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Best Film company role or service of All Time

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    2
    Motion capture

    Motion capture

    Motion capture or mocap is the process of recording the movement of objects or people. It is used in military, entertainment, sports, and medical applications, and for validation of computer vision and robotics. In filmmaking and video game development, it refers to recording actions of human actors, and using that information to animate digital character models in 2D or 3D computer animation. When it includes face and fingers or captures subtle expressions, it is often referred to as performance capture. In many fields, motion capture is sometimes called motion tracking, but in filmmaking and games, motion tracking more usually refers to match moving. In motion capture sessions, movements of one or more actors are sampled many times per second, early techniques used images from multiple cameras and calculate 3D positions, motion capture often records only the movements of the actor, not his or her visual appearance. This animation data is often mapped to a 3D model so that the model performs the same actions as the actor. This process may be contrasted to the older technique of rotoscope, such as the Ralph Bakshi 1978 The Lord of the Rings and 1981 American Pop animated films
    10.00
    4 votes
    3

    Visual effects

    Visual effects (commonly shortened to Visual F/X or VFX) are the various processes by which imagery is created and/or manipulated outside the context of a live action shoot. Visual effects involve the integration of live-action footage and generated imagery to create environments which look realistic, but would be dangerous, costly, or simply impossible to capture on film. Visual effects using computer generated imagery (so recently become accessible to the Independent filmmaker with the introduction of affordable animation and compositing software. Visual effects are often integral to a movie's story and appeal. Although most visual effects work is completed during post-production, it usually must be carefully planned and choreographed in pre-production and production. Visual effects are designed and edited in Post-Production, with the use of graphic design, modeling, animation and similar software, while special effects are made on set, such as explosions, car chases and so on. A visual effects supervisor is usually involved with the production from an early stage to work closely with production and the film's director to achieve the desired effects. Visual effects may be divided
    7.80
    5 votes
    4
    7.75
    4 votes
    6
    Filming location

    Filming location

    A filming location is a place where some or all of a film or television series is produced, in addition to or instead of using sets constructed on a movie studio backlot or soundstage. For example, the television series 24 is filmed primarily on location except for some scenes which are always filmed on the same sets. On location is a term used to describe the filming on such a real site. The term is often mistakenly believed to mean that the production is being filmed on the actual location in which its story is set, but this is not necessarily the case. Location filming has several advantages over filming on a studio set: Its disadvantages include: Location filming can provide significant economic development benefit to an area because local cast and crew use facilities such as catering and accommodation. Location filming usually requires a Location Manager, and locations are usually chosen by a Location Scout. Many popular locations, such as New York City in the United States, and the Isle of Man in the United Kingdom, have dedicated film offices to encourage location filming, and to suggest appropriate locations to film-makers. In many cases a second unit is dispatched to film
    7.00
    4 votes
    7

    Presenter

    A presenter, or host (sometimes hostess when a feminine person), is a person or organization responsible for running a public event. A museum or university, for example, may be the presenter or host of an exhibit. In films, a presenter (but not a host) is a usually well-known executive producer credited with introducing a film or filmmaker to a larger audience. In broadcast media a presenter is, especially in British English, the person who hosts, narrates, or otherwise takes the main role in presenting a radio or television programme. A person who hosts or presents other kinds of public entertainment may also be known as a master of ceremonies (often abbreviated to MC, or emcee). A television presenter is a person who introduces or hosts television programmes. Nowadays it is common for minor celebrities in other fields to take on this role, but there are also a number of people who have made their name solely within the field of presenting, particularly within children's television series to become a television personality. Some presenters may double as an actor, model, singer, comedian etc. Others may be subject matter experts, such as scientists or politicians, serving as
    5.40
    5 votes
    9
    Catering

    Catering

    Catering is the business of providing foodservice at a remote site or a site such as a hotel, public house (pub), or other location. A mobile caterer serves food directly from a vehicle, cart or truck that is designed for the purpose. Mobile catering is common at outdoor events (such as concerts), workplaces, and downtown business districts. Events range from cheese lunch drop-off to full-service catering. Caterers and their staff are part of the foodservice industry. Catering services provided vary depending on the event and can include: cooking and delivering food to an outside location; cooking, delivering and serving food; and full-service (preparing food, providing service staff, decoration of event location, prep and clean-up). In some cases of full-service catering, the caterer is called an "Event Management company." When most people refer to a "caterer", they are referring to an event caterer who serves food with waiting staff at dining tables or sets up a self-serve buffet. The food may be prepared on site, i.e., made completely at the event, or the caterer may choose to bring prepared food and put the finishing touches on once it arrives. The event caterer staff are not
    8.33
    3 votes
    10
    Special effects

    Special effects

    The illusions or tricks of the eye used in the film, television, theatre, videogame, or simulator industries to simulate the imagined events in a story or virtual world are traditionally called special effects (often abbreviated as SFX, SPFX, or simply FX). Special effects are traditionally divided into the categories of optical effects and mechanical effects. With the emergence of digital film-making tools a greater distinction between special effects and visual effects has been recognized, with "visual effects" referring to digital post-production and "special effects" referring to on-set mechanical effects and in-camera optical effects. Optical effects (also called photographic effects), are techniques in which images or film frames are created photographically, either "in-camera" using multiple exposure, mattes, or the Schüfftan process, or in post-production processes using an optical printer. An optical effect might be used to place actors or sets against a different background. Mechanical effects (also called practical or physical effects), are usually accomplished during the live-action shooting. This includes the use of mechanized props, scenery, scale models, pyrotechnics
    8.00
    3 votes
    11
    6.25
    4 votes
    12
    Funding

    Funding

    Funding is the act of providing resources, usually in form of money (financing), or other values such as effort or time (sweat equity), for a project, a person, a business or any other private or public institutions. The process of soliciting and gathering fund is known as fundraising. Sources of funding include credit, donations, grants, savings, subsidies, taxes, Fundings such as donations, subsidies and grants that have no direct requirement for return of investment are described as "soft funding" or "crowd funding". Funding that facilitates the exchange of equity ownership in a company for capital investment via an online funding portal as per the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act (alternately, the "JOBS Act of 2012") (U.S.) is known as "hyper funding". Funds can be allocated for either short-term or long-term purposes. In economics funds are injected into the market as capital by lenders and taken as loans by borrowers. There are two ways in which the capital can end up at the borrower. The lender can lend the capital to a financial intermediary against interest. These financial intermediaries then reinvest the money against a higher rate. The use of financial intermediaries
    7.67
    3 votes
    13
    9.50
    2 votes
    15
    7.33
    3 votes
    16

    Support

    In mathematics, the support of a function is the set of points where the function is not zero-valued, or the closure of that set. This concept is used very widely in mathematical analysis. In the form of functions with support that is bounded, it also plays a major part in various types of mathematical duality theories. A function supported in Y must vanish in X \ Y. For instance, f with domain X is said to have finite support if f(x) = 0 for all but a finite number of x in X. Since any superset of a support is also a support, attention is given to properties of subsets of X that admit at least one support for f. When the support of f (written supp(f)) is mentioned, it may be the intersection of all supports, {x in X:  f(x) ≠ 0} (the set-theoretic support), or the smallest support with some property of interest. The most common situation occurs when X is a topological space (such as the real line) and f : X→R is a continuous function. In this case, only closed supports of X are considered. So a (topological) support of f  is a closed subset of X outside of which f  vanishes. In this sense, supp(f ) is the intersection of all closed supports, since the intersection of closed sets is
    7.33
    3 votes
    17
    7.00
    3 votes
    18
    7.00
    3 votes
    21
    8.00
    2 votes
    22

    Computer-generated imagery

    Computer-generated imagery (CGI) is the application of computer graphics to create or contribute to images in art, printed media, video games, films, television programs, commercials, simulators and simulation generally. The visual scenes may be dynamic or static, and may be 2D or 3D, though the term "CGI" is most commonly used to refer to 3D computer graphics used for creating scenes or special effects in films and television. The term computer animation refers to dynamic CGI rendered as a movie. The term virtual world refers to agent-based, interactive environments. Computer graphics software is used to make computer-generated imagery for movies, etc. Recent availability of CGI software and increased computer speeds have allowed individual artists and small companies to produce professional-grade films, games, and fine art from their home computers. This has brought about an internet subculture with its own set of global celebrities, clichés, and technical vocabulary. Not only do animated images form part of computer-generated imagery, natural looking landscapes, such as fractal landscapes are also generated via computer algorithms. A simple way to generate fractal surfaces is to
    8.00
    2 votes
    25
    Camera dolly

    Camera dolly

    A camera dolly is a specialized piece of filmmaking and television production equipment designed to create smooth camera movements (cinematic techniques). The camera is mounted to the dolly and the camera operator and focus puller or camera assistant, usually ride on the dolly to operate the camera. The dolly grip is the dedicated technician trained to operate the dolly. The camera dolly may be used as a shooting platform on any surface but is often raised onto a track, to create smooth movement on a horizontal axis known as a dolly shot. Additionally, most professional film studio dollies have a hydraulic arm that raises or lowers the camera on the vertical axis. When a dolly grip operates a dolly on perpendicular axes simultaneously, it's known as a compound move. Dolly moves may also be executed without track, giving more freedom on the horizontal plane and with it, a higher degree of difficulty. These are called dancefloor moves and may either be done on the existing surface (if smooth enough) or on an overlay designed for dolly movement. The ground overlay usually consists of thick plywood as a bottom layer and masonite on top. Camera dollies have several steering mechanisms
    5.67
    3 votes
    29

    Co-production

    A co-production is a production where two or more different production companies are working together, for example in a film production. In the case of an international coproduction, production companies from different countries (typically two to three) are working together. Co-production is also refers to the way services are produced by their users, in some parts or entirely. International film coproduction was very common along the 50s, 60s and 70s between Italian, Spanish and French production companies, as exemplified by most of the Spaghetti-western and sword and sandal movies being Spanish-Italian coproductions, typically directed by an Italian, played fifty-fifty by Spanish and Italian actors and shot in southern Spain landscapes. The archetype of such pan-European coproductions was Treasure Island (1972), a British-French-German-Italian-Spanish film, starring American Orson Welles.
    5.00
    3 votes
    32
    8.00
    1 votes
    34

    Audio mixing

    Audio mixing for film and television is a process during the post-production stage of a moving image program by which a multitude of recorded sounds are combined into one or more channels. In the process, the source signals' level, frequency content, dynamics and panoramic position are commonly being manipulated and effects such as reverberation might be added. The process takes place on a mix stage, typically in a studio or theater, once the picture elements are edited into a final version. Normally the engineer will mix 4 main elements: Speech (dialogue, ADR, Voice-overs, etc.), Ambience (or atmosphere), Sound effects, and Music.
    5.00
    2 votes
    36

    Dailies

    Dailies, in filmmaking, are the raw, unedited footage shot during the making of a motion picture. They are so called because usually at the end of each day, that day's footage is developed, synced to sound, and printed on film in a batch (and/or telecined onto video tape or disk) for viewing the next day by the director and some members of the film crew. However, the term can be used to refer to any raw footage, regardless of when it is developed or printed. Another way to describe film dailies is "the first positive prints made by the laboratory from the negative photographed on the previous day". In addition, during filming, the director and some actors may view these dailies as an indication of how the filming and the actors' performances are progressing. In some regions such as the UK and Canada, dailies are usually referred to as rushes or daily rushes, referring to the speed at which the prints are developed. Film dailies can refer to the viewing of dailies on film in a theater. In animation, dailies are also called rushes or Sweat Box sessions. Dailies are usually viewed by members of the film crew either early in the morning before filming starts, during the lunch break, or
    6.00
    1 votes
    37
    6.00
    1 votes
    39

    Digital intermediate

    Digital intermediate (typically abbreviated to DI) is a motion picture finishing process which classically involves digitizing a motion picture and manipulating the color and other image characteristics. It often replaces or augments the photochemical timing process and is usually the final creative adjustment to a movie before distribution in theaters. It is distinguished from the telecine process in which film is scanned and color is manipulated early in the process to facilitate editing. However the lines between telecine and DI are continually blurred and are often executed on the same hardware by colorists of the same background. These two steps are typically part of the overall color management process in a motion picture at different points in time. A digital intermediate is also customarily done at higher resolution and with greater color fidelity than telecine transfers. Although originally used to describe a process that started with film scanning and ended with film recording, digital intermediate is also used to describe color grading and final mastering even when a digital camera is used as the image source and/or when the final movie is not output to film. This is due
    5.00
    1 votes
    40

    Vari-Lite

    VARI*LITE is the brand name of one of the first automated, variable-colour stage lighting systems to be created. Their intelligent lighting fixtures are commonly used in theatre, concerts, television, film and corporate events. The origins of Vari-Lite date to the late 1960s, when college friends Jack Calmes and Rusty Brutsché played together in a Texas-based blues band. They built a sound system for their shows which was of such quality, that other acts asked to rent it from them. In March 1970 Calmes and Brutsché, together with sound engineer Jack Maxson, incorporated Showco, with the intention of hiring sound systems to regional rock concerts. The company initially operated two sound systems and two trucks from Maxson's garage. The company quickly grew, both in size and reputation, and added lighting equipment to its inventory in 1972. By the end of the 1970s, with the competition growing, the company began looking for new ways to compete. In particular, Showco's lighting equipment was fast becoming outdated and the company could not afford to replace it. Showco had a very active R&D department, continuously looking for new technology. At the time, many companies within this
    4.00
    1 votes
    41

    3D post production

    A specialized service that some film production companies provide that involves compositing, image processing, & proofing of 3D films captured in digital form. As of 2011, most portable 3D camera systems do not include image processing to remain lightweight and portable, and so 3D post production is performed by these 3D post production companies.
    0.00
    0 votes
    42

    Film Title Design

    Film title design is (and always has been) an essential part of any motion picture. It was originally a motionless piece of artwork called title art. The main title design consisted of the movie company's name and / or logo and the presentation of the main characters along with the actor’s names, generally using that same artwork. Most independent or major studio had their own title art logo used as the background for their screen credits and they used it almost exclusively on every movie that they produced. Then, early in the 1930s, the more progressive motion picture studios started to change their approach in presenting their screen credits. The major studios took on the challenge of improving the way they introduced their movies. They made the decision to present a more complete list of credits to go with a higher quality of artwork to be used in their screen credits. A main title designer is the designer of the movie title. The manner in which title of a movie is displayed on screen is widely considered an art form. It's often been classified as motion graphics, title design, title sequences and animated credits. The title sequence is often presented through animated visuals
    0.00
    0 votes
    43
    Post-production

    Post-production

    Post-production is part of filmmaking and the video production process. It occurs in the making of motion pictures, television programs, radio programs, advertising, audio recordings, photography, and digital art. It is a term for all stages of production occurring after the actual end of shooting and/or recording the completed work. Post-production is, in fact, many different processes grouped under one name. These typically include: Typically, the post-production phase of creating a film takes longer than the actual shooting of the film, and can take several months to complete because it includes the complete editing, color correction and the addition of music and sound. The process of editing a movie is also seen as the second directing because through the post production it is possible to change the intention of the movie. Furthermore through the use of color correcting tools and the addition of music and sound, the atmosphere of the movie can be heavily influenced. For instance a blue-tinted movie is associated with a cold atmosphere and the choice of music and sound increases the effect of the shown scenes to the audience. Post-production was named the one of the 'Dying
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    0 votes
    45
    Sponsor

    Sponsor

    To sponsor something is to support an event, activity, person, or organization financially or through the provision of products or services. A sponsor is the individual or group that provides the support, similar to a benefactor. Sponsorhip is a cash and/or in-kind fee paid to a property (typically in sports, arts, entertainment or causes) in return for access to the exploitable commercial potential associated with that property, according to IEG. While the sponsoree (property being sponsored) may be nonprofit, unlike philanthropy, sponsorship is done with the expectation of a commercial return. While sponsorship can deliver increased awareness, brand building and propensity to purchase, it is different to advertising. Unlike advertising, sponsorship can not communicate specific product attributes. Nor can it stand alone. Sponsorship requires support elements. And, while advertising messages are controlled by the advertiser, sponsors do not control the message that is communicated. Consumers decide what a sponsorship means. A range of psychological and communications theories have been used to explain how commercial sponsorship works to impact consumer audiences. Most use the
    0.00
    0 votes
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