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Best End of all things of All Time

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    1
    Le Dernier Combat

    Le Dernier Combat

    Le Dernier Combat (French pronunciation: [lə dɛʁnje kɔ̃ba], The Last Battle), released in 1983, is a French film, filmed in black and white, and with virtually no dialogue. It is the first feature film made by Luc Besson and Jean Reno's first leading role. The film is a dark vision of post-apocalyptic survival. The plot explores the devastation of civilization and issues of brutality, hostility and isolation. Pierre Jolivet stars as the main character (identified only as "The Man" in the end credits) who is menaced by "The Brute" (played by Jean Reno) on his journey through a world filled by people rendered nearly mute by some unknown incident. They live in a world of improvised weapons and armour, fighting for survival. A world of rivalry and punishment rather than cooperation Besson served as writer, producer and director for the movie. The entire picture is filmed in black and white and has received cult status for having virtually no dialog. It is also the first of many collaborations between Luc Besson, Eric Serra (musician) and Jean Reno (actor).
    8.11
    9 votes
    2

    A Boy and His Dog

    A Boy and His Dog is a cycle of narratives by science fiction author Harlan Ellison. The cycle tells the story of a boy (Vic) and his uniquely telepathic dog (Blood), who work together as a team in the post-apocalyptic world. Ellison began the cycle with the 1969 short story of the same title, published in New Worlds, and expanded and revised the tale to novella length for his story collection The Beast that Shouted Love at the Heart of the World the same year. The cycle begins chronologically with Eggsucker, which chronicles the early years of the association betweenthe young loner Vic and his brilliant, telepathic dog, Blood. Ellison's expanded novella of A Boy and His Dog was the basis of a film adaptation in 1974, the science fiction film of the same name, directed by L. Q. Jones, which was controversial for alleged sexism; the movie script included lines which were not in Ellison's original stories and which authors such as Joanna Russ found to be objectionable. Ellison disavows the film's misogynistic conclusion. Ellison bookended the original story with two others in the same world, in Vic and Blood: The Chronicles of a Boy and His Dog (St. Martin's Press, 1988), a
    8.20
    5 votes
    3

    Special Bulletin

    Special Bulletin is an American made-for-TV movie first broadcast in 1983. It was an early collaboration between director Edward Zwick and writer Marshall Herskovitz, a team that would later produce such series as thirtysomething and My So-Called Life. In this movie, a terrorist group brings a homemade atomic bomb aboard a tugboat in the harbor of Charleston, South Carolina in order to blackmail the U.S. Government into disabling its nuclear weapons, and the incident is caught live on television. The movie simulates a series of live news broadcasts on the fictional RBS Network. The movie focuses on the media's coverage of news, and whether covering the news changes it. The film has no opening credits (unusual for the time). Instead, the program begins with a promo for a typical daytime network lineup: previews of a game show and soap opera are shown, along with a catchy jingle, "RBS: We're Moving Up!" Suddenly, an ominous "Special Bulletin" slide appears on the screen, with an announcer saying "We interrupt this program to bring you a Special Bulletin from RBS News." It shows how a local TV crew, covering a dockworkers' strike, become caught in the middle of a firefight between the
    8.20
    5 votes
    5

    The Crazies

    The Crazies (also known as Code Name: Trixie) is a 1973 American science fiction horror-action film about the effects of the accidental release of a military biological weapon upon the inhabitants of a small American town. The film was written and directed by George A. Romero, and starred Lane Carroll, Will MacMillan, Harold Wayne Jones. Although it failed at the box office during its original release, it has since become a cult classic. A remake of the film was made in 2010. The film follows two stories, one about the civilians trying to stay alive during the disaster, having to battle both "the crazies" as well as U.S. soldiers ordered to shoot on sight. The other involves the political and military leaders trying to contain the epidemic. Set in the small town of Evans City, Pennsylvania, the central characters are firefighter David (Will McMillan), his girlfriend, nurse Judy (Lane Caroll)and firefighter Clank (Harold Wayne Jones). David was a Green Beret and Clank an infantryman, both having served in Vietnam. The town has seen a number of violent events, including arson at a local farm by a demented farmer. Judy and David are very concerned, since Judy is pregnant. Meanwhile,
    7.60
    5 votes
    6

    The Quiet Earth

    The Quiet Earth is a 1985 New Zealand science fiction post-apocalyptic film directed by Geoff Murphy and starring Bruno Lawrence, Alison Routledge and Pete Smith as three survivors of a cataclysmic disaster. It is loosely based on the 1981 science fiction novel of the same name by Craig Harrison. Its other sources of inspiration have been listed as the 1954 novel I Am Legend, Dawn of the Dead, and especially the 1959 film The World, the Flesh and the Devil, of which it has been called an unofficial remake. July 5 begins as a normal winter morning near Auckland, New Zealand. At 6:12 a.m., the Sun darkens for a moment, and a red light surrounded by darkness is briefly seen. Zac Hobson (Bruno Lawrence) is a scientist working for Delenco, part of an international consortium working on "Project Flashlight", an experiment to create a global energy grid. He awakens abruptly; when he turns on his radio, he is unable to receive any transmissions. Zac gets dressed and drives into the deserted city. Investigating a fire, he discovers the wreckage of a passenger jet, but there are no bodies, only empty seats. He enters his underground laboratory; a monitor displays the message "Project
    9.00
    4 votes
    7

    The Sum of All Fears

    The Sum of All Fears is a 2002 American action/political thriller film directed by Phil Alden Robinson and based on the novel The Sum of All Fears by Tom Clancy. Starring Ben Affleck and Morgan Freeman it was released by Paramount Pictures in the United States on May 31, 2002. This fourth film in the Jack Ryan film series is a reboot set in 2002, with Ryan portrayed as younger than in the 1990 film The Hunt for Red October (set in 1984), and that film's sequels, Patriot Games and Clear and Present Danger. It was partially filmed in Ottawa, Ontario, at the Diefenbunker. During the 1973 Yom Kippur War, an Israeli A-4 Skyhawk carrying a nuclear weapon is shot down over the Syrian desert. The bomb, over time, is consumed by the sand and disappears. Twenty-nine years later, President J. Robert Fowler (James Cromwell) and his senior national security advisors, including CIA Director William Cabot (Morgan Freeman), are conducting a top-secret military simulation of a Russian nuclear attack against the United States. Meanwhile, the bomb is found in Syria by a couple of scrap dealers and unwittingly sold to an arms dealer named Olson (Colm Feore) for US$ 400, who in turn sells it to an
    7.20
    5 votes
    8
    WALL-E

    WALL-E

    WALL-E (stylized with an interpunct as WALL•E) is a 2008 American science fiction romance adventure film produced by Pixar Animation Studios and directed by Andrew Stanton. The story follows a robot named WALL-E, who is designed to clean up a waste-covered Earth far in the future. He falls in love with another robot named EVE, who also has a programmed task, and follows her into outer space on an adventure that changes the destiny of both his kind and humanity. Both robots exhibit an appearance of free will and emotions similar to humans, which develop further as the film progresses. After directing Finding Nemo, Stanton felt Pixar had created believable simulations of underwater physics and was willing to direct a film largely set in space. Most of the characters do not have actual human voices, but instead communicate with body language and robotic sounds, designed by Ben Burtt, that resemble voices. In addition, it is the first animated feature by Pixar to have segments featuring live-action characters. Walt Disney Pictures released it in the United States and Canada on June 27, 2008. The film grossed $23.2 million on its opening day, and $63.1 million during its opening weekend
    8.50
    4 votes
    9

    Meteor

    Meteor is a 1979 science fiction Technicolor disaster film in which scientists detect an asteroid on a collision course with Earth and struggle with international, cold war politics in their efforts to prevent disaster. The movie starred Sean Connery and Natalie Wood. It was directed by Ronald Neame and with a screenplay by Edmund H. North and Stanley Mann, "inspired" by a 1967 MIT report Project Icarus. The movie co-starred Karl Malden, Brian Keith, Martin Landau, Trevor Howard, Joseph Campanella, Richard Dysart and Henry Fonda. After a collision between a comet and an asteroid named Orpheus, a five-mile-wide chunk of Orpheus is set on a collision course with Earth, with devastating results expected on impact. While the United States government and military engage in political maneuvering, other smaller and faster moving fragments rain down on Earth. The United States has a secret orbiting nuclear missile platform satellite named Hercules, which was thought of by Dr. Paul Bradley (Sean Connery) of the U.S. It was intended for defense against a massive space rock, but instead, it was demoted to an orbiting super weapon, its missiles now aimed at Russia. However, its fourteen
    6.00
    6 votes
    10

    Mulberry Street

    Mulberry Street is a 2007 horror film that was released by After Dark Films as a part of their 8 Films to Die For 2007. It was released on DVD in the United States on March 18, 2008. The United Kingdom DVD was retitled Zombie Virus on Mulberry Street. A deadly infection breaks out on Mulberry Street in downtown Manhattan, causing humans to devolve into blood-thirsty monstrosities. Six recently evicted tenants must survive the night and protect their downtown apartment building as the city quickly spirals out of control. Initially emergency services and city authorities attempt to contain the spread by shutting down public transportation, and closing roads, but soon hospitals are inundated with the wounded, and the virus begins to spread island wide. By the time the characters realise the severity of the situation, the infected have overrun much of the city and the streets are highly dangerous, with police seemingly overwhelmed and unable to respond. The survivors barricade themselves in their apartments as the news of the outbreak and subsequent quarantine of Manhattan breaks on TV and radio, waiting on promised rescue from the military, which the government promises will begin to
    8.25
    4 votes
    11

    Testament

    Testament (1983) is a drama film based on The Last Testament by Carol Amen, directed by Lynne Littman and written by John Sacret Young. The film tells the story of how one small suburban town near the San Francisco Bay Area slowly falls apart after a nuclear war destroys outside civilization. Originally produced for the PBS series American Playhouse, it was given a theatrical release instead (although PBS did subsequently air it a year later). The cast includes Jane Alexander, William Devane, Leon Ames, Lukas Haas, Roxana Zal and, in small roles shortly before a rise in their stardom, Kevin Costner and Rebecca De Mornay. Alexander was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actress for her performance. The Wetherly family - husband Tom (William Devane), wife Carol (Jane Alexander), and children Brad (Ross Harris), Mary Liz (Roxana Zal), and Scottie (Lukas Haas) - live in the fictional suburb of Hamlin, California, within a 90-minute drive of San Francisco, where Tom works. On a routine afternoon, Carol (a stay-at-home mom and volunteer for school functions such as directing the school play) listens to an answering-machine message from Tom saying he's on his way home for dinner.
    6.80
    5 votes
    12

    The End of Evangelion

    The End of Evangelion (新世紀エヴァンゲリオン劇場版 Air/まごころを、君に, Shin Seiki Evangerion Gekijō-ban: Air/Magokoro o, Kimi ni) is a 1997 Japanese animated science fiction film written by Hideaki Anno, who co-directed with Kazuya Tsurumaki. The film is divided into two approximately 45-minute episodes: Episode 25': Love is Destructive (Air in the Japanese version) and Episode 26': ONE MORE FINAL: I need you (My Purest Heart for You (まごころを、君に, Magokoro o, kimi ni), an allusion to Charly, in the Japanese version). They can be considered as either a "replacement" or a more detailed, "real world" account of the final two episodes of the popular animated series Neon Genesis Evangelion, which takes place almost completely in the minds of the main characters (an "experimental approach", the Red Cross Book explains, as mainly driven by time and budget restraints). Gainax originally titling the film Evangelion: Rebirth 2. Shinji Ikari, still distraught over the death of Kaworu Nagisa, pleads for help from an unconscious Asuka Langley Soryu, telling her that he is scared of Rei and Misato and that he needs her. Upset and desperately trying to rouse her from her sleep, Shinji accidentally dislodges her
    6.80
    5 votes
    13
    The Time Machine

    The Time Machine

    The Time Machine – also known promotionally as H.G. Wells' The Time Machine – is a 1960 science fiction film based on the 1895 novel of the same name by H. G. Wells in which a man from Victorian England constructs a time-travelling machine which he uses to travel to the future. The film stars Rod Taylor, Yvette Mimieux and Alan Young. The film was produced and directed by George Pal, who had earlier made a film version of Wells's The War of the Worlds (1953). Pal always intended to make a sequel to The Time Machine, but it was not produced; the end of Time Machine: The Journey Back functions as a sequel of sorts. In 1985, elements of this film were incorporated into The Fantasy Film Worlds of George Pal, produced by Arnold Leibovit. The film received an Oscar for time-lapse photographic effects showing the world changing rapidly. On January 5, 1900, four friends arrive for a dinner at a house located near London, but their host, H. George Wells, is absent. As requested, they begin without him, but then George staggers in, exhausted and disheveled. He begins to recount his adventures since they last met on New Year's Eve, 1899. A week earlier, George discusses time as "the fourth
    8.00
    4 votes
    14

    Dawn of the Dead

    Dawn of the Dead is a 2004 horror film directed by Zack Snyder in his directorial debut. It is a remake of George A. Romero's 1978 film of the same name and stars Sarah Polley, Ving Rhames, and Jake Weber. The film depicts a handful of human survivors living in a Milwaukee, Wisconsin shopping mall surrounded by swarms of zombies. The movie was produced by Strike Entertainment in association with New Amsterdam Entertainment, released by Universal Pictures and includes cameos by original cast members Ken Foree, Scott Reiniger and Tom Savini. After finishing a long shift as a nurse, Ana (Sarah Polley), returns to her suburban Milwaukee, Wisconsin neighborhood and to her husband, Luis (Louis Ferreira). Caught up in a scheduled date night the two miss an emergency news bulletin on television. The next morning, Vivian (Hannah Lochner), their neighbor's daughter, enters their bedroom and kills Luis, who immediately reanimates as a zombie and attacks Ana. She flees in her car, but eventually crashes and is knocked unconscious after a bus driver attempts to hijack her car. A montage of news footage depicts zombies overwhelming civilization around the world. Upon waking, Ana joins with
    6.60
    5 votes
    15

    Godzilla

    Godzilla (ゴジラ, Gojira) is a 1954 Japanese science fiction Kaiju film produced by Toho. Directed by Ishirō Honda and featuring special effects by Eiji Tsuburaya, the film starred Akira Takarada, Momoko Kōchi, Akihiko Hirata and Takashi Shimura. The plot tells the story of Godzilla, a giant monster mutated by nuclear radiation who ravages Japan, bringing back the horrors of nuclear devastation to a country that experienced it first hand. It was the first of many Kaiju films released in Japan, paving the way and setting the standard for the genre and future Kaiju films, many of which feature Godzilla. In the spring of 1956, TransWorld Releasing Corp. released an edited version of the film theatrically in the United States titled Godzilla, King of the Monsters!. This version featured newly shot scenes of Hollywood actor Raymond Burr interspliced with the original Japanese footage. In the spring of 2004, Rialto Pictures gave the original Japanese-language version of the film a limited theatrical release (with English subtitles) in the United States to coincide with Godzilla's 50th anniversary. When a Japanese fishing boat is attacked by a flash of light near Odo Island, another ship is
    6.60
    5 votes
    16

    Tank Girl

    Tank Girl is a British comic created by Jamie Hewlett and Alan Martin. Originally drawn by Jamie Hewlett, it has also been drawn by Philip Bond, Glyn Dillon, Ashley Wood, Jim Mahfood, Rufus Dayglo, Andy Pritchett, and Mike McMahon. The eponymous character Tank Girl drives a tank, which is also her home. She undertakes a series of missions for a nebulous organization before making a serious mistake and being declared an outlaw for her sexual inclinations and her substance abuse. The comic centres on her misadventures with her boyfriend, Booga, a mutant kangaroo. The comic's style was heavily influenced by punk visual art, and strips were frequently deeply disorganized, anarchic, absurdist, and psychedelic. The strip features various elements with origins in surrealist techniques, fanzines, collage, cut-up technique, stream of consciousness, and metafiction, with very little regard or interest for conventional plot or committed narrative. The strip was initially set in a stylized post-apocalyptic Australia, although it drew heavily from contemporary British pop culture. Martin and Hewlett first met in the mid-1980s in Worthing, when Martin was in a band with Philip Bond called the
    6.60
    5 votes
    17
    Day of the Dead

    Day of the Dead

    Day of the Dead (Spanish: Día de los Muertos) is a Mexican holiday celebrated throughout Mexico and around the world in other cultures. The holiday focuses on gatherings of family and friends to pray for and remember friends and family members who have died. It is particularly celebrated in Mexico, where it is a national holiday, and all banks are closed. The celebration takes place on November 1, in connection with the Catholic holidays of All Saints' Day and All Souls' Day (November 2). Traditions connected with the holiday include building private altars honoring the deceased using sugar skulls, marigolds, and the favorite foods and beverages of the departed and visiting graves with these as gifts. They also leave possessions of the deceased. Scholars trace the origins of the modern Mexican holiday to indigenous observances dating back hundreds of years and to an Aztec festival dedicated to the goddess Mictecacihuatl. The holiday has spread throughout the world: In Brazil, Dia de Finados is a public holiday that many Brazilians celebrate by visiting cemeteries and churches. In Spain, there are festivals and parades, and, at the end of the day, people gather at cemeteries and
    9.00
    3 votes
    18

    Doomsday

    Doomsday is a 2008 British science fiction film written and directed by Neil Marshall. The film takes place in the future. Scotland has been quarantined because of a deadly virus. When the virus is found in London, political leaders send a team led by Major Eden Sinclair (Rhona Mitra) to Scotland to find a possible cure. Sinclair's team runs into two types of survivors: marauders and medieval knights. Doomsday was conceived by Marshall based on the idea of futuristic soldiers facing medieval knights. In producing the film, he drew from various cinema, including Mad Max and Escape from New York. Marshall had a budget three times the size of his previous two films, The Descent and Dog Soldiers, and the director filmed the larger-scale Doomsday in Scotland and South Africa. The film was released on 14 March 2008 in the United States and Canada and in the United Kingdom on 9 May 2008. Doomsday did not perform well at the box office, and critics gave the film mixed reviews. In 2008, the Reaper virus infects Scotland, so the country is walled off by the British government. A Scottish woman begs retreating soldiers to take her injured little girl with them. Her daughter has an eye injury
    7.25
    4 votes
    19
    Miracle Mile

    Miracle Mile

    Miracle Mile is a 1988 apocalyptic thriller cult film written and directed by Steve De Jarnatt, and starring Anthony Edwards and Mare Winningham that takes place mostly in real time. It is named after the Miracle Mile neighborhood of Los Angeles, where most of the action takes place. The movie was well received by critics, but bombed at the box office. Despite the poor box office performance, the movie has attracted a cult following. The film takes place in a single day and night. The film opens with the two main characters, Harry (Anthony Edwards) and Julie (Mare Winningham), meeting at the La Brea Tar Pits and immediately falling in love. After spending the afternoon together, they make a date to meet after her shift ends at midnight at a local coffee shop, but a power failure means Harry's alarm fails to wake him and Julie leaves for home. When Harry awakes that night he realizes what's happened and rushes to the shop, arriving at 4 AM. Harry tries to call Julie on a pay phone, but only reaches her answering machine, where he leaves an apology. When the phone rings moments later he picks it up, hearing a frantic man telling his dad that nuclear war is about to break out in less
    7.25
    4 votes
    20
    Heat death of the universe

    Heat death of the universe

    The heat death of the universe is a suggested ultimate fate of the universe, in which the universe has diminished to a state of no thermodynamic free energy and therefore can no longer sustain processes that consume energy (including computation and life). Heat death does not imply any particular absolute temperature; it only requires that temperature differences or other process may no longer be exploited to perform work. In the language of physics, this is when the universe reaches thermodynamic equilibrium (maximum entropy). The hypothesis of heat death stems from the ideas of William Thomson, 1st Baron Kelvin, who in the 1850s took the theory of heat as mechanical energy loss in nature (as embodied in the first two laws of thermodynamics) and extrapolated it to larger processes on a universal scale. The idea of heat death stems from the second law of thermodynamics, which states that entropy tends to increase in an isolated system. If the universe lasts for a sufficient time, it will asymptotically approach a state where all energy is evenly distributed. In other words, in nature there is a tendency to the dissipation (energy loss) of mechanical energy (motion); hence, by
    8.67
    3 votes
    21
    Night of the Living Dead

    Night of the Living Dead

    Night of the Living Dead is an American independent horror film directed by George A. Romero, starring Duane Jones, Judith O'Dea and Karl Hardman. It premiered on October 1, 1968, and was completed on a US$114,000 budget. The film became a financial success, grossing $12 million domestically and $18 million internationally. Night of the Living Dead was heavily criticized at its release owing to explicit content, but eventually garnered critical acclaim and has been selected by the Library of Congress for preservation in the National Film Registry as a film deemed "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant." The film has entered the public domain due to an error by the distributor. The story follows characters Ben (Duane Jones), Barbra (Judith O'Dea), and five others trapped in a rural farmhouse in Pennsylvania which is attacked by "living dead" monsters known as zombies. Night of the Living Dead was the basis of five subsequent Living Dead films (1978-2010) also directed by Romero and has inspired two remakes (1990, 2006). The story begins with the white siblings Barbra (Judith O'Dea) and Johnny (Russell Streiner) driving to rural Pennsylvania to visit their white
    8.67
    3 votes
    22
    Aum Shinrikyo

    Aum Shinrikyo

    Aum Shinrikyo (currently known as Aleph) is a Japanese cult, listed as a terrorist organization by several countries. The group was founded by Shoko Asahara in 1984. The group gained international notoriety in 1995, when it carried out the Sarin gas attack on the Tokyo subway. The name "Aum Shinrikyo" (オウム真理教, Ōmu Shinrikyō) derives from the Sanskrit syllable Aum, which represents the universe, followed by Shinrikyo written in kanji, roughly meaning "religion of Truth". In English "Aum Shinrikyo" is usually translated as "Supreme Truth". In January 2000, the organization changed its name to Aleph in reference to the first letter of the Arabic alphabet, Hebrew alphabet and Phoenician alphabets. It changed its logo as well. In 1995, the group claimed they had over 9,000 members in Japan, and as many as 40,000 worldwide. Police consider the existing groups Aleph and Hikari no Wa to be branches of the "dangerous religion". Aum Shinrikyo/Aleph is a syncretic belief system that incorporates Asahara's facets of Christianity with idiosyncratic interpretations of Yoga, and the writings of Nostradamus. In 1992 Asahara published a landmark book, and declared himself "Christ", Japan's only
    5.00
    6 votes
    23
    2012 phenomenon

    2012 phenomenon

    The 2012 phenomenon comprises a range of eschatological beliefs according to which cataclysmic or transformative events will occur on 21 December 2012. This date is regarded as the end-date of a 5,125-year-long cycle in the Mesoamerican Long Count calendar. Various astronomical alignments and numerological formulae have been proposed as pertaining to this date, though none have been accepted by mainstream scholarship. A New Age interpretation of this transition is that this date marks the start of time in which Earth and its inhabitants may undergo a positive physical or spiritual transformation, and that 2012 may mark the beginning of a new era. Others suggest that the 2012 date marks the end of the world or a similar catastrophe. Scenarios suggested for the end of the world include the arrival of the next solar maximum, or Earth's collision with an object such as a black hole, a passing asteroid, or a planet called "Nibiru". Scholars from various disciplines have dismissed the idea of such cataclysmic events occurring in 2012. Professional Mayanist scholars state that predictions of impending doom are not found in any of the extant classic Maya accounts, and that the idea that
    7.00
    4 votes
    24
    The Road

    The Road

    The Road is a 2009 post-apocalyptic drama film directed by John Hillcoat and written by Joe Penhall. Based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning 2006 novel of the same name by American author Cormac McCarthy, the film stars Viggo Mortensen and Kodi Smit-McPhee as a father and his son in a post-apocalyptic wasteland. Filming took place in Pennsylvania, Louisiana, and Oregon. The film received a limited release in North American cinemas from November 25, 2009, and was released in UK cinemas on January 4, 2010. A man and his young son struggle to survive after an unspecified cataclysm has killed all new plant and animal life. Civilization has collapsed, reducing the survivors to scavenging, and in some cases, cannibalism. They search for supplies as they travel south on a road to the coast in the hope it will be warmer. The man carries a revolver, but has only two bullets. Intermittent flashbacks reveal the man's wife had given birth to the child shortly after the catastrophe. She eventually committed suicide. After shooting a member of a cannibal gang who inadvertently stumbles upon them, the man is left with only one bullet. Later, the pair explore a large mansion and discover prisoners in
    8.33
    3 votes
    25
    Cherry 2000

    Cherry 2000

    Cherry 2000 is a 1987 science fiction cult film starring Melanie Griffith and David Andrews. In the year 2017, robotic technology has made tremendous developments and female androids (or "gynoids") are used as prostitutes or substitutes for wives. At the same time, the economy of the world is in decay. Business executive Sam Treadwell's (David Andrews) "Cherry 2000" android (Pamela Gidley), short circuits during sex while on the wet kitchen floor. He is told by a repairman that she's irreparable and finding another Cherry android will be difficult since she was a limited edition. After removing the small optical disk with all the memory from the old unit, Treadwell searches for a replacement, enlisting Edith "E" Johnson (Melanie Griffith), a tough tracker who guides him into the wasteland of a post-apocalyptic United States. She is leading him to an abandoned manufacturing plant where he hopes to find another Cherry 2000 model. Standing in their way is Lester (Tim Thomerson), a wasteland overlord with deranged subordinates. Cherry 2000 is widely known for the original score composed by Basil Poledouris. The soundtrack album prepared for release at the time of the film was canceled
    10.00
    2 votes
    26
    Maya religion

    Maya religion

    The traditional Maya religion of western Honduras, Guatemala, Belize, and Mexico (Chiapas and Yucatán) is a southeastern variant of Mesoamerican religion. As is the case with many other contemporary Mesoamerican religions, it results from centuries of symbiosis with Roman Catholicism. When its pre-Spanish antecedents are taken into account, however, traditional Maya religion already exists for more than two millennia as a recognizably distinct phenomenon. Before the advent of Christianity, it was spread over many indigenous kingdoms, all with their own local traditions. Today, it coexists and interacts with pan-Mayan syncretism, the 're-invention of tradition' by the Maya Movement, and Christianity in its various denominations. The most important source on traditional Maya religion is the Mayas themselves: the incumbents of positions within the religious hierarchy, diviners, and tellers of tales, and more generally all those persons who shared their knowledge with outsiders (such as anthropologists) in the past and continue to do this until today. What is known of pre-Spanish Maya religion stems from heterogeneous sources (the primary ones being of Maya origin): Traditional Maya
    6.75
    4 votes
    27
    End times

    End times

    The end time (also called end times, end of days, last days or eschaton) is a time period described in the eschatological writings in the three Abrahamic religions (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam) and in doomsday scenarios in Hinduism, Buddhism and various other non-Abrahamic religions. In Judaism the term "end of days" is a reference to the Messianic Age and the Jewish belief in the coming of mashiach and the Olam haba, that will usher in peace and unity for all mankind, in the service of one God. In Islam, Yawm al-Qiyāmah "the Day of Resurrection" or Yawm ad-Din "the Day of Judgement", Allah's final assessment of humanity, is preceded by the end of the world. In Christianity, the end times are often depicted as a time of tribulation that precedes the Second Coming of the Christian Messiah, Jesus, who will usher in the Kingdom of God and bring an end to suffering and evil and all things wrong with the current world which is tainted by original sin. Various other religions also have eschatological beliefs associated with turning and redemption. Since the advent of modern science in the 18th century, the discovery of deep time, and the age of the Earth, the concept of an end of
    5.60
    5 votes
    28
    Armageddon

    Armageddon

    Armageddon is a 1998 American science fiction disaster drama film, directed by Michael Bay, produced by Jerry Bruckheimer and released by Disney's Touchstone Pictures. The film follows a group of blue-collar deep-core drillers sent by NASA to stop a gigantic asteroid on a collision course with Earth. It features an ensemble cast including Bruce Willis, Ben Affleck, Billy Bob Thornton, Liv Tyler, Owen Wilson, Will Patton, Peter Stormare, William Fichtner, Michael Clarke Duncan, Keith David and Steve Buscemi. Armageddon opened in theaters only two-and-a-half months after a similar impact-based movie, Deep Impact, which starred Robert Duvall and Morgan Freeman. Armageddon fared better at the box office; astronomers described Deep Impact as being more scientifically accurate. Both films were equally received by film critics. Armageddon was an international box-office success, despite generally negative reviews from critics. It became the highest-grossing film of 1998 worldwide surpassing the Steven Spielberg war epic, Saving Private Ryan. A massive meteor shower destroys the Space Shuttle Atlantis and bombards New York City, the East Coast, and Finland. NASA discovers that a
    8.00
    3 votes
    29
    William Thomson, 1st Baron Kelvin

    William Thomson, 1st Baron Kelvin

    William Thomson, 1st Baron Kelvin OM, GCVO, PC, PRS, PRSE, (26 June 1824 – 17 December 1907) was an Irish-born British mathematical physicist and engineer. At the University of Glasgow he did important work in the mathematical analysis of electricity and formulation of the first and second laws of thermodynamics, and did much to unify the emerging discipline of physics in its modern form. He worked closely with mathematics professor Hugh Blackburn in his work. He also had a career as an electric telegraph engineer and inventor, which propelled him into the public eye and ensured his wealth, fame and honour. For his work on the transatlantic telegraph project he was knighted by Queen Victoria, becoming Sir William Thomson. He had extensive maritime interests and was most noted for his work on the mariner's compass, which had previously been limited in reliability. Lord Kelvin is widely known for realising that there was a lower limit to temperature, absolute zero; absolute temperatures are stated in units of kelvin in his honour. On his ennoblement in 1892 in honour of his achievements in thermodynamics, and of his opposition to Irish Home Rule, he adopted the title Baron Kelvin of
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    3 votes
    30

    Earth vs. the Flying Saucers

    Earth vs. the Flying Saucers (1956) is an American science fiction film, directed by Fred F. Sears and released by Columbia Pictures. The film is also known as Invasion of the Flying Saucers. It was suggested by the non-fiction work Flying Saucers from Outer Space by Donald Keyhoe. The flying saucer effects were created by Ray Harryhausen. Scientist Russell Marvin and his new bride Carol are driving to work when a flying saucer appears overhead then zooms away. Without proof of the encounter other than a tape recording of the ship's sound, Dr. Marvin is hesitant to notify his bosses. He is in charge of Project Skyhook, an American space program that has already launched 10 research satellites into orbit. General Hanley, Carol's father, returns from an investigation and informs Marvin that many of the satellites have crashed. Marvin admits that he has lost contact with all of them and privately suspects alien involvement. The Marvins themselves witness the eleventh falling from the sky. When a saucer lands at the lab the next day, the security guards weapons have no effect on the saucer's force field. The aliens kill everyone but the Marvins, who are trapped underground. The general
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    4 votes
    31

    Order of the Solar Temple

    The Order of the Solar Temple also known as Ordre du Temple Solaire (OTS) in French, and the International Chivalric Organization of the Solar Tradition or simply as The Solar Temple was a secret society based upon the modern myth of the continuing existence of the Knights Templar (see Origins of the Solar Temple below). OTS was started by Joseph Di Mambro and Luc Jouret in 1984 in Geneva as l'Ordre International Chevaleresque de Tradition Solaire (OICTS) and renamed Ordre du Temple Solaire. Some historians allege that the Solar Temple originates with French author Jacques Breyer who established a Sovereign Order of the Solar Temple in 1952. In 1968, a schismatic order was renamed the Renewed Order of the Solar Temple (ROTS) under the leadership of French right-wing political activist Julien Origas. Some reports have claimed that Origas was a Nazi SS member during World War II. According to "Peronnik" (a pseudonym of temple member Robert Chabrier) in his book, "Pourquoi la Résurgence de l'Ordre du Temple? Tome Premier: Le Corps" ("Why a Revival of the Order of the Solar Temple? Vol. One: The Body") 1975, pp. 147–149 , the aims of the Order of the Solar Temple included: establishing
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    4 votes
    32

    On the Beach

    On the Beach (1959) is a post-apocalyptic drama film directed by Stanley Kramer and written by John Paxton, based on Nevil Shute's 1957 novel of the same name and starring Gregory Peck, Ava Gardner, Fred Astaire and Anthony Perkins. Stanley Kramer won the 1960 BAFTA for best director and Ernest Gold won the 1960 Golden Globe for Best Motion Picture Score. The film was remade as an Australian television film by Southern Star Productions in 2000. The story is set in a then-future 1964, in the months following World War III. The conflict has devastated the northern hemisphere, polluting the atmosphere with nuclear fallout and killing all life. While the bombs were confined to the northern hemisphere, air currents are slowly carrying the fallout south. The only areas still habitable are in the far southern hemisphere, like Australia. From Australia, survivors detect an incomprehensible Morse code signal from San Diego in the United States. In the hope that someone is still alive back home, the last American nuclear submarine, USS Sawfish, under Royal Australian Navy command, is ordered to sail north from Melbourne to try to make contact with the signal sender. The captain, Dwight
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    3 votes
    33
    Ragnarök

    Ragnarök

    In Norse mythology, Ragnarök (UK /ˈræɡnərɜrk/, US /ˈræɡnərɒk/ or /ˈræɡnərək/), typically spelled Ragnarǫk in the handwritten scripts, is a series of future events, including a great battle foretold to ultimately result in the death of a number of the major figures: Baldr, Hodr, Nanna, Sol, Mani, Freyr, Freyja, Odin, Tyr, Bragi, Njord, Thor, Loki and Heimdallr the occurrence of various natural disasters, and the subsequent submersion of the world in water. Afterward, the world will resurface anew and fertile, the surviving and returning gods will meet, and the world will be repopulated by two human survivors. Ragnarök is an important event in the Norse canon, and has been the subject of scholarly discourse and theory. The event is attested primarily in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources, and the Prose Edda, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson. In the Prose Edda, and a single poem in the Poetic Edda, the event is referred to as Ragnarök or Ragnarøkkr (Old Norse "Fate of the Gods" or "Twilight of the Gods" respectively), a usage popularized by 19th century composer Richard Wagner with the title of the last of his Der Ring des
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    3 votes
    34

    The Day of the Triffids

    The Day of the Triffids is a 1962 British film based on the science fiction novel of the same name by John Wyndham. It was directed by Steve Sekely, and Howard Keel played the central character, Bill Masen. The movie was filmed in colour with monaural sound and ran for 93 minutes. Triffids are plants. They are able to uproot themselves and walk, possess a deadly whipping poisonous sting, and may even have the ability to communicate with each other. On screen they vaguely resemble gigantic asparagus shoots topped with a flower-like 'head' which houses a whip-like, venomous stinger, and that resembles a Vanda Miss Joaquim orchid. Bill Masen (Howard Keel), a merchant navy officer, is lying in a hospital bed with his eyes bandaged. He discovers that while he has been waiting for his accident damaged eyes to heal, an unusual meteor shower has blinded most people on Earth. Once he leaves hospital Masen finds people all over London, struggling to stay alive in the face of their new affliction. Some survive by cooperating, while others simply fight, but it is apparent that after just a few days society is collapsing. He rescues a school girl, Susan (Janina Faye), from a crashed train. They
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    3 votes
    35

    The Invasion

    The Invasion is a 2007 science fiction thriller film starring Nicole Kidman and Daniel Craig, directed by Oliver Hirschbiegel, with additional scenes written by the The Wachowskis and directed by James McTeigue. The Invasion is the fourth film adaptation of the 1955 novel The Body Snatchers by Jack Finney, following Don Siegel's 1956 film Invasion of the Body Snatchers, Philip Kaufman's 1978 remake of the same name, and Abel Ferrara's 1993 Body Snatchers. After the space shuttle Patriot crashes on Earth, a fungus-like alien lifeform is discovered on the remaining parts scattered over US territory. Once people get in contact with the organism, they are being controlled by it when they enter REM sleep. One of the first people infected is Tucker Kaufman, a CDC director investigating the crash. Tucker's ex-wife, psychiatrist Carol Bennell, begins to feel something is amiss when people seem to have "changed". Her patient Wendy Lenk describes how her husband "is not her husband", and one of her son's friends acts detached and emotionless. At a neighbourhood kids party, Carol's son Oliver discovers a strange lifeform. The mothers speculate if the organism is in any way connected to the
    7.67
    3 votes
    36

    Steel Dawn

    Steel Dawn is a 1987 American post-apocalyptic feature film, with elements of western science fiction. An enigmatic swordsman named Nomad (Patrick Swayze), wanders through the remains of a post-World War III world. He travels the desert, in search of his mentor's killer, the assassin Sho (Christopher Neame). The war itself is never described, but there are hints that a new government rose soon afterwards. Nomad had a position of privilege as a soldier and as part of the elite guard assigned with protecting the upper heads of the new government. Since firearms are no longer available, edged weapons have been revived as the standard fighting tools. The elite guard mastered the use of swords and carried them in an unusual, upright fashion. Eventually, the post-war government collapsed as well and Nomad retired to run a farm with his family. Nomad runs into a group of settlers in the town of Meridian. Damnil (Anthony Zerbe), a local landowner, and his gang are attacking the town to gain a monopoly on the local water supply. Nomad stays at a local farm owned by Kasha (Lisa Niemi) who is Nomad's love interest (and real life wife). Nomad teams up with Kasha's foreman Tark to become
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    2 votes
    37

    Beneath the Planet of the Apes

    Beneath the Planet of the Apes is a 1970 American science fiction film directed by Ted Post and written by Paul Dehn. It is the second of five films in the original Planet of the Apes series produced by Arthur P. Jacobs. The film stars James Franciscus, Kim Hunter, and Linda Harrison, and features Charlton Heston in a supporting role. In this sequel, another spacecraft crashes on the planet ruled by apes, carrying astronaut Brent who searches for Taylor and discovers an underground city inhabited by mutated humans with psychic powers. Beneath the Planet of the Apes was a success at the box office but met with mixed to negative reviews from critics. It was followed by Escape from the Planet of the Apes. Following the events of Planet of the Apes, time-displaced astronaut Taylor (Charlton Heston) and the mute Nova (Linda Harrison) are riding on horseback through the desert of the Forbidden Zone. Without warning, fire shoots up from the ground and deep chasms open. Confused by the strange phenomenon, Taylor investigates a cliff wall and disappears before Nova's eyes. Elsewhere in the Forbidden Zone, a second spaceship has crash landed after being sent to search for Taylor and his
    7.33
    3 votes
    38

    The Terminator

    The Terminator is a 1984 American science fiction action film directed by James Cameron, co-written by Cameron, Gale Anne Hurd and William Wisher Jr. and starring Arnold Schwarzenegger, Michael Biehn, and Linda Hamilton. The film was produced by Hemdale Film Corporation and distributed by Orion Pictures, and filmed in Los Angeles. Schwarzenegger plays the Terminator, a cyborg assassin sent back in time from the year 2029 to 1984 to kill Sarah Connor, played by Hamilton. Biehn plays Kyle Reese, a soldier from the future sent back in time to protect Sarah. Though not expected to be either a commercial or critical success, The Terminator topped the American box office for two weeks and helped launch the film career of Cameron and consolidate that of Schwarzenegger. Three sequels have been produced: Terminator 2: Judgment Day (1991), Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines (2003), and Terminator Salvation (2009), as well as a television series, Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles (2008-2009). In 2008, The Terminator was selected by the Library of Congress for preservation in the United States National Film Registry, being deemed "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant".
    7.33
    3 votes
    39
    The Andromeda Strain

    The Andromeda Strain

    The Andromeda Strain is a 1971 American science-fiction film, based on the novel published in 1969 by Michael Crichton. The film is about a team of scientists who investigate a deadly organism of extraterrestrial origin that causes rapid, fatal blood clotting. Directed by Robert Wise, the film starred Arthur Hill, James Olson, Kate Reid, and David Wayne. The film follows the book closely. The special effects were designed by Douglas Trumbull. After a US government satellite crashes near the town of Piedmont, New Mexico, a microbe attached to the satellite kills all but two of the town's inhabitants — a sixty-two-year-old man and an infant. Some of those who died show signs of having first gone mad. The mechanism of death is massive clotting and granulation of every drop of blood in their bodies. An elite scientific team takes the satellite into a secret underground laboratory in the Nevada desert, known as the Wildfire Complex, in order to study it. The new life form is assigned the code name Andromeda. Within a couple of days the microbe mutates into a form that degrades synthetic rubber gaskets and thus escapes containment. This triggers an automatic self-destruct mechanism
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    4 votes
    40
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    2 votes
    41
    Norse mythology

    Norse mythology

    Norse mythology, a subset of Germanic mythology, is the overall term for the myths, legends and beliefs about supernatural beings of Norse pagans. It flourished prior to the Christianization of Scandinavia, during the Early Middle Ages, and passed into Nordic folklore, with some aspects surviving to the modern day. The mythology from the Romanticist Viking revival came to be an influence on modern literature and popular culture. Norse mythology is the study of the myths told in Germanic countries (Germany, The Netherlands, Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Iceland, Faroe Islands) during the pre-Christian times, especially during the Viking Age. Most of the existing records on Norse mythology date from the 11th to 18th century, having gone through more than two centuries of oral preservation in what was at least officially a Pagan society. At this point scholars started recording it, particularly in the Eddas and the Heimskringla by Snorri Sturluson, who believed that pre-Christian deities trace real historical people. There is also the Danish Gesta Danorum by Saxo Grammaticus, where the Norse gods are more strongly Euhemerized. The Prose or Younger Edda was written in the early 13th century
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    2 votes
    42
    Resident Evil

    Resident Evil

    Resident Evil is a 2002 horror film written and directed by Paul W. S. Anderson. The film stars Milla Jovovich and Michelle Rodriguez. It is the first installment in the Resident Evil film series, which is based on the Capcom survival horror video game series Resident Evil. Borrowing elements from the video games Resident Evil and Resident Evil 2, the film follows amnesiac heroine Alice and a band of Umbrella Corporation commandos as they attempt to contain the outbreak of the T-virus at a secret underground facility. The film received mixed reviews from critics but grossed more than $102 million worldwide. Outside Raccoon City exists a genetic research facility called the Hive, owned by the Umbrella Corporation. A thief steals the genetically engineered T-virus and contaminates the Hive with it. In response, the facility's artificial intelligence, the Red Queen, seals the Hive, killing everyone inside. Alice awakens in a deserted mansion with amnesia. She finds Matt next to her. A group of commandos break into the mansion and take them to an underground train station. The group finds Spence, also suffering from amnesia. The head of the commandos explains that everyone in the
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    2 votes
    43

    Silent Running

    Silent Running is a 1972 environmentally-themed American science fiction film starring Bruce Dern and directed by Douglas Trumbull, who had previously worked as a special effects supervisor on science fiction films including 2001: A Space Odyssey and The Andromeda Strain. The film depicts a future in which all plant life on Earth has been made extinct. Only a few specimens have been preserved in enormous, greenhouse-like geodesic domes attached to a fleet of American Airlines space freighters, just outside the orbit of Saturn. Freeman Lowell (Bruce Dern), one of four crewmen aboard the Valley Forge, is the resident botanist and ecologist who preserves the forests for their eventual return to Earth and the reforestation of the planet. Lowell spends most of his time in the forests, cultivating the plant and animal life. When orders come from Earth to jettison and destroy the domes (with nuclear charges) and return the freighters to commercial service, Lowell rebels and opts instead to save the forests and animals on his ship. After four of the six domes on the Valley Forge are jettisoned and destroyed, Lowell kills one of his crewmates in a struggle, and his right leg is seriously
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    2 votes
    44
    When Worlds Collide

    When Worlds Collide

    When Worlds Collide is a 1951 science fiction film based on the 1933 novel co-written by Philip Gordon Wylie and Edwin Balmer. The film was shot in Technicolor, directed by Rudolph Maté and was the winner of the 1951 Academy Award for special effects. Producer George Pal considered making a sequel based on the novel After Worlds Collide, but the box office failure of his 1955 Conquest of Space made it impossible. Pilot David Randall (Richard Derr) is paid to fly top-secret photographs from South African astronomer Dr. Emery Bronson (Hayden Rorke) to Dr. Cole Hendron (Larry Keating) in America. Hendron, with the assistance of his daughter Joyce (Barbara Rush), confirms their worst fears— Bronson has discovered a star named Bellus and it's on a collision course with Earth. Hendron warns the delegates of the United Nations that the end of the world is little more than eight months away. He pleads for the construction of spaceships to transport a lucky few to Zyra, a planet in orbit around Bellus that will pass very close to the Earth, in the faint hope that it can sustain life and save the human race from extinction. However, other, equally-distinguished scientists scoff at his
    8.50
    2 votes
    45

    Kali Yuga

    Kali Yuga (Devanāgarī: कलियुग [kəli juɡə], lit. "age of [the demon] Kali", or "age of vice") is the last of the four stages the world goes through as part of the cycle of yugas described in the Indian scriptures. The other ages are Satya Yuga, Treta Yuga and Dvapara Yuga. The Mahabharata War and the decimation of Yadavas thus happened at the Yuga-Sandhi i.e. the joint of the two yugas. The scriptures mention Sage Narada to have momentarily intercepted the demon Kali on his way to the Earth when Duryodhana was about to be born...to make him an embodiment of 'arishadvargas' and adharma in preparation of the era of decay in values and the consequent havoc. The duration and chronological starting point in human history of Kali Yuga has given rise to different evaluations and interpretations. According to the Surya Siddhanta, Kali Yuga began at midnight (00:00) on 18 February 3102 BCE in the proleptic Julian calendar, or 14 January 3102 BC in the proleptic Gregorian calendar. This date is also considered by many Hindus to be the day that Krishna left Earth to return to his abode. Most interpreters of Hindu scriptures believe that Earth is currently in Kali Yuga. Other authors such as
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    3 votes
    46

    Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome

    Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome is a 1985 Australian post-apocalyptic film directed by George Miller and George Ogilvie, written by Miller, Doug Mitchell and Terry Hayes, and starring Mel Gibson and Tina Turner. It is the third installment in the action movie Mad Max series, its story taking place fifteen years after that of the previous film. The original music score was composed by Maurice Jarre. A sequel remained in Development Hell for over two decades, before Mad Max: Fury Road, which is instead to be a prequel to the original film, was finally greenlit in 2012. Max Rockatansky rides a camel-drawn wagon across the Australian desert when he is attacked by Jedediah, a pilot flying a Transavia PL-12 Airtruk, who steals his belongings and vehicle. Max continues on foot and stumbles upon the only nearby human outpost in the wasteland—the seedy community of Bartertown, founded and run by the ruthless Aunty Entity. In Bartertown, electricity, vehicles, functioning technology are made possible by a crude methane refinery, fueled by pig feces. The refinery is located under Bartertown and is operated by the diminutive Master, who is carried around by his enormously strong bodyguard, Blaster.
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    3 votes
    47

    The Death Of Grass

    The Death of Grass (published in the United States as No Blade of Grass) is a 1956 post-apocalyptic science fiction novel written by the English author Samuel Youd under the nom de plume John Christopher. It was the first in a series of post-apocalyptic novels written by him, and the plot concerns a virus that kills off all forms of grass. The novel was written in a matter of weeks and liberated Samuel Youd from his day job. It was retitled No Blade of Grass for the US edition, as supposedly the US publisher thought the original title "sounded like something out of a gardening catalogue". The film rights were sold to MGM. A new virus strain has infected rice crops in East Asia causing massive famine; soon a mutation appears which infects the staple crops of West Asia and Europe such as wheat and barley, all of them types of grasses (thus the novel's title), threatening a famine engulfing the whole of the Old World, while Australasia and the Americas attempt to impose rigorous quarantine to keep the virus out. The novel follows the struggles of architect John Custance and his friend, civil servant Roger Buckley, as, along with their families, they make their way across an England
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    3 votes
    48

    The World, the Flesh and the Devil

    The World, the Flesh and the Devil is a 1959 science fiction doomsday film written and directed by Ranald MacDougall. The star is Harry Belafonte, who was then at the peak of his film career. Using a science fiction premise about the end of the world, the movie is based in part on two sources: the novel The Purple Cloud by M. P. Shiel and the story "End of the World" by Ferdinand Reyher. African-American coal mine inspector Ralph Burton (Harry Belafonte) becomes trapped underground in a cave-in while inspecting a mine in Pennsylvania. He can hear rescuers digging towards him, but after a few days they slow down and then stop completely. Alarmed, he digs his own way out. Reaching the surface, he finds a deserted world. (No bodies are seen at any time in the film.) Some discarded newspapers provide an explanation: one proclaims "UN Retaliates For Use Of Atomic Poison", another that "Millions Flee From Cities! End Of The World". Ralph later plays tapes at a radio station that indicate that a dust of radioactive isotopes that became harmless after five days was used as a weapon. Travelling to New York City in search of other survivors, he finds the city vacant. Ralph busies himself
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    3 votes
    49
    Fail-Safe

    Fail-Safe

    Fail-Safe is a 1964 film directed by Sidney Lumet, based on the 1962 novel Fail-Safe written by Eugene Burdick and Harvey Wheeler. It portrays a fictional account of a Cold War nuclear crisis. The film features performances by veteran actors Henry Fonda (The Grapes of Wrath, 12 Angry Men, On Golden Pond), Dan O'Herlihy (Adventures of Robinson Crusoe), Walter Matthau (The Odd Couple, The Fortune Cookie), and Frank Overton (TV series Twelve O'Clock High). Early film appearances include Fritz Weaver, Dom DeLuise, and Larry Hagman as the interpreter. In 2000, the novel was adapted again as a televised play, starring George Clooney, Richard Dreyfuss, and Noah Wyle and broadcast live in black and white on CBS. The genesis of the movie arises out of the Cold War tensions existing between the United States and the Soviet Union during the early 1960s. The film presents a dramatic account of a series of coincidental events leading up to an accidental thermonuclear first-strike attack by a group of United States “Vindicator” bombers (Convair B-58 Hustler aircraft) against Moscow, the capital of what was then the Soviet Union. Amidst an ordinary tour for VIPs at the U.S. headquarters of the
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    1 votes
    50
    The Matrix

    The Matrix

    The Matrix is a 1999 American science fiction action film written and directed by Larry and Andy Wachowski. The film stars Keanu Reeves, Laurence Fishburne, Carrie-Anne Moss, Joe Pantoliano, and Hugo Weaving, and was first released in the United States on March 31, 1999. The success of the film led to the release of two feature film sequels, and the Matrix franchise was further expanded through the production of comic books, video games, and animated short films. The film depicts a future in which reality as perceived by most humans is actually a simulated reality or cyberspace created by sentient machines to pacify and subdue the human population, while their bodies' heat and electrical activity are used as an energy source. Upon learning this, computer programmer "Neo" is drawn into a rebellion against the machines, involving other people who have been freed from the "dream world" and into reality. The film contains many references to the cyberpunk and hacker subcultures; philosophical and religious ideas such as René Descartes' evil genius, the Allegory of the Cave, Jean Baudrillard's Simulacra and Simulation, the brain-in-a-vat thought experiment; and homages to Alice's
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    1 votes
    51
    The Postman

    The Postman

    The Postman is an American post-apocalyptic epic film based on the 1985 novel of the same name by David Brin. It was filmed in northeastern Washington (Metaline Falls), Fidalgo Island, Washington, central Oregon and Tucson, Arizona, and was directed by Kevin Costner, who also stars in the film. The film co-stars Will Patton, Larenz Tate, Olivia Williams, James Russo, Daniel von Bargen, Tom Petty, Scott Bairstow, Roberta Maxwell, Mary Stuart Masterson and George Wyner. The film is set in the northwestern United States after an unspecified apocalypse has left a huge impact on human civilization. A nomadic survivor flees a warlord's army while unwittingly inspiring hope of restoring peace. The film was released on Christmas Day 1997 by Warner Bros. Pictures. In 2013, global society collapses and nuclear war (it is later revealed that there was a war in Europe) has crippled civilization, leaving only pockets of surviving communities. Into this wasteland comes an enigmatic and nomadic survivor (Kevin Costner), wandering the flatlands of Oregon. Needing food and water, he trades performances of Shakespearean plays (with his co-star mule, Bill), in every small settlement he finds. A
    10.00
    1 votes
    52
    Hinduism

    Hinduism

    Hinduism is the predominant religion of the Indian subcontinent, and one of its indigenous religions. Hinduism includes Shaivism, Vaishnavism and Śrauta among numerous other traditions. It also includes historical groups, for example the Kapalikas. Among other practices and philosophies, Hinduism includes a wide spectrum of laws and prescriptions of "daily morality" based on karma, dharma, and societal norms. Hinduism is a conglomeration of distinct intellectual or philosophical points of view, rather than a rigid common set of beliefs. Hinduism is formed of diverse traditions and has no single founder. Among its direct roots is the historical Vedic religion of Iron Age India and, as such, Hinduism is often called the "oldest living religion" or the "oldest living major religion" in the world. One orthodox classification of Hindu texts is to divide into Śruti ("revealed") and Smriti ("remembered") texts. These texts discuss theology, philosophy, mythology, rituals and temple building among other topics. Major scriptures include the Vedas, Upanishads, Purāṇas, Mahābhārata, Rāmāyaṇa, Bhagavad Gītā and Āgamas. Hinduism, with about one billion followers, is the world's third largest
    5.75
    4 votes
    53
    Big Bounce

    Big Bounce

    The Big Bounce is a theoretical scientific model of the formation of the known universe. It is implied by the cyclic model or oscillatory universe interpretation of the Big Bang where the first cosmological event was the result of the collapse of a previous universe. Big bounce models have a venerable history and were endorsed on largely aesthetic grounds by cosmologists including Willem de Sitter, Carl Friedrich von Weizsäcker, George McVittie and George Gamow (who stressed that "from the physical point of view we must forget entirely about the precollapse period"). The phrase itself, however, did not appear in the scientific literature until 1987, when it was used in the title of a pair of articles (in German) in Stern und Weltraum by Wolfgang Priester and Hans-Joachim Blome. It reappeared in 1988 in Iosif Rozental’s Big Bang, Big Bounce, a revised English translation of a Russian book (by a different title), and in a 1991 article (in English) by Priester and Blome in Astronomy and Astrophysics. (The phrase apparently originated as the title of a novel by Elmore Leonard in 1969, a few years after increased public awareness of the big bang model in the wake of the discovery of the
    6.67
    3 votes
    54
    Big Freeze

    Big Freeze

    The Big Freeze (also Big Chill) is a scenario in which the universe becomes too cold to sustain life due to continued expansion and the decay of free energy due to the action of entropy.The Big Freeze is a theory of a possible fate of the universe. The Big Freeze could occur if the universe's geometry is either flat or hyperbolic, as either of those would mean that the universe would expand indefinitely eventually reaching absolute zero (¬ネメ273.15 ᅡᄚC or ¬ネメ459.67 ᅡᄚF, also defined as 0 K or 0 ᅡᄚR). For the universe to expand indefinitely, the shape of the universe as a whole needs to be flat or hyperbolic; this requirement stems from the density of the universe in those particular geometric shapes. There are three likely possibilities for the universe's shape. For the Big Freeze theory to happen, the shape of the Universe must be either hyperbolic or flat. If it is hyperbolic, which is usually pictured as a saddle shape, then the density must be lower than the critical density (which is approximately three hydrogen atoms per cubic meter), which means that the universe isn't heavy enough to collapse under gravity. If our Universe is flat, then the density will be exactly at
    6.67
    3 votes
    55
    Dawn of the Dead

    Dawn of the Dead

    Dawn of the Dead (also known as Zombi internationally) is a 1978 horror film written and directed by George A. Romero. It was the second film made in Romero's Living Dead series, but contains no characters or settings from Night of the Living Dead, and shows in a larger scale the zombie epidemic's apocalyptic effects on society. In the film, a pandemic of unknown origin has caused the reanimation of the dead, who prey on human flesh, which subsequently causes mass hysteria. The cast features David Emge, Ken Foree, Scott Reiniger and Gaylen Ross as survivors of the outbreak who barricade themselves inside a suburban shopping mall. Dawn of the Dead was shot over approximately four months, from late 1977 to early 1978, in the Pennsylvania cities of Pittsburgh and Monroeville. Its primary filming location was the Monroeville Mall. The film was made on a relatively modest budget estimated at $650,000 US, and was a significant box office success for its time, grossing an estimated $55 million worldwide. Since opening in theaters in 1978, and despite heavy gore content, reviews for the film have been nearly unanimously positive. In addition to four official sequels, the film has spawned
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    3 votes
    56

    Maximum Overdrive

    Maximum Overdrive is a 1986 American action-disaster-horror-science fiction film written and directed by novelist Stephen King. The film starred Emilio Estevez, Pat Hingle, Laura Harrington and Yeardley Smith. The screenplay was inspired by and loosely based on King's short story, Trucks, which was included in King's first collection of short stories, Night Shift. Maximum Overdrive is Stephen King's only directorial effort, though dozens of films have been based on King's novels. The film contained black humor elements and a generally camp tone, which contrasts with King's sombre subject matter in books. The film has a mid-1980s rock and roll/hard rock soundtrack composed entirely by the group AC/DC, Stephen King's favorite band. AC/DC's album, Who Made Who, was released as the Maximum Overdrive soundtrack. It includes the best-selling singles "Who Made Who", "You Shook Me All Night Long", and "Hells Bells". The film was nominated for two Golden Raspberry Awards including Worst Director for Stephen King and Worst Actor for Emilio Estevez in 1987, but both lost against Prince for Under the Cherry Moon. In 1988, Maximum Overdrive was nominated for "Best Film" at The International
    6.67
    3 votes
    57

    The Core

    The Core is a 2003 American disaster film. It concerns a team that has to drill to the center of the Earth and set off a series of nuclear explosions in order to restart the rotation of Earth's core. The film was directed by Jon Amiel, and starred Aaron Eckhart, Delroy Lindo, Tchéky Karyo, Hilary Swank, DJ Qualls and Bruce Greenwood. After a series of disturbances caused by instability in the Earth's electromagnetic field, geologist Dr. Josh Keyes (Aaron Eckhart) and scientists Serge Leveque (Tchéky Karyo) and Conrad Zimsky (Stanley Tucci) learn that the Earth's molten core has stopped rotating. That means within a year, the Earth's electromagnetic field will collapse, irradiating the planet. The three develop a plan with the United States government to bore into the Earth's core and plant a series of nuclear charges at precise points to restart the core's motion and restore the field. They design a multi-compartment vessel called the Virgil with the help of Ed "Braz" Brazzelton (Delroy Lindo), who has developed a laser capable of quickly boring through rock. Keyes also enlists the help of computer hacker Theodore Donald "Rat" Finch (DJ Qualls), to keep news of the potential global
    6.67
    3 votes
    58

    The War of the Worlds

    The War of the Worlds (also known promotionally as H. G. Wells' The War of the Worlds) is a 1953 science fiction film starring Gene Barry and Ann Robinson. It is a loose adaptation of the H. G. Wells classic novel of the same name, and the first of a number of film adaptations based on Wells' novel. Produced by George Pal and directed by Byron Haskin from a script by Barré Lyndon, it was the first of several adaptations of Wells's work to be filmed by Pal, and is considered to be one of the great science fiction films of the 1950s. It won an Oscar for its special effects and was later selected for inclusion in the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress. The film begins with a series of illustrations by artist Chesley Bonestell depicting the planets of our Solar System. The narrator explains why the Martians find Earth the only world worthy of invasion. Wells' novel is updated to the early 1950s California. Dr. Clayton Forrester (Gene Barry), a scientist with Manhattan Project, is fishing with colleagues when a large meteorite crash lands near the town of Linda Rosa. At the impact site, he meets Sylvia Van Buren (Ann Robinson) and her uncle, Pastor Matthew Collins (Lewis
    6.67
    3 votes
    59

    Doomsday cult

    Doomsday cult is an expression used to describe groups who believe in Apocalypticism and Millenarianism, and can refer both to groups that prophesy catastrophe and destruction, and to those that attempt to bring it about. The expression was first used by sociologist John Lofland in his 1966 study of a group of Unification Church members in California, Doomsday Cult: A Study of Conversion, Proselytization, and Maintenance of Faith. A classic study of a group with cataclysmic predictions had previously been performed by Leon Festinger and other researchers, and was published in his book When Prophecy Fails: A Social and Psychological Study of a Modern Group that Predicted the Destruction of the World. Some authors have used "doomsday cult" solely to characterize groups that have used acts of violence to harm their members and/or others, such as the salmonella poisoning of salad bars by members of the Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh group, and the mass murder/suicide of members of the Movement for the Restoration of the Ten Commandments of God group. Others have used the term to refer to groups which have made and later revised apocalyptic prophesies or predictions, such as the Church
    8.00
    2 votes
    60
    Rajneeshpuram

    Rajneeshpuram

    Rajneeshpuram, Oregon was an intentional community in Wasco County, Oregon, briefly incorporated as a city in the 1980s, which was populated with followers of the spiritual teacher Osho, then known as Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. The city was located on the site of a 64,229-acre (25,993 ha) Central Oregon property known as the Big Muddy Ranch, which was purchased in 1981 for $5.75 million ($13.8 million in 2011 dollars). Within three years, the neo-sannyasins (Rajneesh's followers, also termed Rajneeshees in contemporaneous press reports) developed a community, turning the ranch from an empty rural property into a city of up to 7,000 people, complete with typical urban infrastructure such as a fire department, police, restaurants, malls, townhouses, a 4,200-foot (1,300 m) airstrip, a public transport system using buses, a sewage reclamation plant and a reservoir. The Rajneeshpuram post office had ZIP code 97741. Within a year of arriving, the commune leaders had become embroiled in a series of legal battles with their neighbours, the principal conflict relating to land use. Initially, they had stated that they were planning to create a small agricultural community, their land being
    6.33
    3 votes
    61
    28 Days Later

    28 Days Later

    28 Days Later is a 2002 British zombie horror film directed by Danny Boyle. The screenplay was written by Alex Garland, and the film stars Cillian Murphy, Naomie Harris, Brendan Gleeson, Megan Burns, and Christopher Eccleston. The plot depicts the breakdown of society following the accidental release of a highly contagious "rage" virus and focuses upon the struggle of four survivors to cope with the destruction of the life they once knew. A critical and commercial success, the film is credited with reinvigorating the zombie sub-genre. The film spawned a 2007 sequel, 28 Weeks Later, a graphic novel titled 28 Days Later: The Aftermath, which expands on the timeline of the outbreak, and a 2009 comic book series 28 Days Later. British animal liberation activists break into a laboratory in Cambridge and are caught by a scientist while trying to free some chimpanzees being used for medical research. Despite the warnings of the chief scientist that the chimps are infected with a virus dubbed "Rage," which he claims is highly contagious and only takes one bite to spread, the activists open the cages anyway and release the chimpanzees. A chimp attacks a female activist and immediately
    9.00
    1 votes
    62

    A Sound of Thunder

    A Sound of Thunder is a 2005 science fiction film directed by Peter Hyams and stars Edward Burns, Catherine McCormack and Ben Kingsley. The film was planned originally for a 2003 release. However, flooding in Prague (where the production was filmed) and other financial difficulties—including the bankruptcy of the original production company during post-production—resulted in a delayed release. A Sound of Thunder is based on the short story "A Sound of Thunder" by Ray Bradbury. The film is about "time tourists" who accidentally interfere too much with the past, completely altering the present. In the year 2055, time travel (referred to as "time jumping") has been perfected but the process is dangerous and unpredictable. Charles Hatton (Ben Kingsley) creates a "Time Safari" service, offering the opportunity for wealthy clients to travel to prehistorical days and hunt dinosaurs; the expedition, led by Travis Ryer (Edward Burns) is set under very specific rules to avoid altering history: their targets are a set of dinosaurs that will imminently be killed by lava from an erupting volcano, frozen nitrogen bullets are used as ammo to leave no trace, and the party wears self-contained
    9.00
    1 votes
    63
    Branch Davidian

    Branch Davidian

    The Branch Davidians (also known as "The Branch") are a Protestant sect that originated in 1955 from a schism in the Davidian Seventh Day Adventists ("Davidians"), a reform movement that began within the Seventh-day Adventist Church ("Adventists") around 1930. The majority of those who accepted the reform message have been disfellowshipped due to the Adventist church rejecting it. The Branch Davidians have many theological beliefs in common with Messianic Judaism From its inception in 1930, the reform movement inherited Adventism's apocalypticism, in that they believed themselves to be living in a time when Bible prophecies of a final divine judgment were coming to pass as a prelude to Christ's second coming. The name "Branch Davidian" is most widely known for the Waco Siege of 1993 on their property (known as the Mount Carmel Center) near Waco, Texas, by the ATF, FBI, and Texas National Guard, which resulted in the deaths of their leader, David Koresh, as well as 82 other Branch Davidians and four ATF agents. In 1929 Victor Houteff, a Bulgarian immigrant and a Seventh-day Adventist Sabbath School teacher, claimed that he had a new message for the church. He presented this message
    9.00
    1 votes
    64

    Night of the Comet

    Night of the Comet is a 1984 horror/science-fiction film directed by Thom Eberhardt and starring Catherine Mary Stewart, Robert Beltran, and Kelli Maroney. It has elements of such diverse genres as science fiction, horror, zombie apocalypse, comedy, and romance. The film was voted number 10 in Bloody Disgusting's Top 10 Doomsday Horror Films in 2009. The Earth is going to pass through the tail of a comet, an event which has not occurred in 65 million years, the last time coinciding with the extinction event that wiped out the dinosaurs. On the night of the comet's passage, large crowds gather outside to watch and celebrate. Eighteen-year-old Regina "Reggie" Belmont (Catherine Mary Stewart) works at a movie theater in southern California. She becomes annoyed when she finds the initials DMK on the high score list of the theater's arcade game Tempest; all the other scores are hers. She sticks around after the theater closes to wipe the intruder off the list, then later has sex with her boyfriend, Larry the theater projectionist, in the steel-lined projection booth. Meanwhile, Reggie's sixteen-year-old sister Samantha "Sam" (Kelli Maroney) argues with their stepmother, who punches her
    9.00
    1 votes
    65
    9.00
    1 votes
    66
    Sunshine

    Sunshine

    Sunshine is a 2007 British science fiction film directed by Danny Boyle. The film was adapted from a screenplay written by Alex Garland about the crew of a spacecraft on a dangerous mission to the Sun. In 2057, with the Earth in peril from the dying Sun, the crew is sent on a mission to reignite the star with a theoretical bomb. The script was based on a scientific back-story that took the characters on a psychological journey. The director cast a group of international actors for the film, and had the actors live together and learn about topics related to their roles, as a form of method acting. To have the actors realistically react to visual effects that would be implemented in post-production, the filmmakers constructed live sets to serve as cues. The ensemble cast features Cillian Murphy, Chris Evans, Rose Byrne, Michelle Yeoh, Cliff Curtis, Troy Garity, Hiroyuki Sanada, Benedict Wong, Chipo Chung, and Mark Strong. The film was a co-production between the motion picture studios of Moving Picture Company, DNA Films, UK Film Council and Ingenious Film Partners. Theatrically, it was commercially distributed by Fox Searchlight Pictures, while the 20th Century Fox Home
    9.00
    1 votes
    67

    The Last Man on Earth

    The Last Man on Earth (Italian: L'ultimo uomo della Terra) is a 1964 science fiction horror film based on the Richard Matheson 1954 novel I Am Legend. The film was directed by Ubaldo Ragona and Sidney Salkow, and stars Vincent Price. The script was written in part by Matheson, but he was dissatisfied with the result and chose to be credited as "Logan Swanson". William Leicester, Furio M. Monetti, and Ubaldo Ragona were the other writers. The Last Man on Earth was filmed in Rome, Italy, with some location shots taken at Esposizione Universale Roma. It was released theatrically in the United States by American International Pictures, and has since fallen into the public domain. MGM Home Video, the current owners of the AIP film catalog, released a digitally remastered widescreen print on DVD in September 2005. In the year 1968, every day is the same for Dr. Robert Morgan (Price): he wakes up, gathers his weapons and then goes hunting for vampires. Morgan lives in a world where everyone else has been infected by a plague that has turned them into undead, vampiric creatures that cannot stand sunlight, fear mirrors, and are repelled by garlic. They would kill Morgan if they could, but
    9.00
    1 votes
    68
    The Omega Man

    The Omega Man

    The Omega Man (stylized as The Ωmega Man) is a 1971 American science fiction film directed by Boris Sagal and starring Charlton Heston. It was written by John William Corrington and Joyce Corrington, based on the 1954 novel I Am Legend by the American writer Richard Matheson. The film was produced by Walter Seltzer, who went on to produce the 1973 science fiction film, Soylent Green, also starring Heston. The Omega Man is the second adaptation of Matheson's novel, the first being The Last Man on Earth (1964) which starred Vincent Price. A third adaptation, I Am Legend starring Will Smith, was released in 2007. The film differs from the novel (and the previous film) in several ways. In the novel the cause of the demise of humanity is a plague spread by bacteria, turning the population into vampire-like creatures, whereas in this film version biological warfare is the cause of the plague. Screenwriter Joyce Corrington holds a doctorate in chemistry and felt this was more suitable for an adaptation. In March 1975, biological warfare between the People's Republic of China and the Soviet Union kills most of the world's population. U.S. Army Col. Robert Neville, M.D. (Charlton Heston), a
    9.00
    1 votes
    69
    Twelve Monkeys

    Twelve Monkeys

    12 Monkeys is a 1995 science fiction film directed by Terry Gilliam, inspired by Chris Marker's 1962 short film La jetée, and starring Bruce Willis, Madeleine Stowe, and Brad Pitt, with Christopher Plummer and David Morse in supporting roles. After Universal Studios acquired the rights to remake La Jetée as a full-length film, David and Janet Peoples were hired to write the script. Under Terry Gilliam's direction, Universal granted the filmmakers a $29.5 million budget, and filming lasted from February to May 1995. The film was shot mostly in Philadelphia and Baltimore, where the story was set. The film was released to critical praise and grossed approximately $168.4 million worldwide. Brad Pitt was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor, and won a Golden Globe for his performance. The film also won and was nominated for various categories at the Saturn Awards. James Cole (Willis) is a convicted criminal living in a grim post-apocalyptic future. In 1996–97, the Earth's surface was contaminated by a virus so deadly that it forced the surviving population to live underground. At some point in the years that followed, scientists have engineered an imprecise form of
    9.00
    1 votes
    70

    Hell Comes to Frogtown

    Hell Comes to Frogtown is a 1987 cult film that was created by Donald G. Jackson. The screenplay for this film was written by Jackson and Randall Frakes. The film was directed by Jackson and R. J. Kizer, and stars the professional wrestler Roddy Piper. This film is set in an post-apocalyptic wasteland where few fertile men and women exist due to atomic fallout and, as a result, the government places a high priority on those that can still breed. Shortly before the movie opens, a group of mutant amphibians (who have been exiled to the desert by humans) capture a group of fertile women and are using them as sex slaves. Sam Hell (Piper) is a nomadic traveler who wanders the countryside. He is eventually captured by an organization of warrior-nurses, the closest thing to a government in his region of the world, who reveal that they located him by tracking the trail of pregnant women left in his wake. Their original plan was to use him as breeding stock with their collection of fertile women, but it turns out this is the group captured by the mutants. With their own attempts to capture the women failing, the group presses Hell into service as a mercenary - he is to infiltrate the mutant
    7.50
    2 votes
    71

    Japan Sinks

    Japan Sinks (日本沈没, Nihon Chinbotsu) is a disaster novel written by Sakyo Komatsu in 1973. Komatsu took nine years to complete the work. The publisher wanted it to be written in two different sections, both published at the same time. The novel received the Japanese Detective Writers Association Prize and the Seiun Prize for a Japanese novel-length work. The novel has led to works in other media as well as sequels: a film based on the novel was made in the same year directed by Shiro Moritani, a television show made in 1975, and a remake in 2006 by Shinji Higuchi. In 1995, after the Osaka-Kobe earthquake, Komatsu published a second English abridged edition (ISBN 4-7700-2039-2). In 2006, a sequel to the novel was published and there is talk of a third. (See Plate Tectonics). Japan is on a destructive plate boundary, where the Philippine Plate subducts the Eurasian Plate. It is a triple junction and three subduction zones are involved. After the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami, towns like Ishinomaki did actually sink. The novel represented the growing discontent in the minds of many Japanese people during the 1970s, as their cultural, economic, and political identity and stability
    7.50
    2 votes
    72
    War of the Worlds

    War of the Worlds

    War of the Worlds is a 2005 American science fiction disaster film and a loose adaptation of H. G. Wells's novel of the same name, directed by Steven Spielberg and written by Josh Friedman and David Koepp. It stars Tom Cruise as Ray Ferrier, a divorced dock worker estranged from his children (Dakota Fanning and Justin Chatwin) and living separately from them. As his ex-wife drops their children off for him to look after for a few days, the planet is invaded by aliens (loosely based on H. G. Wells' Martians) driving Tripods and as earth's armies are defeated, Ray tries to protect his children and flee to Boston to rejoin his ex-wife. War of the Worlds marks Spielberg and Cruise's second collaboration, after the 2002 film Minority Report. The film was shot in 73 days, using five different sound stages as well as locations at Connecticut, Staten Island, California, Virginia, and New Jersey. The film was surrounded by a secrecy campaign so few details would be leaked before its release. Tie-in promotions were made with several companies, including Hitachi. The film was released in United States on 29 June and in United Kingdom on 1 July. War of the Worlds was a box office success, and
    7.50
    2 votes
    73

    Peter Lynds

    Peter Lynds (born May 17, 1975) is a New Zealander who first drew attention in 2003 with the publication of a physics paper about time, mechanics and Zeno's paradoxes. Lynds attended university for only 6 months. He submitted an article entitled "Time and Classical and Quantum Mechanics: Indeterminacy vs. Discontinuity" to the journal Foundations of Physics Letters. Among other things, the paper put forward a solution to Zeno's paradoxes based on the idea that instants, instantaneous magnitudes, determined positions, and time itself, do not actually exist. Lynds rose to sudden prominence when the paper was published and a press release about it appeared on the scientific news site Eurekalert.org on July 31, 2003. The paper caused much controversy, as was detailed in articles in The Guardian and Wired Magazine. Since the appearance of his first article, Lynds has done work on the relationship of time to consciousness, perception and brain function. His main conclusion in this area is that our seeming innate subjective conception of a present moment in time, and the phenomenon of conscious awareness, are actually one and the same thing. Lynds has recently put forward a new cosmology
    6.00
    3 votes
    74
    Big Rip

    Big Rip

    The Big Rip is a cosmological hypothesis first published in 2003, about the ultimate fate of the universe, in which the matter of the universe, from stars and galaxies to atoms and subatomic particles, is progressively torn apart by the expansion of the universe at a certain time in the future. Theoretically, the scale factor of the universe becomes infinite at a finite time in the future. The hypothesis relies crucially on the type of dark energy in the universe. The key value is the equation of state parameter , the ratio between the dark energy pressure and its energy density. At  
    7.00
    2 votes
    75

    Crack in the World

    Crack in the World is an American science-fiction disaster movie filmed in Spain in 1964 and released by Paramount Pictures. An international consortium of scientists, operating as Project Inner Space in Tanganyika, Africa, is trying to tap into the Earth's geothermal energy by drilling a very deep hole down to the Earth's core. The scientists are foiled by an extremely dense layer of material at the boundary between the two. To penetrate the barrier and reach the magma below, they intend to detonate an atomic device at the bottom of the hole. The leader of the project, Dr. Stephen Sorenson (Dana Andrews), who is (secretly) dying of cancer, believes that the atomic device will burn its way through the barrier, but the project's chief geologist, Dr. Ted Rampion (Kieron Moore), is convinced that the lower layers of the crust have been weakened by decades of underground nuclear tests, and that the detonation could produce a massive crack that would threaten the very existence of Earth. The atomic device is used and Rampion's fears prove justified, as the crust of the Earth develops an enormous crack that progresses rapidly. Sorenson discovers that there was a huge signature of
    7.00
    2 votes
    76

    Day of the Dead

    Day of the Dead is a horror film which is a remake of George A. Romero's zombie film of the same name, which was the third in Romero's Dead series. The film is directed by Steve Miner and written by Jeffrey Reddick. The film was principally shot in Bulgaria, with limited shooting in Los Angeles, California. Tyler Bates provided the soundtrack, and screenwriter Jeffrey Reddick has a cameo appearance as an ill-fated police officer. The movie begins in Leadville, Colorado. Trevor (Michael Welch) and his girlfriend, Nina (AnnaLynne McCord), are in an abandoned building having a romantic encounter. They then head back to their respective parents' homes. They see a long line of cars at a military roadblock sealing off the city. An angry man yells at the officers because his child is sick and needs medical care. There has been an outbreak and medical help is needed throughout town. They are introduced to Captain Rhodes (Ving Rhames) and Corporal Sarah Cross (Mena Suvari). Soon after, privates Bud Crain (Stark Sands) and Salazar (Nick Cannon) show up. Cross takes Bud to go with her while she visits her sick mother. When she arrives, Sarah talks to her brother (Trevor) and checks in on her
    7.00
    2 votes
    77

    Heaven's Gate

    Heaven's Gate was an American UFO religion based in San Diego, California, founded in the early 1970s and led by Marshall Applewhite (1931–1997) and Bonnie Nettles (1927–1985). On March 26, 1997, police discovered the bodies of 39 members of the group who had committed suicide in order to reach what they believed was an alien space craft following the Comet Hale–Bopp, which was at its brightest. According to Jacques Vallée in his 1979 book Messengers of Deception, the group began in the early 1970s when Marshall Applewhite was recovering from a heart attack during which he claimed to have had a near-death experience. He came to believe that he and his nurse, Bonnie Nettles, were "the Two", that is, the two witnesses spoken of in the Book of Revelation 11:3 in the Bible. After a brief and unsuccessful attempt to run an inspirational bookstore, they began traveling around the United States of America giving talks about their belief system. As with some other New Age faiths they combined Christian doctrine (particularly the ideas of salvation and apocalypse) with the concept of evolutionary advancement and elements of science fiction, particularly travel to other worlds and
    7.00
    2 votes
    78
    Hellboy

    Hellboy

    Hellboy is a 2004 American supernatural superhero film, starring Ron Perlman and directed by Guillermo del Toro. The film is based on the Dark Horse Comics work Hellboy: Seed of Destruction by Mike Mignola. It was produced by Revolution Studios, and distributed by Columbia Pictures. The film is about a demonic beast known as Hellboy who secretly works to keep the world safe from paranormal threats. Released in the spring of 2004, it grossed $59 million at the United States box office, and $99 million worldwide and was favorably received by critics. A sequel, Hellboy II: The Golden Army, was released on July 11, 2008. In 1944, the Nazis build a dimensional portal off the coast of Scotland. With the help of Russian mystic Grigori Rasputin, they intend to free the Ogdru Jahad—monstrous entities imprisoned in another dimension—to aid them in defeating the Allies. Rasputin knows that this will be an apocalyptic event that he believes will create a paradise. He opens the portal with the aid of his disciples, Ilsa von Haupstein and Obersturmbannführer Karl Ruprecht Kroenen, Adolf Hitler's top assassin. An Allied team is sent to destroy the portal, guided by young Trevor Bruttenholm, who
    7.00
    2 votes
    79

    Le Temps du Loup

    Time of the Wolf (French: Le Temps du Loup) is a dystopian post-apocalyptic drama film, directed by Austrian director Michael Haneke. It was released theatrically in 2003. Set in France at an undisclosed time, the film follows the story of a family: Georges (Daniel Duval), Anne (Isabelle Huppert) and their two children Eva (Anaïs Demoustier) and Ben (Lucas Biscombe). A disaster of some type has occurred, of which the audience only knows that uncontaminated water is scarce and livestock have to be burned. Fleeing the city, the family arrive at their country home, hoping to find refuge and security, only to discover that it is already occupied by strangers. The family are assaulted by the strangers and forced to leave with no supplies or transport. As they seek help from people they have known in the village the scale of the situation is realised when they are repeatedly turned away. The family make their way to a train station where they wait with other survivors in the hope that a train will stop for them and take them back to the city. The film was screened in the 2003 Cannes Film Festival, out of competition. Patrice Chéreau, a member of that year’s jury, stars in the film, which
    7.00
    2 votes
    80

    Titan A.E.

    Titan A.E. is a 2000 American animated post-apocalyptic science fiction film directed by Don Bluth and Gary Goldman. The title refers to the spacecraft that is central to the plot, with A.E. meaning "After Earth." The film's animation technique combines traditional hand-drawn animation (with digital ink and paint/animation using Toon Boom) and extensive use of computer generated imagery and features the voices of Matt Damon, Bill Pullman and Drew Barrymore. Its working title was Planet Ice. The film was a failure at the box office, barely grossing half of its production budget, though it received a cult following and mixed response from critics. In 3028, the Drej, a malevolent, energy-based species, declares war on humanity before Professor Sam Tucker (Ron Perlman), a lead researcher of the experimental Project Titan, gives his 5-year-old son, Cale (Alex D. Linz), a ring and sends him on one of the evacuation ships with his alien friend, Tek (Tone Loc). Meanwhile, Sam and his team launches the Titan spacecraft into hyperspace and the Drej mothership obliterates Earth, which explodes into a massive cloud of debris that destroys the Moon as well, ending any chances of humanity
    7.00
    2 votes
    81
    Cloverfield

    Cloverfield

    Cloverfield is a 2008 American monster horror thriller film directed by Matt Reeves, produced by J. J. Abrams and written by Drew Goddard. Before settling on an official title, the film was marketed as 1-18-08. The film follows six young New Yorkers attending a going-away party on the night that a gigantic monster attacks the city. First publicized in a teaser trailer in screenings of Transformers, the film was released on January 17 in New Zealand and Australia; January 18 in North America; January 24 in South Korea; January 25 in Taiwan; January 31 in Germany; and February 1 in the United Kingdom, Ireland and Italy. In Japan, the film was released on April 5. VFX and CGI were performed by effects studios Double Negative and Tippett Studio. The film is presented as found footage from a personal video camera recovered by the United States Department of Defense. A disclaimer text states that the footage is of a case designated "Cloverfield" and was found in the area "formerly known as Central Park". The video consists chiefly of segments taped the night of Friday, May 22, 2009. The newer segments were taped over older video that is shown occasionally. The first video segment opens
    5.67
    3 votes
    82

    Damnation Alley

    Damnation Alley is a 1977 post-apocalyptic film, directed by Jack Smight, loosely based on the novel of the same name by Roger Zelazny. The original music score was composed by Jerry Goldsmith. 1st Lieutenant Jake Tanner (Jan-Michael Vincent), an unorthodox Air Force officer, shares ICBM silo duty at an Air Force missile base in California with Major Eugene "Sam" Denton (George Peppard). When the United States detects incoming nuclear missiles, Tanner and Denton "turn the key" to launch part of the retaliatory strike, initiating Doomsday. After launching their entire arsenal of nuclear missiles, Tanner and Denton witness nuclear devastation rain down all around them. Two years later, the Earth has been tilted off its axis by World War III, radiation has mutated insect life, and the planet is constantly wracked by massive storms that cover the entire hemisphere. Military order at the base has broken down. Tanner has resigned his commission and Denton is considering going to Albany, New York to find the source of a lone radio transmission. Before they abandon the base, a rocket fuel explosion kills all but four men -- Denton, Tanner, former Airman Keegan (Paul Winfield) and Airman
    5.67
    3 votes
    83

    Martin Bojowald

    Martin Bojowald (born February 18, 1973, Jülich) is a German physicist who now works on the faculty of the Penn State Physics Department, where he is a member of the Institute for Gravitation and the Cosmos. Prior to joining Penn State he spent several years at the Max-Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics in Potsdam, Germany. He works on loop quantum gravity and physical cosmology and is credited with establishing the sub-field of loop quantum cosmology.
    5.67
    3 votes
    84
    Waterworld

    Waterworld

    Waterworld is a 1995 post-apocalyptic science fiction film directed by Kevin Reynolds and co-written by Peter Rader and David Twohy. It was based on Rader's original 1986 screenplay and stars Kevin Costner, who also produced it with Charles Gordon and John Davis. It was distributed by Universal Pictures. The setting of the film is the distant future. Although no exact date was given in the film itself, it has been suggested that it takes place in 2500. The polar ice caps have completely melted, and the sea level has risen many hundreds of meters, covering nearly all the land. The film illustrates this with an unusual variation on the Universal logo, which begins with the usual image of Earth, but shows the planet's water levels gradually rising and the polar ice caps melting until nearly all the land is submerged. The plot of the film centers on an otherwise nameless antihero, "The Mariner," a drifter who sails the Earth in his trimaran. The most expensive film ever made at the time, Waterworld was released to mixed reviews and was unable to recoup its massive budget at the box office. The film's release was accompanied by a tie-in novel, video game, and three themed attractions at
    5.67
    3 votes
    85

    Dead Set

    Dead Set is a critically acclaimed BAFTA-nominated horror drama created by English writer Charlie Brooker. The show takes place primarily on the set of a fictional series of the real television show Big Brother. Dead Set is a production of Zeppotron, part of the Endemol group of production and distribution companies that produces the actual Big Brother. Dead Set first aired on E4 starting on 27 October 2008, just six weeks after the end of Big Brother 2008 on that same channel. The five episodes, aired over five consecutive nights, chronicle a zombie outbreak that strands the housemates and production staff inside the Big Brother House, which quickly becomes a shelter from the undead. Series Omnibus: 257,000 (213,000 viewers on E4, 54,000 on E4+1. Series Average: 844,166 (664,833 on E4, 179,333 on E4 +1). The series was repeated on Channel 4 from the 6th to the 8th of January 2009, reformatted into three hour-long episodes. All five episodes were broadcast consecutively as a Halloween feature length (2.5 hours) version on E4 on 31 October 2009. This was done again on 30 October 2011. Concerning the central characters of the story, Brooker has said he based some of them on actual
    8.00
    1 votes
    86

    The Happening

    The Happening is a 2008 horror film written, co-produced and directed by M. Night Shyamalan, that follows a man, his wife, his best friend, and his friend's daughter as they try to escape from an inexplicable natural disaster. The plot revolves around a cryptic neurotoxin that causes anyone exposed to it to commit suicide. The protagonist, a science teacher named Elliot Moore, attempts to escape from the mystery substance with his friends as hysteria grips the East Coast of the United States. It was advertised as being M. Night Shyamalan's first R-rated film, and received mostly negative reviews from film critics. In New York City's Central Park, people begin committing mass suicide. Initially believed to be a bio-terrorist attack using an airborne neurotoxin, the behavior quickly spreads across the northeastern United States. Elliot Moore, a high school science teacher in Philadelphia, hears about the attacks and decides to go to Harrisburg by train with his wife, Alma. They are accompanied by his friend Julian and Julian's eight-year-old daughter Jess. Julian's wife is stuck in Philadelphia but is expected to meet them in Harrisburg. The train loses all radio contact en route and
    8.00
    1 votes
    87

    Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea

    Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea is an American science fiction film, produced and directed by Irwin Allen, released by 20th Century Fox in 1961. The story was written by Irwin Allen and Charles Bennett. Walter Pidgeon starred as Admiral Harriman Nelson, with Robert Sterling as Captain Lee Crane. The supporting cast included Joan Fontaine, Barbara Eden, Michael Ansara, and Peter Lorre. The theme song was sung by Frankie Avalon, who also appeared in the film. The new, state of the art nuclear submarine Seaview is on diving trials in the Arctic Ocean. The Seaview is designed and built by scientist and engineering genius Admiral Harriman Nelson (USN-Ret) (Walter Pidgeon). Captain Lee Crane (Robert Sterling) is the Seaview's Commanding Officer. One of the on-board observers is Dr. Susan Hiller (Joan Fontaine), studying crew-related stress. The mission includes being out of radio contact for 96 hours while under the Arctic ice cap, but the ice begins to crack and melt, with boulder-size pieces crashing into the ocean around the submarine. Surfacing, Admiral Nelson and Captain Crane discover fire burning in the sky. After the rescue of a delta flow scientist, Miguel Alvarez (Michael
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    88
    Big Crunch

    Big Crunch

    In physical cosmology, the Big Crunch is one possible scenario for the ultimate fate of the universe, in which the metric expansion of space eventually reverses and the universe recollapses, ultimately ending as a black hole singularity. If the universe is finite in extent and the cosmological principle (not to be confused with the cosmological constant) does not apply, and the expansion speed does not exceed the escape velocity, then the mutual gravitational attraction of all its matter will eventually cause it to contract. If entropy continues to increase in the contracting phase (see Ergodic hypothesis), the contraction would appear very different from the time reversal of the expansion. While the early universe was highly uniform, a contracting universe would become increasingly clumped. Eventually all matter would collapse into black holes, which would then coalesce producing a unified black hole or Big Crunch singularity. The Hubble Constant measures the current state of expansion in the universe, and the strength of the gravitational force depends on the density and pressure of the matter and in the universe, or in other words, the critical density of the universe. If the
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    2 votes
    89

    Mad Max

    Mad Max is a 1979 Australian dystopic action film directed by George Miller and revised by Miller and Byron Kennedy over the original script by James McCausland, starring Mel Gibson, who had not yet become famous. Its narrative based on the traditional western genre, Mad Max tells a story of breakdown of society, love and revenge. It became a top-grossing Australian film and has been credited for further opening up the global market to Australian New Wave films. It was also the first Australian film to be shot with a widescreen anamorphic lens. The first film in the series, Mad Max spawned sequels Mad Max 2 in 1981 and Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome in 1985. A fourth installment, Mad Max: Fury Road starring actor Tom Hardy as Max, is currently in production. In a dystopic Australia, after the Earth's oil supplies were nearly exhausted, law and order has begun to break down due to energy shortages. Berserk motorcycle gang member Crawford "Nightrider" Montizano has escaped police custody and is attempting to outrun the Main Force Patrol (MFP) in a stolen Pursuit Special (Holden Monaro). Though he manages to elude his initial pursuers, the MFP's top pursuit man, Max Rockatansky, then
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    2 votes
    90
    Children of Men

    Children of Men

    Children of Men is a 2006 dystopian science fiction film directed by Alfonso Cuarón, based on a script loosely adapted from P. D. James's 1992 novel The Children of Men. In 2027, two decades of human infertility have left society on the brink of collapse. Illegal immigrants seek sanctuary in the United Kingdom, where the last functioning government imposes oppressive immigration laws on refugees. Clive Owen plays civil servant Theo Faron, who must help a pregnant West African refugee (Claire-Hope Ashitey) escape the chaos. Children of Men also stars Julianne Moore, Michael Caine, Pam Ferris, and Chiwetel Ejiofor. The film was released on 22 September 2006 in the UK. It was released on 25 December in the US, where critics noted the relationship between the Christmas opening and the film's themes of hope, redemption and faith. Children of Men received wide critical acclaim and was recognised for its achievements in screenwriting, cinematography, art direction and innovative single-shot action sequences. It was nominated for three Academy Awards: Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Cinematography and Best Film Editing. It was nominated for three BAFTA Awards, winning Best Cinematography and
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    3 votes
    91
    The Birds

    The Birds

    The Birds is a 1963 suspense/horror film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, loosely based on the 1952 story "The Birds" by Daphne du Maurier. It depicts Bodega Bay, California which is, suddenly and for unexplained reasons, the subject of a series of widespread and violent bird attacks over the course of a few days. The film was billed as 'introducing' Tippi Hedren. It also starred Rod Taylor, Jessica Tandy, Suzanne Pleshette and a young Veronica Cartwright. The screenplay was written by Evan Hunter. Hitchcock told him to develop new characters and a more elaborate plot, keeping Du Maurier's title and concept of unexplained bird attacks. Melanie Daniels (Tippi Hedren), a young socialite, meets Mitch Brenner (Rod Taylor) in a San Francisco bird shop. Brenner wants to purchase a pair of lovebirds for his sister's eleventh birthday, but the shop has none. He pretends to mistake Daniels for a salesperson, which infuriates her; she requests an explanation. He says they met previously, but she doesn't remember him. Intrigued, she tracks down his address in Bodega Bay, California and purchases a pair of lovebirds herself. After driving several hours, she sneaks across a bay in a motor boat and
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    3 votes
    92
    Universe

    Universe

    The universe is commonly defined as the totality of existence, including planets, stars, galaxies, the contents of intergalactic space, and all matter and energy. Definitions and usage vary and similar terms include the cosmos, the world and nature. Scientific observation of earlier stages in the development of the universe, which can be seen at great distances, suggests that the universe has been governed by the same physical laws and constants throughout most of its extent and history. There are various multiverse hypotheses, in which physicists have suggested that the universe might be one among many universes that likewise exist. The farthest distance that it is theoretically possible for humans to see is described as the observable universe. Observations have shown that the universe appears to be expanding at an accelerating rate, and a number of models have arisen to predict its ultimate fate. Throughout recorded history, several cosmologies and cosmogonies have been proposed to account for observations of the universe. The earliest quantitative geocentric models were developed by the ancient Greek philosophers. Over the centuries, more precise observations and improved
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    3 votes
    93

    Reign of Fire

    Reign of Fire (2002) is a post-apocalyptic action fantasy film directed by Rob Bowman and starring Christian Bale, Matthew McConaughey, Gerard Butler, and Izabella Scorupco. It takes place in the year 2020 in England, after dragons have reawakened. The film grossed about $82 million on a $60 million budget. Soon after the new millennium, during construction on the London Underground, workers penetrate an underground cave in which a huge hibernating dragon awakens, incinerating the construction workers. The only survivor is a boy named Quinn Abercromby (Ben Thornton) whose mother, Karen (Alice Krige), was crew chief on the project. She is crushed while protecting Quinn as the dragon makes its way to the surface. The dragon flies out and more dragons begin appearing, multiplying rapidly. It is shown through various newspaper clippings and a voice-over that scientists discovered that dragons are a lost species that are responsible for the dinosaurs' extinction by burning them all to ash. The speculation was that dragons instinctively hibernate after destroying most of the earth's living creatures, waiting until the Earth repopulates. In the months and years following the awakening of
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    3 votes
    94
    28 Weeks Later

    28 Weeks Later

    28 Weeks Later is a 2007 British film, sequel to the 2002 post-apocalyptic horror film 28 Days Later. 28 Weeks Later was directed by Juan Carlos Fresnadillo and released in the United Kingdom and United States on 11 May 2007. The on-location filming took place in London and 3 Mills Studios, although scenes intended to be shot at Wembley Stadium, then undergoing final stages of construction, were filmed instead in Wales, with Cardiff's Millennium Stadium used as a replacement. During the original outbreak of the Rage Virus, Don, his wife Alice and four other survivors are hiding in a barricaded cottage on the outskirts of London with food and water left for only a few days. They hear a terrified boy, who is running away from the infected, pounding at their door. They let him in and give him some food to eat. He explains that his own parents tried to kill him. Another survivor named Karen checks outside through a peephole, but one of the infected attacks her and bites her on the arm. Survivor Jacob tries to save her, but Karen attacks him as well. Alice takes the boy upstairs, Jacob and an elderly couple hide in the barn, and Don defends them and kills a few of the infected with a
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    2 votes
    95

    Returner

    Returner (リターナー, Ritaanaa) is a 2002 Japanese Science fiction film, directed by Takashi Yamazaki and starring Anne Suzuki and Takeshi Kaneshiro. Milly (Anne Suzuki) is a soldier from 2084, where humanity is on the verge of extinction because of the "Daggra", an alien race. In mankind's final stronghold in Tibet Milly leaps into a newly-built time portal just before the fortress is overrun. The portal sends her to 2002, where her mission is to kill the first Daggra, who faked a crash landing, and stop him from signaling his invasion fleet. Milly lands in the aftermath of a shootout in Tokyo Bay, Japan, where a hitman named Miyamoto (Takeshi Kaneshiro) holds the murderous Triad mobster Mizoguchi (Goro Kishitani) at gunpoint. Her arrival allows the mobster to escape and Miyamoto takes Milly, who he thinks he accidentally shot, back to his place. She was saved by a plate of metal in her coat. She tapes a tiny bomb to his neck and threatens him into helping her on her mission. Miyamoto has a personal score to settle with Mizoguchi, who killed his childhood friend by kidnapping him and selling off his organs. That night, Miyamoto sees Milly cleaning up his trenchcoat on a coat hanger, so
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    2 votes
    96
    Abrahamic religion

    Abrahamic religion

    Abrahamic religions (also Abrahamism) are the monotheistic faiths emphasizing and tracing their common origin to Abraham or recognizing a spiritual tradition identified with him. They are one of the major divisions in comparative religion, along with Indian religions (Dharmic), East Asian religions (Taoic) and Neopaganism. As of the early twenty-first century, it was estimated that 54% of the world's population (3.8 billion people) considered themselves adherents of the Abrahamic religions, about 30% of other religions, and 16% of no religion. The Abrahamic religions originated in the Middle East. The largest Abrahamic religions are, in chronological order of founding, Judaism, Christianity, Islam and Baha'i Faith. Judaism regards itself as the religion of the descendants of Jacob, a grandson of Abraham. It has a strictly unitary view of God, and the central holy book for almost all branches is the Masoretic Text as elucidated in the oral Torah. Christianity began as a sect of Judaism in the Mediterranean Basin of the 1st century CE and evolved into a separate religion—the Christian Church—with distinctive beliefs and practices. Jesus is the central figure of Christianity,
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    97

    Invasion of the Body Snatchers

    Invasion of the Body Snatchers is a 1956 American science fiction film directed by Don Siegel and starring Kevin McCarthy and Dana Wynter. Daniel Mainwaring adapted the screenplay from Jack Finney's 1954 novel The Body Snatchers. The story depicts an extraterrestrial invasion in a small California town. The invaders replace human beings with duplicates that appear identical on the surface but are devoid of any emotion or individuality. A local doctor uncovers what is happening and tries to stop them. In 1994, Invasion of the Body Snatchers was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant". Psychiatrist Dr. Hill is called to the emergency ward of a hospital, where a frantically screaming man is held in custody. Dr. Hill agrees to listen to his story. The man identifies himself as Dr. Miles Bennell, and recounts the events leading to his arrest in the flashback that follows. In the fictional town of Santa Mira, California, Miles Bennell, a local doctor, has a number of patients accusing their loved ones of being impostors. Another patient is a former girlfriend of his,
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    98
    Shaun of the Dead

    Shaun of the Dead

    Shaun of the Dead is a 2004 British zombie comedy directed and co-written by Edgar Wright, and co-written and starring Simon Pegg alongside Nick Frost. Pegg plays Shaun, a man attempting to get some kind of focus in his life as he deals with his girlfriend, his mother and stepfather. At the same time, he has to cope with an apocalyptic uprising of zombies. The film is the first of what Pegg and Wright call The Three Flavours Cornetto Trilogy with Hot Fuzz (2007) as the second and The World's End (TBA) as the third. The film was a critical and commercial success in the UK, and the US. It received a 91% approval rating on Rotten Tomatoes and a score of 76 out of 100 at Metacritic. Shaun of the Dead was a BAFTA nominee. Pegg and Wright considered a sequel that would replace zombies with another monster, but decided against it as they were pleased with the first film as a stand-alone product, and thought too many characters died to continue the story. Shaun (Pegg) is a salesman whose life has no direction. His younger colleagues show him no respect, he has a rocky relationship with his stepfather, Phillip (Nighy), a tense relationship with his housemate, Pete (Serafinowicz), because of
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    1 votes
    99
    Mars Attacks!

    Mars Attacks!

    Mars Attacks! is a 1996 American science fiction film directed by Tim Burton and written by Jonathan Gems. Based on the cult trading card series of the same name, the film uses elements of black comedy and political satire, and is a parody of science fiction B movies. The film stars Jack Nicholson, Glenn Close, Annette Bening, Pierce Brosnan, and Danny DeVito, with Sarah Jessica Parker, Martin Short, Natalie Portman, Michael J. Fox, and Christina Applegate in supporting roles. Burton and Gems began development for Mars Attacks! in 1993, and Warner Bros. purchased the film rights to the trading card series on Burton's behalf. When Gems turned in his first draft in 1994, Warner Bros. commissioned rewrites from Gems, Burton, Martin Amis, Scott Alexander and Larry Karaszewski in an attempt to lower the budget to $60 million. The final production budget came to $80 million, while Warner Bros. spent another $20 million on the Mars Attacks! marketing campaign. Filming lasted from February to November 1996. It was made famous for the quirky alien laugh, which was created by reversing the sound ducks make when they quack. The filmmakers hired Industrial Light & Magic to create the Martians
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    100

    The Day After Tomorrow

    The Day After Tomorrow is a 2004 American science fiction disaster film depicting catastrophic effects of global warming in a series of extreme weather events that usher in global cooling and leads to a new ice age. The film did well at the box office, grossing $542,771,772 internationally. It is the sixth-highest grossing film not to be #1 in the United States (behind My Big Fat Greek Wedding, Alvin and the Chipmunks and its sequel, Sherlock Holmes, and Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs), but worldwide, it is third behind only Ice Age 3 and Casino Royale. The film was made in Montreal and is the highest grossing Hollywood film to be made in Canada (if adjusted for inflation). The Day After Tomorrow premiered in Mexico City on May 17, 2004 and was released worldwide from May 26 to May 28 except in South Korea and Japan, where it was released June 4 and June 5, respectively. The film was originally planned for release in the summer of 2003. It made $110,000,000 in global DVD sales, bringing its total film gross to $654,771,772. Jack Hall (Dennis Quaid) is a paleoclimatologist on an expedition in Antarctica with colleagues Frank (Jay O. Sanders) and Jason (Dash Mihok). They are drilling
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    2 votes
    101

    Battle for the Planet of the Apes

    Battle for the Planet of the Apes is a 1973 science fiction film directed by J. Lee Thompson. It is the fifth and last entry in the original Planet of the Apes series produced by Arthur P. Jacobs, following Conquest of the Planet of the Apes. It starred Roddy McDowall, Claude Akins, Natalie Trundy, Severn Darden, Lew Ayres, Paul Williams and John Huston. This synopsis is based on the extended version of the film released to Syndicated TV in the late '70s, the Japanese laserdisc and more recently on DVD and Blu-Ray. Told in flashback in the early 21st century, with a wraparound sequence by the Lawgiver (John Huston) (set in "North America - 2670 A.D."), this sequel follows the ape leader, Caesar (Roddy McDowall), at least twelve years after he led the revolution in the previous film, Conquest of the Planet of the Apes. In this post-nuclear society, Caesar tries to cultivate peace between the apes and the surviving humans. A gorilla general named Aldo (Claude Akins), however, opposes this and plots Caesar's downfall. Caesar is married to Lisa (Natalie Trundy), the female ape of the previous film, and they have a son, named Cornelius (Bobby Porter) in honor of Caesar's father. Caesar
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    102
    Peoples Temple

    Peoples Temple

    People's Temple was a religious organization founded in 1955 by Jim Jones that, by the mid-1970s, included over a dozen locations in California including its headquarters in San Francisco. It is best known for the events of November 18, 1978, in Guyana, in which 909 people died at the Peoples Temple Agricultural Project (informally, and now commonly, called "Jonestown") and nearby airstrip at Port Kaituma, and Georgetown in an organized mass suicide/killing. The mass suicide and killings at Jonestown resulted in the greatest single loss of American civilian life in a non-natural non-accidental disaster prior to the events of September 11, 2001. Casualties at the airstrip included, among others, Congressman Leo Ryan. Before forming a church, Jim Jones had become enamored by communism and frustrated by the harassment communists received in the U.S. This, among other things, provided a seminal inspiration for Jones; as he himself described in a biographical recording, Although he feared a backlash for being a communist, Jones was surprised when a Methodist superintendent (whom he had not met through the American Communist Party) helped him into the church, despite his knowledge that
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    103

    The Stand

    The Stand is a 1994 television miniseries based on the novel of the same name by Stephen King. King also wrote the teleplay, and has a cameo role in the series. It was directed by Mick Garris and stars Gary Sinise, Miguel Ferrer, Rob Lowe, Ossie Davis, Ruby Dee, Jamey Sheridan, Laura San Giacomo, Molly Ringwald, Corin Nemec, Adam Storke, Ray Walston and Matt Frewer. It originally aired on ABC starting on May 8, 1994. At a government laboratory, a weaponized version of influenza is accidentally released, immediately wiping out everyone at the laboratory, save for security guard Charles Campion and his family, who flee the base. However, Campion unknowingly spreads the "super flu" to the outside world. One of the first sites of infection is at a gas station in East Texas where Stu Redman (Gary Sinise) and some friends have gathered. While others take sick, Stu remains mysteriously healthy and is kept in confinement at a CDC facility in order to study a possible cure. This proves futile and the superflu rages unchecked, killing over 99% of the population. After the infection runs its course a small group of survivors lies scattered across the country. These include rock star Larry
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    104
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    105
    Soylent Green

    Soylent Green

    Soylent Green is a 1973 American science fiction film directed by Richard Fleischer and starring Charlton Heston and, in his final film, Edward G. Robinson. The film overlays the police procedural and science fiction genres as it depicts the investigation into the murder of a wealthy businessman in a dystopian future suffering from pollution, overpopulation, depleted resources, poverty, dying oceans, and a hot climate due to the greenhouse effect. Much of the population survives on processed food rations, including "soylent green". The film, which is loosely based upon the 1966 science fiction novel Make Room! Make Room!, by Harry Harrison, won the Nebula Award for Best Dramatic Presentation and the Saturn Award for Best Science Fiction Film in 1973. In 2022, with 40 million people in New York City alone, housing is dilapidated and overcrowded; homeless people fill the streets and food is scarce; and most of the population survives on rations produced by the Soylent Corporation, whereof the newest product is Soylent Green, a green wafer advertised to contain "high-energy plankton", more nutritious and palatable than its predecessors "Red" and "Yellow", but in short supply. New York
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    2 votes
    106

    The Last Chase

    The Last Chase is a 1981 science fiction film starring Lee Majors, Burgess Meredith and Chris Makepeace, and directed by Martyn Burke. It was produced by Argosy Films. The setting is the USA at an unspecified future time. The country has been devastated by two major catastrophes: a virulent plague which killed tens of millions of citizens, and exhaustion of the world's fossil fuel supply. In the resulting chaos, democracy collapsed and an authoritarian dictatorial government seized power. Personal freedom has been abolished. Ownership of private vehicles has been outlawed. Surveillance cameras are ubiquitous. Franklyn Hart (Majors), a reclusive former race car driver, has lost his family to the plague. The totalitarian government has made him a propaganda spokesman for mass transit; he spends his days publicly renouncing his race-driving past, deploring the selfishness of private vehicle ownership, and exalting the virtues of public transportation. In private, however, Hart is barely able to contain his contempt for his governmental masters and the lies he is forced to repeat. He is despondent over the loss of his family, and of all the basic rights and privileges he and everyone
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    2 votes
    107
    Independence Day

    Independence Day

    Independence Day is a 1996 American film about an alien invasion of Earth. The narrative focuses on a disparate group of people who converge in the Nevada desert and, along with the rest of the human population, participate in a last-chance counterattack on July 4, the same date as the Independence Day holiday in the United States. It was directed by German director Roland Emmerich, who co-wrote the script with producer Dean Devlin. While promoting Stargate in Europe, Emmerich came up with the idea for the film when fielding a question about his own belief in the existence of alien life. He and Devlin decided to incorporate a large-scale attack when noticing that aliens in most invasion films travel long distances in outer space only to remain hidden when reaching Earth. Principal photography for the film began in July 1995 in New York City, and the film was officially completed on June 20, 1996. The film was scheduled for release on July 3, 1996, but due to the high level of anticipation for the movie, many theaters began showing it on the evening of July 2, 1996, the same day the film begins. The film's combined domestic and international box office gross is $816,969,268, which
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    2 votes
    108
    Mesoamerican Long Count calendar

    Mesoamerican Long Count calendar

    The Mesoamerican Long Count calendar is a non-repeating, vigesimal (base-20) and base-18 calendar used by several Pre-Columbian Mesoamerican cultures, most notably the Maya. For this reason, it is sometimes known as the Maya (or Mayan) Long Count calendar. Using a modified vigesimal tally, the Long Count calendar identifies a day by counting the number of days passed since a mythical creation date that corresponds to August 11, 3114 BCE in the Gregorian calendar. The Long Count calendar was widely used on monuments. Among other calendars devised in pre-Columbian Mesoamerica, two of the most widely used were the 365-day solar calendar (the Maya version is known as the Haab') and the 260-day calendar, with 20 periods of 13 days. In Mayan studies this 260-day calendar is known as the Tzolk'in; the equivalent Aztec calendar is known by a Nahuatl name, tonalpohualli. The Haab' and the Tzolk'in calendars identified and named the days, but not the years. The combination of a Haab' date and a Tzolk'in date identifies a specific date in a combination which did not occur again for 52 years. The two calendars based on 365 days and 260 days repeat every 52 Haab' years, a period generally known
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    109
    The Day the Earth Caught Fire

    The Day the Earth Caught Fire

    The Day the Earth Caught Fire is a British science fiction disaster film starring Edward Judd, Leo McKern and Janet Munro. It was directed by Val Guest and released in 1961, and is one of the classic apocalyptic films of its era. The film, which was partly made on location in London and Brighton, used matte painting to create images of abandoned cities and desolate landscapes. The production also featured the real Daily Express even using the paper's own headquarters, the Daily Express Building, in Fleet Street, London. A lone man walks through the sweltering streets of a deserted London. The film then goes back several months. Peter Stenning (Judd) was an up-and-coming journalist with the Daily Express but a messy divorce has thrown his life into disarray. His Editor (Christiansen) has begun giving him lousy assignments. Stenning's only friend, Bill Maguire (McKern), is a veteran Fleet Street reporter, who offers him encouragement and occasionally covers for him by writing his copy. Meanwhile, after the Soviet Union and US detonate simultaneous nuclear bomb tests, strange meteorological events begin to affect the globe. Stenning is sent to the British Met Office to get data mean
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    110
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    111

    Land of the Dead

    Land of the Dead (also known as George A. Romero's Land of the Dead) is a 2005 horror film written and directed by George A. Romero; the fourth of Romero's six Living Dead movies, it is preceded by Night of the Living Dead, Dawn of the Dead and Day of the Dead, and succeeded by Diary of the Dead and Survival of the Dead. It was released in 2005 and became a success, grossing over $40 million, and had a budget of $15 million, the highest in the series. The story of Land of the Dead deals with a zombie assault on Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where a feudal-like government exists. The survivors in the film have fled to the city. The city is protected on two sides by rivers and on the other by an electric barricade. Released in North America on June 24, 2005, Land of the Dead received mostly positive reviews from film critics. Three years after a zombie apocalypse, survivors have set up outposts across the United States, one of which in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania contains a feudal-like government. Bordered on two sides by rivers and on the third by an electric fence, the city has become a sanctuary, with the rich and powerful living in luxury on the Fiddler's Green while the rest of the
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    112
    Things to Come

    Things to Come

    Things to Come (1936) is a British science fiction film produced by Alexander Korda and directed by William Cameron Menzies. The screenplay was written by H. G. Wells and is a loose adaptation of his own 1933 novel The Shape of Things to Come and his 1931 non-fiction work, The Work, Wealth and Happiness of Mankind. The film stars Raymond Massey, Ralph Richardson, Cedric Hardwicke, Pearl Argyle and Margaretta Scott. The cultural historian Christopher Frayling calls Things to Come "a landmark in cinematic design." Things to Come sets out a future history from 1940 to 2036. It is set in the fictional British city of 'Everytown'. Successful businessman John Cabal (Raymond Massey) cannot enjoy Christmas Day, 1940, with the ominous news of possible war. His guest Harding (Maurice Braddell) shares his worries, but over-optimistic friend Passworthy (Edward Chapman) believes it will not come to pass, or even if it does, it will do good by accelerating technological progress. A bombing raid on the city that night results in general mobilization and global war. Some time later, Cabal, now piloting a biplane, shoots down a one-man enemy bomber. He lands and pulls the badly injured enemy (John
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    113

    Deep Impact

    Deep Impact is a 1998 American science fiction film directed by Mimi Leder, written by Bruce Joel Rubin and Michael Tolkin, and starring Robert Duvall, Téa Leoni, Elijah Wood, Vanessa Redgrave, Maximilian Schell, and Morgan Freeman. It was released by Paramount Pictures and DreamWorks in the United States on May 8, 1998. The plot describes the attempts to prepare for and destroy a 7-mile wide comet, which is expected to collide with the Earth and cause a mass extinction. Deep Impact grossed over $349 million worldwide on a $75 million production budget. Although Deep Impact was perceived to have greater scientific credibility than Armageddon, the latter film fared better at the box office. Both films were similarly received by critics, with Armageddon scoring 39% and Deep Impact scoring 47% on Rotten Tomatoes. On May 10, 1998, teenage amateur astronomer Leo Biederman (Wood) discovers an unusual object near the stars Mizar and Alcor at a star party in Richmond, Virginia. He alerts astronomer Marcus Wolf (Smith), who realizes that the object is a comet on a collision course with Earth, but dies in a car accident before he can alert the world. A year later, MSNBC reporter Jenny Lerner
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    114

    Dirty War

    Dirty War is a 2004 BBC, in association with HBO Films, made-for-TV movie thriller/drama about a terrorist attack on Central London, written by Lizzie Mickery and Daniel Percival. It was originally broadcast on BBC One on September 24, 2004, on HBO on January 24, 2005, and the first time on American broadcast television on PBS on February 23, 2005. It won a BAFTA Award for Best New Director (Fiction), Daniel Percival. The film opens with a June 2003 quote from Eliza Manningham-Buller, the director general (DG) of MI5: "It will only be a matter of time before a crude chemical, biological, or radiological (CBRN) attack is launched on a major western city" and provides the basic premise for the film. The film follows the journey of radioactive material, hidden in vegetable oil containers, from Habiller, Turkey, which is approximately 210 kilometres (130 mi) west of Istanbul, through Sofia, Bulgaria, onwards to Deptford, then to an East End Indian food takeaway restaurant, and finally to a rented house in Willesden, where the radioactive material and other components are assembled into a dirty bomb. When the bomb goes off in the heart of London, next to the entrance to Liverpool Street
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    115

    Escape from New York

    Escape from New York is a 1981 American science fiction action film directed and scored by John Carpenter. He co-wrote the screenplay with Nick Castle. The film is set in the near future in a crime-ridden United States that has converted Manhattan Island in New York City into a maximum security prison. Ex-soldier Snake Plissken (Kurt Russell) is given 24 hours to find the President of the United States, who has been captured after the crash of Air Force One. Carpenter wrote the film in the mid-1970s as a reaction to the Watergate scandal, but proved incapable of articulating how the film related to the scandal. After the success of Halloween, he had enough influence to get the film made and shot most of it in St. Louis, Missouri. The film's total budget was estimated to be US$6 million. It was a commercial hit, grossing over $50 million worldwide. It has since become a cult film. A sequel, Escape from L.A., was released in 1996. In a dystopian 1988, crime in the United States has increased 400%, so the island of Manhattan has been converted into a giant maximum security prison. A 50-foot containment wall surrounds the island, and mines have been placed on all bridges (Brooklyn,
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    116
    Fukkatsu no hi

    Fukkatsu no hi

    Virus (復活の日 Fukkatsu no hi), literally Day of Resurrection is a 1980 post-apocalyptic science fiction movie directed by Kinji Fukasaku and based on a novel written by Sakyo Komatsu in 1964. The movie starred Masao Kusakari, George Kennedy, Robert Vaughn, Chuck Connors, Olivia Hussey, Edward James Olmos, Ken Ogata, Glenn Ford and Sonny Chiba. The film is notable for being the most expensive Japanese film ever made at the time. The movie opens with a British nuclear submarine called the HMS Nereid entering Tokyo Bay in the then-future of December 1983. The ship's crew and Japanese seismologist Yoshizumi sends a reconnaissance drone to search the city for any survivors, only to find decayed bodies. It also gathers air samples of something called MM88. After the movie credits, the film goes back to the then-future of February 1982, where a shady transfer is happening between an East German scientist, Dr. Krause, and a group of Americans. It is revealed that MM88 is a deadly virus created accidentally by an American geneticist that amplifies the potency of any other virus or bacteria it comes in contact with. The scientist wants a sample taken to a colleague in Switzerland, Dr.
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    117
    I Am Legend

    I Am Legend

    I Am Legend is a 2007 American post-apocalyptic science fiction horror film directed by Francis Lawrence and starring Will Smith. It is the third feature film adaptation of Richard Matheson's 1954 novel of the same name, following 1964's The Last Man on Earth and 1971's The Omega Man. Smith plays virologist Robert Neville, who is immune to a man-made virus originally created to cure cancer. He works to create a remedy while defending himself against humans mutated by the virus. Warner Bros. began developing I Am Legend in 1994, and various actors and directors were attached to the project, though production was delayed due to budgetary concerns related to the script. Production began in 2006 in New York City, filming mainly on location in the city, including a $5 million scene at the Brooklyn Bridge, the most expensive scene ever filmed in the city at the time. I Am Legend was released on December 14, 2007 in the United States and Canada, and opened to the largest ever box office (not counting for inflation) for a non-Christmas film released in the U.S. in December. The film was the seventh-highest grossing film of 2007, earning $256 million domestically and $329 million
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    118

    Last Night

    Last Night is a 1998 Canadian drama film by Don McKellar. It was filmed in Toronto. Set in Toronto at an unknown date, Last Night tells the story of how a variety of intersecting characters spend their final evening on Earth. It seems the world is to end at midnight as the result of a calamity that is not explained, but which has been expected for several months. There are several scenes of an ominously glowing sun, which gets progressively larger and brighter even into the night. Some people in the film choose to spend their last evening alone, others with loved ones, others in prayer, others in public mayhem, and still others at raucous festivities. Duncan (David Cronenberg), the owner of a power company, spends the majority of his final day calling up every single one of his customers to reassure them that their heating gas will be kept on until the very end. Meanwhile, his wife Sandra (Sandra Oh) prepares to fulfill their suicide pact when she becomes stranded with a depressed widower Patrick (Don McKellar) preparing to die while listening to music and drinking wine on his roof, surrounded by mementoes of his recently deceased wife. The widower's best friend Craig (Callum Keith
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    119
    Panic in Year Zero!

    Panic in Year Zero!

    Panic in Year Zero! (1962), sometimes known as End of the World, is a science fiction film directed by and starring Ray Milland. The original music score was composed by Les Baxter. It was adapted to film by John Morton and Jay Simms from Ward Moore's stories Lot (1953) and Lot's Daughter (1954). In the 1962 novelization of the film by Dean Owen, which was published under the title End of the World by Alta Vista Productions with Ray Milland's photo on the cover, the introduction page asserted: "The screenplay was by John Morton and Jay Simms, from an original story by Jay Simms." Soon after Harry Baldwin (Ray Milland), his wife Ann (Jean Hagen), their son Rick (Frankie Avalon), and daughter Karen (Mary Mitchell) leave suburban Los Angeles on a camping trip, the Baldwins note unusually bright light flashes coming from a great distance. Sporadic news reports on CONELRAD broadcasts hint at the start of a World War, which is confirmed as the Baldwins see a large mushroom cloud over what was Los Angeles. The family initially attempts to return to rescue Ann's mother near Los Angeles, but soon abandons these plans as panicked refugees climb over one another to escape the fallout from the
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    120

    Six-String Samurai

    Six-String Samurai is a 1998 post-apocalyptic action/comedy film directed by Lance Mungia. Brian Tyler composed the score for this film along with the Red Elvises, the latter providing the majority of the soundtrack. Six-String Samurai was greeted with a great deal of excitement when shown at Slamdance in 1998, winning the Slamdance awards for best editing and cinematography, and gathering extremely favorable reviews from influential alternative, cult and indie film publications such as Fangoria, Film Threat and Ain't It Cool News. It is billed as a "post-apocalyptic musical satire". In a limited theatrical release the film ran for several months in a few theaters, gaining a reputation as a minor cult film; having a budget of $2,000,000, it only made a mere $124,494 at the box offices. An intended trilogy has been discussed but not yet realized, just like the predicted launching of the career of the film's star, Jeffrey Falcon, a martial artist who had appeared in several Hong Kong action movies in the 1980s and early 1990s. While Mungia made several music videos, he did not direct another feature until the 2005 film The Crow: Wicked Prayer. Six-String Samurai is set in an
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    121

    The Time Machine

    The Time Machine is a science fiction novella by H. G. Wells, published in 1895 and later adapted into two feature films of the same name, as well as two television versions, and a large number of comic book adaptations. It indirectly inspired many more works of fiction in many media. This story is generally credited with the popularisation of the concept of time travel using a vehicle that allows an operator to travel purposefully and selectively. The term "time machine", coined by Wells, is now universally used to refer to such a vehicle. This work is an early example of the Dying Earth subgenre. Wells had considered the notion of time travel before, in an earlier work titled The Chronic Argonauts. This short story was published in his college's newspaper and was the foundation for "The Time Machine." Wells frequently stated that "The Chronic Argonauts" highly reflects what was written in "The Time Machine." He had thought of using some of this material in a series of articles in the Pall Mall Gazette, until the publisher asked him if he could instead write a serial novel on the same theme; Wells readily agreed, and was paid £100 (equal to about £9,000 today) on its publication
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    122

    Threads

    Threads is a British television drama produced by the BBC in 1984. Written by Barry Hines and directed by Mick Jackson, it is a documentary-style account of a nuclear war and its effects on the city of Sheffield in northern England. Filmed in late 1983 and early 1984, the primary plot centres on two families, the Kemps and the Becketts, as an international crisis between the United States and the Soviet Union erupts and escalates. As the United Kingdom prepares for war, the members of each family deal with their own personal crises. Meanwhile, a secondary plot centered upon Clive J. Sutton, the Chief Executive of Sheffield City Council serves to illustrate for the viewer the United Kingdom government's then-current continuity of government arrangements. As open warfare between NATO and the USSR-led Warsaw Pact begins, the harrowing details of the characters' struggle to survive the attacks is dramatically depicted. The balance of the play details the fate of each family as the characters face the medical, economic, social, and environmental consequences of a nuclear war. Young lovers Ruth Beckett (Karen Meagher) and Jimmy Kemp (Reece Dinsdale) decide to marry due to an unplanned
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    123

    Tooth And Nail

    Tooth & Nail is a 2007 horror film written, directed and edited by Mark Young, about a group of people in a post-apocalyptic world who must fight to survive against a band of vicious cannibals. Tooth & Nail is a post-apocalyptic movie where mankind has depleted all fossil fuel reserves and civilization has collapsed. A group of survivors called Foragers take cover in an abandoned hospital where the group attempt to re-build society. After saving a young girl from being killed and eaten by a group of vicious cannibals called Rovers, the Foragers find themselves on the run from the cannibals, who stalk the survivors and brutally kill them off one-by-one as the Foragers begin to fight back, causing a chaotic battle of blood and mayhem. This film was released in theatres as part of After Dark Film's Horrorfest, which ran November 9-18, 2007.
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