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Best Film featured song of All Time

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    1

    We Don't Need Another Hero

    • Featured in film: Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome
    "We Don't Need Another Hero (Thunderdome)" is the hit theme song to the 1985 film Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome with Mel Gibson and Tina Turner. The single was recorded by Turner, who played Aunty Entity in the movie. The song was written by Terry Britten and Graham Lyle. "We Don't Need Another Hero (Thunderdome)" was released on the heels of Turner's multiplatinum album Private Dancer. The song's lyrical content is written from the perspective of those being oppressed and not wanting to get their hopes up in yet another "hero" who may or may not save them. The song was released in an extended, six minute-plus 12" version on the soundtrack album. The song received a Golden Globe nomination for Best Original Song in 1986, and a 1986 Grammy nomination for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance. The music video features Turner dressed in a heavy chain mail gown, more or less as Aunty Entity, the character she played in the movie. As several spotlights shine on her, she proceeds to sing atop a platform while various scenes from the movie are interspersed. In the last portion of the video, Turner's tour saxophonist, percussionist and keyboardist – Timmy Capello and a children's choir accompany
    8.00
    7 votes
    2

    Hero

    • Featured in film: Spider-Man
    "Hero" is the title of a song by Chad Kroeger, the lead singer of Nickelback, featuring Josey Scott, the former lead singer of Saliva, recorded in 2002 for the Spider-Man soundtrack. The recording also features Tyler Connolly (Theory of a Deadman lead singer/guitarist), Mike Kroeger (Nickelback bassist), and Matt Cameron (Pearl Jam drummer). Jeremy Taggart (Our Lady Peace drummer) performs on the video. There are two versions of this song, one with an orchestral background and one without. The song was the result of a collaboration between Kroeger and Scott. Scott told Yahoo!'s entertainment news service LAUNCH, "(Kroeger) had the idea for the song 'Hero,' so I came up to Vancouver and met him. He pitched me the idea, and I thought that was pretty dope. So we sort of tweaked it, together, laid down some harmonies on it, and played everything from congas to acoustics on it." Matt Cameron, who played drums on the track, did not appear in the music video and cited "family issues" as the reason. He was replaced with Our Lady Peace drummer Jeremy Taggart. Alice in Chains guitarist Jerry Cantrell was originally picked to play the lead solo (later played by Connolly) but pulled out
    8.50
    6 votes
    3

    Grease

    • Featured in film: Grease
    • Performed by: Frankie Avalon
    "Grease" is the title song for the musical motion picture Grease, which was based on the stage play of the same name. The song was sung by Frankie Valli and was featured twice on the film's soundtrack, as the first track and reprised as the final track. It became a No. 1 single in the United States in 1978 and also reached No. 40 on the R&B charts in the same year. The song was written by Barry Gibb of the Bee Gees. The Bee Gees would later perform the song in concert, as captured on their live offering One Night Only. Barry Gibb wrote a title song to order for the Robert Stigwood film of the stage musical Grease. Since it is heard only in the animated opening credits, it did not need to be recorded before filming. The song was recorded shortly after filming for the 1978 musical film Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, which was probably when Gibb invited Peter Frampton to the session. The other uncredited musicians were some of those from the Andy Gibb album that was being made around the same time. "Grease" was covered by experimental rock band Dog Fashion Disco and included as a hidden track on their album Committed to a Bright Future and sampled in the track "I Want You" by
    6.50
    8 votes
    4

    Flashdance... What a Feeling

    • Featured in film: Flashdance
    "Flashdance... What a Feeling" is a song from the 1983 film Flashdance, written by Giorgio Moroder, Keith Forsey, and Irene Cara, and performed by Cara. Despite the title, the word "Flashdance" is never used in the lyrics; however, the line "In a flash, take a hold of my heart" refers to the movie's title. The instrumental backing tracks of the song made extensive use of synthesizers. In addition to topping the Billboard Hot 100, becoming Cara's only No. 1 hit and earning a platinum record in 1983, "Flashdance... What a Feeling" won the Academy Award for Best Original Song, and the Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song in 1984. Giorgio Moroder originally recorded "Flashdance... What a Feeling" with Joe Esposito; Paramount Pictures asked Moroder to rework the song with a female artist to parallel the gender of the dancer who was the film's protagonist. The song appears on the original soundtrack album of Flashdance, and Irene Cara's second solo album, What a Feelin'. Cara won the Grammy Award for Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female, in 1984 for her performance of the song. The song was also nominated for Record of the Year. There are additional lyrics in the 12-inch single
    9.20
    5 votes
    5

    The Time of My Life

    • Featured in film: Dirty Dancing
    "(I've Had) The Time of My Life" is a song composed by Franke Previte, John DeNicola, and Donald Markowitz. It was recorded by Bill Medley and Jennifer Warnes, after having been selected to be the finale song for the 1987 film Dirty Dancing, by choreographer Kenny Ortega and his assistant Miranda Garrison (who also played Vivian in the film). In the United States, the single topped the Billboard Hot 100 chart in November 1987 for one week and also reached number one on the Adult Contemporary for four weeks. In the United Kingdom the song had two chart outings: in November 1987, after the film's initial release, the song peaked at #6; in January 1991, after the film was shown on mainstream television, the song reached #8. A parody was made in the animated comedy series The Simpsons. The episode, "Faith Off" (season eleven, 2000) altered the chorus during a football game's half-time rendition, lending support to Homer Simpson's alma mater, Springfield University. It sings: "I had the halftime of my life, and I owe it all to S.U." In the Family Guy episode "Blue Harvest", Obi-Wan Kenobi (Herbert) sings a cover version to Luke Skywalker (Chris) while stormtroopers and the other heroes
    7.67
    6 votes
    6

    All Love Can Be

    • Featured in film: A Beautiful Mind
    All Love Can Be is a song written by James Horner for the movie A Beautiful Mind.
    6.43
    7 votes
    7

    Shout!

    • Featured in film: National Lampoon's Animal House
    "Shout" is an influential popular song, originally recorded by The Isley Brothers. Released in 1959, it was written by the brothers themselves as a call-and-response answer to Jackie Wilson's seminal "Lonely Teardrops" which they interpreted after performing that song during a club date. While the song did not reach higher than #47 on the Billboard Hot 100, it became their first gold single on the basis of its longevity and became a much-covered tune, with many U.S. and international artists recording the song. Just one month after the initial release Johnny O'Keefe covered it in his Australian TV show Six O'Clock Rock reaching #3 in Australia. He re-recorded the song in 1964, but it was only a minor hit. This later version is the only one of O'Keefe's that is now commonly available. Joey Dee and the Starlighters reached #6 with their recording of the song in 1962, while the Isley Brothers' version re-charted that same year at #94. Scottish pop singer Lulu had a #7 UK hit with the song in 1964 (attributed to Lulu and the Luvvers), and a #8 UK hit with a re-recorded version in 1986. The Shangri-Las included a version of the song in their debut LP Leader of the Pack in 1965. Tommy
    8.40
    5 votes
    8

    Beautiful maria of my soul

    • Featured in film: The Mambo Kings
    "Beautiful Maria of my Soul" (Spanish: Bella Maria de mi alma) is a song prominently featured in the 1992 motion picture The Mambo Kings. In the film, it is performed in Spanish by Antonio Banderas and in English by Los Lobos. The song was written and composed by Arne Glimcher and Robert Kraft (composer). The film is based on the book The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love. In the film, the character (Banderas) writes the song for his long-lost love, Maria Riveiro (Talisa Soto). This song received an Academy Award nomination, finally won by "A Whole New World", from Aladdin. Antonio Banderas refused to sing the song live, and tenor Placido Domingo became the first Spaniard to perform at the Oscars ceremony. Italian sisters Paola & Chiara covered this song for the album "festival" (2002) The song was performed by Robert Moscio in his 1999 album "One By One".
    7.00
    6 votes
    9

    Love Song for a Vampire

    • Featured in film: Bram Stoker's Dracula
    • Performed by: Annie Lennox
    "Love Song for a Vampire" is a song by Scottish singer Annie Lennox. It was recorded as the theme song to Francis Ford Coppola's 1992 film adaptation of Dracula. The song is used in the end credits of the film. The video features Annie Lennox as a vampire in a white-dress in a dark and gloomy garden. Aside from shots of her singing, the music video incorporates numerous scenes from the movie Dracula that goes along with the beat of the music. The last shot is a fade out with a single beam of light shining on Lennox in the dark garden. In the UK, the song was released as a double-A sided single with Lennox's track "Little Bird" from her album Diva. It reached number three on the UK Singles Chart in early 1993, while in the US, it reached number 24 on the Billboard Modern Rock Tracks chart. All tracks written by Annie Lennox unless otherwise noted.
    8.00
    5 votes
    10

    My Heart Will Go On

    • Featured in film: Titanic
    • Performed by: Celine Dion
    "My Heart Will Go On" is the main theme song to the 1997 blockbuster film Titanic. With music by James Horner, lyrics by Will Jennings, and production by Simon Franglen, James Horner and Walter Afanasieff, it was recorded by Céline Dion. Originally released in 1997 on the Titanic soundtrack album and Dion's album Let's Talk About Love, the song went to number 1 all over the world, including the United States, Ireland, United Kingdom and Australia. "My Heart Will Go On" was released in Australia and Germany on December 8, 1997, and in the rest of the world in January and February 1998. It became Dion's biggest hit, and one of the best-selling singles of all time, and was the world's best-selling single of 1998. James Horner had originally composed the song as an instrumental motif that is used in several scenes during Titanic. He then wanted to make a full vocal song out of it, for use in the end credits of the film. Director James Cameron did not want such a song, but Will Jennings went ahead anyway and wrote the lyrics. When Dion originally heard the song, she did not want to record it. Horner showed the piano sketch to Simon Franglen, who was working with him on electronic
    8.00
    5 votes
    11

    Travelin' Thru

    • Featured in film: Transamerica
    • Performed by: Dolly Parton
    "Travelin' Thru" is a 2005 song written and performed by Dolly Parton and used in the road movie Transamerica. In 2006, the song was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Song. During the 78th Academy Awards broadcast of March 5, 2006, Parton performed "Travelin' Thru" live on stage. The award went to "It's Hard Out Here for a Pimp" by Paul Beauregard, Jordan Houston, and Cedric Coleman. The song was also nominated for the Golden Globe for Best Original Song and for the Broadcast Film Critics Association for Best Song, though it won neither award. According to the New York Times website, "Travelin' Thru" won for best original song at the Phoenix Film Critics Society Awards 2005. On April 1st, 2008, Season 7 contestant Jason Castro, 21, performed "Travelin' Thru" on American Idol for "Dolly Parton Week." This Gospel music inspired song is about a journey on the road to find home and identity. Parton references "The Wayfaring Stranger (song)" and "I Am a Pilgrim", both examples of American folk music about the search for identity on the road. Parton said she wrote the song because of her status as an outsider and her belief that "It's all right to be who you are." She wrote the
    6.83
    6 votes
    12

    Again

    • Featured in film: Poetic Justice
    "Again" is a song by American singer Janet Jackson from her fifth studio album, janet. (1993). Written and produced by Jackson, James Harris III, and Terry Lewis, the ballad was released as the album's third single in October 1993. "Again" topped the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 for two weeks in late 1993 and received nominations for the Golden Globe and Academy Award for Best Original Song. Based on a lost love, "Again" was included as the closing song to her 1993 box-office film debut in Poetic Justice. While not included on its soundtrack album, the song was nominated for Best Original Song at the 66th Academy Awards, where Jackson performed the song live. The janet. jazz-funky track "Funky Big Band" appears on the single as a B-side. A French version of the song was also recorded by Jackson and appears on the CD single as well as the limited edition of the janet. album. The track became her seventh number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, staying atop for two weeks. Since its release, Jackson has performed the song on all of her tours, including the janet. Tour, The Velvet Rope Tour, All for You Tour, Rock Witchu Tour, and the Number Ones: Up Close and Personal tour where it was
    7.80
    5 votes
    13

    I'm Easy

    • Featured in film: Nashville
    "I'm Easy" was a popular music hit in 1976 in the United States. The song was featured in the movie Nashville, written and performed by Keith Carradine. The song is often mistakenly associated with Jim Croce due to the similarity of Carradine's voice and vocal style to those of Croce, as well as the guitar playing in the song, which greatly resembles many of Croce's ballads. The song is a ballad about a lover who is guileless and in awe of the object of his love. The film juxtaposes these lyrics by presenting the song in the context of a fictional character who is a manipulative womanizer. When Tom performs the song at the Exit/In (a real-life Nashville music club where the scene was shot), he dedicates it to "a special someone." Several women in the audience, recent and future conquests, believe the song has been written for them. "I'm Easy" won the Academy Award for Best Original Song, in 1975, and the Golden Globe for Best Original Song (Motion Picture), in 1976. Although the film received five nominations this was the only Academy Award it received. The song peaked at #17 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart and spent one week atop the adult contemporary chart. "I'm Easy" was
    7.80
    5 votes
    14

    Upside Down

    • Featured in film: Curious George
    "Upside Down" is a song written and played by Jack Johnson. It is the first track on the album Sing-A-Longs and Lullabies for the Film Curious George, which was released in February 2006. It was also released as a single in February 2006. It peaked at #38 on the Billboard Hot 100 and was Johnson's sole US Top 40 hit until "You and Your Heart" in 2010. Released as a single in the UK on May 22, 2006, it debuted at #45 in the UK Singles Chart the day before its physical release via download sales alone. The following week, it became Jack Johnson's second UK Top 40 entry, peaking at #30. It has been certified Platinum by the RIAA for sales of over 1,000,000 in the US alone.
    6.67
    6 votes
    15

    Live and Let Die

    • Performed by: Wings
    "Live and Let Die" is the main theme song of the 1973 James Bond film Live and Let Die and was performed by Paul McCartney & Wings. It was one of their most successful singles, and the most successful Bond theme to that point, charting at number two on the US Billboard Hot 100 and number nine on the UK Singles Chart. Commissioned specifically for the movie and credited to Paul McCartney and his wife Linda, it reunited McCartney with Beatles producer George Martin, who both produced the song and arranged the orchestral break. It has been covered by several bands, with Guns N' Roses' version being the most popular. Both McCartney's and Guns N' Roses' versions were nominated for Grammys. In 2012, McCartney was awarded the Million-Air Award from BMI Publishing for over 4 million performances of the song in the USA. Even before Tom Mankiewicz had finished writing the screenplay to Live and Let Die, producers Harry Saltzman and Albert R. Broccoli invited Paul McCartney to write the theme song. McCartney asked to be sent a copy of Ian Fleming's novel. "I read it and thought it was pretty good. That afternoon I wrote the song and went in the next week and did it... It was a job of work for
    8.75
    4 votes
    16

    My Funny Friend and Me

    • Featured in film: The Emperor's New Groove
    • Performed by: Sting
    "My Funny Friend and Me" is a song by English musician Sting. The song was written and composed by Sting and David Hartley for Disney's 2000 animated feature film, The Emperor's New Groove. It was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Song, but lost to Bob Dylan's "Things Have Changed" from the film Wonder Boys). The song illustrates the friendship formed between main characters Kuzco and Pacha through to end of the film from Kuzco's point of view.
    7.40
    5 votes
    17

    Do You Feel Me

    • Featured in film: American Gangster
    • Performed by: Anthony Hamilton
    "Do You Feel Me" is a radio-only single by American R&B/soul singer, Anthony Hamilton. The song written by Diane Warren and produced by production team The Bomb Squad member Hank Shocklee, was featured in the soundtrack to the 2007 film American Gangster, in which Hamilton made a cameo appearance. The song was ranked number forty-six on Rolling Stone's list of the "100 Best Songs of 2007" . It was released to US urban AC radios on October 2, 2007.
    8.50
    4 votes
    18

    You'll Be in My Heart

    • Featured in film: Tarzan
    • Performed by: Phil Collins
    "You'll Be in My Heart" is a song by Phil Collins, from the 1999 Disney animated feature Tarzan. It appeared on Tarzan: An Original Walt Disney Records Soundtrack as well as various other Disney compilations. A version of the single performed by Glenn Close also appears on the soundtrack. The music video for the song was directed by Kevin Godley. "You'll Be in My Heart", spent nineteen non consecutive weeks at number one on the Adult Contemporary charts and peaked at #21 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100. The song was Collins's first appearance on the top forty of the Billboard Hot 100 chart since 1994's "Everyday". The track peaked at #17 in the UK Singles Chart, continuing his success that had not stopped after "Everyday". The song went on to win the Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song and the Academy Award for Best Original Song. Collins performed the song live at that year's ceremony. The entire Tarzan soundtrack, and therefore "You'll Be in My Heart", was also written and performed by Phil Collins in various other languages beside English, namely German, French, Spanish, Bulgarian and Italian. In the Hungarian, Norwegian, Brazilian, Japanese, Mandarin, Cantonese, Malay,
    9.67
    3 votes
    19

    Tired of Waiting for You

    • Featured in film: Vinyl
    • Performed by: The Kinks
    "Tired of Waiting for You" was a hit 1965 rock song by the English band The Kinks. It reached #1 on the UK Singles Chart and #6 in the USA. It was recorded late August 1964 at Pye Studios (No. 2), London, with additional guitar overdub at IBC Studios, London on 29 December 1964. "Come On Now" was recorded 22 or 23 December 1964 at Pye Studios (No. 2). The single was released on 15 January 1965 in the UK and on 17 February 1965 in the USA. It then appeared on their second studio album Kinda Kinks. Chicago jazz-rock band The Flock covered the song, with the title "Tired of Waiting", on their album The Flock in 1969. Suzi Quatro covered this song on her 1978 album If You Knew Suzi.... Little Angels covered the song on their chart-topping album Jam in 1993. In 1997, American punk group Green Day and country singer Dwight Yoakam released cover versions of "Tired of Waiting for You"; Yoakam's version sounding very uncharacteristically Lounge-y. The Green Day version originally appeared as the b-side of 1994's "Basket Case", and can also be found on the soundtrack for Howard Stern's 1997 film Private Parts and on their album Shenanigans. The Dwight Yoakam version is available on his
    7.20
    5 votes
    20

    Iris

    • Featured in film: City of Angels
    • Performed by: Goo Goo Dolls
    "Iris" is a song by American alternative rock band the Goo Goo Dolls. Originally written for the soundtrack of 1998 film City of Angels, the song was later included on the band's sixth album Dizzy Up the Girl. "Iris" has contributed greatly to the band's success. The instrumentals in the song are heavily driven by guitar riffs, mandolin, violins, and cellos, with a steady drum beat beneath. The acoustic guitar in the song gives a distinctive sound as it is in an odd tuning, with 5 of the 6 strings tuned to D. This gives a ringing effect similar to a 12-string guitar. John Rzeznik was approached to write a song for the City of Angels soundtrack, and the end product was "Iris". This song propelled the band to stardom, as it stayed on top of Billboard Hot 100 Airplay charts for a record-breaking 18 weeks, and was nominated for three Grammys that year. According to several interviews with Rzeznik, he was experiencing serious bouts of writer's block when he was approached, and was on the verge of quitting the band days before he wrote the song that would launch the band to worldwide fame. Iris is set to re-enter the UK charts at number 1, following performances by two X-Factor
    8.25
    4 votes
    21

    You Know My Name

    • Featured in film: Casino Royale
    • Performed by: Chris Cornell
    "You Know My Name", performed by Chris Cornell, is the theme song to the 2006 James Bond film, Casino Royale. Cornell wrote it jointly with David Arnold, the soundtrack's composer. The film producers went after Cornell because they wanted a strong male singer (as such, it was the first vocal theme from a James Bond film to be sung by a male vocalist since "The Living Daylights"). Cornell and Arnold tried to make the song a replacement theme for the character instead of the James Bond theme reflecting the agent's inexperience in Casino Royale, as well as an introduction to Daniel Craig's grittier and more emotional portrayal of Bond. The single sold 148,000 copies in 2006 in the UK. The track was leaked onto the Internet on September 20, 2006, and released as a single on November 13, 2006, charting in many countries. Reviews for "You Know My Name" were positive, and the song won the Satellite Award and the World Soundtrack Award, and was nominated for a Grammy Award. While not included in the Casino Royale soundtrack, "You Know My Name" appeared on Cornell's second solo album, Carry On. Lia Vollack, Sony Pictures's President of Music, called Chris Cornell inviting him to make a song
    8.25
    4 votes
    22

    Kiss Me

    • Featured in film: She's All That
    • Performed by: Sixpence None the Richer
    "Kiss Me" is a song recorded by Sixpence None the Richer and released on their self-titled album in 1997. The song was a remarkable success worldwide, it reached number four on both the UK Singles Chart and the Canadian Singles Chart, and number one on the Australian singles chart, making it the group's highest-charting single across the world. The song is also the group's best-selling single in the U.S. The single reached number two on the Billboard Hot 100 for six weeks, stuck behind Cher's "Believe", TLC's "No Scrubs", and Ricky Martin's "Livin' la Vida Loca". Even though it only reached number two, the song did have great longevity on the chart, spending twenty-four weeks on the top ten and thirty-five weeks on the chart. In the end of 1999, Billboard ranked the song as the sixth best selling-single of 1999, ahead of a number of other #1 hits, and the second highest rank for a song that didn't made it to the top, behind Whitney Houston, Faith Evans and Kelly Price's "Heartbreak Hotel", which ranked at number four. The year after the release of the album Sixpence None the Richer, the teen movie She's All That and the popular teen soap Dawson's Creek both played "Kiss Me" (with
    7.00
    5 votes
    23

    Kissing You

    • Featured in film: Romeo + Juliet
    "Kissing You" (or "I'm Kissing You") is a song by British singer Des'ree. It was written by the singer with Timothy Atack for Baz Luhrmann's 1996 film Romeo + Juliet. The song was included on the film's soundtrack album and Des'ree's third studio album, Supernatural (1998). A pop ballad set in the key of a minor , the record uses a simple instrumentation consisting only of piano and string instruments. "Kissing You" featured in Romeo + Juliet when the title characters meet at a ball. The song was well received by critics for its emotional melody and toned-down production. Released as a single on 18 June 1997, it appeared on the ARIA Singles Chart and the UK Singles Chart. A music video accompanied the single, which included scenes from Romeo + Juliet. "Kissing You" has been covered by Beyoncé Knowles (2007), Taylor Dayne (2008) and Stan Walker (2010). Knowles filmed a music video for her rendition, which she retitled "Still in Love (Kissing You)". The change of title and music video went against copyright terms, and thus Des'ree's publishers filed a lawsuit against Knowles and her representatives. Infringing albums were recalled, and both parties agreed that the case be dismissed
    7.00
    5 votes
    24

    Born Free

    • Featured in film: Born Free
    "Born Free" is a popular song with music by John Barry, and lyrics by Don Black. It was written for the 1966 film of the same name and won an Academy Award for Best Original Song. Lyricist Don Black managed British singer Matt Monro at the time, and he and Barry asked him to record the song for the film's soundtrack. The producers of the film considered the song uncommercial, however, and deleted it from the print shown at its Royal Command premiere in London. When Monro, who attended the event, made Black aware of the edit, they lobbied the producers to restore it, citing the burgeoning commercial success of the song. Monro's interpretation appeared over the closing credits in a shortened version recorded especially for the film, which enabled it to qualify for the Academy Award. Monro's complete commercial recording was released on the film's soundtrack album and became the singer's signature tune for the remainder of his career. Roger Williams and Andy Williams and Frank Sinatra recorded cover versions - Roger Williams' version reached number seven on the Billboard Hot 100 and number one on the Adult contemporary chart for six non-consecutive weeks in September/October 1966,
    9.33
    3 votes
    25

    Ever Ever After

    • Featured in film: Enchanted
    • Performed by: Carrie Underwood
    Ever Ever After is a song from the 2007 film Enchanted, with music composed by Alan Menken, lyrics written by Stephen Schwartz and additional material written by Carrie Underwood, who performed the song. Unlike three of the five original songs written for the movie, it is not paying an homage to/parodying previous Disney songs. It is a more contemporary country pop song. Additionally, it is the only original song in the film not sung onscreen. The song plays during the ending montage of the film. The song is about how the ideals of "happily ever after" and dreams coming true are not only found in fairy tales, but also in real life, which is also the idea of the movie itself. Also, while Giselle and Morgan are shopping, a version of the song without the words is playing. Although the song was not released as a single, a music video was still filmed. The video's format is similar to the film's format because it combines live action and animation. The video starts in Andalasia with Underwood in animated form dressed like a nymph overlooking Nathaniel and Giselle walking in the castle courtyard. Underwood walks over to the well that transported Giselle to New York City, jumps in and
    9.33
    3 votes
    26

    Glory of Love

    • Featured in film: The Karate Kid, Part II
    "Glory of Love" is a 1986 Billboard Hot 100 #1 hit song written by Peter Cetera, David Foster and Cetera's wife at the time, Diane Nini, and recorded by Cetera shortly after he left the band Chicago to pursue a solo career. The song was Cetera's first hit single and was included on his 1986 album, Solitude/Solitaire. The single peaked at number one on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart on August 2, 1986, remaining in that spot for two weeks. It also spent five weeks atop the U.S. adult contemporary chart. The song achieved similar success in the UK, peaking at number three on the UK Singles Chart, where it was the 26th best-selling single of 1986. The version of the song as released as a single and on Cetera's album Solitude/Solitare is edited, missing the beginning eight-second section of the song's bridge (which is heard in the actual Karate Kid II film). "Glory of Love" was the inspiration for "In Your Arms"', the love song from Camp Blood: The Musical. The song, which is used in the film The Karate Kid, Part II, earned nominations in 1986 for an Academy Award for Best Song and a Golden Globe in the category of Best Original Song. It was also nominated for a Grammy Award in 1987
    8.00
    4 votes
    27

    Sooner or Later

    • Featured in film: Dick Tracy
    "Sooner or Later" is a song recorded by the American pop singer Madonna, and written by the American composer Stephen Sondheim, for the 1990 film, Dick Tracy. Released that same year on Madonna's album I'm Breathless, the song won Sondheim an Academy Award for Best Original Song in 1991. The song's title as listed in the film credits, and in the official Academy Award records, includes the subtitle "(I Always Get My Man)"; however, this subtitle is not shown on I'm Breathless. In addition to performing the song live at the 1991 Academy Awards, Madonna also performed this song in a lounge setting on her 1990 Blond Ambition Tour. Her performance at the Academy Awards was named by Billboard as the seventh "most awesome Oscar performance". "Sooner or Later" has been sung by Erich Kunzel and the Cincinnati Pops Orchestra, Jane Krakowski, and Karen Akers. Bernadette Peters included the song on her 1997 live album Sondheim, etc. Karen Ziemba performed the song during the concert "Sondheim: A Celebration at Carnegie Hall," New York City, in 1992.
    8.00
    4 votes
    28

    The Rose

    • Featured in film: The Rose
    "The Rose" is a pop song written by Amanda McBroom and made famous by Bette Midler, who performed it in the 1979 film The Rose. Since then it has been covered by a variety of artists. "The Rose" is featured in the 1979 film of the same name, in which it was performed by Midler. The single peaked at #3 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart and #1 on the adult contemporary chart, and it was certified gold by the RIAA for over half a million copies sold. McBroom won the Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song, although she was not nominated for the Academy Award for Best Original Song. Midler won the Grammy Award for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance for "The Rose". There are two mixes of the song. The single mix features orchestration, while the version in the film (and on its soundtrack) includes an extended introduction while doing away with the orchestration in favor of piano-and-vocals only. Country singer Conway Twitty recorded a cover version in 1983. His version, off his album Dream Maker, was a Number One country hit in U.S. and Canada. Conway Twitty's version was his 30th number one single on the U.S. country chart. "The Rose" was covered by Irish boyband Westlife and was
    6.00
    6 votes
    29

    Down Deep Inside

    • Featured in film: The Deep
    "Down Deep Inside" is the theme song from the 1977 film The Deep. The film's score was written by British composer John Barry and the lyrics to the main theme were added by disco singer Donna Summer. The track was released as a single and became a hit in some European countries, including the U.K. The film soundtrack LP also contained a slower tempo version of the song, and an extended version of the original later appeared on a CD version of Summer's 1978 Live and More album. The song was nominated for a Golden Globe Award and a hit on the U.S. Dance Chart, as well as a top-five hit in the UK, and a top-ten hit in the Netherlands.
    6.80
    5 votes
    30

    Let the River Run

    • Featured in film: Working Girl
    "Let the River Run" is a song first featured in the 1988 film Working Girl, with music and lyrics by Carly Simon. The song won the Academy Award for Best Original Song at the 61st Academy Awards in 1989. The song also won a Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song at the 46th Golden Globe Awards in 1989 and the Best Song Written Specifically for a Motion Picture or Television at the 32nd Grammy Awards in 1990. It was the first of only two songs to have won all three awards (Oscar, Golden Globe, Grammy) while being composed and written, as well as performed, entirely by a single artist – the other being "Streets of Philadelphia" by Bruce Springsteen from Philadelphia (1993: Oscar, 1994: Golden Globe and two Grammys.) Barbra Streisand shared the Oscar (1976), Golden Globe (1977) and Grammy (1977) for "Evergreen (Love Theme from A Star is Born)" which she composed and wrote with lyricist Paul Williams (for which she also won the Grammy Award for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance). Annie Lennox won all three awards – 2003 Oscar and Golden Globe, 2004 Grammy – for "Into the West" from The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, sharing all three with co-composer and lyricists Fran
    6.80
    5 votes
    31

    Up Where We Belong

    • Featured in film: An Officer and a Gentleman
    "Up Where We Belong" is the title of a song written by Jack Nitzsche, Buffy Sainte-Marie, and Will Jennings. It was recorded by Joe Cocker and Jennifer Warnes for the 1982 film An Officer and a Gentleman. Richard Gere balked at shooting the ending of the film, in which Zack arrives at Paula's factory wearing his naval dress whites and carries her off the factory floor; he thought that wouldn't work because it was too sentimental. Director Taylor Hackford agreed with Gere until, during a rehearsal, the extras playing the workers began to cheer and cry. When Gere saw the scene later, with the music added ("Up Where We Belong"), he said it gave him chills. Gere is now convinced Hackford made the right decision. Producer Don Simpson unsuccessfully demanded "Up Where We Belong" be cut from An Officer and a Gentleman, saying, "The song is no good. It isn't a hit." The single, released by Island Records in 1982, became a number one on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 on November 6, 1982 and kept the position for three weeks, also reaching number 7 in the UK Singles Chart. "Up Where We Belong" won the Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song and the Academy Award for Best Original Song in 1983.
    6.80
    5 votes
    32

    Cinema Italiano

    • Featured in film: Nine
    • Performed by: Kate Hudson
    Cinema Italiano is a song written by Maury Yeston for the film Nine.
    7.75
    4 votes
    33

    Accidentally in Love

    • Featured in film: Shrek 2
    • Performed by: Counting Crows
    "Accidentally in Love" is a pop song performed by Counting Crows. It was featured in the Shrek 2 movie soundtrack and released in 2004. The song was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Song. This song is included in the music game Lego Rock Band. "Accidentally in Love" was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Song. Counting Crows also performed the song at the ceremony but did not win the award. The song also received nominations for the Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song and the Grammy Award for Best Song Written for a Motion Picture, Television or Other Visual Media. The main music video for the song, directed by Meiert Avis, features a stuffed animal (voiced by Adam Duritz) in the apartment of a young couple (the girl is confirmed to be Ashley Roberts), complete with a TV showing scenes from the film. The animal comes to life and serenades the girl. She falls in love with it and leaves her boyfriend (played by LA Models model Steve Vanda) behind while he is in the kitchen making breakfast for her. Another music video exists for the song and is included on the Shrek 2 DVD as a bonus feature. It features clips from the movie intercut with scenes of Adam Duritz,
    6.60
    5 votes
    34

    Ave Satani

    • Featured in film: The Omen
    "Ave Satani" is the theme song to the film The Omen (1976) composed by Jerry Goldsmith. The Omen won an Oscar for Best Score, with Ave Satani nominated for Best Song, one of the few foreign language (Latin) songs ever to be nominated. The title means "Hail Satan" in Latin. In an interview, Goldsmith says that his idea was to create a kind of Satanic version of a Gregorian chant and came up with ideas while talking with the London choir-master of the orchestra that was helping him. He decided to create something like a Black Mass, inverting Latin phrases from the Latin Mass. The choir-master, according to Goldsmith, was an expert in Latin and helped him come up with phrases – instead of saying "Hail Mary", they decided on "Hail Satan", and so on. So the song contains various Latin phrases inverting Christ and the Mass, such as "Ave Versus Christi", meaning "Hail Anti-Christ", and "Corpus Satani", an inversion of "Corpus Christi", the body of Christ. The resulting lyrics are an inversion of the Roman Catholic rite of the consecration and elevation of the body and blood of Christ during the Mass (see Eucharist in the Catholic Church). A version of the song has been produced by the
    6.60
    5 votes
    35

    8 Mile

    • Featured in film: 8 Mile
    "8 Mile" is a song by Detroit rapper Eminem from the soundtrack album 8 Mile. It was released as an airplay single in 2003 but not released as a mainstream single. It charted reaching #54 on the Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Singles & Tracks. The song is a motivator relating to the character Jimmy in the 8 Mile movie. He talks about being "a new man and travel new lands". The song also makes references to the scene in the movie when Jimmy is trying to blow up in the music world. Critics have claimed it as one of Eminem's finest works in terms of lyricism in the way that it shows his true ability to manipulate words.
    7.50
    4 votes
    36
    Assassin

    Assassin

    • Featured in film: Assassin
    • Performed by: Ari Gold
    To celebrate the movie’s premiere we rock things off with an exclusive Assassin music video featuring clips from the dark and edgy film including the song’s performance by pop-star Sir Ari Gold!
    7.50
    4 votes
    37

    Nothing's Gonna Stop Us Now

    • Featured in film: Mannequin
    • Performed by: Starship
    "Nothing's Gonna Stop Us Now" is a No. 1 hit song co-written by Albert Hammond and Diane Warren, recorded by the American rock band Starship. Featured as the theme to the romantic comedy film Mannequin, it hit No. 1 in the Billboard Hot 100 on April 4, 1987 and reached No. 1 on the UK Singles Chart for four weeks the following month and became the UK's 2nd biggest selling single of 1987. At the time, it made Grace Slick the oldest female artist to have a number one single in the United States though the record was later broken by Cher's "Believe" in 1999. The song also received an Oscar nomination for "Best Original Song" at the 60th Academy Awards. In addition to appearing on the Mannequin soundtrack, the song was also released on Starship's album No Protection in 1987. In a radio interview, Albert Hammond said that the idea for the song came from his impending marriage to his live-in girlfriend of seven years, after his divorce from his previous wife was finalized. He had said to Diane Warren, "It's almost like they've stopped me from marrying this woman for seven years, and they haven't succeeded. They're not gonna stop me doing it."The song in recent years has been played as a
    7.50
    4 votes
    38

    Take My Breath Away

    • Featured in film: Top Gun
    "Take My Breath Away" is the name of a love song from the film Top Gun (1986). The song, performed by the band Berlin, was written by Giorgio Moroder and Tom Whitlock. It won the Academy Award for Best Original Song, as well as the Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song in 1986. "Take My Breath Away" was the first single from the Top Gun soundtrack album and was released in 1986 as a split single alongside the song "Radar Radio": The song reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 on September 13, 1986 and became number 1 in the UK for four weeks in November 1986. "Take My Breath Away" is available on both the original Top Gun soundtrack album and the expanded edition. The song was also featured in several of the band's best-of and remix albums: Best of Berlin 1979-1988, Master Series, Greatest Hits Remixed (which includes a "Mission UK Remix" version), Live: Sacred & Profane and Metro Greatest Hits. "Take My Breath Away" was one of the only songs not written by Berlin's John Crawford that they had performed on any album up to that point. "Take My Breath Away" was re-released in October 1990 to coincide with the first television showing of Top Gun (by ITV, on the evening of
    7.50
    4 votes
    39

    The Climb

    • Featured in film: Hannah Montana: The Movie
    • Performed by: Miley Cyrus
    "The Climb" is a song performed by American recording artist and actress Miley Cyrus, for the 2009 film Hannah Montana: The Movie. The song was written by Jessi Alexander and Jon Mabe, and produced by John Shanks. It was released on March 5, 2009, as the lead single of the film's soundtrack by Walt Disney Records. The song is a power ballad with lyrics that describe life as a difficult but rewarding journey. It is styled as a country pop ballad, and was Cyrus' first solo song to be released to country radio. The instrumentation includes piano, guitar and violins. "The Climb" was generally well received by critics and was nominated for the Best Song Written for a Motion Picture, Television or Other Visual Media at the 52nd Grammy Awards. However, the song was withdrawn from consideration by Walt Disney Records because it had not been written specifically for a movie as the category's eligibility rules required. The song achieved worldwide success and became a top ten hit on charts in Australia, Canada, Norway and the United States. In the United States, the song peaked at number four on the Billboard Hot 100 and became the eighth best selling digital single of 2009. Five months
    7.50
    4 votes
    40

    What Are You Doing the Rest of Your Life?

    • Featured in film: The Happy Ending
    "What Are You Doing the Rest of Your Life?" is a song with lyrics written by Alan Bergman and Marilyn Bergman and original music written by Michel Legrand for the 1969 film The Happy Ending in which Michael Dees sings it. The song was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Song. Legrand won the 1973 Grammy Award for Best Instrumental Arrangement Accompanying a Vocalist for a version performed by Sarah Vaughan. More than thirty years later, Billy Childs, Gil Goldstein, and Heitor Pereira won the 2006 Grammy Award for the same category for a version performed by Chris Botti and Sting. Apart from the award winning versions, the song has been covered by many artists.
    7.50
    4 votes
    41

    Nobody Does It Better

    • Featured in film: The Spy Who Loved Me
    • Performed by: Carly Simon
    "Nobody Does It Better" is a power ballad composed by Marvin Hamlisch with lyrics by Carole Bayer Sager. It was recorded by Carly Simon as the theme song for the 1977 James Bond film The Spy Who Loved Me. It was the first Bond theme song to be titled differently from the name of the film since Dr. No, although the phrase "the spy who loved me" is included in the lyrics. Released as a single from the film's soundtrack album, the song became a hit, spending three weeks at number two on the US Billboard Hot 100 and four weeks at number two on the Cash Box chart, kept from the top by Debby Boone's You Light Up My Life, and it also reached number seven on the UK Singles Chart. The title of the theme was later used for Carly Simon's 1999 greatest hits album, The Very Best of Carly Simon: Nobody Does It Better. "Nobody Does It Better" was Carly Simon's longest-charting hit. Her earlier hit, "You're So Vain" spent three weeks at number one, however, its chart run was two months shorter than that of "Nobody Does It Better." "Nobody Does It Better" received an Academy Award nomination for Best Song. In 2004, the song was also honored by the American Film Institute as the 67th greatest song
    10.00
    2 votes
    42

    Lyra

    • Featured in film: The Golden Compass
    "Lyra" is a song written, produced and performed by British recording artist Kate Bush, from the 2007 soundtrack album The Golden Compass from the film of the same name. It is used in the closing credits of the film. Bush was commissioned to write the song, with the request that it make reference to the lead character, Lyra Belacqua. According to Del Palmer, Bush was asked to do the song on very short notice and the whole project was completed in 10 days. The song was produced and recorded by Bush in her own studio, and features the Magdalen College, Oxford choir. "Lyra" was nominated for the International Press Academy's Satellite Award for original song in a motion picture. The song reached number 187 on the UK Singles Chart, charting on downloads from the album alone.
    6.40
    5 votes
    43

    One in a Million

    • Featured in film: Miss Congeniality
    • Performed by: Bosson
    "One in a Million" is a 2001 song composed and recorded by Bosson. It was featured in the movie Miss Congeniality starring Sandra Bullock.
    7.25
    4 votes
    44

    The Times They Are a-Changin'

    • Featured in film: Watchmen
    "The Times They Are a-Changin'" is a song written by Bob Dylan and released as the title track of his 1964 album, The Times They Are a-Changin'. The song was ranked #59 on Rolling Stone's 2004 list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. Dylan appears to have written the song in September and October 1963. He recorded it as a Witmark publishing demo that month, a version that was finally released on The Bootleg Series Volumes 1–3 (Rare & Unreleased) 1961–1991. The song was then recorded at the Columbia studios in New York on October 23 and 24, and the latter session yielded the version that became the title song of Dylan's third album. Dylan recalled writing the song as a deliberate attempt to create an anthem of change for the moment. In 1985, he told Cameron Crowe: "This was definitely a song with a purpose. It was influenced of course by the Irish and Scottish ballads ...'Come All Ye Bold Highway Men', 'Come All Ye Tender Hearted Maidens'. I wanted to write a big song, with short concise verses that piled up on each other in a hypnotic way. The civil rights movement and the folk music movement were pretty close for a while and allied together at that time." Dylan biographer
    7.25
    4 votes
    45

    Bless the Beasts and Children

    • Featured in film: Bless the Beasts and Children
    The theme song to the 1971 film Bless the Beasts and Children was performed by The Carpenters, and was featured on the B-side to their then-recent hit, "Superstar". The B-side charted on the Billboard Hot 100, eventually topping out at #67. In order to promote it, The Carpenters performed it on their television series, Make Your Own Kind of Music as "F" for "Film Music". It was nominated for a 1972 Academy Award for Best Song, but it lost to Isaac Hayes' "Theme from Shaft". The original soundtrack included two different versions of "Bless the Beasts and Children", the other being an orchestral instrumental arrangement by composers Barry DeVorzon and Perry Botkin, Jr., and the original "Nadia's Theme", which was listed as "Cotton's Dream". "Cotton's Dream" was also used as the theme song to the 1973 soap opera, The Young and the Restless and "Bless the Beasts and Children" was used when David Hasselhoff's character Dr. Foster had to say goodbye to his son in a powerful 1977 episode of the serial. The song was originally released on the original soundtrack, and a slightly different version was released on the Carpenters' 1972 LP, A Song for You on June 13, 1972. The original
    8.33
    3 votes
    46

    Call Me

    • Featured in film: American Gigolo
    "Call Me" is a song by the American New Wave band Blondie. Released in 1980, "Call Me" topped the singles charts in both the US (where it became the band's biggest selling single and second #1) and the UK (where it became their fourth no.1 hit). It was Billboard's #1 hit of the year for 1980. The song was the main theme song of the film American Gigolo. European disco producer Giorgio Moroder originally asked Stevie Nicks from Fleetwood Mac to help compose and perform a song for the soundtrack, but she declined (as a recently signed contract with Modern Records prevented her from working with Moroder). It was at this time that Moroder turned to Debbie Harry and Blondie. Moroder presented Harry with a rough instrumental track called "Man Machine." Harry was asked to write the lyrics and melody, a process that Harry states took only a few hours. Harry stated that the song is about driving, and that "When I was writing it, I pictured the opening scene, driving on the coast of California." The completed song was then recorded by the band, with Moroder producing. The bridge of the original English language version also includes Harry singing "Call Me" in Italian ("Amore, chiamami") and
    8.33
    3 votes
    47

    Go the Distance

    • Featured in film: Hercules
    • Performed by: Roger Bart
    "Go the Distance" is a song from Disney's 1997 animated feature film, Hercules. It was written by composer Alan Menken and lyricist David Zippel, and originally recorded by American actor Roger Bart in his film role as the singing voice of Hercules. American singer-songwriter Michael Bolton recorded a pop version of the song for the film's end credits. In the Spanish version, the song is performed by Hercules voicer Ricky Martin, both in the movie and in the credits; this version is included on Martin's album Vuelve. Both the song and its reprise featured in a stage production of Hercules, performed upon the Disney Wonder during 2007/2008. "Go the Distance" is performed in the film by Hercules (age 15) who possesses god-like strength and finds it increasingly hard to fit in with his peers. The song serves as Hercules' prayer to the Gods to help him find where he truly belongs. His prayers are answered, as he is revealed to be the long-lost son of Zeus, king of the gods. Hercules is also told that he must become a true hero in order to rejoin his father on Mount Olympus. The number is later reprised when Hercules sets off on his quest to become a true hero, proclaiming that he wants
    8.33
    3 votes
    48

    Goldfinger

    • Featured in film: Goldfinger
    • Performed by: Shirley Bassey
    "Goldfinger" was the title song from the 1964 James Bond film Goldfinger. Composed by John Barry and with lyrics by Leslie Bricusse and Anthony Newley, the song was performed by Shirley Bassey for the film's opening and closing title sequences, as well as the soundtrack album release. The single release of the song gave Bassey her only Billboard Hot 100 top forty hit, peaking at number eight and at number two for four weeks on the Adult Contemporary chart, and in the United Kingdom the single reached number 21. In 2008, the single was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. Upon being asked to create a theme song for the film-in-progress, Bricusse and Newley looked at each other instantly and sang out, "Goldfinger . . . wider than a mile," reprising "Moon River," the successful theme song from Breakfast at Tiffany's. John Barry reacted badly to said lyric. One of the inspirations for the song was "Mack the Knife", which director Guy Hamilton showed Barry as he thought it was a "gritty and rough" song that could be a good model for what the film required. Originally, Newley recorded the song, but it was re-recorded by Bassey with production by George Martin, and Jimmy Page as a
    8.33
    3 votes
    49

    Guaranteed

    • Featured in film: Into the Wild
    • Performed by: Eddie Vedder
    "Guaranteed" is a song written and performed by Pearl Jam vocalist Eddie Vedder from the Into the Wild soundtrack (2007). It is the final track on the album, and also features a hidden track of "Guaranteed" (Humming Vocal) after about two minutes of silence following the regular version of "Guaranteed". Like the other songs on the soundtrack, "Guaranteed" is based on the story of American wanderer Christopher McCandless. After graduating as a top student from Emory University in 1990, McCandless decided to give up all of his savings and money and travel across the United States. In April 1992, McCandess hitchhiked to Alaska to live in the wilderness with little food and equipment, hoping to live a period of solitude. Nearly five months later, he died of starvation near Denali National Park and Preserve. Director Sean Penn said that as soon as he heard the song he "just felt that for sure this is the musical voice of (actor) Emile (Hirsch's) character." Eddie Vedder has said that the lyrics "Don't come closer or I'll have to go/Owning me like gravity are places that pull/If ever there was someone to keep me at home/It would be you" are for McCandless' sister, Carine. Vedder won a
    9.50
    2 votes
    50
    9.50
    2 votes
    51
    The Weary Kind

    The Weary Kind

    • Featured in film: Crazy Heart
    • Performed by: Ryan Bingham
    The Weary Kind is a song written by Ryan Bigham and T-Bone Burnett for the film Crazy Heart.
    9.50
    2 votes
    52

    When You Believe

    • Featured in film: The Prince of Egypt
    • Performed by: Mariah Carey
    "When You Believe" is a song by American recording artists Mariah Carey and Whitney Houston. The song was written and composed by Stephen Schwartz for the 1998 DreamWorks animated feature The Prince of Egypt. A version of "When You Believe" was produced as a single with additional music by writer-producer Babyface for the film's soundtrack album. Additionally, the song was featured on Houston's fourth studio album, My Love Is Your Love and Carey's first compilation album, Number 1's. The song was described as a big ballad, with meaningful and inspirational lyrics, describing the ability each person has to achieve miracles when they reach out to God and believe. The original version of the song featured in the narrative portion of the film is sung by Sally Dworsky and Michelle Pfeiffer; Carey and Houston's version is played during the end credits. The song received generally mixed reviews from contemporary music critics. "When You Believe" experienced moderate success on the US Billboard charts, peaking at only number fifteen on the Hot 100, despite heavy media attention and live promotion. The song however, achieved strong charting throughout Europe and other worldwide regions,
    9.50
    2 votes
    53

    9 to 5

    • Featured in film: Nine to Five
    "9 to 5" is a song written and originally performed by Dolly Parton for the 1980 film comedy Nine to Five, starring Jane Fonda, Lily Tomlin, and Parton in her film debut. The film's title song garnered Parton an Academy Award nomination and four Grammy Award nominations, winning her the awards for "Best Country Song" and "Best Country Vocal Performance, Female". In addition to appearing on the film soundtrack, the song was the centerpiece of Parton's 9 to 5 and Odd Jobs album, released in late 1980. The song was released as a single in November 1980 and reached number one on both the Billboard Country Chart and the Billboard Hot 100 in January and February 1981, respectively. For a time, the song became something of an anthem for office workers in the U.S., and in 2004, Parton's song ranked number seventy-eight on American Film Institute's "100 years, 100 songs". The song—and film—owe their titles to an organization founded in 1973 with the aim of bringing about better treatment for women in the workplace. Sesame Street made an educational parody of the song performed by the Anything Muppet parody of Parton herself, Polly Darton, called "Counting 1 to 5". Alvin and the Chipmunks
    7.00
    4 votes
    54

    Alfie

    • Featured in film: Alfie
    "Alfie" is a song written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David in 1965 most successfully recorded by Cher, Cilla Black and Dionne Warwick. Although Burt Bacharach has cited "Alfie" as his personal favorite of his compositions, he and Hal David had not been very interested when approached by Ed Wolpin, who headed the composers' publishers Famous Music, to write a song to serve as a promotional tie-in with the upcoming film Alfie (a release from Paramount Pictures who owned Famous Music). Hal David would attribute the composers' disinterest to the title character's name being pedestrian: "Writing a song about a man called 'Alfie' didn't seem too exciting at the time." The composers agreed to submit an "Alfie" song if they were able to write a worthy candidate so named within a three week period. When Bacharach, resident in California, was shown a rough cut of the film Alfie the quality of the film's depiction of a Cockney womanizer played by Michael Caine instilled in Bacharach a dedication to writing a complementary song and as Bacharach felt - in his own words - "with 'Alfie' the lyric had to come first because it had to say what that movie was all about" he arranged for David - in
    7.00
    4 votes
    55

    Die Another Day

    • Featured in film: Die Another Day
    • Performed by: Madonna
    "Die Another Day" is the theme to the James Bond film of the same name by American singer-songwriter Madonna. The single was released in late 2002 by Warner Bros. Records and marked Madonna's 20th anniversary from her first album release in 1983. It peaked at number eight in the United States and number three in the United Kingdom, selling 175,000 copies – making it the most successful Bond theme since Duran Duran's "A View to a Kill" (1985). The song was included on the soundtrack album of the same name and later included on her 2003 studio album, American Life and her 2009 greatest hits compilation, Celebration. Madonna has included the song on two of her world tours; the first being the 2004 Re-Invention World Tour and again as a video interlude on the 2008–09 Sticky & Sweet Tour, this time a new music video was filmed incorporating the theme of Madonna as a professional boxer and the music was remixed. During the 2012 MDNA Tour, Madonna performed an exclusive club date at L'Olympia for only 2,576 fans and mixed "Die Another Day" with new song "Beautiful Killer". This mash-up was only performed on this date of the tour. The song was co-written and co-produced by Madonna and
    7.00
    4 votes
    56

    Georgy Girl

    • Featured in film: Georgy Girl
    "Georgy Girl", written by Tom Springfield (music) and Jim Dale (lyrics), is the title song performed by The Seekers for the film of the same name. Across late 1966 and early 1967, the song became a No.1 Australian hit and a No.3 British hit. In the United States, it proved to be the Seekers' highest charting single, reaching No.2 on the Billboard Hot 100, prompting the Seekers' British album Come the Day to be retitled Georgy Girl for its American release. The song is heard at both the beginning and end of the film, with markedly different lyrics (and with different lyrics again to those in the commercially released version). It was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Song. The New Seekers released a version on the album We'd Like to Teach the World to Sing (1972). In 1970, the film was adapted for a short-lived Broadway musical of the same name. The tune was adapted as a commercial jingle for NYC metropolitan area White Rock Beverages in 1966, and for Barbie dolls in the early 1980s. In The Simpsons episode "Lisa the Beauty Queen", Homer twice sings the song with the lyrics "Hey there, blimpy boy! Flying through the sky so fancy free!". "Georgy Girl" is also parodied
    7.00
    4 votes
    57

    I Just Called to Say I Love You

    • Featured in film: The Woman in Red
    "I Just Called to Say I Love You" is a song written, produced and performed by Stevie Wonder. It was one of Wonder's most commercially successful singles. The song was first featured in the 1984 comedy The Woman in Red, along with two other songs by Wonder, and scored number one on the Billboard Hot 100 for three weeks from October 13, 1984, and also became Wonder's only solo UK number-one success, staying at the top for six weeks. It also became his tenth number-one on the R&B chart, and his fourth number-one on the adult contemporary chart. In addition, the song won both a Golden Globe and an Academy Award for Best Original Song. There was a dispute among Wonder, his former writing partner Lee Garrett, and Lloyd Chiate as to who actually wrote the song. Chiate claimed in a lawsuit that he and Garrett wrote the song years prior to its 1984 release; however a jury ultimately sided with Wonder.
    7.00
    4 votes
    58

    Listen

    • Featured in film: Dreamgirls
    • Performed by: Beyoncé
    "Listen" is a song recorded by American singer Beyoncé Knowles. The song was written by Henry Krieger, Scott Cutler, Anne Preven, and Knowles, and produced by The Underdogs Matt Sullivan and Randy Spendlove for the soundtrack album Dreamgirls: Music from the Motion Picture to the 2006 musical film Dreamgirls, in which Knowles' character Deena Jones sings the song to assert independence over her controlling husband. Columbia Records released "Listen" as the lead single from soundtrack album on December 5, 2006. It additionally appeared as a hidden track on international editions, and on the deluxe edition of Knowles' second solo studio album, B'Day. The Spanish version of the song, "Oye", was released on the EP, Irreemplazable, and the Spanish deluxe edition of B'Day. "Listen" is an R&B-soul song; its lyrics make reference to tenacity, love, the refusal to defer dreams and finally rise towards fame. Its instrumentation includes bass, drums, guitars, keyboards, percussion, and violins, among others. The song was a critical success. Contemporary music critics complimented the strong and emotional vocals of Knowles, and added that the lyrics perfectly elaborate on Deena Jones's life.
    7.00
    4 votes
    59

    A Whole New World

    • Featured in film: Aladdin
    "A Whole New World" is the Oscar winning featured pop single from the soundtrack to the 1992 Disney film Aladdin. It was composed by Alan Menken with lyrics by Tim Rice. The song is a ballad between the primary characters Aladdin and Jasmine about the new world they are going to discover together. The original version was sung by Brad Kane and Lea Salonga during the film. They also performed the song in their characters at the 65th Academy Awards, where it won Best Song. A single version of the song was previously released that year and was performed by Peabo Bryson and Regina Belle. This version is played in the movie's end credits and is referred on the soundtrack as "Aladdin's Theme". As the biggest pop hit for each artist, this version peaked at number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart on March 6, 1993, replacing Whitney Houston's "I Will Always Love You", which had spent a then record fourteen weeks at the top of the chart. The track peaked at #9 in the UK Singles Chart in 1992. The song is the first and, to date, only song from a Disney animated film to top the Billboard Hot 100. Some notable artists that have covered this song live include: Like most Disney's songs, "A
    6.00
    5 votes
    60

    Don't Blame Me

    • Featured in film: Dinner at Eight
    "Don't Blame Me" is a popular song with music by Jimmy McHugh and lyrics by Dorothy Fields. The song was published in 1933. The song received two significant "rock era" remakes: a mellow ballad version by the Everly Brothers, released by Warner Bros. Records in 1961, which reached #20 on Billboard; and an up-tempo version recorded by Frank Ifield which reached #8 of the UK charts on 15 February 1964. It was also featured in the musical Sugar Babies.
    8.00
    3 votes
    61

    Forever Love

    • Featured in film: X: The Movie
    • Performed by: X Japan
    "Forever Love" is a single released by X Japan on July 8, 1996. The song was written and composed by Yoshiki. An acoustic version appears on their album Dahlia. The single has been reissued several times. On December 18, 1997, following the announcement of the band's breakup, a different mixed version was released with a live version of "Longing" (recorded at "The Last Live" concert) as a B-side. The original single was reissued again on July 22, 1998, after the death of guitarist hide. A single containing all previous versions (except original karaoke version), as well as a live recording (also recorded at "The Last Live" concert) of the song was released on July 11, 2001. Also in 2001, the song was used as background music in several commercials for the Japanese Liberal Democratic Party. LDP member Junichiro Koizumi, at that time the country's Prime Minister has expressed fondness for X Japan's music. "Forever Love" appears on the soundtrack of the 1996 animated feature film X. Inzargi, vocalist of Megamasso, covered "Forever Love" for his 2012 cover album. Awoi covered it for the compilation album Counteraction - V-Rock covered Visual Anime songs Compilation-, which was released
    8.00
    3 votes
    62

    Nice Guys Finish Last

    • Featured in film: Varsity Blues
    • Performed by: Green Day
    "Nice Guys Finish Last" is a song by American punk rock band Green Day. It was released as the fourth and final single from their fifth album, Nimrod. The use of the song in the movie Varsity Blues helped propel it to hit status and earned it a nomination for an MTV movie award for best song from a movie in 1999. AU single/Japanese EP: Tracks 2-4 were recorded live at the Electric Factory in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The music video features the band as a mock football team (parodying the Green Bay Packers with Green Day). The stage set up for them is portrayed as analogous to a football playing field, and in the video, a number of concert scenes are shown in ways that simulate football game action; lead singer Billie Joe Armstrong is tackled by a fan, Mike Dirnt sprains his ankle when jumping, and a coach motivates them in a locker room midway during the song. The video itself, directed by Evan Bernard, humorously extends the analogy with a voice-over emulating that of legendary NFL Films narrator John Facenda.
    8.00
    3 votes
    63

    That Thing You Do

    • Featured in film: That Thing You Do!
    • Performed by: The Wonders
    "That Thing You Do" is a 1996 song that appears in the film That Thing You Do! The song is performed by the fictional 1960s band The Wonders, who are the focus of the film. In 1964, an Erie, Pennsylvania band named "The Oneders" (later known as The Wonders) goes from a college talent show to climbing up the Billboard charts thanks to the song "That Thing You Do". Written by guitarist/vocalist Jimmy Mattingly II, it was originally crafted as a ballad. During the performance at the talent show, drummer Guy Patterson produces a much more up-tempo beat and the rest of the band follow suit, turning the song into an upbeat rock song. The song is a hit with the audience, and they win the talent show. From there, the band is picked up by a local manager who helps them get more shows in the area, and eventually the song receives radio airplay. The band is then signed to Play-Tone Records, under Mr. White's guidance, and the song climbs up the Billboard Hot 100, starting at #93, then #71, #49, and #21. The following week, "That Thing You Do" climbs to #7, becoming the quickest charting song ever on Play-Tone Records. However, the band breaks up before producing another record, so they
    8.00
    3 votes
    64

    Wunderkind

    • Featured in film: The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe
    • Performed by: Alanis Morissette
    "Wunderkind" is a song written and recorded by Alanis Morissette, and produced by Mike Elizondo for the soundtrack of the 2005 film The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe Morissette was inspired to write the song after watching a rough cut of the film; according to her, the song seemed to flow from her and "really touches me deeply". She wrote it on a Friday, recorded it on Saturday, and handed it in on Sunday. After the release of "Wunderkind", Morissette enlisted producer Mike Elizondo to co-produce her tenth album. The protagonist of the song, which is written from the point of view of the character of Lucy Pevensie, describes herself as "a magnet for all kinds of deeper wonderment", "a wunderkind" and "a princess on the way to [her] throne" during the chorus. The string arrangements were in charge of Harry Gregson-Williams, the movie's composer. IGN Music wrote that it was "equally captivating" as Imogen Heap's soundtrack contribution "Can't Take It In", with Morissette "letting her warble drip delicately over a piano driven lament. It's one of the best things she's done in a long time." Sci Fi Weekly also described it as "captivating", writing
    8.00
    3 votes
    65

    I Need to Wake Up

    • Featured in film: An Inconvenient Truth
    • Performed by: Melissa Etheridge
    "I Need to Wake Up" is a song by Melissa Etheridge, written for the 2006 documentary film An Inconvenient Truth. It is the first instance of a documentary film winning the Best Song category, and it notably beat three other nominated songs from the musical film Dreamgirls. Etheridge received the 2006 Academy Award for Best Original Song for "I Need to Wake Up." Upon receiving the award, she noted in her acceptance speech: The song was on the enhanced version of her greatest hits album, The Road Less Traveled (enhanced). It never appeared on the standard version.
    6.75
    4 votes
    66

    We Have All the Time in the World

    • Featured in film: On Her Majesty's Secret Service
    • Performed by: Louis Armstrong
    "We Have All the Time in the World" is a James Bond theme and popular song sung by Louis Armstrong. Its music was composed by John Barry and the lyrics by Hal David. It is a secondary musical theme in 1969 James Bond film On Her Majesty's Secret Service, the title theme being the instrumental "On Her Majesty's Secret Service," also composed by Barry. The song title, "We Have All the Time in the World", is taken from James Bond's final words in both the novel and the film, spoken after his wife's death. Louis Armstrong was too ill to play his trumpet. Barry chose Armstrong because he felt he could "deliver the title line with irony." The song was not registered in the music rating charts in the UK when first released, only becoming well known 25 years later, as part of a Guinness beer commercial after My Bloody Valentine chose to cover it for charity. Armstrong's version was then re-released and reached number 3 in the UK Singles Chart. In 2005, a BBC survey showed it is the third-most-popular love song played at weddings. In addition to My Bloody Valentine, "We Have All the Time in the World" has been covered by Iggy Pop, Fun Lovin' Criminals, Vic Damone, Michael Ball, Amalia Grè,
    6.75
    4 votes
    67

    (I Want To) Come Home

    • Featured in film: Everybody's Fine
    • Performed by: Paul McCartney
    "(I Want to) Come Home" is a song written and recorded by Paul McCartney for the 2009 film Everybody's Fine. An early cut of Everybody's Fine was screened for McCartney, with Aretha Franklin's cover of "Let It Be" inserted as a place holder by director Kirk Jones. McCartney was inspired to write the song for the film after connecting with the protagonist, portrayed by Robert De Niro, a widower who "hits the road to visit his scattered children after they cancel a weekend gathering." McCartney told USA Today, "I can very much relate to a guy who's got older children, who happens to have lost his wife, the mother of those children, and is trying to get them all together at Christmas. I understand that." After recording a demo version on cassette, McCartney received notes for the song from Jones requesting an intro for the song as opposed to its original "abrupt" start. McCartney then collaborated with the film's music composer Dario Marianelli on orchestrations for the song "resulting in an intimate ballad with piano, guitar and spare strings." The song was released as a single in online music stores on 8 December 2009, during the week before the film's theatrical release. According
    9.00
    2 votes
    68

    Almost There

    • Featured in film: The Princess and the Frog
    Almost There is a song written by Randy Newman for the movie The Princess and the Frog.
    9.00
    2 votes
    69

    For Your Eyes Only

    • Featured in film: For Your Eyes Only
    For Your Eyes Only is the fourth track from the 1982 album The Hunter by Blondie. This song was written for the James Bond movie of the same name, but writers Chris Stein and Debbie Harry were unaware that a theme song for the movie had already been written (see "For Your Eyes Only" by Sheena Easton). The song was going to be the B-side to the single "Danceway" however this was never released due to the band breaking up.
    9.00
    2 votes
    70

    Happy Working Song

    • Featured in film: Enchanted
    • Performed by: Amy Adams
    "Happy Working Song" is a musical number from the 2007 Disney film Enchanted, with music composed by Alan Menken and lyrics by Stephen Schwartz. Performed by the film's lead actress, Amy Adams, the song pays an homage to such Disney songs as "Whistle While You Work" from Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs and songs from Cinderella, in particular, "The Work Song". The sound recording was released on the soundtrack of Enchanted on November 20, 2007 in the United States. The song was nominated for an award at the 80th Academy Awards in the Best Original Song category, in which two other songs from the film were also nominated. In the film, "Happy Working Song" is performed by Amy Adams as Giselle. After seeing the untidiness and the dirtiness of Robert's apartment, Giselle decides to clean it with the help of animals from the neighborhood. Since she is now in New York City, instead of the traditional adorable woodland creatures answering her call, urban vermin such as pigeons, rats, cockroaches and flies respond to do the work. As she cleans the apartment, she sings "Happy Working Song" while interacting with the animals she has called upon for help. Adams performed the song at the 80th
    9.00
    2 votes
    71

    No More Lonely Nights

    • Featured in film: Give My Regards to Broad Street
    "No More Lonely Nights" is a song written by Paul McCartney, which was first released in September 1984. It can be heard on the soundtrack, Give My Regards to Broad Street. Two versions of the single on both 7" & 12" as well as a 12" picture disc were issued in both the U.K. and U.S. The first 7" version featured "No More Lonely Nights" backed with the playout version. The second featured the Arthur Baker Dance Mix as the B-side. Both versions of this single exist in a rarer early pressing with the title misspelled as "No More Lonley Nights". The single reached #6 in the US and #2 in the UK. In 1987, it was included in McCartney's double album compilation, All the Best!. Stephen Thomas Erlewine of allmusic said the song was "an absolutely lovely mid-tempo tune graced by a terrific David Gilmour guitar solo." In a radio interview prior to 1990's Knebworth concerts, Gilmour told Jim Ladd that "No More Lonely Nights" was the last thing McCartney recorded for the film, and that he told McCartney to give his session fee to a charity of his choice.
    9.00
    2 votes
    72

    Polonaise in A major

    • Featured in film: Till the End of Time
    The twin Op. 40 Polonaises of the Polonaise in A major, Op. 40, No. 1 (nicknamed the Military Polonaise) and the Polonaise in C minor, Op. 40, No. 2 were composed by Frédéric Chopin in 1838. Anton Rubinstein remarked that the Polonaise in A major is the symbol of Polish glory, whilst the Polonaise in C minor is the symbol of Polish tragedy. The beginning opens with an A major chord and continues in a typical polonaise rhythm. The key then changes into D major in the middle of the polonaise for a trio section, after which the opening is repeated. During the September 1939 German invasion of Poland at the outset of World War II, Polskie Radio broadcast this piece daily as nationalistic protest, and to rally the Polish people.
    9.00
    2 votes
    73

    Blaze of Glory

    • Featured in film: Young Guns II
    "Blaze of Glory (Theme from Young Guns II)" is a song by Jon Bon Jovi which reached No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 and the Mainstream rock chart in 1990, his only chart-topper away from his band Bon Jovi. The song also reached No. 1 on the Billboard Album Rock Tracks chart. "Blaze of Glory (Theme from Young Guns II)" also topped the ARIA music chart in Australia for a total of six weeks, and reached No. 13 on the UK Singles Chart. The song remains a crowd favorite with Bon Jovi fans, despite the fact that the song was not released as one of the band's singles, and only by Jon. The track is notable for the performance of Jeff Beck on guitar. In October 2005, "Blaze of Glory (Theme from Young Guns II)" was voted as "Best Song to Ride a Horse to in Slow Motion" by Blender Magazine. It first appeared in the motion picture Young Guns II, for which it was originally recorded. It later appeared as the title track on his solo album Blaze of Glory. Next, it appeared on Cross Road, Bon Jovi's Greatest Hits album. It appeared on Bon Jovi's live DVD Live From London. and their 2010 Greatest Hits album. The song was sung by Phil Stacey on American Idol. The song is referenced in the 2008
    7.67
    3 votes
    74

    Crazy

    • Featured in film: The Watermelon
    • Performed by: Jessica Magnuson
    "Crazy" is a ballad composed by Willie Nelson. It has been recorded by several artists, most notably by Patsy Cline, whose version was a #2 country hit in 1962. Partly due to the genre-blending nature of the song, it has been covered by dozens of artists in several genres over the years; Nevertheless, the song remains inextricably linked with Cline. Nelson wrote the song in early 1961; at the time he was a journeyman singer-songwriter who had written several hits for other artists but had not yet had a significant recording of his own. Nelson originally wrote the song for country singer Billy Walker who turned it down. The song's eventual success helped launch Nelson as a performer as well as a songwriter. Musically the song is a jazz-pop ballad with country overtones and a complex melody. The lyrics describe the singer's state of bemusement at the singer's own helpless love for the object of his affection. Patsy Cline, who was already a country music superstar and working to extend a string of hits, picked it as a follow up to her previous big hit "I Fall to Pieces". "Crazy", its complex melody suiting Cline's vocal talent perfectly, was released in late 1961 and immediately
    7.67
    3 votes
    75

    Falling Slowly

    • Featured in film: Once
    "Falling Slowly" is a song written and performed by Glen Hansard and Markéta Irglová, as well as by Hansard's band, The Frames. It appeared in their 2007 film Once, from which it won the Academy Award for Best Original Song at the 80th Academy Awards. The song was written while Once was in production. John Carney developed the script around songs provided by Hansard and Irglová. In the movie, the duo play the song in Walton's music shop in Dublin, with Hansard on guitar and Irglová on piano. The couple performed it at gigs in various European venues over the next two years. Versions appeared in 2006 on two albums: The Cost by Hansard's band The Frames, and The Swell Season, an album by Hansard and Irglová. The song was nominated at the 80th Grammy Awards for Best Song Written For Motion Picture, Television Or Other Visual Media; it lost to "Love You I Do" from Dreamgirls. The song won the Academy Award for Best Original Song on 24 February 2008, ahead of the choral gospel song "Raise It Up" from August Rush and three songs from the modern Disney musical Enchanted. The song's win marked the fourth year in a row that the Oscar winner had not been nominated for the Golden Globe Award
    7.67
    3 votes
    76

    In the Deep

    • Featured in film: Crash
    "In the Deep" is a 2003 song written by Michael Becker and Kathleen York and performed by actress-singer Kathleen York, credited to her performing name Bird York. The song gained fame from its use in the critically acclaimed film Crash; it also appeared on her album The Velvet Hour. In 2006, the song was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Song. York performed the song at the 78th Academy Award ceremony on March 5, 2006. There was some question as to the song's eligibility, as it had appeared in the film The Civilization of Maxwell Bright as well as The Velvet Hour, both of which were released before Crash. However, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences determined that the song had been commissioned in 2001 or 2002 by Crash director Paul Haggis for use in the film, prior to its other uses; thus it was eligible. This was likely a precedent for 2007 Best Original Song winner "Falling Slowly", which was also used in other media before the film it was commissioned for, Once, was released. In March, Bird York appeared on the 12th Billboard chart of the year, with In the Deep peaking at #64 on the Billboard Hot 100 and #29 on the digital downloads chart. The song
    7.67
    3 votes
    77

    The Morning After

    • Featured in film: The Poseidon Adventure
    "The Morning After" (aka "The Song from 'The Poseidon Adventure'") is a song first released in May 1973. It was the first success for singer Maureen McGovern and used as the love theme for the film The Poseidon Adventure, which was released late the year before. The song was written in March 1972 by 20th Century Fox songwriters Al Kasha and Joel Hirschhorn, who were asked to write the love theme for The Poseidon Adventure in one night. In the end, the finished product was called "Why Must There Be a Morning After?" but changes by the record label resulted in the song's more optimistic title (as evidenced by the new lyric of "There's got to be a morning after"). In the end titles of the film, it is officially called "The Song from The Poseidon Adventure", though it would become best known by the alternate title, "The Morning After". The song is performed in the film by the character of Nonnie, played by Carol Lynley, but is actually sung by a vocal double, Renee Armand. It appears twice, during a warm-up rehearsal and then later during the New Year's Eve party early in the film. The lyrics relate to the themes of the film, as a band of passengers survive the capsizing of the ship SS
    7.67
    3 votes
    78
    The Neighbor

    The Neighbor

    • Featured in film: Dixie Chicks: Shut Up and Sing
    • Performed by: Dixie Chicks
    The Dixie Chicks is an American country music group composed of Natalie Maines, along with Emily Robison and Martie Maguire, who are sisters. Their discography comprises seven studio albums, one live album and twenty-five singles. Founded in 1989 as a more bluegrass-oriented group with Maguire and Robison — then going by their birth surnames of Erwin — along with Laura Lynch and Robin Lynn Macy, the group did not achieve mainstream success until Lynch and Macy left and were replaced by lead singer Natalie Maines. Shortly after her joining, the group signed to Monument Records, releasing their breakthrough album Wide Open Spaces in 1998. Both it and its followup, 1999's Fly, earned the group several Grammy Awards and chart singles. Two more albums, Home and Taking the Long Way, followed in 2002 and 2006, respectively, on Columbia Records. These latter four albums have been certified double platinum or higher by the RIAA, with the highest-certified being Wide Open Spaces at 12× Multi-Platinum for U.S. shipments of twelve million copies. Of the Dixie Chicks' twenty-five singles, six have reached Number One on the Billboard country singles chart: "There's Your Trouble", "Wide Open
    7.67
    3 votes
    79

    True Love

    • Featured in film: High Society
    • Performed by: Bing Crosby & Grace Kelly
    "True Love" is a popular song written by Cole Porter and was published in 1956. The song was introduced by Bing Crosby and Grace Kelly in the musical film High Society. The Crosby–Kelly version, accompanied by Johnny Green's MGM studio orchestra using a romantic arrangement by Conrad Salinger, was also a popular recorded version of the song, peaking at #5. Kelly's contribution on the record is relatively minor, duetting with Bing on only the final chorus. Nonetheless, the single is co-credited to her and became her only gold record and 21st gold record for Bing Crosby. True Love is the name of C.K. Dexter Haven's yacht, on which he and Tracy Lord honeymooned off the coast of Maine. They are fictional characters in the play The Philadelphia Story, on which the musical is based. Bing Crosby later owned a 55-foot Constellation yacht which he named the True Love. A version of the song by Jane Powell out at the same time as the Crosby–Kelly version was also popular. Elvis Presley cut a version of it that was featured on his successful album Loving You from 1957. Ricky Nelson included a version of the song on his 1957 debut album Ricky. Shelley Fabares cut a version of the song on her
    7.67
    3 votes
    80

    Vanilla Sky

    • Featured in film: Vanilla Sky
    • Performed by: Paul McCartney
    "Vanilla Sky" is a song by Paul McCartney from the 2001 film & soundtrack of the same name. It was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Song.
    7.67
    3 votes
    81

    You Light Up My Life

    • Featured in film: You Light Up My Life
    "You Light Up My Life" is a ballad written by Joe Brooks, and originally recorded by Kasey Cisyk for the soundtrack to the film of the same name. The song was lip synched in the film by its lead, Didi Conn. Later, Debby Boone, Pat Boone's daughter, recorded the single, which became an enormous success, topping the Billboard Hot 100 chart for a (then) record-setting ten consecutive weeks. It became the most successful single of the 1970s in the United States, and set a new Hot 100 record for longest reign at No. 1. (Elvis Presley's double-sided "Don't Be Cruel/Hound Dog", then recognized as the longest-running No. 1 of the rock era, spent eleven weeks atop the Billboard Best Sellers chart in 1956, before the debut of the Hot 100.) The record was matched in 1982 by Olivia Newton-John's "Physical", but never surpassed until a 1991 change in chart methodology allowed songs to achieve longer reigns at No.1 ("End of the Road" by Boyz II Men set the new record, thirteen weeks). The single, which was certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), also hit #1 on the Adult Contemporary chart and reached #4 on the Country chart. The single peaked at #48 in the UK
    7.67
    3 votes
    82

    A Father's Way

    • Featured in film: The Pursuit of Happyness
    • Performed by: Seal
    "A Father's Way" is a song recorded by Seal for the soundtrack to Will Smith's 2006 movie The Pursuit of Happyness. The song was available to download from the UK iTunes Store on December 19, 2006.
    10.00
    1 votes
    83

    Against All Odds

    • Featured in film: Against All Odds
    • Performed by: Phil Collins
    "Against All Odds (Take a Look at Me Now)" (also simply titled "Against All Odds") is a song by English singer Phil Collins recorded for the soundtrack to the 1984 film of the same name. It is a power ballad in which its protagonist implores an ex-lover to "take a look at me now", knowing that reconciliation is "against all odds" while considering it worth trying. The single, while it reached number two in the United Kingdom, peaked at number one on the US Billboard Hot 100, the first for Collins. The song has been covered by several singers, some of which versions have been successful in both the US and UK markets. One of the most notable versions was the pairing of Mariah Carey and boyband Westlife, whose single peaked at number one in the United Kingdom in September 2000. Collins was approached to write the title song to the film Against All Odds while it was still in its "rough cut form". At the time the soundtrack was being completed, Collins was on tour as the lead vocalist/drummer with British progressive rock group Genesis. Director Taylor Hackford flew in to Chicago to catch one of the concert's venues. Collins watched the movie on a videocassette recorder in his hotel
    10.00
    1 votes
    84

    Basketball Jones featuring Tyrone Shoelaces

    • Featured in film: Basketball Jones
    "Basketball Jones featuring Tyrone Shoelaces" is a song by Cheech and Chong that first appeared on the 1973 album Los Cochinos. Sung in falsetto by Cheech Marin, playing the title character Tyrone (as in "tie-your-own") Shoelaces, it told the story of Shoelaces' love of basketball. It was a parody of the song "Love Jones" by Brighter Side of Darkness. In the album version, the song was preceded by a mock interview with Jones' basketball coach named "Umgwana Kickbooti," in a parody of a Wide World of Sports interview conducted by a character named "Red Blazer". "Jones", both in the original song and this parody, is slang for "craving" or "addiction". Musicians who appeared on the record included George Harrison, Carole King, Billy Preston, and Tom Scott. The Blossoms and Michelle Phillips (from The Mamas & the Papas) performed vocals as cheerleaders on the track. The song was released as a single in September 1973 and reached #15 in the US charts. It was backed with "Don't Bug Me", also from Los Cochinos. To coincide with the graffiti artwork from the album's cover, both sides of the single feature the Ode label covered with graffiti. Some notes on the recording of the track, taken
    10.00
    1 votes
    85
    Ben

    Ben

    • Featured in film: Ben
    "Ben" is a song written by Don Black and composed by Walter Scharf for the 1972 film of the same name (the sequel to the 1971 killer rat film Willard). It was performed in the film by Lee Montgomery and by Michael Jackson over the closing credits. Jackson's single, recorded for the Motown label in 1972, spent one week at the top of the U.S. pop chart. It also reached number-one on the Australian pop chart, spending eight weeks at the top spot. The song also later reached a peak of number seven on the British pop chart. "Ben" won a Golden Globe for Best Song. It was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Song in 1973, losing to "The Morning After" from The Poseidon Adventure; Jackson performed the song in front of a live audience at the ceremony. The song was Jackson's first #1 solo hit. Originally written for Donny Osmond, "Ben" was offered to Jackson as Osmond was on tour at the time and unavailable for recording. In addition to its one week at #1 in the U.S., the song also later reached a peak of number seven on the British pop chart. "Ben" won a Golden Globe for Best Song. It was also nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Song in 1973; Jackson performed the
    10.00
    1 votes
    86

    Evergreen

    • Featured in film: A Star Is Born
    "Evergreen (Love Theme from A Star Is Born)" is the theme song from the 1976 film A Star Is Born. It was composed and performed by Barbra Streisand with lyrics by Paul Williams, and arranged by Ian Freebairn-Smith. The song was released on the soundtrack album to A Star Is Born. Streisand earned an Academy Award for Best Original Song, her second Oscar overall, as composer of the song. With "Evergreen", Streisand also earned a Grammy Award for Song of the Year. She and Williams also won Golden Globes in the category of Best Original Song for the song. On the US music charts, the single spent three weeks at number one on the Billboard Hot 100 and six weeks atop the easy listening chart. This was Streisand's second number-one song on the Hot 100 (following "The Way We Were" in 1974), and her third on the adult contemporary chart ("The Way We Were" and 1964's "People"). In the UK Singles Chart, the song peaked at #3 in 1977. The song's opening couplet, "Love, soft as an easy chair, love fresh as the morning air," almost did not appear that way. Williams wrote the morning air line first, but told Streisand to "flip those two first lines, because it sings better." In 1997, the track
    10.00
    1 votes
    87

    God Give Me Strengh

    • Featured in film: Grace of My Heart
    God Give Me Strengh is a song written by Burt Bacharach for the movie Grace of My Heart.
    10.00
    1 votes
    88

    Lose Yourself

    • Featured in film: 8 Mile
    • Performed by: Eminem
    "Lose Yourself" is a song by American hip-hop artist Eminem, released as the first single from the original soundtrack to the movie 8 Mile on October 22, 2002. It was written and produced by Eminem himself, along with longtime collaborator Jeff Bass, one half of the production duo Bass Brothers, along with brother Mark Bass. The song was largely written during the filming of 8 Mile, including several elements written entirely on set by Eminem. The song largely plays to the themes of the film, as it is largely based around, and written from the viewpoint of, the character of Jimmy "B-Rabbit" Smith, Jr., the role taken on by Eminem in the film, and the events of the film itself. Lose Yourself became the first rap song to win The Academy Award for Best Original Song. "Lose Yourself" is a mid-tempo hardcore hip-hop track, which incorporates several aggressive themes, largely dealing with the struggles dealt with by "B-Rabbit" during the film, and how he eventually overcomes his many problems and obstacles to gain the respect of other rappers, as this is his ambition, but he has constantly been held back by his own personal problems. The song earned Eminem five Grammy nominations at the
    10.00
    1 votes
    89

    Rhythm of the Night

    • Featured in film: The Last Dragon
    "Rhythm of the Night" is a 1985 hit single recorded by the American R&B band DeBarge and written by Diane Warren. The song is said to have jump-started the career of songwriter Diane Warren and was the biggest hit recorded by the Motown family singing group. By 1985, DeBarge had become pop/R&B sensations with mostly ballads making the repertoire of their hit catalog though they were as impressive as live performers with their mixture of their trademark soft ballads and a collection of dance material. Motown Records sought to produce DeBarge with a dance single to give them a bigger crossover success that mirrored that of label-mate Lionel Richie, who like DeBarge, had created his initial fan base on soft songs before the release of "All Night Long", which included a catchy dance beat influenced by calypso. A similar influence would come in the production of "Rhythm of the Night" which featured more of El DeBarge's deep tenor with flashes of his trademark falsetto. Richard Perry, the hit producer behind hit recordings for The Pointer Sisters and other artists, was appointed to produce the single with Diane Warren as its writer. The release of "Rhythm of the Night" coincided with the
    10.00
    1 votes
    90

    Somewhere Out There

    • Featured in film: An American Tail
    "Somewhere Out There" is a song written by James Horner, Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil, that is a reminiscent but stylized adaptation using parts of the main melody of the second movement of Beethoven's Pathetique (8th) Sonata as a backdrop intermingled with a modern arrangement and incorporating new melody elements to create the modern song and not a direct copy of the Beethoven tune as has been simplistically suggested before. Its single was released by American recording artists, pop rock icon Linda Ronstadt and R&B musician James Ingram. Originally, it appeared in the 1986 animated film An American Tail, recorded by actors Phillip Glasser and Betsy Cathcart in the role of their fictional characters as Fievel and Tanya Mousekewitz. Steven Spielberg, the producer of An American Tail, invited songwriters Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil to collaborate with James Horner on four songs for the film's soundtrack, to be completed in a four week timeframe. The composers "felt no pressure to come up with a radio-friendly hit" and were surprised when Spielberg felt "Somewhere Out There" had Top 40 hit potential and recruited world renowned recording artists, Linda Ronstadt and James Ingram, to
    10.00
    1 votes
    91

    The Window Cleaner

    • Performed by: George Formby
    "The Window Cleaner" (also known as "When I'm Cleaning Windows") is a comedy song performed by Lancastrian comic, actor and ukulele player George Formby. It first appeared in the 1936 film Keep Your Seats Please. The song was credited as written by Fred Cliff, Harry Gifford and Formby. The song was so successful that George Formby recorded another version of the song entitled "The Window Cleaner (No. 2)". This song uses similar orchestration to the original version and it is about further things which were seen on a window cleaning round. The song also appeared in the PlayStation 2 game, EyeToy: Play. The song appeared on TMI as Tom Fletcher put on his helmet The song made an appearance on American Dad, with brief lines being sung by Avery Bullock in the episode "Failure is not a Factory-Installed Option" A dance mix of the song, sampling the first eight lines of Formby's original vocals from the first version, appeared in the UK Singles Chart in December 1994, billed as by 2 in a Tent. It was, in reality, the work of the British record producers Mike Stock and Matt Aitken.
    10.00
    1 votes
    92

    Work It Out

    • Featured in film: Austin Powers: Goldmember
    "Work It Out" is a song by American R&B singer Beyoncé Knowles. It was released on June 11, 2002, by Columbia Records as the lead single from the soundtrack album of the film Austin Powers in Goldmember, in which Knowles stars as Foxxy Cleopatra. It was later included on the international editions of Knowles' debut album, Dangerously in Love (2003). Composed by Knowles, Pharrell Williams, and Chad Hugo, "Work It Out" is an R&B song which incorporates elements of 1960s and 1970s funk and post-disco. The song was generally well received by music critics, many of whom complimented its retro style and various influences. It has been credited as the beginning of Knowles' career as a successful solo artist, after finding success as the lead singer of Destiny's Child. "Work It Out" was nominated in the category of Best Original or Adapted Song at the 2003 Black Reel Awards. Commercially, the song failed to make an impact on the US Billboard Hot 100 but managed to find success on a few Billboard component charts, topping the Billboard's Hot Dance Club Play chart. "Work It Out" also reached the top ten in Norway and the UK. The song's accompanying music video was shot and directed by
    10.00
    1 votes
    93

    You Will Be My Ain True Love

    • Featured in film: Cold Mountain
    • Performed by: Alison Krauss
    "You Will Be My Ain True Love" is a song written and performed by Sting and Alison Krauss from the 2003 film Cold Mountain. The song was nominated for an Academy Award, a Grammy Award and the Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song. Both artists have included the song on compilations, Kraus on her 2007 A Hundred Miles or More: A Collection, and Sting on his 2010 album Symphonicities. The music video to "You Will Be My Ain True Love" depicts Alison Krauss and Sting performing it live, interspersed with scenes from the film, which stars Nicole Kidman, Jude Law and Renée Zellweger.
    6.50
    4 votes
    94

    Father and Daughter

    • Featured in film: The Wild Thornberrys Movie
    • Performed by: Paul Simon
    Father and Daughter is a Paul Simon song, originally released as a single. It is a notable addition to the Simon anthology mainly because the song was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Song. It was written for the children's animated film The Wild Thornberrys Movie and released in 2002. The song also appeared on the movie soundtrack album, and a different mix of the same performance was used for Simon's 2006 release, Surprise, and the 2007 best-of compilation, The Essential Paul Simon. The song is about a father's love for his daughter, told from his point of view. In the song, he talks about how he has always been there for her over the years and that no matter what life has in store, there'll never be a father that loves their daughter more than him.
    8.50
    2 votes
    95

    Shakedown

    • Featured in film: Beverly Hills Cop II
    "Shakedown" is the title of a song recorded by Bob Seger that is from the soundtrack of the film Beverly Hills Cop II. The music was written by Harold Faltermeyer, who wrote the score for the film, and Keith Forsey, and the lyrics by Seger. The song became a number-one hit on the Billboard Hot 100, Seger's only such top mark singles-wise, as well as the Album Rock Tracks chart, where it became his second number-one hit, spending four weeks at the top. In Canada, it went to number one as well, topping the RPM 100 national singles chart on August 1 of the same year. In 1988, "Shakedown" was nominated for both the Academy Award for Best Original Song and Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song, but it lost both awards to Dirty Dancing's "(I've Had) The Time of My Life". At the 60th Academy Awards, "Shakedown" was performed by Little Richard. In 1989, Alvin and the Chipmunks covered the song for the Alvin and the Chipmunks episode "Alvin's Obsession." The music video featured scenes from the film intercut with Seger and the band performing it, with some members approaching glam metal moves.
    8.50
    2 votes
    96

    The Rainbow Connection

    • Featured in film: The Muppet Movie
    "Rainbow Connection" is a song written by Paul Williams and Kenneth Ascher and originally performed by the character of Kermit the Frog (Jim Henson) in The Muppet Movie in 1979. Kenneth Ascher and Paul Williams received Oscar nominations at the 52nd Academy Awards for the score of The Muppet Movie and for Rainbow Connection, which Allmusic described as an "unlikely radio hit ... which Kermit the Frog sings with all the dreamy wistfulness of a short green Judy Garland" and went on to add that "'Rainbow Connection' serves the same purpose in The Muppet Movie that "Over the Rainbow" serves in The Wizard of Oz, with nearly equal effectiveness: an opening establishment of the characters' driving urge for something more in life." The song was also nominated for the Academy Award for Best Original Song in 1979, but lost the Oscar to "It Goes Like It Goes" from Norma Rae, a win that some critics decried. The song's name has been used by a number of charitable organizations wishing to evoke its message, including a children's charity similar to the Make-A-Wish Foundation, a summer camp for seriously ill children, and a horseback riding camp for people with disabilities. The name's influence
    8.50
    2 votes
    97

    Can You Feel the Love Tonight

    • Featured in film: The Lion King
    "Can You Feel the Love Tonight" is a song from Disney's 1994 animated film, The Lion King, composed by Elton John with lyrics by Tim Rice. It was described by Don Hahn (the film's producer), Roger Allers and Rob Minkoff (the film's directors) as having "the most diverse history" in the film. It was a chart hit in the UK, peaking at #14 on the UK Singles Chart, and achieved even more success in the U.S., reaching a peak of #4 on the Billboard Hot 100. The song was a number-one hit in France. The song was performed in the film by Kristle Edwards, Joseph Williams, Sally Dworsky, Nathan Lane, and Ernie Sabella, while the end title version was performed by Elton John. It won the 1994 Academy Award for Best Original Song, and the Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song. It also earned Elton John the Grammy Award for Best Male Pop Vocal Performance. In 2003, a remixed version of the song was included in the Special Edition soundtrack of The Lion King, again sung by Elton John. In the midquel The Lion King 1½, the romantic scene where the song was originally featured also had the song playing, but with a difference: interspersed with the romantic scenes were short comedic shots of Timon
    7.33
    3 votes
    98

    Stay

    • Featured in film: Faraway, So Close!
    "Stay (Faraway, So Close!)" is a song by the rock band U2. It is the fifth track on their 1993 album, Zooropa and was released as the album's third single on 22 November 1993. The song was a top ten hit in the Ireland, Australia, the United Kingdom, and several other countries. The music video was shot in Berlin, Germany. The earliest incarnation of the song developed during sessions for the group's 1991 album Achtung Baby. It was written for and inspired by Frank Sinatra and bore his surname as the original working title. An alternate recording was used in the Wim Wenders film Faraway, So Close!. "Stay (Faraway, So Close!)" was well received by critics and nominated for a Golden Globe for Best Original Song. The song made its live debut on the Zoo TV Tour but has only been performed intermittently in an acoustic version over subsequent tours. Members of U2 consider it to be one of their favourite songs; guitarist The Edge named it the best track on the album, while lead singer Bono stated that it was one of their best creations. The earliest incarnation of "Stay (Faraway, So Close!)" was developed during the recording sessions for Achtung Baby. While working in Hansa Ton Studios
    7.33
    3 votes
    99

    Sympathy for the Devil

    • Featured in film: Sympathy for the Devil
    "Sympathy for the Devil" is a song by The Rolling Stones which first appeared as the opening track on their 1968 album Beggars Banquet. It was written by Mick Jagger and credited to Jagger/Richards. Rolling Stone magazine placed it at #32 in their list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. "Sympathy for the Devil" was written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, though the song was largely a Jagger composition. The working title of the song was "The Devil Is My Name", and it is sung by Jagger as a first-person narrative from the point of view of Lucifer. In a 1995 interview with Rolling Stone, Jagger said, "I think that was taken from an old idea of Baudelaire's, I think, but I could be wrong. Sometimes when I look at my Baudelaire books, I can't see it in there. But it was an idea I got from French writing. And I just took a couple of lines and expanded on it. I wrote it as sort of like a Bob Dylan song." It was Richards who suggested changing the tempo and using additional percussion, turning the folk song into a samba. Additionally, the song has some similarities to Mikhail Bulgakov's novel The Master and Margarita. Backed by an intensifying rock arrangement, the narrator, with
    7.33
    3 votes
    100
    Under the Sea

    Under the Sea

    • Featured in film: The Little Mermaid
    • Performed by: Samuel E. Wright
    "Under the Sea" is a song from Disney's 1989 animated film The Little Mermaid, composed by Alan Menken with lyrics by Howard Ashman and based in the song "The Beautiful Briny" from the 1971 film Bedknobs and Broomsticks. It is influenced by the Calypso style of the Caribbean. The song was performed in the film by Samuel E. Wright. The track won the Academy Award for Best Original Song in 1989. The song is a plea by the crab Sebastian imploring Ariel to remain sea-bound, and resist her desire to become a human in order to spend her life with Prince Eric, with whom she has fallen in love. Sebastian warns of the struggles of human life while at the same time expounding the benefits of a care-free life underwater. In 2002, the song was featured in the Square Enix action RPG, Kingdom Hearts as the background music for the Atlantica world. In 2006, the song also appeared in Kingdom Hearts II as part of a minigame where it was rearranged to have parts for Sebastian, Ariel, and Sora. For both appearances, the music was arranged by Yoko Shimomura. In 2007, the Broadway musical version uses this as the featured production number with the role of Sebastian played by Tituss Burgess. Because
    7.33
    3 votes
    101

    Until...

    • Featured in film: Kate & Leopold
    • Performed by: Sting
    "Until..." is a song from the 2001 Academy Award-nominated and Golden Globe-winning film Kate & Leopold, written and sung by Sting. The song won the Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song and was nominated for the Academy Award in the same category.
    7.33
    3 votes
    102

    Love You I Do

    • Featured in film: Dreamgirls
    "Love You I Do" is a song performed by American R&B singer Jennifer Hudson in the 2006 film Dreamgirls. The music for the song was written by Henry Krieger, composer of the original Broadway play, with lyrics by Siedah Garrett. It is one of the four songs featured in the film that are not present in the original Broadway play. It was nominated for the 2007 Academy Award for Best Original Song, and won the 2008 Grammy Award for Best Song Written for a Motion Picture, Television or Other Visual Media. "Love You I Do" is soul song inspired by the early 1960s work of female singers such as Aretha Franklin and Mary Wells. In the context of the film, the song is performed in a scene set in 1963 by soul singer Effie White (Hudson), and expresses Effie's romantic feelings for her boyfriend and record label head, Curtis Taylor Jr. (Jamie Foxx). As do most songs in the movie version of "Dreamgirls," this song serves two purposes. Effie is performing the piece to Curtis for review, hoping it will win her a song of her own on a record instead of remaining a mere backup singer for Jimmy Early. The song also helps further illustrate Effie's feelings for Curtis, though he is clearly more
    6.25
    4 votes
    103

    Men in Black

    • Featured in film: Men in Black
    • Performed by: Will Smith
    "Men in Black" is a song by Will Smith (featuring singer Coko from group SWV) from the movie Men in Black, in which he also starred. The song plays during the movie's closing credits. Will Smith raps about how the MiBs "Walk in shadow, move in silence" and play the role of "first, last and only line of defense, against the worst scum of the universe", while Coko adds her soulful soprano vocals in the background. The song won Smith a Grammy in 1998 for Best Rap Solo Performance. "Men In Black" features a sample of and a re-sung chorus from "Forget Me Nots" by Patrice Rushen. In a twist, the line "I want you to remember" is changed to "They won't let you remember", in reference to memory-erasing devices used in the Men in Black movie. Aside from appearing on the movie's soundtrack, the song also appears on Will Smith's Columbia Records album Big Willie Style and reached number one on charts in Australia, France, Germany and the United Kingdom. The song did not chart on the Billboard Hot 100 because it was not released as a commercial single in the US; at the time, only songs that were commercially released as singles were eligible, but it did however top the airplay chart. The music
    6.25
    4 votes
    104

    What Dreams Are Made Of

    • Featured in film: The Lizzie McGuire Movie
    "What Dreams Are Made Of" is a song on the soundtrack of the 2003 film The Lizzie McGuire Movie. There are two versions of the song featured on the soundtrack album The Lizzie McGuire Movie: a ballad version credited to the characters Paolo and Isabella (played by Yani Gellman and Hilary Duff, respectively), and a version credited to Lizzie McGuire (played by Duff). In the United States, the Lizzie McGuire version was released on Radio Disney, and it received significant airplay despite a highly publicised split between Duff and The Walt Disney Company. The "What Dreams Are Made Of" music video shows scenes from the film and the breakthrough scene in which Lizzie is performing with Paolo in front of an audience with backing lights and dancers. The Village Voice called it "a great song, a virtual one-tune Italo-disco revival", and The News Tribune referred to it as "a ditty that's like brain Velcro: It sticks in the head. And sticks. And sticks." The Lowell Sun wrote, "the song they [Paolo and Lizzie] sing together should be called "This Is What Nightmares Are Made Of", because it will echo through your brain like a stubborn migraine. After the fourth time you hear it, unless you
    6.25
    4 votes
    105

    Another Way to Die

    • Featured in film: Quantum of Solace
    • Performed by: Alicia Keys
    "Another Way to Die" is a song by American rock musician and singer Jack White (of The White Stripes) and American R&B singer Alicia Keys. Written and produced by White as the theme song to the 2008 James Bond film Quantum of Solace, it was released as a single in the United States on September 30, 2008 and in Europe on October 20, 2008. The song is the first single from As I Am: The Super Edition. The song—which features White on vocals, guitar and drums and Keys on vocals—is the first duet in the Bond film series and was nominated for Best Short Form Music Video at the 2009 Grammy Awards, with director P. R. Brown. It was also nominated for Best Song at the 2008 Critics' Choice Awards. The song won Best Original Song at the Satellite Awards 2008. The single was released as a limited edition 7" single of 6,000 copies in the U.S. on September 30, 2008 by White's label Third Man Records, and in the United Kingdom on October 20, 2008 by XL Recordings. It was also released as a downloadable song for the video game Guitar Hero World Tour on November 7, 2008. An instrumental version of the song was also used in a Coca-Cola commercial, as Coca-Cola Zero is being used to promote the
    5.40
    5 votes
    106

    Por una cabeza

    • Featured in film: True Lies
    "Por una cabeza", meaning "by a head [of a horse]" in Spanish (one speaks of a horse winning a race by one head's distance), is one of the most famous and popular Argentine tangos with music by Carlos Gardel and lyrics by Alfredo Le Pera, written in 1935. Alfredo Le Pera was a Brazilian from São Paulo, the most Italian-influenced area in Brazil, and also the birthplace of Zequinha de Abreu, composer of Tico-Tico no Fubá. Le Pera died along with Gardel in the same airplane crash in Medellín (Colombia), on June 24, 1935. The lyrics of the song talk about a compulsive horse-track gambler, who compares his addiction for horses with his attraction to women. The tango has since been performed by numerous tango orchestras and is commonly featured in films and television. Tango scenes with "Por una cabeza" appear in Delicatessen (1991), Scent of a Woman (1992), Schindler's List (1993), True Lies (1994), Titanic (1996), Bad Santa (Uncut Version, 2003), All the King's Men (2006), Planet 51 (2009), Episode #37 of Nip/Tuck (2003-2010), Episode #9 of South Korean drama series Sweet Spy (2005-08), the beginning and ending credits of the South Korean drama broadcast I'm Sorry, I Love You (2004),
    5.40
    5 votes
    107

    Arthur's Theme

    • Featured in film: Arthur
    "Arthur's Theme (Best That You Can Do)" is an Academy-Award-winning song performed by Christopher Cross, which was the theme for the 1981 film Arthur starring Dudley Moore and Liza Minnelli. It reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 in the US and on the VG-lista chart in Norway. The song was written in collaboration between Cross, pop music composer Burt Bacharach, and his frequent writing partner Carole Bayer Sager. A fourth writing credit went to Minnelli's ex-husband and Australian songwriter Peter Allen, also a frequent collaborator with Bayer Sager. The line "When you get caught between the moon and New York City" from the chorus is taken from an unreleased song they had previously written together. The song won the 1981 Academy Award for Best Original Song, and the Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song. The award was presented by singer Bette Midler, who, in her presentation of the nominated songs, called the song " 'That Song About the Moon and New York City,' also known as 'Four on a Song,' " referring to the four songwriters. In Japan, the song is known as ニューヨーク・シティ・セレナーデ or "New York City Serenade" and has enjoyed popularity over the years. Cross performed the
    7.00
    3 votes
    108

    Say You, Say Me

    • Featured in film: White Nights
    "Say You, Say Me" is an Oscar winning song, written and recorded by Lionel Richie for the film White Nights, starring Mikhail Baryshnikov and Gregory Hines. Bowing at #40 on the Hot 100 on 9 November 1985, the single hit number one there and on the R&B singles charts in December 1985. It became Richie's ninth number one on the Billboard Adult Contemporary chart. The track is not available on the soundtrack album to the film, because Motown did not want Richie's first single since the Can't Slow Down album to appear on another record label. It finally appeared on the Dancing on the Ceiling album released in 1986. The track won the Academy Award for Best Original Song in 1985. In 2008, the song was ranked at #74 of the top songs of all time on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, commemorating the first 50 years of the chart. In 2012, Lionel Richie re-recorded the song with Danish pop singer-songwriter Rasmus Seebach. The duet is featured on Richie's album Tuskegee, for which Richie has picked a host of best-selling singers from around the world in collaborations.
    7.00
    3 votes
    109
    Shooting Stars

    Shooting Stars

    • Featured in film: With Love
    • Performed by: Soji O
    This CD contains numerous version of a song written from the point of view of "Corinn Michaels," the main character in a series of novels by Stephen Pytak following the adventures of a low-rent mercenary known as "The .40 Caliber Mouse.' The lyrics were written by Stephen Pytak. The CD Maxi Single contains versions of the song by Soji O and Donna Nye. It's available at www.mazzpress.com
    7.00
    3 votes
    110

    An American Trilogy

    • Featured in film: Kick-Ass
    • Performed by: Elvis Presley
    "An American Trilogy" is a song arranged by country songwriter Mickey Newbury and made popular by Elvis Presley, who began including the song as part of his regular concert routine in the 1970s, thereby making the song a showstopper. It is a medley of three 19th century songs—"Dixie", a blackface minstrel song that became the unofficial anthem of the Confederacy since the Civil War; "All My Trials", originally a Bahamian lullaby, but closely related to African American spirituals, and well-known through folk music revivalists; and "The Battle Hymn of the Republic", the marching song of the Union Army during the Civil War. Newbury's first recorded the song on his 1971 album Frisco Mabel Joy, and the song featured prominently on his first concert album Live At Montezuma Hall released in 1973. Presley began performing the song in concert in 1972—a February recording was released by RCA as a single. He performed it in the 1972 documentary, Elvis on Tour, and in his 1973 international satellite telecast "Elvis—Aloha from Hawaii". The song is referenced and partially sung in the Manic Street Preachers' "Elvis Impersonator: Blackpool Pier" from the Everything Must Go album. The original
    8.00
    2 votes
    111

    Decode

    • Featured in film: Twilight
    • Performed by: Paramore
    "Decode" is a song by Paramore released as a single from the soundtrack to the film Twilight. It is also included as a bonus track on the international version of Paramore's third studio album, Brand New Eyes. An acoustic version of this song was released as a part of the special CD/DVD of the Twilight soundtrack. The song was certified Platinum in the U.S on February 16, 2010, selling over 1,000,000 copies. It was also nominated for a Grammy Award in 2010 for Best Song Written for a Movie. Hayley Williams from Paramore is a Twilight fan and recently talked about her love of the books and the song's title: Alexandra Cahill of Billboard.com gave the song a positive review by stating that "vocalist Hayley Williams captures the tension and urgency between undead protagonist Edward and mortal love interest Bella with an impassioned, yet restrained performance". Cahill also stated, "expertly crafted follow-up Decode promises to stake a claim at modern rock and top 40 radio". Entertainment Weekly said that Decode took a step away from Paramore's "bouncier punk-pop sound for a more sprawling, Evanescence-like romanticism". The official music video premiered on November 3, 2008 on MTVu,
    8.00
    2 votes
    112

    I'm Checkin' Out

    • Featured in film: Postcards from the Edge
    "I'm Checkin' Out" is a song written for "Postcards from the Edge (film)" (1990). Shel Silverstein wrote the lyrics and the music. The song was performed by Meryl Streep in the final scene of "Postcards from the Edge". Academy Award for Best Original Song 1990 - Nominated Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song 1990 - Nominated
    8.00
    2 votes
    113

    Jai Ho

    • Featured in film: Slumdog Millionaire
    • Performed by: A. R. Rahman
    "Jai Ho" is a song composed by Indian composer A. R. Rahman for the soundtrack to Subhash Ghai's 2008 film Yuvvraaj. Ghai, who suggested Rahman use the words "jai ho" in a song, thought it was "too subtle and soft" for inclusion in the film. Rahman and Gulzar, who co-wrote the lyrics to the song, felt that the song had "immense potential", so when Danny Boyle, the director of the 2008 film Slumdog Millionaire, approached Rahman to compose its soundtrack, Rahman used the song for it. "Jai Ho" accompanies a choreographed dance sequence at the end credits of Slumdog Millionaire. The song features vocals from Sukhvinder Singh, Mahalaxmi Iyer and Vijay Prakash in three Indian languages: Hindi, Urdu and Punjabi. Indian singer Tanvi Shah wrote and provided vocals for a Spanish section of the song. "Jai Ho" was, at the time of its release, according to the India-EU Film Initiative "the toast of the town in almost every part of the world". Videos were posted on YouTube of people covering and remixing the song, as well as doing the "Jai Ho" dance featured in the film. "Jai Ho" received universally favorable reviews from music critics, citing it as the best song on the Slumdog Millionaire
    8.00
    2 votes
    114

    Last Dance

    • Featured in film: Thank God It's Friday
    "Last Dance" is a 1978 hit song by singer Donna Summer. The song appeared on the Thank God It's Friday movie soundtrack. It was written by Paul Jabara and was co-produced by Summer's regular collaborator Giorgio Moroder, along with Bob Esty. It was mixed by the Grammy Award winning record producer, Stephen Short, whose back-up vocals are featured on the song. Donna Summer has a role in the film Thank God It's Friday as an aspiring singer who brings an instrumental track of "Last Dance" to a disco in hopes the disc jockey will play the track and allow her to sing the song for her fellow patrons: after refusing through most of the film the disc jockey eventually obliges Summer's character and her performance causes a sensation. According to the song's co-producer Bob Esty, Paul Jabara had locked Summer in a Puerto Rico hotel bathroom and forced her to listen to a cassette of him singing a rough version of "Last Dance." Summer liked the song and Jabara asked Esty to work with him on an arrangement for Summer to make her recording. Esty recalls: On David Foster's "The Hitman Returns" DVD, David Foster introduces the song by relating a story to Donna Summer. When he played on the
    8.00
    2 votes
    115

    May It Be

    • Featured in film: The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring
    • Performed by: Enya
    "May It Be" is a song composed by Irish musician Enya and featured in Peter Jackson's 2001 film The Lord of the Rings, the Fellowship of the Ring. The song entered the German Singles Chart at number one in 2002 and was performed by Enya on the 74th Academy Awards. Director Peter Jackson approached Enya, asking if she would be interested in writing a song for The Lord of the Rings. Thrilled at the prospect, Enya headed to New Zealand to see the preliminary edits of the film. Enya worked on the song with Nicky Ryan, her producer, and Roma Ryan, her lyricist. Nicky produced, arranged, and managed while Roma wrote the lyrics. They recorded the song through Enya's contract with Warner Music in the Ryans' Dublin studio, Aigle Studio. Compositionally, the piece is simple, featuring a backdrop of choir and strings. Like most of Enya's music, "May It Be" is classified as New Age. The lyrics of this theme song include English words, as well as words in the fictional Elvish language, Quenya, created by J.R.R. Tolkien. Tolkien began writing this High-Elven language in 1915 at the age of 23. Quenya went through many revisions before it finally appeared in the books. Tolkien's son Christopher
    8.00
    2 votes
    116

    The Shadow of Your Smile

    • Featured in film: The Sandpiper
    "The Shadow of Your Smile", also known as "Love Theme from The Sandpiper", is a popular song. The music was written by Johnny Mandel with the lyrics written by Paul Francis Webster. The song was introduced in the 1965 film The Sandpiper, with a trumpet solo by Jack Sheldon and later became a minor hit for Tony Bennett (Johnny Mandel arranged and conducted his version as well). It won the Grammy Award for Song of the Year and the Academy Award for Best Original Song. Well-known versions of the song were recorded by Barbra Streisand (on her 1965 album My Name Is Barbra, Two...), singer Shirley Bassey (on her 1966 album I've Got a Song for You), Andy Williams, Percy Faith, Rita Reys, Al Martino, Perry Como, Nancy Sinatra, Astrud Gilberto, Peggy Lee, Sammy Davis, Jr., Sarah Vaughan and Frank Sinatra. Connie Francis recorded the song in English, Spanish (La sombra de tu sonrisa), and in Italian (Castelli di sabbia). Trini Lopez included it on his Reprise Records album (Trini). Lill Lindfors recorded it in Swedish as Din skugga stannar kvar. Marvin Gaye recorded several versions of the song. One can be found on Romantically Yours, another on Vulnerable, and a live version on Marvin Gaye:
    8.00
    2 votes
    117

    We May Never Love Like This Again

    • Featured in film: The Towering Inferno
    "We May Never Love Like This Again" is a song written by Al Kasha and Joel Hirschhorn for the 1974 film, The Towering Inferno. It won the Academy Award for Best Original Song in 1974, and was performed by Maureen McGovern both for the film score and, briefly, in the film itself with McGovern portraying a singer. McGovern had performed a cover version of Kasha and Hirschhorn's song "The Morning After", which also won the Academy Award for Best Original Song two years earlier. Her recording of "We May Never Love Like This Again" was issued as a single with McGovern's rendition of "Wherever Love Takes Me", a song from the movie Gold which would compete with "We May Never Love Like This Again" for the Best Song Oscar, serving as B-side. "We May Never Love Like This Again" reached #83 on the Hot 100 in Billboard: the single afforded McGovern a major hit in Australia (#5). Due to her associations with two Oscar winning songs McGovern recorded Academy Award Performance: And The Envelope, Please an album comprising Oscar winning songs featuring "The Morning After" and "We May Never Love This Way Again". Hollywood composer John Williams wrote the music for the film, and interpolated the
    8.00
    2 votes
    118

    When a Woman Loves a Man

    • Featured in film: Bull Durham
    "When a Woman Loves a Man" is a song composed in 1938 by Bernie Hanighen and Gordon Jenkins, with lyrics by Johnny Mercer.
    8.00
    2 votes
    119

    A View to a Kill

    • Featured in film: A View to a Kill
    • Performed by: Duran Duran
    "A View to a Kill" is the thirteenth single by Duran Duran, released in May 1985. It was a stand-alone single, created for the James Bond movie A View to a Kill, and it remains the only James Bond theme song to have reached number 1 on the Billboard Hot 100; it also made it to number 2 for three weeks on the UK Singles Chart. In 1986, John Barry and Duran Duran were nominated for the Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song for A View to a Kill. The song was the last track that the original five members of Duran Duran recorded together until their reunion sixteen years later, in 2001. It was played at their final 1985 performance together before splitting for the very first time, at Live Aid in Philadelphia. The single was at number 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 at the time they performed it on that historic event. The song was written by Duran Duran and John Barry, and recorded at Maison Rouge Studio and CTS Studio in London with a 60-piece orchestra. Duran Duran were chosen to do the song after bassist John Taylor (a lifelong Bond fan) approached producer Cubby Broccoli at a party, and somewhat drunkenly asked "When are you going to get someone decent to do one of your theme
    9.00
    1 votes
    120

    Because You Loved Me

    • Featured in film: Up Close & Personal
    • Performed by: Celine Dion
    "Because You Loved Me" is a song by Canadian singer Céline Dion from her twenty-first studio album Falling into You. Written by Diane Warren and produced by David Foster, it was released as a single on February 19, 1996 as the second from the album. A down-tempo pop ballad, its lyrics revolve around the protagonist thanking a loyal loved one for guiding, encouraging, and protecting her throughout her life, and making her who she is today. "Because You Loved Me" also serves as the theme song from the 1996 film Up Close & Personal. The song was a commercial success. It became Dion's second single to top the Billboard Hot 100, remaining at number-one for six weeks until its reign was ended by Mariah Carey's "Always Be My Baby". The song became a part of two greatest hits released by Dion: All the Way… A Decade of Song in 1999 and My Love: Essential Collection in 2008. "Because You Loved Me" could be found on the Live in Las Vegas - A New Day... DVD and it was also performed during the 2008-09 Taking Chances Tour. Live performances can be found on the A New Day... Live in Las Vegas CD, as well as the English edition of Taking Chances World Tour: The Concert DVD/CD. It reached number 1
    9.00
    1 votes
    121

    I Finally Found Someone

    • Featured in film: The Mirror Has Two Faces
    • Performed by: Bryan Adams
    "I Finally Found Someone" is a song duet from 1996 with Bryan Adams and Barbra Streisand. The song was part of the soundtrack in Barbra's self-directed movie The Mirror Has Two Faces and was nominated for an Oscar. It reached #8 on the Billboard Hot 100, and #2 on the Hot Adult Contemporary chart . "I Finally Found Someone" gave Barbra Streisand her first significant hit in almost a decade and her first top 10 hit on the Hot 100 (and first gold single) since 1981. "I Finally Found Someone" was included on a new issue of Adams's album, 18 Til I Die, which had a purple cover instead of orange. The CD single is unique for Streisand fans as it contains a rare Spanish language version of her 1976 song Evergreen. It was included on the album All Time Greatest Movie Songs, released by Sony in 1999.
    9.00
    1 votes
    122

    Machinehead

    • Featured in film: Fear
    • Performed by: Bush
    "Machinehead" is a hit single from rock band Bush, released in 1996 from their debut album Sixteen Stone. The music video was directed by Shawn Mortensen on November 21, 1995 in London and Portmouth. If you watch closely you can see sections of Shepherd's Bush, where the band members used to live. Gavin Rossdale's dog Winston is also in the video. The song reached the Top 5 of the Modern Rock Tracks as well as the Mainstream Rock Tracks, lifting the band to stardom in the 1990s. The song reached #43 on the Billboard Hot 100 on May 4, 1996 and #24 on the Hot 100 Airplay on May 18, 1996. The song was nominated for Best Alternative Video and Best Video from a Film at the 1996 MTV Music Video Awards but lost both, however it did win the MTV Movie Award for Best Song from a Movie at the 1996 MTV Movie Awards.
    9.00
    1 votes
    123

    Man of the Hour

    • Featured in film: Big Fish
    • Performed by: Eddie Vedder
    "Man of the Hour" is a song by the American rock band Pearl Jam. Written by vocalist Eddie Vedder, "Man of the Hour" accompanies the closing credits of the 2003 film Big Fish, and is the first track on the film's soundtrack album. It was released as a single on November 26, 2003. The song was included on Pearl Jam's 2004 greatest hits album, rearviewmirror (Greatest Hits 1991–2003). Director Tim Burton approached Pearl Jam in 2003 to request an original song for the soundtrack of his new film, Big Fish. After screening an early print of the film, Pearl Jam vocalist Eddie Vedder went home, wrote "Man of the Hour", and had a demo ready by the next day. It was recorded by the band four days later. Guitarist Mike McCready stated, "We were so blown away by the movie...Eddie and I were standing around talking about it afterwards and were teary-eyed. We were so emotionally charged and moved by the imagination and humanity that we felt because of the movie." The wistful song is a young man saying farewell to his father: "The man of the hour has taken his final bow/Goodbye for now." According to Billboard magazine, the "acoustic-tinged track is accented by wistful slide guitar work, with
    9.00
    1 votes
    124

    Nowhere to Run

    • Featured in film: Vinyl
    • Performed by: Martha and the Vandellas
    "Nowhere to Run" is a 1965 pop single, b/w "Motoring", by Martha and the Vandellas for the Gordy (Motown) label and is one of the group's signature songs. The song, written and produced by Motown's main production team of Holland–Dozier–Holland, depicts the story of a woman trapped in a bad relationship with a man she cannot help but love. Holand-Dozier-Holland and the Funk Brothers band gave the song a large, hard-driving instrumentation sound similar of the sound of prior "Dancing In The Street" with snow chains used as percussion alongside the tambourine and drums. Included on their third album, Dance Party, "Nowhere to Run" hit number eight on the Billboard Pop Singles chart, and number five on the Billboard R&B Singles chart. It also charted in the UK peaking at number twenty-six on the chart. This version was ranked #358 on Rolling Stone's list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. The record's brass-heavy arrangement and chorus of "nowhere to run to, baby/nowhere to hide" have made the song a popular one at sporting events, whether played in its original version or reinterpreted by a marching band. The song has also been seen as one of the songs played heavily by troops
    9.00
    1 votes
    125
    Number One Crush

    Number One Crush

    • Featured in film: Romeo + Juliet
    • Performed by: Garbage
    "#1 Crush" is a song by Garbage, released internationally on the b-side to their debut release "Vow", and in the United Kingdom on the b-side to second single "Subhuman". In 1996, the track was remixed by Nellee Hooper and Marius de Vries for the soundtrack to Baz Luhrmann's modernised William Shakespeare's Romeo + Juliet movie adaptation. The remix of "#1 Crush" peaked at #1 on Billboard's Hot Modern Rock Tracks, where it stayed for four weeks, and as of 2010 is Garbage's sole #1 entry on any US chart. It was nominated for Best Song From a Movie at the 1997 MTV Movie Awards. "#1 Crush" was the first of two hit singles from the Romeo + Juliet soundtrack; "Lovefool" by The Cardigans continued the success of the compilation. In 2007, the remix of "#1 Crush" was remastered and included on Garbage's greatest hits album Absolute Garbage. "#1 Crush" was written and recorded between March, 1994 and May, 1995 during sessions between band members Duke Erikson, Shirley Manson, Steve Marker and Butch Vig in either Marker's basement recording studio or at their own Smart Studios in Madison. Manson was concerned that listeners wouldn't realise that the song was about a stalker: "It's about
    9.00
    1 votes
    126

    Strangers in the Night

    • Featured in film: A Man Could Get Killed
    "Strangers in the Night" is a popular song originally composed by Avo Uvezian as "Broken Guitar" and later re-badged by Bert Kaempfert with English lyrics by Charles Singleton and Eddie Snyder. It was originally created under the title "Beddy Bye" as part of the instrumental score for the movie A Man Could Get Killed. The song was made famous in 1966 by Frank Sinatra. Reaching number one on both the Billboard Hot 100 chart and the Easy Listening chart, it was the title song for Sinatra's 1966 album Strangers in the Night, which would become his most commercially successful album. The song also reached number one on the UK Singles Chart. Sinatra's recording won him the Grammy Award for Best Male Pop Vocal Performance and the Grammy Award for Record of the Year, as well as a Grammy Award for Best Arrangement Accompanying a Vocalist or Instrumentalist for Ernie Freeman at the Grammy Awards of 1967. One of the most memorable and recognizable features of the record is Sinatra's scat improvisation of the melody with the syllables "doo-be-doo-be-doo" as the song fades to the end. Many fans lament the fact that the fade was early and Sinatra's improvisation is cut off too soon. For the CD
    9.00
    1 votes
    127

    Theme from New York, New York

    • Featured in film: New York, New York
    "Theme from New York, New York" (or "New York, New York") is the theme song from the Martin Scorsese film New York, New York (1977), composed by John Kander, with lyrics by Fred Ebb. It was written for and performed in the film by Liza Minnelli. English television producer Howard Huntridge suggested to Kander, that he compose the song during a meeting at Caesars Palace, Paradise, Nevada, in 1977. In 1979, it was recorded by Frank Sinatra, for his album Trilogy: Past Present Future (1980), and has since become closely associated with him. He occasionally performed it live with Minnelli as a duet. Sinatra recorded it a second time in duet with Tony Bennett for his 1993 album Duets. The first line of the song is: The song concludes with the line: Minnelli's original recording of the song (also used in the Tony Bennett version in Duets) uses the following closing line: It should not be confused with the song "New York, New York", from Leonard Bernstein/Adolph Green/Betty Comden's musical On the Town (1944), which features the lyric "New York, New York, is a helluva town / The Bronx is up and the Battery's down..." Composers Kander and Ebb stated on the A&E Biography episode about Liza
    9.00
    1 votes
    128

    Children of the Revolution

    • Featured in film: Beyond the Pole
    • Performed by: T. Rex
    "Children of the Revolution" is a song by T. Rex, written by Marc Bolan. It was a #2 hit single in September 1972. The song broke their sequence of four official single releases all reaching #1 ("Hot Love", "Get It On", "Telegram Sam", "Metal Guru"). It did not receive a regular album release. The song is about teenage rebellion, and upon its release, some critics blasted the song, as it marked a change in the band's overall tempo. Some even believed the song was pro-communist propaganda, based on the title alone. It was included in the film Born to Boogie, in the famous Apple Studios jam with Elton John. During the jam, Marc Bolan puts his head through a grand piano while John is playing. The Violent Femmes covered the song on their album The Blind Leading the Naked (1986). The Dead C covered it on their album Eusa Kills (Flying Nun). Lloyd Cole has recorded a cover of the song, as well as several other Marc Bolan songs. It was released as a b-side in 1991. The Killers (Former Iron Maiden singer Paul Di'Anno's Band, not the American band that goes by the same name) covered the song on the album Murder One (1992). A cover is also found on b-side of the Swedish indie band The
    6.67
    3 votes
    129

    For Your Eyes Only

    • Featured in film: For Your Eyes Only
    • Performed by: Sheena Easton
    "For Your Eyes Only" is the theme tune to the 12th James Bond movie, For Your Eyes Only, written by Bill Conti and Mick Leeson, and performed by Scottish singer Sheena Easton. The song reached number four on the US Billboard Hot 100, and number eight on the UK Singles Chart. It was nominated for Best Song at the Academy Awards in 1982. The American new wave band Blondie wrote a song entitled "For Your Eyes Only" in the hopes of making it the upcoming James Bond film's opening-title theme. The producers preferred another song with the same title, written by Bill Conti and Mike Leeson. Blondie turned down an offer to record Conti and Leeson's song. (The band later included their "For Your Eyes Only" song on the 1982 album The Hunter.) Conti - who was also responsible for the film's score - had originally written the song thinking about Donna Summer or Dusty Springfield, singers he thought "fit the Bond style". Studio United Artists suggested Sheena Easton, an up-and-coming singer who had recently scored a No.1 hit in America with "Morning Train". Conti heard Easton's debut album Take My Time and felt unimpressed, but decided to work with her in the song after meeting Easton in
    6.67
    3 votes
    130

    On Broadway

    • Featured in film: All That Jazz
    • Performed by: George Benson
    "On Broadway" is a song written by Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil in collaboration with the team of Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller. Weil and Mann were based at Aldon Music, located at 1650 Broadway, New York City, and the song as written by Mann/Weil was originally recorded by The Cookies (although The Crystals' version beat them to release) and featured an upbeat lyric in which the protagonist is still on her way to Broadway and sings "I got to get there soon, or I'll just die." Additionally the melody was in compound time and the backing riff modulated between the root and the minor 2nd. When Leiber/Stoller let it be known that The Drifters had booked studio time for the following day and were a song short, Mann/Weil forwarded "On Broadway." Leiber and Stoller liked the song but felt that it was not quite right and the four held an overnight brainstorming session which culminated in the better-known version of the song, now in simple time and with a backing riff that modulated down to the flattened 7th, giving it a more bluesy feel which matched the new lyric in which the singer was now actually on Broadway and having a hard time. A young Phil Spector played the distinctive lead
    6.67
    3 votes
    131

    The World is Not Enough

    • Featured in film: The World Is Not Enough
    • Performed by: Garbage
    "The World Is Not Enough" is a 1999 orchestral rock song performed by alternative rock group Garbage, and was the theme single of the James Bond film of the same name. The song and accompanying soundtrack were released internationally by Radioactive Records as the feature film premiered in theaters around the world at the end of November of that year. Garbage recorded the theme song while touring Europe in support of their platinum certified album Version 2.0. "The World Is Not Enough" was written by composer David Arnold, who also did the score for the film, and lyricist Don Black, who had worked in four Bond songs before. The single was written in the traditional style of the series' title themes contrasting with the post-modern production technique and genre-hopping sound that Garbage had established on their first two albums. The lyrics contain the line "There's no point in living if you can't feel alive", an important plot point in the film. "The song reflects the film. It tells the story, which of course is all about world domination, but is a lot more personal and intense," stated Black, "It's quite ballady and dramatic, but feels contemporary." Upon its single release, "The
    6.67
    3 votes
    132

    As Time Goes By

    • Featured in film: Casablanca
    • Performed by: Dooley Wilson
    "As Time Goes By" is a song written by Herman Hupfeld in 1931. It became most famous in 1942 when it was sung by the character Sam (Dooley Wilson) in the movie Casablanca. The song was voted No. 2 on the AFI's 100 Years... 100 Songs special, commemorating the best songs in film. It was used as a fanfare for Warner Bros. Pictures since 1998. Herman Hupfeld wrote "As Time Goes By" for the 1931 Broadway musical Everybody's Welcome. In the original show, it was sung by Frances Williams. It was recorded that year by several artists, including Rudy Vallee and Binnie Hale, as well as orchestra recordings by Jacques Renard and Fred Rich. In terms of popularity at the time, it was a modest hit. The song was re-introduced in 1942 in the film Casablanca, sung by Dooley Wilson accompanied by pianist Elliot Carpenter and heard throughout the film as a leitmotif. Wilson was unable to record his version of the song at the time due to a musicians' strike, leading Brunswick to reissue the Jacques Renard's 1931 recording, as well as Victor to re-issue Vallee's 1931 recording and giving Vallee a number one hit in 1942. The famous opening line, "You must remember this...", is actually the start of the
    5.75
    4 votes
    133

    I Don't Want to Miss a Thing

    • Featured in film: Armageddon
    • Performed by: Aerosmith
    "I Don't Want to Miss a Thing" is a song performed by American rock band Aerosmith for the 1998 film Armageddon. Written by Diane Warren, the song debuted at number one on the Billboard Hot 100 (a first for the band after 28 years together). The song stayed at number one for four weeks from September 5 to September 26, 1998. The song also stayed at number 1 for several weeks in several other countries. In the UK, the song peaked at number four, becoming Aerosmith's highest charting song in the UK, where it was the 17th best-selling single of 1998. This song was Aerosmith's biggest hit, debuting at number 1 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100, where it stayed for four weeks in September, and reaching number 1 in many countries around the world, including Australia, Germany, Ireland, Austria, Norway, Italy, the Netherlands, and Switzerland. The song was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Original Song, but lost to "When You Believe" from the film The Prince of Egypt. The song was also nominated for the Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Original Song, "losing" to "I Wanna Be Mike Ovitz!" from An Alan Smithee Film Burn Hollywood Burn. It is one of only three songs to be nominated for
    5.75
    4 votes
    134

    Kung Fu Fighting

    • Featured in film: Kung Fu Panda
    "Kung Fu Fighting" is a disco song written and performed by Carl Douglas and composed and produced by Biddu. It was released as a single in 1974, at the cusp of a chopsocky film craze, and eventually rose to the top of the British and American charts, in addition to reaching number one on the Soul Singles chart. It received a Gold certification from the RIAA in 1974, won the 1974 Grammy Award for Best Selling Single, and popularized disco music. It eventually went on to sell eleven million records worldwide, making it one of the best-selling singles of all time. The song uses the quintessential Oriental riff, a short musical phrase that is used to signify Chinese culture. "Kung Fu Fighting" was rated number 100 in VH1's 100 Greatest one-hit wonders, and number 1 in the UK Channel 4's Top 10 One Hit Wonders list in 2000, the same channel's 50 Greatest One Hit Wonders poll in 2006 and Bring Back ... the one-hit Wonders, for which Carl Douglas performed the song in a live concert. The song was originally meant to be a B-side to "I Want to Give You My Everything" (written by Brooklyn songwriter Larry Weiss, and sung by Carl Douglas). The producer Biddu originally hired Douglas to sing
    5.75
    4 votes
    135

    After All

    • Featured in film: Chances Are
    "After All" is a 1989 Billboard Hot 100 number six hit song performed as a duet by American singer and actress Cher and American singer and bass player Peter Cetera (former lead vocalist of Chicago), released on February 21, 1989 by Geffen Records. It was used as the love theme for the movie Chances Are and was nominated for Best Original Song at the Academy Awards 1989. The song was also the first North American single (promo in the rest of the world) release from Cher's twentieth album Heart of Stone. The song was featured on Peter Cetera's album "Connection" without any mention of Cher's name as a byline. Also, this song has been found to have headache-reducing powers due to its low frequency. The single peaked at number six in the United States and Canada, the only two countries where the song was officially released. However, it did manage to enter some European charts due to airplay, including Ireland, where it peaked at 24, and the United Kingdom, where it reached 84. "After All" also became Cher's first number one hit on the Adult Contemporary chart in the United States. It was ranked #79 on US Billboard Year-end Hot 100 singles of 1989. The song found strong success
    7.50
    2 votes
    136

    Down in New Orleans

    • Featured in film: The Princess and the Frog
    Down in New Orleans is a song written by Randy Newman for the film The Princess and the Frog.
    7.50
    2 votes
    137
    Eppure Sentire

    Eppure Sentire

    • Featured in film: Manuale d'amore 2 - Capitoli Successivi
    "Eppure sentire (Un senso di te)" is the second single by Italian singer-songwriter Elisa from the album Soundtrack '96-'06.
    7.50
    2 votes
    138

    I'm Shipping Up to Boston

    • Featured in film: The Departed
    • Performed by: Dropkick Murphys
    "I'm Shipping Up to Boston" is a song with lyrics written by the folk singer Woody Guthrie and music written and performed by the Celtic punk band Dropkick Murphys. It appeared on their 2005 album, The Warrior's Code. An earlier recording of it can be found on the Hellcat Records compilation Give 'Em the Boot Vol. 4. The song's simple lyrics describe a sailor who had lost a leg climbing the topsail, and is shipping up to Boston to "find my wooden leg." The song has so far sold 1,044,000 digital copies without ever charting on the Hot 100. The video features the Dropkick Murphys performing the song on the waterfront in East Boston. The band is also seen "hanging out" with hooligans while being chased by Boston police officers. A small Facebook meme grew up after Wisconsin State Representative and Speaker of the Wisconsin State Assembly Jeff Fitzgerald reportedly used the song during the 2012 Wisconsin Republican Convention in Green Bay. This usage prompted the band to release the following statement on Facebook: The song was covered by Finnish melodic death metal band Children of Bodom, and appeared on their 2012 compilation album Holiday at Lake Bodom.
    7.50
    2 votes
    139

    It's My Turn

    • Featured in film: It's My Turn
    "It's My Turn" is a 1980 song used as the theme to the film of the same name. The song, written by Carole Bayer Sager (lyrics) and Michael Masser (music) for Diana Ross, was released as a single and became a top ten hit on the Billboard Hot 100, peaking at number nine. Aretha Franklin recorded the song for her album Love All the Hurt Away in 1981).
    7.50
    2 votes
    140

    Jean

    • Featured in film: The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie
    "Jean" is the title of a popular song from 1969. It was written by the American poet and composer Rod McKuen who also recorded a version of the song. The song was the theme to the film adaptation of Muriel Spark's The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, which starred noted British film actress Maggie Smith. Smith won an Academy Award for Best Actress for her portrayal of the lead character in the film, Jean Brodie. The song was performed by songwriter McKuen was nominated for an Academy Award in the category Best Original Song. Although released as a single in the summer of 1969, McKuen's version of the song failed to reach the American music charts. Sergio Franchi performed the song on the January 3, 1971 broadcast of The Ed Sullivan Show, subsequently released on a rare Franchi DVD. "Jean" was also recorded by the American singer Oliver. Earlier in 1969, Oliver had reached #3 on the Billboard pop and easy listening charts with his version of "Good Morning Starshine," a song from the musical Hair. While working on an album with producer Bob Crewe (which would also be called Good Morning Starshine), "Jean" was selected as a song for the record and subsequently chosen as the follow-up
    7.50
    2 votes
    141

    Tears in Heaven

    • Featured in film: Rush
    "Tears in Heaven" is a song by Eric Clapton and Will Jennings from the soundtrack to the film Rush. The song was written about the pain and loss Clapton felt following the death of his four-year-old son, Conor, on March 20, 1991. Conor fell from a window of the 53rd-floor New York apartment belonging to his mother's friend on March 20, 1991. Clapton arrived at the apartment shortly after the accident, and was distraught over his son's death. "Tears in Heaven" is one of Clapton's most successful songs, as it reached number two on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart in the U.S. The song also stayed three weeks as #1 on the American adult contemporary chart in 1992. Jennings, who worked with Clapton on the song, was reluctant at first to help him write a personal song. The song was initially featured on the soundtrack to the film Rush, followed by Unplugged, and it won three Grammy Awards—Song of the Year, Record of the Year and Male Pop Vocal Performance at the 1993 Grammy Awards. It also won an MTV Video Music Award for Best Male Video in 1992. Clapton stopped playing it in 2004, as well as the song "My Father's Eyes", with Clapton stating; "I didn't feel the loss anymore, which is
    7.50
    2 votes
    142

    The Sound of Music

    • Featured in film: The Sound of Music
    “The Sound of Music” is the title song from the musical The Sound of Music, composed by Richard Rodgers to lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II. It was originally sung by Mary Martin in the 1959 stage musical of the same name. It was sung by Julie Andrews in the 1965 film version, with a reprise by the Von Trapp family later in the film. The song introduces the character of Maria, a young novice in an Austrian abbey. The song was ranked tenth in the American Film Institute's list of the 100 Greatest Songs in Movie History. The stage version of the song has a four-line vocal prelude ("My day in the hills has come to an end I know...) followed by the familiar "The hills are alive with the sound of music..." The film soundtrack and the soundtrack album have two different instrumental preludes to "The hills are alive..." both of which contain portions of the original vocal prelude. The cast album to the 1998 Broadway revival contains the four-line prelude as well as the instrumental prelude present in the film version. This version is also the same key as the film version. Italio-American opera/romantic, crossover artist Sergio Franchi recorded the song in his 1963 RCA Victor Red Seal album
    7.50
    2 votes
    143

    Why Not

    • Featured in film: The Lizzie McGuire Movie
    "Why Not?" is a song by American recording artist Hilary Duff from the soundtrack of The Lizzie McGuire Movie (2003). Disney International released the single internationally on June 23, 2003 (see 2003 in music). The CD single release included a remix of "Why Not?", a remix of "I Can't Wait" and the music video. Later in 2003, a different version of "Why Not?" was released on Duff's first album, Metamorphosis. According to Duff, the song is also included as a single for the album, Metamorphosis. "Why Not?" has three versions. The main version is the one originally recorded for the soundtrack of The Lizzie McGuire Movie. The second version has slightly different lyrics in the first verse and was released as a second single on her album, Metamorphosis. The third version is a remixed version of the second version, with a rock arrangement, and released on Most Wanted. The re-recorded is included in the collection of Duff greatest hits album, Best of Hilary Duff. Singer Michelle Branch said, in a 2003 interview with Rolling Stone Magazine, that she felt it was, at the time, the worst song she had heard recently: "One lyric stuck in my head: 'You always dress in yellow when you wanna
    7.50
    2 votes
    144

    Footloose

    • Featured in film: Footloose
    "Footloose" is a song co-written and recorded by American singer-songwriter Kenny Loggins. It was released in January 1984 as the first of two singles by Loggins from the 1984 film of the same name. The song spent three weeks at number one, March 31—April 14, 1984 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100, and was the first of two number-one hits from the motion picture, Footloose. The song was very well received, and is one of the most recognizable songs recorded by Loggins. When the American Film Institute released its AFI's 100 Years…100 Songs, "Footloose" reached the 96th position. The song was covered by country music artist Blake Shelton for the 2011 remake of the 1984 film. The lyrics describe a young man who can't stop dancing and he encourages others to do the same: 'Cut Footloose' as the chorus suggests. The music video was directed by Brian Grant. It features several scenes from the film, in particular the warehouse where Kevin Bacon's character performs an unorchestrated dance routine (which was actually performed to a different song in the film itself). Blake Shelton covered the song for the 2011 version of the film. Shelton's version also appears on the film's soundtrack. It
    5.50
    4 votes
    145

    You Are So Beautiful

    • Featured in film: Carlito's Way
    • Performed by: Joe Cocker
    "You Are So Beautiful" is a song written by Billy Preston and Dennis Wilson of The Beach Boys. It was first recorded by Preston and made popular in a version by Joe Cocker. Preston's original version first appeared on his 1974 album, The Kids & Me. Cocker's producer, Jim Price created a slowed-down arrangement for Cocker's version, which first appeared on the album, I Can Stand a Little Rain (released later in 1974). Released as a single, the Joe Cocker version reached number five on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart in 1975 and helped the album become a hit. According to Beach Boys member Dennis Wilson's biographer, Jon Stebbins, Wilson claimed that he and Preston spontaneously collaborated on the words to the song at a party. Wilson sang the song as an encore at Beach Boys shows intermittently between 1975 and 1983. As with many other popular songs, You are has been briefly featured in several movies and TV programs:
    5.50
    4 votes
    146

    Love Is a Crime

    • Featured in film: Chicago
    "Love Is a Crime" is a song recorded by R&B singer Anastacia for the soundtrack of the film Chicago, and released as the only single from it exclusively in America. The track also appeared on the collector's edition of Anastacia's album Freak of Nature. A music video was released for the song, but it was never released worldwide, due to the singer's battle with cancer at that time. The single managed to peak at number one on the U.S. Club Play Chart. The music video for "Love Is a Crime" was directed by Matthew Rolston and shot on January 17, 2003 in New York, USA. The video has two main sequences, the first of which features Anastacia singing in a prison cell. The second sequence features Anastacia and her dancers dressed as gangster like characters dancing in front of a large screen with guns. Due the fact it is the soundtrack for the film Chicago, scenes of the movie are also shown in the music video. There also exists an alternate version of the video. The video plot is basically the same, but there are new scenes, from the same videoshoot, of which some include Anastacia in a red outfit without her trademark glasses on. Also, the scenes where Anastacia and the dancers were
    6.33
    3 votes
    147

    Powerhouse

    • Featured in film: Baby Bottleneck
    Powerhouse (1937) is an instrumental musical composition by Raymond Scott, perhaps best known today as the iconic "assembly line" music in animated cartoons released by Warner Brothers. In scripted comments read on the First Anniversary Special of CBS Radio's Saturday Night Swing Club, on which the Raymond Scott Quintette performed, host Paul Douglas announced that Powerhouse had been premiered on that program in January or early February 1937. Scott's Quintette (actually a sextet) first recorded "Powerhouse" in New York on February 20, 1937, along with three other titles. This recording was first commercially issued on the Irving Mills-owned Master Records label as Master 111 (mx. M-120-1), coupled with another Scott composition, The Toy Trumpet. After the demise of the Master label late in 1937, "Powerhouse" was reissued on Brunswick 7993, and subsequently on Columbia 36311 (after the CBS purchase of ARC, which included the Brunswick catalog). The same take was issued on all releases. (An unreleased 1939 recording by the original Scott Quintette was issued in 2002 on the 2-CD Scott compilation Microphone Music.) Both "Powerhouse" and "The Toy Trumpet" remained in Scott's
    6.33
    3 votes
    148
    Precious Jewel

    Precious Jewel

    • Featured in film: Conceived In Prison
    • Performed by: Clint Crisher
    Precious Jewel is on the album Terrific Distraction and is also included on the soundtrack for Conceived in Prison in production now by Crisher Entertainment. This true life story and song lyrics show a very tough life. A great story line but kind of sad set of circumstances. Sad as it is, and the feelings are very strange for the mother. CONCEIVED IN PRISON "the movie" Delivered to strangers, a child discovers an identity inherited by circumstance. Through self-preservation and perseverance, a man is formed by intuitive reason and self-expression; learning that being alive is a cage living is an accomplishment. Precious Jewel is from the album Terrific Distraction and is a true story about a mother stripping to make a living in the 70's with a toddler in a trailer. Precious Jewel was her stage name on the Las Vegas strip. Clint Crisher was the toddler who was CONCEIVED IN PRISON.
    6.33
    3 votes
    149
    Who's That Girl

    Who's That Girl

    • Featured in film: Who's That Girl?
    • Performed by: Madonna
    "Who's That Girl" is a song by American singer-songwriter Madonna from the soundtrack album Who's That Girl of the motion picture of same name. It was released on June 30, 1987, by Sire Records as the first single from the album. It later appeared on the 1991 UK compilation EP The Holiday Collection, which was released to accompany the 1990 compilation album The Immaculate Collection, and has since been included on the two-disc edition of her 2009 greatest hits album Celebration. While shooting for the film, then called Slammer, Madonna had requested Patrick Leonard to develop an uptempo song that captured the nature of her film persona. She later added the lyrics and vocals to the demo tape developed by Leonard, and decided to call both the song and the movie "Who's That Girl". Featuring instrumentation from drums, bass, and stringed instruments, "Who's That Girl" continued Madonna's fascination with Hispanic culture by incorporating Spanish lyrics and using the effect of double vocals. Although it received mixed reactions from reviewers, the song became Madonna's sixth single to top the Billboard Hot 100, while peaking atop the charts in countries like the United Kingdom, Canada,
    6.33
    3 votes
    150

    Believe

    • Featured in film: The Polar Express
    • Performed by: Josh Groban
    "Believe" is a 2004 song from the Christmas-themed performance capture film The Polar Express. The words and music were written by Glen Ballard and Alan Silvestri, and the song was performed by Josh Groban. The song is included on the film soundtrack. The song is included on the 2011 album Heavenly Christmas performed by Jackie Evancho. The songwriters received a Grammy Award in the category Best Song Written for a Motion Picture, Television or Other Visual Media at the ceremony held in February 2006. "Believe" was also nominated for Best Original Song at the 77th Academy Awards in February 2005, with Groban and Beyoncé Knowles performing the song during the awards broadcast. The Oscar nod followed a Golden Globe nomination in the same category at the 62nd Golden Globe Awards. The song "bubbled under" the Billboard Hot 100 chart in late 2004 and early 2005, reaching a peak position of #112. However, on the Billboard Hot Adult Contemporary Tracks chart, the song spent five weeks at the summit. This was Groban's fourth song to top the AC chart, following "To Where You Are" and "O Holy Night" in 2002 and "You Raise Me Up" earlier the same year.
    8.00
    1 votes
    151

    I'm Not a Girl, Not Yet a Woman

    • Featured in film: Crossroads
    "I'm Not a Girl, Not Yet a Woman" is a song by American recording artist Britney Spears. The song was written by Dido, with additional writing and song production by Max Martin and Rami Yacoub for Spears' third studio album, Britney (2001). It was released on February 5, 2002 by Jive Records, as the second single from the album in the United States and Canada and the third worldwide. The soft rock song, speaks about the angst and heartache of puberty, and was considered by Spears as inspirational and one of her favorites that she has ever sang. "I'm Not a Girl, Not Yet a Woman" received positive reviews from music critics. The song was considered to be Spears' standout statement on Britney, while comparing the song to the powerful ballads written by Dianne Warren. However, it won the Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Original Song. While the song did not perform well on the Billboard charts in the United States, "I'm Not a Girl, Not Yet a Woman" reached the top ten in Austria, Australia, Germany, Ireland, Netherlands, Sweden and United Kingdom. The song would later be certified Gold in Australia by the Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA), for selling over 35,000
    8.00
    1 votes
    152

    The Way He Makes Me Feel

    • Featured in film: Yentl
    "The Way He Makes Me Feel" is the title of a popular song from 1983 performed by Barbra Streisand. The song is featured in the film adaptation of the play Yentl, in which Streisand starred and sang most of the music. The lyrics were written by Alan and Marilyn Bergman, with music by Michel Legrand. Along with another song from Yentl ("Papa, Can You Hear Me?"), "The Way He Makes Me Feel" was nominated for an Academy Award in the category Best Original Song. Both tunes lost the Oscar to "Flashdance...What a Feeling". "The Way He Makes Me Feel" was released as a single in a slightly different and more contemporary version than the one on the soundtrack to the film. It reached number 40 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart and spent two weeks at number one on the adult contemporary chart. This was Streisand's eighth (and, to date, final) number-one song on the Billboard adult contemporary chart.
    8.00
    1 votes
    153

    When Doves Cry

    • Featured in film: Purple Rain
    "When Doves Cry" is a song by the American musician Prince, and the lead single from his 1984 album Purple Rain. It was an unprecedented worldwide hit, and his first American number one single, topping the charts for five weeks. According to Billboard magazine, it was the top-selling single of the year. It was certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America, shipping two-million units in the United States. It was the last single released by a solo artist to receive such certification before the certification requirements were lowered in 1989. According to the Purple Rain DVD, Prince was asked by the director to write a song to match the theme of a particular segment of the film – one which involved intermingled parental difficulties and a love affair. The next morning, Prince had reportedly composed two songs, one of which was "When Doves Cry". According to Per Nilsen, Prince's biographer, the song was inspired by his relationship with Vanity 6 member, Susan Moonsie. The song was #1 in the U.S. for five weeks, from July 7, 1984 to August 4, 1984, keeping Bruce Springsteen's "Dancing in the Dark", from reaching the top spot. "When Doves Cry" was voted as the best
    8.00
    1 votes
    154

    A Love That Will Never Grow Old

    • Featured in film: Brokeback Mountain
    • Performed by: Emmylou Harris
    "A Love That Will Never Grow Old" is a song from the film Brokeback Mountain. Its music was composed by Argentine composer Gustavo Santaolalla, with lyrics by Bernie Taupin, and performed by singer Emmylou Harris. It won the 2005 Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song, the Satellite Award and the Internet Movie Award for Best Original Song. The song was nominated at the World Soundtrack Awards for Best Original Song Written Directly for a Film. It is available on the film soundtrack. Thom Jurek from Allmusic described the song as "simple, spare, and poignant", and marked it as a highlight from the film soundtrack.
    7.00
    2 votes
    155

    Christmas Dream

    • Featured in film: The Odessa File
    Christmas Dream is a song written by Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice with German lyrics by Andre Heller for the 1974 Columbia film The Odessa File. It is sung by Perry Como and The London Boy Singers and is included on the album "A Perry Como Christmas".
    7.00
    2 votes
    156

    Dreams to Dream

    • Featured in film: An American Tail: Fievel Goes West
    Dreams to Dream is a song by James Horner and Will Jennings, based on a short instrumental piece from An American Tail (which can be heard in the Orphan Alley scene), appearing in the 1991 animated film An American Tail: Fievel Goes West. There are two versions of that song, one with Cathy Cavadini performing Tanya's version and the other being Linda Ronstadt performing the finale version, both for that film. Released as a single on MCA in late 1991, the song climbed to #13 on Billboard's Adult Contemporary chart but did not cross over to the Hot 100. The composition was nominated in 1992 for a Golden Globe award for Best Original Song in a Motion Picture.
    7.00
    2 votes
    157

    Gonna Fly Now

    • Featured in film: James Balboa: A Wii Sports Tale
    "Gonna Fly Now", also known as "Theme from Rocky", is the theme song from the movie Rocky, composed by Bill Conti with lyrics by Carol Connors and Ayn Robbins, and performed by DeEtta Little (the sister of actor Cleavon Little) and Nelson Pigford. Released in February 1977 with the movie Rocky, the song became part of American popular culture after main character Rocky Balboa completed his daily training regimen while the song played. The song finishes as Rocky completes his famous run up the "Rocky Steps" of the Philadelphia Museum of Art and raises his arms in a victory pose. The song is also often played at sporting events, especially at sporting events in the city of Philadelphia or featuring sports teams from there. The song (whose lyrics have a total count of 30 words) was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Song in the 49th Academy Awards. The version of the song from the movie, performed by Conti with an orchestra, hit number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in 1977, while a version by jazz trumpeter Maynard Ferguson hit the top 30. Disco versions by Rhythm Heritage and Current were on the chart at the same time (Conti's own version reveals some early disco
    7.00
    2 votes
    158

    Maniac

    • Featured in film: Flashdance
    "Maniac" is a synthpop song performed by Michael Sembello. The song was used in the 1983 film Flashdance and was inspired by the 1980 horror film Maniac. The film Maniac was about a serial killer who stalks his victims in New York City. The song's performer and co-writer Michael Sembello recalls that an early version of the chorus was: At the suggestion of the record's producer Phil Ramone, the lyrics were rewritten to describe a girl with a passion for dancing. The lyrics became: "Maniac" appears during an early scene in Flashdance and is used as the backing track of a montage sequence showing Alex (Jennifer Beals) training strenuously in her converted warehouse. The song was included in Flashdance after Sembello's wife sent a tape to executives at Paramount Pictures who were looking for music to use in the film. "Maniac" reached number one in the Billboard Hot 100 for two weeks beginning on September 10, 1983 and is one of the highest-grossing songs ever written for a film. In addition to producing "Maniac", Phil Ramone produced the song that would dethrone it from the top spot, Billy Joel's "Tell Her About It". The Original Soundtrack of Flashdance won the 1984 Grammy Award for
    7.00
    2 votes
    159

    Only the Young

    • Featured in film: Vision Quest
    "Only the Young" is a song recorded by the American rock band Journey in 1983. Previously intended for the Frontiers album, it was pulled from the album within days of recording in favor of songs "Back Talk" and "Troubled Child". The song was eventually released as a single (which reached No. 9 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in March 1985) and appeared on the soundtracks to the 1985 film Vision Quest. The song's lyrical theme focuses on young people and the hope and future they all have in front of them. The song was featured later as a bonus track on the 2006 CD reissue of Frontiers. The song's first live performance was for a young boy named Kenny Sykaluk who was diagnosed with Cystic Fibrosis. His mother wrote a letter to the band telling them about her son's terminal condition, and how big a fan he was of Journey. The band flew to his hospital bedside at the request of the Make a Wish Foundation. Along with a Walkman containing the new track, the band also brought Kenny a football helmet signed by the San Francisco 49ers and an autographed Journey platinum record award. The experience of playing the song for Kenny left Steve Perry and Jonathan Cain deeply affected. Perry said
    7.00
    2 votes
    160

    Pennies from Heaven

    • Featured in film: The Artist
    • Performed by: Rose Murphy
    "Pennies from Heaven" is a 1936 American popular song with music by Arthur Johnston and words by Johnny Burke. It was introduced by Bing Crosby in the 1936 film of the same name. It was recorded in the same year by Billie Holiday and afterwards performed by Louis Armstrong, Tony Bennett, Dinah Washington, Clark Terry, Frances Langford, Arthur Tracy, Big Joe Turner, Frank Sinatra, Stan Getz, Dean Martin, Gene Ammons, The Skyliners (a major hit in 1960), Louis Prima, Legion of Mary, Guy Mitchell, Rose Murphy and many other jazz and popular singers.
    7.00
    2 votes
    161

    Save Me

    • Featured in film: Magnolia
    • Performed by: Aimee Mann
    Save Me is a song written and performed by Aimee Mann for use in the film Magnolia. It appears on the Magnolia soundtrack, which was released on December 7, 1999. The song also appears on the European edition of the album Bachelor No. 2 or, the Last Remains of the Dodo (2000), as well as the 2007 compilation album Acoustic 07. In 1999 "Save Me" was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Song, which it lost to "You'll Be in My Heart" from the Disney movie Tarzan. By way of introduction to a live performance, Mann has referred to "Save Me" as "the song that lost an Oscar to Phil Collins and his cartoon monkey love song." Furthermore, Mann has occasionally dedicated her song to Collins in several different venues, albeit in jest. It is Mann's most well-known song, as evidenced by its Grammy nomination in 2001 for Best Pop Female Vocal (she lost to Macy Gray's "I Try"). The music video, shot during the filming of Magnolia, was directed by the film's director, Paul Thomas Anderson, and uses many of the film's actors, including Julianne Moore, Philip Seymour Hoffman, and Tom Cruise. The video inserts Mann into various scenes from the film as she performs the song. Unlike many such music
    7.00
    2 votes
    162

    The Power of Love

    • Featured in film: Back to the Future
    "The Power of Love" is a 1985 single by Huey Lewis and the News written for and featured in the 1985 blockbuster film Back to the Future. It gave the band their first number-one hit on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100, their second number-one hit on the U.S. Top Rock Tracks chart, and was a top ten hit on the UK Singles Chart, where it appeared on UK editions of the band's fourth studio album, Fore!. The song was nominated for an Academy Award at the 58th Academy Awards. The song appears early in Back to the Future as Marty McFly (Michael J. Fox) skateboards to school. Later in the film, the song appears when McFly and his band play it for a Battle of the Bands auditions (at which a character played by Lewis himself is judging, and tells Marty's group that they are "just too darn loud"), and later when Marty returns to his neighborhood. In the sequel, Back to the Future Part II, the 2015 version of Marty attempts to play the song on his guitar just after being fired, but ends up playing it very poorly due to his damaged hand from his 1985 accident with a Rolls-Royce. Finally, it can be briefly heard playing in the car where Needles and his buddies are driving when Needles challenges
    7.00
    2 votes
    163

    A Song for Mama

    • Featured in film: Soul Food
    • Performed by: Boyz II Men
    "A Song for Mama" is the title of a number-one R&B single by the American R&B group Boyz II Men. The tune, which was written and produced by Babyface, served as the theme song to the 1997 motion picture Soul Food, and spent two weeks at number one on the US R&B chart. To date, it is their last top 10 pop hit, peaking at number 7 on the Billboard Hot 100. The song also appears on the groups album Evolution. US Single US Live Version Single Europe Promo CD Europe Single Europe Maxi-CD Europe Maxi-CD 2 |}
    6.00
    3 votes
    164

    How Deep Is Your Love

    • Featured in film: Saturday Night Fever
    "How Deep Is Your Love" is a pop song written and recorded by the Bee Gees in 1977 and released as a single in September. Originally intended for Yvonne Elliman, it was ultimately used as part of the soundtrack to the film Saturday Night Fever. It was a number three hit in the United Kingdom and Australia. In the United States, it topped the Billboard Hot 100 on 24 December 1977 (becoming the first of six consecutive US number-one hits) and stayed in the Top 10 for a then-record 17 weeks. The single spent six weeks atop the US adult contemporary chart. It is listed at # 20 on Billboard's All Time Top 100. Alongside "Stayin' Alive", it is one of the group's two tracks on the list. The song was covered by Take That for their 1996 Greatest Hits album, reaching number-one on the UK Singles Chart for three weeks. The song was ranked #366 on Rolling Stone's list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. In a British TV special shown in December 2011, it was voted "The Nation's Favourite Bee Gees Song" by ITV viewers. Following mixing for Here at Last... Bee Gees... Live, they began recording songs for what was to be the follow-up studio album to 1976's Children Of The World. Then the call
    6.00
    3 votes
    165
    Puttin' on the Ritz

    Puttin' on the Ritz

    • Featured in film: Puttin' on the Ritz
    • Performed by: Harry Richman
    "Puttin' on the Ritz" is a popular song written and published in 1929 by Irving Berlin and introduced by Harry Richman in the musical film Puttin' on the Ritz (1930). The title derives from the slang expression "putting on the Ritz," meaning to dress very fashionably. The expression was inspired by the swanky Ritz Hotel. The song is in AABA form, with a verse. According to John Mueller, the central device in the A section is the "use of delayed rhythmic resolution: a staggering, off-balance passage, emphasized by the unorthodox stresses in the lyric, suddenly resolves satisfyingly on a held note, followed by the forceful assertion of the title phrase." The marchlike B section, which is only barely syncopated, acts as a contrast to the previous rhythmic complexities. According to Alec Wilder, in his study of American popular song, the rhythmic pattern in "Puttin' on the Ritz" is "the most complex and provocative I have ever come upon." The original version of Berlin's song included references to the then-popular fad of flashily-dressed but poor black Harlemites parading up and down Lenox Avenue, "Spending ev'ry dime / For a wonderful time". The song was featured with the original
    6.00
    3 votes
    166

    So Close

    • Featured in film: Enchanted
    • Performed by: Jon McLaughlin
    "So Close" is a 2007 song written for the Disney film Enchanted, with music composed by Alan Menken and lyrics by Stephen Schwartz. Performed by Jon McLaughlin, the song was released on November 20, 2007 in the United States as part of the soundtrack for Enchanted. The song is a contemporary ballad that contrasts in style to songs featured in earlier parts of the film like "True Love's Kiss", "Happy Working Song" and "That's How You Know", which are sung by characters in the film. Unlike these songs, which were written in part as a parody of classic Disney films, the song is "totally genuine" in tone as it is used to express the emotional journey that the main character Giselle undergoes. The song was a nominee at the 80th Academy Awards in the Best Original Song category, in which "Happy Working Song" and "That's How You Know" were also nominated. In the film, singer Jon McLaughlin performs the song as a band vocalist in the ballroom sequence where Giselle (Amy Adams) and Robert (Patrick Dempsey) dance the King's and Queen's waltz. The song itself is in 12/8 time, in the key of E major. The song reflects both Robert's and Giselle's feelings as they dance and realize they are
    6.00
    3 votes
    167

    You're the One That I Want

    • Featured in film: Grease
    • Performed by: Olivia Newton-John
    "You're the One That I Want" is a song written by John Farrar for the 1978 film version of the musical Grease. It was performed by John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John. The single was a huge international hit, reaching no.1 in several countries. It was the only single from the Grease soundtrack to top both the US and UK pop charts. It reached #1 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 for one week in June 1978, where it was certified Platinum for shipments exceeding 2 million copies. It also topped the UK Singles Chart for nine weeks in the summer of 1978 and, as of June 2012, is still the sixth best-selling single ever in the U.K. where it has sold nearly 2 million copies. A re-released version of the single reached #4 in the UK in 1998, the twentieth anniversary of the film's debut. It is one of the best-selling singles of all time, having sold over 6 million copies in the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany and France alone. In 1993, Epic Records released a soundtrack album in the UK, Grease - Original London Cast Recording, and "You're the One That I Want" was recorded as a duet by Craig McLachlan and Deborah Gibson (Epic UK 659 522, released July 1993). In part due to a routine
    6.00
    3 votes
    168
    Raindrops Keep Fallin' on My Head

    Raindrops Keep Fallin' on My Head

    • Featured in film: Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid
    • Performed by: B. J. Thomas
    "Raindrops Keep Fallin' on My Head" is B. J. Thomas's #1 song, written by Hal David and Burt Bacharach for the 1969 film Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. It won an Academy Award for Best Original Song. David and Bacharach also won Best Original Score. It was recorded in seven takes, after Bacharach expressed dissatisfaction with the first six. In the film version of the song, B. J. Thomas had been recovering from laryngitis, which made his voice sound hoarser than in the 7" release. The film version featured a separate instrumental break when Paul Newman undertook stunts on a bicycle. Ray Stevens was first offered the opportunity to record it for the film, but turned it down. He chose instead to record the song "Sunday Morning Coming Down", written by Kris Kristofferson. Bob Dylan is supposed to have been approached for the song, but he too reportedly declined. The single by B. J. Thomas reached #1 on charts in the United States, Canada, and Norway. It topped the Billboard Hot 100 for four weeks in January 1970 and was also the first American number-one hit of the 1970s. The song also spent seven weeks atop the Billboard adult contemporary chart. In 2008, Thomas's version was
    5.00
    4 votes
    169
    Jingle Bells

    Jingle Bells

    • Featured in film: Christmas Cracker
    "Jingle Bells" is one of the best-known and commonly sung winter songs in the world. It was written by James Lord Pierpont (1822–1893) and published under the title "One Horse Open Sleigh" in the autumn of 1857. Even though it is commonly thought of as a Christmas song, it was actually written and sung for Thanksgiving. James Lord Pierpont originally composed his song in 1850. A plaque commemorating the "birthplace" of "Jingle Bells" adorns the side of a building in Medford, Massachusetts. Pierpont wrote the song there, at the former Simpson Tavern, now 19 High Street in the center of Medford Square. According to the Medford Historical Society, the song was inspired by the town's popular sleigh races during the 1800s. "Jingle Bells" was originally copyrighted with the name "One Horse Open Sleigh" on September 16, 1857. It was reprinted in 1859 with the revised title of "Jingle Bells, or the One Horse Open Sleigh". The song has since passed into public domain. Music historian James Fuld notes that "the word jingle in the title and opening phrase is apparently an imperative verb." In the winter in New England in pre-automobile days, it was common to adorn horses' harnesses with
    5.67
    3 votes
    170

    The James Bond Theme

    • Featured in film: Dr. No
    The "James Bond Theme" is the main signature theme of the James Bond films and has featured in every Eon Productions Bond film since Dr. No. The piece has been used as an accompanying fanfare to the gun barrel sequence in almost every James Bond film. The "James Bond Theme" has accompanied the opening titles twice, as part of the medley that opens Dr. No and then again in the opening credits of From Russia with Love. It has been used as music over the end credits for Dr. No, Thunderball, On Her Majesty's Secret Service, The World Is Not Enough, Casino Royale, and Quantum of Solace. The tune uses a surf rock style guitar riff. At the time of the first film's release, surf rock was a recent craze. Monty Norman has been credited with writing the "James Bond Theme", and has received royalties since 1962. For Dr. No, the tune was arranged by John Barry who would later go on to compose the soundtracks for eleven James Bond films. Courts have ruled twice that the theme was written by Monty Norman despite claims and testimony by Barry that he had actually written the theme. Norman has consequently won two libel actions against publishers for claiming that Barry wrote the theme, most
    5.67
    3 votes
    171

    Can I Get A...

    • Featured in film: Rush Hour
    • Performed by: Jay-Z
    "Can I Get A..." is a 1998 single by rapper Jay-Z that features Amil and Ja Rule. It was released on Def Jam's Rush Hour Soundtrack in promotion of the film Rush Hour, but also appears on Jay-Z's third album Vol. 2... Hard Knock Life. The song is produced by Irv Gotti and Lil' Rob. The song is notable for popularizing a young Amil and Ja Rule, as well as becoming one of Jay-Z's most commercially successful singles at the time, peaking at #19 on the Billboard Hot 100. The chorus of the original song starts with "Can I get a 'fuck you'", but it was censored to "Can I get a 'what what'" and ".. whoop whoop" for radio airplay. The vinyl "Can I Get A..." single was released in 1998 with two tracks that do not feature Jay-Z: Ja Rule's "Bitch Betta Have My Money" and Wu-Tang Clan's "And You Don't Stop." The CD single was released in 1999 with two different tracks that do not feature Jay-Z: Case and Joe's "Faded Pictures" as well as Dru Hill and Redman's "How Deep Is Your Love." All songs were included in the "Rush Hour" soundtrack. Janet Jackson's 2004 song "Strawberry Bounce", from her Damita Jo album, samples "Can I Get A...". VH1 ranked "Can I Get A..." at No. 57 in the network's 100
    6.50
    2 votes
    172

    Down To Earth

    • Featured in film: WALL-E
    • Performed by: Peter Gabriel
    Down To Earth is a song written by Peter Gabriel for the movie Wall-E,
    6.50
    2 votes
    173

    Everybody's Talkin'

    • Featured in film: Midnight Cowboy
    • Performed by: Nilsson
    "Everybody's Talkin'" is a folk rock song originally written and released by Fred Neil in 1966. A version of the song performed by Harry Nilsson became a global success in 1969, reaching #2 and #6 on the Billboard Adult Contemporary chart and Pop Singles chart respectively, and winning a Grammy after it was featured on the soundtrack of the film Midnight Cowboy. The song, which describes the singer's desire to retreat from other people to the ocean, is among the most famous works of both artists, and has been covered by many other notable performers. The song later appeared in the 1994 film Forrest Gump and is also on the film's soundtrack album. It also appeared in the comedy film Borat. The song was first released on Neil's second album, 1966's self-titled Fred Neil. It was composed towards the end of the session, after Neil had become anxious to wrap the album so he could return to his home in Miami, Florida. Manager Herb Cohen promised that if Neil wrote and recorded a final track, he could go. "Everybody's Talkin'", recorded in one take, was the result. Toby Creswell of 1001 Songs noted that the song had parallels to Neil's later life—like the hero of the Midnight Cowboy, he
    6.50
    2 votes
    174

    Moonraker

    • Featured in film: Moonraker
    • Performed by: Shirley Bassey
    Theme song from the movie Moonraker.
    6.50
    2 votes
    175

    Streets of Philadelphia

    • Featured in film: Philadelphia
    "Streets of Philadelphia" is an Academy Award-winning song, written and performed by American rock musician Bruce Springsteen for the film Philadelphia (1993), the first mainstream film dealing with HIV/AIDS. Released in 1994, the song was a hit in many countries, particularly Canada, France, Germany, Ireland and Norway, where it topped the singles charts. The song was a critical success and went on to win the Academy Award for Best Original Song and four Grammy Awards, including Song of the Year, Best Rock Song, Best Rock Vocal Performance, Solo, and Best Song Written Specifically for a Motion Picture or Television. In early 1993, Philadelphia director Jonathan Demme asked Springsteen to write a song for the in-progress film, and in June, after the conclusion of the "Other Band" Tour, Springsteen did so. It was recorded with Springsteen supplying almost all of the instrumentation, with bass and background vocals from "Other Band" member Tommy Sims. Additional saxophone and vocal parts by Ornette Coleman and "Little" Jimmy Scott, respectively, were recorded but never used—although those elements are used in a brief scene in the film when Tom Hanks exits Denzel Washington's office.
    6.50
    2 votes
    176

    To Sir, with Love

    • Featured in film: To Sir, with Love
    • Performed by: Lulu
    "To Sir, with Love" is the theme from the 1967 film To Sir, with Love. The song was written by Don Black and Mark London, husband of Lulu's longtime manager Marion Massey. "To Sir, with Love" was initially recorded by Lulu (with The Mindbenders, who also acted in the film). Her single was released in 1967 and reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100, remaining in the top position for five weeks and earning the number one position for the entire year. The song makes notable use of melisma. In Lulu's native UK, the song was never released in its own right, instead appearing as the B-side to the 1967 No. 11 hit "Let's Pretend." Australian singer Tina Arena released her version of the song as the first single from her 2007 album Songs of Love & Loss.
    6.50
    2 votes
    177

    Two Hearts

    • Featured in film: Buster
    "Two Hearts" is a song by Phil Collins. It was composed by Lamont Dozier (of Motown's Holland-Dozier-Holland), and lyrics by Collins, both of whom also produced this song for the 1988 crime comedy film Buster. It won the Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song alongside the Carly Simon song "Let the River Run" from Working Girl (with the latter having beaten the former for the Academy Award for Best Original Song). Two music videos were made, both directed by Jim Yukich: one featuring Phil as all four members in a band, and the other featuring him in a wrestling match against the Ultimate Warrior which was featured on the Jim Yukich-directed Seriously.. Phil Collins CBS TV special (aired September 8, 1990). The song topped the US Hot 100 for two weeks, the US adult contemporary chart for five weeks, and also reached #6 on the UK Singles Chart. It opened the radio station BBC Hereford and Worcester, appropriate in that the station was based in two different places. The B-side features Anne Dudley and the London Film Orchestra performing "The Robbery", also on the Buster soundtrack.
    6.50
    2 votes
    178

    Uninvited

    • Featured in film: City of Angels
    • Performed by: Alanis Morissette
    "Uninvited" is a song written and recorded by Alanis Morissette, and co-produced by Morissette and Rob Cavallo for the soundtrack of the 1998 film City of Angels (see City of Angels: Music from the Motion Picture). Morissette's first new recording since her international debut album Jagged Little Pill (1995), it was released as a single from the album in March 1998 (see 1998 in music). The song is driven by four piano notes and builds to an instrumental climax. Although never officially released as a single to retail outlets, it became a hit for Morissette. "Uninvited" was Morissette's fourth number-one single on the U.S. Billboard Top 40 Mainstream chart and it reached the top five on the Adult Top 40 and the top 40 on the Modern Rock Tracks chart. Its success was largely because of fans who anxiously anticipated Morissette's new album, which was finally released in November 1998. "Uninvited" was not included on that album, Supposed Former Infatuation Junkie, but a demo version was included on the Australian release and the UK CD single for "Thank U". Morissette's compilation album Alanis Morissette: The Collection (2005) was her first album to include the song in its original
    6.50
    2 votes
    179

    Car Wash

    • Featured in film: Car Wash
    "Car Wash" is a 1976 soul music single by Rose Royce for MCA Records, the group's debut single and one of the most notable successes of the disco era. Written and produced by the band's main producer Norman Whitfield, "Car Wash", the theme of the 1976 film Car Wash, was Rose Royce's most successful hit single and the lead single from their first album, the Car Wash soundtrack. Reaching number one in the United States on the Billboard pop and R&B charts, "Car Wash" also peaked at number three on the disco charts. The song was later covered in 2004 by Christina Aguilera and Missy Elliott, who released their version as the single for the Shark Tale soundtrack. Norman Whitfield, a former producer for Motown Records, had been commissioned to record the soundtrack album for Car Wash by director Michael Schultz. Although Whitfield did not want to assume the project, he decided to do so, both for financial incentives as well as the chance to give Rose Royce, a disco/funk backing band that Whitfield signed to his own label in 1975, the exposure they needed to become mainstream. Unable to develop a theme song for the film, inspiration finally struck Whitfield while playing a game of
    7.00
    1 votes
    180

    Despedida

    • Featured in film: Love in the Time of Cholera
    • Performed by: Shakira
    "Despedida" (English: Farewell) is a song written and performed by Colombian singer-songwriter Shakira. It was written alongside Brazilian composer Antonio Pinto for the soundtrack of the film adaptation of Gabriel García Márquez' Love in the Time of Cholera. "Despedida" is one of the two songs Shakira wrote specifically for the film. On his own initiative, García Márquez persuaded Shakira to provide two new songs for the film. The songs were written with Brazilian composer Antonio Pinto. The full score was composed by Pinto, who also scored City of God and Lord of War. "Despedida" is written in a folkloric style evoking the mournful sound of Andean music, with native instruments such as the bombo, a drum, and the charango, a small guitar. Shakira calls it "the song of her dreams", because she had always wanted to write something that evoked "the lament of the Andes". Shakira told the Los Angeles Times that she finds it curious "that this is a song of farewell, of death, of loss, but at the same time, it was a pleasure to do". She also commented that entering "this new world of folklore was definitely one of the greatest challenges" for her. Shakira has performed the song twice
    7.00
    1 votes
    181

    Kokomo

    • Featured in film: Cocktail
    "Kokomo" is a song written by John Phillips, Scott McKenzie, Mike Love, and Terry Melcher and recorded by The Beach Boys in spring 1988. Its lyrics describe two lovers taking a trip to a relaxing Caribbean island called Kokomo, which is said to only be seen by those of pure heart. It was released as a single on July 18, 1988 by Elektra Records and became a No. 1 Hit in the United States, Japan, and Australia (where it topped for about two months). The single was released to coincide with the release of the Tom Cruise movie Cocktail, and its subsequent soundtrack. It was nominated in the Grammy Award category: Best Song written specifically for a Motion Picture or Television in 1988, but lost to Phil Collins's "Two Hearts" (from the film Buster). The place referred to as "Kokomo" in the song is fictional. Although Kokomo, Indiana, Kokomo, Arkansas, Kokomo, Hawaii, and several other Kokomos do exist, the song refers to a place "off the Florida Keys." The name was later used by resorts in Sandals Cay, Jamaica, and Grassy Key, Florida. The song also mentions many places in or near the Caribbean: in order of their appearance in the song, Aruba, Jamaica, Bermuda, Bahama(s), Key Largo,
    7.00
    1 votes
    182

    Peggy Sue Got Married

    • Featured in film: Peggy Sue Got Married
    "Peggy Sue Got Married" is a song written and sung by Buddy Holly. It was released in 1959 as a 45-rpm single with "Crying, Waiting, Hoping". It refers to his song hit "Peggy Sue". It was one of the first sequels of the rock era. Buddy Holly recorded the vocal, accompanying himself on guitar, on December 8, 1958 in apartment 4H of "The Brevoort", Fifth Avenue, Studio musicians recorded backup vocals and instrumentals on June 30, 1959 at Coral Records' Studio A in New York City. An alternate version of the song, with new instrumentals but without backup singers, was recorded in 1964. For details about the studio recording sessions and overdubs, see the Wikipedia entry for "Crying, Waiting, Hoping". The Crickets would record their own cover single after Buddy Holly's death in 1959. David Box a native of Lubbock, Texas and a near identical Buddy Holly soundalike would join the group as lead vocalist for this version of "Peggy Sue Got Married" (Side B) which was released in the United States as Coral 62238 in 1960. The Crickets had decided to use the original arrangements they had used for "Peggy Sue" with the only change being David Box on lead vocal. Buddy Holly's original, undubbed
    7.00
    1 votes
    183

    Reflection

    • Featured in film: Mulan
    • Performed by: Christina Aguilera
    "Reflection" is a song featured on the soundtrack of the 1998 animated film Mulan, and debut single by American recording artist Christina Aguilera. The song was performed within the movie's narrative by Lea Salonga as the singing voice of Fa Mulan. In the months before the recording of the track, Aguilera approached RCA, which gave her the chance to record the theme song to the film Mulan. Disney at this time was looking for a performer who could perform a musical note, generally difficult for most performers, required for the track. In response, Aguilera recorded herself performing the Whitney Houston track, "Run to You" which featured this note. After Disney representatives were impressed by her performance, they contacted Aguilera, who immediately agreed to fly to Los Angeles to spend a week recording the album. Critical response for "Reflection" was mixed, with reviewers considering it a nice song, however, entirely unmemorable. Aside from critical commentary, the song succeeded in funding her debut album from RCA, in addition to gaining her credibility amongst established writers and producers. The physical and radio releases of the single were limited, which resulted in the
    7.00
    1 votes
    184

    That's How You Know

    • Featured in film: Enchanted
    • Performed by: Amy Adams
    "That's How You Know" is a musical number from the 2007 Disney film Enchanted, with music composed by Alan Menken and lyrics by Stephen Schwartz. It is performed by the film's lead actress, Amy Adams, and features the vocals of Marlon Saunders and other singers in the background chorus. The song appears on the soundtrack of Enchanted, which was released on November 20, 2007 in the United States. Like the film, the song was written as an homage to and a self-parody of past Disney works, specifically such big production numbers as "Under the Sea" from The Little Mermaid and "Be Our Guest" from Beauty and the Beast, both of which, not so coincidentally, also had music by Alan Menken. The song was nominated for Best Song at the 13th Critics' Choice Awards, Best Original Song at the 65th Golden Globe Awards, and at the 80th Academy Awards in the Best Original Song category, in which two other songs from the film were also nominated. It was also nominated at the 51st Grammy Awards in the category of Best Song Written for Motion Picture, Television or Other Visual Media. In the film, the song is performed by Giselle. During their walk through Central Park, Giselle questions Robert's
    7.00
    1 votes
    185

    Grace is Gone

    • Featured in film: Grace Is Gone
    • Performed by: Jamie Cullum
    Grace is Gone is a song written by Clint Eastwood for the movie Grace Is Gone.
    5.33
    3 votes
    186
    Kiss The Girl

    Kiss The Girl

    • Featured in film: The Little Mermaid
    "Kiss the Girl" is a song by American actor Samuel E. Wright. It was written by composer Alan Menken and lyricist Howard Ashman for Walt Disney Pictures' 1989 animated feature film The Little Mermaid, and originally recorded by Wright in his film role as Sebastian. A calypso ballad, the song's lyrics encourage a young man to kiss his female love interest before it's too late. "Kiss the girl" has received mostly positive reception. The song was nominated for both an Academy and Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song, but lost both to "Under the Sea," another song from The Little Mermaid soundtrack. In 1991, Soul II Soul released a version for the compilation Simply Mad About the Mouse: A Musical Celebration of Imagination. In 1995, Alvin and the Chipmunks recorded a version with The Chipettes providing background vocals for their Disney-themed album When You Wish Upon a Chipmunk. Simon sings this song to convince a disgusted Alvin to kiss a girl named Vanessa. Country music band Little Texas recorded a version on the 1996 album The Best of Country Sing the Best of Disney. This rendition peaked at number 52 on the Hot Country Songs charts. When The Little Mermaid was re-released
    5.33
    3 votes
    187

    Tiptoe Through the Tulips

    • Featured in film: Gold Diggers of Broadway
    • Performed by: Nick Lucas
    "Tiptoe Through the Tulips" is a popular song originally published in 1929. The song was written by Al Dubin (lyrics) and Joe Burke (music). ‘Crooning Troubadour’ Nick Lucas’ recording of "Tip-Toe Through The Tulips" hit the top of the charts in May 1929. The song he introduced in the 1929 musical talkie Gold Diggers of Broadway held the #1 position for 10 weeks. Other artists charted the song in 1929, including Jean Goldkette (#5), Johnny Marvin (#11), and Roy Fox (#18). The song was used in "Sinkin' in the Bathtub", the first Looney Tunes cartoon ever, in 1930. It is heard in the opening scene of the 1945 movie "The Confidential Agent." The song was revived in 1967 by the California rock group The Humane Society and in 1968 by Tiny Tim, whose version charted at #17 that year. It was also covered by Uke til U Puke and The Bonzo Dog Doo-Dah Band. The song was also featured in the 2011 horror film Insidious a number of times throughout, and in the thriller film Wrecked as a radiotune. The song was also mentioned in Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone on page 34. Vernon Dursley was humming the song while he boarded up small cracks around the front and back doors. The song is
    5.33
    3 votes
    188

    Holiday Road

    • Featured in film: Hawaiian Vacation
    "Holiday Road" is a 1983 single written and recorded by Fleetwood Mac guitarist Lindsey Buckingham. The song was featured in the 1983 film National Lampoon's Vacation and was played during the opening titles. The song was also used in the sequels National Lampoon's European Vacation and Vegas Vacation. The song peaked at #82 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in 1983. Lindsey Buckingham has released a live version of the song on his 2008 album Live at the Bass Performance Hall. Indie band Matt Pond PA covered the song on their 2005 EP Winter Songs. The song has also been covered by pop punk bands Limp, Whippersnapper, Die Coverlire, and Dirt Bike Annie. Jimmy Fallon, guest Rashida Jones, and The Roots performed the song live on the November 26, 2009 episode of Late Night with Jimmy Fallon. At The Aquabats' holiday shows in 2009, the band distributed a free CD single of a cover of the song to all attendees. In 2011, the song was used as the music on television advertising for Teletext Holidays in the United Kingdom and subsequently made UK #168 from the live download of the song; it became Buckingham's first UK "hit" of sorts in nearly 30 years
    6.00
    2 votes
    189

    Talk to the Animals

    • Featured in film: Doctor Dolittle
    "Talk to the Animals" is a song written by British composer Leslie Bricusse. Written for the film Doctor Dolittle, it won the Academy Award for Best Original Song at the 40th Academy Awards. It was performed in the film by Rex Harrison. The song was not generally well appreciated, and in some cases was disliked, by those who were working on the film during the time of its production. However, it has since become the signature song of the character as evidenced by it being sung in the 1998 remake of the film starring Eddie Murphy. The song first appears in Dolittle's residence, when the Doctor fully realizes from his parrot, Polly, that intelligently communicating with animals is an acquirable skill. In reaction, Dolittle resolves to master it with as many species as possible and starts the song as he muses about the skill's possibilities. The song is reprised outdoors when the Doctor finds he has mastered the skill and joyfully celebrates, surrounded by animals. The song has also been performed by Bobby Darin, Sammy Davis, Jr., Alvin and the Chipmunks, Roger Moore and the Muppet animals on The Muppet Show, and Chief Wiggum of The Simpsons, in the episode "Homer's Barbershop
    6.00
    2 votes
    190
    The Wrestler

    The Wrestler

    • Featured in film: The Wrestler
    • Performed by: Bruce Springsteen
    "The Wrestler" is the title song from the 2008 film, The Wrestler. The track was written and performed by Bruce Springsteen. The origins of the song are based in a lost and resumed friendship between Springsteen and Wrestler lead actor Mickey Rourke; Rourke told Springsteen about his upcoming film and asked if Springsteen could write a song for it. Springsteen subsequently did, played it for Rourke and director Darren Aronofsky before a concert. When they liked it, Springsteen gave them the song for no fee. It first appeared in August 2008 at the 65th Venice International Film Festival debut of the film The Wrestler. In December 2008 it received a nomination for the Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song and won the award during the 66th Golden Globe Awards on January 11, 2009. It also won the 2008 Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Song and was nominated for, but did not win, the 2008 Satellite Award for Best Original Song. The song was widely expected to receive a nomination for the Academy Award for Best Original Song at the 81st Academy Awards, where Springsteen would perform it on the awards show, but in what Rolling Stone termed "shocking news", it was
    6.00
    2 votes
    191

    Tomorrow Never Dies

    • Featured in film: Tomorrow Never Dies
    • Performed by: Sheryl Crow
    "Tomorrow Never Dies" is a song by Sheryl Crow, which was the theme song to the 18th James Bond film of the same name. The song, co-written by Crow and Mitchell Froom, became her fifth UK Top 20 hit, peaking at No. 11 in 1997. Another song, "Tomorrow Never Dies", written by the movie's composer David Arnold and performed by k.d. lang, was originally produced as the official theme tune. When Crow's song became the official theme the k.d. lang song was relegated to the end credits, and renamed "Surrender". The melody of "Surrender" still remains in Arnold's score. Entertainment Weekly music critic Jim Farber negatively reviewed the song, explaining "While Crow's music has the right swank and swing, her brittle voice lacks the operatic quality of the best Bond girls and boys, like Shirley Bassey, Tom Jones, or even Melissa Manchester. Tomorrow Never Dies should be for her ears only." Farber called the choice of Crow "the worst hire since A-ha fronted one of these themes." Rolling Stone was also critical, and believed Lang's song to be superior. Writing for Filmtracks.com, Christian Clemmensen wished Lang's song had remained, and thought Crow's "beach-bum voice and lazy performance was
    6.00
    2 votes
    192

    Friend Like Me

    • Featured in film: Aladdin
    Friend Like Me is a 1992 Academy Award-nominated song from the 1992 film Aladdin. The song was written by Alan Menken and Howard Ashman and was sung by Robin Williams, who also did the voice as Genie in the film. Aladdin Finds a Lamp in Cave
    5.00
    3 votes
    193
    I've Seen It All

    I've Seen It All

    • Featured in film: Dancer in the Dark
    • Performed by: Björk
    "I've Seen It All" is a song by Icelandic singer Björk, with lyrics by Sjón and Lars von Trier. It was released as the first promotional single from the Dancer in the Dark soundtrack, Selmasongs. The song features vocals from Radiohead frontman Thom Yorke. It was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Song. Lyrically, it speaks of one coming to terms with the fact that they are going blind. There are several variations of this track: Additionally, when the song was performed on the 73rd Academy Awards presentation, it was heavily edited and ran just over three minutes. The song is covered by Bonnie 'Prince' Billy on Ask Forgiveness. There are three music videos for this single. The main version of the video is an excerpt from the film Dancer in the Dark in which Björk, Peter Stormare and others sing the song on a train. The second version was directed by Floria Sigismondi and was an interactive "webeo" (a web animation) for an MTV promotion. Björk appeared with her face painted and the viewer could change the scenes and special effects by clicking on the video. A third version was going to be directed by M/M Paris, but there were several problems with the distribution of
    5.00
    3 votes
    194

    When You're Strange

    • Featured in film: When You're Strange
    When You're Strange is a 2009 documentary about the life of The Doors. It is written and directed by Tom DiCillo and for the first time makes material from Jim Morrison's 1969 film fragment HWY: An American Pastoral publicly available. Doors keyboardist Ray Manzarek has stated that "This will be the true story of the Doors," and that the film will be "the anti-Oliver Stone," referring to the 1991 film about the group that Stone directed, and which drew quite a bit of criticism from many Doors fans and Morrison intimates for certain departures from the truth in Stone's screenplay. The documentary first screened at the Sundance Film Festival on January 17, 2009. It received somewhat favorable reviews from that showing, however the narration (by director DiCillo) was singled out by most viewers as very seriously flawed for its monotonic delivery. Due to the rash of complaints about the narration, Johnny Depp was hired to redub it. A few months later, DiCillo pronounced the film "just about locked", and announced that there would be a showing of the new "redux" version. It debuted at the Los Angeles Film Festival on Sunday, June 21, 2009. The completed film was also shown at the London
    5.00
    3 votes
    195
    Hakuna Matata

    Hakuna Matata

    • Featured in film: The Lion King
    "Hakuna Matata" is a song from Disney's 32nd animated feature The Lion King. The song is based on Timon and Pumbaa's common catchphrase in the movie, Hakuna matata, which is a Swahili phrase. It is characterized by its simple 4/4 time, upbeat message and catchy lyrics. The musical score was written by Elton John and the lyrics by Tim Rice. In the film the song is sung by Timon (a meerkat voiced by Nathan Lane), Pumbaa (a warthog voiced by Ernie Sabella), and Simba, a young lion voiced by Jason Weaver (singing voice as a cub) and Joseph Williams (as an adult). The two main comedy characters in the film, (Timon and Pumbaa), talking about moving on from their troubled past and forgetting their worries. The song also provides a backstory for Pumbaa, explaining that he was ostracized from animal society for his excessive flatulence. It contains several breaks at which the music grinds to a halt and then starts again. It makes use of a large proportion of the orchestra as well as many other more unusual instruments including an elaborate drum kit. A second version of the song, produced for the companion album Rhythm of the Pride Lands, was performed by Jimmy Cliff featuring Lebo M. This
    5.50
    2 votes
    196

    Hold Me, Thrill Me, Kiss Me, Kill Me

    • Featured in film: Batman Forever
    "Hold Me, Thrill Me, Kiss Me, Kill Me" is a 1995 single by U2 from the Batman Forever soundtrack album. A number-one single in their home country of Ireland, the single reached number two on the UK Singles Chart, number sixteen on the Billboard Hot 100, and number one on the Billboard Album Rock Tracks and Modern Rock Tracks charts. Bono described it as being about "being in a rock band" and "being a star". "Hold Me, Thrill Me, Kiss Me, Kill Me" has its origins in the sessions for the band's 1993 album, Zooropa. The song's title comes from a play on the classic song "Hold Me, Thrill Me, Kiss Me" and is actually visible (along with the titles of other discarded demos) on the cover of Zooropa in purple text. The song was played on every show of the PopMart Tour as part of the encore, and was not played again until the 2010 leg of the U2 360° Tour, opening the second encore. It was nominated for a Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song, losing to "Colors of the Wind" for Pocahontas. However, it was also nominated for a Razzie Award for Worst Original Song, losing to "Walk Into the Wind" from Showgirls. The animated music video to the song (interspersed with clips from the film)
    5.50
    2 votes
    197

    Song of the Heart

    • Featured in film: Happy Feet
    • Performed by: Prince
    "The Song of the Heart" is a song written and performed by Prince especially for the 2006 film Happy Feet. The song came about when Prince was approached to allow his music to be covered for the film. Prince initially refused, but was so impressed by the film that he not only gave his permission, but offered to write a new song for the film. It is also the only song on the soundtrack specifically written for this film. "The Song of the Heart" is the first single released from the soundtrack and won the 2007 Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song. A music video was produced to promote the single.
    5.50
    2 votes
    198

    The Windmills of Your Mind

    • Featured in film: The Thomas Crown Affair
    "The Windmills of Your Mind" is a song with music by French composer Michel Legrand and English lyrics written by Americans Alan Bergman and Marilyn Bergman. The French lyrics, under the title "Les moulins de mon cœur", were written by Eddy Marnay. The song (with the English lyrics) was used as the theme for the 1968 film, The Thomas Crown Affair. The opening two melodic sentences were borrowed from Mozart's second movement from his Sinfonia Concertante for Violin, Viola and Orchestra, K. 364. In the original 1968 film the song was performed by Noel Harrison who took the song to #8 in the UK Singles Chart. It won the Academy Award for Best Original Song in 1968. A version by Sting was used in the 1999 remake of The Thomas Crown Affair. Dusty Springfield's version of the song from her album Dusty in Memphis is also well known; this version reached #31 on the US Billboard Hot 100 chart and #3 on the Billboard adult contemporary chart in 1969. This recording also appeared on the soundtrack to Breakfast on Pluto (2006). The song has been interpreted by a large number of singers, instrumentalists, and orchestras.
    5.50
    2 votes
    199

    Things Have Changed

    • Featured in film: Wonder Boys
    • Performed by: Bob Dylan
    "Things Have Changed" is a song from the film Wonder Boys, written and performed by Bob Dylan. The song was released as a single on May 1, 2000. "Things Have Changed" won the Academy Award, and the Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song. The director of Wonder Boys, Curtis Hanson, also created a music video for "Things Have Changed," filming new footage of Bob Dylan on the film's various locations and editing it with footage used in Wonder Boys as if Dylan were actually in the film. "Things Have Changed" has been used in the Showtime series Brotherhood and twice in the CBS series NCIS, and is featured on the NCIS Soundtrack. The track peaked at #58 in the UK Singles Chart.
    5.50
    2 votes
    200

    All Time High

    • Featured in film: Octopussy
    • Performed by: Rita Coolidge
    "All Time High" is a 1983 single release by Rita Coolidge introduced as the theme song for the James Bond film Octopussy. "All Time High" marked the return of regular James Bond theme composer John Barry after his absence from the For Your Eyes Only soundtrack. The lyrics were written by Tim Rice and recording and mixing of the track is credited to Stephen Short. Prior to Rita Coolidge being assigned the Octopussy theme a contender was Mari Wilson, a British singer whose retro-image evoked the mid-'60s when the Bond series originated, but Wilson's lack of a US-profile led to a negative decision. The producers of Octopussy were known to have been in negotiations with Laura Branigan, then a top-ranking hitmaker in the US and Europe. The ultimate choice of Coolidge – whose career peak had occurred some six years previously – was a surprising one. Coolidge recalls that Barbara Broccoli, the assistant director of Octopussy, was a fan of Coolidge and made a point of playing Coolidge records around her father, Cubby Broccoli, producer of the films, until "one day [he said], "Who is that? That's the voice I want for the movie.'...in the studio [Tim Rice] was still finishing the song. We
    4.67
    3 votes
    201
    I Thought I Lost You

    I Thought I Lost You

    • Featured in film: Bolt
    • Performed by: John Travolta
    "I Thought I Lost You" is a pop song performed by both American singer-songwriter and actress Miley Cyrus and actor John Travolta. The song was co-written by Cyrus with producer Jeffrey Steele. It was released to Radio Disney as promotion for the 2008 animated film Bolt and its soundtrack; in the film, Cyrus portrays the voice of Penny and Travolta the voice of Bolt. "I Thought I Lost You" was made after filmmakers requested Cyrus to write a song for the film. The song is a teen pop number whose lyrics speak of getting lost and getting found. "I Thought I Lost You" was nominated for Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Song and Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song, but lost both to Bruce Springsteen's "The Wrestler" from The Wrestler (2008). The song's accompanying music video has Cyrus and Travolta performing the song in a recording studio and features clips from Bolt. "I Thought I Lost You" was promoted by several live performances by Cyrus. Cyrus became involved with Bolt once she was cast as Penny, Bolt's owner. Filmmakers asked Cyrus to write a song for herself and John Travolta, who stars as Bolt. She co-wrote the song with the aid of Jeffrey Steele, who
    4.67
    3 votes
    202

    Circle of Life

    • Featured in film: The Lion King
    "Circle of Life" is a song from Disney's 1994 animated film The Lion King, composed by Elton John with lyrics by Tim Rice. It was sung by Carmen Twillie (female vocals) and Lebo M (opening Zulu vocals) in the film as the opening song, and Elton John also sang a pop version with the London Community Gospel Choir which was included in the film's soundtrack and made into a music video. It was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Song in 1994 together with two other songs from The Lion King: "Can You Feel the Love Tonight" and "Hakuna Matata". "Can You Feel the Love Tonight" won the award. The song reached #11 in the UK and #18 in the US. The song is also featured frequently in attractions that include The Lion King at Disney theme parks, such as parades. Michael Crawford sang this song as part of a medley for The Disney Album in 2001. The song is most famous for its debut in the iconic opening scene of the famous animated Disney film The Lion King. The film and the debut of the song commences after sunrise on the Serengeti, its various forms of fauna being alerted somehow to a celebratory upcoming event and gathering at Pride Rock, the dwelling of its two rulers King Mufasa and
    6.00
    1 votes
    203

    Endless Love

    • Featured in film: Endless Love
    "Endless Love" is a song written by Lionel Richie and originally recorded as a duet between Richie and fellow soul singer Diana Ross. In this ballad, the singers declare their "endless love" for one another. It was covered by soul singer Luther Vandross with R&B singer Mariah Carey and also by country music singer Kenny Rogers. Billboard has named it the greatest song duet of all time. Ross and Richie recorded the song for Motown, and it was used as the theme for the Franco Zeffirelli's film Endless Love starring Brooke Shields. Produced by Richie and arranged by Gene Page, it was released as a single from the film's soundtrack in 1981. While the film Endless Love was not a success, the song became the second biggest-selling single of the year (first was "Bette Davis Eyes" by Kim Carnes) in the U.S. and reached number 1 on the Hot 100, where it stayed for nine weeks from August 15 to October 10, 1981. It also topped the Billboard R&B chart and the Adult Contemporary chart, and reached number 7 in the UK. The soulful composition became the biggest-selling single of Ross' career and her 18th career number-one single (including her work with The Supremes), while it was the first of
    6.00
    1 votes
    204

    Eye of the Tiger

    • Featured in film: Rocky III
    "Eye of the Tiger" is a song by American rock band Survivor. It was released in May 1982 as a single from their third album Eye of the Tiger. It was written at the request of actor Sylvester Stallone, who was unable to get permission for Queen's "Another One Bites the Dust". The song was to be the theme song for the movie Rocky III in which Stallone was playing the main role. The movie version of the song is different from the album version because it features tiger growls. It gained tremendous MTV and radio airplay and topped charts worldwide in 1982. It is memorable for its guitar riff and anthemic chorus. It was certified platinum in August 1982 by the RIAA, signifying sales of 2 million vinyl copies, and the song has sold 3 million in digital downloads by March 2012. It was voted VH1's 63rd greatest hard rock song. In an interview with Songfacts, co-writer Jim Peterik explained the song's title. At first, we wondered if calling it 'Eye of the Tiger' was too obvious. The initial draft of the song, we started with 'It's the eye of the tiger, it's the thrill of the fight, rising up to the spirit of our rival, and the last known survivor stalks his prey in the night, and it all
    6.00
    1 votes
    205

    Fame

    • Featured in film: Chemical Hunger
    "Fame" is a pop song, written by Michael Gore (music) and Dean Pitchford (lyrics) that was released in 1980, and achieved chart success as the theme song to the Fame film and TV series. The song was performed by Irene Cara, who played the role of Coco Hernandez in the original movie. It won the Academy Award for Best Original Song in 1980, and the Golden Globe Award for the same. "Fame" rose to number four on the Billboard Hot 100 in August 1980. It also reached number one on the Billboard dance chart for one week. The song was not released in the United Kingdom until 1982, thus coinciding with the UK premiere of the Fame television series in the future. It hit number one in the UK Singles Chart for three weeks. Dame Edna and Sophie Ellis-Bextor also did a live cover of this song
    6.00
    1 votes
    206

    Into the West

    • Featured in film: The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King
    • Performed by: Annie Lennox
    "Into the West" is an Oscar winning song, written by Fran Walsh, Howard Shore, and Annie Lennox, and performed by Lennox. The song plays during the closing credits of the film, The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King. It has later been covered by New Zealand singers Yulia Townsend and Will Martin. The song was conceived as a bittersweet Elvish lament sung by Galadriel for those who have sailed across the Sundering Sea. Several phrases from the song are taken from the last chapter of The Return of the King. In the commentaries and documentaries accompanying the extended DVD edition of the film, director Peter Jackson explains that the song was partially inspired by the premature death from cancer of young New Zealand filmmaker Cameron Duncan, whose work had impressed Jackson and his team. The first public performance of the song was at Duncan's funeral. The song has five different versions, not released, promo's available since late November 2003. Into The West (Album Version)4:35 Into The West (Radio Edit) 3:59 Into The West (Acoustic Edit) 4:05 Into The West (Acoustic Version) 4:39 Into The West (w/o orchestral ending) 4:34 The song won the Oscar for Best Original Song at
    6.00
    1 votes
    207

    Well, Did You Evah!

    • Featured in film: High Society
    • Performed by: Bing Crosby & Frank Sinatra
    "Well, Did You Evah!" is a song written by Cole Porter for his 1939 musical DuBarry Was a Lady, where it was introduced by Betty Grable and Charles Walters. It was later performed by Bing Crosby and Frank Sinatra in the 1956 film High Society, today probably the most famous version of the song. It appears early in the film De-Lovely, a secret history drama that features Kevin Kline as Cole Porter.
    6.00
    1 votes
    208

    Learn to Be Lonely

    • Featured in film: The Phantom of the Opera
    • Performed by: Minnie Driver
    "Learn to be Lonely" is a song written by Andrew Lloyd Webber and Charles Hart for the 2004 film adaptation of The Phantom of the Opera. The song is performed by Minnie Driver during the closing credits, and is found on the film's soundtrack. Another song using the melody of Learn to be Lonely entitled No One Would Listen (also with lyrics by Hart) was originally included in the film, to be sung by the Phantom, but was ultimately cut. This is the only song in the film or on its soundtrack to feature Minnie Driver, who played Carlotta in the film, actually singing; the character's opera voice was given by Margaret Preece (who played Carlotta in the The Phantom of the Opera (1986 musical) at one time and had a bit part in the film as Carlotta's confidante). Beyoncé performed the song at the 2005 Oscars with Webber accompanying on piano. Minnie Driver performed the song during her appearance on The Ellen DeGeneres Show.
    5.00
    2 votes
    209

    Old Habits Die Hard

    • Featured in film: Alfie
    • Performed by: David A. Stewart
    "Old Habits Die Hard" is a song from the 2004 movie Alfie, with music by David Stewart and lyrics by Mick Jagger, and performed by Mick Jagger. It won the 2005 Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song. However, the song failed to get nominated for the Academy Award for Best Original Song, making it the first in five consecutive years where the song won the Golden Globe, but failed to get nominated for an Oscar. It was followed by "A Love That Will Never Grow Old" from Brokeback Mountain (2005), "The Song of the Heart" from Happy Feet (2006), "Guaranteed" from Into the Wild (2007), and the title theme from The Wrestler (2008). Two versions of "Old Habits Die Hard" are available in the Alfie Original Soundtrack: One performed by Mick Jagger alone, and second version featuring Sheryl Crow. In 2006, Ten Second Epic came out with another song titled "Old Habits Die Hard". The song reached the Top 20 on both the MuchMusic Video Countdown and the Canadian Rock Radio charts.
    4.50
    2 votes
    210

    The Noattria Life

    • Featured in film: A Noattria Family Christmas
    Theme song to the movie "A Noattria Family Christmas" and the television show "The Noattria Show".
    4.50
    2 votes
    211

    To Parelthon Mou

    • Featured in film: Bank Bang
    "To Parelthon Mou" (My Past) is a song by Anna Vissi, and the main theme song from the Greek film Bank Bang. "To Parelthon Mou", Vissi's first new song since 2006, was released in the end of October 2008 to radios and as a digital download, and in November on the official soundtrack. It is included as a bonus song on Vissi's 2008 album Apagorevmeno. "To Parelthon Mou", was released officially on October 29, 2008 simultaneously to all radio stations in Greece and Cyprus along with its music video to MAD TV. Composed by Giannis Kifonidis, with lyrics by Giorgos Mitsigkas, "To Parelthon Mou" is the theme song to a Greek film Bank Bang which was released in December. The song was released as a digital download on October 29, 2008 while the soundtrack for the film was released in mid-November. The song is also included as a bonus track on Vissi's album Apagorevmeno. The music video for the song was filmed on October 22, 2008 at the Mall Athens, and features scenes from the movie, while cutting away to Vissi. The song reached number one on the official Greek Singles Chart by Billboard in its first week of release.. It remained in the Top 10 for 7 consecutive weeks.
    4.50
    2 votes
    212

    All That Jazz

    • Featured in film: Chicago
    • Performed by: Catherine Zeta-Jones & Renée Zellweger
    "All That Jazz" is a song from the 1975 musical Chicago. It has lyrics by Fred Ebb and music by John Kander, and is the opening song of the musical. The title of the 1979 film, starring Roy Scheider as a character strongly resembling choreographer/stage and film director Bob Fosse, is derived from the song.
    5.00
    1 votes
    213

    Colors of the Wind

    • Featured in film: Pocahontas
    "Colors of the Wind" is a song by American recording artist Vanessa Williams, from Disney's 1995 animated feature film, Pocahontas. It was written by composer Alan Menken and lyricist Stephen Schwartz. Originally recorded by American singer and actress Judy Kuhn in her film role as the singing voice of Pocahontas, "Colors of the Wind" served as the film's theme song. Williams' version of the song was released on May 23, 1995 as the lead single from the film's soundtrack. A pop ballad, the song's lyrics speak of respecting nature and living in harmony with the Earth's creatures. "Colors of the Wind" won the Academy Award for Best Original Song at the 68th Academy Awards in 1995, becoming composer Alan Menken's fourth win in the category. It also won the Golden Globe in the same category as well as the Grammy Award for Best Song Written for a Movie. The song poetically presents the Native American viewpoint that the earth is a living entity where humankind is connected to everything in nature. The first two notes of Alan Menken's melody span a musical interval of a major sixth. Overall, the span of the melody reaches an eleventh. Because the melody spans a slightly larger range than
    5.00
    1 votes
    214

    I Believe I Can Fly

    • Featured in film: Space Jam
    • Performed by: R. Kelly
    "I Believe I Can Fly" is a 1996 song by R&B singer R. Kelly. The song was written, produced and performed by Kelly and was featured on the soundtrack to the 1996 film Space Jam. It was originally released on November 26 1996, but later appeared in Kelly's 1998 album R.. In early 1997, "I Believe I Can Fly" reached #2 on the Billboard Hot 100; it was kept from the #1 spot by Toni Braxton's "Un-Break My Heart". Despite the fact that two of R. Kelly's songs did reach #1, "I Believe I Can Fly" remains the biggest hit of R. Kelly's career. The single was #1 on the R&B Singles chart (for six nonconsecutive weeks), and also topped the charts in the United Kingdom. It has won three Grammy Awards, and is ranked #406 on Rolling Stone's list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. In 2003, Me First and the Gimme Gimmes covered the song for their album Take a Break. William Hung recorded this song for his 2004 album Inspiration. Saxophonist Marion Meadows also covered the song from the album Dressed to Chill. Patti Labelle sang the chorus of the song on her 1998 live album Live One Night Only as an addition to her signature tune "Over the Rainbow". Jessica Simpson sang the song on her
    5.00
    1 votes
    215

    This Used to Be My Playground

    • Featured in film: A League of Their Own
    "This Used to Be My Playground" is a song performed by Madonna. It is the theme for the film A League of Their Own, which starred Madonna as well as Tom Hanks, Geena Davis and Rosie O'Donnell. Though featured in the film, it is not available on the soundtrack album, due to licensing restrictions that prohibited Madonna material from being mixed or compiled with other singers on albums. It was originally available on the Olympics-inspired Barcelona Gold compilation album released that summer, but in a shorter edit than any of the versions on the commercial singles. It would later be featured on Madonna's 1995 ballads compilation, Something to Remember. The song was written and produced by Madonna and Shep Pettibone, and recorded prior to final sessions for her 1992 studio album Erotica. Released in the summer of 1992, the single was a worldwide hit. It spent one week at number one on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100, becoming Madonna's tenth chart-topping single, breaking her tie with Whitney Houston to become the female artist with the most number one singles at that time. It entered the charts in the UK top five, peaking at number three for two weeks, and was another top five hit for
    5.00
    1 votes
    216

    Trouble in Mind

    • Featured in film: Trouble in Mind
    • Performed by: Marianne Faithfull
    "Trouble in Mind" is a slow eight-bar blues song written by jazz pianist Richard M. Jones. The song was recorded in 1924 by singer Thelma La Vizzo with Jones providing the piano accompaniment. The song became an early blues standard, with versions by Bertha "Chippie" Hill with Louis Armstrong on cornet and Jones on piano (1926 OKeh 8312), Georgia White (1936 Decca 7192), Victoria Spivey (as Jane Lucas) (1936 Vocalion 3346), and Bob Wills and His Texas Playboys (1936 Vocalion 3343). Later, "Trouble in Mind" was a Billboard R&B chart hit for Dinah Washington (#4 in 1952) and Nina Simone (#11 in 1961 and #92 in the pop chart). In many versions of "Trouble in Mind", several new verses are added. However, the songs usually include the opening: "Trouble in Mind" has been recorded by numerous artists, including:
    5.00
    1 votes
    217

    When the Wind Blows

    • Featured in film: When the Wind Blows
    • Performed by: David Bowie
    "When the Wind Blows" is a song from the soundtrack of the film of the same name, performed by David Bowie. It marked the second contribution from Bowie to a film based on a Raymond Briggs book – he contributed a filmed introduction to The Snowman in 1982. Bowie's song was the result of a collaboration with multi-instrumentalist Erdal Kizilcay, who would work with Bowie in the future, most notably on The Buddha of Suburbia. The single peaked at UK #44, promoted by a video that featured a montage of clips from the film, with Bowie's animated face overlaid. Since then, the song has become something of a rarity, appearing rarely on reissues and best-of compilations. Unlike most instrumental B-sides from the 1980s, the instrumental version of "When the Wind Blows" is not simply a version of the song with vocals dubbed, but a completely different orchestral recording. All songs written by David Bowie, Erdal Kizilcay The single release has also appeared on the following:
    5.00
    1 votes
    218

    White Riot

    • Featured in film: Beyond the Pole
    • Performed by: The Clash
    "White Riot" is a song by English punk rock band The Clash, released as the band's first single in 1977 and also featured on their debut album. There are two versions: the single version (also appearing on the US version of the album released in 1979), and a different version on the UK album. According to their respective label copy the single version is 1:58 in running time while the UK album version is 1:55. The song is short and intense, drawing influence from the Ramones' style of three chords played very fast. Mick Jones counts off "1-2-3-4" at the start of the album version (in the single version, it instead begins with the sound of a police siren). Lyrically, the song is about class economics and race and thus proved controversial: some people thought it was advocating a kind of race war. Rather, lyricist Joe Strummer was trying to appeal to white youths to find a worthy cause to riot, as he felt blacks in the UK already had. It contains a positive message in the lines "Are you taking over / Or are you taking orders? / Are you going backwards / Or are you going forwards?" The song was written after Joe Strummer and bassist Paul Simonon were involved in the riots at the
    5.00
    1 votes
    219

    You've Got a Friend in Me

    • Featured in film: Toy Story
    "You've Got a Friend in Me" is a song written and first recorded by Randy Newman. Originally written as the theme song for the 1995 Disney/Pixar animated film Toy Story, it has since become the theme song for its sequels, Toy Story 2 (1999) and Toy Story 3 (2010). The song was nominated for both the 1996 Academy Award for Best Original Song and the 1995 Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song but lost both to another Disney song, "Colors of the Wind" from Pocahontas. Like many other Disney theme songs, "You've Got a Friend in Me" has been covered numerous times. Cover versions featured in the three Toy Story films include a duet with Newman and Lyle Lovett in Toy Story, a version by Robert Goulet and an instrumental by Tom Scott in Toy Story 2, an Italian language version by Riccardo Cocciante, and a Spanish language version by the Gipsy Kings in Toy Story 3. The song is played during the opening credits for Toy Story and Toy Story 3, establishing the importance of Woody and Andy in the first film and the importance of all his toys in the third. Toy Story 3 also uses it for irony and dramatic effect, as the opening credits harken back to the first film and the song abruptly fades
    5.00
    1 votes
    220

    Are You That Somebody

    • Featured in film: Dr. Dolittle
    • Performed by: Aaliyah
    "Are You That Somebody?" is a Grammy nominated single performed by American singer Aaliyah, recorded for the Dr. Dolittle soundtrack. The song was written and composed by Static Major, who also sang backing vocals, and Timbaland, who, in addition to writing the song, produced and performed a guest rap for it. The song was sent to U.S. Pop radio stations on September 29, 1998 (see 1998 in music). The song samples the sound of a baby cooing from Perrey and Kingsley's 1966 hit "Countdown at 6" and D. Train's 1982 dance classic "You're the One for Me". The song was listed 387th on The 500 Greatest Songs Since You Were Born, a list of songs compiled by Blender magazine. It was also ranked 18th on Spin magazine's Top 20 Singles of the 90's, and 5th on The Village Voice's 1998 Pazz & Jop critics' poll. Pitchfork Media included the song at number 8 on their Top 200 Tracks of the 90s. This song earned Aaliyah a Grammy Award nomination for Best Female R&B Vocal Performance. According to Static Major in an interview with Vibe magazine, when he first presented the song to Aaliyah, she initially showed disdain for it. However, she eventually agreed to record it. Many of the unusual beats and
    4.00
    2 votes
    221

    The Way We Were

    • Featured in film: The Way We Were
    "The Way We Were" is the title song to the 1973 movie The Way We Were, starring Barbra Streisand and Robert Redford. The song was written by Alan Bergman and Marilyn Bergman (lyrics) and Marvin Hamlisch (music) and performed by Streisand. It won the Academy Award and Golden Globe for Best Song and also made AFI's list of Top 100 Songs from Film; it was ranked number eight. "The Way We Were" topped the Billboard Hot 100 chart for one week in 1974 and was replaced by "Love's Theme" by the Love Unlimited Orchestra. It then returned to number one for two additional weeks. The song also spent two weeks atop the easy listening chart, Streisand's second single to reach the top of this chart (following 1964's "People"). The track peaked at #31 in the UK Singles Chart in 1974. The version of the song which was released on 45 RPM single contains a different vocal take than the version which appeared on the original movie soundtrack and subsequent greatest hits compilations. Both versions use the same music track. The difference in the vocals can most easily be heard on the line "Smiles we gave to one another" at approximately 1:15 into the song. The true 45 RPM single version has never
    4.00
    2 votes
    222

    You Must Love Me

    • Featured in film: Evita
    • Performed by: Madonna
    "You Must Love Me" is a pop ballad recorded by American singer-songwriter Madonna from the soundtrack album Evita of the motion picture of the same name. It was released in October 1996 by Warner Bros. as the first single from the album. Written by Tim Rice and Andrew Lloyd Webber, the song won an Academy Award for Best Original Song in 1997. It was seen by critics as her "new adult, matriarchal image". Featuring a simple, elegantly arranged melody, the single sold roughly 1.5 million copies worldwide, and entered the top twenty in countries such as the United States, the United Kingdom and Australia. The music video shows her while being eight months pregnant with her first child, and scenes from the film Evita, for which she received a Golden Globe Award for Best Actress in a Motion Picture - Musical or Comedy. The track is the only song recorded for the movie that did not originate in one form or another from the original stage version of the musical. The song reunited lyricist Tim Rice and composer Andrew Lloyd Webber after eleven years of not working together on any new songs. It was written specifically for the film (the director Alan Parker requested a rewrite of parts of
    4.00
    2 votes
    223

    Beauty and the Beast

    • Featured in film: Beauty and the Beast
    "Beauty and the Beast" is a song by Canadian recording artist Celine Dion and American recording artist Peabo Bryson. It was written by composer Alan Menken and lyricist Howard Ashman for Walt Disney Pictures' 1991 animated feature film Beauty and the Beast, and originally recorded by English actress Angela Lansbury in her film role as the character Mrs. Potts. The Dion-Bryson version was produced and arranged by American recorded producer and songwriter Walter Afanasieff, and included on the film's soundtrack album, from which it was released as a single on November 11, 1991. The song was additionally included on Dion's eponymous seventeenth studio album. A pop ballad, its lyrics narrate Beauty and the Beast main characters Belle and the Beast's journey to becoming friends, and how they have managed to change each other. The song has been very well-received by critics, who praised its dual role as both a musical number and a commercial single. "Beauty and the Beast" won an Academy Award for Best Original Song at the 64th Academy Awards. The song also won a Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song, and was nominated for three Grammy Awards, winning one for Best Song Written for
    4.00
    1 votes
    224

    Come What May

    • Featured in film: Moulin Rouge!
    • Performed by: Nicole Kidman
    "Come What May" is a phrase that originates from Shakespeare's Macbeth and means: let whatever events crop up come to pass. It is the love theme from Baz Luhrmann's 2001 film Moulin Rouge! It is sung by Ewan McGregor and Nicole Kidman in their respective roles as Christian and Satine. It was composed by David Baerwald for the film Romeo + Juliet, but not used, and was then rewritten for Moulin Rouge! It was released as a single in Australia where it became the 8th highest selling single by an Australian artist of 2001. It was also released in the UK, where it charted at #27, and in Germany. The song on the soundtrack album and the film differ slightly. The lyrics "Every day I love you more and more" and "Listen to my heart, can you hear it sing / Telling me to give you everything" can be heard on the soundtrack version. In the movie, they are replaced by a musical interlude the first time, and, the second time, Satine sings instead of the latter part: "come back to me and forgive everything." The single version can be found on the original soundtrack, while the original film version can be found on the follow-up soundtrack. When the forbidden relationship between Christian and
    4.00
    1 votes
    225

    Ghostbusters

    • Featured in film: Ghostbusters
    "Ghostbusters" is a 1984 song recorded by Ray Parker, Jr. as the theme to the film of the same name starring Bill Murray and Dan Aykroyd. It hit number one on the Billboard Hot 100 on August 11 in 1984, and stayed there for three weeks. It also peaked at number two on the UK Singles Chart on 16 September 1984, where it stayed for three weeks. It was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Music, Original Song, but lost to Stevie Wonder's "I Just Called to Say I Love You". According to Parker, he was approached by the film's producers to create a theme song for the film. Unfortunately, he only had a few days to do so and the film's title seemed impossible to include in any lyrics. However, when watching television late at night, Parker saw a cheap commercial for a local service that reminded him that the film had a similar commercial featured for the fictional business. This inspired him to write the song as a pseudo-advertising jingle that the business could have commissioned as a promotion. Parker was later the defendant in a copyright infringement lawsuit which claimed "Ghostbusters" was too similar in musical structure to "I Want a New Drug," written and performed by Huey Lewis
    4.00
    1 votes
    226

    Here I Am

    • Featured in film: Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron
    • Performed by: Bryan Adams
    "Here I Am" is the title of a song co-written and recorded by Canadian artist Bryan Adams. The song was written and recorded in 2002 for the movie Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron and was both released on the soundtrack and as a single. The single reached number-one in Taiwan, Azerbaijan, Portugal and hit number 5 in both Canada and the U.K. The song won an ASCAP Award and was nominated for Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song. The music video is shot in the American wilderness and features Adams and several women living in the wilderness trying to survive from the thirst, snakes etc. As a reference to the movie a herd of horses is running through the wilderness. The video was directed by Mike Lipscombe and produced by Michael Pierce.
    4.00
    1 votes
    227

    I Can't Give You Anything but Love, Baby

    • Featured in film: Contract
    "I Can't Give You Anything but Love" is an American popular song and jazz standard by Jimmy McHugh (music) and Dorothy Fields (lyrics). The song was introduced by Adelaide Hall at Les Ambassadeurs Club in New York in January 1928 in Lew Leslie's Blackbird Revue, which opened on Broadway later that year as the highly successful Blackbirds of 1928 (518 performances), wherein it was performed by Adelaide Hall, Aida Ward, and Willard McLean. Some controversy surrounds the song's authorship. Andy Razaf biographer Harry Singer offers circumstantial evidence that suggests Fats Waller might have sold the melody to McHugh in 1926 and that the lyrics were by Andy Razaf. Alternatively, Philip Furia has pointed out that Fields' verse is almost identical to the end of the second verse of Lorenz Hart's and Richard Rodgers' song "Where's That Rainbow?" from Peggy-Ann, the 1926 musical comedy with book by Fields' brother Herbert and produced by their father Lew: My luck will vary surely, That's purely a curse. My luck has changed--it's gotten From rotten to worse. "I Can't Give You Anything but Love" was the hit of Blackbirds of 1928, was McHugh and Fields's first hit, and has been covered
    4.00
    1 votes
    228

    Moonshadow

    • Featured in film: Moonshadow
    "Moonshadow" is a song from the album Teaser and the Firecat, released by Cat Stevens in 1971. It is also the title of his upcoming musical. Stevens, who is now known as Yusuf Islam, considers this his favourite of his old songs. It's one of the songs that convinced him to release a Greatest Hits record of his work as Cat Stevens. He felt its uplifting message could help people. When Yusuf Islam (formerly Cat Stevens) appeared on The Chris Isaak Hour in 2009, he said of this song: "I was on a holiday in Spain. I was a kid from the West End (of London) - bright lights, et cetera. I never got to see the moon on its own in the dark, there were always streetlamps. So there I was on the edge of the water on a beautiful night with the moon glowing, and suddenly I looked down and saw my shadow. I thought that was so cool, I'd never seen it before." An animated short featuring the song was part of the Fantastic Animation Festival feature film released in 1977. The animation begins with a still frame of Teaser and his pet Firecat, pictured as they appear on the cover of the album bearing their names. The picture comes to life, and in the course of the animation, they find the fallen Moon,
    4.00
    1 votes
    229

    The Hands That Built America

    • Featured in film: Gangs of New York
    • Performed by: U2
    "The Hands That Built America" is a song by U2, released on the soundtrack to the film Gangs of New York. It was one of two new songs on their The Best of 1990-2000 compilation, with the other being "Electrical Storm". It was nominated for Best Original Song at the 75th Academy Awards, but lost to Eminem's "Lose Yourself." "The Hands That Built America" is a song about New York. The first verse of the song makes reference to the Irish Potato Famine, and the resulting imigration of millions of Irish people to the United States; a fact reflected in the demographics of New York City. The second verse relates to the American Dream, and the ideals that hard work can bring a person prosperity. The 3rd verse is about Bill Clinton's successful mediation between Ireland and United Kingdom. The final verse is about September 11th. The song was considered for single release and was announced as such for a 2003 release. The songs "The Playboy Mansion" (2003 Version - originally from Pop) and "That's Life" (a cover song by Bono and released on The Good Thief Soundtrack) were announced as B-sides. The release was canceled, possibly because U2 didn't win the Oscar for best song for "The Hands
    4.00
    1 votes
    230

    The Living Daylights

    • Featured in film: The Living Daylights
    • Performed by: A-ha
    "The Living Daylights" is the song performed by A-ha for the James Bond film of the same name. It was co-written by guitarist Paul Waaktaar-Savoy and Bond composer John Barry. Barry was listed on the credits as co-writer and producer, and the initial release of the song was his version. A second version of the song, re-worked by A-ha in 1988, later appeared on their third album, Stay on These Roads. Not surprisingly, the band prefers their version of the song to Barry's. When interviewed on a late-night show in 1987, Barry said that he found working with the band exhausting secondary to the band's insistence on using their own version of the song for release. In an interview with Hotrod Magazine, keyboardist Magne Furuholmen said that "[the band's] fight with Barry left a rather unpleasant aftertaste. Apparently he compared us to Hitlerjugend in a newspaper interview." Waaktaar-Savoy claims that Barry never contributed to the creative process, and should not have his name on the credits. "The Living Daylights" was released in the summer of 1987. The song didn't chart on the Billboard Hot 100, but it charted in the United Kingdom where it peaked at number five. It also remains a
    4.00
    1 votes
    231

    Beautiful Stranger

    • Featured in film: Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me
    • Performed by: Madonna
    "Beautiful Stranger" is a Grammy Award winning dance-pop song written and produced by American singer Madonna and British song-writer and musician William Orbit. "Beautiful Stranger" was written for the film soundtrack Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (1999). The song was released as a single in the middle of 1999. It was the last single Madonna released during the 1990s. It won the Grammy Award for Best Song Written for a Motion Picture, Television or Other Visual Media in 2000. "Beautiful Stranger" is an up-tempo love song featuring heavily reverbed guitars and bouncy drum loops, with lyrics telling a tale of infatuation. The song was specifically written for an inclusion on the Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me soundtrack. The song has a similar lyrical theme and instrumentation as the song "Amazing", which is included on Madonna's album Music (2000). Madonna performed it as the fourth song in the setlist of the Drowned World Tour, between "Candy Perfume Girl" and "Ray of Light". The beginning of the performance features a short scene of Mike Myers as Austin Powers, while another song from the movie's soundtrack, "Soul Bossa Nova", was being played in the background.
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    0 votes
    232

    Change the World

    • Featured in film: Phenomenon
    • Performed by: Eric Clapton
    "Change the World" is a song written by Tommy Sims, Gordon Kennedy and Wayne Kirkpatrick which was recorded by Eric Clapton with backing by Babyface for the soundtrack of the 1996 film Phenomenon. The song won Grammy Awards for Record of the Year, Song of the Year (for the songwriters), as well as Best Male Pop Vocal performance. The song was chosen by the RIAA as one of the Songs of the Century, ranked at #270. The single peaked at #5 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in the summer of 1996. It also spent 13 weeks at #1 on the adult contemporary chart and remained on that chart for over a year and a half (80 weeks), a feat which was extraordinarily rare at the time. Since then, however, certain songs have remained on the AC chart for extended periods of time, prompting the eventual creation af an Adult Contemporary recurrent chart for songs that have stayed on the chart for many weeks and fallen below a certain threshold. Although "Change the World" is better known as an unplugged acoustic track, a rare electric performance of the song was featured on Babyface's 1997 live album Babyface MTV Unplugged NYC, with Clapton on co-lead vocals, playing his namesake signature Fender
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    233
    Crazy for You

    Crazy for You

    • Featured in film: Vision Quest
    • Performed by: Madonna
    "Crazy for You" is a song by American recording artist Madonna for the 1985 film Vision Quest. It was released on March 2, 1985, by Geffen Records as the first single from the soundtrack album of the film, and later included on the ballads compilation Something to Remember (1995). The song also appears as a remix on the greatest hits albums The Immaculate Collection (1990) and Celebration (2009), and was re-released as a single in the form of this remix on February 24, 1991, by Sire Records to promote the former of these two albums. Producers Jon Peters and Peter Guber, along with music director Phil Ramone, decided to use Madonna after listening to her previous recordings. They employed John Bettis and Jon Lind to write the song. After reading the script of the film, Bettis and Lind wrote the song about the situation in which the lead characters meet at a nightclub. Initial recording sessions did not impress Bettis and Lind, and they felt that "Crazy for You" would be dropped from the soundtrack. However, a new version was recorded which did impress them and was added to the album. John "Jellybean" Benitez was the producer for the song, and it was a challenge for him, as
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    234

    Deadweight

    • Featured in film: A Life Less Ordinary
    • Performed by: Beck Hansen
    "Deadweight" is a single by Beck, taken from the soundtrack to the film A Life Less Ordinary. The song was nominated for Best Song from a Movie at the 1998 MTV Movie Awards, but lost out to Will Smith's "Men in Black". The song can also be found on the deluxe version of Odelay, and an alternate version of "Jack-Ass" entitled "Strange Invitation" and a Spanish version entitled "Burro". Beck recorded "Deadweight" with the Dust Brothers between Odelay and Mutations. It was released on the soundtrack to A Life Less Ordinary at the end of 1997. In contrast with the buoyant, lively melody, Beck adds his own Gram Parsons-style hard luck lyrics about gambling, Las Vegas, and loneliness. Beck has mentioned that this song was a part of his "Brazilian trilogy." As of 2001, however, he's only completed two parts, "Deadweight" and "Tropicalia." Unlike "Tropicalia," which is a bossa nova song, "Deadweight" uses its Brazilian influence more as part of a larger funky brew. As Beck said in USA Today, "I'm trying to get to a place where this merging of styles is so fluent and natural that you don't notice the different snippets, a musical consciousness where there's no preconceived ideas". An edited
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    235

    Don't Cry for Me, Argentina

    • Featured in film: Evita
    • Performed by: Madonna
    "Don't Cry for Me Argentina" is a song from the 1978 musical Evita with music by Andrew Lloyd Webber and lyrics by Tim Rice. Sung by the title character Eva Perón, it was titled "It's Only Your Lover Returning" before Rice settled on the eventual name. It appears early in the second act as Evita addresses the crowd from the balcony of the Casa Rosada and features a sweeping melody tied to broad emotional themes of regret and defiance, characteristic of Lloyd Webber’s most popular songs. The song shares its tune with "Oh What a Circus" and "Eva's Final Broadcast" from the same show. The musical Evita was initially produced as an album, before being adapted for the stage, followed a formula Lloyd Webber and Rice had stumbled upon during the production of Jesus Christ Superstar. Julie Covington played the lead role of Eva Peron on the original 1976 album from which the single was released. It reached No. 1 in the UK Singles Chart in February 1977 for a week, selling almost a million copies in the United Kingdom. The song was never performed live on British music show Top of the Pops as might have been anticipated as Covington refused to do so without the full symphonic orchestra.
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    236

    Dueling Banjos

    • Featured in film: Deliverance
    "Dueling Banjos" is an instrumental composition by Arthur "Guitar Boogie" Smith. The song was composed in 1955 by Smith as a banjo instrumental he called "Feudin' Banjos", which contained riffs from "Yankee Doodle". Smith recorded it playing a four-string plectrum banjo and accompanied by five-string bluegrass banjo player Don Reno. The version by Eric Weissberg and Steve Mandell went to #2 for four weeks on the Hot 100 in 1973, all four weeks behind Roberta Flack's "Killing Me Softly With His Song", and topped the adult contemporary chart for two weeks the same year. The song was made famous by the 1972 film Deliverance, which also led to a successful lawsuit by the song's composer, as it was used in the film without his permission. A cover of the song by Steve Ouimette (using electric guitars, bass, and drums) was released as downloadable content for the video game Guitar Hero World Tour. The Toy Dolls also covered the song on their album Absurd-Ditties. In Deliverance, a scene depicts Billy Redden playing it opposite Ronny Cox, who joins him on guitar. Redden plays "Lonnie"—a mentally challenged inbred but extremely gifted banjo player. (Redden could not actually play the banjo.
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    237

    Far From Over

    • Featured in film: Staying Alive
    "Far from Over" is a song by Frank Stallone that appeared in the 1983 film Staying Alive and was also featured in the film's soundtrack. The song was written by Stallone and Vince DiCola. It was a top-ten U.S. single in September 1983, peaking at number ten on the Billboard Hot 100, becoming his only major hit. The 7" single version is slightly different from the LP version, and it was the 7" version which was played on most radio stations in the US while on the Billboard Hot 100. The instrumental version was used as the theme for Starrcade from 1983 to 1987. Also, WRAL-TV in Raleigh, North Carolina used it for their Football Fridays broadcasts during the mid-1980s. as did WDIV-TV in Detroit, Michigan for its Sunday sports wrap-up show "Sports Final Edition", which is still currently used today. The song was nominated for a Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song.
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    238

    Fly

    • Featured in film: Raise Your Voice
    "Fly" is a song by American recording artist Hilary Duff. The song was written by Kara DioGuardi and John Shanks, and produced by Shanks for Duff's self-titled third studio album, Hilary Duff (2004). The song received mixed reviews from music critics, comparing the song to her previous single, "Come Clean" (2004). "Fly" was released to CHR and top 40 radio on August 9, 2004. During the early release of the song, radio stations were adding it to their playlists more than any other song. The song was released digitally on October 19, 2004, as the album's lead single. The song's protagonist encourages listeners to "let go of your yesterday" and "reach for something when there's nothing left". Duff has described it as "an uplifting song in the face of all the negativity going around these days. It's about how people are scared to open up and show who they are inside because they're afraid of what others are going to say". Stylus magazine said the song was very similar to one of Duff's previous singles, "Come Clean" (2004), but called it "an easily excusable offense, as it improves on the template ... [it] rightfully leads off the album." Blender magazine said the song is "Urgent and
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    239

    GoldenEye

    • Featured in film: GoldenEye
    • Performed by: Tina Turner
    "GoldenEye" is a hit James Bond theme performed by Tina Turner used for the 1995 film, GoldenEye. The song was written especially for Turner by Bono and The Edge of U2 when they learned that she had been offered to sing the theme to the upcoming Bond movie, and the track was produced and mixed by British producer/remixer/composer Nellee Hooper, best known for his work with Massive Attack, Madonna, U2 and Björk. The GoldenEye theme became one of the highest-charting hit singles of Turner's career, reaching #10 on the UK Singles Chart and a Top 5 hit in most other European countries. Prominent DJ, David Morales, has performed a club remix of the song, while record producer Dave Hall has provided a more urban flavour on his remix, both versions were included on the European four-track CD single. "GoldenEye" was first released on the original motion picture soundtrack and the following year it was included on Turner's album Wildest Dreams. The song has also been covered by Nicole Scherzinger for the 2010 GoldenEye 007 video game.
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    240

    Have You Ever Really Loved a Woman?

    • Featured in film: Don Juan DeMarco
    "Have You Ever Really Loved a Woman?" is a 1995 song written by Bryan Adams, Michael Kamen and Robert John "Mutt" Lange for the film of the same year Don Juan DeMarco. The melody is used as a musical motif throughout the film, and the song is featured three times in the movie, twice performed by other artists in Spanish, and finally performed by Adams himself during the closing credits. The Adams version of the song, which features flamenco guitarist Paco de Lucia, is featured on the soundtrack album and also on the album 18 Til I Die. It was at number one for five weeks on the Billboard Hot 100 in the United States, making it the third number one song for the songwriting team, and went on to earn them their second Oscar nomination. Various women's groups contacted Adams when the song became popular, which led to his publishing a series of books of photos, with all proceeds going to breast cancer research. The music video was shot in Spain at Casa los Pavos Reales, Málaga starring Cecilie Thomsen and Amira Casar. It was directed by the music video director Anton Corbijn and released and aired in May 1995. The song was covered by many artists, including Chitãozinho & Xororó who
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    241

    Hustler's Ambition

    • Featured in film: Get Rich or Die Tryin'
    "Hustler's Ambition" is the first U.S. single (second in the UK and Australia) by 50 Cent from the Get Rich or Die Tryin' soundtrack, released in 2005. It is also a bonus track on 50 Cent's third album, Curtis, in the UK. 50 Cent has stated that it is one of his personal favorite tracks from the album, but by only reaching #65 on the Billboard Hot 100, it is his least successful charting single after "If I Can't", which charted at #76. "Hustler's Ambition" appears in the film, Get Rich or Die Tryin', when 50 Cent's character, Marcus, performs it in concert towards the end. The song appeared in the trailer for the film. The lyrics summarize 50 Cent's rough time growing up, and how he had to "hustle" to keep up with life, by any means (including selling drugs). They also contain elements from Frankie Beverly & Maze's song "I Need You". The music video was shot in London, and shows 50 Cent coming into a building to train and record new music. There is a boxing match at the end, which 50 Cent walks away from. The video also has several clips from Get Rich or Die Tryin', many of which (such as young Marcus standing outside a shoe store with his friend) were also included in the video
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    242

    I'll Remember

    • Featured in film: With Honors
    "I'll Remember" (shortened from "I'll Remember [Theme from With Honors]") is a song by American recording artist Madonna. It was released on March 8, 1994, by Warner Bros. Records as the soundtrack single of the film With Honors. The song was a radical change in image and style for Madonna, who had received negative feedback, both critically and commercially, for the prior two years due to the release of her book Sex, the studio album Erotica and the film Body of Evidence. Warner Bros. decided to use Madonna as the vocalist for the song after noting that most of her previous soundtrack singles had achieved commercial success. "I'll Remember" has characteristics of late Seventies styled songs. It utilizes a synthesized keyboard arrangement to bring about a continuously reverberating sound of heartbeat. Madonna's voice is supported by backing vocals. Contemporary critics praised the song, hailing it as one of her best work. It was nominated for "Best Song Written Specifically for a Motion Picture or for Television" at the 37th Grammy Awards and "Best Original Song" at the 52nd Golden Globe Awards. After its release, the song peaked at number two on the Billboard Hot 100, becoming her
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    243

    Journey to the Past

    • Featured in film: Anastasia
    • Performed by: Aaliyah
    "Journey to the Past" is a song by American R&B recording artist Aaliyah, from 20th Century Fox's 1997 animated feature film, Anastasia. It was written by lyricist Lynn Ahrens and composer Stephen Flaherty, and originally recorded by American actress and singer Liz Callaway in her role as the film's title character, Anastasia. Aaliyah's pop rendition of the song is played over a portion of the film's end credits, and was released as a single from the film's soundtrack album. "Journey to the Past" is a predominantly pop ballad that draws influence from contemporary R&B music. "Journey to the Past" has received mixed to positive reception, many praising Callaway's version, but criticizing Aaliyah's pop rendition. The song was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Song at the 70th Academy Awards in 1998, but lost to "My Heart Will Go On" from Titanic. The song was also nominated alongside "Once Upon a December" for a Golden Globe Award in the same category, but again lost to the theme song from Titanic. It became a moderately successful pop hit in the UK. The song did not chart on the Billboard Hot 100 when it was released it only received minor Adult Contemporary airplay
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    244

    Million Voices

    • Featured in film: Hotel Rwanda
    • Performed by: Wyclef Jean
    Million Voices is a song by Haitian-American musician Wyclef Jean from the soundtrack of the 2004 film Hotel Rwanda. Wyclef Jean, born in Haiti, like many of the people in his home country as well as other Caribbean countries including many Latin American countries, are descendants of people brought from Africa to the Americas by slave traders from Europe. Many African-Americans and Caribbeans do not know their ancestral heritage, yet are curious about where they come from. They may never know but they still feel connected to Africa. This is why Wyclef Jean wrote Million Voices, a song that deals with the 1994 Rwandan Genocide, in which nearly a million people lost their lives. Rwanda, an African nation that was once under the control of Germany, was later given to Belgium after the First World War, when Germany was forced to surrender its colonies. The Belgians went in, and separated the Rwandans into two pre-existing tribes. The Tutsis were supposedly more "white"-looking in appearance, taller and with thinner noses, and the Hutus darker, so claimed the Belgian rulers who placed the Tutsis in lower rungs of government (the upper rung continued to be occupied by Belgians) to rule
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    245

    My Little Girl

    • Featured in film: Flicka
    • Performed by: Tim McGraw
    "My Little Girl" is a song co-written and recorded by country music singer Tim McGraw that reached the top three on the Billboard Hot Country Songs chart. It was released in August 2006 as the second single from his CD, Tim McGraw Reflected: Greatest Hits Vol. 2. The song was also featured on the 2006 movie, Flicka. It was nominated by the Broadcast Film Critics Association for Best Song in 2006. It is also the first single that Tim co-wrote. The narrator dedicated this song to his daughter to show her how much he loves her. Kevin John Coyne, reviewing the song for Country Universe, gave it a negative rating. He said that the song is "so sugary-sweet it can cause cavities." He then says that compared to his last single, "When The Stars Go Blue", this song is a letdown. The video shows many scenes from the movie, Flicka, while McGraw is shown singing the song with his band in front of an orchestra. It was directed by Sherman Halsey. It was released in late September, 2006. "My Little Girl" debuted at number 51 on the U.S. Billboard Hot Country Songs for the week of August 12, 2006.
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    246

    Promise Me You'll Remember

    • Featured in film: The Godfather Part III
    "Promise Me You'll Remember (Love Theme From The Godfather Part III)" is a song written for The Godfather: Part III (1990), the third film in the Godfather trilogy. "Promise Me You'll Remember" is the vocal version of the love theme. The music is written by Carmine Coppola, the lyrics by John Bettis. The song is recorded by Harry Connick Jr. Track #12 on the Godfather Part III soundtrack. Harry Connick Jr sang "Promise Me You'll Remember", on the Oscar telecast in 1991. The song was nominated for the Oscar for Best Song in a Movie, and a Golden Globe for Best Original Song 1990. According to Francis Ford Coppola, Carmine Coppola died of a stroke due to the shock of the song not winning the Oscar.
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    247

    The Prayer

    • Featured in film: Quest for Camelot
    • Performed by: Celine Dion
    "The Prayer" is most commonly known as a duet between Celine Dion and Andrea Bocelli. It is the second single from Dion's Christmas album These Are Special Times and the first from Bocelli's album Sogno, and was released as a promotional single on March 1, 1999. The song won the Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song from the Quest for Camelot movie in 1999, the second win in a row for a Celine Dion song. It was also nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Song in 1999 and a Grammy Award for Best Pop Collaboration with Vocals in 2000. Dion performed it with Bocelli at both ceremonies. Originally "The Prayer" was recorded as two separate solo versions, Dion's in English and Bocelli's in Italian. They appeared on the Quest for Camelot soundtrack in May 1998. The duet was included on both artists albums, released a few months later. It was also featured on Dion's compilation The Collector's Series, Volume One (2000) and greatest hits My Love: Ultimate Essential Collection (2008). A re-recorded solo version by Celine Dion (renamed "A Mother's Prayer") appeared on her 2004 album Miracle. Dion performed "The Prayer" live during her Taking Chances Tour as a virtual duet with
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    248
    Theme from Shaft

    Theme from Shaft

    • Featured in film: Shaft
    "Theme from Shaft", written and recorded by Isaac Hayes in 1971, is the soul and funk-styled theme song to the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer film, Shaft. The theme was released as a single (shortened and edited from the longer album version) two months after the movie's soundtrack by Stax Records' Enterprise label. "Theme from Shaft" went to number one on the Billboard Hot 100 in the United States in November 1971. The song was also well received by adult audiences, reaching number six on Billboard's Easy Listening (later Adult Contemporary) chart. The following year, "Theme from Shaft" won the Academy Award for Best Original Song, with Hayes not only becoming the first African American to win that honor (or any Academy Award in a non-acting category) but also becoming the first recipient of the award to both write and perform the winning song. Since then, the song has appeared in numerous television shows, commercials, and other movies, including the 2000 remake of Shaft, for which Hayes re-recorded the song. In 2000, Hayes told National Public Radio that he had only agreed to write and record the Shaft score after Shaft producer, Joel Freeman, promised him an audition for the lead role. He
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    249

    There You'll Be

    • Featured in film: Pearl Harbor
    • Performed by: Faith Hill
    "There You'll Be" is a song by Faith Hill, which became a hit single in 2001. Written by Diane Warren it was featured on the Pearl Harbor soundtrack. The song was also featured on Hill's greatest hits albums There You'll Be and The Hits. "There You'll Be" was first offered to Celine Dion, who reportedly turned it down. The song's music video was directed by Michael Bay, who also directed Pearl Harbor. The video was set in the same time period as the film, and drew many parallels. A cover of this song appears in Dance Dance Revolution Extreme. Released in May 2001, "There You'll Be" reached a peak of #10 on the Billboard Hot 100 in July 2001 due to strong airplay. No commercial CD single was released because producers wanted to boost sales of the Pearl Harbor soundtrack, which forced the song to chart solely on airplay in the United States. The song also reached #11 on the Billboard Country Singles Chart. The song was a big hit on the Adult Contemporary chart, staying at number one for 12 non consecutive weeks. It was also popular in Canada, as it topped the singles chart in August 2001. It is by far Faith Hill's biggest hit single in the UK to date, debuting and peaking at #3 on
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    250

    This Town Ain't Big Enough for Both of Us

    • Featured in film: Kick-Ass
    • Performed by: Sparks
    "This Town Ain't Big Enough for Both of Us" is a song written by Ron Mael of the American pop group Sparks. It is the opening track on their 1974 album Kimono My House, and was the lead single from the album, reaching number two in the UK singles chart. The original idea for the song was that after each verse Russell would sing a movie dialogue cliché, one of which was "This town ain't big enough for the both of us". They dropped the idea of having different phrases and instead used only the one in the title. An acoustic version of the song was recorded in 1985 for the B-side of the Change single. In 1997, Sparks recorded two new versions of the song. The first was an orchestral reworking produced by Tony Visconti which reinstated a verse Muff Winwood had cut from the original. The other was for their album Plagiarism as a collaboration with Faith No More, which was released as a single and reached number forty in the British singles chart. Winwood added the distinctive Western movie style gunshots in the studio. It has been claimed that Winwood bet with his friend Elton John that the song would become a top five hit in the UK charts. Elton John bet that it would not; he
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