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Best Fictional Character Creator of All Time

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    1
    Helen Fielding

    Helen Fielding

    • Fictional Characters Created: Bridget Jones
    Helen Fielding (born 19 February 1958) is an English novelist and screenwriter, best known as the creator of the fictional character Bridget Jones, a sequence of novels and films that chronicle the life of a thirtysomething single woman in London as she tries to make sense of life and love. Bridget Jones's Diary and Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason have been published in forty countries and sold over 15 million copies. The two movies of the same name have achieved worldwide success. Bridget Jones’s Diary was named as one of the ten novels that best defined the 20th century, in a survey conducted by The Guardian newspaper. Fielding (born 19 February 1958) grew up in Morley, West Yorkshire, a textile town on the outskirts of Leeds in the north of England. She lived next to a factory that made the fabric for miners’ donkey jackets, where her father was managing director. He died in 1982 and her mother, Nellie, still lives in Yorkshire. Fielding attended Wakefield Girls High School and has three siblings, Jane, David and Richard. She studied English at St Anne's College, Oxford and was part of the Oxford revue at the 1978 Edinburgh Festival, forming a continuing friendship with a
    7.83
    6 votes
    2
    Katherine Paterson

    Katherine Paterson

    • Fictional Characters Created: Leslie Burke
    Katherine Paterson (born October 31, 1932) is an American author best known for children's novels. For four different books published 1975 to 1980, she won two Newbery Medals and two National Book Awards. She is one of three people to win the two major international awards: for "lasting contribution to children's literature" she won the biennial Hans Christian Andersen Award for Writing in 1998. For her career contribution to "children's and young adult literature in the broadest sense", she won the Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award from the Swedish Arts Council in 2006, the biggest prize in children's literature. She was born Katherine Womeldorf in Qingjiang, China, to Christian missionaries George and Mary Womeldorf. Her father was a principal at Sutton 690, a school for girls, and traveled throughout China as part of his missionary duties. The Womeldorf family lived in a Chinese neighborhood and immersed themselves in Chinese culture. When Katherine was five years old, the family was forced to leave China during the Japanese invasion of 1937. The family moved to Richmond, Virginia for a short while before returning to China to live in Shanghai. In 1940, the family was forced to
    7.50
    6 votes
    3
    Ben Edlund

    Ben Edlund

    • Fictional Characters Created: The Terror
    Ben Edlund (born 1968 in Pembroke, Massachusetts) is a comic book artist and writer and television screenwriter. Prior to his involvement in TV, he was best known as the creator of the satirical superhero character The Tick. He serves as an executive producer and staff writer for The CW series Supernatural. Edlund was born and raised in Pembroke. He attended Silver Lake Regional High School and was voted by classmates as "Most Artistic" for both the 8th grade and 12th grade yearbook superlatives. At the age of 17, without a driver's license, Edlund was forced to ride with friends and frequent their favorite hangouts. One particular destination, the New England Comics store, spawned Edlund's interest in the comic book medium, which later launched his art and writing career. While still in high school, he began developing his satirical superhero, The Tick, who became the mascot of the New England Comics newsletter. Edlund was invited to create a comic book series based on the character by New England Comics when, due to a production mix-up, the publisher needed a new title fast. Edlund graduated from high school in 1986 and continued to draw his popular character while majoring in
    6.57
    7 votes
    4
    George Pérez

    George Pérez

    • Fictional Characters Created: Harbinger
    George Pérez (born June 9, 1954) is a Puerto Rican-American writer and illustrator of comic books, known for his work on various titles, including Avengers, Teen Titans, and Wonder Woman. Pérez's family moved from Caguas, Puerto Rico in the 1940s and settled in the Bronx, New York, where there was and continues to be a large Puerto Rican community. His parents became factory workers. Pérez started drawing at the age of five. Eventually, his family moved to Flushing, Queens, New York. Pérez's first involvement with the professional comics industry was as artist Rich Buckler's assistant in 1973. Within a year, Pérez had embarked on his own professional career, which included a run on "Sons of the Tiger", a serialised action-adventure strip published in Marvel's long-running Deadly Hands of Kung Fu magazine and authored by prolific comics writer Bill Mantlo. He and Mantlo co-created the White Tiger (comics' first Puerto Rican superhero) a character that soon appeared in Marvel's color comics, most notably, the Spider-Man titles. Pérez came to prominence when he started illustrating Marvel's The Avengers, starting with issue #141. His early style seemed very much influenced by Jack
    6.57
    7 votes
    5
    Chris Carter

    Chris Carter

    • Fictional Characters Created: Dana Scully
    Chris Carter (born October 13, 1957) is a television and film producer, director and writer. Born in Bellflower, California, Carter graduated with a degree in journalism from California State University before spending thirteen years working for Surfing Magazine. After beginning his television career working on television films for Walt Disney Studios, Carter rose to fame in the early 1990s after creating the science fiction television series The X-Files for the Fox network. The X-Files earned high viewership ratings, and led to Carter being able to negotiate the creation of future series. Carter went on to create three more series for the network—Millennium, a doomsday-themed series which met with critical approval and low viewer numbers; Harsh Realm, which was canceled after three episodes had aired; and The Lone Gunmen, a spin-off of The X-Files which lasted for a single season. Carter's film roles include writing both of The X-Files' cinematic spin-offs—1998's successful The X-Files and the poorly received 2008 follow-up The X-Files: I Want to Believe, the latter of which he also directed—while his television credits have earned him several accolades including eight Primetime
    7.33
    6 votes
    6
    James D. Hudnall

    James D. Hudnall

    • Fictional Characters Created: Hardcase
    James David Hudnall (born April 10, 1957 in Santa Rosa, California) is an American writer who began his career in the comic book field in 1986 with the series Espers, published by Eclipse Comics. He later worked for Marvel and DC on such titles as Alpha Flight, Strikeforce: Morituri, and his own creation Interface, which was a sequel to Espers. He also wrote graphic novels such as Lex Luthor: The Unauthorized Biography, Sinking, Streets and The Psycho. His series Harsh Realm was adapted to television by X-Files producer Chris Carter in 1998. Hudnall and co-creator Andrew Paquette sued Carter and Fox Television when they failed to give them credits on the show. The suit was later settled and as part of the settlement Hudnall and Paquette received credit in the opening titles of the show, in a precedent setting decision by New York Federal court judge John Martin. Hudnall's other works includes: The Age of Heroes, Aftermath, Shut Up And Die, Two to the Chest, Chiller, Devastator, Hardcase and The Solution. He writes a libertarian leaning blog under the Pajamas Media group, a network of political blogs. Hudnall's parents divorced when he was two and his mother remarried to a man in
    8.20
    5 votes
    7
    Bob Powell

    Bob Powell

    • Fictional Characters Created: Merlin
    Bob Powell (1961 - ) is a U.S. composer. In 2004 Bob released the Bob Powell Anthology as open source audio on the Internet. Discography also includes Evil Flower Volume One, Dreamscape Of The Falcon, Pussywillow Patch, Pretzel Head, Room 417, Leftover Noodles and Los Angeles. Born in Rochester, New York, Bob currently lives in self imposed exile in Los Angeles, California working on solo projects and does not believe in collaboration or groups of any kind. "Bob is a wandering minstrel, and as our greedy time has harvested every attention, he's sneaking into neighboring backyards while we're sleeping, luring lucid dreamers to pasture. It may be years before he hops your fence, and longer still will his tales of irreversible lovliness shake your sealed windows and charm your fluffy warm blankets before you repent....but you must!! This music will slip in and out of your indecision, ring true when the bells are tolling, and rest on your weary back as wings whilst you run with hastened resignation for the hills....and like a wandering minstrel, gone far too soon." - Tom Grimley Room 417 is Part Two of Pretzel Head Trilogy by Bob Powell, released in the year 2002 as open source audio.
    7.00
    6 votes
    8
    Pat Cadigan

    Pat Cadigan

    • Fictional Characters Created: Water Lily
    Pat Cadigan (born September 10, 1953) is an American-born science fiction author, whose work is described as part of the cyberpunk movement. Her novels and short stories all share a common theme of exploring the relationship between the human mind and technology. Cadigan was born in Schenectady, New York, and grew up in Fitchburg, Massachusetts. She was educated at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and the University of Kansas, where she studied with James Gunn. She met her first husband Rufus Cadigan while in college; they divorced after she graduated from KU in 1975. That same year Cadigan joined the convention committee for MidAmeriCon, the 34th World Science Fiction Convention being held in Kansas City, Missouri over Labor Day weekend 1976; she served on the committee as the convention's guest liaison to writer guest of honor Robert A. Heinlein, while also working for fantasy writer Tom Reamy at his Nickelodeon Graphics typesetting and graphic design firm. Following Reamy's death in 1977, Cadigan went to work as a writer for Kansas City's Hallmark Cards. In the late 1970s and early 1980s, she also edited the small press fantasy and science fiction magazines Chacal and
    8.00
    5 votes
    9
    Jim Valentino

    Jim Valentino

    • Fictional Characters Created: Phoenix
    Jim Valentino is an American writer, penciler, editor and publisher of comic books. Valentino began his career in the late 1970s creating small press and mostly autobiographical comics. The early-mid 1980s saw normalman which first appeared as a back-up story in Aardvark-Vanaheim's Cerebus. Aardvark-Vanaheim's Dave Sim and Deni Loubert (Sim's wife at the time) began publishing normalman as a 13-issue limited series but only did so until #8, when Loubert began her own publishing company, Renegade Press, which finished the series. Renegade also published three issues of Valentino's self-titled series, in the mid-late 1980s. In the late '80s Valentino began working for Marvel Comics on their superhero titles. His most notable work for the company was as writer/ artist on the future-set super-hero series Guardians of the Galaxy and selected issues of What If...?, plus fill-ins on most of Marvel's major titles. He left Marvel in 1992 to co-found Image Comics with Erik Larsen, Jim Lee, Rob Liefeld, Todd McFarlane and Marc Silvestri. Valentino originated several projects at Image, which he published through his own Shadowline imprint. Unlike at Marvel, where Valentino worked on characters
    6.83
    6 votes
    10
    Garry Shandling

    Garry Shandling

    • Fictional Characters Created: Larry Sanders
    Garry Emmanuel Shandling (born November 29, 1949) is an American comedian, actor and writer. He is best known for his work in It's Garry Shandling's Show and The Larry Sanders Show. Shandling began his career writing for sitcoms such as Sanford and Son and Welcome Back, Kotter. He made a successful stand-up performance on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson and became a frequent guest-host on the show. Shandling was for a time considered the leading contender to replace Carson (other hopefuls were Joan Rivers, David Letterman and David Brenner). In 1986 he created It's Garry Shandling's Show, for the pay cable channel Showtime. It was nominated for four Emmy Awards (including one for Shandling) and lasted until 1990. His second show, The Larry Sanders Show, which began airing on HBO in 1992, was even more successful. Shandling was nominated for 18 Emmy Awards for the show and won in 1998, along with Peter Tolan, for writing the series finale. During his three-decade career, Shandling has been nominated for 19 Primetime Emmy Awards, two Golden Globe Awards, along with many other awards and nominations. Shandling was born in Chicago, Illinois, into a Jewish family. He grew up in
    7.80
    5 votes
    11
    Steve Yeowell

    Steve Yeowell

    • Fictional Characters Created: Ragged Robin
    Steve Yeowell is a British comics artist, well known for his work on the long-running science fiction and fantasy weekly comic 2000 AD. Having trained in 3D design (specialising in silversmithing and jewellery), Yeowell began drawing comics purely for pleasure, with no particular intention to become a professional artist. Having shown his portfolio to artist Bryan Talbot, he quickly found himself given work by Swiftsure (on the Lieutenant Fl'ff strip), Action Force, ThunderCats and Zoids comics. This last put him in touch with writer Grant Morrison, who then picked Yeowell to be the sole artist on new superhero strip Zenith, to run in 2000 AD beginning in 1987. Zenith was a popular success, running to four full-length series plus many one-offs. Yeowell was headhunted by American comics companies and has worked on Batman, The Fantastic Four, The Invisibles, JSA and Starman. He continued his association with Morrison, collaborating on Sebastian O and The New Adventures of Hitler. Yeowell's work is noted for delicate penmanship and lifelike facial expressions, with a notable economy of style that means that his work suits both colour and monochrome treatment. He works with a dip pen
    9.00
    4 votes
    12
    Harold Webster

    Harold Webster

    • Fictional Characters Created: Caspar Milquetoast
    Harold Tucker Webster (September 21, 1885 – September 22, 1952) was an American cartoonist known for The Timid Soul, Bridge, Life's Darkest Moments and others in his syndicated series which ran from the 1920s into the 1950s. Because he disliked his given name, his readers knew him as H. T. Webster, and his signature was simply Webster. His friends, however, called him Webby. Because of the humor and human interest in his cartoons, he was sometimes compared to Mark Twain, and his art style was quite similar to the work of Clare Briggs. During his lifetime, Webster drew more than 16,000 single-panel cartoons. Born in Parkersburg, West Virginia in 1885, Webster grew up in the small town (pop. 3,365) of Tomahawk, Wisconsin where his father was a druggist. He began drawing at age seven. When he was 12, he switched from cigarettes to cigars, and that same year he sold his first cartoon for $5 to the magazine Recreation. He studied drawing from a correspondence course when he was 15, and two years later, he left high school and Tomahawk to study in Chicago at the Frank Holmes School of Illustration, where cartoonist Harry Hershfield had also studied. However, the Holmes School closed only
    7.60
    5 votes
    13
    Seth Cohen

    Seth Cohen

    Seth Ezekiel Cohen is a fictional character on the FOX television series The O.C., portrayed by Adam Brody. Seth is one of the "core four" characters on The O.C. alongside Ryan Atwood, Marissa Cooper, and Summer Roberts. Seth's friendship with Ryan, who eventually became his adoptive brother, formed a focal point of the series along with their romances. Seth married Summer in the series finale. His other relationships were with Anna Stern and Alex Kelly. Seth's goal was to attend Brown University but he ends up going to Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) and continuing work on his comic book Atomic County. The role saw Brody win four Teen Choice Awards from five nominations, from 2004 to 2006. Seth Cohen was born in Berkeley, California, to parents Sanford "Sandy" Cohen and Kirsten Cohen (née Nichol). Raised in Newport Beach, he is Jewish on his father's side and connects and identifies with his father's religious and cultural background. However, he embraces the mutual holiday of Chrismukkah, a joint Christmas and Hanukkah holiday. He was befriended at the start of the series by Ryan Atwood (Benjamin McKenzie) when the latter was brought home by Sandy. Before Ryan's arrival,
    7.60
    5 votes
    14
    Orson Welles

    Orson Welles

    • Fictional Characters Created: Jedediah Leland
    George Orson Welles (May 6, 1915 – October 10, 1985) was an American actor, director, writer and producer who worked extensively in theater, radio and film. He is best remembered for his innovative work in all three media, most notably Caesar (1937), a groundbreaking Broadway adaption of Julius Caesar and the debut of the Mercury Theatre; The War of the Worlds (1938), one of the most famous broadcasts in the history of radio; and Citizen Kane (1941), which is consistently ranked as one of the all-time greatest films. After directing a number of high-profile theatrical productions in his early twenties, including an innovative adaptation of Macbeth and The Cradle Will Rock, Welles found national and international fame as the director and narrator of a 1938 radio adaptation of H. G. Wells' novel The War of the Worlds performed for the radio drama anthology series Mercury Theatre on the Air. It was reported to have caused widespread panic when listeners thought that an invasion by extraterrestrial beings was occurring. Although these reports of panic were mostly false and overstated, they rocketed Welles to instant notoriety. His first film was Citizen Kane (1941), which he co-wrote,
    8.75
    4 votes
    15
    C. C. Beck

    C. C. Beck

    • Fictional Characters Created: Mister Atom
    Charles Clarence Beck (June 8, 1910 – November 22, 1989) was an American cartoonist and comic book artist, best known for his work on Captain Marvel at Fawcett Comics and DC Comics. He was inducted into the comic book industry's Will Eisner Comic Book Hall of Fame in 1993 and the Jack Kirby Hall of Fame in 1997. C. C. Beck was born on June 8, 1910 in Zumbrota, Minnesota. He studied at the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts and the University of Minnesota, and also took an art correspondence course. In 1933, Beck joined Fawcett Publications as a staff artist, where he created pulp magazines. When the company began producing comic books in autumn 1939, Beck was assigned to draw a character created by writer Bill Parker called "Captain Thunder". Before the first issue of Whiz Comics came out, the character's name was changed to Captain Marvel. Besides Captain Marvel, Beck also drew other Fawcett series, including the adventures of Spy Smasher and Ibis the Invincible. His early Captain Marvel stories set the style for the series. Beck favored a cartoony versus realistic rendering of character and setting, which also came to be reflected in the whimsical scripting (by Otto Binder and others).
    6.50
    6 votes
    16
    Dylan Moran

    Dylan Moran

    • Fictional Characters Created: Bernard Black
    Dylan Moran (born 3 November 1971) is an Irish stand-up comedian, writer, actor and filmmaker. He is best known for his sardonic observational comedy, the UK television sitcom Black Books (which he co-wrote and starred in), and his work with Simon Pegg in Shaun of the Dead and Run Fatboy Run. Moran also appeared as one of the two lead characters in the Irish black comedy titled A Film with Me in It in 2008. He is a regular performer at national and international comedy festivals including the Edinburgh Festival Fringe, Just for Laughs Montreal Comedy Festival, the Melbourne International Comedy Festival and the Kilkenny Comedy Festival. In 2007 he was voted the 17th greatest stand-up comic on Channel 4's 100 Greatest Stand-Ups and again in the updated 2010 list as the 14th greatest stand-up comic. In 2012, he became the first professional English-speaking comedian ever to perform in Russia, after two sold-out shows in neighboring Estonia, with his routine referencing Russia's new law banning "homosexual propaganda" and jailed oil tycoon Mikhail Khodorkovsky. He lives in Scotland with his wife and two children. Moran was born in Navan, County Meath, Ireland. He attended St.
    7.40
    5 votes
    17
    David Walliams

    David Walliams

    • Fictional Characters Created: Daffyd Thomas
    David Edward Walliams (born Williams, 20 August 1971) is an English comedian, writer, children's author, and actor, known for his partnership with Matt Lucas on the TV sketch show Little Britain and its predecessor Rock Profile. More recently, he and Lucas wrote and starred in Come Fly with Me. Walliams joined the judging panel for series 6 of Britain's Got Talent for 2012. Born in Merton, southwest London, on 20 August 1971 to Peter, a London Transport engineer, and Kathleen Williams, a lab technician, Williams was brought up in Banstead, Surrey. His parents appeared on The Friday Night Project when he was the guest star on the show. Williams was educated at Collingwood Boys' School in Wallington (now Collingwood School) and the independent Reigate Grammar School (where he was a contemporary of Robert Shearman). He was a member of the National Youth Theatre, where he met Matt Lucas. Walliams studied drama at the University of Bristol from 1989 to 1992, one year below Simon Pegg. Williams changed his name to Walliams ( /ˈwæliəmz/) when he joined the actors' trade union Equity, as there was already a member named David Williams. This was spoofed in a mock interview on Rock Profile,
    9.67
    3 votes
    18
    Len Wein

    Len Wein

    • Fictional Characters Created: Lucius Fox
    Len Wein ( /ˈwiːn/; born June 12, 1948, New York City, New York) is an American-Jewish comic book writer and editor best known for co-creating DC Comics' Swamp Thing and Marvel Comics' Wolverine, and for helping revive the Marvel superhero team the X-Men (including the co-creation of Nightcrawler, Storm, and Colossus). Additionally, he was the editor for writer Alan Moore and illustrator Dave Gibbons' influential DC miniseries Watchmen. Wein was inducted into the Will Eisner Comic Book Hall of Fame in 2008. In 2003 interview, Len Wein recalled that he "was a very sickly kid. While I was in the hospital at age seven, my dad brought me a stack of comic books to keep me occupied. And I was hooked. When my eighth grade art teacher, Mr. Smedley, told me he thought I had actual art talent, I decided to devote all my efforts in that direction in the hope that I might someday get into the comics biz." Approximately once a month, as a teenager, Wein and his friend Marv Wolfman took DC Comics' weekly Thursday afternoon tour of the company's offices. Wolfman was active in fanzine culture, and together he and Wein produced sample superhero stories to show to the DC editorial staff. At that
    7.20
    5 votes
    19
    Simon Fraser

    Simon Fraser

    • Fictional Characters Created: Nikolai Dante
    Simon Fraser is a British comics artist and writer best known for his work on Nikolai Dante, a series he created with writer Robbie Morrison in 2000 AD. Fraser's early work includes Lux and Alby Sign on and Save the Universe, a collaboration with novelist Martin Millar, in 1992. Despite having little interest in football, he worked on Roy of the Rovers, including drawing the character's final appearance in 1995. This led to David Bishop's commissioning him to work on Shimura in the Judge Dredd Megazine, where he first collaborated with Robbie Morrison. The pair then created Nikolai Dante, a swashbuckling adventure story set amid dynastic intrigue in a future Russia, which debuted in 2000 AD in 1997. Fraser was the main artist on the strip, occasionally rotating with other artists, until 2002; the primary artist since then has been John M. Burns, although Fraser returned to the character in 2006 for the storyline "Sword of the Tsar". Also for 2000 AD, Fraser has drawn a number of Judge Dredd stories. Returning to the Judge Dredd Megazine in 2003, he collaborated with writer Rob Williams on Family, a black and white series about a Mafia family with superhuman powers, which has
    7.20
    5 votes
    20
    Michael Ende

    Michael Ende

    • Fictional Characters Created: Southern Oracle
    Michael Andreas Helmuth Ende (12 November 1929 – 28 August 1995) was a German author of fantasy and children's literature. He is best known for his epic fantasy work The Neverending Story; other famous works include Momo and Jim Button and Luke the Engine Driver. His works have been translated into more than 40 languages and sold more than 20 million copies, and have been adapted into motion pictures, stage plays, operas and audio books. Ende was one of the most popular and famous German authors of the 20th century, mostly due to the enormous success of his children's books. However, Ende was not strictly a children's author, as he also wrote books for adults. Ende claimed, "It is for this child in me, and in all of us, that I tell my stories," and that "[my books are] for any child between 80 and 8 years" (qtd. Senick 95, 97). Ende often found frustration in being perceived as exclusively an author for children, considering himself rather a man intending to speak of cultural problems and spiritual wisdom to people of all ages in his works; he wrote in 1985: Ende's writing could be described as a surreal mixture of reality and fantasy. The reader is often invited to take a more
    8.25
    4 votes
    21
    Quentin Tarantino

    Quentin Tarantino

    • Fictional Characters Created: Beatrix Kiddo
    Quentin Jerome Tarantino (pronunciation: /ˌtærənˈtiːnoʊ/; born March 27, 1963) is an American film director, screenwriter, producer, cinematographer and actor. He has received many industry awards, including an Academy Award, a Golden Globe Award, a BAFTA and the Palme d'Or and has been nominated for an Emmy and Grammy. Born in Knoxville, Tennessee, Tarantino was an avid film fan. His career began in the late 1980s, when he wrote and directed My Best Friend's Birthday. Its screenplay would form the basis for True Romance. In the early 1990s, he began his career as an independent filmmaker with films employing nonlinear storylines and the aestheticization of violence. His films include Reservoir Dogs (1992), Pulp Fiction (1994), Jackie Brown (1997), Kill Bill (2003, 2004), Death Proof (2007), and Inglourious Basterds (2009). His movies are generally characterized by stylistic influences from grindhouse, kung fu, and spaghetti western films. Tarantino also frequently collaborates with his friend and fellow filmmaker Robert Rodriguez. Tarantino was born in Knoxville, Tennessee, the son of Tony Tarantino, an actor and amateur musician who was born in Queens, New York, and Connie
    7.00
    5 votes
    22
    Mike Myers

    Mike Myers

    • Fictional Characters Created: Doctor Evil
    Michael John "Mike" Myers (born May 25, 1963) is a Canadian actor, comedian, screenwriter, and film producer of English parentage. He is most known for his roles in various popular films, including playing the title characters of the films Wayne's World, Austin Powers, 54, and the lead voices of Shrek, and The Cat in the Hat. He has also been a recurring member of the cast of the NBC sketch show Saturday Night Live. Myers was born and raised in Scarborough, Ontario, the son of British-born parents Eric Myers (1922–1991), an insurance man and World War II veteran of the Royal Engineers, and his wife Alice E. (née Hind; born 1926), an office supervisor and veteran of the Royal Air Force. Both of his parents are from Liverpool, England. He has two older brothers, Peter Myers and Paul Myers, an indie rock singer-songwriter, broadcaster and author. Myers is of English, Irish, and Scottish ancestry, and was raised Protestant. He holds three citizenships, American, British, and Canadian. Myers began school at Bishopbriggs Academy then changed to the Stephen Leacock Collegiate Institute in Scarborough, Ontario. He began performing in commercials at age eight, and at ten he made a
    9.33
    3 votes
    23
    E. C. Segar

    E. C. Segar

    • Fictional Characters Created: Popeye
    Elzie Crisler Segar (8 December, 1894 – 13 October, 1938) was an American cartoonist, best known as the creator of Popeye, a character who first appeared in 1929 in his comic strip Thimble Theatre. Asked how to say his name, he told The Literary Digest it was "SEE-gar". He commonly signed his work simply Segar or E. Segar above a drawing of a cigar. Segar was born on 8 December, 1894, and raised in Chester, Illinois, a small town near the Mississippi River. The son of a handyman, his earliest work experiences included assisting his father in house painting and paper hanging. Skilled at playing drums, he also provided musical accompaniment to films and vaudeville acts in the local theater, where he was eventually given the job of film projectionist at the Chester Opera House, where he also did live performances. At age 18, he decided to become a cartoonist. He took a correspondence course in cartooning from W.L. Evans of Cleveland, Ohio. He said that after work he "lit up the oil lamps about midnight and worked on the course until 3 a.m." Segar moved to Chicago where he met Richard F. Outcault, creator of The Yellow Kid and Buster Brown. Outcault encouraged him and introduced him at
    8.00
    4 votes
    24
    Matthew Smith

    Matthew Smith

    • Fictional Characters Created: Miner Willy
    Matthew Smith (born 1966) is a British computer game programmer. He is best known for his games Manic Miner and Jet Set Willy for the ZX Spectrum, released in 1983 and 1984 respectively. He is also a playable character in the 2005 mobile game, Jet Set Racing. He was born in London, but his family moved around a great deal, finally ending up in Wallasey. He started out programming on a TRS-80. His first commercial game was a Galaxian clone for the TRS-80 called Delta Tower One. He then went on to produce a game on the VIC-20 called Monster Muncher. He obtained a ZX Spectrum on loan from Bug-Byte Software Ltd. in return for a contract to make three games. The first of these was Styx in 1983. He wrote Manic Miner in just six weeks and it was an instant success. While some games at the time were quite basic and amateur, Manic Miner was an addictive platform game with in-game music (a first for the ZX Spectrum). The sequel, Jet Set Willy, took considerably longer to write and was an even bigger success. Manic Miner and Jet Set Willy are two of the most famous and popular ZX Spectrum games, reputedly co-written with renowned programmer Andrew Dryden. After the creation of Jet Set Willy
    8.00
    4 votes
    25
    Philip Pullman

    Philip Pullman

    • Fictional Characters Created: Marisa Coulter
    Philip Pullman CBE, FRSL (born 19 October 1946) is an English writer from Norwich. He is the author of several best-selling books, most notably the fantasy trilogy His Dark Materials and the fictionalised biography of Jesus, The Good Man Jesus and the Scoundrel Christ. In 2008, The Times named Pullman one of the "50 greatest British writers since 1945". The first book of His Dark Materials (Northern Lights) won the 1995 Carnegie Medal in Literature from the Library Association, recognising the year's outstanding children's book by a British subject. For the 70th anniversary of the Medal it was named one of the top ten winning works by a panel, composing the ballot for a public election of the all-time favourite. Northern Lights won the public vote from that shortlist and was thus named the all-time "Carnegie of Carnegies" on 21 June 2007. It has been adapted as a film under its U.S. title, The Golden Compass. Philip Pullman was born in Norwich, England, the son of Audrey Evelyn Pullman (née Merrifield) and Royal Air Force pilot Alfred Outram Pullman. The family travelled with his father's job, including to Southern Rhodesia where he spent time at school. His father was killed in a
    8.00
    4 votes
    26
    Ridley Scott

    Ridley Scott

    • Fictional Characters Created: Ellen Ripley
    Sir Ridley Scott (born 30 November 1937) is an English film director and producer. Following his commercial breakthrough with Alien (1979), his best-known works are sci-fi classic Blade Runner (1982), Thelma & Louise (1991), best picture Oscar-winner Gladiator (2000), Black Hawk Down (2001), Matchstick Men (2003), Kingdom of Heaven (2005), American Gangster (2007), Robin Hood (2010), and Prometheus (2012). Scott is known for his atmospheric, highly concentrated visual style, which has influenced many directors. Though his films range widely in setting and period, they frequently showcase memorable imagery of urban environments, whether 12th century Jerusalem (Kingdom of Heaven), contemporary Osaka (Black Rain) or Mogadishu (Black Hawk Down), or the future cityscapes of Blade Runner. Scott has been nominated for three Academy Awards for Directing (for Thelma and Louise, Gladiator and Black Hawk Down), plus two Golden Globe and two BAFTA Awards. He was knighted in the UK 2003 New Year Honours list. He is the elder brother of the late Tony Scott. Scott was born in the North East Tyneside coastal town of South Shields, England, the son of Elizabeth and Colonel Francis Percy Scott. He
    8.00
    4 votes
    27
    Yanick Paquette

    Yanick Paquette

    • Fictional Characters Created: Rama
    Yanick Paquette is a Canadian penciller in North American comics. He has worked for Antarctic Press, Topps, Marvel and DC Comics and since 1994. Among the titles Paquette has worked on are Adventures of Superman, Areala Warrior Nun, Avengers, Codename: Knockout, Gambit, Gen¹³, JLA, Negation', Power Company, Space: Above And Beyond, Superman: The Man of Steel, Terra Obscura, Tomorrow Woman, Transmetropolitan: Filth of the City, Seven Soldiers: The Bulleteer, Wonder Woman, Xena: Warrior Princess, and Civil War: X-Men. Clément Sauvé was his assistant on background on a wide number of issues. Paquette was the regular artist on Ultimate X-Men from February 2007 to January 2008, and for the first five issues of Young X-Men in 2008. He later supplied the art for Batman: The Return of Bruce Wayne #3 (August 2010), and a few issues of Batman Inc., teaming up again with Grant Morrison. He is currently the artist on the relaunched Swamp Thing, with Scott Snyder writing, and Marco Rudy doing the fill-in issues.
    6.00
    6 votes
    28
    Bill Jemas

    Bill Jemas

    • Fictional Characters Created: Dog Logan
    Bill Jemas is an American media entrepreneur, writer, and editor. He is a former vice president of Marvel Comics, and a founding partner at 360ep, a media management firm. Bill Jemas is originally from Princeton, New Jersey. In 1980 he received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Rutgers University, where he majored in history and minored in philosophy and economics. In 1983 he graduated from Harvard Law School with a Juris Doctor. After graduating Harvard, Jemas took a job as a tax attorney at Simpson Thacher & Bartlett in New York. Disappointed by this work, he left after two years to work for the National Basketball Association, which he found to be more entrepreneurial, and allowed him to focus on managing a business and working on deals, which Jemas sees as two of the things he does best. It also gave him entry into the entertainment field, which he felt would open up lucrative opportunities. While at NBA, according to Jemas, he helped build an almost non-existent basketball card business into a multimillion-dollar enterprise. Jemas became president of Fleer Entertainment Group and Fleer Corp in 1993, and appointed Jemas as executive vice president of Marvel Entertainment Group
    6.80
    5 votes
    29
    Butch Hartman

    Butch Hartman

    • Fictional Characters Created: Chester McBadbat
    Elmer Earl "Butch" Hartman IV (born January 10, 1965) is an American animator, executive producer, animation director, storyboard artist, voice actor, occasional singer, producer, and creator of the animated series The Fairly OddParents, Danny Phantom and T.U.F.F. Puppy. He heads the production company Billionfold, Inc., which produces the three aforementioned programs. Hartman was born in Highland Park, Michigan to Elmer Earl Hartman III and Carol Davis. He received the nickname "Butch" as a youth and continues to use the name professionally as an adult. Hartman spent his childhood in Roseville, Michigan and his teen years in New Baltimore, Michigan. He graduated from Anchor Bay High School in New Baltimore in 1983. He subsequently attended the California Institute of the Arts in Valencia, California. While still attending the California Institute of the Arts, Hartman received the chance to intern as an in-between animator on the Don Bluth film, An American Tail. Shortly after graduating for the California Institute of the Arts Hartman was hired as a character designer for the animated series My Little Pony. Instead, they had him working on storyboards (which he had not done
    6.80
    5 votes
    30
    Bill Amend

    Bill Amend

    • Fictional Characters Created: Jason Fox
    William J. C. "Bill" Amend III ( /ˈeɪmənd/; born September 20, 1962 in Northampton, Massachusetts) is an American cartoonist, best known for his comic strip FoxTrot. Amend attended high school in Burlingame, California where he was a cartoonist on his school newspaper. Amend is an Eagle Scout in the Boy Scouts of America. He attended Amherst College, where he drew comics for the college paper. He majored in physics and graduated in 1984. In 1982 Amend took first place among sophomores in a mathematics prize examination at Amherst. After a short time in the animation business, Amend decided to pursue a cartooning career and signed on with Universal Press Syndicate. FoxTrot first appeared on April 10, 1988. On May 21, 1999, Amherst College awarded him an honorary degree as Doctor of Humane Letters. On December 5, 2006, Universal Press Syndicate issued a press release stating that Amend's strip, FoxTrot, would turn into a Sunday-only strip. Amend stated that he wants to continue doing the strip, but at a less hurried pace. This news was followed by several weeks of the characters discussing a "cartoonist" semi-retiring to Sundays only, and what methods he would use to phase out the
    9.00
    3 votes
    31
    CLAMP

    CLAMP

    • Fictional Characters Created: Hikaru Shidou
    Clamp (クランプ, Kuranpu), is an all-female Japanese manga artist group that formed in the mid 1980s. Many of the group's manga series are often adapted into anime after release. It consists of their leader Nanase Ohkawa (大川 七瀬, Ōkawa Nanase), who provides much of the storyline and screenplay for all their works and adaptations of those works respectively, and three artists whose roles shift for each series: Mokona (もこな, Mokona), Tsubaki Nekoi (猫井 椿, Nekoi Tsubaki), and Satsuki Igarashi (いがらし 寒月, Igarashi Satsuki). Almost 100 million Clamp tankōbon copies have been sold worldwide as of October 2007. Beginning as an eleven-member dōjinshi circle in the mid 1980s, they began creating original work in 1987. By the time they debuted with RG Veda in 1989, their numbers were reduced to seven. In 1993, three more members left, leaving the four members who are currently still part of the group. In 2006, each member decided to change her name; Ohkawa later changed her name back from Ageha Ohkawa to Nanase Ohkawa, while the other three members retained their new names. Clamp originally began in the mid 1980s as an eleven-member dōjinshi circle named Clamp Cluster. This included O-Kyon (お·きょん),
    9.00
    3 votes
    32
    Ian Fleming

    Ian Fleming

    • Fictional Characters Created: James Bond
    Ian Lancaster Fleming (28 May 1908 – 12 August 1964) was an English author, journalist and Naval Intelligence Officer, best known for his James Bond series of spy novels. Fleming came from a wealthy family connected to the merchant bank Robert Fleming & Co., and his father was the Member of Parliament for Henley from 1910 until his death on the Western Front in 1917. Educated at Eton, Sandhurst and the universities of Munich and Geneva, Fleming moved through a number of jobs before he started writing. While working in British Naval Intelligence during Second World War, Fleming was involved in the planning stages of Operation Mincemeat and Operation Golden Eye. He was also involved in the planning and oversight of two intelligence units, 30 Assault Unit and T-Force. His wartime service and his career as a journalist provided much of the background, detail and depth of the James Bond novels. Fleming wrote his first Bond novel, Casino Royale, in 1952. It was a success, with three print runs being commissioned to cope with the demand. Eleven Bond novels and two short-story collections followed between 1953 and 1966. The novels revolved around James Bond, an officer in the Secret
    9.00
    3 votes
    33
    Matt Lucas

    Matt Lucas

    • Fictional Characters Created: Daffyd Thomas
    Matthew Richard "Matt" Lucas (born 5 March 1974) is a British comedian, screenwriter, singer and actor, best known for his work with David Walliams in the television show Little Britain; as well as for his portrayals of the scorekeeping baby George Dawes in the comedy panel game Shooting Stars, Tweedledee and Tweedledum in Alice in Wonderland, and the roguish innkeeper Thénardier in the musical Les Misérables. In May 2007, he was placed seventh in the list of the UK's 100 most influential gay men and women, by British newspaper The Independent. Lucas was born in Paddington, London, the son of Diana (née Williams) and John Stanley Lucas (1944–1996), who ran a chauffeuring business. Some of Lucas' mother's family fled from Germany during the second world war. Lucas grew up in a Reform Jewish household in Stanmore, Middlesex; he has an older brother, Howard. He has had alopecia since his childhood, which in interviews he has inconsistently attributed to various events, including a delayed reaction to a car accident at the age of four. He lost all of his hair when he was six years old. Lucas' father died of a heart attack aged 52, in Brent, Greater London. Lucas was educated at
    9.00
    3 votes
    34
    Pat Mills

    Pat Mills

    • Fictional Characters Created: The Punisher 2099
    Pat Mills is a British comics writer and editor who, along with John Wagner, revitalised British boys comics in the 1970s, and has remained a leading light in British comics ever since. He has been called "the godfather of British comics". His comics are notable for their violence and anti-authoritarianism. He is best known for creating 2000 AD and playing a major part in the development of Judge Dredd. Mills started his career as a sub-editor for D. C. Thomson & Co. Ltd, where he met Wagner. In 1971 both left to go freelance, and were soon writing scripts for IPC's girls' and humour comics. After D.C. Thomson launched Warlord, a successful war-themed weekly, Mills was asked in 1975 to develop a rival title for IPC. Based in the girls' comics department to avoid the attention of the staff of the boys' department, Mills, along with Wagner and Gerry Finley-Day, worked in secret to create Battle Picture Weekly. Battle's stories were more violent and its characters more working class than IPC's traditional fare, and it was an immediate hit. Having made the comic ready for launch, Mills resigned as editor. He would later write the celebrated First World War series Charley's War, drawn
    9.00
    3 votes
    35
    Gene Colan

    Gene Colan

    • Fictional Characters Created: Death-Stalker
    Eugene Jules "Gene" Colan (September 1, 1926 – June 23, 2011) was an American comic book artist best known for his work for Marvel Comics, where his signature titles include the superhero series Daredevil, the cult-hit satiric series Howard the Duck, and The Tomb of Dracula, considered one of comics' classic horror series. He co-created the Falcon, the first African-American superhero in mainstream comics, and the non-costumed, supernatural African-American character Blade, which went on to star in a series of films starring Wesley Snipes. Colan was inducted into the Will Eisner Comic Book Hall of Fame in 2005. Born in The Bronx, New York City, New York, the son of parents who ran an antiques business on the Upper East Side, Gene Colan began drawing at age three. "The first thing I ever drew was a lion. I must've absolutely copied it or something. But that's what my folks tell me. And from then on, I just drew everything in sight. My grandfather was my favorite subject". Among his earliest influences, he said in 2001, were the Coulton Waugh adventure comic strip Dickie Dare "in The New York Sun. I was influenced by the style, or the story. Mostly the story. I took it very
    5.83
    6 votes
    36
    A. A. Milne

    A. A. Milne

    • Fictional Characters Created: Winnie-the-Pooh
    Alan Alexander Milne  /ˈmɪln/ (18 January 1882 – 31 January 1956) was an English author, best known for his books about the teddy bear Winnie-the-Pooh and for various children's poems. Milne was a noted writer, primarily as a playwright, before the huge success of Pooh overshadowed all his previous work. A. A. Milne was born in Kilburn, London, to parents Vince Milne, who was Scottish, and Sarah Marie Milne (née Heginbotham) and grew up at Henley House School, 6/7 Mortimer Road (now Crescent), Kilburn, a small public school run by his father. One of his teachers was H. G. Wells who taught there in 1889–90. Milne attended Westminster School and Trinity College, Cambridge, where he studied on a mathematics scholarship. While there, he edited and wrote for Granta, a student magazine. He collaborated with his brother Kenneth and their articles appeared over the initials AKM. Milne's work came to the attention of the leading British humour magazine Punch, where Milne was to become a contributor and later an assistant editor. Milne joined the British Army in World War I and served as an officer in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment and later, after a debilitating illness, the Royal Corps of
    6.60
    5 votes
    37
    Matt Groening

    Matt Groening

    • Fictional Characters Created: Homer Simpson
    Matthew Abram "Matt" Groening ( /ˈɡreɪnɪŋ/ GRAY-ning; born February 15, 1954) is an American cartoonist, screenwriter, and producer. He is the creator of the comic strip Life in Hell (1977–2012) as well as two successful television series, The Simpsons (1989–present) and Futurama (1999–2003, 2008–present) Groening made his first professional cartoon sale of Life in Hell to the avant-garde Wet magazine in 1978. At its peak, the cartoon was carried in 250 weekly newspapers. Life in Hell caught the attention of James L. Brooks. In 1985, Brooks contacted Groening with the proposition of working in animation for the Fox variety show The Tracey Ullman Show. Originally, Brooks wanted Groening to adapt his Life in Hell characters for the show. Fearing the loss of ownership rights, Groening decided to create something new and came up with a cartoon family, The Simpsons, and named the members after his own parents and sisters — while Bart was an anagram of the word brat. The shorts would be spun off into their own series: The Simpsons, which has since aired 510 episodes. In 1997, Groening and former Simpsons writer David X. Cohen developed Futurama, an animated series about life in the year
    6.60
    5 votes
    38
    Ron Garney

    Ron Garney

    • Fictional Characters Created: Sammy Paré
    Ron Garney is a comic book writer/artist, known for his work on books such as JLA,The Amazing Spider-Man, Silver Surfer, Hulk, Daredevil and Captain America. Garney has worked on JLA,The Amazing Spider-Man, Daredevil, Ghost Rider volume 3, Wolverine, Captain America, X-Men, Silver Surfer and Hulk. He has also written for Hulk in collaboration with Jerry Ordway. Garney's late 2000s projects include Skaar: Son of Hulk and Wolverine: Weapon X. Garney worked as the Costume illustrator on the 2007 Will Smith film I Am Legend, and the 2010 Nicolas Cage fantasy film, The Sorcerer's Apprentice. Garney is married to Erin Garney, an elementary school art teacher in Orange, Connecticut. Comics work (interior pencil art) includes:
    6.60
    5 votes
    39
    Mark Texeira

    Mark Texeira

    • Fictional Characters Created: Alex
    Mark Texeira is an American comic book artist. Classically trained as a painter, Texeira broke into the comics field in the early 1980s. Mark Texeira was born and raised in New York City. He attended Manhattan's High School of Art and Design, and was granted a Presidential Scholarship at the School of Visual Arts, where he attended for two years before dropping out to pursue a freelance commercial art career. During this period, Texeira took classes at the Art Students League. His oil paintings soon won mentions at the Salmagundi Club and the Society of Illustrators. Comics titles Texeira has contributed to include Jonah Hex and its spinoff Hex (1985–1986), Psi-Force (1986–1987), Punisher War Journal (1990), Ghost Rider vol. 2 (1990–1992, 1997–1998), and vol. 5, Wolverine vol. 2 (1993), Sabretooth (1993), Spider-Man: Legacy of Evil (1996), Black Panther vol.3 (1998), Moon Knight vol. 4 (1999), Vampirella, Cyclops (2001), Hercules vol. 4 (2005) and Wolverine vol. 3 (2005). When painting, Texeira begins with a penciled layout on loose paper, and following approval of the layout, will acquire reference photos or hire models to pose for him, in order to "capture the feeling of the
    5.67
    6 votes
    40
    Agatha Christie

    Agatha Christie

    • Fictional Characters Created: Hercule Poirot
    Dame Agatha Mary Clarissa Christie, DBE (née Miller; 15 September 1890 – 12 January 1976) was a British crime writer of novels, short stories, and plays. She also wrote romances under the name Mary Westmacott, but she is best remembered for her 66 detective novels and more than 15 short story collections, most of which revolve around the investigations of such characters as Hercule Poirot, Miss Jane Marple and Tommy and Tuppence. Born to a wealthy upper-middle-class family in Torquay, Devon, Christie served in a hospital during the First World War before settling into married life with her first child in London. Although initially unsuccessful at getting her work published, in 1920, The Bodley Head press published her novel The Mysterious Affair at Styles, featuring the character of Poirot. This launched her literary career. According to the Guinness Book of World Records, Christie is the best-selling novelist of all time. Her novels have sold roughly four billion copies, and her estate claims that her works rank third, after those of William Shakespeare and the Bible, as the world's most widely published books. According to Index Translationum, Christie is the most translated
    7.50
    4 votes
    41
    Agnes Nixon

    Agnes Nixon

    • Fictional Characters Created: Victoria Lord
    Agnes Nixon (born Agnes Eckhardt; December 10, 1927) is an American writer and producer. She attended Northwestern University where she was a member of Alpha Chi Omega sorority, and is best known as the creator of soap operas such as One Life to Live and All My Children. Having a key role in the production of these programs, she was either executive producer or consulting producer for both shows for many years: on One Life to Live from 1968 to 1975, and All My Children from 1970 to 1981. Nixon continued to write for All My Children program with Wisner Washam until 1983, and again with him and Lorraine Broderick from 1988 to 1992, continuing on as a consultant in recurring capacities to date. From 1970 until 1989, every episode of All My Children was written by either Nixon or her protégés Washam and Broderick, although Nixon's role with One Life to Live was more limited once she surrendered the day-to-day aspects of the show in 1975. Because of her long career and the number of successful shows she created or was a part of, she is often referred to as the "Queen" of the modern soap opera. Her creations and her writing have had the most effect on modern audiences, second only to her
    7.50
    4 votes
    42
    Ivan Reis

    Ivan Reis

    • Fictional Characters Created: Arkillo
    Ivan Reis is a Brazilian comic book artist. He is known for his work on books such as Marvel Comics' Captain Marvel, and DC Comics' Green Lantern books. According to collaborator Geoff Johns, Reis' drawing style resembles a combination of Alan Davis and Neal Adams. For three years, Reis worked for Mauricio de Sousa in Brazil. He began his international career for Dark Horse working on titles such as Ghost, starting with issue 17 and acting as regular artist until that title finished at issue 36. There, he also worked on The Mask, Time Cop and Xena. Later, he worked for Lightning Comics. At Vertigo, he pencilled an issue of Grant Morrison's The Invisibles. He became better known for Lady Death (Chaos! and CrossGen). Reis also worked on Thing & She-Hulk: The Long Night, Avengers Icons: Vision, Captain Marvel, Iron Man, Defenders and Avengers for Marvel Comics. Since 2004 Reis has worked on Action Comics, Teen Titans, Rann-Thanagar War, Superman, and Infinite Crisis. After that, Reis started pencilling Green Lantern vol. 4. Reis' left Green Lantern after issue #38 in 2009, in order to provide the artwork for the 2009 - 2010 miniseries Blackest Night and its 2010 follow-up ongoing
    7.50
    4 votes
    43
    Laura Lee Hope

    Laura Lee Hope

    • Fictional Characters Created: Bobbsey Twins
    Laura Lee Hope is a pseudonym used by the Stratemeyer Syndicate for the Bobbsey Twins and several other series of children's novels. Actual writers taking up the pen of Laura Lee Hope include Edward Stratemeyer, Howard and Lilian Garis, Elizabeth Ward, Harriet (Stratemeyer) Adams, Andrew E. Svenson, June M. Dunn, Grace Grote and Nancy Axelrad. Laura Lee Hope was first used as a pseudonym in 1904 for the debut of the Bobbsey Twins.
    7.50
    4 votes
    44
    Graham Nolan

    Graham Nolan

    • Fictional Characters Created: Fel Andar
    Graham Nolan (born 12 March 1962) is a comic book artist, best known for work for DC Comics on Batman-related titles in the 1990s and his work on The Phantom Sunday strip. He is currently the artist on the syndicated comic Rex Morgan, M.D.. He frequently collaborates with writer Chuck Dixon. His first comics credit came in April 1985, when his work appeared in DC Comics' Talent Showcase #16, alongside Eric Shanower and Stan Woch (among others). Moving on to issues of the UK Transformers comic, in 1988 he started a 12-issue run on DC's Power of the Atom comic. In June 1990, he launched John Ostrander and Tim Truman's Hawkworld comic, pencilling it for 26 issues until late 1992. Between 1992 and 1998, he worked on many issues of Detective Comics, illustrating key parts of the KnightFall and KnightsEnd sagas featuring Azrael and Batman. Graham Nolan also did freelance work for the Dungeons & Dragons game, including The Mines of Bloodstone (1986), Egg of the Phoenix (1987),The Endless Stair (1987), and The Complete Book of Villains (1994). In 1998 he created and published his own comic strip, Monster Island. When this strip was reprinted as a back-up feature in the Scandinavian The
    8.67
    3 votes
    45
    Steven T. Seagle

    Steven T. Seagle

    • Fictional Characters Created: Flex
    Steven T. Seagle (born on March 31, 1965) is an American writer who works in the comic book, television, film, live theater, video game, and animation, industries. He is best known for his nationally acclaimed graphic novel memoir It's a Bird (Vertigo, May 2004), and as part of his Man of Action Studios (with Duncan Rouleau, Joe Casey and Joe Kelly) which created the animated Cartoon Network series Ben 10 responsible for both Cartoon Network's highest-rated single program and highest rated series premiere. Seagle is also a founding member of Speak Theater Arts, creators of innovative live stage productions and is a former college instructor having taught at Ball State University, Pasadena City College and Mt. San Antonio College, where he also served as a coach for the Forensics team during many of their national championship seasons. Seagle's father, Jack, was in the United States Air Force, and as a result, the family moved many times. The family twice lived in Colorado Springs, Colorado, near the United States Air Force Academy where Jack was stationed. Seagle recalls watching the moon landing on television in their apartment by what is today the Chapel Hills Mall. Seagle's
    8.67
    3 votes
    46
    Will Eisner

    Will Eisner

    • Fictional Characters Created: Uncle Sam
    William Erwin "Will" Eisner (March 6, 1917 – January 3, 2005) was an American comic writer, artist and entrepreneur. He is considered one of the most important contributors to the development of the medium and is known for the cartooning studio he founded; for his highly influential series The Spirit; for his use of comics as an instructional medium; for his leading role in establishing the graphic novel as a form of literature with his book A Contract with God and Other Tenement Stories. The comics community paid tribute to Eisner by creating the Will Eisner Comic Industry Awards, more commonly known as "the Eisners", to recognize achievements each year in the comics medium. Eisner enthusiastically participated in the awards ceremony, congratulating each recipient. In 1987, with Carl Barks and Jack Kirby, he was one of the three inaugural inductees of the Will Eisner Comic Book Hall of Fame. Eisner was born in Brooklyn, New York City, the son of Jewish immigrants. His parents provided a modest life for their son. His mother was from Romania and served as the more practical and realistic parent, firmly believing that her son’s artistic tendencies would never amount to any kind of
    8.67
    3 votes
    47
    Gene Roddenberry

    Gene Roddenberry

    • Fictional Characters Created: James T. Kirk
    Eugene Wesley "Gene" Roddenberry (August 19, 1921 – October 24, 1991) was an American television screenwriter, producer and futurist. He was best known for creating the American science fiction series Star Trek. Born in El Paso, Texas, Roddenberry grew up in Los Angeles, California where his father worked as a police officer. Roddenberry flew 89 combat missions in the United States Army Air Forces during World War II, and worked as a commercial pilot after the war. He later followed in his father's footsteps, joining the Los Angeles Police Department to provide for his family, but began focusing on writing scripts for television. As a freelance writer, Roddenberry wrote scripts for Highway Patrol, Have Gun–Will Travel, and other series, before creating and producing his own television program, The Lieutenant. In 1964, Roddenberry created Star Trek, which premiered in 1966 and ran for three seasons before being canceled. Syndication of Star Trek led to increasing popularity, and Roddenberry continued to create, produce, and consult on Star Trek films and the television series, Star Trek: The Next Generation until his death. Roddenberry received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame
    7.25
    4 votes
    48
    Lawrence O'Donnell Jr.

    Lawrence O'Donnell Jr.

    • Fictional Characters Created: Joey Lucas
    Lawrence Francis O'Donnell, Jr. (born November 7, 1951) is an American political analyst, journalist, actor, producer, writer, and host of The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell, a weeknight MSNBC opinion and news program. O'Donnell called himself a "practical European socialist" in a Newsmaker Interview dated November 11, 2005. He frequently filled in as host of Countdown on MSNBC before getting his own show on the cable network. Beginning 24 October 2011, The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell switched time slots with The Ed Show, with Ed Schultz taking over the 8 p.m. Eastern slot, and O'Donnell returning to the 10 p.m. Eastern slot. O'Donnell has also appeared as a political analyst on The McLaughlin Group, The Al Franken Show, and Countdown. He was an Emmy Award-winning producer and writer for the NBC series The West Wing and creator and executive producer of the NBC series Mister Sterling. He is also an occasional actor, appearing as a recurring supporting character on the HBO series Big Love, portraying an attorney. He began his career as an aide to U.S. Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan and was Staff Director for the Senate Finance Committee. O'Donnell was born in Boston on
    7.25
    4 votes
    49
    Mary Shelley

    Mary Shelley

    • Fictional Characters Created: Frankenstein
    Mary Shelley (née Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin; 30 August 1797 – 1 February 1851) was an English novelist, short story writer, dramatist, essayist, biographer, and travel writer, best known for her Gothic novel Frankenstein: or, The Modern Prometheus (1818). She also edited and promoted the works of her husband, the Romantic poet and philosopher Percy Bysshe Shelley. Her father was the political philosopher William Godwin, and her mother was the philosopher and feminist Mary Wollstonecraft. Mary Godwin's mother died when she was eleven days old; afterwards, she and her older half-sister, Fanny Imlay, were raised by her father. When Mary was four, Godwin married his neighbour, Mary Jane Clairmont. Godwin provided his daughter with a rich, if informal, education, encouraging her to adhere to his liberal political theories. In 1814, Mary Godwin began a romantic relationship with one of her father’s political followers, the married Percy Bysshe Shelley. Together with Mary's stepsister, Claire Clairmont, they left for France and travelled through Europe; upon their return to England, Mary was pregnant with Percy's child. Over the next two years, she and Percy faced ostracism, constant
    7.25
    4 votes
    50
    Steve McNiven

    Steve McNiven

    • Fictional Characters Created: Michael Pointer
    Steven "Steve" McNiven is a Canadian comic book artist. He first gained prominence on CrossGen's Meridian, before moving onto books such as Ultimate Secret, New Avengers and Civil War. McNiven first came into prominence after he took over as a penciller of CrossGen's Meridian title following the departure of Josh Middleton. Later, he gained more fame working for Marvel Comics as the penciller of Marvel Knights 4, Ultimate Secret and New Avengers. McNiven was the penciller of the Marvel mini-series Civil War working with Mark Millar. He followed this by provided the art for the Wolverine storyline "Old Man Logan" and the Icon Comics mini-series Nemesis, both with Millar.
    7.25
    4 votes
    51
    Bill Sienkiewicz

    Bill Sienkiewicz

    • Fictional Characters Created: Firefrost
    Boleslav Felix Robert "Bill" Sienkiewicz [pronounced sin-KEV-itch] (born May 3, 1958) is an Eisner Award-winning American artist and writer best known for his comic book work, primarily for Marvel Comics' The New Mutants and Elektra: Assassin. Sienkiewicz often utilizes oil painting, collage, mimeograph and other forms generally uncommon in comic books. Sienkiewicz was born May 3, 1958, in Blakely, Pennsylvania. When he was five years old, he moved with his family to Hainesville, New Jersey, where he attended elementary and secondary school. Sienkiewicz began drawing "when [he] was about four or five", and continued doing and learning about art throughout his childhood. His early comic-book influences include artist Curt Swan Superman comics, and artist Jack Kirby's Fantastic Four. Sieniewicz attended the Newark School of Fine and Industrial Arts in Newark, New Jersey. After art school, he showed a portfolio of his work to DC Comics' art director Vince Colletta, which led to his breaking into the field at age 19. The artist recalled in 1985, "They didn't have any work for me, but that didn't bother me. I just figured that if comics didn't work out I'd have done advertising or
    8.33
    3 votes
    52
    Steve Englehart

    Steve Englehart

    • Fictional Characters Created: Fasaud
    Steve Englehart (born April 22, 1947) is an American novelist. In his earlier career he was a comic book writer best known for his work at Marvel Comics and DC Comics, particularly in the 1970s. His pseudonyms have included John Harkness and Cliff Garnett. Steve Englehart majored in psychology at Wesleyan University, where he was a member of The Kappa Alpha Society, earning his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1969. Englehart's first work in comics was as an art assistant to Neal Adams on a 10-page story by writer Denny O'Neil in Warren Publishing's black-and-white horror comics magazine Vampirella #10 (March 1971). However, Englehart found his true calling as a writer. He began with a co-writing credit, with Gardner Fox, on the six-page, Englehart-drawn "Retribution" in Warren's Eerie #35 (Sept. 1971). Then, as Marvel editor Roy Thomas said in a 2007 interview, Englehart became ...a summer replacement or some such for [writer] Gary Friedrich. When Gary wanted to go away for a while, he got Steve, who was sort of a young aspiring artist when he came up to Neal [Adams]'s studio, and he ended up at Marvel as a proofreader. Then he wanted to write, and I believe he wrote a few pages of a
    8.33
    3 votes
    53
    J. R. R. Tolkien

    J. R. R. Tolkien

    • Fictional Characters Created: Arwen
    John Ronald Reuel Tolkien, CBE ( /ˈtɒlkiːn/; 3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973) was an English writer, poet, philologist, and university professor, best known as the author of the classic high fantasy works The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, and The Silmarillion. Tolkien was Rawlinson and Bosworth Professor of Anglo-Saxon at Pembroke College, Oxford, from 1925 to 1945 and Merton Professor of English Language and Literature there from 1945 to 1959. He was at one time a close friend of C. S. Lewis—they were both members of the informal literary discussion group known as the Inklings. Tolkien was appointed a Commander of the Order of the British Empire by Queen Elizabeth II on 28 March 1972. After his death, Tolkien's son Christopher published a series of works based on his father's extensive notes and unpublished manuscripts, including The Silmarillion. These, together with The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings form a connected body of tales, poems, fictional histories, invented languages, and literary essays about a fantasy world called Arda, and Middle-earth within it. Between 1951 and 1955, Tolkien applied the term legendarium to the larger part of these writings. While many other
    9.50
    2 votes
    54
    Doug Wildey

    Doug Wildey

    • Fictional Characters Created: Outlaw Kid
    Douglas S. Wildey (May 2, 1922 - October 5, 1994) was a cartoonist and comic book artist best known for his co-creation of the 1964 animated television series, Jonny Quest for Hanna-Barbera Productions. Doug Wildey was born and raised in Yonkers, New York, adjacent to New York City. He did World War II military service at Naval Air Station Barbers Point in Hawaii, where he began his art career as a cartoonist for the base newspaper. He recalled his professional start as freelancing for the magazine and comic-book company Street and Smith Publications in 1947. Because comic-book writer and artist credits were not routinely given during this era, the earliest confirmed Wildey works are two signed pieces in this publisher's Top Secret #9 (June 1949): a one-page house ad and the 10-page adventure story "Queen in Jeopardy", by an unknown writer. He went on to draw primarily Western stories for Youthful Magazines comics including Buffalo Bill, Gunsmoke (unrelated to the later television series), and Indian Fighter. He also contributed to the publishers Master Comics, Story Comics, Cross Publications and possibly others, puckishly observing that he'd worked for every publisher except EC,
    7.00
    4 votes
    55
    Kevin Maguire

    Kevin Maguire

    • Fictional Characters Created: Ice
    Kevin Maguire (born September 9, 1960) is an American comic book penciller, known for his work on series such as Justice League, Batman Confidential, Captain America and X-Men. In 1987, Maguire was the artist on the relaunch of Justice League written by Keith Giffen and J. M. DeMatteis. The two writers and Maguire reunited in 2003 for the Formerly Known as the Justice League miniseries and its 2005 sequel, "I Can't Believe It's Not the Justice League" published in JLA Classified. Maguire's collaborations with Giffen and DeMatteis also include Defenders and Metal Men back-ups in the latest volume of Doom Patrol. Maguire has frequently collaborated writer Fabian Nicieza on series such as Adventures of Captain America, X-Men, and Batman Confidential. In 2007, he was the subject of Modern Masters #10 from TwoMorrows Publishing. Maguire and George Pérez are alternating as artist of a revival of the Worlds' Finest series, which is written by Paul Levitz.
    7.00
    4 votes
    56
    Scott Adams

    Scott Adams

    • Fictional Characters Created: Dilbert
    Scott Raymond Adams (born June 8, 1957) is the American creator of the Dilbert comic strip and the author of several nonfiction works of satire, commentary, business, and general speculation. His Dilbert series came to national prominence through the downsizing period in 1990s America and was then distributed worldwide. A former worker in various roles at big businesses, he became a full-time cartoonist in 1995. Adams writes in a satirical, often sarcastic way about the social and mental landscape of white-collar workers in modern corporations and other large enterprises. Scott Adams was born in Windham, New York in 1957. He grew up a big fan of the Peanuts comics, and started drawing his own comics at the age of six. He also became a fan of Mad magazine, and began spending long hours practicing his drawing talent, winning a competition at the age of eleven. In 1968, he was rejected for an arts school and instead focused on a career in law. Adams graduated valedictorian at Windham-Ashland-Jewett Central School in 1975, with a class size of 39. He remained in the area and received a Bachelor of Arts degree in economics from Hartwick College in 1979. In his senior year, a vehicle
    7.00
    4 votes
    57
    Terry Pratchett

    Terry Pratchett

    • Fictional Characters Created: Gaspode
    Sir Terence David John "Terry" Pratchett, OBE (born 28 April 1948) is an English novelist, known for his frequently comical work in the fantasy genre. He is best known for his popular and long-running Discworld series of comic fantasy novels. Pratchett's first novel, The Carpet People, was published in 1971, and since his first Discworld novel (The Colour of Magic) was published in 1983, he has written two books a year on average. His latest Discworld book, Snuff is the third fastest selling novel since records began in the United Kingdom selling 55,000 copies in the first three days. Pratchett was the UK's best-selling author of the 1990s, and as of August 2010 had sold over 65 million books worldwide in thirty-seven languages. He is currently the second most-read writer in the UK, and seventh most-read non-US author in the US. Pratchett was appointed Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) "for services to literature" in 1998. In addition, he was knighted in the 2009 New Year Honours. In 2001 he won the Carnegie Medal for his young adult novel The Amazing Maurice and his Educated Rodents. In December 2007, Pratchett publicly announced that he was suffering from
    7.00
    4 votes
    58
    Arthur C. Clarke

    Arthur C. Clarke

    • Fictional Characters Created: HAL 9000
    Sir Arthur Charles Clarke, CBE, FRAS, Sri Lankabhimanya, (16 December 1917 – 19 March 2008) was a British science fiction author, inventor, and futurist, famous for his short stories and novels, among them 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), and as a host and commentator in the British television series Mysterious World. For many years, Robert A. Heinlein, Isaac Asimov, and Clarke were known as the "Big Three" of science fiction. Clarke served in the Royal Air Force as a radar instructor and technician from 1941 to 1946. In 1945, he proposed a satellite communication system—an idea that, in 1963, won him the Franklin Institute Stuart Ballantine Gold Medal. He was the chairman of the British Interplanetary Society from 1947–1950 and again in 1953. In 1956, Clarke emigrated to Sri Lanka, largely to pursue his interest in scuba diving. That year, he discovered the underwater ruins of the ancient Koneswaram temple in Trincomalee. He lived in Sri Lanka until his death. He was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in 1998, and was awarded Sri Lanka's highest civil honour, Sri Lankabhimanya, in 2005. Clarke was born in Minehead, Somerset, England. As a boy, he grew up on a farm enjoying stargazing and
    6.00
    5 votes
    59
    Gavin Polone

    Gavin Polone

    • Fictional Characters Created: Paris Geller
    Gavin Polone is an American film and television producer. He began producing films in the late 1990s and television in the 2000s. He was nominated for seven Primetime Emmy Awards, of which six were for "Outstanding Comedy Series" for Larry David's Curb Your Enthusiasm. Polone graduated from University of California, Berkeley in three years. He got a realtor's license and applied to work for the Central Intelligence Agency. In 1985, he began work as an assistant at International Creative Management. He eventually became a literary agent at ICM. In 1989, ICM suspected that Polone planned to defect and fired him, though Polone says ICM was wrong about its suspicions. He joined Bauer-Benedek Agency, and the agency eventually merged with Leading Artists Agency to form United Talent Agency. Polone eventually became a partner at UTA. He was disappointed in how the agency was run and threatened to leave. In April 1996, UTA fired Polone and alleged that he sexually harassed a female agent. Polone hired Peter Ostroff to sue UTA in a breach of contract lawsuit, and before the lawsuit was filed, UTA gave Polone a $6 million severance package and made a public admission that "'there were
    6.00
    5 votes
    60
    Charles M. Schulz

    Charles M. Schulz

    • Fictional Characters Created: Charlie Brown
    Charles Monroe Schulz (November 26, 1922 – February 12, 2000), nicknamed Sparky, was an American cartoonist, whose comic strip Peanuts proved one of the most popular and influential in the history of the medium and is still widely reprinted on a daily basis. Born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, Schulz grew up in Saint Paul. He was the only child of Carl Schulz, who was born in Germany, and Dena Halverson, who was Norwegian. His uncle called him "Sparky" after the horse Spark Plug in Billy DeBeck's comic strip, Barney Google. Schulz loved drawing and sometimes drew his family dog, Spike, who ate unusual things, such as pins and tacks. Schulz drew a picture of Spike and sent it to Ripley's Believe It or Not!; his drawing appeared in Robert Ripley's syndicated panel, captioned, "A hunting dog that eats pins, tacks and razor blades is owned by C. F. Schulz, St. Paul, Minn." and "Drawn by 'Sparky'" (C.F. was his father, Carl Fred Schulz.) Schulz attended St. Paul's Richard Gordon Elementary School, where he skipped two half-grades. He became a shy, timid teenager, perhaps as a result of being the youngest in his class at Central High School. One episode in his high school life was the
    8.00
    3 votes
    61
    Greg Berlanti

    Greg Berlanti

    • Fictional Characters Created: Delia Brown
    Greg Berlanti (born May 24, 1972) is an American television writer, producer and director. He is the creator of cult television series Everwood and co-creator of Jack & Bobby and No Ordinary Family. He is also an executive producer of the long awaited superhero television series Arrow and writer of Green Lantern . Berlanti was born in Rye, New York. His parents are Barbara Moller Berlanti and Eugene Berlanti. Greg has one sister, Dina and is the uncle of two nieces. He described his early life in an August 2004 interview with Entertainment Weekly: "We were Italians in a town of WASPs" and his family was not "doing as well as 90% of the community." After each of his shows is his Berlanti Television logo which features a family with their backs to the audience and a quote which says "Greg, move your head!" which is actually what his father Gene used to yell at him when he was blocking the television screen. Berlanti is gay. Berlanti studied writing at Northwestern University and participated in many activities including Delta Tau Delta fraternity. He was a writer and producer on Dawson's Creek and its short-lived spin-off Young Americans. He is best known as being the creator,
    8.00
    3 votes
    62
    Jim Davis

    Jim Davis

    • Fictional Characters Created: Garfield
    James Robert "Jim" Davis (born July 28, 1945) is an American cartoonist, best known as the creator of the comic strip Garfield. He has also worked on other strips: Tumbleweeds, Gnorm Gnat, U.S. Acres (aka Orson's Farm) and a strip about Mr. Potato Head. Davis has written (or in some cases co-written) all of the Emmy Award-winning or nominated Garfield TV specials and was one of the producers behind the Garfield & Friends TV show which aired on CBS from 1988 to 1995. Davis is the writer and executive producer of a trilogy of C.G.-direct-to-video feature films about Garfield, as well as one of the executive producers and the creator for the new CGI-animated TV series The Garfield Show. He continues to work on the strip. Born in Marion, Indiana, Davis grew up on a small farm in Fairmount, Indiana, with his father James William Davis, mother Anna Catherine (Carter) Davis, brother Dave and 25 cats. Davis's childhood on a farm parallels the life of Garfield's owner, Jon Arbuckle, who was also raised on a farm with his parents and a brother, Doc Boy. Jon is a cartoonist, who also celebrates his birthday on July 28. Davis attended Ball State University. While attending Ball State, he
    8.00
    3 votes
    63
    Mike Wieringo

    Mike Wieringo

    • Fictional Characters Created: Spider-Boy
    Michael Lance "Mike" Wieringo (June 24, 1963 – August 12, 2007), who sometimes signed his work under the name 'Ringo, was an American comic book artist best known for his work on DC Comics' The Flash and Marvel Comics' Fantastic Four. Wieringo gained prominence working with writer Mark Waid on DC Comics' super-speedster series The Flash vol. 2, penciling all but two issues from #80–92 (Early Sept. 1993 – July 1994), plus #0 (Oct. 1994); he additionally penciled covers through #100, #118–124, and 128–129, and for Flash 80-Page Giant #2 (April 1999). Wieringo co-created, with Waid, the young speedster Bart Allen, a.k.a. Impulse, in The Flash vol. 2, #91 (cameo) and #92 (first full appearance). Wieringo followed this with a short run on Robin, another DC title, with writer Chuck Dixon, while concurrently penciling Marvel Comics' Rogue #1–4 (Jan.–April 1995), a miniseries starring that X-Men superheroine. During this period, he also penciled occasional Marvel covers and small miscellaneous jobs for that company. Other work around this time included, for the publisher Malibu Comics, penciling the cover and co-penciling (with Rob Haynes) the lead story of Firearm #0 (Nov. 1993) and
    8.00
    3 votes
    64
    Robert Penn Warren

    Robert Penn Warren

    • Fictional Characters Created: Willie Stark
    Robert Penn Warren (April 24, 1905 – September 15, 1989) was an American poet, novelist, and literary critic and was one of the founders of New Criticism. He was also a charter member of the Fellowship of Southern Writers. He founded the influential literary journal The Southern Review with Cleanth Brooks in 1935. He received the 1947 Pulitzer Prize for the Novel for his novel All the King's Men (1946) and the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1958 and 1979. He is the only person to have won Pulitzer Prizes for both fiction and poetry. Warren was born in Guthrie, Kentucky, which is very near the Tennessee-Kentucky border, to Robert Warren and Anna Penn. Warren's mother's family had roots in Virginia, having given their name to the community of Penn's Store in Patrick County, Virginia. Robert Penn Warren graduated from Clarksville High School in Clarksville, Tennessee, Vanderbilt University in 1925 and the University of California, Berkeley in 1926. Warren later attended Yale University and obtained his B. Litt. as a Rhodes Scholar from New College, Oxford, in England in 1930. He also received a Guggenheim Fellowship to study in Italy during the rule of Benito Mussolini. That same year
    8.00
    3 votes
    65
    Ron Wilson

    Ron Wilson

    • Fictional Characters Created: Auntie Freeze
    Ron Wilson (born February 16) is an American comic book artist known for his work on titles starring the Marvel Comics character The Thing, including the titles Marvel Two-in-One and The Thing. Wilson spent eleven years, from 1975 to 1986, chronicling The Thing's adventures through different comic titles. Wilson began work as an illustrator for Marvel in the early 1970s, producing both cover illustrations and interior artwork. He was the regular artist on Marvel Two-In-One from 1975–1978, and again from 1980–1983; while additionally filling-in on titles such as Black Goliath, Power Man, The Hulk! and Captain Britain. In the 1980s, after the cancellation of Marvel Two-in-One, Wilson teamed with writer John Byrne on The Thing (1983–1986). In 1983 he plotted and drew "Super Boxers" (Marvel Graphic Novel #8). He drew the entire run of Marvel's Masters of the Universe (1986–1988), and Wolfpack limited series (1988–1989). Wilson's work also appeared in The Avengers, Captain America, Deadly Hands of Kung Fu, Iron Man, and What If. In 1990, Wilson illustrated an issue of Urth 4 with Continuity Comics, and then returned to Marvel to do WCW World Championship Wrestling in 1992-1993. His work
    8.00
    3 votes
    66
    Dick Ayers

    Dick Ayers

    • Fictional Characters Created: Plantman
    Richard "Dick" Ayers (born April 28, 1924) is an American comic book artist and cartoonist best known for his work as one of Jack Kirby's inkers during the late-1950s and 1960s period known as the Silver Age of Comics, including on some of the earliest issues of Marvel Comics' The Fantastic Four, and as the signature penciler of Marvel's World War II comic Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos. Ayers was inducted into the Will Eisner Comic Book Hall of Fame in 2007. Dick Ayers was born April 28, 1924 in Ossining, New York, the son of John Bache Ayers and Gladys Minnerly Ayers. He was in the 13th generation, he said, of the Ayers family that had settled in Newbury, Massachusetts in 1635. He published his first comic strip, Radio Ray, in the military newspaper Radio Post in 1942 while serving in the Army Air Corps during World War II. Afterward, Ayers broke into comics with unpublished work done for Western Publishing's Dell Comics imprint. "I approached them," Ayers said in a 1996 interview. "I had a story written and drawn. They wanted to wrap a book around it.... I got into it, but Dell decided to scrap the project. ... It was an adventure thing, boy and girl; the boy wanted to be a
    6.75
    4 votes
    67
    Hideo Kojima

    Hideo Kojima

    • Fictional Characters Created: Solid Snake
    Hideo Kojima (小島 秀夫, Kojima Hideo, August 24, 1963) Is a Japanese game director originally employed at Konami. He is the director of Kojima Productions and was promoted to Vice President of Konami Digital Entertainment in early 2011. His previous positions include being vice president of Konami Computer Entertainment Japan. He is the creator and director of a number of successful video games, including the Metal Gear series of stealth games and the adventure games Snatcher and Policenauts, and he also produced series such as Zone of the Enders and Boktai. Kojima is consistently named by fans and industry experts alike as being one of the most influential and innovative video game directors and writers in the industry. Born in Tokyo, Japan in 1963, Kojima moved to western Japan at the age of three. Kojima has said that early on in his life he often had to deal with death. When he was little the Kojima family moved to a small city called Shirasaki. Just as quickly, his family soon moved to Kawanishi, Hyōgo in the Kansai region. Kojima has noted that growing up he was a latchkey kid, often having to look after himself when he came home from school. Staying at home by himself in
    6.75
    4 votes
    68
    Jack Miller

    Jack Miller

    • Fictional Characters Created: Prince Ra-Man
    Jack Richard Miller (June 6, 1916 – August 29, 1994) was a Republican United States Senator from Iowa who served two terms from 1961 to 1973, and then a federal appellate judge. Miller was born in Chicago, Illinois. He first moved to Sioux City, Iowa in 1932 as a teen. He attended The Oratory School in England, then received a bachelor's degree from Creighton University in Omaha in 1938 and a master's degree from the Catholic University of America in Washington D.C. in 1939. In World War II, Miller served with the United States Army Air Corps from 1942 to 1946, attaining the rank of lieutenant colonel. During this time his military service included the China-Burma-India Theater, the faculty at the Army Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, and duty at Air Force Headquarters in Washington, D.C. After the war, Miller received his law degree from Columbia Law School in 1946, and did postgraduate study at University of Iowa College of Law later that year. He served between 1947 and 1948 as an attorney with the Office of Chief Counsel of the U.S. Internal Revenue Service. After one year as an assistant professor of law at Notre Dame Law School, he then returned
    9.00
    2 votes
    69
    Mike Deodato

    Mike Deodato

    • Fictional Characters Created: Aruna
    Mike Deodato (born 23 May 1963 in Campina Grande, Paraíba, Brazil), sometimes credited as Mike Deodato Jr., is the professional pseudonym of Brazilian comic book artist Deodato Taumaturgo Borges Filho. One of Deodato's first works was a 1993 photo-realistic comic book adaptation of the television series Beauty and the Beast published by Innovation Publishing. Deodato became famous in the North American comic book industry for his work with writer William Messner-Loebs on Wonder Woman. After his Wonder Woman project he had a short stint as the penciller of The Mighty Thor, where he worked with writer Warren Ellis, and later drew Glory for Rob Liefeld's Extreme Studios at Image Comics and Maximum Press. While his style in the mid-90s was highly reminiscent of Jim Lee, he has recently changed to a more simplified, photo-realistic and sometimes moody style. His first work with this new artistic identity was The Incredible Hulk, written by Bruce Jones. Since then, he has worked on the Doctor Strange spin-off Witches and became the regular penciller of The Amazing Spider-Man and The New Avengers. Deodato then took over as regular penciller for the Marvel title Thunderbolts with issue
    9.00
    2 votes
    70
    Domino's Pizza

    Domino's Pizza

    • Fictional Characters Created: MacKenzieHeartsu
    Domino's, Inc. is an international pizza delivery corporation headquartered in Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States. Founded in 1960, Domino's is the second-largest pizza chain in the United States (after Pizza Hut) and has more than 10,000 corporate and franchised stores in 70 countries and all 50 U.S. states. Domino's Pizza was sold to Bain Capital in 1998 and went public in 2004. The menu features both vegetarian and meat pizzas, chicken wings and boneless chicken, sandwiches, pasta, stuffed cheesy breads and a variety of dessert items, including cinnamon sticks and chocolate lava cakes and a variety of soft drinks, including Coca-Cola, Fanta, and Sprite. In 1960, Tom Monaghan and his brother, James, purchased DomiNick's, a small pizza store in Ypsilanti, Michigan, near Eastern Michigan University. The deal was secured by a US$75 down payment and the brothers borrowed $500 to pay for the store. Eight months later, James traded his half of the business to Tom for a used Volkswagen Beetle. As sole owner of the company, Monaghan renamed the business Domino's Pizza, Inc. in 1965. In 1967, the first Domino's Pizza franchise store opened in Ypsilanti. The company logo was originally
    7.67
    3 votes
    71
    Larry Hama

    Larry Hama

    • Fictional Characters Created: Colleen Wing
    Larry Hama (born June 7, 1949) is an American comic book writer, artist, actor and musician who has worked in the fields of entertainment and publishing since the 1960s. During the 1970s, he was seen in minor roles on the TV shows M*A*S*H and Saturday Night Live, and appeared on Broadway in two roles in the original 1976 production of Stephen Sondheim's Pacific Overtures. He is best known to American comic book readers as a writer and editor for Marvel Comics, where he wrote the licensed comic book series G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero, based on the Hasbro toyline. He has also written for the series Wolverine, Nth Man: the Ultimate Ninja, and Elektra. He created the character Bucky O'Hare, which was developed into a comic book, a toy line and television cartoon. Larry Hama was born June 7, 1949. As a child, Hama studied Kodokan Judo and later studied Kyūdō (Japanese archery) and Iaido (Japanese martial art swordsmanship). Planning to become a painter, Hama attended Manhattan's High School of Art and Design, where one instructor was former EC Comics artist Bernard Krigstein. He was in the same graduating class as Frank Brunner and Ralph Reese. Hama sold his first comics work to the
    7.67
    3 votes
    72
    Alan Moore

    Alan Moore

    • Fictional Characters Created: Tao
    Alan Oswald Moore (born 18 November 1953) is an English writer primarily known for his work in comic books, a medium where he has produced a number of critically acclaimed and popular series, including Watchmen, V for Vendetta, and From Hell. Frequently described as the best graphic novel writer in history, he has also been described as "one of the most important British writers of the last fifty years". He has occasionally used such pseudonyms as Curt Vile, Jill de Ray, and Translucia Baboon. Moore started out writing for British underground and alternative fanzines in the late 1970s before achieving success publishing comic strips in such magazines as 2000 AD and Warrior. He was subsequently picked up by the American DC Comics, and as "the first comics writer living in Britain to do prominent work in America", he worked on big name characters such as Batman (Batman: The Killing Joke) and Superman (Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?), substantially developed the character Swamp Thing, and penned original titles such as Watchmen. During that decade, Moore helped to bring about greater social respectability for the medium in the United States and United Kingdom, and has
    10.00
    1 votes
    73
    Beau Smith

    Beau Smith

    • Fictional Characters Created: Frank Cobb
    Beau Smith (born December 17, 1954 in Huntington, West Virginia) is an American comic book writer and columnist, best known for his work for DC Comics, Image Comics, IDW Publishing and as vice president of marketing for Eclipse Comics. A lifelong resident of West Virginia, Smith is a graduate of Marshall University in journalism. Smith got his start in the comics field as a letterhack, having written over 400 letters to various comics, and actually was solicited to send letters based on early preview copies. Smith's first professional comics writing job was with Pacific Comics, but the company went out of business prior to publishing the story. Beau Smith's first published work was for Eclipse Comics in 1985, a series of one- to two-page backup features in the Scout comic (created by fellow West Virginia native Timothy Truman). This was followed by a collaboration titled "The Dogs of Danger" with Flint Henry in the title The Swords of Texas. The next feature for Eclipse was a character called Beau LaDuke, the character bearing a striking resemblance to Beau Smith himself. The Beau LaDuke character had a backup feature in Scout: War Shaman #13-#16. Smith's next work was a
    10.00
    1 votes
    74
    Dan Mishkin

    Dan Mishkin

    • Fictional Characters Created: Kid Devil
    Dan Mishkin (born March 3, 1953) is a comic book writer, and co-creator (with Gary Cohn) of the DC Comics characters Amethyst, Princess of Gemworld and Blue Devil. Dan Mishkin and longtime friend Gary Cohn entered the comics industry together following a correspondence with Jack C. Harris, an editor at DC Comics. Their first work for the company was the three-page short story "On the Day of His Return" published in Time Warp #3 (February–March 1980) and drawn by Steve Ditko. They wrote several stories for various mystery titles as well as the "OMAC" backup in Warlord. In 1983, Mishkin, Cohn and artist Ernie Colón created Amethyst, Princess of Gemworld. The following year, the writing team and Paris Cullins introduced Blue Devil. DC gave both series a promotional push by featuring them in free, 16-page insert previews. Among other work, Mishkin had a run on Wonder Woman from 1982 through 1985 with artists Gene Colan and Don Heck. Mishkin and Colan reintroduced the character Circe to the rogues gallery of Wonder Woman's adversaries. In 2001, he worked with artist Tom Mandrake on the short lived series Creeps and in 2006 on the children's book The Forest King: Woodlark's Shadow.
    10.00
    1 votes
    75
    David Finch

    David Finch

    • Fictional Characters Created: The Profile
    David Finch is a Canadian-born comic book artist known for his work on Top Cow Productions' Cyberforce, as well as numerous subsequent books for Marvel Comics and DC Comics, such as New Avengers, Moon Knight, Ultimatum and Brightest Day. He has also provided album cover art for the band Disturbed, and done concept art for films such as Watchmen. David Finch started his career with a lengthy stint on Top Cow Productions' Cyberforce, after series creator and studio founder Marc Silvestri ceased his run as writer/artist on that book. Finch went on to co-create Ascension with Matt "Batt" Banning. He would later work on the first three issues of Aphrodite IX with David Wohl. In 2003, Finch returned to comics for a year-long arc on Ultimate X-Men with writer Brian Michael Bendis. Following that stint, the duo moved on to Avengers, where they destroyed Marvel's premiere superhero team only to relaunch it as The New Avengers featuring a radically different cast. Finch has also worked on the revamped Moon Knight series together with novelist Charlie Huston. After leaving the series, he illustrated Fallen Son: The Death of Captain America #4, featuring Spider-Man. This was followed by the
    10.00
    1 votes
    76
    Geoff Johns

    Geoff Johns

    • Fictional Characters Created: Isamot Kol
    Geoff Johns (born 1973) is an American comic book writer, best known for his work for DC Comics, where he has been Chief Creative Officer since February 2010, in particular for characters such as Green Lantern, The Flash and Superman. He is also a television writer, who has written episodes of Smallville, and a comic book retailer who co-owns Earth-2 Comics in Northridge, California with Carr D'Angelo and Jud Meyers. Johns shares a writing studio, The Empath Magic Tree House, with writers Jeph Loeb and Allan Heinberg. Johns was born in Detroit, Michigan, son of Barbara and Fred Johns of Clarkston, and grew up in the suburbs of Grosse Pointe and Clarkston. He is of half Lebanese ancestry. As a child, Johns and his brother first discovered comics through an old box of comics they found in their grandmother's attic, which included copies of Flash, Superman, Green Lantern, Batman from the 1960s and 1970s. Johns eventually began to patronize a comics shop in Traverse City, recalling that the first new comics he bought were Crisis on Infinite Earth #3 or 4 and Flash #348 or 349, as the latter was his favorite character. As Johns continued collecting comics, he gravitated toward DC Comics
    10.00
    1 votes
    77
    Humberto Ramos

    Humberto Ramos

    • Fictional Characters Created: Wulff
    Humberto Ramos (born 27 November 1970) is a Mexican comic book penciller, best known for his work on American comic books such as Impulse, The Spectacular Spider-Man, The Amazing Spider-Man and his creator-owned series Crimson. Humberto Ramos began his career in 1993 at Milestone Media. He was later hired by DC Comics as the regular penciller for their Flash spin-off Impulse, which launched in March 1995. Written by Mark Waid, the superhero/teen comedy series focused on young speedster Bart Allen, the grandson of the second Flash, Barry Allen, and his struggles with growing up in an alienated Alabama suburb. In 1998, Ramos co-founded the imprint Cliffhanger with comic book artists Joe Madureira and J. Scott Campbell. They created the imprint, housed by Jim Lee's Image Comics division Wildstorm, to publish their creator-owned comic books outside the mainstream superhero genre. Both Campbell and Madureira had already built large fanbases with their previous work on Gen¹³ and Uncanny X-Men respectively, and were two of the most popular comic book artists at the time. Ramos, on the other hand, was not as popular and his inclusion on the imprint was perceived as second choice, after
    10.00
    1 votes
    78
    James Robinson

    James Robinson

    • Fictional Characters Created: Rodney Skinner
    James Dale Robinson is a British writer of comic books and screenplays who is also known for his interest in vintage collectibles and memorabilia. He is known for reviving the Justice Society of America. James Robinson has been writing for over two decades, with an early comics work, "Grendel: The Devil's Whisper", appearing in the 1989 series of British anthology A1. The story for which he has arguably been most renowned is the DC Comics series Starman, where he took the aging Golden Age character of the same name and revitalized both the character and all those who had used the title over the decades, weaving them into an interconnected whole. In 1997, Robinson's work on the title garnered him an Eisner Award for "Best Serialized Story". He is also famous for his comic The Golden Age, which, despite being an Elseworlds story, still established much of the backstory he would later use in Starman. He has also written the Batman book Legends of the Dark Knight, and served as a consultant and co-writer in the first year of JSA and its subsequent spin-off Hawkman. Also at DC, he did a miniseries involving the company's original Vigilante character as well as producing the Sandman
    10.00
    1 votes
    79
    John Romita, Jr.

    John Romita, Jr.

    • Fictional Characters Created: Adversary
    John S. Romita, Jr. (born August 17, 1956) is an American comic book artist best known for his extensive work for Marvel Comics from the 1970s to the 2000s. He is often referred to as JRJR (the abbreviation of John Romita, Jr.) John Romita, Jr. is the son of comic-book artist John Romita, Sr., one of the signature Spider-Man artists since the 1960s. Romita, Jr. began his career at Marvel UK, doing sketches for covers of reprints as a favor thanks to his respected father. His American debut was with a six page story entitled "Chaos at the Coffee Bean!" in The Amazing Spider-Man Annual #11 (1977). Romita's early popularity began with his run on Iron Man with writer David Michelinie and artist Bob Layton which began in 1978. In the early 1980s, he had his first regular run on the Amazing Spider-Man series and also was the artist for the launch of the Dazzler series. Working with writer Roger Stern on Amazing Spider-Man, he co created the character Hobgoblin. From 1983 to 1986 he had a run on the popular Uncanny X-Men with Dan Green and author Chris Claremont. He would return for a second run on Uncanny X-Men in 1993. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, Romita enjoyed an extended stint
    10.00
    1 votes
    80
    Norm Breyfogle

    Norm Breyfogle

    • Fictional Characters Created: Jeremiah Arkham
    Norman Keith "Norm" Breyfogle (b. February 27, 1960) is an American comic book artist, fine artist, illustrator, and writer. He was involved with the character of Batman consistently from 1987-1995. Breyfogle has worked on many different characters for most comic book publishers at one time or another. He co-created the character of Prime for Malibu Comics, and created and owns the copyright and trademark for the character Metaphysique. When Breyfogle was 12 years old, he began taking private lessons from commercial artist Andrew Benson. Around this time, he also won his first award at a town and country art show. The Daily Mining Gazette, a newspaper in Houghton, Michigan, profiled him in 1976 as "Norm Breyfogle: Near Master Cartoonist at 16." During his time in high school, he co-plotted, wrote, and illustrated a comic book titled Tech-Team for Michigan Technological University. After high school, Breyfogle attended Northern Michigan University, studying painting and illustration. During his time in college, Breyfogle worked as an illustrator for a local magazine and also for a graphics company. In 1980, he illustrated a book titled Bunyan: Lore’s Loggin’ Hero, published by Book
    10.00
    1 votes
    81
    Ron Gilbert

    Ron Gilbert

    • Fictional Characters Created: Elaine Marley
    Ron Gilbert (born January 1, 1964) is an American computer game designer, programmer, and producer, best known for his work on several classic LucasArts adventure games, including Maniac Mansion and the first two Monkey Island games. Gilbert was also co-founder of Humongous Entertainment and its sister company Cavedog Entertainment. His games are generally focused on interactive storytelling. Additionally, Ron founded Hulabee Entertainment with Shelley Day after leaving Humongous Entertainment. He was Creative Director at Vancouver-based Hothead Games development studio. He is currently working at Double Fine Productions, with former LucasArts writer/programmer/designer Tim Schafer. Ron Gilbert was born in La Grande, Oregon, United States, as the son of David E. Gilbert, a physics professor and former president of Eastern Oregon University (then Eastern Oregon State College). He became interested in games when he was 13 years old thanks to a Texas Instruments TI-59 programmable calculator his father used to bring home. That calculator included a simple game in which the player had to guess the location of a battleship by entering the coordinates and the calculator would answer if
    10.00
    1 votes
    82
    Sean Phillips

    Sean Phillips

    • Fictional Characters Created: Devlin Waugh
    Sean Phillips (born 27 January 1965) is a British comic book artist, known for his work on DC Comics' Sleeper, WildC.A.T.s, Batman and Hellblazer. Phillips began his career in British comics working with John Smith on New Statesmen and Straitgate, as well as Pat Mills on Third World War both at Crisis. He was part of the British Invasion, getting work on Hellblazer before returning to the UK. There he most notably Devlin Waugh for the Judge Dredd Megazine but also provided the art on a number of series for 2000 AD including Judge Dredd. He returned to the American comic book industry in 2000 when he inked Scene of the Crime written by Ed Brubaker, a writer he would collaborate with a number of times over the following years. He moved on to Wildstorm for a long run on WildC.A.T.s with Joe Casey before teaming up Brubaker on Sleeper. Phillips went over to Marvel Comics in 2005 where he joined Brubaker on Criminal at the Marvel imprint Icon and he also became the main artist on the first two installments of the Marvel Zombies series with Robert Kirkman. Recent work includes Incognito, another series with Brubaker at Icon and a US reprint of 7 Psychopaths at Boom! Studios. Phillips has
    10.00
    1 votes
    83
    Stephen Merchant

    Stephen Merchant

    • Fictional Characters Created: David Brent
    Stephen James Merchant (born 24 November 1974) is an English writer, director, radio presenter, comedian, and actor. He is best known for his collaborations with Ricky Gervais, as the co-writer and co-director of the popular British sitcom The Office, as the co-writer, co-director and a co-star of Extras, and as the co-host of The Ricky Gervais Show in its radio, podcast, audiobook and television-show forms. The Ricky Gervais Show in radio form has won a bronze Sony Award. Merchant appeared in the BBC TV series Life's Too Short in which he co-wrote and co-directs. He also voiced the character Wheatley in the popular 2011 video game Portal 2, co-developed the Sky1 travel series An Idiot Abroad, and performs as a stand-up comedian. He has won three BAFTA Awards, four British Comedy Awards, and an Emmy Award. Merchant was born in Bristol, England, the son of Elaine (née Hibbs), a nursery nurse, and Ronald John Merchant, an insurance representative. He attended Hanham High School. As he has described in Xfm London shows and podcasts, Merchant was a very shy child, tending to focus more on school work as opposed to sport. His school yearbook predicted that he would enjoy
    10.00
    1 votes
    84
    Bill Watterson

    Bill Watterson

    • Fictional Characters Created: Spaceman Spiff
    William "Bill" Boyd Watterson II (born July 5, 1958) is an American cartoonist and the author of the comic strip Calvin and Hobbes, which was syndicated from 1985 to 1995. Watterson stopped drawing Calvin and Hobbes at the end of 1995 with a short statement to newspaper editors and his readers that he felt he had achieved all he could in the medium. Watterson is known for his views on licensing and comic syndication, as well as for his reclusive nature. Watterson was born in Washington, D.C., where his father, James G. Watterson (born 1932), worked as a patent examiner while going to George Washington University Law School before becoming a patent attorney in 1960. In 1964, when Watterson was six years old, the family moved to Chagrin Falls, Ohio, where his mother, Kathryn Watterson, became a city council member. James Watterson was elected as a council member in 1997, holding that position for 12 years before retiring on August 31, 2009 to pursue artistic "projects and goals". Watterson, who drew his first cartoon at age eight, spent much time in childhood alone, drawing and cartooning. This continued through his school years, and he drew cartoons for his high school newspaper and
    6.50
    4 votes
    85
    Fred Perry

    Fred Perry

    • Fictional Characters Created: Brittany Diggers
    Frederick John Perry (18 May 1909 – 2 February 1995) was a championship-winning English tennis and table tennis player who won 10 Majors including eight Grand Slams and two Pro Slams. Perry won three consecutive Wimbledon Championships from 1934 to 1936 and was World No. 1 four years in a row. Perry is the last British player to win the men's Wimbledon championship, in 1936, and was the last British player to win a Men's singles Grand Slam title until Andy Murray won the US Open in 2012. Perry was the first player to win all four Grand Slam singles titles (though not all in the same year) and completed this "Career Grand Slam" at the age of 26, remaining the only British player ever to achieve this. Although Perry began his tennis career aged 18, he was also a Table Tennis World Champion in 1929. In 1933, Perry helped lead the Great Britain team to victory over France in the Davis Cup; the team's first success since 1912, followed by wins over the United States in 1934, 1935, and a fourth consecutive title with victory over Australia in 1936. Perry was acclaimed across the tennis world, but was not universally admired in his homeland, and was widely ostracised by the tennis
    5.60
    5 votes
    86
    John Paul Leon

    John Paul Leon

    • Fictional Characters Created: Tattoo
    John Paul Leon (born April 26, 1972 in New York City) is an American comic book artist, known for his work on the Milestone Comics series Static, and the Marvel Comics limited series Earth X. Leon first began working professionally at the age of 16, with a series of black and white illustrations for TSR's Dragon and Dungeon magazines. While majored in illustration at New York's School of Visual Arts, studying under artists as Will Eisner, Walter Simonson, and Jack Potter. Leon began his comic book career with a mini-series for Dark Horse Comics, RoboCop: Prime Suspect, and followed with the DC Comics/Milestone series Static. Leon received his Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from SVA in 1994, after which he worked on series such as Superman, Batman, and X-Men. Some of his other notable works include Logan: Path of the Warlord, The Further Adventures of Cyclops and Phoenix and Challengers of the Unknown. Leon has contributed artwork for the Superman Returns style guide, as well as a pair of Superman children's books for Meredith Books. He was the artist for The Winter Men, a miniseries for Wildstorm/DC Comics.
    5.60
    5 votes
    87
    Greg Daniels

    Greg Daniels

    • Fictional Characters Created: Michael Scott
    Gregory Martin "Greg" Daniels (born June 13, 1963) is an American television comedy writer, producer, and director. He is known for his work on several television series, including Saturday Night Live, The Simpsons, King of the Hill and The Office. All four shows were named among Time's James Poniewozik's All Time 100 TV Shows. Daniels attended Harvard University and he became friends with Conan O'Brien. Their first writing credit was for Not Necessarily the News, before they were fired due to budget cuts. He eventually became a writer for two long-running series: Saturday Night Live and The Simpsons. He joined the writing staff of The Simpsons during the fifth season, and he wrote several classic episodes including "Lisa's Wedding," "Bart Sells His Soul" and "22 Short Films About Springfield." He left the series in order to co-create another long-running animated series, King of the Hill, with Mike Judge. The series ran for thirteen years before it was cancelled in 2009. During the series run, he worked on several other series, including The Office and Parks and Recreation. The two shows have received critical acclaim. As of 2012, he is currently working on both of those shows and
    8.50
    2 votes
    88
    Stanisław Lem

    Stanisław Lem

    • Fictional Characters Created: Kris Kelvin
    Stanisław Lem (Polish pronunciation: [staˈɲiswaf ˈlɛm] ( listen); 12 September 1921 – 27 March 2006) was a Polish writer of science fiction, philosophy and satire. His books have been translated into 41 languages and have sold over 27 million copies. He is perhaps best known as the author of the 1961 novel Solaris, which has been made into a feature film three times. In 1976 Theodore Sturgeon said that Lem was the most widely read science fiction writer in the world. In 1996, Lem was the recipient of the prestigious Polish national award, the Order of the White Eagle. His works explore philosophical themes; speculation on technology, the nature of intelligence, the impossibility of mutual communication and understanding, despair about human limitations and mankind's place in the universe. They are sometimes presented as fiction, but others are in the form of essays or philosophical books. Translations of his works are difficult due to passages with elaborate word formation, alien or robotic poetry, and puns. Multiple translated versions of his works exist. Lem was born in 1921 in Lwów, Poland (now Ukraine). He was the son of Sabina Woller and Samuel Lem, a wealthy laryngologist and
    8.50
    2 votes
    89
    Albert Uderzo

    Albert Uderzo

    • Fictional Characters Created: Asterix
    Albert Uderzo (French pronunciation: [albeʁ udeʁzo]; born 25 April 1927) is a French comic book artist, and scriptwriter. He is best known for his work on the Astérix series, but also drew other comics such as Oumpah-pah, also in collaboration with René Goscinny. Uderzo was born Alberto Aleandro Uderzo in Fismes (Marne, France), to parents, Silvio and Iria, who had recently immigrated from Italy. His name comes from the Italian village called Oderzo (formerly called Uderzo), where his family tree can be traced. His childhood ambitions were to become an aircraft mechanic, despite his talents in art at an early age. Uderzo obtained French citizenship in 1934, and during World War II, the teenaged Uderzo left Paris and spent a year in Brittany, where he worked on a farm and helped with his father's furniture business. He loved Brittany, both for its scenery and its people. Many years later, when the time came to choose a location for Asterix's village, Goscinny left the decision entirely to Uderzo, only stipulating that it should be near the sea in case the characters needed to travel by boat. Uderzo had no hesitation in choosing Brittany. Uderzo began a successful career as an artist
    7.33
    3 votes
    90
    Brian De Palma

    Brian De Palma

    • Fictional Characters Created: Tony Montana
    Brian Russell De Palma (born September 11, 1940) is an American film director and writer. In a career spanning over 40 years, he is probably best known for his suspense and crime thriller films, including such box office successes as the horror film Carrie, Dressed to Kill, Scarface, The Untouchables, and Mission: Impossible. Throughout the 1970s and early 1980s, De Palma worked repeatedly with actors Jennifer Salt, Amy Irving, Nancy Allen (his wife from 1979 to 1983), Gary Sinise, John Lithgow, William Finley, Charles Durning, Gerrit Graham, cinematographers Stephen H. Burum and Vilmos Zsigmond (see List of noted film director and cinematographer collaborations), set designer Jack Fisk, and composers Bernard Herrmann, John Williams and Pino Donaggio. De Palma is credited with fostering the careers of or outright discovering Robert De Niro, Jill Clayburgh, John C. Reilly, John Leguizamo, Andy Garcia and Margot Kidder. De Palma, whose background is Italian Roman Catholic, was born in Newark, New Jersey, the son of Vivienne (née Muti) and Anthony Federico De Palma, an orthopedic surgeon. He was raised in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and New Hampshire in various Protestant and Quaker
    7.33
    3 votes
    91
    Bruce Timm

    Bruce Timm

    • Fictional Characters Created: Harley Quinn
    Bruce Walter Timm (born on February 8, 1961) is an American character designer, animator and producer. He is also a writer and artist working in comics, and is known for his contributions building the modern DC Comics animated franchise, the DC animated universe. Timm's early career in animation was varied; he started at Filmation, working on the layout of Blackstar, Flash Gordon, He-Man and the Masters of the Universe and its spin-off She-Ra: Princess of Power, and The Lone Ranger (Timm also did background work on G.I. Joe). He also worked for numerous other employers, including Ralph Bakshi, Don Bluth Productions, and attempted to find work at Marvel Comics and DC Comics, but without luck. In 1989, Timm joined Warner Bros. At Warner, Timm worked on Tiny Toon Adventures. However, Timm is best known for his subsequent work on the animated series based on various DC Comics superheroes, popularly referred to as the "DCAU" (DC animated universe). Along with his Tiny Toons partner Eric Radomski, Timm co-created and produced Batman: The Animated Series, which premiered on September 5, 1992, and went on to co-create and produce Superman: The Animated Series (premiered in September 1996),
    7.33
    3 votes
    92
    Daniel Way

    Daniel Way

    • Fictional Characters Created: Whiteface
    Daniel Way (born December 27, 1974) is an American comic book writer. Way received the Xeric Foundation's Xeric Grant in 2000 for his first publication, Violent Lifestyle #1. Through Violent Lifestyle, Way was introduced to Marvel Comics editor Axel Alonso, who hired Way for a Deathlok mini-series that was cancelled prior to publication. Way's first published work for Marvel was the "Heartbreaker" storyline in Spider-Man's Tangled Web #16 & 17. This was followed by Gun Theory, a mini-series with artist Jon Proctor under the revived Epic Comics imprint. The imprint proved to be short-lived, and Gun Theory was cancelled after only two issues. Way continued to work for Marvel; his subsequent work for the publisher includes Agent X #12, Bullseye: Greatest Hits, Ghost Rider, the "Prelude to Planet Hulk" storyline in The Incredible Hulk, Sabretooth: Open Season, Supreme Power: Nighthawk, Venom, What If...? Featuring Wolverine: Enemy of the State, Wolverine, and Wolverine: Origins. Deadpool appeared briefly in the Wolverine: Origins story and then Way, with artist Paco Medina, launched Deadpool (vol. 2) in September 2008, with Carlo Barberi filling in on the first issue after the Secret
    7.33
    3 votes
    93
    Shigeru Miyamoto

    Shigeru Miyamoto

    • Fictional Characters Created: Luigi
    Shigeru Miyamoto (宮本 茂, Miyamoto Shigeru) (born November 16, 1952) is a Japanese video game designer and producer. He is best known as the creator of some of the most successful video game franchises of all time, including Mario, Donkey Kong, The Legend of Zelda, Star Fox, F-Zero, Pikmin, and the Wii series. Miyamoto was born and raised in Kyoto Prefecture; the natural surroundings of Kyoto inspired much of Miyamoto's later work. He currently manages the Nintendo Entertainment Analysis and Development branch, which handles many of Nintendo's top-selling titles. Miyamoto's games have been seen on every Nintendo video game console, with his earliest work appearing on arcade machines. His games have received critical praise from many reviewers, and he has been the recipient of various awards. He has a wife, Yasuko, and two children. Miyamoto was born in the Japanese town of Sonobe, Kyoto on November 16, 1952. Miyamoto's later work was greatly influenced by his childhood experiences in the town. From an early age, he began to explore the forest around his home. On one of these expeditions, Miyamoto came upon a cave, and, after days of hesitation, went inside. Miyamoto's expeditions
    7.33
    3 votes
    94
    Tom DeFalco

    Tom DeFalco

    • Fictional Characters Created: Earth Sentry
    Tom DeFalco (born June 26, 1950) is an American comics writer and editor, well known for his association with Marvel Comics and in particular for his work with Spider-Man. While in college, DeFalco "wrote for a few local newspapers, a weekly comic strip and did a few short stories", and after graduation "got in touch with the various comic book companies", which led to him beginning his comics career as an editorial assistant with Archie Comics in summer 1972. During his tenure with Archie Comics, he "initiated and developed the Archie Comics Digest Series, which is still being produced today and remains the company's most profitable publishing series". Learning fast, DeFalco was soon writing for the flagship title Archie as well as for other titles including Scooby-Doo and Josie and the Pussycats. He later joined Marvel Comics, with whom he would spend the next twenty years of his career. DeFalco briefly wrote for DC Comics in the late 1970s. He scripted several Jimmy Olsen and Lois Lane stories for the Superman Family title; the final issue of Starfire (Oct.-Nov. 1977); and a Cain story in House of Mystery #258 (May-June 1978). DeFalco then moved to Marvel, where he wrote two
    7.33
    3 votes
    95
    Arthur Ranson

    Arthur Ranson

    • Fictional Characters Created: Holly
    Arthur James Ranson (born 1939) is an English comic book illustrator, known for his work on Look-in,Anderson: Psi Division, Button Man. His work on Cassandra Anderson has been called "photo-realistic". Born in 1939, Ranson's childhood and formative years included access to the influences of art and artists in a mixture of British and American comics, including "[The] Beano, Knockout, [The] Dandy, Film Fun, Wizard, Hotspur..., The Eagle with Frank Hampson setting new standards. Wayne Boring's Superman, C.C. Beck's Captain Marvel," and others (including, "[l]ater, John Buscema's Silver Surfer and his Conan, Jack Kirby's Thor"). He says that Hampson in particular was an early influence, but that Ranson attended the South West Essex Technical College and School of Art in Walthamstow, Essex, where he studied painting and printmaking. Trained initially as an "apprentice stamp and banknote designer" in the 1960s, learning "to translate photographs into watercolour... [i]n stamp size." A "rare ability at the time," he would later use this skill as a "selling point" when pursuing a career "as an illustrator in advertising and publishing." After a period of time as a "[l]ettering artist for
    6.25
    4 votes
    96
    Gail Simone

    Gail Simone

    • Fictional Characters Created: Mary Zero
    Gail Simone is an American writer of comic books. Best known for penning DC's Birds of Prey, her other notable works include Secret Six, Welcome to Tranquility, The All-New Atom, and Deadpool. In 2007, she took over Wonder Woman. In 2011, she became the writer for Batgirl as well as co-writer for The Fury of Firestorm. A former hairdresser who had studied theater in college, Simone first came to fan attention with her Web site Women in Refrigerators, listing many instances in which female comic book characters were the victims of violent attacks because of their gender (rape, miscarriage, murder) or whose attacks were used as a plot device for a male character. The site brought her into contact with many people working in the comics industry. Her column You'll All Be Sorry! appeared weekly on Comic Book Resources. Topics ranged from short, satirical summaries of comic books ("Condensed Comic Classics") to fan fiction parodies. Simone worked for Bongo Comics, scripting many of their comics based on The Simpsons. Her contributions include stories for Simpsons Comics, an annual Treehouse of Horror special, and regular scripts for Bart Simpson Comics. Simone also penned many Sunday
    6.25
    4 votes
    97
    Jerry Seinfeld

    Jerry Seinfeld

    • Fictional Characters Created: Jerry Seinfeld
    Jerome Allen "Jerry" Seinfeld (born April 29, 1954) is an American stand-up comedian, actor, writer, and television and film producer, best known for playing a semi-fictional version of himself in the sitcom Seinfeld (1989–1998), which he co-created and co-wrote with Larry David, and, in the show's final two seasons, co-executive-produced. In his first major foray back into the media since the finale of Seinfeld, he co-wrote and co-produced the film Bee Movie, also voicing the lead role of Barry B. Benson. In February 2010, Seinfeld premiered a reality TV series called The Marriage Ref on NBC. Seinfeld directed Colin Quinn in the Broadway show Long Story Short at the Helen Hayes Theater in New York which ran until January 8, 2011. Seinfeld is known for specializing in observational humor, often focusing on personal relationships and uncomfortable social obligations. Comedy Central ranked Jerry Seinfeld as one of the twelve greatest stand-up comedians of all time in its four-part special The 100 Greatest Standups Of All Time. Seinfeld was born in the borough of Brooklyn in New York City. His father, Kalmen Seinfeld (1918–1985), was of Austrian Jewish background and was a sign maker;
    6.25
    4 votes
    98
    Justiniano

    Justiniano

    • Fictional Characters Created: Doctor Fate
    Justiniano (born Josue Rivera) is an American comic book artist. His recent work includes the Doctor Fate feature in the 8-issue Countdown spin-off Countdown to Mystery mini-series (with the late writer Steve Gerber) from DC Comics. His past work includes Evil Ernie, Chastity and The Omen for Chaos! Comics, and The Titans, The Flash, Beast Boy, The Human Race, Day of Vengeance, The Creeper, and 52 for DC. He has worked with writers Brian Pulido, Geoff Johns, Ben Raab, Bill Willingham, and Steve Niles. Justiniano has done artwork on such DC titles as 'The Human Race', 'Beast Boy', 'Day of Vengeance'. He worked on 'Chastity' and 'The Omen' at Chaos Comics, as well as some issues of 'Incredible Hulk' at Marvel. He lives and works in Connecticut. Comics work (interior pencil art) includes: On May 10, 2011, Justiniano was arrested on charges of first-degree possession of child pornography, in connection with a July 2010 incident in which he allegedly gave a thumb drive containing child pornography to an employee of a funeral home by mistake.
    6.25
    4 votes
    99
    Dan Abnett

    Dan Abnett

    • Fictional Characters Created: Resurrection Man
    Dan Abnett (born 12 October 1965) is a British comic book writer and novelist. He is a frequent collaborator with fellow writer Andy Lanning, and is known for his work on books for both Marvel Comics, and their UK imprint, Marvel UK, since the 1990s, including 2000 AD. He has also contributed to DC Comics titles, and his Warhammer Fantasy and Warhammer 40,000 novels and graphic novels for Games Workshop's Black Library now run to several dozen titles and have sold over 1,150,000 copies as of May 2008. In 2009 he released his first original fiction novels through Angry Robot books. Abnett graduated from St Edmund Hall, Oxford in 1984. As one of the more prolific 2000 AD writers, Abnett was responsible for the creation of one of the comic's better known, and longest-running, strips of the last decade, Sinister Dexter. Other original stories include Black Light, Badlands, Atavar, Downlode Tales, Sancho Panzer, Roadkill and Wardog, based on the game of the same name. Abnett has also contributed to some of the comic's major ongoing series, including Judge Dredd, Durham Red and Rogue Trooper. His work for Marvel includes runs on Death's Head 2, Battletide, Knights of Pendragon (all of
    7.00
    3 votes
    100
    Gary Frank

    Gary Frank

    • Fictional Characters Created: Redstone
    Gary Frank (born 1969) is a British comic book artist, notable for pencilling on Midnight Nation and Supreme Power, both written by J. Michael Straczynski. He has also worked with author Peter David on The Incredible Hulk and Supergirl. He had a creator-owned series, Kin, which he wrote himself, published by Top Cow in 2000. Writer Geoff Johns, who has collaborated with Frank, has opined that Frank's rendition of Superman is the best of his generation, and that the only other artist in the same league with Frank in this regard is Curt Swan. Gary Frank began his professional career in 1991, illustrating covers and interior short stories for publications like Doctor Who Magazine and Toxic!. This led to a stint at Marvel UK in 1992, as regular series' artist on Motormouth & Killpower. It was on that series that he began a long-running collaboration with inker Cam Smith, who would continue to ink Frank's work for many years. In 1992, Frank was recruited by Marvel Comics to illustrate covers for The Incredible Hulk, beginning with issue #400. Shortly thereafter, he was hired as the series' ongoing artist (replacing Jan Duursema) beginning with issue #403 in 1993 and ending with #425 in
    7.00
    3 votes
    101
    Guillermo del Toro

    Guillermo del Toro

    • Fictional Characters Created: Eli Damaskinos
    Guillermo del Toro (Spanish pronunciation: [ɡiˈʝeɾmo ðel ˈtoɾo]; born October 9, 1964) is a Mexican director, producer, screenwriter, novelist and designer. He is mostly known for his films Hellboy and Pan's Labyrinth. He is a frequent collaborator of Federico Luppi, Ron Perlman and Doug Jones. His films draw heavily on sources as diverse as weird fiction, fantasy and war. Del Toro was born in Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico. He was raised in a strict Catholic household. Del Toro studied at the Centro de Investigación y Estudios Cinematográficos, in Guadalajara. He first got involved in filmmaking when he was eight years old and studied special effects and make-up with special effects artist Dick Smith. Del Toro participated in the cult series La Hora Marcada with other renowned Mexican filmmakers such as Emmanuel Lubezki and Alfonso Cuarón. He spent ten years as a special effects make-up designer and formed his own company, Necropia. He also co-founded the Guadalajara International Film Festival. Later on in his directing career, he formed his own production company, the Tequila Gang. In 1997, at the age of 34, Guillermo was given a $30 million budget from Miramax Films to shoot his
    7.00
    3 votes
    102
    J. G. Jones

    J. G. Jones

    • Fictional Characters Created: Noh-Varr
    J.G. Jones is an American comic book artist, known for his work on books such as Wanted and Final Crisis. Jones hails from Walker, Louisiana and attended Louisiana State University and the University of New York at Albany where he received his Masters Degree in Fine Arts. Jones is best known for his work as cover artist on various comic book series, including a stint on Brian K. Vaughan's Y: The Last Man (Vertigo Comics), and, for DC Comics, the six-issue limited series Villains United written by Gail Simone, as well as all 52 covers for the maxi-series 52. Jones' interior art credits include: Wonder Woman: The Hiketeia (pencils only) written by Greg Rucka, Mark Millar's Wanted (pencils and inks) published by Top Cow and Grant Morrison's Marvel Boy published by Marvel. Jones was intended to be the sole artist on the Grant Morrison DC event book Final Crisis. However, due to delays, Jones was assisted by artists Carlos Pacheco, Marco Rudy & Doug Mahnke for issues #4–6, and replaced for issue 7 by Mahnke. Jones noted that "Any problems completing the series are my own. I love Doug Mahnke’s art, and he would have probably been a better choice to draw this series in the first
    7.00
    3 votes
    103
    Tony Isabella

    Tony Isabella

    • Fictional Characters Created: Black Lightning
    Tony Isabella (born December 22, 1951) is an American comic book writer, editor, artist and critic, known as the creator and writer of Marvel Comics' Black Goliath, DC Comics' first major African American superhero, Black Lightning, and as a columnist and critic for the Comics Buyer's Guide. Before he joined Marvel Comics, Isabella had many letters published in the company's comic book letter columns. He began his career at Marvel as an editorial assistant in 1972. With Marvel's establishment of Marvel UK in 1972, Isabella was assigned the task of overseeing the reprints used in Marvel UK's nascent comics line. He also served for a time as an editor for Curtis Magazines, Marvel's black-and-white magazine line. As a writer, Isabella scripted Ghost Rider; "It, the Living Colossus" in Astonishing Tales; Luke Cage in Hero for Hire and Power Man; Tigra in Marvel Chillers; The Champions; and Captain America. During his mid-1970s run on Ghost Rider, Isabella wrote a story arc in which Johnny Blaze became a Christian, and in doing so, freed himself of the curse. In May 2007, Isabella said, "I’d written a story wherein, couched in mildly subtle terms, Blaze accepted Jesus as his savior and
    7.00
    3 votes
    104
    J. M. Barrie

    J. M. Barrie

    • Fictional Characters Created: Peter Pan
    Sir James Matthew Barrie, 1st Baronet, OM (9 May 1860 – 19 June 1937) was a Scottish author and dramatist, best remembered today as the creator of Peter Pan. The child of a family of small-town weavers, he was educated in Scotland. He moved to London, where he developed a career as a novelist and playwright. There he met the Llewelyn Davies boys who inspired him in writing about a baby boy who has magical adventures in Kensington Gardens (included in The Little White Bird), then to write Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up, a "fairy play" about this ageless boy and an ordinary girl named Wendy who have adventures in the fantasy setting of Neverland. This play quickly overshadowed his previous work and although he continued to write successfully, it became his best-known work, credited with popularising the name Wendy, which was very uncommon previously. Barrie unofficially adopted the Davies boys following the deaths of their parents. Before his death, he gave the rights to the Peter Pan works to Great Ormond Street Hospital, which continues to benefit from them. Barrie was born in Kirriemuir, Angus, to a conservative Calvinist family. His father David Barrie was a modestly
    6.00
    4 votes
    105
    Nicola Scott

    Nicola Scott

    • Fictional Characters Created: Spy Smasher
    Nicola Scott is a comic book artist from Sydney, Australia whose notable works include Birds of Prey and Secret Six. After a brief acting career, Scott decided in 2001 to become a comic book artist. Her first comics work were painted covers for a series titled The Watch published in Australia by Phosphorescent Comics. In 2002, she traveled to the San Diego Comic-Con International to begin making contacts in the U.S. comics industry. In 2003, she obtained work from Top Cow Comics which in turn led to her being hired by DC Comics. Her first work in the U.S. market appeared in Star Wars: Empire #26 (October 2004) published by Dark Horse Comics. In December 2005, Wizard magazine featured Scott as a "Talent to Watch". At DC, she collaborated with writer Gail Simone on Birds of Prey and Secret Six. In 2010, she drew the Wonder Woman tie-in to Blackest Night. In July 2010, Scott was announced as the artist of the Teen Titans starting with issue #88 and she drew the series until the end of its run with issue #100 (October 2011). Scott penciled Superman vol 3 issues #3, 5, and 6. In January 2012, DC announced Scott and writer James Robinson as the creative team of Earth 2, a new series
    6.00
    4 votes
    106
    Ilene Chaiken

    Ilene Chaiken

    • Fictional Characters Created: Tina Kennard
    Ilene Chaiken (born June 30, 1957) is an American television producer, director and writer. Chaiken is best known as being the co-creator, writer and executive producer of the television series The L Word. Chaiken had previously written the screenplay Barb Wire (1996), and the television films Dirty Pictures (2000), and Damaged Care (2002) before the success of The L Word raised her profile. She was also the coordinating producer for the Fresh Prince of Bel Air and the associate producer for Satisfaction in 1988. Prior to writing and producing, she worked as an agent trainee for Creative Artists Agency, and as an executive for Aaron Spelling and Quincy Jones Entertainment. Chaiken's partner is LouAnne Brickhouse and they live in the Hollywood Hills area of Laurel Canyon in Los Angeles. Chaiken is co-parent to twin daughters Tallulah and Augusta with her former partner, English architect Miggi Hood.
    8.00
    2 votes
    107
    Joe Kubert

    Joe Kubert

    • Fictional Characters Created: Byth
    Joseph Kubert (/ˈkjuːbərt/; September 18, 1926 – August 12, 2012) was an American comic book artist, art teacher and founder of The Kubert School. He is best known for his work on the DC Comics books Sgt. Rock and Hawkman. He is also known for working on his own creations, such as Tor, Son of Sinbad, and Viking Prince, and, with writer Robin Moore, the comic strip Tales of the Green Beret. Two of Kubert's sons, Andy Kubert and Adam Kubert, themselves became successful comic book artists, as have many of Kubert's former students, including Amanda Conner, Rick Veitch, Eric Shanower, Steve Lieber, and Scott Kolins. Kubert was inducted into the Harvey Awards' Jack Kirby Hall of Fame in 1997, and the Will Eisner Comic Book Hall of Fame in 1998. Kubert was born September 18, 1926 to a Jewish family in a shtetl called Yzeran (Jezierzany), in southeast Poland (now Ukraine). He was the son of Etta (née Reisenberg) and Jacob Kubert. He emigrated to Brooklyn, New York City, United States, at age two months with his parents and his two-and-a-half-year-old sister Ida. Raised in the East New York neighborhood, the son of a kosher butcher, Kubert started drawing at an early age, encouraged by his
    8.00
    2 votes
    108
    Mark Buckingham

    Mark Buckingham

    • Fictional Characters Created: Fusion
    Mark Buckingham is a British comic book artist. He is better known for his work on Marvelman and Fables. Born as Mark John Buckingham May 23, 1966 in Clevedon, United Kingdom. He initially started working professionally on strips and illustrations for a British satire magazine called The Truth in 1987 where he first worked with Neil Gaiman illustrating some of his articles. His American debut came the following year as inker on DC Comics Hellblazer, taking over as penciller from issue 18. Some of Mark's earliest (non-professional) work appeared in early issues of the Clevedon Youth CND newsletter in the early 1980s (c.1982/83) in which he saterised members of the group in a fun and amusing manner. Copies of these are now very hard to find, although there a few still known to be in exsistance. He is most famous for his work on Marvelman (Miracleman, in the USA), Hellblazer, and Fables, including a story in the original graphic novel 1001 Nights of Snowfall. His Marvel work includes inking Chris Bachalo's pencils on Generation X, Ghost Rider 2099, and penciling Paul Jenkins's run on Peter Parker: Spider-Man. For DC Comics, Buckingham has inked the two Death miniseries and was the
    8.00
    2 votes
    109
    Tim Sale

    Tim Sale

    • Fictional Characters Created: Holiday
    Tim Sale (born 1956) is an American Eisner Award-winning comic book artist. He is primarily known for his collaborations with writer Jeph Loeb. Tim Sale was born on May 1, 1956 in Ithaca, New York, but spent most of his early life in Seattle, Washington, having moved there with his family at age six. He attended the University of Washington for two years before moving to New York to attend the School of Visual Arts, as well as the comics workshop run by artist John Buscema. Before he graduated from SVA, Sale returned to Seattle. Tim began doing art for the series Myth Adventures in 1983, and was soon working on Thieves' World. The body of Sale's comics work has been with collaborator Jeph Loeb. The duo, credited in their comics as 'storytellers', produced popular work such as the "Year 1"-centered Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight Halloween Specials, Batman: The Long Halloween, Batman: Dark Victory, as well as Superman for All Seasons and Catwoman: When in Rome. At Marvel Comics, the team has produced the so-called 'color' books for starring characters such as Spider-Man, Daredevil, and Hulk. With Darwyn Cooke, Sale launched the Superman Confidential series in 2007. Tim Sale
    8.00
    2 votes
    110
    Archie Comics

    Archie Comics

    • Fictional Characters Created: Salem Saberhagen
    Archie Comics is an American comic book publisher headquartered in the Village of Mamaroneck, Town of Mamaroneck, New York, known for its many series featuring the fictional teenagers Archie Andrews, Betty Cooper, Veronica Lodge, Reggie Mantle and Jughead Jones. The characters were created by publisher/editor John L. Goldwater, written by Vic Bloom and drawn by Bob Montana. They were based in part on people met by Goldwater "in the Midwest" during his travels throughout the United States while looking for jobs and places to stay. Archie's first appearance in Pep Comics #22 on December 22, 1941, was drawn by Montana and written by Vic Bloom. With the creation of Archie, publisher Goldwater hoped to appeal to fans of the Andy Hardy movies starring Mickey Rooney. Archie Comics is also the title of the company's longest-running publication, the first issue appearing with a cover date of Winter 1942. Starting with issue #114, the title was shortened to simply Archie. Maurice Coyne, Louis Silberkleit and John L. Goldwater formed MLJ Magazines and started publishing in November 1939. The company name was derived from the initials of the partners' first names. Coyne served as MLJ's
    9.00
    1 votes
    111
    Dale Eaglesham

    Dale Eaglesham

    • Fictional Characters Created: Moon Maiden
    Dale Eaglesham is a comic book illustrator who has been working in the industry since 1986. He is best known for his work on titles like Conan, Punisher, Green Lantern, Villains United, Justice Society of America and Fantastic Four. In 2008, the Shuster Awards selected him as Outstanding Canadian Comic Book Artist of the year. Eaglesham has worked with DC Comics, Marvel, Dark Horse, and CrossGen, among others. He worked exclusively for DC Comics for several years, before returning to Marvel in early 2009. There, his high-profile work includes pencilling the Fantastic Four and Steve Rogers: Super-Soldier. He also worked on Incredible Hulk for a three-issue arc with writer Greg Pak. On February 15, 2011, Marvel announced that it was bringing back Canadian superhero team Alpha Flight, with writers Fred Van Lente and Greg Pak as the writing team, and Eaglesham on pencils. Speaking about the project, the Canadian artist said "I'm pretty excited to build a Canadian superteam into a force in the mainstream...there's a lot of depth to these characters and a lot of potential. If there's anything different in my approach at all, it'll be an authenticity to the locales because this is where I
    9.00
    1 votes
    112
    Martin Short

    Martin Short

    • Fictional Characters Created: Ed Grimley
    Martin Hayter Short, CM (born March 26, 1950) is a Canadian-American actor, comedian, writer, singer and producer. He is best known for his comedy work, particularly on the TV programs SCTV and Saturday Night Live. He starred in such comedic films as Three Amigos, Innerspace, Pure Luck, Jungle 2 Jungle, Mars Attacks!, Father of the Bride and Father of the Bride Part II and created the characters of Jiminy Glick and Ed Grimley. Short, the youngest of five children, was born in Hamilton, Ontario, the son of Olive (née Hayter), a violinist, and Charles Patrick Short, a corporate executive with Stelco, a Canadian steel company. He and his siblings were raised Catholic. He had three older brothers, David (now deceased), Michael, and Brian, and one older sister, Nora. Short's father was a Catholic from Crossmaglen, South Armagh (present-day Northern Ireland), who came to North America as a stowaway during the Irish War of Independence. Short's mother, who was the concertmaster of the Hamilton Symphony Orchestra, encouraged Martin's early creative endeavours. His eldest brother, David, was killed in a car accident in 1962, when Short was 12. His mother died of cancer when he was 17; and,
    9.00
    1 votes
    113
    P. Craig Russell

    P. Craig Russell

    • Fictional Characters Created: Dagoth
    Philip Craig Russell (b. October 30, 1951 in Wellsville, Ohio), also known as P. Craig Russell, is an American comic book writer, artist, and illustrator. His work has won multiple Harvey and Eisner Awards. Russell was the first mainstream comic book creator to come out as openly gay. Russell broke into comics in 1972, and first became well known with his 11-issue Amazing Adventures run and subsequent graphic novel featuring Killraven, hero of a future version of H. G. Wells' The War of the Worlds, collaborating with writer Don McGregor. Comics historian Peter Sanderson wrote that, "McGregor's finest artistic collaborator on the series was P. Craig Russell, whose sensitive, elaborate artwork, evocative of Art Nouveau illustration, gave the landscape of Killraven's America a nostalgic, pastoral feel, and the Martian architecture the look of futuristic castles." Withdrawing for a while from mainstream comics, Russell produced a number of experimental strips, many of which were later published in his Night Music series and in Epic Magazine. Russell's first Elric story, the Roy Thomas scripted "The Dreaming City", was published by Marvel Comics in 1982 as Marvel Graphic Novel #2,
    9.00
    1 votes
    114
    Paul Schrader

    Paul Schrader

    • Fictional Characters Created: Travis Bickle
    Paul Joseph Schrader (born July 22, 1946) is an American screenwriter, film director, and former film critic. Apart from his credentials as a director, Schrader is most known for his screenplays for Martin Scorsese’s Taxi Driver and Raging Bull. Schrader was born in Grand Rapids, Michigan, the son of Joan (née Fisher) and Charles A. Schrader, an executive. Schrader's family practiced in the Calvinist Christian Reformed Church, and his early life was based upon the religion's strict principles and parental education. He did not see a film until he was seventeen years old, and was able to sneak away from home. In an interview he stated that The Absent-Minded Professor was the first film he saw. In his own words, he was "very unimpressed" by it, while Wild in the Country, which he saw some time later, had quite some effect on him. Schrader refers his intellectual rather than emotional approach towards movies and movie making to his having no adolescent's movie memories. Schrader received his BA from Calvin College, with a minor in Theology. He then earned an MA in Film Studies from the UCLA Film School graduate program upon the recommendation of Pauline Kael. With her as his mentor,
    9.00
    1 votes
    115
    Sandy Jimenez

    Sandy Jimenez

    • Fictional Characters Created: Marley Davidson
    Sandy Jimenez (born March 8, 1968) is an American comic book artist, writer and director, most commonly associated with the New York city independent comic book scene of the 1990s, with work appearing in magazines such as Inner City Press and World War 3 Illustrated. He was born in Manhattan, but raised by a single mother in the South Bronx during all of the 1970s, the years of that borough's most intense economic privation and grinding poverty. Displaying an aptitude for visual art and creative writing from a very early age, he was awarded a scholarship to the Calhoun School in the fall of 1980. He majored in sculpture at The Cooper Union and exhibited four completed comic books in 1990 as part of his Senior exhibition in the Houghton Gallery. One of the comic books shown at the exhibition entitled the Shit House Poet would be the basis of his ongoing published work in World War 3 Illustrated for that entire decade and beyond. In 2004, the comic book story entitled "Skips" originally published in issue #31 of World War 3 Illustrated was adapted into a short that was part of the official competition at the Tribeca Film Festival. Sandy Jimenez also received the ABC/Disney New Talent
    9.00
    1 votes
    116
    François Rabelais

    François Rabelais

    François Rabelais (French: [fʁɑ̃.swa ʁa.blɛ]; c. 1494 – 9 April 1553) was a major French Renaissance writer, doctor, Renaissance humanist, monk and Greek scholar. He has historically been regarded as a writer of fantasy, satire, the grotesque, bawdy jokes and songs. His best known work is Gargantua and Pantagruel. Although the place or date of his birth is not reliably documented, and some scholars put it as early as 1483, it is probable that François Rabelais was born in November 1494 near Chinon, Indre-et-Loire, where his father worked as a lawyer. La Devinière in Seuilly, Indre-et-Loire, is the name of the estate that claims to be the writer's birthplace and houses a Rabelais museum. Rabelais was first a novice of the Franciscan order, and later a friar at Fontenay-le-Comte, where he studied Greek and Latin, as well as science, philology, and law, already becoming known and respected by the humanists of his era, including Guillaume Budé. Harassed due to the directions of his studies, Rabelais petitioned Pope Clement VII and was granted permission to leave the Franciscans and enter the Benedictine order at Maillezais, where he was more warmly received. Later he left the monastery
    6.67
    3 votes
    117
    James Cameron

    James Cameron

    • Fictional Characters Created: Kyle Reese
    James Francis Cameron (born August 16, 1954) is a Canadian film director, film producer, deep-sea explorer, screenwriter, visual artist and editor. His writing and directing work includes The Terminator (1984), Aliens (1986), The Abyss (1989), Terminator 2: Judgment Day (1991), True Lies (1994), Titanic (1997), Dark Angel (2000–02), and Avatar (2009). In the time between making Titanic and Avatar, Cameron spent several years creating many documentary films (specifically underwater documentaries) and co-developed the digital 3D Fusion Camera System. Described by a biographer as part-scientist and part-artist, Cameron has also contributed to underwater filming and remote vehicle technologies. On March 26, 2012, Cameron reached the bottom of the Mariana Trench, the deepest part of the ocean, in the Deepsea Challenger submersible. He was the first person to do this in a solo descent, and only the third person to do so ever. He has been nominated for six Academy Awards overall and won three for Titanic. In total, Cameron's directorial efforts have grossed approximately US$2 billion in North America and US$6 billion worldwide. Not adjusted for inflation, Cameron's Titanic and Avatar are
    6.67
    3 votes
    118
    Joe Sinnott

    Joe Sinnott

    • Fictional Characters Created: Crimebuster
    Joe Sinnott (born October 16, 1926) is an American comic book artist. Working primarily as an inker, Sinnott is best known for his long stint on Marvel Comics' Fantastic Four, from 1965 to 1981 (and briefly in the late 1980s), initially over the pencils of Jack Kirby. During his 60 years as a Marvel freelancer and then salaried artist working from home, Sinnott inked virtually every major title, with notable runs on The Avengers, The Defenders and Thor. Marvel impresario Stan Lee in the mid-2000s cited Sinnott as the company's most in-demand inker, saying jocularly, "[P]encilers used to hurl all sorts of dire threats at me if I didn't make certain that Joe, and only Joe, inked their pages. I knew I couldn't satisfy everyone and I had to save the very most important strips for [him]. To most pencilers, having Joe Sinnott ink their artwork was tantamount to grabbing the brass ring." Sinnott, who as of 2012 continues to ink the The Amazing Spider-Man Sunday comic strip, had his art appear on two US Postal Service commemorative stamps in 2007. Born in Saugerties, New York, Joe Sinnott was one of seven children to Edward and Catherine McGraw Sinnott; his siblings were Frank, Anne,
    6.67
    3 votes
    119
    Kevin Smith

    Kevin Smith

    • Fictional Characters Created: Mia Dearden
    Kevin Patrick Smith (born August 2, 1970) is an American screenwriter, actor, film producer, and director, as well as a popular comic book writer, author, comedian/raconteur, and internet radio personality best recognized by viewers as Silent Bob. Although primarily known for the View Askew film series, Smith also directed and produced films such as the buddy cop action comedy Cop Out, as well as the horror film Red State. His first several films were mostly set in his home state of New Jersey, and while not strictly sequential, they frequently feature crossover plot elements, character references, and a shared canon in what is known by fans as the "View Askewniverse", named after his production company View Askew Productions, which he co-founded with Scott Mosier. Smith is also the owner of Jay and Silent Bob's Secret Stash, a comic book and novelty store in Red Bank, New Jersey. He co-hosts several weekly podcasts that are recorded at various locations around the world and released on SModcast Internet Radio. Smith is well known for participating in long, humorous Q&A sessions that are often filmed for DVD release, beginning with An Evening with Kevin Smith. Kevin Smith was born
    6.67
    3 votes
    120
    Olivier Coipel

    Olivier Coipel

    • Fictional Characters Created: Shikari
    Olivier Coipel is a French comic book artist, known for his work on books such as House of M, Legion of Super-Heroes andThor. Coipel came to prominence and significant controversy as the artist of the American DC Comics book Legion of Super-Heroes during the tenure of writers Dan Abnett and Andy Lanning., beginning with the Legion Lost story arc. Despite complaints about his art style by long-time Legion of Super-Heroes fans - who felt his style was "too rough and unrefined", leading to more than one prominent critic to refer to him as "Ol' Scratchy" - Coipel continued to draw the series when it was relaunched under the new title The Legion. Coipel signed an exclusive contract with Marvel Comics in January 2005. He was named in August 2005 as one of Marvel's "Young Guns," a group of artists that that included Jim Cheung, David Finch, Trevor Hairsine, Adi Granov, and Steve McNiven, which according to Marvel Editor-in-Chief Joe Quesada, exhibited the qualities that make "a future superstar penciller." One of Coipel's first major works at Marvel was House of M, an eight issue New Avengers/X-Men crossover limited series with writer Brian Michael Bendis. Coipel was then announced as
    6.67
    3 votes
    121
    Riyoko Ikeda

    Riyoko Ikeda

    • Fictional Characters Created: Duchess de Polignac
    Riyoko Ikeda (池田 理代子, Ikeda Riyoko, born December 18, 1947 in Osaka, Japan) is a Japanese manga artist and singer. She is included in the Year 24 Group. She was one of the most popular Japanese comic artists in the 1970s, being best known for The Rose of Versailles. Ikeda has written and illustrated many shōjo manga, many of which are based on historical events, such as the French Revolution or the Russian Revolution. Her use of foreign settings and androgynous themes made The Rose of Versailles and Orpheus no Mado "enormous successes". Her most famous manga is The Rose of Versailles also known as Lady Oscar in Europe. This manga, loosely based on the French Revolution, has been made into several Takarazuka musicals and into an anime series and a live-action film. After Rose of Versailles concluded, Ikeda wrote articles for Asahi Shimbun. In the 2000s Ikeda studied at a music school and became a singer. Her voice is in the soprano range. She made a comeback to the comic industry as a scenarist in 1999. Her recent manga includes Der Ring des Nibelungen. It is a manga version of the opera written by Richard Wagner. In 2008 she received France's Ordre national de la Légion d'honneur
    6.67
    3 votes
    122
    Stephen R. Bissette

    Stephen R. Bissette

    • Fictional Characters Created: John Constantine
    Stephen R. Bissette (born March 14, 1955, in Vermont) is an American comics artist, editor, and publisher with a focus on the horror genre. He is best known for working with writer Alan Moore and inker John Totleben on the DC comic Swamp Thing in the 1980s. Bissette was born and raised in Vermont, where he still lives. Shortly after the publication of his first work, Abyss (1976), Bissette enrolled in the first class of The Kubert School. Before his first year was completed, his work was being published professionally in the pages of Sojourn, Sgt. Rock, and Heavy Metal. In 1978, Bissette was among the Kubert School's very first graduating class, along with classmates Rick Veitch, Tom Yeates, and others. His early work appeared in the pages of Heavy Metal, Epic Illustrated, Bizarre Adventures, Scholastic Magazines' Weird Worlds and Bananas (illustrating stories written by Goosebumps founder and author R. L. Stine), and he worked with Rick Veitch on the graphic novelization of Steven Spielberg's motion picture 1941 (Simon and Schuster, 1979). Bissette is best known for his multiple award-winning collaboration with writer Alan Moore and inker John Totleben on DC Comics' Saga of the
    6.67
    3 votes
    123
    William Monahan

    William Monahan

    • Fictional Characters Created: Oliver Queenan
    William J. Monahan (born November 3, 1960) is an American screenwriter and novelist. His second produced screenplay was The Departed, a film that earned him a WGA award and an Academy award for Best Adapted Screenplay. Monahan attended the University of Massachusetts Amherst, where he studied Elizabethan and Jacobean drama. He moved to New York City and contributed to the alternative weekly newspaper New York Press and the magazines Talk, Maxim, and Spy. In 1997 Monahan won a Pushcart Prize for his short story "A Relation of Various Accidents Observable in Some Animals Included in Vacuo". Monahan was an editor at Spy during the magazine's final years, where he would come in at the close of the monthly issue to rewrite articles and improve jokes. Monahan wrote a novel titled Light House: A Trifle, and Warner Bros. optioned the film rights. In 1999 Talk magazine debuted, and Monahan contributed a travelogue on Gloucester, Massachusetts, to the first issue. In 2000 Monahan's first novel, Light House: A Trifle, was finally published, and it garnered critical acclaim; The New York Times proclaimed, "Monahan's cocksure prose gallops along" and BookPage Fiction called Monahan "a worthy
    6.67
    3 votes
    124
    Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

    Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

    • Fictional Characters Created: The Little Prince
    Antoine de Saint-Exupéry (French pronunciation: [ɑ̃twan də sɛ̃tɛɡzypeʁi]), officially Antoine Marie Jean-Baptiste Roger, comte de Saint Exupéry (29 June 1900 – 31 July 1944, Mort pour la France), was a French aristocrat, writer, poet, and pioneering aviator. He became a laureate of several of France's highest literary awards and also won the U.S. National Book Award. He is best remembered for his novella The Little Prince (Le Petit Prince) and for his lyrical aviation writings, including Wind, Sand and Stars and Night Flight. Saint-Exupéry was a successful commercial pilot before World War II, working airmail routes in Europe, Africa and South America. At the outbreak of war he joined the Armée de l'Air (French Air Force), flying reconnaissance missions until France's armistice with Germany in 1940. After being demobilized from the French Air Force he voyaged to the United States to convince its government to enter the war against Nazi Germany quickly. Following a 27-month hiatus in North America, during which he wrote three of his most important works, he joined the Free French Air Force in North Africa, although he was far past the maximum age for such pilots and in declining
    5.75
    4 votes
    125
    Art Adams

    Art Adams

    • Fictional Characters Created: Jonni Future
    Arthur "Art" Adams is an American comic book artist and writer. He first broke into the American comic book industry with the 1985 Marvel Comics miniseries Longshot. His subsequent interior comics work includes a number Marvel's major books, including The Uncanny X-Men, Excalibur, X-Factor, Fantastic Four, Hulk and Ultimate X, as well books by various other publishers, such as Action Comics, Vampirella, The Rocketeer and The Authority. Adams has also illustrated books featuring characters for which he has a personal love, such as Godzilla, The Creature from the Black Lagoon and Gumby, the latter of which garnered him a 1988 Eisner Award for Best Single Issue. In 1994, Adams joined a group of creators that included Frank Miller, John Byrne and Mike Mignola to form Legend, an imprint of creator-owned comics published by Dark Horse Comics, through which Adams published Monkeyman and O'Brien, a science fiction adventure series featuring archetypal sci-fi monsters that Adams wrote and illustrated. Although the Legend imprint ceased in 1998, Monkeyman and O'Brien continued to appear in print, sometimes in crossover stories with other comics characters, such as Gen¹³/Monkeyman and O'Brien
    7.50
    2 votes
    126
    Gaston Leroux

    Gaston Leroux

    • Fictional Characters Created: Raoul, Vicomte de Chagny
    Gaston Louis Alfred Leroux (6 May 1868 – 15 April 1927) was a French journalist and author of detective fiction. In the English-speaking world, he is best known for writing the novel The Phantom of the Opera (Le Fantôme de l'Opéra, 1911), which has been made into several film and stage productions of the same name, notably the 1925 film starring Lon Chaney; and Andrew Lloyd Webber's 1986 musical. Gaston Louis Alfred Leroux was born in Paris in 1868. He went to school in Normandy and studied law in Paris, graduating in 1889. He inherited millions of francs and lived wildly until he nearly reached bankruptcy. Subsequently in 1890, he began working as a court reporter and theater critic for L'Écho de Paris. His most important journalism came when he began working as an international correspondent for the Paris newspaper Le Matin. In 1905, he was present at, and covered, the Russian Revolution. Another case he was present at involved the investigation and in-depth coverage of the former Paris Opera (presently housing the Paris Ballet). The basement contained a cell that held prisoners of the Paris Commune. He suddenly left journalism in 1907, and began writing fiction. In 1909, he and
    7.50
    2 votes
    127
    Jack Kerouac

    Jack Kerouac

    • Fictional Characters Created: Sal Paradise
    Jean-Louis "Jack" Kerouac ( /ˈkɛruːæk/ or /ˈkɛrɵæk/; March 12, 1922 – October 21, 1969) was an American novelist and poet. He is considered a literary iconoclast and, alongside William S. Burroughs and Allen Ginsberg, a pioneer of the Beat Generation. Kerouac is recognized for his spontaneous method of writing, covering topics such as Catholic spirituality, jazz, promiscuity, Buddhism, drugs, poverty, and travel. Kerouac became an underground celebrity and, with other beats, a progenitor of the hippie movement, although he remained antagonistic toward some of its politically radical elements. In 1969, at age 47, Kerouac died from internal bleeding due to long-standing abuse of alcohol. Since his death Kerouac's literary prestige has grown and several previously unseen works have been published. All of his books are in print today, among them: On the Road, Doctor Sax, The Dharma Bums, Mexico City Blues, The Subterraneans, Desolation Angels, Visions of Cody, The Sea is My Brother, and Big Sur. Jack Kerouac was born in Lowell, Massachusetts, to French-Canadian parents, Léo-Alcide Kéroack and Gabrielle-Ange Lévesque, of St-Hubert-de-Rivière-du-Loup in the province of Quebec, Canada.
    7.50
    2 votes
    128
    James Joyce

    James Joyce

    • Fictional Characters Created: Leopold Bloom
    James Augustine Aloysius Joyce (2 February 1882 – 13 January 1941) was an Irish novelist and poet, considered to be one of the most influential writers in the modernist avant-garde of the early 20th century. Joyce is best known for Ulysses (1922), a landmark work in which the episodes of Homer's Odyssey are paralleled in an array of contrasting literary styles, perhaps most prominently the stream of consciousness technique he perfected. Other major works are the short-story collection Dubliners (1914), and the novels A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (1916) and Finnegans Wake (1939). His complete oeuvre includes three books of poetry, a play, occasional journalism, and his published letters. Joyce was born to a middle class family in Dublin, where he excelled as a student at the Jesuit schools Clongowes and Belvedere, then at University College Dublin. In his early twenties he emigrated permanently to continental Europe, living in Trieste, Paris and Zurich. Though most of his adult life was spent abroad, Joyce's fictional universe does not extend beyond Dublin, and is populated largely by characters who closely resemble family members, enemies and friends from his time there;
    7.50
    2 votes
    129
    Kenny Kramer

    Kenny Kramer

    • Fictional Characters Created: Cosmo Kramer
    Kenny Kramer (born May 1943) is an American stand-up comedian and is the real-life inspiration for the character of Cosmo Kramer from the television sitcom Seinfeld. Kramer had a spotty career as a stand-up comedian, and worked as the manager for a British reggae band. Kramer sought to manage Bill Beason, a New York point karate champion, with the hopes that the karate tournament scene would develop along the same lines as wrestling had, since corporate sponsors such as Budweiser and Paul Mitchell were emerging. During the disco years, Kramer created an electronic jewelry item that sold so well that he was able to live comfortably without working. Seinfeld co-creator Larry David lived across the hall from Kenny for six years, just as the character of Jerry Seinfeld did from Cosmo Kramer in the show. The two lived in Manhattan Plaza, a federally assisted apartment complex for performing artists in Hell's Kitchen, New York City. David said that Kramer was a little bit eccentric and would be a good character to have on the show. Many of the traits of Kenny Kramer, such as the obsession with golf, fruit, hot tubs, taking things out of the fridge, and coming up with strange ideas and
    7.50
    2 votes
    130
    Mike Mignola

    Mike Mignola

    • Fictional Characters Created: Tom Manning
    Michael Joseph "Mike" Mignola ( /ˌmɪnˈjoʊlə/; born 16 September 1960) is an American comic book artist and writer who created the comic book series Hellboy for Dark Horse Comics. He has worked for animation projects such as Atlantis: The Lost Empire and the adaptation of his one shot comic book, The Amazing Screw-On Head. Mignola was born in September 16, 1960 Berkeley, California. He began his career in 1980 by illustrating spots in the Comic Reader. His first published piece was in the Comic Reader #183, a spot illustration of Red Sonja (pg. 9). His first published front cover was the Comic Reader #196; Dominic Fortune, the Spirit, and Doc Savage in November 1981. In 1982 he graduated from the California College of the Arts with a BFA in Illustration. In 1983 he worked on inking at Marvel Comics, working on Daredevil and Power Man & Iron Fist for Marvel Comics, and later worked on titles such as The Incredible Hulk, Alpha Flight and the Rocket Raccoon limited-series. With writer Jim Starlin, Mignola produced the Cosmic Odyssey miniseries in 1988. Mignola drew covers for several Batman stories, including Batman: A Death in the Family and Dark Knight, Dark City. Through the early
    7.50
    2 votes
    131
    Orson Scott Card

    Orson Scott Card

    • Fictional Characters Created: Libo
    Orson Scott Card (born August 24, 1951) is an American author, critic, public speaker, essayist, columnist, and political activist. He writes in several genres, but is primarily known for his science fiction. His novel Ender's Game (1985) and its sequel Speaker for the Dead (1986) both won Hugo and Nebula Awards, making Card the only author to win both science fiction's top U.S. prizes in consecutive years. He is also known as an advocate for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, of which he has been a lifelong practicing member, and as a political commentator on many issues, including opposition to homosexual behavior and the legalization of same-sex marriage. A film adaptation of Ender's Game is currently in development, and is set for release on 1 November 2013. Card is co-producing the film. Card is the son of Willard and Peggy Card, third of six children and the older brother of composer and arranger Arlen Card. Card was born in Richland, Washington, and grew up in Santa Clara, California as well as Mesa, Arizona and Orem, Utah. He served as a missionary for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) in Brazil and graduated from Brigham Young
    7.50
    2 votes
    132
    Simon Spurrier

    Simon Spurrier

    • Fictional Characters Created: Jack Point
    Simon Spurrier is a British comics writer, who has previously worked as a cook, a bookseller and an art director for the BBC. Getting his start in comics with the British small press, he went on to write his own series for 2000 AD, like Lobster Random, Bec & Kawl, The Simping Detective and Harry Kipling, as well as a number of stories for the flagship character Judge Dredd. In recent years he has broken into the American comic book industry, writing mainly for Marvel Comics. Simon has also written a number of novels, initially on other people's properties but in 2006 he signed a two-book contract with Hodder Headline, the first of which was 2007's Contract and the second was 2011's A Serpent Uncoiled. He writes mainly for the British comic 2000 AD but has also written comic-strips for the anthology Warhammer Monthly, as well as contributing written articles, stories and reviews to the Judge Dredd Megazine. He is the creator of Lobster Random (with Carl Critchlow), The Simping Detective (with Frazer Irving), From Grace (also with Irving), Zancudo (a belated follow-up to Ant Wars) with Cam Kennedy and Bec & Kawl (with Steve Roberts). Spurrier has done a number of work for hire books,
    7.50
    2 votes
    133
    Ricky Gervais

    Ricky Gervais

    • Fictional Characters Created: David Brent
    Ricky Dene Gervais (/dʒərˈveɪz/; born 25 June 1961) is an English comedian, actor, director, producer, musician, writer, and former radio presenter. Gervais achieved mainstream fame with his television series The Office and the subsequent series Extras, both of which he co-wrote and co-directed with Stephen Merchant. In addition to writing and directing the shows, Gervais played the lead roles of David Brent in The Office and Andy Millman in Extras. Gervais has also starred in Hollywood films, Ghost Town and The Invention of Lying. He has performed on four sell-out stand-up comedy tours, written the best-selling Flanimals book series and starred with Merchant and Karl Pilkington in the most downloaded podcast in the world as of March 2009, The Ricky Gervais Show. Gervais has won seven BAFTA Awards, five British Comedy Awards, three Golden Globe Awards, two Emmy Awards and the 2006 Rose d'Or, as well as a Screen Actors Guild Award nomination. In 2007 he was voted the 11th greatest stand-up comic on Channel 4's 100 Greatest Stand-Ups and again in the updated 2010 list as the 3rd greatest stand-up comic. In 2010 he was named on the TIME 100 list of the world's most influential
    5.50
    4 votes
    134
    Carmine Infantino

    Carmine Infantino

    • Fictional Characters Created: Dmitri Bukharin
    Carmine Infantino (born May 24, 1925, in Brooklyn, New York) is an American comic book artist and editor who was a major force in the Silver Age of Comic Books. He was inducted into the Comic Book Hall of Fame in 2000, and was cited in Comics Buyer's Guide Millennium Poll as the greatest penciller of all time. Carmine Infantino was born via midwife in his family's apartment in Brooklyn, New York City. His father, Pasquale "Patrick" Infantino, born in New York City, was originally a musician who played saxophone, clarinet, and violin, and had a band with composer Harry Warren, but in the poverty of the Great Depression he turned instead to a career as a licensed plumber. Carmine Infantino's mother, Angela Rosa DellaBadia, emigrated from Calitri, a hill town northeast of Naples, Italy. Infantino attended Public Schools 75 and 85 in Brooklyn before going on to the School of Industrial Art (later the High School of Art and Design) in Manhattan. During his freshman year of high school, Infantino began working for Harry "A" Chesler, whose studio was one of a handful of comic-book "packagers" who created complete comics for publishers looking to enter the emerging field in the 1930s-1940s
    6.33
    3 votes
    135
    Michael Avon Oeming

    Michael Avon Oeming

    • Fictional Characters Created: Stardust
    Michael Avon Oeming is an American comic book creator, both as an artist and writer. Oeming is a fan of ancient mythology, having written or drawn several projects centering on the Norse gods. He frequently collaborates with long-time friend Bryan J. L. Glass, and with Brian Michael Bendis. He is part of the M.O.B. crew of comic book creators, along with David Mack, Brian Bendis and Daniel Berman. His 1998 comic book Bulletproof Monk was made into a film of the same name. He has also worked on The Mice Templar from Image Comics which he has drawn and co-authored with Bryan J.L. Glass. and the third volume of Powers from Icon Comics with Brian Bendis. His creator-owned projects include Rapture, on which he collaborated with his wife, Taki Soma, and The Victories, both for Dark Horse Comics. As of 2010, he is employed as a staff member of Valve Software, working on Left 4 Dead, Team Fortress 2 and Portal 2 webcomics. Oeming has a son and currently resides in Seattle with his second wife, fellow writer/artist Taki Soma. Oeming's writing credits include: His art credits include: Oeming has won the Eisner Award for "Best New Series" in 2001 for Powers. Michael received the Eagle Award
    6.33
    3 votes
    136
    Mike McKone

    Mike McKone

    • Fictional Characters Created: Heather Hudson
    Michael "Mike" McKone is a British comic book artist. McKone's first published works for the major companies included DC Comics' Justice League of America and Justice League International for DC Comics and The Punisher War Zone for Marvel Comics. However, it was his work on Marvel's Exiles which brought him instant attention, and led him to work on two of DC's Teen Titans and Marvel's Fantastic Four. McKone is currently penciling Avengers Academy for Marvel Comics. Comics work (interior pencil art) includes:
    6.33
    3 votes
    137
    Ryan Murphy

    Ryan Murphy

    • Fictional Characters Created: Liz Cruz
    Ryan Murphy (born November 9, 1965) is an American film and television screenwriter, director, and producer. He is best known for creating/co-creating the television series Popular, Nip/Tuck, Glee, American Horror Story, and The New Normal. Murphy grew up in Indianapolis, Indiana, in an Irish Catholic family. He attended Catholic school from first through eighth grade, and graduated from Warren Central High School (Indianapolis). He has described his mother as a "beauty queen who left it all to stay at home and take care of her two sons." She wrote 5 books and worked in communications for over 20 years before retiring. His father worked in the newspaper industry as a circulation director before he retired after 30 years. After coming out as gay, he saw his first therapist, who found nothing wrong with him other than being "'too precocious for his own good.'" Murphy performed with a choir as a child, which would later inform his work on Glee. Murphy attended Indiana University, Bloomington. While at college, he was a staff member of the school newspaper, the Indiana Daily Student, and he was a member of the school's "Singing Hoosiers" show choir. Murphy started as a journalist
    6.33
    3 votes
    138
    André 3000

    André 3000

    André Lauren Benjamin (born May 27, 1975), better known by his stage name André 3000 (formerly known as Dré), is an American rapper, singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, record producer and actor, best known for being part of hip-hop duo OutKast alongside fellow rapper Big Boi. As an actor, Benjamin has made appearances in a number of TV series and films, including Families, The Shield, Be Cool, Revolver, Semi-Pro, and Four Brothers. In addition to music and acting, Benjamin has also been an active entrepreneur. In the spring of 2008, he launched a clothing line called Benjamin Bixby. He has also been an advocate for animal rights. He is also known for his work on the Cartoon Network animated series Class of 3000. Benjamin was born in Atlanta, Georgia, the only child of Sharon Benjamin Hodor, a single mother who sold real estate, and Lawrence Walker, a collections agent. He is of African and Native American descent. Growing up in East Point, Georgia and Buckhead, he attended Willis A. Sutton Middle School and Tri-Cities High School. In high school, Benjamin (who was then performing as "Dre") met Antwan "Big Boi" Patton. Benjamin & Patton teamed up to form Outkast. Shortly
    8.00
    1 votes
    139
    Bryan Fuller

    Bryan Fuller

    • Fictional Characters Created: Mason
    Bryan Fuller (born July 27, 1969) is an American screenwriter and television producer. As a contributing writer, Fuller's work has been featured on several shows, including Star Trek: Voyager and Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, earning twenty-two episode writing credits for the Star Trek franchise. He co-executive-produced and wrote for the first season of the NBC series Heroes. TV Guide named an episode of Heroes which Fuller wrote ("Company Man") one of the 100 greatest in television history. Fuller is himself a fan of science fiction, and in an interview said that his favorite Star Trek series were the 1960s original, followed by Deep Space Nine, The Next Generation and Voyager. DS9 is his favorite spinoff as "there were lots of new and innovative things going on during Deep Space Nine and that's why it's my favorite of the new series'. It was much more character-based". Fuller worked on the DS9 episodes "The Darkness and the Light" and "Empok Nor". Fuller has also created several shows. He created the series Dead Like Me and co-created Wonderfalls with Todd Holland. He also wrote the teleplay for the TV adaptation of Stephen King's Carrie, and created the pilot for the animated The
    8.00
    1 votes
    140
    Douglas Adams

    Douglas Adams

    • Fictional Characters Created: Arthur Dent
    Douglas Noel Adams (11 March 1952 – 11 May 2001) was an English writer, humorist and dramatist. He is best known as the author of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, which started life in 1978 as a BBC radio comedy before developing into a "trilogy" of five books that sold over 15 million copies in his lifetime, a television series, several stage plays, comics, a computer game, and in 2005 a feature film. Adams's contribution to UK radio is commemorated in The Radio Academy's Hall of Fame. Adams also wrote Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency (1987) and The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul (1988), and co-wrote The Meaning of Liff (1983), Last Chance to See (1990), and three stories for the television series Doctor Who. A posthumous collection of his work, including an unfinished novel, was published as The Salmon of Doubt in 2002. Adams became known as an advocate for environmentalism and conservation, and also as a lover of fast cars, cameras, technological innovation, and the Apple Macintosh. He was a staunch atheist, famously imagining a sentient puddle who wakes up one morning and thinks, "This is an interesting world I find myself in—an interesting hole I find myself
    8.00
    1 votes
    141
    Michael Lark

    Michael Lark

    • Fictional Characters Created: Matador
    Michael Lark is an American comics artist. Lark has provided pencils for DC Comics' Batman, Terminal City, Gotham Central and Legend of the Hawkman. His work for Marvel Comics includes The Pulse and Captain America.
    8.00
    1 votes
    142
    Norman Lear

    Norman Lear

    • Fictional Characters Created: Fred Sanford
    Norman Milton Lear (born July 27, 1922) is an American television writer and producer who produced such 1970s sitcoms as All in the Family, Sanford and Son, One Day at a Time, The Jeffersons, Good Times and Maude. As a political activist, he founded the advocacy organization People For the American Way in 1981 and has supported First Amendment rights and progressive causes. Lear was born in New Haven, Connecticut, the son of Jeanette (née Seicol) and Herman Lear, who worked in sales. He grew up in a Jewish home and had a Bar Mitzvah. Lear went to high school in Hartford, Connecticut and subsequently attended Emerson College in Boston, but dropped out in 1942 to join the United States Army Air Forces. During World War II, he served in the Mediterranean Theater as a radio operator/gunner on Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress bombers with the 772nd Bombardment Squadron, 463rd Bombardment Group (Heavy) of the Fifteenth Air Force. He flew 52 combat missions, for which he was awarded the Air Medal with four Oak Leaf Clusters. Lear was discharged from the Army in 1945. He and his fellow World War II crew members are featured in the book "Crew Umbriago" by Daniel P.Carroll (tail gunner), and also
    8.00
    1 votes
    143
    P. G. Wodehouse

    P. G. Wodehouse

    • Fictional Characters Created: Jeeves
    Sir Pelham Grenville Wodehouse, KBE ( /ˈwʊd.haʊs/; 15 October 1881 – 14 February 1975) was an English humorist, whose body of work includes novels, short stories, plays, poems, song lyrics, and numerous pieces of journalism. He enjoyed enormous popular success during a career that lasted more than seventy years and his many writings continue to be widely read. Despite the political and social upheavals that occurred during his life, much of which was spent in France and the United States, Wodehouse's main canvas remained that of a pre- and post-World War I English upper-class society, reflecting his birth, education and youthful writing career. An acknowledged master of English prose, Wodehouse has been admired both by contemporaries such as Hilaire Belloc, Evelyn Waugh and Rudyard Kipling and by recent writers such as Stephen Fry, Christopher Hitchens, Douglas Adams, J. K. Rowling, and John Le Carré. Best known today for the Jeeves and Blandings Castle novels and short stories, Wodehouse was also a playwright and lyricist who was part author and writer of 15 plays and of 250 lyrics for some 30 musical comedies, many of them produced in collaboration with Jerome Kern and Guy
    8.00
    1 votes
    144
    Rachel Pollack

    Rachel Pollack

    • Fictional Characters Created: Coagula
    Rachel Pollack (b. August 17, 1945 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American science fiction author, comic book writer, and expert on divinatory tarot. Pollack has been a great influence on the women's spirituality movement. Pollack's work 78 Degrees of Wisdom on tarot reading is commonly referenced by tarot readers. She has created her own tarot deck, Shining Woman Tarot (later Shining Tribe Tarot). She also aided in the creation of the Vertigo Tarot Deck with illustrator Dave McKean and author Neil Gaiman, and she wrote a book to accompany it. Pollack is best known for her run of issues 64-87 on the comic book Doom Patrol, on DC Comics' Vertigo imprint, which became a cult favorite under Grant Morrison. A comic fandom legend has it that Pollack was assigned to write the series after writing persistent letters to the editor. Although the letters are a matter of record, it's unknown if they were actually the cause of her employment. During her tenure Pollack dealt with such rarely addressed comic-book topics as menstruation, sexual identity, and transsexuality. Pollack's run ended two years later, with the book's cancellation. Pollack also wrote a Brother Power the Geek one-shot, and
    8.00
    1 votes
    145
    Alan Ball

    Alan Ball

    • Fictional Characters Created: David Fisher
    Alan E. Ball (born May 13, 1957) is an American writer, director, actor and producer for film, theatre and television. Ball was born in Atlanta, Georgia, to Frank and Mary Ball, an aircraft inspector and a homemaker. He attended high school in Marietta, and went on to attend the University of Georgia and Florida State University, from which he graduated in 1980 with a degree in theater arts. After college, he began work as a playwright at the General Nonsense Theater Company in Sarasota, Florida. Ball has written two films, Academy Award winner American Beauty and Towelhead. He is also the creator, writer and producer of the HBO drama series Six Feet Under and True Blood. For his work in television and film, Ball has received critical acclaim and numerous awards, including an Academy Award, an Emmy and a Golden Globe. In 2010 Ball began work on a television adaptation of the crime noir novel The Mystic Arts of Erasing All Signs of Death by Charlie Huston, to be titled All Signs of Death. In December 2010, after several months of pre-production, HBO cancelled production on All Signs of Death. Ball is gay and has been called "a strong voice for [the] LGBT community". In 2008 he made
    7.00
    2 votes
    146
    Andrew Pepoy

    Andrew Pepoy

    • Fictional Characters Created: Akhenaten
    Andrew Pepoy (born 1969) is an American comic book writer and artist. Andrew Pepoy was born on May 13, 1969 in Holland, Michigan. Pepoy began working as a professional artist while still in college at Loyola University Chicago. He has worked on a large variety of different comics, including Superman, Spider-Man, Batman, The X-Men, Scooby Doo, Sonic the Hedgehog, The Simpsons, Betty & Veronica, Birds of Prey, Godzilla, Ghost, Star Wars, G.I. Joe, and Katy Keene. In 2000, he redesigned the Little Orphan Annie newspaper strip, which he illustrated for the next year.
    7.00
    2 votes
    147
    Bud Yorkin

    Bud Yorkin

    • Fictional Characters Created: Fred Sanford
    Bud Yorkin (born February 22, 1926) is an American film and television producer, director, writer and actor. Yorkin was born Alan David Yorkin in Washington, Pennsylvania. He earned a degree in engineering from Carnegie Tech, now Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsbugh, Pennsylvania. In 1954, Yorkin became the producer of NBC's The Tony Martin Show, a 15 minute variety program which preceded the nightly news on Monday evenings. In 1956, he became the producer and director of Tennessee Ernie Ford's NBC half-hour comedy/variety program, The Ford Show. In 1958, Yorkin joined writer/producer Norman Lear to form Tandem Productions, which produced several motion pictures and television specials in the 1960s to 1971 with such major studios like United Artists and Warner Bros. Yorkin directed and produced the 1958 TV special An Evening With Fred Astaire, which won nine Emmy Awards. He later produced many of the hit sitcoms of the '70s, such as All in the Family, Maude, Good Times, and Sanford and Son. After his split with Lear, Yorkin went on to form Bud Yorkin Productions. His first sitcom after the split was the unsuccessful Sanford and Son spin-off sitcom Grady. In 1976, he formed TOY
    7.00
    2 votes
    148
    Joe Madureira

    Joe Madureira

    • Fictional Characters Created: Skin
    Joe Madureira (often called Joe Mad), is a comic book writer/artist and game developer, best known for his work on Marvel Comics' Uncanny X-Men and his creator-owned comic book Battle Chasers. Madureira's style combines Western comic book influences with aspects of Japanese manga, and has been credited for helping the latter influence the American comic book industry. Madureira attended the High School of Art and Design in Manhattan. At age 16, while still in high school, Madureira started at Marvel Comics as an intern, working under editor Danny Fingeroth. His first published work was an eight-page story for the anthology series Marvel Comics Presents, starring Northstar. He became the regular penciler on Uncanny X-Men in 1994 illustrating that book's installments of the "Age of Apocalypse" storyline. He left Uncanny X-Men in 1997 to work on his own sword and sorcery series Battle Chasers for Wildstorm Comics' creator-owned Cliffhanger imprint (before it was sold to DC Comics). Madureira produced a total of nine issues in four years (publishing two to three a year), a pace for which he was criticized. He canceled Battle Chasers #10, and placed the series on indefinite hiatus after
    7.00
    2 votes
    149
    John Carpenter

    John Carpenter

    • Fictional Characters Created: Michael Myers
    John Howard Carpenter (born January 16, 1948) is an American film director, screenwriter, producer, editor and composer. Although Carpenter has worked in numerous film genres in his career, he is most commonly associated with horror and science fiction films from the 1970s and 1980s. Carpenter was born in Carthage, New York, the son of Milton Jean (née Carter) and Howard Ralph Carpenter, a music professor. He and his family moved to Bowling Green, Kentucky in 1953. He was captivated by movies from an early age, particularly the westerns of Howard Hawks and John Ford, as well as 1950s low budget horror films, such as The Thing from Another World and high budget science fiction like Forbidden Planet and began filming horror shorts on 8 mm film even before entering high school. He attended Western Kentucky University where his father chaired the music department, then transferred to the University of Southern California's School of Cinematic Arts in 1968, but later dropped out to make his first feature. In a beginning film course at USC Cinema in 1969, Carpenter wrote and directed an 8-minute short film, Captain Voyeur. The film was rediscovered in the USC archives in 2011 and proved
    7.00
    2 votes
    150
    Kevin O'Neill

    Kevin O'Neill

    • Fictional Characters Created: Campion Bond
    Kevin O'Neill is an English comic book illustrator best known as the co-creator of Nemesis the Warlock, Marshal Law (with writer Pat Mills), and The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen (with Alan Moore). O'Neill began working for the publishing company IPC at the age of 16 as an office boy for Buster, which was a children's humour title. By 1976 he was working as a colourist on Disney comics reprints and British children's comics such as Monster Fun and Whizzer and Chips. Tired of working on children's humour titles, he heard that a new science fiction title was being put together at IPC and went to see Pat Mills and asked to be transferred to the new comic which was to be called 2000 AD. O'Neill initially provided art for pin-ups and covers, including the centre image of Tharg on the cover of the first issue of 2000AD. After a period of being nurtured by Mills, he eventually started branching out drawing short Tharg the Mighty strips, Future Shocks and various humorous short stories. However it was not until he started work on Ro-Busters (with Pat Mills as writer) in 2000AD issue 88 that O'Neill started work on his first major ongoing strip for the title. O'Neill's quirky and
    7.00
    2 votes
    151
    Mark Schwahn

    Mark Schwahn

    • Fictional Characters Created: Keith Scott
    Mark Schwahn (born June 5, 1966) is an American screenwriter, director and producer. He is best known as creator, head writer and executive producer of the WB/CW drama series One Tree Hill. Schwahn has co-written Coach Carter (2005), The Perfect Score (2004), Whatever It Takes (2000) and 35 Miles from Normal (1997). In addition, he is creator of the TV series One Tree Hill, for which he also writes and directs. He served as producer for Whatever It Takes and One Tree Hill. He also directed 35 Miles from Normal, which he filmed in his hometown of Pontiac, Illinois. He emerged as a top candidate to write a planned spinoff of Melrose Place shortly after the network and CBS Paramount Television announced it in late October 2008. Schwahn signed a two year deal with CPT in early October 2008, but it had not started until June 2009. Until then, he was under a pact with Warner Bros. Television, where he runs One Tree Hill. His agreement with Warner Bros. calls for him to continue as executive producer and showrunner on One Tree Hill returning for the ninth and final season in January 2012. The move to tap Schwahn to conceive a contemporary version of Melrose Place resembles The CW and
    7.00
    2 votes
    152
    Michael Golden

    Michael Golden

    • Fictional Characters Created: Captain Universe
    Michael Golden is an American comic book artist and writer best known for his late-1970s work on Marvel Comics' The Micronauts, as well as his co-creation of the characters Rogue and Bucky O'Hare. After starting his illustration career in commercial art, Golden broke into comics in late 1977, working on such DC Comics titles as Mister Miracle and Batman Family. In 1978, he made a splash with his work on Marvel's Micronauts. He drew a number of Marvel series throughout the 1970s and 1980s, including Doctor Strange, She-Hulk, the Howard the Duck black-and-white comics magazine, and The 'Nam. He drew covers for the licensed series G.I. Joe, ROM, and the lesser-known U.S. 1, Nomad, and The Saga of Crystar. Golden also penciled parts of the Marvel No-Prize Book . In the 2000s, he drew covers for DC Comics' Nightwing, Superman: The Man of Steel, and Vigilante. Golden's art style later inspired a number of later comics creators, including Arthur Adams. Golden's work was also appropriated by Glenn Danzig as a logo for his bands Samhain and Danzig. Golden is an elusive figure, rarely given to interviews or revelations about his background and personal life. He is currently managed by Renee
    7.00
    2 votes
    153
    Paul Dini

    Paul Dini

    • Fictional Characters Created: Harley Quinn
    Paul Dini (born August 7, 1957) is an American writer and producer who works in the television and comic book industries. He is best known as a producer and writer for several Warner Bros./DC Comics animated series, including Star Wars: Ewoks, Tiny Toon Adventures, Batman: The Animated Series, Superman: The Animated Series, The New Batman/Superman Adventures, Batman Beyond and Duck Dodgers. He also developed and scripted Krypto the Superdog and contributed scripts to Transformers, Animaniacs, Freakazoid, Justice League and Justice League Unlimited. After leaving Warner Bros. in early 2004, Dini went on to write and story edit the popular ABC adventure series Lost. He has also written a number of comic books for DC Comics, including Harley Quinn and Superman: Peace on Earth. Fall 2010 also saw the debut of Tower Prep, a new live action/drama series Dini created for Cartoon Network. It has been announced that after two decades of doing DC-related animated projects, Paul Dini will be going over to Marvel to serve as a writer and producer for Ultimate Spider-Man and Hulk and the Agents of S.M.A.S.H. Paul Dini was born in New York City. He attended the Stevenson School in Pebble Beach,
    6.00
    3 votes
    154
    Steve Skeates

    Steve Skeates

    • Fictional Characters Created: Hank Hall
    Steve Skeates (born 1943) is an American comic book creator known for his work on books such as Spectre, Hawk and Dove, T.H.U.N.D.E.R. Agents, Aquaman, and Namor the Sub-Mariner. Skeates graduated from Alfred University with a Bachelor of Arts. Skeates co-created the quirky team Hawk and Dove in Showcase #75 (June 1968), with writer/artist Steve Ditko. During the early 1970s Skeates was a prolific writer at Warren Publishing, writing 72 stories from 1971 to 1975. Ongoing features he wrote at Warren included Targos, the original Pantha, The Mummy Walks, Curse of the Werewolf, and And the Mummies Walk, a combination of the two prior mentioned series. After a period away from the comic book industry, he anonymously wrote the Generic Comic Book in 1984, which got him the job writing Spider-Ham.
    6.00
    3 votes
    155
    Martin Nodell

    Martin Nodell

    • Fictional Characters Created: Alan Scott
    Martin Nodell (November 15, 1915–December 9, 2006) was an American cartoonist and commercial artist, best known as the creator of the Golden Age superhero Green Lantern. Some of his work appeared under the pen name "Mart Dellon." Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Nodell was the son of Jewish immigrants. He attended the Art Institute of Chicago. He moved to New York City in the 1930s, where he attended Pratt Institute. Nodell began his illustrating career in 1938, working first as a freelancer. In 1940 he provided some work for Sheldon Mayer, an editor at All-American Publications, one of three companies that ultimately merged to form the present-day DC Comics. Interested in gaining more steady employment, Nodell created designs for a new character that would become the Golden Age Green Lantern (Alan Scott). The inspiration came in January 1940 at the 34th Street subway station in Manhattan. Nodell noticed a trainman waving a lantern along the darkened tracks. He coupled the imagery with elements from Richard Wagner's operatic Ring cycle as well as Chinese folklore and Greek mythology to create the hero. As Nodell himself described in 2000: I picked out the name from the train man
    5.00
    4 votes
    156
    Bob Layton

    Bob Layton

    • Fictional Characters Created: Buck McHenry
    Bob Layton is an American comic book artist, writer, and editor, who has worked for Marvel Comics, Valiant Comics, DC Comics, Future Comics, and other publishers. Bob Layton learned to read comics from the age of four, explaining that his "older sister Sue became bored with reading the same comic to me about fifty times. (It was a Showcase featuring The Challengers of the Unknown.)" After leaving high school, Layton began "playing comics dealer . . . selling them out of his apartment in Indianapolis," through which he met Roger Stern in 1973, while the latter was working for a radio station in Indianapolis. Ultimately, Layton and Stern began publishing a fanzine called CPL (Contemporary Pictorial Literature) out of Layton's apartment. Stern recalls that, "CPL started out as Bob's sale catalog. Bob was drawing the covers and including little reviews written by some of his customers. By issue #5, it turned into a small 'zine with a catalog insert, and I started writing short articles for it. I eventually became an editor of sorts." CPL rapidly became a popular fan publication, and led to the two forming an alliance with Charlton Comics to produce and publish "the now-famous Charlton
    5.67
    3 votes
    157
    Alex Raymond

    Alex Raymond

    • Fictional Characters Created: Flash Gordon
    Alexander Gillespie "Alex" Raymond (October 2, 1909 – September 6, 1956) was an American cartoonist, best known for creating Flash Gordon for King Features in 1934. The strip was subsequently adapted into many other media, from a series of movie serials (1936–1940) to a 1970s television series and a 1980 film. Raymond's father encouraged his love of drawing from an early age, leading him to become an assistant illustrator in the early 1930s on strips such as Tillie the Toiler and Tim Tyler's Luck. Towards the end of 1933, Raymond created the epic Flash Gordon science-fiction comic strip to compete with the popular Buck Rogers comic strip and, before long, Flash was the more popular strip of the two. Raymond also worked on the jungle adventure saga Jungle Jim and spy adventure Secret Agent X-9 concurrently with Flash, though his increasing workload caused him to leave Secret Agent X-9 to another artist by 1935. He left the strips in 1944 to join the Marines, saw combat in the Pacific Ocean theater in 1945 and was demobilized in 1946. Upon his return from serving during World War II, Raymond created and illustrated the much-heralded Rip Kirby, a private detective comic strip. In
    6.50
    2 votes
    158
    Dave McKean

    Dave McKean

    • Fictional Characters Created: Black Orchid
    David McKean (born 29 December 1963 in Maidenhead, Berkshire) is an English illustrator, photographer, comic book artist, graphic designer, filmmaker and musician. His work incorporates drawing, painting, photography, collage, found objects, digital art and sculpture. McKean's most recent projects are directing an original feature called Luna, and a book with the evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins. After a trip to New York in 1986 during which he failed to find work as a comics artist, McKean met writer Neil Gaiman, and the pair collaborated on a short graphic novel of disturbing childhood memories, Violent Cases, published in 1987. This was followed in 1988 by a Black Orchid miniseries (again with Gaiman) and Hellblazer covers for DC Comics. In 1989, he illustrated the Batman graphic novel, Arkham Asylum: A Serious House on Serious Earth, with writer Grant Morrison. His work during this period was often compared to that of Bill Sienkiewicz. From 1989–1996 McKean produced the covers for Gaiman's celebrated series The Sandman, all its collected editions, and many of its spin-offs. Further collaborations with Gaiman produced the graphic novels Signal to Noise in 1992 (previously
    6.50
    2 votes
    159
    Edgar Allan Poe

    Edgar Allan Poe

    • Fictional Characters Created: Annabel Lee
    Edgar Allan Poe (born Edgar Poe; January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American author, poet, editor and literary critic, considered part of the American Romantic Movement. Best known for his tales of mystery and the macabre, Poe was one of the earliest American practitioners of the short story and is considered the inventor of the detective fiction genre. He is further credited with contributing to the emerging genre of science fiction. He was the first well-known American writer to try to earn a living through writing alone, resulting in a financially difficult life and career. He was born as Edgar Poe in Boston, Massachusetts; he was orphaned young when his mother died shortly after his father abandoned the family. Poe was taken in by John and Frances Allan, of Richmond, Virginia, but they never formally adopted him. He attended the University of Virginia for one semester but left due to lack of money. After enlisting in the Army and later failing as an officer's cadet at West Point, Poe parted ways with the Allans. His publishing career began humbly, with an anonymous collection of poems, Tamerlane and Other Poems (1827), credited only to "a Bostonian". Poe switched his
    6.50
    2 votes
    160
    George R. R. Martin

    George R. R. Martin

    • Fictional Characters Created: Tyrion Lannister
    George Raymond Richard Martin (born September 20, 1948), sometimes referred to as GRRM, is an American screenwriter and author of fantasy, horror, and science fiction. He is best known for A Song of Ice and Fire, his bestselling series of epic fantasy novels that HBO adapted for their dramatic pay-cable series Game of Thrones. Martin was selected by Time magazine as one of the "2011 Time 100", a list of the "most influential people in the world". George R. R. Martin was born on September 20, 1948, in Bayonne, New Jersey, the son of a longshoreman. The family lived in a federal housing project near to the Bayonne docks. Being poor the young Martin lived in his imagination and began writing and selling monster stories for pennies to other neighborhood children, dramatic readings included. He also wrote stories about a mythical kingdom populated by his pet turtles; the turtles died frequently in their toy castle, so he finally decided they were killing off each other in "sinister plots." Martin attended Mary Jane Donohoe School and then later Marist High School. While there he became a comic book fan, developing a strong interest in the innovative superheroes being published by Marvel
    6.50
    2 votes
    161
    J. Michael Straczynski

    J. Michael Straczynski

    • Fictional Characters Created: Redstone
    Joseph Michael Straczynski (/strəˈzɪn.ski/; born July 17, 1954), known professionally as J. Michael Straczynski and informally as Joe Straczynski or JMS, is an American writer and television producer. He works in films, television series, novels, short stories, comic books, and radio dramas. He is a playwright, a former journalist, and author of The Complete Book of Scriptwriting. He was the creator and showrunner for the science fiction television series Babylon 5, and its spin-off Crusade, and of Jeremiah. Straczynski wrote 92 out of the 110 Babylon 5 episodes, notably including an unbroken 59-episode run through the third and fourth seasons, and all but one episode of the fifth season. He also wrote the four Babylon 5 TV movies produced alongside the series. From 2001 to 2007, he was the writer for the long-running Marvel comic book series The Amazing Spider-Man. In 2009, Straczynski was nominated for the BAFTA Award for his screenplay for Changeling. Straczynski is a long-time participant in Usenet and other early computer networks, interacting with fans through various online forums (including GEnie, CompuServe, and America Online) since 1984. He is credited as being the first
    6.50
    2 votes
    162
    L. Frank Baum

    L. Frank Baum

    • Fictional Characters Created: Tin Man
    Lyman Frank Baum (May 15, 1856 – May 6, 1919) was an American author of children's books, best known for writing The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. He wrote thirteen novel sequels, nine other fantasy novels, and a host of other works (55 novels in total, plus four "lost" novels, 83 short stories, over 200 poems, an unknown number of scripts, and many miscellaneous writings), and made numerous attempts to bring his works to the stage and screen. His works predicted such century-later commonplaces as television, augmented reality, laptop computers (The Master Key), wireless telephones (Tik-Tok of Oz), women in high risk, action-heavy occupations (Mary Louise in the Country), and the ubiquity of advertising on clothing (Aunt Jane's Nieces at Work). Baum was born in Chittenango, New York, in 1856, into a devout Methodist family. He had German, Scots-Irish, and English ancestry, and was the seventh of nine children born to Cynthia Ann (née Stanton) and Benjamin Ward Baum, only five of whom survived into adulthood. He was named "Lyman" after his father's brother, but always disliked this name, and preferred to go by his middle name, "Frank". His mother, Cynthia Stanton, was a direct descendant
    6.50
    2 votes
    163
    Shonda Rhimes

    Shonda Rhimes

    • Fictional Characters Created: Dr. Isobel "Izzie" Stevens
    Shonda Rhimes (born January 13, 1970) is an American screenwriter, director and producer. Rhimes is best known as the creator, head writer, and executive producer of the acclaimed medical drama television series Grey's Anatomy and its spin-off Private Practice. In May 2007, Rhimes was named one of Time magazine's 100 people who help shape the world. Rhimes was an executive producer for the medical drama series Off the Map, and developed the ABC drama series Scandal, which debuted as a mid-season replacement on April 5, 2012. Rhimes was born in Chicago, Illinois, the daughter of a university administrator and a college professor. Rhimes resided in Park Forest South, Illinois (now University Park) with two older brothers and two older sisters. Rhimes has stated that she exhibited an early affinity for storytelling and that her time spent as a candy striper while in high school sparked an interest in hospital environments. Rhimes attended Marian Catholic High School, before enrolling at Dartmouth College, where she earned her Bachelor's Degree. At Dartmouth, she divided her time between fiction and directing and performing in plays. After college, she relocated to San Francisco with
    6.50
    2 votes
    164
    Simon Scarrow

    Simon Scarrow

    • Fictional Characters Created: Quintus Lucinius Cato
    Simon Scarrow is a UK-based author, born in Nigeria and now based in Norfolk. He completed a master's degree at the University of East Anglia after working at the Inland Revenue, and then went into teaching as a lecturer, firstly at East Norfolk Sixth Form College, then at City College Norwich. He is best known for his Eagle Series of Roman Military fiction set in the territories of the Roman Empire, covering the second invasion of Britain and the subsequent prolonged campaign undertaken by the rump of the Julio-Claudian dynasty. To date there are eleven books in the series, with the 11th released recently in November 2011, Praetorian. He has also written another series, Revolution, focusing on Wellington and Napoleon, whose first title, Young Bloods, was published in 2006. The second volume, The Generals, was released on the 31 May 2007 and the third volume Fire and Sword was released in January 2009. The fourth and final novel of the series was released in Jun 2010 and is called The Fields of Death. He has now started writing a new series titled Gladiator: The fight for freedom. The Eagle Series centres around two main protagonists; Quintus Licinius Cato and Lucius Cornelius
    6.50
    2 votes
    165
    Greg Capullo

    Greg Capullo

    • Fictional Characters Created: Infinity
    Gregory “Greg” Capullo (born March 30, 1962) is an American comic book artist and penciller, best known for his work on Quasar (1991–1992), X-Force (1992–1993), Angela (1994) and Spawn (1993–1999, 2003–2004). Greg Capullo also published his own creator-owned comic, The Creech, published through Image Comics. These were two three-issue miniseries. Apart from comics, Capullo has been involved in several projects such as pencilling for the Korn album Follow the Leader and the Disturbed album, Ten Thousand Fists, and being part of the crew who worked on the animated sequences in the 2002 film The Dangerous Lives of Altar Boys. Capullo started off as an aspiring self-taught artist. He was influenced by John Buscema who Capullo has referred to as “the master of the human figure.” He began his artistic career with a job in commercial advertising but soon was noticed for his talent as an inker and penciller and began on projects involving his artwork. His first comic work was a publication called Gore Shriek, which was picked up and published by a comic book store in Albany, New York, called Fantaco Enterprises. Gore Shriek was a horror comic book specifically labeled Not Intended for
    4.75
    4 votes
    166
    F. Scott Fitzgerald

    F. Scott Fitzgerald

    • Fictional Characters Created: Jay Gatsby
    Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald (September 24, 1896 – December 21, 1940) was an American author of novels and short stories, whose works are the paradigm writings of the Jazz Age, a term he coined himself. He is widely regarded as one of the greatest American writers of the 20th century. Fitzgerald is considered a member of the "Lost Generation" of the 1920s. He finished four novels: This Side of Paradise, The Beautiful and Damned, Tender Is the Night, and his most famous, The Great Gatsby. A fifth, unfinished novel, The Love of the Last Tycoon, was published posthumously. Fitzgerald also wrote many short stories that treat themes of youth and promise along with despair and age. The Great Gatsby has been the basis for numerous films of the same name, spanning nearly 90 years; 1926, 1949, 1974, 2000, and an upcoming 2013 adaption. In 1958 his life from 1937–1940 was dramatized in Beloved Infidel. Born in 1896 in Saint Paul, Minnesota to an upper middle class Irish Catholic family, Fitzgerald was named after his famous second cousin, three times removed, Francis Scott Key, but was referred to as "Scott." He was also named after his deceased sister, Louise Scott, one of two sisters who
    7.00
    1 votes
    167
    J. K. Rowling

    J. K. Rowling

    • Fictional Characters Created: Harry Potter
    Joanne "Jo" Rowling, ( /ˈroʊlɪŋ/) OBE, FRSL (born 31 July 1965), pen name J. K. Rowling, is a British novelist, best known as the author of the Harry Potter fantasy series. The Potter books have gained worldwide attention, won multiple awards, sold more than 400 million copies to become the best-selling book series in history and been the basis for a popular series of films, in which Rowling had overall approval on the scripts as well as maintaining creative control by serving as a producer on the final instalment. Rowling conceived the idea for the series on a train trip from Manchester to London in 1990. Rowling has led a "rags to riches" life story, in which she progressed from living on social security to multi-millionaire status within five years. As of March 2011, when its latest world billionaires list was published, Forbes estimated Rowling's net worth to be US$1 billion. The 2008 Sunday Times Rich List estimated Rowling's fortune at £560 million ($798 million), ranking her as the twelfth richest woman in the United Kingdom. Forbes ranked Rowling as the forty-eighth most powerful celebrity of 2007, and Time magazine named her as a runner-up for its 2007 Person of the Year,
    7.00
    1 votes
    168
    Jeff Lindsay

    Jeff Lindsay

    • Fictional Characters Created: Dexter Morgan
    Jeff Lindsay is the pen name of American playwright and crime novelist Jeffry P. Freundlich (born July 14, 1952), best known for his novels about sociopathic vigilante Dexter Morgan. Many of his earlier published works include his wife Hilary Hemingway as a co-author. His wife is the niece of Ernest Hemingway and an author in her own right. Lindsay was born in Miami and graduated from Ransom Everglades high school in 1970, and from Middlebury College, Vermont, in 1975. The first book in the Dexter series, Darkly Dreaming Dexter (which Lindsay wanted to name "Pinocchio Bleeds" after his middle daughter suggested it but his publisher disagreed) was included on the original nomination list for the Mystery Writers of America's Edgar Awards in the Best First Novel category. However, it was dropped from the list after the group learned that Lindsay had put out several books in the 1990s under another pen name, Jeffrey P. Lindsay. Dexter aired as a 2006 TV series on Showtime with the first season based on Darkly Dreaming Dexter. The second and third seasons, aired in 2007 and 2008, respectively, have original storylines that do not follow the plots of Lindsay's books. On October 21, 2008,
    7.00
    1 votes
    169
    Joseph Gallagher

    Joseph Gallagher

    • Fictional Characters Created: Psycho-Pirate
    Joseph Gerald Gallagher (born 4 May 1964) is a British Chess Grandmaster and former British Champion, as well as a chess author. Born to Irish parents Norah and Patrick, Gallagher was the eldest child (his sisters Catherine, Noreen, Pauline and Marie, and brother Stephen also played chess). His sister Marie also played chess to an international standard at age 11. He played for many years on the European chess circuit, before marrying and moving to Neuchâtel in Switzerland, taking Swiss nationality, being awarded the title of Grandmaster, and then winning the British Chess Championship in 2001 and the Swiss Chess Championship in 1997, 1998, 2004, 2005, 2007, and 2012. He has represented his adopted country Switzerland regularly at the Chess Olympiad and at the European Team Chess Championship since 1997, his best result occurring at the 2006 Chess Olympiad, when he scored 6½/10. Gallagher is a noted author on various aspects of chess opening theory, being an expert on the King's Indian Defence as Black and the King's Gambit as White. Gallagher was one of four writers of the popular volume Nunn's Chess Openings (Everyman Chess 1999). Gallagher is also interested in poker. He has a
    7.00
    1 votes
    170
    Mike Carlin

    Mike Carlin

    • Fictional Characters Created: Auntie Freeze
    Michael Carlin (b. October 6, 1958) is a comic book writer and editor. He has worked principally for Marvel Comics and DC Comics since the 1970s. Carlin attended the High School of Art and Design in Manhattan. Mike Carlin started out in the business at DC Comics as a summer intern in 1974. He was hired by Marvel Comics as a writer and artist on Crazy Magazine, the company's black-and-white humor title. He later became an assistant editor under Mark Gruenwald, and also wrote a short run of stories in Captain America as well as the Assistant Editors Month issue of Marvel Team-Up (Aunt May and Franklin Richards vs. Galactus). Carlin moved to DC in 1986, where he became Superman group editor. From 1996-2002, he served as an executive editor at DC Comics. The Batman Adventures -- the first DC Comics spinoff of Batman: The Animated Series -- features a screwball trio of incompetent super-villains: the Mastermind (a caricature of Mike Carlin), The Perfessor (a caricature of Dennis O'Neil), and Mr. Nice (a caricature of Archie Goodwin), a super-strong but childishly-innocent super-villain. Superman: The Man of Steel #75, a pastiche of Superman's death in Superman volume 2 #75, where
    7.00
    1 votes
    171
    Paul Levitz

    Paul Levitz

    • Fictional Characters Created: Comet Queen
    Paul Levitz (born October 21, 1956) is an American comic book writer, editor and executive. The president of DC Comics from 2002–2009, he has worked for the company for over 35 years in a wide variety of roles. Along with publisher Jenette Kahn and managing editor Dick Giordano, Levitz was responsible for hiring such writers as Marv Wolfman, John Byrne and Alan Moore, artists such as George Pérez and Keith Giffen, and editor Karen Berger, who contributed to the 1980s revitalization of the company's line of comic book heroes. Levitz was born in Brooklyn, New York, to Hannah and Alfred Levitz. He attended Stuyvesant High School during which time he co-wrote and published a comic fan magazine, The Comic Reader, which according to Levitz, was the first regularly published comics industry news fanzine. The Comic Reader went on to win two Best Fanzine Comic Art Fan Awards. One of Levitz's teachers, the future Pulitzer Prize winner Frank McCourt, was impressed enough with Levitz's work that he arranged for Levitz to appear on McCourt's brother's radio show. During the course of his research for the fanzine, Levitz became well known at the offices of DC Comics, where in December 1972,
    7.00
    1 votes
    172
    Arthur Conan Doyle

    Arthur Conan Doyle

    • Fictional Characters Created: Sherlock Holmes
    Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle DL (22 May 1859 – 7 July 1930) was a Scottish physician and writer, most noted for his stories about the detective Sherlock Holmes, generally considered a milestone in the field of crime fiction, and for the adventures of Professor Challenger. He was a prolific writer whose other works include science fiction stories, plays, romances, poetry, non-fiction and historical novels. Arthur Conan Doyle was born on 22 May 1859 at 11 Picardy Place, Edinburgh, Scotland. His father, Charles Altamont Doyle, was English of Irish descent, and his mother, born Mary Foley, was Irish. They married in 1855. In 1864 the family dispersed due to Charles's growing alcoholism and the children were temporarily housed across Edinburgh. In 1867, the family came together again and lived in the squalid tenement flats at 3 Sciennes Place. Although he is now referred to as "Conan Doyle", the origin of this compound surname is uncertain. The entry in which his baptism is recorded in the register of St Mary's Cathedral in Edinburgh gives "Arthur Ignatius Conan" as his Christian name, and simply "Doyle" as his surname. It also names Michael Conan as his godfather. Supported by
    5.33
    3 votes
    173
    Jon Robin Baitz

    Jon Robin Baitz

    • Fictional Characters Created: Kevin Walker
    Jon Robin Baitz (born November 4, 1961) is an American playwright, screenwriter, television producer, and occasional actor. Baitz was born in Los Angeles, California, the son of Edward Baitz, an executive of the Carnation Company. Baitz was raised in Brazil and South Africa before the family returned to California, where he attended Beverly Hills High School. After graduation, he worked as a bookstore clerk and assistant to two producers, and the experiences became the basis for his first play, a one-acter entitled Mizlansky/Zilinsky. He drew on his own background for his first two-act play, The Film Society, about the staff of a prep school in South Africa. Its 1987 success in L.A. led to an off-Broadway production with Nathan Lane the following year, which earned him a Drama Desk Award nomination for Outstanding New Play. This was followed by The End of the Day starring Roger Rees, and The Substance of Fire with Ron Rifkin and Sarah Jessica Parker. In 1991, Baitz wrote and directed the two-character play Three Hotels, based on his parents, for a presentation of PBS's "American Playhouse", then reworked the material for the stage, earning another Drama Desk Award nomination for
    5.33
    3 votes
    174
    Tom Clancy

    Tom Clancy

    • Fictional Characters Created: Jack Ryan
    Thomas Leo "Tom" Clancy, Jr. (born April 12, 1947) is an American author, best known for his technically-detailed espionage, military science, and techno thriller storylines set during and in the aftermath of the Cold War, along with video games on which he did not work, but which bear his name for licensing and promotional purposes. His name is also a brand for similar movie scripts written by ghost writers and many series of non-fiction books on military subjects and merged biographies of key leaders. He is Vice Chairman of Community Activities and Public Affairs, as well as a part-owner of the MLB Baltimore Orioles. Clancy was born in Baltimore, Maryland. He attended Loyola Blakefield in Towson, Maryland, graduating with the class of 1965. He then attended Loyola College in Baltimore, graduating in 1969. Before making his literary debut, he spent some time running an independent insurance agency. This agency thrived for a few years before joining a group of investors. Clancy and his first wife Wanda married in 1969, separated briefly in 1995, and permanently separated in December 1996. Clancy filed for divorce in November 1997, which became final in January 1999. In 1993, Tom
    5.33
    3 votes
    175
    Gabriele Dell'Otto

    Gabriele Dell'Otto

    • Fictional Characters Created: Daisy Johnson
    Gabriele Dell’Otto (born December 20, 1973) is an Italian illustrator and author whose works have been published in several countries in the fields of scientific illustration, calendars, lithographies, books, colored graphic folders, and cover work for magazines and video games. Dell'Otto was born December 20, 1973 in Rome, Italy. He received a diploma in artistic maturity and registered in the European Design Institute. In 1998 Dell'Otto started collaborating with the European division of Marvel Comics, producing covers, posters and lithographies for Italy, France and Germany. In Germany he started collaborating with DC Comics and other publishers such as IPP, Egmont Ehapa and MG Publishing. In 2002-2003 the Italian Carabinieri hired him to design the images for their historical calendar. In 2002 his work was shown to Joe Quesada, the editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics, who assigned him the art duties for the Secret War mini-series, written by Brian Michael Bendis. In 2006 he illustrated the cover and promotional images of the Italian version of the Activision videogame Marvel: Ultimate Alliance. Between 2006 and 2007 Dell'Otto provided the covers of the miniseries Annihilation,
    6.00
    2 votes
    176
    Melinda Gebbie

    Melinda Gebbie

    • Fictional Characters Created: Cobweb
    Melinda Gebbie is an American comics artist and writer, probably best known for Lost Girls, the three-volume graphic novel she produced in collaboration with writer (and now husband) Alan Moore, published by Top Shelf. Melinda Gebbie was born in San Francisco. She became interested in comics in 1973, when she met writer/artist Lee Marrs at a publishers' fair. Formerly a fine artist, she contributed her first comic strip to Wimmen's Comix #3, the seminal all-women anthology published by Last Gasp. She wrote and drew short stories for Wimmen's Comix and many other anthologies, including Tits & Clits Comix, Wet Satin, and Anarchy Comics. In 1977 she completed her own solo book, Fresca Zizis. In 1984 she moved to England to work on the animated film adaptation of Raymond Briggs' When the Wind Blows. Following this, she worked in a variety of illustration and office jobs and continued making short stories for anthologies such as Strip AIDS and Heartbreak Hotel. During this time she was briefly involved in an obscenity trial when Knockabout Comics was prosecuted by the UK's customs agency over the importation of 'pornographic' comics, including her Fresca Zizis. The verdict was that all
    6.00
    2 votes
    177
    Paul Jenkins

    Paul Jenkins

    • Fictional Characters Created: Sentry
    Paul Jenkins (born 6 December 1965) is a British comic book writer. He has had much success crossing over into the American comic book market. Primarily working for Marvel Comics, he has had a big part shaping the characters of the company over the past decade. Paul Jenkins earned an English degree in his native United Kingdom. After moving to the US, he joined Mirage Studios in 1988, where he worked as editor/production manager. He edited Kevin Eastman and Peter Laird's books, including Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, and even negotiated their licensing deals. Leaving Mirage, Jenkins followed Eastman to Tundra, another Eastman publishing venture. He once again took up editing duties, and also headed licensing and promotions. Tired of editing, Jenkins pitched to several companies as a writer. It was during this process that he landed a gig for DC Comics' Vertigo imprint. In 1994, he took over as writer of Hellblazer, and began what would go on to be a four year long stint. His work on this title gained him attention in the American comic industry, but has yet to be republished in trade paperback form. This makes his run the longest on the series not to be reprinted. Paul's Marvel
    6.00
    2 votes
    178
    Raymond Chandler

    Raymond Chandler

    • Fictional Characters Created: Philip Marlowe
    Raymond Thornton Chandler (July 23, 1888 – March 26, 1959) was an American novelist and screenwriter. In 1932, at age forty-four, Raymond Chandler decided to become a detective fiction writer after losing his job as an oil company executive during the Depression. His first short story, "Blackmailers Don't Shoot", was published in 1933 in Black Mask, a popular pulp magazine. His first novel, The Big Sleep, was published in 1939. In addition to his short stories, Chandler published just seven full novels during his lifetime (though an eighth in progress at his death was completed by Robert B. Parker). All but Playback have been realized into motion pictures, some several times. In the year before he died, he was elected president of the Mystery Writers of America. He died on March 26, 1959, in La Jolla, California. Chandler had an immense stylistic influence on American popular literature, and is considered by many to be a founder, along with Dashiell Hammett, James M. Cain and other Black Mask writers, of the hard-boiled school of detective fiction. His protagonist, Philip Marlowe, along with Hammett's Sam Spade, is considered by some to be synonymous with "private detective," both
    6.00
    2 votes
    179
    Robert E. Howard

    Robert E. Howard

    • Fictional Characters Created: Shuma-Gorath
    Robert Ervin Howard (January 22, 1906 – June 11, 1936) was an American author who wrote pulp fiction in a diverse range of genres. He is probably best known for his character Conan the Barbarian and is regarded as the father of the sword and sorcery subgenre. Howard was born and raised in the state of Texas. He spent most of his life in the town of Cross Plains with some time spent in nearby Brownwood. A bookish and intellectual child, he was also a fan of boxing and spent some time in his late teens bodybuilding, eventually taking up amateur boxing himself. From the age of nine he dreamed of becoming a writer of adventure fiction but did not have real success until he was twenty-three. Thereafter, until his death at the age of thirty by suicide, Howard's writings were published in a wide selection of magazines, journals, and newspapers, and he had become successful in several genres. Although a Conan novel was nearly published into a book in 1934, his stories never appeared in book form during his lifetime. The main outlet for his stories was in the pulp magazine Weird Tales. Howard’s suicide and the circumstances surrounding it have led to varied speculation about his mental
    6.00
    2 votes
    180
    Carlos Pacheco

    Carlos Pacheco

    • Fictional Characters Created: Ms. Steed
    Carlos Pacheco is a Spanish comic book artist and penciller. He is best known in the United States for his work on titles such as Avengers Forever, X-Men and Green Lantern. He usually works with inker Jesus Merino. In his early career, Carlos Pacheco did some work for Planeta-DeAgostini Comics, an imprint of pan-European publisher Planeta De Agostini, mainly covers and pin-ups for Spanish translated editions of Marvel Comics, published at the time by Planeta. He later teamed up with writer Rafael Marin to create the characters Iberia Inc and Tríada Vértice, two groups of Spanish superheroes, that starred in two miniseries also published by Planeta-DeAgostini Comics, with plots by Pacheco and Marin, script by Marin an art by Rafa Fonteriz (in Iberia Inc) and Jesus Merino (in Tríada Vértice). Pacheco first got attention in the United States for his work as penciller on Dark Guard, a 4-issue Marvel UK title where he worked with writer Dan Abnett and inker Oscar Jimenez. This led to him being offered work by American comic editors leading to Marvel Comics' 1994 Bishop four issue limited series where he worked with writer John Ostrander and inker Cam Smith. Later that year Pacheco did
    5.00
    3 votes
    181
    Neal Stephenson

    Neal Stephenson

    • Fictional Characters Created: Hiro Protagonist
    Neal Town Stephenson (born October 31, 1959) is an American writer known for his works of speculative fiction. His novels have been variously categorized as science fiction, historical fiction, cyberpunk, and "postcyberpunk." Other labels, such as "baroque," often appear. Stephenson explores subjects such as mathematics, cryptography, philosophy, currency, and the history of science. He also writes non-fiction articles about technology in publications such as Wired. He has worked part-time as an advisor for Blue Origin, a company (funded by Jeff Bezos) developing a manned sub-orbital launch system, and is also a cofounder of Subutai Corporation, whose first offering is the interactive fiction project The Mongoliad. He has also written novels with his uncle, George Jewsbury ("J. Frederick George"), under the collective pseudonym Stephen Bury. Born on October 31, 1959 in Fort Meade, Maryland, Stephenson came from a family of engineers and hard scientists; his father is a professor of electrical engineering whose father was a physics professor. His mother worked in a biochemistry laboratory, and her father was a biochemistry professor. Stephenson's family moved to Champaign-Urbana,
    5.00
    3 votes
    182
    Samuel Beckett

    Samuel Beckett

    • Fictional Characters Created: Pozzo
    Samuel Barclay Beckett (13 April 1906 – 22 December 1989) was an Irish avant-garde novelist, playwright, theatre director, and poet, who lived in Paris for most of his adult life and wrote in both English and French. His work offers a bleak, tragicomic outlook on human nature, often coupled with black comedy and gallows humour. Beckett is widely regarded as among the most influential writers of the 20th century. Strongly influenced by James Joyce, he is considered one of the last modernists. As an inspiration to many later writers, he is also sometimes considered one of the first postmodernists. He is one of the key writers in what Martin Esslin called the "Theatre of the Absurd". His work became increasingly minimalist in his later career. Beckett was awarded the 1969 Nobel Prize in Literature "for his writing, which—in new forms for the novel and drama—in the destitution of modern man acquires its elevation". He was elected Saoi of Aosdána in 1984. The Becketts were members of the Anglican Church of Ireland. The family home, Cooldrinagh in the Dublin suburb of Foxrock, was a large house and garden complete with tennis court built in 1903 by Samuel's father, William. The house and
    5.00
    3 votes
    183
    William Gibson

    William Gibson

    • Fictional Characters Created: Case
    William Ford Gibson (born March 17, 1948) is an American-Canadian speculative fiction novelist who has been called the "noir prophet" of the cyberpunk subgenre. Gibson coined the term "cyberspace" in his short story "Burning Chrome" (1982) and later popularized the concept in his debut novel, Neuromancer (1984). In envisaging cyberspace, Gibson created an iconography for the information age before the ubiquity of the Internet in the 1990s. He is also credited with predicting the rise of reality television and with establishing the conceptual foundations for the rapid growth of virtual environments such as video games and the World Wide Web. Having changed residence frequently with his family as a child, Gibson became a shy, ungainly teenager who often read science fiction. After spending his adolescence at a private boarding school in Arizona, Gibson evaded the draft during the Vietnam War by emigrating to Canada in 1968, where he became immersed in the counterculture and after settling in Vancouver eventually became a full-time writer. He retains dual citizenship. Gibson's early works are bleak, noir near-future stories about the effect of cybernetics and computer networks on
    5.00
    3 votes
    184
    Barbara Kesel

    Barbara Kesel

    • Fictional Characters Created: Titan
    Barbara Randall Kesel is an American writer and editor of comic books; her bibliography includes work for DC Comics, Marvel Comics, Crossgen, Image Comics and Dark Horse Comics. Kesel initially came into the comics world after writing a 10-page letter to editor Dick Giordano regarding the portrayal of female comic book characters. With her then-husband Karl Kesel, she co-wrote a Hawk and Dove miniseries in 1988 which was drawn by Rob Liefeld. At Dark Horse, Kesel was part of Team CGW, responsible for most of the design and creation of the setting and characters in the Golden City location. She is currently part of book packaging company The Pack, alongside Lee Nordling, Brian Augustyn, Gordon Kent and Dave Olbrich. Kesel is a very outspoken opponent of sexism in the comic book industry. She is known for her strong female characters, influencing her husband's work on Lois Lane in the Superman titles and creating Grace, the ruler of the Golden City location in Comics' Greatest World. She was married to fellow comic book writer Karl Kesel; they have since divorced. Comics she has written include: Comics she has edited: Kesel has been nominated for the 1991 "Best Editor" Eisner Award
    5.50
    2 votes
    185
    Erik Larsen

    Erik Larsen

    • Fictional Characters Created: Savage Dragon
    Erik J. Larsen (born December 8, 1962) is an American comic book writer, artist and publisher. He is best known for his work on Savage Dragon, as one of the founders of Image Comics, and for his work on Spider-Man for Marvel Comics. Larsen was born on December 8, 1962 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. As a child growing up in Bellingham, Washington and Albion, California, he created several comic books featuring versions of a character named "The Dragon", whom he has since described as a Batman-like character who drove a car copied from Speed Racer's Mach Five. The Dragon turned into a superhero using a magic word to trigger his powers like Captain Marvel. He and two friends produced a fanzine called Graphic Fantasy, which featured this character. Larsen's first paid work was for the anthology Megaton, co-creating and illustrating a feature called "Vanguard" with publisher Gary Carlson. A revised version of the Dragon debuted in issue #2 and appeared in the following two issues. The original Dragon, inspired by elements from Captain Marvel, Batman, Speed Racer and later The Incredible Hulk, differs greatly from the modern incarnation. Much later, a greatly redesigned Savage Dragon was
    5.50
    2 votes
    186
    Jerry Siegel

    Jerry Siegel

    • Fictional Characters Created: Superman
    Jerome "Jerry" Siegel (October 17, 1914 – January 28, 1996), who also used pseudonyms including Joe Carter, Jerry Ess, and Herbert S. Fine, was the American co-creator of Superman (along with Joe Shuster), the first of the great comic book superheroes and one of the most recognizable of the 20th century. He was inducted (with Shuster posthumously) into the comic book industry's Will Eisner Comic Book Hall of Fame in 1992 and the Jack Kirby Hall of Fame in 1993. Jerry Siegel was born in Cleveland, Ohio, the youngest of six children of Jewish immigrants from Lithuania, Sarah (née Fine) and Mitchell Siegel He was preceded by sisters Minerva and Roslyn, both in Lithuania, and brothers Harry and Leo and sister Isabel. His father was a sign painter who opened a haberdashery and encouraged his son's artistic inclinations. Mitchell died of a heart attack brought on by the robbery of his store, when Jerry was in junior high school. Siegel was a fan of movies, comic strips, and especially science fiction pulp magazines. He became active in what would become known as fandom, corresponding with other science fiction fans, including the young future author Jack Williamson. In 1929, Siegel
    5.50
    2 votes
    187
    Jim Henson

    Jim Henson

    • Fictional Characters Created: Yoda
    James Maury "Jim" Henson (September 24, 1936 – May 16, 1990) was an American puppeteer, best known as the creator of The Muppets. As a puppeteer, Henson performed in various television programs, such as Sesame Street and The Muppet Show, films such as The Muppet Movie and The Great Muppet Caper, and created advanced puppets for projects like Fraggle Rock, The Dark Crystal, and Labyrinth. He was also an Oscar-nominated film director, Emmy Award-winning television producer, and the founder of The Jim Henson Company, the Jim Henson Foundation, and Jim Henson's Creature Shop. He died on May 16, 1990, of organ failure resulting from a Group A streptococcal infection caused by Streptococcus pyogenes. Henson was born in Greenville, Mississippi and raised in Maryland. He was educated at University of Maryland, College Park, where he created Sam and Friends as a freshman. After suffering struggles with programs that he created, he eventually found success with Sesame Street. During this time, he also contributed to Saturday Night Live. The success of Sesame Street spawned The Muppet Show, which featured Muppets created by Henson. He also co-created with Michael Jacobs the television show
    5.50
    2 votes
    188
    Margaret Mitchell

    Margaret Mitchell

    • Fictional Characters Created: Scarlett O'Hara
    Margaret Munnerlyn Mitchell (November 8, 1900 – August 16, 1949) was an American author and journalist. One novel by Mitchell was published during her lifetime, the American Civil War-era novel, Gone with the Wind. For it she won the National Book Award for Most Distinguished Novel of 1936 and the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1937. In more recent years, a collection of Mitchell's girlhood writings and a novella she wrote as a teenager, Lost Laysen, have been published. A collection of articles written by Mitchell for The Atlanta Journal was republished in book form. These additional works have enabled scholars and the public to more fully comprehend the richness and depth of Margaret Mitchell's writing. Margaret Mitchell was a Southerner and a lifelong resident and native of Atlanta, Georgia, who was born in 1900 into a wealthy and politically prominent family. Her father, Eugene Muse Mitchell, was an attorney, and her mother, Mary Isabel "May Belle" (or "Maybelle") Stephens, was a suffragist. She had two brothers, Russell Stephens Mitchell, who died in infancy in 1894, and Alexander Stephens Mitchell, born in 1896. Mitchell's family on her father's side were descendants of Thomas
    5.50
    2 votes
    189
    Sylvia Plath

    Sylvia Plath

    • Fictional Characters Created: Esther Greenwood
    Sylvia Plath (October 27, 1932 – February 11, 1963) was an American poet, novelist and short story writer. Born in Boston, Massachusetts, she studied at Smith College and Newnham College, Cambridge before receiving acclaim as a professional poet and writer. She married fellow poet Ted Hughes in 1956 and they lived together first in the United States and then England, having two children together: Frieda and Nicholas. After suffering from depression from the age of 20 and a marital separation, Plath committed suicide in 1963. Controversy continues to surround the events of her life and death, as well as her writing and legacy. Plath is credited with advancing the genre of confessional poetry and is best known for her two published collections: The Colossus and Other Poems and Ariel. In 1982, she became the first poet to win a Pulitzer Prize posthumously, for The Collected Poems. She also wrote The Bell Jar, a semi-autobiographical novel published shortly before her death. Plath was born on October 27, 1932 in the Massachusetts Memorial Hospital in Boston's Jamaica Plain neighborhood. Her mother, Aurelia Schober Plath (1906-1994), was a first-generation American of Austrian descent,
    5.50
    2 votes
    190
    George Lucas

    George Lucas

    • Fictional Characters Created: Leia Organa
    George Walton Lucas, Jr. (born May 14, 1944) is an American film producer, screenwriter, director, and entrepreneur. He is the founder, chairman and chief executive of Lucasfilm. He is best known as the creator of the space opera franchise Star Wars and the archaeologist-adventurer character Indiana Jones. Lucas is one of the American film industry's most financially successful directors/producers, with an estimated net worth of $3.3 billion as of 2012. George Lucas was born in Modesto, California, the son of Dorothy Ellinore (née Bomberger) and George Walton Lucas, Sr. (1913–1991), who owned a stationery store. Lucas grew up in the Central Valley town of Modesto, and his early passion for cars and motor racing would eventually serve as inspiration for his USC student film 1:42.08, as well as his Oscar-nominated low-budget phenomenon, American Graffiti. Long before Lucas became obsessed with film making, he wanted to be a race-car driver, and he spent most of his high school years racing on the underground circuit at fairgrounds and hanging out at garages. On June 12, 1962, while driving his souped-up Autobianchi Bianchina, another driver broadsided him, flipping over his car, and
    4.67
    3 votes
    191
    Jack Kirby

    Jack Kirby

    • Fictional Characters Created: Captain America
    Jack Kirby (August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994), born Jacob Kurtzberg, was an American comic book artist, writer and editor regarded by historians and fans as one of the major innovators and most influential creators in the comic book medium. Growing up poor in New York City, Kurtzberg entered the nascent comics industry in the 1930s. He drew various comics features under different pen names, including Jack Curtiss, ultimately settling on Jack Kirby. In 1940, he and writer-editor Joe Simon created the highly successful superhero character Captain America for Timely Comics, predecessor of Marvel Comics. During the 1940s, Kirby, generally teamed with Simon, created numerous characters for that company and for the company that would become DC Comics. After serving in World War II, Kirby returned to comics and worked in a variety of genres. He contributed to a number of publishers, including DC, Harvey Comics, Hillman Periodicals and Crestwood Publications, where he and Simon created the genre of romance comics. He and Simon also launched their own short-lived comic company, Mainline Publications. Kirby ultimately found himself at Timely's 1950s iteration, Atlas Comics, later to be
    4.67
    3 votes
    192
    Bernie Wrightson

    Bernie Wrightson

    • Fictional Characters Created: Swamp Thing
    Bernie "Berni" Wrightson (born October 27, 1948, Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.) is an American artist known for his horror illustrations and comic books. Wrightson received training in art from reading comics, particularly those of EC, as well as through a correspondence course from the Famous Artists School. In 1966, Wrightson began working for The Baltimore Sun newspaper as an illustrator. The following year, after meeting artist Frank Frazetta at a comic-book convention in New York City, he was inspired to produce his own stories. In 1968, he showed copies of his sequential art to DC Comics editor Dick Giordano and was given a freelance assignment. Wrightson began spelling his name "Berni" in his professional work to distinguish himself from an Olympic diver named Bernie Wrightson, but later restored the final "e" to his name. In 1968 he drew his first professional comic book story, "The Man Who Murdered Himself", which appeared in House of Mystery #179 (March-April 1969). He continued to work on a variety of mystery and anthology titles for both DC and, a few years later, its principal rival, Marvel Comics. It was for Marvel's Chamber of Darkness and Tower of Shadows titles where
    6.00
    1 votes
    193
    Elizabeth Hand

    Elizabeth Hand

    • Fictional Characters Created: Anima
    Elizabeth Hand (born March 29, 1957) is an American writer. Hand grew up in Yonkers and Pound Ridge, New York. She studied drama and anthropology at The Catholic University of America. Since 1988, Hand has lived in coastal Maine, the setting for many of her stories. She also lives part-time in Camden Town, London which has been the setting for Mortal Love and the short story "Cleopatra Brimstone". Hand's first story, "Prince of Flowers", was published in 1988 in Twilight Zone magazine, and her first novel, Winterlong, was published in 1990. With Paul Witcover, she created and wrote DC Comics' 1990s cult series Anima. Hand's other works are Aestival Tide (1992); Icarus Descending (1993); Waking the Moon (1994), which won the Tiptree Award and the Mythopoeic Fantasy Award; the post-apocalyptic novel Glimmering (1997); contemporary fantasy Black Light (1999), a New York Times Notable Book; the historical fantasy Mortal Love (2004), a Washington Post Notable Book; and the psychological thriller Generation Loss (2007). Her story collections are Last Summer at Mars Hill (1998) (which includes the Nebula and World Fantasy award-winning title novella); Bibliomancy (2002), winner of the
    6.00
    1 votes
    194
    Ian Irvine

    Ian Irvine

    • Fictional Characters Created: Tiaan
    Ian Irvine (born 1950) is an Australian fantasy and eco-thriller author and marine scientist. To date Irvine has written 27 novels, including fantasy, eco-thrillers and books for children. He has had books published in at least 12 countries and continues to write full-time. Irvine was born in Bathurst, New South Wales, Australia, in 1950. He was educated at Chevalier College and the University of Sydney where he received a PhD in marine science, studying the management of contaminated sediments. Setting up his own environmental consulting firm in 1986, Irvine has worked in many countries in the Asia-Pacific region, including Australia, Indonesia, Singapore, Philippines, South Korea, Papua-New Guinea, Mauritius, Bali, Fiji and Western Samoa. During the course of his career he played a role in developing Australia's national guidelines for protection of the oceanic environment and still works in this field. He was the principal author of Australia’s National Environmental Assessment Guidelines for Dredging, 2009. During 1987 Irvine began writing the first in his The View from the Mirror series. He continued working full-time as an environmental scientist and so wrote the series in
    6.00
    1 votes
    195
    Sacha Baron Cohen

    Sacha Baron Cohen

    • Fictional Characters Created: Borat
    Sacha Noam Baron Cohen (born 13 October 1971) is an English stand-up comedian, writer, actor, and voice actor. A graduate of Cambridge University, Baron Cohen is most widely known for writing and playing four unorthodox fictional characters: Ali G, Borat, Brüno, and Admiral General Aladeen. In his routines, Baron Cohen's characters interact with unsuspecting people who do not realise they are being set up for comic situations and self-revealing ridicule. Baron Cohen was named Best Newcomer at the 1999 British Comedy Awards for The 11 O'Clock Show, and since then, his work has been further recognised with two BAFTA Awards for Da Ali G Show, several Emmy nominations, a nomination for an Academy Award for Writing Adapted Screenplay, and a Golden Globe for Best Actor for his work in the feature film Borat. After the release of Borat, Baron Cohen stated that because the public had become too familiar with the characters, he would retire Borat and Ali G. Similarly, after the release of Brüno, Baron Cohen stated he would also retire the title character. Baron Cohen, the middle of three brothers, was born in Hammersmith, West London. His mother, Daniella Naomi (née Weiser), was born in
    6.00
    1 votes
    196
    Wendy and Richard Pini

    Wendy and Richard Pini

    • Fictional Characters Created: Winnowill
    Wendy Pini née Fletcher, (born June 4, 1951, San Francisco, California) and Richard Pini (born July 19, 1950, New Haven, Connecticut) are the husband-and-wife team responsible for creating the well-known Elfquest series of comics, graphic novels and prose works. They are also known as WaRP (as in Warp Graphics). Wendy Fletcher was born in San Francisco in 1951, and from an early age demonstrated the talents later to come to fruition as a professional illustrator, and eventually as the creator of Elfquest. Wendy's youthful interest in fantasy was inspired in part by such luminaries as Shakespeare and Kipling. She took artistic inspiration from Victorian illustrators such as Arthur Rackham and Edmund Dulac, designers such as Walt Disney, Doug Wildey and Erte, as well as comic book greats such as Jack Kirby and Japanese manga artist Osamu Tezuka. Richard Pini was born in 1950, in New Haven, Connecticut. After an exemplary academic performance at school, he was accepted into the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) for an astrophysics degree. Always fan of science fiction, at college he found new diversion in comic books. Wendy Fletcher and Richard Pini met when Pini read a
    6.00
    1 votes
    197
    Jim Shooter

    Jim Shooter

    • Fictional Characters Created: Buck McHenry
    James Shooter (born September 27, 1951) is an American writer, occasional fill-in artist, editor, and publisher for various comic books. He started professionally in the medium at the age of 14, and he is most notable for his successful and controversial run as Marvel Comics' ninth editor-in-chief, and his work as editor in chief of Valiant Comics. Jim Shooter was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania to parents Ken and Eleanor "Ellie" Shooter, who are of Polish descent. At the age of 14, Shooter began selling stories to DC Comics. Writing for both Action Comics and Adventure Comics, beginning with Adventure Comics #346 (July 1966), Shooter provided not only writing but pencil breakdowns as well. Shooter created several characters for the Legion of Super-Heroes including Karate Kid, a teenage superhero who predated the martial arts fad of the 1970s; Ferro Lad, a teenage superhero who can transform to living iron; and Princess Projectra, who could cast realistic illusions. He also created the Superman villain the Parasite in Action Comics #340 (Aug. 1966). Shooter and artist Curt Swan crafted the story "Superman's Race With the Flash!" in Superman #199 (Aug. 1967) which featured the
    4.33
    3 votes
    198
    Charles Vess

    Charles Vess

    • Fictional Characters Created: Titania
    Charles Vess (born June 10, 1951) is an American fantasy artist and comic-book illustrator who has specialized in the illustration of myths and fairy tales. His illustrations are strongly influenced by the work of artists and illustrators such as Arthur Rackham and Alphonse Mucha. Vess has won several awards for his illustrations. Charlies Vess began drawing comic art as a child. He graduated with a BFA from Virginia Commonwealth University in 1974. His first professional position was as a commercial animator for Candy Apple Productions in Richmond, Virginia, which he held for approximately two years. In 1976 he moved to New York City and became a freelance illustrator. He contributed illustrations to publications including Heavy Metal, Klutz Press (now an imprint of Scholastic Press), and National Lampoon. One notable publication from this early period was The Horns of Elfland (ISBN 0-915822-25-3) published by Archival Press in 1977, which Vess wrote and illustrated. From 1980-82 Vess worked as an art instructor at the Parsons School of Design in New York City. Also during that period, his work appeared in one of the first major museum exhibitions of science fiction and fantasy
    5.00
    2 votes
    199
    Don Cameron

    Don Cameron

    • Fictional Characters Created: Superboy
    Don Cameron (born 1939) is a Scottish balloonist, and later founder of Cameron Balloons, the world's largest hot air balloon manufacturer. Born in Glasgow in 1939, Cameron went to school at Allan Glen's School and then went on to study aeronautical engineering at the University of Glasgow, graduating in 1961. In 1963 he obtained a Masters degree at Cornell, United States. He then joined the Bristol Aeroplane Company. Cameron developed Britain's first modern hot air balloon entitled Bristol Belle which flew for the first time at Weston on the Green in Oxfordshire, England on 9 July 1967. In 1968 Cameron and Leslie Goldsmith founded Omega Balloons which constructed ten balloons, before the company split into Cameron Balloons and Western Balloons in 1970. Cameron Balloons of Bristol, England, was formed by Cameron in 1971 - five years after he constructed his first balloon. The new company was based in Cotham, Bristol where a total of twenty nine balloons were made in the basement of the property. 1971 also saw Cameron build Golden Eagle, a balloon designed specifically to fly across the Sahara to shoot a film for Jack Le Vien. In 1978 his attempt to make the premier Atlantic crossing
    5.00
    2 votes
    200
    Harry Harrison

    Harry Harrison

    • Fictional Characters Created: The Stainless Steel Rat
    Harry Harrison (born Henry Maxwell Dempsey; March 12, 1925 – August 15, 2012) was an American science fiction (SF) author, best known for his character the Stainless Steel Rat and for his novel Make Room! Make Room! (1966). The latter was the rough basis for the motion picture Soylent Green (1973). Harrison was (with Brian Aldiss) the co-president of the Birmingham Science Fiction Group. Aldiss called him "a constant peer and great family friend". His friend Michael Carroll said, "Imagine Pirates of the Caribbean or Raiders of the Lost Ark, and picture them as science-fiction novels. They're rip-roaring adventures, but they're stories with a lot of heart." Novelist Christopher Priest wrote in an obituary, On learning of his death, Harlan Ellison said, "It's a day without stars in it." Before becoming an editor and a writer, Harrison started in the science fiction field as an illustrator, notably with EC Comics two science fiction comic book series, Weird Fantasy and Weird Science. He used house pen names such as Wade Kaempfert and Philip St. John to edit magazines, and published other fiction under the pen names of Felix Boyd, Leslie Charteris, and Hank Dempsey (but see Personal
    5.00
    2 votes
    201
    Marc Cherry

    Marc Cherry

    • Fictional Characters Created: Matthew Applewhite
    Marc Cherry (born March 23, 1962) is an American writer and producer, best known for creating the show Desperate Housewives. Cherry is currently developing a new series Devious Maids. Marc Cherry was born in Long Beach and lived briefly in Oklahoma. His father was an accountant which required the family to relocate to California. After graduating from Troy High School in Fullerton, California, Cherry graduated from California State University, Fullerton's theater program and initially considered a career in performance. After winning $15,000 as a contestant on The $100,000 Pyramid in 1986, he decided to move to Hollywood and pursue writing work. His move came at a bad time; the 1988 writer's strike hit as soon as Cherry arrived. Cherry broke into the industry by working as Designing Women star Dixie Carter's personal assistant. In 1990, he became a writer and producer for the long-running hit sitcom The Golden Girls. Cherry wrote for the show, and its short lived spinoff The Golden Palace. When those shows concluded, Cherry co-created The 5 Mrs. Buchanans. The concept of the show centered around the matriarch of the family (played by Eileen Heckart) and the wives of her four sons.
    5.00
    2 votes
    202
    Stephen Chbosky

    Stephen Chbosky

    • Fictional Characters Created: Eric Green
    Stephen Chbosky ( /ˈʃbɔːski/; born January 25, 1970) is an American novelist, screenwriter, and film director best known for the coming of age novel The Perks of Being a Wallflower (1999). He also wrote the screenplay for the 2005 film Rent, and was co-creator, executive producer, and writer of the CBS television series Jericho, which began airing in 2006. Chbosky was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and raised in the Pittsburgh suburb of Upper St. Clair, Pennsylvania. He is the son of Lea (née Meyer), a tax preparer, and Fred G. Chbosky, a steel company executive and consultant to CFOs. He was raised Catholic. Chbosky has a sister, Stacy. As a teenager, Chbosky "enjoyed a good blend of the classics, horror, and fantasy." He was heavily influenced by J. D. Salinger's novel The Catcher in the Rye and the writing of F. Scott Fitzgerald and Tennessee Williams. Chbosky graduated from Upper St. Clair High School in 1988, around which time he met Stewart Stern, screenwriter of the 1955 James Dean film Rebel Without a Cause. Stern became Chbosky's "good friend and mentor", and proved a major influence on Chbosky's career. In 1992, Chbosky graduated from the University of Southern
    5.00
    2 votes
    203
    Tina Fey

    Tina Fey

    • Fictional Characters Created: Jack Donaghy
    Elizabeth Stamatina "Tina" Fey ( /ˈfeɪ/; born May 18, 1970) is an American actress, comedian, writer and producer, known for her work on the NBC sketch comedy series Saturday Night Live (SNL), the NBC comedy series 30 Rock, and films such as Mean Girls (2004) and Baby Mama (2008). Fey first broke into comedy as a featured player in the Chicago-based improvisational comedy group The Second City. She then joined SNL as a writer, later becoming head writer and a performer, known for her position as co-anchor in the Weekend Update segment. In 2004 she adapted the screenplay Mean Girls in which she also co-starred. After leaving SNL in 2006, she created the television series 30 Rock, a situation comedy loosely based on her experiences at SNL. In the series, Fey portrays the head writer of a fictional sketch comedy series. In 2008, she starred in the comedy film Baby Mama, alongside former SNL co-star Amy Poehler. Fey next appeared in the 2010 comedy films Date Night and Megamind. She has received seven Emmy Awards, three Golden Globe Awards, four Screen Actors Guild Awards, four Writers Guild of America Awards and has been nominated for a Grammy Award for her autobiographical book
    5.00
    2 votes
    204
    Alan Kupperberg

    Alan Kupperberg

    • Fictional Characters Created: Kid Devil
    Alan Kupperberg (born May 18) is an American comic artist known for working in both comic books and newspaper strips. Alan Kupperberg graduated from the High School of Art and Design in 1971. Kupperberg began writing and drawing for Marvel Comics in 1974, mostly doing fill-ins and one-shots. Eventually, he had runs on team books like The Invaders and The Defenders; and drew a number of issues of What If. Occasionally working as a writer, Kupperberg created the 1983 one-shot comic Obnoxio the Clown vs. The X-Men as a one-man band, handling everything from writing and illustrating to lettering. In 1987, Kupperberg worked on both Spectacular Spider-Man and The Amazing Spider-Man. From 1988–1991, Kupperberg drew Spider-Ham back-up stories in Marvel Tales. He also worked for Marvel Custom Comics, for clients such as Campbell Soup Company, the U.S. Department of Energy, the Sylvan Learning Center, and The Dallas Times Herald. From the mid-1980s into the early 1990s, Kupperberg illustrated such DC Comics titles as Justice League of America, Warlord, The Fury of Firestorm, DC Comics Presents, COPS, Dragonlance, and Blue Devil. In 1978 Kupperberg and writer Marv Wolfman took over the Howard
    4.50
    2 votes
    205
    Brian Haberlin

    Brian Haberlin

    • Fictional Characters Created: Sara Pezzini
    Brian Haberlin is an American comic book artist, writer, editor and producer. He is best known as the co-creator of the Witchblade franchise and for his digital art style. Brian Haberlin earned his MA Loyola Marymount University. Haberlin started his career working at Lorimar/Warner Brothers Television, but eventually he gave up his job at Warner Brothers in order to pursue a career in comics, his lifelong passion. Haberlin began his career in comics working at Top Cow Productions, where he served as Vice President of Creative Affairs. While there he co-created Witchblade, prompted by the lack of realistic female superheroes in comics. The Witchblade franchise has since expanded to include multiple spin-offs, a live action television series, an anime, and an upcoming film adaptation. Haberlin formed his own studio in 1995, producing commercial illustrations and digitally coloring for Marvel Comics, DC Comics and Image Comics. He then started Avalon Studios with Whilce Portacio in 1998. Avalon Studios published many successful fantasy and sci-fi titles, including Stone, a fantasy series which incorporated elements of Filipino mythology, Area 52, a science fiction title which is set
    4.50
    2 votes
    206
    Jhonen Vasquez

    Jhonen Vasquez

    • Fictional Characters Created: Zim
    Jhonen C. Vasquez (born September 1, 1974) is a Latino American comic book writer, cartoonist, and music video director. He is best known for creating the Nickelodeon's animated series Invader Zim and the comic books Johnny the Homicidal Maniac, Squee!, and I Feel Sick. Jhonen Vasquez was raised in East San Jose and attended Mt. Pleasant High School, where he often spent much of his class time drawing in sketchbooks. Taking part in a contest to design a new look for his school's mascot, the Cardinal, he submitted an entry that the judges rejected. On the back of a preliminary drawing for the contest, he drew his first sketch of the character who would later become Johnny C. His high school's student newspaper published a number of his comic strips titled Johnny the Homicidal Maniac. Vasquez created Happy Noodle Boy while attending Mt. Pleasant. According to Vasquez, "So many years ago, my little romantical friend in high school was the unwitting reason Happy Noodle Boy was created. She always asked me for comics, but I couldn't draw as fast as she requested. Thus, I tried to create the worst abomination of a comic that I could, so as to make her not want comics anymore. That
    4.50
    2 votes
    207
    Ryan Ottley

    Ryan Ottley

    • Fictional Characters Created: Angstrom Levy
    Ryan Ottley, aka Uncle WYA, is an American comic book artist. He is best known for work on Image Comics' Invincible. Ottley is the artist and co-creator of the webcomic strip Ted Noodleman: Bicycle Delivery Boy, and it was through this webstrip that Robert Kirkman first encountered Ottley's work and then offered him the job of penciling Invincible. In an interview with comic book website Project Fanboy, Ottley discussed how he got into the comic book industry after being fired from his previous employer as a warehouse worker. Ottley attributes this to motivating him to pursue a career in comics and began actively building exposure for his work on the internet through the websites digitalwebbing.com and penciljack.com. The artist appeared in several issues of an independent comic anthology, Digital Webbing Presents. Robert Kirkman saw posts from Ottley on the Penciljack website, searched for other work by the artist and contacted him about a position drawing for the Image Comics' title Invincible. In the same interview, Ottley expressed his opinion on the submission process used by many aspiring artists, when he said, "I was talking to a DC editor once at a store signing that said
    4.50
    2 votes
    208
    Terry Gilliam

    Terry Gilliam

    • Fictional Characters Created: Sam Lowry
    Terrence Vance "Terry" Gilliam ( /ˈɡɪliəm/; born 22 November 1940) is an American-born British screenwriter, film director, animator, actor and member of the Monty Python comedy troupe. Gilliam is also known for directing several films, including Brazil (1985), The Adventures of Baron Munchausen (1988), The Fisher King (1991), 12 Monkeys (1995), Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (1998) and The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus (2009). The only "Python" not born in Britain, he took British citizenship in 1968. In 2006 he formally renounced his American citizenship. Gilliam was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, the son of Beatrice (née Vance) and James Hall Gilliam, who was a traveling salesman for Folgers before becoming a carpenter. Soon after, they moved to the nearby Medicine Lake. The family moved to Panorama City, California, in 1952. Gilliam attended Birmingham High School where he was class president and senior prom King, was voted "Most Likely to Succeed", and achieved straight A's. During high school, he began to avidly read Mad magazine, which was then edited by Harvey Kurtzman; this later influenced his work. Gilliam later spoke to Salman Rushdie about defining experiences in
    4.50
    2 votes
    209
    Aaron Sorkin

    Aaron Sorkin

    • Fictional Characters Created: Matt Albie
    Aaron Sorkin (born June 9, 1961) is an Academy and Emmy award winning American screenwriter, producer, and playwright, whose works include A Few Good Men, The American President, The West Wing, Sports Night, Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip, Charlie Wilson's War, The Social Network, and Moneyball. After graduating from Syracuse University with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Musical Theatre in 1983, Sorkin spent much of the 1980s in New York as a struggling, sporadically employed actor. He found his passion in writing plays, and quickly established himself as a promising young playwright. His stage play A Few Good Men caught the attention of Hollywood producer David Brown, who bought the film rights before the play even premiered. Castle Rock Entertainment hired Sorkin to adapt A Few Good Men for the big screen. The film, directed by Rob Reiner, became a box office success. Sorkin spent the early 1990s writing two other screenplays at Castle Rock, Malice and The American President. In the mid-1990s he worked as a script doctor on films such as Bulworth. In 1998 his television career began when he created the comedy series Sports Night for the ABC network. The second season of Sports
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    210
    Al Gordon

    Al Gordon

    • Fictional Characters Created: Andromeda
    Alan Gordon (b. June 22, 1953, in San Francisco, California) is a comic book creator primarily known as an inker and writer. He is best known for his 1990s work on DC Comics' Legion of Super Heroes and the Justice League Of America, Marvel Comics' Fantastic Four, and Image Comics' creator-owned WildStar. Gordon's career began in the mid-1970s as penciler and inker of the story "A Christmas Carol", starring Michael T. Gilbert's funny-animal detective the Wraith, in Quack #6 (Dec. 1977), from the early independent comics publisher Star Reach. The following year, Gordon began freelance inking for Marvel Comics, working with pencilers Bob Budiansky and Steve Leialoha, respectively, on a backup story each in Captain America #220-221 (April–May 1978). He was the regular inker on Spider-Woman, with penciler Carmine Infantino from #7-16 (Oct. 1978 - July 1979), and worked as well on at least one issue each of The Avengers, Ghost Rider, Iron Man, Marvel Premiere, Marvel Team-Up, Marvel Two-in-One, Master of Kung Fu, Power Man and Iron Fist, The Spectacular Spider-Man, Thor Annual and "What If..." through 1982. In 1982 Gordon left Marvel for DC Comics to ink writer-penciler-co-creator Scott
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    211
    Bill Lawrence

    Bill Lawrence

    • Fictional Characters Created: Dr. Cox
    William Van Duzer Lawrence IV (known as Bill Lawrence, born December 26, 1968) is an American screenwriter, producer, and director best known as the creator of Scrubs and co-creator of Cougar Town. Lawrence is married to the actress Christa Miller whom he cast in both television series; they have three children together. He has also co-created Spin City, of which he wrote several episodes, and Clone High, which ran for 13 episodes. He has written for many other shows including Friends, The Nanny, and Boy Meets World. Lawrence is related to William Van Duzer Lawrence. After graduating from the College of William & Mary where he studied English and also was a member of Kappa Alpha Order, Lawrence wrote for hit shows including Friends, Boy Meets World, and The Nanny and produced the animated series Clone High. He also served as the creator of the sitcom Spin City and Scrubs. He is now currently the co-creator, executive producer, writer and director of TBS's current comedy Cougar Town. He is also one of the producers of the rejected television pilot Nobody's Watching. In 2006-07 he was prepping the film Fletch Won (which is a prequel to the previous Fletch films), but after Scrubs
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    212
    Eric Kripke

    Eric Kripke

    • Fictional Characters Created: Azazel
    Eric Kripke (born April 24, 1974 in Toledo, Ohio) is an American television writer, director, and producer. He is the creator of The WB (now The CW) series Supernatural and more recently the NBC series Revolution. A 1992 graduate of Sylvania Southview High School, Eric often created home movies with friends to show to other students. After graduating from the University of Southern California School of Cinematic Arts in 1996 as a member of the Gamma Eta Chapter of Pi Kappa Alpha, Kripke wrote and directed two 1997 films: Battle of the Sexes and Truly Committed. He later developed and wrote for the The WB's 2003 television series Tarzan, which was cancelled after eight episodes, and followed this by writing the 2005 film Boogeyman. The movie was followed by a sequel, Boogeyman 2. Furthermore he was an associate producer for the 2011 romantic action thriller The Adjustment Bureau. He is currently writing and directing his first theatre film Haunted, ready for a 2012 release. In August 2011, it was announced that Kripke is developing a series for The CW Television Network, based on the DC Comics character Deadman but it was not materialized. However, he created a series for NBC named
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    213
    Frank Herbert

    Frank Herbert

    • Fictional Characters Created: Paul Atreides
    Franklin Patrick Herbert, Jr. (October 8, 1920 – February 11, 1986) was a critically acclaimed and commercially successful American science fiction author. Though also a short story author, he is best known for his novels, most notably Dune and its five sequels. The Dune saga, set in the distant future and taking place over millennia, deals with themes such as human survival and evolution, ecology, and the intersection of religion, politics and power. Dune itself is the "best-selling science fiction novel of all time," and the series is widely considered to be among the classics in the genre. Frank Herbert was born on October 8, 1920, in Tacoma, Washington, to Frank Patrick Herbert Sr. and Eileen (McCarthy) Herbert. Due to a poor home environment, he ran away from home in 1938 to live with an aunt and uncle in Salem, Oregon. He enrolled in high school at Salem High School (now North Salem High School), where he graduated the next year. In 1939 he lied about his age to get his first newspaper job at the Glendale Star. Herbert then returned to Salem in 1940 where he worked for the Oregon Statesman newspaper (now Statesman Journal) in a variety of positions, including photographer. He
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    214
    Grant Morrison

    Grant Morrison

    • Fictional Characters Created: Manhattan Guardian
    Grant Morrison, MBE (born 31 January 1960) is a Scottish comic book writer, playwright and occultist. He is known for his nonlinear narratives and countercultural leanings in his runs on titles including DC Comics' Animal Man, Doom Patrol, JLA, The Invisibles, Action Comics, All-Star Superman, and Batman, and Marvel Comics' New X-Men and Fantastic Four. Grant Morrison, MBE, was born in Glasgow, Scotland in 1960. His first published works were Gideon Stargrave strips for Near Myths in 1978 (when he was about 17), one of the first British alternative comics. His work appeared in four of the five issues of Near Myths and he was suitably encouraged to find more comic work. This included a weekly comic strip Captain Clyde, an unemployed superhero based in Glasgow, for The Govan Press, a local newspaper, plus various issues of DC Thomson's Starblazer, a science fiction version of that company's Commando title. Morrison spent much of the early 1980s touring and recording with his band The Mixers, writing the occasional Starblazer for D. C. Thompson and contributing to various UK indie titles. In 1982 he submitted a proposal involving the Justice League of America and Jack Kirby's New Gods
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    215
    Joe Benitez

    Joe Benitez

    • Fictional Characters Created: Magdalena
    Joe Benitez (born May 21, 1971) is an American comic book artist. He is co-creator and penciller of Weapon Zero, published by Top Cow Productions. Other titles he has worked on include The Darkness, The Magdalena, as well as work for DC Comics.
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    216
    Simon Furman

    Simon Furman

    • Fictional Characters Created: Miss Mass
    Simon Christopher Francis Furman is a comic book writer, particularly associated with of a number of notable Transformers comics for Marvel UK, Marvel US, Dreamwave, and most recently, IDW. He also wrote the final episode of the Beast Wars: Transformers cartoon, the Transformers Ultimate Fan Guide, and several convention exclusive comics and novellas. His first published work appeared in 1984 in Fleetway's weekly comic, Scream! issue 3, writing the opening episode of "Terror of the Cats". He currently writes Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and Transformers for Titan Magazines in the UK and the US Transformers comic line published by IDW. He has also used the pseudonym Chris Francis on occasion, most notable when editing Marvel UK's Transformers in order to keep his role separate from writing some of the stories. Furman invented an origin story for the Transformers that involved an ancient struggle between the colossal godlike creator, Primus, and his counterpart, the colossal godlike destroyer, Unicron. The latter was borrowed from the Transformers movie, where he appeared with no given backstory (an origin for Unicron later came in the third season of the original Transformers
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    217
    Judd Winick

    Judd Winick

    • Fictional Characters Created: Grace
    Judd Winick (born February 12, 1970) is an American comic book, comic strip and television writer/artist and former reality television personality. Winick first gained fame for his 1994 stint on MTV's The Real World: San Francisco, before earning success for his work on comic books as Green Lantern, Green Arrow, and Pedro and Me, his autobiographical graphic novel about his friendship with Real World castmate and AIDS educator Pedro Zamora. He also created the animated TV series The Life and Times of Juniper Lee, which ran for three seasons on Cartoon Network. Winick was born February 12, 1970, and grew up in Dix Hills, New York. He graduated from high school in 1988 and entered the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor's School of Art, intending to emulate his cartoonist heroes, Garry Trudeau and Berkeley Breathed. His comic strip, "Nuts and Bolts", began running in the school’s newspaper, the Michigan Daily, in his freshman year, and he was selected to speak at graduation. U of M also published a small print-run of a collection of his strips called Watching the Spin-Cycle: The Nuts & Bolts Collection. In his senior year, Universal Press Syndicate, which syndicates strips such as
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    218
    Alfred Gough

    Alfred Gough

    • Fictional Characters Created: Chloe Sullivan
    Alfred Gough III (born August 22, 1967) is an American screenwriter and producer. Born in Leonardtown, Maryland, Gough graduated from St. Mary's Ryken High School (1985) and The Catholic University of America (1989). Gough attended the Peter Stark Producing Program at the University of Southern California where he teamed up with his writing partner Miles Millar. Millar and Gough enjoyed early success with a script they wrote while studying at USC. “Mango", a buddy-cop story where a cop who was allergic to animals was paired with an orangutan, sold to New Line Cinema for $400,000. The film was never made but it brought the pair valuable publicity. Al Gough and Millar have become prolific writers/producers. Their feature credits include the action-adventure “The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor,” for director Rob Cohen, the hit action-comedy “Shanghai Noon,” starring Jackie Chan, Owen Wilson and Lucy Liu, as well as its sequel “Shanghai Knights,” directed by David Dobkin, “Spider-Man 2,” starring Toby Maguire, “Herbie: Fully Loaded,” starring Lindsay Lohan, “Lethal Weapon 4,” starring Mel Gibson and Danny Glover and the recent “I Am Number Four,” produced by Michael Bay. Gough and
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    219
    David Simon

    David Simon

    • Fictional Characters Created: Howard "Bunny" Colvin
    David Simon (born 1960) is an American author, journalist, and a writer/producer of television series. He worked for the Baltimore Sun City Desk for twelve years. He wrote Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets and co-wrote The Corner: A Year in the Life of an Inner-City Neighborhood with Ed Burns. The former book was the basis for the NBC series Homicide: Life on the Street, on which Simon served as a writer and producer. Simon adapted the latter book into the HBO mini-series The Corner. He is the creator of the HBO television series The Wire, for which he served as executive producer, head writer, and show runner for all five seasons. He adapted the non-fiction book Generation Kill into an HBO mini-series and served as the show runner for the project. He was selected as one of the 2010 MacArthur Fellows and named an Utne Reader visionary in 2011. Simon also co-created the HBO series Treme with Eric Overmyer, which began its third season in 2012. Born in Washington, D.C., Simon attended Bethesda-Chevy Chase High School in Bethesda, Maryland and wrote for the school newspaper, The Tattler. He graduated from the University of Maryland, College Park. While at college he wrote for
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    220
    Frank Miller

    Frank Miller

    • Fictional Characters Created: Sarah Essen Gordon
    Frank Miller (born January 27, 1957) is an American writer, artist, and film director best known for his dark, film noir-style comic book stories and graphic novels Ronin, Daredevil: Born Again, Batman: The Dark Knight Returns, Sin City and 300. He also directed the film version of The Spirit, shared directing duties with Robert Rodriguez on Sin City and produced the film 300. Miller was born in Olney, Maryland, and raised in Montpelier, Vermont, the fifth of seven children of a nurse mother and a carpenter/electrician father. His family was Irish Catholic. Living in New York City's Hell's Kitchen influenced Miller's material in the 1980s. Miller lived in Los Angeles, California in the 1990s, which influenced Sin City. Miller moved back to Hell's Kitchen by 2001 and was creating Batman: The Dark Knight Strikes Again as the 9/11 terrorist attacks occurred about 4 miles from that neighborhood. Miller was formerly married to colorist Lynn Varley, who colored many of his noted works (from Ronin (1984) through 300 (1998), and the backgrounds to the movie 300 (2007)). Miller and Varley divorced in 2005. He has since been romantically linked to New York-based Shakespearean scholar
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    221
    Frazer Irving

    Frazer Irving

    • Fictional Characters Created: Jack Point
    Frazer Irving (born in the 1970s, Ilford, Essex) is a British comic book artist known for the 2000 AD series Necronauts. Irving studied art at the University of Portsmouth, England, after which he took various temporary jobs in London. Since breaking into the American market he has worked on a number of superhero titles, including a number with Grant Morrison. Irving has worked on Storming Heaven, a psychedelic tale based around Timothy Leary and Charles Manson (written by Gordon Rennie), and The Simping Detective and From Grace written by Simon Spurrier. He has done illustration work for RPG companies like Wizards of the Coast, Hogshead Publishing and Guardians of Order, as well as small press publications like The End Is Nigh. He also does animations on Flash for advertising agencies. Irving's style owes something to the art of Bernie Wrightson, but with a computer-driven edge. His work on Seven Soldiers: Klarion the Witch Boy has received some praise in the United States and writer Grant Morrison said: This led to further work at both of the Big Two, including the Iron Man: The Inevitable mini-series written by Joe Casey, and Silent War, a six-issue mini-series featuring the
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    222
    John Romita, Sr.

    John Romita, Sr.

    • Fictional Characters Created: Wolverine
    John V. Romita, Sr. (often known as simply John Romita) (born January 24, 1930) is an Italian-American comic-book artist best known for his work on Marvel Comics' The Amazing Spider-Man. He was inducted into the Will Eisner Comic Book Hall of Fame in 2002. Romita is the father of John Romita, Jr., also a comic-book artist, and husband of Virginia Romita, for many years Marvel's traffic manager. The son of a baker, John Romita was born and raised in Brooklyn, New York City, with three sisters and a brother. He graduated from Manhattan's School of Industrial Art in 1947, having attended for three years after spending ninth grade at a Brooklyn junior high school. Among his instructors were book illustrator Howard Simon and magazine illustrator Ben Clements, and his influences included comics artists Noel Sickles, Roy Crane, Milton Caniff, and, later, Alex Toth, and Carmine Infantino, as well as commercial illustrators Jon Whitcomb, Coby Whitmore, and Al Parker. Romita broke into comics in 1949 on the seminal series Famous Funnies. "Steven Douglas up there was a benefactor to all young artists", Romita recalled. "The first story he gave me was a love story. It was terrible. All the
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    223
    Kurt Vonnegut

    Kurt Vonnegut

    • Fictional Characters Created: Kilgore Trout
    Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. ( /ˈvɒnɨɡət/; November 11, 1922 – April 11, 2007) was a 20th-century American writer. His works such as Cat's Cradle (1963), Slaughterhouse-Five (1969), and Breakfast of Champions (1973) blend satire, gallows humor, and science fiction. As a citizen he was a lifelong supporter of the American Civil Liberties Union and a critical leftist intellectual. He was known for his humanist beliefs and was honorary president of the American Humanist Association. Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. was born in Indianapolis, Indiana, to third-generation German-American parents, Kurt Vonnegut, Sr. and Edith (Lieber). Both his father and his grandfather Bernard Vonnegut attended Massachusetts Institute of Technology and were architects in the Indianapolis firm of Vonnegut & Bohn. His great-grandfather Clemens Vonnegut, Sr. was the founder of the Vonnegut Hardware Company, an Indianapolis institution. Vonnegut graduated from Shortridge High School in Indianapolis in May 1940 and matriculated into Cornell University that fall. Though majoring in chemistry, he was Assistant Managing Editor and Associate Editor of The Cornell Daily Sun. He was a member of the Delta Upsilon Fraternity, as was his
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    224
    Larry David

    Larry David

    • Fictional Characters Created: Cosmo Kramer
    Lawrence Gene "Larry" David (born July 2, 1947) is an American actor, writer, comedian, and television producer. He is best known as the co-creator (with Jerry Seinfeld), head writer, and executive producer of the television series, Seinfeld, during the period, 1989 to 1996. David has subsequently gained further recognition for the HBO series, Curb Your Enthusiasm, a mostly improvised sitcom, also created by David, in which he stars as a semi-fictionalized version of himself. David's work won him a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Comedy Series in 1993. Formerly a standup comedian, David went into television comedy, writing and starring in ABC's Fridays, as well as writing briefly for Saturday Night Live. He has won two Primetime Emmy Awards as well as being voted by fellow comedians and comedy insiders as number 23 of the greatest comedy stars ever in a British poll to select The Comedian's Comedian. Lawrence Gene David was born to a Jewish family in the neighborhood of Sheepshead Bay in Brooklyn, New York. He graduated from Sheepshead Bay High School and then the University of Maryland, with a bachelor's degree in history (1969), and then in business (1970). After college,
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    225
    Matt Maiellaro

    Matt Maiellaro

    • Fictional Characters Created: Meatwad
    Matthew Gerard Maiellaro (Born August 17, 1966) is the co-creator and writer of the cult television animated Adult Swim shows, Aqua Teen Hunger Force and Perfect Hair Forever, and creator of 12 Oz. Mouse. He is a native of Pensacola, Florida, and a graduate of Pensacola Catholic High School. Prior to his work on Aqua Teen Hunger Force, Maiellaro was a producer and writer for Space Ghost Coast to Coast since the show's inception in 1994. Maiellaro met friend and future writing partner, Dave Willis when Willis came on as a staff writer in 1995. The two have since made a few short independent films together, most notably the live-action short A Day Off, which follows a Michael Myers puppet and documents what he does on his day off from murder. In 2000, Maiellaro and Willis created a spin-off from Space Ghost Coast to Coast -- Aqua Teen Hunger Force. Seven years later, Maiellaro and Willis released a full-length Aqua Teen Hunger Force feature film on April 13, 2007. His writing is characterized by surreal humour and at times, a total disregard for traditional forms of storytelling. Matt Maiellaro started out as a first and second assistant director on full-length feature films such as
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    226
    Miles Millar

    Miles Millar

    • Fictional Characters Created: Chloe Sullivan
    Miles Millar (born c. 1967) is a British screenwriter and producer. Miles is best known for co-developing and writing the long-running Superman-inspired television series Smallville, alongside his partner Alfred Gough. Millar was educated at Claremont Fan Court School, and is a graduate of Christ's College, Cambridge, where he was Chairman of Cambridge University Conservative Association. Millar attended the Peter Stark Producing Program at the University of Southern California where he teamed up with his writing partner Al Gough. Millar and Gough enjoyed early success with a script they wrote while studying at USC. Mango, a buddy-cop story where a cop who was allergic to animals was paired with an orangutan, sold to New Line Cinema for $400,000. The film was never made but it brought the pair valuable publicity. Miles Millar along with his partner Al Gough are prolific writers/producers. Their feature credits include the action-adventure The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor, for director Rob Cohen, the hit action-comedy Shanghai Noon, starring Jackie Chan, Owen Wilson and Lucy Lui, as well as its sequel Shanghai Knights, directed by David Dobkin, Spider-Man 2, starring Toby
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    227
    O. Henry

    O. Henry

    • Fictional Characters Created: Jeff Peters
    William Sydney Porter (September 11, 1862 – June 5, 1910), known by his pen name O. Henry, was an American writer. O. Henry's short stories are known for their wit, wordplay, warm characterization and clever twist endings. William Sidney Porter was born on September 11, 1862, in Greensboro, North Carolina. His middle name at birth was Sidney; he changed the spelling to Sydney in 1898. His parents were Dr. Algernon Sidney Porter (1825–1888), a physician, and Mary Jane Virginia Swaim Porter (1833–1865). They were married on April 20, 1858. When William was three, his mother died from tuberculosis, and he and his father moved into the home of his maternal grandmother. As a child, Porter was always reading, everything from classics to dime novels; his favorite works were Lane's translation of One Thousand and One Nights, and Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy. Porter graduated from his aunt Evelina Maria Porter's elementary school in 1876. He then enrolled at the Lindsey Street High School. His aunt continued to tutor him until he was fifteen. In 1879, he started working in his uncle's drugstore and in 1881, at the age of nineteen, he was licensed as a pharmacist. At the drugstore, he also
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    228
    Paul Ryan

    Paul Ryan

    • Fictional Characters Created: Lyja
    Paul Ryan (born 23 September 1949 in Massachusetts) is an American comic book and comic strip cartoonist. Ryan has worked extensively for Marvel Comics and DC Comics on a number of super-hero comics. He currently pencils and inks the daily comic strip The Phantom for King Features Syndicate. Paul Ryan attended St. Polycarp Grammar School in Somerville, Massachusetts and graduated from St. Mary of the Annunciation High School in 1967. He graduated from the Massachusetts College of Art in 1971 with a Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree in Graphic Design. After graduation Ryan enlisted in the United States National Guard and was assigned to Fort Dix, New Jersey for Basic Training and AIT (Advanced Individual Training) in automotive mechanics. He later attended Massachusetts Military Academy in Wakefield, Massachusetts for officer training. During this period Ryan landed a job in the Graphics Department of Metcalf & Eddy Engineering in Boston, where he worked for 11 years. The Boston Globe reports that "Ryan began his training as a child, growing up in Somerville. He'd park himself in front of the television each night to watch George Reeves in the Adventures of Superman He has said that as a
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    229
    Victor Appleton

    Victor Appleton

    • Fictional Characters Created: Tom Swift
    Victor Appleton was a house pseudonym used by the Stratemeyer Syndicate, most famous for being associated with the Tom Swift series of books. The following series have been published under the Victor Appleton name: Victor Appleton is credited as being the author of the Don Sturdy series which include: Ghostwriters of these books included Howard Roger Garis, John W. Duffield, W. Bert Foster, Debra Doyle with James D.Macdonald, F. Gwynplaine MacIntyre, Robert E. Vardeman, Thomas M. Mitchell, and James Duncan Lawrence.
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    230
    Walt Simonson

    Walt Simonson

    • Fictional Characters Created: Rictor
    Walter "Walt" Simonson (born September 2, 1946) is an American comic book writer and artist. After studying geology at Amherst College, he transferred to the Rhode Island School of Design, graduating in 1972. His thesis project there was The Star Slammers, which was published as a black and white promotional comic book for the 1974 World Science Fiction Convention in Washington, D.C. (DisCon II). In 1983, he produced another version of the story in graphic novel form for Marvel Comics. Simonson continued the adventures of the Star Slammers in a limited series in the mid-1990s as one of the founders of Malibu Comics' short-lived Bravura label. Simonson has won numerous awards for his work, and has influenced artists such as Arthur Adams and Bryan Hitch. Simonson's first professional published comic book work was Weird War Tales #10 (Jan. 1973) for DC Comics. He also did a number of illustrations for the Harry N. Abrams, Inc. edition of The Hobbit, and at least one unrelated print (a Samurai warrior) was purchased by Harvard University's Fogg Museum and included in its annual undergraduate-use loan program. Simonson's breakthrough illustration job was Manhunter, a backup feature in
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    231
    Alan Grant

    Alan Grant

    • Fictional Characters Created: Jeremiah Arkham
    Alan Grant (born 1949) is a Scottish comic book writer known for writing Judge Dredd in 2000 AD as well as various Batman titles during the late 1980s and early 1990s. He is also the creator of the character Anarky. Alan Grant first entered the comics industry in 1967 when he became an editor for D.C. Thomson before moving to London from Dundee in 1970 to work for IPC on various romance magazines. After going back to college and having a series of jobs, Grant found himself back in Dundee and living on Social Security. He then met John Wagner, another former D.C. Thompson editor, who was helping put together a new science fiction comic for IPC, 2000 A.D., and was unable to complete his other work. Wagner asked Grant if he could help him write the Tarzan comic he was working on; so began the Wagner/Grant writing partnership. Wagner asked Grant to write a strip for Starlord, a 2000AD spin off, which eventually got Grant noticed within IPC. On a trip to London, Grant was introduced to Kelvin Gosnell, then editor of 2000AD, who offered Grant an editorial position on the comic. One of Grant's first jobs was to oversee the merger of 2000AD and Tornado, an unsuccessful boys adventure
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    232
    Bob Kane

    Bob Kane

    • Fictional Characters Created: Batman
    Bob Kane (born Robert Kahn; October 24, 1915 – November 3, 1998) was an American comic book artist and writer, credited as the creator of the DC Comics superhero Batman, along with Bill Finger. He was inducted into both the comic book industry's Jack Kirby Hall of Fame in 1994 and the Will Eisner Comic Book Hall of Fame in 1996. Robert Kahn was born in New York City, New York. His parents, Augusta and Herman Kahn, an engraver, were of Eastern European Jewish descent. A high school friend of fellow cartoonist and future Spirit creator Will Eisner, Robert Kahn graduated from DeWitt Clinton High School and legally changed his name to Bob Kane at age 18. He studied art at Cooper Union before "joining the Max Fleischer Studio as a trainee animator in 1934". He entered the comics field two years later, in 1936, freelancing original material to editor Jerry Iger's comic book Wow, What A Magazine!, including his first pencil and ink work on the serial Hiram Hick. The following year, Kane began to work at Iger's subsequent studio, Eisner & Iger, which was one of the first comic book "packagers" that produced comics on demand for publishers entering the new medium during its late-1930s and
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    233
    Brian K. Vaughan

    Brian K. Vaughan

    • Fictional Characters Created: Molly Hayes
    Brian Keller Vaughan (born 1976) is an American comic book and television writer. He is best known for the comic book series Y: The Last Man, Ex Machina, Runaways, Pride of Baghdad, and Saga and was a writer, story editor and producer of the television series Lost, during seasons three through five. He was nominated for a Writers Guild of America Award for Best Dramatic Series at the February 2009 ceremony for his work on the fourth season of Lost. The writing staff was nominated for the award again at the February 2010 ceremony for their work on the fifth season. Wired describes his comics work as "quirky, acclaimed stories that don't pander and still pound pulses". His creator-owned comics work is also characterized by "finite, meticulous, years-long story arcs", on which Vaughan comments, "That's storytelling, with a beginning, a middle, and an end. Something like Spider-Man, a book that never has a third act, that seems crazy." Brian K. Vaughan was born in Cleveland, Ohio, and grew up in Rocky River and Westlake. As of 2009, Vaughan's parents, Geoffrey and Catherine Vaughan, still live in Westlake. Vaughan decided he wanted to be a writer while attending St. Ignatius High
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    234
    Carol Leifer

    Carol Leifer

    • Fictional Characters Created: Elaine Benes
    Carol Leifer (/ˈliːfər/LEE-fər; born July 27, 1956) is an American comedian, writer, producer and actor whose career as a stand-up comedian started in the 1970s when she was in college. David Letterman discovered her performing in a comedy club in the 1980s and she has since been a guest on Late Night with David Letterman over twenty-five times as well as numerous other shows and venues. She has written many television scripts including for The Larry Sanders Show, Saturday Night Live, and most notably, Seinfeld. Leifer's "inner monologue" observational style is often autobiographical encompassing subjects about her Jewish ancestry and upbringing, coming out, same-sex marriage, relationships (having been married previously to a man and now partnered with a woman) and parenting. Leifer recently became vegan, saying "I recently became vegan because I felt that as a Jewish lesbian, I wasn’t part of a small enough minority. So now I’m a Jewish lesbian vegan." Leifer was born in East Williston, New York, to an Ashkenazi Jewish family, the daughter of Anna, a psychologist, and Seymour Leifer, an optometrist. While studying for a theater degree at Binghamton University, Leifer accompanied
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    235
    Casey Jones

    Casey Jones

    • Fictional Characters Created: Aftershock
    Jonathan Luther "John" "Casey" Jones (March 14, 1863 – April 30, 1900) was an American railroad engineer from Jackson, Tennessee, who worked for the Illinois Central Railroad (IC). As a boy, he lived near Cayce, Kentucky, where he acquired the nickname of "Cayce," which he chose to spell as "Casey." On April 30, 1900, he alone was killed when his passenger train, the Cannonball Express, collided with a stalled freight train at Vaughan, Mississippi, on a foggy and rainy night. His dramatic death, trying to stop his train and save lives, made him a hero; he was immortalized in a popular ballad sung by his friend Wallace Saunders, an African-American engine wiper for the IC. Dark-haired Mary Joanna ("Janie") Brady, daughter of the boarding house owner, noticed Jones' remarkable appetite and the way he blushed whenever she flashed him a smile. Jones soon fell in love with her and decided to propose marriage. Since she was Catholic, he decided to be baptized on November 11, 1886 at St. Bridget's Catholic Church in Whistler, Alabama, to please her. They were married at St. Mary's Catholic Church in Jackson on November 25, 1886, and bought a house at 211 West Chester Street in Jackson,
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    236
    Dave Gibbons

    Dave Gibbons

    • Fictional Characters Created: Isamot Kol
    Dave Gibbons (born 14 April 1949) is an English comic book artist, writer and sometime letterer. He is best known for his collaborations with writer Alan Moore, which include the miniseries Watchmen and the Superman story "For the Man Who Has Everything". He also was an artist for the UK anthology 2000 AD, for which he contributed a large body of work from its first issue in 1977. Gibbons broke into British comics by working on horror and action titles for both DC Thomson and IPC. When the science-fiction anthology title 2000 AD was set up in the mid-1970s, Gibbons contributed artwork to the first issue, Prog 01 (February 1977), and went on to draw the first 24 installments of Harlem Heroes, one of the founding (and pre-Judge Dredd) strips. Mid-way through the comic's first year he began illustrating Dan Dare, a cherished project for Gibbons who had been a fan of the original series and artist Frank Hampson who, alongside Frank Bellamy, Don Lawrence and Ron Turner are well-liked and inspirational artists to Gibbons, whose "style evolved out of [his] love for the MAD Magazine artists like Wally Wood and Will Elder". Also working on early feature Ro-Busters (after Starlord merged
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    237
    David W. Mack

    David W. Mack

    • Fictional Characters Created: Echo
    David W. Mack (born 1972) is an American comic book artist and writer, best known for his creator-owned series Kabuki. Mack is known for his unique painted and collage-like work. Rather than employ computers in composing multi-layered artwork, Mack prefers to apply objects directly onto his art. Mack graduated from Ludlow High School in 1990, where he had written and acted in many of the school theatre productions. He gave the commencement address there in 2003. Mack did not attend a specialized art school, but earned scholarships to Northern Kentucky University for five years, a four-year scholarship based on his portfolio of art works, and in his fifth year the Dean's Scholarship for academics. He graduated in 1995 with a BFA in graphic design. As a college student Mack used his drawing, writing and creativity to explore the many aspects of art while retaining his anonymity. While at Northern Kentucky University David Mack took classes ranging from acting and theater, world religions and mythology, world history, children’s literature, Japanese language and even anatomy and physiology, all of which influenced his work. Mack began publishing Kabuki in 1994 with Caliber Press, and
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    238
    Dwayne McDuffie

    Dwayne McDuffie

    • Fictional Characters Created: Icon
    Dwayne Glenn McDuffie (February 20, 1962 – February 21, 2011) was an American writer of comic books and television, known for creating the animated television series Ben 10, Static Shock, writing and producing the animated series Justice League Unlimited, and co-founding the pioneering minority-owned-and-operated comic-book company Milestone Media. McDuffie earned three Eisner Award nominations for his work in comics. Dwayne McDuffie was born and raised in Detroit, Michigan, the son of Edna McDuffie Gardner. He attended The Roeper School and went on to the University of Michigan, graduating with a bachelor's degree in English, then earning a master's degree in physics. He then moved to New York to attend film school at New York University's Tisch School of the Arts. While McDuffie was working as a copy editor at the business magazine Investment Dealers' Digest, a friend got him an interview for an assistant editor position at Marvel Comics. Going on staff at Marvel as editor Bob Budiansky's assistant on special projects, McDuffie helped develop the company's first superhero trading cards. He also scripted stories for Marvel. His first major work was Damage Control, a miniseries
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    239
    Eli Attie

    Eli Attie

    • Fictional Characters Created: Kate Harper
    Eli Attie is a writer, producer, and former political operative. He served as Vice President Al Gore's chief speechwriter from 1997 until Gore's concession of the 2000 election, and before that was a special assistant to President Bill Clinton. Attie is currently a writer and co-executive producer of Fox-TV's House. He previously worked as a writer on the NBC-TV series The West Wing for most of its run; according to the IMDb, he was credited or jointly credited as a writer of 21 episodes, and served as a producer and supervising producer in the show's later seasons. A number of that show's story lines came from Attie's own experiences working in politics and in the White House. According to David Remnick's biography of Barack Obama, "The Bridge," and other news sources, Attie used then-State Senator Obama as a model for the character of Matt Santos, a presidential candidate played by actor Jimmy Smits in the final two seasons of The West Wing. Together with John Wells, Attie was nominated for Writers Guild and Humanitas awards for the episode "Election Day: Part 2," in which Santos wins the presidency. Attie is a seven-time Emmy nominee; he shared a 2002 Emmy Award for "The West
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    240
    Fran Drescher

    Fran Drescher

    • Fictional Characters Created: Maxwell Sheffield
    Francine Joy "Fran" Drescher (born September 30, 1957) is an American film and television actress, comedian, producer, and activist. She is best known for her role as Fran Fine in the hit TV series, The Nanny, her nasal voice and thick New York accent. Drescher made her screen debut with a small role in the 1977 blockbuster film Saturday Night Fever prior to appearing in films such as the biopic American Hot Wax (1978), and Wes Craven's horror film Summer of Fear (1978). In the 1980s, she gained recognition as a comedic actress in the films The Hollywood Knights (1980), Doctor Detroit (1983), This Is Spinal Tap (1984), and UHF (1989) while establishing a television career with guest appearances on several series. In 1993, she achieved wider fame as Fran Fine in her own sitcom vehicle The Nanny, for which she was nominated for two Emmy Awards and two Golden Globe Awards for Best Actress in a Comedy Television Series during the show's run. She received further recognition for her performances in Jack (1996) and The Beautician and the Beast (1997) and reinforced her reputation as a leading sitcom star with Living With Fran (2005–2006) and Happily Divorced (2011–present). A uterine
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    241
    Gary Friedrich

    Gary Friedrich

    • Fictional Characters Created: Phantom Eagle
    Gary Friedrich (born August 21, 1943, Jackson, Missouri). is an American comic book writer best known for his Silver Age stories for Marvel Comics' Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos, and for the following era's Monster of Frankenstein series and co-creating the supernatural motorcyclist the Ghost Rider. Friedrich — no relation to fellow comics writer Mike Friedrich — was the first successful new writer brought in to the burgeoning 1960s Marvel after fellow Missourian Roy Thomas. Succeeding Thomas on Sgt. Fury, Friedrich and the art team of Dick Ayers and John Severin produced a World War II series for the Vietnam years, combining militaristic camaraderie and gung ho humor with a regretful sense of war as a terrible last resort. The humanistic military drama was noted for its semi-anthological "The" stories, such as "The Medic" and "The Deserter". Additionally, one story was an homage to / retcon of the movie Casablanca, and Friedrich annuals caught up with the Howlers in both the 1950s Korean War, and in the 1960s in the Vietnam War. Gary Friedrich, the son of Jerry and Elsie Friedrich, was born and raised in Jackson, Missouri, where he graduated from Jackson High School in 1961.
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    242
    Herman Melville

    Herman Melville

    • Fictional Characters Created: Ishmael
    Herman Melville (August 1, 1819 – September 28, 1891) was an American novelist, short story writer, essayist, and poet. He is best known for his novel Moby-Dick. His first three books gained much contemporary attention (the first, Typee, becoming a bestseller), and after a fast-blooming literary success in the late 1840s, his popularity declined precipitously in the mid-1850s and never recovered during his lifetime. When he died in 1891, he was almost completely forgotten. It was not until the "Melville Revival" in the early 20th century that his work won recognition, especially Moby-Dick, which was hailed as one of the literary masterpieces of both American and world literature. He was the first writer to have his works collected and published by the Library of America. Herman Melville was born in New York City on August 1, 1819, the third of eight children of Allan and Maria Gansevoort Melvill. After her husband Allan died, between 1832 and 1834, Maria added an "e" to the family surname — seemingly at the behest of her son Gansevoort. Part of a well-established and colorful Boston family, Melville's father spent a good deal of time abroad as a commission merchant and an importer
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    243
    Josh Schwartz

    Josh Schwartz

    • Fictional Characters Created: Dr. Neil Roberts
    Josh Schwartz (born August 6, 1976) is an American screenwriter and television producer. Schwartz is best known for creating and executive producing the Fox's teen drama series The O.C. Schwartz recently developed The CW's teen drama series Gossip Girl from the Gossip Girl book series, and co-created NBC's action-comedy-spy series, Chuck. At 26, he became the youngest person in network history to create a network series and run its day-to-day production when he ran The O.C. He currently resides in Los Angeles. Schwartz was born in 1976 in Providence, Rhode Island to Jewish parents: Steve and Honey Schwartz. His parents were both toy inventors at Hasbro, working on the development of toys such as Transformers and My Little Pony, until they went on to start their own company. Schwartz grew up on the East side of Providence, Rhode Island with a younger brother, Danny, and a younger sister, Katie. Schwartz always had ambitions of being a writer since early childhood. When Schwartz was seven years old, he won an essay-writing contest at sleep-away camp for a review of the recently released movie Gremlins; the opening line was "Spielberg has done it again" and stood out amongst the pile
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    244
    Keron Grant

    Keron Grant

    • Fictional Characters Created: Vulcan
    Keron Grant (born August 23, 1976, in Montego Bay) is a Jamaican-American comic book artist, who has worked mostly for Marvel Comics. His first published work was a pinup in the back of one of the final issues of Dale Keown's Pitt. His first steady comics work was drawing three issues of the unpublished Century comic from Rob Liefeld's Awesome Comics. His job drawing online comics for the Matrix series led to a short stint on Iron Man when Matrix comics inker Rob Stull brought Grant to the attention of Marvel editors.
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    245
    Max Allan Collins

    Max Allan Collins

    • Fictional Characters Created: Ms. Tree
    Max Allan Collins (born March 3, 1948) is an American mystery writer. He has written novels, screenplays, comic books, comic strips, trading cards, short stories, movie novelizations and historical fiction. He wrote the graphic novel Road to Perdition (which was developed into a film in 2002), created the comic book private eye Ms. Tree, and took over writing the Dick Tracy comic strip from creator Chester Gould and one of the Batman comic books for a time. He wrote books to expand on the Dark Angel TV series. He has also written books and comics based on the TV series franchise CSI. More recently, he has written a book, Buried Deep, based on the TV series Bones. He has also written two sequel novels to Road to Perdition: Road to Purgatory and Road to Paradise. He also wrote three more graphic novels starring the characters from Road to Perdition. These graphic novels, called collectively On the Road to Perdition, form the basis of the film. He also co-founded the International Association of Media Tie-in Writers with Lee Goldberg. The IAMTW is an organization for writers of tie-ins and novelizations. Collins studied in the Iowa Writers' Workshop at the University of Iowa. Collins
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    246
    Michael Uslan

    Michael Uslan

    • Fictional Characters Created: Captain Stingaree
    Michael E. Uslan (born June 2, 1952) is a producer of the Batman movies and was the first instructor to teach "Comic Book Folklore" at Indiana University. Uslan has been a resident of Cedar Grove, New Jersey. Uslan was born in Bayonne, New Jersey and was an avid comic book collector from a very young age, owning a collection that included the second issue of Batman and the first Superman comic, among others. He grew up in Ocean Township, Monmouth County, New Jersey and graduated from Ocean Township High School in 1969, by which time his collection filled the garage of his home with 30,000 comic books. While still an undergraduate and a graduate at the same time at Indiana University School of Law - Bloomington, attempting to break into the film industry by sending off over 130 résumés (typed on a typewriter), Uslan "developed a course idea for the Experimental Curriculum program at I.U." Uslan recalls that Roger Stern "has been teaching a one-hour credit experimental course on comic book history and art," while he (Uslan) was "having fun with an I.U. Free University course on 'The Comic Book Hero'." Stern and Uslan discovered they shared interests, and when Stern "couldn't stand
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    247
    Neil Gaiman

    Neil Gaiman

    • Fictional Characters Created: Dream
    Neil Richard Gaiman ( /ˈɡeɪmən/; born 10 November 1960) is an English author of short fiction, novels, comic books, graphic novels, audio theatre and films. His notable works include the comic book series The Sandman and novels Stardust, American Gods, Coraline, and The Graveyard Book. He has won numerous awards, including Hugo, Nebula, Bram Stoker, Newbery Medal, and Carnegie Medal in Literature. He is the first author to win both the Newbery and the Carnegie medals for the same work. Gaiman's family is of Polish and other Eastern European Jewish origins; his great-grandfather emigrated from Antwerp before 1914 and his grandfather eventually settled in the Hampshire city of Portsmouth and established a chain of grocery stores. His father, David Bernard Gaiman, worked in the same chain of stores; his mother, Sheila Gaiman (née Goldman), was a pharmacist. He has two younger sisters, Claire and Lizzy. After living for a period in the nearby town of Portchester, Hampshire, where Neil was born in 1960, the Gaimans moved in 1965 to the West Sussex town of East Grinstead where his parents studied Dianetics at the Scientology centre in the town; one of Gaiman's sisters works for the
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    248
    Ron Marz

    Ron Marz

    • Fictional Characters Created: Kyle Rayner
    Ron Marz is an American comic book writer, known for his work on titles such as Silver Surfer, Green Lantern, Marvel vs DC, Batman/Aliens and Witchblade. Marz is known for his work on Silver Surfer and Green Lantern, as well as the DC vs. Marvel crossover and Batman/Aliens. He also worked on the CrossGen Comics series Scion, Mystic, Sojourn, and The Path. At Dark Horse Comics he created Samurai: Heaven and Earth and various Star Wars comics. He has also done work for Devil's Due Publishing's Aftermath line, namely Blade of Kumori. In 1995, he had a brief run on XO-Manowar, for Valiant Comics. While writing Green Lantern, Marz wrote the "Emerald Twilight" storyline, in which the character of Hal Jordan, stricken with grief, became a mass murderer, leading to the destruction of the Green Lantern Corps, and Kyle Rayner being chosen as the last Green Lantern. Marz's 2000s work includes a number of Top Cow books, including Witchblade, which he has written from issue #80 (November 2004) to issue #150, plus a number of specials and crossover stories featuring the character, such as Witchblade/The Punisher in 2007 and Witchblade/Devi in 2008. His other Top Cow work includes Cyberforce #1 -
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    249
    Stan Lee

    Stan Lee

    • Fictional Characters Created: Professor X
    Stanley Martin Lieber (born December 28, 1922), better known by the pen name Stan Lee, is an American comic book writer, editor, actor, producer, publisher, television personality, and the former president and chairman of Marvel Comics. In collaboration with several artists, most notably Jack Kirby and Steve Ditko, he co-created Spider-Man, the Hulk, the X-Men, the Fantastic Four, Iron Man, Thor, and many other fictional characters, introducing complex, naturalistic characters and a thoroughly shared universe into superhero comic books. In addition, he headed the first major successful challenge to the industry's censorship organization, the Comics Code Authority, and forced it to reform its policies. Lee subsequently led the expansion of Marvel Comics from a small division of a publishing house to a large multimedia corporation. He was inducted into the comic book industry's Will Eisner Comic Book Hall of Fame in 1994 and the Jack Kirby Hall of Fame in 1995. Stan Lee was born Stanley Martin Lieber in New York City on December 28, 1922, in the apartment of his Romanian-born Jewish immigrant parents, Celia (née Solomon) and Jack Lieber, at the corner of West 98th Street and West End
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    250
    Tom Joyner

    Tom Joyner

    • Fictional Characters Created: Damage
    Thomas "Tom" Joyner (born November 23, 1949) is an American radio host, host of the nationally syndicated The Tom Joyner Morning Show, and also founder of REACH Media Inc., the Tom Joyner Foundation, and BlackAmericaWeb.com. Joyner was born in Tuskegee, Alabama, the son of Frances and Hercules L. Joyner. Tom came from an educated family: his grandfather Oscar was one of only 3,000 black physicians in the United States, taking a degree in medicine in 1909 . Both of his parents were graduates of historically black colleges, and both Tom and his brother Albert attended Tuskegee Institute, now known as Tuskegee University. Tom Joyner graduated with a degree in sociology in 1978 While a student at Tuskegee, Joyner joined the fraternity Omega Psi Phi. At first, his goal was to be a musician, and he joined a band that included his college friend Lionel Richie, but the band did not make any money and his family encouraged him to seek another way to make a living . Joyner had been involved in college radio, and after graduation, he began his broadcasting career in Montgomery, Alabama immediately upon graduation, and worked at a number of radio stations in the South and Midwest, including
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