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Best English civil parish of All Time

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    1
    Hazelwood, Derbyshire

    Hazelwood, Derbyshire

    Hazelwood (until recently spelt Hazlewood) is a village in Derbyshire at the lower end of the Pennines around five miles north of Derby, England. Ordnance Survey maps in the nineteenth century spelt it Hazzlewood. It is located on the western edge of Chevin Hill. Nearby is a place called Firestone where beacon fires were lit to rouse the country when peril of invasion or other dangers were imminent. Firestone is now the site of a reservoir owned by the Severn Trent water board. Formerly it was part of the parish and manor of nearby Duffield. In 1817 it was recorded that "Hazlewood is parcel of the manor of Duffield. The Blount family had for many years an estate there, called a manor in records of the reign of Edward III. and that of Edward IV." In the days before Hazelwood had its own cemetery, burials were conducted at St.Alkmunds in Duffield. It is said that funeral parties would stop for refreshment at the New Inn on Hazlewood Road (now a private house) and would leave the coffin resting on the flat stone coping of the garden wall. Hazelwood railway station was about half a mile from St. John's Church down Hob Hill, on the Wirksworth Branch of the Midland Railway. Hazelwood
    7.86
    7 votes
    2
    Bostock

    Bostock

    Bostock is a village and civil parish in the unitary authority of Cheshire West and Chester and the ceremonial county of Cheshire, England. According to the 2001 census it had a population of 229. The village is situated between the towns of Winsford and Northwich.
    6.50
    8 votes
    3
    Northrepps

    Northrepps

    Northrepps is a village and a civil parish in the English county of Norfolk. The village is 3.4 miles (5.5 km) southeast of Cromer, 22.2 miles (35.7 km) north of Norwich and 137 miles (220 km) north of London. The village lies west of the A149 which runs between Kings Lynn and Great Yarmouth. The nearest railway station is at Cromer for the Bittern Line which runs between Sheringham, Cromer and Norwich. The nearest airport is Norwich International Airport. The Village and parish of Northrepps had in the 2001 census, a population of 839. For the purposes of local government, the village falls within the district of North Norfolk. The parish of Northrepps was reduced in size in 1906, losing land to the parish of Overstrand which lies to the north. The parish boundary to the north-west is with Cromer, to the north-east with Sidestrand. To the west are the boundaries with Felbrigg and Roughton whilst to the south is the parish of Southrepps. At its nearest point the parish is just 500 meters from the coast on the north-eastern boundary, which partly follows the course of the disused Norfolk and Suffolk Joint Railway between Cromer and North Walsham which closed in 1953. Also in the
    7.50
    6 votes
    4
    8.40
    5 votes
    5
    Bowes

    Bowes

    Bowes is a village in County Durham, England. Located in the Pennine hills, it is situated close to Barnard Castle. It is built around the medieval Bowes Castle. Bowes lies within the historic county boundaries of the North Riding of Yorkshire, but along with the rest of the former Startforth Rural District it was incorporated into the non-metropolitan county of Durham for administrative purposes on 1 April 1974, under the provisions of the Local Government Act 1972. The A66 and A67 roads meet at Bowes. The Roman name for Bowes was Lavatrae. A Roman army station was located there. The only pub in the village, The Ancient Unicorn, is reputed to be haunted by several ghosts. This 17th-century coaching inn famously played host to Charles Dickens as he toured the local area. Dickens found inspiration in the village academy, which he immortalised as Dotheboys Hall in Nicholas Nickleby; and the graves of two of the people who inspired characters portrayed by the great author remain in Bowes churchyard to this day. Until the 1960s, the village was served by Bowes railway station. Bowes has a single primary school at the centre of the village, Bowes Hutchinson's C of E (Aided) Primary
    9.25
    4 votes
    6
    Burnham Thorpe

    Burnham Thorpe

    Burnham Thorpe is a small village and civil parish on the River Burn and near the coast of Norfolk in the United Kingdom. It is famous for being the birthplace of Vice Admiral Horatio Nelson, victor at the Battle of Trafalgar and one of Britain's greatest heroes. At the time of his birth, Nelson's father, Edmund Nelson, was rector of the church in Burnham Thorpe. The house in which Nelson was born was demolished soon after his father's death, though the rectory that replaced it and the church at which his father preached can still be seen. The site of the former rectory is marked by a roadside plaque. The village's main public house was built in 1637 and was known as The Plough until 1798 when it was renamed The Lord Nelson in honour of the victory at the Battle of the Nile. Nelson held a dinner here for the men of the village prior to his departure to join HMS Agamemnon. The pub survives to this day. Burnhamthorpe Road in Mississauga, Ontario, Canada was named after this settlement. Media related to Burnham Thorpe at Wikimedia Commons
    8.00
    5 votes
    7
    Cotgrave

    Cotgrave

    Cotgrave is a village and civil parish in the borough of Rushcliffe in Nottinghamshire, England. It is located about 5 miles (8 km) southeast of the centre of Nottingham. The village sits at the edge of the South Nottinghamshire wolds about 40 meters above sea level. Cotgrave has a population of 7,373 people. With an ancient heart that has largely escaped development Cotgrave has a village atmosphere despite a population of over 7,000. This is accented by its amenities and infrastructure that have remained comparatively underdeveloped even when the large estates were built around the village in the 1960s to house the population of workforce for the mine. It's sandwiched between the A52, A606, and A46. Nearby to the west is Tollerton and Nottingham Airport. Its origins may be in the Iron Age but a 6th century Anglo Saxon burial ground has been excavated at Mill Hill to the north of the old village. There was certainly a Saxon church a century before the Norman invasion. The Roman road Fosse Way passes a mile to the East where it changes direction slightly. The name "Cotgrave" is possible derived from "Cotta" (anglo Saxon name) and "Grave", (grove or thicket). The present substantial
    8.00
    5 votes
    8
    New Milton

    New Milton

    New Milton is a market town in south west Hampshire, England. The town has a high street and holds a market every Wednesday. Situated on the edge of the New Forest, the town is about 6 miles (10 km) west of Lymington town centre and 12 miles (19 km) east of Bournemouth town centre. New Milton dates back to Anglo-Saxon times, and encompasses Old Milton, Barton on Sea, Ashley, Bashley, and Wootton. It is recorded as having a population of approximately 23,000 in 2001. The manor of Milton ("Mildeltune") is listed in the Domesday Book of 1086 and literally means "Middle farm." It was part of the lands belonging to Hugh de Port, and the estate was held from him by William Chernet. The Chernet family maintained possession of Milton into the 13th century, although lesser families were managing the estate on their behalf. The most important of these were the Chaucombe (or Chalcombe) family, who were probably the first people to build a church in Milton in the mid 13th century. In 1303 Thomas de Chaucombe was given permission to hold a weekly market on Tuesdays at Milton, as well as an annual fair on the feast day of Mary Magdalene, but this attempt to create a market town seems to have
    6.83
    6 votes
    9
    Rowley, East Riding of Yorkshire

    Rowley, East Riding of Yorkshire

    Rowley is a small village and civil parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It is situated 1 mile (1.6 km) south of Little Weighton and approximately 6 miles (9.7 km) south-west of Beverley town centre. The civil parish is formed by the villages of Rowley and Little Weighton together with the hamlets of Bentley, High Hunsley, Risby and part of the hamlet of Riplingham. According to the 2001 UK census, Rowley parish had a population of 1,030. The village of Rowley is now mostly depopulated, leaving only a few houses, and most of the population is now in Little Weighton. Rev. Ezekiel Rogers, who became Rector of Rowley in 1621, was suspended from the parish church in 1638 for his non-conformist beliefs. Following this, he led 20 families to emigrate to the American colonies, where he founded the town of Rowley, Massachusetts in 1639. The emigrants sailed from Hull in the John, probably a merchant ship of around 200 tons, probably in June 1638, arriving in Salem, Massachusetts in August. One of those 20 families was the Grants, who are direct forebears of the model Jodie Kidd, as revealed in a 2008 edition of the BBC genealogy programme Who Do You Think You Are?. Also among
    7.80
    5 votes
    10
    Liss

    Liss

    Liss (previously spelt Lys or Lyss) is a village and civil parish in the East Hampshire district of Hampshire, England. It is 3.3 miles (5.3 km) northeast of Petersfield, on the A3 road, on the Hampshire/West Sussex border. Liss has its own railway station, on the Portsmouth Direct Line. The village lies in the East Hampshire Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The parish consists of 3,567 acres (14 km²) of semi-rural countryside, and is one of the largest in the region. The earliest written mention of Liss (or Lyss as it was known then) may be that found in the Domesday book. The village comprises an old village at West Liss and the modern village, which congregated around the 19th-century Southern Railway station, which is largely Victorian and later. The River Rother formed the boundary between West and East Liss. West Liss contains most of the historical and architectural interest. Suburbs later spread out toward Liss Forest. Flint spearheads, arrowheads, scrapers, flakes and cores dating from Palaeolithic and Mesolithic times have been found. Evidence of Neolithic activity is present in axe heads and flint implements. An Irish decorated axe and two bracelets engraved with
    9.00
    4 votes
    11
    East Beckham

    East Beckham

    East Beckham is a village and a civil parish in the English county of Norfolk. The village is 23.4 miles (37.7 km) north of Norwich, 5 miles (8 km) south-west of Cromer and 137 miles (220 km) miles north-east of London. The nearest railway station is in the town of Sheringham where access to the national rail network can be made via the Bittern Line to Norwich. The nearest Airport is Norwich International Airport. East Beckham is within the area covered by North Norfolk District Council. James Gresham (1442–1497), Lord of the Manor of East Beckham, was the grandfather of the Sir John Gresham who founded Gresham's School in 1555 and the great-grandfather of the Sir Thomas Gresham who established Gresham College and the Royal Exchange in the City of London. Media related to East Beckham at Wikimedia Commons
    6.67
    6 votes
    12
    Waldridge

    Waldridge

    Waldridge is a village in County Durham, in England. It is situated to the south west of Chester-le-Street. It is known as either Waldridge Fell or Waldridge Village, the 'Fell' referring to the surrounding area of moorland. The current village dates back to the 1890s, the original village having been located on the fell which overlooks the present location. Rainwater runs into the Cong burn to the north and the South Burn to the south, both of which flow into the River Wear which is a few miles to the east. Waldridge Fell is a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI), as it is one of the last remaining areas of lowland fell (heathland) in the county, with a raised valley floor peat bog. There is extensive evidence of coal mining with subsidence and other features related to the colliery and pits. Typical heathland vegetation and wildlife are present consisting of heather, bracken, gorse, rabbit, game birds, blackberry, bilberry and raspberry. Over recent decades Waldridge area farms have engaged in typical farming such as free range poultry, dairy processing, beekeeping, potatoes and rapeseed. Farmland area continues to reduce as housing expands out from Chester-le-Street, ever
    7.60
    5 votes
    13
    Arrathorne

    Arrathorne

    Arrathorne is a hamlet and civil parish in the Richmondshire district of North Yorkshire, England, six miles south of Richmond, six miles west of Bedale and six miles east of Leyburn. According to the 2001 census it had a population of 61. The population in 2011 is 51.
    8.75
    4 votes
    14
    Chawleigh

    Chawleigh

    Chawleigh is a village and civil parish in Mid Devon in the English county of Devon, situated just off the A377 between Crediton and Barnstaple. It has a population of 621.
    8.75
    4 votes
    15
    Sandown

    Sandown

    Sandown is a seaside resort town and civil parish on the southeast coast of the Isle of Wight, England, neighbouring the town of Shanklin to the south. Sandown Bay is the name of the bay off the English Channel which both towns share, and it is notable for its long stretch of easily accessible golden sandy beach. It is the site of the lost Sandown Castle. Whilst undergoing construction, this was attacked by a French force which had fought its way over Culver Down from Whitecliff Bay, resulting in the French being repulsed. It was built too far into the sea and constantly suffered erosion, until now reduced to a pile of rocks. Later forts in the town include the Diamond Fort (named after its plan), built inshore to replace the castle and which fought off a minor attack from privateers (probably French) in 1788, and the present "Granite Fort", which is now the zoo. The sweeping esplanade from Devonia Steps to Yaverland and the bandstand was built during the First World War, for the first time stabilising the road to Bembridge. An extension to Brown's Golf Course (and former ice cream factory) was added in 1944 to disguise pumping apparatus for the Pipe Line Under the Ocean (PLUTO)
    6.50
    6 votes
    16
    Trowbridge

    Trowbridge

    Trowbridge ( /ˈtroʊbrɪdʒ/) is the county town of Wiltshire, England, situated on the River Biss in the west of the county, approximately 12 miles (19 km) southeast of Bath, Somerset. On the 5th September 1848 the first train steamed through Trowbridge as the Wilts, Somerset and Weymouth Railway was established.The Kennet and Avon canal runs to the north of Trowbridge and played an instrumental part in the town's development as it enabled coal to be transported from the Somerset Coalfield and so marked the advent of steam powered manufacturing in the woollen cloth mills. The town was the foremost centre of woollen cloth production in south west England in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, and was described as "The Manchester of the West". Trowbridge has a railway station on the Wessex Main Line. The civil parish of Trowbridge had a population of 28,163 at the 2001 census. Neighbouring towns and villages include Bradford on Avon, Westbury, Melksham, Devizes, Hilperton, Southwick and Semington. The origin of the name Trowbridge is uncertain; one source claims derivation from treow-brycg, meaning "Tree Bridge", referring to the first bridge over the Biss, while another states
    7.40
    5 votes
    17
    Little Chart

    Little Chart

    Little Chart is a civil parish and small village to the north-west of Ashford in Kent, South East England. The parish has an area of 1,485 acres (6.01 km), and a population of 239. Within the parish boundaries are two hamlets: Little Chart Forstal (the term forstal means the land in front of a farm and farmyard; cp Painters Forstal); and Rooting Street. The Forstal is also home to Little Chart Cricket Club. The main property in the district, Surrenden Park, to the south of the village, was owned by the Dering family for over 400 years; the family estate covered much of this part of Kent. Part of their property was Calehill Park, to the north. Neither property now exists: Surrenden succumbed to fire in 1952; Calehill was demolished in 1951. The original village church, dedicated to St Mary the Virgin and the Holy Rood, was wrecked in 1944 by a V-1 flying bomb during World War II; it stood on a site further upstream from the village, near Chart Court. The new church is now within the village. The Ford Paper Mill, named after the one-time ford over the Great Stour, has a long history, and is still in operation dealing in salvaged paper. The Stour Valley Walk, which follows the Great
    6.33
    6 votes
    18
    St Dominick, Cornwall

    St Dominick, Cornwall

    St Dominic (Cornish: Sen Domynek) is a civil parish and village in Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. The village is situated 2+⁄2 miles (4.0 km) east of Callington and five miles (8 km) north of Saltash. St Dominick is the historic spelling but this is gradually changing to drop the letter K. It is still spelt with the K on Ordnance Survey mapping but Cornwall Council spells the parish name without the K. St Dominic parish is bounded by Calstock parish to the north, by the River Tamar and border with Devon to the east, by St Mellion parish to the south and by Callington parish to the west. The ecclesiastical parish is named after a female saint, St Dominica, and is in the Deanery and Hundred of East. The parish is also in the Registration District of St Germans (however, historic birth and death registers are in Liskeard and marriage registers in St Germans). The population of the parish was 833 in the 2001 census. The parish church is dedicated to St Dominica and has two aisles. The south aisle is the earlier of the two; the tower (of the 13th century) is of an unusual design. St Dominic Parish Council has ten councillors and meets monthly in the village hall. The council
    8.25
    4 votes
    19
    Newton Abbot

    Newton Abbot

    Newton Abbot is a market town and civil parish in the Teignbridge District of Devon, England on the River Teign, with a population of 23,580. Newton Abbot holds a historic Cheese and Onion Fayre in honour of Saint Leonard; it was originally held from the 5th to the 7th of November, but is now celebrated at the beginning of September. The town grew very rapidly in the Victorian era as it was home to the South Devon Railway locomotive works. This later became a major steam engine shed and was retained to service British Railways diesel locomotives, although it closed in 1981 and is now the site of an industrial estate. The town has a racecourse nearby and has a country park, Decoy. Traces of Neolithic people have been found at Berry's Wood Hill Fort near Bradley Manor. This was a contour hill fort that enclosed about 11 acres (4.5 ha). Milber Down camp was built in the 1st century BC. Later it was occupied by the Romans—coins and a pavement have been found. There are remains of a Norman motte-and-bailey castle on Highweek Hill. This was probably a lookout post to watch people coming up the Teign estuary. A village grew up around this castle which over the years became Highweek — the
    9.33
    3 votes
    20
    Saffron Walden

    Saffron Walden

    Saffron Walden is a medium-sized market town in the Uttlesford district of Essex, England. It is located 12 miles (19 km) north of Bishop's Stortford, 15 miles (24 km) south of Cambridge and approx 35 miles (56 km) north of London. The town retains a rural appearance and many very old buildings dating from the medieval period onwards In 2001 the parish had a population of 14,313. There has been a village on or near the site of present day Saffron Walden since before the Roman occupation of Britain when Bronze and Iron Age tribes settled in the area. After the Romans withdrew from the country, a flourishing Anglo-Saxon town was established. With the Norman invasion of 1066, a stone church was built. The castle was constructed c.1116 A Priory, later to become Walden Abbey, was also founded under the patronage of Geoffrey de Mandeville, first Earl of Essex around 1136. The abbey was separated from the town of Walden by Holywell Field, which was enclosed in the sixteenth century to form part of the park of Audley End, the house of Sir Thomas Audley, who converted the abbey cloisters to a dwelling c. 1538-44 The inner or Little Court of the seventeenth-century house corresponds to one
    9.33
    3 votes
    21
    Thorganby

    Thorganby

    Thorganby is a small village and civil parish in the Selby district of North Yorkshire, England. It is situated next to the village of Wheldrake.
    9.33
    3 votes
    22
    Dallinghoo

    Dallinghoo

    Dallinghoo is a village some 3 miles (4.5 km) north of Woodbridge, Suffolk, England. Formed from Church Road (west) and Pound Hill to the south and branches NE after the centre of the village. Its church was originally a large building with a central tower but the chancel has since been destroyed. The Church also had connections with nearby Letheringham Abbey. Dallinghoo is also the birthplace of Francis Light, founder of Penang in Malaysia and father of William Light who founded Adelaide in Australia. Dallinghoo Village Hall (TM2654) is off Pound Hill a little north of the village. The Oldest and most important house in Dallinghoo is Whitehouse Farm. Dallinghoo Hall (TM2754) is 1 km SE from the village. Dallinghoo has featured in the press in 2009 after £500,000 worth of Iceni gold coins were found in a field. Media related to Dallinghoo at Wikimedia Commons
    8.00
    4 votes
    23
    Harlaxton

    Harlaxton

    Harlaxton is a village and civil parish in the South Kesteven district of Lincolnshire, England. It lies on the edge of the Vale of Belvoir and just off the A607, 2 miles (3.2 km) south-east from Grantham and 12 miles (19.3 km) north-east from Melton Mowbray. The village is mentioned in the Domesday Book dated 1086 and called Herlavestune. The name derives from the Old English Herelaf+tun, meaning "estate or farm of Herelaf". In 1740 a burial urn was uncovered in the village containing Roman coins so it seems likely that a settlement existed here since then. The history of Harlaxton village is tied up with that of Harlaxton Manor. The original manor house dated from the 14th century and stood south of the church off Rectory Lane where the original moat can still be seen in gardens there. It is recorded as having been used as a hunting lodge by John O Gaunt. It was purchased and occupied by the De Ligne family around 1475 eventually standing empty from 1780 until 1857 when it was pulled down. By this time the present Harlaxton Manor had been built some distance to the East of the village. As is the case in so many English villages the fortunes of the village was intrinsically tied
    8.00
    4 votes
    24
    Thornton Curtis

    Thornton Curtis

    Thornton Curtis is a village and parish in the North Lincolnshire district of Lincolnshire, England, about 5 miles (8.0 km) south-east of the town of Barton-upon-Humber. The name Thornton is from the Old English thorn+tun, meaning "village where thorn trees grow." In the 1086 Domesday Book the name is written as "Torentune". The origin of the Curtis part of the village name is unknown. The village is served by Thornton Abbey railway station. Nearby is the 12th Century Thornton Abbey. The parish church is a grade I listed building dedicated to Saint Lawrence and dating from the 12th century. It consists of a 13th-century chancel, a nave, aisles, south porch and an embattled 13th-century western tower with eight pinnacles and containing 5 bells. The church was restored 1884 by James Fowler of Louth which included rebuilding the south porch, and new nave and chancel roofs. There is a 12th-century square black Tournai marble font, with opposed pairs of carved animals to sides, standing on a cylindrical column with shafts to each corner on a square base. Thornton Hall is a grade II* listed country house built between 1695 and 1700 by Sir Rowland Wynne. There is one public house in the
    8.00
    4 votes
    25
    Yoxford

    Yoxford

    Yoxford is a village in the east of Suffolk, England close to the Heritage Coast, Minsmere Reserve (RSPB), Aldeburgh and Southwold. Some 94 miles from London and 25 miles north of Ipswich, Yoxford is surrounded by the parkland of three country houses in an area known as the “Garden of Suffolk”. The village derives its name from a ford of the River Yox where oxen could pass. It runs near the village. The junction of the A12 trunk road and the A1120 is in the village. The "Griffin Inn", a medieval Suffolk inn is located here. The Satis House Hotel, an 18th century house, is often erroneously publicised as the inspiration for Charles Dickens in Great Expectations. However the Satis House of that book is better known to be based on Restoration House in Kent, referred to as 'satis' by Queen Elizabeth I. Yoxford's Satis House was actually named 'Yoxford House' until well after publication of the novel, as can quite clearly be seen on old Ordnance Survey maps. The Church of St Peter is situated here. On the edge of the village is Cockfield Hall the old home of the Blois family. The village is known for its antique shops and also has three pubs (The Griffin, The Blois Arms & The King's
    8.00
    4 votes
    26
    Great Alne

    Great Alne

    Great Alne is a small village, known as Round Alne in the Middle Ages. It is situated 7 miles (11 km) north-west of Stratford-upon-Avon, 3 miles (4.8 km) north-east of Alcester, and 15 miles (24 km) from Warwick in the County of Warwickshire, England, on the road to Wootton Wawen via Little Alne. The name Great Alne takes its name from the River Alne. First chronicled in the charter of King Ethelbald (723-737) "near to the river which our ancestors used to call, and which is called to this day, 'Alwine'." The Celtic word Alwine meaning bright or clear. On 26 November 1969 Warwickshire County Council formally designated an area within Great Alne as a Conservation Area, including most of the village east of the Memorial Hall and has within its curtlage twelve listed buildings of local architectural and historical value. In the 2001 census, the population of the parish was 587. Land at Alne was given by Coenwulf, King of the Mercians, about 809, to his newly founded abbey of Winchcombe in Gloucestershire. The Domesday Book records " in Ferncombe Hundred, Winchcombe Abbey holds 6 hides in (Great) Alne. Land for 6 ploughs. In lordship 1 plough; 3 slaves. 11 villagers with 4
    7.75
    4 votes
    27
    Skirlaugh

    Skirlaugh

    Skirlaugh is a village and civil parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England in an area known as Holderness. It is situated approximately 7 miles (11 km) north east of Hull city centre on the A165 road. Originally a farming community, it is now primarily a commuter village for Hull. According to the 2001 UK census, Skirlaugh parish had a population of 1,543. The parish church, St. Augustine's Church, was built by Walter de Skirlaw who later became the Bishop of Durham in the late 14th century. It is, according to Pevsner, a "gem of the early-perpendicular" style. This is because subsequent generations left the original structure largely intact. The stonework was re-pointed in the 1980s and 1990s by Edward Brown, a local volunteer. The church is a Local Ecumenical Partnership between the Church of England and the Methodist church. Skirlaugh was served from 1864 to 1957 by Skirlaugh railway station on the Hull and Hornsea Railway even though the station was located 1.5 miles (2.4 km) south of the village.
    6.60
    5 votes
    28
    Haslingfield

    Haslingfield

    √ Haslingfield is a village and civil parish in South Cambridgeshire, England. The village is about six miles south-west of Cambridge, between Harston, Barton and Barrington. The population in the 2001 census was 1,550 people living in 621 households. The main streets in the village are called High Street and New Road which together form an approximate circle around the Manor House. To find out more about what is going on in Haslingfield today see here Haslingefeld appears in the Domesday book with a population of 400, but there is archaeological evidence of people living in the vicinity 3,000 years ago. An Anglo-Saxon cemetery was discovered in the 1870s on Cantelupe Road, but unfortunately not carefully excavated. The name Haslingfield is thought to be derived as follows: -field is an Anglo-Saxon suffix meaning cleared land in site of woods, while Hasling probably derives from the Haeslingas, a local band of people that lived here. The church was consecrated in 1352, but the present chancel walls date from the 12th century. On White Hill behind the village there used to be a small chapel but all trace has since disappeared. The Tudor manor house was built by Sir Thomas Wendy,
    7.50
    4 votes
    29
    Neatishead

    Neatishead

    Neatishead is a village and civil parish in the English county of Norfolk. The village is situated some 20 km (12 mi) north-east of the city of Norwich, within The Norfolk Broads and to the west of Barton Broad. Access to Neatishead from the broad is by way of Limekiln Dyke, a narrow channel leading off the broad. The civil parish has an area of 7.71 km (2.98 sq mi) and in the 2001 census had a population of 537 in 235 households. For the purposes of local government, the parish falls within the district of North Norfolk. It is famous due to the nearby RAF Neatishead radar station.
    7.50
    4 votes
    30
    Bradwell

    Bradwell

    Bradwell Juxta Coggeshall is a village and civil parish in Essex, England. It is located on the River Blackwater, approximately 5 km (3.1 mi) east of Braintree and is 19 km (12 mi) north-northeast from the county town of Chelmsford. The village is in the district and parliamentary constituency of Braintree. The parish is part of the Blackwater parish cluster. The name can be confused with Bradwell-on-Sea, also in Essex, which is often abbreviated to just Bradwell. The name derives from Old English meaning broad well. To this day there is a spring a few metres north of the modern manor house of Bradwell Hall near to Holy Trinity Church. In the Middle Ages, this spring fed an overshot mill. Remains of the last mill on the site can still be seen in the overgrown surroundings of the millpool. Bradwell Juxta Coggeshall, to give the full parish name, is a dispersed village. There is no good evidence that the village was ever nucleated around the church. The modern village, on the A120 between Braintree and Coggeshall, is the former hamlet of Blackwater (also once known as Blackwater Green) by which name it was known into the twentieth century. There is evidence for settlement in Bradwell
    8.67
    3 votes
    31
    East Hagbourne

    East Hagbourne

    East Hagbourne is a village and civil parish about 1 mile (1.6 km) south of Didcot and 11 miles (18 km) south of Oxford. It was part of Berkshire until the 1974 boundary changes transferred it to Oxfordshire. East Hagbourne's toponym is derived from Hacca's Brook, a stream that flows through the village. East Hagbourne was sometimes called Church Hagbourne. East and West Hagbourne have been separate villages since the time of Edward the Confessor, when Regenbald, a priest of Cirencester, held the manor of East Hagbourne. Regenbald continued to hold the manor after the Norman conquest of England in 1066 and compilation of the Domesday Book in 1086. Regenbald died in the reign of Henry I, who then granted East Hagbourne manor to the Augustinians Cirencester Abbey (founded 1117). The abbey continued to hold the manor until 1539, when it surrendered its lands to the Crown in the Dissolution of the Monasteries. The nave of the Church of England parish church of Saint Andrew may have been built in the 12th century. The south aisle was added early in the 13th century. It is linked with the nave by a three-bays arcade. It was followed a few years later by the south chapel, which is
    8.67
    3 votes
    32
    Beauworth

    Beauworth

    Beauworth is a village and civil parish in the City of Winchester district of Hampshire, England, about eight miles east of Winchester. According to the 2001 census it had a population of 103.
    7.25
    4 votes
    33
    East Meon

    East Meon

    East Meon is a village and civil parish in the East Hampshire district of Hampshire, England. It is 4.4 miles (7.1 km) west of Petersfield. The nearest railway station is 4 miles (6.4 km) east of the village, at Petersfield. The village is located in the Meon Valley approximately 31 km (19 mi) north of Portsmouth and 98 km (61 mi) southwest of London, on the headwaters of the River Meon. With an acreage of 11,370 acres (46.0 km), East Meon is geographically the largest parish in East Hampshire. The boundaries of the present Parish of East Meon date back to 1894. There are bronze age burial barrows within the parish of East Meon which date back to around 2000 BC. There is also an iron age fort, situated just outside the parish boundaries on Old Winchester Hill, constructed approximately 500 years before the Romans invaded Britain. There is also evidence of Roman occupation in and around the village. East Meon itself may have started life somewhere between 400 and 600 AD. Then it was part of a Royal Manor belonging first to King Alfred the Great. The Domesday Survey of 1086 shows that the Manor then belonged to William the Conqueror; it records six mills and land for 64 ploughs.
    7.25
    4 votes
    34
    Kibworth

    Kibworth

    Kibworth /ˈkɪbwərθ/ is an area of the Harborough district of Leicestershire, England, that contains two civil parishes—the villages of Kibworth Beauchamp /ˈbiːtʃəm/ and Kibworth Harcourt /ˈhɑrkɔərt/. According to the 2001 census, Kibworth Beauchamp has a population of 3,798, and Kibworth Harcourt has a population of 990. The two villages are split by the A6. Kibworth is close to Foxton Locks, Market Harborough, and Leicester. Kibworth has many shops and a post office, an award winning community newspaper (The Kibworth & District Chronicle), and between 2002 and 2007 many new shops appeared, including a new branch of Co-op UK. There were also many new houses built on the edge of the village, with plans for 610 more to be built by 2012. The local Cricket club won the ECB National Club Cricket Championship in 2004. There are clubs for golf, bowls and football and also many dance schools in the village. In 1270 Walter de Merton, the founder of Merton College, Oxford, bought a large part of the parish of Kibworth Harcourt from Saer de Harcourt, who had been forced to sell the estate following his support for the unsuccessful "barons' rebellion" led by Simon de Montfort. A large part of
    7.25
    4 votes
    35
    Tetford

    Tetford

    Tetford is both a village and civil parish in the East Lindsey district of Lincolnshire, England. It is situated in the Lincolnshire Wolds, 6.5 miles (10.5 km) north-east from Horncastle, 10 miles (16 km) south from Louth and 8 miles (13 km) north-west from Spilsby. It is in a shallow valley, situated at the bottom of a 98 m (320 feet) high ridge on which runs the Bluestone Heath Road. The parish covers about 1,730 acres (7.0 km). The Prime Meridian passes just to the east of Tetford. The roads in the village form a figure eight. Tetford was recorded as "Tesforde" in the Domesday Book and as having a mill, probably on the site of the present 17th-century watermill near the centre of the village. The parish contains traces of ancient encampments thought to be from Saxon times. It is reputed to be the site where Raengeires, a Briton, defeated the Saxon general Horsa in a great battle. In 1841 the parish was noted for its fertiliser production made from burnt limestone. Tetford lies in the Lincolnshire Wolds, which are a designated Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, running from Louth in the north, to Horncastle in the south. A place of worship has stood on the site of the Church of
    7.25
    4 votes
    36
    Wissett

    Wissett

    Wissett is a village and parish in the Waveney district of Suffolk, England located at 52.35N 01.46E TM3679 about 2 km (about 1.5 miles) northwest of Halesworth. Historically, it was in the hundred of Blything. It has a population of about 200. Wisset manor was held by Ralph the staller, Baron of Gael in Brittany before the Norman Conquest. Ralph was created Earl of Suffolk and Norfolk in 1067, but his son lost the title and the manor passed to Count Alan of Brittany and Richmond in 1075. The Domesday Book shows that in 1086 Wissett had a church at Rumburgh with 2 carucates of free land, 12 monks and a chapel in the village. The eleventh century flint parish church dedicated to Saint Andrew has a circular church tower with a floor dated to the 12th Century. This is the oldest recorded church tower floor in the United Kingdom. Built as a chapel to Rumburgh Priory, the surviving elements of the Norman church are two doors to the nave and the tower arch. The parish is now part of the Blyth Valley Team Ministry in the diocese of St Edmundsbury and Ipswich. Vanessa Bell, Duncan Grant and David Garnett lived in Wissett for the summer of 1916. Virginia Woolf (Vanessa's sister) said after
    7.25
    4 votes
    37
    Coneysthorpe

    Coneysthorpe

    Coneysthorpe is a small village and civil parish in the Ryedale district of North Yorkshire, England. It is situated near Castle Howard and 4 miles west of Malton. The Centenary Way long-distance path runs through the village.
    8.33
    3 votes
    38
    East Dean and Friston

    East Dean and Friston

    East Dean and Friston is a civil parish in the Wealden District of East Sussex, England.The two villages in the parish are in a dry valley on the South Downs - between Eastbourne three miles (4.8 km) to the east and Seaford an equal distance to the west. The main A259 road goes through both village centres. The coast and much of the land between it and the A259 from the east edge of Seaford to the west edge of Eastbourne is owned by the National Trust, and this has prevented further development to the area. East Dean lies in the valley bottom: Friston is at the top of the hill to the west. Within both villages are a large number of buildings of historic interest. The church in East Dean, dedicated to St Simon and St Jude, has a Saxon tower and an unusual Tapsel gate (preventing cattle from entering the churchyard); that at Friston is dedicated to St Mary the Virgin. The churches have formed a united benefice since 1688. The latter contains Tudor monuments to the local family Selwyn and the grave of the composer Frank Bridge (1879-1941) Birling Gap is a coastal hamlet within the parish. It is situated on the Seven Sisters not far from Beachy Head and is owned by the National Trust.
    8.33
    3 votes
    39
    Gedney

    Gedney

    Gedney is a village and civil parish in the South Holland district of Lincolnshire, England. It lies just to the south off the A17 Boston to King's Lynn road, 2 miles (3.2 km) east from Holbeach and 2 miles (3.2 km) north-east from Long Sutton. The parish stretches east to The Wash, its villages and hamlets including Gedney Drove End, Gedney Dyke, GedneyDawsmere, Gedney Marsh, and the geographic extension of Gedney, Gedney Church End. The parish has the only stretch of dual carriageway in South Holland and includes RAF Holbeach at Gedney Marsh. Gedney and its parish lies on reclaimed fenland, making it one of the most intensive crop-growing areas in the UK. To the west, the parish begins at the eastern end of the Fleet Hargate bypass, and includes the village's campsite and a few houses, bordering the parish of Fleet. The boundary passes close to the west of Gedney Dyke, and meets the parish of Holbeach. It passes just to the west of Gedney Dyke Farm then follows Fleet Haven, near to the wind farm to the west of nearby Red House Farm. It deviates to the east from Fleet Haven and passes to the west of (another) Red House Farm then rejoins Fleet Haven just south of Wards Farm. Fleet
    8.33
    3 votes
    40
    Newton Blossomville

    Newton Blossomville

    Newton Blossomville is a village in the Borough of Milton Keynes and ceremonial county of Buckinghamshire, England. It is a civil parish, sharing a joint parish council with Clifton Reynes. At the 2001 census, the population of the parish was 280 It is located in the north of the Borough, about two and a half miles east of Olney & quarter of a mile from the Bucks/Beds border, just outside the village. The village name 'Newton' is an Old English language word meaning 'new farm'. It was recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 under the holdings of Clifton Reynes (Clystone) as not much was left of the original settlement, possibly a victim of raids from across the River Great Ouse. Called 'Niwetone' when first named independently in 1175, it gained the affix 'Blossevill', referring to the family name of the lords of the manor in the 13th century (a common thing to happen to settlement names at that time). Today, the main services remaining in the village are the Newton Blossomville Church of England 1st School and the Old Mill public house (previously The Old Mill Burned Down), which closed twice in recent years. The pub reopened under new ownership in June 2006, after refurbishment.
    8.33
    3 votes
    41
    Rawcliffe, East Riding of Yorkshire

    Rawcliffe, East Riding of Yorkshire

    Rawcliffe (or Rawcliffe in Snaith) is a village and civil parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It is situated approximately 4 miles (6.4 km) west of Goole. It lies on the banks of the River Aire just north of the M62 and on the A614 road. The civil parish is formed by the village of Rawcliffe and the hamlet of Rawcliffe Bridge which lies just to the south east of the village. According to the 2001 UK census, Rawcliffe parish had a population of 2,087. The village is served by a railway station on the Pontefract Line railway, originally part of the Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway route to nearby Goole. The parish was part of the Goole Rural District in the West Riding of Yorkshire from 1894 to 1974, then in Boothferry district of Humberside until 1996. An 8 hectare (20 acres) Local Nature Reserve has been created on the site of an old sugar factory at Rawcliffe Bridge.
    8.33
    3 votes
    42
    Rowsley

    Rowsley

    Rowsley is a village on the A6 road in the English county of Derbyshire. It is at the point where the River Wye flows into the River Derwent and prospered from mills on both. Notable features are the bridge over the River Derwent and the Peacock hotel, originally built in 1652 as a manor house by John Stevenson, agent to Lady Manners, whose family crest bearing a peacock gives it its name. Both Longfellow and Landseer are said to have stayed there. Nearby is Chatsworth House, home of the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire. It was the site of an extensive motive power depot and marshalling yard, the first being built by the Manchester, Buxton, Matlock and Midlands Junction Railway with a railway station designed by Joseph Paxton in 1849. This was replaced by a new station when the line was extended northwards in 1862. It was frequently used by King Edward VII when he visited Chatsworth House. The original station became a goods depot until 1968, when it was used as a contractor's yard. It then became the centrepiece of a shopping development. Rowsley South is the current northern terminus of the preserved heritage railway Peak Rail, and is located about a quarter-mile south of the
    8.33
    3 votes
    43
    Wrenbury

    Wrenbury

    Wrenbury is a village in the civil parish of Wrenbury cum Frith, the unitary authority of Cheshire East, and the ceremonial county of Cheshire, England. It lies on the River Weaver, around 8.5 miles south-west of Crewe. The civil parish of Wrenbury cum Frith covers the village of Wrenbury and the small settlements of Gaunton's Bank, Pinsley Green, Porter's Hill, Smeaton Wood, Wrenbury Heath and Wrenburywood. It has a total population of around 1,100. The village is listed in the Domesday book as Wareneberie, and became Wrennebury in 1230. The name is said to mean "old forest inhabited by wrens". Wrenbury formed part of the extensive lands of William Malbank (also William Malbedeng), who owned much of the Nantwich hundred. As a chapel attached to St Mary's Church, Acton, Wrenbury was included in the lands donated to the Cistercian Combermere Abbey in around 1180, shortly after the abbey's 1133 foundation by Hugh Malbank, second Baron of Nantwich. In 1539, after the Dissolution, the land was granted to George Cotton, and the Cotton family remained important local landowners for centuries. A free school by the church was endowed by Ralph Buckley in 1605. Wrenbury cum Frith is
    8.33
    3 votes
    44
    Beighton

    Beighton

    Beighton ward ( /ˈbeɪtən/ or /ˈbaɪtən/)—which includes the districts of Beighton, Hackenthorpe, Owlthorpe, and Sothall—is one of the 28 electoral wards in City of Sheffield, England. It is located in the eastern part of the city, on the border with Rotherham and covers an area of 5.7 km. The population of this ward in 2001 was 17,800 people in 7,200 households. Prior to 1967, the districts of this ward formed part of Derbyshire. In that year an extension of the then County Borough of Sheffield took in the area, which was consequently transferred to the West Riding of Yorkshire. In 1974 the area became part of the City of Sheffield, in the metropolitan and ceremonial county of South Yorkshire. Beighton (grid reference SK440835) is now a suburb of Sheffield after much expansion from a village in the last 100 years. The village was mentioned three times in the Domesday Book of 1086 as Bectun—the name meaning a farmstead beside a stream (or beck). Some remnants of the old village have survived including the church of Saint Mary the Virgin, which was built in the 12th century. The population in 1931 was 5,553. Being primarily a coal mining area, many of the houses erected in the first
    6.20
    5 votes
    45
    Burbage

    Burbage

    Burbage is a civil parish in Leicestershire, England. According to the United Kingdom Census 2001 the parish had a population of 14,324. Leofric, Earl of Mercia, gave the village of Burbage to Coventry Abbey in 1043. At that time it was valued at two shillings. By the time of the Domesday Book in 1086, its value had risen to £4. There were 1¼ hides of land (around 150 acres (0.61 km)) with 2 ploughs. Twenty villagers held two smallholdings, with two slaves and eight ploughs. Burbage also had a meadow, measuring a furlong in length and width (about 40,500 square metres). The village also owned woodland half a league by four furlongs (2.2 square kilometres). In 1564 the diocesan returns show a population of 57 families within Burbage and 6 at Sketchley. Burbage, for many centuries a small farming community, remained very thinly populated. In the census of 1801 there were 1098 inhabitants. It was not until the twentieth century that the population exceeded 2000. During the English Civil War the village's proximity to Hinckley drew it to the attention of raiding parties from the local parliamentary garrisons in north Warwickshire. A list of claims submitted by the constables of Burbage
    6.20
    5 votes
    46
    Alfriston

    Alfriston

    Alfriston (pronounced All-friston) is a village and civil parish in the Sussex district of Wealden, England. The village lies in the valley of the River Cuckmere, about four miles (6 km) north-east of Seaford and south of the main A27 trunk road and part of the large area of Polegate. The parish has a population of 769 (2001 census). Most of these notes have been adapted from the Village Reference website There is strong evidence of ancient occupation of the area, since several Neolithic long barrows have been discovered on the surrounding Downs; among them, to the west is the fairly well preserved Long Burgh. In Saxon times the village was recorded as Aelfrictun (the town of Alfric), from which the Domesday Book records the town as 'Elfricesh-tun'. One building of historical importance is the Star Inn. Originally a religious hostel built in 1345 and used to accommodate monks and pilgrims en route from Battle Abbey to the shrine of St Richard, patron saint of Sussex, at Chichester Cathedral, it became an inn in the 16th century. Wooden figures grace the upper part of the building, whilst in the front is a one-time ship's figurehead representing a red lion. The latter is connected
    9.50
    2 votes
    47
    Carlton Husthwaite

    Carlton Husthwaite

    Carlton Husthwaite is a village and civil parish in the Hambleton district of North Yorkshire, England, about six miles south of Thirsk. According to the 2001 census it had a population of 167. The village was listed in the Domesday book.
    9.50
    2 votes
    48
    Hopton

    Hopton

    Hopton is a hamlet in the English county of Derbyshire. It is south west of Wirksworth and at the northern end of Carsington Water. The village had a long association with the Gell family who had extensive lead mining interests in the Wirksworth area and lived at Hopton Hall. Notable members include Sir John Gell who was a Parliamentarian in the English Civil War and Sir William Gell who was an archaeologist. The famous Hopton Incline of the Cromford and High Peak Railway, (now disused and part of the High Peak Trail and Pennine Bridleway), is about 1 mile north of the village.
    9.50
    2 votes
    49
    Ingham

    Ingham

    Ingham is a small village and civil parish in the English county of Norfolk. It lies close to the village of Stalham, and is about 2 miles from Sea Palling on the North Sea coast. The civil parish has an area of 6.13 km (2.37 sq mi) and in the 2001 census had a population of 376 in 153 households. For the purposes of local government, the parish falls within the district of North Norfolk. Ingham is mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1086 were it has the name of Hincham. Possible etymologies are "homestead or village of a man called Inga" or "home of the Inguiones" (an ancient Germanic tribe). Oliver Ingham lived here and his son-in-law Miles Stapleton of Bedale, Yorkshire, inherited jure uxoris. There are the remains of a priory and the Ingham Poor's Allotment. The village has one public house which is called the Swan. It is one of only two public houses tied to the Woodforde’s Brewery of Woodbastwick in Norfolk. The original building was built in the 14th Century and was originally part of Ingham Priory until its destruction under Henry VIII in the 16th Century. In spring 2010 chef Daniel Smith and business partner Gregory Adjemian took ownership of the Swan, renaming it as The
    9.50
    2 votes
    50
    West Caister

    West Caister

    West Caister is a village and civil parish in the English county of Norfolk. It is situated just inland from the coast, some 2 km (1.2 mi) from the seaside resort of Caister-on-Sea and 4 km (2.5 mi) north of the town of Great Yarmouth. The civil parish has an area of 6.85 km (2.64 sq mi) and in the 2001 census had a population of 195 in 83 households. For the purposes of local government, the parish falls within the district of Great Yarmouth. West Caister is the site of Caister Castle, a 15th-century moated castle built by Sir John Fastolf, who was the inspiration for William Shakespeare's Falstaff. The great Thomas Ward lived much of his life there adjacent to the main part of the village next to its close neighbour Ormesby St Margaret"
    9.50
    2 votes
    51
    Chudleigh

    Chudleigh

    Chudleigh is a small town in Devon, England located between Newton Abbot and Exeter. Chudleigh is very close to the edge of Dartmoor and bypassed by the A38 road in 1972. Nearby Castle Dyke is an Iron Age Hill Fort which demonstrates far earlier settlement in the area. Chudleigh has expanded a good deal in recent years as commuter houses have been built around its edges, but it still retains a fairly traditional village centre. Local Amenities include There is a Primary School located in the centre. Nearby "the Rock" is a natural beauty spot and attracts rock climbers who scale the range of routes on the (limestone) crag. There has been an annual carnival each summer which draws a large crowd from the surrounding area. This did not take place in 2006, but the carnival has returned since July 2007. The heated outdoor community swimming pool is located within the grounds of Chudleigh Primary School and is open to the public all summer. The weather conditions in Devon in the year 1807 have been described as a drought. Weeks without rain left many people short of water and had farmers worrying about their crops. There was a bakery in Culver Street (now New Exeter Street) and around
    7.00
    4 votes
    52
    Ellingham

    Ellingham

    Ellingham is a civil parish in Northumberland, England. Ellingham First School, which is C of E Aided.
    7.00
    4 votes
    53
    St Ives

    St Ives

    St Ives is a market town in Cambridgeshire, England, around 24 kilometres (15 mi) north-west of the city of Cambridge and 110 kilometres (68 mi) north of London. It lies within the historic county boundaries of Huntingdonshire. Previously called Slepe, its name was changed to St Ives after the body, claimed to be that of a Persian bishop, of Saint Ivo (not to be confused with Ivo of Kermartin), was found buried in the town in about 1001/2. For the past 1,000 years it has been home to some of the biggest markets in the country, and in the thirteenth century it was an important entrepôt, and remains an important market in East Anglia. Built on the banks of the wide River Great Ouse between Huntingdon and Ely, St Ives has a famous chapel on its bridge. In the Anglo-Saxon era, St Ives's position on the river Great Ouse was strategic, as it controlled the last natural crossing point or ford on the river, 80 kilometres (50 mi) from the sea. The flint reef in the bed of the river at this point gave rise to a ford, which then provided the foundations for the celebrated bridge. During the 18th and 19th centuries, St Ives was a hub of trade and navigation and the town had dozens of inns and
    7.00
    4 votes
    54
    West Wittering

    West Wittering

    West Wittering is a small village and civil parish, on the Manhood Peninsula, in the Chichester district of West Sussex, England. It lies near the mouth of Chichester Harbour on the B2179 road 6.5 miles (10.5 km) southwest of Chichester and has a sandy beach with what has been described as excellent water quality. In 1872 it had a population of 616, a post office and a National School. The 2001 census records a population of 2,684. There is a thriving primary school. The locality is referred to in Giles Cooper's Unman, Wittering and Zigo. Part of the Site of Special Scientific Interest Bracklesham Bay runs in between the coastline in the parish. Chichester Harbour, a Site of Special Scientific Interest is partly within the parish. This is a wetland of international importance, a Special Protection Area for wild birds and a Special Area of Conservation. The harbour is of particular importance for wintering wildfowl and waders of which five species reach numbers which are internationally important. Media related to West Wittering at Wikimedia Commons
    7.00
    4 votes
    55
    North Elmham

    North Elmham

    North Elmham is a village and civil parish in the English county of Norfolk. It covers an area of 19.20 km (7.41 sq mi) and had a population of 1,428 in 624 households as of the 2001 census. For the purposes of local government, it falls within the district of Breckland. The Village is located along the B1145 a route which runs between King's Lynn and Mundesley. The village is about 8 km (5.0 mi) north of East Dereham on the west bank of the River Wensum. North Elmham was the site of a pre-Norman cathedral, seat of the Bishop of Elmham until 1075. The name North Elmham comes from the Old English, meaning "village where elms grow" and is first mentioned in 1035. Only ruins now survive of the Saxon cathedral. It housed the episcopal throne of the bishops of Elmham from around 672 until the episcopal see was moved to Thetford in 1075. A mid-ninth century copper-alloy hanging censer was discovered at North Elmham in 1786. The earthworks and ruins at North Elmham stewarded by English Heritage are thought to be the remains of Bishop Herbert de Losinga's late eleventh-century episcopal church and the late fourteenth century double-moated castle built on this by Henry le Despenser, Bishop
    6.00
    5 votes
    56
    Ancroft

    Ancroft

    Ancroft is a village and civil parish in Northumberland, England. Prior to 1844, Ancroft lay within the Islandshire exclave of County Durham. It is south of Berwick-upon-Tweed, and has a population of 885. There are several suggestions as to how Ancroft got its name. It might be an abridged version of "Aidan's-croft" - the croft of St Aidan who was the first Bishop of Lindisfarne (Holy Island). Alternatively, it might be that as the church is dedicated to Saint Anne, the village took its name from the church - "St Anne's croft". A third suggestion is simply that it means one croft or solitary croft - "ane croft". There was surely more than one croft here when the church was built, probably towards the end of the 11th century; but in common with most of this region, the community declined in the latter part of the 13th century because of the continual border raids by the Scots. This turbulent history is reflected in the number of castles and peel towers in the vicinity, besides the fortified tower that was added to the church in the thirteenth century. Because of the repeated incursions by Scots, this northern part of what we now call Northumberland was placed in the charge of the
    8.00
    3 votes
    57
    Caterham on the Hill

    Caterham on the Hill

    Caterham-on-the-Hill is a civil parish in the Tandridge District of Surrey. It has a population of 11,555 and is the oldest part of Caterham. The parish council clerk is Helen Broughton. The Caterham Barracks Trust run some facilities at the site of the former Caterham Barracks Guards Depot. The site is occupied by a supermarket, housing and various leisure facilities, including an arts centre (The Arc) an indoor Skate park (wittily called Skaterham) housed in the former Guard's chapel. The former Battle of Britain airfield RAF Kenley is approximately one mile away. Terry Waite and David Stirling (the founder of the SAS) trained at the barracks. A number of films / TV series were fully or partially filmed at the barracks. They Were Not Divided filmed by Two Cities Films and Invasion: Earth series filmed by the BBC. In 1975 an IRA bomb exploded in the Caterham Arms public house injuring 10 off-duty soldiers and 23 civilians. Caterham Asylum, later known as Caterham Mental Hospital and later still as Saint Lawrence's Hospital was a large establishment. Joey Deacon lived there. Most of the site had now been redeveloped as housing but a few buildings remain, although they are now empty
    8.00
    3 votes
    58
    Fovant

    Fovant

    Fovant is a medium-sized village and civil parish in southwest Wiltshire, England. It is located between Salisbury and Shaftesbury on the A30 road in the Nadder valley. Its name is derived from the Old English Fobbefunta, meaning "spring of a man called Fobbe". It has a population of 683. It is principally known for several regimental badges cut in chalk into a nearby hill (also being the site of Chiselbury Iron age hillfort), created by soldiers garrisoned near Fovant during the First World War. The church of St George is at the north end of the village. Dating from the 13c., it is constructed largely of local Chilmark stone. The tower contains a peal of 6 bells. The oldest from the 15c., four from the 19c. and one from the 20c. Originally with three public houses, an unusual occurrence in a small village, Fovant has one functioning pub, The Pembroke Arms, which has changed ownership a number of times in recent years. Fovant also has a village playing field and playground. Fovant has a post office (closed April 2011 but re-opened in the village shop), village shop and a doctor's surgery all at the south end of the village. There is also a stream that runs through the village. The
    8.00
    3 votes
    59
    Hincaster

    Hincaster

    Hincaster is a small hamlet and civil parish in the South Lakeland district of Cumbria, England, located between Kendal and Milnthorpe. It has a population of 195. Hincaster is most famous for the Hincaster Tunnel which is the longest tunnel on the Lancaster Canal. The building of Hincaster tunnel removed the major obstacle on the northern section of the canal. Faced with limestone, 378 yards (346 m) long, it is lined with something like four million bricks; these in a district where bricks were generally scarce as building material, were made from clay dug at Mosside Farm, on the canalside about 0.5 miles (0.80 km) south south east of Milness, by the present A65. On 4 February 1817, it was reported that 'two million bricks had been made and half the length of the tunnel completed'. The Mosside brickworks were too efficient, for in 1818, Thomas Fletcher, the canal engineer, put up for sale 10,000 bricks, left over from the tunnel. These clay pits and the brickworks were resuscitated in 1845, employing over 100 men and 30 horses; these bricks were made for the new Lancaster to Carlisle railway. Navvies, the tough canal 'navigators' who were to dig the Hincaster section, attended the
    8.00
    3 votes
    60
    Wrotham

    Wrotham

    Wrotham (/ˈruːtəm/) is a village situated on the Pilgrims' Way in Kent, at the foot of the North Downs. It is located one mile north of Borough Green and approximately five miles east of Sevenoaks. It is within the junction of the M20 and M26 motorways. The village has a high number of pubs; there are three within a hundred yards of each other. They are The Rose and Crown, The George and Dragon and The Bull Inn. There is a separate village called Wrotham Heath about two miles to the south-east. Close by is the Wrotham transmitting station, which was the first transmitter in the UK to broadcast on FM in 1955, and now carries the main national FM radio frequencies for most of London. Wrotham shows extensive signs of occupation by the Romans, and it has been claimed that the Wrotham Pinot, a disease-resistant variety of the Pinot noir grape found in Wrotham churchyard, is descended from vines brought by the Romans. Wrotham is in the parliamentary constituency of Tonbridge and Malling. Since the constituency's creation in 1974, its Member of Parliament has been Sir John Stanley of the Conservative Party. The village is within the local government district of Tonbridge and Malling, and
    8.00
    3 votes
    61
    Chapel Allerton

    Chapel Allerton

    Chapel Allerton is a village and civil parish, south of Cheddar in the English county of Somerset. The parish includes the hamlets of Ashton and Stone Allerton. The name comes from "Aelfweard's settlement", with the chapel prefix being added in 1708 to distinguish it from the adjourning Stone Allerton. The manor was brought in 1492 by John Gunthorpe and passed to the Bishop of Wells. Chapel Allerton was part of the hundred of Bempstone. Chapel Allerton forms part of Sedgemoor district and is located southwest of Cheddar. It is noted for the striking Ashton windmill nearby. The parish council has responsibility for local issues, including setting an annual precept (local rate) to cover the council’s operating costs and producing annual accounts for public scrutiny. The parish council evaluates local planning applications and works with the local police, district council officers, and neighbourhood watch groups on matters of crime, security, and traffic. The parish council's role also includes initiating projects for the maintenance and repair of parish facilities, as well as consulting with the district council on the maintenance, repair, and improvement of highways, drainage,
    6.75
    4 votes
    62
    Deeping Gate

    Deeping Gate

    Deeping Gate is a village and civil parish, lying on the River Welland in Cambridgeshire. Traditionally, the area was part of the Soke of Peterborough, geographically considered a part of Northamptonshire; it now falls within the City of Peterborough unitary authority area. With a very small population, void of any major services, including a post office or even a chapel, the community depends on nearby Market Deeping, one and a quarter miles (2 km) north of the river in Lincolnshire, for economic and market services. Renaissance composer Robert Fayrfax was a native of the village. St. Peter's, Maxey, the most northerly ecclesiastical parish in the Diocese of Peterborough, includes Deeping Gate. For local government purposes it forms part of Northborough ward, within North West Cambridgeshire parliamentary constituency. Deeping Gate falls within the drainage area of the Welland and Deepings Internal Drainage Board.
    6.75
    4 votes
    63
    Hauxwell

    Hauxwell

    Hauxwell or East Hauxwell is a village and civil parish in the Richmondshire district of North Yorkshire, England. It is located south of Catterick Garrison. Media related to Hauxwell at Wikimedia Commons
    6.75
    4 votes
    64
    Thornley

    Thornley

    See also Thornley in Weardale. Thornley is a village in County Durham, in England. It is situated about 5 miles (9 km) to the east of Durham and 5 miles (7 km) west of Peterlee. Thornley is part of the Sedgefield parliamentary constituency of which Tony Blair was the Member of Parliament from 1983 until 2007. As with most villages in the area, it grew rapidly with the development of coal-mining in the region. The first shaft was sunk in 1835 and the first coals were delivered via a new mineral railway line to Hartlepool shortly thereafter. The village thus played a major role in the development of Hartlepool as a port. Thornley miners played a key role in the formation of the Durham Miners' Association, the first meeting of which was held in the grounds of the village's Half-Way House public house in 1869. The colliery closed in 1970 with the loss of over 900 jobs and there is now little evidence to be seen of its once extensive plant and machinery. Easington Rural District Council's policy in the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s was to actively discourage development and employment in the ex-colliery villages of East Durham in favour of the new town of Peterlee. One of the oldest surviving
    6.75
    4 votes
    65
    Barlaston

    Barlaston

    Barlaston is a village and civil parish in the borough of Stafford in the county of Staffordshire, England. It is roughly halfway between the city of Stoke-on-Trent and the small town of Stone. According to the 2001 census the population of the parish was 2,659. The old parish church of Saint John is sited on the edge of the Wedgwood estate. It was built to the design of C. Lynam in 1886-8, retaining the west tower from the original medieval building, with the subsequent addition of a vestry in 1969. In 1981 the building had to be closed owing to mining subsidence and a temporary building next to the church took its place until the new church was built on Green Lane. Wedgwood moved their pottery manufacturing business from Etruria, Staffordshire to a large modern factory in a new village in the north of the parish. The factory was planned in 1936 and built in 1938-40 to the designs of Keith Murray who was also a designer of Wedgwood pottery. The factory has a tourist visitor centre and has its own car-parks and a bus station. Wedgwood railway station was opened for the factory in 1940 but closed in 2004. Nearby is Barlaston Hall c1756 by Sir Robert Taylor (architect) and at one
    9.00
    2 votes
    66
    Kilburn

    Kilburn

    Kilburn is a village and civil parish in the English county of Derbyshire, known as Kilbourne until around 100 years ago. Forming part of the borough of Amber Valley, Kilburn has small amenities for the people who live there including a local police station, community officer and several parks for young children. There are two takeaway restaurants, Kilburn Fish Bar which serves traditional British fish and chip cuisine, and a Chinese restaurant, Jade Garden. There are two shops in the village - News Shop which is a medium sized newsagent, and the newly opened Metro Stores, a slightly larger premises which stocks more foodstuffs and sundries. There used to be a SPAR (previously known as Windmill Stores) in a central location, although this has now closed down. It is believed there is now planning permission for houses in place to replace the now vacant shop. There is also a post office on Highfield Rd, but this serves few goods beyond stationery or items associated with the postal service. There is also a salon on Highfield Road, Ghost, that offers a range of beauty treatments. It was once served by Kilburn railway station on the Midland Railway Ripley Branch. Kilburn has three
    9.00
    2 votes
    67
    Cubley, Derbyshire

    Cubley, Derbyshire

    Cubley is a parish of two closely linked villages six miles (10 km) south of Ashbourne in Derbyshire. St Andrews Church is in Cubley parish. Great Cubley and Little Cubley are known collectively as Cubley. The church lies roughly equidistant from the two, but is technically in Great Cubley. Cubley is mentioned in the Domesday book where it is spelt Cobelei. The book says under the title of “The lands of Henry de Ferrers ”In Cubley Siward had two carucates of land to the geld. There is land for two ploughs. There are now two ploughs in demesne and four villans and four bordars and one slave having one plough. There is a priest and a church and one mill rendering 12 pence and eight acres of meadow and woodland pasture one league long and one league broad. TRE worth 100 shillings now 40 shillings. Ralph holds it.“
    7.67
    3 votes
    68
    Harome

    Harome

    Harome is a small village and civil parish in the Ryedale district of North Yorkshire, England. It is on the River Rye and 2 miles south east of Helmsley. Media related to Harome at Wikimedia Commons
    7.67
    3 votes
    69
    Holsworthy

    Holsworthy

    Holsworthy is a market town in the north west of Devon, England. It is situated near the county border with Cornwall, and is 9 miles from the coastal resort of Bude. It is on the intersection of the A388 and A3072 roads, and lies on the River Deer, a tributary of the Tamar. The population increased by 15% from 1981 to 1999 and was estimated at 2,116: the census figure for 2001 is 2,256. Holsworthy is a historic market town with hundreds of years of history and is mentioned in the Domesday Book, as being part of the estate of Harold Godwinson. The town has occupied a hill top site since Saxon times, and in 1154 became a safe trading centre (known as a port town). The date of the original charter for the market and charter fair is between 1154 and 1185. At that time, the spokesman for the inhabitants was known as the portreeve and the ruling council as the court leet. The Court Leet used to hold their tribunals beneath the Great Tree, and a metal disc set in the road on Stanhope Street marks the site. A second charter was granted by King James I in 1614 and this is proclaimed by the town crier on Wednesday of St Peter’s Fair. Holsworthy is twinned with Aunay-sur-Odon, Calvados,
    7.67
    3 votes
    70
    Allostock

    Allostock

    Allostock is a village and civil parish in the unitary authority of Cheshire West and Chester and the ceremonial county of Cheshire, England, about five miles south of Knutsford. It has a population of 783 (2001 census).
    10.00
    1 votes
    71
    Barton Blount

    Barton Blount

    Barton Blount is a village and civil parish in the South Derbyshire district of Derbyshire, England, situated between Derby and Uttoxeter. According to the 2001 census it had a population of 74. During the civil war in October 1644, during the reign of Charles I, the manor-house was garrisoned for the parliament, and a skirmish took place in the neighbourhood between these forces and the royal troops from Tutbury Castle. This manor house, Barton Hall was the home of Francis Bradshaw who was High Sheriff of Derbyshire in 1851.
    10.00
    1 votes
    72
    Burnham-on-Crouch

    Burnham-on-Crouch

    Burnham-on-Crouch is a town in the Maldon District of Essex in the East of England. It lies on the north bank of the River Crouch. It is one of Britain's leading places to go yachting. Historically, it has benefited from its location on the coast - first as a ferry port, later as a fishing port known for its oyster beds, and most recently as a centre for yachting. There are many listed buildings in the town, including the Grade II* listed Royal Corinthian Yacht Club designed in 1931 by the modernist architect Joseph Emberton. The Mangapps Railway Museum is located nearby. Although the town has a population of little over 7,500, it is the principal settlement in the wider Dengie peninsula area (population 20,000), meaning it has facilities that are uncommon in small towns, such as a cinema, a laundrette, a post office, 22 licensed drinking establishments and three pharmacies. Burnham-on-Crouch holds a bi-annual charity fund-raising pub crawl, an event which first took place in June 2007. Typically more than 100 local people walk through the town in themed fancy dress raising money for The Samaritans. There is both a summer and winter edition of the crawl. The town has a community
    10.00
    1 votes
    73
    Kemerton

    Kemerton

    Kemerton is a village and civil parish in Worcestershire in England. It lies at the extreme south of the county in the local government district of Wychavon. Until boundary changes in 1931, it formed part of neighbouring Gloucestershire, and it remains in the Diocese of Gloucester. The northern half of the parish lies within the Cotswolds Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The parish is approximately 5.8 km (3.6 miles) long by 1.2 km (0.7 miles) wide, and encompasses approximately 6.738 square kilometres (1,665 acres). It descends from the summit of Bredon Hill in the north, (elevation 300 m / 981 ft) to the Carrant Brook in the south (elevation 20 m / 65 ft). The north and south parish boundaries are recorded in a Saxon charter of the 8th-century. Notable historic features include Kemerton Camp, an Iron Age hill fort surmounting Bredon Hill, thought to have been vacated suddenly after a considerable battle. On the fort’s south rampart is a two-storey stone tower known as Parsons Folly (or Kemerton Tower), built in the mid-18th century by John Parsons V, MP (1732–1805), the squire of Kemerton, who reputedly wished to raise the summit of Bredon Hill to 1000 ft (305 m). Significant
    10.00
    1 votes
    74
    Kents Hill, Monkston and Brinklow

    Kents Hill, Monkston and Brinklow

    Monkston, Kents Hill and Brinklow is a civil parish that covers the Kents Hill, Brinklow, Monkston, Monkston Park and Kingston districts of Milton Keynes. As the first tier of Local Government, the Parish Council is responsible for the people, living and working in this area of Milton Keynes. The Parish was formed in 2001 as part of a general parishing of the Borough of Milton Keynes. The population according to the 2001 census was 4,545. It is bounded by Chaffron Way, the Broughton Brook, Newport Road, Groveway, Brickhill Street, Standing Way, and the River Ouzel. The west side of this district contains part of the Open University campus (the buildings originally belonged to De Montfort University), the Accenture training centre and the Hilton Hotel. The rest of the district is residential, much of it overlooking a large recreational area. There is a local shop, a church, three parks and three 11-a-side football pitches in the district. There is also a school which consists of a nursery and a first school. This is primarily a residential district based around a large circular recreational area and a combined school. The area that was to become Milton Keynes was relatively rich:
    10.00
    1 votes
    75
    Long Wittenham

    Long Wittenham

    Long Wittenham is a village and civil parish about 3 miles (5 km) north of Didcot, and 3.5 miles (5.6 km) southeast of Abingdon. It was part of Berkshire until the 1974 boundary changes transferred it from Berkshire to Oxfordshire, and from the former Wallingford Rural District to the new district of South Oxfordshire. The village is by a loop in the River Thames, on slightly higher ground than the flood-plain around it. About 1 mile (1.6 km) to the east, across the river, is the Roman town of Dorcic – now Dorchester-on-Thames. To the south-east are neighbouring Little Wittenham and the Wittenham Clumps, also called the Sinodun Hills. The village is supposedly named after a Saxon chieftain, named Witta, but there is evidence of earlier settlement. Bronze Age double-ditch enclosures and middle Bronze Age pottery were identified in the 1960s, and early Bronze Age items, such as an axe and spearhead, have been found in the Thames. Later settlement evidence is more extensive: Iron Age and Roman presence is indicated by trackways, various buildings (enclosures, farms and villas), burials (cremation and inhumation), and pottery and coins. There is also evidence of possible Frankish
    10.00
    1 votes
    76
    Merevale

    Merevale

    Merevale is a Village and Civil Parish in the North Warwickshire district of the county of Warwickshire in England. Located about one and a half miles west of Atherstone, it is the site of a medieval Cistercian Abbey (founded in 1148) and Merevale Hall, (built in 1840 and home to the Dugdale family). An abbey was built in Merevale in 1148 by Robert de Ferrers the Earl of Derby, it was a relatively small abbey with only around 10 monks, The abbey of Merevale itself was dissolved in October 1538, during the reign of Henry VIII and fell into ruin, but some traces of it still remain to the present day. One of the most significant parts of the abbey to have survived is the Gate Chapel, which is now used as the parish church. The church is significant for its Cistercian stained glass, including its famous Jesse window (one of the most important in the British Isles), and for being the only Cistercian Gate Chapel to be open for regular weekly services throughout the year. Designed by Edward Blore, Merevale Hall was completed in 1840 and has been the home of the descendants of Sir William Dugdale since this time. Dugdale was a strong royalist supporter of King Charles I during the English
    10.00
    1 votes
    77
    Northill

    Northill

    Northill is a village and civil parish in the county of Bedfordshire, England. It falls under the Northill and Blunham ward in the Central Bedfordshire local authority. As of 2001 Northill had a population of about 900 people. The village is also the administrative centre of the civil parish of Northill, which as of 2001 had a population of 2,288. The parish includes the hamlets of Budna, Lower and Upper Caldecote, Hatch, Ickwell and Thorncote Green. The village is located about 4 miles to the west north west of Biggleswade and is centred around a T-junction, which sees the Ickwell Road meet the Bedford Road. Topographically, Northill is situated on a slightly elevated ridge that run from north to south, and the surrounding terrain comprises parkland and woodland.It has a school, pub and church. Part of the ancient hundred of Wixamtree, the village was originally known as North Givell, meaning the northern part of territory of the River Ivel. The place-name is first evidenced in the Domesday Book of 1086. The core of the village's buildings date back to the 14th century. To this day many examples of thatched roofing exist around Northill. Among the buildings stemming from the 14th
    10.00
    1 votes
    78
    Cockley Cley

    Cockley Cley

    Cockley Cley is a village and civil parish in the English county of Norfolk. It covers an area of 17.94 km (6.93 sq mi) and had a population of 138 in 58 households as of the 2001 census. For the purposes of local government, it falls within the district of Breckland. Its church, All Saints, is one of 124 existing round-tower churches in Norfolk. It was restored in 1866-1888 by diocesan architect Richard Phipson. In 1991 part of the tower collapsed. The interior was not harmed and still exhibits the Victorian idea of how a church should look. The north arcade is 14th century, and it has been copied for the south arcade.
    6.50
    4 votes
    79
    Gayton

    Gayton

    Gayton is a small village in the west of the English county of Norfolk. It is 7.3 miles east of the town of King's Lynn, and 10.1 miles north-west of the town of Swaffham. The Gaywood River has its source just north of the village at Derby Fen. The village sides astride of the B1145 Kings Lynn to Mundesley road that dissects North Norfolk west to east. The village has a primary school, Gayton Church of England Voluntary Controlled Primary School, which was a first school but in March 2011 gained full primary status. The school will grow to possess the full primary age range by September 2013. The church in Gayton is St Nicholas church. There are two pubs in the village, The Rampant Horse and The Crown. The village also has two butcher's shops, a child care/daycare centre, a hair salon, a fish and chip shop and petrol station combining convenience shop/post office. The village has a windmill and is twinned with nearby Middleton. Media related to Gayton, Norfolk at Wikimedia Commons
    6.50
    4 votes
    80
    North Rigton

    North Rigton

    North Rigton is a village and civil parish in the Harrogate district of North Yorkshire, England. It is situated 2 miles south of Harrogate. Almscliffe Crag adjacent to the village was used for scenery at the end of Yorkshire Television dramas, The Beiderbecke Affair, The Beiderbecke Tapes and The Beiderbecke Connection. The area was never referred to by name.
    5.60
    5 votes
    81
    Ashby-de-la-Zouch

    Ashby-de-la-Zouch

    Ashby-de-la-Zouch /ˈzuːʃ/, often shortened to Ashby, is a small market town and civil parish in North West Leicestershire, England, within the National Forest. It is twinned with Pithiviers in north-central France. Ashby-de-la-Zouch castle was of importance from the 15th to the 17th centuries. In the 19th century the town became a spa town and before the growth of Coalville it was the chief town in north-west Leicestershire. In the 19th century its main industries were ribbon manufacture, coal mining and brickmaking. The town was served by the Leicester to Burton upon Trent Line of the Midland Railway from 1849. The civil parish includes the hamlet of Shellbrook west of the town. Nearby villages include Normanton le Heath, Packington, Donisthorpe, Oakthorpe, Measham, Coleorton and Moira. "Ashby" is a word of Anglo-Danish origin, meaning "Ash-tree farm" or "Ash-tree settlement". The Norman French addition dates from the years after the Norman conquest of England, when the town became a possession of the La Zouche family during the reign of Henry III. Ashby de la Zouch Castle was built in the 12th century. The town and castle came into the possession of the Hastings family in 1464
    8.50
    2 votes
    82
    Aspatria

    Aspatria

    Aspatria (/ˌæsˈpeɪtriə/) is a civil parish in the non-metropolitan district of Allerdale, and is currently embraced in the Parliamentary constituency of Workington. Historically within Cumberland the town rests on the north side of the Ellen Valley, overlooking a panoramic view of the countryside, with Skiddaw to the South and the Solway Firth to the North. Its location is in an east west direction on the main A596, Carlisle to Workington road and extends approximately 2 miles (3 km) in length. It lies about 8 miles (12 km) to the Northeast of Maryport, a similar distance to the Southwest of Wigton, about 9 miles (14 km) north of Cockermouth and 5 miles (8 km) from the coast and Allonby. The parish is bounded on the North by the parishes of Bromfield and Westnewton; on the West by Gilcrux and Crosscannonby; on the South by Plumbland and Torpenow; and on the East by Bromfield and Allhallows. It comprises the townships of Aspatria and Brayton, Hayton and Mealo, and Oughterside and Allerby. The united area being 8,345 acres; while the township embraces an area of 1,600 acres. In earlier days a Roman road leading from "Old Carlisle" to Ellenborough passed through the hamlet. The
    8.50
    2 votes
    83
    Bradley, Derbyshire

    Bradley, Derbyshire

    Bradley is a parish in Derbyshire just to the east of Ashbourne. Other neighbouring parishes include Hulland and Yeldersley. The parish church of All Saints is 14th century, with an aisleless nave and chancel, but no tower. There was an 18th century wooden bell-turret, but this has been removed. The bell is attached to the rear wall. Hole-in-the-Wall is a pair of brick tenements dated 1750-51, with a central road arch. Bradley was mentioned in the Domesday book as belonging to Henry de Ferrers and being worth twenty shillings. The following lines are by Sir Aston Cockayne and begin a commendation of Bancroft's poem:
    8.50
    2 votes
    84
    Fairford

    Fairford

    Fairford is a small town in Gloucestershire, England. The town lies in the Cotswolds on the River Coln, about 6 miles (9.7 km) east of Cirencester, 4 miles (6.4 km) west of Lechlade and 9 miles (14 km) north of Swindon. Nearby are RAF Fairford and the Cotswold Water Park. The town's secondary school is Farmor's School, an 11-18 co-educational Academy. The school is judged to be of outstanding standard, having achieved grade 1 in its Ofsted inspection in 2010. There is also a primary school, Fairford Primary, and a playgroup. Every year RAF Fairford hosts the world's largest military air show – the Royal International Air Tattoo. The event brings a boost to economy of the town and surrounding areas. In March 2003 "Flowers to Fairford" was held as a protest against the use of USAF Fairford as the base for the 14 B-52 bombers aircraft which were used to bomb Iraq. Several thousand people attended and there was a large police presence, but the event passed off peacefully and without incident. The Ernest Cook Trust has its headquarters in Fairford Park, which also hosts the annual Fairford Steam Rally and Show. This is attended by many hundreds of enthusiasts . In July 2007 Fairford
    8.50
    2 votes
    85
    Hargrave

    Hargrave

    Hargrave is a village in the St Edmundsbury district of Suffolk, England, about 7 miles (10 km) south west of Bury St Edmunds. Lying at the crossroads from Ousden and Lady's Green (west) and Chevington (east). Barrow, Suffolk (North) and Wickhambrook (in the South). The village has approximately 120 dwellings, two Churches and a Village Hall (built and funded by the village). Around the turn of the first millennium, East Anglia was continuously being ravaged by invading Danes, leading to questions as to whether the nineteen local residents recorded in the Domesday Survey (1086) were surviving East Angles or were of Scandinavian origin. Prior to the Norman Conquest, the manor lands of Haragraua (Hares Grove) had been held by Aluiet, one of four Freewomen of West Suffolk, and it is recorded that she held 480 acres (1.9 km) of land and the church. Some four fifths of the medieval churches of Suffolk were already in existence at the time of the Conquest and it is probable that Hargrave was one of them, although the oldest surviving fabric of the building dates from the Norman period of architecture. It is also probable that a medieval Hall existed in the vicinity of the present church
    8.50
    2 votes
    86
    Marholm, Cambridgeshire

    Marholm, Cambridgeshire

    Marholm is a civil parish in the city of Peterborough, Cambridgeshire in the United Kingdom. For electoral purposes it forms part of Northborough ward in North West Cambridgeshire constituency. The chancel at the parish church of St. Mary the Virgin, Marholm was re-built by Sir William Fitzwilliam towards the end of the pre-Reformation period.
    8.50
    2 votes
    87
    Taddington

    Taddington

    Taddington is a village in Derbyshire, England. It lies over 1100 feet above sea level, on the former A6 road between Buxton and Bakewell, in the Derbyshire Dales district. To the east, the A6 runs through Taddington Dale, while Taddington Moor lies to the west. Taddington grew around farming and quarrying for limestone and lead. From 1863 to 1967 the village was served by Millers Dale railway station, some 2 miles away, which was on the Midland Railway's extension of the Manchester, Buxton, Matlock and Midlands Junction Railway. The village's main attractions are Five Wells chambered tomb topped by a cairn, and the fourteenth century church, with the remains of a seventh century Celtic cross in the churchyard. The two-metre high cross shaft is decorated with an unusual chevron-based pattern. It was at one time used to support a sink in the wall of a nearby public house. A further possible cross base lies in the churchyard. Notable buildings include Taddington Manor and Marlborough House. Fields around the settlement show evidence of both Celtic lynchett terraces, and of Mediaeval strip farming. Today, Taddington has two pubs, The Queens Arms (Freehouse) and The Waterloo. In 2009
    8.50
    2 votes
    88
    Babraham

    Babraham

    Babraham is a village and civil parish in the South Cambridgeshire district of Cambridgeshire, England, about six miles south-east of Cambridge on the A1307 road. Babraham is home to the Babraham Institute which undertakes research into cell and molecular biology. The parish of Babraham covers an area of 2,387 acres and is roughly rectangular in shape. Its straight northern boundary is formed by the ancient Wool Street, separating it from Fulbourn, and its eastern border follows the Icknield Way (now the A11), separating it from Little Abington. The remaining boundaries with Stapleford, Sawston and Pampisford are formed by field boundaries and a small section of the River Granta, on which the village lies. The course of the River Granta through the parish has been changed on numerous occasions; a watermill was listed as valueless in the 14th century when the river had changed course, and additional water channels have been dug for irrigation as well as to form an ornamental canal alongside Babraham Hall. Severe floods hit Babraham in both 1655 and 1749. Traces of a Roman villa have been found on its parish boundary with Stapleford. It has also been suggested that the village has
    7.33
    3 votes
    89
    Beercrocombe

    Beercrocombe

    Beercrocombe (also known as Beer Crocombe) is a village and civil parish in Somerset, England, situated on the Fivehead River, a tributary of the River Isle, 1 mile (1.6 km) south of Curry Mallet and 7 miles (11.3 km) south-east of Taunton in the South Somerset district. The village has a population of 144. The village is included in the Domesday Book under its old name Bere, which is from the Old English for pasture or possibly grove. The second part of the name comes from Godfrey de Craucombe (of Crowcombe) who was the lord of the manor in 1227. From 1402 John Harwell was the Lord of the manor. Beer Crocombe was part of the hundred of Abdick and Bulstone. From 1746 to 1751 the preacher John Wesley was a frequent visitor to the village. The Manor Farmhouse (also known as Beer Farmhouse), on Beer Street, dates from around 1600 and is grade II* listed. The parish council has responsibility for local issues, including setting an annual precept (local rate) to cover the council’s operating costs and producing annual accounts for public scrutiny. The parish council evaluates local planning applications and works with the local police, district council officers, and neighbourhood watch
    7.33
    3 votes
    90
    Garriston

    Garriston

    Garriston is a hamlet and civil parish north east of Leyburn in the Richmondshire district of North Yorkshire, England. It has a population of 22.
    7.33
    3 votes
    91
    Great Packington

    Great Packington

    Great Packington is a hamlet near Meriden, Warwickshire. It is the home of the Packington estate, including Packington Hall, Packington Old Hall and St James' Church, Great Packington. To the east of the park lies the hamlet of Outwoods.
    7.33
    3 votes
    92
    Grinshill

    Grinshill

    Grinshill is a small village, hill and civil parish in Shropshire, England, United Kingdom. The parish is one of the smallest in the district. The hill rises to 192m above sea level. Grinshill is near to the village of Clive. The A49 runs just to the east of the village. Stone has been quarried at Grinshill since at least the twelfth century. Grinshill stone is a Triassic sandstone that was described by the Pevsner Architectural Guides as the "pre-eminent" building stone of Shropshire, and has been used in buildings as varied as Haughmond Abbey, Shrewsbury railway station and Welsh Bridge. The village church is All Saints . Media related to Grinshill at Wikimedia Commons
    7.33
    3 votes
    93
    Papcastle

    Papcastle

    Papcastle is a village and civil parish in the Borough of Allerdale in the English county of Cumbria. The village is now effectively a northern extension of Cockermouth, which lies to the south of the River Derwent. It has its own parish council and lies within Bridekirk Parish for Church of England purposes. It has a population of 406, which is slowly declining. Remains of a Roman fort (or forts), Derventio, were discovered in the village and were the subject of the television programme Time Team in 1999. Further archaeological digs have been undertaken in 2011 and September 2012 which indicate that the Roman settlement was far greater than previously thought. As at September 2012 the digs are continuing but it appears that the site has national significance. A large mill with monumental masonry and the Roman wooden millrace have been discovered, as well an extensive bath house complex. It also appears that there are at least two phases of use within the development, though conclusions are yet to be finalised. The name of Papcastle is said to be a compound formed from Old Norse and Old English papi+cæster, meaning 'the Roman fort inhabited by a hermit'. Belle Vue Village Hall was
    7.33
    3 votes
    94
    Billinge

    Billinge

    Billinge is a village within the Metropolitan Borough of St Helens, in Merseyside, England. It forms the larger part of the civil parish of Billinge Chapel End. At the United Kingdom Census 2001, it had a population of 6,554. Historically a part of Lancashire, Billinge is located by road approximately 4.5 miles (7.2 km) southwest of Wigan (town centre) and 3.7 miles (5.9 km) northeast of St Helens (town centre). The Billinge parish of St Aidan is in the Wigan Deanery, which is part of the Anglican Diocese of Liverpool. Billinge may mean "(place at the) pointed hill", from Old English billa "ridge, bill of sword" and -ing "place at/people of the". The name was recorded as Bylnge in 1252. This township or civil parish lies within the historic county boundaries of Lancashire. It was in Wigan ecclesiastical parish (Deanery of Wigan) and, therefore, in the Diocese of Liverpool, previously Chester. It came to be divided into two separate townships, Billinge Chapel End and Billinge Higher End. These townships were in Wigan poor law Union. In 1872 Billinge Local Board of Health was established for the area of these two townships and two detached parts of Winstanley township (one known as
    6.25
    4 votes
    95
    Ewhurst

    Ewhurst

    Ewhurst  /ˈjuːhɜrst/) is a rural village and civil parish, connected by minor roads, near Cranleigh 2 miles (3.2 km) to the west and Shere which is around 5 miles (8.0 km) to the north in the borough of Waverley in Surrey, 8.3 miles (13.4 km) from Guildford and 28 miles (45 km) from London. The parish includes the smaller hamlets of Ellen's Green and Cox Green near the border of West Sussex and stretches in far north to the edge of the Surrey Hills AONB, specifically much of the northern area is Hurt Wood which ascends part way up the Greensand Ridge. Holmbury Hill with its Iron Age settlements in the parishes of Shere, Guildford borough and Abinger, Mole Valley borough Holmbury St Mary for early British settlers would have been a more suitable, accessible settlement than the denser woodland of this area. A roman road NNW to SSE just west of the village centre runs from Rowhook over the Sussex border where it met with England's south Stane Street (stone street) between London and Chichester the other end point is not clear however it was traced in the reign of Victoria by James Park Harrison (1816-1901)and the Rapley Roman villa's remains are west of the village: interesting
    6.25
    4 votes
    96
    Kingston

    Kingston

    Kingston is a village and civil parish near Canterbury in Kent, South East England. The village is located 5 miles to the south east of the city centre of Canterbury on the edge of the North Downs in countryside designated as an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The local church, dedicated to Saint Giles, originated during the 11th century, and is now part of the Barham Downs group of churches. The walls of the nave and about two-thirds of the present chancel are thought to be original, the chancel being extended in the 13th century. The font is also said to date from the 13th Century. The tower of a windmill stands some distance from the village. The ‘Kingston Brooch’, an important piece of Anglo-Saxon jewelry dating from the 7th Century, was discovered in a Tumulus on Kingston Downs in 1771 by Rev’d. Brian Faussett who was Rector of Kingston. It is 8 cm in diameter, made of gold, with garnet, blue glass and shell settings. Now on display in the World Museum, Liverpool.
    6.25
    4 votes
    97
    Limpley Stoke

    Limpley Stoke

    Limpley Stoke is a village and civil parish in Wiltshire, in the Avon Valley, between Bath and Freshford. The village is both above and below the A36 road. The civil parish, which had a population of 637 in 2001, also includes the hamlet of Waterhouse, and the outskirts of the Somerset village of Midford. The 18th century country house at Waterhouse used to be a residential home for the elderly. It is a Grade II listed building. In 1885 Messrs E G Browne and J C Margetson acquired a cloth mill, known as Avon Mill, on the banks of the River Avon at Limpley Stoke. The previous owners of the mill had originally been timber merchants, but had later diversified into the production of rubber goods. By 1890 the business had transferred to premises in Melksham in Wiltshire and later became Avon Rubber. The village has two public houses, one of which, The Hop Pole, which dates from the 17th century, was used in the filming of The Remains of the Day with Anthony Hopkins. Limpley Stoke railway station, on the Wessex Main Line, is closed and is now privately owned. It was the junction station for the former branch line to Camerton, Somerset, on which The Titfield Thunderbolt was filmed. The
    6.25
    4 votes
    98
    Sutton-in-the-Isle

    Sutton-in-the-Isle

    Sutton-in-the-Isle, commonly referred to simply as Sutton, is a parish and village in the county of Cambridgeshire in England, near the city of Ely. The "in-the-Isle" suffix refers to the fact that the village is part of the Isle of Ely, once an island in The Fens and also an administrative county until 1965. The village was mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1086, identified as Sudtone. There were then 9 sokemen, 8 villeins (each with 7.5 acres), 15 cotters and 7 serfs. In 1109 the charter 51 of Bishop Hervey included Suttune in the lands laid down as conferred uopn the Cathedral Priory of Ely. The vicarage of St Andrew's was instituted in 1254. The Prior's Manor of Sutton was established in 1292, according to the Ely Diocesan Registry. During the 1300s, Reginald de Beringhale of Sutton became a major landowner, following on from his father's period of "empire"-building. In 1312 Sutton was authorised to hold a street market each Thursday which was held on the wider part of the High Street outside what is now the One Stop Shop. The building of the Anglican church, dedicated to St. Andrew, was started between 1350 and 1360 and substantially completed by 1370. It has a distinctively
    6.25
    4 votes
    99
    Westerdale

    Westerdale

    Westerdale is a village, civil parish and dale within the Scarborough district of North Yorkshire, England. The Esk Valley Walk runs through part of the village. According to the 2001 UK census, Westerdale parish had a population of 175. Westerdale village is a single street of around 25 houses, to the north east of a small stream which joins the Esk near Hunters Sty bridge. There's a Church - Christ Church, and a small Wesleyan Chapel (no longer used). Close to the Church can be found the Village Hall (formerly a small schoolhouse), a postbox and a telephone box. Westerdale Side is part of Westerdale, but is best approached from near the neighbouring village of Castleton. It is accessed by a narrow road running along the southwest of Castleton Rig. Westerdale Moor is an extensive upland area surrounding the farmland in Westerdale. At its highest, Westerdale Moor rises to 429 metres in the vicinity of Ralphs Cross, and Baysdale Moor to the south-west reaches 433 metres at Stony Ridge - the second highest point of the North York Moors. Much of the moor is covered by peat and heather and descending into the dale, bilberry and some bracken can be found, with scirpus and sphagnum in
    6.25
    4 votes
    100
    Crowan

    Crowan

    Crowan (Cornish: Egloskrowenn) is a village and civil parish in Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. It is situated approximately three-and-a-half miles (6 km) south of Camborne. The River Hayle rises near Crowan and flows through the village and the railway branch to Helston passed nearby. Crowan has a population of 2,375. Crowan Churchtown is not the largest settlement: there are villages at Praze-an-Beeble, Nancegollan, Bolitho and Leedstown and a hamlet at Black Rock (on the B3280 road four miles (6.5 km) south of Camborne and five miles (8 km) north of Helston). The hamlets of Carzise, Clowance Wood, Drym, Fraddam, Gwinear Downs, Horsedowns, Nine Maidens Downs, Noonvares, Paul's Green, Releath, Townshend and Tremayne are also in the parish. The parish church is dedicated to St Crewenna and is built of granite. The Latin name of the saint is first given as Crewanus in 1201 though later forms are in the feminine. The church is of the 15th century but was substantially restored in 1872. There are numerous monuments to members of the St Aubyn family. The three St Aubyn brasses (ca. 1420, ca. 1490 & ca. 1550) are however now at Clowance. In some 18th century documents there is
    7.00
    3 votes
    101
    Downhead

    Downhead

    Downhead is a village and civil parish close to Leigh-on-Mendip and 5 miles (8 km) north east of Shepton Mallet, in the Mendip district of Somerset, England. The parish includes the medieval settlement of Tadhill. The parish of Downhead was part of the Whitstone Hundred. The village was recorded as Dunehevede, meaning the top of the down, in 1196. The manor was given to Glastonbury Abbey by King Æthelwulf of Wessex, but by 1066 was held under the abbey by Erneis. By the early 18th century the estate was held by the Portmans of Orchard Portman. Downhead Basalt Quarry to the west of the village, opened before 1904 and ceased Basalt mining in 1925. It was serviced by a 2 ft  (610 mm) narrow gauge railway. The parish council has responsibility for local issues, including setting an annual precept (local rate) to cover the council’s operating costs and producing annual accounts for public scrutiny. The parish council evaluates local planning applications and works with the local police, district council officers, and neighbourhood watch groups on matters of crime, security, and traffic. The parish council's role also includes initiating projects for the maintenance and repair of parish
    7.00
    3 votes
    102
    White Notley

    White Notley

    White Notley is a parish in Essex, England. The settlement (which includes the outlying hamlet of The Green) lies equidistant between the towns of Witham and Braintree amongst arable farmland, 4 miles in each direction. White Notley is a quintessentially English village with a small primary school, Public House, White Notley railway station, Post Office, Village Hall and a 10th Century Church. The village has a population of fewer than five hundred inhabitants. White Notley and the larger neighbouring village of Black Notley (located 3 miles to the north-west) formerly constituted one township – Notley. The name is supposed to have been derived from the Old English (Anglo-Saxon) “knut” and “ley” (meaning “nut pasture”) and is mentioned in the Domesday Book (1086 A.D.) as Nutle[i]a. The local football club, White Notley F.C., was formed on 12 May, 1950, and joined the Essex Intermediate League Division Two in 1988. In the 2001-02 season the club finished second, and was promoted to Division One. After finishing 11th out of 12 teams in the 2003-04 season, the club was relegated to Division Two, but was promoted the following season after winning the Division Two championship. In the
    7.00
    3 votes
    103
    Wickham Bishops

    Wickham Bishops

    Wickham Bishops is a village in Essex, England. The place-name 'Wickham Bishops' is first attested in the Domesday Book of 1086, where it appears as 'Wicham', meaning 'dwelling place with a (dairy) farm'. 'Bishops' refers to the fact that the land belonged to the Bishop of London. Roughly three miles from the town of Witham (which has a mainline train station on the Greater Anglia line). Also at Witham is access to the main A12 road that runs through Essex. Wickham Bishops is a popular village for London-bound rail commuters as well as those who work in the nearby towns of Chelmsford and Colchester. The village once had a railway station of its own on the Witham - Maldon East line. The line closed to passengers in 1964. Wickham Bishops has a village hall (reconstructed in 2005), playing fields, a library, tennis courts, a hairdresser, health food shop, estate agent, a One Stop local shop/off licence and two pubs - The Mitre and The Chequers. The number 90 bus service runs between Maldon to Wickham Bishops and Witham every half an hour for most of the day during Monday to Friday. There is a small library which is located in the old school building in School Road. It is only open
    7.00
    3 votes
    104
    Chiddingfold

    Chiddingfold

    Chiddingfold is a village and civil parish in the heart of The Weald in the Waverley district of Surrey, England. It lies on the A283 between Milford and Petworth. Chiddingfold Forest is a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) lying nearby. The name of Chiddingfold "Chadynge's fold", "Chiddingefoulde", is derived from the Saxon, probably meaning the fold (enclosure for animals) "in the hollow". Chiddingfold became famous for its glass-making - during the reign of Elizabeth I, there were no fewer than eleven glass works on the green. Chiddingfold glass was used in some of the finest buildings in the land, including St Stephen's Chapel, Westminster, and St George's Chapel, Windsor. The Guy Fawkes festivities has an interesting past. In 1887 the village policeman had his house attacked by a mob, and was transferred, following suspicion he had set the bonfire alight early. 1929 saw similar, with wider unrest, culminating a week later with a rumour of apprehending the innocent Sgt Brake and ducking him in the pond being met by 200 officers from all over Surrey in specially requisitioned buses; the village pubs were ordered to close and a JP was on hand to read the Riot Act should
    5.20
    5 votes
    105
    Trunch

    Trunch

    Trunch is a village and parish in Norfolk, England, situated three miles north of North Walsham and two miles from the coast at Mundesley. At the Census 2001 the village had a population of 805, and 388 households. The parish covers an area of 5.5 square kilometres (2.1 sq mi). Trunch Parish Church is the Grade I listed 14th century church of St Botolph, The church is famous for its carved and painted wood font canopy featuring lower panels with paintings of the twelve Apostles, a cornice including a Latin inscription, and above six arches filled with tracery. Only four such canopies still exist in England. St Botolph's also features a hammerbeam roof with carved angels, as well as medieval misericords under the seats in the chancel. Anther medieval survival is the rood screen depicting 11 disciples and St Paul (their faces were scratched out during the Reformation). Lord Nelson's daughter is said to have been married in the church. In 1589 Robert Thexton became the rector of Trunch. While at Cambridge University, Thexton had been the room-mate of Christopher Marlowe the famous, and infamous, Elizabethan playwright. The fictional village of St. Just-near-Trunch is known in English
    6.00
    4 votes
    106
    Ampthill

    Ampthill

    Ampthill is a small town and civil parish in Bedfordshire, England, between Bedford and Luton, with a population of about 6,000. It is administered by Central Bedfordshire Council. A regular market has taken place on Thursdays for centuries. The name 'Ampthill' is of Anglo-Saxon origin. The first settlement was called 'Aemethyll', which literally means either 'ant-heap' or 'ant infested hill'. In the Domesday Book, Ampthill is referred to as 'Ammetelle', with the landholder in 1086 being Nigel de la Vast. In 1242, King Henry III confirmed the right to hold a market on Thursdays. These continue more than 750 years later. Henry VIII was a frequent visitor to Ampthill Castle, and it was there that Catherine of Aragon lived from 1531 until divorced in 1533, when she was moved to Kimbolton. The castle was built in the 15C by Sir John Cornwall, later Lord Fanhope, from ransoms after the Battle of Agincourt. Although the Castle is now gone, some intriguing indications of castle life remain- such as the local ponds (Westminster pond being one) allegedly built to supply the castle with regular supplies of fish. The church of St Andrew ranges in date from Early English to Perpendicular. It
    8.00
    2 votes
    107
    Calstock

    Calstock

    Calstock (Cornish: Kalstok) is a civil parish and a large village in south east Cornwall, England, United Kingdom, on the border with Devon. The village is situated on the River Tamar 6 miles (9.7 km) south west of Tavistock and 10 miles (16 km) north of Plymouth. The parish had a population of 6,095 in the 2001 census. The parish encompasses 5,760 acres (23.3 km) of land, 70 acres (0.28 km) of water, and 44 acres (0.18 km) of the tidal Tamar. As well as Calstock, other settlements in the parish include Albaston, Chilsworthy, Gunnislake, Harrowbarrow, Latchley, Metherell, Coxpark, Dimson, Drakewalls, Norris Green, Rising Sun and St Ann's Chapel. Calstock village is within the Tamar Valley AONB, is overlooked by Cotehele house and gardens, and lies on the scenic Tamar Valley railway. Calstock railway station opened on 2 March 1908. The village is twinned with Saint-Thuriau in Brittany, France. There is evidence of human settlement in Calstock from Roman, or pre-Roman times, settlers attracted by the rich source of minerals, such as tin, in the area. A Roman fort, only the third known in Cornwall, was discovered next to the church in 2008. In Saxon times Calstock was in the Kingdom
    8.00
    2 votes
    108
    Knowle St Giles

    Knowle St Giles

    Knowle St Giles is a village and civil parish in the South Somerset district of Somerset, England, situated on the River Isle 2 miles (3 km) south of Ilminster and 2.5 miles (4 km) north east of Chard. The village has a population of 132. The parish includes the village of Cricket Malherbie. In the Domesday book of 1086, Knowle St Giles is recorded as having small holdings by five villani and four bordarii. In the medieval period this grew with the reclamation of forest on Windwhistle Hill. The parish of St Giles Knowles was part of the South Petherton Hundred. The parish council has responsibility for local issues, including setting an annual precept (local rate) to cover the council’s operating costs and producing annual accounts for public scrutiny. The parish council evaluates local planning applications and works with the local police, district council officers, and neighbourhood watch groups on matters of crime, security, and traffic. The parish council's role also includes initiating projects for the maintenance and repair of parish facilities, as well as consulting with the district council on the maintenance, repair, and improvement of highways, drainage, footpaths, public
    8.00
    2 votes
    109
    Liphook

    Liphook

    Liphook is a large village in the East Hampshire district of Hampshire, England. It is 4.1 miles (6.6 km) west of Haslemere, on the A3 road, and lies on the Hampshire/West Sussex border. Liphook has its own railway station, on the Portsmouth Direct Line. The village grew as a coaching stop between London and Portsmouth during the 17th and 18th centuries. The village also served as a base during the First World War and the Second World War for Canadian troops stationed in Southern England. The village grew out of the hamlet of Bramshott which was established by Norman times The first record to Liphook is in the Bramshott Manor Court Rolls to one 'Robert of Lupe' in 1281. Then follows Matilda of 'Lhupe' in 1337, William at 'Lupe' in 1365, John at 'Lepe' in 1386, and John Maunser at 'Leope' in 1423. On his death in 1428, John Maunser's tenancy at 'Lepe' between modern London Road and Headley Road is the first identifiable landmark in Liphook. Sir Edmund Pakynham inherited a tenement and land in 'Lepoke' in 1527, and John Hooke bought the manor of 'Chiltle' in 'Lippuck' in 1591. John Speed's map of 1610 shows it as Lippocke. It was also a tuppe. It seems some people escaped from the
    8.00
    2 votes
    110
    Semer

    Semer

    Semer is a small village and civil parish in Suffolk, England. Located adjacent to a bridge over the River Brett on the B1115 between Hadleigh and Stowmarket, it is part of Babergh district. The parish also contains the hamlets of Ash Street and Drakestone Green. Semer Wood, a designated wildlife site, is classified as Ancient Woodland. Media related to Semer at Wikimedia Commons
    8.00
    2 votes
    111
    South Stoke

    South Stoke

    South Stoke is a village and civil parish on the River Thames, about 1.5 miles (2.4 km) north of Goring-on-Thames in South Oxfordshire. The parish includes the hamlet and manor house of Littlestoke, 1 mile (1.6 km) north of the village. In AD 975 King Edgar granted Osweard land at Stoke, probably later the South Stoke and Offham manors. The manor passed to Eynsham Abbey in 1094. At the time of the Hundred Rolls in 1279, South Stoke had 40 tenants and only three freeholders. Woodcote, 3 miles (5 km) east of South Stoke, had developed as a dependent settlement by 1109. It was followed by Exlade Street by 1241 and Greenmoor by 1366. The Church of England parish church of Saint Andrew was built in the 13th century and still has Early English Gothic features including the three-bay arcade between the nave and the north aisles, windows in the north wall of the chancel and the east and west ends of the south and north aisle. The east window of the south aisle has late 13th century stained glass of the Virgin and Child. In the 14th century the present font was carved, a new chancel arch was built and new windows were inserted in the east and south walls of the chancel and the north and
    8.00
    2 votes
    112
    Streatley

    Streatley

    Streatley is a village and civil parish on the River Thames in Berkshire, England. Streatley is about 8 miles (13 km) from Reading and 16 miles (26 km) from Oxford. It is in the Goring Gap on the River Thames and is directly across the river from the Oxfordshire village of Goring-on-Thames. The two villages are connected by Goring and Streatley Bridge, with its adjacent lock and weir, and are often considered as a single settlement. Goring & Streatley railway station on the Great Western Main Line is in Goring and serves both villages. The village is mostly surrounded by National Trust land: Lardon Chase, the Holies and Lough Down. The Ridgeway long distance path passes through the village, which is the finishing line for the annual "Ridgeway 40" walk and trail run. The Thames Path, Icknield Way and the Ridgeway cross the Thames at Streatley. Nearby towns and cities: Oxford, Reading, Wallingford Nearby villages: Aldworth, Goring-on-Thames, Lower Basildon, Moulsford, Pangbourne Being in such a vital crossing point on the Thames, Streatley has been around for a long time and was mentioned in the Domesday book. Its history is even older, and Neolithic tools have been found at the base
    8.00
    2 votes
    113
    Swineshead

    Swineshead

    Not to be confused with Swineshead, Bedfordshire Swineshead is a village and civil parish in Lincolnshire, England, approximately 7 miles (11 km) west of the town of Boston. The parish includes the areas of Swineshead Bridge and North End to the north, Fenhouses and Blackjack to the east, and Drayton to the south. It is one of eighteen parishes which, together with Boston, form the Borough of Boston. The local government has been arranged in this way since the reorganisation of 1 April 1974, which resulted from the Local Government Act 1972. This parish forms part of the Swineshead and Holland Fen electoral ward. Swineshead falls within the drainage area of the Black Sluice Internal Drainage Board. The village has various shops, a post office and a medical centre. Public houses include the Wheatsheaf, which is a grade II listed building dating from the 18th century. Swineshead has a railway station on the Nottingham-Skegness Line. The primary school is St Mary's Church of England Primary School. The lost village of Stenning, or Estovening, mentioned in Domesday book of 1806 is represented by the site of the moated Estovening Hall, which was the manor house of the Holland family.
    8.00
    2 votes
    114
    Bighton

    Bighton

    Bighton is a village and civil parish in the City of Winchester district of Hampshire, England. According to the 2001 census it had a population of 319. The village is about three miles north-east of New Alresford.
    9.00
    1 votes
    115
    Cadeleigh

    Cadeleigh

    Cadeleigh is a small village in the county of Devon in England. It sits in the hills above the valley of the River Exe and is about 15 km (9 miles) north of Exeter and 6 km (4 miles) southwest of Tiverton. The village has a church that is dedicated to St. Bartholomew and dates from the early part of the 15th century, although this is probably a rebuilding of a much older 12th century church. There is a single public house in Cadeleigh, which is called the Cadeleigh Arms. Between 1885 and 1963 Cadeleigh also had a railway station, although it was actually located much closer to the nearby village of Bickleigh (in fact, the railway station was named "Cadeleigh and Bickleigh" before 1906).
    9.00
    1 votes
    116
    Dormansland

    Dormansland

    Dormansland is a village and civil parish approximately one mile south of Lingfield in Surrey, southern England. It is bordered on the east by the county of Kent and on the south by West Sussex. The Prime Meridian passes just to the west of Dormansland. The earliest known settlement in the parish was at Dry Hill, dating from approximately 500BC. The camp lay at the junction of trackways from the north and east. The name of the village is derived from Richard Derman who is recorded as holding land in the area in 1435, with the name Dermannysland first appearing in the manorial rolls in 1489. Until the enclosure of the Lingfield Commons in 1816, Dormansland consisted of a few farms and cottages. A Baptist Chapel was built in 1796, and a National School in 1851. By the opening of the Dormans railway station in 1884 the village had most of its modern layout, except for a few housing estates (such as Locks Meadow) later built on farmland. The church of St John the Evangelist was built in 1882 to a design by Arthur Blomfield and consecrated in 1884. The ecclesiastical parish was created from part of the Lingfield parish in 1885. The civil parish was created from part of the Lingfield
    9.00
    1 votes
    117
    Harewood

    Harewood

    Harewood ( /ˈhɛərwʊd/ HAIR-wuud) is a village and civil parish in the City of Leeds metropolitan borough, West Yorkshire, England. The A61 runs through the village, from Leeds city centre in the south to Harrogate in the north. The A659 runs through the village from Collingham in the east, briefly joining the A61 to descend the slopes of the Wharfe valley before continuing towards Pool-in-Wharfedale in the west. The village is mainly known for its vicinity to Harewood House ( /ˈhɑrwʊd/ HAR-wuud), a stately home, and is also home to the UK's longest motorsport hillclimb, Harewood speed Hillclimb (pronounced HAIR-wuud). The village school (Harewood C of E Primary School) stands opposite the grounds of the Harewood estate on the A61 and was built by the Estate in 1864 for the estate workers' children. In 2004 and 2008, the school was awarded "Outstanding" grades following Ofsted inspections. All Saints' Church, the former parish church, stands to the west of the village, within the grounds of Harewood House. It was built in the 15th century, but the village was relocated in the late 18th century, leaving the church isolated. It is a grade I listed building in the care of the Churches
    9.00
    1 votes
    118
    Herstmonceux

    Herstmonceux

    Herstmonceux (/ˌhɜrsmənˈzuː/hurs-mən-ZOO or /-ˈsuː/-SOO) is a village and civil parish in the Wealden District of East Sussex, England. The parish includes Herstmonceux Castle, the village of Cowbeech and a number of smaller hamlets. The name ’’Herstmonceux’’ comes from Anglo-Saxon hyrst, "wooded hill", plus the name of the Monceux family who were lords of the manor here in the 12th century. The parish council consists of eleven elected members. The village (previously called Gardner Street) is part of the larger Herstmonceux civil parish, which includes Cowbeech and the hamlets of Foul Mile, Trolliloes, Cowbeech Hill, Stunts Green, Ginger's Green, Flowers Green and part of Windmill Hill. Cowbeech village is located to the north-west of the parish. Herstmonceux Castle (some 2 miles (3.2 km) south-east of the village) is a former site of the Royal Greenwich Observatory. It is now home to the Bader International Study Centre of Queen's University, Kingston, Canada, and the area therefore enjoys an influx of Canadian and other international students each school year. The castle grounds are also home to the Observatory Science Centre, which is operated by Science Projects Limited, and
    9.00
    1 votes
    119
    Hinderwell

    Hinderwell

    Hinderwell is a village and civil parish in the Scarborough district of North Yorkshire, England. Hinderwell lies about a mile from the coast on the A174 road between the towns of Loftus and Whitby. It may also be visited by the Cleveland Way footpath. Until 1958 the area was served by Staithes and Hinderwell railway stations. The civil parish of Hinderwell encompasses: According to the 2001 UK census, Hinderwell parish had a population of 2,103.
    9.00
    1 votes
    120
    Huddington

    Huddington

    Huddington is a village in Worcestershire, England. Huddington is located five miles east of Worcester and five miles south east of Droitwich Spa. Huddington is associated with Huddington Court and the Worcestershire element in the Gunpowder Plot.
    9.00
    1 votes
    121
    North Frodingham

    North Frodingham

    North Frodingham is a village and civil parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It is situated approximately 5.5 miles (8.9 km) south east of the town of Driffield and lies on the B1249 road. The civil parish is formed by the village of North Frodingham and the hamlets of Church End and Emmotland. According to the 2001 UK census, North Frodingham parish had a population of 712. The Grade II listed church of St Elgin, North Frodingham was restored in stages between 1877-91 by Sir Tatton Sykes, 5th Baronet with the top part of the perpendicular tower being designed by Temple Moor in 1892. It is on the Sykes Churches Trail devised by the East Yorkshire Churches Group. In 1901, there was a proposal to construct a railway terminus as part of the North Holderness Light Railway, but despite appearing on the North Eastern Railway's tile maps at various stations (including Beverley), the line was never constructed. The Old Howe and North Frodingham beck join to the west of the village. The landing was used until the 1950s for unloading coal transported from Kingston upon Hull. North Frodingham has two pubs, The Star Inn and the Blue Post Inn. The village has a small park
    9.00
    1 votes
    122
    West Dereham

    West Dereham

    West Dereham is a village and civil parish in the English county of Norfolk. It covers an area of 13.51 km (5.22 sq mi) and had a population of 440 in 176 households as of the 2001 census. For the purposes of local government, it falls within the district of King's Lynn and West Norfolk. It is situated some 4 miles (6.4 km) east of the town of Downham Market, 12 miles (19 km) south of the larger town of King's Lynn and 37 miles (60 km) west of the city of Norwich. The village should not be confused with the mid-Norfolk town of Dereham (sometimes also called East Dereham), which lies about 25 miles (40 km) away. The church of West Dereham St Andrew is one of 124 existing round-tower churches in Norfolk, and is a Grade I listed building.
    9.00
    1 votes
    123
    Wetherby

    Wetherby

    Wetherby is a market town and civil parish within the City of Leeds metropolitan borough, in West Yorkshire, England. It stands on the River Wharfe, and has been for centuries a crossing place and staging post on the A1 Great North Road, being mid-way between London and Edinburgh. It has a population of 11,155. Historically a part of the Wapentake of Skyrack within the West Riding of Yorkshire, Wetherby is mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1086 as Wedrebi, thought to derive from wether- or ram-farm or else meaning "settlement on the bend of a river". Local folklore has it that when heavy snow storms hit the county, Wetherby does not get as much because the Weather Goes By. Wetherby Bridge, which spans the River Wharfe, is a Scheduled Ancient Monument and a Grade II listed structure. As a result of its situation on the main road, a large number of coaching inns were established in Wetherby, and many are still used today by travellers. The Old Great North Road is still in place and "Toll Bar House" is still present today, however this part of the group of buildings was built much later in 1918-1920. The Toll Bar itself was attached to this building to the North and to date no-one can
    9.00
    1 votes
    124
    Clifton Without

    Clifton Without

    Clifton Without is a suburb and civil parish in the unitary authority of the City of York, North Yorkshire, England. It consists of those parts of Clifton that lie outside, i.e. Without, the (pre-1996) city boundaries and Clifton Moor. It lies on the A19 about two miles north-west of central York. According to the 2001 census it had a population of 5,113. Before 1996 it formed part of the Ryedale district. The Parish is bounded by the River Ouse to the west and the B1363 and River Foss in the east, and from the Clifton Moor retail park in the north to near Clifton Green in the south. The parish contains a diverse mix of industrial and retail areas, to residential areas in the rest of the parish. The area also includes the natural areas of Clifton Ings and Clifton Backies and Rawcliffe Lake. On 27 May 1933 an air circus visited York and flew from Rawcliffe meadow, now the site of Clifton Moor Retail Park. It demonstrated the viability of the area for a commercial airfield for York. In 1934 York Corporation compulsory purchased parts of Clifton (Without) and Rawcilffe and on, 4 July 1936 York Municipal Aerodrome opened. Before the outbreak of the Second World War, the airfield was
    6.67
    3 votes
    125
    Mathon

    Mathon

    Mathon is a village and civil parish in the English county of Herefordshire, lying just to the west of the Malvern Hills between Malvern and Ledbury. Nearby villages include Cradley and Colwall.
    6.67
    3 votes
    126
    Repton

    Repton

    Repton is a village and civil parish on the edge of the River Trent floodplain in South Derbyshire, about 4.5 miles (7 km) north of Swadlincote. Repton is close to the county boundary with neighbouring Staffordshire and about 4.5 miles (7 km) northeast of Burton upon Trent. Christianity was reintroduced to the Midlands at Repton, where the Mercian royal family under Peada were baptised in AD 653. Soon a double abbey under an Abbess was built. In 669 the Bishop of Mercia translated his see from Repton to Lichfield. Offa, King of Mercia, seemed to resent his own bishops paying allegiance to the Archbishop of Canterbury in Kent who, while under Offa's control, was not of his own kingdom of Mercia. Offa therefore created his own Archdiocese of Lichfield, which presided over all the bishops from the Humber to the Thames. Repton was thus the forebear of the archdiocese of Lichfield, a third archdiocese of the English church: Lichfield, the other two being Canterbury and York. This lasted for only 16 years, however, before Mercia returned to being under the Archbishopric of Canterbury. At the centre of the village is the Church of England parish church of Saint Wystan. The church is
    6.67
    3 votes
    127
    South Cadbury

    South Cadbury

    South Cadbury is a village and civil parish in the South Somerset council area of the English county of Somerset. The parish includes the village of Sutton Montis. It is famous as the location of the hill fort of Cadbury Castle, thought by some to be King Arthur's Camelot. The name Cadbury means Cada's fort and refers to Cadbury Castle, which is immediately to the south west of the village. It is a vast Iron Age hill fort covering an area of around 20 acres (8 ha). The site has seen human occupation from Neolithic times until the late Saxon period. It was famously partially excavated by Leslie Alcock in the 1960s, when, amongst other things, an Arthurian period feasting hall was discovered. Since John Leland made reference to local traditions of a connection with King Arthur in the 16th century, there has been widespread speculation that this was the location of Camelot. King Arthur's Well sits at the foot of the hill and the local public house, the Red Lion, was renamed The Camelot when it was remodelled in 2004. In the Domesday Book of 1086 the manor is recorded as held by Turstin FitzRolf. The parish was part of the hundred of Catsash. The parish council has responsibility for
    6.67
    3 votes
    128
    Fosdyke

    Fosdyke

    Fosdyke is a village and civil parish in Lincolnshire, England. It lies about 9 miles (14.5 km) south of Boston just off the A17, and 2 miles (3.2 km) east from the junction of the A17 with the A16. The village is near the mouth of the River Welland, and the parish extends across the river to include both ends of the hamlet of Fosdyke Bridge. The name derives from the Old English and Old Norse "fotrs dic", meaning Fotr's (personal name) ditch. Fosdyke is one of eighteen civil parishes which, together with Boston, form the Borough of Boston local government arrangement, in place since a reorganisation of 1 April 1974 which resulted from the Local Government Act 1972. Fosdyke parish forms part of the Five Villages electoral ward, along with Algarkirk, Bicker, Sutterton and Wigtoft. Hitherto, the parish had formed part of Boston Rural District in the Parts of Holland. Holland was one of the three divisions (formally known as parts) of the traditional county of Lincolnshire. Since the 1888 Local Government Act Holland had been, in most respects, a county in itself. Fosdyke Wash, the marshhy area at the mouth of the Welland, is shown by Ordnance Survey as the nearest coastal location to
    5.75
    4 votes
    129
    Wood Norton

    Wood Norton

    Wood Norton is a village and civil parish in the English county of Norfolk. It is located some 10 km (6.2 mi) east of Fakenham and 30 km (19 mi) north-west of Norwich. The civil parish has an area of 6.99 km (2.70 sq mi) and in the 2001 census had a population of 221 in 94 households. For the purposes of local government, the parish falls within the district of North Norfolk. The original Blue Stocking, Benjamin Stillingfleet was born here where his father Edward Stillingfleet was rector.
    5.75
    4 votes
    130
    Alwinton

    Alwinton

    Alwinton (previously named "Allenton" and sometimes still referred to as this) is a village and parish in Northumberland, England. It is about 18 miles (29 km) to the west of Alnwick. Alwinton village lies at the head of the Coquet valley, on the edge of both the Otterburn Army Training Estate and the Northumberland National Park, roughly 10 miles (16 km) from the border with Scotland. A road continues past Alwinton into the Cheviot Hills where it terminates at the ancient Roman encampment of Chew Green. Having no shops, Alwinton's social life centres on the Rose and Thistle Public House. Regular Church of England services are offered at St. Michael and All Angels, which traditionally serves the parish of Alwinton encompassing the nearby townships of Biddlestone, Burradon, Clennell, Fairhaugh, Farnham, Linbriggs, Netherton, Peels, and Sharperton. Alwinton is in the parliamentary constituency of Berwick-upon-Tweed. Surnames of Alwinton residents during the period 1538 to 1828 gathered from militia lists, parish books, feodary books and poll books include Belany, Bell, Bertram, Bland, Brokyt, Brown, Browne, Burn, Charleton, Clarke, Clavering, Clennell, Davison, Drybrough, Dykson,
    7.50
    2 votes
    131
    Barnetby

    Barnetby

    Barnetby (or Barnetby le Wold) is a village and civil parish in North Lincolnshire, England, between Scunthorpe and Grimsby. According to the 2001 census it had a population of 1,593. Barnetby railway station serves the village and surrounding area. The hamlet of Coskills is in Barnetby parish. Despite being built up by the coming of the railway, the village has a long history. The village goes back over 1,000 years, and in the Domesday Book of 1086 the village appears as "Bernodebi" - which derives from the Scandinavian name "Beornnoth". The redundant Church of St Mary on Church Hill is originally of Saxon origin, but the recent building contains more Norman architecture. The font inside the church is said to date from the times of King Stephen. On the northern side of the church a crude carving of a cat may be seen. St Mary's Church originally possessed a Norman lead font, which was the only one in Lincolnshire - being only 30 such examples in England. The font was moved to the newer church of St Barnabas and is now in the North Lincolnshire Museum, Scunthorpe. Despite being called "new", St Barnabas Church was completed in 1927, and is of brick construction. For many years the
    7.50
    2 votes
    132
    Bishop's Castle

    Bishop's Castle

    Bishop's Castle is a small market town in Shropshire, England, and formerly its smallest borough. According to the 2001 census it had a population of 1,630. Bishop's Castle is 1.5 miles (2.4 km) east of the Wales-England border, about 20 miles (30 km) north-west of Ludlow and about 20 miles (30 km) south-west of Shrewsbury. To the south is Clun and to the east is Church Stretton. The town is best known as a thriving market town with a strong agricultural community and has more recently become known for its alternative community including artists, musicians, writers and craftspeople. This is excellent walking country and Bishop's Castle is a "Walkers are Welcome Town", gaining the award in 2008. The long distance footpath the Shropshire Way runs through the town and Offa's Dyke is only a few miles away to the west. The ancient trackway of the Kerry Ridgeway, a prehistoric Bronze Age route, runs from the town. The BC Ring, a 60-mile (100 km) challenging route around the town, was published in 2008. The town has two micro-breweries, many pubs and eating places and a wide variety of places to stay in the town itself and the surrounding countryside. Documented history begins in Saxon
    7.50
    2 votes
    133
    Bramber

    Bramber

    Bramber is a former manor, village and civil parish in the Horsham District of West Sussex, England. It has a ruined mediaeval castle which was the caput of a large feudal barony. Bramber is located on the northern edge of the South Downs and on the west side of the River Adur. Nearby are the communities of Steyning to the west and Upper Beeding to the east, and the other side of the river. The closest historical connection, however, is with the village of Botolphs to the south. The ecclesiastical parishes of Bramber and Botolphs were united possibly as early as 1526, but certainly by 1534 with the priest living at Botolphs. Later the priest's official residence became the imposing Bramber mansion and landmark now called 'Burletts' and located on Clays Hill. The union of the civil parish councils followed 400 years later in 1933. Bramber was the caput of a large feudal barony held from the 11th to 14th centuries by the Braose family which was noted for its impact on the medieval history of the southern Welsh Marches. On a small hill stand the remains of Bramber Castle, a Norman castle built by the family. Bramber Parish Church of St Nicholas was originally built as the castle
    7.50
    2 votes
    134
    Cavendish

    Cavendish

    Cavendish is a village and civil parish in the Stour Valley in Suffolk, England. It is 18 kilometres (11 mi) from Bury St Edmunds and 23 kilometres (14 mi) from Newmarket. It is believed that Cavendish is called so because a man called Cafa used to own a pasture or 'edisc' there, and it therefore became known as Cafa's Edisc and eventually Cavendish. It was home to Sir John Cavendish, the ancestor of the Dukes of Devonshire who was involved in suppressing the Peasants' Revolt. Wat Tyler, the peasants' leader was arrested by William Walworth, the Mayor of London, for threatening King Richard II in 1381. As Tyler fought back Cavendish's son, also called John Cavendish, who was responsible for escorting the King, ran Tyler through with his sword, killing him. As a result, John Cavendish tried to flee from the pursuing peasants, and he hung on to the handle of the door of St Mary's Church, Cavendish, to plead sanctuary. A few days later, on 15 June 1381, the elder John Cavendish was seized at Bury St Edmunds and beheaded by a mob led by Jack Straw. He is buried in Bury St Edmunds. St. Mary's Church had a bequest from Sir John, and its chancel was restored. The village has a United
    7.50
    2 votes
    135
    East Budleigh

    East Budleigh

    East Budleigh is a small village in East Devon, England. The villages of Yettington, Colaton Raleigh, and Otterton lie (respectively) to the west, north and east of East Budleigh, with the seaside town of Budleigh Salterton about two miles south. Until the River Otter to the east silted up, the village was a market town and port; it was still being used by ships in the 15th century, according to John Leland. Sir Walter Raleigh was born in nearby Hayes Barton in c.1552, and his parents are buried in All Saints churchyard in the village. The 14th century church contains attractive pew ends including one bearing the Raleigh coat of arms. In 2006 a life-size bronze statue of Raleigh by sculptress Vivien Mallock was unveiled by the Duke of Kent and is positioned at the top of the village close to the church. The cost of £30,000 was met by British American Tobacco, and was unveiled in the week when new anti-smoking laws came into effect in England and Wales. Governor Roger Conant, founder of Salem, Massachusetts and the first governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, was born in East Budleigh in 1592 to Richard Conant. East Budleigh had a railway station that was situated between the
    7.50
    2 votes
    136
    Hetton-le-Hole

    Hetton-le-Hole

    Hetton-le-Hole is a town and civil parish situated in the City of Sunderland in Tyne and Wear, England. It is on the A182 between Houghton-le-Spring and Easington Lane. It is located on the southwest corner of Sunderland on the A182, off A690 close to the A1(M). It has a population of 14,402 but this includes the population of nearby village Easington Lane. Liverpool F.C. manager Bob Paisley and Burnley F.C. player and manager Harry Potts were from Hetton-le-Hole, as was Ralph Coates the former Burnley and Tottenham Hotspur player. The famous recording artist and record producer Trevor Horn is also from Hetton-le-Hole. Former Sunderland and Newcastle goalscorer Bryan "Pop" Robson was born in Hetton-le-Hole. The civil parish includes Hetton proper, along with East Rainton, Middle Rainton (but not West Rainton which is a separate parish), Low Moorsley, High Moorsley and Easington Lane. South Hetton constitutes a separate parish. Great Eppleton Wind Farm, a wind farm of four dual bladed alternators, helped provide electricity to the National Grid. The original wind turbines have been replaced by larger three bladed versions. The turbines are far enough away from local houses to not
    7.50
    2 votes
    137
    7.50
    2 votes
    138
    Mellis

    Mellis

    Mellis is a VERY small village in Suffolk, England. It has the largest area of unfenced common land in England. Oliver Cromwell exercised his troops in Mellis. It once had a railway station on the main line between London and Norwich, and a small branch line that ran to nearby Eye. In summer rare plants such as green-winged orchid, sulphur clover and adder’s tongue fern flourish. The abundance of small mammals also makes the site a favourite hunting ground for barn owl and tawny owl.
    7.50
    2 votes
    139
    Wells-next-the-Sea

    Wells-next-the-Sea

    Wells-next-the-Sea, known locally simply as Wells, is a town, civil parish and seaport situated on the North Norfolk coast in England. The civil parish has an area of 16.31 km (6.30 sq mi) and in the 2001 census had a population of 2,451 in 1,205 households. For the purposes of local government, the parish falls within the district of North Norfolk, within the Norfolk Coast AONB. Wells is situated about 15 miles (24 km) to the east of the resort of Hunstanton, 20 miles (32 km) to the west of Cromer, and 10 miles (16 km) north of Fakenham. The city of Norwich lies 32 miles (51 km) to the south-east. Nearby villages include Blakeney (famous for its bird sanctuary), Burnham Market, Burnham Thorpe (the birthplace of Horatio Nelson), Holkham (with its famous stately home Holkham Hall), and Walsingham (a major medieval pilgrimage site). The name is Guella in the Domesday Book (half gallicised, half Latinised from Anglian Wella, a spring). This derives from spring wells of which Wells used to have many, rising through the chalk of the area. The town started to be known as Wells-next-the-Sea in the early 19th century to distinguish it from other places of the same name. When the Wells and
    7.50
    2 votes
    140
    West Tanfield

    West Tanfield

    West Tanfield is a village and civil parish in the Hambleton district of North Yorkshire, England. Situated about 6 miles north of Ripon on the A6108, which goes from Ripon into Wensleydale, West Tanfield is on the edge of both the Yorkshire Dales and the Vale of York. It is well known as one of the most picturesque villages in Yorkshire, the view from the bridge over the River Ure is popular amongst tourists, photographers and artists. The village has a monument called the Marmion Tower, a 15th century gatehouse which belonged to the now vanished manor house formerly home to the Marmion family. At first floor level there is a fine example of an oriel window. The Anglican church next to the tower contains monuments to the Marmion family. The tower is now in the care of English Heritage. As well as the church (dedicated to St. Nicholas), village services include a primary school which shares the same dedication as the church, two public houses, a petrol station a post office and a Methodist chapel. The Memorial Hall serves as a venue for events in the village and was built as a monument to the men of West Tanfield who died during the two world wars. West Tanfield had a railway
    7.50
    2 votes
    141
    Quarrendon

    Quarrendon

    Quarrendon is a civil parish and deserted medieval village on the outskirts of Aylesbury in Buckinghamshire, England. Today its name is also associated with the modern housing estate of Quarrendon in Aylesbury. The toponym is derived from the Old English Cweorndun meaning "hill where mill stones are obtained". There is evidence to suggest that the village dates back at least as far as the Anglo Saxon era as the village was reputedly the birthplace of daughters of King Penda, St Edburga and St Edith, and their niece St Osyth. Legend has it that St Osyth was beheaded by the Danish occupiers of Britain at Nuns Wood in the Grounds of St Osyth Priory, Where a spring of holy water sprang forth and is still in existence today. Queen Elizabeth I was entertained at Quarrendon Manor by Sir Henry Lee of Ditchley for two days in 1592. The village and its manor survived until the 18th century, when Henry Lee, the Lord of the Manor, went bankrupt and lost all his lands. The only remaining building in the old village is the ruined church of St Peter. In 1817 the building was described in the Gentleman's Magazine as "a melancholy object of contemplation". Until the 1930s there were substantial
    5.50
    4 votes
    142
    Waddesdon

    Waddesdon

    Waddesdon ( /ˈwɒdzdən/) is a village within the Aylesbury Vale district in Buckinghamshire, England, 6 miles from Aylesbury on the A41 road. The centre of a civil parish, including the hamlets of Eythrope, Wormstone and Woodham, Waddesdon was an agricultural settlement with milling, silk weaving and lace making enterprises. The parish church of St Michael and All Angels dates from 1190 with medieval and Victorian additions. In 2001, the population of the parish was 2000. Between 1897 and 1936, Waddesdon had train services on the Aylesbury and Buckingham Railway (later part of the Metropolitan) at Waddesdon Manor railway station, two miles from the village. There was also a halt on the Brill Tramway. In 1874, Baron Ferdinand de Rothschild bought a large estate in the area and built the mansion of Waddesdon Manor on a hill-top above the village. He transformed Waddesdon into an estate village, with new houses for employees and tenants, a school, a public house, cricket pavilion and village hall. Waddesdon Manor and grounds are now the property of the National Trust, and Jacob Rothschild, 4th Baron Rothschild retains the estate and a house at nearby Eythrope. Waddesdon was often
    5.50
    4 votes
    143
    Waltham

    Waltham

    Waltham is a village and civil parish in North East Lincolnshire, England. It is geographically 4 miles (6.4 km) south-west from Grimsby and is close to the villages of Scartho, Brigsley, Barnoldby-le-Beck, and Bradley. Less than 2 miles (3.2 km) to the north-east is the village of New Waltham. According to the 2001 Census, Waltham had a population of 6,420. There was a substantial Saxon settlement on the site of the first village although artifacts show earlier Roman occupation. The Waltham name is of Saxon origin, Walt referring to woodland or an area of high forest and Ham to either an estate or a village. It is possible that Saxons changed the name from the Old English 'Wealdhant' which had the same meaning; the first part Ald, prefixed by We, meant "settlement", and Hant a "wooded estate". Waltham Ward is part of North East Lincolnshire Council, and covers the villages of Waltham, Brigsley and Ashby-cum-Fenby. It is one of the safest Conservative wards on the council. Current elected councillors: Waltham's landmarks include Waltham Windmill, which is used as the symbol for the village's Infant and Junior schools. The windmill was originally built in 1666, but was blown down
    5.50
    4 votes
    144
    Balk

    Balk

    Balk is a hamlet and civil parish in the Hambleton district of North Yorkshire, England. According to the 2001 census it had a population of 48. The village is just to the east of Thirsk, and combines with the adjacent parish of Bagby to elect a parish council. The moated grange at grid reference SE47718083 is a scheduled ancient monument.
    6.33
    3 votes
    145
    Gamlingay

    Gamlingay

    Gamlingay is a village and civil parish in South Cambridgeshire, England, near the border with Bedfordshire, and the traditional county of Huntingdonshire. It is 14 miles (22 km) from Cambridge and the population in 2001 was 3,535 people. An ancient village featured in the Domesday Book, the name comes from the Old English Gamelingei, meaning "an enclosure of Gamela's people". There has been a settlement on the site since the middle Bronze Age and there are signs of occupation from the middle Stone Age. The village may have first been established around a central green south of the High Street (now known as Church Street); a complex of medieval buildings stood at the east end of the green, but only a tithe barn and the house known as 'Emplins' remain today. Another focal point was provided by the crossroads at the other end of Church Street and houses spread to the south and east of the junction. In the 16th and 17th centuries, Gamlingay grew to the east towards Dutter End and west to Green End. By 1801, Gamlingay had a population twice as large as that of the hundred's second-largest parish, Bourn. Gamlingay is steeped in history, with many listed buildings in the village. The
    6.33
    3 votes
    146
    Littlehampton

    Littlehampton

    Littlehampton, West Sussex is a seaside resort town and civil parish in the Arun District of West Sussex, England, on the east bank at the mouth of the River Arun. It lies 51.5 miles (83 km) south-south-west of London, 17.5 miles (28 km) west of Brighton and 11 miles (18 km) east of the county town of Chichester. The parish covers an area of 11.35 km (4 sq mi) and has a population of 25,593 (2001 census).The Sub-Urban Area of the town has a population of approx 55,000. The conurbation includes other settlements: Wick in the north west; Lyminster to the north; and Rustington to the east. Wick and Toddington became part of the town in 1901. Nearby towns include Bognor Regis west southwest and Worthing to the east. The town is also the westernmost settlement of the 12th largest urban area in the UK, the Brighton/Worthing/Littlehampton conurbation, a region encompassing some 461,181 people (2001 census). A human settlement at Littlehampton can be traced back to prehistoric and Roman times, while it appears in the Domesday Book of 1086 as the small hamlet of 'Hantone'. The settlement is believed to have been a fishing community around this time, appearing on a French map in around 1100
    6.33
    3 votes
    147
    Stockerston

    Stockerston

    ‎ Stockerston is a village and civil parish in the Harborough district of Leicestershire, England, located on the border with Rutland, by the Eye Brook. According to the 2001 census the parish had a population of 35. The two principle buildings in the village are Stockerston Church and Stockerston Hall
    6.33
    3 votes
    148
    Brindley

    Brindley

    Brindley is a village (at SJ592534) and civil parish in the unitary authority of Cheshire East and the ceremonial county of Cheshire, England. The village lies 3¾ miles to the west of Nantwich. The parish also includes the settlements of Brindley Lea, Ryders Bank and part of Radmore Green, with a total population of a little under 150. Nearby villages include Barbridge, Burland, Haughton and Faddiley. The name Brindley means "a burnt clearing". The township does not appear in the Domesday survey, the first mention of Brindley being in 1288. Brindley fell within the ancient parish of Acton and was once part of the manor of Baddiley. Landowners included Willis Allen in 1656, Sir Thomas Mainwaring and Sir Thomas Brereton in 1671, and the Wilbraham and Tomkinson families from 1798. Medieval landowners In medieval times Brindley township and the Norman landowners that took its name were called: Burndelegh, Birnedelegh, Burendeleg, Brundelegh, Brundeley, Brundylegh and later in Tudor times until the 18th century, 'Brundley', eventually evolving to the modern Brindley. Earlier, in c1272 a marriage was arranged to unite two Norman families. Gilbert de Stoke, son of Randle (Ranulphus) de
    8.00
    1 votes
    149
    Healey

    Healey

    Healey is a small village and civil parish in the Harrogate district of North Yorkshire, England. It is situated to the immediate west of Fearby and is near Leighton and Leighton Reservoir. It is about three miles west of Masham. Healey has several holiday cottages and other investment properties in its small area. Healey is in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and the scenery is outstanding. Healey Mill is a former cornmill and one of the four Grade II Listed buildings within the village. Healey was historically a township in the large ancient parish of Masham in the North Riding of Yorkshire. It became a separate ecclesiastical parish in 1849. The civil parish of Healey with Sutton was formed in 1866. In 1934 a large part of Masham Moor (which had been common to the parishes of Masham and East Witton) was added to the civil parish, which was then known as Healey. Media related to Healey, North Yorkshire at Wikimedia Commons
    8.00
    1 votes
    150
    High Ham

    High Ham

    High Ham is a village and civil parish in Somerset, England. Within the parish of High Ham are the villages of High Ham and Low Ham and the hamlets of Bowdens, Henley, Paradise and Picts Hill. Within the parish of High Ham there have been two Roman villas discovered: Low Ham Roman Villa and another in High Ham. The parish of High Ham was part of the Whitley Hundred. The parish council has responsibility for local issues, including setting an annual precept (local rate) to cover the council’s operating costs and producing annual accounts for public scrutiny. The parish council evaluates local planning applications and works with the local police, district council officers, and neighbourhood watch groups on matters of crime, security, and traffic. The parish council's role also includes initiating projects for the maintenance and repair of parish facilities, as well as consulting with the district council on the maintenance, repair, and improvement of highways, drainage, footpaths, public transport, and street cleaning. Conservation matters (including trees and listed buildings) and environmental issues are also the responsibility of the council. The village falls within the
    8.00
    1 votes
    151
    Slaugham

    Slaugham

    Slaugham (pronounced "Slaffum") is a village and civil parish in the Mid Sussex District of West Sussex, England. It is located seven miles (11 km) to the south of Crawley, on the A23 road to Brighton. The civil parish covers an area of 2432 hectares (6007 acres) and has a population of 2226 persons living in 943 of whom 1174 were economically active (2001 census). The parish also contains the settlements of Pease Pottage, Handcross and Warninglid, in addition to Slaugham itself. St Mary's Church, a Grade II* listed building dating mostly from the 12th and 13th centuries and situated opposite Slaugham's village green, serves all four villages.
    8.00
    1 votes
    152
    Waltham Abbey

    Waltham Abbey

    Waltham Abbey is a market town of about 20,400 people in the south west of the county of Essex, in the East of England region. It is about 24 km north of London on the Greenwich Meridian and lies between the River Lea in the west and Epping Forest in the east. It takes its name from the Abbey Church of Waltham Holy Cross, which was prominent in the early history of the town. The ancient parish covering Waltham Abbey was known as Waltham Holy Cross. The town is in the District of Epping Forest and has its own town council. It is twinned with the German town of Hörstel. The River Lea, which forms the county boundary with Hertfordshire, is also the town’s western boundary, and the eastern boundary runs through Epping Forest. The land rises gradually from the marshes and meadows by the river to the plateau of London clay in the east, 60–90 metres above sea level, capped by the sand and gravel of Epping Forest. To the south, occupying the former course of the River Lea, is the King George V Reservoir, opened in 1913. Cobbins Brook, a tributary of the River Lea, crosses the parish from east to west. In addition to the town, the parish includes in its 41 km² the villages and hamlets of
    8.00
    1 votes
    153
    Yafforth

    Yafforth

    Yafforth is a village in the civil parish of Danby Wiske in Hambleton, North Yorkshire, England about 1 mile (1.6 km) west of Northallerton. The village lies on the B6271 road between Northallerton and the village of Scorton. The River Wiske passes to the east of the village. It is thought that the name Yafforth is derived from Ea-ford, meaning the ford in the river. Yafforth All Saints Church was built in 1208 and extensively rebuilt in 1870 Yafforth also had a Methodist chapel which closed in 1966. Romanby Golf Course is situated between Yafforth and the village of Romanby. Yafforth school opened in 1868 and closed in 1952, the school building still stands in the middle of the village. Yafforth once had two shops, three brickyards, and a pub. The pub was named after a Horse named Reveller, winner of the 1818 St Leger Stakes classic at Doncaster. The pub closed in the late 1990s and is now a residential property. The only reminder of its name is the Reveller Mews across the road. To the north of the village lies a notable mound called Howe Hill, It is a Norman motte probably built during the reign of King Stephen. Today it still stands 15 feet (4.6 m) high and retains some of its
    8.00
    1 votes
    154
    Alkham

    Alkham

    Alkham is a village and civil parish in the Dover district of Kent, England, about five miles west of Dover, on the B2060 secondary road. Within the parish are the settlements of Chalksole and Ewell Minnis; the parish population was 691 people (2001 census). Alkham's parish church is dedicated to St Anthony. The parishes of Alkham and River form the River ward in the Dover local government district. Tom Elliott, the indie/rock/folk and rap artist is one of Alkham's famous residents. Alkham also has its own cricket team. Media related to Alkham at Wikimedia Commons
    7.00
    2 votes
    155
    Hook Norton

    Hook Norton

    Hook Norton is a village and civil parish several miles outside of the Cotswold Hills in Oxfordshire, England. It is 4.5 miles (7.2 km) northeast of Chipping Norton. The toponym is believed to come from a ruler called Hook, whilst Norton is a development of ora-tun meaning a settlement (tun) on the side of a hill (ora), hence Hook Norton. In the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle in AD 922 the village is called Hocnertune. In the Domesday Book of 1086 it is called Hochenartone. Other historical spellings of the name include Hocceneretune (1050), Hogenarton (1216) and Okenardton (1263). Today the village is colloquially known to its inhabitants as "Hooky" and sometimes as "The Hook". The village is formed of four neighbourhoods: East End, Scotland End (in the west), Down End (in the centre) and Southrop (in the south). The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that a Viking army raided the Hook Norton area in AD 913 and the village had a parish church by AD 922. The Domesday Book records that in 1086 Hook Norton had 76 villagers and two mills. The present Church of England parish church of Saint Peter is of Norman origin but also has Early English, Decorated Gothic and Perpendicular Gothic features. The
    7.00
    2 votes
    156
    Kirby Wiske

    Kirby Wiske

    Kirby Wiske is a village and civil parish in the Hambleton district of North Yorkshire, England. It is situated on the River Wiske, about four miles north-west of Thirsk. Sion Hill Hall in Kirby Wiske houses the Birds of Prey and Conservation Centre with over 70 birds of prey and is operated by Falconry UK ltd.
    7.00
    2 votes
    157
    North Cockerington

    North Cockerington

    North Cockerington is a small village and civil parish in the East Lindsey district of Lincolnshire, England. It lies approximately 3 miles (4.8 km) to the east from Louth. Village population has fluctuated between 150 and 200 since at least 1801 and currently remains at just below 200 with an equal distribution of males and females. North Cockerington was formerly known as Cockerington St Mary, distinguishing it from Cockerington St Leonard, now South Cockerington. In 1670 Sir Jarvis Scrope founded six tenements for poor people of North and South Cockerington. The village has no shops or public houses. The former Post Office in Meadow Lane, once called Ashdene and now known as Pump Cottage, is reputed to be haunted. The village school is North Cockerington Church of England Primary School. Media related to North Cockerington at Wikimedia Commons
    7.00
    2 votes
    158
    Old Romney

    Old Romney

    Old Romney is a village and civil parish in the Shepway District of Kent, England. The village, as its name suggests, is the original site of the settlement, and is situated two miles (3.2 km) inland from New Romney. It lies on what was once an island in the erstwhile River Rother estuary. It was noted in Roman times as Vetus Rumellenum; by the time of the Domesday Book New Romney was already in existence. St Clement's Church in Old Romney, Romney Marsh, is a Church of England parish church and one of the oldest churches in Kent. It was originally constructed in the 12th century although there is some evidence of an original structure on the site dating back to the 8th century. The church with the Georgian minstrels' gallery and box pews retaining their rose pink colour was featured in the Doctor Syn film of 1962. Disney and the Rank Film Organisation repainted them in for the filming.
    7.00
    2 votes
    159
    Preston Candover

    Preston Candover

    Preston Candover is a village and large civil parish in Hampshire, England. It has two churches, only one of which is still in use. Its nearest town is Basingstoke, approximately 4.5 miles (7.2 km) away. It has an acreage of 3,457 acres (13.99 km), which lies on comparatively low ground, south of the high country round the surrounding villages of Farleigh Wallop and Nutley, and north-west of that which rises to Wield and beyond Wield to Bentworth. The village itself lies on the lowest ground towards the west of the parish on the road which comes northeast from Northington and the two other Candovers, and runs across the parish to enter Nutley at Axford and continues uphill to Farleigh Wallop and thence to Basingstoke. The village is home to Lord Sainsbury of Preston Candover and his wife Anya Linden, of the supermarket Sainsbury family. The village of Preston Candover is probably of Saxon origin. It was originally called 'Prestecandavere' - the Candover belonging to the Priests. The name derives in part from the Candover Brook which rises from springs just to the south of the village, and from a religious community which flourished here before the Norman Conquest. By the eleventh
    7.00
    2 votes
    160
    Snowshill

    Snowshill

    Snowshill is a small Cotswolds village in Gloucestershire, England, located near to Broadway, Worcestershire. Snowshill is best known for nearby Snowshill Manor, a National Trust property open to the public. The manor house contains an unusual collection of furniture, musical instruments, craft tools, toys, clocks, bicycles and armour, all collected by architect and craftsman Charles Paget Wade between 1900 and 1951. His Arts and Crafts-style gardens are arranged in an eccentric combination of terraces and ponds forming outdoor rooms, with bright colours and delightful scents. Snowshill is also the home to Snowshill Lavender, a farm with 35 acres (142,000 m²) of lavender fields, which also sells lavender products, plants and local crafts.
    7.00
    2 votes
    161
    Swynnerton

    Swynnerton

    Swynnerton is a village in Staffordshire, England. St Mary's Church dates back to at least the 13th Century. Swynnerton received its charter from Edward I in 1306. During the 14th Century a market used to be held every Wednesday and an annual fair was held on August 15 each year. A grand manor house used to exist until its destruction in the English Civil War by Cromwell's men, its replacement being Swynnerton Hall, built in 1725 by Francis Smith of Warwick, which still dominates the Swynnerton skyline today. The Roman Catholic church of Our Lady adjoins the hall, which was built in 1868 by Gilbert Blount. Most of the houses in the village are post war and help to make up a thriving community. The village pub (The Fitzherbert Arms) has three bars, two dining areas, and accommodation. Nearby Cold Meece houses a British Army training area that used to be a Royal Ordnance Factory, ROF Swynnerton. It is often used by the Air Training Corps and the Army Cadet Force, but is also a regular training area for the British Army Lord Stafford, whose family presence dates back several centuries; Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. [1807–1882] is believed to have penned his famous poem The Village
    7.00
    2 votes
    162
    Ulley

    Ulley

    Ulley is a village and civil parish of the Metropolitan Borough of Rotherham in South Yorkshire, England. It is located about 6 kilometres (4 mi) south of the town of Rotherham and 11 kilometres (7 mi) east of Sheffield City Centre. Excavations in Ulley have revealed the course of a probable Roman road running north-south through the village. Other Roman finds in the village include coins and a fragment of Samarian ware. The earliest written record of Ulley is in the Domesday book of 1086, where it is referred to as Ollei. The name is Old English in origin but of uncertain meaning. It may derive from wulf (wolf) or Ulla (a Saxon personal name) and lēah, meaning a meadow. Alternatively, it may mean ‘woodland clearing frequented by owls’. Following the Norman conquest of England in 1066, Ulley was among the lands given to the Earl of Mortain. Later, the village passed into the hands of the Priory of Worksop. During World War II, a German bombing raid for Sheffield dropped bombs on a set of cottages situated on Main Street where houses 5–7 are now. The bombs hit the cottages but failed to detonate. When the army arrived to deal with the unexploded bombs, they retired to the pub to
    7.00
    2 votes
    163
    West Bradley

    West Bradley

    West Bradley is a village and civil parish 4 miles south-east of Glastonbury in the Mendip district of Somerset, England. The parish includes the hamlets of Hornblotton and Lottisham. Hornblotton is a traditional English community with a small village hall. There are no shops in Hornblotton although there are a number of farms, principally Higher Farm, which produces cider and apples. The village is on the Monarch's Way long-distance footpath. Bradley comes from Old English and means the broad clearing or wood. The manor of Bradley was given to Glastonbury Abbey in 746 by Ethelbald, King of Mercia, and held it until the dissolution of the monasteries in 1539. The parish of West Bradley was part of the hundred of Glaston Twelve Hides, while Hornblotton was part of the Whitstone Hundred. The parish council has responsibility for local issues, including setting an annual precept (local rate) to cover the council’s operating costs and producing annual accounts for public scrutiny. The parish council evaluates local planning applications and works with the local police, district council officers, and neighbourhood watch groups on matters of crime, security, and traffic. The parish
    7.00
    2 votes
    164
    Badsey

    Badsey

    Badsey is a village and civil parish in the Wychavon district of Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom. It has two parks and a small first school located in the centre of the village. The village of Badsey is located about two miles east of Evesham, in the Vale of Evesham. It lies close to the River Avon. According to the 2001 census the Badsey ward had a population of 2,657. The village and parish church is dedicated to St. James. The village has a Spar shop (open 7 days a week) with a post office located inside. Two local pubs called the Wheatsheaf and the Round Of Gras. The old manor house still stands on the village street, built originally to house ill or infirm monks from Evesham Abbey, it is half-timbered, black and white and today is a private residence, but was once a Boys Home. Parts of this building date to 1350 but it is mostly 16th century.
    6.00
    3 votes
    165
    Lyndhurst

    Lyndhurst

    Lyndhurst ( /lɪndhərst/) is a village and civil parish in the New Forest, Hampshire, England. It is a popular tourist location with many independent shops, art galleries, cafés, restaurants, pubs and hotels. The nearest city is Southampton located around nine miles (14 km) to the north-east. In 2001 Lyndhurst had a population of 2,973 people. The village is the administrative capital of the New Forest, with the district council based in the village. The Court of Verderers sits in the Queens House in Lyndhurst. The church of St. Michael and All Angels is a major landmark. It was built in the 1860s, and contains a fresco by Lord Leighton and stained-glass windows by Charles Kempe, William Morris, Edward Burne-Jones and others. Alice Liddell, the inspiration for Alice in Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, is buried here. The name "Lyndhurst" is an Old English name, meaning 'Wooded hill growing with lime-trees'. The name comprises the words lind ('lime-tree') and hyrst ('wooded hill'). Lyndhurst is recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 as Linhest. It was part of the royal lands of the New Forest, with the exception of 1 virgate which was held by Herbert the Forester.
    6.00
    3 votes
    166
    Cley next the Sea

    Cley next the Sea

    Cley next the Sea ( /ˈklaɪ/) is a village (population 376) on the River Glaven in Norfolk, England, 4 miles north-west of Holt and east of Blakeney. The main A149 coast road runs through the centre of the village, causing congestion in the summer months due to the tight, narrow streets. It lies within the Norfolk Coast AONB (Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty) and the North Norfolk Heritage Coast. The medieval church of St Margarets is the largest church in the Blakeney Haven area. A ruined building on the marshes is known as Blakeney Chapel; despite its name, it is in Cley parish, and probably never had a religious purpose. Despite its name, Cley has not been "next the sea" since the 17th century, due to land reclamation. Some of the buildings that once lined the quay remain, notably the 18th-century Cley Windmill. The windmill was owned by the family of singer James Blunt for many decades and operated as a bed and breakfast. The mill was sold in 2006, but continues to operate as a bed and breakfast on a non-profit making basis. It was used as a backdrop of the 1949 film Conspirator with Elizabeth Taylor. Cley Mill has often been depicted by local artists and was the subject of a
    5.00
    4 votes
    167
    Alby with Thwaite

    Alby with Thwaite

    Alby with Thwaite is a civil parish in the English county of Norfolk. The parish straddles the A140 some 10 km south of Cromer and 30 km north of Norwich, including the settlements of Alby and Thwaite. Alby with Thwaite has an area of 5.81 km and in the 2001 census had a population of 223 in 86 households. For the purposes of local government, the parish falls within the district of North Norfolk. The church of Thwaite, All Saints, is one of 124 existing round-tower churches in Norfolk.
    5.67
    3 votes
    168
    Barrow

    Barrow

    Barrow is a hamlet and civil parish in Shropshire, England, some 5 miles south of Telford between Ironbridge and Much Wenlock. Although Barrow itself consists of a church and just a few dwellings, the parish extends from Broseley to the eastern edge of Much Wenlock; it also includes the hamlet of Willey. According to the 2001 census the parish had a population of 636. Barrow is a short distance south of the site of a lost mediaeval village, Arlescott. The Jack Mytton Way runs through both Arlescott and Barrow.
    5.67
    3 votes
    169
    Battisford

    Battisford

    Battisford is a village and civil parish in the Mid Suffolk district of Suffolk, England. The village is about 4 miles (6 km) south of Stowmarket, and is directly alongside Wattisham Airfield. The village contains a Parish Church, a Free Church, a Community Centre - which holds the pre-school playgroup - and a village green, containing a play area. The main road which runs through Battisford is Straight Road, being very straight and over a mile long. The village pub, The Punch Bowl, is a registered Community Interest Company (CIC), and is the very first of its kind in Suffolk. In 1983, for one day only, Battisford declared its independence from the United Kingdom. Media related to Battisford at Wikimedia Commons
    5.67
    3 votes
    170
    Rampton

    Rampton

    Rampton is a village and civil parish in Nottinghamshire, England. At the time of the 2001 census it had a population of 1,269. Its name came from Anglo-Saxon Ramm-tūn = "ram farmstead". It is located in the Trent valley north of Nottingham, in the Bassetlaw district 8 miles east of Retford. The village is overshadowed by the chimney and cooling towers of Cottam Power Station. The parish church of All Saints is Early English in architectural style. Between the church and Hill's Farm is an early Tudor brick gateway with terracotta panels belonging to the former Manor House. The Manor House was demolished c. 1850. Rampton Secure Hospital is 2.3 km = 1.4 miles WSW of Rampton village. Media related to Rampton, Nottinghamshire at Wikimedia Commons
    5.67
    3 votes
    171
    South Killingholme

    South Killingholme

    South Killingholme is a village and civil parish in North Lincolnshire, England. It is situated 8 miles (13 km) north-west from the centre of Grimsby and 1 mile (1.6 km) north from the A180 road. Considerably larger than its neighbour, North Killingholme, together they make up the area of Killingholme. The parish includes oil refineries and terminals, and Immingham Power Station. The civil parish lies between North Killingholme to the north, Ulceby to the west, Brocklesby to the south-west (the Lincolnshire/North Lincolnshire boundary), Habrough and Immingham to the south (the North Lincolnshire/North East Lincolnshire boundary). The parish includes Ulceby railway station to the east and part of the A180 near the railway bridge, all of the Humber Refinery, the Immingham Power Station, the Immingham Coal Terminal, the Humber International Terminal (built in 2002), most of the Associated Petroleum Terminals, Immingham Ore Terminal, and the south-east corner of the Lindsey Oil Refinery. The division between North and South Killingholme is the Eastfield Road railway bridge and West Middle Mere Road. Ulceby is in the parish as is Ulceby level crossing. The village is more heavily
    5.67
    3 votes
    172
    South Rauceby

    South Rauceby

    South Rauceby is a village and civil parish in the North Kesteven district of Lincolnshire, England. It is situated 2.5 miles (4.0 km) west from Sleaford. The village of North Rauceby is less than 1 mile (1.6 km) to the north. The 2001 Census recorded a village population of 330 in 161 households. Rauceby village hall is situated on Main Street and serves both North and South Rauceby. It provides for village clubs and events, and the Rauceby Pre-School which serves the local community and surrounding area. The village public house is The Bustard Inn. A daily bus service on the Grantham to Sleaford route is provided by Centrebus. Rauceby railway station, adjoining the A153 road, is less than 1 mile to the south-east. Media related to South Rauceby at Wikimedia Commons
    5.67
    3 votes
    173
    Taverham

    Taverham

    Taverham is a village and civil parish in Norfolk, in the UK. It is approximately 5 miles (8 km) north-west of the City of Norwich. Taverham sits on the River Wensum. In 2001, Taverham had a population of 10,233. It has seen recent population growth with the building of Thorpe Marriott, a new residential development that straddles the boundary with the neighbouring village of Drayton. The patron saint of Taverham is St Walstan who according to legend lived and worked in the village in the 11th century. Taverham has two state run first schools: Ghost Hill First School and Nightingale First School, and a public (privately owned) prep school: Taverham Hall School. Taverham Junior School (formerly St Edmunds Middle School and Taverham Middle School) educates children between the ages of 7 and 11 years. Taverham High School, as well as serving Taverham, has a catchment area that includes the adjoining villages of Felthorpe and Ringland. It has currently been awarded a specialist sports status and will become a government-funded academy in September 2012. It educates children between the ages of 11 and 18. There are a variety of small shops in Taverham, and the Taverham Nursery Centre
    5.67
    3 votes
    174
    Aythorpe Roding

    Aythorpe Roding

    Aythorpe Roding is a village and civil parish in Essex, England and is one of The Rodings of Essex. It is located 15 km (9.3 mi) Northwest from the county town of Chelmsford. The village is in the district of Uttlesford and in the parliamentary constituency of Saffron Walden. The village has its own Parish Council. The village hall is Aythorpe Roding Village Hall and there is a village cricket club, Aythorpe Roding Cricket Club.
    6.50
    2 votes
    175
    Corfe Castle

    Corfe Castle

    Corfe Castle is a village and civil parish in the English county of Dorset. It is the site of a ruined castle of the same name. The village and castle stand over a gap in the Purbeck Hills on the route between Wareham and Swanage. The village lies in the gap below the castle, and is some eight kilometres (five miles) south-east of Wareham, and the same distance west of Swanage. Both the current main A351 road Lytchett Minster to Swanage and the Swanage Railway thread their way through the gap and the village. The civil parish of Corfe Castle stretches across the width of the Isle of Purbeck, with coasts facing both the English Channel and Poole Harbour. It therefore includes sections of both the low lying sandy heathland that lies to the north of the castle, and the rugged Jurassic Coast upland to the south. Burial mounds around the common of Corfe Castle suggest that the area was occupied from 6000BC. The common also points to a later Celtic field system worked by the Durotriges tribe. Evidence suggests that the tribe co-existed with the Romans in a trading relationship following the Roman invasion c. 50AD. The name "Corfe" is derived from the Saxon word for gap. From the 1796
    6.50
    2 votes
    176
    Lytchett Matravers

    Lytchett Matravers

    Lytchett Matravers (/ˈlɪtʃɨt məˈtrævərz/) is a large village and civil parish in the District of Purbeck within Dorset, England. The village has a population of 3,309. The village is situated on rising ground in a landscape of small valleys, open fields and woods 5 miles (8.0 km) north of Wareham and 7 miles (11 km) north west of Poole. The elevation gives views from many parts of the village to Poole Harbour and the Purbeck hills. The village lies within the Green Belt of the Poole/Bournemouth conurbation. Lytchett Matravers was once on the original main Poole to Dorchester road, but for the past one hundred and fifty years there has been no main road through the village. Nevertheless, there is some through commuter traffic between the main A350 and A35. Lytchett Matravers has developed over the 20th century from being a hamlet of mostly scattered cottages with large curtilages to a village with a moderately high housing density. During the 1920s and 1930s, a certain amount of ribbon development took place on the main access road and this continued into the 1950s with the addition of small scale infill housing behind. Since the 1970s development has mainly been through relatively
    6.50
    2 votes
    177
    Morley

    Morley

    Morley is a civil parish within the area of Erewash Borough Council in the English county of Derbyshire, north of Derby grid reference SK394410 It is on the eastern side of Morley Moor, with Morley Smithy to the north. The parish church of St Matthew stands near the (converted) Tithe Barn and dovecote of Morley Hall. The church features a wall of stained glass depicting the story of Robert of Knaresborough along the north aisle which came from Dale Abbey in 1539, home of the fine Sacheverell tombs. In 1009 Æþelræd Unræd (King Ethelred the Unready) signed a charter at the Great Council which recognised the position and boundaries of Westune. The land described in that charter included the lands now known as Shardlow, Great Wilne, Church Wilne, Crich, Morley, Smalley, Weston and Aston-on-Trent. Under this charter Æþelræd gave his minister, Morcar, a number of rights that made him free from tax and to his own rule within the manor. Morley was mentioned in the Domesday book as belonging to Henry de Ferrers and having woodland pasture that was four furlongs by three.. Morley Park was one of the seven royal parks within Duffield Frith and is about five miles north in the parish of
    6.50
    2 votes
    178
    New Alresford

    New Alresford

    New Alresford or simply Alresford ( /ˈɒlzfərd/ or  /ˈɔːlzfəd/) is a small town and civil parish in the City of Winchester district of Hampshire, England. It is 12 kilometres (7.5 mi) north-east of Winchester and 20 kilometres (12 mi) south-west of the town of Alton. In the 2001 census, Alresford had a population of 5,102. New Alresford has shops, a tourist information centre, a central conservation area, two tea rooms and is a terminus as with Alton of the Watercress Line, a steam worked heritage railway at Alresford railway station. There is evidence of Neolithic, Bronze Age and Iron Age occupation on numerous sites in the Alresford area, with a Roman or Romano-British site on nearby Fobdown and to the south-east of the town in Bramdean. There is evidence of a grant to the Church at Winchester sometime before the 9th century, which became known as the Liberty of Alresford. Alresford was listed in the Domesday Book but this probably refers to what is now Old Alresford as there is no evidence of a settlement south of the river at this time. Old Alresford as with Farnham, Guildford, Dorking and Maidstone adjoins the Pilgrims' Way between Canterbury and Winchester. New Alresford was
    6.50
    2 votes
    179
    Stillingfleet

    Stillingfleet

    Stillingfleet is a village and civil parish in the Selby district of North Yorkshire, England. It is about 6 miles (10 km) south of York and nearby settlements include Acaster Selby, Naburn and Appleton Roebuck. Stillingfleet was once the site of UK Coal's Stillingfleet Mine, part of the Selby Coalfield, which closed in 2004. The parish church of St Helen's is a grade I listed building. The origin of the name 'Stillingfleet' lies in Old English. The name means 'stretch of river belonging to the family or followers of a man called Styfel', and is composed of the elements Styfel (the name of the landowner), inga (followers of) and fleot (stream, inlet or creek). The village was recorded as Steflingefled in the Domesday Book.
    6.50
    2 votes
    180
    Westhampnett

    Westhampnett

    Westhampnett is a village and civil parish in the district of Chichester in West Sussex, England located 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) north-east of Chichester on the former A27 road, now by-passed. As originally developed, the village is a scattering of houses around an Anglican parish church of Saxon origin, dedicated to St. Peter. The large churchyard contains an unusually large number of elaborate headstones, including plain and celtic crosses, indicating a wealthy congregation in past centuries. The civil parish includes the hamlets of Maudlin, .5 kilometres (0.31 mi) north east, along the Roman road called Stane Street, and Westerton, 1 kilometre (0.62 mi) to the north. Towards Chichester is a disused watermill on the River Lavant. To the north the parish extends to Goodwood Racecourse high on the South Downs, including Goodwood House and most of Goodwood Airfield and motor racing circuit. The parish has a land area of 888.52 hectares (2,195.6 acres). In the 2001 census 460 people lived in 161 households, of whom 234 were economically active. The airfield began as a World War II fighter base, opened in 1940 during the Battle of Britain when it was home to two Spitfire squadrons.
    6.50
    2 votes
    181
    Norley

    Norley

    Norley is a village and civil parish in the unitary authority of Cheshire West and Chester and the ceremonial county of Cheshire, England. It lies to the north of Delamere Forest, near the village of Cuddington. Its name is derived from Norlegh, which means "north clearing". In the Domesday Book, Norley was included under the manor of Kingsley. During the reign of Henry III the manor of Norley was granted to Richard de Kingsleigh, and Roger de Norley was granted land within the manor. Later the area was dominated by two estates, Norley Hall and Norley Bank. The first Norley Hall was built at the beginning of the 15th century and the present hall dates from 1782 when it was built by William Hall. In the 19th century the hall was bought by the Woodhouse family of Liverpool. It was later occupied by Charles F. Bell and then the Dronsfield family. It has now been divided into apartments. Norley Bank was built by James Croxton in the 18th century and later acquired by Rev. Rowland Egerton. His eldest son was Rowland Egerton-Warburton who inherited the Arley and Warburton estates, and who built the present Arley Hall. Hon. Arthur Lascelles bought the house in about 1852 and it remained
    7.00
    1 votes
    182
    Seaton

    Seaton

    Seaton is a seaside town in East Devon on the south coast of England. It faces onto Lyme Bay, to the west of the mouth of the River Axe with red cliffs to one side and white cliffs on the other. Axmouth and Beer are nearby. A sea wall provides access to the mostly shingle beach stretching for about a mile, and a small harbour. Seaton stands on the 95 miles (153 km) Jurassic Coast of the Dorset and East Devon Coast World Heritage Coastline. From here it is possible to visit rock strata dating from three geological periods in a 185 million-year ‘geological walk through time’. A farming community existed here 4,000 years before the Romans arrived and there were Iron Age forts in the vicinity at Seaton Down, Hawkesdown hill, Blackbury Camp and Berry camp. During Roman times this was an important port although the town's roman remains have been reburied to preserve them. In Saxon times Seaton was known as Fluta or Fleet, the Saxon word for Creek. The town of Fleet was founded by Saxon Charter 1005 AD. The first mention of Seaton was in a Papal Bull by Pope Eugenius in 1146. Seaton was an important port for several centuries, supplying ships and sailors for Edward I's wars against
    7.00
    1 votes
    183
    Swaton

    Swaton

    Swaton is a hamlet and civil parish in North Kesteven, Lincolnshire, England. It is situated on the on the B1394 road, less than 0.5 miles (0.8 km) north from the A52 road, and 6 miles (9.7 km) south-east from Sleaford. Swaton Fen lies to the east. The Eau river rises to the west and runs through the village until it joins the Forty Foot Drain. Before the draining of the Fens the Eau river was navigable and a large inland port existed close to the current bridge. The Roman Car Dyke runs to the east of the village. Roman brick pits remain. The name comes from "Suavetone" or "Swaffa’s Farmstead". In 1240 William Longespee and his wife Idonea applied for and were granted a Royal charter to run a Friday market in the village. This grant was unsuccessfully challenged by residents of Folkingham and Sleaford who feared it would damage their own Saturday and Monday markets. Nicolaa de la Haye (born 1150), a former Sheriff of Lincolnshire in the 12th century is buried in the churchyard. Swaton Vintage Day is held each June. The town also hosts the annual World Egg Throwing competition. Egg throwing in this village started circa 1322 when the new Abbot of Swaton, controlling all poultry in
    7.00
    1 votes
    184
    Besselsleigh

    Besselsleigh

    Besselsleigh or Bessels Leigh is a village and civil parish about 4.5 miles (7.2 km) south-west of Oxford. Besselsleigh was part of Berkshire until the 1974 boundary changes transferred to Oxfordshire. The village is just off the A420 road between Oxford and Swindon. Besselsleigh is almost certainly the Lea or Leigh owned by a Saxon named Earmund in the 7th century. The manor of Leigh passed to the family of a Thomas Bessels in the mid-14th century, and by the next century the village had acquired its present toponym. The Church of England parish church of Saint Lawrence existed by the 12th century, and the west wall, Norman south door and possibly some other parts survive from this time. The church was rebuilt in the latter part of the 13th century, which is the date of the Decorated Gothic west window of the nave and east window of the chancel. Most of the other windows are Perpendicular Gothic: that in the north wall of the chancel from the 14th century and others in the church from the 15th century. In 1632 William Lenthall paid for St. Lawrence's church to be "beautified and repaired". The font is 17th-century and the pulpit is 18th-century. Besselsleigh has a public house,
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    2 votes
    185
    Colebatch, Shropshire

    Colebatch, Shropshire

    Colebatch is a small village and civil parish in Shropshire, England. The village lies on the A488, one mile south of Bishop's Castle, on the road to Clun. Also nearby, to the east, is the village of Lydbury North, while the hamlet of Cefn Einion lies to the west. In the village on the west side of a tributary of the River Kemp are the earthwork remains of Colebatch Castle, a small motte castle.
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    2 votes
    186
    East Hoathly with Halland

    East Hoathly with Halland

    East Hoathly with Halland ( /ˈhoʊðliː/) is a civil parish in the Wealden District of East Sussex, England. The parish contains the two villages of East Hoathly and Halland, two miles (3.2 km) to the west; it sits astride the A22 road, four miles (6.4 km) north-west of Hailsham, although the original sharp bend on that road through East Hoathly has now been bypassed. The origin of the village name is said to be from the family name of De Hodleigh, landowners in the 12th century. The village was the home of Thomas Turner (1729–1793), a local diarist, in the 18th century. In more modern times it was the birthplace of founding member/keyboard player of the progressive rock band Genesis, Tony Banks. Halland is a much smaller village than its near neighbour, its history is mainly connected with the Pelham family who built a house here in 1595. The local iron industry also had connection here: it is possible that Halland was a stopping place for the teams of oxen taking cannon to Lewes. On 3 December 2006 the Festival Fireworks factory in nearby Shortgate caught fire detonating the display pyrotechnics stored on the site. Media reports placed the factory within Halland, although it
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    2 votes
    187
    Groby

    Groby

    Groby (pronounced "groo-bee")  listen (help·info) is a large English village in the county of Leicestershire, to the north west of the city of Leicester. The population at the time of the 2001 census was 7,301. The village has expanded vastly since the 1970s and is now part of the Leicester Urban Area. The southern side is dominated by new housing estates, built upon what was formerly farming land between the historic part of Groby and the neighbouring village of Glenfield. The old village centre still retains some character, with some cobbled lanes and thatched cottages. The church of St Philip and St James, built in the lancet style by George Harry Grey, the seventh Earl of Stamford, dates from 1840 and stands on the site of Groby Castle. The architect was William Railton. No remains are left of the castle, other than a slight rise in ground to the east of the main church building, and the manor house (Groby Old Hall), the stone-built parts of which are thought to have been part of the castle's outer buildings. In April 2010 archaeologists from the popular Channel 4 television show, Time Team excavated the area behind the old hall and the Church. They were looking for Groby
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    2 votes
    188
    Sawley, Derbyshire

    Sawley, Derbyshire

    Sawley is a village and civil parish within the Borough of Erewash, in southeast Derbyshire, England. Around 6,500 people live in the parish. with a slightly higher than average number of people over 65. In 2009 Sawley was blighted with a smell coming from waste products being legally dumped onto nearby farmland. The smell was dubbed the Sawley Stink. A dedicated group of local residents campaigned successfully to put an end to the process and Sawley was soon free of the stink. Every year around the August Bank Holiday, Sawley All Saints holds a flower festival, with themed floral displays inside the church and a popular beer festival held in the village. There are several events throughout the year including a May Day festival, and an ever popular Garden Trail. Sawley Marina is one of the most prominent features of the village, with access to the regions main waterways. The old name for Sawley was Sallé. Between Sawley and Church Wilne and Great Wilne is the junction of the River Derwent and the Trent. It is to this that Sawley owes it position. The church of All Saints is thirteenth century and contains Saxon and Norman work. and commands a position on a small rise near the
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    2 votes
    189
    Toddington

    Toddington

    Toddington is a village and civil parish in north Gloucestershire in Tewkesbury Borough, located approx. 20 km north-east of Cheltenham with a population of around 300 people. The village is split into two, the "Old Town" near the church and the "New Town" at the crossing of the B4077 and B4632 roads. The village pub, The Pheasant is situated at the heart of the village, beside the village shop. Despite the size of the village, it has a large church, St. Andrew's which contains the marble tombs of local nobility, the Tracy family, who variously lived at Sudeley Castle, Hailes Abbey and Toddington Manor. Toddington Manor lies between New Town and Old Town, and was bought by the Turner Prize-winning artist Damien Hirst in 2005; he plans to turn the manor into a museum of his work. Toddington railway station is located in New Town and is the northern terminus of the private heritage line, the Gloucestershire Warwickshire Steam Railway.
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    2 votes
    190
    Baughurst

    Baughurst

    Baughurst ( /ˈbɔːɡhərst/) is a village and civil parish in Hampshire, England. It is located west of the town of Tadley, 6 miles (9.7 km) north of Basingstoke. In the 2001 census it had a population of 2,473. The village is known for its historical association with Tadley in the manufacture of besom brooms. A number of tumuli are in the parish, suggesting that a settlement may have been in the Baughurst area in the Stone Age, Bronze Age, Iron Age, and Roman times. Portway, the Roman road between London (Londinium) and Dorchester (Durnovaria) via nearby Silchester (Calleva Atrebatum), ran through the parish. The recorded history of Baughurst traces to Anglo Saxon Britain. In 885, the area was given to the Bishop of Winchester, and became part of Hurstbourne Priors near Andover. Baughurst was not mentioned in the Domesday Survey of 1086; it was probably still part of Hurstbourne Priors. During the late 13th century, a number of tithings within Baughurst were held by the Coudray family on behalf of Edward I. In 1440, Baughurst became part of the Manor of Manydown near Basingstoke. In the mid-16th century, Baughurst's tithings were bought by the Palmes family. Around the same time, the
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    3 votes
    191
    Beckermet

    Beckermet

    Beckermet ( /bɛˈkɜrmɨt/) is a village, civil parish and post town in the English county of Cumbria, located near the coast between Egremont and Seascale. Historically within Cumberland, it is served by Braystones railway station and is less than a mile west of the A595 road. It is near - around 2 miles/3 km from - the Sellafield nuclear plant which may be seen from the higher parts of the village. The natural assumption is that the village is so-named because two becks (local dialect meaning streams- specifically Kirk Beck and Black Beck) meet there. However, the name is pronounced with the accent on the middle syllable (over the years, attempts by people to spell the name as they heard it have resulted in versions like Beck Armett in 1570, and Bekyremet in 1279). In the 12th century there was an h in the middle, the earliest known version, from 1130, being Bechermet, so the English Place-Name Society suggests that the name really means "hermit's stream". Until May 2011 Beckermet was split between two parishes: Beckermet St Bridget (2001 census population 385) to the south east, and Beckermet St John (pop. 1925) to the north west. Arguably, a third parish should be included, as the
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    3 votes
    192
    Mursley

    Mursley

    Mursley is a small village in and also a civil parish within Aylesbury Vale district Buckinghamshire, England. It is located about three miles east of Winslow and four miles south west of Fenny Stratford. The village name is Anglo Saxon in origin, and means 'Myrsa's woodland'. In the Domesday Book of 1086 the village was recorded as Muselai. The village was at one time a more important place; it was once a market town, by virtue of a royal charter granted in 1230, and the centre of the local deanery. The size of the place has been much reduced since then, most likely by the bubonic plague of the 17th century. There was at one time a manor in the locality called "Salden", within which stood a manor house built by the Chancellor of the Exchequer Sir John Fortescue(d.1629), which was visited by King James I. This house has since disappeared. Actor David Tomlinson who played George Banks in Mary Poppins and Mr. Emelius Browne in Bedknobs and Broomsticks lived and raised his children in Mursley until his death on 24 June 2000. David became notorious around the village for flying very low in his Tiger Moth and on one occasion he crash landed in a field near his house and was tried with,
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    3 votes
    193
    Stiffkey

    Stiffkey

    Stiffkey (often pronounced Stewkey) is a village and civil parish on the north coast of the English county of Norfolk. It is situated on the A149 coast road, some 6 km (3.7 mi) east of Wells-next-the-Sea, 6 km (3.7 mi) west of Blakeney, and 40 km (25 mi) north-west of the city of Norwich. The civil parish has an area of 14.55 km (5.62 sq mi) and in the 2001 census had a population of 223 in 105 households. For the purposes of local government, the parish falls within the district of North Norfolk. The place-name 'Stiffkey' is first evidenced in the Domesday Book of 1086, and means 'stump island, island with stumps of trees'. The village is remembered as the parish whose rector, Harold Davidson, faced charges of immorality and was defrocked in 1932. He was a popular priest in the area and the villagers asked his family to allow him to be buried in Stiffkey when he died, rather than in the family tomb in Sholing, where he was born. (He was killed, rather improbably, by a lion). They have cared for his grave for many years. The author Henry Williamson bought a farm in Stiffkey. The Story of a Norfolk Farm (1941) is his account of his first years of farming here. On 11 May 1978, the
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    3 votes
    194
    Burwardsley

    Burwardsley

    Burwardsley is a village and civil parish the unitary authority of Cheshire West and Chester and the ceremonial county of Cheshire, England. The parish also includes the small villages of Burwardsley, Burwardsley Hill, Higher Burwardsley. The parish also includes Burwardsley Hall and is part of two Cheshire long distance footpaths, the Sandstone Trail and the Eddisbury Way. The parish church of St John the Devine is in Burwardsley. The village has a Post Office and a pub, The Pheasant Inn, with views over the Cheshire plains to Wales and Merseyside. The primary school is now an outdoor education centre. Media related to Burwardsley at Wikimedia Commons
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    2 votes
    195
    Gwinear-Gwithian

    Gwinear-Gwithian

    Gwinear–Gwithian (Cornish: Sen Gwynnyer–Sen Goedhyan) is a coastal civil parish in west Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. It includes the villages of Connor Downs, Gwinear, Gwithian, Reawla and Rosewarne. The parish is situated approximately two miles (3 km) east of Hayle two miles (3 km) west of Camborne. For the purposes of local government Gwinear–Gwithian has a parish council and elects councillors every four years. The principal local authority is Cornwall Council. The population of the parish was 3032 in the 2001 census. The parish church of St Gwinear is of the 13th and 14th centuries (tower mid 15th century, built of granite in three stages). There are three aisles: the south aisle which is shorter than the nave, an inner north aisle, and further north the Arundell Aisle. Lanyon Farm and Polkinghorne Farm (both less than a mile from Gwinear Road Station) are both of the 17th century. Gwinear was surveyed for the Survey of English Dialects.
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    2 votes
    196
    Perranarworthal

    Perranarworthal

    Perranarworthal is a civil parish and village in Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. The village is situated approximately four miles (6.5 km) northwest of Falmouth and five miles (8 km) southwest of Truro. Perran Wharf is the area of the parish beside the River Kennall (a tributary of Restronguet Creek) where there were wharves and a quay. The other major settlement in the parish is Perranwell. Perranarworthal parish is bordered on the north by Kea parish, on the east by Restronguet Creek and Mylor parish, on the south by St Gluvias and Stithians parishes and on the west by Gwennap parish. The name derives from the Manor of Arworthal which has had a number of spellings in the past including Hareworthal (1187), Arwoethel and Arwythel. By the 18th century two names appear on maps “Perran Arworthal” meaning St Piran’s by the creek or estuary. William Penaluna described the settlement in 1838. The original 15th century Anglican church of Saint Piran was replaced by a building designed by James Piers St Aubyn in 1884. However, the original granite-built tower remains from the 15th century church. Pevsner described the church as "indifferent". It was the home of the Perran Iron Foundry,
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    2 votes
    197
    South Milford

    South Milford

    South Milford is a small village and civil parish located in the district of Selby, in the county of North Yorkshire, England. Historically an agricultural village, the population has recently boomed due to housing development. South Milford is now generally considered a commuting satellite for nearby towns and cities, thanks to the local Motorway network, including the A1(M), M1 and M62. Nevertheless the village maintains links with the local farming community. The village is served by South Milford railway station. Steeton Hall Gateway is a listed ancient monument and is protected by English Heritage. It is situated about two kilometres west of South Milford. The gateway originally served a large hall, which was demolished and replaced by a house, which has since been converted into several dwellings. The gateway dates from the 15th century, and is one of four such structures which marked the corners of the estate. It has two arched passages, the large one in the centre to allow horsemen and carriages through and the smaller one to the left for footmen. There is a spiral staircase which leads into a large room above the arch and there are a number of shields and coats of arms
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    2 votes
    198
    Tadcaster

    Tadcaster

    Tadcaster is a market town and civil parish in the Selby district of North Yorkshire, England. Lying near the Great North Road approximately 15 miles (24 km) east of Leeds and 10 miles (16 km) west of York. It is the last town on the River Wharfe before it joins the River Ouse about 10 miles (16 km) downstream. It is part of the shire county of North Yorkshire, despite being further south than York, the traditional centre of Yorkshire and thus historically in the West Riding. The town is twinned with Saint Chély d'Apcher in France. For local government purposes, the River Wharfe divides the town into eastern and western electoral wards. The combined population of Tadcaster East and Tadcaster West in 2004 was 7,280, 3,800 in Tadcaster East and 3,480 in Tadcaster West (source: Office of National Statistics). The local authority is Selby District Council. Tadcaster gave its name to a much larger rural district council, Tadcaster Rural District and other administrative areas. This may lead to confusion when comparing the size and extent of the current town with information for earlier periods. For example the population in 1911 of the Tadcaster sub-district was 6831 compared with that
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    2 votes
    199
    Burton Dassett

    Burton Dassett

    Burton Dassett is a parish and shrunken medieval village in Warwickshire. Much of the area is now the Burton Dassett Hills country park. It was enclosed for sheep farming by Sir Edward Belknap at the end of the 15th century. It was the birthplace of Sir Thomas Temple and for several generations was regarded by the Temple family of Stowe, Buckinghamshire as their ancestral home. There is a heraldic memorial to John Temple and his children in Burton Dassett church. Each of the twelve shields represents one of John Temple's children. The left half of each shield represents the husband and the right half represents the wife. The twelfth (undivided) shield represents Temple's son George who died young and therefore did not marry. Susannah Smith, the wife of agriculturalist Jethro Tull was born in the village.
    4.67
    3 votes
    200
    Hemingford Grey

    Hemingford Grey

    Hemingford Grey is a village in the English county of Cambridgeshire. It is situated on the southern bank of the River Great Ouse in the county of Cambridgeshire, with the northern bank occupied by the flood meadow. Until 1965 it was in Huntingdonshire and between 1965 and 1974 it was in the short-lived county of Huntingdon and Peterborough. It adjoins Hemingford Abbots to the west and St Ives on the north of the river and the A14 trunk road passes through the parish about a mile south of the main settlement. In Anglo-Saxon times the neighbouring villages of Hemingford Grey and Hemingford Abbots were a single estate. In the ninth century they were split into two. In 1066 "Little Hemingford", as it was known, was acquired by nearby Ramsey Abbey. In around 1140 Payn of Hemingford began the construction of Hemingford Manor, one of the oldest inhabited buildings in England, as well as the present church. The manor was then owned by the Turberville family who for a while gave their name to the village. In 1276 the village was given its present name by the de Grey family. The manor remained in the possession of the Greys until seized by Henry VII in the fifteenth century after George
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    3 votes
    201
    Catmore

    Catmore

    Catmore is a civil parish and small village in West Berkshire about 5.5 miles (8.9 km) south-east of Wantage. Catmore is in the Berkshire Downs and the centre of the village is about 575 feet (175 m) above sea level. The 2001 census recorded a population of only 28, making Catmore the least populous parish in Berkshire. In the 11th century the village was recorded as Catmere. The toponym evolved via "Catmor" in the 12th century, "Cattermere" in the 14th century, "Catmard" in the 15th century and "Cattmere" in the 17th century before reaching its present form. The earliest known record of Catmore is from the time of Edward the Confessor (reigned 1042–66), when a Saxon called Ezui held the manor. The manor was devastated in the Norman Conquest of England. The Domesday Book of 1086 records that what was left of the manor was held by the Norman baron Henry de Ferrers. Under the de Ferrers, Catmore became part of the Honour of Tutbury. Two centuries later Robert de Ferrers, 6th Earl of Derby took part in a rebellion against Edward III. He was defeated at Chesterfield in 1266, imprisoned, and all his properties were confiscated by the Crown. In 1267 Edward III created Edmund Crouchback
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    1 votes
    202
    Clatworthy

    Clatworthy

    Clatworthy is a village and civil parish in the West Somerset District of Somerset, England. It is situated 10 miles (16 km) from Wellington and four miles (6 km) from Wiveliscombe on the southern slopes of the Brendon Hills and close to the Exmoor National Park. The Clatworthy Reservoir is run by Wessex Water and has a capacity of 5,364,000 cubic metres, supplying some 200,000 homes. It impounds the head waters of the River Tone and the surrounding area is used for walking and fishing. The name of the village means the "homestead where burdock grows". The parish of Clatworthy was part of the Williton and Freemanners Hundred. Just west of the village, at the edge of Exmoor National Park, is the Clatworthy Reservoir, which impounds the headwaters of River Tone and supplies water to some 200,000 homes and businesses, some as far away as Yeovil. An iron age enclosure known as Clatworthy Castle was sited on the wooded slopes above the reservoir and there are round barrows in the north of the parish. The parish council has responsibility for local issues, including setting an annual precept (local rate) to cover the council’s operating costs and producing annual accounts for public
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    1 votes
    203
    Fen Ditton

    Fen Ditton

    Fen Ditton is a village on the northeast edge of Cambridge in Cambridgeshire, England. The parish covers an area of 5.99 square kilometres (2 sq mi) Fen Ditton lies on the east bank of the River Cam, on the road from Cambridge to Clayhithe, and close to junction 34 of the A14. The nearest railway station is Cambridge, however Waterbeach station is just north of the village. The site has been occupied since at least neolithic times, and stone tools have been found on the meadows between the village and the river. The name was first recorded in around 950 as Dittone, meaning "the village by the ditch", derived from the Fleam Dyke, the prehistoric ditch that passed through the village from the river to the edge of the fens at Stow-cum-Quy and can still be seen just to the east of the village. The name was later changed to its present name to distinguish it from Wood Ditton. The village's history is closely connected to its position on the River Cam, which provided trade throughout the medieval period and its principal connection to other settlements. A large wharf at the western end of the High Street allowed goods to be delivered for the annual Stourbridge Fair between the 12th and
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    1 votes
    204
    Hemswell Cliff

    Hemswell Cliff

    Hemswell Cliff is a village and civil parish in the West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire, England. It lies on the A631 between Caenby Corner and Gainsborough and on the Lincoln Cliff escarpment. According to the 2001 census it had a population of 683. RAF Hemswell was located on the site from 1937 until it closed in 1967. The airfield site was subsequently redeveloped into a private trading estate and the RAF married quarters into a Residential area which became a newly created civil parish of Hemswell Cliff. The old village of Hemswell remains as a separate parish. By mid 2008 there was no longer any RAF presence on the site and it is now all civilian. The RAF sold the community centre in 2009 and since then the new owners, an educational charity have spent considerable money refurbishing it with a view to reopening the facility in 2010 for use by the local community. The old H Block buildings on the site have now become home to one of the Europe's largest antique centres and there are also various shops, a garden centre, hairdresser, used book shop and several cafés. On Sundays there is a very large Sunday market and car boot sale. Hemswell Cliff Primary School is in the
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    1 votes
    205
    Hockering

    Hockering

    Hockering is a village and civil parish in Norfolk, England. At the 2001 census the parish had a population of 628. By 2007 the district estimated that this had risen to 665. The parish has an area of 8.10 square kilometres (3.13 sq mi) The village is around 5 miles (8.0 km) east of Dereham and around 10 miles (16 km) west of Norwich. Hockering Church of England Voluntary Controlled Primary School is a small village school which takes children from Hockering and surrounding villages. It has a friendly, family atmosphere and its small, mixed-age classes enable children to receive a personalised education appropriate to their ability. An Ofsted inspection in December 2010 rated Hockering Primary School as good overall and as satisfactory or better in all respects. It was scored as outstanding for the effectiveness of care, guidance and support, for effectiveness of promoting learning and well-being, and for the extent to which children feel safe. Hockering has a fairly wide range of facilities for a village of its size. As well as the school, it has a village hall, a church (C of E), a playing field, a pub and a garage which includes a post office and a shop. Hockering is just off
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    1 votes
    206
    Salcombe

    Salcombe

    Salcombe is a town in the South Hams district of Devon, south west England. The town is close to the mouth of the Kingsbridge Estuary, built mostly on the steep west side of the estuary and lies within the South Devon Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB). The town's extensive waterfront and the naturally sheltered harbour formed by the estuary gave rise to its success as a boat- and shipbuilding and sailing port and, in modern times, tourism especially in the form of pleasure sailing and yachting. There is also a crabbing industry. There are a number of shipwrecks off Salcombe. One is of a Bronze Age ship, one of only three known in Britain, which had French made weapons and jewellery. The Salcombe Cannon Wreck is of a 17th century ship that contained 400 Moroccan gold coins and Dutch items. In 1936 a Finnish four-masted barque, Herzogin Cecilie stranded at Bolt Head. Also off Salcombe is HMS Untiring which is a Second World War submarine that was sunk in 1957 as a sonar target. A description of the South Hams is given in the 9th century charter S298. This does not show Salcombe but its area is part of Badestone (Batson). "Salcombe" first appears in the records in 1244, on the
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    1 votes
    207
    Saltash

    Saltash

    Saltash (Cornish: Essa) is a town and civil parish in Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. It has a population of 14,964. It lies in the south east of Cornwall, facing Plymouth over the River Tamar. It was in the Caradon district until March 2009 and is known as "the gateway to Cornwall". Saltash means ash tree by the salt mill. Saltash is the largest town within the East Cornwall area and is one of the largest in Cornwall. Saltash is the location of Isambard Kingdom Brunel's Royal Albert Bridge, opened by HRH Prince Albert on May 2, 1859. It takes the railway line across the River Tamar. Alongside it is the Tamar Bridge, a toll bridge carrying the A38 trunk road, which in 2001 became the first suspension bridge to be widened whilst remaining open to traffic. Saltash railway station is close to the town centre. It was hoped that the empty buildings could be restored as a visitor centre for the bridge, but they have instead been purchased by a property developer. The station is served by a regular train service, with some direct High Speed services to and from London Paddington. The cottage of Mary Newman, Sir Francis Drake's first wife, can be found in Saltash on Culver Road downhill
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    1 votes
    208
    The Stukeleys

    The Stukeleys

    The Stukeleys is a civil parish in the district of Huntingdonshire, in Cambridgeshire, England, consisting of the villages of Great Stukeley and Little Stukeley. The two villages are just north-west of Huntingdon. Media related to The Stukeleys at Wikimedia Commons
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    1 votes
    209
    Tisbury, Wiltshire

    Tisbury, Wiltshire

    The large village of Tisbury lies approximately 13 miles (21 km) west of Salisbury in the English county of Wiltshire. With a population at the 2001 census of 2,056 it is an important local centre for communities around the upper River Nadder and Vale of Wardour. It is the largest settlement within the Cranborne Chase and West Wiltshire Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (larger nearby settlements such as Salisbury and Shaftesbury are just outside it). Tisbury railway station is on the West of England Main Line, placing its residents within commuting distance of London. The village is 2.5 miles (4.0 km) from the A303 trunk road linking Andover with the West Country. The village has some certain historical significance. As in much of the Wiltshire downs, there is evidence of Bronze Age settlement and traces of a probable henge monument with some evidence of settlement 3–4000 years ago. To the southeast of the village there is a quite large hill fort, known as Castle Ditches. The Saxon settlement came into the possession of Shaftesbury Abbey across the county border in Dorset. The administration centre was the monastic grange, still called Abbey Grange Place Farm. Its
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    1 votes
    210
    Edensor

    Edensor

    Edensor (pronounced "Ensor") is a village in Derbyshire, England. It is the closest village to Chatsworth House and much of it belongs to the Dukes of Devonshire. Originally the village was close to the River Derwent immediately below Chatsworth, but the Dukes had it moved out of sight over a hill, apart from one cottage whose tenant did not want to move, which still stands in Chatsworth Park. The Chatsworth Estate office occupies a handsome red brick building which was built as an inn for visitors to Chatsworth in the 18th century. Edensor's St Peter's church was expanded by Sir George Gilbert Scott for the 7th Duke of Devonshire in the 1860s. It contains a magnificent early 17th century memorial to Bess of Hardwick's sons, Henry and William Cavendish. Sir Joseph Paxton is buried in the churchyard, as are most Dukes of Devonshire and their families, including U.S. President John F. Kennedy's sister Kathleen Kennedy, who was married to the 10th Duke's eldest son. Kennedy visited the grave during his presidency. The churchyard contains three Commonwealth service war graves of World War I - a British soldier, a British sailor and a Canadian Army officer. The hamlet of Dunsa lies to
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    2 votes
    211
    Hursley

    Hursley

    Hursley is a village and civil parish in Hampshire, England with a population of around 800 in 2005. It is located roughly mid-way between Romsey and Winchester on the A3090. Besides the village the parish includes the hamlets of Standon and Pitt. The earliest references to Hursley date from the late 12th century; Bishop of Winchester Henry de Blois built a manor house called Merdon Castle, within the parish, in 1138 . Hursley continued in the ownership of the Bishop of Winchester until 1552 when it was surrendered to king Edward VI. The buildings had become ruinous by the 16th century, when Edward Vl granted the manor and park at Hursley to Sir Philip Hoby. Some remains, notably of a gatehouse, still stand, much overgrown, and are listed as a building at risk. During the reign of Queen Mary the manor was briefly restored to the church but given back to the Hoby family by Elizabeth I. The Hoby family sold the manor and castle to Thomas Clerke in 1600. The lodge and park at Hursley were leased separately at this time, but the two estates were brought together again in 1630. The estate passed into the Cromwell family in 1643 when Oliver Cromwell's son Richard married Dorothy Major,
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    2 votes
    212
    Nynehead

    Nynehead

    Nynehead is a village and civil parish in Somerset, England, situated on the River Tone, 7 miles (11 km) south-west of Taunton and 1.5 miles (2 km) north-west of Wellington, in the Taunton Deane district. The village has a population of 416. The first documentary evidence comes from 737 when the manor was granted to the Bishop of Winchester. In 890 the land was granted to a Wulfhere Gidding. The parish of Nynehead was part of the Taunton Deane Hundred. The village was the site of a boat lift on the Grand Western Canal, and the remains of two aqueducts are still standing. The parish council has responsibility for local issues, including setting an annual precept (local rate) to cover the council’s operating costs and producing annual accounts for public scrutiny. The parish council evaluates local planning applications and works with the local police, district council officers, and neighbourhood watch groups on matters of crime, security, and traffic. The parish council's role also includes initiating projects for the maintenance and repair of parish facilities, as well as consulting with the district council on the maintenance, repair, and improvement of highways, drainage,
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    West Coker

    West Coker

    West Coker is a village and civil parish in Somerset, England, situated 3 miles (4.8 km) south west of Yeovil in the South Somerset district. The name Coker comes from Coker Water (crooked stream from the Celtic Kukro). Artifacts from early settlement in the parish include a polished stone axe and boat shaped-bronze broach. A Roman villa has been excavated and a bronze plate inscribed to the god Mars discovered. From this Mars was given the title Mars Rigisamus (which means 'Greatest King' or 'King of Kings') as it depicts a standing naked male figure with a close-fitting helmet; his right hand may have once held a weapon, and he probably originally also had a shield (both are now lost). The same epithet for a god is recorded from Bourges in Gaul. The use of this epithet implies that Mars had an extremely high status, over and above his warrior function. The manor descended with its neighbour East Coker until the 14th century when it passed to a junior branch of the Courtenay family. It was later held by the Dukes of Somerset and Northumberland protectors of Edward VI and later still by the Portmans of Orchard Portman. The original manor house burned down during an attack in the
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    214
    Burwell

    Burwell

    Burwell is a small village in the East Lindsey district of Lincolnshire, England, lying on the A16 north of Spilsby. The village covers approximately 2200 acres (9 km²). Now a village, Burwell was a medieval market town. Burwell Priory, which once stood here, was a Benedictine monastery founded at some point before 1110 by Ansgot of Burwell. It was an alien priory belonging to Grande-Sauve Abbey in Aquitaine. It was dissolved in 1427 and sold to the college of Tattershall, along with its chapels at Authorpe, Carlton, Muckton, and Walmgate, and other lands around Burwell. The manor house, Burwell Hall, was situated in Burwell Park, and was built in 1760 for Matthew Lister. It was demolished in 1958, and only the stables remain. The manor itself was previously held by Henry Percy, Duke of Northumberland; John, Duke of Bedford; Ralf, Lord Treasurer Cromwell; and Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk. The parish church of Saint Michael, became redundant on 13 May 1981 and was taken over by the Redundant Churches Fund on 27 October 1982. It is Grade I listed. Burwell buttercross was converted into a dovecote and is now the village hall. Dating from the beginning of the seventeenth century
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    215
    Foggathorpe

    Foggathorpe

    Foggathorpe is a village and civil parish on the A163 road in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. The village is situated approximately 9 miles (14 km) west of Selby and 8 miles (13 km) east of Market Weighton. The civil parish is formed by the villages of Foggathorpe and Laytham and the hamlets of Harlthorpe and Gribthorpe. According to the 2001 UK census, Foggathorpe parish had a population of 233. There are about 35 houses in the centre of the village, a post office in Station Road, a pub called the Black Swan, and a nearby Hoseasons Holiday Park at Yellowtop Country Park, a long established Boarding Kennels and Cattery on the A163 main road, called Three Acres Kennels. Foggathorpe had its own railway station from 1853 to 1954 on the Selby to Driffield Line, and the site of the dismantled railway track runs to the south of the village. The nearest train service is now about ten minutes' drive away at Howden station, from which one can travel to London Kings Cross. A bus service through Foggathorpe transports children to local schools. Bulmer's History and Directory of East Yorkshire (1892) describes Foggathorpe as a township containing 1,320 acres (5.3 km) of land lying on
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    216
    Kimmeridge

    Kimmeridge

    Kimmeridge (/ˈkɪmərɨdʒ/) is a small village in the English county of Dorset. It is situated just over half a mile (1 km) inland on the Isle of Purbeck on the English Channel coast, 3.5 miles (6.0 km) south of Wareham and about 5 miles (8.0 km) west of Swanage. It lies within the Purbeck administrative district of the county, and has a population of 110 (2001). On the coast south-west of the village lies the roughly semi-circular Kimmeridge Bay, which is backed by low cliffs of soft shale. Beneath the cliffs there is a large wave-cut platform (known as The Flats) and a rocky shore with rock pools and attendant ecology. Kimmeridge Bay is a surfer area. Along the shore immediately eastwards of Kimmeridge Bay (above Hen Cliff) is a folly known as Clavell Tower which inspired P.D. James's novel The Black Tower. It had been in danger of falling down the eroding cliff, so recently the tower was dismantled and then reassembled 35 metres further back from the cliff edge. The tower is available as a holiday let. The Royal National Lifeboat Institution stationed a lifeboat at Kimmeridge in 1868 but it was removed in 1896. The parish church was mostly built in 1872. Kimmeridge Bay is a surfing
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    217
    Kirby Knowle

    Kirby Knowle

    Kirby Knowle is a village and civil parish in Hambleton district of North Yorkshire, England, on the border of the North Yorkshire Moors and near Upsall, about 4 miles north east of Thirsk. A mile to the west of the village is Kirby Knowle Castle, a seventeenth century house altered in the nineteenth century and said to be on the site of a medieval castle which burnt down c1568. Media related to Kirby Knowle at Wikimedia Commons
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    218
    Skipton

    Skipton

    Skipton (also known as Skipton-in-Craven) is a market town and civil parish in the Craven district of North Yorkshire, England. It is located on the course of the River Aire and the Leeds and Liverpool Canal to the south of the Yorkshire Dales, 16 miles (26 km) northwest of Bradford and 38 miles (61 km) west of York. At the United Kingdom Census 2001, Skipton had a population of 14,313. Historically a part of the West Riding of Yorkshire, Skipton was anciently distinguished by Skipton Castle, constructed in 1090 as a wooden motte-and-bailey by Robert de Romille, a Norman baron. In the 12th century William le Gros strengthened it with a stone keep to repel attacks from the Kingdom of Scotland to the north, the erection of which elevated Skipton from a poor dependent village to a burgh administered by a reeve. The protection offered by Skipton Castle during the Middle Ages encouraged the urbanisation of the surrounding area, and during times of war and disorder, attracted an influx of families. Skipton became a prosperous market town, trading sheep and woollen goods, which also led to its naming, derived from the Old English sceap (sheep) and tun (town or village). A market stemming
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    219
    Balsham

    Balsham

    Balsham is a rural village and civil parish in the county of Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom which has much expanded since the 1960s and is now one of several dormitory settlements of Cambridge. The village is south east of the centre of Cambridge beyond the A11 road and also within comfortable driving distance of Newmarket and Haverhill where many residents work and shop. In 1010, Balsham was totally destroyed by Viking raiders. A sign on the village green commemorates the sole survivor of the attack who escaped by hiding in the parish church. The current church has a mix of dates, with the bell tower being the oldest part, dating from the 13th century. The chancel dates from the early 14th century, whilst the nave with its clerestory dates from the late 14th - the 26 stalls with their misericords were added during this building phase and probably date from 1400. A rood loft was added in the latter half of the 15th century, and the chancel roof was raised with its clerestory being added at the same time. At some (unrecorded) time between the dissolution of the monasteries and the end of the Commonwealth, 17 of the misericords were removed, leaving nine. In the 19th century one
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    220
    East Chiltington

    East Chiltington

    East Chiltington is a village and civil parish in the Lewes District of East Sussex, England. It is located four miles (5.9 km) south-east of Burgess Hill and five miles (8 km) north-west of Lewes. It is a narrow-shaped parish of some 12 square miles (31 km) on the northern slope of the South Downs. The village church is 13th century in origin; the vicar also has charge of two churches in Plumpton. Near the church a pub, The Jolly Sportsman stands beside a road upon the line of the Roman Sussex Greensand Way. East Chiltington is governed at the local level by East Chiltington Parish Council which consists of seven councillors meeting every two months. The parish council is responsible for local amenities and planning consent. The May 2007 election was uncontested. The next level of government is Lewes District Council. The District council supplies services such as refuse collection, planning consent, leisure amenities and council tax collection. East Chiltington is covered by the Plumpton, Streat, East Chiltington and St John (Without) ward which returns a single seat. In the May 2007 election, a councillor from the local Liberal Democrat party was elected. East Chiltington lies
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    221
    Ingoldmells

    Ingoldmells

    Ingoldmells is a coastal village, civil parish and resort in the East Lindsey district of Lincolnshire, England, on the A52. In terms of villages it is relatively large, and receives a lot of tourism yearly due its close position to Skegness. Most housing is found in the west of the village in large council complexes. The primary school is on Simpson Court Close by to the west is the village of Addlethorpe. There are fish and chip shops near the beach. The parish church is a grade I listed building dedicated to Saint Peter and Saint Paul and dating from 1200. The chancel was demolished in 1706 and it was restored in 1858 and 1892. The west tower dates from the 14th century, and the benches and font are 15th century. In the churchyard, the War Memorial is a grade II listed former churchyard cross and sundial dating from 1600 and restored in 1919. During World War II, RAF Ingoldmells was a Chain Home Low radar station, providing low-altitude short-range warning, with a rotating antenna. RAF Stenigot on the Lincolnshire Wolds provided longer-range warning for the area. RAF Skendleby was the other Chain Home Low station in Lincolnshire near Skendleby, Spilsby. Ingoldale Park is
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    222
    Simpson

    Simpson

    Simpson is a village and civil parish in Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire, England. It was one of the former villages of Buckinghamshire that was included in the New City in 1967. It is located south of the centre, just north of Fenny Stratford, near Walton. It is the only parish of this name in the United Kingdom, (although there is a hamlet called Simpson in the parish of Nolton and Roche in Wales). The village name is an Old English language word, and means 'Sigewine's farm'. It was recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 as Siwinestone', In the mid 19th century the village was described as "in appearance, one of the most wretched of many miserable villages in the county". This was due to the author's approach to the village being blocked in the winter time by a ford 200 yards wide, and three feet deep. This ford was fixed in the 1860s when the road was raised by three and a half feet by Charles Warren, the owner of Simpson House. The civil parish is a small one, consisting of Simpson itself, Ashland and West Ashland. In 1927, the parish included part of Fenny Stratford, but no longer does so. Ashland was best known for the original Milton Keynes Stadium, a greyhound racing track.
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    Watton, East Riding of Yorkshire

    Watton, East Riding of Yorkshire

    Watton is a village and civil parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. The village is situated on the A164 road, about 6 miles (9.7 km) north of Beverley and 6 miles (9.7 km) south of Driffield. According to the 2001 UK census the civil parish of Watton had a population of 238. It is the location for Watton Priory which was a Gilbertine double monastery founded in 1150 by Eustace fitz John. The present building dates mainly from the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, although it has earlier origins, and a house was added in the nineteenth century. It is a grade I listed building. The priory was dissolved in 1539 by Henry VIII. The Nun of Watton, famous from Ailred of Rievaulx's De Sanctimoniali de Wattun, is noted for her pregnancy while in the priory.
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    224
    Werrington, Cornwall

    Werrington, Cornwall

    Werrington is a civil parish in Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. It was formerly in Devon. In Werrington Park is a substantial house built by Sir Francis Drake about 1620. A larger mansion was built next to it on the site of old parish church in the early 18th century (the architect may have been William Kent). The parish church of St Martin was built in 1742 in the Gothick style: the tower is from the old church.
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    225
    Bruisyard

    Bruisyard

    Bruisyard is a village in the valley of the River Alde in the county of Suffolk, England. The village has a population of ~175. The village sign depicts Saint Clare of the Order of the Poor Clares who had an abbey in Bruisyard until the dissolution of the monasteries under Henry VIII (see below). The village sign was commissioned by the Parish Council in 2004 and made by the sculptor Anne Smith . The construction of a new village hall on the Parish Park was completed in December 2009 with support from many funding bodies including the Big Lottery Fund. The village hall was formally opened in July 2010. The village hall has a stained glass window by the artist Sharon McMullin depicting the local flora and fauna, and nine low relief plaster panels by the sculptor Anne Smith showing past and present local scenes of which the central panel shows the Domesday book entry for Bruisyard (Buresiart). There used to be a wine-making vineyard in Bruisyard but this closed in 2002 . Bruisyard's name is in the Domesday Book as Buresiart and seems to have come from Anglo-Saxon gebūres geard = "peasant's enclosure". The village church is a Grade 1 listed building and dates back to at least Saxon
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    226
    Cheadle

    Cheadle

    Cheadle is a small market town near Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, England, with a population of 12,158 according to the 2001 census. It is roughly 11 miles (18 km) from the city of Stoke-on-Trent, 50 miles (80 km) north of Birmingham and 50 miles (80 km) south of Manchester. It is also around 5 miles (8.0 km) from the Alton Towers theme park. Cheadle is an historic market town dating back to Anglo-Saxon times, being referred to in the Domesday Book. It was (and still is, but not for administrative purposes) in the historic Staffordshire Hundred (administrative division) of Totmonslow; nowadays it is part of the Staffordshire Moorlands area. Cheadle appears in the Domesday Book as "Celle" held by the lord of the manor, Robert of Stafford, at the time the area covered 6 miles by 3 miles and listed 9 families. In 1176 the Basset family acquired the manor of "Chedle" and in 1250 Ralph Basset was granted a market charter and annual fair by King Henry III. In 1309, 75 families are recorded as using a corn-grinding mill sited near Mill Road. Fifty years later, a new church was built in the village replacing a 12th-century structure and this church remained in use until 1837. In 1606 a
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    227
    Hadlow

    Hadlow

    Hadlow is a village in the Medway valley, near Tonbridge, Kent; it is in the Tonbridge and Malling district. The Saxon name for the settlement was Haeselholte (in the Textus Roffensis). The Domesday Book records it as Haslow and in the Middle Ages it became Hadloe and then Hadlow. Evidence of settlement in the Hadlow area dates back to the Stone Age implements, which have been found near the village. The Domesday entry for the village reads:- During the Middle Ages the manor of Hadlow was owned by the Knights Hospitallers, then the Earls of Gloucester, followed by the Earls of Stafford, who were elevated to the Dukes of Buckingham in 1444. The third Duke of Buckingham was executed in 1521, and the manor went through a series of ownership changes. Sir Henry Guildford being granted the manor by Henry VIII, and the manor passed back to the Crown on his death, it was then granted to the Duke of Northumberland, and again returned to the Crown. in 1558, Henry Carey, the first Baron Hunsdon, received it from Elizabeth I, later passing to his two sons, one of whom Sir George Carey, owned the manor in 1586 The manor house was called Court Lodge at this time. Early in the 17th century, it
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    228
    Aberford

    Aberford

    Aberford is a large village and civil parish on the eastern outskirts of the City of Leeds metropolitan borough in West Yorkshire, England. It has a population of 1,059 according to the 2001 census. It is situated 12 miles (19 km) east of Leeds city centre and lies in the LS25 Leeds postcode area. Aberford was held to be the midway point between London and Edinburgh, being around 200 miles (320 km) distant from each city and lying as it does on the ancient Great North Road, until the construction of the A1 bypass starting at Hook Moor. It lies in the ancient Kingdom of Elmet, the name now given to the local parliamentary constituency. The name 'Aberford' is of Celtic and Anglo-Saxon origin, approximately translating as 'the crossing at the confluence' (presumably of Cock Beck and the much smaller River Crow), indicating the once-strategic importance of the settlement. Aberford is supposed to have once had a reputation for making pins. Aberford's population growth has historically been around the road, and so the village has developed a linear rather than nucleated profile. Since the early 1990s much new housing has been constructed in the village, as increasing affluence allows
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    229
    Alciston

    Alciston

    Alciston is a village and civil parish in the Wealden district of East Sussex, England. It is inland, just off the A27 road, about ten miles (16 km) north-west of Eastbourne and seven miles (11 km) east of Lewes. The ecclesiastical parish is linked with that of Selmeston and Berwick. Saxon in origin, its name was then Aelfsige; it is mentioned in the Domesday Book. The present 14th century church, of unknown dedication, is built of chalk from the nearby South Downs. There is a large medieval tithe barn in the village. It is 170 feet (52 m) long and is the largest in Sussex. Every Good Friday, the road outside the Rose Cottage Inn is closed for the villagers to take part in a traditional skipping contest. The lowest tier of government for Alciston (Pronounced Awl-ciston) is a Parish meeting. Instead of voting for representatives, a small parish may hold a community meeting twice a year to which all the electors may attend and vote on issues. Wealden District Council is the next tier of government, for which Alciston is part of the Alfriston ward, along with Alfriston, Berwick, Chalvington & Ripe and Selmeston. The ward returns one councillor, who was a Conservative in the May 2007
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    230
    Grasby

    Grasby

    Grasby is a small village in the Lincolnshire Wolds, a designated Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty 3 miles (4.8 km) northwest of the town of Caistor, Lincolnshire, England. Grasby's thirteenth century Anglican parish church, dedicated to 'All Saints', lies opposite the village primary school. The village hall holds events such as Rock and Roll and Jive classes, runs a Learn Direct programme, and is used by the village school for physical education lessons and a yearly Easter ceremony. Grasby has one public house, 'The Cross Keys', situated on the Caistor to Brigg road, that for a time held a village shop. A second public house, the 'Bluebell' on the corner of Church Hill and Canty Nook, is now closed. Since 1987, Grasby has been twinned with the small French village of Saint-Rémy-de-Sillé in Sarthe, whose main road has been renamed Rue de Grasby.
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    231
    Kingston Lisle

    Kingston Lisle

    Kingston Lisle is a village and civil parish in the Vale of White Horse, England. Kingston Lisle was part of Berkshire until the 1974 local government boundary changes transferred the Vale of White Horse to Oxfordshire. Kingston Lisle is at the foot of the Berkshire Downs escarpment 64 miles (103 km) west of London. The local town is Wantage 5 miles (8 km) to the east, and the large town of Swindon is 10 miles (16 km) to the west. The village is at the foot of Blowing Stone Hill and is one of many spring line settlements at the foot of the scarp of the White Horse Hills. The Uffington White Horse, Uffington Castle and the Ridgeway are nearby. The village has one public house, which is also a restaurant. The village area is served by Uffington Primary School just over 2 miles (3 km) away, to which there is a free bus service. Kinston Lisle is also home to several racehorse trainers, being 5 miles (8 km) from the horse racing centre of Lambourn. The Blowing Stone, King Alfred's supposed means of summoning his troops before the momentous Battle of Ashdown, is at Kingston Lisle. The nave and north door of the Church of England parish church of Saint John the Baptist was built in about
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    232
    Morley

    Morley

    Morley is a market town and civil parish within the City of Leeds metropolitan borough, in West Yorkshire, England. It lies approximately 5 miles (8 km) south-west of Leeds city centre. Together with Drighlington, Gildersome, Churwell, Tingley and East/West Ardsley, the town had a population of 47,579 in the 2001 census. The civil parish had a population of 27,738. The town is built on seven hills, like Rome: Scatcherd Hill, Dawson Hill, Daisy Hill, Chapel Hill, Hunger Hill, Troy Hill and Banks Hill. Morley means "wood by a moor", from Old English mor "moor" + leah "wood, clearing". The name was recorded as Morelige in 1156. The -ley in the place name is typical of this section of West Yorkshire, alluding to a forest that was around in medieval times. Morley, mentioned in the 1086 Domesday Book as Morelege, Morelei and Moreleia, is traditionally famous for its textile industry, notably the cloth "Shoddy", which was worn by both sides in the American Civil War. Schoolgirl Sarah Harper was murdered by Robert Black in Morley in 1986, giving the town brief, national notoriety. A fuller description of the history of the town is provided by the West Yorkshire Archaeology Service and
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    233
    Stanway

    Stanway

    Stanway is a small crossroads village in the English county of Gloucestershire, about 1 mile south of Stanton: both villages are on the Cotswold Way. It is part of the Tewkesbury Borough Council area. The village is dominated by Stanway House, a Jacobean manor house, owned by the Earl of Wemyss and March. St Peter's Church was rebuilt in the 12th century, the tower added in the 13th century and the whole building thoroughly restored in 1896. The Tithe Barn was built in the 14th century for Tewkesbury Abbey. Stanway War Memorial is situated at the south side of the village, at the junction of the B4077 road (which runs from Stow-on-the-Wold to the A46 at the Teddington Hands, 3 miles north of Bishop's Cleeve) and the southernmost end of the Stanton Road. The bronze of St George and the Dragon is by Alexander Fisher, the stone column and plinth by Sir Philip Stott carved by Eric Gill. The war memorial in the church chancel is also by Fisher and Gill. Stanway has a cricket pitch, a fenced ground, in the middle of a field. The field has an undulating surface, which was reportedly made uneven to make landing difficult for - possibly hypothetical - German gliders during the Second World
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    Whitton

    Whitton

    Whitton is a village and civil parish of about 166 inhabitants in North Lincolnshire, England. It is situated at the northern termination of the Cliff range of hills, on the south shore of the Humber about 3 miles (4.8 km) below Trent Falls, and 9 miles (14 km) west of Barton-upon-Humber. The parish is bounded on the west by Alkborough, on the east by Winteringham (which also includes the Winteringham Haven Wildlife Reserve) and, to the south, by West Halton. Whitton may have originated at the time the Romans crossed the Humber northward in 71 AD; first as a military camp and then later as a Roman villa, overlooking the river, with its temple a few yards to the east, where the Church now stands. It is possible that Whitton was a landing stage on the south bank for the Roman fort and civitas of Petuaria Parisorum at Brough across the river. Roman Coins of Claudius Gothicus (268-270 AD) and Constantine I (the Great) (309-337 AD) have been found in the fields. Pevsner states that the Church tower "re-uses massive blocks of Roman stone", but these blocks of millstone grit which are to be found in several local churches (such as neighbouring Winteringham) may have been transported down
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    235
    Alderbury

    Alderbury

    Alderbury & Whaddon are two small adjacent villages three miles south-east of Salisbury, Wiltshire, England with a population of about 2,000. They are bypassed by the A36 road, which links them to Southampton and Salisbury.
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    236
    Ardingly

    Ardingly

    Ardingly ( /ˈɑrdɪŋlaɪ/ AR-ding-lye) is a village and civil parish in the High Weald Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty about 3.5 miles (5.6 km) north of Haywards Heath in the Mid Sussex district of West Sussex, England. The village is about 33 miles (53 km) south of London, 6 miles (9.7 km) south-south-west of East Grinstead, 6.5 miles (10.5 km) southeast of Crawley, 14 miles (23 km) north of Brighton and 33 miles (53 km) east northeast of the county town of Chichester. The village is on the B2028 road. The parish covers an area of 3,974 acres (1,608 ha). The 2001 Census recorded 1,833 people in 627 households of whom 830 were economically active. St Peter's parish church, towards the western end of the village, dates from the 14th century. Wakehurst Place and its grounds, "Kew in the Country", are about 1.5 miles (2.4 km) north of the village. Ardingly Reservoir is about 1 mile (1.6 km) west of the village. The Big-Upon-Little rock formation is close to a footpath between Ardingly and Horsted Keynes. In June the South of England Agricultural Show early in the month and the London to Brighton cycle event (usually held on Father's Day) attract visitors from across the country. The
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    237
    Bewerley

    Bewerley

    Bewerley is a village and civil parish in the Harrogate district of North Yorkshire, England, about twelve miles west of Ripon. The parish includes the urban area of Pateley Bridge west of the River Nidd (known as Bridgehouse Gate), and the village of Greenhow, as well as Bewerley village. According to the 2001 census the parish had a population of 730. Bewerley is mentioned in the Domesday Book (as Burelei). Historically Bewerley was a township in the large parish of Ripon. It became a separate civil parish in 1866. Bewerley Hall was built in the 16th or 17th century. In 1774 it was acquired by the Yorke family, who built a new hall in 1815. The new hall was demolished in 1925, but the old hall survives. Bewerley Park Centre for Outdoor Education is run by the North Yorkshire County Council. Bewerley Grange Chapel was built by Marmaduke Huby, abbot of Fountains Abbey from 1495 to 1526.
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    Binsted

    Binsted

    Binsted is a village and civil parish in the East Hampshire district of Hampshire, England. The village is about four miles east of Alton. The nearest railway station is 1.8 miles (2.9 km) northeast of the village, at Bentley. The churchyard of the parish church, the Holy Cross, contains the grave of Bernard Law Montgomery, 1st Viscount Montgomery of Alamein who spent his retirement in Alton. Telegraph House, now a private home, was built by the Admiralty in 1825 as a semaphore relay station on the line linking London with Plymouth. Binsted is also the name of a housing estate in the Wadsley Bridge suburb of Sheffield in South Yorkshire. 43, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, and 53
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    239
    Binton

    Binton

    Binton is a village and civil parish in the Stratford district of Warwickshire, England. It is about five miles (8 km) west of Stratford-upon-Avon. According to the 2001 census it had a population of 272. Binton Manor was bought by Edward Viscount Conway of Ragley Hall in 1670 and the title remains in his family. In the 19th century, the Conways possessed most of the village and proceeded to build the present church in 1875, on the site of a much older one. A picture of the original church can be seen at the back of the current church. Between the Norman Conquest and the Conways' buying of the Manor, it had belonged to many different families. The Wyncote family held it for the longest period: from 1325 until 1531. The name Binton probably derives from Bina’s Ton (or town), Bina being a former Anglo-Saxon owner of the village. Binton is unusual in that it has four entries in the Domesday Book of 1086. There were four major landholders named William, Gerin, Urso and Hugh. The total value of all their property was £8 and 10s, a lot of money at the time. Adding together the figures given gives an area of 1,538 acres (6 km), whilst the modern parish is only 1,300 acres (5 km). This is
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    240
    Bradninch

    Bradninch

    Bradninch is a small town and former manor in Devon, England, lying about three miles south of Cullompton. Much of the surrounding farmland belongs to the Duchy of Cornwall. In 2012, in research of 2,400 postcodes in England and Wales which took into account 60 separate factors of interest to young families, Bradninch was found to be the fifteenth most family friendly location in the country. The town is twinned with Landunvez in Brittany. The place-name 'Bradninch' is first attested in the Domesday Book of 1086, where it appears as 'Bradenese'; the name is thought to mean 'broad oak'. Bradninch dates back to before the 7th century and at this time there was a Saxon fortress on Castle hill. Bradninch was the caput of a feudal barony granted by William the Conqueror (1066–1087) to William Capra, who is listed in the Domesday Book of 1086 as holding this manor. The barony escheated to the crown and King Henry I (1100–1135) granted it to his illegitimate son William I de Tracy (d.circa 1136). He left one daughter and sole-heiress Grace de Tracy who married John de Sudeley, They had two children: Ralph de Sudeley (d. 1192), the eldest, who became his father's heir, and Sir William II
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    Cadney cum Howsham

    Cadney cum Howsham

    Cadney cum Howsham is a civil parish in North Lincolnshire, England, that consists of the small villages of Cadney and Howsham, several farms, and mainly arable farmland. The parish boundary is defined by water on all sides, by the Old River Ancholme, Kettleby Beck and North Kelsey Beck. Within the parish, at Newstead on the River Ancholme, lies the site of the Gilbertine Holy Trinity Priory, founded by Henry II in 1171, and endowed with the island of Ancholme, and lands around Cadney and Hardwick. The priory was limited to 13 canons and lay brothers. It was surrendered in 1538 under the act of suppression. On the site of the priory stands Newstead Priory Farmhouse, which retains the remains of a Norman vaulted room and a Perpendicular window. The farm is Grade I listed. In 2011 the Parish Council launched its own website.
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    Giggleswick

    Giggleswick

    Giggleswick is a village and civil parish in the Craven district of North Yorkshire, England. It is situated on the B6480 road, less than 1 mile (1.6 km) north-west from the town of Settle. It is the site of Giggleswick School. A Dictionary of British Place Names contains the entry: The town is served by Giggleswick railway station which provides services to Leeds in one direction and Lancaster and Morecambe in the other. The station is served by five trains per day in each direction and is operated by Northern Rail. The parish church is dedicated to St Alkelda. The building dates mostly from the 15th century, but carved stones discovered during the restoration of 1890–92 indicated that a building existed on the site before the Norman Conquest. It has been designated by English Heritage as a Grade I listed building. The restoration was carried out by the Lancaster architects Paley, Austin and Paley, and included replacing the roof, removing the gallery, rebuilding the vestry, and reseating, replastering and reflooring the church. Richard Whiteley of Channel 4's Countdown was a pupil at Giggleswick School. Russell Harty was an English teacher at the same time. The operatic soprano,
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    Haddenham

    Haddenham

    Haddenham is a large village and is also a civil parish within Aylesbury Vale district in Buckinghamshire, England. Its estimated population in 2011 is 8,385 It is about 5 miles (8 km) south-west of Aylesbury and 2 miles (3 km) north-east of Thame. The village name is Anglo-Saxon Hǣdanhām, "Hǣda's Homestead" or, perhaps Hǣdingahām, "the home of the Hadding tribe". There is an intriguing possibility that the first villagers were members of the Hadding tribe from Haddenham in Cambridgeshire. It is known that the first Anglo-Saxons to settle in the Vale of Aylesbury were followers of Cuthwulf, from Cottenham in Cambridgeshire, who marched south-west to the Thames after routing the British at the Battle of Bedcanford in 571. It was listed in the Domesday Book of 1086 as Hedreham, but by 1142 had taken on its more modern form and was called Hedenham. From the Norman conquest to the time of the Dissolution of the Monasteries the village was in the possession of the Convent of St Andrew in Rochester. King Henry VIII gained possession of the village after the dissolution and held it until his death, after which it passed to his daughter Elizabeth I. The village had a Royal charter as a
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    Lanivet

    Lanivet

    Lanivet (Cornish: Lanneves) is a village and civil parish in Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. The village is situated approximately 2+⁄2 miles (4.0 km) southwest of Bodmin. The Saints' Way long-distance footpath passes Lanivet near its half-way point. The parish includes the hamlets of Bodwanick, Bokiddick, Lamorick, St Ingunger, Trebell, Tregullon, Tremore, and Woodly. Part of St Lawrence is also in this parish. In the church are monuments of the Courtenays of Tremere. In the churchyard are two ancient stone crosses and a rare example of a hogback grave dating from Viking times. Langdon (1896) also records the existence of four more stone crosses in the parish. About a quarter of a mile from the church are the remains of St. Benet's, a monastery of the Benedictine order, said to have been subordinate to Monte Cassino, in Italy, or according to others, Clairvaux in Burgundy. It was founded as a lazar house in 1411 and during the 15th century a chapel with a tower and an adjacent longhouse were built. The building work was not complete by 1430; it is mentioned in a document of 1535. The tower and longhouse are mentioned by Charles Henderson as being still in existence; he refutes
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    Ludgershall

    Ludgershall

    Ludgershall (pronunciation: /ˈlʌɡərʃɔːl/ LUG-ər-shawl, with a hard g) is a town and civil parish 16 miles (26 km) north east of Salisbury, Wiltshire, at grid SU264509. The population was: 535 in 1831; 1,906 in 1951; and 3,775 in 2001. Ludgershall is now officially a town. The entry in the Domesday Book (1086) reads as follows: "Edward of Salisbury holds Ludgershall. Alfward held it before 1066; it paid tax for one hide (about 24 acres). Land for 3 ploughs. In Lordship 2 ploughs, 3 slaves; 8 Cottagers with 1 plough. Pasture 3 furlongs long and 1 furlong wide; woodland ½ league long and 2 furlongs wide. The value was 100 shillings Ludgershall was originally called Litlegarsele (often rendered as lytel, small and garsheath, a grassy place so a "Small grazing area" or "little grass heath" and in 1141 the Empress Maud took refuge in Ludgershall Castle as she fled from Stephen's army. She was accompanied by Milo Fitzwalter and escaped disguised as a corpse to Vies (Devizes) and thence to Gloucester. Some 600 years later a seal was found by a ploughman, bearing a knight in armour and holding a lance shield with the inscription "Sigillum Millonis De Glocestria". It is thought Fitzwalter
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    Market Drayton

    Market Drayton

    Market Drayton is a small market town in north Shropshire, England, close to the Welsh Border. It is on the River Tern, between Shrewsbury and Stoke-on-Trent, and was formerly known as "Drayton in Hales" (c. 1868) and earlier simply as "Drayton" (c. 1695). Market Drayton is on the Shropshire Union Canal and on Regional Cycle Route 75. The A53 road by-passes the town. The counties of Staffordshire and Cheshire, and the Welsh Border are both close by. In 1965, sausage maker Palethorpe's built a new factory employing 400 people in the town. Purchased by Northern Foods in 1990, the company was merged with Bowyers of Trowbridge, Wiltshire and Pork Farms of Nottingham to form Pork Farms Bowyers. The sausage brand was sold in 2001 to Kerry Group, but the factory remains open to this day as the town's largest employer. It produces various meat based and chilled food products, under both the Pork Farms brand and for third parties, including Asda. Müller Dairies have a factory making yogurts. The town is also the home of Tern Press, a highly respected and collectible small press publisher of poetry. Image on Food also makes local gingerbread. Recent developments in the local service industry
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    Mells

    Mells

    Mells is a village and civil parish in Somerset, England, near the town of Frome. The parish includes the village of Vobster which had a coal mine of the same name on the Somerset coalfield and a quarry, both of which are now disused. The old quarry is now used as a diving centre. The Church of St Edmund, at Vobster by Benjamin Ferrey, dates from 1846 and is a Grade II listed building. Vobster Inn Bridge, which carries the lane over the Mells River, is dated 1764, and is Grade II listed. In the Domesday Book of 1086 the village was known as "Mulne" meaning several mills. The parish was part of the hundred of Frome. Around 1500 Mells seems to have been known as Iron Burgh, as a result of the iron ore extracted in the area. During the 19th and early 20th centuries Mells and surrounding villages had several coal mines on the Somerset coalfield, much of which may have supplied the iron works of James Fussell. The Old Ironstone Works is a biological Site of Special Scientific Interest due to the population of Greater and Lesser Horseshoe bats. The nearby railway is now the route of NCR 24, the Colliers Way. Close to the church is the Grade I listed 16th-century manor house, now the
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    Sharnbrook

    Sharnbrook

    Sharnbrook is a village and civil parish located in the Bedford Borough of Bedfordshire, England. The settlement was recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 as a parish within the Hundred of Willey but was probably first developed in Saxon times. The oldest surviving building, St Peter's Church, is Norman. Many of the older buildings in the village are constructed of the local oolitic limestone, also used in other traditional north Bedfordshire settlements. Situated just north of a loop in the River Great Ouse and almost due north of Bedford, the village has developed as a ribbon-settlement running south-east to north-west, with the core of the community clustered at the north-western end. The village has two schools, the larger of which Sharnbrook Upper School and Community College has a campus on the west of the village, serves a wide area and was attended by the London Marathon-winning Paula Radcliffe, who opened the aptly named Paula Radcliffe Sharnbrook Community Sports Centre in April 2005. This Community Sports Centre is not only for School users but also serves the wider local community of North Bedfordshire with sporting facilities. Students are aged from 13 to 18 and take
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    Sutton on trent

    Sutton on trent

    Sutton-on-Trent is a village in Nottinghamshire. According to the 2001 census it had a population of 1,327. It is located 8 miles north of Newark-on-Trent. Sutton Mill was a stone-built tower windmill, built in 1825. It was owned by the Bingham family of Grassthorpe from the 1860s until 1984. The four-storey tower has been converted to a house. In May 1686 the manor and lordship of Sutton-on-Trent were sold to Richard Levett, later Lord Mayor of London, and his wife Mary.
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    250
    Westleigh

    Westleigh

    Westleigh is a suburb of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia 27 kilometres north-west of the Sydney central business district in the local government area of Hornsby Shire. Westleigh derived its name from its location, directly west of Thornleigh. Development as a residential suburb began in 1967 and was marketed by Steward Upton a large real estate firm following the subdivision of the area bounded by Duneba and Eucalyptus Drive, and the former riding school which was situated near Billarga Road. Prior to this time the area was rural with many citrus orchards, with a small number of homes on acreage along Quarter Sessions Rd, extending north towards the former sandstone quarry near "Blackfellow's Head", which was used as a dumping ground for stolen cars of the 1940s and 1950s. The area was originally heavily timbered, so many streets bear the names of Australian trees such as Stringybark Close, Spotted Gum Road, Eucalyptus Drive, Hibbertia Place, Peppermint Gum place and Ironbark Close. Although the naming of the streets seems only vaguely related to what was there before houses arrived, and many streets named for plants contain not a single representative specimen.
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