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  • Nov 27th 2012
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Best Exhibit of All Time

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    1
    7.86
    7 votes
    2
    A Pair of Shoes

    A Pair of Shoes

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Armory Show
    A Pair of Shoes (1888) is a painting by Dutch artist Vincent van Gogh.
    9.00
    5 votes
    3
    Hemlock Pool

    Hemlock Pool

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Armory Show
    Hemlock Pool (1900) is a painting by American Impressionist artist John Henry Twachtman.
    8.80
    5 votes
    4
    The Wedding of Samson

    The Wedding of Samson

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "The Wedding of Samson" (1638) is a painting by Dutch artist Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn.
    7.17
    6 votes
    5
    The Doctor

    The Doctor

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "The Doctor" (1653) is a painting by Dutch artist Gerard Dou.
    8.20
    5 votes
    6
    7.00
    6 votes
    7
    Brothel Scene

    Brothel Scene

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Brothel Scene" (c. 1645-1650) is a painting by German Baroque painter Nikolaus Knüpfer.
    7.80
    5 votes
    8
    7.80
    5 votes
    9
    7.80
    5 votes
    10
    6.67
    6 votes
    11
    7.60
    5 votes
    12
    7.60
    5 votes
    13
    10.00
    3 votes
    14
    Still Life with Beer Glass

    Still Life with Beer Glass

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Still Life with Beer Glass" (1647) is a painting by Dutch Baroque-era painter Jan van de Velde.
    7.40
    5 votes
    15
    Girl Eating an Apple

    Girl Eating an Apple

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Girl Eating an Apple" (c. 1675-1680) is a painting by Dutch Golden Age artist Godfried Schalcken.
    8.50
    4 votes
    16
    The Grey

    The Grey

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "The Grey" (c. 1646) is a painting by Dutch artist Philips Wouwermans.
    8.50
    4 votes
    17
    Portrait of a Lady

    Portrait of a Lady

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Portrait of a Lady" (1632) is a painting by Thomas de Keyser.
    6.33
    6 votes
    18
    The Little Street

    The Little Street

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    The Little Street (Het Straatje) is a painting by the Dutch painter Johannes Vermeer, executed c. 1657-1658. It is housed in the Rijksmuseum of Amsterdam, and signed left below the window with the writing "I V MEER". The exact location of the scene Vermeer painted is not known. However, recent study by the Delft professor F.H. Kreuger found the Voldersgracht as the location of Vermeer’s The Little Street. Nowadays, the Vermeer Centre Delft is located here ( 52°00′44″N 4°21′34″E / 52.012222°N 4.359444°E / 52.012222; 4.359444 (Het Straatje)).
    7.20
    5 votes
    19
    The Stone Bridge

    The Stone Bridge

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "The Stone Bridge" (c. 1638) is a painting by Dutch artist Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn.
    7.20
    5 votes
    20
    McLaren MP4-21

    McLaren MP4-21

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Fast Forward: 20 ways F1™ is changing our world
    The McLaren MP4-21 is a Formula One car designed by Adrian Newey for the 2006 Formula One season. The car continues the MP4-X naming system and is notable for its striking chrome livery which is designed to maximize the visibility of the teams sponsors. The car started the season in the hands of Kimi Räikkönen and Juan Pablo Montoya, but after a few races it soon became clear that it was not as competitive as its predecessor, the MP4-20, despite an apparent improvement in reliability. McLaren did not win a race all season, for the first time since 1996. Their best results were second place finishes for Kimi Räikkönen in Australia and Italy, for Juan Pablo Montoya in Monaco, and for Pedro de la Rosa in Hungary. (key) (results in bold indicate pole position; results in italics indicate fastest lap)
    8.25
    4 votes
    21
    Naked Playing People

    Naked Playing People

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Armory Show
    Naked Playing People (1910) is a painting by German Expressionist artist Ernst Ludwig Kirchner.
    8.25
    4 votes
    22
    6.17
    6 votes
    23
    7.00
    5 votes
    24
    Company of Captain Reinier Reael

    Company of Captain Reinier Reael

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    The Company of Captain Reinier Reael (also known as the "The Meagre Company") is a painting began by Frans Hals and finished by Pieter Codde.
    7.00
    5 votes
    25
    Landscape with a Huntsman and Dead Game

    Landscape with a Huntsman and Dead Game

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Landscape with a Huntsman and Dead Game" ("Allegory of the Sense of Smell") (1697) is a painting by Dutch artist Jan Weenix.
    7.00
    5 votes
    26
    8.00
    4 votes
    27
    Ginevra de' Benci

    Ginevra de' Benci

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Virtue and Beauty: Leonardo's "Ginevra de Benci" and Renaissance Portraits of Women
    Ginevra de' Benci (born ca. 1458) was an aristocrat from 15th-century Florence, admired for her intelligence by Florentine contemporaries. She is the subject of a portrait painting by Leonardo da Vinci. The oil-on-wood portrait was acquired by the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., in 1967, for US$5 million paid to the Princely House of Liechtenstein, a record price at the time, from the Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund. It is the only painting by Leonardo on public view in the Americas. It is known that Leonardo painted a portrait of Ginevra de' Benci in 1474, possibly to commemorate her marriage that year to Luigi di Bernardo Niccolini at the age of 16. However, according to Giorgio Vasari's "Lives of the Artists" (Second and Corrected Edition) Ginevra was not the daughter of Amerigo de' Benci but his wife. The painting's imagery and the text on the reverse of the panel support the identification of this picture. Directly behind the young lady in the portrait is a juniper tree. The reverse of the portrait is decorated with a juniper sprig encircled by a wreath of laurel and palm and is memorialized by the phrase VIRTUTEM FORMA DECORAT ("beauty adorns virtue"). The Italian word
    8.00
    4 votes
    28
    8.00
    4 votes
    29
    Kindred Spirits

    Kindred Spirits

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Asher B. Durand's "Kindred Spirits"
    Kindred Spirits (1849) is a painting by Asher Brown Durand, who was part of the Hudson River School. It depicts the painter Thomas Cole, who had died in 1848, and his friend, poet William Cullen Bryant, in the Catskill Mountains. The landscape painting, which combines geographical features in Kaaterskill Clove and a minuscule depiction of Kaaterskill Falls, is not a literal depiction of American geography. Rather, it is an idealized memory of Cole's discovery of the region more than twenty years prior, his friendship with Bryant, and his ideas towards American Nature. The painting was commissioned by New York art collector and advocate Jonathan Sturges as a gift to Bryant. Bryant had presented the eulogy for the painter Cole,who had unexpectedly died in February 1848, in May 1848. Sturges explains the commission with: Within days of receiving the painting, Bryant wrote thank you notes to both Sturges and Durand full of praise for the work. Bryant described his first impression of the gift to Durand with “I was more delighted with it than I can express, and am under very great obligations to you for having put so much of your acknowledged genius into a work intended for me.” He
    8.00
    4 votes
    30
    The Railway

    The Railway

    The Railway, widely known as The Gare Saint-Lazare, is an 1873 painting by Édouard Manet. The setting is the urban landscape of Paris in the late nineteenth century. Using his favorite model in his last painting of her, a fellow painter, Victorine Meurent, also the model for Olympia and the Luncheon on the Grass, sits before an iron fence holding a sleeping puppy and an open book in her lap. Next to her is a little girl with her back to the painter, who watches a train pass beneath them. Instead of choosing the traditional natural view as background for an outdoor scene, Manet opted for the iron grating which "boldly stretches across the canvas" (Gay 106). The only evidence of the train is its white cloud of steam. In the distance, modern apartment buildings are seen. This arrangement compresses the foreground into a narrow focus. The traditional convention of deep space is ignored. When the painting was first exhibited at the official Paris Salon of 1874: "Visitors and critics found its subject baffling, its composition incoherent, and its execution sketchy. Caricaturists ridiculed Manet's picture, in which only a few recognized the symbol of modernity that it has become
    8.00
    4 votes
    31
    Mountainous Landscape

    Mountainous Landscape

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Mountainous Landscape" (c. 1620-1633) is a painting by Dutch artist Hercules Seghers.  This painting was once attributed to, and was owned by, Rembrandt.  Art historians believe that Rembrandt added the people at the lower left corner of the painting.
    7.75
    4 votes
    32
    The Art of Painting

    The Art of Painting

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Johannes Vermeer's The Art of Painting
    The Art of Painting, also known as The Allegory of Painting, and or Painter in his Studio, is a famous 17th century oil on canvas painting by Dutch painter, Johannes Vermeer. Many art historians believe that it is an allegory of painting, hence the alternative title of the painting. It is the largest and most complex of all of Vermeer's works. The painting is one of Vermeer's most famous. It offers a realistic presentation of an artist's workplace, and is notable for its depiction of light as it illuminates the interior. The painting depicts an artist painting a female subject in his studio, by a window, with a large map of the Netherlands on the wall behind. The painting has only two figures, the painter and his subject. The painter is thought to be a self-portrait of the artist, though the face is not visible. A number of the items shown in the artist's studio are thought to be somewhat out of place. The marble tiled floor and the golden chandelier are two examples of items which would normally then be reserved for the houses of the well-to-do. The map in the background is of the Seven United Provinces of the Netherlands, flanked by views of the main centres of power. It was
    7.75
    4 votes
    33
    The Green Wave

    The Green Wave

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Manet and the American Civil War: The Battle of U.S.S. "Kearsarge" and C.S.S. "Alabama"
    "The Green Wave" (1867) is a painting by Claude Monet. The handling of paint and composition, especially the high horizon line, in this early seascape by Monet are clearly indebted to Manet's two depictions of American warships, "The 'Kearsarge' at Boulogne" (at right) and "The Battle of the 'Kearsarge' and the 'Alabama'" (Philadelphia Museum of Art), which were exhibited in Paris in 1865 and 1867. Monet later added the date 1865, which is incorrect, as he visited the Normandy coast in 1866 and again in 1867.
    7.75
    4 votes
    34
    5.83
    6 votes
    35
    5.83
    6 votes
    36
    The Jewish Bride

    The Jewish Bride

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    The Jewish Bride (Dutch: Het Joodse bruidje) is a painting by Rembrandt, executed around 1667. The painting gained its current name in the early 19th century, when an Amsterdam art collector identified the subject as that of a Jewish father bestowing a necklace upon his daughter on her wedding day. This interpretation is no longer accepted, and the identity of the couple is uncertain. The ambiguity is heightened by the lack of anecdotal context, leaving only the central universal theme, that of a couple joined in love. Speculative suggestions as to the couple's identity have ranged from Rembrandt's son Titus and his bride, or Amsterdam poet Miguel de Barrios and his wife. Also considered are several couples from the Old Testament, including Abraham and Sarah, or Boaz and Ruth. The likeliest identification, however, is that of Isaac and Rebekah, as described in Genesis 26:8, and is supported by a drawing by the artist of the same theme. While technical evidence suggests that Rembrandt initially envisioned a larger and more elaborate composition, the placement of his signature at lower left indicates that its current dimensions are not significantly different from those at the time
    5.83
    6 votes
    37
    Cows and Sheep at a Stream

    Cows and Sheep at a Stream

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Cows and Sheep at a Stream" (1655-1656) is a painting by Karel Dujardin.
    7.50
    4 votes
    38
    Dancers at the Bar

    Dancers at the Bar

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Masterworks from The Phillips Collection
    "Dancers at the Bar" (1900) is a painting by French artist Edgar Degas.
    7.50
    4 votes
    39
    Landscape with Figures

    Landscape with Figures

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Armory Show
    Landscape with Figures (1913) is a painting by American Post-Impressionist artist Maurice Prendergast.
    8.67
    3 votes
    40
    The Luncheon on the Grass

    The Luncheon on the Grass

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Salon des Refusés
    Le déjeuner sur l'herbe (English, "The Luncheon on the Grass") – originally titled Le Bain (The Bath) – is a large oil on canvas painting by Édouard Manet created in 1862 and 1863. The painting depicts the juxtaposition of a female nude and a scantily dressed female bather on a picnic with two fully dressed men in a rural setting. Rejected by the Salon jury of 1863, Manet seized the opportunity to exhibit this and two other paintings, in the 1863 Salon des Refusés, where the painting sparked public notoriety and controversy. The piece is now in the Musée d'Orsay in Paris. A smaller, earlier version can be seen at the Courtauld Gallery, London. In 1863, Manet shocked the French public by exhibiting his Déjeuner sur l'herbe ("Luncheon on the Grass"). It is not a realist painting in the social or political sense of Daumier, but it is a statement in favor of the artist's individual freedom. The shock value of a nude woman casually lunching with two fully dressed men, which was an affront to the propriety of the time, was accentuated by the familiarity of the figures. Manet's wife, Suzanne Leenhoff, and his favorite model, Victorine Meurent, both posed for the nude woman, which has
    8.67
    3 votes
    41
    View of Campo Vaccino

    View of Campo Vaccino

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "View of the Campo Vaccino" (1620) is a painting by Cornelis van Poelenburgh.
    8.67
    3 votes
    42
    10.00
    2 votes
    43
    Cavaliers and Ladies

    Cavaliers and Ladies

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Cavaliers and Ladies" (1633) is a painting by Dutch artist Pieter Codde.
    6.40
    5 votes
    44
    Nevermore

    Nevermore

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Gauguin: Maker of Myth
    Nevermore (1897) is a painting by French artist Paul Gauguin.
    8.33
    3 votes
    45
    8.33
    3 votes
    46
    Self-Portrait

    Self-Portrait

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Armory Show
    "Self-Portrait" (1887) is a painting by Dutch artist Vincent van Gogh. It was in painted in Paris in the summer of 1887.
    8.33
    3 votes
    47
    Test Site

    Test Site

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Unilever Series: Carsten Höller: Test Site
    Test Site was an art installation, that was displayed in the turbine hall of Tate Modern in London, UK, between October 2006 and April 9, 2007. Test Site was designed by Carsten Höller, and was the seventh commission of the series of works in the turbine hall sponsored by Unilever known as "The Unilever Series". The exhibit consisted of a series of metal slides. There were a total of five slides, two starting on the second floor, and one on each floor after that up to the 5th floor. The slides were composed of metal and fibreglass, and covered all the way around. Visitors could slide down the slides of the installation free, but timed entry tickets were required for all but the second floor slides.
    8.33
    3 votes
    48
    The Kearsarge at Boulogne

    The Kearsarge at Boulogne

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Manet and the American Civil War: The Battle of U.S.S. "Kearsarge" and C.S.S. "Alabama"
    "The 'Kearsarge' at Boulogne" (1864) is a painting by French artist Édouard Manet.
    8.33
    3 votes
    49
    8.33
    3 votes
    50
    Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaes Tulp

    Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaes Tulp

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    The Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaes Tulp is a 1632 oil painting by Rembrandt housed in the Mauritshuis museum in The Hague, the Netherlands. Dr. Nicolaes Tulp is pictured explaining the musculature of the arm to medical professionals. Some of the spectators are various doctors who paid commissions to be included in the painting. The painting is signed in the top-left hand corner Rembrant. f[ecit] 1632. This may be the first instance of Rembrandt signing a painting with his forename (in its original form) as opposed to the monogramme RHL (Rembrant Harmenszoon of Leiden), and is thus a sign of his growing artistic confidence. The event can be dated to 16 January 1632: the Amsterdam Guild of Surgeons, of which Tulp was official City Anatomist, permitted only one public dissection a year, and the body would have to be that of an executed criminal. Anatomy lessons were a social event in the 17th century, taking place in lecture rooms that were actual theatres, with students, colleagues and the general public being permitted to attend on payment of an entrance fee. The spectators are appropriately dressed for a solemn social occasion. It is thought that, with the exception of the figures
    9.50
    2 votes
    51
    Girl with a Flute

    Girl with a Flute

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Johannes Vermeer's The Art of Painting
    "Girl with a Flute" (1670) is a painting by Johannes Vermeer.
    9.50
    2 votes
    52
    The Sick Child

    The Sick Child

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "The Sick Child" (c. 1660) is a painting by Dutch artist Gabriel Metsu.
    9.50
    2 votes
    53
    Camille Monet (1847–1879) on a Garden Bench

    Camille Monet (1847–1879) on a Garden Bench

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Masterpieces of Impressionism and Post-Impressionism: The Annenberg Collection
    Monet's painting of his wife, Camille Doncieux. "Camille Monet on a Garden Bench" is the most enigmatic of Monet's rare genre pictures. Numerous interpretations have been offered, yet nothing has been found in the literature or theater of Monet's time that corresponds to this scene. The most telling clue may be biographical: the death of Camille's father in September 1873. Camille was an impassive model, but here she telegraphs sadness, while holding a note in her gloved hand. Later, Monet identified the gentleman as a neighbor—perhaps one who had called to offer his condolences and a consoling bouquet.
    7.00
    4 votes
    54
    7.00
    4 votes
    55
    7.00
    4 votes
    56
    The Merry Drinker

    The Merry Drinker

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "The Merry Drinker" (c. 1628-1630) is a painting by Dutch artist Frans Hals.
    7.00
    4 votes
    57
    The Sleep of Endymion

    The Sleep of Endymion

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Girodet: Romantic Rebel
    "The Sleep of Endymion" (1791) is a painting by Anne-Louis Girodet de Roussy-Trioson.
    6.00
    5 votes
    58
    8.00
    3 votes
    59
    Bouquet of Flowers in a Vase

    Bouquet of Flowers in a Vase

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Bouquet of Flowers in a Vase" (1618) is a still life painting by Ambrosius Bosschaert.
    8.00
    3 votes
    60
    Four Bathers

    Four Bathers

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Armory Show
    Four Bathers (1877-1888) is a painting by French artist Paul Cezanne.
    8.00
    3 votes
    61
    The Course of Empire - Destruction

    The Course of Empire - Destruction

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Hudson River School at N-YHS (2008); Nature and the American Vision
    "The Course of Empire - Destruction" (1836) is a painting by American artist Thomas Cole.
    8.00
    3 votes
    62
    8.00
    3 votes
    63
    Vampire

    Vampire

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Armory Show
    "Vampire" (1893-1894) is a painting by Norwegian artist Edvard Munch.
    8.00
    3 votes
    64
    View of Naarden

    View of Naarden

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "View of Naarden" (1647) is a painting by Dutch artist Jacob Isaakszoon van Ruysdael.
    8.00
    3 votes
    65
    Vincent van Gogh's display at Les XX, 1890

    Vincent van Gogh's display at Les XX, 1890

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Les XX 1890
    Vincent van Gogh's display at Les XX, 1890, in Brussels is an important testament to the recognition he received amongst avant-garde peers during his own lifetime. Participation in the annual exhibition of Les XX was for members and by invitation only. Van Gogh's choice proves that he was going for more than a simple selection of paintings he considered superior, but that he was willing to provide a well reasoned summary of his years of work in Provence. Evidently this notion remained neglected, and even more: it was washed away by the scandal his works provoked. Then the same works were again shown at the annual exhibition of the Artistes Indépendants in Paris which offered space for an expansion of the display: this was done by Theo van Gogh, the brother of Vincent, who was suffering from long lasting mental problems. In November 1889, Van Gogh selected six of his paintings, all size 30 canvases, to be displayed at Les XX, in 1890. On the back of the letter of invitation from Octave Maus, dated November 15, 1889, there is a pencil sketch that gives some hints for the display Van Gogh proposed, and for its artistic background. His reply to Maus, dated (?) November 20, 1889,
    8.00
    3 votes
    66
    6.75
    4 votes
    67
    View of St. Mary's Square in Utrecht

    View of St. Mary's Square in Utrecht

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "View of St. Mary's Square with the Church of St. Mary in Utrecht" (1662) is a painting by Pieter Jansz Saenredam.
    6.75
    4 votes
    68
    9.00
    2 votes
    69
    9.00
    2 votes
    70
    9.00
    2 votes
    71
    The Celebration of the Treaty of Münster, 1648

    The Celebration of the Treaty of Münster, 1648

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "The Celebration of the Peace of Münster, 1648, at the Crossbowmen's Headquarters (St. George's Guard)" (1648) is a painting by Bartholomeus van der Helst. It depicts a banquet celebrating the Treaty of Münster, which put an end to the Eighty Years' War between Spain and the Republic of the Seven United Netherlands.
    5.80
    5 votes
    72
    Ambulatory of the New Church in Delft

    Ambulatory of the New Church in Delft

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Ambulatory of the New Church in Delft with the Tomb of Willem the Silent" (c. 1651) is a painting by Gerard Houckgeest.
    7.67
    3 votes
    73
    Bust of Vincent Coster

    Bust of Vincent Coster

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "The Bust of Vincent Coster" (1608) is a marble portrait created by Hendrick de Keyser.  Vincent Coster was a wealthy citizen of Amsterdam.
    7.67
    3 votes
    74
    7.67
    3 votes
    75
    Portrait of Abraham van Lennep

    Portrait of Abraham van Lennep

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Portrait of Abraham van Lennep" (1672) is a painting by Dutch artist Caspar Netscher.
    7.67
    3 votes
    76
    St. Sebastian

    St. Sebastian

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    St. Sebastian is a painting by Dutch Carravaggist artist Hendrick ter Brugghen.
    7.67
    3 votes
    77
    Vessels in a Strong Wind

    Vessels in a Strong Wind

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Vessels in a Strong Wind" (c. 1630) is a painting by Jan Porcellis.
    7.67
    3 votes
    78
    Apollo and Aurora

    Apollo and Aurora

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Apollo and Aurora" (1671) is a painting by Dutch artist Gerard de Lairesse.
    10.00
    1 votes
    79
    Jean-Baptiste Belley

    Jean-Baptiste Belley

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Girodet: Romantic Rebel
    "Jean-Baptiste Belley" (1797) is a painting by Anne-Louis Girodet de Roussy-Trioson.
    10.00
    1 votes
    80
    10.00
    1 votes
    81
    10.00
    1 votes
    82
    The Course of Empire - Desolation

    The Course of Empire - Desolation

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Hudson River School at N-YHS (2008); Nature and the American Vision
    "The Course of Empire - Desolation" (1836) is a painting by American artist Thomas Cole.
    10.00
    1 votes
    83
    The Feast of Saint Nicholas

    The Feast of Saint Nicholas

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    The Feast of Saint Nicholas (Dutch: Het Sint Nicolaasfeest, c. 1665–1668), is a painting by Dutch master Jan Steen, which can now be found in the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. It measures 82 x 70.5 cm. The picture, painted in the chaotic Jan Steen "style," depicts a family at home on December 5, the night celebrated in the Netherlands as the Feast of Saint Nicholas, or Sinterklaas. The focal point of the painting is the youngest daughter of the family, a golden-child, painted, in fact, in a golden smock and showing golden locks. She has behaved all year, and Saint Nicholas has rewarded her by stuffing her shoe with a doll and other treats, which she carries in her bucket. She is in stark contrast to her elder brother, standing to her right, who is sobbing, while another brother looks on, laughing. Apparently, the elder brother has been naughty, and his shoe, held up by an elder sister behind him, was left empty. Still there is hope for the sobbing boy. Hidden in the background, almost obscured by the draperies, his grandmother seems to beckon to him—perhaps she is hiding a gift for him too, behind the heavy curtains. While the mother attempts to coax the golden girl to show her the
    10.00
    1 votes
    84
    The Jewish Cemetery

    The Jewish Cemetery

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "The Jewish Cemetery" (c. 1660-1670) is a painting by Jacob van Ruysdael.
    10.00
    1 votes
    85
    A Woman Holding a Balance

    A Woman Holding a Balance

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Johannes Vermeer's The Art of Painting
    Woman Holding a Balance, also called Woman Testing a Balance, is an oil painting by Dutch Baroque artist Johannes Vermeer. At one time the painting, completed 1662-1663, was known as Woman Weighing Gold, but closer evaluation has determined that the balance in her hand is empty. Opinions on the theme and symbolism of the painting differ, with the woman alternatively viewed as a symbol of holiness or earthiness. In the painting, Vermeer has depicted a young woman holding an empty balance before a table on which stands an open jewelry box, the pearls and gold within spilling over. A blue cloth rests in the left foreground, beneath a mirror, and a window to the left — unseen save its golden curtain — provides light. Behind the woman is a painting of the Last Judgment featuring Christ with raised, outstretched hands. The woman may have been modeled on Vermeer's wife, Catharina Vermeer. According to Robert Huerta in Vermeer and Plato: Painting the Ideal (2005), the image has been variously "interpreted as a vanitas painting, as a representation of divine truth or justice, as a religious meditative aid, and as an incitement to lead a balanced, thoughtful life." Some viewers have imagined
    6.50
    4 votes
    86
    L'Atelier Rouge

    L'Atelier Rouge

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Armory Show
    L'Atelier Rouge, also known as The Red Studio, is a painting by Henri Matisse from 1911, in the collection of The Museum of Modern Art New York City. In 2004 it came in at No.5 of a poll of 500 art experts voting for the most influential modern art work of all time, along with works by Pablo Picasso, Marcel Duchamp and Andy Warhol.
    6.50
    4 votes
    87
    The Duet

    The Duet

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "The Duet" (1635) is a painting by Cornelis Saftleven.
    6.50
    4 votes
    88
    The Ford in the River

    The Ford in the River

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "The Ford in the River" (1647) is a painting by Jan Baptist Weenix.
    6.50
    4 votes
    89
    The Gross Clinic

    The Gross Clinic

    • Exhibitions displayed in: An Eakins Masterpiece Restored: Seeing The Gross Clinic Anew
    The Gross Clinic, or, The Clinic of Dr. Gross, is an 1875 painting by American artist Thomas Eakins. It is oil on canvas and measures 8 feet (240 cm) by 6.5 feet (200 cm). Dr. Samuel D. Gross, a seventy-year-old professor dressed in a black frock coat, lectures a group of Jefferson Medical College students. Included among the group is a self-portrait of Eakins, who is seated to the right of the tunnel railing, sketching or writing. Seen over Dr. Gross's right shoulder is the clinic clerk, Dr. Franklin West, taking notes on the operation. Eakins's signature is painted into the painting, on the front of the surgical table. Admired for its uncompromising realism, The Gross Clinic has an important place documenting the history of medicine—both because it honors the emergence of surgery as a healing profession (previously, surgery was associated primarily with amputation), and because it shows us what the surgical theater looked like in the nineteenth century. The painting is based on a surgery witnessed by Eakins, in which Gross treated a young man for osteomyelitis of the femur. Gross is pictured here performing a conservative operation as opposed to an amputation (which is how the
    6.50
    4 votes
    90
    The Red Bridge

    The Red Bridge

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Armory Show
    The Red Bridge (1895) is a painting by American Impressionist artist Julian Alden Weir.
    6.50
    4 votes
    91
    8.50
    2 votes
    92
    Two Tahitian Women

    Two Tahitian Women

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Gauguin: Maker of Myth
    Two Tahitian Women (1899) is a painting by French artist Paul Gauguin.
    8.50
    2 votes
    93
    7.33
    3 votes
    94
    Olive Orchard

    Olive Orchard

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Armory Show
    Olive Orchard (1889) is a painting by Dutch artist Vincent van Gogh.
    7.33
    3 votes
    95
    The Large Bathers

    The Large Bathers

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Cézanne and Beyond
    The Bathers (French: Les Grandes Baigneuses) is an oil painting by French artist Paul Cézanne first exhibited in 1906. The painting is the largest of a series of "Bather" paintings by Cézanne; the others are in the Museum of Modern Art in New York City and the National Gallery, London. Occasionally referred to as the Big Bathers or Large Bathers to distinguish it from the smaller works, the painting is considered one of the masterpieces of modern art, and is often considered Cézanne's finest work. Cézanne worked on the painting for seven years, and it remained unfinished at the time of his death in 1906. The painting was purchased in 1937 for $110,000 with funds from a trust fund for the Philadelphia Museum of Art by their major benefactor Joseph E. Widener. It was previously owned by Leo Stein. With each version of the bathers, Cézanne moved away from the traditional presentation of paintings, intentionally creating works which would not appeal to the novice viewer. He did this in order to avoid fleeting fads and give a timeless quality to his work, and in so doing paved the way for future artists to disregard current trends and paint pieces which would appeal equally to all
    7.33
    3 votes
    96
    7.33
    3 votes
    97
    View of Delft

    View of Delft

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Johannes Vermeer
    View of Delft is an oil painting by Johannes Vermeer. Painted ca. 1660-1661, the painting of the Dutch artist's hometown is among his most popular. Painted at a time when cityscapes were not commonplace, it is one of three known paintings of Delft by Vermeer, along with The Little Street and the lost painting House Standing in Delft. The use of pointillism in the work suggests it postdates The Little Street. In 2011, the painting was featured on gold and silver commemorative coins issued by the Royal Dutch Mint.
    7.33
    3 votes
    98
    The Battle of Livorno

    The Battle of Livorno

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "The Battle of Livorno" (c. 1654-1655) is a painting by Dutch artist Willem van de Velde the Elder.
    6.25
    4 votes
    99
    Young Man in a Yellow Robe

    Young Man in a Yellow Robe

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Young Man in a Yellow Robe" (c. 1630-1631) is a painting by Dutch artist Jan Lievens.
    6.25
    4 votes
    100
    7.00
    3 votes
    101
    Shibboleth

    Shibboleth

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Unilever Series: Doris Salcedo: Shibboleth
    Shibboleth was the title of a temporary art installation placed by the Colombian artist Doris Salcedo in the Tate Modern in 2007. The work took the form of a long crack in the floor. Shibboleth by Doris Salcedo was a £300,000 installation, the eighth commission in the "Unilever Series" (sponsored by Unilever), which takes place annually in the Turbine Hall, the main entrance lobby of Tate Modern in London. Salcedo's installation took the form of a 548-foot (167-metre) long, meandering crack in the floor of the Turbine Hall, initially a hairline crack and eventually widening to a few inches and around two feet deep. The crack was made by opening up the floor and then inserting a cast from a Colombian rock face. A Tate spokesperson said, "She’s not specifying how it’s been done. What she wants is for people to think about what’s real and what’s not." Salcedo said of the work Tate Director, Sir Nicholas Serota stated, "There is a crack, there is a line, and eventually there will be a scar. It will remain as a memory of the work and also as a memorial to the issues Doris touches on." The work has gained the nickname "Doris's crack". The exhibition took place from 9 October 2007 to 6
    7.00
    3 votes
    102
    The Hut

    The Hut

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "The Hut" (1671) is a painting by Dutch artist Adriaen van de Velde.
    7.00
    3 votes
    103
    Trans-Siberian Railway Egg

    Trans-Siberian Railway Egg

    The Trans-Siberian Railway Egg is a jewelled Easter egg made under the supervision of the Russian jeweller Peter Carl Fabergé in 1900 for Tsar Nicholas II of Russia. It was presented by Nicolas II as an Easter gift to his wife, the Tsarina Alexandra Fyodorovna. It is currently held in the Kremlin Armoury Museum in Moscow. The exterior of the 1900 Trans-Siberian Railway egg is made of onyx, silver, gold, and quartz, and is decorated with colored vitreous enamel. The lid of the egg is hinged, has an overlay of green enamel, and is decorated with inlaid leaves of acanthus. On top of the lid is a golden three-headed eagle in gold with the Imperial Crown. The interior is lined with velvet. A route map of the Trans-Siberian Railway is engraved in silver across the face, with major stations marked by a precious stone, forming a belt around the egg. The egg is supported by three griffins made of gold-plated silver on a stepped triangular base of white onyx. The surprise is a miniature clockwork replica of a steam locomotive made of gold and platinum in three sections, forming a train with a length of one foot. It has a diamond headlight, and ruby marker lights. The train has five carriages
    7.00
    3 votes
    104
    Watson and the Shark

    Watson and the Shark

    • Exhibitions displayed in: John Singleton Copley's Watson and the Shark
    Watson and the Shark is the title of a 1778 oil painting by John Singleton Copley, depicting the rescue of Brook Watson from a shark attack in Havana, Cuba. The original of three versions by Copley is in the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. The painting is based on an attack that took place in Havana harbour in 1749. Copley and Brook Watson became friends after the American artist arrived in London in 1774. Watson commissioned him to create a painting of the 1749 event, and Copley produced three versions. It was the first of a series of large-scale historical paintings that Copley would concentrate on after settling in London. The painting is romanticised: the gory detail of the injury is hidden beneath the waves, though there is a hint of blood in the water. The figure of Watson is based on the statue of the "Borghese Gladiator", by Agasias of Ephesus, in the Louvre. Other apparent influences are Renaissance art, and the ancient statue of Laocoön and his Sons, which Copley may have seen in Rome. Copley was probably also influenced by Benjamin West's The Death of General Wolfe, and the growing popularity of romantic painting. The composition of the rescuers in the boat
    7.00
    3 votes
    105
    7.00
    3 votes
    106
    Architecture

    Architecture

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Future Pavilion
    Architecture (Latin architectura, from the Greek ἀρχιτέκτων – arkhitekton, from ἀρχι- "chief" and τέκτων "builder, carpenter, mason") is both the process and product of planning, designing and construction. Architectural works, in the material form of buildings, are often perceived as cultural symbols and as works of art. Historical civilizations are often identified with their surviving architectural achievements. "Architecture" can mean: In relation to buildings, architecture has to do with the planning, designing and constructing form, space and ambience that reflect functional, technical, social, environmental, and aesthetic considerations. It requires the creative manipulation and coordination of material, technology, light and shadow. Architecture also encompasses the pragmatic aspects of realizing buildings and structures, including scheduling, cost estimating and construction administration. As documentation produced by architects, typically drawings, plans and technical specifications, architecture defines the structure and/or behavior of a building or any other kind of system that is to be or has been constructed. The earliest surviving written work on the subject of
    6.00
    4 votes
    107

    Everyone I Have Ever Slept With 1963-1995

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Sensation exhibition
    Everyone I Have Ever Slept With 1963–1995 (1995), also known as "The Tent", was an artwork created by Tracey Emin RA (born 3 July 1963), an English artist of Turkish Cypriot origin and a leading member of the group known as Britartists or YBAs (Young British Artists). The work was a tent with the appliquéd names of, literally, everyone she had ever slept with, but not necessarily in the sexual sense. It achieved iconic status, was owned by Charles Saatchi, and was destroyed in the 2004 Momart London warehouse fire. She has refused to recreate it. Tracey Emin calls Everyone I Have Ever Slept With 1963–1995 "my tent" or "the tent" and considers it to be one of the two "seminal pieces" she has created (the other being My Bed); she has described both pieces as "seminal, fantastic and amazing work". Everyone I Have Ever Slept With 1963–1995 was a tent appliquéd with 102 names of the people she had slept with up to the time of its creation in 1995. The title is often misinterpreted as a euphemism indicating sexual partners and the work termed "a list of all the people that Emin has ever had sex with", but is in fact intended more inclusively: The names include family, friends, drinking
    6.00
    4 votes
    108
    8.00
    2 votes
    109
    8.00
    2 votes
    110
    The Concert

    The Concert

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "The Concert" (1627) is a painting by Hendrick ter Brugghen.
    8.00
    2 votes
    111
    The Mocking of Christ

    The Mocking of Christ

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Manet, the Man who Invented Modernity
    "The Mocking of Christ" (1865) is a painting by French artist Édouard Manet.
    8.00
    2 votes
    112
    Vase with Red Poppies

    Vase with Red Poppies

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Armory Show
    Vase with Red Poppies was a painting made by Vincent van Gogh in Paris in 1886. Flowers were the subject of many of Van Gogh's paintings in Paris, due in great part to his regard for flowers.As said to his brother, "You will see that by making a habit of looking at Japanese pictures you will come to love to make up bouquets and do things with flowers all the more." To his sister, Wil, Van Gogh advised her to cultivate her own garden, like Voltaire's Candide, to find joy and meaning in life. After he left Paris and settled in Arles Van Gogh painted his second group of Sunflowers in 1888 and 1889. His paintings of Sunflowers in vases are among his most well known paintings. In Paris friends and acquaintances sent bouquets of flowers weekly for his still life paintings. He also purchased bouquets inexpensively, choosing flowers in a variety of flowers and colors for his paintings. In a letter to his sister Wil he said, "Last year I painted almost nothing but flowers so I could get used to colors other than grey - pink, soft or bright green, light blue, violet, yellow, glorious red." That was an exaggeration, during his time in Paris he painted 230 paintings, about 30 of which were
    8.00
    2 votes
    113
    9.00
    1 votes
    114
    Cattle Ferry

    Cattle Ferry

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Cattle Ferry" (1622) is a painting by Esaias van de Velde.
    9.00
    1 votes
    115
    David Playing the Harp

    David Playing the Harp

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "David Playing the Harp" (1670) is a painting by Dutch artist Jan de Bray.
    9.00
    1 votes
    116
    Dune Landscape

    Dune Landscape

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Dune Landscape" (1638) is a painting by Jan van Goyen.
    9.00
    1 votes
    117
    Elegant Couple in an Interior

    Elegant Couple in an Interior

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Elegant Couple in an Interior" (1678) is a painting by Dutch artist Eglon van der Neer.
    9.00
    1 votes
    118
    9.00
    1 votes
    119
    Shepherd and Shepherdess

    Shepherd and Shepherdess

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Shepherd and Shepherdess" (1689) is a painting by Dutch artist Adriaen van der Werff.
    9.00
    1 votes
    120
    Still Life with Cheeses

    Still Life with Cheeses

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Still Life with Cheeses" (1615) is a painting by Floris Claesz van Dijck.
    9.00
    1 votes
    121
    The Sampling Officials

    The Sampling Officials

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    The Sampling Officials (Dutch: De Staalmeesters), also called Syndics of the Drapers' Guild, is an oil painting by Rembrandt. It is owned by the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. It has been described as his "last great collective portrait". The painting appears on the packaging of Dutch Masters cigars.
    9.00
    1 votes
    122
    The Young Flute Player

    The Young Flute Player

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "The Young Flute Player" (1635) is a painting by Judith Leyster.
    9.00
    1 votes
    123
    Vertumnus and Pomona

    Vertumnus and Pomona

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Vertumnus and Pomona" is a painting by Paulus Moreelse.
    9.00
    1 votes
    124
    Blue Nude

    Blue Nude

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Armory Show
    Blue Nude (Souvenir of Biskra) ("Nu bleu, Souvenir de Biskra") is an early 1907 oil painting by Henri Matisse. It is located at the Baltimore Museum of Art as part of the Cone Collection. Matisse painted the nude when a sculpture he was working on shattered. He later finished the sculpture which is entitled Reclining Nude I (Aurore). Matisse shocked the French public at the 1907 Société des Artistes Indépendants when he exhibited Blue Nude (Souvenir de Biskra). The Blue Nude was one of the paintings that would later create an international sensation at the Armory Show of 1913 in New York City. The painting, which may be classified as Fauvist, was controversial; it was burned in effigy in 1913 at the Armory Show in Chicago, to where it had toured from New York.
    6.67
    3 votes
    125
    Portrait of a Man with a Ring

    Portrait of a Man with a Ring

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Portrait of a Man with a Ring" (1617) is a painting by Werner van den Valckert.
    6.67
    3 votes
    126
    River Bank with Herdsmen

    River Bank with Herdsmen

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "River Bank with Herdsmen" (c. 1650) is a painting by Jan Asselijn.
    6.67
    3 votes
    127
    6.67
    3 votes
    128
    The Merry Fiddler

    The Merry Fiddler

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "The Merry Fiddler" (1623) is a painting by Gerard van Honthorst.
    6.67
    3 votes
    129
    6.67
    3 votes
    130
    The Spirit of War

    The Spirit of War

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Jasper Francis Cropsey's The Spirit of War and The Spirit of Peace
    "The Spirit of War" (1851) is a painting by American artist Jasper Francis Cropsey.
    6.67
    3 votes
    131
    5.75
    4 votes
    132
    5.75
    4 votes
    133
    7.50
    2 votes
    134
    Flora

    Flora

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Flora" (1634) is a painting by Dutch artist Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn.
    7.50
    2 votes
    135
    Night Watch

    Night Watch

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    The Night Watch or The Shooting Company of Frans Banning Cocq (Dutch: De Nachtwacht) is the common name of one of the most famous works by Dutch painter Rembrandt van Rijn. The painting may be more properly titled The Company of Frans Banning Cocq and Willem van Ruytenburch. It is on prominent display in the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, the Netherlands, being the best known painting in their collection. The Night Watch is one of the most famous paintings in the world. The painting is renowned for three elements: its colossal size (363 x 437 cm ~ 11 ft 10in x 14 ft 4in), the effective use of light and shadow (chiaroscuro), and the perception of motion in what would have been, traditionally, a static military portrait. This painting was completed in 1642, at the peak of the Dutch Golden Age. It depicts the eponymous company moving out, led by Captain Frans Banning Cocq (dressed in black, with a red sash) and his lieutenant, Willem van Ruytenburch (dressed in yellow, with a white sash). With effective use of sunlight and shade, Rembrandt leads the eye to the three most important characters among the crowd, the two gentlemen in the centre (from whom the painting gets its original title),
    7.50
    2 votes
    136
    7.50
    2 votes
    137
    7.50
    2 votes
    138
    'In Luxury Beware'

    'In Luxury Beware'

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    'In Luxury Beware' is a painting by Jan Steen.
    5.50
    4 votes
    139
    The Kitchen Maid

    The Kitchen Maid

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    The Milkmaid (De Melkmeid or Het Melkmeisje), sometimes called The Kitchen Maid, is an oil-on-canvas painting of a "milkmaid", in fact a domestic kitchen maid, by the Dutch artist Johannes Vermeer. It is housed in the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, Netherlands, which esteems it as "unquestionably one of the museum's finest attractions". The exact year of the painting's completion is unknown, with estimates varying by source. The Rijksmuseum estimates it as circa 1658. According to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, it was painted in about 1657 or 1658. The "Essential Vermeer" website gives a broader range of 1658–1661. Despite its traditional title, the picture clearly shows a kitchen or housemaid (a low-ranking servant) in a plain room carefully pouring milk into a squat earthenware container (now commonly known as a "Dutch oven") on a table. Also on the table are various types of bread. She is a young, sturdily built woman wearing a crisp linen cap, a blue apron and work sleeves pushed up from thick forearms. A foot warmer is on the floor behind her, near Delft wall tiles depicting Cupid (to the viewer's left) and a figure with a pole (to the right). Intense light
    5.50
    4 votes
    140
    Paysage d'Arles

    Paysage d'Arles

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Armory Show
    Paysage d'Arles (1889) is a painting by Dutch artist Vincent van Gogh.
    6.33
    3 votes
    141
    6.33
    3 votes
    142
    The Fête Champêtre

    The Fête Champêtre

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "The Fête Champêtre" is a painting by Dirck Hals.
    6.33
    3 votes
    143
    The Washington Family

    The Washington Family

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Washington Family by Edward Savage: An Inaugural Celebration
    The Washington Family by Edward Savage is a life-sized group portrait of U. S. President George Washington, First Lady Martha Washington, two of her grandchildren, and an enslaved servant. Based on life studies made early in Washington's presidency, Savage began the work in New York City, 1789-90, and completed it several years later in Philadelphia, 1795-96. The enormous painting (7 ft. x 9 ft. 4 in. / 213 cm. x 284 cm.) is now at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC. The image was a famous one in the 19th century. Prints were mass-produced by Savage beginning in 1798, and by John Sartain in 1840. The setting for the painting is idealized, with the Potomac River flowing in the background. Shown are grandson George Washington Parke Custis, George Washington, granddaughter Eleanor Parke Custis, Martha Washington, and an enslaved servant (probably Christopher Sheels). With a plan of the future city of Washington, D.C. in front of her, Martha Washington is, according to Savage's catalogue, "pointing with her fan to the grand avenue", which is now the National Mall.
    6.33
    3 votes
    144
    Two Plaques with Landscapes

    Two Plaques with Landscapes

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Two Plaques with a Landscape" (c. 1690) is a blue-painted faience created by Frederik van Frytom.
    6.33
    3 votes
    145
    8.00
    1 votes
    146
    Bentheim Castle

    Bentheim Castle

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Bentheim Castle" (1653) is a painting by Dutch artist Jacob van Ruysdael.
    8.00
    1 votes
    147
    David Gives Uriah a Letter for Joab

    David Gives Uriah a Letter for Joab

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Reclaimed: Paintings from the Collection of Jacques Goudstikker
    David Gives Uriah a Letter for Joab (1619) is a painting by Dutch Golden Age artist Pieter Lastman.
    8.00
    1 votes
    148
    8.00
    1 votes
    149
    8.00
    1 votes
    150
    Peasants in an Interior

    Peasants in an Interior

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Peasants in an Interior" (c. 1661) is a painting by Adriaen van Ostade.
    8.00
    1 votes
    151
    8.00
    1 votes
    152
    8.00
    1 votes
    153
    8.00
    1 votes
    154
    The Farmyard

    The Farmyard

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "The Farmyard" (1649) is a painting by Paulus Potter.
    8.00
    1 votes
    155
    Travellers at a Country Inn

    Travellers at a Country Inn

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Travellers at a Country Inn" (1645) is a painting by Isaack van Ostade.
    8.00
    1 votes
    156
    At the Rat Mort

    At the Rat Mort

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Toulouse-Lautrec and Montmartre
    "At the Rat Mort" (1899) is a painting by French artist Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec.
    7.00
    2 votes
    157
    7.00
    2 votes
    158
    7.00
    2 votes
    159
    Self-Portrait

    Self-Portrait

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Self-Portrait" (c. 1648-1650) is a painting by Dutch artist Carel Fabritius.
    7.00
    2 votes
    160
    Syd Sellars

    Syd Sellars

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Smart Art
    Syd is an Artist with SouthAfricanArtists.com based in South Africa.
    7.00
    2 votes
    161
    7.00
    2 votes
    162
    Woman Reading a Letter

    Woman Reading a Letter

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Woman Reading a Letter" (1660-1662) is a painting by Gerard ter Borch.
    7.00
    2 votes
    163
    River Landscape with Horsemen

    River Landscape with Horsemen

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "River Landscape with Horsemen" (c. 1655) is a painting by Dutch artist Aelbert Cuyp.
    6.00
    3 votes
    164
    6.00
    3 votes
    165
    5.67
    3 votes
    166
    River View By Moonlight

    River View By Moonlight

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "River View by Moonlight" (c1645) is a painting by Aert van der Neer.
    5.67
    3 votes
    167
    The Goldfinch

    The Goldfinch

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "The Goldfinch" (1654) is an oil-on-panel painting by Dutch Golden Age painter Carel Fabritius.
    5.67
    3 votes
    168
    5.67
    3 votes
    169
    Tulips in a Vase

    Tulips in a Vase

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Tulips in a Vase" (1639) is a painting by Hans Boulenger.
    5.67
    3 votes
    170
    Winter Landscape with Skaters

    Winter Landscape with Skaters

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Winter Landscape with Skaters" (1608-1609) is a painting by Hendrick Avercamp.
    5.67
    3 votes
    171
    A Calm

    A Calm

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "A Calm" (1654) is a painting by Dutch artist Jan van de Cappelle.
    6.50
    2 votes
    172
    A Lady Writing a Letter

    A Lady Writing a Letter

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Johannes Vermeer's The Art of Painting
    A Lady Writing a Letter (also known as A Lady Writing; Dutch: Schrijvend meisje) is an oil painting attributed to 17th century Dutch painter Johannes Vermeer. It is believed to have been completed around 1665. The Lady is seen to be writing a letter and has been interrupted, so gently turns her head to see what is happening. She wears twelve pearls (10 on the necklace and two earrings). Most of his paintings are set in his house, which he inherited. Many of the objects seen in the painting, such as the woman's coat, the cloth on the table, and the string of pearls, appear in other Vermeer works. This has led to speculation that he or his family members owned the objects, and even that the subjects of the paintings are his relatives. It has often been suggested that in his paintings, Vermeer sought to grant to his models that which he could not endow to his wife and family: calm and affluence. A Lady Writing a Letter was donated to the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. in 1962 by Harry Waldron Havemeyer and Horace Havemeyer. In its first loan to the Norton Simon Museum, the National Gallery of Art agreed to lend the painting for exhibition at the Pasadena, California
    6.50
    2 votes
    173
    6.50
    2 votes
    174
    Gentleman Writing a Letter

    Gentleman Writing a Letter

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Gentleman Writing a Letter" (1662-1665) is a painting by Dutch artist Gabriel Metsu.
    6.50
    2 votes
    175
    The Floating Feather

    The Floating Feather

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    The Floating Feather is the commonly used name for an oil-on-canvas painting by Dutch artist Melchior d'Hondecoeter, properly titled A Pelican and Other Birds Near a Pool. The fine detail of the feather floating on the pond led to the "official" title being quickly supplanted. The picture was painted around 1680, probably for the hunting lodge of the Stadholder William III of Orange, which is now the royal palace at Soestdijk, or for Het Loo Palace in Apeldoorn. The painting shows a number of birds, both common and exotic, gathered around a pool. Hondecoeter was known for his bird studies and in particular for the realistic portrayal of the subjects. Although he experimented with different styles early in his career, after 1660 he favoured compositions similar to that seen in The Floating Feather: carefully observed subjects set in farmyards, courtyards or country parks with architectural or landscape features enhancing the backgrounds. His paintings were admired by the regents and merchants of Amsterdam, and by William III, who had works at three of his palaces. Hondecoetor's murals and large paintings were well-suited to both the large country houses and the tastes of the
    6.50
    2 votes
    176
    Whistler's Mother

    Whistler's Mother

    Arrangement in Grey and Black No.1, famous under its colloquial name Whistler's Mother, is an 1871 oil-on-canvas painting by American-born painter James McNeill Whistler. The painting is 56.81 by 63.94 inches (144.3 cm × 162.4 cm), displayed in a frame of Whistler's own design in the Musée d'Orsay in Paris, having been bought by the French state in 1891. It is now one of the most famous works by an American artist outside the United States. It has been variously described as an American icon and a Victorian Mona Lisa. Anna McNeill Whistler posed for the painting while living in London with her son. Several unverifiable stories surround the making of the painting itself; one is that Anna Whistler acted as a replacement for another model who couldn't make the appointment. Another is that Whistler originally envisioned painting the model standing up, but that his mother was too uncomfortable to pose standing for an extended period. The work was shown at the 104th Exhibition of the Royal Academy of Art in London (1872), but first came within a hair's breadth of rejection by the Academy. This episode worsened the rift between Whistler and the British art world; Arrangement would be the
    6.50
    2 votes
    177
    Girl at a Window

    Girl at a Window

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Girl at a Window" (1651) is a painting by Dutch artist Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn.
    7.00
    1 votes
    178
    Seascape in the Morning

    Seascape in the Morning

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Seascape in the Morning" (c . 1640-1645) is a painting by Simon de Vlieger.
    7.00
    1 votes
    179
    The Windmill at Wijk bij Duurstede

    The Windmill at Wijk bij Duurstede

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "The Windmill at Wijk bij Duurstede" (c. 1670) is a painting by Dutch artist Jacob Isaakszoon van Ruysdael.
    7.00
    1 votes
    180

    For the Love of God

    • Exhibitions displayed in: For the Love of God - Damien Hirst
    For the Love of God is a sculpture by artist Damien Hirst produced in 2007. It consists of a platinum cast of an 18th century human skull encrusted with 8,601 flawless diamonds, including a pear-shaped pink diamond located in the forehead that is known as the Skull Star Diamond. The skull's teeth are original, and were purchased by Hirst in London. The artwork is a Memento mori, Latin for "Remember your mortality" or "Remember you must die", referring to a genre of artworks that vary widely but share the same purpose: to remind people of their mortality, an artistic theme dating back to antiquity. In 2007, art historian Rudi Fuchs, observed: ‘The skull is out of this world, celestial almost. It proclaims victory over decay. At the same time it represents death as something infinitely more relentless. Compared to the tearful sadness of a vanitas scene, the diamond skull is glory itself.’ Costing £14 million to produce, the work was placed on its inaugural display at the White Cube gallery in London in an exhibition Beyond belief with an asking price of £50 million. This would have been the highest price ever paid for a single work by a living artist. According to Art Knowledge News,
    5.33
    3 votes
    181
    Camille Monet (1847–1879) in the Garden at Argenteuil

    Camille Monet (1847–1879) in the Garden at Argenteuil

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Masterpieces of Impressionism and Post-Impressionism: The Annenberg Collection
    Monet's painting of his wife, Camille Doncieux. Madame Monet seems incidental in comparison to the impressive stand of hollyhocks in the middle of the composition. The artist's Impressionist technique is at its most dazzling here: flickering brushstrokes of brightly colored paint make the canvas pulsate with light. This work belongs to a group of related paintings from summer 1876.
    4.50
    4 votes
    182
    Allies Day, May 1917

    Allies Day, May 1917

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Flag Paintings of Childe Hassam
    "Allies Day, May 1917" (1917) is a painting by American artist Childe Hassam.
    6.00
    2 votes
    183
    Isaac Blessing Jacob

    Isaac Blessing Jacob

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Isaac Blessing Jacob" (1638) is a painting by Govert Flinck.
    6.00
    2 votes
    184
    6.00
    2 votes
    185
    6.00
    2 votes
    186
    Tablecloth with Flora in Oval Cartouche

    Tablecloth with Flora in Oval Cartouche

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Tablecloth with Flora in Oval Cartouche" (c. 1660-1680) is a wool and silk tapestry created by an unknown 17th century Dutch artist.
    6.00
    2 votes
    187
    Burial of Atala

    Burial of Atala

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Girodet: Romantic Rebel
    "Burial of Atala" (1808) is a painting by Anne-Louis Girodet de Roussy-Trioson. The painting is based on François-René de Chateaubriand's Atala, a 1801 novel set in 18th century American South. The Musée Girodet (Montargis) owns a 1813 (206.5 x 265.4 cm) version of this painting.
    5.00
    3 votes
    188
    5.00
    3 votes
    189
    Venus and Adonis

    Venus and Adonis

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Venus and Adonis" (c. 1658) is a painting by Dutch artist Ferdinand Bol.
    5.00
    3 votes
    190
    Bacchanal

    Bacchanal

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Bacchanal" (1627) is a painting by Moses van Uyttenbroeck.
    5.50
    2 votes
    191
    5.50
    2 votes
    192
    Still Life with Gilt Goblet

    Still Life with Gilt Goblet

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Still Life with Gilt Goblet" (1635) is a painting by Willem Claeszoon Heda.
    5.50
    2 votes
    193
    View of the Haarlemmermeer

    View of the Haarlemmermeer

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "View of the Haarlemmermeer" (1646) is a painting by Jan van Goyen.
    5.50
    2 votes
    194
    Portrait of Jaspar Schade

    Portrait of Jaspar Schade

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Portrait of Jaspar Schade" (c. 1645) is a painting by Dutch artist Frans Hals.
    4.67
    3 votes
    195
    Self Portrait

    Self Portrait

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Armory Show
    Self Portrait (ca. 1883-1887) is a painting by French artist Paul Cezanne.
    4.67
    3 votes
    196
    Self-Portrait

    Self-Portrait

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Self-Portrait" (1669) is a painting by Ferdinand Bol.
    4.67
    3 votes
    197
    6.00
    1 votes
    198
    El Jaleo

    El Jaleo

    • Exhibitions displayed in: John Singer Sargent's El Jaleo
    El Jaleo is a large painting by John Singer Sargent, depicting a Spanish Gypsy dancer performing to the accompaniment of musicians. Painted in 1882, it currently hangs in the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston. The painting was inspired by a trip Sargent made through Spain in 1879, which also yielded a smaller oil painting, The Spanish Dance (Hispanic Society of America). Chronologically and thematically, the painting is related to a series of works Sargent painted during a subsequent stay in Venice; these, too, include dramatic light effects, exotic models, and restrained coloring. Impressed by the costumes and theatrical manner of Gypsy dance, the artist returned to Paris and began work on a large canvas whose scale suggested a performing stage. The name El Jaleo refers to both the broad meaning of jaleo, a ruckus, as well as the specific dance known as jaleo de jerez. Sargent planned the composition of El Jaleo for at least a year. The painting was preceded by a series of preliminary studies, focusing particularly on the dancer's stylized posture. The result of thorough preparation, El Jaleo is characterized by an assured and rapid handling, and may have been completed in
    6.00
    1 votes
    199
    Lady Reading a Letter

    Lady Reading a Letter

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Lady Reading a Letter" (1662-1665) is a painting by Dutch artist Gabriel Metsu.
    6.00
    1 votes
    200
    Mona Lisa

    Mona Lisa

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Mona Lisa by Leonardo da Vinci
    The Mona Lisa (La Gioconda or La Joconde, or Portrait of Lisa Gherardini, wife of Francesco del Giocondo) is a half-length portrait of a woman by the Italian artist Leonardo da Vinci, which has been acclaimed as "the best known, the most visited, the most written about, the most sung about, the most parodied work of art in the world." The painting, thought to be a portrait of Lisa Gherardini, the wife of Francesco del Giocondo, is in oil on a poplar panel, and is believed to have been painted between 1503 and 1506. It was acquired by King Francis I of France and is now the property of the French Republic, on permanent display at the Musée du Louvre in Paris. The ambiguity of the subject's expression, frequently described as enigmatic, the monumentality of the composition, the subtle modeling of forms and the atmospheric illusionism were novel qualities that have contributed to the continuing fascination and study of the work. The painting's title Mona Lisa stems from a description by Giorgio Vasari: "Leonardo undertook to paint, for Francesco del Giocondo, the portrait of Mona Lisa, his wife...." In Italian, ma donna means my lady. This became madonna, and its contraction mona.
    6.00
    1 votes
    201

    New Painting of Common Objects

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Roy Lichtenstein
    The exhibition "New Painting of Common Objects" at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1962 was the first museum survey of American pop art. The eight artists included were: Roy Lichtenstein, Jim Dine, Andy Warhol, Phillip Hefferton, Robert Dowd, Edward Ruscha, Joe Goode and Wayne Thiebaud. It was curated by Walter Hopps, who had given Andy Warhol his first solo show at the Ferus Gallery in Los Angeles the previous year. The show helped the pop art movement gain critical acceptance, preceding the Guggenheim Museum's 1963 pop art exhibition "Six Painters and the Object", curated by Lawrence Alloway. The artists came from different backgrounds. Thiebaud was a teacher at the University of California at Davis. Lichtenstein, Hefferton and Dowd had previously worked in the Abstract Expressionist style. Dine had been associated with Happenings in New York. Warhol had been a successful commercial artist. The youngest members of the group, old highschool friends Ruscha (24) and Goode (25), had recently left art school and were supporting themselves with graphic design work and odd jobs. In particular, Ruscha worked as a layout artist for the Carson-Roberts Advertising Agency in Los Angeles.
    6.00
    1 votes
    202
    Olympia

    Olympia

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Manet, the Man who Invented Modernity
    Olympia is an oil on canvas painting by Édouard Manet. Painted in 1863, it measures 130.5 by 190 centimetres (51 x 74.8 in). The nation of France acquired the painting in 1890 with a public subscription organized by Claude Monet. It is now in the Musée d'Orsay, Paris. Though Manet's The Luncheon on the Grass (Le déjeuner sur l'herbe) sparked controversy in 1863, his Olympia stirred an even bigger uproar when it was first exhibited at the 1865 Paris Salon. Conservatives condemned the work as "immoral" and "vulgar." Journalist Antonin Proust later recalled, "If the canvas of the Olympia was not destroyed, it is only because of the precautions that were taken by the administration." However, the work had proponents as well. Émile Zola quickly proclaimed it Manet's "masterpiece" and added, "When other artists correct nature by painting Venus they lie. Manet asked himself why he should lie. Why not tell the truth?" The painting was inspired by Titian's Venus of Urbino, which in turn refers to Giorgione's Sleeping Venus. There is also some similarity to Francisco Goya's La maja desnuda (c. 1800). There were also pictorial precedents for a nude woman, attended by a black servant, such as
    6.00
    1 votes
    203
    6.00
    1 votes
    204
    6.00
    1 votes
    205
    Still Life with Turkey Pie

    Still Life with Turkey Pie

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Still Life with Turkey Pie" (1627) is a painting by Pieter Claesz.
    6.00
    1 votes
    206
    6.00
    1 votes
    207
    Three Women and a Man in a Courtyard

    Three Women and a Man in a Courtyard

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Three Women and a Man in a Courtyard" (1663-1665) is a painting by Dutch Baroque-era artist Pieter de Hooch.
    6.00
    1 votes
    208
    At the Moulin Rouge

    At the Moulin Rouge

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Toulouse-Lautrec and Montmartre
    At the Moulin Rouge is an oil-on-canvas painting by French artist Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. It was painted between 1892 and 1895. It is one of a number of works by Toulouse-Lautrec depicting the Moulin Rouge cabaret built in Paris in 1889. It portrays a group of three men and two women sitting around a table; The people at the table are (from right to left); Édouard Dujardin, dancer La Macarona, photographer Paul Secau and Maurice Guibert. The woman in the right foreground is Mademoiselle Nelly C. In the background on the right you can see La Goulue with a partner and the left background shows Lautrec himself and Gabriel Tapié de Céleyran. It is currently displayed at the Art Institute of Chicago.
    4.33
    3 votes
    209
    The Procuress

    The Procuress

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "The Procuress" (1622) is a painting by Dirck van Baburen.
    4.33
    3 votes
    210
    Granida and Daifilo

    Granida and Daifilo

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    Granida and Daifilo is a painting by Gerald van Honthorst, and it is based on Pieter Corneyisz's pastoral play about Persian Princess Granida meeting shepherd Daifilo.
    5.00
    2 votes
    211
    The Glass of Wine

    The Glass of Wine

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    The Wine Glass (Dutch: Het glas wijn, also known as The Glass of Wine or Lady and Gentleman Drinking Wine) is a painting by the Dutch artist Johannes Vermeer that portrays a seated woman and a standing man drinking in an interior setting. The painting is in the Gemäldegalerie, Berlin. The work is, in many aspects, typical of the genre painting of the Delft School developed by Pieter de Hooch in the late 1650s. It contains figures situated in a brightly lit and spacious interior, while its architectural space is highly defined. In addition, the work's figures are set in the middle ground, rather than positioned in the foreground. Vermeer was about 27 when he painted The Glass of Wine, and according to the critic Walter Liedtke, "No analysis of artistic conventions can suggest the sheer beauty and extraordinary refinement of a painting like The Glass of Wine, which may be considered one of Vermeer's first fully mature works". The concept of figures drinking around a table, and the portrayal of a woman drinking from a glass are taken directly from De Hooch's A Dutch Courtyard. However, Vermeer's work breaks away from the prototypes of De Hooch in that the interior is rendered in a far
    5.00
    2 votes
    212
    The Sleeping Maid

    The Sleeping Maid

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "The Sleeping Maid" (1655) is a painting by Dutch Baroque painter Nicolaes Maes.
    5.00
    2 votes
    213
    Environmental art

    Environmental art

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Future Pavilion
    The term environmental art is used in two different contexts: it can be used generally to refer to art dealing with ecological issues and/or the natural, such as the formal, the political, the historical, or the social context. Depending upon how you look at its definition, earlier examples of environmental art stem from landscape painting and representation. When artists painted onsite they developed a deep connection with the surrounding environment and its weather and brought these close observations into their canvases. John Constable’s sky paintings “most closely represent the sky in nature.” Monet’s London Series also exemplifies the artist’s connection with the environment “For me, a landscape does not exist in its own right, since its appearance changes at every moment; but the surrounding atmosphere brings it to life, the air and the light, which vary continually for me, it is only the surrounding atmosphere that gives subjects their true value." It is possible to trace the growth of environmental art as a "movement", beginning in the late 1960s or the 1970s. In its early phases it was most associated with sculpture—especially Site-specific art, Land art and Arte
    4.50
    2 votes
    214
    4.50
    2 votes
    215
    Trompe-l'oeil Still Life

    Trompe-l'oeil Still Life

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Trompe-l'oeil Still Life" is a painting by Dutch artist Samuel van Hoogstraten.
    4.50
    2 votes
    216
    Aluminaut

    Aluminaut

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Science Museum of Virginia
    Aluminaut was built in 1964 and was the world's first aluminum submarine. The 80-ton, 15.5 meter manned deep-ocean research submersible was built by Reynolds Metals Company, which was seeking to advertise the utility of aluminum. An experimental vessel, the Aluminaut was based in Miami, Florida, and was operated from 1964 to 1970 by Reynolds Marine Services, doing contract work for the U.S. Navy and other organizations, including marine biologist Jacques Cousteau. Aluminaut is best known for helping recover a lost unarmed U.S. atomic bomb in 1966 and recovering its smaller fellow Deep Submergence Vehicle (DSV), Alvin (DSV-2) in 1969, after Alvin had been lost and sank in the Atlantic Ocean the previous year. After retirement, Aluminaut was donated to the Science Museum of Virginia in Richmond, where it is on permanent display. Reynolds Metals was a pioneer in research and development of other products using aluminum. These included an aluminum transit bus and other aluminum motor vehicles. The concept of an aluminum submarine was developed at Reynolds during World War II in 1942 by Executive VP Julian "Louis" Reynolds, a son of the founder. At 34, Louis Reynolds was in charge of
    5.00
    1 votes
    217
    Cypresses at Cagnes

    Cypresses at Cagnes

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Armory Show
    Cypresses at Cagnes (1900) is a painting by French pointillist artist Henri Edmond Cross.
    5.00
    1 votes
    218
    Girl with a Pearl Earring

    Girl with a Pearl Earring

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Johannes Vermeer
    The painting Girl with a Pearl Earring (Dutch: Het Meisje met de Parel) is one of Dutch painter Johannes Vermeer's masterworks and, as the name implies, uses a pearl earring for a focal point. Today the painting is kept in the Mauritshuis gallery in The Hague. It is sometimes referred to as "the Mona Lisa of the North" or "the Dutch Mona Lisa". In general, very little is known about Vermeer and his works. This painting is signed "IVMeer" but not dated. It is unclear whether this work was commissioned, and, if so, by whom. In any case, it is probably not meant as a conventional portrait. More recent Vermeer literature points to the image being a tronie, the Dutch 17th-century description of a ’head’ that was not meant to be a portrait. After the most recent restoration of the painting in 1994, the subtle colour scheme and the intimacy of the girl’s gaze toward the viewer have been greatly enhanced. During the restoration, it was discovered that the dark background, today somewhat mottled, was initially intended by the painter to be a deep enamel-like green. This effect was produced by applying a thick transparent layer of paint, called a glaze, over the present-day black background.
    5.00
    1 votes
    219
    Halt of a Hunting Party

    Halt of a Hunting Party

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Halt of a Hunting Party" (c. 1665) is a painting by Philips Wouwermans.
    5.00
    1 votes
    220
    Mademoiselle Ravoux

    Mademoiselle Ravoux

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Armory Show
    Mademoiselle Ravoux (1890) is a painting by Dutch post-impressionist artist Vincent van Gogh.
    5.00
    1 votes
    221
    Paul Gauguin's exhibit at Les XX, 1889

    Paul Gauguin's exhibit at Les XX, 1889

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Les XX 1889
    Paul Gauguin's exhibit at Les XX, 1889 was the first important display of his works, and added to the recognition that he had begun to receive in 1888. The annual exhibition was organized by Les XX, and participation was by invitation only. Gauguin's exhibit comprised paintings from Martinique, Britanny and Arles. Many of these can be identified easily, but for several items this discussion is not yet closed. Since Gauguin's return from Martinique, end of November 1887, he found support in Theo van Gogh who showed Gauguin's recent work from the Caribics from December 1887. Since then, Gauguin evidently considered Theo van Gogh to be his dealer and promotor, and parallelly, Gauguin kept in touch with Theo's brother Vincent. When Gauguin finally accepted the proposition to live and work side to side with Vincent in Arles, he first sent a batch of recent work to Theo in Paris, who exhibited it together with the first batch of paintings sent from Arles, in November 1888. Around this time, Gauguin also received the invitation to exhibit with Les XX in Brussels, in February 1889. Theo van Gogh had forwarded Octave Maus's invitation to Gauguin when Gauguin was already in Arles. Around the
    5.00
    1 votes
    222
    Waves

    Waves

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Manet and the Sea
    "Waves" (1869) is a painting by French Realist artist Gustave Courbet.
    5.00
    1 votes
    223
    Wooded Landscape with Cottages

    Wooded Landscape with Cottages

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Wooded Landscape with Cottages" (c. 1655) is a painting by Dutch artist Meindert Hobbema.
    5.00
    1 votes
    224
    At the Linen Closet

    At the Linen Closet

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "At the Linen Closet" (1663) is a painting by Dutch Baroque-era artist Pieter de Hooch.
    4.00
    1 votes
    225
    Luncheon of the Boating Party

    Luncheon of the Boating Party

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Masterworks from The Phillips Collection
    Luncheon of the Boating Party (1881, French: Le déjeuner des canotiers) is a painting by French impressionist Pierre-Auguste Renoir. It was purchased from the artist by the dealer-patron Paul Durand-Ruel and bought in 1923 (for $125,000) from his son by Duncan Phillips. It is currently housed in The Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C. It shows a richness of form, a fluidity of brush stroke, and a flickering light. The painting depicts a group of Renoir's friends relaxing on a balcony at the Maison Fournaise along the Seine river in Chatou, France. The painter and art patron, Gustave Caillebotte, is seated in the lower right. Renoir's future wife, Aline Charigot, is in the foreground playing with a small dog. On the table is fruit and wine. The diagonal of the railing serves to demarcate the two halves of the composition, one densely packed with figures, the other all but empty, save for the two figures of the proprietor's daughter Louise-Alphonsine Fournaise and her brother, Alphonse Fournaise, Jr, which are made prominent by this contrast. In this painting Renoir has captured a great deal of light. The main focus of light is coming from the large opening in the balcony, beside
    4.00
    1 votes
    226
    4.00
    1 votes
    227
    Ships on a Stormy Sea

    Ships on a Stormy Sea

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Ships on a Stormy Sea" (c. 1672) is a painting by Dutch artist Willem van de Velde the Younger.
    4.00
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    228
    Banquet Still Life

    Banquet Still Life

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Banquet Still Life" (1667) is a painting by Abraham van Beyeren.
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    229
    Boy De-fleaing a Dog

    Boy De-fleaing a Dog

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Boy De-fleaing a Dog" (1655) is a painting by Gerard ter Borch.
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    230
    Brothel Scene

    Brothel Scene

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    'Brothel Scene" (c. 1658-1659) is a painting by Dutch artist Frans van Mieris, the elder.
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    231
    Elegant Couples Courting

    Elegant Couples Courting

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Elegant Couples Courting" (1618) is a painting by Willem Pieterszoon Buytewech.
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    232
    Festoon with Flowers and Fruit

    Festoon with Flowers and Fruit

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Festoon with Flowers and Fruit" (c. 1660-1670) is a painting by Jan Davidszoon de Heem.
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    233
    Garden at Sainte-Adresse

    Garden at Sainte-Adresse

    • Exhibitions displayed in: 4me exposition de peinture [4th Impressionist exhibition]
    The Garden at Sainte-Adresse is a painting by the French impressionist painter, Claude Monet. (Oil on canvas, 98.1 cm x 129.9 cm). The painting was acquired by the Metropolitan Museum of Art after an auction sale at Christie's in December 1967, under the French title La terrasse à Sainte-Adresse. The painting was exhibited at the 4th Impressionist exhibition, Paris, April 10–May 11, 1879, as no. 157 under the title Jardin à Sainte-Adresse. Monet spent the summer of 1867 at the resort town of Sainte-Adresse on the English Channel, near Le Havre (France). It was there, in a garden with a view of Honfleur on the horizon, that he painted this picture, which combines smooth, traditionally rendered areas with sparkling passages of rapid, separate brushwork, and spots of pure colour. The models were probably Monet's father, Adolphe, in the foreground, Monet' cousin Jeanne Marguérite Lecadre at the fence; Dr. Adolphe Lecadre, her father; and perhaps Lecadre's other daughter, Sophie, the woman seated with her back to the viewer. Although the scene projects affluent domesticity, it is by no means a family portrait. Monet's relations with his father were tense that summer, owing to family
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    234
    Landscape with Estuary

    Landscape with Estuary

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Landscape with Estuary" (c. 1638) is a painting by Cornelis Vroom.
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    235

    Nude Descending a Staircase, No. 2

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris
    Nude Descending a Staircase, No. 2 (French: Nu descendant un escalier n° 2) is a 1912 painting by Marcel Duchamp. The work is widely regarded as a Modernist classic and has become one of the most famous of its time. In its first presentation at the Parisian Salon des Indépendants, it was rejected by the Cubists and caused a huge stir during its exhibition at the 1913 Armory Show in New York following a press copy of an abuse scandal. The work is now found in permanent exhibition at the Louis and Walter Arensberg Collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art in Philadelphia. The work, an oil painting on canvas with dimensions of 147 cm × 89.2 cm (57.9 in × 35.1 in) in portrait, seemingly depicts a figure demonstrating an abstract movement in its ochres and browns. The discernable "body parts" of the figure are composed of nested, conical and cylindrical abstract elements, assembled together in such a way as to suggest rhythm and convey the movement of the figure merging into itself. Dark outlines limit the contours of the body while serving as motion lines that emphasize the dynamics of the moving figure, while the accented arcs of the dotted lines seem to suggest a thrusting pelvic
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    236
    Portrait of Johannes Wtenbogaert

    Portrait of Johannes Wtenbogaert

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Portrait of Johannes Wtenbogaert" (1633) is a painting by Dutch artist Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn.
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    237
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    238
    Portrait of Titus

    Portrait of Titus

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Portrait of Titus" (1655) is a painting by Dutch artist Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn
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    239
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    240
    Shipwreck off a Rocky Coast

    Shipwreck off a Rocky Coast

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "Shipwreck off a Rocky Coast" (1614) is a painting by Adam Willaerts.
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    241
    Still Life

    Still Life

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Armory Show
    Still Life (ca. 1912) is a painting by American cubist artist Patrick Henry Bruce.
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    242
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    243
    The Abduction of Europa

    The Abduction of Europa

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "The Abduction of Europa" (1632) is a painting by Dutch artist Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn.
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    244
    The Circus

    The Circus

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Armory Show
    The Circus (1912) is a painting by American realist artist George Wesley Bellows.
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    245
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    246
    The Farm

    The Farm

    • Exhibitions displayed in: The Glory of the Golden Age: Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    "The Farm" is a painting by Dutch artist Adriaen van de Velde.
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    247

    The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Sensation exhibition
    The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living is an artwork created in 1991 by Damien Hirst, an English artist and a leading member of the "Young British Artists" (or YBA). It consists of a tiger shark preserved in formaldehyde in a vitrine. It was originally commissioned in 1991 by Charles Saatchi, who sold it in 2004, to Steven A. Cohen for an undisclosed amount, widely reported to have been $8 million dollars, however the title of Don Thompson's book, The $12 Million Stuffed Shark: The Curious Economics of Contemporary Art, suggests a higher figure. Due to deterioration of the original 14-foot (4.3 m) tiger shark, it was replaced with a new specimen in 2006. It was on loan to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City from 2007 to 2010. It is considered the iconic work of British art in the 1990s, and has become a symbol of Britart worldwide. The work was funded by Charles Saatchi, who in 1991 had offered to pay for whatever artwork Hirst wanted to create. The shark itself cost Hirst £6,000 and the total cost of the work was £50,000. The shark was caught off Hervey Bay in Queensland, Australia, by a fisherman commissioned to do so. Hirst wanted something
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    248
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    249
    The Uprising

    The Uprising

    • Exhibitions displayed in: Masterworks from The Phillips Collection
    "The Uprising" is a 1848 oil-on-canvas painting by Honoré Daumier. It is currently part of the Phillips Collection in Washington D.C.
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    250
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