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Best Fictional Universe of All Time

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    1

    Jason Bourne

    • Characters: Jason Bourne
    The Bourne franchise consists of several novels, movies, and a video game, all featuring one of the several versions of the Jason Bourne character.
    6.89
    9 votes
    2

    Universe of The Legend of Zelda

    • Characters: Princess Zelda
    • Works Set Here: The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword
    • Created by: Shigeru Miyamoto
    The fictional universe depicted in The Legend of Zelda series of video games consists of a variety of lands, the most commonly appearing of these being Hyrule (ハイラル, Hairaru), and was created by Japanese video game developer Shigeru Miyamoto. The land of Hyrule (ハイラル, Hairaru), first depicted in The Legend of Zelda, is the main setting of the series. Many designated areas of Hyrule appear throughout the series, such as the Lost Woods, Kakariko Village, Death Mountain and Lake Hylia. Several games in the series are set in lands other than Hyrule, including Link's Awakening, set on Koholint Island; Majora's Mask, set in Termina; Oracle of Seasons and Oracle of Ages, set in Holodrum and Labrynna, respectively; The Wind Waker and Phantom Hourglass, both set on the Great Sea, a flooded Hyrule (although a large portion of Phantom Hourglass takes place in the World of the Ocean King, which is in another dimension);.Spirit Tracks, in New Hyrule and Skyward Sword, set on Skyloft, a group of islands floating above the clouds. Hyrule was formed by three goddesses (三柱の女神, Mihashira no Megami) Din (ディン), Farore (フロル, Faroru), and Nayru (ネール, Nēru). According to Hylian legend as depicted in
    8.43
    7 votes
    3

    Gundam

    • Works Set Here: Mobile Suit Gundam: Gundam vs. Zeta Gundam
    • Created by: Sunrise
    The Gundam Series (ガンダムシリーズ, Gandamu Shirīzu) is a metaseries of anime created by Sunrise studios that features giant robots (or "mecha") called "Mobile Suits" (MS); usually the protagonist's MS will carry the name Gundam. The metaseries started on April 7, 1979, as a serial TV show called Mobile Suit Gundam. That first TV series has since spawned a franchise that has come to include works released in numerous media. Titles have appeared in the form of multiple television series and OVAs, movies, manga, novels and video games, among other modes. The story from the original 1979 series has been considerably extended with sequels, prequels, side stories and alternate timelines. As a result, the title Gundam has become a collective term for the seven distinct but related timelines that can be pieced together from the stories that appear in the Gundam franchise. Generally speaking, the timelines do not intersect, but they do contain a few common elements such as the titular war machines called Gundam. However, all Gundam timelines and worlds, long after their own anime series, do eventually intersect and combine in the series Turn A Gundam. The original timeline for the Gundam series
    8.00
    7 votes
    4
    Nisus and Euryalus

    Nisus and Euryalus

    • Characters: Nisos
    Nisus and Euryalus are a pair of friends serving under Aeneas in the Aeneid, the Augustan epic by Vergil. Their foray among the enemy, narrated in Book 9, demonstrates their stealth and prowess as warriors, but ends as a tragedy: the loot Euryalus acquires attracts attention, and the two die together. Vergil presents their deaths as a loss of admirable loyalty and valor. They also appear in Book 5, during the funeral games of Anchises, where Vergil takes note of their amor pius, a love that exhibits the pietas that is Aeneas's own distinguishing virtue. In describing the bonds of devotion between the two men, Vergil draws on conventions of erotic poetry that have suggested a romantic relationship to some, interpreted by scholars in light of the Greek custom of paiderasteia. Nisus and Euryalus are among the refugees who in the aftermath of the Trojan War flee under the leadership of Aeneas, the highest-ranking Trojan to survive. Nisus was the son of Hyrtacus, and was known for his hunting. The family cultivated the huntress-goddess who inhabited Mount Ida. Euryalus, who was younger, has spent his entire life in a state of war and displacement. He was trained as a fighter by his
    7.29
    7 votes
    5
    7.83
    6 votes
    6

    Barsoomian universe

    • Characters: John Carter
    • Works Set Here: A Princess of Mars
    • Created by: Edgar Rice Burroughs
    The "Barsoomian" universe is the setting of Edgar Rice Burrough's Martian novels, including the world of Barsoom (Mars).
    8.80
    5 votes
    7

    World of One Piece

    • Characters: Gold Roger
    • Works Set Here: One Piece: Defeat the Pirate Ganzack! (OVA 1)
    • Created by: Eiichiro Oda
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    8.80
    5 votes
    8

    Central Registry of Births, Marriages and Deaths

    • Characters: Senhor Jose
    The Central Registry of Births, Marriages and Deaths is the centerpiece of Jose Saramago's novel All the Names (2000). Set in an unnamed city in an unnamed country, the protagonist of the novel, Senhor Jose, is a lowly clerk who also happens to live in the last house that is physically attached to the registry building. The registry includes not just current registration records of births, marriages and deaths, but also an archive of all such vital events.
    7.50
    6 votes
    9
    Werewolf: The Forsaken

    Werewolf: The Forsaken

    • Works Set Here: Werewolf: The Forsaken
    Werewolf: The Forsaken is a role-playing game set in the new World of Darkness created by White Wolf Game Studio. It is the successor to Werewolf: The Apocalypse, the "game of savage horror" from the old World of Darkness line of games, but has moved to a more personal sort of horror, reflecting the "dark mystery" theme of the new World of Darkness. Players portray the Forsaken, werewolves whose duty is to maintain the balance between the spirit realms and the physical world, policing intrusions of one into the other. Any human with Uratha heritage may undergo the First Change at some time in their life, becoming a werewolf, though what triggers the change is unknown. It is only known that it almost never happens before puberty or after the age of 60. Each character has an Auspice defined by what phase the moon was at during their First Change, and most join a Tribe, or become a Tribeless Ghost Wolf. Unlike traditional fictional werewolves, Uratha may change at any time into various forms between man and wolf, though they do find this easier when the phase of the moon matches their Auspice. Uratha are fierce territorial predators who feel the compulsion to hunt, compounded by an
    8.60
    5 votes
    10

    Scrooge McDuck universe

    • Characters: Angus McDuck
    The Duck universe (also called the Donald Duck universe or Scrooge McDuck universe) is a fictional universe where Disney cartoon characters Donald Duck and Scrooge McDuck live. It is a spin off of the older Mickey Mouse universe, yet has become much more extensive. "Duck universe" is a term used by fans and is not an official part of the Disney lexicon. The world's continuity has been primarily built in comics by Carl Barks (1901-2000), but has its roots in the Donald Duck short film series and the Silly Symphony comic strip by Ted Osborne and Al Taliaferro. Other cartoonists have built on Barks' work including Romano Scarpa (1927-2005) and Don Rosa (b. 1951). Other media includes children's books such as Little Golden Books and Little Big Books, television series such as Duck Tales (1987-1990) and Darkwing Duck (1991-1992), and video games such as QuackShot (1991) and Goin' Quackers (2000). Life in the Duck universe centers around the city of Duckburg in the fictional U.S. state of Calisota. The world is also a parallel universe and characters sometimes visit real-world locations and meet historical figures. Most of the characters have appeared in the 1980s Disney cartoon series
    9.75
    4 votes
    11

    Eternal Champion Multiverse

    • Characters: Dorian Hawkmoon
    • Works Set Here: The Eternal Champion
    • Created by: Michael Moorcock
    Michael Moorcock's Eternal Champion cycle takes place in an interconnected set of universes known as the Multiverse.  While the universes differ in many substantive ways, there are strong thematic echoes from universe to universe within the multiverse.

    The OED credits Moorcock with the first use of the term multiverse, though the term has seen wide adoption in Science Fiction and Fantasy fiction.
    8.20
    5 votes
    12

    The Evil Dead Fictional Universe

    • Characters: Ash Williams
    • Works Set Here: Evil Dead II
    • Created by: Sam Raimi
    The Evil Dead is an American horror film franchise created by Sam Raimi. The films revolve around the Necronomicon Ex-Mortis, a fictional Sumerian text which wreaks havoc upon a group of cabin inhabitants in a wooded area in Tennesee. The protagonist, Ashley J. "Ash" Williams, played by Bruce Campbell, is the only character left alive by the end of the series. The original series includes The Evil Dead (1981), Evil Dead II (1987), and Army of Darkness (1992). The franchise has since expanded into other formats such as video games and comic books. A musical opened in Toronto in 2003 containing material from all three films, and a remake of the first film is currently in development and due for release in 2013. In January 1979 Bruce Campbell was a college dropout who had just quit his job as a taxicab driver. Sam Raimi was studying literature at Michigan State University with Robert Tapert finishing his economics degree. While putting the finishing touches on It's Murder! Tapert suggested doing a feature length film to Raimi. Raimi felt it to be impossible citing that they could never pull off the funding. Campbell did not mind stating that "I could always move back home." Tapert was
    8.20
    5 votes
    13

    CSI franchise

    • Characters: Kyle Harmon
    CSI (Crime Scene Investigation) is a media franchise of American television programs created by Anthony E. Zuiker and originally broadcast on CBS, all of which deal with forensic scientists as they unveil the circumstances behind mysterious and unusual deaths and crimes committed. The original series, CSI: Crime Scene Investigation was renewed for its 13th season on March 14, 2012. The first series in the franchise to end is CSI: Miami, which was canceled after ten seasons on May 13, 2012. That same day, it was announced that CSI: NY was renewed for its ninth season. As of October 13, 2012, 690 episodes of the CSI franchise have aired. The CSI Franchise is available in 200 territories with an audience of two billion people, various spin-offs have been developed to cater for the market, including novels, comic books, and computer games. The franchise has had a large cultural impact. It has spawned what has been called the "CSI effect", in which juries often have unreasonable expectations of real-life forensics because of what they have seen on CSI. Equally, the new-found popularity of forensics dramas on television has led to an increase in applications for courses dealing with
    7.00
    6 votes
    14

    Ekumen

    • Works Set Here: The Left Hand of Darkness
    The Hainish Cycle consists of a number of science fiction novels and stories of Ursula K. Le Guin. Most of them are not set on the planet Hain, but have it as a distant background. People from Hain are often present but mostly as secondary characters. In keeping with Le Guin's soft science fiction style, the setting is used primarily to explore anthropological and sociological ideas. Notable and award-winning Hainish novels are The Left Hand of Darkness and The Dispossessed. The short novel The Word for World is Forest and the short story "The Day Before the Revolution" have also won awards. In the first three novels—Rocannon's World, Planet of Exile, and City of Illusions—there is or was a League of all Worlds; in City of Illusions, it seems to have been conquered or fragmented by an alien race, called the Shing, from beyond the League. In the fourth, The Left Hand of Darkness, it seems that the planets of the former League of Worlds have re-united as the Ekumen, which was founded by the Hainish people. The fifth, The Dispossessed, is the earliest chronologically in the Hainish Cycle. The Cetians have been visited by people from other planets, including Earth and Hain. The various
    7.00
    6 votes
    15

    Future History

    • Characters: Lazarus Long
    • Works Set Here: The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress
    The Future History, by Robert A. Heinlein, describes a projected future of the human race from the middle of the 20th century through the early 23rd century. The term Future History was coined by John W. Campbell, Jr. in the February 1941 issue of Astounding Science Fiction. Campbell published an early draft of Heinlein's chart of the series in the March 1941 issue. Heinlein wrote most of the Future History stories early in his career, between 1939-1941 and between 1945-1950. Most of the Future History stories written prior to 1967 are collected in The Past Through Tomorrow, which also contains the final version of the chart. That collection does not include Universe and Common Sense; they were published separately as Orphans of the Sky. The Future History was nominated for the Hugo Award for Best All-Time Series in 1966, along with the Barsoom series by Edgar Rice Burroughs, the Lensman series by E. E. Smith, the Foundation series by Isaac Asimov, and The Lord of the Rings series by J. R. R. Tolkien, but lost to Asimov's Foundation series. For the most part, The Past Through Tomorrow defines a core group of stories that are clearly within the Future History category. However,
    7.00
    6 votes
    16

    Mage: The Awakening

    Mage: The Awakening is a role-playing game developed by White Wolf, Inc. and based in their World of Darkness setting. The characters portrayed in this game are individuals able to bend or break the commonly-accepted rules of reality to perform subtle or outlandish acts of magic. These characters are broadly referred to as "mages". Mage: The Awakening is loosely based on a prior White Wolf product, Mage: The Ascension, which had similar game mechanics, though the terminology differs. While the games both focus on magic, the setting and themes of Mage: The Ascension have been completely replaced. Mage: The Awakening won the 2006 ENnie Award for Best Writing. As with the other games in the "new" World of Darkness (nWoD), the history presented in the game provides for some ambiguity. However, the "origin story" of magic and mages is less ambiguous (or at least given more lip-service) than that of the nWoD vampires or werewolves. In the mythic past, a mysterious island existed with a single towering mountain, encircled by dragons which lived upon its summit. The mountain on the island called to humanity through dreams and visions. During this period, humanity was barbaric and tribal,
    8.00
    5 votes
    17

    Dinotopia

    • Works Set Here: Dinotopia
    Dinotopia is a fictional utopia created by author and illustrator James Gurney. It is the setting for the book series with which it shares its name. Dinotopia is an isolated island inhabited by shipwrecked humans and sentient dinosaurs who have learned to coexist peacefully as a single symbiotic society. The first book has "appeared in 18 languages in more than 30 countries and sold two million copies." Dinotopia: A Land Apart from Time and Dinotopia: The World Beneath both won Hugo awards for best original artwork. Since its original publication, over twenty Dinotopia books have been published by various authors to expand the series. A live-action TV mini-series, a brief live-action TV series, an animated film, and several video games have also been released. The name "Dinotopia" is a portmanteau of "dinosaur" and "utopia". Ironically, in Greek "Dinotopia" (Δεινοτοπία) means "terrible place" or "land of suffering", since the original Greek word for "dinosaur" (δεινόσαυρος) translates as "terrible lizard" and is made up of the words for "terrible" (δεινός, dinos) and "lizard" (σαύρα, savra, transliterated as saura). "Utopia" in Greek loosely translates as "a land or place that does
    7.80
    5 votes
    18
    9.00
    4 votes
    19

    Stainless Steel Universe

    • Characters: The Stainless Steel Rat
    • Works Set Here: The Stainless Steel Rat
    • Created by: Harry Harrison
    The universe for Harry Harrison's Stainless Steel Rat series.
    9.00
    4 votes
    20

    Metaverse

    • Characters: Y.T.
    • Works Set Here: Snow Crash
    The Metaverse is our collective online shared space, created by the convergence of virtually enhanced physical reality and physically persistent virtual space, including the sum of all virtual worlds, augmented reality, and the internet. The word metaverse is a portmanteau of the prefix "meta" (meaning "beyond") and "universe" and is typically used to describe the concept of a future iteration of the internet, made up of persistent, shared, 3D virtual spaces linked into a perceived virtual universe. The term was coined in Neal Stephenson's 1992 science fiction novel Snow Crash, where humans, as avatars, interact with each other and software agents, in a three-dimensional space that uses the metaphor of the real world. Stephenson coined the term to describe a virtual reality-based successor to the Internet. Concepts similar to the Metaverse have appeared under a variety of names in the cyberpunk genre of fiction as far back as 1981 in the novella True Names. Conceptually, the Metaverse describes a future internet of persistent, shared, 3D virtual spaces linked into a perceived virtual universe, but common standards, interfaces, and communication protocols between and among virtual
    6.67
    6 votes
    21

    Well World

    • Characters: Mavra Chang
    The Well World series is a series of novels by Jack L. Chalker. The Well World series is largely set on a fictional planet named Well World. The Well World was constructed by an ancient alien species, known as the Markovians, who felt they had reached a dead end in their evolution. Volunteers were transformed into new, designed species. Once a species was deemed ready, it was sent out into the universe to begin evolving anew. The Well World is a planet-sized, reality-shaping computer that controls and maintains this new universe, which is layered on top of the much smaller, original Markovian one. By the time of the stories in the series, the Markovians have vanished, leaving behind the Well World, continually maintaining the new universe. The Markovian planets themselves contain the gateways leading to the Well World. The Well World's surface is composed primarily of 1560 large hexagonal regions — called "hexes" — each with an independent and often dramatically different climate and ecosystem, that David Langford compares to the hexagonally tiled boards used in "hex-and-counter" forms of tabletop wargaming. Each of these hexes is a prototype environment for a planet that exists in
    6.67
    6 votes
    22

    Buck Rogers XXVC

    Buck Rogers XXVC (sometimes written as Buck Rogers in the 25th Century) is a game setting created by TSR, Inc. in the late 1980s. Products based on this setting include novels, graphic novels, a role-playing game (RPG), board game, and video games. The setting was active from 1988 until 1995. Buck Rogers was a fictional character created in 1928 by Philip Nowlan. A Buck Rogers comic strip written by Nowlan was syndicated by John Dille (who may have contributed the nickname "Buck" to the character). Ownership of Buck Rogers and other works passed into the hands of the Dille Family Trust. In the 1980s, John Dille's granddaughter, Lorraine Williams, was the president of TSR. In that decade, business for TSR was booming, mainly as a result of their popular RPG, Advanced Dungeons & Dragons. Lorraine Williams decided to merge Buck Rogers and D&D to make the XXVc game setting, which came out in 1990 and was based on the Advanced Dungeons and Dragons Second Edition rules, but there are some small differences. It was a new incarnation of the Buck Rogers world created by William's brother, Frank Dille. Its universe was limited to the solar system, and revolved heavily around interplanetary
    7.60
    5 votes
    23

    Velgarth

    • Created by: Mercedes Lackey
    Velgarth is the planetary setting created by Mercedes Lackey, the author of the Valdemar Saga novels. The continents are not named. The Valdemar Saga primarily focuses on the story of the nation of Valdemar, and according to Mercedes Lackey’s official bibliography, there are thirty novels and seven anthologies. Many of the inhabitants of Velgarth possess supernatural abilities. These skills primarily fall under the categories of Magic and Mind-Magic; though a number of them fall outside of either description. Magic, in Velgarth, refers to the ability to use a normally invisible form of energy to produce fantastic results. This energy, also referred to as "Mage-power", is present both in living beings and the environment. Powerful streams of energy, known as ley-lines, may be utilized by some mages; and only the most skilled "Adept-level" mages can control and use the powerful nodes, or reservoirs, where two or more ley-lines meet. These lines and nodes can occur naturally, or can be created by extremely skilled mages. From these nodes, the energy is slowly siphoned into a desolate nether plane called the Void; and later returned to the world (Storm Warning). Magic is said to act
    7.40
    5 votes
    24
    8.50
    4 votes
    25
    The Book of One Thousand and One Nights

    The Book of One Thousand and One Nights

    • Characters: Ali Baba
    The Three Apples is a story contained in the One Thousand and One Nights collection (also known as the "Arabian Nights"). It is a first level story, being told by Scheherazade herself, and contains one second level story, the Tale of Núr al-Dín Alí and his Son. It occurs early in the Arabian Nights narrative, being started during night 19, after the Tale of Portress. The Tale of Núr al-Dín Alí and his Son starts during night 20, and the cycle ends during night 25, when Scheherazade starts the Tale of the Hunchback. In this tale, a fisherman discovers a heavy locked chest along the Tigris river and he sells it to the Abbasid Caliph, Harun al-Rashid, who then has the chest broken open only to find inside it the dead body of a young woman who was cut into pieces. Harun orders his vizier, Ja'far ibn Yahya, to solve the crime and find the murderer within three days or else he will have him executed instead. Ja'far, however, fails to find the culprit before the deadline. Just when Harun is about to have Ja'far executed for his failure, a plot twist occurs when two men appear, one a handsome young man and the other an old man, both claiming to be the murderer. Both men argue and call each
    8.50
    4 votes
    26

    Wold Newton family

    • Characters: Doc Savage
    The Wold Newton family is a literary concept derived from a form of crossover fiction developed by the science fiction writer Philip José Farmer. Farmer suggested in two "biographies" of fictional characters (Tarzan Alive and Doc Savage: His Apocalyptic Life), that the real meteorite (Wold Cottage meteorite) which fell near Wold Newton, Yorkshire, England, on December 13, 1795, was radioactive and caused genetic mutations in the occupants of a passing coach. Many of their descendants were thus endowed with extremely high intelligence and strength, as well as an exceptional capacity and drive to perform good, or, as the case may be, evil deeds. The progeny of these travellers were purported to have been the real-life originals of fictionalised characters, both heroic and villainous, over the last few hundred years, such as Sherlock Holmes, Tarzan, Doc Savage, and Lord Peter Wimsey. Other popular characters included by Farmer as members of the Wold Newton family are: Solomon Kane; Captain Blood; The Scarlet Pimpernel; Sherlock Holmes's nemesis Professor Moriarty; Phileas Fogg; The Time Traveller (main character of The Time Machine by H. G. Wells); Allan Quatermain; A.J. Raffles;
    8.50
    4 votes
    27

    Greyhawk

    • Characters: Yolande
    • Works Set Here: Against the Giants
    Greyhawk, also known as the World of Greyhawk, is a fictional world designed as a campaign setting for the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy roleplaying game. Although not the first campaign world developed for Dungeons & Dragons—Dave Arneson's Blackmoor campaign predates it by a few months—the world of Greyhawk was the setting most closely identified with the development of the game from 1972 until 2008. The world itself started as a simple dungeon under a castle designed by Gary Gygax for the amusement of his children and friends, but it rapidly expanded to include not only a complex multi-layered dungeon environment, but also the nearby city of Greyhawk, and eventually an entire world. In addition to the campaign world, which was published in several editions over twenty years, Greyhawk was also used as the setting for many adventures published in support of the game, as well as for RPGA's massively shared Living Greyhawk campaign from 2000–2008. In the late 1960s, Gary Gygax, a military history buff and pulp fantasy fan, started to add elements of fantasy into traditional tabletop medieval miniatures wargames at his games club in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. He sometimes replaced typical
    7.20
    5 votes
    28
    Dungeons & Dragons

    Dungeons & Dragons

    • Characters: Annam
    • Works Set Here: Neverwinter Nights
    • Created by: Gary Gygax
    Dungeons & Dragons (abbreviated as D&D or DnD) is a fantasy role-playing game (RPG) originally designed by Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson, and first published in 1974 by Tactical Studies Rules, Inc. (TSR). The game has been published by Wizards of the Coast since 1997. It was derived from miniature wargames with a variation of the Chainmail game serving as the initial rule system. D&D's publication is widely regarded as the beginning of modern role-playing games and the role-playing game industry. D&D departs from traditional wargaming and assigns each player a specific character to play instead of a military formation. These characters embark upon imaginary adventures within a fantasy setting. A Dungeon Master serves as the game's referee and storyteller, while also maintaining the setting in which the adventures occur and playing the role of the inhabitants. The characters form a party that interacts with the setting's inhabitants (and each other). Together they solve dilemmas, engage in battles and gather treasure and knowledge. In the process the characters earn experience points to become increasingly powerful over a series of sessions. The early success of Dungeons & Dragons led
    7.00
    5 votes
    29

    Revelation Space universe

    • Works Set Here: Chasm City
    • Created by: Alastair Reynolds
    The Revelation Space universe is a fictional universe which was created by Alastair Reynolds and used as the setting for a number of his novels and stories. Its fictional history follows the human species through various conflicts from the relatively near future (roughly 2200) to approximately AD 40 000 (all the novels to date are set between 2427 and 2727, although certain stories extend beyond this period). It takes its name from Revelation Space, which was the first published novel set in the universe. The name "Revelation Space universe" has been used by Alastair Reynolds in both the introductory text in the collections Diamond Dogs, Turquoise Days and Galactic North, and also on several editions of the novels set in the universe. The Revelation Space universe is set in a future version of our world, with the addition of a number of extraterrestrial species and advanced technologies that are not necessarily grounded in current science. It is nonetheless somewhat "harder" than most examples of space opera, relying to a considerable extent on science Reynolds believes to be possible; in particular, faster-than-light travel is absent. Reynolds has said he prefers to keep the
    7.00
    5 votes
    30
    Stargate universe

    Stargate universe

    • Characters: Frank Simmons
    The Stargate universe is the fictional universe in which the various Stargate TV shows, movies, etc, are set. It is based on a world in which Earth discovers an alien artifact which allows wormhole travel to other planets and galaxies.
    9.33
    3 votes
    31

    Xenogenesis

    • Works Set Here: Imago
    • Created by: Octavia E. Butler
    The universe for Octavia E. Butler's Xenogenesis series.
    9.33
    3 votes
    32

    1632 multiverse

    • Characters: Becky Stearns
    • Works Set Here: 1632
    • Created by: Eric Flint
    1632 Multiverse is a sub-article of the various 1632 series articles covering the many Eric Flint works in the popular alternate history book series that began with the 1632 novel set in the turbulent times starting in 1631 and follows the key changes manifest in the "nehistorical timeline" of that diverse and interesting parallel world as the ripples of change occur differently from in our time line (OTL) as reported in OTL's extant history books. The events of that difference in history—the neohistory—is part of the allure of the complicated and sometimes messy series, and is the subject of this sub-article.
    8.00
    4 votes
    33

    Anitaverse

    • Characters: Richard Zeeman
    • Created by: Laurell K. Hamilton
    The fictional universe for Laurell K. Hamilton's Anita Blake: Vampire Hunter series.
    8.00
    4 votes
    34

    Legacy of the Aldenata

    • Created by: John Ringo
    The Legacy of the Aldenata, also known as the Posleen War Series is the fictional universe of one of John Ringo's military science fiction series. The central premise is that in 2001, humanity receives greetings from a highly advanced, peaceable Galactic Federation. However, all is not well, for a species of aggressive aliens known as the Posleen are attacking the Galactics. Since the Galactics are almost entirely unable to fight, they are appealing to the proven military abilities of humanity for aid. However, things are rarely as simple as they seem, and humanity soon discovers that the Galactics are no friends at all. There are plots within plots, some going back to the dawn of humanity and beyond: plots that endanger the very survival of humanity. The first four novels cover the Posleen War in which the Posleen invade Earth. Another novel, Cally's War (and its two sequels), takes up the story a few decades later; The Hero is set nearly a thousand years later. Watch on the Rhine takes place immediately after Gust Front and extends until March 2008, with the very last chapter taking place at some unspecified point far after the end of Hell's Faire but prior to the beginning of
    8.00
    4 votes
    35
    World of Darkness

    World of Darkness

    • Works Set Here: Vampire: The Masquerade
    "World of Darkness" (or WoD) is the name given to three related but distinct fictional universes created as settings for supernatural horror themed role-playing games. It is also the name of roleplaying games in the second and third settings. The first was conceived by Mark Rein-Hagen, while the second was designed by several people at White Wolf Gaming Studio, which Rein-Hagen helped to found. The first two World of Darkness settings have been used for several horror fiction-themed role-playing games that make use of White Wolf's Storyteller / Storytelling System, as well as Mind's Eye Theatre, a live action roleplaying game based on the core games. The third, Monte Cook's World of Darkness, created by Monte Cook based on the first two World of Darkness settings, includes only a single product. In order to avoid confusing the two product lines, many players refer to the most recent version of the World of Darkness line, released on August 21, 2004, as "New World of Darkness" or "nWoD", and the previous version as "Classic World of Darkness" or "cWoD". Prior to the re-release of cWoD it was often referred to as "oWoD" for "Original" or "Old World of Darkness. While the newer
    8.00
    4 votes
    36

    The Red Seas

    • Works Set Here: The Red Seas: Old Gods (Part 1)
    The Red Seas is a series for 2000 AD, written by Ian Edginton and drawn by Steve Yeowell. The stories revolve around Captain Jack Dancer and the crew of his ship the Red Wench. It mixes pirates with anomalous phenomena, including magic, zombies, the hollow earth and werewolves. "Under the Banner of King Death" saw the crew fighting the zombie pirates of Doctor Orlando Doyle, and culminated in an appearance by Satan himself. Interestingly, it was this first story that saw the destruction of the erstwhile pirate's ship and the deaths of most of the crew. It was also where Erebus joined the team - sent on a spiritual quest by Isabella's shaman father, Jack Dancer travelled to the Spirit World and decapitated Erebus in order to use his immortal heads as a spirit compass to help him locate Isabella, who had been kidnapped by Doyle. "Twilight of the Idols" saw the crew captured by the Royal Navy, only to be saved from hanging by an elderly Aladdin, who wanted their help in finding the floating island of Laputa. "Meanwhile..." explored what was happening to the cast of secondary characters while Jack and his crew were away. Erebus and the staff of the Jolly Cripple clashed swords for the
    6.00
    6 votes
    37

    Foreigner Universe

    • Characters: Bren Cameron
    • Created by: C. J. Cherryh
    The Foreigner universe is a fictional universe developed by science fiction and fantasy author C. J. Cherryh. The series centers around the descendants of a ship lost in transit from Earth en route to found a new space station. It consists of semi-encapsulated trilogy arcs (or sequences) that focus on the life of Bren Cameron, the human paidhi, a translator-diplomat to the court of the ruling Aiji of the atevi aishidi'tat. Currently thirteen novels have been published between 1994 and 2012, a fourteenth book is awaiting publication, and a fifteenth is in progress. Cherryh calls the series "First Contact." The Foreigner series opens with the failure of a starship. A brief preamble to the first book describes a system failure that leaves the starship Phoenix stranded in some far-flung reach of space, without any idea of how to get home, completely unable even to locate Sol in the visible stars. Phoenix is carrying colonists and equipment to establish a new space station to extend Earth's interstellar trade empire. Sketched in the preamble is the heroic effort to refuel Phoenix in the environs of a hostile sun, and navigate the lost starship to a more habitable environment. Lost to
    6.80
    5 votes
    38

    Iron Kingdoms

    • Works Set Here: Iron Kingdoms Character Guide
    • Created by: Matt Wilson
    Iron Kingdoms is a fantasy role-playing game, originally published by Privateer Press in 2004. The setting combines fantasy with the age of steam technology, particularly firearms and locomotives, in addition to knowledge of electricity. In addition to the role-playing game, the Iron Kingdoms is the setting for the miniatures games Warmachine and Hordes. The Iron Kingdoms is a Human-dominated campaign setting. Though fantasy standards such as Dwarves and Elves exist, the vast majority of the setting is populated by and run by Humans. Humanity has long established several kingdoms for themselves: Cygnar, Llael, Ord, Khador, the Protectorate of Menoth, and even a number of the Scharde Islands are populated by a majority of humans. Hailing from the central and western areas of Khador, the Khardic people are the most numerous in the Empire. The ancient Khardic Empire took its name from them, and the exhibit a nationalist pride in the old culture. They tend to be dark of hair and rough of features. Also, the Khards tend to be physically larger than most ethnic groups in Western Immoren, and are known for their ability to endure hardship. Many claim that Khardic size is due to descent
    7.75
    4 votes
    39
    Jabberwocky

    Jabberwocky

    • Characters: Jubjub bird
    • Works Set Here: Jabberwocky
    "Jabberwocky" is a nonsense verse poem written by Lewis Carroll in his 1871 novel Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There, a sequel to Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. The book tells of Alice's adventures within the back-to-front world of a looking glass. In a scene in which she is in conversation with the chess pieces White King and White Queen, Alice finds a book written in a seemingly unintelligible language. Realising that she is travelling through an inverted world, she recognises that the verse on the pages are written in mirror-writing. She holds a mirror to one of the poems, and reads the reflected verse of "Jabberwocky". She finds the nonsense verse as puzzling as the odd land she has walked into, later revealed as a dreamscape. "Jabberwocky" is considered one of the greatest nonsense poems written in English. Its playful, whimsical language has given us nonsense words and neologisms such as "galumphing" and "chortle". A decade before the publication of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and the sequel Through the Looking Glass, Carroll wrote the first stanza to what would become "Jabberwocky" while in Croft on Tees, close to nearby Darlington, where he lived
    7.75
    4 votes
    40

    Deathstalker universe

    The Deathstalker universe is the fictional setting for British author Simon R Green's series of Deathstalker science fiction novels. Green's universe is dominated by a vast and powerful human empire that has fallen from its ancient beginnings into cruelty, decadence and oppression. Alien species when encountered are subjugated or exterminated; internal dissent is ruthlessly put down, and power is concentrated in the hands of a psychotic empress (known as the "Iron Bitch") and a small number of aristocratic families, or clans. Under the justification of protecting the empire from external threats, the empress maintains the status quo by playing off different groups against one another, preventing any organisation from becoming powerful enough to challenge her rule. Cloning is commonplace, with clones being regarded as products of science, and therefore, non-people for use as expendable slave labour. Some people, known generically as espers, have various psychic powers including telekinesis, telepathy and teleportation - these are also regarded as products of science and therefore are carefully regulated and exploited by the empire as slaves, weapons, and "bio-computers". The vast
    7.50
    4 votes
    41

    Mouseton

    • Characters: Mickey Mouse
    Mouseton is a US city in Disney comics. Located in the fictional United States state of Calisota, Mouseton is the hometown of Mickey Mouse, Goofy, Minnie Mouse, Clarabelle Cow, and others in Disney comics produced by Disney Italia, Disney-Hachette (France), and various USA publishers. The first time a city for Mickey and his friends was named was in the early story "The Great Orphanage Robbery" (1932), in which a train station sign identified it as Silo Center. A couple of later stories used the name Mouseville. But the first consistent name for Mickey's city came in 1950s Italy, where it was called Topolinia (from Topolino or 'little mouse,' Mickey's Italian name). In 1990, Disney Comics Inc. launched the new American comic Mickey Mouse Adventures and initially planned to use the name Mouseville there. But due to then-current Mighty Mouse cartoons' use of a city called Mouseville, the new name Mouseton was created for Mickey's town instead; both in Mickey Mouse Adventures, and in Disney's contemporary reprints of vintage stories in Walt Disney's Comics and Stories (1991-93). Later publisher Gemstone and the present Boom Studios have continued the use of Mouseton from 2003 onward.
    7.50
    4 votes
    42

    Planet of the Apes

    • Characters: Dr. Hasslein
    • Works Set Here: Planet of the Apes
    • Created by: Pierre Boulle
    Planet of the Apes is an American media franchise comprising seven films (one a remake, one a reboot), two television series (one animated), and various comic books. The series began with the 1968 science fiction film Planet of the Apes, which was based on the 1963 French novel La Planète des singes (Planet of the Apes or Monkey Planet) by Pierre Boulle. The original series of five films (1968–1973) were produced by Arthur P. Jacobs, based on Boulle's original novel premise, and released by 20th Century Fox. They chronicle the fall of humanity and the rise of intelligent apes through the points of view of astronaut George Taylor (Charlton Heston), astronaut John Brent (James Franciscus), the apes Zira (Kim Hunter) and Cornelius (Roddy McDowall), and their ape son Caesar (also played by McDowall). The first film was co-written by Rod Serling, creator of The Twilight Zone and Night Gallery. This was followed by two television series in the 1970s. The live-action series was called Planet of the Apes, and it takes place approximately 900 years prior to the original Planet of the Apes film in a civilization where apes are the dominant life form, but humans still have the ability to
    7.50
    4 votes
    43

    Asterix

    • Characters: Asterix
    • Works Set Here: Asterix and the Great Divide
    Asterix or The Adventures of Asterix (French: Astérix or Astérix le Gaulois, IPA: [asteʁiks lə ɡolwa]) is a series of French comic books written by René Goscinny and illustrated by Albert Uderzo (Uderzo also took over the job of writing the series after the death of Goscinny in 1977). The series first appeared in French in the magazine Pilote on 29 October 1959. As of 2009, 34 comic books in the series have been released. The series follows the exploits of a village of indomitable Gauls as they resist Roman occupation. They do so by means of a magic potion, brewed by their druid, which gives the recipient superhuman strength. The protagonist, the titular character Asterix, along with his friend Obelix have various adventures. The "ix" suffix of both names echoes the names of real Gaulish chieftains such as Vercingetorix, Orgetorix, and Dumnorix. Many of the stories have them travel to foreign countries, though others are set in and around their village. For much of the history of the series (Volumes 4 through 29), settings in Gaul and abroad alternated, with even-numbered volumes set abroad and odd-numbered volumes set in Gaul, mostly in the village. The Asterix series is one of
    8.67
    3 votes
    44

    Casey, Crime Photographer

    • Characters: Flashgun Casey
    • Created by: George Harmon Coxe
    Casey, Crime Photographer (aka Crime photographer; Flashgun Casey; Casey, Press Photographer; Stephen Bristol, Crime Photographer) was a media franchise, in the 1930s until the 1960s. Created by George Harmon Coxe, the photographer Casey was featured in radio, film, theater, novels, magazines and comic books. Launched in a 1934 issue of the pulp magazine Black Mask, the character Jack "Flashgun" Casey, was a crime photographer for the newspaper The Morning Express. With the help of reporter Ann Williams (portrayed on radio and TV by Jan Miner), he solved crimes and recounted his stories to friends at The Blue Note, their favorite tavern. Casey's creator, George Harmon Coxe, was the 1964 recipient of the Mystery Writers of America's prestigious Grand Master Award representing the pinnacle of achievement in the mystery field. This award represents significant output of quality in mystery writing. "Flashgun" Casey began in the March 1934 issue of Black Mask, in the story Return Engagement. This story was later used in the film "Here's Flash Casey". Twenty more stories appeared in the magazine over the next decades, and collections of these stories were published in anthology form as
    8.67
    3 votes
    45

    Digital World

    • Characters: Marcus Damon
    • Works Set Here: Digimon World Data Squad
    The Digital World (often referred to as the "DigiWorld" in English media) is a fictional universe featured in the Digimon media franchise. In Digimon anime, manga, video games, and other related merchandise, the Digital World is a parallel universe to Earth that was made from computer data originating in Earth's communication networks. According to the video game Brave Tamer, the Digital World's beginnings can be traced to the early twentieth century, with the activation of the Atanasoff–Berry Computer (ABC) - the first computer - which laid the basic foundations of the world. Subsequently, the first patented computer, ENIAC, was activated, and proceeded to build upon those foundations, shaping the Digital World. Over the ensuing years, through the continued growth of the electronic communications network on Earth, the Digital World continued to expand and grow, even after the ABC and ENIAC were shut down. There are multiple alternate reality incarnations of the Digital World, each one running parallel with the various multiple Earths that exist in the multiverse. The different Digimon anime series are set in separate Digital Worlds. The basic mechanics, locations and inhabitants
    8.67
    3 votes
    46

    Looney Tunes Universe

    • Characters: Road Runner
    • Works Set Here: Fur of Flying
    The fictional universe in which all of the Warner Bros. animated cartoon characters appear within. It also contains all the characters of the Merrie Melodies animated shorts/films/shows.
    8.67
    3 votes
    47

    Questionable Content

    Questionable Content (abbreviated QC) is a slice of life webcomic written and drawn by Jeph Jacques. It was launched on August 1, 2003. Jacques currently makes his living exclusively from QC merchandising and advertising, making him one of the few professional webcomic artists. By 2004, Jacques was able to support himself and his future wife based on income from merchandise and advertising sales. The plot centers on Marten Reed, an indie rock aficionado; his roommate, Faye Whitaker; and Faye's boss, Dora Bianchi. Supporting characters include employees of the local coffee shop, neighbours and anthropomorphized personal computers. QC's storytelling style combines romantic melodrama, sitcom, humor about indie rock music, and sexual humor. The artistic style has notably changed over the lifetime of the comic, as Jacques has been constantly refining his drawing methods. He has on occasion redrawn older strips in his more recent drawing style. On August 26, 2011, the comic reached its 2000th strip. In 2003, Jacques worked at a local Easthampton, Massachusetts, newspaper answering telephones. According to Jacques, the large amount of free time and access to the Internet led him to read
    10.00
    2 votes
    48

    Dracula 2000

    • Characters: Count Dracula
    • Works Set Here: Dracula 2000
    This is the fictional universe of Wes Craven's Dracula 2000 which is different than the traditional Dracula universe because the story is changed so that Dracula is in fact Judas Iscariot.
    7.25
    4 votes
    49

    Earth-Two

    Earth-Two is a fictional universe appearing in American comic book stories published by DC Comics. First appearing in The Flash #123 (1961), Earth-Two was created to explain how Silver-Age (Earth-One) versions of characters such as the Flash could appear in stories with their Golden Age counterparts. This Earth-Two continuity includes DC Golden Age heroes, including the Justice Society of America, whose careers began at the dawn of World War II, concurrently with their first appearances in comics. Earth-Two, along with the four other surviving Earths of the DC Multiverse, are merged into one in the 1985 miniseries Crisis on Infinite Earths. Characters from DC Comics were originally suggestive of each existing in their own world, as superheroes never encountered each other. However, this was soon changed with alliances being formed between certain protagonists. Several publications, including All Star Comics (publishing tales of the Justice Society of America), Leading Comics (publishing tales of the Seven Soldiers of Victory) and other comic books introduced a "shared universe" among several characters during the 1940s until the present day. Alternative-reality Earths had been used
    7.25
    4 votes
    50
    7.25
    4 votes
    51
    Arthurian legend

    Arthurian legend

    The Arthurian Legends are the legend that concern the legendary history of King Arthur and the knight of the Round Table. Arthur is the chief subject of the Matter of Britain. Arthurian legend as a literary genre emerges in the 12th century as part of courtly medieval literature with authors such as Marie de France, Chrᅢᄅtien de Troyes and Geoffrey of Monmouth. The creator of the familiar literary persona of Arthur was Geoffrey of Monmouth, with his pseudohistorical Historia Regum Britanniae ("History of the Kings of Britain"), written in the 1130s. The textual sources for Arthur are usually divided into those that were written before Geoffrey's Historia was published (known as 'pre-Galfridian' texts, from the Latin form of Geoffrey, Galfridus) and those that followed this, and could not avoid his influence (Galfridian, or post-Galfridian, texts). The earliest literary references to Arthur come from Welsh and Breton sources.One of the most famous Welsh poetic references to Arthur comes in the Welsh collection of heroic death-songs known as Y Gododdin ("The Gododdin"), attributed to the 6th-century poet Aneirin. Y Gododdin is known only from a manuscript of the 13th century, so
    9.50
    2 votes
    52

    Bard's Tale

    • Works Set Here: Bard's Tale
    The fictional universe in which the Bard's Tale series of computer games and the spin-off books are set.
    9.50
    2 votes
    53
    9.50
    2 votes
    54

    Threshold

    • Works Set Here: The Stalk
    • Created by: Janet Morris
    Threshold universe is the characters, events and settings featured in a "young-adult" three-book science fiction series written by Janet and Chris Morris. The stories that form this fictional universe take place in the a high-tech future of space habitats.
    9.50
    2 votes
    55

    View Askewniverse

    • Characters: Silent Bob
    • Works Set Here: Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back
    • Created by: Kevin Smith
    The View Askewniverse is a fictional universe created by writer/director Kevin Smith, featured in several films, comics and a television series; it is named for Smith's production company, View Askew Productions. The characters Jay and Silent Bob appear in almost all the View Askewniverse media, and characters from one story often reappear or are made reference to in others. Smith often casts the same actors for multiple characters in the universe, sometimes even in the same film. Smith's recurring characters, settings, and motifs first appeared in his debut film, Clerks. Since then, the main canon has consisted of six feature films, in addition to several short films, comic books, and a short-lived animated TV series. The View Askewniverse is centered on the towns of Leonardo, Highlands, and Red Bank, all located in Monmouth County, central New Jersey. Chasing Amy also takes place partly in New York, and both Dogma and Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back involve road trips. It's been argued that Wes Craven's Scream franchise world is also a part of the View Askewniverse since Jay and Silent Bob make a cameo appearance in Scream 3 when they are in Hollywood at the same time the murders
    9.50
    2 votes
    56

    Marvel Cinematic Universe

    • Works Set Here: The Incredible Hulk
    • Created by: Marvel Comics
    The Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) is a film franchise and shared fictional universe that is the setting of superhero films independently produced by Marvel Studios, based on characters that appear in publications by Marvel Comics. The shared universe of the films, much like the Marvel Universe in comic books, was established by crossing over common plot elements, settings, cast, and characters. The first film to be released in the Marvel Cinematic Universe was Iron Man (2008), followed by The Incredible Hulk (2008), Iron Man 2 (2010), Thor (2011), Captain America: The First Avenger (2011), and Marvel's The Avengers (2012). Six additional films are in various stages of development as of October 2012: Iron Man 3 and Thor: The Dark World are filming, Captain America: The Winter Soldier and Guardians of the Galaxy have entered pre-production, and The Avengers 2 and Ant-Man are in the early stages of development. As a franchise, the films within the Marvel Cinematic Universe have received both critical and commercial success, and the franchise as a whole ranks as the fourth highest-grossing film franchise of all time. In 2005, Variety reported that Marvel Studios would start producing
    7.00
    4 votes
    57

    Bedrock

    • Characters: Fred Flintstone
    Bedrock is the fictional prehistoric city which is home to the characters of the animated television series, The Flintstones (1960). Though the first two seasons' opening credits of the original Flintstones series stated the town's population as only 2,500 people (though it did swell to 30,000 in a dream sequence in the sixth season episode entitled "Rip Van Flintstone"), Bedrock was generally presented as a medium-sized American city, with all the amenities of such, but with a "prehistoric" twist. For instance, dinosaurs were seen being used as cranes at the town's most well-known employer, "Slate Rock and Gravel" (also known as "Rockhead and Quarry Cave Construction Company" in the series' earlier episodes). The climate of Bedrock is somewhat undetermined, since different Flintstones episodes and media have portrayed it differently. Palm trees and cycads are common yard trees, suggesting a warm climate. However, episodes and movies set at Christmas time depicted plenty of snow. Sometimes the wilderness on Bedrock's outskirts appears to be desert-like, whereas at other times it resembles a tropical/subtropical jungle (as shown in the opening scenes of the theatrical animated movie
    8.00
    3 votes
    58

    Expanded Universe

    • Characters: Luuke Skywalker
    • Works Set Here: Star Wars: The Force Unleashed
    The Star Wars Expanded Universe encompasses all of the officially licensed, fictional background of the Star Wars universe, outside of the six feature films produced by George Lucas. The expanded universe includes books, comic books, video games, spin-off films like Star Wars: The Clone Wars, television series, toys, and other media. This material expands and continues the stories told in the films and, excepting where it contradicts the films, is generally considered canonical. However, George Lucas has viewed it as a separate canon from his movie series. The early development of the Expanded Universe was sporadic and unrefined, particularly because there was so little official material for the creators to build on. For example, the "Expanded Universe" is generally considered to have begun with Alan Dean Foster's February 1978 Star Wars spin-off novel, Splinter of the Mind's Eye (although technically it began with Marvel Comics' Star Wars #7 in January 1978). This novel drew inspiration primarily from an early draft of the Star Wars script and was conceptualized as a possible filmed sequel. Furthermore, while George Lucas was given sole writing credit for the original Star Wars
    8.00
    3 votes
    59

    Star Trek Expanded Universe

    • Characters: Vaatrik Pallra
    • Works Set Here: Starship Exeter
    The Star Trek Expanded Universe is an unofficial, fan-created term to describe an extrapolation of events which occur in the Star Trek Universe outside the scope of the television series and feature films. Information from the Star Trek "Expanded Universe" typically fills "holes" in the Star Trek story and timeline, with explanations of events which have never been adequately explained through live action productions. The term was first used in 1966 by writer D.C. Fontana to describe information put forth in the backstory of Doctor Leonard McCoy. Although original Star Trek fiction (for adult audiences) dates back to James Blish's 1970 novel Spock Must Die!, published by Bantam Books, the publishing company Simon and Schuster is most directly responsible for contributing to the Star Trek Expanded Universe through its licence with Pocket Books which has generated a large number of Star Trek novels over the past twenty five years. Information in the novels, while sometime contradictory, often serves to provide information to the Star Trek Expanded Universe. Note that the term "Star Trek Expanded Universe" is not an official usage of Paramount Pictures, Simon and Schuster or any
    8.00
    3 votes
    60
    8.00
    3 votes
    61

    The X-Files Universe

    • Characters: Fox Mulder
    • Works Set Here: The X-Files
    • Created by: Chris Carter
    The fictional universe in which the television series The X-Files and any movie, book or other spin-offs are set.
    5.17
    6 votes
    62

    Eberron

    • Works Set Here: Eberron Campaign Setting
    • Created by: Keith Baker
    Eberron is a campaign setting for the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game, set in a period after a vast destructive war on the continent of Khorvaire. Eberron is designed to accommodate traditional D&D elements and races within a differently toned setting; Eberron combines a fantasy tone with pulp and dark adventure elements, and some non-traditional fantasy technologies such as trains, skyships, and mechanical beings which are all powered by magic. Eberron was created by author and game designer Keith Baker as the winning entry for Wizards of the Coast's Fantasy Setting Search, a competition run in 2002 to establish a new setting for the Dungeons and Dragons game. Eberron was chosen from more than 11,000 entries, and was officially released with the publication of the Eberron Campaign Setting hardback book in June 2004. The campaign setting book was written by Baker, Bill Slavicsek, and James Wyatt. In June 2005 the Eberron Campaign Setting book won the Origins Award for Best Roleplaying Game Supplement of 2004. A new version of the Campaign Setting was released in June and July 2009 to bring the setting to the new 4th Edition of Dungeons and Dragons. Released were a Player's
    6.75
    4 votes
    63
    Gielinor

    Gielinor

    • Works Set Here: RuneScape
    • Created by: Jagex
    Gielinor, often known simply as RuneScape, is the fantasy realm in which the MMORPG RuneScape is set. Gielinor is divided into several kingdoms, a few unclaimed areas¬タヤsuch as the Wilderness¬タヤand numerous islands. Most of the islands are located in either the southern sea or the northern sea. In addition to these surface areas, many extensive dungeon and cave exist below ground, usually inhabited by monster. Players can travel throughout Gielinor by walking, running, using magic spells to teleport to various locations, canoeing, and using vehicles operated by NPC. Most of the land area of Gielinor is restricted to players who choose to become members by paying a monthly fee for additional content; because of this extra area and the fact that majority of players are not members, member worlds tend to be less crowded. The area occupied by a player is displayed in full detail in the game window. A small circular mini-map in the upper right section of the game screen shows a larger area centred around the player. The mini-map shows the location of NPCs, items, and other players using coloured dots. There is also a separate Java applet showing all of Gielinor; however, this map
    6.75
    4 votes
    64

    Leijiverse

    • Characters: Captain Harlock
    • Created by: Leiji Matsumoto
    Almost all of the works by Leiji Matsumoto feature fictional characters, vehicles, and locations that appear in different Anime and Manga titles. There is a loose (though highly inconsistent) overlapping within his works that has fostered endless speculation by his readers/viewers. There has been multiple re-telling of certain stories that may hold only some resemblance to past versions.For most of Matsumoto's works, continuity is not a crucial issue. An appearance of any particular version of the character does not necessarily connect to any previous or following versions. Major works that dwell within the Leijiverse:Captain HarlockGalaxy Express 999  Queen EmeraldasQueen MillenniaInfluenced by/Cameo appearances of characters, locations and vehicles: Space Battleship Yamato Interstella 5555 
    6.75
    4 votes
    65

    Nehwon

    • Works Set Here: Lankhmar – City of Adventure
    Nehwon is the fictional world created by Fritz Leiber in which his heroes, Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser, adventure. It is notable for the city of Lankhmar. "Nehwon", the reverse spelling of "No When", alludes to Erewhon. Ilthmar is a rival city to Lankhmar, located across the Great Salt Marsh and then the Sinking Land from Lankhmar, on the edge of the Deserts. Its people are known as Ilthmarts, and are known for their gambling, their heartlessness, and their worship of rat and shark gods. The harbor of Ilthmar is kept full of sharks for getting rid of criminals and undesirables. Lankhmar may be the center of Nehwon, and many of the adventures in the stories hold some connection to this place. It is a large and decadent city, ruled by the Overlord Karstak Ovartamortes (at least in theory). Actual rule has been contested by invaders, the Thieves Guild, Wizards, strange cults, and even ultra-intelligent rats. Lankhmar also hosts many religions, which can be divided into the gods in Lankhmar and the gods of Lankhmar. Amongst the streets and alleys of Lankhmar are Cheap Street (where the Thieves' Guild has its headquarters, Thieves' House), Whore Street, Gold Street, Cash Street, Plague
    6.75
    4 votes
    66

    Heroes in Hell fictional universe

    • Characters: Ninazu
    • Works Set Here: Heroes in Hell Series
    • Created by: Janet Morris
    The Heroes in Hell fictional universe was created in 1985 by Janet Morris as a unvierse to be shared with multiple writers of fiction in collaborative volumes. Twelve volumes were produced by Morris and her writers and set in her Heroes in Hell universe during the twentieth century. The twentieth century Heroes in Hell series includes seven anthologies and five book-length novels. Several of these volumes and stories received Locus and Nebula award nominations; one story won a Hugo award. In 1990 the series went on hiatus until 2011, when the 13th volume, "Lawyers in Hell," was published by Perseid Publishing and Kerlak enterprises in hard cover, trade paperback, and ebook formats, revitalizing the series for the twenty-first century.
    9.00
    2 votes
    67

    Oz Universe

    • Characters: Dorothy Gale
    • Works Set Here: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
    • Created by: L. Frank Baum
    9.00
    2 votes
    68
    9.00
    2 votes
    69

    Ptolus

    • Works Set Here: Ptolus: City by the Spire
    Ptolus is a campaign setting for the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game written by Monte Cook. It was published by Malhavoc Press on August 10, 2006. Ptolus is also the name of the city featured in the campaign. It has received good reviews, and won the 2007 ENnie award for Product of the Year. Ptolus is based upon the setting for Cook's home game, which served as the initial campaign for the 3rd edition of Dungeons and Dragons. The campaign centers around the city of the same name, which lies on the Whitewind Sea at the edges of the crumbling empire of Tarsis. The city lies in the shadow of an impossibly tall and narrow spire. Below the city are many dungeons, including the city's sewers and a forgotten dwarven city named Dwarvenhearth. The book's author claims it is the "most deluxe roleplaying product ever published," weighing in at 672 pages with multiple special features, including a CD-ROM that includes a new adventure, The Night of Dissolution, and two previous Malhavoc products with Ptolus connections: The Banewarrens and Chaositech. The book was produced in hardback on full colour glossy paper. The first 1,000 pre-ordered copies of the Ptolus book had their copy signed
    7.67
    3 votes
    70

    Calvin and Hobbes

    • Characters: Calvin
    • Works Set Here: Calvin and Hobbes
    • Created by: Bill Watterson
    Calvin and Hobbes is a syndicated daily comic strip that was written and illustrated by American cartoonist Bill Watterson, and syndicated from November 18, 1985, to December 31, 1995. It follows the humorous antics of Calvin, a precocious and adventurous six-year-old boy, and Hobbes, his sardonic stuffed tiger. The pair are named after John Calvin, a 16th-century French Reformation theologian, and Thomas Hobbes, a 17th-century English political philosopher. At the height of its popularity, Calvin and Hobbes was featured in over 2,400 newspapers worldwide; as of January 2010, reruns of the strip still appear in more than 50 countries. Nearly 45 million copies of the 18 Calvin and Hobbes books have been sold. Calvin and Hobbes is set in the contemporary United States in an unspecified suburban area. The strip depicts Calvin's flights of fantasy and his friendship with Hobbes, and also examines Calvin's relationships with family and classmates. Hobbes' dual nature is a defining motif for the strip: to Calvin, Hobbes is a live anthropomorphic tiger; all the other characters see him as an inanimate stuffed toy. Though the series does not mention specific political figures or current
    10.00
    1 votes
    71

    How to Train Your Dragon

    • Characters: Toothless
    • Works Set Here: How to Train Your Dragon
    The How to Train Your Dragon movie universe is a fictional universe based around the movie "How to Train Your Dragon".
    10.00
    1 votes
    72

    Marvel Universe

    • Characters: Captain America
    • Works Set Here: Spider-Man
    The Marvel Universe is the shared fictional universe where stories in most comic book titles and other media published by Marvel Entertainment take place, including those featuring Marvel's most familiar characters, such as Spider-Man, the Hulk, the X-Men, and the Avengers. The Marvel Universe is further depicted as existing within a "multiverse" consisting of thousands of separate universes, all of which are the creations of Marvel Comics and all of which are, in a sense, "Marvel universes". In this context, "Marvel Universe" is taken to refer to the mainstream Marvel continuity, which is known as Earth-616. Though the concept of a shared universe was not new or unique to comics in 1961, writer/editor Stan Lee, together with several artists including Jack Kirby and Steve Ditko, created a series of titles where events in one book would have repercussions in another title and serialized stories would show characters' growth and change. Headline characters in one title would make cameo or guest appearances in other books. Eventually many of the leading heroes assembled into a team known as the Avengers. This was not the first time that Marvel's characters had interacted with one
    10.00
    1 votes
    73

    Middle-earth

    • Characters: Bilbo Baggins
    • Works Set Here: The Hobbit
    • Created by: J. R. R. Tolkien
    Middle-earth is the fictional setting of the majority of author J. R. R. Tolkien's fantasy writings. The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings take place entirely in Middle-earth, as does much of The Silmarillion and Unfinished Tales. Tolkien prepared several maps of Middle-earth and of the regions of Middle-earth where his stories took place. Some were published in his lifetime, though some of the earliest maps were not published until after his death. The main maps were those published in The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, The Silmarillion, and Unfinished Tales. Most of the events of the First Age took place in the subcontinent Beleriand, which was later engulfed by the ocean at the end of the First Age; the Blue Mountains at the right edge of the map of Beleriand are the same Blue Mountains that appear on the extreme left of the map of Middle-earth in the Second and Third Ages. Tolkien's map of Middle-earth, however, shows only a small part of the world; most of the lands of Rhûn and Harad are not shown on the map, and there are also other continents. Tolkien wrote many times that Middle-earth is located on our Earth. He described it as an imaginary period in Earth's past, not only
    10.00
    1 votes
    74

    Saw

    • Characters: Jigsaw Killer
    • Works Set Here: Saw II
    Saw is a horror franchise distributed by Lions Gate Entertainment and produced by Twisted Pictures that consists of seven films and two video games, published by Konami. The franchise began with the 2003 short film which was created by Australian director James Wan and screenwriter Leigh Whannell to help pitch as a potential feature film. This was successfully done in 2004 with the release of the first feature film at the Sundance Film Festival. It was released theatrically that October. The sequels were directed by Darren Lynn Bousman, David Hackl and Kevin Greutert, and were written by Wan, Whannell, Bousman, Patrick Melton and Marcus Dunstan, and have been released subsequently every October, on the Friday before Halloween. Both of the creators remained with the franchise as executive producers. On July 22, 2010, producer Mark Burg confirmed that the seventh film, Saw 3D, is the final installment of the series. Series creators James Wan and Leigh Whannell are still open to continuing the series, however, if they can do something "different" with the material. The films collectively grossed over $873 million at the box office worldwide. Lionsgate also expressed interest in
    10.00
    1 votes
    75

    Hellsing

    • Characters: Alucard
    • Works Set Here: Hellsing
    • Created by: Kouta Hirano
    Hellsing (ヘルシング, Herushingu) is a Japanese manga series written and illustrated by Kouta Hirano. It first premiered in Young King Ours in 1997 and ended in September 2008. The individual chapters are collected and published in tankōbon volumes by Shōnen Gahosha. As of March 2009 all chapters have been released in 10 volumes in Japan. Hellsing chronicles the efforts of the mysterious and secret Hellsing Organization, as it combats vampires, ghouls, and other supernatural foes who threaten England. The manga series is licensed for English language release in North America by Dark Horse Comics, in Australia and New Zealand by Madman Entertainment, and in Singapore by Chuang Yi. In 2001, Hirano began publishing chapters of a prequel series, Hellsing: The Dawn, in special editions of Young King OURs, with six chapters released as of September 2008. An anime series of the same name was produced by Gonzo. Directed by Umanosuke Iida, the series was based on the manga, but used a screenplay by Chiaki Konaka and is significantly different from the manga in terms of plot, though it uses some of the same characters and similar character designs. Spanning 13 episodes, it was broadcast on
    6.50
    4 votes
    76

    The Middle Man

    The Middleman is a comic book series written by Javier Grillo-Marxuach with art by Les McClaine and published by Viper Comics. The series was initially intended to be a television pilot. Grillo-Marxuach decided he wanted to write a series that represented all of the things he grew up loving (what he calls the "Javi-centric World View"). With a little coaching from Paul Dini, he realized his dream in the medium of comic books – for several reasons, not the least of which was how much it would cost to produce a "tentacled ass monster" for television. Despite this, a single season of a television adaptation was picked up for the 2008 season by ABC Family. The first issue hit the shelves in July, 2005. The mini-series was collected as a single trade paperback volume, entitled The Trade Paperback Imperative. The second trade series trade, entitled The Second Volume Inevitability, was released on July 2006 and includes the supplement Legends of the Middlemen, three short stories chronicling the adventures of past Middlemen. The third "mini-series" was released straight to trade in 2007. All three volumes have now been collected into one: The Middleman: The Collected Series
    6.50
    4 votes
    77
    6.50
    4 votes
    78

    DC Universe

    • Characters: Batman
    • Works Set Here: The Sandman: Dream Country
    The DC Universe (DCU) is the shared universe where most of the comic stories published by DC Comics take place. The fictional characters Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Green Lantern and Flash are well-known superheroes from this universe while it also contains well known supervillains such as Lex Luthor, the Joker and Darkseid. Note that in context, "DC Universe" is usually used to refer to the main DC continuity. Occasionally, "DC Universe" will be used to indicate the entire "DC Multiverse", the collection of all continuities within DC Comics publications. The concept of a shared universe was originally pioneered by DC Comics (originally known as National Periodical Publications) and in particular by writer Gardner Fox. The fact that DC Comics characters coexisted in the same world was first established in All Star Comics #3 (1940) where several superheroes (who starred in separate stories in the series up to that point) met each other in a group dubbed the Justice Society of America, with a request to reintroduce the Justice Society the Justice League of America was then founded with Major League Baseball's National League and American League as inspiration for the name. The
    8.50
    2 votes
    79

    Hundred Acre Wood

    • Characters: Winnie-the-Pooh
    The Hundred Acre Wood (also spelled as 100 Aker Wood, Hundred-Acre Wood, and 100 Acre Wood; also known as simply "The Wood") is the fictional land inhabited by Winnie-the-Pooh and his friends in the Winnie-the-Pooh series of children's stories by author A. A. Milne. The wood is visited regularly by the young boy Christopher Robin, who accompanies (or imagines through make-believe) Pooh and company on their many adventures. In A. A. Milne's books, the term "Hundred Acre Wood" is actually used for a specific part of the larger Forest, centred around Owl's house (see the map in the book, as well as numerous references in the text to the characters going "into" or "out of" the Hundred Acre Wood as they go between Owl's house and other Forest locations). However, in the Pooh movies, and in general conversation with most Pooh fans, "The Hundred Acre Wood" is used for the entire world of Winnie-the-Pooh, the Forest and all the places it contains. The Hundred Acre Wood of the Winnie-the-Pooh stories is in actuality Five Hundred Acre Wood in Ashdown Forest in East Sussex, England, where the Winnie-the-Pooh stories were set. A.A. Milne's country home at Cotchford Farm, Hartfield was situated
    8.50
    2 votes
    80
    Silistra fictional universe

    Silistra fictional universe

    • Characters: M'lennin
    • Works Set Here: High Couch of Silistra
    • Created by: Janet Morris
    Silistra is a fictional universe created by Janet Morris. The Silistra series consists of four volumes and was published in German, Italian, French and other translations of the original four English-language editions.
    8.50
    2 votes
    81
    8.50
    2 votes
    82

    Wodehouse Universe

    • Works Set Here: Tales of St. Austin's
    • Created by: P. G. Wodehouse
    Wodehouse Universe is the fictional universe created by P. G. Wodehouse, in which his novels and short stories take place.
    8.50
    2 votes
    83

    Dark Sun

    • Works Set Here: Dark Sun Campaign Setting
    Dark Sun is a Dungeons & Dragons campaign setting featuring the fictional desert world of Athas. The original Dark Sun Boxed Set campaign setting was released in 1991. The themes of this setting could fit in the Dying Earth subgenre and include survival against the elements, ecological disaster, resource depletion, survival of the fittest, slavery and poverty, and the widespread use of psionic abilities. The political setting is similar to ancient Middle East, North Africa or Mesopotamia. Water and metals are extremely scarce. Survival against the elements has made it a harsh exotic world. TSR released the second edition of Battlesystem in 1989 and, in 1990, began pre-production on a new campaign setting that would use this edition in gameplay. The working title of this setting was "War World." Contributors to this project at its beginnings included Rich Baker, Gerald Brom, Tim Brown, Troy Denning, Mary Kirchoff, and Steve Winter. With the exception of Denning and Kirchoff, design veterans such as David "Zeb" Cook declined to join the conceptual team for "War World" (later on, Cook would write the first two adventure modules: Freedom and Road to Urik). The majority of project
    7.33
    3 votes
    84

    Death Note

    • Characters: Ryuk
    • Created by: Tsugumi Ohba
    Death Note (デスノート, Desu Nōto) is a Japanese manga series created by writer Tsugumi Ohba and manga artist Takeshi Obata. The main character is Light Yagami, a high school student who discovers a supernatural notebook, the "Death Note", dropped on Earth by a shinigami (a god of death) named Ryuk. The Death Note grants its user the ability to kill anyone whose name and face they know, by writing the name in the notebook while picturing their face. The series centers around Light's attempt to create and rule a world "cleansed of evil" as "God" using the notebook, and the efforts of a detective known as L to stop him. Death Note was first serialized in 108 chapters by Shueisha in the Japanese manga magazine Weekly Shōnen Jump from December 2003 to May 2006. The series was also published in tankōbon format in Japan starting in May 2004 and ending in October 2006 with a total of twelve volumes. The series was adapted into live-action films released in Japan on June 17, 2006, November 3, 2006, and February 2, 2008. The anime series aired in Japan from October 3, 2006, to June 26, 2007. Composed of 37 episodes, the anime was developed by Madhouse and directed by Tetsuro Araki. A light novel
    7.33
    3 votes
    85

    Doonesbury

    • Characters: Mike Doonesbury
    Doonesbury is a comic strip by American cartoonist Garry Trudeau, that chronicles the adventures and lives of an array of characters of various ages, professions, and backgrounds, from the President of the United States to the title character, Michael Doonesbury, who has progressed from a college student to a youthful senior citizen in the 40+ years of the strip's daily existence. Frequently political in nature, Doonesbury features characters representing a range of affiliations, but the cartoon is noted for a liberal viewpoint. The name "Doonesbury" is a combination of the word doone (prep school slang for "someone who is out to lunch", that is, someone who is clueless, inattentive, or careless) and the surname of Charles Pillsbury, Trudeau's roommate at Yale University. Doonesbury is written and pencilled by Garry Trudeau, then inked and lettered by his assistant Don Carlton. Doonesbury began as a continuation of Bull Tales, which appeared in the Yale University student newspaper, the Yale Daily News, beginning September 1968. It focused on local campus events at Yale. The executive editor of the paper in the late 1960s, Reed Hundt, who later served as chairman of the FCC, noted
    7.33
    3 votes
    86

    Dune universe

    • Characters: Paul Atreides
    • Works Set Here: Dune
    • Created by: Frank Herbert
    Dune is a science fiction franchise that originated with the 1965 novel Dune by Frank Herbert. Considered by many to be the greatest science fiction novel of all time, Dune is frequently cited as the best-selling science fiction novel in history. Dune won the 1966 Hugo Award and the inaugural Nebula Award for Best Novel, and was later adapted into a 1984 film as well as a 2000 television miniseries. Herbert wrote five sequels, and the first two were presented as a miniseries in 2003. The Dune universe has also inspired some traditional games and a series of video games. Since 2009, the names of planets from the Dune novels have been adopted for the real-world nomenclature of plains and other features on Saturn's moon Titan. Herbert himself died in 1986. Beginning in 1999, his son Brian Herbert and science fiction author Kevin J. Anderson have published a number of prequel novels, as well as two which complete the original Dune series—Hunters of Dune (2006) and Sandworms of Dune (2007)—partially based on Frank Herbert's notes discovered a decade after his death. The political, scientific, and social fictional setting of Herbert's novels and derivative works is known as the Dune
    7.33
    3 votes
    87

    Fictional setting of Madlax

    • Works Set Here: MADLAX
    Madlax (マドラックス, Madorakkusu) is a 26-episode anime television series produced in 2004 by the Bee Train animation studio. Unlike its predominantly realistic spiritual predecessor Noir, this series is set in an alternate reality where supernatural events and powers are possible, and although it bears multiple similarities to the real world (such as in the detailed depiction of existing firearms), the names of all prominently featured countries and political figures have been changed. In fact, the only two countries described in the series are Nafrece (ナフレス, Nafuresu) and Gazth-Sonika (ガザッソニカ, Gazassonika), whereas others are never depicted and seldom mentioned by name. At one point, Madlax's informant mentions that the civil war in Gazth-Sonika has started in 1999 and has been on-going for twelve years, so the story takes place approximately in 2011. Nafrece is a tranquil European country apparently styled after France: for example, the Eiffel Tower that can be seen on multiple occasions, and in the official English translation (see Releases), the names of these two states are almost exact anagrams of each other. No details on the government or the social structure of Nafrece have
    7.33
    3 votes
    88

    The Circle Universe

    • Characters: Briar Moss
    • Works Set Here: Circle of Magic
    The Circle Universe Both the 'Circle of Magic' and the 'Circle Opens' series are set in the land of Emelan. The story of four children, Sandrilene fa Toren, Trisana Chandler, Daja Kisubo and Briar Moss, who are discovered by a powerful mage Niko and told that they are "ambient mages," which means that they use magic from outside themselves. The four youths do not fit in with the other children, and are put together in a cottage. They each learn of their hidden talents; Sandry with thread, Tris with weather, Daja with fire and metal, and Briar with plants. They live with the two mages Lark, a gentle woman especially attentive to Sandry since she also has thread magic, and Rosethorn, a sharp woman who shares Briar's ability with plants. Also teaching and guiding them is Niko, technically Tris's teacher, but available to all four. Daja is mentored and guided by Dedicate Initiate Frostpine, a local smith mage. Their teachers are also ambient mages. At first it seems that a merchant, a street rat, a noblewoman, and a Trader (a trading race that is often hated by others) will never get along, but an extraordinary circumstance brings them together. They are all powerful individually, but they discover that together they are even stronger. Through an earthquake, they realize their full potential and are bound closely together forever. As children skilled in an uncommon magic, they struggle to earn the respect of the adults they encounter.
    7.33
    3 votes
    89

    World of Two Moons

    The World of Two Moons or Abode is a fictional Earth-type planet featured in Wendy and Richard Pini's comic book Elfquest. The second planet of its solar system, the WoTM seems to have developed along very similar lines to Earth (which is not referred to in Elfquest). As its name suggests, the most obvious difference is that it has two moons rather than one. The larger moon seems to be about the same size as Earth's Moon. The smaller orbits closer to the planet but still has a smaller apparent diameter. The planet is home to numerous species that are similar or identical to their Earth equivalents, including deer, pigs, rabbits (called ravvits), allosaurus, wolves, and - perhaps most significantly - humans. At the beginning of the Elfquest story the planet also becomes home to three other intelligent species when a space vessel in the form of a palace crashes there: Elves with seemingly magical powers; trolls, physically strong, greedy and acquisitive; and preservers, small winged beings that can spin fibers with preserving properties, hence their name. The elves split up and form several societies (at least six are described in the Elfquest series) that develop for millennia in
    7.33
    3 votes
    90

    Discworld

    • Characters: Abbot
    • Works Set Here: Men at Arms
    The Discworld is the fictional setting for all of Terry Pratchett's Discworld fantasy novels. It consists of a large disc (complete with edge-of-the-world drop-off and consequent waterfall) resting on the backs of four huge elephants which are in turn standing on the back of an enormous turtle, named Great A'Tuin (similar to Chukwa or Akupara from Hindu mythology) as it slowly swims through space. The Disc has been shown to be heavily influenced by magic and, while Pratchett has given it certain similarities to planet Earth, he has also created his own system of physics for it. Pratchett first explored the idea of a disc-shaped world in the novel Strata (1981). Great A'Tuin is the Giant Star Turtle (of the fictional species: Chelys galactica) who travels through the Discworld universe's space, carrying four giant elephants (named Berilia, Tubul, Great T'Phon, and Jerakeen) who in turn carry the Discworld. The narration has described A'Tuin as "the only turtle ever to feature on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram." Great A'Tuin's gender is unknown (though in The Colour of Magic Pratchett describes the turtle as male), but the subject of much speculation by some of the Disc's finest
    6.25
    4 votes
    91

    Spelljammer

    • Works Set Here: Spelljammer: Pirates of Realmspace
    Spelljammer is a campaign setting for the Advanced Dungeons & Dragons (2nd edition) role-playing game, which features a fantastical (as opposed to scientific) outer space environment. Spelljammer introduced into the AD&D universe a comprehensive system of fantasy astrophysics, including the Ptolemaic concept of crystal spheres. Crystal spheres may contain multiple worlds and are navigable using ships equipped with "spelljamming helms". Ships powered by spelljamming helms are capable of flying into not only the sky but into space. With their own fields of gravity and atmosphere, the ships have open decks and tend not to resemble the spaceships of science fiction, but instead look more like galleons, animals, birds, fish or even more wildly fantastic shapes. The Spelljammer setting is designed to allow the usual sword and sorcery adventures of Dungeons & Dragons to take place within the framework of outer space tropes. Flying ships travel through the vast expanses of interplanetary space, visiting moons and planets and other stellar objects. Like the Planescape setting, Spelljammer unifies most of the other AD&D settings and provides a canonical method for allowing characters from
    6.25
    4 votes
    92

    The Warriors Universe

    • Characters: Leafpool
    • Works Set Here: The Clans Decide
    • Created by: Victoria Holmes
    A world created by Erin Hunter for the warriors series, where cats are sentient and can talk to and understand one another. In this world, there are many clans of cats who live together.
    6.25
    4 votes
    93

    Warhammer Fantasy

    • Characters: Nurgle
    • Works Set Here: Warhammer Fantasy Battle
    Warhammer Fantasy is a fantasy setting, created by Games Workshop, which is used by many of the company's games. Some of the best-known games set in this world are: the table top wargame Warhammer Fantasy Battle, the Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay pen-and-paper role-playing game, and the MMORPG Warhammer Online: Age of Reckoning. Another game, Warhammer Online: Wrath of Heroes, is a free-to-play release. Warhammer is notable for its "dark and gritty" background world, which features a culture similar in appearance to Early Modern Germany crossed with Tolkien's Middle-earth. "Chaos" is central to the setting, as the forces of Chaos are attempting unceasingly to tear the mortal world asunder. The world itself is populated with a variety of races such as humans, high elves, dark elves, wood elves, dwarfs, undead, orcs, lizardmen, ogres, and other creatures familiar to many fantasy/role-playing settings. The first edition of Warhammer Fantasy Battle (WFB) was released by Games Workshop in early 1983. Prior to this release, the company dealt primarily with the importing of American role-playing games, as well as support and review of gaming products, either through their White Dwarf
    6.25
    4 votes
    94

    Vampire: The Requiem

    • Works Set Here: Vampire: the Requiem
    Vampire: The Requiem is a role-playing game published by White Wolf, set in the World of Darkness, and the successor to the Vampire: The Masquerade line. It was first released in August 2004, together with a new core rule book for the World of Darkness. Although it is an entirely new game, rather than a continuation of the previous editions, it uses many elements from the old game in its construction, including some of the clans and their powers. The game's title is a metaphor for the way vampires within the game view their (un)life. Although it can be considered a full game in itself, Vampire: The Requiem requires the World of Darkness corebook for use. The game takes place in modern-day earth where vampires form complex societies hidden from human awareness. Vampires that share common physical powers and qualities group themselves into "clans", but they also join "covenants" along religious, political or philosophical lines (a player's covenant is generally more important to his character than his clan). These groups differ radically in purpose and outlook and are often in conflict, though one principle they agree upon is that they must hide their existence from humans. Vampires
    5.40
    5 votes
    95
    7.00
    3 votes
    96

    Hyperion

    • Characters: The Shrike
    • Created by: Dan Simmons
    The universe of Dan Simmons' Hyperion Cantos.
    7.00
    3 votes
    97

    Indiana Jones franchise

    • Characters: Indiana Jones
    • Works Set Here: Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
    • Created by: George Lucas
    The Indiana Jones franchise is an entertainment franchise, based on the historical adventures of Dr. Henry "Indiana" Jones, a fictional archaeologist. It began in 1981 with the film Raiders of the Lost Ark. A prequel, Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, followed in 1984 and the sequel Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade in 1989. In 1992, The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles, featuring adventures the character had as a child as he traveled around the world with his father, began airing on television. A fourth film, Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull, was released in 2008. The series was created by George Lucas; the films star Harrison Ford and were directed by Steven Spielberg. The franchise has expanded beyond movies and TV. Marvel Comics began publishing The Further Adventures of Indiana Jones in 1983, and Dark Horse Comics earned the comic book rights to the character in 1991. Novelizations of the films have been published, as well as many novels with original adventures, including a series of German novels by Wolfgang Hohlbein, twelve novels set before the films published by Bantam Books, and a series set during the character's childhood inspired by the television
    7.00
    3 votes
    98

    Kingdoms of Kalamar

    • Works Set Here: Kingdoms of Kalamar
    The Kingdoms of Kalamar is a fantasy role-playing game campaign setting created by Kenzer and Company and released in 1994. Shortly after Wizards of the Coast announced the 3rd Edition of Dungeons & Dragons, they announced jointly with Kenzer & Company that Kenzer had acquired a license to produce official Dungeons & Dragons material, using the Kalamar setting exclusively. While not as well known as setting such as Forgotten Realms, the setting has a loyal following and has received praise for its consistency and realism. Kenzer and Company has also made the Kingdoms of Kalamar the official setting of its own role playing fantasy game, Hackmaster. The original Kingdoms of Kalamar material was clearly intended for use with Dungeons & Dragons, while carefully avoiding any direct trademark or copyright infringement. The setting appeared in two books, the Sourcebook of the Sovereign Lands, and Mythos of the Divine and Worldly. While distribution was not widespread, fans of the setting continued to support it. The Sourcebook of the Sovereign Lands detailed the people and places of Tellene, the campaign's continent (and world). It broke the continent down into six regions and examined
    7.00
    3 votes
    99
    Sherlock Holmes Universe

    Sherlock Holmes Universe

    • Characters: Doctor Watson
    • Works Set Here: The Hound of the Baskervilles
    Sherlock Holmes lives on for us all in current fiction and in the works of the originating author Arthur Conan Doyle. Almost every genre of fiction writing/films/tv has been graced by a visit from the penultimate deductive detective superstar in the past 100-plus years.
    7.00
    3 votes
    100

    Terro-Human Future History

    • Works Set Here: Little Fuzzy
    The Terrohuman Future History (TFH) chronicles the expansion of the human race from its origins on Terra (Earth) out into the galaxy.  Consisting of the novels of the famous Fuzzy trilogy (plus the authorized sequels Fuzzy Bones by Bill Tuning and Golden Dream by Ardath Mayhar), the novels Uller Uprising, Four-Day Planet, Cosmic Computer and Space Viking, and nine stories collected in the anthologies Federation and Empire edited by John F. Carr, the TFH spans over five thousand years of future history.
    7.00
    3 votes
    101

    The Foundation Universe

    • Characters: Golan Trevize
    • Works Set Here: Foundation and Earth
    • Created by: Isaac Asimov
    The Foundation Series is a science fiction series by Isaac Asimov. There are seven volumes in the Foundation Series proper, which in its in-universe chronological order are Prelude to Foundation, Forward the Foundation, Foundation, Foundation and Empire, Second Foundation, Foundation's Edge, and Foundation and Earth. The premise of the series is that mathematician Hari Seldon spent his life developing a branch of mathematics known as psychohistory, a concept of mathematical sociology (analogous to mathematical physics). Using the laws of mass action, it can predict the future, but only on a large scale; it is error-prone on a small scale. It works on the principle that the behaviour of a mass of people is predictable if the quantity of this mass is very large (equal to the population of the galaxy, which has a population of quadrillions of humans, inhabiting millions of star systems). The larger the number, the more predictable is the future. Using these techniques, Seldon foresees the imminent fall of the Galactic Empire, which encompasses the entire Milky Way, and a dark age lasting thirty thousand years before a second great empire arises. Seldon's psychohistory also foresees an
    7.00
    3 votes
    102

    Universe of Avatar: The Last Airbender

    • Created by: Michael Dante DiMartino
    Avatar: The Last Airbender is an American animated television series that aired for three seasons on Nickelodeon and the Nicktoons Network. The series was created and produced by Michael Dante DiMartino and Bryan Konietzko. It follows the adventures of Aang and his friends, who must save the world by defeating the Fire Lord and ending the destructive war with the Fire Nation. Avatar: The Last Airbender takes place in a fantasy world that is home to humans, fantastic animals, and spirits. Human civilization is divided into four nations: the Air Nomads, the Water Tribes, the Earth Kingdom, and the Fire Nation. In addition, there exists a Spirit World. Each nation has its own natural element, on which it bases its society. Within each nation exists an order called "Benders" who have the ability to manipulate the eponymous element of their nation, either Waterbending, Earthbending, Firebending, or Airbending. The show's creators assigned each Bending art its own style of martial arts, causing them to inherit the advantages and weaknesses of that martial art. Each generation fields one person who is capable of Bending all four elements, the Avatar, the spirit of the planet manifested in
    7.00
    3 votes
    103

    Wildstorm Universe

    The Wildstorm Universe is a fictional shared universe where the comic books published by Wildstorm take place. It represents an alternate history of the real world where ideas such as interstellar travel and superhuman abilities are commonplace. It is also the name of one of three brands launched by Wildstorm to help differentiate their titles set in the same universe from other, separate titles. Originally launched as part of the Image Universe, it broke off as its own separate universe during the Shattered Image event. The Wildstorm Universe began as part of the Image Comics Universe. During Shattered Image, Wildstorm broke off from Image and constituted a separate universe. The Wildstorm's universe represents an alternate history of the real world, with further similarities to other comic book universes (especially the DC Universe). Interstellar travel and alien races, including the Kherubim and Drahn, are taken for granted, and centuries or more of alien contact gave rise to a distinctive mythology in Wildstorm worlds. Fictional technologies, or technologies only theoretically possible in the real world, are present in the Wildstorm Universe. Superhuman agents are commonplace
    7.00
    3 votes
    104

    Xenaverse

    • Characters: Xena
    Fictional setting for the stories and characters that were created for the TV and Book series for Hercules: Legendary Journeys and Xena: Warrior Princess. A historical fantasy mostly taking place in Ancient Greece.
    7.00
    3 votes
    105
    The Hector Hornsmith Pirate Chronicles

    The Hector Hornsmith Pirate Chronicles

    • Characters: Hector Hornsmith
    • Works Set Here: Hector Hornsmith Diary Entries
    • Created by: Tony Franks-Buckley
    The Hector Hornsmith chronicles is a fictional universe centred around the fictional character Hector Hornsmith and based on the Fictional Pirates of Ye Black Rock in the 18th Century. The universe was created by Tony Franks-Buckley. Two Books and Short Stories (Diary Entry Form) have been created by Franks-Buckley to date. Next Book out is based in the 19th century "The Inventor's Quest) which is set after the death of Hector Hornsmith but his diary entries have left a task in which the inventor must take. The Torment of Tortuga is the next book set in the 18th Century featuring Hector Hornsmith and the Pirates of Ye Black Rock. The History of Pirates in Wallasey has been somewhat over shadowed by the likes of Bristol and of course the Caribbean. Pirates & Smugglers have played a big part in the early history of Wallasey and is known only to the local people of the area. This book will introduce the world to the story of a little suburb called Wallasey. Situated on the banks of the River Mersey, it became one of the biggest smuggling haunts and later became a popular Victorian Seaside Resort in Britain. There have been plenty of rumours of Wallasey's piratical past and its connections with smuggling in the eighteenth century. Many local people know stories of Mother Redcap, and the legendary smugglers? tunnels beneath Wallasey. Mother Redcaps death, however, is linked with mystery; thousands of pounds worth of privateers prize money had been entrusted to her care, but after she died it was never seen again. What did happen to Mother Redcaps treasure Was it spirited away into the labyrinth of tunnels riddling Wallasey's bedrock and just exactly how was Wallasey Linked to Pirates and Smugglers. This is the Preface to Hector Hornsmith & The Torment of Tortuga. Hector Hornsmith speaks of his adventures with his good friend Captain John Gray & his Pirate Crew during the late 18th Century. They are the thorn in the side of King George III and his Royal Navy. Hiding out at Mother Redcaps when they are not at sea in the Inn itself and the network of tunnels that run beneath Wallasey. The Background of the main characters are contained in this book and explain just how Captain John Gray and his Pirate Crew found their way into Liverpool Bay and became housed on the shore line of Wallasey in Mother Redcaps Inn. Not all is plain sailing as whilst Captain John Gray is in search of "The Treasure of Treasures" Lord Captain James Vernon a former Slave Merchant now turned Royal Naval Captain, is in hot pursuit of the pirates as ordered by HRH King George III. for several years he has been hot on the tail of Captain John Gray but is yet to succeed but he grows ever closer to making his capture and is certain that he will soon be celebrating in the Kings Court as the man who captured Captain John Gray. These Diary Entries are the preface to the Historical Fiction book that is due out in the near future "Hector Hornsmith & The Torment of Tortuga" and this book also talks of the history behind the true facts of Pirates and Smugglers on the shore line of Wallasey. The hidden tunnels of Wallasey have been brought to life in the adventures with Hector Hornsmith and using true facts, giving the book an interesting twist that will enlighten the reader to just what it was like in the days of Pirates and Smugglers on the shores of Ye Black Rock. Not only is the book set on the Wallasey side of the River Mersey but Liverpool is also included as it was busy trading goods in and out of the port, that attracted smugglers to the area. Liverpool was a small fishing port which became one of the biggest cities in the world and is a well known city for its links to the Trans-Atlantic slave This is the beginning of the adventures with Hector Hornsmith and his travels around the world as a pirate and smuggler in the 18th century, avoiding the deathly pursuits of the British Royal Navy and searching for treasure that will make fortunes for him, Captain Bones and his crew, It all starts at Ye Black Rock. The Treasure of Treasures is a childrens adventure following Hector Hornsmith and his Diary, in which he records his adventures searching for the Treasure of all Treasures under the command of his good friend Captain John Gray. Hector Hornsmith speaks of his adventures with his good friend Captain John Gray & his Pirate Crew during the late 18th Century. They are the thorn in the side of King George III & Lord Captain James Vernon and his Royal Naval crew aboard the Barfleur. Hector Hornsmith was born in Portishead which was a small fishing hamlet on the West Coast of Britain. Always one with big ideas and a quest for knowledge, he left the shores of Britain and sailed across the ocean to Tortuga where he me Captain John Gray and became best of friends as well as treasure seeking Pirates. Hector and Captain John Gray find their way to the North West Coast when being pursued by the Royal Naval ship The Barfleur with its Captain, Lord Captain James Vernon a former Slave Trader who has been ordered by HRH King George III to capture them at all costs. Captain John Gray and his crew Hide out at Mother Redcaps on Ye Black Rock when they are not at sea which is an Inn and has a network of tunnels running below in several directions filled with treasure rooms, living and sleeping quarters. Captain John Gray has been in search for the biggest treasure find which will allow him to retire from being a pirate and live happily with his Beloved Polly (Mother Redcap) but each time he thought he had sailed for his final time he has lost his loot but this time will be different he is armed with a map which he is keeping close to his chest, not even his best friend Hector knows what the map says. Will he find his treasure or will he once again leave with empty hands? find out in the Treasure of Treasures and join Captain John Gray on his adventures. Part 1 is the first of a trilogy and is Titled "Ye Black Rock" which starts in Liverpool and ends on the island of Tortuga.
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    106

    Babylon 5

    • Characters: Morden
    • Works Set Here: Babylon 5
    • Created by: J. Michael Straczynski
    The fictional universe in which the Babylon 5 television series (and spinoffs) are set. It is based on our own real Earth, though there is a secret history of manipulation of human DNA by the Vorlons. In the 23rd century, the Earth Alliance is one of the five major powers in this part of the galaxy, along with the Vorlons, the Centauri, the Minbari, and the Narn. There are also Shadows…
    8.00
    2 votes
    107

    Hollyoaks

    Hollyoaks is a long-running British television soap opera, first broadcast on Channel 4 on 23 October 1995. It was originally devised by Phil Redmond, who has also devised shows including Brookside and Grange Hill. The programme is set in a fictional suburb of Chester called Hollyoaks and is centred around a local further education college called Hollyoaks Community College, with the characters generally being in their late teens or early twenties. Since 1995, the cast has expanded from just seven major characters to approximately 50 cast members. Since the long-serving producer Bryan Kirkwood quit in 2009, the role of series producer has seen several changes. Kirkwood's successor Lucy Allan stepped down from her position in 2010 after just twelve months, and her replacement, former The Bill producer Paul Marquess took control later that year. Like his predecessor, Marquess left the series after a year and Gareth Philips was appointed as series producer. Emma Smithwick later replaced Phillips as a permanent replacement. Smithwick was a series editor of the soap for a while, before taking on the role of producer in Autumn 2011. In late September 2012, it was announced that Emma
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    108

    Nemo Universe

    • Characters: Captain Nemo
    • Works Set Here: The Mysterious Island
    • Created by: Jules Verne
    The fictional universe Jules Verne's Captain Nemo inhabits.
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    109
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    110

    Torg

    Torg is a cinematic multi-genre role-playing game (RPG) created by Greg Gorden and Bill Slavicsek and released by West End Games in 1990, which uses several innovative techniques. Players take the role of Storm Knights, deliberately larger-than-life heroes engaged in fighting the invasion of Earth, to prevent it being conquered by several invading dimensions (called cosms), each with its own separate reality; cosms largely correspond with popular role-playing genres. The title was originally an acronym for the in-house development name: The Other Roleplaying Game. Unable to find a better name, the name was adopted as the official name and applied to the game. Names that were considered but rejected include Shadow Wars, Shadow Spawn, Twilight Shadows, and Endless Earth. Torg is set in a near future setting, known officially as "the near now." At the games's starting point this world has been subjected for several months to a year, to a pan dimensional invasion by a series of "High Lords" who have changed the natural laws of large swaths of Earth to reflect those of their home dimensions. The players assume the role of "Storm Knights", people from Earth and the various invading
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    111

    Uplift Universe

    • Characters: Alvin Hph-wayuo
    • Created by: David Brin
    The Uplift Universe is a fictional universe created by science fiction writer David Brin. A central feature in this universe is the process of biological uplift. His books which take place in this universe: There is also a short story "Aficionado" (originally titled "Life in the Extreme"), published in 1998, which serves as a prequel to the series as a whole (it also serves as a part of Existence, an unrelated work by Brin), and a novella Temptation published in 1999 in Far Horizons, which follows on from Heaven's Reach. Brin also wrote Contacting Aliens: An Illustrated Guide To David Brin's Uplift Universe which is a guidebook about the background of the series. At least one more Uplift book is planned by the author, as Brin has stated that Temptation "will be a core element of the next Uplift novel... and answers several unresolved riddles left over from Heaven's Reach." GURPS Uplift is a sourcebook for a science fiction themed role-playing game based on the Uplift Universe. It includes a few stories that happen in Jijo after the end of Heaven's Reach. In the Uplift universe an intergalactic civilization called the Five Galaxies, comprising a multitude of sentient races, has
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    112

    Alien vs. Predator

    • Works Set Here: AVP: Alien vs. Predator
    Alien vs. Predator, also known as Aliens vs. Predator and Aliens versus Predator (all titles abbreviated AvP), is a science fiction horror series spanning several media. The series is a fictional crossover between two film franchises about alien species: the Aliens and the Predators. The franchise, which depicts the two species as being in conflict with one another, includes comics, novels, computer/video games, and feature films, the rights to which all belong to 20th Century Fox Studios. There have been two Aliens vs. Predator films. The first Aliens versus Predator story was published by Dark Horse Comics in Dark Horse Presents #34-36 (November 1989-February 1990). In November 1990, Predator 2 was released in theaters, and includes a scene depicting an Alien skull as one of the Predator's trophies. A crossover novel series was produced based on the two franchises. Other books depict the background to the film's work with Amalgamated Dynamics Incorporated (ADI), the special effects company that worked on the Alien films. In 1994, Kenner released a collection of action figures known as Aliens vs. Predator. This followed the two initial series of Aliens that were based on an
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    113
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    114

    Battlestar Galactica

    • Characters: Baltar
    Battlestar Galactica is an American science fiction franchise created by Glen A. Larson. The franchise began with the original television series in 1978, and was followed by a brief sequel TV series in 1980, a line of book adaptations, original novels, comic books, a board game, and video games. A remake of Battlestar Galactica aired in December 2003, beginning with a two-part, three-hour miniseries developed by Ronald D. Moore and David Eick. This led to a weekly TV series which ran for four seasons between 2004 and 2009. A prequel TV series, Caprica, aired in 2010. A two-hour pilot for a second spin-off series, Battlestar Galactica: Blood & Chrome, was filmed, with plans of continuing it into a regular series. The series was eventually scrapped. All Battlestar Galactica productions share the premise that in a distant part of our galaxy, a human civilization lives on a group of planets known as the Twelve Colonies, to which they have migrated from their ancestral homeworld of Kobol. The Twelve Colonies have warred for decades with a cybernetic race known as the Cylons, whose goal is the extermination of the human race. The Cylons offer peace to the humans, which proves to be a
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    1 votes
    115

    Crimson Skies

    • Works Set Here: Crimson Skies
    Crimson Skies is a media franchise and fictional universe created by Jordan Weisman and Dave McCoy. The series' intellectual property is currently owned by Microsoft Game Studios (MGS), although Weisman's new company, Smith & Tinker Inc., has announced that it has licensed the electronic entertainment rights to the franchise. The series is set within an alternate history of the 1930s invented by Weisman and McCoy. Within this divergent timeline, the United States has collapsed, and air travel has become the most popular mode of transportation in North America; as a result, air pirates thrive in the world of Crimson Skies. In describing the concept of Crimson Skies, Jordan Weisman stated he wanted to "take the idea of 16th century Caribbean piracy and translate into a 1930s American setting." Crimson Skies was first conceived as a PC game known as "Corsairs!", but was released first as a board game from FASA. The franchise has since expanded to include a collectible miniatures game from Wizkids, as well as a series of books. The series also includes two arcade flight-based video games published by Microsoft Game Studios-Crimson Skies for the PC and Crimson Skies: High Road to
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    116

    Famous Five universe

    • Characters: Dick Kirrin
    • Works Set Here: Five on a Treasure Island
    • Created by: Enid Blyton
    The universe for the Famous Five works.
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    117
    Harry Potter

    Harry Potter

    • Characters: Dobby the House Elf
    • Works Set Here: Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone
    • Created by: J. K. Rowling
    The fictional universe of J. K. Rowling's Harry Potter series of fantasy novels comprises two separate and distinct societies: the wizarding world and the Muggle world. The Muggle World is the series' name for the world inhabited by the non-magical majority, with the wizarding world existing coextensively with it but hidden from the awareness of the non-magical "Muggles" with few exceptions (most notably, the British Prime Minister). The plot of the series is set in contemporary Britain, but in a veiled and separate shadow society wherein magic is real, and those who can use it live in self-enforced seclusion, hiding their abilities from the rest of the world. The term "wizarding world" refers to the global wizard community that lives hidden in parallel with the Muggle world; the different terms refer to different communities within the same area rather than separate planets or worlds. The entire Harry Potter series is set from 1991–1998 aside from the opening chapter of the first book which takes place on 1 November 1981 and the epilogue of the seventh book which takes place on 1 September 2017. The depiction of the wizarding world is centred on magic, which not only imbues
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    118

    Highlander

    • Characters: Thomas Sullivan
    Highlander is a film and television franchise that began with a 1986 fantasy movie starring Christopher Lambert, who plays Connor MacLeod, the Highlander. Born in Glenfinnan, in the Scottish Highlands in the 16th century, MacLeod is one of a number of Immortals. Over the years, there have been five Highlander movies, two television series, an animated series, an animated movie, an animated flash-movie series, ten original novels, seventeen comic book issues, and various licensed merchandise. The first of what became a series of films, Highlander, directed by Russell Mulcahy, was released on March 7, 1986, with the tagline "There Can Be Only One." The film features a number of flashback scenes establishing Connor MacLeod of the Clan MacLeod's early history, and builds up to his final destiny amongst the last of the mysterious Immortals. Through a mentor and fellow Immortal — Juan Sánchez Villa-Lobos Ramírez, played by Sean Connery — he learns of the existence of other Immortals, who occur spontaneously throughout history. An Immortal can die only after being beheaded, and Immortals battle one another in ritual single combat to the death, until the "Gathering," when the few remaining
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    119
    Mesopotamian mythology

    Mesopotamian mythology

    • Characters: Kur
    Mesopotamian mythology is the collective name given to Sumerian, Akkadian, Assyrian, and Babylonian mythologies from parts of the fertile crescent, the land between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers in the Zagros mountains. The Sumerians practiced a polytheistic religion, with anthropomorphic gods or goddesses representing forces or presences in the world, in much the same way as later Greek mythology. According to said mythology, the gods originally created humans as servants and freed them when they became too much to handle. Many stories in Sumerian religion appear similar to stories in other Middle-Eastern religions. Gods and Goddesses: As social complexity in these cities increased, each god came to resemble a human monarch (Lugal: lu = man, gal = great), or high priest (Ensi: en = lord, si = country), complete with a family and a court of divine stewards and servants. Wars between cities were seen to reflect wars in heavens between the gods. Lesser gods were seen as family members of these bigger divinities. Thus Nanna, goddess of the moon came to be seen as the sister of Inanna, and she came to acquire a husband too, originally Gugalanna, the Wild Bull of Heaven, (from gu =
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    120
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    121

    The Amber Multiverse

    • Characters: Corwin
    • Works Set Here: Nine Princes in Amber
    The series is based on the concept of parallel worlds, domination over them being fought between the kingdoms at the extreme ends of Shadow—Amber, the one true world of Order, and the Courts of Chaos. Amberites of royal blood—those descended from Oberon (and ultimately his parents, Dworkin, formerly of the Courts of Chaos, and the Unicorn of Order herself) —are able to "walk in Shadow", mentally willing changes to occur around them. These changes are, in effect, representative of the Shadow-walker passing through different realities. There are apparently infinite realities, either found by the Shadow-walker locating such worlds or by creating them (we the readers are never sure; neither are the characters). Within this multiverse, Zelazny deals with some interesting philosophical concepts about the nature of existence, compares and contrasts the ideas of Order and Chaos, and plays with the laws of physics—they can differ from Shadow to Shadow; for instance, gunpowder does not ignite in Amber, which is why the characters all carry swords. Other Shadows have green skies and blue suns, cities of glass and Kentucki Fried Lizzard Partes, and worlds out of our own fiction can come to life.
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    1 votes
    122

    The Company

    • Characters: Mendoza
    • Works Set Here: Sky Coyote
    The fictional universe of Kage Baker's "The Company" novels.
    9.00
    1 votes
    123

    Age of Apocalypse

    • Characters: Dark Beast
    "Age of Apocalypse" is a 1995 - 1996 comic book crossover storyline published in the X-Men franchise of books by Marvel Comics. The Age of Apocalypse briefly replaced the universe of Earth-616, although it was later retconned as having occurred in the alternate universe of Earth-295. Still, it had ramifications in the main Marvel Comics universe. Legion (David Haller), a psionic mutant on Earth and son of Professor Charles Xavier, travels back in time with the intention of killing Magneto. However, Legion traveled to a time when Magneto and Xavier were still friends. As Xavier dies trying to protect Magneto, Legion vanishes, and a new time-line is created. The only person aware of how history has changed is Bishop, a time traveling mutant who followed Legion. Because of Xavier's sacrifice, Magneto comes to believe in his late friend's dream of a peaceful coexistence between humans and mutants. Apocalypse, an immortal mutant villain, was monitoring the fight. He chooses this moment as the perfect time to begin his world conquest, which did not happen in the regular Marvel Universe for another ten years. Magneto assembles the X-Men just as Apocalypse begins his war. Despite the
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    3 votes
    124

    Sam & Max

    Sam & Max is a media franchise focusing on the fictional characters of Sam and Max, the Freelance Police. The characters, who occupy a universe that parodies American popular culture, were created by Steve Purcell in his youth, and later debuted in a 1987 comic book series. The characters have since been the subject of a graphic adventure video game developed by LucasArts, a television series produced for Fox in cooperation with Nelvana Limited, and a series of episodic adventure games developed by Telltale Games. In addition, a variety of machinima and a webcomic have been produced for the series. The characters are a pair of anthropomorphic, vigilante private investigators based in a dilapidated office block in New York City. Sam is a calculative six-foot dog wearing a suit and a fedora, while Max is a short and aggressive "hyperkinetic rabbity thing". Both enjoy solving problems and cases as maniacally as possible, often with complete disregard for the law. Driving a seemingly indestructible black-and-white 1960 DeSoto Adventurer, the pair travel to many contemporary and historical locations to fight crime, including the Moon, Ancient Egypt, the White House and the Philippines,
    6.67
    3 votes
    125
    Earth in fiction

    Earth in fiction

    • Characters: Berry Rydell
    An overwhelming majority of fiction is set on or features the Earth. However, authors of speculative fiction novels and writers and directors of science fiction film deal with Earth quite differently from authors of conventional fiction. Unbound from the same ties that bind authors of traditional fiction to the Earth, they can either completely ignore the Earth or use it as but one of many settings in a more complicated universe, exploring a number of common themes through examining outsiders perceptions of and interactions with Earth. The overarching plot in both the original and re-imagined Battlestar Galactica is the quest to find Earth, which is thought to be the location of the thirteenth colony of Kobol, the purported true homeworld of humanity. Both shows are similar in that the location of Earth is initially unknown, but clues to its location are gradually discovered by the refugee fleet from the Twelve Colonies. In both series, the exodus of the Thirteen Tribes took place so far in the past that most modern Colonists have come to assume that the stories of Earth are religious myths. In the original series, several clues indicate that the existence of Earth is real. In the
    5.75
    4 votes
    126

    Mystara

    • Works Set Here: Dungeons & Dragons: Shadow over Mystara
    Mystara is a campaign setting for the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role playing game. Although it has officially been dropped from production by its creators, many fans continue to develop and evolve this fantasy setting jointly, continuing its original theme of group development. It originated as the Known World, a semi-generic setting used in early adventure modules, first mentioned in the Module X1, Isle of Dread, which was expanded upon in various D&D modules and sources, particularly a series of Gazeteers. Mystara began as several semi-independent projects by different teams of writers who were each assigned to the task of developing different cultures and nations that would exist in the fantasy world that was supported by Dungeons & Dragons at the time. Their work was gathered and compiled, blended, and combined to form a fantasy world, Mystara. The D&D Gazetteer series details the game's Known World setting. Each Gazetteer treats one nation or empire, and has three basic elements: cultural and geographic background, features, and adventures. The cultural and geographic campaign background section offers a brief history and timeline for each nation; basic geography, climate,
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    4 votes
    127
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    128

    Half-Life

    • Characters: Gordon Freeman
    • Works Set Here: Half-Life
    The universe for the Half-Life series of games, including Portal.
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    129
    Lovecraft Mythos

    Lovecraft Mythos

    • Characters: Cthulhu
    • Works Set Here: The Shadow Over Innsmouth
    • Created by: H. P. Lovecraft
    The Lovecraft Mythos is the term coined by the scholar S. T. Joshi to describe the imaginary mythical backdrop, settings, and themes employed by the American weird fiction writer H. P. Lovecraft. Lovecraft's mythos is the foundation of a fictional myth-cycle known as the "Cthulhu Mythos", first recognized and developed by the writer August Derleth, that places a particular group of Lovecraft's stories into a separate and distinct category. Lovecraft himself, however, never used the term Cthulhu Mythos, nor did he acknowledge any individual distinctions among his stories. Nonetheless, Lovecraft undoubtedly recognized an underlying unity of certain imagined settings and deities in his tales, though the closest he ever came to naming this collective world was the Arkham cycle (after the main fictional town) or Yog-Sothothery (after one of the primary gods).  Joshi identifies four key elements in Lovecraft's mythos: These elements are given varying weights in different tales. Joshi points out, however, that Lovecraft never fully realized his mythos at any time in his career, but instead developed it gradually, adding elements to it with each story he wrote.  Common themes in
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    130
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    131

    Masters of the Universe

    • Characters: Skeletor
    • Works Set Here: He-Man and the Masters of the Universe
    • Created by: Roger Sweet
    Masters of the Universe (commonly abbreviated MOTU and sometimes referred to as He-Man, after the lead hero) is a media franchise created by Mattel. Although featuring a vast line-up of characters, the main premise revolves around the conflict between the heroic He-Man and the evil Skeletor on planet Eternia. Since its initial launch late 1981, the franchise has spawned a variety of products, including six lines of action figures, four animated television series, several comic series, and a feature film. Designer Roger Sweet claims to be the chief creator of He-Man and MOTU, although this is not officially acknowledged by Mattel, and disputed by some other contributors. The earliest storybooks and much of the original backstory were written by Donald F. Glut. In 1976, Mattel's CEO Ray Wagner declined a request to produce a toyline of action figures based on the characters from the George Lucas film Star Wars. Upon the commercial success of the film trilogy during the next few years and all related merchandise, Mattel attempted to launch several unsuccessful toylines, none of which captured the public's imagination or made a significant dent in the toy market. In the race to design
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    132

    Private Eye

    • Characters: Polly Filler
    Private Eye is a satirical magazine published in the United Kingdom. A number of long running jokes and satirical articles use fictional items as part of the Private Eye fictional universe.
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    2 votes
    133

    The Tortall Universe

    • Characters: Alanna of Trebond
    • Works Set Here: The Emperor Mage
    • Created by: Tamora Pierce
    The Tortall Universe Tortall is a major country in the universe in which the Song of the Lioness, Immortals, Protector of the Small, Trickster and the Provost's Dog books take place. Its capital is Corus, located near the western coast on the Emerald Ocean. To the north is Scanra, a wild and somewhat barbaric country with whom Tortall went to war in the last two books of the Protector of the Small quartet. To the east are Galla, Tusaine, and Tyra, and past them are Maren and Saraine. Carthak is south of Tortall across the inland sea, while to the west lie the Yamani Islands and Copper Isles. Most of the Trickster books took place in the Copper Isles, further south than the Yamani Islands.
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    134

    Earth-616

    • Characters: Peter Parker
    • Works Set Here: Planet X - part 5: Phoenix Invictus
    In the fictional Marvel Comics multiverse, Earth-616 or Earth 616 is the name used to identify the primary continuity in which most Marvel Comics titles take place. The term was first used in "Rough Justice," a story credited to both Alan Moore and Alan Davis published in July 1983 by Marvel UK in the anthology comic The Daredevils (and was later reprinted in the Captain Britain trade paperback). Saturnyne uses the term to differentiate Brian Braddock, the Captain Britain of the regular Marvel Comics universe, from the other members of the Captain Britain Corps, each of which inhabit different universes. The designation was later used by the American branch of Marvel Comics in the Excalibur title, which frequently referenced Captain Britain's early UK-published adventures. This comic was written by Chris Claremont, who had created Captain Britain, and by Alan Davis, the artist on the UK-published series. Alan Moore is usually credited with creating the term (for example by Marvel editor Tom Brevoort). However, Alan Davis has stated that the designation of Earth 616 was actually first made by Dave Thorpe, the previous writer of the UK-published Captain Britain stories. In addition,
    6.33
    3 votes
    135

    Epic Legends Of The Hierarchs: The Elemenstor Saga

    Epic Legends of the Hierarchs: The Elemenstor Saga (abbreviated as ELotH:TES) is a fan-driven parody of the generic fantasy fiction that serves as the backstory of many fantasy game franchises. It started as a single PBWiki page written by Jerry "Tycho" Holkins of Penny Arcade, and rapidly grew in size as Penny Arcade fans joined in expanding the parody. The tales of the Saga itself rotate around several bases: The original 13 'canon' books, the Japanese anime series, the American re-make of the anime, the collectible card game, and even the odd life of the author himself, and such events as his several-year long "pills and booze binge". These are only the major pieces of the story, and other fragments abound. In addition to direct pastiche of works in the parodied genres such as Alan Moore's graphic novel Watchmen, Terry Pratchett's Discworld series, Harry Potter, and Magic:The Gathering, the wiki also touches on and parodies much of popular culture such as the Beatles' song "Maxwell's Silver Hammer". Within the community, the idea that the franchise has existed for at least a decade is strictly enforced. Suggestions that the real world timeline that exists on the
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    3 votes
    136

    Fictional Universe of Galaxy Railways

    • Works Set Here: The Galaxy Railways
    The Galaxy Railways (銀河鉄道物語, Ginga Tetsudō Monogatari) is a 26 episode science fiction anime series about flying trains set in the far reaches of space. It is licensed by Funimation Production Ltd. and produced by Leiji Matsumoto. It debuted on American TV in a syndicated FUNimation Channel programming block airing on CoLours TV on Monday, June 19, 2006, but was replaced by Dragon Ball until the programming block was dropped. Currently, the series is still airing on the linear FUNimation Channel. Two sequels have been produced, both currently unlicensed in English regions. It is not certain where this series fits in with the rest of the Leijiverse. Galaxy Express 999 was noted for guest appearances by Captain Harlock, Queen Emeraldas and other connections such as Queen Millennia. The first Galaxy Railways season had no such crossovers and appearances by other Leijiverse characters were limited to subtle visual homages, although Manabu's brother, when accepted by the SDF, boards the Galaxy Express 999 to start his new assignment. For example, Captain Harlock appears as the Joker in a deck of cards. And Queen Millenia appears on the head of coin used for currency. Their status as
    6.33
    3 votes
    137

    Gaia

    • Characters: Sephiroth
    • Works Set Here: Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children
    Gaia is the fictional world in the 1997 role-playing video game Final Fantasy VII and its subsequent metaseries Compilation of Final Fantasy VII. Referred to as "The Planet" in the original game, the location was retroactively named "Gaia". Gaia is similar to that of the world of Final Fantasy VI insofar as it is a world with considerably more advanced technology than the first five games in the Final Fantasy series. Overall, Gaia's technology and society approximates that of an industrial or post-industrial science fiction milieu. Gaia is composed of three land masses; the eastern, western and northern continents. The eastern continent is home to the city of Midgar, an industrial metropolis that, at the time of Final Fantasy VII, served as Gaia's capital city and hosted the headquarters of the Shinra Electric Power Company, the planet's de facto world government. Midgar is situated in the middle of a large plain on the north-western corner of the eastern continent. Its prosperity came about as a result of the abundance of Mako in the vicinity, but due to the use of Mako reactors, the area around Midgar soon became lifeless and polluted. Within the city itself, there was no
    6.33
    3 votes
    138

    Instrumentality

    • Works Set Here: Scanners Live in Vain
    • Created by: Cordwainer Smith
    Cordwainer Smith's Instrumentality universe.
    6.33
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    139

    Mythic Europe

    Mythic Europe is the setting for the role-playing game Ars Magica, closely based on the Medieval Europe of history and folklore. Note that this is a "Mythic" world, so the folklore, fairy tale and myth is every bit as real (in the game-world) as is the "history." It's sometimes defined as "Europe the way medieval people believed it to be." In broad strokes, Mythic Europe is defined by the following "mythic" elements: the existence of magic and of faeries; the regular, palpable influence of Infernal agents desiring the damnation of humanity, and of Divine forces which seek the salvation of man. These forces act, within the game, much like they were believed to act by people of the era. Magic is the focus of the game, with the most powerful player characters being magi. However, these magi belong to an entirely-fictional group called "the Order of Hermes," which had no historical parallel. The magic system, "Hermetic Magic" is likewise entirely fictional, and not intended to represent even the beliefs of the time. Mythic Europe isn't "Mythic" because the people believed that way (as it is with White Wolf Game Studio's later World of Darkness where reality is informed by the beliefs
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    140

    The Culture

    • Characters: Diziet Sma
    • Works Set Here: Consider Phlebas
    • Created by: Iain Banks
    The Culture is a fictional interstellar anarchist, and utopian society created by the Scottish writer Iain M. Banks which features in a number of science fiction novels and works of short fiction by him, collectively called the Culture series. The Culture is characterized by being a post-scarcity society (meaning that its advanced technologies provide practically limitless material wealth and comforts for everyone for free, having all but abolished the concept of possessions), by having overcome almost all physical constraints on life (including disease and death) and by being an almost totally egalitarian, stable society without the use of any form of force or compulsion, except where necessary to protect others. Minds, powerful artificial intelligences, have an important role to play in this society. They administer this affluence for the benefit of all. As one commentator has said, The novels of the Culture cycle, therefore, mostly deal with people at the fringes of the Culture: diplomats, spies, or mercenaries; those who interact with other civilizations, and who do the Culture's dirty work in moving those societies closer to the Culture ideal, sometimes by force. In this
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    141

    The Sprawl

    • Characters: Molly
    • Works Set Here: The Sprawl trilogy
    • Created by: William Gibson
    In William Gibson's fiction, the Sprawl is a colloquial name for the Boston-Atlanta Metropolitan Axis (BAMA), an urban sprawl environment on a massive scale, and a fictional extension of the real Northeast Megalopolis. The novels Neuromancer (1984), Count Zero (1986), and Mona Lisa Overdrive (1988) (collectively known as the Sprawl trilogy) take place in this environment, as do the short stories "Johnny Mnemonic," "New Rose Hotel," "Burning Chrome," and "Fragments of a Hologram Rose." The Sprawl is a visualization of a future where virtually the entire East Coast of the United States, from Boston to Atlanta, has melded into a single mass of urban sprawl. It has been enclosed in several geodesic domes and merged into one megacity. The city has become a separate world with its own climate, no real night/day cycle, and an artificial sky that is always grey. It is said of the Sprawl that "the actors change but the play remains the same." Although there are areas of rich people in the Sprawl, a vast majority of the people struggle to survive from day to day. However, advanced technology is ubiquitous and accessible to all, regardless of financial standing. People spend much of their
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    142
    Aztec mythology

    Aztec mythology

    • Created by: Aztec
    Aztec mythology is the body or collection of myths of Aztec civilization of Central Mexico. The Aztecs were Nahuatl speaking groups living in central Mexico and much of their mythology is similar to that of other Mesoamerican cultures. According to legend, the various groups who were to become the Aztecs arrived from the north into the Anahuac valley around Lake Texcoco. The location of this valley and lake of destination is clear – it is the heart of modern Mexico City – but little can be known with certainty about the origin of the Aztec. There are different accounts of their origin. In the myth the ancestors of the Mexica/Aztec came from a place in the north called Aztlan, the last of seven nahuatlacas (Nahuatl-speaking tribes, from tlaca, "man") to make the journey southward, hence their name "Azteca." Other accounts cite their origin in Chicomostoc, "the place of the seven caves," or at Tamoanchan (the legendary origin of all civilizations). The Mexica/Aztec were said to be guided by their god Huitzilopochtli, meaning "Left-handed Hummingbird" or "Hummingbird from the South." When they arrived at an island in the lake, they saw an eagle which was perched on a nopal cactus full
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    143

    Exalted

    • Characters: Harmonious Jade
    Exalted is a role-playing game published by White Wolf Publishing. The game is classified as high fantasy, but may be more accurately described as "mythic fantasy", as the developer specifically avoided drawing on J. R. R. Tolkien, but rather turned to a mixture of world mythologies, as well as manga for inspiration. The game is currently in its second edition, and with revised and expanded second edition supplementary materials being released. First Edition is no longer in development, but was originally created by Robert Hatch, Justin Achilli and Stephan Wieck. The original core rulebook was published in July 2001. The basic premise of the game is that the player characters are chosen by a deity and imbued with the powers of a demigod (thus, "exalted", or "raised high"). There are numerous varieties of Exalted, each chosen by a different deity or group of deities; however, the core game is based around the Solar Exalted, Chosen of the Unconquered Sun, with the Core Rulebook covering the Solars' abilities, powers, and place within the setting. While the core rulebook mentions and discusses the other Exalted to the extent necessary for them to appear as supporting characters in
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    144

    Familias Regnant universe

    • Works Set Here: Rules of Engagement
    • Created by: Elizabeth Moon
    The Familias Regnant is the name of the government of an area of the galaxy in the distant future from the Serrano series of books written by Elizabeth Moon. In the early books of the Serrano Legacy, the government is headed by a monarchy. As the story progresses, the abdication of the King after the Cloning Scandal caused the Council (equivalent of the House of Lords in the United Kingdom) to appoint an elected official to govern. The council is made up of members of the Ruling Families. These families have many business interests throughout known space, and political decisions are closely linked to business needs. Non-members of the Ruling Families have little to no control over the choice of leaders and the everyday running of their government. It is likely that the Ruling Families were initially a business arrangement which became a form of government as business relationships grew and merged. Their government is run according to a set of bylaws and there is no constitution or other set framework in place. The Military Forces of the Familias Regnant is made up of two distinct forces: The ' Regs ' are the professional section of the Familias Military Forces, primarily made up of
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    145

    I, the Sun universe

    • Characters: Malnigal
    • Works Set Here: I, the Sun
    • Created by: Janet Morris
    I, the Sun is the fictional universe for Janet Morris' book, I, the Sun. It is set within the Hittite Empire.
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    146
    Lovecraft Country

    Lovecraft Country

    • Works Set Here: Lovecraft Mythos
    Lovecraft Country is a term coined by Keith Herber for the New England setting, combining real and fictitious locations, used by H. P. Lovecraft in many of his weird fiction stories, and later elaborated by other writers working in the Cthulhu Mythos. The term was popularized by Chaosium, the producers of the Lovecraftian role-playing game Call of Cthulhu. Lovecraft scholar S. T. Joshi refers to the area as the "Miskatonic region", after its fictional river and university, while Lovecraft biographer Lin Carter calls it Miskatonic County, though Lovecraft indicates that at least some of his fictional towns were located in the real-life Essex County of Massachusetts. In its 1998 supplement Dead Reckonings, Chaosium defined Lovecraft Country as "a land located in the northeast of Massachusetts. The most important portion stretches along the Miskatonic River valley, from Dunwich in the far west to where it enters the Atlantic Ocean between Arkham, Kingsport, and Martin's Beach." If one were to replace Martin's Beach with another seaside town, Innsmouth, one would have a list of the most significant locations in Lovecraft Country. Sometimes the phrase is used in a more inclusive sense,
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    147

    Skartaris

    • Characters: Warlord
    • Works Set Here: Warlord
    • Created by: Mike Grell
    Skartaris is a fictional Hollow Earth fantasy setting created by Mike Grell for the sword and sorcery comic book Warlord, published by DC Comics. Skartaris debuted in 1st Issue Special #8 (November 1975), where the character Travis Morgan, a US Air Force pilot, discovers a passage into this world through the Earth's North Pole. Subsequent to that first issue, the Warlord series tells of Morgan's adventures in Skartaris. According to Mike Grell, creator of Skartaris and Warlord, "the name comes from the mountain peak Scartaris that points the way to the passage to the earth’s core in Journey to the Center of the Earth." While Grell never drew a map of Skartaris during his tenure on the book, one was created towards the end of the original volume's run, and the illustration appeared in Warlord Annual #4 (1985). In an interview from Comic Scene in 1983, reprinted on TheWarlord.ca he says: "I did things like moving my character around the countryside; I never drew a map so I could move him from one side of Skartaris to the other just for the sake of the story." In a later interview with Comic Book Resources Grell said, "Anything that can happen in fantasy happens in the lore and it’s
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    148

    St Trinian's School

    • Created by: Ronald Searle
    St Trinian's is a fictional girls' boarding school, the creation of English cartoonist Ronald Searle, that later became the subject of a popular series of comedy films. The first cartoon appeared in 1941, but shortly afterwards Searle had to fulfil his military service where he was captured at Singapore and spent the rest of the war as a prisoner of the Japanese. After the war, in 1946 he started making new cartoons about the girls, but the content was a lot darker in comparison with the previous years. The school is the antithesis of the Enid Blyton or Angela Brazil-type posh girls' boarding school; its pupils are wicked and often well armed, and mayhem is rife. The mistresses (as female teachers in Britain were known at the time) are also disreputable. Cartoons often showed dead bodies of girls who had been murdered with pitchforks or succumbed to violent team sports, sometimes with vultures circling; girls drank, gambled and smoked. It is reputed that the gymslip style of dress worn by the girls was closely modelled on the uniform of the school that Searle's daughter Kate attended, JAGS in Dulwich. The films implied that the girls were the daughters of gangsters, crooks, shady
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    149

    The Exiled Realm of Arborea

    The Exiled Realm of Arborea (officially abbreviated as TERA) is a 3D fantasy themed MMORPG developed by Bluehole Studio. The game was launched and published in South Korea on January 25, 2011 by Hangame, in North America on May 1, 2012 by En Masse Entertainment and in Europe on May 3, 2012 by Frogster Interactive Pictures with open and closed beta testings taking place before the launch dates. Possible localizations for other regions have been mentioned, but have not yet been confirmed besides Japan. TERA has typical MMORPG features such as questing, crafting, and player versus player action. The game's combat uses a real-time battle system that incorporates third person camera view. The player targets an enemy with a cross-hair cursor rather than clicking or tabbing an individual opponent (which is called the "Non-Target battle system" by the developer). The Players need to actively dodge enemy attacks. A keyboard and mouse or a control pad can be used to control the character. The developers collaborated with CCP Games and their successful use of "PLEX" for Eve Online as a way of deterring gold farmers. As a result, TERA got to have a currency called "Chronoscrolls" which works
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    150

    The World of the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen

    The world of The League of Extraordinary Gentleman is a fictional universe created by Alan Moore in the comic book series The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, where all of the characters and events from literature (and possibly the entirety of fiction) coexist. The world the characters inhabit is one more technologically advanced than our own, but also home to the strange and supernatural. Beyond the comic itself, the world of The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen is expanded upon by supplemental prose material, including The New Traveller's Almanac, Allan and the Sundered Veil, and the documents from the Black Dossier. In the Black Dossier, the alternate history of the League's United Kingdom is explored in depth. As in medieval British legend, in approximately 1100 BC, Brutus of Troy founds the kingdom of Britain (then called Brutain) with the capital at New Troy. He is accompanied by the ageless and gender swapping Orlando, who aids Brutus in subduing Brutain's population of savage giants and their chieftain, Gogmagog. In 43 AD Britain is invaded by the Roman Empire under Claudius. In 363, the year of Merlin's birth, the Emperor Julian declares Britain a pagan nation. In 410
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    151
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    152

    Battlestar Galactica 2003

    • Characters: Kara Thrace
    • Works Set Here: Battlestar Galactica
    Battlestar Galactica refers to a "re-imagined" science fiction universe debuting in 2003 and based on the 1970s Universal Studios movie and television franchise of the same name. It is not simply a remake, but a new direction taken from the same premise, analogous to a "reboot" in comic books. The term "re-imagining" has been used to describe the show since its early promotion to differentiate it from the original 1978 series. The first production to be set in the re-imagined universe was a miniseries that was first broadcast on the Sci Fi Channel on December 8, 2003. From that followed a regular television series which premiered on Sky One in the UK and Ireland on October 18, 2004 and on Sci Fi Channel in the U.S. on January 14, 2005. A spin-off prequel series called Caprica has been announced. A comic book series was released in 2006 by Dynamite Entertainment, featuring the characters from the re-imagined show. Contents
    • 1 Overview
    • 2 Re-imagining
      • 2.1 History
      • 2.2 Comparison with the 1978 series
      • 2.3 References to modern culture
    • 3 Series information
    • 4 Episodes and DVD/online download information
    • 5 Notes
    • 6 References
    • 7 External links
    [edit] Overview The new BSG series departs from the original in several ways. In terms of style and storytelling, the new BSG rejects the traditional televised science fiction styles of Star Trek (after which the original BSG series was conceived), in favor of what executive producer Ronald D. Moore calls "naturalistic science fiction". The new series emphasizes character drama in an edgy survivalist setting, shedding the light-hearted action/adventure style of the original show. Among plot differences, the key characters of Starbuck and Boomer have been recast as female roles. The Cylons are creation of man (perhaps alluding to Man being ultimately responsible for his own destrction.) And the new breed of Cylon models now imitate humanoid appearance down to the cellular level. The new series benefits from vastly improved visual effects, thanks to computer-generated imaging special effects, which weren't available during the time of the original series. When the miniseries aired on the SciFi channel in 2003, it was the highest-rated rated cable miniseries of that year. The miniseries' success led to the commission of a new ongoing television series, the first episode of which drew an estimated 850,000 viewers—an 8% multichannel viewer share—on its world premiere on Sky One in the UK & Ireland. The subsequent reimagined Battlestar Galactica TV series remains the highest rated original program in the Sci Fi Channel's history. Among media critics, the miniseries and the subsequent weekly TV series have received critical acclaim. Many regard the new BSG to be superior to the original -- Time magazine to declare in the spring of 2005 that the new show was one of the six best drama series on television. It would proclaim the series the best show on television in September of the same year. The American Film Institute named the show to its list of the ten best shows on television. Other mainstream publications such as the Chicago Tribune, Rolling Stone magazine, and Newsday also named the series one of the best on television for 2005. In 2006, the series won a prestigious Peabody Award in recognition of its creative excellence. Among fans of the original (1978) Battlestar Galactica series, a small group loudly disapproved of the changes made to the show's creative direction and premise. Missing from the reimagined series are the sci-fi high-tech gadgets, interaction with other alien and human societies, and the upbeat ending of every episode. The creative direction has purposefully recast the Galactica warship with a decidedly 'retro' look, approximating the function of a World War II era aircraft carrier. In the tradition of science fiction series such as Star Trek and Babylon 5, BSG examines social, moral, and ethical issues of human-society in allegory -- but without the charm and light-heartedness of other scifi shows. [edit] Re-imagining North American DVD release of the first season. [edit] History Previous efforts to remake or continue the story of Battlestar Galactica by Tom DeSanto, Bryan Singer, and original series star Richard Hatch involved using either the original cast or the original characters and plot. None of these projects proceeded beyond the development stage. Ronald D. Moore, executive producer and screenwriter of the new Battlestar Galactica, wrote in February 2003: "Here lies a slumbering giant, its name known to many, its voice remembered by but a few. For a brief moment, it strode the Earth, telling tall tales of things that never were, then stumbled over a rating point and fell into a deep sleep." He tackled the re-imagining with realism in mind, portraying the show's heroes as being part of a "flawed" humanity. Those flaws include Adama and his son harboring resentment toward one another, Colonel Tigh's alcoholism and deep personal demons, and an outdated battlestar prone to problems and outside sabotage. The special effects and space battles are portrayed with muted sounds unlike the unscientific sounds commonplace in most television and film science fiction. Comparatively realistic Newtonian physics first seen in the science-fiction program Babylon 5 and the use of bullets and missiles instead of energy weapons such as lasers also make the re-imagining stand out. Ronald D. Moore has admitted that the miniseries and series drew inspiration from the events of 9/11 and its aftermath. The shows feature elements such as "sleeper" agents, the threat of sneak terrorist attacks using civilian transports, Cylon and human suicide bombers, the torture of prisoners, and a struggle motivated by intense religious differences. Episode thirteen of the second season featured political activists attempting to use sabotage against the fleet to force "peace talks" with the Cylons. [edit] Comparison with the 1978 series Main article: Comparison of Battlestar Galactica (1978) and Battlestar Galactica (2003) Among the most notable changes made from the older series are the inclusion of Cylon models which mimic humans and numerous characters who are of a different ethnicity or gender. Human culture is made to closely resemble contemporary 21st century Western culture, with names and costuming often indistinguishable from other television shows. Human technology is deliberately retro, which is explained as a military necessity given Cylon technical advantages, such as their ability to infiltrate networked computer systems. The tone is also changed from a heroic fantasy to a more naturalistic survival narrative with many allusions, both subtle and obvious, to current events. [edit] References to modern culture The re-imagined show references many aspects of modern culture and the military. The original Cylon attack plays upon post-9/11 fears; frequent outbreaks of xenophobia and fear of Cylon "sleeper agents" mirror current fears of terrorist "sleeper cells" in Europe and North America.[citation needed] In one episode, a Cylon agent blows itself up in a successful suicide bombing attempt. In the first episode of the series, 33, Apollo and Starbuck are ordered to destroy a civilian transport attempting a suicide attack on Galactica, having serious ethical ramifications later. In later episodes, New Caprica is conquered by the Cylons and an insurgent resistance is formed. This sets the stage for numerous comparsions to the situation in Iraq at the time of broadcast, including human suicide bombings, weapons caches in places of worship, and vigilante justice in the form of masked police that cause suspected enemy collaborators to "disappear" without a fair and open trial. The show has also addressed other issues, such as abortion, the morality of prisoner torture, and the use of biological weapons. [edit] Series information
    • Miniseries (2003)
    • Regular television series (2004)
    • "Caprica" prequel (not yet in production)
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    153

    Halloween

    • Works Set Here: Halloween
    Halloween is an American horror franchise that consists of ten slasher films, novels, and comic books. The franchise focuses on the fictional character of Michael Myers who was committed to a sanitarium as a child for the murder of his older sister, Judith Myers. Fifteen years later, he escapes to stalk and kill the people of Haddonfield, Illinois while being chased by his former psychiatrist Dr. Sam Loomis. Michael's killings occur on the holiday of Halloween, on which all of the films primarily take place. The films collectively grossed over $366 million at the box-office worldwide. The original Halloween, released in 1978, was written by John Carpenter and Debra Hill, and directed by Carpenter. The sequels have had various writers and directors attached to them. Michael Myers is the antagonist in all of the films except Halloween III: Season of the Witch, the story of which has no direct connection to any other Halloween film in the series. Carpenter, who had a hand in writing the first sequel, has not had any direct involvement with the rest of the films. The film series is ranked fourth at the United States box office–in adjusted 2008 dollars–when compared to other American
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    154

    Heavy Gear

    Heavy Gear is a game universe published since 1994 by Canadian publisher Dream Pod 9. It includes a tabletop tactical wargame, a role-playing game and a lesser known combat card game (Heavy Gear Fighter). The setting is also known through the PC-game incarnations published by Activision in 1997 and 1999, developed after Activision lost the rights to the Battletech/MechWarrior series. It also spawned a 40-episodes, 3D-animated TV series in 2001, which featured a much simplified version of the universe developed in the role-playing game. The background universe of the game is extremely detailed: several million words have been published to date in more than a hundred books and game accessories. A continual epic storyline runs throughout all of the game's material, with new publications moving chronologically along the timeline. As the name implies, Heavy Gear is best known for its humanoid combat vehicles (or mecha): the 'Gears' and 'Striders' used by the military forces in the setting. Its mecha designs are typical of those found in the Real Robot anime genre; they are most similar in size and tactical role to those in Ryousuke Takahashi's 1983 Armored Trooper Votoms anime. They're,
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    155

    Hollow World

    • Works Set Here: Dungeons & Dragons: Warriors of the Eternal Sun
    The Hollow World is a sub-setting for the Mystara campaign world in the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game. The Hollow World details the inner surface contained within the world of Mystara, similar to the real world legends of the Hollow Earth. In the Mystara setting, the Hollow World acts as a living "cultural museum" for the planet, forever preserving cultures and races that are near extinction on the surface world. The Hollow World was originally discovered by Ka the Preserver, an ancient Immortal who began life as a giant carnosaur, who after finding it, decided to use the inner surface of the world as a refuge and preserve for creatures that were on the verge of becoming extinct in the ever-changing outer world. Since that time, the Hollow World has become a vast refuge for cultures, and species that have become extinct on the surface of Mystara. Within the Hollow World, characters from the surface world are severely limited by the magic used by the Immortals to preserve the stability of the various cultures. The requirements to learn magic are much higher in the Hollow world, and many spells are non-functional or unavailable. The Hollow World also adds several new player
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    156

    Madeleine Duncan Brown is mistress of LBJ

    • Characters: Steven Mark Brown
    • Works Set Here: Texas in the Morning
    This is the universe described in the book Texas in the Morning in which Madeleine Duncan Brown's son Steven Mark Brown was allegedly fathered by president Lyndon B. Johnson.
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    157

    Quicksilver Universe

    • Characters: Jack Shaftoe
    • Works Set Here: The Confusion
    • Created by: Neal Stephenson
    The universe for Neal Stephenson's Cryptonomicon and Baroque Cycle.
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    158

    Ryanverse

    • Characters: Jack Ryan
    • Works Set Here: The Hunt for Red October
    • Created by: Tom Clancy
    Ryanverse (or Ryaniverse) refers to the fictional universe created by Tom Clancy featuring Jack Ryan and other characters, such as John Clark and Domingo Chavez. The first book written to feature Jack Ryan was The Hunt for Red October. Books in the order in which they were written: In the order in which they occur in the storyline (and when they occur): Starting with the following novel, the Ryanverse becomes distinctly different from real history as noted below. A total of five presidents are explicitly shown in the Ryanverse (although Red Rabbit takes place during the Reagan Administration, Reagan does not make an appearance as a character): It should be noted that in later books there are nevertheless multiple references to both the Reagan Presidency and the George H.W. Bush Presidency as if they had happened. Several film adaptation of the Jack Ryan novels have been produced. Many video games based on the Ryanverse have been made, some based on the novels, some on the films, some on the spin-offs. In addition there is the Rainbow Six video game universe, see Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six
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    159
    Sacred Band of Stepsons

    Sacred Band of Stepsons

    • Characters: Askelon of Meridian
    • Works Set Here: City at the Edge of Time
    • Created by: Chris Morris
    The Sacred Band of Stepsons is a fictional ancient cavalry unit created by Janet Morris and based on the historical Sacred Band of Thebes, an elite strike force of paired lovers and friends that flourished during the fourth century BCE in ancient Greece, where sexuality was a behavior, not an identity. The Sacred Band of Stepsons novels and stories take place in a myth-like milieu that mixes historical places such as Nisibis, Mygdonia and Chaeronea; warriors such as Theagenes (commander of the Theban Sacred Band at Chaeronea); gods such as Enlil, Maat and Harmonia; philosophers such as Heraclitus and Thales; cavalry tactics and customs such as homosexuality in the militaries of ancient Greece with those that exist only in fantasy. The exploits of the Stepsons are chronicled in eleven short stories and eight novels (as of 2010). In a fantasy context, this series explores the difficulties facing war-fighters in personal relationships and the enduring questions surrounding the military's historical mixing of homosexuals and heterosexuals in combat.
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    160

    Star Trek

    • Characters: James T. Kirk
    • Works Set Here: Star Trek: First Contact
    • Created by: Gene Roddenberry
    Star Trek is an American science fiction entertainment franchise created by Gene Roddenberry. The franchise began in 1966 with the television series Star Trek later referred to as Star Trek: The Original Series. This series, its spin-off shows: Star Trek: The Animated Series, Star Trek: The Next Generation, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, Star Trek: Voyager, and Star Trek: Enterprise, as well as the Star Trek film series make up the core of the Star Trek mythos. While the critical response of the much of the franchise varies, many individual Star Trek episodes and films have won awards and honors including Emmy Awards, Hugo Awards, and an Academy Award. Westerns such as Wagon Train along with the novel Gulliver's Travels inspired Roddenberry when he created the first Star Trek. The Original Series, followed the interstellar adventures of James T. Kirk and the crew of an exploration vessel of a 23rd century galactic "United Federation of Planets"—the Starship Enterprise. This series debuted in 1966 and ran for three seasons on NBC. These adventures continued in the short-lived Star Trek: The Animated Series and six feature films. Four spin-off television series were eventually produced;
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    161

    Swallows and Amazons

    • Characters: Captain Flint
    • Created by: Arthur Ransome
    The fictional universe for the Swallows and Amazons series of books by Arthur Ransome.
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    162

    Underbelly

    • Characters: Baron ambrosia
    Underbelly is a podcast series which first appeared in January 2007 and distributed through Libsyn (Liberated Syndication Media). The show reached a number #1 ranking under iTunes culinary podcasts.After eight episodes the series ended yet was picked up and revised in Spring 2008 under the name Bronx Flavor on Channel 67 Bronxnet. The new series still captures the Baron's wild adventures yet focuses strictly on his adventures in the Bronx. Bronx Flavor also has a greatly raised production value as it is now done with a small budget and improved facilities. In both Underbelly and Bronx Flavor Fornal/Baron Ambrosia will involve local business owners, diners and passers in his outrageous comedic sketches. His improv is unique and brings a new flavor to Bronx television.The show's following stems largely from its balance of education and humor. Each episode will usually begin with the Baron describing a particular ethnic community and then focus on a culinary specialty they prepare. The Baron will then hunt it down and get into any number of disastrous situations stemming from his obsessive personality and knack for over-indulgence.On July 27, 2008 Baron Ambrosia appeared in the Bronx Dominican Day Parade in his purple roadster the P-Rex to publicize the show.All Underbelly and Bronx Flavor materials are written, directed, produced and edited by Fornal.
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    163

    A Song of Ice and Fire

    • Characters: Ser Duncan the Tall
    • Works Set Here: The Hedge Knight
    • Created by: George R. R. Martin
    The fictional setting for the works in George R. R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire series, and the "Dunk and Egg" prequel stories.
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    164
    Camelot

    Camelot

    • Characters: Gareth
    Camelot is a castle associated with the legendary King Arthur. Absent in the early Arthurian material, Camelot first appeared in 12th-century French romances and eventually came to be described as the fantastic capital of Arthur's realm and a symbol of the Arthurian world. The stories locate it somewhere in Britain and sometimes associate it with real cities, though more usually its precise location is not revealed. Most scholars regard it as being entirely fictional, its geography being perfect for romance writers; Arthurian scholar Norris J. Lacy commented that "Camelot, located no where in particular, can be anywhere". Nevertheless arguments about the location of the "real Camelot" have occurred since the 15th century and continue to rage today in popular works and for tourism purposes. The castle is mentioned for the first time in Chrétien de Troyes' poem Lancelot, the Knight of the Cart, dating to the 1170s, though it does not appear in all the manuscripts. It is mentioned in passing, and is not described: Nothing in Chrétien's poem suggests the level of importance Camelot would have in later romances. For Chrétien, Arthur's chief court was in Caerleon in Wales; this was the
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    165

    Pirates of the Caribbean

    Pirates of the Caribbean is a multi-billion dollar Walt Disney franchise encompassing a series of films, a theme park ride, and spinoff novels as well as numerous video games and other publications. The franchise originated with the Pirates of the Caribbean theme ride attraction, which opened at Disneyland in 1967, the last Disney theme park attraction overseen by Walt Disney. Disney based the ride on pirate legends and folklore. As of August 2006, Pirates of the Caribbean attractions can be found at four Disney theme parks. Their related films have grossed almost US$4 billion as of 2011. Two series of young reader books have been made as prequels to the first film: In addition there is a novel written for adults: Several additional works have been inspired by the original attraction:
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    166
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    167

    Warcraft Universe

    • Works Set Here: World of Warcraft: The Burning Crusade
    Warcraft is a franchise of video games, novels, and other media originally created by Blizzard Entertainment. The series is made up of four core games: Warcraft: Orcs & Humans, Warcraft II: Tides of Darkness, Warcraft III: Reign of Chaos, and World of Warcraft. The first three of these core games are in the real-time strategy genre, where opposing players command virtual armies in battle against each other or a computer-controlled enemy. The last and best selling title of the franchise is a massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG). Expansion sets were also released for multiple games in the series, each adding more content to each game as an effort to expand the product lifespan of each. No expansions were released for Warcraft: Orcs & Humans. Warcraft II was accompanied by the release of Warcraft II: Beyond the Dark Portal. Warcraft III was accompanied by the release of Warcraft III: The Frozen Throne. Multiple expansion packages accompanied World of Warcraft, namely The Burning Crusade, Wrath of the Lich King, Cataclysm, and Mists of Pandaria. All games in the series have been set in and around the world of Azeroth, a high fantasy setting. Initially, the start of
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    168

    Buffyverse

    • Characters: Buffy Summers
    • Works Set Here: Buffy the Vampire Slayer
    • Created by: Joss Whedon
    The Buffyverse or Slayerverse, (which is part of the larger Whedonverse ) is the shared fictional universe in which the TV series Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Angel are set. This term, originally coined by fans of the TV series, has since been used in the titles of published works, and adopted by Joss Whedon, the creator of the fictional universe. The Buffyverse is a place in which supernatural phenomena exist, and supernatural evil can be challenged by people willing to fight against such forces. The Buffyverse is a fictional construct created by hundreds of individual stories told through TV, novels, comics and other media. It began with the first episodes of the Buffy the Vampire Slayer television series in 1997 and expanded with the spinoff TV series Angel in 1999. The popularity of these series led to licensed fiction carrying the Buffy and Angel labels, and resulted in fans beginning to distinguish what they consider 'real' within the Buffyverse (canon). Outside of the TV series, the Buffyverse has been expanded and elaborated by various authors and artists in the so-called "Buffyverse Expanded Universe". The Buffyverse novels, Buffy video games and the vast majority of
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    169
    Disney Princesses

    Disney Princesses

    • Characters: Princess Snow White
    Disney Princess is a Walt Disney Company franchise, based on fictional characters who have been featured as part of the Disney character line-up. The members of the franchise are Snow White, Cinderella, Aurora, Ariel, Belle, Jasmine, Pocahontas, Mulan, Tiana and Rapunzel. The franchise has released dolls, sing-along videos and a variety of other girls' products, apparel, home decor and a variety of toys featuring the Disney Princesses. In early 1999, when Andy Mooney was hired by Disney's Consumer Products division to help combat dropping sales, the idea for the Disney Princess franchise was born. Soon after joining Disney, Mooney attended his first Disney on Ice show. While waiting in line, he found himself surrounded by young girls dressed as princesses. "They weren’t even Disney products. They were generic princess products", he mused. Soon after realizing the demand, the Disney Princess line was formed. Despite limited advertising and no focus groups, the various Disney Princess items released became a huge success. Sales at Disney Consumer Products rose from $300 million in 2001 to $3 billion in 2006. All the princesses are available for meet-n-greets in the Disneyland Resort
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    170

    Kerrion Consortium

    • Characters: Shebat
    • Works Set Here: Dream Dancer
    • Created by: Janet Morris
    Kerrion Consortium is a fictional universe created by Janet Morris, and described in her Kerrion literary series.
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    171
    Krazy Kat

    Krazy Kat

    • Characters: Krazy Kat
    • Created by: George Herriman
    Krazy Kat is an American comic strip created by cartoonist George Herriman, published daily in newspapers between 1913 and 1944. It first appeared in the New York Evening Journal, whose owner, William Randolph Hearst, was a major booster for the strip throughout its run. The characters had been introduced previously in a side strip with Herriman's earlier creation, The Dingbat Family. The phrase "Krazy Kat" originated there, said by the mouse by way of describing the cat. Set in a dreamlike portrayal of Herriman's vacation home of Coconino County, Arizona, Krazy Kat's mixture of offbeat surrealism, innocent playfulness and poetic, idiosyncratic language has made it a favorite of comics aficionados and art critics for more than 80 years. The strip focuses on the curious love triangle between its title character, a guileless, carefree, simple-minded cat of indeterminate gender (referred to as both "he" and "she"); the obsessive antagonist Ignatz Mouse; and the protective police dog, Offissa Bull Pupp. Krazy nurses an unrequited love for the mouse. However, Ignatz despises Krazy and constantly schemes to throw bricks at Krazy's head, which Krazy misinterprets as a sign of affection,
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    172
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    173

    Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles

    • Characters: Donatello
    • Created by: Peter Laird
    The Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (TMNT), often shortened to Ninja Turtles, are a fictional team of four teenage anthropomorphic turtles, who were trained by their anthropomorphic rat sensei in the art of ninjutsu and named after four Renaissance artists. From their home in the storm sewers of New York City, they battle petty criminals, evil overlords and alien invaders, all while remaining isolated from society-at-large. The characters initially appeared in comic books before being licensed for toys, cartoons, video games, films, and other merchandise. During the peak of its popularity in the late 1980s through early 1990s, the franchise gained considerable worldwide success and fame. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles was created in an American comic book published by Mirage Studios in 1984 in Dover, New Hampshire. The concept arose from a humorous drawing sketched out by Kevin Eastman during a casual evening of brainstorming with his friend Peter Laird. Using money from a tax refund together with a loan from Eastman's uncle, the young artists self-published a single-issue comic intended to parody four of the most popular comics of the early 1980s: Marvel Comics' Daredevil and New
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    174
    Greek mythology

    Greek mythology

    • Characters: Chariclo
    • Works Set Here: The Golden Fleece
    Greek mythology are myths and legends belonging to the ancient Greeks, concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world, and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. They were a part of religion in ancient Greece and are part of religion in modern Greece and around the world as Hellenismos. Modern scholars refer to, and study, the myths in an attempt to throw light on the religious and political institutions of Ancient Greece, its civilization, and to gain understanding of the nature of myth-making itself. Greek mythology is embodied, explicitly, in a large collection of narratives, and implicitly in Greek representational arts, such as vase-paintings and votive gifts. Greek myth attempts to explain the origins of the world, and details the lives and adventures of a wide variety of gods, goddesses, heroes, heroines, and mythological creatures. These accounts initially were disseminated in an oral-poetic tradition; today the Greek myths are known primarily from Greek literature. The oldest known Greek literary sources, Homer's epic poems Iliad and Odyssey, focus on events surrounding the Trojan War. Two poems by Homer's near contemporary Hesiod,
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    175

    Majipoor universe

    • Works Set Here: The Book of Changes
    • Created by: Robert Silverberg
    The universe for Robert Silverberg's Majipoor series.
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    176

    Alliance-Union universe

    • Characters: Ariane Emory
    • Works Set Here: Cyteen
    • Created by: C. J. Cherryh
    The Alliance-Union universe is a fictional universe created by science fiction and fantasy author C. J. Cherryh. It is the setting for an epic future history series extending from the 21st century out into the far future. To date, the corpus of the Alliance-Union universe consists of 27 science fiction novels along with a series of seven short story anthologies edited by Cherryh and a few other miscellaneous works. It encompasses both books for which Cherryh won the Hugo Award for Best Novel, Downbelow Station and Cyteen, and also incorporates various other series books such as the Faded Sun trilogy, the Chanur novels, the four Morgaine books, and the Merovingen Nights shared world series. As humanity reaches out to the stars, space stations are financed by the private Sol Corporation, eventually known as the Earth Company. Each new station is built by the previous one and is located ever farther away from Earth. In the days before faster-than-light travel (FTL), nine stations are laboriously constructed around nine stars, all lacking habitable planets. The stationers and the merchanters who man the ships that supply them both develop distinct cultural identities, but remain
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    177
    Commedia dell'arte

    Commedia dell'arte

    • Characters: Tartaglia
    Commedia dell'Arte (Italian pronunciation: [komˈmɛːdja delˈlarte]) is a form of theater characterized by masked "types" which began in Italy in the 16 century and was responsible for the advent of the actress and improvised performances based on sketches or scenarios. The closest translation of the name is "comedy of craft"; it is shortened from commedia dell'arte all'improvviso, or "comedy of the craft of improvisation". Here, arte does not refer to "art" as we currently consider the word, but rather to that which is made by artigiani (artisans). In fact, the term arte was coined much later, for in the early period the term used in contemporary accounts is commedia all'improviso. This was to distinguish the form from commedia erudita or learned comedy that was written by academics and performed by amateurs. Commedia dell'arte, conversely, was performed by professional actors (comici) who perfected a specific role or mask. Italian theater historians, such as Roberto Tessari, Ferdinando Taviani, and Luciano Pinto believe commedia was a response to the political and economic crisis of the 16th century and, as a consequence, became the first entirely professional form of theater. The
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    178
    Cthulhu Mythos

    Cthulhu Mythos

    • Characters: Cthulhu
    • Works Set Here: Dagon
    • Created by: H. P. Lovecraft
    The Cthulhu Mythos is a shared fictional universe, based on the work of American horror writer H. P. Lovecraft. The term was first coined by August Derleth, a contemporary correspondent of Lovecraft, who used the name of the creature Cthulhu—a central figure in Lovecraft literature and the focus of Lovecraft's famous short story The Call of Cthulhu (first published in pulp magazine Weird Tales in 1928)—to identify the system of lore employed by Lovecraft and his literary successors. Writer Richard L. Tierney later applied the term "Derleth Mythos" to distinguish between Lovecraft's works and Derleth's later stories. Authors writing in the Lovecraftian milieu use elements of the Mythos in an ongoing expansion of the fictional universe. Robert M. Price described in his essay "H. P. Lovecraft and the Cthulhu Mythos" two stages in the development of the Cthulhu Mythos. The first stage, termed the "Cthulhu Mythos proper" by Price, was formulated during Lovecraft's lifetime and was subject to his guidance. The second stage was guided by August Derleth who, in addition to publishing Lovecraft's stories after his death, attempted to categorize and expand the Mythos. An ongoing theme in
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    179
    Cupid and Psyche

    Cupid and Psyche

    • Characters: Psyche
    Cupid and Psyche (/ˈsaɪkiː/, Greek: Ψυχή), also known as The Tale of Amour and Psyche and The Tale of Eros and Psyche, is a myth that first appeared as a digressionary story told by an old woman in Lucius Apuleius' novel, The Golden Ass, written in the 2nd century AD. Apuleius likely used an earlier tale as the basis for his story, modifying it to suit the thematic needs of his novel. It has since been interpreted as a Märchen, an allegory and a myth. Considered as a fairy tale, it is neither an allegory nor a myth, but the folkloric tradition tends to blend these. Envious and jealous of the beauty of a mortal girl named Psyche, Venus asks her son Cupid (known to the Greeks as Eros) to use his golden arrows while Psyche sleeps, so that when she awakens, Venus (Aphrodite in the Greek tradition) would place a vile creature for her to fall in love with. Cupid finally agrees to her commands after a long debate. As he flies to Psyche's room at night, he becomes invisible so no one can see him fly in through her window. He takes pity on her, for she was born too beautiful for her own safety. As he slowly approaches, careful not to make a sound, he readies one of his golden arrows. He
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    180

    Dracula (traditional)

    • Characters: Count Dracula
    • Works Set Here: Bram Stoker's Dracula
    The universe created in Bram Stoker's novel Dracula. Later novels and films are largely similar and also set in this universe.
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    181

    Magical Girl Lyrical Nanoha

    • Characters: Chrono Haraoun
    • Works Set Here: Magical Girl Lyrical Nanoha
    • Created by: Masaki Tsuzuki
    Magical Girl Lyrical Nanoha is the fictional universe of the Magical Girl Lyrical Nanoha series.
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    182
    Mazzverse

    Mazzverse

    • Characters: Eden Jones
    • Works Set Here: With Love
    • Created by: Stephen Pytak
    "Mazzverse" is a term used to describe the fictional universe created by Stephen Pytak, an author and independent publisher. Pytak owns Mazz Press, based in Port Carbon, Pa. Through the label, Pytak publishes a series of thriller novels about a low-rent mercenary known as "The .40 Caliber Mouse." A total of seven books are planned in the series. Three have been published to date. Pytak is also a filmmaker, who has made short films about his characters. They include "C (2010," an introduction to "Corinn Michaels," who is secretly "The .40 Caliber Mouse." He is also a song lyricist who has produced a total of three CDs of music based on his characters. His CDs include "Shooting Stars," featuring music and vocals by performers Donna Nye and Soji O. For more information on Mazz Press, log on to www.mazzpress.com
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    183

    Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe

    • Characters: Fenris
    The Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe is an encyclopedic guide which details the fictional universe featured in Marvel Comics publications. The original 15-volume series was published in comic book format in 1982, followed by sporadic updates. Jim Shooter, Marvel's then Editor in Chief, conceived of the idea, envisioning a guide detailing statistics much in the manner of those found upon the backs of baseball cards. This initial project was to be called The Marvel Super-Specifications Handbook (the eventual title incorporating the term "Marvel Universe" was appropriated from Al Milgrom, who had used it as a working title for Marvel Fanfare). Shooter appointed Mark Gruenwald editor of the project, and Gruenwald developed the project to include all aspects of the Marvel Universe, although he noted it was not comprehensive. In addition to Gruenwald, contributing writers on the initial volume were Marvel editors Mike Carlin, Eliot R. Brown, and Peter Sanderson. Critics of the Handbook have argued that the level of detail within the guide effectively limited the ability of writers to innovate, a charge Gruenwald dismissed, reputedly stating that the information presented was only
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    184
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    185

    The Goon Show

    • Characters: Neddie Seagoon
    • Works Set Here: The Last Goon Show of All
    The Goon Show was a British radio comedy programme, originally produced and broadcast by the BBC Home Service from 1951 to 1960, with occasional repeats on the BBC Light Programme. The first series, broadcast between May and September 1951, was titled Crazy People; all subsequent series had the title The Goon Show, a title inspired, according to Spike Milligan, by a Popeye character. The show's chief creator and main writer was Spike Milligan. The scripts mixed ludicrous plots with surreal humour, puns, catchphrases and an array of bizarre sound effects. Some of the later episodes feature electronic effects devised by the then-fledgling BBC Radiophonic Workshop, many of which were reused by other shows for decades afterwards. Many elements of the show satirised contemporary life in Britain, parodying aspects of show business, commerce, industry, art, politics, diplomacy, the police, the military, education, class structure, literature and film. The show was released internationally through the BBC Transcription Services (TS). It was heard regularly from the 1950s in Australia, South Africa, New Zealand, India and Canada, although these TS versions were frequently edited to avoid
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    186
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    187

    Whoniverse

    • Characters: The Doctor
    • Works Set Here: Doctor Who
    Whoniverse, a portmanteau of the words "Who" and "universe", is a word used to describe the fictional setting of the television series Doctor Who, K-9 and Company, Torchwood, The Sarah Jane Adventures and K-9, as well as other related stories. The term is often used to link characters, ideas or items which are seen across multiple productions, such as Sarah Jane Smith from Doctor Who, K-9 and Company and The Sarah Jane Adventures, Jack Harkness from Doctor Who and Torchwood and K9 from Doctor Who, K-9 and Company, The Sarah Jane Adventures, and K-9. Before the expansion of the Doctor Who fictional universe, the term "Whoniverse" referred to everything connected with the programme, both in-universe and behind-the-scenes. In this original meaning, standing exhibitions, discussions about the filming of episodes and even fandom itself were considered part of the "Whoniverse". Unlike the owners of other science fiction franchises, the BBC takes no position on which Doctor Who stories are definitive for future projects. The show has no 'canon', and indeed, recent producers of the show have expressed distaste for the idea. Though the term is essentially an example of fanspeak, it has
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    188

    Transformers universes

    • Characters: Optimus Prime
    • Works Set Here: The Transformers
    Transformers (トランスフォーマー, Toransufōmā) is an entertainment franchise created by Hasbro and Takara Tomy. Beginning with the Transformers toy line, the franchise centers on factions of transforming alien robots (often the Autobots and the Decepticons) in an endless struggle for dominance or eventual peace. In its decades-long history, the franchise has expanded to encompass comic books, animation, video games and films. It was originally a Japanese franchise. The term "Generation 1" covers both the animated television series The Transformers and the comic book series of the same name, which are further divided into Japanese and British spin-offs, respectively. Sequels followed, such as the Generation 2 comic book and Beast Wars TV series, which became its own mini-universe. Generation 1 characters underwent two reboots with Dreamwave in 2001 and IDW Publishing in 2005, also as a remastered series. There have been other incarnations of the story based on different toy lines during and after the 20th-Century. The first was the Robots in Disguise series, followed by three shows (Armada, Energon, and Cybertron) that constitute a single universe called the "Unicron Trilogy". A live-action
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    189

    Dorsai

    • Created by: Gordon R. Dickson
    The universe for Gordon R. Dickson's Dorsai (Childe Cycle) works.
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    190

    Dragon Ball

    • Characters: Bulma
    • Works Set Here: Dragon Ball
    The Z Fighters (孫 悟空, zetto senshi), also known as the Z Senshi, Z Warriors and Earth's Special Forces, are a small organization of superhuman martial artists in Akira Toriyama's Dragon Ball franchise, all of whom are dedicated to protecting the Earth from those who would do it harm. The group's members vary greatly throughout the series' run, but Son Goku is generally the de facto leader of all of its incarnations. The first actual formation of the Z Team was out of necessity when Goku was faced with Raditz, who had kidnapped his son Gohan and wanted to kill the people of Earth and sell it onto an alien such as Freiza. Goku formed an alliance with his arch rival Piccolo in order to fight for a common cause. The alliance made from necessity was the birth of the Z team. The term itself is very rarely actually used in the series, the first, and one of the only occurrences being in the androids saga, when Trunks explains to Goku the order in which "The Z fighters" die, where it becomes something of a plot hole or inconsistency, as the term seemed to have come out of nowhere. The characters involved wouldn't really consider themselves a 'team'. The group works as a team and help each
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    191

    Free Planets Alliance Star Fleet

    The Free Planets Alliance Star Fleet is the primary military organization of the Free Planets Alliance within the fictional Legend of the Galactic Heroes universe. It is the main defensive and offensive arm of the Free Planets Alliance government, and at its peak had several hundred thousand ships of various types under its command. In keeping with the democratic traditions of the Alliance, the Star Fleet itself is under the command of the civilian government. The fleet is also partitioned into different branches, including the Fighter Corps. and a large contingent of ground forces. The Free Planets Alliance Star Fleet was created by the fledgling Free Planets Alliance shortly after its creation to defend itself against the Galactic Empire the colonists knew would eventually return. Not much is known about its early history, but it had grown powerful enough to repulse the first Imperial attack on the Alliance when it was finally rediscovered by the Empire. Since that time, it has been engaged in a large-scale war with the Galactic Empire, recently losing the upper hand when the Empire constructed its Iserlohn Fortress within the Iserlohn Corridor, blocking the passage to Alliance
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    192

    Narnian Multiverse

    • Characters: Susan Pevensie
    • Works Set Here: The Last Battle
    • Created by: C. S. Lewis
    The set of universes that the Narnia books take place in.
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    193
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    194

    RoboCop

    • Characters: RoboCop
    • Works Set Here: RoboCop: The Series
    The RoboCop franchise, began in 1987 with the film RoboCop. RoboCop 2, followed in 1990 and RoboCop 3 in 1993. There have also been various television series, video game and comic book adaptations. The franchise has made over $100 million USD worldwide and a fourth film is planned for 2013. RoboCop is a 1987 American science fiction action film directed by Paul Verhoeven. Set in a crime-ridden Detroit, Michigan in the near future, RoboCop centers on a police officer who is brutally murdered and subsequently re-created as a super-human cyborg known as "RoboCop". The film features Peter Weller, Dan O'Herlihy, Kurtwood Smith, Nancy Allen, Miguel Ferrer, and Ronny Cox. In addition to being an action film, RoboCop includes larger themes regarding the media, resurrection, gentrification, corruption, privatization, capitalism, masculinity, and human nature. It received positive reviews and was cited as one of the best films of 1987, spawning a large franchise, including merchandise, two sequels, a television series, two animated TV series, and a television mini-series, video games and a number of comic book adaptations/crossovers. The film was produced for a relatively modest $13
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    195
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    196

    Vertigo

    • Characters: Titania
    • Works Set Here: A Midsummer Night's Dream
    Vertigo is an imprint of the American comic-book publisher DC Comics. Its books are marketed to a sophisticated audience, and may contain graphic violence, substance abuse, frank (but not explicit) depictions of sexuality, profanity, and controversial subjects. Although many of its releases are in the horror and fantasy genres, it also publishes works dealing with crime, social satire, speculative fiction, and biography. Each issue's cover carries the advisory label "Suggested for mature readers" (regardless of a specific issue's content). As of 2012, Karen Berger is the executive editor of the imprint, and has overseen it since its inception in 1993. Vertigo comics series have won the comics industry's Eisner Award, including the Best Continuing Series of various years (The Sandman, Preacher, 100 Bullets and Fables). Several of its publications have been adapted to film, including Hellblazer, A History of Violence, Stardust, and V for Vendetta. In 2010, it was announced that Vertigo would become a strictly creator-owned imprint, with all titles that originated in the DC Universe, with the exception of flagship title Hellblazer, returning to the DC imprint. This includes characters
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    197

    World of Cars

    • Characters: Lightning McQueen
    • Works Set Here: Cars
    The World of Cars is the fictional universe for Disney•Pixar's Cars films, TV shows, games, theme park rides, and consumer products.
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    198

    Birthright

    • Works Set Here: The Rjurik Highlands
    Birthright is a Dungeons & Dragons campaign setting that was first released by TSR in 1995. The setting based on the world of Aebrynis on the continent of Cerilia, in which the players take on the role of the divinely-empowered rulers, with emphasis on the political rulership level of gameplay. In 1996, Birthright won the Origins Award for Best Roleplaying Supplement of 1995. Though it has a dedicated fan base, Birthright currently has no corporate support, unlike Forgotten Realms and Eberron. The setting revolves around the concept of bloodlines: divine power gained by heroes and passed to their descendants. Characters with a bloodline create an aura of command known as Regency, which is measured in the game using regency points or RP. Using regency, characters acquire a domain composed of provinces and holdings. The development of these domains is as much a part of the game as development of the characters. The game uses three-month domain turns to model actions of rulers over nations in much the same way as Dungeons and Dragons uses combat rounds simulating six-seconds of time to model the characters' actions in battle. In 1994, Rich Baker and Colin McComb co-designed the
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    199
    CoDominium

    CoDominium

    • Works Set Here: King David's Spaceship
    CoDominium is a series of future history novels by Jerry Pournelle. The point of departure of Pournelle's history is the establishment of the CoDominium (CD), a political alliance and union between the United States of America and a revitalized USSR. This union, achieved in the name of planetary stability, reigns over the Earth for over a hundred years. In that time, it achieves peace of a sort, as well as interstellar colonization, but at the price of a complete halt in both scientific and political evolution. Corruption and social decay force the CoDominium's BuReloc (Bureau of Relocation) to forcibly transport people from Earth to offworld colonies. This mass expulsion is made possible by the Alderson Drive, a device that allows instantaneous travel across distances of light-years. The starlanes are patrolled by the CoDominium Armed Forces, an elite fighting force created from the French Foreign Legion. The Navy, in particular, recognizes what the politicians and common people of Earth do not: that Earth is headed for disaster, and their primary mission is to remove as many people from Earth as possible before the holocaust. In due time, the CoDominium crumbles under mounting
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    200

    Enderverse

    • Characters: Ender Wiggin
    • Works Set Here: Ender's Game
    • Created by: Orson Scott Card
    The universe for Orson Scott Card's Ender's series.
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    201

    Grey's Anatomy

    • Characters: Adele Webber
    Grey's Anatomy is the fictional universe in the American television medical drama Grey's Anatomy.
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    202

    Noon Universe

    • Works Set Here: Prisoners of Power
    • Created by: Boris Strugatsky
    The Noon Universe (Russian term: "Мир Полудня" or "Мир Полдня" - "World of Noon") is a fictional future setting for a number of hard science fiction novels written by Arkady and Boris Strugatsky. The universe is named after Noon: 22nd Century, the chronologically first novel from the series. While the Noon Universe shares many utopian qualities with the early Star Trek universe (such as world peace and high standards of living), it has its share of problems and internal conflicts. According to Arkady Strugatsky, at first, the brothers did not make a conscious effort to create a fictional universe. Rather, they reused characters and settings from prior works whenever they found it convenient. It wasn't until later that they began drawing on common themes and plot threads from various novels to create newer works. The victory of communism and the advance of technological progress on the Earth of the Noon Universe resulted in an over-abundance of resources and eliminated the need for most types of manual labor. The most striking difference between Noon Universe and most of the other fictional sci-fi universes (most famous include Dune, Star Wars and Babylon 5) is a complete denial of
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    203
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    204

    Thieves' World fictional shared universe

    • Characters: Tempus
    • Works Set Here: Soul of the City
    • Created by: Robert Asprin
    Thieves' World is the fictional shared universe which encompasses the original Thieves' World anthologies as well as games and comics.
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    205
    Fictional universe of Avatar

    Fictional universe of Avatar

    • Works Set Here: Avatar
    • Created by: James Cameron
    In the 2009 science fiction film Avatar, director James Cameron conceived a fictional universe in which humans seek to mine unobtanium on the fictional exoplanetary moon, Pandora. The Earth-like moon is inhabited by a sapient indigenous humanoid species called the Na'vi, and varied fauna and flora. Resources Development Administration (RDA) scientists, administrators, recruits, support, and security personnel travel to Pandora in the 22nd century to discover this lush world, which is inhabited by many lifeforms including the human-like Na'vi. The clan with which the humans have contact in the film "[lives] in a giant tree that sits on a vast store of a mineral called unobtanium, which humans want as an energy supply." The Pandoran biosphere teems with a biodiversity of bioluminescent species ranging from hexapodal animals to other types of exotic fauna and flora. The Pandoran ecology forms a vast neural network spanning the entire lunar surface into which the Na'vi and other creatures can connect. The strength of this collective consciousness is powerfully illustrated when the human invaders are defeated in battle by the Pandoran ecology, after the resolute Na'vi were nearly
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    206

    Forester Universe

    The Forester Universe is the fictional setting of three novels, a novella and several short stories by Kyell Gold, consisting primarily of homosexual furry romance and erotica. Two of the novels have won the Ursa Major Award for Best Anthropomorphic Novel. A high school boy falls in love with another boy; the novel chronicles his coming out process. Cover and interior illustrations by John Nunnemacher ("Cooner"). Sofawolf Press, ISBN 0-9791496-5-7, 2008. Won the Ursa Major Award for Best Anthropomorphic Novel. A story about a gay activist and an American football player who fall in love with one another. The cover and nine interior illustrations were created by "Blotch". Sofawolf Press, ISBN 978-0-9791496-9-6, 2009. Won the Ursa Major Award for Best Anthropomorphic Novel. A novella of 111 pages. Cover and interior illustrations by "Keovi". Furplanet, ISBN 978-1-935599-16-6, 2010. The sequel to the best-selling novel Out of Position picks up Dev and Lee's story about five minutes after the end of the first book. Over a year and a half in the making, Isolation Play is the longest work Kyell Gold has released. Sofawolf Press, ISBN 978-1-936689-00-2, 2011.
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    207
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    208

    The Sword of Truth universe

    • Characters: Kahlan Amnell
    • Works Set Here: Wizard's First Rule
    This article is about the fictional universe in the fantasy novel series The Sword of Truth, created by Terry Goodkind. The world created by Terry Goodkind in The Sword of Truth series consists of two lands: the New World and the Old World. The New World is made up of three roughly equal-sized regions: D'Hara in the east, Westland in the west, and the Midlands between the two. These three regions are divided by mountain ranges and, in the time between the series' first novel and its prequel, by magical barriers called the Boundaries as well. Additionally, the Midlands are split by the immense Rang'Shada mountain range. D'Hara consists of a number of lands that were united under the rule of Panis Rahl, who conquered his neighbours one by one until the entire eastern third of the New World was under his sway. The Midlands is made up of several separate yet distinct lands and Kingdoms while still bowing to the rule of the Council of the Midlands. The Council of the Midlands is made up of ambassadors and representatives from all the Kingdoms of the lands of the New World and was ultimately presided over by the Mother Confessor of the Confessors Order. Westland, which also consists of a
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    The Witcher universe

    • Characters: Geralt of Rivia
    • Works Set Here: The Witcher
    • Created by: Andrzej Sapkowski
    The fictional universe of The Witcher saga was created by Polish writer Andrzej Sapkowski in his series of books (The Witcher Saga). The following is a list of notable characters from the series. Geralt of Rivia (Polish: Geralt z Rivii), known also as Gwynnbleid (Old Speech: "White Wolf", given to him by the Dryads) is a witcher and the protagonist of the Witcher series and its adaptations. He is also known as the "Butcher of Blaviken". He has been described as a character embodifying "the neo-liberal anti-politics" spirit of the Polish popular culture of the 1990s. Sorceress Yennefer of Vengerberg (Polish: Yennefer z Vengerbergu) is a fictional character, created by Andrzej Sapkowski for his Witcher stories. Yennefer first appeared in the collection of short stories, The Last Wish, featuring in both The Last Wish short story and The Voice of Reason frame story. She went on to appear in numerous other Witcher stories and is one of the main characters of The Witcher saga. In the 2001 movie and 2002 TV series she was played by Grażyna Wolszczak. Yennefer is Geralt's "soul mate" although their relationship is difficult and full of drama. Both Geralt and Yennefer are sterile, which
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    Webisphere

    A term coined by Bruce Shoop, internet pioneer and founder of PlanetWebSite. Commonly used in reference to a group (or web) of independently hosted website, blog, or other form of digital community on the developing global internet. (excerpt)Our Planet is a globe or a sphere, if you will, and it is this Circle Of Life that we must protect. We are currently developing A SAFE Global Internet Community where like-minded people are safely establishing their own personal circle of influence. The term "Webisphere" virtually expresses this place. And so it IS... We will teach you how to develop your own Webisphere here at PlanetWebSite The Global Webisphere is the network of like-minded Internet pioneers who are collectively contributing to the wellness of others and to the environment from which we dwell, both in the physical world called Planet Earth and in the virtual world of the globally recognized World Wide Web also known as The Internet. Shoop, Bruce, About PlanetWebSite. Source: Mission Statement Bruce Shoop Productions, Internet, February 21, 2007
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    Wild Cards

    • Characters: Puppetman
    Wild Cards is a science fiction and superhero anthology series set in a shared universe. The series was created by a group of New Mexico science fiction authors, but it is mostly pulled together and edited by best-selling author George R. R. Martin with assistance by Melinda Snodgrass, also a contributor to the series. There were twelve initial volumes released by Bantam, those being published between 1987 and 1993, before the series switched publishers, going to Baen, which released three new volumes between 1993 and 1995; then it was on to a third, iBooks, which published two new volumes and also reprinted the first six, all between 2002 and 2006; then it was on to its fourth and current publisher, Tor in 2008, that continues the series and has issued four new volumes, with a new one likely forthcoming in late 2012. While most of the books are made up of individual short stories, they generally focus on a central theme or event. There were also several longer storylines which run through several of the books. Some volumes use the format of a mosaic novel. This involved several writers writing individual story lines, which were then edited together into one seamless novel-length
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    World of Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars

    • Works Set Here: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars
    The World of Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars is the fictional world in its titular 1996 role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) and Nintendo. The game is set on the fantasy Toad homeworld in the universe of its protagonist, Mario, containing many distinct elements and references similar to most games in the Mario series. Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars is the first game in the series to use isometric projection to simulate 3D graphics with pre-rendered backgrounds. These backgrounds, as well as the remainder of the graphics and setting, were well received by critics and fans. The game was produced by Shigeru Miyamoto, the creator of Mario, and directed by Yoshihiko Maekawa and Chihiro Fujioka. Miyamoto led teams at both Nintendo and Square Soft (now Square Enix), who spent more than a year developing the game. The game's setting is a newly rendered Mushroom Kingdom based on the Super Mario Bros. series. Early levels showcased were Moleville, Forest Maze, Mushroom Kingdom, Midas River, Land's End, and villages crowded with mushroom people. Super Mario RPG made use of several technologies to create the setting's graphics. The game's
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    Wraeththu

    • Characters: Calanthe Har Aralis
    The Wraeththu (pronounced ray-thoo) are a science fantasy post-apocalyptic hermaphroditic species which evolved from humanity in the Wraeththu novels, created by British fantasy author Storm Constantine. Wraeththu themed works by other authors The Wraeththu appeared amid humanity's downfall. Humans viewed them as nothing more than aggravating street gangs recruiting young men and inhabiting cities of North America (always called Megalithica in this story as old "human" place names are never used). The Wraeththu, however, are a new species, born from a mutation of unknown origin; Constantine implies an apocalypse, but the history is mysterious. They are destined to take over the mantle of rulers of the Earth. Their bodies fought off the environmental damage wreaked by human war and pollution well - much better than the human population they are swiftly replacing. The first Wraeththu har (pl. hara) infected a human male with his blood and thus transformed the man into Wraeththu. The species spread via a blood-sharing procedure that came to be known as inception. Gangs of hara became tribes, which eventually began a war against humanity that resulted in Wraeththu's supremacy. Many
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    Rock Lords

    Rock Lords was a spin-off toyline to the GoBots from Tonka in 1986 after the movie GoBots: Battle of the Rock Lords. They were transforming rocks that came with weapons such as axes, guns and swords. There were vehicles for the Rock Lords to drive in battle. The Rock Lords were imported from Bandai's Machine Robo "Ganseki Chōjin" sub-line. Like other transforming toys, there were "good guys" (led by Boulder) and "bad guys" (led by Magmar). The tagline associated with these toys was "Powerful living rocks!". Rock Lords was not a successful toy line. Transformers was getting the better sales, but Rock Lords was able to last for three seasons. There were unreleased Rock Lords toys such as the Stone Head playset and Crackpot in meteorite colors. Boulder (Japan: Battle Rock) Rock Type: Tungsten Bio: "Brave and wise with an awesome physique, Boulder leads the defense of Quartex against Magmar's villainous plots. Boulder has rallied the remaining free kingdoms of the planet under his leadership. His fiery temper strikes fear into friend and foe alike. In the heart of the battle, he scatters enemies with stungun blasts and zaps them with his Power Sword." Nuggit (Japan: Mecha Rock) Rock
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    Tempus Unbound

    Tempus Unbound

    • Characters: Jerry, called Stinger
    • Works Set Here: Tempus Unbound
    • Created by: Janet Morris
    Tempus Unbound is a novel in the Sacred Band of Stepsons universe. Tempus travels to another unvierse using Lemurian windows and portals to find and rescue his sister-in-arms Cime, as the Wizard Wars break through all boundaries of place and plane and threaten humanity's future.
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    The Hunger Games universe

    • Characters: Gale Hawthorne
    The Hunger Games universe is a fictional dystopian society in which the The Hunger Games trilogy, a series of young adult novels by American television writer and novelist Suzanne Collins, is set. The novel The Hunger Games, the first in the series, was adapted into a film released in 2012, with adaptations of the following novels planned. In the novel The Hunger Games, at an unspecified time in the future, the nation of "Panem" has risen from the ashes of a post-apocalyptic North America. Panem's seat of power is a utopian city, called the "Capitol," located in the Rocky Mountains. Outside of the Capitol, the nation is divided into twelve districts under the hegemony of a totalitarian government, headed by the dictatorial President Snow. A pre-novel thirteenth district once existed but was destroyed by the Capitol 75 years before the beginning of The Hunger Games narrative during a national rebellion called the Dark Days. However, in Mockingjay, it is revealed that the thirteenth district went underground and was the main source of the rebellion that happened in Catching Fire and Mockingjay. The Capitol developed the Hunger Games as an annual event to punish the citizens of Panem
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    Werewolf: The Apocalypse

    Werewolf: The Apocalypse is a role-playing game from the Classic World of Darkness line by White Wolf Publishing. Other related products include the Collectible card games named Rage and several novels (including one series). In the game, players take the role of werewolves known as Garou (from the French 'loup garou'). These Garou are usually warriors who are locked in a two-front war against both the spiritual desolation of urban civilization and supernatural forces of corruption that seek to bring about the Apocalypse. Game supplements detail other lycanthropes. Along with the other titles in the World of Darkness, Werewolf was discontinued in 2004. Its successor title, Werewolf: The Forsaken, was released on March 14, 2005. In 2011 new publications for the Classic World of Darkness were announced, including a 20th Anniversary Edition of Werewolf: The Apocalypse. The Werewolf Translation Guide is the first new publication, being available in April 2012. Also older Classic World of Darkness books are made gradually available as Print on Demand-Versions, through DriveThruRPG. The basic premise of the game is, that the player characters are Garou. Specifically player characters
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    Stargate

    • Characters: Richard Woolsey
    • Works Set Here: Stargate SG-1
    • Created by: Dean Devlin
    Stargate is an adventure military science fiction franchise, initially conceived by Roland Emmerich and Dean Devlin. The first film in the franchise was simply titled Stargate. It was originally released on October 28, 1994, by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and Carolco, and became a hit, grossing nearly $200 million (USD) worldwide. Three years later, Brad Wright and Jonathan Glassner created a television series titled Stargate SG-1 as a sequel for the film. In addition to film and television, the Stargate franchise has expanded into other media, including books, video games, and comic books. These supplements to the film and television series have resulted in significant development of the show's fictional universe and mythology. In 2008, the films Stargate: The Ark of Truth and Continuum were released direct-to-DVD, which in total grossed over $21 million in the United States. In 2002 the franchise's first animated series, Stargate Infinity, began airing, which holds no canonicity in the franchise despite its Stargate SG-1-inspired plot. In 2004, the TV series Stargate Atlantis was released as a spin off from Stargate SG-1 and a third series, Stargate Universe, premiered on October 2,
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    The Wheel of Time

    • Characters: Perrin Aybara
    • Works Set Here: The Eye of the World
    • Created by: Robert Jordan
    The Wheel of Time is a series of epic fantasy novels written by American author James Oliver Rigney, Jr., under the pen name Robert Jordan. Originally planned as a six-book series, the length was gradually increased; at the time of Jordan's death, he expected it to be 12, but it will actually run 14. There is also a prequel novel and a companion book available. Jordan began writing the first volume, The Eye of the World, in 1984 and it was published in January 1990. The author died in 2007 while working on what was planned to be the final volume in the series, although he had prepared extensive notes so another author could complete the book according to his wishes. Fellow fantasy author and long-time Wheel of Time fan Brandon Sanderson was brought in to complete the final book, but during the writing process it was decided that the book would be far too large to be published in one volume, and would instead be published as three volumes as large as, or larger than, any previous book in the series. The first volume was published in 2009 under the title The Gathering Storm. The final two books are called Towers of Midnight (released November 2, 2010) and A Memory of Light (Release
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    Deliria

    Deliria: Faerie Tales for a New Millennium is an "interactive urban fantasy setting" created by Phil Brucato. The title refers to an altered state of awareness in which several levels of reality can be perceived at once, to both good and ill effect. The core concept behind Deliria is one of "ordinary people in an extraordinary world." Inspired by classical fairy tales and urban fantasy, the setting presents a multicultural world in which magic is always present but often invisible. To "twilight people" who encounter the magical realm, the world becomes a frightening yet wonderful place. Meanwhile, the immortal faeries, or aelderfolk, regard mortal humanity with a mixture of awe and terror. The accelerating pace of human imagination reverberates through both worlds, bringing changes that many aelders fear. Within the tensions of this setting, ordinary people become heroes - or villains - in their own new fairy tales. Inspired by authors like Charles de Lint, Erik Davis and Francesca Lia Block, films like Edward ScissorHands and Practical Magic, world music and ethereal wave music, and TV shows like Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Deliria's setting emphasizes "normal people" over
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    Gaean Reach

    The Gaean Reach is a fictional region in space that is a setting for some science fiction by Jack Vance. All of his series and standalone works that are set in a universe evidently including the Gaean Reach, perhaps set inside it or outside it, have been catalogued as the Gaean Reach series or super-series. The Gaean Reach includes all worlds colonized by humans, among which trade and travel flow freely for the most part. Some of these worlds are advanced and cosmopolitan, such as Alphanor; others, like Thamber, are inhabited by shipwrecked and forgotten people, who have reverted to feudalism. Some, like the world of Wyst in the Alastor Cluster, are undeniably strange in their culture and customs. The period of the Gaean Reach spans several centuries, if not millennia, at an indeterminate time in the future. Specific dates are given in the early books of the Demon Princes series, but not in the others. The human civilization in the Demon Princes is the Oikumene, which can be seen as a precursor to or variant of the Gaean Reach. The Reach is mentioned in the three Alastor books, the Cadwal Chronicles, Ports of Call and Lurulu. Singleton works are also included, such as Emphyrio,
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    Hellraiser

    • Works Set Here: Hellraiser
    Hellraiser is a British horror franchise that consists of nine films, a series of comic books, and merchandise based on the series. The franchise is based on the novella The Hellbound Heart by Clive Barker, who would go on to write and direct the adaptation of his story, titled Hellraiser. The films, as well as the comic book series, continually features the Cenobite Pinhead. The series’ storyline focuses on a puzzle box that opens a gateway to the Hell-like realm of the Cenobites, an order of formerly human monsters who harvest human souls to torture in sadomasochistic experiments. Although Clive Barker wrote the original story, as well as wrote and directed the first film, he has not written or directed any of the succeeding sequels. Barker stated in an appearance on Loveline that he signed away the story and character rights to the production company before the first film, not realizing what a great success it would be. In the original Hellraiser (1987), Frank Cotton (Sean Chapman) escapes from the Cenobites when his brother Larry (Andrew Robinson) spills his own blood on the spot where Frank died opening a puzzle box that opened a gateway to the Cenobites. With the help of
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    Known Space

    • Characters: Gil Hamilton
    • Works Set Here: Ringworld
    • Created by: Larry Niven
    Known Space is the fictional setting of some dozen science fiction novels and several collections of short stories written by author Larry Niven. It has also in part been used as a shared universe in the Man-Kzin Wars spin-off anthologies sub-series. The epithet "Known Space" is an in-universe term that refers to a relatively small part of the galaxy centered around Earth. In the future that the series depicts (beginning a few centuries from now and continuing for about a millennium afterward) this region has been explored by humans and a number of its worlds have been colonized. Contact has been made with alien species such as the two-headed Pierson's Puppeteers and the aggressive felinoid Kzinti. The fictional universe is also the home of species from outside Known Space, including the hominid inhabitants of a megastructure called Ringworld. The Ringworld orbits a sun outside Known Space, but it is a well-established artifact within the Known Space "universe". The stories span approximately one thousand years of future history, from the first human explorations of the Solar System to the colonization of dozens of nearby systems. Late in the series, this area is an irregularly
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    Planets of The Saga of Seven Suns

    This article describes fictional Planets featured in The Saga of Seven Suns, a series of science fiction novels written by Kevin J. Anderson. To see the Main Page of the series click here: Main Page The Klikiss race was thought to be extinct and many Klikiss worlds were settled by colonists from the Terran Hanseatic League after the transgate network was reactivated.
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    Pokémon

    • Characters: Masukippa
    • Created by: Ken Sugimori
    Pokémon is the fictional universe of the Pokémon media franchise.
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    Earthsea

    • Characters: Ged
    • Works Set Here: A Wizard of Earthsea
    Earthsea is a fictional realm originally created by Ursula K. Le Guin for her short story "The Word of Unbinding", published in 1964. Earthsea became the setting for a further six books, beginning with A Wizard of Earthsea, first published in 1968, and continuing with The Tombs of Atuan, The Farthest Shore, Tehanu, Tales from Earthsea and The Other Wind. All are set in the world of Earthsea, as are seven short stories by Le Guin, two of which are not collected in any of these books. The world of Earthsea is one of sea and islands: a vast archipelago of hundreds of islands surrounded by mostly uncharted ocean. The central grouping of islands around the main island of Havnor and the Inmost Sea are called "The Archipelago". The outlying islands are loosely grouped into four "Reaches" (The West, North, South and East), and the Kargad Lands, four large islands to the northeast inhabited by the warlike nation of the Kargs. Islands pivotal to the novels include Roke and Havnor in the Inner Sea; Gont in the northeastern Archipelago, and Atuan, one of the Kargad lands. The cultures of Earthsea are not direct analogues of those of our world, but are literate non-industrial civilizations.
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    Dragonlance

    • Characters: Raistlin Majere
    • Works Set Here: Advanced Dungeons and Dragons: Heroes of the Lance
    Dragonlance is a shared universe created by Laura and Tracy Hickman, and expanded by Tracy Hickman and Margaret Weis under the direction of TSR, Inc. into a series of popular fantasy novels. The Hickmans conceived Dragonlance while driving in their car on the way to TSR for a job application. At TSR Tracy met Margaret Weis, his future writing partner, and they gathered a group of associates to play the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game. The adventures during that game inspired a series of gaming modules, a series of novels, licensed products such as board games, and lead miniature figures. In 1984, TSR published the first Dragonlance novel, Dragons of Autumn Twilight. It began the Chronicles trilogy, a core element of the Dragonlance world. While the authoring team of Tracy Hickman and Margaret Weis wrote the setting's central books, numerous other authors contributed novels and short stories to the setting. Over 190 novels have used the Dragonlance setting, and have been accompanied by supplemental Dungeons & Dragons campaign setting material for over a decade. In 1997, Wizards of the Coast LLC purchased TSR, and licensed Dragonlance to Sovereign Press, Inc in 2001 to produce
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    Hammerverse

    • Created by: David Drake
    Hammerverse (or the Slammerverse, Slammers universe, Hammer universe) is a setting for a series of military science fiction short stories and novels by author David Drake. The series follows the career of a future mercenary tank regiment called Hammer's Slammers, after their leader, Colonel Alois Hammer. As with his other work, Drake borrows plots from historical or mythological sources for many of the Hammer's Slammers stories. For example, he retells the story of Jason and the Argonauts in The Voyage, and part of the Odyssey in Cross the Stars. Other stories borrow from pulp era fiction (The Sharp End is based on Dashiell Hammett's Red Harvest.) The contents of the first five books of the main series were repackaged and republished, with some additional stories. Drake has said that this is his preferred order and edition. The Complete Hammer's Slammers (2006): is a three volume set from Night Shade Books that contains all Hammer's Slammers fiction, including three new stories written for this set. Volume 1 was released in January 2006, and features an introduction by Gene Wolfe. Volume 2 (introduction by David G Hartwell) was released January 2007, with Volume 3 (introduction by
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    Humanx Commonwealth

    • Created by: Alan Dean Foster
    The Humanx Commonwealth is a fictional interstellar ethical/political entity featured in the science fiction novels of Alan Dean Foster. The Commonwealth takes its name from its two major sapient species, who jointly inhabit Commonwealth planets and administer both the political and religious/ethical aspects. They are the mammalian Humans of the planet Earth and the insectoid Thranx which dwell upon Hivehom. The Commonwealth is described as a progressive, well-intentioned liberal democracy spanning many star systems, and is somewhat similar to the United Federation of Planets from Star Trek. The Humanx Commonwealth is notable for its portrayal of a human-alien relationship that is not just mutually beneficial but symbiotic, allowing an amalgamation of the two species. The AAnn are a lizard-like with flexibility and speed superior to that of most men, though generally shorter and stronger. Minidrags resemble flying snakes, measure about one meter long. They are empathic telepaths, or "empaths" who rarely bond to a sapient being they deem worthy. A highly scientific alien race which seemed almost identical to humankind in appearance and biology. The Thranx are an insectoid species
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    World of Naruto

    • Characters: Jiraiya
    • Created by: Masashi Kishimoto
    The Naruto anime and manga series takes place in an unnamed fictional world with numerous countries and locations. When Kishimoto was creating the setting of the Naruto manga, he initially concentrated on the designs for the village of Konohagakure, the primary setting of the series. He asserts that his design for Konohagakure was created "pretty spontaneously without much thought", but admits that the scenery is based on his home in the Okayama prefecture in Japan. Kishimoto created Konohagakure without specifying an era or location in the real world, noting that the village is "just a place in his head". Without a specific time period, Kishimoto included modern elements in the series such as convenience stores and movies, but specifically excluded projectile weapons and vehicles from the storyline. For reference materials, Kishimoto performs his own research into Japanese culture and alludes to it in his work. In an interview, he commented that he "often visits Japanese gardens and goes to Kabuki performances" for reference material. Kishimoto added that, as Naruto takes place in a "Japanese fantasy world," the creator has to "set certain rules, in a systematic way" so that he
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    Alagaësia

    Alagaësia

    Alagaᅢᆱsia is a literary fantasy world in which the Inheritance trilogy takes place. Major races include Humans, Elves, Dwarves, Urgal, and Dragons, although the Dragons are on the verge of extinction. There are also a number of creatures whose origins are hidden and are not understood, such as Shades, and the Ra'zac. Apart from the different kind of beings found in Alagaᅢᆱsia, there are also societies that have existed or do exist that deserve recognition, such as the Varden, the Dragon Riders, and the Forsworn. Humans seem to populate most of the known world of Alagaᅢᆱsia, though they came from across the sea relatively recently. A group of twenty warriors found Alagaᅢᆱsia, and although their exact cause for coming has not been revealed, it's quite possible that the Ra'zac made them leave. The warriors came three hundred years after the formation of the Dragon Riders. They landed in Surda from lands far south of Alaga￑ムsia. The humans began adapting to this new place they had found, and lived in peace. Here they first learned of the existence of Dwarves, with whom they frequently traded with for a few years before they left for isolation. The warriors went northwest and began
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    Earth-11052

    • Characters: Spyke
    • Works Set Here: X-Men: Evolution
    An off-shot of the main Marvel universe (Earth-616) and the setting of the animated TV series X-Men Evolution.
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    Firefly

    • Characters: Mr. Universe
    • Works Set Here: Serenity Role Playing Game
    • Created by: Joss Whedon
    The Firefly media franchise is an American space Western media franchise created by Joss Whedon and produced by Mutant Enemy Productions. The franchise includes the TV series Firefly, the film Serenity, and other media. The franchise is set in the year 2517, after humanity's arrival in a new star system, and follows the adventures of the renegade crew of Serenity, a "Firefly-class" spaceship. Whedon described the Serenity crew members as "nine people looking into the blackness of space and seeing nine different things". The franchise explores the lives of people who fought on the losing side of a civil war and now make a living as part of the pioneer culture that exists on the fringes of their star system. In addition, it is set in a future where the only two surviving superpowers, the United States and China, fused to form the central federal government, called the Alliance, resulting in the fusion of the two cultures as well. According to Whedon's vision, "nothing will change in the future: technology will advance, but we will still have the same political, moral, and ethical problems as today." Firefly, the first part of the franchise, was a short-lived TV series. One season of
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    Forgotten Realms

    • Characters: Sarevok
    • Works Set Here: Baldur's Gate series
    The Forgotten Realms is a campaign setting for the Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) fantasy role-playing game. Commonly referred to by players and game designers alike as "The Realms", it was created by game designer Ed Greenwood around 1967 as a setting for his childhood stories. Several years later, Greenwood brought the setting to the D&D game as a series of magazine articles, and the first Realms game products were released in 1987. Role-playing game products have been produced for the setting ever since, as have various licensed products including sword and sorcery novels, role-playing video game adaptations (including the first massively multiplayer online role-playing game to use graphics), and comic books. The Forgotten Realms is one of the most popular D&D settings, largely due to the success of novels by authors such as R. A. Salvatore and numerous role-playing video games, including Pool of Radiance (1988), Baldur's Gate (1998), Icewind Dale (2000) and Neverwinter Nights (2002). According to the setting's creators, Forgotten Realms is the name of an imaginary fantasy world that exists somewhere beyond the real world. The setting is described as a world of strange lands,
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    Hero and Leander

    Hero and Leander

    Hero and Leander is a myth relating the story of Hērō (Greek: Ἡρώ, pron. hay-rō (ancient) and like "hero" in English), a priestess of Aphrodite who dwelt in a tower in Sestos on the European side of the Dardanelles, and Leander (Greek: Λέανδρος, Léandros), a young man from Abydos on the opposite side of the strait. Leander fell in love with Hero and would swim every night across the Hellespont to be with her. Hero would light a lamp at the top of her tower to guide his way. Succumbing to Leander's soft words, and to his argument that Aphrodite, as goddess of love, would scorn the worship of a virgin, Hero allowed him to make love to her. This routine lasted through the warm summer. But one stormy winter night, the waves tossed Leander in the sea and the breezes blew out Hero's light, and Leander lost his way, and was drowned. When Hero saw his dead body, she threw herself over the edge of the tower to her death to be with him. The myth of Hero and Leander has been used extensively in literature and the arts:
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    Jönssonligan

    • Characters: Max Adrian Busé
    • Works Set Here: Jönssonligans största kupp
    Jönssonligan, literally the Jönsson League, is featured in a series of comedic Swedish films. The gang consists of the criminal genius Charles Ingvar "Sickan" Jönsson, hence the name, and his two companions "Dynamit-Harry" (an alcoholic demolition expert) and Ragnar Vanheden (a small-timer from Stockholm). Eight films have been made in total, though in the last three the gang leader character has been replaced by the following characters, in order; "Doctor Max Adrian Busé", "Herman Melvin" and "Sven-Ingvar 'Sivan' Jönsson". The first two films featured the character Rocky, a Swedish Speaking Finn as member of the gang. He was eventually replaced by "Dynamit-Harry" who first appeared in the second film. Jönssonligans arch-enemy is Morgan Rockefeller Wall-Enberg Jr. who in all the films have been played by Per Grundén. Wall-Enbergs henchman is Biffen. In every film except for Jönssonligan dyker upp igen and Jönssonligan på Mallorca he has been played by Weiron Holmberg. In Jönssonligan dyker upp igen he is played by Lars Dejert and in Jönssonligan på Mallorca he never appears. The series was originally remakes of the Danish films about the Olsen Gang. The main series has also created
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    MÄR-Heaven

    MÄR-Heaven

    • Works Set Here: MÄR Heaven
    MÄR-Heaven is a fictional world in the anime and manga series MÄR, and its sequel series MÄR Omega. It is largely based upon fairy tales, and is set in a world similar to the Middle Ages of Europe in the real world. A world set in a different universe from Earth, the world of MÄR-Heaven is, culturally, largely based upon fictional stories and fairy tales. While Earth has settled upon more democratic types of government, MÄR-Heaven is still in a medieval-style age and their main form of government is based entirely around kings and queens. Its official currency is called pewter. MÄR-Heaven's land and denizens do not unite under the rule of one single monarchy, but instead are commanded by separate kingdoms, the apparent leader of them being Lestava. Its recent history is revealed as the series progresses, most of which being shaped through the uprise of a militant faction goes by the name of Chess Pieces. Any documents concerning MÄR-Heaven's earlier, more sophisticated evolutions other than Chess-related materials did not surface throughout the story; however as many Chess Pieces members asserted to having led a previous traumatic living in their own community, while some certain
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    Middleverse

    • Characters: The Middleman
    • Works Set Here: The Middle Man
    • Created by: Javier Grillo-Marxuach
    "Middleverse" was also the title of an episode of the animated series X-Men: Evolution The Middleverse is a fictional universe created by Javier Grillo-Marxuach. So far it has only appeared in a single comic series, but at least three one-shot spin-offs are planned. The Middleverse is named for its first leading character, The Middle Man. The Middleverse is centered around the principle that comic book villains who try to destroy or take over the world do in fact exist. A program was created only Ida knows how long ago to "Fight evil so you don't have to." The title and persona of Middle Man is passed down from teacher to student and the only common link between any of them is Ida herself.
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    243
    Planescape

    Planescape

    • Works Set Here: Planescape: Torment
    Planescape is a campaign setting for the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game, originally designed by Zeb Cook. The Planescape setting was published in 1994. As its name suggests, the setting crosses and comprises the numerous planes of existence, encompassing an entire cosmology called the Great Wheel, as originally developed in the Manual of the Planes by Jeff Grubb. This includes many of the other Dungeons & Dragons worlds, linking them via inter-dimensional magical portals. Planescape won the 1994 Origins Award and has received critical acclaim for its unique visual aspects, especially the work of artists Tony DiTerlizzi, Robh Ruppel, and Dana Knutson. Pyramid magazine reviewer Scott Haring said Planescape is "the finest game world ever produced for Advanced Dungeons & Dragons. Period." Haring described the writing as "wonderful," also saying that it "has got one of the most distinctive graphic looks I've seen in any game product" and that the "unusual drawings remind [him] a little of Dr. Seuss." The Dungeons & Dragons cosmology as reflected in Planescape consists of a number of planes, which can be divided into the following regions: Sigil, the "City of Doors", is
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    244

    Ravenloft

    • Characters: Strahd von Zarovich
    • Works Set Here: Ravenloft
    Ravenloft is a campaign setting for the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game. It is an alternate time-space existence known as a pocket dimension called the Demiplane of Dread, which consists of a collection of land pieces called domains brought together by a mysterious force known only as "The Dark Powers". Each domain is mystically ruled by a being called a "Darklord". Ravenloft is primarily a Gothic horror setting. Dungeon Masters are encouraged to use scenes that build apprehension and fear, culminating in the eventual face-to-face meeting with the nameless evil. Characters have a much greater significance attached to their acts, especially if they are morally impure, as they risk coming under the influence of the Dark Powers (through the game process called "dark powers checks") and gradually transforming themselves into figures of evil. The magical mists of Ravenloft could appear anywhere in the Dungeons & Dragons universe, drawing evil-doers (or player characters) into the Ravenloft setting. One exception is the 'phlogiston' of the Spelljammer setting. The phlogiston blocks all planar travel, but the mists can appear in deep space inside crystal shells, according to the
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    245

    Tekken Universe

    • Characters: Jin Kazama
    The Tekken Universe is the universe where the stories from the video game, Tekken, take place.
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    246

    Tékumel

    • Created by: M. A. R. Barker
    Tékumel is a fantasy world created by M. A. R. Barker over the course of several decades from around 1940. With time, Barker also created the role-playing game Empire of the Petal Throne, set in the Tékumel fictional universe and first published in 1975 by TSR, Inc. In this imaginary world, huge, tradition-bound empires with medieval levels of technology vie for control using magic, large standing armies, and ancient technological devices. Barker's legendarium, like that of the better-known J. R. R. Tolkien, considered not just the creation of a fantasy world but also an in-depth development of the societies and languages of the world. In other words, the setting also provided a context for Barker's constructed languages which were developed in parallel from the mid-to-late 1940s, long before the mass-market publication of his works in roleplaying game and book form. The most significant language created by Barker for his setting is Tsolyáni, which resembles Urdu, Pushtu and Mayan. Tsolyáni has had grammatical guides, dictionaries, pronunciation recordings, and even a complete language course developed for it. In order for his imaginary languages to have this type of depth, Barker
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    247

    The Smurfs

    • Characters: Smurfette
    The Smurfs is a Belgian comic series, created by cartoonist Peyo (pen name of Pierre Culliford). The fictional characters of the Smurfs first appeared in Johan and Peewit in 1958, and the first independent Smurf comics appeared in 1959. Thirty Smurf comic albums have been created, 16 of them by Peyo. Originally, the Smurf stories appeared in Spirou magazine with reprints in many different magazines, but after Peyo left the publisher Dupuis, many comics were first published in dedicated Smurf magazines, which existed in French, Dutch and German. A number of short stories and one page gags have been collected in comic books next to the regular series of 30. By 2008, Smurf comics have been translated into 25 languages, and some 25 million albums have been sold. A new Smurfs comic album sold in 2009 in French alone some 140,000 copies. And a new Smurfs comic album has just been released his year now making the title of albums to thirty. In 1952, Peyo created a Franco-Belgian comics series in Le Journal de Spirou titled Johan et Pirlouit (translated to English as Johan and Peewit), set in Europe during the Middle Ages. Johan serves as a brave young page to the king, and Pirlouit
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    248

    Ultimate Marvel

    • Characters: Ultimate Thor
    Ultimate Marvel is an imprint of comic books published by Marvel Comics, featuring reimagined and updated versions of the company's superhero characters, including Spider-Man, the X-Men, the Avengers, and the Fantastic Four. The imprint was launched in 2000 with the publication of the series Ultimate Spider-Man and Ultimate X-Men. The characters have new origins, freeing them from the sometimes convoluted back-histories of the original versions. The universe has been designated as Earth-1610 within the Marvel Multiverse, which comprises an infinite number of alternate universes. The Ultimate Universe was launched in 2000 with the publication of Ultimate Spider-Man, followed by Ultimate X-Men in 2001 and The Ultimates in 2002, and finally Ultimate Fantastic Four. Prior to the launch, the imprint was under the working title of "Ground Zero". The characters in this line exist outside of the regular Earth-616 Marvel Universe and therefore do not interact with their original version counterparts. The stories and characters of Ultimate Marvel have been adapted to reflect the differences between the present and past continuities, most of which were created in the 1960s and 1970s. For
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    249

    Vatta's War

    • Works Set Here: Command decision
    • Created by: Elizabeth Moon
    The universe that Elizabeth Moon's Vatta's War series is set in.
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    250

    Xanth

    • Works Set Here: The Color of Her Panties
    • Created by: Piers Anthony
    Xanth is a fantasy world created by author Piers Anthony for his Xanth series of novels, also known as The Magic of Xanth. The name Xanth is in itself an unintentional pun, which matches the playful tone of the books. Anthony has said that the coincidence of the word Xanth sounding like a portion of his name ("Pier-XANTH-Ony") was unintentional, and in fact he only realized this years after the series was created. Anthony commonly states that he originally intended for Xanth to be a trilogy, and after the wild success of the first three books decided to expand the series to nine books. An extremely devoted fan base persuaded the author to continue writing the series, which is now open-ended. He has since declared, in the Author's Notes of Cube Route, that this 27th book ended the first "magical trilogy" and that he was beginning a new one with the 28th, punning on the fact that 27 is the third power of three, i.e. three cubed. In an interview with Agony Booth.com, Anthony stated that he's kept the series going as long as he has because the Xanth novels are "just about the only thing the publishers want" from him. Each human character in Xanth is born with a unique magical ability,
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