slave Lords, and then concludes with GDQ1-7. A new beginning was added to the adventure. Giants have been raiding civilized lands in increasing numbers, and the player characters have been asked to deal with them and also investigate the reasons or forces behind them. The first module (Steading of the Hill GIant Chief) takes place in a gigantic wooden fort populated by
    5.00
    2 votes
    206

    The Lost City

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons Basic Set
    The Lost City (B4) is a Dungeons & Dragons adventure module by Tom Moldvay. It was first published by TSR in 1982 and was designed as a stand-alone adventure for use with the Dungeons & Dragons Basic Set. The working title for the module was "The Lost City of Cynidecia". Moldvay designed the module to give novice Dungeon Masters experience fleshing out adventures and is only partially complete. The module is described as a low-level scenario, in which the only hope of the player characters' survival can be found in a ruined city slowly rising out of the sands. The adventure is set inside a huge step pyramid, with the lower pyramid only sketched out and the city itself described with a list of the major areas and a map. The adventure’s main villain is Zargon, a giant one-eyed monster and his minions. The entire double pyramid, not including the city, contains over 100 rooms. This module includes a cover folder with maps and a descriptive booklet with ready-made adventurers for the Dungeons & Dragons Basic Game. It also includes enough information to continue the adventure beyond level 3, using the Dungeons & Dragons Expert Game rules. This adventure was partially reprinted in the
    5.00
    2 votes
    207

    White Plume Mountain

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
    White Plume Mountain is an adventure module for the Advanced Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game, written by Lawrence Schick and published by TSR in 1979. The 16-page adventure bears the code "S2" ("S" for "special") The adventure is a dungeon crawl where the players' characters are hired to retrieve three "notorious" magical weapons: a trident, a war hammer and a sword, each possessing its own intelligence. The adventure contains art by Erol Otus, and a cover by Jeff Dee. A sequel, Return to White Plume Mountain, was published in 1999, and an updated version conforming to v3.5 rules was released online in 2005. White Plume Mountain was well received by critics. It was ranked the 9th greatest Dungeons & Dragons adventure of all time by Dungeon magazine in 2004. One judge, commenting on the ingenuity required to complete the adventure, described it as "the puzzle dungeon to end all puzzle dungeons." A review for British magazine White Dwarf gave it an overall rating of 8/10, noting that the adventure focuses on problem solving. It is also the favorite adventure of Wired magazine's Ken Denmead, who described it as the "amusement park of dungeons". Other adventures in the S
    5.00
    2 votes
    208

    Tournament Season 3

    • Game: Yu-Gi-Oh! Trading Card Game
    Tournament Pack 3 (TP3) was the third tournament booster released for the Yu-Gi-Oh! Trading Card Game. It was given out at tournaments after the Tournament Season 2 packs had gone out-of-print It contains 1 Ultra Rare, 4 Super Rares, 4 Rares, and 11 Commons.
    4.50
    2 votes
    209

    Apocalypse

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Apocalypse is the name of a Magic: The Gathering expansion set, released in June 2001. It is the third set of the Invasion Block. Following Gerrard and the Weatherlight's victory at Koilos and the death of Hanna, Yawgmoth unleashes the Apocalypse on Dominaria by coming to the world himself, and raising the dead from the earth. As this was after a war that lasted a few years, there were many, many dead. Apocalypse reprised many cycles found in Invasion, including enemy-colored "Bears" and "split cards." Apocalypse's single most important cycle of cards were the enemy-colored "painlands," which promoted the set's theme, power level, and popularity.
    5.00
    1 votes
    210
    5.00
    1 votes
    211

    Expedition to the Barrier Peaks

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
    Expedition to the Barrier Peaks is a 1980 adventure module for the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game written by Gary Gygax. While Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) is typically a fantasy game, the adventure includes elements of science fiction, and thus belongs to the science fantasy genre. It takes place on a downed spaceship; the ship's crew has died of an unspecified disease, but functioning robots and strange creatures still inhabit the ship. The player characters fight monsters and robots, and gather the futuristic weapons and colored access cards that are necessary for advancing the story. Expedition to the Barrier Peaks was first played at the Origins II convention in 1976, where it was used to introduce Dungeons & Dragons players to the science fiction game Metamorphosis Alpha. In 1980, TSR published the adventure, updated for first edition Advanced Dungeons & Dragons rules. The adventure was not updated for later rules systems, but a Wizards.com article did provide a conversion to Future Tech. It included a separate booklet of illustrations, in both color and black and white. The adventure is an old-time favorite of many Dungeons & Dragons fans, including Stephen Colbert. It was
    5.00
    1 votes
    212
    5.00
    1 votes
    213

    Monster Manual

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    The Monster Manual for the 3rd Edition of Dungeons & Dragons.
    5.00
    1 votes
    214

    Saviors of Kamigawa

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Saviors of Kamigawa (also Saviors or SoK) is a Magic: The Gathering set, third and last in the Kamigawa block. Saviors of Kamigawa was released on June 3, 2005 (prerelease on May 21, 2005). Its expansion symbol is a Japanese lantern. Saviors of Kamigawa introduces several new mechanics to the game. Saviors also features the first intentionally (see Alpha's Cyclopean Tomb) uncastable spell, Evermind, which has no mana cost. Its effect can only be achieved through the use of the Splice mechanic introduced in Champions of Kamigawa. However, new rules from Time Spiral now allow cards without mana costs to be cast, as long as the player can bypass paying the non-existent mana cost.
    5.00
    1 votes
    215

    Slavers

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 2nd Edition
    Slavers is an adventure module for the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game. The 128-page book was published by Wizards of the Coast in 2000 for second edition Advanced Dungeons & Dragons rules. The adventure is a sequel to the Scourge of the Slave Lords series (modules A1 - A4), being set in the World of Greyhawk campaign setting ten years after the events described in the earlier adventures. Slavers was written by Sean K. Reynolds and Chris Pramas. The module's cover art is by Jeff Easley, with interior art by Wayne Reynolds, David Roach and Sam Wood. Slavers is designed for five to eight characters of levels 4 - 5.
    5.00
    1 votes
    216

    The Primal Order

    The Primal Order, or "TPO", is a religion-based fantasy roleplaying game supplement". Of particular note, TPO was the first work published by Wizards of the Coast and its president, Peter Adkison. Through TPO, Wizards of the Coast introduced the "Capsystem" concept, enabling gamemasters to seamlessly integrate TPO and future Capsystem titles into other role-playing games. The supplement covers high-powered gaming and the gods. TPO provides guidelines for gamemasters to develop individual gods of various power levels, to include entire pantheons, as well as the vast support network, both divine and mortal, required to maintain and increase godly status. These guidelines stem from the foundational concept of primal energy, its sources and impact, as well as its resource management. TPO received very good reviews from various sources, including Pyramid Magazine and RPGNet. As part of the sale of Wizards of the Coast to Hasbro in 2001, Adkison retained the rights to The Primal Order, his own original work. Wizards quickly followed up the release of TPO with several supplements to help build on the system's foundation. These supplements included: One of the driving forces behind the
    5.00
    1 votes
    217

    Against the Cult of the Reptile God

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
    Against the Cult of the Reptile God is an adventure module for the first edition of the Advanced Dungeons & Dragons fantasy roleplaying game, set in the game's World of Greyhawk campaign setting. It is designed for novice players and gamemasters. The suggested party size is 4-7 characters of level 1-3. The adventure takes place on the border between the Gran March and the Kingdom of Keoland in the western Flanaess. It is one of the most challenging of the early AD&D modules, featuring a mystery that leads to adventures in town, the wilderness and a dungeon. The scenario details the village and the cult's dungeon caves. The player characters arrive in the village of Orlane, where they are met with mixed reactions. Some villagers are friendly towards the characters, whereas some are distant and others are very suspcious and guarded. The characters realize that something is amiss, and have to find out what. They find that Orlane is being plagued by an evil cult, and the characters have to stop the cult. The module was written by Douglas Niles, with the cover drawn by Tim Truman, and published by TSR in 1982 as a 32-page booklet with an outer folder for the first edition of Advanced
    4.00
    2 votes
    218
    Defenders of the Faith

    Defenders of the Faith

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Defenders of the Faith: A Guidebook to Clerics and Paladins is an optional rulebook for the 3rd edition of Dungeons & Dragons, and notable for its trade paperback format. The guidebook provides supplemental information for characters belonging to the Cleric and Paladin base classes. This book introduced Divine Feats, which are still used in version 3.5. This book also contained tips for creating and playing characters of the aforementioned class, as well as several prestige classes. The book was designed by Rich Redman and James Wyatt, and was published in 2001 by Wizards of the Coast. Cover art was by Brom, with interior art by Dennis Cramer. Although it was not updated to 3.5 Edition, most of the book's prestige classes were reintroduced in the 3.5 supplemental sourcebook Complete Divine.
    4.00
    2 votes
    219

    Blood of the Yakuza

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
    Blood of the Yakuza is a module in the Oriental Adventures subset of the Advanced Dungeons & Dragons Forgotten Realms product line. Blood of the Yakuza is a campaign setting and scenario package for use with Oriental Adventures. The module describes the Japanese-style island of Wa and the port of Nakamura, detailing the history, politics, districts, architecture, and important personalities of the Tokugawa-era town. The module contains information on the rival Yakuza gangs and the political machinations of the important families and temples, as well as background on the major NPCs of the city, plus lists of names, occupations, and personalities for detailing minor non-player characters. Narratives are provided, rather than presenting the adventures as straightforward encounter plots, and depending on their character classes and backgrounds, the player characters can interact with the stories in many different ways. As the module was based on the Kara Tur boxed set, its information is older than the information about Wa found in such product lines as the Spelljammer series. Blood of the Yakuza was written by David "Zeb" Cook, with a cover by Jim Holloway, and was published by TSR in
    4.00
    1 votes
    220

    Book of Lairs

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 2nd Edition
    This is the Forgotten Realms "Book of Lairs" - it is a different book from the Dragonlance "Book of Lairs" released by TSR around the same time.
    4.00
    1 votes
    221

    City of the Spider Queen

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    City of the Spider Queen is an adventure module for the Forgotten Realms campaign setting of the 3rd edition of the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. This 160-page book begins with an introduction on pages 3–9. According to the adventure background provided, drow priestesses are no longer receiving spells or guidance from their goddess, Lolth. While in most places, the drow have remained steadfast, the Underdark city of Maerimydra is in a state of unrest and has been invaded by a host of enemy creatures. Some of the desperate survivors have begun making raids on the surface world. The adventure outline provided states that the player characters will be investigating these raids, travelling through the Underdark and exploring the ruined city, fighting the creatures that have taken it over, ultimately fighting a priestess of the rival drow goddess Kiaransalee. Following the introduction is the four-chapter adventure scenario: Part 1: Spinning the Web, is on pages 10–44, Part 2: The Deep Wastes, is on pages 45–63, Part 3: Maerimydra", is on pages 64–101, and Part 4: The Undying Temple", is on pages 102-114. The book also features two appendices. Appendix 1: Monsters and
    4.00
    1 votes
    222

    Descent into the Depths of the Earth

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
    Descent Into the Depths of the Earth is an adventure module for the Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) fantasy roleplaying game coded D1–2. It was written by Gary Gygax, and combines two previously published modules from 1978, the original Descent into the Depths of the Earth and Shrine of the Kuo-Toa. A sequel to the first two modules, Vault of the Drow, was also published in 1978. All of these D-series modules were produced for use with the 1st edition Advanced Dungeons & Dragons (AD&D) rules. The D-series itself is part of a larger overall campaign of adventures set in the World of Greyhawk campaign setting. The overall campaign begins with the three modules in the Against the Giants series, continues through the D-series, and concludes with module Q1 Queen of the Demonweb Pits. The latter segments of the campaign, including the D-series and module Q1, are set in a vast network of caverns and tunnels called the Underdark. The plot of the original modules Descent Into the Depths of the Earth and Shrine of the Kuo-Toa place a party of player characters (PCs) on the trail of the drow priestess Eclavdra through the Underdark, a vast subterranean network of interconnected caverns and tunnels,
    4.00
    1 votes
    223

    Legacies of Blood

    • Game: Vampire: The Eternal Struggle
    Legacies of Blood (LoB) is the ninth expansion of White Wolf, Inc.'s trading card game Vampire: The Eternal Struggle released on November 14, 2005. The expansion's theme is the Laibon sect consisting of vampires native to Africa. The expansion features four new clans, Akunanse, Ishtarri, Guruhi and Osebo. In addition the support of the minor clans (like Ahrimanes or Samedi) from the Bloodlines expansion is continued in this expansion. Part of the expansion are four different pre-constructed decks with 89 cards each as well as boosters with 11 cards each (7 common, 3 uncommon, and 1 rare). There is a total of 201 new and 99 reprinted cards. The pre-constructed decks are: The vampires Angelo and Genina, The Red Poet (both not included in this set) were given as a promo cards in a number of magazines. Initially due to printing error the vampire Kisha Bhimji was missing from the set, but was given later as tournament promo card.
    4.00
    1 votes
    224

    Scourge

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Scourge is a Magic: The Gathering expansion set. It is the third set of the Onslaught block. There are 143 cards overall. The expansion symbol is a dragon's skull. The release of Scourge made a large impact on tournament play. The additions of Goblin Warchief and Siege-Gang Commander greatly strengthened decks using Goblins in multiple formats. Eternal Dragon gave white control decks both a robust card advantage engine and finisher all in one. Vintage quickly adopted both Mind's Desire and Tendrils of Agony due to their extreme synergy with fast artifact mana and Yawgmoth's Will plus their relative immunity to disruption like Force of Will and Chalice of the Void. Almost in protest, the Scourge card Stifle also allowed decks to counter things that were previously immune, including the Scourge Storm cards. The war between Phage and Akroma is over, but with no true winner, and one loser, Otaria. The clash of such sheer power merged the two into a new creature, Karona the False God, an immensely powerful being forged from all five colors of Magic (Phage was originally Jeska, a red aligned barbarian corrupted by black mana; Akroma was a white angel created by Ixidor, a blue wizard;
    4.00
    1 votes
    225

    Shards of Alara

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Shards of Alara is an expansion set from the trading card game Magic: The Gathering. It is the 47th limited-edition expansion set for Magic and was released on October 3, 2008. On Magic Online Shards was released on October 20, 2008. Shards of Alara is the first set of the Alara block. Bill Rose was its lead designer, and Devin Low was its lead developer. Shards is a multicolor set which revolves around three-color combinations. Its tagline is, "Five worlds share one fate." The set consists of 249 cards, 20 basic lands, 101 common, 60 uncommon, 53 rare, and 15 mythic rare. The design of Shards of Alara focuses on five different "shards" which together formed a single world once. Mechanically, each shard consists of one of the five magic colors and its two allied colors. Each shard has its own key worded mechanic or strong overarching theme, and its own creature types. The five shards were designed separately by three person design teams. Shards of Alara introduced several changes in Wizards' design and publishing approach. Sets from Shards forward have a smaller number of cards, to reduce the size of the card pool for Block and Standard constructed tournament formats. A new level
    4.00
    1 votes
    226

    Unglued

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Unglued is the name of a Magic: The Gathering expansion set, the first silver-bordered, non-tournament-legal Magic: The Gathering expansion set released. It came out in August 1998. Its symbol is a cracked egg. Among the themes of the set were chicken, dice rolling and multiplayer Magic games. Unglued was originally conceived by then-lead Magic designer Joel Mick and fellow designer Bill Rose. Having helped in the creation of many of the expansion sets of the time, they began talking about cards which were cut from the expansion or were unplayable, based on the rules of the game. Thinking this through, they conceptualized an expansion where all the cards had no place in serious games. Unglued was not entirely a commercially successful expansion, but the unique basic land cards - the only cards from the set legal in tournaments - were and still are valuable. The set also developed a cult following among casual Magic fans, and eventually a sequel set, Unhinged, was released in 2004. All 94 cards in the Unglued set each had a single word printed on the bottom of the card. Alone these single words made little or no sense but when combined in proper numerical order with other cards in
    4.00
    1 votes
    227

    Against the Giants

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
    Against the Giants is an adventure module written by Gary Gygax and published by TSR in 1981 for the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy roleplaying game. It combines the G series of modules previously published in 1978: Steading of the Hill Giant Chief, Glacial Rift of the Frost Giant Jarl, and Hall of the Fire Giant King. All three were produced for use with the 1st edition Advanced Dungeons & Dragons rules. In 1999, to recognize the 25th anniversary of TSR, the company released an updated version, Against the Giants: The Liberation of Geoff. Later in 1999, Wizards of the Coast published a novelization of Against the Giants by Ru Emerson. The plot of each of the three original modules focuses on a particular type of evil giant. Each can be played as a standalone adventure, or as a series. In Steading of the Hill Giant Chief, a tribe of hill giants have been raiding lands occupied by humans, and the humans hire the player characters to defeat them. Glacial Rift of the Frost Giant Jarl pits the player characters against the evil Jarl of the frost giants. Hall of the Fire Giant King concludes the series, this time against a group of fire giants. The first two modules disclose the existence
    0.00
    0 votes
    228

    Deckmasters 2001

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Deckmasters: Garfield vs. Finkel, usually known as simply Deckmasters, was a set created in 2001 to showcase the epic match between Richard Garfield, the creator of the card game, and Jon Finkel, a Magic World Champion. Two decks were included in the set, a red/green deck that Richard Garfield used, and a red/black deck that was played by Finkel. This set was created to let players relive this famous match. It is the fifth compilation set. The match was held in January 2002. About a year before, Wizards of the Coast challenged both of them to build a deck out of Ice Age and Alliances cards to compete against each other with. They were given very strict criteria to build these decks such as each deck could only use four rare cards, and no more than two copies of any one card. Some cards were banned for the purpose of this event such as Kjeldoran Outpost. Finkel won match one because Garfield misplayed the current timing rules at least twice during the course of the game. Garfield joked, "Shouldn't we be playing by the rules as I made them?" In the second match, Garfield was defeated by lack of mana. "This is the first time I am sitting up here and am honestly unhappy that my
    0.00
    0 votes
    229

    Dragon Magic

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Dragon Magic is an optional supplemental source book for the 3.5 edition of the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy roleplaying game. With this book, the player will be able to use dragon magic and learn a lot of other fighting styles from the powerful beasts. Dragon Magic was written by Owen K.C. Stephens and Rodney Thompson, and was published in September 2006. Cover art was by Eric Polak, with interior art by David Bircham, Jeff Carlisle, Carl Critchlow, Daarken, Eric Deschamps, Jeff Easley, Wayne England, E.M. Gist, Brian Hagan, Ralph Horsley, Warren Mahy, Lucio Parrillo, Mike Schley, Arnie Swekel, Francis Tsai, Franz Vohwinkel, David Wahlstrom, Eva Widermann, and James Zhang.
    0.00
    0 votes
    230

    Expedition to the Demonweb Pits

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Expedition to the Demonweb Pits is a super-adventure module for the 3.5 edition of the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game. The adventure is designed for characters of levels 9–12. It involves the machinations of the demon lords Lolth and Graz'zt, and was heavily influenced by the 1980 adventure module, Queen of the Demonweb Pits. Expedition to the Demonweb Pits revolves around the reading of the Dark Pact. The demon lord Graz'zt seeks to form an alliance with Lolth against Orcus. Lolth spurns his offer, and Graz'zt, not taking rejection lightly, now schemes to undermine Lolth. With the aid of his cambion son, Rule-of-Three, Graz'zt plans a Demon Council within the Abyss. While he is doing this, Rule-of-Three spreads word among the drow that their goddess is coming to the Prime Material Plane to wage the eternity war against their hated cousins, the surface elves and their god, Corellon Larethian. After the Demonic Council is arranged, Rule-of-Three and Graz'zt involve a group of mortals (the PCs) about Lolth's coming. Their goal is to bring attention to Lolth in her own Demonweb and then use the mortals to embarrass her in the eyes of the other demon lords, while at the same time,
    0.00
    0 votes
    231

    Frostburn

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Frostburn is a supplemental book to the 3.5 edition of the Dungeons and Dragons fantasy role-playing game. Frostburn provides rules for adventuring in a cold environment as well as an environment known as frostfell, which is a sort of arctic environment with extreme (sometimes even magical) cold. The book contains information about cold and how it affect characters in the game, as well as various monsters, races, weapons, and spells that can be found in a Frostfell environment. Frostburn was written by Wolfgang Baur, James Jacobs, and George Strayton, and published in September 2004. Cover art was by Sam Wood, with interior art by Steve Belledin, Mitch Cotie, Ed Cox, Dennis Crabapple McClain, Steve Ellis, David Griffith, David Hudnut, Dana Knutson, Doug Kovacs, and Dan Scott. This book follows two other books, Sandstorm and Stormwrack, which also deal with specific environments.
    0.00
    0 votes
    232

    Hunter: The Vigil

    • Game: World of Darkness
    Hunter: The Vigil is a game line from White Wolf, announced on January 2, 2008, and released on August 14, 2008, when the sponsors for the second Free RPG Day were announced. It is the sixth game line to be part of the World of Darkness and the spiritual successor of Hunter: The Reckoning from the old World of Darkness setting. Like Promethean: The Created and Changeling: The Lost, Hunter: The Vigil will be a limited game line, consisting of a core setting book and several supplements. A board game is also planned. The first hints of the new game line came in the Changeling: The Lost core book. At the back of the book was a word search, and after finding all the words and removing several Xs, all that was left was a cryptic message: thehuntersarrivetwothousandeight. There are two sets of quickstart rules, one for Free RPG Day and another in line with the usual quickstart rules for the other game lines. They are "about 50% different". Hunters operate socially, in collectives and groups of various sizes. The smallest organizational unit in which hunters operate is the cell. Cells operate independently of one another, frequently without even being aware of the existence of other cells
    0.00
    0 votes
    233

    Invasion

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Invasion is the 21st expert level set, and the first set in the Invasion block of cards of Magic: The Gathering. The rest of the block is Planeshift and Apocalypse. It contains 350 cards. Invasion saw the return of multi-colored "gold" cards, absent since the Stronghold expansion. Its major themes revolved around multicolor decks and strategies. The popularity and appeal of "gold" cards along with high but balanced power level culminated into making Invasion one of the most popular Magic sets in the game's history. The multi-color nature of the set had been decided by late in 1998 The set was designed by Bill Rose, Mike Elliot and Mark Rosewater, the crux of the design occurred late in 2000 over the course of five days at Rosewater's fathers' cabin on Lake Tahoe. The time has come. Urza the Planeswalker must now help Gerrard Capashen and the crew of Weatherlight to repel the invading Phyrexians from Dominaria. However, it will not be easy, as Yawgmoth will stop at nothing to get what he wants. The following mechanics first appeared in Invasion:
    0.00
    0 votes
    234

    Magic of Incarnum

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Magic of Incarnum is a supplemental book for the 3.5 edition of the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game. It was first printed in 2005 to be applied to 3.5 D&D rules. It introduces new classes (Incarnate, Soulborn, and Totemist) and new races (Azurin, Duskling, Rilkan, and Skarn), along with new feats, rules, and spells, for both classes within the book and classes from other books. Magic of Incarnum describes Incarnum, which, in its pure form, looks like a "radiant mist, deep blue in color." With the supplemental rules provided within, characters can use incarnum to create Soulmelds using Essentia. The Soulmelds function like magically-sustained items that are applied to different parts of the body, and Essentia is invested into said Soulmelds to make them more effective. In addition to investing Essentia, characters can bind Soulmelds to different Chakras, which further fuses Soulmelds to their corresponding body parts, providing characters with bonus effects. The book was written by James Wyatt, Frank Brunner, and Stephen Schubert, and first published in September 2005. Cover art was by Henry Higginbotham with cover photography by N. Eric Heath, and interior art by Wayne
    0.00
    0 votes
    235
    Miniatures Handbook

    Miniatures Handbook

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    The Miniatures Handbook is an official supplement for the 3.5 edition of the Dungeons and Dragons roleplaying game. It includes information about the Dungeons and Dragons Miniatures Game, new base classes, prestige classes, feats, spells, and monsters, including aspects of deities and archfiends. Miniatures Handbook was authored by Jonathan Tweet, Mike Donais, Skaff Elias, and Rob Heinsoo, and published by Wizards of the Coast in October 2003. Cover art was by Stephen Tappin, and interior art was by Trevor Hairsine, Des Hanley, Adrian Smith, Stephen Tappin, and Richard Wright.
    0.00
    0 votes
    236
    Monsters of Faerûn

    Monsters of Faerûn

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Monstrous Compendium: Monsters of Faerûn is a supplement for the 3rd edition of Dungeons & Dragons. It features about 150 pages of monsters unique to the Forgotten Realms campaign setting. It was the first 3rd edition book to feature the now-common "in the Realms" section for each monster, offering helpful and concise hints to the Dungeon Master as to how and where to incorporate the creature into the campaign setting. The book was released in 2001. The book was co-authored by James Wyatt and Rob Heinsoo. Cover art is by Brom and Henry Higginbotham, with interior art by Daren Bader, Ed Beard, Theodor Black, Carl Critchlow, Brian Despain, Scott Fischer, Michael Kaluta, Todd Lockwood, David Martin, Monte Moore, Allan Pollack, Adam Rex, Wayne Reynolds, Richard Sardinha, Brian Snoddy, and Sam Wood.
    0.00
    0 votes
    237

    Monstrous Compendium

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 2nd Edition
    The first volume (MC1) of the Monstrous Compendium for the 2nd Edition of Advanced Dungeons & Dragons.
    0.00
    0 votes
    238

    Odyssey

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Odyssey is the 24th Magic: The Gathering expert-level expansion set. Released in September, 2001, Odyssey is the first set in the Odyssey Block. Its expansion symbol is a small image of the Mirari (see storyline). The storyline of Odyssey leaps forward 100 years after the events in the set Apocalypse on the remote continent Otaria. Odyssey 's protagonist is Kamahl, a formidable fighter-mage skilled in both throwing fireballs and melee combat. Kamahl has a close friend Chainer, a cabalist, and a cool-headed sister Jeska. The antagonist is Laquatus, a sly merfolk who uses trickery and mind control to bend others to his will. Other characters include the cephalid emperor Aboshan, Kamahl's centaur friend Seton, Kamahl and Jeska's dwarven trainer Balthor, the militaristic Kirtar, the mellow but dangerous Cabal Patriarch (The First), and the unpredictable sociopath Braids. Almost everyone in the story is after the Mirari, a legendary artifact of immense power with the ability to make its wielder's innermost wishes come true. The Mirari is relatively small, resembling a metallic ball mounted on a wiry helix. The Mirari notoriously drives its wielder insane, often causing death and massive
    0.00
    0 votes
    239

    Patriots of Ulek

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 2nd Edition
    Patriots of Ulek is an adventure module for the fantasy role-playing game Dungeons & Dragons, set in the game's World of Greyhawk campaign setting. The adventure takes place in the Principality of Ulek in the southwestern Flanaess. The module bears the code WGQ1 and was published by TSR, Inc. in 1992 for the second edition Advanced Dungeons & Dragons rules. The module was written by Anthony Pryor with cover art by John and Laura Lakey and interior art by Ken Frank. Patriots of Ulek at the TSR Archive
    0.00
    0 votes
    240

    Pharaoh

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
    Pharaoh is an adventure module for the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. The module was published in 1982 by TSR, Inc. for the first edition Advanced Dungeons & Dragons rules. It formed the first of the three-part Desert of Desolation module series. Design: Tracy & Laura Hickman Editing: Curtis Smith Cover Art: Jim Holloway Distributed to the book trade in the United States by Random House, Inc., and in Canada by Random House of Canada, Ltd. Distributed to the toy and hobby trade by regional distributors. Distributed in the United Kingdom by TSR UK Ltd. product number 117-T- 9052 ISBN 0-888038-007-1 Condemned to wander the desert wilderness, the ghost of Pharaoh Amun-re pleads with adventurers to free his cursed soul - but no one has ever returned from his ancient pyramid - will you? No one has ever returned from the tomb of Amun-re: a Star Gem must still lie unclaimed! You will need all of your cunning, imagination, strength and magic - just to survive! Your skin was blistered all day before the hot desert sun sank slowly below the horizon. Now, the deep blue mists of the desert night swirl about you in the wind. The cool night air seems to soak up the heat of the
    0.00
    0 votes
    241

    Prophecy

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Prophecy is a Magic: The Gathering expansion set. It was the third set of the Masques block, along with the expansion Mercadian Masques and Nemesis. The Prophecy expansion consists of 143 cards. Its expansion symbol are three crystals. Prophecy is set on the plane of Dominaria. When released, was one of the least popular sets ever among tournament players. Though many casual players liked it because of the enormous Avatar and Winds cycle, both of which had a big effect at a big cost, it had relatively little impact on Standard tournaments. As of February 2012 only 21 cards from the Prophecy expansion have been reprinted. The main theme and mechanic of the set was lands; specifically, whether lands were untapped or not. Similarly, the Rhystic cards gave the player an advantage if no other players paid a certain amount of mana. Prophecy introduced no keyword mechanics. Keld has declared war on Jamuraa in order to reclaim 'hero's blood', known also as tufa, which is a type of fossil fuel to run great machines. The city-states of Jamuraa form the Kipamu League and then repulse the invaders. The war bears a striking similarity to the Peloponnesian War between the Athenian Empire and the
    0.00
    0 votes
    242

    Quagmire!

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons Expert Set
    Quagmire! is a 1984 adventure module for the Expert Rules of the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. In the beginning of this adventure, the player characters set off in search of the city of Quagmire. The characters must travel through a monster-infested swamp to get to the city, which is being slowly swallowed into the sea. Quagmire is a whelk-shaped "spiral city", built by a dead race in the Serpent Peninsula. The module includes a description of the city. X6 Quagmire! was written by Merle M. Rasmussen, with cover art by Steve Peregrine, and was published by TSR in 1984 as a 32-page booklet with an outer folder. The module featured interior art by Jeffrey Butler. The scenario was written for the Expert Rules. Graham Staplehurst reviewed Quagmire! for White Dwarf, and gave it 8/10 overall, calling it "a useful acquisition for any D&D player, particularly as a first excursion into a fully fledged wilderness." Staplehurst praised the module, stating that it "promotes a whole 'experience', a total environment and ecosystem, with background colour and depth which more localised scenarios and modules lack. The designers have done a good job in describing large areas of wild
    0.00
    0 votes
    243

    Ravnica: City of Guilds

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    Ravnica: City of Guilds is a Magic: The Gathering set and is the first set in the Ravnica Block. Ravnica was released on October 7, 2005 (prerelease events were held worldwide on September 24 and 25, 2005). Its expansion symbol is a silhouette of a city with a prominent clock tower. Following in the tradition of recent Magic blocks, Ravnica takes place in a plane of the multiverse that was previously unexplored in the game's backstory. The world of Ravnica is an ecumenopolis, a vast city that covers the entire surface of its planet, and is home to a diverse assortment of sentient races. Much power in Ravnica is held by the ten "guilds", political factions that each represent a combination of two of Magic's five colors. Ravnica was conceived following the success of Invasion. Invasion, released in 2000, emphasized interactions between the colors, and it was one of Magic's most popular releases ever. Magic's lead designer, Mark Rosewater, wanted to expand on the multicolor theme in a new way. Therefore, the design of Ravnica is based around ten two-color pairs, including cards in which those pairs of colors work in concert. The Ravnica block is functionally different from Invasion
    0.00
    0 votes
    244

    Ruins of Adventure

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
    Ruins of Adventure is a Dungeons & Dragons module that served as the basis for the popular "Gold Box" role-playing video game Pool of Radiance, published in 1988 by Strategic Simulations, Inc. (SSI). According to the editors of Dragon magazine, Pool of Radiance was based on Ruins of Adventure, and not vice versa. The plot loosely tracks that of the computer game. It is now out of print. Ruins of Adventure contains four linked Forgotten Realms miniscenarios set in the ruined town of Phlan. The scenarios form the core of the Pool of Radiance computer game, and include clues to that game's solution. The adventurers are hired to remove evil forces from Phlan, presumably by killing them. They hear rumor of a Boss controlling them and seek him out. This Boss proves to be a worthy adversary, but in the end the adventurers defeat him. There are various locations in the fictional city of Phlan. Each of these locations comes with a map and detailed area description. These locations include: There are numerous pre-generated characters in this book. Monsters each have their own stats prepared and there are quite a few non-player characters. Ruins of Adventure was written by James Ward, David
    0.00
    0 votes
    245

    Stronghold Builder's Guidebook

    • Game: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Stronghold Builder's Guidebook is a sourcebook for the 3rd edition of the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. This 128-page book begins with a table of contents with a list of tables found in the book, followed by a brief introduction on page 4. Chapter 1: Building a Stronghold (pages 4–14) details a step-by-step process by with DMs and players can design a stronghold. Notes provided include how to stock the structure with gear and fill it with people, and figuring how much it costs. Chapter 2: Stronghold Components (pages 14–86) describes where and how to place items such as walls and doors, and various locations that can be placed within a stronghold. Also described are suggestions on how to place magic items, spells, traps, and siege weapons in a stronghold. Chapter 3: Strongholds in Your Campaign (pages 87–104) includes tips for building a campaign with a stronghold as the setting, as well as how to use the book in adventures that have already been established. This chapter also details how a stronghold can be attacked or defended during combat. Chapter 4: Example Strongholds (pages 104-128) provides room-by-room descriptions and maps for five detailed structures that
    0.00
    0 votes
    246

    The Dark

    • Game: Magic: The Gathering
    The Dark was the eighth Magic: The Gathering set and the fourth expansion to the game, released in August 1994. The set continued the story begun in Antiquities and recounted the aftermath of the events of that set. The 119-card set had a dark, sacrificial theme, though unlike its predecessor Legends it did not introduce any new keywords. Mechanically the set has no clear focus, experimenting in minor quantities with sacrifice and a tribal subtheme. The expansion symbol for the The Dark is an eclipsed moon. This set, as well as the next sets, Fallen Empires and Homelands, are widely considered by players to be the weakest Magic sets. Unlike all the previous sets, The Dark was created with an overall decrease in the power level and the speed of the game. Initial problems with the Power Nine in Alpha/Beta/Unlimited, the Library of Alexandria and Ali from Cairo in Arabian Nights, as well as Mana Drain and The Abyss in Legends had led Magic designers to more closely consider all the possibilities when creating an individual card. This led to an underpowered set. The Dark is also the oldest set released to not have a card retail over $100 USD on the secondary market. The most sought
    0.00
    0 votes
    247

    The Hidden Shrine of Tamoachan

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
    The Hidden Shrine of Tamoachan is an adventure module for the Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) fantasy role-playing game, set in the World of Greyhawk campaign setting for use with the 1st edition Advanced Dungeons & Dragons rules. It is the first in the C-series of modules, a set of unrelated adventures originally designed for competitive play, with the C representing the first letter in the word competition. Originally printed for the 1979 Origins International Game Expo, the module was made available to the general public in 1980. The Hidden Shrine of Tamoachan received generally positive reviews from critics and was ranked the 18th greatest Dungeons & Dragons adventure of all time by Dungeon magazine in 2004. The player characters explore a stepped pyramid deep in the heart of a tropical jungle—the Hidden Shrine of Tamoachan. The characters must penetrate this Mayan-style temple, which is full of tricks and traps. Some of the traps include cursed items, firebombs, and triggered statues. This module was originally used for the Official Advanced Dungeons & Dragons tournament at the 1979 Origins International Game Expo (Origins '79). The original printing consisted of forty loose-leaf
    0.00
    0 votes
    248

    The Rjurik Highlands

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 2nd Edition
    The Rjurik Highlands is an accessory for the 2nd edition of the Advanced Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game, published in 1996. The Rjurik Highlands describes the wilds of northwestern Cerilia, where dwell the fearsome but honorable warriors, the Rjurik, and their unique druidic priests. This package is designed to give a complete picture of the lands and peoples it addresses and to lay out the realm for use by DMs and players who wish to rule its varied kingdoms. Holds some resemblance to Celts and Viking (Nordic countries: Scandinavia).
    0.00
    0 votes
    249

    The Secret of Bone Hill

    • Game: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
    The Secret of Bone Hill is an adventure module written by Lenard Lakofka for the first edition of Advanced Dungeons & Dragons and published by TSR in 1981. It is designed for novice and intermediate players with characters of levels 2-4. The module received mixed reviews from critics. The module is described as a low-level scenario that involves evil creatures prowling the unexplored reaches of Bone Hill. The campaign setting and scenario featured in the book detail a complete town in the Lendore Isles, along with nearby monster lairs. The player characters adventure in and around the fishing port of Restenford. The module is more of a mini-setting than an adventure, offering several adventure locations, and may require a Dungeon Master to expand it using the World of Greyhawk milieu. The module expands upon the basic types of undead creatures found. The Secret of Bone Hill was written by Len Lakofka and published by TSR in 1981 as a thirty two page booklet with an outer folder, and a cover illustration by Bill Willingham. This adventure is continued in L2: The Assassin's Knot, and L3: Deep Dwarven Delve. The module was reviewed in issue No. 16 of Different Worlds magazine, which
    0.00
    0 votes
    250
    0.00
    0 votes
    Get your friends to vote! Spread this URL or share:
    Tags: best, all, time, game, expansion

    Discuss Best Game expansion of All Time

    Top List Voters