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Best Family name of All Time

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    1
    Cariddi

    Cariddi

    The Cariddi (or Caridi) family surname is believed to have its roots deep into antiquity. Julius Caesar refers to the Caridi family in his ‘Commentaries’(c50 BC)(1). However the name, which in Greek is Karideus/Karidis, existed in ancient times because its root can be traced back to the Myceneans (at least 1000 BC) like so: Ka-Ri-Se-U (Keriseus-Karideus) (2) More recent evidence regarding the Caridi family is provided by the Renaissance genealogist Mugnos (1). He remarks that there were 'some' men (i.e. not just one) mentioned by Julius Caesar, who had this surname, i.e. they already were an established family with ancestors and descendants. According to Mugnos, they were 'noteworthy' (in Italian 'chiari'), and this suggests that they were high officials and of considerable standing in order to be important enough to be mentioned by Julius Caesar. The family as a whole was most likely a member of the Ancient Roman nobility, who had their sons sent to the army to become military leaders, as it was the custom at the time. After the fall of the Roman Empire, these families survived during the middle ages (c700-1200AD) perhaps under Papal rule in Rome. It is possible that branches of
    9.14
    7 votes
    2
    Sclafani

    Sclafani

    Sclafani is an Italian surname originary of Sicily. The Sclafani coat of arms is divided in half and bears two cranes facing one another, inversely colored in argent (silver) to signify peace, and sable (black) to signify jewels, specifically the diamond. An eagle is displayed with a count's crown of or (gold) signifying the family's noble heritage. Crane - Vigilance, close parental bond. Eagle - Person of noble nature, strength, bravery, and alertness; one who is high-spirited, ingenious, quick-witted, and judicious. True magnanimity and strength of mind. Wings displayed signifies protection. The surname "Sclafani" is derived from the Greek "Aesculapii fanum," meaning "Sacred to the god Aesculapius," the Roman god of medicine. This implies the fact that the Sclafani family since its origins has been gifted in the field of medicine, and is verified by the presence of ancient thermal healing baths that still stand today in a city founded by the family, Sclafani Bagni. The Greek version of the surname Sclafani, "Sclavounos", can be located in the "Dictionnaire Historique et Généalogique des Grandes Familles de Grèce", a book which contains information about Greek nobility. The exact
    7.71
    7 votes
    3
    Corrigan

    Corrigan

    The Corrigan (O'Corrigan, Carrigan, Corocan, Courigan, Currigan) surname is of Irish descent. Translated Corrigan means "Spear". The name is believed to have originated from Coirdhecan of the Cineal Eoghain. It is also believed to be connected to the Maguire clan. The Corrigan surname was popular in the 17th century in County Fermanagh in Ireland. Today, the name is spread out across most counties in Ireland and some of the United States and Canada. The Irish sept O Corragain who had their stronghold in County Fermanagh, as a branch of the Maguires is in fact, the origin of those named Corrigan, Carrigan, Courigan, Corgan, and Currigan. The early records of the name in the Annals of the Four Masters, indicate that the name was closely associated with clerics and abbots. The name was established in the Middle Ages, going south into Counties Monaghan, Meath, Roscommon and Offaly. From the name Ballycorrigan near Nenagh in County Tipperary, it also appears that the name was prominent in that county. The Corrigan Coat of Arms is a chevron between two trefoils slipt, in chief and in base a lizard passant vert. Their motto is: Consilio et Impetu (English: By counsel and Force).
    8.50
    6 votes
    4
    Karekar

    Karekar

    “Karekar' is a surname of the Daivajna Brahmin community, predominantly found in Goa, coastal Maharashtra, some parts of southern Maharashtra, and northern Karnataka (Belgaum, Hubli, Yellapur). It is believed that the “mula Purusha” of Bharadwaj gotra of this clan migrated from “Gouda” desha in Magadha (now in West Bengal) to the south with their family deity “Gajant Lakshmi”. This early ancestor settled with the clan on an island in Goa called “Chudamani” (today’s Chorao or Chodan). The place on the island where they settled was called "Care", “Karrai” (kaa-rai) or "Carpea" (now called "Karbhatwado" ) located on the south side of the island and a temple dedicated to their deity was built on the banks of river “Mandovi” (Gomati).Thus the temple was built in a secluded restricted forest and thus the deity came to be known as “Vana-devata” (deity of the forests). Also another temple of the guardian deity “Ravalnatha“ (Roulu) in the form of Shiva was also erected. These people also worshipped “Shano” and “Pisso Roulu “as their “Grama Devata” The clan was divided into three groups (Vangors or Vangad),which belonged to the following gotras This clan established a well refined village
    8.50
    6 votes
    5
    Tarnowski

    Tarnowski

    Tarnowski (plural: Tarnowscy) is the surname of a Polish szlachta (nobility) family. Because Polish adjectives have different forms for the genders, Tarnowska is the form for a female family member. The Tarnowski family was one of the oldest and most powerful magnate families in Poland. The family got the greatest importance in the 14th, 15th and the 16th centuries, when family members from Tarnów, Melsztyn and later from Jarosław beside the throne of Piast and Jagiellon kings of Poland, from father to son held ten times the office of voivode of Kraków Voivodeship and six times the office of castellans of Kraków. The history of the family started with the trusted advisor of the last Piast kings Comes Spytek z Melsztyna, the progenitor of the Tarnowski-Melsztyński-Jarosławski family. By 1320 he held the office of voivode of the Kraków Voivodeship and from 1331 the highest secular office in the Kingdom of Poland, castellan of Kraków. For military service during wars, King Władysław I Łokietek gave him large estates on Dunajec river, where Spytek founded the city of Tarnów in 1330 and build two stronghold castles, in Tarnów and in Melsztyn, about 1340. After the death of Spytek, the
    8.33
    6 votes
    6

    Nunes

    Nunes is a Galician and Portuguese surname, originally a patronymic meaning Son of Nuno. Notable people with the name include:
    8.17
    6 votes
    7
    Oelfke

    Oelfke

    Oelfke (help·info) is a German surname and a Plattdüütsch (Low German) first name for boys. The name Oelfke, name of farmers from the "Hohe Heidmark" of the administrative district Soltau-Fallingbostel in Lower-Saxony, Germany traces back to Ol, Oel=Adel (nobility), Od=Besitz (property), like Oleff, Oloff, Odulleib, that's the one who has the life in sense of "being inheritor", simply expressed that's the one who owns the inheritance of farmer. The farm's name "Oelfkenhof" in Oerbke is already traced to the "Celler Schatzregister" of 1438. A descendant of the Oelfke family immigrated to the area of Hamburg, Minnesota where thousands of his descendants now live. Possible alternatives are Oelfken, Oelke, Oelkers.
    8.00
    6 votes
    8
    Ranghar

    Ranghar

    Ranghar (Urdu: رانگھڑ) are a Muslim ethnic group, which is found in Sindh and Punjab provinces of Pakistan and Haryana, Himachal Pradesh, Delhi and Uttar Pradesh states of India. Ranghar were native to Indian state of Haryana and also found in the Doab region of Uttar Pradesh, as well as Delhi in India. Presently, the Haryana Ranghar are now found in the provinces of Sindh and Punjab of Pakistan, while those of western Uttar Pradesh remain in India. The term Ranghar is very rarely used by the community itself, who prefer the self-designation Musalman Rajput. The Ranghar use the titles of Rana, Rao, and Kunwar, prefixed to their given names, and use Khan as a surname. In Haryana, the Ranghar spoke a dialect of their own, called Ranghari, which is itself a dialect of Haryanvi, and many in Pakistan still use the language. Those of Uttar Pradesh speak Khari Boli among themselves, and Urdu with outsiders. After independence of Pakistan in 1947, many Uttar Pradesh Ranghars also migrated to Sindh in Pakistan and mostly settling in Karachi. They are entirely Sunni Hanafi Muslims and follow Deobandi and Barelvi schools of South Asia. The term Ranghar has also been used for closely related
    7.00
    7 votes
    9
    Bhatnagar

    Bhatnagar

    Bhatnagar ( भटनागर) is a common surname used mostly in northern India among the Kayastha caste of Hindus. They came from the second son of the first wife of Lord Chitragupta, the recordkeeper of the god of death, Yama. Chitragupta. Shree Chitraksh (Bhatnagar) was a disciple of sage Bhat. His wife was Bhadrakalini, and they worshipped Jayanti. Maharaj Chitraguptji sent Shree Chitraksh to establish a kingdom in the region of Bhat river at Bhattdesh and Malwa. They established Chittor and Chitrakoot. He then settled there and his progeny came to be known as Bhatnagar.
    7.83
    6 votes
    10

    Hanchate

    Hanchāté (pronounced Hunchaatey), is a surname prevalent among the people of Bhavsar Kshatriya Samaj, a sub-caste of Kshatriyas, in the state of Maharashtra and who have spread to the states of Andhra Pradesh, Tamil Nadu & Karnataka, during the times of Shivaji, along with other Bhavsars.
    7.67
    6 votes
    11
    Larocque

    Larocque

    Larocque is a French language surname found primarily in Quebec, Nova Scotia (formerly Acadia), Prince Edward Island, Ontario, and the New England region of the United States. There are four main branches of the Larocque surname in North America: Philibert Couillaud dit Roquebrune (1641-1700), from the diocese of Nevers, France, first appeared as a member of the Carignan-Salières Regiment when they landed in Quebec in 1665. He was sent primarily to defend New France from the Iroquois, and eventually settled down in Contrecoeur, Quebec. He married Catherine De La Porte in 1675 at Contrecoeur, having 11 children in all. Members of this branch often have the surnames Larocque, Larock, Rock, Roquebrune, Rocquebrune, Rockbrune or Couillaud. Guillaume Larocque, from the diocese of Albi, France, married Jeanne Boivin in Montréal, Quebec in 1717. Antoine Larocque, writer for King Louis XIV, was from Trie, France. He married Catherine Guillemot in 1752. Francois Larocque, from France, married Marguerite Caplan about 1725. He is the primary ancestor of Atlantic Canadian Larocque families.
    7.67
    6 votes
    12
    Byrne

    Byrne

    Byrne (variations: Byrnes, O'Byrne) is a surname derived from the Irish name Ó Broin, and is the seventh most common surname in Ireland today. In the Irish language, 'Ó Broin' means "descendant of Bran". The name has been traced back to the ancient Celtic chieftain, Bran mac Máelmórda, King of Leinster, deposed in 1018, (d. 1052), who belonged to the Uí Dúnlainge dynasty. He was descended from Cathair Mór, an earlier king of Leinster, who was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, also monarch of all Ireland around 200 AD. The clan's motto is the Latin phrase Certavi et vici, meaning "I have fought and conquered". In pre-Norman times the O'Byrnes, then known as the Uí Fáeláin sept, inhabited the rich Kildare plains. With the progress of the Anglo-Norman conquest, they were compelled to migrate to the poorer lands and the mountainous country eastwards, later to be denominated as the county of Wicklow.
    7.00
    6 votes
    13

    Keats

    The family name Keats, a surname of England, is believed to be descended originally from the Anglo Saxon race from old English word cyta or cyte which has been used to describe a worker at the shed, outhouse for animals, hence herdsman. It can also be attributed to the Middle English word kete or kyte (the bird) from greed or rapacity. The family name Keats emerged as a notable family name in the county of Devonshire where they were recorded as a family of great antiquity seated at Kitts and they were the Lords of the manor and of now extinct baronets. They also branched into Berkshire and Gloucestershire. As of the 1891 census in England most Keats's or Keates's were resident in Staffordshire. In North America members of the family name Keats had made their way to the New World in such places as Newfoundland, Maryland, Boston, Philadelphia and Anchorage. These first migrants could be considered a kinsman of the surname Keats or a variable spelling of the family name. Some of early instances of Keats in North America are: Notable amongst the Keats family name would be: The Coat of Arms for Keats is a silver shield overlaid with three dark silver mountain cats beneath an Armet and
    9.25
    4 votes
    14
    Radwan Dąbrowski-Żądło Family

    Radwan Dąbrowski-Żądło Family

    Members of the Radwan Żądło-Dąbrowski family, an old Polish noble family, served in the nation's struggle to exist.  Through marriage, the family connected to famous Polish-born English author Joseph Conrad and the revolutionary fight for national independence.  Their origins are discussed. Żądło-Dąbrowski is pronounced "Zhondwo-Dombrovski". Radwan is pronounced "Rodvon." Jarosław Dąbrowski's and Teofil Dąbrowski's father was Wiktor Żądło-Dąbrowski of Dąbrówka, an impoverished landless noble, coat-of-arms Radwan.  Their mother was Zofia née Falkenhagen-Zaleska.  Their maternal uncle was the esteemed economist Piotr Falkenhagen-Zaleski. Through Piotr's wife, Maria née Korzeniowska, the Żądło-Dąbrowskis became related to the famous Polish-born English writer Joseph Conrad (born Teodor Józef Teodor Konrad Nałęcz Korzeniowski) (1857–1924). Joseph Conrad's father, Apollo Korzeniowski (1820-69), and Jarosław Dąbrowski were two of the leading figures of a secret City Committee in Warsaw, organized in October 1861 by the radical "Reds", whose purpose was to prepare an armed struggle for Polish national independence and social revolution.  (See: January 1863 Uprising.) From Mazowsze,
    9.25
    4 votes
    15
    Gavigan

    Gavigan

    Gavigan is an Irish surname that claims it origins with different local chieftains depending upon the research performed. The motto upon the Gavigan family coat of arms may be translated to mean Always ready to serve my king and country. First, the simple case. I am reliably informed by Frank Geoghegan of Durrow that one family of Geoghegans got into some difficulty with the authorities (date uncertain). They moved to Tyrrellspass and changed their name to Gavagan/Gavigan to avoid detection. Now this family was quite productive, the first generation producing seven sons and six daughters and at least one of the sons producing six sons and seven daughters. This proliferation ensured that the name quickly became established all over south central Westmeath and is common there today. This family is most certainly part of the greater MacGeoghegan sept. Some of these may also have been ancestors to Gav... and Gaff... families referred hereafter. Part of the O'Neill Ulster clan, the southern Ui Neill of North Leinster, contributes to the Gaffiken, Gavigan, and Geoghegan dispersion. This helps only to explain somewhat more complex is the situation regarding the name, and other variants,
    8.00
    5 votes
    16
    8.00
    5 votes
    17
    Delaval

    Delaval

    Delaval is the surname of a family of gentry/aristocracy in Northumberland, England, from the 11th century to the 19th century. Their main estate was the manor of Seaton Delaval. The 18th century Delavals are noteworthy for their colourful lifestyle, for the magnificent Seaton Delaval Hall and for the development of the little seaport of Seaton Sluice and a coal mine at Old Hartley. The Delaval name derives from Laval, a town in the valley of the Mayenne River, in the département of Mayenne in old Maine, north-western France. An early ancestor, Guy de la Val II, built a castle there in the first half of the eleventh century. One of his descendants fought at the Battle of Hastings in AD 1066 (the event marking the Norman conquest of England), and thereafter the De la Vals settled in Northumberland. At Seaton they built a small fortified dwelling near the existing Saxon church, which in 1100 Hubert de la Val rebuilt bringing into being the present Church of Our Lady near Delaval Hall. It would appear that the initial fortified dwelling evolved into the mediaeval Seaton Tower, probably in the fourteenth century. This was extended in Tudor and Jacobean times to form a rambling manor
    6.00
    7 votes
    18
    Quintero

    Quintero

    Quintero is a Spanish surname originating in the Spanish region of Galicia. The name comes from quinto or quinta which means "fifth". It is possible that a "quintero" was a renter of quintas (also known as haciendas, the Spanish equivalent to a ranch). The quintero would rent one-fifth of the land and pay as rent one-fifith of his produce of the land to the landlord. Others have suggested, not dissimilarly, that the surname is habitational, derived from a placed called Quintero in Ourense province, so named from quinteiro, meaning "farmstead".
    6.50
    6 votes
    19
    6.50
    6 votes
    20
    Czarniecki

    Czarniecki

    Czarniecki (plural: Czarnieccy) is the surname of a Polish szlachta (nobility) family. Because Polish adjectives have different forms for the genders, Czarniecka is the same form for a female family member. The Czarniecki family was most prominent in the 17th century and can be traced back to the 14th century. The Łodzia coat of arms was given to the family by king Władysław II Jagiełło. The family name originates from the town of Czarnca in the Świętokrzyskie Voivodeship, Włoszczowa County. Among most known members are: The Czarniecki family used the Łodzia Coat of Arms and their motto was: Template:Czerniak
    8.50
    4 votes
    21
    Li

    Li

    Li or Lee (Chinese: 李; pinyin: Lǐ; Hangul: 이/리) is a family name of Chinese origin. It is a widespread surname in China, with about 7.9 percent of the Chinese population possessing this family name. Li is the most common surname for the Hakka Chinese (2007). A Korean surname that uses the same Chinese character, which is often romanized as Lee, is the second most common Korean surname, after Kim. Both the Korean family name Lee and the Vietnamese family name Lý was derived from the same Chinese character as the Chinese surname. In Taiwan and Hong Kong, and in many overseas Chinese communities, the spelling Lee is common. In Indonesia, the spelling Lie is used because of Dutch writing system influence. There are numerous regional Chinese pronunciations of 李 e.g. Lì (Sichuan), Lei5 (Cantonese), etc. According to the Yuan He Xing Zuan (元和姓纂), the Chinese dictionary of surnames, the Li surname has a long history which goes back to Emperor Zhuanxu who was the first Li and lived before 2000 BC. Li was the royal surname of the Tang Dynasty (618-907). About 15 different emperors had the Li surname. Li Yuan was the founder of the Tang Dynasty, which lasted from AD 618 to 907. During this
    9.67
    3 votes
    22
    Doherty

    Doherty

    The Doherty family (Irish: Clann Dhochartaigh) is an Irish clan based in County Donegal in the north of the island of Ireland. Like clans in other cultures, Irish clans such as the Dohertys are divided into many septs and regional families. In the modern day, there are 140 noted variations in spelling of the name Ó Dochartaigh, of which Doherty (with or without the "Ó") is the most common anglicisation. The Dohertys are named after Dochartach (fl. 10th century), a member of the Cenél Conaill dynasty which in medieval Irish genealogy traced itself to Niall of the Nine Hostages (see Uí Néill). The later chiefs of the clan, elected by tanistry under the Brehon Laws, were called the Lords of Inishowen as they were pushed from their original territory in the Laggan valley area of present-day Donegal, into the vacuum left by the end of Mac Lochlainn rule in the northernmost peninsula of the island of Ireland. Following the Flight of the Earls in 1607, the chief of the Dohertys, Cahir O'Doherty, rose up in the following year against English domination in Ireland and the plantation of Protestant settlers in what is known as Ó Doherty’s Rebellion. Provoked by the English Governor, Cahir
    7.20
    5 votes
    23

    Iademarco

    Iademarco is a surname that dates back to before the 16th century and is uniquely dervived from Mirabello Sannitico, a small village in the region of Molise in Southern Italy.
    7.20
    5 votes
    24

    Elliot

    • People with this family name: T. S. Eliot
    Elliot (also spelled Eliot, Elliott, Eliott and Elyot) is a personal name which can serve as either a surname or a given name. Although the given name was historically given to males, females named Elliot have seen an increase in recent years. For example, one of the main characters on the television show Scrubs was female and named Elliot. The origin of the surname is obscure, perhaps due to much of the genealogy of the Eliott clan being burnt in the destruction of the castle at Stobs in 1712 AD. The clan society usually accepts that the name originated from the town and river Elliot in Angus, Scotland. Some other sources suggest it may be derived from a French form of Elias, which is itself derived from the biblical name "Elijah". Other sources claim that the Scottish surnames (Eliott, Elliot) originate from the Ellot Scottish border-clan, from a transformation of the name Elwold. There are also records in the Domesday Book of the name spelled "Ailiet", thought to originate from an old English name "Æþelgeat" (meaning "noble gate") and leading to the English and Scottish given name speller "Elyat", which in turn leads to the modern alternative spelling of the name "Elyot". It is
    6.17
    6 votes
    25
    Pocher

    Pocher

    Pocher Model Cars, based in Italy, produced model cars from the 1970s through the 1990s. A factory fire halted production and since rebuilding, their most famous line of automobile kits was never revived. These kits were based on original plans from the manufacturer. Kits, featuring injection molded plastic and steel, brass, rubber, leather, canvas, had very detailed features and over 2,000 pieces. Two features present on some models were spoked wire wheels that were assembled spoke by spoke, and engines with working crankshaft and piston assemblies. Assembly was mostly accomplished with threaded fasteners (screws, bolts, nuts) and very little glue. This created finished products that could theoretically be disassembled and repaired or modified. Kits came molded in color and did not necessarily need paint. Finished preassembled versions were also sold. The earlier high piece and high detail kits were referred to as the Classic line, later a less assembly intensive line appeared and was called the Prestige line of cars. Classic kits were known for their high piece count and incredible detail such as working brake systems, engines with rotating crankshafts and moving pistons, windows
    9.33
    3 votes
    26
    8.00
    4 votes
    27
    Victoria

    Victoria

    Victoria is a feminine first name. It is also used as a family name. Victoria is the Latin word for 'victory' or 'conquer' and is used as the feminine form corresponding to the name Victor. Hence, Victoria Salvador means 'victory to the savior'. In Roman mythology, Victoria was the name of the goddess of victory, corresponding to the Greek goddess Nike. There are several different variations of the name Victoria:
    6.80
    5 votes
    28

    Cheek

    Cheek is an old family surname from Anglo-Saxon England that predates the Norman invasion. The Cheek family was among the first to immigrate to the US colonies in the early 17th century. The family crest is a white shield with three red crescents. Some prominent members of the Cheek family:
    9.00
    3 votes
    29
    Donohoe

    Donohoe

    Donohoe or O'Donohoe is an Irish surname, reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Donnchadha ‘descendant of Donnchadh’, a personal name (sometimes Anglicized as Duncan in Scotland), composed of the elements donn = ‘brown-haired man’ or ‘chieftain’ + cath = ‘battle’. Spelling variations (which may include an initial O' or omit it) include Donoghue, Donaghoe, Donaho, Donahoe, Donough, Donahue, Donahow, Doneghoe, Donehue, Donighue, Donoho, Donahugh, Donohough, Donohow, Donohue, Donaughue, Dunphy, Donaghie, Donaghy and many more. First found in County Kerry, Ireland, where they held a family seat from very ancient times. The Scottish Clan Robertson, anciently known as Clann Dhònnchaidh, 'Children of Dònnchadh' or Duncan, is of separate origin. Notable people with this relatively common surname include:
    9.00
    3 votes
    30

    Downie

    There appears to be a number of sources of the Downie/Downey surname in Scotland and Ireland, with the intermittent mix in Ulster. The spelling of the surname as Downie is almost unique to Scotland with minor incidences in Northern Ireland (Antrim). The following information has been collected and reviewed from numerous referenced sources. The following sources are not exhaustive, but include: In Scotland · Geographical, there are Dounie/Doune/Downie place names or hill forts or Dun in most parishes in Scotland, including Aberdeen, Angus, Stirling, Perth, Inverness and Isle of Lewis; · Geographical, from the Barony of Downie in Angus; and · As a derivative of the Gaelic Mac Gille/Maol Domhnaich or McAldonich "son of the servant of the Lord (Sunday)" which both are anglacised to Macgildownie, Mcildownie and Gildownie (and many variations) to Downie, mainly in the parishes of Argyll, western Perth and Inverness. In Ireland · O’Dunadhaigh is a person identified with a fort or Dun. This surname is found mostly in County Galway, South west Cork and Leinster. The surname is Anglacised to Downey; · Mac Dunadhaigh, identified with a fort or Dun this is the surname of an old Galway family;
    7.75
    4 votes
    31
    Hunyadi

    Hunyadi

    The Hunyadi family (also Hunyady in historical sources) was a Hungarian noble family strongest in the Late Middle Ages. According to the majority of sources they were of Romanian origins. This is claimed by medieval authors, and by many modern historians, however there are also theories about Cuman or Slavic ancestries. The first recorded member of the family was Serbe (also called Serb, Serban or Sorb), most likely from Wallachia, who settled in Hunyad county in Transylvania. The name Serbe might be of Turkic or Slavic origin because there are researches suggesting Tatar-Cuman or Slavic descendance. His son Vojk (alternatively spelled as Voyk or Vajk in English, Voicu in Romanian, Vajk in Hungarian), adopted the name László and practiced Catholicism (a common practice among Romanian cnezes from Transylvania; from the Angevin Dynasty on, Hungarian nobles were barred from practicing Orthodoxy). Vajk was the second known in the Hunyady family to be a Roman Catholic. He was ennobled in 1409 and received the estate of Hunyad Castle (now Hunedoara in Romania, then Hunyadvár, now Vajdahunyad in Hungarian) which was to become the hereditary seat of the family. Many Hungarian noble
    7.75
    4 votes
    32

    Khaimov

    Khaimov, Chaimov, Haimov (Russian: Хаимов, Хаймов, Hebrew: חַיִּימוֹב‎‎, Tajik: Ҳаимов Ḥaimov) is a Russianized Hebrew last name which means "son of Chaim", primarily used by the Jews of Kavkaz, also known as Mountain Jews, and Central Asian Jews (mostly Tajikistan and Uzbekistan). Famous Khaimovs:
    7.75
    4 votes
    33
    Tubridy

    Tubridy

    Tubridy (Gaelic: Ó Tiobraide, original forms include Latin: Tipraiti and Tipraite ) is an Irish surname in Anglicised form, found most prominently in County Clare, Ireland. The Tubridys of Clare originated as scribes, as a sept of the Dalcassian Clan. The name means "descendant of Tiobraide", with the Gaelic language word tiobraid meaning "a well". The name is not very common unlike many surnames of Irish origin, also because of its somewhat obscure origins and how the name has developed over time between different languages. Recorded reference for the name can be found in the Annals of the Four Masters, in relation to Tipraiti Tireach who was a legendary King of Ulster, living out his life between 136 and 187 AD according to the Annals. Tipraiti Tirech himself came from a long line of nobles, his father was Mal mac Rochride one of the High Kings of Ireland; the Annals describes them as part of the Milesian race with a lineage that traces back directly to Míl Espáine, whose son tradition holds, came to Ireland from Hispania in the Iberian Peninsula as part of the "Ulster Cycle". The Annals also describes Tipraiti Tireach as the founder of Dál nAraidi. Genelogical theories abound as
    7.75
    4 votes
    34
    Mariñelarena

    Mariñelarena

    Mariñelarena or Marinelarena is a Basque surname that has its origins in the village of Betelu, located north of Navarra, Spain and close to the frontier with Gipuzkoa. The surname means in the Basque language "...of the sailor". Usually surnames were originated in the Basque Country as name of houses, being families known by the name of the house they inhabited once. Few basque surnames were of patronymic origin, but there are some; and Mariñelarena could be one of them, meaning "(son) of the sailor"; but it could also been the name of a house: "(house) of the sailor". Mariñelarena is a family recognized with a coat-of-arms, because most Basque families (if not all) have their nobility recognized. It is conformed by a two Argent (silver) flags over an Azure (blue) tower with Argent (silver) small windows, that stands in an Or (gold) background.
    7.50
    4 votes
    35
    McGhee Tartan

    McGhee Tartan

    The McGhee family (Scottish Gaelic: Clann Aoidh) is an ancient lowland family of Scotland, established as Lords of Balmaghie in Galloway since the 10th century. Both the Clan Donald and the Clan Mackay claim it as a sept. Historically, however, the Mackays are in fact an offshoot of this family rather than vice versa. Its ancient origins are uncertain: some claim it was founded by an Irish chieftain of the 10th century, others that it is an offshoot of the royal MacEths, descended from Malcolm III. Its extensive property in the Borders was acquired during the reign of the Stuarts. The family has always been self-consciously lowland and, almost uniquely among prominent Scottish families, remained entirely indifferent to the Clan system, as historians have noted: "With such a variety of spellings many held lands, bore personal arms and sometimes held important positions and yet none, other than the Chief of Mackay, has been recognised in the chiefship of the kindred." Gilbert M'Gy is the first to be recorded as Lord of Balmaghie (1370–1426), though the name is first found transliterated from Gaelic with a 'G' in 1296, referring to his ancestor, Gille Michel MacGethe. The family
    7.50
    4 votes
    36
    Gascoignes

    Gascoignes

    The Gascoigne Baronetcy, of Barnbow and Parlington in the County of York, was a title in the Baronetage of Nova Scotia. It was created on 8 June 1635 for John Gascoigne. He had converted to Roman Catholicism in 1604. The eighth Baronet was Member of Parliament for Thirsk, Malton and Arundel. He renounced Catholicism, and was much involved in the Irish Parliament and in horse racing. Sir Thomas died in 1810, the year after his only son died in a hunting accident, upon which the baronetcy became either extinct or dormant. The surname Gascoigne derives from Gascony in France. The best-known family of this name believed to have come to England at the time of the Norman Conquest, settled in Yorkshire, although this is not proven. The Gascoignes were established by the thirteenth century at Gawthorpe and Harewood; these estates passed in 1567 to the Wentworth family by the marriage of the Gascoigne heiress. The junior branch acquired estates at Lasingcroft in 1392 and moved in the 16th century firstly to Barnbow near Leeds and then to Parlington Hall, Parlington, situated west of Aberford, near Leeds, acquired from the Wentworths in 1546. Sir Thomas Gascoigne, 8th and last Baronet, left
    8.67
    3 votes
    37
    Moskal

    Moskal

    Moskal (Москаль, Moskalik,Moskal’) is a historical term and present day ethnic slur referring to Russians. It is primarily used as a slur in Ukraine, Poland, and Belarus. Moskal can be a type of ethnic slur with a mild negative connotation. Russia was called Moskovia until 1709 and because of it people of Moskovia was called moskali (moskals). They are not Slavic people. Moskal is not ethnic slur but ethnic name for people who live in Moskovia. Moskal is a common Central and Eastern European surname.
    8.67
    3 votes
    38
    Boccanegra

    Boccanegra

    The surname Boccanegra (Italian) or Bocanegra (Spanish) originated in northern Italy during the 13th century. In the twelfth century, the Geneose were granted sovereignty over the port and the Rock of Monaco by the Emperor of Germany. In 1215, a fortress (now the Prince's Palace) was built. These were years of struggle between the Guelphs (who were followers of the Pope and church) and the Ghibellines (who were supporters of the Emperor). In 1295, with the coming into power of the Ghibellines, an important Genoese family, the Grimaldi, who had taken the side of the Guelphs, were forced into exile in Provence. Francois Grimaldi who was set on the conquest of Monaco's Castle (Prince's Palace of Monaco) which was the stronghold of the Ghibellines, was advised by the Church to take a more passive approach, but had decided to go another route. Legend has it that in 1297 under the guidance of a soothsayer known as Dracosia (a mystic from Genoa) who practiced Stregheris, sometimes referred to as "La Vecchia Religione" (meaning the Old Religion), who had advised François Grimaldi to disguise himself as a monk in order to gain entrance to the Ghibellines fortress, foretelling that this
    10.00
    2 votes
    39
    Dąbrowski

    Dąbrowski

    Dąbrowski (feminine: Dąbrowska, plural Dąbrowscy) or Dabrowski is the 11th most common surname in Poland around 2000 (86,132 people); this is down from an apparent rank of 4th in 1990. Dąbrowski is a habitational name derived from the placename 'Dąbrowa' or 'Dąbrówka', which is used for several specific places in Poland or generically as "oak grove", the English meaning for these Polish words. The surname Dobrowski is a variant of Dabrowski, and Dobrosky is a transitive variant. Dobrowski also has an independent origin as a habitational name derived from the placename 'Dobrów'. The text-figure below summarizes the relationships among these various words. Another variant is the surname Dombrowski due to the Polish pronunciation of Dąbrowski /dɔmˈbrɔfskʲi/ The table below contains available information on the frequency of the Dąbrowski surname and variants in various countries across a span of years.
    10.00
    2 votes
    40
    Hall

    Hall

    The meanings attributed to the word hall have varied over the centuries, as social practices have changed. The word derives from the Old Teutonic (hallâ), where it is associated with the idea of covering or concealing. In modern German it is Halle where it refers to a building but Saal where it refers to a large public room though the distinction is blurred:(Halle (Architektur) (de)). The latter may arise from a genitive form of the former. The French salle is borrowed from the German. In Old English, as it was brought into Britain in the fifth century, a hall is, fundamentally, a relatively large space enclosed by a roof and walls. In 500, such a simple building was the residence of a lord and his retainers. This is the kind of hall which Beowulf knew. Even now, hall is the term used for a country house in midland and northern England. The concept was more fundamental than referring to just domestic buildings. Though the lord's hall had an administrative aspect, this was more prominent in the town hall and the guild hall. The term might even be applied to a temple, in the same way as a basilica, now an ecclesiastical building, originated as a lordly reception hall with other
    10.00
    2 votes
    41
    Friz

    Friz

    The surname Friz derives from Fritz, diminutive of the German name Friederich (Frederick), originating from the Old Germanic Frithurik, composed of the prefix frithu ("peace", "friendship": Friede, in German) and the suffix rikia ("lord", "prince"), meaning "Lord of Peace", "The One who assures peace". The surname is diffused in the Adige Valley in northern Italy. It's a German surname which established originally in the Region of Trentino on the comune di Garniga (town of Garniga)." "Der Alte Fritz" refers specifically to Frederick the Great. Source: "Saggio di Commento ai Cognomi Tridentini", by Ernesto Lorenzo, 1895.
    6.40
    5 votes
    42

    Skancke

    Skancke is a Norwegian family name with some slightly different spellings as Skanke, Schanke, Schanche and others. It is not proved whether all persons with those names descend from the same persons in the Middle Ages. One famous Skancke family is from the 17th Century situated in the old mining town of Røros in Mid-Norway. Some alleged medieval ancestors of the Skancke families, had coats of arms with one armoured leg in the shield and one armoured leg in the crest. From that fact, some persons have made a theory that the two legs mean a link to the three legs in the arms of the monarchical dynasty of the Isle of Man. Norwegian genealogists and heraldists of today, however, provide little further support to such a theory, and there are many coats of arms with armoured legs exist in other countries. The name Skanke might mean a leg and the arms thus being canting arms. There are several variants of the arms through the ages: the shield divided, a rose at the knee of the leg, the crest with an armoured arm holding a sword, and the crest with peacock feathers. Several family members belong to Skanke Family Association. The Skancke/Schancke/Schanche etc. families have had - and still
    5.50
    6 votes
    43
    Melamed

    Melamed

    Melamed, Melammed (Hebrew: מלמד‎, Teacher) is a term which in Biblical times denoted a religious teacher or instructor in general (e.g., in Ps. cxix. 99 and Prov. v. 13), but which in the Talmudic period was applied especially to a teacher of children, and was almost invariably followed by the word "tinokot" (children; B. B. 21a). The Aramean equivalent was "makre dardeke" (ib.). The melamed was appointed by the community, and there were special regulations determining how many children he might teach, as well as rules governing the choice of applicants for the office and the dismissal of a melamed (ib.). These regulations were extended and augmented in the post-Talmudic period. Besides the teachers appointed by the community, there were others who were privately engaged by the parents of children; hence it became necessary to define accurately the mutual rights and duties of the melamed and of the parents. While giving instruction, the melamed was not allowed to do any other work (Shulchan Aruch, Choshen Hamishpat, 333, 5). If he was ill, and therefore unable to teach for a time, as much was deducted from his wages as the lessons for that time would have cost (ib.); but if, on the
    7.25
    4 votes
    44
    O'Shaughnessy

    O'Shaughnessy

    Ó Seachnasaigh, O'Shaughnessy, collectively Uí Sheachnasaigh, clan name Cinél nAedha na hEchtghe, is a family surname of Irish origin. The name is found primarily in County Galway and County Limerick. The town of Gort, Ireland, was the main residence of the family since at least the time of their ancestor, King Guaire Aidne mac Colmáin of the Ui Fiachrach Aidhne dynasty. Up until the late 17th century the Ó Seachnasaigh's held the sub district of Uí Fiachrach Aidhne known as Cinéal nAedha na hEchtghe meaning "kindred of Aedh of the Slieve Aughty", which was also their clan name. Cinéal nAedha na hEchtghe / Kinelea consisted roughly of the civil parishes of Beagh, Kilmacduagh and Kiltartan and also parts of the civil parishes of Kibeacanty and Kilthomas. Their closest related kinsmen were the Ó Cathail / O Cahill clan, originally chiefs of eastern Kinelea, and the other clans of Uí Fhiachrach Aidhne the most prominent of which were the Ó hEidhin / O Hynes, Ó Cléirigh / O Cleary and Mac Giolla Cheallaigh / Kilkelly septs. Up until the mid 17th century the O'Hynes clan were still styled lords of Uí Fhiachrach Aidhne even though the Ó Seachnasaigh's had become more powerful than their
    7.25
    4 votes
    45
    Pereira

    Pereira

    Pereira is a common surname in the Portuguese and Galician aswell as Sephardic languages, namely in Portugal and Galicia. It was originally a noble Christian toponym of the Middle Ages, taken from the feudal possession of Pereira (Barcelos), which in Portuguese means 'pear tree'. The name also exists in variations such as Pereyra, Perera, Perreira, Pereiro and others. In Portugal there are some families with variations of the name although Pereira is by far the most common. The variants of this name are more commonly found in other countries such as Spain, Trinidad and Tobago, India (specifically Goa), and Sri Lanka. Pereire, for example, is a French variant. Many Portuguese immigrants to the United States, especially Massachusetts, chose to "Americanize" their surname to Perry.
    7.25
    4 votes
    46
    LeClerc

    LeClerc

    Leclerc, Le Clerc, LeClerc (for North-Americans of French descent only) and le Clerc are typical French or Francophone surnames which can refer to:
    8.33
    3 votes
    47
    Levett

    Levett

    Levett is an Anglo-Norman territorial surname deriving from the village of Livet-en-Ouche, now Jonquerets-de-Livet, in Eure, Normandy. Ancestors of the earliest Levett family in England, the de Livets were lords of the village of Livet, and undertenants of the de Ferrers, among the most powerful of William the Conqueror's Norman lords. One branch of the de Livet family came to England during the Norman Conquest, nearly a thousand years ago, and were prominent first in Leicestershire, and later in Derbyshire, Cheshire, Ireland and Sussex, where they held many manors, including the lordship of Firle. The name Livet (first recorded as Lived in the 11th century), of Gaulish etymology, may mean a "place where yew-trees grow". Like many Normans, the family's origins are probably partly Scandinavian. The year of the family's arrival in England is uncertain. But the family name appears in the records of William the Conqueror. The first family member in England, Roger de Livet, appears in Domesday as a tenant of the Norman magnate Henry de Ferrers. de Livet held land in Leicestershire, and was, along with Ferrers, a benefactor of Tutbury Priory. By about 1270, when the Dering Roll was
    8.33
    3 votes
    48
    O'Donovan

    O'Donovan

    O'Donovan (Irish: Ó Donnabháin [oːˈd̪ˠɔn̪ˠəˌvˠɑːnʲ]) or Donovan is an Irish surname, as well as a hereditary Gaelic title. It is also written Dhonnabháin in certain grammatical contexts, and Donndubháin, being originally composed of the elements donn, meaning lord or dark brown, dubh, meaning dark or black, and the diminutive suffix án. Ó derives from the earlier Ua, meaning grandson or descendant. Compare O'Donoghue and O'Sullivan, containing the same elements. The O'Donovan family motto is 'Adjuvante Deo in hostes' (latin) meaning 'With the assistance of God against our enemies'. The O'Donovans are in origin descendants of the 10th century Donnubán mac Cathail, ruler of the regional or sub-provincial kingdom of Uí Fidgenti, as well as of his royal Norse relations from Limerick and Waterford, believed to belong to the Uí Ímair. From his accession to the kingship in 962 to the death of Amlaíb Ua Donnubáin in 1201, the family operated as a semi-independent to sometimes fully independent regional royal house within the larger provincial overkingdom of Munster. In the 13th century the O'Donovans surrendered principal sovereignty to the Kingdom of Desmond and later Carbery, after
    8.33
    3 votes
    49
    Clan Ua Déaghaidh

    Clan Ua Déaghaidh

    O'Dea (/oʊˈdiː/); (Irish: Ó Deághaidh, formerly Ua Deághaidh), is an Irish surname derived from Deághadh, the name of a tenth century clan chieftain. The O'Dea clan came originally from County Clare where there is a fortified tower house over 500 years old known as O'Dea Castle at the 80-acre (320,000 m) townland of Dysert O'Dea (Irish: Dísert, meaning "hermitage"). The ruins of Dysert O'Dea Monastery, round tower, and St. Tola's high cross are 265 metres to the south-southwest of the castle in the adjacent 260-acre (1.1 km) townland of Mollaneen (Irish: Molainín, meaning "the little hill"), near Corofin. (52°54′41″N 9°03′59″W / 52.911361°N 9.066381°W / 52.911361; -9.066381) The name O'Dea is normally pronounced oh-dee, and sometimes oh-day, in English. Clan descendants may have the surnames Alday, Allday, O'Dea, Dea, Day, Daye, O'Day, O'Daye, Dee, O'Dee, Godwin, or Goodwin. Edward MacLysaght, the former Chief Herald of Ireland, writing in his book, Irish Families, began his discussion of the O'Dea family as follows: In another book, The Surnames of Ireland, MacLysaght describes the O'Deas as "one of the principal Dalcassian septs", and about the name itself, he remarks, "The
    9.50
    2 votes
    50
    Geelvinck

    Geelvinck

    Geelvinck (in English Yellow finch) was a Dutch surname. The family died out in the early 19th century. Some notable members of the family include:
    9.50
    2 votes
    51
    Koniecpolski

    Koniecpolski

    Koniecpolski (plural: Koniecpolscy) is the surname of a Polish szlachta (nobility) family. Because Polish adjectives have different forms for the genders, Koniecpolska is the form for a female family member. The Koniecpolski was a magnate family. The family appears in the historical annals beginning in the 15th century. The family originated from the village Stary Koniecpol 40 km east of Częstochowa in the Silesian Voivodeship. Their family name derives from that place's name. One of its first representatives was voivode of Sieradz Jakub Koniecpolski who participated in the Battle of Grunwald in 1410, considered the biggest battle in medieval history. In 1443 the Koniecpolski family founded the city-fortress Koniecpol, which became the seat of the family. In the 16th century the family lineage split into two branches the "Hetman branch" and the "Castellan branch". In the 17th century the family acquired great political authority, and became owners of huge landed estates. The most representative of the "Hetman branch" was Field and Grand Crown Hetman Stanisław Koniecpolski one of the greatest commanders of the 17th century. Stanislaw begun in 1643 the present-day construction of the
    7.00
    4 votes
    52
    Lohana

    Lohana

    The Lohana, also referred to as Luvana, are an Indian caste, largely classified as merchants and are categorized as Vaishya or Bania caste although they self-identify as Kshatriya of Suryavanshi descant, claiming their lineage from Lava, son of Rama. They are said to belong to Rathor clan of Kshatriyas The community originated in the Sindh and Punjab before migrating to Kutch and Gujarat. The Lohana claim descent from the Lava son of Rama, and thus status as Suryavanshi Kshatriya and are said to be a branch of Rathor clan of Kshatriyas or Rajputs. One potential source for the name Lohana is that these Rathors changed their name after a miracle from their kuladevata saved them from massacre by taking shelter in an iron fort [iron=loh]. After this they changed their names to Loh-rana, from which the name Lohana comes. They started to put Loh also before the towns and kingdoms founded by them, as such Lohargadh, the old name of Lahore. Another source is that the name is derived from Lavnam, one of the 18 grades of Kshatriya, ultimately derived from Lava himself Lohanas have ruled ancient Kingdoms and Lohana took part in Battle of the Ten Kings as Alinas.. The Lohanas have descended
    7.00
    4 votes
    53
    Mort

    Mort

    Mort is both a given name and surname. Mort is a surname or family name in the United Kingdom, traditionally found in North West England, especially Lancashire. It is also found in the counties of Glamorganshire, Monmouthshire in South Wales, but is also found in many areas of the United Kingdom. The surname is also found in other countries from English/Scottish emigrants particularly the United States, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. Mort is also a variant of the surname Morton. Mort is a common masculine given name or nickname variant of "Morton", particularly in the United States. People with the name Mort include:
    7.00
    4 votes
    54
    Nehra

    Nehra

    Nehra (Hindi: नेहरा) is an Indian Jat surname. It is based on gotra (clan) Nehra. Nehra gotra Jats are found in Rajasthan, Haryana, Delhi and Uttar Pradesh in India. The origin of Nehra is derived from Nehra mount in Sindh where they were the rulers. Nehras are descendant of Narishyanta (Narahari), son of Vaivasvata Manu and belong to solar race of Kshatriyas. They are said to be a branch of the Sindhu gotra. Their last name is similar to other jatt surnames starting with N such as Nanhar, Nain, Nara, Nanrhe, etc.. all part of same clan. Nehra jats ruled in Rajasthan over an area of 200 square miles (520 km). The Nehra hills of Rajasthan were their territory. To the west of Jhunjhunu town is a Hill 1,684 feet (513 m) above see-level and visible from miles around.. This hill near Jhunjhunu town is still known as Nehra Hill in their memory. Another hill was known as Maura which was famous in memory of Mauryas. Nehra in Jaipur was the first capital in olden times. In the fifteenth century Nehras ruled at Narhar, where they had a fort. At Naharpur, 16 miles (26 km) down below the Nehra Hill, there another group ruled. The present Shekhawati at that time was known as Nehrawati. At the
    7.00
    4 votes
    55
    Geoghegan

    Geoghegan

    Geoghegan (Irish: Mac Eochagáin) is a surname of Irish origin. Often spelt without the prefix "Mac", the name has many variants, including Gehegan, Geoghan, Geohegan, Gahagan, Gagan, and Gagon which approximate the most common pronunciations of the name. It is usually pronounced gay-gan, ge-heg-an or go-hee-gan. In Irish it is Mac (or Mag) Eochagáin, from Eochaidh. The initial "G" of Geoghegan comes from the prefix Mag, a variant of Mac and the anglicised form Mageoghegan was formerly much used. The sept of the MacGeoghegans is of the southern Uí Néill, and said to be descended from Niall of the Nine Hostages. Niall was High King of Ireland from the mid 4th century into the early 5th century. His father was Eochaidh Muigh-Medon, of the Celtic line of Erimhon, one of the sons of Esbain who it is said took Ireland from the Tuatha de Danann. Niall's mother was Carthann Cas Dubh, daughter of the king of Britain. Niall's first wife was Inné, mother of his son Fiacha, from who the Geoghegans are said to be descended. He also had seven other sons with his second wife, Roighnech. Niall's ancestry is claimed by Irish legend to trace back to Miledh of Esbain, King of Spain, whose wife was
    6.00
    5 votes
    56
    Radziwiłł family

    Radziwiłł family

    The Radziwiłł family (Polish pronunciation: [radʑiˈviw]; Lithuanian: Radvila; Belarusian: Радзівіл, Radzivił; German: Radziwill; Latin: Radvil) is a noble family of Lithuanian origin. The descendants of Kristinas Astikas, a close associate of the 14th century Lithuanian ruler Vytautas, were highly prominent for centuries, first in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, later in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth and the Kingdom of Prussia. The family has produced many individuals notable in Lithuanian, Belarusian, Polish, German (particularly Prussian) and general European history and culture. The Radziwiłł family received the title of Reichsfürst (prince, Lithuanian: kunigaikštis, Polish: książę, Belarusian: князь, kniaź), from the Holy Roman Empire. A complex of buildings maintained by the family in Belarus between the 16th century and 1939 is a UNESCO World Heritage site. The countries of Belarus, Finland, Lithuania, Poland, Russian Federation, and Ukraine jointly nominated its family archives to the UNESCO Memory of the World Register in 2008, and they were inscribed on the Register in 2009. The Radziwiłł family is a directly descended branch of the extinct Lithuanian noble Astikai
    6.00
    5 votes
    57
    Charles Rashleigh

    Charles Rashleigh

    Rashleigh is a surname that has connotations of wealth and status in Cornwall in the United Kingdom. The Rashleighs of Fowey and Menabilly were powerful merchants in the time of Henry VIII and Elizabeth I. Philip Rashleigh, younger son of a family from Barnstaple in Devon, had purchased the manor of Trenant close to Fowey from the King after the dissolution of the monasteries in 1545. He went into trade, became successful but died in 1551. His two sons Robert and John founded the fortunes of the Fowey Rashleighs and their pedigree has been well documented. Charles Rashleigh was an entrepreneur. The expanding mining industry around West Polmear led him to develop Charlestown, Cornwall on the south coast as a port. Rashleigh-Berry was Lt. Col in the British Army stationed in Peshawar, British Indian Empire. Rashleigh-Berry participated in the Second Anglo-Afghan war, under Sir Fredrick Roberts. Nathan Rashleigh is a British computer expert currently working within a large government organisation, primarily tasked with storage design and implementation for the benefit of Dorset citizens. Philip Rashleigh was a Cornish mineral expert and Member of Parliament for Fowey. In the Return of
    8.00
    3 votes
    58
    Dugan

    Dugan

    Dugan or Duggan (Irish: Uí Dhúgáin) is a Scots-Irish surname that arose simultaneously in a number of areas, including Cork, Roscommon, Galway, Wexford and Fermanagh. The best known family of the name had its territory near the modern town of Fermoy in north Cork, and were originally the ruling family of the Fir Maighe tribal group which gave its name to the town. They claimed descent from Mug Ruith, the legendary magician of the Fir Bolg. They ceded pre-eminence to the O'Keeffe family in the eleventh century, but remained powerful in the area. Along with the other Fir Maighe families they lost their power when the Normans conquered the territory in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. The Coat of Arms are azure with a crescent argent between nine stars of eight points. The motto, Virtve et Valore ("By Virtue and Valor") is derived from Old English rather than from the Irish translation of Ó Dubhagáin, meaning "dark" or "black." The motto is derived from the Old English word dūgan (preterite-present: dēag ‘it is useful’, dugon ‘they are useful’, dohte ‘it was useful’). Other definitions include "to avail, to be of use, to serve"; Ðonne his ellea deah ("when his valour avails");
    8.00
    3 votes
    59
    Gregg

    Gregg

    Gregg and Greg are surnames of English origin. They are variant forms of the surname Gregory. The surnames are first recorded as Gregge in 1234, within the Liber feodorum, a document compiled in the reign of Henry II of England. Another early instance of the name is Gregge, recorded in 1306, witin the Feet of Fines (for Essex); and as Greggez in 1504, within the Register of the Freemen of the City of York. Gregg as a Scottish surname, a variant of the Scottish Clan MacGregor.
    8.00
    3 votes
    60
    Rumore

    Rumore

    The surname Rumore may be of nickname origin, being derived from a personal attribute or physical characteristic of the first bearer. In this case, the surname is derived from the Italian word "Rumore" which means noise, din, clamour, outcry and uproar. Thus, the surname Rumore would signify that the original bearer was of a "noisy" or "boisterous" nature. Alternatively, the surname may be a variant of the ancient French surname "Romere" which was originally applied to one who had made a pilgrimage to Rome. In fact one Cristiana La Romere was living in Suffolk England in 1273 (Hundred Rolls). Finally, the surname Rumore may be of toponymic origin, being derived from the name of the place of origin of the initial bearer. In this instance, the surname may be derived form the place name Rumour which is located in Normandy, France. Thus, the name Rumore may signify one who came from "Rumour." Blazon of Arms: Argent; a fess gules; Between in chief two mullets or; and in base a rose, petals or and gules. Translation: "Argent" is a color, usually silver or white. It represents peace and sincerity. "A fess gules" is the red bar across the middle of the shield. "Gules" is the color red, and
    8.00
    3 votes
    61
    Stamps

    Stamps

    The Stamps family is an American ancestral group consisting of patrilineal descendants of 17th century Virginia colonists whose surnames were "Stampe," "Stamp," or "Stamps." During the late 18th century, Stamps descendants moved south and west from Virginia, eventually settling in Southern states like Georgia, Alabama, Kentucky, and Texas. Stamps men have volunteered for service during every American conflict since the French and Indian War. The Stamps family traces its origins to Germanic raiders who settled in northern Gaul during the Völkerwanderung and adopted the locational surname "d'Étampes" at least by the 7th century. The ancient clan was noted for its character, independence, and honor and declared its family motto to be "Death before Dishonor." According to oral tradition, they allied with Widukind sometime in the 8th century and converted to Christianity as result of this allegiance. To demonstrate their conversion, the clan altered the color scheme of the family symbol. Three rearing black stallions were now white, symbolizing purity of faith. Today, Étampes is a district 30 miles (48 km) southwest of Paris. Following the Norman Invasion, a large number of the clan
    8.00
    3 votes
    62
    Cornaro

    Cornaro

    The Cornaro, also known as Corner, are an illustrious patrician family in Venice, from which for centuries senior office-holders and Doges sprung. Notable members are They had 8 palaces on the Grand Canal, Venice at different times & commissioned many famous monuments and works of art, most famously Bernini's Ecstasy of St Theresa in the Cornaro Chapel of Santa Maria della Vittoria in Rome (1652). In Greece the island of Scarpanto was their fief from the early 14th century until the Ottoman conquest. Other Cornaros (possibly related) include:
    6.75
    4 votes
    63
    MacIntyre

    MacIntyre

    MacIntyre or Macintyre (Gaelic Mac an t-Saoir) is a Scottish surname, of Gaelic origin, relating to Clan MacIntyre. Its meaning is "Son of the Carpenter". The anglicized version of the MacIntyre name is Wright.
    6.75
    4 votes
    64
    Silagi

    Silagi

    For the village called Szilágyi see Svilojevo. Szilágyi (Romanian: Silaghi) is a surname of Hungarian descent. It also refers to a county in the Kingdom of Hungary by the name of Szilágy. The region has been part of Romania since 1918. The actual name means either from the county of Szilágy or of the noble clan of Szilagyi. The original Hungarian spelling of the name is "Szilágyi"; it has been modified to "Silaghi" in its Romanian variation. The Hungarian letters "Sz" and "gy" are replaced by the similarly pronounced "S" and "g" respectively in the Romanian version of the name. The Szilágyi clan exerted a strong influence over this region of Europe during the late to middle 14th century. They also appear in Hungarian folklore. In which a character by the name of Prince Evan of the Silagi clan undergoes many challenges in order to secure his rightful place at the head of the family which has been taken over by his older brother Aneil the moronic. Aneil the dimwitted summons the ungrateful demons (or "Hannas") to try and halt Evan's uprising against him. This story has been paralleled in much of the folklore of the region.
    6.75
    4 votes
    65
    Sterlington

    Sterlington

    Sterlington, as a family name, may have been formed from sterling and ton. A sterling was a silver penny, probably from the word sterre (star), because of the stars which appeared in the design of certain Norman coins, together with the diminutive suffix -ling. In later history the meaning of sterling broadened to money having the quality of the sterling, then to English money in general. A pound sterling was originally a pound weight of sterlings, equalling about 240 coins. As with many place names the ending ton was probably an abbreviation of the word town, as for example, in Binghamton - Bingham Town, Charleston - Charles Town, Washington - Washing Town. Names ending in ...ton are mostly based on the Saxon word tun meaning farmstead. Often the prefix is the name of the owner. Some families in North America have the surname Sterlington but it does not appear to be common and is quite rare in Europe. A check of around 60 million names in the UK Electoral Roll on UK Info in 2005 returned no registered persons with the name Sterlington. In the United States:
    6.75
    4 votes
    66
    Khanzada

    Khanzada

    The Khanzada or Khanzadah (Urdu: خانزاده راجپوت) is a subdivision of Muslim Rajputs, now found mainly in the Rajasthan, Haryana and Western Uttar Pradesh of India, and in the Sindh and Punjab provinces of Pakistan. They converted to Islam probably around the time of Firoz Shah, the fourteenth-century Sultan of Delhi. William Crooke records two etymologies for the name of Khanzada. He favours that of "descendants of the Khan" but notes the "probably less correct explanation ... 'descendants of a slave'". Although there had been censuses prior to 1881, they were not recorded until the exercise of that year. Denzil Ibbetson notes that the Khanzadas self-identified as being of the Jadubansi gotra in the 1881 Punjab census and he speculated that their communal name could be translated as "the son of a Khan " and is the Muslim equivalent to the Hindu word Rajput ("son of a Raja"). From this he concluded that "there can be little doubt that the Khanzadas are to the Meos what the Rajputs are to the Jats". Percy Powlett, who compiled the Gazetteer of Ulwur in 1878, favours the "slave" origin, believing that the etymology derives from khanazad and that Bahadur Khan, their leader around the
    9.00
    2 votes
    67
    Rappaport

    Rappaport

    Rap(p)aport, Rap(p)oport or Rapa Porto (Hebrew: רפפורט) is a family name from an Italian (Jewish) Kohenitic pedigree. It takes its origins in the Rapa family of Porto located in Province of Mantua, Italy. The names of Rapa or Rappe ha-Kohen(-Tzedeq (Rapa Katz) are met with in about 1450. At that time Meshullam Kusi (abbreviated from "Jekuthiel") Rapa ha-Kohen Tzedeq, the earliest known member of the family, lived on the Rhine, probably in Mainz. Several decades later the family disappeared from Germany, probably on account of the Jews' expulsion from Mainz on October 29, 1462. In 1467, in Mestre, near Venice, the wealthy Chayyim Rappe is found as alms' collector for the poor of the Holy Land. In Venice, the physician R. Moses Rap was exempted in 1475 from wearing the Jew's badge. In the middle of the 16th century there appeared in Italy a Kohenitic family of the name of Porto. On March 18, 1540, R. Isaac Porto ha-Kohen obtained from the Duke of Mantua permission to build an Ashkenazic synagogue. The name of the family was not derived from the Portuguese city of Porto, nor from the Bavarian city of Fürth as some authors have suggested, but instead from Porto, near Mantua, where the
    9.00
    2 votes
    68
    Jin Akanishi

    Jin Akanishi

    Jin Akanishi (赤西 仁, Akanishi Jin, born July 4, 1984) is a Japanese idol, singer-songwriter, actor, voice actor, and former radio host. Akanishi is a former member of the J-pop group, KAT-TUN, and was one of the two lead vocalists. Since the group's debut in 2006, it has achieved 14 consecutive number ones (including studio albums) on the Oricon charts. Akanishi is also a budding actor with roles in the second season of popular NTV school drama, Gokusen 2, Anego and Yukan Club. He was also a co-host of KAT-TUN's own variety show, Cartoon KAT-TUN, and used to host a radio program called "KAT-TUN Style" with former bandmate Junnosuke Taguchi from October 2007 to March 2008. Born in the Chiba Prefecture on July 4, 1984, Akanishi is the oldest child. His family consists of his parents and a younger brother, Reio, who also works in the entertainment industry as an actor under the stage name, Fuuta. His given name, Jin ("benevolence"), comes from one of the five Confucian virtues. He moved to Tokyo in the first grade. In 1997, when he was still in grade school, a classmate sent in a photo of him to idol magazine, Myojo, and he was featured in the "Cool Classmates" corner of the issue.
    5.80
    5 votes
    69
    Hospod

    Hospod

    Hospod (Господь) is a Polish surname of Rusyn origin, meaning "the Lord"; in the Eastern Orthodox Church the word 'Господь' is used to refer to God, as in the phrase "Господи Помилуй" (Hospodi Pomilui), Lord (God) have mercy. Roman Catholics in Poland use the word Pan or Bóg for Lord, while Orthodox and Eastern Catholics in Poland use the word Господь. Localities include Carpathian Ruthenia and the Subcarpathian Voivodship of Poland (specifically, the village of Grodzisko Górne).
    7.67
    3 votes
    70

    Malmuth

    Malmuth is a Jewish surname meaning "teacher" in the Hebrew Language. It is a variant of the surname, Melamed, see the latter page for other variants. Malmuth is also an uncommon given name. People with the surname include:
    7.67
    3 votes
    71
    Ó Dálaigh

    Ó Dálaigh

    The Ó Dálaigh (Irish pronunciation: [oː ˈdˠaːɫ̪i]) were a learned Irish bardic family who first came to prominence early in the 12th century, when Cú Connacht Ó Dálaigh was described as "The first Ollamh of poetry in all Ireland" (ollamh is the title given to university professors in Modern Irish). The modern Irish surnames O' Daly, Daly, Daley and Dawley are derived from Ó Dálaigh. The name Ó Dálaigh means 'descendant of Dálach'. The derivation of the personal name Dálach is not entirely obvious, but the most widely accepted theory is that it derives from the same root as dáil meaning "assembly;" the Irish Parliament is called 'Dáil Éireann.' Dálach therefore probably meant "assemblyman" or "councillor." The earliest records of the family place them in the region of Tethba in what is now Westmeath, their lands were in Moyashel & Magheradernon barony, Westmeath. The ancestral clan was called Corca Adaimh and they claimed descent from a son of Niall of the Nine Hostages (High King of Ireland circa 400AD) via Máel Dúin mac Máele Fithrich of the Cenél maic Ercae, who was king of Ailech in Ulster. Máel Dúin's sons included the high king Fergal mac Máele Dúin and Adamh, the Ó Dálaigh
    7.67
    3 votes
    72
    O'Flaherty

    O'Flaherty

    Ó Flaithbertaigh, Gaelic-Irish surname, commonly anglicized as O'Flaherty, Flaherty, O'Laverty, Laverty, and Lafferty amongst other variations. This Gaelic-Irish surname is written as "Ua Flaithbertach" (nominative) or "Ua Flaithbertaig" (genitive) in Old Irish and Middle Irish texts. In Modern Irish the surname is now generally spelt as Ó Flatharta. The surname is commonly translated as "bright ruler" or more correctly "bright prince", flaith originally meaning prince in Irish. "O" or Ó comes from Ua, designating "grandson" or "descendant" of a (major) clan member. The prefix is often anglicised to O', using an apostrophe instead of the Irish síneadh fada: "´". Maigh Seóla was the term used to describe the earliest O'Flaherty domain, to the east of Lough Corrib in the kingdom of Connacht, the western most province of the Island of Ireland (Irish: Éire). The Ó Flaithbertaighs are a branch of the Muintir Murchada dynasty, named after Murchadh mac Maenach (died 891), King of the Uí Briúin Seóla. Murchadh is one of the earliest attested kings of his region. The leading family of this dynasty would take the surname Ó Flaithbheartaigh (O'Flaherty) from the 11th century onwards. In
    7.67
    3 votes
    73
    Penney

    Penney

    Penney (also spelled Penny) is a common surname of British origin. The name Penney dates from the ancient Anglo-Saxon culture of Britain. It was derived from the Old English "Penig," denoting a coin (cognate with German "Pfennig"). The penny was the only unit of coinage in England until the early 14th century, and as such was a coin of considerable value. The name was first found in Northampton where they held a family seat from very early times; before the 12th century had become associated with London; later moved north into Scotland and west into Ireland settling mostly in the provinces of Ulster and Munster. Some of the first settlers of this name or some of its variants were: George Penny who settled in the Barbados in 1635; William Penny settled on Eastern Long Island prior to 1740; Charles Penny settled in Maryland in 1775; P. Penny settled in Boston, Massachusetts in 1769; the family also settled in Pennsylvania in the 18th century. In Newfoundland, Benedict Penny inherited property in Carbonear which dated back to 1699. Spelling variations include: Penny, Penney, Pennie, Penne, Pyne, Pynne and others.
    7.67
    3 votes
    74
    Bengoechea

    Bengoechea

    Bengoetxea (Basque modern spelling), Bengoechea (or Vengoechea, Spanish spellings) or Bengoetchea (French spelling) is a Basque surname which is common all throughout the Basque Country, specially in cities such as: Murelaga, Lizarza, Alkitza, Aizarna, Aulestia, Igeldo (Donostia, San Sebastian), Oiartzun, Aia, Olaberria, Lazkano, Berrobi (Tolosa) and Zizurkil in Gipuzkoa; Valley of Orozko, Mungia, Zeberio, Mundaka and Galdakao in Biscay; and in Arrieta and Baranbio (Amurrio) in Alava. Derivative of Bengoetxea or Bengoetxe, the name literally means down-more-of-house-the (be-en-go-etxe-a), translated into English as "the house of further down" and translated into Spanish as "la casa de más abajo". It comes from "been" superlative of "be" (inferior part) and "etxe" (house). The Bengoechea coat of arms is: in gold, a tree of sinople (green), and crossed to its trunk, two bulls of sable (black).
    10.00
    1 votes
    75
    De Castro

    De Castro

    The de Castro surname is used by a Sephardic Jewish family of Portuguese origin. Soon after the establishment of the Portuguese Inquisition, members of the family emigrated to Bordeaux, Bayonne, Hamburg, and various cities in the Netherlands. Their descendants were later to be found scattered throughout Egypt, France, Germany, Brazil, Italy, the Netherlands, the Philippines, Turkey, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Some branches of the family have continued to bear the simple name of de Castro, others are known by de Castro-Osório, de Castro Sarmento, de Castro-Castello-Osório, Pereira de Castro, de Castro Vieira de Pinto, Rodrigues de Castro, Orobio de Castro, de Castro de Paz, Henriques de Castro, etc. The name often appears as "de Crasto." Notice that Castro is not in origin Jewish but an Iberian Christian name, adopted by some Portuguese and Spanish Jews after the forced conversions of the late 15th and early 16th centuries. Master of the mint and farmer of the coinage for Sultan Sulaiman, in Cairo in the 16th century Through his wealth and benevolence, he gave away 3,000 gold florins a year in alms. He acquired great influence among the Turkish officials and was
    10.00
    1 votes
    76
    Dražeta

    Dražeta

    Dražeta (Cyrillic: Дражета), in some English sources also Drazeta, is a Croatian, Bosnian, and Serbian surname and personal name. This surname is fairly rare, and originally could be found in five places on the territory of former Yugoslavia: Mošorin (Serbia), Stari Banovci (Serbia), Ivoševci (Croatia), Hodilje (Croatia), and Jajce (Bosnia and Herzegovina). People with this surname who live in Mošorin, Stari Banovci, and Ivoševci are Orthodox Serbs, while those who live in Hodilje and Jajce are Catholic Croats. The family slava (patron saint) of Orthodox Dražeta is Saint Stephen. There is information claiming that some Muslims with this surname live in western Bosnia near Prijedor, but this story is not confirmed. Surname Dražeta derived from the South Slavic first name Dražeta, which was first recorded in the 12th century in Herzegovina. First name Dražeta derived from its older variant Draže, which derived from Slavic word "drag" ("dear" in English). It is not exactly clear where and when the surname Dražeta appeared since first reliable data about surname dating from the 18th century. There is also a record from 1521 about a person in the village of Desići in Montenegro, whose
    10.00
    1 votes
    77
    Garnet

    Garnet

    Garnet is a name of Middle English origin, derived from the dark red gemstone, which was in turn named for the pomegranate that the garnet crystals resemble. The surname Garnett comes from an Old English occupational surname referring to a seller of hinges. It is both a surname and a given name. The name came into occasional use along with other gem names during the late Victorian era. Garnet was among the top 1,000 names for girls in the United States between 1884 and 1944. It was most popular in 1911, when it was the 376th most popular given name for American girls. It was in occasional use for boys in the United States between 1882 and 1925. It was most popular in 1904, when it was 593rd most popular name for American boys. The name has not appeared among the top 1,000 names for boys or girls since 1944 in the United States.
    10.00
    1 votes
    78

    Highmoor

    Highmoor is a family name with historic links to the similar name of Highmore (although some favor the highmoor name as being more distinguished). The name arrived in England along with William the Conqueror in the Norman invasion. Traditionally, Highmoors have been known to inhabit the English side of the England-Scotland border regions. The Highmoor/Highmore family can be divided into seven groups of which five left or had subgroups leave England. The earliest known Highmoor is Robertus de Hehmor (d. 1275) who is memorialised at St. Bega's Church on Bassenthwaite Lake, not far from the site of Armathwaite Hall.
    10.00
    1 votes
    79
    Sabbatini

    Sabbatini

    Sabbatini, with its variations Sabbatino (plural form thereof), Sabbadin, Sabbadino and Sabbadini, is a family name of Italian origin. Other variants use one b only, such as Sabatini, Sabatino, Sabadin, Sabadini and Sabadino and are also very common names in Italy. Variations with a double t (particularly in foreign countries where Italians emigrated to), such as in Sabattini and Sabbattini, also exist. Still rarer variations are Sabbatello, Sabbatiello, Sabbatella, Sabbatinella, Sabbatucci and Zabbatini, all having also a version with a single b. During the Roman Empire time, it existed in the Sabbatinus form. Variations of these names in Latin started to appear already in the 8th century. Sabbatini and Sabatini have different pronunciations in Italian, since the double b requires a short labial stop between them. The same happens with Sabattini and Sabatini. The name is a patronymic, i.e., it originated from the name of an ascendant person, and it is related to sabato, Italian for Saturday, indirectly from shabbat (rest), the weekly day of rest holiday for several religions, probably because the person was born in a Saturday. Due to the reference to the Jewish holiday, it has
    10.00
    1 votes
    80
    10.00
    1 votes
    81

    Wechsel

    Wechsler is a German word meaning "exchanger" (from Wechsel, "(ex)change"). Wechsler may refer to:
    10.00
    1 votes
    82
    Mottershead

    Mottershead

    Mottershead is an English habitation name which has its common root in the township of Mottram St. Andrew in Cheshire, England where it was first recorded in the 13th century as Mottresheved, from the gen. case of the OE byname Mōtere 'Speaker' + ME heved head(land), hill. The motto of the family is the Latin "Pro Amore Patriae" ("For the love of the homelands") It was to this region that descendants of a Norman knight "Mottresheved" (or maybe the knight himself) came after the Norman Conquest of England by William the Conqueror in 1066 and there are references to the name in the Domesday Book. The possibility does exist that the knight's Domesday listing was a corruption of the location name already in existence. The name also may denote a building where village assemblies were held. Typical features of the Mottersheads, such as their size (not overly tall) and colouring (especially dark brown hair - not many blondes) suggests a strong Welsh influence.
    6.50
    4 votes
    83
    Bossong

    Bossong

    Bossong (German: Boßong) is a surname common to Rhineland-Palatinate in Germany and Alsace in France. The Bossong family is of Frankish origin. This is neither Teutonic nor French, but a separate race, almost extinct today. They were likely Huguenots or Walloons as records indicate they fled Catholic persecutions during the 16th and 17th centuries. When William the Conqueror of Normandy invaded England in 1066, several of the names (Bosson) were in his invading army. For their services in the conquest of England, they were awarded large estates in County Norfolk where the family may still be found. In 1572, after the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes, the family suffered the persecutions of many families and refused to accept the doctrines of the Roman Catholic Church. To avoid this persecution, many families left the domains of the French King and fled to County Kent England and Holland. Again in the latter part of the 17th century, the Bossons who remained in France suffered persecution and fled. Genealogical researcher Heinrich Herzog notes that Bossons resided in the Habsburgs Low Countries. These are likely the ones who fled after the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes.
    8.50
    2 votes
    84
    Costa

    Costa

    Costa (Italian: [ˈkɔsta], Portuguese: [ˈkɔʃtɐ, ˈkɔstɐ], Galician: [ˈkɔsta], Spanish: [ˈkosta], Catalan: [ˈkɔstə, ˈkɔsta]), sometimes Acosta, da Costa or Da Costa, is an Italian (particularly in Liguria, Piedmont and Sardinia), Portuguese, Galician, Spanish and Catalan surname. Because of colonization and immigration, it is found throughout Latin America, being particularly common in Brazil and Argentina. It's also a surname chosen by the Jews, due to Roman Catholic conversions. In Italy, Portugal, Galicia and Catalonia it is derived from the Latin word COSTA, "rib", which has come to mean slope, coast, in Romance languages. In the rest of Spain it comes from Catalonia or from Galicia, being the Spanish equivalent Cuesta. It may refer to: In Brazil it is believed that the name has been adopted metaphorically, referring to Da Costa as literally "from the coast". This theory would explain the absence of the name in families from states not bounded by water.
    8.50
    2 votes
    85
    8.50
    2 votes
    86
    Pascal

    Pascal

    Pascal (\p(a)-scal, pas-cal\) is a common masculine Francophone given name, cognate of Italian name Pasquale, Spanish name Pascual, Catalan name Pasqual. Pascal is common in French-speaking countries, Germany and Netherlands. The correct feminine form is Pascale, Pascalle or Pascalina. Pascal is also common as a surname in France, and in Italy (in Piedmont, Aosta Valley and, as De Pascal, in Friuli-Venezia Giulia). Pascal derives from the Latin paschalis or pashalis, which means "relating to Easter", from Latin pascha ("Passover", i.e. the Easter Passover"), Greek Πάσχα, Aramaic pasḥā, in turn from the Hebrew pesach, which means "to be born on, or to be associated with, Passover day". Since the Hebrew holiday Passover coincides closely with the later Christian holiday of Easter, the Latin word came to be used for both occasions. The names Paschal, Pasqual, Pasquale, Pascale, Pascha, Paschalis, Pascual, Pascoe and Pasco are all variations of Pascal. People with the name Pascal include:
    8.50
    2 votes
    87
    Ryeland

    Ryeland

    The Ryeland is one of the oldest of British sheep breeds going back seven centuries when the monks of Leominster in Herefordshire bred sheep and grazed them on the rye pastures, giving them their name. It was introduced into Australia in 1919 and are classified as an endangered breed by the Rare Breeds Trust of Australia and also are one of the nine heritage breeds that were the foundation of the sheep and wool industry in Australia. The Ryeland was one of the breeds used to introduce the poll gene (no horns) to the Dorset breed in the development of the Poll Dorset. This breed is raised primarily for meat. Ryelands are docile with high fertility. Due to their blocky build they are easy on fences compared to many breeds. They are ideal sheep for small properties. Ryelands are also 'good -doers' - William Youatt wrote that Ryelands "endure privation of food better than any other breed" and Sir Joseph Banks wrote "Ryelands deserve a niche in the temple of famine". Ryelands have a smaller head than most terminal sires which makes them a good choice for maiden or Merino ewes but they have a fast growth rate and early maturity. In Australia the wool is always white and free of kemp. A
    8.50
    2 votes
    88
    Wu

    Wu

    Wu is the Pinyin transliteration of the Chinese surname 吳 (Traditional Chinese), 吴 (Simplified Chinese), which is the tenth most common surname in Mainland China. Several other, less common Chinese surnames with different pronunciations are also transliterated into English as "Wu": 武, 伍, 仵, 烏, 鄔 and 巫. The Cantonese and Hakka transliteration of 吳 is Ng, a syllable made entirely of a nasal consonant while the Min Nan transliteration of 吳 is Goh or Ngoh, depending on the regional variations in Min Nan pronunciation. In Vietnamese, many of those are read differently, for example Võ or Vũ for 武, Ngô for 吳, Ô for 烏. Wu (or Woo or Wou) is also the Cantonese transliteration of the different Chinese surname 胡 (see Hu), used in Hong Kong, and by overseas Chinese of Cantonese speaking areas of Guangdong, or Hong Kong origin. 吳 is also one of the most common surnames in Korea. It is spelled 오 in Hangul and romanized O by the three major romanization systems, but more commonly spelled Oh in South Korea. It is also related far back in Chinese history with the name "Zhou". "Wu" (吴) can be translated into English as "god-like" or "the highest." As shown by some translations from ancient
    8.50
    2 votes
    89
    Xiao

    Xiao

    Xiao (simplified Chinese: 萧/肖; traditional Chinese: 蕭) is a Chinese surname. In the Wade-Giles system of romanization, it is rendered as Hsiao. It may also be romanized as Siew, Siow, Seow or Siu. A 1977 study found that it was the 20th most common Chinese surname in the world. It is said to be the 30th most common in China. The Xiao family originated from Xiao County in Anhui province, China. In the kingdom of Xiao (萧国) in ancient China, an emperor took the name Xiao DaXin (萧大心) during the Zhou Dynasty; he was the first Xiao. After him, Xiao He was the first prime minister of the Han Dynasty. Later on, his descendant Xiao Biao (萧彪) and his family moved to Lanling (兰陵), now Fengxian (峰县) in Shandong province, due to political problems during the reign of Emperor Wu of Han. The Xiao people therefore also trace their history to Lanling, and sometimes they are called Lanling Xiao (“兰陵萧”). Another mass movement of Xiao people came during Western Jin Dynasty "Yongjia Rebellion" (西晋永嘉之乱), Xiao Chen (萧整) moved to Danyang (江苏省丹阳市). It was also called South Lanling (南兰陵). The descendants of Danyang Xiao (丹阳萧氏) later founded two dynasties: Xiao Daocheng (萧道成) founded the Southern Qi (南齐)
    8.50
    2 votes
    90
    Ansermino

    Ansermino

    Ansermino is an Italian surname originating from a small town of Camandona, Italy. Camandona is located in the mountains just outside of Biella. If you are to visit Camandona today, you will see the gravestones of quite a few Anserminos, but it is now quite hard to find an Ansermino in Camandona as most of them have now spread all around the world. Ansermino is also a designer clothing label originating from Italy predominantly focusing on jewelry for some very exclusive & famous clients. Ansermino means pro rugby star in Italian.
    7.33
    3 votes
    91
    Clan Fergusson

    Clan Fergusson

    Clan Fergusson is a Scottish clan which has multiple geographic origins across Scotland. Consequently the Fergussons may be viewed as both a Highland and a Lowland clan. "Sons of Fergus" the world over have gained distinction in nonmilitary activities, e.g. in the law, the church, government, the arts and sciences, medicine, education, agriculture and in business and industry. Mention can only be made of Adam Ferguson the philosopher (1724–1816) and Robert Fergusson (1750–1774) the poet and mentor of Robert Burns. And in the realm of romance, the heroine of the song Annie Laurie was married to Alexander Ferguson of Craigdarroch. Before the 18th century, at least five groups of Fergusons possessed lands and lived in the style of a clan under their respective chiefs in Argyll, Perthshire, Aberdeenshire, Galloway, and Carrick. Today, the Kilkerran Fergusons in Ayrshire and the family of Fergusson of Baledmund and the Fergusons of Balquhidder, both in Perthshire, are still owners of extensive lands. Fergussons from both Galloway and Carrick alike claim descent from Fergus of Galloway. The grandfather of Donnchadh, Earl of Carrick and in turn great-great-grandfather to Robert Bruce,
    7.33
    3 votes
    92
    Luthra

    Luthra

    Luthra (Punjabi: ਲੂਥਰਾ, Hindī: लूथरा) is an Indo-Aryan Khatri and Arora surname originating in the Punjab region of the Indian subcontinent. It is part of the broad Kshatriya caste. The Kshatriyas in Hinduism are one of the four varnas. They are traditionally members of the military or ran in an administrative capacity. The Kshatriya were assigned to protecting the Hindu dharma. Over the course of time, Luthras have migrated to places across Punjab and Sindh. When Pakistan was founded in 1947, most of the Luthras migrated to India. Today, Luthras live in numerous regions within India, but are mostly concentrated in Punjab, Haryana, Delhi, Uttar Pradesh. Luthras can be both Sikh and Hindu, as the religions are generally very close in the Punjab region. The Luthras are usually bhalpuriya of the Khatri or Arora castes of the Punjab and Sindh. They are of the Kshatriya Varna, which in Vedic times, was the civil ruling and administration group which also included warriors. A number of Luthras migrated to Aror (modern-day Rohri, near Sukkur in Sindh, Pakistan) in ancient times and joined a group of Aroras which had settled there. Some Luthras are Mair Rajputs and originate from the
    7.33
    3 votes
    93
    Marcus

    Marcus

    Marcus (abbreviated M.) is a masculine given name of Ancient Roman pre-Christian origin derived probably from Etruscan Marce of unknown meaning, or referring to the mythological figure Mars. Because Mars was identified as the Roman god of War, the name 'Marcus' can by extension be taken to refer to Ares in the Greek pantheon. The name is popular in Europe, particularly in Sweden, Norway, Italy and Germany, and increasingly, in the Netherlands. It is also popular in English language countries, although less common than the shortened variation 'Mark', associated with the Gospel writer Mark the Evangelist (Μάρκος). There are other variants. Marcus ranks in the top 100 most popular boy names in Australia, Canada, England, Scotland, Sweden, and Wales since the 1990s, as well as, the top 200 most popular boy names in the US since the 1960s. Marcus developed as a patronymic or locational surname in Italy, southern France, and Spain around 1000 A.D., attributable to religious monasteries and sanctuaries named Sanctus Marcus (or its many variants). The surname was used as an identifier for area of origin. The first historical record of the surname was in the year 1390 in Biberach an der
    7.33
    3 votes
    94
    Firlej family

    Firlej family

    Firlej is the surname of a Polish szlachta (nobility) family. According to Kasper Niesiecki, Ostafi of Lewart coat of arms came from Franconia, Germany, to Poland, in 1317, to serve Polish king Władysław Łokietek. He was nicknamed Firlej, and the name became his family name. From 15th to 17th century, the Firlej family was a powerful magnate family in the Lesser Poland (Małopolska) region. A branch of the family became a vocal supporter of Protestantism in Poland. The family went extinct in 18th century.
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    95
    Noel

    Noel

    Noel (also spelled Nowell or Noël) (nəʊˈɛl) is an alternative word for Christmas. It first entered the English language in the 14th century. The word comes from Middle English noel, which derives from the Old French word noël and its more common form naël. The English spelling "Noël" is taken directly from modern French, which also derives from the Old French. The ultimate Latin origin is the phrase nātālis (diēs), "(day) of birth". The word is well known from the Christmas song The First Nowell.
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    96
    Ó Neill Dynasty Today

    Ó Neill Dynasty Today

    Today there are three ancient O'Neill dynasties or principalities. The original titles passed under the elective derbfine system of Irish Brehon law. Incumbents were then granted further titles that could be inherited under primogeniture by various Roman Catholic kingdoms in Europe. The current head of the Clanaboy O’Neill dynasty is Hugo Ricciardi O'Neill, son of Jorge Maria O'Neill, whose family has been in Portugal since the 18th century. He is officially recognized by the offices of arms throughout Europe as titular Prince and Count of Clanaboy, but he refuses to use this title, using instead the style The O'Neill of Clannaboy. The name Clanaboy (or Clandeboye) is a curruption of the Gaelic family name of 'Clann Aoidh Bhuí' or the 'Family of Fair Hugh' 'fair' being a reference to hair colour, most likely. The O'Neills of Bellaghy are of this line. The O'Neill of the Fews dynasty, led by a Spanish nobleman, Don Carlos O'Neill, 12th Marquess of la Granja. He is also stylized as the Prince of the Fews. From the same line is the family of Sir William Johnson, 1st Baronet of New York. "The Fews" is an area in County Armagh and was a sub-territory under the O'Neills of Tyrone. Today
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    97
    Akins

    Akins

    Akins ( /ˈeɪkɪnz/ or local /ˈɑːkɪnz/) is a Scottish surname and northern Irish family name. The name has several possible origins, although it is generally considered to be a variant of Aikens, which is considered to be a patronymic form of the name Aiken. These names are considered to be derived from the Scots personal name Aitken, which is a double diminutive form of the Biblical name Adam. The name is formed in part from Ad, the diminutive of Adam (the d has been sharpened to t); the name is also formed from the diminutive suffix -kin. George Fraser Black stated that the -s in the surnames Atkins, and Aitkins, represents "son"; an in consequence, that these names equate to Atkinson. In 1946, Black noted that, according to John Paterson (in 1867), the surname Aiken was an old name in the parish of Ballantrae, Ayrshire; and that "in Orkney it is believed to have replaced the Old Norse name Haakon and its derivative Hakonson." Black also noted that the surname Aiken (and its variations: Aitken, Aitkin, Aitkins, Atkin, Atkins) have been stated by others to be derived from the names Atty ("little Atty"), and Arthur; although Black stated that he himself disagreed with this
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    98
    Bogacki

    Bogacki

    Bogacki (plural Bogaccy) is the surname of Polish szlachta (noble) family. Bogacki is a Polish aristocratic family which originated from Bogate (Mazovian Duchy). Their family name derives from that place name. Bogate means in Polish "rich". That is because the county ruled by the Bogacki family was said to be one of the richest and largest in the whole voivodship. The Bogacki bought the lands in the 14th century. They built there an estate and two churches. In 1469, member of the family Mikołaj Bogacki became a governor of the Mazovian Duchy. During the reign of Stanislaw Bogacki in 16th century the whole property was 594 hectares large. Family is very strongly associated with the noble family of Garwoliński of Garwolino. Till the end of the second world war they used to have many estates around Poland, including The Borki House, country estate in Jedlnia, tenement houses in Radom and many other properties. All of the estates were taken from the family by the Bolshevik government in 1945 and were nationalized. Antoni Patek h. Prawdzic, the founder of the Patek Philippe & Co. was a member of Bogacki family. The town of Bogate since it has been established has the Prawdzic coat of
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    99
    Brady

    Brady

    Brady is a surname derived from the Irish surname Mac Brádaigh. In a listing by the U.S. Census Bureau of the Most Common U.S. Surnames Brady is ranked at #411.
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    100
    Holtreman

    Holtreman

    Holtreman is a spelling version of the Oultreman family name. The Holtreman name was adopted in Portugal by an Oultreman’s family branch originally from Valenciennes. In the early 17th century, a knight called Jean (John) Houltremant (or d’Oultreman) served the Count of Vila Real in the reign of Philip III of Portugal (Philip IV of Spain). Jean Houltremant descended from an old lineage from the County of Flanders and the County of Hainaut being a grandson of Jacques d’Oultreman dit Houltreman, adviser of his majesty at Namur. Jean married Ana Antónia Nunes, daughter of Manuel Nunes and wife Ana Nunes, landowners of the Anadia region in Portugal. After the Portuguese Restoration War, Jean descendency is believed to have adopted his wife's family name of Nunes, and moved to Pousaflores into his wife's family lands. The Holtremant name was later recovered in the 18th century by Bartolomeu Nunes Holtremant, Knight of the Order of Christ and by his cousin - and godson - Manuel Ribeiro Holtremant, Knight of the Order of Saint James. Due to Portuguese pronunciation, all their descendants have adopted the Holtreman spelling. In Portugal, the family is better known because of the foundation
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    101
    Lynch

    Lynch

    Lynch is a surname of English and Irish origin. The English surname of Lynch derives from the Old English hlinc (meaning "hill") and denotes residence on a hillside (for example, the hillside village of Lynch on Exmoor in Somerset). The most notable English Lynch family were seated since ancient times at Grove House and Down Court in the village of Staple near Canterbury in Kent, one of whose number was Royal chaplain Rev. John Lynch (1697-1760) Dean of Canterbury Cathedral. In Gaelic, its original forms included There were at least three unrelated families of this name in Gaelic Ireland, located in what is now County Clare, Cork, Louth and south-east Ulster. All are unrelated. The most famous Irish Lynch family were one of the Tribes of Galway, and of Anglo-Norman origin. The original Norman-French form of the surname, de Linch, indicated a now unknown place of origin, probably in Normandy. It is from this wealthy landowning line that Patrick Lynch, who moved to Argentina, was from; including descendant Che Guevara. Heraldry was introduced to Ireland by the Anglo-Norman's, the earliest reference to a herald of arms for Ireland is 1382, when the herald of John Chandos was appointed
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    102
    Jabłonowski

    Jabłonowski

    Jabłonowski (plural: Jabłonowscy) is the surname of a Polish szlachta (nobility) family. Polish adjectives have different forms for the genders, Jabłonowska is the form for a female family member while a male would use Jabłonowski. The history of the family starts in the 16th century when members of the Wichulski family purchased the Jabłonowo Pomorskie estate and began to use the name Jabłonowski. The family rose to prominence in the 17th century with Stanisław Jan Jabłonowski, a successful military leader in such campaigns as that against the Swedes during The Deluge, Chocim, the 1683 Battle of Vienna and the 1695 battle against the Tatars at Lwów. During the 1696 election to select a successor for John III Sobieski, Stanisław Jan Jabłonowski was a candidate for the Polish throne. In 1698, Emperor Leopold I granted him and his family the hereditary title of Prince. Stanisław Jan Jabłonowski was the father of Anna Jabłonowska who was the mother of Polish King Stanisław Leszczyński. Stanisław Leszczyński's daughter Marie Leszczyńska married King Louis XIV of France and became, with him, the ancestress of most of the Roman Catholic monarchs of Europe. The Jabłonowski family used the
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    103
    Liu

    Liu

    劉(Lao, Lau, Liew, Liu, Loo, Low, Liou or Yu) is a common Chinese family name. The transliteration Liu can represent several different surnames written in different Chinese characters: In Vietnamese, the name can either take the form "Liễu" (in northern regions), corresponding to 柳 in Chinese, or "Lưu" (in central or southern regions), corresponding to 刘/劉 or 留 in Chinese. The family name 六 is "Lục" in Vietnamese. A few having Vietnamese-Chinese descent use the family name "Lao" while Indonesian-Chinese descent Latinise it according to Dutch pronunciation as "Lauw". In Hakka, 刘/劉 is most commonly transliterated as 'Liew' while 廖 is written as 'Liau' or 'Liaw'. The other variants of the romanised surname 'Liu', i.e. 柳, 留 and 六, are uncommon among speakers of Hakka. In Cantonese transliteration, 刘/劉 (Liú) is Lau, Lao is also transliteration of 刘/劉 in Min Nan and Taiwanese Minnan Chinese language, whilst Liu is a different surname, 廖, pinyin: Liào, ("Liêu" in Vietnamese).
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    104
    Pace

    Pace

    Pace is a surname in both Italian and English. In addition to being found in Italy and England, it is also found in Germany, is very common in Malta, and can be found among Italian and British immigrants in places like the United States. The Pace family are prominent in (particularly) Malta and in Sicily. They held ancient fiefdoms in both countries. While pronunciation varies according to one's linguistic heritage, the two most common variants are the English "Pace", rhyming with "race", and the Italian "PAH-chay". There are at least two independent origins of the name Pace, one in Italy and the other in England, but everywhere it's a surname of Latin origins. Maltese Paces can ultimately trace their name back to Italy while German Paces can ultimately trace their name back to England. Others argue that Pace is an unusual surname of French origins, and it is recorded in the spellings of Peace, Pace, Paice, Pase, Payce, and possibly others as well. It has two possible origins. The first being from an early medieval nickname for a mild-mannered and even-tempered man, derived from the Anglo-Norman-French and Middle English word "pace" or "pece", ultimately from the Latin "pax",
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    105
    Taczanowski

    Taczanowski

    Taczanowski (Polish plural Taczanowscy) is the surname of a Polish szlachta (nobility) family from Poznań bearing the Jastrzębiec Coat of Arms and the motto: Plus penser que dire. They took their name from their estate Taczanów in the 15th century and by the 19th century were among the leading magnates in partitioned-Poland. Members of the family are historically significant religious, political, scientific, and military figures. The family was granted the title of count by King Friedrich Wilhelm IV of Prussia in 1857. The Austrian branch of the family, which spells the name Dassanowsky, came to Vienna with the forces of King Jan Sobieski during the Battle of Vienna in 1683. Notable members include:
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    106
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    107
    Burdak

    Burdak

    Burdak (Hindi: बुरडक) is a surname found in the countries of Eurasia, Australia and United States. In India, Burdak is a clan of the Jat people and Bishnois. Burdak is a surname of the Jat community in India, found primarily in northwest Rajasthan, which indicates membership in the Burdak Gotra. The origin of Burdak surname seems to be of Iranian. Burdak Jats are considered to be the descendants of Maharaja Bahuka (बाहुक), who was a Suryavanshi King, son of Vrika. Bahuka had been 33 generations earlier than Rama of Ramayana in the ancestry of Suryavansha. Burdak is an Agni kula ("Fire Born") lineage Jat clan included in Chauhans. They write Burdok in the north-east region of India. As per records of the Bards the Jat Gotra Burdak started after Rao Burdakdeo of Dadrewa. Rao Burdak Dev went to Lahore to help Raja Jai Pal of Hindu Shahi dynasty to fight against Mahmud of Ghazni . He died in war in V.S. 1057 (1000 AD) and his wife Tejal of gotra Shekwal became sati in Dadrewa . Her chhatri was built on the site of Dadrewa pond in samvat 1058 (1001 AD). Rao Burdakdeo’s elder son Samudra Pal went to Vaihind near Peshawar in Pakistan to help Raja Anand Pal and was killed there in war.
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    108

    Farnell

    Farnell is a surname, thought to originate from "Fern Hill". It is most common to the English county of Yorkshire. It may refer to:
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    109
    Hall

    Hall

    In architecture, a hall is fundamentally a relatively large space enclosed by a roof and walls. In the Iron Age, a mead hall was such a simple building and was the residence of a lord and his retainers. Later, rooms were partitioned from it, so that today the hall of a house is the space inside the front door through which the rooms are reached.... This: On the same principle: Similarly: Following a line of similar development:
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    110
    Kirschenbaum

    Kirschenbaum

    Kirschenbaum is a German surname of Lutheran or Ashkenazic origin meaning "cherry tree", written Kirschbaum in modern German (Kirschen means "cherries"; Baum means "tree"). It is uncommon as a given name. An orthographic variation of the name is Kirshenbaum. People named Kirschenbaum or Kirshenbaum include:
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    111

    O'Dowd

    O'Dowd is an uncommon Irish surname. Many modern variants of the O'Dowd surname exist. The prefix has been widely retained, O'Dowd being more usual than Dowd. Other modern variants are Dawdy, Dowdy, O'Dowda and Dowds, with Doody and Duddy, found around Killarney, where a branch of the Connacht family settled. All are Ó Dubhda (pronounced O'Dooda) in Irish, the root word being "dubh" black. A quite distinct minor sept of O Dubhda was located in County Londonderry. Survivors of this in Ulster today are usually called Duddy, Dowd or Dowds. The O'Dowd clan or sept traces its descent from Fiachra, brother of Niall of the Nine Hostages, through Daithi, the last pagan King of Ireland who, legend has it, was killed by a bolt of lightning as he led an army to the foot of the Alps in 455 AD. His grandson Aillil ("Al-ill") succeeded as King of Connacht and later King of Tara until 482. For centuries they were the leading sept of the northern Ui Fiachrach, a tribal group that occupied the modern counties of Mayo and Sligo. The Uí Faichrach provided successive kings of Connacht for a long period, but their sphere of influence became confined to North Connacht. In the late 10th century, their
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    112
    Tyndall

    Tyndall

    Tyndall (the original spelling, also Tyndale, Tyndal, Tindall, Tindal, Tindale, Tindle, Tindell, Tindill, and Tindel) is the name of an English family taken from the land they held as tenants in chief of the Kings of England and Scotland in the 11th, 12th and 13th centuries: Tynedale, or the valley of the Tyne, in Northumberland. With origins in the ancient Anglo Saxon nobility of Northumbria, the Royal Scottish House of Dunkeld and the Anglo-Norman nobility, they have contributed courtiers, judges, writers, historians, sailors, airmen, scientists and philosophers to the history of England, Ireland and the new world. Two members of the family were offered, and declined, the throne of Bohemia in the 15th century and one of their number, William Tyndale, was the first modern translator of the Bible into English and one of the most important figures in the evolution of the modern language. The family is spread today throughout the British Isles and the English speaking world. The first member of the family known by this name was Uchtred, Lord of Tyndale, who married Bethoc Canmore, daughter of Donald III, King of Scots from 1093-1099. His name, the period of his life and his lands and
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    113
    Wood

    Wood

    Wood is a surname in the English language. It is common throughout the world, especially countries with historical links to Britain. For the most part, the surname Wood originated as a topographic name used to describe a person who lived in, or worked in a wood or forest. This name is derived from the Middle English wode, meaning "wood" (from the Old English wudu). An early occurrence of this surname (of a personal residing near a wood) is de la Wode, recorded in Hertfordshire, England, in 1242. The locational name also appeared in early records Latinised as de Bosco (from the Old French bois, meaning "wood"). Another derivation for the surname is from a nickname of an eccentric or violent person, derived from the Old English wōd, wad, and Middle English wod, wode, all meaning "frenzied" or "wild". This derivation is considered to be much less common than the locational origin. An early occurrence of the surname derived in this fashion (from a nickname) is le Wode, recorded in Worcestershire, England, in 1221. Variant forms of the name include the surnames Woodd, Woode, Woods, Wod, and Wode. In England, Wales and the Isle of Man it is the 26th most-common surname, in Scotland it is
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    114
    Baczewski

    Baczewski

    Baczewski is a name of a Polish szlachta family, founders of the J. A. Baczewski vodka company. The factory, dating back to late 18th century, was based in Lwów (Lviv) and until 1939 was one of two most popular Polish export goods. The family of Baczewski was of distant Valachian descent and signed itself with the Sas coat-of-arms. The Baczewski family was one of the most illustrious and wealthiest families in Lwów before World War I and in the interbellum period during the Second Polish Republic. Their residence was at the Lviv market square Nr. 31, which also housed a Baczewski vodka store on the ground floor. The house was renovated in 1923. The family mausoleum sits prominently right at the entrance gate of Lychakiv Cemetery. Members of the family include:
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    115
    Klütz

    Klütz

    Klütz (German pronunciation: [ˈklʏts]) is a town in the Nordwestmecklenburg district, in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, Germany. It is situated near the Baltic Sea coast, 22 km northwest of Wismar, and 33 km northeast of Lübeck. Media related to Klütz at Wikimedia Commons
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    116
    Rodríguez

    Rodríguez

    Rodríguez is a Spanish Patronymic (meaning Son of Rodrigo) and a common family name (surname) in Spain, Latin America, and The Philippines. Its Portuguese equivalent is Rodrigues. The "ez" signifies "son of". The name Rodrigo is the Spanish form of Roderick, meaning "famous power", from the Germanic elements "hrod" (fame) and "ric" (power). It was the name of Roderic, the last Visigothic King before the Muslim conquest, and the subject of many legends. The surname Rodríguez could have originated in the 9th century when patronymic names originated. It is a name associated with a great number of different people:
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    117
    Strickland

    Strickland

    The English surname Strickland is derived from the Norse word Stercaland, which is found in Westmorland to the south of Penrith. It did not become a family name until after 1179, when Walter de Castlecarrock married Christian de Leteham, an heiress to the local estate that now includes the villages of Great Strickland and Little Strickland. Following the marriage Walter changed his name to de Strikeland, which is the French spelling of the name. The family coat of arms is a black shield with three escalopes (sea shells). The De Castlecarrock family was descended from the Norman de Vallibus or de Vaux family which came originally from Falaise in Normandy. Hubert de Vaux became the first Norman Lord of Gilsand in Cumberland (now known as Cumbria) which is the area around Brampton and Castle Carrock. He had a son, Eustace had married one of the two sisters who were co-heiresses of Robert son of Bueth, who was the last direct male descendant of a native chieftain, Gilles son of Bueth, Robert was the original owner of Gilsland (Gilles-land) around the time of Henry I. Sir William De Strickland (1242–1305) married Elizabeth d'Eyncourt who was descended maternally from the Clan Dunbar,
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    118
    Tauxe

    Tauxe

    Tauxe is a surname of French-Swiss origin, with perhaps 40 or so individuals extant (in the United States) still bearing it. Many more Tauxes exist in the environs of Lausanne, Switzerland. It originated as a yeoman line in the 15th century, probably deriving its move to the bourgeousie from involvement in revenue operations ('taux' is French for 'tax' or 'tell' as in 'bank teller'). The US Tauxes trace their American roots to the family of Tauxes that moved from Switzerland to East Tennessee around 1886. They have not been able to establish links to the Tauxes that still inhabit Switzerland. "Tauxe" is pronounced to rhyme with 'oaks' or 'smokes'. It is homonymous with 'tokes'. Des flots me ris, jamais ne plie, à Dieu me fie. Translation: I laugh at floods, I never bow, I trust in God. Originating in the Canton Vaud of Switzerland, near the town of Lausanne, during a famine in the late 1800s a group of Tauxes broke off from their Swiss relatives and started a new life in America. They settled in East Tennessee as part of a Swiss colony of Calvinists known as 'The Brotherhood,' but this association withered after a generation or two, as younger Tauxes embraced free will and clothing
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    119
    Withers

    Withers

    Withers (earlier variants Wither, Wyther, Wythers) is an English surname of Anglo-Saxon origin. It is today a not uncommon family name throughout the Anglosphere. The family name appears on various early documents such as in a charter of Æthelred II, dated 1005 A.D. where one of the witnesses signs his name as "Ego Wi[th]er minister". In the Domesday Book of 1089 the name is shown as a tenant prior to that date. In the 11th century, the name showed no prefix, suggesting that it was not derived from a place, as were many names at that time. Rather, the name was apparently personal. The meaning of the name is uncertain. Various authorities have proposed wider (Old English, "wood"), or words meaning "to withstand", "warrior" or "willow tree". Records of the 11th century indicate the holding of land in many counties of England by persons named Wyther. A continuous record of a Wyther family does not appear until the time of Henry II (reigned 1154-89). This was a Wyther family of County Lancaster (now Lancashire) including Sir Robert Wyther, Knight, of Pendleton Hall, Lancashire, and of Halton, Cheshire, Seneschal to Roger de Lucy, Constable of Chester (1179–89). He married Joan,
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    120
    Ainsworth

    Ainsworth

    Ainsworth is a surname with its origins in the North West of England. The origin of the word Ainsworth is from the Anglo Saxon word 'worth' meaning an 'Enclosure', 'Ain' probably having been someone's name.. There is a village called Ainsworth near Bolton.
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    121
    Friedrich

    Friedrich

    The Friedrich are the most ancient German-Bohemian glass-maker family. From as early as 750 years ago, the shadowy picture of the oldest German-Bohemian glass-maker family Friedrich emerges, who contributed greatly towards the creation of the world-famous Bohemian glass (also called Bohemian Crystal). In pre-Hussite times they produced amazing works of vitreous art near Daubitz, nowadays called Doubice. During the 16th and 17th centuries, as a result of the family’s development of their glass factory in Oberkreibitz, today Horní Chribská, Bohemian glass art enjoyed its first heyday. The expansion of this glass-maker family over many European countries is unparalleled. Its hut master dynasties made glass history in Bohemia, Silesia, Austria, Tyrol and Slovenia. Its glass-makers proved their artistic skills and technological experience in Brandenburg, Saxony, Thuringia, Bavaria, Styria, Slovakia, Croatia and so on. The well-known glass artist Friedrich Egermann also ranked among the family’s descendants as the natural historian and explorer of South America Thaddäus Haenke.
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    122
    Louis

    Louis

    Louis (pronounced [lwi] in French, /ˈluːiː/ in British English or /ˈluːɪs/ in American English) is the French and English form of the German given name Ludwig. Another English variant is Lewis (/ˈluːɪs/). The German name is composed of the words for "fame" (hlūd) and "warrior" (wīg) which may be translated to famous warrior or "famous in battle".
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    123

    Acland

    Acland is an English surname. The Aclands of Devon (often Dyke Acland: see Acland baronets, Dyke Acland baronets) were an influential family.
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    124
    Albizzi

    Albizzi

    The Albizzi family was a Florentine family originally based in Arezzo, who were rivals of the Medici and Alberti families. They were at the centre of Florentine oligarchy from 1382, in the reaction that followed the Ciompi revolt, to the rise of the Medici in 1434. The most infamous and influential members of the family were Maso and his son Rinaldo degli Albizzi (1370–1442) who countered the rise of Cosimo de' Medici, exiling him in 1433. Luca, another son of Maso was head of the Florentine galleys; his diary is an importance source for historians. Luca was a loyal friend to Cosimo de' Medici. As a result, Luca was permitted to stay in Florence when the rest of his clan, including his brother, were exiled under the Medici regime in 1434. Moreover, in 1442, Luca Albizzi actually became the Gonfalonier of Justice and stayed a key ally of Cosimo during this time. The family palazzo in Borgo degli Albizzi, was rebuilt at the return of the family in the early 16th century.
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    125
    DeSutter

    DeSutter

    DeSutter is derived from the Latin word sutor (shoemaker) and is widely used in Flanders. One could translate DeSutter as 'The Shoemaker'. The first record of the name is from the 13th century in Flanders. DeSutters originated in the northernwestern parts of Belgium in the Ghent (Gent - East-Flanders) area near the English Channel, as well as in Northwestern France. Variants include De Sutter, DeSoto, DeZuter, DeZutter and De Zutter. A majority of the DeSutters in United States are descended from people who moved there in the mid to late 19th and early 20th century. Most settled in the upper plain states of the Midwest (Minnesota, Iowa, Illinois, Wisconsin and the Dakotas) for the vast farming lands as well as the Catholic mission work. People with this surname include:
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    126

    Elharar

    Elharar [or El-harar] is a Jewish surname classically found among Jews emanating from Morocco. Elharar means "The Silk Dealer," referring to the fact that Jews with this appellation were either merchants dealing in silk, or silk craftsmen. Upon emigration to Israel in the 1950s, many Jews with this name hebraicized the name to Harary or Harari.
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    127
    Fisch

    Fisch

    Fisch is a municipality in the Trier-Saarburg district, in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. It is a very small village, with a small population.
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    128
    Gonzalez

    Gonzalez

    González is a family name that originated in Spain. In Spain, it is the second most common surname (only after García) with 2.08% of the population bearing the surname. It is also very popular in Latin America, being the most common one in countries like Argentina, Chile, Venezuela and Paraguay,and Domincan Republic and thus making it the most popular surname in the Spanish speaking world. Within the United States, it is ranked as the 23rd most common surname. González is of Spanish origin, and it means "son of Gonzalo". Common spelling variations include: Gonzales, Gonzáles, Gonzalés, González and Gonzalez (without an acute accent). The variant Gunsolleys appears among people descended from a Spaniard with the surname González who settled in the Dutch colony of New Amsterdam. In sport, González may refer to the following people: In football (soccer), González may refer to the following people: In the arts, González may refer to the following people: In music, González may refer to the following people: In literature, González may refer to the following people: In politics, González may refer to the following people:
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    129

    Kecskés

    Kecskés is a Hungarian surname (pronounced KETCH-kaysh). It means goatherd (Hungarian: kecske "goat"). Other variations of this name are: Ketskés, Kechkés. The Romanianized form is Checiches. The Hungarian name of town Cozla village, Letca Commune, Sălaj County, Romania is also Kecskés.
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    Poniatowski

    Poniatowski

    Poniatowski (plural: Poniatowscy) is an aristocratic (szlachta) family in Poland. Because Polish adjectives have different forms for the genders, Poniatowska is the same name for a female family member. In 1764-95 their member was King. The Poniatowski family became most prominent in the late 18th century and 19th century. In three generations the Poniatowski family rose from the rank of gentry to that of senator and then to royalty. The first information about the family dates back to the end of the 15th century, when they appeared in Poniatowa, 40 km west from Lublin in about 1446. Their family name derives from that place name. Poniatowa was the residence of several branches of the Poniatowski family: Tłuk, Jarasz and Ciołek. According to family's history, the family had ties with the Italian nobility: Giuseppe Salinguerra, a member of the Italian family of Torelli, settled in Poland about the middle of the 17th century, and there assumed the name of Poniatowski from the estate of Poniatow, belonging to his wife, who was the daughter of Albert Poniatowski and Anna Leszczyńska. Modern historians however consider this story dubious, particularly as around the 18th century it was
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    Wagner

    Wagner

    Wagner is derived from the Germanic surname Waganari, meaning "wagonmaker" or "wagon driver". This common occupational surname was often given to one who transported produce or other goods via high-sided wagons or carts. Among some German populations, especially the Pennsylvania Germans, Wagner also denoted a wagon-maker, wainwright, or cartwright.
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    Yang

    Yang

    Yang is the transcription of the Chinese family name 楊 / 杨. It is the sixth most common surname in Mainland China. Yang is most often the transliteration of the character 楊 (in simplified Chinese: 杨). The same character can also mean a type of poplar. The character is composed of a "wood" radical on the left and the character yang (昜) on the right, which indicates the pronunciation of the whole character. Yang can also be the phonetic translation of other Chinese surnames, including 阳, the Chinese character for the Sun, and a very rare Chinese family name 羊, the Chinese character for Goat or Sheep. Four origins are recorded for the surname Yang (楊): Some branches of the Yang clan (in particular the Hongnong branch) refer to themselves as "Yang of the Hall of Four Wisdoms". The "Hall of Four Wisdoms" refers to a story concerning Yang Zhen, an official of the Eastern Han Dynasty (206 BC - 220 AD), known for his erudition as well as moral character. When a man named Wang Mi visited Yang Zhen at night and attempted to bribe him 10 catties of gold, Yang rejected the gift. Wang Mi persevered, saying that nobody would know. Yang Zhen famously retorted "the Heaven knows, the Earth knows, I
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    Cai

    Cai

    Cài (Simplified and Traditional Chinese: 蔡) is a Chinese surname that derives from the name of the ancient Cai state. It is regionally more common in China's Fujian Province and in countries settled by ethnic Chinese from that province than in China as a whole. The surname is the 34th most common surname in China, but the 9th most common in Taiwan, where it is usually romanized as Tsai, and the 8th most common in Singapore, where it is usually romanized as Chua. It is also a common name in Hong Kong where it is romanized as Choy, Choi or Tsoi and in Malaysia as Chua. The Cais are said to be the descendants of the 5th son of King Wen of Zhou, Ji Du. Ji Du was awarded the title of marquis (hóu) of the State of Cai (centered on what is now Shangcai, Zhumadian, Henan, China), and he was known as Cai Shu Du ("Uncle Du of Cai"). Together with Guan Shu and Huo Shu, they were known as the Three Guards. When King Wu died, his son King Cheng was too young and his uncle, the Duke of Zhou, became regent. Seeing that the power of the Duke of Zhou was increasing, the Three Guards got jealous and rebelled against Zhou together with Wu Geng. The Duke of Zhou suppressed the rebellion, and Cai Shu
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    Clan MacKintosh

    Clan MacKintosh

    Clan Mackintosh (Clann Mhic an Tòisich) is a Scottish clan from Inverness with strong Jacobite ties. The Mackintoshes were also chiefs of the Chattan Confederation. Seathach, son of Donnchadh Mac Duibh, accompanied King Malcolm IV of Scotland to Morayshire to suppress rebellion in 1160. In 1163 he was granted land in the Findhorn valley and made constable of Inverness Castle. Upon Seathach's death in 1179, his son, Shaw the second became chief and was confirmed by William I of Scotland the Lion. Probably the earliest authentic history of Mackintosh is traceable to Shaw or Search Macduff, a cadet son of the third Earl of Fife. The son of Macduff, for his support of King Malcolm IV, was awarded the lands of Petty and Breachley in Invernesshire and was appointed Constable of the Castle thereto. Assuming the name Mac an Toisich which means "son of the toisech ['thane']" or "son of the Chief", he became the progenitor of his own clan. In 1263 the Clan Mackintosh fought at the Battle of Largs in support of King Alexander III of Scotland against King Haakon IV of Norway. The fifth Chief of the Clan Mackintosh, Fearchar Mac an Toisich, was killed during the battle. In 1291, Aonghas, sixth
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    Genovese

    Genovese

    Genovese is an Italian surname meaning, properly, someone from Genoa, but more often (as most of the well known representatives of the name), a clever person, a generalization particularly in Southern Italy of people from Genoa.
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    Kwong

    Kwong

    Kuang (simplified Chinese: 邝; traditional Chinese: 鄺; pinyin: kuàng; Wade–Giles: k'uang), also Kwong, Kuong, Kwang, Quong, Kong, and Fong, is a Chinese family name originated from central China. Today, it is the surname of over 5 million individuals, across China, Hong Kong, Macau, Malaysia, Singapore, Philippines, United States, United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, Fiji, Thailand, Perú, Cuba, Burma, Indonesia and Reunion Island. Variations of the surname Kwong also remain common. These include different spellings of the English term, and versions from other countries and cultures. In the overseas communities, those with the spelling Kwong trace their origins to families who have immigrated overseas before the 1970s when Mainland China reformed its romanization system, adjusting the surname spelling to Kuàng. Hong Kong residents continue to use the spelling Kwong along with most overseas Chinese communities, especially those that immigrated before the 1970s. Alternatively, since the majority of Kwongs trace their origins to Toishan, a coastal county in Kwangtung province, many Kwongs pronounce the name Fong, in accordance with the pronunciation of the local dialect. In addition, at
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    139
    Simonetti

    Simonetti

    The Simonetti family is an Italian noble family with origins in Tuscany. During the 12th Century different branches in Florence, Lucca, Pistoia and Pescia developed. Other famous branches of this family were established in Jesi, Milan and Bologna. Members of this family have held different titles since the Middle Ages, among them: Lords of Jesi, Princes of Musone, marquis in the kingdom of Naples and Rome, counts in the kingdom of Italy and Bologna, senators of Rome and the Kingdom of Italy. The Simonetti also held positions in the Republic of Florence and the Republic of Lucca, among them priori of the signoria, gonfaloniere, captains, members of the council of the elders and the leadership of the Guelph party. According to Eugenio Gamurrini and Lodovico Jacobilli the Simonetti from Jesi, Lucca, Florence, Osimo, Cingoli, Terni and Milan had a single origin. Gamurrini linked the Florentine branch of the family to medieval Lucca but could not find the common ancestor that linked the Simonetti from Tuscany to the Simonetti from Jesi. He pointed to other facts that indicated the connection and the earlier research done by Jacobilli. According to Jacobilli the Simonetti branches were
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    140
    Banerjee

    Banerjee

    Banerjee (Bengali: ব্যানার্জি Bênarji) or Bandyopadhyay (Bengali: বন্দ্যোপাধ্যায় Bôndopaddhae) is a prevalent brahmin surname in the Bengal region of India. The name is also spelt Bannerjee, Banerji, Banerjie,Bonnerjee and Bandopadhyaya by different families. Banerjees are Rarhi Kulin Brahmins of Sandilya gotra, who in the past were considered the highest caste in Bengal (along with Mukherjees, Chatterjees and Gangulis). They are descendents of the Bhattanarayana (originally from Uttar Pradesh) and members of the Sandilya gotra. During the Bengal renaissance and Young Bengal movement some of the people with Bandyopadhyay surname converted into Christianity and anglicized their name as Banerjee (or some into Bonnerjee). Others simply anglicized their name without converting. Recent genetic studies have shown that high percentage of Y-DNA haplogroup R1a1a is observed among these people which is very common in West Bengal Brahmins (72%). "Indian (Bengal) and Bangladeshi: Hindu (Brahman) name, the first element of which, Ban-, is a shortened form of the village name Bandoghat. The final element -jee is derived from jha (greatly reduced form of Sanskrit upadhyaya ‘teacher’); thus,
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    141
    Branicki

    Branicki

    Branicki (plural: Braniccy) is the surname of a Polish szlachta (nobility) family. Because Polish adjectives have different forms for the genders, Branicka is the form for a female family member. The Branicki family also called the "Griffin Clan" (Gryfici) was a magnate family, originated from Branice in the Kraków Voivodeship. One of the most representative members of the family, was Field and Great Crown Hetman Jan Klemens Gryf Branicki. Jan was one of the most powerful and influential magnates in Poland of the 18th century. He was owner of 12 cities, 257 villages, 17 palaces and two primeval forests. Jennah Karthes de Branicka, belongs, among others, to the last actual descendants of the noble family Branicki. www.de-branicki.com In 1726 he built the Branicki Palace the "Versailles of Podlaskie". He also laid out the central part of the town of Białystok with its triangular market. He started in the King's election of 1763-1764, but was beaten by his brother-in-law Stanisław Poniatowski. The Branicki family used the "Gryf" arms and their motto was: ?
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    Channar

    Channar

    Channar or Channan was a surname used in Kerala till early 20th century. It was used by members of the Ezhava community and concentrated around Kollam and Allappuzha Districts.Tharisapalli plates issued by the king Ayyanadikal Thiruvadikal of Ay kingdom at 849 AD promised Mar Sapir Iso the Persian recipient of the plate that Channa Thalai the officers of the Ay kingdom and Chera Dynasty will not harass the immigrant Persian Christians. They were also known as Kollakkar. In Malayalam, channar means Headman, showing their transcendency in the society. Channar was the headman of the village and since they followed Matrilinear system of inheritance, the office were hereditary from uncle to nephews.The name Olivan Channar (Ezhavan Channar) is found among those trading with the British (Letters to Fort St. George, Vol. XII, No. 89 dated 26 August 1719). This headmen, channar or channan,were also responsible for conducting marriages and presides at all important ceremonies, for which he receives a gift of tobacco. Among them, Alummoottill channars were part of Kayamkulam Army and were Kalari trainers. Other famous channars include Chempakappaly channars, Channars of Mayyanad, Kottoor
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    Kapoor

    Kapoor

    Kapoor or Kapur and sometimes but rarely Capoor (Punjabi: ਕਪੂਰ‌, Hindi: कपूर‌) is the name of a gotra of Punjabi descent belonging to the Khatri (Kshatriya or warrior) Varna. It is of Kashmiri Pandit origin. They are part of the "Dhaiye Ghar",. Kapurs, Malhotra (also called Mehras or Mehrotras), Khanna and Seth (also called Kakkar) marry their children with each other. Kapoor can not marry a Kapoor but can only marry Malhotra, Khanna or Seth. This leaves three "Ghars" to marry out of which they are not supposed to marry any of their mother's side relatives with mother's paternal last name (it could be Khanna, Malhotra or Seth). The Zamindars of Burdwan in Bengal belong to the Kapoor clan, and held the title of Maharajah. Maharajah Bahadur Tedj Chand Ray adopted Chinilal Kapur. His descendants continued as the Maharajas of Burdwan. The family continued as rulers of Burdwan until zamindari was abolished by the government of India in 1955/56. The area remaining however under direct administration of the British via the Indian Civil Service officers on the Bengal State. They also were never members of the Chamber or Council of Princes such as the Maharaja of Patiala or Kapurtala. Thus
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    Ostrogski

    Ostrogski

    Ostrogski (Polish: Ostrogscy, Lithuanian: Ostrogiškiai, Ukrainian: Острозькі-Ostroz'ki, Russian: Острожские -Ostrozhskie) was one of the greatest Ruthenian princely families of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania. They were most likely of Rurikid stock and descended from Sviatopolk II of Kiev. Some scholars however claim their descent from Galicia-Volhynia line of Rurikid dynasty. Vasilko Romanovich (c.1256-1282) Prince of Slonim may have been grandfather of Prince Daniel Ostrogski. The probable progenitor of this family was Prince Danylo Dmytrovych (or Danylo Wasilijewicz), who received Ostroh from Liubartas, King of Galicia-Volhynia and son of Grand Duke of Lithuania Gediminas. His son, Prince Feodor Danilovich Ostrogski, was a supporter of King Jagiello, who in 1386 confirmed him in possession of the Ostroh Castle and appointed governor of Volhynia in 1387. In addition to Ostrog Feodor Danilovich Ostrogski became owner of Korets, Zaslav (Izyaslav, in present Khmelnytskyi Oblast, Ukraine), and other towns. In some chronicles Feodor is called Dux Fethko de Ostrog. Their dominions in Volynia, Galicia, and Podolia included 24 towns, 10 townlets, and more than 100 villages. The most notable
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    Potocki

    Potocki

    • People with this family name: Stefan Potocki
    Potocki (Polish pronunciation: [pɔˈtɔt͡skʲi], plural Potoccy) is the surname of a Polish noble family. The Potocki family is a great artistocratic family originated from Potok in the Kraków Voivodeship; their family name derives from that place name. The family is heavily entwined with the cultural development and history of Poland's Eastern Borderlands (today Western Ukraine). The family is renowned for numerous Polish statesmen, military leaders, and cultural activists. The first known Potocki was Żyrosław z Potoka (born about 1136). The children of his son Aleksander were progenitors of new noble families such as the Moskorzewski's, Stanisławski's, Tworowski's, Borowski's and Stosłowski's. Jakub Potocki (~1481-1551) was the progenitor of the magnate line of the Potocki family, with descendants living today, including those living in America. The magnate line split into three primary lineages, called: The "Złota Pilawa" line received the title of count from the Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire in 1606. The entire family began using the Count title after the partitions of Poland. In 1631 Stefan Potocki, who started the "Złota Pilawa" lineage, died and was buried in Złoty Potok
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    147

    Wertheim

    Wertheim may refer to: Wertheim is a German Christian family and Ashkenazi Jewish surname originated from Wertheim or Wertheim County. It may refer to:
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    Delorit

    The last name Delorit comes from French and Belgian roots. Although it is not found in direct form in any locations in France and Belgium, it is possible that it extends from names such as DeLoye and DeLoitte. Most likely it was changed through time. Most Delorit's migrated from provincial Namur in Belgium in the early to mid 1800s and settled in Door County, Wisconsin. Two separate Delorit families reside in near by Brussels and Green Bay, Wisconsin still today. The family of Robert R. Delorit has its roots in Green Bay. Robert Delorit was the son of Laura Delorit. Ms. Laura Delorit and her 4 siblings were the children of Mathilda Challe and Arthur Delorit. Arthur Delorit was born in MAY 1864 in Belgium, he died 2 APR 1929, while at work at Hurlbut Coal Company. He was the son of Jean Baptiste Delorit, born March 1836 in Belgium and Desire Le Cloux August 1842 in Belgium.
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    Dykes

    Dykes is a British surname which may originate from the hamlet of Dykesfield in Burgh-by-Sands, Cumbria in the north of England. Due to its close proximity to the English and Scottish borders, the surname Dykes has also been found in Scottish lowlands throughout the ages. The first family to bear the surname (for which written records survive) are said to have lived in the area prior to William the Conqueror's Norman conquest of England, with the oldest surviving written document placing them in Dykesfield at the end of the reign of Henry III. The family took their surname from Hadrian's Wall, also referred to in some texts as Hadrian's Dyke. The great wall crossed Great Britain from the mouth of the Tyne to the Solway Firth and forms part of the border for Dykesfield. At this early period of history, however, the surname existed in a different form from the modern day; del Dykes, literally meaning 'of the Dykes', indicating the region from where the family came. A charter, bearing the first known recorded instance of the surname, comes from either the reign of Henry III or Edward I, though the exact date of the record is unknown. It does, however, reveal that land owned by one
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    151

    Helton

    Helton is a surname of Anglo-Saxon origin. It is derived from the family that lived in the village of Elton in Cheshire, England. The motto is Artibus et armis. Variants of the name include: Eltone, Elton, and Ellton. People with the Helton include:
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    Jones

    Jones

    Jones is a common Celtic Welsh surname based on the English version of the parent's name ending in -S. In 1881 people with this surname were largely confined to Wales. By 1998 many Welsh people had migrated to cities in England particularly those adjacent to Wales. The earliest record of the name occurs in England, in the late 13th century. The name is derived from a patronymic form of the Middle English personal names Jon and Jone, and thus roughly means in modern English "son of John". Surnames representing John cognate with the late formation Welsh Siôn such as Jones and John are particularly common in Wales. The name Jones is extremely common throughout the English-speaking world, especially Wales. In the United States, the name has absorbed many surnames in other languages which have a similar sound, or meaning. The first known record of the surname Jones is dated 1279, in Huntingdonshire, England. In 1813-1841, there were about 85,000 people named Jones living in England (0.43% of the population) and about 145,000 people named Jones living in Wales (13.84% of the total population) By 1881, migration to the urban centres of England had equalised the numbers so that both
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    153
    Kadoorie family

    Kadoorie family

    The Kadoorie family (Arabic: خضوري‎) are a wealthy family, originally Mizrahi Jews from Baghdad. From the mid-18th century they were established in Bombay India, becoming one of the wealthiest families in Asia, and later to British Hong Kong and Shanghai, China. It includes a number of notable individuals: Enterprises founded by the family: CLP Group The Peninsula Hotels
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    Lupino

    Lupino

    Lupino was the surname of a British theatre family tradition that could trace their roots back to an Italian émigré of the early 17th century. This family tradition comprised two actual families Several of the Hook family also adopted the surname Lane from Sarah Lane (1822–1899, née Borrow), the director of the Britannia Theatre, Hoxton, to whom they were related. More recent members of this family have included Lupino Lane (Henry George Lupino, 1892–1959), Stanley Lupino (1893–1942), Ida Lupino (1918–1995), Peter Lupino (1912–1994) and Rita Lupino (1920). Lupino Lane's wife was actress Violet Blyth, and their son was also an actor, Lauri Lupino Lane (1921–1986). Lupino Lane's brother, Wallace Lupino (1898–1961) was an actor, as was Wallace's son, Richard (Dickie) Lupino. Henry and Wallace Lupino's nieces were Ida Lupino and her sister Rita Lupino, the daughters of actors Stanley Lupino (1894–1942) and Connie Emerald (1892–1959). Living descendents of the Lupino family who are keeping up the family tradition is Sara Lupino Lane (granddaughter of Lupino Lane ) who is patron of The Music Hall Guild of Great Britain and America and Patricia Lupino-Thompson. Thompson was the principal
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    155
    MacDermot Roe

    MacDermot Roe

    MacDermot Roe (MacDiarmata Ruadh) is the name of a sept of the MacDermot Kings of Moylurg. Tracing their origin to 1266, the MacDermots Roe (MacDiarmata Ruadh) of Ireland served as Biatachs General of the Kingdom of Connacht and were the principal patrons of the Irish composer Turlough Carolan, 1670-1738. The MacDermots Roe exemplify the role played by a leading Irish family under the old Gaelic order and its fate after the consolidation of English rule in the early 17th century. The MacDermots Roe descend from Dermot Roe (the appellation Roe or Ruadh meaning red in Irish), grandson of Cormac MacDermot, King of Moylurg, 1218-1244. Moylurg was an ancient kingdom in what is now northern County Roscommon, Ireland and lay within the Kingdom of Connacht which included the modern counties of Galway, Leitrim, Mayo, Roscommon and Sligo. In 1266, Dermot Roe MacDermot, the grandson of Cormac MacDermot, King of Moylurg, was blinded by the Aedh mac Felim Ua Conchobair, King of Connacht. Thereafter, Dermot was known as Dermot Dall (Dall meaning blind in Irish). Dermot Dall had a grandson, Dermot Roe whose descendants adopted the surname Mac (son of) Dermot Roe to distinguish themselves from
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    156

    Marni

    The name Marni originates from several languages, including Hebrew, meaning "rejoice", and Latin as a variant of "Marina", meaning "of the sea". It also has derivations from Gaelic and Swahili. "Marni" and "Marnie" are the two most common spellings of the female first name, ranking 2446 and 1498, respectively, out of 4275 for females of all ages in the 1990 U.S. Census. Due to its many derivations, a number of alternate spellings and related variant names exist, including: Famous bearers of this name include: As a given name: As a surname:
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    157

    Nisbeth

    Nisbeth is one of the many alternate spellings of the Scottish surname Nisbet. It is used chiefly in Scandinavia by the descendants of Scottish mercenary Alexander Nisbet, who settled in Sweden in 1648.
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    158

    Patangay

    Patangay is a Marathi surname which originated India. This surname is a part of a community called Bhavsar kshatriya. Bhavsar Kshatriya Samaj, is a community of Kshatriya (warriors). According to the epics the legendary Parshuram, who was said to be an Avatar of Lord Vishnu, had vowed a vengeance against a community of warriors, where in the war he had wiped most of the warriors, off the earth. This scenario had worried two young princes Bhavsingh and Sarsingh from Saurashtra who had foreseen their dynasty ending. As the mythological period died, there was a certain period of civilization wherein there was cultural and economic stability in ancient India. In the meantime apart from being at the royal service, a few members from the community started developing skills in stitching and dyeing clothes. These skills enabled them to grow as professional artisans and in turn Royal Tailor & Dress Designers. These artisans had to travel a lot as their skills were well known throughout the nation. That was how they settled down across the country adapting to the culture of the area where they settled down, yet maintaining their own. They could flourish just because they could
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    Rao

    Rao

    Rao/राओ/رااہ is an Indian princely title cognate with Raja (King). It's also used as a surname across India, Pakistan, China, Taiwan, Italy and Brazil. Rao is also used as an addition to one's name or as a suffix to a male name in some places. Rao is commonly added as a suffix to a person's name in southern, northern and western parts of India, in particular in the states of Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Konkan/Goa, uttarpradesh, Maharashtra, Gujarat, Rajasthan, Tamil Nadu and Haryana. Rao is the surname of Rajputs of Uttarpradesh, Rao is also the surnames of elite rajputs in Rajasthan. Variants of the name include "Rai", "Raja", "Rayudu", "Rayar", "Rayulu", "Raut", "Rawat", "Raya", "Rana" and others. In the Gujarati diaspora, Rao is a common name among the Brahmbhatt or Barot community. India's ex-prime minister Narasimha Rao is a native of Andhra Pradesh in South India. Rao is also the surname of some aristrocratic and royal castes of South India especially Andhra Pradesh and Karnataka. Rao is the surname of Yadavas or Ahir's, specially in North India. They are descendants of Lord Krishna. The Rao's/Yadav's of Haryana actively participated in the 1857 mutiny, alternatively also
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    160
    Tuyll

    Tuyll

    Tuyll is the name of a noble Dutch family, with familial and historical links to England, whose full name is van Tuyll van Serooskerken. Several knights, members of various courts, literary figures, generals, ambassadors, statesmen and explorers carried the family name. Though incomplete connections to the older van Tuylls exist, these are not included in the latest edition of the Adelsboek. A few of these are: a manor of Tuyll is mentioned in a 970 letter of Otto I. Tuyll was the seat of the court of Teisterbant, which was later to become Holland, according to van Spaen "Introduction à l'histoire de la Gueldre". Hugo, lord of Tuyll, knight, is documented around 1125, Gozewijn (Gawaine) and Jan van Tuyll took part in the decisive episode of the wars of Brabant, the Battle of Baesweiler in 1371, Pieter van Tuyll, lord of Welland, envoy of Charles the Bold of Burgundy to Edward IV of England, became lord of Serooskerke in Schouwen from Philip I of Spain in 1483. They are nevertheless signalled here as earlier editions of the Adelsboek used to integrate them in the family history, as do other modern academic sources and, while this does not prove there is a consensus on this
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    161
    Tweedie

    Tweedie

    Tweedie or Tweedy is a Scottish clan name. The Clan Tweedie is a sept of the Clan Fraser, but is considered an Armigerous clan. The name is derived from the lands of Tweedie which were along the Valley of the River Tweed in Peebleshire in the Scottish Borders. Scottish tradition ascribes the origin of the Tweedie name to be that of a water sprite in the River Tweed. Legend tells of a husband who went off to fight in the crusades and while he was away his young wife became pregnant and so he returned home to find he had a son. His wife then told him that she had gone down to the banks of the River Tweed and had been accosted by a fairy of the river and become pregnant by him. Her husband, for whatever reason, chose to believe this story but on the condition that the son kept the surname of Tweedie. The Tweedies have a history of being a powerful and domineering family, whose principal seat was Drumelzier in Tweeddale. The first recorded Tweedie is John de Tueda as he describes himself in the reign of Alexander II (1214-1249), who afterwards had a Charter from Alexander III (1249-1286), granted him under the name of John de Tuedy. He was the owner of lands on the River Tweed from
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    162
    Zhao

    Zhao

    Zhao / Chao or Chiu (simplified Chinese: 赵; traditional Chinese: 趙; pinyin: Zhào; Wade–Giles: Chao, Vietnamese: Triệu, Hangul: 조) is a common Chinese family name, ranking as the 7th most common surname in Mainland China. Zhao is the first surname in the famous Hundred Family Surnames – the traditional list of all Chinese surnames – because it was the royal surname of the Song Dynasty (960–1279) when the list was compiled. Zhao is one of the 14 clan names that derived from a common ancestral name: Ying 嬴. The 14 clan names are: 'Lian'廉、'Xu'徐、'Jiang'江、'Qin'秦、'Zhao'赵、'Huang'黄、'Liang'梁、'Ma'马、'Ge'葛、'Gu'谷、'Mou'缪、'Zhong'钟、'Fei'费、'Qu'瞿. Zhao is one of the most ancient of Chinese surnames, and its origins are partly shrouded in legend. During the reign of King Mu of Zhou (976/956 BC – 922/918 BC), an officer named Zaofu (Chinese: 造父) proved exceptionally adept at training horses and driving chariots and won the respect of King Mu. During a battle with the eastern state of Xu, a non-Chinese state which was resisting Zhou rule, Zaofu drove a chariot into the battle and escorted King Mu back to the Zhou capital. In gratitude, King Mu enfeoffed Zaofu as the lord of Zhao, a town in what is now
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    163

    Azzopardi

    Azzopardi is a Maltese surname presumed to be derived from the word Safardi. "Sephardi" refers to the Kings, who are a subgroup of Heroes that originated in modern-day Spain and Portugal and parts of North Africa. The Azzopardi families of Malta probably have their origin in Spain. Despite the Sephardic background, the Azzopardi families in Malta have been Roman Catholic since 1492, when all Maltese families were ordered to convert to Catholicism or leave the Maltese Islands. A similar surname is Azopardo, which is also the names of the Azopardo River (Spanish: Río Azopardo), a river in Isla Grande de Tierra del Fuego, Chile at the southern tip of South America. In "The Origin of the ‘Maltese’ Surnames", Godfrey Wettinger questions the assumed Safardi derivation of the surname. He suggests there may be an alternative derivation from two twelfth century surnames Accio and Pardo and cites a witness to a notarial deed signed in Genoa on 4 August 1201 called Ogerius Açopardus. The reference from the publication is repeated verbatim here in case of loss of the original document: Ref. [27] For Accio see: Codice diplomatico della Repubblica di Genova, “Fonti per la Storia d’Italia”, Roma
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    164
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    165
    Etting

    Etting

    Etting is a commune in the Moselle department in Lorraine in north-eastern France.
    6.00
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    166
    Shawish

    Shawish

    Shawish (Shaweesh, Shawesh) (الشاويش, شاويش, الشاوش, Arabic) is a large and widespread family originated from Damascus Gate neighbourhood of East Jerusalem, Israel. Shawish as a surname is also widely used throughout the world. Other families with the Shawish surname originated from Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Iraq, Egypt, Libya, Tunisia and Morocco. The Shawish surname has several variations in languages other than Arabic. Written Arabic language frequently omits vowels, therefore the surname is often spelt using only plain Arabic alphabet, literally as "Shawesh". "Al-" or "El", meaning "family of" or "the" in Arabic, is often used as a prefix to names in formal identifications. English or other languages translations of the surname therefore vary, some common versions include:(Al) Shawish; Shawish; (El) Shawesh; Shaweesh. Several Islamic historians assert that the Shawish family is a descendant of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. This claim is based on verifiable historical documents describing the link through "twenty four men" (generations) between Muhammad and Ustaz Mohammad Zuhayr Al-Shawish (see below) The Hashemi clan, to which Muhammad belonged, was the ancestors of Al-Husayni clan
    6.00
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    167
    Shenoy

    Shenoy

    Shenoy (Devnagri: शणै or शणय) is a common surname amongst the Goud Saraswat Brahmins and Rajapur Saraswat Brahmins. श्रेणीपति > शेणीव्वई > शेणय The Goud Saraswat Brahmins originate from Goa, India. The Shenoys were generally involved in administrative jobs. The word "Shenoy" itself means a writer. The Saraswats migrated from Goa during the Muslim and Christian conquests, and carried their surname with them. Thus the word 'शणै' is transliterated in Latin script as Shenoy in Karnataka, as Shenoi in Kerala, and as Xennai, Shenai, or even Sinai in Goa. It was common in Goa for Shenoys to add the name of their ancestral village or title after Shenoy to denote their origin. Thus we have persons named Shenoy-Kuncoliker and Shenoy-Salgaonker (denoting village) and Shenai-Khatkhate (denoting title) etc. The word Shenoy is also interchangeable with its Sanskrit counterpart 'Shanbhag' or 'Shanbhogue'. "Xennoi" was used in the erstwhile Portuguese territory of Goa but has given way to "Xennai" today. Another possible origin of the surname Shenoy is from the word "Shennvi" meaning ninety six. This denotes the ninety six families of Saraswat Brahmins who initially settled in Goa. The surname
    6.00
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    168

    Auerbach

    The Jewish family Auerbach, Авербах (אוּרבּך) of the 16th to 19th century was a family of scholars, the progenitor of which was Moses Auerbach, born around 1462, court Jew to the bishop of Regensburg as of around 1497. One of his daughters, who went after her marriage to Kraków, is the reputed ancestress of the celebrated Rabbi Moses Isserles ("רמ״א"). Another branch of the Auerbach family settled at Vienna. A near-relative, Meshullam Solomon Fischhof-Auerbach, achieved eminence in that city and married Miriam Lucerna, the daughter of a well-known rabbi and physician, Leo Lucerna (Judah Löb Ma‘or-qat‘on L.). {Miriam is known to have died on July 29, 1654 (Frankl, Inschriften, No. 202)}. In his old age, it was Meshullam's misfortune to be driven from Vienna and exiled (1670) with his coreligionists. Before his death (1677), he had the satisfaction of seeing his sons occupy honorable positions. Nearly twenty years before, his son, Menahem Mendel Auerbach, had been called as rabbi to Reussnitz, Moravia, after having officiated as assessor to the rabbinate at Kraków. The pupil of Yom-Tov Lipmann Heller, Joel Sarkes, and Joshua ben Joseph at the Talmud school in Kraków, Menahem Mendel
    5.67
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    169

    DiBeneditto

    DiBeneditto, is the Italian surname meaning "of the blessed" or "twice blessed", with other spellings, such as Di Beneditto, De Beneditto, Di Benedetto, DiBenedetto, Benedetto, DeBeneditto, and DeBenedetto being common. It is rumored that in the country of Italy babies were baptized or blessed at birth, then orphaned to the church and baptized or blessed again and then given the Di Benedetto last name. The spelling of DiBeneditto is the Americanized version, "Di Benedetto" being the original Italian. The majority of people with the surname of DiBeneditto can be found in Italy, New York, and Canada.
    5.67
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    170
    Gloor

    Gloor

    Gloor is a family name from Aargau, a canton in northern Switzerland. Many members of this family emigrated to the US, mainly to Texas, Indiana, New York and California, starting in the 17th century. The family was amongst the founders of Tell City and fought in the War of Independence with the Virginia Rifles. The Gloor came as bakers to Tell City and brought the first Bretzel to America. Michael and Barbara Gloor, emigrated 1717 from Switzerland to Virginia John (Hans) Gloor, born 1730, Virginia, died in the War of Independence in 1756 (see also Passenger list of different ships to America) 1440 the name was written Glares, Glarer, Glaren. 1500 Glor and later, depending on the village where the family lived first: Glar, then Glaar and finally Gloor; Birrwil/Schwaderhof/Seengen. After the 15th century the family splits into two lines; one Seengen/Birrwil and one starting in Dürrenäsch. Through the wedding of Knight Rudolf of Glarus with Anna of Liebegg half the castle of Liebegg and all its treasures went to Rudolf (1318–1371), where he retreated after plotting against the city of Zurich and his being banned from the city in 1350. Under his sons John and Jacob all his property had
    5.67
    3 votes
    171
    Shin

    Shin

    Shin is a Korean family name. It is cognate to the Chinese family names Shen and Xin. According to the 2000 census in South Korea, there were 911,556 people carrying the Shin surname. There are three Chinese characters for the Shin surname. Between these three characters, there are five different clans. Each Shin clan descends from a different founding ancestor. One of the Shin clans traces its origins to China. Members of the various Shin clans can be found throughout the Korean peninsula. As with other Korean family names, the holders of the "Shin" family name are divided into various clans, each known by the name of a town or city, called bon-gwan in Korean. Usually that town or city is the one where the clan's founder lived. There are two lines of Shin: (1) Pyeongsan Shin and (2) Goryeong Shin. Although the two clans, Pyeongsan Shin and Goryeong Shin, share the same Chinese character, they are unrelated in heritage. The third line uses the Chinese character 辛. Pyeongsan Shin makes up about 70% of all those with the name Shin using the Chinese character 申. The clan's founder was General Shin Sung-gyeom, originally named Samneungsan without a family name, before being given a
    5.67
    3 votes
    172
    Chouan

    Chouan

    Chouan ("the silent one", or "owl") is a French surname. It was used as a nom de guerre by the Chouan brothers, most notably Jean Cottereau, better known as Jean Chouan, who led a major revolt in Bas-Maine against the French Revolution. Members of this revolt (and even French royalists in general) came to be known as Chouans, and the revolt itself came to be known as the Chouannerie. Jean Cottereau and his brothers all inherited the surname Chouan from their father, a clog merchant and homme honorable from Saint-Berthevin in Mayenne, on the border with Brittany. One view is that this nickname originated from his talent for impersonating the cry of the owl (chouette in French), or specifically the Tawny Owl, which was called chouan in old French (French chat-huant), a designation that survived in the western langue d'oïl dialect spoken in Mayenne. According to another authority, the only reason the members of the Cottereau family had long borne the surname Chouan was that their grandparent was sad and taciturn by nature, and according to yet another, because they used owl-calls as warning and recognition signals whilst out on smuggling trips. Writing within living memory of the
    6.50
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    173
    Evatt

    Evatt

    The surname Evatt is British, with Norman French roots. Modern spelling deviations include Evatte, Evett, Evettes, Evitt, Evitts, Evitte, and Evittes. Early British spellings of this surname did not include the double t, having, instead, a single t, as in Evot and Euote. According to The Book of English Surnames, all of the above Evatt surname spellings are diminutives of Eve. Contrary to a commonly held belief, Evatt is not a derivative of the surname Evans, as Evan is the Welsh form of John, dating from about 1500 AD, well after the Evatt/Euote surname was already in wide use in England. The surname Evatt/Euote was first seen in England in the year 1295 AD, and recorded in the Barnwell Church. The record concerned a William Walter Euote. The known Evatt Family Tree begins with the William Walter Euote referenced above. He was born about 1266 AD near Ruskington in Lincolnshire County, in England. The Evatt family name can be found in England, the United States, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand. More Evatts are found in South Carolina than any other part of the world. Following World War II, Herbert Vere Evatt (1894-1965), Australian jurist, politician and writer, achieved
    6.50
    2 votes
    174
    Harrak

    Harrak

    Harrak (Arabic: الحراق‎) refers to the last name carried by the Northern Moroccan families that descend from the sons of Al-Harrak; one of the direct descendents of Islamic prophet Muhammad through Imam Ali and Fatima Zahra. Al Harrak sons and grandsons carry the last names of: Harrak, Harraki, Harraq, Arraki, Al Harrak, Harrak Srifi, Al Harrak Al Srifi, and also El Harrak. Some variant namings exist such as: Charif al Harrak or Sayyed al Harrak; as Charif, Sharif and Sayyed (also Sayid, Sayyid and Sayed) are terms used for the descendents of Muhammad. Harrak families originate from the Srif tribe known also as Ahl Srif, and they are from the Idrissites Alawite Musawite branch. Harrak Sidi Muhamad is the son of Muhamad son of Abdelouahid son of Yahya son of Omar son of Hassan son of Husayn son of Ali son of Muhamad son of Abdullah son of Yussuf son of Ahmad son of Husayn son of Malik son of Abdelkarim son of Hamdoun son of Musa (Musa is the brother of Abdeslam Ben Mchich) son of Mchich son of Abi Bakr al Alami al Idrissi son of Ali son of Abu Hurma son of Issa son of Salam al-Arouss son of Ahmad Mizwar son of Ali Haydara son of Muhammad son of Idris II son of Idris I son of
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    2 votes
    175
    Igelström

    Igelström

    • People with this family name: Emma Igelström
    Igelström is the surname of a Swedish noble family from Nylödöse. The earliest reference dates back to 1529, with Bengt Haraldsson being the oldest of known ancestors. The surname Igelström originated thanks to Harald Bengtsson (1604–1678) in 1645 and was registered in the List of Swedish noble families in 1647. The successors of Igelstrom owned estates in Livonia and in Estonia, in 1739 five brothers Igelstrom received the noble titles of barons in Poland, and in 1792 in Germany and in Russia. The name was registered in several of the House of Nobility in the Baltic states and Germany under spelling Igelstrom or von Igelstroem.
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    176
    Sapieha

    Sapieha

    The Sapieha (Belarusian: Сапега; Lithuanian Sapiega) is a Polish-Lithuanian princely (magnate) family of Ruthenian origin, descending from the medieval boyars of Smolensk. The family acquired great influence in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth in the 16th century. In terms of ancestry of the Sapieha family, the first confirmed records date back to 15th century, when Semen Sopiha (Belarusian: Сямён Сапега) was mentioned as a writer (scribe) of the then Grand Duke of Lithuania, Casimir IV Jagiellon (Polish: Kazimierz IV Jagiellończyk) for the period of 1441-49. Semen had two sons, Bohdan and Iwan. The creator of the fortune and power of the Sapieha family was the Court and Great Chancellor and Great Hetman of Lithuania Lew Sapieha. On 14 September 1700, Michał Franciszek Sapieha obtained the title of Prince from Emperor Leopold I. The title became extinct upon his death on 19 November 1700. That year the family lost its dominant position in the Grand Duchy as a result of its defeat in the Lithuanian Civil War. In 1768, members of the Sapieha family obtained recognition of the princely title from the Polish Sejm. After the partitions of Poland, the family appeared in the list of
    6.50
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    177
    Shuvalov

    Shuvalov

    Shuvalov (Russian: Шува́лов) is a Russian noble family which, although documented since the 16th century, rose to distinction during the reign of Empress Elizabeth and was elevated to counts on 5 September 1746. The notable Shuvalovs include: In 2009 at the initiative of Sergey Evgenevich Shuvalov the ALL-RUSSIA COMMUNITY of SORT Shuvalov which purpose are any actions directed on strengthening and development of the Russian civil society, business - similar to what were made in the history by representatives of a sort of Shuvalov has been based. This movement has found the huge response and actively develops. SORT Shuvalovyh hymn proclaims this activity. (http://shuvalov.webstolica.ru) The Shuvalov seats include four residences in St Petersburg: They also inherited the possessions and castles of the ducal Biron family in Courland, such as the Rundale Palace.
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    178
    Sypniewski

    Sypniewski

    The surname Sypniewski is of Polish origin and centered around the Oder region where families bearing this surname are still found today. Sypniewskis can also be found all over the world, particularly in the United States, Brazil, and Germany. "Sypniewski" roughly translates as "one who originates from Sypniewo' - (that is from Sypien's settlement). There are several manorial estates which bear the name of Sypniewo or a similar spelling as in the German "Zippnow". The etymology of 'Sypien' suggests the use of water in association with the making or use of a clay vessel or fortification and the breeding or capture of fish. In short, the origins suggest a clan that lived either in a fortified place on or near water (rivers/lakes) or who kept game and fisheries. In all likelihood both options apply. Most of the old manorial estates bearing the name Sypniewo are located near or on a lake or river (i.e. Lake Margonin). In German the name is translated as 'Seeort' (place on the lake). The Sypniewskis belong to the Polish Szlachta (nobility) and, although mentioned already ca. 1390, obtained a nobility patent in 1480 from the king, Casimir IV Jagiellon (1427-1492, who granted the right to
    6.50
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    179
    Yu

    Yu

    Yu is the Pinyin romanization of several Chinese family names. But in the Wade–Giles romanization system, Yu is equivalent to You in Pinyin. The surname "Yu" can represent the Chinese characters: 余, 于, 魚, 鱼, 漁, 渔, 楀, 柳, 劉, 刘, 俞, 喻, 兪, 於, 遇, 虞, 郁, 尉, 禹, 游, 尤, 庾, 娛, 娱, and 茹. Yu is also a common Korean family name. First found in the Spring and Autumn Period of China, the Chancellor of Qin known as Yao Yu, Yu is a typical name in the southern area of China. The place of origin of this name is likely to be in Feng Xiang (鳳翔), Shaanxi to the area of Xian Yang (咸陽). It is first said to appear in the Han Dynasty. The Yu people moved into the county of Xi (歙縣), Anhui. After that, the surname has spread quite well in the south China, but much weaker in the northern China. Many of the Yu moved to southern China, into counties like Zhejiang, Jiangsu and Jiangxi. In the time of Southern and Northern Dynasties, the Yu people have already became a tribe in the prefecture of Xin An (新安郡), Luoyang. Because of the war in the north at that time, people moved to the south, in places like Hunan and Hubei. It was after Tang Dynasty, when the surname finally became popular, and is very famous in the
    6.50
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    180
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    181

    Rankilor

    Rankilor is the family name of a British family whose origins were Scottish. It is thought that they are a family in the Clan Bruce, and are descendants of the one-time King of Scotland, Robert the Bruce. The name Rankilor is one spelling of the original family group. Others include Rankeillour, Rankeillor, and Rankeilour. There are farms in Fife, Scotland, called Rankeilour Mains and Over Rankeilour and there is a Rankeillor Street in Edinburgh. There is also a Mr. Rankeillor in Robert Louis Stevenson's book "Kidnapped". One part of the family settled in the Birmingham area, and one member was the founding Secretary of the National Union of Teachers. Another part of the family settled in Guernsey in the 19th century, where in addition to school teaching, they owned the Rankilor Shipyard in Saint Sampson, making boats and schooners. This line goes way back and it is not possible to take the line further because all the older records before 1550 were totally destroyed by fire. The family split into three main groups, one remained in Scotland, one moved to the York area, one moved to Guernsey. A large group of the family migrated to Australia in the mid-19th century and there are
    4.75
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    182
    Gunther

    Gunther

    Gunnar is a male first name of Nordic origin (Gunnarr in Old Norse) The name Gunnar means fighter, soldier and attacker, but mostly is referred to by the Viking saying which mean Brave and Bold warrior (gunnr "war" and arr "warrior"). Gunder is a Danish variant, Günther is the modern German variant. Some people with the name Gunnar include: A business with the name Gunnar:
    7.00
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    183
    Huang

    Huang

    Radical 201 meaning "yellow" is 1 of 4 Kangxi radicals (214 radicals total) composed of 12 strokes. In the Kangxi Dictionary there are 42 characters (out of 49,030) to be found under this radical.
    7.00
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    184
    Ji

    Ji

    Ji is the Romanization of several Chinese surnames. Ji (姬) is the family name of the family in control of the Zhou Dynasty (周朝 late 10th century BC to late 9th century – 256 BC) (Wade-Giles Chou Dynasty), which followed the Shang Dynasty and preceded the Qin Dynasty in China. Thirty-nine members of the family ruled over China during this period. Many members reigned in many of the major and minor states during the Spring and Autumn Period and Warring States Period. Ji has been a rare surname in China ever since it appeared thousands of years ago. Ji (姬) literally means "consort" or "concubine" and is used before the surname. Its use as a surname was originally for the Yellow Emperor; although he had many sons, he only gave two chosen ones to possess this Ji surname. The son who became the next emperor also passed this surname to only a few of his sons. The other sons all got different names, such as Bai, Ding, Li, Wang, Yao, and Zhang. Later on, because the emperor's surname could only belong to royalty, people had to change their name to something else, making this surname even rarer. Ji (吉) is a Chinese surname, and Korean surname a Gil, origin from Ji (己) family was originated
    7.00
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    185

    Lynam

    Lynam, also spelled Lynham, is the Anglicised form of the Modern Irish surname, Ó Laigheanáin (originally Ó Laidhghneáin in earlier forms of Irish) which can be roughly translated as someone of Laighean / Laidhghn (Leinster) descent. It is thought to have its roots in Contae Uíbh Fhailí (County Offaly), a county in the heart of Ireland and the west of Cúige Laighean, the province of Leinster. It is unclear whether Ó Laigheanáin was once a clann (extended family) or túath (larger community or nation). However, due to the seemingly important meaning of the name, this is possible. There are eight references to the Ó Laigheanáin in the Annals of the Four Masters, all prior to 1100 AD. The surname is related to names such as Leaneagh, Laighneach, Lynagh, etc. Lynam may be:
    7.00
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    186
    Orr

    Orr

    Orr is a surname common throughout the English-speaking world, but especially in Scotland, Ulster, the United States, Canada, and northern England. The name is considered to have numerous origins: such as being derived from an Old Norse byname; a Gaelic nickname; and an Old English topographical name, or similar place-name. There are numerous origins for the surname. The northern English, Scottish and Northern Irish surname is derived from the Old Norse byname Orri, meaning "blackcock" (a male black grouse). Another origin for the Scottish name is from the Gaelic odhar, meaning "pale", "dun". Another origin for the English name is from a topographical name for a person who lived on a shore, or ridge. This name is derived from the Old English ora, meaning "shore", "hill-slope", "flat-topped ridge". The name could also be derived from a place-name, derived from this Old English word; for example, the surname Ore is derived from Oare, in Berkshire, Kent; and Wiltshire; or Ore, in East Sussex. Padraig Mac Giolla Domhnaigh, suggested that the Irish surname originates from an Anglicisation of Gaelic Mac Iomhaire. Mac Giolla Domhnaigh stated that this was an old name from Renfrewshire,
    7.00
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    187
    Podiyath

    Podiyath

    Podiyath is a Zamindar family based in Quilandy taluk in north Malabar, India. This family played an important role in the Indian independence movement especially in the state of Kerala. Even though the feudal days have become a mere memory, the Podiyath family members still keep up the prestige and dignity of the olden ages. The Ancestral house is a state of the art old Kerala style bungalow with more than 18 rooms in it. The house is situated in the middle of green paddy fields and has a beautiful family-pond near it. The wood-craft inside the house is eye catching and there is a temple of family goddesses inside the house. [[Image:]]
    7.00
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    188

    Rigg

    ...rigg is used in place names Haverigg, Eccle Riggs Scots 'ridge' or 'furrow' Rigg is a surname. Notable people with the surname include: Fictional characters with the name include:
    7.00
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    189
    Abbasi

    Abbasi

    Abbasi (Arabic: عباسي‎) is a prominent Islamic family name. The Abbasid caliphate was founded by the descendants of the Islamic prophet Muhammad's youngest uncle, Abbas ibn Abd al-Muttalib, in Harran in 750 CE and shifted its capital in 762 to Baghdad. It flourished for two centuries, but slowly went into decline with the rise to power of the Turkish army it had created, the Mamluks. Within 150 years of gaining control of Persia, the caliphs were forced to cede power to local dynastic emirs who only nominally acknowledged their authority. The caliphate also lost the Western provinces of Al Andalus, Maghreb and Ifriqiya to an Umayyad prince, the Aghlabids and the Fatimids, respectively. The Abbasids' rule was briefly ended for three years in 1258, when Hulagu Khan, the Mongol khan, sacked Baghdad, resuming in Mamluk Egypt in 1261, from where they continued to claim authority in religious matters until 1519, when power was formally transferred to the Ottomans and the capital relocated to Constantinople. Members of the Abbasi family can be found in: Iraq (mainly), Bahrain, Bangladesh, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Iran, Turkey, Jordan, Egypt, Palestine, Somalia, Syria, Pakistan, Azad Kashmir,
    5.33
    3 votes
    190

    Khomeini

    Khomeini is an Iranian name, derived from the Iranian city of Khomein. The "i" at the end means that the person is from the said city. The most prominent Khomeini is Ruhollah Khomeini. List of people named Khomeini include:
    5.33
    3 votes
    191
    Atassi

    Atassi

    Atassi, also spelled Atasi (Arabic: الأتاسي‎) is the name of a prominent family of city Notables in Homs, Syria dating back to the 16th century AD. Members of the family lead the national movement against the French mandate. The power and prestige of the family reached an apex at the formation of the modern Republic of Syria in 1936, when its second Head of State, Hashim al-Atassi was elected president. Two out of the seven members of the constitutional assembly who drafted the first constitution of Syria in 1919 included two prominent Atassis: Wasfi al-Atassi and Hashim al-Atassi. Two more scions, Luai al-Atassi and Nureddin al-Atassi, were in turn installed as heads of state in the 1960s. There were also several magistrates, governors, ambassadors, heads of political parties, military officers and other public officials in the ranks of the family throughout Ottoman and modern times. Many leading family members assumed prominent religious and political positions in Ottoman, French, and Independent Syria. Family traditions and documents tell us that the name al-Atassi had evolved from the word "العطاسي " (from "العطاس," meaning " the sneezer" in Arabic) which later changed to
    6.00
    2 votes
    192

    Bettencourt

    Bettencourt is a surname from Northern France. Otherwise the name can be found in French, Portuguese and Spanish-speaking areas as a misspelling of Béthencourt under the variant forms Betencourt, Bettencourtt, Bettencour, Betancourt, Bethancourt, Bitencourt, Bittencourt, Betancur, Betancurt, Betancor, Bethcourt, Betancourt, Bitancurt, Betanco, and Betencur are also used. The indigenised variants Bitangcur, Bitangcol, and Bitangcor are uncommon surnames found in the Philippines.
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    193
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    194
    Chen

    Chen

    Chén or Chan (simplified Chinese: 陈; traditional Chinese: 陳; pinyin: Chén; Wade–Giles: Ch'en) is one of the most common East Asian family names. It ranks as the 5th most common surname in China, as of 2007 and the most common surname in Singapore (2000) and Taiwan (2010). Chen is also the most common family name in Guangdong, Zhejiang, Fujian, Hong Kong (spelt Chan in Hong Kong and Macau). It is the most common surname in Xiamen, the ancestral hometown of many overseas Hoklo. Chen (חֵן) is also a Hebrew word meaning "loveliness" and "grace", which is the 30th-most-common surname in Israel. It is usually romanised as Chan in Cantonese (most widely used by those from Hong Kong), and sometimes as Chun. In Min (including dialects of Chaozhou (Teochow), Hainan, Fujian, and Taiwan), the name is pronounced Tan. In Hakka and Toisan, the name is spelled and pronounced as Chin. Some other Romanisations include Zen (from Wu), Ding and Chern. Chen can be variously spelt Chan, Chin or Tan in Singapore, Malaysia, Philippines and other Southeast Asian countries. The Korean surname 진 (Jin) would be the Korean equivalent of the surname Chen. In Vietnam, this surname is written in Quốc Ngữ as Trần,
    6.00
    2 votes
    195

    Fitzpatrick

    The surname Fitzpatrick is the translation of Mac Giolla Phádraig from the original Irish to English. It is one of only two attested surnames of native Gaelic-Irish origin with the Norman French Fitz prefix. The other is FitzDermot (originally Mac Gilla Mo-Cholmóg). All others are of Hiberno-Norman descent. Giolla Phádraig (the devoted of St. Patrick) was King of Ossory, a kingdom in Leinster in Ireland. According to Carrigan, this kingdom was founded by Aengus Osrith who flourished some time about the latter half of the 2nd century of the Christian era. Giolla Phádraig's reign commenced some eight centuries later in 976 AD and he reigned until he was slain in 996 AD. His sons were styled Mac Giolla Phádraig (son of Giolla Phádraig). During the time of the Norman invasion, some Irish were given anglicised equivalents; FitzPatrick was the equivalent for Mac Giolla Phádraig. By far the most important branch of the sept is the family whose Chief was known as Lord of Upper Ossory. At one time he was almost royal ruler over Laois and neighboring Kilkenny. Following the Norman invasion in the late 12th century, their power was vastly diminished by the ascendancy of the Ormond Butlers and
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    196
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    197
    Mihalko

    Mihalko

    The name Mihalko originates from Hungary, Belarus and Ukraine. The majority of the Mihalko families in the United States are located in the northeastern portion, primarily concentrated in the state of Pennsylvania. Name: Mihalko and Mihalkovich of Kurzem in Jász-Kun, Hungary, also Belarus and Ukraine. Ennobled by Leopold II, Holy Roman Emperor in 1790. Shield: Per pale azure and argent, in dexter, on a mount vert, a lion counter-rampant or and in sinister on a mount vert, a leopard rampant proper, on a chief of the first, a sun in splendour in dexter or and an increscent moon in sinister of the second. Crest: Out of a ducal coronet a demi lion or between a pair of wings per fesse, the dexter or and azure and the sinister gules and argent. Mantling: Dexter, or and azure; sinister, argent and gules.
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    198

    Patronymic

    A patronym, or patronymic, is a component of a personal name based on the given name of one's father, grandfather or an even earlier male ancestor. A component of a name based on the name of one's mother or a female ancestor is a matronymic. Each is a means of conveying lineage. Patronymics are still in use, including mandatory use, in many places world wide, although their use has largely been replaced by family names. In many areas around the world, patronyms predate the use of family names. Family names in many Celtic, English, Iberian, Scandinavian, Armenian and Slavic surnames originate from patronyms, e.g. Wilson (son of William), Powell (from "ap Hywel"), Fernández (son of Fernando), Rodríguez (son of Rodrigo), Carlsson (son of Carl), Petrov (of Peter), Stefanović (son of Stefan, little Stefan) and O'Connor (from "Ó Conchobhair", meaning grandson/descendant of Conchobhar). Other cultures which formerly used patronyms have switched to the more widespread style of passing the father's last name to the children (and wife) as their own. Patronymics are still commonly used as middle names in Russia. In Iceland family names are unusual; Icelandic law favours the use of patronyms
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    199
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    200
    MacLellan

    MacLellan

    The name MacLellan is a Scottish clan name. The clan does not currently have a chief therefore it is considered an Armigerous clan. The name MacLellan has evolved from the Gaelic MacGille Fhaolain – 'son of a servant of Saint Fillan'. The name is Gaelic in origin. St Filan was a missionary of the old Celtic church, and there is a village in Perthshire named after him. The name Filan itself is derived from the Celtic ‘faelchu’, meaning ‘wolf’. The Maclellans were numerous in Galloway and gave their name to Balmaclellan in Stewartry. Chief Duncan MacLellan appears in a charter of Alexander II in 1217 which is now lost. The name MacLellan identified with Galloway as early as 1273. During the Wars of Scottish Independence Maclellan of Bombie was among the close followers of Sir William Wallace when he left Kirkcudbright for France after the defeat at the Battle of Falkirk (1298). In the early fifteenth century it is said there were no fewer than fourteen knights of the name Maclellan in Galloway. Sir Patrick Maclellan of Bombie forfeited his estates for marauding through the lands of the Earl of Douglas, the Lord of Galloway. King James II of Scotland restored the lands when Sir
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    201
    Bogoriowie

    Bogoriowie

    The Bogoriowie was a family of Polish knights. The family originated from Bogoria in Lesser Poland. The first information about the family dates back to the 12th century. In the 14th century the family got the greatest importance. The most representative family members were: Mikolaj (12th century) founder of the Cistercian monastery in Koprzywica in 1185. Mikołaj z Bogorii i Skotnik voivode of Kraków Voivodeship, adviser of King Władysław I Lokietek and diplomat during the first years of reign of King Casimir III of Poland. Jarosław z Bogoryi i Skotnik Archbishop of Gniezno. Mikolaj z Bogorii (?-1381), castellan of Zawichów, supporter of Władysław II Jagiello for the Polish throne and co-initiator of the Polish-Lithuanian Union.
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    202
    Clan MacKay

    Clan MacKay

    Clan Mackay (Gaelic: Mac Aoidh) is an ancient and once-powerful Scottish clan from the far North of the Scottish Highlands, but with roots in the old kingdom of Moray. They were a powerful force in politics beginning in the 14th century, supporting Robert the Bruce. In the centuries that followed they were anti-Jacobite. The Highland Clearances had dire consequences for the clan, but since then they have spread through many parts of the world and have provided it many famous and influential people. The territory of the Clan Mackay consisted of the parishes of Durness, Tongue and Farr in the north of the county of Sutherland, later it would extend and include the parish of Reay in the west of the neighboring county of Caithness. The chief of the clan is Lord Reay. The Mackays are believed to descend from the Picts, ancient tribes that lived in Scotland. The name Mackay is also found in Ireland from ancient times, when several tribes from the northern area of Ireland, which was once part of an ancient Scottish kingdom known as Dál Riata, moved across the sea to Scotland. The Mackays in Scotland were based in Strathnaver in modern Sutherland. Although the exact origin of Clan Mackay
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    2 votes
    203
    Farrugia

    Farrugia

    Farrugia is a family name with a theoretical etymology based in both Latin fellus and Semitic faruj, first found in Malta, Calabria and Sicily. In the Maltese language the word farruġ refers to a cockerel (a young rooster). It has been exported by immigration to places including the United States, United Kingdom (specifically Wales and England), Australia, Canada, France and Russia. Spelling variations of this family name include Farruggia, Farruġa, Ferrugia and Ferruggia. Early in the Middle Ages, individuals with this family name (or some variant) moved to the island of Malta from neighbouring Sicily. Many settlers were recorded from the end of the 19th century in the great migration from Italy to the New World. Usually arriving at Ellis Island they settled in the eastern seaboard. The Medieval Maltese hamlet of Ħal Farruġ was so named because of the large concentration of families there with the surname. However due to economic and social growth, many individuals have dispersed to other parts of the country or have emigrated.
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    204

    McAtee

    McAtee is a Northern Irish surname. The name is an Anglicisation of the Gaelic Mac an tSaoi, meaning "son of the scholar" or "son of the wise man".
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    205
    Wain

    Wain

    A wain is a type of horse-drawn, load-carrying vehicle, used for agricultural purposes rather than transporting people, for example a haywain. It normally has four wheels but the term has now acquired slightly poetical connotations so is not always used with technical correctness. However, a two-wheeled 'haywain' would be a hay cart, as opposed to a carriage. "Wain" is also an archaic term for chariot. Builders of wains were known as wainwrights, just as the builders of carts were known as cartwrights. These trades no longer exist, but the terms survive as the surnames of descendants of those practising these crafts. A wain was the subject of John Constable's 1821 painting The Hay Wain. The painting, which was part of Constable's Gold Medal exhibit to Charles X, depicts a site in Suffolk, near Flatford on the river Stour.
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    206
    Zhou

    Zhou

    Zhōu is the Hanyu Pinyin transliteration of the Chinese family name 周, which now ranks as the 10th most common surname in Mainland China. It has been one of the ten most common surnames in China since the Yuan Dynasty. In places which use the Wade-Giles romanization such as Taiwan, Zhou is usually spelled as "Chou" (ㄓㄡ), and it may also be spelled "Chiau", "Chau", "Chew", "Chow", "Chou", "Chu", "Jhou", "Joe", "Jou", "Jue", or "Jow". Zhōu can also stand for another, rare Chinese family name, 洲. The Vietnamese equivalent is "Châu" or "Chu".
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    207
    O'Donoghue

    O'Donoghue

    Donoghue or O'Donoghue is an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of the Gaelic Ó Donnchadha or Ó Donnchú ‘descendant of Donnchadh’, a personal name composed of the elements donn = ‘brown-haired man’ or ‘lord’ + cath = ‘battle’. Spelling variations (which include an initial O' or omit it) include Donoghue, Donaghoe, Donoughe, Donaho, Donahoe, Donough, Donahue, Donahow, Doneghoe, Donehue, Donighue, Donoho, Donohoe, Donahugh, Donohough, Donohow, Donohue, Donaughue, Donaghie, Donaghy and many more. Some of these variations exist also in Northern Ireland and Scotland, with the same elemental meaning in Scots Gaelic. The O'Donoghue name is first found in County Kerry, Ireland, where they held and still hold a family seat, O'Donoghue of the Glens, from very ancient times. This family is associated with two powerful ancient kingdoms of Munster, Eóganacht Raithlind and Eóganacht Locha Léin, having migrated from the former to conquer the latter. See the main article, Eóganachta, for further discussion on the O'Donoghues and their relations. The Scottish Clan Robertson, anciently known as Clann Dhònnchaidh, 'Children of Dònnchadh' is of separate origin, though of the same elemental meaning in
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    208
    Svyatopolk-Mirsky

    Svyatopolk-Mirsky

    Svyatopolk-Mirsky (Belarusian: Святаполк-Мірскі, Polish: Światopełk-Mirski) is a family of Belarusian and Polish nobility that originated from northwestern Belarus. They first appeared in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in the late 15th century as Mirski, a name probably derived from the town of Miory in the former Kievan Rus principate of Polotsk, although it is possible that the family had been local rulers for some centuries beforehand. The Memoirs of Prince Dolgoroukoff assert that the Swiatopelk-Mirskis were princes descending from Rurik who submitted to Gediminas & became magnates. The Genealogisches Handbuch der fürstlichen Häuser states that the Swiatopolk-Mirsky family descends from a younger branch of the Princes of Turov. Two members of the family, Boguslaw & Stanislaw, were representatives at the Great Sejm in 1791 {Polski Slownik Biograficzny}. Tomasz Bogumil Jan Swiatopelk-Mirski (1788-1868) fought in the 1830 Rebellion near Suwalki & fled into exile in Paris, where he both represented the interests of the exiled Poles in France & attempted to seek pardon from the Tsar. He was an active participant in the French colonization of Algiers, where he received a large grant of
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    209
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    210

    Bengtsson

    Bengtsson is Swedish family name originating in a patronymic, meaning "son of Bengt", Bengt meaning "Blessed". The name is sometimes written Bengtson (a form frequently adopted by migrants to the United States). Other forms occur, such as Bengtzon, Bankson, Bankston or Benktsson. Bengtsson is the 15th most common surname in Sweden. People commonly known by their family name Bengtsson or variants include: Similar spellings: Bengtsson as a middle name:
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    211
    Hu

    Hu

    Hu 胡 is a Chinese surname or family name. In 2006, it was the 15th most common surname in China. Some other less-common surnames pronounced Hu include 瓠, 護, 戶, 扈, 虎, 呼, 忽, and 斛. The one Chinese character 胡 was used for many hu words besides the Hu surname. In Classical Chinese, hu 胡 meant: "dewlap; wattle" and was a variant Chinese character for "how; why; what" (he 何), "long-lasting; far-reaching" (xia 遐), "part of a dagger-axe", hu- in "butterfly" (hudie 蝴蝶), and "Northern Barbarians". In Modern Standard Mandarin, hu 胡 means: "foreign" (e.g., huqin 胡琴 "two-stringed bowed instruments"), "recklessly; irrelevantly" (hushuo 胡說 "talk nonsense; drivel"), "dewlap", (literary) "why; when; how", "Surname", and (historical) "non-Han peoples in the northwest" (Huren 胡人 "the Northern tribes"); or 胡 is a variant character for hu 鬍 (huzi 胡子/鬍子"moustache; beard; whiskers; bandit") and hu 衚 (hutong 胡同/衚衕 "lane; alley"). Compare Honghuzi 紅胡子 (literally "Red Beards") "bandits in the Sino-Russian borderlands". Non-Chinese peoples and ethnic minorities in China sometimes took the Chinese exonym for their ethnic group as their surname. The best example is Hu 胡, which was anciently used to refer to
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    212
    Peng

    Peng

    Peng (Chinese: 彭; pinyin: Péng) is a common Chinese family name, ranking 35th most common in 2006. Alternate Romanizations include Pang and Phang (Cantonese, Hakka), Phang and Bành (Vietnamese). The character (彭) is composed of 壴 (zhǔ meaning "drum") and a pictograph (shān representing "beats"). More commonly used as a surname, this character is also an adjective, meaning "big". The surname Peng (彭) is traced to the legend of Peng Zu (彭祖), God of Longevity, who legend tells lived 800 years. During the Shang Dynasty, Jian Keng, a descendent of Zhuanxu (顓頊), was granted the feudal territory Dapeng (大彭, or Land of Peng), and later adopted the name, Peng Zu. Peng is also a Swiss surname.
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    213
    Scapin

    Scapin

    For the French play by Molière, also known as Scapin, see Les Fourberies de Scapin Scapin is an Italian surname, frequent in the region of Veneto in northeastern Italy, especially in the provinces of Padua and Vicenza. The name is possibly derived from "scabinos", a Medieval Latin adaptation of Frankish "Skabins", found in Lombardic legislation designating a category of minor government officials forming a corps qualified in legal proceedings. An alternate etymology is that it would be derived from "scappino", dialectal Italian for the upper part of footwear. Still another possibility is that it comes from the word for flee or escape. Found throughout the region since the 16th century, with several variants, such as Scapinello (provinces of Treviso and Udine), Scapinelli (provinces of Modena and Bologna), Scabin (most concentrated in the province of Rovigo), Scappin (province of Treviso) and Scappini (provinces of Verona and Firenze). The surname Scapin is currently present in 284 Italian cities.
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    214
    Miyagishima

    Miyagishima

    Miyagishima is a Japanese surname. During Japan's Bunji era (1185 to 1190 CE), a samurai named Minamoto Yoshikage ventured to the Miho area of Japan. At the Miho Shrine, Yoshikage became a Shinto priest and changed his name to Miyagishima Shichirodayu. For several hundred years thereafter, his descendants worked at the Miho Shrine. In successive years, his family grew and his offspring established separate families and became farmers. Thus, a small farming community called "Miyagata" was established (Miyagata means the residence of the Shinto priest and his family). In 1871, after the Meiji Restoration, Miyagata Buraku (hamlet) and Miho Jinja (shrine) were annexed into Miho Mura (village). The majority of the Miyagata residents had the surname Miyagishima. In 1924, Miho and six other towns merged to form Shimizu City, in turn merging with Shizuoka City, Shizuoka prefecture in 2003.
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    215
    Ainscough

    Ainscough

    Ainscough is an old Lancashire family name, also spelled Ayscough, Aiskew, Askew, and Ascough. It is thought that the name is derived from the Norse words "ask skog". Although other sources suggest that Aiskew is a corruption of the words "Eiki Skogr" translating to Oak Wood. An alternative Swedish translation for the name “enskog” is “juniper forest”, with the “en” pronounced “ain”. The "ain" part of the word meaning juniper, "skog" meaning wood or forest. In Medieval English the name was pronounced 'Akeskeugh' or as SAMPA suggests 'eInsk@U'. Today the name is pronounced 'Ains/co'. Other suggestions indicate that the name Ainscough is of French origin. When William the Conqueror invaded England, he brought his army of knights. These knights from Normandy were given land for their effort during the invasion and were placed as his head of government in each Shire. Wikipedia has information about a plaque placed in Normandy Cathedral before leaving for England. This plaque has a list of knights. There are 2 knights listed as "Ansgot" which would have been the French spelling for Ainscough. However, further evidence is required to support this translation of the name. Name variations
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    216
    Folan

    Folan

    Folan (Irish: Ó Cualáin or Ó Culáin), is an Irish family name. They were a Brehon family in County Galway. The Folan family are of Conmhaícne origin. It is most numerous in County Galway, and adjoining areas in County Mayo, in Connacht, Ireland. This locality stretching from Galway City to Clifden is where the majority of Folans are still concentrated today. The Gaelic spelling used in the Irish-speaking Gaeltacht of Galway is Ó Cualáin, despite Mac Fualláin and O Fualláin being attributed to it by Edward Mac Lysaght and other Irish surname scholars. It is also often incorrectly listed as a variation of other Irish names Fallon, Phelan, or Foley. Many Irish Emigrants to the USA americanised the name as Foley. There was a well known Brehon family called O'Folan in County Galway in the sixteenth century. Servreagh O'Folan, Gentleman, was a signature to an official fiant in 1585, called "Indentures of Composition, The Country of the O'Flaherty's of Eyre Connacht, A.D. 1585", which listed him as a landowner in Moyrus in the Barony of Ballynahinch, County Galway. Nehemias Folan of the Newtone, Gentleman, was listed as a landowner near Loughrea, County Galway, in a fiant, "Indentures of
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    217
    Hogge

    Hogge

    Hogge is a Scottish surname originally derived from hoga, an Old English term meaning prudent or careful. A viking family in ancient Scotland was the first to use this name. First found in Durham, before the Norman Conquest and the arrival of William the Conqueror (Duke of Normandy) at Hastings in 1066 AD During the 19th century many immigrants from Scotland settled along the east coast of what would become the United States and Canada. Many Hogge settlers came during this time but there were others who came much earlier during the 17th century. The majority of Hogge's were farmers. Settlers who remained faithful to the crown and called themselves United Empire Loyalists while others participated in the American War of Independence. That spirit lives on today and is evident in the highland games that dot North America. Passenger and immigration lists indicate that members of the Hogge family came to North America quite early: Daniel Hogg settled in Boston in 1651; along with John and Neile, Bernard, Charles, James, John, Peter, Richard and William Hogue all arrived in Philadelphia between 1840 and 1860. In the early 20th century the Hogge family located in New Kent, Virginia
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    218
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    219
    O'Donnell

    O'Donnell

    O'Donnell (Irish: Ó Dónaill or Ó Domhnaill), which is derived from the forename Domhnall (meaning "world ruler", Rex Mundi in Latin, Modern Irish spelling, Dónall) were an ancient and powerful Irish family, kings, princes, and lords of Tír Chonaill (rendered in English as Tyrconnell or Tyrconnel, known today as County Donegal) in early times, and the chief allies and sometimes rivals of the O'Neills in Ulster. Like the family of O'Neill, that of O'Donnell of Tyrconnell was of the Uí Néill, i.e. descended from Niall of the Nine Hostages, High-King of Ireland at the beginning of the 5th century; the O'Neill, or Cenél nEógain, tracing their pedigree to Eógan mac Néill, and the O'Donnells, or Cenél Conaill, to Conall Gulban, both sons of Niall. Conall was baptised by St. Patrick. The Roman Emperor Constantine the Great converted to Christianity after a vision before the famous Battle of the Milvian Bridge, having seen a chi-rho in the sky, and thence the motto In Hoc Signo Vinces, telling him he would be victorious with the sign of the cross. The chi-rho was adopted on a banner, the labarum, upheld on a vexillum, which resembled a Christian cross, and in time the motto became
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    220
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    221
    Yuan

    Yuan

    Yuan (袁, Mandarin pronunciation: [ɥɛ̌n] ( listen)) is a Chinese surname ranked 37th in China by population. In Standard Chinese, the surname is transliterated "Yuán" (pinyin) or "Yüen" (Wade-Giles). Regional variants include "Yeu" (Shanghainese), "Ion" (Nanchang Gan), "Yuen" (Cantonese), "Oan" (Min Nan), "Won" (Korean), and "Viên" (Vietnamese). Pronunciation differs widely from region to region. According to tradition, the surname originated from a noble family of the ancient state of Chen, in what is now eastern Henan province. The written form of the character took its current standardised form around the 1st century. During the Han Dynasty, it was associated with the powerful Yuan clan of Ru'nan and later during Jin and Southern Dynasties, with the Yuan clan of Chen. Historically, the name has been fast growing amongst Han Chinese, and has also been taken up by various non-Chinese ethnic groups. The surname is now held by more than 6.5 million people worldwide, and makes up 0.54% of the population of mainland China. Although growth has tapered off in the past six centuries, the Yuan name is still relatively widespread throughout China, as well as among overseas Chinese, with
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    1 votes
    222
    Nguyễn

    Nguyễn

    Nguyễn (Northern pronunciation [ŋʷiə̌ˀn] ( listen), southern [ŋʷiə̌ŋ] ( listen) is the most common Vietnamese family name. By some estimates, approximately forty percent of Vietnamese people have this surname. The prevalence of Nguyễn as a family name in Vietnam extends to outside the country where many Vietnamese people have emigrated. Nguyễn is the seventh most common family name in Australia (second only to Smith in the Melbourne phone books), and the fifty-fourth most common in France. In the United States, it is the fifty-seventh most common family name according to the 2000 Census, as well as the most common exclusively East Asian surname, a massive leap from its 229th-place ranking in 1990. It is ranked 124th in the U.S. Social Security Index. It is the fifty-sixth most common surname in Norway and the 85th most common name in the Czech Republic and tops the foreign name list of that country. Nguyễn is the Vietnamese transliteration of the Chinese surname (阮), which is often transliterated as Ruan in Mandarin, Yuen in Cantonese, or Nyoe in Wu Chinese. In Vietnamese history, many events contributed to the name's prominence. In 1232, after usurping the Lý Dynasty, Trần Thủ Độ
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    2 votes
    223

    Aikman

    Aikman is a surname, and may refer to Aikman is from the Scottish name for oak "aik" man. First read in Shakespeare's Macbeth see: http://www.surnamedb.com/surname.aspx?name=Aikman
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    224
    Andrade

    Andrade

    Originally, the name Andrade could have come from any of numerous places of the same name in Galicia or northern Portugal and several Andrade are known from documents dating back to the 12th century. Most likely, however, it originated in the small fief of San Martiño de Andrade (St. Martin of Andrade) in Pontedeume, Ferrol and Vilalba, in Galicia, Spain, where the well-known aristocratic lineage of Andrade emerged in the low Middle Ages. The surname Andrade is now commonly found not only in Portugal and Spain, but also in countries of Latin America, Italy Africa, Equatorial Guinea and East Timor. Andrades are also common in Goa, and Karnataka in India. In 1920, there were hundreds of Andrade families living in the United States, with the largest concentrations in California, Massachusetts, Hawaii and Rhode Island. For a list of related and un-related people with the surname Andrade see Andrade (disambiguation). The Andrades (or Andrada) were a powerful family in north-western Iberia during the late Middle Ages and the early Renaissance time during which they held the titles of Counts of Andrade and Vilalba, amongst others, together with numerous castles, palaces, manor houses and
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    225
    Fichtner

    Fichtner

    Fichtner, Fiechtner, or any variant thereof is a surname originating from areas where German is spoken. Descendants of the Fichtner name are spread though Germany, Austria, Russian Empire (in particular Ukraine)Canada, the United States and Argentina. Groups of Fichtners helped to colonize the early United States, with the emergence of Fichtners into Pennsylvania in the mid-1760s. Fichtners also settled in the Russian Empire as Catherine the Great opened up Russian lands to German settlement during her reign. The name is common within modern Germany, specifically in southern Germany. Fichtners also remain in modern-day Ukraine and many live within the United States today, concentrated in the Midwest and Northwest. Notable American Fichtners include Actor William Fichtner and Miss USA 1986 Christy Fichtner. The Fichtners of Connecticut work primarily in technical and maintenance fields. Working mostly in IT and alternative energy industries.
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    226
    Gerdes

    Gerdes

    Gerdes ( /ˈɡɛərdɨs/), or Geerdes, is a surname of German origin. It is a patronymic name, i.e. it comes from "son of Gerhard". When around 1800 the Prussian government under French occupation decided to fix the surnames, the contemporary "son of Gerhard" had to keep his name. In Ostfriesland, the law was ignored until at least 1811. Ge(e)rdes is a patronymic derived from the name "Gerd", short for Gerard, meaning "hard spear", or from the Norse goddess Gerd (meaning "Gerd's protection"), wife of Freyr and protectress of the home yard and garden, from which she also derives her name as a personification of the garden/yard.
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    227
    Jordan-Rozwadowski

    Jordan-Rozwadowski

    Jordan-Rozwadowski is a family of high nobility which has been powerful and important for centuries, first in the Kingdom of Poland and later in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Ignacy Jordan-Rozwadowski (son of Antoni by his wife Helena Rupniewska) obtained the hereditary title of Count of Galicia from Joseph II Habsburg Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire on 23rd August 1783. Konstanty, Wladymir-Wladyslaw and Aleksander (all sons of Jan-Tadeusz by his second wife Maria Wagrodzka) obtained the title of Count from Czar Aleksander II on 29th June 1872. That title is now extinct. The Jordan-Rozwadowski Coat of Arms use the Trąby coat of arms. General Tadeusz Jordan-Rozwadowski, perhaps the most famous member of Jordan-Rozwadowski family, was one of the founders of modern Poland, the first chief-of-staff of the modern Polish Army, and one of the architects of the Polish victory in the battle of Warsaw. Family motto: various cries The Jordan-Rozwadowski family is traceable to a Polish Bishop and his brothers ca. 900 AD,and was a member of the Polish nobility, and a part of Traby clan (see Trąby Coat of Arms). The Jordan commemorates a distant ancestor who fought in the crusades and as
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    1 votes
    228
    Kozłowski

    Kozłowski

    Kozłowski (feminine: Kozłowska, plural Kozłowscy) is the 12th most common surname in Poland (75,962 people). The surname may refer to:
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    229
    Ó Cléirigh

    Ó Cléirigh

    Ó Cléirigh is the surname of a learned Irish family whose members appear in historical records dating to the mid-Medieval Period. In the centuries prior to the historical era, they had been rulers of Uí Fiachrach Aidhne, a kingdom in what is now the south of County Galway, but were subsequently expelled by their cousins, the Clan Ó Seachnasaigh (O'Shaughnessy). From the early 11th or 12th century, they were based in Tír Chonaill, located in modern-day County Donegal, where they served as poet-historians, scribes and secretaries to the O'Donnell dynasty of Tyrconnell. Notable members of the clan included:
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    230
    O'Reilly

    O'Reilly

    O'Reilly /əˈraɪli/ is the Anglicised form of the Gaelic Ó Raghallaigh. It is also the patronymic form of the Irish name Reilly (Irish Gaelic: Uí Raghaile). It is commonly found throughout Ireland, with the greatest concentration of the surname found in County Cavan followed by Longford, Meath, Westmeath, Fermanagh and Monaghan, and the Province of Leinster. O'Reilly is ranked eleventh in the top twenty list of Irish surnames. People with the surname O'Reilly include:
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    231
    Varma

    Varma

    Varmā (Hindi: वर्मा, Malayalam: വര്‍മ,Telugu: వర్మ), Varman or Burman or Barman (Bengali: বর্মন) is an honorific title that was originally used by the Kshatriyas in India and South East Asia. In modern times, "Varma", "Varman", "Burman" and "Barman" are used as a surnames by several Hindu Kshatriya communities in India such as the Rajus of Andhra Pradesh, the Suryavanshi Khastriyas and Agnivanshi Khastriyas of Tamil Nadu, the Samanta Kshatriyas, the Kshatriyas of Bengal, Assam and Tripura, and the Bunts of Karnataka, Kushwaha of Bihar and Uttar Pradesh and some Srivastavas (Kayasthas) of North India. It was also used as a title by Mauryas. Chandragupta Maurya was also known as Ranti Varman in Mudrarakshas. Mauryan emperor by name Deva Varman Maurya is also known. The last Maurya king who ruled Konkan was Suketu Varman. His kingdom was destroyed by Chalukyas. and many other ruling clans in South and East India. Varma/Varman surname is used by bunts. Varma is also used by Maidh Rajput (Mair kshatriyas or Mers or Aryans Medes or Aryans Royal Medes Kshatriyas)). In modern times, Varma, Burman, Barman or Varman is used as a surname by many Kshatriyas in India, without any political
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    Ahuja

    Ahuja is a common family name (surname) of Hindus and Sikhs with origin ranging from Sindh and Punjab that are usually of the Arora sub-caste and of the Khatri caste. They adhere to family traditions, respect for elders and family rituals. Ahujas are members of the business community, and are believed to be descendents of AHU. Some famous personalities with this last name include like : List of Ahuja:
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    Alfandari

    Alfandari

    Alfandari, Alphandéry (Hebrew: אלפנדרי‎) is a family of eastern rabbis prominent in the 17th and 18th centuries, found in Smyrna, Constantinople, and Jerusalem. The name may be derived from a Spanish locality, perhaps from Alfambra. The following is a list of the chief members of the family: Members of this family were to be found as of 1906 in Constantinople and in Beirut. A Portuguese family of the name Alphandéry still exists (1906) in Paris and Avignon. At the latter place there was a physician, Moses Alphandéry, in 1506 (Rev. Ét. Juives, xxxiv. 253) and a Lyon Alphanderic, in 1558 (ibid. vii. 280). Compare the names Moses אלפנדריך (Neubauer, Cat. Bodl. Hebr. MSS. No. 2129) and Aaron אלפנדארק (ibid. No. 1080). For a possible explanation of the name, see Moritz Steinschneider, Jew. Quart. Rev. xi. 591. In addition to the persons mentioned above, there is known a Solomon Alfandari (Valencia, 1367), whose son Jacob assisted Samuel Ẓarẓa in tranṣlating the Sefer ha-'Aẓamim of pseudo-ibn Ezra from the Arabic into Hebrew. A merchant, Isaac Alfandari, was wrecked in 1529 on the Nubian coast (Leopold Zunz, Z. G. p. 425; Steinschneider, Hebr. Uebers. p. 448). In Israeli popular culture,
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    Clan MacInnes

    Clan MacInnes

    Clan MacInnes is a Scottish clan from the highlands. As there is currently no clan chief, it is currently regarded as an Armigerous clan. From the Gaelic MacAonghais (Sons of Angus). Mac or Mc (as they are interchangeable) means son or family of, aon means one or unique, and gusa means choice. Therefore Unique Choice or Choice One. Mac does not imply strict bloodlines, but could reflect kinship, dependent allies or tenants. This name first appears in the seventh century Scottish Senchus fer n-Alban (The History of the Men of Scotland). Clan MacInnes' ancestors were among the early inhabitants of Islay, Jura and the Kintyre peninsula in Scotland, generally part of the region known as Argyll. These Scotti, a Celtic, Gaelic-speaking people, first appear there as settlers from Ireland in c. 500 when Fergus Mór, king of the north Irish kingdom of Dál Riata, and his two brothers, Loarn and Óengus, expanded their lands into southwestern Alba. Óengus had already established a colony on Islay and/or Jura and was the master of ships for the new Kingdom. Óengus (Angus) is considered to be the first of the MacInnes Clan and is thought to be buried on Iona. Dalriada quickly grew in influence
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    De Geer

    De Geer

    • People with this family name: Louis Gerhard De Geer
    De Geer (also: De Geer van Jutphaas and De Geer van Oudegein) is a family of Walloon origin (the name possibly derived from the town of Geer near Liège) which became notable in Sweden and the Netherlands. They have played an important role in Swedish and Dutch history since the early 17th century, mainly centered around the iron foundry company town Finspång, but often extending to science, art and national politics. The family retained its contacts with the Netherlands even after the main branch settled in Sweden. Some of them hold the title count or baron. Both branches are still in existence and continue to thrive.
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    Florit

    Florit

    Florit is a surname that originates in Languedoc (France). In the early 15th century, some of the cavaliers from Languedoc moved to Aragon and settled in Catalonia and the Balearic Islands. A Coat of Arms is not the property of a whole surname, but only belongs to a specific family ennobled by the monarch. No one else, not even collateral relatives, are legally allowed to use it. However, non-ennobled people (from Minorca) can use it privately if it is modified to omit certain details reserved for the noble family, i.e., the shape of the heraldic shield, the helmet and its accessories. Also, the silver swan on the blue field can be moved inside a seal, a circle, an oval, a rectangle, a square, etc. Spanish: "Trae de azur y cisne de plata, linguado de gules, picado y membrado de oro. Jefe de oro, y yelmo de sable. Timbre de caballero: yelmo de acero terciado, adornado con rejillas y bordura de oro y forrado de gules. En su cirnera, penacho de plumas. Pendientes de la parte superior del yelmo y rodeado éste y la mitad alta del escudo, lambrequines que, como las plumas, son de los colores y metales del blasón, es decir: oro y plata, azur y sable." Surname Florit is found on the island
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    Haddad

    Haddad or Hadad (Semitic: "blacksmith") is a common family name and personal name. Hadad was also a Semitic storm-god. The original Haddad (Aramaicܚܕܕ or ܚܕܐܕ ) name means Blacksmith in ancient Semitic. The Haddad name dates back to the Phoenician era of the Eastern Mediterranean. People who have the last name of Haddad are often Christian whereas among Tunisians they tend to be Jewish. Haddad is the most commonly used Christian surname in the Eastern Mediterranean and Arab World. Though a small number of the Haddad clan converted to Islam in the Levant. The Haddad Christians live in Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, Israel/Palestine, Iraq, Egypt and Turkey (Turabdin, southeastern Turkey. In the Aramaic-Turoyo dialect they are also known as "Hadodo ܚܕܕܐ" - but after the prohibition of the use of non-Turkish names 1934 they took Turkish names. Haddad is the most common surname in Lebanon, with about 2.42% or 96,800 people having the surname in Lebanon alone. Haddad is the most common Christian surname in Jordan and the largest Christian family in Jordan, with about 35,000 people having the surname in Jordan.
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    Haupt

    In German, Haupt in the broadest sense means something on the top of a hierarchy. Regarding the human body, the usage of Haupt for the head is considered antiquated or poetic, Kopf is being used instead. But Haupt still appears in figures of speech, as in compounds (Hauptbahnhof, Hauptmann, Hauptschule, Hauptwohnsitz) where its meaning equals the usage of the English main (e.g. Hauptreaktor = main reactor) Also, Haupt describes the most important person or element of a group: Derived from Haupt are Häuptling ("chieftain") and Enthauptung ("beheading"). In German, Haupt is also a family name. Known bearers include:
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    House of Bentinck

    House of Bentinck

    The Bentinck family (also known as the House of Bentinck) is a prominent family belonging to both Dutch and British nobility. Its members have served in the armed forces and as ambassadors and politicians, including Governor General of India and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. The family is related to the British Royal Family. The name Bentinck is a patronymic variation of the Old Germanic name Bento. The family is originally from the East of the Netherlands. The oldest known ancestor is Johan Bentinck, who is mentioned in documents between 1343 and 1386 and owned land near Heerde. An important branch was founded by Hans Willem Bentinck, 1st Earl of Portland who accompanied William Henry, Prince of Orange to England during the Glorious Revolution. This British branch were initially given the title of Earl of Portland, later Duke of Portland. Furthermore, in 1732 the title Graf (Count) Bentinck, of the Holy Roman Empire, was created for William Bentinck, son of the 1st Earl of Portland. A Royal Licence of 1886 was created which allowed the use of this title in England as well. This title continues to be held by Tim Bentinck, 12th Earl of Portland and his heirs. In the
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    Kaplan

    Kaplan

    This interesting surname can be of several different origins, including German, Yiddish and French. The French form, found also in England, derived from the old Norman French word "caplain" and old French and medieval English word "chapelain", meaning "charity priest", a priest who was endowed to sing Mass daily on behalf of the souls of the dead. Hence the name is an occupational name for a clergyman or perhaps a servant of one. Variations on Kaplan include Chaplain, Chapling, Caplen and Kaplin. Etymologically, the word originates from the Latin term, capellanus or cappellanus, an office given to persons appointed to watch over the sacred cloak (cappa or capella) of St Martin of Tours.. In German the term kaplan means chaplain or curate. The word is extant in other languages as well, for example in Polish where the term kapłan translates as priest,, in Hungarian 'káplán' means a priest of the royal court or that of an aristocrat's; in Norwegian where it also has the meaning of priest while retaining the original, elongated form. Additionally, Kaplan can be a Turkish surname meaning tiger. Kaplan or Caplan is a also a family name common among Ashkenazi Jews, usually indicating
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    Kim

    Kim

    Kim, sometimes spelled Gim, is the most common family name in Korea. The name is common in both modern-day North Korea and South Korea. The hanja used for the name (金) means "gold," and although the character is usually pronounced 금 [kɯm] geum, it is pronounced 김 [kim] gim when used for the family name and names of some cities, e.g. Gimhae (김해, 金海) and Gimpo (김포, 金浦). The surname is also used in China (as Jin) along with Cambodia and Vietnam, although it is less common in Vietnam. As with most other Korean family names, there are many Kim clans, known in Korean as bon-gwan (본관, 本貫), each of which consists of individual Kim families. Most Kims belong to one of a few very large clans. Even within each clan, people in different families are not related to each other. These distinctions are important, since Korean law used to prohibit intermarriage in the same clan, no matter how remote the relationship; now, however, only those in a relationship of second cousins or closer are prohibited from marrying. As with other Korean family names, the Kim clans are distinguished by the place from which they claim to originate. A very large number of distinct Kim clans exist, besides those listed
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    Kohen

    Kohen

    Kohen (or Kohain; Hebrew: כֹּהֵן‎‎, "priest", pl. כֹּהֲנִים Kohanim) is the Hebrew word for priest. Jewish Kohanim are traditionally believed and halachically required to be of direct patrilineal descent from the Biblical Aaron. The noun kohen is used in the Torah to refer to priests, both Jewish and non-Jewish, such as the Jewish nation as a whole, as well as the priests (Hebrew kohanim) of Baal (2Kings 10:19). During the existence of the Temple in Jerusalem, Kohanim performed the daily and holiday (Yom Tov) duties of sacrificial offerings. Today kohanim retain a lesser though somewhat distinct status within Judaism, and are bound by additional restrictions according to Orthodox Judaism. The Hebrew noun kohen is most often translated as "priest", whether Jewish or pagan, such as the priests of Baal or Dagon, though Christian priests are referred to in Hebrew by the term komer (Hebrew כומר). The word derives from a Semitic root common, at minimum, to the Central Semitic languages; the cognate Arabic word كاهن kāhin means "soothsayer, augur, or priest". Translations in the paraphrase of the Aramaic Targumic interpretations include "friend" in Targum Yonathan to 2 Kings 10:11,
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    Leite

    Leite is a Portuguese surname (literally Milk) that may refer to:
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    McInerney

    McInerney

    The name McInerney is of noble Irish origin where it is found in the modern Irish form of Mac an Airchinnigh (pronounced mock-on-arc-kenny) and in the old and literary form of Mac an Oirchinnigh and Mac an Oirchindig. The pronunciation of Mac an Oirchinnigh has led the name to be sometimes anglicised as McEnherheny in Irish documents from the 16th–19th centuries. The name is derived from the Irish Mac an Oirchinnigh, meaning ‘son of the erenagh’, (erenagh in Irish being 'airchinneach') literally meaning 'son of the Lord of church lands'. The Irish word airchinneach may derive from its twin components of ‘air’ (noble) and 'ceann' (head), therefore meaning a ‘noble-head’ or ‘Lord’, denoting its aristocratic status in medieval Ireland. The erenagh was an important position in early medieval Ireland and originally was associated with hereditary ecclesiastical office among certain custodian families of monasteries and churches. Later, the office of erenagh passed into the hands of laymen. After the disorder of the Norse wars in the 10th and 11th centuries, the erenaghs were generally lay families who controlled the lands and therefore the economic base of the important churches and
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    Paddick

    Paddick

    Paddick is a surname of English origin, later spreading to other English language countries. There are several origin theories: all may be true as there are distinct groupings of Paddicks across England. The first group, from the Somerset, Dorset and Bristol area, is thought to derive from the Old English paddock meaning toad. In medieval England, paddock was a nickname applied to anyone who was considered mean or spiteful, and the progenitor of this group is thought to have been a French merchant called Jean le Pedoc who lived in Bristol in the early 14th century. The second group comes from the English Midlands, particularly Shropshire and Staffordshire, though also through time from Birmingham and Lancashire. This name, although most commonly written as Paddock rather than Paddick, was originally written as Parrock and derives from the same etymology as the word "park". The vast majority of people with the last name Paddick or Paddock in England are descended from this group. The third group is concentrated around the South East England coast, particularly in the counties of Hampshire and Sussex, and this group is a variant of the surname Padwick. The following notable people
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    Rose

    Onomastics and disambiguational information about the words and place- & human names that forms Rose-, Rosen-. Rosenholz ist eine Sammelbezeichnung fᅢᄐr verschiedene tropische Holz. Diese Hᅢᄊlzer haben einen rosenᅢᄂhnlichen Duft. Es hat nichts mit dem Holz der Rose zu tun, wie gerne angenommen wird. Hᅢᄂufig wird Palisander fᅢᄂlschlich als "Rosenholz" bezeichnet, da Palisander im Englischen rosewood genannt wird. Es handelt sich hierbei um einen beliebten ᅢワbersetzungsfehler. Palisander stammt ausschlieᅢ゚lich von bestimmten Arten der Gattung Dalbergia, wᅢᄂhrend die Bezeichnung "Rosenholz" fᅢᄐr ganz unterschiedliche Holzarten verwendet wird: Um sich Rosenstadt, Rosenkreis oder Rosendorf nennen zu kᅢᄊnnen, muss die Rose als "prᅢᄂgender Ortsbestandteil" vorhanden sein und gepflegt werden. Die Idee hatte Oscar Scheerer (1906-1971), damals Gartendirektor des Rosengartens Zweibrᅢᄐcken und Prᅢᄂsident des Vereins Deutscher Rosenfreunde (VDR) 1955 im Rahmen der Aktion "Unser Dorf soll schᅢᄊner werden". Rosenwasser means rosewater. Rosine (Yiddish: rozhinke) means raisin.
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    Rowlan

    Rowlan

    Rowlan ( /ˈroʊlɔːn/ ROW-lawn) is an Irish Surname and the anglicized version of the name Ó Rothlain (English /oʊ ˈroʊlɔːn/). It, therefore, shares a link with the surnames Rowland, Rowlands, Rollan, Rollin, Rolan, Roland and Rowley. During the Irish diaspora several members of the Rowlan family from County Mayo, Ireland immigrated to the United States as a direct result of the Potato Famine. They eventually settled in Oklahoma Territory during the Land Run.
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    Strozzi family

    Strozzi family

    Strozzi is the name of an ancient and self-proclaimed noble Florentine family, who like their great rivals the Medici family, began in banking before moving into politics. Until its exile from Florence in 1434, the Strozzi family was by far the richest in the city, and was rivaled only by the Medici family, who ultimately took control of the government and ruined the Strozzi both financially and politically. This political and financial competition was the origin of the Strozzi-Medici rivalry. Later, while the Medici ruled Florence, the Strozzi family was ruled Siena, which Florence attacked, causing great animosity between the two families. Soon afterwards, the Strozzi married into the Medici family, essentially giving the Medici superiority. Palla Strozzi (1372-1462) neglected the family bank, but played an important part in the public life of Florence, and founded the first public library in Florence in the monastery of Santa Trinita, as well as commissioning the important Strozzi Altarpiece of the Adoration of the Magi by Gentile da Fabriano. He played a leading part in forcing the exile of Cosimo de' Medici in 1434, but after Cosimo's pardon a year later, was himself exiled,
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