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Best Game designer of All Time

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    1
    Steve Jackson

    Steve Jackson

    • Games designed: GURPS
    Steve Jackson (born c. 1953) is an American game designer. After working for many years at Metagaming Concepts designing such games as Ogre and The Fantasy Trip, he left to found Steve Jackson Games (SJ Games) in the early 1980s. He designed many of the games published by SJ Games, such as Car Wars, GURPS, Munchkin and many others. The company won a case against the US Secret Service after a raid of their offices in 1990 (see: Steve Jackson Games, Inc. v. United States Secret Service). The Electronic Frontier Foundation was created at that time to address this and similar cases. Jackson is a 1974 graduate of Rice University, where he was a resident of Baker College before moving to Sid Richardson College when it opened in 1971. He is often mistaken for a different Steve Jackson, a British gamebook and video game writer who co-founded Games Workshop. The confusion is exacerbated by the fact that while the UK Jackson was co-creator of the Fighting Fantasy gamebook series, the US Jackson also wrote three books in this series (Scorpion Swamp, Demons of the Deep, and Robot Commando), and the books did not acknowledge that this was a different Steve Jackson. Jackson is an avid collector
    9.00
    22 votes
    2
    Gary Gygax

    Gary Gygax

    • Games designed: Dungeons & Dragons
    Ernest Gary Gygax ( /ˈɡaɪɡæks/ GY-gaks; July 27, 1938 – March 4, 2008) was an American writer and game designer best known for co-creating the pioneering role-playing game Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) with Dave Arneson. Gygax has been described as the father of Dungeons & Dragons. In the 1960s, Gygax created an organization of wargaming clubs and founded the Gen Con gaming convention. In 1971, he helped develop Chainmail, a miniatures wargame based on medieval warfare. He co-founded the company Tactical Studies Rules (TSR, Inc.) with childhood friend Don Kaye in 1973. The following year, he and Dave Arneson created Dungeons & Dragons, which expanded on his work on Chainmail and included elements of the fantasy stories he loved as a child. In the same year, he founded The Dragon, a magazine based around the new game. In 1977, Gygax began work on a more comprehensive version of the game, called Advanced Dungeons & Dragons. Gygax designed numerous manuals for the game system, as well as several pre-packaged adventures called "modules" that gave a person running a D&D game (the "Dungeon Master") a rough script and ideas on how to run a particular gaming scenario. In 1983, he worked to
    9.35
    20 votes
    3

    Steffan O'Sullivan

    • Games designed: Fudge
    Steffan O'Sullivan is the author of several role-playing game books. Among his works are the GURPS system books Bestiary, Bunnies & Burrows, Fantasy Bestiary and Swashbucklers. He is also the collaborative author of the FUDGE open gaming system and the Sherpa game. He currently lives in New Hampshire.
    8.79
    19 votes
    4

    Robin D. Laws

    • Games designed: Trail of Cthulhu
    Robin D. Laws (October 14, 1964) is a writer and game designer who lives in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. He is the author of a number of role-playing games and related products. Robin D. Laws designed the collectable card game Shadowfist, as well as the role-playing game (RPG) Feng Shui, originally published by Daedalus Entertainment in 1996 and later published by Atlas Games, as well as supplements for Feng Shui. Laws also designed the Rune RPG for Atlas Games, based on the computer game Rune, for which he determined that "the game would need to have a big point of difference to distinguish it from the many other fantasy games available"; in this case, the game would allow players to swap roles with the Game Master (GM): "You can win! And when you're not the GM, it's not boring because the GM can win!" Laws was the senior designer for the Dying Earth Roleplaying Game based on the Jack Vance stories in the Dying Earth setting, and a sourcebook for the setting titled White-Walled Kaiin. Laws also had stories published in Synister Creative's pulp magazine, and in the fiction anthology The Book of All Flesh for the All Flesh Must Be Eaten RPG: "The first is a light-hearted adventure, and
    8.63
    19 votes
    6

    Bill Bridges

    • Games designed: Fading Suns
    Bill Bridges is a role-playing game developer and author. He was one of the primary White Wolf Publishing original developer (along with many others who contributed) to Werewolf: The Apocalypse from 1992 to 1995. He was extremely influential in turning the idea that werewolves could be something besides cursed humans, and instead be spiritual warriors defending the environment from inevitable impending doom. This idea has since been echoed in some of popular contemporary novel series in werewolves can breed new werewolves in addition to creating new ones by biting them. While previous examples of this exist, his contributions help broaden the idea of what a werewolf could be or entail as accepted by the reading audience. He was a part of the original Mage: The Ascension design team. He has numerous writing credits encompassing most of the second edition World of Darkness games, and helped design the Werewolf collectible card game, Rage. After years with White Wolf Publishing, he joined Holistic Design (HDI) where he co-created Fading Suns with Andrew Greenberg. Bridge's most measurable contributions to the game were his "Alustro's Journals" a series of Marco Polo style travel logs
    8.47
    19 votes
    7

    Mike Carr

    Mike Carr (born September 4, 1951) is a writer and game designer known for writing Fight in the Skies (1968, also known as Dawn Patrol). He also co-authored Don't Give Up The Ship! (1971) with Dave Arneson and Gary Gygax. Carr began wargaming with the International Federation of Wargamers as a teenager. At the invitation of Gygax, he joined TSR, Inc. in 1976, for whom he wrote an introductory Dungeons and Dragons module called In Search of the Unknown (1979). Since it was included with the Dungeons and Dragons introductory box set the module enjoyed a sizeable print run. As the role playing game evolved into a more complete and complex version known as Advanced Dungeons and Dragons, Carr served as editor for three hardbound volumes, the Monster Manual, Dungeon Masters Guide and Players Handbook and wrote the Foreword to each book's early editions. In the early 1980s Carr authored three children's books which were published by TSR, including one in the Endless Quest series entitled "Robbers & Robots". Carr worked as an editor for TSR, with his editing credits for Dungeons & Dragons including the original Monster Manual (1977), Vault of the Drow (1978), Players Handbook (1978), White
    9.06
    18 votes
    8

    Games Workshop

    • Games designed: Warhammer Quest
    Games Workshop (often abbreviated as GW) is a British game production and retailing company. Games Workshop has published the tabletop wargames Warhammer, Warhammer 40,000 and The Lord of the Rings Strategy Battle Game. The company is listed on the London Stock Exchange with the symbol GAW.L. Founded in 1975 at 15 Bolingbroke Road, London, by John Peake, Ian Livingstone, and Steve Jackson (not to be confused with US citizen Steve Jackson, also a games designer), Games Workshop was originally a manufacturer of wooden boards for games such as backgammon, mancala, Nine Men's Morris, and Go which later became an importer of the U.S. role-playing game Dungeons & Dragons, and then a publisher of wargames and role-playing games in its own right, expanding from a bedroom mail-order company in the process. In order to promote their business, postal games, create a games club, and provide an alternative source for games news, the newsletter, Owl and Weasel, was founded in February 1975. This was superseded in June 1977 by White Dwarf. From the outset, there was a clear stated interest in print regarding "progressive games," including computer gaming which led to the departure of
    9.00
    18 votes
    9
    Keith Baker

    Keith Baker

    • Games designed: Gloom
    Keith Baker (born July 7, 1969) is a game designer and fantasy novel author. Keith Baker is best known as a freelance writer of Dungeons & Dragons material and the campaign setting Eberron, which won the Wizards of the Coast Fantasy Setting Search in 2002. In addition to working with Wizards of the Coast on Eberron material, he has also contributed material for Atlas Games, Goodman Games, Paizo Publishing and Green Ronin Games He lives in Portland, Oregon. He has a tattoo of the Greater Mark of Making on his right arm. Prior to working in the role-playing game industry, he worked in the video game industry. Baker has won an Origins Award twice, first in 2004 for Best Roleplaying Game Supplement as part of the team for the Eberron campaign setting, then alone in 2005 for Traditional Card Game of the Year for Gloom, published by Atlas Games. He appears in a cameo in the comic book The Order of the Stick: Start of Darkness by Rich Burlew.
    8.83
    18 votes
    10
    Jane McGonigal

    Jane McGonigal

    • Games designed: SuperBetter
    Jane McGonigal (born October 21, 1977) is an American game designer, specializing in pervasive gaming and alternate reality games (ARGs). She currently serves as the Director of Game Research & Development at Institute for the Future and Chief Creative Officer at SuperBetter Labs. McGonigal has taught game design and game studies at the San Francisco Art Institute and the University of California, Berkeley. Additionally, she has collaborated on commissioned games for the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. McGonigal writes and speaks about alternate reality games and massively multiplayer online gaming, especially about the way that collective intelligence can be generated and used as a means for improving the quality of human life or working towards the solution of social ills. She has stated that gaming should be moving "towards Nobel Prizes." McGonigal has been called "the current public face of gamification". On January 20, 2011, McGonigal's first book, Reality Is Broken: Why Games Make us Better and How they Can Change the World, was published. In this book, McGonigal looks not only at massively multiplayer online gaming and
    8.21
    19 votes
    11
    BROCCOLI

    BROCCOLI

    Broccoli Co., Ltd. (株式会社ブロッコリー, Kabushiki-gaisha Burokkorī) is a Japanese media company that publishes manga, anime, and video games through its various subsidiaries. Broccoli is the parent company of Broccoli Music Publishing, Broccoli International USA, and Anime Gamers USA Inc. Broccoli also published manga under Broccoli Books. Broccoli is well known for the Di Gi Charat franchise and series. Satsuki Yamashita, the editor of Broccoli Books, explained that the company derived its president's desire to create a memorable name similar to the memorability of Apple Inc. While trying to imagine of another fruit or vegetable, he arrived at broccoli. This coincidentally has the same name in every language. On January 23, 2008, Broccoli announced it would be collaborating with rival Animate to form a new company called "AniBro". Broccoli holds 30% ownership of the company, which is managed by the CEO of Animate. Broccoli owns a chain of retail stores, Gamers, which are used for distributing anime, manga, anime music CDs, figurines, snacks, stationery, apparel, posters, calendars, trading cards and accessories such as cell phone straps and keychains. Headquartered at the Akihabara, Japan
    8.72
    18 votes
    12

    Ephraim Hertzano

    Ephraim Hertzano was a board game designer born in Romania. He immigrated to Israel, where he founded the games company Hertzano. Hertzano's most famous game creation is Rummikub. Hertzano was a Jewish Israeli. Hertzano originally made his living selling toothbrushes and other plastic accessories as well as cosmetics. Hertzano started developing the tile game Rummikub in the 1940s, in Romania, when card-playing was outlawed under the Communist regime. Hertzano moved to Israel in the 1940s after World War II, continuing the development on Rummikub in the backyard of his house in Bat Yam, and eventually became a professional game developer after publishing it to the markets. Rummikub was the best-selling game in the United States in 1977. Hertzano founded the company Lemada Light Industries Ltd in 1978. Spiel des Jahres Spel van het Jaar
    8.72
    18 votes
    13

    Justin D. Jacobson

    Justin D. Jacobson is an attorney and professional game designer. Jacobson is the owner and operator of Blue Devil Games, publishers of role-playing games and strategy games. He is best known as the designer of Poisoncraft: The Dark Art, Dawning Star, and Passages, and the winner of the About.com 2004 Shared Pieces Design Competition for Golem.
    9.18
    17 votes
    14

    Wolfram Janich

    Wolfram Janich has published several 18XX games, and has started Marflow Games for future games in the series. Janich, WolframJanich, Wolfram
    8.56
    18 votes
    15
    Allen Varney

    Allen Varney

    Allen Varney (born April 1959) is an American writer and game designer born in St. Louis, Missouri. He has a dual B.A. in English and History from the University of Nevada, Reno. Varney has produced numerous books, role-playing game supplements, technical manuals, articles, reviews, columns, and stories, as well as the fantasy novel Cast of Fate (TSR, 1996). Since the 1990s, he has worked primarily in computer games. Varney started his career in paper roleplaying games. From 1984 to 1985 he worked as Assistant Editor at Steve Jackson Games (with Warren Spector, then Editor-in-Chief) editing Space Gamer magazine. In 1986, he left Steve Jackson Games to freelance. From this time onward, he wrote a large body of game supplements for companies like TSR, Inc., FASA Corporation, West End Games, and White Wolf, Inc.. Varney did work for TSR from 1987 to roughly 1992, including the HWA1-3 "Blood Brethren" trilogy (Nightwail, Nightrage, Nightstorm) and M4 Five Coins for a Kingdom, SJA1 Wildspace for Spelljammer, Veiled Alliance for Dark Sun, and several gamebooks, and the Ariya, Binsada, and Talinie realm packs for Birthright. He also edited several modules for the Ravenloft, Planescape,
    9.00
    17 votes
    16
    Erick Wujcik

    Erick Wujcik

    • Games designed: Amber Diceless Roleplaying Game
    Erick Wujcik (January 26, 1951 – June 7, 2008) was an American designer of both pen-and-paper and computer role-playing games, and co-founder of Palladium Books. Wujcik started off as head of the gaming society at Wayne State University, and then as a computer columnist for The Detroit News where he wrote their weekly Computer Column from 1979 to 1981. That served to be a springboard for him to co-found Palladium Books alongside Kevin Siembieda and work on developing numerous role-playing games and supplements for such settings as Palladium Fantasy Role-Playing Game, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles & Other Strangeness, After the Bomb, Rifts, and many others, including Amber Diceless Roleplaying Game and Paranoia. Wujcik was also the director of the Detroit Gaming Center, and founder of the gaming conventions known as Ambercon. In 1997 he went to work for Sierra Studios and was lead game designer on the game Return to Krondor. He also served as a game designer at Outrage Entertainment for the game Alter Echo. Wujcik served as chief editor of Amberzine, a fanzine for the Amber Diceless Roleplaying Game, publishing the work of such notables as Ray Bradbury, Henry Kuttner, and Roger
    9.00
    17 votes
    17

    Joseph Goodman

    • Games designed: DragonMech
    Joseph Goodman is the owner of Goodman Games, and has been a gaming professional since 1994, when he self-published The Dark Library. Writing credits include: Goodman Games is chiefly known for the d20 adventure series, Dungeon Crawl Classics.
    9.00
    17 votes
    18

    Robin Spriggs

    • Games designed: Capes & Cowls
    Robin Spriggs (born April 1, 1974) is an American writer, actor, and poet. Known primarily as a dark fabulist, he is the author of the critically acclaimed Diary of a Gentleman Diabolist and Wondrous Strange: Tales of the Uncanny; the co-author of The Dracula Poems: A Poetic Encounter with the Lord of Vampires; and the creator of Capes & Cowls: Adventures in Wyrd City, a "book-in-a-box" superhero board game based on his illustrated series, Capes & Cowls: The Wyrd City Chronicles. Spriggs holds degrees in both English and Theatre. He has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize, a Bram Stoker Award, a Rhysling Award, and received honorable mention in The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror. His fiction and poetry have appeared in such anthologies and magazines as Beyond, The Rhysling Anthology, Cemetery Dance, Going Postal, Space & Time, and Terminal Fright. The literary offerings of Robin Spriggs have been well received by critics. According to Cemetery Dance magazine, "Spriggs displays a wide range of talents in both form and substance. He's equally comfortable in the short story, short-short and novella lengths. His tone varies from the gently whimsical to the truly nasty. He crosses genre
    8.82
    17 votes
    19
    Nintendo

    Nintendo

    Nintendo Co., Ltd. (任天堂株式会社, Nintendō Kabushiki gaisha) is a Japanese multinational consumer electronics company located in Kyoto, Japan. Nintendo is the world's largest gaming company by revenue. Founded on September 23, 1889 by Fusajiro Yamauchi, it originally produced handmade hanafuda cards. By 1963, the company had tried several small niche businesses, such as a cab company and a love hotel. Abandoning previous ventures, Nintendo developed into a video game company, becoming one of the most influential in the industry and Japan's third most valuable listed company with a market value of over US$85 billion. Nintendo of America is also the majority owner of the Seattle Mariners Major League Baseball team. The name Nintendo can be roughly translated from Japanese to English as "leave luck to heaven". As of October 18, 2010, Nintendo has sold over 565 million hardware units and 3.4 billion software units. Nintendo was founded as a card company in late 1889, originally named Nintendo Koppai. Based in Kyoto, Japan, the business produced and marketed a playing card game called Hanafuda. The handmade cards soon became popular, and Yamauchi hired assistants to mass produce cards to
    9.38
    16 votes
    20

    Gary Mroczka

    Gary Mroczka is an 18XX designer, and has had 18GL published by Deep Thought Games, LLC. As of 2006, he is working on 18NYC, an 18XX game modelling subway development in New York City. The game will push new boundaries of the 18XX system, adding random events players must be prepared to deal with and track ownership by companies. It is in early development and will likely not be ready for publication in 2006.
    8.65
    17 votes
    21
    Tom Filsinger

    Tom Filsinger

    Tom Filsinger (February 11, 1957— ) is a creator, author, professor, and entrepreneur. He has founded two companies, Filsinger Games and Filsinger Publishing. Filsinger is the creator of Champions of the Galaxy and Legends of Wrestling role playing games. He is also a psychology professor and author of The Dark Menace of the Universe, a memoir and treatise on creativity. Filsinger was born Savvas Athanasios Tsagarakis, a descendant of Greek immigrants. His grandfather Tom Tsoulis and family came to America from Greece in 1917 and settled in Cleveland, Ohio. Tom Tsoulis' daughter Sophie married Christos Tsagarakis and bore a son, who was later to become known as Tom Filsinger. His father skipped town, reuniting with him only briefly 29 years later. His mother married Eugene Filsinger who later adopted her son, who changed his name to Tom Filsinger. In 1968, Tom's family moved to Lyndhurst, Ohio. Tom grew up with an interest in professional wrestling and comic books. After graduating from high school, he attended John Carroll University, a Jesuit college in University Heights, Ohio. He went on to graduate school at Northern Illinois University in Dekalb, Illinois and majored in
    6.95
    20 votes
    22

    Bryan Ansell

    Bryan Ansell is a British role-playing and war game designer. He founded Asgard Miniatures before creating Citadel Miniatures in the late 1970s. Around 1982-1983, he became Managing Director of Games Workshop, and bought Games Workshop from Steve Jackson and Ian Livingstone. Along with Rick Priestley, Alan and Michael Perry, Richard Halliwell, John Blanche, Jervis Johnson, and Alan Merrett, Ansell was responsible for the Warhammer (later Warhammer Fantasy Battle) boom of the mid-to-late 1980s. The contents page of White Dwarf 77 (May 1986) contained a coded message by the then editor Ian Marsh, who made the description of each item spell out "S O D O F F B R Y A N A N S E L L" This was due to a protest against the changes Ansell had demanded of the magazine. He later sold Games Workshop to Tom Kirby, and left to concentrate on Wargames Foundry. Wargames Foundry creates historical miniature ranges, originally sculpted by the Perry Twins for Citadel Miniatures, but no longer sold as part of the Games Workshop fantasy ranges. Ansell took a number of figure molds used for historical and fantasy figures under Citadel Miniatures and Games Workshop, and they have become part of the
    9.13
    16 votes
    23
    Hasbro

    Hasbro

    Hasbro (NASDAQ: HAS) is an American multinational toy and board game company. It is one of the largest toy makers in the world. The corporate headquarters is located in Pawtucket, Rhode Island. The majority of its products are manufactured in East Asia. In 1923, two brothers, Henry and Helal Hassenfeld, founded Hassenfeld Brothers, a textile remnant company in Hasbrouck Heights, New Jersey. Over the next two decades, the company expanded to produce pencil cases and school supplies. In the 1940s, Hassenfeld Brothers produced doctor and nurse kits, its first toys. Hassenfeld Brothers' first toy hit was Mr. Potato Head, which the company purchased from inventor George Lerner in 1952. The toy was a smash success. In 1964, Hassenfeld Brothers produced the G.I. Joe toy, which they termed an "action figure" in order to market the toy to boys who wouldn't want to play with "dolls." The company shortened its name to Hasbro Industries in 1968. Its promotional efforts included the catchphrase "Boy Oh Boy! It's A Hasbro Toy!" in television commercials and print ads. In 1969 Hasbro bought Romper Room, Inc., and re-branded it as Claster Television Productions. In 1982, Hasbro produced another
    9.13
    16 votes
    24
    Kris Burm

    Kris Burm

    • Games designed: PÜNCT
    Kris Burm is a Belgian game designer specializing in abstract board games. He is best known for his award-winning GIPF series of games. He was born in Antwerp, Belgium in 1957 and still lives there today. Published games include: All his published games are abstract, except Dicemaster, which is a collectible dice game and Tamsk, which has a real time element.
    8.94
    16 votes
    25
    Alex Randolph

    Alex Randolph

    Alexander Randolph (4 May 1922 – 28 April 2004) was a designer of board games. Randolph's game creations include TwixT, Breakthru, Inkognito (with Leo Colovini), Raj, Ricochet Robot, and Enchanted Forest (with Michael Matschoss). Randolph was born on a ranch by the Colorado River in Arizona. He attended school as a Swiss boarder, studying Philosophy and Semantics. Randolph spent many of his early years in various occupations, including military intelligence and as an advertising copy editor in Boston. In 1961, Randolph moved to Japan and became a professional game developer, performing initial work on TwixT. During this time he became a dan player in shogi. In 1962, Randolph (along with Sid Sackson) was commissioned to start a new game division for Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing (also known as 3M). Though 3M, Randolph created and published such games as Breakthru, Evade, Oh-Wah-Ree, and TwixT. Randolph moved to Venice, Italy in 1968, continuing his career as a game developer with the company Venice Connection established with Dario De Toffoli and Leo Colovini. Randolph died in Venice on 28 April 2004. Spiel des Jahres Origins Awards Hall of Fame
    8.88
    16 votes
    26

    Mark Rein·Hagen

    • Games designed: Z-G
    Mark Rein·Hagen (often written Rein-Hagen) is a role-playing, card, video and board game designer, best known as the creator of Vampire: The Masquerade and its associated World of Darkness games. Rein·Hagen is also one of the original two designers of Ars Magica along with Jonathan Tweet. A founder and owner of White Wolf Publishing he sold his half of the company in 2007 and left the gaming field. Rein·Hagen served as a writer and producer for Kindred: The Embraced, a TV show based on Vampire, produced by Aaron Spelling and shown on Fox TV. Kindred was cancelled, however, following the death of its star Mark Frankel. As a side project independent of White Wolf Publishing, Rein·Hagen founded Atomoton Games and created Z-G, the first collectible action figure game. Despite the high production value and plans for numerous tie-ins, the game failed to find a market and sank the company. Following the demise of Atomoton Games, Mark briefly pursued a farming career in central California, raising poultry for export to Asian markets. As of mid 2008 he was purportedly living in Tbilisi, Georgia with his wife and child during the 2008 South Ossetia War, Rein-Hagen was evacuated with other US
    8.75
    16 votes
    27

    Christopher Taylor

    Christopher "Chris" Taylor is a computer, board and card game developer originally from Southern California. Taylor is most famous for designing the original Fallout title for Interplay Entertainment, along with Tim Cain, Leonard Boyarsky and Jason Anderson. While at Interplay, Taylor contributed to the design of Star Trek: Starfleet Command, Stonekeep and Fallout 2. He also served as producer for The Lord of the Rings: Middle-Earth Online. In 2005, Taylor and two other Fallout designers (Tom Decker and Scott Everts) founded Zero Radius Games, a board game and non-collective card game development company. On September 22, 2008, it was announced on Interplay's website that Taylor had rejoined the company and would be working on "Project V13", later revealed to be Fallout Online.
    8.19
    16 votes
    28

    Redmond A. Simonsen

    Redmond Askel Simonsen (June 18, 1942–March 9, 2005) was an American graphic artist and game designer best known for his work at the board wargame company Simulations Publications, Inc. (SPI) in the 1970s and early 1980s. Simonsen was considered an innovator in game information graphics, and is credited with creating the term "game designer". As art director at SPI Simonsen supervised the release of over 400 game titles, and had game design or development credit for over twenty games. In addition, he variously held positions of executive art editor and co-editor or executive editor for the SPI magazines Strategy & Tactics, MOVES and Ares. Simonsen was the Charles S. Roberts Awards Hall of Fame inductee for 1977. Simonsen was born and raised in Inwood, Manhattan, the second son of Astri Nordlie Simonsen and August Emil Simonsen, an immigrant from Norway. His father was a high ironworker who died in a fall from a building; his mother then worked as a domestic and raised her three children August, Lois, and Redmond. Simonsen attended the Stuyvesant High School from 1956-1960. He served two tours in the United States Air Force, and was accepted for enrollment at Cooper Union, where he
    8.43
    14 votes
    29
    Klaus Teuber

    Klaus Teuber

    • Games designed: Settlers of Catan
    Klaus Teuber (born June 25, 1952) is a German designer of board games. He won the Spiel des Jahres award four times, for The Settlers of Catan, Barbarossa, Drunter und Drüber and Adel Verpflichtet. He retired from his profession as a dental technician to become a full-time game designer in 1999. As of 2007, he lives in Darmstadt with his wife Claudia. They have two sons, Guido and Benny.
    7.53
    15 votes
    30

    Ted Alspach

    Ted Alspach is a board-game designer and the author of more than 30 books on graphics, publishing and the web. He is best known for his Adobe Illustrator-related books, including Illustrator for Dummies and the best-selling Illustrator Bible series. Other books he has written include Photoshop Complete, Microsoft Bob, Internet E-mail Quick Tour, Acrobat Visual Quickstart Guide, and PageMaker Visual Quickstart Guide. Ted was employed by Adobe Systems as Group Product Manager for Adobe Illustrator and the Creative Suite from 1999-2006. He is the creator of the online and print comic strip Board 2 Pieces, which is a humorous slant on boardgaming told by the game pieces themselves. The comic appears twice a week at www.opinionatedgamers.com. From 2006-through 2010, it appeared on Boardgamenews.com and previously appeared in a larger format each issue of Knucklebones magazine (before it closed). Ted Alspach is the designer of the strategy game Seismic, published by Atlas Games, 2006, in which players lay tiles and claim highways in an attempt to create as many completed highway segments before the end of the game, avoiding periodic earthquake activity; the game Rapscallion which allows
    8.14
    14 votes
    31

    Z-Man Games

    Z-Man Games is a company incorporated in 1999 in the USA to produce games. The headquarters is in Mahopac, New York, near New York City. It is named after its proprietor, Zev Shlasinger. Its productions include: In 2011, Quebec-based distributor Filosofia bought Z-Man Games. Shlasinger remains head of Z-Man games.
    8.31
    13 votes
    32

    Scott Abbott

    Charles Scott Abbott is the co-inventor of Trivial Pursuit along with Chris Haney. Known as "Scott," he was the owner of the Brampton Battalion hockey team, of the Ontario Hockey League. For his work in building this hockey club, he was inducted into the Brampton Sports Hall of Fame in 2005. Born in Montreal, Quebec, before he became wealthy through the invention of Trivial Pursuit, Scott Abbott was a sports journalist for Canadian Press. He owns C. Scott Abbott Racing Stable Ltd. whose horse Smart Sky finished seventh in the 2010 Queen's Plate.
    8.50
    12 votes
    33

    Atlas Games

    • Games designed: Unwelcome Guests
    Atlas Games is a company which publishes role-playing games, board games and card games. Its current president is John Nephew. Games published include:
    8.42
    12 votes
    34
    Hans im Glück

    Hans im Glück

    Hans im Glück Verlags-GmbH is a German board and card game publisher. Though many of their own games are language-independent they themselves publish only printings for the domestic market which include only German-language rules; English-language printings of their games have been published primarily by Rio Grande Games, Dutch versions by 999 Games and so on. They are named after a story recorded by the Brothers Grimm, called "Hans in Luck" or "Lucky Hans" in English, hence the logo of Hans riding a pig.
    7.50
    12 votes
    35
    Charles Darrow

    Charles Darrow

    • Games designed: Monopoly
    Charles Brace Darrow (August 10, 1889 – August 28, 1967) was born in Philadelphia; he is best known as the purported inventor of the Monopoly board game. Darrow was a domestic heater salesman from Germantown, a neighborhood in Philadelphia (the part of Germantown he lived in is now called Mount Airy) during the Great Depression. The house he lived in still stands at 40 Westview Street. While Darrow eventually sold his version of Monopoly to Parker Brothers, claiming it to be his own invention, modern historians credit Darrow as just one of the game's final developers. After losing his job at a sales company following the Stock Market Crash of 1929, Darrow worked at various odd jobs. Seeing his neighbors and acquaintances play a home-made board game in which the object was to buy and sell property, he decided to publish his own version of the game, with the help of his first son, William, and his wife Ester. Darrow marketed his version of the game under the name Monopoly. In truth, Darrow was just one of many people in the American Midwest and East Coast who had been playing a game of buying and trading property. The game's direct ancestor was The Landlord's Game, created by
    8.00
    10 votes
    36

    Kevin Siembieda

    • Games designed: Rifts
    Kevin Siembieda (born April 2, 1956) is an American artist, writer, designer, and publisher of role-playing games, and the co-founder and president of Palladium Books. Some of the role-playing games that Siembieda has created include Palladium Fantasy Role-Playing Game (1983), Heroes Unlimited (1984), Robotech (1986), and Rifts (1990). Siembieda is also an artist, best known for occasionally illustrating Palladium Books' products. Prior to 1973, he started the now-defunct Megaton Publications in Detroit, Michigan with Alex Marciniszyn. Together they published a science fiction fanzine called Nightspawn in 1973 and a digest-style title called A+Plus Comics in 1977. Siembieda also contributed art and cartography to several early Judges Guild products for the Dungeons & Dragons, RuneQuest, and Traveller lines.
    7.80
    10 votes
    37
    Upper Deck Company

    Upper Deck Company

    The Upper Deck Company, LLC (colloquially as Upper Deck and Upper Deck Authenticated, Ltd. in the UK), founded in 1988, is a private company primarily known for producing trading cards. Its headquarters are in Carlsbad, California, United States. The company also produces sports related items such as figurines and die-cast on top of having exclusive agreements to produce memorabilia (under the brand name Upper Deck Authenticated) with such sports superstars as Michael Jordan, Derek Jeter, Tiger Woods, LeBron James, Kevin Garnett, Andrew Bynum, Ernie Els, Albert Pujols, Grady Sizemore, Matt Kemp, James Loney, Sandy Koufax and Ken Griffey Jr. Under the Upper Deck Entertainment name, the company also produced card games such as World of Warcraft. On December 23, 1988, Upper Deck was granted a license by Major League Baseball to produce baseball cards, and just two months later, on February 23, 1989, delivered its first case of baseball cards to George Moore of Tulsa's Baseball Card Store in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Upper Deck sold out its baseball cards midway through this inaugural year, then pre-sold its entire 1990 baseball stock before the year began. The 1990 set included the industry's
    9.86
    7 votes
    38

    Martin H. Samuel

    Martin Howard Samuel (born July 13, 1949) on the island of Mombasa, Kenya is an English drummer, lyricist, game designer, international surfer and blue-water sailor. A survivor of the British boarding school system in Kenya who then attended Bournemouth Grammar School, UK, Samuel was finally expelled from Hottentots Holland High School, Somerset West, South Africa. Despite all, he "blames" his parents, Margaret Vera (mother) and Arthur Hentshel (father) for a wonderful childhood. Born with perfect meter, the ability to play more than one tempo at the same time and already playing drums at the age of five in Nairobi, Samuel became a recording studio session drummer in London, Cologne, New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle and Honolulu. His drums of preference are Ludwig. He was the drummer in the London, UK pop group Heatwave who released the single 'Sister Simon b/w Rastus Ravel' on Penny Farthing Records in 1970. Heatwave was a regular on BBC Radio in the early 70’s and, in addition to touring the UK (including playing at the original Cavern Club in Liverpool), opened for Ben E. King and The Drifters, Love Sculpture with Dave Edmunds, Spooky Tooth, Love Affair, Consortium
    9.71
    7 votes
    39
    9.67
    6 votes
    40

    David "Zeb" Cook

    • Games designed: Dungeons & Dragons Expert Set
    David "Zeb" Cook is an American game designer best known for his work at TSR, Inc., where he was employed for over fifteen years. Cook was born in East Lansing, Michigan, and grew up on a farm in Iowa where his father worked as a farmer and a college professor. In junior high school, Cook playing wargames such as Avalon Hill's Blitzkrieg and Afrika Korps. "I was primarily a wargamer, but there wasn’t any role-playing available then," although in college, he was introduced to the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game through the University of Iowa gaming club. Cook earned his B.A. in English (with a Theater minor) in 1977. He married his high school sweetheart, Helen, with whom he had one son, Ian. Cook became a high school teacher in Milligan, Nebraska, where his students gave him his nickname of "Zeb"; the name derives from his signature, which is dominated by a stroke resembling a 'Z', as well as his resemblance to the James Arness character Zeb Macahan in the TV series How the West Was Won. Cook responded to an ad in Dragon magazine for a game designer position at TSR. After completing the designer test that the company then used, and writing a sample module section, Cook became
    9.00
    6 votes
    41

    Larry Harris

    • Games designed: Axis and Allies
    Larry Harris, Jr., is a game designer most famous for creating the board game Axis & Allies, as well as all of its sequels. His other significant games include Conquest of the Empire, Broadsides and Boarding Parties, LionHeart and more. He has also assisted in the further development of Trivial Pursuit and Risk. Larry is also the inventor of Thin Ice. Four of his Axis & Allies games won Origins Awards, including the induction of the original game into the Academy of Adventure Gaming Arts & Design's Hall of Fame in 1996. He is the son of Lawrence (Larry) Harris, Sr., who was a U.S. infantryman in the Pacific Theatre, participating in assaults in the Solomon Islands, New Guinea and the Philippines.
    9.00
    6 votes
    43
    8.83
    6 votes
    44

    Andrea Angiolino

    • Games designed: Wings of War
    Andrea Angiolino (born April 27, 1966 in Rome, Italy) is a game designer: among his last boardgames Dragon Ball - Alla ricerca delle sette sfere (Nexus Editrice 1998), Ulysses (Winning Moves 2001), Wings of War (Nexus Editrice 2004, then NG International, now published as Wings of Glory by Ares Games), Isla Dorada (FunForge 2010, English edition by Fantasy Flight Games), and the card game Obscura Tempora (Rose & Poison 2005). He wrote several role-playing games: among them Orlando Furioso, written with Gianluca Meluzzi, published by the City Council of Rome to be distributed in schools and public libraries. He also created games for radio and TV, magazines, training, advertising, festivals and shows. He is a professional journalist specialized in games: he started with a column about role-playing games on the Italian monthly magazine Pergioco in September 1982, together with Gregory Alegi, and then worked for many national newspaper and magazines, radio broadcasts and Internet sites. He wrote more than 20 books, some of which translated into several languages, and created several game CD-Roms. His main work is a "Games Dictionary" (Dizionario del Gioco, with Beniamino Sidoti,
    7.86
    7 votes
    45
    Boris Kourtoukov

    Boris Kourtoukov

    • Games designed: Strands of Destiny: Deception
    A professional web designer and front end developer. In the past he dabbled in game development, digital painting and project management.
    8.67
    6 votes
    46

    Tom Moldvay

    Tom Moldvay (Thomas Steven Moldvay, Nov. 5, 1948 – March 9, 2007) was a game designer and author most notable for his work on early materials for the fantasy role-playing game Dungeons & Dragons (D&D). As an employee of TSR, Inc., Moldvay authored or co-authored landmark D&D adventure modules such as Castle Amber, Isle of Dread, the rewrite of Palace of the Silver Princess, and Secret of the Slavers Stockade, all published in 1981. Of these, X1 – Isle of Dread was one of the most widely played modules of the time because it was distributed inside the D&D Expert Set rules. Also in 1981, Moldvay edited the first major revision of the rulebooks in the D&D Basic Set since its original publication. Other Moldvay adventure modules for D&D include The Lost City (1982) and Twilight Calling (1986). In the years between 1980 and 1988, he also penned several articles in Dragon magazine. The fictional city of Yavdlom in the D&D Mystara setting – which in the following years included most of the old D&D material – is an homage to him (Yavdlom being the backward reading of Moldvay). Moldvay also co-developed TSR's Gangbusters role-playing game, wrote adventures for TSR's Star Frontiers game, and
    8.67
    6 votes
    47

    David G. Watts

    David G. Watts is a Welsh games designer and publisher. Originally a school geography teacher at Milford Haven Grammar School, he designed Railway Rivals, his most popular game, to teach the geography of Wales and upon retirement published it under the imprint Rostherne Games. His games have been published worldwide with his greatest successes in Germany. Most use transportation as a theme but he has also designed abstract games, chess variants and a variety of race games.
    7.71
    7 votes
    48

    Mattel

    Mattel, Inc. ( /məˈtɛl/; NASDAQ: MAT) is the world's largest toy company based on revenue. The products it produces include Fisher Price, Barbie dolls, Hot Wheels and Matchbox toys, Masters of the Universe, American Girl dolls, board games, and, in the early 1980s, video game consoles. The company's name is derived from Harold "Matt" Matson and Elliot Handler, who founded the company in 1945. Handler's wife, Ruth Handler, later became president, and is credited with establishing the Barbie product line for the company in 1959. After the release of the Barbie doll, Mattel revolutionized the toy industry with its talking dolls and toys. Major successes in the 1960s with the talking Chatty Cathy doll in 1960 and See 'N Say toys in 1965 moved Mattel to its position as the number one toymaker in America. Mattel closed its last factory in the United States of America, originally part of the Fisher-Price division, in 2002, outsourcing production to China, the beginning of a chain of events that led to a scandal involving lead contamination. On Friday, September 3, 2010 a small-scale "Flash Crash" appears to have occurred in Mattel shares which plunged 22% in pre-market trade for no
    7.71
    7 votes
    49

    Clinton R. Nixon

    • Games designed: Donjon
    Clinton R. Nixon is the designer and publisher of indie role-playing games like The Shadow of Yesterday, Donjon, Paladin, and others. He co-administered the Forge with Ron Edwards, and is a proponent of independent publishing in general and independent game publishing in particular.
    6.88
    8 votes
    50

    John Jefferys

    John Jefferys, birth and death date unknown, is the first game designer to whom a game design can be definitively ascribed. (Note: In the Anglophone world, at least; prior dates are welcome.) He is the designer of A Journey Through Europe, published in 1759 by Carringtown Bowles. The game is inscribed "Invented and sold by the Proprietor, John Jefferys, at his house in Chapel Street, near the Broad Way, Westmr. Writing Master, Accompt. Geographer, etc. Printed for Carrington Bowles, Map & Printseller, No 69 in St. Paul's Church Yard, London. Price 8s. Published as the Act directs, September 14th, 1759." As with most 18th-century British original boardgames, it is a track game, with the kind of game mechanics familiar in track games today (e.g., landing on certain spaces advances you or sends you back to other spaces). Rather than using dice, players used a teetotum, a multi-sided top, with a number on each side, players moving the number of spaces indicated by the uppermost side when the top falls. (Dice were considered gambling instruments, and not appropriate in Christian households.)
    9.60
    5 votes
    51

    Bruce Barrymore Halpenny

    • Games designed: Great train robbery board game
    Bruce Barrymore Halpenny is a widely respected English military historian and author, specialising in airfields and aircraft, as well as ghost stories and mysteries. He is also a broadcaster and games inventor. Halpenny's father was a Canadian First World War soldier who fought at Vimy Ridge, and his mother a British First World War munitions worker from Lincolnshire. Bruce himself, is from Lincolnshire, England. Halpenny served in the Royal Air Force Police in specialist units, often overseas, but after being wounded, and instead of coming out of the RAF, he moved across to the RAF Police (RAFPD) on Special Security Duties (Atomic & Chemical Weapons) SS, and was part of a special RAF military police unit on Special Duties and in the Nuclear Division, that was responsible for the protection of the nuclear weapons that the V bombers were to use in time of war. In the 1950s whilst in the RAF he was wounded and had to undergo several operations, in which his life was in the balance as dedicated surgeons fought to not only save his hand and arm, but also his life. In rehabilitation he started writing and research as a hobby, and though he stayed in the RAF and was to serve on Special
    6.38
    8 votes
    52

    George Chanos

    • Games designed: Notable Quotables
    George Chanos (born 1960) is an American politician. He was the Attorney General of the state of Nevada, United States. He was appointed by Governor Kenny Guinn in 2005 to fill out the term of his predecessor, Brian Sandoval, who became a federal district judge. He also created a moderately successful trivia board game known as Notable Quotables in 1990. He is a member of the Republican Party. Chanos is divorced with one daughter. He was born in Wauwatosa, Wisconsin and is of Greek ancestry.
    6.38
    8 votes
    53

    Wolfgang Kramer

    • Games designed: Torres
    Wolfgang Kramer (born June 29, 1942 in Stuttgart) is a German board game designer. Kramer formerly worked as an operations manager and computer scientist, but since 1989 he has worked full-time on game design. He has designed over 100 games, many which have been nominated for or have won the Spiel des Jahres. He frequently collaborates with other designers, notably Michael Kiesling and Richard Ulrich. A common feature of German-style board games, where players' scores are recorded on a track around the edge of the board, is known in Germany as the Kramerleiste in honour of Wolfgang Kramer. Kramer himself first used this method of score-tracking in his 1984 game, Heimlich & Co. Kramer is also an author of mystery novels. His works include Der Palast der Rätsel (The Palace of Mysteries) and Die Rätsel der Pyramide (The Mysteries of the Pyramid).
    6.38
    8 votes
    54

    Brady Games

    BradyGames is a publishing company in the United States operating as an imprint of Dorling Kindersley, which specialises in video game strategy guides, covering multiple video game platforms. BradyGames published their first strategy guide in November 1993 and has grown to publish roughly 90-100 guides per year. Competitors include Prima Games and Piggyback Interactive. In the US, most BradyGames strategy guides range from $14.99 to $19.99, with the most expensive guide BradyGames has ever published priced at $29.99. The company occasionally offers two different versions of the same guide: one regular and one limited edition (which usually contains bonus items like a CD soundtrack or separate book containing art from the respective game).
    8.80
    5 votes
    55
    Donald Featherstone

    Donald Featherstone

    Donald F. Featherstone (born 20 March 1918, London) is a British author of more than forty books on wargaming and military history. He wrote classic texts on wargaming in the 1960s and 1970s. During the Second World War, Featherstone attempted to join the Royal Air Force and the Royal Navy; both rejected him. Therefore he settled on the Army and joined the Royal Armoured Corps. An account of his war experiences can be found in his book Lost Tales Originally a physiotherapist, Featherstone was first introduced to wargaming by reading HG Well's Little Wars and his first opponent was Tony Bath in 1955. In 1960 the two of them began editing the UK version of the War Game Digest, a seminal wargaming newsletter started by Jack Scruby. Disapproving of a trend towards articles that were "attempting to spread an aura of pseudo-science over what is a pastime," Featherstone started his own periodical in 1962, the Wargamers' Newsletter. While in discussion late one night with Dr. Paddy Griffith (the well known military historian), Don had a Eureka moment when he came to realise that the hobby of wargaming could considerably aid understanding of military history . Featherstone appeared on the
    8.80
    5 votes
    56

    Greg Costikyan

    • Games designed: Toon
    Greg Costikyan, sometimes known under the pseudonym "Designer X", is an American game designer and science fiction writer. Costikyan's career spans nearly all extant genres of gaming, including hex-based wargames, role-playing games, boardgames, card games, computer games, online games and mobile games. Several of his games have won Origins Awards. He co-founded Manifesto Games, now out of business, with Johnny Wilson in 2005. Costikyan lives in New York City near his three daughters and is a 1982 graduate (B.S.) of Brown University. He is a frequent speaker at game industry events including the Game Developers Conference and E³. Costikyan's notable works include: In addition, Costikyan is a widely-published author on the subject of game design and the role of games in culture. His essay, "I Have No Words and I Must Design" is widely read as a conceptual approach to framing game design. Costikyan worked on game design for many years, including writing and consulting for Nokia. In September 2005, he left Nokia to join with Johnny Wilson, former editor of Computer Gaming World, in founding the startup indie game publisher Manifesto Games. He regularly contributed to the now defunct
    8.80
    5 votes
    57

    Jonathan Tweet

    • Games designed: Star Wars Miniatures
    Jonathan Tweet is a game designer who has been involved in the development of the role-playing games Ars Magica, Everway, Over the Edge, Talislanta and the third edition of Dungeons & Dragons, as well as the Collectible Miniatures Game Dreamblade. Jonathan Tweet started playing D&D in the 1970s, when his father gave him his first Dungeons & Dragons game. He briefly played with a group of college students, although he says, "but the DM killed me off... because he didn't want a twelve-year-old in his group". Tweet then formed his own gaming group by recruiting classmates. In 1987, Tweet designed the game Ars Magica, a game centered around wizards in the Middle Ages. In 1992 he designed the game Over the Edge, which involved free-form rules and a subjective approach. Tweet was lead designer on the third edition of Dungeons & Dragons. Tweet, Monte Cook, and Skip Williams all contributed to the 3rd edition Players Handbook, Dungeon Master's Guide, and Monster Manual, and then each designer wrote one of the books based on those contributions. On December 2, 2008 he was one of the lay offs from Wizards of the Coast. In 2007, he was inducted into the Origins Hall of Fame. An atheist since
    8.80
    5 votes
    58

    Bob Doyle

    • Games designed: Merlin
    Bob Doyle (born June 19, 1936 in Fall River, Massachusetts) is a scientist, inventor, and philosopher. Doyle studied physics at Brown University (Sc.B, 1958) and astrophysics at Harvard University (Ph.D., 1968). In 2008 he returned to the Harvard Astronomy Department to study the origin of information structures in the universe. Doyle's Ph.D. thesis was on the continuous spectrum of the hydrogen quasi-molecule. He was the secretary of the NASA Astronomy Missions Board from 1969 to 1972. He edited the Long-Range Program in Space Astronomy for NASA in 1970 , which led to the HEAO Program, including the Einstein Observatory. He was the coordinator of the Skylab Joint Observing Program, supporting a network of 250 ground-based observatories around the world synchronizing their cameras with space telescopes in the Skylab Apollo Telescope Mount. As Visiting Professor of Astronomy at University of Washington in 1970, he taught a course on Space Astronomy and developed Project ASTRA (Astronomical and Space Techniques for Research on the Atmosphere). Project ASTRA was funded by the National Science Foundation, winning a special Director's Competition for innovative inter-disciplinary
    9.75
    4 votes
    59
    Dave Arneson

    Dave Arneson

    • Games designed: Dungeons & Dragons
    David Lance "Dave" Arneson (October 1, 1947 – April 7, 2009) was an American game designer best known for co-developing the first published role-playing game (RPG), Dungeons & Dragons, with Gary Gygax, in the early 1970s. Arneson's early work was fundamental to the development of the genre, developing the concept of the RPG using devices now considered to be archetypical, such as adventuring in "dungeons", using a neutral judge, and having conversations with imaginary characters to develop the storyline. Arneson discovered wargaming as a teenager in the 1960s, and began combining these games with the concept of role-playing. He was a University of Minnesota student when he met Gygax at the Gen Con gaming convention in the late 1960s. In 1970 Arneson created the game and fictional world that became Blackmoor, writing his own rules and basing the setting on medieval fantasy elements. Arneson showed the game to Gygax the following year, and the pair co-developed a set of rules that became Dungeons & Dragons (D&D). Gygax subsequently founded TSR, Inc. to publish the game in 1974. Arneson worked briefly for the company. Arneson left TSR in 1976, and filed suit in 1979 to retain credits
    9.75
    4 votes
    60

    Colin Rumford

    Colin Rumford is the co-author of Rapid Fire! (Fast Play World War Two wargames rules). Based in the United Kingdom Colin Rumford and Richard Marsh have been prominent in the wargaming area for over 20 years. Notable of their achievements have been the highly visual demonstration games and Wargames shows in the United Kingdom and their published supplements and articles in Wargames magazines.
    8.20
    5 votes
    62

    Andrew Greenberg

    • Games designed: Fading Suns
    Andrew Greenberg is a game designer of both tabletop role-playing games and role-playing video games. He was one of White Wolf Publishing's original developers on Vampire: The Masquerade (1991), particularly the famous supplement Chicago by Night which many credit with setting the tone for the Vampire books that followed. After years with White Wolf, he joined Holistic Design, Inc. (HDI) where he worked on computer games like Emperor of the Fading Suns and Mall Tycoon. He is also co-creator of the Fading Suns (1996) RPG with Bill Bridges. In addition, he helped found the Mythic Imagination Institute and is co-chair of the Mythic Journeys convention. In 2007, he began teaching video game design classes at the Art Institute of Atlanta.
    8.00
    5 votes
    63
    Alan R. Moon

    Alan R. Moon

    • Games designed: Elfenland
    Alan R. Moon (born 18 Novemember 1951) is an author of board games, born in Southampton, England, and currently living in the United States. Despite his nationality, he is generally considered to be one of the foremost designers of German-style board games. Many of his games can be seen as board game variations on the travelling salesman problem. Alan R. Moon initially worked for Avalon Hill and later Parker Brothers. He started his own publishing company, White Wind in 1990. He now publishes his games through other companies, such as Ravensburger and Days of Wonder.
    10.00
    3 votes
    64
    Bandai

    Bandai

    Bandai Co., Ltd. (株式会社バンダイ, Kabushiki-gaisha Bandai) is a Japanese toy making and video game company, as well as the producer of a large number of plastic model kits. It is the world's third-largest producer of toys (after Mattel and Hasbro). Some ex-Bandai group companies produce anime and tokusatsu programs. Its headquarters is located in Taitō, Tokyo. After the merger with game developer and amusement facility operator Namco, Bandai Co., Ltd. is now under the management of Namco Bandai Holdings and a member of Bandai Namco Group. After group reorganisation in 2006, Bandai heads the group's Toys and Hobby Strategic Business Unit (SBU). Bandai was founded in 1950. In the 1960s Bandai expanded to include export sales. Bandai's racing car set, which first appeared in 1962, became a huge success. The 1970s continued to see Bandai expand, with Bandai Models being established in 1971. Although not their most profitable range, Bandai's 1/48 scale AFV models dominated that segment of the model kit market. Bandai America Inc. was established as local US sales/marketing operation in 1978. Since the 1980s, Bandai has become the leading toy company of Japan, and to this day, has the main toy
    7.80
    5 votes
    65

    Andreas Seyfarth

    • Games designed: San Juan
    Andreas Seyfarth (born November 6, 1962) is a German-style board game designer, who is most famous for creating Puerto Rico, which is rated #3 on BoardGameGeek. In 2002, the game was awarded first place for the prestigious Deutscher Spiele Preis (German for German Game Prize). Seyfarth also received the crown jewel of German board-game awards, the Spiel des Jahres (German for Game of the Year) in 1994 and 2006 for his games Manhattan and Thurn and Taxis respectively. Seyfarth married his wife Karen in 1988. He credits her with playtesting and helping design most of his games, she is also the co-author of Thurn and Taxis. Seyfarth works as a financial controller at Deutsche Telekom.
    6.83
    6 votes
    66

    Ron Edwards

    • Games designed: Sorcerer
    Ronald Edwards (born September 4, 1964) is a game designer, theorist, and an influential member of the indie role-playing game community. Notably, he is the creator of the Sorcerer RPG, the GNS Theory of gameplay, and The Big Model. Edwards is also co-founder of The Forge, an online community to support Indie RPG design and publication.
    9.67
    3 votes
    67

    Anne Abbott

    Anne Wales Abbott or, Abbot (April 10, 1808 – June 1, 1908) was a game designer, magazine editor, literary reviewer, and author. She was born 10 April 1808, the daughter of Reverend Abiel Abbott, a Beverly, Massachusetts clergyman, and Eunice Abbott. Abbott designed the hugely popular card game Dr. Busby, which was published by W. & S. B. Ives of Salem, Massachusetts that sold 15,000 copies in its first eighteen months and "Master Roddenbury" through W. & S.B. Ives in 1844. In July 1850, Abbott reviewed Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter for the North American Review, declaring she liked the preface better than the tale. Abbott disapproved of Hawthorne's subject matter and believed he had allowed his good judgement to be carried away by "the magic power of the style." Hawthorne referred to Abbott as one of that "damned mob of scribbling women." Abbott served gratuitously as editor (1851–1858) of The Child's Friend, a literary journal for young people. Profits from the publication were directed to the relief of indigent and neglected children. In 1853, Abbott's Autumn Leaves: Original Pieces in Prose and Verse was published by John Bartlett of Cambridge. Children's books by Abbott
    7.60
    5 votes
    68
    6.00
    7 votes
    69

    Lynn Willis

    Lynn Willis is a wargame and role-playing game designer who has done work for Metagaming Concepts, Game Designers' Workshop, and Chaosium. Willis began by designing science fiction wargames for Metagaming, starting with the Godsfire in 1976. He also designed the microgames Olympica (1978) and Holy War (1979). Chaosium published Lords of the Middle Sea (1978), while GDW published Bloodtree Rebellion (1979). However, Willis's relationship with Chaosium has proved the most enduring, and there he would turn to role-playing games. He helped founder Greg Stafford trim and refine the RuneQuest rules into Basic Role-Playing, the rules that would serve as the base for many of Chaosium's RPG lines. He is included in the design credits for Worlds of Wonder (1982) and the Ringworld RPG (1984). With other members of Chaosium, he co-wrote the Ghostbusters RPG for West End Games, which won the H.G. Wells Award for Best Role-playing Rules of 1986. After their original creators left, Willis took on the task of developing new editions of Stormbringer and Call of Cthulhu. Throughout, he edited, and sometimes wrote for, Chaosium supplements. Indeed, as other staff members, even Stafford, have
    8.50
    4 votes
    71
    Charles S. Roberts

    Charles S. Roberts

    Charles Swann Roberts (February 3, 1930 – August 20, 2010) was a wargame designer, railroad historian, and businessman. He is renowned as "The Father of Board Wargaming", having created the first modern wargame (a boardgame) in 1952, and the first wargaming company in 1954. He is also the author of a series of books on railroad history, published by the small publishing firm, Barnard, Roberts, and Company, Inc. Roberts created the first board wargame, Tactics, in an apartment in Catonsville, Maryland in 1952. In 1954, out of a garage in Avalon, Maryland, he began selling it via mail-order as The Avalon Game Company, which later become Avalon Hill in 1958. His Tactics II (1958) improved on the basic game design of his earlier effort, and formed the genesis for the concept of the combat results table. In 1958 he published Gettysburg, considered to be the first board wargame based upon an actual historical battle, with subsequent versions in 1961 and 1964. Hard hit by a recession, Roberts turned over Avalon Hill to one of his creditors, Eric Dott of Monarch Services, in December 1963. Starting in 1974, Roberts' name was given to the Charles S. Roberts Awards, given for excellence in
    6.67
    6 votes
    72
    John Forbes Nash

    John Forbes Nash

    John Forbes Nash, Jr. (born June 13, 1928) is an American mathematician whose works in game theory, differential geometry, and partial differential equations have provided insight into the forces that govern chance and events inside complex systems in daily life. His theories are used in market economics, computing, evolutionary biology, artificial intelligence, accounting, politics and military theory. Serving as a Senior Research Mathematician at Princeton University during the latter part of his life, he shared the 1994 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences with game theorists Reinhard Selten and John Harsanyi. Nash is the subject of the Hollywood movie A Beautiful Mind. The film, loosely based on the biography of the same name, focuses on Nash's mathematical genius and struggle with paranoid schizophrenia. In his own words, he states, Nash was born on June 13, 1928, in Bluefield, West Virginia. His father, after whom he is named, was an electrical engineer for the Appalachian Electric Power Company. His mother, born Margaret Virginia Martin and known as Virginia, had been a schoolteacher before she married. Both parents pursued opportunities to supplement their son's
    6.67
    6 votes
    73
    Mark Derrick

    Mark Derrick

    Mark Derrick works for the Tennessee Department of Transportation as a Civil Engineer and graduated from the University of Tennessee in 1982. He is a licensed professional engineer in the State of Tennessee and has been married to his wife Maria since 1979. He runs an annual 18XX convention, the Chattanooga Rail Game Challenge, in January or February of each year. The event draws approximately 50 players, including many from outside the United States. He has published four 18XX games: He is working on 18Dixie which is a large game that includes 18GA as a playable subset (with the Cotton Port variant) and connects to 18TN to provide a 6-panel map covering the entire Southeastern United States. It will be available from Deep Thought Games, LLC when it is ready, likely to be in 2007. Derrick, MarkDerrick, Mark
    6.67
    6 votes
    74

    Don Lowry

    Don Lowry is a wargamer, businessman, illustrator, and game designer who is best known as the publisher of Chainmail and the editor of Panzerfaust Magazine. Lowry was active in the International Federation of Wargaming in the late 1960s and ran a mail order business called "Lowry's Hobbies" with his wife Julie. In 1970 he produced a supplement to the Avalon Hill game Battle of the Bulge called Operation Greif which was distributed via the IFW newsletter. In 1971 he started a publishing imprint called Guidon Games which produced rulebooks for miniature wargaming and board wargames, and he tapped Gary Gygax to serve as editor. Lowry designed two of the games, Ironclad and Atlanta, himself and provided the illustrations for some of the other games. Lowry's mail order business was originally in Evansville, Indiana, but he relocated to Belfast, Maine in 1972. The same year he acquired Panzerfaust Magazine from Don Greenwood and took over as editor. Lowry declined to publish Dungeons & Dragons, which motivated Gygax to found TSR, Inc.. TSR would republish some of the Guidon titles, and the Guidon board game Alexander the Great was picked up by Avalon Hill. By 1975 Lowry moved his
    7.40
    5 votes
    75

    Fundex Games

    Fundex Games, Ltd. is an American toy and game company based in Plainfield, Indiana. Founded in 1986, Fundex Games produces many different games including card games, dice games, domino-based games, magic tricks, board games, and children's toys. Fundex also produces a line of outdoor lawn and tailgate games. Fundex Games was founded by Peter Voigt and his son, Chip Voigt. Fundex Games has an exclusive partnership with the Professional Domino Association to market PDA-licensed domino games and other products for the United States market. Fundex's best selling game is Phase 10, in which it is the second best selling cardgame in the world, behind Uno. On September 7, 2012, Fundex Games, Ltd. filed for bankruptcy in the Southern District of Indiana. Fundex Games has been awarded numerous iParenting Media Awards for its products: five awards for Hottest Products for 2004 and one award for Best Products of 2006. Additionally, Fundex Games earned an Oppenheim Toy Portfolio Platinum Award in 2006 for Alfredo's Food Fight, a board game for young children and Highrise a family Domino Game.
    7.40
    5 votes
    76
    Greg Stafford

    Greg Stafford

    Francis Gregory Stafford (born February 9, 1948), usually known as Greg Stafford, is an American game designer, publisher and shaman. Stafford is perhaps most famous as the creator of the fantasy world of Glorantha, but is also a prolific games designer - he was designer of Pendragon, he was co-designer of the RuneQuest, Ghostbusters, Prince Valiant and HeroQuest role-playing systems, founder of the role-playing game companies Chaosium and Issaries, designer of the White Bear and Red Moon, Nomad Gods, King Arthur’s Knights and Elric! board games, and co-designer of the King of Dragon Pass computer game. Greg Stafford's interest in roleplaying and gaming originated in his adolescent fascination with mythology. During his adolescent years he read anything he could find on the subject, and when he exhausted the libraries, he started to write his own stories in his freshman year at Beloit College, in 1966. This was the start of the world of Glorantha. Around 1974, Stafford created White Bear and Red Moon, a board game about the violent struggle between several cultures in the Dragon Pass region of Glorantha. In essence the game centered around the conflict between the barbarian Kingdom
    7.40
    5 votes
    77
    7.40
    5 votes
    78

    Larry Bond

    Larry Bond (born 1952) is an American author and video game designer. He is the designer of the Harpoon and Command at Sea gaming systems and several supplements for the games. His numerous novels include Dangerous Ground, Day of Wrath, The Enemy Within, Cauldron, Vortex and Red Phoenix. He also co-authored Red Storm Rising with Tom Clancy. Graduating from St. Thomas College, St. Paul, Minnesota in 1973 with a degree in Quantitative Methods, Bond worked first as a computer programmer for two years before being selected for Officer Candidate School in Newport, Rhode Island. He was sworn into the United States Navy in 1975 and graduated from NAVOCS the following year. Bond served in the United States Navy for six years, serving four years on a destroyer and two years on shore duty in the Washington, D.C. area. He served in the reserves for two years with the Naval Reserve Intelligence Program. After leaving the Navy he worked as a naval analyst for defense consulting firms in the Washington, D.C. area. Bond's writing career started by collaborating with Tom Clancy on Red Storm Rising, a New York Times bestseller that was one of the best-selling books of the 1980s. It depicted a
    7.40
    5 votes
    79
    Lou Zocchi

    Lou Zocchi

    Louis Zocchi, Sergeant, USAF (retired), is a gaming hobbyist, former game distributor and publisher, and maker and seller of polyhedral game dice. Zocchi and his company GameScience have published a number of games over the years (many designed by Zocchi), but are best known for making dice, and inventing the Zocchihedron (100-sided) die. Zocchi is a well-known figure at gaming conventions like Gen Con and Origins Game Fair, where he demonstrates the various inconsistencies in most mass-produced gaming dice. Most dice, according to Zocchi, do not roll accurately because of flawed manufacturing processes. The dice favor certain numbers and are more likely to land on those numbers. Zocchi believes the "superstition" of many gamers who use specific dice to roll high and others to roll low results from the fact that major dice manufacturers smooth out the straight edges of their dice in machines much like rock tumblers. The result is that plastic dice originally molded evenly are unevened and unbalanced, making them more likely to land on some numbers than on others. Zocchi demonstrates the imperfections of dice with statistical results (showing uneven distribution of rolled die
    7.40
    5 votes
    80

    Scott Leaton

    Scott Leaton is a writer and game designer. He is credited as the creator of the Fairy Meat miniatures game, co-creator (with Richard Ranallo) of the role-playing game Starchildren: Velvet Generation, and writer for the Xbox 360 video game Saint's Row.
    7.40
    5 votes
    81

    John Eric Holmes

    • Games designed: Dungeons & Dragons Basic Set
    John Eric Holmes M.D. (February 16, 1930 – March 20, 2010) was an associate professor of neurology at the University of Southern California School of Medicine, an author and promoter of fantasy role-playing games, a noted fan and enthusiast of Edgar Rice Burroughs, and an American writer of non-fiction, fantasy and science fiction. His writings appeared under his full name and under variants such as Eric Holmes and J. Eric Holmes. Holmes's non-fiction relates to both his chosen profession and the role-playing game phenomenon. He was a one-time editor of the Dungeons & Dragons Basic Set RPG rule book. His fantasy consists of a series set in a D&D-influenced world, including four short stories and one novel, while his science fiction includes two pastiches of the Pellucidar novels of Edgar Rice Burroughs and the Buck Rogers novel Mordred. The first of his Pellucidar pastiches, Mahars of Pellucidar was authorized by the Burroughs estate, but it reportedly blocked his follow-up novel, Red Axe of Pellucidar. Ready for publication in 1980, it only saw print thirteen years later in a private printing. A planned third novel in the series remained unwritten. Other writing projects included
    8.25
    4 votes
    82

    Brian Campbell

    • Games designed: Betrayal at House on the Hill
    Brian "Chainsaw" Campbell is a Greater Seattle area game developer, author and editor who is credited for working in the role-playing game industry as far back as 1993. Brian's notable work includes Werewolf: The Apocalypse, Mage: The Ascension, Changeling: The Dreaming, Ratkin, and other World of Darkness products for White Wolf, the d20 versions of Call of Cthulhu and Star Wars for Wizards of the Coast, indie games such as Spaceship Zero for Green Ronin and Fading Suns for Holistic Design, Inc., and a foray into board games that included Betrayal at House on the Hill from Avalon Hill.
    6.50
    6 votes
    83

    James M. Day

    James M. Day is an American game designer best known for military based board games, computer games, card games, and miniature rules. He is also an accomplished historian and military weaponry subject matter expert. His first published title was the board game Panzer, from Yaquinto Publications in 1979. This was followed shortly by the board games 88 and Armor from the same publisher. From 1990 through 1995, Jim was a game designer and producer for MicroProse Software. During his stint, he was responsible for the games Gunship 2000, Gunship 2000: Islands & Ice, F-15 Strike Eagle III, and Across the Rhine. During the next several years, Jim continued to contribute to a number of game and historical publications, as well as designed the board games MBT and IDF for the Avalon Hill Company and wrote the user manual for Jane's F/A-18. In recent times Jim has returned to his original interest in miniatures designing the Panzer Miniatures Rules for StrikeNet Games. His newest effort, the card game The Kaiser’s Pirates was released in 2007 for StrikeNet Games -- included in Games Magazine's top 100 for 2008 . The Kaiser's Pirates was re-published by GMT Games in 2009. It was nominated for
    6.50
    6 votes
    84

    Albert Lamorisse

    Albert Lamorisse (French: [lamɔʁis]; 13 January 1922 – 2 June 1970) was a French filmmaker, film producer, and writer, who is best known for his award winning short films which he began making in the late 1940s, and also for inventing the famous strategic board game Risk in 1957. Lamorisse was born in Paris, France. He first came into prominence - just after Bim - for directing and producing White Mane (1953), an award winning short film that tells a fable of how a young boy befriends an untamable wild white stallion in the marshes of Camargue (the Petite Camargue). His best known work is the short film The Red Balloon (1956), which earned him the Palme d'Or Grand Prize at the Cannes Film Festival, and an Oscar for writing the best original screenplay in 1956. Lamorisse also wrote, directed and produced the well-regarded films Stowaway in the Sky (1960) and Circus Angel, as well as the documentaries Versailles and Paris Jamais Vu. In addition to films, he created the popular strategy board game Risk in 1957. In the mid-sixties Lamorisse shot parts of The Prospect of Iceland, a documentary about Iceland, which was made by Henry Sandoz and commissioned by NATO. Albert Lamorisse died
    7.20
    5 votes
    85

    Helmut Ohley

    Helmut Ohley has developed several 18XX games. He and Lonny Orgler formed Double-O Games to publish future 18XX titles.
    7.20
    5 votes
    86

    Lech Pijanowski

    Lech Pijanowski (26 July, 1928, Warsaw, died 6 January 1974, Warsaw) was a Polish film critic, broadcaster, director, screenwriter and populiser of games. He is buried in the Powazki Cemetery. Pijanowski contributed the game Lap, a development of Battleship, to A Gamut of Games, edited by Sid Sackson. In this game each player secretly divides an 8x8 grid cells, into four sectors of exactly 16 contiguous squares. Each players in turn gathers clues by asking their opponent how many cells in a particular 2x2 square belong to each sector. The first player who correctly deduces the opponent's setup wins the game. Directed: Screenplay:
    7.20
    5 votes
    87
    Fantasy Flight Games

    Fantasy Flight Games

    Fantasy Flight Games (FFG) is a Roseville, Minnesota-based game company that creates and publishes role-playing, board, and card games. Fantasy Flight Publishing was founded in 1995 by its CEO, Christian T. Petersen. Since the release of its first game product (Twilight Imperium) in 1997, the company has been doing business as Fantasy Flight Games ("FFG"). Since that time, FFG has grown to become one of the biggest names in the hobby games industry, being a marketplace leader in board games and maintaining strong businesses in the card game, roleplaying game, and miniature game categories. In 2008, FFG formed an exclusive partnership with industry-leading, UK-Based Games Workshop, to represent its acclaimed IPs (Warhammer and Warhammer 40K) in the hobby games market, publishing new versions of classic titles such as Talisman and Horus Heresy as well as brand new games such as Warhammer: Invasion LCG and Chaos In the Old World. In August 2011 Fantasy Flight Games bought the license which allows it to commercialize any card, miniature or role-playing game set in the Star Wars universe. Living Card Games (LCGs) are a variant of collectible card games (CCG) developed by Fantasy
    8.00
    4 votes
    88

    Jeff Bellinger

    • Games designed: Killer Bunnies and the Quest for the Magic Carrot
    Jeffrey Neil Bellinger is a game inventor and high school math teacher. Bellinger has invented games since he was 12 years old, his most popular being the Killer Bunnies series, which includes Killer Bunnies and the Quest for the Magic Carrot, Killer Bunnies and the Conquest of the Magic Carrot, Killer Bunnies and the Journey to Jupiter, Killer Bunnies and the Ultimate Odyssey, and KinderBunnies. Bellinger was born and raised in New Jersey. During the 1980’s, he attended Johnson Regional High School in his hometown of Clark and then Rutgers University where he earned a Bachelor’s degree in Electrical Engineering. In the 1990’s, Bellinger moved to Virginia to attend Old Dominion University where he earned his Master’s degree in Mathematics and Education. He has has taught secondary science and mathematics education for over 20 years in New Jersey and Virginia. Soon after settling in the San Diego area, Bellinger created the company Sarsen's Stuff and enjoyed a successful first few years of business floating four games on the market. Sarsen's Stuff dissolved in 2002, and his new company, Creative Team Alpha, started to freelance their work to larger publishing companies. Killer
    9.00
    3 votes
    89
    10.00
    2 votes
    90

    Timothy Brown

    • Games designed: 2300 AD
    A game industry veteran of twenty years, Timothy B. Brown has been a designer at Games Designers' Workshop, an editor at Challenge magazine, and the director of product development at TSR, Inc. He is the award-winning designer of 2300 AD and AD&D's Dark Sun Universe. Brown co-created the Dark Sun setting with Troy Denning and Mary Kirchoff. As well as a notable game designer, Tim Brown is an accomplished guitar player and teacher. He is married and has two children.
    10.00
    2 votes
    91

    Frank Mentzer

    Jacob Franklin "Frank" Mentzer III (born in 1950), is an American fantasy author and game designer best known for his work on early materials for the Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) fantasy role-playing game. He was a performing folk musician from 1968 to 1975, and played one concert at the White House during the administration of Richard Nixon. He was an employee of TSR, Inc. from 1980–1986, part of that time as Creative Advisor to the Chairman of the Board, Gary Gygax. He also founded the Role-Playing Games Association (RPGA) during his time with TSR. He has been closely involved with the world's largest game auction at the Gen Con game convention since 1983, and is an expert on (and a major collector of) family boardgames and role-playing games. After Gygax was ousted from TSR at the end of 1985, Mentzer left TSR as well and helped Gygax to start New Infinities Productions Inc. (NIPI). When this venture failed, Mentzer left the gaming industry, eventually becoming the manager of a bakery. In 2008, he closed down this business, and two years later, announced he was returning to the gaming industry as a founding partner of a new publishing company, Eldritch Enterprises. Frank Mentzer was
    8.67
    3 votes
    92
    Ian Livingstone

    Ian Livingstone

    • Games designed: Battlecars
    Ian Livingstone OBE (born December 1949 in Prestbury, Cheshire, England) is an English fantasy author and entrepreneur. Along with Steve Jackson he is the co-founder of the popular and influential series of Fighting Fantasy roleplaying gamebook series and author of many books within that series. He is also one of the co-founders of prominent games company Games Workshop. Livingstone attended Altrincham Grammar School for Boys, and left armed with (he claims) only one A level in Geography. He has retained his close links with the school on numerous occasions including to donate money for a refurbishment of the ICT suite, and also to give a speech and present awards to the GCSE graduates of 1998. Livingstone co-founded Games Workshop in early 1975 with flatmates John Peake and Steve Jackson, and began distributing Dungeons & Dragons and other TSR products later that year. Under the direction of Livingstone and Jackson, Games Workshop expanded from being a bedroom mail order company to a successful gaming manufacturer and retail chain, with the first Games Workshop store opening in Hammersmith in 1977. In June of that year, partially to advertise the opening, Livingstone and Jackson
    9.00
    2 votes
    93
    Jeff Dee

    Jeff Dee

    • Games designed: TWERPS
    Jeff Dee (born May 15, 1961) is an American artist and game designer. Based in Austin, Texas, he is a recognized figure in the role-playing game community and game industry. His illustrative work shows comic book art form and influence. When still a teenager in the late 1970s, Dee and Jack Herman co-created Villains and Vigilantes, the first complete superhero role-playing game. He also designed or co-designed several other RPG's including TWERPS, The System, Living Legends, Quicksilver, and Pocket Universe. He also designed WarChest, a customizable fantasy boardgame. He went on to illustrate numerous materials for the role-playing game Dungeons & Dragons (AD&D) including interior artwork for manuals and illustrations and covers for adventure modules for the game. Some of his most recognized work can be found in the manual Deities & Demigods (especially in the Egyptian and Norse pantheons). Along with Erol Otus, Jim Roslof, David S. LaForce, David C. Sutherland III and David A. Trampier, Dee is recognized as one of the first-generation D&D artists, providing artwork as settings for imaginary worlds and adventures. About 1989, Dee went on to provide artwork for computer games. He
    7.00
    4 votes
    94

    Allan B. Calhamer

    • Games designed: Diplomacy
    Allan B. Calhamer (born December 7, 1931) is an American mail carrier who invented the board game Diplomacy. A friend of Calhamer's recounted how, when they were boys in La Grange Park, Illinois, he and Calhamer "discovered in the attic a geography book that showed a map of Europe before World War I with the Austro-Hungarian Empire and the old boundaries." Years later, Calhamer put the memory to good use. He received his bachelor's degree from Harvard University in 1953. In 1954, while enrolled at Harvard Law School, he developed a game of strategy and alliances that put seven players in control of the major powers of the pre-World War I era. Although he did not complete law school, his prototype game, still unpublished, was part of the reason that Sylvania hired him in 1958 to do operations research. In 1959, Calhamer published his game as Diplomacy and printed 500 copies. After selling all of them in six months, he licensed the game to a publisher. Over the years, Diplomacy has been published in North America by Games Research, Avalon Hill, and Hasbro, and has been published in several different languages in other nations by various publishers. Calhamer's original face-to-face
    7.67
    3 votes
    95

    Bill Dixon

    Bill Dixon (William R. Dixon) is a board game designer, who has four 18XX games published: As of 2006, he is currently working on an expansion kit which will combine 1830, 1832, 1850, and 1870 into one large game covering the eastern half of the United States. The expansion kit will include the extra map pieces and components (ownership of all four games will be required), and be published, like 1832 and 1850, by Deep Thought Games.
    8.50
    2 votes
    96
    Daniel Stahl

    Daniel Stahl

    Daniel Stahl (born 1971) is an American game designer best known for creating German-style board games. In 2002, his game Pirate's Cove (with Paul Randles) was published by Amigo Spiele in Europe (under the name Piratenbucht) and then in the United States by Days of Wonder. A former member of the ImagiNation Network, He became a webmaster in 1994 and later created Alphastrike.com, a BattleTech trading card game fansite. He was also an online producer at Wizards of the Coast during the Hasbro acquisition where he managed development for the Star Wars: TCG, and MagicTheGathering.com websites. He was a member of the Xbox 360 and Zune launch teams while working at Microsoft and later went on to work for Cryptic Studios where he was a game producer on Champions Online and Star Trek Online. On July 1, 2010, the current Executive Producer, Craig Zinkiviech, for Star Trek Online announced he would be leaving Cryptic/STO. At this point Daniel Stahl became the executive producer for STO. In September 2011, it was announced on the Star Trek Online website that he would be leaving Cryptic Studios and in an interview with Trek Radio, he revealed is taking a position at Zynga In December 2011,
    8.50
    2 votes
    97
    David Hecht

    David Hecht

    David Hecht is a designer of board games. Hecht has been playing boardgames since 1971, when he was introduced to Alan Calhamer's Diplomacy and SPI's Borodino by his history teacher. He has been playing railroad games since a friend introduced him to Rail Baron in 1977. He was introduced to 18XX games when a friend brought back a copy of 1829 from a trip to England and has not looked back since. Hecht has assisted in game development since 1972, when he first began attending sessions of SPI's "Friday Night Follies" in downtown Manhattan. He also participated in playtesting of the original Cosmic Encounter from Eon Games. Hecht was first inspired to design an 18XX game in 1995, when he met Federico Vellani, the designer of 1841 and 1849, at RailCon '95 in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Vellani, the convention guest of honor, had brought some prototypes of his works in progress, 1827 and 1827Jr, and encouraged Hecht to try his own hand at it. Hecht has designed, developed and published;
    8.50
    2 votes
    98
    Edward de Bono

    Edward de Bono

    • Games designed: L game
    Edward de Bono (born 19 May 1933) is a Maltese physician, author, inventor and consultant. He originated the term lateral thinking, wrote the book Six Thinking Hats and is a proponent of the deliberate teaching of thinking as a subject in schools. Edward Charles Francis Publius de Bono was born in Malta on 19 May 1933. His father, Joseph, was a Professor of Medicine, and was awarded a CBE. His mother, Josephine, was one of the first female journalists writing for The Times of Malta. Edward studied at St Edward's College in Malta. Nicknamed 'genius', he graduated at the age of 15. De Bono then gained a medical degree from the University of Malta. He was a Rhodes Scholar at Christ Church, Oxford, in England where he gained an M.A. degree in psychology and physiology whilst being a keen sportsman. Note a canoeing record, going from Oxford to London, a distance of 113 miles and crossing 33 locks in 33 hours. He played Polo for Oxford University with a Handicap of 2. He also has a Ph.D. degree and a D.Phil. degree in Medicine from Trinity College, Cambridge, a D.Des. degree (Doctor of Design) from the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, and an LL.D. degree from the University of
    8.50
    2 votes
    99

    Richard Ulrich

    • Games designed: The Princes of Florence
    Richard Ulrich is a German board game designer. Many of his games have been nominated for or have won the Spiel des Jahres, a German games award. He is best known for co-authoring the board game El Grande with Wolfgang Kramer.
    8.50
    2 votes
    100

    Winning Moves

    Winning Moves Games is a maker of classic card games and board games, puzzles, action games and adult party games. Winning Moves Games was founded in 1995 by four game industry professionals: Tom Kremer (who discovered and licensed the Rubik's Cube from behind the "Iron Curtain"), Philip Orbanes (formerly at Parker Brothers, and the leading expert on the game Monopoly), Mike Meyers (formerly at Milton Bradley), and Alex Randolph. The company then forged a close relationship with the world's largest game company, Hasbro, Inc., owner of Parker Brothers and Milton Bradley games. As a result, many long-lived Parker Brothers and Milton Bradley games have been and continue to be made exclusively by Winning Moves Games. The company continues to primarily produce family and children's games, including both retro and original designs. There are currently four Winning Moves companies in the world: Winning Moves France, Winning Moves Germany, Winning Moves UK, and Winning Moves USA. Winning Moves USA has published a number games and puzzles throughout the years. In 2008, they produced: In 2005 Winning Moves UK started producing custom games on behalf of companies in Europe. Originally their
    8.50
    2 votes
    101

    Cheapass Games

    • Games designed: Get Out
    Cheapass Games is a game company founded and run by game designer James Ernest, based in Seattle, Washington. Cheapass Games operates on the philosophy that most game owners have plenty of dice, counters, play money, etc., so there is no need to bundle all of these components with every game that requires them. Cheapass games thus come packaged in white envelopes, small boxes, or plastic resealable bags containing only those components unique to the game - typically a rules sheet, a playing board printed on card stock, and game cards banded by magazine-cutout "sleeves". This allows the company to produce games for prices well below the market average. Later, Cheapass started offering some higher-quality, full color games under the "James Ernest Games" brand. Ernest originally developed the idea for selling basic games without all the common components while freelancing at Wizards of the Coast during the 1990s. However, Wizards rejected the idea, and in 1995, Ernest quit and started up the company. Creating the games by hand, he initially showed the games at tradeshows and conventions, resulting in sales demand from game stores. The company creates and assembles each game pack by
    7.33
    3 votes
    102

    Denys Fisher

    Denys Fisher (11 May 1918, Leeds, England – 17 September 2002, Barrow-in-Furness, England) was an English engineer who invented the spirograph toy. He left Leeds University to join the family firm, Kingfisher (Lubrication) Ltd. In 1960 he left the firm to set up his own company, Denys Fisher Engineering, in Leeds. In 1961 the company won a contract with NATO to supply springs and precision component for its 20 mm cannon. Between 1962 and 1964 he developed various drawing machines from Meccano pieces, eventually producing a prototype Spirograph. Patented in 16 countries, it went on sale in Schofields department store in Leeds in 1965. A year later, Fisher licensed Spirograph to Kenner Products in the United States. In 1967 Spirograph was chosen as the UK Toy of the Year. In 1970, Fisher sold his company, which, as Denys Fisher Toys, produced other toys and board games to Palitoy, which was subsequently bought by Hasbro. Through the 1980s & 1990's he continued to work with Hasbro in developing new toys and refining Spirograph. Denys Fisher Toys produced the following toys and games:
    7.33
    3 votes
    103

    John Hill

    • Games designed: Hue
    John Hill is an American designer of military wargames, as well as rules for miniature wargaming such as Johnny Reb 3. He is a member of the Wargaming Hall of Fame. Hill, a native of Indiana, is most known as the designer of the extremely popular Avalon Hill board game Squad Leader in 1977. Hill founded Conflict Games Company in the late 1960s and owned a hobby shop, The Scale, in Lafayette, Indiana, for several years. Among his many titles were Verdun, Kasserine Pass, Overlord, Battle For Stalingrad, Tank Leader, Eastern Front Tank Leader and many others. He also designed Hue, based upon the fighting near the City of Hue in the Vietnam War. In 1978, Hill was named to the Wargaming Hall of Fame, receiving the Charles S. Roberts Award at the Origins gaming convention in Chester, Pennsylvania, on June 23, 1979. Hill developed what arguably is the most popular rules set ever developed for regimental level American Civil War miniature gaming, the Johnny Reb series (published by Game Designers' Workshop). He was noted for his elaborate 10mm miniature wargaming layouts for Civil War battles at Historical Miniatures Gaming Society conventions such as Historicon, Cold Wars and Fall In!. He
    7.33
    3 votes
    104
    Kenneth Hite

    Kenneth Hite

    • Games designed: Trail of Cthulhu
    Kenneth Hite (born September 15, 1965) is a writer and role-playing game designer. He holds an M.A. in International Relations from the University of Chicago and a Bachelor's degree in Cartography from East Central University. He has been writing games since 1981 and full-time since 1995. He writes the "Suppressed Transmission" column for Pyramid magazine, which has been collected into the volumes Suppressed Transmission: The First Broadcast and Suppressed Transmission 2: The Second Broadcast, as well as the "Out of the Box" column (previously for the GamingReport, now IndiePressRevolution). He was the line editor for Last Unicorn Games' Star Trek RPG. He also contributed a guest comic strip for Dork Tower in 2004. Hite wrote or contributed to several GURPS supplements: as well as supplements for other role-playing games: Hite has also written several books: Hite is also one of many contributors to the book Gamemastering Secrets, which won the 2002 Origins Award for Best Game Aid or Accessory. His essay, “Cthulhu’s Polymorphous Perversity”, appears in Cthulhurotica, published by Dagan Books, December 2010. In February 2008, Pelgrane Press published Hite's Trail of Cthulhu, a
    7.33
    3 votes
    105

    R. Sean Borgstrom

    • Games designed: Weapons of the Gods
    Jenna Katerin Moran, previously Rebecca Sean Borgstrom (Born: March 3, 1972) is a role-playing game writer. She is the author of Nobilis and The Game of Powers (the LARP version of Nobilis), as well as co-author of several source books for Exalted, the Weapons of the Gods RPG, and other works. She currently resides in Seattle, Washington. Moran legally changed her name. Rebecca Sean Borgstrom was, she says, her legal name, but she did not consider it her 'real' name. She is also credited as R. Sean Borgstrom, Rebecca Borgstrom, and Sean Borgstrom. In contexts where she is well known, such as mailing lists centered on games she has authored, she is often referred to simply as "RSB." Moran graduated from Georgetown University with a bachelor's degree in Computer Science in 1988, and from Johns Hopkins University with a doctorate in computer science in 2000. Moran writes Hitherby Dragons, a blog-style ongoing story or collection of stories. She posts a new entry Monday through Saturday. The collection consists of legends and histories. Legends are performances put on by a girl named Jane, her brother Martin, and other recurring actors. Histories are actual events in Jane's world. They
    7.33
    3 votes
    106

    Steve Jackson

    • Games designed: Warlock of Firetop Mountain
    Steve Jackson (born May 20, 1951 in Manchester, England) is a game designer, writer and game reviewer. In early 1975, Steve Jackson co-founded the company Games Workshop with John Peake and Ian Livingstone. In 1980, he created the line of the Fighting Fantasy gamebooks published by Puffin Books (a subsidiary label of Penguin Books) with Livingstone. Jackson now works at Lionhead Studios, which he founded with Peter Molyneux. He is also an honorary professor at Brunel University in London, teaching the Digital Games Theory and Design MA. He is often mistaken for Steve Jackson, an American game designer. The US Jackson also wrote three books in the Fighting Fantasy series, which adds to the confusion, especially as these books were simply credited to "Steve Jackson" without any acknowledgement that it was a different person.
    7.33
    3 votes
    107

    William King

    • Games designed: Warzone
    William King (born 1959) also known as "Bill King" is the writer of a number of successful science-fiction and fantasy books, most notably in Games Workshop's Warhammer and Warhammer 40,000 series, all published by GW's fiction arm, The Black Library. His most memorable characters, Gotrek and Felix, have appeared in a series of novels, beginning with Trollslayer, a collection of previously published and new short stories. His next-most-famous character is Ragnar Blackmane, a Space Marine from the Warhammer 40,000 game setting universe (although the character was already in existence in the game and background material, King took him and expanded his history in the novel series). In 2010 he signed a three-book deal with Black Library that will focus on elven brothers Tyrion and Teclis. Prior to moving to the Czech Republic, King spent a number of years as a designer for Games Workshop, contributing to their game universes (where much of his fiction is also set). He has also written a tetralogy of books featuring the Death's Angels which are currently available in the Czech Republic, Spain and Germany. He married his long-time girlfriend Radka on September 24, 2005 and currently
    7.33
    3 votes
    108
    Aaron Allston

    Aaron Allston

    Aaron Allston (born 1960 in Corsicana, Texas) is an American game designer and novelist of many science fiction books, notably Star Wars novels. His works as a game designer include game supplements for role-playing games, several of which served to establish the basis for products and subsequent development of TSR's Dungeons & Dragons game setting Mystara. Later works as a novelist include those of the X-Wing series: Wraith Squadron, Iron Fist, Solo Command, Starfighters of Adumar. He has also written two entries in the New Jedi Order series: Enemy Lines I: Rebel Dream, and Enemy Lines II: Rebel Stand. Allston wrote three of the nine Legacy of the Force novels: Betrayal, Exile, and Fury, and three of the nine Fate of the Jedi novels: Outcast, Backlash and Conviction. Allston moved all over Texas in his youth and graduated from high school in Denton. Allston moved to Austin in 1979 and attended the University of Texas. He became editor of Space Gamer magazine and by 1983 was a full time freelance game designer. He served as editor of Space Gamer from issues 52 (June 1982) - 65 (Sept/Oct 1983), and as editor of Fantasy Gamer for the first issue (Aug/Sep 1983) and co-editor of the
    6.50
    4 votes
    109

    Mike Young

    Mike Young is a game designer, author, and founder of the first independent professional LARP publishing house, "Interactivities Ink". His works include co-authorship of Rules to Live By (RTLB), one of the few published generic (non-license not from tabletop) LARP system. He has also published several LARPs and several card games. He also contributed many short pieces to the professional LARP journal "Metagame" from 1989 through 1999. His "The Galactic Emperor is Dead" LARP was sold to Skotos Inc for their online game play. Mike's "Tales From the Floating Vagabond 1" (1990), "Tales From the Floating Vagabond 2" 1992, and "Tales From the Floating Vagabond Square Root of Pi" (1997) were officially licensed LARPs run in the Tales from the Floating Vagabond RPG setting originally published by Avalon Hill. The first two were run with the creator of Tales from the Floating Vagabond, Lee Garvin. He has also authored computer games (from Alien Software), including the Neophyte series. He is credited on Legend Entertainment's "Callahan's Crosstime Saloon" and "Blackstone Chronicles". He is also credited as a level designer and developer for Icebreaker from Magnet Interactive Studios. Mike
    6.50
    4 votes
    110

    Thomas Lehmann

    • Games designed: Fast Food Franchise
    Tom Lehmann has been an economist, programmer, boardgame publisher, game designer, and technical writer. Tom has also contributed design ideas to other published games, including San Juan.
    6.50
    4 votes
    111
    9.00
    1 votes
    112

    John Tynes

    • Games designed: Unknown Armies
    John Tynes (born 1971) is a writer best known for his work on role-playing games such as Unknown Armies, Delta Green, Puppetland, and for his company Tynes Cowan Corporation. Under its imprint Pagan Publishing, Tynes Cowan Corp. produces third-party books for the Call of Cthulhu role-playing game under license from Chaosium as well as fiction and non-fiction books under its imprint Armitage House. Following the end of Unknown Armies in 2003, Tynes withdrew from the tabletop gaming industry in order to pursue other interests, particularly film and videogames. He was the producer of Pirates of the Burning Sea, a massively-multiplayer online role-playing game developed by Flying Lab Software and published in 2008 by Sony Online Entertainment. After the launch of PotBS, he joined Microsoft Game Studios to work on various Xbox Live Arcade titles including South Park Let's Go Tower Defense Play!, Toy Soldiers, and Full House Poker as a producer and game designer.
    9.00
    1 votes
    113

    Joseph Huber

    • Games designed: Rorschach: The Inkblot Party Game
    The game designer responsible for "Rorschach". He is not the same as the Joe Huber who is responsible for "Burger Joint".
    9.00
    1 votes
    114

    Looney Labs

    Looney Labs is a small game company based in College Park, Maryland, USA. It is named after its founders, Andrew Looney and Kristin Looney. The company is probably best known for its card games, especially Fluxx , whose rules and goals change as the result of its players' actions , and Chrononauts, themed around time travel. Both of these were designed by Andrew Looney and derive much of their popularity from the whimsical, unpredictable nature that he tends to give his games. While a player can definitely benefit from an overall strategy, the games are random enough to demand far more short-term tactical skill than long-term planning ability. Looney Labs publishes a number of less popular card and board games (see Andrew Looney for a more complete list), but one of particular note is Are You a Werewolf?, Andrew Plotkin's thematic variant of Mafia. The game, which requires a relatively large number of people to play, is especially popular at game conventions such as Origins, where it frequently draws in players (and sometimes entire families) from other areas of the convention. Looney Labs also produces and sells Icehouse pieces, small, colorful plastic pyramids useful for playing
    9.00
    1 votes
    115

    Mark H. Walker

    • Games designed: Lock 'n Load: Band of Heroes
    Mark H. Walker is a writer and board wargame designer. He has written articles about Information Technology and computer and video games for publications including AutoWeek, PC Gamer, Computer Gaming World and Playboy and websites such as GameSpy and Science Fiction Weekly. Walker spent over 17 years in the U.S. Navy, reaching the rank of Commander. He has a Masters degree in Warfighting and International Relations from the Naval War College. Walker has written or co-authored dozens of computer-related books, including the official game guides for several computer games. His first novel, A Craving for Blood (ISBN 1-60145-008-7), was published on October 2, 2006. Walker designed an award-winning series of board wargames called Lock 'n Load. The games are squad-level wargames in which a counter can represent a squad, a vehicle or a person such as a sniper or a commanding officer. The first of these games, Lock 'n Load: Forgotten Heroes: Vietnam was published by Shrapnel Games in 2003. Lock 'n Load: ANZAC Attack, an expansion pack was released in 2004. Lock ’n Load: Band of Heroes, published in 2006 by Matrix Games, is set during World War II. Both Forgotten Heroes and Band of Heroes
    9.00
    1 votes
    116
    9.00
    1 votes
    117
    9.00
    1 votes
    118
    9.00
    1 votes
    119

    Überplay

    Überplay Entertainment was a board game publishing company located in St. George, Utah. As of April 2008, it had ceased operations. The company held three separate brands: Überplay provided family-oriented "Euro-style" board games; Inspiration Games developed games aimed at religious markets; Überplay Digital targeted PC based gaming. Überplay-published games include: Ra, Motley Fool's Buy Low - Sell High, Alhambra, Metro, Hoity Toity, and Hansa. In 2004, New England won the Traditional Game of the Year by Games Magazine. Under the Inspiration Games imprint, Überplay's published religious-based games, including Settlers of Zarahemla (similar to The Settlers of Catan) and The Ark of the Covenant (similar to Carcassonne).
    9.00
    1 votes
    120

    Christian Wolf

    Christian Wolf is a designer of board games. He has won the As d'Or for Tutankhamen and the Kinderspiel des Jahres for Klondike in 2001; both were collaborations with Stefanie Rohner.
    8.00
    2 votes
    121
    Edouard Lucas

    Edouard Lucas

    • Games designed: Tower of Hanoi
    François Édouard Anatole Lucas (4 April 1842 – 3 October 1891) was a French mathematician. Lucas is known for his study of the Fibonacci sequence. The related Lucas sequences and Lucas numbers are named after him. Lucas was educated at the École Normale Supérieure. He worked in the Paris observatory and later became a professor of mathematics in Paris. In the meantime he served in the army. In 1875, Lucas posed a challenge to prove that the only solution of the Diophantine equation: with N > 1 is when N = 24 and M = 70. This is known as the cannonball problem, since it can be visualized as the problem of taking a square arrangement of cannonballs on the ground and building a square pyramid out of them. It was not until 1918 that a proof (using hyperelliptic functions) was found for this remarkable fact, which has relevance to the bosonic string theory in 26 dimensions. Elementary proofs have been more recently published. He devised methods for testing the primality of numbers. In 1857, at age 15, Lucas began testing the primality of 2 − 1 by hand, using Lucas Sequences. In 1876, after 19 years of testing, he finally proved that 2 − 1 was prime; this would remain the largest known
    8.00
    2 votes
    122

    Klaus-Jürgen Wrede

    • Games designed: Carcassonne
    Klaus-Jürgen Wrede (born 1963 in Meschede, North Rhine-Westphalia) is a German board game creator, the creator of the best-selling Carcassonne and Downfall of Pompeii. Born to music-teacher parents in Meschede, Germany, Wrede grew up in the town of Arnsberg, Germany. He attended college in Cologne, learning music and theology. While on a vacation Wrede created Carcassonne which was published in 2000 by Hans im Glück in German and Rio Grande Games in English. Carcassonne has become one of the most popular games at BoardGameGeek over recent years; as of 2007, of the thousands of games on the website, only The Settlers of Catan has more user ratings. As a child he played games such as Monopoly and chess. He later played games such as Kremlin, Civilization, Age of Renaissance, Tikal, Ra, and Tigris and Euphrates. His favorite game designers include Wolfgang Kramer, Reiner Knizia, Alan R. Moon, Klaus Teuber, Uwe Rosenberg, and Karl-Heinz Schmiel. Klaus-Jürgen Wrede lives near Cologne and teaches music and religious education. His favorite music includes soul, Wagner, Sting, Brahms, U2, jazz, Supertramp, and Chopin.
    8.00
    2 votes
    123

    Steve Kenson

    • Games designed: True20
    Steve Kenson (born June 16, 1969) is a writer and designer of fantasy role-playing games (RPGs) and related fiction. His most notable creation is the d20 System superhero roleplaying game Mutants & Masterminds for Green Ronin Publishing, which won multiple ENnie awards. He also designed True20 Adventure Roleplaying and the Freedom City campaign setting for Green Ronin. He has written material for many RPGs, including: Aberrant, Champions, DC Universe, the Marvel Super-Heroes Adventure Game, Shadowrun, Silver Age Sentinels, and his Mutants and Masterminds. He has written ten RPG tie-in novels: seven for the original Shadowrun series, two for Crimson Skies, and one for MechWarrior. He wrote a first trilogy Shadowrun books produced by WizKids Games after they acquired the Shadowrun property from FASA Corporation: Born to Run, Poison Agendas, and Fallen Angels. In 1993, Kenson helped to found Nashua Outright, a social/support group for gay, lesbian, bisexual, and questioning youth and their allies, in Nashua, NH. He worked with the group as a volunteer facilitator for thirteen years. Kenson became a full-time freelance writer for RPGs in 1995. In 2004, he became a line developer for
    8.00
    2 votes
    124

    Target Games

    Target Games was a Swedish publisher of role-playing games active from 1980 until the year 1999 when they went into bankruptcy proceedings. They published much of their early material in the form of stapled books in G5 (169 by 239 mm) format in a box together with dice. They released the role-playing games Drakar och Demoner (1982), Mutant (1984) (with the later versions Mutant (1989) Mutant RYMD (1992) and Mutant Chronicles), Kult (1991), Chock (1985, a translation of Chill), Sagan om Ringen (1986, a translation of Middle-earth Role Playing) and Stjärnornas Krig (1988, a translation of the WEG Star Wars role-playing game). Target Games also published Warzone, a miniature wargame. They also released three generic sourcebooks, Grymkäfts fällor (1987) (translated from the classic game supplement Grimtooth's Traps), Stadsintermezzon (1988) and Skattkammaren (1988) as well as many adventures and sourcebooks for their games. Until the mid 1990s Target Games published their Swedish roleplaying games under the brand name Äventyrsspel (meaning "adventure games"). Target Games was reconstructed in 1999 and ceased publication of all of its inventory and the intellectual property rights were
    8.00
    2 votes
    125
    Warren Spector

    Warren Spector

    • Games designed: Toon
    Warren Spector (born October 2, 1955) is an American role-playing game designer and a video game designer. He is known for having worked to merge elements of role-playing video games and first-person shooters. He currently resides in Austin, Texas with his wife, fantasy writer Caroline L. Spector. He is best known for the cyberpunk video games System Shock and Deus Ex. Spector grew up in Manhattan, which he described as a sometimes hostile environment where “short, pudgy, Jewish kids didn’t fare well.” He showed an intense devotion to whatever topic became his obsession at any given time, from dinosaurs and airplanes as a small boy, to an interest in law by the sixth grade. At age 13, Spector had decided he wanted to be a film critic, and by high school, his obsessions expanded to include cars and basketball. Spector attended Northwestern University in Illinois, still intending to become a film critic, stating that he “knew more about movies than a lot of my teachers.” Spector earned his BSc in Communications at Northwestern, and went on to earn his MA in Radio-TV-Film at the University of Texas in Austin in 1980. His thesis was a critical history of Warner Bros. cartoons. All
    8.00
    2 votes
    126

    Runic Games

    • Games designed: Torchlight 2
    Runic Games is a Seattle-based American computer game company formed by Travis Baldree (creator of Fate), Max Schaefer and Erich Schaefer (co-founders of Blizzard North, of Diablo fame), Peter Hu, and the Flagship Studios Seattle team responsible for Mythos. It is a subsidiary of Perfect World Co., Ltd. In 2009, the company released Torchlight, a single-player action role-playing game. They released a sequel, Torchlight II, on September 20th, 2012. It was at this time the developers revealed they were no longer pursuing plans to create an MMO in the "Torchlight" universe. Runic Games was founded in August 2008 by Travis Baldree, Max Schaefer, Erich Schaefer and Peter Hu. The company formed specifically for the purpose of keeping the Mythos team together to develop a new action RPG video game as a "spiritual successor" to their previous project. Following the dissolution of Flagship Studios in 2008, all 14 members of the Seattle team that developed Mythos signed onto Runic Games. Full production on the game started around November 2008, meaning that the game's total development period was approximately 11 months. At the 2009 Game Developers Conference some members of the Runic
    6.25
    4 votes
    127

    Amigo Spiele

    Amigo Spiele is a German board and card game publisher. Many of their games have won Spiel des Jahres awards, and many have been published in English by Rio Grande Games.
    7.00
    3 votes
    128
    Brian Kibler

    Brian Kibler

    • Games designed: World of Warcraft Trading Card Game
    Brian M. Kibler (born 7 September 1980) is an American game designer currently working with Gamer Entertainment, a gaming consultancy. In 2010 Kibler designed Ascension: Chronicle of the Godslayer with Justin Gary, Rob Dougherty, and John Fiorillo. Previously he worked on Chaotic and was the lead designer of the World of Warcraft Trading Card Game. Kibler is also a professional card player and has had great success at Magic the Gathering with five Pro Tour Top 8s, winning Pro Tour Austin in 2009 and Pro Tour Honolulu in 2012. He also has 11 Grand Prix Top 8s, winning three of them including the first one held in the 1997–98 season and most recently Grand Prix Sendai. In August 2004 he won the inaugural VS System Pro Circuit event taking home $40,000 and a spot in history as the game's first champion. Kibler began his Magic: The Gathering career at the age of fifteen, placing 30th in the Junior Division of the first-ever Pro Tour, Pro Tour New York 1996. Kibler would not qualify for the senior Pro Tour until Pro Tour Chicago 1998, which he qualified for by winning Grand Prix Toronto 1997. Kibler notes that all his opponents in the Top 8 of Grand Prix Toronto went on to work at
    7.00
    3 votes
    129

    Capcom

    Capcom Co., Ltd. (株式会社カプコン, Kabushiki-gaisha Kapukon), or just Capcom, is a American-Japanese developer and publisher of videogames, known for creating multi-million-selling franchises such as Mega Man, Resident Evil and Street Fighter. Originally established in 1983, it has since become an international enterprise with branches and subsidiaries in North America, Europe, and East Asia. The original companies that spawned Capcom's Japanese branch were I.R.M Corporation founded on May 30, 1979, as well as its subsidiary Japan Capsule Computers Co., Ltd., both of which were devoted to the manufacturing and distribution of electronic game machines. The two companies underwent a name change to Sambi Co., Ltd. in September 1981, while Capcom Co., Ltd. itself was first established on June 11, 1983, for the purpose of taking over the internal sales department. In January 1989, the old affiliate company Capcom Co., Ltd. merged with Sambi Co., Ltd., resulting in the current Japanese branch. The name Capcom is an abbreviation of "Capsule Computers", a term coined by the company to describe the arcade machines it solely manufactured in its early years, designed to set themselves apart from
    7.00
    3 votes
    130

    Elizabeth Magie

    • Games designed: Monopoly
    Elizabeth "Lizzie" J. Phillips née Magie (1866–1948) was an American game designer. She invented The Landlord's Game, the precursor to Monopoly. Elizabeth Magie was born in Canton, Illinois in 1866, and later became a follower of the economist Henry George. Magie first made the game, known as The Landlord's Game, popular with friends while living in Brentwood, Maryland, and sought her first patent on it while living there. On March 23, 1903, Magie applied to the US Patent Office for a patent on her board game, which was designed to demonstrate the economic ill effects of land monopolism and the use of land value tax as a remedy for them. She was granted U.S. Patent 748,626 on January 5, 1904. In 1906, she moved to Chicago. That year, she and fellow Georgists formed the Economic Game Co. to self-publish her original edition of The Landlord's Game. In 1910 she married Albert Phillips and Parker Brothers published her humorous card game Mock Trial. In 1912, The Landlord's Game was adapted in Scotland by the Newbie Game Co. as Bre'r Fox and Bre'r Rabbit. Although the instructions claimed it was protected by a British patent, there is no evidence this was actually done. She and her
    7.00
    3 votes
    131

    Francis Tresham

    • Games designed: Civilization
    Francis Tresham is an United Kingdom-based board game designer who has been producing board games since the early 1970s. Tresham founded and ran games company Hartland Trefoil (founded 1971), a company well known for its Civilization board game, until its sale to Microprose in 1997. His 1829 game was the first of the 18xx board game series and some of his board games have inspired Sid Meier computer games such as Railroad Tycoon. Francis Tresham was the first to introduce a technology tree into his boardgames. This idea had a large influence on boardgames and computer games that were later produced. He is currently managing director of Tresham Games and is, as of 2009, still producing 18xx-style board games.
    7.00
    3 votes
    132

    Jim Ward

    • Games designed: Gamma World
    James M. Ward (born May 23, 1951), is an American game designer and fantasy author. He is most famous for his game development and writing work for TSR, Inc., where he worked for more than 20 years. In 1989 he was inducted into the Academy of Adventure Gaming Arts & Design Hall of Fame. From 2000 - 2005, he was President of Fast Forward Entertainment, an independent game development company. The Dungeons & Dragons character Drawmij was named after him; "Drawmij" is simply "Jim Ward" spelled backwards. Ward can be glimpsed early in the Dragon Strike tutorial video playing the man who is slapped in the face at the king's party. Ward, with David Cook, Steve Winter, and Mike Breault, co-wrote the adventure scenario that was adapted into the game Pool of Radiance. In 2010, Ward was diagnosed with a serious neurological disorder that required treatment at the Mayo Clinic. His friend Tim Kask has helped to establish a fund to help Ward offset some of these medical bills.
    7.00
    3 votes
    133

    Mark Gottlieb

    Mark Gottlieb, also known as MaGo, is an employee of Wizards of the Coast and is game designer and the rules manager of the Magic: The Gathering game. Within the community of enthusiasts of the game, he is a well-known columnist and public face of the company alongside Mark Rosewater. Mark Gottlieb was born on August 30, 1974 in New York City and grew up in Fair Lawn, NJ. He has two brothers, Neal and Carl. Neal owns an organic ice cream shop in San Rafael, CA, called Three Twins Ice Cream. Mark is an avid puzzler and his team won the MIT Mystery Hunt three times and has created three of their own (each year's hunt is created by the winning team from the previous year). He led the team to create the puzzle for the World Puzzle Championship 9, which is the largest international puzzle competition. He was introduced to the game Magic: The Gathering at Random Hall, which was his dorm at MIT. As he was finishing college, he decided to apply for a job writing at The Duelist, a now-defunct Magic magazine, which he was not given. Later he applied for a job as a developer at Wizards of the Coast, which he was also denied. In 2000, he applied for a job as a Magic Technical Editor.
    7.00
    3 votes
    135

    Rüdiger Dorn

    • Games designed: Jambo
    Rüdiger Dorn (born 1969) is a German-style board game designer. He was nominated for the 2005 Spiel des Jahres award for his game Jambo, which also placed 8th for the Deutscher Spiele Preis award. He was also nominated for the 2007 Spiel des Jahres award for his game Die Baumeister von Arkadia.
    7.00
    3 votes
    136

    Federico Vellani

    Federico Vellani (Born in Modena, Italy, 1960-04-18) is a board game designer. He has published two 18XX games: Vellani appears to have withdrawn from the hobby.
    4.83
    6 votes
    137
    David Petersen

    David Petersen

    • Games designed: Mouse Guard Role-Playing Game
    David E. Petersen (born July 4, 1977) is an American comic book creator best known for the series Mouse Guard. David Petersen was influenced by animated television series such as The Transformers. "When it comes to story telling, I’m a big fan of Mike Mignola and Frank Miller. Although Mouse Guard doesn’t look like either of their work. My ink work is something that comes from my printmaking background, something you don’t associate with comics, but after seeing some folks like Rick Geary and Gary Gianni doing comics in styles with line quality different than traditional comics, I knew I could incorporate it as well." "I have long been a fan of classic adventure stories and at one time planned on doing a cross between an adventure story and an anthropology experiment with only animals natural to the same habitat as the main characters. It gave me a problem of coming up with story devices and plot to keep everyone from simply eating each other. It more closely resembled Disney's Robin Hood than Mouse Guard. In giving the mice a leg up, the idea of the mouse guard and how the mice hide themselves away became the most interesting focus. I quickly shifted all attention to their story.
    6.00
    4 votes
    138

    Dirk Henn

    • Games designed: Shogun
    Dirk Henn (1960–) is a German-style board game designer who was born in Bendorf, Germany Dirk Henn is best known for his game Alhambra, which won the Spiel des Jahres and placed 2nd in the Deutscher Spiele Preis in 2003.
    6.00
    4 votes
    139
    Jordan Weisman

    Jordan Weisman

    • Games designed: Arcane Legions
    Jordan Weisman is an American game designer, author, and serial entrepreneur who has founded four major game design companies, each in a different game genre and segment of the industry. Weisman graduated from Francis W. Parker High School, in Chicago, Illinois. He went to the Merchant Marine Academy and briefly attended University of Illinois at Chicago, before leaving school to pursue his business interests. In 1980 Weisman founded role playing game publisher FASA Corporation (short for the Freedonia Aeronautics & Space Administration, named after the fictional country in the Marx Brothers film Duck Soup) with partner L. Ross Babcock. After starting out producing supplements for the pen and paper role-playing game Traveller. FASA later produced the successful BattleTech and Shadowrun franchises. With funding from FASA and from a Japanese investor, Jordan founded Environmental Simulations Project — later renamed Virtual Worlds Entertainment — in 1990, the company that produced the BattleTech Centers. Working with Incredible Technologies, VWE created the world's first immersive networked location-based virtual reality gaming centers. VWE was a critical, though not a commercial
    6.00
    4 votes
    140

    Rick Priestley

    • Games designed: Warhammer 40,000
    Rick Priestley is a miniature wargaming designer and author who lives near Nottingham, England Priestley worked extensively for Games Workshop. He is credited with authoring or co-authoring the following games: Rick left Games Workshop in November 2010. He now works with Warlord Games, and also does consulting work on a freelance basis. Since joining Warlord Games, he has authored or co-authored the following games:
    6.00
    4 votes
    141

    GMT Games

    GMT Games, probably the most prolific of the wargame companies in the 1990s and 2000s, was founded in 1990. The current management and creative team includes Tony Curtis, Rodger MacGowan, Mark Simonitch, and Andy Lewis. The company has become well known for graphically attractive games that range from "monster games", of many maps and counters, to quite simple games suitable for introducing new players to wargaming. They also produce card games and family games. GMT's name comes from the first name initials of founders Gene Billingsley, Mike Crane, and Terry Shrum. However, Crane and Shrum soon split acrimoniously with GMT, and founded their own company, the Fresno Gaming Association. After the downsizing of the game distribution network in the mid-late 1990s, the company decided they needed a new way to fund the production of new games. This prompted them to introduce the "Project 500" system, which allows customers to vote via pre-order for the games they most want to see produced. Production of a new game does not start until there are a minimum number pre-orders for a particular game (originally about 500, but now more realistically about 750). Pre-orders are offered at a
    7.50
    2 votes
    142
    Kaiyodo

    Kaiyodo

    • Games designed: Pokemon Trading Figure Game
    Kaiyodo (海洋堂, Kaiyōdō) is a Japanese company dedicated to figurines and garage kits. Its headquarters is in Kadoma, Osaka Prefecture. While the company mostly focuses on anime related characters, it recently has acquired other licenses, e.g. King Kong, and some Godzilla characters. Kaiyodo was originally a small shop in Japan, but grew into a famous company over the years, leading them to sell collectables worldwide. One of their most famous sculptors is Bome, who is most well known for his Mon-sieur BOME collection. In recent years, his figurines have become well known and sought by collectors, and his works have been displayed on a worldwide scale at conventions, including Paris, Tokyo etc. Revoltech (リボルテック) is a portmanteau for "Revolver Technology," in reference to the unique "Revolver Joint" articulation which all of the figures in this particular series utilize. This gives the figures a wide range of motion and stability, allowing for many dynamic and varied poses. The subject matter for the Revoltech line can be broadly split into four categories—Real Robot, Super Robot, Humanoid and Creature. Thus far, robots and characters from anime, video games, manga, tokusatsu, film
    7.50
    2 votes
    143

    Lonny Orgler

    Lonny (Leonhard) Orgler is a creator of board games. He has developed three 18XX games, all set in Austria. He and Helmut Ohley formed Double-O Games to publish future 18XX titles.
    7.50
    2 votes
    144
    Maurice Kanbar

    Maurice Kanbar

    • Games designed: Tangoes
    Maurice Kanbar (born 1930) is an American entrepreneur and inventor who lives in San Francisco, California. He is particularly well known for his creation of SKYY vodka, and is also noted for his extensive real estate investments. Kanbar is stated to own 36 patents on various consumer and medical products, invented the D-Fuzz-It comb for sweaters, Tangoes Puzzle Game, the Safetyglide hypodermic needle protector, a cryogenic cataract remover, a new LED traffic light, and Zip Notes, rolled sticky notes with a centerline adhesive strip. He created New York's first multiplex cinema, the Quad Cinema, which was the first movie theater in Manhattan to have four small auditoriums in one building. In the beverage industry, Kanbar had a success with SKYY vodka, also introduced Vermeer Dutch Chocolate Cream Liqueur and more recently launched Blue Angel Premium Vodka. He produced the animated film Hoodwinked! which was released in January 2006 and grossed over $100M worldwide. Kanbar owns many commercial buildings in Tulsa, Oklahoma. His extensive investments in Tulsa led to a legal dispute with his former business partner Henry Kaufman, with each suing the other. At one point Kanbar's
    7.50
    2 votes
    145

    Richard Tucholka

    Richard Tucholka (born February 9, 1954) is a writer, game designer and publisher, best known for his work in the creation of the role-playing game Bureau 13: Stalking the Night Fantastic. Tucholka has been a RPG Designer, comic book publisher, actor, book reviewer, staff writer for Stardate and Stardrive magazines, and a science fiction fan. He has participated in science fiction conventions and gaming conventions since 1973 and is a member of Sci-Fi Fandom's Dorsai Irregulars. He is also a Senior Computer Technician for a world wide service supplier of the automotive industry. As of 2011, Tucholka lives in Pontiac/Oak Park, Michigan, where he manages Tri Tac Games. His best known role-playing game, Bureau 13, was voted Best Fantasy RPG of 1991 by the RPGA Network at Gen Con. Others works include The Morrow Project with Robert Sadler and Kevin Dockery, Fringeworthy, FTL:2448, and Hardwired Hinterland. Supplements and adventure scenarios he has created include "Invasion U.S.", "Rogue 417", "Hellsnight", "Haunts", "Starcharts", "Bureau 13: Lost Files 1 & 2", "COP 2448" and the DM's Book Of Nasty Tricks & Misfit Magic. The Tri Tac Micro Games that Tucholka has authored include
    7.50
    2 votes
    146

    Spectrum HoloByte

    • Games designed: Crisis in the Kremlin
    Spectrum HoloByte, Inc. was a video game developer and publisher originally based in Alameda, California. The company was founded in 1983 and was most famous for its simulation games, notably the Falcon series of flight simulators and Vette!, a driving simulator from 1989. Spectrum Holobyte published games for many platforms, including home computers of the 1980s and early 1990s, IBM PC compatibles, and some video game consoles. The company was the publisher of the Solitaire Royale, the first computer card solitaire program. They were the first to bring Tetris to gamers outside the Soviet Union and Sokoban to gamers outside Japan. It was also the distributor for Domark games before Domark set up its own US operations in San Mateo, California. In 1993, Spectrum HoloByte acquired MicroProse. For the following years, games from both companies were published under their respective brands, but in 1996 all titles were consolidated under the MicroProse brand. The merged company was acquired by Hasbro Interactive in 1998, and what had been Spectrum HoloByte ceased to exist when the development studio in Alameda was closed in 1998. Hasbro subsequently sold all the assets of the various
    7.50
    2 votes
    147

    Ken Lightner

    • Games designed: Hammer of the Gods
    Ken Lightner is a game designer with experience in multiple fields. His primary area of expertise is in computer games. Among his more notable successes with Holistic Design include Battles of Destiny, Hammer of the Gods, Final Liberation, Machiavelli the Prince, Merchant Prince II, Emperor of the Fading Suns, and Mall Tycoon. He also worked heavily on a computer game called Noble Armada that never materialized. He has worked as a third-party developer for very large companies such as Mindscape, Take Two Interactive, Red Storm, Microprose, and Segasoft. Mall Tycoon was arguably his largest game, which sold extremely well. The Merchant Prince Series was highly critically acclaimed. He was the line developer for their Real-Life Roleplaying series covering d20 Afghanistan, d20 Columbia, d20 Somalia and the d20 FBI. He also contributed heavily towards the flagship rpg product Holistic Design produced Fadings Suns, being the principal author of the military supplement Legions of the Empire. He also worked in conjunction with Chris Wiese to design the miniature based game Carnage and Noble Armada (upon which the aforementioned Computer Game was based). He also contributed fiction to the
    6.67
    3 votes
    148

    Michael Schacht

    • Games designed: Zooloretto
    Michael Schacht (born 1964 in Wiesbaden) is a German game designer, graphician and owner of the small publishing company Spiele aus Timbuktu. Schacht studied graphic design at the FH Darmstadt. About 15 years he worked as Art Director in different advertising agencies. 2005 he quit the branch and became one of the few full-time board game designer in Germany. He is married and lives presently (2010) in Frankfurt/Main. Developing started for him with a boardgame designing contest. His first publication was in 1992 the game Taxi in the magazine Spielerei. His bigegst success so far was in 2007 his game Zooloretto that received Spiel des Jahres (game of the year) in Germany.
    6.67
    3 votes
    149
    Monte Cook

    Monte Cook

    • Games designed: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Monte Cook is an American professional table-top role-playing game designer and writer, best known for his work on Dungeons & Dragons. He was married to Sue Weinlein Cook, although they are now divorced. Cook has been a professional game designer since 1988, working primarily on role-playing games. Much of his early work was for Iron Crown Enterprises as an editor and writer for the Rolemaster and Champions lines. Cook worked for Iron Crown Enterprises for four years; two as a freelancer and two as a full-time designer. During this period, he attracted fan and critical attention with the popular multi-genre setting Dark Space. Cook began working for TSR in 1992 as a freelancer, "writing a whole slew of stuff for the old Marvel game that never came out because the game got canceled". Joining the TSR team, Cook designed Dungeons & Dragons modules such as Labyrinth of Madness (1995) and A Paladin in Hell (1998), and dozens of supplements to the Planescape line including The Planewalker's Handbook (1996) and Dead Gods (1998). Cook also designed the conspiracy game Dark•Matter (1999). After TSR was purchased by Wizards of the Coast, Cook became a Senior Designer, and was part of the
    6.67
    3 votes
    150

    Reuben Klamer

    • Games designed: The Game of Life
    Reuben Klamer (born in Canton, Ohio) is an inventor of the classic Milton Bradley (currently owned by Hasbro) board game The Game Of Life. Mr. Klamer also has over 200 "to market" toys, games and inventions to his credit to date. He was inducted into the Toy Industry Hall of Fame in 2005.
    6.67
    3 votes
    151
    8.00
    1 votes
    152

    Craige Schensted

    Craige Eugene Schensted is a physicist who first formulated the insertion algorithm (Schensted 1961) that defines the Robinson–Schensted correspondence; under a different form, that correspondence had earlier been described by Gilbert de Beauregard Robinson in 1938, but it is due to the Schensted insertion algorithm that the correspondence has become widely known in combinatorics. Schensted also designed several board games including *Star, Star, and Y. In 1995, he changed his name to Ea, the Babylonian name for the Sumerian god Enki, and in 1999 changed it to Ea Ea. He lived on Peaks Island in Portland, Maine.
    8.00
    1 votes
    153

    Friedemann Friese

    • Games designed: Power Grid
    Friedemann Friese (born June 5, 1970) is a German board game designer, currently residing and working in Bremen. His trademarks are his green-colored hair and games whose titles begin with the letter "F". The majority of his games, self-published by his company 2F-Spiele, also sport a green color scheme. He is known for his absurd and humour-themed games.
    8.00
    1 votes
    154

    Howard Thompson

    • Games designed: WarpWar
    Howard M. Thompson was a wargame designer and founder of Metagaming Concepts. His first game was Stellar Conquest, a popular and well-designed simulation of interstellar warfare. Thompson is most famous for his idea to publish small, low-cost games in what came to be known as the MicroGame format. For a while, Metagaming dominated this niche wargaming market. In the early 1980s, some speculate that the company started to run into financial trouble, partially because of the generally poor economic situation at that time, and because of the split with one of his main game designers, Steve Jackson. Thompson was not satisfied with the work done on The Fantasy Trip by Jackson. In April 1983, Thompson decided to sell the company's assets and shut the company down. Little is known about his present whereabouts. On 1 January 1982, Thompson created Games Research Group, Inc., which was initially part of Metagaming. Thompson also provided illustrations for two of his company's games, Helltank and Monsters! Monsters!
    8.00
    1 votes
    155

    Jeux Descartes

    Jeux Descartes was a French publisher of roleplaying games and board games. Their most popular lines included: Eurogames, a set of serious board games, previously published by Duccio Vitale's independent company; Blue Games, small card games for larger groups; and Games for Two. Jeux Descartes was founded in 1977 and went out of business in 2005. Their assets are now owned by former rival Asmodée Éditions, and are sold under the Descartes Editeur imprint.
    8.00
    1 votes
    156

    Marvin Glass and Associates

    • Games designed: Hands Down
    Marvin Glass and Associates (MGA) was a toy design and engineering firm based out of Chicago, Illinois. While not a household name, Marvin Glass (1914–1974) and his employees created some of the most successful toys and games of the 20th century such as Mr. Machine, Rock'Em Sock'Em Robots, Lite Brite, Ants in the Pants, Mouse Trap, Operation, SIMON, and the Evel Knievel Stunt Cycle. Surprisingly, the web offers very limited info on the company and even less about the man behind it. Photo: Marvin Glass (center) won’t unveil a new toy to a buyer unless he signs a promise not to copy it. Left, engineer John Parks of Glass’s staff. Marvin Glass and Associates was founded in 1941. Its founder, Marvin Glass, was an entrepreneur and the creative force behind Marvin Glass & Associates. His salesmanship and uncanny ability to spark creativity in the designers he employed was unparalleled. In 1949 he licensed a "novelty item" to H. Fishlove & Company called Yakitty-Yak Talking Teeth. This item was invented by Eddy Goldfarb, who worked for Marvin Glass for a very short time after World War II. MGA was contracted by Bally-Midway to design coin-operated video games during the 1980s. Some of
    8.00
    1 votes
    157

    Milton Bradley Company

    The Milton Bradley Company is an American board game company established by Milton Bradley in Springfield, Massachusetts, in 1860. In 1920, it absorbed the game production of McLoughlin Brothers, formerly the largest game manufacturer in the United States, and in 1987, it purchased Selchow and Righter, makers of Parcheesi and Scrabble. Milton Bradley was taken over by Hasbro, Inc., in 1984. Now wholly owned by Hasbro, it is still retained as one of Hasbro's brands, similar to the manner in which Parker Brothers is one of Hasbro's brands. Milton Bradley was a board game designer, he made his money by making games that people enjoyed playing.. In 1860, Milton Bradley moved to Springfield, Massachusetts, and set up the state’s first color lithography shop. His likeness of Abraham Lincoln sold very well until Lincoln grew his beard and rendered the likeness out-of-date. Struggling to find a new way to use his lithography machine, Bradley visited his friend George Tapley. Tapley challenged him to a game, most likely an old English game. Bradley conceived the idea of making a purely American game. He created “The Checkered Game of Life”, which had players move along a track from Infancy
    8.00
    1 votes
    158

    Richard Borg

    • Games designed: Wyatt Earp
    Richard Borg is a game designer. Games Richard has designed or co-designed include: In 2010 he was elected to the Charles Roberts Awards Hall of Fame.
    8.00
    1 votes
    159

    Stephen Euin Cobb

    Stephen Euin Cobb (born February 3, 1955) is a U.S. author, magazine writer, interviewer and host of the award-winning podcast The Future and You. A contributing editor for Space and Time Magazine, and a former contributing editor for Robot Magazine; he writes regularly for H+ Magazine, Grim Couture Magazine, Digit Magazine and Port Iris magazine; and for three years was a columnist and contributing editor for Jim Baen's Universe Magazine. Cobb is also a game designer, artist, essayist, futurist, transhumanist, and is on the Advisory Board of the Lifeboat Foundation. Most of Cobb's articles and columns in magazines center on technology and/or science. His essay-style articles also center on technology and science but often speculate about how the trends visible today will alter the future. He has also done celebrity interviews. Articles about the future include: Fifteen Ways Cheap Solar Cells are going to Change the World, What I've Learned Interviewing Futurists and Your Medical Care in the Coming Three Decades. Science speculation articles include: The Perpetual Electron and The Universal Diagram (published in the February 2007 episode of Jim Baen's Universe Magazine, in which he
    8.00
    1 votes
    160

    Christian Freeling

    Christian Freeling (born 1 February 1947, Enschede, the Netherlands) is a Dutch game designer and inventor of abstract strategy games, notably Grand Chess, Havannah, Hexdame, and Dameo. "Christian's games often embody a desire to get to the heart of the concepts used in abstract games. This is most clearly displayed by his minimalist chess variant, Chad, and his version of column checkers, Emergo." (Handscomb 2002 Spring:7) Freeling's designs cover a range of game types. Several are endeavors to improve on established games that he concluded are flawed or limited in some way. Some introduce familiar game mechanics into uncommon settings. He regularly translates rules for his orthogonal board games to the hexagonal grid, resulting in new versions with altered properties (usually enhanced tactics and strategy options, and fewer draws). Grand Chess utilizes the same combined-power pieces as Capablanca Chess, but connects the rooks giving immediate freedom of movement and "yields the better game" (Schmittberger 1992:206). Cyber (Internet) Grand Chess World Championships have been conducted, and NOST sponsored yearly tournaments beginning in 1998. A tournament in Yerevan in 1996
    6.33
    3 votes
    161

    Mayfair Games

    Mayfair Games is a publisher of board, card, and roleplaying games. They also license German-style board games and publish them in English throughout the world. They license the worldwide English-language rights to publish the The Settlers of Catan series from Catan GmbH. The genre of Crayon Rails board games was started by Mayfair's publication in 1982 of Empire Builder. Mayfair Games was originally founded by 1981 by Darwin Bromley in Chicago, Illinois, United States. Robert T. Carty, Jr., its current Executive VP, came on board in 1998. Its current President, Mr. Larry Roznai, took over in 1999 and now oversees operations. Chairman since 1997, Pete Fenlon became CEO in 2007. Coleman Charlton became Director of Products that same year, the latter half of which marked a major reorganization with a refocusing on Catan and other core brands. In 1982, Mayfair released its War in the Falklands game just as the war ended, leading the English press to accuse Mayfair of "ghoulish" exploitation. Gary Gygax had advocated arranging a licensing agreement between TSR, Inc. and Mayfair Games for their Role Aids line of game supplements, but was outvoted in the board meeting considering the
    6.33
    3 votes
    162

    Mordecai Meirowitz

    Mordecai Meirowitz was an Israeli postmaster and telecommunications expert who invented the code-breaking board game Master Mind. Having been rejected by the leading games companies, he managed to interest a Leicester-based Company, Invicta Plastics, which restyled and renamed the game. Released in 1971, the game sold over 50 million sets in 80 countries, making it the most successful new game of the 1970s. Pickover, Clifford A. (2009). The Math Book: From Pythagoras to the 57th Dimension, 250 Milestones in the History of Mathematics. New York: Sterling. ISBN 978-1-4027-5796-9. OCLC 262694306.
    6.33
    3 votes
    163
    Wilf K. Backhaus

    Wilf K. Backhaus

    Wilfried Karl Backhaus (7 November 1946 – 14 October 2009) was a role-playing game designer, business professor,and lawyer. He co-designed Chivalry & Sorcery a role playing game. He founded the "Loyal Order of Chivalry & Sorcery" (Locs) and was a baron in the SCA. He was also a published philosopher. Most recently he moderated a panel during a conference at University of Maryland, College Park and was a special guest at the Calgary Games Convention (CalCon). On 14 October 2009 Backhaus died following a two year battle with cancer.
    6.33
    3 votes
    164
    Emiliano Sciarra

    Emiliano Sciarra

    Emiliano Sciarra (born December 6, 1971 in Civitavecchia, Rome, Italy) is a game designer of board games, card games and videogames. He is the author of Bang!, a Wild West themed card game published by daVinci Editrice. He has been fascinated by games from when he was 12 years old, and he wrote simple board games and word games for his schoolmates and relatives. In the same time he also showed interest in computers (years later he earned a degree in Computer Science at Sapienza University of Rome). In 1988 he published his first game: a shoot 'em up videogame for the Commodore 64 called Ciuffy (Systems Editoriale), created using the software SEUCK by Sensible Software. Starting from 1999 he wrote several reviews, games and articles for the magazine PowerKaos and the fanzine Un'Altra Cosa, along with a brief "Little Informal Dictionary of Computer Science" (Piccolo Dizionario Informale di Informatica). His topics included logic puzzles, original games and theoretic discussions about the meaning of the game and its role in the human society. Before becoming a professional game designer, he acquired experience as freelance computer programmer and Privacy advisor for several companies
    7.00
    2 votes
    165

    James Ernest

    • Games designed: Before I Kill You, Mr. Bond
    James Ernest is an American game designer and juggler. He is best known as the owner and lead designer of Cheapass Games. Prior to founding Cheapass, he worked as a juggler at various venues, including Camlann Medieval Village, and as a freelancer with Wizards of the Coast. He also worked for Carbonated Games. Ernest also directed the short film The Man Between.
    7.00
    2 votes
    166
    Lewis Carroll

    Lewis Carroll

    • Games designed: Word ladder
    Charles Lutwidge Dodgson ( /ˈtʃɑrlz ˈlʌtwɪdʒ ˈdɒdʒsən/ CHARLZ LUDT-wij DOJ-sən; 27 January 1832 – 14 January 1898), better known by the pseudonym Lewis Carroll (/ˈkærəl/ KARR-əl), was an English author, mathematician, logician, Anglican deacon and photographer. His most famous writings are Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and its sequel Through the Looking-Glass, as well as the poems "The Hunting of the Snark" and "Jabberwocky", all examples of the genre of literary nonsense. He is noted for his facility at word play, logic, and fantasy, and there are societies in many parts of the world (including the United Kingdom, Japan, the United States, and New Zealand) dedicated to the enjoyment and promotion of his works and the investigation of his life. Dodgson's family was predominantly northern English, with Irish connections. Conservative and High Church Anglican, most of Dodgson's ancestors were army officers or Church of England clergy. His great-grandfather, also named Charles Dodgson, had risen through the ranks of the church to become the Bishop of Elphin. His grandfather, another Charles, had been an army captain, killed in action in Ireland in 1803 when his two sons were hardly
    7.00
    2 votes
    167

    Mac Gerdts

    • Games designed: Imperial
    Mac Gerdts (or Walther Gerdts) is the designer of German-style board games such as Imperial, Imperial 2030, Antike and Hamburgum. His games introduced the concept of a rondel rather than dice as a mechanism for play. This is designed to prevent players from repeatedly taking the same action in quick succession without paying a cost. Like many German board games, all of Gerdts' games include a mechanism designed to keep game length roughly within the specified time constraint. In Imperial, the game ends when a nation reaches the 25 point on the counting chart. In Hamburgum, the game ends when six churches are constructed. Antike, released in 2005, is about evolution and competition among ancient civilizations. Imperial, a 2006 game, has the players take on the roles of international investors in pre-WWI Europe. Hamburgum, released in 2007, is a game in which the object is to trade goods and make prestigious church donations. The spaces on the rondel are Church, Trade, Cloth, Guildhall, Beer, Dockyard, and Sugar. "The Princes of Machu Picchu", released in 2008 "Imperial 2030", released in 2009, is a follow-up of Imperial, where USA, Europe, Russia, China, India and Brazil compete for
    7.00
    2 votes
    168

    Michael Kiesling

    • Games designed: Torres
    Michael Kiesling (born 1957) is a German board game designer. Many of his games have been nominated for or have won the Spiel des Jahres, a German games award. He is best known for co-authoring the board game trilogy Tikal, Java and Mexica with Wolfgang Kramer.
    7.00
    2 votes
    169
    7.00
    2 votes
    170

    Tilsit Editions

    Tilsit Éditions is a French game publisher started in 1997 by Didier Jacobée. It makes board games, strategy games, games for kids, and other such games. Tilsit also distributed a number of French versions of Kosmos games, but the collaboration ended in 2006. Since 2003, Tilsit has published three main lines: Tilsit Collection for large-box games, Tilsit Poche for small-box multiplayer games and Tilsit Famille for intermediate games.
    7.00
    2 votes
    171
    7.00
    2 votes
    172

    Tom Jolly

    • Games designed: Wiz-War
    Tom Jolly is a board game inventor whose games include Wiz-War, Gootmu, and Knots, Drakon, Cavetroll, Vortex, Light Speed, Cargo, Camelot, Disk Wars, WayWord, and Got It!. Of these Wiz-War is among the best known. The publisher of Wiz-War, Chessex, has been promising a new edition "within a few months" since 2001, but as of January 2009 has yet to publish a new edition. The seventh, and last printed edition, came out in 1997. The eighth edition was recently announced by publisher Fantasy Flight Games, with a release date of 4th quarter of 2011
    7.00
    2 votes
    173
    7.00
    2 votes
    174

    Jeff Grubb

    • Games designed: Star Wars Miniatures
    Jeff Grubb (born August 27, 1957, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) is an author and game designer. He is known for his work on computer and role-playing games such as Dragonlance. He has also published novels, short stories, and comics. His credits include The Finder's Stone Trilogy with his wife, Kate Novak, the Spelljammer and the Jakandor campaign settings, and computer games such as Guild Wars Nightfall (2006). A wargaming enthusiast since high school, Grubb began playing Avalon Hill wargames and later got interested in playing Panzerblitz, Blitzkrieg, and Frigate from Simulations Publications, Inc. (SPI). He met Kate Novak in high school, and they were married in 1983. He first learned of roleplaying games as a freshman majoring in engineering at Purdue University, when he happened upon a game of Dungeons & Dragons being played by members of the campus wargaming club. Grubb says, "I walked up to a group of players to ask what they were doing. One turned to me, handed me three six-siders, and said, 'Roll these. We need a cleric.' It was all downhill from there." Within a year, he had attended his first Gen Con and was running his own campaign set in Toril, a world of his own
    5.50
    4 votes
    175

    Bill Slavicsek

    • Games designed: Star Wars Miniatures
    Bill Slavicsek is a game designer who served as the Director of Roleplaying Design and Development at Wizards of the Coast. He previously worked for West End Games and TSR, Inc., and designed products for Dungeons & Dragons, Star Wars, Alternity, Torg, Paranoia and Ghostbusters. Bill Slavicsek was born and raised in New York City. Slavicsek was a comic book, horror, and science fiction fan as a boy: "Some of my earliest memories involve looking at issues of Marvel Comics, drawing my own comics, and watching old SF and horror movies on TV". Interested in gaming from an early age, Slavicsek was introduced to roleplaying games in 1977 when he discovered Dungeons & Dragons. Originally intending to pursue a career as a comic book artist, Slavicsek switched to journalism and communication at St. John's University. After working for a year at a community newspaper, Slavicsek was hired by West End Games as an editor in 1986. In 1987 the company secured the license to publish a Star Wars roleplaying game, a project which Slavicsek oversaw as an editor and developer. In 1988 he was promoted to Creative and Editorial Director for WEG. He co-created the Torg game with Greg Gorden, published in
    6.00
    3 votes
    176
    Milton Bradley

    Milton Bradley

    • Games designed: The Checkered Game of Life
    Milton Bradley (November 8, 1836 – May 30, 1911) was an American game pioneer, credited by many with launching the board game industry in North America with Milton Bradley Company. A native of Vienna, Maine, Bradley grew up in a working-class household in Lowell, Massachusetts. After completing high school he found work as a draftsman before enrolling at the Lawrence Scientific School in Cambridge, Massachusetts. In 1856, he secured employment at the Watson Company in Springfield, Massachusetts. After the company was shuttered during the recession of 1858, he entered business for himself as a mechanical draftsman and patent agent. Later, Bradley pursued lithography and in 1860, he set up the first color lithography shop in Springfield, Massachusetts. Eventually, Bradley moved forward with an idea he had for a board game which he called The Checkered Game of Life, an early version of what later became The Game of Life. In 2004, he was posthumously inducted into the National Toy Hall of Fame along with George Ditomassi of Milton Bradley Company. Through the 20th century the company he founded in 1860, Milton Bradley Company dominated the production of American games, with titles like
    6.00
    3 votes
    177

    Tom Wham

    Tom Wham (born 1944 in Chester, Illinois) is a designer of board games who has also produced artwork, including that for his own games. Wham worked a variety of odd jobs during his early adult life. After serving four years in the U.S. Navy, he worked for the Guidon Games hobby shop in Maine where he got his first game, a variant on a Civil War naval miniatures campaign, published. Afterwards he became a prison guard in his hometown, then held an office job in Denver. In May 1977 he began working for TSR, Inc. at their Lake Geneva, Wisconsin headquarters as a general office worker. In a separate capacity as an independent contractor, Wham began doing some creative work for the company, contributing a handful of illustrations for the original AD&D Monster Manual, including the creature called the beholder. he also began writing games for Dragon magazine. These games, printed on cardstock and included in the centerfold of the magazine, usually featured artwork supplied by Wham. Notable games published this way include: Since leaving TSR Wham has designed many more games, most recently collaborating with James M. Ward on the board game Dragon Lairds, published in April 2008. The game
    6.00
    3 votes
    178

    Vincent Baker

    • Games designed: Dogs in the Vineyard
    Vincent Baker is the designer of Indie role-playing games.
    6.00
    3 votes
    179

    Anthony Ernest Pratt

    • Games designed: Cluedo
    Anthony Ernest Pratt (10 August 1903 – 9 April 1994) was the inventor of the board game Cluedo. Pratt was born at 13 Brighton Road, Balsall Heath, Birmingham. He received his secondary education at St. Philip's School in Edgbaston. His favourite subject was Chemistry but he suffered from poor eyesight which affected his education somewhat. Anthony was a very gifted musician and a proficient pianist from an early age. When he left school, at 15, he wanted to pursue a career in chemistry and was apprenticed to a local chemical manufacturer. But with no formal qualifications in chemistry and a growing interest in music he went onto pursue a musical career. During the interwar years Anthony Pratt went onto become a successful musician earning a living playing piano recitals in country hotels and on cruise ships where he travelled to places like New York and Iceland. Also an aspiring composer (he was a huge fan of Edward Elgar) he was at one time accompanist to the well known soprano Kirsten Flagstad. During the Second World War Anthony worked in an engineering factory in Birmingham that manufactured components for tanks. Working on a drilling machine he found the work rather tedious
    6.50
    2 votes
    180

    Avalon Hill

    Avalon Hill is a game company that specializes in wargames and strategic board games. Its logo contains its initials "AH", and is often referred to by this abbreviation. It has also published the occasional miniature wargaming rules, role-playing game, and had a popular line of sports simulations. It is now a division of the game company Wizards of the Coast, which is itself a subsidiary of Hasbro. The company was started in 1954 by Charles S. Roberts under the name of "The Avalon Game Company" for the publication of his game Tactics, considered the first commercial wargame. Following the success of Tactics Roberts changed the name "The Avalon Game Company" to "Avalon Hill" in 1958, name kept by the company until it folded in 1998. The first game published by the company under the name of "Avalon Hill" was the second edition of Tactics, titled Tactics II and also published in 1958. Between 1958 and 1963 Avalon Hill published many different games, many of them being wargames: 1776, Starship Troopers, Africa Korps, Wooden Ships and Iron Men, Richtovens War, Battle of the Bulge, Gettysburg, Tactics II, U-Boat, Chancellorsville, D-Day, Civil War, Waterloo, Bismarck and Stalingrad.
    6.50
    2 votes
    181
    Bruno Faidutti

    Bruno Faidutti

    • Games designed: Citadels
    Bruno Faidutti (23 October 1961) is an historian and sociologist, living in France, who is best known as an author of board games. His best known games include Knightmare Chess (1991), Mystery of the Abbey (1993, 2003) and Citadels (2000). He is also involved in the boardgaming community with his "Ideal Games Library" website and personal "Game of the Year" prize. Many of his games are the results of collaboration with other designers.
    6.50
    2 votes
    182

    Charlie Catino

    Charlie Catino is a board game designer who created the Avalon Hill-Hasbro game Nexus Ops. He played in chess and bridge tournaments from his teenage to college years. In college he started playing games like Axis & Allies, Titan (game), Acquire, and Cosmic Encounter. He was an early playtester for the popular Richard Garfield game Magic: The Gathering which landed him a job as a game developer for Wizards of the Coast.
    6.50
    2 votes
    183
    David Parlett

    David Parlett

    • Games designed: Hare and Tortoise
    David Parlett (born 1939) is a games scholar from South London, who has studied both card games and board games. His published works include many popular books on games and the more academic volumes "Oxford Guide to Card Games" and "Oxford History of Board Games", both now out of print. Parlett has also invented a number of board games, the most successful of which is Hare and Tortoise (1974). The German edition was awarded Spiel des Jahres (game of the year) in 1979.
    6.50
    2 votes
    184
    Emily Care Boss

    Emily Care Boss

    • Games designed: Breaking the Ice
    Emily Care Boss is an Indie roleplaying game designer and publisher. She is the author of Breaking the Ice Breaking the Ice, Shooting the Moon and Under my Skin and MonkeyDome. She currently resides in Plainfield Massachusetts. Ms. Boss is engaged to fellow game designer, Epidiah Ravachol. Boss graduated from University of Massachusetts Amherst with a bachelors degree in Social Thought and Political Economy and masters degree in Forestry. She is currently a forestry consultant in the woodlands of western Massachusetts. Boss co-writes Fair Game, with Meguey Baker a blog-style design and roleplaying theory journal. She is the founding owner of Black & Green Games. A contributor to the role playing journal Push, Emily has designed role playing games and discussed role playing game theory since 1999. She organizes the JiffyCon series of indie roleplaying game mini-conventions in Massachusetts, was a guest of honor in August 2007 at the Finnish role playing convention, Ropecon, and in 2009 at the Danish role playing convention Fastaval. Her new game of alien first contact, Sign in Stranger, was released in August 2009. Boss and Vincent Baker are attributed as formulating the Lumpley
    6.50
    2 votes
    185

    Jerry Taylor

    • Games designed: Hammer of the Scots
    Jerry Taylor (born 1963 or 1964) is a senior fellow at the Cato Institute, where he researches environmental policy. He attended the University of Iowa as a political science major. He is also a board game designer who has released three wargames, Hammer of the Scots, Crusader Rex, and Richard III. He resides in Alexandria, Virginia with his wife and son.
    6.50
    2 votes
    186
    Matt Wolf

    Matt Wolf

    Matt Wolf is an American video game and new media designer, director, producer, creator and board game inventor. Wolf also conceived the first Alternate Reality Game to ever win a Primetime Emmy Award. Born in Tennessee and raised in Santa Barbara and Sacramento, Matt Wolf is the only son of two PhD Psychologists. Wolf started his career at Electronic Arts in 1992 and worked there until 1998. Wolf moved from Electronic Arts to Sega Entertainment in 1998 and in 2000 he left Sega Entertainment to form Double Twenty Productions (D20). Today Wolf still runs D20 as his primary media and entertainment production company. In 2007, one of Wolf's original creations the fallen Alternate Reality Game won a Primetime Creative Arts Emmy Award for the Outstanding Creative Achievement for an Interactive Television Program. Wolf originally conceived the game's story and design for ABC Family to promote their Fallen (ABC Family Miniseries). It also won Best Experimental Project at SXSW in 2007 and Best Interactive Program at the Banf World Television festival in 2007. Wolf acts as interactive creative adviser to the Robert Ludlum Estate. The Estate relies on Wolf to oversee Ludlum based interactive
    6.50
    2 votes
    187
    Peter Suber

    Peter Suber

    • Games designed: Nomic
    Peter Suber (born November 8, 1951) is the creator of the game Nomic and a leading voice in the open access movement. He is the Director of the Harvard Open Access Project, a senior research professor of philosophy at Earlham College, the open access project director at Public Knowledge, a senior researcher at SPARC (Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition), and a Fellow at Harvard's Berkman Center and Office for Scholarly Communication. He is a member of the Board of Enabling Open Scholarship, the Advisory Boards at the Wikimedia Foundation, the Open Knowledge Foundation, and the advisory boards of other organizations devoted to open access and an information commons. Suber is married to Liffey Thorpe, professor emerita of Classics at Earlham College, with whom he has two daughters. Since 2003 he and Thorpe have resided in Brooksville, Maine. Suber graduated from Earlham in 1973, received a PhD degree in philosophy in 1978 and a JD degree in 1982, both from Northwestern University. He worked as a stand-up comic from 1976 to 1981, including an appearance on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson in 1976. Suber returned to Earlham College as a professor from 1982 to
    6.50
    2 votes
    188

    999 Games

    999 Games is a Dutch board game publishing company. In Belgium and the Netherlands it publishes mostly German-style board games such as The Settlers of Catan, El Grande and Carcassonne. The company also imports foreign games, such as Magic: the Gathering cards. In recent years, 999 Games has moved away a bit from designer board games and turned more towards family, kids or even party games, with Agricola being a popular exception.
    7.00
    1 votes
    189
    Dave Humpherys

    Dave Humpherys

    David Humpherys (born 11 June 1972) is a former professional Magic: The Gathering player from the United States. Humpherys now works for the company that produced Magic, Wizards of the Coast. He was inducted to the Magic: The Gathering Pro Tour Hall of Fame in November 2006. Last updated: 4 April 2009 Source: Wizards.com
    7.00
    1 votes
    190

    David A. Hargrave

    David Allen Hargrave (May 25, 1946 – August 29, 1988), known as The Dream Weaver, was a prolific and sometimes controversial game designer and writer of fantasy and science fiction role-playing games (RPGs). Hargrave's most notable written works were based upon his own mythical world of Arduin. Hargrave was also an Army combat veteran of the Vietnam War with a six-year tour of duty in country. From the mid-1970s through 1988 David A. Hargrave was very active in the role-playing community. He authored ten books based upon this Arduin game world. Hargrave also produced four Arduin Dungeon Modules and several fantasy item collections, which were published by Grimoire Games. Hargrave's work was perhaps the first "cross-genre" venture into fantasy RPG, and it included everything from interstellar wars to horror and historical drama. His work was, however, based principally upon the traditional (and not so traditional) medieval fantasy genre. Arduin was one of the earliest challengers to TSR's Dungeons & Dragons, and a leading representative of the high-entropy, multiversal campaigns then prevalent in RPG circles. While Hargrave was considered one of the best of the best of Game Masters,
    7.00
    1 votes
    191

    Don Greenwood

    • Games designed: Advanced Squad Leader
    Don Greenwood is a board game designer and was a pioneer editor among commercial board-wargaming magazines. He began his own fanzine, Panzerfaust Magazine, which he oversaw from 1967 until 1972. He then joined The Avalon Hill Game Company in 1972, and took over editorship of that company's "house organ", The General Magazine, which office he held until 1982. He left Avalon Hill and continued to work in the wargame industry, notably for GMT Games. He is the founder of the Origins, Avaloncon, and WBC gaming conventions and remains the WBC convention manager. Greenwood is also president of the Boardgame Players Association. He was inducted into the Origins Award hall of fame in 1991 and the Charles S. Roberts Award hall of fame in 1994. Greenwood was a prolific game designer, with a unique rules-writing style. Among the titles he was responsible:
    7.00
    1 votes
    192

    Mark Rosewater

    Mark Rosewater (born May 25, 1967) is a Magic: The Gathering card designer. He is currently Magic's head designer. Rosewater grew up in Pepper Pike, Ohio, where he attended the Orange High School. Rosewater has a Jewish background. Rosewater has described himself in his youth as a "social outcast", who did not have many friends. He was particularly small, smart and was bullied by other children. In his youth, he worked as a professional magician. Rosewater attended Boston University, where he got a Bachelor of Science in Communication. After graduating, Rosewater started his career in television as a runner. He then found work as a writer. Before 1994 he was on the writing staff of Roseanne. He is credited for two Roseanne episodes: "Vegas, Vegas" and "Take My Bike, Please", both aired in 1991. He considered his time in Hollywood a "roller coaster ride." While working as a freelance writer he took a job at a game store in order to have some social contacts. Working there he first found out about Magic: The Gathering from a customer. Since 1995, Mark Rosewater has worked for Wizards of the Coast, the company which makes Magic: The Gathering. He wrote puzzles based on Magic cards and
    7.00
    1 votes
    193

    Rio Grande Games

    Rio Grande Games is a board game publisher based in Rio Rancho, New Mexico. The company primarily imports and localizes foreign language German-style board games. In 1995, Jay Tummelson began working for Mayfair Games. At that time, Mayfair had begun to import German-style board games for sale, without doing any localization. Tummelson first suggested that they incorporate an English translation, and then that they completely localize the game for American audiences. Tummelson acquired the rights for Detroit/Cleveland Grand Prix, Manhattan, Modern Art, Streetcar, and The Settlers of Catan, which were published together in 1996. One part of the localization process was to create original art and components. Tummelson thought that a better solution would be to use the same artwork and components as the originals and to share the cost of printing with the European publishers, as well. In 1998, he founded Rio Grande Games to take that approach. Since then, Rio Grande Games has published over 350 games and has had a significant effect on board gaming in the United States. The most popular of the games published by Rio Grande Games are Carcassonne, Puerto Rico, Dominion, Power Grid, Race
    7.00
    1 votes
    194

    Sid Sackson

    • Games designed: I'm the Boss!
    Sid Sackson (February 4, 1920, Chicago – November 6, 2002) was a prolific American board game designer and collector. His most popular creation is probably the business game Acquire. Other games he designed include Can't Stop and Focus (Domination), which won the prestigious German Spiel des Jahres game design award in 1981. Other notable works include his books, especially A Gamut of Games and Card Games Around the World; both titles include a large array of rules for games both new and old, and Sackson himself invented a number of the games covered by these works. For several years in the mid-1970s, Sid Sackson wrote a monthly column for Strategy & Tactics magazine called “Sackson on Games” in which he reviewed games (other than wargames). Sackson collected games throughout his life; at the time of his death, his collection was estimated at over 18,000 titles. Many of those were unique, sent to him by hopeful game developers who wanted Sackson's advice. At one point in his life, Sackson turned down an offer to bring his collection elsewhere for permanent safekeeping; the games were sold at a series of auctions after his death, breaking up the collection. Sackson’s personal papers
    7.00
    1 votes
    195

    Waddingtons

    Waddingtons was a publisher of card and board games in the United Kingdom. The company was founded by John Waddington of Leeds, England and Wilson Barratt, under the name Waddingtons Limited. The name was changed to Waddington's House of Games, then John Waddington Limited, then Waddington Games, and finally just Waddingtons. The company was initially established as a printing business, entering into game production in 1922, due to a boom in demand for playing cards around World War I. Waddingtons subsequently sold both original games (especially tie-ins for UK television programmes) and games licensed from other publishers. The company was eventually bought by Hasbro in 1994. Beginning in 1994, Christmas-themed jigsaw puzzles were released annually until 2007, a total of thirteen puzzles. The first twelve in the series depicted a scene from a Victorian-era Christmas. The final puzzle depicted a scene from the fairy tale Cinderella. The small number of puzzles, combined with the fact that they were all limited editions, has made these puzzles among the most sought-after in the world. Among the games published by Waddingtons were: 2. In Avid Merrion's Bo! in the USA during a
    7.00
    1 votes
    196

    Greg Stolze

    • Games designed: Reign
    Greg Stolze (born 1970) is an American novelist and writer, whose work has mainly focused on properties derived from role-playing games. Stolze has contributed to numerous role-playing game books for White Wolf Game Studio and Atlas Games, including Demon: the Fallen. Some of Stolze's recent work has been self-published using the "ransom method", whereby the game is only released when enough potential buyers have contributed enough money to reach a threshold set by the author. Together with John Tynes he created and wrote the role-playing game Unknown Armies, published by Atlas Games. He has also co-written the free game NEMESIS, which uses the One-Roll Engine presented in Godlike and the Madness Meter derived from Unknown Armies.
    5.67
    3 votes
    197

    Philippe Keyaerts

    • Games designed: Vinci
    Philippe Keyaerts is a Belgian designer of German-style board games. His two most popular games are Evo and Vinci. Those two games use the mechanism of allowing the players to spend victory points to improve the characteristics of their play. He also invented Space Blast, a small space battle game. Philippe Keyaerts is also credited as the designer of Small World, a 2009 fantasy-themed board game based upon a remake of his popular board game Vinci. Keyaerts is also active in the organisation of board game conventions in Belgium.
    5.67
    3 votes
    198
    6.00
    2 votes
    199

    Ian Hanomansing

    Ian Hanomansing (born 1961) is a Canadian television journalist with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC). He currently reports for CBC Television's nightly newscast, The National. He is married and has two sons. Hanomansing was born in Port-of-Spain, Trinidad and Tobago, and grew up in Sackville, New Brunswick. He attended Mount Allison University for his undergraduate education, and then studied law at Dalhousie Law School. While in university, he was one of the country's most successful debaters and the top speaker at the Canadian National Debating Championship. His broadcast media career began in the summer after his graduation at CKDH in Amherst, Nova Scotia, followed by work at CKCW in Moncton, New Brunswick and at CHNS in nearby Halifax, Nova Scotia. He later worked for CBC bureaus in the Maritimes and Toronto, Ontario before moving to Vancouver, where he was a network reporter and hosted the now-defunct programs Pacific Rim Report and Foreign Assignment. As a reporter, Hanomansing has covered a number of stories, including the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill, the 1992 Los Angeles riots, the 1994 Stanley Cup riot, the handover of Hong Kong from Great Britain, and five
    6.00
    2 votes
    200

    Leo Colovini

    • Games designed: Clans
    Leo Colovini is an Italian designer of German-style board games born in Venice 1964. His most popular game is Cartagena. He is one of the few top board game designers who has owned a game store. His life in games was strongly influenced by meeting Alex Randolph at the age of 12 with whom he worked on several of his games. He has also been part of studiogiochi (an Italian games company) and has also collaborated with Dario De Toffoli and has written books on games. Complete list of games that Colovini has created: His games are known for their simplicity and drama as this quote from Board Game Geek illustrates: "Carcasonne: The Discovery is also the simplest and most vanilla of the Carcassonnes. (Of course, if you know anything about Leo Colovini, you'd expect that.) But, it also the most tense Carcassonne. (And if you know Mr. Colovini, you also knew THAT!)"
    6.00
    2 votes
    201
    Reiner Knizia

    Reiner Knizia

    • Games designed: Ra
    Reiner Knizia (German pronunciation: [ˈʁaɪnɐ ˈknɪtsiə]) is a prolific German-style board game designer. Born in Germany, he developed his first game at the age of eight. He has a PhD in mathematics, and has been a full-time game designer since 1997, when he quit his job from the board of a large international bank. Knizia has been living in England since 1993. In addition to being quite prolific, with over 500 published games, he is highly acclaimed as a designer, having won the Deutscher Spiele Preis four times, a Spiel des Jahres (in addition to a Kinderspiel des Jahres and a special award), and numerous other national and international awards. At the Origins Game Fair in 2002 he was inducted into the Gaming Hall of Fame. His games frequently make appearances on various "top games" lists, including the GAMES 100 list, the BoardGameGeek top 100, and the Internet Top 100 Games List. Several gaming conventions host "Kniziathons", which are tournaments dedicated to celebrating Knizia-designed games. Reiner Knizia started developing games for his play-by-mail game zine Postspillion, founded in 1985. The zine still exists, and the game Bretton Woods (also a Reiner Knizia design), which
    6.00
    2 votes
    202
    Uwe Rosenberg

    Uwe Rosenberg

    • Games designed: Agricola
    Uwe Rosenberg (born 27 March 1970 in Aurich, Lower Saxony) is a German game designer. He has become known mainly for his card game Bohnanza, which is successful both in Germany and internationally. He also designed Agricola, a game that dethroned Puerto Rico as the highest rated game on BoardGameGeek.com. Rosenberg first began to occupy himself with the development and mechanisms of games during his school years. During that time, he published a number of play-by-mail games, some of which are now available at www.omido.de. When he was a student, Amigo published his best-known game, Bohnanza. Since finishing his statistics studies in Dortmund (the subject of his thesis was "Probability distributions in Memory"), his main occupation is the development of games. In 2000, he founded the small publishing company Lookout Games, together with a few other authors. It published a number of expansions to Bohnanza, partly in cooperation with Hanno Girke. Larger projects were still published at other publishers, such as Amigo and Kosmos. Rosenberg is well known for the development of innovative card game mechanisms. Another main point of his work are the research-intensive games, that have
    6.00
    2 votes
    203
    Jason Bulmahn

    Jason Bulmahn

    • Games designed: Pathfinder Roleplaying Game
    Jason Bulmahn is a game designer who has authored or contributed to several works. Jason Bulmahn became the managing editor of Dragon in 2004 and is the lead designer of Paizo Publishing and the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game. The Beta version of the Pathfinder RPG received the gold ENnie award for "best free product or web enhancement" in 2008. He has also written or contributed to Pathfinder books such as Carnival of Tears, as well as Dragon and Dungeon articles and books such as Secrets of Xen'Drik, Expedition to the Ruins of Greyhawk, Dungeonscape, and Elder Evils.
    5.33
    3 votes
    204

    Jared Sorensen

    • Games designed: InSpectres
    Jared Sorensen is one of the role playing game industry's indie game founding fathers. His Memento Mori Theatricks site has been the host to over a dozen little games. His most famous games include InSpectres, octaNe, and Lacuna Part I. He is also the co-founder of Wicked Dead Brewing Company with John Wick. In September 2007, Jared announced his employment as a Senior Game Design at Hidden City Games. His current project is Free Market co-designed with Luke Crane.
    5.00
    3 votes
    205

    Paul J. Gruen

    • Games designed: Pay Day
    Paul J. Gruen (1940 – 1993) was a prolific inventor working in the toy & game industry for nearly 30 years. Some of his 40+ published games are listed below.
    5.50
    2 votes
    206

    Richard Berg

    For the television producer see Dick Berg. Richard Berg, trained as a lawyer, is a prolific wargame designer, and recipient of the Charles S. Roberts Hall of Fame Award in 1987. Notable games include SPQR and The Campaign for North Africa. He was the editor and publisher of the now defunct Berg's Review of Games. Richard Berg designed or co-designed the following.
    5.50
    2 votes
    207

    Andrew Looney

    • Games designed: Cosmic Coasters
    Andrew J. Looney (born November 5, 1963), better known as Andy Looney, is an award-winning game designer and computer programmer. Looney, his wife Kristin Looney, and Alison Frane together run the games company Looney Labs, which has published most of his game designs, such as Fluxx, Chrononauts, and the Icehouse game system. Before Looney and his wife started Looney Labs, they had both worked at NASA, where, in 1993, some of Looney's software was launched into orbit as part of the repairs to the Hubble Space Telescope. He then went on to a brief career as a game programmer at Magnet Interactive Studios, where he created that company's only entry to the market, Icebreaker. Looney holds patents on the game mechanics for Icehouse, IceTowers and Chrononauts: Looney has won the following game design awards:
    6.00
    1 votes
    208

    Mike Selinker

    • Games designed: Fightball
    Mike Selinker is a game designer whose design credits include Pirates of the Spanish Main and Fightball with James Ernest, Axis & Allies Revised Edition with Larry Harris, the Marvel Super Heroes Adventure Game, and Risk Godstorm. He was a creative director for the 3rd edition of Dungeons & Dragons and the Harry Potter Trading Card Game. As a puzzle maker, he created the fictional police officer Lt. Nodumbo for GAMES World of Puzzles. He is a founder of the Lone Shark Games design studio with James Ernest, LIVE/WIRE with Tim Beach, and the Maze of Games with Teeuwynn Woodruff. He also has written poker books such as Dealer's Choice: The Complete Handbook of Saturday Night Poker, with James Ernest and Phil Foglio. Selinker won three 2004 Origins Awards for Pirates, Axis & Allies: D-Day, and Betrayal at House on the Hill. His game Alpha Blitz was Games Magazine's 1998 Word Game of the Year.
    6.00
    1 votes
    209

    Skip Williams

    • Games designed: Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition)
    Ralph Williams, almost always referred to as Skip Williams, is an American game designer. He is married to Penny Williams, who is also involved with the games industry. He is best known as co-creator of Dungeons & Dragons 3rd Edition and as the longtime author of Dragon Magazine's column "Sage Advice." Born in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, Williams was informally acquainted with many of the people who developed and influenced the original Dungeons & Dragons game, going to school with Gary Gygax's son Ernie and participating in a gaming group that Gary used to playtest some of the AD&D rules. Williams started out working as a part-time clerk in TSR's Dungeon Hobby Shop in 1976. Williams first worked for TSR in an administrative capacity, working as a cashier, in shipping, and doing various office tasks. Williams directed the Gen Con game fair from 1980-1983. Williams was laid off after a time but continued to work for TSR in a freelance role, performing odd jobs; it was in this circumstance in 1987 that he came to write "Sage Advice" in the pages of Dragon - Williams recalls that Dragon editor Roger E. Moore simply couldn't find anyone else willing to regularly write the column. Williams
    6.00
    1 votes
    210

    Stephen V. Cole

    Stephen V. Cole is an American game designer and the CEO of Amarillo Design Bureau, Inc. (also known as ADB or Starfleet Games) which publishes Star Fleet Battles, Federation and Empire, Federation Commander, Prime Directive, and other wargames set in the Star Fleet Universe. Cole, an engineer and former US Army intelligence officer, was founder of the company JagdPanther Publications, which operated from 1973 to 1977. This company published several games, as well as the magazine JagdPanther which featured a complete game, or variant, in each issue. Later, Cole co-founded Task Force Games which first published Star Fleet Battles, designed by Cole in the 1980s. Star Fleet Battles continues to be published by Amarillo Design Bureau and was inducted into the Academy of Adventure Gaming, Arts, & Design Hall of Fame in 2005 where they stated that "Star Fleet Battles literally defined the genre of spaceship combat games in the early 1980s, and was the first game that combined a major license with 'high re-playability'." Cole is a contributor to StrategyPage that "provides quick, easy access to what is going on in military affairs."
    6.00
    1 votes
    211
    Mark Twain

    Mark Twain

    • Games designed: Memory Builder
    Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910), better known by his pen name Mark Twain, was an American author and humorist. He is most noted for his novel The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876) and its sequel, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885), the latter often called "the Great American Novel." Twain grew up in Hannibal, Missouri, which would later provide the setting for Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer. He apprenticed with a printer. He also worked as a typesetter and contributed articles to his older brother Orion's newspaper. After toiling as a printer in various cities, he became a master riverboat pilot on the Mississippi River before heading west to join Orion. He was a failure at gold mining, so he next turned to journalism. While a reporter, he wrote a humorous story, "The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County," which became very popular and brought nationwide attention. His travelogues were also well received. Twain had found his calling. He achieved great success as a writer and public speaker. His wit and satire earned praise from critics and peers, and he was a friend to presidents, artists, industrialists, and European royalty. He lacked
    4.25
    4 votes
    212

    Days of Wonder

    Days of Wonder is a board game publisher based in the United States and France. Founded in 2002, Days of Wonder distributes its games to 25 countries. It specialises in German-style board games and have branched out to include some online games. Days of Wonder has published games in English, French, German and Korean. Days of Wonder was co-founded by Eric Hautemont and vice president Mark Kaufman. In 2004, Days of Wonder received the Spiel des Jahres for their board game, Ticket to Ride, by Alan R. Moon. Ticket to Rides is the company's best selling series according to Boardgamegeek.com. It was the youngest publisher ever to take that award. Shadows Over Camelot won a special Spiel des Jahres award as Best Fantasy Game in 2006. In 2009, Smallworld received three awards including "Best Game of the Year", "Best Family Game", and "Best Game Artwork" from the Dice Tower Gaming Awards. Below are just some of the games published by Days of Wonder:
    4.67
    3 votes
    213

    Kari Mannerla

    • Games designed: Afrikan tähti
    Kari Mannerla (January 9, 1930, Helsinki, Finland – July 12, 2006, Helsinki, Finland) was a Finnish board and card game designer and advertising agency executive. The most famous game designed by Mannerla is the board game Afrikan tähti (The Star of Africa), the idea of which he began to develop in 1949. The game was published two years later. Mannerla made up the name of the game when reading an article about the biggest diamond in the world, the Star of Africa, discovered in South Africa. Apart from the board game, he also designed the Afrikan tähti card play version. He also designed the board game Inkan aarre (Treasure of the Inca) that was published in 2005. It is similar to Afrikan tähti, but takes place in South America. Earlier Kari Mannerla also designed solitaire card games and adventure party games. Kari Mannerla made a career in an advertising agency and retired as the chairman of the board of directors. He died of cancer in the age of 76.
    5.00
    2 votes
    214

    Uwe Eickert

    • Games designed: Conflict of Heroes: Awakening the Bear!
    Uwe Eickert is an American board game designer of German descent. He is the Principal and one of the founders of Academy Games. He is the chief designer of the "Conflict of Heroes" board wargame series, games that teach combined arms usage. Players can experiment with different tactical options to learn effective company level strategies. The first game in the "Conflict of Heroes" series, "Conflict of Heroes: Awakening the Bear! - Russia 1941-1942", is the 2009 Origins Award Winner for the Best Historical Board Game. A jury of experts drawn from the Academy of Adventure Gaming Arts & Design and the Game Manufacturers Association’s (GAMA) three divisions select the top ten of the submitted games and present them to game store retailers in attendance at the GAMA Trade Show in April each year. In 2009, "Conflict of Heroes: Awakening the Bear! - Russia 1941-1942" won two 2008 Charles S. Roberts Awards: (1) Best WWII Era Board Game, and (2) Best Graphic Design. In that same year, Uwe himself also won the 2008 Charles S. Roberts James F. Dunnigan Best Design Elegance Award. Also in 2009, the second game in the "Conflict of Heroes" series, another Uwe Eickert design, was released:
    5.00
    2 votes
    215

    Aaron Forsythe

    Aaron Forsythe is the current director of Magic: The Gathering R&D, and former player on the pro tour. Forsythe started playing Magic in the summer of 1994 after Revised and directly before the release of The Dark. He qualified for the pro tour after the release of Exodus. He was part of the first team, Car Acrobatic, to make it to the top eight in two pro tours. In the summer of 2001 Forsythe was invited by Mark Rosewater to apply as the content manager of the new Wizards of the Coast Magic website. Although originally not selected, he was offered the job on the condition he could be moved to Seattle in a month to start. He was given the chance to design for Fifth Dawn and metaphorically "knocked the ball out of the park" according to Rosewater. In 2009 with the help of what Rosewater termed a "high octane" design team Forsythe assembled, he revamped the core set in Magic 2010. New cards were included for the first time since Limited Edition Beta in an attempt to return to flavorful card by card design for modern magic.
    5.00
    1 votes
    216
    Charles Grant

    Charles Grant

    Charles Grant was a game author who helped popularize the hobby of tabletop wargaming. He is best known as the author of The War Game. Born in Scotland, and served in the Royal Air Force in World War 2. Later in Scotland Yard's Special Branch. Contributor to Military Modelling and Battle. Sometime editor of Slingshot the Journal of the Society of Ancients. He has had influence amongst the designers of Warhammer Ancient Battles. Jeff Jonas describes his writings as inspirational. Died May 1979. He is survived by his son Charles S. Grant, who is also a published wargamer.
    5.00
    1 votes
    217

    Fletcher Pratt

    Murray Fletcher Pratt (1897–1956) was an American writer of science fiction, fantasy and history, particularly noted for his works on naval history and on the American Civil War. According to L. Sprague de Camp, Pratt was born near Tonawanda, New York, and attended Hobart College for one year. During the 1920s he worked for the Buffalo Courier-Express and on a Staten Island newspaper. In 1926, he married Inga Stephens, an artist. In the late 1920s he began selling stories to pulp magazines. Again, according to de Camp's memoir, when a fire gutted his apartment in the 1930s he used the insurance money to study at the Sorbonne for a year. After that he began writing histories. Pratt was a military analyst for Time magazine (whose obituary described him as "bearded, gnome-like" and listed "raising marmosets" among his hobbies), as well as a regular reviewer of historical nonfiction and fantasy and science fiction for the New York Times Book Review. Wargamers know Pratt as the inventor of a set of rules for naval wargaming before the Second World War. This was known as the "The Fletcher Pratt Naval War Game" and involved dozens of tiny wooden ships, built on a scale of one inch to 50
    5.00
    1 votes
    218

    Geoffrey C. Grabowski

    • Games designed: Exalted
    Geoffrey C. Grabowski is a roleplaying game writer and editor, and a teacher born in 1973. He was, with John Chambers, developer and an author on the Exalted RPG from White Wolf Game Studio. He has also contributed to White Wolf's Hunter: The Reckoning, Kindred of the East, Vampire: The Masquerade, and Wraith: The Oblivion game lines. He contributed to Ars Magica from Wizards of the Coast and has also been published by Atlas Games and Pagan Publishing. Grabowski teaches computer science classes part-time.
    5.00
    1 votes
    219

    Ken Rolston

    Ken Rolston is an American computer game and board game designer best known for his work with West End Games and the hit computer game series The Elder Scrolls. In February 2007, he elected to join the staff of computer games company Big Huge Games to create a new role-playing game. Ken has a Masters Degree from NYU, and is a member of the Science Fiction Writers Association. He has been a professional games designer since 1982. Before entering the computer game field, for twelve years Ken was an award-winning designer of paper-and-pencil role-playing games. His credits include games and supplements for Paranoia, RuneQuest, Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay, AD&D, D&D. Ken also was winner of the H. G. Wells Award for Best Role-playing Game, Paranoia, 1985, and served as role-playing director for West End Games, Games Workshop, and Avalon Hill Game Company. Rolston was the lead designer for Bethesda's role-playing game, The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind, its expansions, and was also lead designer for The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion. Ken Rolston designs computer role-playing and adventure games. He was lead designer for two Big Huge Games projects, both which were canceled in 2009. Rolston
    5.00
    1 votes
    220

    Martin Wallace

    • Games designed: Railroad Tycoon
    Martin Wallace is a game designer from Manchester, England. He is the founder and chief designer of Treefrog (former Warfrog) Games. Wallace is known for designing complex strategy games that depict a variety of historical settings. Two themes he has frequently used are the construction and operation of railroads, and the rise and fall of ancient civilizations. He has developed a reputation for blending elegant European style game mechanics with the strong themes that are more typical of American style games. Many of his games feature economic systems, incorporating rules for income, taxation, and debt. Martin Wallace's most popular game, Age of Steam, was the winner of the 2003 International Gamers Award, and is one of the top twenty rated games on BoardGameGeek.
    5.00
    1 votes
    221

    Mike Mearls

    • Games designed: Dungeons & Dragons (4th Edition)
    Michael Mearls is a writer and designer of fantasy role-playing games (RPGs) and related fiction. He worked as a freelance writer and designer for various gaming publishers for several years before being hired in June 2005 as a designer by Wizards of the Coast. He was a lead developer for Dungeons & Dragons R&D working on the new 4th Edition. During the period from 2000-up until his hiring at WotC, he was one of the most prolific freelance writers in the gaming industry. Mearls is an alumnus of Dartmouth College. While at Dartmouth he was a member of Sigma Nu fraternity.
    5.00
    1 votes
    222

    Elwood T. Baker

    Elwood Thomas Baker (1853 – November 22, 1938) and his son, Charles Graham Baker, invented Gin rummy in 1909. Elwood was a whist teacher in Brooklyn, New York.
    4.50
    2 votes
    223

    Jim Dunnigan

    • Games designed: PanzerBlitz
    James F. Dunnigan (born 8 August 1943) is an author, military-political analyst, Defense and State Department consultant, and wargame designer currently living in New York City, notable for his matter-of-fact approach to military analysis. He was born in Rockland County, New York. After high school, he volunteered for the military instead of waiting to be drafted. From 1961 to 1964, he worked as a repair technician for the Sergeant ballistic missile, which included a tour in Korea. Afterwards, he attended Pace University studying accounting, then transferred to Columbia University, graduating with a degree in history in 1970. While still in college, he became involved in wargaming. He designed Jutland, which Avalon Hill published in 1967, following it up with 1914 the next year, and PanzerBlitz in 1970, which eventually sold most than 300,000 copies. Meanwhile, he had founded his own company, Simulations Publications Inc. (SPI), which issued games and published the magazine Strategy & Tactics. Between 1966 and 1992, he designed over 100 wargames and other conflict simulations, ranging from 1969's Up Against the Wall, Motherfucker about the student takeover at Columbia (which he
    4.00
    2 votes
    224

    Tony Bath

    Tony Bath (1926, Southampton -2000) was a British wargamer who favored the ancient period. His Hyboria campaign, based on the Conan the Barbarian stories of Robert E. Howard, is sometimes cited as the first fantasy wargame. It is even said to have included role playing elements. The Hyboria campaign did not contain magic or fantastic creatures, however. A detailed account of the campaign has been reprinted in Tony Bath's Ancient Wargaming (2009) It can now be revealed that Phil Barker was the decisive winner of the 10 year campaign. Phil still refers to this as his finest victory. . After serving in World War II, Bath began collecting military figures. In 1955 he joined the British Model Soldier Society. About this time he began wargaming, introducing Don Featherstone to the hobby. Bath contributed articles to Jack Scruby's seminal newsletter, the War Game Digest, and in 1960 he began editing the British edition of the newsletter with Featherstone. He also contributed articles to the Wargamer's Newsletter which Featherstone started in 1962. When Bath began playing wargames set in the ancient period, the only miniatures available were German flats which were difficult to procure.
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    225

    Chris Lawson

    Chris Lawson is an Australian writer of speculative fiction. Lawson was born in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia in 1966. During his childhood Lawson spent time in New Guinea where his father worked as a biologist on a crocodile farm and his mother studied psychology of personal identity. Later he studied medicine in which he has attained a graduate diploma in biostatistics, epidemiology and human genetics. Lawson has previously worked for the Victorian Aboriginal Health Service and Merck Sharpe and Dohme and currently practises as a family doctor. Lawson's first work was published in 1993, entitled "Metacarcinoma" his short story was published in the Summer 1993 edition of Eidolon. He received his first award for his work in 2000 when his short story "Written in Blood" won both the 1999 Aurealis Award for best science fiction short story and the 2000 Ditmar Award for best short fiction. Lawson is married and has two children and is currently living in Melbourne.
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    226

    Donald X Vaccarino

    • Games designed: Dominion
    Donald X. Vaccarino is an American board/card game designer. His first published game, Dominion in 2009, won the Spiel des Jahres award along with many others; he has published six expansions for it, with two more to come. His 2012 game Kingdom Builder also won the Spiel des Jahres award.
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    227

    Franz-Benno Delonge

    • Games designed: Fjords
    Franz-Benno Delonge (1957 – September 2, 2007) was a designer of German-style board games. He has been nominated for multiple best game awards, including Spiel des Jahres and International Gamers Awards. TransAmerica won the Mensa best mind game award for 2003. He died of cancer on September 2, 2007. Delonge started boardgaming as a child, often spending extended periods of time with his grandmother and her sisters. These three widows enjoyed all kinds of card and board games, and the most popular card game in Bavaria was for four players. Although quite hard, they made sure he could play by the time he was eight. While enjoying the success of TransAmerica, he would prefer to play other games he designed, like Dos Rios, Hellas or Big City. He considered his best work to have been Manila. TransAmerica was the game he thought was easiest for him to design, and found that even simple rules can have unexpected consequences. Dos Rios, on the other hand, he felt was clearly the hardest game to work to completion, which took around 5 years to improve from basic design to publishable product. Big City (published 1999) is a game with a modular board, each board section representing a
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    228
    Kosmos

    Kosmos

    Franckh-Kosmos Verlags-GmbH & Co. is a media publishing house based in Stuttgart, Germany, founded in 1822 by Johann Friedrich Franckh. In the nineteenth century the company published the fairy tales of Wilhelm Hauff as well as works by Wilhelm Waiblinger and Eduard Mörike. The "Friends of Nature Club" (Gesellschaft der Naturfreunde) was set up in 1903 in response to booming public interest in science and technology, and by 1912 100,000 members were receiving its monthly magazine "Cosmos" (Kosmos). The company moved into publishing books on popular science topics under the brands Franckh’sche Verlagshandlung and KOSMOS, including successful non-fiction guidebooks by Hanns Günther and Heinz Richter. Children's fiction and Kosmos-branded science experimentation kits were introduced in the 1920s. Kosmos's current output includes non-fiction, children's books, science kits and German-style board games. Many of their games are translated into English and published by Rio Grande Games, Mayfair Games, and Fantasy Flight Games. Their line of experiment kits and science kits is distributed in North America by Thames & Kosmos.
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    229
    Loyd Blankenship

    Loyd Blankenship

    • Games designed: GURPS Cyberpunk
    Loyd Blankenship (a.k.a. The Mentor, stylized as +++The Mentor+++) (born 1965) has been a well-known American computer hacker and writer since the 1970s, when he was a member of the hacker groups Extasyy Elite and Legion of Doom. He is the author of The Conscience of a Hacker (Hacker Manifesto), written after he was arrested, and was published in the underground hacker ezine Phrack. Blankenship gave a reading of The Hacker Manifesto and offered additional insight at H2K2. He also authored the cyberpunk role-playing sourcebook GURPS Cyberpunk, the manuscript of which was seized in a 1990 raid of his employer's (Steve Jackson Games, SJ Games) headquarters by the U.S. Secret Service. (This was not part of the Operation Sundevil raids, but rather came months afterward.) In a decision following a subsequent lawsuit filed by SJ Games, the court reprimanded the Secret Service for "sloppy" warrant preparation, suggested that the Secret Service needed "better education" regarding relevant statutes, and found that the Secret Service had no basis to suspect SJ Games of any wrongdoing. The court awarded SJ Games US$300,000 in damages and attorney's fees. (For the full article, see Steve
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    230

    Ravensburger

    Ravensburger Spieleverlag GmbH is a German game company and market leader in the European jigsaw puzzle market. The company was founded by Otto Robert Maier with seat in Ravensburg, a town in Upper Swabia in southern Germany. He began publishing in 1883 with his first author contract. He started publishing instruction folders for craftsmen and architects, which soon acquired him a solid financial basis. His first board game appeared in 1884, named "Journey around the world". At the turn of the 20th century, his product line broadened to include picture books, books, children’s activity books, Art Instruction manuals, non-fiction books, and reference books as well as children’s games, Happy Families and activity kits. In 1900, the Ravensburger blue triangle trademark was registered with the Imperial Patent office. As of 1912, many board and activity games had an export version that was distributed to Western Europe, the countries of the Danube Monarchy as well as Russia. Before the First World War, Ravensburger had around 800 products. The publishing house was damaged during the Second World War and continued to produce games in the years of the reconstruction. The company focused
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    231

    Richard Garfield

    • Games designed: Netrunner
    Richard Channing Garfield, PhD (born June 26, 1963, Philadelphia) is a game designer who created the card games Magic: The Gathering, Netrunner, BattleTech CCG, Vampire: The Eternal Struggle (originally known as Jyhad), The Great Dalmuti, Star Wars Trading Card Game, and the board game RoboRally. He also created a variation of the game Hearts called Complex hearts. The development of Magic: The Gathering is credited with popularising the collectible card game genre. Garfield was born in Philadelphia, and spent his childhood in many locations throughout the world as a result of his father's work in architecture. His family eventually settled in Oregon when he was twelve. While always having an interest in puzzles and games, his passion for games began when he was introduced to Dungeons & Dragons. Garfield designed his first game by the time he was 13. In 1985, he received a Bachelor of Science degree in computer mathematics. He joined Bell Laboratories, then decided to continue his education and attended the University of Pennsylvania, and studied combinatorial mathematics. He began designing Magic: The Gathering as a Penn graduate student. A group of playtesters, comprising mostly
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    232

    Alfred Mosher Butts

    • Games designed: Scrabble
    Alfred Mosher Butts (April 13, 1899 – April 4, 1993) was an American architect and the inventor of the board game Scrabble in 1938. Alfred Mosher Butts was born in Poughkeepsie, New York on April 13, 1899. Born to Allison Butts and Arrie Elizabeth Mosher. His father was a lawyer and his mother was a high school teacher. Alfred attended Poughkeepsie High School and graduated in 1917. He was also an amateur artist and six of his drawings were acquired by the Metropolitan Museum of Art. In the early 1930s after working as an architect but now unemployed, Butts set out to design a board game. He studied existing games and found that games fell into three categories: number games such as dice and bingo; move games such as chess and checkers; and word games such as anagrams. A resident of Jackson Heights, it was there that the game of Scrabble was invented. Butts decided to create a game that utilized both chance and skill by combining elements of anagrams and crossword puzzles, a popular pastime of the 1920s. Players would draw seven lettered tiles from a pool and then attempt to form words from their seven letters. A key to the game was Butts' analysis of the English language. Butts
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    233

    Bruce Shelley

    Bruce Campbell Shelley is a computer game designer who helped design Sid Meier's Civilization and Railroad Tycoon with MicroProse and the 1997 hit real-time strategy game Age of Empires with Ensemble Studios. He is currently working with Zynga, best known for Farmville, and helped develop FrontierVille in 2010. He served in an advisor role at Ensemble until it closed down in 2009 and recently stepped down from the board of directors of the Academy of Interactive Arts & Sciences. He also acted as a consultant on the Ubisoft game, The Settlers 7: Paths to a Kingdom. Bruce Shelley was born in Michigan, U.S. and grew up in Baltimore. He attended Syracuse University and the State University of New York's College of Forestry, earning a degree in forest biology. Shelley continued his education at the University of Virginia. He had developed a fondness for strategy board games in school, playing Risk and Stratego. The first time he thought of making games for a living came in the 1970s, but he had a difficult time finding a job. In 1980, he and several of his Univ. of Virginia friends formed a role-playing game company called Iron Crown Enterprises and acquired the license to make games
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    234

    Columbia Games

    Columbia Games is a maker of board and role-playing games including Hârn and a variety of games, mostly wargames (Wizard Kings and various historical and quasi-historical games) using blocks instead of the more conventional chits. The company is based in Blaine, Washington; it is run by founder Tom Dalgliesh and his son Grant. Columbia is one of the hobby's oldest wargame companies. Tom Dalgliesh, Lance Gutteridge, and Steve Brewster founded Gamma Two Games in Vancouver, BC in the early 1970s, and published their first game in 1972. Brewster left the company soon after its formation. Gamma Two Games became Columbia Games in 1982. In the mid 1980s, Gutteridge left the company, leaving Dalgliesh as its sole owner, although the two still associate frequently and Gutteridge still makes some contributions. Columbia Games moved from Vancouver, BC to Washington State in 1994 for a variety of personal and economic reasons. Columbia's most well-known games are block wargames. Many of these games are suitable to introducing new players to the hobby, but there are also some very detailed games that have been produced, such as EuroFront, a monster wargame depicting the entirety of World War II
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    235

    CSE Games

    • Games designed: Card Football
    Card Sports & Entertainment Inc. (CSE Games) is a games publisher and licensed-products manufacturing company incorporated in 2004. Its main products are the award-winning boardgames Card Football and NHL Ice Breaker. In early 2009, CSE Games will release NCAA Football Hand-Off, an updated version of Card Football which features 20 of the top U.S. college football programs. The company's games use the D54 Game System which is based on a standard 54-card deck.
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    236

    David Wesely

    • Games designed: Source of the nile
    David Wesely (born March 15, 1945) is a wargamer, board game designer, and video game developer. Dave Arneson credited him with coming up with the idea of the role-playing game. Wesely earned a B.S. in physics at Hamline University in 1967 and an M.S. in high energy physics at the University of Kansas in 1969. During his college years Wesely was a member of the Midwest Military Simulation Association, a group of wargamers based in Minneapolis-St Paul. In 1967 Wesely served as referee for a Napoleonic wargame set in the fictional German town of Braunstein. As usual, two players acted as commanders of the opposing armies, but because he was interested in multi-player games, Wesely assigned additional, non-military roles. For example, he had players acting as town mayor, banker, and university chancellor. When two players challenged each other to a duel, Wesely found it necessary to improvise rules for the encounter on the spot. Though Wesely thought the results were chaotic and the experiment a failure, the other players enjoyed the role playing aspect and asked him to run another game. Wesely thus contributed to the development of RPGs by introducing: (1) a one-to-one identification
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    237
    Frank Chadwick

    Frank Chadwick

    Frank Chadwick is a multiple-award–winning game designer and New York Times Best Selling author. He has designed hundreds of games, his most notable include being one of the principal designers of the RPGs Traveler and Twilight 2000, and the wargame series Europa and The Third World War. Frank Chadwick, along with Rich Banner and Marc Miller, were (the only) members of the Illinois State University in Bloomington-Normal Games Club. They used their club funding to design war games. They also formed a small educational games organization in response to a project by the university to bring new ideas into the system. After failing to win this project, the three continued to work together, forming Game Designers' Workshop in June, 1973. There is little doubt that, even in the rather busy pantheon of (wargame) industry heroes, Frank Chadwick is a Zeus amongst the Ajaxes. He is one of - if not THE - finest game designer working today. Since GDW's emergence in the mid-1970s, Chadwick has been GDW's main designer, producing a body of work remarkable for its breadth and width. ... ever resourceful, Frank C covered his simulated butt with the out-of-sight success of his Desert Shield Fact
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    238

    Guy Debord

    Guy Ernest Debord (French: [dəbɔʁ]; December 28, 1931 – November 30, 1994) was a French Marxist theorist, writer, filmmaker, member of the Letterist International, founder of a Letterist faction, and founding member of the Situationist International (SI). He was also briefly a member of Socialisme ou Barbarie. Guy Debord was born in Paris in 1931. Guy's father, Martial, was a pharmacist who died due to illness when Guy was young. Guy's mother, Paulette Rossi, sent Guy to live with his grandmother in her family villa in Italy. During World War II, the Rossis left the villa and began to travel from town to town. As a result, Guy attended high school in Cannes, where he began his interest in film and vandalism. As a young man, Debord actively opposed the French war in Algeria and joined in demonstrations in Paris against it. Debord joined the Letterist International when he was 19. The Letterists were led dictatorially by Isidore Isou until a widely agreed upon schism ended Isou's authority. This schism birthed several factions of Letterists, one of which was decidedly led by Debord upon Gil Wolman's unequivocal recommendation. In the 1960s, Debord led the Situationist International
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    240

    James Cooke Brown

    • Games designed: Careers
    Dr. James Cooke Brown (July 21, 1921 – February 13, 2000) was a sociologist and science fiction author. He is notable for creating the artificial language Loglan and for designing the Parker Brothers board game Careers. Brown's novel The Troika Incident (Doubleday, 1970) describes a worldwide free knowledge base similar to the Internet. The novel begins with the belief that the world is on the eve of self-destruction, but then it presents a world about a century from now which is a paradise of peace and prosperity, all based on ideas, movements, and knowledge presently available in the world. In its metafictional structure, the novel is a call for social change, not through revolution but through free education and the resilience of human ingenuity. Among his other achievements, Brown designed, and had built, a three-hulled sailboat, called a trimaran. He utilized this boat to sail to many parts of the world. While on a South American cruise with his wife, Brown was admitted to a hospital in Argentina, where he died at the age of 78.
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    241

    Joe Huber

    • Games designed: Burger Joint
    The game designer responsible for "Burger Joint". He is not the same as the Joe Huber who is responsible for "Rorschach".
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    242
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    243

    Marcus Rowland

    • Games designed: Diana: Warrior Princess
    Marcus L. Rowland (born 1953) is an English laboratory technician by profession, and an important figure in Victorian gaming. Rowland is the author of the Forgotten Futures, Diana: Warrior Princess and Original Flatland role-playing games, and numerous scenarios for other RPGs including Call of Cthulhu, Space 1889, and Games Workshop's Judge Dredd and Golden Heroes RPGs. In the 1990s, he also wrote some short stories, "Frog Day Afternoon", "Playing Safe", and "The Missing Martian", published in the Midnight Rose collective's anthologies, which are now available online, and fan fiction. He usually writes as Marcus L. Rowland. He has also written for various computer magazines, 2000 AD, and New Scientist. Rowland contributed the article on gaming in the second edition of Encyclopedia of Science Fiction and co-wrote the entry on gaming in the Encyclopedia of Fantasy. He was a frequent contributor to early issues of White Dwarf (issues 23 onwards) and is often credited as the first tabletop RPG designer to publish games as shareware (Forgotten Futures, 1993 onwards) and one of the first to publish games material as charityware. As source material for this RPG he has put numerous
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    244

    Parker Brothers

    Parker Brothers is a toy and game manufacturer and brand. Since 1883, the company has published more than 1,800 games; among their best known products are Monopoly, Cluedo (licensed from the British publisher and known as Clue in North America), Sorry!, Risk, Trivial Pursuit, Ouija, Aggravation, and Probe. Parker Brothers is currently a subsidiary of Hasbro. Parker Brothers was founded by George S. Parker. Parker's philosophy deviated from the prevalent theme of board game design; he believed that games should be played for enjoyment and did not need to emphasize morals and values. He created his first game, called Banking, in 1883 at the age of 16. Banking is a game in which players borrowed money from the bank and tried to generate wealth by guessing how well they could do. The game included 160 cards which foretold their failures or successes. The game was so popular among family and friends that his brother, Charles Parker urged him to publish it. George approached two Boston publishers with the idea, but was unsuccessful. Not discouraged, he spent $40 to publish 500 sets of Banking. He eventually sold all but twelve copies, making a profit of $100. Parker founded his game
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    Paul Randles

    Paul Joseph Randles (December 16, 1965 - February 10, 2003) was an American game designer who designed German-style board games. His games Pirate's Cove (with Daniel Stahl) and Key Largo (with Bruno Faidutti and Mike Selinker) were published first in Europe and then in the United States. Previously he was a brand manager at Wizards of the Coast, a game company in Renton, Washington. He died of pancreatic cancer in 2003.
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    246
    Queen Games

    Queen Games

    Queen Games is a German publisher of tabletop games, based in Troisdorf and founded in 1992 by head Rajive Gupta, which specialises primarily in German-style, family-level games but has also published smaller numbers of both simpler, children's games and more complex, gamers' games. They have shown a propensity for re-releasing previously self-published games in professionally illustrated editions, having drawn multiple times from the catalogues of db-Spiele and, more recently, Winsome Games, and re-releasing those already published by themselves with a different theme and varying degrees of revision of the rules. One of their more popular releases is Alhambra, itself developed from a game originally self-published in 1992, which won the Spiel des Jahres and placed second in the Deutscher Spiele Preis in 2003. Alhambra has since spawned many expansions and a number of standalone spin-offs and could be considered the "franchise" of the company. They are also known to some extent for publishing many games designed by Dirk Henn (and not only, though primarily, those previously self-published by him), with illustration by Jo Hartwig or Michael Menzel and/or with an Arabian theme,
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    247
    Robert Abbott

    Robert Abbott

    Robert Abbott (born March 2, 1933) is an American game inventor, sometimes referred to by fans as "The Official Grand Old Man of Card Games". Though early in his life he worked as a computer programmer with the IBM 360 assembly language, he has been designing games since the 1950s. Two of his more popular creations include the chess variant Baroque chess (also known as Ultima) and Crossings, which later became Epaminondas. Eleusis was also successful, appearing in several card game collections, such as Hoyle's Rules of Games and New Rules for Classic Games, among others. In 1963, Abbott himself released a publication, Abbott's New Card Games, which included instructions for all of his card games, in addition to Baroque chess. Abbott also invented logic mazes, the first of which appeared in Martin Gardner's Mathematical Games column in the October 1962 issue of Scientific American. One of the more prominent of these is Theseus and the Minotaur, which was originally published in the book Mad Mazes. Recently, his game Confusion was named "Best New Abstract Strategy Game" for 2012 by GAMES Magazine. Abbott was born in St. Louis, Missouri, and attended St. Louis Country Day School.
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    248

    Robert J. Harris

    • Games designed: Mythgardia
    Robert J. Harris (Bob) is a Scottish academic and author of children's fantasies and historical novels, best known for his collaborations with Jane Yolen. He also designed the fantasy board game Talisman. Recently Bob released his sequel to Talisman, Mythgardia. He lives in Scotland and is married to American author Deborah Turner Harris. (with Jane Yolen)
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    249

    Tom Dalgliesh

    • Games designed: Richard III: The Wars of the Roses
    Tom Dalgliesh is the owner/president of Columbia Games in Blaine, WA. Tom is the designer of dozens of well known boardgames. Grant Dalgliesh is his son who also works with him. 1945: Born Aberdeen, Scotland. 1961: "Ran away to sea" as British Merchant Navy Cadet. Sailed mostly on freighters from Britain to West, South, and East Africa. Spent a lot of time playing games, and designed my first game, a silly golf game, unpublished. 1965: Became licensed Navigation Officer (2nd Mate). 1966: Spent year sailing Pacific coast on freighter carrying salt from Mexico (Baja) to USA and Canada. Met future wife Penny - Oregon girl - and decided to emigrate. 1967: Emigrating to America in 1967, age 22, with Vietnam draft in full swing seemed like a bad idea (visions of gunboat service on the Mekong) so I emigrated to Canada instead. Married and Penny emigrated to Vancouver from USA. 1968: Worked on BC Ferries as 2nd mate, but entered Simon Fraser University with the idea of becoming a history teacher. 1971: Graduated with BA history honors, but decided against teaching. By this time I was deeply into wargames having formed the university "Diplomacy" club. 1972: Founded game company,
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    250

    Wizards of the Coast

    Wizards of the Coast (often referred to as WotC or simply Wizards) is an American publisher of games, primarily based on fantasy and science fiction themes, and formerly an operator of retail stores for games. Originally a basement-run role-playing game publisher, the company popularized the collectible card game genre with Magic: The Gathering in the mid-1990s, acquired the popular Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game by purchasing the failing company TSR, and experienced tremendous success by publishing the licensed Pokémon Trading Card Game. The company's corporate headquarters are located in Renton, in the U.S. state of Washington. Today, Wizards of the Coast publishes role-playing games, board games, and collectible card games. They have received numerous awards, including several Origins Awards. The company has been a subsidiary of Hasbro since 1999. All Wizards of the Coast stores were closed in 2004. Wizards of the Coast was founded by Peter Adkison in 1990 just outside Seattle, Washington, and its current headquarters are located in nearby Renton. Originally the company only published role-playing games such as the third edition of Talislanta and its own The Primal Order.
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    Discuss Best Game designer of All Time

    • Allen Shock 18th of February 2014
      Tony Lee should be on here (Extreme Vengeance)